Science.gov

Sample records for 3d tracking microscope

  1. Spatial light modulation for improved microscope stereo vision and 3D tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Michael P.; Gibson, Graham; Tassieri, Manlio; Phillips, Dave; Bernet, Stefan; Ritsh-Marte, Monika; Padgett, Miles J.

    2013-09-01

    We present a new type of stereo microscopy which can be used for tracking in 3D over an extended depth. The use of Spatial Light Modulators (SLMs) in the Fourier plane of a microscope sample is a common technique in Holographic Optical Tweezers (HOT). This set up is readily transferable from a tweezer system to an imaging system, where the tweezing laser is replaced with a camera. Just as a HOT system can diffract many traps of different types, in the imaging system many different imaging types can be diffracted with the SLM. The type of imaging we have developed is stereo imaging combined with lens correction. This approach has similarities with human vision where each eye has a lens, and it also extends the depth over which we can accurately track particles.

  2. High-throughput 3D tracking of bacteria on a standard phase contrast microscope

    PubMed Central

    Taute, K.M.; Gude, S.; Tans, S.J.; Shimizu, T.S.

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria employ diverse motility patterns in traversing complex three-dimensional (3D) natural habitats. 2D microscopy misses crucial features of 3D behaviour, but the applicability of existing 3D tracking techniques is constrained by their performance or ease of use. Here we present a simple, broadly applicable, high-throughput 3D bacterial tracking method for use in standard phase contrast microscopy. Bacteria are localized at micron-scale resolution over a range of 350 × 300 × 200 μm by maximizing image cross-correlations between their observed diffraction patterns and a reference library. We demonstrate the applicability of our technique to a range of bacterial species and exploit its high throughput to expose hidden contributions of bacterial individuality to population-level variability in motile behaviour. The simplicity of this powerful new tool for bacterial motility research renders 3D tracking accessible to a wider community and paves the way for investigations of bacterial motility in complex 3D environments. PMID:26522289

  3. 3D tracking and phase-contrast imaging by twin-beams digital holographic microscope in microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miccio, L.; Memmolo, P.; Finizio, A.; Paturzo, M.; Merola, F.; Grilli, S.; Ferraro, P.

    2012-06-01

    A compact twin-beam interferometer that can be adopted as a flexible diagnostic tool in microfluidic platforms is presented. The devise has two functionalities, as explained in the follow, and can be easily integrated in microfluidic chip. The configuration allows 3D tracking of micro-particles and, at same time, furnishes Quantitative Phase-Contrast maps of tracked micro-objects by interference microscopy. Experimental demonstration of its effectiveness and compatibility with biological field is given on for in vitro cells in microfluidic environment. Nowadays, several microfluidic configuration exist and many of them are commercially available, their development is due to the possibility for manipulating droplets, handling micro and nano-objects, visualize and quantify processes occurring in small volumes and, clearly, for direct applications on lab-on-a chip devices. In microfluidic research field, optical/photonics approaches are the more suitable ones because they have various advantages as to be non-contact, full-field, non-invasive and can be packaged thanks to the development of integrable optics. Moreover, phase contrast approaches, adapted to a lab-on-a-chip configurations, give the possibility to get quantitative information with remarkable lateral and vertical resolution directly in situ without the need to dye and/or kill cells. Furthermore, numerical techniques for tracking of micro-objects needs to be developed for measuring velocity fields, trajectories patterns, motility of cancer cell and so on. Here, we present a compact holographic microscope that can ensure, by the same configuration and simultaneously, accurate 3D tracking and quantitative phase-contrast analysis. The system, simple and solid, is based on twin laser beams coming from a single laser source. Through a easy conceptual design, we show how these two different functionalities can be accomplished by the same optical setup. The working principle, the optical setup and the mathematical

  4. Robust and highly performant ring detection algorithm for 3d particle tracking using 2d microscope imaging

    PubMed Central

    Afik, Eldad

    2015-01-01

    Three-dimensional particle tracking is an essential tool in studying dynamics under the microscope, namely, fluid dynamics in microfluidic devices, bacteria taxis, cellular trafficking. The 3d position can be determined using 2d imaging alone by measuring the diffraction rings generated by an out-of-focus fluorescent particle, imaged on a single camera. Here I present a ring detection algorithm exhibiting a high detection rate, which is robust to the challenges arising from ring occlusion, inclusions and overlaps, and allows resolving particles even when near to each other. It is capable of real time analysis thanks to its high performance and low memory footprint. The proposed algorithm, an offspring of the circle Hough transform, addresses the need to efficiently trace the trajectories of many particles concurrently, when their number in not necessarily fixed, by solving a classification problem, and overcomes the challenges of finding local maxima in the complex parameter space which results from ring clusters and noise. Several algorithmic concepts introduced here can be advantageous in other cases, particularly when dealing with noisy and sparse data. The implementation is based on open-source and cross-platform software packages only, making it easy to distribute and modify. It is implemented in a microfluidic experiment allowing real-time multi-particle tracking at 70 Hz, achieving a detection rate which exceeds 94% and only 1% false-detection. PMID:26329642

  5. Miniaturized 3D microscope imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Yung-Sung; Chang, Chir-Weei; Sung, Hsin-Yueh; Wang, Yen-Chang; Chang, Cheng-Yi

    2015-05-01

    We designed and assembled a portable 3-D miniature microscopic image system with the size of 35x35x105 mm3 . By integrating a microlens array (MLA) into the optical train of a handheld microscope, the biological specimen's image will be captured for ease of use in a single shot. With the light field raw data and program, the focal plane can be changed digitally and the 3-D image can be reconstructed after the image was taken. To localize an object in a 3-D volume, an automated data analysis algorithm to precisely distinguish profundity position is needed. The ability to create focal stacks from a single image allows moving or specimens to be recorded. Applying light field microscope algorithm to these focal stacks, a set of cross sections will be produced, which can be visualized using 3-D rendering. Furthermore, we have developed a series of design rules in order to enhance the pixel using efficiency and reduce the crosstalk between each microlens for obtain good image quality. In this paper, we demonstrate a handheld light field microscope (HLFM) to distinguish two different color fluorescence particles separated by a cover glass in a 600um range, show its focal stacks, and 3-D position.

  6. Electrically tunable lens speeds up 3D orbital tracking

    PubMed Central

    Annibale, Paolo; Dvornikov, Alexander; Gratton, Enrico

    2015-01-01

    3D orbital particle tracking is a versatile and effective microscopy technique that allows following fast moving fluorescent objects within living cells and reconstructing complex 3D shapes using laser scanning microscopes. We demonstrated notable improvements in the range, speed and accuracy of 3D orbital particle tracking by replacing commonly used piezoelectric stages with Electrically Tunable Lens (ETL) that eliminates mechanical movement of objective lenses. This allowed tracking and reconstructing shape of structures extending 500 microns in the axial direction. Using the ETL, we tracked at high speed fluorescently labeled genomic loci within the nucleus of living cells with unprecedented temporal resolution of 8ms using a 1.42NA oil-immersion objective. The presented technology is cost effective and allows easy upgrade of scanning microscopes for fast 3D orbital tracking. PMID:26114037

  7. 3D printing of microscopic bacterial communities

    PubMed Central

    Connell, Jodi L.; Ritschdorff, Eric T.; Whiteley, Marvin; Shear, Jason B.

    2013-01-01

    Bacteria communicate via short-range physical and chemical signals, interactions known to mediate quorum sensing, sporulation, and other adaptive phenotypes. Although most in vitro studies examine bacterial properties averaged over large populations, the levels of key molecular determinants of bacterial fitness and pathogenicity (e.g., oxygen, quorum-sensing signals) may vary over micrometer scales within small, dense cellular aggregates believed to play key roles in disease transmission. A detailed understanding of how cell–cell interactions contribute to pathogenicity in natural, complex environments will require a new level of control in constructing more relevant cellular models for assessing bacterial phenotypes. Here, we describe a microscopic three-dimensional (3D) printing strategy that enables multiple populations of bacteria to be organized within essentially any 3D geometry, including adjacent, nested, and free-floating colonies. In this laser-based lithographic technique, microscopic containers are formed around selected bacteria suspended in gelatin via focal cross-linking of polypeptide molecules. After excess reagent is removed, trapped bacteria are localized within sealed cavities formed by the cross-linked gelatin, a highly porous material that supports rapid growth of fully enclosed cellular populations and readily transmits numerous biologically active species, including polypeptides, antibiotics, and quorum-sensing signals. Using this approach, we show that a picoliter-volume aggregate of Staphylococcus aureus can display substantial resistance to β-lactam antibiotics by enclosure within a shell composed of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. PMID:24101503

  8. 3D Printed Microscope for Mobile Devices that Cost Pennies

    ScienceCinema

    Erikson, Rebecca; Baird, Cheryl; Hutchinson, Janine

    2016-07-12

    Scientists at PNNL have designed a 3D-printable microscope for mobile devices using pennies worth of plastic and glass materials. The microscope has a wide range of uses, from education to in-the-field science.

  9. 3D Printed Microscope for Mobile Devices that Cost Pennies

    SciTech Connect

    Erikson, Rebecca; Baird, Cheryl; Hutchinson, Janine

    2014-09-15

    Scientists at PNNL have designed a 3D-printable microscope for mobile devices using pennies worth of plastic and glass materials. The microscope has a wide range of uses, from education to in-the-field science.

  10. 3-D model-based vehicle tracking.

    PubMed

    Lou, Jianguang; Tan, Tieniu; Hu, Weiming; Yang, Hao; Maybank, Steven J

    2005-10-01

    This paper aims at tracking vehicles from monocular intensity image sequences and presents an efficient and robust approach to three-dimensional (3-D) model-based vehicle tracking. Under the weak perspective assumption and the ground-plane constraint, the movements of model projection in the two-dimensional image plane can be decomposed into two motions: translation and rotation. They are the results of the corresponding movements of 3-D translation on the ground plane (GP) and rotation around the normal of the GP, which can be determined separately. A new metric based on point-to-line segment distance is proposed to evaluate the similarity between an image region and an instantiation of a 3-D vehicle model under a given pose. Based on this, we provide an efficient pose refinement method to refine the vehicle's pose parameters. An improved EKF is also proposed to track and to predict vehicle motion with a precise kinematics model. Experimental results with both indoor and outdoor data show that the algorithm obtains desirable performance even under severe occlusion and clutter.

  11. 3-D model-based vehicle tracking.

    PubMed

    Lou, Jianguang; Tan, Tieniu; Hu, Weiming; Yang, Hao; Maybank, Steven J

    2005-10-01

    This paper aims at tracking vehicles from monocular intensity image sequences and presents an efficient and robust approach to three-dimensional (3-D) model-based vehicle tracking. Under the weak perspective assumption and the ground-plane constraint, the movements of model projection in the two-dimensional image plane can be decomposed into two motions: translation and rotation. They are the results of the corresponding movements of 3-D translation on the ground plane (GP) and rotation around the normal of the GP, which can be determined separately. A new metric based on point-to-line segment distance is proposed to evaluate the similarity between an image region and an instantiation of a 3-D vehicle model under a given pose. Based on this, we provide an efficient pose refinement method to refine the vehicle's pose parameters. An improved EKF is also proposed to track and to predict vehicle motion with a precise kinematics model. Experimental results with both indoor and outdoor data show that the algorithm obtains desirable performance even under severe occlusion and clutter. PMID:16238061

  12. Light driven micro-robotics with holographic 3D tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glückstad, Jesper

    2016-04-01

    We recently pioneered the concept of light-driven micro-robotics including the new and disruptive 3D-printed micro-tools coined Wave-guided Optical Waveguides that can be real-time optically trapped and "remote-controlled" in a volume with six-degrees-of-freedom. To be exploring the full potential of this new drone-like 3D light robotics approach in challenging microscopic geometries requires a versatile and real-time reconfigurable light coupling that can dynamically track a plurality of "light robots" in 3D to ensure continuous optimal light coupling on the fly. Our latest developments in this new and exciting area will be reviewed in this invited paper.

  13. 3D imaging of neutron tracks using confocal microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillmore, Gavin; Wertheim, David; Flowers, Alan

    2016-04-01

    Neutron detection and neutron flux assessment are important aspects in monitoring nuclear energy production. Neutron flux measurements can also provide information on potential biological damage from exposure. In addition to the applications for neutron measurement in nuclear energy, neutron detection has been proposed as a method of enhancing neutrino detectors and cosmic ray flux has also been assessed using ground-level neutron detectors. Solid State Nuclear Track Detectors (or SSNTDs) have been used extensively to examine cosmic rays, long-lived radioactive elements, radon concentrations in buildings and the age of geological samples. Passive SSNTDs consisting of a CR-39 plastic are commonly used to measure radon because they respond to incident charged particles such as alpha particles from radon gas in air. They have a large dynamic range and a linear flux response. We have previously applied confocal microscopy to obtain 3D images of alpha particle tracks in SSNTDs from radon track monitoring (1). As a charged particle traverses through the polymer it creates an ionisation trail along its path. The trail or track is normally enhanced by chemical etching to better expose radiation damage, as the damaged area is more sensitive to the etchant than the bulk material. Particle tracks in CR-39 are usually assessed using 2D optical microscopy. In this study 6 detectors were examined using an Olympus OLS4100 LEXT 3D laser scanning confocal microscope (Olympus Corporation, Japan). The detectors had been etched for 2 hours 50 minutes at 85 °C in 6.25M NaOH. Post etch the plastics had been treated with a 10 minute immersion in a 2% acetic acid stop bath, followed by rinsing in deionised water. The detectors examined had been irradiated with a 2mSv neutron dose from an Am(Be) neutron source (producing roughly 20 tracks per mm2). We were able to successfully acquire 3D images of neutron tracks in the detectors studied. The range of track diameter observed was between 4

  14. 3-D imaging of particle tracks in solid state nuclear track detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wertheim, D.; Gillmore, G.; Brown, L.; Petford, N.

    2010-05-01

    It has been suggested that 3 to 5% of total lung cancer deaths in the UK may be associated with elevated radon concentration. Radon gas levels can be assessed using CR-39 plastic detectors which are often assessed by 2-D image analysis of surface images. 3-D analysis has the potential to provide information relating to the angle at which alpha particles impinge on the detector. In this study we used a "LEXT" OLS3100 confocal laser scanning microscope (Olympus Corporation, Tokyo, Japan) to image tracks on five CR-39 detectors. We were able to identify several patterns of single and coalescing tracks from 3-D visualisation. Thus this method may provide a means of detailed 3-D analysis of Solid State Nuclear Track Detectors.

  15. 3D visualisation and analysis of single and coalescing tracks in Solid state Nuclear Track Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wertheim, David; Gillmore, Gavin; Brown, Louise; Petford, Nick

    2010-05-01

    Exposure to radon gas (222Rn) and associated ionising decay products can cause lung cancer in humans (1). Solid state Nuclear Track Detectors (SSNTDs) can be used to monitor radon concentrations (2). Radon particles form tracks in the detectors and these tracks can be etched in order to enable 2D surface image analysis. We have previously shown that confocal microscopy can be used for 3D visualisation of etched SSNTDs (3). The aim of the study was to further investigate track angles and patterns in SSNTDs. A 'LEXT' confocal laser scanning microscope (Olympus Corporation, Japan) was used to acquire 3D image datasets of five CR-39 plastic SSNTD's. The resultant 3D visualisations were analysed by eye and inclination angles assessed on selected tracks. From visual assessment, single isolated tracks as well as coalescing tracks were observed on the etched detectors. In addition varying track inclination angles were observed. Several different patterns of track formation were seen such as single isolated and double coalescing tracks. The observed track angles of inclination may help to assess the angle at which alpha particles hit the detector. Darby, S et al. Radon in homes and risk of lung cancer : collaborative analysis of individual data from 13 European case-control studies. British Medical Journal 2005; 330, 223-226. Phillips, P.S., Denman, A.R., Crockett, R.G.M., Gillmore, G., Groves-Kirkby, C.J., Woolridge, A., Comparative Analysis of Weekly vs. Three monthly radon measurements in dwellings. DEFRA Report No., DEFRA/RAS/03.006. (2004). Wertheim D, Gillmore G, Brown L, and Petford N. A new method of imaging particle tracks in Solid State Nuclear Track Detectors. Journal of Microscopy 2010; 237: 1-6.

  16. Scanning Acoustic Microscope of 3D-Interconnect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wai Kong, Lay; Diebold, A. C.; Rudack, A.; Arkalgud, S.

    2009-09-01

    The College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering of the University at Albany in collaboration with International SEMATECH is investigating the use of Scanning Acoustic Microscope (SAM) for analyzing 3D Interconnects. SAM is a non-destructive metrology technique which utilizes high frequency ultrasound to generate a microscopic image of the internal parts of a specimen. The goal of this project is to develop microscopic techniques for evaluating Through-Silicon Vias (TSVs) for 3D-Interconnects. Preliminary data shows voids and other defects in the interface between bonded wafers as shown in Figure 1. Our SAM laboratory system operates at 230 MHz and has a spatial resolution of 5-10 μm and focal length of 5.9 mm on a silicon wafer. The spatial resolution and sampling depth depend on the ultrasonic frequency, sound velocity, focal length and diameter of piezoelectric crystal. Typically, the silicon wafers have a thickness of 775 μm before they are bonded. Our initial work is focused on blanket wafers in order to develop the bonding process. The next step is to bond wafers with test die where the patterning obscures the interface. This paper will discuss the limitations of SAM and compare it to infrared microscopy which is another important imaging capability for 3D Interconnect. We also discuss the current status of research into more advanced acoustic microscopy methods and how this might impact 3D Interconnect imaging.

  17. 3D imaging of particle tracks in Solid State Nuclear Track Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wertheim, D.; Gillmore, G.; Brown, L.; Petford, N.

    2009-04-01

    Inhalation of radon gas (222Rn) and associated ionizing decay products is known to cause lung cancer in human. In the U.K., it has been suggested that 3 to 5 % of total lung cancer deaths can be linked to elevated radon concentrations in the home and/or workplace. Radon monitoring in buildings is therefore routinely undertaken in areas of known risk. Indeed, some organisations such as the Radon Council in the UK and the Environmental Protection Agency in the USA, advocate a ‘to test is best' policy. Radon gas occurs naturally, emanating from the decay of 238U in rock and soils. Its concentration can be measured using CR?39 plastic detectors which conventionally are assessed by 2D image analysis of the surface; however there can be some variation in outcomes / readings even in closely spaced detectors. A number of radon measurement methods are currently in use (for examples, activated carbon and electrets) but the most widely used are CR?39 solid state nuclear track?etch detectors (SSNTDs). In this technique, heavily ionizing alpha particles leave tracks in the form of radiation damage (via interaction between alpha particles and the atoms making up the CR?39 polymer). 3D imaging of the tracks has the potential to provide information relating to angle and energy of alpha particles but this could be time consuming. Here we describe a new method for rapid high resolution 3D imaging of SSNTDs. A ‘LEXT' OLS3100 confocal laser scanning microscope was used in confocal mode to successfully obtain 3D image data on four CR?39 plastic detectors. 3D visualisation and image analysis enabled characterisation of track features. This method may provide a means of rapid and detailed 3D analysis of SSNTDs. Keywords: Radon; SSNTDs; confocal laser scanning microscope; 3D imaging; LEXT

  18. Single 3D cell segmentation from optical CT microscope images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Yiting; Reeves, Anthony P.

    2014-03-01

    The automated segmentation of the nucleus and cytoplasm regions in 3D optical CT microscope images has been achieved with two methods, a global threshold gradient based approach and a graph-cut approach. For the first method, the first two peaks of a gradient figure of merit curve are selected as the thresholds for cytoplasm and nucleus segmentation. The second method applies a graph-cut segmentation twice: the first identifies the nucleus region and the second identifies the cytoplasm region. Image segmentation of single cells is important for automated disease diagnostic systems. The segmentation methods were evaluated with 200 3D images consisting of 40 samples of 5 different cell types. The cell types consisted of columnar, macrophage, metaplastic and squamous human cells and cultured A549 cancer cells. The segmented cells were compared with both 2D and 3D reference images and the quality of segmentation was determined by the Dice Similarity Coefficient (DSC). In general, the graph-cut method had a superior performance to the gradient-based method. The graph-cut method achieved an average DSC of 86% and 72% for nucleus and cytoplasm segmentations respectively for the 2D reference images and 83% and 75% for the 3D reference images. The gradient method achieved an average DSC of 72% and 51% for nucleus and cytoplasm segmentation for the 2D reference images and 71% and 51% for the 3D reference images. The DSC of cytoplasm segmentation was significantly lower than for the nucleus since the cytoplasm was not differentiated as well by image intensity from the background.

  19. Temporal tracking of 3D coronary arteries in projection angiograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shechter, Guy; Devernay, Frederic; Coste-Maniere, Eve; McVeigh, Elliot R.

    2002-05-01

    A method for 3D temporal tracking of a 3D coronary tree model through a sequence of biplane cineangiography images has been developed. A registration framework is formulated in which the coronary tree centerline model deforms in an external potential field defined by a multiscale analysis response map computed from the angiogram images. To constrain the procedure and to improve convergence, a set of three motion models is hierarchically used: a 3D rigid-body transformation, a 3D affine transformation, and a 3D B-spline deformation field. This 3D motion tracking approach has significant advantages over 2D methods: (1) coherent deformation of a single 3D coronary reconstruction preserves the topology of the arterial tree; (2) constraints on arterial length and regularity, which lack meaning in 2D projection space, are directly applicable in 3D; and (3) tracking arterial segments through occlusions and crossings in the projection images is simplified with knowledge of the 3D relationship of the arteries. The method has been applied to patient data and results are presented.

  20. 3-D rigid body tracking using vision and depth sensors.

    PubMed

    Gedik, O Serdar; Alatan, A Aydn

    2013-10-01

    In robotics and augmented reality applications, model-based 3-D tracking of rigid objects is generally required. With the help of accurate pose estimates, it is required to increase reliability and decrease jitter in total. Among many solutions of pose estimation in the literature, pure vision-based 3-D trackers require either manual initializations or offline training stages. On the other hand, trackers relying on pure depth sensors are not suitable for AR applications. An automated 3-D tracking algorithm, which is based on fusion of vision and depth sensors via extended Kalman filter, is proposed in this paper. A novel measurement-tracking scheme, which is based on estimation of optical flow using intensity and shape index map data of 3-D point cloud, increases 2-D, as well as 3-D, tracking performance significantly. The proposed method requires neither manual initialization of pose nor offline training, while enabling highly accurate 3-D tracking. The accuracy of the proposed method is tested against a number of conventional techniques, and a superior performance is clearly observed in terms of both objectively via error metrics and subjectively for the rendered scenes. PMID:23955795

  1. 3-D rigid body tracking using vision and depth sensors.

    PubMed

    Gedik, O Serdar; Alatan, A Aydn

    2013-10-01

    In robotics and augmented reality applications, model-based 3-D tracking of rigid objects is generally required. With the help of accurate pose estimates, it is required to increase reliability and decrease jitter in total. Among many solutions of pose estimation in the literature, pure vision-based 3-D trackers require either manual initializations or offline training stages. On the other hand, trackers relying on pure depth sensors are not suitable for AR applications. An automated 3-D tracking algorithm, which is based on fusion of vision and depth sensors via extended Kalman filter, is proposed in this paper. A novel measurement-tracking scheme, which is based on estimation of optical flow using intensity and shape index map data of 3-D point cloud, increases 2-D, as well as 3-D, tracking performance significantly. The proposed method requires neither manual initialization of pose nor offline training, while enabling highly accurate 3-D tracking. The accuracy of the proposed method is tested against a number of conventional techniques, and a superior performance is clearly observed in terms of both objectively via error metrics and subjectively for the rendered scenes.

  2. 3D guide wire tracking for navigation in endovascular interventions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baert, Shirley A.; van Walsum, Theo; Niessen, Wiro J.

    2004-05-01

    A method is presented to track the guide wire during endovascular interventions and to visualize it in 3D, together with the vasculature of the patient. The guide wire is represented by a 3D spline whose position is optimized using internal and external forces. For the external forces, the 3D spline is projected onto the biplane projection images that are routinely acquired. Feature images are constructed based on the enhancement of line-like structures in the projection images. A threshold is applied to this image such that if the probability of a pixel to be part of the guide wire is sufficiently high this feature image is used, whereas outside this region a distance transform is computed to improve the capture range of the method. In preliminary experiments, it is shown that some of the problems of the 2D tracking which where presented in previous work can successfully be circumvented using the 3D tracking method.

  3. Holographic microscopy for 3D tracking of bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadeau, Jay; Cho, Yong Bin; El-Kholy, Marwan; Bedrossian, Manuel; Rider, Stephanie; Lindensmith, Christian; Wallace, J. Kent

    2016-03-01

    Understanding when, how, and if bacteria swim is key to understanding critical ecological and biological processes, from carbon cycling to infection. Imaging motility by traditional light microscopy is limited by focus depth, requiring cells to be constrained in z. Holographic microscopy offers an instantaneous 3D snapshot of a large sample volume, and is therefore ideal in principle for quantifying unconstrained bacterial motility. However, resolving and tracking individual cells is difficult due to the low amplitude and phase contrast of the cells; the index of refraction of typical bacteria differs from that of water only at the second decimal place. In this work we present a combination of optical and sample-handling approaches to facilitating bacterial tracking by holographic phase imaging. The first is the design of the microscope, which is an off-axis design with the optics along a common path, which minimizes alignment issues while providing all of the advantages of off-axis holography. Second, we use anti-reflective coated etalon glass in the design of sample chambers, which reduce internal reflections. Improvement seen with the antireflective coating is seen primarily in phase imaging, and its quantification is presented here. Finally, dyes may be used to increase phase contrast according to the Kramers-Kronig relations. Results using three test strains are presented, illustrating the different types of bacterial motility characterized by an enteric organism (Escherichia coli), an environmental organism (Bacillus subtilis), and a marine organism (Vibrio alginolyticus). Data processing steps to increase the quality of the phase images and facilitate tracking are also discussed.

  4. Automatic respiration tracking for radiotherapy using optical 3D camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Tuotuo; Geng, Jason; Li, Shidong

    2013-03-01

    Rapid optical three-dimensional (O3D) imaging systems provide accurate digitized 3D surface data in real-time, with no patient contact nor radiation. The accurate 3D surface images offer crucial information in image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) treatments for accurate patient repositioning and respiration management. However, applications of O3D imaging techniques to image-guided radiotherapy have been clinically challenged by body deformation, pathological and anatomical variations among individual patients, extremely high dimensionality of the 3D surface data, and irregular respiration motion. In existing clinical radiation therapy (RT) procedures target displacements are caused by (1) inter-fractional anatomy changes due to weight, swell, food/water intake; (2) intra-fractional variations from anatomy changes within any treatment session due to voluntary/involuntary physiologic processes (e.g. respiration, muscle relaxation); (3) patient setup misalignment in daily reposition due to user errors; and (4) changes of marker or positioning device, etc. Presently, viable solution is lacking for in-vivo tracking of target motion and anatomy changes during the beam-on time without exposing patient with additional ionized radiation or high magnet field. Current O3D-guided radiotherapy systems relay on selected points or areas in the 3D surface to track surface motion. The configuration of the marks or areas may change with time that makes it inconsistent in quantifying and interpreting the respiration patterns. To meet the challenge of performing real-time respiration tracking using O3D imaging technology in IGRT, we propose a new approach to automatic respiration motion analysis based on linear dimensionality reduction technique based on PCA (principle component analysis). Optical 3D image sequence is decomposed with principle component analysis into a limited number of independent (orthogonal) motion patterns (a low dimension eigen-space span by eigen-vectors). New

  5. A new 3D tracking method exploiting the capabilities of digital holography in microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miccio, L.; Memmolo, P.; Merola, F.; Fusco, S.; Embrione, V.; Netti, P. A.; Ferraro, P.

    2013-04-01

    A method for 3D tracking has been developed exploiting Digital Holographic Microscopy (DHM) features. In the framework of self-consistent platform for manipulation and measurement of biological specimen we use DHM for quantitative and completely label free analysis of specimen with low amplitude contrast. Tracking capability extend the potentiality of DHM allowing to monitor the motion of appropriate probes and correlate it with sample properties. Complete 3D tracking has been obtained for the probes avoiding the issue of amplitude refocusing in traditional tracking processing. Our technique belongs to the video tracking methods that, conversely from Quadrant Photo-Diode method, opens the possibility to track multiples probes. All the common used video tracking algorithms are based on the numerical analysis of amplitude images in the focus plane and the shift of the maxima in the image plane are measured after the application of an appropriate threshold. Our approach for video tracking uses different theoretical basis. A set of interferograms is recorded and the complex wavefields are managed numerically to obtain three dimensional displacements of the probes. The procedure works properly on an higher number of probes and independently from their size. This method overcomes the traditional video tracking issues as the inability to measure the axial movement and the choice of suitable threshold mask. The novel configuration allows 3D tracking of micro-particles and simultaneously can furnish Quantitative Phase-contrast maps of tracked micro-objects by interference microscopy, without changing the configuration. In this paper, we show a new concept for a compact interferometric microscope that can ensure the multifunctionality, accomplishing accurate 3D tracking and quantitative phase-contrast analysis. Experimental results are presented and discussed for in vitro cells. Through a very simple and compact optical arrangement we show how two different functionalities

  6. Inverse Tomo-Lithography for Making Microscopic 3D Parts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Victor; Wiberg, Dean

    2003-01-01

    According to a proposal, basic x-ray lithography would be extended to incorporate a technique, called inverse tomography, that would enable the fabrication of microscopic three-dimensional (3D) objects. The proposed inverse tomo-lithographic process would make it possible to produce complex shaped, submillimeter-sized parts that would be difficult or impossible to make in any other way. Examples of such shapes or parts include tapered helices, paraboloids with axes of different lengths, and even Archimedean screws that could serve as rotors in microturbines. The proposed inverse tomo-lithographic process would be based partly on a prior microfabrication process known by the German acronym LIGA (lithographie, galvanoformung, abformung, which means lithography, electroforming, molding). In LIGA, one generates a precise, high-aspect ratio pattern by exposing a thick, x-ray-sensitive resist material to an x-ray beam through a mask that contains the pattern. One can electrodeposit metal into the developed resist pattern to form a precise metal part, then dissolve the resist to free the metal. Aspect ratios of 100:1 and patterns into resist thicknesses of several millimeters are possible.

  7. Monocular 3-D gait tracking in surveillance scenes.

    PubMed

    Rogez, Grégory; Rihan, Jonathan; Guerrero, Jose J; Orrite, Carlos

    2014-06-01

    Gait recognition can potentially provide a noninvasive and effective biometric authentication from a distance. However, the performance of gait recognition systems will suffer in real surveillance scenarios with multiple interacting individuals and where the camera is usually placed at a significant angle and distance from the floor. We present a methodology for view-invariant monocular 3-D human pose tracking in man-made environments in which we assume that observed people move on a known ground plane. First, we model 3-D body poses and camera viewpoints with a low dimensional manifold and learn a generative model of the silhouette from this manifold to a reduced set of training views. During the online stage, 3-D body poses are tracked using recursive Bayesian sampling conducted jointly over the scene's ground plane and the pose-viewpoint manifold. For each sample, the homography that relates the corresponding training plane to the image points is calculated using the dominant 3-D directions of the scene, the sampled location on the ground plane and the sampled camera view. Each regressed silhouette shape is projected using this homographic transformation and is matched in the image to estimate its likelihood. Our framework is able to track 3-D human walking poses in a 3-D environment exploring only a 4-D state space with success. In our experimental evaluation, we demonstrate the significant improvements of the homographic alignment over a commonly used similarity transformation and provide quantitative pose tracking results for the monocular sequences with a high perspective effect from the CAVIAR dataset. PMID:23955796

  8. Linear tracking for 3-D medical ultrasound imaging.

    PubMed

    Huang, Qing-Hua; Yang, Zhao; Hu, Wei; Jin, Lian-Wen; Wei, Gang; Li, Xuelong

    2013-12-01

    As the clinical application grows, there is a rapid technical development of 3-D ultrasound imaging. Compared with 2-D ultrasound imaging, 3-D ultrasound imaging can provide improved qualitative and quantitative information for various clinical applications. In this paper, we proposed a novel tracking method for a freehand 3-D ultrasound imaging system with improved portability, reduced degree of freedom, and cost. We designed a sliding track with a linear position sensor attached, and it transmitted positional data via a wireless communication module based on Bluetooth, resulting in a wireless spatial tracking modality. A traditional 2-D ultrasound probe fixed to the position sensor on the sliding track was used to obtain real-time B-scans, and the positions of the B-scans were simultaneously acquired when moving the probe along the track in a freehand manner. In the experiments, the proposed method was applied to ultrasound phantoms and real human tissues. The results demonstrated that the new system outperformed a previously developed freehand system based on a traditional six-degree-of-freedom spatial sensor in phantom and in vivo studies, indicating its merit in clinical applications for human tissues and organs. PMID:23757592

  9. Note: Time-gated 3D single quantum dot tracking with simultaneous spinning disk imaging

    SciTech Connect

    DeVore, M. S.; Stich, D. G.; Keller, A. M.; Phipps, M. E.; Hollingsworth, J. A.; Goodwin, P. M.; Werner, J. H.; Cleyrat, C.; Lidke, D. S.; Wilson, B. S.

    2015-12-15

    We describe recent upgrades to a 3D tracking microscope to include simultaneous Nipkow spinning disk imaging and time-gated single-particle tracking (SPT). Simultaneous 3D molecular tracking and spinning disk imaging enable the visualization of cellular structures and proteins around a given fluorescently labeled target molecule. The addition of photon time-gating to the SPT hardware improves signal to noise by discriminating against Raman scattering and short-lived fluorescence. In contrast to camera-based SPT, single-photon arrival times are recorded, enabling time-resolved spectroscopy (e.g., measurement of fluorescence lifetimes and photon correlations) to be performed during single molecule/particle tracking experiments.

  10. Note: Time-gated 3D single quantum dot tracking with simultaneous spinning disk imaging.

    PubMed

    DeVore, M S; Stich, D G; Keller, A M; Cleyrat, C; Phipps, M E; Hollingsworth, J A; Lidke, D S; Wilson, B S; Goodwin, P M; Werner, J H

    2015-12-01

    We describe recent upgrades to a 3D tracking microscope to include simultaneous Nipkow spinning disk imaging and time-gated single-particle tracking (SPT). Simultaneous 3D molecular tracking and spinning disk imaging enable the visualization of cellular structures and proteins around a given fluorescently labeled target molecule. The addition of photon time-gating to the SPT hardware improves signal to noise by discriminating against Raman scattering and short-lived fluorescence. In contrast to camera-based SPT, single-photon arrival times are recorded, enabling time-resolved spectroscopy (e.g., measurement of fluorescence lifetimes and photon correlations) to be performed during single molecule/particle tracking experiments.

  11. A 3D diamond detector for particle tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachmair, F.; Bäni, L.; Bergonzo, P.; Caylar, B.; Forcolin, G.; Haughton, I.; Hits, D.; Kagan, H.; Kass, R.; Li, L.; Oh, A.; Phan, S.; Pomorski, M.; Smith, D. S.; Tyzhnevyi, V.; Wallny, R.; Whitehead, D.

    2015-06-01

    A novel device using single-crystal chemical vapour deposited diamond and resistive electrodes in the bulk forming a 3D diamond detector is presented. The electrodes of the device were fabricated with laser assisted phase change of diamond into a combination of diamond-like carbon, amorphous carbon and graphite. The connections to the electrodes of the device were made using a photo-lithographic process. The electrical and particle detection properties of the device were investigated. A prototype detector system consisting of the 3D device connected to a multi-channel readout was successfully tested with 120 GeV protons proving the feasibility of the 3D diamond detector concept for particle tracking applications for the first time.

  12. Speeding up 3D speckle tracking using PatchMatch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zontak, Maria; O'Donnell, Matthew

    2016-03-01

    Echocardiography provides valuable information to diagnose heart dysfunction. A typical exam records several minutes of real-time cardiac images. To enable complete analysis of 3D cardiac strains, 4-D (3-D+t) echocardiography is used. This results in a huge dataset and requires effective automated analysis. Ultrasound speckle tracking is an effective method for tissue motion analysis. It involves correlation of a 3D kernel (block) around a voxel with kernels in later frames. The search region is usually confined to a local neighborhood, due to biomechanical and computational constraints. For high strains and moderate frame-rates, however, this search region will remain large, leading to a considerable computational burden. Moreover, speckle decorrelation (due to high strains) leads to errors in tracking. To solve this, spatial motion coherency between adjacent voxels should be imposed, e.g., by averaging their correlation functions.1 This requires storing correlation functions for neighboring voxels, thus increasing memory demands. In this work, we propose an efficient search using PatchMatch, 2 a powerful method to find correspondences between images. Here we adopt PatchMatch for 3D volumes and radio-frequency signals. As opposed to an exact search, PatchMatch performs random sampling of the search region and propagates successive matches among neighboring voxels. We show that: 1) Inherently smooth offset propagation in PatchMatch contributes to spatial motion coherence without any additional processing or memory demand. 2) For typical scenarios, PatchMatch is at least 20 times faster than the exact search, while maintaining comparable tracking accuracy.

  13. Improving z-tracking accuracy in the two-photon single-particle tracking microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, C.; Liu, Y.-L.; Perillo, E. P.; Jiang, N.; Dunn, A. K.; Yeh, H.-C.

    2015-10-01

    Here, we present a method that can improve the z-tracking accuracy of the recently invented TSUNAMI (Tracking of Single particles Using Nonlinear And Multiplexed Illumination) microscope. This method utilizes a maximum likelihood estimator (MLE) to determine the particle's 3D position that maximizes the likelihood of the observed time-correlated photon count distribution. Our Monte Carlo simulations show that the MLE-based tracking scheme can improve the z-tracking accuracy of TSUNAMI microscope by 1.7 fold. In addition, MLE is also found to reduce the temporal correlation of the z-tracking error. Taking advantage of the smaller and less temporally correlated z-tracking error, we have precisely recovered the hybridization-melting kinetics of a DNA model system from thousands of short single-particle trajectories in silico. Our method can be generally applied to other 3D single-particle tracking techniques.

  14. Improving z-tracking accuracy in the two-photon single-particle tracking microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, C.; Liu, Y.-L.; Perillo, E. P.; Jiang, N.; Dunn, A. K. E-mail: tim.yeh@austin.utexas.edu; Yeh, H.-C. E-mail: tim.yeh@austin.utexas.edu

    2015-10-12

    Here, we present a method that can improve the z-tracking accuracy of the recently invented TSUNAMI (Tracking of Single particles Using Nonlinear And Multiplexed Illumination) microscope. This method utilizes a maximum likelihood estimator (MLE) to determine the particle's 3D position that maximizes the likelihood of the observed time-correlated photon count distribution. Our Monte Carlo simulations show that the MLE-based tracking scheme can improve the z-tracking accuracy of TSUNAMI microscope by 1.7 fold. In addition, MLE is also found to reduce the temporal correlation of the z-tracking error. Taking advantage of the smaller and less temporally correlated z-tracking error, we have precisely recovered the hybridization-melting kinetics of a DNA model system from thousands of short single-particle trajectories in silico. Our method can be generally applied to other 3D single-particle tracking techniques.

  15. Tracking people and cars using 3D modeling and CCTV.

    PubMed

    Edelman, Gerda; Bijhold, Jurrien

    2010-10-10

    The aim of this study was to find a method for the reconstruction of movements of people and cars using CCTV footage and a 3D model of the environment. A procedure is proposed, in which video streams are synchronized and displayed in a 3D model, by using virtual cameras. People and cars are represented by cylinders and boxes, which are moved in the 3D model, according to their movements as shown in the video streams. The procedure was developed and tested in an experimental setup with test persons who logged their GPS coordinates as a recording of the ground truth. Results showed that it is possible to implement this procedure and to reconstruct movements of people and cars from video recordings. The procedure was also applied to a forensic case. In this work we experienced that more situational awareness was created by the 3D model, which made it easier to track people on multiple video streams. Based on all experiences from the experimental set up and the case, recommendations are formulated for use in practice.

  16. Inertial Motion-Tracking Technology for Virtual 3-D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    In the 1990s, NASA pioneered virtual reality research. The concept was present long before, but, prior to this, the technology did not exist to make a viable virtual reality system. Scientists had theories and ideas they knew that the concept had potential, but the computers of the 1970s and 1980s were not fast enough, sensors were heavy and cumbersome, and people had difficulty blending fluidly with the machines. Scientists at Ames Research Center built upon the research of previous decades and put the necessary technology behind them, making the theories of virtual reality a reality. Virtual reality systems depend on complex motion-tracking sensors to convey information between the user and the computer to give the user the feeling that he is operating in the real world. These motion-tracking sensors measure and report an object s position and orientation as it changes. A simple example of motion tracking would be the cursor on a computer screen moving in correspondence to the shifting of the mouse. Tracking in 3-D, necessary to create virtual reality, however, is much more complex. To be successful, the perspective of the virtual image seen on the computer must be an accurate representation of what is seen in the real world. As the user s head or camera moves, turns, or tilts, the computer-generated environment must change accordingly with no noticeable lag, jitter, or distortion. Historically, the lack of smooth and rapid tracking of the user s motion has thwarted the widespread use of immersive 3-D computer graphics. NASA uses virtual reality technology for a variety of purposes, mostly training of astronauts. The actual missions are costly and dangerous, so any opportunity the crews have to practice their maneuvering in accurate situations before the mission is valuable and instructive. For that purpose, NASA has funded a great deal of virtual reality research, and benefited from the results.

  17. Coverage Assessment and Target Tracking in 3D Domains

    PubMed Central

    Boudriga, Noureddine; Hamdi, Mohamed; Iyengar, Sitharama

    2011-01-01

    Recent advances in integrated electronic devices motivated the use of Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs) in many applications including domain surveillance and mobile target tracking, where a number of sensors are scattered within a sensitive region to detect the presence of intruders and forward related events to some analysis center(s). Obviously, sensor deployment should guarantee an optimal event detection rate and should reduce coverage holes. Most of the coverage control approaches proposed in the literature deal with two-dimensional zones and do not develop strategies to handle coverage in three-dimensional domains, which is becoming a requirement for many applications including water monitoring, indoor surveillance, and projectile tracking. This paper proposes efficient techniques to detect coverage holes in a 3D domain using a finite set of sensors, repair the holes, and track hostile targets. To this end, we use the concepts of Voronoi tessellation, Vietoris complex, and retract by deformation. We show in particular that, through a set of iterative transformations of the Vietoris complex corresponding to the deployed sensors, the number of coverage holes can be computed with a low complexity. Mobility strategies are also proposed to repair holes by moving appropriately sensors towards the uncovered zones. The tracking objective is to set a non-uniform WSN coverage within the monitored domain to allow detecting the target(s) by the set of sensors. We show, in particular, how the proposed algorithms adapt to cope with obstacles. Simulation experiments are carried out to analyze the efficiency of the proposed models. To our knowledge, repairing and tracking is addressed for the first time in 3D spaces with different sensor coverage schemes. PMID:22163733

  18. 3-D model-based tracking for UAV indoor localization.

    PubMed

    Teulière, Céline; Marchand, Eric; Eck, Laurent

    2015-05-01

    This paper proposes a novel model-based tracking approach for 3-D localization. One main difficulty of standard model-based approach lies in the presence of low-level ambiguities between different edges. In this paper, given a 3-D model of the edges of the environment, we derive a multiple hypotheses tracker which retrieves the potential poses of the camera from the observations in the image. We also show how these candidate poses can be integrated into a particle filtering framework to guide the particle set toward the peaks of the distribution. Motivated by the UAV indoor localization problem where GPS signal is not available, we validate the algorithm on real image sequences from UAV flights.

  19. 3-D model-based tracking for UAV indoor localization.

    PubMed

    Teulière, Céline; Marchand, Eric; Eck, Laurent

    2015-05-01

    This paper proposes a novel model-based tracking approach for 3-D localization. One main difficulty of standard model-based approach lies in the presence of low-level ambiguities between different edges. In this paper, given a 3-D model of the edges of the environment, we derive a multiple hypotheses tracker which retrieves the potential poses of the camera from the observations in the image. We also show how these candidate poses can be integrated into a particle filtering framework to guide the particle set toward the peaks of the distribution. Motivated by the UAV indoor localization problem where GPS signal is not available, we validate the algorithm on real image sequences from UAV flights. PMID:25099967

  20. Preparation and 3D Tracking of Catalytic Swimming Devices

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Andrew; Archer, Richard; Ebbens, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    We report a method to prepare catalytically active Janus colloids that "swim" in fluids and describe how to determine their 3D motion using fluorescence microscopy. One commonly deployed method for catalytically active colloids to produce enhanced motion is via an asymmetrical distribution of catalyst. Here this is achieved by spin coating a dispersed layer of fluorescent polymeric colloids onto a flat planar substrate, and then using directional platinum vapor deposition to half coat the exposed colloid surface, making a two faced "Janus" structure. The Janus colloids are then re-suspended from the planar substrate into an aqueous solution containing hydrogen peroxide. Hydrogen peroxide serves as a fuel for the platinum catalyst, which is decomposed into water and oxygen, but only on one side of the colloid. The asymmetry results in gradients that produce enhanced motion, or "swimming". A fluorescence microscope, together with a video camera is used to record the motion of individual colloids. The center of the fluorescent emission is found using image analysis to provide an x and y coordinate for each frame of the video. While keeping the microscope focal position fixed, the fluorescence emission from the colloid produces a characteristic concentric ring pattern which is subject to image analysis to determine the particles relative z position. In this way 3D trajectories for the swimming colloid are obtained, allowing swimming velocity to be accurately measured, and physical phenomena such as gravitaxis, which may bias the colloids motion to be detected. PMID:27404327

  1. Two-photon single particle tracking in 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    So, Peter T. C.; Ragan, Timothy; Gratton, Enrico; Carerro, Jenny; Voss, Edward

    1997-05-01

    Transport processes are important in biology and medicine. Examples include virus docking and infection, endocytosis of extracellular protein and phagocytosis of antigenic material. Trafficking driven by molecular motors inside a complex 3D environment is a shared common theme. The complex sequence of these events are difficult to resolve with conventional techniques where the action of many cells are asynchronously averaged. Single particle tracking (SPT) was developed by Ghosh and Webb to address this problem and has proven to be a powerful technique in understanding membrane- protein interaction. Since the traditional SPT method uses wide field illumination and area detectors, it is limited to the study of 2D systems. In this presentation, we report the development of a 3D single particle tracking technique using two-photon excitation. Using a real-time feedback system, we can dynamically position the sub-femtoliter two-photon excitation volume to follow the fluorescent particle under transport by maximizing the detected fluorescent intensity. Further, fluorescence spectroscopy can be performed in real time along the particle trajectory to monitor the underlying biochemical signals driving this transport process. The first application of this instrument will focus on the study of antigen endocytosis process of macrophages.

  2. Light sheet adaptive optics microscope for 3D live imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourgenot, C.; Taylor, J. M.; Saunter, C. D.; Girkin, J. M.; Love, G. D.

    2013-02-01

    We report on the incorporation of adaptive optics (AO) into the imaging arm of a selective plane illumination microscope (SPIM). SPIM has recently emerged as an important tool for life science research due to its ability to deliver high-speed, optically sectioned, time-lapse microscope images from deep within in vivo selected samples. SPIM provides a very interesting system for the incorporation of AO as the illumination and imaging paths are decoupled and AO may be useful in both paths. In this paper, we will report the use of AO applied to the imaging path of a SPIM, demonstrating significant improvement in image quality of a live GFP-labeled transgenic zebrafish embryo heart using a modal, wavefront sensorless approach and a heart synchronization method. These experimental results are linked to a computational model showing that significant aberrations are produced by the tube holding the sample in addition to the aberration from the biological sample itself.

  3. 3D harmonic phase tracking with anatomical regularization.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yitian; Bernard, Olivier; Saloux, Eric; Manrique, Alain; Allain, Pascal; Makram-Ebeid, Sherif; De Craene, Mathieu

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents a novel algorithm that extends HARP to handle 3D tagged MRI images. HARP results were regularized by an original regularization framework defined in an anatomical space of coordinates. In the meantime, myocardium incompressibility was integrated in order to correct the radial strain which is reported to be more challenging to recover. Both the tracking and regularization of LV displacements were done on a volumetric mesh to be computationally efficient. Also, a window-weighted regression method was extended to cardiac motion tracking which helps maintain a low complexity even at finer scales. On healthy volunteers, the tracking accuracy was found to be as accurate as the best candidates of a recent benchmark. Strain accuracy was evaluated on synthetic data, showing low bias and strain errors under 5% (excluding outliers) for longitudinal and circumferential strains, while the second and third quartiles of the radial strain errors are in the (-5%,5%) range. In clinical data, strain dispersion was shown to correlate with the extent of transmural fibrosis. Also, reduced deformation values were found inside infarcted segments.

  4. 3D harmonic phase tracking with anatomical regularization.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yitian; Bernard, Olivier; Saloux, Eric; Manrique, Alain; Allain, Pascal; Makram-Ebeid, Sherif; De Craene, Mathieu

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents a novel algorithm that extends HARP to handle 3D tagged MRI images. HARP results were regularized by an original regularization framework defined in an anatomical space of coordinates. In the meantime, myocardium incompressibility was integrated in order to correct the radial strain which is reported to be more challenging to recover. Both the tracking and regularization of LV displacements were done on a volumetric mesh to be computationally efficient. Also, a window-weighted regression method was extended to cardiac motion tracking which helps maintain a low complexity even at finer scales. On healthy volunteers, the tracking accuracy was found to be as accurate as the best candidates of a recent benchmark. Strain accuracy was evaluated on synthetic data, showing low bias and strain errors under 5% (excluding outliers) for longitudinal and circumferential strains, while the second and third quartiles of the radial strain errors are in the (-5%,5%) range. In clinical data, strain dispersion was shown to correlate with the extent of transmural fibrosis. Also, reduced deformation values were found inside infarcted segments. PMID:26363844

  5. 3D whiteboard: collaborative sketching with 3D-tracked smart phones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lue, James; Schulze, Jürgen P.

    2014-02-01

    We present the results of our investigation of the feasibility of a new approach for collaborative drawing in 3D, based on Android smart phones. Our approach utilizes a number of fiduciary markers, placed in the working area where they can be seen by the smart phones' cameras, in order to estimate the pose of each phone in the room. Our prototype allows two users to draw 3D objects with their smart phones by moving their phones around in 3D space. For example, 3D lines are drawn by recording the path of the phone as it is moved around in 3D space, drawing line segments on the screen along the way. Each user can see the virtual drawing space on their smart phones' displays, as if the display was a window into this space. Besides lines, our prototype application also supports 3D geometry creation, geometry transformation operations, and it shows the location of the other user's phone.

  6. SOFI-based 3D superresolution sectioning with a widefield microscope

    PubMed Central

    Dertinger, Thomas; Xu, Jianmin; Naini, Omeed Foroutan; Vogel, Robert; Weiss, Shimon

    2013-01-01

    Background Fluorescence-based biological imaging has been revolutionized by the recent introduction of superresolution microscopy methods. 3D superresolution microscopy, however, remains a challenge as its implementation by existing superresolution methods is non-trivial. Methods Here we demonstrate a facile and straightforward 3D superresolution imaging and sectioning of the cytoskeletal network of a fixed cell using superresolution optical fluctuation imaging (SOFI) performed on a conventional lamp-based widefield microscope. Results and Conclusion SOFI’s inherent sectioning capability effectively transforms a conventional widefield microscope into a superresolution ‘confocal widefield’ microscope. PMID:24163789

  7. Ion track reconstruction in 3D using alumina-based fluorescent nuclear track detectors.

    PubMed

    Niklas, M; Bartz, J A; Akselrod, M S; Abollahi, A; Jäkel, O; Greilich, S

    2013-09-21

    Fluorescent nuclear track detectors (FNTDs) based on Al2O3: C, Mg single crystal combined with confocal microscopy provide 3D information on ion tracks with a resolution only limited by light diffraction. FNTDs are also ideal substrates to be coated with cells to engineer cell-fluorescent ion track hybrid detectors (Cell-Fit-HD). This radiobiological tool enables a novel platform linking cell responses to physical dose deposition on a sub-cellular level in proton and heavy ion therapies. To achieve spatial correlation between single ion hits in the cell coating and its biological response the ion traversals have to be reconstructed in 3D using the depth information gained by the FNTD read-out. FNTDs were coated with a confluent human lung adenocarcinoma epithelial (A549) cell layer. Carbon ion irradiation of the hybrid detector was performed perpendicular and angular to the detector surface. In situ imaging of the fluorescently labeled cell layer and the FNTD was performed in a sequential read-out. Making use of the trajectory information provided by the FNTD the accuracy of 3D track reconstruction of single particles traversing the hybrid detector was studied. The accuracy is strongly influenced by the irradiation angle and therefore by complexity of the FNTD signal. Perpendicular irradiation results in highest accuracy with error of smaller than 0.10°. The ability of FNTD technology to provide accurate 3D ion track reconstruction makes it a powerful tool for radiobiological investigations in clinical ion beams, either being used as a substrate to be coated with living tissue or being implanted in vivo. PMID:23965401

  8. Ion track reconstruction in 3D using alumina-based fluorescent nuclear track detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niklas, M.; Bartz, J. A.; Akselrod, M. S.; Abollahi, A.; Jäkel, O.; Greilich, S.

    2013-09-01

    Fluorescent nuclear track detectors (FNTDs) based on Al2O3: C, Mg single crystal combined with confocal microscopy provide 3D information on ion tracks with a resolution only limited by light diffraction. FNTDs are also ideal substrates to be coated with cells to engineer cell-fluorescent ion track hybrid detectors (Cell-Fit-HD). This radiobiological tool enables a novel platform linking cell responses to physical dose deposition on a sub-cellular level in proton and heavy ion therapies. To achieve spatial correlation between single ion hits in the cell coating and its biological response the ion traversals have to be reconstructed in 3D using the depth information gained by the FNTD read-out. FNTDs were coated with a confluent human lung adenocarcinoma epithelial (A549) cell layer. Carbon ion irradiation of the hybrid detector was performed perpendicular and angular to the detector surface. In situ imaging of the fluorescently labeled cell layer and the FNTD was performed in a sequential read-out. Making use of the trajectory information provided by the FNTD the accuracy of 3D track reconstruction of single particles traversing the hybrid detector was studied. The accuracy is strongly influenced by the irradiation angle and therefore by complexity of the FNTD signal. Perpendicular irradiation results in highest accuracy with error of smaller than 0.10°. The ability of FNTD technology to provide accurate 3D ion track reconstruction makes it a powerful tool for radiobiological investigations in clinical ion beams, either being used as a substrate to be coated with living tissue or being implanted in vivo.

  9. Single nanoparticle tracking spectroscopic microscope

    DOEpatents

    Yang, Haw; Cang, Hu; Xu, Cangshan; Wong, Chung M.

    2011-07-19

    A system that can maintain and track the position of a single nanoparticle in three dimensions for a prolonged period has been disclosed. The system allows for continuously imaging the particle to observe any interactions it may have. The system also enables the acquisition of real-time sequential spectroscopic information from the particle. The apparatus holds great promise in performing single molecule spectroscopy and imaging on a non-stationary target.

  10. Fully automatic and robust 3D registration of serial-section microscopic images.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ching-Wei; Budiman Gosno, Eric; Li, Yen-Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Robust and fully automatic 3D registration of serial-section microscopic images is critical for detailed anatomical reconstruction of large biological specimens, such as reconstructions of dense neuronal tissues or 3D histology reconstruction to gain new structural insights. However, robust and fully automatic 3D image registration for biological data is difficult due to complex deformations, unbalanced staining and variations on data appearance. This study presents a fully automatic and robust 3D registration technique for microscopic image reconstruction, and we demonstrate our method on two ssTEM datasets of drosophila brain neural tissues, serial confocal laser scanning microscopic images of a drosophila brain, serial histopathological images of renal cortical tissues and a synthetic test case. The results show that the presented fully automatic method is promising to reassemble continuous volumes and minimize artificial deformations for all data and outperforms four state-of-the-art 3D registration techniques to consistently produce solid 3D reconstructed anatomies with less discontinuities and deformations. PMID:26449756

  11. Recording High Resolution 3D Lagrangian Motions In Marine Dinoflagellates using Digital Holographic Microscopic Cinematography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, J.; Malkiel, E.; Katz, J.; Place, A. R.; Belas, R.

    2006-11-01

    Detailed data on swimming behavior and locomotion for dense population of dinoflagellates constitutes a key component to understanding cell migration, cell-cell interactions and predator-prey dynamics, all of which affect algae bloom dynamics. Due to the multi-dimensional nature of flagellated cell motions, spatial-temporal Lagrangian measurements of multiple cells in high concentration are very limited. Here we present detailed data on 3D Lagrangian motions for three marine dinoflagellates: Oxyrrhis marina, Karlodinium veneficum, and Pfiesteria piscicida, using digital holographic microscopic cinematography. The measurements are performed in a 5x5x25mm cuvette with cell densities varying from 50,000 ˜ 90,000 cells/ml. Approximately 200-500 cells are tracked simultaneously for 12s at 60fps in a sample volume of 1x1x5 mm at a spatial resolution of 0.4x0.4x2 μm. We fully resolve the longitudinal flagella (˜200nm) along with the Lagrangian trajectory of each organism. Species dependent swimming behavior are identified and categorized quantitatively by velocities, radii of curvature, and rotations of pitch. Statistics on locomotion, temporal & spatial scales, and diffusion rate show substantial differences between species. The scaling between turning radius and cell dimension can be explained by a distributed stokeslet model for a self-propelled body.

  12. 3D interferometric microscope: color visualization of engineered surfaces for industrial applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmit, Joanna; Novak, Matt; Bui, Son

    2015-09-01

    3D microscopes based on white light interference (WLI) provide precise measurement for the topography of engineering surfaces. However, the display of an object in its true colors as observed under white illumination is often desired; this traditionally has presented a challenge for WLI-based microscopes. Such 3D color display is appealing to the eye and great for presentations, and also provides fast evaluation of certain characteristics like defects, delamination, or deposition of different materials. Determination of color as observed by interferometric objectives is not straightforward; we will present how color imaging capabilities similar to an ordinary microscope can be obtained in interference microscopes based on WLI and we will give measurement and imaging examples of a few industrial samples.

  13. LayTracks3D: A new approach for meshing general solids using medial axis transform

    SciTech Connect

    Quadros, William Roshan

    2015-08-22

    This study presents an extension of the all-quad meshing algorithm called LayTracks to generate high quality hex-dominant meshes of general solids. LayTracks3D uses the mapping between the Medial Axis (MA) and the boundary of the 3D domain to decompose complex 3D domains into simpler domains called Tracks. Tracks in 3D have no branches and are symmetric, non-intersecting, orthogonal to the boundary, and the shortest path from the MA to the boundary. These properties of tracks result in desired meshes with near cube shape elements at the boundary, structured mesh along the boundary normal with any irregular nodes restricted to the MA, and sharp boundary feature preservation. The algorithm has been tested on a few industrial CAD models and hex-dominant meshes are shown in the Results section. Work is underway to extend LayTracks3D to generate all-hex meshes.

  14. Stardust Under a Microscope - 3D maps of Wild 2/81P Cometary Samples in Aerogel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Amanda J.; Ebel, Denton

    2016-01-01

    The NASA Stardust mission to comet Wild 2 returned to Earth in 2006 with cometary and interstellar material captured in aerogel. Cometary particles impacted an aerogel collector at a relative velocity of 6.1 km/s, creating three-dimensional (3D) impact tracks of melted and crushed aerogel, void space, and fragmented cometary material. Each track represents the history of a unique hypervelocity capture event. The nature of each impact, including the original state of the impactor, is recorded in track morphology and material distribution. Using a combination of 3D morphological data, chemical data, and microphysical models, it is possible to reconstruct track formation events and a model of the original impactor.The focus of this work is to fully characterize whole tracks both morphologically and chemically using solely non-destructive methods. To achieve this, we combine high-resolution laser scanning confocal microscope (LSCM) 3D imaging with synchrotron X-ray fluorescence (SXRF) chemical mapping. We are also beginning to incorporate Raman spectroscopy to perform mineral phase analysis of fine track wall material. Using a Zeiss LSM 710 LSCM located in the American Museum of Natural History, we have imaged the morphology of over a dozen, whole Stardust tracks at high resolution (<80 nm/pixel in XY). We obtain the distribution of fine material along the track walls both quickly and without disturbing the sample. Complementary chemical data is acquired using the GSECARS X-ray microbe on beamline 13-IDE at the Advance Photon Source (APS) of Argonne National Laboratory. X-ray fluorescence maps of each track were collected with 100ms/pixel dwell time at a resolution of 1 or 2 micron/pixel. Many tracks were tilted and mapped a second time for stereo measurements.A thorough understanding of how cometary material and aerogel is distributed along tracks is required to understand the events which occurred after impact and to back-calculate properties of the original impactor

  15. A 3D feature point tracking method for ion radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouwenberg, Jasper J. M.; Ulrich, Leonie; Jäkel, Oliver; Greilich, Steffen

    2016-06-01

    A robust and computationally efficient algorithm for automated tracking of high densities of particles travelling in (semi-) straight lines is presented. It extends the implementation of (Sbalzarini and Koumoutsakos 2005) and is intended for use in the analysis of single ion track detectors. By including information of existing tracks in the exclusion criteria and a recursive cost minimization function, the algorithm is robust to variations on the measured particle tracks. A trajectory relinking algorithm was included to resolve the crossing of tracks in high particle density images. Validation of the algorithm was performed using fluorescent nuclear track detectors (FNTD) irradiated with high- and low (heavy) ion fluences and showed less than 1% faulty trajectories in the latter.

  16. 3D Fluorescent and Reflective Imaging of Whole Stardust Tracks in Aerogel

    SciTech Connect

    Greenberg, M.; Ebel, D.S.

    2011-11-07

    The NASA Stardust mission returned to earth in 2006 with the cometary collector having captured over 1,000 particles in an aerogel medium at a relative velocity of 6.1 km/s. Particles captured in aerogel were heated, disaggregated and dispersed along 'tracks' or cavities in aerogel, singular tracks representing a history of one capture event. It has been our focus to chemically and morphologically characterize whole tracks in 3-dimensions, utilizing solely non-destructive methods. To this end, we have used a variety of methods: 3D Laser Scanning Confocal Microscopy (LSCM), synchrotron X-ray fluorescence (SXRF), and synchrotron X-ray diffraction (SXRD). In the past months we have developed two new techniques to aid in data collection. (1) We have received a new confocal microscope which has enabled autofluorescent and spectral imaging of aerogel samples. (2) We have developed a stereo-SXRF technique to chemically identify large grains in SXRF maps in 3-space. The addition of both of these methods to our analytic abilities provides a greater understanding of the mechanisms and results of track formation.

  17. A 3D diamond detector for particle tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artuso, M.; Bachmair, F.; Bäni, L.; Bartosik, M.; Beacham, J.; Bellini, V.; Belyaev, V.; Bentele, B.; Berdermann, E.; Bergonzo, P.; Bes, A.; Brom, J.-M.; Bruzzi, M.; Cerv, M.; Chau, C.; Chiodini, G.; Chren, D.; Cindro, V.; Claus, G.; Collot, J.; Costa, S.; Cumalat, J.; Dabrowski, A.; D`Alessandro, R.; de Boer, W.; Dehning, B.; Dobos, D.; Dünser, M.; Eremin, V.; Eusebi, R.; Forcolin, G.; Forneris, J.; Frais-Kölbl, H.; Gan, K. K.; Gastal, M.; Goffe, M.; Goldstein, J.; Golubev, A.; Gonella, L.; Gorišek, A.; Graber, L.; Grigoriev, E.; Grosse-Knetter, J.; Gui, B.; Guthoff, M.; Haughton, I.; Hidas, D.; Hits, D.; Hoeferkamp, M.; Hofmann, T.; Hosslet, J.; Hostachy, J.-Y.; Hügging, F.; Jansen, H.; Janssen, J.; Kagan, H.; Kanxheri, K.; Kasieczka, G.; Kass, R.; Kassel, F.; Kis, M.; Kramberger, G.; Kuleshov, S.; Lacoste, A.; Lagomarsino, S.; Lo Giudice, A.; Maazouzi, C.; Mandic, I.; Mathieu, C.; McFadden, N.; McGoldrick, G.; Menichelli, M.; Mikuž, M.; Morozzi, A.; Moss, J.; Mountain, R.; Murphy, S.; Oh, A.; Olivero, P.; Parrini, G.; Passeri, D.; Pauluzzi, M.; Pernegger, H.; Perrino, R.; Picollo, F.; Pomorski, M.; Potenza, R.; Quadt, A.; Re, A.; Riley, G.; Roe, S.; Sapinski, M.; Scaringella, M.; Schnetzer, S.; Schreiner, T.; Sciortino, S.; Scorzoni, A.; Seidel, S.; Servoli, L.; Sfyrla, A.; Shimchuk, G.; Smith, D. S.; Sopko, B.; Sopko, V.; Spagnolo, S.; Spanier, S.; Stenson, K.; Stone, R.; Sutera, C.; Taylor, A.; Traeger, M.; Tromson, D.; Trischuk, W.; Tuve, C.; Uplegger, L.; Velthuis, J.; Venturi, N.; Vittone, E.; Wagner, S.; Wallny, R.; Wang, J. C.; Weilhammer, P.; Weingarten, J.; Weiss, C.; Wengler, T.; Wermes, N.; Yamouni, M.; Zavrtanik, M.

    2016-07-01

    In the present study, results towards the development of a 3D diamond sensor are presented. Conductive channels are produced inside the sensor bulk using a femtosecond laser. This electrode geometry allows full charge collection even for low quality diamond sensors. Results from testbeam show that charge is collected by these electrodes. In order to understand the channel growth parameters, with the goal of producing low resistivity channels, the conductive channels produced with a different laser setup are evaluated by Raman spectroscopy.

  18. Rapid, High-Throughput Tracking of Bacterial Motility in 3D via Phase-Contrast Holographic Video Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Cheong, Fook Chiong; Wong, Chui Ching; Gao, YunFeng; Nai, Mui Hoon; Cui, Yidan; Park, Sungsu; Kenney, Linda J.; Lim, Chwee Teck

    2015-01-01

    Tracking fast-swimming bacteria in three dimensions can be extremely challenging with current optical techniques and a microscopic approach that can rapidly acquire volumetric information is required. Here, we introduce phase-contrast holographic video microscopy as a solution for the simultaneous tracking of multiple fast moving cells in three dimensions. This technique uses interference patterns formed between the scattered and the incident field to infer the three-dimensional (3D) position and size of bacteria. Using this optical approach, motility dynamics of multiple bacteria in three dimensions, such as speed and turn angles, can be obtained within minutes. We demonstrated the feasibility of this method by effectively tracking multiple bacteria species, including Escherichia coli, Agrobacterium tumefaciens, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In addition, we combined our fast 3D imaging technique with a microfluidic device to present an example of a drug/chemical assay to study effects on bacterial motility. PMID:25762336

  19. Real Time 3D Facial Movement Tracking Using a Monocular Camera.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yanchao; Wang, Yanming; Yue, Jiguang; Hu, Zhencheng

    2016-01-01

    The paper proposes a robust framework for 3D facial movement tracking in real time using a monocular camera. It is designed to estimate the 3D face pose and local facial animation such as eyelid movement and mouth movement. The framework firstly utilizes the Discriminative Shape Regression method to locate the facial feature points on the 2D image and fuses the 2D data with a 3D face model using Extended Kalman Filter to yield 3D facial movement information. An alternating optimizing strategy is adopted to fit to different persons automatically. Experiments show that the proposed framework could track the 3D facial movement across various poses and illumination conditions. Given the real face scale the framework could track the eyelid with an error of 1 mm and mouth with an error of 2 mm. The tracking result is reliable for expression analysis or mental state inference. PMID:27463714

  20. Real Time 3D Facial Movement Tracking Using a Monocular Camera.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yanchao; Wang, Yanming; Yue, Jiguang; Hu, Zhencheng

    2016-07-25

    The paper proposes a robust framework for 3D facial movement tracking in real time using a monocular camera. It is designed to estimate the 3D face pose and local facial animation such as eyelid movement and mouth movement. The framework firstly utilizes the Discriminative Shape Regression method to locate the facial feature points on the 2D image and fuses the 2D data with a 3D face model using Extended Kalman Filter to yield 3D facial movement information. An alternating optimizing strategy is adopted to fit to different persons automatically. Experiments show that the proposed framework could track the 3D facial movement across various poses and illumination conditions. Given the real face scale the framework could track the eyelid with an error of 1 mm and mouth with an error of 2 mm. The tracking result is reliable for expression analysis or mental state inference.

  1. Real Time 3D Facial Movement Tracking Using a Monocular Camera

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Yanchao; Wang, Yanming; Yue, Jiguang; Hu, Zhencheng

    2016-01-01

    The paper proposes a robust framework for 3D facial movement tracking in real time using a monocular camera. It is designed to estimate the 3D face pose and local facial animation such as eyelid movement and mouth movement. The framework firstly utilizes the Discriminative Shape Regression method to locate the facial feature points on the 2D image and fuses the 2D data with a 3D face model using Extended Kalman Filter to yield 3D facial movement information. An alternating optimizing strategy is adopted to fit to different persons automatically. Experiments show that the proposed framework could track the 3D facial movement across various poses and illumination conditions. Given the real face scale the framework could track the eyelid with an error of 1 mm and mouth with an error of 2 mm. The tracking result is reliable for expression analysis or mental state inference. PMID:27463714

  2. 3-D tracking in a miniature time projection chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vahsen, S. E.; Hedges, M. T.; Jaegle, I.; Ross, S. J.; Seong, I. S.; Thorpe, T. N.; Yamaoka, J.; Kadyk, J. A.; Garcia-Sciveres, M.

    2015-07-01

    The three-dimensional (3-D) detection of millimeter-scale ionization trails is of interest for detecting nuclear recoils in directional fast neutron detectors and in direction-sensitive searches for weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs), which may constitute the Dark Matter of the universe. We report on performance characterization of a miniature gas target Time Projection Chamber (TPC) where the drift charge is avalanche-multiplied with Gas Electron Multipliers (GEMs) and detected with the ATLAS FE-I3 Pixel Application Specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC). We report on measurements of gain, gain resolution, point resolution, diffusion, angular resolution, and energy resolution with low-energy X-rays, cosmic rays, and alpha particles, using the gases Ar:CO2 (70:30) and He:CO2 (70:30) at atmospheric pressure. We discuss the implications for future, larger directional neutron and Dark Matter detectors. With an eye to designing and selecting components for these, we generalize our results into analytical expressions for detector performance whenever possible. We conclude by demonstrating the 3-D directional detection of a fast neutron source.

  3. THE THOMSON SURFACE. III. TRACKING FEATURES IN 3D

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, T. A.; DeForest, C. E.; Tappin, S. J.; Odstrcil, D.

    2013-03-01

    In this, the final installment in a three-part series on the Thomson surface, we present simulated observations of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) observed by a hypothetical polarizing white light heliospheric imager. Thomson scattering yields a polarization signal that can be exploited to locate observed features in three dimensions relative to the Thomson surface. We consider how the appearance of the CME changes with the direction of trajectory, using simulations of a simple geometrical shape and also of a more realistic CME generated using the ENLIL model. We compare the appearance in both unpolarized B and polarized pB light, and show that there is a quantifiable difference in the measured brightness of a CME between unpolarized and polarized observations. We demonstrate a technique for using this difference to extract the three-dimensional (3D) trajectory of large objects such as CMEs. We conclude with a discussion on how a polarizing heliospheric imager could be used to extract 3D trajectory information about CMEs or other observed features.

  4. High resolution 3D insider detection and tracking.

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Cynthia Lee

    2003-09-01

    Vulnerability analysis studies show that one of the worst threats against a facility is that of an active insider during an emergency evacuation. When a criticality or other emergency alarm occurs, employees immediately proceed along evacuation routes to designated areas. Procedures are then implemented to account for all material, classified parts, etc. The 3-Dimensional Video Motion Detection (3DVMD) technology could be used to detect and track possible insider activities during alarm situations, as just described, as well as during normal operating conditions. The 3DVMD technology uses multiple cameras to create 3-dimensional detection volumes or zones. Movement throughout detection zones is tracked and high-level information, such as the number of people and their direction of motion, is extracted. In the described alarm scenario, deviances of evacuation procedures taken by an individual could be immediately detected and relayed to a central alarm station. The insider could be tracked and any protected items removed from the area could be flagged. The 3DVMD technology could also be used to monitor such items as machines that are used to build classified parts. During an alarm, detections could be made if items were removed from the machine. Overall, the use of 3DVMD technology during emergency evacuations would help to prevent the loss of classified items and would speed recovery from emergency situations. Further security could also be added by analyzing tracked behavior (motion) as it corresponds to predicted behavior, e.g., behavior corresponding with the execution of required procedures. This information would be valuable for detecting a possible insider not only during emergency situations, but also during times of normal operation.

  5. Track of Right-Wheel Drag (3-D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 1

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 2

    This 360-degree stereo panorama combines several frames taken by the navigation camera on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit during the rover's 313th martian day (Nov. 19, 2004). The site, labeled Spirit site 93, is in the 'Columbia Hills' inside Gusev Crater. The rover tracks point westward. Spirit had driven eastward, in reverse and dragging its right front wheel, for about 30 meters (100 feet) on the day the picture was taken. Driving backwards while dragging that wheel is a precautionary strategy to extend the usefulness of the wheel for when it is most needed, because it has developed more friction than the other wheels. The right-hand track in this look backwards shows how the dragging disturbed the soil. This view is presented in a cylindrical-perspective projection with geometric seam correction.

    Figure 1 is the left-eye view of a stereo pair and Figure 2 is the right-eye view of a stereo pair.

  6. Tracking 3-D body motion for docking and robot control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donath, M.; Sorensen, B.; Yang, G. B.; Starr, R.

    1987-01-01

    An advanced method of tracking three-dimensional motion of bodies has been developed. This system has the potential to dynamically characterize machine and other structural motion, even in the presence of structural flexibility, thus facilitating closed loop structural motion control. The system's operation is based on the concept that the intersection of three planes defines a point. Three rotating planes of laser light, fixed and moving photovoltaic diode targets, and a pipe-lined architecture of analog and digital electronics are used to locate multiple targets whose number is only limited by available computer memory. Data collection rates are a function of the laser scan rotation speed and are currently selectable up to 480 Hz. The tested performance on a preliminary prototype designed for 0.1 in accuracy (for tracking human motion) at a 480 Hz data rate includes a worst case resolution of 0.8 mm (0.03 inches), a repeatability of plus or minus 0.635 mm (plus or minus 0.025 inches), and an absolute accuracy of plus or minus 2.0 mm (plus or minus 0.08 inches) within an eight cubic meter volume with all results applicable at the 95 percent level of confidence along each coordinate region. The full six degrees of freedom of a body can be computed by attaching three or more target detectors to the body of interest.

  7. Ultra-Wideband Time-Difference-of-Arrival High Resolution 3D Proximity Tracking System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ni, Jianjun; Arndt, Dickey; Ngo, Phong; Phan, Chau; Dekome, Kent; Dusl, John

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes a research and development effort for a prototype ultra-wideband (UWB) tracking system that is currently under development at NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC). The system is being studied for use in tracking of lunar./Mars rovers and astronauts during early exploration missions when satellite navigation systems are not available. U IATB impulse radio (UWB-IR) technology is exploited in the design and implementation of the prototype location and tracking system. A three-dimensional (3D) proximity tracking prototype design using commercially available UWB products is proposed to implement the Time-Difference- Of-Arrival (TDOA) tracking methodology in this research effort. The TDOA tracking algorithm is utilized for location estimation in the prototype system, not only to exploit the precise time resolution possible with UWB signals, but also to eliminate the need for synchronization between the transmitter and the receiver. Simulations show that the TDOA algorithm can achieve the fine tracking resolution with low noise TDOA estimates for close-in tracking. Field tests demonstrated that this prototype UWB TDOA High Resolution 3D Proximity Tracking System is feasible for providing positioning-awareness information in a 3D space to a robotic control system. This 3D tracking system is developed for a robotic control system in a facility called "Moonyard" at Honeywell Defense & System in Arizona under a Space Act Agreement.

  8. The agreement between 3D, standard 2D and triplane 2D speckle tracking: effects of image quality and 3D volume rate

    PubMed Central

    Stöbe, Stephan; Tarr, Adrienn; Pfeiffer, Dietrich; Hagendorff, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Comparison of 3D and 2D speckle tracking performed on standard 2D and triplane 2D datasets of normal and pathological left ventricular (LV) wall-motion patterns with a focus on the effect that 3D volume rate (3DVR), image quality and tracking artifacts have on the agreement between 2D and 3D speckle tracking. 37 patients with normal LV function and 18 patients with ischaemic wall-motion abnormalities underwent 2D and 3D echocardiography, followed by offline speckle tracking measurements. The values of 3D global, regional and segmental strain were compared with the standard 2D and triplane 2D strain values. Correlation analysis with the LV ejection fraction (LVEF) was also performed. The 3D and 2D global strain values correlated good in both normally and abnormally contracting hearts, though systematic differences between the two methods were observed. Of the 3D strain parameters, the area strain showed the best correlation with the LVEF. The numerical agreement of 3D and 2D analyses varied significantly with the volume rate and image quality of the 3D datasets. The highest correlation between 2D and 3D peak systolic strain values was found between 3D area and standard 2D longitudinal strain. Regional wall-motion abnormalities were similarly detected by 2D and 3D speckle tracking. 2DST of triplane datasets showed similar results to those of conventional 2D datasets. 2D and 3D speckle tracking similarly detect normal and pathological wall-motion patterns. Limited image quality has a significant impact on the agreement between 3D and 2D numerical strain values. PMID:26693303

  9. Phase Tomography Reconstructed by 3D TIE in Hard X-ray Microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Yin, G.-C.; Chen, F.-R.; Pyun, Ahram; Je, Jung Ho; Hwu, Yeukuang; Liang, Keng S.

    2007-01-19

    X-ray phase tomography and phase imaging are promising ways of investigation on low Z material. A polymer blend of PE/PS sample was used to test the 3D phase retrieval method in the parallel beam illuminated microscope. Because the polymer sample is thick, the phase retardation is quite mixed and the image can not be distinguished when the 2D transport intensity equation (TIE) is applied. In this study, we have provided a different approach for solving the phase in three dimensions for thick sample. Our method involves integration of 3D TIE/Fourier slice theorem for solving thick phase sample. In our experiment, eight sets of de-focal series image data sets were recorded covering the angular range of 0 to 180 degree. Only three set of image cubes were used in 3D TIE equation for solving the phase tomography. The phase contrast of the polymer blend in 3D is obviously enhanced, and the two different groups of polymer blend can be distinguished in the phase tomography.

  10. Multiplex acquisition approach for high speed 3D measurements with a chromatic confocal microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taphanel, Miro; Zink, Ralf; Längle, Thomas; Beyerer, Jürgen

    2015-05-01

    A technical realization of a multispectral camera is proposed, by multiplexing a light source with six different spectra. A monochrome line scan camera with six pixel rows is used as detector. The special feature of this acquisition approach is its high speed capability. The scan speed is as high as the frame rate of the line scan camera and not affected by the multiplexing. As application a chromatic confocal microscope was build up. From a data acquisition perspective up to 284 million 3D points per second can be measured. A real time signal processing is proposed, too.

  11. 3D deformable organ model based liver motion tracking in ultrasound videos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jung-Bae; Hwang, Youngkyoo; Oh, Young-Taek; Bang, Won-Chul; Lee, Heesae; Kim, James D. K.; Kim, Chang Yeong

    2013-03-01

    This paper presents a novel method of using 2D ultrasound (US) cine images during image-guided therapy to accurately track the 3D position of a tumor even when the organ of interest is in motion due to patient respiration. Tracking is possible thanks to a 3D deformable organ model we have developed. The method consists of three processes in succession. The first process is organ modeling where we generate a personalized 3D organ model from high quality 3D CT or MR data sets captured during three different respiratory phases. The model includes the organ surface, vessel and tumor, which can all deform and move in accord with patient respiration. The second process is registration of the organ model to 3D US images. From 133 respiratory phase candidates generated from the deformable organ model, we resolve the candidate that best matches the 3D US images according to vessel centerline and surface. As a result, we can determine the position of the US probe. The final process is real-time tracking using 2D US cine images captured by the US probe. We determine the respiratory phase by tracking the diaphragm on the image. The 3D model is then deformed according to respiration phase and is fitted to the image by considering the positions of the vessels. The tumor's 3D positions are then inferred based on respiration phase. Testing our method on real patient data, we have found the accuracy of 3D position is within 3.79mm and processing time is 5.4ms during tracking.

  12. Integrated bronchoscopic video tracking and 3D CT registration for virtual bronchoscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higgins, William E.; Helferty, James P.; Padfield, Dirk R.

    2003-05-01

    Lung cancer assessment involves an initial evaluation of 3D CT image data followed by interventional bronchoscopy. The physician, with only a mental image inferred from the 3D CT data, must guide the bronchoscope through the bronchial tree to sites of interest. Unfortunately, this procedure depends heavily on the physician's ability to mentally reconstruct the 3D position of the bronchoscope within the airways. In order to assist physicians in performing biopsies of interest, we have developed a method that integrates live bronchoscopic video tracking and 3D CT registration. The proposed method is integrated into a system we have been devising for virtual-bronchoscopic analysis and guidance for lung-cancer assessment. Previously, the system relied on a method that only used registration of the live bronchoscopic video to corresponding virtual endoluminal views derived from the 3D CT data. This procedure only performs the registration at manually selected sites; it does not draw upon the motion information inherent in the bronchoscopic video. Further, the registration procedure is slow. The proposed method has the following advantages: (1) it tracks the 3D motion of the bronchoscope using the bronchoscopic video; (2) it uses the tracked 3D trajectory of the bronchoscope to assist in locating sites in the 3D CT "virtual world" to perform the registration. In addition, the method incorporates techniques to: (1) detect and exclude corrupted video frames (to help make the video tracking more robust); (2) accelerate the computation of the many 3D virtual endoluminal renderings (thus, speeding up the registration process). We have tested the integrated tracking-registration method on a human airway-tree phantom and on real human data.

  13. 3D model-based catheter tracking for motion compensation in EP procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brost, Alexander; Liao, Rui; Hornegger, Joachim; Strobel, Norbert

    2010-02-01

    Atrial fibrillation is the most common sustained heart arrhythmia and a leading cause of stroke. Its treatment by radio-frequency catheter ablation, performed using fluoroscopic image guidance, is gaining increasingly more importance. Two-dimensional fluoroscopic navigation can take advantage of overlay images derived from pre-operative 3-D data to add anatomical details otherwise not visible under X-ray. Unfortunately, respiratory motion may impair the utility of these static overlay images for catheter navigation. We developed an approach for image-based 3-D motion compensation as a solution to this problem. A bi-plane C-arm system is used to take X-ray images of a special circumferential mapping catheter from two directions. In the first step of the method, a 3-D model of the device is reconstructed. Three-dimensional respiratory motion at the site of ablation is then estimated by tracking the reconstructed catheter model in 3-D. This step involves bi-plane fluoroscopy and 2-D/3-D registration. Phantom data and clinical data were used to assess our model-based catheter tracking method. Experiments involving a moving heart phantom yielded an average 2-D tracking error of 1.4 mm and an average 3-D tracking error of 1.1 mm. Our evaluation of clinical data sets comprised 469 bi-plane fluoroscopy frames (938 monoplane fluoroscopy frames). We observed an average 2-D tracking error of 1.0 mm +/- 0.4 mm and an average 3-D tracking error of 0.8 mm +/- 0.5 mm. These results demonstrate that model-based motion-compensation based on 2-D/3-D registration is both feasible and accurate.

  14. LayTracks3D: A new approach for meshing general solids using medial axis transform

    DOE PAGES

    Quadros, William Roshan

    2015-08-22

    This study presents an extension of the all-quad meshing algorithm called LayTracks to generate high quality hex-dominant meshes of general solids. LayTracks3D uses the mapping between the Medial Axis (MA) and the boundary of the 3D domain to decompose complex 3D domains into simpler domains called Tracks. Tracks in 3D have no branches and are symmetric, non-intersecting, orthogonal to the boundary, and the shortest path from the MA to the boundary. These properties of tracks result in desired meshes with near cube shape elements at the boundary, structured mesh along the boundary normal with any irregular nodes restricted to themore » MA, and sharp boundary feature preservation. The algorithm has been tested on a few industrial CAD models and hex-dominant meshes are shown in the Results section. Work is underway to extend LayTracks3D to generate all-hex meshes.« less

  15. 3D simulation of the image formation in soft x-ray microscopes.

    PubMed

    Selin, Mårten; Fogelqvist, Emelie; Holmberg, Anders; Guttmann, Peter; Vogt, Ulrich; Hertz, Hans M

    2014-12-15

    In water-window soft x-ray microscopy the studied object is typically larger than the depth of focus and the sample illumination is often partially coherent. This blurs out-of-focus features and may introduce considerable fringing. Understanding the influence of these phenomena on the image formation is therefore important when interpreting experimental data. Here we present a wave-propagation model operating in 3D for simulating the image formation of thick objects in partially coherent soft x-ray microscopes. The model is compared with present simulation methods as well as with experiments. The results show that our model predicts the image formation of transmission soft x-ray microscopes more accurately than previous models.

  16. Sketch on dynamic gesture tracking and analysis exploiting vision-based 3D interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woo, Woontack; Kim, Namgyu; Wong, Karen; Tadenuma, Makoto

    2000-12-01

    In this paper, we propose a vision-based 3D interface exploiting invisible 3D boxes, arranged in the personal space (i.e. reachable space by the body without traveling), which allows robust yet simple dynamic gesture tracking and analysis, without exploiting complicated sensor-based motion tracking systems. Vision-based gesture tracking and analysis is still a challenging problem, even though we have witnessed rapid advances in computer vision over the last few decades. The proposed framework consists of three main parts, i.e. (1) object segmentation without bluescreen and 3D box initialization with depth information, (2) movement tracking by observing how the body passes through the 3D boxes in the personal space and (3) movement feature extraction based on Laban's Effort theory and movement analysis by mapping features to meaningful symbols using time-delay neural networks. Obviously, exploiting depth information using multiview images improves the performance of gesture analysis by reducing the errors introduced by simple 2D interfaces In addition, the proposed box-based 3D interface lessens the difficulties in both tracking movement in 3D space and in extracting low-level features of the movement. Furthermore, the time-delay neural networks lessens the difficulties in movement analysis by training. Due to its simplicity and robustness, the framework will provide interactive systems, such as ATR I-cubed Tangible Music System or ATR Interactive Dance system, with improved quality of the 3D interface. The proposed simple framework also can be extended to other applications requiring dynamic gesture tracking and analysis on the fly.

  17. Persistent and automatic intraoperative 3D digitization of surfaces under dynamic magnifications of an operating microscope

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Ankur N.; Miga, Michael I.; Pheiffer, Thomas S.; Chambless, Lola B.; Thompson, Reid C.; Dawant, Benoit M.

    2014-01-01

    One of the major challenges impeding advancement in image-guided surgical (IGS) systems is the soft-tissue deformation during surgical procedures. These deformations reduce the utility of the patient’s preoperative images and may produce inaccuracies in the application of preoperative surgical plans. Solutions to compensate for the tissue deformations include the acquisition of intraoperative tomographic images of the whole organ for direct displacement measurement and techniques that combines intraoperative organ surface measurements with computational biomechanical models to predict subsurface displacements. The later solution has the advantage of being less expensive and amenable to surgical workflow. Several modalities such as textured laser scanners, conoscopic holography, and stereo-pair cameras have been proposed for the intraoperative 3D estimation of organ surfaces to drive patient-specific biomechanical models for the intraoperative update of preoperative images. Though each modality has its respective advantages and disadvantages, stereo-pair camera approaches used within a standard operating microscope is the focus of this article. A new method that permits the automatic and near real-time estimation of 3D surfaces (at 1Hz) under varying magnifications of the operating microscope is proposed. This method has been evaluated on a CAD phantom object and on full-length neurosurgery video sequences (~1 hour) acquired intraoperatively by the proposed stereovision system. To the best of our knowledge, this type of validation study on full-length brain tumor surgery videos has not been done before. The method for estimating the unknown magnification factor of the operating microscope achieves accuracy within 0.02 of the theoretical value on a CAD phantom and within 0.06 on 4 clinical videos of the entire brain tumor surgery. When compared to a laser range scanner, the proposed method for reconstructing 3D surfaces intraoperatively achieves root mean square

  18. Extraction and tracking of MRI tagging sheets using a 3D Gabor filter bank.

    PubMed

    Qian, Zhen; Metaxas, Dimitris N; Axel, Leon

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we present a novel method for automatically extracting the tagging sheets in tagged cardiac MR images, and tracking their displacement during the heart cycle, using a tunable 3D Gabor filter bank. Tagged MRI is a non-invasive technique for the study of myocardial deformation. We design the 3D Gabor filter bank based on the geometric characteristics of the tagging sheets. The tunable parameters of the Gabor filter bank are used to adapt to the myocardium deformation. The whole 3D image dataset is convolved with each Gabor filter in the filter bank, in the Fourier domain. Then we impose a set of deformable meshes onto the extracted tagging sheets and track them over time. Dynamic estimation of the filter parameters and the mesh internal smoothness are used to help the tracking. Some very encouraging results are shown.

  19. Real-time visual sensing system achieving high-speed 3D particle tracking with nanometer resolution.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Peng; Jhiang, Sissy M; Menq, Chia-Hsiang

    2013-11-01

    This paper presents a real-time visual sensing system, which is created to achieve high-speed three-dimensional (3D) motion tracking of microscopic spherical particles in aqueous solutions with nanometer resolution. The system comprises a complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) camera, a field programmable gate array (FPGA), and real-time image processing programs. The CMOS camera has high photosensitivity and superior SNR. It acquires images of 128×120 pixels at a frame rate of up to 10,000 frames per second (fps) under the white light illumination from a standard 100 W halogen lamp. The real-time image stream is downloaded from the camera directly to the FPGA, wherein a 3D particle-tracking algorithm is implemented to calculate the 3D positions of the target particle in real time. Two important objectives, i.e., real-time estimation of the 3D position matches the maximum frame rate of the camera and the timing of the output data stream of the system is precisely controlled, are achieved. Two sets of experiments were conducted to demonstrate the performance of the system. First, the visual sensing system was used to track the motion of a 2 μm polystyrene bead, whose motion was controlled by a three-axis piezo motion stage. The ability to track long-range motion with nanometer resolution in all three axes is demonstrated. Second, it was used to measure the Brownian motion of the 2 μm polystyrene bead, which was stabilized in aqueous solution by a laser trapping system. PMID:24216655

  20. Improving segmentation of 3D touching cell nuclei using flow tracking on surface meshes.

    PubMed

    Li, Gang; Guo, Lei

    2012-01-01

    Automatic segmentation of touching cell nuclei in 3D microscopy images is of great importance in bioimage informatics and computational biology. This paper presents a novel method for improving 3D touching cell nuclei segmentation. Given binary touching nuclei by the method in Li et al. (2007), our method herein consists of several steps: surface mesh reconstruction and curvature information estimation; direction field diffusion on surface meshes; flow tracking on surface meshes; and projection of surface mesh segmentation to volumetric images. The method is validated on both synthesised and real 3D touching cell nuclei images, demonstrating its validity and effectiveness.

  1. Vision-Based Long-Range 3D Tracking, applied to Underground Surveying Tasks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mossel, Annette; Gerstweiler, Georg; Vonach, Emanuel; Kaufmann, Hannes; Chmelina, Klaus

    2014-04-01

    To address the need of highly automated positioning systems in underground construction, we present a long-range 3D tracking system based on infrared optical markers. It provides continuous 3D position estimation of static or kinematic targets with low latency over a tracking volume of 12 m x 8 m x 70 m (width x height x depth). Over the entire volume, relative 3D point accuracy with a maximal deviation ≤ 22 mm is ensured with possible target rotations of yaw, pitch = 0 - 45° and roll = 0 - 360°. No preliminary sighting of target(s) is necessary since the system automatically locks onto a target without user intervention and autonomously starts tracking as soon as a target is within the view of the system. The proposed system needs a minimal hardware setup, consisting of two machine vision cameras and a standard workstation for data processing. This allows for quick installation with minimal disturbance of construction work. The data processing pipeline ensures camera calibration and tracking during on-going underground activities. Tests in real underground scenarios prove the system's capabilities to act as 3D position measurement platform for multiple underground tasks that require long range, low latency and high accuracy. Those tasks include simultaneously tracking of personnel, machines or robots.

  2. 3D target tracking in infrared imagery by SIFT-based distance histograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Ruicheng; Cao, Zhiguo

    2011-11-01

    SIFT tracking algorithm is an excellent point-based tracking algorithm, which has high tracking performance and accuracy due to its robust capability against rotation, scale change and occlusion. However, when tracking a huge 3D target in complicated real scenarios in a forward-looking infrared (FLIR) image sequence taken from an airborne moving platform, the tracked point locating in the vertical surface usually shifts away from the correct position. In this paper, we propose a novel algorithm for 3D target tracking in FLIR image sequences. Our approach uses SIFT keypoints detected in consecutive frames for point correspondence. The candidate position of the tracked point is firstly estimated by computing the affine transformation using local corresponding SIFT keypoints. Then the correct position is located via an optimal method. Euclidean distances between a candidate point and SIFT keypoints nearby are calculated and formed into a SIFT-based distance histogram. The distance histogram is defined a cost of associating each candidate point to a correct tracked point using the constraint based on the topology of each candidate point with its surrounding SIFT keypoints. Minimization of the cost is formulated as a combinatorial optimization problem. Experiments demonstrate that the proposed algorithm efficiently improves the tracking performance and accuracy.

  3. Design and Performance Evaluation on Ultra-Wideband Time-Of-Arrival 3D Tracking System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ni, Jianjun; Arndt, Dickey; Ngo, Phong; Dusl, John

    2012-01-01

    A three-dimensional (3D) Ultra-Wideband (UWB) Time--of-Arrival (TOA) tracking system has been studied at NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) to provide the tracking capability inside the International Space Station (ISS) modules for various applications. One of applications is to locate and report the location where crew experienced possible high level of carbon-dioxide and felt upset. In order to accurately locate those places in a multipath intensive environment like ISS modules, it requires a robust real-time location system (RTLS) which can provide the required accuracy and update rate. A 3D UWB TOA tracking system with two-way ranging has been proposed and studied. The designed system will be tested in the Wireless Habitat Testbed which simulates the ISS module environment. In this presentation, we discuss the 3D TOA tracking algorithm and the performance evaluation based on different tracking baseline configurations. The simulation results show that two configurations of the tracking baseline are feasible. With 100 picoseconds standard deviation (STD) of TOA estimates, the average tracking error 0.2392 feet (about 7 centimeters) can be achieved for configuration Twisted Rectangle while the average tracking error 0.9183 feet (about 28 centimeters) can be achieved for configuration Slightly-Twisted Top Rectangle . The tracking accuracy can be further improved with the improvement of the STD of TOA estimates. With 10 picoseconds STD of TOA estimates, the average tracking error 0.0239 feet (less than 1 centimeter) can be achieved for configuration "Twisted Rectangle".

  4. Semi-automated 3D Leaf Reconstruction and Analysis of Trichome Patterning from Light Microscopic Images

    PubMed Central

    Schrader, Andrea; Hülskamp, Martin; Tresch, Achim

    2013-01-01

    Trichomes are leaf hairs that are formed by single cells on the leaf surface. They are known to be involved in pathogen resistance. Their patterning is considered to emerge from a field of initially equivalent cells through the action of a gene regulatory network involving trichome fate promoting and inhibiting factors. For a quantitative analysis of single and double mutants or the phenotypic variation of patterns in different ecotypes, it is imperative to statistically evaluate the pattern reliably on a large number of leaves. Here we present a method that enables the analysis of trichome patterns at early developmental leaf stages and the automatic analysis of various spatial parameters. We focus on the most challenging young leaf stages that require the analysis in three dimensions, as the leaves are typically not flat. Our software TrichEratops reconstructs 3D surface models from 2D stacks of conventional light-microscope pictures. It allows the GUI-based annotation of different stages of trichome development, which can be analyzed with respect to their spatial distribution to capture trichome patterning events. We show that 3D modeling removes biases of simpler 2D models and that novel trichome patterning features increase the sensitivity for inter-accession comparisons. PMID:23637587

  5. Semi-automated 3D leaf reconstruction and analysis of trichome patterning from light microscopic images.

    PubMed

    Failmezger, Henrik; Jaegle, Benjamin; Schrader, Andrea; Hülskamp, Martin; Tresch, Achim

    2013-04-01

    Trichomes are leaf hairs that are formed by single cells on the leaf surface. They are known to be involved in pathogen resistance. Their patterning is considered to emerge from a field of initially equivalent cells through the action of a gene regulatory network involving trichome fate promoting and inhibiting factors. For a quantitative analysis of single and double mutants or the phenotypic variation of patterns in different ecotypes, it is imperative to statistically evaluate the pattern reliably on a large number of leaves. Here we present a method that enables the analysis of trichome patterns at early developmental leaf stages and the automatic analysis of various spatial parameters. We focus on the most challenging young leaf stages that require the analysis in three dimensions, as the leaves are typically not flat. Our software TrichEratops reconstructs 3D surface models from 2D stacks of conventional light-microscope pictures. It allows the GUI-based annotation of different stages of trichome development, which can be analyzed with respect to their spatial distribution to capture trichome patterning events. We show that 3D modeling removes biases of simpler 2D models and that novel trichome patterning features increase the sensitivity for inter-accession comparisons.

  6. Site-specific 3D imaging of cells and tissues with a dual beam microscope

    PubMed Central

    Heymann, Jurgen A.W.; Hayles, Mike; Gestmann, Ingo; Giannuzzi, Lucille A.; Lich, Ben; Subramaniam, Sriram

    2006-01-01

    Current approaches to 3D imaging at subcellular resolution using confocal microscopy and electron tomography, while powerful, are limited to relatively thin and transparent specimens. Here we report on the use of a new generation of dual beam electron microscopes capable of site-specific imaging of the interior of cellular and tissue specimens at spatial resolutions about an order of magnitude better than those currently achieved with optical microscopy. The principle of imaging is based on using a focused ion beam to create a cut at a designated site in the specimen, followed by viewing the newly generated surface with a scanning electron beam. Iteration of these two steps several times thus results in the generation of a series of surface maps of the specimen at regularly spaced intervals, which can be converted into a three-dimensional map of the specimen. We have explored the potential of this sequential “slice-and-view” strategy for site-specific 3D imaging of frozen yeast cells and tumor tissue, and establish that this approach can identify the locations of intracellular features such as the 100 nm-wide yeast nuclear pore complex. We also show that 200 nm thick sections can be generated in situ by “milling” of resin-embedded specimens using the ion beam, providing a valuable alternative to manual sectioning of cells and tissues using an ultramicrotome. Our results demonstrate that dual beam imaging is a powerful new tool for cellular and subcellular imaging in 3D for both basic biomedical and clinical applications. PMID:16713294

  7. Moving Human Path Tracking Based on Video Surveillance in 3d Indoor Scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yan; Zlatanova, Sisi; Wang, Zhe; Zhang, Yeting; Liu, Liu

    2016-06-01

    Video surveillance systems are increasingly used for a variety of 3D indoor applications. We can analyse human behaviour, discover and avoid crowded areas, monitor human traffic and so forth. In this paper we concentrate on use of surveillance cameras to track and reconstruct the path a person has followed. For the purpose we integrated video surveillance data with a 3D indoor model of the building and develop a single human moving path tracking method. We process the surveillance videos to detected single human moving traces; then we match the depth information of 3D scenes to the constructed 3D indoor network model and define the human traces in the 3D indoor space. Finally, the single human traces extracted from multiple cameras are connected with the help of the connectivity provided by the 3D network model. Using this approach, we can reconstruct the entire walking path. The provided experiments with a single person have verified the effectiveness and robustness of the method.

  8. 3D single molecule tracking in thick cellular specimens using multifocal plane microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ram, Sripad; Ward, E. Sally; Ober, Raimund J.

    2011-03-01

    One of the major challenges in single molecule microscopy concerns 3D tracking of single molecules in cellular specimens. This has been a major impediment to study many fundamental cellular processes, such as protein transport across thick cellular specimens (e.g. a cell-monolayer). Here we show that multifocal plane microscopy (MUM), an imaging modality developed by our group, provides the much needed solution to this longstanding problem. While MUM was previously used for 3D single molecule tracking at shallow depths (~ 1 micron) in live-cells, the question arises if MUM can also live up to the significant challenge of tracking single molecules in thick samples. Here by substantially expanding the capabilities of MUM, we demonstrate 3D tracking of quantum-dot labeled molecules in a ~ 10 micron thick cell monolayer. In this way we have reconstructed the complete 3D intracellular trafficking itinerary of single molecules at high spatial and temporal precision in a thick cell-sample. Funding support: NIH and the National MS Society.

  9. Mesoscopic in vivo 3-D tracking of sparse cell populations using angular multiplexed optical projection tomography

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lingling; Alexandrov, Yuriy; Kumar, Sunil; Andrews, Natalie; Dallman, Margaret J.; French, Paul M. W.; McGinty, James

    2015-01-01

    We describe an angular multiplexed imaging technique for 3-D in vivo cell tracking of sparse cell distributions and optical projection tomography (OPT) with superior time-lapse resolution and a significantly reduced light dose compared to volumetric time-lapse techniques. We demonstrate that using dual axis OPT, where two images are acquired simultaneously at different projection angles, can enable localization and tracking of features in 3-D with a time resolution equal to the camera frame rate. This is achieved with a 200x reduction in light dose compared to an equivalent volumetric time-lapse single camera OPT acquisition with 200 projection angles. We demonstrate the application of this technique to mapping the 3-D neutrophil migration pattern observed over ~25.5 minutes in a live 2 day post-fertilisation transgenic LysC:GFP zebrafish embryo following a tail wound. PMID:25909009

  10. Surveillance, detection, and 3D infrared tracking of bullets, rockets, mortars, and artillery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leslie, Daniel H.; Hyman, Howard; Moore, Fritz; Squire, Mark D.

    2001-09-01

    We describe test results using the FIRST (Fast InfraRed Sniper Tracker) to detect, track, and range to bullets in flight for determining the location of the bullet launch point. The technology developed for the FIRST system can be used to provide detection and accurate 3D track data for other small threat objects including rockets, mortars, and artillery in addition to bullets. We discuss the radiometry and detection range for these objects, and discuss the trade-offs involved in design of the very fast optical system for acquisition, tracking, and ranging of these targets.

  11. Incremental learning of 3D-DCT compact representations for robust visual tracking.

    PubMed

    Li, Xi; Dick, Anthony; Shen, Chunhua; van den Hengel, Anton; Wang, Hanzi

    2013-04-01

    Visual tracking usually requires an object appearance model that is robust to changing illumination, pose, and other factors encountered in video. Many recent trackers utilize appearance samples in previous frames to form the bases upon which the object appearance model is built. This approach has the following limitations: 1) The bases are data driven, so they can be easily corrupted, and 2) it is difficult to robustly update the bases in challenging situations. In this paper, we construct an appearance model using the 3D discrete cosine transform (3D-DCT). The 3D-DCT is based on a set of cosine basis functions which are determined by the dimensions of the 3D signal and thus independent of the input video data. In addition, the 3D-DCT can generate a compact energy spectrum whose high-frequency coefficients are sparse if the appearance samples are similar. By discarding these high-frequency coefficients, we simultaneously obtain a compact 3D-DCT-based object representation and a signal reconstruction-based similarity measure (reflecting the information loss from signal reconstruction). To efficiently update the object representation, we propose an incremental 3D-DCT algorithm which decomposes the 3D-DCT into successive operations of the 2D discrete cosine transform (2D-DCT) and 1D discrete cosine transform (1D-DCT) on the input video data. As a result, the incremental 3D-DCT algorithm only needs to compute the 2D-DCT for newly added frames as well as the 1D-DCT along the third dimension, which significantly reduces the computational complexity. Based on this incremental 3D-DCT algorithm, we design a discriminative criterion to evaluate the likelihood of a test sample belonging to the foreground object. We then embed the discriminative criterion into a particle filtering framework for object state inference over time. Experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness and robustness of the proposed tracker.

  12. 3D model-based detection and tracking for space autonomous and uncooperative rendezvous

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Yang; Zhang, Yueqiang; Liu, Haibo

    2015-10-01

    In order to fully navigate using a vision sensor, a 3D edge model based detection and tracking technique was developed. Firstly, we proposed a target detection strategy over a sequence of several images from the 3D model to initialize the tracking. The overall purpose of such approach is to robustly match each image with the model views of the target. Thus we designed a line segment detection and matching method based on the multi-scale space technology. Experiments on real images showed that our method is highly robust under various image changes. Secondly, we proposed a method based on 3D particle filter (PF) coupled with M-estimation to track and estimate the pose of the target efficiently. In the proposed approach, a similarity observation model was designed according to a new distance function of line segments. Then, based on the tracking results of PF, the pose was optimized using M-estimation. Experiments indicated that the proposed method can effectively track and accurately estimate the pose of freely moving target in unconstrained environment.

  13. Extracting, Tracking, and Visualizing Magnetic Flux Vortices in 3D Complex-Valued Superconductor Simulation Data.

    PubMed

    Guo, Hanqi; Phillips, Carolyn L; Peterka, Tom; Karpeyev, Dmitry; Glatz, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    We propose a method for the vortex extraction and tracking of superconducting magnetic flux vortices for both structured and unstructured mesh data. In the Ginzburg-Landau theory, magnetic flux vortices are well-defined features in a complex-valued order parameter field, and their dynamics determine electromagnetic properties in type-II superconductors. Our method represents each vortex line (a 1D curve embedded in 3D space) as a connected graph extracted from the discretized field in both space and time. For a time-varying discrete dataset, our vortex extraction and tracking method is as accurate as the data discretization. We then apply 3D visualization and 2D event diagrams to the extraction and tracking results to help scientists understand vortex dynamics and macroscale superconductor behavior in greater detail than previously possible.

  14. Eye Tracking to Explore the Impacts of Photorealistic 3d Representations in Pedstrian Navigation Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Weihua; Liao, Hua

    2016-06-01

    Despite the now-ubiquitous two-dimensional (2D) maps, photorealistic three-dimensional (3D) representations of cities (e.g., Google Earth) have gained much attention by scientists and public users as another option. However, there is no consistent evidence on the influences of 3D photorealism on pedestrian navigation. Whether 3D photorealism can communicate cartographic information for navigation with higher effectiveness and efficiency and lower cognitive workload compared to the traditional symbolic 2D maps remains unknown. This study aims to explore whether the photorealistic 3D representation can facilitate processes of map reading and navigation in digital environments using a lab-based eye tracking approach. Here we show the differences of symbolic 2D maps versus photorealistic 3D representations depending on users' eye-movement and navigation behaviour data. We found that the participants using the 3D representation were less effective, less efficient and were required higher cognitive workload than using the 2D map for map reading. However, participants using the 3D representation performed more efficiently in self-localization and orientation at the complex decision points. The empirical results can be helpful to improve the usability of pedestrian navigation maps in future designs.

  15. Label free cell tracking in 3D tissue engineering constructs with high resolution imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, W. A.; Lam, K.-P.; Dempsey, K. P.; Mazzocchi-Jones, D.; Richardson, J. B.; Yang, Y.

    2014-02-01

    Within the field of tissue engineering there is an emphasis on studying 3-D live tissue structures. Consequently, to investigate and identify cellular activities and phenotypes in a 3-D environment for all in vitro experiments, including shape, migration/proliferation and axon projection, it is necessary to adopt an optical imaging system that enables monitoring 3-D cellular activities and morphology through the thickness of the construct for an extended culture period without cell labeling. This paper describes a new 3-D tracking algorithm developed for Cell-IQ®, an automated cell imaging platform, which has been equipped with an environmental chamber optimized to enable capturing time-lapse sequences of live cell images over a long-term period without cell labeling. As an integral part of the algorithm, a novel auto-focusing procedure was developed for phase contrast microscopy equipped with 20x and 40x objectives, to provide a more accurate estimation of cell growth/trajectories by allowing 3-D voxels to be computed at high spatiotemporal resolution and cell density. A pilot study was carried out in a phantom system consisting of horizontally aligned nanofiber layers (with precise spacing between them), to mimic features well exemplified in cellular activities of neuronal growth in a 3-D environment. This was followed by detailed investigations concerning axonal projections and dendritic circuitry formation in a 3-D tissue engineering construct. Preliminary work on primary animal neuronal cells in response to chemoattractant and topographic cue within the scaffolds has produced encouraging results.

  16. Towards robust 3D visual tracking for motion compensation in beating heart surgery.

    PubMed

    Richa, Rogério; Bó, Antônio P L; Poignet, Philippe

    2011-06-01

    In the context of minimally invasive cardiac surgery, active vision-based motion compensation schemes have been proposed for mitigating problems related to physiological motion. However, robust and accurate visual tracking remains a difficult task. The purpose of this paper is to present a robust visual tracking method that estimates the 3D temporal and spatial deformation of the heart surface using stereo endoscopic images. The novelty is the combination of a visual tracking method based on a Thin-Plate Spline (TPS) model for representing the heart surface deformations with a temporal heart motion model based on a time-varying dual Fourier series for overcoming tracking disturbances or failures. The considerable improvements in tracking robustness facing specular reflections and occlusions are demonstrated through experiments using images of in vivo porcine and human beating hearts.

  17. PEPT: An invaluable tool for 3-D particle tracking and CFD simulation verification in hydrocyclone studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Yu-Fen; Adamsen, Tom C. H.; Pisarev, Gleb I.; Hoffmann, Alex C.

    2013-05-01

    Particle tracks in a hydrocyclone generated both experimentally by positron emission particle tracking (PEPT) and numerically with Eulerian-Lagranian CFD have been studied and compared. A hydrocyclone with a cylinder-on-cone design was used in this study, the geometries used in the CFD simulations and in the experiments being identical. It is shown that it is possible to track a fast-moving particle in a hydrocyclone using PEPT with high temporal and spatial resolutions. The numerical 3-D particle trajectories were generated using the Large Eddy Simulation (LES) turbulence model for the fluid and Lagrangian particle tracking for the particles. The behaviors of the particles were analyzed in detail and were found to be consistent between experiments and CFD simulations. The tracks of the particles are discussed and related to the fluid flow field visualized in the CFD simulations using the cross-sectional static pressure distribution.

  18. Towards robust 3D visual tracking for motion compensation in beating heart surgery.

    PubMed

    Richa, Rogério; Bó, Antônio P L; Poignet, Philippe

    2011-06-01

    In the context of minimally invasive cardiac surgery, active vision-based motion compensation schemes have been proposed for mitigating problems related to physiological motion. However, robust and accurate visual tracking remains a difficult task. The purpose of this paper is to present a robust visual tracking method that estimates the 3D temporal and spatial deformation of the heart surface using stereo endoscopic images. The novelty is the combination of a visual tracking method based on a Thin-Plate Spline (TPS) model for representing the heart surface deformations with a temporal heart motion model based on a time-varying dual Fourier series for overcoming tracking disturbances or failures. The considerable improvements in tracking robustness facing specular reflections and occlusions are demonstrated through experiments using images of in vivo porcine and human beating hearts. PMID:21277821

  19. Microscopic spin Hamiltonian approaches for 3d8 and 3d2 ions in a trigonal crystal field - perturbation theory methods versus complete diagonalization methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudowicz, Czeslaw; Yeung, Yau-yuen; Yang, Zi-Yuan; Qin, Jian

    2002-06-01

    In this paper, we critically review the existing microscopic spin Hamiltonian (MSH) approaches, namely the complete diagonalization method (CDM) and the perturbation theory method (PTM), for 3d8(3d2) ions in a trigonal (C3v, D3, D3d) symmetry crystal field (CF). A new CDM is presented and a CFA/MSH computer package based on our crystal-field analysis (CFA) package for 3dN ions is developed for numerical calculations. Our method takes into account the contribution to the SH parameters (D, g∥ and g⊥) from all 45 CF states for 3d8(3d2) ions and is based on the complete diagonalization of the Hamiltonian including the electrostatic interactions, the CF terms (in the intermediate CF scheme) and the spin-orbit coupling. The CFA/MSH package enables us to study not only the CF energy levels and wavefunctions but also the SH parameters as functions of the CF parameters (B20, B40 and B43 or alternatively Dq, v and v') for 3d8(3d2) ions in trigonal symmetry. Extensive comparative studies of other MSH approaches are carried out using the CFA/MSH package. First, we check the accuracy of the approximate PTM based on the `quasi-fourth-order' perturbation formulae developed by Petrosyan and Mirzakhanyan (PM). The present investigations indicate that the PM formulae for the g-factors (g∥ and g⊥) indeed work well, especially for the cases of small v and v' and large Dq, whereas the PM formula for the zero-field splitting (ZFS) exhibits serious shortcomings. Earlier criticism of the PM approach by Zhou et al (Zhou K W, Zhao S B, Wu P F and Xie J K 1990 Phys. Status Solidi b 162 193) is then revisited. Second, we carry out an extensive comparison of the results of the present CFA/MSH package and those of other CDMs based on the strong- and weak-CF schemes. The CF energy levels and the SH parameters for 3d2 and 3d8 ions at C3v symmetry sites in several crystals are calculated and analysed. Our investigations reveal serious inconsistencies in the CDM results of Zhou et al and Li

  20. Fusing inertial sensor data in an extended Kalman filter for 3D camera tracking.

    PubMed

    Erdem, Arif Tanju; Ercan, Ali Özer

    2015-02-01

    In a setup where camera measurements are used to estimate 3D egomotion in an extended Kalman filter (EKF) framework, it is well-known that inertial sensors (i.e., accelerometers and gyroscopes) are especially useful when the camera undergoes fast motion. Inertial sensor data can be fused at the EKF with the camera measurements in either the correction stage (as measurement inputs) or the prediction stage (as control inputs). In general, only one type of inertial sensor is employed in the EKF in the literature, or when both are employed they are both fused in the same stage. In this paper, we provide an extensive performance comparison of every possible combination of fusing accelerometer and gyroscope data as control or measurement inputs using the same data set collected at different motion speeds. In particular, we compare the performances of different approaches based on 3D pose errors, in addition to camera reprojection errors commonly found in the literature, which provides further insight into the strengths and weaknesses of different approaches. We show using both simulated and real data that it is always better to fuse both sensors in the measurement stage and that in particular, accelerometer helps more with the 3D position tracking accuracy, whereas gyroscope helps more with the 3D orientation tracking accuracy. We also propose a simulated data generation method, which is beneficial for the design and validation of tracking algorithms involving both camera and inertial measurement unit measurements in general.

  1. Alignment of 3D Building Models and TIR Video Sequences with Line Tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwaszczuk, D.; Stilla, U.

    2014-11-01

    Thermal infrared imagery of urban areas became interesting for urban climate investigations and thermal building inspections. Using a flying platform such as UAV or a helicopter for the acquisition and combining the thermal data with the 3D building models via texturing delivers a valuable groundwork for large-area building inspections. However, such thermal textures are useful for further analysis if they are geometrically correctly extracted. This can be achieved with a good coregistrations between the 3D building models and thermal images, which cannot be achieved by direct georeferencing. Hence, this paper presents methodology for alignment of 3D building models and oblique TIR image sequences taken from a flying platform. In a single image line correspondences between model edges and image line segments are found using accumulator approach and based on these correspondences an optimal camera pose is calculated to ensure the best match between the projected model and the image structures. Among the sequence the linear features are tracked based on visibility prediction. The results of the proposed methodology are presented using a TIR image sequence taken from helicopter in a densely built-up urban area. The novelty of this work is given by employing the uncertainty of the 3D building models and by innovative tracking strategy based on a priori knowledge from the 3D building model and the visibility checking.

  2. Real-Time 3D Tracking and Reconstruction on Mobile Phones.

    PubMed

    Prisacariu, Victor Adrian; Kähler, Olaf; Murray, David W; Reid, Ian D

    2015-05-01

    We present a novel framework for jointly tracking a camera in 3D and reconstructing the 3D model of an observed object. Due to the region based approach, our formulation can handle untextured objects, partial occlusions, motion blur, dynamic backgrounds and imperfect lighting. Our formulation also allows for a very efficient implementation which achieves real-time performance on a mobile phone, by running the pose estimation and the shape optimisation in parallel. We use a level set based pose estimation but completely avoid the, typically required, explicit computation of a global distance. This leads to tracking rates of more than 100 Hz on a desktop PC and 30 Hz on a mobile phone. Further, we incorporate additional orientation information from the phone's inertial sensor which helps us resolve the tracking ambiguities inherent to region based formulations. The reconstruction step first probabilistically integrates 2D image statistics from selected keyframes into a 3D volume, and then imposes coherency and compactness using a total variational regularisation term. The global optimum of the overall energy function is found using a continuous max-flow algorithm and we show that, similar to tracking, the integration of per voxel posteriors instead of likelihoods improves the precision and accuracy of the reconstruction.

  3. Drogue tracking using 3D flash lidar for autonomous aerial refueling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chao-I.; Stettner, Roger

    2011-06-01

    Autonomous aerial refueling (AAR) is an important capability for an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) to increase its flying range and endurance without increasing its size. This paper presents a novel tracking method that utilizes both 2D intensity and 3D point-cloud data acquired with a 3D Flash LIDAR sensor to establish relative position and orientation between the receiver vehicle and drogue during an aerial refueling process. Unlike classic, vision-based sensors, a 3D Flash LIDAR sensor can provide 3D point-cloud data in real time without motion blur, in the day or night, and is capable of imaging through fog and clouds. The proposed method segments out the drogue through 2D analysis and estimates the center of the drogue from 3D point-cloud data for flight trajectory determination. A level-set front propagation routine is first employed to identify the target of interest and establish its silhouette information. Sufficient domain knowledge, such as the size of the drogue and the expected operable distance, is integrated into our approach to quickly eliminate unlikely target candidates. A statistical analysis along with a random sample consensus (RANSAC) is performed on the target to reduce noise and estimate the center of the drogue after all 3D points on the drogue are identified. The estimated center and drogue silhouette serve as the seed points to efficiently locate the target in the next frame.

  4. Error control in the set-up of stereo camera systems for 3d animal tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavagna, A.; Creato, C.; Del Castello, L.; Giardina, I.; Melillo, S.; Parisi, L.; Viale, M.

    2015-12-01

    Three-dimensional tracking of animal systems is the key to the comprehension of collective behavior. Experimental data collected via a stereo camera system allow the reconstruction of the 3d trajectories of each individual in the group. Trajectories can then be used to compute some quantities of interest to better understand collective motion, such as velocities, distances between individuals and correlation functions. The reliability of the retrieved trajectories is strictly related to the accuracy of the 3d reconstruction. In this paper, we perform a careful analysis of the most significant errors affecting 3d reconstruction, showing how the accuracy depends on the camera system set-up and on the precision of the calibration parameters.

  5. Measurement Matrix Optimization and Mismatch Problem Compensation for DLSLA 3-D SAR Cross-Track Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Qian; Jiang, Chenglong; Lin, Yun; Tan, Weixian; Wang, Zhirui; Hong, Wen

    2016-01-01

    With a short linear array configured in the cross-track direction, downward looking sparse linear array three-dimensional synthetic aperture radar (DLSLA 3-D SAR) can obtain the 3-D image of an imaging scene. To improve the cross-track resolution, sparse recovery methods have been investigated in recent years. In the compressive sensing (CS) framework, the reconstruction performance depends on the property of measurement matrix. This paper concerns the technique to optimize the measurement matrix and deal with the mismatch problem of measurement matrix caused by the off-grid scatterers. In the model of cross-track reconstruction, the measurement matrix is mainly affected by the configuration of antenna phase centers (APC), thus, two mutual coherence based criteria are proposed to optimize the configuration of APCs. On the other hand, to compensate the mismatch problem of the measurement matrix, the sparse Bayesian inference based method is introduced into the cross-track reconstruction by jointly estimate the scatterers and the off-grid error. Experiments demonstrate the performance of the proposed APCs’ configuration schemes and the proposed cross-track reconstruction method. PMID:27556471

  6. Measurement Matrix Optimization and Mismatch Problem Compensation for DLSLA 3-D SAR Cross-Track Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Bao, Qian; Jiang, Chenglong; Lin, Yun; Tan, Weixian; Wang, Zhirui; Hong, Wen

    2016-01-01

    With a short linear array configured in the cross-track direction, downward looking sparse linear array three-dimensional synthetic aperture radar (DLSLA 3-D SAR) can obtain the 3-D image of an imaging scene. To improve the cross-track resolution, sparse recovery methods have been investigated in recent years. In the compressive sensing (CS) framework, the reconstruction performance depends on the property of measurement matrix. This paper concerns the technique to optimize the measurement matrix and deal with the mismatch problem of measurement matrix caused by the off-grid scatterers. In the model of cross-track reconstruction, the measurement matrix is mainly affected by the configuration of antenna phase centers (APC), thus, two mutual coherence based criteria are proposed to optimize the configuration of APCs. On the other hand, to compensate the mismatch problem of the measurement matrix, the sparse Bayesian inference based method is introduced into the cross-track reconstruction by jointly estimate the scatterers and the off-grid error. Experiments demonstrate the performance of the proposed APCs' configuration schemes and the proposed cross-track reconstruction method. PMID:27556471

  7. Measurement Matrix Optimization and Mismatch Problem Compensation for DLSLA 3-D SAR Cross-Track Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Bao, Qian; Jiang, Chenglong; Lin, Yun; Tan, Weixian; Wang, Zhirui; Hong, Wen

    2016-08-22

    With a short linear array configured in the cross-track direction, downward looking sparse linear array three-dimensional synthetic aperture radar (DLSLA 3-D SAR) can obtain the 3-D image of an imaging scene. To improve the cross-track resolution, sparse recovery methods have been investigated in recent years. In the compressive sensing (CS) framework, the reconstruction performance depends on the property of measurement matrix. This paper concerns the technique to optimize the measurement matrix and deal with the mismatch problem of measurement matrix caused by the off-grid scatterers. In the model of cross-track reconstruction, the measurement matrix is mainly affected by the configuration of antenna phase centers (APC), thus, two mutual coherence based criteria are proposed to optimize the configuration of APCs. On the other hand, to compensate the mismatch problem of the measurement matrix, the sparse Bayesian inference based method is introduced into the cross-track reconstruction by jointly estimate the scatterers and the off-grid error. Experiments demonstrate the performance of the proposed APCs' configuration schemes and the proposed cross-track reconstruction method.

  8. Local characterization of hindered Brownian motion by using digital video microscopy and 3D particle tracking

    SciTech Connect

    Dettmer, Simon L.; Keyser, Ulrich F.; Pagliara, Stefano

    2014-02-15

    In this article we present methods for measuring hindered Brownian motion in the confinement of complex 3D geometries using digital video microscopy. Here we discuss essential features of automated 3D particle tracking as well as diffusion data analysis. By introducing local mean squared displacement-vs-time curves, we are able to simultaneously measure the spatial dependence of diffusion coefficients, tracking accuracies and drift velocities. Such local measurements allow a more detailed and appropriate description of strongly heterogeneous systems as opposed to global measurements. Finite size effects of the tracking region on measuring mean squared displacements are also discussed. The use of these methods was crucial for the measurement of the diffusive behavior of spherical polystyrene particles (505 nm diameter) in a microfluidic chip. The particles explored an array of parallel channels with different cross sections as well as the bulk reservoirs. For this experiment we present the measurement of local tracking accuracies in all three axial directions as well as the diffusivity parallel to the channel axis while we observed no significant flow but purely Brownian motion. Finally, the presented algorithm is suitable also for tracking of fluorescently labeled particles and particles driven by an external force, e.g., electrokinetic or dielectrophoretic forces.

  9. Fast parallel interferometric 3D tracking of numerous optically trapped particles and their hydrodynamic interaction.

    PubMed

    Ruh, Dominic; Tränkle, Benjamin; Rohrbach, Alexander

    2011-10-24

    Multi-dimensional, correlated particle tracking is a key technology to reveal dynamic processes in living and synthetic soft matter systems. In this paper we present a new method for tracking micron-sized beads in parallel and in all three dimensions - faster and more precise than existing techniques. Using an acousto-optic deflector and two quadrant-photo-diodes, we can track numerous optically trapped beads at up to tens of kHz with a precision of a few nanometers by back-focal plane interferometry. By time-multiplexing the laser focus, we can calibrate individually all traps and all tracking signals in a few seconds and in 3D. We show 3D histograms and calibration constants for nine beads in a quadratic arrangement, although trapping and tracking is easily possible for more beads also in arbitrary 2D arrangements. As an application, we investigate the hydrodynamic coupling and diffusion anomalies of spheres trapped in a 3 × 3 arrangement. PMID:22109012

  10. A 3D front tracking method on a CPU/GPU system

    SciTech Connect

    Bo, Wurigen; Grove, John

    2011-01-21

    We describe the method to port a sequential 3D interface tracking code to a GPU with CUDA. The interface is represented as a triangular mesh. Interface geometry properties and point propagation are performed on a GPU. Interface mesh adaptation is performed on a CPU. The convergence of the method is assessed from the test problems with given velocity fields. Performance results show overall speedups from 11 to 14 for the test problems under mesh refinement. We also briefly describe our ongoing work to couple the interface tracking method with a hydro solver.

  11. 3D silicon sensors with variable electrode depth for radiation hard high resolution particle tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Da Vià, C.; Borri, M.; Dalla Betta, G.; Haughton, I.; Hasi, J.; Kenney, C.; Povoli, M.; Mendicino, R.

    2015-04-01

    3D sensors, with electrodes micro-processed inside the silicon bulk using Micro-Electro-Mechanical System (MEMS) technology, were industrialized in 2012 and were installed in the first detector upgrade at the LHC, the ATLAS IBL in 2014. They are the radiation hardest sensors ever made. A new idea is now being explored to enhance the three-dimensional nature of 3D sensors by processing collecting electrodes at different depths inside the silicon bulk. This technique uses the electric field strength to suppress the charge collection effectiveness of the regions outside the p-n electrodes' overlap. Evidence of this property is supported by test beam data of irradiated and non-irradiated devices bump-bonded with pixel readout electronics and simulations. Applications include High-Luminosity Tracking in the high multiplicity LHC forward regions. This paper will describe the technical advantages of this idea and the tracking application rationale.

  12. 3D Visualization of Monte-Carlo Simulation's of HZE Track Structure and Initial Chemical Species

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plante, Ianik; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2009-01-01

    Heavy ions biophysics is important for space radiation risk assessment [1] and hadron-therapy [2]. The characteristic of heavy ions tracks include a very high energy deposition region close to the track (<20 nm) denoted as the track core, and an outer penumbra region consisting of individual secondary electrons (6-rays). A still open question is the radiobiological effects of 6- rays relative to the track core. Of importance is the induction of double-strand breaks (DSB) [3] and oxidative damage to the biomolecules and the tissue matrix, considered the most important lesions for acute and long term effects of radiation. In this work, we have simulated a 56Fe26+ ion track of 1 GeV/amu with our Monte-Carlo code RITRACKS [4]. The simulation results have been used to calculate the energy depiction and initial chemical species in a "voxelized" space, which is then visualized in 3D. Several voxels with dose >1000 Gy are found in the penumbra, some located 0.1 mm from the track core. In computational models, the DSB induction probability is calculated with radial dose [6], which may not take into account the higher RBE of electron track ends for DSB induction. Therefore, these simulations should help improve models of DSB induction and our understanding of heavy ions biophysics.

  13. Magnetic interactions and microscopic spin Hamiltonian approaches for 3d 3 ions at trigonal symmetry sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Hao; Zi-Yuan, Yang

    2006-04-01

    The spin-Hamiltonian (SH) parameters ( D, g //, and g ⊥) for 4A2(3d 3)-state ions at trigonal symmetry sites, taking into account the spin-spin (SS), the spin-other-orbit (SOO), the orbit-orbit (OO) magnetic interactions besides the well-known spin-orbit (SO) magnetic interaction, are studied in the intermediate-field coupling scheme using the CDM/MSH (Complete Diagonalization Method/ Microscopic Spin Hamiltonian) program recently developed. It is shown that the SH parameters arise from five microscopic mechanisms including SO coupling mechanism, SS coupling mechanism, SOO coupling mechanism, OO coupling mechanism, and SO-SS-SOO-OO combined coupling mechanism. The relative importance of the five (SO, SS, SOO, OO and combined SO-SS-SOO-OO) contributions to the SH parameters is investigated. It is shown that the SO coupling mechanism in these coupling mechanisms is the most important one. The effect of the OO coupling mechanism on the energy levels is appreciable whereas that on the SH parameters is negligible. The contribution from the SS coupling mechanism to the zero-field splitting (ZFS) parameter D is appreciable but is quite small to g-factors: g // and g ⊥. In contrast, the contribution from the SOO coupling mechanism to the ZFS parameter D is quite small but is appreciable to g-factors. Two perturbation theory method approaches have been examined using CDM/MSH program. It is found that the analytical expressions developed by Macfarlane for D, g //, and g ⊥ work well in most of the CF ranges considered whereas those developed by Zdansky for D do not work well in almost all the CF ranges considered. The illustrative evaluation is performed for typical laser material Cr 3+: Al 2O 3. The good agreements between the theoretical values and the experimental finding are obtained. It is found that the percentage difference δ (=|D-D|/|D|×100%) reaches 20.9% for laser material Cr 3+: Al 2O 3. The investigation indicates that the contribution to the ZFS parameter

  14. 3D motion tracking of the heart using Harmonic Phase (HARP) isosurfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soliman, Abraam S.; Osman, Nael F.

    2010-03-01

    Tags are non-invasive features induced in the heart muscle that enable the tracking of heart motion. Each tag line, in fact, corresponds to a 3D tag surface that deforms with the heart muscle during the cardiac cycle. Tracking of tag surfaces deformation is useful for the analysis of left ventricular motion. Cardiac material markers (Kerwin et al, MIA, 1997) can be obtained from the intersections of orthogonal surfaces which can be reconstructed from short- and long-axis tagged images. The proposed method uses Harmonic Phase (HARP) method for tracking tag lines corresponding to a specific harmonic phase value and then the reconstruction of grid tag surfaces is achieved by a Delaunay triangulation-based interpolation for sparse tag points. Having three different tag orientations from short- and long-axis images, the proposed method showed the deformation of 3D tag surfaces during the cardiac cycle. Previous work on tag surface reconstruction was restricted for the "dark" tag lines; however, the use of HARP as proposed enables the reconstruction of isosurfaces based on their harmonic phase values. The use of HARP, also, provides a fast and accurate way for tag lines identification and tracking, and hence, generating the surfaces.

  15. Meanie3D - a mean-shift based, multivariate, multi-scale clustering and tracking algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Jürgen-Lorenz; Malte, Diederich; Silke, Troemel

    2014-05-01

    Project OASE is the one of 5 work groups at the HErZ (Hans Ertel Centre for Weather Research), an ongoing effort by the German weather service (DWD) to further research at Universities concerning weather prediction. The goal of project OASE is to gain an object-based perspective on convective events by identifying them early in the onset of convective initiation and follow then through the entire lifecycle. The ability to follow objects in this fashion requires new ways of object definition and tracking, which incorporate all the available data sets of interest, such as Satellite imagery, weather Radar or lightning counts. The Meanie3D algorithm provides the necessary tool for this purpose. Core features of this new approach to clustering (object identification) and tracking are the ability to identify objects using the mean-shift algorithm applied to a multitude of variables (multivariate), as well as the ability to detect objects on various scales (multi-scale) using elements of Scale-Space theory. The algorithm works in 2D as well as 3D without modifications. It is an extension of a method well known from the field of computer vision and image processing, which has been tailored to serve the needs of the meteorological community. In spite of the special application to be demonstrated here (like convective initiation), the algorithm is easily tailored to provide clustering and tracking for a wide class of data sets and problems. In this talk, the demonstration is carried out on two of the OASE group's own composite sets. One is a 2D nationwide composite of Germany including C-Band Radar (2D) and Satellite information, the other a 3D local composite of the Bonn/Jülich area containing a high-resolution 3D X-Band Radar composite.

  16. Automated 3-D Tracking of Centrosomes in Sequences of Confocal Image Stacks

    SciTech Connect

    Kerekes, Ryan A; Gleason, Shaun Scott; Trivedi, Dr. Niraj; Solecki, Dr. David

    2009-01-01

    In order to facilitate the study of neuron migration, we propose a method for 3-D detection and tracking of centrosomes in time-lapse confocal image stacks of live neuron cells. We combine Laplacian-based blob detection, adaptive thresholding, and the extraction of scale and roundness features to find centrosome-like objects in each frame. We link these detections using the joint probabilistic data association filter (JPDAF) tracking algorithm with a Newtonian state-space model tailored to the motion characteristics of centrosomes in live neurons. We apply our algorithm to image sequences containing multiple cells, some of which had been treated with motion-inhibiting drugs. We provide qualitative results and quantitative comparisons to manual segmentation and tracking results showing that our motion estimates closely agree with those generated by neurobiology experts.

  17. Sensor Spatial Distortion, Visual Latency, and Update Rate Effects on 3D Tracking in Virtual Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, S. R.; Adelstein, B. D.; Baumeler, S.; Jense, G. J.; Jacoby, R. H.; Trejo, Leonard (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Several common defects that we have sought to minimize in immersing virtual environments are: static sensor spatial distortion, visual latency, and low update rates. Human performance within our environments during large amplitude 3D tracking was assessed by objective and subjective methods in the presence and absence of these defects. Results show that 1) removal of our relatively small spatial sensor distortion had minor effects on the tracking activity, 2) an Adapted Cooper-Harper controllability scale proved the most sensitive subjective indicator of the degradation of dynamic fidelity caused by increasing latency and decreasing frame rates, and 3) performance, as measured by normalized RMS tracking error or subjective impressions, was more markedly influenced by changing visual latency than by update rate.

  18. Tracking left ventricular borders in 3D echocardiographic sequences using motion-guided optical flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leung, K. Y. Esther; Danilouchkine, Mikhail G.; van Stralen, Marijn; de Jong, Nico; van der Steen, Antonius F. W.; Bosch, Johan G.

    2009-02-01

    For obtaining quantitative and objective functional parameters from three-dimensional (3D) echocardiographic sequences, automated segmentation methods may be preferable to cumbersome manual delineation of 3D borders. In this study, a novel optical-flow based tracking method is proposed for propagating 3D endocardial contours of the left ventricle throughout the cardiac cycle. To take full advantage of the time-continuous nature of cardiac motion, a statistical motion model was explicitly embedded in the optical flow solution. The cardiac motion was modeled as frame-to-frame affine transforms, which were extracted using Procrustes analysis on a set of training contours. Principal component analysis was applied to obtain a compact model of cardiac motion throughout the whole cardiac cycle. The parameters of this model were resolved in an optical flow manner, via spatial and temporal gradients in image intensity. The algorithm was tested on 36 noncontrast and 28 contrast enhanced 3D echocardiographic sequences in a leave-one-out manner. Good results were obtained using a combination of the proposed motion-guided method and a purely data-driven optical flow approach. The improvement was particularly noticeable in areas where the LV wall was obscured by image artifacts. In conclusion, the results show the applicability of the proposed method in clinical quality echocardiograms.

  19. 3-D Flow Field Diagnostics and Validation Studies using Stereoscopic Tracking Velocimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cha, Soyoung Stephen; Ramachandran, Narayanan; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The measurement of 3-D three-component velocity fields is of great importance in both ground and space experiments for understanding materials processing and fluid physics. Here, we present the investigation results of stereoscopic tracking velocimetry (STV) for measuring 3-D velocity fields. The effort includes diagnostic technology development, experimental velocity measurement, and comparison with analytical and numerical computation. The advantages of STV stems from the system simplicity for building compact hardware and in software efficiency for continual near-real-time process monitoring. It also has illumination flexibility for observing volumetric flow fields from arbitrary directions. STV is based on stereoscopic CCD observations of particles seeded in a flow. Neural networks are used for data analysis. The developed diagnostic tool is tested with a simple directional solidification apparatus using Succinonitrile. The 3-D velocity field in the liquid phase is measured and compared with results from detailed numerical computations. Our theoretical, numerical, and experimental effort has shown STV to be a viable candidate for reliably quantifying the 3-D flow field in materials processing and fluids experiments.

  20. Analysis of thoracic aorta hemodynamics using 3D particle tracking velocimetry and computational fluid dynamics.

    PubMed

    Gallo, Diego; Gülan, Utku; Di Stefano, Antonietta; Ponzini, Raffaele; Lüthi, Beat; Holzner, Markus; Morbiducci, Umberto

    2014-09-22

    Parallel to the massive use of image-based computational hemodynamics to study the complex flow establishing in the human aorta, the need for suitable experimental techniques and ad hoc cases for the validation and benchmarking of numerical codes has grown more and more. Here we present a study where the 3D pulsatile flow in an anatomically realistic phantom of human ascending aorta is investigated both experimentally and computationally. The experimental study uses 3D particle tracking velocimetry (PTV) to characterize the flow field in vitro, while finite volume method is applied to numerically solve the governing equations of motion in the same domain, under the same conditions. Our findings show that there is an excellent agreement between computational and measured flow fields during the forward flow phase, while the agreement is poorer during the reverse flow phase. In conclusion, here we demonstrate that 3D PTV is very suitable for a detailed study of complex unsteady flows as in aorta and for validating computational models of aortic hemodynamics. In a future step, it will be possible to take advantage from the ability of 3D PTV to evaluate velocity fluctuations and, for this reason, to gain further knowledge on the process of transition to turbulence occurring in the thoracic aorta.

  1. METHODS FOR USING 3-D ULTRASOUND SPECKLE TRACKING IN BIAXIAL MECHANICAL TESTING OF BIOLOGICAL TISSUE SAMPLES

    PubMed Central

    Yap, Choon Hwai; Park, Dae Woo; Dutta, Debaditya; Simon, Marc; Kim, Kang

    2014-01-01

    Being multilayered and anisotropic, biological tissues such as cardiac and arterial walls are structurally complex, making full assessment and understanding of their mechanical behavior challenging. Current standard mechanical testing uses surface markers to track tissue deformations and does not provide deformation data below the surface. In the study described here, we found that combining mechanical testing with 3-D ultrasound speckle tracking could overcome this limitation. Rat myocardium was tested with a biaxial tester and was concurrently scanned with high-frequency ultrasound in three dimensions. The strain energy function was computed from stresses and strains using an iterative non-linear curve-fitting algorithm. Because the strain energy function consists of terms for the base matrix and for embedded fibers, spatially varying fiber orientation was also computed by curve fitting. Using finite-element simulations, we first validated the accuracy of the non-linear curve-fitting algorithm. Next, we compared experimentally measured rat myocardium strain energy function values with those in the literature and found a matching order of magnitude. Finally, we retained samples after the experiments for fiber orientation quantification using histology and found that the results satisfactorily matched those computed in the experiments. We conclude that 3-D ultrasound speckle tracking can be a useful addition to traditional mechanical testing of biological tissues and may provide the benefit of enabling fiber orientation computation. PMID:25616585

  2. Ultrasonic diaphragm tracking for cardiac interventional navigation on 3D motion compensated static roadmaps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timinger, Holger; Kruger, Sascha; Dietmayer, Klaus; Borgert, Joern

    2005-04-01

    In this paper, a novel approach to cardiac interventional navigation on 3D motion-compensated static roadmaps is presented. Current coronary interventions, e.g. percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasties, are performed using 2D X-ray fluoroscopy. This comes along with well-known drawbacks like radiation exposure, use of contrast agent, and limited visualization, e.g. overlap and foreshortening, due to projection imaging. In the presented approach, the interventional device, i.e. the catheter, is tracked using an electromagnetic tracking system (MTS). Therefore, the catheters position is mapped into a static 3D image of the volume of interest (VOI) by means of an affine registration. In order to compensate for respiratory motion of the catheter with respect to the static image, a parameterized affine motion model is used which is driven by a respiratory sensor signal. This signal is derived from ultrasonic diaphragm tracking. The motion compensation for the heartbeat is done using ECG-gating. The methods are validated using a heart- and diaphragm-phantom. The mean displacement of the catheter due to the simulated organ motion decreases from approximately 9 mm to 1.3 mm. This result indicates that the proposed method is able to reconstruct the catheter position within the VOI accurately and that it can help to overcome drawbacks of current interventional procedures.

  3. 3D measurement of the position of gold particles via evanescent digital holographic particle tracking velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satake, Shin-ichi; Unno, Noriyuki; Nakata, Shuichiro; Taniguchi, Jun

    2016-08-01

    A new technique based on digital holography and evanescent waves was developed for 3D measurements of the position of gold nanoparticles in water. In this technique, an intensity profile is taken from a holographic image of a gold particle. To detect the position of the gold particle with high accuracy, its holographic image is recorded on a nanosized step made of MEXFLON, which has a refractive index close to that of water, and the position of the particle is reconstructed by means of digital holography. The height of the nanosized step was measured by using a profilometer and the digitally reconstructed height of the glass substrate had good agreement with the measured value. Furthermore, this method can be used to accurately track the 3D position of a gold particle in water.

  4. Oblique needle segmentation and tracking for 3D TRUS guided prostate brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Wei Zhouping; Gardi, Lori; Downey, Donal B.; Fenster, Aaron

    2005-09-15

    An algorithm was developed in order to segment and track brachytherapy needles inserted along oblique trajectories. Three-dimensional (3D) transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) images of the rigid rod simulating the needle inserted into the tissue-mimicking agar and chicken breast phantoms were obtained to test the accuracy of the algorithm under ideal conditions. Because the robot possesses high positioning and angulation accuracies, we used the robot as a ''gold standard,'' and compared the results of algorithm segmentation to the values measured by the robot. Our testing results showed that the accuracy of the needle segmentation algorithm depends on the needle insertion distance into the 3D TRUS image and the angulations with respect to the TRUS transducer, e.g., at a 10 deg. insertion anglulation in agar phantoms, the error of the algorithm in determining the needle tip position was less than 1 mm when the insertion distance was greater than 15 mm. Near real-time needle tracking was achieved by scanning a small volume containing the needle. Our tests also showed that, the segmentation time was less than 60 ms, and the scanning time was less than 1.2 s, when the insertion distance into the 3D TRUS image was less than 55 mm. In our needle tracking tests in chicken breast phantoms, the errors in determining the needle orientation were less than 2 deg. in robot yaw and 0.7 deg. in robot pitch orientations, for up to 20 deg. needle insertion angles with the TRUS transducer in the horizontal plane when the needle insertion distance was greater than 15 mm.

  5. An automated tool for 3D tracking of single molecules in living cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardini, L.; Capitanio, M.; Pavone, F. S.

    2015-03-01

    Since the behaviour of proteins and biological molecules is tightly related to cell's environment, more and more microscopy techniques are moving from in vitro to in living cells experiments. Looking at both diffusion and active transportation processes inside a cell requires three-dimensional localization over a few microns range, high SNR images and high temporal resolution. Since protein dynamics inside a cell involve all three dimensions, we developed an automated routine for 3D tracking of single fluorescent molecules inside living cells with nanometer accuracy, by exploiting the properties of the point-spread-function of out-of-focus Quantum Dots bound to the protein of interest.

  6. Study of a viewer tracking system with multiview 3D display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jinn-Cherng; Wu, Chang-Shuo; Hsiao, Chuan-Heng; Yang, Ming-Chieh; Liu, Wen-Chieh; Hung, Yi-Ping

    2008-02-01

    An autostereoscopic display provides users great enjoyment of stereo visualization without uncomfortable and inconvenient drawbacks of wearing stereo glasses. However, bandwidth constraints of current multi-view 3D display severely restrict the number of views that can be simultaneously displayed without degrading resolution or increasing display cost unacceptably. An alternative to multiple view presentation is that the position of observer can be measured by using viewer-tracking sensor. It is a very important module of the viewer-tracking component for fluently rendering and accurately projecting the stereo video. In order to render stereo content with respect to user's view points and to optically project the content onto the left and right eyes of the user accurately, the real-time viewer tracking technique that allows the user to move around freely when watching the autostereoscopic display is developed in this study. It comprises the face detection by using multiple eigenspaces of various lighting conditions, fast block matching for tracking four motion parameters of the user's face region. The Edge Orientation Histogram (EOH) on Real AdaBoost to improve the performance of original AdaBoost algorithm is also applied in this study. The AdaBoost algorithm using Haar feature in OpenCV library developed by Intel to detect human face and enhance the accuracy performance with rotating image. The frame rate of viewer tracking process can achieve up to 15 Hz. Since performance of the viewer tracking autostereoscopic display is still influenced under variant environmental conditions, the accuracy, robustness and efficiency of the viewer-tracking system are evaluated in this study.

  7. Longitudinal Measurement of Extracellular Matrix Rigidity in 3D Tumor Models Using Particle-tracking Microrheology

    PubMed Central

    El-Hamidi, Hamid; Celli, Jonathan P.

    2014-01-01

    The mechanical microenvironment has been shown to act as a crucial regulator of tumor growth behavior and signaling, which is itself remodeled and modified as part of a set of complex, two-way mechanosensitive interactions. While the development of biologically-relevant 3D tumor models have facilitated mechanistic studies on the impact of matrix rheology on tumor growth, the inverse problem of mapping changes in the mechanical environment induced by tumors remains challenging. Here, we describe the implementation of particle-tracking microrheology (PTM) in conjunction with 3D models of pancreatic cancer as part of a robust and viable approach for longitudinally monitoring physical changes in the tumor microenvironment, in situ. The methodology described here integrates a system of preparing in vitro 3D models embedded in a model extracellular matrix (ECM) scaffold of Type I collagen with fluorescently labeled probes uniformly distributed for position- and time-dependent microrheology measurements throughout the specimen. In vitro tumors are plated and probed in parallel conditions using multiwell imaging plates. Drawing on established methods, videos of tracer probe movements are transformed via the Generalized Stokes Einstein Relation (GSER) to report the complex frequency-dependent viscoelastic shear modulus, G*(ω). Because this approach is imaging-based, mechanical characterization is also mapped onto large transmitted-light spatial fields to simultaneously report qualitative changes in 3D tumor size and phenotype. Representative results showing contrasting mechanical response in sub-regions associated with localized invasion-induced matrix degradation as well as system calibration, validation data are presented. Undesirable outcomes from common experimental errors and troubleshooting of these issues are also presented. The 96-well 3D culture plating format implemented in this protocol is conducive to correlation of microrheology measurements with therapeutic

  8. An automated tool for 3D tracking of single molecules in living cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardini, L.; Capitanio, M.; Pavone, F. S.

    2015-07-01

    Recently, tremendous improvements have been achieved in the precision of localization of single fluorescent molecules, allowing localization and tracking of biomolecules at the nm level. Since the behaviour of proteins and biological molecules is tightly influenced by the cell's environment, a growing number of microscopy techniques are moving from in vitro to live cell experiments. Looking at both diffusion and active transportation processes inside a cell requires three-dimensional localization over a few microns range, high SNR images and high temporal resolution (ms order of magnitude). To satisfy these requirements we developed an automated routine that allow 3D tracking of single fluorescent molecules in living cells with nanometer accuracy, by exploiting the properties of the point-spread-function of out-of-focus Quantum Dots bound to the protein of interest.

  9. Passive Markers for Tracking Surgical Instruments in Real-Time 3-D Ultrasound Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Stoll, Jeffrey; Ren, Hongliang; Dupont, Pierre E.

    2013-01-01

    A family of passive echogenic markers is presented by which the position and orientation of a surgical instrument can be determined in a 3-D ultrasound volume, using simple image processing. Markers are attached near the distal end of the instrument so that they appear in the ultrasound volume along with the instrument tip. They are detected and measured within the ultrasound image, thus requiring no external tracking device. This approach facilitates imaging instruments and tissue simultaneously in ultrasound-guided interventions. Marker-based estimates of instrument pose can be used in augmented reality displays or for image-based servoing. Design principles for marker shapes are presented that ensure imaging system and measurement uniqueness constraints are met. An error analysis is included that can be used to guide marker design and which also establishes a lower bound on measurement uncertainty. Finally, examples of marker measurement and tracking algorithms are presented along with experimental validation of the concepts. PMID:22042148

  10. Quantifying the 3D Odorant Concentration Field Used by Actively Tracking Blue Crabs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webster, D. R.; Dickman, B. D.; Jackson, J. L.; Weissburg, M. J.

    2007-11-01

    Blue crabs and other aquatic organisms locate food and mates by tracking turbulent odorant plumes. The odorant concentration fluctuates unpredictably due to turbulent transport, and many characteristics of the fluctuation pattern have been hypothesized as useful cues for orienting to the odorant source. To make a direct linkage between tracking behavior and the odorant concentration signal, we developed a measurement system based the laser induced fluorescence technique to quantify the instantaneous 3D concentration field surrounding actively tracking blue crabs. The data suggest a correlation between upstream walking speed and the concentration of the odorant signal arriving at the antennule chemosensors, which are located near the mouth region. More specifically, we note an increase in upstream walking speed when high concentration bursts arrive at the antennules location. We also test hypotheses regarding the ability of blue crabs to steer relative to the plume centerline based on the signal contrast between the chemosensors located on their leg appendages. These chemosensors are located much closer to the substrate compared to the antennules and are separated by the width of the blue crab. In this case, it appears that blue crabs use the bilateral signal comparison to track along the edge of the plume.

  11. Adaptive Kalman snake for semi-autonomous 3D vessel tracking.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang-Hoon; Lee, Sanghoon

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, we propose a robust semi-autonomous algorithm for 3D vessel segmentation and tracking based on an active contour model and a Kalman filter. For each computed tomography angiography (CTA) slice, we use the active contour model to segment the vessel boundary and the Kalman filter to track position and shape variations of the vessel boundary between slices. For successful segmentation via active contour, we select an adequate number of initial points from the contour of the first slice. The points are set manually by user input for the first slice. For the remaining slices, the initial contour position is estimated autonomously based on segmentation results of the previous slice. To obtain refined segmentation results, an adaptive control spacing algorithm is introduced into the active contour model. Moreover, a block search-based initial contour estimation procedure is proposed to ensure that the initial contour of each slice can be near the vessel boundary. Experiments were performed on synthetic and real chest CTA images. Compared with the well-known Chan-Vese (CV) model, the proposed algorithm exhibited better performance in segmentation and tracking. In particular, receiver operating characteristic analysis on the synthetic and real CTA images demonstrated the time efficiency and tracking robustness of the proposed model. In terms of computational time redundancy, processing time can be effectively reduced by approximately 20%.

  12. The role of 3D and speckle tracking echocardiography in cardiac amyloidosis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Nucci, E M; Lisi, M; Cameli, M; Baldi, L; Puccetti, L; Mondillo, S; Favilli, R; Lunghetti, S

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac amyloidosis (CA) is a disorder characterized by amyloid fibrils deposition in cardiac interstitium; it results in a restrictive cardiomyopathy with heart failure (HF) and conduction abnormalities. The "gold standard" for diagnosis of CA is myocardial biopsy but possible sampling errors and procedural risks, limit it's use. Magnetic resonance (RMN) offers more information than traditional echocardiography and allows diagnosis of CA but often it's impossible to perform. We report the case of a man with HF and symptomatic bradyarrhythmia that required an urgent pacemaker implant. Echocardiography was strongly suggestive of CA but wasn't impossible to perform an RMN to confirm this hypothesis because the patient was implanted with a definitive pacemaker. So was performed a Speckle Tracking Echocardiography (STE) and a 3D echocardiography: STE allows to differentiate CA from others hypertrophic cardiomyopathy by longitudinal strain value < 12% and 3D echocardiography shows regional left ventricular dyssynchrony with a characteristic temporal pattern of dispersion of regional volume systolic change. On the basis of these results, finally was performed an endomyocardial biopsy that confirmed the diagnosis of CA. This case underlines the importance of news, noninvasive techniques such as eco 3D and STE for early diagnosis of CA, especially when RMN cannot be performed.

  13. Robust object tracking techniques for vision-based 3D motion analysis applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knyaz, Vladimir A.; Zheltov, Sergey Y.; Vishnyakov, Boris V.

    2016-04-01

    Automated and accurate spatial motion capturing of an object is necessary for a wide variety of applications including industry and science, virtual reality and movie, medicine and sports. For the most part of applications a reliability and an accuracy of the data obtained as well as convenience for a user are the main characteristics defining the quality of the motion capture system. Among the existing systems for 3D data acquisition, based on different physical principles (accelerometry, magnetometry, time-of-flight, vision-based), optical motion capture systems have a set of advantages such as high speed of acquisition, potential for high accuracy and automation based on advanced image processing algorithms. For vision-based motion capture accurate and robust object features detecting and tracking through the video sequence are the key elements along with a level of automation of capturing process. So for providing high accuracy of obtained spatial data the developed vision-based motion capture system "Mosca" is based on photogrammetric principles of 3D measurements and supports high speed image acquisition in synchronized mode. It includes from 2 to 4 technical vision cameras for capturing video sequences of object motion. The original camera calibration and external orientation procedures provide the basis for high accuracy of 3D measurements. A set of algorithms as for detecting, identifying and tracking of similar targets, so for marker-less object motion capture is developed and tested. The results of algorithms' evaluation show high robustness and high reliability for various motion analysis tasks in technical and biomechanics applications.

  14. Real-time visualization of 3-D dynamic microscopic objects using optical diffraction tomography.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyoohyun; Kim, Kyung Sang; Park, Hyunjoo; Ye, Jong Chul; Park, Yongkeun

    2013-12-30

    3-D refractive index (RI) distribution is an intrinsic bio-marker for the chemical and structural information about biological cells. Here we develop an optical diffraction tomography technique for the real-time reconstruction of 3-D RI distribution, employing sparse angle illumination and a graphic processing unit (GPU) implementation. The execution time for the tomographic reconstruction is 0.21 s for 96(3) voxels, which is 17 times faster than that of a conventional approach. We demonstrated the real-time visualization capability with imaging the dynamics of Brownian motion of an anisotropic colloidal dimer and the dynamic shape change in a red blood cell upon shear flow.

  15. Orbital Single Particle Tracking on a commercial confocal microscope using piezoelectric stage feedback

    PubMed Central

    Lanzanò, Luca; Gratton, Enrico

    2014-01-01

    Single Particle Tracking (SPT) is a technique used to locate fluorescent particles with nanometer precision. In the orbital tracking method the position of a particle is obtained analyzing the distribution of intensity along a circular orbit scanned around the particle. In combination with an active feedback this method allows tracking of particles in 2D and 3D with millisecond temporal resolution. Here we describe a SPT setup based on a feedback approach implemented with minimal modification of a commercially available confocal laser scanning microscope, the Zeiss LSM 510, in combination with an external piezoelectric stage scanner. The commercial microscope offers the advantage of a user-friendly software interface and pre-calibrated hardware components. The use of an external piezo-scanner allows the addition of feedback into the system but also represents a limitation in terms of its mechanical response. We describe in detail this implementation of the orbital tracking method and discuss advantages and limitations. As an example of application to live cell experiments we perform the 3D tracking of acidic vesicles in live polarized epithelial cells. PMID:25419461

  16. Nondestructive 3D confocal laser imaging with deconvolution of seven whole stardust tracks with complementary XRF and quantitative analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Greenberg, M.; Ebel, D.S.

    2009-03-19

    We present a nondestructive 3D system for analysis of whole Stardust tracks, using a combination of Laser Confocal Scanning Microscopy and synchrotron XRF. 3D deconvolution is used for optical corrections, and results of quantitative analyses of several tracks are presented. The Stardust mission to comet Wild 2 trapped many cometary and ISM particles in aerogel, leaving behind 'tracks' of melted silica aerogel on both sides of the collector. Collected particles and their tracks range in size from submicron to millimeter scale. Interstellar dust collected on the obverse of the aerogel collector is thought to have an average track length of {approx}15 {micro}m. It has been our goal to perform a total non-destructive 3D textural and XRF chemical analysis on both types of tracks. To that end, we use a combination of Laser Confocal Scanning Microscopy (LCSM) and X Ray Florescence (XRF) spectrometry. Utilized properly, the combination of 3D optical data and chemical data provides total nondestructive characterization of full tracks, prior to flattening or other destructive analysis methods. Our LCSM techniques allow imaging at 0.075 {micro}m/pixel, without the use of oil-based lenses. A full textural analysis on track No.82 is presented here as well as analysis of 6 additional tracks contained within 3 keystones (No.128, No.129 and No.140). We present a method of removing the axial distortion inherent in LCSM images, by means of a computational 3D Deconvolution algorithm, and present some preliminary experiments with computed point spread functions. The combination of 3D LCSM data and XRF data provides invaluable information, while preserving the integrity of the samples for further analysis. It is imperative that these samples, the first extraterrestrial solids returned since the Apollo era, be fully mapped nondestructively in 3D, to preserve the maximum amount of information prior to other, destructive analysis.

  17. Wave optics theory and 3-D deconvolution for the light field microscope

    PubMed Central

    Broxton, Michael; Grosenick, Logan; Yang, Samuel; Cohen, Noy; Andalman, Aaron; Deisseroth, Karl; Levoy, Marc

    2013-01-01

    Light field microscopy is a new technique for high-speed volumetric imaging of weakly scattering or fluorescent specimens. It employs an array of microlenses to trade off spatial resolution against angular resolution, thereby allowing a 4-D light field to be captured using a single photographic exposure without the need for scanning. The recorded light field can then be used to computationally reconstruct a full volume. In this paper, we present an optical model for light field microscopy based on wave optics, instead of previously reported ray optics models. We also present a 3-D deconvolution method for light field microscopy that is able to reconstruct volumes at higher spatial resolution, and with better optical sectioning, than previously reported. To accomplish this, we take advantage of the dense spatio-angular sampling provided by a microlens array at axial positions away from the native object plane. This dense sampling permits us to decode aliasing present in the light field to reconstruct high-frequency information. We formulate our method as an inverse problem for reconstructing the 3-D volume, which we solve using a GPU-accelerated iterative algorithm. Theoretical limits on the depth-dependent lateral resolution of the reconstructed volumes are derived. We show that these limits are in good agreement with experimental results on a standard USAF 1951 resolution target. Finally, we present 3-D reconstructions of pollen grains that demonstrate the improvements in fidelity made possible by our method. PMID:24150383

  18. Bridging microscopes: 3D correlative light and scanning electron microscopy of complex biological structures.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Miriam S; Günthert, Maja; Gasser, Philippe; Lucas, Falk; Wepf, Roger

    2012-01-01

    The rationale of correlative light and electron microscopy (CLEM) is to collect data on different information levels--ideally from an identical area on the same sample--with the aim of combining datasets at different levels of resolution to achieve a more holistic view of the hierarchical structural organization of cells and tissues. Modern three-dimensional (3D) imaging techniques in light and electron microscopy opened up new possibilities to expand morphological studies into the third dimension at the nanometer scale and over various volume dimensions. Here, we present two alternative approaches to correlate 3D light microscopy (LM) data with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) volume data. An adapted sample preparation method based on high-pressure freezing for structure preservation, followed by freeze-substitution for multimodal en-bloc imaging or serial-section imaging is described. The advantages and potential applications are exemplarily shown on various biological samples, such as cells, individual organisms, human tissue, as well as plant tissue. The two CLEM approaches presented here are per se not mutually exclusive, but have their distinct advantages. Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and focused ion beam-SEM (FIB-SEM) is most suitable for targeted 3D correlation of small volumes, whereas serial-section LM and SEM imaging has its strength in large-area or -volume screening and correlation. The second method can be combined with immunocytochemical methods. Both methods, however, have the potential to extract statistically relevant data of structural details for systems biology.

  19. Analysis of a vibrating interventional device to improve 3-D colormark tracking.

    PubMed

    Fronheiser, Matthew P; Smith, Stephen W

    2007-08-01

    Ultrasound guidance of interventional devices during minimally invasive surgical procedures has been investigated by many researchers. Previously, we extended the methods used by the Colormark tracking system to several interventional devices using a real-time, three-dimensional (3-D) ultrasound system. These results showed that we needed to improve the efficiency and reliability of the tracking. In this paper, we describe an analytical model to predict the transverse vibrations along the length of an atrial septal puncture needle to enable design improvements of the tracking system. We assume the needle can be modeled as a hollow bar with a circular cross section with a fixed proximal end and a free distal end that is suspended vertically to ignore gravity effects. The initial results show an ability to predict the natural nodes and antinodes along the needle using the characteristic equation for free vibrations. Simulations show that applying a forcing function to the device at a natural antinode yields an order of magnitude larger vibration than when driving the device at a node. Pulsed wave spectral Doppler data was acquired along the distal portion of the needle in a water tank using a 2-D matrix array transesophageal echocardiography probe. This data was compared to simulations of forced vibrations from the model. These initial results suggest that the model is a good first order approximation of the vibrating device in a water tank. It is our belief that knowing the location of the natural nodes and antinodes will improve our ability to drive the device to ensure the vibrations at the proximal end will reach the tip of the device, which in turn should improve our ability to track the device in vivo. PMID:17703675

  20. A 3D Vector/Scalar Visualization and Particle Tracking Package

    1999-08-19

    BOILERMAKER is an interactive visualization system consisting of three components: a visualization component, a particle tracking component, and a communication layer. The software, to date, has been used primarily in the visualization of vector and scalar fields associated with computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models of flue gas flows in industrial boilers and incinerators. Users can interactively request and toggle static vector fields, dynamic streamlines, and flowing vector fields. In addition, the user can interactively placemore » injector nozzles on boiler walls and visualize massed, evaporating sprays emanating from them. Some characteristics of the spray can be adjusted from within the visualization environment including spray shape and particle size. Also included with this release is software that supports 3D menu capabilities, scrollbars, communication and navigation.« less

  1. A 3D Vector/Scalar Visualization and Particle Tracking Package

    SciTech Connect

    Freitag, Lori; Disz, Terry; Papka, Mike; Heath, Daniel; Diachin, Darin; Herzog, Jim; Ryan, and Bob

    1999-08-19

    BOILERMAKER is an interactive visualization system consisting of three components: a visualization component, a particle tracking component, and a communication layer. The software, to date, has been used primarily in the visualization of vector and scalar fields associated with computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models of flue gas flows in industrial boilers and incinerators. Users can interactively request and toggle static vector fields, dynamic streamlines, and flowing vector fields. In addition, the user can interactively place injector nozzles on boiler walls and visualize massed, evaporating sprays emanating from them. Some characteristics of the spray can be adjusted from within the visualization environment including spray shape and particle size. Also included with this release is software that supports 3D menu capabilities, scrollbars, communication and navigation.

  2. Neural network techniques for invariant recognition and motion tracking of 3-D objects

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, J.N.; Tseng, Y.H.

    1995-12-31

    Invariant recognition and motion tracking of 3-D objects under partial object viewing are difficult tasks. In this paper, we introduce a new neural network solution that is robust to noise corruption and partial viewing of objects. This method directly utilizes the acquired range data and requires no feature extraction. In the proposed approach, the object is first parametrically represented by a continuous distance transformation neural network (CDTNN) which is trained by the surface points of the exemplar object. When later presented with the surface points of an unknown object, this parametric representation allows the mismatch information to back-propagate through the CDTNN to gradually determine the best similarity transformation (translation and rotation) of the unknown object. The mismatch can be directly measured in the reconstructed representation domain between the model and the unknown object.

  3. Application of 3D hydrodynamic and particle tracking models for better environmental management of finfish culture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno Navas, Juan; Telfer, Trevor C.; Ross, Lindsay G.

    2011-04-01

    Hydrographic conditions, and particularly current speeds, have a strong influence on the management of fish cage culture. These hydrodynamic conditions can be used to predict particle movement within the water column and the results used to optimise environmental conditions for effective site selection, setting of environmental quality standards, waste dispersion, and potential disease transfer. To this end, a 3D hydrodynamic model, MOHID, has been coupled to a particle tracking model to study the effects of mean current speed, quiescent water periods and bulk water circulation in Mulroy Bay, Co. Donegal Ireland, an Irish fjard (shallow fjordic system) important to the aquaculture industry. A Lagangrian method simulated the instantaneous release of "particles" emulating discharge from finfish cages to show the behaviour of waste in terms of water circulation and water exchange. The 3D spatial models were used to identify areas of mixed and stratified water using a version of the Simpson-Hunter criteria, and to use this in conjunction with models of current flow for appropriate site selection for salmon aquaculture. The modelled outcomes for stratification were in good agreement with the direct measurements of water column stratification based on observed density profiles. Calculations of the Simpson-Hunter tidal parameter indicated that most of Mulroy Bay was potentially stratified with a well mixed region over the shallow channels where the water is faster flowing. The fjard was characterised by areas of both very low and high mean current speeds, with some areas having long periods of quiescent water. The residual current and the particle tracking animations created through the models revealed an anticlockwise eddy that may influence waste dispersion and potential for disease transfer, among salmon cages and which ensures that the retention time of waste substances from cages is extended. The hydrodynamic model results were incorporated into the ArcView TM GIS

  4. CISUS: an integrated 3D ultrasound system for IGT using a modular tracking API

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boctor, Emad M.; Viswanathan, Anand; Pieper, Steve; Choti, Michael A.; Taylor, Russell H.; Kikinis, Ron; Fichtinger, Gabor

    2004-05-01

    Ultrasound has become popular in clinical/surgical applications, both as the primary image guidance modality and also in conjunction with other modalities like CT or MRI. Three dimensional ultrasound (3DUS) systems have also demonstrated usefulness in image-guided therapy (IGT). At the same time, however, current lack of open-source and open-architecture multi-modal medical visualization systems prevents 3DUS from fulfilling its potential. Several stand-alone 3DUS systems, like Stradx or In-Vivo exist today. Although these systems have been found to be useful in real clinical setting, it is difficult to augment their functionality and integrate them in versatile IGT systems. To address these limitations, a robotic/freehand 3DUS open environment (CISUS) is being integrated into the 3D Slicer, an open-source research tool developed for medical image analysis and surgical planning. In addition, the system capitalizes on generic application programming interfaces (APIs) for tracking devices and robotic control. The resulting platform-independent open-source system may serve as a valuable tool to the image guided surgery community. Other researchers could straightforwardly integrate the generic CISUS system along with other functionalities (i.e. dual view visualization, registration, real-time tracking, segmentation, etc) to rapidly create their medical/surgical applications. Our current driving clinical application is robotically assisted and freehand 3DUS-guided liver ablation, which is fully being integrated under the CISUS-3D Slicer. Initial functionality and pre-clinical feasibility are demonstrated on phantom and ex-vivo animal models.

  5. Defragmented image based autostereoscopic 3D displays with dynamic eye tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sung-Kyu; Yoon, Ki-Hyuk; Yoon, Seon Kyu; Ju, Heongkyu

    2015-12-01

    We studied defragmented image based autostereoscopic 3D displays with dynamic eye tracking. Specifically, we examined the impact of parallax barrier (PB) angular orientation on their image quality. The 3D display system required fine adjustment of PB angular orientation with respect to a display panel. This was critical for both image color balancing and minimizing image resolution mismatch between horizontal and vertical directions. For evaluating uniformity of image brightness, we applied optical ray tracing simulations. The simulations took effects of PB orientation misalignment into account. The simulation results were then compared with recorded experimental data. Our optimal simulated system produced significantly enhanced image uniformity at around sweet spots in viewing zones. However this was contradicted by real experimental results. We offer quantitative treatment of illuminance uniformity of view images to estimate misalignment of PB orientation, which could account for brightness non-uniformity observed experimentally. Our study also shows that slight imperfection in the adjustment of PB orientation due to practical restrictions of adjustment accuracy can induce substantial non-uniformity of view images' brightness. We find that image brightness non-uniformity critically depends on misalignment of PB angular orientation, for example, as slight as ≤ 0.01 ° in our system. This reveals that reducing misalignment of PB angular orientation from the order of 10-2 to 10-3 degrees can greatly improve the brightness uniformity.

  6. Using an Automated 3D-tracking System to Record Individual and Shoals of Adult Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Maaswinkel, Hans; Zhu, Liqun; Weng, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Like many aquatic animals, zebrafish (Danio rerio) moves in a 3D space. It is thus preferable to use a 3D recording system to study its behavior. The presented automatic video tracking system accomplishes this by using a mirror system and a calibration procedure that corrects for the considerable error introduced by the transition of light from water to air. With this system it is possible to record both single and groups of adult zebrafish. Before use, the system has to be calibrated. The system consists of three modules: Recording, Path Reconstruction, and Data Processing. The step-by-step protocols for calibration and using the three modules are presented. Depending on the experimental setup, the system can be used for testing neophobia, white aversion, social cohesion, motor impairments, novel object exploration etc. It is especially promising as a first-step tool to study the effects of drugs or mutations on basic behavioral patterns. The system provides information about vertical and horizontal distribution of the zebrafish, about the xyz-components of kinematic parameters (such as locomotion, velocity, acceleration, and turning angle) and it provides the data necessary to calculate parameters for social cohesions when testing shoals. PMID:24336189

  7. A new method for automatic tracking of facial landmarks in 3D motion captured images (4D).

    PubMed

    Al-Anezi, T; Khambay, B; Peng, M J; O'Leary, E; Ju, X; Ayoub, A

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to validate the automatic tracking of facial landmarks in 3D image sequences. 32 subjects (16 males and 16 females) aged 18-35 years were recruited. 23 anthropometric landmarks were marked on the face of each subject with non-permanent ink using a 0.5mm pen. The subjects were asked to perform three facial animations (maximal smile, lip purse and cheek puff) from rest position. Each animation was captured by the 3D imaging system. A single operator manually digitised the landmarks on the 3D facial models and their locations were compared with those of the automatically tracked ones. To investigate the accuracy of manual digitisation, the operator re-digitised the same set of 3D images of 10 subjects (5 male and 5 female) at 1 month interval. The discrepancies in x, y and z coordinates between the 3D position of the manual digitised landmarks and that of the automatic tracked facial landmarks were within 0.17mm. The mean distance between the manually digitised and the automatically tracked landmarks using the tracking software was within 0.55 mm. The automatic tracking of facial landmarks demonstrated satisfactory accuracy which would facilitate the analysis of the dynamic motion during facial animations. PMID:23218511

  8. A new method for automatic tracking of facial landmarks in 3D motion captured images (4D).

    PubMed

    Al-Anezi, T; Khambay, B; Peng, M J; O'Leary, E; Ju, X; Ayoub, A

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to validate the automatic tracking of facial landmarks in 3D image sequences. 32 subjects (16 males and 16 females) aged 18-35 years were recruited. 23 anthropometric landmarks were marked on the face of each subject with non-permanent ink using a 0.5mm pen. The subjects were asked to perform three facial animations (maximal smile, lip purse and cheek puff) from rest position. Each animation was captured by the 3D imaging system. A single operator manually digitised the landmarks on the 3D facial models and their locations were compared with those of the automatically tracked ones. To investigate the accuracy of manual digitisation, the operator re-digitised the same set of 3D images of 10 subjects (5 male and 5 female) at 1 month interval. The discrepancies in x, y and z coordinates between the 3D position of the manual digitised landmarks and that of the automatic tracked facial landmarks were within 0.17mm. The mean distance between the manually digitised and the automatically tracked landmarks using the tracking software was within 0.55 mm. The automatic tracking of facial landmarks demonstrated satisfactory accuracy which would facilitate the analysis of the dynamic motion during facial animations.

  9. A segmentation method for 3D visualization of neurons imaged with a confocal laser scanning microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Jeffrey R.; Barrett, Steven F.; Wilcox, Michael J.

    2005-04-01

    Our understanding of the world around us is based primarily on three-dimensional information because of the environment in which we live and interact. Medical or biological image information is often collected in the form of two-dimensional, serial section images. As such, it is difficult for the observer to mentally reconstruct the three dimensional features of each object. Although many image rendering software packages allow for 3D views of the serial sections, they lack the ability to segment, or isolate different objects in the data set. Segmentation is the key to creating 3D renderings of distinct objects from serial slice images, like separate pieces to a puzzle. This paper describes a segmentation method for objects recorded with serial section images. The user defines threshold levels and object labels on a single image of the data set that are subsequently used to automatically segment each object in the remaining images of the same data set, while maintaining boundaries between contacting objects. The performance of the algorithm is verified using mathematically defined shapes. It is then applied to the visual neurons of the housefly, Musca domestica. Knowledge of the fly"s visual system may lead to improved machine visions systems. This effort has provided the impetus to develop this segmentation algorithm. The described segmentation method can be applied to any high contrast serial slice data set that is well aligned and registered. The medical field alone has many applications for rapid generation of 3D segmented models from MRI and other medical imaging modalities.

  10. Development of a temporal multiplexed 3D beam-scanning Lissajous trajectory microscope for rapid multimodal volumetric imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, Justin A.; Sullivan, Shane Z.; Dinh, Janny; Sarkar, Sreya; Simpson, Garth J.

    2016-03-01

    A beam-scanning microscope is described based on a temporally multiplexed Lissajous trajectory for achieving 1 kHz frame rate 3D imaging. The microscope utilizes two fast-scan resonant mirrors to direct the optical beam on a circuitous, Lissajous trajectory through the field of view. Acquisition of two simultaneous focal planes is achieved by implementation of an optical delay line, producing a second incident beam at a different focal plane relative to the initial incident beam. High frame rates are achieved by separating the full time-domain data into shorter sub-trajectories resulting in undersampling of the field of view. A model-based image reconstruction (MBIR) 3D in-painting algorithm is utilized for interpolating the missing data to recover full images. The MBIR algorithm uses a maximum a posteriori estimation with a generalized Gaussian Markov random field prior model for image interpolation. Because images are acquired using photomultiplier tubes or photodiodes, parallelization for multi-channel imaging is straightforward. Preliminary results obtained using a Lissajous trajectory beam-scanning approach coupled with temporal multiplexing by the implementation of an optical delay line demonstrate the ability to acquire 2 distinct focal planes simultaneously at frame rates >450 Hz for full 512 × 512 images. The use of multi-channel data acquisition cards allows for simultaneous multimodal image acquisition with perfect image registry between all imaging modalities. Also discussed here is the implementation of Lissajous trajectory beam-scanning on commercially available microscope hardware.

  11. Infrared tomographic PIV and 3D motion tracking system applied to aquatic predator-prey interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adhikari, Deepak; Longmire, Ellen K.

    2013-02-01

    Infrared tomographic PIV and 3D motion tracking are combined to measure evolving volumetric velocity fields and organism trajectories during aquatic predator-prey interactions. The technique was used to study zebrafish foraging on both non-evasive and evasive prey species. Measurement volumes of 22.5 mm × 10.5 mm × 12 mm were reconstructed from images captured on a set of four high-speed cameras. To obtain accurate fluid velocity vectors within each volume, fish were first masked out using an automated visual hull method. Fish and prey locations were identified independently from the same image sets and tracked separately within the measurement volume. Experiments demonstrated that fish were not influenced by the infrared laser illumination or the tracer particles. Results showed that the zebrafish used different strategies, suction and ram feeding, for successful capture of non-evasive and evasive prey, respectively. The two strategies yielded different variations in fluid velocity between the fish mouth and the prey. In general, the results suggest that the local flow field, the direction of prey locomotion with respect to the predator and the relative accelerations and speeds of the predator and prey may all be significant in determining predation success.

  12. The systematic and random errors determination using realtime 3D surface tracking system in breast cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanphet, J.; Suriyapee, S.; Dumrongkijudom, N.; Sanghangthum, T.; Kumkhwao, J.; Wisetrintong, M.

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this study to determine the patient setup uncertainties in deep inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) radiation therapy for left breast cancer patients using real-time 3D surface tracking system. The six breast cancer patients treated by 6 MV photon beams from TrueBeam linear accelerator were selected. The patient setup errors and motion during treatment were observed and calculated for interfraction and intrafraction motions. The systematic and random errors were calculated in vertical, longitudinal and lateral directions. From 180 images tracking before and during treatment, the maximum systematic error of interfraction and intrafraction motions were 0.56 mm and 0.23 mm, the maximum random error of interfraction and intrafraction motions were 1.18 mm and 0.53 mm, respectively. The interfraction was more pronounce than the intrafraction, while the systematic error was less impact than random error. In conclusion the intrafraction motion error from patient setup uncertainty is about half of interfraction motion error, which is less impact due to the stability in organ movement from DIBH. The systematic reproducibility is also half of random error because of the high efficiency of modern linac machine that can reduce the systematic uncertainty effectively, while the random errors is uncontrollable.

  13. Automatic alignment of standard views in 3D echocardiograms using real-time tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orderud, Fredrik; Torp, Hans; Rabben, Stein Inge

    2009-02-01

    In this paper, we present an automatic approach for alignment of standard apical and short-axis slices, and correcting them for out-of-plane motion in 3D echocardiography. This is enabled by using real-time Kalman tracking to perform automatic left ventricle segmentation using a coupled deformable model, consisting of a left ventricle model, as well as structures for the right ventricle and left ventricle outflow tract. Landmark points from the segmented model are then used to generate standard apical and short-axis slices. The slices are automatically updated after tracking in each frame to correct for out-of-plane motion caused by longitudinal shortening of the left ventricle. Results from a dataset of 35 recordings demonstrate the potential for automating apical slice initialization and dynamic short-axis slices. Apical 4-chamber, 2-chamber and long-axis slices are generated based on an assumption of fixed angle between the slices, and short-axis slices are generated so that they follow the same myocardial tissue over the entire cardiac cycle. The error compared to manual annotation was 8.4 +/- 3.5 mm for apex, 3.6 +/- 1.8 mm for mitral valve and 8.4 +/- 7.4 for apical 4-chamber view. The high computational efficiency and automatic behavior of the method enables it to operate in real-time, potentially during image acquisition.

  14. Segmentation of whole cells and cell nuclei from 3-D optical microscope images using dynamic programming.

    PubMed

    McCullough, D P; Gudla, P R; Harris, B S; Collins, J A; Meaburn, K J; Nakaya, M A; Yamaguchi, T P; Misteli, T; Lockett, S J

    2008-05-01

    Communications between cells in large part drive tissue development and function, as well as disease-related processes such as tumorigenesis. Understanding the mechanistic bases of these processes necessitates quantifying specific molecules in adjacent cells or cell nuclei of intact tissue. However, a major restriction on such analyses is the lack of an efficient method that correctly segments each object (cell or nucleus) from 3-D images of an intact tissue specimen. We report a highly reliable and accurate semi-automatic algorithmic method for segmenting fluorescence-labeled cells or nuclei from 3-D tissue images. Segmentation begins with semi-automatic, 2-D object delineation in a user-selected plane, using dynamic programming (DP) to locate the border with an accumulated intensity per unit length greater that any other possible border around the same object. Then the two surfaces of the object in planes above and below the selected plane are found using an algorithm that combines DP and combinatorial searching. Following segmentation, any perceived errors can be interactively corrected. Segmentation accuracy is not significantly affected by intermittent labeling of object surfaces, diffuse surfaces, or spurious signals away from surfaces. The unique strength of the segmentation method was demonstrated on a variety of biological tissue samples where all cells, including irregularly shaped cells, were accurately segmented based on visual inspection.

  15. Photoactive Self-Shaping Hydrogels as Noncontact 3D Macro/Microscopic Photoprinting Platforms.

    PubMed

    Liao, Yue; An, Ning; Wang, Ning; Zhang, Yinyu; Song, Junfei; Zhou, Jinxiong; Liu, Wenguang

    2015-12-01

    A photocleavable terpolymer hydrogel cross-linked with o-nitrobenzyl derivative cross-linker is shown to be capable of self-shaping without losing its physical integrity and robustness due to spontaneous asymmetric swelling of network caused by UV-light-induced gradient cleavage of chemical cross-linkages. The continuum model and finite element method are used to elucidate the curling mechanism underlying. Remarkably, based on the self-changing principle, the photosensitive hydrogels can be developed as photoprinting soft and wet platforms onto which specific 3D characters and images are faithfully duplicated in macro/microscale without contact by UV light irradiation under the cover of customized photomasks. Importantly, a quick response (QR) code is accurately printed on the photoactive hydrogel for the first time. Scanning QR code with a smartphone can quickly connect to a web page. This photoactive hydrogel is promising to be a new printing or recording material. PMID:26439808

  16. Photoactive Self-Shaping Hydrogels as Noncontact 3D Macro/Microscopic Photoprinting Platforms.

    PubMed

    Liao, Yue; An, Ning; Wang, Ning; Zhang, Yinyu; Song, Junfei; Zhou, Jinxiong; Liu, Wenguang

    2015-12-01

    A photocleavable terpolymer hydrogel cross-linked with o-nitrobenzyl derivative cross-linker is shown to be capable of self-shaping without losing its physical integrity and robustness due to spontaneous asymmetric swelling of network caused by UV-light-induced gradient cleavage of chemical cross-linkages. The continuum model and finite element method are used to elucidate the curling mechanism underlying. Remarkably, based on the self-changing principle, the photosensitive hydrogels can be developed as photoprinting soft and wet platforms onto which specific 3D characters and images are faithfully duplicated in macro/microscale without contact by UV light irradiation under the cover of customized photomasks. Importantly, a quick response (QR) code is accurately printed on the photoactive hydrogel for the first time. Scanning QR code with a smartphone can quickly connect to a web page. This photoactive hydrogel is promising to be a new printing or recording material.

  17. Breakup of Finite-Size Colloidal Aggregates in Turbulent Flow Investigated by Three-Dimensional (3D) Particle Tracking Velocimetry.

    PubMed

    Saha, Debashish; Babler, Matthaus U; Holzner, Markus; Soos, Miroslav; Lüthi, Beat; Liberzon, Alex; Kinzelbach, Wolfgang

    2016-01-12

    Aggregates grown in mild shear flow are released, one at a time, into homogeneous isotropic turbulence, where their motion and intermittent breakup is recorded by three-dimensional particle tracking velocimetry (3D-PTV). The aggregates have an open structure with a fractal dimension of ∼2.2, and their size is 1.4 ± 0.4 mm, which is large, compared to the Kolmogorov length scale (η = 0.15 mm). 3D-PTV of flow tracers allows for the simultaneous measurement of aggregate trajectories and the full velocity gradient tensor along their pathlines, which enables us to access the Lagrangian stress history of individual breakup events. From this data, we found no consistent pattern that relates breakup to the local flow properties at the point of breakup. Also, the correlation between the aggregate size and both shear stress and normal stress at the location of breakage is found to be weaker, when compared with the correlation between size and drag stress. The analysis suggests that the aggregates are mostly broken due to the accumulation of the drag stress over a time lag on the order of the Kolmogorov time scale. This finding is explained by the fact that the aggregates are large, which gives their motion inertia and increases the time for stress propagation inside the aggregate. Furthermore, it is found that the scaling of the largest fragment and the accumulated stress at breakup follows an earlier established power law, i.e., dfrag ∼ σ(-0.6) obtained from laminar nozzle experiments. This indicates that, despite the large size and the different type of hydrodynamic stress, the microscopic mechanism causing breakup is consistent over a wide range of aggregate size and stress magnitude. PMID:26646289

  18. Breakup of Finite-Size Colloidal Aggregates in Turbulent Flow Investigated by Three-Dimensional (3D) Particle Tracking Velocimetry.

    PubMed

    Saha, Debashish; Babler, Matthaus U; Holzner, Markus; Soos, Miroslav; Lüthi, Beat; Liberzon, Alex; Kinzelbach, Wolfgang

    2016-01-12

    Aggregates grown in mild shear flow are released, one at a time, into homogeneous isotropic turbulence, where their motion and intermittent breakup is recorded by three-dimensional particle tracking velocimetry (3D-PTV). The aggregates have an open structure with a fractal dimension of ∼2.2, and their size is 1.4 ± 0.4 mm, which is large, compared to the Kolmogorov length scale (η = 0.15 mm). 3D-PTV of flow tracers allows for the simultaneous measurement of aggregate trajectories and the full velocity gradient tensor along their pathlines, which enables us to access the Lagrangian stress history of individual breakup events. From this data, we found no consistent pattern that relates breakup to the local flow properties at the point of breakup. Also, the correlation between the aggregate size and both shear stress and normal stress at the location of breakage is found to be weaker, when compared with the correlation between size and drag stress. The analysis suggests that the aggregates are mostly broken due to the accumulation of the drag stress over a time lag on the order of the Kolmogorov time scale. This finding is explained by the fact that the aggregates are large, which gives their motion inertia and increases the time for stress propagation inside the aggregate. Furthermore, it is found that the scaling of the largest fragment and the accumulated stress at breakup follows an earlier established power law, i.e., dfrag ∼ σ(-0.6) obtained from laminar nozzle experiments. This indicates that, despite the large size and the different type of hydrodynamic stress, the microscopic mechanism causing breakup is consistent over a wide range of aggregate size and stress magnitude.

  19. Confocal fluorometer for diffusion tracking in 3D engineered tissue constructs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daly, D.; Zilioli, A.; Tan, N.; Buttenschoen, K.; Chikkanna, B.; Reynolds, J.; Marsden, B.; Hughes, C.

    2016-03-01

    We present results of the development of a non-contacting instrument, called fScan, based on scanning confocal fluorometry for assessing the diffusion of materials through a tissue matrix. There are many areas in healthcare diagnostics and screening where it is now widely accepted that the need for new quantitative monitoring technologies is a major pinch point in patient diagnostics and in vitro testing. With the increasing need to interpret 3D responses this commonly involves the need to track the diffusion of compounds, pharma-active species and cells through a 3D matrix of tissue. Methods are available but to support the advances that are currently only promised, this monitoring needs to be real-time, non-invasive, and economical. At the moment commercial meters tend to be invasive and usually require a sample of the medium to be removed and processed prior to testing. This methodology clearly has a number of significant disadvantages. fScan combines a fiber based optical arrangement with a compact, free space optical front end that has been integrated so that the sample's diffusion can be measured without interference. This architecture is particularly important due to the "wet" nature of the samples. fScan is designed to measure constructs located within standard well plates and a 2-D motion stage locates the required sample with respect to the measurement system. Results are presented that show how the meter has been used to evaluate movements of samples through collagen constructs in situ without disturbing their kinetic characteristics. These kinetics were little understood prior to these measurements.

  20. Automated 3D Motion Tracking using Gabor Filter Bank, Robust Point Matching, and Deformable Models

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaoxu; Chung, Sohae; Metaxas, Dimitris; Axel, Leon

    2013-01-01

    Tagged Magnetic Resonance Imaging (tagged MRI or tMRI) provides a means of directly and noninvasively displaying the internal motion of the myocardium. Reconstruction of the motion field is needed to quantify important clinical information, e.g., the myocardial strain, and detect regional heart functional loss. In this paper, we present a three-step method for this task. First, we use a Gabor filter bank to detect and locate tag intersections in the image frames, based on local phase analysis. Next, we use an improved version of the Robust Point Matching (RPM) method to sparsely track the motion of the myocardium, by establishing a transformation function and a one-to-one correspondence between grid tag intersections in different image frames. In particular, the RPM helps to minimize the impact on the motion tracking result of: 1) through-plane motion, and 2) relatively large deformation and/or relatively small tag spacing. In the final step, a meshless deformable model is initialized using the transformation function computed by RPM. The model refines the motion tracking and generates a dense displacement map, by deforming under the influence of image information, and is constrained by the displacement magnitude to retain its geometric structure. The 2D displacement maps in short and long axis image planes can be combined to drive a 3D deformable model, using the Moving Least Square method, constrained by the minimization of the residual error at tag intersections. The method has been tested on a numerical phantom, as well as on in vivo heart data from normal volunteers and heart disease patients. The experimental results show that the new method has a good performance on both synthetic and real data. Furthermore, the method has been used in an initial clinical study to assess the differences in myocardial strain distributions between heart disease (left ventricular hypertrophy) patients and the normal control group. The final results show that the proposed method

  1. Microscopic magnetic nature of K2NiF4-type 3d transition metal oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugiyama, J.; Nozaki, H.; Umegaki, I.; Higemoto, W.; Ansaldo, E. J.; Brewer, J. H.; Sakurai, H.; Kao, T.-H.; Yang, H.-D.; Månsson, M.

    2014-12-01

    In order to elucidate the magnetic nature of K2NiF4-type 3d transition metal oxides, we have measured μ+SR spectra for Sr2VO4, LaSrVO4, and Sr2CrO4 using powder samples. ZF- and wTF-μ+SR measurements propose that Sr2VO4 enters into the static antiferromagnetic (AF) order phase below 8 K. In addition, TF-μ+SR measurements evidence that the transition at 105 K is not magnetic but structural and/or electronic in origin. For LaSrVO4, static long-range order has not been observed down to 20 K, while, as T decreases from 145 K, wTF asymmetry starts to decrease below 60 K, suggesting the appearance and evolution of localized magnetic moments below 60 K. For Sr2CrO4, by contrast, both ZF- and wTF-μ+SR have confirmed the presence of antiferromagnetic order below 117 K, as predicted in the χ(T) curve.

  2. Tracking Paths of Ocean Source Ambient Seismic Noise into, and through, the 3D Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reading, A. M.; Gal, M.; Morse, P. E.; Koper, K. D.; Hemer, M. A.; Rawlinson, N.; Salmon, M.; De Kool, M.; Kennett, B. L. N.

    2014-12-01

    Array measurements of seismic noise (microseisms) are emerging as independent observables that inform our knowledge of ocean storms. Using an improved implementation of IAS Capon analysis, we can infer the location and amplitude of multiple sources of seismic noise over multiple decades. For the Southern Ocean, we can use seismic records to assist in identifying shifting patterns of ocean storms. Thus we can investigate topics such as the disparity between wave height trends identified using calibrated satellite records, which appear to be in increasing over multiple decades, and wave heights measured directly using a wave-rider buoy, which does not show a significant change over the same time frame. The passage of wave energy from the water column to the solid Earth, and through the 3D Earth to the seismic array must be tracked effectively. In this contribution, we focus on understanding the passage of seismic noise through the 3D Earth. In particular, we investigate path deviations from 1D Earth models for body waves sources from a variety of locations in the Southern Ocean recorded at Australian seismic arrays. We also investigate path deviations of surface waves travelling across the Australian continent, using the AusREM Earth model. We also appraise other factors affecting the interpretation of slowness, backazimuth and amplitude from seismic array records. These include the effect of the bathymetry-related transfer function controlling energy entering the solid Earth from the water column and the impact of local geology at the site of the seismic array. For a season of storms in the southern hemisphere winter, we simulate the path of energy from a representative range of locations to Australia seismic arrays. We employ a wavefront tracking technique, fast marching, that can support heterogeneous structure and the consideration of multiple arrivals. We find that storms in some locations are subject to a much larger deviation from the expected path of energy

  3. 3-D geometry calibration and markerless electromagnetic tracking with a mobile C-arm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheryauka, Arvi; Barrett, Johnny; Wang, Zhonghua; Litvin, Andrew; Hamadeh, Ali; Beaudet, Daniel

    2007-03-01

    The design of mobile X-ray C-arm equipment with image tomography and surgical guidance capabilities involves the retrieval of repeatable gantry positioning in three-dimensional space. Geometry misrepresentations can cause degradation of the reconstruction results with the appearance of blurred edges, image artifacts, and even false structures. It may also amplify surgical instrument tracking errors leading to improper implant placement. In our prior publications we have proposed a C-arm 3D positioner calibration method comprising separate intrinsic and extrinsic geometry calibration steps. Following this approach, in the present paper, we extend the intrinsic geometry calibration of C-gantry beyond angular positions in the orbital plane into angular positions on a unit sphere of isocentric rotation. Our method makes deployment of markerless interventional tool guidance with use of high-resolution fluoro images and electromagnetic tracking feasible at any angular position of the tube-detector assembly. Variations of the intrinsic parameters associated with C-arm motion are measured off-line as functions of orbital and lateral angles. The proposed calibration procedure provides better accuracy, and prevents unnecessary workflow steps for surgical navigation applications. With a slight modification, the Misalignment phantom, a tool for intrinsic geometry calibration, is also utilized to obtain an accurate 'image-to-sensor' mapping. We show simulation results, image quality and navigation accuracy estimates, and feasibility data acquired with the prototype system. The experimental results show the potential of high-resolution CT imaging (voxel size below 0.5 mm) and confident navigation in an interventional surgery setting with a mobile C-arm.

  4. 3-D Raman Imagery and Atomic Force Microscopy of Ancient Microscopic Fossils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schopf, J.

    2003-12-01

    Investigations of the Precambrian (~540- to ~3,500-Ma-old) fossil record depend critically on identification of authentic microbial fossils. Combined with standard paleontologic studies (e.g., of paleoecologic setting, population structure, cellular morphology, preservational variants), two techniques recently introduced to such studies -- Raman imagery and atomic force microscopy -- can help meet this need. Laser-Raman imagery is a non-intrusive, non-destructive technique that can be used to demonstrate a micron-scale one-to-one correlation between optically discernable morphology and the organic (kerogenous) composition of individual microbial fossils(1,2), a prime indicator of biogencity. Such analyses can be used to characterize the molecular-structural makeup of organic-walled microscopic fossils both in acid-resistant residues and in petrographic thin sections, and whether the fossils analyzed are exposed at the upper surface of, or are embedded within (to depths >65 microns), the section studied. By providing means to map chemically, in three dimensions, whole fossils or parts of such fossils(3), Raman imagery can also show the presence of cell lumina, interior cellular cavities, another prime indicator of biogenicity. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) has been used to visualize the nanometer-scale structure of the kerogenous components of single Precambrian microscopic fossils(4). Capable of analyzing minute fragments of ancient organic matter exposed at the upper surface of thin sections (or of kerogen particles deposited on flat surfaces), such analyses hold promise not only for discriminating between biotic and abiotic micro-objects but for elucidation of the domain size -- and, thus, the degree of graphitization -- of the graphene subunits of the carbonaceous matter analyzed. These techniques -- both new to paleobiology -- can provide useful insight into the biogenicity and geochemical maturity of ancient organic matter. References: (1) Kudryavtsev, A.B. et

  5. Correcting for 3D distortion when using backscattered electron detectors in a scanning electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Proctor, Jacob M

    2009-01-01

    A variable pressure scanning electron microscope (VPSEM) can produce a topographic surface relief of a physical object under examination, in addition to its two-dimensional (2D) image. This topographic surface relief is especially helpful when dealing with porous rock because it may elucidate the pore-space structure as well as grain shape and size. Whether the image accurately reproduces the physical object depends on the management of the hardware, acquisition, and postprocessing. Two problems become apparent during testing: (a) a topographic surface relief of a precision ball bearing is distorted and does not correspond to the physical dimensions of the actual sphere and (b) an image of a topographic surface relief of a Berea sandstone is geometrically tilted and topographically distorted even after standard corrections are applied. The procedure presented here is to ensure the veracity of the image, and includes: (a) adjusting the brightness and contrast levels originally provided by the manufacturer and (b) tuning the amplifiers of the backscatter detector plates to be equal to each other, and producing zero voltage when VPSEM is idle. This procedure is tested and verified on the said two physical samples. SCANNING 31: 59-64, 2009. (c) 2009 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. GPU based, real-time tracking of perturbed, 3D plasma equilibria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rath, N.; Bialek, J.; Byrne, P. J.; Debono, B.; Levesque, J. P.; Li, B.; Mauel, M. E.; Maurer, D. A.; Navratil, G. A.; Shiraki, D.

    2011-10-01

    The new high-resolution magnetic diagnostics and actuators of the HBT-EP tokamak are used to evaluate a novel approach to long-wavelength MHD mode control: instead of controlling the amplitude of specific preselected perturbations from axisymmetry, the control system will attempt to control the 3D shape of the plasma. This approach frees the experimenter from having to know the approximate shape of the expected instabilities ahead of time, and lifts the restriction of the control reference having to be the perfectly axisymmetric state. Instead, the plasma can be maintained in an arbitrary perturbed equilibrium, which may be selected for beneficial plasma properties. The increased computational demands on the control system are handled by a graphical computing unit (GPU) with 448 computing cores that interfaces directly to digitizers and analog output boards. The control system is designed to handle 96 inputs and 64 outputs with cycle times below 5 and I/O latencies below 10 microseconds. We report on the technical and theoretical design of the control system and give experimental results from testing the system's observer module which tracks the perturbed plasma equilibrium in real-time. This work was supported by US-DOE grant DE-FG02-86ER53222.

  7. Fast, automatic, and accurate catheter reconstruction in HDR brachytherapy using an electromagnetic 3D tracking system

    SciTech Connect

    Poulin, Eric; Racine, Emmanuel; Beaulieu, Luc; Binnekamp, Dirk

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: In high dose rate brachytherapy (HDR-B), current catheter reconstruction protocols are relatively slow and error prone. The purpose of this technical note is to evaluate the accuracy and the robustness of an electromagnetic (EM) tracking system for automated and real-time catheter reconstruction. Methods: For this preclinical study, a total of ten catheters were inserted in gelatin phantoms with different trajectories. Catheters were reconstructed using a 18G biopsy needle, used as an EM stylet and equipped with a miniaturized sensor, and the second generation Aurora{sup ®} Planar Field Generator from Northern Digital Inc. The Aurora EM system provides position and orientation value with precisions of 0.7 mm and 0.2°, respectively. Phantoms were also scanned using a μCT (GE Healthcare) and Philips Big Bore clinical computed tomography (CT) system with a spatial resolution of 89 μm and 2 mm, respectively. Reconstructions using the EM stylet were compared to μCT and CT. To assess the robustness of the EM reconstruction, five catheters were reconstructed twice and compared. Results: Reconstruction time for one catheter was 10 s, leading to a total reconstruction time inferior to 3 min for a typical 17-catheter implant. When compared to the μCT, the mean EM tip identification error was 0.69 ± 0.29 mm while the CT error was 1.08 ± 0.67 mm. The mean 3D distance error was found to be 0.66 ± 0.33 mm and 1.08 ± 0.72 mm for the EM and CT, respectively. EM 3D catheter trajectories were found to be more accurate. A maximum difference of less than 0.6 mm was found between successive EM reconstructions. Conclusions: The EM reconstruction was found to be more accurate and precise than the conventional methods used for catheter reconstruction in HDR-B. This approach can be applied to any type of catheters and applicators.

  8. Mapping 3D Strains with Ultrasound Speckle Tracking: Method Validation and Initial Results in Porcine Scleral Inflation.

    PubMed

    Cruz Perez, Benjamin; Pavlatos, Elias; Morris, Hugh J; Chen, Hong; Pan, Xueliang; Hart, Richard T; Liu, Jun

    2016-07-01

    This study aimed to develop and validate a high frequency ultrasound method for measuring distributive, 3D strains in the sclera during elevations of intraocular pressure. A 3D cross-correlation based speckle-tracking algorithm was implemented to compute the 3D displacement vector and strain tensor at each tracking point. Simulated ultrasound radiofrequency data from a sclera-like structure at undeformed and deformed states with known strains were used to evaluate the accuracy and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of strain estimation. An experimental high frequency ultrasound (55 MHz) system was built to acquire 3D scans of porcine eyes inflated from 15 to 17 and then 19 mmHg. Simulations confirmed good strain estimation accuracy and SNR (e.g., the axial strains had less than 4.5% error with SNRs greater than 16.5 for strains from 0.005 to 0.05). Experimental data in porcine eyes showed increasing tensile, compressive, and shear strains in the posterior sclera during inflation, with a volume ratio close to one suggesting near-incompressibility. This study established the feasibility of using high frequency ultrasound speckle tracking for measuring 3D tissue strains and its potential to characterize physiological deformations in the posterior eye. PMID:26563101

  9. Tracking of cracks in bridges using GPR: a 3D approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benedetto, A.

    2012-04-01

    Corrosion associated with reinforcing bars is the most significant contributor to bridge deficiencies. The corrosion is usually caused by moisture and chloride ion exposure. In particular, corrosion products FeO, Fe2O3, Fe3O4 and other oxides along reinforcement bars. The reinforcing bars are attacked by corrosion and yield expansive corrosion products. These oxidation products occupy a larger volume than the original intact steel and internal expansive stresses lead to cracking and debonding. There are some conventional inspection methods for detection of reinforcing bar corrosion but they can be invasive and destructive, often laborious, lane closures is required and it is difficult or unreliable any quantification of corrosion. For these reasons, bridge engineers are always more preferring to use the Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) technique. In this work a novel numerical approach for three dimensional tracking and mapping of cracks in the bridge is proposed. The work starts from some interesting results based on the use of the 3D imaging technique in order to improve the potentiality of GPR to detect voids, cracks or buried object. The numerical approach has been tested on data acquired on some bridges using a pulse GPR system specifically designed for bridge deck and pavement inspection that is called RIS Hi Bright. The equipment integrates two arrays of Ultra Wide Band ground coupled antennas, having a main working frequency of 2 GHz. The two arrays within the RIS Hi Bright are using antennas arranged with different polarization. One array includes sensors with parallel polarization with respect to the scanning direction (VV array), the other has sensors in orthogonal polarization (HH array). Overall the system collects 16 profiles within a single scan (8 HH + 8 VV). The cracks, associated often to moisture increasing and higher values of the dielectric constant, produce a not negligible increasing of the signal amplitude. Following this, the algorithm

  10. Electron microscopic evidence for nucleation and growth of 3D acetylcholine receptor microcrystals in structured lipid-detergent matrices.

    PubMed

    Paas, Yoav; Cartaud, Jean; Recouvreur, Michel; Grailhe, Regis; Dufresne, Virginie; Pebay-Peyroula, Eva; Landau, Ehud M; Changeux, Jean-Pierre

    2003-09-30

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) belong to a superfamily of oligomeric proteins that transduce electric signals across the cell membrane on binding of neurotransmitters. These receptors harbor a large extracellular ligand-binding domain directly linked to an ion-conducting channel-forming domain that spans the cell membrane 20 times and considerably extends into the cytoplasm. Thus far, none of these receptor channels has been crystallized in three dimensions. The crystallization of the AChR from Torpedo marmorata electric organs is challenged here in lipidic-detergent matrices. Detergent-soluble AChR complexed with alpha-bungarotoxin (alphaBTx), a polypeptidic competitive antagonist, was purified. The AChR-alphaBTx complex was reconstituted in a lipidic matrix composed of monoolein bilayers that are structured in three dimensions. The alphaBTx was conjugated to a photo-stable fluorophore, enabling us to monitor the physical behavior of the receptor-toxin complex in the lipidic matrix under light stereomicroscope, and to freeze fracture regions containing the receptor-toxin complex for visualization under a transmission electron microscope. Conditions were established for forming 2D receptor-toxin lattices that are stacked in the third dimension. 3D AChR nanocrystals were thereby grown inside the highly viscous lipidic 3D matrix. Slow emulsification of the lipidic matrix converted these nanocrystals into 3D elongated thin crystal plates of micrometer size. The latter are stable in detergent-containing aqueous solutions and can currently be used for seeding and epitaxial growth, en route to crystals of appropriate dimensions for x-ray diffraction studies.

  11. 3D registration of intravascular optical coherence tomography and cryo-image volumes for microscopic-resolution validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prabhu, David; Mehanna, Emile; Gargesha, Madhusudhana; Wen, Di; Brandt, Eric; van Ditzhuijzen, Nienke S.; Chamie, Daniel; Yamamoto, Hirosada; Fujino, Yusuke; Farmazilian, Ali; Patel, Jaymin; Costa, Marco; Bezerra, Hiram G.; Wilson, David L.

    2016-03-01

    High resolution, 100 frames/sec intravascular optical coherence tomography (IVOCT) can distinguish plaque types, but further validation is needed, especially for automated plaque characterization. We developed experimental and 3D registration methods, to provide validation of IVOCT pullback volumes using microscopic, brightfield and fluorescent cryoimage volumes, with optional, exactly registered cryo-histology. The innovation was a method to match an IVOCT pullback images, acquired in the catheter reference frame, to a true 3D cryo-image volume. Briefly, an 11-parameter, polynomial virtual catheter was initialized within the cryo-image volume, and perpendicular images were extracted, mimicking IVOCT image acquisition. Virtual catheter parameters were optimized to maximize cryo and IVOCT lumen overlap. Local minima were possible, but when we started within reasonable ranges, every one of 24 digital phantom cases converged to a good solution with a registration error of only +1.34+/-2.65μm (signed distance). Registration was applied to 10 ex-vivo cadaver coronary arteries (LADs), resulting in 10 registered cryo and IVOCT volumes yielding a total of 421 registered 2D-image pairs. Image overlays demonstrated high continuity between vascular and plaque features. Bland- Altman analysis comparing cryo and IVOCT lumen area, showed mean and standard deviation of differences as 0.01+/-0.43 mm2. DICE coefficients were 0.91+/-0.04. Finally, visual assessment on 20 representative cases with easily identifiable features suggested registration accuracy within one frame of IVOCT (+/-200μm), eliminating significant misinterpretations introduced by 1mm errors in the literature. The method will provide 3D data for training of IVOCT plaque algorithms and can be used for validation of other intravascular imaging modalities.

  12. Intracellular nanomanipulation by a photonic-force microscope with real-time acquisition of a 3D stiffness matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertseva, E.; Singh, A. S. G.; Lekki, J.; Thévenaz, P.; Lekka, M.; Jeney, S.; Gremaud, G.; Puttini, S.; Nowak, W.; Dietler, G.; Forró, L.; Unser, M.; Kulik, A. J.

    2009-07-01

    A traditional photonic-force microscope (PFM) results in huge sets of data, which requires tedious numerical analysis. In this paper, we propose instead an analog signal processor to attain real-time capabilities while retaining the richness of the traditional PFM data. Our system is devoted to intracellular measurements and is fully interactive through the use of a haptic joystick. Using our specialized analog hardware along with a dedicated algorithm, we can extract the full 3D stiffness matrix of the optical trap in real time, including the off-diagonal cross-terms. Our system is also capable of simultaneously recording data for subsequent offline analysis. This allows us to check that a good correlation exists between the classical analysis of stiffness and our real-time measurements. We monitor the PFM beads using an optical microscope. The force-feedback mechanism of the haptic joystick helps us in interactively guiding the bead inside living cells and collecting information from its (possibly anisotropic) environment. The instantaneous stiffness measurements are also displayed in real time on a graphical user interface. The whole system has been built and is operational; here we present early results that confirm the consistency of the real-time measurements with offline computations.

  13. Integrating eye tracking and motion sensor on mobile phone for interactive 3D display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yu-Wei; Chiang, Chen-Kuo; Lai, Shang-Hong

    2013-09-01

    In this paper, we propose an eye tracking and gaze estimation system for mobile phone. We integrate an eye detector, cornereye center and iso-center to improve pupil detection. The optical flow information is used for eye tracking. We develop a robust eye tracking system that integrates eye detection and optical-flow based image tracking. In addition, we further incorporate the orientation sensor information from the mobile phone to improve the eye tracking for accurate gaze estimation. We demonstrate the accuracy of the proposed eye tracking and gaze estimation system through experiments on some public video sequences as well as videos acquired directly from mobile phone.

  14. Development of a two photon microscope for tracking Drosophila larvae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karagyozov, Doycho; Mihovilovic Skanata, Mirna; Gershow, Marc

    Current in vivo methods for measuring neural activity in Drosophila larva require immobilization of the animal. Although we can record neural signals while stimulating the sensory organs, we cannot read the behavioral output because we have prevented the animal from moving. Many research questions cannot be answered without observation of neural activity in behaving (freely-moving) animals. Our project aims to develop a tracking microscope that maintains the neurons of interest in the field of view and in focus during the rapid three dimensional motion of a free larva.

  15. 3D tracking of single nanoparticles and quantum dots in living cells by out-of-focus imaging with diffraction pattern recognition

    PubMed Central

    Gardini, Lucia; Capitanio, Marco; Pavone, Francesco S.

    2015-01-01

    Live cells are three-dimensional environments where biological molecules move to find their targets and accomplish their functions. However, up to now, most single molecule investigations have been limited to bi-dimensional studies owing to the complexity of 3d-tracking techniques. Here, we present a novel method for three-dimensional localization of single nano-emitters based on automatic recognition of out-of-focus diffraction patterns. Our technique can be applied to track the movements of single molecules in living cells using a conventional epifluorescence microscope. We first demonstrate three-dimensional localization of fluorescent nanobeads over 4 microns depth with accuracy below 2 nm in vitro. Remarkably, we also establish three-dimensional tracking of Quantum Dots, overcoming their anisotropic emission, by adopting a ligation strategy that allows rotational freedom of the emitter combined with proper pattern recognition. We localize commercially available Quantum Dots in living cells with accuracy better than 7 nm over 2 microns depth. We validate our technique by tracking the three-dimensional movements of single protein-conjugated Quantum Dots in living cell. Moreover, we find that important localization errors can occur in off-focus imaging when improperly calibrated and we give indications to avoid them. Finally, we share a Matlab script that allows readily application of our technique by other laboratories. PMID:26526410

  16. 3D tracking of single nanoparticles and quantum dots in living cells by out-of-focus imaging with diffraction pattern recognition.

    PubMed

    Gardini, Lucia; Capitanio, Marco; Pavone, Francesco S

    2015-01-01

    Live cells are three-dimensional environments where biological molecules move to find their targets and accomplish their functions. However, up to now, most single molecule investigations have been limited to bi-dimensional studies owing to the complexity of 3d-tracking techniques. Here, we present a novel method for three-dimensional localization of single nano-emitters based on automatic recognition of out-of-focus diffraction patterns. Our technique can be applied to track the movements of single molecules in living cells using a conventional epifluorescence microscope. We first demonstrate three-dimensional localization of fluorescent nanobeads over 4 microns depth with accuracy below 2 nm in vitro. Remarkably, we also establish three-dimensional tracking of Quantum Dots, overcoming their anisotropic emission, by adopting a ligation strategy that allows rotational freedom of the emitter combined with proper pattern recognition. We localize commercially available Quantum Dots in living cells with accuracy better than 7 nm over 2 microns depth. We validate our technique by tracking the three-dimensional movements of single protein-conjugated Quantum Dots in living cell. Moreover, we find that important localization errors can occur in off-focus imaging when improperly calibrated and we give indications to avoid them. Finally, we share a Matlab script that allows readily application of our technique by other laboratories.

  17. 3D shape tracking of minimally invasive medical instruments using optical frequency domain reflectometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parent, Francois; Kanti Mandal, Koushik; Loranger, Sebastien; Watanabe Fernandes, Eric Hideki; Kashyap, Raman; Kadoury, Samuel

    2016-03-01

    We propose here a new alternative to provide real-time device tracking during minimally invasive interventions using a truly-distributed strain sensor based on optical frequency domain reflectometry (OFDR) in optical fibers. The guidance of minimally invasive medical instruments such as needles or catheters (ex. by adding a piezoelectric coating) has been the focus of extensive research in the past decades. Real-time tracking of instruments in medical interventions facilitates image guidance and helps the user to reach a pre-localized target more precisely. Image-guided systems using ultrasound imaging and shape sensors based on fiber Bragg gratings (FBG)-embedded optical fibers can provide retroactive feedback to the user in order to reach the targeted areas with even more precision. However, ultrasound imaging with electro-magnetic tracking cannot be used in the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) suite, while shape sensors based on FBG embedded in optical fibers provides discrete values of the instrument position, which requires approximations to be made to evaluate its global shape. This is why a truly-distributed strain sensor based on OFDR could enhance the tracking accuracy. In both cases, since the strain is proportional to the radius of curvature of the fiber, a strain sensor can provide the three-dimensional shape of medical instruments by simply inserting fibers inside the devices. To faithfully follow the shape of the needle in the tracking frame, 3 fibers glued in a specific geometry are used, providing 3 degrees of freedom along the fiber. Near real-time tracking of medical instruments is thus obtained offering clear advantages for clinical monitoring in remotely controlled catheter or needle guidance. We present results demonstrating the promising aspects of this approach as well the limitations of using the OFDR technique.

  18. Automatic shape-based level set segmentation for needle tracking in 3-D TRUS-guided prostate brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Yan, Ping; Cheeseborough, John C; Chao, K S Clifford

    2012-09-01

    Prostate brachytherapy is an effective treatment for early prostate cancer. The success depends critically on the correct needle implant positions. We have devised an automatic shape-based level set segmentation tool for needle tracking in 3-D transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) images, which uses the shape information and level set technique to localize the needle position and estimate the endpoint of needle in real-time. The 3-D TRUS images used in the evaluation of our tools were obtained using a 2-D TRUS transducer from Ultrasonix (Richmond, BC, Canada) and a computer-controlled stepper motor system from Thorlabs (Newton, NJ, USA). The accuracy and feedback mechanism had been validated using prostate phantoms and compared with 3-D positions of these needles derived from experts' readings. The experts' segmentation of needles from 3-D computed tomography images was the ground truth in this study. The difference between automatic and expert segmentations are within 0.1 mm for 17 of 19 implanted needles. The mean errors of automatic segmentations by comparing with the ground truth are within 0.25 mm. Our automated method allows real-time TRUS-based needle placement difference within one pixel compared with manual expert segmentation.

  19. Quantitative 3-d diagnostic ultrasound imaging using a modified transducer array and an automated image tracking technique.

    PubMed

    Hossack, John A; Sumanaweera, Thilaka S; Napel, Sandy; Ha, Jun S

    2002-08-01

    An approach for acquiring dimensionally accurate three-dimensional (3-D) ultrasound data from multiple 2-D image planes is presented. This is based on the use of a modified linear-phased array comprising a central imaging array that acquires multiple, essentially parallel, 2-D slices as the transducer is translated over the tissue of interest. Small, perpendicularly oriented, tracking arrays are integrally mounted on each end of the imaging transducer. As the transducer is translated in an elevational direction with respect to the central imaging array, the images obtained by the tracking arrays remain largely coplanar. The motion between successive tracking images is determined using a minimum sum of absolute difference (MSAD) image matching technique with subpixel matching resolution. An initial phantom scanning-based test of a prototype 8 MHz array indicates that linear dimensional accuracy of 4.6% (2 sigma) is achievable. This result compares favorably with those obtained using an assumed average velocity [31.5% (2 sigma) accuracy] and using an approach based on measuring image-to-image decorrelation [8.4% (2 sigma) accuracy]. The prototype array and imaging system were also tested in a clinical environment, and early results suggest that the approach has the potential to enable a low cost, rapid, screening method for detecting carotid artery stenosis. The average time for performing a screening test for carotid stenosis was reduced from an average of 45 minutes using 2-D duplex Doppler to 12 minutes using the new 3-D scanning approach.

  20. Characterization of a subwavelength-scale 3D void structure using the FDTD-based confocal laser scanning microscopic image mapping technique.

    PubMed

    Choi, Kyongsik; Chon, James W; Gu, Min; Lee, Byoungho

    2007-08-20

    In this paper, a simple confocal laser scanning microscopic (CLSM) image mapping technique based on the finite-difference time domain (FDTD) calculation has been proposed and evaluated for characterization of a subwavelength-scale three-dimensional (3D) void structure fabricated inside polymer matrix. The FDTD simulation method adopts a focused Gaussian beam incident wave, Berenger's perfectly matched layer absorbing boundary condition, and the angular spectrum analysis method. Through the well matched simulation and experimental results of the xz-scanned 3D void structure, we first characterize the exact position and the topological shape factor of the subwavelength-scale void structure, which was fabricated by a tightly focused ultrashort pulse laser. The proposed CLSM image mapping technique based on the FDTD can be widely applied from the 3D near-field microscopic imaging, optical trapping, and evanescent wave phenomenon to the state-of-the-art bio- and nanophotonics.

  1. Tracking the interframe deformation of structures in 3D ultrasound imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syn, M.; Gosling, J. P.; Prager, Richard W.; Berman, Laurence; Crowley, J.

    1994-09-01

    Three dimensional ultrasound imaging with a freehand probe allows a flexible approach to medical visualization and diagnosis. Given the imperfect accuracy of proprioceptive devices used to log the position and tilt of the probe, it is important to utilize the position constraints provided by image evidence. This is also important if we wish to consider the visualization of structures which move significantly during acquisition, such as a heart of fetus. We present here an initial approach to more robust segmentation and shape recovery in a particularly noisy modality. We consider 2D segmentation based on edge evidence, using first an active contour, then finding an optimal segmentation using simulated annealing. Correspondence between contours in adjacent frames can only be solved in general cases by use of a 3D prior model. Dynamic physics-based mesh models as used by Pentland [20] and Nastar [17], allow for shape modelling, then over-constrained 3D shape recovery can be performed using the intrinsic vibration modes of the model.

  2. Laetoli’s lost tracks: 3D generated mean shape and missing footprints

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, M. R.; Reynolds, S. C.; Morse, S. A.; Budka, M.

    2016-01-01

    The Laetoli site (Tanzania) contains the oldest known hominin footprints, and their interpretation remains open to debate, despite over 35 years of research. The two hominin trackways present are parallel to one another, one of which is a composite formed by at least two individuals walking in single file. Most researchers have focused on the single, clearly discernible G1 trackway while the G2/3 trackway has been largely dismissed due to its composite nature. Here we report the use of a new technique that allows us to decouple the G2 and G3 tracks for the first time. In so doing we are able to quantify the mean footprint topology of the G3 trackway and render it useable for subsequent data analyses. By restoring the effectively ‘lost’ G3 track, we have doubled the available data on some of the rarest traces directly associated with our Pliocene ancestors. PMID:26902912

  3. 3D environment modeling and location tracking using off-the-shelf components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luke, Robert H.

    2016-05-01

    The remarkable popularity of smartphones over the past decade has led to a technological race for dominance in market share. This has resulted in a flood of new processors and sensors that are inexpensive, low power and high performance. These sensors include accelerometers, gyroscope, barometers and most importantly cameras. This sensor suite, coupled with multicore processors, allows a new community of researchers to build small, high performance platforms for low cost. This paper describes a system using off-the-shelf components to perform position tracking as well as environment modeling. The system relies on tracking using stereo vision and inertial navigation to determine movement of the system as well as create a model of the environment sensed by the system.

  4. 3D cloud detection and tracking system for solar forecast using multiple sky imagers

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, Zhenzhou; Yu, Dantong; Huang, Dong; Heiser, John; Yoo, Shinjae; Kalb, Paul

    2015-06-23

    We propose a system for forecasting short-term solar irradiance based on multiple total sky imagers (TSIs). The system utilizes a novel method of identifying and tracking clouds in three-dimensional space and an innovative pipeline for forecasting surface solar irradiance based on the image features of clouds. First, we develop a supervised classifier to detect clouds at the pixel level and output cloud mask. In the next step, we design intelligent algorithms to estimate the block-wise base height and motion of each cloud layer based on images from multiple TSIs. Thus, this information is then applied to stitch images together into larger views, which are then used for solar forecasting. We examine the system’s ability to track clouds under various cloud conditions and investigate different irradiance forecast models at various sites. We confirm that this system can 1) robustly detect clouds and track layers, and 2) extract the significant global and local features for obtaining stable irradiance forecasts with short forecast horizons from the obtained images. Finally, we vet our forecasting system at the 32-megawatt Long Island Solar Farm (LISF). Compared with the persistent model, our system achieves at least a 26% improvement for all irradiance forecasts between one and fifteen minutes.

  5. 3D cloud detection and tracking system for solar forecast using multiple sky imagers

    DOE PAGES

    Peng, Zhenzhou; Yu, Dantong; Huang, Dong; Heiser, John; Yoo, Shinjae; Kalb, Paul

    2015-06-23

    We propose a system for forecasting short-term solar irradiance based on multiple total sky imagers (TSIs). The system utilizes a novel method of identifying and tracking clouds in three-dimensional space and an innovative pipeline for forecasting surface solar irradiance based on the image features of clouds. First, we develop a supervised classifier to detect clouds at the pixel level and output cloud mask. In the next step, we design intelligent algorithms to estimate the block-wise base height and motion of each cloud layer based on images from multiple TSIs. Thus, this information is then applied to stitch images together intomore » larger views, which are then used for solar forecasting. We examine the system’s ability to track clouds under various cloud conditions and investigate different irradiance forecast models at various sites. We confirm that this system can 1) robustly detect clouds and track layers, and 2) extract the significant global and local features for obtaining stable irradiance forecasts with short forecast horizons from the obtained images. Finally, we vet our forecasting system at the 32-megawatt Long Island Solar Farm (LISF). Compared with the persistent model, our system achieves at least a 26% improvement for all irradiance forecasts between one and fifteen minutes.« less

  6. Tracking immune-related cell responses to drug delivery microparticles in 3D dense collagen matrix.

    PubMed

    Obarzanek-Fojt, Magdalena; Curdy, Catherine; Loggia, Nicoletta; Di Lena, Fabio; Grieder, Kathrin; Bitar, Malak; Wick, Peter

    2016-10-01

    Beyond the therapeutic purpose, the impact of drug delivery microparticles on the local tissue and inflammatory responses remains to be further elucidated specifically for reactions mediated by the host immune cells. Such immediate and prolonged reactions may adversely influence the release efficacy and intended therapeutic pathway. The lack of suitable in vitro platforms limits our ability to gain insight into the nature of immune responses at a single cell level. In order to establish an in vitro 3D system mimicking the connective host tissue counterpart, we utilized reproducible, compressed, rat-tail collagen polymerized matrices. THP1 cells (human acute monocytic leukaemia cells) differentiated into macrophage-like cells were chosen as cell model and their functionality was retained in the dense rat-tail collagen matrix. Placebo microparticles were later combined in the immune cell seeded system during collagen polymerization and secreted pro-inflammatory factors: TNFα and IL-8 were used as immune response readout (ELISA). Our data showed an elevated TNFα and IL-8 secretion by macrophage THP1 cells indicating that Placebo microparticles trigger certain immune cell responses under 3D in vivo like conditions. Furthermore, we have shown that the system is sensitive to measure the differences in THP1 macrophage pro-inflammatory responses to Active Pharmaceutical Ingredient (API) microparticles with different API release kinetics. We have successfully developed a tissue-like, advanced, in vitro system enabling selective "readouts" of specific responses of immune-related cells. Such system may provide the basis of an advanced toolbox enabling systemic evaluation and prediction of in vivo microparticle reactions on human immune-related cells.

  7. 3D tracking of surgical instruments using a single camera for laparoscopic surgery simulation.

    PubMed

    Shin, Sangkyun; Kim, Youngjun; Kwak, Hyunsoo; Lee, Deukhee; Park, Sehyung

    2011-01-01

    Most laparoscopic surgery simulation systems are expensive and complex. To overcome these problems, this study presents a novel three-dimensional tracking method for laparoscopic surgical instruments that uses only a single camera and fiducial markers. The proposed method does not require any mechanical parts to measure the three-dimensional positions/orientations of surgical instruments and the opening angle of graspers. We implemented simple and cost-effective hardware using the proposed method and successfully combined it with virtual simulation software for laparoscopic surgery.

  8. Visualizing and Tracking Evolving Features in 3D Unstructured and Adaptive Datasets

    SciTech Connect

    Silver, D.; Zabusky, N.

    2002-08-01

    The massive amounts of time-varying datasets being generated demand new visualization and quantification techniques. Visualization alone is not sufficient. Without proper measurement information/computations real science cannot be done. Our focus is this work was to combine visualization with quantification of the data to allow for advanced querying and searching. As part of this proposal, we have developed a feature extraction adn tracking methodology which allows researcher to identify features of interest and follow their evolution over time. The implementation is distributed and operates over data In-situ: where it is stored and when it was computed.

  9. Pulmonary CT image registration and warping for tracking tissue deformation during the respiratory cycle through 3D consistent image registration

    PubMed Central

    Li, Baojun; Christensen, Gary E.; Hoffman, Eric A.; McLennan, Geoffrey; Reinhardt, Joseph M.

    2008-01-01

    Tracking lung tissues during the respiratory cycle has been a challenging task for diagnostic CT and CT-guided radiotherapy. We propose an intensity- and landmark-based image registration algorithm to perform image registration and warping of 3D pulmonary CT image data sets, based on consistency constraints and matching corresponding airway branchpoints. In this paper, we demonstrate the effectivenss and accuracy of this algorithm in tracking lung tissues by both animal and human data sets. In the animal study, the result showed a tracking accuracy of 1.9 mm between 50% functional residual capacity (FRC) and 85% total lung capacity (TLC) for 12 metal seeds implanted in the lungs of a breathing sheep under precise volume control using a pulmonary ventilator. Visual inspection of the human subject results revealed the algorithm’s potential not only in matching the global shapes, but also in registering the internal structures (e.g., oblique lobe fissures, pulmonary artery branches, etc.). These results suggest that our algorithm has significant potential for warping and tracking lung tissue deformation with applications in diagnostic CT, CT-guided radiotherapy treatment planning, and therapeutic effect evaluation. PMID:19175115

  10. Pulmonary CT image registration and warping for tracking tissue deformation during the respiratory cycle through 3D consistent image registration.

    PubMed

    Li, Baojun; Christensen, Gary E; Hoffman, Eric A; McLennan, Geoffrey; Reinhardt, Joseph M

    2008-12-01

    Tracking lung tissues during the respiratory cycle has been a challenging task for diagnostic CT and CT-guided radiotherapy. We propose an intensity- and landmark-based image registration algorithm to perform image registration and warping of 3D pulmonary CT image data sets, based on consistency constraints and matching corresponding airway branchpoints. In this paper, we demonstrate the effectivenss and accuracy of this algorithm in tracking lung tissues by both animal and human data sets. In the animal study, the result showed a tracking accuracy of 1.9 mm between 50% functional residual capacity (FRC) and 85% total lung capacity (TLC) for 12 metal seeds implanted in the lungs of a breathing sheep under precise volume control using a pulmonary ventilator. Visual inspection of the human subject results revealed the algorithm's potential not only in matching the global shapes, but also in registering the internal structures (e.g., oblique lobe fissures, pulmonary artery branches, etc.). These results suggest that our algorithm has significant potential for warping and tracking lung tissue deformation with applications in diagnostic CT, CT-guided radiotherapy treatment planning, and therapeutic effect evaluation.

  11. The birth of a dinosaur footprint: Subsurface 3D motion reconstruction and discrete element simulation reveal track ontogeny

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Locomotion over deformable substrates is a common occurrence in nature. Footprints represent sedimentary distortions that provide anatomical, functional, and behavioral insights into trackmaker biology. The interpretation of such evidence can be challenging, however, particularly for fossil tracks recovered at bedding planes below the originally exposed surface. Even in living animals, the complex dynamics that give rise to footprint morphology are obscured by both foot and sediment opacity, which conceals animal–substrate and substrate–substrate interactions. We used X-ray reconstruction of moving morphology (XROMM) to image and animate the hind limb skeleton of a chicken-like bird traversing a dry, granular material. Foot movement differed significantly from walking on solid ground; the longest toe penetrated to a depth of ∼5 cm, reaching an angle of 30° below horizontal before slipping backward on withdrawal. The 3D kinematic data were integrated into a validated substrate simulation using the discrete element method (DEM) to create a quantitative model of limb-induced substrate deformation. Simulation revealed that despite sediment collapse yielding poor quality tracks at the air–substrate interface, subsurface displacements maintain a high level of organization owing to grain–grain support. Splitting the substrate volume along “virtual bedding planes” exposed prints that more closely resembled the foot and could easily be mistaken for shallow tracks. DEM data elucidate how highly localized deformations associated with foot entry and exit generate specific features in the final tracks, a temporal sequence that we term “track ontogeny.” This combination of methodologies fosters a synthesis between the surface/layer-based perspective prevalent in paleontology and the particle/volume-based perspective essential for a mechanistic understanding of sediment redistribution during track formation. PMID:25489092

  12. The birth of a dinosaur footprint: subsurface 3D motion reconstruction and discrete element simulation reveal track ontogeny.

    PubMed

    Falkingham, Peter L; Gatesy, Stephen M

    2014-12-23

    Locomotion over deformable substrates is a common occurrence in nature. Footprints represent sedimentary distortions that provide anatomical, functional, and behavioral insights into trackmaker biology. The interpretation of such evidence can be challenging, however, particularly for fossil tracks recovered at bedding planes below the originally exposed surface. Even in living animals, the complex dynamics that give rise to footprint morphology are obscured by both foot and sediment opacity, which conceals animal-substrate and substrate-substrate interactions. We used X-ray reconstruction of moving morphology (XROMM) to image and animate the hind limb skeleton of a chicken-like bird traversing a dry, granular material. Foot movement differed significantly from walking on solid ground; the longest toe penetrated to a depth of ∼5 cm, reaching an angle of 30° below horizontal before slipping backward on withdrawal. The 3D kinematic data were integrated into a validated substrate simulation using the discrete element method (DEM) to create a quantitative model of limb-induced substrate deformation. Simulation revealed that despite sediment collapse yielding poor quality tracks at the air-substrate interface, subsurface displacements maintain a high level of organization owing to grain-grain support. Splitting the substrate volume along "virtual bedding planes" exposed prints that more closely resembled the foot and could easily be mistaken for shallow tracks. DEM data elucidate how highly localized deformations associated with foot entry and exit generate specific features in the final tracks, a temporal sequence that we term "track ontogeny." This combination of methodologies fosters a synthesis between the surface/layer-based perspective prevalent in paleontology and the particle/volume-based perspective essential for a mechanistic understanding of sediment redistribution during track formation.

  13. Lagrangian 3D particle tracking in high-speed flows: Shake-The-Box for multi-pulse systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novara, Matteo; Schanz, Daniel; Reuther, Nico; Kähler, Christian J.; Schröder, Andreas

    2016-08-01

    The Shake-The-Box (STB) particle tracking technique, recently introduced for time-resolved 3D particle image velocimetry (PIV) images, is applied here to data from a multi-pulse investigation of a turbulent boundary layer flow with adverse pressure gradient in air at 36 m/s ( Re τ = 10,650). The multi-pulse acquisition strategy allows for the recording of four-pulse long time-resolved sequences with a time separation of a few microseconds. The experimental setup consists of a dual-imaging system and a dual-double-cavity laser emitting orthogonal polarization directions to separate the four pulses. The STB particle triangulation and tracking strategy is adapted here to cope with the limited amount of realizations available along the time sequence and to take advantage of the ghost track reduction offered by the use of two independent imaging systems. Furthermore, a correction scheme to compensate for camera vibrations is discussed, together with a method to accurately identify the position of the wall within the measurement domain. Results show that approximately 80,000 tracks can be instantaneously reconstructed within the measurement volume, enabling the evaluation of both dense velocity fields, suitable for spatial gradients evaluation, and highly spatially resolved boundary layer profiles. Turbulent boundary layer profiles obtained from ensemble averaging of the STB tracks are compared to results from 2D-PIV and long-range micro particle tracking velocimetry; the comparison shows the capability of the STB approach in delivering accurate results across a wide range of scales.

  14. An efficient quasi-3D particle tracking-based approach for transport through fractures with application to dynamic dispersion calculation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lichun; Cardenas, M Bayani

    2015-08-01

    The quantitative study of transport through fractured media has continued for many decades, but has often been constrained by observational and computational challenges. Here, we developed an efficient quasi-3D random walk particle tracking (RWPT) algorithm to simulate solute transport through natural fractures based on a 2D flow field generated from the modified local cubic law (MLCL). As a reference, we also modeled the actual breakthrough curves (BTCs) through direct simulations with the 3D advection-diffusion equation (ADE) and Navier-Stokes equations. The RWPT algorithm along with the MLCL accurately reproduced the actual BTCs calculated with the 3D ADE. The BTCs exhibited non-Fickian behavior, including early arrival and long tails. Using the spatial information of particle trajectories, we further analyzed the dynamic dispersion process through moment analysis. From this, asymptotic time scales were determined for solute dispersion to distinguish non-Fickian from Fickian regimes. This analysis illustrates the advantage and benefit of using an efficient combination of flow modeling and RWPT. PMID:26042625

  15. A smart homecage system with 3D tracking for long-term behavioral experiments.

    PubMed

    Byunghun Lee; Kiani, Mehdi; Ghovanloo, Maysam

    2014-01-01

    A wirelessly-powered homecage system, called the EnerCage-HC, that is equipped with multi-coil wireless power transfer, closed-loop power control, optical behavioral tracking, and a graphic user interface (GUI) is presented for long-term electrophysiology experiments. The EnerCage-HC system can wirelessly power a mobile unit attached to a small animal subject and also track its behavior in real-time as it is housed inside a standard homecage. The EnerCage-HC system is equipped with one central and four overlapping slanted wire-wound coils (WWCs) with optimal geometries to form 3-and 4-coil power transmission links while operating at 13.56 MHz. Utilizing multi-coil links increases the power transfer efficiency (PTE) compared to conventional 2-coil links and also reduces the number of power amplifiers (PAs) to only one, which significantly reduces the system complexity, cost, and dissipated heat. A Microsoft Kinect installed 90 cm above the homecage localizes the animal position and orientation with 1.6 cm accuracy. An in vivo experiment was conducted on a freely behaving rat by continuously delivering 24 mW to the mobile unit for > 7 hours inside a standard homecage. PMID:25570379

  16. Multisensor 3D tracking for counter small unmanned air vehicles (CSUAV)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasquez, Juan R.; Tarplee, Kyle M.; Case, Ellen E.; Zelnio, Anne M.; Rigling, Brian D.

    2008-04-01

    A variety of unmanned air vehicles (UAVs) have been developed for both military and civilian use. The typical large UAV is typically state owned, whereas small UAVs (SUAVs) may be in the form of remote controlled aircraft that are widely available. The potential threat of these SUAVs to both the military and civilian populace has led to research efforts to counter these assets via track, ID, and attack. Difficulties arise from the small size and low radar cross section when attempting to detect and track these targets with a single sensor such as radar or video cameras. In addition, clutter objects make accurate ID difficult without very high resolution data, leading to the use of an acoustic array to support this function. This paper presents a multi-sensor architecture that exploits sensor modes including EO/IR cameras, an acoustic array, and future inclusion of a radar. A sensor resource management concept is presented along with preliminary results from three of the sensors.

  17. A Smart Homecage System with 3D Tracking for Long-Term Behavioral Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Byunghun; Kiani, Mehdi; Ghovanloo, Maysam

    2015-01-01

    A wirelessly-powered homecage system, called the EnerCage-HC, that is equipped with multi-coil wireless power transfer, closed-loop power control, optical behavioral tracking, and a graphic user interface (GUI) is presented for long-term electrophysiology experiments. The EnerCage-HC system can wirelessly power a mobile unit attached to a small animal subject and also track its behavior in real-time as it is housed inside a standard homecage. The EnerCage-HC system is equipped with one central and four overlapping slanted wire-wound coils (WWCs) with optimal geometries to form 3- and 4-coil power transmission links while operating at 13.56 MHz. Utilizing multi-coil links increases the power transfer efficiency (PTE) compared to conventional 2-coil links and also reduces the number of power amplifiers (PAs) to only one, which significantly reduces the system complexity, cost, and dissipated heat. A Microsoft Kinect installed 90 cm above the homecage localizes the animal position and orientation with 1.6 cm accuracy. An in vivo experiment was conducted on a freely behaving rat by continuously delivering 24 mW to the mobile unit for > 7 hours inside a standard homecage. PMID:25570379

  18. Catheter tracking in asynchronous biplane fluoroscopy images by 3D B-snakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schenderlein, Marcel; Stierlin, Susanne; Manzke, Robert; Rasche, Volker; Dietmayer, Klaus

    2010-02-01

    Minimally invasive catheter ablation procedures are guided by biplane fluoroscopy images visualising the interventional scene from two different orientations. However, these images do not provide direct access to their inherent spatial information. A three-dimensional reconstruction and visualisation of the catheters from such projections has the potential to support quick and precise catheter navigation. It enhances the perception of the interventional situation and provides means of three-dimensional catheter pose documentation. In this contribution we develop an algorithm for tracking the three-dimensional pose of electro-physiological catheters in biplane fluoroscopy images. It is based on the B-Snake algorithm which had to be adapted to the biplane and in particular the asynchronous image acquisition situation. A three-dimensional B-spline curve is transformed so that its projections are consistent with the catheter path enhancing feature images, while the information from the missing image caused by the asynchronous acquisition is interpolated from its sequence neighbours. In order to analyse the three-dimensional precision, virtual images were created from patient data sets and threedimensional ground truth catheter paths. The evaluation of the three-dimensional catheter pose reconstruction by means of our algorithm on 33 of such virtual image sets indicated a mean catheter pose error of 1.26 mm and a mean tip deviation of 3.28 mm. The tracking capability of the algorithm was evaluated on 10 patient data sets. In 94 % of all images our algorithm followed the catheter projections.

  19. A Detailed Study of FDIRC Prototype with Waveform Digitizing Electronics in Cosmic Ray Telescope Using 3D Tracks.

    SciTech Connect

    Nishimura, K

    2012-07-01

    We present a detailed study of a novel Cherenkov imaging detector called the Focusing DIRC (FDIRC) with waveform digitizing electronics. In this test study, the FDIRC prototype has been instrumented with seven Hamamatsu H-8500 MaPMTs. Waveforms from ~450 pixels are digitized with waveform sampling electronics based on the BLAB2 ASIC, operating at a sampling speed of ~2.5 GSa/s. The FDIRC prototype was tested in a large cosmic ray telescope (CRT) providing 3D muon tracks with ~1.5 mrad angular resolution and muon energy of Emuon greater than 1.6 GeV. In this study we provide a detailed analysis of the tails in the Cherenkov angle distribution as a function of various variables, compare experimental results with simulation, and identify the major contributions to the tails. We demonstrate that to see the full impact of these tails on the Cherenkov angle resolution, it is crucial to use 3D tracks, and have a full understanding of the role of ambiguities. These issues could not be fully explored in previous FDIRC studies where the beam was perpendicular to the quartz radiator bars. This work is relevant for the final FDIRC prototype of the PID detector at SuperB, which will be tested this year in the CRT setup.

  20. A Detailed Study of FDIRC Prototype with Waveform Digitizing Electronics in Cosmic Ray Telescope Using 3D Tracks

    SciTech Connect

    Nishimura, K.; Dey, B.; Aston, D.; Leith, D.W.G.S.; Ratcliff, B.; Roberts, D.; Ruckman, L.; Shtol, D.; Varner, G.S.; Va'vra, J.; Vavra, Jerry; /SLAC

    2012-07-30

    We present a detailed study of a novel Cherenkov imaging detector called the Focusing DIRC (FDIRC) with waveform digitizing electronics. In this test study, the FDIRC prototype has been instrumented with seven Hamamatsu H-8500 MaPMTs. Waveforms from {approx}450 pixels are digitized with waveform sampling electronics based on the BLAB2 ASIC, operating at a sampling speed of {approx}2.5 GSa/s. The FDIRC prototype was tested in a large cosmic ray telescope (CRT) providing 3D muon tracks with {approx}1.5 mrad angular resolution and muon energy of E{sub muon} > 1.6 GeV. In this study we provide a detailed analysis of the tails in the Cherenkov angle distribution as a function of various variables, compare experimental results with simulation, and identify the major contributions to the tails. We demonstrate that to see the full impact of these tails on the Cherenkov angle resolution, it is crucial to use 3D tracks, and have a full understanding of the role of ambiguities. These issues could not be fully explored in previous FDIRC studies where the beam was perpendicular to the quartz radiator bars. This work is relevant for the final FDIRC prototype of the PID detector at SuperB, which will be tested this year in the CRT setup.

  1. Dynamic tracking of a deformable tissue based on 3D-2D MR-US image registration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marami, Bahram; Sirouspour, Shahin; Fenster, Aaron; Capson, David W.

    2014-03-01

    Real-time registration of pre-operative magnetic resonance (MR) or computed tomography (CT) images with intra-operative Ultrasound (US) images can be a valuable tool in image-guided therapies and interventions. This paper presents an automatic method for dynamically tracking the deformation of a soft tissue based on registering pre-operative three-dimensional (3D) MR images to intra-operative two-dimensional (2D) US images. The registration algorithm is based on concepts in state estimation where a dynamic finite element (FE)- based linear elastic deformation model correlates the imaging data in the spatial and temporal domains. A Kalman-like filtering process estimates the unknown deformation states of the soft tissue using the deformation model and a measure of error between the predicted and the observed intra-operative imaging data. The error is computed based on an intensity-based distance metric, namely, modality independent neighborhood descriptor (MIND), and no segmentation or feature extraction from images is required. The performance of the proposed method is evaluated by dynamically deforming 3D pre-operative MR images of a breast phantom tissue based on real-time 2D images obtained from an US probe. Experimental results on different registration scenarios showed that deformation tracking converges in a few iterations. The average target registration error on the plane of 2D US images for manually selected fiducial points was between 0.3 and 1.5 mm depending on the size of deformation.

  2. Ultra-high-speed 3D astigmatic particle tracking velocimetry: application to particle-laden supersonic impinging jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchmann, N. A.; Cierpka, C.; Kähler, C. J.; Soria, J.

    2014-11-01

    The paper demonstrates ultra-high-speed three-component, three-dimensional (3C3D) velocity measurements of micron-sized particles suspended in a supersonic impinging jet flow. Understanding the dynamics of individual particles in such flows is important for the design of particle impactors for drug delivery or cold gas dynamic spray processing. The underexpanded jet flow is produced via a converging nozzle, and micron-sized particles ( d p = 110 μm) are introduced into the gas flow. The supersonic jet impinges onto a flat surface, and the particle impact velocity and particle impact angle are studied for a range of flow conditions and impingement distances. The imaging system consists of an ultra-high-speed digital camera (Shimadzu HPV-1) capable of recording rates of up to 1 Mfps. Astigmatism particle tracking velocimetry (APTV) is used to measure the 3D particle position (Cierpka et al., Meas Sci Technol 21(045401):13, 2010) by coding the particle depth location in the 2D images by adding a cylindrical lens to the high-speed imaging system. Based on the reconstructed 3D particle positions, the particle trajectories are obtained via a higher-order tracking scheme that takes advantage of the high temporal resolution to increase robustness and accuracy of the measurement. It is shown that the particle velocity and impingement angle are affected by the gas flow in a manner depending on the nozzle pressure ratio and stand-off distance where higher pressure ratios and stand-off distances lead to higher impact velocities and larger impact angles.

  3. Readily Accessible Multiplane Microscopy: 3D Tracking the HIV-1 Genome in Living Cells.

    PubMed

    Itano, Michelle S; Bleck, Marina; Johnson, Daniel S; Simon, Sanford M

    2016-02-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 infection and the associated disease AIDS are a major cause of human death worldwide with no vaccine or cure available. The trafficking of HIV-1 RNAs from sites of synthesis in the nucleus, through the cytoplasm, to sites of assembly at the plasma membrane are critical steps in HIV-1 viral replication, but are not well characterized. Here we present a broadly accessible microscopy method that captures multiple focal planes simultaneously, which allows us to image the trafficking of HIV-1 genomic RNAs with high precision. This method utilizes a customization of a commercial multichannel emission splitter that enables high-resolution 3D imaging with single-macromolecule sensitivity. We show with high temporal and spatial resolution that HIV-1 genomic RNAs are most mobile in the cytosol, and undergo confined mobility at sites along the nuclear envelope and in the nucleus and nucleolus. These provide important insights regarding the mechanism by which the HIV-1 RNA genome is transported to the sites of assembly of nascent virions. PMID:26567131

  4. Aref's chaotic orbits tracked by a general ellipsoid using 3D numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shui, Pei; Popinet, Stéphane; Govindarajan, Rama; Valluri, Prashant

    2015-11-01

    The motion of an ellipsoidal solid in an ideal fluid has been shown to be chaotic (Aref, 1993) under the limit of non-integrability of Kirchhoff's equations (Kozlov & Oniscenko, 1982). On the other hand, the particle could stop moving when the damping viscous force is strong enough. We present numerical evidence using our in-house immersed solid solver for 3D chaotic motion of a general ellipsoidal solid and suggest criteria for triggering such motion. Our immersed solid solver functions under the framework of the Gerris flow package of Popinet et al. (2003). This solver, the Gerris Immersed Solid Solver (GISS), resolves 6 degree-of-freedom motion of immersed solids with arbitrary geometry and number. We validate our results against the solution of Kirchhoff's equations. The study also shows that the translational/ rotational energy ratio plays the key role on the motion pattern, while the particle geometry and density ratio between the solid and fluid also have some influence on the chaotic behaviour. Along with several other benchmark cases for viscous flows, we propose prediction of chaotic Aref's orbits as a key benchmark test case for immersed boundary/solid solvers.

  5. Readily Accessible Multiplane Microscopy: 3D Tracking the HIV-1 Genome in Living Cells.

    PubMed

    Itano, Michelle S; Bleck, Marina; Johnson, Daniel S; Simon, Sanford M

    2016-02-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 infection and the associated disease AIDS are a major cause of human death worldwide with no vaccine or cure available. The trafficking of HIV-1 RNAs from sites of synthesis in the nucleus, through the cytoplasm, to sites of assembly at the plasma membrane are critical steps in HIV-1 viral replication, but are not well characterized. Here we present a broadly accessible microscopy method that captures multiple focal planes simultaneously, which allows us to image the trafficking of HIV-1 genomic RNAs with high precision. This method utilizes a customization of a commercial multichannel emission splitter that enables high-resolution 3D imaging with single-macromolecule sensitivity. We show with high temporal and spatial resolution that HIV-1 genomic RNAs are most mobile in the cytosol, and undergo confined mobility at sites along the nuclear envelope and in the nucleus and nucleolus. These provide important insights regarding the mechanism by which the HIV-1 RNA genome is transported to the sites of assembly of nascent virions.

  6. Particle tracking approach for transport in three-dimensional discrete fracture networks: Particle tracking in 3-D DFNs

    SciTech Connect

    Makedonska, Nataliia; Painter, Scott L.; Bui, Quan M.; Gable, Carl W.; Karra, Satish

    2015-09-16

    The discrete fracture network (DFN) model is a method to mimic discrete pathways for fluid flow through a fractured low-permeable rock mass, and may be combined with particle tracking simulations to address solute transport. However, experience has shown that it is challenging to obtain accurate transport results in three-dimensional DFNs because of the high computational burden and difficulty in constructing a high-quality unstructured computational mesh on simulated fractures. We present a new particle tracking capability, which is adapted to control volume (Voronoi polygons) flow solutions on unstructured grids (Delaunay triangulations) on three-dimensional DFNs. The locally mass-conserving finite-volume approach eliminates mass balance-related problems during particle tracking. The scalar fluxes calculated for each control volume face by the flow solver are used to reconstruct a Darcy velocity at each control volume centroid. The groundwater velocities can then be continuously interpolated to any point in the domain of interest. The control volumes at fracture intersections are split into four pieces, and the velocity is reconstructed independently on each piece, which results in multiple groundwater velocities at the intersection, one for each fracture on each side of the intersection line. This technique enables detailed particle transport representation through a complex DFN structure. Verified for small DFNs, the new simulation capability enables numerical experiments on advective transport in large DFNs to be performed. As a result, we demonstrate this particle transport approach on a DFN model using parameters similar to those of crystalline rock at a proposed geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel in Forsmark, Sweden.

  7. Particle tracking approach for transport in three-dimensional discrete fracture networks: Particle tracking in 3-D DFNs

    DOE PAGES

    Makedonska, Nataliia; Painter, Scott L.; Bui, Quan M.; Gable, Carl W.; Karra, Satish

    2015-09-16

    The discrete fracture network (DFN) model is a method to mimic discrete pathways for fluid flow through a fractured low-permeable rock mass, and may be combined with particle tracking simulations to address solute transport. However, experience has shown that it is challenging to obtain accurate transport results in three-dimensional DFNs because of the high computational burden and difficulty in constructing a high-quality unstructured computational mesh on simulated fractures. We present a new particle tracking capability, which is adapted to control volume (Voronoi polygons) flow solutions on unstructured grids (Delaunay triangulations) on three-dimensional DFNs. The locally mass-conserving finite-volume approach eliminates massmore » balance-related problems during particle tracking. The scalar fluxes calculated for each control volume face by the flow solver are used to reconstruct a Darcy velocity at each control volume centroid. The groundwater velocities can then be continuously interpolated to any point in the domain of interest. The control volumes at fracture intersections are split into four pieces, and the velocity is reconstructed independently on each piece, which results in multiple groundwater velocities at the intersection, one for each fracture on each side of the intersection line. This technique enables detailed particle transport representation through a complex DFN structure. Verified for small DFNs, the new simulation capability enables numerical experiments on advective transport in large DFNs to be performed. As a result, we demonstrate this particle transport approach on a DFN model using parameters similar to those of crystalline rock at a proposed geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel in Forsmark, Sweden.« less

  8. Method for dose-reduced 3D catheter tracking on a scanning-beam digital x-ray system using dynamic electronic collimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunkerley, David A. P.; Funk, Tobias; Speidel, Michael A.

    2016-03-01

    Scanning-beam digital x-ray (SBDX) is an inverse geometry x-ray fluoroscopy system capable of tomosynthesis-based 3D catheter tracking. This work proposes a method of dose-reduced 3D tracking using dynamic electronic collimation (DEC) of the SBDX scanning x-ray tube. Positions in the 2D focal spot array are selectively activated to create a regionof- interest (ROI) x-ray field around the tracked catheter. The ROI position is updated for each frame based on a motion vector calculated from the two most recent 3D tracking results. The technique was evaluated with SBDX data acquired as a catheter tip inside a chest phantom was pulled along a 3D trajectory. DEC scans were retrospectively generated from the detector images stored for each focal spot position. DEC imaging of a catheter tip in a volume measuring 11.4 cm across at isocenter required 340 active focal spots per frame, versus 4473 spots in full-FOV mode. The dose-area-product (DAP) and peak skin dose (PSD) for DEC versus full field-of-view (FOV) scanning were calculated using an SBDX Monte Carlo simulation code. DAP was reduced to 7.4% to 8.4% of the full-FOV value, consistent with the relative number of active focal spots (7.6%). For image sequences with a moving catheter, PSD was 33.6% to 34.8% of the full-FOV value. The root-mean-squared-deviation between DEC-based 3D tracking coordinates and full-FOV 3D tracking coordinates was less than 0.1 mm. The 3D distance between the tracked tip and the sheath centerline averaged 0.75 mm. Dynamic electronic collimation can reduce dose with minimal change in tracking performance.

  9. Fast and accurate global multiphase arrival tracking: the irregular shortest-path method in a 3-D spherical earth model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Guo-Jiao; Bai, Chao-Ying; Greenhalgh, Stewart

    2013-09-01

    The traditional grid/cell-based wavefront expansion algorithms, such as the shortest path algorithm, can only find the first arrivals or multiply reflected (or mode converted) waves transmitted from subsurface interfaces, but cannot calculate the other later reflections/conversions having a minimax time path. In order to overcome the above limitations, we introduce the concept of a stationary minimax time path of Fermat's Principle into the multistage irregular shortest path method. Here we extend it from Cartesian coordinates for a flat earth model to global ray tracing of multiple phases in a 3-D complex spherical earth model. The ray tracing results for 49 different kinds of crustal, mantle and core phases show that the maximum absolute traveltime error is less than 0.12 s and the average absolute traveltime error is within 0.09 s when compared with the AK135 theoretical traveltime tables for a 1-D reference model. Numerical tests in terms of computational accuracy and CPU time consumption indicate that the new scheme is an accurate, efficient and a practical way to perform 3-D multiphase arrival tracking in regional or global traveltime tomography.

  10. Pulse electrochemical machining on Invar alloy: Optical microscopic/SEM and non-contact 3D measurement study of surface analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, S. H.; Choi, S. G.; Choi, W. K.; Yang, B. Y.; Lee, E. S.

    2014-09-01

    In this study, Invar alloy (Fe 63.5%, Ni 36.5%) was electrochemically polished by PECM (Pulse Electro Chemical Machining) in a mixture of NaCl, glycerin, and distilled water. A series of PECM experiments were carried out with different voltages and different electrode shapes, and then the surfaces of polished Invar alloy were investigated. The polished Invar alloy surfaces were investigated by optical microscope, scanning electron microscope (SEM), and non-contact 3D measurement (white light microscopes) and it was found that different applied voltages produced different surface characteristics on the Invar alloy surface because of the locally concentrated applied voltage on the Invar alloy surface. Moreover, we found that the shapes of electrode also have an effect on the surface characteristics on Invar alloy surface by influencing the applied voltage. These experimental findings provide fundamental knowledge for PECM of Invar alloy by surface analysis.

  11. A quantitative study of 3D-scanning frequency and Δd of tracking points on the tooth surface

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hong; Lyu, Peijun; Sun, Yuchun; Wang, Yong; Liang, Xiaoyue

    2015-01-01

    Micro-movement of human jaws in the resting state might influence the accuracy of direct three-dimensional (3D) measurement. Providing a reference for sampling frequency settings of intraoral scanning systems to overcome this influence is important. In this study, we measured micro-movement, or change in distance (∆d), as the change in position of a single tracking point from one sampling time point to another in five human subjects. ∆d of tracking points on incisors at 7 sampling frequencies was judged against the clinical accuracy requirement to select proper sampling frequency settings. The curve equation was then fit quantitatively between ∆d median and the sampling frequency to predict the trend of ∆d with increasing f. The difference of ∆d among the subjects and the difference between upper and lower incisor feature points of the same subject were analyzed by a non-parametric test (α = 0.05). Significant differences of incisor feature points were noted among different subjects and between upper and lower jaws of the same subject (P < 0.01). Overall, ∆d decreased with increasing frequency. When the frequency was 60 Hz, ∆d nearly reached the clinical accuracy requirement. Frequencies higher than 60 Hz did not significantly decrease Δd further. PMID:26400112

  12. Extracellular vesicles of calcifying turkey leg tendon characterized by immunocytochemistry and high voltage electron microscopic tomography and 3-D graphic image reconstruction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, W. J.; Hodgens, K. J.; McKee, M. D.; Nanci, A.; Song, M. J.; Kiyonaga, S.; Arena, J.; McEwen, B.

    1992-01-01

    To gain insight into the structure and possible function of extracellular vesicles in certain calcifying vertebrate tissues, normally mineralizing leg tendons from the domestic turkey, Meleagris gallopavo, have been studied in two separate investigations, one concerning the electron microscopic immunolocalization of the 66 kDa phosphoprotein, osteopontin, and the other detailing the organization and distribution of mineral crystals associated with the vesicles as determined by high voltage microscopic tomography and 3-D graphic image reconstruction. Immunolabeling shows that osteopontin is related to extracellular vesicles of the tendon in the sense that its initial presence appears coincident with the development of mineral associated with the vesicle loci. By high voltage electron microscopy and 3-D imaging techniques, mineral crystals are found to consist of small irregularly shaped particles somewhat randomly oriented throughout individual vesicles sites. Their appearance is different from that found for the mineral observed within calcifying tendon collagen, and their 3-D disposition is not regularly ordered. Possible spatial and temporal relationships of vesicles, osteopontin, mineral, and collagen are being examined further by these approaches.

  13. Standing-wave-excited multiplanar fluorescence in a laser scanning microscope reveals 3D information on red blood cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amor, Rumelo; Mahajan, Sumeet; Amos, William Bradshaw; McConnell, Gail

    2014-12-01

    Standing-wave excitation of fluorescence is highly desirable in optical microscopy because it improves the axial resolution. We demonstrate here that multiplanar excitation of fluorescence by a standing wave can be produced in a single-spot laser scanning microscope by placing a plane reflector close to the specimen. We report here a variation in the intensity of fluorescence of successive planes related to the Stokes shift of the dye. We show by the use of dyes specific for the cell membrane how standing-wave excitation can be exploited to generate precise contour maps of the surface membrane of red blood cells, with an axial resolution of ~90 nm. The method, which requires only the addition of a plane mirror to an existing confocal laser scanning microscope, may well prove useful in studying diseases which involve the red cell membrane, such as malaria.

  14. Standing-wave-excited multiplanar fluorescence in a laser scanning microscope reveals 3D information on red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Amor, Rumelo; Mahajan, Sumeet; Amos, William Bradshaw; McConnell, Gail

    2014-12-08

    Standing-wave excitation of fluorescence is highly desirable in optical microscopy because it improves the axial resolution. We demonstrate here that multiplanar excitation of fluorescence by a standing wave can be produced in a single-spot laser scanning microscope by placing a plane reflector close to the specimen. We report here a variation in the intensity of fluorescence of successive planes related to the Stokes shift of the dye. We show by the use of dyes specific for the cell membrane how standing-wave excitation can be exploited to generate precise contour maps of the surface membrane of red blood cells, with an axial resolution of ≈90 nm. The method, which requires only the addition of a plane mirror to an existing confocal laser scanning microscope, may well prove useful in studying diseases which involve the red cell membrane, such as malaria.

  15. Novel 3D light microscopic analysis of IUGR placentas points to a morphological correlate of compensated ischemic placental disease in humans

    PubMed Central

    Haeussner, Eva; Schmitz, Christoph; Frank, Hans-Georg; Edler von Koch, Franz

    2016-01-01

    The villous tree of the human placenta is a complex three-dimensional (3D) structure with branches and nodes at the feto-maternal border in the key area of gas and nutrient exchange. Recently we introduced a novel, computer-assisted 3D light microscopic method that enables 3D topological analysis of branching patterns of the human placental villous tree. In the present study we applied this novel method to the 3D architecture of peripheral villous trees of placentas from patients with intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR placentas), a severe obstetric syndrome. We found that the mean branching angle of branches in terminal positions of the villous trees was significantly different statistically between IUGR placentas and clinically normal placentas. Furthermore, the mean tortuosity of branches of villous trees in directly preterminal positions was significantly different statistically between IUGR placentas and clinically normal placentas. We show that these differences can be interpreted as consequences of morphological adaptation of villous trees between IUGR placentas and clinically normal placentas, and may have important consequences for the understanding of the morphological correlates of the efficiency of the placental villous tree and their influence on fetal development. PMID:27045698

  16. Prospective motion correction of 3D echo-planar imaging data for functional MRI using optical tracking.

    PubMed

    Todd, Nick; Josephs, Oliver; Callaghan, Martina F; Lutti, Antoine; Weiskopf, Nikolaus

    2015-06-01

    We evaluated the performance of an optical camera based prospective motion correction (PMC) system in improving the quality of 3D echo-planar imaging functional MRI data. An optical camera and external marker were used to dynamically track the head movement of subjects during fMRI scanning. PMC was performed by using the motion information to dynamically update the sequence's RF excitation and gradient waveforms such that the field-of-view was realigned to match the subject's head movement. Task-free fMRI experiments on five healthy volunteers followed a 2 × 2 × 3 factorial design with the following factors: PMC on or off; 3.0mm or 1.5mm isotropic resolution; and no, slow, or fast head movements. Visual and motor fMRI experiments were additionally performed on one of the volunteers at 1.5mm resolution comparing PMC on vs PMC off for no and slow head movements. Metrics were developed to quantify the amount of motion as it occurred relative to k-space data acquisition. The motion quantification metric collapsed the very rich camera tracking data into one scalar value for each image volume that was strongly predictive of motion-induced artifacts. The PMC system did not introduce extraneous artifacts for the no motion conditions and improved the time series temporal signal-to-noise by 30% to 40% for all combinations of low/high resolution and slow/fast head movement relative to the standard acquisition with no prospective correction. The numbers of activated voxels (p<0.001, uncorrected) in both task-based experiments were comparable for the no motion cases and increased by 78% and 330%, respectively, for PMC on versus PMC off in the slow motion cases. The PMC system is a robust solution to decrease the motion sensitivity of multi-shot 3D EPI sequences and thereby overcome one of the main roadblocks to their widespread use in fMRI studies.

  17. Prospective motion correction of 3D echo-planar imaging data for functional MRI using optical tracking

    PubMed Central

    Todd, Nick; Josephs, Oliver; Callaghan, Martina F.; Lutti, Antoine; Weiskopf, Nikolaus

    2015-01-01

    We evaluated the performance of an optical camera based prospective motion correction (PMC) system in improving the quality of 3D echo-planar imaging functional MRI data. An optical camera and external marker were used to dynamically track the head movement of subjects during fMRI scanning. PMC was performed by using the motion information to dynamically update the sequence's RF excitation and gradient waveforms such that the field-of-view was realigned to match the subject's head movement. Task-free fMRI experiments on five healthy volunteers followed a 2 × 2 × 3 factorial design with the following factors: PMC on or off; 3.0 mm or 1.5 mm isotropic resolution; and no, slow, or fast head movements. Visual and motor fMRI experiments were additionally performed on one of the volunteers at 1.5 mm resolution comparing PMC on vs PMC off for no and slow head movements. Metrics were developed to quantify the amount of motion as it occurred relative to k-space data acquisition. The motion quantification metric collapsed the very rich camera tracking data into one scalar value for each image volume that was strongly predictive of motion-induced artifacts. The PMC system did not introduce extraneous artifacts for the no motion conditions and improved the time series temporal signal-to-noise by 30% to 40% for all combinations of low/high resolution and slow/fast head movement relative to the standard acquisition with no prospective correction. The numbers of activated voxels (p < 0.001, uncorrected) in both task-based experiments were comparable for the no motion cases and increased by 78% and 330%, respectively, for PMC on versus PMC off in the slow motion cases. The PMC system is a robust solution to decrease the motion sensitivity of multi-shot 3D EPI sequences and thereby overcome one of the main roadblocks to their widespread use in fMRI studies. PMID:25783205

  18. Direct observation of macrostructure formation of hierarchically structured meso-macroporous aluminosilicates with 3D interconnectivity by optical microscope.

    PubMed

    Lemaire, Arnaud; Rooke, Joanna Claire; Chen, Li-Hua; Su, Bao-Lian

    2011-03-15

    Hierarchically structured spongy meso-macroporous aluminosilicates with high tetrahedral aluminum content were synthesized from a mixture of single molecular alkoxide precursor, (sec-BuO)2-Al-O-Si(OEt)3, already containing Si-O-Al bonds, and a silica coreactant, tetramethoxysilane (TMOS). The spontaneous byproduct templated macroporous structure formation has been directly visualized using in situ high-resolution optical microscopy (OM), allowing the crucial observation of a microbubble dispersion which is directly correlated to the macrostructure observed by electronic microscopies (SEM and TEM). This discovery leads to a comparative study with meso-macroporous pure metal oxide and to a proposal of the formation mechanism of meso-macroporous aluminosilicates with 3D interconnectivity. The aluminosilicate phase/microbubbles emulsion is produced by a phase separation process occurring between the aluminosilicate nanoparticles and the liquid hydrolysis-condensation reaction byproducts (water, methanol, ethanol, and butanol). The use of alkoxysilane improves the heterocondensation rates between the highly reactive aluminum alkoxide part of the single precursor and added silica species but, above all, leads to the spontaneous generation of an unusual meso-macroporosity in alkaline media. The particles obtained at pH = 13.0 featured regular micrometer-sized macrospheres separated by very thin mesoporous walls and connected by submicrometric openings, providing a 3D interconnectivity. The slight increase in pH value to 13.5 induced significant modifications in morphology and textural properties due to the slower gelification process of the aluminosilicate phase, resulting in the formation of an aluminosilicate material constituted of 1-2 µm large independent hollow mesoporous spheres.

  19. Improvement of the size estimation of 3D tracked droplets using digital in-line holography with joint estimation reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verrier, N.; Grosjean, N.; Dib, E.; Méès, L.; Fournier, C.; Marié, J.-L.

    2016-04-01

    Digital holography is a valuable tool for three-dimensional information extraction. Among existing configurations, the originally proposed set-up (i.e. Gabor, or in-line holography), is reasonably immune to variations in the experimental environment making it a method of choice for studies of fluid dynamics. Nevertheless, standard hologram reconstruction techniques, based on numerical light back-propagation are prone to artifacts such as twin images or aliases that limit both the quality and quantity of information extracted from the acquired holograms. To get round this issue, the hologram reconstruction as a parametric inverse problem has been shown to accurately estimate 3D positions and the size of seeding particles directly from the hologram. To push the bounds of accuracy on size estimation still further, we propose to fully exploit the information redundancy of a hologram video sequence using joint estimation reconstruction. Applying this approach in a bench-top experiment, we show that it led to a relative precision of 0.13% (for a 60 μm diameter droplet) for droplet size estimation, and a tracking precision of {σx}× {σy}× {σz}=0.15× 0.15× 1~\\text{pixels} .

  20. 3D photothermal microscope for the detection of nano-sized absorbing defects responsible for laser-induced damage initiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertussi, Bertrand; Natoli, Jean Yves; Commandre, Mireille

    2005-02-01

    The recent progresses in optical components manufacturing have permitted to increase strongly the laser-induced damage threshold. However, in high power laser applications, the slightest inhomogeneity of the material can lead to an irreversible breakdown. Considering the difficulty to eliminate the whole defects, it is important to have an accurate tool to exhibit the smallest absorbing centers assumed to be precursors of laser damage. We propose in this paper to describe a non destructive technique based on the photothermal effect induced by local absorbing inhomogeneities in order to detect nano-scale absorbing defects. The purpose will be illustrated by the detection of artificial isolated metallic inclusions of a few ten nanometers in the bulk of transparent substrates and thin-film coatings. The high spatial resolution of detection is obtained thank to a piezolectric 3D stage. Moreover, the photothermal setup coupled with a laser damage facility, permits to follow with high accuracy the evolution of these defects under laser irradiation and determine a pre-damage stage ten times lower than the surface damage.

  1. Fingerprint authentication via joint transform correlator and its application in remote access control of a 3D microscopic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Wenqi; Lai, Hongji; Wang, Meng; Liu, Zeyi; Yin, Yongkai; Peng, Xiang

    2014-05-01

    We present a fingerprint authentication scheme based on the optical joint transform correlator (JTC) and further describe its application to the remote access control of a Network-based Remote Laboratory (NRL). It is built to share a 3D microscopy system of our realistic laboratory in Shenzhen University with the remote co-researchers in Stuttgart University. In this article, we would like to focus on the involved security issues, mainly on the verification of various remote visitors to our NRL. By making use of the JTC-based optical pattern recognition technique as well as the Personal Identification Number (PIN), we are able to achieve the aim of authentication and access control for any remote visitors. Note that only the authorized remote visitors could be guided to the Virtual Network Computer (VNC), a cross-platform software, which allows the remote visitor to access the desktop applications and visually manipulate the instruments of our NRL through the internet. Specifically to say, when a remote visitor attempts to access to our NRL, a PIN is mandatory required in advance, which is followed by fingerprint capturing and verification. Only if both the PIN and the fingerprint are correct, can one be regarded as an authorized visitor, and then he/she would get the authority to visit our NRL by the VNC. It is also worth noting that the aforementioned "two-step verification" strategy could be further applied to verify the identity levels of various remote visitors, and therefore realize the purpose of diversified visitor management.

  2. Robust Adaptive 3-D Segmentation of Vessel Laminae From Fluorescence Confocal Microscope Images and Parallel GPU Implementation

    PubMed Central

    Narayanaswamy, Arunachalam; Dwarakapuram, Saritha; Bjornsson, Christopher S.; Cutler, Barbara M.; Shain, William

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents robust 3-D algorithms to segment vasculature that is imaged by labeling laminae, rather than the lumenal volume. The signal is weak, sparse, noisy, nonuniform, low-contrast, and exhibits gaps and spectral artifacts, so adaptive thresholding and Hessian filtering based methods are not effective. The structure deviates from a tubular geometry, so tracing algorithms are not effective. We propose a four step approach. The first step detects candidate voxels using a robust hypothesis test based on a model that assumes Poisson noise and locally planar geometry. The second step performs an adaptive region growth to extract weakly labeled and fine vessels while rejecting spectral artifacts. To enable interactive visualization and estimation of features such as statistical confidence, local curvature, local thickness, and local normal, we perform the third step. In the third step, we construct an accurate mesh representation using marching tetrahedra, volume-preserving smoothing, and adaptive decimation algorithms. To enable topological analysis and efficient validation, we describe a method to estimate vessel centerlines using a ray casting and vote accumulation algorithm which forms the final step of our algorithm. Our algorithm lends itself to parallel processing, and yielded an 8× speedup on a graphics processor (GPU). On synthetic data, our meshes had average error per face (EPF) values of (0.1–1.6) voxels per mesh face for peak signal-to-noise ratios from (110–28 dB). Separately, the error from decimating the mesh to less than 1% of its original size, the EPF was less than 1 voxel/face. When validated on real datasets, the average recall and precision values were found to be 94.66% and 94.84%, respectively. PMID:20199906

  3. Hybrid MV-kV 3D respiratory motion tracking during radiation therapy with low imaging dose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Huagang; Li, Haiyun; Liu, Zhixiang; Nath, Ravinder; Liu, Wu

    2012-12-01

    A novel real-time adaptive MV-kV imaging framework for image-guided radiation therapy is developed to reduce the thoracic and abdominal tumor targeting uncertainty caused by respiration-induced intrafraction motion with ultra-low patient imaging dose. In our method, continuous stereoscopic MV-kV imaging is used at the beginning of a radiation therapy delivery for several seconds to measure the implanted marker positions. After this stereoscopic imaging period, the kV imager is switched off except for the times when no fiducial marker is detected in the cine-MV images. The 3D time-varying marker positions are estimated by combining the MV 2D projection data and the motion correlations between directional components of marker motion established from the stereoscopic imaging period and updated afterwards; in particular, the most likely position is assumed to be the position on the projection line that has the shortest distance to the first principal component line segment constructed from previous trajectory points. An adaptive windowed auto-regressive prediction is utilized to predict the marker position a short time later (310 ms and 460 ms in this study) to allow for tracking system latency. To demonstrate the feasibility and evaluate the accuracy of the proposed method, computer simulations were performed for both arc and fixed-gantry deliveries using 66 h of retrospective tumor motion data from 42 patients treated for thoracic or abdominal cancers. The simulations reveal that using our hybrid approach, a smaller than 1.2 mm or 1.5 mm root-mean-square tracking error can be achieved at a system latency of 310 ms or 460 ms, respectively. Because the kV imaging is only used for a short period of time in our method, extra patient imaging dose can be reduced by an order of magnitude compared to continuous MV-kV imaging, while the clinical tumor targeting accuracy for thoracic or abdominal cancers is maintained. Furthermore, no additional hardware is required with the

  4. Crosstalk minimization in autostereoscopic multiveiw 3D display by eye tracking and fusion (overlapping) of viewing zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sung-Kyu; Yoon, Seon-Kyu; Yoon, Ki-Hyuk

    2012-06-01

    An autostereoscopic 3D display provides the binocular perception without eye glasses, but induces the low 3D effect and dizziness due to the crosstalk effect. The crosstalk related problems give the deterioration of 3D effect, clearness, and reality of 3D image. A novel method of reducing the crosstalk is designed and tested; the method is based on the fusion of viewing zones and the real time eye position. It is shown experimentally that the crosstalk is effectively reduced at any position around the optimal viewing distance.

  5. Direct measurement of particle size and 3D velocity of a gas-solid pipe flow with digital holographic particle tracking velocimetry.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yingchun; Wu, Xuecheng; Yao, Longchao; Gréhan, Gérard; Cen, Kefa

    2015-03-20

    The 3D measurement of the particles in a gas-solid pipe flow is of great interest, but remains challenging due to curved pipe walls in various engineering applications. Because of the astigmatism induced by the pipe, concentric ellipse fringes in the hologram of spherical particles are observed in the experiments. With a theoretical analysis of the particle holography by an ABCD matrix, the in-focus particle image can be reconstructed by the modified convolution method and fractional Fourier transform. Thereafter, the particle size, 3D position, and velocity are simultaneously measured by digital holographic particle tracking velocimetry (DHPTV). The successful application of DHPTV to the particle size and 3D velocity measurement in a glass pipe's flow can facilitate its 3D diagnostics.

  6. On the comparison of visual discomfort generated by S3D and 2D content based on eye-tracking features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iatsun, Iana; Larabi, Mohamed-Chaker; Fernandez-Maloigne, Christine

    2014-03-01

    The changing of TV systems from 2D to 3D mode is the next expected step in the telecommunication world. Some works have already been done to perform this progress technically, but interaction of the third dimension with humans is not yet clear. Previously, it was found that any increased load of visual system can create visual fatigue, like prolonged TV watching, computer work or video gaming. But watching S3D can cause another nature of visual fatigue, since all S3D technologies creates illusion of the third dimension based on characteristics of binocular vision. In this work we propose to evaluate and compare the visual fatigue from watching 2D and S3D content. This work shows the difference in accumulation of visual fatigue and its assessment for two types of content. In order to perform this comparison eye-tracking experiments using six commercially available movies were conducted. Healthy naive participants took part into the test and gave their answers feeling the subjective evaluation. It was found that watching stereo 3D content induce stronger feeling of visual fatigue than conventional 2D, and the nature of video has an important effect on its increase. Visual characteristics obtained by using eye-tracking were investigated regarding their relation with visual fatigue.

  7. HSA: integrating multi-track Hi-C data for genome-scale reconstruction of 3D chromatin structure.

    PubMed

    Zou, Chenchen; Zhang, Yuping; Ouyang, Zhengqing

    2016-03-02

    Genome-wide 3C technologies (Hi-C) are being increasingly employed to study three-dimensional (3D) genome conformations. Existing computational approaches are unable to integrate accumulating data to facilitate studying 3D chromatin structure and function. We present HSA ( http://ouyanglab.jax.org/hsa/ ), a flexible tool that jointly analyzes multiple contact maps to infer 3D chromatin structure at the genome scale. HSA globally searches the latent structure underlying different cleavage footprints. Its robustness and accuracy outperform or rival existing tools on extensive simulations and orthogonal experiment validations. Applying HSA to recent in situ Hi-C data, we found the 3D chromatin structures are highly conserved across various human cell types.

  8. Unstructured grids in 3D and 4D for a time-dependent interface in front tracking with improved accuracy

    SciTech Connect

    Glimm, J.; Grove, J. W.; Li, X. L.; Li, Y.; Xu, Z.

    2002-01-01

    Front tracking traces the dynamic evolution of an interface separating differnt materials or fluid components. In this paper, they describe three types of the grid generation methods used in the front tracking method. One is the unstructured surface grid. The second is a structured grid-based reconstruction method. The third is a time-space grid, also grid based, for a conservative tracking algorithm with improved accuracy.

  9. Tracking of Cells with a Compact Microscope Imaging System with Intelligent Controls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McDowell, Mark (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A Microscope Imaging System (CMIS) with intelligent controls is disclosed that provides techniques for scanning, identifying, detecting and tracking microscopic changes in selected characteristics or features of various surfaces including, but not limited to, cells, spheres, and manufactured products subject to difficult-to-see imperfections. The practice of the present invention provides applications that include colloidal hard spheres experiments, biological cell detection for patch clamping, cell movement and tracking, as well as defect identification in products, such as semiconductor devices, where surface damage can be significant, but difficult to detect. The CMIS system is a machine vision system, which combines intelligent image processing with remote control capabilities and provides the ability to autofocus on a microscope sample, automatically scan an image, and perform machine vision analysis on multiple samples simultaneously

  10. Tracking of cells with a compact microscope imaging system with intelligent controls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McDowell, Mark (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A Microscope Imaging System (CMIS) with intelligent controls is disclosed that provides techniques for scanning, identifying, detecting and tracking microscopic changes in selected characteristics or features of various surfaces including, but not limited to, cells, spheres, and manufactured products subject to difficult-to-see imperfections. The practice of the present invention provides applications that include colloidal hard spheres experiments, biological cell detection for patch clamping, cell movement and tracking, as well as defect identification in products, such as semiconductor devices, where surface damage can be significant, but difficult to detect. The CMIS system is a machine vision system, which combines intelligent image processing with remote control capabilities and provides the ability to auto-focus on a microscope sample, automatically scan an image, and perform machine vision analysis on multiple samples simultaneously.

  11. Image Tracking of Multiple C. Elegans Worms Using Adaptive Scanning Optical Microscope (ASOM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivera, Linda; Potsaid, Benjamin; Wen, John T.

    2010-03-01

    Long-term imaging of living biological specimens is important to infer behaviorial trends and correlate neural structure with behavior. Such study is plagued by the field of view limitation in standard optical microscopes, as the motile specimen would frequently move out of view. A novel microscope, called the adaptive scanning optical microscope (ASOM), has recently been proposed to address this limitation. Through high speed post-objective scanning with a steering mirror, and compensation for optical aberrations with a MEMS deformable mirror, simultaneous imaging and tracking of multiple Caenorhabditis elegans worms has been demonstrated. This article presents the image processing algorithm for tracking multiple worms. Since the steering mirror has to move based on the predicted worm motion, image processing and stable steering mirror motion need to be executed at higher than the composite mosaic video frame rate (in contrast to existing works on image-based worm tracking, which are predominantly based on post-processing). Particular care is placed on disambiguating the worms when they overlap, collide, or entangle, where the worm tracking algorithm may fail. Results from both real time and simulated tracking are presented.

  12. Position tracking of moving liver lesion based on real-time registration between 2D ultrasound and 3D preoperative images

    SciTech Connect

    Weon, Chijun; Hyun Nam, Woo; Lee, Duhgoon; Ra, Jong Beom; Lee, Jae Young

    2015-01-15

    Purpose: Registration between 2D ultrasound (US) and 3D preoperative magnetic resonance (MR) (or computed tomography, CT) images has been studied recently for US-guided intervention. However, the existing techniques have some limits, either in the registration speed or the performance. The purpose of this work is to develop a real-time and fully automatic registration system between two intermodal images of the liver, and subsequently an indirect lesion positioning/tracking algorithm based on the registration result, for image-guided interventions. Methods: The proposed position tracking system consists of three stages. In the preoperative stage, the authors acquire several 3D preoperative MR (or CT) images at different respiratory phases. Based on the transformations obtained from nonrigid registration of the acquired 3D images, they then generate a 4D preoperative image along the respiratory phase. In the intraoperative preparatory stage, they properly attach a 3D US transducer to the patient’s body and fix its pose using a holding mechanism. They then acquire a couple of respiratory-controlled 3D US images. Via the rigid registration of these US images to the 3D preoperative images in the 4D image, the pose information of the fixed-pose 3D US transducer is determined with respect to the preoperative image coordinates. As feature(s) to use for the rigid registration, they may choose either internal liver vessels or the inferior vena cava. Since the latter is especially useful in patients with a diffuse liver disease, the authors newly propose using it. In the intraoperative real-time stage, they acquire 2D US images in real-time from the fixed-pose transducer. For each US image, they select candidates for its corresponding 2D preoperative slice from the 4D preoperative MR (or CT) image, based on the predetermined pose information of the transducer. The correct corresponding image is then found among those candidates via real-time 2D registration based on a

  13. Accuracy and precision of a custom camera-based system for 2D and 3D motion tracking during speech and nonspeech motor tasks

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Yongqiang; Max, Ludo

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Studying normal or disordered motor control requires accurate motion tracking of the effectors (e.g., orofacial structures). The cost of electromagnetic, optoelectronic, and ultrasound systems is prohibitive for many laboratories, and limits clinical applications. For external movements (lips, jaw), video-based systems may be a viable alternative, provided that they offer high temporal resolution and sub-millimeter accuracy. Method We examined the accuracy and precision of 2D and 3D data recorded with a system that combines consumer-grade digital cameras capturing 60, 120, or 240 frames per second (fps), retro-reflective markers, commercially-available computer software (APAS, Ariel Dynamics), and a custom calibration device. Results Overall mean error (RMSE) across tests was 0.15 mm for static tracking and 0.26 mm for dynamic tracking, with corresponding precision (SD) values of 0.11 and 0.19 mm, respectively. The effect of frame rate varied across conditions, but, generally, accuracy was reduced at 240 fps. The effect of marker size (3 vs. 6 mm diameter) was negligible at all frame rates for both 2D and 3D data. Conclusion Motion tracking with consumer-grade digital cameras and the APAS software can achieve sub-millimeter accuracy at frame rates that are appropriate for kinematic analyses of lip/jaw movements for both research and clinical purposes. PMID:24686484

  14. Solar Flare Track Exposure Ages in Regolith Particles: A Calibration for Transmission Electron Microscope Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berger, Eve L.; Keller, Lindsay P.

    2015-01-01

    Mineral grains in lunar and asteroidal regolith samples provide a unique record of their interaction with the space environment. Space weathering effects result from multiple processes including: exposure to the solar wind, which results in ion damage and implantation effects that are preserved in the rims of grains (typically the outermost 100 nm); cosmic ray and solar flare activity, which result in track formation; and impact processes that result in the accumulation of vapor-deposited elements, impact melts and adhering grains on particle surfaces. Determining the rate at which these effects accumulate in the grains during their space exposure is critical to studies of the surface evolution of airless bodies. Solar flare energetic particles (mainly Fe-group nuclei) have a penetration depth of a few millimeters and leave a trail of ionization damage in insulating materials that is readily observable by transmission electron microscope (TEM) imaging. The density of solar flare particle tracks is used to infer the length of time an object was at or near the regolith surface (i.e., its exposure age). Track measurements by TEM methods are routine, yet track production rate calibrations have only been determined using chemical etching techniques [e.g., 1, and references therein]. We used focused ion beam-scanning electron microscope (FIB-SEM) sample preparation techniques combined with TEM imaging to determine the track density/exposure age relations for lunar rock 64455. The 64455 sample was used earlier by [2] to determine a track production rate by chemical etching of tracks in anorthite. Here, we show that combined FIB/TEM techniques provide a more accurate determination of a track production rate and also allow us to extend the calibration to solar flare tracks in olivine.

  15. Creation of 3D digital anthropomorphic phantoms which model actual patient non-rigid body motion as determined from MRI and position tracking studies of volunteers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connolly, C. M.; Konik, A.; Dasari, P. K. R.; Segars, P.; Zheng, S.; Johnson, K. L.; Dey, J.; King, M. A.

    2011-03-01

    Patient motion can cause artifacts, which can lead to difficulty in interpretation. The purpose of this study is to create 3D digital anthropomorphic phantoms which model the location of the structures of the chest and upper abdomen of human volunteers undergoing a series of clinically relevant motions. The 3D anatomy is modeled using the XCAT phantom and based on MRI studies. The NURBS surfaces of the XCAT are interactively adapted to fit the MRI studies. A detailed XCAT phantom is first developed from an EKG triggered Navigator acquisition composed of sagittal slices with a 3 x 3 x 3 mm voxel dimension. Rigid body motion states are then acquired at breath-hold as sagittal slices partially covering the thorax, centered on the heart, with 9 mm gaps between them. For non-rigid body motion requiring greater sampling, modified Navigator sequences covering the entire thorax with 3 mm gaps between slices are obtained. The structures of the initial XCAT are then adapted to fit these different motion states. Simultaneous to MRI imaging the positions of multiple reflective markers on stretchy bands about the volunteer's chest and abdomen are optically tracked in 3D via stereo imaging. These phantoms with combined position tracking will be used to investigate both imaging-data-driven and motion-tracking strategies to estimate and correct for patient motion. Our initial application will be to cardiacperfusion SPECT imaging where the XCAT phantoms will be used to create patient activity and attenuation distributions for each volunteer with corresponding motion tracking data from the markers on the body-surface. Monte Carlo methods will then be used to simulate SPECT acquisitions, which will be used to evaluate various motion estimation and correction strategies.

  16. Using virtual reality technology and hand tracking technology to create software for training surgical skills in 3D game

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakirova, A. A.; Ganiev, B. A.; Mullin, R. I.

    2015-11-01

    The lack of visible and approachable ways of training surgical skills is one of the main problems in medical education. Existing simulation training devices are not designed to teach students, and are not available due to the high cost of the equipment. Using modern technologies such as virtual reality and hands movements fixation technology we want to create innovative method of learning the technics of conducting operations in 3D game format, which can make education process interesting and effective. Creating of 3D format virtual simulator will allow to solve several conceptual problems at once: opportunity of practical skills improvement unlimited by the time without the risk for patient, high realism of environment in operational and anatomic body structures, using of game mechanics for information perception relief and memorization of methods acceleration, accessibility of this program.

  17. Longitudinal, label-free, quantitative tracking of cell death and viability in a 3D tumor model with OCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Yookyung; Klein, Oliver J.; Wang, Hequn; Evans, Conor L.

    2016-06-01

    Three-dimensional in vitro tumor models are highly useful tools for studying tumor growth and treatment response of malignancies such as ovarian cancer. Existing viability and treatment assessment assays, however, face shortcomings when applied to these large, complex, and heterogeneous culture systems. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a noninvasive, label-free, optical imaging technique that can visualize live cells and tissues over time with subcellular resolution and millimeters of optical penetration depth. Here, we show that OCT is capable of carrying out high-content, longitudinal assays of 3D culture treatment response. We demonstrate the usage and capability of OCT for the dynamic monitoring of individual and combination therapeutic regimens in vitro, including both chemotherapy drugs and photodynamic therapy (PDT) for ovarian cancer. OCT was validated against the standard LIVE/DEAD Viability/Cytotoxicity Assay in small tumor spheroid cultures, showing excellent correlation with existing standards. Importantly, OCT was shown to be capable of evaluating 3D spheroid treatment response even when traditional viability assays failed. OCT 3D viability imaging revealed synergy between PDT and the standard-of-care chemotherapeutic carboplatin that evolved over time. We believe the efficacy and accuracy of OCT in vitro drug screening will greatly contribute to the field of cancer treatment and therapy evaluation.

  18. Longitudinal, label-free, quantitative tracking of cell death and viability in a 3D tumor model with OCT

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Yookyung; Klein, Oliver J.; Wang, Hequn; Evans, Conor L.

    2016-01-01

    Three-dimensional in vitro tumor models are highly useful tools for studying tumor growth and treatment response of malignancies such as ovarian cancer. Existing viability and treatment assessment assays, however, face shortcomings when applied to these large, complex, and heterogeneous culture systems. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a noninvasive, label-free, optical imaging technique that can visualize live cells and tissues over time with subcellular resolution and millimeters of optical penetration depth. Here, we show that OCT is capable of carrying out high-content, longitudinal assays of 3D culture treatment response. We demonstrate the usage and capability of OCT for the dynamic monitoring of individual and combination therapeutic regimens in vitro, including both chemotherapy drugs and photodynamic therapy (PDT) for ovarian cancer. OCT was validated against the standard LIVE/DEAD Viability/Cytotoxicity Assay in small tumor spheroid cultures, showing excellent correlation with existing standards. Importantly, OCT was shown to be capable of evaluating 3D spheroid treatment response even when traditional viability assays failed. OCT 3D viability imaging revealed synergy between PDT and the standard-of-care chemotherapeutic carboplatin that evolved over time. We believe the efficacy and accuracy of OCT in vitro drug screening will greatly contribute to the field of cancer treatment and therapy evaluation. PMID:27248849

  19. Quantification of Coupled Stiffness and Fiber Orientation Remodeling in Hypertensive Rat Right-Ventricular Myocardium Using 3D Ultrasound Speckle Tracking with Biaxial Testing

    PubMed Central

    Park, Dae Woo; Sebastiani, Andrea; Yap, Choon Hwai; Simon, Marc A.; Kim, Kang

    2016-01-01

    Mechanical and structural changes of right ventricular (RV) in response to pulmonary hypertension (PH) are inadequately understood. While current standard biaxial testing provides information on the mechanical behavior of RV tissues using surface markers, it is unable to fully assess structural and mechanical properties across the full tissue thickness. In this study, the mechanical and structural properties of normotensive and pulmonary hypertension right ventricular (PHRV) myocardium through its full thickness were examined using mechanical testing combined with 3D ultrasound speckle tracking (3D-UST). RV pressure overload was induced in Sprague–Dawley rats by pulmonary artery (PA) banding. The second Piola–Kirchhoff stress tensors and Green-Lagrangian strain tensors were computed in the RV myocardium using the biaxial testing combined with 3D-UST. A previously established non-linear curve-fitting algorithm was applied to fit experimental data to a Strain Energy Function (SEF) for computation of myofiber orientation. The fiber orientations obtained by the biaxial testing with 3D-UST compared well with the fiber orientations computed from the histology. In addition, the re-orientation of myofiber in the right ventricular free wall (RVFW) along longitudinal direction (apex-to-outflow-tract direction) was noticeable in response to PH. For normotensive RVFW samples, the average fiber orientation angles obtained by 3D-UST with biaxial test spiraled from 20° at the endo-cardium to -42° at the epi-cardium (Δ = 62°). For PHRV samples, the average fiber orientation angles obtained by 3D-UST with biaxial test had much less spiral across tissue thickness: 3° at endo-cardium to -7° at epi-cardium (Δ = 10°, P<0.005 compared to normotensive). PMID:27780271

  20. Use of MV and kV imager correlation for maintaining continuous real-time 3D internal marker tracking during beam interruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiersma, R. D.; Riaz, N.; Dieterich, Sonja; Suh, Yelin; Xing, L.

    2009-01-01

    The integration of onboard kV imaging together with a MV electronic portal imaging device (EPID) on linear accelerators (LINAC) can provide an easy to implement real-time 3D organ position monitoring solution for treatment delivery. Currently, real-time MV-kV tracking has only been demonstrated by simultaneous imagining by both MV and kV imaging devices. However, modalities such as step-and-shoot IMRT (SS-IMRT), which inherently contain MV beam interruptions, can lead to loss of target information necessary for 3D localization. Additionally, continuous kV imaging throughout the treatment delivery can lead to high levels of imaging dose to the patient. This work demonstrates for the first time how full 3D target tracking can be maintained even in the presence of such beam interruption, or MV/kV beam interleave, by use of a relatively simple correlation model together with MV-kV tracking. A moving correlation model was constructed using both present and prior positions of the marker in the available MV or kV image to compute the position of the marker on the interrupted imager. A commercially available radiotherapy system, equipped with both MV and kV imaging devices, was used to deliver typical SS-IMRT lung treatment plans to a 4D phantom containing internally embedded metallic markers. To simulate actual lung tumor motion, previous recorded 4D lung patient motion data were used. Lung tumor motion data of five separate patients were inputted into the 4D phantom, and typical SS-IMRT lung plans were delivered to simulate actual clinical deliveries. Application of the correlation model to SS-IMRT lung treatment deliveries was found to be an effective solution for maintaining continuous 3D tracking during 'step' beam interruptions. For deliveries involving five or more gantry angles with 50 or more fields per plan, the positional errors were found to have <=1 mm root mean squared error (RMSE) in all three spatial directions. In addition to increasing the robustness of

  1. Use of MV and kV imager correlation for maintaining continuous real-time 3D internal marker tracking during beam interruptions.

    PubMed

    Wiersma, R D; Riaz, N; Dieterich, Sonja; Suh, Yelin; Xing, L

    2009-01-01

    The integration of onboard kV imaging together with a MV electronic portal imaging device (EPID) on linear accelerators (LINAC) can provide an easy to implement real-time 3D organ position monitoring solution for treatment delivery. Currently, real-time MV-kV tracking has only been demonstrated by simultaneous imagining by both MV and kV imaging devices. However, modalities such as step-and-shoot IMRT (SS-IMRT), which inherently contain MV beam interruptions, can lead to loss of target information necessary for 3D localization. Additionally, continuous kV imaging throughout the treatment delivery can lead to high levels of imaging dose to the patient. This work demonstrates for the first time how full 3D target tracking can be maintained even in the presence of such beam interruption, or MV/kV beam interleave, by use of a relatively simple correlation model together with MV-kV tracking. A moving correlation model was constructed using both present and prior positions of the marker in the available MV or kV image to compute the position of the marker on the interrupted imager. A commercially available radiotherapy system, equipped with both MV and kV imaging devices, was used to deliver typical SS-IMRT lung treatment plans to a 4D phantom containing internally embedded metallic markers. To simulate actual lung tumor motion, previous recorded 4D lung patient motion data were used. Lung tumor motion data of five separate patients were inputted into the 4D phantom, and typical SS-IMRT lung plans were delivered to simulate actual clinical deliveries. Application of the correlation model to SS-IMRT lung treatment deliveries was found to be an effective solution for maintaining continuous 3D tracking during 'step' beam interruptions. For deliveries involving five or more gantry angles with 50 or more fields per plan, the positional errors were found to have < or =1 mm root mean squared error (RMSE) in all three spatial directions. In addition to increasing the robustness

  2. Performance and suitability assessment of a real-time 3D electromagnetic needle tracking system for interstitial brachytherapy

    PubMed Central

    Boutaleb, Samir; Fillion, Olivier; Bonillas, Antonio; Hautvast, Gilion; Binnekamp, Dirk; Beaulieu, Luc

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Accurate insertion and overall needle positioning are key requirements for effective brachytherapy treatments. This work aims at demonstrating the accuracy performance and the suitability of the Aurora® V1 Planar Field Generator (PFG) electromagnetic tracking system (EMTS) for real-time treatment assistance in interstitial brachytherapy procedures. Material and methods The system's performance was characterized in two distinct studies. First, in an environment free of EM disturbance, the boundaries of the detection volume of the EMTS were characterized and a tracking error analysis was performed. Secondly, a distortion analysis was conducted as a means of assessing the tracking accuracy performance of the system in the presence of potential EM disturbance generated by the proximity of standard brachytherapy components. Results The tracking accuracy experiments showed that positional errors were typically 2 ± 1 mm in a zone restricted to the first 30 cm of the detection volume. However, at the edges of the detection volume, sensor position errors of up to 16 mm were recorded. On the other hand, orientation errors remained low at ± 2° for most of the measurements. The EM distortion analysis showed that the presence of typical brachytherapy components in vicinity of the EMTS had little influence on tracking accuracy. Position errors of less than 1 mm were recorded with all components except with a metallic arm support, which induced a mean absolute error of approximately 1.4 mm when located 10 cm away from the needle sensor. Conclusions The Aurora® V1 PFG EMTS possesses a great potential for real-time treatment assistance in general interstitial brachytherapy. In view of our experimental results, we however recommend that the needle axis remains as parallel as possible to the generator surface during treatment and that the tracking zone be restricted to the first 30 cm from the generator surface. PMID:26622231

  3. Tumor-tracking radiotherapy of moving targets; verification using 3D polymer gel, 2D ion-chamber array and biplanar diode array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceberg, Sofie; Falk, Marianne; Rosenschöld, Per Munck Af; Cattell, Herbert; Gustafsson, Helen; Keall, Paul; Korreman, Stine S.; Medin, Joakim; Nordström, Fredrik; Persson, Gitte; Sawant, Amit; Svatos, Michelle; Zimmerman, Jens; Bäck, Sven ÅJ

    2010-11-01

    The aim of this study was to carry out a dosimetric verification of a dynamic multileaf collimator (DMLC)-based tumor-tracking delivery during respiratory-like motion. The advantage of tumor-tracking radiation delivery is the ability to allow a tighter margin around the target by continuously following and adapting the dose delivery to its motion. However, there are geometric and dosimetric uncertainties associated with beam delivery system constraints and output variations, and several investigations have to be accomplished before a clinical integration of this tracking technique. Two types of delivery were investigated in this study I) a single beam perpendicular to a target with a one dimensional motion parallel to the MLC moving direction, and II) an intensity modulated arc delivery (RapidArc®) with a target motion diagonal to the MLC moving direction. The feasibility study (I) was made using an 2D ionisation chamber array and a true 3D polymer gel. The arc delivery (II) was verified using polymer gel and a biplanar diode array. Good agreement in absorbed dose was found between delivery to a static target and to a moving target with DMLC tracking using all three detector systems. However, due to the limited spatial resolution of the 2D array a detailed comparison was not possible. The RapidArc® plan delivery was successfully verified using the biplanar diode array and true 3D polymer gel, and both detector systems could verify that the DMLC-based tumor-tracking delivery system has a very good ability to account for respiratory target motion.

  4. [Recent echocardiographic examination of the left ventricle – from M-mode to 3D speckle-tracking imaging].

    PubMed

    Nemes, Attila; Forster, Tamás

    2015-10-25

    The left ventricle has a vital role in maintaining circulation of the body, therefore, its non-invasive assessment is essential. The aim of the present review is to demonstrate clinical relevance of different echocardiographic methods in the evaluation of left ventricle emphasizing the importance of the most recent three-dimensional (and) speckle-tracking methodologies.

  5. Defect tracking for nanoimprint lithography using optical surface scanner and scanning electron microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Zhaoning; Kurataka, Nobuo; Tran, Hieu; Gauzner, Gene

    2016-09-01

    Fast optical surface scanners are used in combination with high-resolution scanning electron microscopes to facilitate the identification and tracking of nanoimprint defects. We have confirmed that hard particles cause permanent template damages during imprint, resulting in repeating imprint defects. Since contaminants encountered during imprint are dominated by hard metal oxide particles capable of causing such damage, stringent pre-imprint substrate screening is a critical requirement in a manufacturing environment.

  6. Tracking naturally occurring indoor features in 2-D and 3-D with lidar range/amplitude data

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, M.D.; Kerstens, A.

    1998-09-01

    Sensor-data processing for the interpretation of a mobile robot`s indoor environment, and the manipulation of this data for reliable localization, are still some of the most important issues in robotics. This article presents algorithms that determine the true position of a mobile robot, based on real 2-D and 3-D optical range and intensity data. The authors start with the physics of the particular type of sensor used, so that the extraction of reliable and repeatable information (namely, edge coordinates) can be determined, taking into account the noise associated with each range sample and the possibility of optical multiple-path effects. Again, applying the physical model of the sensor, the estimated positions of the mobile robot and the uncertainty in these positions are determined. They demonstrate real experiments using 2-D and 3-D scan data taken in indoor environments. To update the robot`s position reliably, the authors address the problem of matching the information recorded in a scan to, first, an a priori map, and second, to information recorded in previous scans, eliminating the need for an a priori map.

  7. Knowledge-based 3D segmentation of the brain in MR images for quantitative multiple sclerosis lesion tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, Elizabeth; Cothren, Robert M., Jr.; Tkach, Jean A.; Masaryk, Thomas J.; Cornhill, J. Fredrick

    1997-04-01

    Brain segmentation in magnetic resonance (MR) images is an important step in quantitative analysis applications, including the characterization of multiple sclerosis (MS) lesions over time. Our approach is based on a priori knowledge of the intensity and three-dimensional (3D) spatial relationships of structures in MR images of the head. Optimal thresholding and connected-components analysis are used to generate a starting point for segmentation. A 3D radial search is then performed to locate probable locations of the intra-cranial cavity (ICC). Missing portions of the ICC surface are interpolated in order to exclude connected structures. Partial volume effects and inter-slice intensity variations in the image are accounted for automatically. Several studies were conducted to validate the segmentation. Accuracy was tested by calculating the segmented volume and comparing to known volumes of a standard MR phantom. Reliability was tested by comparing calculated volumes of individual segmentation results from multiple images of the same subject. The segmentation results were also compared to manual tracings. The average error in volume measurements for the phantom was 1.5% and the average coefficient of variation of brain volume measurements of the same subject was 1.2%. Since the new algorithm requires minimal user interaction, variability introduced by manual tracing and interactive threshold or region selection was eliminated. Overall, the new algorithm was shown to produce a more accurate and reliable brain segmentation than existing manual and semi-automated techniques.

  8. Generation of efficient 2D templates from 3D multisensor data for correlation-based target tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witte, Carmen; Armbruster, Walter; Jäger, Klaus; Hebel, Marcus

    2008-04-01

    The general demand for the prevention of collateral damages in military operations requires methods of robust automatic identification of target objects like vehicles especially during target approach. This requires the development of sophisticated techniques for automatic and semi-automatic interpretation of sensor data. In particular the automatic pre-analysis of reconnaissance data is important for the human observer as well as for autonomous systems. In the phase of target approach fully automatic methods are needed for the recognition of predefined objects. For this purpose appropriate sensors are used like imaging IR sensors suitable for day/night operation and laser radar supplying 3D information of the scenario. Classical methods for target recognition based on comparison with synthetic IR object models imply certain shortcomings, e.g. unknown weather conditions and the engine status of vehicles. We propose a concept of generating efficient 2D templates for IR target signatures based on the evaluation of a precise 3D model of the target generated from real multisensor data. This model is created from near-term laser range and IR data gathered by reconnaissance in advance to gain realistic and up-to-date target signatures. It consists of the visible part of the object surface textured with measured infrared values. This enables recognition from slightly differing viewing angles. Our test bed is realized by a helicopter equipped with a multisensor suite (laser radar, imaging IR, GPS, and IMU). Results are demonstrated by the analysis of a complex scenario with different vehicles.

  9. Applications of 3D hydrodynamic and particle tracking models in the San Francisco bay-delta estuary

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, P.E.; Donovan, J.M.; Wong, H.F.N.

    2005-01-01

    Three applications of three-dimensional hydrodynamic and particle-tracking models are currently underway by the United States Geological Survey in the San Francisco Bay-Delta Estuary. The first application is to the San Francisco Bay and a portion of the coastal ocean. The second application is to an important, gated control channel called the Delta Cross Channel, located within the northern portion of the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta. The third application is to a reach of the San Joaquin River near Stockton, California where a significant dissolved oxygen problem exists due, in part, to conditions associated with the deep-water ship channel for the Port of Stockton, California. This paper briefly discusses the hydrodynamic and particle tracking models being used and the three applications. Copyright ASCE 2005.

  10. From 1D to 2D via 3D: dynamics of surface motion segmentation for ocular tracking in primates.

    PubMed

    Masson, Guillaume S

    2004-01-01

    In primates, tracking eye movements help vision by stabilising onto the retinas the images of a moving object of interest. This sensorimotor transformation involves several stages of motion processing, from the local measurement of one-dimensional luminance changes up to the integration of first and higher-order local motion cues into a global two-dimensional motion immune to antagonistic motions arising from the surrounding. The dynamics of this surface motion segmentation is reflected into the various components of the tracking responses and its underlying neural mechanisms can be correlated with behaviour at both single-cell and population levels. I review a series of behavioural studies which demonstrate that the neural representation driving eye movements evolves over time from a fast vector average of the outputs of linear and non-linear spatio-temporal filtering to a progressive and slower accurate solution for global motion. Because of the sensitivity of earliest ocular following to binocular disparity, antagonistic visual motion from surfaces located at different depths are filtered out. Thus, global motion integration is restricted within the depth plane of the object to be tracked. Similar dynamics were found at the level of monkey extra-striate areas MT and MST and I suggest that several parallel pathways along the motion stream are involved albeit with different latencies to build-up this accurate surface motion representation. After 200-300 ms, most of the computational problems of early motion processing (aperture problem, motion integration, motion segmentation) are solved and the eye velocity matches the global object velocity to maintain a clear and steady retinal image. PMID:15477021

  11. Applying IR Tomo PIV and 3D Organism Tracking to Study Turbulence Effects on Oceanic Predator-Prey Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adhikari, Deepak; Hallberg, Michael; Gemmell, Brad; Longmire, Ellen; Buskey, Edward

    2012-11-01

    The behavorial response of aquatic predators and prey depends strongly on the surrounding fluid motion. We present a facility and non-intrusive instrumentation system designed to quantify the motions associated with interactions between small coral reef fish (blennies) and evasive zooplankton prey (copepod) subject to various flow disturbances. A recirculating water channel facility is driven by a paddlewheel to prevent damaging the zooplankton located throughout the channel. Fluid velocity vectors surrounding both species are determined by time-resolved infrared tomographic PIV, while a circular Hough transform and PTV technique is used to track the fish eye in three-dimensional space. Simultaneously, zooplankton motions are detected and tracked using two additional high-speed cameras with IR filters. For capturing larger scales, a measurement volume of 80 x 40 x 18 mm is used with spatial resolution of 3.5 mm. For capturing smaller scales, particularly for observing flow near the mouth of the fish during feeding, the measurement volume is reduced to 20 × 18 × 18 mm with spatial resolution of 1.5 mm. Results will be presented for both freshwater and seawater species. Supported by NSF IDBR grant #0852875.

  12. Terrestrial laser scanning point clouds time series for the monitoring of slope movements: displacement measurement using image correlation and 3D feature tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bornemann, Pierrick; Jean-Philippe, Malet; André, Stumpf; Anne, Puissant; Julien, Travelletti

    2016-04-01

    Dense multi-temporal point clouds acquired with terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) have proved useful for the study of structure and kinematics of slope movements. Most of the existing deformation analysis methods rely on the use of interpolated data. Approaches that use multiscale image correlation provide a precise and robust estimation of the observed movements; however, for non-rigid motion patterns, these methods tend to underestimate all the components of the movement. Further, for rugged surface topography, interpolated data introduce a bias and a loss of information in some local places where the point cloud information is not sufficiently dense. Those limits can be overcome by using deformation analysis exploiting directly the original 3D point clouds assuming some hypotheses on the deformation (e.g. the classic ICP algorithm requires an initial guess by the user of the expected displacement patterns). The objective of this work is therefore to propose a deformation analysis method applied to a series of 20 3D point clouds covering the period October 2007 - October 2015 at the Super-Sauze landslide (South East French Alps). The dense point clouds have been acquired with a terrestrial long-range Optech ILRIS-3D laser scanning device from the same base station. The time series are analyzed using two approaches: 1) a method of correlation of gradient images, and 2) a method of feature tracking in the raw 3D point clouds. The estimated surface displacements are then compared with GNSS surveys on reference targets. Preliminary results tend to show that the image correlation method provides a good estimation of the displacement fields at first order, but shows limitations such as the inability to track some deformation patterns, and the use of a perspective projection that does not maintain original angles and distances in the correlated images. Results obtained with 3D point clouds comparison algorithms (C2C, ICP, M3C2) bring additional information on the

  13. FFT integration of instantaneous 3D pressure gradient fields measured by Lagrangian particle tracking in turbulent flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huhn, F.; Schanz, D.; Gesemann, S.; Schröder, A.

    2016-09-01

    Pressure gradient fields in unsteady flows can be estimated through flow measurements of the material acceleration in the fluid and the assumption of the governing momentum equation. In order to derive pressure from its gradient, almost exclusively two numerical methods have been used to spatially integrate the pressure gradient until now: first, direct path integration in the spatial domain, and second, the solution of the Poisson equation for pressure. Instead, we propose an alternative third method that integrates the pressure gradient field in Fourier space. Using a FFT function, the method is fast and easy to implement in programming languages for scientific computing. We demonstrate the accuracy of the integration scheme on a synthetic pressure field and apply it to an experimental example based on time-resolved material acceleration data from high-resolution Lagrangian particle tracking with the Shake-The-Box method.

  14. Development of the 3-D Track Imager for Medium and High-Energy Gamma-Ray Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Stanley D.

    2006-01-01

    The Advanced Compton Telescope (ACT) and Advanced Pair Telescope (APT) are envisioned as the next medium (0.3 ^ 50 MeV) and high-energy (30 MeV - greater than 100 GeV) gamma-ray missions. These missions will address many research focus areas of the Structure and Evolution of the Universe Roadmap. These areas include: element formation, matter, energy, & magnetic field interactions in galaxies, AGN & GRB emission, and behavior of matter in extreme environments of black holes & pulsars. Achieving these science goals requires a substantial increases in telescope sensitivity and angular resolution. This talk will discuss how these goals can be met with the three-dimensional track imager (3-DTI), a large volume, low density, time projection chamber with two-dimensional micro-well detector readout and report on our development of a 10 cm x 10 cm x 30 prototype instrument.

  15. Improved image guidance technique for minimally invasive mitral valve repair using real-time tracked 3D ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rankin, Adam; Moore, John; Bainbridge, Daniel; Peters, Terry

    2016-03-01

    In the past ten years, numerous new surgical and interventional techniques have been developed for treating heart valve disease without the need for cardiopulmonary bypass. Heart valve repair is now being performed in a blood-filled environment, reinforcing the need for accurate and intuitive imaging techniques. Previous work has demonstrated how augmenting ultrasound with virtual representations of specific anatomical landmarks can greatly simplify interventional navigation challenges and increase patient safety. These techniques often complicate interventions by requiring additional steps taken to manually define and initialize virtual models. Furthermore, overlaying virtual elements into real-time image data can also obstruct the view of salient image information. To address these limitations, a system was developed that uses real-time volumetric ultrasound alongside magnetically tracked tools presented in an augmented virtuality environment to provide a streamlined navigation guidance platform. In phantom studies simulating a beating-heart navigation task, procedure duration and tool path metrics have achieved comparable performance to previous work in augmented virtuality techniques, and considerable improvement over standard of care ultrasound guidance.

  16. Feasibility of 3D tracking of surgical tools using 2D single plane x-ray projections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seslija, Petar; Habets, Damiaan F.; Peters, Terry M.; Holdsworth, David W.

    2008-03-01

    Fluoroscopy is widely used for intra-procedure image guidance, however its planar images provide limited information about the location of the surgical tools or targets in three-dimensional space. An iterative method based on the projection-Procrustes technique can determine the three-dimensional positions and orientations of known sparse objects from a single, perspective projection. We assess the feasibility of applying this technique to track surgical tools by measuring its accuracy and precision through in vitro experiments. Two phantoms were fabricated to perform this assessment: a grid plate phantom with numerous point-targets at regular distances from each other; and a sparse object used as a surgical tool phantom. Two-dimensional projections of the phantoms were acquired using an image intensifier-based C-arm x-ray unit. The locations of the markers projected onto the images were identified and measured using an automated algorithm. The three-dimensional location of the phantom tool tip was identified from these images using the projection-Procrustes technique. The accuracy and precision of the tip localization were used to assess our technique. The average three-dimensional root-mean-square target registration error of the phantom tool tip was 1.8 mm. The average three-dimensional root-mean-square precision of localizing the tool tip was 0.5 mm.

  17. Tracking Down the Causes of Recent Induced and Natural Intraplate Earthquakes with 3D Seismological Analyses in Northwest Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uta, P.; Brandes, C.; Boennemann, C.; Plenefisch, T.; Winsemann, J.

    2015-12-01

    Northwest Germany is a typical low strain intraplate region with a low seismic activity. Nevertheless, 58 well documented earthquakes with magnitudes of 0.5 - 4.3 affected the area in the last 40 years. Most of the epicenters were located in the vicinity of active natural gas fields and some inside. Accordingly, the earthquakes were interpreted as a consequence of hydrocarbon recovery (e.g. Dahm et al. 2007, Bischoff et al. 2013) and classified as induced events in the bulletins of the Federal Institute for Geosciences and Natural Resources (BGR). The two major ones have magnitudes of 4.3 and 4.0. They are the strongest earthquakes ever recorded in Northern Germany. Consequently, these events raise the question whether the ongoing extraction itself can cause them or if other natural tectonic processes like glacial isostatic adjustment may considerably contribute to their initiation. Recent studies of Brandes et al. (2012) imply that lithospheric stress changes due to post glacial isostatic adjustment might be also a potential natural cause for earthquakes in Central Europe. In order to better analyse the earthquakes and to test this latter hypothesis we performed a relocalization of the events with the NonLinLoc (Lomax et al. 2000) program package and two differently scaled 3D P-wave velocity models. Depending on the station coverage for a distinct event, either a fine gridded local model (88 x 73 x 15 km, WEG-model, made available by the industry) or a coarse regional model (1600 x 1600 x 45 km, data from CRUST1.0, Laske et al. 2013) and for some cases a combination of both models was used for the relocalization. The results confirm the trend of the older routine analysis: The majority of the events are located at the margins of the natural gas fields, some of them are now located closer to them. Focal depths mostly vary between 3.5 km and 10 km. However, for some of the events, especially for the older events with relatively bad station coverage, the error bars

  18. MultiFocus Polarization Microscope (MF-PolScope) for 3D polarization imaging of up to 25 focal planes simultaneously.

    PubMed

    Abrahamsson, Sara; McQuilken, Molly; Mehta, Shalin B; Verma, Amitabh; Larsch, Johannes; Ilic, Rob; Heintzmann, Rainer; Bargmann, Cornelia I; Gladfelter, Amy S; Oldenbourg, Rudolf

    2015-03-23

    We have developed an imaging system for 3D time-lapse polarization microscopy of living biological samples. Polarization imaging reveals the position, alignment and orientation of submicroscopic features in label-free as well as fluorescently labeled specimens. Optical anisotropies are calculated from a series of images where the sample is illuminated by light of different polarization states. Due to the number of images necessary to collect both multiple polarization states and multiple focal planes, 3D polarization imaging is most often prohibitively slow. Our MF-PolScope system employs multifocus optics to form an instantaneous 3D image of up to 25 simultaneous focal-planes. We describe this optical system and show examples of 3D multi-focus polarization imaging of biological samples, including a protein assembly study in budding yeast cells.

  19. Scanning heterodyne Kerr-effect microscope for imaging of magnetic tracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Protopopov, Vladimir V.; Lee, Sukwon; Kwon, Youngkun; Cho, Sunghoon; Kim, Hyuk; Chae, Jonggyn

    2006-07-01

    Design and performance of a new type of Kerr microscope based on heterodyne cross-polarized technique is presented. Weak depolarization of the probe beam due to longitudinal magneto-optical Kerr effect is detected by means of heterodyne mixing of the two cross-polarized and frequency shifted waves generated by Zeeman-type He-Ne laser. In comparison with the traditional homodyne method the proposed technique has better sensitivity and spatial resolution. Experimental results of imaging service magnetic tracks on real samples of magnetic disks are presented, showing better contrast and spatial resolution with respect to the images obtained from commercial devices available in the market.

  20. Three-Dimensional Rotation, Twist and Torsion Analyses Using Real-Time 3D Speckle Tracking Imaging: Feasibility, Reproducibility, and Normal Ranges in Pediatric Population

    PubMed Central

    Han, Wei; Gao, Jun; He, Lin; Yang, Yali; Yin, Ping; Xie, Mingxing; Ge, Shuping

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objective The specific aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility, reproducibility and maturational changes of LV rotation, twist and torsion variables by real-time 3D speckle-tracking echocardiography (RT3DSTE) in children. Methods A prospective study was conducted in 347 consecutive healthy subjects (181 males/156 females, mean age 7.12 ± 5.3 years, and range from birth to 18-years) using RT 3D echocardiography (3DE). The LV rotation, twist and torsion measurements were made off-line using TomTec software. Manual landmark selection and endocardial border editing were performed in 3 planes (apical “2”-, “4”-, and “3”- chamber views) and semi-automated tracking yielded LV rotation, twist and torsion measurements. LV rotation, twist and torsion analysis by RT 3DSTE were feasible in 307 out of 347 subjects (88.5%). Results There was no correlation between rotation or twist and age, height, weight, BSA or heart rate, respectively. However, there was statistically significant, but very modest correlation between LV torsion and age (R2 = 0.036, P< 0.001). The normal ranges were defined for rotation and twist in this cohort, and for torsion for each age group. The intra-observer and inter-observer variabilities for apical and basal rotation, twist and torsion ranged from 7.3% ± 3.8% to 12.3% ± 8.8% and from 8.8% ± 4.6% to 15.7% ± 10.1%, respectively. Conclusions We conclude that analysis of LV rotation, twist and torsion by this new RT3D STE is feasible and reproducible in pediatric population. There is no maturational change in rotation and twist, but torsion decreases with age in this cohort. Further refinement is warranted to validate the utility of this new methodology in more sensitive and quantitative evaluation of congenital and acquired heart diseases in children. PMID:27427968

  1. MRI-3D ultrasound-X-ray image fusion with electromagnetic tracking for transendocardial therapeutic injections: in-vitro validation and in-vivo feasibility.

    PubMed

    Hatt, Charles R; Jain, Ameet K; Parthasarathy, Vijay; Lang, Andrew; Raval, Amish N

    2013-03-01

    Myocardial infarction (MI) is one of the leading causes of death in the world. Small animal studies have shown that stem-cell therapy offers dramatic functional improvement post-MI. An endomyocardial catheter injection approach to therapeutic agent delivery has been proposed to improve efficacy through increased cell retention. Accurate targeting is critical for reaching areas of greatest therapeutic potential while avoiding a life-threatening myocardial perforation. Multimodal image fusion has been proposed as a way to improve these procedures by augmenting traditional intra-operative imaging modalities with high resolution pre-procedural images. Previous approaches have suffered from a lack of real-time tissue imaging and dependence on X-ray imaging to track devices, leading to increased ionizing radiation dose. In this paper, we present a new image fusion system for catheter-based targeted delivery of therapeutic agents. The system registers real-time 3D echocardiography, magnetic resonance, X-ray, and electromagnetic sensor tracking within a single flexible framework. All system calibrations and registrations were validated and found to have target registration errors less than 5 mm in the worst case. Injection accuracy was validated in a motion enabled cardiac injection phantom, where targeting accuracy ranged from 0.57 to 3.81 mm. Clinical feasibility was demonstrated with in-vivo swine experiments, where injections were successfully made into targeted regions of the heart.

  2. Real-time 3D internal marker tracking during arc radiotherapy by the use of combined MV kV imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, W.; Wiersma, R. D.; Mao, W.; Luxton, G.; Xing, L.

    2008-12-01

    To minimize the adverse dosimetric effect caused by tumor motion, it is desirable to have real-time knowledge of the tumor position throughout the beam delivery process. A promising technique to realize the real-time image guided scheme in external beam radiation therapy is through the combined use of MV and onboard kV beam imaging. The success of this MV-kV triangulation approach for fixed-gantry radiation therapy has been demonstrated. With the increasing acceptance of modern arc radiotherapy in the clinics, a timely and clinically important question is whether the image guidance strategy can be extended to arc therapy to provide the urgently needed real-time tumor motion information. While conceptually feasible, there are a number of theoretical and practical issues specific to the arc delivery that need to be resolved before clinical implementation. The purpose of this work is to establish a robust procedure of system calibration for combined MV and kV imaging for internal marker tracking during arc delivery and to demonstrate the feasibility and accuracy of the technique. A commercially available LINAC equipped with an onboard kV imager and electronic portal imaging device (EPID) was used for the study. A custom built phantom with multiple ball bearings was used to calibrate the stereoscopic MV-kV imaging system to provide the transformation parameters from imaging pixels to 3D world coordinates. The accuracy of the fiducial tracking system was examined using a 4D motion phantom capable of moving in accordance with a pre-programmed trajectory. Overall, spatial accuracy of MV-kV fiducial tracking during the arc delivery process for normal adult breathing amplitude and period was found to be better than 1 mm. For fast motion, the results depended on the imaging frame rates. The RMS error ranged from ~0.5 mm for the normal adult breathing pattern to ~1.5 mm for more extreme cases with a low imaging frame rate of 3.4 Hz. In general, highly accurate real

  3. Real-time 3D internal marker tracking during arc radiotherapy by the use of combined MV-kV imaging.

    PubMed

    Liu, W; Wiersma, R D; Mao, W; Luxton, G; Xing, L

    2008-12-21

    To minimize the adverse dosimetric effect caused by tumor motion, it is desirable to have real-time knowledge of the tumor position throughout the beam delivery process. A promising technique to realize the real-time image guided scheme in external beam radiation therapy is through the combined use of MV and onboard kV beam imaging. The success of this MV-kV triangulation approach for fixed-gantry radiation therapy has been demonstrated. With the increasing acceptance of modern arc radiotherapy in the clinics, a timely and clinically important question is whether the image guidance strategy can be extended to arc therapy to provide the urgently needed real-time tumor motion information. While conceptually feasible, there are a number of theoretical and practical issues specific to the arc delivery that need to be resolved before clinical implementation. The purpose of this work is to establish a robust procedure of system calibration for combined MV and kV imaging for internal marker tracking during arc delivery and to demonstrate the feasibility and accuracy of the technique. A commercially available LINAC equipped with an onboard kV imager and electronic portal imaging device (EPID) was used for the study. A custom built phantom with multiple ball bearings was used to calibrate the stereoscopic MV-kV imaging system to provide the transformation parameters from imaging pixels to 3D world coordinates. The accuracy of the fiducial tracking system was examined using a 4D motion phantom capable of moving in accordance with a pre-programmed trajectory. Overall, spatial accuracy of MV-kV fiducial tracking during the arc delivery process for normal adult breathing amplitude and period was found to be better than 1 mm. For fast motion, the results depended on the imaging frame rates. The RMS error ranged from approximately 0.5 mm for the normal adult breathing pattern to approximately 1.5 mm for more extreme cases with a low imaging frame rate of 3.4 Hz. In general

  4. [A primary Raman microscopic study of the turquoise and its role in provenance-tracking].

    PubMed

    She, Ling-zhu; Qin, Ying; Feng, Min; Mao, Zhen-wei; Xu, Cun-yi; Huang, Feng-chun

    2008-09-01

    The authors analyzed four modern turquoises from Hubei province and Anhui province by using the Raman microscopic with the samples are gathered on the spot. According to the study the authors discovered that the Raman spectra of the Hubei turquoises with different color but with the same backgrounds of mineral resource and the formation cause of mineral resource and in the same formation line of turquoise mineral resource have little difference. On the contrary, there is a strong difference in the 900-100 cm(-1) region of the Raman spectra between the turquoises from Hubei province and the turquoise from Anhui province which has remarkable different backgrounds of mineral resource and the formation cause of mineral resource. At the same time the authors studied two ancient turquoises to discuss the feasibility of using the Raman spectra of turquoises, the provenance of which is known, as the fingerprint directions to track the provenance of ancient turquoises.

  5. Tracking the dynamic seroma cavity using fiducial markers in patients treated with accelerated partial breast irradiation using 3D conformal radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Yue, Ning J.; Haffty, Bruce G.; Goyal, Sharad

    2013-02-15

    Purpose: The purpose of the present study was to perform an analysis of the changes in the dynamic seroma cavity based on fiducial markers in early stage breast cancer patients treated with accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) using three-dimensional conformal external beam radiotherapy (3D-CRT). Methods: A prospective, single arm trial was designed to investigate the utility of gold fiducial markers in image guided APBI using 3D-CRT. At the time of lumpectomy, four to six suture-type gold fiducial markers were sutured to the walls of the cavity. Patients were treated with a fractionation scheme consisting of 15 fractions with a fractional dose of 333 cGy. Treatment design and planning followed NSABP/RTOG B-39 guidelines. During radiation treatment, daily kV imaging was performed and the markers were localized and tracked. The change in distance between fiducial markers was analyzed based on the planning CT and daily kV images. Results: Thirty-four patients were simulated at an average of 28 days after surgery, and started the treatment on an average of 39 days after surgery. The average intermarker distance (AiMD) between fiducial markers was strongly correlated to seroma volume. The average reduction in AiMD was 19.1% (range 0.0%-41.4%) and 10.8% (range 0.0%-35.6%) for all the patients between simulation and completion of radiotherapy, and between simulation and beginning of radiotherapy, respectively. The change of AiMD fits an exponential function with a half-life of seroma shrinkage. The average half-life for seroma shrinkage was 15 days. After accounting for the reduction which started to occur after surgery through CT simulation and treatment, radiation was found to have minimal impact on the distance change over the treatment course. Conclusions: Using the marker distance change as a surrogate for seroma volume, it appears that the seroma cavity experiences an exponential reduction in size. The change in seroma size has implications in the size of

  6. WE-A-17A-10: Fast, Automatic and Accurate Catheter Reconstruction in HDR Brachytherapy Using An Electromagnetic 3D Tracking System

    SciTech Connect

    Poulin, E; Racine, E; Beaulieu, L; Binnekamp, D

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: In high dose rate brachytherapy (HDR-B), actual catheter reconstruction protocols are slow and errors prompt. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the accuracy and robustness of an electromagnetic (EM) tracking system for improved catheter reconstruction in HDR-B protocols. Methods: For this proof-of-principle, a total of 10 catheters were inserted in gelatin phantoms with different trajectories. Catheters were reconstructed using a Philips-design 18G biopsy needle (used as an EM stylet) and the second generation Aurora Planar Field Generator from Northern Digital Inc. The Aurora EM system exploits alternating current technology and generates 3D points at 40 Hz. Phantoms were also scanned using a μCT (GE Healthcare) and Philips Big Bore clinical CT system with a resolution of 0.089 mm and 2 mm, respectively. Reconstructions using the EM stylet were compared to μCT and CT. To assess the robustness of the EM reconstruction, 5 catheters were reconstructed twice and compared. Results: Reconstruction time for one catheter was 10 seconds or less. This would imply that for a typical clinical implant of 17 catheters, the total reconstruction time would be less than 3 minutes. When compared to the μCT, the mean EM tip identification error was 0.69 ± 0.29 mm while the CT error was 1.08 ± 0.67 mm. The mean 3D distance error was found to be 0.92 ± 0.37 mm and 1.74 ± 1.39 mm for the EM and CT, respectively. EM 3D catheter trajectories were found to be significantly more accurate (unpaired t-test, p < 0.05). A mean difference of less than 0.5 mm was found between successive EM reconstructions. Conclusion: The EM reconstruction was found to be faster, more accurate and more robust than the conventional methods used for catheter reconstruction in HDR-B. This approach can be applied to any type of catheters and applicators. We would like to disclose that the equipments, used in this study, is coming from a collaboration with Philips Medical.

  7. Three-dimensional tracking of a single fluorescent nanoparticle using four-focus excitation in a confocal microscope.

    PubMed

    Germann, James A; Davis, Lloyd M

    2014-03-10

    We report high sensitivity detection and tracking of a single fluorescent nanoparticle in solution by use of four alternately pulsed laser diodes for fluorescence excitation in a confocal microscope. Slight offsets between the centers of the overlapping laser foci together with time-resolved photon counting enable sub-micron precision position measurements. Real-time correction for diffusional motion with a xyz-piezo stage then enables tracking of a nanoparticle with diffusivity up to ~12 μm(2) s(-1). Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy and calibration measurements indicate a net fluorescence photon detection efficiency of ~6-9%, comparable to that of an optimized single-molecule microscope. PMID:24663905

  8. Tracking Efficiency And Charge Sharing of 3D Silicon Sensors at Different Angles in a 1.4T Magnetic Field

    SciTech Connect

    Gjersdal, H.; Bolle, E.; Borri, M.; Da Via, C.; Dorholt, O.; Fazio, S.; Grenier, P.; Grinstein, S. Hansson, P.; Hasi, J.; Hugging, F.; Jackson, P.; Kenney, C.; Kocian, M.; La Rosa, A.; Mastroberardino, A.; Nordahl, P.; Rivero, F.; Rohne, O.; Sandaker, H.; Sjobaek, K.; /Oslo U. /Prague, Tech. U. /SLAC /Bonn U. /SUNY, Stony Brook /Bonn U. /SLAC

    2012-05-07

    A 3D silicon sensor fabricated at Stanford with electrodes penetrating throughout the entire silicon wafer and with active edges was tested in a 1.4 T magnetic field with a 180 GeV/c pion beam at the CERN SPS in May 2009. The device under test was bump-bonded to the ATLAS pixel FE-I3 readout electronics chip. Three readout electrodes were used to cover the 400 {micro}m long pixel side, this resulting in a p-n inter-electrode distance of {approx} 71 {micro}m. Its behavior was confronted with a planar sensor of the type presently installed in the ATLAS inner tracker. Time over threshold, charge sharing and tracking efficiency data were collected at zero and 15{sup o} angles with and without magnetic field. The latest is the angular configuration expected for the modules of the Insertable B-Layer (IBL) currently under study for the LHC phase 1 upgrade expected in 2014.

  9. On the local acceleration and flow trajectory of jet flows from circular and semi-circular pipes via 3D particle tracking velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jin-Tae; Liberzon, Alex; Chamorro, Leonardo P.

    2015-11-01

    The distinctive differences between two jet flows that share the same hydraulic diameter dh = 0.01 m and Re ~ 6000, but different (nozzle) shape are explored via 3D Particle Tracking Velocimetry using OpenPTV (http://www.openptv.net). The two jets are formed from circular and semicircular pipes and released in a quiescent water tank of 40 dh height, 40 dh wide, and 200 dh long. The recirculating system is seeded with 100 μm particles, where flow measurements are performed in the intermediate flow field (14.5 < x /dh <18.5) at 550Hz for a total of ~ 30,000 frames. Analysis is focused on the spatial distribution of the local flow acceleration and curvature of the Lagrangian trajectories. The velocity and acceleration of particles are estimated by low-pass filtering their position with a moving cubic spline fitting, while the curvature is obtained from the Frenet-Serret equations. Probability density functions (p.d.f.) of these quantities are obtained at various sub-volumes containing a given streamwise velocity range, and compared between the two cases to evaluate the memory effects in the intermediate flow field.

  10. Eye-tracking and EMG supported 3D Virtual Reality - an integrated tool for perceptual and motor development of children with severe physical disabilities: a research concept.

    PubMed

    Pulay, Márk Ágoston

    2015-01-01

    Letting children with severe physical disabilities (like Tetraparesis spastica) to get relevant motional experiences of appropriate quality and quantity is now the greatest challenge for us in the field of neurorehabilitation. These motional experiences may establish many cognitive processes, but may also cause additional secondary cognitive dysfunctions such as disorders in body image, figure invariance, visual perception, auditory differentiation, concentration, analytic and synthetic ways of thinking, visual memory etc. Virtual Reality is a technology that provides a sense of presence in a real environment with the help of 3D pictures and animations formed in a computer environment and enable the person to interact with the objects in that environment. One of our biggest challenges is to find a well suited input device (hardware) to let the children with severe physical disabilities to interact with the computer. Based on our own experiences and a thorough literature review we have come to the conclusion that an effective combination of eye-tracking and EMG devices should work well.

  11. Preparation of cultured cells using high-pressure freezing and freeze substitution for subsequent 2D or 3D visualization in the transmission electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Hawes, Philippa C

    2015-01-01

    Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is an invaluable technique used for imaging the ultrastructure of samples and it is particularly useful when determining virus-host interactions at a cellular level. The environment inside a TEM is not favorable for biological material (high vacuum and high energy electrons). Also biological samples have little or no intrinsic electron contrast, and rarely do they naturally exist in very thin sheets, as is required for optimum resolution in the TEM. To prepare these samples for imaging in the TEM therefore requires extensive processing which can alter the ultrastructure of the material. Here we describe a method which aims to minimize preparation artifacts by freezing the samples at high pressure to instantaneously preserve ultrastructural detail, then rapidly substituting the ice and infiltrating with resin to provide a firm matrix which can be cut into thin sections for imaging. Thicker sections of this material can also be imaged and reconstructed into 3D volumes using electron tomography.

  12. Quantitative Evaluation of 3D Mouse Behaviors and Motor Function in the Open-Field after Spinal Cord Injury Using Markerless Motion Tracking

    PubMed Central

    Sheets, Alison L.; Lai, Po-Lun; Fisher, Lesley C.; Basso, D. Michele

    2013-01-01

    Thousands of scientists strive to identify cellular mechanisms that could lead to breakthroughs in developing ameliorative treatments for debilitating neural and muscular conditions such as spinal cord injury (SCI). Most studies use rodent models to test hypotheses, and these are all limited by the methods available to evaluate animal motor function. This study’s goal was to develop a behavioral and locomotor assessment system in a murine model of SCI that enables quantitative kinematic measurements to be made automatically in the open-field by applying markerless motion tracking approaches. Three-dimensional movements of eight naïve, five mild, five moderate, and four severe SCI mice were recorded using 10 cameras (100 Hz). Background subtraction was used in each video frame to identify the animal’s silhouette, and the 3D shape at each time was reconstructed using shape-from-silhouette. The reconstructed volume was divided into front and back halves using k-means clustering. The animal’s front Center of Volume (CoV) height and whole-body CoV speed were calculated and used to automatically classify animal behaviors including directed locomotion, exploratory locomotion, meandering, standing, and rearing. More detailed analyses of CoV height, speed, and lateral deviation during directed locomotion revealed behavioral differences and functional impairments in animals with mild, moderate, and severe SCI when compared with naïve animals. Naïve animals displayed the widest variety of behaviors including rearing and crossing the center of the open-field, the fastest speeds, and tallest rear CoV heights. SCI reduced the range of behaviors, and decreased speed (r = .70 p<.005) and rear CoV height (r = .65 p<.01) were significantly correlated with greater lesion size. This markerless tracking approach is a first step toward fundamentally changing how rodent movement studies are conducted. By providing scientists with sensitive, quantitative measurement

  13. Self consistent particles dynamics in/out of the cusp region by using back tracking technics; a global 3D PIC simulation approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esmaeili, A.; Cai, D.; Lembege, B.; Nishikawa, K.

    2013-12-01

    Large scale three dimensionbal PIC (particle in cell) simulations are presently used in order to analyze the global solar wind-terrestrial magnetosphere intreraction within a full self-consistent approach, and where both electrons and ions are treated as an assembly of individual particles. This 3D kinetic approach allows us to analyze in particular the dynamics and the fine structures of the cusp region when including self consistently not only its whole neighborhood (in the terrestrial magnetosphere) but also the impact of the solar wind and the interplanetary field (IMF) features. Herein, we focuss our attention on the cusp region and in particular on the acceleration and precipitation of particles (both ions and electrons) within the cusp. In present simulations, the IMF is chosen northward, (i.e. where the X -reconnection region is just above the cusp, in the meridian plane). Back-trackings of self-consistent particles are analyzed in details in order to determine (i) which particles (just above the cusp) are precipitated deeply into the cusp, (ii) which populations are injected from the cusp into the nearby tail, (iii) where the particles suffer the largest energisation along their self-consistent trajectories, (iv) where these populations accumulate, and (v) where the most energetic particles are originally coming from. This approach allows to make a traking of particles within the scenario "solar wind-magnetosheath- cusp -nearbytail"; moreover it strongly differs from the standard test particles technics and allows to provide informations not accessible when using full MHD approach. Keywords: Tracing Particles, Particle In Cell (PIC) simulation, double cusp, test particles method, IMF, Solar wind, Magnetosphere

  14. A multi-model approach to simultaneous segmentation and classification of heterogeneous populations of cell nuclei in 3D confocal microscope images.

    PubMed

    Lin, Gang; Chawla, Monica K; Olson, Kathy; Barnes, Carol A; Guzowski, John F; Bjornsson, Christopher; Shain, William; Roysam, Badrinath

    2007-09-01

    Automated segmentation and morphometry of fluorescently labeled cell nuclei in batches of 3D confocal stacks is essential for quantitative studies. Model-based segmentation algorithms are attractive due to their robustness. Previous methods incorporated a single nuclear model. This is a limitation for tissues containing multiple cell types with different nuclear features. Improved segmentation for such tissues requires algorithms that permit multiple models to be used simultaneously. This requires a tight integration of classification and segmentation algorithms. Two or more nuclear models are constructed semiautomatically from user-provided training examples. Starting with an initial over-segmentation produced by a gradient-weighted watershed algorithm, a hierarchical fragment merging tree rooted at each object is built. Linear discriminant analysis is used to classify each candidate using multiple object models. On the basis of the selected class, a Bayesian score is computed. Fragment merging decisions are made by comparing the score with that of other candidates, and the scores of constituent fragments of each candidate. The overall segmentation accuracy was 93.7% and classification accuracy was 93.5%, respectively, on a diverse collection of images drawn from five different regions of the rat brain. The multi-model method was found to achieve high accuracy on nuclear segmentation and classification by correctly resolving ambiguities in clustered regions containing heterogeneous cell populations.

  15. Real-time catheter tracking for high-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy using an electromagnetic 3D-guidance device: A preliminary performance study

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou Jun; Sebastian, Evelyn; Mangona, Victor; Yan Di

    2013-02-15

    Purpose: In order to increase the accuracy and speed of catheter reconstruction in a high-dose-rate (HDR) prostate implant procedure, an automatic tracking system has been developed using an electromagnetic (EM) device (trakSTAR, Ascension Technology, VT). The performance of the system, including the accuracy and noise level with various tracking parameters and conditions, were investigated. Methods: A direct current (dc) EM transmitter (midrange model) and a sensor with diameter of 1.3 mm (Model 130) were used in the trakSTAR system for tracking catheter position during HDR prostate brachytherapy. Localization accuracy was assessed under both static and dynamic analyses conditions. For the static analysis, a calibration phantom was used to investigate error dependency on operating room (OR) table height (bottom vs midposition vs top), sensor position (distal tip of catheter vs connector end of catheter), direction [left-right (LR) vs anterior-posterior (AP) vs superior-inferior (SI)], sampling frequency (40 vs 80 vs 120 Hz), and interference from OR equipment (present vs absent). The mean and standard deviation of the localization offset in each direction and the corresponding error vectors were calculated. For dynamic analysis, the paths of five straight catheters were tracked to study the effects of directions, sampling frequency, and interference of EM field. Statistical analysis was conducted to compare the results in different configurations. Results: When interference was present in the static analysis, the error vectors were significantly higher at the top table position (3.3 {+-} 1.3 vs 1.8 {+-} 0.9 mm at bottom and 1.7 {+-} 1.0 mm at middle, p < 0.001), at catheter end position (3.1 {+-} 1.1 vs 1.4 {+-} 0.7 mm at the tip position, p < 0.001), and at 40 Hz sampling frequency (2.6 {+-} 1.1 vs 2.4 {+-} 1.5 mm at 80 Hz and 1.8 {+-} 1.1 at 160 Hz, p < 0.001). So did the mean offset errors in the LR direction (-1.7 {+-} 1.4 vs 0.4 {+-} 0.5 mm in AP and 0

  16. Accuracy and Precision of a Custom Camera-Based System for 2-D and 3-D Motion Tracking during Speech and Nonspeech Motor Tasks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feng, Yongqiang; Max, Ludo

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Studying normal or disordered motor control requires accurate motion tracking of the effectors (e.g., orofacial structures). The cost of electromagnetic, optoelectronic, and ultrasound systems is prohibitive for many laboratories and limits clinical applications. For external movements (lips, jaw), video-based systems may be a viable…

  17. Nuclear accessibility of β-actin mRNA is measured by 3D single-molecule real-time tracking.

    PubMed

    Smith, Carlas S; Preibisch, Stephan; Joseph, Aviva; Abrahamsson, Sara; Rieger, Bernd; Myers, Eugene; Singer, Robert H; Grunwald, David

    2015-05-25

    Imaging single proteins or RNAs allows direct visualization of the inner workings of the cell. Typically, three-dimensional (3D) images are acquired by sequentially capturing a series of 2D sections. The time required to step through the sample often impedes imaging of large numbers of rapidly moving molecules. Here we applied multifocus microscopy (MFM) to instantaneously capture 3D single-molecule real-time images in live cells, visualizing cell nuclei at 10 volumes per second. We developed image analysis techniques to analyze messenger RNA (mRNA) diffusion in the entire volume of the nucleus. Combining MFM with precise registration between fluorescently labeled mRNA, nuclear pore complexes, and chromatin, we obtained globally optimal image alignment within 80-nm precision using transformation models. We show that β-actin mRNAs freely access the entire nucleus and fewer than 60% of mRNAs are more than 0.5 µm away from a nuclear pore, and we do so for the first time accounting for spatial inhomogeneity of nuclear organization. PMID:26008747

  18. Nuclear accessibility of β-actin mRNA is measured by 3D single-molecule real-time tracking

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Carlas S.; Preibisch, Stephan; Joseph, Aviva; Abrahamsson, Sara; Rieger, Bernd; Myers, Eugene; Singer, Robert H.

    2015-01-01

    Imaging single proteins or RNAs allows direct visualization of the inner workings of the cell. Typically, three-dimensional (3D) images are acquired by sequentially capturing a series of 2D sections. The time required to step through the sample often impedes imaging of large numbers of rapidly moving molecules. Here we applied multifocus microscopy (MFM) to instantaneously capture 3D single-molecule real-time images in live cells, visualizing cell nuclei at 10 volumes per second. We developed image analysis techniques to analyze messenger RNA (mRNA) diffusion in the entire volume of the nucleus. Combining MFM with precise registration between fluorescently labeled mRNA, nuclear pore complexes, and chromatin, we obtained globally optimal image alignment within 80-nm precision using transformation models. We show that β-actin mRNAs freely access the entire nucleus and fewer than 60% of mRNAs are more than 0.5 µm away from a nuclear pore, and we do so for the first time accounting for spatial inhomogeneity of nuclear organization. PMID:26008747

  19. PLOT3D/AMES, APOLLO UNIX VERSION USING GMR3D (WITHOUT TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P.

    1994-01-01

    Apollo's 3-dimensional graphics hardware, but does not take advantage of the shading and hidden line/surface removal capabilities of the Apollo DN10000. Although this implementation does not offer a capability for putting text on plots, it does support the use of a mouse to translate, rotate, or zoom in on views. The version 3.6b+ Apollo implementations of PLOT3D (ARC-12789) and PLOT3D/TURB3D (ARC-12785) were developed for use on Apollo computers running UNIX System V with BSD 4.3 extensions and the graphics library GMR3D Version 2.0. The standard distribution media for each of these programs is a 9-track, 6250 bpi magnetic tape in TAR format. Customers purchasing one implementation version of PLOT3D or PLOT3D/TURB3D will be given a $200 discount on each additional implementation version ordered at the same time. Version 3.6b+ of PLOT3D and PLOT3D/TURB3D are also supported for the following computers and graphics libraries: 1) generic UNIX Supercomputer and IRIS, suitable for CRAY 2/UNICOS, CONVEX, and Alliant with remote IRIS 2xxx/3xxx or IRIS 4D (ARC-12779, ARC-12784); 2) VAX computers running VMS Version 5.0 and DISSPLA Version 11.0 (ARC-12777, ARC-12781); 3) generic UNIX and DISSPLA Version 11.0 (ARC-12788, ARC-12778); and (4) Silicon Graphics IRIS 2xxx/3xxx or IRIS 4D workstations (ARC-12783, ARC-12782). Silicon Graphics Iris, IRIS 4D, and IRIS 2xxx/3xxx are trademarks of Silicon Graphics Incorporated. VAX and VMS are trademarks of Digital Electronics Corporation. DISSPLA is a trademark of Computer Associates. CRAY 2 and UNICOS are trademarks of CRAY Research, Incorporated. CONVEX is a trademark of Convex Computer Corporation. Alliant is a trademark of Alliant. Apollo and GMR3D are trademarks of Hewlett-Packard, Incorporated. UNIX is a registered trademark of AT&T.

  20. PLOT3D/AMES, APOLLO UNIX VERSION USING GMR3D (WITH TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P.

    1994-01-01

    Apollo's 3-dimensional graphics hardware, but does not take advantage of the shading and hidden line/surface removal capabilities of the Apollo DN10000. Although this implementation does not offer a capability for putting text on plots, it does support the use of a mouse to translate, rotate, or zoom in on views. The version 3.6b+ Apollo implementations of PLOT3D (ARC-12789) and PLOT3D/TURB3D (ARC-12785) were developed for use on Apollo computers running UNIX System V with BSD 4.3 extensions and the graphics library GMR3D Version 2.0. The standard distribution media for each of these programs is a 9-track, 6250 bpi magnetic tape in TAR format. Customers purchasing one implementation version of PLOT3D or PLOT3D/TURB3D will be given a $200 discount on each additional implementation version ordered at the same time. Version 3.6b+ of PLOT3D and PLOT3D/TURB3D are also supported for the following computers and graphics libraries: 1) generic UNIX Supercomputer and IRIS, suitable for CRAY 2/UNICOS, CONVEX, and Alliant with remote IRIS 2xxx/3xxx or IRIS 4D (ARC-12779, ARC-12784); 2) VAX computers running VMS Version 5.0 and DISSPLA Version 11.0 (ARC-12777, ARC-12781); 3) generic UNIX and DISSPLA Version 11.0 (ARC-12788, ARC-12778); and (4) Silicon Graphics IRIS 2xxx/3xxx or IRIS 4D workstations (ARC-12783, ARC-12782). Silicon Graphics Iris, IRIS 4D, and IRIS 2xxx/3xxx are trademarks of Silicon Graphics Incorporated. VAX and VMS are trademarks of Digital Electronics Corporation. DISSPLA is a trademark of Computer Associates. CRAY 2 and UNICOS are trademarks of CRAY Research, Incorporated. CONVEX is a trademark of Convex Computer Corporation. Alliant is a trademark of Alliant. Apollo and GMR3D are trademarks of Hewlett-Packard, Incorporated. UNIX is a registered trademark of AT&T.

  1. Europeana and 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pletinckx, D.

    2011-09-01

    The current 3D hype creates a lot of interest in 3D. People go to 3D movies, but are we ready to use 3D in our homes, in our offices, in our communication? Are we ready to deliver real 3D to a general public and use interactive 3D in a meaningful way to enjoy, learn, communicate? The CARARE project is realising this for the moment in the domain of monuments and archaeology, so that real 3D of archaeological sites and European monuments will be available to the general public by 2012. There are several aspects to this endeavour. First of all is the technical aspect of flawlessly delivering 3D content over all platforms and operating systems, without installing software. We have currently a working solution in PDF, but HTML5 will probably be the future. Secondly, there is still little knowledge on how to create 3D learning objects, 3D tourist information or 3D scholarly communication. We are still in a prototype phase when it comes to integrate 3D objects in physical or virtual museums. Nevertheless, Europeana has a tremendous potential as a multi-facetted virtual museum. Finally, 3D has a large potential to act as a hub of information, linking to related 2D imagery, texts, video, sound. We describe how to create such rich, explorable 3D objects that can be used intuitively by the generic Europeana user and what metadata is needed to support the semantic linking.

  2. Robust patella motion tracking using intensity-based 2D-3D registration on dynamic bi-plane fluoroscopy: towards quantitative assessment in MPFL reconstruction surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otake, Yoshito; Esnault, Matthieu; Grupp, Robert; Kosugi, Shinichi; Sato, Yoshinobu

    2016-03-01

    The determination of in vivo motion of multiple-bones using dynamic fluoroscopic images and computed tomography (CT) is useful for post-operative assessment of orthopaedic surgeries such as medial patellofemoral ligament reconstruction. We propose a robust method to measure the 3D motion of multiple rigid objects with high accuracy using a series of bi-plane fluoroscopic images and a multi-resolution, intensity-based, 2D-3D registration. A Covariance Matrix Adaptation Evolution Strategy (CMA-ES) optimizer was used with a gradient correlation similarity metric. Four approaches to register three rigid objects (femur, tibia-fibula and patella) were implemented: 1) an individual bone approach registering one bone at a time, each with optimization of a six degrees of freedom (6DOF) parameter, 2) a sequential approach registering one bone at a time but using the previous bone results as the background in DRR generation, 3) a simultaneous approach registering all the bones together (18DOF) and 4) a combination of the sequential and the simultaneous approaches. These approaches were compared in experiments using simulated images generated from the CT of a healthy volunteer and measured fluoroscopic images. Over the 120 simulated frames of motion, the simultaneous approach showed improved registration accuracy compared to the individual approach: with less than 0.68mm root-mean-square error (RMSE) for translation and less than 1.12° RMSE for rotation. A robustness evaluation was conducted with 45 trials of a randomly perturbed initialization showed that the sequential approach improved robustness significantly (74% success rate) compared to the individual bone approach (34% success) for patella registration (femur and tibia-fibula registration had a 100% success rate with each approach).

  3. 'Diamond' in 3-D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This 3-D, microscopic imager mosaic of a target area on a rock called 'Diamond Jenness' was taken after NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity ground into the surface with its rock abrasion tool for a second time.

    Opportunity has bored nearly a dozen holes into the inner walls of 'Endurance Crater.' On sols 177 and 178 (July 23 and July 24, 2004), the rover worked double-duty on Diamond Jenness. Surface debris and the bumpy shape of the rock resulted in a shallow and irregular hole, only about 2 millimeters (0.08 inch) deep. The final depth was not enough to remove all the bumps and leave a neat hole with a smooth floor. This extremely shallow depression was then examined by the rover's alpha particle X-ray spectrometer.

    On Sol 178, Opportunity's 'robotic rodent' dined on Diamond Jenness once again, grinding almost an additional 5 millimeters (about 0.2 inch). The rover then applied its Moessbauer spectrometer to the deepened hole. This double dose of Diamond Jenness enabled the science team to examine the rock at varying layers. Results from those grindings are currently being analyzed.

    The image mosaic is about 6 centimeters (2.4 inches) across.

  4. 3-D Animation of Typhoon Bopha

    NASA Video Gallery

    This 3-D animation of NASA's TRMM satellite data showed Typhoon Bopha tracking over the Philippines on Dec. 3 and moving into the Sulu Sea on Dec. 4, 2012. TRMM saw heavy rain (red) was falling at ...

  5. Rheo-Raman microscope: Tracking molecular structures as a function of deformation and temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plog, Jan P.; Meyer, Matt; De Vito, Francesca; Soergel, Fritz; Kotula, Anthony

    2016-05-01

    The Rheo-Raman Microscope combines rheology, Raman spectroscopy and polarization light microscopy and provides comprehensive insight into a material's bulk as well as micro structural properties under well defined and reproducible conditions such as temperature or shear profiles. The simultaneous acquisition with three independent analytical methods is advantageous for investigation of structural changes occurring for example in gelation, melting or crystallization. Details of this hyphenated instrumentation as well as selected results including temperature induced melting of a polymer emulsion and crystallization of a polymer melt are presented in this contribution.

  6. Chaotic orbits tracked by a 3D asymmetric immersed solid at high Reynolds numbers using a novel Gerris-Immersed Solid (DNS) Solver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shui, Pei; Popinet, Stéphane; Valluri, Prashant; Govindarajan, Rama

    2014-11-01

    The motion of a neutrally buoyant ellipsoidal solid with an initial momentum has been theoretically predicted to be chaotic in inviscid flow by Aref (1993). On the other hand, the particle could stop moving when the damping viscous force is strong enough. This work provides numerical evidence for 3D chaotic motion of a neutrally buoyant general ellipsoidal solid and suggests criteria for triggering this motion. The study also shows that the translational/rotational energy ratio plays the key role on the motion pattern, while the particle geometry and density aspect ratios also have some influence on the chaotic behaviour. We have developed a novel variant of the immersed solid solver under the framework of the Gerris flow package of Popinet et al. (2003). Our solid solver, the Gerris Immersed Solid Solver (GISS), is capable of handling 6 degree-of-freedom motion of particles with arbitrary geometry and number in three-dimensions and can precisely predict the hydrodynamic interactions and their effects on particle trajectories. The reliability and accuracy have been checked by a series of classical studies, testing both translational and rotational motions with a vast range of flow properties.

  7. 3d-3d correspondence revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Hee-Joong; Dimofte, Tudor; Gukov, Sergei; Sułkowski, Piotr

    2016-04-01

    In fivebrane compactifications on 3-manifolds, we point out the importance of all flat connections in the proper definition of the effective 3d {N}=2 theory. The Lagrangians of some theories with the desired properties can be constructed with the help of homological knot invariants that categorify colored Jones polynomials. Higgsing the full 3d theories constructed this way recovers theories found previously by Dimofte-Gaiotto-Gukov. We also consider the cutting and gluing of 3-manifolds along smooth boundaries and the role played by all flat connections in this operation.

  8. 3d-3d correspondence revisited

    DOE PAGES

    Chung, Hee -Joong; Dimofte, Tudor; Gukov, Sergei; Sułkowski, Piotr

    2016-04-21

    In fivebrane compactifications on 3-manifolds, we point out the importance of all flat connections in the proper definition of the effective 3d N = 2 theory. The Lagrangians of some theories with the desired properties can be constructed with the help of homological knot invariants that categorify colored Jones polynomials. Higgsing the full 3d theories constructed this way recovers theories found previously by Dimofte-Gaiotto-Gukov. As a result, we also consider the cutting and gluing of 3-manifolds along smooth boundaries and the role played by all flat connections in this operation.

  9. Monte-Carlo Simulation of Heavy Ion Track Structure Calculation of Local Dose and 3D Time Evolution of Radiolytic Species

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plante, Ianik; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2010-01-01

    Heavy ions have gained considerable importance in radiotherapy due to their advantageous dose distribution profile and high Relative Biological Effectiveness (RBE). Heavy ions are difficult to produce on Earth, but they are present in space and it is impossible at this moment to completely shield astronauts from them. The risk of these radiations is poorly understood, which is a concern for a 3-years Mars mission. The effects of radiation are mainly due to DNA damage such as DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), although non-targeted effects are also very important. DNA can be damaged by the direct interaction of radiation and by reactions with chemical species produced by the radiolysis of water. The energy deposition is of crucial importance to understand biological effects of radiation. Therefore, much effort has been done recently to improve models of radiation tracks.

  10. Remote 3D Medical Consultation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welch, Greg; Sonnenwald, Diane H.; Fuchs, Henry; Cairns, Bruce; Mayer-Patel, Ketan; Yang, Ruigang; State, Andrei; Towles, Herman; Ilie, Adrian; Krishnan, Srinivas; Söderholm, Hanna M.

    Two-dimensional (2D) video-based telemedical consultation has been explored widely in the past 15-20 years. Two issues that seem to arise in most relevant case studies are the difficulty associated with obtaining the desired 2D camera views, and poor depth perception. To address these problems we are exploring the use of a small array of cameras to synthesize a spatially continuous range of dynamic three-dimensional (3D) views of a remote environment and events. The 3D views can be sent across wired or wireless networks to remote viewers with fixed displays or mobile devices such as a personal digital assistant (PDA). The viewpoints could be specified manually or automatically via user head or PDA tracking, giving the remote viewer virtual head- or hand-slaved (PDA-based) remote cameras for mono or stereo viewing. We call this idea remote 3D medical consultation (3DMC). In this article we motivate and explain the vision for 3D medical consultation; we describe the relevant computer vision/graphics, display, and networking research; we present a proof-of-concept prototype system; and we present some early experimental results supporting the general hypothesis that 3D remote medical consultation could offer benefits over conventional 2D televideo.

  11. 3DSEM: A 3D microscopy dataset.

    PubMed

    Tafti, Ahmad P; Kirkpatrick, Andrew B; Holz, Jessica D; Owen, Heather A; Yu, Zeyun

    2016-03-01

    The Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) as a 2D imaging instrument has been widely used in many scientific disciplines including biological, mechanical, and materials sciences to determine the surface attributes of microscopic objects. However the SEM micrographs still remain 2D images. To effectively measure and visualize the surface properties, we need to truly restore the 3D shape model from 2D SEM images. Having 3D surfaces would provide anatomic shape of micro-samples which allows for quantitative measurements and informative visualization of the specimens being investigated. The 3DSEM is a dataset for 3D microscopy vision which is freely available at [1] for any academic, educational, and research purposes. The dataset includes both 2D images and 3D reconstructed surfaces of several real microscopic samples. PMID:26779561

  12. 3DSEM: A 3D microscopy dataset

    PubMed Central

    Tafti, Ahmad P.; Kirkpatrick, Andrew B.; Holz, Jessica D.; Owen, Heather A.; Yu, Zeyun

    2015-01-01

    The Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) as a 2D imaging instrument has been widely used in many scientific disciplines including biological, mechanical, and materials sciences to determine the surface attributes of microscopic objects. However the SEM micrographs still remain 2D images. To effectively measure and visualize the surface properties, we need to truly restore the 3D shape model from 2D SEM images. Having 3D surfaces would provide anatomic shape of micro-samples which allows for quantitative measurements and informative visualization of the specimens being investigated. The 3DSEM is a dataset for 3D microscopy vision which is freely available at [1] for any academic, educational, and research purposes. The dataset includes both 2D images and 3D reconstructed surfaces of several real microscopic samples. PMID:26779561

  13. 3DSEM: A 3D microscopy dataset.

    PubMed

    Tafti, Ahmad P; Kirkpatrick, Andrew B; Holz, Jessica D; Owen, Heather A; Yu, Zeyun

    2016-03-01

    The Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) as a 2D imaging instrument has been widely used in many scientific disciplines including biological, mechanical, and materials sciences to determine the surface attributes of microscopic objects. However the SEM micrographs still remain 2D images. To effectively measure and visualize the surface properties, we need to truly restore the 3D shape model from 2D SEM images. Having 3D surfaces would provide anatomic shape of micro-samples which allows for quantitative measurements and informative visualization of the specimens being investigated. The 3DSEM is a dataset for 3D microscopy vision which is freely available at [1] for any academic, educational, and research purposes. The dataset includes both 2D images and 3D reconstructed surfaces of several real microscopic samples.

  14. OFAI: 3D block tracking for a real-size rockfall experiment in the weathered volcanic context of Tahiti, French Polynesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewez, Thomas; Nachbaur, Aude; Mathon, Christian; Sedan, Olivier; Berger, Frédéric; Des Garets, Emmanuel

    2010-05-01

    The Land Management Authority of French Polynesia contracted BRGM to run a real-size rockfall experiment name-coded OFAI in September 2009. The purposes of the experiment are two fold: first observe real-size rock trajectories in a context of variably weathered volcanic rock slopes; and second, use observed rockfall trajectories to calibrate block propagation numerical models (see Mathon et al., EGU 2010, this session). 90 basalt blocks were dropped down a 150-m-long slope made of hard basalt veins, lenses of colluvium and erosion channels covered in blocks of various sizes. Parameters of the experiment concerned the shape (from nearly perfect sphere to elongated cubes) and mass of the blocks (from 300 kg to >5000 kg), and the launching point, in order to bounce the blocks both off stiff basalt veins and colluvium lenses. The presentation addresses the monitoring technique developed to measure block trajectories in 3D and the variables extracted from them. A set of two 50-frame-per-second digital reflex cameras (Panasonic GH1) were installed on two prominent vantage points in order to record block motion in stereoscopy. A series of ground control points, surveyed with centimetre accuracy, served to orient pairs of images in the local topographic reference frame. This enabled the computation of block position at 50 Hz along a section of ca. 30-m-long slope, constrained by the cameras field of view. These results were then processed to extract parameters, such as velocity (horizontal, vertical, rotational, incident and reflected), number of impacts, and height of rebounds in relation with ground cover properties.

  15. Tracking sub-micron fluorescent particles in three dimensions with a microscope objective under non-design optical conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, R.; Sun, Y. F.; Peng, X. F.; Yang, X. Y.

    2006-06-01

    A microscope objective designed for air medium has been used under non-design optical conditions to focus an exciting laser beam on sub-micron fluorescent particles with the emitted fluorescence received through a glass layer with a mismatched refractive index. The diffraction pattern with several clear interference fringes generated from the fluorescence emitted from a fluorescent particle changed with the particle's position along the optical axis. A scalar diffraction model developed by Gibson and Lanni (1991 J. Opt. Soc. Am. A 8 1601-13) was used to predict the diffraction patterns for various aberration conditions and to analyse the effects of the coherence properties of the fluorescence on the details of the diffraction pattern. The particle position along the optical axis, i.e. its defocus distance, could be determined based on the characteristic sizes of the particle's diffraction pattern to track the particle in three dimensions.

  16. Description of an evaluation system for knee kinematics in ligament lesions, by means of optical tracking and 3D tomography☆☆☆

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Tiago Lazzaretti; Ribeiro, Douglas Badillo; da Rocha, Diogo Cristo; Albuquerque, Cyro; Pereira, César Augusto Martins; Pedrinelli, André; Hernandez, Arnaldo José

    2014-01-01

    Objective To describe and demonstrate the viability of a method for evaluating knee kinematics, by means of a continuous passive motion (CPM) machine, before and after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury. Methods This study was conducted on a knee from a cadaver, in a mechanical pivot-shift simulator, with evaluations using optical tracking, and also using computed tomography. Results This study demonstrated the viability of a protocol for measuring the rotation and translation of the knee, using reproducible and objective tools (error < 0.2 mm). The mechanized provocation system of the pivot-shift test was independent of the examiner and always allowed the same angular velocity and traction of 20 N throughout the movement. Conclusion The clinical relevance of this method lies in making inferences about the in vivo behavior of a knee with an ACL injury and providing greater methodological quality in future studies for measuring surgical techniques with grafts in relatively close positions. PMID:26229854

  17. 3D and Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meulien Ohlmann, Odile

    2013-02-01

    Today the industry offers a chain of 3D products. Learning to "read" and to "create in 3D" becomes an issue of education of primary importance. 25 years professional experience in France, the United States and Germany, Odile Meulien set up a personal method of initiation to 3D creation that entails the spatial/temporal experience of the holographic visual. She will present some different tools and techniques used for this learning, their advantages and disadvantages, programs and issues of educational policies, constraints and expectations related to the development of new techniques for 3D imaging. Although the creation of display holograms is very much reduced compared to the creation of the 90ies, the holographic concept is spreading in all scientific, social, and artistic activities of our present time. She will also raise many questions: What means 3D? Is it communication? Is it perception? How the seeing and none seeing is interferes? What else has to be taken in consideration to communicate in 3D? How to handle the non visible relations of moving objects with subjects? Does this transform our model of exchange with others? What kind of interaction this has with our everyday life? Then come more practical questions: How to learn creating 3D visualization, to learn 3D grammar, 3D language, 3D thinking? What for? At what level? In which matter? for whom?

  18. Monitoring the microcirculation at the bedside using hand-held imaging microscopes: Automatic tracking of erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Sorelli, M; Bocchi, L; Ince, C

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, the development of portable microscopy devices that enable the noninvasive bedside evaluation of the mucosal microcirculation in critically ill patients has expanded the research on this level of the cardiovascular system. Several semi-quantitative scores have been defined to assess the peripheral perfusion, based on videos of the microcirculation. However, they are cumbersome and time-consuming processes, highlighting the need for the development of automated software techniques, to reduce physicians workload and ensure prompt and objective patient evaluation. We developed a rapid, automatic method for the quantitative assessment of erythrocyte velocities in Incident Dark Field (IDF) illumination videos of capillary flow. The technique, based on Kalman filter object tracking, was tested in 35 IDF videos against space-time diagrams, showing high correlation (r = 0.96) and agreement (bias = 3.3 μm/s) with space-time diagrams (STD), below 200 μm/s.

  19. Extracting full-field dynamic strain on a wind turbine rotor subjected to arbitrary excitations using 3D point tracking and a modal expansion technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baqersad, Javad; Niezrecki, Christopher; Avitabile, Peter

    2015-09-01

    Health monitoring of rotating structures such as wind turbines and helicopter rotors is generally performed using conventional sensors that provide a limited set of data at discrete locations near or on the hub. These sensors usually provide no data on the blades or inside them where failures might occur. Within this paper, an approach was used to extract the full-field dynamic strain on a wind turbine assembly subject to arbitrary loading conditions. A three-bladed wind turbine having 2.3-m long blades was placed in a semi-built-in boundary condition using a hub, a machining chuck, and a steel block. For three different test cases, the turbine was excited using (1) pluck testing, (2) random impacts on blades with three impact hammers, and (3) random excitation by a mechanical shaker. The response of the structure to the excitations was measured using three-dimensional point tracking. A pair of high-speed cameras was used to measure displacement of optical targets on the structure when the blades were vibrating. The measured displacements at discrete locations were expanded and applied to the finite element model of the structure to extract the full-field dynamic strain. The results of the paper show an excellent correlation between the strain predicted using the proposed approach and the strain measured with strain-gages for each of the three loading conditions. The approach used in this paper to predict the strain showed higher accuracy than the digital image correlation technique. The new expansion approach is able to extract dynamic strain all over the entire structure, even inside the structure beyond the line of sight of the measurement system. Because the method is based on a non-contacting measurement approach, it can be readily applied to a variety of structures having different boundary and operating conditions, including rotating blades.

  20. Studies of Grounding Line Migration Over Rutofrd Ice Stream Using 3D Short Repeat-Time Series From Multi-Track InSAR Acquisitions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milillo, P.; Minchew, B. M.; Riel, B. V.; Simons, M.; Gardner, A. S.; Agram, P. S.

    2015-12-01

    It has long been known that basal mechanics of ice streams are sensitive to short- timescale hourly to seasonal forcings, such as water pressure fluctuations and tidal loading as well as long-timescale (yearly to decadal) thinning. Designing SAR short repeat time observations to cover nearly an entire test-site in Antarctica from ascending and descending orbital directions, using every available SAR satellite is fundamental for understanding a new class of phenomena, underlying the physics of glaciers and ice streams. Understanding grounding-line dynamics is necessary for predictions of long-term ice-sheet stability. However, despite growing observations of the tidal influence on grounding-line migration, this short-timescale migration is poorly understood, with most modeling attempts assuming beam theory to calculate displacements. Knowing the position of the grounding line with accuracy is important for the global mass balance of ice sheets or for quantitatively modeling the mechanical interaction between ice shelves and ice sheets. Here we present a general method for retrieving three dimensional displacement vector given a set of multiple tracks, multiple geometry SAR acquisitions. The algorithm extends the single line of sight mathematical framework to the four spatial and temporal dimensions including both range and azimuth measurements. We designed COSMO-SkyMed (CSK) observations of Rutford Ice Stream to cover nearly the grounding zone from ascending and descending orbital directions using every available CSK satellite This spatially comprehensive observational scheme allowed us to derive time series of the 3-dimensional surface displacement for the grounding zone, facilitating studies of ice stream mechanics and tidally induced grounding line migrations with unprecedented spatial extent and temporal resolution. Having a constellation with occasional 1- day repeat time and an average 4-days repeat time is beneficial when looking at displacements of more than

  1. Intraoperative Image-based Multiview 2D/3D Registration for Image-Guided Orthopaedic Surgery: Incorporation of Fiducial-Based C-Arm Tracking and GPU-Acceleration

    PubMed Central

    Armand, Mehran; Armiger, Robert S.; Kutzer, Michael D.; Basafa, Ehsan; Kazanzides, Peter; Taylor, Russell H.

    2012-01-01

    Intraoperative patient registration may significantly affect the outcome of image-guided surgery (IGS). Image-based registration approaches have several advantages over the currently dominant point-based direct contact methods and are used in some industry solutions in image-guided radiation therapy with fixed X-ray gantries. However, technical challenges including geometric calibration and computational cost have precluded their use with mobile C-arms for IGS. We propose a 2D/3D registration framework for intraoperative patient registration using a conventional mobile X-ray imager combining fiducial-based C-arm tracking and graphics processing unit (GPU)-acceleration. The two-stage framework 1) acquires X-ray images and estimates relative pose between the images using a custom-made in-image fiducial, and 2) estimates the patient pose using intensity-based 2D/3D registration. Experimental validations using a publicly available gold standard dataset, a plastic bone phantom and cadaveric specimens have been conducted. The mean target registration error (mTRE) was 0.34 ± 0.04 mm (success rate: 100%, registration time: 14.2 s) for the phantom with two images 90° apart, and 0.99 ± 0.41 mm (81%, 16.3 s) for the cadaveric specimen with images 58.5° apart. The experimental results showed the feasibility of the proposed registration framework as a practical alternative for IGS routines. PMID:22113773

  2. Fast and Adaptive Auto-focusing Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obara, Takeshi; Igarashi, Yasunobu; Hashimoto, Koichi

    Optical microscopes are widely used in biological and medical researches. By using the microscope, we can observe cellular movements including intracellular ions and molecules tagged with fluorescent dyes at a high magnification. However, a freely motile cell easily escapes from a 3D field of view of the typical microscope. Therefore, we propose a novel auto-focusing algorithm and develop a auto-focusing and tracking microscope. XYZ positions of a microscopic stage are feedback controlled to focus and track the cell automatically. A bright-field image is used to estimate a cellular position. XY centroids are used to estimate XY positions of the tracked cell. To estimate Z position, we use a diffraction pattern around the cell membrane. This estimation method is so-called Depth from Diffraction (DFDi). However, this method is not robust for individual differences between cells because the diffraction pattern depends on each cellular shape. Therefore, in this study, we propose a real-time correction of DFDi by using 2D Laplacian of an intracellular area as a goodness of the focus. To evaluate the performance of our developed algorithm and microscope, we auto-focus and track a freely moving paramecium. In this experimental result, the paramecium is auto-focused and kept inside the scope of the microscope during 45s. The evaluated focal error is within 5µm, while a length and a thickness of the paramecium are about 200µm and 50µm, respectively.

  3. Recording stereoscopic 3D neurosurgery with a head-mounted 3D camera system.

    PubMed

    Lee, Brian; Chen, Brian R; Chen, Beverly B; Lu, James Y; Giannotta, Steven L

    2015-06-01

    Stereoscopic three-dimensional (3D) imaging can present more information to the viewer and further enhance the learning experience over traditional two-dimensional (2D) video. Most 3D surgical videos are recorded from the operating microscope and only feature the crux, or the most important part of the surgery, leaving out other crucial parts of surgery including the opening, approach, and closing of the surgical site. In addition, many other surgeries including complex spine, trauma, and intensive care unit procedures are also rarely recorded. We describe and share our experience with a commercially available head-mounted stereoscopic 3D camera system to obtain stereoscopic 3D recordings of these seldom recorded aspects of neurosurgery. The strengths and limitations of using the GoPro(®) 3D system as a head-mounted stereoscopic 3D camera system in the operating room are reviewed in detail. Over the past several years, we have recorded in stereoscopic 3D over 50 cranial and spinal surgeries and created a library for education purposes. We have found the head-mounted stereoscopic 3D camera system to be a valuable asset to supplement 3D footage from a 3D microscope. We expect that these comprehensive 3D surgical videos will become an important facet of resident education and ultimately lead to improved patient care.

  4. 3D Imaging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hastings, S. K.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses 3 D imaging as it relates to digital representations in virtual library collections. Highlights include X-ray computed tomography (X-ray CT); the National Science Foundation (NSF) Digital Library Initiatives; output peripherals; image retrieval systems, including metadata; and applications of 3 D imaging for libraries and museums. (LRW)

  5. ShowMe3D

    SciTech Connect

    Sinclair, Michael B

    2012-01-05

    ShowMe3D is a data visualization graphical user interface specifically designed for use with hyperspectral image obtained from the Hyperspectral Confocal Microscope. The program allows the user to select and display any single image from a three dimensional hyperspectral image stack. By moving a slider control, the user can easily move between images of the stack. The user can zoom into any region of the image. The user can select any pixel or region from the displayed image and display the fluorescence spectrum associated with that pixel or region. The user can define up to 3 spectral filters to apply to the hyperspectral image and view the image as it would appear from a filter-based confocal microscope. The user can also obtain statistics such as intensity average and variance from selected regions.

  6. ShowMe3D

    2012-01-05

    ShowMe3D is a data visualization graphical user interface specifically designed for use with hyperspectral image obtained from the Hyperspectral Confocal Microscope. The program allows the user to select and display any single image from a three dimensional hyperspectral image stack. By moving a slider control, the user can easily move between images of the stack. The user can zoom into any region of the image. The user can select any pixel or region from themore » displayed image and display the fluorescence spectrum associated with that pixel or region. The user can define up to 3 spectral filters to apply to the hyperspectral image and view the image as it would appear from a filter-based confocal microscope. The user can also obtain statistics such as intensity average and variance from selected regions.« less

  7. Automatic 3D video format detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Tao; Wang, Zhe; Zhai, Jiefu; Doyen, Didier

    2011-03-01

    Many 3D formats exist and will probably co-exist for a long time even if 3D standards are today under definition. The support for multiple 3D formats will be important for bringing 3D into home. In this paper, we propose a novel and effective method to detect whether a video is a 3D video or not, and to further identify the exact 3D format. First, we present how to detect those 3D formats that encode a pair of stereo images into a single image. The proposed method detects features and establishes correspondences between features in the left and right view images, and applies the statistics from the distribution of the positional differences between corresponding features to detect the existence of a 3D format and to identify the format. Second, we present how to detect the frame sequential 3D format. In the frame sequential 3D format, the feature points are oscillating from frame to frame. Similarly, the proposed method tracks feature points over consecutive frames, computes the positional differences between features, and makes a detection decision based on whether the features are oscillating. Experiments show the effectiveness of our method.

  8. A new method of imaging particle tracks in solid state nuclear track detectors.

    PubMed

    Wertheim, D; Gillmore, G; Brown, L; Petford, N

    2010-01-01

    Solid state nuclear track detectors are used to determine the concentration of alpha particles in the environment. The standard method for assessing exposed detectors involves 2D image analysis. However 3D imaging has the potential to provide additional information relating to angle as well as to differentiate clustered hit sequences and possibly energy of alpha particles but this could be time consuming. Here we describe a new method for rapid high-resolution 3D imaging of solid state nuclear track detectors. A 'LEXT' OLS3100 confocal laser scanning microscope (Olympus Corporation, Tokyo, Japan) was used in confocal mode to successfully obtain 3D image data on four CR-39 plastic detectors. Three-dimensional visualization and image analysis enabled characterization of track features. This method may provide a means of rapid and detailed 3D analysis of solid state nuclear track detectors.

  9. 3D ultrafast ultrasound imaging in vivo.

    PubMed

    Provost, Jean; Papadacci, Clement; Arango, Juan Esteban; Imbault, Marion; Fink, Mathias; Gennisson, Jean-Luc; Tanter, Mickael; Pernot, Mathieu

    2014-10-01

    Very high frame rate ultrasound imaging has recently allowed for the extension of the applications of echography to new fields of study such as the functional imaging of the brain, cardiac electrophysiology, and the quantitative imaging of the intrinsic mechanical properties of tumors, to name a few, non-invasively and in real time. In this study, we present the first implementation of Ultrafast Ultrasound Imaging in 3D based on the use of either diverging or plane waves emanating from a sparse virtual array located behind the probe. It achieves high contrast and resolution while maintaining imaging rates of thousands of volumes per second. A customized portable ultrasound system was developed to sample 1024 independent channels and to drive a 32  ×  32 matrix-array probe. Its ability to track in 3D transient phenomena occurring in the millisecond range within a single ultrafast acquisition was demonstrated for 3D Shear-Wave Imaging, 3D Ultrafast Doppler Imaging, and, finally, 3D Ultrafast combined Tissue and Flow Doppler Imaging. The propagation of shear waves was tracked in a phantom and used to characterize its stiffness. 3D Ultrafast Doppler was used to obtain 3D maps of Pulsed Doppler, Color Doppler, and Power Doppler quantities in a single acquisition and revealed, at thousands of volumes per second, the complex 3D flow patterns occurring in the ventricles of the human heart during an entire cardiac cycle, as well as the 3D in vivo interaction of blood flow and wall motion during the pulse wave in the carotid at the bifurcation. This study demonstrates the potential of 3D Ultrafast Ultrasound Imaging for the 3D mapping of stiffness, tissue motion, and flow in humans in vivo and promises new clinical applications of ultrasound with reduced intra--and inter-observer variability.

  10. 3D ultrafast ultrasound imaging in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Provost, Jean; Papadacci, Clement; Esteban Arango, Juan; Imbault, Marion; Fink, Mathias; Gennisson, Jean-Luc; Tanter, Mickael; Pernot, Mathieu

    2014-10-01

    Very high frame rate ultrasound imaging has recently allowed for the extension of the applications of echography to new fields of study such as the functional imaging of the brain, cardiac electrophysiology, and the quantitative imaging of the intrinsic mechanical properties of tumors, to name a few, non-invasively and in real time. In this study, we present the first implementation of Ultrafast Ultrasound Imaging in 3D based on the use of either diverging or plane waves emanating from a sparse virtual array located behind the probe. It achieves high contrast and resolution while maintaining imaging rates of thousands of volumes per second. A customized portable ultrasound system was developed to sample 1024 independent channels and to drive a 32  ×  32 matrix-array probe. Its ability to track in 3D transient phenomena occurring in the millisecond range within a single ultrafast acquisition was demonstrated for 3D Shear-Wave Imaging, 3D Ultrafast Doppler Imaging, and, finally, 3D Ultrafast combined Tissue and Flow Doppler Imaging. The propagation of shear waves was tracked in a phantom and used to characterize its stiffness. 3D Ultrafast Doppler was used to obtain 3D maps of Pulsed Doppler, Color Doppler, and Power Doppler quantities in a single acquisition and revealed, at thousands of volumes per second, the complex 3D flow patterns occurring in the ventricles of the human heart during an entire cardiac cycle, as well as the 3D in vivo interaction of blood flow and wall motion during the pulse wave in the carotid at the bifurcation. This study demonstrates the potential of 3D Ultrafast Ultrasound Imaging for the 3D mapping of stiffness, tissue motion, and flow in humans in vivo and promises new clinical applications of ultrasound with reduced intra—and inter-observer variability.

  11. 3D ultrafast ultrasound imaging in vivo.

    PubMed

    Provost, Jean; Papadacci, Clement; Arango, Juan Esteban; Imbault, Marion; Fink, Mathias; Gennisson, Jean-Luc; Tanter, Mickael; Pernot, Mathieu

    2014-10-01

    Very high frame rate ultrasound imaging has recently allowed for the extension of the applications of echography to new fields of study such as the functional imaging of the brain, cardiac electrophysiology, and the quantitative imaging of the intrinsic mechanical properties of tumors, to name a few, non-invasively and in real time. In this study, we present the first implementation of Ultrafast Ultrasound Imaging in 3D based on the use of either diverging or plane waves emanating from a sparse virtual array located behind the probe. It achieves high contrast and resolution while maintaining imaging rates of thousands of volumes per second. A customized portable ultrasound system was developed to sample 1024 independent channels and to drive a 32  ×  32 matrix-array probe. Its ability to track in 3D transient phenomena occurring in the millisecond range within a single ultrafast acquisition was demonstrated for 3D Shear-Wave Imaging, 3D Ultrafast Doppler Imaging, and, finally, 3D Ultrafast combined Tissue and Flow Doppler Imaging. The propagation of shear waves was tracked in a phantom and used to characterize its stiffness. 3D Ultrafast Doppler was used to obtain 3D maps of Pulsed Doppler, Color Doppler, and Power Doppler quantities in a single acquisition and revealed, at thousands of volumes per second, the complex 3D flow patterns occurring in the ventricles of the human heart during an entire cardiac cycle, as well as the 3D in vivo interaction of blood flow and wall motion during the pulse wave in the carotid at the bifurcation. This study demonstrates the potential of 3D Ultrafast Ultrasound Imaging for the 3D mapping of stiffness, tissue motion, and flow in humans in vivo and promises new clinical applications of ultrasound with reduced intra--and inter-observer variability. PMID:25207828

  12. Track and trap in 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glückstad, Jesper; Rodrigo, Peter J.; Nielsen, Ivan P.; Alonzo, Carlo A.

    2007-04-01

    Three-dimensional light structures can be created by modulating the spatial phase and polarization properties of an an expanded laser beam. A particularly promising technique is the Generalized Phase Contrast (GPC) method invented and patented at Risø National Laboratory. Based on the combination of programmable spatial light modulator devices and an advanced graphical user-interface the GPC method enables real-time, interactive and arbitrary control over the dynamics and geometry of synthesized light patterns. Recent experiments have shown that GPC-driven micro-manipulation provides a unique technology platform for fully user-guided assembly of a plurality of particles in a plane, control of particle stacking along the beam axis, manipulation of multiple hollow beads, and the organization of living cells into three-dimensional colloidal structures. Here we present GPC-based optical micromanipulation in a microfluidic system where trapping experiments are computer-automated and thereby capable of running with only limited supervision. The system is able to dynamically detect living yeast cells using a computer-interfaced CCD camera, and respond to this by instantly creating traps at positions of the spotted cells streaming at flow velocities that would be difficult for a human operator to handle.

  13. Search for microscopic black holes in a like-sign dimuon final state using large track multiplicity with the ATLAS detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aad, G.; Abajyan, T.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdel Khalek, S.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Addy, T. N.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Aefsky, S.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Agustoni, M.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmad, A.; Ahmadov, F.; Ahsan, M.; Aielli, G.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimoto, G.; Akimov, A. V.; Alam, M. A.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Alconada Verzini, M. J.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alessandria, F.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexandre, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Aliev, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alio, L.; Alison, J.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allison, L. J.; Allport, P. P.; Allwood-Spiers, S. E.; Almond, J.; Aloisio, A.; Alon, R.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Altheimer, A.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amako, K.; Amaral Coutinho, Y.; Amelung, C.; Ammosov, V. V.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amram, N.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Anduaga, X. S.; Angelidakis, S.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonaki, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aperio Bella, L.; Apolle, R.; Arabidze, G.; Aracena, I.; Arai, Y.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arfaoui, S.; Arguin, J.-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, E.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnal, V.; Arslan, O.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ask, S.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Astbury, A.; Atkinson, M.; Atlay, N. B.; Auerbach, B.; Auge, E.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Avolio, G.; Axen, D.; Azuelos, G.; Azuma, Y.; Baak, M. A.; Bacci, C.; Bach, A. M.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Backus Mayes, J.; Badescu, E.; Bagiacchi, P.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Bailey, D. C.; Bain, T.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Baker, S.; Balek, P.; Balli, F.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, Sw.; Banfi, D.; Bangert, A.; Bansal, V.; Bansil, H. S.; Barak, L.; Baranov, S. P.; Barber, T.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Bardin, D. Y.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartsch, V.; Bassalat, A.; Basye, A.; Bates, R. L.; Batkova, L.; Batley, J. R.; Battistin, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beale, S.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, K.; Becker, S.; Beckingham, M.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bedikian, S.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bee, C. P.; Beemster, L. J.; Beermann, T. A.; Begel, M.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, P. J.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellerive, A.; Bellomo, M.; Belloni, A.; Beloborodova, O. L.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez Garcia, J. A.; Benjamin, D. P.; Bensinger, J. R.; Benslama, K.; Bentvelsen, S.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Berglund, E.; Beringer, J.; Bernard, C.; Bernat, P.; Bernhard, R.; Bernius, C.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Berry, T.; Berta, P.; Bertella, C.; Bertolucci, F.; Besana, M. I.; Besjes, G. J.; Bessidskaia, O.; Besson, N.; Bethke, S.; Bhimji, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianchini, L.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Bieniek, S. P.; Bierwagen, K.; Biesiada, J.; Biglietti, M.; Bilbao De Mendizabal, J.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Bittner, B.; Black, C. W.; Black, J. E.; Black, K. M.; Blackburn, D.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J.-B.; Blazek, T.; Bloch, I.; Blocker, C.; Blocki, J.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. S.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Boddy, C. R.; Boehler, M.; Boek, J.; Boek, T. T.; Boelaert, N.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogdanchikov, A. G.; Bogouch, A.; Bohm, C.; Bohm, J.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Boldyrev, A. S.; Bolnet, N. M.; Bomben, M.; Bona, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Bordoni, S.; Borer, C.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Borri, M.; Borroni, S.; Bortfeldt, J.; Bortolotto, V.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Boterenbrood, H.; Bouchami, J.; Boudreau, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boumediene, D.; Bourdarios, C.; Bousson, N.; Boutouil, S.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Branchini, P.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Braun, H. M.; Brazzale, S. F.; Brelier, B.; Brendlinger, K.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Bristow, T. M.; Britton, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Broggi, F.; Bromberg, C.; Bronner, J.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, T.; Brooks, W. K.; Brost, E.; Brown, G.; Brown, J.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Brunet, S.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruschi, M.; Bryngemark, L.; Buanes, T.; Buat, Q.; Bucci, F.; Buchanan, J.; Buchholz, P.; Buckingham, R. M.; Buckley, A. G.; Buda, S. I.; Budagov, I. A.; Budick, B.; Buehrer, F.; Bugge, L.; Bulekov, O.; Bundock, A. C.; Bunse, M.; Burckhart, H.; Burdin, S.; Burgess, T.; Burke, S.; Burmeister, I.; Busato, E.; Büscher, V.; Bussey, P.; Buszello, C. P.; Butler, B.; Butler, J. M.; Butt, A. I.; Buttar, C. M.; Butterworth, J. M.; Buttinger, W.; Buzatu, A.; Byszewski, M.; Cabrera Urbán, S.; Caforio, D.; Cakir, O.; Calafiura, P.; Calderini, G.; Calfayan, P.; Calkins, R.; Caloba, L. P.; Caloi, R.; Calvet, D.; Calvet, S.; Camacho Toro, R.; Camarri, P.; Cameron, D.; Caminada, L. M.; Caminal Armadans, R.; Campana, S.; Campanelli, M.; Canale, V.; Canelli, F.; Canepa, A.; Cantero, J.; Cantrill, R.; Cao, T.; Capeans Garrido, M. D. M.; Caprini, I.; Caprini, M.; Capua, M.; Caputo, R.; Cardarelli, R.; Carli, T.; Carlino, G.; Carminati, L.; Caron, S.; Carquin, E.; Carrillo-Montoya, G. D.; Carter, A. A.; Carter, J. R.; Carvalho, J.; Casadei, D.; Casado, M. P.; Caso, C.; Castaneda-Miranda, E.; Castelli, A.; Castillo Gimenez, V.; Castro, N. F.; Cataldi, G.; Catastini, P.; Catinaccio, A.; Catmore, J. R.; Cattai, A.; Cattani, G.; Caughron, S.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli, D.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cavasinni, V.; Ceradini, F.; Cerio, B.; Cerqueira, A. S.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Cerutti, F.; Cervelli, A.; Cetin, S. A.; Chafaq, A.; Chakraborty, D.; Chalupkova, I.; Chan, K.; Chang, P.; Chapleau, B.; Chapman, J. D.; Chapman, J. W.; Charlton, D. G.; Chavda, V.; Chavez Barajas, C. A.; Cheatham, S.; Chekanov, S.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Chelkov, G. A.; Chelstowska, M. A.; Chen, C.; Chen, H.; Chen, K.; Chen, S.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, Y.; Cheplakov, A.; Cherkaoui El Moursli, R.; Chernyatin, V.; Cheu, E.; Chevalier, L.; Chiarella, V.; Chiefari, G.; Childers, J. T.; Chilingarov, A.; Chiodini, G.; Chisholm, A. S.; Chislett, R. T.; Chitan, A.; Chizhov, M. V.; Choudalakis, G.; Chouridou, S.; Chow, B. K. B.; Christidi, I. A.; Christov, A.; Chromek-Burckhart, D.; Chu, M. L.; Chudoba, J.; Ciapetti, G.; Ciftci, A. K.; Ciftci, R.; Cinca, D.; Cindro, V.; Ciocio, A.; Cirilli, M.; Cirkovic, P.; Citron, Z. H.; Citterio, M.; Ciubancan, M.; Clark, A.; Clark, P. J.; Clarke, R. N.; Clemens, J. C.; Clement, B.; Clement, C.; Coadou, Y.; Cobal, M.; Coccaro, A.; Cochran, J.; Coelli, S.; Coffey, L.; Cogan, J. G.; Coggeshall, J.; Colas, J.; Cole, B.; Cole, S.; Colijn, A. P.; Collins-Tooth, C.; Collot, J.; Colombo, T.; Colon, G.; Compostella, G.; Conde Muiño, P.; Coniavitis, E.; Conidi, M. C.; Consonni, S. M.; Consorti, V.; Constantinescu, S.; Conta, C.; Conti, G.; Conventi, F.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, B. D.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Cooper-Smith, N. J.; Copic, K.; Cornelissen, T.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Corso-Radu, A.; Cortes-Gonzalez, A.; Cortiana, G.; Costa, G.; Costa, M. J.; Costanzo, D.; Côté, D.; Cottin, G.; Courneyea, L.; Cowan, G.; Cox, B. E.; Cranmer, K.; Cree, G.; Crépé-Renaudin, S.; Crescioli, F.; Cristinziani, M.; Crosetti, G.; Cuciuc, C.-M.; Cuenca Almenar, C.; Cuhadar Donszelmann, T.; Cummings, J.; Curatolo, M.; Cuthbert, C.; Czirr, H.; Czodrowski, P.; Czyczula, Z.; D'Auria, S.; D'Onofrio, M.; D'Orazio, A.; Da Cunha Sargedas De Sousa, M. J.; Da Via, C.; Dabrowski, W.; Dafinca, A.; Dai, T.; Dallaire, F.; Dallapiccola, C.; Dam, M.; Damiani, D. S.; Daniells, A. C.; Dao, V.; Darbo, G.; Darlea, G. L.; Darmora, S.; Dassoulas, J. A.; Davey, W.; David, C.; Davidek, T.; Davies, E.; Davies, M.; Davignon, O.; Davison, A. R.; Davygora, Y.; Dawe, E.; Dawson, I.; Daya-Ishmukhametova, R. K.; De, K.; de Asmundis, R.; De Castro, S.; De Cecco, S.; de Graat, J.; De Groot, N.; de Jong, P.; De La Taille, C.; De la Torre, H.; De Lorenzi, F.; De Nooij, L.; De Pedis, D.; De Salvo, A.; De Sanctis, U.; De Santo, A.; De Vivie De Regie, J. B.; De Zorzi, G.; Dearnaley, W. J.; Debbe, R.; Debenedetti, C.; Dechenaux, B.; Dedovich, D. V.; Degenhardt, J.; Del Peso, J.; Del Prete, T.; Delemontex, T.; Deliot, F.; Deliyergiyev, M.; Dell'Acqua, A.; Dell'Asta, L.; Della Pietra, M.; della Volpe, D.; Delmastro, M.; Delsart, P. A.; Deluca, C.; Demers, S.; Demichev, M.; Demilly, A.; Demirkoz, B.; Denisov, S. P.; Derendarz, D.; Derkaoui, J. E.; Derue, F.; Dervan, P.; Desch, K.; Deviveiros, P. O.; Dewhurst, A.; DeWilde, B.; Dhaliwal, S.; Dhullipudi, R.; Di Ciaccio, A.; Di Ciaccio, L.; Di Donato, C.; Di Girolamo, A.; Di Girolamo, B.; Di Mattia, A.; Di Micco, B.; Di Nardo, R.; Di Simone, A.; Di Sipio, R.; Di Valentino, D.; Diaz, M. A.; Diehl, E. B.; Dietrich, J.; Dietzsch, T. A.; Diglio, S.; Dindar Yagci, K.; Dingfelder, J.; Dionisi, C.; Dita, P.; Dita, S.; Dittus, F.; Djama, F.; Djobava, T.; do Vale, M. A. B.; Do Valle Wemans, A.; Doan, T. K. O.; Dobos, D.; Dobson, E.; Dodd, J.; Doglioni, C.; Doherty, T.; Dohmae, T.; Doi, Y.; Dolejsi, J.; Dolezal, Z.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Donadelli, M.; Donati, S.; Donini, J.; Dopke, J.; Doria, A.; Dos Anjos, A.; Dotti, A.; Dova, M. T.; Doyle, A. T.; Dris, M.; Dubbert, J.; Dube, S.; Dubreuil, E.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Duda, D.; Dudarev, A.; Dudziak, F.; Duflot, L.; Duguid, L.; Dührssen, M.; Dunford, M.; Duran Yildiz, H.; Düren, M.; Dwuznik, M.; Ebke, J.; Edson, W.; Edwards, C. A.; Edwards, N. C.; Ehrenfeld, W.; Eifert, T.; Eigen, G.; Einsweiler, K.; Eisenhandler, E.; Ekelof, T.; El Kacimi, M.; Ellert, M.; Elles, S.; Ellinghaus, F.; Ellis, K.; Ellis, N.; Elmsheuser, J.; Elsing, M.; Emeliyanov, D.; Enari, Y.; Endner, O. C.; Engelmann, R.; Engl, A.; Erdmann, J.; Ereditato, A.; Eriksson, D.; Ernis, G.; Ernst, J.; Ernst, M.; Ernwein, J.; Errede, D.; Errede, S.; Ertel, E.; Escalier, M.; Esch, H.; Escobar, C.; Espinal Curull, X.; Esposito, B.; Etienne, F.; Etienvre, A. I.; Etzion, E.; Evangelakou, D.; Evans, H.; Fabbri, L.; Facini, G.; Fakhrutdinov, R. M.; Falciano, S.; Fang, Y.; Fanti, M.; Farbin, A.; Farilla, A.; Farooque, T.; Farrell, S.; Farrington, S. M.; Farthouat, P.; Fassi, F.; Fassnacht, P.; Fassouliotis, D.; Fatholahzadeh, B.; Favareto, A.; Fayard, L.; Federic, P.; Fedin, O. L.; Fedorko, W.; Fehling-Kaschek, M.; Feligioni, L.; Feng, C.; Feng, E. J.; Feng, H.; Fenyuk, A. B.; Ferencei, J.; Fernando, W.; Ferrag, S.; Ferrando, J.; Ferrara, V.; Ferrari, A.; Ferrari, P.; Ferrari, R.; Ferreira de Lima, D. E.; Ferrer, A.; Ferrere, D.; Ferretti, C.; Ferretto Parodi, A.; Fiascaris, M.; Fiedler, F.; Filipčič, A.; Filipuzzi, M.; Filthaut, F.; Fincke-Keeler, M.; Finelli, K. D.; Fiolhais, M. C. N.; Fiorini, L.; Firan, A.; Fischer, J.; Fisher, M. J.; Fitzgerald, E. A.; Flechl, M.; Fleck, I.; Fleischmann, P.; Fleischmann, S.; Fletcher, G. T.; Fletcher, G.; Flick, T.; Floderus, A.; Flores Castillo, L. R.; Florez Bustos, A. C.; Flowerdew, M. J.; Fonseca Martin, T.; Formica, A.; Forti, A.; Fortin, D.; Fournier, D.; Fox, H.; Francavilla, P.; Franchini, M.; Franchino, S.; Francis, D.; Franklin, M.; Franz, S.; Fraternali, M.; Fratina, S.; French, S. T.; Friedrich, C.; Friedrich, F.; Froidevaux, D.; Frost, J. A.; Fukunaga, C.; Fullana Torregrosa, E.; Fulsom, B. G.; Fuster, J.; Gabaldon, C.; Gabizon, O.; Gabrielli, A.; Gabrielli, A.; Gadatsch, S.; Gadfort, T.; Gadomski, S.; Gagliardi, G.; Gagnon, P.; Galea, C.; Galhardo, B.; Gallas, E. J.; Gallo, V.; Gallop, B. J.; Gallus, P.; Galster, G.; Gan, K. K.; Gandrajula, R. P.; Gao, J.; Gao, Y. S.; Garay Walls, F. M.; Garberson, F.; García, C.; García Navarro, J. E.; Garcia-Sciveres, M.; Gardner, R. W.; Garelli, N.; Garonne, V.; Gatti, C.; Gaudio, G.; Gaur, B.; Gauthier, L.; Gauzzi, P.; Gavrilenko, I. L.; Gay, C.; Gaycken, G.; Gazis, E. N.; Ge, P.; Gecse, Z.; Gee, C. N. P.; Geerts, D. A. A.; Geich-Gimbel, Ch.; Gellerstedt, K.; Gemme, C.; Gemmell, A.; Genest, M. H.; Gentile, S.; George, M.; George, S.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gershon, A.; Ghazlane, H.; Ghodbane, N.; Giacobbe, B.; Giagu, S.; Giangiobbe, V.; Giannetti, P.; Gianotti, F.; Gibbard, B.; Gibson, S. M.; Gilchriese, M.; Gillam, T. P. S.; Gillberg, D.; Gillman, A. R.; Gingrich, D. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giordani, M. P.; Giordano, R.; Giorgi, F. M.; Giovannini, P.; Giraud, P. F.; Giugni, D.; Giuliani, C.; Giunta, M.; Gjelsten, B. K.; Gkialas, I.; Gladilin, L. K.; Glasman, C.; Glatzer, J.; Glazov, A.; Glonti, G. L.; Goblirsch-Kolb, M.; Goddard, J. R.; Godfrey, J.; Godlewski, J.; Goeringer, C.; Goldfarb, S.; Golling, T.; Golubkov, D.; Gomes, A.; Gomez Fajardo, L. S.; Gonçalo, R.; Goncalves Pinto Firmino Da Costa, J.; Gonella, L.; González de la Hoz, S.; Gonzalez Parra, G.; Gonzalez Silva, M. L.; Gonzalez-Sevilla, S.; Goodson, J. J.; Goossens, L.; Gorbounov, P. A.; Gordon, H. A.; Gorelov, I.; Gorfine, G.; Gorini, B.; Gorini, E.; Gorišek, A.; Gornicki, E.; Goshaw, A. T.; Gössling, C.; Gostkin, M. I.; Gough Eschrich, I.; Gouighri, M.; Goujdami, D.; Goulette, M. P.; Goussiou, A. G.; Goy, C.; Gozpinar, S.; Grabas, H. M. X.; Graber, L.; Grabowska-Bold, I.; Grafström, P.; Grahn, K.-J.; Gramling, J.; Gramstad, E.; Grancagnolo, F.; Grancagnolo, S.; Grassi, V.; Gratchev, V.; Gray, H. M.; Gray, J. A.; Graziani, E.; Grebenyuk, O. G.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Gregersen, K.; Gregor, I. M.; Grenier, P.; Griffiths, J.; Grigalashvili, N.; Grillo, A. A.; Grimm, K.; Grinstein, S.; Gris, Ph.; Grishkevich, Y. V.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Grohs, J. P.; Grohsjean, A.; Gross, E.; Grosse-Knetter, J.; Groth-Jensen, J.; Grout, Z. J.; Grybel, K.; Guescini, F.; Guest, D.; Gueta, O.; Guicheney, C.; Guido, E.; Guillemin, T.; Guindon, S.; Gul, U.; Gumpert, C.; Gunther, J.; Guo, J.; Gupta, S.; Gutierrez, P.; Gutierrez Ortiz, N. G.; Gutschow, C.; Guttman, N.; Gutzwiller, O.; Guyot, C.; Gwenlan, C.; Gwilliam, C. B.; Haas, A.; Haber, C.; Hadavand, H. K.; Haefner, P.; Hageboeck, S.; Hajduk, Z.; Hakobyan, H.; Hall, D.; Halladjian, G.; Hamacher, K.; Hamal, P.; Hamano, K.; Hamer, M.; Hamilton, A.; Hamilton, S.; Han, L.; Hanagaki, K.; Hanawa, K.; Hance, M.; Handel, C.; Hanke, P.; Hansen, J. R.; Hansen, J. B.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, P. H.; Hansson, P.; Hara, K.; Hard, A. S.; Harenberg, T.; Harkusha, S.; Harper, D.; Harrington, R. D.; Harris, O. M.; Harrison, P. F.; Hartjes, F.; Harvey, A.; Hasegawa, S.; Hasegawa, Y.; Hassani, S.; Haug, S.; Hauschild, M.; Hauser, R.; Havranek, M.; Hawkes, C. M.; Hawkings, R. J.; Hawkins, A. D.; Hayashi, T.; Hayden, D.; Hays, C. P.; Hayward, H. S.; Haywood, S. J.; Head, S. J.; Heck, T.; Hedberg, V.; Heelan, L.; Heim, S.; Heimel, B.; Heinemann, B.; Heisterkamp, S.; Hejbal, J.; Helary, L.; Heller, C.; Heller, M.; Heller, R. E.; Hellman, S.; Hellmich, D.; Helsens, C.; Henderson, J.; Henderson, R. C. W.; Henrichs, A.; Henriques Correia, A. M.; Henrot-Versille, S.; Hensel, C.; Herbert, G. H.; Hernandez, C. M.; Hernández Jiménez, Y.; Herrberg-Schubert, R.; Herten, G.; Hertenberger, R.; Hervas, L.; Hesketh, G. G.; Hessey, N. P.; Hickling, R.; Higón-Rodriguez, E.; Hill, J. C.; Hiller, K. H.; Hillert, S.; Hillier, S. J.; Hinchliffe, I.; Hines, E.; Hirose, M.; Hirschbuehl, D.; Hobbs, J.; Hod, N.; Hodgkinson, M. C.; Hodgson, P.; Hoecker, A.; Hoeferkamp, M. R.; Hoffman, J.; Hoffmann, D.; Hofmann, J. I.; Hohlfeld, M.; Holmgren, S. O.; Hong, T. M.; Hooft van Huysduynen, L.; Hostachy, J.-Y.; Hou, S.; Hoummada, A.; Howard, J.; Howarth, J.; Hrabovsky, M.; Hristova, I.; Hrivnac, J.; Hryn'ova, T.; Hsu, P. J.; Hsu, S.-C.; Hu, D.; Hu, X.; Huang, Y.; Hubacek, Z.; Hubaut, F.; Huegging, F.; Huettmann, A.; Huffman, T. B.; Hughes, E. W.; Hughes, G.; Huhtinen, M.; Hülsing, T. A.; Hurwitz, M.; Huseynov, N.; Huston, J.; Huth, J.; Iacobucci, G.; Iakovidis, G.; Ibragimov, I.; Iconomidou-Fayard, L.; Idarraga, J.; Iengo, P.; Igonkina, O.; Iizawa, T.; Ikegami, Y.; Ikematsu, K.; Ikeno, M.; Iliadis, D.; Ilic, N.; Inamaru, Y.; Ince, T.; Ioannou, P.; Iodice, M.; Iordanidou, K.; Ippolito, V.; Irles Quiles, A.; Isaksson, C.; Ishino, M.; Ishitsuka, M.; Ishmukhametov, R.; Issever, C.; Istin, S.; Ivashin, A. V.; Iwanski, W.; Iwasaki, H.; Izen, J. M.; Izzo, V.; Jackson, B.; Jackson, J. N.; Jackson, M.; Jackson, P.; Jaekel, M. R.; Jain, V.; Jakobs, K.; Jakobsen, S.; Jakoubek, T.; Jakubek, J.; Jamin, D. O.; Jana, D. K.; Jansen, E.; Jansen, H.; Janssen, J.; Janus, M.; Jared, R. C.; Jarlskog, G.; Jeanty, L.; Jeng, G.-Y.; Jen-La Plante, I.; Jennens, D.; Jenni, P.; Jentzsch, J.; Jeske, C.; Jézéquel, S.; Jha, M. K.; Ji, H.; Ji, W.; Jia, J.; Jiang, Y.; Jimenez Belenguer, M.; Jin, S.; Jinnouchi, O.; Joergensen, M. D.; Joffe, D.; Johansson, K. E.; Johansson, P.; Johns, K. A.; Jon-And, K.; Jones, G.; Jones, R. W. L.; Jones, T. J.; Jorge, P. M.; Joshi, K. D.; Jovicevic, J.; Ju, X.; Jung, C. A.; Jungst, R. M.; Jussel, P.; Juste Rozas, A.; Kaci, M.; Kaczmarska, A.; Kadlecik, P.; Kado, M.; Kagan, H.; Kagan, M.; Kajomovitz, E.; Kalinin, S.; Kama, S.; Kanaya, N.; Kaneda, M.; Kaneti, S.; Kanno, T.; Kantserov, V. A.; Kanzaki, J.; Kaplan, B.; Kapliy, A.; Kar, D.; Karakostas, K.; Karastathis, N.; Karnevskiy, M.; Karpov, S. N.; Karthik, K.; Kartvelishvili, V.; Karyukhin, A. N.; Kashif, L.; Kasieczka, G.; Kass, R. D.; Kastanas, A.; Kataoka, Y.; Katre, A.; Katzy, J.; Kaushik, V.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Kawamura, G.; Kazama, S.; Kazanin, V. F.; Kazarinov, M. Y.; Keeler, R.; Keener, P. T.; Kehoe, R.; Keil, M.; Keller, J. S.; Keoshkerian, H.; Kepka, O.; Kerševan, B. P.; Kersten, S.; Kessoku, K.; Keung, J.; Khalil-zada, F.; Khandanyan, H.; Khanov, A.; Kharchenko, D.; Khodinov, A.; Khomich, A.; Khoo, T. J.; Khoriauli, G.; Khoroshilov, A.; Khovanskiy, V.; Khramov, E.; Khubua, J.; Kim, D. W.; Kim, H.; Kim, S. H.; Kimura, N.; Kind, O.; King, B. T.; King, M.; King, R. S. B.; King, S. B.; Kirk, J.; Kiryunin, A. E.; Kishimoto, T.; Kisielewska, D.; Kitamura, T.; Kittelmann, T.; Kiuchi, K.; Kladiva, E.; Klein, M.; Klein, U.; Kleinknecht, K.; Klimek, P.; Klimentov, A.; Klingenberg, R.; Klinger, J. A.; Klinkby, E. B.; Klioutchnikova, T.; Klok, P. F.; Kluge, E.-E.; Kluit, P.; Kluth, S.; Kneringer, E.; Knoops, E. B. F. G.; Knue, A.; Ko, B. R.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Kocian, M.; Kodys, P.; Koenig, S.; Koevesarki, P.; Koffas, T.; Koffeman, E.; Kogan, L. A.; Kohlmann, S.; Kohn, F.; Kohout, Z.; Kohriki, T.; Koi, T.; Kolanoski, H.; Koletsou, I.; Koll, J.; Komar, A. A.; Komori, Y.; Kondo, T.; Köneke, K.; König, A. C.; Kono, T.; Konoplich, R.; Konstantinidis, N.; Kopeliansky, R.; Koperny, S.; Köpke, L.; Kopp, A. K.; Korcyl, K.; Kordas, K.; Korn, A.; Korol, A. A.; Korolkov, I.; Korolkova, E. V.; Korotkov, V. A.; Kortner, O.; Kortner, S.; Kostyukhin, V. V.; Kotov, S.; Kotov, V. M.; Kotwal, A.; Kourkoumelis, C.; Kouskoura, V.; Koutsman, A.; Kowalewski, R.; Kowalski, T. Z.; Kozanecki, W.; Kozhin, A. S.; Kral, V.; Kramarenko, V. A.; Kramberger, G.; Krasny, M. W.; Krasznahorkay, A.; Kraus, J. K.; Kravchenko, A.; Kreiss, S.; Kretzschmar, J.; Kreutzfeldt, K.; Krieger, N.; Krieger, P.; Kroeninger, K.; Kroha, H.; Kroll, J.; Kroseberg, J.; Krstic, J.; Kruchonak, U.; Krüger, H.; Kruker, T.; Krumnack, N.; Krumshteyn, Z. V.; Kruse, A.; Kruse, M. C.; Kruskal, M.; Kubota, T.; Kuday, S.; Kuehn, S.; Kugel, A.; Kuhl, T.; Kukhtin, V.; Kulchitsky, Y.; Kuleshov, S.; Kuna, M.; Kunkle, J.; Kupco, A.; Kurashige, H.; Kurata, M.; Kurochkin, Y. A.; Kurumida, R.; Kus, V.; Kuwertz, E. S.; Kuze, M.; Kvita, J.; Kwee, R.; La Rosa, A.; La Rotonda, L.; Labarga, L.; Lablak, S.; Lacasta, C.; Lacava, F.; Lacey, J.; Lacker, H.; Lacour, D.; Lacuesta, V. R.; Ladygin, E.; Lafaye, R.; Laforge, B.; Lagouri, T.; Lai, S.; Laier, H.; Laisne, E.; Lambourne, L.; Lampen, C. L.; Lampl, W.; Lançon, E.; Landgraf, U.; Landon, M. P. J.; Lang, V. S.; Lange, C.; Lankford, A. J.; Lanni, F.; Lantzsch, K.; Lanza, A.; Laplace, S.; Lapoire, C.; Laporte, J. F.; Lari, T.; Larner, A.; Lassnig, M.; Laurelli, P.; Lavorini, V.; Lavrijsen, W.; Laycock, P.; Le, B. T.; Le Dortz, O.; Le Guirriec, E.; Le Menedeu, E.; LeCompte, T.; Ledroit-Guillon, F.; Lee, C. A.; Lee, H.; Lee, J. S. H.; Lee, S. C.; Lee, L.; Lefebvre, G.; Lefebvre, M.; Legendre, M.; Legger, F.; Leggett, C.; Lehan, A.; Lehmacher, M.; Lehmann Miotto, G.; Leister, A. G.; Leite, M. A. L.; Leitner, R.; Lellouch, D.; Lemmer, B.; Lendermann, V.; Leney, K. J. C.; Lenz, T.; Lenzen, G.; Lenzi, B.; Leone, R.; Leonhardt, K.; Leontsinis, S.; Leroy, C.; Lessard, J.-R.; Lester, C. G.; Lester, C. M.; Levêque, J.; Levin, D.; Levinson, L. J.; Lewis, A.; Lewis, G. H.; Leyko, A. M.; Leyton, M.; Li, B.; Li, B.; Li, H.; Li, H. L.; Li, S.; Li, X.; Liang, Z.; Liao, H.; Liberti, B.; Lichard, P.; Lie, K.; Liebal, J.; Liebig, W.; Limbach, C.; Limosani, A.; Limper, M.; Lin, S. C.; Linde, F.; Lindquist, B. E.; Linnemann, J. T.; Lipeles, E.; Lipniacka, A.; Lisovyi, M.; Liss, T. M.; Lissauer, D.; Lister, A.; Litke, A. M.; Liu, B.; Liu, D.; Liu, J. B.; Liu, K.; Liu, L.; Liu, M.; Liu, M.; Liu, Y.; Livan, M.; Livermore, S. S. A.; Lleres, A.; Llorente Merino, J.; Lloyd, S. L.; Lo Sterzo, F.; Lobodzinska, E.; Loch, P.; Lockman, W. S.; Loddenkoetter, T.; Loebinger, F. K.; Loevschall-Jensen, A. E.; Loginov, A.; Loh, C. W.; Lohse, T.; Lohwasser, K.; Lokajicek, M.; Lombardo, V. P.; Long, R. E.; Lopes, L.; Lopez Mateos, D.; Lopez Paredes, B.; Lorenz, J.; Lorenzo Martinez, N.; Losada, M.; Loscutoff, P.; Losty, M. J.; Lou, X.; Lounis, A.; Love, J.; Love, P. A.; Lowe, A. J.; Lu, F.; Lubatti, H. J.; Luci, C.; Lucotte, A.; Ludwig, D.; Ludwig, I.; Ludwig, J.; Luehring, F.; Lukas, W.; Luminari, L.; Lund, E.; Lundberg, J.; Lundberg, O.; Lund-Jensen, B.; Lungwitz, M.; Lynn, D.; Lysak, R.; Lytken, E.; Ma, H.; Ma, L. L.; Maccarrone, G.; Macchiolo, A.; Maček, B.; Machado Miguens, J.; Macina, D.; Mackeprang, R.; Madar, R.; Madaras, R. J.; Maddocks, H. J.; Mader, W. F.; Madsen, A.; Maeno, M.; Maeno, T.; Magnoni, L.; Magradze, E.; Mahboubi, K.; Mahlstedt, J.; Mahmoud, S.; Mahout, G.; Maiani, C.; Maidantchik, C.; Maio, A.; Majewski, S.; Makida, Y.; Makovec, N.; Mal, P.; Malaescu, B.; Malecki, Pa.; Maleev, V. P.; Malek, F.; Mallik, U.; Malon, D.; Malone, C.; Maltezos, S.; Malyshev, V. M.; Malyukov, S.; Mamuzic, J.; Mandelli, L.; Mandić, I.; Mandrysch, R.; Maneira, J.; Manfredini, A.; Manhaes de Andrade Filho, L.; Manjarres Ramos, J. A.; Mann, A.; Manning, P. M.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Mansoulie, B.; Mantifel, R.; Mapelli, L.; March, L.; Marchand, J. F.; Marchese, F.; Marchiori, G.; Marcisovsky, M.; Marino, C. P.; Marques, C. N.; Marroquim, F.; Marshall, Z.; Marti, L. F.; Marti-Garcia, S.; Martin, B.; Martin, B.; Martin, J. P.; Martin, T. A.; Martin, V. J.; Martin dit Latour, B.; Martinez, H.; Martinez, M.; Martin-Haugh, S.; Martyniuk, A. C.; Marx, M.; Marzano, F.; Marzin, A.; Masetti, L.; Mashimo, T.; Mashinistov, R.; Masik, J.; Maslennikov, A. L.; Massa, I.; Massol, N.; Mastrandrea, P.; Mastroberardino, A.; Masubuchi, T.; Matsunaga, H.; Matsushita, T.; Mättig, P.; Mättig, S.; Mattmann, J.; Mattravers, C.; Maurer, J.; Maxfield, S. J.; Maximov, D. A.; Mazini, R.; Mazzaferro, L.; Mazzanti, M.; Mc Goldrick, G.; Mc Kee, S. P.; McCarn, A.; McCarthy, R. L.; McCarthy, T. G.; McCubbin, N. A.; McFarlane, K. W.; Mcfayden, J. A.; Mchedlidze, G.; Mclaughlan, T.; McMahon, S. J.; McPherson, R. A.; Meade, A.; Mechnich, J.; Mechtel, M.; Medinnis, M.; Meehan, S.; Meera-Lebbai, R.; Mehlhase, S.; Mehta, A.; Meier, K.; Meineck, C.; Meirose, B.; Melachrinos, C.; Mellado Garcia, B. R.; Meloni, F.; Mendoza Navas, L.; Mengarelli, A.; Menke, S.; Meoni, E.; Mercurio, K. M.; Mergelmeyer, S.; Meric, N.; Mermod, P.; Merola, L.; Meroni, C.; Merritt, F. S.; Merritt, H.; Messina, A.; Metcalfe, J.; Mete, A. S.; Meyer, C.; Meyer, C.; Meyer, J.-P.; Meyer, J.; Meyer, J.; Michal, S.; Middleton, R. P.; Migas, S.; Mijović, L.; Mikenberg, G.; Mikestikova, M.; Mikuž, M.; Miller, D. W.; Mills, W. J.; Mills, C.; Milov, A.; Milstead, D. A.; Milstein, D.; Minaenko, A. A.; Miñano Moya, M.; Minashvili, I. A.; Mincer, A. I.; Mindur, B.; Mineev, M.; Ming, Y.; Mir, L. M.; Mirabelli, G.; Mitani, T.; Mitrevski, J.; Mitsou, V. A.; Mitsui, S.; Miyagawa, P. S.; Mjörnmark, J. U.; Moa, T.; Moeller, V.; Mohapatra, S.; Mohr, W.; Molander, S.; Moles-Valls, R.; Molfetas, A.; Mönig, K.; Monini, C.; Monk, J.; Monnier, E.; Montejo Berlingen, J.; Monticelli, F.; Monzani, S.; Moore, R. W.; Mora Herrera, C.; Moraes, A.; Morange, N.; Morel, J.; Moreno, D.; Moreno Llácer, M.; Morettini, P.; Morgenstern, M.; Morii, M.; Moritz, S.; Morley, A. K.; Mornacchi, G.; Morris, J. D.; Morvaj, L.; Moser, H. G.; Mosidze, M.; Moss, J.; Mount, R.; Mountricha, E.; Mouraviev, S. V.; Moyse, E. J. W.; Mudd, R. D.; Mueller, F.; Mueller, J.; Mueller, K.; Mueller, T.; Mueller, T.; Muenstermann, D.; Munwes, Y.; Murillo Quijada, J. A.; Murray, W. J.; Mussche, I.; Musto, E.; Myagkov, A. G.; Myska, M.; Nackenhorst, O.; Nadal, J.; Nagai, K.; Nagai, R.; Nagai, Y.; Nagano, K.; Nagarkar, A.; Nagasaka, Y.; Nagel, M.; Nairz, A. M.; Nakahama, Y.; Nakamura, K.; Nakamura, T.; Nakano, I.; Namasivayam, H.; Nanava, G.; Napier, A.; Narayan, R.; Nash, M.; Nattermann, T.; Naumann, T.; Navarro, G.; Neal, H. A.; Nechaeva, P. Yu.; Neep, T. J.; Negri, A.; Negri, G.; Negrini, M.; Nektarijevic, S.; Nelson, A.; Nelson, T. K.; Nemecek, S.; Nemethy, P.; Nepomuceno, A. A.; Nessi, M.; Neubauer, M. S.; Neumann, M.; Neusiedl, A.; Neves, R. M.; Nevski, P.; Newcomer, F. M.; Newman, P. R.; Nguyen, D. H.; Nguyen Thi Hong, V.; Nickerson, R. B.; Nicolaidou, R.; Nicquevert, B.; Nielsen, J.; Nikiforou, N.; Nikiforov, A.; Nikolaenko, V.; Nikolic-Audit, I.; Nikolics, K.; Nikolopoulos, K.; Nilsson, P.; Ninomiya, Y.; Nisati, A.; Nisius, R.; Nobe, T.; Nodulman, L.; Nomachi, M.; Nomidis, I.; Norberg, S.; Nordberg, M.; Novakova, J.; Nozaki, M.; Nozka, L.; Ntekas, K.; Nuncio-Quiroz, A.-E.; Nunes Hanninger, G.; Nunnemann, T.; Nurse, E.; O'Brien, B. J.; O'grady, F.; O'Neil, D. C.; O'Shea, V.; Oakes, L. B.; Oakham, F. G.; Oberlack, H.; Ocariz, J.; Ochi, A.; Ochoa, M. I.; Oda, S.; Odaka, S.; Odier, J.; Ogren, H.; Oh, A.; Oh, S. H.; Ohm, C. C.; Ohshima, T.; Okamura, W.; Okawa, H.; Okumura, Y.; Okuyama, T.; Olariu, A.; Olchevski, A. G.; Olivares Pino, S. A.; Oliveira, M.; Oliveira Damazio, D.; Oliver Garcia, E.; Olivito, D.; Olszewski, A.; Olszowska, J.; Onofre, A.; Onyisi, P. U. E.; Oram, C. J.; Oreglia, M. J.; Oren, Y.; Orestano, D.; Orlando, N.; Oropeza Barrera, C.; Orr, R. S.; Osculati, B.; Ospanov, R.; Otero y Garzon, G.; Otono, H.; Ottersbach, J. P.; Ouchrif, M.; Ouellette, E. A.; Ould-Saada, F.; Ouraou, A.; Oussoren, K. P.; Ouyang, Q.; Ovcharova, A.; Owen, M.; Owen, S.; Ozcan, V. E.; Ozturk, N.; Pachal, K.; Pacheco Pages, A.; Padilla Aranda, C.; Pagan Griso, S.; Paganis, E.; Pahl, C.; Paige, F.; Pais, P.; Pajchel, K.; Palacino, G.; Palestini, S.; Pallin, D.; Palma, A.; Palmer, J. D.; Pan, Y. B.; Panagiotopoulou, E.; Panduro Vazquez, J. G.; Pani, P.; Panikashvili, N.; Panitkin, S.; Pantea, D.; Papadelis, A.; Papadopoulou, Th. D.; Papageorgiou, K.; Paramonov, A.; Paredes Hernandez, D.; Parker, M. A.; Parodi, F.; Parsons, J. A.; Parzefall, U.; Pashapour, S.; Pasqualucci, E.; Passaggio, S.; Passeri, A.; Pastore, F.; Pastore, Fr.; Pásztor, G.; Pataraia, S.; Patel, N. D.; Pater, J. R.; Patricelli, S.; Pauly, T.; Pearce, J.; Pedersen, M.; Pedraza Lopez, S.; Pedraza Morales, M. I.; Peleganchuk, S. V.; Pelikan, D.; Peng, H.; Penning, B.; Penson, A.; Penwell, J.; Perepelitsa, D. V.; Perez Cavalcanti, T.; Perez Codina, E.; Pérez García-Estañ, M. T.; Perez Reale, V.; Perini, L.; Pernegger, H.; Perrino, R.; Peshekhonov, V. D.; Peters, K.; Peters, R. F. Y.; Petersen, B. A.; Petersen, J.; Petersen, T. C.; Petit, E.; Petridis, A.; Petridou, C.; Petrolo, E.; Petrucci, F.; Petteni, M.; Pezoa, R.; Phillips, P. W.; Piacquadio, G.; Pianori, E.; Picazio, A.; Piccaro, E.; Piccinini, M.; Piec, S. M.; Piegaia, R.; Pignotti, D. T.; Pilcher, J. E.; Pilkington, A. D.; Pina, J.; Pinamonti, M.; Pinder, A.; Pinfold, J. L.; Pingel, A.; Pinto, B.; Pizio, C.; Pleier, M.-A.; Pleskot, V.; Plotnikova, E.; Plucinski, P.; Poddar, S.; Podlyski, F.; Poettgen, R.; Poggioli, L.; Pohl, D.; Pohl, M.; Polesello, G.; Policicchio, A.; Polifka, R.; Polini, A.; Pollard, C. S.; Polychronakos, V.; Pomeroy, D.; Pommès, K.; Pontecorvo, L.; Pope, B. G.; Popeneciu, G. A.; Popovic, D. S.; Poppleton, A.; Portell Bueso, X.; Pospelov, G. E.; Pospisil, S.; Potamianos, K.; Potrap, I. N.; Potter, C. J.; Potter, C. T.; Poulard, G.; Poveda, J.; Pozdnyakov, V.; Prabhu, R.; Pralavorio, P.; Pranko, A.; Prasad, S.; Pravahan, R.; Prell, S.; Price, D.; Price, J.; Price, L. E.; Prieur, D.; Primavera, M.; Proissl, M.; Prokofiev, K.; Prokoshin, F.; Protopapadaki, E.; Protopopescu, S.; Proudfoot, J.; Prudent, X.; Przybycien, M.; Przysiezniak, H.; Psoroulas, S.; Ptacek, E.; Pueschel, E.; Puldon, D.; Purohit, M.; Puzo, P.; Pylypchenko, Y.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quarrie, D. R.; Quayle, W. B.; Quilty, D.; Radeka, V.; Radescu, V.; Radloff, P.; Ragusa, F.; Rahal, G.; Rajagopalan, S.; Rammensee, M.; Rammes, M.; Randle-Conde, A. S.; Rangel-Smith, C.; Rao, K.; Rauscher, F.; Rave, T. C.; Ravenscroft, T.; Raymond, M.; Read, A. L.; Rebuzzi, D. M.; Redelbach, A.; Redlinger, G.; Reece, R.; Reeves, K.; Reinsch, A.; Reisinger, I.; Relich, M.; Rembser, C.; Ren, Z. L.; Renaud, A.; Rescigno, M.; Resconi, S.; Resende, B.; Reznicek, P.; Rezvani, R.; Richter, R.; Richter-Was, E.; Ridel, M.; Rieck, P.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Rimoldi, A.; Rinaldi, L.; Rios, R. R.; Ritsch, E.; Riu, I.; Rivoltella, G.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rizvi, E.; Robertson, S. H.; Robichaud-Veronneau, A.; Robinson, D.; Robinson, J. E. M.; Robson, A.; Rocha de Lima, J. G.; Roda, C.; Roda Dos Santos, D.; Rodrigues, L.; Roe, A.; Roe, S.; Røhne, O.; Rolli, S.; Romaniouk, A.; Romano, M.; Romeo, G.; Romero Adam, E.; Rompotis, N.; Roos, L.; Ros, E.; Rosati, S.; Rosbach, K.; Rose, A.; Rose, M.; Rosendahl, P. L.; Rosenthal, O.; Rossetti, V.; Rossi, E.; Rossi, L. P.; Rosten, R.; Rotaru, M.; Roth, I.; Rothberg, J.; Rousseau, D.; Royon, C. R.; Rozanov, A.; Rozen, Y.; Ruan, X.; Rubbo, F.; Rubinskiy, I.; Ruckstuhl, N.; Rud, V. I.; Rudolph, C.; Rudolph, M. S.; Rühr, F.; Ruiz-Martinez, A.; Rumyantsev, L.; Rurikova, Z.; Rusakovich, N. A.; Ruschke, A.; Rutherfoord, J. P.; Ruthmann, N.; Ruzicka, P.; Ryabov, Y. F.; Rybar, M.; Rybkin, G.; Ryder, N. C.; Saavedra, A. F.; Saddique, A.; Sadeh, I.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Sadykov, R.; Safai Tehrani, F.; Sakamoto, H.; Sakurai, Y.; Salamanna, G.; Salamon, A.; Saleem, M.; Salek, D.; Salihagic, D.; Salnikov, A.; Salt, J.; Salvachua Ferrando, B. M.; Salvatore, D.; Salvatore, F.; Salvucci, A.; Salzburger, A.; Sampsonidis, D.; Sanchez, A.; Sánchez, J.; Sanchez Martinez, V.; Sandaker, H.; Sander, H. G.; Sanders, M. P.; Sandhoff, M.; Sandoval, T.; Sandoval, C.; Sandstroem, R.; Sankey, D. P. C.; Sansoni, A.; Santoni, C.; Santonico, R.; Santos, H.; Santoyo Castillo, I.; Sapp, K.; Sapronov, A.; Saraiva, J. G.; Sarkisyan-Grinbaum, E.; Sarrazin, B.; Sarri, F.; Sartisohn, G.; Sasaki, O.; Sasaki, Y.; Sasao, N.; Satsounkevitch, I.; Sauvage, G.; Sauvan, E.; Sauvan, J. B.; Savard, P.; Savinov, V.; Savu, D. O.; Sawyer, C.; Sawyer, L.; Saxon, D. H.; Saxon, J.; Sbarra, C.; Sbrizzi, A.; Scanlon, T.; Scannicchio, D. A.; Scarcella, M.; Schaarschmidt, J.; Schacht, P.; Schaefer, D.; Schaelicke, A.; Schaepe, S.; Schaetzel, S.; Schäfer, U.; Schaffer, A. C.; Schaile, D.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scharf, V.; Schegelsky, V. A.; Scheirich, D.; Schernau, M.; Scherzer, M. I.; Schiavi, C.; Schieck, J.; Schillo, C.; Schioppa, M.; Schlenker, S.; Schmidt, E.; Schmieden, K.; Schmitt, C.; Schmitt, C.; Schmitt, S.; Schneider, B.; Schnellbach, Y. J.; Schnoor, U.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoening, A.; Schorlemmer, A. L. S.; Schott, M.; Schouten, D.; Schovancova, J.; Schram, M.; Schramm, S.; Schreyer, M.; Schroeder, C.; Schroer, N.; Schuh, N.; Schultens, M. J.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-C.; Schulz, H.; Schumacher, M.; Schumm, B. A.; Schune, Ph.; Schwartzman, A.; Schwegler, Ph.; Schwemling, Ph.; Schwienhorst, R.; Schwindling, J.; Schwindt, T.; Schwoerer, M.; Sciacca, F. G.; Scifo, E.; Sciolla, G.; Scott, W. G.; Scutti, F.; Searcy, J.; Sedov, G.; Sedykh, E.; Seidel, S. C.; Seiden, A.; Seifert, F.; Seixas, J. M.; Sekhniaidze, G.; Sekula, S. J.; Selbach, K. E.; Seliverstov, D. M.; Sellers, G.; Seman, M.; Semprini-Cesari, N.; Serfon, C.; Serin, L.; Serkin, L.; Serre, T.; Seuster, R.; Severini, H.; Sforza, F.; Sfyrla, A.; Shabalina, E.; Shamim, M.; Shan, L. Y.; Shank, J. T.; Shao, Q. T.; Shapiro, M.; Shatalov, P. B.; Shaw, K.; Sherwood, P.; Shimizu, S.; Shimojima, M.; Shin, T.; Shiyakova, M.; Shmeleva, A.; Shochet, M. J.; Short, D.; Shrestha, S.; Shulga, E.; Shupe, M. A.; Shushkevich, S.; Sicho, P.; Sidorov, D.; Sidoti, A.; Siegert, F.; Sijacki, Dj.; Silbert, O.; Silva, J.; Silver, Y.; Silverstein, D.; Silverstein, S. B.; Simak, V.; Simard, O.; Simic, Lj.; Simion, S.; Simioni, E.; Simmons, B.; Simoniello, R.; Simonyan, M.; Sinervo, P.; Sinev, N. B.; Sipica, V.; Siragusa, G.; Sircar, A.; Sisakyan, A. N.; Sivoklokov, S. Yu.; Sjölin, J.; Sjursen, T. B.; Skinnari, L. A.; Skottowe, H. P.; Skovpen, K. Yu.; Skubic, P.; Slater, M.; Slavicek, T.; Sliwa, K.; Smakhtin, V.; Smart, B. H.; Smestad, L.; Smirnov, S. Yu.; Smirnov, Y.; Smirnova, L. N.; Smirnova, O.; Smith, K. M.; Smizanska, M.; Smolek, K.; Snesarev, A. A.; Snidero, G.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Sobie, R.; Sodomka, J.; Soffer, A.; Soh, D. A.; Solans, C. A.; Solar, M.; Solc, J.; Soldatov, E. Yu.; Soldevila, U.; Solfaroli Camillocci, E.; Solodkov, A. A.; Solovyanov, O. V.; Solovyev, V.; Soni, N.; Sood, A.; Sopko, V.; Sopko, B.; Sosebee, M.; Soualah, R.; Soueid, P.; Soukharev, A. M.; South, D.; Spagnolo, S.; Spanò, F.; Spearman, W. R.; Spighi, R.; Spigo, G.; Spousta, M.; Spreitzer, T.; Spurlock, B.; St. Denis, R. D.; Stahlman, J.; Stamen, R.; Stanecka, E.; Stanek, R. W.; Stanescu, C.; Stanescu-Bellu, M.; Stanitzki, M. M.; Stapnes, S.; Starchenko, E. A.; Stark, J.; Staroba, P.; Starovoitov, P.; Staszewski, R.; Staude, A.; Stavina, P.; Steele, G.; Steinbach, P.; Steinberg, P.; Stekl, I.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer, H. J.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stenzel, H.; Stern, S.; Stewart, G. A.; Stillings, J. A.; Stockton, M. C.; Stoebe, M.; Stoerig, K.; Stoicea, G.; Stonjek, S.; Stradling, A. R.; Straessner, A.; Strandberg, J.; Strandberg, S.; Strandlie, A.; Strauss, E.; Strauss, M.; Strizenec, P.; Ströhmer, R.; Strom, D. M.; Stroynowski, R.; Stucci, S. A.; Stugu, B.; Stumer, I.; Stupak, J.; Sturm, P.; Styles, N. A.; Su, D.; Subramania, HS.; Subramaniam, R.; Succurro, A.; Sugaya, Y.; Suhr, C.; Suk, M.; Sulin, V. V.; Sultansoy, S.; Sumida, T.; Sun, X.; Sundermann, J. E.; Suruliz, K.; Susinno, G.; Sutton, M. R.; Suzuki, Y.; Svatos, M.; Swedish, S.; Swiatlowski, M.; Sykora, I.; Sykora, T.; Ta, D.; Tackmann, K.; Taenzer, J.; Taffard, A.; Tafirout, R.; Taiblum, N.; Takahashi, Y.; Takai, H.; Takashima, R.; Takeda, H.; Takeshita, T.; Takubo, Y.; Talby, M.; Talyshev, A. A.; Tam, J. Y. C.; Tamsett, M. C.; Tan, K. G.; Tanaka, J.; Tanaka, R.; Tanaka, S.; Tanaka, S.; Tanasijczuk, A. J.; Tani, K.; Tannoury, N.; Tapprogge, S.; Tarem, S.; Tarrade, F.; Tartarelli, G. F.; Tas, P.; Tasevsky, M.; Tashiro, T.; Tassi, E.; Tavares Delgado, A.; Tayalati, Y.; Taylor, C.; Taylor, F. E.; Taylor, G. N.; Taylor, W.; Teischinger, F. A.; Teixeira Dias Castanheira, M.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Temming, K. K.; Ten Kate, H.; Teng, P. K.; Terada, S.; Terashi, K.; Terron, J.; Terzo, S.; Testa, M.; Teuscher, R. J.; Therhaag, J.; Theveneaux-Pelzer, T.; Thoma, S.; Thomas, J. P.; Thompson, E. N.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomsen, L. A.; Thomson, E.; Thomson, M.; Thong, W. M.; Thun, R. P.; Tian, F.; Tibbetts, M. J.; Tic, T.; Tikhomirov, V. O.; Tikhonov, Yu. A.; Timoshenko, S.; Tiouchichine, E.; Tipton, P.; Tisserant, S.; Todorov, T.; Todorova-Nova, S.; Toggerson, B.; Tojo, J.; Tokár, S.; Tokushuku, K.; Tollefson, K.; Tomlinson, L.; Tomoto, M.; Tompkins, L.; Toms, K.; Tonoyan, A.; Topilin, N. D.; Torrence, E.; Torres, H.; Torró Pastor, E.; Toth, J.; Touchard, F.; Tovey, D. R.; Tran, H. L.; Trefzger, T.; Tremblet, L.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I. M.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Tripiana, M. F.; Triplett, N.; Trischuk, W.; Trocmé, B.; Troncon, C.; Trottier-McDonald, M.; Trovatelli, M.; True, P.; Trzebinski, M.; Trzupek, A.; Tsarouchas, C.; Tseng, J. C.-L.; Tsiareshka, P. V.; Tsionou, D.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsiskaridze, S.; Tsiskaridze, V.; Tskhadadze, E. G.; Tsukerman, I. I.; Tsulaia, V.; Tsung, J.-W.; Tsuno, S.; Tsybychev, D.; Tua, A.; Tudorache, A.; Tudorache, V.; Tuggle, J. M.; Tuna, A. N.; Tupputi, S. A.; Turchikhin, S.; Turecek, D.; Turk Cakir, I.; Turra, R.; Tuts, P. M.; Tykhonov, A.; Tylmad, M.; Tyndel, M.; Uchida, K.; Ueda, I.; Ueno, R.; Ughetto, M.; Ugland, M.; Uhlenbrock, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unal, G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Ungaro, F. C.; Unno, Y.; Urbaniec, D.; Urquijo, P.; Usai, G.; Usanova, A.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Vahsen, S.; Valencic, N.; Valentinetti, S.; Valero, A.; Valery, L.; Valkar, S.; Valladolid Gallego, E.; Vallecorsa, S.; Valls Ferrer, J. A.; Van Berg, R.; Van Der Deijl, P. C.; van der Geer, R.; van der Graaf, H.; Van Der Leeuw, R.; van der Ster, D.; van Eldik, N.; van Gemmeren, P.; Van Nieuwkoop, J.; van Vulpen, I.; Vanadia, M.; Vandelli, W.; Vaniachine, A.; Vankov, P.; Vannucci, F.; Vari, R.; Varnes, E. W.; Varol, T.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K. E.; Vassilakopoulos, V. I.; Vazeille, F.; Vazquez Schroeder, T.; Veatch, J.; Veloso, F.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Ventura, D.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J. C.; Vest, A.; Vetterli, M. C.; Viazlo, O.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Vickey Boeriu, O. E.; Viehhauser, G. H. A.; Viel, S.; Vigne, R.; Villa, M.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M. G.; Vinogradov, V. B.; Virzi, J.; Vitells, O.; Viti, M.; Vivarelli, I.; Vives Vaque, F.; Vlachos, S.; Vladoiu, D.; Vlasak, M.; Vogel, A.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; Volpi, M.; Volpini, G.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Radziewski, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vu Anh, T.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Vykydal, Z.; Wagner, W.; Wagner, P.; Wahrmund, S.; Wakabayashi, J.; Walch, S.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wall, R.; Waller, P.; Walsh, B.; Wang, C.; Wang, H.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, K.; Wang, R.; Wang, S. M.; Wang, T.; Wang, X.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Wardrope, D. R.; Warsinsky, M.; Washbrook, A.; Wasicki, C.; Watanabe, I.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, I. J.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, A. T.; Waugh, B. M.; Webb, S.; Weber, M. S.; Weber, S. W.; Webster, J. S.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weigell, P.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Weits, H.; Wells, P. S.; Wenaus, T.; Wendland, D.; Weng, Z.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M.; Werner, P.; Werth, M.; Wessels, M.; Wetter, J.; Whalen, K.; White, A.; White, M. J.; White, R.; White, S.; Whiteson, D.; Whittington, D.; Wicke, D.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik-Fuchs, L. A. M.; Wijeratne, P. A.; Wildauer, A.; Wildt, M. A.; Wilhelm, I.; Wilkens, H. G.; Will, J. Z.; Williams, E.; Williams, H. H.; Williams, S.; Willis, W.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, J. A.; Wilson, A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winkelmann, S.; Winklmeier, F.; Wittgen, M.; Wittig, T.; Wittkowski, J.; Wollstadt, S. J.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Wong, W. C.; Wooden, G.; Wosiek, B. K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M. J.; Wozniak, K. W.; Wraight, K.; Wright, M.; Wrona, B.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wu, Y.; Wulf, E.; Wyatt, T. R.; Wynne, B. M.; Xella, S.; Xiao, M.; Xu, C.; Xu, D.; Xu, L.; Yabsley, B.; Yacoob, S.; Yamada, M.; Yamaguchi, H.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamamura, T.; Yamanaka, T.; Yamauchi, K.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, H.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Z.; Yanush, S.; Yao, L.; Yasu, Y.; Yatsenko, E.; Yau Wong, K. H.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yen, A. L.; Yildirim, E.; Yilmaz, M.; Yoosoofmiya, R.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Yoshihara, K.; Young, C.; Young, C. J. S.; Youssef, S.; Yu, D. R.; Yu, J.; Yu, J.; Yuan, L.; Yurkewicz, A.; Zabinski, B.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zaman, A.; Zambito, S.; Zanello, L.; Zanzi, D.; Zaytsev, A.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeman, M.; Zemla, A.; Zenin, O.; Ženiš, T.; Zerwas, D.; Zevi della Porta, G.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, N.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zibell, A.; Zieminska, D.; Zimin, N. I.; Zimmermann, C.; Zimmermann, R.; Zimmermann, S.; Zimmermann, S.; Zinonos, Z.; Ziolkowski, M.; Zitoun, R.; Živković, L.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; zur Nedden, M.; Zurzolo, G.; Zutshi, V.; Zwalinski, L.

    2013-10-01

    A search is presented for microscopic black holes in a like-sign dimuon final state in proton-proton collisions at s=8TeV. The data were collected with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider in 2012 and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 20.3fb-1. Using a high track multiplicity requirement, 0.6±0.2 background events from Standard Model processes are predicted and none observed. This result is interpreted in the context of low-scale gravity models and 95% C.L. lower limits on microscopic black hole masses are set for different model assumptions.

  14. Radiochromic 3D Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oldham, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Radiochromic materials exhibit a colour change when exposed to ionising radiation. Radiochromic film has been used for clinical dosimetry for many years and increasingly so recently, as films of higher sensitivities have become available. The two principle advantages of radiochromic dosimetry include greater tissue equivalence (radiologically) and the lack of requirement for development of the colour change. In a radiochromic material, the colour change arises direct from ionising interactions affecting dye molecules, without requiring any latent chemical, optical or thermal development, with important implications for increased accuracy and convenience. It is only relatively recently however, that 3D radiochromic dosimetry has become possible. In this article we review recent developments and the current state-of-the-art of 3D radiochromic dosimetry, and the potential for a more comprehensive solution for the verification of complex radiation therapy treatments, and 3D dose measurement in general.

  15. 3-D Seismic Interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Gregory F.

    2009-05-01

    This volume is a brief introduction aimed at those who wish to gain a basic and relatively quick understanding of the interpretation of three-dimensional (3-D) seismic reflection data. The book is well written, clearly illustrated, and easy to follow. Enough elementary mathematics are presented for a basic understanding of seismic methods, but more complex mathematical derivations are avoided. References are listed for readers interested in more advanced explanations. After a brief introduction, the book logically begins with a succinct chapter on modern 3-D seismic data acquisition and processing. Standard 3-D acquisition methods are presented, and an appendix expands on more recent acquisition techniques, such as multiple-azimuth and wide-azimuth acquisition. Although this chapter covers the basics of standard time processing quite well, there is only a single sentence about prestack depth imaging, and anisotropic processing is not mentioned at all, even though both techniques are now becoming standard.

  16. 3D Ultrafast Ultrasound Imaging In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Provost, Jean; Papadacci, Clement; Arango, Juan Esteban; Imbault, Marion; Gennisson, Jean-Luc; Tanter, Mickael; Pernot, Mathieu

    2014-01-01

    Very high frame rate ultrasound imaging has recently allowed for the extension of the applications of echography to new fields of study such as the functional imaging of the brain, cardiac electrophysiology, and the quantitative real-time imaging of the intrinsic mechanical properties of tumors, to name a few, non-invasively and in real time. In this study, we present the first implementation of Ultrafast Ultrasound Imaging in three dimensions based on the use of either diverging or plane waves emanating from a sparse virtual array located behind the probe. It achieves high contrast and resolution while maintaining imaging rates of thousands of volumes per second. A customized portable ultrasound system was developed to sample 1024 independent channels and to drive a 32×32 matrix-array probe. Its capability to track in 3D transient phenomena occurring in the millisecond range within a single ultrafast acquisition was demonstrated for 3-D Shear-Wave Imaging, 3-D Ultrafast Doppler Imaging and finally 3D Ultrafast combined Tissue and Flow Doppler. The propagation of shear waves was tracked in a phantom and used to characterize its stiffness. 3-D Ultrafast Doppler was used to obtain 3-D maps of Pulsed Doppler, Color Doppler, and Power Doppler quantities in a single acquisition and revealed, for the first time, the complex 3-D flow patterns occurring in the ventricles of the human heart during an entire cardiac cycle, and the 3-D in vivo interaction of blood flow and wall motion during the pulse wave in the carotid at the bifurcation. This study demonstrates the potential of 3-D Ultrafast Ultrasound Imaging for the 3-D real-time mapping of stiffness, tissue motion, and flow in humans in vivo and promises new clinical applications of ultrasound with reduced intra- and inter-observer variability. PMID:25207828

  17. Bootstrapping 3D fermions

    DOE PAGES

    Iliesiu, Luca; Kos, Filip; Poland, David; Pufu, Silviu S.; Simmons-Duffin, David; Yacoby, Ran

    2016-03-17

    We study the conformal bootstrap for a 4-point function of fermions <ψψψψ> in 3D. We first introduce an embedding formalism for 3D spinors and compute the conformal blocks appearing in fermion 4-point functions. Using these results, we find general bounds on the dimensions of operators appearing in the ψ × ψ OPE, and also on the central charge CT. We observe features in our bounds that coincide with scaling dimensions in the GrossNeveu models at large N. Finally, we also speculate that other features could coincide with a fermionic CFT containing no relevant scalar operators.

  18. Degeneracy-aware interpolation of 3D diffusion tensor fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bi, Chongke; Takahashi, Shigeo; Fujishiro, Issei

    2012-01-01

    Visual analysis of 3D diffusion tensor fields has become an important topic especially in medical imaging for understanding microscopic structures and physical properties of biological tissues. However, it is still difficult to continuously track the underlying features from discrete tensor samples, due to the absence of appropriate interpolation schemes in the sense that we are able to handle possible degeneracy while fully respecting the smooth transition of tensor anisotropic features. This is because the degeneracy may cause rotational inconsistency of tensor anisotropy. This paper presents such an approach to interpolating 3D diffusion tensor fields. The primary idea behind our approach is to resolve the possible degeneracy through optimizing the rotational transformation between a pair of neighboring tensors by analyzing their associated eigenstructure, while the degeneracy can be identified by applying a minimum spanning tree-based clustering algorithm to the original tensor samples. Comparisons with existing interpolation schemes will be provided to demonstrate the advantages of our scheme, together with several results of tracking white matter fiber bundles in a human brain.

  19. 3-D Teaching Models for All

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradley, Joan; Farland-Smith, Donna

    2010-01-01

    Allowing a student to "see" through touch what other students see through a microscope can be a challenging task. Therefore, author Joan Bradley created three-dimensional (3-D) models with one student's visual impairment in mind. They are meant to benefit all students and can be used to teach common high school biology topics, including the…

  20. Venus in 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plaut, J. J.

    1993-08-01

    Stereographic images of the surface of Venus which enable geologists to reconstruct the details of the planet's evolution are discussed. The 120-meter resolution of these 3D images make it possible to construct digital topographic maps from which precise measurements can be made of the heights, depths, slopes, and volumes of geologic structures.

  1. 3D reservoir visualization

    SciTech Connect

    Van, B.T.; Pajon, J.L.; Joseph, P. )

    1991-11-01

    This paper shows how some simple 3D computer graphics tools can be combined to provide efficient software for visualizing and analyzing data obtained from reservoir simulators and geological simulations. The animation and interactive capabilities of the software quickly provide a deep understanding of the fluid-flow behavior and an accurate idea of the internal architecture of a reservoir.

  2. Counter-sniper 3D laser radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shepherd, Orr; LePage, Andrew J.; Wijntjes, Geert J.; Zehnpfennig, Theodore F.; Sackos, John T.; Nellums, Robert O.

    1999-01-01

    Visidyne, Inc., teaming with Sandia National Laboratories, has developed the preliminary design for an innovative scannerless 3-D laser radar capable of acquiring, tracking, and determining the coordinates of small caliber projectiles in flight with sufficient precision, so their origin can be established by back projecting their tracks to their source. The design takes advantage of the relatively large effective cross-section of a bullet at optical wavelengths. Kay to its implementation is the use of efficient, high- power laser diode arrays for illuminators and an imaging laser receiver using a unique CCD imager design, that acquires the information to establish x, y (angle-angle) and range coordinates for each bullet at very high frame rates. The detection process achieves a high degree of discrimination by using the optical signature of the bullet, solar background mitigation, and track detection. Field measurements and computer simulations have been used to provide the basis for a preliminary design of a robust bullet tracker, the Counter Sniper 3-D Laser Radar. Experimental data showing 3-D test imagery acquired by a lidar with architecture similar to that of the proposed Counter Sniper 3-D Lidar are presented. A proposed Phase II development would yield an innovative, compact, and highly efficient bullet-tracking laser radar. Such a device would meet the needs of not only the military, but also federal, state, and local law enforcement organizations.

  3. 3D rapid mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isaksson, Folke; Borg, Johan; Haglund, Leif

    2008-04-01

    In this paper the performance of passive range measurement imaging using stereo technique in real time applications is described. Stereo vision uses multiple images to get depth resolution in a similar way as Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) uses multiple measurements to obtain better spatial resolution. This technique has been used in photogrammetry for a long time but it will be shown that it is now possible to do the calculations, with carefully designed image processing algorithms, in e.g. a PC in real time. In order to get high resolution and quantitative data in the stereo estimation a mathematical camera model is used. The parameters to the camera model are settled in a calibration rig or in the case of a moving camera the scene itself can be used for calibration of most of the parameters. After calibration an ordinary TV camera has an angular resolution like a theodolite, but to a much lower price. The paper will present results from high resolution 3D imagery from air to ground. The 3D-results from stereo calculation of image pairs are stitched together into a large database to form a 3D-model of the area covered.

  4. TEAM Electron Microscope Animation

    SciTech Connect

    2012-01-01

    The TEAM Electron Microscope, a device that enables atomic-scale imaging in 3-D, has a rotating stage that can hold and position samples inside electron microscopes with unprecedented stability, position-control accuracy, and range of motion.The TEAM Stage makes one of the world's most powerful electron microscopes even better, and enables previously impossible experiments.

  5. Taming supersymmetric defects in 3d-3d correspondence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gang, Dongmin; Kim, Nakwoo; Romo, Mauricio; Yamazaki, Masahito

    2016-07-01

    We study knots in 3d Chern-Simons theory with complex gauge group {SL}(N,{{C}}), in the context of its relation with 3d { N }=2 theory (the so-called 3d-3d correspondence). The defect has either co-dimension 2 or co-dimension 4 inside the 6d (2,0) theory, which is compactified on a 3-manifold \\hat{M}. We identify such defects in various corners of the 3d-3d correspondence, namely in 3d {SL}(N,{{C}}) CS theory, in 3d { N }=2 theory, in 5d { N }=2 super Yang-Mills theory, and in the M-theory holographic dual. We can make quantitative checks of the 3d-3d correspondence by computing partition functions at each of these theories. This Letter is a companion to a longer paper [1], which contains more details and more results.

  6. 3D Audio System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Ames Research Center research into virtual reality led to the development of the Convolvotron, a high speed digital audio processing system that delivers three-dimensional sound over headphones. It consists of a two-card set designed for use with a personal computer. The Convolvotron's primary application is presentation of 3D audio signals over headphones. Four independent sound sources are filtered with large time-varying filters that compensate for motion. The perceived location of the sound remains constant. Possible applications are in air traffic control towers or airplane cockpits, hearing and perception research and virtual reality development.

  7. A three-camera imaging microscope for high-speed single-molecule tracking and super-resolution imaging in living cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    English, Brian P.; Singer, Robert H.

    2015-08-01

    Our aim is to develop quantitative single-molecule assays to study when and where molecules are interacting inside living cells and where enzymes are active. To this end we present a three-camera imaging microscope for fast tracking of multiple interacting molecules simultaneously, with high spatiotemporal resolution. The system was designed around an ASI RAMM frame using three separate tube lenses and custom multi-band dichroics to allow for enhanced detection efficiency. The frame times of the three Andor iXon Ultra EMCCD cameras are hardware synchronized to the laser excitation pulses of the three excitation lasers, such that the fluorophores are effectively immobilized during frame acquisitions and do not yield detections that are motion-blurred. Stroboscopic illumination allows robust detection from even rapidly moving molecules while minimizing bleaching, and since snapshots can be spaced out with varying time intervals, stroboscopic illumination enables a direct comparison to be made between fast and slow molecules under identical light dosage. We have developed algorithms that accurately track and co-localize multiple interacting biomolecules. The three-color microscope combined with our co-movement algorithms have made it possible for instance to simultaneously image and track how the chromosome environment affects diffusion kinetics or determine how mRNAs diffuse during translation. Such multiplexed single-molecule measurements at a high spatiotemporal resolution inside living cells will provide a major tool for testing models relating molecular architecture and biological dynamics.

  8. A three-camera imaging microscope for high-speed single-molecule tracking and super-resolution imaging in living cells

    PubMed Central

    English, Brian P.; Singer, Robert H.

    2016-01-01

    Our aim is to develop quantitative single-molecule assays to study when and where molecules are interacting inside living cells and where enzymes are active. To this end we present a three-camera imaging microscope for fast tracking of multiple interacting molecules simultaneously, with high spatiotemporal resolution. The system was designed around an ASI RAMM frame using three separate tube lenses and custom multi-band dichroics to allow for enhanced detection efficiency. The frame times of the three Andor iXon Ultra EMCCD cameras are hardware synchronized to the laser excitation pulses of the three excitation lasers, such that the fluorophores are effectively immobilized during frame acquisitions and do not yield detections that are motion-blurred. Stroboscopic illumination allows robust detection from even rapidly moving molecules while minimizing bleaching, and since snapshots can be spaced out with varying time intervals, stroboscopic illumination enables a direct comparison to be made between fast and slow molecules under identical light dosage. We have developed algorithms that accurately track and co-localize multiple interacting biomolecules. The three-color microscope combined with our co-movement algorithms have made it possible for instance to simultaneously image and track how the chromosome environment affects diffusion kinetics or determine how mRNAs diffuse during translation. Such multiplexed single-molecule measurements at a high spatiotemporal resolution inside living cells will provide a major tool for testing models relating molecular architecture and biological dynamics. PMID:26819489

  9. 3D Spray Droplet Distributions in Sneezes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Techet, Alexandra; Scharfman, Barry; Bourouiba, Lydia

    2015-11-01

    3D spray droplet clouds generated during human sneezing are investigated using the Synthetic Aperture Feature Extraction (SAFE) method, which relies on light field imaging (LFI) and synthetic aperture (SA) refocusing computational photographic techniques. An array of nine high-speed cameras are used to image sneeze droplets and tracked the droplets in 3D space and time (3D + T). An additional high-speed camera is utilized to track the motion of the head during sneezing. In the SAFE method, the raw images recorded by each camera in the array are preprocessed and binarized, simplifying post processing after image refocusing and enabling the extraction of feature sizes and positions in 3D + T. These binary images are refocused using either additive or multiplicative methods, combined with thresholding. Sneeze droplet centroids, radii, distributions and trajectories are determined and compared with existing data. The reconstructed 3D droplet centroids and radii enable a more complete understanding of the physical extent and fluid dynamics of sneeze ejecta. These measurements are important for understanding the infectious disease transmission potential of sneezes in various indoor environments.

  10. Superplot3d: an open source GUI tool for 3d trajectory visualisation and elementary processing.

    PubMed

    Whitehorn, Luke J; Hawkes, Frances M; Dublon, Ian An

    2013-09-30

    When acquiring simple three-dimensional (3d) trajectory data it is common to accumulate large coordinate data sets. In order to examine integrity and consistency of object tracking, it is often necessary to rapidly visualise these data. Ordinarily, to achieve this the user must either execute 3d plotting functions in a numerical computing environment or manually inspect data in two dimensions, plotting each individual axis.Superplot3d is an open source MATLAB script which takes tab delineated Cartesian data points in the form x, y, z and time and generates an instant visualization of the object's trajectory in free-rotational three dimensions. Whole trajectories may be instantly presented, allowing for rapid inspection. Executable from the MATLAB command line (or deployable as a compiled standalone application) superplot3d also provides simple GUI controls to obtain rudimentary trajectory information, allow specific visualization of trajectory sections and perform elementary processing.Superplot3d thus provides a framework for non-programmers and programmers alike, to recreate recently acquired 3d object trajectories in rotatable 3d space. It is intended, via the use of a preference driven menu to be flexible and work with output from multiple tracking software systems. Source code and accompanying GUIDE .fig files are provided for deployment and further development.

  11. Superplot3d: an open source GUI tool for 3d trajectory visualisation and elementary processing.

    PubMed

    Whitehorn, Luke J; Hawkes, Frances M; Dublon, Ian An

    2013-01-01

    When acquiring simple three-dimensional (3d) trajectory data it is common to accumulate large coordinate data sets. In order to examine integrity and consistency of object tracking, it is often necessary to rapidly visualise these data. Ordinarily, to achieve this the user must either execute 3d plotting functions in a numerical computing environment or manually inspect data in two dimensions, plotting each individual axis.Superplot3d is an open source MATLAB script which takes tab delineated Cartesian data points in the form x, y, z and time and generates an instant visualization of the object's trajectory in free-rotational three dimensions. Whole trajectories may be instantly presented, allowing for rapid inspection. Executable from the MATLAB command line (or deployable as a compiled standalone application) superplot3d also provides simple GUI controls to obtain rudimentary trajectory information, allow specific visualization of trajectory sections and perform elementary processing.Superplot3d thus provides a framework for non-programmers and programmers alike, to recreate recently acquired 3d object trajectories in rotatable 3d space. It is intended, via the use of a preference driven menu to be flexible and work with output from multiple tracking software systems. Source code and accompanying GUIDE .fig files are provided for deployment and further development. PMID:24079529

  12. 'Berries' on the Ground 2 (3-D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This is the 3-D anaglyph showing a microscopic image taken of soil featuring round, blueberry-shaped rock formations on the crater floor at Meridiani Planum, Mars. This image was taken on the 13th day of the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity's journey, before the Moessbauer spectrometer, an instrument located on the rover's instrument deployment device, or 'arm,' was pressed down to take measurements. The area in this image is approximately 3 centimeters (1.2 inches) across.

  13. Adirondack Post-Drill (3-D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This is a 3-D anaglyph showing a microscopic image taken of an area measuring 3 centimeters (1.2 inches) across on the rock called Adirondack. The image was taken at Gusev Crater on the 33rd day of the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit's journey (Feb. 5, 2004), after the rover used its rock abrasion tool to drill into the rock. Debris from the use of the tool is visible to the left of the hole.

  14. Tracking in real time the crawling dynamics of adherent living cells with a high resolution surface plasmon microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Streppa, L.; Berguiga, L.; Boyer Provera, E.; Ratti, F.; Goillot, E.; Martinez Torres, C.; Schaeffer, L.; Elezgaray, Juan; Arneodo, A.; Argoul, F.

    2016-03-01

    We introduce a high resolution scanning surface plasmon microscope for long term imaging of living adherent mouse myoblast cells. The coupling of a high numerical aperture objective lens with a fibered heterodyne interferometer provides both enhanced sensitivity and long term stability. This microscope takes advantage of the plasmon resonance excitation and the amplification of the electromagnetic field in near-field distance to the gold coated coverslip. This plasmon enhanced evanescent wave microscopy is particularly attractive for the study of cell adhesion and motility since it can be operated without staining of the biological sample. We show that this microscope allows very long-term imaging of living samples, and that it can capture and follow the temporal deformation of C2C12 myoblast cell protusions (lamellipodia), during their migration on a at surface.

  15. Adaptive optics enables three-dimensional single particle tracking at the sub-millisecond scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juette, Manuel F.; Rivera-Molina, Felix E.; Toomre, Derek K.; Bewersdorf, Joerg

    2013-04-01

    We present the integration of an adaptive optics element into a feedback-driven single particle tracking microscope. Our instrument captures three-dimensional (3D) trajectories with down to 130 μs temporal resolution for dynamic studies on the nanoscale. Our 3D beam steering approach tracks particles over an axial range of >6 μm with ˜2 ms mechanical response times and isolates the sample from any tracking motion. Tracking of transport vesicles containing Alexa488-labeled transferrin glycoprotein in living cells demonstrates the speed and sensitivity of our instrument.

  16. Prominent rocks - 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Many prominent rocks near the Sagan Memorial Station are featured in this image, taken in stereo by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) on Sol 3. 3D glasses are necessary to identify surface detail. Wedge is at lower left; Shark, Half-Dome, and Pumpkin are at center. Flat Top, about four inches high, is at lower right. The horizon in the distance is one to two kilometers away.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

    Click below to see the left and right views individually. [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Left [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Right

  17. Martian terrain - 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This area of terrain near the Sagan Memorial Station was taken on Sol 3 by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP). 3D glasses are necessary to identify surface detail.

    The IMP is a stereo imaging system with color capability provided by 24 selectable filters -- twelve filters per 'eye.' It stands 1.8 meters above the Martian surface, and has a resolution of two millimeters at a range of two meters.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

    Click below to see the left and right views individually. [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Left [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Right

  18. 3-D stimulated emission depletion microscopy with programmable aberration correction.

    PubMed

    Lenz, Martin O; Sinclair, Hugo G; Savell, Alexander; Clegg, James H; Brown, Alice C N; Davis, Daniel M; Dunsby, Chris; Neil, Mark A A; French, Paul M W

    2014-01-01

    We present a stimulated emission depletion (STED) microscope that provides 3-D super resolution by simultaneous depletion using beams with both a helical phase profile for enhanced lateral resolution and an annular phase profile to enhance axial resolution. The 3-D depletion point spread function is realised using a single spatial light modulator that can also be programmed to compensate for aberrations in the microscope and the sample. We apply it to demonstrate the first 3-D super-resolved imaging of an immunological synapse between a Natural Killer cell and its target cell.

  19. 3D multiplexed immunoplasmonics microscopy.

    PubMed

    Bergeron, Éric; Patskovsky, Sergiy; Rioux, David; Meunier, Michel

    2016-07-21

    , the developed technology is simple and compatible with standard epi-fluorescence microscopes used in biological and clinical laboratories. Thus, 3D multiplexed immunoplasmonics microscopy is ready for clinical applications as a cost-efficient alternative to immunofluorescence. PMID:27336475

  20. 3D microscopy for microfabrication quality control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muller, Matthew S.; De Jean, Paul D.

    2015-03-01

    A novel stereo microscope adapter, the SweptVue, has been developed to rapidly perform quantitative 3D microscopy for cost-effective microfabrication quality control. The SweptVue adapter uses the left and right stereo channels of an Olympus SZX7 stereo microscope for sample illumination and detection, respectively. By adjusting the temporal synchronization between the illumination lines projected from a Texas Instruments DLP LightCrafter and the rolling shutter on a Point Grey Flea3 CMOS camera, micrometer-scale depth features can be easily and rapidly measured at up to 5 μm resolution on a variety of microfabricated samples. In this study, the build performance of an industrial-grade Stratasys Object 300 Connex 3D printer was examined. Ten identical parts were 3D printed with a lateral and depth resolution of 42 μm and 30 μm, respectively, using both a rigid and flexible Stratasys PolyJet material. Surface elevation precision and accuracy was examined over multiple regions of interest on plateau and hemispherical surfaces. In general, the dimensions of the examined features were reproducible across the parts built using both materials. However, significant systemic lateral and height build errors were discovered, such as: decreased heights when approaching the edges of plateaus, inaccurate height steps, and poor tolerances on channel width. For 3D printed parts to be used in functional applications requiring micro-scale tolerances, they need to conform to specification. Despite appearing identical, our 3D printed parts were found to have a variety of defects that the SweptVue adapter quickly revealed.

  1. Surface imaging microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogala, Eric W.; Bankman, Isaac N.

    2008-04-01

    The three-dimensional shapes of microscopic objects are becoming increasingly important for battlespace CBRNE sensing. Potential applications of microscopic 3D shape observations include characterization of biological weapon particles and manufacturing of micromechanical components. Aerosol signatures of stand-off lidar systems, using elastic backscatter or polarization, are dictated by the aerosol particle shapes and sizes that must be well characterized in the lab. A low-cost, fast instrument for 3D surface shape microscopy will be a valuable point sensor for biological particle sensing applications. Both the cost and imaging durations of traditional techniques such as confocal microscopes, atomic force microscopes, and electron scanning microscopes are too high. We investigated the feasibility of a low-cost, fast interferometric technique for imaging the 3D surface shape of microscopic objects at frame rates limited only by the camera in the system. The system operates at two laser wavelengths producing two fringe images collected simultaneously by a digital camera, and a specialized algorithm we developed reconstructs the surface map of the microscopic object. The current implementation assembled to test the concept and develop the new 3D reconstruction algorithm has 0.25 micron resolution in the x and y directions, and about 0.1 micron accuracy in the z direction, as tested on a microscopic glass test object manufactured with etching techniques. We describe the interferometric instrument, present the reconstruction algorithm, and discuss further development.

  2. Three dimensional time-gated tracking of non-blinking quantum dots in live cells

    DOE PAGES

    DeVore, Matthew S.; Werner, James H.; Goodwin, Peter M.; Keller, Aaron M.; Hollingsworth, Jennifer A.; Wilson, Bridget S.; Cleyrat, Cedric; Lidke, Diane S.; Ghosh, Yagnaseni; Stewart, Michael H.; et al

    2015-03-12

    Single particle tracking has provided a wealth of information about biophysical processes such as motor protein transport and diffusion in cell membranes. However, motion out of the plane of the microscope or blinking of the fluorescent probe used as a label generally limits observation times to several seconds. Here, we overcome these limitations by using novel non-blinking quantum dots as probes and employing a custom 3D tracking microscope to actively follow motion in three dimensions (3D) in live cells. As a result, signal-to-noise is improved in the cellular milieu through the use of pulsed excitation and time-gated detection.

  3. Three dimensional time-gated tracking of non-blinking quantum dots in live cells

    PubMed Central

    DeVore, Matthew S.; Stich, Dominik G.; Keller, Aaron M.; Ghosh, Yagnaseni; Goodwin, Peter M.; Phipps, Mary E.; Stewart, Michael H.; Cleyrat, Cédric; Wilson, Bridget S.; Lidke, Diane S.; Hollingsworth, Jennifer A.; Werner, James H.

    2015-01-01

    Single particle tracking has provided a wealth of information about biophysical processes such as motor protein transport and diffusion in cell membranes. However, motion out of the plane of the microscope or blinking of the fluorescent probe used as a label generally limits observation times to several seconds. Here, we overcome these limitations by using novel non-blinking quantum dots as probes and employing a custom 3D tracking microscope to actively follow motion in three dimensions (3D) in live cells. Signal-to-noise is improved in the cellular milieu through the use of pulsed excitation and time-gated detection. PMID:25932286

  4. Three dimensional time-gated tracking of non-blinking quantum dots in live cells

    SciTech Connect

    DeVore, Matthew S.; Werner, James H.; Goodwin, Peter M.; Keller, Aaron M.; Hollingsworth, Jennifer A.; Wilson, Bridget S.; Cleyrat, Cedric; Lidke, Diane S.; Ghosh, Yagnaseni; Stewart, Michael H.; Stich, Dominik G.; Phipps, Mary E.

    2015-12-03

    Single particle tracking has provided a wealth of information about biophysical processes such as motor protein transport and diffusion in cell membranes. However, motion out of the plane of the microscope or blinking of the fluorescent probe used as a label generally limits observation times to several seconds. Here, we overcome these limitations by using novel non-blinking quantum dots as probes and employing a custom 3D tracking microscope to actively follow motion in three dimensions (3D) in live cells. As a result, signal-to-noise is improved in the cellular milieu through the use of pulsed excitation and time-gated detection.

  5. Three dimensional time-gated tracking of non-blinking quantum dots in live cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeVore, Matthew S.; Stich, Dominik G.; Keller, Aaron M.; Ghosh, Yagna; Goodwin, Peter M.; Phipps, Mary E.; Stewart, Michael H.; Cleyrat, Cédric; Wilson, Bridget S.; Lidke, Diane S.; Hollingsworth, Jennifer A.; Werner, James H.

    2015-03-01

    Single particle tracking has provided a wealth of information about biophysical processes such as motor protein transport and diffusion in cell membranes. However, motion out of the plane of the microscope or blinking of the fluorescent probe used as a label generally limits observation times to several seconds. Here, we overcome these limitations by using novel non-blinking quantum dots as probes and employing a custom 3D tracking microscope to actively follow motion in three dimensions (3D) in live cells. Signal-to-noise is improved in the cellular milieu through the use of pulsed excitation and time-gated detection.

  6. 3D multiplexed immunoplasmonics microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergeron, Éric; Patskovsky, Sergiy; Rioux, David; Meunier, Michel

    2016-07-01

    technology is simple and compatible with standard epi-fluorescence microscopes used in biological and clinical laboratories. Thus, 3D multiplexed immunoplasmonics microscopy is ready for clinical applications as a cost-efficient alternative to immunofluorescence.Selective labelling, identification and spatial distribution of cell surface biomarkers can provide important clinical information, such as distinction between healthy and diseased cells, evolution of a disease and selection of the optimal patient-specific treatment. Immunofluorescence is the gold standard for efficient detection of biomarkers expressed by cells. However, antibodies (Abs) conjugated to fluorescent dyes remain limited by their photobleaching, high sensitivity to the environment, low light intensity, and wide absorption and emission spectra. Immunoplasmonics is a novel microscopy method based on the visualization of Abs-functionalized plasmonic nanoparticles (fNPs) targeting cell surface biomarkers. Tunable fNPs should provide higher multiplexing capacity than immunofluorescence since NPs are photostable over time, strongly scatter light at their plasmon peak wavelengths and can be easily functionalized. In this article, we experimentally demonstrate accurate multiplexed detection based on the immunoplasmonics approach. First, we achieve the selective labelling of three targeted cell surface biomarkers (cluster of differentiation 44 (CD44), epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and voltage-gated K+ channel subunit KV1.1) on human cancer CD44+ EGFR+ KV1.1+ MDA-MB-231 cells and reference CD44- EGFR- KV1.1+ 661W cells. The labelling efficiency with three stable specific immunoplasmonics labels (functionalized silver nanospheres (CD44-AgNSs), gold (Au) NSs (EGFR-AuNSs) and Au nanorods (KV1.1-AuNRs)) detected by reflected light microscopy (RLM) is similar to the one with immunofluorescence. Second, we introduce an improved method for 3D localization and spectral identification of fNPs based on fast z

  7. 3D multiplexed immunoplasmonics microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergeron, Éric; Patskovsky, Sergiy; Rioux, David; Meunier, Michel

    2016-07-01

    technology is simple and compatible with standard epi-fluorescence microscopes used in biological and clinical laboratories. Thus, 3D multiplexed immunoplasmonics microscopy is ready for clinical applications as a cost-efficient alternative to immunofluorescence.Selective labelling, identification and spatial distribution of cell surface biomarkers can provide important clinical information, such as distinction between healthy and diseased cells, evolution of a disease and selection of the optimal patient-specific treatment. Immunofluorescence is the gold standard for efficient detection of biomarkers expressed by cells. However, antibodies (Abs) conjugated to fluorescent dyes remain limited by their photobleaching, high sensitivity to the environment, low light intensity, and wide absorption and emission spectra. Immunoplasmonics is a novel microscopy method based on the visualization of Abs-functionalized plasmonic nanoparticles (fNPs) targeting cell surface biomarkers. Tunable fNPs should provide higher multiplexing capacity than immunofluorescence since NPs are photostable over time, strongly scatter light at their plasmon peak wavelengths and can be easily functionalized. In this article, we experimentally demonstrate accurate multiplexed detection based on the immunoplasmonics approach. First, we achieve the selective labelling of three targeted cell surface biomarkers (cluster of differentiation 44 (CD44), epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and voltage-gated K+ channel subunit KV1.1) on human cancer CD44+ EGFR+ KV1.1+ MDA-MB-231 cells and reference CD44- EGFR- KV1.1+ 661W cells. The labelling efficiency with three stable specific immunoplasmonics labels (functionalized silver nanospheres (CD44-AgNSs), gold (Au) NSs (EGFR-AuNSs) and Au nanorods (KV1.1-AuNRs)) detected by reflected light microscopy (RLM) is similar to the one with immunofluorescence. Second, we introduce an improved method for 3D localization and spectral identification of fNPs based on fast z

  8. Computational-optical microscopy for 3D biological imaging beyond the diffraction limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grover, Ginni

    In recent years, super-resolution imaging has become an important fluorescent microscopy tool. It has enabled imaging of structures smaller than the optical diffraction limit with resolution less than 50 nm. Extension to high-resolution volume imaging has been achieved by integration with various optical techniques. In this thesis, development of a fluorescent microscope to enable high resolution, extended depth, three dimensional (3D) imaging is discussed; which is achieved by integration of computational methods with optical systems. In the first part of the thesis, point spread function (PSF) engineering for volume imaging is discussed. A class of PSFs, referred to as double-helix (DH) PSFs, is generated. The PSFs exhibit two focused spots in the image plane which rotate about the optical axis, encoding depth in rotation of the image. These PSFs extend the depth-of-field up to a factor of ˜5. Precision performance of the DH-PSFs, based on an information theoretical analysis, is compared with other 3D methods with conclusion that the DH-PSFs provide the best precision and the longest depth-of-field. Out of various possible DH-PSFs, a suitable PSF is obtained for super-resolution microscopy. The DH-PSFs are implemented in imaging systems, such as a microscope, with a special phase modulation at the pupil plane. Surface-relief elements which are polarization-insensitive and ˜90% light efficient are developed for phase modulation. The photon-efficient DH-PSF microscopes thus developed are used, along with optimal position estimation algorithms, for tracking and super-resolution imaging in 3D. Imaging at depths-of-field of up to 2.5 microm is achieved without focus scanning. Microtubules were imaged with 3D resolution of (6, 9, 39) nm, which is in close agreement with the theoretical limit. A quantitative study of co-localization of two proteins in volume was conducted in live bacteria. In the last part of the thesis practical aspects of the DH-PSF microscope are

  9. 3D Elevation Program—Virtual USA in 3D

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lukas, Vicki; Stoker, J.M.

    2016-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) 3D Elevation Program (3DEP) uses a laser system called ‘lidar’ (light detection and ranging) to create a virtual reality map of the Nation that is very accurate. 3D maps have many uses with new uses being discovered all the time.  

  10. 3D Elevation Program—Virtual USA in 3D

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lukas, Vicki; Stoker, J.M.

    2016-04-14

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) 3D Elevation Program (3DEP) uses a laser system called ‘lidar’ (light detection and ranging) to create a virtual reality map of the Nation that is very accurate. 3D maps have many uses with new uses being discovered all the time.  

  11. Effects of etching time on alpha tracks in Solid state Nuclear Track Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillmore, Gavin; Wertheim, David; Crust, Simon

    2013-04-01

    Inhalation of radon gas is thought to be the cause of about 1100 lung cancer related deaths each year in the UK (1). Radon concentrations can be monitored using Solid State Nuclear Track Detectors (SSNTDs) as the natural decay of radon results in alpha particles which form tracks in the detectors and these tracks can be etched in order to enable microscopic analysis. We have previously shown that confocal microscopy can be used for 3D visualisation of etched SSNTDs (2, 3). The aim of the study was to examine the effect of etching time on the appearance of alpha tracks in SSNTDs. Six SSNTDs were placed in a chamber with a luminous dial watch for a fixed period. The detectors were etched for between 30 minutes and 4.5 hours using 6M NaOH at a temperature of 90oC. A 'LEXT' OLS4000 confocal laser scanning microscope (Olympus Corporation, Japan) was used to acquire 2D and 3D image datasets of CR-39 plastic SSNTDs. Confocal microscope 3D images were acquired using a x50 or x100 objective lens. Data were saved as images and also spreadsheet files with height measurements. Software was written using MATLAB (The MathWorks Inc., USA) to analyse the height data. Comparing the 30 minute and 4 hour etching time detectors, we observed that there were marked differences in track area; the lower the etching time the smaller the track area. The degree to which etching may prevent visualising adjacent tracks also requires further study as it is possible that etching could result in some tracks being subsumed in other tracks. On the other hand if there is too little etching, track sizes would be reduced and hence could be more difficult to image; thus there is a balance required to obtain suitable measurement accuracy. (1) Gray A, Read S, McGale P and Darby S. Lung cancer deaths from indoor radon and the cost effectiveness and potential of policies to reduce them. BMJ 2009; 338: a3110. (2) Wertheim D, Gillmore G, Brown L, and Petford N. A new method of imaging particle tracks in

  12. Spacecraft 3D Augmented Reality Mobile App

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hussey, Kevin J.; Doronila, Paul R.; Kumanchik, Brian E.; Chan, Evan G.; Ellison, Douglas J.; Boeck, Andrea; Moore, Justin M.

    2013-01-01

    The Spacecraft 3D application allows users to learn about and interact with iconic NASA missions in a new and immersive way using common mobile devices. Using Augmented Reality (AR) techniques to project 3D renditions of the mission spacecraft into real-world surroundings, users can interact with and learn about Curiosity, GRAIL, Cassini, and Voyager. Additional updates on future missions, animations, and information will be ongoing. Using a printed AR Target and camera on a mobile device, users can get up close with these robotic explorers, see how some move, and learn about these engineering feats, which are used to expand knowledge and understanding about space. The software receives input from the mobile device's camera to recognize the presence of an AR marker in the camera's field of view. It then displays a 3D rendition of the selected spacecraft in the user's physical surroundings, on the mobile device's screen, while it tracks the device's movement in relation to the physical position of the spacecraft's 3D image on the AR marker.

  13. What is 3D good for? A review of human performance on stereoscopic 3D displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIntire, John P.; Havig, Paul R.; Geiselman, Eric E.

    2012-06-01

    This work reviews the human factors-related literature on the task performance implications of stereoscopic 3D displays, in order to point out the specific performance benefits (or lack thereof) one might reasonably expect to observe when utilizing these displays. What exactly is 3D good for? Relative to traditional 2D displays, stereoscopic displays have been shown to enhance performance on a variety of depth-related tasks. These tasks include judging absolute and relative distances, finding and identifying objects (by breaking camouflage and eliciting perceptual "pop-out"), performing spatial manipulations of objects (object positioning, orienting, and tracking), and navigating. More cognitively, stereoscopic displays can improve the spatial understanding of 3D scenes or objects, improve memory/recall of scenes or objects, and improve learning of spatial relationships and environments. However, for tasks that are relatively simple, that do not strictly require depth information for good performance, where other strong cues to depth can be utilized, or for depth tasks that lie outside the effective viewing volume of the display, the purported performance benefits of 3D may be small or altogether absent. Stereoscopic 3D displays come with a host of unique human factors problems including the simulator-sickness-type symptoms of eyestrain, headache, fatigue, disorientation, nausea, and malaise, which appear to effect large numbers of viewers (perhaps as many as 25% to 50% of the general population). Thus, 3D technology should be wielded delicately and applied carefully; and perhaps used only as is necessary to ensure good performance.

  14. 'Berries' on the Ground 2 (3-D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This is the 3-D anaglyph showing a microscopic image taken of soil featuring round, blueberry-shaped rock formations on the crater floor at Meridiani Planum, Mars. This image was taken on the 13th day of the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity's journey, after the Moessbauer spectrometer, an instrument located on the rover's instrument deployment device, or 'arm,' was pressed down to measure the soil's iron mineralogy. Note the donut-shaped imprint of the instrument in the lower part of the image. The area in this image is approximately 3 centimeters (1.2 inches) across.

  15. Automated Serial Sectioning for 3D Reconstruction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alkemper, Jen; Voorhees, Peter W.

    2003-01-01

    Some aspects of an apparatus and method for automated serial sectioning of a specimen of a solder, aluminum, or other relatively soft opaque material are discussed. The apparatus includes a small milling machine (micromiller) that takes precise, shallow cuts (increments of depth as small as 1 micron) to expose successive sections. A microscope equipped with an electronic camera, mounted in a fixed position on the micromiller, takes pictures of the newly exposed specimen surface at each increment of depth. The images are digitized, and the resulting data are subsequently processed to reconstruct three-dimensional (3D) features of the specimen.

  16. Market study: 3-D eyetracker

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    A market study of a proposed version of a 3-D eyetracker for initial use at NASA's Ames Research Center was made. The commercialization potential of a simplified, less expensive 3-D eyetracker was ascertained. Primary focus on present and potential users of eyetrackers, as well as present and potential manufacturers has provided an effective means of analyzing the prospects for commercialization.

  17. 3D World Building System

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    This video provides an overview of the Sandia National Laboratories developed 3-D World Model Building capability that provides users with an immersive, texture rich 3-D model of their environment in minutes using a laptop and color and depth camera.

  18. 3D World Building System

    SciTech Connect

    2013-10-30

    This video provides an overview of the Sandia National Laboratories developed 3-D World Model Building capability that provides users with an immersive, texture rich 3-D model of their environment in minutes using a laptop and color and depth camera.

  19. LLNL-Earth3D

    SciTech Connect

    2013-10-01

    Earth3D is a computer code designed to allow fast calculation of seismic rays and travel times through a 3D model of the Earth. LLNL is using this for earthquake location and global tomography efforts and such codes are of great interest to the Earth Science community.

  20. [3-D ultrasound in gastroenterology].

    PubMed

    Zoller, W G; Liess, H

    1994-06-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) sonography represents a development of noninvasive diagnostic imaging by real-time two-dimensional (2D) sonography. The use of transparent rotating scans, comparable to a block of glass, generates a 3D effect. The objective of the present study was to optimate 3D presentation of abdominal findings. Additional investigations were made with a new volumetric program to determine the volume of selected findings of the liver. The results were compared with the estimated volumes of 2D sonography and 2D computer tomography (CT). For the processing of 3D images, typical parameter constellations were found for the different findings, which facilitated processing of 3D images. In more than 75% of the cases examined we found an optimal 3D presentation of sonographic findings with respect to the evaluation criteria developed by us for the 3D imaging of processed data. Great differences were found for the estimated volumes of the findings of the liver concerning the three different techniques applied. 3D ultrasound represents a valuable method to judge morphological appearance in abdominal findings. The possibility of volumetric measurements enlarges its potential diagnostic significance. Further clinical investigations are necessary to find out if definite differentiation between benign and malign findings is possible.

  1. A Mach-Zender digital holographic microscope with sub-micrometer resolution for imaging and tracking of marine micro-organisms.

    PubMed

    Kühn, Jonas; Niraula, Bimochan; Liewer, Kurt; Kent Wallace, J; Serabyn, Eugene; Graff, Emilio; Lindensmith, Christian; Nadeau, Jay L

    2014-12-01

    Digital holographic microscopy is an ideal tool for investigation of microbial motility. However, most designs do not exhibit sufficient spatial resolution for imaging bacteria. In this study we present an off-axis Mach-Zehnder design of a holographic microscope with spatial resolution of better than 800 nm and the ability to resolve bacterial samples at varying densities over a 380 μm × 380 μm × 600 μm three-dimensional field of view. Larger organisms, such as protozoa, can be resolved in detail, including cilia and flagella. The instrument design and performance are presented, including images and tracks of bacterial and protozoal mixed samples and pure cultures of six selected species. Organisms as small as 1 μm (bacterial spores) and as large as 60 μm (Paramecium bursaria) may be resolved and tracked without changes in the instrument configuration. Finally, we present a dilution series investigating the maximum cell density that can be imaged, a type of analysis that has not been presented in previous holographic microscopy studies. PMID:25554278

  2. A Mach-Zender digital holographic microscope with sub-micrometer resolution for imaging and tracking of marine micro-organisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kühn, Jonas; Niraula, Bimochan; Liewer, Kurt; Kent Wallace, J.; Serabyn, Eugene; Graff, Emilio; Lindensmith, Christian; Nadeau, Jay L.

    2014-12-01

    Digital holographic microscopy is an ideal tool for investigation of microbial motility. However, most designs do not exhibit sufficient spatial resolution for imaging bacteria. In this study we present an off-axis Mach-Zehnder design of a holographic microscope with spatial resolution of better than 800 nm and the ability to resolve bacterial samples at varying densities over a 380 μm × 380 μm × 600 μm three-dimensional field of view. Larger organisms, such as protozoa, can be resolved in detail, including cilia and flagella. The instrument design and performance are presented, including images and tracks of bacterial and protozoal mixed samples and pure cultures of six selected species. Organisms as small as 1 μm (bacterial spores) and as large as 60 μm (Paramecium bursaria) may be resolved and tracked without changes in the instrument configuration. Finally, we present a dilution series investigating the maximum cell density that can be imaged, a type of analysis that has not been presented in previous holographic microscopy studies.

  3. 3D technology for intelligent trackers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipton, Ronald

    2010-10-01

    At Super-LHC luminosity it is expected that the standard suite of level 1 triggers for CMS will saturate. Information from the tracker will be needed to reduce trigger rates to satisfy the level 1 bandwidth. Tracking trigger modules which correlate information from closely-spaced sensor layers to form an on-detector momentum filter are being developed by several groups. We report on a trigger module design which utilizes three dimensional integrated circuit technology incorporating chips which are connected both to the top and bottom sensor, providing the ability to filter information locally. A demonstration chip, the VICTR, has been submitted to the Chartered/Tezzaron two-tier 3D run coordinated by Fermilab. We report on the 3D design concept, the status of the VICTR chip and associated sensor integration utilizing oxide bonding.

  4. 3D Technology for intelligent trackers

    SciTech Connect

    Lipton, Ronald; /Fermilab

    2010-09-01

    At Super-LHC luminosity it is expected that the standard suite of level 1 triggers for CMS will saturate. Information from the tracker will be needed to reduce trigger rates to satisfy the level 1 bandwidth. Tracking trigger modules which correlate information from closely-spaced sensor layers to form an on-detector momentum filter are being developed by several groups. We report on a trigger module design which utilizes three dimensional integrated circuit technology incorporating chips which are connected both to the top and bottom sensor, providing the ability to filter information locally. A demonstration chip, the VICTR, has been submitted to the Chartered/Tezzaron two-tier 3D run coordinated by Fermilab. We report on the 3D design concept, the status of the VICTR chip and associated sensor integration utilizing oxide bonding.

  5. Debris Dispersion Model Using Java 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thirumalainambi, Rajkumar; Bardina, Jorge

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes web based simulation of Shuttle launch operations and debris dispersion. Java 3D graphics provides geometric and visual content with suitable mathematical model and behaviors of Shuttle launch. Because the model is so heterogeneous and interrelated with various factors, 3D graphics combined with physical models provides mechanisms to understand the complexity of launch and range operations. The main focus in the modeling and simulation covers orbital dynamics and range safety. Range safety areas include destruct limit lines, telemetry and tracking and population risk near range. If there is an explosion of Shuttle during launch, debris dispersion is explained. The shuttle launch and range operations in this paper are discussed based on the operations from Kennedy Space Center, Florida, USA.

  6. Euro3D Science Conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, J. R.

    2004-02-01

    The Euro3D RTN is an EU funded Research Training Network to foster the exploitation of 3D spectroscopy in Europe. 3D spectroscopy is a general term for spectroscopy of an area of the sky and derives its name from its two spatial + one spectral dimensions. There are an increasing number of instruments which use integral field devices to achieve spectroscopy of an area of the sky, either using lens arrays, optical fibres or image slicers, to pack spectra of multiple pixels on the sky (``spaxels'') onto a 2D detector. On account of the large volume of data and the special methods required to reduce and analyse 3D data, there are only a few centres of expertise and these are mostly involved with instrument developments. There is a perceived lack of expertise in 3D spectroscopy spread though the astronomical community and its use in the armoury of the observational astronomer is viewed as being highly specialised. For precisely this reason the Euro3D RTN was proposed to train young researchers in this area and develop user tools to widen the experience with this particular type of data in Europe. The Euro3D RTN is coordinated by Martin M. Roth (Astrophysikalisches Institut Potsdam) and has been running since July 2002. The first Euro3D science conference was held in Cambridge, UK from 22 to 23 May 2003. The main emphasis of the conference was, in keeping with the RTN, to expose the work of the young post-docs who are funded by the RTN. In addition the team members from the eleven European institutes involved in Euro3D also presented instrumental and observational developments. The conference was organized by Andy Bunker and held at the Institute of Astronomy. There were over thirty participants and 26 talks covered the whole range of application of 3D techniques. The science ranged from Galactic planetary nebulae and globular clusters to kinematics of nearby galaxies out to objects at high redshift. Several talks were devoted to reporting recent observations with newly

  7. 3D printing in dentistry.

    PubMed

    Dawood, A; Marti Marti, B; Sauret-Jackson, V; Darwood, A

    2015-12-01

    3D printing has been hailed as a disruptive technology which will change manufacturing. Used in aerospace, defence, art and design, 3D printing is becoming a subject of great interest in surgery. The technology has a particular resonance with dentistry, and with advances in 3D imaging and modelling technologies such as cone beam computed tomography and intraoral scanning, and with the relatively long history of the use of CAD CAM technologies in dentistry, it will become of increasing importance. Uses of 3D printing include the production of drill guides for dental implants, the production of physical models for prosthodontics, orthodontics and surgery, the manufacture of dental, craniomaxillofacial and orthopaedic implants, and the fabrication of copings and frameworks for implant and dental restorations. This paper reviews the types of 3D printing technologies available and their various applications in dentistry and in maxillofacial surgery. PMID:26657435

  8. PLOT3D user's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walatka, Pamela P.; Buning, Pieter G.; Pierce, Larry; Elson, Patricia A.

    1990-01-01

    PLOT3D is a computer graphics program designed to visualize the grids and solutions of computational fluid dynamics. Seventy-four functions are available. Versions are available for many systems. PLOT3D can handle multiple grids with a million or more grid points, and can produce varieties of model renderings, such as wireframe or flat shaded. Output from PLOT3D can be used in animation programs. The first part of this manual is a tutorial that takes the reader, keystroke by keystroke, through a PLOT3D session. The second part of the manual contains reference chapters, including the helpfile, data file formats, advice on changing PLOT3D, and sample command files.

  9. 3D printing in dentistry.

    PubMed

    Dawood, A; Marti Marti, B; Sauret-Jackson, V; Darwood, A

    2015-12-01

    3D printing has been hailed as a disruptive technology which will change manufacturing. Used in aerospace, defence, art and design, 3D printing is becoming a subject of great interest in surgery. The technology has a particular resonance with dentistry, and with advances in 3D imaging and modelling technologies such as cone beam computed tomography and intraoral scanning, and with the relatively long history of the use of CAD CAM technologies in dentistry, it will become of increasing importance. Uses of 3D printing include the production of drill guides for dental implants, the production of physical models for prosthodontics, orthodontics and surgery, the manufacture of dental, craniomaxillofacial and orthopaedic implants, and the fabrication of copings and frameworks for implant and dental restorations. This paper reviews the types of 3D printing technologies available and their various applications in dentistry and in maxillofacial surgery.

  10. Computational optical-sectioning microscopy for 3D quantization of cell motion: results and challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNally, James G.

    1994-09-01

    How cells move and navigate within a 3D tissue mass is of central importance in such diverse problems as embryonic development, wound healing and metastasis. This locomotion can now be visualized and quantified by using computation optical-sectioning microscopy. In this approach, a series of 2D images at different depths in a specimen are stacked to construct a 3D image, and then with a knowledge of the microscope's point-spread function, the actual distribution of fluorescent intensity in the specimen is estimated via computation. When coupled with wide-field optics and a cooled CCD camera, this approach permits non-destructive 3D imaging of living specimens over long time periods. With these techniques, we have observed a complex diversity of motile behaviors in a model embryonic system, the cellular slime mold Dictyostelium. To understand the mechanisms which control these various behaviors, we are examining motion in various Dictyostelium mutants with known defects in proteins thought to be essential for signal reception, cell-cell adhesion or locomotion. This application of computational techniques to analyze 3D cell locomotion raises several technical challenges. Image restoration techniques must be fast enough to process numerous 1 Gbyte time-lapse data sets (16 Mbytes per 3D image X 60 time points). Because some cells are weakly labeled and background intensity is often high due to unincorporated dye, the SNR in some of these images is poor. Currently, the images are processed by a regularized linear least- squares restoration method, and occasionally by a maximum-likelihood method. Also required for these studies are accurate automated- tracking procedures to generate both 3D trajectories for individual cells and 3D flows for a group of cells. Tracking is currently done independently for each cell, using a cell's image as a template to search for a similar image at the next time point. Finally, sophisticated visualization techniques are needed to view the

  11. 3D Tissue Culturing: Tissue in Cube: In Vitro 3D Culturing Platform with Hybrid Gel Cubes for Multidirectional Observations (Adv. Healthcare Mater. 13/2016).

    PubMed

    Hagiwara, Masaya; Kawahara, Tomohiro; Nobata, Rina

    2016-07-01

    An in vitro 3D culturing platform enabling multidirectional observations of 3D biosamples is presented by M. Hagiwara and co-workers on page 1566. 3D recognition of a sample structure can be achieved by facilitating multi-directional views using a standard microscope without a laser system. The cubic platform has the potential to promote 3D culture studies, offering easy handling and compatibility with commercial culture plates at a low price tag. PMID:27384934

  12. 3D Tissue Culturing: Tissue in Cube: In Vitro 3D Culturing Platform with Hybrid Gel Cubes for Multidirectional Observations (Adv. Healthcare Mater. 13/2016).

    PubMed

    Hagiwara, Masaya; Kawahara, Tomohiro; Nobata, Rina

    2016-07-01

    An in vitro 3D culturing platform enabling multidirectional observations of 3D biosamples is presented by M. Hagiwara and co-workers on page 1566. 3D recognition of a sample structure can be achieved by facilitating multi-directional views using a standard microscope without a laser system. The cubic platform has the potential to promote 3D culture studies, offering easy handling and compatibility with commercial culture plates at a low price tag.

  13. Walker Ranch 3D seismic images

    DOE Data Explorer

    Robert J. Mellors

    2016-03-01

    Amplitude images (both vertical and depth slices) extracted from 3D seismic reflection survey over area of Walker Ranch area (adjacent to Raft River). Crossline spacing of 660 feet and inline of 165 feet using a Vibroseis source. Processing included depth migration. Micro-earthquake hypocenters on images. Stratigraphic information and nearby well tracks added to images. Images are embedded in a Microsoft Word document with additional information. Exact location and depth restricted for proprietary reasons. Data collection and processing funded by Agua Caliente. Original data remains property of Agua Caliente.

  14. Unassisted 3D camera calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atanassov, Kalin; Ramachandra, Vikas; Nash, James; Goma, Sergio R.

    2012-03-01

    With the rapid growth of 3D technology, 3D image capture has become a critical part of the 3D feature set on mobile phones. 3D image quality is affected by the scene geometry as well as on-the-device processing. An automatic 3D system usually assumes known camera poses accomplished by factory calibration using a special chart. In real life settings, pose parameters estimated by factory calibration can be negatively impacted by movements of the lens barrel due to shaking, focusing, or camera drop. If any of these factors displaces the optical axes of either or both cameras, vertical disparity might exceed the maximum tolerable margin and the 3D user may experience eye strain or headaches. To make 3D capture more practical, one needs to consider unassisted (on arbitrary scenes) calibration. In this paper, we propose an algorithm that relies on detection and matching of keypoints between left and right images. Frames containing erroneous matches, along with frames with insufficiently rich keypoint constellations, are detected and discarded. Roll, pitch yaw , and scale differences between left and right frames are then estimated. The algorithm performance is evaluated in terms of the remaining vertical disparity as compared to the maximum tolerable vertical disparity.

  15. 3-D Perspective Pasadena, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This perspective view shows the western part of the city of Pasadena, California, looking north towards the San Gabriel Mountains. Portions of the cities of Altadena and La Canada, Flintridge are also shown. The image was created from three datasets: the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) supplied the elevation data; Landsat data from November 11, 1986 provided the land surface color (not the sky) and U.S. Geological Survey digital aerial photography provides the image detail. The Rose Bowl, surrounded by a golf course, is the circular feature at the bottom center of the image. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory is the cluster of large buildings north of the Rose Bowl at the base of the mountains. A large landfill, Scholl Canyon, is the smooth area in the lower left corner of the scene. This image shows the power of combining data from different sources to create planning tools to study problems that affect large urban areas. In addition to the well-known earthquake hazards, Southern California is affected by a natural cycle of fire and mudflows. Wildfires strip the mountains of vegetation, increasing the hazards from flooding and mudflows for several years afterwards. Data such as shown on this image can be used to predict both how wildfires will spread over the terrain and also how mudflows will be channeled down the canyons. The Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), launched on February 11, 2000, uses the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. The mission was designed to collect three dimensional measurements of the Earth's surface. To collect the 3-D data, engineers added a 60-meter-long (200-foot) mast, an additional C-band imaging antenna and improved tracking and navigation devices. The mission is a cooperative project between the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the National Imagery and Mapping Agency

  16. Flexydos3D: A new deformable anthropomorphic 3D dosimeter readout with optical CT scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Deene, Yves; Hill, Robin; Skyt, Peter S.; Booth, Jeremy

    2015-01-01

    A new deformable polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) based dosimeter is proposed that can be cast in an anthropomorphic shape and that can be used for 3D radiation dosimetry of deformable targets. The new material has additional favorable characteristics as it is tissue equivalent for high-energy photons, easy to make and is non-toxic. In combination with dual wavelength optical scanning, it is a powerful dosimeter for dose verification of image gated or organ tracked radiotherapy with moving and deforming targets.

  17. PLOT3D/AMES, DEC VAX VMS VERSION USING DISSPLA (WITH TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P.

    1994-01-01

    well as 2-D and 3-D lines, but does not support graphics features requiring 3-D polygons (shading and hidden line removal, for example). Views can be manipulated using keyboard commands. This version of PLOT3D is potentially able to produce files for a variety of output devices; however, site-specific capabilities will vary depending on the device drivers supplied with the user's DISSPLA library. If ARCGRAPH (ARC-12350) is installed on the user's VAX, the VMS/DISSPLA version of PLOT3D can also be used to create files for use in GAS (Graphics Animation System, ARC-12379), an IRIS program capable of animating and recording images on film. The version 3.6b+ VMS/DISSPLA implementations of PLOT3D (ARC-12777) and PLOT3D/TURB3D (ARC-12781) were developed for use on VAX computers running VMS Version 5.0 and DISSPLA Version 11.0. The standard distribution media for each of these programs is a 9-track, 6250 bpi magnetic tape in DEC VAX BACKUP format. Customers purchasing one implementation version of PLOT3D or PLOT3D/TURB3D will be given a $200 discount on each additional implementation version ordered at the same time. Version 3.6b+ of PLOT3D and PLOT3D/TURB3D are also supported for the following computers and graphics libraries: (1) generic UNIX Supercomputer and IRIS, suitable for CRAY 2/UNICOS, CONVEX, and Alliant with remote IRIS 2xxx/3xxx or IRIS 4D (ARC-12779, ARC-12784); (2) Silicon Graphics IRIS 2xxx/3xxx or IRIS 4D (ARC-12783, ARC12782); (3) generic UNIX and DISSPLA Version 11.0 (ARC-12788, ARC-12778); and (4) Apollo computers running UNIX and GMR3D Version 2.0 (ARC-12789, ARC-12785 which have no capabilities to put text on plots). Silicon Graphics Iris, IRIS 4D, and IRIS 2xxx/3xxx are trademarks of Silicon Graphics Incorporated. VAX and VMS are trademarks of Digital Electronics Corporation. DISSPLA is a trademark of Computer Associates. CRAY 2 and UNICOS are trademarks of CRAY Research, Incorporated. CONVEX is a trademark of Convex Computer Corporation. Alliant is a

  18. PLOT3D/AMES, DEC VAX VMS VERSION USING DISSPLA (WITHOUT TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P. G.

    1994-01-01

    well as 2-D and 3-D lines, but does not support graphics features requiring 3-D polygons (shading and hidden line removal, for example). Views can be manipulated using keyboard commands. This version of PLOT3D is potentially able to produce files for a variety of output devices; however, site-specific capabilities will vary depending on the device drivers supplied with the user's DISSPLA library. If ARCGRAPH (ARC-12350) is installed on the user's VAX, the VMS/DISSPLA version of PLOT3D can also be used to create files for use in GAS (Graphics Animation System, ARC-12379), an IRIS program capable of animating and recording images on film. The version 3.6b+ VMS/DISSPLA implementations of PLOT3D (ARC-12777) and PLOT3D/TURB3D (ARC-12781) were developed for use on VAX computers running VMS Version 5.0 and DISSPLA Version 11.0. The standard distribution media for each of these programs is a 9-track, 6250 bpi magnetic tape in DEC VAX BACKUP format. Customers purchasing one implementation version of PLOT3D or PLOT3D/TURB3D will be given a $200 discount on each additional implementation version ordered at the same time. Version 3.6b+ of PLOT3D and PLOT3D/TURB3D are also supported for the following computers and graphics libraries: (1) generic UNIX Supercomputer and IRIS, suitable for CRAY 2/UNICOS, CONVEX, and Alliant with remote IRIS 2xxx/3xxx or IRIS 4D (ARC-12779, ARC-12784); (2) Silicon Graphics IRIS 2xxx/3xxx or IRIS 4D (ARC-12783, ARC12782); (3) generic UNIX and DISSPLA Version 11.0 (ARC-12788, ARC-12778); and (4) Apollo computers running UNIX and GMR3D Version 2.0 (ARC-12789, ARC-12785 which have no capabilities to put text on plots). Silicon Graphics Iris, IRIS 4D, and IRIS 2xxx/3xxx are trademarks of Silicon Graphics Incorporated. VAX and VMS are trademarks of Digital Electronics Corporation. DISSPLA is a trademark of Computer Associates. CRAY 2 and UNICOS are trademarks of CRAY Research, Incorporated. CONVEX is a trademark of Convex Computer Corporation. Alliant is a

  19. Spatially resolved 3D noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haefner, David P.; Preece, Bradley L.; Doe, Joshua M.; Burks, Stephen D.

    2016-05-01

    When evaluated with a spatially uniform irradiance, an imaging sensor exhibits both spatial and temporal variations, which can be described as a three-dimensional (3D) random process considered as noise. In the 1990s, NVESD engineers developed an approximation to the 3D power spectral density (PSD) for noise in imaging systems known as 3D noise. In this correspondence, we describe how the confidence intervals for the 3D noise measurement allows for determination of the sampling necessary to reach a desired precision. We then apply that knowledge to create a smaller cube that can be evaluated spatially across the 2D image giving the noise as a function of position. The method presented here allows for both defective pixel identification and implements the finite sampling correction matrix. In support of the reproducible research effort, the Matlab functions associated with this work can be found on the Mathworks file exchange [1].

  20. Autofocus for 3D imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee-Elkin, Forest

    2008-04-01

    Three dimensional (3D) autofocus remains a significant challenge for the development of practical 3D multipass radar imaging. The current 2D radar autofocus methods are not readily extendable across sensor passes. We propose a general framework that allows a class of data adaptive solutions for 3D auto-focus across passes with minimal constraints on the scene contents. The key enabling assumption is that portions of the scene are sparse in elevation which reduces the number of free variables and results in a system that is simultaneously solved for scatterer heights and autofocus parameters. The proposed method extends 2-pass interferometric synthetic aperture radar (IFSAR) methods to an arbitrary number of passes allowing the consideration of scattering from multiple height locations. A specific case from the proposed autofocus framework is solved and demonstrates autofocus and coherent multipass 3D estimation across the 8 passes of the "Gotcha Volumetric SAR Data Set" X-Band radar data.

  1. Accepting the T3D

    SciTech Connect

    Rich, D.O.; Pope, S.C.; DeLapp, J.G.

    1994-10-01

    In April, a 128 PE Cray T3D was installed at Los Alamos National Laboratory`s Advanced Computing Laboratory as part of the DOE`s High-Performance Parallel Processor Program (H4P). In conjunction with CRI, the authors implemented a 30 day acceptance test. The test was constructed in part to help them understand the strengths and weaknesses of the T3D. In this paper, they briefly describe the H4P and its goals. They discuss the design and implementation of the T3D acceptance test and detail issues that arose during the test. They conclude with a set of system requirements that must be addressed as the T3D system evolves.

  2. Combinatorial 3D Mechanical Metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coulais, Corentin; Teomy, Eial; de Reus, Koen; Shokef, Yair; van Hecke, Martin

    2015-03-01

    We present a class of elastic structures which exhibit 3D-folding motion. Our structures consist of cubic lattices of anisotropic unit cells that can be tiled in a complex combinatorial fashion. We design and 3d-print this complex ordered mechanism, in which we combine elastic hinges and defects to tailor the mechanics of the material. Finally, we use this large design space to encode smart functionalities such as surface patterning and multistability.

  3. PLOT3D/AMES, GENERIC UNIX VERSION USING DISSPLA (WITH TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P.

    1994-01-01

    well as 2-D and 3-D lines, but does not support graphics features requiring 3-D polygons (shading and hidden line removal, for example). Views can be manipulated using keyboard commands. This version of PLOT3D is potentially able to produce files for a variety of output devices; however, site-specific capabilities will vary depending on the device drivers supplied with the user's DISSPLA library. The version 3.6b+ UNIX/DISSPLA implementations of PLOT3D (ARC-12788) and PLOT3D/TURB3D (ARC-12778) were developed for use on computers running UNIX SYSTEM 5 with BSD 4.3 extensions. The standard distribution media for each ofthese programs is a 9track, 6250 bpi magnetic tape in TAR format. Customers purchasing one implementation version of PLOT3D or PLOT3D/TURB3D will be given a $200 discount on each additional implementation version ordered at the same time. Version 3.6b+ of PLOT3D and PLOT3D/TURB3D are also supported for the following computers and graphics libraries: (1) generic UNIX Supercomputer and IRIS, suitable for CRAY 2/UNICOS, CONVEX, Alliant with remote IRIS 2xxx/3xxx or IRIS 4D (ARC-12779, ARC-12784); (2) Silicon Graphics IRIS 2xxx/3xxx or IRIS 4D (ARC-12783, ARC-12782); (3) VAX computers running VMS Version 5.0 and DISSPLA Version 11.0 (ARC-12777, ARC-12781); and (4) Apollo computers running UNIX and GMR3D Version 2.0 (ARC-12789, ARC-12785 which have no capabilities to put text on plots). Silicon Graphics Iris, IRIS 4D, and IRIS 2xxx/3xxx are trademarks of Silicon Graphics Incorporated. VAX and VMS are trademarks of Digital Electronics Corporation. DISSPLA is a trademark of Computer Associates. CRAY 2 and UNICOS are trademarks of CRAY Research, Incorporated. CONVEX is a trademark of Convex Computer Corporation. Alliant is a trademark of Alliant. Apollo and GMR3D are trademarks of Hewlett-Packard, Incorporated. System 5 is a trademark of Bell Labs, Incorporated. BSD4.3 is a trademark of the University of California at Berkeley. UNIX is a registered trademark of AT&T.

  4. PLOT3D/AMES, GENERIC UNIX VERSION USING DISSPLA (WITHOUT TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P.

    1994-01-01

    well as 2-D and 3-D lines, but does not support graphics features requiring 3-D polygons (shading and hidden line removal, for example). Views can be manipulated using keyboard commands. This version of PLOT3D is potentially able to produce files for a variety of output devices; however, site-specific capabilities will vary depending on the device drivers supplied with the user's DISSPLA library. The version 3.6b+ UNIX/DISSPLA implementations of PLOT3D (ARC-12788) and PLOT3D/TURB3D (ARC-12778) were developed for use on computers running UNIX SYSTEM 5 with BSD 4.3 extensions. The standard distribution media for each ofthese programs is a 9track, 6250 bpi magnetic tape in TAR format. Customers purchasing one implementation version of PLOT3D or PLOT3D/TURB3D will be given a $200 discount on each additional implementation version ordered at the same time. Version 3.6b+ of PLOT3D and PLOT3D/TURB3D are also supported for the following computers and graphics libraries: (1) generic UNIX Supercomputer and IRIS, suitable for CRAY 2/UNICOS, CONVEX, Alliant with remote IRIS 2xxx/3xxx or IRIS 4D (ARC-12779, ARC-12784); (2) Silicon Graphics IRIS 2xxx/3xxx or IRIS 4D (ARC-12783, ARC-12782); (3) VAX computers running VMS Version 5.0 and DISSPLA Version 11.0 (ARC-12777, ARC-12781); and (4) Apollo computers running UNIX and GMR3D Version 2.0 (ARC-12789, ARC-12785 which have no capabilities to put text on plots). Silicon Graphics Iris, IRIS 4D, and IRIS 2xxx/3xxx are trademarks of Silicon Graphics Incorporated. VAX and VMS are trademarks of Digital Electronics Corporation. DISSPLA is a trademark of Computer Associates. CRAY 2 and UNICOS are trademarks of CRAY Research, Incorporated. CONVEX is a trademark of Convex Computer Corporation. Alliant is a trademark of Alliant. Apollo and GMR3D are trademarks of Hewlett-Packard, Incorporated. System 5 is a trademark of Bell Labs, Incorporated. BSD4.3 is a trademark of the University of California at Berkeley. UNIX is a registered trademark of AT&T.

  5. LASTRAC.3d: Transition Prediction in 3D Boundary Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Chau-Lyan

    2004-01-01

    Langley Stability and Transition Analysis Code (LASTRAC) is a general-purpose, physics-based transition prediction code released by NASA for laminar flow control studies and transition research. This paper describes the LASTRAC extension to general three-dimensional (3D) boundary layers such as finite swept wings, cones, or bodies at an angle of attack. The stability problem is formulated by using a body-fitted nonorthogonal curvilinear coordinate system constructed on the body surface. The nonorthogonal coordinate system offers a variety of marching paths and spanwise waveforms. In the extreme case of an infinite swept wing boundary layer, marching with a nonorthogonal coordinate produces identical solutions to those obtained with an orthogonal coordinate system using the earlier release of LASTRAC. Several methods to formulate the 3D parabolized stability equations (PSE) are discussed. A surface-marching procedure akin to that for 3D boundary layer equations may be used to solve the 3D parabolized disturbance equations. On the other hand, the local line-marching PSE method, formulated as an easy extension from its 2D counterpart and capable of handling the spanwise mean flow and disturbance variation, offers an alternative. A linear stability theory or parabolized stability equations based N-factor analysis carried out along the streamline direction with a fixed wavelength and downstream-varying spanwise direction constitutes an efficient engineering approach to study instability wave evolution in a 3D boundary layer. The surface-marching PSE method enables a consistent treatment of the disturbance evolution along both streamwise and spanwise directions but requires more stringent initial conditions. Both PSE methods and the traditional LST approach are implemented in the LASTRAC.3d code. Several test cases for tapered or finite swept wings and cones at an angle of attack are discussed.

  6. From 3D view to 3D print

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dima, M.; Farisato, G.; Bergomi, M.; Viotto, V.; Magrin, D.; Greggio, D.; Farinato, J.; Marafatto, L.; Ragazzoni, R.; Piazza, D.

    2014-08-01

    In the last few years 3D printing is getting more and more popular and used in many fields going from manufacturing to industrial design, architecture, medical support and aerospace. 3D printing is an evolution of bi-dimensional printing, which allows to obtain a solid object from a 3D model, realized with a 3D modelling software. The final product is obtained using an additive process, in which successive layers of material are laid down one over the other. A 3D printer allows to realize, in a simple way, very complex shapes, which would be quite difficult to be produced with dedicated conventional facilities. Thanks to the fact that the 3D printing is obtained superposing one layer to the others, it doesn't need any particular work flow and it is sufficient to simply draw the model and send it to print. Many different kinds of 3D printers exist based on the technology and material used for layer deposition. A common material used by the toner is ABS plastics, which is a light and rigid thermoplastic polymer, whose peculiar mechanical properties make it diffusely used in several fields, like pipes production and cars interiors manufacturing. I used this technology to create a 1:1 scale model of the telescope which is the hardware core of the space small mission CHEOPS (CHaracterising ExOPlanets Satellite) by ESA, which aims to characterize EXOplanets via transits observations. The telescope has a Ritchey-Chrétien configuration with a 30cm aperture and the launch is foreseen in 2017. In this paper, I present the different phases for the realization of such a model, focusing onto pros and cons of this kind of technology. For example, because of the finite printable volume (10×10×12 inches in the x, y and z directions respectively), it has been necessary to split the largest parts of the instrument in smaller components to be then reassembled and post-processed. A further issue is the resolution of the printed material, which is expressed in terms of layers

  7. 3D-Pathology: a real-time system for quantitative diagnostic pathology and visualisation in 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gottrup, Christian; Beckett, Mark G.; Hager, Henrik; Locht, Peter

    2005-02-01

    This paper presents the results of the 3D-Pathology project conducted under the European EC Framework 5. The aim of the project was, through the application of 3D image reconstruction and visualization techniques, to improve the diagnostic and prognostic capabilities of medical personnel when analyzing pathological specimens using transmitted light microscopy. A fully automated, computer-controlled microscope system has been developed to capture 3D images of specimen content. 3D image reconstruction algorithms have been implemented and applied to the acquired volume data in order to facilitate the subsequent 3D visualization of the specimen. Three potential application fields, immunohistology, cromogenic in situ hybridization (CISH) and cytology, have been tested using the prototype system. For both immunohistology and CISH, use of the system furnished significant additional information to the pathologist.

  8. YouDash3D: exploring stereoscopic 3D gaming for 3D movie theaters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schild, Jonas; Seele, Sven; Masuch, Maic

    2012-03-01

    Along with the success of the digitally revived stereoscopic cinema, events beyond 3D movies become attractive for movie theater operators, i.e. interactive 3D games. In this paper, we present a case that explores possible challenges and solutions for interactive 3D games to be played by a movie theater audience. We analyze the setting and showcase current issues related to lighting and interaction. Our second focus is to provide gameplay mechanics that make special use of stereoscopy, especially depth-based game design. Based on these results, we present YouDash3D, a game prototype that explores public stereoscopic gameplay in a reduced kiosk setup. It features live 3D HD video stream of a professional stereo camera rig rendered in a real-time game scene. We use the effect to place the stereoscopic effigies of players into the digital game. The game showcases how stereoscopic vision can provide for a novel depth-based game mechanic. Projected trigger zones and distributed clusters of the audience video allow for easy adaptation to larger audiences and 3D movie theater gaming.

  9. Depth-fused 3D imagery on an immaterial display.

    PubMed

    Lee, Cha; Diverdi, Stephen; Höllerer, Tobias

    2009-01-01

    We present an immaterial display that uses a generalized form of depth-fused 3D (DFD) rendering to create unencumbered 3D visuals. To accomplish this result, we demonstrate a DFD display simulator that extends the established depth-fused 3D principle by using screens in arbitrary configurations and from arbitrary viewpoints. The feasibility of the generalized DFD effect is established with a user study using the simulator. Based on these results, we developed a prototype display using one or two immaterial screens to create an unencumbered 3D visual that users can penetrate, examining the potential for direct walk-through and reach-through manipulation of the 3D scene. We evaluate the prototype system in formative and summative user studies and report the tolerance thresholds discovered for both tracking and projector errors.

  10. Speaking Volumes About 3-D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    In 1999, Genex submitted a proposal to Stennis Space Center for a volumetric 3-D display technique that would provide multiple users with a 360-degree perspective to simultaneously view and analyze 3-D data. The futuristic capabilities of the VolumeViewer(R) have offered tremendous benefits to commercial users in the fields of medicine and surgery, air traffic control, pilot training and education, computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing, and military/battlefield management. The technology has also helped NASA to better analyze and assess the various data collected by its satellite and spacecraft sensors. Genex capitalized on its success with Stennis by introducing two separate products to the commercial market that incorporate key elements of the 3-D display technology designed under an SBIR contract. The company Rainbow 3D(R) imaging camera is a novel, three-dimensional surface profile measurement system that can obtain a full-frame 3-D image in less than 1 second. The third product is the 360-degree OmniEye(R) video system. Ideal for intrusion detection, surveillance, and situation management, this unique camera system offers a continuous, panoramic view of a scene in real time.

  11. Interactions between motile Escherichia coli and glass in media with various ionic strengths, as observed with a three-dimensional-tracking microscope.

    PubMed Central

    Vigeant, M A; Ford, R M

    1997-01-01

    Escherichia coli bacteria have been observed to swim along a glass surface for several minutes at a time. Settling velocities of nonmotile cells and a computer simulation of motile cells confirmed that an attractive force kept the bacteria near the surface. The goal of this study was to evaluate whether this attractive force could be explained by reversible adhesion of E. coli to the surface in the secondary energy minimum, according to the theory of Derjaguin, Landan, Verwey, and Overbeek (DLVO theory). This theory describes interactions between colloidal particles by combining attractive van der Waals forces with repulsive electrostatic forces. A three-dimensional-tracking microscope was used to follow both wild-type and smooth-swimming E. coli bacteria as they interacted with a glass coverslip in media of increasing ionic strengths, which corresponded to increasing depths of the secondary energy minimum. We found no quantifiable changes with ionic strength for either the tendencies of individual bacteria to approach the surface or the overall times bacteria spent near the surface. One change in bacterial behavior which was observed with the change in ionic strength was that the diameters of the circles which the smooth-swimming bacteria traced out on the glass increased in low-ionic-strength solution. PMID:9292997

  12. 3D-Printed Microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Au, Anthony K; Huynh, Wilson; Horowitz, Lisa F; Folch, Albert

    2016-03-14

    The advent of soft lithography allowed for an unprecedented expansion in the field of microfluidics. However, the vast majority of PDMS microfluidic devices are still made with extensive manual labor, are tethered to bulky control systems, and have cumbersome user interfaces, which all render commercialization difficult. On the other hand, 3D printing has begun to embrace the range of sizes and materials that appeal to the developers of microfluidic devices. Prior to fabrication, a design is digitally built as a detailed 3D CAD file. The design can be assembled in modules by remotely collaborating teams, and its mechanical and fluidic behavior can be simulated using finite-element modeling. As structures are created by adding materials without the need for etching or dissolution, processing is environmentally friendly and economically efficient. We predict that in the next few years, 3D printing will replace most PDMS and plastic molding techniques in academia.

  13. 3D Computations and Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Couch, R; Faux, D; Goto, D; Nikkel, D

    2004-04-05

    This project consists of two activities. Task A, Simulations and Measurements, combines all the material model development and associated numerical work with the materials-oriented experimental activities. The goal of this effort is to provide an improved understanding of dynamic material properties and to provide accurate numerical representations of those properties for use in analysis codes. Task B, ALE3D Development, involves general development activities in the ALE3D code with the focus of improving simulation capabilities for problems of mutual interest to DoD and DOE. Emphasis is on problems involving multi-phase flow, blast loading of structures and system safety/vulnerability studies.

  14. Finding and tracing human MSC in 3D microenvironments with the photoconvertible protein Dendra2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caires, Hugo R.; Gomez-Lazaro, Maria; Oliveira, Carla M.; Gomes, David; Mateus, Denisa D.; Oliveira, Carla; Barrias, Cristina C.; Barbosa, Mário A.; Almeida, Catarina R.

    2015-05-01

    Mesenchymal Stem/Stromal Cells (MSC) are a promising cell type for cell-based therapies - from tissue regeneration to treatment of autoimmune diseases - due to their capacity to migrate to damaged tissues, to differentiate in different lineages and to their immunomodulatory and paracrine properties. Here, a simple and reliable imaging technique was developed to study MSC dynamical behavior in natural and bioengineered 3D matrices. Human MSC were transfected to express a fluorescent photoswitchable protein, Dendra2, which was used to highlight and follow the same group of cells for more than seven days, even if removed from the microscope to the incubator. This strategy provided reliable tracking in 3D microenvironments with different properties, including the hydrogels Matrigel and alginate as well as chitosan porous scaffolds. Comparison of cells mobility within matrices with tuned physicochemical properties revealed that MSC embedded in Matrigel migrated 64% more with 5.2 mg protein/mL than with 9.6 mg/mL and that MSC embedded in RGD-alginate migrated 51% faster with 1% polymer concentration than in 2% RGD-alginate. This platform thus provides a straightforward approach to characterize MSC dynamics in 3D and has applications in the field of stem cell biology and for the development of biomaterials for tissue regeneration.

  15. Making Inexpensive 3-D Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manos, Harry

    2016-01-01

    Visual aids are important to student learning, and they help make the teacher's job easier. Keeping with the "TPT" theme of "The Art, Craft, and Science of Physics Teaching," the purpose of this article is to show how teachers, lacking equipment and funds, can construct a durable 3-D model reference frame and a model gravity…

  16. SNL3dFace

    2007-07-20

    This software distribution contains MATLAB and C++ code to enable identity verification using 3D images that may or may not contain a texture component. The code is organized to support system performance testing and system capability demonstration through the proper configuration of the available user interface. Using specific algorithm parameters the face recognition system has been demonstrated to achieve a 96.6% verification rate (Pd) at 0.001 false alarm rate. The system computes robust facial featuresmore » of a 3D normalized face using Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Fisher Linear Discriminant Analysis (FLDA). A 3D normalized face is obtained by alighning each face, represented by a set of XYZ coordinated, to a scaled reference face using the Iterative Closest Point (ICP) algorithm. The scaled reference face is then deformed to the input face using an iterative framework with parameters that control the deformed surface regulation an rate of deformation. A variety of options are available to control the information that is encoded by the PCA. Such options include the XYZ coordinates, the difference of each XYZ coordinates from the reference, the Z coordinate, the intensity/texture values, etc. In addition to PCA/FLDA feature projection this software supports feature matching to obtain similarity matrices for performance analysis. In addition, this software supports visualization of the STL, MRD, 2D normalized, and PCA synthetic representations in a 3D environment.« less

  17. SNL3dFace

    SciTech Connect

    Russ, Trina; Koch, Mark; Koudelka, Melissa; Peters, Ralph; Little, Charles; Boehnen, Chris; Peters, Tanya

    2007-07-20

    This software distribution contains MATLAB and C++ code to enable identity verification using 3D images that may or may not contain a texture component. The code is organized to support system performance testing and system capability demonstration through the proper configuration of the available user interface. Using specific algorithm parameters the face recognition system has been demonstrated to achieve a 96.6% verification rate (Pd) at 0.001 false alarm rate. The system computes robust facial features of a 3D normalized face using Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Fisher Linear Discriminant Analysis (FLDA). A 3D normalized face is obtained by alighning each face, represented by a set of XYZ coordinated, to a scaled reference face using the Iterative Closest Point (ICP) algorithm. The scaled reference face is then deformed to the input face using an iterative framework with parameters that control the deformed surface regulation an rate of deformation. A variety of options are available to control the information that is encoded by the PCA. Such options include the XYZ coordinates, the difference of each XYZ coordinates from the reference, the Z coordinate, the intensity/texture values, etc. In addition to PCA/FLDA feature projection this software supports feature matching to obtain similarity matrices for performance analysis. In addition, this software supports visualization of the STL, MRD, 2D normalized, and PCA synthetic representations in a 3D environment.

  18. 3D Printing: Exploring Capabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samuels, Kyle; Flowers, Jim

    2015-01-01

    As 3D printers become more affordable, schools are using them in increasing numbers. They fit well with the emphasis on product design in technology and engineering education, allowing students to create high-fidelity physical models to see and test different iterations in their product designs. They may also help students to "think in three…

  19. TACO3D. 3-D Finite Element Heat Transfer Code

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, W.E.

    1992-03-04

    TACO3D is a three-dimensional, finite-element program for heat transfer analysis. An extension of the two-dimensional TACO program, it can perform linear and nonlinear analyses and can be used to solve either transient or steady-state problems. The program accepts time-dependent or temperature-dependent material properties, and materials may be isotropic or orthotropic. A variety of time-dependent and temperature-dependent boundary conditions and loadings are available including temperature, flux, convection, and radiation boundary conditions and internal heat generation. Additional specialized features treat enclosure radiation, bulk nodes, and master/slave internal surface conditions (e.g., contact resistance). Data input via a free-field format is provided. A user subprogram feature allows for any type of functional representation of any independent variable. A profile (bandwidth) minimization option is available. The code is limited to implicit time integration for transient solutions. TACO3D has no general mesh generation capability. Rows of evenly-spaced nodes and rows of sequential elements may be generated, but the program relies on separate mesh generators for complex zoning. TACO3D does not have the ability to calculate view factors internally. Graphical representation of data in the form of time history and spatial plots is provided through links to the POSTACO and GRAPE postprocessor codes.

  20. 3D stereolithography printing of graphene oxide reinforced complex architectures.

    PubMed

    Lin, Dong; Jin, Shengyu; Zhang, Feng; Wang, Chao; Wang, Yiqian; Zhou, Chi; Cheng, Gary J

    2015-10-30

    Properties of polymer based nanocomposites reply on distribution, concentration, geometry and property of nanofillers in polymer matrix. Increasing the concentration of carbon based nanomaterials, such as CNTs, in polymer matrix often results in stronger but more brittle material. Here, we demonstrated the first three-dimensional (3D) printed graphene oxide complex structures by stereolithography with good combination of strength and ductility. With only 0.2% GOs, the tensile strength is increased by 62.2% and elongation increased by 12.8%. Transmission electron microscope results show that the GOs were randomly aligned in the cross section of polymer. We investigated the strengthening mechanism of the 3D printed structure in terms of tensile strength and Young's modulus. It is found that an increase in ductility of the 3D printed nanocomposites is related to increase in crystallinity of GOs reinforced polymer. Compression test of 3D GOs structure reveals the metal-like failure model of GOs nanocomposites.

  1. 3D stereolithography printing of graphene oxide reinforced complex architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Dong; Jin, Shengyu; Zhang, Feng; Wang, Chao; Wang, Yiqian; Zhou, Chi; Cheng, Gary J.

    2015-10-01

    Properties of polymer based nanocomposites reply on distribution, concentration, geometry and property of nanofillers in polymer matrix. Increasing the concentration of carbon based nanomaterials, such as CNTs, in polymer matrix often results in stronger but more brittle material. Here, we demonstrated the first three-dimensional (3D) printed graphene oxide complex structures by stereolithography with good combination of strength and ductility. With only 0.2% GOs, the tensile strength is increased by 62.2% and elongation increased by 12.8%. Transmission electron microscope results show that the GOs were randomly aligned in the cross section of polymer. We investigated the strengthening mechanism of the 3D printed structure in terms of tensile strength and Young’s modulus. It is found that an increase in ductility of the 3D printed nanocomposites is related to increase in crystallinity of GOs reinforced polymer. Compression test of 3D GOs structure reveals the metal-like failure model of GOs nanocomposites.

  2. 3D stereolithography printing of graphene oxide reinforced complex architectures.

    PubMed

    Lin, Dong; Jin, Shengyu; Zhang, Feng; Wang, Chao; Wang, Yiqian; Zhou, Chi; Cheng, Gary J

    2015-10-30

    Properties of polymer based nanocomposites reply on distribution, concentration, geometry and property of nanofillers in polymer matrix. Increasing the concentration of carbon based nanomaterials, such as CNTs, in polymer matrix often results in stronger but more brittle material. Here, we demonstrated the first three-dimensional (3D) printed graphene oxide complex structures by stereolithography with good combination of strength and ductility. With only 0.2% GOs, the tensile strength is increased by 62.2% and elongation increased by 12.8%. Transmission electron microscope results show that the GOs were randomly aligned in the cross section of polymer. We investigated the strengthening mechanism of the 3D printed structure in terms of tensile strength and Young's modulus. It is found that an increase in ductility of the 3D printed nanocomposites is related to increase in crystallinity of GOs reinforced polymer. Compression test of 3D GOs structure reveals the metal-like failure model of GOs nanocomposites. PMID:26443263

  3. Mirrored or identical--is the role of visual perception underestimated in the mental rotation process of 3D-objects?: a combined fMRI-eye tracking-study.

    PubMed

    Paschke, Kerstin; Jordan, Kirsten; Wüstenberg, Torsten; Baudewig, Jürgen; Leo Müller, Jürgen

    2012-07-01

    The mental-rotation task is a well known research paradigm to examine cognitive processes of mental imaging and mental manipulation (Shepard & Metzler, 1971). So far, research has been focused on stimulus orientation which indicates the necessary amount of mental rotation. But little attention has been paid to stimulus parity, specifically if and how identical and mirror-reversed stimuli are processed differently. We wanted to fill this gap by combining performance, eye-tracking, and neurofunctional measures using pairwise presented three-dimensional Shepard-Metzler stimuli in a self-paced event-related fMRI design. Based on our results we tried to reason at which stage of the mental-rotation process the treatment of mirrored and identical stimuli begins to diverge. As a common finding, response times for tasks with mirrored stimuli were longer compared to tasks with identical stimuli reflecting their higher cognitive demand. Moreover, we observed smaller saccade amplitudes for mirrored than for identical stimuli suggesting a smaller functional field of view during stimulus perception. The eye-movement results were complemented by our neurofunctional findings. Here, the processing of mirrored stimuli led to less activation in parts of the early visual cortex that respond to the visual periphery than the processing of identical figures. This activation difference remained after eye-movement-associated activations had been excluded. We explain our findings by stimulus-parity-induced differences in saliency maps built up to enhance perception. Thus, the treatment of mirrored and identical stimuli begins to diverge very early in the mental-rotation process and is associated with differences in visual processing.

  4. Forensic 3D scene reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Little, Charles Q.; Small, Daniel E.; Peters, Ralph R.; Rigdon, J. B.

    2000-05-01

    Traditionally law enforcement agencies have relied on basic measurement and imaging tools, such as tape measures and cameras, in recording a crime scene. A disadvantage of these methods is that they are slow and cumbersome. The development of a portable system that can rapidly record a crime scene with current camera imaging, 3D geometric surface maps, and contribute quantitative measurements such as accurate relative positioning of crime scene objects, would be an asset to law enforcement agents in collecting and recording significant forensic data. The purpose of this project is to develop a fieldable prototype of a fast, accurate, 3D measurement and imaging system that would support law enforcement agents to quickly document and accurately record a crime scene.

  5. 3D Printable Graphene Composite.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xiaojun; Li, Dong; Jiang, Wei; Gu, Zheming; Wang, Xiaojuan; Zhang, Zengxing; Sun, Zhengzong

    2015-07-08

    In human being's history, both the Iron Age and Silicon Age thrived after a matured massive processing technology was developed. Graphene is the most recent superior material which could potentially initialize another new material Age. However, while being exploited to its full extent, conventional processing methods fail to provide a link to today's personalization tide. New technology should be ushered in. Three-dimensional (3D) printing fills the missing linkage between graphene materials and the digital mainstream. Their alliance could generate additional stream to push the graphene revolution into a new phase. Here we demonstrate for the first time, a graphene composite, with a graphene loading up to 5.6 wt%, can be 3D printable into computer-designed models. The composite's linear thermal coefficient is below 75 ppm·°C(-1) from room temperature to its glass transition temperature (Tg), which is crucial to build minute thermal stress during the printing process.

  6. Forensic 3D Scene Reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    LITTLE,CHARLES Q.; PETERS,RALPH R.; RIGDON,J. BRIAN; SMALL,DANIEL E.

    1999-10-12

    Traditionally law enforcement agencies have relied on basic measurement and imaging tools, such as tape measures and cameras, in recording a crime scene. A disadvantage of these methods is that they are slow and cumbersome. The development of a portable system that can rapidly record a crime scene with current camera imaging, 3D geometric surface maps, and contribute quantitative measurements such as accurate relative positioning of crime scene objects, would be an asset to law enforcement agents in collecting and recording significant forensic data. The purpose of this project is to develop a feasible prototype of a fast, accurate, 3D measurement and imaging system that would support law enforcement agents to quickly document and accurately record a crime scene.

  7. 3D Printed Robotic Hand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pizarro, Yaritzmar Rosario; Schuler, Jason M.; Lippitt, Thomas C.

    2013-01-01

    Dexterous robotic hands are changing the way robots and humans interact and use common tools. Unfortunately, the complexity of the joints and actuations drive up the manufacturing cost. Some cutting edge and commercially available rapid prototyping machines now have the ability to print multiple materials and even combine these materials in the same job. A 3D model of a robotic hand was designed using Creo Parametric 2.0. Combining "hard" and "soft" materials, the model was printed on the Object Connex350 3D printer with the purpose of resembling as much as possible the human appearance and mobility of a real hand while needing no assembly. After printing the prototype, strings where installed as actuators to test mobility. Based on printing materials, the manufacturing cost of the hand was $167, significantly lower than other robotic hands without the actuators since they have more complex assembly processes.

  8. 3D light scanning macrography.

    PubMed

    Huber, D; Keller, M; Robert, D

    2001-08-01

    The technique of 3D light scanning macrography permits the non-invasive surface scanning of small specimens at magnifications up to 200x. Obviating both the problem of limited depth of field inherent to conventional close-up macrophotography and the metallic coating required by scanning electron microscopy, 3D light scanning macrography provides three-dimensional digital images of intact specimens without the loss of colour, texture and transparency information. This newly developed technique offers a versatile, portable and cost-efficient method for the non-invasive digital and photographic documentation of small objects. Computer controlled device operation and digital image acquisition facilitate fast and accurate quantitative morphometric investigations, and the technique offers a broad field of research and educational applications in biological, medical and materials sciences. PMID:11489078

  9. Sperm navigation along helical paths in 3D chemoattractant landscapes.

    PubMed

    Jikeli, Jan F; Alvarez, Luis; Friedrich, Benjamin M; Wilson, Laurence G; Pascal, René; Colin, Remy; Pichlo, Magdalena; Rennhack, Andreas; Brenker, Christoph; Kaupp, U Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    Sperm require a sense of direction to locate the egg for fertilization. They follow gradients of chemical and physical cues provided by the egg or the oviduct. However, the principles underlying three-dimensional (3D) navigation in chemical landscapes are unknown. Here using holographic microscopy and optochemical techniques, we track sea urchin sperm navigating in 3D chemoattractant gradients. Sperm sense gradients on two timescales, which produces two different steering responses. A periodic component, resulting from the helical swimming, gradually aligns the helix towards the gradient. When incremental path corrections fail and sperm get off course, a sharp turning manoeuvre puts sperm back on track. Turning results from an 'off' Ca(2+) response signifying a chemoattractant stimulation decrease and, thereby, a drop in cyclic GMP concentration and membrane voltage. These findings highlight the computational sophistication by which sperm sample gradients for deterministic klinotaxis. We provide a conceptual and technical framework for studying microswimmers in 3D chemical landscapes. PMID:26278469

  10. Sperm navigation along helical paths in 3D chemoattractant landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jikeli, Jan F.; Alvarez, Luis; Friedrich, Benjamin M.; Wilson, Laurence G.; Pascal, René; Colin, Remy; Pichlo, Magdalena; Rennhack, Andreas; Brenker, Christoph; Kaupp, U. Benjamin

    2015-08-01

    Sperm require a sense of direction to locate the egg for fertilization. They follow gradients of chemical and physical cues provided by the egg or the oviduct. However, the principles underlying three-dimensional (3D) navigation in chemical landscapes are unknown. Here using holographic microscopy and optochemical techniques, we track sea urchin sperm navigating in 3D chemoattractant gradients. Sperm sense gradients on two timescales, which produces two different steering responses. A periodic component, resulting from the helical swimming, gradually aligns the helix towards the gradient. When incremental path corrections fail and sperm get off course, a sharp turning manoeuvre puts sperm back on track. Turning results from an `off' Ca2+ response signifying a chemoattractant stimulation decrease and, thereby, a drop in cyclic GMP concentration and membrane voltage. These findings highlight the computational sophistication by which sperm sample gradients for deterministic klinotaxis. We provide a conceptual and technical framework for studying microswimmers in 3D chemical landscapes.

  11. 3D Finite Element Analysis of Particle-Reinforced Aluminum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, H.; Lissenden, C. J.

    2002-01-01

    Deformation in particle-reinforced aluminum has been simulated using three distinct types of finite element model: a three-dimensional repeating unit cell, a three-dimensional multi-particle model, and two-dimensional multi-particle models. The repeating unit cell model represents a fictitious periodic cubic array of particles. The 3D multi-particle (3D-MP) model represents randomly placed and oriented particles. The 2D generalized plane strain multi-particle models were obtained from planar sections through the 3D-MP model. These models were used to study the tensile macroscopic stress-strain response and the associated stress and strain distributions in an elastoplastic matrix. The results indicate that the 2D model having a particle area fraction equal to the particle representative volume fraction of the 3D models predicted the same macroscopic stress-strain response as the 3D models. However, there are fluctuations in the particle area fraction in a representative volume element. As expected, predictions from 2D models having different particle area fractions do not agree with predictions from 3D models. More importantly, it was found that the microscopic stress and strain distributions from the 2D models do not agree with those from the 3D-MP model. Specifically, the plastic strain distribution predicted by the 2D model is banded along lines inclined at 45 deg from the loading axis while the 3D model prediction is not. Additionally, the triaxial stress and maximum principal stress distributions predicted by 2D and 3D models do not agree. Thus, it appears necessary to use a multi-particle 3D model to accurately predict material responses that depend on local effects, such as strain-to-failure, fracture toughness, and fatigue life.

  12. How to track protists in three dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drescher, Knut; Leptos, Kyriacos C.; Goldstein, Raymond E.

    2009-01-01

    We present an apparatus optimized for tracking swimming micro-organisms in the size range of 10-1000 μm, in three dimensions (3Ds), far from surfaces, and with negligible background convective fluid motion. Charge coupled device cameras attached to two long working distance microscopes synchronously image the sample from two perpendicular directions, with narrow band dark-field or bright-field illumination chosen to avoid triggering a phototactic response. The images from the two cameras can be combined to yield 3D tracks of the organism. Using additional, highly directional broad-spectrum illumination with millisecond timing control the phototactic trajectories in 3D of organisms ranging from Chlamydomonas to Volvox can be studied in detail. Surface-mediated hydrodynamic interactions can also be investigated without convective interference. Minimal modifications to the apparatus allow for studies of chemotaxis and other taxes.

  13. How to track protists in three dimensions.

    PubMed

    Drescher, Knut; Leptos, Kyriacos C; Goldstein, Raymond E

    2009-01-01

    We present an apparatus optimized for tracking swimming micro-organisms in the size range of 10-1000 microm, in three dimensions (3Ds), far from surfaces, and with negligible background convective fluid motion. Charge coupled device cameras attached to two long working distance microscopes synchronously image the sample from two perpendicular directions, with narrow band dark-field or bright-field illumination chosen to avoid triggering a phototactic response. The images from the two cameras can be combined to yield 3D tracks of the organism. Using additional, highly directional broad-spectrum illumination with millisecond timing control the phototactic trajectories in 3D of organisms ranging from Chlamydomonas to Volvox can be studied in detail. Surface-mediated hydrodynamic interactions can also be investigated without convective interference. Minimal modifications to the apparatus allow for studies of chemotaxis and other taxes.

  14. [Real time 3D echocardiography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, F.; Shiota, T.; Thomas, J. D.

    2001-01-01

    Three-dimensional representation of the heart is an old concern. Usually, 3D reconstruction of the cardiac mass is made by successive acquisition of 2D sections, the spatial localisation and orientation of which require complex guiding systems. More recently, the concept of volumetric acquisition has been introduced. A matricial emitter-receiver probe complex with parallel data processing provides instantaneous of a pyramidal 64 degrees x 64 degrees volume. The image is restituted in real time and is composed of 3 planes (planes B and C) which can be displaced in all spatial directions at any time during acquisition. The flexibility of this system of acquisition allows volume and mass measurement with greater accuracy and reproducibility, limiting inter-observer variability. Free navigation of the planes of investigation allows reconstruction for qualitative and quantitative analysis of valvular heart disease and other pathologies. Although real time 3D echocardiography is ready for clinical usage, some improvements are still necessary to improve its conviviality. Then real time 3D echocardiography could be the essential tool for understanding, diagnosis and management of patients.

  15. [Real time 3D echocardiography].

    PubMed

    Bauer, F; Shiota, T; Thomas, J D

    2001-07-01

    Three-dimensional representation of the heart is an old concern. Usually, 3D reconstruction of the cardiac mass is made by successive acquisition of 2D sections, the spatial localisation and orientation of which require complex guiding systems. More recently, the concept of volumetric acquisition has been introduced. A matricial emitter-receiver probe complex with parallel data processing provides instantaneous of a pyramidal 64 degrees x 64 degrees volume. The image is restituted in real time and is composed of 3 planes (planes B and C) which can be displaced in all spatial directions at any time during acquisition. The flexibility of this system of acquisition allows volume and mass measurement with greater accuracy and reproducibility, limiting inter-observer variability. Free navigation of the planes of investigation allows reconstruction for qualitative and quantitative analysis of valvular heart disease and other pathologies. Although real time 3D echocardiography is ready for clinical usage, some improvements are still necessary to improve its conviviality. Then real time 3D echocardiography could be the essential tool for understanding, diagnosis and management of patients. PMID:11494630

  16. 3D View of Mars Particle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This is a 3D representation of the pits seen in the first Atomic Force Microscope, or AFM, images sent back from NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander. Red represents the highest point and purple represents the lowest point.

    The particle in the upper left corner shown at the highest magnification ever seen from another world is a rounded particle about one micrometer, or one millionth of a meter, across. It is a particle of the dust that cloaks Mars. Such dust particles color the Martian sky pink, feed storms that regularly envelop the planet and produce Mars' distinctive red soil.

    The particle was part of a sample informally called 'Sorceress' delivered to the AFM on the 38th Martian day, or sol, of the mission (July 2, 2008). The AFM is part of Phoenix's microscopic station called MECA, or the Microscopy, Electrochemistry, and Conductivity Analyzer.

    The AFM was developed by a Swiss-led consortium, with Imperial College London producing the silicon substrate that holds sampled particles.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  17. 3-D Printed High Power Microwave Magnetrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, Nicholas; Greening, Geoffrey; Exelby, Steven; Gilgenbach, Ronald; Lau, Y. Y.; Hoff, Brad

    2015-11-01

    The size, weight, and power requirements of HPM systems are critical constraints on their viability, and can potentially be improved through the use of additive manufacturing techniques, which are rapidly increasing in capability and affordability. Recent experiments on the UM Recirculating Planar Magnetron (RPM), have explored the use of 3-D printed components in a HPM system. The system was driven by MELBA-C, a Marx-Abramyan system which delivers a -300 kV voltage pulse for 0.3-1.0 us, with a 0.15-0.3 T axial magnetic field applied by a pair of electromagnets. Anode blocks were printed from Water Shed XC 11122 photopolymer using a stereolithography process, and prepared with either a spray-coated or electroplated finish. Both manufacturing processes were compared against baseline data for a machined aluminum anode, noting any differences in power output, oscillation frequency, and mode stability. Evolution and durability of the 3-D printed structures were noted both visually and by tracking vacuum inventories via a residual gas analyzer. Research supported by AFOSR (grant #FA9550-15-1-0097) and AFRL.

  18. DYNA3D. Explicit 3-d Hydrodynamic FEM Program

    SciTech Connect

    Whirley, R.G.; Englemann, B.E. )

    1993-11-30

    DYNA3D is an explicit, three-dimensional, finite element program for analyzing the large deformation dynamic response of inelastic solids and structures. DYNA3D contains 30 material models and 10 equations of state (EOS) to cover a wide range of material behavior. The material models implemented are: elastic, orthotropic elastic, kinematic/isotropic plasticity, thermoelastoplastic, soil and crushable foam, linear viscoelastic, Blatz-Ko rubber, high explosive burn, hydrodynamic without deviatoric stresses, elastoplastic hydrodynamic, temperature-dependent elastoplastic, isotropic elastoplastic, isotropic elastoplastic with failure, soil and crushable foam with failure, Johnson/Cook plasticity model, pseudo TENSOR geological model, elastoplastic with fracture, power law isotropic plasticity, strain rate dependent plasticity, rigid, thermal orthotropic, composite damage model, thermal orthotropic with 12 curves, piecewise linear isotropic plasticity, inviscid two invariant geologic cap, orthotropic crushable model, Moonsy-Rivlin rubber, resultant plasticity, closed form update shell plasticity, and Frazer-Nash rubber model. The hydrodynamic material models determine only the deviatoric stresses. Pressure is determined by one of 10 equations of state including linear polynomial, JWL high explosive, Sack Tuesday high explosive, Gruneisen, ratio of polynomials, linear polynomial with energy deposition, ignition and growth of reaction in HE, tabulated compaction, tabulated, and TENSOR pore collapse. DYNA3D generates three binary output databases. One contains information for complete states at infrequent intervals; 50 to 100 states is typical. The second contains information for a subset of nodes and elements at frequent intervals; 1,000 to 10,000 states is typical. The last contains interface data for contact surfaces.

  19. 3D microscopy - new powerful tools in geomaterials characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauko Pranjić, Alenka; Mladenovič, Ana; Turk, Janez; Šajna, Aljoša; Čretnik, Janko

    2016-04-01

    Microtomography (microCT) is becoming more and more widely recognized in geological sciences as a powerful tool for the spatial characterization of rock and other geological materials. Together with 3D image analysis and other complementary techniques, it has the characteristics of an innovative and non-destructive 3D microscopical technique. On the other hand its main disadvantages are low availability (only a few geological laboratories are equipped with high resolution tomographs), the relatively high prices of testing connected with the use of an xray source, technical limitations connected to the resolution and imaging of certain materials, as well as timeconsuming and complex 3D image analysis, necessary for quantification of 3D tomographic data sets. In this work three examples are presented of optimal 3D microscopy analysis of geomaterials in construction such as porosity characterization of impregnated sandstone, aerated concrete and marble prone to bowing. Studies include processes of microCT imaging, 3D data analysis and fitting of data with complementary analysis, such as confocal microscopy, mercury porosimetry, gas sorption, optical/fluorescent microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Present work has been done in the frame of national research project 3D and 4D microscopy development of new powerful tools in geosciences (ARRS J1-7148) funded by Slovenian Research Agency.

  20. GPU-Accelerated Denoising in 3D (GD3D)

    2013-10-01

    The raw computational power GPU Accelerators enables fast denoising of 3D MR images using bilateral filtering, anisotropic diffusion, and non-local means. This software addresses two facets of this promising application: what tuning is necessary to achieve optimal performance on a modern GPU? And what parameters yield the best denoising results in practice? To answer the first question, the software performs an autotuning step to empirically determine optimal memory blocking on the GPU. To answer themore » second, it performs a sweep of algorithm parameters to determine the combination that best reduces the mean squared error relative to a noiseless reference image.« less

  1. Magmatic Systems in 3-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kent, G. M.; Harding, A. J.; Babcock, J. M.; Orcutt, J. A.; Bazin, S.; Singh, S.; Detrick, R. S.; Canales, J. P.; Carbotte, S. M.; Diebold, J.

    2002-12-01

    Multichannel seismic (MCS) images of crustal magma chambers are ideal targets for advanced visualization techniques. In the mid-ocean ridge environment, reflections originating at the melt-lens are well separated from other reflection boundaries, such as the seafloor, layer 2A and Moho, which enables the effective use of transparency filters. 3-D visualization of seismic reflectivity falls into two broad categories: volume and surface rendering. Volumetric-based visualization is an extremely powerful approach for the rapid exploration of very dense 3-D datasets. These 3-D datasets are divided into volume elements or voxels, which are individually color coded depending on the assigned datum value; the user can define an opacity filter to reject plotting certain voxels. This transparency allows the user to peer into the data volume, enabling an easy identification of patterns or relationships that might have geologic merit. Multiple image volumes can be co-registered to look at correlations between two different data types (e.g., amplitude variation with offsets studies), in a manner analogous to draping attributes onto a surface. In contrast, surface visualization of seismic reflectivity usually involves producing "fence" diagrams of 2-D seismic profiles that are complemented with seafloor topography, along with point class data, draped lines and vectors (e.g. fault scarps, earthquake locations and plate-motions). The overlying seafloor can be made partially transparent or see-through, enabling 3-D correlations between seafloor structure and seismic reflectivity. Exploration of 3-D datasets requires additional thought when constructing and manipulating these complex objects. As numbers of visual objects grow in a particular scene, there is a tendency to mask overlapping objects; this clutter can be managed through the effective use of total or partial transparency (i.e., alpha-channel). In this way, the co-variation between different datasets can be investigated

  2. 3D visual presentation of shoulder joint motion.

    PubMed

    Totterman, S; Tamez-Pena, J; Kwok, E; Strang, J; Smith, J; Rubens, D; Parker, K

    1998-01-01

    The 3D visual presentation of biodynamic events of human joints is a challenging task. Although the 3D reconstruction of high contrast structures from CT data has been widely explored, then there is much less experience in reconstructing the small low contrast soft tissue structures from inhomogeneous and sometimes noisy MR data. Further, there are no algorithms for tracking the motion of moving anatomic structures through MR data. We represent a comprehensive approach to 3D musculoskeletal imagery that addresses these challenges. Specific imaging protocols, segmentation algorithms and rendering techniques are developed and applied to render complex 3D musculoskeletal systems for their 4D visual presentation. Applications of our approach include analysis of rotational motion of the shoulder, the knee flexion, and other complex musculoskeletal motions, and the development of interactive virtual human joints.

  3. 3DSEM++: Adaptive and intelligent 3D SEM surface reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Tafti, Ahmad P; Holz, Jessica D; Baghaie, Ahmadreza; Owen, Heather A; He, Max M; Yu, Zeyun

    2016-08-01

    Structural analysis of microscopic objects is a longstanding topic in several scientific disciplines, such as biological, mechanical, and materials sciences. The scanning electron microscope (SEM), as a promising imaging equipment has been around for decades to determine the surface properties (e.g., compositions or geometries) of specimens by achieving increased magnification, contrast, and resolution greater than one nanometer. Whereas SEM micrographs still remain two-dimensional (2D), many research and educational questions truly require knowledge and facts about their three-dimensional (3D) structures. 3D surface reconstruction from SEM images leads to remarkable understanding of microscopic surfaces, allowing informative and qualitative visualization of the samples being investigated. In this contribution, we integrate several computational technologies including machine learning, contrario methodology, and epipolar geometry to design and develop a novel and efficient method called 3DSEM++ for multi-view 3D SEM surface reconstruction in an adaptive and intelligent fashion. The experiments which have been performed on real and synthetic data assert the approach is able to reach a significant precision to both SEM extrinsic calibration and its 3D surface modeling. PMID:27200484

  4. 3DSEM++: Adaptive and intelligent 3D SEM surface reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Tafti, Ahmad P; Holz, Jessica D; Baghaie, Ahmadreza; Owen, Heather A; He, Max M; Yu, Zeyun

    2016-08-01

    Structural analysis of microscopic objects is a longstanding topic in several scientific disciplines, such as biological, mechanical, and materials sciences. The scanning electron microscope (SEM), as a promising imaging equipment has been around for decades to determine the surface properties (e.g., compositions or geometries) of specimens by achieving increased magnification, contrast, and resolution greater than one nanometer. Whereas SEM micrographs still remain two-dimensional (2D), many research and educational questions truly require knowledge and facts about their three-dimensional (3D) structures. 3D surface reconstruction from SEM images leads to remarkable understanding of microscopic surfaces, allowing informative and qualitative visualization of the samples being investigated. In this contribution, we integrate several computational technologies including machine learning, contrario methodology, and epipolar geometry to design and develop a novel and efficient method called 3DSEM++ for multi-view 3D SEM surface reconstruction in an adaptive and intelligent fashion. The experiments which have been performed on real and synthetic data assert the approach is able to reach a significant precision to both SEM extrinsic calibration and its 3D surface modeling.

  5. Examination of 3D visual attention in stereoscopic video content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huynh-Thu, Quan; Schiatti, Luca

    2011-03-01

    Recent advances in video technology and digital cinema have made it possible to produce entertaining 3D stereoscopic content that can be viewed for an extended duration without necessarily causing extreme fatigue, visual strain and discomfort. Viewers focus naturally their attention on specific areas of interest in their visual field. Visual attention is an important aspect of perception and its understanding is therefore an important aspect for the creation of 3D stereoscopic content. Most of the studies on visual attention have focused on the case of still images or 2D video. Only a very few studies have investigated eye movement patterns in 3D stereoscopic moving sequences, and how these may differ from viewing 2D video content. In this paper, we present and discuss the results of a subjective experiment that we conducted using an eye-tracking apparatus to record observers' gaze patterns. Participants were asked to watch the same set of video clips in a free-viewing task. Each clip was shown in a 3D stereoscopic version and 2D version. Our results indicate that the extent of areas of interests is not necessarily wider in 3D. We found a very strong content dependency in the difference of density and locations of fixations between 2D and 3D stereoscopic content. However, we found that saccades were overall faster and that fixation durations were overall lower when observers viewed the 3D stereoscopic version.

  6. Interactive 3D Mars Visualization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, Mark W.

    2012-01-01

    The Interactive 3D Mars Visualization system provides high-performance, immersive visualization of satellite and surface vehicle imagery of Mars. The software can be used in mission operations to provide the most accurate position information for the Mars rovers to date. When integrated into the mission data pipeline, this system allows mission planners to view the location of the rover on Mars to 0.01-meter accuracy with respect to satellite imagery, with dynamic updates to incorporate the latest position information. Given this information so early in the planning process, rover drivers are able to plan more accurate drive activities for the rover than ever before, increasing the execution of science activities significantly. Scientifically, this 3D mapping information puts all of the science analyses to date into geologic context on a daily basis instead of weeks or months, as was the norm prior to this contribution. This allows the science planners to judge the efficacy of their previously executed science observations much more efficiently, and achieve greater science return as a result. The Interactive 3D Mars surface view is a Mars terrain browsing software interface that encompasses the entire region of exploration for a Mars surface exploration mission. The view is interactive, allowing the user to pan in any direction by clicking and dragging, or to zoom in or out by scrolling the mouse or touchpad. This set currently includes tools for selecting a point of interest, and a ruler tool for displaying the distance between and positions of two points of interest. The mapping information can be harvested and shared through ubiquitous online mapping tools like Google Mars, NASA WorldWind, and Worldwide Telescope.

  7. 3D-MSCT imaging of bullet trajectory in 3D crime scene reconstruction: two case reports.

    PubMed

    Colard, T; Delannoy, Y; Bresson, F; Marechal, C; Raul, J S; Hedouin, V

    2013-11-01

    Postmortem investigations are increasingly assisted by three-dimensional multi-slice computed tomography (3D-MSCT) and have become more available to forensic pathologists over the past 20years. In cases of ballistic wounds, 3D-MSCT can provide an accurate description of the bullet location, bone fractures and, more interestingly, a clear visual of the intracorporeal trajectory (bullet track). These forensic medical examinations can be combined with tridimensional bullet trajectory reconstructions created by forensic ballistic experts. These case reports present the implementation of tridimensional methods and the results of 3D crime scene reconstruction in two cases. The authors highlight the value of collaborations between police forensic experts and forensic medicine institutes through the incorporation of 3D-MSCT data in a crime scene reconstruction, which is of great interest in forensic science as a clear visual communication tool between experts and the court. PMID:23931960

  8. 3D-MSCT imaging of bullet trajectory in 3D crime scene reconstruction: two case reports.

    PubMed

    Colard, T; Delannoy, Y; Bresson, F; Marechal, C; Raul, J S; Hedouin, V

    2013-11-01

    Postmortem investigations are increasingly assisted by three-dimensional multi-slice computed tomography (3D-MSCT) and have become more available to forensic pathologists over the past 20years. In cases of ballistic wounds, 3D-MSCT can provide an accurate description of the bullet location, bone fractures and, more interestingly, a clear visual of the intracorporeal trajectory (bullet track). These forensic medical examinations can be combined with tridimensional bullet trajectory reconstructions created by forensic ballistic experts. These case reports present the implementation of tridimensional methods and the results of 3D crime scene reconstruction in two cases. The authors highlight the value of collaborations between police forensic experts and forensic medicine institutes through the incorporation of 3D-MSCT data in a crime scene reconstruction, which is of great interest in forensic science as a clear visual communication tool between experts and the court.

  9. What Lies Ahead (3-D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This 3-D cylindrical-perspective mosaic taken by the navigation camera on the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit on sol 82 shows the view south of the large crater dubbed 'Bonneville.' The rover will travel toward the Columbia Hills, seen here at the upper left. The rock dubbed 'Mazatzal' and the hole the rover drilled in to it can be seen at the lower left. The rover's position is referred to as 'Site 22, Position 32.' This image was geometrically corrected to make the horizon appear flat.

  10. Making Inexpensive 3-D Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manos, Harry

    2016-03-01

    Visual aids are important to student learning, and they help make the teacher's job easier. Keeping with the TPT theme of "The Art, Craft, and Science of Physics Teaching," the purpose of this article is to show how teachers, lacking equipment and funds, can construct a durable 3-D model reference frame and a model gravity well tailored to specific class lessons. Most of the supplies are readily available in the home or at school: rubbing alcohol, a rag, two colors of spray paint, art brushes, and masking tape. The cost of these supplies, if you don't have them, is less than 20.

  11. 3D Printed Shelby Cobra

    SciTech Connect

    Love, Lonnie

    2015-01-09

    ORNL's newly printed 3D Shelby Cobra was showcased at the 2015 NAIAS in Detroit. This "laboratory on wheels" uses the Shelby Cobra design, celebrating the 50th anniversary of this model and honoring the first vehicle to be voted a national monument. The Shelby was printed at the Department of Energy’s Manufacturing Demonstration Facility at ORNL using the BAAM (Big Area Additive Manufacturing) machine and is intended as a “plug-n-play” laboratory on wheels. The Shelby will allow research and development of integrated components to be tested and enhanced in real time, improving the use of sustainable, digital manufacturing solutions in the automotive industry.

  12. Positional Awareness Map 3D (PAM3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, Monica; Allen, Earl L.; Yount, John W.; Norcross, April Louise

    2012-01-01

    The Western Aeronautical Test Range of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration s Dryden Flight Research Center needed to address the aging software and hardware of its current situational awareness display application, the Global Real-Time Interactive Map (GRIM). GRIM was initially developed in the late 1980s and executes on older PC architectures using a Linux operating system that is no longer supported. Additionally, the software is difficult to maintain due to its complexity and loss of developer knowledge. It was decided that a replacement application must be developed or acquired in the near future. The replacement must provide the functionality of the original system, the ability to monitor test flight vehicles in real-time, and add improvements such as high resolution imagery and true 3-dimensional capability. This paper will discuss the process of determining the best approach to replace GRIM, and the functionality and capabilities of the first release of the Positional Awareness Map 3D.

  13. 3D acoustic atmospheric tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, Kevin; Finn, Anthony

    2014-10-01

    This paper presents a method for tomographically reconstructing spatially varying 3D atmospheric temperature profiles and wind velocity fields based. Measurements of the acoustic signature measured onboard a small Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) are compared to ground-based observations of the same signals. The frequency-shifted signal variations are then used to estimate the acoustic propagation delay between the UAV and the ground microphones, which are also affected by atmospheric temperature and wind speed vectors along each sound ray path. The wind and temperature profiles are modelled as the weighted sum of Radial Basis Functions (RBFs), which also allow local meteorological measurements made at the UAV and ground receivers to supplement any acoustic observations. Tomography is used to provide a full 3D reconstruction/visualisation of the observed atmosphere. The technique offers observational mobility under direct user control and the capacity to monitor hazardous atmospheric environments, otherwise not justifiable on the basis of cost or risk. This paper summarises the tomographic technique and reports on the results of simulations and initial field trials. The technique has practical applications for atmospheric research, sound propagation studies, boundary layer meteorology, air pollution measurements, analysis of wind shear, and wind farm surveys.

  14. Gravitation in 3D Spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laubenstein, John; Cockream, Kandi

    2009-05-01

    3D spacetime was developed by the IWPD Scale Metrics (SM) team using a coordinate system that translates n dimensions to n-1. 4-vectors are expressed in 3D along with a scaling factor representing time. Time is not orthogonal to the three spatial dimensions, but rather in alignment with an object's axis-of-motion. We have defined this effect as the object's ``orientation'' (X). The SM orientation (X) is equivalent to the orientation of the 4-velocity vector positioned tangent to its worldline, where X-1=θ+1 and θ is the angle of the 4-vector relative to the axis-of -motion. Both 4-vectors and SM appear to represent valid conceptualizations of the relationship between space and time. Why entertain SM? Scale Metrics gravity is quantized and may suggest a path for the full unification of gravitation with quantum theory. SM has been tested against current observation and is in agreement with the age of the universe, suggests a physical relationship between dark energy and dark matter, is in agreement with the accelerating expansion rate of the universe, contributes to the understanding of the fine-structure constant and provides a physical explanation of relativistic effects.

  15. 3D printed bionic ears.

    PubMed

    Mannoor, Manu S; Jiang, Ziwen; James, Teena; Kong, Yong Lin; Malatesta, Karen A; Soboyejo, Winston O; Verma, Naveen; Gracias, David H; McAlpine, Michael C

    2013-06-12

    The ability to three-dimensionally interweave biological tissue with functional electronics could enable the creation of bionic organs possessing enhanced functionalities over their human counterparts. Conventional electronic devices are inherently two-dimensional, preventing seamless multidimensional integration with synthetic biology, as the processes and materials are very different. Here, we present a novel strategy for overcoming these difficulties via additive manufacturing of biological cells with structural and nanoparticle derived electronic elements. As a proof of concept, we generated a bionic ear via 3D printing of a cell-seeded hydrogel matrix in the anatomic geometry of a human ear, along with an intertwined conducting polymer consisting of infused silver nanoparticles. This allowed for in vitro culturing of cartilage tissue around an inductive coil antenna in the ear, which subsequently enables readout of inductively-coupled signals from cochlea-shaped electrodes. The printed ear exhibits enhanced auditory sensing for radio frequency reception, and complementary left and right ears can listen to stereo audio music. Overall, our approach suggests a means to intricately merge biologic and nanoelectronic functionalities via 3D printing.

  16. 3D medical thermography device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moghadam, Peyman

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, a novel handheld 3D medical thermography system is introduced. The proposed system consists of a thermal-infrared camera, a color camera and a depth camera rigidly attached in close proximity and mounted on an ergonomic handle. As a practitioner holding the device smoothly moves it around the human body parts, the proposed system generates and builds up a precise 3D thermogram model by incorporating information from each new measurement in real-time. The data is acquired in motion, thus it provides multiple points of view. When processed, these multiple points of view are adaptively combined by taking into account the reliability of each individual measurement which can vary due to a variety of factors such as angle of incidence, distance between the device and the subject and environmental sensor data or other factors influencing a confidence of the thermal-infrared data when captured. Finally, several case studies are presented to support the usability and performance of the proposed system.

  17. 3D printed bionic ears.

    PubMed

    Mannoor, Manu S; Jiang, Ziwen; James, Teena; Kong, Yong Lin; Malatesta, Karen A; Soboyejo, Winston O; Verma, Naveen; Gracias, David H; McAlpine, Michael C

    2013-06-12

    The ability to three-dimensionally interweave biological tissue with functional electronics could enable the creation of bionic organs possessing enhanced functionalities over their human counterparts. Conventional electronic devices are inherently two-dimensional, preventing seamless multidimensional integration with synthetic biology, as the processes and materials are very different. Here, we present a novel strategy for overcoming these difficulties via additive manufacturing of biological cells with structural and nanoparticle derived electronic elements. As a proof of concept, we generated a bionic ear via 3D printing of a cell-seeded hydrogel matrix in the anatomic geometry of a human ear, along with an intertwined conducting polymer consisting of infused silver nanoparticles. This allowed for in vitro culturing of cartilage tissue around an inductive coil antenna in the ear, which subsequently enables readout of inductively-coupled signals from cochlea-shaped electrodes. The printed ear exhibits enhanced auditory sensing for radio frequency reception, and complementary left and right ears can listen to stereo audio music. Overall, our approach suggests a means to intricately merge biologic and nanoelectronic functionalities via 3D printing. PMID:23635097

  18. 3D Printable Graphene Composite

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Xiaojun; Li, Dong; Jiang, Wei; Gu, Zheming; Wang, Xiaojuan; Zhang, Zengxing; Sun, Zhengzong

    2015-01-01

    In human being’s history, both the Iron Age and Silicon Age thrived after a matured massive processing technology was developed. Graphene is the most recent superior material which could potentially initialize another new material Age. However, while being exploited to its full extent, conventional processing methods fail to provide a link to today’s personalization tide. New technology should be ushered in. Three-dimensional (3D) printing fills the missing linkage between graphene materials and the digital mainstream. Their alliance could generate additional stream to push the graphene revolution into a new phase. Here we demonstrate for the first time, a graphene composite, with a graphene loading up to 5.6 wt%, can be 3D printable into computer-designed models. The composite’s linear thermal coefficient is below 75 ppm·°C−1 from room temperature to its glass transition temperature (Tg), which is crucial to build minute thermal stress during the printing process. PMID:26153673

  19. 3D Printable Graphene Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Xiaojun; Li, Dong; Jiang, Wei; Gu, Zheming; Wang, Xiaojuan; Zhang, Zengxing; Sun, Zhengzong

    2015-07-01

    In human being’s history, both the Iron Age and Silicon Age thrived after a matured massive processing technology was developed. Graphene is the most recent superior material which could potentially initialize another new material Age. However, while being exploited to its full extent, conventional processing methods fail to provide a link to today’s personalization tide. New technology should be ushered in. Three-dimensional (3D) printing fills the missing linkage between graphene materials and the digital mainstream. Their alliance could generate additional stream to push the graphene revolution into a new phase. Here we demonstrate for the first time, a graphene composite, with a graphene loading up to 5.6 wt%, can be 3D printable into computer-designed models. The composite’s linear thermal coefficient is below 75 ppm·°C-1 from room temperature to its glass transition temperature (Tg), which is crucial to build minute thermal stress during the printing process.

  20. LOTT RANCH 3D PROJECT

    SciTech Connect

    Larry Lawrence; Bruce Miller

    2004-09-01

    The Lott Ranch 3D seismic prospect located in Garza County, Texas is a project initiated in September of 1991 by the J.M. Huber Corp., a petroleum exploration and production company. By today's standards the 126 square mile project does not seem monumental, however at the time it was conceived it was the most intensive land 3D project ever attempted. Acquisition began in September of 1991 utilizing GEO-SEISMIC, INC., a seismic data contractor. The field parameters were selected by J.M. Huber, and were of a radical design. The recording instruments used were GeoCor IV amplifiers designed by Geosystems Inc., which record the data in signed bit format. It would not have been practical, if not impossible, to have processed the entire raw volume with the tools available at that time. The end result was a dataset that was thought to have little utility due to difficulties in processing the field data. In 1997, Yates Energy Corp. located in Roswell, New Mexico, formed a partnership to further develop the project. Through discussions and meetings with Pinnacle Seismic, it was determined that the original Lott Ranch 3D volume could be vastly improved upon reprocessing. Pinnacle Seismic had shown the viability of improving field-summed signed bit data on smaller 2D and 3D projects. Yates contracted Pinnacle Seismic Ltd. to perform the reprocessing. This project was initiated with high resolution being a priority. Much of the potential resolution was lost through the initial summing of the field data. Modern computers that are now being utilized have tremendous speed and storage capacities that were cost prohibitive when this data was initially processed. Software updates and capabilities offer a variety of quality control and statics resolution, which are pertinent to the Lott Ranch project. The reprocessing effort was very successful. The resulting processed data-set was then interpreted using modern PC-based interpretation and mapping software. Production data, log data

  1. 3D annotation and manipulation of medical anatomical structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitanovski, Dime; Schaller, Christian; Hahn, Dieter; Daum, Volker; Hornegger, Joachim

    2009-02-01

    Although the medical scanners are rapidly moving towards a three-dimensional paradigm, the manipulation and annotation/labeling of the acquired data is still performed in a standard 2D environment. Editing and annotation of three-dimensional medical structures is currently a complex task and rather time-consuming, as it is carried out in 2D projections of the original object. A major problem in 2D annotation is the depth ambiguity, which requires 3D landmarks to be identified and localized in at least two of the cutting planes. Operating directly in a three-dimensional space enables the implicit consideration of the full 3D local context, which significantly increases accuracy and speed. A three-dimensional environment is as well more natural optimizing the user's comfort and acceptance. The 3D annotation environment requires the three-dimensional manipulation device and display. By means of two novel and advanced technologies, Wii Nintendo Controller and Philips 3D WoWvx display, we define an appropriate 3D annotation tool and a suitable 3D visualization monitor. We define non-coplanar setting of four Infrared LEDs with a known and exact position, which are tracked by the Wii and from which we compute the pose of the device by applying a standard pose estimation algorithm. The novel 3D renderer developed by Philips uses either the Z-value of a 3D volume, or it computes the depth information out of a 2D image, to provide a real 3D experience without having some special glasses. Within this paper we present a new framework for manipulation and annotation of medical landmarks directly in three-dimensional volume.

  2. 3D quantitative phase imaging of neural networks using WDT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Taewoo; Liu, S. C.; Iyer, Raj; Gillette, Martha U.; Popescu, Gabriel

    2015-03-01

    White-light diffraction tomography (WDT) is a recently developed 3D imaging technique based on a quantitative phase imaging system called spatial light interference microscopy (SLIM). The technique has achieved a sub-micron resolution in all three directions with high sensitivity granted by the low-coherence of a white-light source. Demonstrations of the technique on single cell imaging have been presented previously; however, imaging on any larger sample, including a cluster of cells, has not been demonstrated using the technique. Neurons in an animal body form a highly complex and spatially organized 3D structure, which can be characterized by neuronal networks or circuits. Currently, the most common method of studying the 3D structure of neuron networks is by using a confocal fluorescence microscope, which requires fluorescence tagging with either transient membrane dyes or after fixation of the cells. Therefore, studies on neurons are often limited to samples that are chemically treated and/or dead. WDT presents a solution for imaging live neuron networks with a high spatial and temporal resolution, because it is a 3D imaging method that is label-free and non-invasive. Using this method, a mouse or rat hippocampal neuron culture and a mouse dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neuron culture have been imaged in order to see the extension of processes between the cells in 3D. Furthermore, the tomogram is compared with a confocal fluorescence image in order to investigate the 3D structure at synapses.

  3. 3D Printing of Graphene Aerogels.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiangqiang; Zhang, Feng; Medarametla, Sai Pradeep; Li, Hui; Zhou, Chi; Lin, Dong

    2016-04-01

    3D printing of a graphene aerogel with true 3D overhang structures is highlighted. The aerogel is fabricated by combining drop-on-demand 3D printing and freeze casting. The water-based GO ink is ejected and freeze-cast into designed 3D structures. The lightweight (<10 mg cm(-3) ) 3D printed graphene aerogel presents superelastic and high electrical conduction.

  4. 3D Printing of Graphene Aerogels.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiangqiang; Zhang, Feng; Medarametla, Sai Pradeep; Li, Hui; Zhou, Chi; Lin, Dong

    2016-04-01

    3D printing of a graphene aerogel with true 3D overhang structures is highlighted. The aerogel is fabricated by combining drop-on-demand 3D printing and freeze casting. The water-based GO ink is ejected and freeze-cast into designed 3D structures. The lightweight (<10 mg cm(-3) ) 3D printed graphene aerogel presents superelastic and high electrical conduction. PMID:26861680

  5. 3D Elastic Wavefield Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guasch, L.; Warner, M.; Stekl, I.; Umpleby, A.; Shah, N.

    2010-12-01

    Wavefield tomography, or waveform inversion, aims to extract the maximum information from seismic data by matching trace by trace the response of the solid earth to seismic waves using numerical modelling tools. Its first formulation dates from the early 80's, when Albert Tarantola developed a solid theoretical basis that is still used today with little change. Due to computational limitations, the application of the method to 3D problems has been unaffordable until a few years ago, and then only under the acoustic approximation. Although acoustic wavefield tomography is widely used, a complete solution of the seismic inversion problem requires that we account properly for the physics of wave propagation, and so must include elastic effects. We have developed a 3D tomographic wavefield inversion code that incorporates the full elastic wave equation. The bottle neck of the different implementations is the forward modelling algorithm that generates the synthetic data to be compared with the field seismograms as well as the backpropagation of the residuals needed to form the direction update of the model parameters. Furthermore, one or two extra modelling runs are needed in order to calculate the step-length. Our approach uses a FD scheme explicit time-stepping by finite differences that are 4th order in space and 2nd order in time, which is a 3D version of the one developed by Jean Virieux in 1986. We chose the time domain because an explicit time scheme is much less demanding in terms of memory than its frequency domain analogue, although the discussion of wich domain is more efficient still remains open. We calculate the parameter gradients for Vp and Vs by correlating the normal and shear stress wavefields respectively. A straightforward application would lead to the storage of the wavefield at all grid points at each time-step. We tackled this problem using two different approaches. The first one makes better use of resources for small models of dimension equal

  6. Conducting Polymer 3D Microelectrodes

    PubMed Central

    Sasso, Luigi; Vazquez, Patricia; Vedarethinam, Indumathi; Castillo-León, Jaime; Emnéus, Jenny; Svendsen, Winnie E.

    2010-01-01

    Conducting polymer 3D microelectrodes have been fabricated for possible future neurological applications. A combination of micro-fabrication techniques and chemical polymerization methods has been used to create pillar electrodes in polyaniline and polypyrrole. The thin polymer films obtained showed uniformity and good adhesion to both horizontal and vertical surfaces. Electrodes in combination with metal/conducting polymer materials have been characterized by cyclic voltammetry and the presence of the conducting polymer film has shown to increase the electrochemical activity when compared with electrodes coated with only metal. An electrochemical characterization of gold/polypyrrole electrodes showed exceptional electrochemical behavior and activity. PC12 cells were finally cultured on the investigated materials as a preliminary biocompatibility assessment. These results show that the described electrodes are possibly suitable for future in-vitro neurological measurements. PMID:22163508

  7. Supernova Remnant in 3-D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    wavelengths. Since the amount of the wavelength shift is related to the speed of motion, one can determine how fast the debris are moving in either direction. Because Cas A is the result of an explosion, the stellar debris is expanding radially outwards from the explosion center. Using simple geometry, the scientists were able to construct a 3-D model using all of this information. A program called 3-D Slicer modified for astronomical use by the Astronomical Medicine Project at Harvard University in Cambridge, Mass. was used to display and manipulate the 3-D model. Commercial software was then used to create the 3-D fly-through.

    The blue filaments defining the blast wave were not mapped using the Doppler effect because they emit a different kind of light synchrotron radiation that does not emit light at discrete wavelengths, but rather in a broad continuum. The blue filaments are only a representation of the actual filaments observed at the blast wave.

    This visualization shows that there are two main components to this supernova remnant: a spherical component in the outer parts of the remnant and a flattened (disk-like) component in the inner region. The spherical component consists of the outer layer of the star that exploded, probably made of helium and carbon. These layers drove a spherical blast wave into the diffuse gas surrounding the star. The flattened component that astronomers were unable to map into 3-D prior to these Spitzer observations consists of the inner layers of the star. It is made from various heavier elements, not all shown in the visualization, such as oxygen, neon, silicon, sulphur, argon and iron.

    High-velocity plumes, or jets, of this material are shooting out from the explosion in the plane of the disk-like component mentioned above. Plumes of silicon appear in the northeast and southwest, while those of iron are seen in the southeast and north. These jets were already known and Doppler velocity measurements have been made for these

  8. Full 3D simulations of BNL one-sided silicon 3D detectors and comparisons with other types of 3D detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grönlund, Tanja; Li, Zheng; Carini, Gabriella; Li, Michael

    2008-02-01

    Full three-dimensional (3D) simulations have been carried out on the BNL one-sided single-type column and dual-type column 3D Si detectors (p-type substrate). Due to the facts that columns are not etched all the way through, all electrodes are on the front side, and the backside is neither supported nor processed at all, the BNL one-sided 3D detectors are true one-sided detectors. Simulations show that the volume under the columns, where it is supposed to be dead space (about 10%), can be depleted at high biases with some modest electric field, leading to the possibility of recovering some sensitivity from this region. This region can also provide some sensitivity to particle tracks directly through the columns. The dual-type column detectors are the best in radiation hardness due to their low depletion voltages and short drift distances. Single-type column detectors are more radiation hard than the planar detectors due to their lower depletion voltages. Single-type column detectors are easier to process than dual-type column detectors, but have a more complicated, non-uniform electric field profile. The BNL one-sided 3D detectors were compared to various 3D detector structures developed by other institutes. The field profiles for all types of dual-type column 3D detectors are similar with just some minor differences on both surfaces (front and back). The BNL single-type column one-sided 3D detectors have some major differences from the Trento ones: (1) the high electric field is on the sensing electrode side (pixel or strip); and (2) it can develop some high electric field along the junction column as the bias voltage increases.

  9. Test Beam Results of 3D Silicon Pixel Sensors for the ATLAS upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Grenier, P.; Alimonti, G.; Barbero, M.; Bates, R.; Bolle, E.; Borri, M.; Boscardin, M.; Buttar, C.; Capua, M.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cobal, M.; Cristofoli, A.; Dalla Betta, G.F.; Darbo, G.; Da Via, C.; Devetak, E.; DeWilde, B.; Di Girolamo, B.; Dobos, D.; Einsweiler, K.; Esseni, D.; /Udine U. /INFN, Udine /Calabria U. /INFN, Cosenza /Barcelona, Inst. Microelectron. /Manchester U. /CERN /LBL, Berkeley /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Udine U. /INFN, Udine /Oslo U. /ICREA, Barcelona /Barcelona, IFAE /SINTEF, Oslo /SINTEF, Oslo /SLAC /SLAC /Bergen U. /New Mexico U. /Bonn U. /SLAC /Freiburg U. /VTT Electronics, Espoo /Bonn U. /SLAC /Freiburg U. /SLAC /SINTEF, Oslo /Manchester U. /Barcelona, IFAE /Bonn U. /Bonn U. /CERN /Manchester U. /SINTEF, Oslo /Barcelona, Inst. Microelectron. /Calabria U. /INFN, Cosenza /Udine U. /INFN, Udine /Manchester U. /VTT Electronics, Espoo /Glasgow U. /Barcelona, IFAE /Udine U. /INFN, Udine /Hawaii U. /Freiburg U. /Manchester U. /Barcelona, Inst. Microelectron. /CERN /Fond. Bruno Kessler, Povo /Prague, Tech. U. /Trento U. /INFN, Trento /CERN /Oslo U. /Fond. Bruno Kessler, Povo /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Bergen U. /New Mexico U. /Udine U. /INFN, Udine /SLAC /Oslo U. /Prague, Tech. U. /Oslo U. /Bergen U. /SUNY, Stony Brook /SLAC /Calabria U. /INFN, Cosenza /Manchester U. /Bonn U. /SUNY, Stony Brook /Manchester U. /Bonn U. /SLAC /Fond. Bruno Kessler, Povo

    2011-08-19

    Results on beam tests of 3D silicon pixel sensors aimed at the ATLAS Insertable-B-Layer and High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) upgrades are presented. Measurements include charge collection, tracking efficiency and charge sharing between pixel cells, as a function of track incident angle, and were performed with and without a 1.6 T magnetic field oriented as the ATLAS Inner Detector solenoid field. Sensors were bump bonded to the front-end chip currently used in the ATLAS pixel detector. Full 3D sensors, with electrodes penetrating through the entire wafer thickness and active edge, and double-sided 3D sensors with partially overlapping bias and read-out electrodes were tested and showed comparable performance. Full and partial 3D pixel detectors have been tested, with and without a 1.6T magnetic field, in high energy pion beams at the CERN SPS North Area in 2009. Sensors characteristics have been measured as a function of the beam incident angle and compared to a regular planar pixel device. Overall full and partial 3D devices have similar behavior. Magnetic field has no sizeable effect on 3D performances. Due to electrode inefficiency 3D devices exhibit some loss of tracking efficiency for normal incident tracks but recover full efficiency with tilted tracks. As expected due to the electric field configuration 3D sensors have little charge sharing between cells.

  10. A navigation system for flexible endoscopes using abdominal 3D ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, R.; Kaar, M.; Bathia, Amon; Bathia, Amar; Lampret, A.; Birkfellner, W.; Hummel, J.; Figl, M.

    2014-09-01

    A navigation system for flexible endoscopes equipped with ultrasound (US) scan heads is presented. In contrast to similar systems, abdominal 3D-US is used for image fusion of the pre-interventional computed tomography (CT) to the endoscopic US. A 3D-US scan, tracked with an optical tracking system (OTS), is taken pre-operatively together with the CT scan. The CT is calibrated using the OTS, providing the transformation from CT to 3D-US. Immediately before intervention a 3D-US tracked with an electromagnetic tracking system (EMTS) is acquired and registered intra-modal to the preoperative 3D-US. The endoscopic US is calibrated using the EMTS and registered to the pre-operative CT by an intra-modal 3D-US/3D-US registration. Phantom studies showed a registration error for the US to CT registration of 5.1 mm ± 2.8 mm. 3D-US/3D-US registration of patient data gave an error of 4.1 mm compared to 2.8 mm with the phantom. From this we estimate an error on patient experiments of 5.6 mm.

  11. Patterned illumination for analysing neuronal function in 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Go, Mary Ann; Stricker, Christian; Redman, Steve; Bachor, Hans; Daria, Vincent R.

    2012-06-01

    We use patterned 3D multi-spot illumination to perform neuronal multi-site stimulation in rat brain tissue. Using a spatial light modulator, we holograpically project 3D light fields for multi-site two-photon photolysis of caged neurotransmitters to generate synaptic inputs to a neuron. Controlled photostimulation of multiple synapses from various locations in the dendritic tree provides a way to analyze how neurons integrate multiple inputs. Our holographic projection setup is incorporated into a two-photon 3D imaging microscope for visualization and for accurate positioning of specific uncaging sites along the neuron's dendritic tree. We show two-photon images and the neuron's response to holographic photostimulation of synapses along dendrites.

  12. Reconstruction and Visualization of Coordinated 3D Cell Migration Based on Optical Flow.

    PubMed

    Kappe, Christopher P; Schütz, Lucas; Gunther, Stefan; Hufnagel, Lars; Lemke, Steffen; Leitte, Heike

    2016-01-01

    Animal development is marked by the repeated reorganization of cells and cell populations, which ultimately determine form and shape of the growing organism. One of the central questions in developmental biology is to understand precisely how cells reorganize, as well as how and to what extent this reorganization is coordinated. While modern microscopes can record video data for every cell during animal development in 3D+t, analyzing these videos remains a major challenge: reconstruction of comprehensive cell tracks turned out to be very demanding especially with decreasing data quality and increasing cell densities. In this paper, we present an analysis pipeline for coordinated cellular motions in developing embryos based on the optical flow of a series of 3D images. We use numerical integration to reconstruct cellular long-term motions in the optical flow of the video, we take care of data validation, and we derive a LIC-based, dense flow visualization for the resulting pathlines. This approach allows us to handle low video quality such as noisy data or poorly separated cells, and it allows the biologists to get a comprehensive understanding of their data by capturing dynamic growth processes in stills. We validate our methods using three videos of growing fruit fly embryos.

  13. Supernova Remnant in 3-D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    wavelengths. Since the amount of the wavelength shift is related to the speed of motion, one can determine how fast the debris are moving in either direction. Because Cas A is the result of an explosion, the stellar debris is expanding radially outwards from the explosion center. Using simple geometry, the scientists were able to construct a 3-D model using all of this information. A program called 3-D Slicer modified for astronomical use by the Astronomical Medicine Project at Harvard University in Cambridge, Mass. was used to display and manipulate the 3-D model. Commercial software was then used to create the 3-D fly-through.

    The blue filaments defining the blast wave were not mapped using the Doppler effect because they emit a different kind of light synchrotron radiation that does not emit light at discrete wavelengths, but rather in a broad continuum. The blue filaments are only a representation of the actual filaments observed at the blast wave.

    This visualization shows that there are two main components to this supernova remnant: a spherical component in the outer parts of the remnant and a flattened (disk-like) component in the inner region. The spherical component consists of the outer layer of the star that exploded, probably made of helium and carbon. These layers drove a spherical blast wave into the diffuse gas surrounding the star. The flattened component that astronomers were unable to map into 3-D prior to these Spitzer observations consists of the inner layers of the star. It is made from various heavier elements, not all shown in the visualization, such as oxygen, neon, silicon, sulphur, argon and iron.

    High-velocity plumes, or jets, of this material are shooting out from the explosion in the plane of the disk-like component mentioned above. Plumes of silicon appear in the northeast and southwest, while those of iron are seen in the southeast and north. These jets were already known and Doppler velocity measurements have been made for these

  14. NIF Ignition Target 3D Point Design

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, O; Marinak, M; Milovich, J; Callahan, D

    2008-11-05

    We have developed an input file for running 3D NIF hohlraums that is optimized such that it can be run in 1-2 days on parallel computers. We have incorporated increasing levels of automation into the 3D input file: (1) Configuration controlled input files; (2) Common file for 2D and 3D, different types of capsules (symcap, etc.); and (3) Can obtain target dimensions, laser pulse, and diagnostics settings automatically from NIF Campaign Management Tool. Using 3D Hydra calculations to investigate different problems: (1) Intrinsic 3D asymmetry; (2) Tolerance to nonideal 3D effects (e.g. laser power balance, pointing errors); and (3) Synthetic diagnostics.

  15. Tracking sperm in three-dimensions.

    PubMed

    Corkidi, G; Taboada, B; Wood, C D; Guerrero, A; Darszon, A

    2008-08-15

    Sperm motility, crucial for fertilization, has been mostly studied in two dimensions (2D) by recording their swimming trajectories near a flat surface. However, spermatozoa swim in three-dimensions (3D) to find eggs, with their speed being the main impediment to track them under realistic conditions. Here, we describe a novel method allowing 3D tracking and analysis of the trajectories of multiple free-swimming sperm. The system uses a piezo-electric device displacing a large focal distance objective mounted on a microscope to acquire 70 image stacks per second, each stack composed of 60 images that span a depth of 100 microm. With this method, 3D paths of multiple sperm in the same field could be visualized simultaneously during 1 s. Within the same sample we found that surface-confined sperm swam 25% slower, produced 3-fold fewer circular revolutions per second, and had trajectories of 134% greater radius of curvature than those sperm swimming freely in 3D. PMID:18555013

  16. Tracking sperm in three-dimensions.

    PubMed

    Corkidi, G; Taboada, B; Wood, C D; Guerrero, A; Darszon, A

    2008-08-15

    Sperm motility, crucial for fertilization, has been mostly studied in two dimensions (2D) by recording their swimming trajectories near a flat surface. However, spermatozoa swim in three-dimensions (3D) to find eggs, with their speed being the main impediment to track them under realistic conditions. Here, we describe a novel method allowing 3D tracking and analysis of the trajectories of multiple free-swimming sperm. The system uses a piezo-electric device displacing a large focal distance objective mounted on a microscope to acquire 70 image stacks per second, each stack composed of 60 images that span a depth of 100 microm. With this method, 3D paths of multiple sperm in the same field could be visualized simultaneously during 1 s. Within the same sample we found that surface-confined sperm swam 25% slower, produced 3-fold fewer circular revolutions per second, and had trajectories of 134% greater radius of curvature than those sperm swimming freely in 3D.

  17. 3D Kitaev spin liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermanns, Maria

    The Kitaev honeycomb model has become one of the archetypal spin models exhibiting topological phases of matter, where the magnetic moments fractionalize into Majorana fermions interacting with a Z2 gauge field. In this talk, we discuss generalizations of this model to three-dimensional lattice structures. Our main focus is the metallic state that the emergent Majorana fermions form. In particular, we discuss the relation of the nature of this Majorana metal to the details of the underlying lattice structure. Besides (almost) conventional metals with a Majorana Fermi surface, one also finds various realizations of Dirac semi-metals, where the gapless modes form Fermi lines or even Weyl nodes. We introduce a general classification of these gapless quantum spin liquids using projective symmetry analysis. Furthermore, we briefly outline why these Majorana metals in 3D Kitaev systems provide an even richer variety of Dirac and Weyl phases than possible for electronic matter and comment on possible experimental signatures. Work done in collaboration with Kevin O'Brien and Simon Trebst.

  18. Locomotive wheel 3D reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Xin; Luo, Zhisheng; Gao, Xiaorong; Wu, Jianle

    2010-08-01

    In the article, a system, which is used to reconstruct locomotive wheels, is described, helping workers detect the condition of a wheel through a direct view. The system consists of a line laser, a 2D camera, and a computer. We use 2D camera to capture the line-laser light reflected by the object, a wheel, and then compute the final coordinates of the structured light. Finally, using Matlab programming language, we transform the coordinate of points to a smooth surface and illustrate the 3D view of the wheel. The article also proposes the system structure, processing steps and methods, and sets up an experimental platform to verify the design proposal. We verify the feasibility of the whole process, and analyze the results comparing to standard date. The test results show that this system can work well, and has a high accuracy on the reconstruction. And because there is still no such application working in railway industries, so that it has practical value in railway inspection system.

  19. 3D ultrafast laser scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahjoubfar, A.; Goda, K.; Wang, C.; Fard, A.; Adam, J.; Gossett, D. R.; Ayazi, A.; Sollier, E.; Malik, O.; Chen, E.; Liu, Y.; Brown, R.; Sarkhosh, N.; Di Carlo, D.; Jalali, B.

    2013-03-01

    Laser scanners are essential for scientific research, manufacturing, defense, and medical practice. Unfortunately, often times the speed of conventional laser scanners (e.g., galvanometric mirrors and acousto-optic deflectors) falls short for many applications, resulting in motion blur and failure to capture fast transient information. Here, we present a novel type of laser scanner that offers roughly three orders of magnitude higher scan rates than conventional methods. Our laser scanner, which we refer to as the hybrid dispersion laser scanner, performs inertia-free laser scanning by dispersing a train of broadband pulses both temporally and spatially. More specifically, each broadband pulse is temporally processed by time stretch dispersive Fourier transform and further dispersed into space by one or more diffractive elements such as prisms and gratings. As a proof-of-principle demonstration, we perform 1D line scans at a record high scan rate of 91 MHz and 2D raster scans and 3D volumetric scans at an unprecedented scan rate of 105 kHz. The method holds promise for a broad range of scientific, industrial, and biomedical applications. To show the utility of our method, we demonstrate imaging, nanometer-resolved surface vibrometry, and high-precision flow cytometry with real-time throughput that conventional laser scanners cannot offer due to their low scan rates.

  20. Crowdsourcing Based 3d Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somogyi, A.; Barsi, A.; Molnar, B.; Lovas, T.

    2016-06-01

    Web-based photo albums that support organizing and viewing the users' images are widely used. These services provide a convenient solution for storing, editing and sharing images. In many cases, the users attach geotags to the images in order to enable using them e.g. in location based applications on social networks. Our paper discusses a procedure that collects open access images from a site frequently visited by tourists. Geotagged pictures showing the image of a sight or tourist attraction are selected and processed in photogrammetric processing software that produces the 3D model of the captured object. For the particular investigation we selected three attractions in Budapest. To assess the geometrical accuracy, we used laser scanner and DSLR as well as smart phone photography to derive reference values to enable verifying the spatial model obtained from the web-album images. The investigation shows how detailed and accurate models could be derived applying photogrammetric processing software, simply by using images of the community, without visiting the site.

  1. DspaceOgreTerrain 3D Terrain Visualization Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myint, Steven; Jain, Abhinandan; Pomerantz, Marc I.

    2012-01-01

    DspaceOgreTerrain is an extension to the DspaceOgre 3D visualization tool that supports real-time visualization of various terrain types, including digital elevation maps, planets, and meshes. DspaceOgreTerrain supports creating 3D representations of terrains and placing them in a scene graph. The 3D representations allow for a continuous level of detail, GPU-based rendering, and overlaying graphics like wheel tracks and shadows. It supports reading data from the SimScape terrain- modeling library. DspaceOgreTerrain solves the problem of displaying the results of simulations that involve very large terrains. In the past, it has been used to visualize simulations of vehicle traverses on Lunar and Martian terrains. These terrains were made up of billions of vertices and would not have been renderable in real-time without using a continuous level of detail rendering technique.

  2. Developing 3D SEM in a broad biological context

    PubMed Central

    Kremer, A; Lippens, S; Bartunkova, S; Asselbergh, B; Blanpain, C; Fendrych, M; Goossens, A; Holt, M; Janssens, S; Krols, M; Larsimont, J-C; Mc Guire, C; Nowack, MK; Saelens, X; Schertel, A; Schepens, B; Slezak, M; Timmerman, V; Theunis, C; Van Brempt, R; Visser, Y; GuÉRin, CJ

    2015-01-01

    When electron microscopy (EM) was introduced in the 1930s it gave scientists their first look into the nanoworld of cells. Over the last 80 years EM has vastly increased our understanding of the complex cellular structures that underlie the diverse functions that cells need to maintain life. One drawback that has been difficult to overcome was the inherent lack of volume information, mainly due to the limit on the thickness of sections that could be viewed in a transmission electron microscope<