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Sample records for 3d time-of-flight mra

  1. Diagnostic value of 3D time-of-flight MRA in trigeminal neuralgia.

    PubMed

    Cai, Jing; Xin, Zhen-Xue; Zhang, Yu-Qiang; Sun, Jie; Lu, Ji-Liang; Xie, Feng

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this meta-analysis was to evaluate the diagnostic value of 3D time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography (3D-TOF-MRA) in trigeminal neuralgia (TN). Relevant studies were identified by computerized database searches supplemented by manual search strategies. The studies were included in accordance with stringent inclusion and exclusion criteria. Following a multistep screening process, high quality studies related to the diagnostic value of 3D-TOF-MRA in TN were selected for meta-analysis. Statistical analyses were conducted using Statistical Analysis Software (version 8.2; SAS Institute, Cary, NC, USA) and Meta Disc (version 1.4; Unit of Clinical Biostatistics, Ramon y Cajal Hospital, Madrid, Spain). For the present meta-analysis, we initially retrieved 95 studies from database searches. A total of 13 studies were eventually enrolled containing a combined total of 1084 TN patients. The meta-analysis results demonstrated that the sensitivity and specificity of the diagnostic value of 3D-TOF-MRA in TN were 95% (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.93-0.96) and 77% (95% CI 0.66-0.86), respectively. The pooled positive likelihood ratio and negative likelihood ratio were 2.72 (95% CI 1.81-4.09) and 0.08 (95% CI 0.06-0.12), respectively. The pooled diagnostic odds ratio of 3D-TOF-MRA in TN was 52.92 (95% CI 26.39-106.11), and the corresponding area under the curve in the summary receiver operating characteristic curve based on the 3D-TOF-MRA diagnostic image of observers was 0.9695 (standard error 0.0165). Our results suggest that 3D-TOF-MRA has excellent sensitivity and specificity as a diagnostic tool for TN, and that it can accurately identify neurovascular compression in TN patients. PMID:26077938

  2. Three-dimensional time-of-flight MR angiography for evaluation of intracranial aneurysms after endosaccular packing with Guglielmi detachable coils: comparison with 3D digital subtraction angiography.

    PubMed

    Okahara, Mika; Kiyosue, Hiro; Hori, Yuzo; Yamashita, Masanori; Nagatomi, Hirofumi; Mori, Hiromu

    2004-07-01

    The sensitivities and specificities of three-dimensional time-of-flight MR angiography (3D-TOF MRA) and 3D digital subtraction angiography (3D-DSA) were compared for evaluation of cerebral aneurysms after endosaccular packing with Guglielmi detachable coils (GDCs). Thirty-three patients with 33 aneurysms were included in this prospective study. 3D-TOF MRA and 3D-DSA were performed in the same week on all patients. Maximal intensity projection (MIP) and 3D reconstructed MRA images were compared with 3D-DSA images. The diameters of residual/recurrent aneurysms detected on 3D-DSA were calculated on a workstation. In 3 (9%) of 33 aneurysms, 3D-TOF MRA did not provide reliable information due to significant susceptibility artifacts on MRA. The sensitivity and specificity rates of MRA were 72.7 and 90.9%, respectively, for the diagnosis of residual/recurrent aneurysm. The diameters of residual/recurrent aneurysms that could not be detected by MRA were significantly smaller than those of detected aneurysms (mean 1.1 vs mean 2.3 mm). In one aneurysm of the anterior communicating artery (ACoA), the relationship between the residual aneurysm and the ACoA was more evident on MRA than DSA images. MRA can detect the recurrent/residual lumen of aneurysms treated with GDCs of up to at least 1.8 mm in diameter. 3D-TOF MRA is useful for follow-up of intracranial aneurysms treated with GDCs, and could partly replace DSA.

  3. Validity of computational hemodynamics in human arteries based on 3D time-of-flight MR angiography and 2D electrocardiogram gated phase contrast images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Huidan (Whitney); Chen, Xi; Chen, Rou; Wang, Zhiqiang; Lin, Chen; Kralik, Stephen; Zhao, Ye

    2015-11-01

    In this work, we demonstrate the validity of 4-D patient-specific computational hemodynamics (PSCH) based on 3-D time-of-flight (TOF) MR angiography (MRA) and 2-D electrocardiogram (ECG) gated phase contrast (PC) images. The mesoscale lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) is employed to segment morphological arterial geometry from TOF MRA, to extract velocity profiles from ECG PC images, and to simulate fluid dynamics on a unified GPU accelerated computational platform. Two healthy volunteers are recruited to participate in the study. For each volunteer, a 3-D high resolution TOF MRA image and 10 2-D ECG gated PC images are acquired to provide the morphological geometry and the time-varying flow velocity profiles for necessary inputs of the PSCH. Validation results will be presented through comparisons of LBM vs. 4D Flow Software for flow rates and LBM simulation vs. MRA measurement for blood flow velocity maps. Indiana University Health (IUH) Values Fund.

  4. Precise time-of-flight calculation for 3-D synthetic aperture focusing.

    PubMed

    Andresen, Henrik; Nikolov, Svetoslav Ivanov; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2009-09-01

    Conventional linear arrays can be used for 3-D ultrasound imaging by moving the array in the elevation direction and stacking the planes in a volume. The point-spread function is larger in the elevation plane, because the aperture is smaller and has a fixed elevation focus. Resolution improvements in elevation can be achieved by applying synthetic aperture focusing to the beamformed-in-plane RF data. The proposed method uses a virtual source placed at the elevation focus for postbeamforming. This has previously been done in 2 steps, in-plane focusing followed by synthetic aperture postfocusing in elevation, due to lack of a simple expression for the exact time of flight. This paper presents a new single step method for calculating the time of flight for a 3-D case using a linear array. The new method is more flexible and is able to beamform a fewer number of points much more efficiently. The method is evaluated using both simulated data and phantom measurements using the RASMUS experimental scanner. Computational cost of the method is higher than the 2-step method for a full volume beamforming, but it allows for a reduction of an order-of-magnitude if 3 planes are used for real-time visualization. In addition, the need for a temporary storage of beamformed data is removed.

  5. 3D-guided CT reconstruction using time-of-flight camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismail, Mahmoud; Taguchi, Katsuyuki; Xu, Jingyan; Tsui, Benjamin M. W.; Boctor, Emad M.

    2011-03-01

    We propose the use of a time-of-flight (TOF) camera to obtain the patient's body contour in 3D guided imaging reconstruction scheme in CT and C-arm imaging systems with truncated projection. In addition to pixel intensity, a TOF camera provides the 3D coordinates of each point in the captured scene with respect to the camera coordinates. Information from the TOF camera was used to obtain a digitized surface of the patient's body. The digitization points are transformed to X-Ray detector coordinates by registering the two coordinate systems. A set of points corresponding to the slice of interest are segmented to form a 2D contour of the body surface. Radon transform is applied to the contour to generate the 'trust region' for the projection data. The generated 'trust region' is integrated as an input to augment the projection data. It is used to estimate the truncated, unmeasured projections using linear interpolation. Finally the image is reconstructed using the combination of the estimated and the measured projection data. The proposed method is evaluated using a physical phantom. Projection data for the phantom were obtained using a C-arm system. Significant improvement in the reconstructed image quality near the truncation edges was observed using the proposed method as compared to that without truncation correction. This work shows that the proposed 3D guided CT image reconstruction using a TOF camera represents a feasible solution to the projection data truncation problem.

  6. Indirect time-of-flight 3D ranging based on SPADs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellisai, S.; Villa, F.; Tisa, S.; Bronzi, D.; Zappa, F.

    2012-01-01

    Systems for 3D image acquisition are the enabling technology for a number of applications such as architectural studies, safety and security, automotive. Single-sensor active-illumination cameras are the most promising system, ensuring a good depth measurement accuracy combined with a simple structure (no double sensor required), simplest measurement algorithm and night and daytime operation. These systems are based on the measurement of the time delay between the emission of light signal and the detection of the back-reflected signal (Time of Flight - TOF). The direct measurement of the time delay between two adjacent pulses is called direct TOF (dTOF), while if the time delay is obtained starting from the phase delay of a periodic waveform we speak of indirect TOF (iTOF). We present two different 0.35μm CMOS Silicon mini-arrays for iTOF 3D ranging based on square and sinusoidal waveforms, in which the sensitive element is a Single-Photon Avalanche Diode (SPAD).

  7. MOEMS-based time-of-flight camera for 3D video capturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Jang-Woo; Park, Yong-Hwa; Cho, Yong-Chul; Park, Chang-Young; Yoon, Heesun; Lee, Sang-Hun; Lee, Seung-Wan

    2013-03-01

    We suggest a Time-of-Flight (TOF) video camera capturing real-time depth images (a.k.a depth map), which are generated from the fast-modulated IR images utilizing a novel MOEMS modulator having switching speed of 20 MHz. In general, 3 or 4 independent IR (e.g. 850nm) images are required to generate a single frame of depth image. Captured video image of a moving object frequently shows motion drag between sequentially captured IR images, which results in so called `motion blur' problem even when the frame rate of depth image is fast (e.g. 30 to 60 Hz). We propose a novel `single shot' TOF 3D camera architecture generating a single depth image out of synchronized captured IR images. The imaging system constitutes of 2x2 imaging lens array, MOEMS optical shutters (modulator) placed on each lens aperture and a standard CMOS image sensor. The IR light reflected from object is modulated by optical shutters on the apertures of 2x2 lens array and then transmitted images are captured on the image sensor resulting in 2x2 sub-IR images. As a result, the depth image is generated with those simultaneously captured 4 independent sub-IR images, hence the motion blur problem is canceled. The resulting performance is very useful in the applications of 3D camera to a human-machine interaction device such as user interface of TV, monitor, or hand held devices and motion capturing of human body. In addition, we show that the presented 3D camera can be modified to capture color together with depth image simultaneously on `single shot' frame rate.

  8. CBCT-based 3D MRA and angiographic image fusion and MRA image navigation for neuro interventions

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qiang; Zhang, Zhiqiang; Yang, Jiakang; Sun, Qi; Luo, Yongchun; Shan, Tonghui; Zhang, Hao; Han, Jingfeng; Liang, Chunyang; Pan, Wenlong; Gu, Chuanqi; Mao, Gengsheng; Xu, Ruxiang

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Digital subtracted angiography (DSA) remains the gold standard for diagnosis of cerebral vascular diseases and provides intraprocedural guidance. This practice involves extensive usage of x-ray and iodinated contrast medium, which can induce side effects. In this study, we examined the accuracy of 3-dimensional (3D) registration of magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) and DSA imaging for cerebral vessels, and tested the feasibility of using preprocedural MRA for real-time guidance during endovascular procedures. Twenty-three patients with suspected intracranial arterial lesions were enrolled. The contrast medium-enhanced 3D DSA of target vessels were acquired in 19 patients during endovascular procedures, and the images were registered with preprocedural MRA for fusion accuracy evaluation. Low-dose noncontrasted 3D angiography of the skull was performed in the other 4 patients, and registered with the MRA. The MRA was overlaid afterwards with 2D live fluoroscopy to guide endovascular procedures. The 3D registration of the MRA and angiography demonstrated a high accuracy for vessel lesion visualization in all 19 patients examined. Moreover, MRA of the intracranial vessels, registered to the noncontrasted 3D angiography in the 4 patients, provided real-time 3D roadmap to successfully guide the endovascular procedures. Radiation dose to patients and contrast medium usage were shown to be significantly reduced. Three-dimensional MRA and angiography fusion can accurately generate cerebral vasculature images to guide endovascular procedures. The use of the fusion technology could enhance clinical workflow while minimizing contrast medium usage and radiation dose, and hence lowering procedure risks and increasing treatment safety. PMID:27512846

  9. CBCT-based 3D MRA and angiographic image fusion and MRA image navigation for neuro interventions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiang; Zhang, Zhiqiang; Yang, Jiakang; Sun, Qi; Luo, Yongchun; Shan, Tonghui; Zhang, Hao; Han, Jingfeng; Liang, Chunyang; Pan, Wenlong; Gu, Chuanqi; Mao, Gengsheng; Xu, Ruxiang

    2016-08-01

    Digital subtracted angiography (DSA) remains the gold standard for diagnosis of cerebral vascular diseases and provides intraprocedural guidance. This practice involves extensive usage of x-ray and iodinated contrast medium, which can induce side effects. In this study, we examined the accuracy of 3-dimensional (3D) registration of magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) and DSA imaging for cerebral vessels, and tested the feasibility of using preprocedural MRA for real-time guidance during endovascular procedures.Twenty-three patients with suspected intracranial arterial lesions were enrolled. The contrast medium-enhanced 3D DSA of target vessels were acquired in 19 patients during endovascular procedures, and the images were registered with preprocedural MRA for fusion accuracy evaluation. Low-dose noncontrasted 3D angiography of the skull was performed in the other 4 patients, and registered with the MRA. The MRA was overlaid afterwards with 2D live fluoroscopy to guide endovascular procedures.The 3D registration of the MRA and angiography demonstrated a high accuracy for vessel lesion visualization in all 19 patients examined. Moreover, MRA of the intracranial vessels, registered to the noncontrasted 3D angiography in the 4 patients, provided real-time 3D roadmap to successfully guide the endovascular procedures. Radiation dose to patients and contrast medium usage were shown to be significantly reduced.Three-dimensional MRA and angiography fusion can accurately generate cerebral vasculature images to guide endovascular procedures. The use of the fusion technology could enhance clinical workflow while minimizing contrast medium usage and radiation dose, and hence lowering procedure risks and increasing treatment safety. PMID:27512846

  10. Lanthanum halide scintillators for time-of-flight 3-D pet

    DOEpatents

    Karp, Joel S.; Surti, Suleman

    2008-06-03

    A Lanthanum Halide scintillator (for example LaCl.sub.3 and LaBr.sub.3) with fast decay time and good timing resolution, as well as high light output and good energy resolution, is used in the design of a PET scanner. The PET scanner includes a cavity for accepting a patient and a plurality of PET detector modules arranged in an approximately cylindrical configuration about the cavity. Each PET detector includes a Lanthanum Halide scintillator having a plurality of Lanthanum Halide crystals, a light guide, and a plurality of photomultiplier tubes arranged respectively peripherally around the cavity. The good timing resolution enables a time-of-flight (TOF) PET scanner to be developed that exhibits a reduction in noise propagation during image reconstruction and a gain in the signal-to-noise ratio. Such a PET scanner includes a time stamp circuit that records the time of receipt of gamma rays by respective PET detectors and provides timing data outputs that are provided to a processor that, in turn, calculates time-of-flight (TOF) of gamma rays through a patient in the cavity and uses the TOF of gamma rays in the reconstruction of images of the patient.

  11. Sensors for 3D Imaging: Metric Evaluation and Calibration of a CCD/CMOS Time-of-Flight Camera.

    PubMed

    Chiabrando, Filiberto; Chiabrando, Roberto; Piatti, Dario; Rinaudo, Fulvio

    2009-01-01

    3D imaging with Time-of-Flight (ToF) cameras is a promising recent technique which allows 3D point clouds to be acquired at video frame rates. However, the distance measurements of these devices are often affected by some systematic errors which decrease the quality of the acquired data. In order to evaluate these errors, some experimental tests on a CCD/CMOS ToF camera sensor, the SwissRanger (SR)-4000 camera, were performed and reported in this paper. In particular, two main aspects are treated: the calibration of the distance measurements of the SR-4000 camera, which deals with evaluation of the camera warm up time period, the distance measurement error evaluation and a study of the influence on distance measurements of the camera orientation with respect to the observed object; the second aspect concerns the photogrammetric calibration of the amplitude images delivered by the camera using a purpose-built multi-resolution field made of high contrast targets.

  12. Non-invasive 3D time-of-flight imaging technique for tumour volume assessment in subcutaneous models.

    PubMed

    Delgado San Martin, J A; Worthington, P; Yates, J W T

    2015-04-01

    Subcutaneous tumour xenograft volumes are generally measured using callipers. This method is susceptible to inter- and intra-observer variability and systematic inaccuracies. Non-invasive 3D measurement using ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have been considered, but require immobilization of the animal. An infrared-based 3D time-of-flight (3DToF) camera was used to acquire a depth map of tumour-bearing mice. A semi-automatic algorithm based on parametric surfaces was applied to estimate tumour volume. Four clay mouse models and 18 tumour-bearing mice were assessed using callipers (applying both prolate spheroid and ellipsoid models) and 3DToF methods, and validated using tumour weight. Inter-experimentalist variability could be up to 25% in the calliper method. Experimental results demonstrated good consistency and relatively low error rates for the 3DToF method, in contrast to biased overestimation using callipers. Accuracy is currently limited by camera performance; however, we anticipate the next generation 3DToF cameras will be able to support the development of a practical system. Here, we describe an initial proof of concept for a non-invasive, non-immobilized, morphology-independent, economical and potentially more precise tumour volume assessment technique. This affordable technique should maximize the datapoints per animal, by reducing the numbers required in experiments and reduce their distress.

  13. Systolically gated 3D phase contrast MRA of mesenteric arteries in suspected mesenteric ischemia

    SciTech Connect

    Wasser, M.N.; Schultze Kool, L.J.; Roos, A. de

    1996-03-01

    Our goal was to assess the value of MRA for detecting stenoses in the celiac (CA) and superior mesenteric (SMA) arteries in patients suspected of having chronic mesenteric ischemia, using an optimized systolically gated 3D phase contrast technique. In an initial study in 24 patients who underwent conventional angiography of the abdominal vessels for different clinical indications, a 3D phase contrast MRA technique (3D-PCA) was evaluated and optimized to image the CAs and SMAs. Subsequently, a prospective study was performed to assess the value of systolically gated 3D-PCA in evaluation of the mesenteric arteries in 10 patients with signs and symptoms of chronic mesenteric ischemia. Intraarterial digital subtraction angiography and surgical findings were used as the reference standard. In the initial study, systolic gating appeared to be essential in imaging the SMA on 3D-PCA. In 10 patients suspected of mesenteric ischemia, systolically gated 3D-PCA identified significant proximal disease in the two mesenteric vessels in 4 patients. These patients underwent successful reconstruction of their stenotic vessels. Cardiac-gated MRA may become a useful tool in selection of patients suspected of having mesenteric ischemia who may benefit from surgery. 16 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.

  14. Detection of cerebral aneurysms in MRA, CTA and 3D-RA data sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hentschke, Clemens M.; Beuing, Oliver; Nickl, Rosa; Tönnies, Klaus D.

    2012-03-01

    We propose a system to automatically detect cerebral aneurysms in 3D X-ray rotational angiography images (3D-RA), magnetic resonance angiography images (MRA) and computed tomography angiography images (CTA). After image normalization, initial candidates are found by applying a blob-enhancing filter on the data sets. Clusters are computed by a modified k-means algorithm. A post-processing step reduces the false positive (FP) rate on the basis of computed features. This is implemented as a rule-based system that is adapted according to the modality. In MRA, clusters are excluded that are not neighbored to a vessel. As a final step, FP are further reduced by applying a threshold classification on a feature. Our method was tested on 93 angiographic data sets containing aneurysm and non-aneurysm cases. We achieved 95 % sensitivity with an average rate of 2.6 FP per data set (FP/DS) in case of 3D-RA, 89 % sensitivity at 6.6 FP/DS for MRA and 95 % sensitivity at 37.6 FP/DS with CTA, respectively. We showed that our post-processing approach eliminates FP in MRA with only a slight decrease of sensitivity. In contrast to other approaches, our algorithm does not require a vessel segmentation and does not require training of distributional properties.

  15. 3D DCE-MRA of pedal arteries in patients with diabetes mellitus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamyshevskaya, M.; Zavadovskaya, V.; Zorkaltsev, M.; Udodov, V.; Grigorev, E.

    2016-02-01

    Purpose was identification and evaluation of pedal vascularization in diabetic patients of using contrast MR-angiography (3D DCE-MRA). 23 diabetic feet of 23 patients (15 male, 8 female; mean age 56 ± 14.6) underwent 3D DCE-MRA (Gadobutrol 15ml) at 1.5 T. Imaging analysis included blood-flow's speed, vascular architectonic's condition and character of contrast's accumulation. Osteomyelitis was verified by surgery in 15 cases. All patients were divided in 3 groups: neuropathic, neuroischemic, ischemic forms of diabetic foot. First- pass MRA detected significant delay of contrast's arrival in ischemic group. There were no significant differences between the values of neuropathic and neuroischemic forms of diabetic foot. Pedal vessels in patients were absent. Contrast MRA revealed three types of contrast distribution in soft tissues: uniform, local increase and local absence. Osteomyelitis was associated with diffuse enhanced contrast accumulation in all cases. In summary, MRI blood vessel imaging is a promising and valuable method for examining peripheral arterial changes in diabetic foot and might be useful for treatment planning in different forms of diabetic foot.

  16. Improving Three-Dimensional (3D) Range Gated Reconstruction Through Time-of-Flight (TOF) Imaging Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chua, S. Y.; Wang, X.; Guo, N.; Tan, C. S.; Chai, T. Y.; Seet, G. L.

    2016-04-01

    This paper performs an experimental investigation on the TOF imaging profile which strongly influences the quality of reconstruction to accomplish accurate range sensing. From our analysis, the reflected intensity profile recorded appears to deviate from Gaussian model which is commonly assumed and can be perceived as a mixture of noises and actual reflected signal. Noise-weighted Average range calculation is therefore proposed to alleviate noise influence based on the signal detection threshold and system noises. From our experimental result, this alternative range solution demonstrates better accuracy as compared to the conventional weighted average method and proven as a para-axial correction to improve range reconstruction in 3D gated imaging system.

  17. Automatic 3D Segmentation and Quantification of Lenticulostriate Arteries from High-Resolution 7 Tesla MRA Images.

    PubMed

    Wei Liao; Rohr, Karl; Chang-Ki Kang; Zang-Hee Cho; Worz, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    We propose a novel hybrid approach for automatic 3D segmentation and quantification of high-resolution 7 Tesla magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) images of the human cerebral vasculature. Our approach consists of two main steps. First, a 3D model-based approach is used to segment and quantify thick vessels and most parts of thin vessels. Second, remaining vessel gaps of the first step in low-contrast and noisy regions are completed using a 3D minimal path approach, which exploits directional information. We present two novel minimal path approaches. The first is an explicit approach based on energy minimization using probabilistic sampling, and the second is an implicit approach based on fast marching with anisotropic directional prior. We conducted an extensive evaluation with over 2300 3D synthetic images and 40 real 3D 7 Tesla MRA images. Quantitative and qualitative evaluation shows that our approach achieves superior results compared with a previous minimal path approach. Furthermore, our approach was successfully used in two clinical studies on stroke and vascular dementia.

  18. Automatic 3D Segmentation and Quantification of Lenticulostriate Arteries from High-Resolution 7 Tesla MRA Images.

    PubMed

    Wei Liao; Rohr, Karl; Chang-Ki Kang; Zang-Hee Cho; Worz, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    We propose a novel hybrid approach for automatic 3D segmentation and quantification of high-resolution 7 Tesla magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) images of the human cerebral vasculature. Our approach consists of two main steps. First, a 3D model-based approach is used to segment and quantify thick vessels and most parts of thin vessels. Second, remaining vessel gaps of the first step in low-contrast and noisy regions are completed using a 3D minimal path approach, which exploits directional information. We present two novel minimal path approaches. The first is an explicit approach based on energy minimization using probabilistic sampling, and the second is an implicit approach based on fast marching with anisotropic directional prior. We conducted an extensive evaluation with over 2300 3D synthetic images and 40 real 3D 7 Tesla MRA images. Quantitative and qualitative evaluation shows that our approach achieves superior results compared with a previous minimal path approach. Furthermore, our approach was successfully used in two clinical studies on stroke and vascular dementia. PMID:26571526

  19. Magnetic Resonance Angiography in the Diagnosis of Cerebral Arteriovenous Malformation and Dural Arteriovenous Fistulas: Comparison of Time-Resolved Magnetic Resonance Angiography and Three Dimensional Time-of-Flight Magnetic Resonance Angiography

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Yu-Ching; Chen, Hung-Chieh; Wu, Chen-Hao; Wu, Yi-Ying; Sun, Ming-His; Chen, Wen-Hsien; Chai, Jyh-Wen; Chi-Chang Chen, Clayton

    2016-01-01

    Background Traditional digital subtraction angiography (DSA) is currently the gold standard diagnostic method for the diagnosis and evaluation of cerebral arteriovenous malformation (AVM) and dural arteriovenous fistulas (dAVF). Objectives The aim of this study was to analyze different less invasive magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) images, time-resolved MRA (TR-MRA) and three-dimensional time-of-flight MRA (3D TOF MRA) to identify their diagnostic accuracy and to determine which approach is most similar to DSA. Patients and Methods A total of 41 patients with AVM and dAVF at their initial evaluation or follow-up after treatment were recruited in this study. We applied time-resolved angiography using keyhole (4D-TRAK) MRA to perform TR-MRA and 3D TOF MRA examinations simultaneously followed by DSA, which was considered as a standard reference. Two experienced neuroradiologists reviewed the images to compare the diagnostic accuracy, arterial feeder and venous drainage between these two MRA images. Inter-observer agreement for different MRA images was assessed by Kappa coefficient and the differences of diagnostic accuracy between MRA images were evaluated by the Wilcoxon rank sum test. Results Almost all vascular lesions (92.68%) were correctly diagnosed using 4D-TRAK MRA. However, 3D TOF MRA only diagnosed 26 patients (63.41%) accurately. There were statistically significant differences regarding lesion diagnostic accuracy (P = 0.008) and venous drainage identification (P < 0.0001) between 4D-TRAK MRA and 3D TOF MRA. The results indicate that 4D-TRAK MRA is superior to 3D TOF MRA in the assessment of lesions. Conclusion Compared with 3D TOF MRA, 4D-TRAK MRA proved to be a more reliable screening modality and follow-up method for the diagnosis of cerebral AVM and dAVF.

  20. Magnetic Resonance Angiography in the Diagnosis of Cerebral Arteriovenous Malformation and Dural Arteriovenous Fistulas: Comparison of Time-Resolved Magnetic Resonance Angiography and Three Dimensional Time-of-Flight Magnetic Resonance Angiography

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Yu-Ching; Chen, Hung-Chieh; Wu, Chen-Hao; Wu, Yi-Ying; Sun, Ming-His; Chen, Wen-Hsien; Chai, Jyh-Wen; Chi-Chang Chen, Clayton

    2016-01-01

    Background Traditional digital subtraction angiography (DSA) is currently the gold standard diagnostic method for the diagnosis and evaluation of cerebral arteriovenous malformation (AVM) and dural arteriovenous fistulas (dAVF). Objectives The aim of this study was to analyze different less invasive magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) images, time-resolved MRA (TR-MRA) and three-dimensional time-of-flight MRA (3D TOF MRA) to identify their diagnostic accuracy and to determine which approach is most similar to DSA. Patients and Methods A total of 41 patients with AVM and dAVF at their initial evaluation or follow-up after treatment were recruited in this study. We applied time-resolved angiography using keyhole (4D-TRAK) MRA to perform TR-MRA and 3D TOF MRA examinations simultaneously followed by DSA, which was considered as a standard reference. Two experienced neuroradiologists reviewed the images to compare the diagnostic accuracy, arterial feeder and venous drainage between these two MRA images. Inter-observer agreement for different MRA images was assessed by Kappa coefficient and the differences of diagnostic accuracy between MRA images were evaluated by the Wilcoxon rank sum test. Results Almost all vascular lesions (92.68%) were correctly diagnosed using 4D-TRAK MRA. However, 3D TOF MRA only diagnosed 26 patients (63.41%) accurately. There were statistically significant differences regarding lesion diagnostic accuracy (P = 0.008) and venous drainage identification (P < 0.0001) between 4D-TRAK MRA and 3D TOF MRA. The results indicate that 4D-TRAK MRA is superior to 3D TOF MRA in the assessment of lesions. Conclusion Compared with 3D TOF MRA, 4D-TRAK MRA proved to be a more reliable screening modality and follow-up method for the diagnosis of cerebral AVM and dAVF. PMID:27679690

  1. Impact of time-of-flight on indirect 3D and direct 4D parametric image reconstruction in the presence of inconsistent dynamic PET data.

    PubMed

    Kotasidis, F A; Mehranian, A; Zaidi, H

    2016-05-01

    Kinetic parameter estimation in dynamic PET suffers from reduced accuracy and precision when parametric maps are estimated using kinetic modelling following image reconstruction of the dynamic data. Direct approaches to parameter estimation attempt to directly estimate the kinetic parameters from the measured dynamic data within a unified framework. Such image reconstruction methods have been shown to generate parametric maps of improved precision and accuracy in dynamic PET. However, due to the interleaving between the tomographic and kinetic modelling steps, any tomographic or kinetic modelling errors in certain regions or frames, tend to spatially or temporally propagate. This results in biased kinetic parameters and thus limits the benefits of such direct methods. Kinetic modelling errors originate from the inability to construct a common single kinetic model for the entire field-of-view, and such errors in erroneously modelled regions could spatially propagate. Adaptive models have been used within 4D image reconstruction to mitigate the problem, though they are complex and difficult to optimize. Tomographic errors in dynamic imaging on the other hand, can originate from involuntary patient motion between dynamic frames, as well as from emission/transmission mismatch. Motion correction schemes can be used, however, if residual errors exist or motion correction is not included in the study protocol, errors in the affected dynamic frames could potentially propagate either temporally, to other frames during the kinetic modelling step or spatially, during the tomographic step. In this work, we demonstrate a new strategy to minimize such error propagation in direct 4D image reconstruction, focusing on the tomographic step rather than the kinetic modelling step, by incorporating time-of-flight (TOF) within a direct 4D reconstruction framework. Using ever improving TOF resolutions (580 ps, 440 ps, 300 ps and 160 ps), we demonstrate that direct 4D TOF image

  2. Impact of time-of-flight on indirect 3D and direct 4D parametric image reconstruction in the presence of inconsistent dynamic PET data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotasidis, F. A.; Mehranian, A.; Zaidi, H.

    2016-05-01

    Kinetic parameter estimation in dynamic PET suffers from reduced accuracy and precision when parametric maps are estimated using kinetic modelling following image reconstruction of the dynamic data. Direct approaches to parameter estimation attempt to directly estimate the kinetic parameters from the measured dynamic data within a unified framework. Such image reconstruction methods have been shown to generate parametric maps of improved precision and accuracy in dynamic PET. However, due to the interleaving between the tomographic and kinetic modelling steps, any tomographic or kinetic modelling errors in certain regions or frames, tend to spatially or temporally propagate. This results in biased kinetic parameters and thus limits the benefits of such direct methods. Kinetic modelling errors originate from the inability to construct a common single kinetic model for the entire field-of-view, and such errors in erroneously modelled regions could spatially propagate. Adaptive models have been used within 4D image reconstruction to mitigate the problem, though they are complex and difficult to optimize. Tomographic errors in dynamic imaging on the other hand, can originate from involuntary patient motion between dynamic frames, as well as from emission/transmission mismatch. Motion correction schemes can be used, however, if residual errors exist or motion correction is not included in the study protocol, errors in the affected dynamic frames could potentially propagate either temporally, to other frames during the kinetic modelling step or spatially, during the tomographic step. In this work, we demonstrate a new strategy to minimize such error propagation in direct 4D image reconstruction, focusing on the tomographic step rather than the kinetic modelling step, by incorporating time-of-flight (TOF) within a direct 4D reconstruction framework. Using ever improving TOF resolutions (580 ps, 440 ps, 300 ps and 160 ps), we demonstrate that direct 4D TOF image

  3. High-Resolution Variable-Density 3D Cones Coronary MRA

    PubMed Central

    Addy, Nii Okai; Ingle, R. Reeve; Wu, Holden H.; Hu, Bob S.; Nishimura, Dwight G.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To improve the spatial/temporal resolution of whole-heart coronary MR angiography (CMRA) by developing a variable-density (VD) 3D cones acquisition suitable for image reconstruction with parallel imaging and compressed sensing techniques. Methods A VD 3D cones trajectory design incorporates both radial and spiral trajectory undersampling techniques to achieve higher resolution. This design is used to generate a VD cones trajectory with 0.8 mm/66 ms isotropic spatial/temporal resolution, using a similar number of readouts as our previous fully sampled cones trajectory (1.2 mm/100 ms). Scans of volunteers and patients are performed to evaluate the performance of the VD trajectory, using non-Cartesian L1-ESPIRiT for high-resolution image reconstruction. Results With gridding reconstruction, the high-resolution scans experience an expected drop in signal-to-noise and contrast-to-noise ratios, but with L1-ESPIRiT, the apparent noise is substantially reduced. Compared to 1.2 mm images, in each volunteer, the L1-ESPIRiT 0.8 mm images exhibit higher vessel sharpness values in the right and left anterior descending arteries. Conclusion CMRA with isotropic sub-millimeter spatial resolution and high temporal resolution can be performed with VD 3D cones to improve the depiction of coronary arteries. PMID:26172829

  4. Photodissociative pathways of C{sub 2}H{sub 2} at 121.6 nm revealed by a Doppler-selected time-of-flight (a 3-D mapping) technique

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, L.H.; Che, D.C.; Liu, K.

    1996-04-18

    The photodissociation dynamics of C{sub 2}H{sub 2} near the H-atom Lyman-{alpha} transition was investigated by a newly developed, Doppler-selected time-of-flight technique. The aim of this study is to elucidate the detailed dynamics via the directly measured fragment 3-D distribution. An alternative, preliminary analysis of a fraction of the data is presented here which already reveals a rich dynamics involved in the photodissociation. A strong propensity against the formation of the ground electronic C{sub 2}H(X{sup 2}{Sigma}) state, a prominent C-H stretching excitation in the production of the C{sub 2}H(A) state, and two distinct dissociation pathways being likely involved in the title process have been found. 30 refs., 4 figs.

  5. [Identification of offending vessels in trigeminal neuralgia and hemifacial spasm using SPGR-MRI and 3D-TOF-MRA].

    PubMed

    Niwa, Y; Shiotani, M; Karasawa, H; Ohseto, K; Naganuma, Y

    1996-04-01

    We investigated 100 consecutive patients with trigeminal neuralgia (TN) and 53 patients with hemifacial spasm (HFS) concerning the anatomical relationship between the root entry (exit) zone (REZ) of cranial nerve and the offending artery, using spoiled GRASS MRI (SPGR-MRI) and three dimensional-time of fly-MRA (MRA). In 67 of 100 (67%) patiets with TN, this new radiological method, SPGR-MRI and MRA demonstrated the relationship between the fifth cranial nerve root and offending artery causing neurovascular compression (NVC), and in 46 of 53 (87%) with HFS, demonstrated the similar relationship between seventh and eighth nerve complex and offending artery. Microvascular decompression (MVD) was performed in 10 with HFS, and NVC of the REZ of the facial nerve caused by the offending artery was exactly predicted by SPGR-MRI and MRA in 9 (90%). The combination of SPGR-MRI and MRA is very useful for demonstrating NVC as the cause of TN and HFS. On the other hand, we investigated asymptomatic 206 trigeminal and 253 facial nerves about the relationship between their REZ and the surrounding structures using the similar method. The contact of REZ of cranial nerve with surrounding artery is demonstrated in 31.6% of trigeminal nerves and in 22.5% of facial nerves. These results indicate that the contact of REZ of cranial nerve with surrounding artery is not rare in healthy subjects, though causing TN and HFS in particular patients. In this context, we discussed the difference between the contact which is asymptomatic and the compression which is symptomatic.

  6. Time of flight mass spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Ulbricht, Jr., William H.

    1984-01-01

    A time-of-flight mass spectrometer is described in which ions are desorbed from a sample by nuclear fission fragments, such that desorption occurs at the surface of the sample impinged upon by the fission fragments. This configuration allows for the sample to be of any thickness, and eliminates the need for complicated sample preparation.

  7. Three-Dimensional Time-of-Flight Magnetic Resonance Angiography Detection of Duplication of the Vertebral Artery in a Large Chinese Population

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shuhua; Li, Yunyun; Bai, Min; Zhang, Chuanchen

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to investigate duplication of the vertebral artery (VA) using three-dimensional time-of-flight (3D TOF) magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) in a large study population to further our understanding of vascular variations. Material/Methods A retrospective analysis of 3D TOF-MRA data in 12 826 cases was performed. The occurrence rate of VA duplication was calculated and accompanied vascular anomalies were recoded. Results Twenty-one VA duplication patients were found, with an occurrence rate of 0.164%; 12 of them had left VA duplication with 2 branches initially arising from the aortic arch and left subclavian artery; 9 of them were right VA duplication with the branches originating from the right subclavian artery. In the 21 cases, 11 had other vascular abnormalities. Conclusions VA duplication is very rare and often associated with other vascular abnormalities. 3D TOF-MRA can accurately display the duplication variation. Better understanding of the variation is instrumental for disease diagnosis, interventional therapy, and surgical operation. PMID:27749814

  8. Analytical Properties of Time-of-Flight PET Data

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Sanghee; Ahn, Sangtae; Li, Quanzheng; Leahy, Richard M.

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the analytical properties of time-of-flight (TOF) positron emission tomography (PET) sinograms, where the data are modeled as line integrals weighted by a spatially invariant TOF kernel. First, we investigate the Fourier transform properties of 2D TOF data and extend the “bow-tie” property of the 2D Radon transform to the time of flight case. Second, we describe a new exact Fourier rebinning method, TOF-FOREX, based on the Fourier transform in the time-of-flight variable. We then combine TOF-FOREX rebinning with a direct extension of the projection slice theorem to TOF data, to perform fast 3D TOF PET image reconstruction. Finally, we illustrate these properties using simulated data. PMID:18460746

  9. Analytical properties of time-of-flight PET data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Sanghee; Ahn, Sangtae; Li, Quanzheng; Leahy, Richard M.

    2008-06-01

    We investigate the analytical properties of time-of-flight (TOF) positron emission tomography (PET) sinograms, where the data are modeled as line integrals weighted by a spatially invariant TOF kernel. First, we investigate the Fourier transform properties of 2D TOF data and extend the 'bow-tie' property of the 2D Radon transform to the time-of-flight case. Second, we describe a new exact Fourier rebinning method, TOF-FOREX, based on the Fourier transform in the time-of-flight variable. We then combine TOF-FOREX rebinning with a direct extension of the projection slice theorem to TOF data, to perform fast 3D TOF PET image reconstruction. Finally, we illustrate these properties using simulated data.

  10. Analytical properties of time-of-flight PET data.

    PubMed

    Cho, Sanghee; Ahn, Sangtae; Li, Quanzheng; Leahy, Richard M

    2008-06-01

    We investigate the analytical properties of time-of-flight (TOF) positron emission tomography (PET) sinograms, where the data are modeled as line integrals weighted by a spatially invariant TOF kernel. First, we investigate the Fourier transform properties of 2D TOF data and extend the 'bow-tie' property of the 2D Radon transform to the time-of-flight case. Second, we describe a new exact Fourier rebinning method, TOF-FOREX, based on the Fourier transform in the time-of-flight variable. We then combine TOF-FOREX rebinning with a direct extension of the projection slice theorem to TOF data, to perform fast 3D TOF PET image reconstruction. Finally, we illustrate these properties using simulated data. PMID:18460746

  11. Inexpensive Time-of-Flight Velocity Measurements.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Everett, Glen E.; Wild, R. L.

    1979-01-01

    Describes a circuit designed to measure time-of-flight velocity and shows how to use it to determine bullet velocity in connection with the ballistic pendulum demonstration of momentum conservation. (Author/GA)

  12. [Fusion imaging of 3D MR cisternography/angiography for differential diagnosis of internal carotid-posterior communicating artery aneurysms and infundibular dilations].

    PubMed

    Satoh, Toru; Sasahara, Wataru; Omi, Megumi; Ohsako, Chika

    2006-05-01

    By using a fusion imaging of three-dimensional (3D) magnetic resonance cisternography (MRC) and coregistered magnetic resonance angiography (MRA), protrusions at the bifurcation of the internal carotid-posterior communication artery, detected by MRA, were investigated to differentiate between the infundibular dilations and aneurysms. The MRA, obtained by the 3D time-of-flight sequence, showed the flow-related arterial structures by means of an inflow effect mainly induced by the peak systolic flow velocity. The MRC, obtained by 3D fast spin-echo sequence, depicted the contours of the vascular structures within the cisternal space in contrast to the surrounding cerebrospinal fluid. Fusion images of 3D MRC/MRA showed the anatomy of protrusions from the different viewpoints with flow-related intraluminal images (MRA) in conjunction with outer-wall configuration images of the vascular structures (MRC). This imaging technique may be useful to differentiate the infundibular dilations from the internal carotid-posterior communicating artery aneurysms.

  13. Time-of-flight radio location system

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, Thomas E.

    1996-01-01

    A bi-static radar configuration measures the direct time-of-flight of a transmitted RF pulse and is capable of measuring this time-of-flight with a jitter on the order of about one pico-second, or about 0.01 inch of free space distance for an electromagnetic pulse over a range of about one to ten feet. A transmitter transmits a sequence of electromagnetic pulses in response to a transmit timing signal, and a receiver samples the sequence of electromagnetic pulses with controlled timing in response to a receive timing signal, and generates a sample signal in response to the samples. A timing circuit supplies the transmit timing signal to the transmitter and supplies the receive timing signal to the receiver. The receive timing signal causes the receiver to sample the sequence of electromagnetic pulses such that the time between transmission of pulses in the sequence and sampling by the receiver sweeps over a range of delays. The receive timing signal sweeps over the range of delays in a sweep cycle such that pulses in the sequence are sampled at the pulse repetition rate, and with different delays in the range of delays to produce a sample signal representing magnitude of a received pulse in equivalent time. Automatic gain control circuitry in the receiver controls the magnitude of the equivalent time sample signal. A signal processor analyzes the sample signal to indicate the time-of-flight of the electromagnetic pulses in the sequence.

  14. Time-of-flight radio location system

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, T.E.

    1996-04-23

    A bi-static radar configuration measures the direct time-of-flight of a transmitted RF pulse and is capable of measuring this time-of-flight with a jitter on the order of about one pico-second, or about 0.01 inch of free space distance for an electromagnetic pulse over a range of about one to ten feet. A transmitter transmits a sequence of electromagnetic pulses in response to a transmit timing signal, and a receiver samples the sequence of electromagnetic pulses with controlled timing in response to a receive timing signal, and generates a sample signal in response to the samples. A timing circuit supplies the transmit timing signal to the transmitter and supplies the receive timing signal to the receiver. The receive timing signal causes the receiver to sample the sequence of electromagnetic pulses such that the time between transmission of pulses in the sequence and sampling by the receiver sweeps over a range of delays. The receive timing signal sweeps over the range of delays in a sweep cycle such that pulses in the sequence are sampled at the pulse repetition rate, and with different delays in the range of delays to produce a sample signal representing magnitude of a received pulse in equivalent time. Automatic gain control circuitry in the receiver controls the magnitude of the equivalent time sample signal. A signal processor analyzes the sample signal to indicate the time-of-flight of the electromagnetic pulses in the sequence. 7 figs.

  15. Time-of-flight radio location system

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, Thomas E.

    1997-01-01

    A bi-static radar configuration measures the direct time-of-flight of a transmitted RF pulse and is capable of measuring this time-of-flight with a jitter on the order of about one pico-second, or about 0.01 inch of free space distance for an electromagnetic pulse over a range of about one to ten feet. A transmitter transmits a sequence of electromagnetic pulses in response to a transmit timing signal, and a receiver samples the sequence of electromagnetic pulses with controlled timing in response to a receive timing signal, and generates a sample signal in response to the samples. A timing circuit supplies the transmit timing signal to the transmitter and supplies the receive timing signal to the receiver. The receive timing signal causes the receiver to sample the sequence of electromagnetic pulses such that the time between transmission of pulses in the sequence and sampling by the receiver sweeps over a range of delays. The receive timing signal sweeps over the range of delays in a sweep cycle such that pulses in the sequence are sampled at the pulse repetition rate, and with different delays in the range of delays to produce a sample signal representing magnitude of a received pulse in equivalent time. Automatic gain control circuitry in the receiver controls the magnitude of the equivalent time sample signal. A signal processor analyzes the sample signal to indicate the time-of-flight of the electromagnetic pulses in the sequence. The sample signal in equivalent time is passed through an envelope detection circuit, formed of an absolute value circuit followed by a low pass filter, to convert the sample signal to a unipolar signal to eliminate effects of antenna misorientation.

  16. Time-of-flight radio location system

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, T.E.

    1997-08-26

    A bi-static radar configuration measures the direct time-of-flight of a transmitted RF pulse and is capable of measuring this time-of-flight with a jitter on the order of about one pico-second, or about 0.01 inch of free space distance for an electromagnetic pulse over a range of about one to ten feet. A transmitter transmits a sequence of electromagnetic pulses in response to a transmit timing signal, and a receiver samples the sequence of electromagnetic pulses with controlled timing in response to a receive timing signal, and generates a sample signal in response to the samples. A timing circuit supplies the transmit timing signal to the transmitter and supplies the receive timing signal to the receiver. The receive timing signal causes the receiver to sample the sequence of electromagnetic pulses such that the time between transmission of pulses in the sequence and sampling by the receiver sweeps over a range of delays. The receive timing signal sweeps over the range of delays in a sweep cycle such that pulses in the sequence are sampled at the pulse repetition rate, and with different delays in the range of delays to produce a sample signal representing magnitude of a received pulse in equivalent time. Automatic gain control circuitry in the receiver controls the magnitude of the equivalent time sample signal. A signal processor analyzes the sample signal to indicate the time-of-flight of the electromagnetic pulses in the sequence. The sample signal in equivalent time is passed through an envelope detection circuit, formed of an absolute value circuit followed by a low pass filter, to convert the sample signal to a unipolar signal to eliminate effects of antenna misorientation. 8 figs.

  17. Optimal Rebinning of Time-of-Flight PET Data

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Sangtae; Cho, Sanghee; Li, Quanzheng; Lin, Yanguang

    2012-01-01

    Time-of-flight (TOF) positron emission tomography (PET) scanners offer the potential for significantly improved signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and lesion detectability in clinical PET. However, fully 3D TOF PET image reconstruction is a challenging task due to the huge data size. One solution to this problem is to rebin TOF data into a lower dimensional format. We have recently developed Fourier rebinning methods for mapping TOF data into non-TOF formats that retain substantial SNR advantages relative to sinograms acquired without TOF information. However, mappings for rebinning into non-TOF formats are not unique and optimization of rebinning methods has not been widely investigated. In this paper we address the question of optimal rebinning in order to make full use of TOF information. We focus on FORET-3D, which approximately rebins 3D TOF data into 3D non-TOF sinogram formats without requiring a Fourier transform in the axial direction. We optimize the weighting for FORET-3D to minimize the variance, resulting in H2-weighted FORET-3D, which turns out to be the best linear unbiased estimator (BLUE) under reasonable approximations and furthermore the uniformly minimum variance unbiased (UMVU) estimator under Gaussian noise assumptions. This implies that any information loss due to optimal rebinning is as a result only of the approximations used in deriving the rebinning equation and developing the optimal weighting. We demonstrate using simulated and real phantom TOF data that the optimal rebinning method achieves variance reduction and contrast recovery improvement compared to nonoptimized rebinning weightings. In our preliminary study using a simplified simulation setup, the performance of the optimal rebinning method was comparable to that of fully 3D TOF MAP. PMID:21536530

  18. Time-of-flight Fourier UCN spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulin, G. V.; Frank, A. I.; Goryunov, S. V.; Kustov, D. V.; Geltenbort, P.; Jentschel, M.; Lauss, B.; Schmidt-Wellenburg, P.

    2016-05-01

    We describe a new time-of-flight Fourier spectrometer for investigation of UCN diffraction by a moving grating. The device operates in the regime of a discrete set of modulation frequencies. The results of the first experiments show that the spectrometer may be used for obtaining UCN energy spectra in the energy range of 60 - 200 neV with a resolution of about 5 neV. The accuracy of determination of the line position was estimated to be several units of 10-10 eV.

  19. The TORCH time-of-flight detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harnew, N.; Brook, N.; Castillo García, L.; Cussans, D.; Föhl, K.; Forty, R.; Frei, C.; Gao, R.; Gys, T.; Piedigrossi, D.; Rademacker, J.; Ros Garcia, A.; van Dijk, M.

    2016-07-01

    The TORCH time-of-flight detector is being developed to provide particle identification between 2 and 10 GeV/c momentum over a flight distance of 10 m. TORCH is designed for large-area coverage, up to 30 m2, and has a DIRC-like construction. The goal is to achieve a 15 ps time-of-flight resolution per incident particle by combining arrival times from multiple Cherenkov photons produced within quartz radiator plates of 10 mm thickness. A four-year R&D programme is underway with an industrial partner (Photek, UK) to produce 53×53 mm2 Micro-Channel Plate (MCP) detectors for the TORCH application. The MCP-PMT will provide a timing accuracy of 40 ps per photon and it will have a lifetime of up to at least 5 Ccm-2 of integrated anode charge by utilizing an Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) coating. The MCP will be read out using charge division with customised electronics incorporating the NINO chipset. Laboratory results on prototype MCPs are presented. The construction of a prototype TORCH module and its simulated performance are also described.

  20. Time-of-Flight Microwave Camera.

    PubMed

    Charvat, Gregory; Temme, Andrew; Feigin, Micha; Raskar, Ramesh

    2015-10-05

    Microwaves can penetrate many obstructions that are opaque at visible wavelengths, however microwave imaging is challenging due to resolution limits associated with relatively small apertures and unrecoverable "stealth" regions due to the specularity of most objects at microwave frequencies. We demonstrate a multispectral time-of-flight microwave imaging system which overcomes these challenges with a large passive aperture to improve lateral resolution, multiple illumination points with a data fusion method to reduce stealth regions, and a frequency modulated continuous wave (FMCW) receiver to achieve depth resolution. The camera captures images with a resolution of 1.5 degrees, multispectral images across the X frequency band (8 GHz-12 GHz), and a time resolution of 200 ps (6 cm optical path in free space). Images are taken of objects in free space as well as behind drywall and plywood. This architecture allows "camera-like" behavior from a microwave imaging system and is practical for imaging everyday objects in the microwave spectrum.

  1. Time of flight system on a chip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paschalidis, Nicholas P. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A CMOS time-of-flight TOF system-on-a-chip SoC for precise time interval measurement with low power consumption and high counting rate has been developed. The analog and digital TOF chip may include two Constant Fraction Discriminators CFDs and a Time-to-Digital Converter TDC. The CFDs can interface to start and stop anodes through two preamplifiers and perform signal processing for time walk compensation (110). The TDC digitizes the time difference with reference to an off-chip precise external clock (114). One TOF output is an 11-bit digital word and a valid event trigger output indicating a valid event on the 11-bit output bus (116).

  2. Compact time-of-flight mass spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Belov, A.S.; Kubalov, S.A.; Kuzik, V.F.; Yakushev, V.P.

    1986-02-01

    This paper describes a time-of-flight mass spectrometer developed for measuring the parameters of a pulsed hydrogen beam. The duration of an electron-beam current pulse in the ionizer of the mass spectrometer can be varied within 2-20 usec, the pulse electron current is 0.6 mA, and the electron energy is 250 eV. The time resolution of the mass spectrometer is determined by the repetition period of the electron-beam current pulses and is 40 usec. The mass spectrometer has 100% transmission in the direction of motion of molecular-beam particles. The dimension of the mass spectrometer is 7 cm in this direction. The mass resolution is sufficient for determination of the composition of the hydrogen beam.

  3. Miniature Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Potember, Richard S.

    1999-01-01

    Major advances must occur to protect astronauts from prolonged periods in near-zero gravity and high radiation associated with extended space travel. The dangers of living in space must be thoroughly understood and methods developed to reverse those effects that cannot be avoided. Six of the seven research teams established by the National Space Biomedical Research Institute (NSBRI) are studying biomedical factors for prolonged space travel to deliver effective countermeasures. To develop effective countermeasures, each of these teams require identification of and quantitation of complex pharmacological, hormonal, and growth factor compounds (biomarkers) in humans and in experimental animals to develop an in-depth knowledge of the physiological changes associated with space travel. At present, identification of each biomarker requires a separate protocol. Many of these procedures are complicated and the identification of each biomarker requires a separate protocol and associated laboratory equipment. To carry all of this equipment and chemicals on a spacecraft would require a complex clinical laboratory; and it would occupy much of the astronauts time. What is needed is a small, efficient, broadband medical diagnostic instrument to rapidly identify important biomarkers for human space exploration. The Miniature Time-Of- Flight Mass Spectrometer Project in the Technology Development Team is developing a small, high resolution, time-of-flight mass spectrometer (TOFMS) to quantitatively measure biomarkers for human space exploration. Virtues of the JHU/APL TOFMS technologies reside in the promise for a small (less than one cubic ft), lightweight (less than 5 kg), low-power (less than 50 watts), rugged device that can be used continuously with advanced signal processing diagnostics. To date, the JHU/APL program has demonstrated mass capability from under 100 to beyond 10,000 atomic mass units (amu) in a very small, low power prototype for biological analysis. Further

  4. Time-of-Flight Microwave Camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charvat, Gregory; Temme, Andrew; Feigin, Micha; Raskar, Ramesh

    2015-10-01

    Microwaves can penetrate many obstructions that are opaque at visible wavelengths, however microwave imaging is challenging due to resolution limits associated with relatively small apertures and unrecoverable “stealth” regions due to the specularity of most objects at microwave frequencies. We demonstrate a multispectral time-of-flight microwave imaging system which overcomes these challenges with a large passive aperture to improve lateral resolution, multiple illumination points with a data fusion method to reduce stealth regions, and a frequency modulated continuous wave (FMCW) receiver to achieve depth resolution. The camera captures images with a resolution of 1.5 degrees, multispectral images across the X frequency band (8 GHz-12 GHz), and a time resolution of 200 ps (6 cm optical path in free space). Images are taken of objects in free space as well as behind drywall and plywood. This architecture allows “camera-like” behavior from a microwave imaging system and is practical for imaging everyday objects in the microwave spectrum.

  5. Time-of-Flight Microwave Camera.

    PubMed

    Charvat, Gregory; Temme, Andrew; Feigin, Micha; Raskar, Ramesh

    2015-01-01

    Microwaves can penetrate many obstructions that are opaque at visible wavelengths, however microwave imaging is challenging due to resolution limits associated with relatively small apertures and unrecoverable "stealth" regions due to the specularity of most objects at microwave frequencies. We demonstrate a multispectral time-of-flight microwave imaging system which overcomes these challenges with a large passive aperture to improve lateral resolution, multiple illumination points with a data fusion method to reduce stealth regions, and a frequency modulated continuous wave (FMCW) receiver to achieve depth resolution. The camera captures images with a resolution of 1.5 degrees, multispectral images across the X frequency band (8 GHz-12 GHz), and a time resolution of 200 ps (6 cm optical path in free space). Images are taken of objects in free space as well as behind drywall and plywood. This architecture allows "camera-like" behavior from a microwave imaging system and is practical for imaging everyday objects in the microwave spectrum. PMID:26434598

  6. Advances in time-of-flight PET.

    PubMed

    Surti, Suleman; Karp, Joel S

    2016-01-01

    This paper provides a review and an update on time-of-flight PET imaging with a focus on PET instrumentation, ranging from hardware design to software algorithms. We first present a short introduction to PET, followed by a description of TOF PET imaging and its history from the early days. Next, we introduce the current state-of-art in TOF PET technology and briefly summarize the benefits of TOF PET imaging. This is followed by a discussion of the various technological advancements in hardware (scintillators, photo-sensors, electronics) and software (image reconstruction) that have led to the current widespread use of TOF PET technology, and future developments that have the potential for further improvements in the TOF imaging performance. We conclude with a discussion of some new research areas that have opened up in PET imaging as a result of having good system timing resolution, ranging from new algorithms for attenuation correction, through efficient system calibration techniques, to potential for new PET system designs.

  7. Time-of-Flight Microwave Camera

    PubMed Central

    Charvat, Gregory; Temme, Andrew; Feigin, Micha; Raskar, Ramesh

    2015-01-01

    Microwaves can penetrate many obstructions that are opaque at visible wavelengths, however microwave imaging is challenging due to resolution limits associated with relatively small apertures and unrecoverable “stealth” regions due to the specularity of most objects at microwave frequencies. We demonstrate a multispectral time-of-flight microwave imaging system which overcomes these challenges with a large passive aperture to improve lateral resolution, multiple illumination points with a data fusion method to reduce stealth regions, and a frequency modulated continuous wave (FMCW) receiver to achieve depth resolution. The camera captures images with a resolution of 1.5 degrees, multispectral images across the X frequency band (8 GHz–12 GHz), and a time resolution of 200 ps (6 cm optical path in free space). Images are taken of objects in free space as well as behind drywall and plywood. This architecture allows “camera-like” behavior from a microwave imaging system and is practical for imaging everyday objects in the microwave spectrum. PMID:26434598

  8. Advances in time-of-flight PET.

    PubMed

    Surti, Suleman; Karp, Joel S

    2016-01-01

    This paper provides a review and an update on time-of-flight PET imaging with a focus on PET instrumentation, ranging from hardware design to software algorithms. We first present a short introduction to PET, followed by a description of TOF PET imaging and its history from the early days. Next, we introduce the current state-of-art in TOF PET technology and briefly summarize the benefits of TOF PET imaging. This is followed by a discussion of the various technological advancements in hardware (scintillators, photo-sensors, electronics) and software (image reconstruction) that have led to the current widespread use of TOF PET technology, and future developments that have the potential for further improvements in the TOF imaging performance. We conclude with a discussion of some new research areas that have opened up in PET imaging as a result of having good system timing resolution, ranging from new algorithms for attenuation correction, through efficient system calibration techniques, to potential for new PET system designs. PMID:26778577

  9. Update on time-of-flight PET imaging

    PubMed Central

    Surti, Suleman

    2015-01-01

    Time-of-flight (TOF) PET was initially introduced in the early days of PET. TOF PET scanners developed in the 1980s had limited sensitivity and spatial resolution, operated in 2D mode with septa, and used analytic image reconstruction methods. Current generation of TOF PET scanners have the highest sensitivity and spatial resolution ever achieved in commercial whole-body PET, operate in fully-3D mode, and use iterative reconstruction with full system modeling. Previously, it was shown that TOF provides a gain in image signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR) that is proportional to the square root of the object size divided by the system timing resolution. With oncologic studies being the primary application of PET, more recent work has shown that in modern TOF PET scanners there is an improved trade-off between lesion contrast, image noise, and total imaging time, leading to a combination of improved lesion detectability, reduced scan time or injected dose, and more accurate and precise lesion uptake measurement. The benefit of TOF PET is also higher for heavier patients, which leads to a more uniform clinical performance over all patient sizes. PMID:25525181

  10. Partial scene reconstruction using Time-of-Flight imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yuchen; Xiong, Hongkai

    2014-11-01

    This paper is devoted to generating the coordinates of partial 3D points in scene reconstruction via time of flight (ToF) images. Assuming the camera does not move, only the coordinates of the points in images are accessible. The exposure time is two trillionths of a second and the synthetic visualization shows that the light moves at half a trillion frames per second. In global light transport, direct components signify that the light is emitted from a light point and reflected from a scene point only once. Considering that the camera and source light point are supposed to be two focuses of an ellipsoid and have a constant distance at a time, we take into account both the constraints: (1) the distance is the sum of distances which light travels between the two focuses and the scene point; and (2) the focus of the camera, the scene point and the corresponding image point are in a line. It is worth mentioning that calibration is necessary to obtain the coordinates of the light point. The calibration can be done in the next two steps: (1) choose a scene that contains some pairs of points in the same depth, of which positions are known; and (2) take the positions into the last two constraints and get the coordinates of the light point. After calculating the coordinates of scene points, MeshLab is used to build the partial scene model. The proposed approach is favorable to estimate the exact distance between two scene points.

  11. 14 CFR 398.7 - Timing of flights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Timing of flights. 398.7 Section 398.7... STATEMENTS GUIDELINES FOR INDIVIDUAL DETERMINATIONS OF BASIC ESSENTIAL AIR SERVICE § 398.7 Timing of flights. To qualify as essential air service, flights must depart at reasonable times, considering the...

  12. 14 CFR 398.7 - Timing of flights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Timing of flights. 398.7 Section 398.7... STATEMENTS GUIDELINES FOR INDIVIDUAL DETERMINATIONS OF BASIC ESSENTIAL AIR SERVICE § 398.7 Timing of flights. To qualify as essential air service, flights must depart at reasonable times, considering the...

  13. 14 CFR 398.7 - Timing of flights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Timing of flights. 398.7 Section 398.7... STATEMENTS GUIDELINES FOR INDIVIDUAL DETERMINATIONS OF BASIC ESSENTIAL AIR SERVICE § 398.7 Timing of flights. To qualify as essential air service, flights must depart at reasonable times, considering the...

  14. 14 CFR 398.7 - Timing of flights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Timing of flights. 398.7 Section 398.7... STATEMENTS GUIDELINES FOR INDIVIDUAL DETERMINATIONS OF BASIC ESSENTIAL AIR SERVICE § 398.7 Timing of flights. To qualify as essential air service, flights must depart at reasonable times, considering the...

  15. Multi-MHz time-of-flight electronic bandstructure imaging of graphene on Ir(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tusche, C.; Goslawski, P.; Kutnyakhov, D.; Ellguth, M.; Medjanik, K.; Elmers, H. J.; Chernov, S.; Wallauer, R.; Engel, D.; Jankowiak, A.; Schönhense, G.

    2016-06-01

    In the quest for detailed spectroscopic insight into the electronic structure at solid surfaces in a large momentum range, we have developed an advanced experimental approach. It combines the 3D detection scheme of a time-of-flight momentum microscope with an optimized filling pattern of the BESSY II storage ring. Here, comprehensive data sets covering the full surface Brillouin zone have been used to study faint substrate-film hybridization effects in the electronic structure of graphene on Ir(111), revealed by a pronounced linear dichroism in angular distribution. The method paves the way to 3D electronic bandmapping with unprecedented data recording efficiency.

  16. Time-of-flight compressed-sensing ultrafast photography for encrypted three-dimensional dynamic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Jinyang; Gao, Liang; Hai, Pengfei; Li, Chiye; Wang, Lihong V.

    2016-02-01

    We applied compressed ultrafast photography (CUP), a computational imaging technique, to acquire three-dimensional (3D) images. The approach unites image encryption, compression, and acquisition in a single measurement, thereby allowing efficient and secure data transmission. By leveraging the time-of-flight (ToF) information of pulsed light reflected by the object, we can reconstruct a volumetric image (150 mm×150 mm×1050 mm, x × y × z) from a single camera snapshot. Furthermore, we demonstrated high-speed 3D videography of a moving object at 75 frames per second using the ToF-CUP camera.

  17. Encrypted Three-dimensional Dynamic Imaging using Snapshot Time-of-flight Compressed Ultrafast Photography.

    PubMed

    Liang, Jinyang; Gao, Liang; Hai, Pengfei; Li, Chiye; Wang, Lihong V

    2015-01-01

    Compressed ultrafast photography (CUP), a computational imaging technique, is synchronized with short-pulsed laser illumination to enable dynamic three-dimensional (3D) imaging. By leveraging the time-of-flight (ToF) information of pulsed light backscattered by the object, ToF-CUP can reconstruct a volumetric image from a single camera snapshot. In addition, the approach unites the encryption of depth data with the compressed acquisition of 3D data in a single snapshot measurement, thereby allowing efficient and secure data storage and transmission. We demonstrated high-speed 3D videography of moving objects at up to 75 volumes per second. The ToF-CUP camera was applied to track the 3D position of a live comet goldfish. We have also imaged a moving object obscured by a scattering medium. PMID:26503834

  18. Encrypted Three-dimensional Dynamic Imaging using Snapshot Time-of-flight Compressed Ultrafast Photography.

    PubMed

    Liang, Jinyang; Gao, Liang; Hai, Pengfei; Li, Chiye; Wang, Lihong V

    2015-10-27

    Compressed ultrafast photography (CUP), a computational imaging technique, is synchronized with short-pulsed laser illumination to enable dynamic three-dimensional (3D) imaging. By leveraging the time-of-flight (ToF) information of pulsed light backscattered by the object, ToF-CUP can reconstruct a volumetric image from a single camera snapshot. In addition, the approach unites the encryption of depth data with the compressed acquisition of 3D data in a single snapshot measurement, thereby allowing efficient and secure data storage and transmission. We demonstrated high-speed 3D videography of moving objects at up to 75 volumes per second. The ToF-CUP camera was applied to track the 3D position of a live comet goldfish. We have also imaged a moving object obscured by a scattering medium.

  19. Encrypted Three-dimensional Dynamic Imaging using Snapshot Time-of-flight Compressed Ultrafast Photography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Jinyang; Gao, Liang; Hai, Pengfei; Li, Chiye; Wang, Lihong V.

    2015-10-01

    Compressed ultrafast photography (CUP), a computational imaging technique, is synchronized with short-pulsed laser illumination to enable dynamic three-dimensional (3D) imaging. By leveraging the time-of-flight (ToF) information of pulsed light backscattered by the object, ToF-CUP can reconstruct a volumetric image from a single camera snapshot. In addition, the approach unites the encryption of depth data with the compressed acquisition of 3D data in a single snapshot measurement, thereby allowing efficient and secure data storage and transmission. We demonstrated high-speed 3D videography of moving objects at up to 75 volumes per second. The ToF-CUP camera was applied to track the 3D position of a live comet goldfish. We have also imaged a moving object obscured by a scattering medium.

  20. Encrypted Three-dimensional Dynamic Imaging using Snapshot Time-of-flight Compressed Ultrafast Photography

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Jinyang; Gao, Liang; Hai, Pengfei; Li, Chiye; Wang, Lihong V.

    2015-01-01

    Compressed ultrafast photography (CUP), a computational imaging technique, is synchronized with short-pulsed laser illumination to enable dynamic three-dimensional (3D) imaging. By leveraging the time-of-flight (ToF) information of pulsed light backscattered by the object, ToF-CUP can reconstruct a volumetric image from a single camera snapshot. In addition, the approach unites the encryption of depth data with the compressed acquisition of 3D data in a single snapshot measurement, thereby allowing efficient and secure data storage and transmission. We demonstrated high-speed 3D videography of moving objects at up to 75 volumes per second. The ToF-CUP camera was applied to track the 3D position of a live comet goldfish. We have also imaged a moving object obscured by a scattering medium. PMID:26503834

  1. Simulations on time-of-flight ERDA spectrometer performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Julin, Jaakko; Arstila, Kai; Sajavaara, Timo

    2016-08-01

    The performance of a time-of-flight spectrometer consisting of two timing detectors and an ionization chamber energy detector has been studied using Monte Carlo simulations for the recoil creation and ion transport in the sample and detectors. The ionization chamber pulses have been calculated using Shockley-Ramo theorem and the pulse processing of a digitizing data acquisition setup has been modeled. Complete time-of-flight-energy histograms were simulated under realistic experimental conditions. The simulations were used to study instrumentation related effects in coincidence timing and position sensitivity, such as background in time-of-flight-energy histograms. Corresponding measurements were made and simulated results are compared with data collected using the digitizing setup.

  2. Time-of-flight spectroscopy for medical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plucinski, Jerzy

    2004-08-01

    The paper presents benefits of optical time-of-flight spectroscopy for medical applications. It also presents the principles of measurement and describes how the basic optical properties of tissue can be estimated from measured data. The potential of time-of-flight spectroscopy is demonstrated, based on measurements conducted for highly scattering materials, such as paper samples, technological liquids from paper mills and aqueous milk solutions. Picosecond semiconductor pulse lasers and fast light detectors (a streak camera and an avalanche photodiode working in Geiger mode) were used. Obtained results show that it is possible to construct a new type of optic fiber sensors for medical applications. The chief advantage of the sensors is their ability to perform measurements in difficult to reach places (e.g. inside human body). Moreover, it is expected that fiber optic sensors based on time-of-flight spectroscopy will significantly reduce the costs of medical diagnosis.

  3. Simulations on time-of-flight ERDA spectrometer performance.

    PubMed

    Julin, Jaakko; Arstila, Kai; Sajavaara, Timo

    2016-08-01

    The performance of a time-of-flight spectrometer consisting of two timing detectors and an ionization chamber energy detector has been studied using Monte Carlo simulations for the recoil creation and ion transport in the sample and detectors. The ionization chamber pulses have been calculated using Shockley-Ramo theorem and the pulse processing of a digitizing data acquisition setup has been modeled. Complete time-of-flight-energy histograms were simulated under realistic experimental conditions. The simulations were used to study instrumentation related effects in coincidence timing and position sensitivity, such as background in time-of-flight-energy histograms. Corresponding measurements were made and simulated results are compared with data collected using the digitizing setup. PMID:27587115

  4. Time-of-Flight Counters for VENUS Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemmi, Yasuo; Kikuchi, Ryusaburo; Kubo, Kiyoshi; Kurashige, Hisaya; Miyake, Kozo; Nakamura, Teruo; Sasao, Noboru; Tamura, Norio; Yamada, Yoshikazu; Daigo, Motomasa; Kondo, Takahiko

    1987-06-01

    A time-of-flight counter system has been installed in the VENUS detector of the TRISTAN experiment at KEK. A time resolution of about 200 ps was obtained for a long scintillator of 466 cm. The system is being successfully operated in experiments.

  5. Rocket-borne time-of-flight mass spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reiter, R. F.

    1976-01-01

    Theoretical and numerical analyses are made of planar, cylindrical and spherical-electrode two-field time-of-flight mass spectrometers in order to optimize their operating conditions. A method is introduced which can improve the resolving power of these instruments by a factor of 7.5. Potential barrier gating in time-of-flight mass spectrometers is also analyzed. Experimental studies of a miniature cylindrical-electrode and a hemispherical-electrode time-of-flight mass spectrometer are presented. Their sensitivity and ability to operate at D-region pressures with an open source make them ideal instruments for D-region ion composition measurements. A sounding rocket experiment package carrying a cylindrical electrode time-of-flight mass spectrometer was launched. The data indicate that essentially 100% of the positive electric charge on positive ions is carried by ions with mass-to-charge ratios greater than 500 below an altitude of 92 km. These heavy charge carriers were present at altitudes up to about 100 km.

  6. 14 CFR 398.7 - Timing of flights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Timing of flights. 398.7 Section 398.7 Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (AVIATION PROCEEDINGS) POLICY... reasonableness of the time in view of the purpose for which the local passengers are traveling. If travel...

  7. Beam Test of a Time-of-Flight Detector Prototype

    SciTech Connect

    Va'vra, J.; Leith, D.W.G.S.; Ratcliff, B.; Ramberg, E.; Albrow, M.; Ronzhin, A.; Ertley, C.; Natoli, T.; May, E.; Byrum, K.; /Argonne

    2009-04-01

    We report on results of a Time-of-Flight, TOF, counter prototype in beam tests at SLAC and Fermilab. Using two identical 64-pixel Photonis Microchannel Plate Photomultipliers, MCP-PMTs, to provide start and stop signals, each having a 1 cm-long quartz Cherenkov radiator, we have achieved a timing resolution of {sigma}{sub Single{_}detector} {approx} 14 ps.

  8. Time-of-flight imaging of invisibility cloaks.

    PubMed

    Halimeh, Jad C; Wegener, Martin

    2012-01-01

    As invisibility cloaking has recently become experimental reality, it is interesting to explore ways to reveal remaining imperfections. In essence, the idea of most invisibility cloaks is to recover the optical path lengths without an object (to be made invisible) by a suitable arrangement around that object. Optical path length is proportional to the time of flight of a light ray or to the optical phase accumulated by a light wave. Thus, time-of-flight images provide a direct and intuitive tool for probing imperfections. Indeed, recent phase-sensitive experiments on the carpet cloak have already made early steps in this direction. In the macroscopic world, time-of-flight images could be measured directly by light detection and ranging (LIDAR). Here, we show calculated time-of-flight images of the conformal Gaussian carpet cloak, the conformal grating cloak, the cylindrical free-space cloak, and of the invisible sphere. All results are obtained by using a ray-velocity equation of motion derived from Fermat's principle. PMID:22274329

  9. Highly segmented, high resolution time-of-flight system

    SciTech Connect

    Nayak, T.K.; Nagamiya, S.; Vossnack, O.; Wu, Y.D.; Zajc, W.A.; Miake, Y.; Ueno, S.; Kitayama, H.; Nagasaka, Y.; Tomizawa, K.; Arai, I.; Yagi, K

    1991-12-31

    The light attenuation and timing characteristics of time-of-flight counters constructed of 3m long scintillating fiber bundles of different shapes and sizes are presented. Fiber bundles made of 5mm diameter fibers showed good timing characteristics and less light attenuation. The results for a 1.5m long scintillator rod are also presented.

  10. Development of a 10 picosecond time-of-flight Counter

    SciTech Connect

    Brandt, Andrew G

    2010-03-18

    This Advanced Detector Research proposal presented a plan to develop an extremely fast time-of-flight detector for measuring the arrival time of beam protons scattered at small angles in high energy hadron colliders, such as the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The proposed detectors employ a gas or quartz Cerenkov radiator which produce light when a proton passes through them, coupled to a micro-channel plate photomultiplier tube (MCP-PMT) that converts the light to an electrical pulse. The very small jitter of the pulse time provided by the MCP-PMT, combined with downstream electronics that accurately measure the pulse time results in a time-of-flight measurement of unprecedented accuracy. This ADR proposal was extremely successful, culminating in the development of a 10 ps resolution time-of-flight system, about an order of magnitude better than any time-of-flight system previously deployed at a collider experiment. The primary areas of advance were the usage of new radiator geometries providing fast detector signals, using multiple measurements to obtain a superior system resolution, and development of an electronics readout system tuned to maintain the excellent timing afforded by the detector. Test beam and laser tests have improved the knowledge of MCP-PMT’s and enabled the evaluation of the new detector concepts. In addition to being a generally useful detector concept, these fast timing detectors are a major component of proposed upgrades to the LHC ATLAS and CMS detectors, and if deployed could significantly enhance the discovery potential of these detectors, including contributions to the measurement of the properties of the Higgs Boson. In addition to the potential for furthering fundamental understanding of nature, the knowledge gained on MCP-PMT’s could be useful in developing improved versions of these devices which have promise in diverse fields such as biological and medical imaging.

  11. Time-of-flight direct recoil ion scattering spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Krauss, A.R.; Gruen, D.M.; Lamich, G.J.

    1994-09-13

    A time-of-flight direct recoil and ion scattering spectrometer beam line is disclosed. The beam line includes an ion source which injects ions into pulse deflection regions and separated by a drift space. A final optics stage includes an ion lens and deflection plate assembly. The ion pulse length and pulse interval are determined by computerized adjustment of the timing between the voltage pulses applied to the pulsed deflection regions. 23 figs.

  12. KELVIN rare gas time-of-flight program

    SciTech Connect

    Vernon, M.

    1981-03-01

    The purpose of this appendix is to explain in detail the procedure for performing time-of-flight (TOF) calibration measurements. The result of the calibration measurements is to assign a correct length (L) to the path the molecules travel in a particular experimental configuration. In conjunction with time information (t) a velocity distribution (L/t) can then be determined. The program KELVIN is listed.

  13. A Segmented Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, S. K.; Iga, I.; Rao, M. V. V. S.

    1995-01-01

    The present paper describes the design of a time-of-flight mass spectrometer (TOFMS) in which the single flight tube of a conventional TOFMS has been replaced by several cylindrical electrostatic lenses in tandem. By a judicious choice of voltages on these lenses, an improved TOFMS has been realized which has a superior mass and energy resolution, shorter flight lengths, excellent signal-to-noise ratio and less stringent requirements on the bias voltages.

  14. Time-of-flight direct recoil ion scattering spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Krauss, Alan R.; Gruen, Dieter M.; Lamich, George J.

    1994-01-01

    A time of flight direct recoil and ion scattering spectrometer beam line (10). The beam line (10) includes an ion source (12) which injects ions into pulse deflection regions (14) and (16) separated by a drift space (18). A final optics stage includes an ion lens and deflection plate assembly (22). The ion pulse length and pulse interval are determined by computerized adjustment of the timing between the voltage pulses applied to the pulsed deflection regions (14) and (16).

  15. Continuous time-of-flight ion mass spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Funsten, Herbert O.; Feldman, William C.

    2004-10-19

    A continuous time-of-flight mass spectrometer having an evacuated enclosure with means for generating an electric field located in the evacuated enclosure and means for injecting a sample material into the electric field. A source of continuous ionizing radiation injects ionizing radiation into the electric field to ionize atoms or molecules of the sample material, and timing means determine the time elapsed between arrival of a secondary electron out of said ionized atoms or molecules at a first predetermined location and arrival of a sample ion out of said ionized atoms or molecules at a second predetermined location.

  16. The HARP RPC time-of-flight system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogomilov, M.; Dedovich, D.; Dumps, R.; Dydak, F.; Gapienko, V.; Semak, A.; Sviridov, Y.; Usenko, E.; Wotschack, J.; Zaets, V.

    2003-08-01

    The time-of-flight system based on thin-gap glass resistive plate chambers (RPCs) for the HARP detector at CERN is described and first experience with the chamber operation and performance is reported. The system consists of 46 chambers, covers an area of 10 m2 and has 368 readout channels. The chambers are 2 m long, 150 mm wide, and 10 mm thick and have four gas gaps of 0.3 mm each, the glass plates are 0.7 mm thick. The RPCs are operated in avalanche mode with a mixture of 90% C 2F 4H 2, 5% SF 6, and 5% C 4H 10.

  17. Time-of-Flight Tip-Clearance Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dhadwal, H. S.; Kurkov, A. P.; Janetzke, D. C.

    1999-01-01

    In this paper a time-of-flight probe system incorporating the two integrated fiber optic probes which are tilted equally relative to the probe holder centerline, is applied for the first time to measure the tip clearance of an advanced fan prototype. Tip clearance is largely independent of the signal amplitude and it relies on timing measurement. This work exposes optical effects associated with the fan blade stagger angle that were absent during the original spin-rig experiment on the zero stagger rotor. Individual blade tip clearances were measured with accuracy of +/- 127-mm (+/- 0.005-in). Probe features are discussed and improvements to the design are suggested.

  18. Miniature Focusing Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanik, Isik; Srivastava, Santosh

    2005-01-01

    An improved miniature time-of-flight mass spectrometer has been developed in a continuing effort to minimize the sizes, weights, power demands, and costs of mass spectrometers for such diverse applications as measurement of concentrations of pollutants in the atmosphere, detecting poisonous gases in mines, and analyzing exhaust gases of automobiles. Advantageous characteristics of this mass spectrometer include the following: It is simple and rugged. Relative to prior mass spectrometers, it is inexpensive to build. There is no need for precise alignment of its components. Its mass range is practically unlimited Relative to prior mass spectrometers, it offers high sensitivity (ability to measure relative concentrations as small as parts per billion). Its resolution is one dalton (one atomic mass unit). An entire mass spectrum is recorded in a single pulse. (In a conventional mass spectrometer, a spectrum is recorded mass by mass.) The data-acquisition process takes only seconds. It is a lightweight, low-power, portable instrument. Although time-of-flight mass spectrometers (TOF-MSs) have been miniaturized previously, their performances have not been completely satisfactory. An inherent adverse effect of miniaturization of a TOF-MS is a loss of resolution caused by reduction of the length of its flight tube. In the present improved TOF-MS, the adverse effect of shortening the flight tube is counteracted by (1) using charged-particle optics to constrain ion trajectories to the flight-tube axis while (2) reducing ion velocities to increase ion flight times. In the present improved TOF-MS, a stream of gas is generated by use of a hypodermic needle. The stream of gas is crossed by an energy-selected, pulsed beam of electrons (see Figure 1). The ions generated by impingement of the electrons on the gas atoms are then focused by three cylindrical electrostatic lenses, which constitute a segmented flight tube. After traveling along the flight tube, the ions enter a charged

  19. Time of flight Laue fiber diffraction studies of perdeuterated DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Forsyth, V.T.; Whalley, M.A.; Mahendrasingam, A.; Fuller, W.

    1994-12-31

    The diffractometer SXD at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory ISIS pulsed neutron source has been used to record high resolution time-of-flight Laue fiber diffraction data from DNA. These experiments, which are the first of their kind, were undertaken using fibers of DNA in the A conformation and prepared using deuterated DNA in order to minimis incoherent background scattering. These studies complement previous experiments on instrument D19 at the Institute Laue Langevin using monochromatic neutrons. Sample preparation involved drawing large numbers of these deuterated DNA fibers and mounting them in a parallel array. The strategy of data collection is discussed in terms of camera design, sample environment and data collection. The methods used to correct the recorded time-of-flight data and map it into the final reciprocal space fiber diffraction dataset are also discussed. Difference Fourier maps showing the distribution of water around A-DNA calculated on the basis of these data are compared with results obtained using data recorded from hydrogenated A-DNA on D19. Since the methods used for sample preparation, data collection and data processing are fundamentally different for the monochromatic and Laue techniques, the results of these experiments also afford a valuable opportunity to independently test the data reduction and analysis techniques used in the two methods.

  20. High Resolution Electron Spectroscopy with Time-of-Flight Spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krässig, Bertold; Kanter, Elliot P.

    2015-05-01

    We have developed a parametrization based on ray-tracing calculations to convert electron time-of-flight (eTOF) to kinetic energy for the spectrometers of the LCLS-AMO end station at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. During the experiments the eTOF detector signals are recorded as digitized waveforms for every shot of the accelerator. With our parameterization we can analyze the waveforms on-line and convert detector hit times to kinetic energies. In this way we accumulate histograms with equally spaced bins in energy directly, rather than a posteriori converting an accumulated histogram of equally spaced flight times into a histogram of kinetic energies with unequal bin sizes. The parametrization is, of course, not a perfect replica of the ray tracing results, and the ray tracing is based on nominal dimensions, perfect alignment, detector response, and knowledge of time zero for the time-of-flight. In this presentation we will discuss causes, effects, and remedies for the observed deviations. We will present high-resolution results for the Ne KLL Auger spectrum that has been well studied and serves as a benchmark for our analysis algorithm. This work was supported by the Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences Division by the Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Office of Science, US Department of Energy, under Contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  1. Inductively Coupled Plasma Zoom-Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dennis, Elise A.; Ray, Steven J.; Enke, Christie G.; Hieftje, Gary M.

    2016-03-01

    A zoom-time-of-flight mass spectrometer has been coupled to an inductively coupled plasma (ICP) ionization source. Zoom-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (zoom-TOFMS) combines two complementary types of velocity-based mass separation. Specifically, zoom-TOFMS alternates between conventional, constant-energy acceleration (CEA) TOFMS and energy-focused, constant-momentum acceleration (CMA) (zoom) TOFMS. The CMA mode provides a mass-resolution enhancement of 1.5-1.7× over CEA-TOFMS in the current, 35-cm ICP-zoom-TOFMS instrument geometry. The maximum resolving power (full-width at half-maximum) for the ICP-zoom-TOFMS instrument is 1200 for CEA-TOFMS and 1900 for CMA-TOFMS. The CMA mode yields detection limits of between 0.02 and 0.8 ppt, depending upon the repetition rate and integration time—compared with single ppt detection limits for CEA-TOFMS. Isotope-ratio precision is shot-noise limited at approximately 0.2% relative-standard deviation (RSD) for both CEA- and CMA-TOFMS at a 10 kHz repetition rate and an integration time of 3-5 min. When the repetition rate is increased to 43.5 kHz for CMA, the shot-noise limited, zoom-mode isotope-ratio precision is improved to 0.09% RSD for the same integration time.

  2. Analysis and dynamic 3D visualization of cerebral blood flow combining 3D and 4D MR image sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forkert, Nils Daniel; Säring, Dennis; Fiehler, Jens; Illies, Till; Möller, Dietmar; Handels, Heinz

    2009-02-01

    In this paper we present a method for the dynamic visualization of cerebral blood flow. Spatio-temporal 4D magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) image datasets and 3D MRA datasets with high spatial resolution were acquired for the analysis of arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). One of the main tasks is the combination of the information of the 3D and 4D MRA image sequences. Initially, in the 3D MRA dataset the vessel system is segmented and a 3D surface model is generated. Then, temporal intensity curves are analyzed voxelwise in the 4D MRA image sequences. A curve fitting of the temporal intensity curves to a patient individual reference curve is used to extract the bolus arrival times in the 4D MRA sequences. After non-linear registration of both MRA datasets the extracted hemodynamic information is transferred to the surface model where the time points of inflow can be visualized color coded dynamically over time. The dynamic visualizations computed using the curve fitting method for the estimation of the bolus arrival times were rated superior compared to those computed using conventional approaches for bolus arrival time estimation. In summary the procedure suggested allows a dynamic visualization of the individual hemodynamic situation and better understanding during the visual evaluation of cerebral vascular diseases.

  3. Development of a time-of-flight spectrometer at the Ruder Bošković Institute in Zagreb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siketić, Zdravko; Radović, Iva Bogdanović; Jakšić, Milko

    2008-04-01

    A new TOF telescope has been constructed for thin film and surface analysis. The timing system consists of two electrostatic mirror type detectors of Busch design. The detection efficiency of timing stations for very light ions was significantly improved using DLC (diamond like carbon) foils coated with LiF instead of the conventionally used carbon foils. Ion energy is measured by a 300 mm2 ULTRA ion-implanted silicon detector. For the ERDA measurements with heavy and energetic ion beams, a time-of-flight (TOF) spectrometer is positioned at 37.5°. Spectrometer can be easily moved to 120° backward angle for time-of-flight RBS analysis with low energy beam of light ions. Positioning and fine adjustments of sample orientation are performed with a motorized sample stage. The same spectrometer can be also installed at the ion microprobe scattering chamber for 3D elemental imaging.

  4. Time-of-flight Fourier Spectrometry with UCN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulin, G. V.; Frank, A. I.; Goryunov, S. V.; Geltenbort, P.; Jentschel, M.; Bushuev, V. A.; Lauss, B.; Schmidt-Wellenburg, Ph.; Panzarella, A.; Fuchs, Y.

    2016-09-01

    The report presents the first experience of using a time-of-flight Fourier spectrometer of ultracold neutrons (UCN). The description of the spectrometer design and first results of its testing are presented. The results of the first experiments show that the spectrometer may be used for obtaining UCN energy spectra in the energy range of 60÷200 neV with a resolution of about 5 neV. The application of TOF Fourier spectrometry technique allowed us to obtain the energy spectra from the diffraction of monochromatic ultracold neutrons on a moving grating. Lines of 0, +1 and +2 diffraction orders were simultaneously recorded, which had previously been impossible to be done by other methods. These results have made it possible to make a comparison with the recent theoretical calculations based on the dynamical theory of neutron diffraction on a moving phase grating.

  5. Time of flight transients in the dipolar glass model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novikov, S. V.; Tyutnev, A. P.; Schein, L. B.

    2012-07-01

    Using Monte Carlo simulation we investigated time of flight current transients predicted by the dipolar glass model for a random spatial distribution of hopping centers. Behavior of the carrier drift mobility was studied at room temperature over a broad range of electric field and sample thickness. A flat plateau followed by j∝t-2 current decay is the most common feature of the simulated transients. Poole-Frenkel mobility field dependence was confirmed over 5-200 V/μm as well as its independence of the sample thickness. Universality of transients with respect to both field and sample thickness has been observed. A simple phenomenological model to describe simulated current transients has been proposed. Simulation results agree well with the reported Poole-Frenkel slope and shape of the transients for a prototype molecularly doped polymer.

  6. Linear electronic field time-of-flight ion mass spectrometers

    DOEpatents

    Funsten, Herbert O.

    2010-08-24

    Time-of-flight mass spectrometer comprising a first drift region and a second drift region enclosed within an evacuation chamber; a means of introducing an analyte of interest into the first drift region; a pulsed ionization source which produces molecular ions from said analyte of interest; a first foil positioned between the first drift region and the second drift region, which dissociates said molecular ions into constituent atomic ions and emits secondary electrons; an electrode which produces secondary electrons upon contact with a constituent atomic ion in second drift region; a stop detector comprising a first ion detection region and a second ion detection region; and a timing means connected to the pulsed ionization source, to the first ion detection region, and to the second ion detection region.

  7. Avalanche photodiode based time-of-flight mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Ogasawara, Keiichi Livi, Stefano A.; Desai, Mihir I.; Ebert, Robert W.; McComas, David J.; Walther, Brandon C.

    2015-08-15

    This study reports on the performance of Avalanche Photodiodes (APDs) as a timing detector for ion Time-of-Flight (TOF) mass spectroscopy. We found that the fast signal carrier speed in a reach-through type APD enables an extremely short timescale response with a mass or energy independent <2 ns rise time for <200 keV ions (1−40 AMU) under proper bias voltage operations. When combined with a microchannel plate to detect start electron signals from an ultra-thin carbon foil, the APD comprises a novel TOF system that successfully operates with a <0.8 ns intrinsic timing resolution even using commercial off-the-shelf constant-fraction discriminators. By replacing conventional total-energy detectors in the TOF-Energy system, APDs offer significant power and mass savings or an anti-coincidence background rejection capability in future space instrumentation.

  8. Time Of Flight Detectors: From phototubes to SiPM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurenti, G.; Levi, G.; Foschi, E.; Guandalini, C.; Quadrani, L.; Sbarra, C.; Zuffa, M.

    2008-04-01

    A sample of Silicon Photomultipliers was tested because they looked promising for future space missions: low consumption, low weight, resistance to radiation damage and insensitivity to magnetic fields. They have been studied in laboratory by means of the same characterization methods adopted to calibrate the fine mesh photomultipliers used by the Time Of Flight of the AMS-02 experiment. A detailed simulation was made to reproduce the SiPM response to the various experimental conditions. A possible counter design has been studied with front end electronics card equipped with SiPMs and Peltier cell for thermoregulation. A proper simulation based on COMSOL Multiphysics package reproduces quite well the Peltier cell nominal cooling capability.

  9. Tests and calibration of NIF neutron time of flight detectors.

    PubMed

    Ali, Z A; Glebov, V Yu; Cruz, M; Duffy, T; Stoeckl, C; Roberts, S; Sangster, T C; Tommasini, R; Throop, A; Moran, M; Dauffy, L; Horsefield, C

    2008-10-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) neutron time of flight (NTOF) diagnostic will measure neutron yield and ion temperature in all NIF campaigns in DD, DT, and THD(*) implosions. The NIF NTOF diagnostic is designed to measure neutron yield from 1x10(9) to 2x10(19). The NTOF consists of several detectors of varying sensitivity located on the NIF at about 5 and 20 m from the target. Production, testing, and calibration of the NIF NTOF detectors have begun at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE). Operational tests of the NTOF detectors were performed on several facilities including the OMEGA laser at LLE and the Titan laser at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Neutron calibrations were carried out on the OMEGA laser. Results of the NTOF detector tests and calibration will be presented.

  10. Inverse time-of-flight spectrometer for beam plasma research

    SciTech Connect

    Yushkov, Yu. G. Zolotukhin, D. B.; Tyunkov, A. V.; Oks, E. M.

    2014-08-15

    The paper describes the design and principle of operation of an inverse time-of-flight spectrometer for research in the plasma produced by an electron beam in the forevacuum pressure range (5–20 Pa). In the spectrometer, the deflecting plates as well as the drift tube and the primary ion beam measuring system are at high potential with respect to ground. This provides the possibility to measure the mass-charge constitution of the plasma created by a continuous electron beam with a current of up to 300 mA and electron energy of up to 20 keV at forevacuum pressures in the chamber placed at ground potential. Research results on the mass-charge state of the beam plasma are presented and analyzed.

  11. Accurate Fiber Length Measurement Using Time-of-Flight Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terra, Osama; Hussein, Hatem

    2016-06-01

    Fiber artifacts of very well-measured length are required for the calibration of optical time domain reflectometers (OTDR). In this paper accurate length measurement of different fiber lengths using the time-of-flight technique is performed. A setup is proposed to measure accurately lengths from 1 to 40 km at 1,550 and 1,310 nm using high-speed electro-optic modulator and photodetector. This setup offers traceability to the SI unit of time, the second (and hence to meter by definition), by locking the time interval counter to the Global Positioning System (GPS)-disciplined quartz oscillator. Additionally, the length of a recirculating loop artifact is measured and compared with the measurement made for the same fiber by the National Physical Laboratory of United Kingdom (NPL). Finally, a method is proposed to relatively correct the fiber refractive index to allow accurate fiber length measurement.

  12. National Ignition Facility neutron time-of-flight measurements (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Lerche, R. A.; Moran, M. J.; McNaney, J. M.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Eckart, M. J.; Zacharias, R. A.; Haslam, J. J.; Clancy, T. J.; Yeoman, M. F.; Warwas, D. P.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Sangster, T. C.; Stoeckl, C.; Knauer, J. P.; Horsfield, C. J.

    2010-10-15

    The first 3 of 18 neutron time-of-flight (nTOF) channels have been installed at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The role of these detectors includes yield, temperature, and bang time measurements. This article focuses on nTOF data analysis and quality of results obtained for the first set of experiments to use all 192 NIF beams. Targets produced up to 2x10{sup 10} 2.45 MeV neutrons for initial testing of the nTOF detectors. Differences in neutron scattering at the OMEGA laser facility where the detectors were calibrated and at NIF result in different response functions at the two facilities. Monte Carlo modeling shows this difference. The nTOF performance on these early experiments indicates that the nTOF system with its full complement of detectors should perform well in future measurements of yield, temperature, and bang time.

  13. The Time-of-Flight trigger at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, G.; Mulhearn, M.J.; Paus, Ch.; Schieferdecker, P.; Tether, S.; Lewis, J.D.; Shaw, T.; Acosta, D.; Konigsberg, J.; Madorsky, A.; /Florida U.

    2006-05-01

    The Time-of-Flight (TOF) detector measures the arrival time and deposited energy of charged particles reaching scintillator bars surrounding the central tracking region of the CDF detector. Requiring high ionization in the TOF system provides a unique trigger capability, which has been used for a magnetic monopole search. Other uses, with smaller pulse height thresholds, include a high-multiplicity charged-particle trigger useful for QCD studies and a much improved cosmic ray trigger for calibrating other detector components. Although not designed as input to CDF's global Level 1 trigger, the TOF system has been easily adapted to this role by the addition of 24 cables, new firmware, and four custom TOF trigger boards (TOTRIBs). This article describes the TOF trigger.

  14. Time-of-flight neutral particle analyzer and calibration.

    PubMed

    Harris, W S; Garate, E P; Heidbrink, W W; McWilliams, R; Roche, T; Trask, E; Zhang, Yang

    2008-10-01

    A time-of-flight diagnostic has been implemented on the Irvine field reversed configuration (IFRC) to obtain an energy distribution function from charge-exchanged neutral hydrogen. The diagnostic includes a 13 cm radius slotted disk rotating at 165 Hz in vacuum which chops the emitted neutrals at a rate of 26 kHz. In situ timing verification was performed with a dc xenon discharge lamp with an uncertainty less than 100 ns for a 38 micros chopping period. Energy calibration was accomplished with a singly ionized lithium source in the range of 300-1500 eV, achieving an average energy uncertainty, DeltaE/E, of 0.11. The diagnostic has measured neutrals in the range of 20-80 eV from the IFRC and the corresponding energy distribution function has been obtained.

  15. Time-of-flight neutral particle analyzer and calibration

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, W. S.; Garate, E. P.; Heidbrink, W. W.; McWilliams, R.; Roche, T.; Trask, E.; Zhang Yang

    2008-10-15

    A time-of-flight diagnostic has been implemented on the Irvine field reversed configuration (IFRC) to obtain an energy distribution function from charge-exchanged neutral hydrogen. The diagnostic includes a 13 cm radius slotted disk rotating at 165 Hz in vacuum which chops the emitted neutrals at a rate of 26 kHz. In situ timing verification was performed with a dc xenon discharge lamp with an uncertainty less than 100 ns for a 38 {mu}s chopping period. Energy calibration was accomplished with a singly ionized lithium source in the range of 300-1500 eV, achieving an average energy uncertainty, {delta}E/E, of 0.11. The diagnostic has measured neutrals in the range of 20-80 eV from the IFRC and the corresponding energy distribution function has been obtained.

  16. Highly charged ion based time of flight emission microscope

    DOEpatents

    Barnes, Alan V.; Schenkel, Thomas; Hamza, Alex V.; Schneider, Dieter H.; Doyle, Barney

    2001-01-01

    A highly charged ion based time-of-flight emission microscope has been designed, which improves the surface sensitivity of static SIMS measurements because of the higher ionization probability of highly charged ions. Slow, highly charged ions are produced in an electron beam ion trap and are directed to the sample surface. The sputtered secondary ions and electrons pass through a specially designed objective lens to a microchannel plate detector. This new instrument permits high surface sensitivity (10.sup.10 atoms/cm.sup.2), high spatial resolution (100 nm), and chemical structural information due to the high molecular ion yields. The high secondary ion yield permits coincidence counting, which can be used to enhance determination of chemical and topological structure and to correlate specific molecular species.

  17. Inverse time-of-flight spectrometer for beam plasma research.

    PubMed

    Yushkov, Yu G; Oks, E M; Zolotukhin, D B; Tyunkov, A V; Savkin, K P

    2014-08-01

    The paper describes the design and principle of operation of an inverse time-of-flight spectrometer for research in the plasma produced by an electron beam in the forevacuum pressure range (5-20 Pa). In the spectrometer, the deflecting plates as well as the drift tube and the primary ion beam measuring system are at high potential with respect to ground. This provides the possibility to measure the mass-charge constitution of the plasma created by a continuous electron beam with a current of up to 300 mA and electron energy of up to 20 keV at forevacuum pressures in the chamber placed at ground potential. Research results on the mass-charge state of the beam plasma are presented and analyzed. PMID:25173261

  18. Chern numbers hiding in time-of-flight images

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao Erhai; Satija, Indubala I.; Bray-Ali, Noah; Williams, Carl J.; Spielman, I. B.

    2011-12-15

    We present a technique for detecting topological invariants--Chern numbers--from time-of-flight images of ultracold atoms. We show that the Chern numbers of integer quantum Hall states of lattice fermions leave their fingerprints in the atoms' momentum distribution. We analytically demonstrate that the number of local maxima in the momentum distribution is equal to the Chern number in two limiting cases, for large hopping anisotropy and in the continuum limit. In addition, our numerical simulations beyond these two limits show that these local maxima persist for a range of parameters. Thus, an everyday observable in cold atom experiments can serve as a useful tool to characterize and visualize quantum states with nontrivial topology.

  19. 3MRA UNCERTAINTY AND SENSITIVITY ANALYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation discusses the Multimedia, Multipathway, Multireceptor Risk Assessment (3MRA) modeling system. The outline of the presentation is: modeling system overview - 3MRA versions; 3MRA version 1.0; national-scale assessment dimensionality; SuperMUSE: windows-based super...

  20. A unified Fourier theory for time-of-flight PET data.

    PubMed

    Li, Yusheng; Matej, Samuel; Metzler, Scott D

    2016-01-21

    Fully 3D time-of-flight (TOF) PET scanners offer the potential of previously unachievable image quality in clinical PET imaging. TOF measurements add another degree of redundancy for cylindrical PET scanners and make photon-limited TOF-PET imaging more robust than non-TOF PET imaging. The data space for 3D TOF-PET data is five-dimensional with two degrees of redundancy. Previously, consistency equations were used to characterize the redundancy of TOF-PET data. In this paper, we first derive two Fourier consistency equations and Fourier-John equation for 3D TOF PET based on the generalized projection-slice theorem; the three partial differential equations (PDEs) are the dual of the sinogram consistency equations and John's equation. We then solve the three PDEs using the method of characteristics. The two degrees of entangled redundancy of the TOF-PET data can be explicitly elicited and exploited by the solutions of the PDEs along the characteristic curves, which gives a complete understanding of the rich structure of the 3D x-ray transform with TOF measurement. Fourier rebinning equations and other mapping equations among different types of PET data are special cases of the general solutions. We also obtain new Fourier rebinning and consistency equations (FORCEs) from other special cases of the general solutions, and thus we obtain a complete scheme to convert among different types of PET data: 3D TOF, 3D non-TOF, 2D TOF and 2D non-TOF data. The new FORCEs can be used as new Fourier-based rebinning algorithms for TOF-PET data reduction, inverse rebinnings for designing fast projectors, or consistency conditions for estimating missing data. Further, we give a geometric interpretation of the general solutions--the two families of characteristic curves can be obtained by respectively changing the azimuthal and co-polar angles of the biorthogonal coordinates in Fourier space. We conclude the unified Fourier theory by showing that the Fourier consistency equations are

  1. A unified Fourier theory for time-of-flight PET data.

    PubMed

    Li, Yusheng; Matej, Samuel; Metzler, Scott D

    2016-01-21

    Fully 3D time-of-flight (TOF) PET scanners offer the potential of previously unachievable image quality in clinical PET imaging. TOF measurements add another degree of redundancy for cylindrical PET scanners and make photon-limited TOF-PET imaging more robust than non-TOF PET imaging. The data space for 3D TOF-PET data is five-dimensional with two degrees of redundancy. Previously, consistency equations were used to characterize the redundancy of TOF-PET data. In this paper, we first derive two Fourier consistency equations and Fourier-John equation for 3D TOF PET based on the generalized projection-slice theorem; the three partial differential equations (PDEs) are the dual of the sinogram consistency equations and John's equation. We then solve the three PDEs using the method of characteristics. The two degrees of entangled redundancy of the TOF-PET data can be explicitly elicited and exploited by the solutions of the PDEs along the characteristic curves, which gives a complete understanding of the rich structure of the 3D x-ray transform with TOF measurement. Fourier rebinning equations and other mapping equations among different types of PET data are special cases of the general solutions. We also obtain new Fourier rebinning and consistency equations (FORCEs) from other special cases of the general solutions, and thus we obtain a complete scheme to convert among different types of PET data: 3D TOF, 3D non-TOF, 2D TOF and 2D non-TOF data. The new FORCEs can be used as new Fourier-based rebinning algorithms for TOF-PET data reduction, inverse rebinnings for designing fast projectors, or consistency conditions for estimating missing data. Further, we give a geometric interpretation of the general solutions--the two families of characteristic curves can be obtained by respectively changing the azimuthal and co-polar angles of the biorthogonal coordinates in Fourier space. We conclude the unified Fourier theory by showing that the Fourier consistency equations are

  2. A unified Fourier theory for time-of-flight PET data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yusheng; Matej, Samuel; Metzler, Scott D.

    2016-01-01

    Fully 3D time-of-flight (TOF) PET scanners offer the potential of previously unachievable image quality in clinical PET imaging. TOF measurements add another degree of redundancy for cylindrical PET scanners and make photon-limited TOF-PET imaging more robust than non-TOF PET imaging. The data space for 3D TOF-PET data is five-dimensional with two degrees of redundancy. Previously, consistency equations were used to characterize the redundancy of TOF-PET data. In this paper, we first derive two Fourier consistency equations and Fourier-John equation for 3D TOF PET based on the generalized projection-slice theorem; the three partial differential equations (PDEs) are the dual of the sinogram consistency equations and John’s equation. We then solve the three PDEs using the method of characteristics. The two degrees of entangled redundancy of the TOF-PET data can be explicitly elicited and exploited by the solutions of the PDEs along the characteristic curves, which gives a complete understanding of the rich structure of the 3D x-ray transform with TOF measurement. Fourier rebinning equations and other mapping equations among different types of PET data are special cases of the general solutions. We also obtain new Fourier rebinning and consistency equations (FORCEs) from other special cases of the general solutions, and thus we obtain a complete scheme to convert among different types of PET data: 3D TOF, 3D non-TOF, 2D TOF and 2D non-TOF data. The new FORCEs can be used as new Fourier-based rebinning algorithms for TOF-PET data reduction, inverse rebinnings for designing fast projectors, or consistency conditions for estimating missing data. Further, we give a geometric interpretation of the general solutions—the two families of characteristic curves can be obtained by respectively changing the azimuthal and co-polar angles of the biorthogonal coordinates in Fourier space. We conclude the unified Fourier theory by showing that the Fourier consistency equations

  3. Automated segmentation of cerebral vasculature with aneurysms in 3DRA and TOF-MRA using geodesic active regions: An evaluation study

    SciTech Connect

    Bogunovic, Hrvoje; Pozo, Jose Maria; Villa-Uriol, Maria Cruz; and others

    2011-01-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the suitability of an improved version of an automatic segmentation method based on geodesic active regions (GAR) for segmenting cerebral vasculature with aneurysms from 3D x-ray reconstruction angiography (3DRA) and time of flight magnetic resonance angiography (TOF-MRA) images available in the clinical routine. Methods: Three aspects of the GAR method have been improved: execution time, robustness to variability in imaging protocols, and robustness to variability in image spatial resolutions. The improved GAR was retrospectively evaluated on images from patients containing intracranial aneurysms in the area of the Circle of Willis and imaged with two modalities: 3DRA and TOF-MRA. Images were obtained from two clinical centers, each using different imaging equipment. Evaluation included qualitative and quantitative analyses of the segmentation results on 20 images from 10 patients. The gold standard was built from 660 cross-sections (33 per image) of vessels and aneurysms, manually measured by interventional neuroradiologists. GAR has also been compared to an interactive segmentation method: isointensity surface extraction (ISE). In addition, since patients had been imaged with the two modalities, we performed an intermodality agreement analysis with respect to both the manual measurements and each of the two segmentation methods. Results: Both GAR and ISE differed from the gold standard within acceptable limits compared to the imaging resolution. GAR (ISE) had an average accuracy of 0.20 (0.24) mm for 3DRA and 0.27 (0.30) mm for TOF-MRA, and had a repeatability of 0.05 (0.20) mm. Compared to ISE, GAR had a lower qualitative error in the vessel region and a lower quantitative error in the aneurysm region. The repeatability of GAR was superior to manual measurements and ISE. The intermodality agreement was similar between GAR and the manual measurements. Conclusions: The improved GAR method outperformed ISE qualitatively as well as

  4. Video Guidance Sensor and Time-of-Flight Rangefinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryan, Thomas; Howard, Richard; Bell, Joseph L.; Roe, Fred D.; Book, Michael L.

    2007-01-01

    A proposed video guidance sensor (VGS) would be based mostly on the hardware and software of a prior Advanced VGS (AVGS), with some additions to enable it to function as a time-of-flight rangefinder (in contradistinction to a triangulation or image-processing rangefinder). It would typically be used at distances of the order of 2 or 3 kilometers, where a typical target would appear in a video image as a single blob, making it possible to extract the direction to the target (but not the orientation of the target or the distance to the target) from a video image of light reflected from the target. As described in several previous NASA Tech Briefs articles, an AVGS system is an optoelectronic system that provides guidance for automated docking of two vehicles. In the original application, the two vehicles are spacecraft, but the basic principles of design and operation of the system are applicable to aircraft, robots, objects maneuvered by cranes, or other objects that may be required to be aligned and brought together automatically or under remote control. In a prior AVGS system of the type upon which the now-proposed VGS is largely based, the tracked vehicle is equipped with one or more passive targets that reflect light from one or more continuous-wave laser diode(s) on the tracking vehicle, a video camera on the tracking vehicle acquires images of the targets in the reflected laser light, the video images are digitized, and the image data are processed to obtain the direction to the target. The design concept of the proposed VGS does not call for any memory or processor hardware beyond that already present in the prior AVGS, but does call for some additional hardware and some additional software. It also calls for assignment of some additional tasks to two subsystems that are parts of the prior VGS: a field-programmable gate array (FPGA) that generates timing and control signals, and a digital signal processor (DSP) that processes the digitized video images. The

  5. Analysis of Trap Distribution Using Time-of-Flight Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohno, Akira; Hanna, Jun-ichi; Dunlap, David H.

    2008-02-01

    A new analytical method for determining trap distribution from a transient photocurrent in time-of-flight (TOF) measurements has been proposed in the context of convection diffusion equation with multiple-trapping and detrapping processes. The method does not need, in principle, data on temperature dependence and any initial assumption about the form of trap distribution. A trap distribution is directly extracted from time profiles of transient photocurrents on assuming the Einstein relation between mobility and diffusion constant. To demonstrate the validity of the method, we first applied photocurrents that were prepared in advance by random walk simulation for some typical trap distributions assumed. Then, we attempt to determine a trap distribution for a particular mesophase of a liquid crystal of phenylnaphthalene derivative, for which the temperature dependence of carrier transport properties is hardly available. Indeed, we have obtained an extrinsic shallow trap distribution at about 200 meV in depth together with a tail-shaped Gaussian-type density-of-states distribution. Thus, we conclude that the method may be a powerful tool to analyze a trap distribution for a system that exhibits temperature-sensitive conformational changes and/or whose carrier transport properties are not available as a function of temperature.

  6. Laser Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry for Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brinckerhoff, W. B.; Managadze, G. G.; McEntire, R. W.; Cheng, A. F.; Green, W. J.

    2000-01-01

    A miniature reflection time-of-flight mass spectrometer for in situ planetary surface analysis is described. The laser ablation mass spectrometer (LAMS) measures the regolith's elemental and isotopic composition without high-voltage source extraction or sample preparation. The compact size (< 2 x 10(exp 3) cubic cm) and low mass (approximately 2 kg) of LAMS, due to its fully coaxial design and two-stage reflectron, fall within the strict resource limitations of landed science missions to solar system bodies. A short-pulse laser focused to a spot with a diameter approximately 30-50 micrometers is used to obtain microscopic surface samples. Assisted by a microimager, LAMS can interactively select and analyze a range of compositional regions (with lateral motion) and with repeated pulses can access unweathered, subsurface materials. The mass resolution is calibrated to distinguish isotopic peaks at unit masses, and detection limits are on resolved to a few ppm. The design and calibration method of a prototype LAMS device is described, which include the development of preliminary relative sensitivity coefficients for major element bulk abundance measurements.

  7. Positron Emission Tomography (PET): Towards Time of Flight

    SciTech Connect

    Karp, Joel

    2004-09-29

    PET is a powerful imaging tool that is being used to study cancer, using a variety of tracers to measure physiological processes including glucose metabolism, cell proliferation, and hypoxia in tumor cells. As the utilization of PET has grown in the last several years, it has become clear that improved lesion detection and quantification are critical goals for cancer studies. Although physical performance of the current generation of PET scanners has improved recently, there are limitations especially for heavy patients where attenuation and scatter effects are increased. We are investigating new scintillation detectors, scanner designs, and image processing algorithms in order to overcome these limitations and improve performance. In particular, we are studying scanner designs that would incorporate scintillators with improved energy and timing resolution. Improved energy resolution helps to reduce scattered radiation, and improved timing resolution makes it feasible to incorporate the time-of-flight information between the two coincident gamma rays into the image reconstruction algorithm, a technique that improves signal-to-noise. Results of recent experiments and computer simulations will be shown to demonstrate these potential improvements.

  8. The high-resolution time-of-flight spectrometer TOFTOF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unruh, Tobias; Neuhaus, Jürgen; Petry, Winfried

    2007-10-01

    The TOFTOF spectrometer is a multi-disc chopper time-of-flight spectrometer for cold neutrons at the research neutron source Heinz Maier-Leibnitz (FRM II). After five reactor cycles of routine operation the characteristics of the instrument are reported in this article. The spectrometer features an excellent signal to background ratio due to its remote position in the neutron guide hall, an elaborated shielding concept and an s-shaped curved primary neutron guide which acts i.a. as a neutron velocity filter. The spectrometer is fed with neutrons from the undermoderated cold neutron source of the FRM II leading to a total neutron flux of ˜1010n/cm2/s in the continuous white beam at the sample position distributed over a continuous and particularly broad wavelength spectrum. A high energy resolution is achieved by the use of high speed chopper discs made of carbon-fiber-reinforced plastic. In the combination of intensity, resolution and signal to background ratio the spectrometer offers new scientific prospects in the fields of inelastic and quasielastic neutron scattering.

  9. Performance of the Tachyon Time-of-Flight PET Camera

    DOE PAGES

    Peng, Q.; Choong, W. -S.; Vu, C.; Huber, J. S.; Janecek, M.; Wilson, D.; Huesman, R. H.; Qi, Jinyi; Zhou, Jian; Moses, W. W.

    2015-01-23

    We have constructed and characterized a time-of-flight Positron Emission Tomography (TOF PET) camera called the Tachyon. The Tachyon is a single-ring Lutetium Oxyorthosilicate (LSO) based camera designed to obtain significantly better timing resolution than the ~ 550 ps found in present commercial TOF cameras, in order to quantify the benefit of improved TOF resolution for clinically relevant tasks. The Tachyon's detector module is optimized for timing by coupling the 6.15 ×25 mm2 side of 6.15 ×6.15 ×25 mm3 LSO scintillator crystals onto a 1-inch diameter Hamamatsu R-9800 PMT with a super-bialkali photocathode. We characterized the camera according to the NEMAmore » NU 2-2012 standard, measuring the energy resolution, timing resolution, spatial resolution, noise equivalent count rates and sensitivity. The Tachyon achieved a coincidence timing resolution of 314 ps +/- 20 ps FWHM over all crystal-crystal combinations. Experiments were performed with the NEMA body phantom to assess the imaging performance improvement over non-TOF PET. We find that the results show that at a matched contrast, incorporating 314 ps TOF reduces the standard deviation of the contrast by a factor of about 2.3.« less

  10. Performance of the Tachyon Time-of-Flight PET Camera

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, Q.; Choong, W. -S.; Vu, C.; Huber, J. S.; Janecek, M.; Wilson, D.; Huesman, R. H.; Qi, Jinyi; Zhou, Jian; Moses, W. W.

    2015-01-23

    We have constructed and characterized a time-of-flight Positron Emission Tomography (TOF PET) camera called the Tachyon. The Tachyon is a single-ring Lutetium Oxyorthosilicate (LSO) based camera designed to obtain significantly better timing resolution than the ~ 550 ps found in present commercial TOF cameras, in order to quantify the benefit of improved TOF resolution for clinically relevant tasks. The Tachyon's detector module is optimized for timing by coupling the 6.15 ×25 mm2 side of 6.15 ×6.15 ×25 mm3 LSO scintillator crystals onto a 1-inch diameter Hamamatsu R-9800 PMT with a super-bialkali photocathode. We characterized the camera according to the NEMA NU 2-2012 standard, measuring the energy resolution, timing resolution, spatial resolution, noise equivalent count rates and sensitivity. The Tachyon achieved a coincidence timing resolution of 314 ps +/- 20 ps FWHM over all crystal-crystal combinations. Experiments were performed with the NEMA body phantom to assess the imaging performance improvement over non-TOF PET. We find that the results show that at a matched contrast, incorporating 314 ps TOF reduces the standard deviation of the contrast by a factor of about 2.3.

  11. Performance of the Tachyon Time-of-Flight PET Camera

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Q.; Choong, W.-S.; Vu, C.; Huber, J. S.; Janecek, M.; Wilson, D.; Huesman, R. H.; Qi, Jinyi; Zhou, Jian; Moses, W. W.

    2015-01-01

    We have constructed and characterized a time-of-flight Positron Emission Tomography (TOF PET) camera called the Tachyon. The Tachyon is a single-ring Lutetium Oxyorthosilicate (LSO) based camera designed to obtain significantly better timing resolution than the ~ 550 ps found in present commercial TOF cameras, in order to quantify the benefit of improved TOF resolution for clinically relevant tasks. The Tachyon’s detector module is optimized for timing by coupling the 6.15 × 25 mm2 side of 6.15 × 6.15 × 25 mm3 LSO scintillator crystals onto a 1-inch diameter Hamamatsu R-9800 PMT with a super-bialkali photocathode. We characterized the camera according to the NEMA NU 2-2012 standard, measuring the energy resolution, timing resolution, spatial resolution, noise equivalent count rates and sensitivity. The Tachyon achieved a coincidence timing resolution of 314 ps +/− ps FWHM over all crystal-crystal combinations. Experiments were performed with the NEMA body phantom to assess the imaging performance improvement over non-TOF PET. The results show that at a matched contrast, incorporating 314 ps TOF reduces the standard deviation of the contrast by a factor of about 2.3. PMID:26594057

  12. Fourier rebinning and consistency equations for time-of-flight PET planograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yusheng; Defrise, Michel; Matej, Samuel; Metzler, Scott D.

    2016-09-01

    Due to the unique geometry, dual-panel PET scanners have many advantages in dedicated breast imaging and on-board imaging applications since the compact scanners can be combined with other imaging and treatment modalities. The major challenges of dual-panel PET imaging are the limited-angle problem and data truncation, which can cause artifacts due to incomplete data sampling. The time-of-flight (TOF) information can be a promising solution to reduce these artifacts. The TOF planogram is the native data format for dual-panel TOF PET scanners, and the non-TOF planogram is the 3D extension of linogram. The TOF planograms is five-dimensional while the objects are three-dimensional, and there are two degrees of redundancy. In this paper, we derive consistency equations and Fourier-based rebinning algorithms to provide a complete understanding of the rich structure of the fully 3D TOF planograms. We first derive two consistency equations and John’s equation for 3D TOF planograms. By taking the Fourier transforms, we obtain two Fourier consistency equations (FCEs) and the Fourier–John equation (FJE), which are the duals of the consistency equations and John’s equation, respectively. We then solve the FCEs and FJE using the method of characteristics. The two degrees of entangled redundancy of the 3D TOF data can be explicitly elicited and exploited by the solutions along the characteristic curves. As the special cases of the general solutions, we obtain Fourier rebinning and consistency equations (FORCEs), and thus we obtain a complete scheme to convert among different types of PET planograms: 3D TOF, 3D non-TOF, 2D TOF and 2D non-TOF planograms. The FORCEs can be used as Fourier-based rebinning algorithms for TOF-PET data reduction, inverse rebinnings for designing fast projectors, or consistency conditions for estimating missing data. As a byproduct, we show the two consistency equations are necessary and sufficient for 3D TOF planograms. Finally, we give

  13. Fourier rebinning and consistency equations for time-of-flight PET planograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yusheng; Defrise, Michel; Matej, Samuel; Metzler, Scott D.

    2016-09-01

    Due to the unique geometry, dual-panel PET scanners have many advantages in dedicated breast imaging and on-board imaging applications since the compact scanners can be combined with other imaging and treatment modalities. The major challenges of dual-panel PET imaging are the limited-angle problem and data truncation, which can cause artifacts due to incomplete data sampling. The time-of-flight (TOF) information can be a promising solution to reduce these artifacts. The TOF planogram is the native data format for dual-panel TOF PET scanners, and the non-TOF planogram is the 3D extension of linogram. The TOF planograms is five-dimensional while the objects are three-dimensional, and there are two degrees of redundancy. In this paper, we derive consistency equations and Fourier-based rebinning algorithms to provide a complete understanding of the rich structure of the fully 3D TOF planograms. We first derive two consistency equations and John’s equation for 3D TOF planograms. By taking the Fourier transforms, we obtain two Fourier consistency equations (FCEs) and the Fourier-John equation (FJE), which are the duals of the consistency equations and John’s equation, respectively. We then solve the FCEs and FJE using the method of characteristics. The two degrees of entangled redundancy of the 3D TOF data can be explicitly elicited and exploited by the solutions along the characteristic curves. As the special cases of the general solutions, we obtain Fourier rebinning and consistency equations (FORCEs), and thus we obtain a complete scheme to convert among different types of PET planograms: 3D TOF, 3D non-TOF, 2D TOF and 2D non-TOF planograms. The FORCEs can be used as Fourier-based rebinning algorithms for TOF-PET data reduction, inverse rebinnings for designing fast projectors, or consistency conditions for estimating missing data. As a byproduct, we show the two consistency equations are necessary and sufficient for 3D TOF planograms. Finally, we give numerical

  14. Recent developments in time-of-flight PET.

    PubMed

    Vandenberghe, S; Mikhaylova, E; D'Hoe, E; Mollet, P; Karp, J S

    2016-12-01

    While the first time-of-flight (TOF)-positron emission tomography (PET) systems were already built in the early 1980s, limited clinical studies were acquired on these scanners. PET was still a research tool, and the available TOF-PET systems were experimental. Due to a combination of low stopping power and limited spatial resolution (caused by limited light output of the scintillators), these systems could not compete with bismuth germanate (BGO)-based PET scanners. Developments on TOF system were limited for about a decade but started again around 2000. The combination of fast photomultipliers, scintillators with high density, modern electronics, and faster computing power for image reconstruction have made it possible to introduce this principle in clinical TOF-PET systems. This paper reviews recent developments in system design, image reconstruction, corrections, and the potential in new applications for TOF-PET. After explaining the basic principles of time-of-flight, the difficulties in detector technology and electronics to obtain a good and stable timing resolution are shortly explained. The available clinical systems and prototypes under development are described in detail. The development of this type of PET scanner also requires modified image reconstruction with accurate modeling and correction methods. The additional dimension introduced by the time difference motivates a shift from sinogram- to listmode-based reconstruction. This reconstruction is however rather slow and therefore rebinning techniques specific for TOF data have been proposed. The main motivation for TOF-PET remains the large potential for image quality improvement and more accurate quantification for a given number of counts. The gain is related to the ratio of object size and spatial extent of the TOF kernel and is therefore particularly relevant for heavy patients, where image quality degrades significantly due to increased attenuation (low counts) and high scatter fractions. The

  15. Time-of-flight PET image reconstruction using origin ensembles.

    PubMed

    Wülker, Christian; Sitek, Arkadiusz; Prevrhal, Sven

    2015-03-01

    The origin ensemble (OE) algorithm is a novel statistical method for minimum-mean-square-error (MMSE) reconstruction of emission tomography data. This method allows one to perform reconstruction entirely in the image domain, i.e. without the use of forward and backprojection operations. We have investigated the OE algorithm in the context of list-mode (LM) time-of-flight (TOF) PET reconstruction. In this paper, we provide a general introduction to MMSE reconstruction, and a statistically rigorous derivation of the OE algorithm. We show how to efficiently incorporate TOF information into the reconstruction process, and how to correct for random coincidences and scattered events. To examine the feasibility of LM-TOF MMSE reconstruction with the OE algorithm, we applied MMSE-OE and standard maximum-likelihood expectation-maximization (ML-EM) reconstruction to LM-TOF phantom data with a count number typically registered in clinical PET examinations. We analyzed the convergence behavior of the OE algorithm, and compared reconstruction time and image quality to that of the EM algorithm. In summary, during the reconstruction process, MMSE-OE contrast recovery (CRV) remained approximately the same, while background variability (BV) gradually decreased with an increasing number of OE iterations. The final MMSE-OE images exhibited lower BV and a slightly lower CRV than the corresponding ML-EM images. The reconstruction time of the OE algorithm was approximately 1.3 times longer. At the same time, the OE algorithm can inherently provide a comprehensive statistical characterization of the acquired data. This characterization can be utilized for further data processing, e.g. in kinetic analysis and image registration, making the OE algorithm a promising approach in a variety of applications.

  16. Dynamically Multiplexed Ion Mobility Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Belov, Mikhail E.; Clowers, Brian H.; Prior, David C.; Danielson, William F.; Liyu, Andrei V.; Petritis, Brianne O.; Smith, Richard D.

    2008-08-01

    Ion Mobility Spectrometry–Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (IMS-TOFMS) has been increasingly used in analysis of complex biological samples. A major challenge is to transform IMS-TOFMS to a high-sensitivity high-throughput platform for e.g. proteomics applications. In this work, we have developed and integrated three advanced technologies, enabling (1) efficient ion accumulation in the ion funnel trap prior to IMS separation, (2) multiplexing (MP) of ion packet introduction into the IMS drift tube and (3) signal detection with an analog-to-digital converter (ADC), into the IMS-TOFMS system for the high-throughput analysis of highly complex proteolytic digests of e.g. blood plasma. To better address variable sample complexity, we have additionally developed and rigorously evaluated a new dynamic MP approach that ensures correlation of the analyzer performance with an ion source function, and provides the improved dynamic range and sensitivity. The MP IMS-TOF MS instrument has been shown to reliably detect peptides at a concentration of 1 nM in a highly complex matrix, as well as to provide a four orders of magnitude dynamic range and a mass measurement accuracy of better than 5 ppm. When matched against human blood plasma database, the detected IMS-TOF features yielded ~ 700 unique peptide identifications at a false discovery rate (FDR) of ~ 7.5 %. Accounting for IMS information gave rise to a projected FDR of ~ 4 %. Signal reproducibility was found to be greater than 80 %, while the variations in the number of unique peptide identifications were < 15 %. A single sample analysis was completed in 15 min, corresponding to approximately an order of magnitude improvement compared to a more conventional LC-MS approach.

  17. LVGEMS Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry on Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herrero, Federico

    2013-01-01

    NASA fs investigations of the upper atmosphere and ionosphere require measurements of composition of the neutral air and ions. NASA is able to undertake these observations, but the instruments currently in use have their limitations. NASA has extended the scope of its research in the atmosphere and now requires more measurements covering more of the atmosphere. Out of this need, NASA developed multipoint measurements using miniaturized satellites, also called nanosatellites (e.g., CubeSats), that require a new generation of spectrometers that can fit into a 4 4 in. (.10 10 cm) cross-section in the upgraded satellites. Overall, the new mass spectrometer required for the new depth of atmospheric research must fulfill a new level of low-voltage/low-power requirements, smaller size, and less risk of magnetic contamination. The Low-Voltage Gated Electrostatic Mass Spectrometer (LVGEMS) was developed to fulfill these requirements. The LVGEMS offers a new spectrometer that eliminates magnetic field issues associated with magnetic sector mass spectrometers, reduces power, and is about 1/10 the size of previous instruments. LVGEMS employs the time of flight (TOF) technique in the GEMS mass spectrometer previously developed. However, like any TOF mass spectrometer, GEMS requires a rectangular waveform of large voltage amplitude, exceeding 100 V -- that means that the voltage applied to one of the GEMS electrodes has to change from 0 to 100 V in a time of only a few nanoseconds. Such electronic speed requires more power than can be provided in a CubeSat. In the LVGEMS, the amplitude of the rectangular waveform is reduced to about 1 V, compatible with digital electronics supplies and requiring little power.

  18. Sensors for Using Times of Flight to Measure Flow Velocities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fralick, Gutave; Wrbanek, John D.; Hwang, Danny; Turso, James

    2006-01-01

    Thin-film sensors for measuring flow velocities in terms of times of flight are undergoing development. These sensors are very small and can be mounted flush with surfaces of airfoils, ducts, and other objects along which one might need to measure flows. Alternatively or in addition, these sensors can be mounted on small struts protruding from such surfaces for acquiring velocity measurements at various distances from the surfaces for the purpose of obtaining boundary-layer flow-velocity profiles. These sensors are related to, but not the same as, hot-wire anemometers. Each sensor includes a thin-film, electrically conductive loop, along which an electric current is made to flow to heat the loop to a temperature above that of the surrounding fluid. Instantaneous voltage fluctuations in segments of the loop are measured by means of electrical taps placed at intervals along the loop. These voltage fluctuations are caused by local fluctuations in electrical resistance that are, in turn, caused by local temperature fluctuations that are, in turn, caused by fluctuations in flow-induced cooling and, hence, in flow velocity. The differential voltage as a function of time, measured at each pair of taps, is subjected to cross-correlation processing with the corresponding quantities measured at other pairs of taps at different locations on the loop. The cross-correlations yield the times taken by elements of fluid to travel between the pairs of taps. Then the component of velocity along the line between any two pairs of taps is calculated simply as the distance between the pairs of taps divided by the travel time. Unlike in the case of hot-wire anemometers, there is no need to obtain calibration data on voltage fluctuations versus velocity fluctuations because, at least in principle, the correlation times are independent of the calibration data.

  19. Detection performance analysis for time-of-flight PET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Nannan; Huesman, Ronald H.; Moses, William W.; Qi, Jinyi

    2010-11-01

    In this paper, we investigate the performance of time-of-flight (TOF) positron emission tomography (PET) in improving lesion detectability. We present a theoretical approach to compare lesion detectability of TOF versus non-TOF systems and perform computer simulations to validate the theoretical prediction. A single-ring TOF PET tomograph is simulated using SimSET software, and images are reconstructed in 2D from list-mode data using a maximum a posteriori method. We use a channelized Hotelling observer to assess the detection performance. Both the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) and localization ROC curves are compared for the TOF and non-TOF PET systems. We first studied the SNR gains for TOF PET with different scatter and random fractions, system timing resolutions and object sizes. We found that the TOF information improves the lesion detectability and the improvement is greater with larger fractions of randoms, better timing resolution and bigger objects. The scatters by themselves have little impact on the SNR gain after correction. Since the true system timing resolution may not be known precisely in practice, we investigated the effect of mismatched timing kernels and showed that using a mismatched kernel during reconstruction always degrades the detection performance, no matter whether it is narrower or wider than the real value. Using the proposed theoretical framework, we also studied the effect of lumpy backgrounds on the detection performance. Our results indicated that with lumpy backgrounds, the TOF PET still outperforms the non-TOF PET, but the improvement is smaller compared with the uniform background case. More specifically, with the same correlation length, the SNR gain reduces with bigger number of lumpy patches and greater lumpy amplitudes. With the same variance, the SNR gain reaches the minimum when the width of the Gaussian lumps is close to the size of the tumor.

  20. Electronics for a Picosecond Time-of-flight Measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Brandt, Andrew Gerhart; Rijssenbeek, Michael

    2014-11-03

    TITLE: Electronics for a Picosecond Time-of-flight Measurement ABSTRACT: Time-of-flight (TOF) detectors have historically been used as part of the particle identification capability of multi-purpose particle physics detectors. An accurate time measurement, combined with a momentum measurement based on the curvature of the track in a magnetic field, is often sufficient to determine the particle's mass, and thus its identity. Such detectors typically have measured the particle flight time extremely precisely, with an uncertainty of one hundred trillionths of a second (also referred to as 100 picoseconds). To put this in perspective it would be like counting all the people on the Earth and getting it right within 1 person! Another use of TOFs is to measure the vertex of the event, which is the location along the beam line where the incoming particles (typically protons) collide. This vertex positon is a well measured quantity for events where the protons collide “head on” as the outgoing particles produced when you blast the proton apart can be used to trace back to a vertex point from which they originated. More frequently the protons just strike a glancing blow and remain intact—in this case they are nearly parallel to the beam and you cannot tell their vertex without this ability to precisely measure the time of flight of the protons. Occasionally both happen in the same event, that is, a central system and two protons are produced. But are they from the same collision, or just a boring background where more than one collision in the same bunch crossing conspire to fake the signal of interest? That’s where the timing of the protons comes into play. The main idea is to measure the time it takes for the two protons to reach TOF detectors positioned equidistant from the center of the main detector. If the vertex is displaced to one side than that detector will measure a shorter time while the other side detector will measure a correspondingly longer time

  1. High-speed digitization readout of silicon photomultipliers for time of flight positron emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Ronzhin, A.; Los, S.; Martens, M.; Ramberg, E.; Kim, H.; Chen, C.; Kao, C.; Niessen, K.; Zatserklyaniy, A.; Mazzillo, M.; Carbone, B.; /SGS Thomson, Catania

    2011-02-01

    We report on work to develop a system with about 100 picoseconds (ps) time resolution for time of flight positron emission tomography [TOF-PET]. The chosen photo detectors for the study were Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPM's). This study was based on extensive experience in studying timing properties of SiPM's. The readout of these devices used the commercial high speed digitizer DRS4. We applied different algorithms to get the best time resolution of 155 ps Guassian (sigma) for a LYSO crystal coupled to a SiPM. We consider the work as a first step in building a prototype TOF-PET module. The field of positron-emission-tomography (PET) has been rapidly developing. But there are significant limitations in how well current PET scanners can reconstruct images, related to how fast data can be acquired, how much volume they can image, and the spatial and temporal resolution of the generated photons. Typical modern scanners now include multiple rings of detectors, which can image a large volume of the patient. In this type of scanner, one can treat each ring as a separate detector and require coincidences only within the ring, or treat the entire region viewed by the scanner as a single 3 dimensional volume. This 3d technique has significantly better sensitivity since more photon pair trajectories are accepted. However, the scattering of photons within the volume of the patient, and the effect of random coincidences limits the technique. The advent of sub-nanosecond timing resolution detectors means that there is potentially much better rejection of scattered photon events and random coincidence events in the 3D technique. In addition, if the timing is good enough, then the origin of photons pairs can be determined better, resulting in improved spatial resolution - so called 'Time-of-Flight' PET, or TOF-PET. Currently a lot of activity has occurred in applications of SiPMs for TOF-PET. This is due to the devices very good time resolution, low profile, lack of high voltage

  2. Exact and Approximate Fourier Rebinning of PET Data from Time-of-Flight to Non Time-of-Flight

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Sanghee; Ahn, Sangtae; Li, Quanzheng; Leahy, Richard M.

    2015-01-01

    The image reconstruction problem for fully 3D TOF PET is challenging because of the large data sizes involved. One approach to this problem is to first rebin the data into one of the following lower dimensional formats: 2D TOF, 3D non TOF, or 2D non TOF. Here we present a unified framework based on a generalized projection slice theorem for TOF data that can be used to compute each of these mappings. We use this framework to develop approaches for rebinning into non TOF formats without significant loss of information. We first derive the exact mappings and then describe approximations which address the missing data problem for oblique sinograms. We evaluate the performance of approximate rebinning using Monte Carlo simulations. Our results show that rebinning into non TOF sinograms retains significant SNR advantages over sinograms collected without TOF information. PMID:19124956

  3. Improved Cerebral Time-of-Flight Magnetic Resonance Angiography at 7 Tesla – Feasibility Study and Preliminary Results Using Optimized Venous Saturation Pulses

    PubMed Central

    Wrede, Karsten H.; Johst, Sören; Dammann, Philipp; Özkan, Neriman; Mönninghoff, Christoph; Kraemer, Markus; Maderwald, Stefan; Ladd, Mark E.; Sure, Ulrich; Umutlu, Lale; Schlamann, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Conventional saturation pulses cannot be used for 7 Tesla ultra-high-resolution time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography (TOF MRA) due to specific absorption rate (SAR) limitations. We overcome these limitations by utilizing low flip angle, variable rate selective excitation (VERSE) algorithm saturation pulses. Material and Methods Twenty-five neurosurgical patients (male n = 8, female n = 17; average age 49.64 years; range 26–70 years) with different intracranial vascular pathologies were enrolled in this trial. All patients were examined with a 7 Tesla (Magnetom 7 T, Siemens) whole body scanner system utilizing a dedicated 32-channel head coil. For venous saturation pulses a 35° flip angle was applied. Two neuroradiologists evaluated the delineation of arterial vessels in the Circle of Willis, delineation of vascular pathologies, presence of artifacts, vessel-tissue contrast and overall image quality of TOF MRA scans in consensus on a five-point scale. Normalized signal intensities in the confluence of venous sinuses, M1 segment of left middle cerebral artery and adjacent gray matter were measured and vessel-tissue contrasts were calculated. Results Ratings for the majority of patients ranged between good and excellent for most of the evaluated features. Venous saturation was sufficient for all cases with minor artifacts in arteriovenous malformations and arteriovenous fistulas. Quantitative signal intensity measurements showed high vessel-tissue contrast for confluence of venous sinuses, M1 segment of left middle cerebral artery and adjacent gray matter. Conclusion The use of novel low flip angle VERSE algorithm pulses for saturation of venous vessels can overcome SAR limitations in 7 Tesla ultra-high-resolution TOF MRA. Our protocol is suitable for clinical application with excellent image quality for delineation of various intracranial vascular pathologies. PMID:25232868

  4. Time-Of-Flight Camera, Optical Tracker and Computed Tomography in Pairwise Data Registration

    PubMed Central

    Badura, Pawel; Juszczyk, Jan; Pietka, Ewa

    2016-01-01

    Purpose A growing number of medical applications, including minimal invasive surgery, depends on multi-modal or multi-sensors data processing. Fast and accurate 3D scene analysis, comprising data registration, seems to be crucial for the development of computer aided diagnosis and therapy. The advancement of surface tracking system based on optical trackers already plays an important role in surgical procedures planning. However, new modalities, like the time-of-flight (ToF) sensors, widely explored in non-medical fields are powerful and have the potential to become a part of computer aided surgery set-up. Connection of different acquisition systems promises to provide a valuable support for operating room procedures. Therefore, the detailed analysis of the accuracy of such multi-sensors positioning systems is needed. Methods We present the system combining pre-operative CT series with intra-operative ToF-sensor and optical tracker point clouds. The methodology contains: optical sensor set-up and the ToF-camera calibration procedures, data pre-processing algorithms, and registration technique. The data pre-processing yields a surface, in case of CT, and point clouds for ToF-sensor and marker-driven optical tracker representation of an object of interest. An applied registration technique is based on Iterative Closest Point algorithm. Results The experiments validate the registration of each pair of modalities/sensors involving phantoms of four various human organs in terms of Hausdorff distance and mean absolute distance metrics. The best surface alignment was obtained for CT and optical tracker combination, whereas the worst for experiments involving ToF-camera. Conclusion The obtained accuracies encourage to further develop the multi-sensors systems. The presented substantive discussion concerning the system limitations and possible improvements mainly related to the depth information produced by the ToF-sensor is useful for computer aided surgery developers

  5. Uterine cirsoid aneurysm: MRI and MRA

    SciTech Connect

    Joja, Ikuo; Asakawa, Mari; Motoyama, Kazumi

    1996-03-01

    Uterine cirsoid aneurysm is uncommon. It is important to make a diagnosis of this disease preoperatively, because repeated curettages may induce life-threatening massive genital bleeding. We present a case of a 51-year-old woman with uterine cirsoid aneurysm in whom MRI and MRA were very useful for the preoperative diagnosis. The radiologic appearances on ultrasonography, CT, conventional SE MRI, MRA, dynamic MRI, and pelvic angiography are presented. Conventional SE T1-weighted and T2-weighted images demonstrated multiple flow voids in the uterus and bilateral adnexal regions. MRA demonstrated a cluster of distinct, tortuous, and coiled vascular channels in the pelvis. MRA could obtain images almost equal to angiography and was considered to be an excellent noninvasive imaging technique for the diagnosis of uterine cirsoid aneurysm. 28 refs., 7 figs

  6. Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA)

    MedlinePlus

    ... this Site RadiologyInfo.org is produced by: Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA) ... time and for your attention! Spotlight Recently posted: Video: Ultrasound-guided Breast Biopsy Video: Breast MRI Video: ...

  7. Ultra-performance liquid chromatography/quadrupole-time-of-flight mass spectrometry analysis of icariside II metabolites in rats.

    PubMed

    Sun, E; Xu, Fengjuan; Qian, Qian; Cui, Li; Tan, Xiaobin; Jia, Xiaobin

    2014-01-01

    The possible metabolic pathways of icariside II were proposed. An ultra-performance liquid chromatography/quadrupole-time-of-flight mass spectrometry method was used for analysing the faecal, bile, plasma and urine samples of rats administrated with icariside II. In all, 27 metabolites were identified in the biosamples. Of these, 20, including F1-F12, D3, D4, D6, D7-D9 and M3, M4, were, to our knowledge, reported for the first time. The results indicated that icariside II was metabolised via desugarisation, dehydrogenation, hydrogenation, hydroxylation, demethylation, glucuronidation, dehydration and glycosylation pathways in vivo. Specific hydrolysis of 7-O glucosides in the gut lumen and glucuronic acid conjugation in the liver were considered as the main physiologic processes of icariside II. This study revealed the possible metabolite profiles of icariside II in rats. PMID:25076022

  8. Visualization of acetaminophen-induced liver injury by time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Murayama, Yohei; Satoh, Shuya; Hashiguchi, Akinori; Yamazaki, Ken; Hashimoto, Hiroyuki; Sakamoto, Michiie

    2015-11-01

    Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (MS) provides secondary ion images that reflect distributions of substances with sub-micrometer spatial resolution. To evaluate the use of time-of-flight secondary ion MS to capture subcellular chemical changes in a tissue specimen, we visualized cellular damage showing a three-zone distribution in mouse liver tissue injured by acetaminophen overdose. First, we selected two types of ion peaks related to the hepatocyte nucleus and cytoplasm using control mouse liver. Acetaminophen-overdosed mouse liver was then classified into three areas using the time-of-flight secondary ion MS image of the two types of peaks, which roughly corresponded to established histopathological features. The ion peaks related to the cytoplasm decreased as the injury became more severe, and their origin was assumed to be mostly glycogen based on comparison with periodic acid-Schiff staining images and reference compound spectra. This indicated that the time-of-flight secondary ion MS image of the acetaminophen-overdosed mouse liver represented the chemical changes mainly corresponding to glycogen depletion on a subcellular scale. In addition, this technique also provided information on lipid species related to the injury. These results suggest that time-of-flight secondary ion MS has potential utility in histopathological applications.

  9. Velocity-space sensitivity of the time-of-flight neutron spectrometer at JET.

    PubMed

    Jacobsen, A S; Salewski, M; Eriksson, J; Ericsson, G; Hjalmarsson, A; Korsholm, S B; Leipold, F; Nielsen, S K; Rasmussen, J; Stejner, M

    2014-11-01

    The velocity-space sensitivities of fast-ion diagnostics are often described by so-called weight functions. Recently, we formulated weight functions showing the velocity-space sensitivity of the often dominant beam-target part of neutron energy spectra. These weight functions for neutron emission spectrometry (NES) are independent of the particular NES diagnostic. Here we apply these NES weight functions to the time-of-flight spectrometer TOFOR at JET. By taking the instrumental response function of TOFOR into account, we calculate time-of-flight NES weight functions that enable us to directly determine the velocity-space sensitivity of a given part of a measured time-of-flight spectrum from TOFOR.

  10. Velocity-space sensitivity of the time-of-flight neutron spectrometer at JET

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobsen, A. S. Salewski, M.; Korsholm, S. B.; Leipold, F.; Nielsen, S. K.; Rasmussen, J.; Stejner, M.; Eriksson, J.; Ericsson, G.; Hjalmarsson, A.

    2014-11-15

    The velocity-space sensitivities of fast-ion diagnostics are often described by so-called weight functions. Recently, we formulated weight functions showing the velocity-space sensitivity of the often dominant beam-target part of neutron energy spectra. These weight functions for neutron emission spectrometry (NES) are independent of the particular NES diagnostic. Here we apply these NES weight functions to the time-of-flight spectrometer TOFOR at JET. By taking the instrumental response function of TOFOR into account, we calculate time-of-flight NES weight functions that enable us to directly determine the velocity-space sensitivity of a given part of a measured time-of-flight spectrum from TOFOR.

  11. The design and commissioning of the MICE upstream time-of-flight system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertoni, R.; Blondel, A.; Bonesini, M.; Cecchet, G.; de Bari, A.; Graulich, J. S.; Karadzhov, Y.; Rayner, M.; Rusinov, I.; Tsenov, R.; Terzo, S.; Verguilov, V.

    2010-03-01

    In the MICE experiment at RAL the upstream time-of-flight detectors are used for particle identification in the incoming muon beam, for the experiment trigger and for a precise timing (σt˜50 ps) with respect to the accelerating RF cavities working at 201 MHz. The construction of the upstream section of the MICE time-of-flight system and the tests done to characterize its individual components are shown. Detector timing resolutions ˜50-60 ps were achieved. Test beam performance and preliminary results obtained with beam at RAL are reported.

  12. Time of flight estimation for breast cancer margin thickness using embedded tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowman, Tyler; El-Shenawee, Magda; Campbell, Lucas

    2016-03-01

    This work aims to enact a quick and reasonable estimation of breast cancer margin thickness using time of flight analysis of embedded breast cancer tissue. A pulsed terahertz system is used to obtain reflection imaging scans from breast cancer tumors that are formalin-fixed and embedded in paraffin blocks. Time of flight analysis is then used to compare the reflection patterns seen within the block to pathology sections and paraffin-embedded sections that are taken throughout the depth of the tumor in order to estimate the three-dimensional boundaries of the tumor.

  13. The dynamic method for time-of-flight measurement of thermal neutron spectra from pulsed sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pepyolyshev, Yu. N.; Chukiyaev, S. V.; Tulaev, A. B.; Bobrakov, V. F.

    1995-02-01

    A time-of-flight method for measurement of thermal neutron spectra in pulsed neutron sources with an efficiency more than 10 5 times higher than the standard method is described. The main problems associated with the electric current technique for time-of-flight spectra measurement are examined. The methodical errors, problems of special neutron detector design and other questions are discussed. Some experimental results for spectra from the surfaces of water and solid methane moderators obtained at the IBR-2 pulsed reactor (Dubna, Russia) are presented.

  14. The ROTAX/DIFF time-of-flight diffractometer at ISIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tietze-Jaensch, H.; Kockelmann, W.; Schmidt, W.; Will, G.

    1997-02-01

    We report on the setup of the ROTAX instrument as a conventional angle-dispersive time-of-flight diffractometer. This utilisation of the instrument not only provides a powerful and very versatile tool for many bread-and-butter applications in crystallographic and magnetic structure determination but also exploits the methods of single-crystal diffraction of quasi-Laue and diffuse scattering. White beam neutron time-of-flight diffraction expands to a very economic way of obtaining pole figures for texture analysis in bulk-material and earth sciences. Generally speaking, an overall gain-factor of 5-10 is practically achieved compared to an equivalent constant wavelength instrument.

  15. Optimisation of the design parameters of a reflection geometry time-of-flight mass spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Sankari, M.; Suryanarayana, M.V.

    1996-12-31

    Optimisation of the design parameters for a reflectron geometry time-of-flight mass spectrometer (RTOFMS) has been done by a simplex optimisation method based on a Nelder-Mead Algorithm. The space and energy resolutions obtained are 6100 and 7400, respectively, for mass 200 amu. The resolution is quite adequate for all the applications of RIMS. A high resolution reflectron geometry time-of-flight mass spectrometer (RTOFMS) for resonance ionisation mass spectrometer (RIMS) is being fabricated, based on these optimised design parameters. 19 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Quantification of the effects of fur, fur color, and velocity on Time-Of-Flight technology in dairy production.

    PubMed

    Salau, Jennifer; Bauer, Ulrike; Haas, Jan H; Thaller, Georg; Harms, Jan; Junge, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    With increasing herd sizes, camera based monitoring solutions rise in importance. 3D cameras, for example Time-Of-Flight (TOF) cameras, measure depth information. These additional information (3D data) could be beneficial for monitoring in dairy production. In previous studies regarding TOF technology, only standing cows were recorded to avoid motion artifacts. Therefore, necessary conditions for a TOF camera application in dairy cows are examined in this study. For this purpose, two cow models with plaster and fur surface, respectively, were recorded at four controlled velocities to quantify the effects of movement, fur color, and fur. Comparison criteria concerning image usability, pixel-wise deviation, and precision in coordinate determination were defined. Fur and fur color showed large effects (η (2)=0.235 and η (2)=0.472, respectively), which became even more considerable when the models were moving. The velocity of recorded animals must therefore be controlled when using TOF cameras. As another main result, body parts which lie in the middle of the cow model's back can be determined neglecting the effect of velocity or fur. With this in mind, further studies may obtain sound results using TOF technology in dairy production.

  17. Quantification of the effects of fur, fur color, and velocity on Time-Of-Flight technology in dairy production.

    PubMed

    Salau, Jennifer; Bauer, Ulrike; Haas, Jan H; Thaller, Georg; Harms, Jan; Junge, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    With increasing herd sizes, camera based monitoring solutions rise in importance. 3D cameras, for example Time-Of-Flight (TOF) cameras, measure depth information. These additional information (3D data) could be beneficial for monitoring in dairy production. In previous studies regarding TOF technology, only standing cows were recorded to avoid motion artifacts. Therefore, necessary conditions for a TOF camera application in dairy cows are examined in this study. For this purpose, two cow models with plaster and fur surface, respectively, were recorded at four controlled velocities to quantify the effects of movement, fur color, and fur. Comparison criteria concerning image usability, pixel-wise deviation, and precision in coordinate determination were defined. Fur and fur color showed large effects (η (2)=0.235 and η (2)=0.472, respectively), which became even more considerable when the models were moving. The velocity of recorded animals must therefore be controlled when using TOF cameras. As another main result, body parts which lie in the middle of the cow model's back can be determined neglecting the effect of velocity or fur. With this in mind, further studies may obtain sound results using TOF technology in dairy production. PMID:25859424

  18. Two-dimensional and three-dimensional dynamic imaging of live biofilms in a microchannel by time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Hua, Xin; Marshall, Matthew J.; Xiong, Yijia; Ma, Xiang; Zhou, Yufan; Tucker, Abigail E.; Zhu, Zihua; Liu, Songqin; Yu, Xiao-Ying

    2015-05-01

    A vacuum compatible microfluidic reactor, SALVI (System for Analysis at the Liquid Vacuum Interface) was employed for in situ chemical imaging of live biofilms using time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS). Depth profiling by sputtering materials in sequential layers resulted in live biofilm spatial chemical mapping. 2D images were reconstructed to report the first 3D images of hydrated biofilm elucidating spatial and chemical heterogeneity. 2D image principal component analysis (PCA) was conducted among biofilms at different locations in the microchannel. Our approach directly visualized spatial and chemical heterogeneity within the living biofilm by dynamic liquid ToF-SIMS.

  19. Time-of-Flight Measurement of the Speed of Sound in Water

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ganci, Salvatore

    2016-01-01

    A simple setup is designed to investigate a "time-of-flight" measurement of the speed of sound in water. This experiment only requires low cost components and is also very simple to understand by students. It could be easily used as a demonstration experiment.

  20. Laser desorption time-of-flight mass spectrometer DNA analyzer. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, C.H.W.; Martin, S.A.

    1997-02-01

    The objective of this project is the development of a laser desorption time-of-flight mass spectrometer DNA analyzer which can be broadly used for biomedical research. Tasks include: pulsed ion extraction to improve resolution; two-component matrices to enhance ionization; and solid phase DNA purification.

  1. Proceedings of the 1986 workshop on advanced time-of-flight neutron powder diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Lawson, A.C.; Smith, K.

    1986-09-01

    This report contains abstracts of talks and summaries of discussions from a small workshop held to discuss the future of time-of-flight neutron powder diffraction and its implementation at the Los Alamos Neutron Scattering Center. 47 refs., 3 figs.

  2. Time-of-Flight Measurement of the Speed of Sound in a Metal Bar

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ganci, Salvatore

    2016-01-01

    A simple setup was designed for a "time-of-flight" measurement of the sound speed in a metal bar. The experiment requires low cost components and is very simple to understand by students. A good use of it is as a demonstration experiment.

  3. Time-of-flight measurement of the speed of sound in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganci, Salvatore

    2016-05-01

    A simple setup is designed to investigate a time-of-flight measurement of the speed of sound in water. This experiment only requires low cost components and is also very simple to understand by students. It could be easily used as a demonstration experiment.

  4. Four-Spot Time-Of-Flight Laser Anemometer For Turbomachinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wernet, Mark P.; Skoch, Gary J.

    1995-01-01

    Two-color, four-spot time-of-flight laser anemometer designed for measuring flow velocity within narrow confines of small centrifugal compressor. Apparatus well suited for measuring fast (typical speeds 160 to 700 m/s), highly turbulent gas flows in turbomachinery. Other potential applications include measurement of gas flows in pipelines and in flows from explosions.

  5. Novel Solid-State Devices as Timing Detectors for Ion Time-of-Flight Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogasawara, K.; Allegrini, F.; Desai, M. I.; Livi, S. A.

    2016-10-01

    This study reports on the performance of Avalanche Photodiode (APD) and Multi-Pixel Photon Counter (MPPC) as timing detectors for ion time-of-flight mass spectroscopy. APDs detect >10 keV ions directly, while MPPCs detect sub-keV secondary electrons.

  6. The time-of-flight system on the Goddard medium energy gamma-ray telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, R. W.; Chesney, J. R.

    1979-01-01

    A scintillation counter time of flight system, incorporated into the Goddard 50 cm by 50 cm spark chamber gamma ray telescope is described. The system, which utilizes constant fractions timing and particle position compensation and digitizes up to 10 ns time differences to six bit accuracy in less than 500 ns is analyzed. The performance of this system during balloon flight is discussed.

  7. Time-of-Flight Experiments in Molecular Motion and Electron-Atom Collision Kinematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donnelly, Denis P.; And Others

    1971-01-01

    Describes a set of experiments for an undergraduate laboratory which demonstrates the relationship between velocity, mass, and temperature in a gas. The experimental method involves time-of-flight measurements on atoms excited to metastable states by electron impact. Effects resulting from recoil in the electron-atom collision can also be…

  8. Sensitivity Upgrades to the Idaho Accelerator Center Neutron Time of Flight Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, S. J.; Kinlaw, M. T.; Harmon, J. F.; Wells, D. P.; Hunt, A. W.

    2007-10-26

    Past experiments have shown that discrimination between between fissionable and non-fissionable materials is possible using an interrogation technique that monitors for high energy prompt fission neutrons. Several recent upgrades have been made to the neutron time of flight spectrometer at the Idaho Accelerator Center with the intent of increasing neutron detection sensitivity, allowing for system use in nonproliferation and security applications.

  9. Identification of Bacteria Using Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kedney, Mollie G.; Strunk, Kevin B.; Giaquinto, Lisa M.; Wagner, Jennifer A.; Pollack, Sidney; Patton, Walter A.

    2007-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS or simply MALDI) has become ubiquitous in the identification and analysis of biomacromolecules. As a technique that allows for the molecular weight determination of otherwise nonvolatile molecules, MALDI has had a profound impact in the molecular…

  10. Imaging objects behind a partially reflective surface with a modified time-of-flight sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geerardyn, D.; Kuijk, M.

    2014-05-01

    Time-of-Flight (ToF) methods are used in different applications for depth measurements. There are mainly 2 types of ToF measurements, Pulsed Time-of-Flight and Continuous-Wave Time-of-Flight. Pulsed Time-of-Flight (PToF) techniques are mostly used in combination with a scanning mirror, which makes them not well suited for imaging purposes. Continuous-wave Time-of-Flight (CWToF) techniques are mostly used wide-field, hence they are much faster and more suited for imaging purposes but cannot be used behind partially-reflective surfaces. In commercial applications, both ToF methods require specific hardware, which cannot be exchanged. In this paper, we discuss the transformation of a CWToF sensor to a PToF camera, which is able to make images and measure the distances of objects behind a partially-reflective surface, like the air-water interface in swimming pools when looking from above. We first created our own depth camera which is suitable for both CWToF and PToF. We describe the necessary hardware components for a normal ToF camera and compare it with the adapted components which make it a range-gating depth imager. Afterwards, we modeled the distances and images of one or more objects positioned behind a partially-reflective surface and combine it with measurement data of the optical pulse. A scene was virtualized and the rays from a raytracing software tool were exported to Matlab™. Subsequently, pulse deformations were calculated for every pixel, which resulted in the calculation of the depth information.

  11. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight/time-of-flight tandem mass spectra of poly(butylene adipate).

    PubMed

    Rizzarelli, Paola; Puglisi, Concetto; Montaudo, Giorgio

    2006-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight/time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS/MS) was employed to analyze four poly(butylene adipate) (PBAd) oligomers and to investigate their fragmentation pathways as a continuation of our work on the MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS/MS study of synthetic polymers. MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS/MS analysis was performed on oligomers terminated by carboxyl and hydroxyl groups, methyl adipate and hydroxyl groups, dihydroxyl groups, and dicarboxyl groups. The sodium adducts of these oligomers were selected as precursor ions. Different end groups do not influence the fragmentation of sodiated polyester oligomers and similar series of product ions were observed in all the MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS/MS spectra. According to the structures of the most abundant product ions identified in the present work, three fragmentation pathways have been proposed to occur most frequently in PBAd: beta-hydrogen-transfer rearrangement, leading to the selective cleavage of the --O--CH(2)-- bonds; --CH(2)--CH(2)-- (beta--beta) bond cleavage in the adipate moiety; and ester bond scission.

  12. Thoracic outlet syndrome in a throwing athlete diagnosed with MRI and MRA.

    PubMed

    Esposito, M D; Arrington, J A; Blackshear, M N; Murtagh, F R; Silbiger, M L

    1997-01-01

    Thoracic outlet syndrome comprises the clinical manifestations in the arm caused by compression of the neurovascular bundle as it leaves the thoracic inlet. The neurovascular bundle is composed of the subclavian artery, the subclavian vein, and the brachial plexus. The symptoms of thoracic outlet or inlet syndrome are most often caused by compression of the nerves of the brachial plexus, which is involved in up to 98% of cases; the remainder are due to vascular compression. MRI with MRA demonstrates well the anatomy of the brachial plexus as well as any vascular compression or occlusion. The relationship of the axillary and subclavian vein to the first rib and subclavius muscle also can be demonstrated. We present a college baseball player who presented with numbness in the fingers of his throwing hand when throwing a baseball. Evaluation with spin-echo and two-dimensional time-of-flight MR angiographic (MRA) imaging of the thoracic outlet region revealed obstruction of the subclavian vein with the arm abducted. To our knowledge, no such cases have been diagnosed previously with MRI.

  13. Near-infrared photon time-of-flight spectroscopy of turbid materials up to 1400 nm.

    PubMed

    Svensson, Tomas; Alerstam, Erik; Khoptyar, Dmitry; Johansson, Jonas; Folestad, Staffan; Andersson-Engels, Stefan

    2009-06-01

    Photon time-of-flight spectroscopy (PTOFS) is a powerful tool for analysis of turbid materials. We have constructed a time-of-flight spectrometer based on a supercontinuum fiber laser, acousto-optical tunable filtering, and an InP/InGaAsP microchannel plate photomultiplier tube. The system is capable of performing PTOFS up to 1400 nm, and thus covers an important region for vibrational spectroscopy of solid samples. The development significantly increases the applicability of PTOFS for analysis of chemical content and physical properties of turbid media. The great value of the proposed approach is illustrated by revealing the distinct absorption features of turbid epoxy resin. Promising future applications of the approach are discussed, including quantitative assessment of pharmaceuticals, powder analysis, and calibration-free near-infrared spectroscopy.

  14. Non-tissue-like features in the time-of-flight distributions of plastic tissue phantoms.

    PubMed

    Nardo, Luca; Brega, Adriano; Bondani, Maria; Andreoni, Alessandra

    2008-05-01

    We measure high-temporal-resolution time-of-flight distributions of picosecond laser pulses in the visible and near-infrared, scattered in the forward direction by solid and liquid phantoms, and compare them to those obtained by using ex vivo tissues. We demonstrate that time-of-flight distributions from solid phantoms made of Delrin, Nylon, and Teflon are modulated by ripples that are absent in the biological samples and disappear when the temporal and/or angular resolution of the measuring apparatus is decreased. This behavior prevents the use of such materials as tissue phantoms when spatial mode and time selection are required, such as in imaging methods exploiting early arriving photons.

  15. Invited article: Characterization of background sources in space-based time-of-flight mass spectrometers.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, J A; Gershman, D J; Gloeckler, G; Lundgren, R A; Zurbuchen, T H; Orlando, T M; McLain, J; von Steiger, R

    2014-09-01

    For instruments that use time-of-flight techniques to measure space plasma, there are common sources of background signals that evidence themselves in the data. The background from these sources may increase the complexity of data analysis and reduce the signal-to-noise response of the instrument, thereby diminishing the science value or usefulness of the data. This paper reviews several sources of background commonly found in time-of-flight mass spectrometers and illustrates their effect in actual data using examples from ACE-SWICS and MESSENGER-FIPS. Sources include penetrating particles and radiation, UV photons, energy straggling and angular scattering, electron stimulated desorption of ions, ion-induced electron emission, accidental coincidence events, and noise signatures from instrument electronics. Data signatures of these sources are shown, as well as mitigation strategies and design considerations for future instruments.

  16. Detection system for high-resolution gamma radiation spectroscopy with neutron time-of-flight filtering

    DOEpatents

    Dioszegi, Istvan; Salwen, Cynthia; Vanier, Peter

    2014-12-30

    A .gamma.-radiation detection system that includes at least one semiconductor detector such as HPGe-Detector, a position-sensitive .alpha.-Detector, a TOF Controller, and a Digitizer/Integrator. The Digitizer/Integrator starts to process the energy signals of a .gamma.-radiation sent from the HPGe-Detector instantly when the HPGe-Detector detects the .gamma.-radiation. Subsequently, it is determined whether a coincidence exists between the .alpha.-particles and .gamma.-radiation signal, based on a determination of the time-of-flight of neutrons obtained from the .alpha.-Detector and the HPGe-Detector. If it is determined that the time-of-flight falls within a predetermined coincidence window, the Digitizer/Integrator is allowed to continue and complete the energy signal processing. If, however, there is no coincidence, the Digitizer/Integrator is instructed to be clear and reset its operation instantly.

  17. Invited Article: Characterization of background sources in space-based time-of-flight mass spectrometers

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, J. A.; Gershman, D. J.; Gloeckler, G.; Lundgren, R. A.; Zurbuchen, T. H.; Orlando, T. M.; McLain, J.; Steiger, R. von

    2014-09-15

    For instruments that use time-of-flight techniques to measure space plasma, there are common sources of background signals that evidence themselves in the data. The background from these sources may increase the complexity of data analysis and reduce the signal-to-noise response of the instrument, thereby diminishing the science value or usefulness of the data. This paper reviews several sources of background commonly found in time-of-flight mass spectrometers and illustrates their effect in actual data using examples from ACE-SWICS and MESSENGER-FIPS. Sources include penetrating particles and radiation, UV photons, energy straggling and angular scattering, electron stimulated desorption of ions, ion-induced electron emission, accidental coincidence events, and noise signatures from instrument electronics. Data signatures of these sources are shown, as well as mitigation strategies and design considerations for future instruments.

  18. The time-of-flight TOFW detector of the HARP experiment: construction and performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldo-Ceolin, M.; Barichello, G.; Bobisut, F.; Bonesini, M.; De Min, A.; Ferri, A. F.; Gibin, D.; Guglielmi, A.; Laveder, M.; Menegolli, A.; Mezzetto, M.; Paganoni, M.; Paleari, F.; Pepato, A.; Tonazzo, A.; Vascon, M.

    2004-10-01

    The construction and performance of a large area scintillator-based time-of-flight detector for the HARP experiment at CERN are reported. An intrinsic counter time resolution of ∼160 ps was achieved. The precision on the time calibration and monitoring of the detector was maintained at better than 100 ps by using dedicated cosmic rays runs, a fast laser-based system and calibrations with beam particles. The detector was operated on the T9 PS beamline during 2001 and 2002. A time-of-flight resolution of ∼200 ps was obtained, providing π/p discrimination at more than 3σ up to 4.0 GeV/c momentum.

  19. Ambient aerosol analysis using aerosol-time-of-flight mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Prather, K.A.; Noble, C.A.; Liu, D.Y.; Silva, P.J.; Fergenson, D.F.

    1996-10-01

    We have recently developed a technique, Aerosol-Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (ATOFMS), which is capable of real-time determination of the aerodynamic size and chemical composition of individual aerosol particles. In order to obtain such information, the techniques of aerodynamic particle sizing and time-of-flight mass spectrometry are combined in a single instrument. ATOFMS is being used for the direct analysis of ambient aerosols with the goal of establishing correlations between particle size and chemical composition. Currently, measurements are being made to establish potential links between the presence of particular types of particles with such factors as the time of day, weather conditions, and concentration levels of gaseous smog components such as NO{sub x} and ozone. This data will be used to help establish a better understanding of tropospheric gas-aerosol processes. This talk will discuss the operating principles of ATOFMS as well as present the results of ambient analysis studies performed in our laboratory.

  20. Digitizing data acquisition and time-of-flight pulse processing for ToF-ERDA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Julin, Jaakko; Sajavaara, Timo

    2016-01-01

    A versatile system to capture and analyze signals from multi channel plate (MCP) based time-of-flight detectors and ionization based energy detectors such as silicon diodes and gas ionization chambers (GIC) is introduced. The system is based on commercial digitizers and custom software. It forms a part of a ToF-ERDA spectrometer, which has to be able to detect recoil atoms of many different species and energies. Compared to the currently used analogue electronics the digitizing system provides comparable time-of-flight resolution and improved hydrogen detection efficiency, while allowing the operation of the spectrometer be studied and optimized after the measurement. The hardware, data acquisition software and digital pulse processing algorithms to suit this application are described in detail.

  1. A compact time-of-flight mass spectrometer for ion source characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, L. Wan, X.; Jin, D. Z.; Tan, X. H.; Huang, Z. X.; Tan, G. B.

    2015-03-15

    A compact time-of-flight mass spectrometer with overall dimension of about 413 × 250 × 414 mm based on orthogonal injection and angle reflection has been developed for ion source characterization. Configuration and principle of the time-of-flight mass spectrometer are introduced in this paper. The mass resolution is optimized to be about 1690 (FWHM), and the ion energy detection range is tested to be between about 3 and 163 eV with the help of electron impact ion source. High mass resolution and compact configuration make this spectrometer useful to provide a valuable diagnostic for ion spectra fundamental research and study the mass to charge composition of plasma with wide range of parameters.

  2. Beam derived trigger system for multibunch time-of-flight measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, J.; Pellegrin, J.L.

    1981-01-01

    Particle time-of-flight measurement requires accurate triggers in synchronism with each bunch, and occurring in a sequence which depends on the position of the observer around the storage ring. A system has been devised for tagging the colliding bunches at each interaction point; it allows one to record which pair of bunches is colliding at any time and any location around the machine. Besides bunch identification, the time-of-flight triggers are also expected to have a time stability better than the bunch length itself. A system is presented here which exhibits time variations of less than 80 psec over a 20 to 1 range of beam current, while the jitter is at least an order of magnitude smaller. 4 refs., 4 figs.

  3. TOF-VIS, software for interactive exploration of time-of-flight data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikkelson, D.; Worlton, T.

    TOF-VIS is a fast, highly interactive program for examining time-of-flight neutron-scattering data. All spectra from an experiment are displayed simultaneously as an image. The data can be displayed in terms of time-of-flight, energy, wave vector, or lattice spacing. TOF-VIS has been used for examining data from IPNS and ISIS, and has been useful for diagnosing problems with instruments and detectors as well as for making a quick evaluation of the quality of the data. Hard copy output to a variety of devices using routines built on PGPLOT is now available. TOF-VIS is portable to VMS and UNIX, and is currently implemented primarily using object-based methods in C, MOTIF and X-windows.

  4. Study of ultrasonic thermometry based on ultrasonic time-of-flight measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Ruixi; Xiong, Qingyu; Wang, Lijie; Wang, Kai; Shen, Xuehua; Liang, Shan; Shi, Xin

    2016-03-01

    Ultrasonic thermometry is a kind of acoustic pyrometry and it has been evolving as a new temperature measurement technology for various environment. However, the accurate measurement of the ultrasonic time-of-flight is the key for ultrasonic thermometry. In this paper, we study the ultrasonic thermometry technique based on ultrasonic time-of-flight measurement with a pair of ultrasonic transducers for transmitting and receiving signal. The ultrasonic transducers are installed in a single path which ultrasonic travels. In order to validate the performance of ultrasonic thermometry, we make a contrast about the absolute error between the measured temperature value and the practical one. With and without heater source, the experimental results indicate ultrasonic thermometry has high precision of temperature measurement.

  5. Comparison between triple quadrupole, time of flight and hybrid quadrupole time of flight analysers coupled to liquid chromatography for the detection of anabolic steroids in doping control analysis.

    PubMed

    Pozo, Oscar J; Van Eenoo, Peter; Deventer, Koen; Elbardissy, Hisham; Grimalt, Susana; Sancho, Juan V; Hernandez, Felix; Ventura, Rosa; Delbeke, Frans T

    2011-01-17

    Triple quadrupole (QqQ), time of flight (TOF) and quadrupole-time of flight (QTOF) analysers have been compared for the detection of anabolic steroids in human urine. Ten anabolic steroids were selected as model compounds based on their ionization and the presence of endogenous interferences. Both qualitative and quantitative analyses were evaluated. QqQ allowed for the detection of all analytes at the minimum required performance limit (MRPL) established by the World Anti-Doping Agency (between 2 and 10 ng mL(-1) in urine). TOF and QTOF approaches were not sensitive enough to detect some of the analytes (3'-hydroxy-stanozolol or the metabolites of boldenone and formebolone) at the established MRPL. Although a suitable accuracy was obtained, the precision was unsatisfactory (RSD typically higher than 20%) for quantitative purposes irrespective of the analyser used. The methods were applied to 30 real samples declared positives either for the misuse of boldenone, stanozolol and/or methandienone. Most of the compounds were detected by every technique, however QqQ was necessary for the detection of some metabolites in a few samples. Finally, the possibility to detect non-target steroids has been explored by the use of TOF and QTOF. The use of this approach revealed that the presence of boldenone and its metabolite in one sample was due to the intake of androsta-1,4,6-triene-3,17-dione. Additionally, the intake of methandienone was confirmed by the post-target detection of a long-term metabolite.

  6. Fully digital data acquisition system for the neutron time-of-flight spectrometer TOFOR at JET

    SciTech Connect

    Skiba, M.; Weiszflog, M.; Hjalmarsson, A.; Ericsson, G.; Hellesen, C.; Conroy, S.; Andersson-Sunden, E.; Eriksson, J.; Binda, F.; Collaboration: JET-EFDA Contributors

    2012-10-15

    A prototype of a fully digital data acquisition system based on 1 Gsps 12 bit digitizers for the TOFOR fusion neutron spectrometer at JET is assessed. The prototype system enables the use of geometry-based background discrimination techniques, which are modeled, evaluated, and compared to experimental data. The experimental results are in line with the models and show a significant improvement in signal-to-background ratio in measured time-of-flight spectrum compared to the existing data acquisition system.

  7. Neutron-induced fission measurements at the time-of-flight facility nELBE

    DOE PAGES

    Kögler, T.; Beyer, R.; Junghans, A. R.; Massarczyk, R.; Schwengner, R.; Wagner, A.

    2015-05-18

    Neutron-induced fission of ²⁴²Pu is studied at the photoneutron source nELBE. The relative fast neutron fission cross section was determined using actinide fission chambers in a time-of-flight experiment. A good agreement of present nuclear data with evalua- tions has been achieved in the range of 100 keV to 10 MeV.

  8. Single-particle correlated time-of-flight velocimeter for remote wind-speed measurement.

    PubMed

    Bartlett, K G; She, C Y

    1977-11-01

    A new technique of single-particle correlation for wind-speed measurement by determining aerosol time of flight is discussed. Using this technique, single-ended remote measurement of atmospheric wind speeds has been demonstrated at ranges up to 100 m under natural aerosol conditions with less than 0.2-W continuous-wave laser power with a measurement time of approximately 1 sec.

  9. Microsphere plate detectors used with a compact Mott polarimeter for time-of-flight studies

    SciTech Connect

    Snell, G.; Viefhaus, J.; Dunning, F. B.; Berrah, N.

    2000-06-01

    A compact retarding-potential Mott polarimeter combined with microsphere plates (MSP) as electron detectors was built to perform spin-resolved time-of-flight electron spectroscopy. The comparison of the performance of MSP and channeltron detectors shows that the MSP detector has a better time resolution but a lower efficiency. The overall time resolution of the system was determined to be 350 ps using synchrotron radiation pulses. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

  10. Parameters’ Covariance in Neutron Time of Flight Analysis – Explicit Formulae

    SciTech Connect

    Odyniec, M.; Blair, J.

    2014-12-01

    We present here a method that estimates the parameters’ variance in a parametric model for neutron time of flight (NToF). The analytical formulae for parameter variances, obtained independently of calculation of parameter values from measured data, express the variances in terms of the choice, settings, and placement of the detector and the oscilloscope. Consequently, the method can serve as a tool in planning a measurement setup.

  11. Semen quality detection using time of flight and acoustic wave sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Newton, M. I.; Evans, C. R.; Simons, J. J.; Hughes, D. C.

    2007-04-09

    The authors report a real-time technique for assessing the number of motile sperm in a semen sample. The time of flight technique uses a flow channel with detection at the end of the channel using quartz crystal microbalances. Data presented suggest that a simple rigid mass model may be used in interpreting the change in resonant frequency using an effective mass for the sperm.

  12. Contactless flow measurement in liquid metal using electromagnetic time-of-flight method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubovikova, Nataliia; Resagk, Christian; Karcher, Christian; Kolesnikov, Yuri

    2016-05-01

    Measuring flow rates of liquid metal flows is of utmost importance in industrial applications such as metal casting, in order to ensure process efficiency and product quality. A non-contact method for flow rate control is described here. The method is known as time-of-flight Lorentz force velocimetry (LFV) and determines flow rate through measurement of Lorentz force that act on magnet systems that are placed close to the flow. In this method, a vortex generator is used to generate an eddy in the flow, with two magnet systems separated by a known distance placed downstream of the vortex generator. Each of the magnet systems has a force sensor attached to them which detects the passing of the eddy through its magnetic field as a significant perturbation in the force signal. The flow rate is estimated from the time span between the perturbations in the two force signals. In this paper, time-of-flight LFV technique is demonstrated experimentally for the case of liquid metal flow in a closed rectangular duct loop that is driven by an electromagnetic pump. A liquid metal alloy of gallium (Ga), indium (In) and tin (Sn)—GaInSn—is used as the working fluid. In contrast to prior works, for the first time, three-dimensional strain gauge force sensors were used for measuring Lorentz force to investigate the effect of flow disturbances in different directions for flow measurements by the time-of-flight LFV method. A prototype time-of-flight LFV flowmeter is developed, the operation of which in laboratory conditions is characterised by different experiments.

  13. The time-of-flight spectrometer with cold neutrons at the FRM-II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zirkel, A.; Roth, S.; Schneider, W.; Neuhaus, J.; Petry, W.

    2000-03-01

    We are presenting a design study of the new cold-time-of-flight spectrometer to be built at the FRM-II. Monte Carlo techniques were used to optimize the flux at the sample position and to calculate the elastic energy resolution. A doubly focusing neutron guide is used to enhance the intensity on the sample. Magnetic bearings and carbon fiber composite disks will give access to very high chopper speeds, thereby considerably increasing the overall performance of the instrument.

  14. Neutron xyz - polarization analysis at a time-of-flight instrument

    SciTech Connect

    Ehlers, Georg; Stewart, John Ross; Andersen, Ken

    2015-01-01

    When implementing a dedicated polarization analysis setup at a neutron time-of-flight instrument with a large area detector, one faces enormous challenges. Nevertheless, significant progress has been made towards this goal over the last few years. This paper addresses systematic limitations of the traditional method that is used to make these measurements, and a possible strategy to overcome these limitations. This will be important, for diffraction as well as inelastic experiments, where the scattering occurs mostly out-of-plane.

  15. Acetazolamide challenge for three-dimensional time-of-flight MR angiography of the brain

    SciTech Connect

    Mandai, Kenji; Sueyoshi, Kenji; Fukunaga, Ryuzo; Nukada, Masaru; Ohtani, Fumio; Araki, Yutaka; Tsukaguchi, Isao; Abe, Hiroshi )

    1994-04-01

    We compared three-dimensional time-of-flight MR angiograms obtained before and after acetazolamide administration to evaluate whether use of this drug could improve visualization of small peripheral intracranial arteries and atherosclerotic stenosis. For evaluation of small peripheral arteries, 10 patients with clinical diagnosis of ischemic cerebrovascular disease and 10 healthy volunteers were investigated, and for evaluation of stenosis, another 6 patients were investigated. Vascular images were obtained by three-dimensional time-of-flight MR angiography. After a baseline scan, 17 mg/kg acetazolamide was injected intravenously and the second scan was performed 20 minutes later. Several small peripheral arteries that had not been seen on the baseline images were visible on the acetazolamide images without any augmentation of the background signals. Stenotic lesions in the main trunks of the major cerebral arteries were detected more clearly on acetazolamide images. Acetazolamide improves visualization of small peripheral intracranial arteries and sensitivity in detecting atherosclerotic stenosis in the main trunk of major cerebral artery by three-dimensional time-of-flight MR angiography without changing MR apparatus and software. 15 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Accurate time-of-flight measurement of particle based on ECL-TTL Timer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Deping; Liu, Jianguo; Huang, Shuhua; Gui, Huaqiao; Cheng, Yin; Wang, Jie; Lu, Yihuai

    2014-11-01

    Because of its aerodynamic diameter of the aerosol particles are stranded in different parts of different human respiratory system, thus affecting human health. Therefore, how to continue to effectively monitor the aerosol particles become increasingly concerned about. Use flight time of aerosol particle beam spectroscopy of atmospheric aerosol particle size distribution is the typical method for monitoring atmospheric aerosol particle size and particle concentration measurement , and it is the key point to accurate measurement of aerosol particle size spectra that measurement of aerosol particle flight time. In order to achieve accurate measurements of aerosol particles in time-of-flight, this paper design an ECL-TTL high-speed timer with ECL counter and TTL counter. The high-speed timer includes a clock generation, high-speed timer and the control module. Clock Generation Module using a crystal plus multiplier design ideas, take advantage of the stability of the crystal to provide a stable 500MHz clock signal is high counter. High count module design using ECL and TTL counter mix design, timing accuracy while effectively maintaining , expanding the timing range, and simplifies circuit design . High-speed counter control module controls high-speed counter start, stop and reset timely based on aerosol particles time-of-flight, is a key part of the high-speed counting. The high-speed counting resolution of 4ns, the full scale of 4096ns, has been successfully applied Aerodynamic Particle Sizer, to meet the precise measurement of aerosol particles time-of-flight.

  17. Advanced 3D imaging lidar concepts for long range sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, K. J.; Hiskett, P. A.; Lamb, R. A.

    2014-06-01

    Recent developments in 3D imaging lidar are presented. Long range 3D imaging using photon counting is now a possibility, offering a low-cost approach to integrated remote sensing with step changing advantages in size, weight and power compared to conventional analogue active imaging technology. We report results using a Geiger-mode array for time-of-flight, single photon counting lidar for depth profiling and determination of the shape and size of tree canopies and distributed surface reflections at a range of 9km, with 4μJ pulses with a frame rate of 100kHz using a low-cost fibre laser operating at a wavelength of λ=1.5 μm. The range resolution is less than 4cm providing very high depth resolution for target identification. This specification opens up several additional functionalities for advanced lidar, for example: absolute rangefinding and depth profiling for long range identification, optical communications, turbulence sensing and time-of-flight spectroscopy. Future concepts for 3D time-of-flight polarimetric and multispectral imaging lidar, with optical communications in a single integrated system are also proposed.

  18. Europeana and 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pletinckx, D.

    2011-09-01

    The current 3D hype creates a lot of interest in 3D. People go to 3D movies, but are we ready to use 3D in our homes, in our offices, in our communication? Are we ready to deliver real 3D to a general public and use interactive 3D in a meaningful way to enjoy, learn, communicate? The CARARE project is realising this for the moment in the domain of monuments and archaeology, so that real 3D of archaeological sites and European monuments will be available to the general public by 2012. There are several aspects to this endeavour. First of all is the technical aspect of flawlessly delivering 3D content over all platforms and operating systems, without installing software. We have currently a working solution in PDF, but HTML5 will probably be the future. Secondly, there is still little knowledge on how to create 3D learning objects, 3D tourist information or 3D scholarly communication. We are still in a prototype phase when it comes to integrate 3D objects in physical or virtual museums. Nevertheless, Europeana has a tremendous potential as a multi-facetted virtual museum. Finally, 3D has a large potential to act as a hub of information, linking to related 2D imagery, texts, video, sound. We describe how to create such rich, explorable 3D objects that can be used intuitively by the generic Europeana user and what metadata is needed to support the semantic linking.

  19. Kinetic energy analysis in time of flight mass spectrometry: application of time of flight methods to clusters and pyrolysis studies in supersonic expansions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riley, John S.; Baer, Tomas

    1994-02-01

    A new experimental technique, based on high resolution time of flight analysis of ions in a molecular beam, is described with the use of several examples. Although the approach used here is based on threshold photoelectron photoion coincidence (TPEPICO), the technique can also be used with pulsed laser photoionization, albeit without the benefit of ion energy selection. The approach is based on the fact that the TOF distribution of parent ions formed from cold neutral molecules are narrow, while product ion TOF distributions are broad due to kinetic energy release. This distinction permits differentiating cluster ions formed by "simple" ionization of the corresponding neutral clusters from similar mass cluster ions formed by dissociative ionization. Results so far obtained indicate that most clusters ionize, even at threshold, via dissociative ionization. The technique is also suitable for obtaining the threshold photoelectron spectra (TPES) of mass selected cold species in the presence of a mixture of warm and cold species as might be encountered in a pyrolysis experiment.

  20. Tandem time-of-flight mass spectrometer for cluster--surface scattering experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Beck, R.D.; Weis, P.; Braeuchle, G.; Rockenberger, J.

    1995-08-01

    A new tandem time-of-flight mass spectrometer is described which is designed to study the mass-, velocity-, and angle-resolved scattering of cluster ions from solid surfaces. Clusters are produced in a supersonic jet laser desorption/vaporization source, ionized either directly in the formation step or by subsequent photoionization of neutrals, mass selected in a primary time-of-flight region, and decelerated to the impact energy (50--1000 eV) close to the target surface. Cluster--surface collisions take place in a field-free region in order to determine both velocity and angular distributions of the scattered clusters and fragments with an independently pulsed, rotatable secondary time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Several surface targets can be mounted in the UHV scattering chamber (10{sup {minus}10} Torr base pressure) on a five-axis manipulator which, together with the rotatable secondary TOF, allows for independent variation of incident and scattering angles. Target surfaces can be cleaned by direct current heating and sputtering with an argon-ion gun. Surface structure and composition are assessed by low-energy electron diffraction (LEED) and Auger spectroscopy with a four grid reverse view LEED/Auger system. Surface collision experiments of fullerenes (C{sup +}{sub 60}, C{sup +}{sub 70}, C{sup +}{sub 76}, C{sup +}{sub 84}, ...) and metallofullerenes (La{at}C{sup +}{sub 82}) with highly oriented pyrolitic graphite (HOPG) surfaces are described as examples for the performance of the instrument. Effects of surface contamination in the scattering of fullerenes from HOPG are described to demonstrate the need for thorough cleaning procedures in order to obtain reproducible results. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  1. Quasi-dynamic mode of nanomembranes for time-of-flight mass spectrometry of proteins.

    PubMed

    Park, Jonghoo; Kim, Hyunseok; Blick, Robert H

    2012-04-21

    Mechanical resonators realized on the nano-scale by now offer applications in mass-sensing of biomolecules with extraordinary sensitivity. The general idea is that perfect mechanical biosensors should be of extremely small size to achieve zeptogram sensitivity in weighing single molecules similar to a balance. However, the small scale and long response time of weighing biomolecules with a cantilever restrict their usefulness as a high-throughput method. Commercial mass spectrometry (MS) such as electro-spray ionization (ESI)-MS and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI)-time of flight (TOF)-MS are the gold standards to which nanomechanical resonators have to live up to. These two methods rely on the ionization and acceleration of biomolecules and the following ion detection after a mass selection step, such as time-of-flight (TOF). Hence, the spectrum is typically represented in m/z, i.e. the mass to ionization charge ratio. Here, we describe the feasibility and mass range of detection of a new mechanical approach for ion detection in time-of-flight mass spectrometry, the principle of which is that the impinging ion packets excite mechanical oscillations in a silicon nitride nanomembrane. These mechanical oscillations are henceforth detected via field emission of electrons from the nanomembrane. Ion detection is demonstrated in MALDI-TOF analysis over a broad range with angiotensin, bovine serum albumin (BSA), and an equimolar protein mixture of insulin, BSA, and immunoglobulin G (IgG). We find an unprecedented mass range of operation of the nanomembrane detector. PMID:22378023

  2. Effect of electron beam pulse width on time-of-flight spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Misakian, M.; Mumma, M. J.

    1974-01-01

    A simple but useful formula describing the effect of electron gun pulse width on the time of flight (TOF) spectra measured in translational spectroscopy experiments is developed. An approximately monoenergetic pulsed electrostatically focused electron beam traverses a scattering cell filled with a Maxwellian gas. Inelastic electron collisions with the gas produce metastable particles, ions, scattered electrons, and photons which then pass through a collimating slit system at right angles to the electron beam. TOF techniques are used to separate the photon signal from the metastable particle signal and to measure the TOF distribution of the metastable species.

  3. Time of flight measurement of speed of sound in air with a computer sound card

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aljalal, Abdulaziz

    2014-11-01

    A computer sound card and freely available audio editing software are used to measure accurately the speed of sound in air using the time-of-flight method. In addition to speed of sound measurement, inversion behaviour upon reflection from an open and closed end of a pipe is demonstrated. Also, it is demonstrated that the reflection at an open end of a pipe occurs slightly outside the pipe. The equipment needed is readily available to any student with access to a microphone, loudspeaker and computer.

  4. Calibration of time of flight detectors using laser-driven neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Mirfayzi, S. R.; Kar, S. Ahmed, H.; Green, A.; Alejo, A.; Jung, D.; Krygier, A. G.; Freeman, R. R.; Clarke, R.; Fuchs, J.; Vassura, L.; Kleinschmidt, A.; Roth, M.; Morrison, J. T.; Najmudin, Z.; Nakamura, H.; Norreys, P.; Oliver, M.; Zepf, M.; Borghesi, M.

    2015-07-15

    Calibration of three scintillators (EJ232Q, BC422Q, and EJ410) in a time-of-flight arrangement using a laser drive-neutron source is presented. The three plastic scintillator detectors were calibrated with gamma insensitive bubble detector spectrometers, which were absolutely calibrated over a wide range of neutron energies ranging from sub-MeV to 20 MeV. A typical set of data obtained simultaneously by the detectors is shown, measuring the neutron spectrum emitted from a petawatt laser irradiated thin foil.

  5. Integration of neutron time-of-flight single-crystal Bragg peaks in reciprocal space

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, Arthur J; Joergensen, Mads; Wang, Xiaoping; Mikkelson, Ruth L; Mikkelson, Dennis J; Lynch, Vickie E; Peterson, Peter F; Green, Mark L; Hoffmann, Christina

    2014-01-01

    The intensity of single crystal Bragg peaks obtained by mapping neutron time-of-flight event data into reciprocal space and integrating in various ways are compared. These include spherical integration with a fixed radius, ellipsoid fitting and integrating of the peak intensity and one-dimensional peak profile fitting. In comparison to intensities obtained by integrating in real detector histogram space, the data integrated in reciprocal space results in better agreement factors and more accurate atomic parameters. Furthermore, structure refinement using integrated intensities from one-dimensional profile fitting is demonstrated to be more accurate than simple peak-minus-background integration.

  6. Resolving multipath interference in time-of-flight imaging via modulation frequency diversity and sparse regularization.

    PubMed

    Bhandari, Ayush; Kadambi, Achuta; Whyte, Refael; Barsi, Christopher; Feigin, Micha; Dorrington, Adrian; Raskar, Ramesh

    2014-03-15

    Time-of-flight (ToF) cameras calculate depth maps by reconstructing phase shifts of amplitude-modulated signals. For broad illumination of transparent objects, reflections from multiple scene points can illuminate a given pixel, giving rise to an erroneous depth map. We report here a sparsity-regularized solution that separates K interfering components using multiple modulation frequency measurements. The method maps ToF imaging to the general framework of spectral estimation theory and has applications in improving depth profiles and exploiting multiple scattering.

  7. A composition analyzer for microparticles using a spark ion source. [using time of flight spectrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Auer, S. O.; Berg, O. E.

    1975-01-01

    Iron microparticles were fired onto a capacitor-type microparticle detector which responded to an impact with a spark discharge. Ion currents were extracted from the spark and analyzed in a time-of-flight mass spectrometer. The mass spectra showed the element of both detector and particle materials. The total extracted ion currents was typically 10A within a period of 100ns, indicating very efficient vaporization of the particle and ionization of the vapor. Potential applications include research on cosmic dust, atmospheric aerosols and cloud droplets, particles ejected by rocket or jet engines, by machining processes, or by nuclear bomb explosions.

  8. Interaction of solar wind ions with thin carbon foils: Calibration of time-of-flight spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonin, M.; Buergi, Alfred; Oetliker, M.; Bochsler, P.

    1992-11-01

    With the KAFKA (German acronym for carbon foils collisions analyzer) experiment, charge exchange, energy loss and angular scattering of solar wind ions in thin (1 to 10 microg/sq cm) carbon foils, are studied. Such foils are extensively used in time of flight mass spectrometry. So far, the properties of H, He, B, C, N, O, F, Ne, Na, Mg, Al, Si, S, Cl, Ar, K, Ti, Fe, and Ni and in the 0.5 to 5 keV/u energy range have been investigated.

  9. Solid Phase Microextraction and Miniature Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Hiller, j.m.

    1999-01-26

    A miniature mass spectrometer, based on the time-of-flight principle, has been developed for the detection of chemical warfare agent precursor molecules. The instrument, with minor modifications, could fulfill many of the needs for sensing organic molecules in various Defense Programs, including Enhanced Surveillance. The basic footprint of the instrument is about that of a lunch box. The instrument has a mass range to about 300, has parts-per-trillion detection limits, and can return spectra in less than a second. The instrument can also detect permanent gases and is especially sensitive to hydrogen. In volume, the device could be manufactured for under $5000.

  10. Note: A novel dual-channel time-of-flight mass spectrometer for photoelectron imaging spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Qin Zhengbo; Wu Xia; Tang Zichao

    2013-06-15

    A novel dual-channel time-of-flight mass spectrometer (D-TOFMS) has been designed to select anions in the photoelectron imaging measurements. In this instrument, the radiation laser can be triggered precisely to overlap with the selected ion cloud at the first-order space focusing plane. Compared with that of the conventional single channel TOFMS, the in situ mass selection performance of D-TOFMS is significantly improved. Preliminary experiment results are presented for the mass-selected photodetachment spectrum of F{sup -} to demonstrate the capability of the instrument.

  11. Analysis of the neutron time-of-flight spectra from inertial confinement fusion experiments

    DOE PAGES

    Hatarik, R.; Sayre, D. B.; Caggiano, J. A.; Phillips, T.; Eckart, M. J.; Bond, E. J.; Cerjan, C.; Grim, G. P.; Hartouni, E. P.; Knauer, J. P.; et al

    2015-11-12

    For a long time, neutron time-of-flight diagnostics been used to characterize the neutron spectrum produced by inertial confinement fusion experiments. The primary diagnostic goals are to extract the d+t→n+α (DT) and d+d→n+³He (DD) neutron yields and peak widths, and the amount DT scattering relative to its unscattered yield, which is also known as the down-scatter ratio (DSR). These quantities are used to infer yield weighted plasma conditions, such as ion temperature (Tion) and cold fuel areal density. We explain such novel methodologies used to determine neutron yield, apparent Tion and DSR.

  12. Combined distance-of-flight and time-of-flight mass spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Enke, Christie G; Ray, Steven J; Graham, Alexander W; Hieftje, Gary M; Barinaga, Charles J; Koppenaal, David W

    2014-02-11

    A combined distance-of-flight mass spectrometry (DOFMS) and time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOFMS) instrument includes an ion source configured to produce ions having varying mass-to-charge ratios, a first detector configured to determine when each of the ions travels a predetermined distance, a second detector configured to determine how far each of the ions travels in a predetermined time, and a detector extraction region operable to direct portions of the ions either to the first detector or to the second detector.

  13. Stopping power measurements with the Time-of-Flight (ToF) technique

    DOE PAGES

    Fontana, Cristiano L.; Chen, Chien-Hung; Crespillo, Miguel L.; Graham, Joseph T.; Xue, Haizhou; Zhang, Yanwen; Weber, William J.

    2015-11-10

    In our review of measurements of the stopping power of ions in matter is presented along with new measurements of the stopping powers of O, Si, Ti, and Au ions in self-supporting thin foils of SiO2, Nb2O5, and Ta2O5. Moreover, a Time-of-Flight system at the Ion Beam Materials Laboratory at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, was used in transmission geometry in order to reduce experimental uncertainties. Finally, the resulting stopping powers show good precision and accuracy and corroborate previously quoted values in the literature. New stopping data are determined.

  14. Use of a large time-compensated scintillation detector in neutron time-of-flight measurements

    DOEpatents

    Goodman, Charles D.

    1979-01-01

    A scintillator for neutron time-of-flight measurements is positioned at a desired angle with respect to the neutron beam, and as a function of the energy thereof, such that the sum of the transit times of the neutrons and photons in the scintillator are substantially independent of the points of scintillations within the scintillator. Extrapolated zero timing is employed rather than the usual constant fraction timing. As a result, a substantially larger scintillator can be employed that substantially increases the data rate and shortens the experiment time.

  15. Reply to 'Comment on 'Quantum time-of-flight distribution for cold trapped atoms''

    SciTech Connect

    Ali, Md. Manirul; Home, Dipankar; Pan, Alok K.; Majumdar, A. S.

    2008-02-15

    In their comment Gomes et al. [Phys. Rev. A 77, 026101 (2008)] have questioned the possibility of empirically testable differences existing between the semiclassical time of flight distribution for cold trapped atoms and a quantum distribution discussed by us recently [Ali et al., Phys. Rev. A 75, 042110 (2007).]. We argue that their criticism is based on a semiclassical treatment having restricted applicability for a particular trapping potential. Their claim does not preclude, in general, the possibility of differences between the semiclassical calculations and fully quantum results for the arrival time distribution of freely falling atoms.

  16. Electron pair emission detected by time-of-flight spectrometers: Recent progress

    SciTech Connect

    Huth, Michael; Schumann, Frank O.; Chiang, Cheng-Tien; Trützschler, Andreas; Kirschner, Jürgen; Widdra, Wolf

    2014-02-10

    We present results for electron coincidence spectroscopy using two time-of-flight (ToF) spectrometers. Excited by electron impact, the energy and momentum distribution of electron pairs emitted from the Cu(111) surface are resolved and a spectral feature related to the Shockley surface state is identified. By combining the two ToF spectrometers with a high-order harmonic generation light source, we demonstrate double photoemission spectroscopy in the laboratory that required synchrotron radiation in the past. Utilizing this setup, we report results for (γ,2e) on NiO(001) on Ag(001) excited with light at 30 eV photon energy.

  17. Time-of-flight detection of ultra-cold atoms using resonant frequency modulation imaging.

    PubMed

    Hardman, K S; Wigley, P B; Everitt, P J; Manju, P; Kuhn, C C N; Robins, N P

    2016-06-01

    Resonant frequency modulation imaging is used to detect free falling ultra-cold atoms. A theoretical comparison of fluorescence imaging (FI) and frequency modulation imaging (FMI) is made, indicating that for low optical depth clouds, FMI accomplished a higher signal-to-noise ratio under conditions necessary for a 200 μm spatially resolved atom interferometer. A 750 ms time-of-flight measurement reveals near atom shot-noise limited number measurements of 2×106 Bose-condensed Rb87 atoms. The detection system is applied to high precision spinor BEC based atom interferometer.

  18. Note: Detection jitter of pulsed time-of-flight lidar with dual pulse triggering.

    PubMed

    Hallman, L W; Kostamovaara, J

    2014-03-01

    To enable very large dynamic range of optical input amplitude for pulsed time-of-flight laser rangefinders required in industrial applications, multi-triggering receivers have been previously proposed. In this Note, the detection jitter of such a receiver using the average of leading and trailing edge crossing times as a pulse timing estimate is experimentally evaluated, with especial attention on the jitter due to signal shot noise. It is shown that the average of leading and trailing edge threshold crossing times gives smaller detection jitter than either edge solely, and that this effect is emphasized at higher signal shot noise levels.

  19. Testing a new NIF neutron time-of-flight detector with a bibenzyl scintillator on OMEGA.

    PubMed

    Glebov, V Yu; Forrest, C; Knauer, J P; Pruyne, A; Romanofsky, M; Sangster, T C; Shoup, M J; Stoeckl, C; Caggiano, J A; Carman, M L; Clancy, T J; Hatarik, R; McNaney, J; Zaitseva, N P

    2012-10-01

    A new neutron time-of-flight (nTOF) detector with a bibenzyl crystal as a scintillator has been designed and manufactured for the National Ignition Facility (NIF). This detector will replace a nTOF20-Spec detector with an oxygenated xylene scintillator currently operational on the NIF to improve the areal-density measurements. In addition to areal density, the bibenzyl detector will measure the D-D and D-T neutron yield and the ion temperature of indirect- and direct-drive-implosion experiments. The design of the bibenzyl detector and results of tests on the OMEGA Laser System are presented.

  20. TORCH - Cherenkov and Time-of-Flight PID Detector for the LHCb Upgrade at CERN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Föhl, K.; Brook, N.; Castillo García, L.; Conneely, T.; Cussans, D.; Forty, R.; Frei, C.; Gao, R.; Gys, T.; Harnew, N.; Milnes, J.; Piedigrossi, D.; Rademacker, J.; Ros Garcì a, A.; van Dijk, M.

    2016-05-01

    TORCH is a large-area precision time-of-flight detector, based on Cherenkov light production and propagation in a quartz radiator plate, which is read out at its edges. TORCH is proposed for the LHCb experiment at CERN to provide positive particle identification for kaons, and is currently in the Research-and-Development phase. A brief overview of the micro-channel plate photon sensor development, the custom-made electronics, and an introduction to the current test beam activities is given. Optical readout solutions are presented for the potential use of BaBar DIRC bar boxes as part of the TORCH configuration in LHCb.

  1. A time-of-flight detector based on silicon avalanche diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauger, J. A.; Choi, Y.; Hirsch, A. S.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Stringfellow, B. C.; Tincknell, M. L.; Porile, N. T.; Rai, G.; Garbarino, J.; McIntyre, R. J.

    1994-01-01

    We have investigated reach-through silicon avalanche diodes (AVDs) as time of flight detectors for nuclear and particle physics experiments. The signal is initiated by a minimum ionizing charged particle passing directly through the AVD. We have studied the effect of pulse amplitude and noise characteristics on timing using β- particles. The time resolution of four AVDs has been measured with a range of standard deviations, σ = 65-87 ps. This time resolution is comparable to the best available with the conventional alternative, a plastic scintillator and photomultiplier tube. Further optimization of the AVD results appears possible.

  2. Biomark/Organic Analysis with Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waite, J. Hunter, Jr.

    2004-01-01

    The concept of a Comprehensive 2-Dimensional Gas Chromatography coupled with Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (GCxGC-TOWS) for the analysis of organic compounds has been proven with commercially available instrumentation (LECO Corp). The performance of a GCxGC instrument has been characterized in various stages using two independent breadboard systems. The GCxGC separation systems, including the thermal modulator, have been miniaturized to the size of a benchtop configuration. One breadboard system employs a Flame Ionization Detector (FID), whereas the second breadboard system employs a Time-of-Fight mass spectrometer (TOFWS) as a detection system.

  3. A radial collimator for a time-of-flight neutron spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, M. B.; Abernathy, D. L.; Niedziela, J. L.; Loguillo, M. J.; Overbay, M. A.

    2014-08-15

    We have engineered and installed a radial collimator for use in the scattered beam of a neutron time-of-flight spectrometer at a spallation neutron source. The radial collimator may be used with both thermal and epithermal neutrons, reducing the detected scattering intensity due to material outside of the sample region substantially. The collimator is located inside of the sample chamber of the instrument, which routinely cycles between atmospheric conditions and cryogenic vacuum. The oscillation and support mechanism of the collimator allow it to be removed from use without breaking vacuum. We describe here the design and characterization of this radial collimator.

  4. WIDEBAND ULTRASONIC TIME OF FLIGHT DIFFRACTION COMBINING B-SCANS AND CROSS-SECTIONAL IMAGING

    SciTech Connect

    Petcher, P. A.; Dixon, S.

    2009-03-03

    Time of Flight Diffraction and Imaging (ToFDI) is a new technique utilizing a sparse array of transducers and signal processing to improve B-Scan output and create a cross-sectional image of a sample. This paper describes preliminary work demonstrating the concept, including; Finite Element Modelling (FEM), basic processing, likely applications. The eventual aim is for fast and automated detection, identification, positioning and sizing for all defects in a sample with known basic characteristics, such as bulk and shear elastic moduli.

  5. Evaluation of Inductively Couple Plasma-time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry for Laser Ablation Analyses

    SciTech Connect

    S.J. Bajic; D.B. Aeschliman; D.P. Baldwin; R.S. Houk

    2003-09-30

    The purpose of this trip to LECO Corporation was to test the non-matrix matched calibration method and the principal component analysis (PCA) method on a laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-time of flight mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-TOFMS) system. An LA-ICP-TOFMS system allows for multielement single-shot analysis as well as spatial analysis on small samples, because the TOFMS acquires an entire mass spectrum for all ions extracted simultaneously from the ICP. The TOFMS system differs from the double-focusing mass spectrometer, on which the above methods were developed, by having lower sensitivity and lower mass resolution.

  6. Detector response in time-of-flight mass spectrometry at high pulse repetition frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gulcicek, Erol E.; Boyle, James G.

    1993-01-01

    Dead time effects in chevron configured dual microchannel plates (MCPs) are investigated. Response times are determined experimentally for one chevron-configured dual MCP-type detector and two discrete dynode-type electron multipliers with 16 and 23 resistively divided stages. All of these detectors are found to be suitable for time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOF MS), yielding 3-6-ns (FWHM) response times triggered on a single ion pulse. It is concluded that, unless there are viable solutions to overcome dead time disadvantages for continuous dynode detectors, suitable discrete dynode detectors for TOF MS appear to have a significant advantage for high repetition rate operation.

  7. Effect of trapped ions in a gated time-of-flight apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martus, K. E.; Orient, O. J.; Chutjian, A.

    1993-01-01

    A three-mesh gate is used in a time-of-flight (TOF) apparatus to analyze the velocity of positive ions. Test results and a theoretical description are presented of an effect arising from trapping ions between meshes of a two-gate TOF velocity analyzer. The entrapped ions produce a side peak in the TOF spectra corresponding to faster ions. The onset and relative height of the side peak is dependent on the gating voltage and risetime of the pulsing electronics, while the relative intensity depends upon the velocity being sampled and the ratio of the gate width to duration.

  8. Time-of-flight detection of ultra-cold atoms using resonant frequency modulation imaging.

    PubMed

    Hardman, K S; Wigley, P B; Everitt, P J; Manju, P; Kuhn, C C N; Robins, N P

    2016-06-01

    Resonant frequency modulation imaging is used to detect free falling ultra-cold atoms. A theoretical comparison of fluorescence imaging (FI) and frequency modulation imaging (FMI) is made, indicating that for low optical depth clouds, FMI accomplished a higher signal-to-noise ratio under conditions necessary for a 200 μm spatially resolved atom interferometer. A 750 ms time-of-flight measurement reveals near atom shot-noise limited number measurements of 2×106 Bose-condensed Rb87 atoms. The detection system is applied to high precision spinor BEC based atom interferometer. PMID:27244400

  9. Analysis of ion dynamics and peak shapes for delayed extraction time-of-flight mass spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collado, V. M.; Ponciano, C. R.; Fernandez-Lima, F. A.; da Silveira, E. F.

    2004-06-01

    The dependence of time-of-flight (TOF) peak shapes on time-dependent extraction electric fields is studied theoretically. Conditions for time focusing are analyzed both analytically and numerically for double-acceleration-region TOF spectrometers. Expressions for the spectrometer mass resolution and for the critical delay time are deduced. Effects due to a leakage field in the first acceleration region are shown to be relevant under certain conditions. TOF peak shape simulations for the delayed extraction method are performed for emitted ions presenting a Maxwellian initial energy distribution. Calculations are compared to experimental results of Cs+ emission due to CsI laser ablation.

  10. Calibration of time of flight detectors using laser-driven neutron source.

    PubMed

    Mirfayzi, S R; Kar, S; Ahmed, H; Krygier, A G; Green, A; Alejo, A; Clarke, R; Freeman, R R; Fuchs, J; Jung, D; Kleinschmidt, A; Morrison, J T; Najmudin, Z; Nakamura, H; Norreys, P; Oliver, M; Roth, M; Vassura, L; Zepf, M; Borghesi, M

    2015-07-01

    Calibration of three scintillators (EJ232Q, BC422Q, and EJ410) in a time-of-flight arrangement using a laser drive-neutron source is presented. The three plastic scintillator detectors were calibrated with gamma insensitive bubble detector spectrometers, which were absolutely calibrated over a wide range of neutron energies ranging from sub-MeV to 20 MeV. A typical set of data obtained simultaneously by the detectors is shown, measuring the neutron spectrum emitted from a petawatt laser irradiated thin foil. PMID:26233373

  11. A silicon photomultiplier readout for time of flight neutron spectroscopy with {gamma}-ray detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Pietropaolo, A.; Gorini, G.; Festa, G.; Andreani, C.; De Pascale, M. P.; Reali, E.; Grazzi, F.; Schooneveld, E. M.

    2009-09-15

    The silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) is a recently developed photosensor used in particle physics, e.g., for detection of minimum ionizing particles and/or Cherenkov radiation. Its performance is comparable to that of photomultiplier tubes, but with advantages in terms of reduced volume and magnetic field insensitivity. In the present study, the performance of a gamma ray detector made of an yttrium aluminum perovskite scintillation crystal and a SiPM-based readout is assessed for use in time of flight neutron spectroscopy. Measurements performed at the ISIS pulsed neutron source demonstrate the feasibility of {gamma}-detection based on the new device.

  12. A time-of-flight backscattering spectrometer at the Spallation Neutron Source, BASIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamontov, E.; Herwig, K. W.

    2011-08-01

    We describe the design and current performance of the backscattering silicon spectrometer (BASIS), a time-of-flight backscattering spectrometer built at the spallation neutron source (SNS) of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). BASIS is the first silicon-based backscattering spectrometer installed at a spallation neutron source. In addition to high intensity, it offers a high-energy resolution of about 3.5 μeV and a large and variable energy transfer range. These ensure an excellent overlap with the dynamic ranges accessible at other inelastic spectrometers at the SNS.

  13. Waveform-Sampling Electronics for a Whole-Body Time-of-Flight PET Scanner

    PubMed Central

    Ashmanskas, W. J.; LeGeyt, B. C.; Newcomer, F. M.; Panetta, J. V.; Ryan, W. A.; Van Berg, R.; Wiener, R. I.; Karp Fellow, J. S.

    2014-01-01

    Waveform sampling is an appealing technique for instruments requiring precision time and pulse-height measurements. Sampling each PMT waveform at oscilloscope-like rates of several gigasamples per second enables one to process PMT signals digitally, which in turn makes it straightforward to optimize timing resolution and amplitude (energy and position) resolution in response to calibration effects, pile-up effects, and other systematic sources of waveform variation. We describe a system design and preliminary implementation that neatly maps waveform-sampling technology onto the LaPET prototype whole-body time-of-flight PET scanner that serves as the platform for testing this new technology. PMID:25484379

  14. Analysis of the neutron time-of-flight spectra from inertial confinement fusion experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Hatarik, R.; Sayre, D. B.; Caggiano, J. A.; Phillips, T.; Eckart, M. J.; Bond, E. J.; Cerjan, C.; Grim, G. P.; Hartouni, E. P.; Knauer, J. P.; Mcnaney, J. M.; Munro, D. H.

    2015-11-12

    For a long time, neutron time-of-flight diagnostics been used to characterize the neutron spectrum produced by inertial confinement fusion experiments. The primary diagnostic goals are to extract the d+t→n+α (DT) and d+d→n+³He (DD) neutron yields and peak widths, and the amount DT scattering relative to its unscattered yield, which is also known as the down-scatter ratio (DSR). These quantities are used to infer yield weighted plasma conditions, such as ion temperature (Tion) and cold fuel areal density. We explain such novel methodologies used to determine neutron yield, apparent Tion and DSR.

  15. Aerosol matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization for liquid chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, K.K.; Lewis, T.M.; Beeson, M.D.; Russell, D.H. )

    1994-05-15

    We report the application of aerosol matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) to liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS). The aerosol MALDI experiment uses aerosol liquid introduction in conjunction with pulsed UV laser ionization to form ions from large biomolecules in solution. Mass analysis is achieved in a time-of-flight mass spectrometer. In the LC/MALDI-MS experiment, the matrix solution is combined with the column effluent in a mixing tee, LC/MALDI-MS is demonstrated for the separation of bradykinin, gramicidin S, and myoglobin. 32 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  16. A position sensitive time of flight detector for heavy ion ERD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eschbaumer, S.; Bergmaier, A.; Dollinger, G.

    2016-03-01

    A new 2D position sensitive time of flight detector for heavy ion ERD has been developed. The detector features separate time and position measurement in a straight geometry. An electrostatic lens focuses the secondary electrons ejected from a carbon foil onto a channel plate stack maintaining the position information despite the electron momentum distribution. For position readout a 2D Backgammon anode is used. A position resolution of <0.6 mm (FWHM) and a time resolution of 96 ps (FWHM) is demonstrated.

  17. An iodide-adduct high-resolution time-of-flight chemical-ionization mass spectrometer: application to atmospheric inorganic and organic compounds.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ben H; Lopez-Hilfiker, Felipe D; Mohr, Claudia; Kurtén, Theo; Worsnop, Douglas R; Thornton, Joel A

    2014-06-01

    A high-resolution time-of-flight chemical-ionization mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-CIMS) using Iodide-adducts has been characterized and deployed in several laboratory and field studies to measure a suite of organic and inorganic atmospheric species. The large negative mass defect of Iodide, combined with soft ionization and the high mass-accuracy (<20 ppm) and mass-resolving power (R>5500) of the time-of-flight mass spectrometer, provides an additional degree of separation and allows for the determination of elemental compositions for the vast majority of detected ions. Laboratory characterization reveals Iodide-adduct ionization generally exhibits increasing sensitivity toward more polar or acidic volatile organic compounds. Simultaneous retrieval of a wide range of mass-to-charge ratios (m/Q from 25 to 625 Th) at a high frequency (>1 Hz) provides a comprehensive view of atmospheric oxidative chemistry, particularly when sampling rapidly evolving plumes from fast moving platforms like an aircraft. We present the sampling protocol, detection limits and observations from the first aircraft deployment for an instrument of this type, which took place aboard the NOAA WP-3D aircraft during the Southeast Nexus (SENEX) 2013 field campaign.

  18. 3d-3d correspondence revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Hee-Joong; Dimofte, Tudor; Gukov, Sergei; Sułkowski, Piotr

    2016-04-01

    In fivebrane compactifications on 3-manifolds, we point out the importance of all flat connections in the proper definition of the effective 3d {N}=2 theory. The Lagrangians of some theories with the desired properties can be constructed with the help of homological knot invariants that categorify colored Jones polynomials. Higgsing the full 3d theories constructed this way recovers theories found previously by Dimofte-Gaiotto-Gukov. We also consider the cutting and gluing of 3-manifolds along smooth boundaries and the role played by all flat connections in this operation.

  19. 3d-3d correspondence revisited

    DOE PAGES

    Chung, Hee -Joong; Dimofte, Tudor; Gukov, Sergei; Sułkowski, Piotr

    2016-04-21

    In fivebrane compactifications on 3-manifolds, we point out the importance of all flat connections in the proper definition of the effective 3d N = 2 theory. The Lagrangians of some theories with the desired properties can be constructed with the help of homological knot invariants that categorify colored Jones polynomials. Higgsing the full 3d theories constructed this way recovers theories found previously by Dimofte-Gaiotto-Gukov. As a result, we also consider the cutting and gluing of 3-manifolds along smooth boundaries and the role played by all flat connections in this operation.

  20. Barrel time-of-flight detector for the PANDA experiment at FAIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruber, L.; Brunner, S. E.; Marton, J.; Orth, H.; Suzuki, K.

    2016-07-01

    The barrel time-of-flight detector for the PANDA experiment at FAIR is foreseen as a Scintillator Tile (SciTil) Hodoscope based on several thousand small plastic scintillator tiles read-out with directly attached Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPMs). The main tasks of the system are an accurate determination of the time origin of particle tracks to avoid event mixing at high collision rates, relative time-of-flight measurements as well as particle identification in the low momentum regime. The main requirements are the use of a minimum material amount and a time resolution of σ < 100 ps. We have performed extensive optimization studies and prototype tests to prove the feasibility of the SciTil design and finalize the R&D phase. In a 2.7 GeV/c proton beam at Forschungszentrum Jülich a time resolution of about 80 ps has been achieved using SiPMs from KETEK and Hamamatsu with an active area of 3 × 3mm2. Employing the Digital Photon Counter from Philips a time resolution of about 30 ps has been reached.

  1. A Fast Pulsed Neutron Source for Time-of-Flight Detection of Nuclear Materials and Explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnan, Mahadevan; Bures, Brian; James, Colt; Madden, Robert; Hennig, Wolfgang; Breus, Dimitry; Asztalos, Stephen; Sabourov, Konstantin; Lane, Stephen

    2011-12-13

    AASC has built a fast pulsed neutron source based on the Dense Plasma Focus (DPF). The more current version stores only 100 J but fires at {approx}10-50 Hz and emits {approx}10{sup 6}n/pulse at a peak current of 100 kA. Both sources emit 2.45{+-}0.1 MeV(DD) neutron pulses of {approx}25-40 ns width. Such fast, quasi-monoenergetic pulses allow time-of-flight detection of characteristic emissions from nuclear materials or high explosives. A test is described in which iron targets were placed at different distances from the point neutron source. Detectors such as Stilbene and LaBr3 were used to capture inelastically induced, 847 keV gammas from the iron target. Shielding of the source and detectors eliminated most (but not all) of the source neutrons from the detectors. Gated detection, pulse shape analysis and time-of-flight discrimination enable separation of gamma and neutron signatures and localization of the target. A Monte Carlo simulation allows evaluation of the potential of such a fast pulsed source for a field-portable detection system. The high rep-rate source occupies two 200 liter drums and uses a cooled DPF Head that is <500 cm{sup 3} in volume.

  2. Time-of-flight Extreme Environment Diffractometer at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin

    SciTech Connect

    Prokhnenko, Oleksandr Stein, Wolf-Dieter; Bleif, Hans-Jürgen; Fromme, Michael; Bartkowiak, Maciej; Wilpert, Thomas

    2015-03-15

    The Extreme Environment Diffractometer (EXED) is a new neutron time-of-flight instrument at the BER II research reactor at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin, Germany. Although EXED is a special-purpose instrument, its early construction made it available for users as a general-purpose diffractometer. In this respect, EXED became one of the rare examples, where the performance of a time-of-flight diffractometer at a continuous source can be characterized. In this paper, we report on the design and performance of EXED with an emphasis on the unique instrument capabilities. The latter comprise variable wavelength resolution and wavelength band, control of the incoming beam divergence, the possibility to change the angular positions of detectors and their distance to the sample, and use of event recording and offline histogramming. These features combined make EXED easily tunable to the requirements of a particular problem, from conventional diffraction to small angle neutron scattering. The instrument performance is demonstrated by several reference measurements and user experiments.

  3. A Compact Liquid Xenon Compton Telescope with High Energy Resolution and Time-of-Flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oberlack, Uwe; Gomez, R.; Olsen, C.; Shagin, P.; Aprile, E.; Giboni, K.; Plante, G.; Santorelli, R.

    2006-09-01

    Two recent developments have led us to propose a new type of Compton telescope in compact geometry with time-of-flight, for gamma-ray astronomy in the energy regime of 0.2 - 10 MeV. First, the technology of vacuum ultraviolet photosensors for efficient and fast readout of liquid xenon (LXe) scintillation light has improved dramatically over the last few years, and new developments are underway. A LXe Advanced Compton Telescope would consist of two detector arrays of LXe time projection chambers in compact geometry, with time-of-flight (ToF) between detector modules at a resolution of order 100 ps. Second, the previously achieved moderate energy resolution in LXe, a significant draw-back for gamma-ray line spectroscopy, has been found to be largely due to a strong anti-correlation of ionization and scintillation in LXe. Efficient measurement of both charge and light enables us to improve energy resolution greatly. A factor of three improvement over a previous prototype, LXeGRIT, has already been achieved, and the measured underlying physics indicate the possibility of achievng energy resolution below 1% FWHM at 1 MeV. We are vigorously working on improving light and charge readout to realize this potential in a practical detector. We report on the status and prospects of our current research and development program. This work is supported by NASA grant NNG05WC24G.

  4. Neutron Inelastic Scattering Mechanism and Measurement of Neutron Asymmetry Using Time of Flight Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Al Azzawe, A. J. M.

    2007-02-14

    Inelastic scattering is an essential reaction for other nuclear reactions to detect the optical model and compound nucleus formation within the range of (0.4- 5.0) MeV neutron incident energy by using time of flight technique. The time of flight system (TOFS) installed on the horizontal channel reactor RRA has been used to measure the asymmetry of scattered fast neutrons, when data acquisition and system control were recorded event by event by HP - computer via CAMAC system. Eight NE 213 neutron counters were used in order to detect neutron inelastic scattering in the forward direction (4 neutron counters at 0 deg. angle) and in the backward direction (4 neutron counters at 180 deg. angle) to measure the asymmetry of fast neutron. Each neutron counter was 50cm in length and 8cm in diameter, viewed by two (58 - DVP) photomultiplier tubes. The contribution of direct interaction to the compound nucleus formation was deduced from the asymmetry in the neutron detection at the same direction of these eight neutron counters. A time resolution of 8.2 ns between the eight neutron counters and one of the two Ge(Li) detectors has been obtained.

  5. Contribution of time-of-flight information to limited-angle positron tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Macdonald, B.; Perez-Mendez, V.; Tam, K.C.

    1981-10-01

    Limited-angle emission tomography was investigated using a two-dimensional phantom to generate positron events simulating a camera with two opposed parallel position-sensitive detectors collecting data within a 90/sup 0/ cone. The data, backprojected onto lines passing through the phantom volume, is used with a matrix reconstruction method to provide two-dimensional images. Image quality was measured using the standard deviation of the reconstructions with respect to the original phantom. The application of Phillips-Twomey smoothing to the deconvolution matrices has substantially improved the original reconstructions, a factor of 1.9 in signal to noise ratio, giving S/N = 3.4 for a phantom having an average of 150 events/pixel. Using photon time-of-flight to restrict the reconstruction volume a further considerable improvement is made. When the time-of-flight limited the contributing volume to 4 lines out of 11 the improvement was another factor of 1.9 giving S/N = 6.0 for the same phantom. Comparable increases in signal to noise ratios are expected for three-dimensional reconstructions.

  6. Central Time-Of-Flight detector for CLAS12 Hall-B upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baturin, Vitaly

    2013-10-01

    The time-of-flight system for CLAS12 at Hall-B of the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility will have a refurbished forward-angle detector and a new barrel scintillation detector for the time-of-flight measurements in the central region inside the superconducting 5 T-solenoid. The 92 cm-long barrel with the inner diameter 50 cm is formed by 48 scintillators of a trapezoidal cross-section about 3×3 cm2. Each scintillator is readout by R2083 PMTs from both upstream and downstream sides via a novel focusing light guides 1 m- and 1.6 m-long respectively. Both PMTs of each counter are enclosed into a novel dynamical magnetic shield that allows PMT performance at 1000 G-solenoid fringe fields. The expected timing resolution of this detector is 60 ps that allows pion-kaon and pion-proton separation at 3.3. sigma level up to 0.64 GeV/c and 1.25 GeV/c respectively. Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility. Done...processed 770 records...10:56:06

  7. Impact energy measurement in time-of-flight mass spectrometry with cryogenic microcalorimeters.

    PubMed

    Hilton, G C; Martinis, J M; Wollman, D A; Irwin, K D; Dulcie, L L; Gerber, D; Gillevet, P M; Twerenbold, D

    1998-02-12

    Time-of-flight mass spectrometry-most notably matrix-assisted laser-desorption-ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) spectrometry-is an important class of techniques for the study of proteins and other biomolecules. Although these techniques provide excellent performance for masses up to about 20,000 daltons, there has been limited success in achieving good mass resolution at higher masses. This is because the sensitivity of the microchannel plate (MCP) detectors used in most systems decreases rapidly with increasing particle mass, limiting the utility of MCP detectors for very large masses. It has recently been proposed that cryogenic particle detectors may provide a solution to these difficulties. Cryogenic detectors measure the thermal energy deposited by the particle impact, and thus have a sensitivity that is largely independent of particle mass. Recent experiments have demonstrated the sensitivity of cryogenic particle detectors to single biomolecules, a quantum efficiency several orders of magnitude larger than the MCP detectors, and sensitivity to masses as large as 750,000 daltons. Here we present results demonstrating an order of magnitude better energy resolution than previous measurements, allowing direct determination of particle charge state during acceleration. Although application of these detectors to practical mass spectrometry will require further development of the detectors and cryogenics, these detectors can be used to elucidate the performance-limiting processes that occur in such systems.

  8. Ambient aerosol analysis using aerosol-time-of-flight mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Prather, K.A.; Noble, C.; Salt, K.; Nordmeyer, T.; Fergenson, D.; Morrical, B.

    1995-12-31

    Particulate pollution is an area of growing concern in light of recent studies which suggest a link between high concentrations of ambient PM{sub 10} (particles with diameters equal to or less than 10 {mu}m) and adverse health effects ranging from respiratory ailments to premature death. However, analytical chemistry techniques aimed at sampling and analysis of atmospheric aerosols are extremely limited in comparison to the number of methods that exist for studying gas phase smog components. As a result, current government regulations for levels of ambient particulates are necessarily general, lacking any chemical specificity. The authors have recently developed a technique, Aerosol-Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (ATOFMS), which is capable of real-time determination of the size and chemical composition of individual aerosol particles. In order to obtain such information, the techniques of aerodynamic particle sizing and time-of-flight spectrometry are combined in a single instrument. In one of the aerosol studies performed in this laboratory, this instrument is being used for the direct analysis of ambient aerosols with the goal of establishing correlations between particle size and chemical composition. To date, the authors have observed very distinct size/composition correlations for organic and inorganic particles.

  9. Data acquisition schemes for continuous two-particle time-of-flight coincidence experiments.

    PubMed

    Bodi, Andras; Sztáray, Bálint; Baer, Tomas; Johnson, Melanie; Gerber, Thomas

    2007-08-01

    Three data acquisition schemes for two-particle coincidence experiments with a continuous source are discussed. The single-start/single-stop technique, implemented with a time-to-pulse-height converter, results in a complicated spectrum and breaks down severely at high count rates. The single-start/multiple-stop setup, based on a time-to-digital converter and the first choice in today's similar coincidence experiments, performs significantly better at high count rates, but its performance is still hampered if the time-of-flight range is large, and the false coincidence background is variable if the event frequency and the collection efficiency of the starts are both high. A straightforward, multistart/multistop setup is proposed for coincidence experiments. By collecting all detector data, it ensures the highest signal-to-noise ratio, constant background, and fast data acquisition and can now be easily constructed with commercially available time-to-digital converters. Analytical and numerically evaluated formulas are derived to characterize the performance of each setup in a variety of environments. Computer simulated spectra are presented to illustrate the analytically predicted features of the various raw time-of-flight distributions obtained with each technique.

  10. Time-of-flight MeV-SIMS with beam induced secondary electron trigger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulte-Borchers, Martina; Döbeli, Max; Müller, Arnold Milenko; George, Matthias; Synal, Hans-Arno

    2016-08-01

    A new Time-of-flight MeV Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (MeV-SIMS) setup was developed to be used with a capillary microprobe for molecular imaging with heavy primary ions at MeV energies. Due to the low output current of the ion collimating capillary a Time-of-flight (ToF) measurement method with high duty cycle is necessary. Secondary electrons from the sample surface and transmitted ions were studied as start signals. They enable measurements with a continuous primary beam and unpulsed ToF spectrometer. Tests with various primary ion beams and sample types have shown that a secondary electron signal is obtained from 30% to 40% of incident MeV particles. This provides a ToF start signal with considerably better time resolution than the one obtained from transmitted primary ions detected in a radiation hard gas ionization detector. Beam induced secondary electrons therefore allow for MeV-SIMS measurements with reasonable mass resolution at primary ion beam currents in the low fA range.

  11. Evaluating the capability of time-of-flight cameras for accurately imaging a cyclically loaded beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahamy, Hervé; Lichti, Derek; El-Badry, Mamdouh; Qi, Xiaojuan; Detchev, Ivan; Steward, Jeremy; Moravvej, Mohammad

    2015-05-01

    Time-of-flight cameras are used for diverse applications ranging from human-machine interfaces and gaming to robotics and earth topography. This paper aims at evaluating the capability of the Mesa Imaging SR4000 and the Microsoft Kinect 2.0 time-of-flight cameras for accurately imaging the top surface of a concrete beam subjected to fatigue loading in laboratory conditions. Whereas previous work has demonstrated the success of such sensors for measuring the response at point locations, the aim here is to measure the entire beam surface in support of the overall objective of evaluating the effectiveness of concrete beam reinforcement with steel fibre reinforced polymer sheets. After applying corrections for lens distortions to the data and differencing images over time to remove systematic errors due to internal scattering, the periodic deflections experienced by the beam have been estimated for the entire top surface of the beam and at witness plates attached. The results have been assessed by comparison with measurements from highly-accurate laser displacement transducers. This study concludes that both the Microsoft Kinect 2.0 and the Mesa Imaging SR4000s are capable of sensing a moving surface with sub-millimeter accuracy once the image distortions have been modeled and removed.

  12. Accurate Estimation of Airborne Ultrasonic Time-of-Flight for Overlapping Echoes

    PubMed Central

    Sarabia, Esther G.; Llata, Jose R.; Robla, Sandra; Torre-Ferrero, Carlos; Oria, Juan P.

    2013-01-01

    In this work, an analysis of the transmission of ultrasonic signals generated by piezoelectric sensors for air applications is presented. Based on this analysis, an ultrasonic response model is obtained for its application to the recognition of objects and structured environments for navigation by autonomous mobile robots. This model enables the analysis of the ultrasonic response that is generated using a pair of sensors in transmitter-receiver configuration using the pulse-echo technique. This is very interesting for recognizing surfaces that simultaneously generate a multiple echo response. This model takes into account the effect of the radiation pattern, the resonant frequency of the sensor, the number of cycles of the excitation pulse, the dynamics of the sensor and the attenuation with distance in the medium. This model has been developed, programmed and verified through a battery of experimental tests. Using this model a new procedure for obtaining accurate time of flight is proposed. This new method is compared with traditional ones, such as threshold or correlation, to highlight its advantages and drawbacks. Finally the advantages of this method are demonstrated for calculating multiple times of flight when the echo is formed by several overlapping echoes. PMID:24284774

  13. Identification of rolling circulating tumor cells using photoacoustic time-of-flight method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarimollaoglu, Mustafa; Nedosekin, Dmitry A.; Galanzha, Ekaterina I.; Zharov, Vladimir P.

    2013-03-01

    Existing optical techniques for in vivo measurement of blood flow velocity are not quite applicable for determination of velocity of individual cells or nanoparticles. A time-of-flight photoacoustic (PA) technique can solve this problem by measuring the transient PA signal width, which is related to the cell velocity passing the laser beam. This technique was demonstrated in vivo using an animal (mouse) model by estimating the velocity of nanoparticles, and red and white blood cells labeled with conjugated gold nanorods (GNRs) in the bloodstream. Here we describe the features and the parameters of novel modifications to the PA time-of-flight method and its new application for real-time monitoring of circulating tumor cells (CTCs), such as B16F10 melanoma. This method provided, for the first time, identification of rolling CTCs in analogy to rolling white blood cells and CTC aggregates. Specifically, monitoring of PA signal widths from CTCs in mouse ear microvessels revealed double maxima in peak-width histograms associated with the fast moving portion of CTCs in central flow and slowly rolling CTCs in analogy to white blood cells. We also developed a two-parameter plot representing PA peak amplitude and peak widths. This method allowed identification of fast-moving individual CTCs, CTC aggregates, and rolling CTCs. The discovery of rolling CTCs in relatively large blood vessels indicates a higher probability of CTC extravasations, further increasing the possibility of metastasis through rolling mechanism in addition to mechanical capturing of CTCs in small vessels.

  14. Accurate estimation of airborne ultrasonic time-of-flight for overlapping echoes.

    PubMed

    Sarabia, Esther G; Llata, Jose R; Robla, Sandra; Torre-Ferrero, Carlos; Oria, Juan P

    2013-01-01

    In this work, an analysis of the transmission of ultrasonic signals generated by piezoelectric sensors for air applications is presented. Based on this analysis, an ultrasonic response model is obtained for its application to the recognition of objects and structured environments for navigation by autonomous mobile robots. This model enables the analysis of the ultrasonic response that is generated using a pair of sensors in transmitter-receiver configuration using the pulse-echo technique. This is very interesting for recognizing surfaces that simultaneously generate a multiple echo response. This model takes into account the effect of the radiation pattern, the resonant frequency of the sensor, the number of cycles of the excitation pulse, the dynamics of the sensor and the attenuation with distance in the medium. This model has been developed, programmed and verified through a battery of experimental tests. Using this model a new procedure for obtaining accurate time of flight is proposed. This new method is compared with traditional ones, such as threshold or correlation, to highlight its advantages and drawbacks. Finally the advantages of this method are demonstrated for calculating multiple times of flight when the echo is formed by several overlapping echoes. PMID:24284774

  15. The multipurpose time-of-flight neutron reflectometer “Platypus” at Australia's OPAL reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, M.; Nelson, A.; Holt, S. A.; Saerbeck, T.; Hamilton, W. A.; Klose, F.

    2011-03-01

    In this manuscript we describe the major components of the Platypus time-of-flight neutron reflectometer at the 20 MW OPAL reactor in Sydney, Australia. Platypus is a multipurpose spectrometer for the characterisation of solid thin films, materials adsorbed at the solid-liquid interface and free-liquid surfaces. It also has the capacity to study magnetic thin films using spin-polarised neutrons. Platypus utilises a white neutron beam ( λ=2-20 Å) that is pulsed using boron-coated disc chopper pairs; thus providing the capacity to tailor the wavelength resolution of the pulses to suit the system under investigation. Supermirror optical components are used to focus, deflect or spin-polarise the broad bandwidth neutron beams, and typical incident spectra are presented for each configuration. A series of neutron reflectivity datasets are presented, indicating the quality and flexibility of this spectrometer. Minimum reflectivity values of <10 -7 are observed; while maximum thickness values of 325 nm have been measured for single-component films and 483 nm for a multilayer system. Off-specular measurements have also been made to investigate in-plane features as opposed to those normal to the sample surface. Finally, the first published studies conducted using the Platypus time-of-flight neutron reflectometer are presented.

  16. Time-of-Flight Polarized Neutron Reflectometry on PLATYPUS: Status and Future Developments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saerbeck, T.; Cortie, D. L.; Brück, S.; Bertinshaw, J.; Holt, S. A.; Nelson, A.; James, M.; Lee, W. T.; Klose, F.

    Time-of-flight (ToF) polarized neutron reflectometry enables the detailed investigation of depth-resolved magnetic structures in thin film and multilayer magnetic systems. The general advantage of the time-of-flight mode of operation over monochromatic instruments is a decoupling of spectral shape and polarization of the neutron beam with variable resolution. Thus, a wide Q-range can be investigated using a single angle of incidence, with resolution and flux well-adjusted to the experimental requirement. Our paper reviews the current status of the polarization equipment of the ToF reflectometer PLATYPUS and presents first results obtained on stratified Ni80Fe20/α-Fe2O3 films, revealing the distribution of magnetic moments in an exchange bias system. An outlook on the future development of the PLATYPUS polarization system towards the implementation of a polarized 3He cell is presented and discussed with respect to the efficiency and high Q-coverage up to 1 Å-1 and 0.15 Å-1 in the vertical and lateral momentum transfer, respectively.

  17. The CDFII time-of-flight detector and impact on beauty flavor tagging

    SciTech Connect

    C. Grozis et al.

    2002-12-03

    Following the successful RunI from 1992 to 1996, the CDF detector has undergone a major upgrade [1] for the RunII which begun in March 2001. The approval for the addition of a Time-of-Flight detector was granted in January 1999. The installation of the TOF detector was completed in August 2001 and its data has been included in the CDFII readout since then. The primary physics motivation for TOF is to complement and enhance the particle identification capability provided by the central drift chamber (COT) since it distinguishes K{sup {+-}} and {pi}{sup {+-}} in the momentum region of their cross-over in dE=dX. With an expected time-of-flight resolution of 100 ps, the TOF system will be capable of identifying charged kaons from pions by their flight time difference with at least two standard deviation separation up to kaon momenta of 1.6 GeV/c. Such an addition results in an enhancement of the b flavor identification power, crucial to improve the statistical precision in CP violation and B{sub s} mixing measurements.

  18. Ion Funnel Trap Interface for Orthogonal Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Belov, Mikhail E.; Tolmachev, Aleksey V.; Prior, David C.; Smith, Richard D.

    2007-10-15

    A combined electrodynamic ion funnel and ion trap coupled to an orthogonal acceleration (oa)-time-of-flight mass spectrometer was developed and characterized. The ion trap was incorporated through the use of added terminal electrodynamic ion funnel electrodes enabling control over the axial dc gradient in the trap section. The ion trap operates efficiently at a pressure of ~1 Torr, and measurements indicate a maximum charge capacity of ~3 × 107 charges. An order of magnitude increase in sensitivity was observed in the analysis of low concentration peptides mixtures with orthogonal acceleration (oa)-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (oa-TOF MS) in the trapping mode as compared to the continuous regime. A signal increase in the trapping mode was accompanied by reduction in the chemical background, due to more efficient desolvation of, for example, solvent related clusters. Controlling the ion trap ejection time was found to result in efficient removal of singly charged species and improving signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) for the multiply charged analytes.

  19. TOFPET 2: A high-performance circuit for PET time-of-flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Francesco, Agostino; Bugalho, Ricardo; Oliveira, Luis; Rivetti, Angelo; Rolo, Manuel; Silva, Jose C.; Varela, Joao

    2016-07-01

    We present a readout and digitization ASIC featuring low-noise and low-power for time-of flight (TOF) applications using SiPMs. The circuit is designed in standard CMOS 110 nm technology, has 64 independent channels and is optimized for time-of-flight measurement in Positron Emission Tomography (TOF-PET). The input amplifier is a low impedance current conveyor based on a regulated common-gate topology. Each channel has quad-buffered analogue interpolation TDCs (time binning 20 ps) and charge integration ADCs with linear response at full scale (1500 pC). The signal amplitude can also be derived from the measurement of time-over-threshold (ToT). Simulation results show that for a single photo-electron signal with charge 200 (550) fC generated by a SiPM with (320 pF) capacitance the circuit has 24 (30) dB SNR, 75 (39) ps r.m.s. resolution, and 4 (8) mW power consumption. The event rate is 600 kHz per channel, with up to 2 MHz dark counts rejection.

  20. Time-of-flight Extreme Environment Diffractometer at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin.

    PubMed

    Prokhnenko, Oleksandr; Stein, Wolf-Dieter; Bleif, Hans-Jürgen; Fromme, Michael; Bartkowiak, Maciej; Wilpert, Thomas

    2015-03-01

    The Extreme Environment Diffractometer (EXED) is a new neutron time-of-flight instrument at the BER II research reactor at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin, Germany. Although EXED is a special-purpose instrument, its early construction made it available for users as a general-purpose diffractometer. In this respect, EXED became one of the rare examples, where the performance of a time-of-flight diffractometer at a continuous source can be characterized. In this paper, we report on the design and performance of EXED with an emphasis on the unique instrument capabilities. The latter comprise variable wavelength resolution and wavelength band, control of the incoming beam divergence, the possibility to change the angular positions of detectors and their distance to the sample, and use of event recording and offline histogramming. These features combined make EXED easily tunable to the requirements of a particular problem, from conventional diffraction to small angle neutron scattering. The instrument performance is demonstrated by several reference measurements and user experiments. PMID:25832206

  1. Design and performance of a high spatial resolution, time-of-flight PET detector

    PubMed Central

    Krishnamoorthy, Srilalan; LeGeyt, Benjamin; Werner, Matthew E.; Kaul, Madhuri; Newcomer, F. M.; Karp, Joel S.; Surti, Suleman

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the design and performance of a high spatial resolution PET detector with time-of-flight capabilities. With an emphasis on high spatial resolution and sensitivity, we initially evaluated the performance of several 1.5 × 1.5 and 2.0 × 2.0 mm2 and 12–15 mm long LYSO crystals read out by several appropriately sized PMTs. Experiments to evaluate the impact of reflector on detector performance were performed and the final detector consisted of a 32 × 32 array of 1.5 × 1.5 × 15 mm3 LYSO crystals packed with a diffuse reflector and read out by a single Hamamatsu 64 channel multi-anode PMT. Such a design made it compact, modular and offered a cost-effective solution to obtaining excellent energy and timing resolution. To minimize the number of readout signals, a compact front-end readout electronics that summed anode signals along each of the orthogonal directions was also developed. Experimental evaluation of detector performance demonstrates clear discrimination of the crystals within the detector. An average energy resolution (FWHM) of 12.7 ± 2.6% and average coincidence timing resolution (FWHM) of 348 ps was measured, demonstrating suitability for use in the development of a high spatial resolution time-of-flight scanner for dedicated breast PET imaging. PMID:25246711

  2. An integrated time-of-flight versus residual energy subsystem for a compact dual ion composition experiment for space plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Desai, M. I.; McComas, D. J.; Allegrini, F.; Livi, S. A.; Ogasawara, K.; Ebert, R. W.; Weidner, S. E.; Alexander, N.

    2015-05-15

    We have developed a novel concept for a Compact Dual Ion Composition Experiment (CoDICE) that simultaneously provides high quality plasma and energetic ion composition measurements over 6 decades in ion energy in a wide variety of space plasma environments. CoDICE measures the two critical ion populations in space plasmas: (1) mass and ionic charge state composition and 3D velocity and angular distributions of ∼10 eV/q–40 keV/q plasma ions—CoDICE-Lo and (2) mass composition, energy spectra, and angular distributions of ∼30 keV–10 MeV energetic ions—CoDICE-Hi. CoDICE uses a common, integrated Time-of-Flight (TOF) versus residual energy (E) subsystem for measuring the two distinct ion populations. This paper describes the CoDICE design concept, and presents results of the laboratory tests of the TOF portion of the TOF vs. E subsystem, focusing specifically on (1) investigation of spill-over and contamination rates on the start and stop microchannel plate (MCP) anodes vs. secondary electron steering and focusing voltages, scanned around their corresponding model-optimized values, (2) TOF measurements and resolution and angular resolution, and (3) cross-contamination of the start and stop MCPs’ singles rates from CoDICE-Lo and -Hi, and (4) energy resolution of avalanche photodiodes near the lower end of the CoDICE-Lo energy range. We also discuss physical effects that could impact the performance of the TOF vs. E subsystem in a flight instrument. Finally, we discuss advantages of the CoDICE design concept by comparing with capabilities and resources of existing flight instruments.

  3. An integrated time-of-flight versus residual energy subsystem for a compact dual ion composition experiment for space plasmas.

    PubMed

    Desai, M I; Ogasawara, K; Ebert, R W; McComas, D J; Allegrini, F; Weidner, S E; Alexander, N; Livi, S A

    2015-05-01

    We have developed a novel concept for a Compact Dual Ion Composition Experiment (CoDICE) that simultaneously provides high quality plasma and energetic ion composition measurements over 6 decades in ion energy in a wide variety of space plasma environments. CoDICE measures the two critical ion populations in space plasmas: (1) mass and ionic charge state composition and 3D velocity and angular distributions of ∼10 eV/q-40 keV/q plasma ions—CoDICE-Lo and (2) mass composition, energy spectra, and angular distributions of ∼30 keV-10 MeV energetic ions—CoDICE-Hi. CoDICE uses a common, integrated Time-of-Flight (TOF) versus residual energy (E) subsystem for measuring the two distinct ion populations. This paper describes the CoDICE design concept, and presents results of the laboratory tests of the TOF portion of the TOF vs. E subsystem, focusing specifically on (1) investigation of spill-over and contamination rates on the start and stop microchannel plate (MCP) anodes vs. secondary electron steering and focusing voltages, scanned around their corresponding model-optimized values, (2) TOF measurements and resolution and angular resolution, and (3) cross-contamination of the start and stop MCPs' singles rates from CoDICE-Lo and -Hi, and (4) energy resolution of avalanche photodiodes near the lower end of the CoDICE-Lo energy range. We also discuss physical effects that could impact the performance of the TOF vs. E subsystem in a flight instrument. Finally, we discuss advantages of the CoDICE design concept by comparing with capabilities and resources of existing flight instruments.

  4. Time-frequency energy density precipitation method for time-of-flight extraction of narrowband Lamb wave detection signals.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Y; Huang, S L; Wang, S; Zhao, W

    2016-05-01

    The time-of-flight of the Lamb wave provides an important basis for defect evaluation in metal plates and is the input signal for Lamb wave tomographic imaging. However, the time-of-flight can be difficult to acquire because of the Lamb wave dispersion characteristics. This work proposes a time-frequency energy density precipitation method to accurately extract the time-of-flight of narrowband Lamb wave detection signals in metal plates. In the proposed method, a discrete short-time Fourier transform is performed on the narrowband Lamb wave detection signals to obtain the corresponding discrete time-frequency energy density distribution. The energy density values at the center frequency for all discrete time points are then calculated by linear interpolation. Next, the time-domain energy density curve focused on that center frequency is precipitated by least squares fitting of the calculated energy density values. Finally, the peak times of the energy density curve obtained relative to the initial pulse signal are extracted as the time-of-flight for the narrowband Lamb wave detection signals. An experimental platform is established for time-of-flight extraction of narrowband Lamb wave detection signals, and sensitivity analysis of the proposed time-frequency energy density precipitation method is performed in terms of propagation distance, dispersion characteristics, center frequency, and plate thickness. For comparison, the widely used Hilbert-Huang transform method is also implemented for time-of-flight extraction. The results show that the time-frequency energy density precipitation method can accurately extract the time-of-flight with relative error of <1% and thus can act as a universal time-of-flight extraction method for narrowband Lamb wave detection signals. PMID:27250446

  5. Time-frequency energy density precipitation method for time-of-flight extraction of narrowband Lamb wave detection signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.; Huang, S. L.; Wang, S.; Zhao, W.

    2016-05-01

    The time-of-flight of the Lamb wave provides an important basis for defect evaluation in metal plates and is the input signal for Lamb wave tomographic imaging. However, the time-of-flight can be difficult to acquire because of the Lamb wave dispersion characteristics. This work proposes a time-frequency energy density precipitation method to accurately extract the time-of-flight of narrowband Lamb wave detection signals in metal plates. In the proposed method, a discrete short-time Fourier transform is performed on the narrowband Lamb wave detection signals to obtain the corresponding discrete time-frequency energy density distribution. The energy density values at the center frequency for all discrete time points are then calculated by linear interpolation. Next, the time-domain energy density curve focused on that center frequency is precipitated by least squares fitting of the calculated energy density values. Finally, the peak times of the energy density curve obtained relative to the initial pulse signal are extracted as the time-of-flight for the narrowband Lamb wave detection signals. An experimental platform is established for time-of-flight extraction of narrowband Lamb wave detection signals, and sensitivity analysis of the proposed time-frequency energy density precipitation method is performed in terms of propagation distance, dispersion characteristics, center frequency, and plate thickness. For comparison, the widely used Hilbert-Huang transform method is also implemented for time-of-flight extraction. The results show that the time-frequency energy density precipitation method can accurately extract the time-of-flight with relative error of <1% and thus can act as a universal time-of-flight extraction method for narrowband Lamb wave detection signals.

  6. Time-frequency energy density precipitation method for time-of-flight extraction of narrowband Lamb wave detection signals.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Y; Huang, S L; Wang, S; Zhao, W

    2016-05-01

    The time-of-flight of the Lamb wave provides an important basis for defect evaluation in metal plates and is the input signal for Lamb wave tomographic imaging. However, the time-of-flight can be difficult to acquire because of the Lamb wave dispersion characteristics. This work proposes a time-frequency energy density precipitation method to accurately extract the time-of-flight of narrowband Lamb wave detection signals in metal plates. In the proposed method, a discrete short-time Fourier transform is performed on the narrowband Lamb wave detection signals to obtain the corresponding discrete time-frequency energy density distribution. The energy density values at the center frequency for all discrete time points are then calculated by linear interpolation. Next, the time-domain energy density curve focused on that center frequency is precipitated by least squares fitting of the calculated energy density values. Finally, the peak times of the energy density curve obtained relative to the initial pulse signal are extracted as the time-of-flight for the narrowband Lamb wave detection signals. An experimental platform is established for time-of-flight extraction of narrowband Lamb wave detection signals, and sensitivity analysis of the proposed time-frequency energy density precipitation method is performed in terms of propagation distance, dispersion characteristics, center frequency, and plate thickness. For comparison, the widely used Hilbert-Huang transform method is also implemented for time-of-flight extraction. The results show that the time-frequency energy density precipitation method can accurately extract the time-of-flight with relative error of <1% and thus can act as a universal time-of-flight extraction method for narrowband Lamb wave detection signals.

  7. High mass resolution, high angular acceptance time-of-flight mass spectroscopy for planetary missions under the Planetary Instrument Definition and Development Program (PIDDP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, David T.

    1991-01-01

    This final report covers three years and several phases of work in which instrumentation for the Planetary Instrument Definition and Development Program (PIDDP) were successfully developed. There were two main thrusts to this research: (1) to develop and test methods for electrostatically scanning detector field-of-views, and (2) to improve the mass resolution of plasma mass spectrometers to M/delta M approximately 25, their field-of-view (FOV) to 360 degrees, and their E-range to cover approximately 1 eV to 50 keV. Prototypes of two different approaches to electrostatic scanning were built and tested. The Isochronous time-of-flight (TOF) and the linear electric field 3D TOF devices were examined.

  8. 3D and Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meulien Ohlmann, Odile

    2013-02-01

    Today the industry offers a chain of 3D products. Learning to "read" and to "create in 3D" becomes an issue of education of primary importance. 25 years professional experience in France, the United States and Germany, Odile Meulien set up a personal method of initiation to 3D creation that entails the spatial/temporal experience of the holographic visual. She will present some different tools and techniques used for this learning, their advantages and disadvantages, programs and issues of educational policies, constraints and expectations related to the development of new techniques for 3D imaging. Although the creation of display holograms is very much reduced compared to the creation of the 90ies, the holographic concept is spreading in all scientific, social, and artistic activities of our present time. She will also raise many questions: What means 3D? Is it communication? Is it perception? How the seeing and none seeing is interferes? What else has to be taken in consideration to communicate in 3D? How to handle the non visible relations of moving objects with subjects? Does this transform our model of exchange with others? What kind of interaction this has with our everyday life? Then come more practical questions: How to learn creating 3D visualization, to learn 3D grammar, 3D language, 3D thinking? What for? At what level? In which matter? for whom?

  9. Development of an ion time-of-flight spectrometer for neutron depth profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cetiner, Mustafa Sacit

    Ion time-of-flight spectrometry techniques are investigated for applicability to neutron depth profiling. Time-of-flight techniques are used extensively in a wide range of scientific and technological applications including energy and mass spectroscopy. Neutron depth profiling is a near-surface analysis technique that gives concentration distribution versus depth for certain technologically important light elements. The technique uses thermal or sub-thermal neutrons to initiate (n, p) or (n, alpha) reactions. Concentration versus depth distribution is obtained by the transformation of the energy spectrum into depth distribution by using stopping force tables of the projectiles in the substrate, and by converting the number of counts into concentration using a standard sample of known dose value. Conventionally, neutron depth profiling measurements are based on charged particle spectrometry, which employs semiconductor detectors such as a surface barrier detector (SBD) and the associated electronics. Measurements with semiconductor detectors are affected by a number of broadening mechanisms, which result from the interactions between the projectile ion and the detector material as well as fluctuations in the signal generation process. These are inherent features of the detection mechanism that involve the semiconductor detectors and cannot be avoided. Ion time-of-flight spectrometry offers highly precise measurement capabilities, particularly for slow particles. For high-energy low-mass particles, measurement resolution tends to degrade with all other parameters fixed. The threshold for more precise ion energy measurements with respect to conventional techniques, such as direct energy measurement by a surface barrier detector, is directly related to the design and operating parameters of the device. Time-of-flight spectrometry involves correlated detection of two signals by a coincidence unit. In ion time-of-flight spectroscopy, the ion generates the primary input

  10. Development of grazing incidence devices for space-borne time of flight mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cadu, A.; Devoto, P.; Louarn, P.; Sauvaud, J.-A.

    2012-04-01

    Time of flight mass spectrometer is widely used to study space plasmas in planetary and solar missions. This space-borne instrument selects ions in function of their energy through an electrostatic analyzer. Particles are then post-accelerated to energies in the range of 20 keV to cross a carbon foil. At the foil exit, electrons are emitted and separated from ion beam in the time of flight section. A first detector (a Micro-Channel Plate or MCP) emits a start signal at electron arrival and a second one emits a stop signal at incident ion end of path. The time difference gives the speed of the particle and its mass can be calculated, knowing its initial energy. However, current instruments suffer from strong limitations. The post acceleration needs very high voltage power supplies which are heavy, have a high power consumption and imply technical constraints for the development. A typical instrument weighs from 5 to 6 kg, includes a 20 kV power supply, consumes a least 5 W and encounters corona effect and electrical breakdown problems. Moreover, despite the particle high energy range, scattering and straggling phenomena in the carbon foil significantly reduce the instrument overall resolution. Some methods, such as electrostatic focus lenses or reflectrons, really improve mass separation but global system efficiency remains very low because of the charge state dependence of such devices. The main purpose of our work is to replace carbon foil by grazing incidence MCP's - also known as MPO's, for Micro Pore Optics - for electron emission. Thus, incident particles would back-scatter onto the channel inner surface with an angle of a few degrees. With this solution, we can decrease dispersion sources and lower the power supplies to post accelerate ions. The result would be a lighter and simpler instrument with a substantial resolution improvement. We have first simulated MPO's behavior with TRIM and MARLOWE Monte-Carlo codes. Energy scattering and output angle computed

  11. Tof-vis, software for interactive exploration of time-of-flight data.

    SciTech Connect

    Mikkelson, D.; Worlton, T.

    1997-12-05

    TOF-VIS, Software for Interactive Exploration of Time-of-Flight Data TOF-VIS is a fast, highly interactive program for examining time-of-flight neutron scattering data. All spectra from an experiment are displayed simultaneously as an image. The data can be displayed in terms of time-of-flight, energy, wave-vector, or lattice spacing. TOF-VIS has beer? used for examining data from IPNS and ISIS, and has been useful for diagnosing problems with instruments and detectors as well as for making a quick evaluation of the quality of the data. Hard copy output to a variety of devices using routines built on PGPLOT is now available. TOF-VIS is portable to VMS and UNIX, and is currently implemented primarily using object-based methods in This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the US Government. Neither the US Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, make any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the US Government or any agency thereof. The views and opinions of authors expressed herein do not necessarily state or reflect those of the US Government or any agency thereof. The TOF-VIS main or ''image'' view shows the set of spectra as an image in which rows of the image correspond to spectra from different detectors ordered by detector number or by detector as graphs in the other views. The values of the time, energy, wave-vector, lattice spacing and ''Q'' split into three levels: an interface layer, a translation layer, and an application layer. The interface The heart of the application layer

  12. Three-Dimensional Image of Cleavage Bodies in Nuclei Is Configured Using Gas Cluster Ion Beam with Time-of-Flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Masaki, Noritaka; Ishizaki, Itsuko; Hayasaka, Takahiro; Fisher, Gregory L.; Sanada, Noriaki; Yokota, Hideo; Setou, Mitsutoshi

    2015-01-01

    Structural variations of DNA in nuclei are deeply related with development, aging, and diseases through transcriptional regulation. In order to bare cross sections of samples maintaining sub-micron structures, an Ar2500+-gas cluster ion beam (GCIB) sputter was recently engineered. By introducing GCIB sputter to time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS), we analyzed the 3D configuration and chemical composition of subnuclear structures of pyramidal cells in the CA2 region in mouse brain hippocampus. Depth profiles of chemicals were analyzed as 3D distributions by combining topographic analyses. Signals corresponding to anions such as CN− and PO3− were distributed characteristically in the shape of cell organelles. CN− signals overlapped DAPI fluorescence signals corresponding to nuclei. The clusters shown by PO3− and those of adenine ions were colocalized inside nuclei revealed by the 3D reconstruction. Taking into account their size and their number in each nucleus, those clusters could be in the cleavage bodies, which are a kind of intranuclear structure. PMID:25961407

  13. Three-Dimensional Image of Cleavage Bodies in Nuclei Is Configured Using Gas Cluster Ion Beam with Time-of-Flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Masaki, Noritaka; Ishizaki, Itsuko; Hayasaka, Takahiro; Fisher, Gregory L; Sanada, Noriaki; Yokota, Hideo; Setou, Mitsutoshi

    2015-05-11

    Structural variations of DNA in nuclei are deeply related with development, aging, and diseases through transcriptional regulation. In order to bare cross sections of samples maintaining sub-micron structures, an Ar2500(+)-gas cluster ion beam (GCIB) sputter was recently engineered. By introducing GCIB sputter to time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS), we analyzed the 3D configuration and chemical composition of subnuclear structures of pyramidal cells in the CA2 region in mouse brain hippocampus. Depth profiles of chemicals were analyzed as 3D distributions by combining topographic analyses. Signals corresponding to anions such as CN(-) and PO3(-) were distributed characteristically in the shape of cell organelles. CN(-) signals overlapped DAPI fluorescence signals corresponding to nuclei. The clusters shown by PO3(-) and those of adenine ions were colocalized inside nuclei revealed by the 3D reconstruction. Taking into account their size and their number in each nucleus, those clusters could be in the cleavage bodies, which are a kind of intranuclear structure.

  14. Data acquisition system with pulse height capability for the TOFED time-of-flight neutron spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Z. J.; Peng, X. Y.; Zhang, X.; Du, T. F.; Hu, Z. M.; Cui, Z. Q.; Ge, L. J.; Xie, X. F.; Yuan, X.; Li, X. Q.; Zhang, G. H.; Chen, J. X.; Fan, T. S.; Gorini, G.; Nocente, M.; Tardocchi, M.; Hu, L. Q.; Zhong, G. Q.; Lin, S. Y.; Wan, B. N.

    2014-11-15

    A new time-of-flight neutron spectrometer TOFED has been constructed for installation at Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak. A data acquisition system combining measurements of flight time and energy from the interaction of neutrons with the TOFED scintillators has been developed. The data acquisition system can provide a digitizing resolution better than 1.5% (to be compared with the >10% resolution of the recoil particle energy in the plastic scintillators) and a time resolution <1 ns. At the same time, it is compatible with high count rate event recording, which is an essential feature to investigate phenomena occurring on time scales faster than the slowing down time (≈100 ms) of the beam ions in the plasma. Implications of these results on the TOFED capability to resolve fast ion signatures in the neutron spectrum from EAST plasmas are discussed.

  15. Monte Carlo study of the performance of a time-of-flight multichopper spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Daemen, L.L.; Eckert, J.; Pynn, R.

    1995-12-01

    The Monte Carlo method is a powerful technique for neutron transport studies. While it has been applied for many years to the study of nuclear systems, there are few codes available for neutron transport in the optical regime. The recent surge of interest in so-called next generation spallation neutron sources and the desire to design new and optimized instruments for these facilities has led us to develop a Monte Carlo code geared toward the simulation of neutron scattering instruments. The time-of-flight multichopper spectrometer, of which IN5 at the ILL is the prototypical example, is the first spectrometer studied with the code. Some of the results of a comparison between the IN5 performance at a reactor and at a Long Pulse Spallation Source (LPSS) are summarized here.

  16. Characterization of mustard seeds and paste by DART ionization with time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Prchalová, Jana; Kovařík, František; Ševčík, Rudolf; Čížková, Helena; Rajchl, Aleš

    2014-09-01

    Direct analysis in real time (DART) is a novel technique with great potential for rapid screening analysis. The DART ionization method coupled with high-resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOF-MS) has been used for characterization of mustard seeds and table mustard. The possibility to use DART to analyse glucosinolates was confirmed on determination of sinalbin (4-hydroxybenzyl glucosinolate). The DART-TOF-MS method was optimized and validated. A set of samples of mustard seeds and mustard products was analyzed. High-performance liquid chromatography and DART-TOF-MS were used to determine glucosinolates in mustard seeds and compared. The correlation equation between these methods was DART = 0.797*HPLC + 6.987, R(2)  = 0.972. The DART technique seems to be a suitable method for evaluation of the quality of mustard seeds and mustard products. PMID:25230177

  17. Data acquisition system with pulse height capability for the TOFED time-of-flight neutron spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Chen, Z J; Peng, X Y; Zhang, X; Du, T F; Hu, Z M; Cui, Z Q; Ge, L J; Xie, X F; Yuan, X; Gorini, G; Nocente, M; Tardocchi, M; Hu, L Q; Zhong, G Q; Lin, S Y; Wan, B N; Li, X Q; Zhang, G H; Chen, J X; Fan, T S

    2014-11-01

    A new time-of-flight neutron spectrometer TOFED has been constructed for installation at Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak. A data acquisition system combining measurements of flight time and energy from the interaction of neutrons with the TOFED scintillators has been developed. The data acquisition system can provide a digitizing resolution better than 1.5% (to be compared with the >10% resolution of the recoil particle energy in the plastic scintillators) and a time resolution <1 ns. At the same time, it is compatible with high count rate event recording, which is an essential feature to investigate phenomena occurring on time scales faster than the slowing down time (≈100 ms) of the beam ions in the plasma. Implications of these results on the TOFED capability to resolve fast ion signatures in the neutron spectrum from EAST plasmas are discussed.

  18. A comparison of four direct geometry time-of-flight spectrometers at the Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, Matthew B; Niedziela, Jennifer L; Abernathy, Douglas L; Debeer-Schmitt, Lisa M; Garlea, Vasile O; Granroth, Garrett E; Graves-Brook, Melissa K; Ehlers, Georg; Kolesnikov, Alexander I; Podlesnyak, Andrey A; Winn, Barry L

    2014-04-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory now hosts four direct geometry time-of-flight chopper spectrometers. These instruments cover a range of wave vector and energy transfer space with varying degrees of neutron flux and resolution. The regions of reciprocal and energy space available to measure at these instruments is not exclusive and overlaps significantly. We present a direct comparison of the capabilities of this instrumentation, conducted by data mining the instrument usage histories, and specific scanning regimes. In addition, one of the common science missions for these instruments is the study of magnetic excitations in condensed matter systems. We have measured the powder averaged spin wave spectra in one particular sample using each of these instruments, and use these data in our comparisons.

  19. A comparison of four direct geometry time-of-flight spectrometers at the Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, M. B.; Abernathy, D. L.; Ehlers, G.; Garlea, O.; Podlesnyak, A.; Winn, B.; Niedziela, J. L.; DeBeer-Schmitt, L.; Graves-Brook, M.; Granroth, G. E.; Kolesnikov, A. I.

    2014-04-15

    The Spallation Neutron Source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory now hosts four direct geometry time-of-flight chopper spectrometers. These instruments cover a range of wave-vector and energy transfer space with varying degrees of neutron flux and resolution. The regions of reciprocal and energy space available to measure at these instruments are not exclusive and overlap significantly. We present a direct comparison of the capabilities of this instrumentation, conducted by data mining the instrument usage histories, and specific scanning regimes. In addition, one of the common science missions for these instruments is the study of magnetic excitations in condensed matter systems. We have measured the powder averaged spin wave spectra in one particular sample using each of these instruments, and use these data in our comparisons.

  20. Time-of-Flight Measurements of Single-Electron Wave Packets in Quantum Hall Edge States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kataoka, M.; Johnson, N.; Emary, C.; See, P.; Griffiths, J. P.; Jones, G. A. C.; Farrer, I.; Ritchie, D. A.; Pepper, M.; Janssen, T. J. B. M.

    2016-03-01

    We report time-of-flight measurements on electrons traveling in quantum Hall edge states. Hot-electron wave packets are emitted one per cycle into edge states formed along a depleted sample boundary. The electron arrival time is detected by driving a detector barrier with a square wave that acts as a shutter. By adding an extra path using a deflection barrier, we measure a delay in the arrival time, from which the edge-state velocity v is deduced. We find that v follows 1 /B dependence, in good agreement with the E →×B → drift. The edge potential is estimated from the energy dependence of v using a harmonic approximation.

  1. The distribution of "time of flight" in three dimensional stationary chaotic advection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raynal, Florence; Carrière, Philippe

    2015-04-01

    The distributions of "time of flight" (time spent by a single fluid particle between two crossings of the Poincaré section) are investigated for five different three dimensional stationary chaotic mixers. Above all, we study the large tails of those distributions and show that mainly two types of behaviors are encountered. In the case of slipping walls, as expected, we obtain an exponential decay, which, however, does not scale with the Lyapunov exponent. Using a simple model, we suggest that this decay is related to the negative eigenvalues of the fixed points of the flow. When no-slip walls are considered, as predicted by the model, the behavior is radically different, with a very large tail following a power law with an exponent close to -3.

  2. Quantum fluctuations and condensate fraction during time-of-flight expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Fang Shiang; Lee, Ray-Kuang; Wang, Daw-Wei

    2010-09-15

    The quantum fluctuation effects in the time-of-flight (TOF) experiment for a condensate released from an optical-lattice potential is studied within the truncated Wigner approximation. By investigating both the spatial and momentum density distributions, we find that the condensate fraction decreases monotonically in time and hence cannot be measured in the standard TOF image. We then propose a semiquantitative analysis for such dynamical quantum-depletion process. Our study shows a universal algebraic decay of the true condensate fraction, and has a very good agreement with numerical results. We also discuss possible methods to determine the condensate fraction inside the optical lattice, and its implication to the TOF experiments in higher dimensional systems.

  3. The Time-Of-Flight Detector for RHIC/STAR and The Related Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Dong Xin

    2006-11-02

    A full barrel Time-Of-Flight (TOF) detector based on the Multi-gap Resistive Plate Chamber (MRPC) technology will be constructed and installed in the STAR detector at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). Several TOP prototypes with some MRPC modules were tested in the last RHIC runs and they functioned well, satisfying the requested characteristics for the TOF detector by the STAR physics. Some important physics results have been obtained using these prototypes in STAR and released to publication. With the coming full barrel TOF detector, many measurements on more penetrating probes can be made with high precision and large acceptance. The related physics which may reveal the discovery and property of Quark-Gluon Plasma will be discussed.

  4. Note: Ultrasonic gas flowmeter based on optimized time-of-flight algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, X. F.; Tang, Z. A.

    2011-04-15

    A new digital signal processor based single path ultrasonic gas flowmeter is designed, constructed, and experimentally tested. To achieve high accuracy measurements, an optimized ultrasound driven method of incorporation of the amplitude modulation and the phase modulation of the transmit-receive technique is used to stimulate the transmitter. Based on the regularities among the received envelope zero-crossings, different received signal's signal-to-noise ratio situations are discriminated and optional time-of-flight algorithms are applied to take flow rate calculations. Experimental results from the dry calibration indicate that the designed flowmeter prototype can meet the zero-flow verification test requirements of the American Gas Association Report No. 9. Furthermore, the results derived from the flow calibration prove that the proposed flowmeter prototype can measure flow rate accurately in the practical experiments, and the nominal accuracies after FWME adjustment are lower than 0.8% throughout the calibration range.

  5. Asymmetric band flipping for time-of-flight neutron diffraction data

    DOE PAGES

    Whitfield, Pamela S.; Coelho, Alan A.

    2016-08-24

    Charge flipping with powder diffraction data is known to produce a result more reliably with high-resolution data,i.e.visible reflections at smalldspacings. This data are readily accessible with the neutron time-of-flight technique but the assumption that negative scattering density is nonphysical is no longer valid where elements with negative scattering lengths are present. The concept of band flipping was introduced in the literature, where a negative threshold is used in addition to a positive threshold during the flipping. But, it was not tested with experimental data at the time. Finallly, band flipping has been implemented inTOPAStogether with the band modification of low-densitymore » elimination and tested with experimental powder and Laue single-crystal neutron data.« less

  6. Laser Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry for Future In Situ Planetary Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Getty, S. A.; Brinckerhoff, W. B.; Cornish, T.; Ecelberger, S. A.; Li, X.; Floyd, M. A. Merrill; Chanover, N.; Uckert, K.; Voelz, D.; Xiao, X.; Tawalbeh, R.; Glenar, D.; Elsila, J. E.; Callahan, M.

    2012-01-01

    Laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LD-TOF-MS) is a versatile, low-complexity instrument class that holds significant promise for future landed in situ planetary missions that emphasize compositional analysis of surface materials. Here we describe a 5kg-class instrument that is capable of detecting and analyzing a variety of analytes directly from rock or ice samples. Through laboratory studies of a suite of representative samples, we show that detection and analysis of key mineral composition, small organics, and particularly, higher molecular weight organics are well suited to this instrument design. A mass range exceeding 100,000 Da has recently been demonstrated. We describe recent efforts in instrument prototype development and future directions that will enhance our analytical capabilities targeting organic mixtures on primitive and icy bodies. We present results on a series of standards, simulated mixtures, and meteoritic samples.

  7. Depth profiling and imaging capabilities of an ultrashort pulse laser ablation time of flight mass spectrometer

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Yang; Moore, Jerry F.; Milasinovic, Slobodan; Liu, Yaoming; Gordon, Robert J.; Hanley, Luke

    2012-01-01

    An ultrafast laser ablation time-of-flight mass spectrometer (AToF-MS) and associated data acquisition software that permits imaging at micron-scale resolution and sub-micron-scale depth profiling are described. The ion funnel-based source of this instrument can be operated at pressures ranging from 10−8 to ∼0.3 mbar. Mass spectra may be collected and stored at a rate of 1 kHz by the data acquisition system, allowing the instrument to be coupled with standard commercial Ti:sapphire lasers. The capabilities of the AToF-MS instrument are demonstrated on metal foils and semiconductor wafers using a Ti:sapphire laser emitting 800 nm, ∼75 fs pulses at 1 kHz. Results show that elemental quantification and depth profiling are feasible with this instrument. PMID:23020378

  8. Note: ultrasonic gas flowmeter based on optimized time-of-flight algorithms.

    PubMed

    Wang, X F; Tang, Z A

    2011-04-01

    A new digital signal processor based single path ultrasonic gas flowmeter is designed, constructed, and experimentally tested. To achieve high accuracy measurements, an optimized ultrasound driven method of incorporation of the amplitude modulation and the phase modulation of the transmit-receive technique is used to stimulate the transmitter. Based on the regularities among the received envelope zero-crossings, different received signal's signal-to-noise ratio situations are discriminated and optional time-of-flight algorithms are applied to take flow rate calculations. Experimental results from the dry calibration indicate that the designed flowmeter prototype can meet the zero-flow verification test requirements of the American Gas Association Report No. 9. Furthermore, the results derived from the flow calibration prove that the proposed flowmeter prototype can measure flow rate accurately in the practical experiments, and the nominal accuracies after FWME adjustment are lower than 0.8% throughout the calibration range. PMID:21529053

  9. Stopping power measurements with the Time-of-Flight (ToF) technique

    SciTech Connect

    Fontana, Cristiano L.; Chen, Chien-Hung; Crespillo, Miguel L.; Graham, Joseph T.; Xue, Haizhou; Zhang, Yanwen; Weber, William J.

    2015-11-10

    In our review of measurements of the stopping power of ions in matter is presented along with new measurements of the stopping powers of O, Si, Ti, and Au ions in self-supporting thin foils of SiO2, Nb2O5, and Ta2O5. Moreover, a Time-of-Flight system at the Ion Beam Materials Laboratory at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, was used in transmission geometry in order to reduce experimental uncertainties. Finally, the resulting stopping powers show good precision and accuracy and corroborate previously quoted values in the literature. New stopping data are determined.

  10. A new neutron time-of-flight detector for fuel-areal-density measurements on OMEGA

    SciTech Connect

    Glebov, V. Yu. Forrest, C. J.; Marshall, K. L.; Romanofsky, M.; Sangster, T. C.; Shoup, M. J.; Stoeckl, C.

    2014-11-15

    A new neutron time-of-flight (nTOF) detector for fuel-areal-density measurements in cryogenic DT implosions was installed on the OMEGA Laser System. The nTOF detector has a cylindrical thin-wall, stainless-steel, 8-in.-diam, 4-in.-thick cavity filled with an oxygenated liquid xylene scintillator. Four gated photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) with different gains are used to measure primary DT and D{sub 2} neutrons, down-scattered neutrons in nT and nD kinematic edge regions, and to study tertiary neutrons in the same detector. The nTOF detector is located 13.4 m from target chamber center in a well-collimated line of sight. The design details of the nTOF detector, PMT optimization, and test results on OMEGA will be presented.

  11. A large-area time-of-flight system for a colliding beam machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basile, M.; Cara Romeo, G.; Cifarelli, L.; D'Ali, G.; Di Cesare, P.; Giusti, P.; Massam, T.; Palmonari, F.; Sartorelli, G.; Valenti, G.; Contin, A.; Favale, L.; Zichichi, A.; Esposito, B.

    1981-02-01

    We describe the performance of a large solid-angle (2 sr) time-of-flight system used in conjunction with the Split Field Magnet spectrometer of the CERN Intersecting Storage Rings (ISR). The system consists of a hodoscope of 67 scintillator counters, at a distance of about 5 m from the beam intersection. The ISR being a coasting beam machine, contrary to the tightly bunched e +e - machines, the event time is unknown and therefore a special analysis procedure for particle identification is required. We illustrate a powerful statistical method which allows the identification, with more than 90% efficiency, of pions up to about 1 GeV/c, kaons up to about 1.4 GeV/c, and protons up to about 2 GeV/c.

  12. Quantitative analysis of biomolecules by time-of-flight secondary-ion mass spectrometry: Fundamental considerations

    SciTech Connect

    Muddiman, D.C.; Nicola, A.J.; Proctor, A.

    1995-12-31

    Static Time-of-Flight Secondary-Ion Mass Spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) has been applied to investigate an extensive assortment of analytical systems; from semiconductors to DNA sequencing. Recently, the TOF-SIMS method has been successfully applied to real biological systems. This report focuses on some important aspects that must be taken into consideration when conducting measurements on biomaterials in order to observe the potential the TOF-SIMS method affords. The current data are presented using Cyclosporin A (CsA, 1202 Da) and cocaine (303 Da) as model compounds. CsA is observed in the TOF-SIMS mass spectrum predominately as a Ag-cationized species and cocaine as a protonated species; thus, they are complementary probe molecules.

  13. Time-of-flight electron spectrometer for a broad range of kinetic energies

    SciTech Connect

    Kothe, Alexander; Metje, Jan; Wilke, Martin; Moguilevski, Alexandre; Engel, Nicholas; Al-Obaidi, Ruba; Richter, Clemens; Golnak, Ronny; Kiyan, Igor Yu.; Aziz, Emad F.

    2013-02-15

    A newly constructed time-of-flight electron spectrometer of the magnetic bottle type is characterized for electron detection in a broad range of kinetic energies. The instrument is designed to measure the energy spectra of electrons generated from liquids excited by strong laser fields and photons in the range of extreme ultra violet and soft X-rays. Argon inner shell electrons were recorded to calibrate the spectrometer and investigate its characteristics, such as energy resolution and collection efficiency. Its energy resolution {Delta}E/E of 1.6% allows resolving the Ar 2p spin orbit structure at kinetic energies higher than 100 eV. The collection efficiency is determined and compared to that of the spectrometer in its field-free configuration.

  14. Automated Gain Control Ion Funnel Trap for Orthogonal Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Belov, Mikhail E.; Liyu, Andrei V.; Smith, Richard D.

    2009-01-01

    Time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOF MS) is increasingly used in proteomics research. Herein, we report on the development and characterization of a TOF MS instrument with improved sensitivity equipped with an electrodynamic ion funnel trap (IFT) that employs an automated gain control (AGC) capability. The IFT-TOF MS was coupled to a reversed-phase capillary liquid chromatography (RPLC) separation and evaluated in experiments with complex proteolytic digests. When applied to a global tryptic digest of Shewanella oneidensis proteins, an order-of-magnitude increase in sensitivity compared to that of the conventional continuous mode of operation was achieved due to efficient ion accumulation prior to TOF MS analysis. As a result of this sensitivity improvement and related improvement in mass measurement accuracy, the number of unique peptides identified in the AGC-IFT mode was 5-fold greater than that obtained in the continuous mode. PMID:18512944

  15. Background optimization for the neutron time-of-flight spectrometer NEAT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Günther, G.; Russina, M.

    2016-08-01

    The neutron time-of-flight spectrometer NEAT at BER II is currently undergoing a major upgrade where an important aspect is the prevention of parasitic scattering to enhance the signal-to-noise ratio. Here, we discuss the impact of shielding to suppress parasitic scattering from two identified sources of background: the sample environment and detector tubes. By means of Monte Carlo simulations and a modification of the analytical model of Copley et al. [Copley and Cook, 1994], the visibility functions of instrument parts are computed for different shielding configurations. According to three selection criteria, namely suppression of background, transmission and detection limit, the parameters of an oscillating radial collimator are optimized for NEAT's default setup. Moreover, different configurations of detector shielding are discussed to prevent cross-talk within the radial detector system.

  16. Multiphoton Ionization Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry for the Detection of Bioactive Lignan.

    PubMed

    Uchimura, Tomohiro; Tokumoto, Goro; Batnyam, Onon; Chou, Chih-Wei; Fujita, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    Multiphoton ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MPI-TOFMS) combined with a pulsed laser for sample vaporization was developed for the detection of a low-volatile compound in a solution. A solution containing Taiwanin A ((3E,4E)-3,4-bis(1,3-benzodioxol-5-ylmethylene)dihydro-2(3H)-furanone), which is a lignan that has an anticancer effect, was employed in the present study. Consequently, Taiwanin A could be detected by irradiating a laser pulse for vaporization to an inlet nozzle, rather than by heating. Therefore, the present method could be effective for detecting compounds with lower volatilities in a liquid sample. PMID:26860576

  17. Phase-aware candidate selection for time-of-flight depth map denoising

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hach, Thomas; Seybold, Tamara; Böttcher, Hendrik

    2015-03-01

    This paper presents a new pre-processing algorithm for Time-of-Flight (TOF) depth map denoising. Typically, denoising algorithms use the raw depth map as it comes from the sensor. Systematic artifacts due to the measurement principle are not taken into account which degrades the denoising results. For phase measurement TOF sensing, a major artifact is observed as salt-and-pepper noise caused by the measurement's ambiguity. Our pre-processing algorithm is able to isolate and unwrap affected pixels deploying the physical behavior of the capturing system yielding Gaussian noise. Using this pre-processing method before applying the denoising step clearly improves the parameter estimation for the denoising filter together with its final results.

  18. Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance versus time of flight for precision mass measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Kouzes, R.T.

    1993-02-01

    Both Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance and ICR Time-of-Flight mass spectroscopy (FTICR-MS and ICR-TOF-MS, respectively) have been applied to precision atomic mass measurements. This paper reviews the status of these approaches and compares their limitations. Comparisons are made of FTICR-MS and ICR-TOF-MS for application to precision atomic mass measurements of stable and unstable nuclei, where the relevant scale is an accuracy of 1 keV and where halflives are longer than 10 milliseconds (optimistically). The atomic mass table is built up from mass chains, and ICR-MS brings a method of producing new types of mass chains to the mass measurement arena.

  19. Beer fingerprinting by Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption-Ionisation-Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Šedo, Ondrej; Márová, Ivana; Zdráhal, Zbyněk

    2012-11-15

    A method allowing parallel fingerprinting of proteins and maltooligosaccharides directly from untreated beer samples is presented. These two classes of compounds were detected by Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption-Ionisation-Time of Flight-Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) analysis of beer mixed with 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid solution. The maltooligosaccharide profiles acquired from the MALDI sample spot center were not found characteristic for beers of different source and technology. On the other hand, according to profiles containing protein signals acquired from crystals formed on the border of the MALDI sample spot, we were able to distinguish beer samples of the same brand produced by different breweries. The discriminatory abilities of the method were further examined on a set of 17 lager beers, where the fingerprints containing protein signals enabled resolution of majority of examined brands. We propose MALDI-TOF-MS profiling as a rapid tool for beer brewing technology process monitoring, quality control, and determination of beer authenticity.

  20. A Design for a Compact Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Manard, M.

    2012-10-01

    The design of a prototype, compact time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometer (MS) is described. The system primarily consists of an ion acceleration/focusing/steering assembly (AFSA), an 8 cm field-free region, a 4 cm, dual-stage reflectron and a miniature microchannel plate detector. Consequently, the resulting flight length of the system is 12 cm. The system has been designed with the capability to sample directly from atmosphere at ambient pressures. This is accomplished through the use of an electrodynamic ion funnel, housed in an intermediate-vacuum chamber that is coupled to the inlet of the TOF chamber. TOF spectra were obtained using noble gases (Ar, Kr and Xe) as test chemicals. These measured flight times were used to probe the performance of the instrument. A temporal resolution (tflight/Δt) of approximately 125, acquired using 129Xe+, has been measured for the system.

  1. Development of picoseconds Time of Flight systems in Meson Test Beam Facility at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Ronzhin, A.; Albrow, M.; Demarteau, M.; Los, S.; Malik, S.; Pronko, S.; Ramberg, E.; Zatserklyaniy, A.; /Puerto Rico U., Mayaguez

    2010-11-01

    The goal of the work is to develop time of flight (TOF) system with about 10 picosecond time resolution in real beam line when start and stop counters separated by some distance. We name the distance as 'base' for the TOF. This 'real' TOF setup is different from another one when start and stop counters located next to each other. The real TOF is sensitive to beam momentum spread, beam divergence, etc. Anyway some preliminary measurements are useful with close placement of start and stop counter. We name it 'close geometry'. The work started about 2 years ago at Fermilab Meson Test Beam Facility (MTBF). The devices tested in 'close geometry' were Microchannel Plate Photomultipliers (MCP PMT) with Cherenkov radiators. TOF counters based on Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPms) with Cherenkov radiators also in 'close geometry' were tested. We report here new results obtained with the counters in the MTBF at Fermilab, including beam line data.

  2. Liquid Chromatography Quadrupole Time-of-Flight Characterization of Metabolites Guided by the METLIN Database

    PubMed Central

    Schultz, Andrew W.; Wang, Junhua; Zhu, Zheng-Jiang; Johnson, Caroline H.; Patti, Gary J.; Siuzdak, Gary

    2013-01-01

    Untargeted metabolomics provides a comprehensive platform to identify metabolites whose levels are altered between two or more populations. By using liquid chromatography quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC-Q-ToF-MS), hundreds to thousands of peaks with a unique m/z and retention time are routinely detected from most biological samples in an untargeted profiling experiment. Each peak, termed a metabolomic feature, can be characterized on the basis of its accurate mass, retention time, and tandem mass spectral fragmentation pattern. Here a 7-step protocol is suggested for such a characterization by using the METLIN metabolite database. The protocol starts from untargeted metabolomic LC-Q-ToF-MS data that has been analyzed with the bioinformatic program XCMS, and describes a strategy for selecting interesting features as well as performing subsequent targeted tandem mass spectrometry. The 7 steps described will require 2-4 hours to complete per feature, depending on the compound. PMID:23391889

  3. Campaign 1.7 Pu Aging. Development of Time of Flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Venhaus, Thomas J.

    2015-09-09

    The first application of Time-of-Flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectroscopy (ToF-SIMS) to an aged plutonium surface has resulted in a rich set of surface chemistry data, as well as some unexpected results. FY15 was highlighted by not only the first mapping of hydrogen-containing features within the metal, but also a prove-in series of experiments using the system’s Sieverts Reaction Cell. These experiments involved successfully heating the sample to ~450 oC for nearly 24 hours while the sample was dosed several times with hydrogen, followed by an in situ ToF-SIMS analysis. During this year, the data allowed for better and more consistent identification of the myriad peaks that result from the SIMS sputter process. In collaboration with the AWE (U.K), the system was also fully aligned for sputter depth profiling for future experiments.

  4. Characterization of gunpowder samples using time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS).

    PubMed

    Mahoney, Christine M; Gillen, Greg; Fahey, Albert J

    2006-04-20

    Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) was utilized to obtain characteristic mass spectra from three different smokeless powders and six different black powder samples. In these mass spectra, peaks indicative of both the organic and inorganic additive constituents in the gunpowders were observed. TOF-SIMS was able to successfully differentiate between the different black and smokeless gunpowder samples analyzed with the aid of principal components analysis (PCA), a multivariate statistical analysis approach often used to reduce the dimensionality of complex data. TOF-SIMS was also used to obtain information about the spatial distribution of the various additives contained within the gunpowder samples. SIMS imaging demonstrated that that the samples could potentially be characterized by their 2-D structure, which varied from sample to sample. These results clearly demonstrate the feasibility of utilizing TOF-SIMS as a tool for the characterization and differentiation of gunpowder samples for general forensic applications.

  5. New high-resolution electrostatic ion mass analyzer using time of flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, D. C.; Gloeckler, G.; Ipavich, F. M.; Lundgren, R. A.; Sheldon, R. B.

    1990-01-01

    The design of a high-resolution ion-mass analyzer is described, which is based on an accurate measurement of the time of flight (TOF) of ions within a region configured to produce a harmonic potential. In this device, the TOF, which is independent of ion energy, is determined from a start pulse from secondary electrons produced when the ion passes through a thin carbon foil at the entrance of the TOF region and at a stop pulse from the ion striking a microchannel plate upon exciting the region. A laboratory prototype instrument called 'VMASS' was built and was tested at the Goddard Space Flight Center electrostatic accelerator, showing a good mass resolution of the instrument. Sensors of the VMASS type will form part of the WIND Solar Wind and Suprathermal Ion experiment, the Soho mission, and the Advanced Composition Explorer.

  6. Invited Article: Polarization ``Down Under'': The polarized time-of-flight neutron reflectometer PLATYPUS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saerbeck, T.; Klose, F.; Le Brun, A. P.; Füzi, J.; Brule, A.; Nelson, A.; Holt, S. A.; James, M.

    2012-08-01

    This review presents the implementation and full characterization of the polarization equipment of the time-of-flight neutron reflectometer PLATYPUS at the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO). The functionality and efficiency of individual components are evaluated and found to maintain a high neutron beam polarization with a maximum of 99.3% through polarizing Fe/Si supermirrors. Neutron spin-flippers with efficiencies of 99.7% give full control over the incident and scattered neutron spin direction over the whole wavelength spectrum available in the instrument. The first scientific experiments illustrate data correction mechanisms for finite polarizations and reveal an extraordinarily high reproducibility for measuring magnetic thin film samples. The setup is now fully commissioned and available for users through the neutron beam proposal system of the Bragg Institute at ANSTO.

  7. Improved time-of-flight range acquisition technique in underwater lidar experiments.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Zao; Yang, Kecheng; Han, Jiefei; Zhou, Yiyu; Sun, Liying; Li, Wei; Xia, Min

    2015-06-20

    This paper presents an underwater lidar time-of-flight ranging system that combines the variable forgivable factor recursive least-squares (VFF-RLS) adaptive filter algorithm and the constant fraction discriminator (CFD) timing technology. The effectiveness of suppressing the backscattering and increasing timing accuracy is experimentally verified in the water basin under the different target distances, especially near the detection limit. The classical RLS is creatively transformed by introducing the VFF, which is highly correlated to the target echo at any distance. The improvement of the signal-to-backscatter ratio always exceeds 18.9 dB. The Monte Carlo simulation proves the applicability of the proposed method in the media of different turbidity. The influences of the selective timing methods on the walk error and time jitter are compared, and the optimum zero point of CFD is achieved by the slope analysis of leading (falling) edge in experimental target pulses. PMID:26193020

  8. Joint Temperature-Lasing Mode Compensation for Time-of-Flight LiDAR Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Alhashimi, Anas; Varagnolo, Damiano; Gustafsson, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    We propose an expectation maximization (EM) strategy for improving the precision of time of flight (ToF) light detection and ranging (LiDAR) scanners. The novel algorithm statistically accounts not only for the bias induced by temperature changes in the laser diode, but also for the multi-modality of the measurement noises that is induced by mode-hopping effects. Instrumental to the proposed EM algorithm, we also describe a general thermal dynamics model that can be learned either from just input-output data or from a combination of simple temperature experiments and information from the laser’s datasheet. We test the strategy on a SICK LMS 200 device and improve its average absolute error by a factor of three. PMID:26690445

  9. TOFwave: reproducibility in biomarker discovery from time-of-flight mass spectrometry data.

    PubMed

    Chierici, Marco; Albanese, Davide; Franceschi, Pietro; Furlanello, Cesare

    2012-11-01

    Many are the sources of variability that can affect reproducibility of disease biomarkers from time-of-flight (TOF) Mass Spectrometry (MS) data. Here we present TOFwave, a complete software pipeline for TOF-MS biomarker identification, that limits the impact of parameter tuning along the whole chain of preprocessing and model selection modules. Peak profiles are obtained by a preprocessing based on Continuous Wavelet Transform (CWT), coupled with a machine learning protocol aimed at avoiding selection bias effects. Only two parameters (minimum peak width and a signal to noise cutoff) have to be explicitly set. The TOFwave pipeline is built on top of the mlpy Python package. Examples on Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption and Ionization (MALDI) TOF datasets are presented. Software prototype, datasets and details to replicate results in this paper can be found at http://mlpy.sf.net/tofwave/. PMID:22875362

  10. Analysis of Gait Using a Treadmill and a Time-of-Flight Camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, Rasmus R.; Paulsen, Rasmus R.; Larsen, Rasmus

    We present a system that analyzes human gait using a treadmill and a Time-of-flight camera. The camera provides spatial data with local intensity measures of the scene, and data are collected over several gait cycles. These data are then used to model and analyze the gait. For each frame the spatial data and the intensity image are used to fit an articulated model to the data using a Markov random field. To solve occlusion issues the model movement is smoothened providing the missing data for the occluded parts. The created model is then cut into cycles, which are matched and through Fourier fitting a cyclic model is created. The output data are: Speed, Cadence, Step length and Range-of-motion. The described output parameters are computed with no user interaction using a setup with no requirements to neither background nor subject clothing.

  11. Neutron beam monitoring for time-of-flight facilities with gaseous detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aza, Eleni; Magistris, Matteo; Murtas, Fabrizio; Puddu, Silvia; Silari, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Triple Gas Electron Multipliers (GEM) for slow and fast neutrons were employed at the n_TOF facility at CERN as online beam imaging monitors and for energy spectra measurements via the time-of-flight technique. The detectors were exposed to the neutron spectrum ranging from thermal to 1 GeV, produced by spallation of 20 GeV/c protons in a lead target with a maximum intensity of 7·1012 protons per pulse. The spectrum and the 2D count distribution of the neutron beam were measured and compared at two distances from the target, 185 m and 200 m. The detectors showed radiation hardness, linear response and the ability to monitor the beam profile online with high spatial resolution.

  12. Joint Temperature-Lasing Mode Compensation for Time-of-Flight LiDAR Sensors.

    PubMed

    Alhashimi, Anas; Varagnolo, Damiano; Gustafsson, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    We propose an expectation maximization (EM) strategy for improving the precision of time of flight (ToF) light detection and ranging (LiDAR) scanners. The novel algorithm statistically accounts not only for the bias induced by temperature changes in the laser diode, but also for the multi-modality of the measurement noises that is induced by mode-hopping effects. Instrumental to the proposed EM algorithm, we also describe a general thermal dynamics model that can be learned either from just input-output data or from a combination of simple temperature experiments and information from the laser's datasheet. We test the strategy on a SICK LMS 200 device and improve its average absolute error by a factor of three. PMID:26690445

  13. Note: Ultrasonic gas flowmeter based on optimized time-of-flight algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X. F.; Tang, Z. A.

    2011-04-01

    A new digital signal processor based single path ultrasonic gas flowmeter is designed, constructed, and experimentally tested. To achieve high accuracy measurements, an optimized ultrasound driven method of incorporation of the amplitude modulation and the phase modulation of the transmit-receive technique is used to stimulate the transmitter. Based on the regularities among the received envelope zero-crossings, different received signal's signal-to-noise ratio situations are discriminated and optional time-of-flight algorithms are applied to take flow rate calculations. Experimental results from the dry calibration indicate that the designed flowmeter prototype can meet the zero-flow verification test requirements of the American Gas Association Report No. 9. Furthermore, the results derived from the flow calibration prove that the proposed flowmeter prototype can measure flow rate accurately in the practical experiments, and the nominal accuracies after FWME adjustment are lower than 0.8% throughout the calibration range.

  14. Probing nanoparticles and nanoparticle-conjugated biomolecules using time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Pil; Shon, Hyun Kyong; Shin, Seung Koo; Lee, Tae Geol

    2015-01-01

    Bio-conjugated nanoparticles have emerged as novel molecular probes in nano-biotechnology and nanomedicine and chemical analyses of their surfaces have become challenges. The time-of-flight (TOF) secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) has been one of the most powerful surface characterization techniques for both nanoparticles and biomolecules. When combined with various nanoparticle-based signal enhancing strategies, TOF-SIMS can probe the functionalization of nanoparticles as well as their locations and interactions in biological systems. Especially, nanoparticle-based SIMS is an attractive approach for label-free drug screening because signal-enhancing nanoparticles can be designed to directly measure the enzyme activity. The chemical-specific imaging analysis using SIMS is also well suited to screen nanoparticles and nanoparticle-biomolecule conjugates in complex environments. This review presents some recent applications of nanoparticle-based TOF-SIMS to the chemical analysis of complex biological systems.

  15. A quadrupole/time-of-flight mass spectrometry study of Trp-cage's conformation.

    PubMed

    Lin, Mingxiang; Ahmed, Zeeshan; Taormina, Christopher R; Somayajula, Kasi V

    2007-02-01

    Trp-cage is a synthetic 20-residue miniprotein that uses tertiary contacts to stabilize its native conformation. NMR, circular dichroism (CD), and UV-resonance Raman spectroscopy were used to probe its energy landscape. In this quadrupole/time-of-flight study, electrospray ionization charge state distribution (CSD) and solution-phase H/D exchange are used to probe Trp-cage's tertiary structure. The CSDs of Trp-cage and its mutant provide spectra showing a pH-dependent conformation change. Solution-phase H/D exchange in 30% deuterated trifluoroethanol solution of the wild type shows increased protection of one labile hydrogen in the native state. Together, CSDs and solution-phase H/D exchange are demonstrated to constitute a simple but effective means to follow conformation changes in a small tertiary protein. PMID:17067814

  16. National Ignition Facility (NIF) Neutron time-of-flight (nTOF) Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Lerche, R A; Glebov, V Y; Moran, M J; McNaney, J M; Kilkenny, J D; Eckart, M; Zacharias, R A; Haslam, J J; Clancy, T J; Yeoman, M F; Warwas, D P; Sangster, T C; Stoeckl, C; Knauer, J; Horsfield, C J

    2010-05-13

    The first three of eighteen neutron time-of-flight (nTOF) channels have been installed at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The role of these detectors includes yield, temperature, and bang time measurements. This article focuses on nTOF data analysis and quality of results obtained for the first set of experiments to use all 192 NIF beams. Targets produced up to 2 x 10{sup 10} 2.45-MeV neutrons for initial testing of the nTOF detectors. Differences in neutron scattering at the OMEGA laser facility where the detectors were calibrated and at NIF result in different response functions at the two facilities. Monte Carlo modeling shows this difference. The nTOF performance on these early experiments indicates the nTOF system with its full complement of detectors should perform well in future measurements of yield, temperature, and bang time.

  17. High precision electric gate for time-of-flight ion mass spectrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sittler, Edward C. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A time-of-flight mass spectrometer having a chamber with electrodes to generate an electric field in the chamber and electric gating for allowing ions with a predetermined mass and velocity into the electric field. The design uses a row of very thin parallel aligned wires that are pulsed in sequence so the ion can pass through the gap of two parallel plates, which are biased to prevent passage of the ion. This design by itself can provide a high mass resolution capability and a very precise start pulse for an ion mass spectrometer. Furthermore, the ion will only pass through the chamber if it is within a wire diameter of the first wire when it is pulsed and has the right speed so it is near all other wires when they are pulsed.

  18. Delayed bunching for multi-reflection time-of-flight mass separation

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenbusch, M.; Marx, G.; Schweikhard, L.; Wienholtz, F.; Chauveau, P.; Delahaye, P.

    2015-06-29

    Many experiments are handicapped when the ion sources do not only deliver the ions of interest but also contaminations, i.e., unwanted ions of similar mass. In the recent years, multi-reflection time-of-flight mass separation has become a promising method to isolate the ions of interest from the contaminants, in particular for measurements with low-energy short-lived nuclides. To further improve the performance of multi-reflection mass separators with respect to the limitations by space-charge effects, the simultaneously trapped ions are spatially widely distributed in the apparatus. Thus, the ions can propagate with reduced Coulomb interactions until, finally, they are bunched by a change in the trapping conditions for high-resolution mass separation. Proof-of-principle measurements are presented.

  19. Molecular structure of fulvic acids by electrospray with quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Plancque, G; Amekraz, B; Moulin, V; Toulhoat, P; Moulin, C

    2001-01-01

    Characterisation of the molecular structure of aquatic fulvic acids (FA) has been performed using a quadrupole time-of-flight (Q-TOF) mass spectrometer equipped with an electrospray ionisation interface. Molecular masses centred around 450 Da and sinusoidal spectral distributions have been obtained for all fulvic acids. Tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) experiments showed losses of 18 Da (H(2)O) and 44 Da (CO(2)), and possible molecular structures were determined for the first time to our knowledge. A methodology is reported for evaluating the average elemental composition of FA from high-resolution mass spectra by processing post-acquisition data calculations using molecular size distributions and atomic compositions of ions. The results are found to be consistent with elemental analysis data.

  20. MONSTER: a time of flight spectrometer for β-delayed neutron emission measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, A. R.; Martínez, T.; Cano-Ott, D.; Castilla, J.; Guerrero, C.; Marín, J.; Martínez, G.; Mendoza, E.; Ovejero, M. C.; Reillo, E. M.; Santos, C.; Tera, F. J.; Villamarín, D.; Nolte, R.; Agramunt, J.; Algora, A.; Tain, J. L.; Banerjee, K.; Bhattacharya, C.; Pentillä, H.; Rinta-Antila, S.; Gorelov, D.

    2012-05-01

    The knowledge of the β-decay properties of nuclei contributes decisively to our understanding of nuclear phenomena: the β-delayed neutron emission of neutron rich nuclei plays an important role in the nucleosynthesis r-process and constitutes a probe for nuclear structure of very neutron rich nuclei providing information about the high energy part of the full beta strength (Sβ) function. In addition, β-delayed neutrons are essential for the control and safety of nuclear reactors. In order to determine the neutron energy spectra and emission probabilities from neutron precursors a MOdular Neutron time-of-flight SpectromeTER (MONSTER) has been proposed for the DESPEC experiment at the future FAIR facility. The design of MONSTER and status of its construction are reported in this work.

  1. Porosity detection in ceramic armor tiles via ultrasonic time-of-flight

    SciTech Connect

    Margetan, Frank J.; Richter, Nathaniel; Jensen, Terrence

    2011-06-23

    Some multilayer armor panels contain ceramic tiles as one constituent, and porosity in the tiles can affect armor performance. It is well known that porosity in ceramic materials leads to a decrease in ultrasonic velocity. We report on a feasibility study exploring the use of ultrasonic time-of-flight (TOF) to locate and characterize porous regions in armor tiles. The tiles in question typically have well-controlled thickness, thus simplifying the translation of TOF data into velocity data. By combining UT velocity measurements and X-ray absorption measurements on selected specimens, one can construct a calibration curve relating velocity to porosity. That relationship can then be used to translate typical ultrasonic C-scans of TOF-versus-position into C-scans of porosity-versus-position. This procedure is demonstrated for pulse/echo, focused-transducer inspections of silicon carbide (SiC) ceramic tiles.

  2. Analysis of liposome model systems by time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Lovrić, Jelena; Keighron, Jacqueline D.; Angerer, Tina B.; Li, Xianchan; Malmberg, Per; Fletcher, John S.; Ewing, Andrew G.

    2015-01-01

    Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) is an important technique for studying chemical composition of micrometer scale objects due to its high spatial resolution imaging capabilities and chemical specificity. In this work we focus on the application of ToF-SIMS to gain insight into the chemistry of micrometer size liposomes as a potential model for neurotransmitter vesicles. Two models of giant liposomes were analyzed: histamine and aqueous two phase system (ATPS)-containing liposomes. Characterization of the internal structure of single fixed liposomes was done both with the Bi3+ and C60+ ion sources. The depth profiling capability of ToF-SIMS was used to investigate the liposome interior. PMID:25918450

  3. Airborne nanoparticle characterization with a digital ion trap-reflectron time of flight mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shenyi; Johnston, Murray V.

    2006-12-01

    A digital ion trap-reflectron time of flight mass spectrometer is described for airborne nanoparticle characterization. Charged particles sampled into this nanoaerosol mass spectrometer (NAMS) are captured in the ion trap and ablated with a high fluence laser pulse to reach the "complete ionization limit". Atomic ions produced from the trapped particle(s) are mass analyzed by time of flight, and the elemental composition is determined from the relative signal intensities in the mass spectrum. The particle size range captured in the ion trap is selected by the frequency applied to the ring electrode. Size selection is based on the mass normalized particle diameter, defined as the diameter of a spherical particle with unit density that has the same mass as the particle being analyzed. For the current instrument configuration, ring electrode frequencies between 5 and 140 kHz allow selective trapping of particles with a mass normalized diameter between 7 and 25 nm with a geometric standard deviation of about 1.1. The particle detection efficiency, defined as the fraction of charged particles entering the mass spectrometer that are subsequently captured and analyzed, is between l x l0-4 and 3 x l0-4 over this size range. The effective particle density can be determined from simultaneous measurement of the mobility and mass normalized diameters. Test nanoparticles composed of sucrose, polyethylene glycol, polypropylene glycol, sodium chloride, ammonium sulfate and copper(II) chloride are investigated. In most cases, the measured elemental compositions match the expected elemental compositions within +/-5% or less and the measured compositions do not change with particle size. The one exception is copper chloride, which does not yield a well-developed plasma when it is irradiated by the laser pulse.

  4. 3D Imaging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hastings, S. K.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses 3 D imaging as it relates to digital representations in virtual library collections. Highlights include X-ray computed tomography (X-ray CT); the National Science Foundation (NSF) Digital Library Initiatives; output peripherals; image retrieval systems, including metadata; and applications of 3 D imaging for libraries and museums. (LRW)

  5. 3D camera assisted fully automated calibration of scanning laser Doppler vibrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sels, Seppe; Ribbens, Bart; Mertens, Luc; Vanlanduit, Steve

    2016-06-01

    Scanning laser Doppler vibrometers (LDV) are used to measure full-field vibration shapes of products and structures. In most commercially available scanning laser Doppler vibrometer systems the user manually draws a grid of measurement locations on a 2D camera image of the product. The determination of the correct physical measurement locations can be a time consuming and diffcult task. In this paper we present a new methodology for product testing and quality control that integrates 3D imaging techniques with vibration measurements. This procedure allows to test prototypes in a shorter period because physical measurements locations will be located automatically. The proposed methodology uses a 3D time-of-flight camera to measure the location and orientation of the test-object. The 3D image of the time-of-flight camera is then matched with the 3D-CAD model of the object in which measurement locations are pre-defined. A time of flight camera operates strictly in the near infrared spectrum. To improve the signal to noise ratio in the time-of-flight measurement, a time-of-flight camera uses a band filter. As a result of this filter, the laser spot of most laser vibrometers is invisible in the time-of-flight image. Therefore a 2D RGB-camera is used to find the laser-spot of the vibrometer. The laser spot is matched to the 3D image obtained by the time-of-flight camera. Next an automatic calibration procedure is used to aim the laser at the (pre)defined locations. Another benefit from this methodology is that it incorporates automatic mapping between a CAD model and the vibration measurements. This mapping can be used to visualize measurements directly on a 3D CAD model. Secondly the orientation of the CAD model is known with respect to the laser beam. This information can be used to find the direction of the measured vibration relatively to the surface of the object. With this direction, the vibration measurements can be compared more precisely with numerical

  6. 1024 pixels single photon imaging array for 3D ranging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellisai, S.; Guerrieri, F.; Tisa, S.; Zappa, F.; Tosi, A.; Giudice, A.

    2011-01-01

    Three dimensions (3D) acquisition systems are driving applications in many research field. Nowadays 3D acquiring systems are used in a lot of applications, such as cinema industry or in automotive (for active security systems). Depending on the application, systems present different features, for example color sensitivity, bi-dimensional image resolution, distance measurement accuracy and acquisition frame rate. The system we developed acquires 3D movie using indirect Time of Flight (iTOF), starting from phase delay measurement of a sinusoidally modulated light. The system acquires live movie with a frame rate up to 50frame/s in a range distance between 10 cm up to 7.5 m.

  7. HYSPEC : A CRYSTAL TIME OF FLIGHT HYBRID SPECTROMETER FOR THE SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE.

    SciTech Connect

    SHAPIRO,S.M.; ZALIZNYAK,I.A.

    2002-12-30

    This document lays out a proposal by the Instrument Development Team (IDT) composed of scientists from leading Universities and National Laboratories to design and build a conceptually new high-flux inelastic neutron spectrometer at the pulsed Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge. This instrument is intended to supply users of the SNS and scientific community, of which the IDT is an integral part, with a platform for ground-breaking investigations of the low-energy atomic-scale dynamical properties of crystalline solids. It is also planned that the proposed instrument will be equipped with a polarization analysis capability, therefore becoming the first polarized beam inelastic spectrometer in the SNS instrument suite, and the first successful polarized beam inelastic instrument at a pulsed spallation source worldwide. The proposed instrument is designed primarily for inelastic and elastic neutron spectroscopy of single crystals. In fact, the most informative neutron scattering studies of the dynamical properties of solids nearly always require single crystal samples, and they are almost invariably flux-limited. In addition, in measurements with polarization analysis the available flux is reduced through selection of the particular neutron polarization, which puts even more stringent limits on the feasibility of a particular experiment. To date, these investigations have mostly been carried out on crystal spectrometers at high-flux reactors, which usually employ focusing Bragg optics to concentrate the neutron beam on a typically small sample. Construction at Oak Ridge of the high-luminosity spallation neutron source, which will provide intense pulsed neutron beams with time-averaged fluxes equal to those at medium-flux reactors, opens entirely new opportunities for single crystal neutron spectroscopy. Drawing upon experience acquired during decades of studies with both crystal and time-of-flight (TOF) spectrometers, the IDT has developed a conceptual

  8. Time-of-flight technique for particle identification at energies from 2 to 400 keV/nucleon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gloeckler, G.; Hsieh, K. C.

    1979-01-01

    The time of flight technique for particle identification was extended to 2 keV/nucleon and the size of the start-time detector was reduced considerably by the use of carbon foils of few micrograms/cm square in thickness combined with microchannel plates for detecting secondary electrons. Time of flight telescopes incorporating this start-time device were used to measure the stopping power of a number of low energy heavy ions in thin carbon foils and the charge states of these ions emerging from such foils. Applications for the detection and identification of low energy interplanetary and magnetospheric particles are suggested.

  9. A laser diode based system for calibration of fast time-of-flight detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertoni, R.; Bonesini, M.; de Bari, A.; Rossella, M.

    2016-05-01

    A system based on commercially available items, such as a laser diode, emitting in the visible range ~ 400 nm, and multimode fiber patches, fused fiber splitters and optical switches may be assembled, for time calibration of multi-channels time-of-flight (TOF) detectors with photomultipliers' (PMTs') readout. As available laser diode sources have unfortunately limited peak power, the main experimental problem is the tight light power budget of such a system. In addition, while the technology for fused fiber splitters is common in the Telecom wavelength range (λ ~ 850, 1300-1500 nm), it is not easily available in the visible one. Therefore, extensive laboratory tests had to be done on purpose, to qualify the used optical components, and a full scale timing calibration prototype was built. Obtained results show that with such a system, a calibration resolution (σ) in the range 20-30 ps may be within reach. Therefore, fast multi-channels TOF detectors, with timing resolutions in the range 50-100 ps, may be easily calibrated in time. Results on tested optical components may be of interest also for time calibration of different light detection systems based on PMTs, as the ones used for detection of the vacuum ultraviolet scintillation light emitted by ionizing particles in large LAr TPCs.

  10. Monoacylglycerol Analysis Using MS/MSALL Quadruple Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Fei; McDaniel, Justice; Chen, Emily Y.; Rockwell, Hannah; Lynes, Matthew D.; Tseng, Yu-Hua; Sarangarajan, Rangaprasad; Narain, Niven R.; Kiebish, Michael A.

    2016-01-01

    Monoacylglycerols (MAGs) are structural and bioactive metabolites critical for biological function. Development of facile tools for measuring MAG are essential to understand its role in different diseases and various pathways. A data-independent acquisition method, MS/MSALL, using electrospray ionization (ESI) coupled quadrupole time of flight mass spectrometry (MS), was utilized for the structural identification and quantitative analysis of individual MAG molecular species. Compared with other acylglycerols, diacylglycerols (DAG) and triacylglycerols (TAG), MAG characteristically presented as a dominant protonated ion, [M + H]+, and under low collision energy as fatty acid-like fragments due to the neutral loss of the glycerol head group. At low concentrations (<10 pmol/µL), where lipid-lipid interactions are rare, there was a strong linear correlation between ion abundance and MAG concentration. Moreover, using the MS/MSALL method the major MAG species from human plasma and mouse brown and white adipose tissues were quantified in less than 6 min. Collectively, these results demonstrate that MS/MSALL analysis of MAG is an enabling strategy for the direct identification and quantitative analysis of low level MAG species from biological samples with high throughput and sensitivity. PMID:27548241

  11. Time-of-flight accurate mass spectrometry identification of quinoline alkaloids in honey.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Cabo, Tamara; Moniruzzaman, Mohammed; Rodríguez, Isaac; Ramil, María; Cela, Rafael; Gan, Siew Hua

    2015-08-01

    Time-of-flight accurate mass spectrometry (TOF-MS), following a previous chromatographic (gas or liquid chromatography) separation step, is applied to the identification and structural elucidation of quinoline-like alkaloids in honey. Both electron ionization (EI) MS and positive electrospray (ESI+) MS spectra afforded the molecular ions (M(.+) and M+H(+), respectively) of target compounds with mass errors below 5 mDa. Scan EI-MS and product ion scan ESI-MS/MS spectra permitted confirmation of the existence of a quinoline ring in the structures of the candidate compounds. Also, the observed fragmentation patterns were useful to discriminate between quinoline derivatives having the same empirical formula but different functionalities, such as aldoximes and amides. In the particular case of phenylquinolines, ESI-MS/MS spectra provided valuable clues regarding the position of the phenyl moiety attached to the quinoline ring. The aforementioned spectral information, combined with retention times matching, led to the identification of quinoline and five quinoline derivatives, substituted at carbon number 4, in honey samples. An isomer of phenyquinoline was also noticed; however, its exact structure could not be established. Liquid-liquid microextraction and gas chromatography (GC) TOF-MS were applied to the screening of the aforementioned compounds in a total of 62 honeys. Species displaying higher occurrence frequencies were 4-quinolinecarbonitrile, 4-quinolinecarboxaldehyde, 4-quinolinealdoxime, and the phenylquinoline isomer. The Pearson test revealed strong correlations among the first three compounds. PMID:26041455

  12. Development and characterization of an aircraft aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Pratt, Kerri A; Mayer, Joseph E; Holecek, John C; Moffet, Ryan C; Sanchez, Rene O; Rebotier, Thomas P; Furutani, Hiroshi; Gonin, Marc; Fuhrer, Katrin; Su, Yongxuan; Guazzotti, Sergio; Prather, Kimberly A

    2009-03-01

    Vertical and horizontal profiles of atmospheric aerosols are necessary for understanding the impact of air pollution on regional and global climate. To gain further insight into the size-resolved chemistry of individual atmospheric particles, a smaller aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometer (ATOFMS) with increased data acquisition capabilities was developed for aircraft-based studies. Compared to previous ATOFMS systems, the new instrument has a faster data acquisition rate with improved ion transmission and mass resolution, as well as reduced physical size and power consumption, all required advances for use in aircraft studies. In addition, real-time source apportionment software allows the immediate identification and classification of individual particles to guide sampling decisions while in the field. The aircraft (A)-ATOFMS was field-tested on the ground during the Study of Organic Aerosols in Riverside, CA (SOAR) and aboard an aircraft during the Ice in Clouds Experiment-Layer Clouds (ICE-L). Initial results from ICE-L represent the first reported aircraft-based single-particle dual-polarity mass spectrometry measurements and provide an increased understanding of particle mixing state as a function of altitude. Improved ion transmission allows for the first single-particle detection of species out to approximately m/z 2000, an important mass range for the detection of biological aerosols and oligomeric species. In addition, high time resolution measurements of single-particle mixing state are demonstrated and shown to be important for airborne studies where particle concentrations and chemistry vary rapidly.

  13. Facile time-of-flight methods for characterizing pulsed superfluid helium droplet beams

    PubMed Central

    He, Yunteng; Zhang, Jie; Li, Yang; Freund, William M.; Kong, Wei

    2015-01-01

    We present two facile time-of-flight (TOF) methods of detecting superfluid helium droplets and droplets with neutral dopants. Without an electron gun and with only a heated filament and pulsed electrodes, the electron impact ionization TOF mass spectrometer can resolve ionized helium clusters such as He2+ and He4+, which are signatures of superfluid helium droplets. Without ionizing any helium atoms, multiphoton non-resonant laser ionization of CCl4 doped in superfluid helium droplets at 266 nm generates complex cluster ions of dopant fragments with helium atoms, including (He)nC+, (He)nCl+, and (He)nCCl+. Using both methods, we have characterized our cryogenic pulsed valve—the Even-Lavie valve. We have observed a primary pulse with larger helium droplets traveling at a slower speed and a rebound pulse with smaller droplets at a faster speed. In addition, the pickup efficiency of dopant is higher for the primary pulse when the nozzle temperature is higher than 13 K, and the total time duration of the doped droplet pulse is only on the order of 20 μs. These results stress the importance of fast and easy characterization of the droplet beam for sensitive measurements such as electron diffraction of doped droplets. PMID:26329210

  14. Implementation of Dipolar Resonant Excitation Collision Induced Dissociation with Ion Mobility/Time-of-Flight MS

    SciTech Connect

    Webb, Ian K.; Chen, Tsung-Chi; Danielson, William F.; Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Tang, Keqi; Anderson, Gordon A.; Smith, Richard D.

    2014-01-28

    Under and overfragmentation are significant hurdles to the data independent “bottom-up” approach to proteomics. Another challenge to the data independent approach is the convolution of fragments from different peptides that coelute in reverse-phase liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (RPLC/MS). The ion mobility/collision induced dissociation/time-of flight mass spectrometry (IMS/CID/TOF MS) approach gives drift-time aligned fragment ions that have the same arrival time distributions as precursor ions, greatly aiding in fragment and peptide ion identification. We have modified an IMS/TOF MS platform to allow for resonant excitation CID experiments. Resonant excitation CID leads to highly efficient, mass-resolved fragmentation without additional excitation of product ions, alleviating the overfragmentation problem. The ability to apply resonant waveforms in mobility-resolved windows has been demonstrated with a peptide mixture yielding fragmentation over a range of mass-to-charge (m/z) ratios within a single IMS separation experiment.

  15. Sensitivity estimation in time-of-flight list-mode positron emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Herraiz, J. L.; Sitek, A.

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: An accurate quantification of the images in positron emission tomography (PET) requires knowing the actual sensitivity at each voxel, which represents the probability that a positron emitted in that voxel is finally detected as a coincidence of two gamma rays in a pair of detectors in the PET scanner. This sensitivity depends on the characteristics of the acquisition, as it is affected by the attenuation of the annihilation gamma rays in the body, and possible variations of the sensitivity of the scanner detectors. In this work, the authors propose a new approach to handle time-of-flight (TOF) list-mode PET data, which allows performing either or both, a self-attenuation correction, and self-normalization correction based on emission data only. Methods: The authors derive the theory using a fully Bayesian statistical model of complete data. The authors perform an initial evaluation of algorithms derived from that theory and proposed in this work using numerical 2D list-mode simulations with different TOF resolutions and total number of detected coincidences. Effects of randoms and scatter are not simulated. Results: The authors found that proposed algorithms successfully correct for unknown attenuation and scanner normalization for simulated 2D list-mode TOF-PET data. Conclusions: A new method is presented that can be used for corrections for attenuation and normalization (sensitivity) using TOF list-mode data.

  16. Facile time-of-flight methods for characterizing pulsed superfluid helium droplet beams.

    PubMed

    He, Yunteng; Zhang, Jie; Li, Yang; Freund, William M; Kong, Wei

    2015-08-01

    We present two facile time-of-flight (TOF) methods of detecting superfluid helium droplets and droplets with neutral dopants. Without an electron gun and with only a heated filament and pulsed electrodes, the electron impact ionization TOF mass spectrometer can resolve ionized helium clusters such as He2(+) and He4(+), which are signatures of superfluid helium droplets. Without ionizing any helium atoms, multiphoton non-resonant laser ionization of CCl4 doped in superfluid helium droplets at 266 nm generates complex cluster ions of dopant fragments with helium atoms, including (He)(n)C(+), (He)(n)Cl(+), and (He)(n)CCl(+). Using both methods, we have characterized our cryogenic pulsed valve—the Even-Lavie valve. We have observed a primary pulse with larger helium droplets traveling at a slower speed and a rebound pulse with smaller droplets at a faster speed. In addition, the pickup efficiency of dopant is higher for the primary pulse when the nozzle temperature is higher than 13 K, and the total time duration of the doped droplet pulse is only on the order of 20 μs. These results stress the importance of fast and easy characterization of the droplet beam for sensitive measurements such as electron diffraction of doped droplets.

  17. TOF (time-of-flight) measurements of pulsed neutrons for texture analysis of low symmetry materials

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, A.C.; Vergamini, P.J.; Lujan, M. Jr. ); Wenk, H.R. . Dept. of Geology and Geophysics)

    1989-01-01

    The single crystal diffractometer at LANSCE, SCD, provides and ideal capability for the study of preferred orientation in geological samples by time-of flight (TOF) measurement of pulsed neutrons. The 2-d position sensitive neutron detector with the large wave length range allows one to measure the complete distribution of intensities for several poles very quickly. Each histogram covers about {pi}{sup 2}/16 radians of reciprocal space and contains information from all possible poles visible with the wave length range used, usually about 0.5 to 5.0{Angstrom}. With this method complete pole figures of many lattice planes can be constructed from only 12 to 20 sample orientations as compared to over 1000 sample settings per lattice plane using conventional diffractometers. Pole figures from measurements of experimentally deformed standard samples of calcite and quartzite with known history of deformation provide information about deformation mechanisms and their temperature/strain history. This information can be applied to interpret preferred orientation of naturally deformed rocks. 6 refs., 10 figs.

  18. Development of high-rate MRPCs for high resolution time-of-flight systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jingbo; Wang, Yi; Gonzalez-Diaz, D.; Chen, Huangshan; Fan, Xingming; Li, Yuanjing; Cheng, Jianping; Kaspar, Marcus; Kotte, Roland; Laso Garcia, Alejandro; Naumann, Lothar; Stach, Daniel; Wendisch, Christian; Wüstenfeld, Jörn

    2013-06-01

    We show how the high charged-particle flux (1-20 kHz/cm2) expected over the 150 m2 large time-of-flight wall of the future Compressed Baryonic Matter experiment (CBM) at FAIR can be realistically handled with Multi-gap Resistive Plate Chambers (MRPCs). This crucial 100-fold increase of the chamber rate capability, as compared to that of standard MRPCs presently employed in experiments resorting to sub-100 ps timing, has been achieved thanks to the development of a new type of low-resistive doped glass. Following the encouraging results previously obtained with small counters, two types of modules (active area: ˜150 cm2) have been built at Tsinghua University with the new material. The measurements conveyed in this work, obtained with a quasi- minimum ionizing electron beam (γβ≥3), prove their suitability as the building blocks of the present hadron-identification concept of the CBM experiment. Namely, they provide a time resolution better than 80 ps and an efficiency above 90% at a particle flux well in excess of 20 kHz/cm2 (up to 35-60 kHz/cm2), being at the core of a modular concept that is easily scalable. Recent measurements of the electrical and mechanical properties of this new material, together with its long-term behavior, are shortly summarized.

  19. Laser desorption time-of-flight mass spectrometry of ultraviolet photo-processed ices

    SciTech Connect

    Paardekooper, D. M. Bossa, J.-B.; Isokoski, K.; Linnartz, H.

    2014-10-01

    A new ultra-high vacuum experiment is described that allows studying photo-induced chemical processes in interstellar ice analogues. MATRI²CES - a Mass Analytical Tool to study Reactions in Interstellar ICES applies a new concept by combining laser desorption and time-of-flight mass spectrometry with the ultimate goal to characterize in situ and in real time the solid state evolution of organic compounds upon UV photolysis for astronomically relevant ice mixtures and temperatures. The performance of the experimental setup is demonstrated by the kinetic analysis of the different photoproducts of pure methane (CH₄) ice at 20 K. A quantitative approach provides formation yields of several new species with up to four carbon atoms. Convincing evidence is found for the formation of even larger species. Typical mass resolutions obtained range from M/ΔM ~320 to ~400 for CH₄ and argon, respectively. Additional tests show that the typical detection limit (in monolayers) is ⩽0.02 ML, substantially more sensitive than the regular techniques used to investigate chemical processes in interstellar ices.

  20. Multi-capillary-column proton-transfer-reaction time-of-flight mass spectrometry☆

    PubMed Central

    Ruzsanyi, Veronika; Fischer, Lukas; Herbig, Jens; Ager, Clemes; Amann, Anton

    2013-01-01

    Proton-transfer-reaction time-of-flight mass-spectrometry (PTR-TOFMS) exhibits high selectivity with a resolution of around 5000 m/Δm. While isobars can be separated with this resolution, discrimination of isomeric compounds is usually not possible. The coupling of a multi-capillary column (MCC) with a PTR-TOFMS overcomes these problems as demonstrated in this paper for the ketone isomers 3-heptanone and 2-methyl-3-hexanone and for different aldehydes. Moreover, fragmentation of compounds can be studied in detail which might even improve the identification. LODs for compounds tested are in the range of low ppbv and peak positions of the respective separated substances show good repeatability (RSD of the peak positions <3.2%). Due to its special characteristics, such as isothermal operation, compact size, the MCC setup is suitable to be installed inside the instrument and the overall retention time for a complete spectrum is only a few minutes: this allows near real-time measurements in the optional MCC mode. In contrast to other methods that yield additional separation, such as the use of pre-cursor ions other than H3O+, this method yields additional information without increasing complexity. PMID:24119758

  1. Application of lidar techniques to time-of-flight range imaging.

    PubMed

    Whyte, Refael; Streeter, Lee; Cree, Michael J; Dorrington, Adrian A

    2015-11-20

    Amplitude-modulated continuous wave (AMCW) time-of-flight (ToF) range imaging cameras measure distance by illuminating the scene with amplitude-modulated light and measuring the phase difference between the transmitted and reflected modulation envelope. This method of optical range measurement suffers from errors caused by multiple propagation paths, motion, phase wrapping, and nonideal amplitude modulation. In this paper a ToF camera is modified to operate in modes analogous to continuous wave (CW) and stepped frequency continuous wave (SFCW) lidar. In CW operation the velocity of objects can be measured. CW measurement of velocity was linear with true velocity (R2=0.9969). Qualitative analysis of a complex scene confirms that range measured by SFCW is resilient to errors caused by multiple propagation paths, phase wrapping, and nonideal amplitude modulation which plague AMCW operation. In viewing a complicated scene through a translucent sheet, quantitative comparison of AMCW with SFCW demonstrated a reduction in the median error from -1.3  m to -0.06  m with interquartile range of error reduced from 4.0 m to 0.18 m. PMID:26836520

  2. Laser desorption time-of-flight mass spectrometry of vacuum UV photo-processed methanol ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paardekooper, D. M.; Bossa, J.-B.; Linnartz, H.

    2016-07-01

    Context. Methanol in the interstellar medium mainly forms upon sequential hydrogenation of solid CO. With typical abundances of up to 15% (with respect to water) it is an important constituent of interstellar ices where it is considered as a precursor in the formation of large and complex organic molecules (COMs), e.g. upon vacuum UV (VUV) photo-processing or exposure to cosmic rays. Aims: This study aims at detecting novel complex organic molecules formed during the VUV photo-processing of methanol ice in the laboratory using a technique more sensitive than regular surface diagnostic tools. In addition, the formation kinetics of the main photo-products of methanol are unravelled for an astronomically relevant temperature (20 K) and radiation dose. Methods: The VUV photo-processing of CH3OH ice is studied by applying laser desorption post-ionisation time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LDPI TOF-MS), and analysed by combining molecule-specific fragmentation and desorption features. Results: The mass spectra correspond to fragment ions originating from a number of previously recorded molecules and from new COMs, such as the series (CO)xH, with x = 3 and y < 3x-1, to which prebiotic glycerin belongs. The formation of these large COMs has not been reported in earlier photolysis studies and suggests that such complex species may form in the solid state under interstellar conditions.

  3. Switching Transient Generation in Surface Interrogation Scanning Electrochemical Microscopy and Time-of-Flight Techniques.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Hyun S; Bard, Allen J

    2015-12-15

    In surface interrogation scanning electrochemical microscopy (SI-SECM), fine and accurate control of the delay time between substrate generation and tip interrogation (tdelay) is crucial because tdelay defines the decay time of the reactive intermediate. In previous applications of the SI-SECM, the resolution in the control of tdelay has been limited to several hundreds of milliseconds due to the slow switching of the bipotentiostat. In this work, we have improved the time resolution of tdelay control up to ca. 1 μs, enhancing the SI-SECM to be competitive in the time domain with the decay of many reactive intermediates. The rapid switching SI-SECM has been implemented in a substrate generation-tip collection time-of-flight (SG-TC TOF) experiment of a solution redox mediator, and the results obtained from the experiment exhibited good agreement with that obtained from digital simulation. The reaction rate constant of surface Co(IV) on oxygen-evolving catalyst film, which was inaccessible thus far due to the lack of tdelay control, has been measured by the rapid switching SI-SECM.

  4. The Time of Flight Upgrade for CLAS at 12 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis Graham

    2007-10-01

    The Time of Flight (TOF) system is a detection system within the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) at Jefferson National Accelerator Facility. CLAS, being a magnetic toroidal multi-gap spectrometer, is used in the detection of particles and their varying properties. Jefferson National Accelerator Facility is providing an incoming electron beam of energy 6 GeV that is used to probe the structure and production of these particles. The CLAS detector is currently adapted to energies of up to 6 GeV, but with recent approval it will now upgrade to energies of 12 GeV. CLAS consists of drift chambers to determine the charged particle paths, gas Cherenkov counters for electron discrimination, TOF scintillators for particle identification, and an electromagnetic calorimeter for identifying showering electrons and photons. The TOF system, which is our focus, is composed of scintillation counters at the forward angle, and covers an area of 206 meters squared. Therefore, we look to upgrade and construct the TOF system of CLAS and outline strategies of current construction, purpose for design, and outlook for the TOF system upgrade

  5. The Time of Flight Upgrade for CLAS at 12 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, Lewis

    2007-10-26

    The Time of Flight (TOF) system is a detection system within the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) at Jefferson National Accelerator Facility. CLAS, being a magnetic toroidal multi-gap spectrometer, is used in the detection of particles and their varying properties. Jefferson National Accelerator Facility is providing an incoming electron beam of energy 6 GeV that is used to probe the structure and production of these particles. The CLAS detector is currently adapted to energies of up to 6 GeV, but with recent approval it will now upgrade to energies of 12 GeV. CLAS consists of drift chambers to determine the charged particle paths, gas Cherenkov counters for electron discrimination, TOF scintillators for particle identification, and an electromagnetic calorimeter for identifying showering electrons and photons. The TOF system, which is our focus, is composed of scintillation counters at the forward angle, and covers an area of 206 meters squared. Therefore, we look to upgrade and construct the TOF system of CLAS and outline strategies of current construction, purpose for design, and outlook for the TOF system upgrade.

  6. Effect of Coulomb interaction on time of flight of cold antiprotons launched from an ion trap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Camp, J. B.; Witteborn, F. C.

    1993-01-01

    Time-of-flight spectra for Maxwell-Boltzman (MB) distributions of antiprotons initially held in an ion trap and detected after being launched through a 50-cm-long shielding drift tube have been calculated. The distributions used are of temperature 0.4-40 K, cubic length 0.003-3.0 cm, and number 10-100 particles. The mutual Coulomb repulsion of the particles causes a reduction in the number of late arrival particles expected from the MB velocity distribution. The Coulomb energy is not equally divided among the particles during the expansion. The energy is transferred preferentially to the outer particles so that the reduction in the number of slow particles is not necessarily large. The reduction factor is found to be greater than unity when the potential energy of the trapped ions is greater than about 5 percent of the ions' kinetic energy and is about 2 for the launch parameters of the Los Alamos antiproton gravity experiment.

  7. Photo-Detectors for Time of Flight Positron Emission Tomography (ToF-PET)

    PubMed Central

    Spanoudaki, Virginia Ch.; Levin⋆, Craig S.

    2010-01-01

    We present the most recent advances in photo-detector design employed in time of flight positron emission tomography (ToF-PET). PET is a molecular imaging modality that collects pairs of coincident (temporally correlated) annihilation photons emitted from the patient body. The annihilation photon detector typically comprises a scintillation crystal coupled to a fast photo-detector. ToF information provides better localization of the annihilation event along the line formed by each detector pair, resulting in an overall improvement in signal to noise ratio (SNR) of the reconstructed image. Apart from the demand for high luminosity and fast decay time of the scintillation crystal, proper design and selection of the photo-detector and methods for arrival time pick-off are a prerequisite for achieving excellent time resolution required for ToF-PET. We review the two types of photo-detectors used in ToF-PET: photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) and silicon photo-multipliers (SiPMs) with a special focus on SiPMs. PMID:22163482

  8. The 27.3 meter neutron time-of-flight system for the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grim, G. P.; Morgan, G. L.; Aragonez, R.; Archuleta, T. N.; Bower, D. E.; Danly, C. R.; Drury, O. B.; Dzenitis, J. M.; Fatherley, V. E.; Felker, B.; Fittinghoff, D. N.; Guler, N.; Merrill, F. E.; Oertel, J. A.; Wilde, C. H.; Wilke, M. D.

    2013-09-01

    One of the scientific goals of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore CA, is to obtain thermonuclear ignition by compressing 2.2 mm diameter capsules filed with deuterium and tritium to densities approaching 1000 g/cm3 and temperatures in excess of 4 keV. Thefusion reaction d + t --> n + a results in a 14.03 MeV neutron providing a source of diagnostic particles to characterize the implosion. The spectrum of neutrons emanating from the assembly may be used to infer the fusion yield, plasma ion temperature, and fuel areal density, all key diagnostic quantities of implosion quality. The neutron time-of-flight (nToF) system co-located along the Neutron Imaging System line-of-site, (NIToF), is a set of 4 scintillation detectors located approximately 27.3 m from the implosion source. Neutron spectral information is inferred using arrival time at the detector. The NIToF system is described below, including the hardware elements, calibration data, analysis methods, and an example of its basic performance characteristics.

  9. On Location Estimation Technique Based of the Time of Flight in Low-power Wireless Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botta, Miroslav; Simek, Milan; Krajsa, Ondrej; Cervenka, Vladimir; Pal, Tamas

    2015-04-01

    This study deals with the distance estimation issue in low-power wireless systems being usually used for sensor networking and interconnecting the Internet of Things. There is an effort to locate or track these sensor entities for different needs the radio signal time of flight principle from the theoretical and practical side of application research is evaluated. Since these sensor devices are mainly targeted for low power consumption appliances, there is always need for optimization of any aspects needed for regular sensor operation. For the distance estimation we benefit from IEEE 802.15.4a technology, which offers the precise ranging capabilities. There is no need for additional hardware to be used for the ranging task and all fundamental measurements are acquired within the 15.4a standard compliant hardware in the real environment. The proposed work examines the problems and the solutions for implementation of distance estimation algorithms for WSN devices. The main contribution of the article is seen in this real testbed evaluation of the ranging technology.

  10. Neutron time-of-flight spectroscopy measurement using a waveform digitizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Long-Xiang; Wang, Hong-Wei; Ma, Yu-Gang; Cao, Xi-Guang; Cai, Xiang-Zhou; Chen, Jin-Gen; Zhang, Gui-Lin; Han, Jian-Long; Zhang, Guo-Qiang; Hu, Ji-Feng; Wang, Xiao-He

    2016-05-01

    The photoneutron source (PNS, phase 1), an electron linear accelerator (linac)-based pulsed neutron facility that uses the time-of-flight (TOF) technique, was constructed for the acquisition of nuclear data from the Thorium Molten Salt Reactor (TMSR) at the Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics (SINAP). The neutron detector signal used for TOF calculation, with information on the pulse arrival time, pulse shape, and pulse height, was recorded by using a waveform digitizer (WFD). By using the pulse height and pulse-shape discrimination (PSD) analysis to identify neutrons and γ-rays, the neutron TOF spectrum was obtained by employing a simple electronic design, and a new WFD-based DAQ system was developed and tested in this commissioning experiment. The DAQ system developed is characterized by a very high efficiency with respect to millisecond neutron TOF spectroscopy. Supported by Strategic Priority Research Program of the Chinese Academy of Science(TMSR) (XDA02010100), National Natural Science Foundation of China(NSFC)(11475245,No.11305239), Shanghai Key Laboratory of Particle Physics and Cosmology (11DZ2260700)

  11. Time-of-flight remote detection MRI of thermally modified wood.

    PubMed

    Telkki, Ville-Veikko; Saunavaara, Jani; Jokisaari, Jukka

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate that time-of-flight (TOF) remote detection (RD) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides detailed information about physical changes in wood due to thermal modification that is not available with conventional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) based techniques. In the experiments, xenon gas was forced to flow through Pinus sylvestris pine wood samples, and the flow paths and dispersion of gas atoms were observed by measuring (129)Xe TOF RD MRI images from the samples. MRI sensitivity of xenon was boosted by the spin exchange optical pumping (SEOP) method. Two different samples were studied: a reference sample, dried at low temperature, and a modified sample, which was thermally modified at 240 degrees C after the drying. The samples were taken next to each other from the same wood plank in order to ensure the comparability of the results. The most important conclusion is that both the smaller dispersion observed in all the TOF RD experiments independent of each other and the decreased amount of flow paths shown by the time projection of z-encoded TOF RD MRI experiment imply that a large amount of pits connecting tracheid cells are closed in thermal modification. Closed pits may be one reason for reduced moisture content and improved dimensional stability of wood achieved in thermal modification. This is the first time biological samples have been investigated by TOF RD MRI.

  12. Impulse responses of visible phototubes used in National Ignition Facility neutron time of flight diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datte, P. S.; Eckart, M.; Moore, A. S.; Thompson, W.; Vergel de Dios, G.

    2016-11-01

    Neutron-induced visible scintillation in neutron time of flight (NToF) diagnostics at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) is measured with 40 mm single stage micro-channel plate photomultipliers and a 40 mm vacuum photodiode, outside the neutron line of sight. In NIF experiments with 14 MeV neutron yields above Y > 10 × 1015 these tubes are configured to deliver of order 1 nC of charge in the nominally 5 ns NToF into a 50 Ω load. We have examined a number of 40 mm tubes manufactured by Photek Ltd. of St. Leonards on Sea, UK, to determine possible changes in the instrument impulse response as a function of signal charge delivered in 1 ns. Precision NToF measurements at approximately 20 m require that we characterize changes in the impulse response moments to <40 ps for the first central moment and ˜2% rms for the square root of the second central moment with ˜500 ps value. Detailed results are presented for three different diode configurations.

  13. Analysis of the neutron time-of-flight spectra from inertial confinement fusion experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Hatarik, R. Sayre, D. B.; Caggiano, J. A.; Phillips, T.; Eckart, M. J.; Bond, E. J.; Cerjan, C.; Grim, G. P.; Hartouni, E. P.; Mcnaney, J. M.; Munro, D. H.; Knauer, J. P.

    2015-11-14

    Neutron time-of-flight diagnostics have long been used to characterize the neutron spectrum produced by inertial confinement fusion experiments. The primary diagnostic goals are to extract the d + t → n + α (DT) and d + d → n + {sup 3}He (DD) neutron yields and peak widths, and the amount DT scattering relative to its unscattered yield, also known as the down-scatter ratio (DSR). These quantities are used to infer yield weighted plasma conditions, such as ion temperature (T{sub ion}) and cold fuel areal density. We report on novel methodologies used to determine neutron yield, apparent T{sub ion}, and DSR. These methods invoke a single temperature, static fluid model to describe the neutron peaks from DD and DT reactions and a spline description of the DT spectrum to determine the DSR. Both measurements are performed using a forward modeling technique that includes corrections for line-of-sight attenuation and impulse response of the detection system. These methods produce typical uncertainties for DT T{sub ion} of 250 eV, 7% for DSR, and 9% for the DT neutron yield. For the DD values, the uncertainties are 290 eV for T{sub ion} and 10% for the neutron yield.

  14. Analysis of the neutron time-of-flight spectra from inertial confinement fusion experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatarik, R.; Sayre, D. B.; Caggiano, J. A.; Phillips, T.; Eckart, M. J.; Bond, E. J.; Cerjan, C.; Grim, G. P.; Hartouni, E. P.; Knauer, J. P.; Mcnaney, J. M.; Munro, D. H.

    2015-11-01

    Neutron time-of-flight diagnostics have long been used to characterize the neutron spectrum produced by inertial confinement fusion experiments. The primary diagnostic goals are to extract the d + t → n + α (DT) and d + d → n + 3He (DD) neutron yields and peak widths, and the amount DT scattering relative to its unscattered yield, also known as the down-scatter ratio (DSR). These quantities are used to infer yield weighted plasma conditions, such as ion temperature (Tion) and cold fuel areal density. We report on novel methodologies used to determine neutron yield, apparent Tion, and DSR. These methods invoke a single temperature, static fluid model to describe the neutron peaks from DD and DT reactions and a spline description of the DT spectrum to determine the DSR. Both measurements are performed using a forward modeling technique that includes corrections for line-of-sight attenuation and impulse response of the detection system. These methods produce typical uncertainties for DT Tion of 250 eV, 7% for DSR, and 9% for the DT neutron yield. For the DD values, the uncertainties are 290 eV for Tion and 10% for the neutron yield.

  15. Time-of-flight electron energy loss spectroscopy using TM110 deflection cavities

    PubMed Central

    Verhoeven, W.; van Rens, J. F. M.; van Ninhuijs, M. A. W.; Toonen, W. F.; Kieft, E. R.; Mutsaers, P. H. A.; Luiten, O. J.

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate the use of two TM110 resonant cavities to generate ultrashort electron pulses and subsequently measure electron energy losses in a time-of-flight type of setup. The method utilizes two synchronized microwave cavities separated by a drift space of 1.45 m. The setup has an energy resolution of 12 ± 2 eV FWHM at 30 keV, with an upper limit for the temporal resolution of 2.7 ± 0.4 ps. Both the time and energy resolution are currently limited by the brightness of the tungsten filament electron gun used. Through simulations, it is shown that an energy resolution of 0.95 eV and a temporal resolution of 110 fs can be achieved using an electron gun with a higher brightness. With this, a new method is provided for time-resolved electron spectroscopy without the need for elaborate laser setups or expensive magnetic spectrometers. PMID:27704035

  16. Aerosol chemical composition in cloud events by high resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hao, Liqing; Romakkaniemi, Sami; Kortelainen, Aki; Jaatinen, Antti; Portin, Harri; Miettinen, Pasi; Komppula, Mika; Leskinen, Ari; Virtanen, Annele; Smith, James N; Sueper, Donna; Worsnop, Douglas R; Lehtinen, Kari E J; Laaksonen, Ari

    2013-03-19

    This study presents results of direct observations of aerosol chemical composition in clouds. A high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer was used to make measurements of cloud interstitial particles (INT) and mixed cloud interstitial and droplet residual particles (TOT). The differences between these two are the cloud droplet residuals (RES). Positive matrix factorization analysis of high-resolution mass spectral data sets and theoretical calculations were performed to yield distributions of chemical composition of the INT and RES particles. We observed that less oxidized hydrocarbon-like organic aerosols (HOA) were mainly distributed into the INT particles, whereas more oxidized low-volatile oxygenated OA (LVOOA) mainly in the RES particles. Nitrates existed as organic nitrate and in chemical form of NH(4)NO(3). Organic nitrates accounted for 45% of total nitrates in the INT particles, in clear contrast to 26% in the RES particles. Meanwhile, sulfates coexist in forms of acidic NH(4)HSO(4) and neutralized (NH(4))(2)SO(4). Acidic sulfate made up 64.8% of total sulfates in the INT particles, much higher than 10.7% in the RES particles. The results indicate a possible joint effect of activation ability of aerosol particles, cloud processing, and particle size effects on cloud formation.

  17. Facile time-of-flight methods for characterizing pulsed superfluid helium droplet beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yunteng; Zhang, Jie; Li, Yang; Freund, William M.; Kong, Wei

    2015-08-01

    We present two facile time-of-flight (TOF) methods of detecting superfluid helium droplets and droplets with neutral dopants. Without an electron gun and with only a heated filament and pulsed electrodes, the electron impact ionization TOF mass spectrometer can resolve ionized helium clusters such as He2+ and He4+, which are signatures of superfluid helium droplets. Without ionizing any helium atoms, multiphoton non-resonant laser ionization of CCl4 doped in superfluid helium droplets at 266 nm generates complex cluster ions of dopant fragments with helium atoms, including (He)nC+, (He)nCl+, and (He)nCCl+. Using both methods, we have characterized our cryogenic pulsed valve—the Even-Lavie valve. We have observed a primary pulse with larger helium droplets traveling at a slower speed and a rebound pulse with smaller droplets at a faster speed. In addition, the pickup efficiency of dopant is higher for the primary pulse when the nozzle temperature is higher than 13 K, and the total time duration of the doped droplet pulse is only on the order of 20 μs. These results stress the importance of fast and easy characterization of the droplet beam for sensitive measurements such as electron diffraction of doped droplets.

  18. A high resolution electrostatic time-of-flight spectrometer with adiabatic magnetic collimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonn, J.; Bornschein, L.; Degen, B.; Otten, E. W.; Weinheimer, Ch

    1999-01-01

    A new type of spectrometer for low energy charged particles is presented. It consists of an adiabatic magnetic collimation and two filters: an electrostatic retarding potential to set a lower limit (high pass) and a time-of-flight analysis to reject high energy charged particles (low pass). Both filters are only limited in their resolution by the efficiency of the adiabatic magnetic collimation. The proof of this principle is demonstrated by a pilot measurement on the K conversion line of 83mKr. Possible applications to pulsed and continuous electron sources are discussed with the emphasis on the investigation of the β spectrum of T 2 to deduce information on the mass of the electron antineutrino and possible anomalies in the β spectrum. In this context design parameters of a spectrometer with a resolving power of E/ ΔE=20 000 and a luminosity of A ΔΩ/4 π=4 cm2 for 20 keV electrons are given.

  19. High-resolution detection system for time-of-flight electron spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Hussain, Zahid; Tremsin, A.S.; Lebedev, G.V.; Siegmund, O.H.W.; Vallerga, J.V.; McPhate, J.B.; Hussain, Z.

    2007-08-12

    One of the key components of a time-of-flight (TOF) spectrometer is the detection system. In addition to high timing resolution, accurate two-dimensional imaging substantially broadensthe areas of applications of TOF spectrometers; for example, add a new dimension to angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES). In this paper we report on the recent developments of a high spatial (<50 mm) and timing (<130 ps) resolution imaging system capable of selective detection of electrons, ions and/or photons. Relative to our previously reported results, we have substantially improved the counting rate capabilities of the system especially for cases where the energy range of interest represents a small fraction of the incoming flux at the detector plane. The new system ignores all the events outside of a tunable time window substantially decreasing the dead time required for the event processing. That allows high-resolution TOF measurements within a given energy or momentum range and also can be used for distinguishing (or disabling) detection of photons versus detection of charged particles. The counting rate within a given energy window can be as high as ~;;400KHz at 10percent dead time. The electron detection system reported in the paper was developed for the TOF ARPES experiments at the Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory.

  20. Liquid chromatography quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry selective determination of ochratoxin A in wine.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Cabo, T; Rodríguez, I; Ramil, M; Cela, R

    2016-05-15

    The performance of liquid chromatography quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC-QTOF-MS) for ochratoxin A (OTA) determination in wine is evaluated for the first time. Sample preparation was optimized to obtain quantitative recoveries at the same time that the efficiency of electrospray ionization (ESI) remained unaltered between sample extracts and calibration standards. Under final conditions, samples (20 mL) were concentrated using a reversed-phase solid-phase extraction (SPE) cartridge, followed by OTA elution with 1 mL of ethyl acetate. The absolute recoveries of the method, established against calibration standards, were 91-121% and 90-113% (without and with internal standard correction, respectively), for wines fortified at 3 concentration levels. The attained LOQ (0.05 ng mL(-1)) remained below the maximum permitted OTA concentration (2 ng mL(-1)) in dry wines. The method was applied to different samples, with OTA being found in some dessert wines at concentrations below 1 ng mL(-1). The ethyl ester of OTA (OTC) could be identified in the same wine samples from its accurate full product ion spectra.

  1. Time-of-flights and traps: from the Histone Code to Mars*

    PubMed Central

    Swatkoski, Stephen; Becker, Luann; Evans-Nguyen, Theresa

    2011-01-01

    Two very different analytical instruments are featured in this perspective paper on mass spectrometer design and development. The first instrument, based upon the curved-field reflectron developed in the Johns Hopkins Middle Atlantic Mass Spectrometry Laboratory, is a tandem time-of-flight mass spectrometer whose performance and practicality are illustrated by applications to a series of research projects addressing the acetylation, deacetylation and ADP-ribosylation of histone proteins. The chemical derivatization of lysine-rich, hyperacetylated histones as their deuteroacetylated analogs enables one to obtain an accurate quantitative assessment of the extent of acetylation at each site. Chemical acetylation of histone mixtures is also used to determine the lysine targets of sirtuins, an important class of histone deacetylases (HDACs), by replacing the deacetylated residues with biotin. Histone deacetylation by sirtuins requires the co-factor NAD+, as does the attachment of ADP-ribose. The second instrument, a low voltage and low power ion trap mass spectrometer known as the Mars Organic Mass Analyzer (MOMA), is a prototype for an instrument expected to be launched in 2018. Like the tandem mass spectrometer, it is also expected to have applicability to environmental and biological analyses and, ultimately, to clinical care. PMID:20530839

  2. Herbal medicine analysis by liquid chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jian-Liang; Qi, Lian-Wen; Li, Ping

    2009-10-30

    The fact that the effects of herbal medicines (HMs) are brought about by their chemical constituents has created a critical demand for powerful analytical tools performing the chemical analysis to assure their efficacy, safety and quality. Liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (LC-MS) is an excellent technique to analyze multi-components in complex herbal matrices. Due to its inherent characteristics of accurate mass measurements and high resolution, time-of-flight (TOF) MS is well-suited to this field, especially for qualitative applications. The purpose of this article is to provide an overview on the potential of TOF, including the hybrid quadrupole- and ion trap-TOF (QTOF and IT-TOF), hyphenated to LC for chemical analysis in HMs or HM-treated biological samples. The peculiarities of LC-(Q/IT)TOF-MS for the analysis of HMs are discussed first, including applied stationary phase, mobile-phase selection, accurate mass measurements, fragmentation and selectivity. The final section is devoted to describing the applicability of LC-(Q/IT)TOF-MS to routine analysis of multi-components, including target and non-target (unknown) compounds, in herbal samples, emphasizing both the advantages and limitations of this approach for qualitative and quantitative purposes. The potential and future trends of fast high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) (e.g. rapid resolution LC and ultra-performance LC) coupled to (Q)TOF-MS for chemical analysis of HMs are highlighted.

  3. Detection and quantification of pipe damage from change in time of flight and phase.

    PubMed

    Amjad, Umar; Yadav, Susheel K; Kundu, Tribikram

    2015-09-01

    The use of ultrasonic guided waves for damage detection in pipes is continuously increasing. Generally longitudinal (axial symmetric) modes are excited and detected by PZT (Lead Zirconate Titanate) transducers in transmission mode for this purpose. In most studies the change in the received signal strength with the extent of damage has been investigated while in this study the change in the phase and the time-of-flight (TOF) of the propagating wave modes with the damage size is investigated. The cross-correlation technique is used to record the small changes in the TOF as the damage size varies in steel pipes. Dispersion curves are calculated to carefully identify the propagating wave modes. Differential TOF is recorded and compared for different propagating wave modes. Feature extraction techniques are used for extracting phase and time-frequency information. The main advantage of this approach is that unlike the recorded signal strength the TOF and the phase are not affected by the bonding condition between the transducer and the pipe. Therefore, if the pipe is not damaged but the transducer-pipe bonding is deteriorated then although the received signal strength is altered the TOF and phase remain same avoiding the false positive alarms of damage.

  4. Detection of brake wear aerosols by aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beddows, D. C. S.; Dall'Osto, M.; Olatunbosun, O. A.; Harrison, Roy M.

    2016-03-01

    Brake dust particles were characterised using an Aerosol Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (ATOFMS) operated using two inlet configurations, namely the aerodynamic lens (AFL) inlet and countersunk nozzle inlet. Laboratory studies show that dust particles are characterised by mass spectra containing ions deriving from Fe and Ba and although highly correlated to each other, the Fe and Ba signals were mostly detected using the nozzle inlet with relatively high laser desorption energies. When using the AFL, only [56Fe] and [-88FeO2] ions were observed in brake dust spectra generated using lower laser desorption pulse energies, and only above 0.75 mJ was the [138Ba] ion detected. When used with the preferred nozzle inlet configuration, the [-88FeO2] peak was considered to be the more reliable tracer peak, because it is not present in other types of dust (mineral, tyre, Saharan etc). As shown by the comparison with ambient data from a number of locations, the aerodynamic lens is not as efficient in detecting brake wear particles, with less than 1% of sampled particles attributed to brake wear. Five field campaigns within Birmingham (background, roadside (3) and road tunnel) used the nozzle inlet and showed that dust particles (crustal and road) accounted for between 3.1 and 65.9% of the particles detected, with the remaining particles being made up from varying percentages of other constituents.

  5. Determination of triacetone triperoxide using ultraviolet femtosecond multiphoton ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ezoe, Ryota; Imasaka, Tomoko; Imasaka, Totaro

    2015-01-01

    Triacetone triperoxide (TATP), an explosive compound, was measured using gas chromatography combined with multiphoton ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC/MPI-TOFMS). By decreasing the pulse width of a femtosecond laser from 80 to 35 fs, a molecular ion was drastically enhanced and was measured as one of the major ions in the mass spectrum. The detection limits obtained using the molecular (M(+)) and fragment (C2H3O(+)) ions were similar or slightly superior to those obtained using conventional mass spectrometry based on electron and chemical ionization. In order to improve the reliability, an isotope of TATP, i.e., TATP-d18, was synthesized and used as an internal standard in the trace analysis of TATP in a sample of human blood. TATP could be identified in a two-dimensional display, even though numerous interfering compounds were present in the sample. Acetone, which is frequently used as a solvent in sampling TATP, produced a chemical species with a retention time nearly identical to that of TATP and provided a C2H3O(+) fragment ion that was employed for measuring a chromatogram of TATP in conventional MS. This compound, the structure of which was assigned as phorone, was clearly differentiated from TATP based on a molecular ion observable in MPI-TOFMS. PMID:25467497

  6. A laser diode based system for calibration of fast time-of-flight detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertoni, R.; Bonesini, M.; de Bari, A.; Rossella, M.

    2016-05-01

    A system based on commercially available items, such as a laser diode, emitting in the visible range ~ 400 nm, and multimode fiber patches, fused fiber splitters and optical switches may be assembled, for time calibration of multi-channels time-of-flight (TOF) detectors with photomultipliers' (PMTs') readout. As available laser diode sources have unfortunately limited peak power, the main experimental problem is the tight light power budget of such a system. In addition, while the technology for fused fiber splitters is common in the Telecom wavelength range (λ ~ 850, 1300–1500 nm), it is not easily available in the visible one. Therefore, extensive laboratory tests had to be done on purpose, to qualify the used optical components, and a full scale timing calibration prototype was built. Obtained results show that with such a system, a calibration resolution (σ) in the range 20–30 ps may be within reach. Therefore, fast multi-channels TOF detectors, with timing resolutions in the range 50–100 ps, may be easily calibrated in time. Results on tested optical components may be of interest also for time calibration of different light detection systems based on PMTs, as the ones used for detection of the vacuum ultraviolet scintillation light emitted by ionizing particles in large LAr TPCs.

  7. Protocol of single cells preparation for time of flight secondary ion mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Bobrowska, Justyna; Pabijan, Joanna; Wiltowska-Zuber, Joanna; Jany, Benedykt R; Krok, Franciszek; Awsiuk, Kamil; Rysz, Jakub; Budkowski, Andrzej; Lekka, Malgorzata

    2016-10-15

    There are several techniques like time of flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF SIMS) that require a special protocol for preparation of biological samples, in particular, those containing single cells due to high vacuum conditions that must be kept during the experiment. Frequently, preparation methodology involves liquid nitrogen freezing what is not always convenient. In our studies, we propose and validate a protocol for preparation of single cells. It consists of four steps: (i) paraformaldehyde fixation, (ii) salt removal, (iii) dehydrating, and (iv) sample drying under ambient conditions. The protocol was applied to samples with single melanoma cells i.e. WM115 and WM266-4 characterized by similar morphology. The surface and internal structures of cells were monitored using atomic force, scanning electron and fluorescent microscopes, used to follow any potential protocol-induced alterations. To validate the proposed methodology for sample preparation, ToF SIMS experiments were carried out using C60(+) cluster ion beam. The applied principal component analysis (PCA) revealed that chemical changes on cell surface of melanoma cells were large enough to differentiate between primary and secondary tumor sites. Subject category: Mass spectrometry. PMID:27318241

  8. Comprehensive blood plasma lipidomics by liquid chromatography/quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Sandra, Koen; Pereira, Alberto Dos Santos; Vanhoenacker, Gerd; David, Frank; Sandra, Pat

    2010-06-18

    A lipidomics strategy, combining high resolution reversed-phase liquid chromatography (RPLC) with high resolution quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (QqTOF), is described. The method has carefully been assessed in both a qualitative and a quantitative fashion utilizing human blood plasma. The inherent low technical variability associated with the lipidomics method allows to measure 65% of the features with an intensity RSD value below 10%. Blood plasma lipid spike-in experiments demonstrate that relative concentration differences smaller than 25% can readily be revealed by means of a t-test. Utilizing an advanced identification strategy, it is shown that the detected features mainly originate from (lyso-)phospholipids, sphingolipids, mono-, di- and triacylglycerols and cholesterol esters. The high resolution offered by the up-front RPLC step further allows to discriminate various isomeric species associated with the different lipid classes. The added value of utilizing a Jetstream electrospray ionization (ESI) source over a regular ESI source in lipidomics is for the first time demonstrated. In addition, the application of ultra high performance LC (UHPLC) up to 1200bar to extend the peak capacity or increase productivity is discussed. PMID:20307888

  9. Development of position-sensitive time-of-flight spectrometer for fission fragment research

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, C. W.; Tovesson, F.; Meierbachtol, K.; Bredeweg, T.; Jandel, M.; Jorgenson, H. J.; Laptev, A.; Rusev, G.; Shields, D. W.; White, M.; Blakeley, R. E.; Mader, D. M.; Hecht, A. A.

    2014-07-09

    A position-sensitive, high-resolution time-of-flight detector for fission fragments has been developed. The SPectrometer for Ion DEtermination in fission Research (SPIDER) is a 2E–2v spectrometer designed to measure the mass of light fission fragments to a single mass unit. The time pick-off detector pairs to be used in SPIDER have been tested with α-particles from 229Th and its decay chain and α-particles and spontaneous fission fragments from 252Cf. Each detector module is comprised of thin electron conversion foil, electrostatic mirror, microchannel plates, and delay-line anodes. Particle trajectories on the order of 700 mm are determined accurately to within 0.7 mm. Flight times were measured with 250 ps resolution FWHM. Computed particle velocities are accurate to within 0.06 mm/ns corresponding to a precision of 0.5%. As a result, an ionization chamber capable of 400 keV energy resolution coupled with the velocity measurements described here will pave the way for modestly efficient measurements of light fission fragments with unit mass resolution.

  10. Development of position-sensitive time-of-flight spectrometer for fission fragment research

    DOE PAGES

    Arnold, C. W.; Tovesson, F.; Meierbachtol, K.; Bredeweg, T.; Jandel, M.; Jorgenson, H. J.; Laptev, A.; Rusev, G.; Shields, D. W.; White, M.; et al

    2014-07-09

    A position-sensitive, high-resolution time-of-flight detector for fission fragments has been developed. The SPectrometer for Ion DEtermination in fission Research (SPIDER) is a 2E–2v spectrometer designed to measure the mass of light fission fragments to a single mass unit. The time pick-off detector pairs to be used in SPIDER have been tested with α-particles from 229Th and its decay chain and α-particles and spontaneous fission fragments from 252Cf. Each detector module is comprised of thin electron conversion foil, electrostatic mirror, microchannel plates, and delay-line anodes. Particle trajectories on the order of 700 mm are determined accurately to within 0.7 mm. Flightmore » times were measured with 250 ps resolution FWHM. Computed particle velocities are accurate to within 0.06 mm/ns corresponding to a precision of 0.5%. As a result, an ionization chamber capable of 400 keV energy resolution coupled with the velocity measurements described here will pave the way for modestly efficient measurements of light fission fragments with unit mass resolution.« less

  11. Acoustic tweezers via sub–time-of-flight regime surface acoustic waves

    PubMed Central

    Collins, David J.; Devendran, Citsabehsan; Ma, Zhichao; Ng, Jia Wei; Neild, Adrian; Ai, Ye

    2016-01-01

    Micrometer-scale acoustic waves are highly useful for refined optomechanical and acoustofluidic manipulation, where these fields are spatially localized along the transducer aperture but not along the acoustic propagation direction. In the case of acoustic tweezers, such a conventional acoustic standing wave results in particle and cell patterning across the entire width of a microfluidic channel, preventing selective trapping. We demonstrate the use of nanosecond-scale pulsed surface acoustic waves (SAWs) with a pulse period that is less than the time of flight between opposing transducers to generate localized time-averaged patterning regions while using conventional electrode structures. These nodal positions can be readily and arbitrarily positioned in two dimensions and within the patterning region itself through the imposition of pulse delays, frequency modulation, and phase shifts. This straightforward concept adds new spatial dimensions to which acoustic fields can be localized in SAW applications in a manner analogous to optical tweezers, including spatially selective acoustic tweezers and optical waveguides. PMID:27453940

  12. Preparation, IR spectroscopy, and time-of-flight mass spectrometry of halogenated and methylated Si(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salingue, Nils; Hess, Peter

    2011-09-01

    The preparation of chlorine-, bromine-, and iodine-terminated silicon surfaces (Si(111):Cl, Br, and I) using atomically flat Si(111)-(1×1):H is described. The halogenated surfaces were obtained by photochemically induced radical substitution reactions with the corresponding dihalogen in a Schlenk tube by conventional inert gas chemistry. The nucleophilic substitution of the Si-Cl functionality with the Grignard reagent (CH3MgCl) resulted in the unreconstructed methylated Si(111)-(1×1):CH3 surface. The halogenated and methylated silicon surfaces were characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and laser-induced desorption of monolayers (LIDOM). Calibration of the desorption temperature via analysis of time-of-flight (TOF) distributions as a function of laser fluence allowed the determination of the originally emitted neutral fragments by TOF mass spectrometry using electron-impact ionization. The halogens were desorbed atomically and as SiX n (X = Cl, Br) clusters. The methyl groups mainly desorbed as methyl and ethyl fragments and a small amount of +SiCH3.

  13. Development of a Portable Single Photon Ionization-Photoelectron Ionization Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yunguang; Li, Jinxu; Tang, Bin; Zhu, Liping; Hou, Keyong; Li, Haiyang

    2015-01-01

    A vacuum ultraviolet lamp based single photon ionization- (SPI-) photoelectron ionization (PEI) portable reflecting time-of-flight mass spectrometer (TOFMS) was designed for online monitoring gas samples. It has a dual mode ionization source: SPI for analyte with ionization energy (IE) below 10.6 eV and PEI for IE higher than 10.6 eV. Two kinds of sampling inlets, a capillary inlet and a membrane inlet, are utilized for high concentration and trace volatile organic compounds, respectively. A mass resolution of 1100 at m/z 64 has been obtained with a total size of 40 × 31 × 29 cm, the weight is 27 kg, and the power consumption is only 70 W. A mixture of benzene, toluene, and xylene (BTX), SO2, and discharging products of SF6 were used to test its performance, and the result showed that the limit of quantitation for BTX is as low as 5 ppbv (S/N = 10 : 1) with linear dynamic ranges greater than four orders of magnitude. The portable TOFMS was also evaluated by analyzing volatile organic compounds from wine and decomposition products of SF6 inside of a gas-insulated switchgear. PMID:26587023

  14. Combining endoscopic ultrasound with Time-Of-Flight PET: The EndoTOFPET-US Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frisch, Benjamin

    2013-12-01

    The EndoTOFPET-US collaboration develops a multimodal imaging technique for endoscopic exams of the pancreas or the prostate. It combines the benefits of high resolution metabolic imaging with Time-Of-Flight Positron Emission Tomography (TOF PET) and anatomical imaging with ultrasound (US). EndoTOFPET-US consists of a PET head extension for a commercial US endoscope and a PET plate outside the body in coincidence with the head. The high level of miniaturization and integration creates challenges in fields such as scintillating crystals, ultra-fast photo-detection, highly integrated electronics, system integration and image reconstruction. Amongst the developments, fast scintillators as well as fast and compact digital SiPMs with single SPAD readout are used to obtain the best coincidence time resolution (CTR). Highly integrated ASICs and DAQ electronics contribute to the timing performances of EndoTOFPET. In view of the targeted resolution of around 1 mm in the reconstructed image, we present a prototype detector system with a CTR better than 240 ps FWHM. We discuss the challenges in simulating such a system and introduce reconstruction algorithms based on graphics processing units (GPU).

  15. A technology review of time-of-flight photon counting for advanced remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamb, Robert A.

    2010-04-01

    Time correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) has made tremendous progress during the past ten years enabling improved performance in precision time-of-flight (TOF) rangefinding and lidar. In this review the development and performance of several ranging systems is presented that use TCSPC for accurate ranging and range profiling over distances up to 17km. A range resolution of a few millimetres is routinely achieved over distances of several kilometres. These systems include single wavelength devices operating in the visible; multi-wavelength systems covering the visible and near infra-red; the use of electronic gating to reduce in-band solar background and, most recently, operation at high repetition rates without range aliasing- typically 10MHz over several kilometres. These systems operate at very low optical power (<100μW). The technique therefore has potential for eye-safe lidar monitoring of the environment and obvious military, security and surveillance sensing applications. The review will highlight the theoretical principles of photon counting and progress made in developing absolute ranging techniques that enable high repetition rate data acquisition that avoids range aliasing. Technology trends in TCSPC rangefinding are merging with those of quantum cryptography and its future application to revolutionary quantum imaging provides diverse and exciting research into secure covert sensing, ultra-low power active imaging and quantum rangefinding.

  16. A novel method for digital ultrasonic time-of-flight measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X. F.; Tang, Z. A.

    2010-10-01

    Most ultrasonic ranging measurements are based on the determination of the ultrasonic time-of-flight (TOF). This paper develops a novel method for the TOF measurement which combines both the improved self-interference driving technique and the optional optimization signal processing algorithms. By stimulating the transmitter with the amplitude modulation and the phase modulation envelope square waveforms (APESWs), the proposed system can effectively reduce the errors caused by inertia delay and amplitude attenuation. In addition, based on different signal-to-noise ratio test conditions, the resultant received zero-crossing samples, which are deteriorated by noise, can be precisely inspected and calculated with two optimized algorithms named zero-crossing tracking (ZCT) and time-shifted superposition (TSS) method. The architecture of the designed system is divided into two parts. The novel APESW driving module, the received envelope zero-crossings phase detection module, and the ZCT method processing module are designed in a complex programable logic device. The TSS signal processing module and the optimization algorithm discrimination program module are integrated in a digital signal processor. The TOF measurements calibrated in ultrasonic ranging experiments indicate that the relative errors of the method are limited in ±0.8%. Therefore, a feasible method is provided with the advantages of high noise immunity, accuracy, low cost, and ease of implementation.

  17. Multiplexed Ion Mobility Spectrometry - Orthogonal Time-Of-Flight Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Belov, Mikhail E.; Buschbach, Michael A.; Prior, David C.; Tang, Keqi; Smith, Richard D.

    2007-03-15

    Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) coupled to orthogonal time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOF) has shown significant promise for the characterization of complex biological mixtures. The enormous complexity of biological samples (e.g. from proteomics) and the need for both biological and technical analysis replicates imposes major challenges for multidimensional separation platforms in regard to both sensitivity and sample throughput. A major potential attraction of the IMS-TOF MS platform is separation speeds exceeding that of conventional condensed-phase separations by orders of magnitude. Known limitations of the IMS-TOF MS platforms that presently mitigate this attraction include the need for extensive signal averaging due to factors that include significant ion losses in the IMS-TOF interface and an ion utilization efficiency of less than ~1% with continuous ion sources (e.g. ESI). We have developed a new multiplexed ESI-IMS-TOF mass spectrometer that enables lossless ion transmission through the IMS-TOF as well as a utilization efficiency of >50% for ions from the ESI source. Initial results with a mixture of peptides show a ~10-fold increase in signal-to-noise ratio with the multiplexed approach compared to a signal averaging approach, with no reduction in either IMS or TOF MS resolution.

  18. Intracranial aneurysms: Diagnostics accuracy of three-dimensional, fourier transform, time-of-flight MR angiography

    SciTech Connect

    Korogi, Yukunori; Takahashi, Mutsumasa; Mabuchi, Nobuhisa; Miki, Hitoshi; Fujiwara, Satoru; Horikawa, Yoshiharu; Nakagawa, Toshio; O`Uchi, Toshihiro; Watabe, Tsuneya; Shiga, Hayao

    1994-10-01

    To assess the accuracy of three-dimensional, Fourier transform, time-of-flight magnetic resonance (MR) angiography in the identification of intracranial aneurysms. MR angiograms of 126 patients (59 male and 67 female patients, aged 12-77 years) with various intracranial vascular lesions were evaluated. Seventy-eight aneurysms, including 60 less than 5 mm in diameter, in 61 patients were depicted at conventional angiography. Eight projection images, as well as one axial collapsed MR angiogram obtained with a maximum-intensity projection algorithm, were used for evaluation. Sensitivity for the five observers ranged from 58% to 68% (mean, 63%). Higher sensitivity was achieved for anterior communicating and middle cerebral artery aneurysms, while that for internal carotid artery aneurysms was poor. Sensitivities for small and medium aneurysms ranged from 50% to 60% (mean, 56%) and from 77% to 94% (mean, 85%), respectively. MR angiography can depict intracranial aneurysms 5 mm or larger with good accuracy but is less useful for the identification of smaller aneurysms. 12 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs.

  19. Measuring time-of-flight in an ultrasonic LPS system using generalized cross-correlation.

    PubMed

    Villladangos, José Manuel; Ureña, Jesús; García, Juan Jesús; Mazo, Manuel; Hernández, Alvaro; Jiménez, Ana; Ruíz, Daniel; De Marziani, Carlos

    2011-01-01

    In this article, a time-of-flight detection technique in the frequency domain is described for an ultrasonic local positioning system (LPS) based on encoded beacons. Beacon transmissions have been synchronized and become simultaneous by means of the DS-CDMA (direct-sequence code Division multiple access) technique. Every beacon has been associated to a 255-bit Kasami code. The detection of signal arrival instant at the receiver, from which the distance to each beacon can be obtained, is based on the application of the generalized cross-correlation (GCC), by using the cross-spectral density between the received signal and the sequence to be detected. Prior filtering to enhance the frequency components around the carrier frequency (40 kHz) has improved estimations when obtaining the correlation function maximum, which implies an improvement in distance measurement precision. Positioning has been achieved by using hyperbolic trilateration, based on the time differences of arrival (TDOA) between a reference beacon and the others.

  20. Robot navigation and obstacle detection in pipelines using time-of-flight imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thielemann, Jens T.; Breivik, Gøril M.; Berge, Asbjørn

    2010-02-01

    Range imagery provided by time-of-flight (TOF) cameras has been shown to be useful to facilitate robot navigation in several applications. Visual navigation for autonomous pipeline inspection robots is a special case of such a task, where the cramped operating environment influences the range measurements in a detrimental way. Inherent in the imaging system are also several defects that will lead to a smearing of range measurements. This paper sketches an approach for using TOF cameras as a visual navigation aid in pipelines, and addresses the challenges concerning the inherent defects in the imaging system and the impact of the operating environment. New results on our previously proposed strategy for detecting and tracking possible landmarks and obstacles in pipelines are presented. We consider an explicit model for correcting lens distortions, and use this to explain why the cylindrical pipe is perceived as a cone. A simplified model, which implicitly handles the combined effects of the environment and the camera on the measured ranges by adjusting for the conical shape, is used to map the robot's environment into an along-axis-view relative to the pipe, which facilitates obstacle traversal. Experiments using a model pipeline and a prototype camera rig are presented.

  1. Introduction to time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry application in chromatographic analysis.

    PubMed

    Orinák, Andrej; Arlinghaus, Heinrich F; Vering, Guido; Orináková, Renáta; Hellweg, Sebastian

    2005-08-19

    New on-line analytical system coupling thin layer chromatography (TLC) and high selective identification unit-time of flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) is introduced in this article. Chromatographic mixture separation and analyte surface deposition followed with surface TOF-SIMS analysis on-line allows to identify the analytes at trace and ultratrace levels. The selected analytes with different detectability and identification possibility were analysed in this hyphenated unit (Methyl Red indicator, Terpinolen and Giberrelic acid). Here, the chromatographic thin layer plays a universal role: separation unit, analyte depositing surface and TOF-SIMS interface, finally. Two depositing substrates and TOF-SIMS compatible interfaces were tested in above-mentioned interfacing unit: modified aluminium backed chromatographic thin layer and monolithic silica thin layer. The sets of positive and negative ions TOF-SIMS spectra obtained from different SIMS modes of analysis were used for analyte identification purposes. SIMS enables analyte detection with high mass resolution at the concentration level that is not achieved by other methods. PMID:16114244

  2. Monoacylglycerol Analysis Using MS/MS(ALL) Quadruple Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Gao, Fei; McDaniel, Justice; Chen, Emily Y; Rockwell, Hannah; Lynes, Matthew D; Tseng, Yu-Hua; Sarangarajan, Rangaprasad; Narain, Niven R; Kiebish, Michael A

    2016-01-01

    Monoacylglycerols (MAGs) are structural and bioactive metabolites critical for biological function. Development of facile tools for measuring MAG are essential to understand its role in different diseases and various pathways. A data-independent acquisition method, MS/MS(ALL), using electrospray ionization (ESI) coupled quadrupole time of flight mass spectrometry (MS), was utilized for the structural identification and quantitative analysis of individual MAG molecular species. Compared with other acylglycerols, diacylglycerols (DAG) and triacylglycerols (TAG), MAG characteristically presented as a dominant protonated ion, [M + H]⁺, and under low collision energy as fatty acid-like fragments due to the neutral loss of the glycerol head group. At low concentrations (<10 pmol/µL), where lipid-lipid interactions are rare, there was a strong linear correlation between ion abundance and MAG concentration. Moreover, using the MS/MS(ALL) method the major MAG species from human plasma and mouse brown and white adipose tissues were quantified in less than 6 min. Collectively, these results demonstrate that MS/MS(ALL) analysis of MAG is an enabling strategy for the direct identification and quantitative analysis of low level MAG species from biological samples with high throughput and sensitivity. PMID:27548241

  3. Exploiting sparsity in time-of-flight range acquisition using a single time-resolved sensor.

    PubMed

    Kirmani, Ahmed; Colaço, Andrea; Wong, Franco N C; Goyal, Vivek K

    2011-10-24

    Range acquisition systems such as light detection and ranging (LIDAR) and time-of-flight (TOF) cameras operate by measuring the time difference of arrival between a transmitted pulse and the scene reflection. We introduce the design of a range acquisition system for acquiring depth maps of piecewise-planar scenes with high spatial resolution using a single, omnidirectional, time-resolved photodetector and no scanning components. In our experiment, we reconstructed 64 × 64-pixel depth maps of scenes comprising two to four planar shapes using only 205 spatially-patterned, femtosecond illuminations of the scene. The reconstruction uses parametric signal modeling to recover a set of depths present in the scene. Then, a convex optimization that exploits sparsity of the Laplacian of the depth map of a typical scene determines correspondences between spatial positions and depths. In contrast with 2D laser scanning used in LIDAR systems and low-resolution 2D sensor arrays used in TOF cameras, our experiment demonstrates that it is possible to build a non-scanning range acquisition system with high spatial resolution using only a standard, low-cost photodetector and a spatial light modulator. PMID:22108998

  4. Facile time-of-flight methods for characterizing pulsed superfluid helium droplet beams

    SciTech Connect

    He, Yunteng; Zhang, Jie; Li, Yang; Freund, William M.; Kong, Wei

    2015-08-15

    We present two facile time-of-flight (TOF) methods of detecting superfluid helium droplets and droplets with neutral dopants. Without an electron gun and with only a heated filament and pulsed electrodes, the electron impact ionization TOF mass spectrometer can resolve ionized helium clusters such as He{sub 2}{sup +} and He{sub 4}{sup +}, which are signatures of superfluid helium droplets. Without ionizing any helium atoms, multiphoton non-resonant laser ionization of CCl{sub 4} doped in superfluid helium droplets at 266 nm generates complex cluster ions of dopant fragments with helium atoms, including (He){sub n}C{sup +}, (He){sub n}Cl{sup +}, and (He){sub n}CCl{sup +}. Using both methods, we have characterized our cryogenic pulsed valve—the Even-Lavie valve. We have observed a primary pulse with larger helium droplets traveling at a slower speed and a rebound pulse with smaller droplets at a faster speed. In addition, the pickup efficiency of dopant is higher for the primary pulse when the nozzle temperature is higher than 13 K, and the total time duration of the doped droplet pulse is only on the order of 20 μs. These results stress the importance of fast and easy characterization of the droplet beam for sensitive measurements such as electron diffraction of doped droplets.

  5. Analysis of lung surfactant model systems with time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry.

    PubMed Central

    Bourdos, N; Kollmer, F; Benninghoven, A; Ross, M; Sieber, M; Galla, H J

    2000-01-01

    An often-used model lung surfactant containing dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC), dipalmitoylphosphatidylglycerol (DPPG), and the surfactant protein C (SP-C) was analyzed as Langmuir-Blodgett film by spatially resolved time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) to directly visualize the formation and composition of domains. Binary lipid and lipid/SP-C systems were probed for comparison. TOF-SIMS spectra revealed positive secondary ions (SI) characteristic for DPPC and SP-C, but not for DPPG. SI mapping results in images with domain structures in DPPC/DPPG and DPPG/SP-C, but not in DPPC/SP-C films. We are able to distinguish between the fluid and condensed areas probably due to a matrix effect. These findings correspond with other imaging techniques, fluorescence light microscopy (FLM), scanning force microscopy (SFM), and silver decoration. The ternary mixture DPPC/DPPG/SP-C transferred from the collapse region exhibited SP-C-rich domains surrounding pure lipid areas. The results obtained are in full accordance with our earlier SFM picture of layered protrusions that serve as a compressed reservoir for surfactant material during expansion. Our study demonstrates once more that SP-C plays a unique role in the respiration process. PMID:10866961

  6. Crystal timing offset calibration method for time of flight PET scanners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Jinghan; Song, Xiyun

    2016-03-01

    In time-of-flight (TOF) positron emission tomography (PET), precise calibration of the timing offset of each crystal of a PET scanner is essential. Conventionally this calibration requires a specially designed tool just for this purpose. In this study a method that uses a planar source to measure the crystal timing offsets (CTO) is developed. The method uses list mode acquisitions of a planar source placed at multiple orientations inside the PET scanner field-of-view (FOV). The placement of the planar source in each acquisition is automatically figured out from the measured data, so that a fixture for exactly placing the source is not required. The expected coincidence time difference for each detected list mode event can be found from the planar source placement and the detector geometry. A deviation of the measured time difference from the expected one is due to CTO of the two crystals. The least squared solution of the CTO is found iteratively using the list mode events. The effectiveness of the crystal timing calibration method is evidenced using phantom images generated by placing back each list mode event into the image space with the timing offset applied to each event. The zigzagged outlines of the phantoms in the images become smooth after the crystal timing calibration is applied. In conclusion, a crystal timing calibration method is developed. The method uses multiple list mode acquisitions of a planar source to find the least squared solution of crystal timing offsets.

  7. A new design of ion storage accelerator for time-of-flight-MS

    SciTech Connect

    Kraft, A.; Wollnik, H.; Laiko, V.; Dodonov, A.F.

    1995-12-31

    A new Time-of-Flight MS for orthogonal extraction has been constructed. It consists of a API-source, the orthogonal extraction optic and a single stage reflectron as well as a detector with two MCP`s in Chevron-arrangement. The extraction optic has a new design in respect to the prevention of disturbing fields. Such fields take influence on the primary beam during accumulation made and causes noise as well as broadening of mass peaks. This fields arises from the penetration of field through the grid between the two stages of the extraction optic. In this construction, this penetration is compensated by the introduction of an additional electrode which is held at the average virtual potential of the separation grid. By adjusting all electrical parameters of the mass spectrometer (extraction-pulser, backplane of reflector, focussing optics) the peakwidth had been optimized. It has been shown the peakwidth strongly depends on the potential of the compensation electrode. The optimal value corresponds in good agreement with the calculated value (1.7V instead of 1.56V). In the case of Gramicidin S (m=1140) a resolving power of 2000 is achieved.

  8. An improved method for calibrating time-of-flight Laue single-crystal neutron diffractometers

    PubMed Central

    Bull, Craig L.; Johnson, Michael W.; Hamidov, Hayrullo; Komatsu, Kazuki; Guthrie, Malcolm; Gutmann, Matthias J.; Loveday, John S.; Nelmes, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    A robust and comprehensive method for determining the orientation matrix of a single-crystal sample using the neutron Laue time-of-flight (TOF) technique is described. The new method enables the measurement of the unit-cell parameters with an uncertainty in the range 0.015–0.06%, depending upon the crystal symmetry and the number of reflections measured. The improved technique also facilitates the location and integration of weak reflections, which are often more difficult to discern amongst the increased background at higher energies. The technique uses a mathematical model of the relative positions of all the detector pixels of the instrument, together with a methodology that establishes a reproducible reference frame and a method for determining the parameters of the instrument detector model. Since all neutron TOF instruments require precise detector calibration for their effective use, it is possible that the method described here may be of use on other instruments where the detector calibration cannot be determined by other means. PMID:24904244

  9. Nonenhanced peripheral MR-angiography (MRA) at 3 Tesla: evaluation of quiescent-interval single-shot MRA in patients undergoing digital subtraction angiography.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Moritz; Knobloch, Gesine; Gielen, Martin; Lauff, Marie-Teres; Romano, Valentina; Hamm, Bernd; Kröncke, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Quiescent-interval single-shot MRA (QISS-MRA) is a promising nonenhanced imaging technique for assessment of peripheral arterial disease (PAD). Previous studies at 3 Tesla included only very limited numbers of patients for correlation of QISS-MRA with digital subtraction angiography (DSA) as standard of reference (SOR). The aim of this prospective institutional review board-approved study was to compare QISS-MRA at 3 Tesla with DSA in a larger patient group. Our study included 32 consecutive patients who underwent QISS-MRA, contrast-enhanced MRA (CE-MRA), and DSA. Two readers independently performed a per-segment evaluation of QISS-MRA and CE-MRA for image quality and identification of non-significant stenosis (<50%) versus significant stenosis (50-100%). The final dataset included 1,027 vessel segments. Reader 1 and 2 rated image quality as diagnostic in 96.8 and 98.0% of the vessel segments on QISS-MRA and in 99.3 and 98.4% of the vessel segments on CE-MRA, respectively. DSA was available for 922 segments and detected significant stenosis in 133 segments (14.4%). Consensus reading yielded the following diagnostic parameters for QISS-MRA versus CE-MRA: sensitivity: 83.5% (111/133) versus 82.7% (110/133), p = 0.80; specificity: 93.9% (741/789) versus 95.7% (755/789), p = 0.25; and diagnostic accuracy: 92.4% (852/922) versus 93.8% (865/922), p = 0.35. In conclusion, using DSA as SOR, QISS-MRA and CE-MRA at 3 Tesla showed similar diagnostic accuracy in the assessment of PAD. A limitation of QISS-MRA was the lower rate of assessable vessel segments compared to CE-MRA.

  10. Radiochromic 3D Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oldham, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Radiochromic materials exhibit a colour change when exposed to ionising radiation. Radiochromic film has been used for clinical dosimetry for many years and increasingly so recently, as films of higher sensitivities have become available. The two principle advantages of radiochromic dosimetry include greater tissue equivalence (radiologically) and the lack of requirement for development of the colour change. In a radiochromic material, the colour change arises direct from ionising interactions affecting dye molecules, without requiring any latent chemical, optical or thermal development, with important implications for increased accuracy and convenience. It is only relatively recently however, that 3D radiochromic dosimetry has become possible. In this article we review recent developments and the current state-of-the-art of 3D radiochromic dosimetry, and the potential for a more comprehensive solution for the verification of complex radiation therapy treatments, and 3D dose measurement in general.

  11. 3-D Seismic Interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Gregory F.

    2009-05-01

    This volume is a brief introduction aimed at those who wish to gain a basic and relatively quick understanding of the interpretation of three-dimensional (3-D) seismic reflection data. The book is well written, clearly illustrated, and easy to follow. Enough elementary mathematics are presented for a basic understanding of seismic methods, but more complex mathematical derivations are avoided. References are listed for readers interested in more advanced explanations. After a brief introduction, the book logically begins with a succinct chapter on modern 3-D seismic data acquisition and processing. Standard 3-D acquisition methods are presented, and an appendix expands on more recent acquisition techniques, such as multiple-azimuth and wide-azimuth acquisition. Although this chapter covers the basics of standard time processing quite well, there is only a single sentence about prestack depth imaging, and anisotropic processing is not mentioned at all, even though both techniques are now becoming standard.

  12. Bootstrapping 3D fermions

    DOE PAGES

    Iliesiu, Luca; Kos, Filip; Poland, David; Pufu, Silviu S.; Simmons-Duffin, David; Yacoby, Ran

    2016-03-17

    We study the conformal bootstrap for a 4-point function of fermions <ψψψψ> in 3D. We first introduce an embedding formalism for 3D spinors and compute the conformal blocks appearing in fermion 4-point functions. Using these results, we find general bounds on the dimensions of operators appearing in the ψ × ψ OPE, and also on the central charge CT. We observe features in our bounds that coincide with scaling dimensions in the GrossNeveu models at large N. Finally, we also speculate that other features could coincide with a fermionic CFT containing no relevant scalar operators.

  13. Laser photoionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry of nitrated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and nitrated heterocyclic compounds. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Noyes, R.A.

    1993-01-01

    Partial Contents: Laser Desorption-Laser Photoionization Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry; Basic Principles of TOFMS; Factors Affecting Flight Time; Source of Broadening; Laser Desorption; Theory of Multiphoton Ionization: Application to Mass Spectrometry; Quantum Theory of MPI; Time-Dependent Perturbation Theory; Time-Dependent Coefficients; Probability of a Two-Photon Process; and Attributes of R2PI.

  14. The highly conserved MraZ protein is a transcriptional regulator in Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Eraso, Jesus M.; Markillie, Lye Meng; Mitchell, Hugh D.; Taylor, Ronald C.; Orr, Galya; Margolin, William

    2014-05-05

    The mraZ and mraW genes are highly conserved in bacteria, both in sequence and location at the head of the division and cell wall (dcw) gene cluster. Although MraZ has structural similarity to the AbrB transition state regulator and the MazE antitoxin, and MraW is known to methylate ribosomal RNA, mraZ and mraW null mutants have no detectable growth phenotype in any species tested to date, hampering progress in understanding their physiological role. Here we show that overproduction of Escherichia coli MraZ perturbs cell division and the cell envelope, is more lethal at high levels or in minimal growth medium, and that MraW antagonizes these effects. MraZGFP localizes to the nucleoid, suggesting that it binds DNA. Indeed, purified MraZ directly binds a region upstream from its own promoter containing three direct repeats to regulate its own expression and that of downstream cell division and cell wall genes. MraZ-LacZ fusions are repressed by excess MraZ but not when DNA binding by MraZ is inhibited. RNAseq analysis indicates that MraZ is a global transcriptional regulator with numerous targets in addition to dcw genes. One of these targets, mioC, is directly bound by MraZ in a region with three direct repeats.

  15. SPADnet: a fully digital, scalable, and networked photonic component for time-of-flight PET applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruschini, Claudio; Charbon, Edoardo; Veerappan, Chockalingam; Braga, Leo H. C.; Massari, Nicola; Perenzoni, Matteo; Gasparini, Leonardo; Stoppa, David; Walker, Richard; Erdogan, Ahmet; Henderson, Robert K.; East, Steve; Grant, Lindsay; Játékos, Balázs; Ujhelyi, Ferenc; Erdei, Gábor; Lörincz, Emöke; André, Luc; Maingault, Laurent; Jacolin, David; Verger, L.; Gros d'Aillon, Eric; Major, Peter; Papp, Zoltan; Nemeth, Gabor

    2014-05-01

    The SPADnet FP7 European project is aimed at a new generation of fully digital, scalable and networked photonic components to enable large area image sensors, with primary target gamma-ray and coincidence detection in (Time-of- Flight) Positron Emission Tomography (PET). SPADnet relies on standard CMOS technology, therefore allowing for MRI compatibility. SPADnet innovates in several areas of PET systems, from optical coupling to single-photon sensor architectures, from intelligent ring networks to reconstruction algorithms. It is built around a natively digital, intelligent SPAD (Single-Photon Avalanche Diode)-based sensor device which comprises an array of 8×16 pixels, each composed of 4 mini-SiPMs with in situ time-to-digital conversion, a multi-ring network to filter, carry, and process data produced by the sensors at 2Gbps, and a 130nm CMOS process enabling mass-production of photonic modules that are optically interfaced to scintillator crystals. A few tens of sensor devices are tightly abutted on a single PCB to form a so-called sensor tile, thanks to TSV (Through Silicon Via) connections to their backside (replacing conventional wire bonding). The sensor tile is in turn interfaced to an FPGA-based PCB on its back. The resulting photonic module acts as an autonomous sensing and computing unit, individually detecting gamma photons as well as thermal and Compton events. It determines in real time basic information for each scintillation event, such as exact time of arrival, position and energy, and communicates it to its peers in the field of view. Coincidence detection does therefore occur directly in the ring itself, in a differed and distributed manner to ensure scalability. The selected true coincidence events are then collected by a snooper module, from which they are transferred to an external reconstruction computer using Gigabit Ethernet.

  16. High-performance electronics for time-of-flight PET systems.

    PubMed

    Choong, W-S; Peng, Q; Vu, C Q; Turko, B T; Moses, W W

    2013-01-01

    We have designed and built a high-performance readout electronics system for time-of-flight positron emission tomography (TOF PET) cameras. The electronics architecture is based on the electronics for a commercial whole-body PET camera (Siemens/CPS Cardinal electronics), modified to improve the timing performance. The fundamental contributions in the electronics that can limit the timing resolution include the constant fraction discriminator (CFD), which converts the analog electrical signal from the photo-detector to a digital signal whose leading edge is time-correlated with the input signal, and the time-to-digital converter (TDC), which provides a time stamp for the CFD output. Coincident events are identified by digitally comparing the values of the time stamps. In the Cardinal electronics, the front-end processing electronics are performed by an Analog subsection board, which has two application-specific integrated circuits (ASICs), each servicing a PET block detector module. The ASIC has a built-in CFD and TDC. We found that a significant degradation in the timing resolution comes from the ASIC's CFD and TDC. Therefore, we have designed and built an improved Analog subsection board that replaces the ASIC's CFD and TDC with a high-performance CFD (made with discrete components) and TDC (using the CERN high-performance TDC ASIC). The improved Analog subsection board is used in a custom single-ring LSO-based TOF PET camera. The electronics system achieves a timing resolution of 60 ps FWHM. Prototype TOF detector modules are read out with the electronics system and give coincidence timing resolutions of 259 ps FWHM and 156 ps FWHM for detector modules coupled to LSO and LaBr3 crystals respectively. PMID:24575149

  17. Development of analytically capable time-of-flight mass spectrometer with continuous ion introduction.

    PubMed

    Hárs, György; Dobos, Gábor

    2010-03-01

    The present article describes the results and findings explored in the course of the development of the analytically capable prototype of continuous time-of-flight (CTOF) mass spectrometer. Currently marketed pulsed TOF (PTOF) instruments use ion introduction with a 10 ns or so pulse width, followed by a waiting period roughly 100 micros. Accordingly, the sample is under excitation in 10(-4) part of the total measuring time. This very low duty cycle severely limits the sensitivity of the PTOF method. A possible approach to deal with this problem is to use linear sinusoidal dual modulation technique (CTOF) as described in this article. This way the sensitivity of the method is increased, due to the 50% duty cycle of the excitation. All other types of TOF spectrometer use secondary electron multiplier (SEM) for detection, which unfortunately discriminates in amplification in favor of the lighter ions. This discrimination effect is especially undesirable in a mass spectrometric method, which targets high mass range. In CTOF method, SEM is replaced with Faraday cup detector, thus eliminating the mass discrimination effect. Omitting SEM is made possible by the high ion intensity and the very slow ion detection with some hundred hertz detection bandwidth. The electrometer electronics of the Faraday cup detector operates with amplification 10(10) V/A. The primary ion beam is highly monoenergetic due to the construction of the ion gun, which made possible to omit any electrostatic mirror configuration for bunching the ions. The measurement is controlled by a personal computer and the intelligent signal generator Type Tabor WW 2571, which uses the direct digital synthesis technique for making arbitrary wave forms. The data are collected by a Labjack interface board, and the fast Fourier transformation is performed by the software. Noble gas mixture has been used to test the analytical capabilities of the prototype setup. Measurement presented proves the results of the

  18. The power of hyphenated chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectrometry in public health laboratories.

    PubMed

    Ibáñez, María; Portolés, Tania; Rúbies, Antoni; Muñoz, Eva; Muñoz, Gloria; Pineda, Laura; Serrahima, Eulalia; Sancho, Juan V; Centrich, Francesc; Hernández, Félix

    2012-05-30

    Laboratories devoted to the public health field have to face the analysis of a large number of organic contaminants/residues in many different types of samples. Analytical techniques applied in this field are normally focused on quantification of a limited number of analytes. At present, most of these techniques are based on gas chromatography (GC) or liquid chromatography (LC) coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). Using these techniques only analyte-specific information is acquired, and many other compounds that might be present in the samples would be ignored. In this paper, we explore the potential of time-of-flight (TOF) MS hyphenated to GC or LC to provide additional information, highly useful in this field. Thus, all positives reported by standard reference targeted LC-MS/MS methods were unequivocally confirmed by LC-QTOF MS. Only 61% of positives reported by targeted GC-MS/MS could be confirmed by GC-TOF MS, which was due to its lower sensitivity as nonconfirmations corresponded to analytes that were present at very low concentrations. In addition, the use of TOF MS allowed searching for additional compounds in large-scope screening methodologies. In this way, different contaminants/residues not included in either LC or GC tandem MS analyses were detected. This was the case of the insecticide thiacloprid, the plant growth regulator paclobutrazol, the fungicide prochloraz, or the UV filter benzophenone, among others. Finally, elucidation of unknowns was another of the possibilities offered by TOF MS thanks to the accurate-mass full-acquisition data available when using this technique.

  19. High-performance electronics for time-of-flight PET systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choong, W.-S.; Peng, Q.; Vu, C. Q.; Turko, B. T.; Moses, W. W.

    2013-01-01

    We have designed and built a high-performance readout electronics system for time-of-flight positron emission tomography (TOF PET) cameras. The electronics architecture is based on the electronics for a commercial whole-body PET camera (Siemens/CPS Cardinal electronics), modified to improve the timing performance. The fundamental contributions in the electronics that can limit the timing resolution include the constant fraction discriminator (CFD), which converts the analog electrical signal from the photo-detector to a digital signal whose leading edge is time-correlated with the input signal, and the time-to-digital converter (TDC), which provides a time stamp for the CFD output. Coincident events are identified by digitally comparing the values of the time stamps. In the Cardinal electronics, the front-end processing electronics are performed by an Analog subsection board, which has two application-specific integrated circuits (ASICs), each servicing a PET block detector module. The ASIC has a built-in CFD and TDC. We found that a significant degradation in the timing resolution comes from the ASIC's CFD and TDC. Therefore, we have designed and built an improved Analog subsection board that replaces the ASIC's CFD and TDC with a high-performance CFD (made with discrete components) and TDC (using the CERN high-performance TDC ASIC). The improved Analog subsection board is used in a custom single-ring LSO-based TOF PET camera. The electronics system achieves a timing resolution of 60 ps FWHM. Prototype TOF detector modules are read out with the electronics system and give coincidence timing resolutions of 259 ps FWHM and 156 ps FWHM for detector modules coupled to LSO and LaBr3 crystals respectively.

  20. Qualitative nontarget analysis of landfill leachate using gas chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Jernberg, Joonas; Pellinen, Jukka; Rantalainen, Anna-Lea

    2013-01-15

    Nontarget analysis means that a sample is analysed without preselection of the studied analytes. While target analysis attempts to determine whether certain selected compounds are present in the sample, nontarget analysis is performed to explore what unknown compounds can be found. We developed a nontarget method using a landfill leachate sample as a complex test sample. The method was based on the use of a gas chromatograph-time-of-flight mass spectrometer (GC-TOF-MS) for final analysis and a deconvolution computer application for data processing. This nontarget analysis method was tested and validated by applying it to a landfill leachate sample spiked with 11 organic pollutants that were treated as unknowns. Sensitivity was found to be the most critical parameter affecting the success of nontarget analysis. The limit of identification (LOI) was 2500 ng L(-1) for four of the 11 compounds, 500 ng L(-1) for three compounds and 100 ng L(-1) for one compound. Three compounds were not detected in any of the spiked samples. A six-stage identification process was developed based on the spiking experiments. The process was based on the forward fit value of the library hit, the number of deconvoluted ions and the accurate mass scoring of the measured ions. The process was applied to an unspiked leachate water sample. Altogether, 44 compounds were tentatively identified in the sample. Elemental compositions of 36 components were additionally determined for which an unequivocal compound identification could not be given. Nontarget analysis with GC-TOF-MS is a promising method for the qualitative analysis of complex water samples. However, we conclude that the computer application for nontarget analysis needs improvement to decrease the amount of manual work needed in the identification process.

  1. Time of flight emission spectroscopy of laser produced nickel plasma: Short-pulse and ultrafast excitations

    SciTech Connect

    Smijesh, N.; Chandrasekharan, K.; Joshi, Jagdish C.; Philip, Reji

    2014-07-07

    We report the experimental investigation and comparison of the temporal features of short-pulse (7 ns) and ultrafast (100 fs) laser produced plasmas generated from a solid nickel target, expanding into a nitrogen background. When the ambient pressure is varied in a large range of 10⁻⁶Torr to 10²Torr, the plume intensity is found to increase rapidly as the pressure crosses 1 Torr. Time of flight (TOF) spectroscopy of emission from neutral nickel (Ni I) at 361.9 nm (3d⁹(²D) 4p → 3d⁹(²D) 4s transition) reveals two peaks (fast and slow species) in short-pulse excitation and a single peak in ultrafast excitation. The fast and slow peaks represent recombined neutrals and un-ionized neutrals, respectively. TOF emission from singly ionized nickel (Ni II) studied using the 428.5 nm (3p⁶3d⁸(³P) 4s→ 3p⁶3d⁹ 4s) transition shows only a single peak for either excitation. Velocities of the neutral and ionic species are determined from TOF measurements carried out at different positions (i.e., at distances of 2 mm and 4 mm, respectively, from the target surface) on the plume axis. Measured velocities indicate acceleration of neutrals and ions, which is caused by the Coulomb pull of the electrons enveloping the plume front in the case of ultrafast excitation. Both Coulomb pull and laser-plasma interaction contribute to the acceleration in the case of short-pulse excitation. These investigations provide new information on the pressure dependent temporal behavior of nickel plasmas produced by short-pulse and ultrafast laser pulses, which have potential uses in applications such as pulsed laser deposition and laser-induced nanoparticle generation.

  2. An FPGA Wave Union TDC for Time-of-Flight Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, J.; /Fermilab

    2009-01-01

    An 18-channel time-of-flight (TOF) grade time-to-digit converter (TDC) has been implemented in a low cost FPGA device. The TDC has the following unique features. (1) The time recording structures of the TDC is based on the 'wave union TDC' we developed in our previous work. A leading edge of the input hit launches a bit pattern, or wave union into the delay chain-register array structure which yields two usable measurements. The two measurements effectively sub-divide timing bins for each other especially the 'ultra-wide bins' caused by the FPGA logic array block (LAB) structure and improves measurement precision both in terms of maximum bin width and RMS resolution. A coarser measurement on input signal trailing edge is also provided for time-over-threshold (TOT) applications. (2) The TDC supports advanced timing reference distribution schemes that are superior to conventional common start/stop schemes. The TDC has 16 regular measurement channels plus two channels for timing reference. The timing reference is established with multiple measurements rather than single shot common start/stop. An advanced scheme, the mean-timing approach even eliminates needs of high quality timing distribution media. (3) The ASIC-like encapsulation of the FPGA TDC significantly shorten the learning curve for potential users while maintain certain flexibility for various applications. Necessary digital post-processing functions including semicontinuous automatic calibration, data buffer, data link jam prevention logic etc. are integrated into the firmware to provide a turn-key solution for users.

  3. SU-E-J-184: Stereo Time-Of-Flight System for Patient Positioning in Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Wentz, T; Gilles, M; Visvikis, D; Le Fur, E; Pradier, O

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The objective of this work is to test the advantage of using the surface acquired by two stereo Time-of-Flight (ToF) cameras in comparison of the use of one camera only for patient positioning in radiotherapy. Methods: A first step consisted on validating the use of a stereo ToFcamera system for positioning management of a phantom mounted on a linear actuator producing very accurate and repeatable displacements. The displacements between two positions were computed from the surface point cloud acquired by either one or two cameras thanks to an iterative closest point algorithm. A second step consisted on determining the displacements on patient datasets, with two cameras fixed on the ceiling of the radiotherapy room. Measurements were done first on voluntary subject with fixed translations, then on patients during the normal clinical radiotherapy routine. Results: The phantom tests showed a major improvement in lateral and depth axis for motions above 10 mm when using the stereo-system instead of a unique camera (Fig1). Patient measurements validate these results with a mean real and measured displacement differences in the depth direction of 1.5 mm when using one camera and 0.9 mm when using two cameras (Fig2). In the lateral direction, a mean difference of 1 mm was obtained by the stereo-system instead of 3.2 mm. Along the longitudinal axis mean differences of 5.4 and 3.4 mm with one and two cameras respectively were noticed but these measurements were still inaccurate and globally underestimated in this direction as in the literature. Similar results were also found for patient subjects with a mean difference reduction of 35%, 7%, and 25% for the lateral, depth, and longitudinal displacement with the stereo-system. Conclusion: The addition of a second ToF-camera to determine patient displacement strongly improved patient repositioning results and therefore insures better radiation delivery.

  4. Time-of-flight camera technique for augmented reality in computer-assisted interventions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mersmann, Sven; Müller, Michael; Seitel, Alexander; Arnegger, Florian; Tetzlaff, Ralf; Dinkel, Julien; Baumhauer, Matthias; Schmied, Bruno; Meinzer, Hans-Peter; Maier-Hein, Lena

    2011-03-01

    Augmented reality (AR) for enhancement of intra-operative images is gaining increasing interest in the field of navigated medical interventions. In this context, various imaging modalities such as ultrasound (US), C-Arm computed tomography (CT) and endoscopic images have been applied to acquire intra-operative information about the patient's anatomy. The aim of this paper was to evaluate the potential of the novel Time-of-Flight (ToF) camera technique as means for markerless intra-operative registration. For this purpose, ToF range data and corresponding CT images were acquired from a set of explanted non-transplantable human and porcine organs equipped with a set of marker that served as targets. Based on a rigid matching of the surfaces generated from the ToF images with the organ surfaces generated from the CT data, the targets extracted from the planning images were superimposed on the 2D ToF intensity images, and the target visualization error (TVE) was computed as quality measure. Color video data of the same organs were further used to assess the TVE of a previously proposed marker-based registration method. The ToF-based registration showed promising accuracy yielding a mean TVE of 2.5+/-1.1 mm compared to 0.7+/-0.4 mm with the marker-based approach. Furthermore, the target registration error (TRE) was assessed to determine the anisotropy in the localization error of ToF image data. The TRE was 8.9+/- 4.7 mm on average indicating a high localization error in the viewing direction of the camera. Nevertheless, the young ToF technique may become a valuable means for intra-operative surface acquisition. Future work should focus on the calibration of systematic distance errors.

  5. Time-Of-Flight Mass Spectrometry of Laser Exploding Foil Initiated PETN Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fajardo, Mario

    2015-06-01

    We report the results of time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOFMS) measurements of the gaseous products of thin film PETN samples reacting in-vacuo. The PETN sample spots are produced by masked physical vapor deposition of PETN onto a first-surface aluminum mirror. A pulsed laser beam imaged through the soda lime glass mirror substrate converts the aluminum layer into a high-temperature high-pressure plasma which initiates chemical reactions in the overlying PETN sample. We had previously proposed to exploit differences in gaseous product chemical identities and molecular velocities to provide a chemically-based diagnostic for distinguishing between ``detonation-like'' and deflagration responses. Briefly: we expect in-vacuum detonations to produce hyperthermal (v ~ 10 km/s) thermodynamically-stable products such as N2, CO2, and H2O, and for deflagrations to produce mostly reaction intermediates, such as NO and NO2, with much slower molecular velocities - consistent with the expansion-quenched thermal decomposition of PETN. We observe primarily slow reaction intermediates (NO2, CH2NO3) at low laser pulse energies, the appearance of NO at intermediate laser pulse energies, and the appearance of hyperthemal CO/N2 at mass 28 amu at the highest laser pulse energies. However, these results are somewhat ambiguous, as the NO, NO2, and CH2NO3 intermediates persist and all species become hyperthermal at the higher laser pulse energies. Also, the purported CO/N2 signal at 28 amu may be contaminated by silicon ablated from the glass mirror substrate. We plan to mitigate these problems in future experiments by adopting the ``Buelow'' sample configuration which employs an intermediate foil barrier to shield the energetic material from the laser and the laser driven plasma. [RW PA#4930

  6. Investigation of isovaline enantiomeric excesses in CM meteorites using liquid chromatography time of flight mass spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glavin, Daniel P.; Dworkin, Jason P.

    2003-01-01

    The enantiomeric abundances of the alpha-dialkyl amino acid isovaline were measured in the CM2 meteorites Murchison and LEW 90500 using a new liquid chromatography-time of flight-mass spectrometry (LC-ToF-MS) technique coupled with OPA/NAC derivatization and UV fluorescence detection. Previous analyses of Murchison have shown that L-enantiomeric excesses of isovaline range from 0 to 15.2% with significant variation between meteorite fragments [1]. For this study, hot water extracts of interior fragments (> 2 cm from fusion crust) of the Murchison (USNM 6650.2, mass 6 g) and LEW 90500 (split 69, parent 1, mass 5 g) carbonaceous meteorites were analyzed. Enantiomeric excesses were measured using the single ion LC-ToF-MS trace for the OPA/NAC derivative of isovaline at d z 393.15 (Fig. 1). L-isovaline excesses in these meteorite samples ranged from 18.9 to 20.5% for Murchison and -0.5 to 3.0% for LEW 90500. The measured values for Murchison are the largest enantiomeric excesses for isovaline reported to date. The enantiomeric excesses of L-isovaline cannot be the result of interference from other C5 amino acid isomers present in the meteorites or terrestrial contamination from the landing site environments. The L-isovaline excesses in Murchison are inconsistent with the synthesis of all of the isovaline by the Strecker-cyanohydrin pathway on the CM meteorite parent body. The mechanism(s) for the formation of the enantiomeric asymmetry in isovaline in Murchison are currently unknown and it is not clear how the asymmetry of alpha-dialkyl amino acids could be transferred to the a-hydrogen protein amino acids common in all life on Earth today.

  7. Development of analytically capable time-of-flight mass spectrometer with continuous ion introduction

    SciTech Connect

    Hars, Gyoergy; Dobos, Gabor

    2010-03-15

    The present article describes the results and findings explored in the course of the development of the analytically capable prototype of continuous time-of-flight (CTOF) mass spectrometer. Currently marketed pulsed TOF (PTOF) instruments use ion introduction with a 10 ns or so pulse width, followed by a waiting period roughly 100 {mu}s. Accordingly, the sample is under excitation in 10{sup -4} part of the total measuring time. This very low duty cycle severely limits the sensitivity of the PTOF method. A possible approach to deal with this problem is to use linear sinusoidal dual modulation technique (CTOF) as described in this article. This way the sensitivity of the method is increased, due to the 50% duty cycle of the excitation. All other types of TOF spectrometer use secondary electron multiplier (SEM) for detection, which unfortunately discriminates in amplification in favor of the lighter ions. This discrimination effect is especially undesirable in a mass spectrometric method, which targets high mass range. In CTOF method, SEM is replaced with Faraday cup detector, thus eliminating the mass discrimination effect. Omitting SEM is made possible by the high ion intensity and the very slow ion detection with some hundred hertz detection bandwidth. The electrometer electronics of the Faraday cup detector operates with amplification 10{sup 10} V/A. The primary ion beam is highly monoenergetic due to the construction of the ion gun, which made possible to omit any electrostatic mirror configuration for bunching the ions. The measurement is controlled by a personal computer and the intelligent signal generator Type Tabor WW 2571, which uses the direct digital synthesis technique for making arbitrary wave forms. The data are collected by a Labjack interface board, and the fast Fourier transformation is performed by the software. Noble gas mixture has been used to test the analytical capabilities of the prototype setup. Measurement presented proves the results of

  8. Accurate characterization of carcinogenic DNA adducts using MALDI tandem time-of-flight mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, Charles A.; Chiu, Norman H. L.

    2009-01-01

    Many chemical carcinogens and their in vivo activated metabolites react readily with genomic DNA, and form covalently bound carcinogen-DNA adducts. Clinically, carcinogen-DNA adducts have been linked to various cancer diseases. Among the current methods for DNA adduct analysis, mass spectroscopic method allows the direct measurement of unlabeled DNA adducts. The goal of this study is to explore the use of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization tandem time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/TOF MS) to determine the identity of carcinogen-DNA adducts. Two of the known carcinogenic DNA adducts, namely N-(2'-deoxyguanosin-8-yl)-2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenyl-imidazo [4,5-b] pyridine (dG-C8-PhIP) and N-(2'-deoxyguanosin-8yl)-4-aminobiphenyl (dG-C8-ABP), were selected as our models. In MALDI-TOF MS measurements, the small matrix ion and its cluster ions did not interfere with the measurements of both selected dG adducts. To achieve a higher accuracy for the characterization of selected dG adducts, 1 keV collision energy in MALDI-TOF/TOF MS/MS was used to measure the adducts. In comparison to other MS/MS techniques with lower collision energies, more extensive precursor ion dissociations were observed. The detection of the corresponding fragment ions allowed the identities of guanine, PhIP or ABP, and the position of adduction to be confirmed. Some of the fragment ions of dG-C8-PhIP have not been reported by other MS/MS techniques.

  9. The power of hyphenated chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectrometry in public health laboratories.

    PubMed

    Ibáñez, María; Portolés, Tania; Rúbies, Antoni; Muñoz, Eva; Muñoz, Gloria; Pineda, Laura; Serrahima, Eulalia; Sancho, Juan V; Centrich, Francesc; Hernández, Félix

    2012-05-30

    Laboratories devoted to the public health field have to face the analysis of a large number of organic contaminants/residues in many different types of samples. Analytical techniques applied in this field are normally focused on quantification of a limited number of analytes. At present, most of these techniques are based on gas chromatography (GC) or liquid chromatography (LC) coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). Using these techniques only analyte-specific information is acquired, and many other compounds that might be present in the samples would be ignored. In this paper, we explore the potential of time-of-flight (TOF) MS hyphenated to GC or LC to provide additional information, highly useful in this field. Thus, all positives reported by standard reference targeted LC-MS/MS methods were unequivocally confirmed by LC-QTOF MS. Only 61% of positives reported by targeted GC-MS/MS could be confirmed by GC-TOF MS, which was due to its lower sensitivity as nonconfirmations corresponded to analytes that were present at very low concentrations. In addition, the use of TOF MS allowed searching for additional compounds in large-scope screening methodologies. In this way, different contaminants/residues not included in either LC or GC tandem MS analyses were detected. This was the case of the insecticide thiacloprid, the plant growth regulator paclobutrazol, the fungicide prochloraz, or the UV filter benzophenone, among others. Finally, elucidation of unknowns was another of the possibilities offered by TOF MS thanks to the accurate-mass full-acquisition data available when using this technique. PMID:22578112

  10. Time-of-flight secondary neutral & ion mass spectrometry using swift heavy ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breuer, L.; Meinerzhagen, F.; Bender, M.; Severin, D.; Wucher, A.

    2015-12-01

    We report on a new time-of-flight (TOF) spectrometer designed to investigate sputtering phenomena induced by swift heavy ions in the electronic stopping regime. In this experiment, particular emphasis is put on the detection of secondary ions along with their emitted neutral counterparts in order to examine the ionization efficiency of the sputtered material. For the detection of neutral species, the system is equipped with a pulsed VUV laser for post-ionization of sputtered neutral atoms and molecules via single photon ionization at a wavelength of 157 nm (corresponding to 7.9 eV photon energy). For alignment purposes and in order to facilitate comparison to nuclear sputtering conditions, the system also includes a 5 keV Ar+ ion beam directed to the same sample area. The instrument has been added to the M1-branch beam line at the German accelerator facility in Darmstadt (GSI) and was tested with 4.8 MeV/u Au26+ ions impinging onto various samples including metals, salts and organic films. It is found that secondary ion and neutral spectra obtained under both bombardment conditions can be acquired in an interleaved manner throughout a single accelerator pulse cycle, thus making efficient use of valuable beam time. In addition, the keV ion beam can be intermittently switched to dc mode between subsequent data acquisition windows and accelerator pulses in order to ensure reproducible surface conditions. For the case of a dynamically sputter cleaned metal surface, comparison of secondary ion and neutral signals obtained under otherwise identical instrumental conditions reveals a nearly identical ionization probability of atoms emitted under electronic and nuclear sputtering conditions.

  11. Development of analytically capable time-of-flight mass spectrometer with continuous ion introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hárs, György; Dobos, Gábor

    2010-03-01

    The present article describes the results and findings explored in the course of the development of the analytically capable prototype of continuous time-of-flight (CTOF) mass spectrometer. Currently marketed pulsed TOF (PTOF) instruments use ion introduction with a 10 ns or so pulse width, followed by a waiting period roughly 100 μs. Accordingly, the sample is under excitation in 10-4 part of the total measuring time. This very low duty cycle severely limits the sensitivity of the PTOF method. A possible approach to deal with this problem is to use linear sinusoidal dual modulation technique (CTOF) as described in this article. This way the sensitivity of the method is increased, due to the 50% duty cycle of the excitation. All other types of TOF spectrometer use secondary electron multiplier (SEM) for detection, which unfortunately discriminates in amplification in favor of the lighter ions. This discrimination effect is especially undesirable in a mass spectrometric method, which targets high mass range. In CTOF method, SEM is replaced with Faraday cup detector, thus eliminating the mass discrimination effect. Omitting SEM is made possible by the high ion intensity and the very slow ion detection with some hundred hertz detection bandwidth. The electrometer electronics of the Faraday cup detector operates with amplification 1010 V/A. The primary ion beam is highly monoenergetic due to the construction of the ion gun, which made possible to omit any electrostatic mirror configuration for bunching the ions. The measurement is controlled by a personal computer and the intelligent signal generator Type Tabor WW 2571, which uses the direct digital synthesis technique for making arbitrary wave forms. The data are collected by a Labjack interface board, and the fast Fourier transformation is performed by the software. Noble gas mixture has been used to test the analytical capabilities of the prototype setup. Measurement presented proves the results of the mathematical

  12. High Energy Collisions on Tandem Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cotter, Robert J.

    2013-05-01

    Long before the introduction of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI), electrospray ionization (ESI), Orbitraps, and any of the other tools that are now used ubiquitously for proteomics and metabolomics, the highest performance mass spectrometers were sector instruments, providing high resolution mass measurements by combining an electrostatic energy analyzer (E) with a high field magnet (B). In its heyday, the four sector mass spectrometer (or EBEB) was the crown jewel, providing the highest performance tandem mass spectrometry using single, high energy collisions to induce fragmentation. During a time in which quadrupole and tandem triple quadrupole instruments were also enjoying increased usage and popularity, there were, nonetheless, some clear advantages for sectors over their low collision energy counterparts. Time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometers are high voltage, high vacuum instruments that have much in common with sectors and have inspired the development of tandem instruments exploiting single high energy collisions. In this retrospective, we recount our own journey to produce high performance TOFs and tandem TOFs, describing the basic theory, problems, and the advantages for such instruments. An experiment testing impulse collision theory (ICT) underscores the similarities with sector mass spectrometers where this concept was first developed. Applications provide examples of more extensive fragmentation, side chain cleavages, and charge-remote fragmentation, also characteristic of high energy sector mass spectrometers. Moreover, the so-called curved-field reflectron has enabled the design of instruments that are simpler, collect and focus all of the ions, and may provide the future technology for the clinic, for tissue imaging, and the characterization of microorganisms.

  13. Conceptual design of the time-of-flight backscattering spectrometer MIRACLES, at the European Spallation Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsapatsaris, N.; Lechner, R. E.; Markó, M.; Bordallo, H. N.

    2016-08-01

    In this work, we present the conceptual design of the backscattering time-of-flight spectrometer MIRACLES approved for construction at the long-pulse European Spallation Source (ESS). MIRACLES's unparalleled combination of variable resolution, high flux, extended energy, and momentum transfer (0.2-6 Å-1) ranges will open new avenues for neutron backscattering spectroscopy. Its remarkable flexibility can be attributed to 3 key elements: the long-pulse time structure and low repetition rate of the ESS neutron source, the chopper cascade that tailors the moderator pulse in the primary part of the spectrometer, and the bent Si(111) analyzer crystals arranged in a near-backscattering geometry in the secondary part of the spectrometer. Analytical calculations combined with instrument Monte-Carlo simulations show that the instrument will provide a variable elastic energy resolution, δ(ħ ω), between 2 and 32 μeV, when using a wavelength of λ ≈ 6.267 Å (Si(111)-reflection), with an energy transfer range, ħ ω, centered at the elastic line from -600 to +600 μeV. In addition, when selecting λ ≈ 2.08 Å (i.e., the Si(333)-reflection), δ(ħ ω) can be relaxed to 300 μeV and ħ ω from about 10 meV in energy gain to ca -40 meV in energy loss. Finally, the dynamic wavelength range of MIRACLES, approximately 1.8 Å, can be shifted within the interval of 2-20 Å to allow the measurement of low-energy inelastic excitations.

  14. SENJU: a new time-of-flight single-crystal neutron diffractometer at J-PARC

    PubMed Central

    Ohhara, Takashi; Kiyanagi, Ryoji; Oikawa, Kenichi; Kaneko, Koji; Kawasaki, Takuro; Tamura, Itaru; Nakao, Akiko; Hanashima, Takayasu; Munakata, Koji; Moyoshi, Taketo; Kuroda, Tetsuya; Kimura, Hiroyuki; Sakakura, Terutoshi; Lee, Chang-Hee; Takahashi, Miwako; Ohshima, Ken-ichi; Kiyotani, Tamiko; Noda, Yukio; Arai, Masatoshi

    2016-01-01

    SENJU is a new single-crystal time-of-flight neutron diffractometer installed at BL18 at the Materials and Life Science Experimental Facility of the Japan Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC). The diffractometer was designed for precise crystal and magnetic structure analyses under multiple extreme sample environments such as low temperature, high pressure and high magnetic field, and for diffraction measurements of small single crystals down to 0.1 mm3 in volume. SENJU comprises three choppers, an elliptical shape straight supermirror guide, a vacuum sample chamber and 37 scintillator area detectors. The moderator-to-sample distance is 34.8 m, and the sample-to-detector distance is 800 mm. The wavelength of incident neutrons is 0.4–4.4 Å (first frame). Because short-wavelength neutrons are available and the large solid angle around the sample position is covered by the area detectors, a large reciprocal space can be simultaneously measured. Furthermore, the vacuum sample chamber and collimator have been designed to produce a very low background level. Thus, the measurement of a small single crystal is possible. As sample environment devices, a newly developed cryostat with a two-axis (ω and φ axes) goniometer and some extreme environment devices, e.g. a vertical-field magnet, high-temperature furnace and high-pressure cell, are available. The structure analysis of a sub-millimetre size (0.1 mm3) single organic crystal, taurine, and a magnetic structure analysis of the antiferromagnetic phase of MnF2 have been performed. These results demonstrate that SENJU can be a powerful tool to promote materials science research. PMID:26937237

  15. Conceptual design of the time-of-flight backscattering spectrometer, MIRACLES, at the European Spallation Source.

    PubMed

    Tsapatsaris, N; Lechner, R E; Markó, M; Bordallo, H N

    2016-08-01

    In this work, we present the conceptual design of the backscattering time-of-flight spectrometer MIRACLES approved for construction at the long-pulse European Spallation Source (ESS). MIRACLES's unparalleled combination of variable resolution, high flux, extended energy, and momentum transfer (0.2-6 Å(-1)) ranges will open new avenues for neutron backscattering spectroscopy. Its remarkable flexibility can be attributed to 3 key elements: the long-pulse time structure and low repetition rate of the ESS neutron source, the chopper cascade that tailors the moderator pulse in the primary part of the spectrometer, and the bent Si(111) analyzer crystals arranged in a near-backscattering geometry in the secondary part of the spectrometer. Analytical calculations combined with instrument Monte-Carlo simulations show that the instrument will provide a variable elastic energy resolution, δ(ħ ω), between 2 and 32 μeV, when using a wavelength of λ ≈ 6.267 Å (Si(111)-reflection), with an energy transfer range, ħ ω, centered at the elastic line from -600 to +600 μeV. In addition, when selecting λ ≈ 2.08 Å (i.e., the Si(333)-reflection), δ(ħ ω) can be relaxed to 300 μeV and ħ ω from about 10 meV in energy gain to ca -40 meV in energy loss. Finally, the dynamic wavelength range of MIRACLES, approximately 1.8 Å, can be shifted within the interval of 2-20 Å to allow the measurement of low-energy inelastic excitations.

  16. EndoTOFPET-US - A Miniaturised Calorimeter for Endoscopic Time-of-Flight Positron Emission Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zvolský, Milan; EndoTOFPET-US Collaboration

    2015-02-01

    In the scope of the EndoTOFPET-US project, a novel multimodal device for Ultrasound (US) Endoscopy and Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is being developed. The project aims at detecting and quantifying morphologic and functional markers and developing new biomarkers for pancreas and prostate oncology. Exploiting the Time-of-Flight (TOF) information of the gamma rays allows for a more sensitive, more precise and lower radiation- dose imaging and intervention on small internal structures. The detection of the gamma rays is realised with the help of scintillator crystals with Silicon Photomultiplier (SiPM) read-out, aiming at a coincidence time resolution of 200 ps and a spatial resolution of ≈ 1 mm. For the endoscopic detector, digital SiPMs are utilised for the first time in an instrument planned for clinical applications. The functionality of the instrument as well as the challenges that accompany the high miniaturisation of the endoscopic detector and the asymmetric and variable geometry of the system, are presented. The demands on the system involve the fields of scintillating crystallography, ultra-fast photon detection, highly integrated electronics, system integration as well as image reconstruction. The single detector components have been fully characterised and are performing up to specifications. Two dedicated ASIC chips have been developed for the project. The first PET images have been acquired with a test setup that consists solely of hardware and software developed within the collaboration and demonstrate that the data acquisition and reconstruction chain is operational. In this talk, the characterisation of the single components and the status of the detector integration and comissioning is presented.

  17. Conceptual design of the time-of-flight backscattering spectrometer, MIRACLES, at the European Spallation Source.

    PubMed

    Tsapatsaris, N; Lechner, R E; Markó, M; Bordallo, H N

    2016-08-01

    In this work, we present the conceptual design of the backscattering time-of-flight spectrometer MIRACLES approved for construction at the long-pulse European Spallation Source (ESS). MIRACLES's unparalleled combination of variable resolution, high flux, extended energy, and momentum transfer (0.2-6 Å(-1)) ranges will open new avenues for neutron backscattering spectroscopy. Its remarkable flexibility can be attributed to 3 key elements: the long-pulse time structure and low repetition rate of the ESS neutron source, the chopper cascade that tailors the moderator pulse in the primary part of the spectrometer, and the bent Si(111) analyzer crystals arranged in a near-backscattering geometry in the secondary part of the spectrometer. Analytical calculations combined with instrument Monte-Carlo simulations show that the instrument will provide a variable elastic energy resolution, δ(ħ ω), between 2 and 32 μeV, when using a wavelength of λ ≈ 6.267 Å (Si(111)-reflection), with an energy transfer range, ħ ω, centered at the elastic line from -600 to +600 μeV. In addition, when selecting λ ≈ 2.08 Å (i.e., the Si(333)-reflection), δ(ħ ω) can be relaxed to 300 μeV and ħ ω from about 10 meV in energy gain to ca -40 meV in energy loss. Finally, the dynamic wavelength range of MIRACLES, approximately 1.8 Å, can be shifted within the interval of 2-20 Å to allow the measurement of low-energy inelastic excitations. PMID:27587171

  18. Fast time-of-flight camera based surface registration for radiotherapy patient positioning

    SciTech Connect

    Placht, Simon; Stancanello, Joseph; Schaller, Christian; Balda, Michael; Angelopoulou, Elli

    2012-01-15

    Purpose: This work introduces a rigid registration framework for patient positioning in radiotherapy, based on real-time surface acquisition by a time-of-flight (ToF) camera. Dynamic properties of the system are also investigated for future gating/tracking strategies. Methods: A novel preregistration algorithm, based on translation and rotation-invariant features representing surface structures, was developed. Using these features, corresponding three-dimensional points were computed in order to determine initial registration parameters. These parameters became a robust input to an accelerated version of the iterative closest point (ICP) algorithm for the fine-tuning of the registration result. Distance calibration and Kalman filtering were used to compensate for ToF-camera dependent noise. Additionally, the advantage of using the feature based preregistration over an ''ICP only'' strategy was evaluated, as well as the robustness of the rigid-transformation-based method to deformation. Results: The proposed surface registration method was validated using phantom data. A mean target registration error (TRE) for translations and rotations of 1.62 {+-} 1.08 mm and 0.07 deg. {+-} 0.05 deg., respectively, was achieved. There was a temporal delay of about 65 ms in the registration output, which can be seen as negligible considering the dynamics of biological systems. Feature based preregistration allowed for accurate and robust registrations even at very large initial displacements. Deformations affected the accuracy of the results, necessitating particular care in cases of deformed surfaces. Conclusions: The proposed solution is able to solve surface registration problems with an accuracy suitable for radiotherapy cases where external surfaces offer primary or complementary information to patient positioning. The system shows promising dynamic properties for its use in gating/tracking applications. The overall system is competitive with commonly-used surface

  19. Nanocluster isotope distributions measured by electrospray time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Comeau, Amanda N; Liu, JiangJiang; Khadka, Chhatra B; Corrigan, John F; Konermann, Lars

    2013-01-15

    Electrospray ionization (ESI) mass spectrometry (MS) is a widely used tool for the characterization of organometallic nanoclusters. By matching experimental mass spectra with calculated isotope distributions it is possible to determine the elemental composition of these analytes. In this work we conduct ESI-MS investigations on M(14)E(13)Cl(2)(tmeda)(6) nanoclusters, where M is a transition metal, E represents a chalcogen, and tmeda is N,N,N',N'-tetramethyl-ethylenediamine. ESI mass spectra of these systems agree poorly with theoretical isotope distributions when data are acquired under standard conditions. This behavior is attributed to dead-time artifacts of the time-of-flight (TOF) analyzer used. It is well-known that excessively high TOF ion count rates lead to dead-time issues. Surprisingly, our data reveal that nanocluster spectra are affected by this problem even at moderate signal intensities that do not cause any problems for other types of analytes. This unexpected vulnerability is attributed to the extremely wide isotope distributions of the nanoclusters studied here. A good match between experimental and calculated nanocluster spectra is obtained only at ion count rates that are more than 1 order of magnitude below commonly used levels. Discrepancies between measured and theoretical isotope distributions have been observed in a number of previous ESI-MS nanocluster investigations. The dead-time issue identified here likely represents a contributing factor to the spectral distortions that were observed in those earlier studies. Using low-intensity ESI-MS conditions we demonstrate the feasibility of analyzing highly heterogeneous nanocluster samples that comprise subpopulations with a wide range of metal compositions.

  20. CF NEUTRON TIME OF FLIGHT TRANSMISSION FOR MATERIAL IDENTIFICATION FOR WEAPONS TRAINERS

    SciTech Connect

    Mihalczo, John T; Valentine, Timothy E; Blakeman, Edward D; Pare, Victor

    2011-01-01

    The neutron transmission, elastic scattering, and non elastic reactions can be used to distinguish various isotopes. Neutron transmission as a function of energy can be used in some cases to identify materials in unknown objects. A time tagged californium source that provides a fission spectrum of neutrons is a useful source for neutron time-of-flight (TOF) transmission measurements. Many nuclear weapons trainer units for a particular weapons system (no fissile, but of same weight and center of gravity) in shipping containers were returned to the National Nuclear Security Administration Y-12 National Security Complex in the mid 1990s. Nuclear Materials Identification System (NMIS) measurements with a time tagged californium neutron source were used to verify that these trainers did not contain fissile material. In these blind tests, the time distributions of neutrons through the containers were measured as a function of position to locate the approximate center of the trainer in the container. Measurements were also performed with an empty container. TOF template matching measurements were then performed at this location for a large number of units. In these measurements, the californium source was located on one end of the container and a proton recoil scintillator was located on the other end. The variations in the TOF transmission for times corresponding to 1 to 5 MeV were significantly larger than statistical. Further examination of the time distribution or the energy dependence revealed that these variations corresponded to the variations in the neutron cross section of aluminum averaged over the energy resolution of the californium TOF measurement with a flight path of about 90 cm. Measurements using different thicknesses of aluminum were also performed with the source and detector separated the same distance as for the trainer measurements. These comparison measurements confirmed that the material in the trainers was aluminum, and the total thickness of

  1. High-performance electronics for time-of-flight PET systems.

    PubMed

    Choong, W-S; Peng, Q; Vu, C Q; Turko, B T; Moses, W W

    2013-01-01

    We have designed and built a high-performance readout electronics system for time-of-flight positron emission tomography (TOF PET) cameras. The electronics architecture is based on the electronics for a commercial whole-body PET camera (Siemens/CPS Cardinal electronics), modified to improve the timing performance. The fundamental contributions in the electronics that can limit the timing resolution include the constant fraction discriminator (CFD), which converts the analog electrical signal from the photo-detector to a digital signal whose leading edge is time-correlated with the input signal, and the time-to-digital converter (TDC), which provides a time stamp for the CFD output. Coincident events are identified by digitally comparing the values of the time stamps. In the Cardinal electronics, the front-end processing electronics are performed by an Analog subsection board, which has two application-specific integrated circuits (ASICs), each servicing a PET block detector module. The ASIC has a built-in CFD and TDC. We found that a significant degradation in the timing resolution comes from the ASIC's CFD and TDC. Therefore, we have designed and built an improved Analog subsection board that replaces the ASIC's CFD and TDC with a high-performance CFD (made with discrete components) and TDC (using the CERN high-performance TDC ASIC). The improved Analog subsection board is used in a custom single-ring LSO-based TOF PET camera. The electronics system achieves a timing resolution of 60 ps FWHM. Prototype TOF detector modules are read out with the electronics system and give coincidence timing resolutions of 259 ps FWHM and 156 ps FWHM for detector modules coupled to LSO and LaBr3 crystals respectively.

  2. Venus in 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plaut, J. J.

    1993-08-01

    Stereographic images of the surface of Venus which enable geologists to reconstruct the details of the planet's evolution are discussed. The 120-meter resolution of these 3D images make it possible to construct digital topographic maps from which precise measurements can be made of the heights, depths, slopes, and volumes of geologic structures.

  3. 3D reservoir visualization

    SciTech Connect

    Van, B.T.; Pajon, J.L.; Joseph, P. )

    1991-11-01

    This paper shows how some simple 3D computer graphics tools can be combined to provide efficient software for visualizing and analyzing data obtained from reservoir simulators and geological simulations. The animation and interactive capabilities of the software quickly provide a deep understanding of the fluid-flow behavior and an accurate idea of the internal architecture of a reservoir.

  4. Microbial metabolic exchange in 3D

    PubMed Central

    Watrous, Jeramie D; Phelan, Vanessa V; Hsu, Cheng-Chih; Moree, Wilna J; Duggan, Brendan M; Alexandrov, Theodore; Dorrestein, Pieter C

    2013-01-01

    Mono- and multispecies microbial populations alter the chemistry of their surrounding environments during colony development thereby influencing multicellular behavior and interspecies interactions of neighboring microbes. Here we present a methodology that enables the creation of three-dimensional (3D) models of a microbial chemotype that can be correlated to the colony phenotype through multimodal imaging analysis. These models are generated by performing matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) on serial cross-sections of microbial colonies grown on 8 mm deep agar, registering data sets of each serial section in MATLAB to create a model, and then superimposing the model with a photograph of the colonies themselves. As proof-of-principle, 3D models were used to visualize metabolic exchange during microbial interactions between Bacillus subtilis and Streptomyces coelicolor, as well as, Candida albicans and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The resulting models were able to capture the depth profile of secreted metabolites within the agar medium and revealed properties of certain mass signals that were previously not observable using two-dimensional MALDI-TOF IMS. Most significantly, the 3D models were capable of mapping previously unobserved chemical distributions within the array of sub-surface hyphae of C. albicans and how this chemistry is altered by the presence of P. aeruginosa, an opportunistic pathogen known to alter virulence of C. albicans. It was determined that the presence of C. albicans triggered increased rhamnolipid production by P. aeruginosa, which in turn was capable of inhibiting embedded hyphal growth produced beneath the C. albicans colony at ambient temperature. PMID:23283018

  5. 3D rapid mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isaksson, Folke; Borg, Johan; Haglund, Leif

    2008-04-01

    In this paper the performance of passive range measurement imaging using stereo technique in real time applications is described. Stereo vision uses multiple images to get depth resolution in a similar way as Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) uses multiple measurements to obtain better spatial resolution. This technique has been used in photogrammetry for a long time but it will be shown that it is now possible to do the calculations, with carefully designed image processing algorithms, in e.g. a PC in real time. In order to get high resolution and quantitative data in the stereo estimation a mathematical camera model is used. The parameters to the camera model are settled in a calibration rig or in the case of a moving camera the scene itself can be used for calibration of most of the parameters. After calibration an ordinary TV camera has an angular resolution like a theodolite, but to a much lower price. The paper will present results from high resolution 3D imagery from air to ground. The 3D-results from stereo calculation of image pairs are stitched together into a large database to form a 3D-model of the area covered.

  6. Bismuth germanate coupled to near ultraviolet silicon photomultipliers for time-of-flight PET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Sun Il; Gola, Alberto; Ferri, Alessandro; Piemonte, Claudio; Cherry, Simon R.

    2016-09-01

    Bismuth germanate (BGO) was a very attractive scintillator in early-generation positron emission tomography (PET) scanners. However, the major disadvantages of BGO are lower light yield and longer rise and decay time compared to currently popular scintillators such as LSO and LYSO. This results in poorer coincidence timing resolution and it has generally been assumed that BGO is not a suitable scintillator for time-of-flight (TOF) PET applications. However, when a 511 keV photon interacts in a scintillator, a number of Cerenkov photons are produced promptly by energetic electrons released by photoelectric or Compton interactions. If these prompt photons can be captured, they could provide a better timing trigger for PET. Since BGO has a high refractive index (increasing the Cerenkov light yield) and excellent optical transparency down to 320 nm (Cerenkov light yield is higher at shorter wavelengths), we hypothesized that the coincidence timing resolution of BGO can be significantly improved by efficient detection of the Cerenkov photons. However, since the number of Cerenkov photons is far less than the number of scintillation photons, and they are more abundant in the UV and blue part of the spectrum, photosensors need to have high UV/blue sensitivity, fast temporal response, and very low noise in order to trigger on the faint Cerenkov signal. In this respect, NUV-HD silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs) (FBK, Trento, Italy) are an excellent fit for our approach. In this study, coincidence events were measured using BGO crystals coupled with NUV-HD SiPMs. The existence and influence of Cerenkov photons on the timing measurements were studied using different configurations to exploit the directionality of the Cerenkov emissions. Coincidence resolving time values (FWHM) of ~270 ps from 2  ×  3  ×  2 mm3 BGO crystals and ~560 ps from 3  ×  3  ×  20 mm3 BGO crystals were obtained. To our knowledge, these are the best

  7. Low energy stopping cross section of light ions in light gases using time of flight techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jedrejcic, David

    Electronic stopping occurs when an energetic particle interacts with the electrons of a target material, causing charge exchange, excitation, and ionization of the atomic electrons and a corresponding energy loss for the impinging particle. Charge exchange between the projectile and target, in the form of electron capture and electron stripping, is the dominant mode of energy transfer for low energy projectiles in the keV region. In the case of protons in Helium gas, the difference between the ground state energy level of an ionized H atom and the first ionization energy of a Helium atom is large (11.0 eV), and so the process of electron capture is suppressed at very low energy. This leads to a reduction in the stopping cross section near this threshold, and a resultant deviation from the velocity proportionality which is otherwise characteristic of this low energy regime. The present work uses time-of-flight techniques to directly measure the stopping cross section of various target gases for the light ions H +, D+, and He+ using projectile energies between 2.4 -- 22 keV/u. Measurements are obtained using a low-energy linear accelerator fed by an RF ion source at the Colorado School of Mines Department of Physics. System accuracy is checked with a projectile-target pair which has been well measured in the past using gaseous targets in the energy regime of interest (He+-N2). Data is then accumulated for several projectile-target pairs (H+-He, D+-He, H+-N 2, D+-N2, H+-Ne, D+ -Ne, He+-H2, He+-He, He +-Ne). Results show that the stopping cross section of H+, D+ in He does exhibit a threshold effect for projectile energies lower than ˜20 keV/u. This work provides an independent measurement of this interaction, for which we find only two previous data sets below the threshold energy, and whose results differ by an order of magnitude below 6 keV/u. This work also provides measurements of several other projectile-target pairs for which there exist only limited

  8. Multielectron spectroscopy: Auger decays of the krypton 3d hole

    SciTech Connect

    Palaudoux, J.; Lablanquie, P.; Penent, F.; Andric, L.; Ito, K.; Shigemasa, E.; Eland, J. H. D.; Jonauskas, V.; Kucas, S.; Karazija, R.

    2010-10-15

    The emission of one or two Auger electrons, following Kr 3d inner-shell ionization by synchrotron light, has been investigated both experimentally and theoretically. All electrons emitted in the process are detected in coincidence and analyzed in energy thanks to a magnetic-bottle electron time-of-flight spectrometer. In addition, noncoincident high-resolution electron spectra have been measured to characterize the cascade double-Auger paths more fully. Combination of the two experimental approaches and of our calculations allows a full determination of the decay pathways and branching ratios in the case of Kr 3d single- and double-Auger decays. The Kr{sup 3+} threshold is found at 74.197{+-}0.020 eV.

  9. Interactive 3-D graphics workstations in stereotaxy: clinical requirements, algorithms, and solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehricke, Hans-Heino; Daiber, Gerhard; Sonntag, Ralf; Strasser, Wolfgang; Lochner, Mathias; Rudi, Lothar S.; Lorenz, Walter J.

    1992-09-01

    In stereotactic treatment planning the spatial relationships between a variety of objects has to be taken into account in order to avoid destruction of vital brain structures and rupture of vasculature. The visualization of these highly complex relations may be supported by 3-D computer graphics methods. In this context the three-dimensional display of the intracranial vascular tree and additional objects, such as neuroanatomy, pathology, stereotactic devices, or isodose surfaces, is of high clinical value. We report an advanced rendering method for a depth-enhanced maximum intensity projection from magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) and a walk-through approach to the analysis of MRA volume data. Furthermore, various methods for a multiple-object 3-D rendering in stereotaxy are discussed. The development of advanced applications in medical imaging can hardly be successful if image acquisition problems are disregarded. We put particular emphasis on the use of conventional MRI and MRA for stereotactic guidance. The problem of MR distortion is discussed and a novel three- dimensional approach to the quantification and correction of the distortion patterns is presented. Our results suggest that the sole use of MR for stereotactic guidance is highly practical. The true three-dimensionality of the acquired datasets opens up new perspectives to stereotactic treatment planning. For the first time it is possible now to integrate all the necessary information into 3-D scenes, thus enabling an interactive 3-D planning.

  10. Combined Dynamic Contrast Enhanced Liver MRI and MRA Using Interleaved Variable Density Sampling

    PubMed Central

    Rahimi, Mahdi Salmani; Korosec, Frank R.; Wang, Kang; Holmes, James H.; Motosugi, Utaroh; Bannas, Peter; Reeder, Scott B.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To develop and evaluate a method for volumetric contrast-enhanced MR imaging of the liver, with high spatial and temporal resolutions, for combined dynamic imaging and MR angiography using a single injection of contrast. Methods An interleaved variable density (IVD) undersampling pattern was implemented in combination with a real-time-triggered, time-resolved, dual-echo 3D spoiled gradient echo sequence. Parallel imaging autocalibration lines were acquired only once during the first time-frame. Imaging was performed in ten subjects with focal nodular hyperplasia (FNH) and compared with their clinical MRI. The angiographic phase of the proposed method was compared to a dedicated MR angiogram acquired during a second injection of contrast. Results A total of 21 FNH, 3 cavernous hemangiomas, and 109 arterial segments were visualized in 10 subjects. The temporally-resolved images depicted the characteristic arterial enhancement pattern of the lesions with a 4 s update rate. Images were graded as having significantly higher quality compared to the clinical MRI. Angiograms produced from the IVD method provided non-inferior diagnostic assessment compared to the dedicated MRA. Conclusion Using an undersampled IVD imaging method, we have demonstrated the feasibility of obtaining high spatial and temporal resolution dynamic contrast-enhanced imaging and simultaneous MRA of the liver. PMID:24639130

  11. Optimizing sequence coverage for a moderate mass protein in nano-electrospray ionization quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Ryan; Kolli, Venkata; Woods, Megan; Dodds, Eric D; Hage, David S

    2016-09-15

    Sample pretreatment was optimized to obtain high sequence coverage for human serum albumin (HSA, 66.5 kDa) when using nano-electrospray ionization quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (nESI-Q-TOF-MS). Use of the final method with trypsin, Lys-C, and Glu-C digests gave a combined coverage of 98.8%. The addition of peptide fractionation resulted in 99.7% coverage. These results were comparable to those obtained previously with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS). The sample pretreatment/nESI-Q-TOF-MS method was also used with collision-induced dissociation to analyze HSA digests and to identify peptides that could be employed as internal mass calibrants in future studies of modifications to HSA.

  12. A novel double-focusing time-of-flight mass spectrometer for absolute recoil ion cross sections measurements.

    PubMed

    Sigaud, L; de Jesus, V L B; Ferreira, Natalia; Montenegro, E C

    2016-08-01

    In this work, the inclusion of an Einzel-like lens inside the time-of-flight drift tube of a standard mass spectrometer coupled to a gas cell-to study ionization of atoms and molecules by electron impact-is described. Both this lens and a conical collimator are responsible for further focalization of the ions and charged molecular fragments inside the spectrometer, allowing a much better resolution at the time-of-flight spectra, leading to a separation of a single mass-to-charge unit up to 100 a.m.u. The procedure to obtain the overall absolute efficiency of the spectrometer and micro-channel plate detector is also discussed. PMID:27587105

  13. Hippo/crates-in-situ deformation strain and testure studies using neutron time-of-flight diffraction.

    SciTech Connect

    Vogel, S. C.; Hartig, C.; Brissier, T. D.; Mecking, H.

    2005-01-01

    In situ deformation studies by diffraction allow studying of deformation mechanisms and provide valuable data to validate and improve deformation models. In particular, deformation studies using time-of-flight neutrons provide averages over large numbers of grains and allow to probing the response of lattice planes parallel and perpendicular to the applied load simultaneously. In this paper we describe the load-frame CRATES, designed for the HIPPO neutron time-of-flight diffractometer at LANSCE. The HIPPO/CRATES combination allows probing up to 20 diffraction vectors simultaneously and provides rotation of the sample in the beam while under load. With this, deformation texture, i.e. the change of grain orientation due to plastic deformation, or strain pole figures may be measured. We report initial results of a validation experiment, comparing deformation of a Zircaloy specimen measured using the NPD neutron diffractometer with results obtained for the same material using HIPPO/CRATES.

  14. Symmetry-broken momentum distributions induced by matter-wave diffraction during time-of-flight expansion of ultracold atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simonet, Juliette; Weinberg, Malte; Juergensen, Ole; Oelschlaeger, Christoph; Luehmann, Dirk-Soeren; Sengstock, Klaus

    2016-05-01

    The information about quantum gas systems is still commonly inferred from time-of-flight measurements. Here, we demonstrate that interaction during the time-of-flight expansion can strongly alter the measurement of the initial atomic momentum distribution. We discuss the observation of symmetry-broken momentum distributions for bosonic mixtures in state-dependent honeycomb lattices due to scattering processes within the first milliseconds of the expansion time. These findings are of fundamental importance in a broad range of systems, including state-dependent lattices and superlattices, where the lattice symmetry does not cancel the influence of the scattering processes on the interference pattern. Beyond that, the interactions during a free expansion can be used as an interferometric probe to reveal novel quantum phases, such as supersolids.

  15. A novel double-focusing time-of-flight mass spectrometer for absolute recoil ion cross sections measurements.

    PubMed

    Sigaud, L; de Jesus, V L B; Ferreira, Natalia; Montenegro, E C

    2016-08-01

    In this work, the inclusion of an Einzel-like lens inside the time-of-flight drift tube of a standard mass spectrometer coupled to a gas cell-to study ionization of atoms and molecules by electron impact-is described. Both this lens and a conical collimator are responsible for further focalization of the ions and charged molecular fragments inside the spectrometer, allowing a much better resolution at the time-of-flight spectra, leading to a separation of a single mass-to-charge unit up to 100 a.m.u. The procedure to obtain the overall absolute efficiency of the spectrometer and micro-channel plate detector is also discussed.

  16. Quantum phase diagrams and time-of-flight pictures of spin-1 Bose systems in honeycomb optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jun; Jiang, Ying

    2016-09-01

    By treating the hopping parameter as a perturbation, with the help of cumulant expansion and the re-summing technique, the one-particle Green’s function of a spin-1 Bose system in a honeycomb optical lattice is calculated analytically. By the use of the re-summed Green’s function, the quantum phase diagrams of the system in ferromagnetic cases as well as in antiferromagnetic cases are determined. It is found that in antiferromagnetic cases the Mott insulating states with even filling factor are more robust against the hopping parameter than that with odd filling factor, in agreement with results via other different approaches. Moreover, in order to illustrate the effectiveness of the re-summed Green’s function method in calculating time-of-flight pictures, the momentum distribution function of a honeycomb lattice spin-1 Bose system in the antiferromagnetic case is also calculated analytically and the corresponding time-of-flight absorption pictures are plotted.

  17. Status of the front-end-electronics for the time-of-flight measurements at the MPD experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buryakov, M. G.; Babkin, V. A.; Golovatyuk, V. M.; Volgin, S. V.; Rumyantsev, M. M.

    2016-09-01

    The preamplifier based on the ASIC NINO for the Time of Flight system (TOF) of MPD/NICA was developed and tested. The signal is read from both sides of the strip of the multi gap Resistive Plate Chamber (MRPC). In total there are around 14000 channels of electronics. To measure time of flight of secondary particles from collision of heavy ions on the collider NICA the Time over Threshold (ToT) method is used. According to the bench tests the preamplifier board showed stable work and good time resolution <10 ps for one channel. It was also tested at the test beam facility of the Nuclotron. The time resolution of the TOF detector which used the described preamplifier was reached ˜42 ps.

  18. A novel double-focusing time-of-flight mass spectrometer for absolute recoil ion cross sections measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigaud, L.; de Jesus, V. L. B.; Ferreira, Natalia; Montenegro, E. C.

    2016-08-01

    In this work, the inclusion of an Einzel-like lens inside the time-of-flight drift tube of a standard mass spectrometer coupled to a gas cell—to study ionization of atoms and molecules by electron impact—is described. Both this lens and a conical collimator are responsible for further focalization of the ions and charged molecular fragments inside the spectrometer, allowing a much better resolution at the time-of-flight spectra, leading to a separation of a single mass-to-charge unit up to 100 a.m.u. The procedure to obtain the overall absolute efficiency of the spectrometer and micro-channel plate detector is also discussed.

  19. Structural Investigation of Park’s Nucleotide on Bacterial Translocase MraY: Discovery of Unexpected MraY Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Kuo-Ting; Chen, Po-Ting; Lin, Cheng-Kun; Huang, Lin-Ya; Hu, Chia-Ming; Chang, Yi-Fan; Hsu, Hua-Ting; Cheng, Ting-Jen R.; Wu, Ying-Ta; Cheng, Wei-Chieh

    2016-01-01

    Systematic structural modifications of the muramic acid, peptide, and nucleotide moieties of Park’s nucleotide were performed to investigate the substrate specificity of B. subtilis MraY (MraYBS). It was found that the simplest analogue of Park’s nucleotide only bearing the first two amino acids, l-alanine-iso-d-glutamic acid, could function as a MraYBS substrate. Also, the acid group attached to the Cα of iso-d-glutamic acid was found to play an important role for substrate activity. Epimerization of the C4-hydroxyl group of muramic acid and modification at the 5-position of the uracil in Park’s nucleotide were both found to dramatically impair their substrate activity. Unexpectedly, structural modifications on the uracil moiety changed the parent molecule from a substrate to an inhibitor, blocking the MraYBS translocation. One unoptimized inhibitor was found to have a Ki value of 4 ± 1 μM against MraYBS, more potent than tunicamycins. PMID:27531195

  20. Taming supersymmetric defects in 3d-3d correspondence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gang, Dongmin; Kim, Nakwoo; Romo, Mauricio; Yamazaki, Masahito

    2016-07-01

    We study knots in 3d Chern-Simons theory with complex gauge group {SL}(N,{{C}}), in the context of its relation with 3d { N }=2 theory (the so-called 3d-3d correspondence). The defect has either co-dimension 2 or co-dimension 4 inside the 6d (2,0) theory, which is compactified on a 3-manifold \\hat{M}. We identify such defects in various corners of the 3d-3d correspondence, namely in 3d {SL}(N,{{C}}) CS theory, in 3d { N }=2 theory, in 5d { N }=2 super Yang-Mills theory, and in the M-theory holographic dual. We can make quantitative checks of the 3d-3d correspondence by computing partition functions at each of these theories. This Letter is a companion to a longer paper [1], which contains more details and more results.

  1. Rapid Detection of OXA-48-Producing Enterobacteriaceae by Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization-Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Oviaño, Marina; Barba, Maria José; Fernández, Begoña; Ortega, Adriana; Aracil, Belén; Oteo, Jesús; Campos, José; Bou, Germán

    2016-03-01

    A rapid and sensitive (100%) matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) assay was developed to detect OXA-48-type producers, using 161 previously characterized clinical isolates. Ertapenem was monitored to detect carbapenem resistance, and temocillin was included in the assay as a marker for OXA-48-producers. Structural analysis of temocillin is described. Data are obtained within 60 min. PMID:26677247

  2. Molecule-Specific Imaging Analysis of Carcinogens in Breast Cancer Cells Using Time-of-Flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Quong, J N; Knize, M G; Kulp, K S; Wu, K J

    2003-08-19

    Imaging time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) is used to study the localization of heterocyclic amines in MCF7 line of human breast cancer cells. The detection sensitivities of a model rodent mutagen, 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP) were determined. Following an established criteria for the determination of status of freeze-fracture cells, the distribution of PhIP in the MCF7 cells are reported.

  3. MCP PMT with high time response and linear output current for neutron time-of-flight detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolotov, A. S.; Konovalov, P. I.; Nurtdinov, R. I.

    2016-09-01

    A microchannel plate (MCP) photomultiplier tube (PMT) with a subnanosecond time response and a high linear output current has been developed. PMT is designed for detection of weak pulses of radiation in UV-, visible and nearer-IR ranges and can be used in neutron time-of-flight (nTOF) detectors in experiments on laser compression of thermonuclear fuel. The results of measurements of MCP PMT main parameters are presented: photocathode spectral sensitivity, gain, maximum linear output current, and time response.

  4. Fusobacterium nucleatum subspecies identification by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Nie, Shuping; Tian, Baoyu; Wang, Xiaowei; Pincus, David H; Welker, Martin; Gilhuley, Kathleen; Lu, Xuedong; Han, Yiping W; Tang, Yi-Wei

    2015-04-01

    We explored the use of matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) for identification of Fusobacterium nucleatum subspecies. MALDI-TOF MS spectra of five F. nucleatum subspecies (animalis, fusiforme, nucleatum, polymorphum, and vincentii) were analyzed and divided into four distinct clusters, including subsp. animalis, nucleatum, polymorphum, and fusiforme/vincentii. MALDI-TOF MS with the modified SARAMIS database further correctly identified 28 of 34 F. nucleatum clinical isolates to the subspecies level.

  5. Rapid Detection of OXA-48-Producing Enterobacteriaceae by Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization-Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Oviaño, Marina; Barba, Maria José; Fernández, Begoña; Ortega, Adriana; Aracil, Belén; Oteo, Jesús; Campos, José; Bou, Germán

    2016-03-01

    A rapid and sensitive (100%) matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) assay was developed to detect OXA-48-type producers, using 161 previously characterized clinical isolates. Ertapenem was monitored to detect carbapenem resistance, and temocillin was included in the assay as a marker for OXA-48-producers. Structural analysis of temocillin is described. Data are obtained within 60 min.

  6. Rapid Detection of OXA-48-Producing Enterobacteriaceae by Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization−Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Oviaño, Marina; Barba, Maria José; Fernández, Begoña; Ortega, Adriana; Aracil, Belén; Oteo, Jesús; Campos, José

    2015-01-01

    A rapid and sensitive (100%) matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization−time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) assay was developed to detect OXA-48-type producers, using 161 previously characterized clinical isolates. Ertapenem was monitored to detect carbapenem resistance, and temocillin was included in the assay as a marker for OXA-48-producers. Structural analysis of temocillin is described. Data are obtained within 60 min. PMID:26677247

  7. Carrier mobility in rubrene-doped 4-cyano-4'-pentylbiphenyl studied by the time-of-flight method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honma, Michinori; Nose, Toshiaki

    2013-09-01

    We have investigated the transient photocurrent of rubrene-doped nematic liquid crystal using a time-of-flight examination. Drift mobilities on the order of 10-6 cm2/V s were obtained for both positive and negative carriers. The minimal dependence of the rubrene concentration on the drift mobility is indicative of the ionic conduction as carrier transport process. The product of the drift mobility and the viscosity obeys the Walden rule, further supporting the ionic carrier transport process.

  8. Use Of The BigSol Time Of Flight Spectrometer In The Study Of Superheavy Element Production

    SciTech Connect

    Barbui, M.; Hagel, K.; Natowitz, J. B.; Wada, R.; Sahu, P. K.; Materna, T.; Chen, Z.; Quin, L.; Chubaryan, G.; Souliotis, G. A.; Bonasera, A.; Fabris, D.; Lunardon, M.; Morando, M.; Moretto, S.; Nebbia, G.; Pesente, S.; Viesti, G.; Bocci, F.; Cinausero, M.

    2011-06-01

    A time-of-flight spectrometer with the BigSol superconducting solenoid at Texas A and M was used to investigate the possibility to produce heavy and superheavy nuclei by using two body collisions involving heavy projectiles and targets. The reaction {sup 197}Au+{sup 232}Th at 7.5 AMeV is studied in this work. Preliminary results for the yields of heavy nuclei are presented.

  9. 3D Audio System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Ames Research Center research into virtual reality led to the development of the Convolvotron, a high speed digital audio processing system that delivers three-dimensional sound over headphones. It consists of a two-card set designed for use with a personal computer. The Convolvotron's primary application is presentation of 3D audio signals over headphones. Four independent sound sources are filtered with large time-varying filters that compensate for motion. The perceived location of the sound remains constant. Possible applications are in air traffic control towers or airplane cockpits, hearing and perception research and virtual reality development.

  10. High spatial resolution mapping of deposition layers on plasma facing materials by laser ablation microprobe time-of-flight mass spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Qingmei; Li, Cong; Hai, Ran; Zhang, Lei; Feng, Chunlei; Ding, Hongbin; Zhou, Yan; Yan, Longwen; Duan, Xuru

    2014-05-15

    A laser ablation microprobe time-of-flight mass spectroscopy (LAM-TOF-MS) system with high spatial resolution, ∼20 nm in depth and ∼500 μm or better on the surface, is developed to analyze the composition distributions of deposition layers on the first wall materials or first mirrors in tokamak. The LAM-TOF-MS system consists of a laser ablation microprobe combined with a TOF-MS and a data acquisition system based on a LabVIEW program software package. Laser induced ablation combined with TOF-MS is an attractive method to analyze the depth profile of deposited layer with successive laser shots, therefore, it can provide information for composition reconstruction of the plasma wall interaction process. In this work, we demonstrate that the LAM-TOF-MS system is capable of characterizing the depth profile as well as mapping 2D composition of deposited film on the molybdenum first mirror retrieved from HL-2A tokamak, with particular emphasis on some of the species produced during the ablation process. The presented LAM-TOF-MS system provides not only the 3D characterization of deposition but also the removal efficiency of species of concern.

  11. On the precision of time-of-flight shear wave speed estimation in homogeneous soft solids: initial results using a matrix array transducer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Michael; Byram, Brett; Palmeri, Mark; Rouze, Ned; Nightingale, Kathryn

    2013-04-01

    A system capable of tracking radiation-force-induced shear wave propagation in a 3-D volume using ultrasound is presented. In contrast to existing systems, which use 1-D array transducers, a 2-D matrix array is used for tracking shear wave displacements. A separate single-element transducer is used for radiation force excitation. This system allows shear wave propagation in all directions away from the push to be observed. It is shown that for a limit of 64 tracking beams, by placing the beams at the edges of the measurement region of interest (ROI) at multiple directions from the push, time-of- flight (TOF) shear wave speed (SWS) measurement uncertainty can theoretically be reduced by 40% compared with equally spacing the tracking beams within the ROI along a single plane, as is typical when using a 1-D array for tracking. This was verified by simulation, and a reduction of 30% was experimentally observed on a homogeneous phantom. Analytical expressions are presented for the relationship between TOF SWS measurement uncertainty and various shear wave imaging parameters. It is shown that TOF SWS uncertainty is inversely proportional to ROI size, and inversely proportional to the square root of the number of tracking locations for a given distribution of beam locations relative to the push. TOF SWS uncertainty is shown to increase with the square of the SWS, indicating that TOF SWS measurements are intrinsically less precise for stiffer materials.

  12. High mass resolution time of flight mass spectrometer for measuring products in heterogeneous catalysis in highly sensitive microreactors

    SciTech Connect

    Andersen, T.; Jensen, R.; Christensen, M. K.; Chorkendorff, I.; Pedersen, T.; Hansen, O.

    2012-07-15

    We demonstrate a combined microreactor and time of flight system for testing and characterization of heterogeneous catalysts with high resolution mass spectrometry and high sensitivity. Catalyst testing is performed in silicon-based microreactors which have high sensitivity and fast thermal response. Gas analysis is performed with a time of flight mass spectrometer with a modified nude Bayard-Alpert ionization gauge as gas ionization source. The mass resolution of the time of flight mass spectrometer using the ion gauge as ionization source is estimated to m/{Delta}m > 2500. The system design is superior to conventional batch and flow reactors with accompanying product detection by quadrupole mass spectrometry or gas chromatography not only due to the high sensitivity, fast temperature response, high mass resolution, and fast acquisition time of mass spectra but it also allows wide mass range (0-5000 amu in the current configuration). As a demonstration of the system performance we present data from ammonia oxidation on a Pt thin film showing resolved spectra of OH and NH{sub 3}.

  13. High mass resolution time of flight mass spectrometer for measuring products in heterogeneous catalysis in highly sensitive microreactors.

    PubMed

    Andersen, T; Jensen, R; Christensen, M K; Pedersen, T; Hansen, O; Chorkendorff, I

    2012-07-01

    We demonstrate a combined microreactor and time of flight system for testing and characterization of heterogeneous catalysts with high resolution mass spectrometry and high sensitivity. Catalyst testing is performed in silicon-based microreactors which have high sensitivity and fast thermal response. Gas analysis is performed with a time of flight mass spectrometer with a modified nude Bayard-Alpert ionization gauge as gas ionization source. The mass resolution of the time of flight mass spectrometer using the ion gauge as ionization source is estimated to m/Δm > 2500. The system design is superior to conventional batch and flow reactors with accompanying product detection by quadrupole mass spectrometry or gas chromatography not only due to the high sensitivity, fast temperature response, high mass resolution, and fast acquisition time of mass spectra but it also allows wide mass range (0-5000 amu in the current configuration). As a demonstration of the system performance we present data from ammonia oxidation on a Pt thin film showing resolved spectra of OH and NH(3).

  14. A 4-spot time-of-flight anemometer for small centrifugal compressor velocity measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wernet, Mark P.; Skoch, Gary J.

    1992-01-01

    The application of laser anemometry techniques in turbomachinery facilities is a challenging dilemma requiring an anemometer system with special qualities. Here, we describe the use of a novel laser anemometry technique applied to a small 4.5 kg/s, 4:1 pressure ratio centrifugal compressor. Sample velocity profiles across the blade pitch are presented for a single location along the rotor. The results of the intra-blade passage velocity measurements will ultimately be used to verify CFD 3-D viscous code predictions.

  15. 3D brain MR angiography displayed by a multi-autostereoscopic screen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magalhães, Daniel S. F.; Ribeiro, Fádua H.; Lima, Fabrício O.; Serra, Rolando L.; Moreno, Alfredo B.; Li, Li M.

    2012-02-01

    The magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) can be used to examine blood vessels in key areas of the body, including the brain. In the MRA, a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer produce the detailed images. Physicians use the procedure in brain images mainly to detect atherosclerosis disease in the carotid artery of the neck, which may limit blood flow to the brain and cause a stroke and identify a small aneurysm or arteriovenous malformation inside the brain. Multi-autostereoscopic displays provide multiple views of the same scene, rather than just two, as in autostereoscopic systems. Each view is visible from a different range of positions in front of the display. This allows the viewer to move left-right in front of the display and see the correct view from any position. The use of 3D imaging in the medical field has proven to be a benefit to doctors when diagnosing patients. For different medical domains a stereoscopic display could be advantageous in terms of a better spatial understanding of anatomical structures, better perception of ambiguous anatomical structures, better performance of tasks that require high level of dexterity, increased learning performance, and improved communication with patients or between doctors. In this work we describe a multi-autostereoscopic system and how to produce 3D MRA images to be displayed with it. We show results of brain MR angiography images discussing, how a 3D visualization can help physicians to a better diagnosis.

  16. Prominent rocks - 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Many prominent rocks near the Sagan Memorial Station are featured in this image, taken in stereo by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) on Sol 3. 3D glasses are necessary to identify surface detail. Wedge is at lower left; Shark, Half-Dome, and Pumpkin are at center. Flat Top, about four inches high, is at lower right. The horizon in the distance is one to two kilometers away.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

    Click below to see the left and right views individually. [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Left [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Right

  17. 'Diamond' in 3-D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This 3-D, microscopic imager mosaic of a target area on a rock called 'Diamond Jenness' was taken after NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity ground into the surface with its rock abrasion tool for a second time.

    Opportunity has bored nearly a dozen holes into the inner walls of 'Endurance Crater.' On sols 177 and 178 (July 23 and July 24, 2004), the rover worked double-duty on Diamond Jenness. Surface debris and the bumpy shape of the rock resulted in a shallow and irregular hole, only about 2 millimeters (0.08 inch) deep. The final depth was not enough to remove all the bumps and leave a neat hole with a smooth floor. This extremely shallow depression was then examined by the rover's alpha particle X-ray spectrometer.

    On Sol 178, Opportunity's 'robotic rodent' dined on Diamond Jenness once again, grinding almost an additional 5 millimeters (about 0.2 inch). The rover then applied its Moessbauer spectrometer to the deepened hole. This double dose of Diamond Jenness enabled the science team to examine the rock at varying layers. Results from those grindings are currently being analyzed.

    The image mosaic is about 6 centimeters (2.4 inches) across.

  18. Martian terrain - 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This area of terrain near the Sagan Memorial Station was taken on Sol 3 by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP). 3D glasses are necessary to identify surface detail.

    The IMP is a stereo imaging system with color capability provided by 24 selectable filters -- twelve filters per 'eye.' It stands 1.8 meters above the Martian surface, and has a resolution of two millimeters at a range of two meters.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

    Click below to see the left and right views individually. [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Left [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Right

  19. Using GNG to improve 3D feature extraction--application to 6DoF egomotion.

    PubMed

    Viejo, Diego; Garcia, Jose; Cazorla, Miguel; Gil, David; Johnsson, Magnus

    2012-08-01

    Several recent works deal with 3D data in mobile robotic problems, e.g. mapping or egomotion. Data comes from any kind of sensor such as stereo vision systems, time of flight cameras or 3D lasers, providing a huge amount of unorganized 3D data. In this paper, we describe an efficient method to build complete 3D models from a Growing Neural Gas (GNG). The GNG is applied to the 3D raw data and it reduces both the subjacent error and the number of points, keeping the topology of the 3D data. The GNG output is then used in a 3D feature extraction method. We have performed a deep study in which we quantitatively show that the use of GNG improves the 3D feature extraction method. We also show that our method can be applied to any kind of 3D data. The 3D features obtained are used as input in an Iterative Closest Point (ICP)-like method to compute the 6DoF movement performed by a mobile robot. A comparison with standard ICP is performed, showing that the use of GNG improves the results. Final results of 3D mapping from the egomotion calculated are also shown. PMID:22386789

  20. Trajectory bending and energy spreading of charged ions in time-of-flight telescopes used for ion beam analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laitinen, Mikko; Sajavaara, Timo

    2014-04-01

    Carbon foil time pick-up detectors are widely used in pairs in ion beam applications as time-of-flight detectors. These detectors are suitable for a wide energy range and for all ions but at the lowest energies the tandem effect limits the achievable time of flight and therefore the energy resolution. Tandem effect occurs when an ion passes the first carbon foil of the timing detector and its charge state is changed. As the carbon foil of the first timing detector has often a non-zero voltage the ion can accelerate or decelerate before and after the timing detector. The combination of different charge state properties before and after the carbon foil now induces spread to the measured times of flight. We have simulated different time pick-up detector orientations, voltages, ions and ion energies to examine the tandem effect in detail and found out that the individual timing detector orientation and the average ion charge state have a very small influence to the magnitude of the tandem effect. On the other hand, the width of the charge state distribution for particular ion and energy in the first carbon foil, and the carbon foil voltage contributes linearly to the magnitude of the tandem effect. In the simulations low energy light ion trajectories were observed to bend in the electric fields of the first timing gate, and the magnitude of this bending was studied. It was found out that 50-150 keV proton trajectories can even bend outside the second timing gate.

  1. 3D imaging lidar for lunar robotic exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussein, Marwan W.; Tripp, Jeffrey W.

    2009-05-01

    Part of the requirements of the future Constellation program is to optimize lunar surface operations and reduce hazards to astronauts. Toward this end, many robotic platforms, rovers in specific, are being sought to carry out a multitude of missions involving potential EVA sites survey, surface reconnaissance, path planning and obstacle detection and classification. 3D imaging lidar technology provides an enabling capability that allows fast, accurate and detailed collection of three-dimensional information about the rover's environment. The lidar images the region of interest by scanning a laser beam and measuring the pulse time-of-flight and the bearing. The accumulated set of laser ranges and bearings constitutes the threedimensional image. As part of the ongoing NASA Ames research center activities in lunar robotics, the utility of 3D imaging lidar was evaluated by testing Optech's ILRIS-3D lidar on board the K-10 Red rover during the recent Human - Robotics Systems (HRS) field trails in Lake Moses, WA. This paper examines the results of the ILRIS-3D trials, presents the data obtained and discusses its application in lunar surface robotic surveying and scouting.

  2. Algorithms for 3D shape scanning with a depth camera.

    PubMed

    Cui, Yan; Schuon, Sebastian; Thrun, Sebastian; Stricker, Didier; Theobalt, Christian

    2013-05-01

    We describe a method for 3D object scanning by aligning depth scans that were taken from around an object with a Time-of-Flight (ToF) camera. These ToF cameras can measure depth scans at video rate. Due to comparably simple technology, they bear potential for economical production in big volumes. Our easy-to-use, cost-effective scanning solution, which is based on such a sensor, could make 3D scanning technology more accessible to everyday users. The algorithmic challenge we face is that the sensor's level of random noise is substantial and there is a nontrivial systematic bias. In this paper, we show the surprising result that 3D scans of reasonable quality can also be obtained with a sensor of such low data quality. Established filtering and scan alignment techniques from the literature fail to achieve this goal. In contrast, our algorithm is based on a new combination of a 3D superresolution method with a probabilistic scan alignment approach that explicitly takes into account the sensor's noise characteristics.

  3. Mycobacterium abscessus Complex Identification with Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization–Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Panagea, Theofano; Pincus, David H.; Grogono, Dorothy; Jones, Melissa; Bryant, Josephine; Parkhill, Julian; Floto, R. Andres

    2015-01-01

    We determined that the Vitek MS Plus matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight mass spectrometry using research-use-only (RUO) v.4.12 and in vitro-diagnostic (IVD) v.3.0 databases accurately identified 41 Mycobacterium abscessus subsp. abscessus and 13 M. abscessus subsp. massiliense isolates identified by whole-genome sequencing to the species but not the subspecies level, from Middlebrook 7H11 and Burkholderia cepacia selective agars. Peak analysis revealed three peaks potentially able to differentiate between subspecies. PMID:25948607

  4. Mycobacterium abscessus Complex Identification with Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization-Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Panagea, Theofano; Pincus, David H; Grogono, Dorothy; Jones, Melissa; Bryant, Josephine; Parkhill, Julian; Floto, R Andres; Gilligan, Peter

    2015-07-01

    We determined that the Vitek MS Plus matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry using research-use-only (RUO) v.4.12 and in vitro-diagnostic (IVD) v.3.0 databases accurately identified 41 Mycobacterium abscessus subsp. abscessus and 13 M. abscessus subsp. massiliense isolates identified by whole-genome sequencing to the species but not the subspecies level, from Middlebrook 7H11 and Burkholderia cepacia selective agars. Peak analysis revealed three peaks potentially able to differentiate between subspecies. PMID:25948607

  5. Design of the radiation shielding for the time of flight enhanced diagnostics neutron spectrometer at Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Du, T. F.; Chen, Z. J.; Peng, X. Y.; Yuan, X.; Zhang, X.; Hu, Z. M.; Cui, Z. Q.; Xie, X. F.; Ge, L. J.; Li, X. Q.; Zhang, G. H.; Chen, J. X.; Fan, T. S.; Gorini, G.; Nocente, M.; Tardocchi, M.; Hu, L. Q.; Zhong, G. Q.; Lin, S. Y.; Wan, B. N.

    2014-11-15

    A radiation shielding has been designed to reduce scattered neutrons and background gamma-rays for the new double-ring Time Of Flight Enhanced Diagnostics (TOFED). The shielding was designed based on simulation with the Monte Carlo code MCNP5. Dedicated model of the EAST tokamak has been developed together with the emission neutron source profile and spectrum; the latter were simulated with the Nubeam and GENESIS codes. Significant reduction of background radiation at the detector can be achieved and this satisfies the requirement of TOFED. The intensities of the scattered and direct neutrons in the line of sight of the TOFED neutron spectrometer at EAST are studied for future data interpretation.

  6. Design of a magnetic shielding system for the time of flight enhanced diagnostics neutron spectrometer at Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Cui, Z. Q.; Chen, Z. J.; Xie, X. F.; Peng, X. Y.; Hu, Z. M.; Du, T. F.; Ge, L. J.; Zhang, X.; Yuan, X.; Fan, T. S.; Chen, J. X.; Li, X. Q. E-mail: guohuizhang@pku.edu.cn; Zhang, G. H. E-mail: guohuizhang@pku.edu.cn; Xia, Z. W.; Hu, L. Q.; Zhong, G. Q.; Lin, S. Y.; Wan, B. N.

    2014-11-15

    The novel neutron spectrometer TOFED (Time of Flight Enhanced Diagnostics), comprising 90 individual photomultiplier tubes coupled with 85 plastic scintillation detectors through light guides, has been constructed and installed at Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak. A dedicated magnetic shielding system has been constructed for TOFED, and is designed to guarantee the normal operation of photomultiplier tubes in the stray magnetic field leaking from the tokamak device. Experimental measurements and numerical simulations carried out employing the finite element method are combined to optimize the design of the magnetic shielding system. The system allows detectors to work properly in an external magnetic field of 200 G.

  7. Mass determination of light ions in a Penning trap by time-of-flight detection of ion resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kern, J.; Engel, T.; Hagena, D.; Werth, G.

    1992-12-01

    We describe an experimental setup to determine the cyclotron frequencies of ions confined in a Penning trap by resonant excitation of the ions eigenfrequencies and a time-of-flight detection of the resonances. Systematic shifts from trap- and B-field imperfections are discussed and methods to minimize those effects in our experiment are presented. Results on the mass ratio for 4He/D2 and 3He/H2 demonstrate the experimentally obtained precision in the ppb range, which might be further improved by modification of our apparatus.

  8. Two-step Laser Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry to Elucidate Organic Diversity in Planetary Surface Materials.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Getty, Stephanie A.; Brinckerhoff, William B.; Cornish, Timothy; Li, Xiang; Floyd, Melissa; Arevalo, Ricardo Jr.; Cook, Jamie Elsila; Callahan, Michael P.

    2013-01-01

    Laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LD-TOF-MS) holds promise to be a low-mass, compact in situ analytical capability for future landed missions to planetary surfaces. The ability to analyze a solid sample for both mineralogical and preserved organic content with laser ionization could be compelling as part of a scientific mission pay-load that must be prepared for unanticipated discoveries. Targeted missions for this instrument capability include Mars, Europa, Enceladus, and small icy bodies, such as asteroids and comets.

  9. Ion time-of-flight determinations of doubly to singly ionized mercury ion ratios from a mercury electron bombardment discharge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sellen, J. M., Jr.; Kemp, R. F.; Hall, D. F.

    1973-01-01

    Doubly to singly charged mercury ion ratios in electron bombardment ion thruster exhaust beams have been determined as functions of bombardment discharge potential, thrust beam current, thrust beam radial position, acceleration-deceleration voltage ratio, and propellant utilization fraction. A mathematical model for two-step ionization processes has been derived, and calculated ion ratios are compared to observed ratios. Production of Hg(++) appears to result primarily from sequential ionization of Hg(+) in the discharge. Experimental and analytical results are presented, and design, construction, and operation features of an electrostatic deflection ion time-of-flight analyzer for the determination of the above-mentioned ratios are reviewed.

  10. A gas ionisation detector in the axial (Bragg) geometry used for the time-of-flight elastic recoil detection analysis.

    PubMed

    Siketić, Zdravko; Skukan, Natko; Bogdanović Radović, Iva

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, time-of-flight elastic recoil detection analysis spectrometer with a newly constructed gas ionization detector for energy detection is presented. The detector is designed in the axial (Bragg) geometry with a 3 × 3 array of 50 nm thick Si3N4 membranes as an entrance window. 40 mbar isobutane gas was sufficient to stop a 30 MeV primary iodine beam as well as all recoils in the detector volume. Spectrometer and detector performances were determined showing significant improvement in the mass and energy resolution, respectively, comparing to the spectrometer with a standard silicon particle detector for an energy measurement.

  11. Monitoring single coffee bean roasting by direct volatile compound analysis with proton transfer reaction time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Yener, Sine; Navarini, Luciano; Lonzarich, Valentina; Cappellin, Luca; Märk, Tilmann D; Bonn, Günther K; Biasioli, Franco

    2016-09-01

    This study applies proton transfer reaction time-of-flight mass spectrometry for the rapid analysis of volatile compounds released from single coffee beans. The headspace volatile profiles of single coffee beans (Coffeea arabica) from different geographical origins (Brazil, Guatemala and Ethiopia) were analyzed via offline profiling at different stages of roasting. The effect of coffee geographical origin was reflected on volatile compound formation that was supported by one-way ANOVA. Clear origin signatures were observed in the formation of different coffee odorants. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27476633

  12. A gas ionisation detector in the axial (Bragg) geometry used for the time-of-flight elastic recoil detection analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Siketić, Zdravko; Skukan, Natko; Bogdanović Radović, Iva

    2015-08-15

    In this paper, time-of-flight elastic recoil detection analysis spectrometer with a newly constructed gas ionization detector for energy detection is presented. The detector is designed in the axial (Bragg) geometry with a 3 × 3 array of 50 nm thick Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} membranes as an entrance window. 40 mbar isobutane gas was sufficient to stop a 30 MeV primary iodine beam as well as all recoils in the detector volume. Spectrometer and detector performances were determined showing significant improvement in the mass and energy resolution, respectively, comparing to the spectrometer with a standard silicon particle detector for an energy measurement.

  13. Time-of-flight diffractometer with multiple pulse overlap - an example for the application of modern tools for instrument design

    SciTech Connect

    Stuhr, U.; Bauer, G.S.; Wagner, W.

    1997-09-01

    A Time-of-Flight Diffractometer with high pulse rates, allowing multiple frame overlap, is a completely novel design of an instrument dedicated for high resolution strain-field mapping. We elaborated a detailed concept of this instrument applying analytical calculations and Monte Carlo computer simulations. Having established the instrument concept, the computer simulations will now be extended to optimize the total performance of the instrument. To illustrate the necessity and possibilities of applying modem tools for instrument design, we describe, as an example, the different steps towards the development of the detailed design of this instrument, which we intend to build at the Swiss spallation. source SINQ in the near future.

  14. Combining time of flight and diffraction tomography for high resolution breast imaging: initial in vivo results (L).

    PubMed

    Huthwaite, P; Simonetti, F; Duric, N

    2012-09-01

    Ultrasound tomography (UST) is being developed to address the limitations of mammography in breast cancer detection. Central to the success of UST is the possibility of obtaining high-resolution images of tissue mechanical properties across the whole breast. A recent paper [Huthwaite and Simonetti, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 130, 1721-1734 (2011)] made use of a numerical phantom to demonstrate that sufficient image resolution can be obtained by simply treating refraction and diffraction effects in consecutive steps through the combination of ray-based time of flight and diffraction tomography. This letter presents the first experimental demonstration of the method using phantom and invivo data from a cancer patient. PMID:22978851

  15. Current status of matrix-assisted laser desorption ionisation-time of flight mass spectrometry in the clinical microbiology laboratory.

    PubMed

    Kok, Jen; Chen, Sharon C A; Dwyer, Dominic E; Iredell, Jonathan R

    2013-01-01

    The integration of matrix-assisted laser desorption ionisation-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) into many clinical microbiology laboratories has revolutionised routine pathogen identification. MALDI-TOF MS complements and has good potential to replace existing phenotypic identification methods. Results are available in a more clinically relevant timeframe, particularly in bacteraemic septic shock. Novel applications include strain typing and the detection of antimicrobial resistance, but these are not widely used. This review discusses the technical aspects, current applications, and limitations of MALDI-TOF MS.

  16. Application of the Monte Carlo methods and variational procedure for optimizing time-of-flight neutron diffractometer characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khrushchinsky, A. A.; Kuten, S. A.; Viarenich, K. A.; Speransky, P. A.

    2016-05-01

    Based on variational calculus, a procedure for the optimal approximation of detector surface of the time-of-flight neutron diffractometer has been suggested. The exact solution for a point sample and zero thickness detector has been obtained. Using the shape of the detector surface, an optimized Monte Carlo simulation has been performed for the parameters of the spectrometer depending on the sample size and detector thickness, its azimuthal and Bragg's angular dimensions, and taking into account the neutron absorption in the sample and detector.

  17. Design of a magnetic shielding system for the time of flight enhanced diagnostics neutron spectrometer at Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak.

    PubMed

    Cui, Z Q; Chen, Z J; Xie, X F; Peng, X Y; Hu, Z M; Du, T F; Ge, L J; Zhang, X; Yuan, X; Xia, Z W; Hu, L Q; Zhong, G Q; Lin, S Y; Wan, B N; Fan, T S; Chen, J X; Li, X Q; Zhang, G H

    2014-11-01

    The novel neutron spectrometer TOFED (Time of Flight Enhanced Diagnostics), comprising 90 individual photomultiplier tubes coupled with 85 plastic scintillation detectors through light guides, has been constructed and installed at Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak. A dedicated magnetic shielding system has been constructed for TOFED, and is designed to guarantee the normal operation of photomultiplier tubes in the stray magnetic field leaking from the tokamak device. Experimental measurements and numerical simulations carried out employing the finite element method are combined to optimize the design of the magnetic shielding system. The system allows detectors to work properly in an external magnetic field of 200 G.

  18. Design of the radiation shielding for the time of flight enhanced diagnostics neutron spectrometer at Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak.

    PubMed

    Du, T F; Chen, Z J; Peng, X Y; Yuan, X; Zhang, X; Gorini, G; Nocente, M; Tardocchi, M; Hu, Z M; Cui, Z Q; Xie, X F; Ge, L J; Hu, L Q; Zhong, G Q; Lin, S Y; Wan, B N; Li, X Q; Zhang, G H; Chen, J X; Fan, T S

    2014-11-01

    A radiation shielding has been designed to reduce scattered neutrons and background gamma-rays for the new double-ring Time Of Flight Enhanced Diagnostics (TOFED). The shielding was designed based on simulation with the Monte Carlo code MCNP5. Dedicated model of the EAST tokamak has been developed together with the emission neutron source profile and spectrum; the latter were simulated with the Nubeam and GENESIS codes. Significant reduction of background radiation at the detector can be achieved and this satisfies the requirement of TOFED. The intensities of the scattered and direct neutrons in the line of sight of the TOFED neutron spectrometer at EAST are studied for future data interpretation.

  19. SYNCHROTRON RADIATION, FREE ELECTRON LASER, APPLICATION OF NUCLEAR TECHNOLOGY, ETC. Physical design of positronium time of flight spectroscopy apparatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Xiao-Pan; Zhang, Zi-Liang; Qin, Xiu-Bo; Yu, Run-Sheng; Wang, Bao-Yi

    2010-12-01

    Positronium time of flight spectroscopy (Ps-TOF) is an effective technique for porous material research. It has advantages over other techniques for analyzing the porosity and pore tortuosity of materials. This paper describes a design for Ps-TOF apparatus based on the Beijing intense slow positron beam, supplying a new material characterization technique. In order to improve the time resolution and increase the count rate of the apparatus, the detector system is optimized. For 3 eV o-Ps, the time broadening is 7.66 ns and the count rate is 3 cps after correction.

  20. Design Study for a Multi-Reflection Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrograph for Very Short Lived Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Jin Woo; Park, Young-Ho; Im, Kang-Bin; Kim, Gi Dong; Kim, Yong Kyun

    The multi-reflection time-of-flight mass spectrometer (MR-TOF-MS) has been designed for the high precision mass measurement system in RAON accelerator facility, which will be constructed in Korea. Mirror-electrode potentials were numerically optimized by Nelder-Mead algorithm. The temporal spread and the mass-resolving power were calculated for the 132Sn+ ions with an energy spread of 20 eV and an emittance of 3 π mm mrad; the mass resolving power over 105 was achieved. MR-TOF-MS will be used for the isobar separation and the mass measurement for very short-lived isotopes.

  1. Determination of impurities in uranium matrices by time-of-flight ICP-MS using matrix-matched method

    SciTech Connect

    Buerger, Stefan; Riciputi, Lee R; Bostick, Debra A

    2007-01-01

    The analysis of impurities in uranium matrices is performed in a variety of fields, e.g. for quality control in the production stream converting uranium ores to fuels, as element signatures in nuclear forensics and safeguards, and for non-proliferation control. We have investigated the capabilities of time-of-flight ICP-MS for the analysis of impurities in uranium matrices using a matrix-matched method. The method was applied to the New Brunswick Laboratory CRM 124(1-7) series. For the seven certified reference materials, an overall precision and accuracy of approximately 5% and 14%, respectively, were obtained for 18 analyzed elements.

  2. A gas ionisation detector in the axial (Bragg) geometry used for the time-of-flight elastic recoil detection analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siketić, Zdravko; Skukan, Natko; Bogdanović Radović, Iva

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, time-of-flight elastic recoil detection analysis spectrometer with a newly constructed gas ionization detector for energy detection is presented. The detector is designed in the axial (Bragg) geometry with a 3 × 3 array of 50 nm thick Si3N4 membranes as an entrance window. 40 mbar isobutane gas was sufficient to stop a 30 MeV primary iodine beam as well as all recoils in the detector volume. Spectrometer and detector performances were determined showing significant improvement in the mass and energy resolution, respectively, comparing to the spectrometer with a standard silicon particle detector for an energy measurement.

  3. [Separation and identification of beta-casein from Chinese human milk by ion exchange chromatography-matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight/time of flight mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Huang, Yu; Ren, Haowei; Liu, Biao; Liu, Ning; Li, Meng; Wang, Dongmao

    2013-05-01

    The selective precipitation of whole casein from skimmed milk was achieved by the addition of calcium salt under acidic pH. The effects of pH, centrifugal force and final concentration of CaCl2 on the separation of casein were studied by measuring the purity of final products using sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). The results showed that casein with the highest purity could be obtained with the pH of 4.3, the centrifugal force of 10 400 g and the final concentration of CaCl2 of 60 mmol/L. The casein was processed with DEAE anion exchange chromatography and three peaks were obtained. Then the third peak (peak III) was identified with Western-Blot method and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight/time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/TOF MS). The identification of Western-Blot showed that peak III can combine with the specificity of human milk beta-casein antibody, and it is proved to be human milk beta-casein. The fingerprints of peak III were nalyzed by Mascot searching, and the sequence coverage was 50%, further supporting it is human milk beta-casein. In conclusion, an effective method to obtain human milk beta-casein from milk samples through DEAE anion exchange chromatography was established, and it is suitable for the proteomics research requirements of the beta-casein from human milk.

  4. A Rietveld refinement method for angular- and wavelength-dispersive neutron time-of-flight powder diffraction data

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Philipp; Houben, Andreas; Schweika, Werner; Tchougréeff, Andrei L.; Dronskowski, Richard

    2015-01-01

    This paper introduces a two-dimensional extension of the well established Rietveld refinement method for modeling neutron time-of-flight powder diffraction data. The novel approach takes into account the variation of two parameters, diffraction angle 2θ and wavelength λ, to optimally adapt to the varying resolution function in diffraction experiments. By doing so, the refinement against angular- and wavelength-dispersive data gets rid of common data-reduction steps and also avoids the loss of high-resolution information typically introduced by integration. In a case study using a numerically simulated diffraction pattern of Rh0.81Fe3.19N taking into account the layout of the future POWTEX instrument, the profile function as parameterized in 2θ and λ is extracted. As a proof-of-concept, the resulting instrument parameterization is then utilized to perform a typical refinement of the angular- and wavelength-dispersive diffraction pattern of CuNCN, yielding excellent residuals within feasible computational efforts. Another proof-of-concept is carried out by applying the same approach to a real neutron diffraction data set of CuNCN obtained from the POWGEN instrument at the Spallation Neutron Source in Oak Ridge. The paper highlights the general importance of the novel approach for data analysis at neutron time-of-flight diffractometers and its possible inclusion within existing Rietveld software packages. PMID:26664340

  5. Potential of monitoring isotopologues by quantitative gas chromatography with time-of-flight mass spectrometry for metabolomic assay.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi; Hu, Haiyan; Su, Yue; Zhang, Fang; Guo, Yinlong

    2016-03-01

    Because of the extreme complexity of metabolomic samples, the effectiveness of quantitative gas chromatography with time-of-flight mass spectrometry depends substantially on the expansion of the linear dynamic range. Facing the existence of numerous saturated detector signals, a data processing method based on monitoring isotopologues has been developed. The monoisotopic ion kept the high mass spectrometry sensitivity, and the less abundant isotopologue ions extended the linear dynamic range. This alternative method was proved to extend the linear dynamic range to five orders of magnitude successfully and overcome the quantitative problems induced by the ion detector saturation. Finally, to validate the applicability, the method was applied to a metabolomic assay of Alzheimer's disease. Comparing with the traditional monoisotopic method, the use of monitoring isotopologues helped us to discover an additional eight metabolites with significant difference and to conduct a more reliable principal component analysis as well. The results demonstrated that monitoring isotopologues in quantitative gas chromatography with time-of-flight mass spectrometry could improve the authenticity of metabolomic analysis. PMID:26763370

  6. PILGRIM, a Multi-Reflection Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer for Spiral2-S3 at GANIL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chauveau, P.; Delahaye, P.; De France, G.; El Abir, S.; Lory, J.; Merrer, Y.; Rosenbusch, M.; Schweikhard, L.; Wolf, R. N.

    2016-06-01

    PILGRIM is a Multi-Reflection Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer currently under development at GANIL for the S3 (Super Separator Spectrometer) collaboration and dedicated to the study of the ground-state properties of exotic nuclei. MR-ToF devices have proven to be effective tools for isobar separation (with mass resolving powers in excess of 105) and high-precision mass measurements (relative mass uncertainty down to a few 10-7) within a few tens of milliseconds. These features make them extremely interesting for ensuring beam purity and accurate mass determinations of very exotic, short lived nuclei. PILGRIM is to be set up in the future low energy branch of the S3-Spiral2 project and may also be used as a beam purifier in front of the double Penning trap PIPERADE at DESIR-Spiral2. An electrostatic 90 degree quadrupole deflector to be placed between an RFQ cooler-buncher (for beam preparation) and PILGRIM is also under study. The study on the deflector focuses on conserving the beam features, especially the time-of-flight spread of the ion bunches which has a direct impact on the resolving power of a multi-reflection device.

  7. Further study of scintillation counters with BaF 2 crystals for time-of-flight positron tomography in medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moszyński, M.; Allemand, R.; Cormoreche, E.; Laval, M.; Odru, R.; Vacher, J.

    1984-10-01

    The study and the optimalisation of scintillation counters consisting of R1668 (R1398 with quartz window) photomultipliers and BaF 2 crystals were carried-out in order to construct a 96 counter ring for time-of-flight positron tomography. The photoelectron yield measured for CsF and BaF 2 crystals permitted us to estimate the photoelectron collection efficiency at different light wavelengths for R1668 photomultiplier in relation to the XP2020Q. This experiment, and the time resolution study, showed that at present the ability of R1668 photomultiplier for timing with BaF 2 crystals is limited by a poor collection of photoelectrons produced by UV light. It was shown that a certain modification of the voltage between D 1 and D 2 dynodes improves the time resolution by 10%. A comparison of BaF 2 crystals of different shapes showed that pyramidal cut crystal with a small opening angle equal to 1° ensures both a high detection efficiency and a good time resolution for 511 keV γ-rays. The best time resolution equal to 330 ps and the typical one equal to 350 ps were achieved with two counters for time-of-flight positron tomography.

  8. Quantitative Organic Acids in Urine by Two Dimensional Gas Chromatography-Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry (GCxGC-TOFMS).

    PubMed

    Sweetman, Lawrence; Ashcraft, Paula; Bennett-Firmin, Jeanna

    2016-01-01

    Seventy-six organic acids in urine specimens are determined with quantitative two dimensional Gas Chromatography-Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry (GCxGC-TOFMS). The specimen is treated with urease to remove urea then derivatized to form pentafluorobenzyl oximes (PFBO) of oxoacids. The sample is then treated with ethyl alcohol to precipitate proteins and centrifuged. After drying the supernatant, the organic acids are derivatized to form volatile trimethylsilyl (TMS) derivatives for separation by capillary two dimensional Gas Chromatography (GCxGC) with temperature programming and modulation. Detection is by Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry (TOFMS) with identification of the organic acids by their mass spectra. Organic acids are quantitated by peak areas of reconstructed ion chromatograms with internal standards and calibration curves. Organic acids are quantified to determine abnormal patterns for the diagnosis of more than 100 inherited disorders of organic acid metabolism. Characteristic abnormal metabolites are quantified to monitor dietary and other modes of treatment for patients who are diagnosed with specific organic acid disorders.

  9. Clustering, methodology, and mechanistic insights into acetate chemical ionization using high-resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brophy, Patrick; Farmer, Delphine K.

    2016-08-01

    We present a comprehensive characterization of cluster control and transmission through the Tofwerk atmospheric pressure interface installed on various chemical ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometers using authentic standards. This characterization of the atmospheric pressure interface allows for a detailed investigation of the acetate chemical ionization mechanisms and the impact of controlling these mechanisms on sensitivity, selectivity, and mass spectral ambiguity with the aim of non-targeted analysis. Chemical ionization with acetate reagent ions is controlled by a distribution of reagent ion-neutral clusters that vary with relative humidity and the concentration of the acetic anhydride precursor. Deprotonated carboxylic acids are primarily detected only if sufficient declustering is employed inside the atmospheric pressure interface. The configuration of a high-resolution time-of-flight chemical ionization mass spectrometer (HR-TOF-CIMS) using an acetate chemical ionization source for non-targeted analysis is discussed. Recent approaches and studies characterizing acetate chemical ionization as it applies to the HR-TOF-CIMS are evaluated in light of the work presented herein.

  10. Symmetry-broken momentum distributions induced by matter-wave diffraction during time-of-flight expansion of ultracold atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinberg, M.; Jürgensen, O.; Ölschläger, C.; Lühmann, D.-S.; Sengstock, K.; Simonet, J.

    2016-03-01

    We study several effects which lead to symmetry-broken momentum distributions of quantum gases released from optical lattices. In particular, we demonstrate that the interaction within the first milliseconds of the time-of-flight expansion can strongly alter the measurement of the initial atomic momentum distribution. For bosonic mixtures in state-dependent lattices, interspecies scattering processes lead to a symmetry breaking in momentum space. The underlying mechanism is identified to be diffraction of the matter wave from the total density lattice, which gives rise to a time-dependent interaction potential. Our findings are of fundamental relevance for the interpretation of time-of-flight measurements and for the study of exotic quantum phases such as the twisted superfluid. Beyond that, the observed matter-wave diffraction can also be used as an interferometric probe. In addition, we report on diffraction from the state-dependent standing light field, which leads to the same symmetry-broken momentum distributions, even for single component condensates.

  11. STiC — a mixed mode silicon photomultiplier readout ASIC for time-of-flight applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harion, T.; Briggl, K.; Chen, H.; Fischer, P.; Gil, A.; Kiworra, V.; Ritzert, M.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-C.; Shen, W.; Stankova, V.

    2014-02-01

    STiC is an application specific integrated circuit (ASIC) for the readout of silicon photomultipliers. The chip has been designed to provide a very high timing resolution for time-of-flight applications in medical imaging and particle physics. It is dedicated in particular to the EndoToFPET-US project, which is developing an endoscopic PET detector combined with ultrasound imaging for early pancreas and prostate cancer detection. This PET system aims to provide a spatial resolution of 1 mm and a time-of-flight resolution of 200 ps FWHM. The analog frontend of STiC can use either a differential or single ended connection to the SiPM. The time and energy information of the detector signal is encoded into two time stamps. A special linearized time-over-threshold method is used to obtain a linear relation between the signal charge and the measured signal width, improving the energy resolution. The trigger signals are digitized by an integrated TDC module with a resolution of less than 20 ps. The TDC data is stored in an internal memory and transfered over a 160 MBit/s serial link using 8/10 bit encoding. First coincidence measurements using a 3.1 × 3.1 × 15 mm3 LYSO crystal and a S10362-33-50 Hamamtsu MPPC show a coincidence time resolution of less than 285 ps. We present details on the chip design as well as first characterization measurements.

  12. A novel range ambiguity resolution technique applying pulse-position modulation in time-of-flight ranging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieger, Peter; Ullrich, Andreas

    2012-06-01

    Time-of-Flight range measurements rely on the unambiguous assignment of each received echo signal to its causative emitted pulse signal. The maximum unambiguous measurement range depends on the signal group velocity in the propagation medium and the source signals' pulse repetition interval. When this range is exceeded an echo signal and its preceding pulse signal are not associated any longer and the result is ambiguous. We introduce a novel, two-stage approach which significantly increases the maximum unambiguous measurement range by applying a specifically coded pulse-position-modulation scheme to the train of emitted pulses in the first step. In the second step the analysis of resulting measurement ranges allows the unambiguous decision for the correct ranges. In this regard we also present a unique feature of a group of digital codes which helps to enhance detection robustness. Results are given on the basis of time-of-flight measurements from scanning LIDAR, where this technique has been implemented for the first time.

  13. Endo-TOFPET-US: A multimodal ultrasonic probe featuring time of flight PET in diagnostic and therapeutic endoscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, T. C.; Endo-Tofpet-Us Collaboration

    2013-08-01

    This work outlines the functionality of a new medical instrument and describes the research and development work aiming at new and higher performance imaging techniques with Time of Flight-PET capability in endoscopy and surgical oncology. It focuses on the associated scientific and technological challenges to be met in fields such as scintillating crystallography, ultra-fast photo-detection, highly integrated electronics, and system integration. This will highlight possible answers and solutions that derive from techniques and instrumentation prominent in high energy physics. Special emphasis is put on new developments of scintillators and diffractive optics to increase light output, and fast and compact photodetectors such as silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs) with the option of single SPAD readout. In view of the targeted coincidence time of flight performance of 200 ps FWHM equivalent to 30 mm along the line of response (LOR), tests using cerium-calcium-co-doped LSO crystals of 10 mm length and commercial SiPMs from Hamamatsu already produced a coincidence time resolution (CTR) of better than 170 ps FWHM.

  14. Analysis of sucralose and other sweeteners in water and beverage samples by liquid chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ferrer, Imma; Thurman, E Michael

    2010-06-18

    A methodology for the chromatographic separation and analysis of three of the most popular artificial sweeteners (aspartame, saccharin, and sucralose) in water and beverage samples was developed using liquid chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC/TOF-MS). The sweeteners were extracted from water samples using solid-phase extraction (SPE) cartridges. Furthermore, several beverages were analyzed by a rapid and simple method without SPE, and the presence of the sweeteners was confirmed by accurate mass measurements below 2-ppm error. The unambiguous confirmation of the compounds was based on accurate mass measurements of the protonated molecules [M+H](+), their sodium adducts and their main fragment ions. Quantitation was carried out using matrix-matched standard calibration and linearity of response over 2 orders of magnitude was demonstrated (r>0.99). A detailed fragmentation study for sucralose was carried out by time-of-flight and a characteristic spectrum fingerprint pattern was obtained for the presence of this compound in water samples. Finally, the analysis of several wastewater, surface water and groundwater samples from the US showed that sucralose can be found in the aquatic environment at concentrations up to 2.4microg/L, thus providing a good indication of wastewater input from beverage sources.

  15. The Effect of Magnetic Field on Positron Range and Spatial Resolution in an Integrated Whole-Body Time-Of-Flight PET/MRI System

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Shih-ying; Savic, Dragana; Yang, Jaewon; Shrestha, Uttam; Seo, Youngho

    2014-01-01

    Simultaneous imaging systems combining positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have been actively investigated. A PET/MR imaging system (GE Healthcare) comprised of a time-of-flight (TOF) PET system utilizing silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs) and 3-tesla (3T) MRI was recently installed at our institution. The small-ring (60 cm diameter) TOF PET subsystem of this PET/MRI system can generate images with higher spatial resolution compared with conventional PET systems. We have examined theoretically and experimentally the effect of uniform magnetic fields on the spatial resolution for high-energy positron emitters. Positron emitters including 18F, 124I, and 68Ga were simulated in water using the Geant4 Monte Carlo toolkit in the presence of a uniform magnetic field (0, 3, and 7 Tesla). The positron annihilation position was tracked to determine the 3D spatial distribution of the 511-keV gammy ray emission. The full-width at tenth maximum (FWTM) of the positron point spread function (PSF) was determined. Experimentally, 18F and 68Ga line source phantoms in air and water were imaged with an investigational PET/MRI system and a PET/CT system to investigate the effect of magnetic field on the spatial resolution of PET. The full-width half maximum (FWHM) of the line spread function (LSF) from the line source was determined as the system spatial resolution. Simulations and experimental results show that the in-plane spatial resolution was slightly improved at field strength as low as 3 Tesla, especially when resolving signal from high-energy positron emitters in the air-tissue boundary. PMID:27076778

  16. A real-time noise filtering strategy for photon counting 3D imaging lidar.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zijing; Zhao, Yuan; Zhang, Yong; Wu, Long; Su, Jianzhong

    2013-04-22

    For a direct-detection 3D imaging lidar, the use of Geiger mode avalanche photodiode (Gm-APD) could greatly enhance the detection sensitivity of the lidar system since each range measurement requires a single detected photon. Furthermore, Gm-APD offers significant advantages in reducing the size, mass, power and complexity of the system. However the inevitable noise, including the background noise, the dark count noise and so on, remains a significant challenge to obtain a clear 3D image of the target of interest. This paper presents a smart strategy, which can filter out false alarms in the stage of acquisition of raw time of flight (TOF) data and obtain a clear 3D image in real time. As a result, a clear 3D image is taken from the experimental system despite the background noise of the sunny day.

  17. A real-time noise filtering strategy for photon counting 3D imaging lidar.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zijing; Zhao, Yuan; Zhang, Yong; Wu, Long; Su, Jianzhong

    2013-04-22

    For a direct-detection 3D imaging lidar, the use of Geiger mode avalanche photodiode (Gm-APD) could greatly enhance the detection sensitivity of the lidar system since each range measurement requires a single detected photon. Furthermore, Gm-APD offers significant advantages in reducing the size, mass, power and complexity of the system. However the inevitable noise, including the background noise, the dark count noise and so on, remains a significant challenge to obtain a clear 3D image of the target of interest. This paper presents a smart strategy, which can filter out false alarms in the stage of acquisition of raw time of flight (TOF) data and obtain a clear 3D image in real time. As a result, a clear 3D image is taken from the experimental system despite the background noise of the sunny day. PMID:23609635

  18. Measuring Waves and Erosion in Underwater Oil Blobs and Monitoring Other Arbitrary Surfaces with a Kinect v2 Time-of-Flight Camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butkiewicz, T.

    2014-12-01

    We developed free software that enables researchers to utilize Microsoft's new Kinect for Windows v2 sensor for a range of coastal and ocean mapping applications, as well as monitoring and measuring experimental scenes. While the original Kinect device used structured light and had very poor resolution, many geophysical researchers found uses for it in their experiments. The new next generation of this sensor uses time-of-flight technology, and can produce higher resolution depth measurements with an order of magnitude more accuracy. It also is capable of measurement through and under water. An analysis tool in our application lets users quickly select any arbitrary surface in the sensor's view. The tools automatically scans the surface, then calibrates and aligns a measurement volume to it. Depth readings from the sensor are converted into 3D point clouds, and points falling within this volume are projected into surface coordinates. Raster images can be output which consist of height fields aligned to the surface, generated from these projected measurements and interpolations between them. Images have a simple 1 pixel = 1 mm resolution and intensity values representing mm in height from the base-plane, which enables easy measurement and calculations to be conducted on the images in other analysis packages. Single snapshots can be taken manually on demand, or the software can monitor the surface automatically, capturing frames at preset intervals. This produces time lapse animations of dynamically changing surfaces. We apply this analysis tool to an experiment studying the behavior of underwater oil in response to flowing water of different speeds and temperatures. Blobs of viscous oils are placed in a flume apparatus, which circulates water past them. Over the course of a couple hours, the oil blobs spread out, waves slowly ripple across their surfaces, and erosions occur as smaller blobs break off from the main blob. All of this can be captured in 3D, with mm

  19. 3D temperature field reconstruction using ultrasound sensing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yuqian; Ma, Tong; Cao, Chengyu; Wang, Xingwei

    2016-04-01

    3D temperature field reconstruction is of practical interest to the power, transportation and aviation industries and it also opens up opportunities for real time control or optimization of high temperature fluid or combustion process. In our paper, a new distributed optical fiber sensing system consisting of a series of elements will be used to generate and receive acoustic signals. This system is the first active temperature field sensing system that features the advantages of the optical fiber sensors (distributed sensing capability) and the acoustic sensors (non-contact measurement). Signals along multiple paths will be measured simultaneously enabled by a code division multiple access (CDMA) technique. Then a proposed Gaussian Radial Basis Functions (GRBF)-based approach can approximate the temperature field as a finite summation of space-dependent basis functions and time-dependent coefficients. The travel time of the acoustic signals depends on the temperature of the media. On this basis, the Gaussian functions are integrated along a number of paths which are determined by the number and distribution of sensors. The inversion problem to estimate the unknown parameters of the Gaussian functions can be solved with the measured times-of-flight (ToF) of acoustic waves and the length of propagation paths using the recursive least square method (RLS). The simulation results show an approximation error less than 2% in 2D and 5% in 3D respectively. It demonstrates the availability and efficiency of our proposed 3D temperature field reconstruction mechanism.

  20. 3D Elevation Program—Virtual USA in 3D

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lukas, Vicki; Stoker, J.M.

    2016-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) 3D Elevation Program (3DEP) uses a laser system called ‘lidar’ (light detection and ranging) to create a virtual reality map of the Nation that is very accurate. 3D maps have many uses with new uses being discovered all the time.  

  1. 3D Elevation Program—Virtual USA in 3D

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lukas, Vicki; Stoker, J.M.

    2016-04-14

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) 3D Elevation Program (3DEP) uses a laser system called ‘lidar’ (light detection and ranging) to create a virtual reality map of the Nation that is very accurate. 3D maps have many uses with new uses being discovered all the time.  

  2. Construction and simulation of a multi-reflection time-of-flight mass spectrometer at the University of Notre Dame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, B. E.; Kelly, J. M.; Nicoloff, C.; Long, J.; Ryan, S.; Brodeur, M.

    2016-06-01

    One of the most significant problems in the production of rare isotopes is the simultaneous production of contaminants, often time isobaric. Thus, a high-resolution beam purification method is required which needs to be compatible with both the low yield and short half-life of the desired radionuclide. A multi-reflection time-of-flight mass spectrometer meets all these criteria, in addition to boasting a smaller footprint relative to traditional separator dipole magnets. Such a device is currently under construction at the University of Notre Dame and is intended to be coupled to the IG-ISOL source of the planned cyclotron facility. The motivation and conceptual design are presented, as well as the status of simulations to determine the feasibility of using a Bradbury-Nielsen gate for bunching ion beams during initial system testing.

  3. Second generation fusion neutron time-of-flight spectrometer at optimized rate for fully digital data acquisition

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, X. E-mail: jnke1@icloud.com Fan, T.; Yuan, X.; Xie, X.; Chen, Z.; Källne, J.; Gorini, G.; Nocente, M.

    2014-04-15

    The progress on high-rate event recording of data is taken as starting point to revisit the design of fusion neutron spectrometers based on the TOF (time-of-flight) technique. The study performed was aimed at how such instruments for optimized rate (TOFOR) can be further developed to enhance the plasma diagnostic capabilities based on measurement of the 2.5 MeV dd neutron emission from D plasmas, especially the weak spectral components that depend on discrimination of extraneous events. This paper describes a design (TOFOR II) adapted for use with digital wave form recording of all detector pulses providing information on both amplitude (pulse height) and timing. The results of simulations are presented and the performance enhancement is assessed in comparison to the present.

  4. Study on three-dimensional face recognition with continuous-wave time-of-flight range cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebers, Olga; Ebers, Tatjana; Plaue, Matthias; Radüntz, Thea; Bärwolff, Günter; Schwandt, Hartmut

    2011-06-01

    For a number of different security and industrial applications, there is the need for reliable person identification methods. Among these methods, face recognition has a number of advantages such as being noninvasive and potentially covert. Other advantages of conventional two-dimensional face recognition, in particular, are its low data capture duration and its low cost. However, the recent introduction of fast and comparatively inexpensive time-of-flight cameras for the recording of 2.5D range data in real time calls for a closer look at three-dimentional face recognition in this context. One major disadvantage, however, is the low quality of the data acquired with this type of camera. In this paper, we investigate the feasibility of face recognition systems based on such range images.

  5. Parallel Configuration For Fast Superconducting Strip Line Detectors With Very Large Area In Time Of Flight Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Casaburi, A.; Zen, N.; Suzuki, K.; Ohkubo, M.; Ejrnaes, M.; Cristiano, R.; Pagano, S.

    2009-12-16

    We realized a very fast and large Superconducting Strip Line Detector based on a parallel configuration of nanowires. The detector with size 200x200 {mu}m{sup 2} recorded a sub-nanosecond pulse width of 700 ps in FWHM (400 ps rise time and 530 ps relaxation time) for lysozyme monomers/multimers molecules accelerated at 175 keV in a Time of Flight Mass Spectrometer. This record is the best in the class of superconducting detectors and comparable with the fastest NbN superconducting single photon detector of 10x10 {mu}m{sup 2}. We succeeded in acquiring mass spectra as the first step for a scale-up to {approx}mm pixel size for high throughput MS analysis, while keeping a fast response.

  6. Critical factors determining the quantification capability of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization- time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chia-Chen; Lai, Yin-Hung; Ou, Yu-Meng; Chang, Huan-Tsung; Wang, Yi-Sheng

    2016-10-28

    Quantitative analysis with mass spectrometry (MS) is important but challenging. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) coupled with time-of-flight (TOF) MS offers superior sensitivity, resolution and speed, but such techniques have numerous disadvantages that hinder quantitative analyses. This review summarizes essential obstacles to analyte quantification with MALDI-TOF MS, including the complex ionization mechanism of MALDI, sensitive characteristics of the applied electric fields and the mass-dependent detection efficiency of ion detectors. General quantitative ionization and desorption interpretations of ion production are described. Important instrument parameters and available methods of MALDI-TOF MS used for quantitative analysis are also reviewed.This article is part of the themed issue 'Quantitative mass spectrometry'.

  7. Quantum phase diagram and time-of-flight absorption pictures of an ultracold Bose system in a square optical superlattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Fan; Zhang, Jun; Jiang, Ying

    2016-01-01

    In this letter, by the use of the generalized effective potential theory, with the help of the process chain approach under the framework of the Kato formulation of the perturbation expansion, we calculate out the quantum phase diagram up to the 8th order for an ultracold Bose system in a square optical superlattice. Based on these perturbative data, with the help of the linear fit extrapolation technique, more accurate results are obtained, which are in excellent agreement with recent Monte Carlo numerical results. Moreover, by employing the generalized re-summed Green's function method and cumulant expansion, the momentum distribution function of the system is also calculated analytically and the time-of-flight absorption pictures of the system are plotted.

  8. Neutron capture cross section measurement of 151Sm at the CERN neutron time of flight facility (n_TOF).

    PubMed

    Abbondanno, U; Aerts, G; Alvarez-Velarde, F; Alvarez-Pol, H; Andriamonje, S; Andrzejewski, J; Badurek, G; Baumann, P; Becvár, F; Benlliure, J; Berthoumieux, E; Calviño, F; Cano-Ott, D; Capote, R; Cennini, P; Chepel, V; Chiaveri, E; Colonna, N; Cortes, G; Cortina, D; Couture, A; Cox, J; Dababneh, S; Dahlfors, M; David, S; Dolfini, R; Domingo-Pardo, C; Duran, I; Embid-Segura, M; Ferrant, L; Ferrari, A; Ferreira-Marques, R; Frais-Koelbl, H; Furman, W; Goncalves, I; Gallino, R; Gonzalez-Romero, E; Goverdovski, A; Gramegna, F; Griesmayer, E; Gunsing, F; Haas, B; Haight, R; Heil, M; Herrera-Martinez, A; Isaev, S; Jericha, E; Käppeler, F; Kadi, Y; Karadimos, D; Kerveno, M; Ketlerov, V; Koehler, P; Konovalov, V; Krticka, M; Lamboudis, C; Leeb, H; Lindote, A; Lopes, I; Lozano, M; Lukic, S; Marganiec, J; Marrone, S; Martinez-Val, J; Mastinu, P; Mengoni, A; Milazzo, P M; Molina-Coballes, A; Moreau, C; Mosconi, M; Neves, F; Oberhummer, H; O'Brien, S; Pancin, J; Papaevangelou, T; Paradela, C; Pavlik, A; Pavlopoulos, P; Perlado, J M; Perrot, L; Pignatari, M; Plag, R; Plompen, A; Plukis, A; Poch, A; Policarpo, A; Pretel, C; Quesada, J; Raman, S; Rapp, W; Rauscher, T; Reifarth, R; Rosetti, M; Rubbia, C; Rudolf, G; Rullhusen, P; Salgado, J; Soares, J C; Stephan, C; Tagliente, G; Tain, J; Tassan-Got, L; Tavora, L; Terlizzi, R; Vannini, G; Vaz, P; Ventura, A; Villamarin, D; Vincente, M C; Vlachoudis, V; Voss, F; Wendler, H; Wiescher, M; Wisshak, K

    2004-10-15

    The151Sm(n,gamma)152Sm cross section has been measured at the spallation neutron facility n_TOF at CERN in the energy range from 1 eV to 1 MeV. The new facility combines excellent resolution in neutron time-of-flight, low repetition rates, and an unsurpassed instantaneous luminosity, resulting in rather favorable signal/background ratios. The 151Sm cross section is of importance for characterizing neutron capture nucleosynthesis in asymptotic giant branch stars. At a thermal energy of kT=30 keV the Maxwellian averaged cross section of this unstable isotope (t(1/2)=93 yr) was determined to be 3100+/-160 mb, significantly larger than theoretical predictions.

  9. Microscopic observation of carrier-transport dynamics in quantum-structure solar cells using a time-of-flight technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toprasertpong, Kasidit; Kasamatsu, Naofumi; Fujii, Hiromasa; Kada, Tomoyuki; Asahi, Shigeo; Wang, Yunpeng; Watanabe, Kentaroh; Sugiyama, Masakazu; Kita, Takashi; Nakano, Yoshiaki

    2015-07-01

    In this study, we propose a carrier time-of-flight technique to evaluate the carrier transport time across a quantum structure in an active region of solar cells. By observing the time-resolved photoluminescence signal with a quantum-well probe inserted under the quantum structure at forward bias, the carrier transport time can be efficiently determined at room temperature. The averaged drift velocity shows linear dependence on the internal field, allowing us to estimate the quantum structure as a quasi-bulk material with low effective mobility containing the information of carrier dynamics. We show that this direct and real-time observation is more sensitive to carrier transport than other conventional techniques, providing better insights into microscopic carrier transport dynamics to overcome a device design difficulty.

  10. Time of flight mass spectrometry of DNA laser-ablated from frozen aqueous solutions: applications to the Human Genome Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Peter

    1994-02-01

    Time of flight mass spectrometry offers an extremely rapid and accurate alternative to gel electrophoresis for sizing DNA fragments in the Sanger sequencing process, if large single-stranded DNA molecules can be volatilized and ionized without fragmentation. A process based on pulsed laser ablation of thin frozen films of DNA solutions has been shown to ablate intact DNA molecules up to [approximate]400 kDa in mass, and also has been shown to yield molecular ions of single-stranded DNA up to [approximate]18 500 Da. The theoretical basis and the progress to date in this approach are described and the potential impact of mass spectrometry on large-scale DNA sequencing is discussed.

  11. First Isochronous Time-of-Flight Mass Measurements of Short-Lived Projectile Fragments in the ESR

    SciTech Connect

    Stadlmann, J.; Geissel, H.; Hausmann, M.; Nolden, F.; Radon, T.; Schatz, H.; Scheidenberger, C.; Attallah, F.; Beckert, K.; Bosch, F.; Falch, M.; Franczak, B.; Franzke, B.; Kerscher, Th.; Klepper, O.; Kluge, H.J.; Kozhuharov, C.; Loebner, K.E.G.; Muenzenberg, G.; Novikov, Yu.N.; Steck, M.; Sun, Z.; Suemmerer, K.; Weick, H.; Wollnik, H.

    2000-12-31

    A new method for precise mass measurements of short-lived hot nuclei is presented. These nuclei were produced via projectile fragmentation, separated with the FRS and injected into the storage ring ESR being operated in the isochronous mode. The revolution time of the ions is measured with a time-of-flight detector sensitive to single particles. This new method allows access to exotic nuclei with half-lives in the microsecond region. First results from this novel method obtained with measurements on neutron-deficient fragments of a chromium primary beam with half-lives down to 50 ms are reported. A precision of {delta}m/m {<=} 5 {center_dot} 10{sup -6} has been achieved.

  12. Structural calculations and experimental detection of small Ga mS n clusters using time-of-flight mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    BelBruno, J. J.; Sanville, E.; Burnin, A.; Muhangi, A. K.; Malyutin, A.

    2009-08-01

    Ga mS n clusters were generated by laser ablation of a solid sample of Ga 2S 3. The resulting molecules were analyzed in a time-of-flight mass spectrometer. In addition to atomic species, the spectra exhibited evidence for the existence of GaS3+, GaS4+, GaS5+, and GaS6+ clusters. The potential neutral and cationic structures of the observed Ga mS n clusters were computationally investigated using a density-functional approach. Reference is made to the kinetic pathways required for production of clusters from the starting point of the stoichiometric molecule or molecular ion. Cluster atomization enthalpies are compared with bulk values from the literature.

  13. Reconstruction of Time-Resolved Neutron Energy Spectra in Z-Pinch Experiments Using Time-of-flight Method

    SciTech Connect

    Rezac, K.; Klir, D.; Kubes, P.; Kravarik, J.

    2009-01-21

    We present the reconstruction of neutron energy spectra from time-of-flight signals. This technique is useful in experiments with the time of neutron production in the range of about tens or hundreds of nanoseconds. The neutron signals were obtained by a common hard X-ray and neutron fast plastic scintillation detectors. The reconstruction is based on the Monte Carlo method which has been improved by simultaneous usage of neutron detectors placed on two opposite sides from the neutron source. Although the reconstruction from detectors placed on two opposite sides is more difficult and a little bit inaccurate (it followed from several presumptions during the inclusion of both sides of detection), there are some advantages. The most important advantage is smaller influence of scattered neutrons on the reconstruction. Finally, we describe the estimation of the error of this reconstruction.

  14. Shock tube coupled to the time-of-flight mass spectrometer via a molecular beam sampling system.

    PubMed

    Krizancic, I; Haluk, M; Cho, S H; Trass, O

    1979-07-01

    A method for continuous mass spectrometric analysis of high-temperature reacting gas mixtures is described. The apparatus consists of a unique combination of three devices: the shock tube, the time-of-flight mass spectrometer, and the supersonic molecular beam. The driven section of the shock tube constitutes the reservoir of a supersonic molecular beam by which gas is continuously extracted from the reaction zone and introduced through a two-stage high-capacity vacuum system into the ionization region of the mass spectrometer. The shock tube and the mass spectrometer are coupled at right angles to one another. This configuration avoids excessive pressure buildup in the mass spectrometer system. The apparatus has an estimated mass resolution of 100 amu, a frequency range of 10-100 kHz, and can be operated over a wide range of shock conditions during the complete high-temperature pulse. PMID:18699630

  15. Microscopic observation of carrier-transport dynamics in quantum-structure solar cells using a time-of-flight technique

    SciTech Connect

    Toprasertpong, Kasidit; Fujii, Hiromasa; Sugiyama, Masakazu; Nakano, Yoshiaki; Kasamatsu, Naofumi; Kada, Tomoyuki; Asahi, Shigeo; Kita, Takashi; Wang, Yunpeng; Watanabe, Kentaroh

    2015-07-27

    In this study, we propose a carrier time-of-flight technique to evaluate the carrier transport time across a quantum structure in an active region of solar cells. By observing the time-resolved photoluminescence signal with a quantum-well probe inserted under the quantum structure at forward bias, the carrier transport time can be efficiently determined at room temperature. The averaged drift velocity shows linear dependence on the internal field, allowing us to estimate the quantum structure as a quasi-bulk material with low effective mobility containing the information of carrier dynamics. We show that this direct and real-time observation is more sensitive to carrier transport than other conventional techniques, providing better insights into microscopic carrier transport dynamics to overcome a device design difficulty.

  16. Direct Mass Measurements in the Light Neutron-Rich Region Using a Combined Energy and Time-of-Flight Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pillai, C.; Swenson, L. W.; Vieira, D. J.; Butler, G. W.; Wouters, J. M.; Rokni, S. H.; Vaziri, K.; Remsberg, L. P.

    This experiment has demonstrated that direct mass measurements can be performed (albeit of low precision in this first attempt) using the M proportional to ET(2) method. This technique has the advantage that many particle-bound nuclei, produced in fragmentation reactions can be measured simultaneously, independent of their N or Z. The main disadvantage of this approach is that both energy and time-of-flight must be measured precisely on an absolute scale. Although some mass walk with N and Z was observed in this experiment, these uncertainties were largely removed by extrapolating the smooth dependence observed for known nuclei which lie closer to the valley of (BETA)-stability. Mass measurements for several neutron-rich light nuclei ranging from C-17 to NE-26 have been performed. In all cases these measurements agree with the latest mass compilation of Wapstra and Audi. The masses of N-20 N and F-24 have been determined for the first time.

  17. Time-of-flight analyzer system to detect reflected particles from a solid surface following low-energy particle injection

    SciTech Connect

    Yamaoka, H.; Tanaka, N.; Tsumori, K.; Nishiura, M.; Kenmotsu, T.; Hirouchi, T.; Kisaki, M.; Shinto, K.; Sasao, M.; Matsumoto, Y.; Wada, M.

    2008-02-15

    We have developed a time-of-flight analyzer to measure energy distributions of reflected particles from solid surfaces bombarded by low-energy (1-2 keV) ions. The analyzer yields energy distributions of neutrals which can be compared with the energy distributions of charged particles measured by a magnetic deflection-type momentum analyzer. We have tested the system to measure the angular dependence of energy and intensity for neutrals reflected from a polycrystalline W target. The energies of the reflected neutrals are much smaller than the incident ion energies, suggesting multiple scattering in the target. No angular dependence is observed under the condition that the sum of the incident and reflected angles is constant. The intensity of the reflected neutrals takes the maximum around the mirror angle. We compare these characteristics of neutral particle reflections with those of reflected ions.

  18. Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization-Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry for the Discrimination of Food-Borne Microorganisms

    PubMed Central

    Mazzeo, Maria Fiorella; Sorrentino, Alida; Gaita, Marcello; Cacace, Giuseppina; Di Stasio, Michele; Facchiano, Angelo; Comi, Giuseppe; Malorni, Antonio; Siciliano, Rosa Anna

    2006-01-01

    A methodology based on matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry of intact bacterial cells was used for rapid discrimination of 24 bacterial species, and detailed analyses to identify Escherichia coli O157:H7 were carried out. Highly specific mass spectrometric profiles of pathogenic and nonpathogenic bacteria that are well-known major food contaminants were obtained, uploaded in a specific database, and made available on the Web. In order to standardize the analytical protocol, several experimental, sample preparation, and mass spectrometry parameters that can affect the reproducibility and accuracy of data were evaluated. Our results confirm the conclusion that this strategy is a powerful tool for rapid and accurate identification of bacterial species and that mass spectrometric methodologies could play an essential role in polyphasic approaches to the identification of pathogenic bacteria. PMID:16461665

  19. Lipid imaging by gold cluster time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry: application to Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Touboul, David; Brunelle, Alain; Halgand, Frédéric; De La Porte, Sabine; Laprévote, Olivier

    2005-07-01

    Imaging with time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) has expanded very rapidly with the development of gold cluster ion sources (Au(3+)). It is now possible to acquire ion density maps (ion images) on a tissue section without any treatment and with a lateral resolution of few micrometers. In this article, we have taken advantage of this technique to study the degeneration/regeneration process in muscles of a Duchenne muscular dystrophy model mouse. Specific distribution of different lipid classes (fatty acids, triglycerides, phospholipids, tocopherol, coenzyme Q9, and cholesterol) allows us to distinguish three different regions on a mouse leg section: one is destroyed, another is degenerating (oxidative stress and deregulation of the phosphoinositol cycle), and the last one is stable. TOF-SIMS imaging shows the ability to localize directly on a tissue section a great number of lipid compounds that reflect the state of the cellular metabolism. PMID:15834124

  20. Design of Cherenkov bars for the optical part of the time-of-flight detector in Geant4.

    PubMed

    Nozka, L; Brandt, A; Rijssenbeek, M; Sykora, T; Hoffman, T; Griffiths, J; Steffens, J; Hamal, P; Chytka, L; Hrabovsky, M

    2014-11-17

    We present the results of studies devoted to the development and optimization of the optical part of a high precision time-of-flight (TOF) detector for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). This work was motivated by a proposal to use such a detector in conjunction with a silicon detector to tag and measure protons from interactions of the type p + p → p + X + p, where the two outgoing protons are scattered in the very forward directions. The fast timing detector uses fused silica (quartz) bars that emit Cherenkov radiation as a relativistic particle passes through and the emitted Cherenkov photons are detected by, for instance, a micro-channel plate multi-anode Photomultiplier Tube (MCP-PMT). Several possible designs are implemented in Geant4 and studied for timing optimization as a function of the arrival time, and the number of Cherenkov photons reaching the photo-sensor.