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Sample records for 3d transrectal ultrasound

  1. Towards 3D ultrasound image based soft tissue tracking: a transrectal ultrasound prostate image alignment system.

    PubMed

    Baumann, Michael; Mozer, Pierre; Daanen, Vincent; Troccaz, Jocelyne

    2007-01-01

    The emergence of real-time 3D ultrasound (US) makes it possible to consider image-based tracking of subcutaneous soft tissue targets for computer guided diagnosis and therapy. We propose a 3D transrectal US based tracking system for precise prostate biopsy sample localisation. The aim is to improve sample distribution, to enable targeting of unsampled regions for repeated biopsies, and to make post-interventional quality controls possible. Since the patient is not immobilized, since the prostate is mobile and due to the fact that probe movements are only constrained by the rectum during biopsy acquisition, the tracking system must be able to estimate rigid transformations that are beyond the capture range of common image similarity measures. We propose a fast and robust multi-resolution attribute-vector registration approach that combines global and local optimization methods to solve this problem. Global optimization is performed on a probe movement model that reduces the dimensionality of the search space and thus renders optimization efficient. The method was tested on 237 prostate volumes acquired from 14 different patients for 3D to 3D and 3D to orthogonal 2D slices registration. The 3D-3D version of the algorithm converged correctly in 96.7% of all cases in 6.5s with an accuracy of 1.41mm (r.m.s.) and 3.84mm (max). The 3D to slices method yielded a success rate of 88.9% in 2.3s with an accuracy of 1.37mm (r.m.s.) and 4.3mm (max).

  2. A 5-MHz cylindrical dual-layer transducer array for 3-D transrectal ultrasound imaging.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yuling; Nguyen, Man; Yen, Jesse T

    2012-07-01

    Two-dimensional transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) is being used in guiding prostate biopsies and treatments. In many cases, the TRUS probes are moved manually or mechanically to acquire volumetric information, making the imaging slow, user dependent, and unreliable. A real-time three-dimensional (3-D) TRUS system could improve reliability and volume rates of imaging during these procedures. In this article, the authors present a 5-MHz cylindrical dual-layer transducer array capable of real-time 3-D transrectal ultrasound without any mechanically moving parts. Compared with fully sampled 2-D arrays, this design substantially reduces the channel count and fabrication complexity. This dual-layer transducer uses PZT elements for transmit and P[VDF-TrFE] copolymer elements for receive, respectively. The mechanical flexibility of both diced PZT and copolymer makes it practical for transrectal applications. Full synthetic aperture 3-D data sets were acquired by interfacing the transducer with a Verasonics Data Acquisition System. Offline 3-D beamforming was then performed to obtain volumes of two wire phantoms and a cyst phantom. Generalized coherence factor was applied to improve the contrast of images. The measured -6-dB fractional bandwidth of the transducer was 62% with a center frequency of 5.66 MHz. The measured lateral beamwidths were 1.28 mm and 0.91 mm in transverse and longitudinal directions, respectively, compared with a simulated beamwidth of 0.92 mm and 0.74 mm.

  3. Random Walk Based Segmentation for the Prostate on 3D Transrectal Ultrasound Images.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ling; Guo, Rongrong; Tian, Zhiqiang; Venkataraman, Rajesh; Sarkar, Saradwata; Liu, Xiabi; Nieh, Peter T; Master, Viraj V; Schuster, David M; Fei, Baowei

    2016-02-27

    This paper proposes a new semi-automatic segmentation method for the prostate on 3D transrectal ultrasound images (TRUS) by combining the region and classification information. We use a random walk algorithm to express the region information efficiently and flexibly because it can avoid segmentation leakage and shrinking bias. We further use the decision tree as the classifier to distinguish the prostate from the non-prostate tissue because of its fast speed and superior performance, especially for a binary classification problem. Our segmentation algorithm is initialized with the user roughly marking the prostate and non-prostate points on the mid-gland slice which are fitted into an ellipse for obtaining more points. Based on these fitted seed points, we run the random walk algorithm to segment the prostate on the mid-gland slice. The segmented contour and the information from the decision tree classification are combined to determine the initial seed points for the other slices. The random walk algorithm is then used to segment the prostate on the adjacent slice. We propagate the process until all slices are segmented. The segmentation method was tested in 32 3D transrectal ultrasound images. Manual segmentation by a radiologist serves as the gold standard for the validation. The experimental results show that the proposed method achieved a Dice similarity coefficient of 91.37±0.05%. The segmentation method can be applied to 3D ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy and other applications.

  4. Random Walk Based Segmentation for the Prostate on 3D Transrectal Ultrasound Images

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Ling; Guo, Rongrong; Tian, Zhiqiang; Venkataraman, Rajesh; Sarkar, Saradwata; Liu, Xiabi; Nieh, Peter T.; Master, Viraj V.; Schuster, David M.; Fei, Baowei

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes a new semi-automatic segmentation method for the prostate on 3D transrectal ultrasound images (TRUS) by combining the region and classification information. We use a random walk algorithm to express the region information efficiently and flexibly because it can avoid segmentation leakage and shrinking bias. We further use the decision tree as the classifier to distinguish the prostate from the non-prostate tissue because of its fast speed and superior performance, especially for a binary classification problem. Our segmentation algorithm is initialized with the user roughly marking the prostate and non-prostate points on the mid-gland slice which are fitted into an ellipse for obtaining more points. Based on these fitted seed points, we run the random walk algorithm to segment the prostate on the mid-gland slice. The segmented contour and the information from the decision tree classification are combined to determine the initial seed points for the other slices. The random walk algorithm is then used to segment the prostate on the adjacent slice. We propagate the process until all slices are segmented. The segmentation method was tested in 32 3D transrectal ultrasound images. Manual segmentation by a radiologist serves as the gold standard for the validation. The experimental results show that the proposed method achieved a Dice similarity coefficient of 91.37±0.05%. The segmentation method can be applied to 3D ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy and other applications. PMID:27660383

  5. Random walk based segmentation for the prostate on 3D transrectal ultrasound images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Ling; Guo, Rongrong; Tian, Zhiqiang; Venkataraman, Rajesh; Sarkar, Saradwata; Liu, Xiabi; Nieh, Peter T.; Master, Viraj V.; Schuster, David M.; Fei, Baowei

    2016-03-01

    This paper proposes a new semi-automatic segmentation method for the prostate on 3D transrectal ultrasound images (TRUS) by combining the region and classification information. We use a random walk algorithm to express the region information efficiently and flexibly because it can avoid segmentation leakage and shrinking bias. We further use the decision tree as the classifier to distinguish the prostate from the non-prostate tissue because of its fast speed and superior performance, especially for a binary classification problem. Our segmentation algorithm is initialized with the user roughly marking the prostate and non-prostate points on the mid-gland slice which are fitted into an ellipse for obtaining more points. Based on these fitted seed points, we run the random walk algorithm to segment the prostate on the mid-gland slice. The segmented contour and the information from the decision tree classification are combined to determine the initial seed points for the other slices. The random walk algorithm is then used to segment the prostate on the adjacent slice. We propagate the process until all slices are segmented. The segmentation method was tested in 32 3D transrectal ultrasound images. Manual segmentation by a radiologist serves as the gold standard for the validation. The experimental results show that the proposed method achieved a Dice similarity coefficient of 91.37+/-0.05%. The segmentation method can be applied to 3D ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy and other applications.

  6. 3D transrectal ultrasound prostate biopsy using a mechanical imaging and needle-guidance system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bax, Jeffrey; Cool, Derek; Gardi, Lori; Montreuil, Jacques; Gil, Elena; Bluvol, Jeremy; Knight, Kerry; Smith, David; Romagnoli, Cesare; Fenster, Aaron

    2008-03-01

    Prostate biopsy procedures are generally limited to 2D transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) imaging for biopsy needle guidance. This limitation results in needle position ambiguity and an insufficient record of biopsy core locations in cases of prostate re-biopsy. We have developed a multi-jointed mechanical device that supports a commercially available TRUS probe with an integrated needle guide for precision prostate biopsy. The device is fixed at the base, allowing the joints to be manually manipulated while fully supporting its weight throughout its full range of motion. Means are provided to track the needle trajectory and display this trajectory on a corresponding TRUS image. This allows the physician to aim the needle-guide at predefined targets within the prostate, providing true 3D navigation. The tracker has been designed for use with several end-fired transducers that can be rotated about the longitudinal axis of the probe to generate 3D images. The tracker reduces the variability associated with conventional hand-held probes, while preserving user familiarity and procedural workflow. In a prostate phantom, biopsy needles were guided to within 2 mm of their targets, and the 3D location of the biopsy core was accurate to within 3 mm. The 3D navigation system is validated in the presence of prostate motion in a preliminary patient study.

  7. Development of transrectal diffuse optical tomography combined with 3D-transrectal ultrasound imaging to monitor the photocoagulation front during interstitial photothermal therapy of primary focal prostate cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Jie; Weersink, Robert; Veilleux, Israel; Mayo, Kenwrick; Zhang, Anqi; Piao, Daqing; Alam, Adeel; Trachtenberg, John; Wilson, Brian C.

    2013-03-01

    Interstitial near-infrared laser thermal therapy (LITT) is currently undergoing clinical trials as an alternative to watchful waiting or radical surgery in patients with low-risk focal prostate cancer. Currently, we use magnetic resonance image (MRI)-based thermography to monitor treatment delivery and determine indirectly the completeness of the target tissue destruction while avoiding damage to adjacent normal tissues, particularly the rectal wall. However, incomplete tumor destruction has occurred in a significant fraction of patients due to premature termination of treatment, since the photocoagulation zone is not directly observed. Hence, we are developing transrectal diffuse optical tomography (TRDOT), in combination with transrectal 3D ultrasound (3D-TRUS), to address his limitation. This is based on the large changes in optical scattering expected upon tissue coagulation. Here, we present forward simulations of a growing coagulated lesion with optical scattering contrast, using an established finite element analysis software platform (NIRFAST). The simulations were validated in tissue-simulating phantoms, with measurements acquired by a state-of-the-art continuous wave (CW) TRDOT system and a recently assembled bench-top CW-DOT system, with specific source-detector configurations. Two image reconstruction schemes were investigated and evaluated, specifically for the accurate delineation of the posterior boundary of the coagulation zone as the critical parameter for treatment guidance in this clinical application.

  8. Toward a 3D transrectal ultrasound system for verification of needle placement during high-dose-rate interstitial gynecologic brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Rodgers, Jessica Robin; Surry, Kathleen; Leung, Eric; D'Souza, David; Fenster, Aaron

    2017-05-01

    Treatment for gynecologic cancers, such as cervical, recurrent endometrial, and vaginal malignancies, commonly includes external-beam radiation and brachytherapy. In high-dose-rate (HDR) interstitial gynecologic brachytherapy, radiation treatment is delivered via hollow needles that are typically inserted through a template on the perineum with a cylinder placed in the vagina for stability. Despite the need for precise needle placement to minimize complications and provide optimal treatment, there is no standard intra-operative image-guidance for this procedure. While some image-guidance techniques have been proposed, including magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, X-ray computed tomography (CT), and two-dimensional (2D) transrectal ultrasound (TRUS), these techniques have not been widely adopted. In order to provide intra-operative needle visualization and localization during interstitial brachytherapy, we have developed a three-dimensional (3D) TRUS system. This study describes the 3D TRUS system and reports on the system validation and results from a proof-of-concept patient study. To obtain a 3D TRUS image, the system rotates a conventional 2D endocavity transducer through 170 degrees in 12 s, reconstructing the 2D frames into a 3D image in real-time. The geometry of the reconstruction was validated using two geometric phantoms to ensure the accuracy of the linear measurements in each of the image coordinate directions and the volumetric accuracy of the system. An agar phantom including vaginal and rectal canals, as well as a model uterus and tumor, was designed and used to test the visualization and localization of the interstitial needles under idealized conditions by comparing the needles' positions between the 3D TRUS scan and a registered MR image. Five patients undergoing HDR interstitial gynecologic brachytherapy were imaged using the 3D TRUS system following the insertion of all needles. This image was manually, rigidly registered to the clinical

  9. Transrectal Ultrasound of Prostatic Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Daniel J.; Cooperberg, Peter L.; Goldenberg, S. Larry; Toi, Ants

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to review the indications for transrectal ultrasound; to briefly describe the sonographic technique; to describe the sonographic findings of prostatic carcinoma; to review the indications for transrectal sonographic-guided biopsy; and to discuss the controversles of routine screening and staging. ImagesFigures 1-3 PMID:21229044

  10. A comparison of needle tip localization accuracy using 2D and 3D trans-rectal ultrasound for high-dose-rate prostate cancer brachytherapy treatment planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hrinivich, W. Thomas; Hoover, Douglas A.; Surry, Kathleen; Edirisinghe, Chandima; Montreuil, Jacques; D'Souza, David; Fenster, Aaron; Wong, Eugene

    2016-03-01

    Background: High-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT) is a prostate cancer treatment option involving the insertion of hollow needles into the gland through the perineum to deliver a radioactive source. Conventional needle imaging involves indexing a trans-rectal ultrasound (TRUS) probe in the superior/inferior (S/I) direction, using the axial transducer to produce an image set for organ segmentation. These images have limited resolution in the needle insertion direction (S/I), so the sagittal transducer is used to identify needle tips, requiring a manual registration with the axial view. This registration introduces a source of uncertainty in the final segmentations and subsequent treatment plan. Our lab has developed a device enabling 3D-TRUS guided insertions with high S/I spatial resolution, eliminating the need to align axial and sagittal views. Purpose: To compare HDR-BT needle tip localization accuracy between 2D and 3D-TRUS. Methods: 5 prostate cancer patients underwent conventional 2D TRUS guided HDR-BT, during which 3D images were also acquired for post-operative registration and segmentation. Needle end-length measurements were taken, providing a gold standard for insertion depths. Results: 73 needles were analyzed from all 5 patients. Needle tip position differences between imaging techniques was found to be largest in the S/I direction with mean+/-SD of -2.5+/-4.0 mm. End-length measurements indicated that 3D TRUS provided statistically significantly lower mean+/-SD insertion depth error of -0.2+/-3.4 mm versus 2.3+/-3.7 mm with 2D guidance (p < .001). Conclusions: 3D TRUS may provide more accurate HDR-BT needle localization than conventional 2D TRUS guidance for the majority of HDR-BT needles.

  11. NOTE: Adaptation of a 3D prostate cancer atlas for transrectal ultrasound guided target-specific biopsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayanan, R.; Werahera, P. N.; Barqawi, A.; Crawford, E. D.; Shinohara, K.; Simoneau, A. R.; Suri, J. S.

    2008-10-01

    Due to lack of imaging modalities to identify prostate cancer in vivo, current TRUS guided prostate biopsies are taken randomly. Consequently, many important cancers are missed during initial biopsies. The purpose of this study was to determine the potential clinical utility of a high-speed registration algorithm for a 3D prostate cancer atlas. This 3D prostate cancer atlas provides voxel-level likelihood of cancer and optimized biopsy locations on a template space (Zhan et al 2007). The atlas was constructed from 158 expert annotated, 3D reconstructed radical prostatectomy specimens outlined for cancers (Shen et al 2004). For successful clinical implementation, the prostate atlas needs to be registered to each patient's TRUS image with high registration accuracy in a time-efficient manner. This is implemented in a two-step procedure, the segmentation of the prostate gland from a patient's TRUS image followed by the registration of the prostate atlas. We have developed a fast registration algorithm suitable for clinical applications of this prostate cancer atlas. The registration algorithm was implemented on a graphical processing unit (GPU) to meet the critical processing speed requirements for atlas guided biopsy. A color overlay of the atlas superposed on the TRUS image was presented to help pick statistically likely regions known to harbor cancer. We validated our fast registration algorithm using computer simulations of two optimized 7- and 12-core biopsy protocols to maximize the overall detection rate. Using a GPU, patient's TRUS image segmentation and atlas registration took less than 12 s. The prostate cancer atlas guided 7- and 12-core biopsy protocols had cancer detection rates of 84.81% and 89.87% respectively when validated on the same set of data. Whereas the sextant biopsy approach without the utility of 3D cancer atlas detected only 70.5% of the cancers using the same histology data. We estimate 10-20% increase in prostate cancer detection rates

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging-targeted, 3D transrectal ultrasound-guided fusion biopsy for prostate cancer: Quantifying the impact of needle delivery error on diagnosis

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Peter R.; Cool, Derek W.; Romagnoli, Cesare; Fenster, Aaron; Ward, Aaron D.

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-targeted, 3D transrectal ultrasound (TRUS)-guided “fusion” prostate biopsy intends to reduce the ∼23% false negative rate of clinical two-dimensional TRUS-guided sextant biopsy. Although it has been reported to double the positive yield, MRI-targeted biopsies continue to yield false negatives. Therefore, the authors propose to investigate how biopsy system needle delivery error affects the probability of sampling each tumor, by accounting for uncertainties due to guidance system error, image registration error, and irregular tumor shapes. Methods: T2-weighted, dynamic contrast-enhanced T1-weighted, and diffusion-weighted prostate MRI and 3D TRUS images were obtained from 49 patients. A radiologist and radiology resident contoured 81 suspicious regions, yielding 3D tumor surfaces that were registered to the 3D TRUS images using an iterative closest point prostate surface-based method to yield 3D binary images of the suspicious regions in the TRUS context. The probabilityP of obtaining a sample of tumor tissue in one biopsy core was calculated by integrating a 3D Gaussian distribution over each suspicious region domain. Next, the authors performed an exhaustive search to determine the maximum root mean squared error (RMSE, in mm) of a biopsy system that gives P ≥ 95% for each tumor sample, and then repeated this procedure for equal-volume spheres corresponding to each tumor sample. Finally, the authors investigated the effect of probe-axis-direction error on measured tumor burden by studying the relationship between the error and estimated percentage of core involvement. Results: Given a 3.5 mm RMSE for contemporary fusion biopsy systems,P ≥ 95% for 21 out of 81 tumors. The authors determined that for a biopsy system with 3.5 mm RMSE, one cannot expect to sample tumors of approximately 1 cm{sup 3} or smaller with 95% probability with only one biopsy core. The predicted maximum RMSE giving P ≥ 95% for each

  13. Comparison of prostate MRI-3D transrectal ultrasound fusion biopsy for first-time and repeat biopsy patients with previous atypical small acinar proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Cool, Derek W.; Romagnoli, Cesare; Izawa, Jonathan I.; Chin, Joseph; Gardi, Lori; Tessier, David; Mercado, Ashley; Mandel, Jonathan; Ward, Aaron D.; Fenster, Aaron

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: This study evaluates the clinical benefit of magnetic resonance-transrectal ultrasound (MR-TRUS) fusion biopsy over systematic biopsy between first-time and repeat prostate biopsy patients with prior atypical small acinar proliferation (ASAP). Materials: 100 patients were enrolled in a single-centre prospective cohort study: 50 for first biopsy, 50 for repeat biopsy with prior ASAP. Multiparameteric magnetic resonance imaging (MP-MRI) and standard 12-core ultrasound biopsy (Std-Bx) were performed on all patients. Targeted biopsy using MRI-TRUS fusion (Fn-Bx) was performed f suspicious lesions were identified on the pre-biopsy MP-MRI. Classification of clinically significant disease was assessed independently for the Std-Bx vs. Fn-Bx cores to compare the two approaches. Results: Adenocarcinoma was detected in 49/100 patients (26 first biopsy, 23 ASAP biopsy), with 25 having significant disease (17 first, 8 ASAP). Fn-Bx demonstrated significantly higher per-core cancer detection rates, cancer involvement, and Gleason scores for first-time and ASAP patients. However, Fn-Bx was significantly more likely to detect significant cancer missed on Std-Bx for ASAP patients than first-time biopsy patients. The addition of Fn-Bx to Std-Bx for ASAP patients had a 166.7% relative risk reduction for missing Gleason ≥ 3 + 4 disease (number needed to image with MP-MRI=10 patients) compared to 6.3% for first biopsy (number to image=50 patients). Negative predictive value of MP-MRI for negative biopsy was 79% for first-time and 100% for ASAP patients, with median followup of 32.1 ± 15.5 months. Conclusions: MR-TRUS Fn-Bx has a greater clinical impact for repeat biopsy patients with prior ASAP than biopsy-naïve patients by detecting more significant cancers that are missed on Std-Bx. PMID:27800057

  14. Comparison of prostate MRI-3D transrectal ultrasound fusion biopsy for first-time and repeat biopsy patients with previous atypical small acinar proliferation.

    PubMed

    Cool, Derek W; Romagnoli, Cesare; Izawa, Jonathan I; Chin, Joseph; Gardi, Lori; Tessier, David; Mercado, Ashley; Mandel, Jonathan; Ward, Aaron D; Fenster, Aaron

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluates the clinical benefit of magnetic resonance-transrectal ultrasound (MR-TRUS) fusion biopsy over systematic biopsy between first-time and repeat prostate biopsy patients with prior atypical small acinar proliferation (ASAP). 100 patients were enrolled in a single-centre prospective cohort study: 50 for first biopsy, 50 for repeat biopsy with prior ASAP. Multiparameteric magnetic resonance imaging (MP-MRI) and standard 12-core ultrasound biopsy (Std-Bx) were performed on all patients. Targeted biopsy using MRI-TRUS fusion (Fn-Bx) was performed f suspicious lesions were identified on the pre-biopsy MP-MRI. Classification of clinically significant disease was assessed independently for the Std-Bx vs. Fn-Bx cores to compare the two approaches. Adenocarcinoma was detected in 49/100 patients (26 first biopsy, 23 ASAP biopsy), with 25 having significant disease (17 first, 8 ASAP). Fn-Bx demonstrated significantly higher per-core cancer detection rates, cancer involvement, and Gleason scores for first-time and ASAP patients. However, Fn-Bx was significantly more likely to detect significant cancer missed on Std-Bx for ASAP patients than first-time biopsy patients. The addition of Fn-Bx to Std-Bx for ASAP patients had a 166.7% relative risk reduction for missing Gleason ≥ 3 + 4 disease (number needed to image with MP-MRI=10 patients) compared to 6.3% for first biopsy (number to image=50 patients). Negative predictive value of MP-MRI for negative biopsy was 79% for first-time and 100% for ASAP patients, with median followup of 32.1 ± 15.5 months. MR-TRUS Fn-Bx has a greater clinical impact for repeat biopsy patients with prior ASAP than biopsy-naïve patients by detecting more significant cancers that are missed on Std-Bx.

  15. Integrated transrectal probe for translational ultrasound-photoacoustic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Kevan L.; Harrison, Tyler; Usmani, Nawaid; Zemp, Roger J.

    2016-03-01

    A compact photoacoustic transrectal probe is constructed for improved imaging in brachytherapy treatment. A 192 element 5 MHz linear transducer array is mounted inside a small 3D printed casing along with an array of optical fibers. The device is fed by a pump laser and tunable NIR-optical parametric oscillator with data collected by a Verasonics ultrasound platform. This assembly demonstrates improved imaging of brachytherapy seeds in phantoms with depths up to 5 cm. The tuneable excitation in combination with standard US integration provides adjustable contrast between the brachytherapy seeds, blood filled tubes and background tissue.

  16. [The role of transrectal ultrasound on prostatic cryotherapy and brachytherapy].

    PubMed

    Arias Fúnez, Fernando; Escudero Barrilero, Angel; Rodríguez-Patrón Rodríguez, Rafael; Vallejo Ocaña, Carmen

    2006-05-01

    Transrectal ultrasound is the method that gives a direct image of the prostate, its limits, structural and morphologic anomalies, and anatomical relations. Therefore, prostate volume is easily determined, being the first step for the application of certain therapeutic procedures. Prostatic cryotherapy and brachytherapy have been developed over the last years as minimally invasive options for the treatment of prostate cancer. Transrectal ultrasound of the prostate has allowed the application of these technologies in the daily practice, guaranteeing high efficacy and safety indexes. Cryosurgery is the controlled freezing of tissues. Prostatic transrectal ultrasound is the only method able to show the real-time evolution of prostatic cryoablation, allowing the urologist to control the evolution of the ice ball and to reach the targeted anatomical structures guaranteeing the oncological objectives, and diminishing complications and sequels. Brachytherapy, as a local intraprostatic radiotherapy, needs exact volume and dose calculations before the implant of the radioactive source within the gland. With transrectal ultrasound of the prostate, ultrasound-tomographic cuts are made for prostatic volume calculation and planimetry Once dosimetry is completed, real-time transrectal ultrasound control is necessary to perform the implant of the needles loaded with the seeds. Today, prostate cryotherapy and brachytherapy would be inconceivable without transrectal ultrasound.

  17. 3D ultrasound in fetal spina bifida.

    PubMed

    Schramm, T; Gloning, K-P; Minderer, S; Tutschek, B

    2008-12-01

    3D ultrasound can be used to study the fetal spine, but skeletal mode can be inconclusive for the diagnosis of fetal spina bifida. We illustrate a diagnostic approach using 2D and 3D ultrasound and indicate possible pitfalls.

  18. Ultrasound guided transrectal catheter drainage of pelvic collections.

    PubMed

    Thakral, Anuj; Sundareyan, Ramaniwas; Kumar, Sheo; Arora, Divya

    2015-01-01

    The transrectal approach to draining deep-seated pelvic collections may be used to drain The transrectal approach to draining deep-seated pelvic collections may be used to drain intra-abdominal collections not reached by the transabdominal approach. We discuss 6 patients with such pelvic collections treated with transrectal drainage using catheter placement via Seldinger technique. Transrectal drainage helped achieve clinical and radiological resolution of pelvic collections in 6 and 5 of 6 cases, respectively. It simultaneously helped avoid injury to intervening bowel loops and neurovascular structures using real-time visualization of armamentarium used for drainage. Radiation exposure from fluoroscopic/CT guidance was avoided. Morbidity and costs incurred in surgical exploration were reduced using this much less invasive ultrasound guided transrectal catheter drainage of deep-seated pelvic collections.

  19. Applications of transrectal ultrasound in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Harvey, C J; Pilcher, J; Richenberg, J; Patel, U; Frauscher, F

    2012-01-01

    Transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) was first developed in the 1970s. TRUS-guided biopsy, under local anaesthetic and prophylactic antibiotics, is now the most widely accepted method to diagnose prostate cancer. However, the sensitivity and specificity of greyscale TRUS in the detection of prostate cancer is low. Prostate cancer most commonly appears as a hypoechoic focal lesion in the peripheral zone on TRUS but the appearances are variable with considerable overlap with benign lesions. Because of the low accuracy of greyscale TRUS, TRUS-guided biopsies have become established in the acquisition of systematic biopsies from standard locations. The number of systematic biopsies has increased over the years, with 10–12 cores currently accepted as the minimum standard. This article describes the technique of TRUS and biopsy and its complications. Novel modalities including contrast-enhanced modes and elastography as well as fusion techniques for increasing the sensitivity of TRUS-guided prostate-targeted biopsies are discussed along with their role in the diagnosis and management of prostate cancer. PMID:22844031

  20. Dual-Modality Prostate Imaging with PET and Transrectal Ultrasound

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    as a high-scatter ultrasound TMM, using 4% agarose mixed with deionized water and heated to 62 (in a hot water bath on a hot plate and mixed...prostate” was prepared as a low-scatter ultrasound TMM, using 8% gelatin mixed with deionized water and heated until the gelatin dissolved. The PET-US...Emission Tomography–Transrectal Ultrasound (PET-TRUS) imaging of the prostate and validate the technology with phantom and “proof of principle” human

  1. Geometric Evaluation of Systematic Transrectal Ultrasound Guided Prostate Biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Han, Misop; Chang, Doyoung; Kim, Chunwoo; Lee, Brian J.; Zuo, Yihe; Kim, Hyung-Joo; Petrisor, Doru; Trock, Bruce; Partin, Alan W.; Rodriguez, Ronald; Carter, H. Ballentine; Allaf, Mohamad; Kim, Jongwon; Stoianovici, Dan

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Transrectal ultrasound guided prostate biopsy results rely on physician ability to target the gland according to the biopsy schema. However, to our knowledge it is unknown how accurately the freehand, transrectal ultrasound guided biopsy cores are placed in the prostate and how the geometric distribution of biopsy cores may affect the prostate cancer detection rate. Materials and Methods To determine the geometric distribution of cores, we developed a biopsy simulation system with pelvic mock-ups and an optical tracking system. Mock-ups were biopsied in a freehand manner by 5 urologists and by our transrectal ultrasound robot, which can support and move the transrectal ultrasound probe. We compared 1) targeting errors, 2) the accuracy and precision of repeat biopsies, and 3) the estimated significant prostate cancer (0.5 cm3 or greater) detection rate using a probability based model. Results Urologists biopsied cores in clustered patterns and under sampled a significant portion of the prostate. The robot closely followed the predefined biopsy schema. The mean targeting error of the urologists and the robot was 9.0 and 1.0 mm, respectively. Robotic assistance significantly decreased repeat biopsy errors with improved accuracy and precision. The mean significant prostate cancer detection rate of the urologists and the robot was 36% and 43%, respectively (p <0.0001). Conclusions Systematic biopsy with freehand transrectal ultrasound guidance does not closely follow the sextant schema and may result in suboptimal sampling and cancer detection. Repeat freehand biopsy of the same target is challenging. Robotic assistance with optimized biopsy schemas can potentially improve targeting, precision and accuracy. A clinical trial is needed to confirm the additional benefits of robotic assistance. PMID:23088974

  2. Novel trends in transrectal ultrasound imaging of prostate gland carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Szopiński, Tomasz; Nowicki, Andrzej; Záťura, František; Gołąbek, Tomasz; Chłosta, Piotr

    2014-09-01

    Carcinoma of the prostate gland is the most common neoplasm in men. Its treatment depends on multiple factors among which local staging plays a significant role. The basic method is transrectal ultrasound imaging. This examination enables imaging of the prostate gland and its abnormalities, but it also allows ultrasound-guided biopsies to be conducted. A conventional gray-scale ultrasound examination enables assessment of the size, echostructure and outlines of the anatomic capsule, but in many cases, neoplastic lesions cannot be observed. For this reason, new sonographic techniques are implemented in order to facilitate detectability of cancer. The usage of contrast agents during transrectal ultrasound examination must be emphasized since, in combination with color Doppler, it facilitates detection of cancerous lesions by visualizing flow which is not observable without contrast enhancement. Elastography, in turn, is a different solution. It uses the differences in tissue elasticity between a neoplastic region and normal prostatic parenchyma that surrounds it. This technique facilitates detection of lesions irrespective of their echogenicity and thereby supplements conventional transrectal examinations. However, the size of the prostate gland and its relatively far location from the transducer may constitute limitations to the effectiveness of elastography. Moreover, the manner of conducting such an examination depends on the examiner and his or her subjective assessment. Another method, which falls within the novel, popular trend of combining imaging methods, is fusion of magnetic resonance imaging and transrectal sonography. The application of multidimensional magnetic resonance imaging, which is currently believed to be the best method for prostate cancer staging, in combination with the availability of a TRUS examination and the possibility of monitoring biopsies in real-time sonography is a promising alternative, but it is associated with higher costs and

  3. Novel trends in transrectal ultrasound imaging of prostate gland carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Nowicki, Andrzej; Záťura, František; Gołąbek, Tomasz; Chłosta, Piotr

    2014-01-01

    Carcinoma of the prostate gland is the most common neoplasm in men. Its treatment depends on multiple factors among which local staging plays a significant role. The basic method is transrectal ultrasound imaging. This examination enables imaging of the prostate gland and its abnormalities, but it also allows ultrasound-guided biopsies to be conducted. A conventional gray-scale ultrasound examination enables assessment of the size, echostructure and outlines of the anatomic capsule, but in many cases, neoplastic lesions cannot be observed. For this reason, new sonographic techniques are implemented in order to facilitate detectability of cancer. The usage of contrast agents during transrectal ultrasound examination must be emphasized since, in combination with color Doppler, it facilitates detection of cancerous lesions by visualizing flow which is not observable without contrast enhancement. Elastography, in turn, is a different solution. It uses the differences in tissue elasticity between a neoplastic region and normal prostatic parenchyma that surrounds it. This technique facilitates detection of lesions irrespective of their echogenicity and thereby supplements conventional transrectal examinations. However, the size of the prostate gland and its relatively far location from the transducer may constitute limitations to the effectiveness of elastography. Moreover, the manner of conducting such an examination depends on the examiner and his or her subjective assessment. Another method, which falls within the novel, popular trend of combining imaging methods, is fusion of magnetic resonance imaging and transrectal sonography. The application of multidimensional magnetic resonance imaging, which is currently believed to be the best method for prostate cancer staging, in combination with the availability of a TRUS examination and the possibility of monitoring biopsies in real-time sonography is a promising alternative, but it is associated with higher costs and

  4. 3D ultrafast ultrasound imaging in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Provost, Jean; Papadacci, Clement; Esteban Arango, Juan; Imbault, Marion; Fink, Mathias; Gennisson, Jean-Luc; Tanter, Mickael; Pernot, Mathieu

    2014-10-01

    Very high frame rate ultrasound imaging has recently allowed for the extension of the applications of echography to new fields of study such as the functional imaging of the brain, cardiac electrophysiology, and the quantitative imaging of the intrinsic mechanical properties of tumors, to name a few, non-invasively and in real time. In this study, we present the first implementation of Ultrafast Ultrasound Imaging in 3D based on the use of either diverging or plane waves emanating from a sparse virtual array located behind the probe. It achieves high contrast and resolution while maintaining imaging rates of thousands of volumes per second. A customized portable ultrasound system was developed to sample 1024 independent channels and to drive a 32  ×  32 matrix-array probe. Its ability to track in 3D transient phenomena occurring in the millisecond range within a single ultrafast acquisition was demonstrated for 3D Shear-Wave Imaging, 3D Ultrafast Doppler Imaging, and, finally, 3D Ultrafast combined Tissue and Flow Doppler Imaging. The propagation of shear waves was tracked in a phantom and used to characterize its stiffness. 3D Ultrafast Doppler was used to obtain 3D maps of Pulsed Doppler, Color Doppler, and Power Doppler quantities in a single acquisition and revealed, at thousands of volumes per second, the complex 3D flow patterns occurring in the ventricles of the human heart during an entire cardiac cycle, as well as the 3D in vivo interaction of blood flow and wall motion during the pulse wave in the carotid at the bifurcation. This study demonstrates the potential of 3D Ultrafast Ultrasound Imaging for the 3D mapping of stiffness, tissue motion, and flow in humans in vivo and promises new clinical applications of ultrasound with reduced intra—and inter-observer variability.

  5. 3D ultrafast ultrasound imaging in vivo.

    PubMed

    Provost, Jean; Papadacci, Clement; Arango, Juan Esteban; Imbault, Marion; Fink, Mathias; Gennisson, Jean-Luc; Tanter, Mickael; Pernot, Mathieu

    2014-10-07

    Very high frame rate ultrasound imaging has recently allowed for the extension of the applications of echography to new fields of study such as the functional imaging of the brain, cardiac electrophysiology, and the quantitative imaging of the intrinsic mechanical properties of tumors, to name a few, non-invasively and in real time. In this study, we present the first implementation of Ultrafast Ultrasound Imaging in 3D based on the use of either diverging or plane waves emanating from a sparse virtual array located behind the probe. It achieves high contrast and resolution while maintaining imaging rates of thousands of volumes per second. A customized portable ultrasound system was developed to sample 1024 independent channels and to drive a 32  ×  32 matrix-array probe. Its ability to track in 3D transient phenomena occurring in the millisecond range within a single ultrafast acquisition was demonstrated for 3D Shear-Wave Imaging, 3D Ultrafast Doppler Imaging, and, finally, 3D Ultrafast combined Tissue and Flow Doppler Imaging. The propagation of shear waves was tracked in a phantom and used to characterize its stiffness. 3D Ultrafast Doppler was used to obtain 3D maps of Pulsed Doppler, Color Doppler, and Power Doppler quantities in a single acquisition and revealed, at thousands of volumes per second, the complex 3D flow patterns occurring in the ventricles of the human heart during an entire cardiac cycle, as well as the 3D in vivo interaction of blood flow and wall motion during the pulse wave in the carotid at the bifurcation. This study demonstrates the potential of 3D Ultrafast Ultrasound Imaging for the 3D mapping of stiffness, tissue motion, and flow in humans in vivo and promises new clinical applications of ultrasound with reduced intra--and inter-observer variability.

  6. 3D Ultrafast Ultrasound Imaging In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Provost, Jean; Papadacci, Clement; Arango, Juan Esteban; Imbault, Marion; Gennisson, Jean-Luc; Tanter, Mickael; Pernot, Mathieu

    2014-01-01

    Very high frame rate ultrasound imaging has recently allowed for the extension of the applications of echography to new fields of study such as the functional imaging of the brain, cardiac electrophysiology, and the quantitative real-time imaging of the intrinsic mechanical properties of tumors, to name a few, non-invasively and in real time. In this study, we present the first implementation of Ultrafast Ultrasound Imaging in three dimensions based on the use of either diverging or plane waves emanating from a sparse virtual array located behind the probe. It achieves high contrast and resolution while maintaining imaging rates of thousands of volumes per second. A customized portable ultrasound system was developed to sample 1024 independent channels and to drive a 32×32 matrix-array probe. Its capability to track in 3D transient phenomena occurring in the millisecond range within a single ultrafast acquisition was demonstrated for 3-D Shear-Wave Imaging, 3-D Ultrafast Doppler Imaging and finally 3D Ultrafast combined Tissue and Flow Doppler. The propagation of shear waves was tracked in a phantom and used to characterize its stiffness. 3-D Ultrafast Doppler was used to obtain 3-D maps of Pulsed Doppler, Color Doppler, and Power Doppler quantities in a single acquisition and revealed, for the first time, the complex 3-D flow patterns occurring in the ventricles of the human heart during an entire cardiac cycle, and the 3-D in vivo interaction of blood flow and wall motion during the pulse wave in the carotid at the bifurcation. This study demonstrates the potential of 3-D Ultrafast Ultrasound Imaging for the 3-D real-time mapping of stiffness, tissue motion, and flow in humans in vivo and promises new clinical applications of ultrasound with reduced intra- and inter-observer variability. PMID:25207828

  7. 3D ultrasound image segmentation using wavelet support vector machines

    PubMed Central

    Akbari, Hamed; Fei, Baowei

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) imaging is clinically used in prostate biopsy and therapy. Segmentation of the prostate on TRUS images has many applications. In this study, a three-dimensional (3D) segmentation method for TRUS images of the prostate is presented for 3D ultrasound-guided biopsy. Methods: This segmentation method utilizes a statistical shape, texture information, and intensity profiles. A set of wavelet support vector machines (W-SVMs) is applied to the images at various subregions of the prostate. The W-SVMs are trained to adaptively capture the features of the ultrasound images in order to differentiate the prostate and nonprostate tissue. This method consists of a set of wavelet transforms for extraction of prostate texture features and a kernel-based support vector machine to classify the textures. The voxels around the surface of the prostate are labeled in sagittal, coronal, and transverse planes. The weight functions are defined for each labeled voxel on each plane and on the model at each region. In the 3D segmentation procedure, the intensity profiles around the boundary between the tentatively labeled prostate and nonprostate tissue are compared to the prostate model. Consequently, the surfaces are modified based on the model intensity profiles. The segmented prostate is updated and compared to the shape model. These two steps are repeated until they converge. Manual segmentation of the prostate serves as the gold standard and a variety of methods are used to evaluate the performance of the segmentation method. Results: The results from 40 TRUS image volumes of 20 patients show that the Dice overlap ratio is 90.3% ± 2.3% and that the sensitivity is 87.7% ± 4.9%. Conclusions: The proposed method provides a useful tool in our 3D ultrasound image-guided prostate biopsy and can also be applied to other applications in the prostate. PMID:22755682

  8. Development of a PET-Transrectal Ultrasound Prostate Imaging System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, Jennifer S.; Peng, Qiyu.; Moses, William W.; Reutter, Bryan W.; Pouliot, Jean; Hsu, I. Chow

    2011-06-01

    Multimodality imaging has an increasing role in the management of a large number of diseases, particularly if both functional and structural information are acquired and accurately registered. Transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) imaging is currently an integral part of prostate cancer diagnosis and treatment procedures, providing high-resolution anatomical detail of the prostate region. Positron Emission Tomography (PET) imaging with 11C-choline is a sensitive functional imaging technique that can identify biochemical states associated with prostate cancer. We believe that merging these prostate imaging technologies will help identify the location and aggressiveness of prostate cancer. We envision using dual PET-TRUS prostate imaging to guide biopsy, guide treatment procedures, and detect local recurrence earlier than is currently possible. Hence, we have developed a dual PET-TRUS prostate imaging system and protocol designed to allow accurate 3-D image registration. We have evaluated this PET-TRUS system by performing dual PET-TRUS imaging of custom phantoms. We describe here our dual-modality imaging system, custom phantoms and phantom study results. We also discuss our investigation of the PET-TRUS registration accuracy. We measure an average PET-TRUS registration error for our phantom studies of 2.1 ±1.7 mm in the x direction, 1.9 ±1.6 mm in the y direction, and 0.6 ±0.2 mm in the z direction. This registration accuracy is sufficient for some clinical applications such as biopsy guidance and early detection of recurrence.

  9. Freehand 3D ultrasound breast tumor segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qi; Ge, Yinan; Ou, Yue; Cao, Biao

    2007-12-01

    It is very important for physicians to accurately determine breast tumor location, size and shape in ultrasound image. The precision of breast tumor volume quantification relies on the accurate segmentation of the images. Given the known location and orientation of the ultrasound probe, We propose using freehand three dimensional (3D) ultrasound to acquire original images of the breast tumor and the surrounding tissues in real-time, after preprocessing with anisotropic diffusion filtering, the segmentation operation is performed slice by slice based on the level set method in the image stack. For the segmentation on each slice, the user can adjust the parameters to fit the requirement in the specified image in order to get the satisfied result. By the quantification procedure, the user can know the tumor size varying in different images in the stack. Surface rendering and interpolation are used to reconstruct the 3D breast tumor image. And the breast volume is constructed by the segmented contours in the stack of images. After the segmentation, the volume of the breast tumor in the 3D image data can be obtained.

  10. The future perspectives in transrectal prostate ultrasound guided biopsy.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Sung Ii; Lee, Hak Jong

    2014-12-01

    Prostate cancer is one of the most common neoplasms in men. Transrectal ultrasound (TRUS)-guided systematic biopsy has a crucial role in the diagnosis of prostate cancer. However, it shows limited value with gray-scale ultrasound alone because only a small number of malignancies are visible on TRUS. Recently, new emerging technologies in TRUS-guided prostate biopsy were introduced and showed high potential in the diagnosis of prostate cancer. High echogenicity of ultrasound contrast agent reflect the increased status of angiogenesis in tumor. Molecular imaging for targeting specific biomarker can be also used using ultrasound contrast agent for detecting angiogenesis or surface biomarker of prostate cancer. The combination of TRUS-guided prostate biopsy and ultrasound contrast agents can increase the accuracy of prostate cancer diagnosis. Elastography is an emerging ultrasound technique that can provide the information regarding tissue elasticity and stiffness. Tumors are usually stiffer than the surrounding soft tissue. In two types of elastography techniques, shearwave elastography has many potential in that it can provide quantitative information on tissue elasticity. Multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) from high resolution morphologic and functional magnetic resonance (MR) technique enables to detect more prostate cancers. The combination of functional techniques including apparent diffusion coefficient map from diffusion weighted imaging, dynamic contrast enhanced MR and MR spectroscopy are helpful in the localization of the prostate cancer. MR-ultrasound (US) fusion image can enhance the advantages of both two modalities. With MR-US fusion image, targeted biopsy of suspicious areas on MRI is possible and fusion image guided biopsy can provide improved detection rate. In conclusion, with recent advances in multiparametric-MRI, and introduction of new US techniques such as contrast-enhanced US and elastography, TRUS-guided biopsy may evolve toward

  11. The future perspectives in transrectal prostate ultrasound guided biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Sung II; Lee, Hak Jong

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer is one of the most common neoplasms in men. Transrectal ultrasound (TRUS)-guided systematic biopsy has a crucial role in the diagnosis of prostate cancer. However, it shows limited value with gray-scale ultrasound alone because only a small number of malignancies are visible on TRUS. Recently, new emerging technologies in TRUS-guided prostate biopsy were introduced and showed high potential in the diagnosis of prostate cancer. High echogenicity of ultrasound contrast agent reflect the increased status of angiogenesis in tumor. Molecular imaging for targeting specific biomarker can be also used using ultrasound contrast agent for detecting angiogenesis or surface biomarker of prostate cancer. The combination of TRUS-guided prostate biopsy and ultrasound contrast agents can increase the accuracy of prostate cancer diagnosis. Elastography is an emerging ultrasound technique that can provide the information regarding tissue elasticity and stiffness. Tumors are usually stiffer than the surrounding soft tissue. In two types of elastography techniques, shearwave elastography has many potential in that it can provide quantitative information on tissue elasticity. Multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) from high resolution morphologic and functional magnetic resonance (MR) technique enables to detect more prostate cancers. The combination of functional techniques including apparent diffusion coefficient map from diffusion weighted imaging, dynamic contrast enhanced MR and MR spectroscopy are helpful in the localization of the prostate cancer. MR-ultrasound (US) fusion image can enhance the advantages of both two modalities. With MR-US fusion image, targeted biopsy of suspicious areas on MRI is possible and fusion image guided biopsy can provide improved detection rate. In conclusion, with recent advances in multiparametric-MRI, and introduction of new US techniques such as contrast-enhanced US and elastography, TRUS-guided biopsy may evolve toward

  12. Interstitially implanted I125 for prostate cancer using transrectal ultrasound

    SciTech Connect

    Greenburg, S.; Petersen, J.; Hansen-Peters, I.; Baylinson, W. )

    1990-11-01

    Prostate cancer is the third leading cause of death from cancer among men in the United States. Traditional treatments for prostate cancer are prostatectomy, external beam irradiation, and interstitial implantation of Iodine125 (I125) via laparotomy. These treatments are associated with significant morbidity and limitations. Based on experience with I125 interstitial implantation by transrectal ultrasound guidance for early-stage prostate cancer, it seems that this newer method of treatment has greater accuracy of placement and distribution of the isotope and has had few reported complications. The need for a surgical incision has been eliminated. Hospitalization time also has been decreased, creating the need for ambulatory and inpatient nurses to understand the importance of their respective roles in providing coordinated quality care for these patients. Nurses in these departments must have knowledge of the procedure, radiation safety, and common side effects related to the implant.

  13. Transperineal ultrasound for measurement of prostate volume: validation against transrectal ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, Kaye A; Ly, Lam P; Jin, Bo; Chan, Lewis; Handelsman, David J

    2007-10-01

    We evaluated the transperineal ultrasound method to measure total and central prostate volume compared with the standard transrectal ultrasound. Healthy men without prostate disease underwent transperineal and transrectal ultrasound at a single session to calculate total and central prostate volume by the ellipsoidal formula from maximal measured dimensions. Reproducibility within and between methods was evaluated by ICC, CV and Bland-Altman plots. In 13 men measured on 3 occasions within 2 weeks transperineal and transrectal ultrasound had high within method (ICC 0.92 and 0.97, and CV 7.2% and 5.1%, respectively) and between method (ICC 0.98 and CV 5.4%) agreement. Agreement for central prostate volume was good but it was lower within method (ICC 0.74 and 0.73, and CV 20.5% and 20.3%, respectively) and between method (ICC 0.85 and CV 19.7%). Transperineal ultrasound bias was -2.7% for total and -8.9% for central prostate volume. Of 287 healthy men the methods highly correlated for total prostate volume in 245 (ICC 0.92, 95% CI 0.90 to 0.94) and for central prostate volume in 217 (ICC 0.87, 95% CI 0.83 to 0.90). Transperineal ultrasound had minimal bias for total prostate volume (-3.7%, mean -1.0 ml, 95% CI -1.7 to -0.2 ml) and no bias for central prostate volume (-3.0%, mean bias 0.10 ml, 95% CI -0.3 to 0.5 ml). Transperineal ultrasound was more acceptable but it had a higher technical failure rate for total and central prostate volume (13.6% vs 1.4% and 23.7% vs 3.5%, respectively). Transperineal ultrasound provides an accurate, less invasive and more acceptable alternative but with a higher technical failure rate than transrectal ultrasound, especially for central prostate volume. By trading off acceptability for the failure rate transperineal ultrasound may enhance the feasibility of valid studies requiring repeat prostate volume measurement in asymptomatic men.

  14. Status of transrectal ultrasound imaging of the prostate.

    PubMed

    Aigner, Friedrich; Mitterberger, Michael; Rehder, Peter; Pallwein, Leo; Junker, Daniel; Horninger, Wolfgang; Frauscher, Ferdinand

    2010-05-01

    To describe the current and new developments in transrectal ultrasound (US) imaging of the prostate. Grayscale imaging of the prostate is the standard method for diagnostic evaluation and biopsy guidance. Color Doppler (CD) imaging, including CD and power Doppler US, allows for detection of macrovascularity and may therefore be helpful for assessment of prostatic blood flow. The use of US microbubbles for CD imaging and new contrast-specific techniques enable assessment of prostate microvascularity associated with prostate cancer (PCa). Recently, real-time elastography has been introduced to improve detection of cancer based upon changes in tissue stiffness. Contrast-enhanced CD imaging has shown to enable PCa detection by performing targeted biopsies into suspicious areas. Comparisons between systematic and contrast-enhanced targeted biopsies have shown that the targeted approach detects more cancers and cancers with higher Gleason scores with a reduced number of biopsy cores. New microbubble-specific US techniques can improve sensitivity and specificity of US imaging for PCa detection. Real-time elastography has been demonstrated to be useful for the detection of PCa, and may further improve PCa staging. The new US techniques seem to have the potential to improve PCa detection, and also PCa grading and staging. As these diagnostic methods improve, the ultimate hope is to eliminate biopsy in patients without cancer.

  15. Boundary delineation in transrectal ultrasound image for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ying; Sankar, Ravi; Qian, Wei

    2007-11-01

    This paper presents a new advanced automatic edge delineation model for the detection and diagnosis of prostate cancer on transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) images. The proposed model is to improve prostate boundary detection system by modifying a set of preprocessing algorithms including tree-structured nonlinear filter (TSF), directional wavelet transforms (DWT) and tree-structured wavelet transform (TSWT). The model consists of a preprocessing module and a segmentation module. The preprocessing module is implemented for noise suppression, image smoothing and boundary enhancement. The active contours model is used in the segmentation module for prostate boundary detection in two-dimensional (2D) TRUS images. Experimental results show that the addition of the preprocessing module improves the accuracy and sensitivity of the segmentation module, compared to the implementation of the segmentation module alone. It is believed that the proposed automatic boundary detection module for the TRUS images is a promising approach, which provides an efficient and robust detection and diagnosis strategy and acts as "second opinion" for the physician's interpretation of prostate cancer.

  16. Ultrasound scatter in heterogeneous 3D microstructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engle, B. J.; Roberts, R. A.; Grandin, R. J.

    2017-02-01

    This paper reports on a computational study of ultrasound propagation in heterogeneous metal microstructures. Random spatial fluctuations in elastic properties over a range of length scales relative to ultrasound wavelength can give rise to scatter-induced attenuation, backscatter noise, and phase front aberration. It is of interest to quantify the dependence of these phenomena on the microstructure parameters, for the purpose of quantifying deleterious consequences on flaw detectability, and for the purpose of material characterization. Valuable tools for estimation of microstructure parameters (e.g. grain size) through analysis of ultrasound backscatter have been developed based on approximate weak-scattering models. While useful, it is understood that these tools display inherent inaccuracy when multiple scattering phenomena significantly contribute to the measurement. It is the goal of this work to supplement weak scattering model predictions with corrections derived through application of an exact computational scattering model to explicitly prescribed microstructures.

  17. [A case of hepatitis C virus possible transmission following a transrectal ultrasound guided prostate biopsy].

    PubMed

    Ferhi, K; Haertig, A; Mozer, P; de la Taille, A; Roupret, M; Van Glabeke, E; Bitker, M-O

    2013-03-01

    The prostate biopsy is a current and well-codified act. To date, there have been no reported risks of viral transmission between patients linked to contaminated ultrasound probe. We report the case of a patient having contracted the virus of hepatitis C after transrectal prostate biopsy during an individual screening of prostate cancer.

  18. Automatic 3D Segmentation of Ultrasound Images Using Atlas Registration and Statistical Texture Prior

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xiaofeng; Schuster, David; Master, Viraj; Nieh, Peter; Fenster, Aaron; Fei, Baowei

    2012-01-01

    We are developing a molecular image-directed, 3D ultrasound-guided, targeted biopsy system for improved detection of prostate cancer. In this paper, we propose an automatic 3D segmentation method for transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) images, which is based on multi-atlas registration and statistical texture prior. The atlas database includes registered TRUS images from previous patients and their segmented prostate surfaces. Three orthogonal Gabor filter banks are used to extract texture features from each image in the database. Patient-specific Gabor features from the atlas database are used to train kernel support vector machines (KSVMs) and then to segment the prostate image from a new patient. The segmentation method was tested in TRUS data from 5 patients. The average surface distance between our method and manual segmentation is 1.61 ± 0.35 mm, indicating that the atlas-based automatic segmentation method works well and could be used for 3D ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy. PMID:22708024

  19. Ovarian tumor characterization using 3D ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Acharya, U Rajendra; Sree, S Vinitha; Krishnan, M Muthu Rama; Saba, Luca; Molinari, Filippo; Guerriero, Stefano; Suri, Jasjit S

    2012-12-01

    Among gynecological malignancies, ovarian cancer is the most frequent cause of death. Preoperative determination of whether a tumor is benign or malignant has often been found to be difficult. Because of such inconclusive findings from ultrasound images and other tests, many patients with benign conditions have been offered unnecessary surgeries thereby increasing patient anxiety and healthcare cost. The key objective of our work is to develop an adjunct Computer Aided Diagnostic (CAD) technique that uses ultrasound images of the ovary and image mining algorithms to accurately classify benign and malignant ovarian tumor images. In this algorithm, we extract texture features based on Local Binary Patterns (LBP) and Laws Texture Energy (LTE) and use them to build and train a Support Vector Machine (SVM) classifier. Our technique was validated using 1000 benign and 1000 malignant images, and we obtained a high accuracy of 99.9% using a SVM classifier with a Radial Basis Function (RBF) kernel. The high accuracy can be attributed to the determination of the novel combination of the 16 texture based features that quantify the subtle changes in the images belonging to both classes. The proposed algorithm has the following characteristics: cost-effectiveness, complete automation, easy deployment, and good end-user comprehensibility. We have also developed a novel integrated index, Ovarian Cancer Index (OCI), which is a combination of the texture features, to present the physicians with a more transparent adjunct technique for ovarian tumor classification.

  20. Adaptive kernel regression for freehand 3D ultrasound reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alshalalfah, Abdel-Latif; Daoud, Mohammad I.; Al-Najar, Mahasen

    2017-03-01

    Freehand three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound imaging enables low-cost and flexible 3D scanning of arbitrary-shaped organs, where the operator can freely move a two-dimensional (2D) ultrasound probe to acquire a sequence of tracked cross-sectional images of the anatomy. Often, the acquired 2D ultrasound images are irregularly and sparsely distributed in the 3D space. Several 3D reconstruction algorithms have been proposed to synthesize 3D ultrasound volumes based on the acquired 2D images. A challenging task during the reconstruction process is to preserve the texture patterns in the synthesized volume and ensure that all gaps in the volume are correctly filled. This paper presents an adaptive kernel regression algorithm that can effectively reconstruct high-quality freehand 3D ultrasound volumes. The algorithm employs a kernel regression model that enables nonparametric interpolation of the voxel gray-level values. The kernel size of the regression model is adaptively adjusted based on the characteristics of the voxel that is being interpolated. In particular, when the algorithm is employed to interpolate a voxel located in a region with dense ultrasound data samples, the size of the kernel is reduced to preserve the texture patterns. On the other hand, the size of the kernel is increased in areas that include large gaps to enable effective gap filling. The performance of the proposed algorithm was compared with seven previous interpolation approaches by synthesizing freehand 3D ultrasound volumes of a benign breast tumor. The experimental results show that the proposed algorithm outperforms the other interpolation approaches.

  1. 3D ultrasound imaging in image-guided intervention.

    PubMed

    Fenster, Aaron; Bax, Jeff; Neshat, Hamid; Cool, Derek; Kakani, Nirmal; Romagnoli, Cesare

    2014-01-01

    Ultrasound imaging is used extensively in diagnosis and image-guidance for interventions of human diseases. However, conventional 2D ultrasound suffers from limitations since it can only provide 2D images of 3-dimensional structures in the body. Thus, measurement of organ size is variable, and guidance of interventions is limited, as the physician is required to mentally reconstruct the 3-dimensional anatomy using 2D views. Over the past 20 years, a number of 3-dimensional ultrasound imaging approaches have been developed. We have developed an approach that is based on a mechanical mechanism to move any conventional ultrasound transducer while 2D images are collected rapidly and reconstructed into a 3D image. In this presentation, 3D ultrasound imaging approaches will be described for use in image-guided interventions.

  2. Three-dimensional nonrigid landmark-based magnetic resonance to transrectal ultrasound registration for image-guided prostate biopsy.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yue; Qiu, Wu; Yuan, Jing; Romagnoli, Cesare; Fenster, Aaron

    2015-04-01

    Registration of three-dimensional (3-D) magnetic resonance (MR) to 3-D transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) prostate images is an important step in the planning and guidance of 3-D TRUS guided prostate biopsy. In order to accurately and efficiently perform the registration, a nonrigid landmark-based registration method is required to account for the different deformations of the prostate when using these two modalities. We describe a nonrigid landmark-based method for registration of 3-D TRUS to MR prostate images. The landmark-based registration method first makes use of an initial rigid registration of 3-D MR to 3-D TRUS images using six manually placed approximately corresponding landmarks in each image. Following manual initialization, the two prostate surfaces are segmented from 3-D MR and TRUS images and then nonrigidly registered using the following steps: (1) rotationally reslicing corresponding segmented prostate surfaces from both 3-D MR and TRUS images around a specified axis, (2) an approach to find point correspondences on the surfaces of the segmented surfaces, and (3) deformation of the surface of the prostate in the MR image to match the surface of the prostate in the 3-D TRUS image and the interior using a thin-plate spline algorithm. The registration accuracy was evaluated using 17 patient prostate MR and 3-D TRUS images by measuring the target registration error (TRE). Experimental results showed that the proposed method yielded an overall mean TRE of [Formula: see text] for the rigid registration and [Formula: see text] for the nonrigid registration, which is favorably comparable to a clinical requirement for an error of less than 2.5 mm. A landmark-based nonrigid 3-D MR-TRUS registration approach is proposed, which takes into account the correspondences on the prostate surface, inside the prostate, as well as the centroid of the prostate. Experimental results indicate that the proposed method yields clinically sufficient accuracy.

  3. Development and validation of a virtual reality transrectal ultrasound guided prostatic biopsy simulator

    PubMed Central

    Chalasani, Venu; Cool, Derek W.; Sherebrin, Shi; Fenster, Aaron; Chin, Joseph; Izawa, Jonathan I

    2011-01-01

    Objective We present the design, reliability, face, content and construct validity testing of a virtual reality simulator for transrectal ultrasound (TRUS), which allows doctors-in-training to perform multiple different biopsy schemes. Methods This biopsy system design uses a regular “end-firing” TRUS probe. Movements of the probe are tracked with a micro-magnetic sensor to dynamically slice through a phantom patient’s 3D prostate volume to provide real-time continuous TRUS views. 3D TRUS scans during prostate biopsy clinics were recorded. Intrinsic reliability was assessed by comparing the left side of the prostate to the right side of the prostate for each biopsy. A content and face validity questionnaire was administered to 26 doctors to assess the simulator. Construct validity was assessed by comparing notes from experts and novices with regards to the time taken and the accuracy of each biopsy. Results Imaging data from 50 patients were integrated into the simulator. The completed VR TRUS simulator uses real patient images, and is able to provide simulation for 50 cases, with a haptic interface that uses a standard TRUS probe and biopsy needle. Intrinsic reliability was successfully demonstrated by comparing results from the left and right sides of the prostate. Face and content validity respondents noted the realism of the simulator, and its appropriateness as a teaching model. The simulator was able to distinguish between experts and novices during construct validity testing. Conclusions A virtual reality TRUS simulator has successfully been created. It has promising face, content and construct validity results. PMID:21470507

  4. Reconstruction of freehand 3D ultrasound based on kernel regression.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiankang; Wen, Tiexiang; Li, Xingmin; Qin, Wenjian; Lan, Donglai; Pan, Weizhou; Gu, Jia

    2014-08-28

    Freehand three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound has the advantages of flexibility for allowing clinicians to manipulate the ultrasound probe over the examined body surface with less constraint in comparison with other scanning protocols. Thus it is widely used in clinical diagnose and image-guided surgery. However, as the data scanning of freehand-style is subjective, the collected B-scan images are usually irregular and highly sparse. One of the key procedures in freehand ultrasound imaging system is the volume reconstruction, which plays an important role in improving the reconstructed image quality. A novel freehand 3D ultrasound volume reconstruction method based on kernel regression model is proposed in this paper. Our method consists of two steps: bin-filling and regression. Firstly, the bin-filling step is used to map each pixel in the sampled B-scan images to its corresponding voxel in the reconstructed volume data. Secondly, the regression step is used to make the nonparametric estimation for the whole volume data from the previous sampled sparse data. The kernel penalizes distance away from the current approximation center within a local neighborhood. To evaluate the quality and performance of our proposed kernel regression algorithm for freehand 3D ultrasound reconstruction, a phantom and an in-vivo liver organ of human subject are scanned with our freehand 3D ultrasound imaging system. Root mean square error (RMSE) is used for the quantitative evaluation. Both of the qualitative and quantitative experimental results demonstrate that our method can reconstruct image with less artifacts and higher quality. The proposed kernel regression based reconstruction method is capable of constructing volume data with improved accuracy from irregularly sampled sparse data for freehand 3D ultrasound imaging system.

  5. Chest wall segmentation in automated 3D breast ultrasound scans.

    PubMed

    Tan, Tao; Platel, Bram; Mann, Ritse M; Huisman, Henkjan; Karssemeijer, Nico

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, we present an automatic method to segment the chest wall in automated 3D breast ultrasound images. Determining the location of the chest wall in automated 3D breast ultrasound images is necessary in computer-aided detection systems to remove automatically detected cancer candidates beyond the chest wall and it can be of great help for inter- and intra-modal image registration. We show that the visible part of the chest wall in an automated 3D breast ultrasound image can be accurately modeled by a cylinder. We fit the surface of our cylinder model to a set of automatically detected rib-surface points. The detection of the rib-surface points is done by a classifier using features representing local image intensity patterns and presence of rib shadows. Due to attenuation of the ultrasound signal, a clear shadow is visible behind the ribs. Evaluation of our segmentation method is done by computing the distance of manually annotated rib points to the surface of the automatically detected chest wall. We examined the performance on images obtained with the two most common 3D breast ultrasound devices in the market. In a dataset of 142 images, the average mean distance of the annotated points to the segmented chest wall was 5.59 ± 3.08 mm. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. 3-D Ultrasound Vascularity Assessment for Breast Cancer Diagnosis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-09-01

    Doppler color-echo in the echo- using NPDM or vM • NPDM in conjunction with mean graphic evaluation of solid neoplasms of the breast : 5 years of grey-scale...UNCLASSIFIED AD CONTRACT NUMBER DAMDl7-96-C-6061 TITLE: 3-D Ultrasound Vascularity Assessment for Breast Cancer Diagnosis PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Paul L. Carson...97 - 31 Aug 98) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 3-D Ultrasound Vascularity Assessment for Breast Cancer DAMDl7-96-C-6061 Diagnosis 6. AUTHOR

  7. Autonomous surgical robotics using 3-D ultrasound guidance: feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Whitman, John; Fronheiser, Matthew P; Ivancevich, Nikolas M; Smith, Stephen W

    2007-10-01

    The goal of this study was to test the feasibility of using a real-time 3D (RT3D) ultrasound scanner with a transthoracic matrix array transducer probe to guide an autonomous surgical robot. Employing a fiducial alignment mark on the transducer to orient the robot's frame of reference and using simple thresholding algorithms to segment the 3D images, we tested the accuracy of using the scanner to automatically direct a robot arm that touched two needle tips together within a water tank. RMS measurement error was 3.8% or 1.58 mm for an average path length of 41 mm. Using these same techniques, the autonomous robot also performed simulated needle biopsies of a cyst-like lesion in a tissue phantom. This feasibility study shows the potential for 3D ultrasound guidance of an autonomous surgical robot for simple interventional tasks, including lesion biopsy and foreign body removal.

  8. Linear tracking for 3-D medical ultrasound imaging.

    PubMed

    Huang, Qing-Hua; Yang, Zhao; Hu, Wei; Jin, Lian-Wen; Wei, Gang; Li, Xuelong

    2013-12-01

    As the clinical application grows, there is a rapid technical development of 3-D ultrasound imaging. Compared with 2-D ultrasound imaging, 3-D ultrasound imaging can provide improved qualitative and quantitative information for various clinical applications. In this paper, we proposed a novel tracking method for a freehand 3-D ultrasound imaging system with improved portability, reduced degree of freedom, and cost. We designed a sliding track with a linear position sensor attached, and it transmitted positional data via a wireless communication module based on Bluetooth, resulting in a wireless spatial tracking modality. A traditional 2-D ultrasound probe fixed to the position sensor on the sliding track was used to obtain real-time B-scans, and the positions of the B-scans were simultaneously acquired when moving the probe along the track in a freehand manner. In the experiments, the proposed method was applied to ultrasound phantoms and real human tissues. The results demonstrated that the new system outperformed a previously developed freehand system based on a traditional six-degree-of-freedom spatial sensor in phantom and in vivo studies, indicating its merit in clinical applications for human tissues and organs.

  9. High Resolution Anatomic and Elastographic Transrectal Ultrasound for Improved Diagnosis of Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-08-01

    strain estimation technique in elastography ." Ultrason Imaging 24: 109–118. Tay, P. C., S. T. Acton, et al. (2006). "Ultrasound despeckling using an...incrementally increasing pressure. Strain , related to elasticity, can be calculated from the displace ment image . Our second objective is to use a...that has been found to be optimal for strain imaging (Lubinski, Emelianov et al. 1999).An example B-mode image obtained by the transrectal I-Beam

  10. Needle tip visibility in 3D ultrasound images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arif, Muhammad; Moelker, Adriaan; van Walsum, Theo

    2017-03-01

    Needle visibility is of crucial importance for ultrasound guided interventional procedures. However, several factors, such as shadowing by bone or gas and tissue echogenic properties similar to needles, may compromise needle visibility. Additionally, small angle between the ultrasound beam and the needle, as well as small gauged needles may reduce visibility. Variety in needle tips design may also affect needle visibility. Whereas several studies have investigated needle visibility in 2D ultrasound imaging, no data is available for 3D ultrasound imaging, a modality that has great potential for image guidance interventions1. In this study, we evaluated needle visibility using a 3D ultrasound transducer. We examined different needles in a tissue mimicking liver phantom at three angles (200, 550 and 900) and quantify their visibility. The liver phantom was made by 5% polyvinyl alcohol solution containing 1% Silica gel particles to act as ultrasound scattering particles. We used four needles; two biopsy needles (Quick core 14G and 18G), one Ablation needle (Radiofrequency Ablation 17G), and Initial puncture needle (IP needle 17G). The needle visibility was quantified by calculating contrast to noise ratio. The results showed that the visibility for all needles were almost similar at large angles. However the difference in visibility at lower angles is more prominent. Furthermore, the visibility increases with the increase in angle of ultrasound beam with needles.

  11. Fast rendering scheme for 3D cylindrical ultrasound data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jung Pill; Ra, Jong Beom

    2000-04-01

    3D ultrasound imaging is an emerging and prospective modality in the ultrasound scanning area. Since 3D ultrasound dat are often acquired by translation or rotation of 2D data acquisition systems, the data can be directly sampled on cylindrical or spherical structured girds rather tan on rectilinear grids. However, visualization of cylindrical or spherical data is more complex than that of rectilinear grids. Therefore, conventional rendering methods resample the grids into rectilinear grids and visualize the resampled rectilinear dat. However, resampling introduces an undesired resolution loss. In this paper a direct rendering scheme of cylindrical ultrasound data is considered. Even though cell sin cylindrical grids have different sizes, they are very similar in shape and contain some regularity. We use this similarity and regularity of cells to reduce rendering time in a projection-based rendering method. To achieve high sped rendering, we prose a simple projection ordering method and a fast projection method using a common edge table. And also, to produce good rendering results, an efficient bilinear interpolation scheme is prosed for the hexahedral projection. In this scheme, since weighting coefficients are calculated in the image plane, we can avoid calculating crossing point sin the object space. Based on the proposed techniques above, we can produce high resolution rendered images directly form a cylindrical 3D ultrasound data set.

  12. Factors influencing estrus and ovulation in weaned sows as determined by transrectal ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Knox, R V; Zas, S L

    2001-12-01

    Characterization of factors influencing estrus and ovulation in sows may facilitate development of procedures for improving reproductive performance. The experiment was conducted in confinement during 1997 to 1999 using 174 Large White x Landrace sows. After weaning, sows were checked for estrus twice daily. In the 1st yr, transrectal ultrasound was performed once daily and in the 2nd yr twice daily at estrus and on every day until ovulation. The effects of lactation length (< or = 16 d, 17 to 24 d, 25 to 31 d or > or = 32 d), parity (1, 2, or > or = 3), season (winter, spring, summer, or fall) and weaning-to-estrus interval (3, 4, 5, or 6 to 8 d) and their interactions on estrual and ovulatory responses were studied. There was no effect of frequency of ultrasound on any response variable, so data across years were pooled. Percentage of sows expressing estrus within 8 d of weaning was influenced by lactation length (P < 0.001), with sows lactating < or = 16 d (35.2%) less likely to express estrus than sows lactating > or = 17 d (94%). A parity x season interaction was observed (P < 0.001) for estrus, with the lowest expression in parity 1 (73.0%) and parity 2 sows in fall (67.2%), compared with > or = parity 3 sows (98.1%). No explanatory variable had a significant effect on weaning-to-estrus interval (4.4 d) or on follicle size at estrus (8.1 mm). Ovulation hour after onset of estrus was affected by weaning-to-estrus interval (P < 0.01), with sows returning in 3 d ovulating at 46.2 h and between 6 and 8 d at 30.2 h. For sows that expressed estrus within 8 d of weaning, the percentage of sows ovulating was influenced by lactation length (P < 0.001) and weaning-to-estrus interval (P < 0.001). Sows that lactated < or = 16 d were less likely to ovulate (78.0%) than those lactating > or = 17 d (> 92%). Sows that returned to estrus in 3 d were also less likely to ovulate (79.5%) than sows returning > or = 4 d after weaning (> 92%). A parity x season interaction was also

  13. Midbrain segmentation in transcranial 3D ultrasound for Parkinson diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Ahmadi, Seyed-Ahmad; Baust, Maximilian; Karamalis, Athanasios; Plate, Annika; Boetzel, Kai; Klein, Tassilo; Navab, Nassir

    2011-01-01

    Ultrasound examination of the human brain through the temporal bone window, also called transcranial ultrasound (TC-US), is a completely non-invasive and cost-efficient technique, which has established itself for differential diagnosis of Parkinson's Disease (PD) in the past decade. The method requires spatial analysis of ultrasound hyperechogenicities produced by pathological changes within the Substantia Nigra (SN), which belongs to the basal ganglia within the midbrain. Related work on computer aided PD diagnosis shows the urgent need for an accurate and robust segmentation of the midbrain from 3D TC-US, which is an extremely difficult task due to poor image quality of TC-US. In contrast to 2D segmentations within earlier approaches, we develop the first method for semi-automatic midbrain segmentation from 3D TC-US and demonstrate its potential benefit on a database of 11 diagnosed Parkinson patients and 11 healthy controls.

  14. Ultrasound anal sphincter defects and 3D anal pressure defects.

    PubMed

    Mion, F; Garros, A; Damon, H; Roman, S

    2017-04-13

    We read with interest the paper by Rezaie et al. on the use of 3D high definition anorectal manometry (3DARM) to detect anal sphincter defects in patients with faecal incontinence [1]. In their series of 39 patients, they described a new metrics to define anal pressure defect (defect of at least 18° of the 25 mmHg isobaric contour on anal resting pressures), and then compared the results of pressure defects determined by 3DARM and 3D anal ultrasound results. They found a rather good negative predictive value of manometry to eliminate the presence of ultrasound anal sphincter defects (92%), and suggested the possibility to use 3DARM to rule out anal sphincter defects and avoid the need of anal ultrasound in selected patients. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  15. 3D Subharmonic Ultrasound Imaging In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Eisenbrey, John R.; Sridharan, Anush; Machado, Priscilla; Zhao, Hongjia; Halldorsdottir, Valgerdur G.; Dave, Jaydev K.; Liu, Ji-Bin; Park, Suhyun; Dianis, Scott; Wallace, Kirk; Thomenius, Kai E.; Forsberg, F.

    2012-01-01

    Rationale and Objectives While contrast-enhanced ultrasound imaging techniques such as harmonic imaging (HI) have evolved to reduce tissue signals using the nonlinear properties of the contrast agent, levels of background suppression have been mixed. Subharmonic imaging (SHI) offers near-complete tissue suppression by centering the receive bandwidth at half the transmitting frequency. In this work we demonstrate the feasibility of 3D SHI and compare it to 3D HI. Materials and Methods 3D HI and SHI were implemented on a Logiq 9 ultrasound scanner (GE Healthcare, Milwaukee, Wisconsin) with a 4D10L probe. Four-cycle SHI was implemented to transmit at 5.8 MHz and receive at 2.9 MHz, while 2-cycle HI was implemented to transmit at 5 MHz and receive at 10 MHz. The ultrasound contrast agent Definity (Lantheus Medical Imaging, North Billerica, MA) was imaged within a flow phantom and the lower pole of two canine kidneys in both HI and SHI modes. Contrast to tissue ratios (CTR) and rendered images were compared offline. Results SHI resulted in significant improvement in CTR levels relative to HI both in vitro (12.11±0.52 vs. 2.67±0.77, p<0.001) and in vivo (5.74±1.92 vs. 2.40±0.48, p=0.04). Rendered 3D SHI images provided better tissue suppression and a greater overall view of vessels in a flow phantom and canine renal vasculature. Conclusions The successful implementation of SHI in 3D allows imaging of vascular networks over a heterogeneous sample volume and should improve future diagnostic accuracy. Additionally, 3D SHI provides improved CTR values relative to 3D HI. PMID:22464198

  16. Tracked 3D ultrasound in radio-frequency liver ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boctor, Emad M.; Fichtinger, Gabor; Taylor, Russell H.; Choti, Michael A.

    2003-05-01

    Recent studies have shown that radio frequency (RF) ablation is a simple, safe and potentially effective treatment for selected patients with liver metastases. Despite all recent therapeutic advancements, however, intra-procedural target localization and precise and consistent placement of the tissue ablator device are still unsolved problems. Various imaging modalities, including ultrasound (US) and computed tomography (CT) have been tried as guidance modalities. Transcutaneous US imaging, due to its real-time nature, may be beneficial in many cases, but unfortunately, fails to adequately visualize the tumor in many cases. Intraoperative or laparoscopic US, on the other hand, provides improved visualization and target imaging. This paper describes a system for computer-assisted RF ablation of liver tumors, combining navigational tracking of a conventional imaging ultrasound probe to produce 3D ultrasound imaging with a tracked RF ablation device supported by a passive mechanical arm and spatially registered to the ultrasound volume.

  17. The Application of Ultrasound in 3D Bio-Printing.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yufeng

    2016-05-05

    Three-dimensional (3D) bioprinting is an emerging and promising technology in tissue engineering to construct tissues and organs for implantation. Alignment of self-assembly cell spheroids that are used as bioink could be very accurate after droplet ejection from bioprinter. Complex and heterogeneous tissue structures could be built using rapid additive manufacture technology and multiple cell lines. Effective vascularization in the engineered tissue samples is critical in any clinical application. In this review paper, the current technologies and processing steps (such as printing, preparation of bioink, cross-linking, tissue fusion and maturation) in 3D bio-printing are introduced, and their specifications are compared with each other. In addition, the application of ultrasound in this novel field is also introduced. Cells experience acoustic radiation force in ultrasound standing wave field (USWF) and then accumulate at the pressure node at low acoustic pressure. Formation of cell spheroids by this method is within minutes with uniform size and homogeneous cell distribution. Neovessel formation from USWF-induced endothelial cell spheroids is significant. Low-intensity ultrasound could enhance the proliferation and differentiation of stem cells. Its use is at low cost and compatible with current bioreactor. In summary, ultrasound application in 3D bio-printing may solve some challenges and enhance the outcomes.

  18. 2D/ 3D Quantitative Ultrasound of the Breast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasief, Haidy Gerges

    Breast cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death of women in the United States, so breast cancer screening for early detection is common. The purpose of this dissertation is to optimize quantitative ultrasound (QUS) methods to improve the specificity and objectivity of breast ultrasound. To pursue this goal, the dissertation is divided into two parts: 1) to optimize 2D QUS, and 2) to introduce and validate 3D QUS. Previous studies had validated these methods in phantoms. Applying our QUS analysis on subcutaneous breast fat demonstrated that QUS parameter estimates for subcutaneous fat were consistent among different human subjects. This validated our in vivo data acquisition methods and supported the use of breast fat as a clinical reference tissue for ultrasound BI-RADSRTM assessments. Although current QUS methods perform well for straightforward cases when assumptions of stationarity and diffuse scattering are well-founded, these conditions often are not present due to the complicated nature of in vivo breast tissue. Key improvements in QUS algorithms to address these challenges were: 1) applying a "modified least squares method (MLSM)" to account for the heterogeneous tissue path between the transducer and the region of interest, ROI; 2) detecting anisotropy in acoustic parameters; and 3) detecting and removing the echo sources that depart from diffuse and stationary scattering conditions. The results showed that a Bayesian classifier combining three QUS parameters in a biased pool of high-quality breast ultrasound data successfully differentiated all fibroadenomas from all carcinomas. Given promising initial results in 2D, extension to 3D acquisitions in QUS provided a unique capability to test QUS for the entire breast volume. QUS parameter estimates using 3D data were consistent with those found in 2D for phantoms and in vivo data. Extensions of QUS technology from 2D to 3D can improve the specificity of breast ultrasound, and thus, could lead to

  19. Advances in transrectal ultrasound imaging of the prostate.

    PubMed

    Linden, Robert A; Halpern, Ethan J

    2007-08-01

    Grayscale imaging of the prostate is the basic method for diagnostic evaluation and biopsy guidance. Doppler imaging may improve sensitivity for detection of prostate cancer. Microbubble contrast agents represent a major advance to more selectively demonstrate neovascular flow within the prostate. Recently, real-time elastography has been introduced to improve detection of cancer based upon changes in tissue stiffness. As diagnostic methods improve, the ultimate hope is to eliminate biopsy in patients without cancer. New ultrasound-based treatment systems, such as high-intensity focused ultrasound ablative therapy for prostate cancer, may someday allow diagnosis and treatment of prostate cancer to be completed in one sitting.

  20. 3D frequency-domain ultrasound waveform tomography breast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandhu, Gursharan Yash; West, Erik; Li, Cuiping; Roy, Olivier; Duric, Neb

    2017-03-01

    Frequency-domain ultrasound waveform tomography is a promising method for the visualization and characterization of breast disease. It has previously been shown to accurately reconstruct the sound speed distributions of breasts of varying densities. The reconstructed images show detailed morphological and quantitative information that can help differentiate different types of breast disease including benign and malignant lesions. The attenuation properties of an ex vivo phantom have also been assessed. However, the reconstruction algorithms assumed a 2D geometry while the actual data acquisition process was not. Although clinically useful sound speed images can be reconstructed assuming this mismatched geometry, artifacts from the reconstruction process exist within the reconstructed images. This is especially true for registration across different modalities and when the 2D assumption is violated. For example, this happens when a patient's breast is rapidly sloping. It is also true for attenuation imaging where energy lost or gained out of the plane gets transformed into artifacts within the image space. In this paper, we will briefly review ultrasound waveform tomography techniques, give motivation for pursuing the 3D method, discuss the 3D reconstruction algorithm, present the results of 3D forward modeling, show the mismatch that is induced by the violation of 3D modeling via numerical simulations, and present a 3D inversion of a numerical phantom.

  1. Transrectal ultrasound – Techniques and outcomes in the management of intestinal endometriosis

    PubMed Central

    Rossini, Lucio G.B.; Ribeiro, Paulo A.A.G.; Rodrigues, Francisco C.M.; Filippi, Sheila S.; Zago, Rodrigo de R.; Schneider, Nutianne C.; Okawa, Luciano; Klug, Wilmar A.

    2012-01-01

    The widespread use of endoscopic ultrasound has facilitated the evaluation of subepithelial and surrounding lesions of the gastrointestinal tract. Deep pelvic endometriosis, with or without infiltration of the intestinal wall, is a frequent disease that can be observed in women in their fertile age. Patients of this disease may present nonspecific signs and symptoms or be completely asymptomatic. Laparoscopic surgical resection of endometriotic lesions is the treatment of choice in symptomatic patients. An accurate preoperative evaluation is indispensable for therapeutic decisions mainly in the suspicion of intestinal wall and/or urinary tract infiltration, and also in cases where we need to establish histological diagnosis or to rule out malignant disease. Diagnostic tools, including transrectal ultrasound, magnetic resonance image, transvaginal ultrasound, barium enema, and colonoscopy, play significant roles in determining the presence, depth, histology, and other relevant data about the extension of the disease. Diagnostic algorithm depends on the clinical presentation, the expertise of the medical team, and the technology available at each institution. This article reviews and discusses relevant clinical points in endometriosis, including techniques and outcomes of the study of the disease through transrectal ultrasound and fine-needle aspiration. PMID:24949332

  2. Localization of liver tumors in freehand 3D laparoscopic ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahin, O.; Martens, V.; Besirevic, A.; Kleemann, M.; Schlaefer, A.

    2012-02-01

    The aim of minimally invasive laparoscopic liver interventions is to completely resect or ablate tumors while minimizing the trauma caused by the operation. However, restrictions such as limited field of view and reduced depth perception can hinder the surgeon's capabilities to precisely localize the tumor. Typically, preoperative data is acquired to find the tumor(s) and plan the surgery. Nevertheless, determining the precise position of the tumor is required, not only before but also during the operation. The standard use of ultrasound in hepatic surgery is to explore the liver and identify tumors. Meanwhile, the surgeon mentally builds a 3D context to localize tumors. This work aims to upgrade the use of ultrasound in laparoscopic liver surgery. We propose an approach to segment and localize tumors intra-operatively in 3D ultrasound. We reconstruct a 3D laparoscopic ultrasound volume containing a tumor. The 3D image is then preprocessed and semi-automatically segmented using a level set algorithm. During the surgery, for each subsequent reconstructed volume, a fast update of the tumor position is accomplished via registration using the previously segmented and localized tumor as a prior knowledge. The approach was tested on a liver phantom with artificial tumors. The tumors were localized in approximately two seconds with a mean error of less than 0.5 mm. The strengths of this technique are that it can be performed intra-operatively, it helps the surgeon to accurately determine the location, shape and volume of the tumor, and it is repeatable throughout the operation.

  3. 3D ultrasound imaging for prosthesis fabrication and diagnostic imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Morimoto, A.K.; Bow, W.J.; Strong, D.S.

    1995-06-01

    The fabrication of a prosthetic socket for a below-the-knee amputee requires knowledge of the underlying bone structure in order to provide pressure relief for sensitive areas and support for load bearing areas. The goal is to enable the residual limb to bear pressure with greater ease and utility. Conventional methods of prosthesis fabrication are based on limited knowledge about the patient`s underlying bone structure. A 3D ultrasound imaging system was developed at Sandia National Laboratories. The imaging system provides information about the location of the bones in the residual limb along with the shape of the skin surface. Computer assisted design (CAD) software can use this data to design prosthetic sockets for amputees. Ultrasound was selected as the imaging modality. A computer model was developed to analyze the effect of the various scanning parameters and to assist in the design of the overall system. The 3D ultrasound imaging system combines off-the-shelf technology for image capturing, custom hardware, and control and image processing software to generate two types of image data -- volumetric and planar. Both volumetric and planar images reveal definition of skin and bone geometry with planar images providing details on muscle fascial planes, muscle/fat interfaces, and blood vessel definition. The 3D ultrasound imaging system was tested on 9 unilateral below-the- knee amputees. Image data was acquired from both the sound limb and the residual limb. The imaging system was operated in both volumetric and planar formats. An x-ray CT (Computed Tomography) scan was performed on each amputee for comparison. Results of the test indicate beneficial use of ultrasound to generate databases for fabrication of prostheses at a lower cost and with better initial fit as compared to manually fabricated prostheses.

  4. Three-dimensional nonrigid landmark-based magnetic resonance to transrectal ultrasound registration for image-guided prostate biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yue; Qiu, Wu; Yuan, Jing; Romagnoli, Cesare; Fenster, Aaron

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Registration of three-dimensional (3-D) magnetic resonance (MR) to 3-D transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) prostate images is an important step in the planning and guidance of 3-D TRUS guided prostate biopsy. In order to accurately and efficiently perform the registration, a nonrigid landmark-based registration method is required to account for the different deformations of the prostate when using these two modalities. We describe a nonrigid landmark-based method for registration of 3-D TRUS to MR prostate images. The landmark-based registration method first makes use of an initial rigid registration of 3-D MR to 3-D TRUS images using six manually placed approximately corresponding landmarks in each image. Following manual initialization, the two prostate surfaces are segmented from 3-D MR and TRUS images and then nonrigidly registered using the following steps: (1) rotationally reslicing corresponding segmented prostate surfaces from both 3-D MR and TRUS images around a specified axis, (2) an approach to find point correspondences on the surfaces of the segmented surfaces, and (3) deformation of the surface of the prostate in the MR image to match the surface of the prostate in the 3-D TRUS image and the interior using a thin-plate spline algorithm. The registration accuracy was evaluated using 17 patient prostate MR and 3-D TRUS images by measuring the target registration error (TRE). Experimental results showed that the proposed method yielded an overall mean TRE of 3.50±1.34  mm for the rigid registration and 2.24±0.71  mm for the nonrigid registration, which is favorably comparable to a clinical requirement for an error of less than 2.5 mm. A landmark-based nonrigid 3-D MR-TRUS registration approach is proposed, which takes into account the correspondences on the prostate surface, inside the prostate, as well as the centroid of the prostate. Experimental results indicate that the proposed method yields clinically sufficient accuracy. PMID

  5. Intrarectal Lidocaine-Diltiazem-Meperidine Gel for Transrectal Ultrasound Guided Prostate Biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Imani, Farsad; Moghaddam, Yasaman; Shariat Moharari, Reza; Etezadi, Farhad; Khajavi, Mohammad Reza; Hosseini, Seyed Reza

    2015-01-01

    Background: TRUS-guided needle biopsy of the prostate gland is the current standard method used for diagnosis of prostate cancer. Pain control during this procedure is through the use of i.v. sedation or local anaesthetic (LA), depending on clinician preference. Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of intrarectal lidocaine, lidocaine-diltiazem and lidocaine-meperidine-diltiazem gel for anesthetizing transrectal ultrasound guided prostate biopsy. Patients and Methods: In a randomized double-blind clinical trial, 100 consecutive patients were divided into three groups. The patients received one of the gels before transrectal ultrasound guided prostate needle biopsy: group A, intrarectal and perianal lidocaine, gel 1 g; group B, intrarectal lidocaine gel, 1 g, + perianal diltiazem, 1 g; group C, intrarectal lidocaine gel, 1 g, + meperidine, 25 mg, and perianal diltiazem, 1 g. Visual analog pain scale was used to estimate pain during probe insertion and biopsy. Heart rate and blood pressure during probe insertion and biopsy were recorded too. Results: The mean of visual analog pain scale was 4.5 in group A, 3.5 in group B, and 2.0 in group C during probe insertion (P value = 0.01). The mean of visual analog pain scale was 5.1 in group A, 3.5 group B, and 2.5 in group C during biopsy (P value = 0.001). The groups were comparable for patients' age, weight, serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA), and prostate size (P > 0.05). No side effects of meperidine and lidocaine including drowsiness, dizziness, tinnitus and light-headedness or requiring assistance for activity were noted. Conclusions: Lidocaine-meperidine-diltiazem gel provides significantly better pain control than lidocaine-diltiazem gel and lidocaine gel alone during transrectal ultrasound guided prostate biopsy and probe insertion. This mixture gel is safe, easy to administer and well accepted by patients. PMID:26161317

  6. Breast tumour visualization using 3D quantitative ultrasound methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gangeh, Mehrdad J.; Raheem, Abdul; Tadayyon, Hadi; Liu, Simon; Hadizad, Farnoosh; Czarnota, Gregory J.

    2016-04-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most common cancer types accounting for 29% of all cancer cases. Early detection and treatment has a crucial impact on improving the survival of affected patients. Ultrasound (US) is non-ionizing, portable, inexpensive, and real-time imaging modality for screening and quantifying breast cancer. Due to these attractive attributes, the last decade has witnessed many studies on using quantitative ultrasound (QUS) methods in tissue characterization. However, these studies have mainly been limited to 2-D QUS methods using hand-held US (HHUS) scanners. With the availability of automated breast ultrasound (ABUS) technology, this study is the first to develop 3-D QUS methods for the ABUS visualization of breast tumours. Using an ABUS system, unlike the manual 2-D HHUS device, the whole patient's breast was scanned in an automated manner. The acquired frames were subsequently examined and a region of interest (ROI) was selected in each frame where tumour was identified. Standard 2-D QUS methods were used to compute spectral and backscatter coefficient (BSC) parametric maps on the selected ROIs. Next, the computed 2-D parameters were mapped to a Cartesian 3-D space, interpolated, and rendered to provide a transparent color-coded visualization of the entire breast tumour. Such 3-D visualization can potentially be used for further analysis of the breast tumours in terms of their size and extension. Moreover, the 3-D volumetric scans can be used for tissue characterization and the categorization of breast tumours as benign or malignant by quantifying the computed parametric maps over the whole tumour volume.

  7. Refraction Correction in 3D Transcranial Ultrasound Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Lindsey, Brooks D.; Smith, Stephen W.

    2014-01-01

    We present the first correction of refraction in three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound imaging using an iterative approach that traces propagation paths through a two-layer planar tissue model, applying Snell’s law in 3D. This approach is applied to real-time 3D transcranial ultrasound imaging by precomputing delays offline for several skull thicknesses, allowing the user to switch between three sets of delays for phased array imaging at the push of a button. Simulations indicate that refraction correction may be expected to increase sensitivity, reduce beam steering errors, and partially restore lost spatial resolution, with the greatest improvements occurring at the largest steering angles. Distorted images of cylindrical lesions were created by imaging through an acrylic plate in a tissue-mimicking phantom. As a result of correcting for refraction, lesions were restored to 93.6% of their original diameter in the lateral direction and 98.1% of their original shape along the long axis of the cylinders. In imaging two healthy volunteers, the mean brightness increased by 8.3% and showed no spatial dependency. PMID:24275538

  8. SU-E-J-93: Parametrisation of Dose to the Mucosa of the Anterior Rectal Wall in Transrectal Ultrasound Guided High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy of the Prostate

    SciTech Connect

    Aitkenhead, A; Hamlett, L; Wood, D; Choudhury, A

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: In high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy of the prostate, radiation is delivered from a number of radioactive sources which are inserted via catheter into the target volume. The rectal mucosa also receives dose during the treatment, which may lead to late toxicity effects. To allow possible links between rectal dose and toxicity to be investigated, suitable methods of parametrising the rectal dose are needed. Methods: During treatment of a series of 95 patients, anatomy and catheter locations were monitored by transrectal ultrasound, and target volume positions were contoured on the ultrasound scan by the therapist. The anterior rectal mucosal wall was identified by contouring the transrectal ultrasound balloon within the ultrasound scan. Source positions and dwell times, along with the dose delivered to the patient were computed using the Oncentra Prostate treatment planning system (TPS). Data for the series of patients were exported from the TPS in Dicom format, and a series of parametrisation methods were developed in a Matlab environment to assess the rectal dose. Results: Contours of the anterior rectal mucosa were voxelised within Matlab to allow the dose to the rectal mucosa to be analysed directly from the 3D dose grid. Dose parametrisations based on dose-surface (DSH) and dose-line (DLH) histograms were obtained. Both lateral and longitudinal extents of the mucosal dose were parametrised using dose-line histograms in the relevant directions. Conclusion: We have developed a series of dose parametrisations for quantifying the dose to the rectal mucosa during HDR prostate brachytherapy which are suitable for future studies investigating potential associations between mucosal dose and late toxicity effects. The geometry of the transrectal probe standardises the rectal anatomy, making this treatment technique particularly suited to studies of this nature.

  9. Quantitative three-dimensional transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) for prostate imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pathak, Sayan D.; Aarnink, Rene G.; de la Rosette, Jean J.; Chalana, Vikram; Wijkstra, Hessel; Haynor, David R.; Debruyne, Frans M. J.; Kim, Yongmin

    1998-06-01

    With the number of men seeking medical care for prostate diseases rising steadily, the need of a fast and accurate prostate boundary detection and volume estimation tool is being increasingly experienced by the clinicians. Currently, these measurements are made manually, which results in a large examination time. A possible solution is to improve the efficiency by automating the boundary detection and volume estimation process with minimal involvement from the human experts. In this paper, we present an algorithm based on SNAKES to detect the boundaries. Our approach is to selectively enhance the contrast along the edges using an algorithm called sticks and integrate it with a SNAKES model. This integrated algorithm requires an initial curve for each ultrasound image to initiate the boundary detection process. We have used different schemes to generate the curves with a varying degree of automation and evaluated its effects on the algorithm performance. After the boundaries are identified, the prostate volume is calculated using planimetric volumetry. We have tested our algorithm on 6 different prostate volumes and compared the performance against the volumes manually measured by 3 experts. With the increase in the user inputs, the algorithm performance improved as expected. The results demonstrate that given an initial contour reasonably close to the prostate boundaries, the algorithm successfully delineates the prostate boundaries in an image, and the resulting volume measurements are in close agreement with those made by the human experts.

  10. Glasses for 3D ultrasound computer tomography: phase compensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zapf, M.; Hopp, T.; Ruiter, N. V.

    2016-03-01

    Ultrasound Computer Tomography (USCT), developed at KIT, is a promising new imaging system for breast cancer diagnosis, and was successfully tested in a pilot study. The 3D USCT II prototype consists of several hundreds of ultrasound (US) transducers on a semi-ellipsoidal aperture. Spherical waves are sequentially emitted by individual transducers and received in parallel by many transducers. Reflectivity volumes are reconstructed by synthetic aperture focusing (SAFT). However, straight forward SAFT imaging leads to blurred images due to system imperfections. We present an extension of a previously proposed approach to enhance the images. This approach includes additional a priori information and system characteristics. Now spatial phase compensation was included. The approach was evaluated with a simulation and clinical data sets. An increase in the image quality was observed and quantitatively measured by SNR and other metrics.

  11. Influence of transrectal ultrasound probe on prostate cancer detection in transrectal ultrasound-guided sextant biopsy of prostate.

    PubMed

    Paul, Roger; Korzinek, Christian; Necknig, Ulrike; Niesel, Thomas; Alschibaja, Michael; Leyh, Herbert; Hartung, Rudolf

    2004-09-01

    To determine whether end-fire probes increase the prostate cancer (PCa) detection rate. Enhancing the PCa detection rate is the main goal of biopsy protocols. Prostate biopsy is limited by side-fire probes to a longitudinal axis, but end-fire probes allow biopsy cores to also be taken in the transverse section. A total of 2625 patients underwent systematic sextant biopsy in three institutions using the same protocol. Three different ultrasound probes were used-the Kretz Combisone and Bruel & Kjaer side-fire probes and the ATL HDI end-fire probe. We retrospectively evaluated the influence of the probe on the PCa detection rate. The Kretz probe was used in 384 men, the Bruel & Kjaer probe in 598 men, and the ATL probe in 1643 men. Overall, 35.2% had PCa detected. Analyzing all patients, no statistically significant difference (P = 0.73) was found for the probes, but the subgroup with a prostate-specific antigen level of 4 to 10 ng/mL demonstrated a statistically significant improvement in the detection rate using the end-fire probe (31.3% versus 24.5% and 21.5% for the side-fire probes, P = 0.01). Patients with nonpalpable PCa also demonstrated a statistically significant increase in detection with the end-fire probe (P = 0.004). Multivariate analysis confirmed that the ultrasound probe is an independent parameter to enhance the PCa detection rate. Our results showed that end-fire probes provide a statistically significant improvement in the PCa detection rate compared with side-fire probes in patients with a prostate-specific antigen level of 4 to 10 ng/mL and nonpalpable disease. The reason could be the facilitated sampling in the most lateral part of the peripheral zone. Our results suggest that the widespread use of end-fire probes for prostate biopsy could enhance the PCa detection rate.

  12. The effects of hypnotherapy during transrectal ultrasound-guided prostate needle biopsy for pain and anxiety.

    PubMed

    Hızlı, Fatih; Özcan, Osman; Selvi, İsmail; Eraslan, Pınar; Köşüş, Aydın; Baş, Okan; Yıkılmaz, Taha Numan; Güven, Oğuz; Başar, Halil

    2015-11-01

    Several studies evaluating the tolerance of transrectal ultrasound (TRUS)-guided needle biopsies showed that moderate-to-severe pain was associated with the procedure. Additionally, prebiopsy anxiety or rebiopsy as a result of a prior biopsy procedure is mentioned as factors predisposing to higher pain intensity. Thus, in this study, we investigated the effects of hypnotherapy during transrectal ultrasound-guided prostate needle biopsy for pain and anxiety. Sixty-four patients presenting for TRUS-guided prostate needle biopsy were randomly assigned to receive either 10-min presurgery hypnosis session (n = 32, mean age 63.5 ± 6.1, p = 0.289) or a presurgery control session (n = 32, mean age 61.8 ± 6.8, p = 0.289). The hypnosis session involved suggestions for increased relaxation and decreased anxiety. Presurgery pain and anxiety were measured using visual analog scales (VAS), Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI), and Hamilton Anxiety Scale (HAS), respectively. In our statistics, p < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Postintervention, and before surgery, patients in the hypnosis group had significantly lower mean values for presurgery VAS [mean 1 (0-8); p = 0.011], BAI (6.0 vs 2.0; p < 0.001), and HAS (11.0 vs 6.0; p < 0.001). The study results indicate that a brief presurgery hypnosis intervention can be an effective means of controlling presurgical anxiety, and therefore pain, in patients awaiting diagnostic prostate cancer surgery.

  13. Transrectal Ultrasound Guided Biopsy of the Prostate: Is the Information Accessible, Usable, Reliable and Readable?

    PubMed Central

    Redmond, Ciaran E.; Nason, Gregory J.; Kelly, Michael E.; McMahon, Colm; Cantwell, Colin P.; Quinlan, David M.

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims To evaluate the accessibility, usability, reliability and readability of Internet information regarding transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) guided biopsy of the prostate. Materials and Methods The terms “prostate biopsy”, “TRUS biopsy” and “transrectal ultrasound guided biopsy of the prostate” were separately entered into the each of the top 5 most accessed Internet search engines. Websites were evaluated for accessibility, usability and reliability using the LIDA tool – a validated tool for the assessment of health related websites. Website readability was assessed using the Flesch Reading Ease Score and the Flesch Kincaid Grade Level. Results Following the application of exclusion criteria, 82 unique websites were analyzed. There was a significant difference in scores depending on authorship categories (p ≤ 0.001), with health related charity websites scoring highest (mean 122.29 ± 13.98) and non-academic affiliated institution websites scoring lowest (mean 87 ± 19.76). The presence of advertisements on a website was associated with a lower mean overall LIDA tool score (p = 0.024). Only a single website adhered to the National Institutes for Health recommendations on readability. Conclusions This study demonstrates variability in the quality of information available to Internet users regarding TRUS biopsies. Collaboration of website design and clinical acumen are necessary to develop appropriate websites for patient benefit. PMID:26195961

  14. Are Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Transrectal Ultrasound Guided Targeted Biopsies Noninferior to Transrectal Ultrasound Guided Systematic Biopsies for the Detection of Prostate Cancer?

    PubMed

    Delongchamps, Nicolas Barry; Portalez, Daniel; Bruguière, Eric; Rouvière, Olivier; Malavaud, Bernard; Mozer, Pierre; Fiard, Gaelle; Cornud, François

    2016-10-01

    In men with suspicion of prostate cancer the standard of cancer detection is transrectal ultrasound guided 10 to 12-core systematic biopsy. The targeted biopsy only strategy using magnetic resonance imaging-transrectal ultrasound image registration is gaining in popularity. We assessed the noninferiority of targeted vs systematic biopsy. Between June and October 2014 a total of 108 biopsy naïve patients with prostate specific antigen between 4 and 20 ng/ml, normal rectal examination and a single suspicious image on magnetic resonance imaging were included in study at 7 centers. Patients underwent systematic biopsy by a first operator blinded to magnetic resonance imaging, immediately followed by 3 targeted biopsies within the suspicious image by a second operator. The primary end point was the cancer detection rate. The noninferiority margin was set at -5%. The secondary end points were the detection rate of clinically significant prostate cancer (maximum cancer core length 5 mm or greater for Gleason 6 or any Gleason 7 or greater disease) and procedure duration. Systematic and targeted biopsies detected cancer in 66 (61.1%) and 61 patients (56.5%), respectively. The mean difference was -4.5% with a 95% CI lower bound of -11.8%. A total of 13 patients with protocol violations were excluded from the per protocol analysis, which showed a mean difference of -5.2% with a 95% CI lower bound of -13.1%. Clinically significant prostate cancer was detected in 50 (46.2%) and 52 patients (48.1%) with systematic and targeted biopsies, respectively (p = 0.69). The mean ± SD duration of image fusion plus targeted biopsy was 16.7 ± 7 minutes vs 7.4 ± 3 for systematic biopsy (p <0.001). Targeted biopsy seemed to be inferior to systematic biopsy for overall cancer detection. Detection of clinically significant prostate cancer did not differ between targeted and systematic biopsies. Copyright © 2016 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by

  15. Detection of Curved Robots using 3D Ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Ren, Hongliang; Vasilyev, Nikolay V; Dupont, Pierre E

    2011-09-25

    Three-dimensional ultrasound can be an effective imaging modality for image-guided interventions since it enables visualization of both the instruments and the tissue. For robotic applications, its realtime frame rates create the potential for image-based instrument tracking and servoing. These capabilities can enable improved instrument visualization, compensation for tissue motion as well as surgical task automation. Continuum robots, whose shape comprises a smooth curve along their length, are well suited for minimally invasive procedures. Existing techniques for ultrasound tracking, however, are limited to straight, laparoscopic-type instruments and thus are not applicable to continuum robot tracking. Toward the goal of developing tracking algorithms for continuum robots, this paper presents a method for detecting a robot comprised of a single constant curvature in a 3D ultrasound volume. Computational efficiency is achieved by decomposing the six-dimensional circle estimation problem into two sequential three-dimensional estimation problems. Simulation and experiment are used to evaluate the proposed method.

  16. Prenatal assessment of pulmonary maturity on 3-D ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Wang, Sha-Sha; Tian, Xue-Ye; Yan, Hong-Wei; Yuan, Ting; Zheng, Xiao-Ye; Han, Zhen

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility and accuracy of 3-D ultrasound indices to evaluate fetal lung maturity, and to establish a normal reference for fetal lung volume (FLV) and fetal lung-to-liver intensity ratio (FLLIR) in a Chinese population. A total of 1022 pregnant women with singleton pregnancy were prospectively studied between June 2008 to June 2011. Ultrasound examination was performed. The breathing-related nasal fluid flow (BRNFF) spectrum, FLV, pulmonary artery blood flow parameters, and echo intensity of the lung were calculated. Phosphoglycerides in the amniotic fluid were measured on thin layer chromatography. FLLIR and FLV were positively and linearly correlated with gestational age (F = 0.915, 0.846). Indicators of fetal lung maturity included FLLIR >1.1, FLV >50 mL, and regular BRNFF spectrum, with positive likelihood ratios of 12.28, 11.78, and 11.63, independently. Ultrasound indices, including FLLIR, FLV and BRNFF may serve as useful alternatives to amniotic fluid phospholipids in analyzing fetal lung maturity in Chinese patients. © 2016 Japan Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  17. Comparison of thyroid segmentation techniques for 3D ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wunderling, T.; Golla, B.; Poudel, P.; Arens, C.; Friebe, M.; Hansen, C.

    2017-02-01

    The segmentation of the thyroid in ultrasound images is a field of active research. The thyroid is a gland of the endocrine system and regulates several body functions. Measuring the volume of the thyroid is regular practice of diagnosing pathological changes. In this work, we compare three approaches for semi-automatic thyroid segmentation in freehand-tracked three-dimensional ultrasound images. The approaches are based on level set, graph cut and feature classification. For validation, sixteen 3D ultrasound records were created with ground truth segmentations, which we make publicly available. The properties analyzed are the Dice coefficient when compared against the ground truth reference and the effort of required interaction. Our results show that in terms of Dice coefficient, all algorithms perform similarly. For interaction, however, each algorithm has advantages over the other. The graph cut-based approach gives the practitioner direct influence on the final segmentation. Level set and feature classifier require less interaction, but offer less control over the result. All three compared methods show promising results for future work and provide several possible extensions.

  18. A single element 3D ultrasound tomography system.

    PubMed

    Xiang Zhang; Fincke, Jonathan; Kuzmin, Andrey; Lempitsky, Victor; Anthony, Brian

    2015-08-01

    Over the past decade, substantial effort has been directed toward developing ultrasonic systems for medical imaging. With advances in computational power, previously theorized scanning methods such as ultrasound tomography can now be realized. In this paper, we present the design, error analysis, and initial backprojection images from a single element 3D ultrasound tomography system. The system enables volumetric pulse-echo or transmission imaging of distal limbs. The motivating clinical applications include: improving prosthetic fittings, monitoring bone density, and characterizing muscle health. The system is designed as a flexible mechanical platform for iterative development of algorithms targeting imaging of soft tissue and bone. The mechanical system independently controls movement of two single element ultrasound transducers in a cylindrical water tank. Each transducer can independently circle about the center of the tank as well as move vertically in depth. High resolution positioning feedback (~1μm) and control enables flexible positioning of the transmitter and the receiver around the cylindrical tank; exchangeable transducers enable algorithm testing with varying transducer frequencies and beam geometries. High speed data acquisition (DAQ) through a dedicated National Instrument PXI setup streams digitized data directly to the host PC. System positioning error has been quantified and is within limits for the imaging requirements of the motivating applications.

  19. Density-tapered spiral arrays for ultrasound 3-D imaging.

    PubMed

    Ramalli, Alessandro; Boni, Enrico; Savoia, Alessandro Stuart; Tortoli, Piero

    2015-08-01

    The current high interest in 3-D ultrasound imaging is pushing the development of 2-D probes with a challenging number of active elements. The most popular approach to limit this number is the sparse array technique, which designs the array layout by means of complex optimization algorithms. These algorithms are typically constrained by a few steering conditions, and, as such, cannot guarantee uniform side-lobe performance at all angles. The performance may be improved by the ungridded extensions of the sparse array technique, but this result is achieved at the expense of a further complication of the optimization process. In this paper, a method to design the layout of large circular arrays with a limited number of elements according to Fermat's spiral seeds and spatial density modulation is proposed and shown to be suitable for application to 3-D ultrasound imaging. This deterministic, aperiodic, and balanced positioning procedure attempts to guarantee uniform performance over a wide range of steering angles. The capabilities of the method are demonstrated by simulating and comparing the performance of spiral and dense arrays. A good trade-off for small vessel imaging is found, e.g., in the 60λ spiral array with 1.0λ elements and Blackman density tapering window. Here, the grating lobe level is -16 dB, the lateral resolution is lower than 6λ the depth of field is 120λ and, the average contrast is 10.3 dB, while the sensitivity remains in a 5 dB range for a wide selection of steering angles. The simulation results may represent a reference guide to the design of spiral sparse array probes for different application fields.

  20. Quantification of thyroid volume using 3-D ultrasound imaging.

    PubMed

    Kollorz, E K; Hahn, D A; Linke, R; Goecke, T W; Hornegger, J; Kuwert, T

    2008-04-01

    Ultrasound (US) is among the most popular diagnostic techniques today. It is non-invasive, fast, comparably cheap, and does not require ionizing radiation. US is commonly used to examine the size, and structure of the thyroid gland. In clinical routine, thyroid imaging is usually performed by means of 2-D US. Conventional approaches for measuring the volume of the thyroid gland or its nodules may therefore be inaccurate due to the lack of 3-D information. This work reports a semi-automatic segmentation approach for the classification, and analysis of the thyroid gland based on 3-D US data. The images are scanned in 3-D, pre-processed, and segmented. Several pre-processing methods, and an extension of a commonly used geodesic active contour level set formulation are discussed in detail. The results obtained by this approach are compared to manual interactive segmentations by a medical expert in five representative patients. Our work proposes a novel framework for the volumetric quantification of thyroid gland lobes, which may also be expanded to other parenchymatous organs.

  1. Breast tumor angiogenesis analysis using 3D power Doppler ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Ruey-Feng; Huang, Sheng-Fang; Lee, Yu-Hau; Chen, Dar-Ren; Moon, Woo Kyung

    2006-03-01

    Angiogenesis is the process that correlates to tumor growth, invasion, and metastasis. Breast cancer angiogenesis has been the most extensively studied and now serves as a paradigm for understanding the biology of angiogenesis and its effects on tumor outcome and patient prognosis. Most studies on characterization of angiogenesis focus on pixel/voxel counts more than morphological analysis. Nevertheless, in cancer, the blood flow is greatly affected by the morphological changes, such as the number of vessels, branching pattern, length, and diameter. This paper presents a computer-aided diagnostic (CAD) system that can quantify vascular morphology using 3-D power Doppler ultrasound (US) on breast tumors. We propose a scheme to extract the morphological information from angiography and to relate them to tumor diagnosis outcome. At first, a 3-D thinning algorithm helps narrow down the vessels into their skeletons. The measurements of vascular morphology significantly rely on the traversing of the vascular trees produced from skeletons. Our study of 3-D assessment of vascular morphological features regards vessel count, length, bifurcation, and diameter of vessels. Investigations into 221 solid breast tumors including 110 benign and 111 malignant cases, the p values using the Student's t-test for all features are less than 0.05 indicating that the proposed features are deemed statistically significant. Our scheme focuses on the vascular architecture without involving the technique of tumor segmentation. The results show that the proposed method is feasible, and have a good agreement with the diagnosis of the pathologists.

  2. Integration of 3D intraoperative ultrasound for enhanced neuronavigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulsen, Keith D.; Ji, Songbai; Hartov, Alex; Fan, Xiaoyao; Roberts, David W.

    2012-03-01

    True three-dimensional (3D) volumetric ultrasound (US) acquisitions stand to benefit intraoperative neuronavigation on multiple fronts. While traditional two-dimensional (2D) US and its tracked, hand-swept version have been recognized for many years to advantage significantly image-guided neurosurgery, especially when coregistered with preoperative MR scans, its unregulated and incomplete sampling of the surgical volume of interest have limited certain intraoperative uses of the information that are overcome through direct volume acquisition (i.e., through 2D scan-head transducer arrays). In this paper, we illustrate several of these advantages, including image-based intraoperative registration (and reregistration) and automated, volumetric displacement mapping for intraoperative image updating. These applications of 3D US are enabled by algorithmic advances in US image calibration, and volume rasterization and interpolation for multi-acquisition synthesis that will also be highlighted. We expect to demonstrate that coregistered 3D US is well worth incorporating into the standard neurosurgical navigational environment relative to traditional tracked, hand-swept 2D US.

  3. 3D imaging options and ultrasound contrast agents for the ultrasound assessment of pediatric rheumatic patients.

    PubMed

    Madej, Tomasz

    2013-12-01

    The application of 3D imaging in pediatric rheumatology helps to make the assessment of inflammatory changes more objective and to estimate accurately their volume and the actual response to treatment in the course of follow-up examinations. Additional interesting opportunities are opened up by the vascularity analysis with the help of power Doppler and color Doppler in 3D imaging. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound examinations enable a more sensitive assessment of the vascularity of inflamed structures of the locomotor system, and a more accurate analysis of treatment's effect on changes in vascularity, and thereby the inflammation process activity, as compared to the classical options of power and color Doppler. The equipment required, time limitations, as well as the high price in the case of contrast-enhanced ultrasound, contribute to the fact that the 3D analysis of inflammatory changes and contrast-enhanced ultrasound examinations are not routinely applied for pediatric patients.

  4. Crouzon syndrome associated with acanthosis nigricans: prenatal 2D and 3D ultrasound findings and postnatal 3D CT findings

    PubMed Central

    Nørgaard, Pernille; Hagen, Casper Petri; Hove, Hanne; Dunø, Morten; Nissen, Kamilla Rothe; Kreiborg, Sven; Jørgensen, Finn Stener

    2012-01-01

    Crouzon syndrome with acanthosis nigricans (CAN) is a very rare condition with an approximate prevalence of 1 per 1 million newborns. We add the first report on prenatal 2D and 3D ultrasound findings in CAN. In addition we present the postnatal 3D CT findings. The diagnosis was confirmed by molecular testing. PMID:23986840

  5. Crouzon syndrome associated with acanthosis nigricans: prenatal 2D and 3D ultrasound findings and postnatal 3D CT findings.

    PubMed

    Nørgaard, Pernille; Hagen, Casper Petri; Hove, Hanne; Dunø, Morten; Nissen, Kamilla Rothe; Kreiborg, Sven; Jørgensen, Finn Stener

    2012-01-01

    Crouzon syndrome with acanthosis nigricans (CAN) is a very rare condition with an approximate prevalence of 1 per 1 million newborns. We add the first report on prenatal 2D and 3D ultrasound findings in CAN. In addition we present the postnatal 3D CT findings. The diagnosis was confirmed by molecular testing.

  6. Clinical application of a 3D ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy system.

    PubMed

    Natarajan, Shyam; Marks, Leonard S; Margolis, Daniel J A; Huang, Jiaoti; Macairan, Maria Luz; Lieu, Patricia; Fenster, Aaron

    2011-01-01

    Prostate biopsy (Bx) has for 3 decades been performed in a systematic, but blind fashion using 2D ultrasound (US). Herein is described the initial clinical evaluation of a 3D Bx tracking and targeting device (Artemis; Eigen, Grass Valley, CA). Our main objective was to test accuracy of the new 3D method in men undergoing first and follow-up Bx to rule out prostate cancer (CaP). Patients in the study were men ages 35-87 years (66.1 ± 9.9), scheduled for Bx to rule out CaP, who entered into an IRB-approved protocol. A total of 218 subjects underwent conventional trans-rectal US (TRUS); the tracking system was then attached to the US probe; the prostate was scanned and a 3D reconstruction was created. All Bx sites were visualized in 3D and tracked electronically. In 11 men, a pilot study was conducted to test ability of the device to return a Bx to an original site. In 47 men, multi-parametric 3 Tesla MRI, incorporating T2-weighted images, dynamic contrast enhancement, and diffusion-weighted imaging, was performed in advance of the TRUS, allowing the stored MRI images to be fused with real-time US during biopsy. Lesions on MRI were delineated by a radiologist, assigned a grade of CaP suspicion, and fused into TRUS for biopsy targeting. 3D Bx tracking was completed successfully in 180/218 patients, with a success rate approaching 95% among the last 50 men. Average time for Bx with the Artemis device was 15 minutes with an additional 5 minutes for MRI fusion and Bx targeting. In the tracking study, an ability to return to prior Bx sites (n=32) within 1.2 ± 1.1 mm SD was demonstrated and was independent of prostate volume or location of Bx site. In the MRI fusion study, when suspicious lesions were targeted, a 33% Bx-positivity rate was found compared with a 7% positivity rate for systematic, nontargeted Bx (19/57 cores vs. 9/124 cores, P=0.03). Use of 3D tracking and image fusion has the potential to transform MRI into a clinical tool to aid biopsy and improve current

  7. Clinical Application of a 3D Ultrasound-guided Prostate Biopsy System

    PubMed Central

    Natarajan, Shyam; Marks, Leonard S.; Margolis, Daniel; Huang, Jiaoti; Macairan, Maria Luz; Lieu, Patricia; Fenster, Aaron

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Prostate biopsy (Bx) has for three decades been performed in a systematic, but blind fashion using 2D ultrasound (US). Herein is described the initial clinical evaluation of a 3D Bx tracking and targeting device (Artemis, Eigen, Grass Valley, CA). Our main objective was to test accuracy of the new 3D method in men undergoing first and follow-up Bx to rule out prostate cancer (CaP). Methods & Materials Patients in the study were men ages 35-87 (66.1 +/- 9.9 yrs), scheduled for Bx to rule out CaP, who entered into an IRB-approved protocol. 218 subjects underwent conventional trans-rectal US (TRUS); the tracking system was then attached to the US probe; the prostate was scanned and a 3D reconstruction was created. All Bx sites were visualized in 3D and tracked electronically. In 11 men, a pilot study was conducted to test ability of the device to return a Bx to an original site. In 47 men, multi-parametric 3 Tesla MRI – incorporating T2-weighted images, dynamic contrast enhancement, and diffusion-weighted imaging – was performed in advance of the TRUS, allowing the stored MRI images to be fused with real-time US during biopsy. Lesions on MRI were delineated by a radiologist, assigned a grade of CaP suspicion, and fused into TRUS for biopsy targeting. Results 3D Bx tracking was completed successfully in 180/218 patients, with a success rate approaching 95% among the last 50 men. Average time for Bx with the Artemis device was 15 minutes with an additional 5 minutes for MRI fusion and Bx targeting. In the tracking study, an ability to return to prior Bx sites (n=32) within 1.2 +/- 1.1 mm S.D. was demonstrated and was independent of prostate volume or location of Bx site. In the MRI fusion study, when suspicious lesions were targeted, a 33% Bx-positivity rate was found compared to a 7% positivity rate for systematic, non-targeted Bx (19/57 cores vs. 9/124 cores, p=0.03). Conclusion Use of 3D tracking and image fusion has the potential to transform MRI into

  8. Extensive repeat transrectal ultrasound guided prostate biopsy in patients with previous benign sextant biopsies.

    PubMed

    Borboroglu, P G; Comer, S W; Riffenburgh, R H; Amling, C L

    2000-01-01

    Standard sextant prostate biopsy may underestimate cancer in men in whom clinical findings are suspicious for localized prostate cancer. We describe our experience with extensive transrectal ultrasound guided prostate biopsy in men in whom previous sextant biopsy was negative. Between November 1997 and March 1999, 57 men 47 to 72 years old (mean age 61.4) underwent extensive transrectal ultrasound guided biopsy of the prostate using intravenous sedation at our institution. An average of 22.5 cores (range 15 to 31) were obtained depending on prostate size. Biopsies were obtained from each of 6 sagittal regions, including samples from the far lateral and mid transitional zones. Each patient had undergone at least 1 previous benign transrectal ultrasound guided sextant biopsy (mean 2.1, range 1 to 4). Indications for repeat biopsy were persistently elevated prostate specific antigen (PSA) in 89% of the cases, increased PSA velocity in 63%, suspicious free-to-total PSA in 39% and a previous suspicious biopsy finding in 32%. Clinical factors (PSA, PSA velocity, free-to-total PSA and previous suspicious biopsy) were analyzed for the ability to predict positive biopsy, and tumor parameters were assessed pathologically in patients undergoing radical prostatectomy. Adenocarcinoma was identified in 17 of the 57 men (30%). Biopsy revealed a Gleason score of 6 to 8 (mean 6.4). In 7 of the 17 patients (41%) in whom cancer was identified only 1 biopsy core was positive. Of the 15 patients in whom previous sextant biopsy had demonstrated high grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia or atypical small acinar proliferation extensive biopsy revealed cancer in 7 (47%). Although serum PSA was higher and free-to-total PSA was lower in those with cancer, the only statistically significant predictor of positive biopsy was PSA velocity (p <0.001). Prostate cancer was noted in 64% of the men with PSA velocity 1 ng./ml. or greater. Of the 13 patients undergoing radical prostatectomy

  9. Transrectal high-intensity focused ultrasound ablation of prostate cancer: effective treatment requiring accurate imaging.

    PubMed

    Rouvière, Olivier; Souchon, Rémi; Salomir, Rarès; Gelet, Albert; Chapelon, Jean-Yves; Lyonnet, Denis

    2007-09-01

    Transrectal HIFU ablation has become a reasonable option for the treatment of localized prostate cancer in non-surgical patients, with 5-year disease-free survival similar to that of radiation therapy. It is also a promising salvage therapy of local recurrence after radiation therapy. These favourable results are partly due to recent improvements in prostate cancer imaging. However, further improvements are needed in patient selection, pre-operative localization of the tumor foci, assessment of the volume treated and early detection of recurrence. A better knowledge of the factors influencing the HIFU-induced tissue destruction and a better pre-operative assessment of them by imaging techniques should improve treatment outcome. Whereas prostate HIFU ablation is currently performed under transrectal ultrasound guidance, MR guidance with real-time operative monitoring of temperature will be available in the near future. If this technique will give better targeting and more uniform tissue destruction, its cost-effectiveness will have to be carefully evaluated. Finally, a recently reported synergistic effect between HIFU ablation and chemotherapy opens possibilities for treatment in high-risk or clinically advanced tumors.

  10. Transrectal high-intensity focused ultrasound in the treatment of localized prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Rebillard, Xavier; Gelet, Albert; Davin, Jean Louis; Soulie, Michel; Prapotnich, Dominique; Cathelineau, Xavier; Rozet, François; Vallancien, Guy

    2005-01-01

    The literature concerning the efficacy and safety of transrectal high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) for the treatment of localized prostate cancer still comprises a relatively small number of articles. The main studies have been published by four teams using an apparatus available in Europe for several years. The recently presented results of the European Multicentre Study and the study by Gelet and associates based on 242 patients with a follow-up of more than 1 year show that HIFU is a valid alternative for the management of welldifferentiated and moderately differentiated localized prostate cancer with an initial PSA 10 years. In two studies, the combination of transurethral resection of the prostate and HIFU limited the risk of postoperative urinary retention without inducing a higher complication rate. In a series of patients presenting recurrence after external-beam radiotherapy, HIFU was found to be a useful therapy, with >80% negative biopsies. The best indications for HIFU are men over the age of 65, those who are not candidates for radical prostatectomy, obese patients, or patients with comorbidities likely to make surgery more difficult. The learning curve for this technique is relatively short, between 10 and 15 patients, for urologists experienced in transrectal ultrasonography. One of the advantages of HIFU is that it can be repeated in the case of recurrence or to re-treat a prostatic site, it involves no radiation, and patients do not suffer from long-term irritative urinary symptoms.

  11. Development of 3D ultrasound needle guidance for high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy of gynaecological cancers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodgers, J.; Tessier, D.; D'Souza, D.; Leung, E.; Hajdok, G.; Fenster, A.

    2016-04-01

    High-dose-rate (HDR) interstitial brachytherapy is often included in standard-of-care for gynaecological cancers. Needles are currently inserted through a perineal template without any standard real-time imaging modality to assist needle guidance, causing physicians to rely on pre-operative imaging, clinical examination, and experience. While two-dimensional (2D) ultrasound (US) is sometimes used for real-time guidance, visualization of needle placement and depth is difficult and subject to variability and inaccuracy in 2D images. The close proximity to critical organs, in particular the rectum and bladder, can lead to serious complications. We have developed a three-dimensional (3D) transrectal US system and are investigating its use for intra-operative visualization of needle positions used in HDR gynaecological brachytherapy. As a proof-of-concept, four patients were imaged with post-insertion 3D US and x-ray CT. Using software developed in our laboratory, manual rigid registration of the two modalities was performed based on the perineal template's vaginal cylinder. The needle tip and a second point along the needle path were identified for each needle visible in US. The difference between modalities in the needle trajectory and needle tip position was calculated for each identified needle. For the 60 needles placed, the mean trajectory difference was 3.23 +/- 1.65° across the 53 visible needle paths and the mean difference in needle tip position was 3.89 +/- 1.92 mm across the 48 visible needles tips. Based on the preliminary results, 3D transrectal US shows potential for the development of a 3D US-based needle guidance system for interstitial gynaecological brachytherapy.

  12. Hemimegalencephaly: 2D, 3D Ultrasound and MRI Correlation.

    PubMed

    Romero, X C; Molina, F S; Pastor, E; Amaya, F

    2011-01-01

    Hemimegalencephaly (HMC) is a disorder associated with enlarged and dysplastic hamartomatous overgrowth of all or part of the one cerebral hemisphere that can be isolated or associated with other syndromes. In the normal development of the brain it is important to bear in mind that there are two main processes: firstly the development of the hemispheres and the corpus callosum, and secondly the cortical formation with proliferation, migration and organization of the cortex, which occurs mostly between 12 and 20 weeks of gestation. We present a 22-week-old fetus with macrocephaly depending on HMC and emphasize the possibility of an early ultrasound diagnosis, the correlation in the diagnosis between 2D and 3D ultrasound, and the use of magnetic resonance imaging as an imaging method for a more precise diagnosis of neuronal migration anomalies. The diagnosis of HMC is possible at the time of the anomaly scan. The use and correlation with other diagnostic tools provide essential information for parent counseling in these complex cases. Copyright © 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  13. Ultrasound to video registration using a bi-plane transrectal probe with photoacoustic markers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Alexis; Kang, Hyun Jae; Zhang, Haichong K.; Taylor, Russell H.; Boctor, Emad M.

    2016-03-01

    Modern surgical scenarios typically provide surgeons with additional information through fusion of video and other imaging modalities. To provide this information, the tools and devices used in surgery must be registered together with interventional guidance equipment and surgical navigation systems. In this work, we focus explicitly on registering ultrasound with a stereo camera system using photoacoustic markers. Previous work has shown that photoacoustic markers can be used in this registration task to achieve target registration errors lower than the current available systems. Photoacoustic markers are defined as a set of non-collinear laser spots projected onto some surface. They can be simultaneously visualized by a stereo camera system and an ultrasound transducer because of the photoacoustic effect. In more recent work, the three-dimensional ultrasound volume was replaced by images from a single ultrasound image pose from a convex array transducer. The feasibility of this approach was demonstrated, but the accuracy was lacking due to the physical limitations of the convex array transducer. In this work, we propose the use of a bi-plane transrectal ultrasound transducer. The main advantage of using this type of transducer is that the ultrasound elements are no longer restricted to a single plane. While this development would be limited to prostate applications, liver and kidney applications are also feasible if a suitable transducer is built. This work is demonstrated in two experiments, one without photoacoustic sources and one with. The resulting target registration error for these experiments were 1.07mm±0.35mm and 1.27mm+/-0.47mm respectively, both of which are better than current available navigation systems.

  14. Validation of 3D ultrasound: CT registration of prostate images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Firle, Evelyn A.; Wesarg, Stefan; Karangelis, Grigoris; Dold, Christian

    2003-05-01

    All over the world 20% of men are expected to develop prostate cancer sometime in his life. In addition to surgery - being the traditional treatment for cancer - the radiation treatment is getting more popular. The most interesting radiation treatment regarding prostate cancer is Brachytherapy radiation procedure. For the safe delivery of that therapy imaging is critically important. In several cases where a CT device is available a combination of the information provided by CT and 3D Ultrasound (U/S) images offers advantages in recognizing the borders of the lesion and delineating the region of treatment. For these applications the CT and U/S scans should be registered and fused in a multi-modal dataset. Purpose of the present development is a registration tool (registration, fusion and validation) for available CT volumes with 3D U/S images of the same anatomical region, i.e. the prostate. The combination of these two imaging modalities interlinks the advantages of the high-resolution CT imaging and low cost real-time U/S imaging and offers a multi-modality imaging environment for further target and anatomy delineation. This tool has been integrated into the visualization software "InViVo" which has been developed over several years in Fraunhofer IGD in Darmstadt.

  15. 3D ultrasound computer tomography: update from a clinical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopp, T.; Zapf, M.; Kretzek, E.; Henrich, J.; Tukalo, A.; Gemmeke, H.; Kaiser, C.; Knaudt, J.; Ruiter, N. V.

    2016-04-01

    Ultrasound Computer Tomography (USCT) is a promising new imaging method for breast cancer diagnosis. We developed a 3D USCT system and tested it in a pilot study with encouraging results: 3D USCT was able to depict two carcinomas, which were present in contrast enhanced MRI volumes serving as ground truth. To overcome severe differences in the breast shape, an image registration was applied. We analyzed the correlation between average sound speed in the breast and the breast density estimated from segmented MRIs and found a positive correlation with R=0.70. Based on the results of the pilot study we now carry out a successive clinical study with 200 patients. For this we integrated our reconstruction methods and image post-processing into a comprehensive workflow. It includes a dedicated DICOM viewer for interactive assessment of fused USCT images. A new preview mode now allows intuitive and faster patient positioning. We updated the USCT system to decrease the data acquisition time by approximately factor two and to increase the penetration depth of the breast into the USCT aperture by 1 cm. Furthermore the compute-intensive reflectivity reconstruction was considerably accelerated, now allowing a sub-millimeter volume reconstruction in approximately 16 minutes. The updates made it possible to successfully image first patients in our ongoing clinical study.

  16. Indications for extended 14-core transrectal ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy.

    PubMed

    Uno, Hiromi; Nakano, Masahiro; Ehara, Hidetoshi; Deguchi, Takashi

    2008-01-01

    We compared the cancer detection rate of extended 14-core biopsy with that of sextant biopsy to assess whether additional biopsy cores are useful for detection of prostate cancer and to clarify the indications for obtaining additional cores. Study subjects were 313 patients who underwent transrectal ultrasound-guided 14-core biopsy because of a prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level greater than 4.0 ng/mL and/or abnormalities found on digital rectal examination (DRE). In addition to the standard 6 biopsy cores, 6 lateral cores were obtained as well as 2 transition zone cores. PSA density (PSAD) was determined as the total PSA level divided by the prostate volume as estimated by transrectal ultrasound. Prostate cancer was diagnosed in 127 patients (40.6%). In 28 (22%) patients, the cancer would not have been detected by the sextant method alone. Among 211 patients with normal DRE findings, the cancer detection rate with 14-core biopsy was statistically higher than that with 6-core biopsy in the 141 patients with a PSA level of 4.01 ng/mL to 10.0 ng/mL, and 14 (38.9%) of 36 cancers were diagnosed in additional cores only, not in the standard sextant biopsy cores. Among the 141 patients with a gray-zone PSA level, the cancer detection rate with extended biopsy was statistically higher in those with PSAD greater than 0.13 ng/mL. Lateral biopsy should be used in conjunction with sextant biopsy in patients with a PSA level of 4.01 ng/mL to 10.0 ng/mL with normal DRE findings, especially in those with PSAD greater than 0.13 ng/mL.

  17. Optical biopsy of the prostate: can we TRUST (trans-rectal ultrasound-coupled spectral tomography)?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piao, Daqing; Jiang, Zhen; Bartels, Kenneth E.; Holyoak, G. Reed; Ritchey, Jerry W.; Rock, Kendra; Ownby, Charlotte L.; Bunting, Charles F.; Slobodov, Gennady

    2011-03-01

    Needle-based core-biopsy to locate prostate cancer relies heavily upon trans-rectal ultrasound (TRUS) imaging guidance. Ultrasonographic findings of classic hypoechoic peripheral zone lesions have a low specificity of ~28%, a low positive predictive value of ~29%, and an overall accuracy of ~43%, in prostate cancer diagnosis. The prevalence of isoechoic or nearly invisible prostate cancers on ultrasonography ranges from 25 to 42%. As a result, TRUS is useful and convenient to direct the needle trajectory following a systematic biopsy sampling template rather than to target only the potentially malignant lesion for focal-biopsy. To address this deficiency in the first-line of prostate cancer imaging, a trans-rectal ultrasound-coupled spectral tomography (TRUST) approach is being developed to non-invasively resolve the likely optical signatures of prostate malignancy. The approach has evolved from using one NIR wavelength to two NIR bands, and recently to three bands of NIR spectrum information. The concept has been evaluated on one normal canine prostate and three dogs with implanted prostate tumor developed as a model. The initial results implementing TRUST on the canine prostate tumor model includes: (1) quantifying substantially increased total hemoglobin concentration over the time-course of imaging in a rapidly growing prostate tumor; (2) confirming hypoxia in a prostatic cystic lesion; and (3) imaging hypoxic changes of a necrotic prostate tumor. Despite these interesting results, intensive technologic development is necessary for translating the approach to benefiting clinical practice, wherein the ultimate utility is not possibly to eliminate needle-biopsy but to perform focal-biopsy that is only necessary to confirm the cancer, as well as to monitor and predict treatment responses.

  18. Transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) guided prostate biopsy: Three different types of local anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Anastasi, Giuseppina; Subba, Enrica; Pappalardo, Rosa; Macchione, Luciano; Ricotta, Gioacchino; Muscarà, Graziella; Lembo, Francesco; Magno, Carlo

    2016-12-30

    Transrectal Ultrasound (TRUS) guided prostate biopsy is regarded as the gold standard for prostate cancer diagnosis. The majority of patients perceive TRUS-guided prostate biopsy as a physically and psychologically traumatic experience. We aimed to compare in this paper the efficacy of three different anesthesia techniques to control the pain during the procedure. 150 patients who underwent transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) guided prostate biopsy were randomly divided into three groups. Group A included 50 patients who received one hour before the procedure a mixture of 2.5% lidocaine and 2.5% prilocaine, Group B: 50 patients who received intrarectal local anesthetic administration (lidocaine 5 ml 10%) and lidocaine local spray 15 % and Group C included 50 patients who received periprostatic block anesthesia (lidocaine 10 ml 10%). Visual analogue scale (VAS) of patients in different groups was evaluated at the end of the biopsy and 30 minutes after the procedure. The VAS of patients in Group A was 1.32 ± 0.65 (VAS I) and 2.47 ± 0.80 (VAS II). In group B the VAS of patients was 1.09 ± 0.47 (VAS I) and 1.65 ± 0.61 (VAS II). In group C the VAS of patients was 2.63 ± 0.78 (VAS I) and 1.70 ± 0.85 (VAS II). There was no statistically significant difference in term of VAS I between group A and B. A statistically significant difference was determined in terms of VAS II between group A and B. There was no statistically significant difference in term of VAS between group B and C. The most effective of the three methods for pain control we used was intrarectal local anesthetic administration and lidocaine local spray 15% that enables an ideal patient comfort.

  19. Local periprostatic anesthesia between option and necessity in transrectal ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy.

    PubMed

    Novac, B; Costache, C; Costachescu, Oana; Nechifor, V; Miron, Adelina; Ciută, C; Novac, C

    2013-01-01

    According to the European Association of Urology guidelines, local periprostatic anesthesia during ultrasound guided biopsy is "state of the art" without specifying the exact benefits and character of choice vs. necessity of this maneuver. To determine the benefits of using periprostatic anesthesia as standard method of analgesia in patients undergoing transrectal ultrasound guided prostate biopsy. We conducted a prospective randomized study involving 100 biopsy patients. The patients were randomized in two groups, 50 patients benefiting from local periprostatic anesthesia with 10 ml of lidocaine and the remaining 50 without local anesthesia. In our clinic we use the 12-core prostate biopsy procedure using 18G/20 cm caliber needles. To assess perceived pain intensity during the procedure, immediately after biopsy we applied to patients a VAS questionnaire (Visual Analogue Scale) as a simple method of quantitative evaluation of a symptom the perception of which varies greatly between individuals. A reduction in perceived pain by 45.06% (30.47 vs. 16.74) was recorded in the group receiving local periprostatic anesthesia. It is also worth mentioning that the patients receiving anesthesia said that anesthesia punctures were the most painful (the remaining punctures being much less painful), while patients without anesthesia reported pain intensity levels more or less equal in all 12 performed punctures. Local anesthesia is a necessity in ultrasound guided prostate biopsies as it significantly reduces pain intensity in patients undergoing this diagnostic procedure.

  20. 360-degree 3D transvaginal ultrasound system for high-dose-rate interstitial gynaecological brachytherapy needle guidance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodgers, Jessica R.; Surry, Kathleen; D'Souza, David; Leung, Eric; Fenster, Aaron

    2017-03-01

    Treatment for gynaecological cancers often includes brachytherapy; in particular, in high-dose-rate (HDR) interstitial brachytherapy, hollow needles are inserted into the tumour and surrounding area through a template in order to deliver the radiation dose. Currently, there is no standard modality for visualizing needles intra-operatively, despite the need for precise needle placement in order to deliver the optimal dose and avoid nearby organs, including the bladder and rectum. While three-dimensional (3D) transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) imaging has been proposed for 3D intra-operative needle guidance, anterior needles tend to be obscured by shadowing created by the template's vaginal cylinder. We have developed a 360-degree 3D transvaginal ultrasound (TVUS) system that uses a conventional two-dimensional side-fire TRUS probe rotated inside a hollow vaginal cylinder made from a sonolucent plastic (TPX). The system was validated using grid and sphere phantoms in order to test the geometric accuracy of the distance and volumetric measurements in the reconstructed image. To test the potential for visualizing needles, an agar phantom mimicking the geometry of the female pelvis was used. Needles were inserted into the phantom and then imaged using the 3D TVUS system. The needle trajectories and tip positions in the 3D TVUS scan were compared to their expected values and the needle tracks visualized in magnetic resonance images. Based on this initial study, 360-degree 3D TVUS imaging through a sonolucent vaginal cylinder is a feasible technique for intra-operatively visualizing needles during HDR interstitial gynaecological brachytherapy.

  1. Feasibility of 3D ultrasound to evaluate upper extremity nerves.

    PubMed

    Girtler, M-T; Krasinski, A; Dejaco, C; Kitzler, H H; Cui, L G; Sherebrin, S; Gardi, L; Chhem, R K; Fenster, A; Romagnoli, C; De Zordo, T

    2013-08-01

    This study investigates the performance of a 3 D Ultrasound (US) system in imaging elbow and wrist nerves. Twenty healthy volunteers with asymptomatic median, ulnar and radial nerves were prospectively investigated. Bilateral 3DUS scans of the elbows and wrists were acquired by using a commercially available US scanner (18 MHz, AplioXG, Toshiba) and stored as a 3 D volume by a dedicated software (CURE, Robarts Research Institute). Retrospectively, qualitative (image quality, atypical nerve location, findings potentially associated with compression neuropathy) and quantitative (cross-sectional area measurements) evaluations were performed. In all 200 nerves 3DUS was feasible (100%). Image quality was insufficient in 13.5% (25 ulnar nerve elbow, 2 radial nerve) and sonomorphology was not assessable in those nerves. Measurement of cross sectional areas was feasible in all nerves (100%). Median cross-sectional area (range) were: median nerve elbow 7 mm2 (6-9), radial nerve 3 mm2 (1-4), ulnar nerve elbow 8 mm2 (5-11), median nerve wrist 8 mm2 (5-10), and ulnar nerve wrist 4 mm2 (2-6). No significant changes in nerve cross-sectional area along each nerve was found. Ulnar nerve subluxation was found in 2 nerves (6.7%). No anconeus epitrochlearis muscle or osteophytes were found. 3DUS is a feasible method for assessing nerves of the upper extremity and has been shown to provide a good overview of the median, ulnar and radial nerve at the elbow and wrist, but is limited for evaluation of the ulnar nerve in the cubital tunnel. This technique enables reliable measurements at different locations along the nerve. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  2. Results of a comparative analysis of magnetic resonance imaging-targeted versus three-dimensional transrectal ultrasound prostate biopsies: Size does matter.

    PubMed

    Peltier, Alexandre; Aoun, Fouad; Albisinni, Simone; Marcelis, Quentin; Ledinh, Dam; Paesmans, Marianne; Lemort, Marc; van Velthoven, Roland

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the detection rate of clinically significant disease in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-targeted biopsies versus three-dimensional transrectal ultrasound (3D TRUS)-guided biopsies according to prostate size. The study compared 120 consecutive biopsy-naïve men who underwent 3D TRUS-guided systematic biopsy to 120 consecutive men who underwent MRI-targeted biopsy. Stratifications based on tertiles were used for assessing interactions between prostate volume and rates of detection of significant cancer. Older age, higher prostate-specific antigen level, lower prostate volume, increased number of cores and MRI-targeted biopsy were independent predictors of prostate cancer detection in the entire cohort on logistic regression. Clinically significant cancer detection rates were significantly higher in the MRI-targeted group than in the 3D TRUS-guided biopsy group (48.7% vs 29.4%, p = 0.002). When stratified according to prostate volume, these rates were significantly higher only in the third tertile group (volume > 50 cm(3)) for MRI-targeted biopsy compared to 3D TRUS-guided biopsy (56% vs 22%, p = 0.003). MRI-targeted biopsies increased the detection rate of clinically significant prostate cancer only in patients with enlarged prostates compared to the 3D TRUS.

  3. Registration of real-time 3-D ultrasound images of the heart for novel 3-D stress echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Shekhar, Raj; Zagrodsky, Vladimir; Garcia, Mario J; Thomas, James D

    2004-09-01

    Stress echocardiography is a routinely used clinical procedure to diagnose cardiac dysfunction by comparing wall motion information in prestress and poststress ultrasound images. Incomplete data, complicated imaging protocols and misaligned prestress and poststress views, however, are known limitations of conventional stress echocardiography. We discuss how the first two limitations are overcome via the use of real-time three-dimensional (3-D) ultrasound imaging, an emerging modality, and have called the new procedure "3-D stress echocardiography." We also show that the problem of misaligned views can be solved by registration of prestress and poststress 3-D image sequences. Such images are misaligned because of variations in placing the ultrasound transducer and stress-induced anatomical changes. We have developed a technique to temporally align 3-D images of the two sequences first and then to spatially register them to rectify probe placement error while preserving the stress-induced changes. The 3-D spatial registration is mutual information-based. Image registration used in conjunction with 3-D stress echocardiography can potentially improve the diagnostic accuracy of stress testing.

  4. The role of transrectal ultrasound in the diagnosis of prostate cancer: new contributions.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Pedro Marinho; Sepúlveda, Luís; Ramos, Rui; Sousa, Pedro

    2015-01-01

    The present study was aimed at evaluating the contribution of transrectal prostate ultrasound in the screening for prostate neoplasias and in the guidance of prostate biopsies. Prospective study developed over a one-year period. All the patients with indication for prostate biopsy were evaluated. Regardless of PSA values, the patients underwent ultrasound in order to identify suspicious nodules (confirmed by two observers). Sextant biopsy was subsequently performed. In cases of finding suspicious nodules, an additional puncture directed to such nodules was done. In a total of 155 cases the prevalence of malignancy was of 53%. Suspicious nodules were detected in 34 patients, and 25 where malignant (positive predictive value of 74%). The specificity and sensitivity for suspicious nodules were 88% and 31% respectively. Comparatively with the randomly obtained sextant specimens, the rate of findings of neoplasia was higher in the specimens obtained with puncture directed to the nodule (p = 0.032). No statistically significant difference was observed in the Gleason score for both types of specimens (p = 0.172). The high positive predictive value and the high rate of findings of neoplasia in specimens of suspicious nodules should be taken into consideration in the future. The authors suggest a biopsy technique similar to the one described in the present study (sextant biopsy plus puncture directed to the suspicious nodule).

  5. The role of transrectal ultrasound in the diagnosis of prostate cancer: new contributions

    PubMed Central

    Lopes, Pedro Marinho; Sepúlveda, Luís; Ramos, Rui; Sousa, Pedro

    2015-01-01

    Objective The present study was aimed at evaluating the contribution of transrectal prostate ultrasound in the screening for prostate neoplasias and in the guidance of prostate biopsies. Materials and Methods Prospective study developed over a one-year period. All the patients with indication for prostate biopsy were evaluated. Regardless of PSA values, the patients underwent ultrasound in order to identify suspicious nodules (confirmed by two observers). Sextant biopsy was subsequently performed. In cases of finding suspicious nodules, an additional puncture directed to such nodules was done. Results In a total of 155 cases the prevalence of malignancy was of 53%. Suspicious nodules were detected in 34 patients, and 25 where malignant (positive predictive value of 74%). The specificity and sensitivity for suspicious nodules were 88% and 31% respectively. Comparatively with the randomly obtained sextant specimens, the rate of findings of neoplasia was higher in the specimens obtained with puncture directed to the nodule (p = 0.032). No statistically significant difference was observed in the Gleason score for both types of specimens (p = 0.172). Conclusion The high positive predictive value and the high rate of findings of neoplasia in specimens of suspicious nodules should be taken into consideration in the future. The authors suggest a biopsy technique similar to the one described in the present study (sextant biopsy plus puncture directed to the suspicious nodule). PMID:25798001

  6. Gleason Score Determination with Transrectal Ultrasound-Magnetic Resonance Imaging Fusion Guided Prostate Biopsies--Are We Gaining in Accuracy?

    PubMed

    Lanz, Camille; Cornud, François; Beuvon, Frédéric; Lefèvre, Arnaud; Legmann, Paul; Zerbib, Marc; Delongchamps, Nicolas Barry

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated the accuracy of prostate magnetic resonance imaging- transrectal ultrasound targeted biopsy for Gleason score determination. We selected 125 consecutive patients treated with radical prostatectomy for a clinically localized prostate cancer diagnosed on magnetic resonance imaging-transrectal ultrasound targeted biopsy and/or systematic biopsy. On multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging each suspicious area was graded according to PI-RADS™ score. A correlation analysis between multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging and pathological findings was performed. Factors associated with determining the accuracy of Gleason score on targeted biopsy were statistically assessed. Pathological analysis of radical prostatectomy specimens detected 230 tumor foci. Multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging detected 151 suspicious areas. Of these areas targeted biopsy showed 126 cancer foci in 115 patients, and detected the index lesion in all of them. The primary Gleason grade, secondary Gleason grade and Gleason score of the 126 individual tumors were determined accurately in 114 (90%), 75 (59%) and 85 (67%) cases, respectively. Maximal Gleason score was determined accurately in 80 (70%) patients. Gleason score determination accuracy on targeted biopsy was significantly higher for low Gleason and high PI-RADS score tumors. Magnetic resonance imaging-transrectal ultrasound targeted biopsy allowed for an accurate estimation of Gleason score in more than two-thirds of patients. Gleason score misclassification was mostly due to a lack of accuracy in the determination of the secondary Gleason grade. Copyright © 2016 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. 3D-2D ultrasound feature-based registration for navigated prostate biopsy: a feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Selmi, Sonia Y; Promayon, Emmanuel; Troccaz, Jocelyne

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this paper is to describe a 3D-2D ultrasound feature-based registration method for navigated prostate biopsy and its first results obtained on patient data. A system combining a low-cost tracking system and a 3D-2D registration algorithm was designed. The proposed 3D-2D registration method combines geometric and image-based distances. After extracting features from ultrasound images, 3D and 2D features within a defined distance are matched using an intensity-based function. The results are encouraging and show acceptable errors with simulated transforms applied on ultrasound volumes from real patients.

  8. Effectiveness of stress management in patients undergoing transrectal ultrasound-guided biopsy of the prostate.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Li-Pin; Tung, Heng-Hsin; Lin, Kuan-Chia; Lai, Yu-Wei; Chiu, Yi-Chun; Chen, Saint Shiou-Sheng; Chiu, Allen W

    2016-01-01

    To assess the utilization of stress management in relieving anxiety and pain among patients who undergo transrectal ultrasound (TRUS)-guided biopsy of the prostate. Eighty-two patients admitted to a community hospital for a TRUS biopsy of the prostate participated in this case-controlled study. They were divided into an experimental group that was provided with stress management and a control group that received only routine nursing care. Stress management included music therapy and one-on-one simulation education. Before and after the TRUS biopsy, the patients' state-anxiety inventory score, pain visual analogue scale (VAS), respiratory rate, heart rate, and blood pressure were obtained. There were no differences in baseline and disease characteristics between the two groups. The VAS in both groups increased after the TRUS biopsy, but the difference in pre- and postbiopsy VAS scores was significantly lower in the experimental group (P=0.03). Patients in both groups experienced mild anxiety before and after the biopsy, but those in the experimental group displayed a significantly greater decrease in postbiopsy state-anxiety inventory score compared to the control group (P=0.02). Stress management can alleviate anxiety and pain in patients who received a TRUS biopsy of the prostate under local anesthesia.

  9. Combining artificial neural networks and transrectal ultrasound in the diagnosis of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Porter, Christopher R; Crawford, E David

    2003-10-01

    Arguably the most important step in the prognosis of prostate cancer is early diagnosis. More than 1 million transrectal ultrasound (TRUS)-guided prostate needle biopsies are performed annually in the United States, resulting in the detection of 200,000 new cases per year. Unfortunately, the urologist's ability to diagnose prostate cancer has not kept pace with therapeutic advances; currently, many men are facing the need for prostate biopsy with the likelihood that the result will be inconclusive. This paper will focus on the tools available to assist the clinician in predicting the outcome of the prostate needle biopsy. We will examine the use of "machine learning" models (artificial intelligence), in the form of artificial neural networks (ANNs), to predict prostate biopsy outcomes using prebiopsy variables. Currently, six validated predictive models are available. Of these, five are machine learning models, and one is based on logistic regression. The role of ANNs in providing valuable predictive models to be used in conjunction with TRUS appears promising. In the few studies that have compared machine learning to traditional statistical methods, ANN and logistic regression appear to function equivalently when predicting biopsy outcome. With the introduction of more complex prebiopsy variables, ANNs are in a commanding position for use in predictive models. Easy and immediate physician access to these models will be imperative if their full potential is to be realized.

  10. American Brachytherapy Society consensus guidelines for transrectal ultrasound-guided permanent prostate brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Davis, Brian J; Horwitz, Eric M; Lee, W Robert; Crook, Juanita M; Stock, Richard G; Merrick, Gregory S; Butler, Wayne M; Grimm, Peter D; Stone, Nelson N; Potters, Louis; Zietman, Anthony L; Zelefsky, Michael J

    2012-01-01

    To provide updated American Brachytherapy Society (ABS) guidelines for transrectal ultrasound-guided transperineal interstitial permanent prostate brachytherapy (PPB). The ABS formed a committee of brachytherapists and researchers experienced in the clinical practice of PPB to formulate updated guidelines for this technique. Sources of input for these guidelines included prior published guidelines, clinical trials, published literature, and experience of the committee. The recommendations of the committee were reviewed and approved by the Board of Directors of the ABS. Patients with high probability of organ-confined disease or limited extraprostatic extension are considered appropriate candidates for PPB monotherapy. Low-risk patients may be treated with PPB alone without the need for supplemental external beam radiotherapy. High-risk patients should receive supplemental external beam radiotherapy if PPB is used. Intermediate-risk patients should be considered on an individual case basis. Intermediate-risk patients with favorable features may appropriately be treated with PPB monotherapy but results from confirmatory clinical trials are pending. Computed tomography-based postimplant dosimetry performed within 60 days of the implant is considered essential for maintenance of a satisfactory quality assurance program. Postimplant computed tomography-magnetic resonance image fusion is viewed as useful, but not mandatory. Updated guidelines for patient selection, workup, treatment, postimplant dosimetry, and followup are provided. These recommendations are intended to be advisory in nature with the ultimate responsibility for the care of the patients resting with the treating physicians. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. [Significance of transrectal ultrasound and sextant systematic core biopsy for performing radical prostatectomy].

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, H; Tobisu, K; Niwakawa, M; Kume, H; Tomita, K; Mizutani, T; Tsutsumi, M; Kakizoe, T

    1997-04-01

    To estimate the usefulness of sextant systematic core biopsy or transrectal ultrasonography (TURS) for performing radical prostatectomy. The findings of sextant biopsy and TRUS were compared with 52 step-sectioned specimens obtained from radical prostatectomy. In 34 cases with no influence of hormonal therapy at the time of TRUS and biopsy, sextant systematic core biopsy provided tumor distribution rather precisely. In 33% of the cases who had received hormonal therapy, tumor cells were not detected by this sextant biopsy series. In these cases, majority of residual cancer existed in transition zone, paraurethral or fibromuscular stroma. Six cases showed small adenocarcinoma in only one biopsy tip obtained from sextant biopsy, while 4 cases were revealed well differentiated adenocarcinoma (Gleason score less than 4) by these core biopsies. Comparing with tumor mapping, Gleason score, PSA level and pT stage of the radical prostatectomy specimens, these tumors presented as, not clinically insignificant, but clinically significant prostate cancer. Playing special attention to distraction of normal ultrasound zonal configuration, TRUS detected neurovascular invasion with 94.7% sensitivity, 78.3% positive predictive value and 90. 9% negative predictive value, while seminal vesicle invasion with 75% sensitivity, 50% positive predictive value, 90.9% negative value. Sextant biopsy tended to underestimate the tumors located in the transition zone, paraurethral and fibromuscular lesion. Additional or direct biopsies in transition zone are indispensable for accurate diagnosis. Findings of TRUS and distribution of positive core biopsy from sextant biopsy enable to extract stage C prostate cancer providing negative surgical margin.

  12. Rare complication after a transrectal ultrasound guided prostate biopsy: a giant retroperitoneal hematoma.

    PubMed

    Chiancone, Francesco; Mirone, Vincenzo; Fedelini, Maurizio; Meccariello, Clemente; Pucci, Luigi; Carrino, Maurizio; Fedelini, Paolo

    2016-05-24

    Common complications related to transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) guided prostatic needle biopsy are hematuria, hematospermia, and hematochezia. To the best of our knowledge, we report the second case of a very large hematoma extending from the pelvis into the retroperitoneal space in literature.A 66-year-old man with a serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) of 5.4 ng/ml was admitted to our department for a TRUS-guided prostatic needle biopsy. Laboratory values on the day before biopsy, including coagulation studies, were all normal. The patients did not take any anticoagulant drugs. No immediate complications were encountered. Nevertheless, 7 hours after the biopsy, the patient reached our emergency department with severe diffuse abdominal pain, hypotension, tachycardia, and confusional state. He underwent an ultrasonography and then a computed tomography (CT) scan that showed "a blood collection in the pelvis that extending to the lower pole of left kidney associated with a focus of active contrast extravasation, indicating active ongoing prostate bleeding." Consequently, he underwent a diagnostic angiography that showed no more contrast extravasation, without the need of embolization. Management of hematoma has been conservative and hematoma was completely reabsorbed 4 months later.

  13. Transrectal ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging measurement of extramural tumor spread in rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rafaelsen, Søren R; Vagn-Hansen, Chris; Sørensen, Torben; Pløen, John; Jakobsen, Anders

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the agreement between transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in classification of ≥ T3 rectal tumors. METHODS: From January 2010 to January 2012, 86 consecutive patients with ≥ T3 tumors were included in this study. The mean age of the patients was 66.4 years (range: 26-91 years). The tumors were all ≥ T3 on TRUS. The sub-classification was defined by the penetration of the rectal wall: a: 0 to 1 mm; b: 1-5 mm; c: 6-15; d: > 15 mm. Early tumors as ab (≤ 5 mm) and advanced tumors as cd (> 5 mm). All patients underwent TRUS using a 6.5 MHz transrectal transducer. The MRI was performed with a 1.5 T Philips unit. The TRUS findings were blinded to the radiologist performing the interpretation of the MRI images and measuring the depth of extramural tumor spread. RESULTS: TRUS found 51 patients to have an early ≥ T3 tumors and 35 to have an advanced tumor, whereas MRI categorized 48 as early ≥ T3 tumors and 38 as advanced tumors. No patients with tumors classified as advanced by TRUS were found to be early on MRI. The kappa value in classifying early versus advanced T3 rectal tumors was 0.93 (95% CI: 0.85-1.00). We found a kappa value of 0.74 (95% CI: 0.63-0.86) for the total sub-classification between the two methods. The mean maximal tumor outgrowth measured by TRUS, 5.5 mm ± 5.63 mm and on MRI, 6.3 mm ± 6.18 mm, P = 0.004. In 19 of the 86 patients the following CT scan or surgery revealed distant metastases; of the 51 patients in the ultrasound ab group three (5.9%) had metastases, whereas 16 (45.7%) of 35 in the cd group harbored distant metastases, P = 0.00002. The odds ratio of having distant metastases in the ultrasound cd group compared to the ab group was 13.5 (95% CI: 3.5-51.6), P = 0.00002. The mean maximal ultrasound measured outgrowth was 4.3 mm (95% CI: 3.2-5.5 mm) in patients without distant metastases, while the mean maximal outgrowth was 9.5 mm (95% CI: 6.2-12.8 mm) in the patients with metastases

  14. Prostate volume estimations using magnetic resonance imaging and transrectal ultrasound compared to radical prostatectomy specimens

    PubMed Central

    Paterson, Nicholas R.; Lavallée, Luke T.; Nguyen, Laura N.; Witiuk, Kelsey; Ross, James; Mallick, Ranjeeta; Shabana, Wael; MacDonald, Blair; Scheida, Nicola; Fergusson, Dean; Momoli, Franco; Cnossen, Sonya; Morash, Christopher; Cagiannos, Ilias; Breau, Rodney H.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: We sought to evaluate the accuracy of prostate volume estimates in patients who received both a preoperative transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in relation to the referent pathological specimen post-radical prostatectomy. Methods: Patients receiving both TRUS and MRI prior to radical prostatectomy at one academic institution were retrospectively analyzed. TRUS and MRI volumes were estimated using the prolate ellipsoid formula. TRUS volumes were collected from sonography reports. MRI volumes were estimated by two blinded raters and the mean of the two was used for analyses. Pathological volume was calculated using a standard fluid displacement method. Results: Three hundred and eighteen (318) patients were included in the analysis. MRI was slightly more accurate than TRUS based on interclass correlation (0.83 vs. 0.74) and absolute risk bias (higher proportion of estimates within 5, 10, and 20 cc of pathological volume). For TRUS, 87 of 298 (29.2%) prostates without median lobes differed by >10 cc of specimen volume and 22 of 298 (7.4%) differed by >20 cc. For MRI, 68 of 298 (22.8%) prostates without median lobes differed by >10 cc of specimen volume, while only 4 of 298 (1.3%) differed by >20 cc. Conclusions: MRI and TRUS prostate volume estimates are consistent with pathological volumes along the prostate size spectrum. MRI demonstrated better correlation with prostatectomy specimen volume in most patients and may be better suited in cases where TRUS and MRI estimates are disparate. Validation of these findings with prospective, standardized ultrasound techniques would be helpful. PMID:27878049

  15. Should Hypoechoic Lesions on Transrectal Ultrasound Be Sampled During Magnetic Resonance Imaging-targeted Prostate Biopsy?

    PubMed

    Shakir, Nabeel A; Siddiqui, M Minhaj; George, Arvin K; Kongnyuy, Michael; Ho, Richard; Fascelli, Michele; Merino, Maria J; Turkbey, Baris; Choyke, Peter L; Wood, Bradford J; Pinto, Peter A

    2017-07-01

    To determine whether supplemental biopsy of hypoechoic ultrasound lesions (HUL) incidentally found during magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) fusion-targeted prostate biopsy results in improved prostate cancer (PCa) detection. Patients underwent MRI-TRUS-targeted biopsy as part of an ongoing prospective trial from August 2007 to February 2015. For men with HUL, the biopsy pathology of HUL and MRI lesions was classified according to the updated 2014 International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) grading system. The detection of PCa by MRI-targeted biopsy with and without HUL biopsy was compared. Of 1260 men in the trial, 106 underwent biopsy of 119 HULs. PCa was diagnosed in 52 out of 106 men (49%) by biopsy of either MRI lesions or HUL. Biopsy of HUL in addition to MRI lesions resulted in 4 additional diagnoses of high-grade (ISUP grades 3-5) PCa versus biopsy of MRI lesions alone (20 vs 16 men, P = .046). Three of these cases were upgraded from lower grade (ISUP grades 1-2) PCa on MRI-guided biopsy alone, and only 1 case (1% of cohort) was diagnosed that would have been missed by MRI-guided biopsy alone. Supplemental biopsy of HUL did not change the PCa risk category in 96% (102 out of 106) of men with HUL. Supplemental biopsy of HUL yields a small increase in the detection of higher grade PCa as compared with biopsy of MRI lesions alone. As upgrading is rare, routinely screening for HUL during MRI-targeted biopsy remains controversial. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. Abdominal aortic aneurysm imaging with 3-D ultrasound: 3-D-based maximum diameter measurement and volume quantification.

    PubMed

    Long, A; Rouet, L; Debreuve, A; Ardon, R; Barbe, C; Becquemin, J P; Allaire, E

    2013-08-01

    The clinical reliability of 3-D ultrasound imaging (3-DUS) in quantification of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) was evaluated. B-mode and 3-DUS images of AAAs were acquired for 42 patients. AAAs were segmented. A 3-D-based maximum diameter (Max3-D) and partial volume (Vol30) were defined and quantified. Comparisons between 2-D (Max2-D) and 3-D diameters and between orthogonal acquisitions were performed. Intra- and inter-observer reproducibility was evaluated. Intra- and inter-observer coefficients of repeatability (CRs) were less than 5.18 mm for Max3-D. Intra-observer and inter-observer CRs were respectively less than 6.16 and 8.71 mL for Vol30. The mean of normalized errors of Vol30 was around 7%. Correlation between Max2-D and Max3-D was 0.988 (p < 0.0001). Max3-D and Vol30 were not influenced by a probe rotation of 90°. Use of 3-DUS to quantify AAA is a new approach in clinical practice. The present study proposed and evaluated dedicated parameters. Their reproducibility makes the technique clinically reliable.

  17. Towards real-time 3D ultrasound planning and personalized 3D printing for breast HDR brachytherapy treatment.

    PubMed

    Poulin, Eric; Gardi, Lori; Fenster, Aaron; Pouliot, Jean; Beaulieu, Luc

    2015-03-01

    Two different end-to-end procedures were tested for real-time planning in breast HDR brachytherapy treatment. Both methods are using a 3D ultrasound (3DUS) system and a freehand catheter optimization algorithm. They were found fast and efficient. We demonstrated a proof-of-concept approach for personalized real-time guidance and planning to breast HDR brachytherapy treatments. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. 3D ultrasound image segmentation using multiple incomplete feature sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Liexiang; Herrington, David M.; Santago, Peter, II

    1999-05-01

    We use three features, the intensity, texture and motion to obtain robust results for segmentation of intracoronary ultrasound images. Using a parameterized equation to describe the lumen-plaque and media-adventitia boundaries, we formulate the segmentation as a parameter estimation through a cost functional based on the posterior probability, which can handle the incompleteness of the features in ultrasound images by employing outlier detection.

  19. [Three- and four-dimensional (3D/4D) ultrasound in obstetric practice: review].

    PubMed

    Pavlova, E; Ivanov, St

    2014-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound is following the natural development of the imaging technology. This review of the technical applications and clinical aspects of the three-dimensional ultrasound is focused on vizualiztion of the fetal anatomy and the possibilities of this new technology and to increase awareness of its present clinical usefulness. Consulting specialists understand fetal pathology better and can better plan postnatal interventions. 3D ultrasound is a promising imaging method to image the fetus. Here are presented the methods for visualization in obstetrics, and the place of the ultrasound imaging in prenatal diagnosis. The role and value of this method will be in the focus of further studies.

  20. Measuring Femoral Torsion In Vivo Using Freehand 3-D Ultrasound Imaging.

    PubMed

    Passmore, Elyse; Pandy, Marcus G; Graham, H Kerr; Sangeux, Morgan

    2016-02-01

    Despite variation in bone geometry, muscle and joint function is often investigated using generic musculoskeletal models. Patient-specific bone geometry can be obtained from computerised tomography, which involves ionising radiation, or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which is costly and time consuming. Freehand 3-D ultrasound provides an alternative to obtain bony geometry. The purpose of this study was to determine the accuracy and repeatability of 3-D ultrasound in measuring femoral torsion. Measurements of femoral torsion were performed on 10 healthy adults using MRI and 3-D ultrasound. Measurements of femoral torsion from 3-D ultrasound were, on average, smaller than those from MRI (mean difference = 1.8°; 95% confidence interval: -3.9°, 7.5°). MRI and 3-D ultrasound had Bland and Altman repeatability coefficients of 3.1° and 3.7°, respectively. Accurate measurements of femoral torsion were obtained with 3-D ultrasound offering the potential to acquire patient-specific bone geometry for musculoskeletal modelling. Three-dimensional ultrasound is non-invasive and relatively inexpensive and can be integrated into gait analysis.

  1. [Free hand acquisition, reconstruction and visualization of 3D and 4D ultrasound].

    PubMed

    Sakas, G; Walter, S; Grimm, M; Richtscheid, M

    2000-03-01

    3D Ultrasound will find in the next years a wide popularity under the medical imaging applications. The method expands the well-known sonography on the third dimension, therefore it becomes possible to generate spatial 3D views of internal organs. It is further possible to display static (3D) as well as dynamic organs (4D, e.g. pulsating heart). The clarity of the three-dimensional presentation supports very effectively the navigation. In this article we review the upgrading of conventional ultrasound devices on 3D and 4D capabilities, as well as the display of the datasets by corresponding visualisation and filtering approaches.

  2. Sedoanalgesia With Midazolam and Fentanyl Citrate Controls Probe Pain During Prostate Biopsy by Transrectal Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Tsuji, Fábio Hissachi; Chambó, Renato Caretta; Agostinho, Aparecido Donizeti; Trindade Filho, José Carlos Souza

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To assess the pain intensity of patients administered midazolam and fentanyl citrate before undergoing transrectal ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy. Materials and Methods This was a study in patients with different indications for prostate biopsy in whom 5 mg of midazolam and 50 µg of fentanyl citrate was administered intravenously 3 minutes before the procedure. After biopsy, pain was assessed by use of a visual analogue scale (VAS) in three stages: VAS 1, during probe introduction; VAS 2, during needle penetration into prostate tissue; and VAS 3, in the weeks following the exam. Pain intensity at these different times was tested with stratification by age, race, education, prostate volume, rebiopsy, and anxiety before biopsy. Pain was ranked according to the following scores: 0 (no pain), 1-3 (mild pain), 4-7 (moderate pain), and 8-10 (severe pain). Statistical analysis was performed by using Kruskal-Wallis and Wilcoxon two-tailed tests with a significance of 5%. Results Pain intensity was not influenced by any risk factors. The mean VAS 1 score was 1.95±1.98, the mean VAS 2 score was 2.73±2.55, and the mean VAS 3 score was 0.3±0.9, showing greater pain at the time of needle penetration than in other situations (VAS 2>VAS 1>VAS 3, p=0.0013, p=0.0001, respectively). Seventy-five percent of patients reported a VAS pain scale of less than 3.1 or mild pain. Conclusions Intravenous sedation and analgesia with midazolam and fentanyl citrate is a good method for reducing pain caused by prostate biopsy, even during probe insertion. PMID:24578806

  3. Routine Ertapenem Prophylaxis for Transrectal Ultrasound Guided Prostate Biopsy does Not Select for Carbapenem Resistant Organisms: A Prospective Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Bloomfield, Maxim G; Page, Matthew J; McLachlan, Alice G; Studd, Rodney C; Blackmore, Timothy K

    2017-03-10

    Sepsis after transrectal ultrasound guided prostate biopsy is an increasing problem in this era of rising antibiotic resistance. Although ertapenem prophylaxis has proved effective at our institution to reduce this, it has raised local and regional antimicrobial stewardship concerns. We investigated the possible selective effect of single dose ertapenem prophylaxis on fecal colonization with carbapenem resistant Enterobacteriaceae. Patients underwent a rectal swab prior to receiving prebiopsy ertapenem prophylaxis. A second swab was obtained at followup 4 to 6 weeks later. Swabs were screened for carbapenem resistant Enterobacteriaceae using an enhanced CDC (Centers for Disease Control) method. Prebiopsy swabs were also screened for extended spectrum β-lactamase producing and ciprofloxacin resistant Enterobacteriaceae. Patients were monitored for post-biopsy sepsis. A total of 326 patients were enrolled in the study. At baseline 6.4% and 9.0% of patients had colonization with extended spectrum β-lactamase producing and ciprofloxacin resistant Enterobacteriaceae, respectively. Carbapenem resistant Enterobacteriaceae were not detected at baseline or followup in any patients. Colonization with nonfermentative organisms with intrinsic ertapenem resistance was detected in 29.4% of patients at baseline and followup (p = 1.0). Three cases (0.9%, 95% CI 0.2-2.8) of probable post-biopsy sepsis were identified during the study period. None was bacteremic or required intensive care unit admission. Single dose ertapenem prophylaxis did not appear to have a significant selective effect on fecal colonization with carbapenem resistant Enterobacteriaceae or other ertapenem resistant gram-negative organisms in this outpatient group. It is highly effective prophylaxis for transrectal ultrasound guided prostate biopsy. In the right setting ertapenem may represent a useful prophylactic option to prevent post-transrectal ultrasound guided prostate biopsy sepsis. Copyright © 2017

  4. Role of 3-D ultrasound in clinical obstetric practice: evolution over 20 years.

    PubMed

    Tonni, Gabriele; Martins, Wellington P; Guimarães Filho, Hélio; Araujo Júnior, Edward

    2015-05-01

    The use of 3-D ultrasound in obstetrics has undergone dramatic development over the past 20 years. Since the first publications on this application in clinical practice, several 3-D ultrasound techniques and rendering modes have been proposed and applied to the study of fetal brain, face and cardiac anatomy. In addition, 3-D ultrasound has improved calculations of the volume of fetal organs and limbs and estimations of fetal birth weight. And furthermore, angiographic patterns of fetal organs and the placenta have been assessed using 3-D power Doppler ultrasound quantification. In this review, we aim to summarize current evidence on the clinical relevance of these methodologies and their application in obstetric practice.

  5. Incremental Volume Rendering Algorithm for Interactive 3D Ultrasound Imaging

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-02-01

    hidden surface removal, such effects as cutaway viewing of the 17 Rat -cache (16 samples organized as 4-ary tree) embedded in an array,1,f -f I I I I I I...70. [Stick84] Stickels, K. R., and Wann, L.S. (1984). "An Analysis of Three- Dimensional Reconstructive Echocardiography ." Ultrasound in Med. & Biol

  6. [Computerized supported transrectal ultrasound (C-TRUS) in the diagnosis of prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Loch, T

    2004-11-01

    In the diagnosis of prostate cancer digital rectal examination and transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) are the most utilized methods for clinical evaluation. However, both methods are not able to differentiate between benign and malignant findings with a high amount of certainty. Nevertheless, TRUS is an excellent tool to guide biopsies in practically any region of the prostate. The most significant problem of visual TRUS interpretation is the lack of specificity, especially being an inexperienced user. In order to enhance the diagnostic capabilities of TRUS we developed a computerized analysis of the TRUS signal information (C-TRUS/ANNA), which was validated by the pathohistologic findings of radical prostatectomies. The question was asked: Can C-TRUS detect cancer that has been missed by even multiple systematic biopsies? The entrance criteria was prior negative systematic random biopsies regardless of number of biopsy sessions or number of individual biopsy cores. Five C-TRUS subvisual algorithms were utilized to evaluate the information of the ultrasound signal. The most suspicious regions were marked by C-TRUS and biopsied by guiding a needle into that specific location. In this study 132 with a history of 6-72 negative systematic random biopsies (median: 12 cores) were evaluated by C-TRUS. The PSA ranged from 3.1-36 ng/ml with a median of 9.01 ng/ml. C-TRUS detected in 66 (50%) of these 132 patients cancer by targeted biopsies. In thes 66 men the median number of negative biopsy sessions were two and a median of 12 biopsy cores had been taken. From the literature, we would expect a cancer detection rate in this group with systematic sextant biopsies of about 7%. Only five of the detected carcinomas showed a Gleason Score (GS) of 5, were as 25 had a GS of 6, 22 a GS of 7 and 15 a GS above 7. The results of this prospective clinical trail indicate that C-TRUS is able to identify clinically significant cancers that were missed by even multiple systematic random

  7. Correlation of preoperative MRI and intraoperative 3D ultrasound to measure brain tissue shift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gobbi, David G.; Lee, Belinda K. H.; Peters, Terence M.

    2001-05-01

    B-Mode ultrasound is often used during neurosurgery to provide intra-operative images of the brain though a craniotomy, but the use of 3D ultrasound during surgery is still in its infancy. We have developed a system that provides real-time freehand 3D ultrasound reconstruction at a reduced resolution. The reconstruction proceeds incrementally and the 3D image is overlayed, via a computer, on a pre-operative 3D MRI scan. This provides the operator with the necessary feedback to maintain a constant freehand sweep-rate, and also ensures that the sweep covers the desired anatomical volume. All of the ultrasound video frames are buffered, and a full-resolution, compounded reconstruction proceeds once the manual sweep is complete. We have also developed tools for manual tagging of homologous landmarks in the 3D MRI and 3D ultrasound volumes that use a piecewise cubic approximation of thin-plate spline interpolation to achieve interactive nonlinear registration and warping of the MRI volume to the ultrasound volume: Each time a homologous point-pair is identified by the use, the image of the warped MRI is updated on the computer screen after less than 0.5 s.

  8. Cardiac Chamber Volumetric Assessment Using 3D Ultrasound - A Review.

    PubMed

    Pedrosa, João; Barbosa, Daniel; Almeida, Nuno; Bernard, Olivier; Bosch, Johan; D'hooge, Jan

    2016-01-01

    When designing clinical trials for testing novel cardiovascular therapies, it is highly relevant to understand what a given technology can provide in terms of information on the physiologic status of the heart and vessels. Ultrasound imaging has traditionally been the modality of choice to study the cardiovascular system as it has an excellent temporal resolution; it operates in real-time; it is very widespread and - not unimportant - it is cheap. Although this modality is mostly known clinically as a two-dimensional technology, it has recently matured into a true three-dimensional imaging technique. In this review paper, an overview is given of the available ultrasound technology for cardiac chamber quantification in terms of volume and function and evidence is given why these parameters are of value when testing the effect of new cardiovascular therapies.

  9. 3-D Ultrasound Vascularity Assessment for Breast Cancer Diagnosis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-09-01

    Andiona denin n eation im-posed, on 0y. Additional registration accuracies using phantom data from computed tomography, magnetic res- tion is nearly...The renal circulation. In: 21. Shung KK. In vitro experiment results on 299-302. Hamilton WF, Dow P, eds. Handbook of ultrasonic scattering in...ultrasonic image feature localization based on magnetic scanhead tracking: In vitro calibration and validation, Ultrasound Med. and Bio. 20:923

  10. 3-D Ultrasound Guidance of Autonomous Robot for Location of Ferrous Shrapnel

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Albert J.; Light, Edward D.

    2010-01-01

    Vibrations can be induced in ferromagnetic shrapnel by a variable electromagnet. Real time 3-D color Doppler ultrasound located the induced motion in a needle fragment and determined its 3-D position in the scanner coordinates. This information was used to guide a robot which moved a probe to touch the shrapnel fragment. PMID:19574140

  11. 3-D ultrasound guidance of autonomous robot for location of ferrous shrapnel.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Albert J; Light, Edward D; Smith, Stephen W

    2009-07-01

    Vibrations can be induced in ferromagnetic shrapnel by a variable electromagnet. Real time 3-D color Doppler ultrasound located the induced motion in a needle fragment and determined its 3-D position in the scanner coordinates. This information was used to guide a robot which moved a probe to touch the shrapnel fragment.

  12. 3-D Ultrasound Vascularity Assessment for Breast Cancer Diagnosis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-09-01

    34truth" data in classifying a given case as benign or malignant. Discrimination thresholds are determined using a linear Baysian classifier for the two...somewhat intuitive. The diagonal line represents a Baysian discrimination line, equally weighing the cost of false-positive and false-negative...threshold is lowered to produce a sensitivity of 100%. Using a 3D linear Baysian discrimination scheme (which produces a threshold plane), the average

  13. 3D temperature field reconstruction using ultrasound sensing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yuqian; Ma, Tong; Cao, Chengyu; Wang, Xingwei

    2016-04-01

    3D temperature field reconstruction is of practical interest to the power, transportation and aviation industries and it also opens up opportunities for real time control or optimization of high temperature fluid or combustion process. In our paper, a new distributed optical fiber sensing system consisting of a series of elements will be used to generate and receive acoustic signals. This system is the first active temperature field sensing system that features the advantages of the optical fiber sensors (distributed sensing capability) and the acoustic sensors (non-contact measurement). Signals along multiple paths will be measured simultaneously enabled by a code division multiple access (CDMA) technique. Then a proposed Gaussian Radial Basis Functions (GRBF)-based approach can approximate the temperature field as a finite summation of space-dependent basis functions and time-dependent coefficients. The travel time of the acoustic signals depends on the temperature of the media. On this basis, the Gaussian functions are integrated along a number of paths which are determined by the number and distribution of sensors. The inversion problem to estimate the unknown parameters of the Gaussian functions can be solved with the measured times-of-flight (ToF) of acoustic waves and the length of propagation paths using the recursive least square method (RLS). The simulation results show an approximation error less than 2% in 2D and 5% in 3D respectively. It demonstrates the availability and efficiency of our proposed 3D temperature field reconstruction mechanism.

  14. Real-time 3-D ultrasound scan conversion using a multicore processor.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Bo; Shamdasani, Vijay; Sikdar, Siddhartha; Managuli, Ravi; Kim, Yongmin

    2009-07-01

    Real-time 3-D ultrasound scan conversion (SC) in software has not been practical due to its high computation and I/O data handling requirements. In this paper, we describe software-based 3-D SC with high volume rates using a multicore processor, Cell. We have implemented both 3-D SC approaches: 1) the separable 3-D SC where two 2-D coordinate transformations in orthogonal planes are performed in sequence and 2) the direct 3-D SC where the coordinate transformation is directly handled in 3-D. One Cell processor can scan-convert a 192 x 192 x 192 16-bit volume at 87.8 volumes/s with the separable 3-D SC algorithm and 28 volumes/s with the direct 3-D SC algorithm.

  15. Effective Concentration of Lidocaine Plus Fentanyl for Caudal Block in Patients Undergoing Transrectal Ultrasound Guided Prostate Biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jinguo; Zhou, Honglan; An, Wei; Gao, Yang

    2016-01-01

    Objective. This study determined the effective concentration (EC) of lidocaine plus 75 μg fentanyl for caudal block in patients undergoing transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) guided prostate biopsy. Methods. Consecutive male patients scheduled for TRUS guided prostate biopsy were enrolled. The mixed solution for caudal block contained lidocaine and 75 μg fentanyl, in total 20 mL. The concentration of lidocaine was determined using the up-and-down method, starting at 0.8% (a step size of 0.1%). A successful caudal block was defined by no pain perception during biopsy. The EC50 of lidocaine for successful caudal block was calculated and side effects were evaluated. Results. A total of 23 patients were recruited. The EC50 of lidocaine for successful caudal block was 0.53%. Conclusions. Lidocaine of 0.53% combined with 75 μg fentanyl resulted in excellent caudal block in 50% of male patients undergoing transrectal ultrasound guided prostate biopsy. PMID:27872761

  16. Real-Time 3D Contrast-Enhanced Transcranial Ultrasound and Aberration Correction

    PubMed Central

    Ivancevich, Nikolas M.; Pinton, Gianmarco F.; Nicoletto, Heather A.; Bennett, Ellen; Laskowitz, Daniel T.; Smith, Stephen W.

    2008-01-01

    Contrast-enhanced (CE) transcranial ultrasound (US) and reconstructed 3D transcranial ultrasound have shown advantages over traditional methods in a variety of cerebrovascular diseases. We present the results from a novel ultrasound technique, namely real-time 3D contrast-enhanced transcranial ultrasound. Using real-time 3D (RT3D) ultrasound and micro-bubble contrast agent, we scanned 17 healthy volunteers via a single temporal window and 9 via the sub-occipital window and report our detection rates for the major cerebral vessels. In 71% of subjects, both of our observers identified the ipsilateral circle of Willis from the temporal window, and in 59% we imaged the entire circle of Willis. From the sub-occipital window, both observers detected the entire vertebrobasilar circulation in 22% of subjects, and in 44% the basilar artery. After performing phase aberration correction on one subject, we were able to increase the diagnostic value of the scan, detecting a vessel not present in the uncorrected scan. These preliminary results suggest that RT3D CE transcranial US and RT3D CE transcranial US with phase aberration correction have the potential to greatly impact the field of neurosonology. PMID:18395321

  17. Sound-speed image reconstruction in sparse-aperture 3-D ultrasound transmission tomography.

    PubMed

    Jirík, Radovan; Peterlík, Igor; Ruiter, Nicole; Fousek, Jan; Dapp, Robin; Zapf, Michael; Jan, Jirí

    2012-02-01

    The paper is focused on sound-speed image reconstruction in 3-D ultrasound transmission tomography. Along with ultrasound reflectivity and the attenuation coefficient, sound speed is an important parameter which is related to the type and pathological state of the imaged tissue. This is important in the intended application, breast cancer diagnosis. In contrast to 2-D ultrasound transmission tomography systems, a 3-D system can provide an isotropic spatial resolution in the x-, y-, and z-directions in reconstructed 3-D images of ultrasound parameters. Several challenges must, however, be addressed for 3-D systems-namely, a sparse transducer distribution, low signal-to-noise ratio, and higher computational complexity. These issues are addressed in terms of sound-speed image reconstruction, using edge-preserving regularized algebraic reconstruction in combination with synthetic aperture focusing. The critical points of the implementation are also discussed, because they are crucial to enable a complete 3-D image reconstruction. The methods were tested on a synthetic data set and on data sets measured with the Karlsruhe 3-D ultrasound computer tomography (USCT) I prototype using phantoms. The sound-speed estimates in the reconstructed volumes agreed with the reference values. The breast-phantom outlines and the lesion-mimicking objects were also detectable in the resulting sound-speed volumes.

  18. Vascular Structure Identification in Intraoperative 3D Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound Data

    PubMed Central

    Ilunga-Mbuyamba, Elisee; Avina-Cervantes, Juan Gabriel; Lindner, Dirk; Cruz-Aceves, Ivan; Arlt, Felix; Chalopin, Claire

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a method of vascular structure identification in intraoperative 3D Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound (CEUS) data is presented. Ultrasound imaging is commonly used in brain tumor surgery to investigate in real time the current status of cerebral structures. The use of an ultrasound contrast agent enables to highlight tumor tissue, but also surrounding blood vessels. However, these structures can be used as landmarks to estimate and correct the brain shift. This work proposes an alternative method for extracting small vascular segments close to the tumor as landmark. The patient image dataset involved in brain tumor operations includes preoperative contrast T1MR (cT1MR) data and 3D intraoperative contrast enhanced ultrasound data acquired before (3D-iCEUSstart) and after (3D-iCEUSend) tumor resection. Based on rigid registration techniques, a preselected vascular segment in cT1MR is searched in 3D-iCEUSstart and 3D-iCEUSend data. The method was validated by using three similarity measures (Normalized Gradient Field, Normalized Mutual Information and Normalized Cross Correlation). Tests were performed on data obtained from ten patients overcoming a brain tumor operation and it succeeded in nine cases. Despite the small size of the vascular structures, the artifacts in the ultrasound images and the brain tissue deformations, blood vessels were successfully identified. PMID:27070610

  19. A novel two-axis micromechanical scanning transducer for handheld 3D ultrasound and photoacoustic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chih-Hsien; Zou, Jun

    2016-03-01

    This paper reports the development of a new two-axis micromechanical scanning transducer for handheld 3D ultrasound imaging. It consists of a miniaturized single-element ultrasound transducer driven by a unique 2-axis liquid-immersible electromagnetic microactuator. With a mechanical scanning frequency of 19.532 Hz and an ultrasound pulse repetition rate of 5 kHz, the scanning transducer was scanned along 60 concentric paths with 256 detection points on each to simulate a physical 2D ultrasound transducer array of 60 × 256 elements. Using the scanning transducer, 3D pulse-echo ultrasound imaging of two silicon discs immersed in water as the imaging target was successfully conducted. The lateral resolution of the 3D ultrasound image was further improved with the synthetic aperture focusing technique (SAFT). The new two-axis micromechanical scanning transducer doesn't require complex and expensive multi-channel data acquisition (DAQ) electronics. Therefore, it could provide a new approach to achieve compact and low-cost 3D ultrasound and photoacoustic imaging systems, especially for handheld operations.

  20. Patient information leaflets for Transrectal Ultrasound guided prostate biopsy: Results of North Thames deanery survey

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background We evaluated the quality of patient information leaflets for Trans-Rectal Ultrasound guided prostate biopsies (TRUS-Bx) in North Thames region. TRUS-Bx information leaflets were requested from 24 hospitals in the region. All hospitals were contacted by telephone, and non-responders were followed-up by postal survey. Leaflets received were evaluated for a clear description of the procedure, directions to TRUS-Bx location, a clear description of the procedure, contact for queries/concerns, information about preparation prior to procedure, information about regular medication, information on how to obtain results, instructions for follow-up arrangements, analgesia used and risk of morbidity/mortality. Additionally, the leaflets were evaluated for diagrams to clarify the procedure and the anatomy, and sources of additional information, such as reference to published articles or prostate cancer patient support groups/internet websites. Findings In summary, a total of 17 leaflets (77%) were received. Of these, the majority (94%) had a clear description of the procedure, contact for queries/concerns (82%), information about preparation prior to TRUS-Bx (71%). Directions to TRUS-Bx location (29%), and analgesia used (35%), was very poorly described, and information on obtaining results and follow-up arrangements were described in only 12 (71%) leaflets. Complications such as risks of infection, haematuria, haematospermia and rectal bleeding, were generally explained (71%-76% of leaflets), urinary retention was mentioned in only 5 (29%) leaflets and mortality in only 1 case. Descriptive diagrams of the procedure and prostate anatomy were very rarely used, and sources of additional information were limited to 1 published article and reference to 1 prostate cancer support group. Conclusions This study demonstrates that there is large variation in the information supplied in TRUS-Bx patient information leaflets in the North Thames region, with some leaflets lacking

  1. Temporal-based needle segmentation algorithm for transrectal ultrasound prostate biopsy procedures.

    PubMed

    Cool, Derek W; Gardi, Lori; Romagnoli, Cesare; Saikaly, Manale; Izawa, Jonathan I; Fenster, Aaron

    2010-04-01

    Automatic identification of the biopsy-core tissue location during a prostate biopsy procedure would provide verification that targets were adequately sampled and would allow for appropriate intraprocedure biopsy target modification. Localization of the biopsy core requires accurate segmentation of the biopsy needle and needle tip from transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) biopsy images. A temporal-based TRUS needle segmentation algorithm was developed specifically for the prostate biopsy procedure to automatically identify the TRUS image containing the biopsy needle from a collection of 2D TRUS images and to segment the biopsy-core location from the 2D TRUS image. The temporal-based segmentation algorithm performs a temporal analysis on a series of biopsy TRUS images collected throughout needle insertion and withdrawal. Following the identification of points of needle insertion and retraction, the needle axis is segmented using a Hough transform-based algorithm, which is followed by a temporospectral TRUS analysis to identify the biopsy-needle tip. Validation of the temporal-based algorithm is performed on 108 TRUS biopsy sequences collected from the procedures of ten patients. The success of the temporal search to identify the proper images was manually assessed, while the accuracies of the needle-axis and needle-tip segmentations were quantitatively compared to implementations of two other needle segmentation algorithms within the literature. The needle segmentation algorithm demonstrated a >99% accuracy in identifying the TRUS image at the moment of needle insertion from the collection of real-time TRUS images throughout the insertion and withdrawal of the biopsy needle. The segmented biopsy-needle axes were accurate to within 2.3 +/- 2.0 degrees and 0.48 +/- 0.42 mm of the gold standard. Identification of the needle tip to within half of the biopsy-core length (<10 mm) was 95% successful with a mean error of 2.4 +/- 4.0 mm. Needle-tip detection using the temporal

  2. Fully automated prostate magnetic resonance imaging and transrectal ultrasound fusion via a probabilistic registration metric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sparks, Rachel; Bloch, B. Nicholas; Feleppa, Ernest; Barratt, Dean; Madabhushi, Anant

    2013-03-01

    In this work, we present a novel, automated, registration method to fuse magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) images of the prostate. Our methodology consists of: (1) delineating the prostate on MRI, (2) building a probabilistic model of prostate location on TRUS, and (3) aligning the MRI prostate segmentation to the TRUS probabilistic model. TRUS-guided needle biopsy is the current gold standard for prostate cancer (CaP) diagnosis. Up to 40% of CaP lesions appear isoechoic on TRUS, hence TRUS-guided biopsy cannot reliably target CaP lesions and is associated with a high false negative rate. MRI is better able to distinguish CaP from benign prostatic tissue, but requires special equipment and training. MRI-TRUS fusion, whereby MRI is acquired pre-operatively and aligned to TRUS during the biopsy procedure, allows for information from both modalities to be used to help guide the biopsy. The use of MRI and TRUS in combination to guide biopsy at least doubles the yield of positive biopsies. Previous work on MRI-TRUS fusion has involved aligning manually determined fiducials or prostate surfaces to achieve image registration. The accuracy of these methods is dependent on the reader's ability to determine fiducials or prostate surfaces with minimal error, which is a difficult and time-consuming task. Our novel, fully automated MRI-TRUS fusion method represents a significant advance over the current state-of-the-art because it does not require manual intervention after TRUS acquisition. All necessary preprocessing steps (i.e. delineation of the prostate on MRI) can be performed offline prior to the biopsy procedure. We evaluated our method on seven patient studies, with B-mode TRUS and a 1.5 T surface coil MRI. Our method has a root mean square error (RMSE) for expertly selected fiducials (consisting of the urethra, calcifications, and the centroids of CaP nodules) of 3.39 +/- 0.85 mm.

  3. Two-dimensional ultrasound measurement of thyroid gland volume: a new equation with higher correlation with 3-D ultrasound measurement.

    PubMed

    Ying, Michael; Yung, Dennis M C; Ho, Karen K L

    2008-01-01

    This study aimed to develop a new two-dimensional (2-D) ultrasound thyroid volume estimation equation using three-dimensional (3-D) ultrasound as the standard of reference, and to compare the thyroid volume estimation accuracy of the new equation with three previously reported equations. 2-D and 3-D ultrasound examinations of the thyroid gland were performed in 150 subjects with normal serum thyrotropin (TSH, thyroid-stimulating hormone) and free thyroxine (fT4) levels (63 men and 87 women, age range: 17 to 71 y). In each subject, the volume of both thyroid lobes was measured by 3-D ultrasound. On 2-D ultrasound, the craniocaudal (CC), lateromedial (LM) and anteroposterior (AP) dimensions of the thyroid lobes were measured. The equation was derived by correlating the volume of the thyroid lobes measured with 3-D ultrasound and the product of the three dimensions measured with 2-D ultrasound using linear regression analysis, in 75 subjects without thyroid nodule. The accuracy of thyroid volume estimation of the new equation and the three previously reported equations was evaluated and compared in another 75 subjects (without thyroid nodule, n = 30; with thyroid nodule, n = 45). It is suggested that volume of thyroid lobe may be estimated as: volume of thyroid lobe = 0.38.(CC.LM.AP) + 1.76. Result showed that the new equation (16.9% to 36.1%) had a significantly smaller thyroid volume estimation error than the previously reported equations (20.8% to 54.9%) (p < 0.05). There was a significantly larger thyroid volume estimation error when thyroid glands with nodules were examined (p < 0.05). With the use of the appropriate thyroid volume equation, 2-D ultrasound can be a useful alternative in thyroid volume measurement when 3-D ultrasound is not available.

  4. Tissue ablation after 120W greenlight laser vaporization and bipolar plasma vaporization of the prostate: a comparison using transrectal three-dimensional ultrasound volumetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kranzbühler, Benedikt; Gross, Oliver; Fankhauser, Christian D.; Hefermehl, Lukas J.; Poyet, Cédric; Largo, Remo; Müntener, Michael; Seifert, Hans-Helge; Zimmermann, Matthias; Sulser, Tullio; Müller, Alexander; Hermanns, Thomas

    2012-02-01

    Introduction and objectives: Greenlight laser vaporization (LV) of the prostate is characterized by simultaneous vaporization and coagulation of prostatic tissue resulting in tissue ablation together with excellent hemostasis during the procedure. It has been reported that bipolar plasma vaporization (BPV) of the prostate might be an alternative for LV. So far, it has not been shown that BPV is as effective as LV in terms of tissue ablation or hemostasis. We performed transrectal three-dimensional ultrasound investigations to compare the efficiency of tissue ablation between LV and BPV. Methods: Between 11.2009 and 5.2011, 50 patients underwent pure BPV in our institution. These patients were matched with regard to the pre-operative prostate volume to 50 LV patients from our existing 3D-volumetry-database. Transrectal 3D ultrasound and planimetric volumetry of the prostate were performed pre-operatively, after catheter removal, 6 weeks and 6 months. Results: Median pre-operative prostate volume was not significantly different between the two groups (45.3ml vs. 45.4ml; p=1.0). After catheter removal, median absolute volume reduction (BPV 12.4ml, LV 6.55ml) as well as relative volume reduction (27.8% vs. 16.4%) were significantly higher in the BPV group (p<0.001). After six weeks (42.9% vs. 33.3%) and six months (47.2% vs. 39.7%), relative volume reduction remained significantly higher in the BPV group (p<0.001). Absolute volume reduction was non-significantly higher in the BPV group after six weeks (18.4ml, 13.8ml; p=0.051) and six months (20.8ml, 18ml; p=0.3). Clinical outcome parameters improved significantly in both groups without relevant differences between the groups. Conclusions: Both vaporization techniques result in efficient tissue ablation with initial prostatic swelling. BPV seems to be superior due to a higher relative volume reduction. This difference had no clinical impact after a follow-up of 6M.

  5. GPU-accelerated 3D mipmap for real-time visualization of ultrasound volume data.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Koojoo; Lee, Eun-Seok; Shin, Byeong-Seok

    2013-10-01

    Ultrasound volume rendering is an efficient method for visualizing the shape of fetuses in obstetrics and gynecology. However, in order to obtain high-quality ultrasound volume rendering, noise removal and coordinates conversion are essential prerequisites. Ultrasound data needs to undergo a noise filtering process; otherwise, artifacts and speckle noise cause quality degradation in the final images. Several two-dimensional (2D) noise filtering methods have been used to reduce this noise. However, these 2D filtering methods ignore relevant information in-between adjacent 2D-scanned images. Although three-dimensional (3D) noise filtering methods are used, they require more processing time than 2D-based methods. In addition, the sampling position in the ultrasonic volume rendering process has to be transformed between conical ultrasound coordinates and Cartesian coordinates. We propose a 3D-mipmap-based noise reduction method that uses graphics hardware, as a typical 3D mipmap requires less time to be generated and less storage capacity. In our method, we compare the density values of the corresponding points on consecutive mipmap levels and find the noise area using the difference in the density values. We also provide a noise detector for adaptively selecting the mipmap level using the difference of two mipmap levels. Our method can visualize 3D ultrasound data in real time with 3D noise filtering.

  6. Computer-aided (HistoScanning) biopsies versus conventional transrectal ultrasound-guided prostate biopsies: do targeted biopsy schemes improve the cancer detection rate?

    PubMed

    Hamann, Moritz F; Hamann, Claudius; Schenk, Eckhard; Al-Najar, Amr; Naumann, Carsten M; Jünemann, Klaus-Peter

    2013-02-01

    To define potential improvement in prostate cancer detection by application of a computer-aided, targeted, biopsy regimen using HistoScanning. We analyzed 80 patients who underwent systematic transrectal, targeted transrectal, and targeted perineal biopsies. Each patient was diagnosed preoperatively by HistoScanning, defining a maximum of 3 suspicious areas. These areas were biopsied, both transrectally and via the perineum, with a maximum of 3 cores per location. We detected prostatitis in 30 patients (37.5%), premalignant lesions in 10 (12.5%), and prostate cancer in 28 (35%). The transrectal technique was used to detect 78.6% of all cancers using 14 cores by systematic biopsy. With a maximum of 9 targeted cores, 82.1% of all cancers were detected with the targeted perineal approach and 53.6% were detected with the targeted transrectal approach. Although our data did not show significant difference in the performance of targeted transperineal compared with systematic transrectal biopsies, the detection rate of targeted transrectal biopsies was significantly lower. The presented targeted biopsy scheme achieved an overall detection rate of 85% of prostate-specific antigen-relevant pathologic lesions within the prostate. Thus, the presented procedure shows an improved detection rate compared with standard systematic prostate biopsies, and the number of cores required is reduced. Furthermore, the perineal HistoScanning-aided approach seems to be superior to the transrectal approach with respect to the prostate cancer detection rate. The presented procedure might be a step toward reliable ultrasound-based tissue characterization and toward fulfilling the requirements of novel therapeutic strategies. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. The Ultrasound Brain Helmet: Simultaneous Multi-transducer 3D Transcranial Ultrasound Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindsey, Brooks D.

    In this work, I examine the problem of rapid imaging of stroke and present ultrasound-based approaches for addressing it. Specifically, this dissertation discusses aberration and attenuation due to the skull as sources of image degradation and presents a prototype system for simultaneous 3D bilateral imaging via both temporal acoustic windows. This system uses custom sparse array transducers built on flexible multilayer circuits that can be positioned for simultaneous imaging via both temporal acoustic windows, allowing for registration and fusion of multiple real-time 3D scans of cerebral vasculature. I examine hardware considerations for new matrix arrays—transducer design and interconnects—in this application. Specifically, it is proposed that signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) may be increased by reducing the length of probe cables. This claim is evaluated as part of the presented system through simulation, experimental data, and in vivo imaging. Ultimately, gains in SNR of 7 dB are realized by replacing a standard probe cable with a much shorter flex interconnect; higher gains may be possible using ribbon-based probe cables. In vivo images are presented depicting cerebral arteries with and without the use of microbubble contrast agent that have been registered and fused using a search algorithm which maximizes normalized cross-correlation. The scanning geometry of a brain helmet-type system is also utilized to allow each matrix array to serve as a correction source for the opposing array. Aberration is estimated using cross-correlation of RF channel signals followed by least mean squares solution of the resulting overdetermined system. Delay maps are updated and real-time 3D scanning resumes. A first attempt is made at using multiple arrival time maps to correct multiple unique aberrators within a single transcranial imaging volume, i.e. several isoplanatic patches. This adaptive imaging technique, which uses steered unfocused waves transmitted by the opposing or

  8. Quantitative 3D high resolution transmission ultrasound tomography: creating clinically relevant images (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiskin, James; Klock, John; Iuanow, Elaine; Borup, Dave T.; Terry, Robin; Malik, Bilal H.; Lenox, Mark

    2017-03-01

    There has been a great deal of research into ultrasound tomography for breast imaging over the past 35 years. Few successful attempts have been made to reconstruct high-resolution images using transmission ultrasound. To this end, advances have been made in 2D and 3D algorithms that utilize either time of arrival or full wave data to reconstruct images with high spatial and contrast resolution suitable for clinical interpretation. The highest resolution and quantitative accuracy result from inverse scattering applied to full wave data in 3D. However, this has been prohibitively computationally expensive, meaning that full inverse scattering ultrasound tomography has not been considered clinically viable. Here we show the results of applying a nonlinear inverse scattering algorithm to 3D data in a clinically useful time frame. This method yields Quantitative Transmission (QT) ultrasound images with high spatial and contrast resolution. We reconstruct sound speeds for various 2D and 3D phantoms and verify these values with independent measurements. The data are fully 3D as is the reconstruction algorithm, with no 2D approximations. We show that 2D reconstruction algorithms can introduce artifacts into the QT breast image which are avoided by using a full 3D algorithm and data. We show high resolution gross and microscopic anatomic correlations comparing cadaveric breast QT images with MRI to establish imaging capability and accuracy. Finally, we show reconstructions of data from volunteers, as well as an objective visual grading analysis to confirm clinical imaging capability and accuracy.

  9. Automated 3D ultrasound image segmentation for assistant diagnosis of breast cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuxin; Gu, Peng; Lee, Won-Mean; Roubidoux, Marilyn A.; Du, Sidan; Yuan, Jie; Wang, Xueding; Carson, Paul L.

    2016-04-01

    Segmentation of an ultrasound image into functional tissues is of great importance to clinical diagnosis of breast cancer. However, many studies are found to segment only the mass of interest and not all major tissues. Differences and inconsistencies in ultrasound interpretation call for an automated segmentation method to make results operator-independent. Furthermore, manual segmentation of entire three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound volumes is time-consuming, resource-intensive, and clinically impractical. Here, we propose an automated algorithm to segment 3D ultrasound volumes into three major tissue types: cyst/mass, fatty tissue, and fibro-glandular tissue. To test its efficacy and consistency, the proposed automated method was employed on a database of 21 cases of whole breast ultrasound. Experimental results show that our proposed method not only distinguishes fat and non-fat tissues correctly, but performs well in classifying cyst/mass. Comparison of density assessment between the automated method and manual segmentation demonstrates good consistency with an accuracy of 85.7%. Quantitative comparison of corresponding tissue volumes, which uses overlap ratio, gives an average similarity of 74.54%, consistent with values seen in MRI brain segmentations. Thus, our proposed method exhibits great potential as an automated approach to segment 3D whole breast ultrasound volumes into functionally distinct tissues that may help to correct ultrasound speed of sound aberrations and assist in density based prognosis of breast cancer.

  10. Automated 3D ultrasound image segmentation to aid breast cancer image interpretation.

    PubMed

    Gu, Peng; Lee, Won-Mean; Roubidoux, Marilyn A; Yuan, Jie; Wang, Xueding; Carson, Paul L

    2016-02-01

    Segmentation of an ultrasound image into functional tissues is of great importance to clinical diagnosis of breast cancer. However, many studies are found to segment only the mass of interest and not all major tissues. Differences and inconsistencies in ultrasound interpretation call for an automated segmentation method to make results operator-independent. Furthermore, manual segmentation of entire three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound volumes is time-consuming, resource-intensive, and clinically impractical. Here, we propose an automated algorithm to segment 3D ultrasound volumes into three major tissue types: cyst/mass, fatty tissue, and fibro-glandular tissue. To test its efficacy and consistency, the proposed automated method was employed on a database of 21 cases of whole breast ultrasound. Experimental results show that our proposed method not only distinguishes fat and non-fat tissues correctly, but performs well in classifying cyst/mass. Comparison of density assessment between the automated method and manual segmentation demonstrates good consistency with an accuracy of 85.7%. Quantitative comparison of corresponding tissue volumes, which uses overlap ratio, gives an average similarity of 74.54%, consistent with values seen in MRI brain segmentations. Thus, our proposed method exhibits great potential as an automated approach to segment 3D whole breast ultrasound volumes into functionally distinct tissues that may help to correct ultrasound speed of sound aberrations and assist in density based prognosis of breast cancer. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Automated 3D Ultrasound Image Segmentation to Aid Breast Cancer Image Interpretation

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Peng; Lee, Won-Mean; Roubidoux, Marilyn A.; Yuan, Jie; Wang, Xueding; Carson, Paul L.

    2015-01-01

    Segmentation of an ultrasound image into functional tissues is of great importance to clinical diagnosis of breast cancer. However, many studies are found to segment only the mass of interest and not all major tissues. Differences and inconsistencies in ultrasound interpretation call for an automated segmentation method to make results operator-independent. Furthermore, manual segmentation of entire three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound volumes is time-consuming, resource-intensive, and clinically impractical. Here, we propose an automated algorithm to segment 3D ultrasound volumes into three major tissue types: cyst/mass, fatty tissue, and fibro-glandular tissue. To test its efficacy and consistency, the proposed automated method was employed on a database of 21 cases of whole breast ultrasound. Experimental results show that our proposed method not only distinguishes fat and non-fat tissues correctly, but performs well in classifying cyst/mass. Comparison of density assessment between the automated method and manual segmentation demonstrates good consistency with an accuracy of 85.7%. Quantitative comparison of corresponding tissue volumes, which uses overlap ratio, gives an average similarity of 74.54%, consistent with values seen in MRI brain segmentations. Thus, our proposed method exhibits great potential as an automated approach to segment 3D whole breast ultrasound volumes into functionally distinct tissues that may help to correct ultrasound speed of sound aberrations and assist in density based prognosis of breast cancer. PMID:26547117

  12. Registration of 2D cardiac images to real-time 3D ultrasound volumes for 3D stress echocardiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leung, K. Y. Esther; van Stralen, Marijn; Voormolen, Marco M.; van Burken, Gerard; Nemes, Attila; ten Cate, Folkert J.; Geleijnse, Marcel L.; de Jong, Nico; van der Steen, Antonius F. W.; Reiber, Johan H. C.; Bosch, Johan G.

    2006-03-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) stress echocardiography is a novel technique for diagnosing cardiac dysfunction, by comparing wall motion of the left ventricle under different stages of stress. For quantitative comparison of this motion, it is essential to register the ultrasound data. We propose an intensity based rigid registration method to retrieve two-dimensional (2D) four-chamber (4C), two-chamber, and short-axis planes from the 3D data set acquired in the stress stage, using manually selected 2D planes in the rest stage as reference. The algorithm uses the Nelder-Mead simplex optimization to find the optimal transformation of one uniform scaling, three rotation, and three translation parameters. We compared registration using the SAD, SSD, and NCC metrics, performed on four resolution levels of a Gaussian pyramid. The registration's effectiveness was assessed by comparing the 3D positions of the registered apex and mitral valve midpoints and 4C direction with the manually selected results. The registration was tested on data from 20 patients. Best results were found using the NCC metric on data downsampled with factor two: mean registration errors were 8.1mm, 5.4mm, and 8.0° in the apex position, mitral valve position, and 4C direction respectively. The errors were close to the interobserver (7.1mm, 3.8mm, 7.4°) and intraobserver variability (5.2mm, 3.3mm, 7.0°), and better than the error before registration (9.4mm, 9.0mm, 9.9°). We demonstrated that the registration algorithm visually and quantitatively improves the alignment of rest and stress data sets, performing similar to manual alignment. This will improve automated analysis in 3D stress echocardiography.

  13. Registering preprocedure volumetric images with intraprocedure 3-D ultrasound using an ultrasound imaging model.

    PubMed

    King, A P; Rhode, K S; Ma, Y; Yao, C; Jansen, C; Razavi, R; Penney, G P

    2010-03-01

    For many image-guided interventions there exists a need to compute the registration between preprocedure image(s) and the physical space of the intervention. Real-time intraprocedure imaging such as ultrasound (US) can be used to image the region of interest directly and provide valuable anatomical information for computing this registration. Unfortunately, real-time US images often have poor signal-to-noise ratio and suffer from imaging artefacts. Therefore, registration using US images can be challenging and significant preprocessing is often required to make the registrations robust. In this paper we present a novel technique for computing the image-to-physical registration for minimally invasive cardiac interventions using 3-D US. Our technique uses knowledge of the physics of the US imaging process to reduce the amount of preprocessing required on the 3-D US images. To account for the fact that clinical US images normally undergo significant image processing before being exported from the US machine our optimization scheme allows the parameters of the US imaging model to vary. We validated our technique by computing rigid registrations for 12 cardiac US/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) datasets acquired from six volunteers and two patients. The technique had mean registration errors of 2.1-4.4 mm, and 75% capture ranges of 5-30 mm. We also demonstrate how the same approach can be used for respiratory motion correction: on 15 datasets acquired from five volunteers the registration errors due to respiratory motion were reduced by 45%-92%.

  14. Proximal femoral focal deficiency of the fetus - early 3D/4D prenatal ultrasound diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Kudla, Marek J; Beczkowska-Kielek, Aleksandra; Kutta, Katarzyna; Partyka-Lasota, Justyna

    2016-09-01

    Proximal Femoral Focal Deficiency (PFFD) is a rare congenital syndrome of unknown etiology. Additional disorders can be present up to 70% of PFFD cases. Management (including termination) depends on the severity of the malformation. We present a case of a 32-year-old woman referred for routine ultrasound examination in the 12th week of pregnancy. Detailed 3D/4D evaluation revealed asymmetry of lower limbs and diagnosis of isolated PFFD was established. Parents were fully informed and decided to continue the pregnancy. We stress here the importance of early 3D/4D ultrasound diagnosis. Our paper presents the earliest case where the diagnosis of PFFD was established with 3D/4D ultrasound.

  15. Computer-Assisted Hepatocellular Carcinoma Ablation Planning Based on 3-D Ultrasound Imaging.

    PubMed

    Li, Kai; Su, Zhongzhen; Xu, Erjiao; Guan, Peishan; Li, Liu-Jun; Zheng, Rongqin

    2016-08-01

    To evaluate computer-assisted hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) ablation planning based on 3-D ultrasound, 3-D ultrasound images of 60 HCC lesions from 58 patients were obtained and transferred to a research toolkit. Compared with virtual manual ablation planning (MAP), virtual computer-assisted ablation planning (CAP) consumed less time and needle insertion numbers and exhibited a higher rate of complete tumor coverage and lower rate of critical structure injury. In MAP, junior operators used less time, but had more critical structure injury than senior operators. For large lesions, CAP performed better than MAP. For lesions near critical structures, CAP resulted in better outcomes than MAP. Compared with MAP, CAP based on 3-D ultrasound imaging was more effective and achieved a higher rate of complete tumor coverage and a lower rate of critical structure injury; it is especially useful for junior operators and with large lesions, and lesions near critical structures.

  16. 3D freehand ultrasound for medical assistance in diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer: preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres, Fabian; Fanti, Zian; Arambula Cosío, F.

    2013-11-01

    Image-guided interventions allow the physician to have a better planning and visualization of a procedure. 3D freehand ultrasound is a non-invasive and low-cost imaging tool that can be used to assist medical procedures. This tool can be used in the diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer. There are common medical practices that involve large needles to obtain an accurate diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer. In this study we propose the use of 3D freehand ultrasound for planning and guiding such procedures as core needle biopsy and radiofrequency ablation. The proposed system will help the physician to identify the lesion area, using image-processing techniques in the 3D freehand ultrasound images, and guide the needle to this area using the information of position and orientation of the surgical tools. We think that this system can upgrade the accuracy and efficiency of these procedures.

  17. FPGA-based real-time anisotropic diffusion filtering of 3D ultrasound images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro-Pareja, Carlos R.; Dandekar, Omkar S.; Shekhar, Raj

    2005-02-01

    Three-dimensional ultrasonic imaging, especially the emerging real-time version of it, is particularly valuable in medical applications such as echocardiography, obstetrics and surgical navigation. A known problem with ultrasound images is their high level of speckle noise. Anisotropic diffusion filtering has been shown to be effective in enhancing the visual quality of 3D ultrasound images and as preprocessing prior to advanced image processing. However, due to its arithmetic complexity and the sheer size of 3D ultrasound images, it is not possible to perform online, real-time anisotropic diffusion filtering using standard software implementations. We present an FPGA-based architecture that allows performing anisotropic diffusion filtering of 3D images at acquisition rates, thus enabling the use of this filtering technique in real-time applications, such as visualization, registration and volume rendering.

  18. 3D reconstruction of a carotid bifurcation from 2D transversal ultrasound images.

    PubMed

    Yeom, Eunseop; Nam, Kweon-Ho; Jin, Changzhu; Paeng, Dong-Guk; Lee, Sang-Joon

    2014-12-01

    Visualizing and analyzing the morphological structure of carotid bifurcations are important for understanding the etiology of carotid atherosclerosis, which is a major cause of stroke and transient ischemic attack. For delineation of vasculatures in the carotid artery, ultrasound examinations have been widely employed because of a noninvasive procedure without ionizing radiation. However, conventional 2D ultrasound imaging has technical limitations in observing the complicated 3D shapes and asymmetric vasodilation of bifurcations. This study aims to propose image-processing techniques for better 3D reconstruction of a carotid bifurcation in a rat by using 2D cross-sectional ultrasound images. A high-resolution ultrasound imaging system with a probe centered at 40MHz was employed to obtain 2D transversal images. The lumen boundaries in each transverse ultrasound image were detected by using three different techniques; an ellipse-fitting, a correlation mapping to visualize the decorrelation of blood flow, and the ellipse-fitting on the correlation map. When the results are compared, the third technique provides relatively good boundary extraction. The incomplete boundaries of arterial lumen caused by acoustic artifacts are somewhat resolved by adopting the correlation mapping and the distortion in the boundary detection near the bifurcation apex was largely reduced by using the ellipse-fitting technique. The 3D lumen geometry of a carotid artery was obtained by volumetric rendering of several 2D slices. For the 3D vasodilatation of the carotid bifurcation, lumen geometries at the contraction and expansion states were simultaneously depicted at various view angles. The present 3D reconstruction methods would be useful for efficient extraction and construction of the 3D lumen geometries of carotid bifurcations from 2D ultrasound images.

  19. Ultrasound-Guided Transrectal Implantation of Gold Markers for Prostate Localization During External Beam Radiotherapy: Complication Rate and Risk Factors

    SciTech Connect

    Langenhuijsen, Johan F.; Lin, Emile N.J.T. van Kiemeney, Lambertus A.; Vight, Lisette P. van der; McColl, Gill; Visser, Andries G.; Witjes, J. Alfred

    2007-11-01

    Purpose: To report the complication rate and risk factors of transrectally implanted gold markers, used for prostate position verification and correction procedures. Methods and Materials: In 209 consecutive men with localized prostate cancer, four gold markers (1 x 7 mm) were inserted under ultrasound guidance in an outpatient setting, and the toxicity was analyzed. All patients received a questionnaire regarding complications after marker implantation. The complications and risk factors were further evaluated by reviewing the medical charts. Results: Of the 209 men, 13 (6.2%) had a moderate complication, consisting of pain and fever that resolved after treatment with oral medication. In 1.9% of the men, minor voiding complaints were observed. Other minor transient complications, defined as hematuria lasting >3 days, hematospermia, and rectal bleeding, occurred in 3.8%, 18.5%, and 9.1% of the patients, respectively. These complications were seen more often in patients with advanced tumor stage, younger age, and shorter duration of hormonal therapy. Conclusion: Transrectal gold marker implantation for high-precision prostate radiotherapy is a safe and well-tolerated procedure.

  20. [Epidermolysis bullosa simplex congenital antenatal discovery and contribution of 3D ultrasound].

    PubMed

    Wylomanski, S; Camp, G; Philippe, H J; Le Vaillant, C

    2014-06-01

    Epidermolysis bullosa (EB) comprises a heterogeneous group of genodermatoses whose prognosis is variable. The diagnosis is suggested by prenatal ultrasound at signs, especially for junctional EB with pyloric atresia. The authors report a case of antenatal image limited skin undermining highlighted by the ultrasound three-dimensional (3D) in connection with a diagnosis of a congenital epidermolysis simplex confirmed postnatal period. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. [Current status of 3D/4D volume ultrasound of the breast].

    PubMed

    Weismann, C; Hergan, K

    2007-06-01

    3D/4D volume ultrasound is an established method that offers various options for analyzing and presenting ultrasound volume data. The following imaging techniques are based on automatically acquired ultrasound volumes. The multiplanar view is the typical mode of 3D ultrasound data presentation. The niche mode view is a cut open view of the volume data set. The surface mode is a rendering technique that represents the data within a volume of interest (VOI) with different slice thicknesses (typically 1-4 mm) with a contrast-enhanced surface algorithm. Related to the diagnostic target, the transparency mode helps to present echopoor or echorich structures and their spatial relationships within the ultrasound volume. Glass body rendering is a special type of transparency mode that makes the grayscale data transparent and shows the color flow data in a surface render mode. The inversion mode offers a three-dimensional surface presentation of echopoor lesions. Volume Contrast Imaging (VCI) works with static 3D volume data and is able to be used with 4D for dynamic scanning. Volume calculation of a lesion and virtual computer-assisted organ analysis of the same lesion is performed with VoCal software. Tomographic Ultrasound Imaging (TUI) is the perfect tool to document static 3D ultrasound volumes. 3D/4D volume ultrasound of the breast provides diagnostic information of the coronal plane. In this plane benign lesions show the compression pattern sign, while malignant lesions show the retraction pattern or star pattern sign. The indeterminate pattern of a lesion combines signs of compression and retraction or star pattern in the coronal plane. Glass body rendering in combination with Power-Doppler, Color-Doppler or High-Definition Flow Imaging presents the intra- and peritumoral three-dimensional vascular architecture. 3D targeting shows correct or incorrect needle placement in all three planes after 2D or 4D needle guidance. In conclusion, it is safe to say that 3D/4D

  2. 3D Ultrasound and Virtual Touch® in Breast Tumors - Two Clinical Cases.

    PubMed

    Leonida, Claudiu V; Topciu, Alina

    2017-01-01

    Visualization of infraclinical malignant lesions using 3D breast ultrasound, and differentiation of benign and malignant lesions using ARFI Virtual Touch® technology in two patients. 3D ultrasound is useful in early detection of architectural distortions, even in the soft tissue of the breast, and Virtual Touch® ARFI differentiates more accurately malignant vs. benign lesions, allowing the patient to be regraded in the BiRADS score (increasing or decreasing the BiRADS score, depending on the situation). Celsius.

  3. Feasibility study: real-time 3-D ultrasound imaging of the brain.

    PubMed

    Smith, Stephen W; Chu, Kengyeh; Idriss, Salim F; Ivancevich, Nikolas M; Light, Edward D; Wolf, Patrick D

    2004-10-01

    We tested the feasibility of real-time, 3-D ultrasound (US) imaging in the brain. The 3-D scanner uses a matrix phased-array transducer of 512 transmit channels and 256 receive channels operating at 2.5 MHz with a 15-mm diameter footprint. The real-time system scans a 65 degrees pyramid, producing up to 30 volumetric scans per second, and features up to five image planes as well as 3-D rendering, 3-D pulsed-wave and color Doppler. In a human subject, the real-time 3-D scans produced simultaneous transcranial horizontal (axial), coronal and sagittal image planes and real-time volume-rendered images of the gross anatomy of the brain. In a transcranial sheep model, we obtained real-time 3-D color flow Doppler scans and perfusion images using bolus injection of contrast agents into the internal carotid artery.

  4. Observation of Dynamic Structure Using Ultrasound 3D Imaging System with Encoded Wave Front

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishigami, Satoshi; Yanagida, Hirotaka; Tamura, Yasutaka; Ishihara, Chiaki; Okada, Nagaya

    2003-05-01

    Dynamic ultrasound three-dimensional (3D) imaging using coded transmission is described. A sequence of 3D images of moving objects is reconstructed for each transmission of pulses modulated by Walsh functions. Then, the dynamic structure of the objects is extracted from the image sequence. In this paper, we discuss the relationship of the system performance to the parameters of the transmitting code such as duration time, repetition period, and total transmission length. A Doppler shift estimation and motion compensated image reconstruction method is described. The computer simulation for the motion compensation image reconstruction was carried out. Ultrasound 3D stroboscopic photography was demonstrated by a preliminary experiment utilizing the evaluation system in a 3D medical diagnostic scanner which has 32 transmitters and 32 receivers.

  5. 3D/4D sonographic evaluation of amniotic band syndrome in early pregnancy: a supplement to 2D ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Hata, Toshiyuki; Tanaka, Hirokazu; Noguchi, Junko

    2011-06-01

    We present two cases of amniotic band syndrome diagnosed using two-dimensional (2D) ultrasound with three-dimensional (3D)/four-dimensional (4D) ultrasound in early pregnancy. In Case 1, at 13 weeks' gestation, multiple amniotic bands, acrania, the absence of fingers and amputation of the toes bilaterally were clearly shown using transvaginal 3D/4D ultrasound. In Case 2, at 15 weeks' gestation, several amniotic bands, acrania and a cleft lip were depicted with transabdominal 3D/4D ultrasound. The spatial relationship between the amniotic bands and the fetus was clearly visualized and easily discernible by 3D/4D ultrasound. The parents and families could readily understand the fetal conditions and undergo counseling; they then choose the option of termination of pregnancy. 3D/4D ultrasound has the potential to be a supplement to conventional 2D ultrasound in evaluating amniotic band syndrome.

  6. Mapping cardiac fiber orientations from high-resolution DTI to high-frequency 3D ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Xulei; Wang, Silun; Shen, Ming; Zhang, Xiaodong; Wagner, Mary B.; Fei, Baowei

    2014-03-01

    The orientation of cardiac fibers affects the anatomical, mechanical, and electrophysiological properties of the heart. Although echocardiography is the most common imaging modality in clinical cardiac examination, it can only provide the cardiac geometry or motion information without cardiac fiber orientations. If the patient's cardiac fiber orientations can be mapped to his/her echocardiography images in clinical examinations, it may provide quantitative measures for diagnosis, personalized modeling, and image-guided cardiac therapies. Therefore, this project addresses the feasibility of mapping personalized cardiac fiber orientations to three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound image volumes. First, the geometry of the heart extracted from the MRI is translated to 3D ultrasound by rigid and deformable registration. Deformation fields between both geometries from MRI and ultrasound are obtained after registration. Three different deformable registration methods were utilized for the MRI-ultrasound registration. Finally, the cardiac fiber orientations imaged by DTI are mapped to ultrasound volumes based on the extracted deformation fields. Moreover, this study also demonstrated the ability to simulate electricity activations during the cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) process. The proposed method has been validated in two rat hearts and three canine hearts. After MRI/ultrasound image registration, the Dice similarity scores were more than 90% and the corresponding target errors were less than 0.25 mm. This proposed approach can provide cardiac fiber orientations to ultrasound images and can have a variety of potential applications in cardiac imaging.

  7. [Possibilities of using magnetic resonance imaging-transrectal ultrasound fusion in the diagnosis of recurrent prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Kapustin, V V

    2011-01-01

    This paper considers whether magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) can be fused, by applying an external bobbin with transrectal ultrasound imaging. The author has studied whether imaging fusion can be used to select a targeted needle biopsy (NB) portion if the development of recurrent prostate cancer (PC) is suspected after radical prostatectomy (RP). MRI-TRUS fusion was performed in 11 patients in different periods after RP. All the patients underwent dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI and then MRI-TRUS fusion during TRUS studies (TRUSS). MRI-TRUS fusion-guided NBs of suspected portions in the vesicourethral anastomotic area were carried out in 7 patients. A control group comprised 18 patients, of whom 12 patients underwent isolated TRUS-guided NB. The use of the fusion technology was shown to make a simultaneous assessment of the MRI and TRUS images of a vesicourethral anastomotic area in post-RP patients. At the same time, the high accuracy of comparison of MRI and TRUS images ensures the steady position of portions with early intensive accumulation of a MRI contrast agent during real-time TRUSS. Thus, morphologically relevant materials could be obtained in 6 of the 7 patients in the MRI-TRUS-guided NB group and only in 3 of the 12 control patients. Therefore, the use of MRI-TRUS fusion enhances the efficiency of NB in post-RP patients suspected of having recurrent PC. The criterion for selecting a target portion is the abnormal accumulation of a MRI contrast agent.

  8. Enhancement characteristics of benign and malignant focal peripheral nodules in the peripheral zone of the prostate gland studied using contrast-enhanced transrectal ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Tang, J; Yang, J-C; Luo, Y; Li, J; Li, Y; Shi, H

    2008-10-01

    To assess the value of contrast-enhanced grey-scale transrectal ultrasound (CETRUS) in predicting the nature of peripheral zone hypoechoic lesions of the prostate. Ninety-one patients with peripheral zone hypoechoic lesions on ultrasound were evaluated with CETRUS followed by lesion-specific and sextant transrectal ultrasound-guided biopsies. The enhancement patterns of the lesions were observed and graded subjectively using adjacent peripheral zone tissue as the reference. Time to enhancement (AT), time to peak intensity (TTP) and peak intensity (PI) were quantified within each nodule. Ultrasound findings were correlated with biopsy findings. Transrectal ultrasound-guided biopsy of the hypoechoic lesions revealed prostate cancer in 44 patients and benign prostatic diseases in 47. The intensity of enhancement within the lesions were graded as no enhancement, increased, equal, or decreased compared with adjacent peripheral zone tissue in two, 30, five and seven in the prostate cancer group and 14, 15, four and 14 in the benign group, respectively. The difference was statistically significant (p<0.05). The peak enhancement intensity was found to be the most optimal discriminatory parameter (area under curve AUC 0.70; 95% CI: 0.58, 0.82). Malignant hypoechoic nodules in the peripheral zone of the prostate are more likely to enhance early and more intensely on CETRUS. A non-enhanced hypoechoic peripheral zone lesion was more likely to be benign.

  9. OVERALL PROCEDURES PROTOCOL AND PATIENT ENROLLMENT PROTOCOL: TESTING FEASIBILITY OF 3D ULTRASOUND DATA ACQUISITION AND RELIABILITY OF DATA RETRIEVAL FROM STORED 3D IMAGES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this study is to examine the feasibility of collecting, transmitting,

    and analyzing 3-D ultrasound data in the context of a multi-center study of pregnant

    women. The study will also examine the reliability of measurements obtained from 3-D

    imag...

  10. [Pain during transrectal ultrasound guided needle biopsy of the prostate: comparison of the use or not of lidocaine gel].

    PubMed

    Díaz Pérez, Gilmer A; Meza Montoya, Luis; Morante Deza, Carlos; Pow-Sang Godoy, Mariela; Destefano Urrutia, Víctor

    2009-02-01

    The prostate biopsy guided by ultrasound is the method of choice for early diagnosis of prostate cancer, is a safe whose main trouble is that it feels discomfort during the procedure. From July 2004 until March 2005 we prospectively studied 114 patients who underwent transrectal ultrasound guided needle biopsy of the prostate, they were divided in two groups: in one group we used lidocaina gel 2% inside the rectum before the procedure and in the other group we did not use it. We compared the pain that patients felt during the procedure with a pain scale. We did not find differences between both groups, but the patients in whom we used a new needle felt less pain than the patients in whom we used a re-esterilized one. The use of lidocaine gel intrarectal 2% before a prostate biopsy guided by ultrasound did not diminish the sensation of pain from the procedure in our patients, which was increased by the use of sterilized needles.

  11. Validity Study of Vertebral Rotation Measurement Using 3-D Ultrasound in Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qian; Li, Meng; Lou, Edmond H M; Chu, Winnie C W; Lam, Tsz-Ping; Cheng, Jack C Y; Wong, Man-Sang

    2016-07-01

    This study aimed to assess the validity of 3-D ultrasound measurements on the vertebral rotation of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) under clinical settings. Thirty curves (mean Cobb angle: 21.7° ± 15.9°) from 16 patients with AIS were recruited. 3-D ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging scans were performed at the supine position. Each of the two raters measured the apical vertebral rotation using the center of laminae (COL) method in the 3-D ultrasound images and the Aaro-Dahlborn method in the magnetic resonance images. The intra- and inter-reliability of the COL method was demonstrated by the intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) (both [2, K] >0.9, p < 0.05). The COL method showed no significant difference (p < 0.05) compared with the Aaro-Dahlborn method. Furthermore, the agreement between these two methods was demonstrated by the Bland-Altman method, and high correlation was found (r > 0.9, p < 0.05). These results validated the proposed 3-D ultrasound method in the measurements of vertebral rotation in the patients with AIS.

  12. Visualization of hepatic arteries with 3D ultrasound during intra-arterial therapies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gérard, Maxime; Tang, An; Badoual, Anaïs.; Michaud, François; Bigot, Alexandre; Soulez, Gilles; Kadoury, Samuel

    2016-03-01

    Liver cancer represents the second most common cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide. The prognosis is poor with an overall mortality of 95%. Moreover, most hepatic tumors are unresectable due to their advanced stage at discovery or poor underlying liver function. Tumor embolization by intra-arterial approaches is the current standard of care for advanced cases of hepatocellular carcinoma. These therapies rely on the fact that the blood supply of primary hepatic tumors is predominantly arterial. Feedback on blood flow velocities in the hepatic arteries is crucial to ensure maximal treatment efficacy on the targeted masses. Based on these velocities, the intra-arterial injection rate is modulated for optimal infusion of the chemotherapeutic drugs into the tumorous tissue. While Doppler ultrasound is a well-documented technique for the assessment of blood flow, 3D visualization of vascular anatomy with ultrasound remains challenging. In this paper we present an image-guidance pipeline that enables the localization of the hepatic arterial branches within a 3D ultrasound image of the liver. A diagnostic Magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) is first processed to automatically segment the hepatic arteries. A non-rigid registration method is then applied on the portal phase of the MRA volume with a 3D ultrasound to enable the visualization of the 3D mesh of the hepatic arteries in the Doppler images. To evaluate the performance of the proposed workflow, we present initial results from porcine models and patient images.

  13. Flow integration transform: detecting shapes in matrix-array 3D ultrasound data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stetten, George D.; Caines, Michael; von Ramm, Olaf T.

    1995-03-01

    Matrix-array ultrasound produces real-time 3D images of the heart, by employing a square array of transducers to steer the ultrasound beam in three dimensions electronically with no moving parts. Other 3D modalities such as MR, MUGA, and CT require the use of gated studies, which combine many cardiac cycles to produce a single average cycle. Three- dimensional ultrasound eliminates this restriction, in theory permitting the continuous measurement of cardiac ventricular volume, which we call the volumetricardiogram. Towards implementing the volumetricardiogram, we have developed the flow integration transform (FIT), which operates on a 2D slice within the volumetric ultrasound data. The 3D ultrasound machine's scan converter produces a set of such slices in real time, at any desired location and orientation, to which the FIT may then be applied. Although lacking rotational or scale invariance, the FIT is designed to operate in dedicated hardware where an entire transform could be completed within a few microseconds with present integrated circuit technology. This speed would permit the application of a large battery of test shapes, or the evolution of the test shape to converge on that of the actual target.

  14. Modeling of multi-view 3D freehand radio frequency ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Klein, T; Hansson, M; Navab, Nassir

    2012-01-01

    Nowadays ultrasound (US) examinations are typically performed with conventional machines providing two dimensional imagery. However, there exist a multitude of applications where doctors could benefit from three dimensional ultrasound providing better judgment, due to the extended spatial view. 3D freehand US allows acquisition of images by means of a tracking device attached to the ultrasound transducer. Unfortunately, view dependency makes the 3D representation of ultrasound a non-trivial task. To address this we model speckle statistics, in envelope-detected radio frequency (RF) data, using a finite mixture model (FMM), assuming a parametric representation of data, in which the multiple views are treated as components of the FMM. The proposed model is show-cased with registration, using an ultrasound specific distribution based pseudo-distance, and reconstruction tasks, performed on the manifold of Gamma model parameters. Example field of application is neurology using transcranial US, as this domain requires high accuracy and data systematically features low SNR, making intensity based registration difficult. In particular, 3D US can be specifically used to improve differential diagnosis of Parkinson's disease (PD) compared to conventional approaches and is therefore of high relevance for future application.

  15. Real-time 3D ultrasound imaging of infant tongue movements during breast-feeding.

    PubMed

    Burton, Pat; Deng, Jing; McDonald, Daren; Fewtrell, Mary S

    2013-09-01

    Whether infants use suction or peristaltic tongue movements or a combination to extract milk during breast-feeding is controversial. The aims of this pilot study were 1] to evaluate the feasibility of using 3D ultrasound scanning to visualise infant tongue movements; and 2] to ascertain whether peristaltic tongue movements could be demonstrated during breast-feeding. 15 healthy term infants, aged 2 weeks to 4 months were scanned during breast-feeding, using a real-time 3D ultrasound system, with a 7 MHz transducer placed sub-mentally. 1] The method proved feasible, with 72% of bi-plane datasets and 56% of real-time 3D datasets providing adequate coverage [>75%] of the infant tongue. 2] Peristaltic tongue movement was observed in 13 of 15 infants [83%] from real-time or reformatted truly mid-sagittal views under 3D guidance. This is the first study to demonstrate the feasibility of using 3D ultrasound to visualise infant tongue movements during breast-feeding. Peristaltic infant tongue movement was present in the majority of infants when the image plane was truly mid-sagittal but was not apparent if the image was slightly off the mid-sagittal plane. This should be considered in studies investigating the relative importance of vacuum and peristalsis for milk transfer. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. A non-disruptive technology for robust 3D tool tracking for ultrasound-guided interventions.

    PubMed

    Mung, Jay; Vignon, Francois; Jain, Ameet

    2011-01-01

    In the past decade ultrasound (US) has become the preferred modality for a number of interventional procedures, offering excellent soft tissue visualization. The main limitation however is limited visualization of surgical tools. A new method is proposed for robust 3D tracking and US image enhancement of surgical tools under US guidance. Small US sensors are mounted on existing surgical tools. As the imager emits acoustic energy, the electrical signal from the sensor is analyzed to reconstruct its 3D coordinates. These coordinates can then be used for 3D surgical navigation, similar to current day tracking systems. A system with real-time 3D tool tracking and image enhancement was implemented on a commercial ultrasound scanner and 3D probe. Extensive water tank experiments with a tracked 0.2mm sensor show robust performance in a wide range of imaging conditions and tool position/orientations. The 3D tracking accuracy was 0.36 +/- 0.16mm throughout the imaging volume of 55 degrees x 27 degrees x 150mm. Additionally, the tool was successfully tracked inside a beating heart phantom. This paper proposes an image enhancement and tool tracking technology with sub-mm accuracy for US-guided interventions. The technology is non-disruptive, both in terms of existing clinical workflow and commercial considerations, showing promise for large scale clinical impact.

  17. Variational approach to reconstruct surface from sparse and nonparallel contours in freehand 3D ultrasound imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Shuangcheng; Jiang, Lipei; Cao, Yingyu; Zhang, Junwen; Zheng, Haiyang

    2012-01-01

    The 3D reconstruction for freehand 3D ultrasound is a challenging issue because the recorded B-scans are not only sparse, but also non-parallel (actually they may intersect each other). Conventional volume reconstruction methods can't reconstruct sparse data efficiently while not introducing geometrical artifacts, and conventional surface reconstruction methods can't reconstruct surfaces from contours that are arbitrarily oriented in 3D space. We developed a new surface reconstruction method for freehand 3D ultrasound. It is based on variational implicit function which is presented by Greg Turk for shape transformation. In the new method, we first constructed on- & off-surface constraints from the segmented contours of all recorded B-scans, then used a variational interpolation technique to get a single implicit function in 3D. Finally, the implicit function was evaluated to extract the zero-valued surface as reconstruction result. Two experiment was conducted to assess our variational surface reconstruction method, and the experiment results have shown that the new method is capable of reconstructing surface smoothly from sparse contours which can be arbitrarily oriented in 3D space.

  18. Optimization of real-time rigid registration motion compensation for prostate biopsies using 2D/3D ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillies, Derek J.; Gardi, Lori; Zhao, Ren; Fenster, Aaron

    2017-03-01

    During image-guided prostate biopsy, needles are targeted at suspicious tissues to obtain specimens that are later examined histologically for cancer. Patient motion causes inaccuracies when using MR-transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) image fusion approaches used to augment the conventional biopsy procedure. Motion compensation using a single, user initiated correction can be performed to temporarily compensate for prostate motion, but a real-time continuous registration offers an improvement to clinical workflow by reducing user interaction and procedure time. An automatic motion compensation method, approaching the frame rate of a TRUS-guided system, has been developed for use during fusion-based prostate biopsy to improve image guidance. 2D and 3D TRUS images of a prostate phantom were registered using an intensity based algorithm utilizing normalized cross-correlation and Powell's method for optimization with user initiated and continuous registration techniques. The user initiated correction performed with observed computation times of 78 ± 35 ms, 74 ± 28 ms, and 113 ± 49 ms for in-plane, out-of-plane, and roll motions, respectively, corresponding to errors of 0.5 ± 0.5 mm, 1.5 ± 1.4 mm, and 1.5 ± 1.6°. The continuous correction performed significantly faster (p < 0.05) than the user initiated method, with observed computation times of 31 ± 4 ms, 32 ± 4 ms, and 31 ± 6 ms for in-plane, out-of-plane, and roll motions, respectively, corresponding to errors of 0.2 ± 0.2 mm, 0.6 ± 0.5 mm, and 0.8 ± 0.4°.

  19. Tubular Enhanced Geodesic Active Contours for Continuum Robot Detection using 3D Ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Ren, Hongliang; Dupont, Pierre E

    2012-01-01

    Three dimensional ultrasound is a promising imaging modality for minimally invasive robotic surgery. As the robots are typically metallic, they interact strongly with the sound waves in ways that are not modeled by the ultrasound system's signal processing algorithms. Consequently, they produce substantial imaging artifacts that can make image guidance difficult, even for experienced surgeons. This paper introduces a new approach for detecting curved continuum robots in 3D ultrasound images. The proposed approach combines geodesic active contours with a speed function that is based on enhancing the "tubularity" of the continuum robot. In particular, it takes advantage of the known robot diameter along its length. It also takes advantage of the fact that the robot surface facing the ultrasound probe provides the most accurate image. This method, termed Tubular Enhanced Geodesic Active Contours (TEGAC), is demonstrated through ex vivo intracardiac experiments to offer superior performance compared to conventional active contours.

  20. Passive Markers for Tracking Surgical Instruments in Real-Time 3-D Ultrasound Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Stoll, Jeffrey; Ren, Hongliang; Dupont, Pierre E.

    2013-01-01

    A family of passive echogenic markers is presented by which the position and orientation of a surgical instrument can be determined in a 3-D ultrasound volume, using simple image processing. Markers are attached near the distal end of the instrument so that they appear in the ultrasound volume along with the instrument tip. They are detected and measured within the ultrasound image, thus requiring no external tracking device. This approach facilitates imaging instruments and tissue simultaneously in ultrasound-guided interventions. Marker-based estimates of instrument pose can be used in augmented reality displays or for image-based servoing. Design principles for marker shapes are presented that ensure imaging system and measurement uniqueness constraints are met. An error analysis is included that can be used to guide marker design and which also establishes a lower bound on measurement uncertainty. Finally, examples of marker measurement and tracking algorithms are presented along with experimental validation of the concepts. PMID:22042148

  1. Tubular Enhanced Geodesic Active Contours for Continuum Robot Detection using 3D Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Hongliang; Dupont, Pierre E.

    2013-01-01

    Three dimensional ultrasound is a promising imaging modality for minimally invasive robotic surgery. As the robots are typically metallic, they interact strongly with the sound waves in ways that are not modeled by the ultrasound system’s signal processing algorithms. Consequently, they produce substantial imaging artifacts that can make image guidance difficult, even for experienced surgeons. This paper introduces a new approach for detecting curved continuum robots in 3D ultrasound images. The proposed approach combines geodesic active contours with a speed function that is based on enhancing the “tubularity” of the continuum robot. In particular, it takes advantage of the known robot diameter along its length. It also takes advantage of the fact that the robot surface facing the ultrasound probe provides the most accurate image. This method, termed Tubular Enhanced Geodesic Active Contours (TEGAC), is demonstrated through ex vivo intracardiac experiments to offer superior performance compared to conventional active contours. PMID:24231880

  2. Passive markers for tracking surgical instruments in real-time 3-D ultrasound imaging.

    PubMed

    Stoll, Jeffrey; Ren, Hongliang; Dupont, Pierre E

    2012-03-01

    A family of passive echogenic markers is presented by which the position and orientation of a surgical instrument can be determined in a 3-D ultrasound volume, using simple image processing. Markers are attached near the distal end of the instrument so that they appear in the ultrasound volume along with the instrument tip. They are detected and measured within the ultrasound image, thus requiring no external tracking device. This approach facilitates imaging instruments and tissue simultaneously in ultrasound-guided interventions. Marker-based estimates of instrument pose can be used in augmented reality displays or for image-based servoing. Design principles for marker shapes are presented that ensure imaging system and measurement uniqueness constraints are met. An error analysis is included that can be used to guide marker design and which also establishes a lower bound on measurement uncertainty. Finally, examples of marker measurement and tracking algorithms are presented along with experimental validation of the concepts.

  3. [Use of intrarectal lidocaine gel in ultrasound-guided transrectal biopsies of the prostate].

    PubMed

    García Mediero, J M; Martínez-Piñeiro Lorenzo, L; Núñez Mora, C; de Fata Chillón, F Ramón; Cruz Jimeno, J L; Alonso y Gregorio, S; de la Peña Barthel, J J

    2003-01-01

    To know in a quantitative manner the degree of discomfort and pain of the biopsies of the prostate and to evaluate the effectiveness of the transrectal lidocaine. We performed 140 transrectal biopsies of the prostate, Patients were included on a random basis into two arms: one of them received intrarectal lidocaine, 20 mg (group 1, n = 71) and the other group received placebo (group 2, n = 28) both of them ten minutes prior the proceeding. The global pain mean was 3.7 (0 no pain, 10 highest pain) and the global discomfort mean was 3.5. The group 1 patients showed a trend to feel less pain and discomfort although it did not reach the necessary statistic significance (p = 0.7 y p = 0.5 respectively). We do not achieve the good results obtained by other groups in order to decrease the degree of pain and discomfort with the use of intrarectal lidocaine. We did not find relationship between the PSA level, previous biopsies, intrarectal lidocaina and degree of information received and the degree of pain and discomfort.

  4. Multi-resolution Gabor wavelet feature extraction for needle detection in 3D ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pourtaherian, Arash; Zinger, Svitlana; Mihajlovic, Nenad; de With, Peter H. N.; Huang, Jinfeng; Ng, Gary C.; Korsten, Hendrikus H. M.

    2015-12-01

    Ultrasound imaging is employed for needle guidance in various minimally invasive procedures such as biopsy guidance, regional anesthesia and brachytherapy. Unfortunately, a needle guidance using 2D ultrasound is very challenging, due to a poor needle visibility and a limited field of view. Nowadays, 3D ultrasound systems are available and more widely used. Consequently, with an appropriate 3D image-based needle detection technique, needle guidance and interventions may significantly be improved and simplified. In this paper, we present a multi-resolution Gabor transformation for an automated and reliable extraction of the needle-like structures in a 3D ultrasound volume. We study and identify the best combination of the Gabor wavelet frequencies. High precision in detecting the needle voxels leads to a robust and accurate localization of the needle for the intervention support. Evaluation in several ex-vivo cases shows that the multi-resolution analysis significantly improves the precision of the needle voxel detection from 0.23 to 0.32 at a high recall rate of 0.75 (gain 40%), where a better robustness and confidence were confirmed in the practical experiments.

  5. Transrectal Ultrasound-Integrated Spectral Optical Tomography of Hypoxic Progression of a Regressing Tumor in a Canine Prostate

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Z.; Piao, D.; Bartels, K. E.; Holyoak, G. R.; Ritchey, J. W.; Ownby, C. L.; Rock, K.; Slobodov, G.

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate if transrectal optical tomography implemented at three wavelength bands for spectral detection could monitor changes of the hemoglobin oxygen saturation (StO2) in addition to those of the total hemoglobin concentration ([HbT]) in lesions of a canine prostate, including an induced tumor modeling canine prostate cancer. Near-infrared (NIR) optical tomography was integrated with ultrasound (US) for transrectal imaging. Multi-spectral detection at 705 nm, 785 nm and 808 nm rendered measurements of [HbT] and StO2. Canine transmissible venereal tumor (TVT) cells were injected into the right lobe of a dog's prostate gland, which had a pre-existing cyst in the left lobe. Longitudinal assessments of the prostate were performed weekly over a 63-day duration by NIR imaging concurrent with grey-scale and Doppler US. Ultrasonography revealed a bi-lobular tumor-mass regressing from day-49 to day-63. At day-49 this tumor-mass developed a hypoxic core that became larger and more intense by day-56 and expanded further by day-63. The tumor-mass presented a strong hyper-[HbT] feature on day-56 that was inconsistent with US-visualized blood flow. Histology confirmed two necrotic TVT foci within this tumor-mass. The cyst appeared to have a large anoxic-like interior that was greater in size than its ultrasonographically delineated lesion, and a weak lesional elevation of [HbT]. On day-56, the cyst presented a strong hyper-[HbT] feature consistent with US-resolved blood flow. Histology revealed acute and chronic hemorrhage in the periphery of the cyst. The NIR imaging features of two other TVT nodules and a metastatic lymph node were evaluated retrospectively. Transrectal US-integrated spectral optical tomography seems to enable longitudinal monitoring of intra-lesional oxygenation dynamics in addition to the hemoglobin content of lesions in the canine prostate. PMID:22066593

  6. Distributed network, wireless and cloud computing enabled 3-D ultrasound; a new medical technology paradigm.

    PubMed

    Meir, Arie; Rubinsky, Boris

    2009-11-19

    Medical technologies are indispensable to modern medicine. However, they have become exceedingly expensive and complex and are not available to the economically disadvantaged majority of the world population in underdeveloped as well as developed parts of the world. For example, according to the World Health Organization about two thirds of the world population does not have access to medical imaging. In this paper we introduce a new medical technology paradigm centered on wireless technology and cloud computing that was designed to overcome the problems of increasing health technology costs. We demonstrate the value of the concept with an example; the design of a wireless, distributed network and central (cloud) computing enabled three-dimensional (3-D) ultrasound system. Specifically, we demonstrate the feasibility of producing a 3-D high end ultrasound scan at a central computing facility using the raw data acquired at the remote patient site with an inexpensive low end ultrasound transducer designed for 2-D, through a mobile device and wireless connection link between them. Producing high-end 3D ultrasound images with simple low-end transducers reduces the cost of imaging by orders of magnitude. It also removes the requirement of having a highly trained imaging expert at the patient site, since the need for hand-eye coordination and the ability to reconstruct a 3-D mental image from 2-D scans, which is a necessity for high quality ultrasound imaging, is eliminated. This could enable relatively untrained medical workers in developing nations to administer imaging and a more accurate diagnosis, effectively saving the lives of people.

  7. Postprostatectomy ultrasound-guided transrectal implantation of gold markers for external beam radiotherapy. Technique and complications rate.

    PubMed

    Langenhuijsen, J F; Donker, R; McColl, G M; Kiemeney, L A L M; Witjes, J A; van Lin, E N J T

    2013-06-01

    Postprostatectomy radiotherapy (RT) improves survival in adjuvant and salvage settings. The implantation technique and complications rate of gold markers in the prostate bed for high-precision RT were analyzed. Patients undergoing postprostatectomy RT for prostate-specific antigen (PSA) relapse or high-risk disease were enrolled in the study. Under transrectal ultrasound guidance, three fine gold markers were implanted in the prostate bed and the technical difficulties of insertion were documented. Patients received our self-designed questionnaires concerning complications and pain. The influence of anticoagulants and coumarins on bleeding was analyzed, as was the effect of potential risk factors on pain. In 77 consecutive patients, failure of marker implantation or marker migration was seen in six cases. Rectal bleeding was reported by 10 patients and 1 had voiding complaints. No macroscopic hematuria persisting for more than 3 days was observed. Other complications included rectal discomfort (n = 2), nausea (n = 1), abdominal discomfort (n = 1), and pain requiring analgesics (n = 4). No major complications were reported. On a 0-10 visual analogue scale (VAS), the mean pain score was 3.7. No clinically significant risk factors for complications were identified. Transrectal implantation of gold markers in the prostate bed is feasible and safe. Alternatives like cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) should be considered, but the advantages of gold marker implantation for high-precision postprostatectomy RT would seem to outweigh the minor risks involved.

  8. Thyroid gland visualization with 3D/4D ultrasound: integrated hands-on imaging in anatomical dissection laboratory.

    PubMed

    Carter, John L; Patel, Ankura; Hocum, Gabriel; Benninger, Brion

    2017-05-01

    In teaching anatomy, clinical imaging has been utilized to supplement the traditional dissection laboratory promoting education through visualization of spatial relationships of anatomical structures. Viewing the thyroid gland using 3D/4D ultrasound can be valuable to physicians as well as students learning anatomy. The objective of this study was to investigate the perceptions of first-year medical students regarding the integration of 3D/4D ultrasound visualization of spatial anatomy during anatomical education. 108 first-year medical students were introduced to 3D/4D ultrasound imaging of the thyroid gland through a detailed 20-min tutorial taught in small group format. Students then practiced 3D/4D ultrasound imaging on volunteers and donor cadavers before assessment through acquisition and identification of thyroid gland on at least three instructor-verified images. A post-training survey was administered assessing student impression. All students visualized the thyroid gland using 3D/4D ultrasound. Students revealed 88.0% strongly agreed or agreed 3D/4D ultrasound is useful revealing the thyroid gland and surrounding structures and 87.0% rated the experience "Very Easy" or "Easy", demonstrating benefits and ease of use including 3D/4D ultrasound in anatomy courses. When asked, students felt 3D/4D ultrasound is useful in teaching the structure and surrounding anatomy of the thyroid gland, they overwhelmingly responded "Strongly Agree" or "Agree" (90.2%). This study revealed that 3D/4D ultrasound was successfully used and preferred over 2D ultrasound by medical students during anatomy dissection courses to accurately identify the thyroid gland. In addition, 3D/4D ultrasound may nurture and further reinforce stereostructural spatial relationships of the thyroid gland taught during anatomy dissection.

  9. Integrated Interventional Devices For Real Time 3D Ultrasound Imaging and Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Stephen W.; Lee, Warren; Gentry, Kenneth L.; Pua, Eric C.; Light, Edward D.

    2006-05-01

    Two recent advances have expanded the potential of medical ultrasound: the introduction of real-time 3-D ultrasound imaging with catheter, transesophageal and laparoscopic probes and the development of interventional ultrasound therapeutic systems for focused ultrasound surgery, ablation and ultrasound enhanced drug delivery. This work describes devices combining both technologies. A series of transducer probes have been designed, fabricated and tested including: 1) a 12 French side scanning catheter incorporating a 64 element matrix array for imaging at 5MHz and a piston ablation transducer operating at 10 MHz. 2) a 14 Fr forward-scanning catheter integrating a 112 element 2-D array for imaging at 5 MHz encircled by an ablation annulus operating at 10 MHz. Finite element modeling was then used to simulate catheter annular and linear phased array transducers for ablation. 3) Linear phased array transducers were built to confirm the finite element analysis at 4 and 8 MHz including a mechanically focused 86 element 9 MHz array which transmits an ISPTA of 29.3 W/cm2 and creates a lesion in 2 minutes. 4) 2-D arrays of 504 channels operating at 5 MHz have been developed for transesophageal and laparascopic 3D imaging as well as therapeutic heating. All the devices image the heart anatomy including atria, valves, septa and en face views of the pulmonary veins.

  10. Reconfigurable 2D cMUT-ASIC arrays for 3D ultrasound image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Jongkeun; Jung, Sungjin; Kim, Youngil; Cho, Kyungil; Kim, Baehyung; Lee, Seunghun; Na, Junseok; Yang, Ikseok; Kwon, Oh-kyong; Kim, Dongwook

    2012-03-01

    This paper describes the design and implementations of the complete 2D capacitive micromachined ultrasound transducer electronics and its analog front-end module for transmitting high voltage ultrasound pulses and receiving its echo signals to realize 3D ultrasound image. In order to minimize parasitic capacitances and ultimately improve signal-to- noise ratio (SNR), cMUT has to be integrate with Tx/Rx electronics. Additionally, in order to integrate 2D cMUT array module, significant optimized high voltage pulser circuitry, low voltage analog/digital circuit design and packaging challenges are required due to high density of elements and small pitch of each element. We designed 256(16x16)- element cMUT and reconfigurable driving ASIC composed of 120V high voltage pulser, T/R switch, low noise preamplifier and digital control block to set Tx frequency of ultrasound and pulse train in each element. Designed high voltage analog ASIC was successfully bonded with 2D cMUT array by flip-chip bonding process and it connected with analog front-end board to transmit pulse-echo signals. This implementation of reconfigurable cMUT-ASIC-AFE board enables us to produce large aperture 2D transducer array and acquire high quality of 3D ultrasound image.

  11. The application of transabdominal 3D ultrasound for the diagnosis of gastric varices: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Maruyama, Hitoshi; Kamezaki, Hidehiro; Kondo, Takayuki; Sekimoto, Tadashi; Shimada, Taro; Takahashi, Masanori; Yokosuka, Osamu

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the feasibility of using transabdominal three-dimensional (3D) colour Doppler ultrasound as a non-invasive tool to demonstrate and quantify gastric varices. A phantom study compared the 3D water flow volume data in a hose with the actual volume inside the hose at three different flow velocities. The prospective clinical study examined the reliability and reproducibility of 3D volume data for gastric varices (mild 28, moderate 26, large 8) in 62 patients. The 3D images were acquired using the colour Doppler with both convex and micro-convex probes. The phantom study showed a 12.4-17.6% difference between the 3D data and the actual volume with no difference between the two types of probes or three velocities. The detectability of gastric varices was identical between the two probes (54/62, 87.1%). However, the scanning efficiency was significantly greater for the micro-convex probe (66.9 ± 14.1%) than the convex probe (57.3 ± 14%, p=0.012). Body mass index was the only factor that had a significant relationship with the detectability of varices. The mean volume (mL) of the 3D signal was 0.82 ± 0.74 for mild varices, 5.48 ± 3.84 for moderate varices, and 10.63 ± 6.67 for large varices with significant differences between different grades. The intra-/inter-rater reliability was excellent. The method of 3D colour Doppler ultrasound is reliable and reproducible in the quantitative assessment of vascular volume and is applicable for grading gastric varices. This study may offer a practical usefulness for 3D ultrasonography as an alternative to endoscopy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Reconstruction of 3D ultrasound images based on Cyclic Regularized Savitzky-Golay filters.

    PubMed

    Toonkum, Pollakrit; Suwanwela, Nijasri C; Chinrungrueng, Chedsada

    2011-02-01

    This paper presents a new three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound reconstruction algorithm for generation of 3D images from a series of two-dimensional (2D) B-scans acquired in the mechanical linear scanning framework. Unlike most existing 3D ultrasound reconstruction algorithms, which have been developed and evaluated in the freehand scanning framework, the new algorithm has been designed to capitalize the regularity pattern of the mechanical linear scanning, where all the B-scan slices are precisely parallel and evenly spaced. The new reconstruction algorithm, referred to as the Cyclic Regularized Savitzky-Golay (CRSG) filter, is a new variant of the Savitzky-Golay (SG) smoothing filter. The CRSG filter has been improved upon the original SG filter in two respects: First, the cyclic indicator function has been incorporated into the least square cost function to enable the CRSG filter to approximate nonuniformly spaced data of the unobserved image intensities contained in unfilled voxels and reduce speckle noise of the observed image intensities contained in filled voxels. Second, the regularization function has been augmented to the least squares cost function as a mechanism to balance between the degree of speckle reduction and the degree of detail preservation. The CRSG filter has been evaluated and compared with the Voxel Nearest-Neighbor (VNN) interpolation post-processed by the Adaptive Speckle Reduction (ASR) filter, the VNN interpolation post-processed by the Adaptive Weighted Median (AWM) filter, the Distance-Weighted (DW) interpolation, and the Adaptive Distance-Weighted (ADW) interpolation, on reconstructing a synthetic 3D spherical image and a clinical 3D carotid artery bifurcation in the mechanical linear scanning framework. This preliminary evaluation indicates that the CRSG filter is more effective in both speckle reduction and geometric reconstruction of 3D ultrasound images than the other methods. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Development of a 3D ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cool, Derek; Sherebrin, Shi; Izawa, Jonathan; Fenster, Aaron

    2007-03-01

    Biopsy of the prostate using ultrasound guidance is the clinical gold standard for diagnosis of prostate adenocarinoma. However, because early stage tumors are rarely visible under US, the procedure carries high false-negative rates and often patients require multiple biopsies before cancer is detected. To improve cancer detection, it is imperative that throughout the biopsy procedure, physicians know where they are within the prostate and where they have sampled during prior biopsies. The current biopsy procedure is limited to using only 2D ultrasound images to find and record target biopsy core sample sites. This information leaves ambiguity as the physician tries to interpret the 2D information and apply it to their 3D workspace. We have developed a 3D ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy system that provides 3D intra-biopsy information to physicians for needle guidance and biopsy location recording. The system is designed to conform to the workflow of the current prostate biopsy procedure, making it easier for clinical integration. In this paper, we describe the system design and validate its accuracy by performing an in vitro biopsy procedure on US/CT multi-modal patient-specific prostate phantoms. A clinical sextant biopsy was performed by a urologist on the phantoms and the 3D models of the prostates were generated with volume errors less than 4% and mean boundary errors of less than 1 mm. Using the 3D biopsy system, needles were guided to within 1.36 +/- 0.83 mm of 3D targets and the position of the biopsy sites were accurately localized to 1.06 +/- 0.89 mm for the two prostates.

  14. Accurate Diagnosis of Severe Hypospadias Using 2D and 3D Ultrasounds

    PubMed Central

    López Ramón y Cajal, Carlos; Marín Ortiz, Elena; Sarmiento Carrera, Nerea

    2016-01-01

    The hypospadias is the most common urogenital anomaly of male neonates but the prenatal diagnosis of this is often missed before birth. We present the prenatal diagnosis of a severe penoscrotal hypospadias using 2D and 3D ultrasounds. 3D sonography allowed us the best evaluation of the genitals and their anatomical relations. This ample detailed study allowed us to show the findings to the parents and the pediatric surgeon and to configure the best information about the prognosis and surgical treatment. PMID:27774326

  15. 3D Ultrasound Guidance of Autonomous Robotic Breast Biopsy: Feasibility Study

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Kaicheng; Rogers, Albert J.; Light, Edward D.; von Allmen, Daniel; Smith, Stephen W.

    2009-01-01

    Feasibility studies of autonomous robot biopsies in tissue have been conducted using real time 3D ultrasound combined with simple thresholding algorithms. The robot first autonomously processed 3D image volumes received from the ultrasound scanner to locate a metal rod target embedded in turkey breast tissue simulating a calcification, and in a separate experiment, the center of a water-filled void in the breast tissue simulating a cyst. In both experiments the robot then directed a needle to the desired target, with no user input required. Separate needle-touch experiments performed by the image-guided robot in a water tank yielded an rms error of 1.15 mm. PMID:19900753

  16. 2D array transducers for real-time 3D ultrasound guidance of interventional devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Light, Edward D.; Smith, Stephen W.

    2009-02-01

    We describe catheter ring arrays for real-time 3D ultrasound guidance of devices such as vascular grafts, heart valves and vena cava filters. We have constructed several prototypes operating at 5 MHz and consisting of 54 elements using the W.L. Gore & Associates, Inc. micro-miniature ribbon cables. We have recently constructed a new transducer using a braided wiring technology from Precision Interconnect. This transducer consists of 54 elements at 4.8 MHz with pitch of 0.20 mm and typical -6 dB bandwidth of 22%. In all cases, the transducer and wiring assembly were integrated with an 11 French catheter of a Cook Medical deployment device for vena cava filters. Preliminary in vivo and in vitro testing is ongoing including simultaneous 3D ultrasound and x-ray fluoroscopy.

  17. Registration of Real-Time 3-D Ultrasound to Tomographic Images of the Abdominal Aorta.

    PubMed

    Brekken, Reidar; Iversen, Daniel Høyer; Tangen, Geir Arne; Dahl, Torbjørn

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop an image-based method for registration of real-time 3-D ultrasound to computed tomography (CT) of the abdominal aorta, targeting future use in ultrasound-guided endovascular intervention. We proposed a method in which a surface model of the aortic wall was segmented from CT, and the approximate initial location of this model relative to the ultrasound volume was manually indicated. The model was iteratively transformed to automatically optimize correspondence to the ultrasound data. Feasibility was studied using data from a silicon phantom and in vivo data from a volunteer with previously acquired CT. Through visual evaluation, the ultrasound and CT data were seen to correspond well after registration. Both aortic lumen and branching arteries were well aligned. The processing was done offline, and the registration took approximately 0.2 s per ultrasound volume. The results encourage further patient studies to investigate accuracy, robustness and clinical value of the approach.

  18. [A 3D-ultrasound imaging system based on back-end scanning mode].

    PubMed

    Qi, Jian; Chen, Yimin; Ding, Mingyue; Wei, Chiming

    2012-07-01

    A new scanning mode is proposed that the front-end of the probe is fixed, while the back-end makes fan-shaped, scanning movement. The new scanning mode avoided ribs drawbacks successfully. Based on the new scanning mode a 3D-Ultrasound Images System is accomplished to acquire 2D data of fetusfetus fetusfetus phantom and livers and kidneys, to demonstrates the effectiveness of the new scanning mode.

  19. Different optical spectral characteristics in a necrotic transmissible venereal tumor and a cystic lesion in the same canine prostate observed by triple-band trans-rectal optical tomography under trans-rectal ultrasound guidance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Zhen; Holyoak, G. Reed; Ritchey, Jerry W.; Bartels, Kenneth E.; Rock, Kendra; Ownby, Charlotte L.; Slobodov, Gennady; Bunting, Charles F.; Piao, Daqing

    2011-03-01

    Different optical spectral characteristics were observed in a necrotic transmissible venereal tumor (TVT) and a cystic lesion in the same canine prostate by triple-wavelength trans-rectal optical tomography under trans-rectal ultrasound (TRUS) guidance. The NIR imager acquiring at 705nm, 785nm and 808nm was used to quantify both the total hemoglobin concentration (HbT) and oxygen saturation (StO2) in the prostate. The TVT tumor in the canine prostate as a model of prostate cancer was induced in a 7-year old, 27 kg dog. A 2 mL suspension of 2.5x106 cells/mL of homogenized TVT cells recovered from an in vivo subcutaneously propagated TVT tumor in an NOD/SCID mouse were injected in the cranial aspect of the right lobe of the canine prostate. The left lobe of the prostate had a cystic lesion present before TVT inoculation. After the TVT homogenate injection, the prostate was monitored weekly over a 9-week period, using trans-rectal NIR and TRUS in grey-scale and Doppler. A TVT mass within the right lobe developed a necrotic center during the later stages of this study, as the mass presented with substantially increased [HbT] in the periphery, with an area of reduced StO2 less than the area of the mass itself shown on ultrasonography. Conversely, the cystic lesion presented with slightly increased [HbT] in the periphery of the lesion shown on ultrasound with oxygen-reduction inside and in the periphery of the lesion. There was no detectable change of blood flow on Doppler US in the periphery of the cystic lesion. The slightly increased [HbT] in the periphery of the cystic lesion was correlated with intra-lesional hemorrhage upon histopathologic examination.

  20. Complications of transrectal ultrasound-guided 12-core prostate biopsy: a single center experience with 2049 patients

    PubMed Central

    Efesoy, Ozan; Bozlu, Murat; Çayan, Selahittin; Akbay, Erdem

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Currently, transrectal ultrasound-guided (TRUS) systematic prostate biopsy is the standard procedure in the diagnosis of prostate cancer. Although TRUS-guided prostate biopsy is a safe method, it is an invasive procedure that is not free from complications. In this prospective study we evaluated the complications of a TRUS-guided 12-core prostate biopsy. Material and methods: The study included 2049 patients undergoing transrectal ultrasound-guided 12-core prostate biopsy used in the diagnosis of prostate cancer. The indications for the prostate biopsy were abnormal digital rectal examination findings and/or an elevated serum total prostate specific antigen (PSA) level (greater than 4 ng/mL). The participants received prophylactic oral ciprofloxacin (500 mg) the night before and the morning of the biopsy, followed by 500 mg orally twice daily for 2 days. To prevent development of voiding disorders, the patients also received oral alpha blockers for 30 days starting the day before the procedure. A Fleet enema was self-administered the night before the procedure for rectal cleansing. The complications were assessed both 10 days and 1 month after the biopsy. Results: The mean age, serum total PSA level and prostate volume of the patients were 65.4±9.6 years, 18.6±22.4 ng/mL and 51.3±22.4 cc, respectively. From these 2.042 biopsies, 596 cases (29.1%) were histopathologically diagnosed as prostate adenocarcinoma. Minor complications, such as hematuria (66.3%), hematospermia (38.8%), rectal bleeding (28.4%), mild to moderate degrees of vasovagal episodes (7.7%), and genitourinary tract infection (6.1%) were noted frequently. Major complications were rare and included urosepsis (0.5%), rectal bleeding requiring intervention (0.3%), acute urinary retention (0.3%), hematuria necessitating transfusion (0.05%), Fournier’s gangrene (0.05%), and myocardial infarction (0.05%). Conclusion: TRUS-guided prostate biopsy is safe for diagnosing prostate cancer with few

  1. Top-orthogonal-to-bottom-electrode (TOBE) CMUT arrays for 3-D ultrasound imaging.

    PubMed

    Sampaleanu, Alex; Zhang, Peiyu; Kshirsagar, Abhijeet; Moussa, Walied; Zemp, Roger J

    2014-02-01

    Two-dimensional ultrasound arrays hold great promise for 3-D imaging; however, wiring of each channel becomes impractical for large arrays or for small-footprint catheter probes for which the number of wires must be limited. Capacitive micromachined ultrasound transducers offer a promising solution for such 2-D array applications, but channel routing is still non-trivial. A top-orthogonal-to-bottom-electrode (TOBE) 2-D CMUT array architecture is presented along with row-column addressing schemes for low-channel-count 3-D ultrasound imaging. An N × N TOBE array is capable of obtaining 3-D images using only 2N channels. An interfacing scheme is presented in which transmit-receive signals are routed along rows while bias voltages are applied along columns, effectively allowing for single-element transmit/receive control. Simulations demonstrated potentially finer resolution and improved side lobe suppression over a previously published row-column-based imaging method. Laser vibrometer testing was done to measure membrane displacement in air and confirmed that single-element air-coupled actuation in transmit mode could be achieved using our proposed interfacing scheme. Acoustic testing was also performed in both transmit and receive modes to characterize the ability of the proposed interfacing scheme to achieve dominant-element transmission and reception in immersion operation. It was seen that membrane displacement in both modes was indeed largely confined to the active area.

  2. Real-time 3D target tracking in MRI guided focused ultrasound ablations in moving tissues.

    PubMed

    Ries, Mario; de Senneville, Baudouin Denis; Roujol, Sébastien; Berber, Yasmina; Quesson, Bruno; Moonen, Chrit

    2010-12-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging-guided high intensity focused ultrasound is a promising method for the noninvasive ablation of pathological tissue in abdominal organs such as liver and kidney. Due to the high perfusion rates of these organs, sustained sonications are required to achieve a sufficiently high temperature elevation to induce necrosis. However, the constant displacement of the target due to the respiratory cycle render continuous ablations challenging, since dynamic repositioning of the focal point is required. This study demonstrates subsecond 3D high intensity focused ultrasound-beam steering under magnetic resonance-guidance for the real-time compensation of respiratory motion. The target is observed in 3D space by coupling rapid 2D magnetic resonance-imaging with prospective slice tracking based on pencil-beam navigator echoes. The magnetic resonance-data is processed in real-time by a computationally efficient reconstruction pipeline, which provides the position, the temperature and the thermal dose on-the-fly, and which feeds corrections into the high intensity focused ultrasound-ablator. The effect of the residual update latency is reduced by using a 3D Kalman-predictor for trajectory anticipation. The suggested method is characterized with phantom experiments and verified in vivo on porcine kidney. The results show that for update frequencies of more than 10 Hz and latencies of less then 114 msec, temperature elevations can be achieved, which are comparable to static experiments. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  3. 3D ocular ultrasound using gaze tracking on the contralateral eye: a feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Afsham, Narges; Najafi, Mohammad; Abolmaesumi, Purang; Rohling, Robert

    2011-01-01

    A gaze-deviated examination of the eye with a 2D ultrasound transducer is a common and informative ophthalmic test; however, the complex task of the pose estimation of the ultrasound images relative to the eye affects 3D interpretation. To tackle this challenge, a novel system for 3D image reconstruction based on gaze tracking of the contralateral eye has been proposed. The gaze fixates on several target points and, for each fixation, the pose of the examined eye is inferred from the gaze tracking. A single camera system has been developed for pose estimation combined with subject-specific parameter identification. The ultrasound images are then transformed to the coordinate system of the examined eye to create a 3D volume. Accuracy of the proposed gaze tracking system and the pose estimation of the eye have been validated in a set of experiments. Overall system error, including pose estimation and calibration, are 3.12 mm and 4.68 degrees.

  4. Fast and robust 3D ultrasound registration--block and game theoretic matching.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Jyotirmoy; Klink, Camiel; Peters, Edward D; Niessen, Wiro J; Moelker, Adriaan; van Walsum, Theo

    2015-02-01

    Real-time 3D US has potential for image guidance in minimally invasive liver interventions. However, motion caused by patient breathing makes it hard to visualize a localized area, and to maintain alignment with pre-operative information. In this work we develop a fast affine registration framework to compensate in real-time for liver motion/displacement due to breathing. The affine registration of two consecutive ultrasound volumes in time is performed using block-matching. For a set of evenly distributed points in one volume and their correspondences in the other volume, we propose a robust outlier rejection method to reject false matches. The inliers are then used to determine the affine transformation. The approach is evaluated on 13 4D ultrasound sequences acquired from 8 subjects. For 91 pairs of 3D ultrasound volumes selected from these sequences, a mean registration error of 1.8mm is achieved. A graphics processing unit (GPU) implementation runs the 3D US registration at 8 Hz.

  5. Automatic nipple detection on 3D images of an automated breast ultrasound system (ABUS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Javanshir Moghaddam, Mandana; Tan, Tao; Karssemeijer, Nico; Platel, Bram

    2014-03-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that applying Automated Breast Ultrasound in addition to mammography in women with dense breasts can lead to additional detection of small, early stage breast cancers which are occult in corresponding mammograms. In this paper, we proposed a fully automatic method for detecting the nipple location in 3D ultrasound breast images acquired from Automated Breast Ultrasound Systems. The nipple location is a valuable landmark to report the position of possible abnormalities in a breast or to guide image registration. To detect the nipple location, all images were normalized. Subsequently, features have been extracted in a multi scale approach and classification experiments were performed using a gentle boost classifier to identify the nipple location. The method was applied on a dataset of 100 patients with 294 different 3D ultrasound views from Siemens and U-systems acquisition systems. Our database is a representative sample of cases obtained in clinical practice by four medical centers. The automatic method could accurately locate the nipple in 90% of AP (Anterior-Posterior) views and in 79% of the other views.

  6. 3-D Ultrasound-Guided Robotic Needle Steering in Biological Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Fletcher, Ashley E.; Okamura, Allison M.

    2017-01-01

    Robotic needle steering systems have the potential to greatly improve medical interventions, but they require new methods for medical image guidance. Three-dimensional (3-D) ultrasound is a widely available, low-cost imaging modality that may be used to provide real-time feedback to needle steering robots. Unfortunately, the poor visibility of steerable needles in standard grayscale ultrasound makes automatic segmentation of the needles impractical. A new imaging approach is proposed, in which high-frequency vibration of a steerable needle makes it visible in ultrasound Doppler images. Experiments demonstrate that segmentation from this Doppler data is accurate to within 1–2 mm. An image-guided control algorithm that incorporates the segmentation data as feedback is also described. In experimental tests in ex vivo bovine liver tissue, a robotic needle steering system implementing this control scheme was able to consistently steer a needle tip to a simulated target with an average error of 1.57 mm. Implementation of 3-D ultrasound-guided needle steering in biological tissue represents a significant step toward the clinical application of robotic needle steering. PMID:25014948

  7. 3D ultrasound Nakagami imaging for radiation-induced vaginal fibrosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiaofeng; Rossi, Peter; Shelton, Joseph; Bruner, Debrorah; Tridandapani, Srini; Liu, Tian

    2014-03-01

    Radiation-induced vaginal fibrosis is a debilitating side-effect affecting up to 80% of women receiving radiotherapy for their gynecological (GYN) malignancies. Despite the significant incidence and severity, little research has been conducted to identify the pathophysiologic changes of vaginal toxicity. In a previous study, we have demonstrated that ultrasound Nakagami shape and PDF parameters can be used to quantify radiation-induced vaginal toxicity. These Nakagami parameters are derived from the statistics of ultrasound backscattered signals to capture the physical properties (e.g., arrangement and distribution) of the biological tissues. In this paper, we propose to expand this Nakagami imaging concept from 2D to 3D to fully characterize radiation-induced changes to the vaginal wall within the radiation treatment field. A pilot study with 5 post-radiotherapy GYN patients was conducted using a clinical ultrasound scanner (6 MHz) with a mechanical stepper. A serial of 2D ultrasound images, with radio-frequency (RF) signals, were acquired at 1 mm step size. The 2D Nakagami shape and PDF parameters were calculated from the RF signal envelope with a sliding window, and then 3D Nakagami parameter images were generated from the parallel 2D images. This imaging method may be useful as we try to monitor radiation-induced vaginal injury, and address vaginal toxicities and sexual dysfunction in women after radiotherapy for GYN malignancies.

  8. Towards the volumetricardiogram: volume determination of cardiac chambers using 3D matrix-array ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stetten, George D.; Caines, Michael; Ohazama, Chikai J.; von Ramm, Olaf T.

    1995-05-01

    Matrix-array ultrasound is a new medical imaging modality that steers an ultrasound beam electronically in three dimensions. It is the first imaging modality that can view the heart in 3D in real time, making possible the `volumetricardiogram,' i.e., continuous beat to beat measurement of cardiac chamber volume. To create a fully automatic real-time volumetricardiogram, we have developed the flow integration transform (FIT), which operates on 2D images produced by slicing through the 3D ultrasound data. Although lacking rotational or scale invariance, the FIT is designed to operate eventually in dedicated hardware at very high speed, permitting the application of a large battery of test shapes within the period of a single ultrasound frame (approximately 45 milliseconds). To test the FIT, we have volumetrically scanned a series of 21 fluid-filled balloons. We used the FIT to detect circular cross-sections of the balloons by applying a battery of circles over a range of radii. The detected circles were used to compute volumes, which were then compared to volumes determined independently by weight. Our results are encouraging towards further development of this completely automated method of volume determination.

  9. 3D deformable organ model based liver motion tracking in ultrasound videos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jung-Bae; Hwang, Youngkyoo; Oh, Young-Taek; Bang, Won-Chul; Lee, Heesae; Kim, James D. K.; Kim, Chang Yeong

    2013-03-01

    This paper presents a novel method of using 2D ultrasound (US) cine images during image-guided therapy to accurately track the 3D position of a tumor even when the organ of interest is in motion due to patient respiration. Tracking is possible thanks to a 3D deformable organ model we have developed. The method consists of three processes in succession. The first process is organ modeling where we generate a personalized 3D organ model from high quality 3D CT or MR data sets captured during three different respiratory phases. The model includes the organ surface, vessel and tumor, which can all deform and move in accord with patient respiration. The second process is registration of the organ model to 3D US images. From 133 respiratory phase candidates generated from the deformable organ model, we resolve the candidate that best matches the 3D US images according to vessel centerline and surface. As a result, we can determine the position of the US probe. The final process is real-time tracking using 2D US cine images captured by the US probe. We determine the respiratory phase by tracking the diaphragm on the image. The 3D model is then deformed according to respiration phase and is fitted to the image by considering the positions of the vessels. The tumor's 3D positions are then inferred based on respiration phase. Testing our method on real patient data, we have found the accuracy of 3D position is within 3.79mm and processing time is 5.4ms during tracking.

  10. Clinical Evaluation of a 3-D Automatic Annotation Method for Breast Ultrasound Imaging.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Wei-Wei; Li, Cheng; Li, An-Hua; Zheng, Yong-Ping

    2016-04-01

    The routine clinical breast ultrasound annotation method is limited by the time it consumes, inconsistency, inaccuracy and incomplete notation. A novel 3-D automatic annotation method for breast ultrasound imaging has been developed that uses a spatial sensor to track and record conventional B-mode scanning so as to provide more objective annotation. The aim of the study described here was to test the feasibility of the automatic annotation method in clinical breast ultrasound scanning. An ultrasound scanning procedure using the new method was established. The new method and the conventional manual annotation method were compared in 46 breast cancer patients (49 ± 12 y). The time used for scanning a patient was recorded and compared for the two methods. Intra-observer and inter-observer experiments were performed, and intra-class correlation coefficients (ICCs) were calculated to analyze system reproducibility. The results revealed that the new annotation method had an average scanning time 36 s (42.9%) less than that of the conventional method. There were high correlations between the results of the two annotation methods (r = 0.933, p < 0.0001 for distance; r = 0.995, p < 0.0001 for radial angle). Intra-observer and inter-observer reproducibility was excellent, with all ICCs > 0.92. The results indicated that the 3-D automatic annotation method is reliable for clinical breast ultrasound scanning and can greatly reduce scanning time. Although large-scale clinical studies are still needed, this work verified that the new annotation method has potential to be a valuable tool in breast ultrasound examination.

  11. Dynamic 3D ultrasound and MR image registration of the beating heart.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xishi; Hill, Nicholas A; Ren, Jing; Guiraudon, Gerard; Boughner, Derek; Peters, Terry M

    2005-01-01

    Real-time three-dimensional ultrasound (RT3D US) is an ideal imaging modality for the diagnosis of cardiac disease. RT3D US is a flexible, inexpensive, non-invasive tool that provides important diagnostic information related to cardiac function. Unfortunately, RT3D US suffers from inherent shortcomings, such as low signal-to-noise ratio and limited field of view, producing images that are difficult to interpret. Multi-modal dynamic cardiac image registration is a well-recognized approach that compensates for these deficiencies while retaining the advantages of RT3D US imaging. The clinical application of multi-modal image registration methods is difficult, and there are a number of implementation issues to be resolved. In this work, we present a method for the rapid registration of RT3D US images of the beating heart to high-resolution magnetic resonance (MR) images. This method was validated using a volunteer image set. Validation results demonstrate that this approach can achieve rapid registration of images of the beating heart with fiducial landmark and registration errors of 1.25 +/- 0.63 and 1.76 mm respectively. This technique can potentially be used to improve the diagnosis of cardiac disease by augmenting RT3D US images with high-resolution MR images and to facilitate intra-operative image fusion for minimally invasive cardio-thoracic surgical navigation.

  12. Advantages and limitations of intraoperative 3D ultrasound in neurosurgery. Technical note.

    PubMed

    Bozinov, Oliver; Burkhardt, Jan-Karl; Fischer, Claudia Miranda; Kockro, Ralf Alfons; Bernays, René-Ludwig; Bertalanffy, Helmut

    2011-01-01

    Three-dimensional ultrasound (US) technology is supposed to help combat some of the orientation difficulties inherent to two-dimensional US. Contemporary navigation solutions combine reconstructed 3D US images with common navigation images and support orientation. New real-time 3D US (without neuronavigation) is more time effective, but whether it further assists in orientation remains to be determined. An integrated US system (IGSonic, VectorVision, BrainLAB, Munich Germany) and a non-integrated system with real-time 3D US (iU22, Philips, Bothell, USA) were recently compared in neurosurgical procedures in our group. The reconstructed navigation view was time-consuming, but images were displayed in familiar planes (e.g., axial, sagittal, coronal). Further potential applications of US angiography and pure US navigation are possible. Real-time 3D images were displayed without the need for an additional acquisition and reconstruction process, but spatial orientation remained challenging in this preliminary testing phase. Reconstructed 3D US navigation appears to be superior with respect to spatial orientation, and the technique can be combined with other imaging data. However, the potential of real-time 3D US imaging is promising.

  13. 3D ultrasound volume stitching using phase symmetry and harris corner detection for orthopaedic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalvi, Rupin; Hacihaliloglu, Ilker; Abugharbieh, Rafeef

    2010-03-01

    Stitching of volumes obtained from three dimensional (3D) ultrasound (US) scanners improves visualization of anatomy in many clinical applications. Fast but accurate volume registration remains the key challenge in this area.We propose a volume stitching method based on efficient registration of 3D US volumes obtained from a tracked US probe. Since the volumes, after adjusting for probe motion, are coarsely registered, we obtain salient correspondence points in the central slices of these volumes. This is done by first removing artifacts in the US slices using intensity invariant local phase image processing and then applying the Harris Corner detection algorithm. Fast sub-volume registration on a small neighborhood around the points then gives fast, accurate 3D registration parameters. The method has been tested on 3D US scans of phantom and real human radius and pelvis bones and a phantom human fetus. The method has also been compared to volumetric registration, as well as feature based registration using 3D-SIFT. Quantitative results show average post-registration error of 0.33mm which is comparable to volumetric registration accuracy (0.31mm) and much better than 3D-SIFT based registration which failed to register the volumes. The proposed method was also much faster than volumetric registration (~4.5 seconds versus 83 seconds).

  14. A fast convolution-based methodology to simulate 2-D/3-D cardiac ultrasound images.

    PubMed

    Gao, Hang; Choi, Hon Fai; Claus, Piet; Boonen, Steven; Jaecques, Siegfried; Van Lenthe, G Harry; Van der Perre, Georges; Lauriks, Walter; D'hooge, Jan

    2009-02-01

    This paper describes a fast convolution-based methodology for simulating ultrasound images in a 2-D/3-D sector format as typically used in cardiac ultrasound. The conventional convolution model is based on the assumption of a space-invariant point spread function (PSF) and typically results in linear images. These characteristics are not representative for cardiac data sets. The spatial impulse response method (IRM) has excellent accuracy in the linear domain; however, calculation time can become an issue when scatterer numbers become significant and when 3-D volumetric data sets need to be computed. As a solution to these problems, the current manuscript proposes a new convolution-based methodology in which the data sets are produced by reducing the conventional 2-D/3-D convolution model to multiple 1-D convolutions (one for each image line). As an example, simulated 2-D/3-D phantom images are presented along with their gray scale histogram statistics. In addition, the computation time is recorded and contrasted to a commonly used implementation of IRM (Field II). It is shown that COLE can produce anatomically plausible images with local Rayleigh statistics but at improved calculation time (1200 times faster than the reference method).

  15. Methods for 2-D and 3-D Endobronchial Ultrasound Image Segmentation.

    PubMed

    Zang, Xiaonan; Bascom, Rebecca; Gilbert, Christopher; Toth, Jennifer; Higgins, William

    2016-07-01

    Endobronchial ultrasound (EBUS) is now commonly used for cancer-staging bronchoscopy. Unfortunately, EBUS is challenging to use and interpreting EBUS video sequences is difficult. Other ultrasound imaging domains, hampered by related difficulties, have benefited from computer-based image-segmentation methods. Yet, so far, no such methods have been proposed for EBUS. We propose image-segmentation methods for 2-D EBUS frames and 3-D EBUS sequences. Our 2-D method adapts the fast-marching level-set process, anisotropic diffusion, and region growing to the problem of segmenting 2-D EBUS frames. Our 3-D method builds upon the 2-D method while also incorporating the geodesic level-set process for segmenting EBUS sequences. Tests with lung-cancer patient data showed that the methods ran fully automatically for nearly 80% of test cases. For the remaining cases, the only user-interaction required was the selection of a seed point. When compared to ground-truth segmentations, the 2-D method achieved an overall Dice index = 90.0% ±4.9%, while the 3-D method achieved an overall Dice index = 83.9 ± 6.0%. In addition, the computation time (2-D, 0.070 s/frame; 3-D, 0.088 s/frame) was two orders of magnitude faster than interactive contour definition. Finally, we demonstrate the potential of the methods for EBUS localization in a multimodal image-guided bronchoscopy system.

  16. Methods for 2D and 3D Endobronchial Ultrasound Image Segmentation

    PubMed Central

    Zang, Xiaonan; Bascom, Rebecca; Gilbert, Christopher; Toth, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Endobronchial ultrasound (EBUS) is now commonly used for cancer-staging bronchoscopy. Unfortunately, EBUS is challenging to use and interpreting EBUS video sequences is difficult. Other ultrasound imaging domains, hampered by related difficulties, have benefited from computer-based image-segmentation methods. Yet, so far, no such methods have been proposed for EBUS. We propose image-segmentation methods for 2D EBUS frames and 3D EBUS sequences. Our 2D method adapts the fast-marching level-set process, anisotropic diffusion, and region growing to the problem of segmenting 2D EBUS frames. Our 3D method builds upon the 2D method while also incorporating the geodesic level-set process for segmenting EBUS sequences. Tests with lung-cancer patient data showed that the methods ran fully automatically for nearly 80% of test cases. For the remaining cases, the only user-interaction required was the selection of a seed point. When compared to ground-truth segmentations, the 2D method achieved an overall Dice index = 90.0%±4.9%, while the 3D method achieved an overall Dice index = 83.9±6.0%. In addition, the computation time (2D, 0.070 sec/frame; 3D, 0.088 sec/frame) was two orders of magnitude faster than interactive contour definition. Finally, we demonstrate the potential of the methods for EBUS localization in a multimodal image-guided bronchoscopy system. PMID:26529748

  17. Left Ventricular Myocardial Segmentation in 3D Ultrasound Recordings: Effect of Different Endoand Epicardial Coupling Strategies.

    PubMed

    Pedrosa, Joao; Barbosa, Daniel; Heyde, Brecht; Schnell, Frederic; Rosner, Assami; Claus, Piet; D Hooge, Jan

    2016-12-12

    Cardiac volume/function assessment remains a critical step in daily cardiology and 3D ultrasound plays an increasingly important role. Though development of automatic endocardial segmentation methods has received much attention, the same cannot be said about epicardial segmentation, in spite of the importance of full myocardial segmentation. In this study, different ways of coupling the endo- and epicardial segmentation are contrasted and compared to uncoupled segmentation. For this purpose, the B-spline Explicit Active Surfaces framework was used. Twenty-seven 3D echocardiographic images were used to validate the different coupling strategies which were compared to manual contouring of the endo- and epicardial borders performed by an expert. It is shown that an independent segmentation of the endocardium followed by an epicardial segmentation coupled to the endocardium is the most advantageous. In this way, a framework for fully automatic 3D myocardial segmentation is proposed using a novel coupling strategy.

  18. An efficient calibration method for freehand 3-D ultrasound imaging systems.

    PubMed

    Leotta, Daniel F

    2004-07-01

    A phantom has been developed to quickly calibrate a freehand 3-D ultrasound (US) imaging system. Calibration defines the spatial relationship between the US image plane and an external tracking device attached to the scanhead. The phantom consists of a planar array of strings and beads, and a set of out-of-plane strings that guide the user to proper scanhead orientation for imaging. When an US image plane is coincident with the plane defined by the strings, the calibration parameters are calculated by matching of homologous points in the image and phantom. The resulting precision and accuracy of the 3-D imaging system are similar to those achieved with a more complex calibration procedure. The 3-D reconstruction performance of the calibrated system is demonstrated with a magnetic tracking system, but the method could be applied to other tracking devices.

  19. Therapeutic response assessment using 3D ultrasound for hepatic metastasis from colorectal cancer: Application of a personalized, 3D-printed tumor model using CT images

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Ye Ra; Park, Sang Joon; Hur, Bo Yun; Han, Joon Koo

    2017-01-01

    Background & aims To evaluate accuracy and reliability of three-dimensional ultrasound (3D US) for response evaluation of hepatic metastasis from colorectal cancer (CRC) using a personalized 3D-printed tumor model. Methods Twenty patients with liver metastasis from CRC who underwent baseline and after chemotherapy CT, were retrospectively included. Personalized 3D-printed tumor models using CT were fabricated. Two radiologists measured volume of each 3D printing model using 3D US. With CT as a reference, we compared difference between CT and US tumor volume. The response evaluation was based on Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) criteria. Results 3D US tumor volume showed no significant difference from CT volume (7.18 ± 5.44 mL, 8.31 ± 6.32 mL vs 7.42 ± 5.76 mL in CT, p>0.05). 3D US provided a high correlation coefficient with CT (r = 0.953, r = 0.97) as well as a high inter-observer intraclass correlation (0.978; 0.958–0.988). Regarding response, 3D US was in agreement with CT in 17 and 18 out of 20 patients for observer 1 and 2 with excellent agreement (κ = 0.961). Conclusions 3D US tumor volume using a personalized 3D-printed model is an accurate and reliable method for the response evaluation in comparison with CT tumor volume. PMID:28797089

  20. A 3D ultrasound scanning system for image guided liver interventions.

    PubMed

    Neshat, Hamid; Cool, Derek W; Barker, Kevin; Gardi, Lori; Kakani, Nirmal; Fenster, Aaron

    2013-11-01

    Two-dimensional ultrasound (2D US) imaging is commonly used for diagnostic and intraoperative guidance of interventional liver procedures; however, 2D US lacks volumetric information that may benefit interventional procedures. Over the past decade, three-dimensional ultrasound (3D US) has been developed to provide the missing spatial information. 3D US image acquisition is mainly based on mechanical, electromagnetic, and freehand tracking of conventional 2D US transducers, or 2D array transducers available on high-end machines. These approaches share many problems during clinical use for interventional liver imaging due to lack of flexibility and compatibility with interventional equipment, limited field-of-view (FOV), and significant capital cost compared to the benefits they introduce. In this paper, a novel system for mechanical 3D US scanning is introduced to address these issues. The authors have developed a handheld mechanical 3D US system that incorporates mechanical translation and tilt sector sweeping of any standard 2D US transducer to acquire 3D images. Each mechanical scanning function can be operated independently or may be combined to allow for a hybrid wide FOV acquisition. The hybrid motion mode facilitates registration of other modalities (e.g., CT or MRI) to the intraoperative 3D US images by providing a larger FOV in which to acquire anatomical information. The tilting mechanism of the developed mover allows image acquisition in the intercostal rib space to avoid acoustic shadowing from bone. The geometric and volumetric scanning validity of the 3D US system was evaluated on tissue mimicking US phantoms for different modes of operation. Identical experiments were performed on a commercially available 3D US system for direct comparison. To replicate a clinical scenario, the authors evaluated their 3D US system by comparing it to CT for measurement of angle and distance between interventional needles in different configurations, similar to those

  1. Probe localization for freehand 3D ultrasound by tracking skin features.

    PubMed

    Sun, Shih-Yu; Gilbertson, Matthew; Anthony, Brian W

    2014-01-01

    Ultrasound probe localization with respect to the patient's body is essential for freehand three-dimensional ultrasound and image-guided intervention. However, current methods for probe localization generally involve bulky and expensive equipment. In this paper, a highly cost-effective and miniature-mobile system is described for 6-DoF probe localization that is robust to rigid patient motion. In this system, skin features in the scan region are recorded at each ultrasound scan acquisition by a lightweight camera rigidly mounted to the probe. A skin map is built based on the skin features and optimal probe poses are estimated in a Bayesian probabilistic framework that incorporates a prior motion model, camera frames, and ultrasound scans. Through freehand scanning on three different body parts, it is shown that on average, for every probe travel distance of 10 mm, the translational and rotational errors are 0.91 ± 0.49 mm and 0.55 degrees ± 0.17 degrees, respectively. The 3D reconstructions were also validated by comparison with real ultrasound scans.

  2. Lidocaine suppository for transrectal ultrasound-guided biopsy of the prostate: a prospective, double-blind, randomized study.

    PubMed

    Goluza, Eleonora; Hudolin, Tvrtko; Kastelan, Zeljko; Peric, Mladen; Murselovic, Tamara; Sosic, Hrvoje

    2011-01-01

    To investigate analgesia using lidocaine suppositories for prostate biopsy. From 2007 to 2009, 160 patients underwent transrectal ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy at the Department of Urology, KBC Zagreb. 80 patients received a 60-mg lidocaine suppository intrarectally at different time points from 15 to 120 min before biopsy and 80 patients received a glycerin suppository as placebo. The pain level was evaluated using a visual analogue scale (VAS). There were no statistically significant differences between the groups, i.e. they were similar regarding patients' age, prostate-specific antigen levels, prostate volume and the incidence of diagnosis of malignancy on biopsy. The mean pain score in the lidocaine group (3 ± 1) was significantly lower than the mean pain score in the glycerin group (4.1 ± 1.3) (p < 0.001). A noticeable trend towards lower pain scores in the lidocaine group was observed with more time elapsing from placing the suppository till the biopsy and the optimal time for performing biopsy starting approximately 1 h after placing the suppository. Lidocaine suppositories are an easy-to-use, self-applicable (by the patient) and cheap method of local analgesia, with acceptable results. Possible complications related to this procedure are insignificant. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. The performance of transrectal ultrasound in the diagnosis of seminal vesicle defects: a comparison with magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xu; Wang, Hua; Wu, Rong-Pei; Liang, Hui; Mao, Xiao-Peng; Mao, Cheng-Qiang; Zhu, Hong-Zhang; Qiu, Shao-Peng; Wang, Dao-Hu

    2014-01-01

    Obstructive azoospermia (OA) is one of the most common causes of male infertility. Transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) has been used to diagnose OA for many years. From 2009 to 2013, we evaluated a prospective cohort of 1249 patients with suspected OA using TRUS. It was found that dilation of the ejaculatory duct (ED) (29.9%, 374/1249) was the most common cause of OA, followed by seminal vesicle (SV) abnormalities (28.5%, 356/1249). A total of 237 patients were diagnosed with congenital defects (agenesis and/or hypoplasia) of the SV, constituting more than half of the cases of SV disease in OA (19.0%, 237/1249). In contrast to ED, congenital defects of the SV could not be corrected with surgical treatment. Therefore, it is meaningful to compare TRUS and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for accurate diagnosis of SV defects. Among our patients, 30 with agenesis or/and hypoplasia of the SV on TRUS were further evaluated using pelvic MRI within 2 years, with the objective of verifying the TRUS results. The concordance rate for diagnosing congenital defects of the SV was 73.3% (22/30). We concluded that TRUS is a reliable and convenient method for diagnosing agenesis or hypoplasia of the SV in OA patients with a high concordance with MRI while MRI is useful in patients with inconclusive TRUS findings. PMID:25337847

  4. Predictive value of clinical examination, transrectal ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging prior to radiotherapy in carcinoma of the cervix.

    PubMed

    Hawnaur, J M; Johnson, R J; Carrington, B M; Hunter, R D

    1998-08-01

    The objectives of this study were to compare tumour staging and volume assessment by examination under anaesthesia (EUA), transrectal ultrasound (TRU) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with invasive carcinoma of the cervix, and to correlate findings with long-term outcome following treatment by radiotherapy. Tumour staging was performed on 60 patients immediately before starting radiotherapy. Clinicians and radiologists performing EUA, TRU or MRI were blinded to the results of other investigations. Tumour stage and dimensions were recorded prospectively for each technique, and analysed for concordance. The relationship between pre-treatment stage, size of tumour and patient outcome after radiotherapy was assessed, using clinical status 5 years after treatment as the truth measure. EUA, TRU and MRI assigned the same tumour stage in only 30% of patients and EUA and MRI agreed tumour stage in a further 27%. In cases of disagreement, the MRI stage correlated better with outcome than the TRU or EUA stage. There was a significant difference between tumour volume obtained from measurements made on MRI and those from TRU. 62% of patients with enlarged lymph nodes on pre-treatment MRI either died, or developed tumour recurrence or metastases. The ability of MRI to assess the full extent of bulky tumours and the presence of lymph node enlargement was an advantage over both EUA and TRU in identifying patients with a poor prognosis.

  5. "Targeted" prophylaxis: Impact of rectal swab culture-directed prophylaxis on infectious complications after transrectal ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy.

    PubMed

    Singh, Prabhjot; Kumar, Ashish; Yadav, Siddharth; Prakash, Lok; Nayak, Brusabhanu; Kumar, Rajeev; Kapil, Arti; Dogra, Prem Nath

    2017-09-01

    To assess the prevalence of fluoroquinolone resistance among patients undergoing transrectal ultrasound (TRUS)-guided prostate biopsy and the impact of rectal swab culture-directed antibiotic prophylaxis on postbiopsy infectious complications. We prospectively analyzed all patients undergoing TRUS-guided prostate biopsy from April 2013 to February 2015. Antibiotic prophylaxis was tailored to the results of rectal swab cultures. If the organism was fluoroquinolone-sensitive, oral ciprofloxacin 500 mg with tinidazole 600 mg was prescribed. If the organism was fluoroquinolone-resistant, then a culture-directed antibiotic was prescribed. In both cases the antibiotic was continued for 3 days. All patients were followed for 14 days after biopsy to record infectious complications. A total of 247 patients were included, and Escherichia coli was isolated on rectal swab cultures in 99.5% of the patients. Of these, 41.7% harbored fluoroquinolone-resistant E. coli. Piperacillin/tazobactam was the most common culture-directed antibiotic prescribed (59.3%), with amoxicillin/clavulanic being the second most common (25.5%) for the fluoroquinolone-resistant group. Only 2 patients (0.9%) developed postbiopsy fever and none had sepsis. Colonization of rectal flora with fluoroquinolone-resistant E. coli was seen in 40% of men undergoing prostate biopsy. Targeted prophylaxis, which uses the results of prebiopsy rectal swab culture to direct antibiotic prophylaxis, results in low rates of postbiopsy infections.

  6. Strain-Initialized Robust Bone Surface Detection in 3-D Ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Mohammad Arafat; Hodgson, Antony J; Abugharbieh, Rafeef

    2017-03-01

    Three-dimensional ultrasound has been increasingly considered as a safe radiation-free alternative to radiation-based fluoroscopic imaging for surgical guidance during computer-assisted orthopedic interventions, but because ultrasound images contain significant artifacts, it is challenging to automatically extract bone surfaces from these images. We propose an effective way to extract 3-D bone surfaces using a surface growing approach that is seeded from 2-D bone contours. The initial 2-D bone contours are estimated from a combination of ultrasound strain images and envelope power images. Novel features of the proposed method include: (i) improvement of a previously reported 2-D strain imaging-based bone segmentation method by incorporation of a depth-dependent cumulative power of the envelope into the elastographic data; (ii) incorporation of an echo decorrelation measure-based weight to fuse the strain and envelope maps; (iii) use of local statistics of the bone surface candidate points to detect the presence of any bone discontinuity; and (iv) an extension of our 2-D bone contour into a 3-D bone surface by use of an effective surface growing approach. Our new method produced average improvements in the mean absolute error of 18% and 23%, respectively, on 2-D and 3-D experimental phantom data, compared with those of two state-of-the-art bone segmentation methods. Validation on 2-D and 3-D clinical in vivo data also reveals, respectively, an average improvement in the mean absolute fitting error of 55% and an 18-fold improvement in the computation time.

  7. Efficient Sample Delay Calculation for 2-D and 3-D Ultrasound Imaging.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Aya; Hager, Pascal A; Bartolini, Andrea; Angiolini, Federico; Arditi, Marcel; Thiran, Jean-Philippe; Benini, Luca; De Micheli, Giovanni

    2017-08-01

    Ultrasound imaging is a reference medical diagnostic technique, thanks to its blend of versatility, effectiveness, and moderate cost. The core computation of all ultrasound imaging methods is based on simple formulae, except for those required to calculate acoustic propagation delays with high precision and throughput. Unfortunately, advanced three-dimensional (3-D) systems require the calculation or storage of billions of such delay values per frame, which is a challenge. In 2-D systems, this requirement can be four orders of magnitude lower, but efficient computation is still crucial in view of low-power implementations that can be battery-operated, enabling usage in numerous additional scenarios. In this paper, we explore two smart designs of the delay generation function. To quantify their hardware cost, we implement them on FPGA and study their footprint and performance. We evaluate how these architectures scale to different ultrasound applications, from a low-power 2-D system to a next-generation 3-D machine. When using numerical approximations, we demonstrate the ability to generate delay values with sufficient throughput to support 10 000-channel 3-D imaging at up to 30 fps while using 63% of a Virtex 7 FPGA, requiring 24 MB of external memory accessed at about 32 GB/s bandwidth. Alternatively, with similar FPGA occupation, we show an exact calculation method that reaches 24 fps on 1225-channel 3-D imaging and does not require external memory at all. Both designs can be scaled to use a negligible amount of resources for 2-D imaging in low-power applications and for ultrafast 2-D imaging at hundreds of frames per second.

  8. Accuracy assessment of high frequency 3D ultrasound for digital impression-taking of prepared teeth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heger, Stefan; Vollborn, Thorsten; Tinschert, Joachim; Wolfart, Stefan; Radermacher, Klaus

    2013-03-01

    Silicone based impression-taking of prepared teeth followed by plaster casting is well-established but potentially less reliable, error-prone and inefficient, particularly in combination with emerging techniques like computer aided design and manufacturing (CAD/CAM) of dental prosthesis. Intra-oral optical scanners for digital impression-taking have been introduced but until now some drawbacks still exist. Because optical waves can hardly penetrate liquids or soft-tissues, sub-gingival preparations still need to be uncovered invasively prior to scanning. High frequency ultrasound (HFUS) based micro-scanning has been recently investigated as an alternative to optical intra-oral scanning. Ultrasound is less sensitive against oral fluids and in principal able to penetrate gingiva without invasively exposing of sub-gingival preparations. Nevertheless, spatial resolution as well as digitization accuracy of an ultrasound based micro-scanning system remains a critical parameter because the ultrasound wavelength in water-like media such as gingiva is typically smaller than that of optical waves. In this contribution, the in-vitro accuracy of ultrasound based micro-scanning for tooth geometry reconstruction is being investigated and compared to its extra-oral optical counterpart. In order to increase the spatial resolution of the system, 2nd harmonic frequencies from a mechanically driven focused single element transducer were separated and corresponding 3D surface models were calculated for both fundamentals and 2nd harmonics. Measurements on phantoms, model teeth and human teeth were carried out for evaluation of spatial resolution and surface detection accuracy. Comparison of optical and ultrasound digital impression taking indicate that, in terms of accuracy, ultrasound based tooth digitization can be an alternative for optical impression-taking.

  9. Improved 3D reconstruction algorithm for ultrasound B-scan image with freehand tracker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Shuangren; Suri, Jasjit

    2010-03-01

    EM algorithm for the reconstruction of freehand B-Scan ultrasound image was developed by Joao M. Sanches et al. The reconstruction has a parameter K which can be adjusted so that the results can be smoother or sharper depending to the value of K. In order to make the image smoother inside the organs but sharper in their boundaries simultaneously, we introduced a improved EM algorithm: EM algorithm with a diffusion filer or is referred as EMD algorithm. There was a cubic average filter inside the loop of the iteration of the EM algorithm. This average filter is replaced by a diffusion filter in the EMD algorithm. The diffusion filter offers an additional parameter Kd which can be used to adjust the reconstructed image with better optimization in both smoothness insider the human organ and sharpness in its boundary. Two above mentioned reconstruction algorithms for the freehand B-scan ultrasound image are compared through the simulation and the phantom measurements. In the simulation, strong noises are added to the ultrasound frame data. The parameters of two algorithms are optimized to get smallest errors. The errors are compared between two algorithms with optimized parameters. For the measurement with phantom, the Eigen's tracker system is used to continuously measure the coordinates of the ultrasound probe. The ultrasound B-scan frame is synchronously recorded with the probe coordinates. Zonare ultrasound machine is used to acquire the 2D frame images. The segmentation of the reconstruction results is done. The segmentation volumes of the prostate phantoms are compared. The results shows that EMD algorithm is better at reducing the noises and keeping the image edge comparing to EM algorithm. Eigen's tracker is cacaple to acquire freehand ultrasound data for a 3D image reconstruction with high quality.

  10. Real-time registration of 3D to 2D ultrasound images for image-guided prostate biopsy.

    PubMed

    Gillies, Derek J; Gardi, Lori; De Silva, Tharindu; Zhao, Shuang-Ren; Fenster, Aaron

    2017-09-01

    During image-guided prostate biopsy, needles are targeted at tissues that are suspicious of cancer to obtain specimen for histological examination. Unfortunately, patient motion causes targeting errors when using an MR-transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) fusion approach to augment the conventional biopsy procedure. This study aims to develop an automatic motion correction algorithm approaching the frame rate of an ultrasound system to be used in fusion-based prostate biopsy systems. Two modes of operation have been investigated for the clinical implementation of the algorithm: motion compensation using a single user initiated correction performed prior to biopsy, and real-time continuous motion compensation performed automatically as a background process. Retrospective 2D and 3D TRUS patient images acquired prior to biopsy gun firing were registered using an intensity-based algorithm utilizing normalized cross-correlation and Powell's method for optimization. 2D and 3D images were downsampled and cropped to estimate the optimal amount of image information that would perform registrations quickly and accurately. The optimal search order during optimization was also analyzed to avoid local optima in the search space. Error in the algorithm was computed using target registration errors (TREs) from manually identified homologous fiducials in a clinical patient dataset. The algorithm was evaluated for real-time performance using the two different modes of clinical implementations by way of user initiated and continuous motion compensation methods on a tissue mimicking prostate phantom. After implementation in a TRUS-guided system with an image downsampling factor of 4, the proposed approach resulted in a mean ± std TRE and computation time of 1.6 ± 0.6 mm and 57 ± 20 ms respectively. The user initiated mode performed registrations with in-plane, out-of-plane, and roll motions computation times of 108 ± 38 ms, 60 ± 23 ms, and 89 ± 27 ms, respectively, and corresponding

  11. Multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging-transrectal ultrasound fusion-assisted biopsy for the diagnosis of local recurrence after radical prostatectomy.

    PubMed

    Muller, Berrend G; Kaushal, Aradhana; Sankineni, Sandeep; Lita, Elena; Hoang, Anthony N; George, Arvin K; Rais-Bahrami, Soroush; Kruecker, Jochen; Yan, Pingkun; Xu, Sheng; de la Rosette, Jean J; Merino, Maria J; Wood, Bradford J; Pinto, Peter A; Choyke, Peter L; Turkbey, Baris

    2015-10-01

    Approximately 15% of patients who undergo radical prostatectomy (RP) for prostate cancer develop local recurrence, which is heralded by a rise in serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels. Early detection and treatment of recurrence improves the outcome of salvage treatment. We investigated the ability of multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (mpMRI)-transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) fusion-guided biopsy (FGB) combined with "cognitive biopsy" to confirm local recurrence of prostate cancer after RP. In this retrospective study conducted between January 2010 and December 2014, patients with rising PSA levels after RP who had no known evidence of distant metastases underwent mpMRI including T2-weighted (T2W) imaging, diffusion-weighted imaging, dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI at 3 Tesla, and subsequent MRI-ultrasound fusion biopsy with cognitive assistance. The detection rate of locally recurrent disease was determined. A total of 10 patients (mean age = 67y, mean PSA level = 3.44ng/ml) met the inclusion criteria. Of the 10 patients, all had positive findings suspicious for local recurrence on mpMRI per entrance criterion. The most important features on mpMRI were early enhancement on DCE MR images and hypointensity on T2W images. The average lesion diameter on mpMRI was 1.12cm (range: 0.40-2.20cm). All suspicious lesions (16/16, 100%) were positive on T2W MR images, 14 (89%) showed positive features on apparent diffusion coefficient maps of diffusion-weighted images, and 16 (100%) were positive on DCE MR images. MRI-TRUS FGBs were positive in 10/16 lesions (62.5%) and 8/10 (80%) patients. MRI-TRUS FGB with cognitive assistance is able to detect and diagnose locally recurrent lesions after RP, even at low PSA levels. This may facilitate early detection of recurrent disease and improve salvage treatment outcomes. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Poster — Thur Eve — 77: Implanted Brachythearpy Seed Movement due to Transrectal Ultrasound Probe-Induced Prostate Deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, D; Usmani, N; Sloboda, R; Meyer, T; Husain, S; Angyalfi, S; Kay, I

    2014-08-15

    The study investigated the movement of implanted brachytherapy seeds upon transrectal US probe removal, providing insight into the underlying prostate deformation and an estimate of the impact on prostate dosimetry. Implanted seed distributions, one obtained with the prostate under probe compression and another with the probe removed, were reconstructed using C-arm fluoroscopy imaging. The prostate, delineated on ultrasound images, was registered to the fluoroscopy images using seeds and needle tracks identified on ultrasound. A deformation tensor and shearing model was developed to correlate probe-induced seed movement with position. Changes in prostate TG-43 dosimetry were calculated. The model was used to infer the underlying prostate deformation and to estimate the location of the prostate surface in the absence of probe compression. Seed movement patterns upon probe removal reflected elastic decompression, lateral shearing, and rectal bending. Elastic decompression was characterized by expansion in the anterior-posterior direction and contraction in the superior-inferior and lateral directions. Lateral shearing resulted in large anterior movement for extra-prostatic seeds in the lateral peripheral region. Whole prostate D90 increased up to 8 Gy, mainly due to the small but systematic seed movement associated with elastic decompression. For selected patients, lateral shearing movement increased prostate D90 by 4 Gy, due to increased dose coverage in the anterior-lateral region at the expense of the posterior-lateral region. The effect of shearing movement on whole prostate D90 was small compared to elastic decompression due to the subset of peripheral seeds involved, but is expected to have greater consequences for local dose coverage.

  13. WE-A-17A-11: Implanted Brachytherapy Seed Movement Due to Transrectal Ultrasound Probe-Induced Prostate Deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, D; Usmani, N; Sloboda, R; Meyer, T; Husain, S; Angyalfi, S; Kay, I

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To characterize the movement of implanted brachytherapy seeds due to transrectal ultrasound probe-induced prostate deformation and to estimate the effects on prostate dosimetry. Methods: Implanted probe-in and probe-removed seed distributions were reconstructed for 10 patients using C-arm fluoroscopy imaging. The prostate was delineated on ultrasound and registered to the fluoroscopy seeds using a visible subset of seeds and residual needle tracks. A linear tensor and shearing model correlated the seed movement with position. The seed movement model was used to infer the underlying prostate deformation and to simulate the prostate contour without probe compression. Changes in prostate and surrogate urethra dosimetry were calculated. Results: Seed movement patterns reflecting elastic decompression, lateral shearing, and rectal bending were observed. Elastic decompression was characterized by anterior-posterior expansion and superior-inferior and lateral contractions. For lateral shearing, anterior movement up to 6 mm was observed for extraprostatic seeds in the lateral peripheral region. The average intra-prostatic seed movement was 1.3 mm, and the residual after linear modeling was 0.6 mm. Prostate D90 increased by 4 Gy on average (8 Gy max) and was correlated with elastic decompression. For selected patients, lateral shearing resulted in differential change in D90 of 7 Gy between anterior and posterior quadrants, and increase in whole prostate D90 of 4 Gy. Urethra D10 increased by 4 Gy. Conclusion: Seed movement upon probe removal was characterized. The proposed model captured the linear correlation between seed movement and position. Whole prostate dose coverage increased slightly, due to the small but systematic seed movement associated with elastic decompression. Lateral shearing movement increased dose coverage in the anterior-lateral region, at the expense of the posterior-lateral region. The effect on whole prostate D90 was smaller due to the subset

  14. Accuracy of volume measurement using 3D ultrasound and development of CT-3D US image fusion algorithm for prostate cancer radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Baek, Jihye; Huh, Jangyoung; Hyun An, So; Oh, Yoonjin; Kim, Myungsoo; Kim, DongYoung; Chung, Kwangzoo; Cho, Sungho; Lee, Rena

    2013-02-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the accuracy of measuring volumes using three-dimensional ultrasound (3D US), and to verify the feasibility of the replacement of CT-MR fusion images with CT-3D US in radiotherapy treatment planning. Methods: Phantoms, consisting of water, contrast agent, and agarose, were manufactured. The volume was measured using 3D US, CT, and MR devices. A CT-3D US and MR-3D US image fusion software was developed using the Insight Toolkit library in order to acquire three-dimensional fusion images. The quality of the image fusion was evaluated using metric value and fusion images. Results: Volume measurement, using 3D US, shows a 2.8 {+-} 1.5% error, 4.4 {+-} 3.0% error for CT, and 3.1 {+-} 2.0% error for MR. The results imply that volume measurement using the 3D US devices has a similar accuracy level to that of CT and MR. Three-dimensional image fusion of CT-3D US and MR-3D US was successfully performed using phantom images. Moreover, MR-3D US image fusion was performed using human bladder images. Conclusions: 3D US could be used in the volume measurement of human bladders and prostates. CT-3D US image fusion could be used in monitoring the target position in each fraction of external beam radiation therapy. Moreover, the feasibility of replacing the CT-MR image fusion to the CT-3D US in radiotherapy treatment planning was verified.

  15. Ultrasound array photoacoustic microscopy for dynamic in vivo 3D imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Liang; Maslov, Konstantin; Shung, K. Kirk; Wang, Lihong V.

    2010-02-01

    Using realtime ultrasound array photoacoustic microscopy (UA-PAM), we demonstrated the feasibility of noninvasive in vivo imaging of human pulsatile dynamics, as well as 3-D dynamic imaging of sentinel lymph nodes (SLNs) in a murine model. The system, capable of realtime B-scan imaging at 50 Hz and high-speed 3-D imaging, was validated by imaging the subcutaneous microvasculature in rats and humans. After the validation, a human superficial palmar was imaged, and its pulsatile dynamics monitored, with 20-ms B-scan imaging temporal resolution. In addition, noninvasive photoacoustic sentinel lymph node (SLN) mapping with high spatial resolution has the potential to reduce the false negative rate and eliminate the use of radioactive tracers. Upon intra-dermal injection of Evans blue, the system maps SLNs accurately in mice and rats. Furthermore, the ~6 s 3-D imaging temporal resolution offers the capability to quantitatively and noninvasively monitor the dye dynamics in SLNs in vivo through sequential 3-D imaging. The demonstrated capability suggests that high-speed 3-D photoacoustic imaging should facilitate the understanding of the dynamics of various dyes in SLNs, and potentially help identify SLNs with high accuracy. With the results shown in this study, we believe that UA-PAM can potentially enable many new possibilities for studying functional and physiological dynamics in both preclinical and clinical imaging settings.

  16. 3D registration method based on scattered point cloud from B-model ultrasound image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Lei; Xu, Xiaojun; Wang, Lifeng; Guo, Na; Xie, Feng

    2017-01-01

    The paper proposes a registration method on 3D point cloud of the bone tissue surface extracted by B-mode ultrasound image and the CT model . The B-mode ultrasound is used to get two-dimensional images of the femur tissue . The binocular stereo vision tracker is used to obtain spatial position and orientation of the optical positioning device fixed on the ultrasound probe. The combining of the two kind of data generates 3D point cloud of the bone tissue surface. The pixel coordinates of the bone surface are automatically obtained from ultrasound image using an improved local phase symmetry (phase symmetry, PS) . The mapping of the pixel coordinates on the ultrasound image and 3D space is obtained through a series of calibration methods. In order to detect the effect of registration, six markers are implanted on a complete fresh pig femoral .The actual coordinates of the marks are measured with two methods. The first method is to get the coordinates with measuring tools under a coordinate system. The second is to measure the coordinates of the markers in the CT model registered with 3D point cloud using the ICP registration algorithm under the same coordinate system. Ten registration experiments are carried out in the same way. Error results are obtained by comparing the two sets of mark point coordinates obtained by two different methods. The results is that a minimum error is 1.34mm, the maximum error is 3.22mm,and the average error of 2.52mm; ICP registration algorithm calculates the average error of 0.89mm and a standard deviation of 0.62mm.This evaluation standards of registration accuracy is different from the average error obtained by the ICP registration algorithm. It can be intuitive to show the error caused by the operation of clinical doctors. Reference to the accuracy requirements of different operation in the Department of orthopedics, the method can be apply to the bone reduction and the anterior cruciate ligament surgery.

  17. Real-time 3-d intracranial ultrasound with an endoscopic matrix array transducer.

    PubMed

    Light, Edward D; Mukundan, Srinivasan; Wolf, Patrick D; Smith, Stephen W

    2007-08-01

    A transducer originally designed for transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) was adapted for real-time volumetric endoscopic imaging of the brain. The transducer consists of a 36 x 36 array with an interelement spacing of 0.18 mm. There are 504 transmitting and 252 receive channels placed in a regular pattern in the array. The operating frequency is 4.5 MHz with a -6 dB bandwidth of 30%. The transducer is fabricated on a 10-layer flexible circuit from Microconnex (Snoqualmie, WA, USA). The purpose of this study is to evaluate the clinical feasibility of real-time 3-D intracranial ultrasound with this device. The Volumetrics Medical Imaging (Durham, NC, USA) 3-D scanner was used to obtain images in a canine model. A transcalvarial acoustic window was created under general anesthesia in the animal laboratory by placing a 10-mm burr hole in the high parietal calvarium of a 50-kg canine subject. The burr-hole was placed in a left parasagittal location to avoid the sagittal sinus, and the transducer was placed against the intact dura mater for ultrasound imaging. Images of the lateral ventricles were produced, including real-time 3-D guidance of a needle puncture of one ventricle. In a second canine subject, contrast-enhanced 3-D Doppler color flow images were made of the cerebral vessels including the complete Circle of Willis. Clinical applications may include real-time 3-D guidance of cerebrospinal fluid extraction from the lateral ventricles and bedside evaluation of critically ill patients where computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging techniques are unavailable.

  18. Methods for using 3-D ultrasound speckle tracking in biaxial mechanical testing of biological tissue samples.

    PubMed

    Yap, Choon Hwai; Park, Dae Woo; Dutta, Debaditya; Simon, Marc; Kim, Kang

    2015-04-01

    Being multilayered and anisotropic, biological tissues such as cardiac and arterial walls are structurally complex, making the full assessment and understanding of their mechanical behavior challenging. Current standard mechanical testing uses surface markers to track tissue deformations and does not provide deformation data below the surface. In the study described here, we found that combining mechanical testing with 3-D ultrasound speckle tracking could overcome this limitation. Rat myocardium was tested with a biaxial tester and was concurrently scanned with high-frequency ultrasound in three dimensions. The strain energy function was computed from stresses and strains using an iterative non-linear curve-fitting algorithm. Because the strain energy function consists of terms for the base matrix and for embedded fibers, spatially varying fiber orientation was also computed by curve fitting. Using finite-element simulations, we first validated the accuracy of the non-linear curve-fitting algorithm. Next, we compared experimentally measured rat myocardium strain energy function values with those in the literature and found a matching order of magnitude. Finally, we retained samples after the experiments for fiber orientation quantification using histology and found that the results satisfactorily matched those computed in the experiments. We conclude that 3-D ultrasound speckle tracking can be a useful addition to traditional mechanical testing of biological tissues and may provide the benefit of enabling fiber orientation computation.

  19. METHODS FOR USING 3-D ULTRASOUND SPECKLE TRACKING IN BIAXIAL MECHANICAL TESTING OF BIOLOGICAL TISSUE SAMPLES

    PubMed Central

    Yap, Choon Hwai; Park, Dae Woo; Dutta, Debaditya; Simon, Marc; Kim, Kang

    2014-01-01

    Being multilayered and anisotropic, biological tissues such as cardiac and arterial walls are structurally complex, making full assessment and understanding of their mechanical behavior challenging. Current standard mechanical testing uses surface markers to track tissue deformations and does not provide deformation data below the surface. In the study described here, we found that combining mechanical testing with 3-D ultrasound speckle tracking could overcome this limitation. Rat myocardium was tested with a biaxial tester and was concurrently scanned with high-frequency ultrasound in three dimensions. The strain energy function was computed from stresses and strains using an iterative non-linear curve-fitting algorithm. Because the strain energy function consists of terms for the base matrix and for embedded fibers, spatially varying fiber orientation was also computed by curve fitting. Using finite-element simulations, we first validated the accuracy of the non-linear curve-fitting algorithm. Next, we compared experimentally measured rat myocardium strain energy function values with those in the literature and found a matching order of magnitude. Finally, we retained samples after the experiments for fiber orientation quantification using histology and found that the results satisfactorily matched those computed in the experiments. We conclude that 3-D ultrasound speckle tracking can be a useful addition to traditional mechanical testing of biological tissues and may provide the benefit of enabling fiber orientation computation. PMID:25616585

  20. Development of a Wireless and Near Real-Time 3D Ultrasound Strain Imaging System.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhaohong; Chen, Yongdong; Huang, Qinghua

    2016-04-01

    Ultrasound elastography is an important medical imaging tool for characterization of lesions. In this paper, we present a wireless and near real-time 3D ultrasound strain imaging system. It uses a 3D translating device to control a commercial linear ultrasound transducer to collect pre-compression and post-compression radio-frequency (RF) echo signal frames. The RF frames are wirelessly transferred to a high-performance server via a local area network (LAN). A dynamic programming strain estimation algorithm is implemented with the compute unified device architecture (CUDA) on the graphic processing unit (GPU) in the server to calculate the strain image after receiving a pre-compression RF frame and a post-compression RF frame at the same position. Each strain image is inserted into a strain volume which can be rendered in near real-time. We take full advantage of the translating device to precisely control the probe movement and compression. The GPU-based parallel computing techniques are designed to reduce the computation time. Phantom and in vivo experimental results demonstrate that our system can generate strain volumes with good quality and display an incrementally reconstructed volume image in near real-time.

  1. Benchmarking of state-of-the-art needle detection algorithms in 3D ultrasound data volumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pourtaherian, Arash; Zinger, Svitlana; de With, Peter H. N.; Korsten, Hendrikus H. M.; Mihajlovic, Nenad

    2015-03-01

    Ultrasound-guided needle interventions are widely practiced in medical diagnostics and therapy, i.e. for biopsy guidance, regional anesthesia or for brachytherapy. Needle guidance using 2D ultrasound can be very challenging due to the poor needle visibility and the limited field of view. Since 3D ultrasound transducers are becoming more widely used, needle guidance can be improved and simplified with appropriate computer-aided analyses. In this paper, we compare two state-of-the-art 3D needle detection techniques: a technique based on line filtering from literature and a system employing Gabor transformation. Both algorithms utilize supervised classification to pre-select candidate needle voxels in the volume and then fit a model of the needle on the selected voxels. The major differences between the two approaches are in extracting the feature vectors for classification and selecting the criterion for fitting. We evaluate the performance of the two techniques using manually-annotated ground truth in several ex-vivo situations of different complexities, containing three different needle types with various insertion angles. This extensive evaluation provides better understanding on the limitations and advantages of each technique under different acquisition conditions, which is leading to the development of improved techniques for more reliable and accurate localization. Benchmarking results that the Gabor features are better capable of distinguishing the needle voxels in all datasets. Moreover, it is shown that the complete processing chain of the Gabor-based method outperforms the line filtering in accuracy and stability of the detection results.

  2. Pitch-catch phase aberration correction of multiple isoplanatic patches for 3-D transcranial ultrasound imaging.

    PubMed

    Lindsey, Brooks D; Smith, Stephen W

    2013-03-01

    Having previously presented the ultrasound brain helmet, a system for simultaneous 3-D ultrasound imaging via both temporal bone acoustic windows, the scanning geometry of this system is utilized to allow each matrix array to serve as a correction source for the opposing array. Aberration is estimated using cross-correlation of RF channel signals, followed by least mean squares solution of the resulting overdetermined system. Delay maps are updated and real-time 3-D scanning resumes. A first attempt is made at using multiple arrival time maps to correct multiple unique aberrators within a single transcranial imaging volume, i.e., several isoplanatic patches. This adaptive imaging technique, which uses steered unfocused waves transmitted by the opposing, or beacon, array, updates the transmit and receive delays of 5 isoplanatic patches within a 64° x 64° volume. In phantom experiments, color flow voxels above a common threshold have also increased by an average of 92%, whereas color flow variance decreased by an average of 10%. This approach has been applied to both temporal acoustic windows of two human subjects, yielding increases in echo brightness in 5 isoplanatic patches with a mean value of 24.3 ± 9.1%, suggesting that such a technique may be beneficial in the future for performing noninvasive 3-D color flow imaging of cerebrovascular disease, including stroke.

  3. A compact robotic apparatus and method for 3-D ultrasound guided prostate therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bax, Jeffrey; Gardi, Lori; Montreuil, Jacques; Smith, David; Fenster, Aaron

    2007-03-01

    Ultrasound imaging has revolutionized the treatment of prostate cancer by producing increasingly accurate models of the prostate and influencing sophisticated targeting procedures for the insertion of radioactive seeds during brachytherapy. Three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound imaging, which allows 3D models of the prostate to be constructed from a series of two-dimensional images, helps to accurately target and implant seeds into the prostate. We have developed a compact robotic apparatus, as well as an effective method for guiding and controlling the insertion of transperineal needles into the prostate. This device has been designed to accurately guide a needle in 3D space so that the needle can be inserted into the prostate at an angle that does not interfere with the pubic arch. The physician can adjust manually or automatically the position of the apparatus in order to place several radioactive seeds into the prostate at designated target locations. Because many physicians are wary of conducting robotic surgical procedures, the apparatus has been developed so that the physician can position the needle for manual insertion and apply a method for manually releasing the needle without damaging the apparatus or endangering the patient.

  4. Correlation of pre-operative MRI and intra-operative 3D ultrasound to measure brain tissue shift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gobbi, David G.; Comeau, Roch M.; Lee, Belinda K. H.; Peters, Terence M.

    2000-04-01

    The usefulness of stereotactic neurosurgery performed via a craniotomy is limited because the craniotomy leads to a brain tissue shift of 10 mm on average. We have recently completed an examination of 2D intra-operative ultrasound as a means of visualization and measurement of brain shift. A commercial 3D tracking system was used for real-time registration of the ultrasound video to pre-operative MR images, and annotation of the images was used to measure the shift. More than 15 surgical cases have been performed thus far with the 2D system. We are now undertaking phantom studies with tracked 3D ultrasound, and have developed sophisticated tools for real- time overlay of ultrasound and MRI volumes. These tools include a virtual-reality view of the ultrasound probe with live ultrasound video superimposed over a 3D -rendered MRI of the brain, as well as 3D ultrasound/MRI transparency overlay views. Algorithms to automatically extract landmarks from MRI and 3D ultrasound images are under development. We aim to use these landmarks to automatically generate nonlinear warp transformations to correct the pre-operative MRI as well as surgical target coordinates for brain shift. Portions of the C++ code developed for this project have been contributed to the open-source Visualization Toolkit (VTK).

  5. Correlation of transrectal and transabodominal ultrasound measurement of transition zone volume with post-operative enucleated adenoma volume in benign prostatic hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Ajayi, Idowu; Aremu, Ademola; Olajide, Abimbola; Bello, Tope; Olajide, Folake; Adetiloye, Victor

    2013-01-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia is a common disease of ageing men worldwide. Though transrectal ultrasonography (TRUS) is the standard in most parts of the world in evaluation of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), it is rarely done in some less developed countries because of non availability of appropriate probes and or specialists. Transabdominal ultrasonography (TAUS) remains the mainstay in these areas. Some controversies still exist in literature about the accuracy of TAUS evaluation of prostatic volume in patients with BPH. This study aimed at comparing the transition zone volume estimation of the prostate on transrectal and transabdominal ultrasound with post-operative enucleated adenoma volume in Nigeria patients with BPH and to suggest better predictor of prostate volume in evaluation of BPH. Forty-six (46) patients with lower urinary tract symptoms due to BPH attending the urologic clinic were evaluated ultrasonographically and eventually managed with open surgery (prostatectomy) after due counselling. The post operative samples were weighted using a sensitive top loading weighing balance and converted to volume. Since the specific gravity of the prostate is equivalent to that of water,the weight is the same as volume. Patients' ages ranged between 59 and 90 years with a peak age incidence at seventh decade. Transition Zone (TZ) volume estimation on both transrectal and transabdominal ultrasound showed positive correlation with the post operative enucleated adenoma(r = 0.594, p < 0.001) but the transrectal method was more accurate. There was no significant relationship between the TZ volume and patients' symptoms(r = 0.491, p = 0.007). Both TRUS and TAUS are comparable at TZ volume estimation and therefore TAUS can be utilized in regions where intracavitary probes and or the expertise is/are not available.

  6. Geometric modeling of hepatic arteries in 3D ultrasound with unsupervised MRA fusion during liver interventions.

    PubMed

    Gérard, Maxime; Michaud, François; Bigot, Alexandre; Tang, An; Soulez, Gilles; Kadoury, Samuel

    2017-06-01

    Modulating the chemotherapy injection rate with regard to blood flow velocities in the tumor-feeding arteries during intra-arterial therapies may help improve liver tumor targeting while decreasing systemic exposure. These velocities can be obtained noninvasively using Doppler ultrasound (US). However, small vessels situated in the liver are difficult to identify and follow in US. We propose a multimodal fusion approach that non-rigidly registers a 3D geometric mesh model of the hepatic arteries obtained from preoperative MR angiography (MRA) acquisitions with intra-operative 3D US imaging. The proposed fusion tool integrates 3 imaging modalities: an arterial MRA, a portal phase MRA and an intra-operative 3D US. Preoperatively, the arterial phase MRA is used to generate a 3D model of the hepatic arteries, which is then non-rigidly co-registered with the portal phase MRA. Once the intra-operative 3D US is acquired, we register it with the portal MRA using a vessel-based rigid initialization followed by a non-rigid registration using an image-based metric based on linear correlation of linear combination. Using the combined non-rigid transformation matrices, the 3D mesh model is fused with the 3D US. 3D US and multi-phase MRA images acquired from 10 porcine models were used to test the performance of the proposed fusion tool. Unimodal registration of the MRA phases yielded a target registration error (TRE) of [Formula: see text] mm. Initial rigid alignment of the portal MRA and 3D US yielded a mean TRE of [Formula: see text] mm, which was significantly reduced to [Formula: see text] mm ([Formula: see text]) after affine image-based registration. The following deformable registration step allowed for further decrease of the mean TRE to [Formula: see text] mm. The proposed tool could facilitate visualization and localization of these vessels when using 3D US intra-operatively for either intravascular or percutaneous interventions to avoid vessel perforation.

  7. 3D visualization of strain in abdominal aortic aneurysms based on navigated ultrasound imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brekken, Reidar; Kaspersen, Jon Harald; Tangen, Geir Arne; Dahl, Torbjørn; Hernes, Toril A. N.; Myhre, Hans Olav

    2007-03-01

    The criterion for recommending treatment of an abdominal aortic aneurysm is that the diameter exceeds 50-55 mm or shows a rapid increase. Our hypothesis is that a more accurate prediction of aneurysm rupture is obtained by estimating arterial wall strain from patient specific measurements. Measuring strain in specific parts of the aneurysm reveals differences in load or tissue properties. We have previously presented a method for in vivo estimation of circumferential strain by ultrasound. In the present work, a position sensor attached to the ultrasound probe was used for combining several 2D ultrasound sectors into a 3D model. The ultrasound was registered to a computed-tomography scan (CT), and the strain values were mapped onto a model segmented from these CT data. This gave an intuitive coupling between anatomy and strain, which may benefit both data acquisition and the interpretation of strain. In addition to potentially provide information relevant for assessing the rupture risk of the aneurysm in itself, this model could be used for validating simulations of fluid-structure interactions. Further, the measurements could be integrated with the simulations in order to increase the amount of patient specific information, thus producing a more reliable and accurate model of the biomechanics of the individual aneurysm. This approach makes it possible to extract several parameters potentially relevant for predicting rupture risk, and may therefore extend the basis for clinical decision making.

  8. Using rotation for steerable needle detection in 3D color-Doppler ultrasound images.

    PubMed

    Mignon, Paul; Poignet, Philippe; Troccaz, Jocelyne

    2015-08-01

    This paper demonstrates a new way to detect needles in 3D color-Doppler volumes of biological tissues. It uses rotation to generate vibrations of a needle using an existing robotic brachytherapy system. The results of our detection for color-Doppler and B-Mode ultrasound are compared to a needle location reference given by robot odometry and robot ultrasound calibration. Average errors between detection and reference are 5.8 mm on needle tip for B-Mode images and 2.17 mm for color-Doppler images. These results show that color-Doppler imaging leads to more robust needle detection in noisy environment with poor needle visibility or when needle interacts with other objects.

  9. Self-contained image mapping of placental vasculature in 3D ultrasound-guided fetoscopy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Liangjing; Wang, Junchen; Ando, Takehiro; Kubota, Akihiro; Yamashita, Hiromasa; Sakuma, Ichiro; Chiba, Toshio; Kobayashi, Etsuko

    2016-09-01

    Surgical navigation technology directed at fetoscopic procedures is relatively underdeveloped compared with other forms of endoscopy. The narrow fetoscopic field of views and the vast vascular network on the placenta make examination and photocoagulation treatment of twin-to-twin transfusion syndrome challenging. Though ultrasonography is used for intraoperative guidance, its navigational ability is not fully exploited. This work aims to integrate 3D ultrasound imaging and endoscopic vision seamlessly for placental vasculature mapping through a self-contained framework without external navigational devices. This is achieved through development, integration, and experimentation of novel navigational modules. Firstly, a framework design that addresses the current limitations based on identified gaps is conceptualized. Secondly, integration of navigational modules including (1) ultrasound-based localization, (2) image alignment, and (3) vision-based tracking to update the scene texture map is implemented. This updated texture map is projected to an ultrasound-constructed 3D model for photorealistic texturing of the 3D scene creating a panoramic view of the moving fetoscope. In addition, a collaborative scheme for the integration of the modular workflow system is proposed to schedule updates in a systematic fashion. Finally, experiments are carried out to evaluate each modular variation and an integrated collaborative scheme of the framework. The modules and the collaborative scheme are evaluated through a series of phantom experiments with controlled trajectories for repeatability. The collaborative framework demonstrated the best accuracy (5.2 % RMS error) compared with all the three single-module variations during the experiment. Validation on an ex vivo monkey placenta shows visual continuity of the freehand fetoscopic panorama. The proposed developed collaborative framework and the evaluation study of the framework variations provide analytical insights for

  10. Measurement of anastomosis geometry in lower extremity bypass grafts with 3-D ultrasound imaging.

    PubMed

    Leotta, Daniel F; Primozich, Jean F; Lowe, Christopher M; Karr, Leni N; Bergelin, Robert O; Beach, Kirk W; Zierler, R Eugene

    2005-10-01

    The attachment sites of lower extremity bypass grafts are known to exhibit a wide range of geometries. Factors that determine the geometry of a given anastomosis include graft material, graft site, native vessel size, graft size and individual patient anatomy. Therefore, it is difficult to specify a standard anastomosis geometry before surgery and difficult to predict the effect of the geometry on long-term graft patency. We have used 3-D ultrasound imaging to study 46 proximal anastomoses of lower limb bypass grafts. We have developed methods to characterize the 3-D geometry of the anastomosis in terms of component sizes and angles. These detailed geometric measurements describe a range of anastomosis geometries and establish standardized parameters across cases that can be used to relate anastomosis geometry to outcome.

  11. Improved Visualization of Intracranial Vessels with Intraoperative Coregistration of Rotational Digital Subtraction Angiography and Intraoperative 3D Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Podlesek, Dino; Meyer, Tobias; Morgenstern, Ute; Schackert, Gabriele; Kirsch, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Ultrasound can visualize and update the vessel status in real time during cerebral vascular surgery. We studied the depiction of parent vessels and aneurysms with a high-resolution 3D intraoperative ultrasound imaging system during aneurysm clipping using rotational digital subtraction angiography as a reference. Methods We analyzed 3D intraoperative ultrasound in 39 patients with cerebral aneurysms to visualize the aneurysm intraoperatively and the nearby vascular tree before and after clipping. Simultaneous coregistration of preoperative subtraction angiography data with 3D intraoperative ultrasound was performed to verify the anatomical assignment. Results Intraoperative ultrasound detected 35 of 43 aneurysms (81%) in 39 patients. Thirty-nine intraoperative ultrasound measurements were matched with rotational digital subtraction angiography and were successfully reconstructed during the procedure. In 7 patients, the aneurysm was partially visualized by 3D-ioUS or was not in field of view. Post-clipping intraoperative ultrasound was obtained in 26 and successfully reconstructed in 18 patients (69%) despite clip related artefacts. The overlap between 3D-ioUS aneurysm volume and preoperative rDSA aneurysm volume resulted in a mean accuracy of 0.71 (Dice coefficient). Conclusions Intraoperative coregistration of 3D intraoperative ultrasound data with preoperative rotational digital subtraction angiography is possible with high accuracy. It allows the immediate visualization of vessels beyond the microscopic field, as well as parallel assessment of blood velocity, aneurysm and vascular tree configuration. Although spatial resolution is lower than for standard angiography, the method provides an excellent vascular overview, advantageous interpretation of 3D-ioUS and immediate intraoperative feedback of the vascular status. A prerequisite for understanding vascular intraoperative ultrasound is image quality and a successful match with preoperative

  12. 3D Ultrasound Can Contribute to Planning CT to Define the Target for Partial Breast Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Berrang, Tanya S.; Truong, Pauline T. Popescu, Carmen; Drever, Laura; Kader, Hosam A.; Hilts, Michelle L.; Mitchell, Tracy; Soh, S.Y.; Sands, Letricia; Silver, Stuart; Olivotto, Ivo A.

    2009-02-01

    Purpose: The role of three-dimensional breast ultrasound (3D US) in planning partial breast radiotherapy (PBRT) is unknown. This study evaluated the accuracy of coregistration of 3D US to planning computerized tomography (CT) images, the seroma contouring consistency of radiation oncologists using the two imaging modalities and the clinical situations in which US was associated with improved contouring consistency compared to CT. Materials and Methods: Twenty consecutive women with early-stage breast cancer were enrolled prospectively after breast-conserving surgery. Subjects underwent 3D US at CT simulation for adjuvant RT. Three radiation oncologists independently contoured the seroma on separate CT and 3D US image sets. Seroma clarity, seroma volumes, and interobserver contouring consistency were compared between the imaging modalities. Associations between clinical characteristics and seroma clarity were examined using Pearson correlation statistics. Results: 3D US and CT coregistration was accurate to within 2 mm or less in 19/20 (95%) cases. CT seroma clarity was reduced with dense breast parenchyma (p = 0.035), small seroma volume (p < 0.001), and small volume of excised breast tissue (p = 0.01). US seroma clarity was not affected by these factors (p = NS). US was associated with improved interobserver consistency compared with CT in 8/20 (40%) cases. Of these 8 cases, 7 had low CT seroma clarity scores and 4 had heterogeneously to extremely dense breast parenchyma. Conclusion: 3D US can be a useful adjunct to CT in planning PBRT. Radiation oncologists were able to use US images to contour the seroma target, with improved interobserver consistency compared with CT in cases with dense breast parenchyma and poor CT seroma clarity.

  13. In Vivo Validation of a 3-D Ultrasound System for Imaging the Lateral Ventricles of Neonates.

    PubMed

    Kishimoto, Jessica; Fenster, Aaron; Lee, David S C; de Ribaupierre, Sandrine

    2016-04-01

    Intra-ventricular hemorrhage, with the resultant cerebral ventricle dilation, is a common cause of brain injury in preterm neonates. Clinically, monitoring is performed using 2-D ultrasound (US); however, its clinical utility in dilation is limited because it cannot provide accurate measurements of irregular volumes such as those of the ventricles, and this might delay treatment until the patient's condition deteriorates severely. We have developed a 3-D US system to image the lateral ventricles of neonates within the confines of incubators. We describe an in vivo ventricle volume validation study in two parts: (i) comparisons between ventricle volumes derived from 3-D US and magnetic resonance images obtained within 24 h; and (ii) the difference between 3-D US ventricle volumes before and after clinically necessary interventions (ventricle taps), which remove cerebral spinal fluid. Magnetic resonance imaging ventricle volumes were found to be 13% greater than 3-D US ventricle volumes; however, we observed high correlations (R(2) = 0.99) when comparing the two modalities. Differences in ventricle volume pre- and post-intervention compared with the reported volume of cerebrospinal fluid removed also were highly correlated (R(2) = 0.93); the slope was not found to be statistically significantly different from 1 (p < 0.05), and the y-intercept was not found to be statistically different from 0 (p < 0.05). Comparison between 3-D US images can detect the volume change after neonatal intra-ventricular hemorrhage. This could be used to determine which patients will have progressive ventricle dilation and allow for more timely surgical interventions. However, 3-D US ventricle volumes should not be directly compared with magnetic resonance imaging ventricle volumes.

  14. Evaluation of Gastric Volumes: Comparison of 3-D Ultrasound and Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Buisman, Wijnand J; Mauritz, Femke A; Westerhuis, Wouter E; Gilja, Odd Helge; van der Zee, David C; van Herwaarden-Lindeboom, Maud Y A

    2016-07-01

    To investigate gastric accommodation, accurate measurements of gastric volumes are necessary. An excellent technique to measure gastric volumes is dynamic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Unfortunately, dynamic MRI is expensive and not always available. A new 3-D ultrasound (US) method using a matrix transducer was developed to measure gastric volumes. In this prospective study, 14 healthy volunteers underwent a dynamic MRI and a 3-D US. Gastric volumes were calculated with intra-gastric liquid content and total gastric volume. Mean postprandial liquid gastric content was 397 ± 96.5 mL. Mean volume difference was 1.0 mL with limits of agreement of -8.9 to 10.9 mL. When gastric air was taken into account, mean total gastric volume was 540 ± 115.4 mL SD. Mean volume difference was 2.3 mL with limits of agreement of -21.1 to 26.4 mL. The matrix 3-D US showed excellent agreement with dynamic MRI. Therefore matrix 3-D US is a reliable alternative to measure gastric volumes.

  15. 3D conformal MRI-guided transurethral ultrasound therapy: results of gel phantom experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    N'Djin, W. A.; Burtnyk, M.; McCormick, S.; Bronskill, M.; Chopra, R.

    2011-09-01

    MRI-guided transurethral ultrasound therapy shows promise for minimally invasive treatment of localized prostate cancer. Previous in-vivo studies demonstrated the feasibility of performing conservative treatments using real-time temperature feedback to control accurately the establishment of coagulative lesions within circumscribed prostate regions. This in-vitro study tested device configuration and control options for achieving full prostate treatments. A multi-channel MRI compatible ultrasound therapy system was evaluated in gel phantoms using 3 canine prostate models. Prostate profiles were 5 mm-step-segmented from T2-weighted MR images performed during previous in-vivo experiments. During ultrasound exposures, each ultrasound element was controlled independently by the 3D controller. Decisions on acoustic power, frequency, and device rotation rate were made in real time based on MR thermometry feedback and prostate radii. Low and high power treatment approaches using maximum acoustic powers of 10 or 20 W.cm-2 were tested as well as single and dual-frequency strategies (4.05/13.10 MHz). The dual-frequency strategy used either the fundamental frequency or the 3rd harmonic component, depending on the prostate radius. The 20 W.cm-2 dual frequency approach was the most efficient configuration in achieving full prostate treatments. Treatment times were about half the duration of those performed with 10 W.cm-2 configurations. Full prostate coagulations were performed in 16.3±6.1 min at a rate of 1.8±0.2 cm3.min-1, and resulted in very little undertreated tissue (<3%). Surrounding organs positioned beyond a safety distance of 1.4±1.0 mm from prostate boundaries were not damaged, particularly rectal wall tissues. In this study, a 3D, MR-thermometry-guided transurethral ultrasound therapy was validated in vitro in a tissue-mimicking phantom for performing full prostate treatment. A dual-frequency configuration with 20 W.cm-2 ultrasound intensity exposure showed good

  16. A 3D reconstruction solution to ultrasound Joule heat density tomography based on acousto-electric effect: a simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, R.; Song, A.; Li, X. D.; Lu, Y.; Yan, R.; Xu, B.; Li, X.

    2014-10-01

    A 3D reconstruction solution to ultrasound Joule heat density tomography based on acousto-electric effect by deconvolution is proposed for noninvasive imaging of biological tissue. Compared with ultrasound current source density imaging, ultrasound Joule heat density tomography doesn't require any priori knowledge of conductivity distribution and lead fields, so it can gain better imaging result, more adaptive to environment and with wider application scope. For a general 3D volume conductor with broadly distributed current density field, in the AE equation the ultrasound pressure can't simply be separated from the 3D integration, so it is not a common modulation and basebanding (heterodyning) method is no longer suitable to separate Joule heat density from the AE signals. In the proposed method the measurement signal is viewed as the output of Joule heat density convolving with ultrasound wave. As a result, the internal 3D Joule heat density can be reconstructed by means of Wiener deconvolution. A series of computer simulations set for breast cancer imaging applications, with consideration of ultrasound beam diameter, noise level, conductivity contrast, position dependency and size of simulated tumors, have been conducted to evaluate the feasibility and performance of the proposed reconstruction method. The computer simulation results demonstrate that high spatial resolution 3D ultrasound Joule heat density imaging is feasible using the proposed method, and it has potential applications to breast cancer detection and imaging of other organs.

  17. Treatment envelope evaluation in transcranial magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound utilizing 3D MR thermometry

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Current clinical targets for transcranial magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound (tcMRgFUS) are all located close to the geometric center of the skull convexity, which minimizes challenges related to focusing the ultrasound through the skull bone. Non-central targets will have to be reached to treat a wider variety of neurological disorders and solid tumors. Treatment envelope studies utilizing two-dimensional (2D) magnetic resonance (MR) thermometry have previously been performed to determine the regions in which therapeutic levels of FUS can currently be delivered. Since 2D MR thermometry was used, very limited information about unintended heating in near-field tissue/bone interfaces could be deduced. Methods In this paper, we present a proof-of-concept treatment envelope study with three-dimensional (3D) MR thermometry monitoring of FUS heatings performed in a phantom and a lamb model. While the moderate-sized transducer used was not designed for transcranial geometries, the 3D temperature maps enable monitoring of the entire sonication field of view, including both the focal spot and near-field tissue/bone interfaces, for full characterization of all heating that may occur. 3D MR thermometry is achieved by a combination of k-space subsampling and a previously described temporally constrained reconstruction method. Results We present two different types of treatment envelopes. The first is based only on the focal spot heating—the type that can be derived from 2D MR thermometry. The second type is based on the relative near-field heating and is calculated as the ratio between the focal spot heating and the near-field heating. This utilizes the full 3D MR thermometry data achieved in this study. Conclusions It is shown that 3D MR thermometry can be used to improve the safety assessment in treatment envelope evaluations. Using a non-optimal transducer, it is shown that some regions where therapeutic levels of FUS can be delivered, as suggested by

  18. Segmentation of Skin Tumors in High-Frequency 3-D Ultrasound Images.

    PubMed

    Sciolla, Bruno; Cowell, Lester; Dambry, Thibaut; Guibert, Benoît; Delachartre, Philippe

    2017-01-01

    High-frequency 3-D ultrasound imaging is an informative tool for diagnosis, surgery planning and skin lesion examination. The purpose of this article was to describe a semi-automated segmentation tool providing easy access to the extent, shape and volume of a lesion. We propose an adaptive log-likelihood level-set segmentation procedure using non-parametric estimates of the intensity distribution. The algorithm has a single parameter to control the smoothness of the contour, and we describe how a fixed value yields satisfactory segmentation results with an average Dice coefficient of D = 0.76. The algorithm is implemented on a grid, which increases the speed by a factor of 100 compared with a standard pixelwise segmentation. We compare the method with parametric methods making the hypothesis of Rayleigh or Nakagami distributed signals, and illustrate that our method has greater robustness with similar computational speed. Benchmarks are made on realistic synthetic ultrasound images and a data set of nine clinical 3-D images acquired with a 50-MHz imaging system. The proposed algorithm is suitable for use in a clinical context as a post-processing tool.

  19. Accuracy evaluation of a 3D ultrasound-guided biopsy system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wooten, Walter J.; Nye, Jonathan A.; Schuster, David M.; Nieh, Peter T.; Master, Viraj A.; Votaw, John R.; Fei, Baowei

    2013-03-01

    Early detection of prostate cancer is critical in maximizing the probability of successful treatment. Current systematic biopsy approach takes 12 or more randomly distributed core tissue samples within the prostate and can have a high potential, especially with early disease, for a false negative diagnosis. The purpose of this study is to determine the accuracy of a 3D ultrasound-guided biopsy system. Testing was conducted on prostate phantoms created from an agar mixture which had embedded markers. The phantoms were scanned and the 3D ultrasound system was used to direct the biopsy. Each phantom was analyzed with a CT scan to obtain needle deflection measurements. The deflection experienced throughout the biopsy process was dependent on the depth of the biopsy target. The results for markers at a depth of less than 20 mm, 20-30 mm, and greater than 30 mm were 3.3 mm, 4.7 mm, and 6.2 mm, respectively. This measurement encapsulates the entire biopsy process, from the scanning of the phantom to the firing of the biopsy needle. Increased depth of the biopsy target caused a greater deflection from the intended path in most cases which was due to an angular incidence of the biopsy needle. Although some deflection was present, this system exhibits a clear advantage in the targeted biopsy of prostate cancer and has the potential to reduce the number of false negative biopsies for large lesions.

  20. Accuracy Evaluation of a 3D Ultrasound-guided Biopsy System.

    PubMed

    Wooten, Walter J; Nye, Jonathan A; Schuster, David M; Nieh, Peter T; Master, Viraj A; Votaw, John R; Fei, Baowei

    2013-03-14

    Early detection of prostate cancer is critical in maximizing the probability of successful treatment. Current systematic biopsy approach takes 12 or more randomly distributed core tissue samples within the prostate and can have a high potential, especially with early disease, for a false negative diagnosis. The purpose of this study is to determine the accuracy of a 3D ultrasound-guided biopsy system. Testing was conducted on prostate phantoms created from an agar mixture which had embedded markers. The phantoms were scanned and the 3D ultrasound system was used to direct the biopsy. Each phantom was analyzed with a CT scan to obtain needle deflection measurements. The deflection experienced throughout the biopsy process was dependent on the depth of the biopsy target. The results for markers at a depth of less than 20 mm, 20-30 mm, and greater than 30 mm were 3.3 mm, 4.7 mm, and 6.2 mm, respectively. This measurement encapsulates the entire biopsy process, from the scanning of the phantom to the firing of the biopsy needle. Increased depth of the biopsy target caused a greater deflection from the intended path in most cases which was due to an angular incidence of the biopsy needle. Although some deflection was present, this system exhibits a clear advantage in the targeted biopsy of prostate cancer and has the potential to reduce the number of false negative biopsies for large lesions.

  1. Infections caused by fluoroquinolone-resistant Escherichia coli following transrectal ultrasound-guided biopsy of the prostate

    PubMed Central

    Suwantarat, Nuntra; Rudin, Susan D.; Marshall, Steven H.; Hujer, Andrea M.; Perez, Federico; Hujer, Kristine M.; Domitrovic, T. Nicholas J.; Dumford, Donald M.; Donskey, Curtis J.; Bonomo, Robert A.

    2014-01-01

    An increase in the number of infections with fluoroquinolone (FQ)-resistant Escherichia coli following transrectal ultrasound-guided biopsy of the prostate (TRUBP) was observed in Louis Stokes Cleveland Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center. This study investigated whether these infections were caused by a single strain of E. coli possessing distinct resistance and virulence determinants. Of 15 patients with urinary tract infection, 5 were complicated with bacteraemia and 1 with prostate abscess. Thirteen FQ-resistant isolates demonstrated mutations in the quinolone resistance-determining regions (QRDRs) of gyrA and parC but did not contain plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance determinants; blaCTX-M and blaCMY as well as genes coding for extended-spectrum β-lactamases were also absent. Genes encoding aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes were discovered in an isolate that was gentamicin-resistant. The most prevalent sequence type (ST) was ST43 (n = 7), corresponding to ST131 in Achtman's multilocus sequence typing (MLST) scheme. These isolates (i) were distinguished as >95% similar by repetitive sequence-based PCR (rep-PCR), (ii) belonged to the virulent phylogenetic group B2 and (iii) contained plasmid types FIB, FIA and Frep. Several other strain types were present (ST2, ST27, ST30, ST44, ST472, ST494, ST511 and ST627). Non-ST43 isolates infected patients with more co-morbidities but contained similar virulence factors (kpsMTII, iutA, papAH/papC and sfa/focDE). In our hospital, E. coli isolates causing TRUBP-related infection are quite heterogeneous (ST131 and other ST types) and are part of phylogenetic groups containing multiple virulence factors. PMID:25024933

  2. [XPS Greenlight photoselective vaporization for benign prostatic hyperplasia: analysis of the learning curve and contribution of transrectal ultrasound monitoring].

    PubMed

    Misrai, V; Faron, M; Elman, B; Bordier, B; Portalez, D; Guillotreau, J

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the XPS laser learning curve of one single surgeon with no previous experience of PVP and the impact of the use of reel time transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) monitoring. Retrospective analysis of the first 100 patients: group 1 (1st-49th patient without TRUS) and group 2 (50th-100th with TRUS). The learning curve was analyzed through technical variables: vaporization time/intervention time (VT/IT) (%), energy delivered (J)/prostate volume (J/mL) and delivered energy (J/s or Watt), peroperative conversion into monopolar transurethral resection, postoperative complication, duration of catheterization and hospitalization and evolution of International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS), PSA level, prostate residual volume and Qmax. Relationships between variables were evaluated by analysing the covariance (R 2 software. 14.2). A significant increase in VT/IT (P=0.0001) and the energy delivered per mL prostate (P=0.043) was reported in group 1. The average energy delivered per second was significantly higher in group 2 (P=0.0016). No difference was observed in terms of intra- or postoperative complication and catheterization time. The duration of hospitalization was significantly shorter in group 2 (P=0.03). The use of TRUS was associated with a gain of energy delivered by prostate volume at the end of learning curve (P=0.018). Prostate residual volume was significantly lower in the group 2 (P=0.0004). In our experience, 50 procedures are required to achieve the learning curve of PVP. The use of reel time TRUS would increase the energy delivered by prostate volume. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Documenting the location of systematic transrectal ultrasound-guided prostate biopsies: correlation with multi-parametric MRI

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Sheng; Kruecker, Jochen; Locklin, Julia; Pang, Yuxi; Shah, Vijay; Bernardo, Marcelino; Baccala, Angelo; Rastinehad, Ardeshir; Benjamin, Compton; Merino, Maria J.; Wood, Bradford J.; Choyke, Peter L.; Pinto, Peter A.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract During transrectal ultrasound (TRUS)-guided prostate biopsies, the actual location of the biopsy site is rarely documented. Here, we demonstrate the capability of TRUS-magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) image fusion to document the biopsy site and correlate biopsy results with multi-parametric MRI findings. Fifty consecutive patients (median age 61 years) with a median prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level of 5.8 ng/ml underwent 12-core TRUS-guided biopsy of the prostate. Pre-procedural T2-weighted magnetic resonance images were fused to TRUS. A disposable needle guide with miniature tracking sensors was attached to the TRUS probe to enable fusion with MRI. Real-time TRUS images during biopsy and the corresponding tracking information were recorded. Each biopsy site was superimposed onto the MRI. Each biopsy site was classified as positive or negative for cancer based on the results of each MRI sequence. Sensitivity, specificity, and receiver operating curve (ROC) area under the curve (AUC) values were calculated for multi-parametric MRI. Gleason scores for each multi-parametric MRI pattern were also evaluated. Six hundred and 5 systemic biopsy cores were analyzed in 50 patients, of whom 20 patients had 56 positive cores. MRI identified 34 of 56 positive cores. Overall, sensitivity, specificity, and ROC area values for multi-parametric MRI were 0.607, 0.727, 0.667, respectively. TRUS-MRI fusion after biopsy can be used to document the location of each biopsy site, which can then be correlated with MRI findings. Based on correlation with tracked biopsies, T2-weighted MRI and apparent diffusion coefficient maps derived from diffusion-weighted MRI are the most sensitive sequences, whereas the addition of delayed contrast enhancement MRI and three-dimensional magnetic resonance spectroscopy demonstrated higher specificity consistent with results obtained using radical prostatectomy specimens. PMID:21450548

  4. Transrectal ultrasound guided biopsy of the prostate: random sextant versus biopsies of sono-morphologically suspicious lesions.

    PubMed

    Loch, Tillmann; Eppelmann, Ursula; Lehmann, Jan; Wullich, Bernd; Loch, Annemie; Stöckle, Michael

    2004-11-01

    Transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) guided multiple systematic random biopsies are presently the method of choice for determining the presence or absence of prostate cancer. TRUS image information is only used to guide the biopsy needle into the prostate, but not to localize and target cancerous lesions. Our aim in this study was to evaluated the possible predictive value of tumor suspicious endosonographic lesions of the prostate for prostate biopsies. We prospectively compared six systematic biopsies with lesion guided biopsies in a consecutive series of 217 patients. All patients had a prostate specific antigen (PSA) level of >4 ng/ml without a history of prostate disease. In a subgroup of 145 men with sonomorphologic lesions suggestive for prostate cancer (hypoechoic areas or asymmetries predominantly in the peripheral zone), lesion-guided biopsies were taken in addition to the systematic biopsies. We evaluated the number of tumors which were diagnosed or missed by both of the biopsy strategies. Of the 217 evaluated patients, 64 (29%) had histology confirmed cancer. Four patients with negative sextant biopsies had a positive TRUS guided biopsy. Out of 145 patients with a normal TRUS, three were cancer positive by sextant biopsy. A total of 1,387 individual biopsy cores were evaluated. Of the 1,304 systematic biopsy cores, 182 (14%) were positive and 1,122 (86%) negative. Of the 329 TRUS lesion guided biopsy cores 139 (42%) were positive and 190 (58%) negative. Patients with tumor suggestive TRUS lesions have a considerably higher risk of being diagnosed with prostate cancer compared to patients without such lesions. Both systematic sextant and TRUS lesion guided biopsies missed detectable prostate cancer in a minority of patients. Taking the endosonographic morphology of the prostate gland into consideration for biopsy strategies may improve the quality of the biopsy and avoid unnecessary invasive procedures in selected cases.

  5. Design and test of a PC-based portable three-dimensional ultrasound software system Ultra3D.

    PubMed

    Xu, X George; Hum Na, Yong; Zhang, Tiantian

    2008-02-01

    Currently, portable ultrasound units lack three-dimensional (3D) image display, limiting their potential usefulness especially under remote and hostile operating environments where information must be intuitive and objective. A freehand 3D image processing and visualization software package, Ultra3D, has been developed and tested, especially to work with a miniaturized linear-array transducer probe that is connected to a laptop PC. This paper presents the software design and method to integrate Ultra3D into Terason's miniaturized SmartProbe for freehand 3D ultrasound imaging. Since images generated by Ultra3D are in a digital imaging and communications in medicine (DICOM) format, data sharing with others is easy.

  6. [Interest using 3D ultrasound and MRI fusion biopsy for prostate cancer detection].

    PubMed

    Marien, A; De Castro Abreu, A; Gill, I; Villers, A; Ukimura, O

    2017-09-01

    The strategic therapy for prostate cancer depends on histo-pronostics data, which could be upgraded by obtaining targeted biopsies (TB) with MRI (magnetic resonance imagery) fusion 3D ultrasound. To compare diagnostic yield of image fusion guided prostate biopsy using image fusion of multi-parametric MRI (mpMRI) with 3D-TRUS. Between January 2010 and April 2013, 179 consecutive patients underwent outpatient TRUS biopsy using the real-time 3D TRUS tracking system (Urostation™). These patients underwent MRI-TRUS fusion targeted biopsies (TB) with 3D volume data of the MRI elastically fused with 3D TRUS at the time of biopsy. A hundred and seventy-three patients had TBs with fusion. Mean biopsy core per patient were 11.1 (6-14) for SB and 2.4 (1-6) for TB. SBs were positive in 11% compared to 56% for TB (P<0.001). TB outperformed systematic biopsy(SB) in overall any cancer detection rate, detection of clinically significant cancer (58% vs. 36%), cancer core length (6.8mm vs. 2.8mm), and cancer rate per core (P<0.001). In multivariable logistic regression, with TB we have more chance to find a clinically significant cancer (OR:3.72 [2-6.95]). When both TRUS and MRI are positive, there is 2.73 more chance to find a clinically significant cancer. MR/TRUS elastic fusion-guided biopsies outperform systematic random biopsies in diagnosing clinically significant cancer. Ability of interpretation of real-time TRUS is essential to perform the higher level of MR/US fusion and should be use for active surveillance. 4. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Diagnosis and Monitoring of Prostatic Lesions: A Comparison of Three Modalities: Multiparametric MRI, Fusion MRI/Transrectal Ultrasound (TRUS), and Traditional TRUS

    PubMed Central

    Joyce, Peter H; Pavlovic, Zoran J; Lim, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) has been the gold standard of imaging for diagnosing prostate cancer for decades but is plagued by user error and undersampling. We aim to explore imaging modalities that are now being used in combination or alone for screening, diagnosis, and/or active surveillance of prostate cancer. Methods: A PubMed literature search was performed to include articles published up to April 2016. Data were extracted and analyzed. Results: Several large-scale studies have found an increased cancer detection rate in MRI-targeted lesions with an improved ability to target anterior lesions as well as an increased cancer detection in high-risk cancers using fusion platforms vs TRUS alone. Conclusions: To date, there have been few head-to-head trials to directly compare the use of multiparametric MRI (mpMRI), transrectal ultrasound, and MRI-ultrasound fusion modalities for accurate and reliable detection, active surveillance, or biopsy procedure success rates. Further investigation utilizing these modalities are needed before they can be relied upon in active surveillance management, although mpMRI appears to be currently the most reliable in monitoring and diagnosing prostate lesions. PMID:27588224

  8. Thermal analysis of the surrounding anatomy during 3-D MRI-guided transurethral ultrasound prostate therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burtnyk, Mathieu; Chopra, Rajiv; Bronskill, Michael

    2010-03-01

    Previous numerical simulations have shown that MRI-guided transurethral ultrasound therapy can generate highly accurate volumes of thermal coagulation conforming to 3-D human prostate geometries. The goal of this work is to simulate, quantify and evaluate the thermal impact of these treatments on the rectum, pelvic bone, neurovascular bundles (NVB) and urinary sphincters. This study used twenty 3-D anatomical models of prostate cancer patients and detailed bio-acoustic simulations incorporating an active feedback algorithm which controlled a rotating, planar ultrasound transducer (17-4×3 mm elements, 4.7/9.7 MHz, 10 Wac/cm2). Heating of the adjacent surrounding anatomy was evaluated using thermal tolerances reported in the literature. Heating of the rectum poses the most important safety concern and is influenced largely by the water temperature flowing through an endorectal cooling device; temperatures of 7-37° C are required to limit potential damage to less than 10 mm3 on the outer 1 mm layer of rectum. Significant heating of the pelvic bone was predicted in 30% of the patient models with an ultrasound frequency of 4.7 MHz; setting the frequency to 9.7 MHz when the bone is less than 10 mm away from the prostate reduced heating in all cases below the threshold for irreversible damage. Heating of the NVB was significant in 75% of the patient models in the absence of treatment planning; this proportion was reduced to 5% by using treatment margins of up to 4 mm. To avoid damaging the urinary sphincters, margins from the transducer of 2-4 mm should be used, depending on the transurethral cooling temperature. Simulations show that MRI-guided transurethral therapy can treat the entire prostate accurately. Strategies have been developed which, along with careful treatment planning, can be used to avoid causing thermal injury to the rectum, pelvic bone, NVB and urinary sphincters.

  9. Craniosynostosis: prenatal diagnosis by 2D/3D ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Helfer, Talita Micheletti; Peixoto, Alberto Borges; Tonni, Gabriele; Araujo Júnior, Edward

    2016-09-01

    Craniosynostosis is defined as the process of premature fusion of one or more of the cranial sutures. It is a common condition that occurs in about 1 to 2,000 live births. Craniosynostosis may be classified in primary or secondary. It is also classified as nonsyndromic or syndromic. According to suture commitment, craniosynostosis may affect a single suture or multiple sutures. There is a wide range of syndromes involving craniosynostosis and the most common are Apert, Pffeifer, Crouzon, Shaethre-Chotzen and Muenke syndromes. The underlying etiology of nonsyndromic craniosynostosis is unknown. Mutations in the fibroblast growth factor (FGF) signalling pathway play a crucial role in the etiology of craniosynostosis syndromes. Prenatal ultrasound`s detection rate of craniosynostosis is low. Nowadays, different methods can be applied for prenatal diagnosis of craniosynostosis, such as two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), computed tomography (CT) scan and, finally, molecular diagnosis. The presence of craniosynostosis may affect the birthing process. Fetuses with craniosynostosis also have higher rates of perinatal complications. In order to avoid the risks of untreated craniosynostosis, children are usually treated surgically soon after postnatal diagnosis.

  10. Experimental evaluation of ultrasound-guided 3D needle steering in biological tissue.

    PubMed

    Abayazid, Momen; Vrooijink, Gustaaf J; Patil, Sachin; Alterovitz, Ron; Misra, Sarthak

    2014-11-01

    In this paper, we present a system capable of automatically steering bevel tip flexible needles under ultrasound guidance toward stationary and moving targets in gelatin phantoms and biological tissue while avoiding stationary and moving obstacles. We use three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound to track the needle tip during the procedure. Our system uses a fast sampling-based path planner to compute and periodically update a feasible path to the target that avoids obstacles. We then use a novel control algorithm to steer the needle along the path in a manner that reduces the number of needle rotations, thus reducing tissue damage. We present experimental results for needle insertion procedures for both stationary and moving targets and obstacles for up to 90 mm of needle insertion. We obtained a mean targeting error of [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] mm in gelatin-based phantom and biological tissue, respectively. The achieved submillimeter accuracy suggests that our approach is sufficient to target the smallest lesions ([Formula: see text] 2 mm) that can be detected using state-of-the-art ultrasound imaging systems.

  11. Experimental Evaluation of Ultrasound-Guided 3D Needle Steering in Biological Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Abayazid, Momen; Vrooijink, Gustaaf J.; Patil, Sachin; Alterovitz, Ron; Misra, Sarthak

    2014-01-01

    Purpose In this paper, we present a system capable of automatically steering bevel-tip flexible needles under ultrasound guidance towards stationary and moving targets in gelatin phantoms and biological tissue while avoiding stationary and moving obstacles. We use three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound to track the needle tip during the procedure. Methods Our system uses a fast sampling-based path planner to compute and periodically update a feasible path to the target that avoids obstacles. We then use a novel control algorithm to steer the needle along the path in a manner that reduces the number of needle rotations, thus reducing tissue damage. We present experimental results for needle insertion procedures for both stationary and moving targets and obstacles for up to 90 mm of needle insertion. Results We obtained a mean targeting error of 0.32 ± 0.10 mm and 0.38 ± 0.19 mm in gelatin-based phantom and biological tissue, respectively. Conclusions The achieved submillimeter accuracy suggests that our approach is sufficient to target the smallest lesions (ϕ2 mm) that can be detected using state-of-the-art ultrasound imaging systems. PMID:24562744

  12. Multi-drug resistant E.coli urosepsis in physicians following transrectal ultrasound guided prostate biopsies--three cases including one death.

    PubMed

    Carlson, William H; Bell, David G; Lawen, Joseph G; Rendon, Ricardo A

    2010-04-01

    Three male physicians underwent transrectal ultrasound guided prostate biopsies for elevated prostate-specific antigen levels or irregular digital rectal exam findings. All three of these patients developed urosepsis secondary to multi-drug resistant organisms despite antibiotic prophylaxis. There are increasing reports of infectious complications following prostate biopsy caused by multi-drug resistant organisms. These cases highlight the potentially lethal risks to healthcare workers who are more likely to harbor multi-drug resistant organisms than the general population. Further research into preoperative assessment and appropriate antibiotic prophylaxis in all potentially high risk patients is warranted.

  13. Fast myocardial strain estimation from 3D ultrasound through elastic image registration with analytic regularization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Bidisha; Heyde, Brecht; Alessandrini, Martino; D'hooge, Jan

    2016-04-01

    Image registration techniques using free-form deformation models have shown promising results for 3D myocardial strain estimation from ultrasound. However, the use of this technique has mostly been limited to research institutes due to the high computational demand, which is primarily due to the computational load of the regularization term ensuring spatially smooth cardiac strain estimates. Indeed, this term typically requires evaluating derivatives of the transformation field numerically in each voxel of the image during every iteration of the optimization process. In this paper, we replace this time-consuming step with a closed-form solution directly associated with the transformation field resulting in a speed up factor of ~10-60,000, for a typical 3D B-mode image of 2503 and 5003 voxels, depending upon the size and the parametrization of the transformation field. The performance of the numeric and the analytic solutions was contrasted by computing tracking and strain accuracy on two realistic synthetic 3D cardiac ultrasound sequences, mimicking two ischemic motion patterns. Mean and standard deviation of the displacement errors over the cardiac cycle for the numeric and analytic solutions were 0.68+/-0.40 mm and 0.75+/-0.43 mm respectively. Correlations for the radial, longitudinal and circumferential strain components at end-systole were 0.89, 0.83 and 0.95 versus 0.90, 0.88 and 0.92 for the numeric and analytic regularization respectively. The analytic solution matched the performance of the numeric solution as no statistically significant differences (p>0.05) were found when expressed in terms of bias or limits-of-agreement.

  14. Early detection of liver fibrosis in rats using 3-D ultrasound Nakagami imaging: a feasibility evaluation.

    PubMed

    Ho, Ming-Chih; Tsui, Po-Hsiang; Lee, Yu-Hsin; Chen, Yung-Sheng; Chen, Chiung-Nien; Lin, Jen-Jen; Chang, Chien-Cheng

    2014-09-01

    We investigated the feasibility of using 3-D ultrasound Nakagami imaging to detect the early stages of liver fibrosis in rats. Fibrosis was induced in livers of rats (n = 60) by intraperitoneal injection of 0.5% dimethylnitrosamine (DMN). Group 1 was the control group, and rats in groups 2-6 received DMN injections for 1-5 weeks, respectively. Each rat was sacrificed to perform 3-D ultrasound scanning of the liver in vitro using a single-element transducer of 6.5 MHz. The 3-D raw data acquired at a sampling rate of 50 MHz were used to construct 3-D Nakagami images. The liver specimen was further used for histologic analysis with hematoxylin and eosin and Masson staining to score the degree of liver fibrosis. The results indicate that the Metavir scores of the hematoxylin and eosin-stained sections in Groups 1-4 were 0 (defined as early liver fibrosis in this study), and those in groups 5 and 6 ranged from 1 to 2 and 2 to 3, respectively. To quantify the degree of early liver fibrosis, the histologic sections with Masson stain were analyzed to calculate the number of fiber-related blue pixels. The number of blue pixels increased from (2.36 ± 0.79) × 10(4) (group 1) to (7.68 ± 2.62) × 10(4) (group 4) after DMN injections for 3 weeks, indicating that early stages of liver fibrosis were successfully induced in rats. The Nakagami parameter increased from 0.36 ± 0.02 (group 1) to 0.55 ± 0.03 (group 4), with increasing numbers of blue pixels in the Masson-stained sections (p-value < 0.05, t-test). We concluded that 3-D Nakagami imaging has potential in the early detection of liver fibrosis in rats and may serve as an image-based pathologic model to visually track fibrosis formation and growth.

  15. Spatiotemporal non-rigid image registration for 3D ultrasound cardiac motion estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loeckx, D.; Ector, J.; Maes, F.; D'hooge, J.; Vandermeulen, D.; Voigt, J.-U.; Heidbüchel, H.; Suetens, P.

    2007-03-01

    We present a new method to evaluate 4D (3D + time) cardiac ultrasound data sets by nonrigid spatio-temporal image registration. First, a frame-to-frame registration is performed that yields a dense deformation field. The deformation field is used to calculate local spatiotemporal properties of the myocardium, such as the velocity, strain and strain rate. The field is also used to propagate particular points and surfaces, representing e.g. the endo-cardial surface over the different frames. As such, the 4D path of these point is obtained, which can be used to calculate the velocity by which the wall moves and the evolution of the local surface area over time. The wall velocity is not angle-dependent as in classical Doppler imaging, since the 4D data allows calculating the true 3D motion. Similarly, all 3D myocardium strain components can be estimated. Combined they result in local surface area or volume changes which van be color-coded as a measure of local contractability. A diagnostic method that strongly benefits from this technique is cardiac motion and deformation analysis, which is an important aid to quantify the mechanical properties of the myocardium.

  16. A new combined prior based reconstruction method for compressed sensing in 3D ultrasound imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uddin, Muhammad S.; Islam, Rafiqul; Tahtali, Murat; Lambert, Andrew J.; Pickering, Mark R.

    2015-03-01

    Ultrasound (US) imaging is one of the most popular medical imaging modalities, with 3D US imaging gaining popularity recently due to its considerable advantages over 2D US imaging. However, as it is limited by long acquisition times and the huge amount of data processing it requires, methods for reducing these factors have attracted considerable research interest. Compressed sensing (CS) is one of the best candidates for accelerating the acquisition rate and reducing the data processing time without degrading image quality. However, CS is prone to introduce noise-like artefacts due to random under-sampling. To address this issue, we propose a combined prior-based reconstruction method for 3D US imaging. A Laplacian mixture model (LMM) constraint in the wavelet domain is combined with a total variation (TV) constraint to create a new regularization regularization prior. An experimental evaluation conducted to validate our method using synthetic 3D US images shows that it performs better than other approaches in terms of both qualitative and quantitative measures.

  17. Intracranial Catheter for Integrated 3D Ultrasound Imaging & Hyperthermia: Feasibility Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herickhoff, Carl D.; Light, Edward D.; Bing, Kristin Frinkley; Mukundan, Srinivasan; Grant, Gerald A.; Wolf, Patrick D.; Dixon-Tulloch, Ellen; Shih, Timothy; Hsu, Stephen J.; Smith, Stephen W.

    2009-04-01

    In this study, we investigated the feasibility of an intracranial catheter transducer capable of real-time 3D (RT3D) imaging and ultrasound hyperthermia, for application in the visualization and treatment of tumors in the brain. We designed and constructed a 12 Fr, integrated matrix and linear array catheter transducer prototype for combined RT3D imaging and heating capability. This dual-mode catheter incorporated 153 matrix array elements and 11 linear array elements, on a 0.2 mm pitch, with a total aperture size of 8.4 mm×2.3 mm. This array achieved a 3.5° C in vitro temperature rise at a 2 cm focal distance in tissue-mimicking material. The dual-mode catheter prototype was compared with a Siemens 10 Fr AcuNav™ catheter as a gold standard in experiments assessing image quality and therapeutic potential, and both probes were used in a canine brain model to image anatomical structures and color Doppler blood flow and to attempt in vivo heating.

  18. 3D endobronchial ultrasound reconstruction and analysis for multimodal image-guided bronchoscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zang, Xiaonan; Bascom, Rebecca; Gilbert, Christopher R.; Toth, Jennifer W.; Higgins, William E.

    2014-03-01

    State-of-the-art image-guided intervention (IGI) systems for lung-cancer management draw upon high-resolution three-dimensional multi-detector computed-tomography (MDCT) images and bronchoscopic video. An MDCT scan provides a high-resolution three-dimensional (3D) image of the chest that is used for preoperative procedure planning, while bronchoscopy gives live intraoperative video of the endobronchial airway tree structure. However, because neither source provides live extraluminal information on suspect nodules or lymph nodes, endobronchial ultrasound (EBUS) is often introduced during a procedure. Unfortunately, existing IGI systems provide no direct synergistic linkage between the MDCT/video data and EBUS data. Hence, EBUS proves difficult to use and can lead to inaccurate interpretations. To address this drawback, we present a prototype of a multimodal IGI system that brings together the various image sources. The system enables 3D reconstruction and visualization of structures depicted in the 2D EBUS video stream. It also provides a set of graphical tools that link the EBUS data directly to the 3D MDCT and bronchoscopic video. Results using phantom and human data indicate that the new system could potentially enable smooth natural incorporation of EBUS into the system-level work flow of bronchoscopy.

  19. The Effect of Ultrasound Stimulation on the Cytoskeletal Organization of Chondrocytes Seeded In 3D Matrices

    PubMed Central

    Noriega, Sandra; Hasanova, Gulnara; Subramanian, Anuradha

    2013-01-01

    The impact of low intensity diffuse ultrasound (LIDUS) stimulation on the cytoskeletal organization of chondrocytes seeded in 3D scaffolds was evaluated. Chondrocytes seeded on 3D chitosan matrices were exposed to LIDUS at 5.0 MHz (~15kPa, 51-secs, 4-applications/day) in order to study the organization of actin, tubulin and vimentin. The results showed that actin presented a cytosolic punctuated distribution, tubulin presented a quasi parallel organization of microtubules whereas vimentin distribution was unaffected. Chondrocytes seeded on 3D scaffolds responded to US stimulation by the disruption of actin stress fibers and were sensitive to the presence of ROCK inhibitor (Y27632). The gene expression of ROCK-I, a key element in the formation of stress fibers and mDia1, was significantly up-regulated under the application of US. We conclude that the results of both the cytoskeletal analyses and gene expression support the argument that the presence of punctuated actin upon US stimulation was accompanied by the up-regulation of the RhoA/ROCK pathway. PMID:22987069

  20. Registration of 3D ultrasound computer tomography and MRI for evaluation of tissue correspondences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopp, T.; Dapp, R.; Zapf, M.; Kretzek, E.; Gemmeke, H.; Ruiter, N. V.

    2015-03-01

    3D Ultrasound Computer Tomography (USCT) is a new imaging method for breast cancer diagnosis. In the current state of development it is essential to correlate USCT with a known imaging modality like MRI to evaluate how different tissue types are depicted. Due to different imaging conditions, e.g. with the breast subject to buoyancy in USCT, a direct correlation is demanding. We present a 3D image registration method to reduce positioning differences and allow direct side-by-side comparison of USCT and MRI volumes. It is based on a two-step approach including a buoyancy simulation with a biomechanical model and free form deformations using cubic B-Splines for a surface refinement. Simulation parameters are optimized patient-specifically in a simulated annealing scheme. The method was evaluated with in-vivo datasets resulting in an average registration error below 5mm. Correlating tissue structures can thereby be located in the same or nearby slices in both modalities and three-dimensional non-linear deformations due to the buoyancy are reduced. Image fusion of MRI volumes and USCT sound speed volumes was performed for intuitive display. By applying the registration to data of our first in-vivo study with the KIT 3D USCT, we could correlate several tissue structures in MRI and USCT images and learn how connective tissue, carcinomas and breast implants observed in the MRI are depicted in the USCT imaging modes.

  1. Dual-frequency super harmonic imaging piezoelectric transducers for transrectal ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jinwook; Li, Sibo; Kasoji, Sandeep; Dayton, Paul A.; Jiang, Xiaoning

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, a 2/14 MHz dual-frequency single-element transducer and a 2/22 MHz sub-array (16/48-elements linear array) transducer were developed for contrast enhanced super-harmonic ultrasound imaging of prostate cancer with the low frequency ultrasound transducer as a transmitter for contrast agent (microbubble) excitation and the high frequency transducer as a receiver for detection of nonlinear responses from microbubbles. The 1-3 piezoelectric composite was used as active materials of the single-element transducers due to its low acoustic impedance and high coupling factor. A high dielectric constant PZT ceramic was used for the sub-array transducer due to its high dielectric property induced relatively low electrical impedance. The possible resonance modes of the active elements were estimated using finite element analysis (FEA). The pulse-echo response, peak-negative pressure and bubble response were tested, followed by in vitro contrast imaging tests using a graphite-gelatin tissue-mimicking phantom. The single-element dual frequency transducer (8 × 4 × 2 mm3) showed a -6 dB fractional bandwidth of 56.5% for the transmitter, and 41.8% for the receiver. A 2 MHz-transmitter (730 μm pitch and 6.5 mm elevation aperture) and a 22 MHz-receiver (240 μm pitch and 1.5 mm aperture) of the sub-array transducer exhibited -6 dB fractional bandwidth of 51.0% and 40.2%, respectively. The peak negative pressure at the far field was about -1.3 MPa with 200 Vpp, 1-cycle 2 MHz burst, which is high enough to excite microbubbles for nonlinear responses. The 7th harmonic responses from micro bubbles were successfully detected in the phantom imaging test showing a contrast-to-tissue ratio (CTR) of 16 dB.

  2. An intraoperative 3D ultrasound system for tumor margin determination in breast cancer surgery.

    PubMed

    DeJean, Paul; Brackstone, Muriel; Fenster, Aaron

    2010-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the clinical utility of a portable three-dimensional ultrasound (3DUS) system to be used for surgical guidance of lumpectomy surgeries. In 11%-60% of lumpectomy surgeries, a second surgery is required to fully resect the tumor. Previous studies have used 3DUS as a guidance tool with the hope of more accuracy in resecting the entire tumor during the first surgery. However, they utilized larger systems, which are not easily integrated into the operating room. The portable 3DUS scanning system we developed consisted of a motorized "tilt" scanner coupled to a Terason t3000 portable ultrasound machine (Terason Ultrasound, Burlington, MA). The 3DUS system was evaluated by measuring agar "tumor" phantoms of known volumes and acquiring and segmenting images from nine patients undergoing lumpectomy. Experiments on simulated agar tumor phantoms have shown that our device could be used to measure objects with smooth, well-defined boundaries of known volume with an error of 3%. It was possible to view and segment estimated tumor margins from the clinical images in three dimensions. Correspondence between measurements obtained in the laboratory and the operating room varied with tumor geometry and the degree of spiculation in the ultrasound image. The measured values obtained by the system did not correspond closely with those obtained using histology. However, a more accurate histological measurement using 3D histology may provide a better basis for comparison. The results of imaging simulated agar tumor phantoms indicate the system's consistency in measuring objects of known volume and geometry. The system could be used for segmenting the approximate boundary of lumpectomy patients' breast tumors relative to inserted guide wires. The potential advantages of this system are a reduction in the number of re-excision surgeries required and a reduction in the operative time with the patient under anesthesia.

  3. Defining the medial-lateral axis of an anatomical femur coordinate system using freehand 3D ultrasound imaging.

    PubMed

    Passmore, Elyse; Sangeux, Morgan

    2016-03-01

    Hip rotation from gait analysis informs clinical decisions regarding correction of femoral torsional deformities. However, it is among the least repeatable due to discrepancies in determining the medial-lateral axis of the femur. Conventional or functional calibration methods may be used to define the axis but there is no benchmark to evaluate these methods. Freehand 3D ultrasound, the coupling of ultrasound with 3D motion capture, may provide such a benchmark. We measured the accuracy in vitro and repeatability in vivo of determining the femur condylar axis from freehand 3D ultrasound. The condylar axis provided the reference medial-lateral axis of the femur and was used to evaluate one conventional method and three functional calibration methods, applied to three calibration movements. Ten healthy subjects (20 limbs) underwent 3D gait analysis and freehand 3D ultrasound. The functional calibration methods were a transformation technique, a geometrical method and a method that minimises variance of knee varus-valgus kinematics (DynaKAD). The conventional method used markers over the femoral epicondyles. The condylar axis determined by 3D ultrasound showed good accuracy in vitro, 1.6° (SD: 0.3°) and good repeatability in vivo, 0.2° (RSMD: 2.3°). The DynaKAD method applied to the walking calibration movement determined the medial-lateral axis closest to the ultrasound reference. The average angular difference in the transverse plane was 3.1° (SD: 6.1°). Freehand 3D ultrasound offers an accurate, non-invasive and relatively fast method to locate the medial-lateral axis of the femur for gait analysis.

  4. Mitral valve analysis using a novel 3D holographic display: a feasibility study of 3D ultrasound data converted to a holographic screen.

    PubMed

    Beitnes, Jan Otto; Klæboe, Lars Gunnar; Karlsen, Jørn Skaarud; Urheim, Stig

    2015-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to test the feasibility of analyzing 3D ultrasound data on a novel holographic display. An increasing number of mini-invasive procedures for mitral valve repair require more effective visualization to improve patient safety and speed of procedures. A novel 3D holographic display has been developed and may have the potential to guide interventional cardiac procedures in the near future. Forty patients with degenerative mitral valve disease were analyzed. All had complete 2D transthoracic (TTE) and transoesophageal (TEE) echocardiographic examinations. In addition, 3D TTE of the mitral valve was obtained and recordings were converted from the echo machine to the holographic screen. Visual inspection of the mitral valve during surgery or TEE served as the gold standard. 240 segments were analyzed by 2 independent observers. A total of 53 segments were prolapsing. The majority included P2 (31), the remaining located at A2 (8), A3 (6), P3 (5), P1 (2) and A1 (1). The sensitivity and specificity of the 3D display was 87 and 99 %, respectively (observer I), and for observer II 85 and 97 %, respectively. The accuracies and precisions were 96.7 and 97.9 %, respectively, (observer I), 94.3 and 88.2 % (observer II), and inter-observer agreement was 0.954 with Cohen's Kappa 0.86. We were able to convert 3D ultrasound data to the holographic display. A very high accuracy and precision was shown, demonstrating the feasibility of analyzing 3D echo of the mitral valve on the holographic screen.

  5. Quantification of cerebral ventricle volume change of preterm neonates using 3D ultrasound images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yimin; Kishimoto, Jessica; Qiu, Wu; de Ribaupierre, Sandrine; Fenster, Aaron; Chiu, Bernard

    2015-03-01

    Intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH) is a major cause of brain injury in preterm neonates. Quantitative measurement of ventricular dilation or shrinkage is important for monitoring patients and in evaluation of treatment options. 3D ultrasound (US) has been used to monitor the ventricle volume as a biomarker for ventricular dilation. However, volumetric quantification does not provide information as to where dilation occurs. The location where dilation occurs may be related to specific neurological problems later in life. For example, posterior horn enlargement, with thinning of the corpus callosum and parietal white matter fibres, could be linked to poor visuo-spatial abilities seen in hydrocephalic children. In this work, we report on the development and application of a method used to analyze local surface change of the ventricles of preterm neonates with IVH from 3D US images. The technique is evaluated using manual segmentations from 3D US images acquired in two imaging sessions. The surfaces from baseline and follow-up were registered and then matched on a point-by-point basis. The distance between each pair of corresponding points served as an estimate of local surface change of the brain ventricle at each vertex. The measurements of local surface change were then superimposed on the ventricle surface to produce the 3D local surface change map that provide information on the spatio-temporal dilation pattern of brain ventricles following IVH. This tool can be used to monitor responses to different treatment options, and may provide important information for elucidating the deficiencies a patient will have later in life.

  6. Intraoperative 3D ultrasound guidance system for permanent breast seed implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michael, Justin; Morton, Daniel; Batchelar, Deidre; Hilts, Michelle; Fenster, Aaron

    2017-03-01

    Permanent breast seed implantation (PBSI) is a single-visit technique for accelerated partial breast irradiation that uses a template and needles to implant seeds of Pd-103 under 2D ultrasound (US) guidance. The short treatment time is advantageous given the widely hypothesized link between treatment burden and mastectomy use. However, limitations of 2D US contribute to high operator dependence and seed placement error that we aim to address by developing a 3D US guidance system. A 3D US scanner for PBSI and a mechanism for template localization have been developed and validated. The 3D US system mechatronically moves and tracks a 2D US transducer over a 5 cm translation and 60° tilt, reconstructing the 2D images into a 3D volume as they are acquired. Additionally, a localizing arm, tracked via encoded joints and mounted to the scanner, determines template position by localizing divots on a modified needle template. Volume reconstruction was validated using linear measurements of a grid phantom and volumetric measurements of two surgical cavity phantoms. Localizing arm measurement accuracy was established using a testing jig with divots at known positions. Imaging volume was rigidly registered to scanner geometry using a string phantom mounted to a test jig. Lastly, volunteer scans were conducted to demonstrate clinical applicability. Median linear and average volumetric measurements were within +/-1.4% of nominal and +/-4.1% of water displacement measurements, respectively. Median measurement accuracy of the localizing arm was 0.475 mm. Imaging volume target registration error was 0.458 mm. Volunteer scans produced clinical quality images.

  7. Anterior and posterior compartment 3D endovaginal ultrasound anatomy based on direct histologic comparison.

    PubMed

    Shobeiri, S Abbas; White, Dena; Quiroz, Lieschen H; Nihira, Mikio A

    2012-08-01

    We used direct histologic comparison to validate the use of 3D endovaginal ultrasound (EVUS) as a novel and emerging technology for evaluating the structures found in the anterior and posterior pelvic floor compartments. A young nulliparous female pelvis specimen was dissected and histologic slides were prepared by making 8-Micron-thick sagittal cuts. The slides were stained with Mallory trichrome and arranged to form large sections encompassing each anterior and posterior sagittal plane. Healthy nulliparous women underwent 3D EVUS to obtain 3D cubes of the anterior and posterior compartments. Two investigators independently evaluated the anterior and posterior midsagittal structures. The investigators mutually viewed the images and calculated urethral and anal sphincter measurements. Thirty-one nulliparous women underwent 3D EVUS; 77% of the participants were Caucasian, with mean age 31.8 [standard deviation (SD) 5.8] and mean body mass index (BMI) of 28.5 (SD 7.9). The following mean (SD) measurements were obtained: urethral length 36 mm (± 5); striated urogenital sphincter area 0.6 cm(2) (± 0.16); longitudinal and circular smooth muscle area 1.1 cm(2) (± 0.4); urethral complex width 14 mm (± 2); urethral complex area 1.3 cm(2) (± 0.4); internal anal sphincter length 26 mm (± 4); internal anal sphincter thickness 3.2 mm (± 0.8); and rectovaginal septum length 31 mm (± 5). The agreement for visualization of structures was as follows: vesical trigone 96% (κ = 0.65), trigonal ring 94% (κ = 0.8), trigonal plate 84% (κ = 0.6); longitudinal and circular smooth muscle 100%; compressor urethra 97% (κ = 0.85); striated urogenital sphincter 97% (κ = 0.85); rectovaginal septum 100%; internal anal sphincter 100%; external anal sphincter subdivisions 100%. Three-dimensional EVUS can be used to visualize structures of the anterior and posterior compartments in nullipara.

  8. Segmentation of the common carotid artery with active shape models from 3D ultrasound images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xin; Jin, Jiaoying; He, Wanji; Yuchi, Ming; Ding, Mingyue

    2012-03-01

    Carotid atherosclerosis is a major cause of stroke, a leading cause of death and disability. In this paper, we develop and evaluate a new segmentation method for outlining both lumen and adventitia (inner and outer walls) of common carotid artery (CCA) from three-dimensional ultrasound (3D US) images for carotid atherosclerosis diagnosis and evaluation. The data set consists of sixty-eight, 17× 2× 2, 3D US volume data acquired from the left and right carotid arteries of seventeen patients (eight treated with 80mg atorvastain and nine with placebo), who had carotid stenosis of 60% or more, at baseline and after three months of treatment. We investigate the use of Active Shape Models (ASMs) to segment CCA inner and outer walls after statin therapy. The proposed method was evaluated with respect to expert manually outlined boundaries as a surrogate for ground truth. For the lumen and adventitia segmentations, respectively, the algorithm yielded Dice Similarity Coefficient (DSC) of 93.6%+/- 2.6%, 91.8%+/- 3.5%, mean absolute distances (MAD) of 0.28+/- 0.17mm and 0.34 +/- 0.19mm, maximum absolute distances (MAXD) of 0.87 +/- 0.37mm and 0.74 +/- 0.49mm. The proposed algorithm took 4.4 +/- 0.6min to segment a single 3D US images, compared to 11.7+/-1.2min for manual segmentation. Therefore, the method would promote the translation of carotid 3D US to clinical care for the fast, safety and economical monitoring of the atherosclerotic disease progression and regression during therapy.

  9. Location of residual cancer after transrectal high-intensity focused ultrasound ablation for clinically localized prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Boutier, Romain; Girouin, Nicolas; Cheikh, Alexandre Ben; Belot, Aurélien; Rabilloud, Muriel; Gelet, Albert; Chapelon, Jean-Yves; Rouvière, Olivier

    2011-12-01

    What's known on the subject ? and What does the study add? Transrectal High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) ablation has been used as a minimally invasive treatment for localized prostate cancer for 15 years. Five-year disease-free survival rates of 66-78% have been reported, challenging the results of external-beam radiation therapy. Usually, a 6-mm safety margin is used in the apex to preserve the urinary sphincter and potency. The influence of this 6-mm margin on the results of the treatment has never been assessed. This retrospective study of a cohort of 99 patients who underwent systematic biopsy 3-6 months after HIFU ablation for prostate cancer (with a 6-mm safety margin in the apex) shows that post-HIFU residual cancer is found more frequently in the apex. Therefore, new strategies improving the prostate destruction at the apex while preserving the urinary continence need to be found. • To evaluate whether the location (apex/midgland/base) of prostate cancer influences the risk of incomplete transrectal high-intensity focused ultrasonography (HIFU) ablation. • We retrospectively studied 99 patients who underwent prostate cancer HIFU ablation (Ablatherm; EDAP, Vaulx-en-Velin, France) with a 6-mm safety margin at the apex, and had systematic biopsies 3-6 months after treatment. • Locations of positive pre- and post-HIFU sextants were compared. • The present study included two analyses. First, sextants negative before and positive after treatment were recoded as positive/positive, hypothesizing that cancer had been missed at pretreatment biopsy. Second, patients with such sextants were excluded. • Pre-HIFU biopsies found cancer in all patients and in 215/594 sextants (36.2%); 55 (25.6%) positive sextants were in the apex, 86 (40%) in the midgland and 74 (34.4%) in the base. • After treatment, residual cancer was found in 36 patients (36.4%) and 50 sextants (8.4%); 30 (60%) positive sextants were in the apex, 12 (24%) in the midgland

  10. Automated 3D ultrasound elastography of the breast: a phantom validation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendriks, Gijs A. G. M.; Holländer, Branislav; Menssen, Jan; Milkowski, Andy; Hansen, Hendrik H. G.; de Korte, Chris L.

    2016-04-01

    In breast cancer screening, the automated breast volume scanner (ABVS) was introduced as an alternative for mammography since the latter technique is less suitable for women with dense breasts. Although clinical studies show promising results, clinicians report two disadvantages: long acquisition times (>90 s) introducing breathing artefacts, and high recall rates due to detection of many small lesions of uncertain malignant potential. Technical improvements for faster image acquisition and better discrimination between benign and malignant lesions are thus required. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate if 3D ultrasound elastography using plane-wave imaging is feasible. Strain images of a breast elastography phantom were acquired by an ABVS-mimicking device that allowed axial and elevational movement of the attached transducer. Pre- and post-deformation volumes were acquired with different constant speeds (between 1.25 and 40.0 mm s-1) and by three protocols: Go-Go (pre- and post-volumes with identical start and end positions), Go-Return (similar to Go-Go with opposite scanning directions) and Control (pre- and post-volumes acquired per position, this protocol can be seen as reference). Afterwards, 2D and 3D cross-correlation and strain algorithms were applied to the acquired volumes and the results were compared. The Go-Go protocol was shown to be superior with better strain image quality (CNRe and SNRe) than Go-Return and to be similar as Control. This can be attributed to applying opposite mechanical forces to the phantom during the Go-Return protocol, leading to out-of-plane motion. This motion was partly compensated by using 3D cross-correlation. However, the quality was still inferior to Go-Go. Since these results were obtained in a phantom study with controlled deformations, the effect of possible uncontrolled in vivo tissue motion artefacts has to be addressed in future studies. In conclusion, it seems feasible to implement 3D ultrasound

  11. 3D quantitative breast ultrasound analysis for differentiating fibroadenomas and carcinomas smaller than 1cm.

    PubMed

    Meel-van den Abeelen, A S S; Weijers, G; van Zelst, J C M; Thijssen, J M; Mann, R M; de Korte, C L

    2017-03-01

    In (3D) ultrasound, accurate discrimination of small solid masses is difficult, resulting in a high frequency of biopsies for benign lesions. In this study, we investigate whether 3D quantitative breast ultrasound (3DQBUS) analysis can be used for improving non-invasive discrimination between benign and malignant lesions. 3D US studies of 112 biopsied solid breast lesions (size <1cm), were included (34 fibroadenomas and 78 invasive ductal carcinomas). The lesions were manually delineated and, based on sonographic criteria used by radiologists, 3 regions of interest were defined in 3D for analysis: ROI (ellipsoid covering the inside of the lesion), PER (peritumoural surrounding: 0.5mm around the lesion), and POS (posterior-tumoural acoustic phenomena: region below the lesion with the same size as delineated for the lesion). After automatic gain correction (AGC), the mean and standard deviation of the echo level within the regions were calculated. For the ROI and POS also the residual attenuation coefficient was estimated in decibel per cm [dB/cm]. The resulting eight features were used for classification of the lesions by a logistic regression analysis. The classification accuracy was evaluated by leave-one-out cross-validation. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were constructed to assess the performance of the classification. All lesions were delineated by two readers and results were compared to assess the effect of the manual delineation. The area under the ROC curve was 0.86 for both readers. At 100% sensitivity, a specificity of 26% and 50% was achieved for reader 1 and 2, respectively. Inter-reader variability in lesion delineation was marginal and did not affect the accuracy of the technique. The area under the ROC curve of 0.86 was reached for the second reader when the results of the first reader were used as training set yielding a sensitivity of 100% and a specificity of 40%. Consequently, 3DQBUS would have achieved a 40% reduction in

  12. Simulation of Autonomous Robotic Multiple-Core Biopsy by 3D Ultrasound Guidance

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Kaicheng; Rogers, Albert J.; Light, Edward D.; von Allmen, Daniel; Smith, Stephen W.

    2010-01-01

    An autonomous multiple-core biopsy system guided by real-time 3D ultrasound and operated by a robotic arm with 6+1 degrees of freedom has been developed. Using a specimen of turkey breast as a tissue phantom, our system was able to first autonomously locate the phantom in the image volume and then perform needle sticks in each of eight sectors in the phantom in a single session, with no human intervention required. Based on the fraction of eight sectors successfully sampled in an experiment of five trials, a success rate of 93% was recorded. This system could have relevance in clinical procedures that involve multiple needle-core sampling such as prostate or breast biopsy. PMID:20687279

  13. Grebe dysplasia - prenatal diagnosis based on rendered 3-D ultrasound images of fetal limbs.

    PubMed

    Goncalves, Luis F; Berger, Julie A; Macknis, Jacqueline K; Bauer, Samuel T; Bloom, David A

    2017-01-01

    Grebe dysplasia is a rare skeletal dysplasia characterized by severe acromesomelic shortening of the long bones in a proximal to distal gradient of severity, with bones of the hands and feet more severely affected than those of the forearms and legs, which in turn are more severely affected than the humeri and femora. In addition, the bones of the lower extremities tend to be more severely affected than the bones of the upper extremities. Despite the severe skeletal deformities, the condition is not lethal and surviving individuals can have normal intelligence. Herein we report a case of Grebe dysplasia diagnosed at 20 weeks of gestation. Rendered 3-D ultrasound images of the fetal limbs, particularly of the characteristic tiny and globular-looking fingers and toes, were instrumental in accurately characterizing the phenotype prenatally.

  14. 3D in vivo imaging of rat hearts by high frequency ultrasound and its application in myofiber orientation wrapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Xulei; Wang, Silun; Shen, Ming; Zhang, Xiaodong; Lerakis, Stamatios; Wagner, Mary B.; Fei, Baowei

    2015-03-01

    Cardiac ultrasound plays an important role in the imaging of hearts in basic cardiovascular research and clinical examinations. 3D ultrasound imaging can provide the geometry or motion information of the heart. Especially, the wrapping of cardiac fiber orientations to the ultrasound volume could supply useful information on the stress distributions and electric action spreading. However, how to acquire 3D ultrasound volumes of the heart of small animals in vivo for cardiac fiber wrapping is still a challenging problem. In this study, we provide an approach to acquire 3D ultrasound volumes of the rat hearts in vivo. The comparison between both in vivo and ex vivo geometries indicated 90.1% Dice similarity. In this preliminary study, the evaluations of the cardiac fiber orientation wrapping errors were 24.7° for the acute angle error and were 22.4° for the inclination angle error. This 3D ultrasound imaging and fiber orientation estimation technique have potential applications in cardiac imaging.

  15. Comparison of 3-D synthetic aperture phased-array ultrasound imaging and parallel beamforming.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Morten Fischer; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2014-10-01

    This paper demonstrates that synthetic aperture imaging (SAI) can be used to achieve real-time 3-D ultrasound phased-array imaging. It investigates whether SAI increases the image quality compared with the parallel beamforming (PB) technique for real-time 3-D imaging. Data are obtained using both simulations and measurements with an ultrasound research scanner and a commercially available 3.5- MHz 1024-element 2-D transducer array. To limit the probe cable thickness, 256 active elements are used in transmit and receive for both techniques. The two imaging techniques were designed for cardiac imaging, which requires sequences designed for imaging down to 15 cm of depth and a frame rate of at least 20 Hz. The imaging quality of the two techniques is investigated through simulations as a function of depth and angle. SAI improved the full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) at low steering angles by 35%, and the 20-dB cystic resolution by up to 62%. The FWHM of the measured line spread function (LSF) at 80 mm depth showed a difference of 20% in favor of SAI. SAI reduced the cyst radius at 60 mm depth by 39% in measurements. SAI improved the contrast-to-noise ratio measured on anechoic cysts embedded in a tissue-mimicking material by 29% at 70 mm depth. The estimated penetration depth on the same tissue-mimicking phantom shows that SAI increased the penetration by 24% compared with PB. Neither SAI nor PB achieved the design goal of 15 cm penetration depth. This is likely due to the limited transducer surface area and a low SNR of the experimental scanner used.

  16. CISUS: an integrated 3D ultrasound system for IGT using a modular tracking API

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boctor, Emad M.; Viswanathan, Anand; Pieper, Steve; Choti, Michael A.; Taylor, Russell H.; Kikinis, Ron; Fichtinger, Gabor

    2004-05-01

    Ultrasound has become popular in clinical/surgical applications, both as the primary image guidance modality and also in conjunction with other modalities like CT or MRI. Three dimensional ultrasound (3DUS) systems have also demonstrated usefulness in image-guided therapy (IGT). At the same time, however, current lack of open-source and open-architecture multi-modal medical visualization systems prevents 3DUS from fulfilling its potential. Several stand-alone 3DUS systems, like Stradx or In-Vivo exist today. Although these systems have been found to be useful in real clinical setting, it is difficult to augment their functionality and integrate them in versatile IGT systems. To address these limitations, a robotic/freehand 3DUS open environment (CISUS) is being integrated into the 3D Slicer, an open-source research tool developed for medical image analysis and surgical planning. In addition, the system capitalizes on generic application programming interfaces (APIs) for tracking devices and robotic control. The resulting platform-independent open-source system may serve as a valuable tool to the image guided surgery community. Other researchers could straightforwardly integrate the generic CISUS system along with other functionalities (i.e. dual view visualization, registration, real-time tracking, segmentation, etc) to rapidly create their medical/surgical applications. Our current driving clinical application is robotically assisted and freehand 3DUS-guided liver ablation, which is fully being integrated under the CISUS-3D Slicer. Initial functionality and pre-clinical feasibility are demonstrated on phantom and ex-vivo animal models.

  17. Transvaginal 3D Image-Guided High Intensity Focused Ultrasound Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Held, Robert; Nguyen, Thuc Nghi; Vaezy, Shahram

    2005-03-01

    The goal of this project is to develop a transvaginal image-guided High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) device using piezocomposite HIFU array technology, and commercially-available ultrasound imaging. Potential applications include treatment of uterine fibroids and abnormal uterine bleeding. The HIFU transducer was an annular phased array, with a focal length range of 30-60 mm, an elliptically-shaped aperture of 35×60 mm, and an operating frequency of 3 MHz. A pillow-shaped bag with water circulation will be used for coupling the HIFU energy into the tissue. An intra-cavity imaging probe (C9-5, Philips) was integrated with the HIFU array such that the focal axis of the HIFU transducer was within the image plane. The entire device will be covered by a gel-filled condom when inserted in the vaginal cavity. To control it, software packages were developed in the LabView programming environment. An imaging algorithm processed the ultrasound image to remove noise patterns due to the HIFU signal. The device will be equipped with a three-dimensional tracking system, using a six-degrees-of-freedom articulating arm. Necrotic lesions were produced in a tissue-mimicking phantom and a turkey breast sample for all focal lengths. Various HIFU doses allow various necrotic lesion shapes, including thin ellipsoidal, spherical, wide cylindrical, and teardrop-shaped. Software control of the device allows multiple foci to be activated sequentially for desired lesion patterns. Ultrasound imaging synchronization can be achieved using hardware signals obtained from the imaging system, or software signals determined empirically for various imaging probes. The image-guided HIFU device will provide a valuable tool in visualization of uterine fibroid tumors for the purposes of planning and subsequent HIFU treatment of the tumor, all in a 3D environment. The control system allows for various lesions of different shapes to be optimally positioned in the tumor to cover the entire tumor

  18. Nonlinear 3-D simulation of high-intensity focused ultrasound therapy in the Kidney.

    PubMed

    Suomi, Visa; Jaros, Jiri; Treeby, Bradley; Cleveland, Robin

    2016-08-01

    Kidney cancer is a severe disease which can be treated non-invasively using high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) therapy. However, tissue in front of the transducer and the deep location of kidney can cause significant losses to the efficiency of the treatment. The effect of attenuation, refraction and reflection due to different tissue types on HIFU therapy of the kidney was studied using a nonlinear ultrasound simulation model. The geometry of the tissue was derived from a computed tomography (CT) dataset of a patient which had been segmented for water, bone, soft tissue, fat and kidney. The combined effect of inhomogeneous attenuation and soundspeed was found to result in an 11.0 dB drop in spatial peak-temporal average (SPTA) intensity in the kidney compared to pure water. The simulation without refraction effects showed a 6.3 dB decrease indicating that both attenuation and refraction contribute to the loss in focal intensity. The losses due to reflections at soft tissue interfaces were less than 0.1 dB. Focal point shifting due to refraction effects resulted in -1.3, 2.6 and 1.3 mm displacements in x-, y- and z-directions respectively. Furthermore, focal point splitting into several smaller subvolumes was observed. The total volume of the secondary focal points was approximately 46% of the largest primary focal point. This could potentially lead to undesired heating outside the target location and longer therapy times.

  19. Correlation of intrapartum translabial ultrasound parameters with computed tomographic 3D reconstruction of the female pelvis.

    PubMed

    Armbrust, Robert; Henrich, Wolfgang; Hinkson, Larry; Grieser, Christian; Siedentopf, Jan-Peter

    2016-07-01

    Intrapartum translabial ultrasound [ITU] can be an objective, reproducible and more reliable method than digital vaginal examination when evaluating fetal head position and station in prolonged second stage of labor. However, two-dimensional (2D) ultrasound is not sufficient to demonstrate the ischial spines and other important "landmarks" of the female pelvis. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to evaluate the distance of the interspinous plane as a parallel line to the infrapubic line in 2D ITU with the help of 3D computed tomography and digital reconstruction. Mean distance between the infrapubic plane and the tip of the ischiadic spine was 32.35 (±4.46) mm. The mean height was 166 (±7) cm; the mean weight was 67.5 (±18.4) kg. Body height and the measured distance were significantly correlated (P=0.025; correlation coefficient of 0.5), whereas body weight was not (P=0.37; correlation coefficient of -0.214). With the present results, clinicians were enabled to transfer the reproducible measurements of the "head station" by ITU to the widespread but observer-depending vaginal examination. Furthermore, ITU can be verified as an objective method in comparison to subjective palpation with the ability to optimize the evaluation of the head station according to bony structures as landmarks in a standardized application.

  20. 2D versus 3D cross-correlation-based radial and circumferential strain estimation using multiplane 2D ultrafast ultrasound in a 3D atherosclerotic carotid artery model.

    PubMed

    Fekkes, Stein; Swillens, Abigail E S; Hansen, Hendrik H G; Saris, Anne E C M; Nillesen, Maartje M; Iannaccone, Francesco; Segers, Patrick; de Korte, Chris L

    2016-08-25

    Three-dimensional strain estimation might improve the detection and localization of high strain regions in the carotid artery for identification of vulnerable plaques. This study compares 2D vs. 3D displacement estimation in terms of radial and circumferential strain using simulated ultrasound images of a patient specific 3D atherosclerotic carotid artery model at the bifurcation embedded in surrounding tissue generated with ABAQUS software. Global longitudinal motion was superimposed to the model based on literature data. A Philips L11-3 linear array transducer was simulated which transmitted plane waves at 3 alternating angles at a pulse repetition rate of 10 kHz. Inter-frame radiofrequency ultrasound data were simulated in Field II for 191 equally spaced longitudinal positions of the internal carotid artery. Accumulated radial and circumferential displacements were estimated using tracking of the inter-frame displacements estimated by a two-step normalized cross-correlation method and displacement compounding. Least squares strain estimation was performed to determine accumulated radial and circumferential strain. The performance of the 2D and 3D method was compared by calculating the root-mean-squared error of the estimated strains with respect to the reference strains obtained from the model. More accurate strain images were obtained using the 3D displacement estimation for the entire cardiac cycle. The 3D technique clearly outperformed the 2D technique in phases with high inter-frame longitudinal motion. In fact the large inter-frame longitudinal motion rendered it impossible to accurately track the tissue and cumulate strains over the entire cardiac cycle with the 2D technique.

  1. Ultrasound and 3D Skin Imaging: Methods to Evaluate Efficacy of Striae Distensae Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Bleve, Mariella; Capra, Priscilla; Pavanetto, Franca; Perugini, Paola

    2012-01-01

    Background. Over time, the striae rubra develop into striae alba that appear white, flat, and depressed. It is very important to determine the optimum striae management. In order to evaluate the effectiveness of these therapies, objective measurement tools are necessary. Objective. The aim of this study is to evaluate if ultrasonography and PRIMOS can be used to obtain an objective assessment of stretch marks type and stage; furthermore, we aim to apply these techniques to evaluate the efficacy of a topical treatment. Methods. 20 volunteers were enrolled with a two-month study. A marketed cosmetic product was used as the active over one body area. The controlateral area with stretch marks was treated with a “placebo” formulation without active, as a control. The instrumental evaluation was carried out at the beginning of the trial (baseline values or t0), after 1 month (t1), and at the end of the study (t2). Results. PRIMOS was able to measure and document striae distensae maturation; furthermore, ultrasound imaging permitted to visualize and diagnose the striae. Statistical analysis of skin roughness demonstrated a statistically significant reduction of Rp value only in a treated group. In fact, the Rp value represented a maximum peak height in the area selected. These results demonstrated that after two months of treatment only the striae rubra can be treated successfully. Conclusions. This work demonstrated that the 22MHz ultrasound can diagnose stretch marks; PRIMOS device can detect and measure striae distensae type and maturation. Furthermore, the high-frequency ultrasound and the 3D image device, described in this work, can be successfully employed in order to evaluate the efficacy of a topical treatment. PMID:22203840

  2. Ultrasound and 3D Skin Imaging: Methods to Evaluate Efficacy of Striae Distensae Treatment.

    PubMed

    Bleve, Mariella; Capra, Priscilla; Pavanetto, Franca; Perugini, Paola

    2012-01-01

    Background. Over time, the striae rubra develop into striae alba that appear white, flat, and depressed. It is very important to determine the optimum striae management. In order to evaluate the effectiveness of these therapies, objective measurement tools are necessary. Objective. The aim of this study is to evaluate if ultrasonography and PRIMOS can be used to obtain an objective assessment of stretch marks type and stage; furthermore, we aim to apply these techniques to evaluate the efficacy of a topical treatment. Methods. 20 volunteers were enrolled with a two-month study. A marketed cosmetic product was used as the active over one body area. The controlateral area with stretch marks was treated with a "placebo" formulation without active, as a control. The instrumental evaluation was carried out at the beginning of the trial (baseline values or t(0)), after 1 month (t(1)), and at the end of the study (t(2)). Results. PRIMOS was able to measure and document striae distensae maturation; furthermore, ultrasound imaging permitted to visualize and diagnose the striae. Statistical analysis of skin roughness demonstrated a statistically significant reduction of Rp value only in a treated group. In fact, the Rp value represented a maximum peak height in the area selected. These results demonstrated that after two months of treatment only the striae rubra can be treated successfully. Conclusions. This work demonstrated that the 22MHz ultrasound can diagnose stretch marks; PRIMOS device can detect and measure striae distensae type and maturation. Furthermore, the high-frequency ultrasound and the 3D image device, described in this work, can be successfully employed in order to evaluate the efficacy of a topical treatment.

  3. Optimization of the aperture and the transducer characteristics of a 3D ultrasound computer tomography system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiter, Nicole V.; Zapf, Michael; Hopp, Torsten; Dapp, Robin; Gemmeke, Hartmut

    2014-03-01

    A promising candidate for improved imaging of breast cancer is ultrasound computer tomography (USCT). The aim of this work was to design a new aperture for our full 3D USCT which extends the properties of the current aperture to a larger ROI fitting the buoyant breast in water and decreasing artifacts in transmission tomography. The optimization resulted in a larger opening angle of the transducers, a larger diameter of the aperture and an approximately homogeneous distribution of the transducers, with locally random distances. The developed optimization methods allow us to automatically generate an optimized aperture for given diameters of apertures and transducer arrays, as well as quantitative comparison to other arbitrary apertures. Thus, during the design phase of the next generation KIT 3D USCT, the image quality can be balanced against the specification parameters and given hardware and cost limitations. The methods can be applied for general aperture optimization, only limited by the assumptions of a hemispherical aperture and circular transducer arrays.

  4. A preliminary evaluation work on a 3D ultrasound imaging system for 2D array transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Xiaoli; Li, Xu; Yang, Jiali; Li, Chunyu; Song, Junjie; Ding, Mingyue; Yuchi, Ming

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents a preliminary evaluation work on a pre-designed 3-D ultrasound imaging system. The system mainly consists of four parts, a 7.5MHz, 24×24 2-D array transducer, the transmit/receive circuit, power supply, data acquisition and real-time imaging module. The row-column addressing scheme is adopted for the transducer fabrication, which greatly reduces the number of active channels . The element area of the transducer is 4.6mm by 4.6mm. Four kinds of tests were carried out to evaluate the imaging performance, including the penetration depth range, axial and lateral resolution, positioning accuracy and 3-D imaging frame rate. Several strong reflection metal objects , fixed in a water tank, were selected for the purpose of imaging due to a low signal-to-noise ratio of the transducer. The distance between the transducer and the tested objects , the thickness of aluminum, and the seam width of the aluminum sheet were measured by a calibrated micrometer to evaluate the penetration depth, the axial and lateral resolution, respectively. The experiment al results showed that the imaging penetration depth range was from 1.0cm to 6.2cm, the axial and lateral resolution were 0.32mm and 1.37mm respectively, the imaging speed was up to 27 frames per second and the positioning accuracy was 9.2%.

  5. Active contours extension and similarity indicators for improved 3D segmentation of thyroid ultrasound images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poudel, P.; Illanes, A.; Arens, C.; Hansen, C.; Friebe, M.

    2017-03-01

    Thyroid segmentation in tracked 2D ultrasound (US) using active contours has a low segmentation accuracy mainly due to the fact that smaller structures cannot be efficiently recognized and segmented. To address this issue, we propose a new similarity indicator with the main objective to provide information to the active contour algorithm concerning the regions that the active contour should continue to expand or should stop. First, a preprocessing step is carried out in order to attenuate the noise present in the US image and to increase its contrast, using histogram equalization and a median filter. In the second step, active contours are used to segment the thyroid in each 2D image of the dataset. After performing a first segmentation, two similarity indicators (ratio of mean square error, MSE and correlation between histograms) are computed at each contour point of the initial segmented thyroid between rectangles located inside and outside the obtained contour. A threshold is used on a final indicator computed from the other two indicators to find the probable regions for further segmentation using active contours. This process is repeated until no new segmentation region is identified. Finally, all the segmented thyroid images passed through a 3D reconstruction algorithm to obtain a 3D volume segmented thyroid. The results showed that including similarity indicators based on histogram equalization and MSE between inside and outside regions of the contour can help to segment difficult areas that active contours have problem to segment.

  6. Patient-specific CFD simulation of intraventricular haemodynamics based on 3D ultrasound imaging.

    PubMed

    Bavo, A M; Pouch, A M; Degroote, J; Vierendeels, J; Gorman, J H; Gorman, R C; Segers, P

    2016-09-09

    The goal of this paper is to present a computational fluid dynamic (CFD) model with moving boundaries to study the intraventricular flows in a patient-specific framework. Starting from the segmentation of real-time transesophageal echocardiographic images, a CFD model including the complete left ventricle and the moving 3D mitral valve was realized. Their motion, known as a function of time from the segmented ultrasound images, was imposed as a boundary condition in an Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian framework. The model allowed for a realistic description of the displacement of the structures of interest and for an effective analysis of the intraventricular flows throughout the cardiac cycle. The model provides detailed intraventricular flow features, and highlights the importance of the 3D valve apparatus for the vortex dynamics and apical flow. The proposed method could describe the haemodynamics of the left ventricle during the cardiac cycle. The methodology might therefore be of particular importance in patient treatment planning to assess the impact of mitral valve treatment on intraventricular flow dynamics.

  7. Characterization of neonatal patients with intraventricular hemorrhage using 3D ultrasound cerebral ventricle volumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishimoto, Jessica; Fenster, Aaron; Lee, David S. C.; de Ribaupierre, Sandrine

    2015-03-01

    One of the major non-congenital cause of neurological impairment among neonates born very preterm is intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH) - bleeding within the lateral ventricles. Most IVH patients will have a transient period of ventricle dilation that resolves spontaneously. However, those patients most at risk of long-term impairment are those who have progressive ventricle dilation as this causes macrocephaly, an abnormally enlarged head, then later causes increases intracranial pressure (ICP). 2D ultrasound (US) images through the fontanelles of the patients are serially acquired to monitor the progression of the ventricle dilation. These images are used to determine when interventional therapies such as needle aspiration of the built up CSF might be indicated for a patient. Initial therapies usually begin during the third week of life. Such interventions have been shown to decrease morbidity and mortality in IVH patients; however, this comes with risks of further hemorrhage or infection; therefore only patients requiring it should be treated. Previously we have developed and validated a 3D US system to monitor the progression of ventricle volumes (VV) in IVH patients. This system has been validated using phantoms and a small set of patient images. The aim of this work is to determine the ability of 3D US generated VV to categorize patients into those who will require interventional therapies, and those who will have spontaneous resolution. Patients with higher risks could therefore be monitored better, by re-allocating some of the resources as the low risks infants would need less monitoring.

  8. Automated kidney detection for 3D ultrasound using scan line searching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noll, Matthias; Nadolny, Anne; Wesarg, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    Ultrasound (U/S) is a fast and non-expensive imaging modality that is used for the examination of various anatomical structures, e.g. the kidneys. One important task for automatic organ tracking or computer-aided diagnosis is the identification of the organ region. During this process the exact information about the transducer location and orientation is usually unavailable. This renders the implementation of such automatic methods exceedingly challenging. In this work we like to introduce a new automatic method for the detection of the kidney in 3D U/S images. This novel technique analyses the U/S image data along virtual scan lines. Here, characteristic texture changes when entering and leaving the symmetric tissue regions of the renal cortex are searched for. A subsequent feature accumulation along a second scan direction produces a 2D heat map of renal cortex candidates, from which the kidney location is extracted in two steps. First, the strongest candidate as well as its counterpart are extracted by heat map intensity ranking and renal cortex size analysis. This process exploits the heat map gap caused by the renal pelvis region. Substituting the renal pelvis detection with this combined cortex tissue feature increases the detection robustness. In contrast to model based methods that generate characteristic pattern matches, our method is simpler and therefore faster. An evaluation performed on 61 3D U/S data sets showed, that in 55 cases showing none or minor shadowing the kidney location could be correctly identified.

  9. Anechoic sphere phantoms for estimating 3-D resolution of very-high-frequency ultrasound scanners.

    PubMed

    Madsen, Ernest; Frank, Gary; McCormick, Matthew; Deaner, Meagan; Stiles, Timothy

    2010-10-01

    Two phantoms have been constructed for assessing performance of high-frequency ultrasound imagers. They also allow for periodic quality assurance tests and training technicians in the use of higher-frequency scanners. The phantoms contain eight blocks of tissue-mimicking material; each block contains a spatially random distribution of suitably small anechoic spheres having a small distribution of diameters. The eight mean sphere diameters are distributed from 0.10 to 1.09 mm. The two phantoms differ primarily in terms of the frequency dependence of the backscatter coefficient of the background material. Because spheres have no preferred orientation, all three (spatial) dimensions of resolution contribute to sphere detection on an equal basis; thus, the resolution is termed 3-D. Two high-frequency scanners are compared. One employs single-element (fixed focus) transducers (25 and 55 MHz), and the other employs variable focus linear arrays (20, 30, and 40 MHz). The depth range for detection of spheres of each size is determined corresponding to determination of 3-D resolution as a function of depth. As expected, the single-element transducers are severely limited in useful imaging depth ranges compared with the linear arrays. In this preliminary report, only one human observer analyzed images.

  10. 3D functional ultrasound imaging of the cerebral visual system in rodents.

    PubMed

    Gesnik, Marc; Blaize, Kevin; Deffieux, Thomas; Gennisson, Jean-Luc; Sahel, José-Alain; Fink, Mathias; Picaud, Serge; Tanter, Mickaël

    2017-02-03

    3D functional imaging of the whole brain activity during visual task is a challenging task in rodents due to the complex tri-dimensional shape of involved brain regions and the fine spatial and temporal resolutions required to reveal the visual tract. By coupling functional ultrasound (fUS) imaging with a translational motorized stage and an episodic visual stimulation device, we managed to accurately map and to recover the activity of the visual cortices, the Superior Colliculus (SC) and the Lateral Geniculate Nuclei (LGN) in 3D. Cerebral Blood Volume (CBV) responses during visual stimuli were found to be highly correlated with the visual stimulus time profile in visual cortices (r=0.6), SC (r=0.7) and LGN (r=0.7). These responses were found dependent on flickering frequency and contrast, and optimal stimulus parameters for largest CBV increases were obtained. In particular, increasing the flickering frequency higher than 7Hz revealed a decrease of visual cortices response while the SC response was preserved. Finally, cross-correlation between CBV signals exhibited significant delays (d=0.35s +/-0.1s) between blood volume response in SC and visual cortices in response to our visual stimulus. These results emphasize the interest of fUS imaging as a whole brain neuroimaging modality for brain vision studies in rodent models.

  11. Comparison of two different doses of lidocaine on the pain sensation during transrectal ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Ateş, Ferhat; Dursun, Furkan; Malkoç, Ercan; Yılmaz, Ömer; Soydan, Hasan; Şen, Hüseyin; Başal, Şeref; Zekey, Fatih; Karademir, Kenan

    2016-01-01

    Objective To compare two different doses of lidocaine used for periprostatic nerve block on pain perception during transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) guided prostate biopsy. Material and methods A total of 288 patients with elevated prostate specific antigen (PSA) levels and/or abnormal digital rectal examination who underwent TRUS-guided prostate biopsy were included in the study. The patients were divided into 3 groups: Group 1 (n=103) prostate biopsy were performed after administering perianal intrarectal application of 10 mL 2% lidocaine gel, Group 2 (n=98) 2 mL of 2% lidocaine injection on each side following rectal installation of lidocaine gel and Group 3 (n=87) 4 mL of 2% lidocaine injection on each side after rectal instillation of lidocaine gel. Patients’ pain scores during biopsy procedure were reported using visual analogue score (VAS). Independent sample t test, ANOVA test and Tukey test were used for statistical evaluation. Results The mean age, prostate volume and PSA level were 65.6±8.4 years, 58.2±34.8 mL, and 11.8±3.4 ng/mL respectively. There were no statistically significant differences in baseline characteristics between the groups. The mean VAS scores were 2.4±1.8 in Group 1, 2.5±1.9 in Group 2 and 1.6±1.6 in Group 3. Patients in Group 3, reported significant pain reduction compared with patients in Groups 1 and 2 (p=0.002, and 0.001, respectively). However, there was no statistically significant difference in VAS scores between Groups 1 and 2 (p=0.815). Conclusion According to our results we recommend the use of perianal intrarectal lidocain gel application, and periprostatic nerve block with injection of 4 ml 2% lidocaine per side combination in TRUS-guided prostate biopsies. Further large-scale randomized control studies are needed to validate these finding. PMID:27635288

  12. Local anesthesia for pain control during transrectal ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Pu; Wang, Xiao-yan; Huang, Wei; Zhang, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Background A meta-analysis was performed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of intrarectal local anesthestic (IRLA), periprostatic nerve block (PPNB), and the combined modalities in alleviating the pain during transrectal ultrasound (TRUS)-guided prostate biopsy. Materials and methods A literature review was performed to identify all published randomized controlled trials (RCTs) about IRLA vs no anesthesia or placebo gel; PPNB vs no injection, periprostatic placebo injection, or IRLA; combined PPNB and IRLA vs PPNB alone; and combined PPNB and intraprostatic nerve block (IPNB) vs PPNB alone before TRUS-guided biopsy. Sources included MEDILINE, EMBASE, and Cochrane Library from 1980 to 2016. The main outcomes were biopsy pain score, probe manipulation pain score, and anesthetic infiltration pain score assessed by the visual pain scale. Results A total of 26 articles involving 36 RCTs were used in this analysis: Although IRLA can lead to pain reduction, the result was not statistically significant when compared with no anesthesia or placebo gel (weighted mean difference [WMD]: −0.22, 95% CI: −0.45 to 0, P=0.06). PPNB can lead to significantly lower biopsy pain scores when compared with no analgesia (WMD: −1.32, 95% CI: −1.68 to −0.95, P<0.00001), placebo injection (WMD: −2.62, 95% CI: −3.16 to −2.07, P<0.00001), or IRLA (WMD: −1.31, 95% CI: −1.40 to −1.22, P<0.00001). PPNB + IRLA can lead to significantly lower biopsy pain scores when compared with PPNB alone (WMD: −0.45, 95% CI: −0.62 to −0.28, P<0.00001). PPNB + IPNB can lead to significantly lower biopsy pain scores when compared with PPNB alone (WMD: −0.73, 95% CI: −0.92 to −0.55, P<0.00001). There were no severe reported general or local complications related to local anesthesia. Conclusion This meta-analysis indicates that a combination of PPNB and IRLA/IPNB is effective and safe in alleviating the pain during TRUS-guided prostate biopsy. Further high-quality RCTs are needed

  13. 3D ultrasound system to investigate intraventricular hemorrhage in preterm neonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishimoto, J.; de Ribaupierre, S.; Lee, D. S. C.; Mehta, R.; St. Lawrence, K.; Fenster, A.

    2013-11-01

    Intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH) is a common disorder among preterm neonates that is routinely diagnosed and monitored by 2D cranial ultrasound (US). The cerebral ventricles of patients with IVH often have a period of ventricular dilation (ventriculomegaly). This initial increase in ventricle size can either spontaneously resolve, which often shows clinically as a period of stabilization in ventricle size and eventual decline back towards a more normal size, or progressive ventricular dilation that does not stabilize and which may require interventional therapy to reduce symptoms relating to increased intracranial pressure. To improve the characterization of ventricle dilation, we developed a 3D US imaging system that can be used with a conventional clinical US scanner to image the ventricular system of preterm neonates at risk of ventriculomegaly. A motorized transducer housing was designed specifically for hand-held use inside an incubator using a transducer commonly used for cranial 2D US scans. This system was validated using geometric phantoms, US/MRI compatible ventricle volume phantoms, and patient images to determine 3D reconstruction accuracy and inter- and intra-observer volume estimation variability. 3D US geometric reconstruction was found to be accurate with an error of <0.2%. Measured volumes of a US/MRI compatible ventricle-like phantom were within 5% of gold standard water displacement measurements. Intra-class correlation for the three observers was 0.97, showing very high agreement between observers. The coefficient of variation was between 1.8-6.3% for repeated segmentations of the same patient. The minimum detectable difference was calculated to be 0.63 cm3 for a single observer. Results from ANOVA for three observers segmenting three patients of IVH grade II did not show any significant differences (p > 0.05) for the measured ventricle volumes between observers. This 3D US system can reliably produce 3D US images of the neonatal ventricular

  14. 3D MRI-Controlled Transurethral Ultrasound Prostate Therapy: Experimental Validation of Numerical Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burtnyk, Mathieu; N'Djin, William Apoutou; Kobelevskiy, Ilya; Bronskill, Michael; Chopra, Rajiv

    2011-09-01

    MRI-guided transurethral ultrasound therapy uses a linear array of transducer elements and active temperature feedback to create volumes of thermal coagulation shaped to predefined prostate geometries in 3-D. Numerical simulations have been used to determine robust feedback control algorithms, optimal transducer designs, effects of various tissue and imaging parameters, as well as to evaluate potential treatment accuracy and safety in patient-specific anatomical models. The goal of this work is to evaluate quantitatively the accuracy with which these numerical simulations predict the extent, shape and temperature pattern of 3-D heating produced in tissue-mimicking Zerdine* gel phantoms. Methods. Eleven experiments were performed in a 1.5T MRI scanner. Temperature feedback was used to control the rotation rate and ultrasound power of a transurethral device with five 3.5×5 mm transducer elements. Heating patterns shaped to 23 and 11 cc human prostate geometries were generated using devices operating at 4.7 and 8.0 MHz, respectively, and 10 W/cm2 surface acoustic intensity. Transducer surface velocity measurements were acquired using a vibrometer and used to calculate the resulting acoustic pressure distribution in gel. Temperature dynamics were determined according to a FDTD solution to Pennes' BHTE. Results. The numerical simulations predicted the extent and shape of the coagulation boundary produced in gel to within (mean±stdev [min, max]): 0.1±0.4 [-1.4, 1.7] and 0.0±0.3 [-1.0, 1.5] mm for the treatments at 4.7 and 8.0 MHz, respectively. The temperatures across all MRI thermometry images were predicted to within 10%, and the treatment time (˜20 min) to within 20%. The simulations showed excellent agreement in regions of sharp temperature gradients, near the transurethral and endorectal devices. Conclusion. Heating patterns predicted by the numerical simulations correspond closely to those produced experimentally in gel. This work quantifies the accuracy and

  15. Model-based correction of velocity measurements in navigated 3-D ultrasound imaging during neurosurgical interventions.

    PubMed

    Iversen, Daniel Hoyer; Lindseth, Frank; Unsgaard, Geirmund; Torp, Hans; Lovstakken, Lasse

    2013-09-01

    In neurosurgery, information of blood flow is important to identify and avoid damage to important vessels. Three-dimensional intraoperative ultrasound color-Doppler imaging has proven useful in this respect. However, due to Doppler angle-dependencies and the complexity of the vascular architecture, clinical valuable 3-D information of flow direction and velocity is currently not available. In this work, we aim to correct for angle-dependencies in 3-D flow images based on a geometric model of the neurovascular tree generated on-the-fly from free-hand 2-D imaging and an accurate position sensor system. The 3-D vessel model acts as a priori information of vessel orientation used to angle-correct the Doppler measurements, as well as provide an estimate of the average flow direction. Based on the flow direction we were also able to do aliasing correction to approximately double the measurable velocity range. In vitro experiments revealed a high accuracy and robustness for estimating the mean direction of flow. Accurate angle-correction of axial velocities were possible given a sufficient beam-to-flow angle for at least parts of a vessel segment . In vitro experiments showed an absolute relative bias of 9.5% for a challenging low-flow scenario. The method also showed promising results in vivo, improving the depiction of flow in the distal branches of intracranial aneurysms and the feeding arteries of an arteriovenous malformation. Careful inspection by an experienced surgeon confirmed the correct flow direction for all in vivo examples.

  16. Patient-specific pediatric silicone heart valve models based on 3D ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilina, Anna; Lasso, Andras; Jolley, Matthew A.; Wohler, Brittany; Nguyen, Alex; Scanlan, Adam; Baum, Zachary; McGowan, Frank; Fichtinger, Gabor

    2017-03-01

    PURPOSE: Patient-specific heart and valve models have shown promise as training and planning tools for heart surgery, but physically realistic valve models remain elusive. Available proprietary, simulation-focused heart valve models are generic adult mitral valves and do not allow for patient-specific modeling as may be needed for rare diseases such as congenitally abnormal valves. We propose creating silicone valve models from a 3D-printed plastic mold as a solution that can be adapted to any individual patient and heart valve at a fraction of the cost of direct 3D-printing using soft materials. METHODS: Leaflets of a pediatric mitral valve, a tricuspid valve in a patient with hypoplastic left heart syndrome, and a complete atrioventricular canal valve were segmented from ultrasound images. A custom software was developed to automatically generate molds for each valve based on the segmentation. These molds were 3D-printed and used to make silicone valve models. The models were designed with cylindrical rims of different sizes surrounding the leaflets, to show the outline of the valve and add rigidity. Pediatric cardiac surgeons practiced suturing on the models and evaluated them for use as surgical planning and training tools. RESULTS: Five out of six surgeons reported that the valve models would be very useful as training tools for cardiac surgery. In this first iteration of valve models, leaflets were felt to be unrealistically thick or stiff compared to real pediatric leaflets. A thin tube rim was preferred for valve flexibility. CONCLUSION: The valve models were well received and considered to be valuable and accessible tools for heart valve surgery training. Further improvements will be made based on surgeons' feedback.

  17. A compact mechatronic system for 3D ultrasound guided prostate interventions

    SciTech Connect

    Bax, Jeffrey; Smith, David; Bartha, Laura; Montreuil, Jacques; Sherebrin, Shi; Gardi, Lori; Edirisinghe, Chandima; Fenster, Aaron

    2011-02-15

    Purpose: Ultrasound imaging has improved the treatment of prostate cancer by producing increasingly higher quality images and influencing sophisticated targeting procedures for the insertion of radioactive seeds during brachytherapy. However, it is critical that the needles be placed accurately within the prostate to deliver the therapy to the planned location and avoid complications of damaging surrounding tissues. Methods: The authors have developed a compact mechatronic system, as well as an effective method for guiding and controlling the insertion of transperineal needles into the prostate. This system has been designed to allow guidance of a needle obliquely in 3D space into the prostate, thereby reducing pubic arch interference. The choice of needle trajectory and location in the prostate can be adjusted manually or with computer control. Results: To validate the system, a series of experiments were performed on phantoms. The 3D scan of the string phantom produced minimal geometric error, which was less than 0.4 mm. Needle guidance accuracy tests in agar prostate phantoms showed that the mean error of bead placement was less then 1.6 mm along parallel needle paths that were within 1.2 mm of the intended target and 1 deg. from the preplanned trajectory. At oblique angles of up to 15 deg. relative to the probe axis, beads were placed to within 3.0 mm along a trajectory that were within 2.0 mm of the target with an angular error less than 2 deg. Conclusions: By combining 3D TRUS imaging system to a needle tracking linkage, this system should improve the physician's ability to target and accurately guide a needle to selected targets without the need for the computer to directly manipulate and insert the needle. This would be beneficial as the physician has complete control of the system and can safely maneuver the needle guide around obstacles such as previously placed needles.

  18. A compact mechatronic system for 3D ultrasound guided prostate interventions.

    PubMed

    Bax, Jeffrey; Smith, David; Bartha, Laura; Montreuil, Jacques; Sherebrin, Shi; Gardi, Lori; Edirisinghe, Chandima; Fenster, Aaron

    2011-02-01

    Ultrasound imaging has improved the treatment of prostate cancer by producing increasingly higher quality images and influencing sophisticated targeting procedures for the insertion of radioactive seeds during brachytherapy. However, it is critical that the needles be placed accurately within the prostate to deliver the therapy to the planned location and avoid complications of damaging surrounding tissues. The authors have developed a compact mechatronic system, as well as an effective method for guiding and controlling the insertion of transperineal needles into the prostate. This system has been designed to allow guidance of a needle obliquely in 3D space into the prostate, thereby reducing pubic arch interference. The choice of needle trajectory and location in the prostate can be adjusted manually or with computer control. To validate the system, a series of experiments were performed on phantoms. The 3D scan of the string phantom produced minimal geometric error, which was less than 0.4 mm. Needle guidance accuracy tests in agar prostate phantoms showed that the mean error of bead placement was less then 1.6 mm along parallel needle paths that were within 1.2 mm of the intended target and 1 degree from the preplanned trajectory. At oblique angles of up to 15 degrees relative to the probe axis, beads were placed to within 3.0 mm along a trajectory that were within 2.0 mm of the target with an angular error less than 2 degrees. By combining 3D TRUS imaging system to a needle tracking linkage, this system should improve the physician's ability to target and accurately guide a needle to selected targets without the need for the computer to directly manipulate and insert the needle. This would be beneficial as the physician has complete control of the system and can safely maneuver the needle guide around obstacles such as previously placed needles.

  19. A new optimization approach for the calibration of an ultrasound probe using a 3D optical localizer.

    PubMed

    Dardenne, G; Cano, J D Gil; Hamitouche, C; Stindel, E; Roux, C

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes a fast procedure for the calibration of an ultrasound (US) probe using a 3D optical localizer. This calibration step allows us to obtain the 3D position of any point located on the 2D ultrasonic (US) image. To carry out correctly this procedure, a phantom of known geometric properties is probed and these geometries are found in the US images. A segmentation step is applied in order to obtain automatically the needed information in the US images and then, an optimization approach is performed to find the optimal calibration parameters. A new optimization method to estimate the calibration parameters for an ultrasound (US) probe is developed.

  20. Mapping 3D Strains with Ultrasound Speckle Tracking: Method Validation and Initial Results in Porcine Scleral Inflation.

    PubMed

    Cruz Perez, Benjamin; Pavlatos, Elias; Morris, Hugh J; Chen, Hong; Pan, Xueliang; Hart, Richard T; Liu, Jun

    2016-07-01

    This study aimed to develop and validate a high frequency ultrasound method for measuring distributive, 3D strains in the sclera during elevations of intraocular pressure. A 3D cross-correlation based speckle-tracking algorithm was implemented to compute the 3D displacement vector and strain tensor at each tracking point. Simulated ultrasound radiofrequency data from a sclera-like structure at undeformed and deformed states with known strains were used to evaluate the accuracy and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of strain estimation. An experimental high frequency ultrasound (55 MHz) system was built to acquire 3D scans of porcine eyes inflated from 15 to 17 and then 19 mmHg. Simulations confirmed good strain estimation accuracy and SNR (e.g., the axial strains had less than 4.5% error with SNRs greater than 16.5 for strains from 0.005 to 0.05). Experimental data in porcine eyes showed increasing tensile, compressive, and shear strains in the posterior sclera during inflation, with a volume ratio close to one suggesting near-incompressibility. This study established the feasibility of using high frequency ultrasound speckle tracking for measuring 3D tissue strains and its potential to characterize physiological deformations in the posterior eye.

  1. Transvaginal 3-d power Doppler ultrasound evaluation of the fetal brain at 10-13 weeks' gestation.

    PubMed

    Hata, Toshiyuki; Tanaka, Hirokazu; Noguchi, Junko

    2012-03-01

    The objective of this study was to measure the fetal brain volume (FBV) and vascularization and blood flow using transvaginal 3-D power Doppler (3DPD) ultrasound late in the first trimester of pregnancy. 3DPD ultrasound examinations with the VOCAL imaging analysis program were performed on 36 normal fetuses from 10-13 weeks' gestation. FBV and 3DPD indices related to the fetal brain vascularization (vascularization index [VI], flow index [FI] and vascularization flow index [VFI]) were calculated in each fetus. Intra- and interclass correlation coefficients and intra- and interobserver agreements of measurements were assessed. FBV was curvilinearly correlated well with the gestational age (R2 = 0.861, p < 0.0001). All 3-D power Doppler indices (VI, FI and VFI) showed no change at 10-13 weeks' gestation. FBV and all 3-D power Doppler indices (VI, FI and VFI) showed a correlation > 0.82, with good intra- and interobserver agreement. Our findings suggest that 3-D ultrasound is a superior means of evaluating the FBV in utero, and that 3-D power Doppler ultrasound histogram analysis may provide new information on the assessment of fetal brain perfusion.

  2. 2-D Versus 3-D Cross-Correlation-Based Radial and Circumferential Strain Estimation Using Multiplane 2-D Ultrafast Ultrasound in a 3-D Atherosclerotic Carotid Artery Model.

    PubMed

    Fekkes, Stein; Swillens, Abigail E S; Hansen, Hendrik H G; Saris, Anne E C M; Nillesen, Maartje M; Iannaccone, Francesco; Segers, Patrick; de Korte, Chris L

    2016-10-01

    Three-dimensional (3-D) strain estimation might improve the detection and localization of high strain regions in the carotid artery (CA) for identification of vulnerable plaques. This paper compares 2-D versus 3-D displacement estimation in terms of radial and circumferential strain using simulated ultrasound (US) images of a patient-specific 3-D atherosclerotic CA model at the bifurcation embedded in surrounding tissue generated with ABAQUS software. Global longitudinal motion was superimposed to the model based on the literature data. A Philips L11-3 linear array transducer was simulated, which transmitted plane waves at three alternating angles at a pulse repetition rate of 10 kHz. Interframe (IF) radio-frequency US data were simulated in Field II for 191 equally spaced longitudinal positions of the internal CA. Accumulated radial and circumferential displacements were estimated using tracking of the IF displacements estimated by a two-step normalized cross-correlation method and displacement compounding. Least-squares strain estimation was performed to determine accumulated radial and circumferential strain. The performance of the 2-D and 3-D methods was compared by calculating the root-mean-squared error of the estimated strains with respect to the reference strains obtained from the model. More accurate strain images were obtained using the 3-D displacement estimation for the entire cardiac cycle. The 3-D technique clearly outperformed the 2-D technique in phases with high IF longitudinal motion. In fact, the large IF longitudinal motion rendered it impossible to accurately track the tissue and cumulate strains over the entire cardiac cycle with the 2-D technique.

  3. Semiautomatic registration of 3D transabdominal ultrasound images for patient repositioning during postprostatectomy radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Presles, Benoît Rit, Simon; Sarrut, David; Fargier-Voiron, Marie; Liebgott, Hervé; Biston, Marie-Claude; Munoz, Alexandre; Pommier, Pascal; Lynch, Rod

    2014-12-15

    Purpose: The aim of the present work is to propose and evaluate registration algorithms of three-dimensional (3D) transabdominal (TA) ultrasound (US) images to setup postprostatectomy patients during radiation therapy. Methods: Three registration methods have been developed and evaluated to register a reference 3D-TA-US image acquired during the planning CT session and a 3D-TA-US image acquired before each treatment session. The first method (method A) uses only gray value information, whereas the second one (method B) uses only gradient information. The third one (method C) combines both sets of information. All methods restrict the comparison to a region of interest computed from the dilated reference positioning volume drawn on the reference image and use mutual information as a similarity measure. The considered geometric transformations are translations and have been optimized by using the adaptive stochastic gradient descent algorithm. Validation has been carried out using manual registration by three operators of the same set of image pairs as the algorithms. Sixty-two treatment US images of seven patients irradiated after a prostatectomy have been registered to their corresponding reference US image. The reference registration has been defined as the average of the manual registration values. Registration error has been calculated by subtracting the reference registration from the algorithm result. For each session, the method has been considered a failure if the registration error was above both the interoperator variability of the session and a global threshold of 3.0 mm. Results: All proposed registration algorithms have no systematic bias. Method B leads to the best results with mean errors of −0.6, 0.7, and −0.2 mm in left–right (LR), superior–inferior (SI), and anterior–posterior (AP) directions, respectively. With this method, the standard deviations of the mean error are of 1.7, 2.4, and 2.6 mm in LR, SI, and AP directions, respectively

  4. 3D ultrasound estimation of the effective volume for popliteal block at the level of division.

    PubMed

    Sala-Blanch, X; Franco, J; Bergé, R; Marín, R; López, A M; Agustí, M

    2017-03-01

    Local anaesthetic injection between the tibial and commmon peroneal nerves within connective tissue sheath results in a predictable diffusion and allows for a reduction in the volume needed to achieve a consistent sciatic popliteal block. Using 3D ultrasound volumetric acquisition, we quantified the visible volume in contact with the nerve along a 5cm segment. We included 20 consecutive patients scheduled for bunion surgery. Ultrasound guided popliteal block was performed using a posterior, out of plane approach at the level of división of the sciatic nerve. Thirty ml of mepivacaine 1.5% and levobupivacaine 0.5% were slowly injected while assessing the injection pressure and the diffusion of the local anaesthetic. Volumetric acquisition was performed before and after the block to quantify the the volume of the sciatic nerve and the volume of the surrounding hypoechoic halo contained inside the connective tissue in a 5cm segment. All blocks were successful within 20min after the injection. The total estimated volume contained inside the common connective tissue sheath was 6.8±2.6cm(3). Of this, the volume of the halo sorrounding the nerve was 4.4±1.7cm(3) and the volume inside the sciatic nerve was 2.4±1.7cm(3). The volume of local anaesthetic in close contact with the sciatic nerve can be estimated by volumetric acquisition. Our results suggest that the effective volume of local anaesthetic needed for a successful sciatic popliteal block could be reduced to less than 7ml. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  5. 3-D Ultrasound Segmentation of the Placenta Using the Random Walker Algorithm: Reliability and Agreement.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, Gordon N; Collins, Sally L; Ding, Jane; Impey, Lawrence; Noble, J Alison

    2015-12-01

    Volumetric segmentation of the placenta using 3-D ultrasound is currently performed clinically to investigate correlation between organ volume and fetal outcome or pathology. Previously, interpolative or semi-automatic contour-based methodologies were used to provide volumetric results. We describe the validation of an original random walker (RW)-based algorithm against manual segmentation and an existing semi-automated method, virtual organ computer-aided analysis (VOCAL), using initialization time, inter- and intra-observer variability of volumetric measurements and quantification accuracy (with respect to manual segmentation) as metrics of success. Both semi-automatic methods require initialization. Therefore, the first experiment compared initialization times. Initialization was timed by one observer using 20 subjects. This revealed significant differences (p < 0.001) in time taken to initialize the VOCAL method compared with the RW method. In the second experiment, 10 subjects were used to analyze intra-/inter-observer variability between two observers. Bland-Altman plots were used to analyze variability combined with intra- and inter-observer variability measured by intra-class correlation coefficients, which were reported for all three methods. Intra-class correlation coefficient values for intra-observer variability were higher for the RW method than for VOCAL, and both were similar to manual segmentation. Inter-observer variability was 0.94 (0.88, 0.97), 0.91 (0.81, 0.95) and 0.80 (0.61, 0.90) for manual, RW and VOCAL, respectively. Finally, a third observer with no prior ultrasound experience was introduced and volumetric differences from manual segmentation were reported. Dice similarity coefficients for observers 1, 2 and 3 were respectively 0.84 ± 0.12, 0.94 ± 0.08 and 0.84 ± 0.11, and the mean was 0.87 ± 0.13. The RW algorithm was found to provide results concordant with those for manual segmentation and to outperform VOCAL in aspects of observer

  6. Time efficiency and diagnostic agreement of 2-D versus 3-D ultrasound acquisition of the neonatal brain.

    PubMed

    Romero, Javier M; Madan, Neil; Betancur, Ilda; Ciobanu, Adrian; Murphy, Erin; McCullough, Danielle; Grant, P Ellen

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare acquisition time efficiency and diagnostic agreement of neonatal brain ultrasound (US) scans obtained with a 3-D volume US acquisition protocol and the conventional 2-D acquisition protocol. Ninety-one consecutive premature neonatal brain ultrasound scans were prospectively performed on 59 neonates with the conventional 2-D acquisition protocol. Immediately after the 2-D study, a coronal 3-D ultrasound volume was acquired and later reconstructed into axial and sagittal planes. All 59 neonates were imaged in the neonatal intensive care unit to rule out intracranial hemorrhage. Total time for 2-D and 3-D acquisition protocols was recorded, and a two-tailed t-test was used to determine if study durations differed significantly. One pediatric neuroradiologist reviewed the reformatted 3-D images, tomographic ultrasound images. Results were compared with the clinical interpretation of the 2-D conventional study. The mean scanning time for the 2-D US acquisition protocol was 10.56 min (standard deviation [SD] = 7.11), and that for the 3-D volume US acquisition protocol was 1.48 min (SD = 0.59) (p ≤ 0.001). Inter-observer agreement revealed k values of 0.84 for hydrocephalus, 0.80 for germinal matrix hemorrhage/intraventricular hemorrhage, 0.74 for periventricular leukomalacia and 0.91 for subdural collection, hence near-perfect to substantial agreement between imaging protocols. There was a significant decrease in acquisition time for the 3-D volume ultrasound acquisition protocol compared with the conventional 2-D US protocol (p = <0.001), without compromising the diagnostic quality compared with a conventional 2-D US imaging protocol.

  7. Compressed Sensing Reconstruction of 3D Ultrasound Data Using Dictionary Learning and Line-Wise Subsampling.

    PubMed

    Lorintiu, Oana; Liebgott, Hervé; Alessandrini, Martino; Bernard, Olivier; Friboulet, Denis

    2015-12-01

    In this paper we present a compressed sensing (CS) method adapted to 3D ultrasound imaging (US). In contrast to previous work, we propose a new approach based on the use of learned overcomplete dictionaries that allow for much sparser representations of the signals since they are optimized for a particular class of images such as US images. In this study, the dictionary was learned using the K-SVD algorithm and CS reconstruction was performed on the non-log envelope data by removing 20% to 80% of the original data. Using numerically simulated images, we evaluate the influence of the training parameters and of the sampling strategy. The latter is done by comparing the two most common sampling patterns, i.e., point-wise and line-wise random patterns. The results show in particular that line-wise sampling yields an accuracy comparable to the conventional point-wise sampling. This indicates that CS acquisition of 3D data is feasible in a relatively simple setting, and thus offers the perspective of increasing the frame rate by skipping the acquisition of RF lines. Next, we evaluated this approach on US volumes of several ex vivo and in vivo organs. We first show that the learned dictionary approach yields better performances than conventional fixed transforms such as Fourier or discrete cosine. Finally, we investigate the generality of the learned dictionary approach and show that it is possible to build a general dictionary allowing to reliably reconstruct different volumes of different ex vivo or in vivo organs.

  8. Multiplanar Reconstructions of 3D Automated Breast Ultrasound Improve Lesion Differentiation by Radiologists.

    PubMed

    Van Zelst, Jan C M; Platel, Bram; Karssemeijer, Nico; Mann, Ritse M

    2015-12-01

    To investigate the value of multiplanar reconstructions (MPRs) of automated three-dimensional (3D) breast ultrasound (ABUS) compared to transverse evaluation only, in differentiation of benign and malignant breast lesions. Five breast radiologists evaluated ABUS scans of 96 female patients with biopsy-proven abnormalities (36 malignant and 60 benign). They classified the most suspicious lesion based on the breast imaging reporting and data system (BI-RADS) lexicon using the transverse scans only. A likelihood-of-malignancy (LOM) score (0-100) and a BI-RADS final assessment were assigned. Thereafter, the MPR was provided and readers scored the cases again. In addition, they rated the presence of spiculation and retraction in the coronal plane on a five-point scale called Spiculation and Retraction Severity Index (SRSI). Reader performance was analyzed with receiver-operating characteristics analysis. The area under the curve increased from 0.82 to 0.87 (P = .01) after readers were shown the reconstructed planes. The SRSI scores are highly correlated (Spearman's r) with the final LOM scores (range, r = 0.808-0.872) and ΔLOM scores (range, r = 0.525-0.836). Readers downgraded 3%-18% of the biopsied benign lesions to BI-RADS 2 after MPR evaluation. Inter-reader agreement for SRSI was substantial (intraclass correlation coefficient, 0.617). Inter-reader agreement of the BI-RADS final assessment improved from 0.367 to 0.536 after MPRs were read. Full 3D evaluation of ABUS using MPR improves differentiation of breast lesions in comparison to evaluating only transverse planes. Results suggest that the added value of MPR might be related to visualization of spiculation and retraction patterns in the coronal reconstructions. Copyright © 2015 AUR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Improved Human Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cell Osteogenesis in 3D Bioprinted Tissue Scaffolds with Low Intensity Pulsed Ultrasound Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xuan; Castro, Nathan J.; Zhu, Wei; Cui, Haitao; Aliabouzar, Mitra; Sarkar, Kausik; Zhang, Lijie Grace

    2016-01-01

    3D printing and ultrasound techniques are showing great promise in the evolution of human musculoskeletal tissue repair and regeneration medicine. The uniqueness of the present study was to combine low intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) and advanced 3D printing techniques to synergistically improve growth and osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (MSC). Specifically, polyethylene glycol diacrylate bioinks containing cell adhesive Arginine-Glycine-Aspartic acid-Serene (RGDS) peptide and/or nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite (nHA) were used to fabricate 3D scaffolds with different geometric patterns via novel table-top stereolithography 3D printer. The resultant scaffolds provide a highly porous and interconnected 3D environment to support cell proliferation. Scaffolds with small square pores were determined to be the optimal geometric pattern for MSC attachment and growth. The optimal LIPUS working parameters were determined to be 1.5 MHz, 20% duty cycle with 150 mW/cm2 intensity. Results demonstrated that RGDS peptide and nHA containing 3D printed scaffolds under LIPUS treatment can greatly promote MSC proliferation, alkaline phosphatase activity, calcium deposition and total protein content. These results illustrate the effectiveness of the combination of LIPUS and biomimetic 3D printing scaffolds as a valuable combinatorial tool for improved MSC function, thus make them promising for future clinical and various regenerative medicine application. PMID:27597635

  10. Improved Human Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cell Osteogenesis in 3D Bioprinted Tissue Scaffolds with Low Intensity Pulsed Ultrasound Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xuan; Castro, Nathan J; Zhu, Wei; Cui, Haitao; Aliabouzar, Mitra; Sarkar, Kausik; Zhang, Lijie Grace

    2016-09-06

    3D printing and ultrasound techniques are showing great promise in the evolution of human musculoskeletal tissue repair and regeneration medicine. The uniqueness of the present study was to combine low intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) and advanced 3D printing techniques to synergistically improve growth and osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (MSC). Specifically, polyethylene glycol diacrylate bioinks containing cell adhesive Arginine-Glycine-Aspartic acid-Serene (RGDS) peptide and/or nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite (nHA) were used to fabricate 3D scaffolds with different geometric patterns via novel table-top stereolithography 3D printer. The resultant scaffolds provide a highly porous and interconnected 3D environment to support cell proliferation. Scaffolds with small square pores were determined to be the optimal geometric pattern for MSC attachment and growth. The optimal LIPUS working parameters were determined to be 1.5 MHz, 20% duty cycle with 150 mW/cm(2) intensity. Results demonstrated that RGDS peptide and nHA containing 3D printed scaffolds under LIPUS treatment can greatly promote MSC proliferation, alkaline phosphatase activity, calcium deposition and total protein content. These results illustrate the effectiveness of the combination of LIPUS and biomimetic 3D printing scaffolds as a valuable combinatorial tool for improved MSC function, thus make them promising for future clinical and various regenerative medicine application.

  11. Segmentation of 3D ultrasound computer tomography reflection images using edge detection and surface fitting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopp, T.; Zapf, M.; Ruiter, N. V.

    2014-03-01

    An essential processing step for comparison of Ultrasound Computer Tomography images to other modalities, as well as for the use in further image processing, is to segment the breast from the background. In this work we present a (semi-) automated 3D segmentation method which is based on the detection of the breast boundary in coronal slice images and a subsequent surface fitting. The method was evaluated using a software phantom and in-vivo data. The fully automatically processed phantom results showed that a segmentation of approx. 10% of the slices of a dataset is sufficient to recover the overall breast shape. Application to 16 in-vivo datasets was performed successfully using semi-automated processing, i.e. using a graphical user interface for manual corrections of the automated breast boundary detection. The processing time for the segmentation of an in-vivo dataset could be significantly reduced by a factor of four compared to a fully manual segmentation. Comparison to manually segmented images identified a smoother surface for the semi-automated segmentation with an average of 11% of differing voxels and an average surface deviation of 2mm. Limitations of the edge detection may be overcome by future updates of the KIT USCT system, allowing a fully-automated usage of our segmentation approach.

  12. Automated linking of suspicious findings between automated 3D breast ultrasound volumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gubern-Mérida, Albert; Tan, Tao; van Zelst, Jan; Mann, Ritse M.; Karssemeijer, Nico

    2016-03-01

    Automated breast ultrasound (ABUS) is a 3D imaging technique which is rapidly emerging as a safe and relatively inexpensive modality for screening of women with dense breasts. However, reading ABUS examinations is very time consuming task since radiologists need to manually identify suspicious findings in all the different ABUS volumes available for each patient. Image analysis techniques to automatically link findings across volumes are required to speed up clinical workflow and make ABUS screening more efficient. In this study, we propose an automated system to, given the location in the ABUS volume being inspected (source), find the corresponding location in a target volume. The target volume can be a different view of the same study or the same view from a prior examination. The algorithm was evaluated using 118 linkages between suspicious abnormalities annotated in a dataset of ABUS images of 27 patients participating in a high risk screening program. The distance between the predicted location and the center of the annotated lesion in the target volume was computed for evaluation. The mean ± stdev and median distance error achieved by the presented algorithm for linkages between volumes of the same study was 7.75±6.71 mm and 5.16 mm, respectively. The performance was 9.54±7.87 and 8.00 mm (mean ± stdev and median) for linkages between volumes from current and prior examinations. The proposed approach has the potential to minimize user interaction for finding correspondences among ABUS volumes.

  13. 3D dynamic model of healthy and pathologic arteries for ultrasound technique evaluation.

    PubMed

    Balocco, Simone; Basset, Olivier; Azencot, Jacques; Tortoli, Piero; Cachard, Christian

    2008-12-01

    A 3D model reproducing the biomechanical behavior of human blood vessels is presented. The model, based on a multilayer geometry composed of right generalized cylinders, enables the representation of different vessel morphologies, including bifurcations, either healthy or affected by stenoses. Using a finite element approach, blood flow is simulated by considering a dynamic displacement of the scatterers (erythrocytes), while arterial pulsation due to the hydraulic pressure is taken into account through a fluid-structure interaction based on a wall model. Each region is acoustically characterized using FIELD II software, which produces the radio frequency echo signals corresponding to echographic scans. Three acoustic physiological phantoms of carotid arteries surrounded by elastic tissue are presented to illustrate the model's capability. The first corresponds to a healthy blood vessel, the second includes a 50% stenosis, and the third represents a carotid bifurcation. Examples of M mode, B mode and color Doppler images derived from these phantoms are shown. Two examples of M-mode image segmentation and the identification of the atherosclerotic plaque boundaries on Doppler color images are reported. The model could be used as a tool for the preliminary evaluation of ultrasound signal processing and visualization techniques.

  14. 2D Ultrasound and 3D MR Image Registration of the Prostate for Brachytherapy Surgical Navigation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shihui; Jiang, Shan; Yang, Zhiyong; Liu, Ranlu

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Two-dimensional (2D) ultrasound (US) images are widely used in minimally invasive prostate procedure for its noninvasive nature and convenience. However, the poor quality of US image makes it difficult to be used as guiding utility. To improve the limitation, we propose a multimodality image guided navigation module that registers 2D US images with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) based on high quality preoperative models. A 2-step spatial registration method is used to complete the procedure which combines manual alignment and rapid mutual information (MI) optimize algorithm. In addition, a 3-dimensional (3D) reconstruction model of prostate with surrounding organs is employed to combine with the registered images to conduct the navigation. Registration accuracy is measured by calculating the target registration error (TRE). The results show that the error between the US and preoperative MR images of a polyvinyl alcohol hydrogel model phantom is 1.37 ± 0.14 mm, with a similar performance being observed in patient experiments. PMID:26448009

  15. Chest-wall segmentation in automated 3D breast ultrasound images using thoracic volume classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Tao; van Zelst, Jan; Zhang, Wei; Mann, Ritse M.; Platel, Bram; Karssemeijer, Nico

    2014-03-01

    Computer-aided detection (CAD) systems are expected to improve effectiveness and efficiency of radiologists in reading automated 3D breast ultrasound (ABUS) images. One challenging task on developing CAD is to reduce a large number of false positives. A large amount of false positives originate from acoustic shadowing caused by ribs. Therefore determining the location of the chestwall in ABUS is necessary in CAD systems to remove these false positives. Additionally it can be used as an anatomical landmark for inter- and intra-modal image registration. In this work, we extended our previous developed chestwall segmentation method that fits a cylinder to automated detected rib-surface points and we fit the cylinder model by minimizing a cost function which adopted a term of region cost computed from a thoracic volume classifier to improve segmentation accuracy. We examined the performance on a dataset of 52 images where our previous developed method fails. Using region-based cost, the average mean distance of the annotated points to the segmented chest wall decreased from 7.57±2.76 mm to 6.22±2.86 mm.art.

  16. Male accessory gland infection frequency in infertile patients with chronic microbial prostatitis and irritable bowel syndrome: transrectal ultrasound examination helps to understand the links.

    PubMed

    Vicari, Enzo; Calogero, Aldo E; Condorelli, Rosita A; Vicari, Lucia O; La Vignera, Sandro

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the frequency of male accessory gland infection (MAGI) in patients with chronic bacterial prostatitis (CBP) plus irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and to compare the sperm parameters of patients with or without MAGI. In addition, another objective of this study was to evaluate the ultrasound characterization of the anatomical space between the posterior wall of the prostate and the anterior wall of the rectum using transrectal ultrasonography. Fifty consecutive patients with the following criteria were enrolled: 1) infertility, 2) diagnosis of CBP, and 3) diagnosis of IBS according to the Rome III criteria. The following 2 age-matched control groups were also studied: infertile patients with CBP alone (n = 56) and fertile men (n = 30) who had fathered a child within the previous 3 months. Patients and controls underwent an accurate patient history; administration of the National Institutes of Health-Chronic Prostatitis Symptom Index and the Rome III questionnaires for prostatitis and IBS, respectively; physical examination; semen analysis; and transrectal ultrasound evaluation (limited to patients with CBP and IBS or CBP alone). A significantly higher frequency of MAGI was found in patients with CBP plus IBS (82.0%) compared with patients with CBP alone (53.6%) or fertile men (0%). The presence of MAGI in patients with CBP plus IBS was associated with a significantly lower sperm concentration, total number, and forward motility, and with a higher seminal leukocyte concentration compared with patients with CBP alone and MAGI. Sperm normal morphology was similar in the groups of patients. All sperm parameters did not differ significantly in both groups of patients without MAGI. With ultrasound evaluation, a significantly higher frequency of dilatation of prostatic venous plexus was found in patients with CBP plus IBS (75%) compared with patients with CBP alone (10%). Patients with CBP plus IBS had a significantly higher frequency of

  17. WE-EF-210-08: BEST IN PHYSICS (IMAGING): 3D Prostate Segmentation in Ultrasound Images Using Patch-Based Anatomical Feature

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, X; Rossi, P; Jani, A; Ogunleye, T; Curran, W; Liu, T

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) is the standard imaging modality for the image-guided prostate-cancer interventions (e.g., biopsy and brachytherapy) due to its versatility and real-time capability. Accurate segmentation of the prostate plays a key role in biopsy needle placement, treatment planning, and motion monitoring. As ultrasound images have a relatively low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), automatic segmentation of the prostate is difficult. However, manual segmentation during biopsy or radiation therapy can be time consuming. We are developing an automated method to address this technical challenge. Methods: The proposed segmentation method consists of two major stages: the training stage and the segmentation stage. During the training stage, patch-based anatomical features are extracted from the registered training images with patient-specific information, because these training images have been mapped to the new patient’ images, and the more informative anatomical features are selected to train the kernel support vector machine (KSVM). During the segmentation stage, the selected anatomical features are extracted from newly acquired image as the input of the well-trained KSVM and the output of this trained KSVM is the segmented prostate of this patient. Results: This segmentation technique was validated with a clinical study of 10 patients. The accuracy of our approach was assessed using the manual segmentation. The mean volume Dice Overlap Coefficient was 89.7±2.3%, and the average surface distance was 1.52 ± 0.57 mm between our and manual segmentation, which indicate that the automatic segmentation method works well and could be used for 3D ultrasound-guided prostate intervention. Conclusion: We have developed a new prostate segmentation approach based on the optimal feature learning framework, demonstrated its clinical feasibility, and validated its accuracy with manual segmentation (gold standard). This segmentation technique could be a useful

  18. The effect of object speed and direction on the performance of 3D speckle tracking using a 3D swept-volume ultrasound probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Emma J.; Miller, Naomi R.; Bamber, Jeffrey C.; Symonds-Tayler, J. Richard N.; Evans, Philip M.

    2011-11-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) soft tissue tracking using 3D ultrasound is of interest for monitoring organ motion during therapy. Previously we demonstrated feature tracking of respiration-induced liver motion in vivo using a 3D swept-volume ultrasound probe. The aim of this study was to investigate how object speed affects the accuracy of tracking ultrasonic speckle in the absence of any structural information, which mimics the situation in homogenous tissue for motion in the azimuthal and elevational directions. For object motion prograde and retrograde to the sweep direction of the transducer, the spatial sampling frequency increases or decreases with object speed, respectively. We examined the effect object motion direction of the transducer on tracking accuracy. We imaged a homogenous ultrasound speckle phantom whilst moving the probe with linear motion at a speed of 0-35 mm s-1. Tracking accuracy and precision were investigated as a function of speed, depth and direction of motion for fixed displacements of 2 and 4 mm. For the azimuthal direction, accuracy was better than 0.1 and 0.15 mm for displacements of 2 and 4 mm, respectively. For a 2 mm displacement in the elevational direction, accuracy was better than 0.5 mm for most speeds. For 4 mm elevational displacement with retrograde motion, accuracy and precision reduced with speed and tracking failure was observed at speeds of greater than 14 mm s-1. Tracking failure was attributed to speckle de-correlation as a result of decreasing spatial sampling frequency with increasing speed of retrograde motion. For prograde motion, tracking failure was not observed. For inter-volume displacements greater than 2 mm, only prograde motion should be tracked which will decrease temporal resolution by a factor of 2. Tracking errors of the order of 0.5 mm for prograde motion in the elevational direction indicates that using the swept probe technology speckle tracking accuracy is currently too poor to track homogenous tissue over

  19. Complication rates and risk factors of 5802 transrectal ultrasound-guided sextant biopsies of the prostate within a population-based screening program.

    PubMed

    Raaijmakers, René; Kirkels, Wim J; Roobol, Monique J; Wildhagen, Mark F; Schrder, Fritz H

    2002-11-01

    To evaluate the complication rates and possible risk factors of biopsy of the prostate, with the aim of improving patient counseling and the safety of the procedure. Biopsy of the prostate has to be a relatively safe procedure and the participants have to be well informed about the possible complications. Within the biopsy protocol of the Rotterdam section of the European Randomized Study of Screening for Prostate Cancer, we evaluated 5802 transrectal ultrasound-guided systematic sextant biopsies. All participants received prophylactic antibiotic therapy. We performed 5802 biopsies. Hematuria lasting longer than 3 days and hematospermia were present after 22.6% and 50.4% of the procedures, respectively. More severe complications were far less frequent. Two hundred participants (3.5%) developed fever after biopsy. Urinary retention was seen 20 times (0.4%), and hospitalization was needed in 27 cases (0.5%). Twenty-five of these men were admitted because of signs of prostatitis and/or urosepsis. Risk factor analyses revealed that an earlier episode of prostatitis was significantly associated with hospital admission and pain after biopsy. Characteristics of prostatic hyperplasia, such as prostate volume, transition zone volume/total prostate volume ratio, and a higher International Prostate Symptom Score, were all predictors of urinary retention. Minor complications are frequently seen but major complications are rare after prostate biopsy. Assessment of the risk factors before biopsy can help to improve the adequacy of counseling, and precautionary measures can be taken to minimize the risk of complications after the procedure. Transrectal ultrasound-guided sextant biopsy remains a safe procedure for the diagnosis of prostate cancer within the general population.

  20. [Relationship between screening by stratifying cases into groups on prostate specific antigen level and the positive rate of transrectal ultrasound guided systematic sextant prostate biopsy].

    PubMed

    Cao, Xi-liang; Gao, Jiang-ping; Han, Gang; Tang, Jie; Hong, Bao-fa

    2006-03-15

    To evaluate the detection of prostate cancer in different prostate specific antigen (PSA) level and the predict value of PSA, digital rectal examination (DRE), transrectal ultrasound scan (TRUS) and PSA density (PSAD). The clinical data of 634 cases who had underwent transrectal ultrasound guided systematic sextant prostate biopsies between April 1996 to December 2002 due to being suspicious of prostate cancer were retrospectively analyzed. The detection of prostate cancer in different PSA groups, namely PSA < or = 4.0, 4.1-, 10.1-, > 20.0 microg/L, and the predict values of PSA, DRE, TRUS and PSAD were statistically analyzed using t test, chi2 test and logistic regression analysis. The rates of prostate cancer detection in different PSA groups were 11.6%, 26.8%, 39.8% and 68.6%, respectively. The higher the PSA, the higher the rate of prostate cancer detection, the same was the positive predictive value of DRE and TRUS. The sensitivity and specificity of PSA > 4.0 microg/L were 93.0% and 33.0%, and the efficiency of DRE and TRUS were very low. Logistic regression analysis indicated that PSAD was the most risk factor of prostate cancer in the group of PSA 4.1-20.0 microg/L (OR = 687.09 +/- 646.96, P = 0.000). The rates of prostate cancer detection in different PSA groups are different compared with other countries. The screening roles of DRE and TRUS are dependent on PSA level. Utilization of the screening protocol which to stratify cases into three PSA groups, namely PSA < or = 4.0, 4.1 - 20.0, > 20.0 microg/L, can elevate the positive rate of prostate biopsies without sacrificing cancers detected.

  1. Quantitative analysis of vascular heterogeneity in breast lesions using contrast-enhanced 3-D harmonic and subharmonic ultrasound imaging.

    PubMed

    Sridharan, Anush; Eisenbrey, John R; Machado, Priscilla; Ojeda-Fournier, Haydee; Wilkes, Annina; Sevrukov, Alexander; Mattrey, Robert F; Wallace, Kirk; Chalek, Carl L; Thomenius, Kai E; Forsberg, Flemming

    2015-03-01

    Ability to visualize breast lesion vascularity and quantify the vascular heterogeneity using contrast-enhanced 3-D harmonic (HI) and subharmonic (SHI) ultrasound imaging was investigated in a clinical population. Patients (n = 134) identified with breast lesions on mammography were scanned using power Doppler imaging, contrast-enhanced 3-D HI, and 3-D SHI on a modified Logiq 9 scanner (GE Healthcare). A region of interest corresponding to ultrasound contrast agent flow was identified in 4D View (GE Medical Systems) and mapped to raw slice data to generate a map of time-intensity curves for the lesion volume. Time points corresponding to baseline, peak intensity, and washout of ultrasound contrast agent were identified and used to generate and compare vascular heterogeneity plots for malignant and benign lesions. Vascularity was observed with power Doppler imaging in 84 lesions (63 benign and 21 malignant). The 3-D HI showed flow in 8 lesions (5 benign and 3 malignant), whereas 3-D SHI visualized flow in 68 lesions (49 benign and 19 malignant). Analysis of vascular heterogeneity in the 3-D SHI volumes found benign lesions having a significant difference in vascularity between central and peripheral sections (1.71 ± 0.96 vs. 1.13 ± 0.79 dB, p < 0.001, respectively), whereas malignant lesions showed no difference (1.66 ± 1.39 vs. 1.24 ± 1.14 dB, p = 0.24), indicative of more vascular coverage. These preliminary results suggest quantitative evaluation of vascular heterogeneity in breast lesions using contrast-enhanced 3-D SHI is feasible and able to detect variations in vascularity between central and peripheral sections for benign and malignant lesions.

  2. Quantitative Analysis of Vascular Heterogeneity in Breast Lesions Using Contrast-Enhanced 3-D Harmonic and Subharmonic Ultrasound Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Sridharan, Anush; Eisenbrey, John R.; Machado, Priscilla; Ojeda-Fournier, Haydee; Wilkes, Annina; Sevrukov, Alexander; Mattrey, Robert F.; Wallace, Kirk; Chalek, Carl L.; Thomenius, Kai E.; Forsberg, Flemming

    2015-01-01

    Ability to visualize breast lesion vascularity and quantify the vascular heterogeneity using contrast-enhanced 3-D harmonic (HI) and subharmonic (SHI) ultrasound imaging was investigated in a clinical population. Patients (n = 134) identified with breast lesions on mammography were scanned using power Doppler imaging, contrast-enhanced 3-D HI, and 3-D SHI on a modified Logiq 9 scanner (GE Healthcare). A region of interest corresponding to ultrasound contrast agent flow was identified in 4D View (GE Medical Systems) and mapped to raw slice data to generate a map of time-intensity curves for the lesion volume. Time points corresponding to baseline, peak intensity, and washout of ultrasound contrast agent were identified and used to generate and compare vascular heterogeneity plots for malignant and benign lesions. Vascularity was observed with power Doppler imaging in 84 lesions (63 benign and 21 malignant). The 3-D HI showed flow in 8 lesions (5 benign and 3 malignant), whereas 3-D SHI visualized flow in 68 lesions (49 benign and 19 malignant). Analysis of vascular heterogeneity in the 3-D SHI volumes found benign lesions having a significant difference in vascularity between central and peripheral sections (1.71 ± 0.96 vs. 1.13 ± 0.79 dB, p < 0.001, respectively), whereas malignant lesions showed no difference (1.66 ± 1.39 vs. 1.24 ± 1.14 dB, p = 0.24), indicative of more vascular coverage. These preliminary results suggest quantitative evaluation of vascular heterogeneity in breast lesions using contrast-enhanced 3-D SHI is feasible and able to detect variations in vascularity between central and peripheral sections for benign and malignant lesions. PMID:25935933

  3. Breast Density Analysis with Automated Whole-Breast Ultrasound: Comparison with 3-D Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jeon-Hor; Lee, Yan-Wei; Chan, Si-Wa; Yeh, Dah-Cherng; Chang, Ruey-Feng

    2016-05-01

    In this study, a semi-automatic breast segmentation method was proposed on the basis of the rib shadow to extract breast regions from 3-D automated whole-breast ultrasound (ABUS) images. The density results were correlated with breast density values acquired with 3-D magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). MRI images of 46 breasts were collected from 23 women without a history of breast disease. Each subject also underwent ABUS. We used Otsu's thresholding method on ABUS images to obtain local rib shadow information, which was combined with the global rib shadow information (extracted from all slice projections) and integrated with the anatomy's breast tissue structure to determine the chest wall line. The fuzzy C-means classifier was used to extract the fibroglandular tissues from the acquired images. Whole-breast volume (WBV) and breast percentage density (BPD) were calculated in both modalities. Linear regression was used to compute the correlation of density results between the two modalities. The consistency of density measurement was also analyzed on the basis of intra- and inter-operator variation. There was a high correlation of density results between MRI and ABUS (R(2) = 0.798 for WBV, R(2) = 0.825 for PBD). The mean WBV from ABUS images was slightly smaller than the mean WBV from MR images (MRI: 342.24 ± 128.08 cm(3), ABUS: 325.47 ± 136.16 cm(3), p < 0.05). In addition, the BPD calculated from MR images was smaller than the BPD from ABUS images (MRI: 24.71 ± 15.16%, ABUS: 28.90 ± 17.73%, p < 0.05). The intra-operator and inter-operator variant analysis results indicated that there was no statistically significant difference in breast density measurement variation between the two modalities. Our results revealed a high correlation in WBV and BPD between MRI and ABUS. Our study suggests that ABUS provides breast density information useful in the assessment of breast health.

  4. 3D thoracoscopic ultrasound volume measurement validation in an ex vivo and in vivo porcine model of lung tumours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hornblower, V. D. M.; Yu, E.; Fenster, A.; Battista, J. J.; Malthaner, R. A.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to validate the accuracy and reliability of volume measurements obtained using three-dimensional (3D) thoracoscopic ultrasound (US) imaging. Artificial 'tumours' were created by injecting a liquid agar mixture into spherical moulds of known volume. Once solidified, the 'tumours' were implanted into the lung tissue in both a porcine lung sample ex vivo and a surgical porcine model in vivo. 3D US images were created by mechanically rotating the thoracoscopic ultrasound probe about its long axis while the transducer was maintained in close contact with the tissue. Volume measurements were made by one observer using the ultrasound images and a manual-radial segmentation technique and these were compared with the known volumes of the agar. In vitro measurements had average accuracy and precision of 4.76% and 1.77%, respectively; in vivo measurements had average accuracy and precision of 8.18% and 1.75%, respectively. The 3D thoracoscopic ultrasound can be used to accurately and reproducibly measure 'tumour' volumes both in vivo and ex vivo.

  5. Accurate 3-D Profile Extraction of Skull Bone using an Ultrasound Matrix Array.

    PubMed

    Hajian, Mehdi; Gaspar, Robert; Maev, Roman

    2017-03-08

    The present study investigates the feasibility, accuracy, and precision of 3-D profile extraction of the human skull bone using a custom-designed ultrasound matrix transducer in Pulse-Echo. Due to the attenuative scattering properties of the skull, the backscattered echoes from the inner surface of the skull are severely degraded, attenuated, and at some points overlapped. Furthermore, the speed of sound (SOS) in the skull varies significantly in different zones and also from case to case; if considered constant, it introduces significant error to the profile measurement. A new method for simultaneous estimation of the skull profiles and the sound speed value is presented. The proposed method is a two-folded procedure: first, the arrival times of the backscattered echoes from the skull bone are estimated using multi-lag phase delay (MLPD) and modified space alternating generalized expectation maximization (SAGE) algorithms. Next, these arrival times are fed into an adaptive sound speed estimation algorithm to compute the optimal SOS value and subsequently, the skull bone thickness. For quantitative evaluation, the estimated bone phantom thicknesses were compared with the mechanical measurements. The accuracies of the bone thickness measurements using MLPD and modified SAGE algorithms combined with the adaptive SOS estimation were 7.93% and 4.21%, respectively. These values were 14.44% and 10.75% for the autocorrelation and crosscorrelation methods. Additionally, the Bland-Altman plots showed the modified SAGE outperformed the other methods with -0.35 mm and 0.44 mm limits of agreement. No systematic error that could be related to the skull bone thickness was observed for this method.

  6. 3D perfused brain phantom for interstitial ultrasound thermal therapy and imaging: design, construction and characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez, José M.; Jarosz, Boguslaw J.

    2015-03-01

    Thermal therapy has emerged as an independent modality of treating some tumors. In many clinics the hyperthermia, one of the thermal therapy modalities, has been used adjuvant to radio- or chemotherapy to substantially improve the clinical treatment outcomes. In this work, a methodology for building a realistic brain phantom for interstitial ultrasound low dose-rate thermal therapy of the brain is proposed. A 3D brain phantom made of the tissue mimicking material (TMM) had the acoustic and thermal properties in the 20-32 °C range, which is similar to that of a brain at 37 °C. The phantom had 10-11% by mass of bovine gelatin powder dissolved in ethylene glycol. The TMM sonicated at 1 MHz, 1.6 MHz and 2.5 MHz yielded the amplitude attenuation coefficients of 62  ±  1 dB m-1, 115  ±  4 dB m-1 and 175  ±  9 dB m-1, respectively. The density and acoustic speed determination at room temperature (~24 °C) gave 1040  ±  40 kg m-3 and 1545  ±  44 m s-1, respectively. The average thermal conductivity was 0.532 W m-1 K-1. The T1 and T2 values of the TMM were 207  ±  4 and 36.2  ±  0.4 ms, respectively. We envisage the use of our phantom for treatment planning and for quality assurance in MRI based temperature determination. Our phantom preparation methodology may be readily extended to other thermal therapy technologies.

  7. Critical assessment of intramodality 3D ultrasound imaging for prostate IGRT compared to fiducial markers

    SciTech Connect

    Meer, Skadi van der; Bloemen-van Gurp, Esther; Hermans, Jolanda; Voncken, Robert; Heuvelmans, Denys; Gubbels, Carol; Fontanarosa, Davide; Visser, Peter; Lutgens, Ludy; Gils, Francis van; Verhaegen, Frank

    2013-07-15

    Purpose: A quantitative 3D intramodality ultrasound (US) imaging system was verified for daily in-room prostate localization, and compared to prostate localization based on implanted fiducial markers (FMs).Methods: Thirteen prostate patients underwent multiple US scans during treatment. A total of 376 US-scans and 817 matches were used to determine the intra- and interoperator variability. Additionally, eight other patients underwent daily prostate localization using both US and electronic portal imaging (EPI) with FMs resulting in 244 combined US-EPI scans. Scanning was performed with minimal probe pressure and a correction for the speed of sound aberration was performed. Uncertainties of both US and FM methods were assessed. User variability of the US method was assessed.Results: The overall US user variability is 2.6 mm. The mean differences between US and FM are: 2.5 {+-} 4.0 mm (LR), 0.6 {+-} 4.9 mm (SI), and -2.3 {+-} 3.6 mm (AP). The intramodality character of this US system mitigates potential errors due to transducer pressure and speed of sound aberrations.Conclusions: The overall accuracy of US (3.0 mm) is comparable to our FM workflow (2.2 mm). Since neither US nor FM can be considered a gold standard no conclusions can be drawn on the superiority of either method. Because US imaging captures the prostate itself instead of surrogates no invasive procedure is required. It requires more effort to standardize US imaging than FM detection. Since US imaging does not involve a radiation burden, US prostate imaging offers an alternative for FM EPI positioning.

  8. 3D perfused brain phantom for interstitial ultrasound thermal therapy and imaging: design, construction and characterization.

    PubMed

    Martínez, José M; Jarosz, Boguslaw J

    2015-03-07

    Thermal therapy has emerged as an independent modality of treating some tumors. In many clinics the hyperthermia, one of the thermal therapy modalities, has been used adjuvant to radio- or chemotherapy to substantially improve the clinical treatment outcomes. In this work, a methodology for building a realistic brain phantom for interstitial ultrasound low dose-rate thermal therapy of the brain is proposed. A 3D brain phantom made of the tissue mimicking material (TMM) had the acoustic and thermal properties in the 20-32 °C range, which is similar to that of a brain at 37 °C. The phantom had 10-11% by mass of bovine gelatin powder dissolved in ethylene glycol. The TMM sonicated at 1 MHz, 1.6 MHz and 2.5 MHz yielded the amplitude attenuation coefficients of 62  ±  1 dB m(-1), 115  ±  4 dB m(-1) and 175  ±  9 dB m(-1), respectively. The density and acoustic speed determination at room temperature (~24 °C) gave 1040  ±  40 kg m(-3) and 1545  ±  44 m s(-1), respectively. The average thermal conductivity was 0.532 W m(-1) K(-1). The T1 and T2 values of the TMM were 207  ±  4 and 36.2  ±  0.4 ms, respectively. We envisage the use of our phantom for treatment planning and for quality assurance in MRI based temperature determination. Our phantom preparation methodology may be readily extended to other thermal therapy technologies.

  9. A 2D to 3D ultrasound image registration algorithm for robotically assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esteghamatian, Mehdi; Pautler, Stephen E.; McKenzie, Charles A.; Peters, Terry M.

    2011-03-01

    Robotically assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (RARP) is an effective approach to resect the diseased organ, with stereoscopic views of the targeted tissue improving the dexterity of the surgeons. However, since the laparoscopic view acquires only the surface image of the tissue, the underlying distribution of the cancer within the organ is not observed, making it difficult to make informed decisions on surgical margins and sparing of neurovascular bundles. One option to address this problem is to exploit registration to integrate the laparoscopic view with images of pre-operatively acquired dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) MRI that can demonstrate the regions of malignant tissue within the prostate. Such a view potentially allows the surgeon to visualize the location of the malignancy with respect to the surrounding neurovascular structures, permitting a tissue-sparing strategy to be formulated directly based on the observed tumour distribution. If the tumour is close to the capsule, it may be determined that the adjacent neurovascular bundle (NVB) needs to be sacrificed within the surgical margin to ensure that any erupted tumour was resected. On the other hand, if the cancer is sufficiently far from the capsule, one or both NVBs may be spared. However, in order to realize such image integration, the pre-operative image needs to be fused with the laparoscopic view of the prostate. During the initial stages of the operation, the prostate must be tracked in real time so that the pre-operative MR image remains aligned with patient coordinate system. In this study, we propose and investigate a novel 2D to 3D ultrasound image registration algorithm to track the prostate motion with an accuracy of 2.68+/-1.31mm.

  10. Learning process for performing and analyzing 3D/4D transperineal ultrasound imaging and interobserver reliability study.

    PubMed

    Siafarikas, F; Staer-Jensen, J; Braekken, I H; Bø, K; Engh, M Ellström

    2013-03-01

    To evaluate the learning process for acquiring three- and four-dimensional (3D/4D) transperineal ultrasound volumes of the levator hiatus (LH) dimensions at rest, during pelvic floor muscle (PFM) contraction and on Valsalva maneuver, and for analyzing the ultrasound volumes, as well as to perform an interobserver reliability study between two independent ultrasound examiners. This was a prospective study including 22 women. We monitored the learning process of an inexperienced examiner (IE) performing 3D/4D transperineal ultrasonography and analyzing the volumes. The examination included acquiring volumes during three PFM contractions and three Valsalva maneuvers. LH dimensions were determined in the axial plane. The learning process was documented by estimating agreement between the IE and an experienced examiner (E) using the intraclass correlation coefficient. Agreement was calculated in blocks of 10 ultrasound examinations and analyzed volumes. After the learning process was complete the interobserver reliability for the technique was calculated between these two independent examiners. For offline analysis of the first 10 ultrasound volumes obtained by E, good to very good agreement between E and IE was achieved for all LH measurements except for the left and right levator-urethra gap and pubic arc. For the next 10 analyzed volumes, agreement improved for all LH measurements. Volumes that had been obtained by IE and E were then re-evaluated by IE, and good to very good agreement was found for all LH measurements indicating consistency in volume acquisition. The interobserver reliability study showed excellent ICC values (ICC, 0.81-0.97) for all LH measurements except the pubic arc (ICC = 0.67). 3D/4D transperineal ultrasound is a reliable technique that can be learned in a short period of time. Copyright © 2012 ISUOG. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. The ultrasound brain helmet: early human feasibility study of multiple simultaneous 3D scans of cerebral vasculature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindsey, Brooks D.; Ivancevich, Nikolas M.; Whitman, John; Light, Edward; Fronheiser, Matthew; Nicoletto, Heather A.; Laskowitz, Daniel T.; Smith, Stephen W.

    2009-02-01

    We describe early stage experiments to test the feasibility of an ultrasound brain helmet to produce multiple simultaneous real-time 3D scans of the cerebral vasculature from temporal and suboccipital acoustic windows of the skull. The transducer hardware and software of the Volumetrics Medical Imaging real-time 3D scanner were modified to support dual 2.5 MHz matrix arrays of 256 transmit elements and 128 receive elements which produce two simultaneous 64° pyramidal scans. The real-time display format consists of two coronal B-mode images merged into a 128° sector, two simultaneous parasagittal images merged into a 128° × 64° C-mode plane, and a simultaneous 64° axial image. Real-time 3D color Doppler images acquired in initial clinical studies after contrast injection demonstrate flow in several representative blood vessels. An offline Doppler rendering of data from two transducers simultaneously scanning via the temporal windows provides an early visualization of the flow in vessels on both sides of the brain. The long-term goal is to produce real-time 3D ultrasound images of the cerebral vasculature from a portable unit capable of internet transmission, thus enabling interactive 3D imaging, remote diagnosis and earlier therapeutic intervention. We are motivated by the urgency for rapid diagnosis of stroke due to the short time window of effective therapeutic intervention.

  12. Low intensity pulse ultrasound stimulate chondrocytes growth in a 3-D alginate scaffold through improved porosity and permeability.

    PubMed

    Guo, Gepu; Lu, Lu; Ji, Hongfei; Ma, Yong; Dong, Rui; Tu, Juan; Guo, Xiasheng; Qiu, Yuanyuan; Wu, Junru; Zhang, Dong

    2015-04-01

    A 3-D scaffold culture system has been used to promote in producing functional chondrocytes for repairing damaged cartilage. In the present study, the low intensity pulse ultrasound (LIPUS) (P(-)=0, 0.055, 0.085 and 0.11 MPa) was applied to improve the porosity and permeability of a 3-D alginate scaffold which was beneficial for the nutrition supply and metabolism during cell growth in 3-D alginate scaffold. The porosity and permeability of the scaffold was quantitatively analyzed based on scanning electron microscopy examination and fluorescence image observation. The results suggest that, for the scaffold exposed to LIPUS, its porosity and permeability could be significantly enhanced by the increasing LIPUS amplitude, which might be induced by the microstreaming shear stress generated by ultrasound-driven microbubble oscillations. Furthermore, the assessments of cell proliferation and collagen II expression confirmed that chondrocytes growth could be effectively promoted in 3-D alginate scaffolds treated by LIPUS, because of the improved scaffold porosity and permeability might benefit cell growth space and nutrition supply. It should also be noticed that appropriate LIPUS driving parameters should be adapted to achieve optimized chondrocytes culture effect in 3-D alginate scaffold.

  13. Analysis of 3D Subharmonic Ultrasound Signals from Patients with Known Breast Masses for Lesion Differentiation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    kinetics based on temporal data for 4D subharmonic breast ultrasound exams.  Applied these algorithms to an existing data set of contrast enhanced...Mattrey, H. Ojeda- Fournier, K. Wallace, C.L. Chalek, K.E. Thomenius, F. Forsberg. Initial 10 experiences with 4D subharmonic breast Imaging. Ultrasound ...to improve visualization of vascularity using 4D subharmonic breast imaging. Ultrasound Med Biol 2013; 39(5): S27. Scientific presentations: 1

  14. FINAL INTERIM REPORT, CANDIDATE SITES, MACHINES IN USE, DATA STORAGE AND TRANSMISSION METHODS: TESTING FEASIBILITY OF 3D ULTRASOUND DATA ACQUISITION AND RELIABILITY OF DATA RETRIEVAL FROM STORED 3D IMAGES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this Work Assignment, 02-03, is to examine the feasibility of collecting transmitting, and analyzing 3-D ultrasound data in the context of a multi-center study of pregnant women. The study will also examine the reliability of measurements obtained from 3-D images< ...

  15. FINAL INTERIM REPORT, CANDIDATE SITES, MACHINES IN USE, DATA STORAGE AND TRANSMISSION METHODS: TESTING FEASIBILITY OF 3D ULTRASOUND DATA ACQUISITION AND RELIABILITY OF DATA RETRIEVAL FROM STORED 3D IMAGES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this Work Assignment, 02-03, is to examine the feasibility of collecting transmitting, and analyzing 3-D ultrasound data in the context of a multi-center study of pregnant women. The study will also examine the reliability of measurements obtained from 3-D images< ...

  16. Theoretical Analysis of the Accuracy and Safety of MRI-Guided Transurethral 3-D Conformal Ultrasound Prostate Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burtnyk, Mathieu; Chopra, Rajiv; Bronskill, Michael

    2009-04-01

    MRI-guided transurethral ultrasound therapy is a promising new approach for the treatment of localized prostate cancer. Several studies have demonstrated the feasibility of producing large regions of thermal coagulation adequate for prostate therapy; however, the quantitative assessment of shaping these regions to complex 3-D human prostate geometries has not been fully explored. This study used numerical simulations and twenty manually-segmented pelvic anatomical models derived from high-quality MR images of prostate cancer patients to evaluate the treatment accuracy and safety of 3-D conformal MRI-guided transurethral ultrasound therapy. The simulations incorporated a rotating multi-element planar dual-frequency ultrasound transducer (seventeen 4×3 mm elements) operating at 4.7/9.7 MHz and 10 W/cm2 maximum acoustic power. Results using a novel feedback control algorithm which modulated the ultrasound frequency, power and device rate of rotation showed that regions of thermal coagulation could be shaped to predefined prostate volumes within 1.0 mm across the vast majority of these glands. Treatment times were typically 30 min and remained below 60 min for large 60 cc prostates. With a rectal cooling temperature of 15° C, the rectal wall did not exceed 30EM43 in half of the twenty patient models with only a few 1 mm3 voxels above this threshold in the other cases. At 4.7 MHz, heating of the pelvic bone can become significant when it is located less than 10 mm from the prostate. Numerical simulations show that MRI-guided transurethral ultrasound therapy can thermally coagulate whole prostate glands accurately and safely in 3-D.

  17. Real-time 3D ultrasound fetal image enhancment techniques using motion-compensated frame rate up-conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Gun-Ill; Park, Rae-Hong; Song, Young-Seuk; Kim, Cheol-An; Hwang, Jae-Sub

    2003-05-01

    In this paper, we present a motion compensated frame rate up-conversion method for real-time three-dimensional (3-D) ultrasound fetal image enhancement. The conventional mechanical scan method with one-dimensional (1-D) array converters used for 3-D volume data acquisition has a slow frame rate of multi-planar images. This drawback is not an issue for stationary objects, however in ultrasound images showing a fetus of more than about 25 weeks, we perceive abrupt changes due to fast motions. To compensate for this defect, we propose the frame rate up-conversion method by which new interpolated frames are inserted between two input frames, giving smooth renditions to human eyes. More natural motions can be obtained by frame rate up-conversion. In the proposed algorithm, we employ forward motion estimation (ME), in which motion vectors (MVs) ar estimated using a block matching algorithm (BMA). To smooth MVs over neighboring blocks, vector median filtering is performed. Using these smoothed MVs, interpolated frames are reconstructed by motion compensation (MC). The undesirable blocking artifacts due to blockwise processing are reduced by block boundary filtering using a Gaussian low pass filter (LPF). The proposed method can be used in computer aided diagnosis (CAD), where more natural 3-D ultrasound images are displayed in real-time. Simulation results with several real test sequences show the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm.

  18. Elastic Versus Rigid Image Registration in Magnetic Resonance Imaging-transrectal Ultrasound Fusion Prostate Biopsy: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Venderink, Wulphert; de Rooij, Maarten; Sedelaar, J P Michiel; Huisman, Henkjan J; Fütterer, Jurgen J

    2016-07-29

    The main difference between the available magnetic resonance imaging-transrectal ultrasound (MRI-TRUS) fusion platforms for prostate biopsy is the method of image registration being either rigid or elastic. As elastic registration compensates for possible deformation caused by the introduction of an ultrasound probe for example, it is expected that it would perform better than rigid registration. The aim of this meta-analysis is to compare rigid with elastic registration by calculating the detection odds ratio (OR) for both subgroups. The detection OR is defined as the ratio of the odds of detecting clinically significant prostate cancer (csPCa) by MRI-TRUS fusion biopsy compared with systematic TRUS biopsy. Secondary objectives were the OR for any PCa and the OR after pooling both registration techniques. The electronic databases PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane were systematically searched for relevant studies according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Review and Meta-analysis Statement. Studies comparing MRI-TRUS fusion and systematic TRUS-guided biopsies in the same patient were included. The quality assessment of included studies was performed using the Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies version 2. Eleven papers describing elastic and 10 describing rigid registration were included. Meta-analysis showed an OR of csPCa for elastic and rigid registration of 1.45 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.21-1.73, p<0.0001) and 1.40 (95% CI: 1.13-1.75, p=0.002), respectively. No significant difference was seen between the subgroups (p=0.83). Pooling subgroups resulted in an OR of 1.43 (95% CI: 1.25-1.63, p<0.00001). No significant difference was identified between rigid and elastic registration for MRI-TRUS fusion-guided biopsy in the detection of csPCa; however, both techniques detected more csPCa than TRUS-guided biopsy alone. We did not identify any significant differences in prostate cancer detection between two distinct magnetic resonance

  19. Register cardiac fiber orientations from 3D DTI volume to 2D ultrasound image of rat hearts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Xulei; Wang, Silun; Shen, Ming; Zhang, Xiaodong; Lerakis, Stamatios; Wagner, Mary B.; Fei, Baowei

    2015-03-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) ultrasound or echocardiography is one of the most widely used examinations for the diagnosis of cardiac diseases. However, it only supplies the geometric and structural information of the myocardium. In order to supply more detailed microstructure information of the myocardium, this paper proposes a registration method to map cardiac fiber orientations from three-dimensional (3D) magnetic resonance diffusion tensor imaging (MR-DTI) volume to the 2D ultrasound image. It utilizes a 2D/3D intensity based registration procedure including rigid, log-demons, and affine transformations to search the best similar slice from the template volume. After registration, the cardiac fiber orientations are mapped to the 2D ultrasound image via fiber relocations and reorientations. This method was validated by six images of rat hearts ex vivo. The evaluation results indicated that the final Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) achieved more than 90% after geometric registrations; and the inclination angle errors (IAE) between the mapped fiber orientations and the gold standards were less than 15 degree. This method may provide a practical tool for cardiologists to examine cardiac fiber orientations on ultrasound images and have the potential to supply additional information for diagnosis of cardiac diseases.

  20. Investigation of mass transfer intensification under power ultrasound irradiation using 3D computational simulation: A comparative analysis.

    PubMed

    Sajjadi, Baharak; Asgharzadehahmadi, Seyedali; Asaithambi, Perumal; Raman, Abdul Aziz Abdul; Parthasarathy, Rajarathinam

    2017-01-01

    This paper aims at investigating the influence of acoustic streaming induced by low-frequency (24kHz) ultrasound irradiation on mass transfer in a two-phase system. The main objective is to discuss the possible mass transfer improvements under ultrasound irradiation. Three analyses were conducted: i) experimental analysis of mass transfer under ultrasound irradiation; ii) comparative analysis between the results of the ultrasound assisted mass transfer with that obtained from mechanically stirring; and iii) computational analysis of the systems using 3D CFD simulation. In the experimental part, the interactive effects of liquid rheological properties, ultrasound power and superficial gas velocity on mass transfer were investigated in two different sonicators. The results were then compared with that of mechanical stirring. In the computational part, the results were illustrated as a function of acoustic streaming behaviour, fluid flow pattern, gas/liquid volume fraction and turbulence in the two-phase system and finally the mass transfer coefficient was specified. It was found that additional turbulence created by ultrasound played the most important role on intensifying the mass transfer phenomena compared to that in stirred vessel. Furthermore, long residence time which depends on geometrical parameters is another key for mass transfer. The results obtained in the present study would help researchers understand the role of ultrasound as an energy source and acoustic streaming as one of the most important of ultrasound waves on intensifying gas-liquid mass transfer in a two-phase system and can be a breakthrough in the design procedure as no similar studies were found in the existing literature. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. Measurement of the 3D arterial wall strain tensor using intravascular B-mode ultrasound images: a feasibility study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Yun; Zhu, Hui; Friedman, Morton H.

    2010-11-01

    Intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) elastography is a promising tool for studying atherosclerotic plaque composition and assessing plaque vulnerability. Current IVUS elastography techniques can measure the 1D or 2D strain of the vessel wall using various motion tracking algorithms. Since biological soft tissue tends to deform non-uniformly in 3D, measurement of the complete 3D strain tensor is desirable for more rigorous analysis of arterial wall mechanics. In this paper, we extend our previously developed method of 2D arterial wall strain measurement based on non-rigid image registration into 3D strain measurement. The new technique registers two image volumes acquired from the same vessel segment under different levels of luminal pressure and longitudinal stress. The 3D displacement field obtained from the image registration is used to calculate the local 3D strain tensor. From the 3D strain tensor, radial, circumferential and longitudinal strain distributions can be obtained and displayed. This strain tensor measurement method is validated and evaluated using IVUS images of healthy porcine carotid arteries subjected to a luminal pressure increase and longitudinal stretch. The ability of the algorithm to overcome systematic noise was tested, as well as the consistency of the results under different longitudinal frame resolutions.

  2. Skeletonization approach for characterization of benign vs. malignant single thyroid nodules using 3D contrast enhanced ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molinari, Filippo; Mantovani, Alice; Deandrea, Maurilio; Limone, Paolo; Garberoglio, Roberto; Suri, Jasjit S.

    2011-03-01

    High-resolution ultrasonography (HRUS) has potentialities in differential diagnosis between malignant and benign thyroid lesions, but interpretative pitfalls remain and accuracy is still poor. We developed an image processing technique for characterizing the intra-nodular vascularization of thyroid lesions. Twenty nodules (ten malignant) were analyzed by 3-D contrast-enhanced ultrasound imaging. The 3-D volumes were preprocessed and skeletonized. Seven vascular parameters were computed on the skeletons: number of vascular trees (NT); vascular density (VD); number of branching nodes (or branching points) (NB); mean vessel radius (MR); 2-D (DM) and 3-D (SOAM) tortuosity; and inflection count metric (ICM). Results showed that the malignant nodules had higher values of NT (83.1 vs. 18.1), VD (00.4 vs. 0.01), NB (1453 vs. 552), DM (51 vs. 18), ICM (19.9 vs. 8.7), and SOAM (26 vs. 11). Quantification of nodular vascularization based on 3-D contrast-enhanced ultrasound and skeletonization could help differential diagnosis of thyroid lesions.

  3. A 3D Freehand Ultrasound System for Multi-view Reconstructions from Sparse 2D Scanning Planes

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background A significant limitation of existing 3D ultrasound systems comes from the fact that the majority of them work with fixed acquisition geometries. As a result, the users have very limited control over the geometry of the 2D scanning planes. Methods We present a low-cost and flexible ultrasound imaging system that integrates several image processing components to allow for 3D reconstructions from limited numbers of 2D image planes and multiple acoustic views. Our approach is based on a 3D freehand ultrasound system that allows users to control the 2D acquisition imaging using conventional 2D probes. For reliable performance, we develop new methods for image segmentation and robust multi-view registration. We first present a new hybrid geometric level-set approach that provides reliable segmentation performance with relatively simple initializations and minimum edge leakage. Optimization of the segmentation model parameters and its effect on performance is carefully discussed. Second, using the segmented images, a new coarse to fine automatic multi-view registration method is introduced. The approach uses a 3D Hotelling transform to initialize an optimization search. Then, the fine scale feature-based registration is performed using a robust, non-linear least squares algorithm. The robustness of the multi-view registration system allows for accurate 3D reconstructions from sparse 2D image planes. Results Volume measurements from multi-view 3D reconstructions are found to be consistently and significantly more accurate than measurements from single view reconstructions. The volume error of multi-view reconstruction is measured to be less than 5% of the true volume. We show that volume reconstruction accuracy is a function of the total number of 2D image planes and the number of views for calibrated phantom. In clinical in-vivo cardiac experiments, we show that volume estimates of the left ventricle from multi-view reconstructions are found to be in better

  4. A 3D freehand ultrasound system for multi-view reconstructions from sparse 2D scanning planes.

    PubMed

    Yu, Honggang; Pattichis, Marios S; Agurto, Carla; Beth Goens, M

    2011-01-20

    A significant limitation of existing 3D ultrasound systems comes from the fact that the majority of them work with fixed acquisition geometries. As a result, the users have very limited control over the geometry of the 2D scanning planes. We present a low-cost and flexible ultrasound imaging system that integrates several image processing components to allow for 3D reconstructions from limited numbers of 2D image planes and multiple acoustic views. Our approach is based on a 3D freehand ultrasound system that allows users to control the 2D acquisition imaging using conventional 2D probes.For reliable performance, we develop new methods for image segmentation and robust multi-view registration. We first present a new hybrid geometric level-set approach that provides reliable segmentation performance with relatively simple initializations and minimum edge leakage. Optimization of the segmentation model parameters and its effect on performance is carefully discussed. Second, using the segmented images, a new coarse to fine automatic multi-view registration method is introduced. The approach uses a 3D Hotelling transform to initialize an optimization search. Then, the fine scale feature-based registration is performed using a robust, non-linear least squares algorithm. The robustness of the multi-view registration system allows for accurate 3D reconstructions from sparse 2D image planes. Volume measurements from multi-view 3D reconstructions are found to be consistently and significantly more accurate than measurements from single view reconstructions. The volume error of multi-view reconstruction is measured to be less than 5% of the true volume. We show that volume reconstruction accuracy is a function of the total number of 2D image planes and the number of views for calibrated phantom. In clinical in-vivo cardiac experiments, we show that volume estimates of the left ventricle from multi-view reconstructions are found to be in better agreement with clinical

  5. Development of a semi-automated method for mitral valve modeling with medial axis representation using 3D ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Pouch, Alison M; Yushkevich, Paul A; Jackson, Benjamin M; Jassar, Arminder S; Vergnat, Mathieu; Gorman, Joseph H; Gorman, Robert C; Sehgal, Chandra M

    2012-02-01

    Precise 3D modeling of the mitral valve has the potential to improve our understanding of valve morphology, particularly in the setting of mitral regurgitation (MR). Toward this goal, the authors have developed a user-initialized algorithm for reconstructing valve geometry from transesophageal 3D ultrasound (3D US) image data. Semi-automated image analysis was performed on transesophageal 3D US images obtained from 14 subjects with MR ranging from trace to severe. Image analysis of the mitral valve at midsystole had two stages: user-initialized segmentation and 3D deformable modeling with continuous medial representation (cm-rep). Semi-automated segmentation began with user-identification of valve location in 2D projection images generated from 3D US data. The mitral leaflets were then automatically segmented in 3D using the level set method. Second, a bileaflet deformable medial model was fitted to the binary valve segmentation by Bayesian optimization. The resulting cm-rep provided a visual reconstruction of the mitral valve, from which localized measurements of valve morphology were automatically derived. The features extracted from the fitted cm-rep included annular area, annular circumference, annular height, intercommissural width, septolateral length, total tenting volume, and percent anterior tenting volume. These measurements were compared to those obtained by expert manual tracing. Regurgitant orifice area (ROA) measurements were compared to qualitative assessments of MR severity. The accuracy of valve shape representation with cm-rep was evaluated in terms of the Dice overlap between the fitted cm-rep and its target segmentation. The morphological features and anatomic ROA derived from semi-automated image analysis were consistent with manual tracing of 3D US image data and with qualitative assessments of MR severity made on clinical radiology. The fitted cm-reps accurately captured valve shape and demonstrated patient-specific differences in valve

  6. Accurate visualization and quantification of coronary vasculature by 3D/4D fusion from biplane angiography and intravascular ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahle, Andreas; Mitchell, Steven C.; Olszewski, Mark E.; Long, Ryan M.; Sonka, Milan

    2001-01-01

    In the rapidly evolving field of intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) for tissue characterization and visualization, the assessment of vessel morphology still lacks a geometrically correct 3D reconstruction. The IVUS frames are usually stacked up to form a straight vessel, neglecting curvature and the axial twisting of the catheter during the pullback. This paper presents a comprehensive system for geometrically correct reconstruction of IVUS images by fusion with biplane angiography, thus combining the advantages of both modalities. Vessel cross-section and tissue characteristics are obtained form IVUS, while the 3D locations are derived by geometrical reconstruction from the angiographic projections. ECG-based timing ensures a proper match of the image data with the respective heart phase. The fusion is performed for each heart phase individually, thus yielding the 4-D data as a set of 3-D reconstructions.

  7. Left Ventricular Myocardial Segmentation in 3-D Ultrasound Recordings: Effect of Different Endocardial and Epicardial Coupling Strategies.

    PubMed

    Pedrosa, Joao; Barbosa, Daniel; Heyde, Brecht; Schnell, Frederic; Rosner, Assami; Claus, Piet; D'hooge, Jan

    2017-03-01

    Cardiac volume/function assessment remains a critical step in daily cardiology, and 3-D ultrasound plays an increasingly important role. Though development of automatic endocardial segmentation methods has received much attention, the same cannot be said about epicardial segmentation, in spite of the importance of full myocardial segmentation. In this paper, different ways of coupling the endocardial and epicardial segmentations are contrasted and compared with uncoupled segmentation. For this purpose, the B-spline explicit active surfaces framework was used; 27 3-D echocardiographic images were used to validate the different coupling strategies, which were compared with manual contouring of the endocardial and epicardial borders performed by an expert. It is shown that an independent segmentation of the endocardium followed by an epicardial segmentation coupled to the endocardium is the most advantageous. In this way, a framework for fully automatic 3-D myocardial segmentation is proposed using a novel coupling strategy.

  8. A new concept for intraoperative matching of 3D ultrasound and CT.

    PubMed

    Schorr, O; Wörn, H

    2001-01-01

    Matching of ultrasound images with CT or MRI scans is an awkward and unsatisfactory task when using conventional methods. Wide ranging differences in modality of ultrasound and CT/MRI require new techniques to be explored for successful alignment. Ultrasound images characteristically show comparable high noise ratio due to scattering inside the region of interest and the surrounding area. Additionally, shadowing and tissue dependent echo response time produce geometric artifacts. These image distortions are sophisticated to recover. Though image quality and geometric relationship are poor, ultrasound images show the potential for fast, low-cost, non-invasive and flexible image acquisition, predestinated for intraoperative application. The fusion of intraoperative ultrasound and preoperatively acquired CT/MRI images provides both, geometric invariance and flexible fast image acquisition, merging in a powerful tool for augmented three dimensional reality. In this paper we describe a completely new concept for alignment with abstaining from direct rigid or elastic matching of ultrasound to CT/MRI. Instead of placing those images in direct relationship, our approach involves a simulation of ultrasound wave behavior in order to predict B-mode images.

  9. Characterization of controlled bone defects using 2D and 3D ultrasound imaging techniques.

    PubMed

    Parmar, Biren J; Longsine, Whitney; Sabonghy, Eric P; Han, Arum; Tasciotti, Ennio; Weiner, Bradley K; Ferrari, Mauro; Righetti, Raffaella

    2010-08-21

    Ultrasound is emerging as an attractive alternative modality to standard x-ray and CT methods for bone assessment applications. As of today, however, there is a lack of systematic studies that investigate the performance of diagnostic ultrasound techniques in bone imaging applications. This study aims at understanding the performance limitations of new ultrasound techniques for imaging bones in controlled experiments in vitro. Experiments are performed on samples of mammalian and non-mammalian bones with controlled defects with size ranging from 400 microm to 5 mm. Ultrasound findings are statistically compared with those obtained from the same samples using standard x-ray imaging modalities and optical microscopy. The results of this study demonstrate that it is feasible to use diagnostic ultrasound imaging techniques to assess sub-millimeter bone defects in real time and with high accuracy and precision. These results also demonstrate that ultrasound imaging techniques perform comparably better than x-ray imaging and optical imaging methods, in the assessment of a wide range of controlled defects both in mammalian and non-mammalian bones. In the future, ultrasound imaging techniques might provide a cost-effective, real-time, safe and portable diagnostic tool for bone imaging applications.

  10. Diagnostic algorithm: how to make use of new 2D, 3D and 4D ultrasound technologies in breast imaging.

    PubMed

    Weismann, C F; Datz, L

    2007-11-01

    The aim of this publication is to present a time saving diagnostic algorithm consisting of two-dimensional (2D), three-dimensional (3D) and four-dimensional (4D) ultrasound (US) technologies. This algorithm of eight steps combines different imaging modalities and render modes which allow a step by step analysis of 2D, 3D and 4D diagnostic criteria. Advanced breast US systems with broadband high frequency linear transducers, full digital data management and high resolution are the actual basis for two-dimensional breast US studies in order to detect early breast cancer (step 1). The continuous developments of 2D US technologies including contrast resolution imaging (CRI) and speckle reduction imaging (SRI) have a direct influence on the high quality of three-dimensional and four-dimensional presentation of anatomical breast structures and pathological details. The diagnostic options provided by static 3D volume datasets according to US BI-RADS analogue assessment, concerning lesion shape, orientation, margin, echogenic rim sign, lesion echogenicity, acoustic transmission, associated calcifications, 3D criteria of the coronal plane, surrounding tissue composition (step 2) and lesion vascularity (step 6) are discussed. Static 3D datasets offer the combination of long axes distance measurements and volume calculations, which are the basis for an accurate follow-up in BI-RADS II and BI-RADS III lesions (step 3). Real time 4D volume contrast imaging (VCI) is able to demonstrate tissue elasticity (step 5). Glass body rendering is a static 3D tool which presents greyscale and colour information to study the vascularity and the vascular architecture of a lesion (step 6). Tomographic ultrasound imaging (TUI) is used for a slice by slice documentation in different investigation planes (A-,B- or C-plane) (steps 4 and 7). The final step 8 uses the panoramic view technique (XTD-View) to document the localisation within the breast and to make the position of a lesion simply

  11. Particle image velocimetry on simulated 3D ultrafast ultrasound from pediatric matrix TEE transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voorneveld, J. D.; Bera, D.; van der Steen, A. F. W.; de Jong, N.; Bosch, J. G.

    2017-03-01

    Ultrafast 3D transesophageal echocardiographic (TEE) imaging, combined with 3D echo particle image velocimetry (ePIV), would be ideal for tracking the complex blood flow patterns in the heart. We are developing a miniature pediatric matrix TEE transducer that employs micro-beamforming (μBF) and allows high framerate in 3D. In this paper, we assess the feasibility of 3D ePIV with a high frame rate, small aperture transducer and the influence of the micro-beamforming technique. We compare the results of 3D ePIV on simulated images using the μBF transducer and an idealized, fully sampled (FS) matrix transducer. For the two transducers, we have simulated high-framerate imaging of an 8.4mm diameter artery having a known 4D velocity field. The simulations were performed in FieldII. 1000 3D volumes, at a rate of 1000 volumes/sec, were created using a single diverging transmission per volume. The error in the 3D velocity estimation was measured by comparing the ePIV results of both transducers to the ground truth. The results on the simulated volumes show that ePIV can estimate the 4D velocity field of the arterial phantom using these small-aperture transducers suitable for pediatric 3D TEE. The μBF transducer (RMSE 44.0%) achieved comparable ePIV accuracy to that of the FS transducer (RMSE 42.6%).

  12. A probabilistic framework for freehand 3D ultrasound reconstruction applied to catheter ablation guidance in the left atrium.

    PubMed

    Koolwal, Aditya B; Barbagli, Federico; Carlson, Christopher R; Liang, David H

    2009-09-01

    The catheter ablation procedure is a minimally invasive surgery used to treat atrial fibrillation. Difficulty visualizing the catheter inside the left atrium anatomy has led to lengthy procedure times and limited success rates. In this paper, we present a set of algorithms for reconstructing 3D ultrasound data of the left atrium in real-time, with an emphasis on automatic tissue classification for improved clarity surrounding regions of interest. Using an intracardiac echo (ICE) ultrasound catheter, we collect 2D-ICE images of a left atrium phantom from multiple configurations and iteratively compound the acquired data into a 3D-ICE volume. We introduce two new methods for compounding overlapping US data-occupancy-likelihood and response-grid compounding-which automatically classify voxels as "occupied" or "clear," and mitigate reconstruction artifacts caused by signal dropout. Finally, we use the results of an ICE-to-CT registration algorithm to devise a response-likelihood weighting scheme, which assigns weights to US signals based on the likelihood that they correspond to tissue-reflections. Our algorithms successfully reconstruct a 3D-ICE volume of the left atrium with voxels classified as "occupied" or "clear," even within difficult-to-image regions like the pulmonary vein openings. We are robust to dropout artifact that plagues a subset of the 2D-ICE images, and our weighting scheme assists in filtering out spurious data attributed to ghost-signals from multi-path reflections. By automatically classifying tissue, our algorithm precludes the need for thresholding, a process that is difficult to automate without subjective input. Our hope is to use this result towards developing 3D ultrasound segmentation algorithms in the future.

  13. 3D intra-operative ultrasound and MR image guidance: pursuing an ultrasound-based management of brainshift to enhance neuronavigation.

    PubMed

    Riva, Marco; Hennersperger, Christoph; Milletari, Fausto; Katouzian, Amin; Pessina, Federico; Gutierrez-Becker, Benjamin; Castellano, Antonella; Navab, Nassir; Bello, Lorenzo

    2017-04-08

    Brainshift is still a major issue in neuronavigation. Incorporating intra-operative ultrasound (iUS) with advanced registration algorithms within the surgical workflow is regarded as a promising approach for a better understanding and management of brainshift. This work is intended to (1) provide three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound reconstructions specifically for brain imaging in order to detect brainshift observed intra-operatively, (2) evaluate a novel iterative intra-operative ultrasound-based deformation correction framework, and (3) validate the performance of the proposed image-registration-based deformation estimation in a clinical environment. Eight patients with brain tumors undergoing surgical resection are enrolled in this study. For each patient, a 3D freehand iUS system is employed in combination with an intra-operative navigation (iNav) system, and intra-operative ultrasound data are acquired at three timepoints during surgery. On this foundation, we present a novel resolution-preserving 3D ultrasound reconstruction, as well as a framework to detect brainshift through iterative registration of iUS images. To validate the system, the target registration error (TRE) is evaluated for each patient, and both rigid and elastic registration algorithms are analyzed. The mean TRE based on 3D-iUS improves significantly using the proposed brainshift compensation compared to neuronavigation (iNav) before (2.7 vs. 5.9 mm; [Formula: see text]) and after dural opening (4.2 vs. 6.2 mm, [Formula: see text]), but not after resection (6.7 vs. 7.5 mm; [Formula: see text]). iUS depicts a significant ([Formula: see text]) dynamic spatial brainshift throughout the three timepoints. Accuracy of registration can be improved through rigid and elastic registrations by 29.2 and 33.3%, respectively, after dural opening, and by 5.2 and 0.4%, after resection. 3D-iUS systems can improve the detection of brainshift and significantly increase the accuracy of the navigation in a real

  14. Intraoperative patient registration using volumetric true 3D ultrasound without fiducials

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Songbai; Roberts, David W.; Hartov, Alex; Paulsen, Keith D.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Accurate patient registration is crucial for effective image-guidance in open cranial surgery. Typically, it is accomplished by matching skin-affixed fiducials manually identified in the operating room (OR) with their counterparts in the preoperative images, which not only consumes OR time and personnel resources but also relies on the presence (and subsequent fixation) of the fiducials during the preoperative scans (until the procedure begins). In this study, the authors present a completely automatic, volumetric image-based patient registration technique that does not rely on fiducials by registering tracked (true) 3D ultrasound (3DUS) directly with preoperative magnetic resonance (MR) images. Methods: Multistart registrations between binary 3DUS and MR volumes were first executed to generate an initial starting point without incorporating prior information on the US transducer contact point location or orientation for subsequent registration between grayscale 3DUS and MR via maximization of either mutual information (MI) or correlation ratio (CR). Patient registration was then computed through concatenation of spatial transformations. Results: In ten (N = 10) patient cases, an average fiducial (marker) distance error (FDE) of 5.0 mm and 4.3 mm was achieved using MI or CR registration (FDE was smaller with CR vs MI in eight of ten cases), which are comparable to values reported for typical fiducial- or surface-based patient registrations. The translational and rotational capture ranges were found to be 24.0 mm and 27.0° for binary registrations (up to 32.8 mm and 36.4°), 12.2 mm and 25.6° for MI registrations (up to 18.3 mm and 34.4°), and 22.6 mm and 40.8° for CR registrations (up to 48.5 mm and 65.6°), respectively. The execution time to complete a patient registration was 12–15 min with parallel processing, which can be significantly reduced by confining the 3DUS transducer location to the center of craniotomy in MR before registration (an

  15. Outcomes of transrectal ultrasound scan of the prostate with sector biopsies for 323 New Zealand men with suspicion of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Smart, R

    1999-12-10

    To assess the results and clinical outcomes of the first four years of transrectal ultrasound scanning (TRUS) with sector biopsies of the prostate, as the definitive second-line investigation for men with suspicion of prostate cancer, including comparability with subsequent information from histology of surgical specimens. Information was collated from the author's ongoing surgical audit. TRUS and sector biopsies were carried out as a rooms procedure using a Toshiba Sono-Layer SSA-270A ultrasound machine with a PVL 725 RT transrectal probe and biopsy guide. Six or eight sector biopsies were taken with a Manan biopsy gun using 18 French gauge biopsy needles. Prophylactic ciprofloxacin and tinidazole were administered. Men with suspicion of prostate-specific antigen assay or digital rectal examination were considered for the investigation, especially if they were candidates for potentially curative treatments. Of 330 TRUS procedures performed on 323 men, 328 were done in rooms under local anaesthetic. The only significant complication was a transient bacteraemia in one patient not taking the antibiotics. Twenty men had prostate intraepithelial neoplasia or atypia, and 94 (29%) had cancer, of whom 24 (25%) had evidence of metastases. Curative treatment by radical prostatectomy or radiotherapy was attempted in 62 men (66%) and 28 are being managed by surveillance only. Comparisons with subsequent radical prostatectomy in 44 men showed that if only one TRUS biopsy core was involved with cancer (15 men), surgical margins were clear. For those with more cores involved (29 men), one-third (9 men) had positive margins or capsular perforation. The Gleason Score was different, more often higher, for 29 men by histology at radical prostatectomy compared to TRUS. Twenty-eight men had a subsequent transurethral resection of the prostate of which the histology resulted in management changes for ten of the 28, including three who were placed on surveillance and seven who underwent

  16. Role of information in preparing men for transrectal ultrasound guided prostate biopsy: a qualitative study embedded in the ProtecT trial.

    PubMed

    Wade, Julia; Rosario, Derek J; Howson, Joanne; Avery, Kerry N L; Salter, C Elizabeth; Goodwin, M Louise; Blazeby, Jane M; Lane, J Athene; Metcalfe, Chris; Neal, David E; Hamdy, Freddie C; Donovan, Jenny L

    2015-02-28

    The histological diagnosis of prostate cancer requires a prostate needle biopsy. Little is known about the relationship between information provided to prepare men for transrectal ultrasound guided biopsy (TRUS-Bx) and how men experience biopsy. The objectives were a) to understand men's experiences of biopsy as compared to their expectations; and b) to propose current evidence-based information for men undergoing TRUS-Bx. Between February 2006 and May 2008, 1,147 men undergoing a standardised 10-core transrectal ultrasound guided biopsy protocol under antibiotic cover following a PSA 3.0-19.9 ng/ml in the Prostate Testing for Cancer and Treatment (ProtecT) trial, completed questionnaires about biopsy symptoms. In this embedded qualitative study, in-depth interviews were undertaken with 85 men (mean age 63.6 yrs, mean PSA 4.5 ng/ml) to explore men's experiences of prostate biopsy and how the experience might be improved. Interview data were analysed thematically using qualitative research methods. Findings from the qualitative study were used to guide selection of key findings from the questionnaire study in developing a patient information leaflet preparing men for biopsy. Although most men tolerated TRUS-Bx, a quarter reported problematic side-effects and anxiety. Side effects were perceived as problematic and anxiety arose most commonly when experiences deviated from information provided. Men who were unprepared for elements of TRUS-Bx procedure or its sequelae responded by contacting health professionals for reassurance and voiced frustration that pre-biopsy information had understated the possible severity or duration of pain/discomfort and bleeding. Findings from questionnaire and interview data were combined to propose a comprehensive, evidence-based patient information leaflet for TRUS-Bx. Men reported anxiety associated with TRUS-Bx or its side-effects most commonly if they felt inadequately prepared for the procedure. Data from this qualitative study and

  17. Assessment of Prospectively Assigned Likert Scores for Targeted Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Transrectal Ultrasound Fusion Biopsies in Patients with Suspected Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Costa, Daniel N; Lotan, Yair; Rofsky, Neil M; Roehrborn, Claus; Liu, Alexander; Hornberger, Brad; Xi, Yin; Francis, Franto; Pedrosa, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    We assess the performance of prospectively assigned magnetic resonance imaging based Likert scale scores for the detection of clinically significant prostate cancer, and analyze the pre-biopsy imaging variables associated with increased cancer detection using targeted magnetic resonance imaging-transrectal ultrasound fusion biopsy. In this retrospective review of prospectively generated data including men with abnormal multiparametric prostate magnetic resonance imaging (at least 1 Likert score 3 or greater lesion) who underwent subsequent targeted magnetic resonance imaging-transrectal ultrasound fusion biopsy, we determined the association between different imaging variables (Likert score, lesion size, lesion location, prostate volume, radiologist experience) and targeted biopsy positivity rate. We also compared the detection of clinically significant cancer according to Likert scale scores. Tumors with high volume (50% or more of any core) Gleason score 3+4 or any tumor with greater Gleason score were considered clinically significant. Each lesion served as the elementary unit for analysis. We used logistic regression for univariate and multivariate (stepwise selection) analysis to assess for an association between targeted biopsy positivity rate and each tested variable. The relationship between Likert scale and Gleason score was evaluated using the Spearman correlation coefficient. A total of 161 men with 244 lesions met the study eligibility criteria. Targeted biopsies diagnosed cancer in 41% (66 of 161) of the men and 41% (99 of 244) of the lesions. The Likert score was the strongest predictor of targeted biopsy positivity (OR 3.7, p <0.0001). Other imaging findings associated with a higher targeted biopsy positivity rate included smaller prostate volume (OR 0.7, p <0.01), larger lesion size (OR 2.2, p <0.001) and anterior location (OR 2.0, p=0.01). On multiple logistic regression analysis Likert score, lesion size and prostate volume were significant

  18. Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Transrectal Ultrasound Guided Fusion Biopsy to Detect Progression in Patients with Existing Lesions on Active Surveillance for Low and Intermediate Risk Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Frye, Thomas P; George, Arvin K; Kilchevsky, Amichai; Maruf, Mahir; Siddiqui, M Minhaj; Kongnyuy, Michael; Muthigi, Akhil; Han, Hui; Parnes, Howard L; Merino, Maria; Choyke, Peter L; Turkbey, Baris; Wood, Brad; Pinto, Peter A

    2017-03-01

    Active surveillance is an established option for men with low risk prostate cancer. Multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging with magnetic resonance imaging-transrectal ultrasound fusion guided biopsy may better identify patients for active surveillance compared to systematic 12-core biopsy due to improved risk stratification. To our knowledge the performance of multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging in following men on active surveillance with visible lesions is unknown. We evaluated multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance imaging-transrectal ultrasound fusion guided biopsy to monitor men on active surveillance. This retrospective review included men from 2007 to 2015 with prostate cancer on active surveillance in whom magnetic resonance imaging visible lesions were monitored by multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging and fusion guided biopsy. Progression was defined by ISUP (International Society of Urological Pathology) grade group 1 to 2 and ISUP grade group 2 to 3. Significance was considered at p ≤0.05. A total of 166 patients on active surveillance with 2 or more fusion guided biopsies were included in analysis. Mean followup was 25.5 months. Of the patients 29.5% had pathological progression. Targeted biopsy alone identified 44.9% of patients who progressed compared to 30.6% identified by systematic 12-core biopsy alone (p = 0.03). Fusion guided biopsy detected 26% more cases of pathological progression on surveillance biopsy compared to systematic 12-core biopsy. Progression on multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging was the sole predictor of pathological progression at surveillance biopsy (p = 0.013). Multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging progression in the entire cohort had 81% negative predictive value, 35% positive predictive value, 77.6% sensitivity and 40.5% specificity in detecting pathological progression. Multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging progression predicts the risk of pathological

  19. Development and applications of 4-D ultrasound (dynamic 3-D) in neurosonology.

    PubMed

    Delcker, A; Schürks, M; Polz, H

    1999-10-01

    The development and application of color-coded data in three-dimensional (3-D) reconstruction or four-dimensional (4-D) imaging (equal to dynamic 3-D) are demonstrated. In 4-D imaging, electrocardiography-triggered data acquisition of consecutive phases during the heart cycle are stored to form a multiphase 3-D data set. The option of color-coded data gives a new insight into such hemodynamic information. In the past, 3-D reconstructions were simple unicolor images, as in power mode, and the color-coded hemodynamic information was lost. These new options are presented here, along with color-coded data in examples of angiographically controlled pathologic results in extracranial and intracranial vessels.

  20. Elastic image registration to quantify 3-D regional myocardial deformation from volumetric ultrasound: experimental validation in an animal model.

    PubMed

    Heyde, Brecht; Bouchez, Stefaan; Thieren, Sabine; Vandenheuvel, Michael; Jasaityte, Ruta; Barbosa, Daniel; Claus, Piet; Maes, Frederik; Wouters, Patrick; D'Hooge, Jan

    2013-09-01

    Although real-time 3-D echocardiography has the potential to allow more accurate assessment of global and regional ventricular dynamics compared with more traditional 2-D ultrasound examinations, it still requires rigorous testing and validation should it break through as a standard examination in routine clinical practice. However, only a limited number of studies have validated 3-D strain algorithms in an in vivo experimental setting. The aim of the present study, therefore, was to validate a registration-based strain estimation methodology in an animal model. Volumetric images were acquired in 14 open-chest sheep instrumented with ultrasonic microcrystals. Radial strain (ɛRR), longitudinal strain (ɛLL) and circumferential strain (ɛCC) were estimated during different stages: at rest, during reduced and increased cardiac inotropy induced by esmolol and dobutamine infusion, respectively, and during acute ischemia. Agreement between image-based and microcrystal-based strain estimates was evaluated by their linear correlation, indicating that all strain components could be estimated with acceptable accuracy (r = 0.69 for ɛRR, r = 0.64 for ɛLL and r = 0.62 for ɛCC). These findings are comparable to the performance of the current state-of-the-art commercial 3-D speckle tracking methods. Furthermore, shape of the strain curves, timing of peak values and location of dysfunctional regions were identified well. Whether 3-D elastic registration performs better than 3-D block matching-based methodologies still remains to be proven. Copyright © 2013 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. SIMULTANEOUS BILATERAL REAL-TIME 3-D TRANSCRANIAL ULTRASOUND IMAGING AT 1 MHZ THROUGH POOR ACOUSTIC WINDOWS

    PubMed Central

    Lindsey, Brooks D.; Nicoletto, Heather A.; Bennett, Ellen R.; Laskowitz, Daniel T.; Smith, Stephen W.

    2013-01-01

    Ultrasound imaging has been proposed as a rapid, portable alternative imaging modality to examine stroke patients in pre-hospital or emergency room settings. However, in performing transcranial ultrasound examinations, 8%–29% of patients in a general population may present with window failure, in which case it is not possible to acquire clinically useful sonographic information through the temporal bone acoustic window. In this work, we describe the technical considerations, design and fabrication of low-frequency (1.2 MHz), large aperture (25.3 mm) sparse matrix array transducers for 3-D imaging in the event of window failure. These transducers are integrated into a system for real-time 3-D bilateral transcranial imaging—the ultrasound brain helmet—and color flow imaging capabilities at 1.2 MHz are directly compared with arrays operating at 1.8 MHz in a flow phantom with attenuation comparable to the in vivo case. Contrast-enhanced imaging allowed visualization of arteries of the Circle of Willis in 5 of 5 subjects and 8 of 10 sides of the head despite probe placement outside of the acoustic window. Results suggest that this type of transducer may allow acquisition of useful images either in individuals with poor windows or outside of the temporal acoustic window in the field. PMID:23415287

  2. Simultaneous bilateral real-time 3-d transcranial ultrasound imaging at 1 MHz through poor acoustic windows.

    PubMed

    Lindsey, Brooks D; Nicoletto, Heather A; Bennett, Ellen R; Laskowitz, Daniel T; Smith, Stephen W

    2013-04-01

    Ultrasound imaging has been proposed as a rapid, portable alternative imaging modality to examine stroke patients in pre-hospital or emergency room settings. However, in performing transcranial ultrasound examinations, 8%-29% of patients in a general population may present with window failure, in which case it is not possible to acquire clinically useful sonographic information through the temporal bone acoustic window. In this work, we describe the technical considerations, design and fabrication of low-frequency (1.2 MHz), large aperture (25.3 mm) sparse matrix array transducers for 3-D imaging in the event of window failure. These transducers are integrated into a system for real-time 3-D bilateral transcranial imaging-the ultrasound brain helmet-and color flow imaging capabilities at 1.2 MHz are directly compared with arrays operating at 1.8 MHz in a flow phantom with attenuation comparable to the in vivo case. Contrast-enhanced imaging allowed visualization of arteries of the Circle of Willis in 5 of 5 subjects and 8 of 10 sides of the head despite probe placement outside of the acoustic window. Results suggest that this type of transducer may allow acquisition of useful images either in individuals with poor windows or outside of the temporal acoustic window in the field.

  3. Accuracy of Tumor Sizing in Breast Cancer: A Comparison of Strain Elastography, 3-D Ultrasound and Conventional B-Mode Ultrasound with and without Compound Imaging.

    PubMed

    Stachs, Angrit; Pandjaitan, Alexander; Martin, Annett; Stubert, Johannes; Hartmann, Steffi; Gerber, Bernd; Glass, Änne

    2016-12-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the accuracy of strain elastography (SE), 3-D ultrasound (US), B-mode US with compound imaging (CI) and B-mode US without compound imaging for lesion sizing in breast cancer. The prospective study included 93 patients with invasive breast cancer. The largest tumor diameters measured by B-mode US, B-mode US with CI, SE and 3-D US were compared in Bland-Altman plots versus pathology as reference. A general linear model repeated measures (GLM Rep) was applied to investigate factors influencing tumor sizing. All methods underestimated pathologic size, with SE (-0.08 ± 7.7 mm) and 3-D US (-1.4 ± 6.5 mm) having the smallest mean differences from pathology. Bland-Altman plots revealed that B-mode US, B-mode US with CI and 3-D US systematically underestimated large tumor sizes, and only SE was technically comparable to pathology. The study indicates that sonographic underestimation of tumor size occurs mainly in tumors >20 mm; in this subgroup, SE is superior to other ultrasound methods.

  4. Prospective evaluation of magnetic resonance imaging guided in-bore prostate biopsy versus systematic transrectal ultrasound guided prostate biopsy in biopsy naïve men with elevated prostate specific antigen.

    PubMed

    Quentin, Michael; Blondin, Dirk; Arsov, Christian; Schimmöller, Lars; Hiester, Andreas; Godehardt, Erhard; Albers, Peter; Antoch, Gerald; Rabenalt, Robert

    2014-11-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging guided biopsy is increasingly performed to diagnose prostate cancer. However, there is a lack of well controlled, prospective trials to support this treatment method. We prospectively compared magnetic resonance imaging guided in-bore biopsy with standard systematic transrectal ultrasound guided biopsy in biopsy naïve men with increased prostate specific antigen. We performed a prospective study in 132 biopsy naïve men with increased prostate specific antigen (greater than 4 ng/ml). After 3 Tesla functional multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging patients were referred for magnetic resonance imaging guided in-bore biopsy of prostate lesions (maximum 3) followed by standard systematic transrectal ultrasound guided biopsy (12 cores). We analyzed the detection rates of prostate cancer and significant prostate cancer (greater than 5 mm total cancer length or any Gleason pattern greater than 3). A total of 128 patients with a mean ± SD age of 66.1 ± 8.1 years met all study requirements. Median prostate specific antigen was 6.7 ng/ml (IQR 5.1-9.0). Transrectal ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging guided biopsies provided the same 53.1% detection rate, including 79.4% and 85.3%, respectively, for significant prostate cancer. Magnetic resonance imaging and transrectal ultrasound guided biopsies missed 7.8% and 9.4% of clinically significant prostate cancers, respectively. Magnetic resonance imaging biopsy required significantly fewer cores and revealed a higher percent of cancer involvement per biopsy core (each p <0.01). Combining the 2 methods provided a 60.9% detection rate with an 82.1% rate for significant prostate cancer. Magnetic resonance imaging guided in-bore and systematic transrectal ultrasound guided biopsies achieved equally high detection rates in biopsy naïve patients with increased prostate specific antigen. Magnetic resonance imaging guided in-bore biopsies required significantly fewer cores and revealed a

  5. Image guidance of breast cancer surgery using 3-D ultrasound images and augmented reality visualization.

    PubMed

    Sato, Y; Nakamoto, M; Tamaki, Y; Sasama, T; Sakita, I; Nakajima, Y; Monden, M; Tamura, S

    1998-10-01

    This paper describes augmented reality visualization for the guidance of breast-conservative cancer surgery using ultrasonic images acquired in the operating room just before surgical resection. By combining an optical three-dimensional (3-D) position sensor, the position and orientation of each ultrasonic cross section are precisely measured to reconstruct geometrically accurate 3-D tumor models from the acquired ultrasonic images. Similarly, the 3-D position and orientation of a video camera are obtained to integrate video and ultrasonic images in a geometrically accurate manner. Superimposing the 3-D tumor models onto live video images of the patient's breast enables the surgeon to perceive the exact 3-D position of the tumor, including irregular cancer invasions which cannot be perceived by touch, as if it were visible through the breast skin. Using the resultant visualization, the surgeon can determine the region for surgical resection in a more objective and accurate manner, thereby minimizing the risk of a relapse and maximizing breast conservation. The system was shown to be effective in experiments using phantom and clinical data.

  6. A semi-automated 3-D annotation method for breast ultrasound imaging: system development and feasibility study on phantoms.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Wei-wei; Li, An-hua; Zheng, Yong-Ping

    2014-02-01

    Spatial annotation is an essential step in breast ultrasound imaging, because the follow-up diagnosis and treatment are based on this annotation. However, the current method for annotation is manual and highly dependent on the operator's experience. Moreover, important spatial information, such as the probe tilt angle, cannot be indicated in the clinical 2-D annotations. To solve these problems, we developed a semi-automated 3-D annotation method for breast ultrasound imaging. A spatial sensor was fixed on an ultrasound probe to obtain the image spatial data. Three-dimensional virtual models of breast and probe were used to annotate image locations. After the reference points were recorded, this system displayed the image annotations automatically. Compared with the conventional manual annotation method, this new annotation system has higher accuracy as indicated by the phantom test results. In addition, this new annotation method has good repeatability, with intra-class correlation coefficients of 0.907 (average variation: ≤3.45%) and 0.937 (average variation: ≤2.85%) for the intra-rater and inter-rater tests, respectively. Breast phantom experiments simulating clinical breast scanning further indicated the feasibility of this system for clinical applications. This new annotation method is expected to facilitate more accurate, intuitive and rapid breast ultrasound diagnosis.

  7. Toward a real-time simulation of ultrasound image sequences based on a 3-D set of moving scatterers.

    PubMed

    Marion, Adrien; Vray, Didier

    2009-10-01

    Data simulation is an important research tool to evaluate algorithms. Two types of methods are currently used to simulate medical ultrasound data: those based on acoustic models and those based on convolution models. The simulation of ultrasound data sequences is very time-consuming. In addition, many applications require accounting for the out-of-plane motion induced by the 3-D displacement of scatterers. The purpose of this paper is to propose a model adapted to a fast simulation of ultrasonic data sequences with 3-D moving scatterers. Our approach is based on the convolution model. The scatterers are moved in a 3-D continuous medium between each pair of images and then projected onto the imaging plane before being convolved. This paper discusses the practical implementation of the convolution that can be performed directly or after a grid approximation. The grid approximation convolution is obviously faster than the direct convolution but generates errors resulting from the approximation to the grid's nodes. We provide the analytical expression of these errors and then define 2 intensity-based criteria to quantify them as a function of the spatial sampling. The simulation of an image requires less than 2 s with oversampling, thus reducing these errors. The simulation model is validated with first- and second-order statistics. The positions of the scatterers at each imaging time can be provided by a displacement model. An example applied to flow imaging is proposed. Several cases are used to show that this displacement model provides realistic data. It is validated with speckle tracking, a well-known motion estimator in ultrasound imaging.

  8. 3-D high-frequency ultrasound backscatter analysis of human articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Männicke, Nils; Schöne, Martin; Gottwald, Matthias; Göbel, Felix; Oelze, Michael L; Raum, Kay

    2014-01-01

    High-frequency ultrasound is a promising method for non-invasive characterization of cartilage degeneration. Surface reflection and integrated spectral parameters are often used. In the work described here, human cartilage samples with varying degrees of degeneration were measured using a 40-MHz transducer. Backscatter signals originating from the superficial and transitional zones of cartilage were analyzed using amplitude, spectral and envelope statistical parameters and related to degenerative changes of the matrix given by the Mankin score. The results indicate an increased sensitivity of spectral slope and envelope statistical parameters to early matrix degeneration compared with conventional amplitude parameters. Furthermore, moderate correlations of chondrocyte number with backscatter amplitude and envelope statistics were observed, suggesting that at high frequencies, cells are one important scattering source in cartilage. An application of spectral and envelope statistical parameters to intra-articular ultrasound arthroscopy is conceivable and could improve the diagnostic potential of these examinations. Future studies are necessary to clarify the contributions of chondrocytes, extracellular matrix and collagen content to ultrasound backscatter to further improve the diagnostic potential of ultrasound for cartilage assessment.

  9. Addition of Ceftriaxone and Amikacin to a Ciprofloxacin plus Metronidazole Regimen for Preventing Infectious Complications of Transrectal Ultrasound-Guided Prostate Biopsy: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Izadpanahi, Mohammad-Hossein; Majidi, Seyed Mahmood; Khorrami, Mohammad-Hatef; Mohammadi-Sichani, Mehrdad

    2017-01-01

    Background. The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of adding single doses of ceftriaxone and amikacin to a ciprofloxacin plus metronidazole regimen on the reduction of infectious complications following transrectal ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy (TRUS Bx). Materials and Methods. Four hundred and fifty patients who were candidates for TRUS Bx were divided into two groups of 225 each. The control group received ciprofloxacin 500 mg orally every 12 hours together with metronidazole 500 mg orally every 8 hours from the day prior to the procedure until the fifth postoperative day. In the second group, single doses of ceftriaxone 1 g by intravenous infusion and amikacin 5 mg/kg intramuscularly were administered 30–60 minutes before TRUS Bx in addition to the oral antimicrobials described for group 1. The incidence of infection was compared between the groups. Results. The incidence of infectious complications in the intervention group was significantly lower than that in the control group (4.6% versus 0.9%, p = 0.017). Conclusion. The addition of single doses of intramuscular amikacin and intravenously infused ceftriaxone to our prophylactic regimen of ciprofloxacin plus metronidazole resulted in a statistically significant reduction of infectious complications following TRUS Bx. PMID:28167960

  10. The prevalence of urinary tract infection, or urosepsis following transrectal ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy in a subset of the Saudi population and patterns of susceptibility to flouroquinolones

    PubMed Central

    AlKhateeb, Sultan S.; AlShammari, Nayf A.; AlZughaibi, Mohand A.; Ghazwani, Yahya G.; Alrabeeah, Khalid A.; Albqami, Nasser M.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To study the prevalence of urinary tract infections (UTI), or sepsis secondary to trans-rectal ultrasound-guided (TRUS) biopsy of the prostate, the pathogens involved, and patterns of antibiotic resistance in a cohort of patients. Methods: This is a descriptive study of a consecutive cohort of patients who underwent elective TRUS biopsy at King Abdulaziz Medical City Riyadh, Saudi Arabia between January 2012 and December 2014. All patients who underwent the TRUS guided prostate biopsy were prescribed the standard prophylactic antibiotics. Variables included were patients’ demographics, type of antibiotic prophylaxis, results of biopsy, the rate of UTI, and urosepsis with the type of pathogen(s) involved and its/their antimicrobial sensitivity. Results: Simple descriptive statistics were used in a total of 139 consecutive patients. Urosepsis requiring hospital admission was encountered in 7 (5%) patients and uncomplicated UTI was observed in 4 (2.8%). The most common pathogens were Escherichia coli (90.1%) and Klebsiella pneumoniae (9.1%). Resistance to the routinely used prophylaxis (ciprofloxacin) was observed in 10 of these patients (90.9%). Conclusion: This showed an increase in the rate of infectious complications after TRUS prostate biopsy. Ciprofloxacin resistance was found in 90.9% of patients with no sepsis. PMID:27464862

  11. The prevalence of urinary tract infection, or urosepsis following transrectal ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy in a subset of the Saudi population and patterns of susceptibility to flouroquinolones.

    PubMed

    AlKhateeb, Sultan S; AlShammari, Nayf A; AlZughaibi, Mohand A; Ghazwani, Yahya G; Alrabeeah, Khalid A; Albqami, Nasser M

    2016-08-01

    To study the prevalence of urinary tract infections (UTI), or sepsis secondary to trans-rectal ultrasound-guided (TRUS) biopsy of the prostate, the pathogens involved, and patterns of antibiotic resistance in a cohort of patients. This is a descriptive study of a consecutive cohort of patients who underwent elective TRUS biopsy at King Abdulaziz Medical City, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia between January 2012 and December 2014. All patients who underwent the TRUS guided prostate biopsy were prescribed the standard prophylactic antibiotics. Variables included were patients' demographics, type of antibiotic prophylaxis, results of biopsy, the rate of UTI, and urosepsis with the type of pathogen(s) involved and its/their antimicrobial sensitivity.  Simple descriptive statistics were used in a total of 139 consecutive patients. Urosepsis requiring hospital admission was encountered in 7 (5%) patients and uncomplicated UTI was observed in 4 (2.8%). The most common pathogens were Escherichia coli (90.1%) and Klebsiella pneumoniae (9.1%). Resistance to the routinely used prophylaxis (ciprofloxacin) was observed in 10 of these patients (90.9%). This showed an increase in the rate of infectious complications after TRUS prostate biopsy. Ciprofloxacin resistance was found in 90.9% of patients with no sepsis.

  12. Visual pain score during transrectal ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy using no anaesthesia or three different types of local anaesthetic application.

    PubMed

    Gurbuz, Cenk; Canat, Lutfi; Bayram, Guner; Gokhan, Atis; Samet, Gungor; Caskurlu, Turhan

    2010-09-01

    To evaluate the pain score during transrectal ultrasound (TRUS)-guided prostate biopsy using three different anaesthetic applications and no anaesthesia. One-hundred men undergoing TRUS-guided prostate biopsy were prospectively enrolled in this study. Patients were randomized to four groups. Group 1 (n = 25) received no anaesthesia, group 2 (n = 25) was administered a perianal lidocaine injection, group 3 (n = 25) was administered a periprostatic lidocaine injection, and group 4 (n = 25) was administered a combination of perianal-intrarectal lidocaine-prilocaine cream. The anaesthetic application was given 5 min before the procedure. All patients were asked to indicate the level of pain experienced on a visual analogue scale (VAS) during three situations, including when the TRUS probe was inserted and 15 min and 2 weeks after biopsy. Mean pain scores were similar in all groups at the time of probe insertion. Mean pain scores showed statistically significant differences between group 1 and the other groups, except for group 4, 15 min after the procedure. Group 3 showed better pain control 15 min after biopsy and this difference was statistically significant (p < 0.043).The VAS scores were similar 2 weeks after the procedure in all groups. Anaesthetic application before TRUS-guided prostate biopsy may be advocated. The application of periprostatic lidocaine seems to be the most advantageous method for lowering the perception of pain.

  13. Intravenous paracetamol for relief of pain during transrectal-ultrasound-guided biopsy of the prostate: A prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study.

    PubMed

    Kilic, Ozcan; Akand, Murat; Kulaksizoglu, Haluk; Haliloglu, Ahmet H; Tanidik, Seher; Piskin, Mehmet M; Yurdakul, Talat

    2015-11-01

    Transrectal-ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy (TRUS-PBx) is the standard procedure for diagnosing prostate cancer. The procedure does cause some pain and discomfort; therefore, an adequate analgesia is necessary to ensure patient comfort, which can also facilitate good-quality results. This prospective, randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled study aimed to determine if intravenous (IV) paracetamol can reduce the severity of pain associated with TRUS-PBx. The study included 104 patients, scheduled to undergo TRUS-PBx with a suspicion of prostate cancer, that were prospectively randomized to receive either IV paracetamol (paracetamol group) or placebo (placebo group) 30 minutes prior to TRUS-PBx. All patients had 12 standardized biopsy samples taken. Pain was measured using a 10-point visual analog pain scale during probe insertion, during the biopsy procedure, and 1 hour postbiopsy. All biopsies were performed by the same urologist, whereas a different urologist administered the visual analog pain scale. There were not any significant differences in age, prostate-specific antigen level, or prostate volume between the two groups. The pain scores were significantly lower during probe insertion, biopsy procedure, and 1 hour postbiopsy in the paracetamol group than in the placebo group. In conclusion, the IV administration of paracetamol significantly reduced the severity of pain associated with TRUS-PBx. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Taiwan.

  14. Contrast-enhanced transrectal ultrasound for prediction of prostate cancer aggressiveness: The role of normal peripheral zone time-intensity curves

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Hui; Zhu, Zheng-Qiu; Zhou, Zheng-Guo; Chen, Ling-Shan; Zhao, Ming; Zhang, Yang; Li, Hong-Bo; Yin, Li-Ping

    2016-01-01

    To assess the role of time-intensity curves (TICs) of the normal peripheral zone (PZ) in the identification of biopsy-proven prostate nodules using contrast-enhanced transrectal ultrasound (CETRUS). This study included 132 patients with 134 prostate PZ nodules. Arrival time (AT), peak intensity (PI), mean transit time (MTT), area under the curve (AUC), time from peak to one half (TPH), wash in slope (WIS) and time to peak (TTP) were analyzed using multivariate linear logistic regression and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves to assess whether combining nodule TICs with normal PZ TICs improved the prediction of prostate cancer (PCa) aggressiveness. The PI, AUC (p < 0.001 for both), MTT and TPH (p = 0.011 and 0.040 respectively) values of the malignant nodules were significantly higher than those of the benign nodules. Incorporating the PI and AUC values (both, p < 0.001) of the normal PZ TIC, but not the MTT and TPH values (p = 0.076 and 0.159 respectively), significantly improved the AUC for prediction of malignancy (PI: 0.784–0.923; AUC: 0.758–0.891) and assessment of cancer aggressiveness (p < 0.001). Thus, all these findings indicate that incorporating normal PZ TICs with nodule TICs in CETRUS readings can improve the diagnostic accuracy for PCa and cancer aggressiveness assessment. PMID:27929134

  15. 3D Near Infrared and Ultrasound Imaging of Peripheral Blood Vessels for Real-Time Localization and Needle Guidance

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Alvin I.; Balter, Max L.; Maguire, Timothy J.; Yarmush, Martin L.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a portable imaging device designed to detect peripheral blood vessels for cannula insertion that are otherwise difficult to visualize beneath the skin. The device combines near infrared stereo vision, ultrasound, and real-time image analysis to map the 3D structure of subcutaneous vessels. We show that the device can identify adult forearm vessels and be used to guide manual insertions in tissue phantoms with increased first-stick accuracy compared to unassisted cannulation. We also demonstrate that the system may be coupled with a robotic manipulator to perform automated, image-guided venipuncture. PMID:27981261

  16. Three dimensional level set based semiautomatic segmentation of atherosclerotic carotid artery wall volume using 3D ultrasound imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossain, Md. Murad; AlMuhanna, Khalid; Zhao, Limin; Lal, Brajesh K.; Sikdar, Siddhartha

    2014-03-01

    3D segmentation of carotid plaque from ultrasound (US) images is challenging due to image artifacts and poor boundary definition. Semiautomatic segmentation algorithms for calculating vessel wall volume (VWV) have been proposed for the common carotid artery (CCA) but they have not been applied on plaques in the internal carotid artery (ICA). In this work, we describe a 3D segmentation algorithm that is robust to shadowing and missing boundaries. Our algorithm uses distance regularized level set method with edge and region based energy to segment the adventitial wall boundary (AWB) and lumen-intima boundary (LIB) of plaques in the CCA, ICA and external carotid artery (ECA). The algorithm is initialized by manually placing points on the boundary of a subset of transverse slices with an interslice distance of 4mm. We propose a novel user defined stopping surface based energy to prevent leaking of evolving surface across poorly defined boundaries. Validation was performed against manual segmentation using 3D US volumes acquired from five asymptomatic patients with carotid stenosis using a linear 4D probe. A pseudo gold-standard boundary was formed from manual segmentation by three observers. The Dice similarity coefficient (DSC), Hausdor distance (HD) and modified HD (MHD) were used to compare the algorithm results against the pseudo gold-standard on 1205 cross sectional slices of 5 3D US image sets. The algorithm showed good agreement with the pseudo gold standard boundary with mean DSC of 93.3% (AWB) and 89.82% (LIB); mean MHD of 0.34 mm (AWB) and 0.24 mm (LIB); mean HD of 1.27 mm (AWB) and 0.72 mm (LIB). The proposed 3D semiautomatic segmentation is the first step towards full characterization of 3D plaque progression and longitudinal monitoring.

  17. In vivo validation of a 3D ultrasound system for imaging the lateral ventricles of neonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishimoto, J.; Fenster, A.; Chen, N.; Lee, D.; de Ribaupierre, S.

    2014-03-01

    Dilated lateral ventricles in neonates can be due to many different causes, such as brain loss, or congenital malformation; however, the main cause is hydrocephalus, which is the accumulation of fluid within the ventricular system. Hydrocephalus can raise intracranial pressure resulting in secondary brain damage, and up to 25% of patients with severely enlarged ventricles have epilepsy in later life. Ventricle enlargement is clinically monitored using 2D US through the fontanels. The sensitivity of 2D US to dilation is poor because it cannot provide accurate measurements of irregular volumes such as the ventricles, so most clinical evaluations are of a qualitative nature. We developed a 3D US system to image the cerebral ventricles of neonates within the confines of incubators that can be easily translated to more open environments. Ventricle volumes can be segmented from these images giving a quantitative volumetric measurement of ventricle enlargement without moving the patient into an imaging facility. In this paper, we report on in vivo validation studies: 1) comparing 3D US ventricle volumes before and after clinically necessary interventions removing CSF, and 2) comparing 3D US ventricle volumes to those from MRI. Post-intervention ventricle volumes were less than pre-intervention measurements for all patients and all interventions. We found high correlations (R = 0.97) between the difference in ventricle volume and the reported removed CSF with the slope not significantly different than 1 (p < 0.05). Comparisons between ventricle volumes from 3D US and MR images taken 4 (±3.8) days of each other did not show significant difference (p=0.44) between 3D US and MRI through paired t-test.

  18. [Value of 3D-4D sonography in fetal and gynecological ultrasound examination: principles and indications].

    PubMed

    Levaillant, Jm

    2006-12-01

    Three-dimensional ultrasound has become an essential tool for visualization of fetal structures in the past few years. The recent improvements in transducers and signal processing provide new information, particularly in obstetrics and gynecology sonography. The present paper will present the most recent advances in volume acquisition and presentation modes followed by results of fetal organ visualization in normal and abnormal cases as well as applications in gynecology.

  19. Guided Interventions for Prostate Cancer Using 3D-Transurethral Ultrasound and MRI Fusion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    fabrication. An FDA approved radially- phased 64-element array intravascular ultrasound ( IVUS ) device (Visions, Volcano Therapeutics) 8.2 French...catheter and Volcano s5 imaging system were used for the TUUS imaging. The IVUS was electronically controlled to yield 2D images that were stitched to...the stability of the phantoms over time, acquiring IVUS catheters, access to the imaging tools (TUUS imaging machine, TRUS imaging machine and MRI

  20. Predicate-Based Focus-and-Context Visualization for 3D Ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Schulte zu Berge, Christian; Baust, Maximilian; Kapoor, Ankur; Navab, Nassir

    2014-12-01

    Direct volume visualization techniques offer powerful insight into volumetric medical images and are part of the clinical routine for many applications. Up to now, however, their use is mostly limited to tomographic imaging modalities such as CT or MRI. With very few exceptions, such as fetal ultrasound, classic volume rendering using one-dimensional intensity-based transfer functions fails to yield satisfying results in case of ultrasound volumes. This is particularly due its gradient-like nature, a high amount of noise and speckle, and the fact that individual tissue types are rather characterized by a similar texture than by similar intensity values. Therefore, clinicians still prefer to look at 2D slices extracted from the ultrasound volume. In this work, we present an entirely novel approach to the classification and compositing stage of the volume rendering pipeline, specifically designed for use with ultrasonic images. We introduce point predicates as a generic formulation for integrating the evaluation of not only low-level information like local intensity or gradient, but also of high-level information, such as non-local image features or even anatomical models. Thus, we can successfully filter clinically relevant from non-relevant information. In order to effectively reduce the potentially high dimensionality of the predicate configuration space, we propose the predicate histogram as an intuitive user interface. This is augmented by a scribble technique to provide a comfortable metaphor for selecting predicates of interest. Assigning importance factors to the predicates allows for focus-and-context visualization that ensures to always show important (focus) regions of the data while maintaining as much context information as possible. Our method naturally integrates into standard ray casting algorithms and yields superior results in comparison to traditional methods in terms of visualizing a specific target anatomy in ultrasound volumes.

  1. [Spatio-temporal image correlation (STIC) and tomographic ultrasound imaging (TUI)--combined clinical implementation in 3D/4D fetal echocardiography].

    PubMed

    Markov, D

    2010-01-01

    Two new forms of volume data image processing by three (3D) and four (4D) dimensional ultrasound named Spatio-Temporal Image Correlation (STIC) and Tomographic Ultrasound Imaging (TUI) are presented. The advantages and disadvantages of the combined clinical implementation of both modalities in fetal echocardiography are discussed.

  2. A computational model for estimating tumor margins in complementary tactile and 3D ultrasound images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamsil, Arefin; Escoto, Abelardo; Naish, Michael D.; Patel, Rajni V.

    2016-03-01

    Conventional surgical methods are effective for treating lung tumors; however, they impose high trauma and pain to patients. Minimally invasive surgery is a safer alternative as smaller incisions are required to reach the lung; however, it is challenging due to inadequate intraoperative tumor localization. To address this issue, a mechatronic palpation device was developed that incorporates tactile and ultrasound sensors capable of acquiring surface and cross-sectional images of palpated tissue. Initial work focused on tactile image segmentation and fusion of position-tracked tactile images, resulting in a reconstruction of the palpated surface to compute the spatial locations of underlying tumors. This paper presents a computational model capable of analyzing orthogonally-paired tactile and ultrasound images to compute the surface circumference and depth margins of a tumor. The framework also integrates an error compensation technique and an algebraic model to align all of the image pairs and to estimate the tumor depths within the tracked thickness of a palpated tissue. For validation, an ex vivo experimental study was conducted involving the complete palpation of 11 porcine liver tissues injected with iodine-agar tumors of varying sizes and shapes. The resulting tactile and ultrasound images were then processed using the proposed model to compute the tumor margins and compare them to fluoroscopy based physical measurements. The results show a good negative correlation (r = -0.783, p = 0.004) between the tumor surface margins and a good positive correlation (r = 0.743, p = 0.009) between the tumor depth margins.

  3. 3D ultrasound in assessment of growth and development of frontal lobes in children with perinatal brain injury.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yunfeng; Zhou, Congle; Wang, Hongmei; Tang, Zezhong; Ding, Haiyan

    2009-01-01

    To investigate the functions of cranial 3D ultrasound in the assessment of growth and development of the volume of frontal lobes in children with perinatal brain injury, 226 neonates of different gestational ages and 86 full term with perinatal brain injury were selected as subjects. The volume of frontal lobe of neonate increased with gestational age within 7 days after birth (r=0.676, P<0.05). The volume of frontal lobe in the 33 children with serious brain injury was lower than that in the control group at 1 month and the difference was significant at 3 and 6 months (P<0.01). There was a correlation between the long-term nervous system dysplasia and the slow increase of frontal lobe volume. The volume of frontal lobe increases with gestational age. The brain injury during the perinatal period affects the development of frontal lobe and is related with neural dysplasia. 3D ultrasound is useful for evaluating the normal and abnormal brain development.

  4. SU-E-J-135: An Investigation of Ultrasound Imaging for 3D Intra-Fraction Prostate Motion Estimation

    SciTech Connect

    O'Shea, T; Harris, E; Bamber, J; Evans, P

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: This study investigates the use of a mechanically swept 3D ultrasound (US) probe to estimate intra-fraction motion of the prostate during radiation therapy using an US phantom and simulated transperineal imaging. Methods: A 3D motion platform was used to translate an US speckle phantom while simulating transperineal US imaging. Motion patterns for five representative types of prostate motion, generated from patient data previously acquired with a Calypso system, were using to move the phantom in 3D. The phantom was also implanted with fiducial markers and subsequently tracked using the CyberKnife kV x-ray system for comparison. A normalised cross correlation block matching algorithm was used to track speckle patterns in 3D and 2D US data. Motion estimation results were compared with known phantom translations. Results: Transperineal 3D US could track superior-inferior (axial) and anterior-posterior (lateral) motion to better than 0.8 mm root-mean-square error (RMSE) at a volume rate of 1.7 Hz (comparable with kV x-ray tracking RMSE). Motion estimation accuracy was poorest along the US probe's swept axis (right-left; RL; RMSE < 4.2 mm) but simple regularisation methods could be used to improve RMSE (< 2 mm). 2D US was found to be feasible for slowly varying motion (RMSE < 0.5 mm). 3D US could also allow accurate radiation beam gating with displacement thresholds of 2 mm and 5 mm exhibiting a RMSE of less than 0.5 mm. Conclusion: 2D and 3D US speckle tracking is feasible for prostate motion estimation during radiation delivery. Since RL prostate motion is small in magnitude and frequency, 2D or a hybrid (2D/3D) US imaging approach which also accounts for potential prostate rotations could be used. Regularisation methods could be used to ensure the accuracy of tracking data, making US a feasible approach for gating or tracking in standard or hypo-fractionated prostate treatments.

  5. 3-D airborne ultrasound synthetic aperture imaging based on capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducers.

    PubMed

    Park, Kwan Kyu; Khuri-Yakub, Butrus T

    2013-09-01

    In this paper, we present an airborne 3-D volumetric imaging system based on capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducers (CMUTs). For this purpose we fabricated 89-kHz CMUTs where each CMUT is made of a circular single-crystal silicon plate with a radius of 1mm and a thickness of 20 μm, which is actuated by electrostatic force through a 20-μm vacuum gap. The measured transmit sensitivity at 300-V DC bias is 14.6 Pa/V and 24.2 Pa/V, when excited by a 30-cycle burst and a continuous wave, respectively. The measured receive sensitivity at 300-V DC bias is 16.6 mV/Pa (-35.6 dB re 1 V/Pa) for a 30-cycle burst. A 26×26 2-D array was implemented by mechanical scanning a co-located transmitter and receiver using the classic synthetic aperture (CSA) method. The measurement of a 1.6λ-size target at a distance of 500 mm presented a lateral resolution of 3.17° and also showed good agreement with the theoretical point spread function. The 3-D imaging of two plates at a distance of 350 mm and 400 mm was constructed to exhibit the capability of the imaging system. This study experimentally demonstrates that a 2-D CMUT array can be used for practical 3-D imaging applications in air, such as a human-machine interface.

  6. Lipid Coated Microbubbles and Low Intensity Pulsed Ultrasound Enhance Chondrogenesis of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells in 3D Printed Scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Aliabouzar, Mitra; Zhang, Lijie Grace; Sarkar, Kausik

    2016-01-01

    Lipid-coated microbubbles are used to enhance ultrasound imaging and drug delivery. Here we apply these microbubbles along with low intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) for the first time to enhance proliferation and chondrogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) in a 3D printed poly-(ethylene glycol)-diacrylate (PEG-DA) hydrogel scaffold. The hMSC proliferation increased up to 40% after 5 days of culture in the presence of 0.5% (v/v) microbubbles and LIPUS in contrast to 18% with LIPUS alone. We systematically varied the acoustic excitation parameters—excitation intensity, frequency and duty cycle—to find 30 mW/cm2, 1.5 MHz and 20% duty cycle to be optimal for hMSC proliferation. A 3-week chondrogenic differentiation results demonstrated that combining LIPUS with microbubbles enhanced glycosaminoglycan (GAG) production by 17% (5% with LIPUS alone), and type II collagen production by 78% (44% by LIPUS alone). Therefore, integrating LIPUS and microbubbles appears to be a promising strategy for enhanced hMSC growth and chondrogenic differentiation, which are critical components for cartilage regeneration. The results offer possibilities of novel applications of microbubbles, already clinically approved for contrast enhanced ultrasound imaging, in tissue engineering. PMID:27883051

  7. A new methodology based on q-entropy for breast lesion classification in 3-D ultrasound images.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Paulo S; Giraldi, Gilson A; Provenzano, Marcia; Faria, Marcelo D; Chang, Ruey-Feng; Suri, Jasjit S

    2006-01-01

    Classification of breast lesions is clinically most relevant for breast radiologists and pathologists for early breast cancer detection. This task is not easy due to poor ultrasound resolution and large amount of patient data size. This paper proposes a five step novel and automatic methodology for breast lesion classification in 3-D ultrasound images. The first three steps yield an accurate segmentation of the breast lesions based on the combination of (a) novel non-extensive entropy, (b) morphologic cleaning and (c) accurate region and boundary extraction in level set framework. Segmented lesions then undergo five feature extractions consisting of: area, circularity, protuberance, homogeneity, and acoustic shadow. These breast lesion features are then input to a support vector machine (SVM)-based classifier that classifies the breast lesions between malignant and benign types. SVM utilizes B-spline as a kernel in its framework. Using a data base of 250 breast ultrasound images (100 benign and 150 malignant) and utilizing the cross-validation protocol, we demonstrate system's accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value as: 95%, 97%, 94%, 92% and 98% respectively in terms of ROC curves and Az areas, better in performance than the current literature offers.

  8. Computer-generated 3D ultrasound images of the carotid artery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Selzer, Robert H.; Lee, Paul L.; Lai, June Y.; Frieden, Howard J.; Blankenhorn, David H.

    1989-01-01

    A method is under development to measure carotid artery lesions from a computer-generated three-dimensional ultrasound image. For each image, the position of the transducer in six coordinates (x, y, z, azimuth, elevation, and roll) is recorded and used to position each B-mode picture element in its proper spatial position in a three-dimensional memory array. After all B-mode images have been assembled in the memory, the three-dimensional image is filtered and resampled to produce a new series of parallel-plane two-dimensional images from which arterial boundaries are determined using edge tracking methods.

  9. Computer-generated 3D ultrasound images of the carotid artery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selzer, Robert H.; Lee, Paul L.; Lai, June Y.; Frieden, Howard J.; Blankenhorn, David H.

    A method is under development to measure carotid artery lesions from a computer-generated three-dimensional ultrasound image. For each image, the position of the transducer in six coordinates (x, y, z, azimuth, elevation, and roll) is recorded and used to position each B-mode picture element in its proper spatial position in a three-dimensional memory array. After all B-mode images have been assembled in the memory, the three-dimensional image is filtered and resampled to produce a new series of parallel-plane two-dimensional images from which arterial boundaries are determined using edge tracking methods.

  10. Using High Frequency Focused Water-Coupled Ultrasound for 3-D Surface Depression Profiling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, Don J.; Whalen, Mike F.; Hendricks, J. Lynne; Bodis, James R.

    1999-01-01

    Surface topography is an important variable in the performance of many industrial components and is normally measured with diamond-tip profilometry over a small area or using optical scattering methods for larger area measurement. A prior study was performed demonstrating that focused air-coupled ultrasound at 1 MHz was capable of profiling surfaces with 25 micron depth resolution and 400 micron lateral resolution over a 1.4 mm depth range. In this article, the question of whether higher-frequency focused water-coupled ultrasound can improve on these specifications is addressed. 10 and 25 MHz focused ultrasonic transducers were employed in the water-coupled mode. Time-of-flight images of the sample surface were acquired and converted to depth / surface profile images using the simple relation (d = V*t/2) between distance (d), time-of-flight (t), and the velocity of sound in water (V). Results are compared for the two frequencies used and with those from the 1 MHz air-coupled configuration.

  11. 3-D microvessel-mimicking ultrasound phantoms produced with a scanning motion system.

    PubMed

    Gessner, Ryan C; Kothadia, Roshni; Feingold, Steven; Dayton, Paul A

    2011-05-01

    Ultrasound techniques are currently being developed that can assess the vascularization of tissue as a marker for therapeutic response. Some of these ultrasound imaging techniques seek to extract quantitative features about vessel networks, whereas high-frequency imaging also allows individual vessels to be resolved. The development of these new techniques, and subsequent imaging analysis strategies, necessitates an understanding of their sensitivities to vessel and vessel network structural abnormalities. Constructing in-vitro flow phantoms for this purpose can be prohibitively challenging, because simulating precise flow environments with nontrivial structures is often impossible using conventional methods of construction for flow phantoms. Presented in this manuscript is a method to create predefined structures with <10 μm precision using a three-axis motion system. The application of this technique is demonstrated for the creation of individual vessel and vessel networks, which can easily be made to simulate the development of structural abnormalities typical of diseased vasculature in vivo. In addition, beyond facilitating the creation of phantoms that would otherwise be very challenging to construct, the method presented herein enables one to precisely simulate very slow blood flow and respiration artifacts, and to measure imaging resolution.

  12. Numerical Modeling of 3-D Dynamics of Ultrasound Contrast Agent Microbubbles Using the Boundary Integral Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvisi, Michael; Manmi, Kawa; Wang, Qianxi

    2014-11-01

    Ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) are microbubbles stabilized with a shell typically of lipid, polymer, or protein and are emerging as a unique tool for noninvasive therapies ranging from gene delivery to tumor ablation. The nonspherical dynamics of contrast agents are thought to play an important role in both diagnostic and therapeutic applications, for example, causing the emission of subharmonic frequency components and enhancing the uptake of therapeutic agents across cell membranes and tissue interfaces. A three-dimensional model for nonspherical contrast agent dynamics based on the boundary integral method is presented. The effects of the encapsulating shell are approximated by adapting Hoff's model for thin-shell, spherical contrast agents to the nonspherical case. A high-quality mesh of the bubble surface is maintained by implementing a hybrid approach of the Lagrangian method and elastic mesh technique. Numerical analyses for the dynamics of UCAs in an infinite liquid and near a rigid wall are performed in parameter regimes of clinical relevance. The results show that the presence of a coating significantly reduces the oscillation amplitude and period, increases the ultrasound pressure amplitude required to incite jetting, and reduces the jet width and velocity.

  13. Dual-mode intracranial catheter integrating 3D ultrasound imaging and hyperthermia for neuro-oncology: feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Herickhoff, Carl D; Light, Edward D; Bing, Kristin F; Mukundan, Srinivasan; Grant, Gerald A; Wolf, Patrick D; Smith, Stephen W

    2009-04-01

    In this study, we investigated the feasibility of an intracranial catheter transducer with dual-mode capability of real-time 3D (RT3D) imaging and ultrasound hyperthermia, for application in the visualization and treatment of tumors in the brain. Feasibility is demonstrated in two ways: first by using a 50-element linear array transducer (17 mm x 3.1 mm aperture) operating at 4.4 MHz with our Volumetrics diagnostic scanner and custom, electrical impedance-matching circuits to achieve a temperature rise over 4 degrees C in excised pork muscle, and second, by designing and constructing a 12 Fr, integrated matrix and linear-array catheter transducer prototype for combined RT3D imaging and heating capability. This dual-mode catheter incorporated 153 matrix array elements and 11 linear array elements diced on a 0.2 mm pitch, with a total aperture size of 8.4 mm x 2.3 mm. This 3.64 MHz array achieved a 3.5 degrees C in vitro temperature rise at a 2 cm focal distance in tissue-mimicking material. The dual-mode catheter prototype was compared with a Siemens 10 Fr AcuNav catheter as a gold standard in experiments assessing image quality and therapeutic potential and both probes were used in an in vivo canine brain model to image anatomical structures and color Doppler blood flow and to attempt in vivo heating.

  14. User-guided segmentation of preterm neonate ventricular system from 3-D ultrasound images using convex optimization.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Wu; Yuan, Jing; Kishimoto, Jessica; McLeod, Jonathan; Chen, Yimin; de Ribaupierre, Sandrine; Fenster, Aaron

    2015-02-01

    A three-dimensional (3-D) ultrasound (US) system has been developed to monitor the intracranial ventricular system of preterm neonates with intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH) and the resultant dilation of the ventricles (ventriculomegaly). To measure ventricular volume from 3-D US images, a semi-automatic convex optimization-based approach is proposed for segmentation of the cerebral ventricular system in preterm neonates with IVH from 3-D US images. The proposed semi-automatic segmentation method makes use of the convex optimization technique supervised by user-initialized information. Experiments using 58 patient 3-D US images reveal that our proposed approach yielded a mean Dice similarity coefficient of 78.2% compared with the surfaces that were manually contoured, suggesting good agreement between these two segmentations. Additional metrics, the mean absolute distance of 0.65 mm and the maximum absolute distance of 3.2 mm, indicated small distance errors for a voxel spacing of 0.22 × 0.22 × 0.22 mm(3). The Pearson correlation coefficient (r = 0.97, p < 0.001) indicated a significant correlation of algorithm-generated ventricular system volume (VSV) with the manually generated VSV. The calculated minimal detectable difference in ventricular volume change indicated that the proposed segmentation approach with 3-D US images is capable of detecting a VSV difference of 6.5 cm(3) with 95% confidence, suggesting that this approach might be used for monitoring IVH patients' ventricular changes using 3-D US imaging. The mean segmentation times of the graphics processing unit (GPU)- and central processing unit-implemented algorithms were 50 ± 2 and 205 ± 5 s for one 3-D US image, respectively, in addition to 120 ± 10 s for initialization, less than the approximately 35 min required by manual segmentation. In addition, repeatability experiments indicated that the intra-observer variability ranges from 6.5% to 7.5%, and the inter-observer variability is 8.5% in terms

  15. Repeat prostate biopsy accuracy: simulator-based comparison of two- and three-dimensional transrectal US modalities.

    PubMed

    Cool, Derek W; Connolly, Michael J; Sherebrin, Shi; Eagleson, Roy; Izawa, Jonathan I; Amann, Justin; Romagnoli, Cesare; Romano, Walter M; Fenster, Aaron

    2010-02-01

    To compare the accuracy of biopsy with two-dimensional (2D) transrectal ultrasonography (US) with that of biopsy with conventional three-dimensional (3D) transrectal US and biopsy with guided 3D transrectal US in the guidance of repeat prostate biopsy procedures in a prostate biopsy simulator. The institutional review board approved this retrospective study. Five residents and five experts performed repeat biopsies with a biopsy simulator that contained the transrectal US prostate images of 10 patients who had undergone biopsy. Simulated repeat biopsies were performed with 2D transrectal US, conventional 3D transrectal US, and guided 3D transrectal US (an extension of 3D transrectal US that enables active display of biopsy targets). The modalities were compared on the basis of time per biopsy and how accurately simulated repeat biopsies could be guided to specific targets. The probability for successful biopsy of a repeat target was calculated for each modality. Guided 3D transrectal US was significantly (P < .01) more accurate for simulated biopsy of repeat targets than was 2D or 3D transrectal US, with a biopsy accuracy of 0.86 mm +/- 0.47 (standard deviation), 3.68 mm +/- 2.60, and 3.60 mm +/- 2.57, respectively. Experts had a 70% probability of sampling a prior biopsy target volume of 0.5 cm(3) with 2D transrectal US; however, the probability approached 100% with guided 3D transrectal US. Biopsy accuracy was not significantly different between experts and residents for any modality; however, experts were significantly (P < .05) faster than residents with each modality. Repeat biopsy of the prostate with 2D transrectal US has limited accuracy. Compared with 2D transrectal US, the biopsy accuracy of both experts and residents improved with guided 3D transrectal US but did not improve with conventional 3D transrectal US.

  16. Prospective randomized trial comparing magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided in-bore biopsy to MRI-ultrasound fusion and transrectal ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy in patients with prior negative biopsies.

    PubMed

    Arsov, Christian; Rabenalt, Robert; Blondin, Dirk; Quentin, Michael; Hiester, Andreas; Godehardt, Erhard; Gabbert, Helmut E; Becker, Nikolaus; Antoch, Gerald; Albers, Peter; Schimmöller, Lars

    2015-10-01

    A significant proportion of prostate cancers (PCas) are missed by conventional transrectal ultrasound-guided biopsy (TRUS-GB). It remains unclear whether the combined approach using targeted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-ultrasound fusion-guided biopsy (FUS-GB) and systematic TRUS-GB is superior to targeted MRI-guided in-bore biopsy (IB-GB) for PCa detection. To compare PCa detection between IB-GB alone and FUS-GB + TRUS-GB in patients with at least one negative TRUS-GB and prostate-specific antigen ≥4 ng/ml. Patients were prospectively randomized after multiparametric prostate MRI to IB-GB (arm A) or FUS-GB + TRUS-GB (arm B) from November 2011 to July 2014. The study was powered at 80% to demonstrate an overall PCa detection rate of ≥60% in arm B compared to 40% in arm A. Secondary endpoints were the distribution of highest Gleason scores, the rate of detection of significant PCa (Gleason ≥7), the number of biopsy cores to detect one (significant) PCa, the positivity rate for biopsy cores, and tumor involvement per biopsy core. The study was halted after interim analysis because the primary endpoint was not met. The trial enrolled 267 patients, of whom 210 were analyzed (106 randomized to arm A and 104 to arm B). PCa detection was 37% in arm A and 39% in arm B (95% confidence interval for difference, -16% to 11%; p=0.7). Detection rates for significant PCa (29% vs 32%; p=0.7) and the highest percentage tumor involvement per biopsy core (48% vs 42%; p=0.4) were similar between the arms. The mean number of cores was 5.6 versus 17 (p<0.001). A limitation is the limited number of patients because of early cessation of accrual. This trial failed to identify an important improvement in detection rate for the combined biopsy approach over MRI-targeted biopsy alone. A prospective comparison between MRI-targeted biopsy alone and systematic TRUS-GB is justified. Our randomized study showed similar prostate cancer detection rates between targeted prostate biopsy

  17. Percutaneous renal intervention: comparison of 2-D and time-resolved 3-D (4-D) ultrasound for minimal calyceal dilation using an ultrasound phantom and fluoroscopic control.

    PubMed

    John, Babbin S; Rowland, David; Ratnam, Lakshmi; Walkden, Miles; Nayak, Siew; Patel, Uday; Anson, Ken; Nassiri, Dariush

    2008-11-01

    The rapid advances made by ultrasound in recent years have increasingly taken 3-D ultrasound (3DUS) and 4-D ultrasound (4DUS) from the research setting to the patient's bedside. There are still unexplored areas like renal percutaneous intervention, where 4DUS has yet to be proven an effective tool. Ultrasound-only guidance in renal percutaneous access is used in selected well-dilated pelvi-calyceal systems (PCS), and fluoroscopy is often utilized as an adjunct. Our aim was to compare 2-D and 4-D guidance for punctures, with fluoroscopy as control, using an in vitro ultrasound phantom. Agar and latex were the tissue-mimicking materials used for the construction of the phantom. The latex targets were designed to simulate multidirection-facing minimally dilated renal calyces. Two interventional fellows punctured the "calyces" using first 2DUS and then 4DUS guidance, making use of a different set of targets each time. The time to puncture, time to introduction of wire, quality of puncture (judged on fluoroscopy) and global rating of both modalities were documented. There was no significant difference between the times to puncture using 2DUS (1.8 min) and 4DUS (2 min). Nor was there a significant difference in the quality of puncture. 4DUS had a higher median difficulty rating. The multiplanar reformatted (MPR) longitudinal and transverse images were found to be the most useful for needle guidance. Cross hairs in all MPR images were not just useful in aligning the images on target but also as surrogate targets. The phantom was found to be robust, with only one instance of air introduction after 30 punctures. We have found that 4DUS is at least as good as 2DUS in terms of quality of punctures in vitro. The technology still has some way to go as frame rates, transducer size and resolution improve.

  18. Fluoroquinolone-resistant E. coli in intestinal flora of patients undergoing transrectal ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy--should we reassess our practices for antibiotic prophylaxis?

    PubMed

    Steensels, D; Slabbaert, K; De Wever, L; Vermeersch, P; Van Poppel, H; Verhaegen, J

    2012-06-01

    Although the estimate of the incidence of sepsis following transrectal ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy (TRUSPB) is low, fluoroquinolone-resistant infections after prostate biopsy are being increasingly noted. This study was aimed at determining the prevalence of faecal carriage of fluoroquinolone-resistant Escherichia coli strains before TRUSPB and at evaluating potential predisposing risk factors. The incidence of sepsis after prostate biopsy was determined, and our routine practice for antibiotic prophylaxis for TRUSPB was evaluated. A prospective study was conducted in 342 consecutive patients undergoing prostate biopsy between December 2009 and July 2010. Before TRUSPB, a rectal swab was cultured. The correlation between the presence of fluoroquinolone-resistant strains and plausible risk factors was investigated by the use of a questionnaire. Of the 236 patients included, 22.0% (52/236) harboured ciprofloxacin-resistant E. coli strains. The use of fluoroquinolones in the 6 months before biopsy was associated with an increased risk of faecal carriage of fluoroquinolone-resistant E. coli strains (p <0.01). Faecal carriage of fluoroquinolone-resistant E. coli strains was an important risk factor for infectious complications after TRUSPB (p <0.01). In conclusion, a significant number of patients have faecal carriage of fluoroquinolone-resistant E. coli strains (22.0%) before TRUSPB. The use of fluoroquinolones in the previous 6 months before biopsy is a risk factor for faecal carriage of fluoroquinolone-resistant E. coli strains and for infectious complications after TRUSPB. Hence, the universal administration of fluoroquinolones should be reconsidered. © 2011 The Authors. Clinical Microbiology and Infection © 2011 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases.

  19. Free-hand transperineal targeted prostate biopsy with real-time fusion imaging of multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging and transrectal ultrasound: single-center experience in China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qing; Wang, Wei; Yang, Rong; Zhang, Gutian; Zhang, Bing; Li, Weiping; Huang, Haifeng; Guo, Hongqian

    2015-05-01

    To report our experience with free-hand transperineal targeted biopsy with real-time transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) and multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (mpMRI) fusion images for the diagnosis of prostate cancer (PCa). A total of 62 consecutive patients suspicious of PCa at the mpMRI scan and PSA >4.0 ng/mL were recruited prospectively. Targeted biopsies (TBs) were carried out for each cancer-suspicious lesion and followed a 12-core systematic biopsy (SB) protocol. Pathological findings of TB and SB were analyzed. The age of the patients was 68.38