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Sample records for 3d turbulent flow

  1. Two-equation turbulence modeling for 3-D hypersonic flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bardina, J. E.; Coakley, T. J.; Marvin, J. G.

    1992-01-01

    An investigation to verify, incorporate and develop two-equation turbulence models for three-dimensional high speed flows is presented. The current design effort of hypersonic vehicles has led to an intensive study of turbulence models for compressible hypersonic flows. This research complements an extensive review of experimental data and the current development of 2D turbulence models. The review of experimental data on 2D and 3D flows includes complex hypersonic flows with pressure profiles, skin friction, wall heat transfer, and turbulence statistics data. In a parallel effort, turbulence models for high speed flows have been tested against flat plate boundary layers, and are being tested against the 2D database. In the present paper, we present the results of 3D Navier-Stokes numerical simulations with an improved k-omega two-equation turbulence model against experimental data and empirical correlations of an adiabatic flat plate boundary layer, a cold wall flat plate boundary layer, and a 3D database flow, the interaction of an oblique shock wave and a thick turbulent boundary layer with a free stream Mach number = 8.18 and Reynolds number = 5 x 10 to the 6th.

  2. Multigrid calculations of 3-D turbulent viscous flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yokota, Jeffrey W.

    1989-01-01

    Convergence properties of a multigrid algorithm, developed to calculate compressible viscous flows, are analyzed by a vector sequence eigenvalue estimate. The full 3-D Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations are integrated by an implicit multigrid scheme while a k-epsilon turbulence model is solved, uncoupled from the flow equations. Estimates of the eigenvalue structure for both single and multigrid calculations are compared in an attempt to analyze the process as well as the results of the multigrid technique. The flow through an annular turbine is used to illustrate the scheme's ability to calculate complex 3-D flows.

  3. Unsteady 3D Turbulent Flow Separation around a ROV Body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ungureanu, Costel; Lungu, Adrian

    2009-09-01

    Turbulent separated flows around ellipsoids of various aspect ratios are investigated using a numerical method. The Reynolds averaged equations for continuity and momentum are solved by cell-centered finite-volume method for the primitive variables to describe the 3D turbulent incompressible flow. The objectives of the study are: (a) to investigate the propulsive performances of a moving Remotely Operated Vehicle (ROV hereafter) ellipsoidal body; (b) to validate the computational solutions through comparisons with the experimental data; (c) to investigate the effects of the angle of attack on the separation pattern as well as on the hydrodynamic forces and moments.

  4. Supersonic turbulence in 3D isothermal flow collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Folini, Doris; Walder, Rolf; Favre, Jean M.

    2014-02-01

    Large scale supersonic bulk flows are present in a wide range of astrophysical objects, from O-star winds to molecular clouds, galactic sheets, accretion, or γ-ray bursts. Associated flow collisions shape observable properties and internal physics alike. Our goal is to shed light on the interplay between large scale aspects of such collision zones and the characteristics of the compressible turbulence they harbor. Our model setup is as simple as can be: 3D hydrodynamical simulations of two head-on colliding, isothermal, and homogeneous flows with identical upstream (subscript u) flow parameters and Mach numbers 2 < Mu < 43. The turbulence in the collision zone is driven by the upstream flows, whose kinetic energy is partly dissipated and spatially modulated by the shocks confining the zone. Numerical results are in line with expectations from self-similarity arguments. The spatial scale of modulation grows with the collision zone. The fraction of energy dissipated at the confining shocks decreases with increasing Mu. The mean density is ρm ≈ 20ρu, independent of Mu. The root mean square Mach number is Mrms ≈ 0.25Mu. Deviations toward weaker turbulence are found as the collision zone thickens and for small Mu. The density probability function is not log-normal. The turbulence is inhomogeneous, weaker in the center of the zone than close to the confining shocks. It is also anisotropic: transverse to the upstream flows Mrms is always subsonic. We argue that uniform, head-on colliding flows generally disfavor turbulence that is at the same time isothermal, supersonic, and isotropic. The anisotropy carries over to other quantities like the density variance - Mach number relation. Line-of-sight effects thus exist. Structure functions differ depending on whether they are computed along a line-of-sight perpendicular or parallel to the upstream flow. Turbulence characteristics generally deviate markedly from those found for uniformly driven, supersonic, isothermal

  5. ODTLES : a model for 3D turbulent flow based on one-dimensional turbulence modeling concepts.

    SciTech Connect

    McDermott, Randy; Kerstein, Alan R.; Schmidt, Rodney Cannon

    2005-01-01

    This report describes an approach for extending the one-dimensional turbulence (ODT) model of Kerstein [6] to treat turbulent flow in three-dimensional (3D) domains. This model, here called ODTLES, can also be viewed as a new LES model. In ODTLES, 3D aspects of the flow are captured by embedding three, mutually orthogonal, one-dimensional ODT domain arrays within a coarser 3D mesh. The ODTLES model is obtained by developing a consistent approach for dynamically coupling the different ODT line sets to each other and to the large scale processes that are resolved on the 3D mesh. The model is implemented computationally and its performance is tested and evaluated by performing simulations of decaying isotropic turbulence, a standard turbulent flow benchmarking problem.

  6. Inverse cascades sustained by the transfer rate of angular momentum in a 3D turbulent flow.

    PubMed

    López-Caballero, Miguel; Burguete, Javier

    2013-03-22

    The existence of energy cascades as signatures of conserved magnitudes is one of the universal characteristics of turbulent flows. In homogeneous 3D turbulence, the energy conservation produces a direct cascade from large to small scales, although in 2D, it produces an inverse cascade pointing towards small wave numbers. In this Letter, we present the first evidence of an inverse cascade in a fully developed 3D experimental turbulent flow where the conserved magnitude is the angular momentum. Two counterrotating flows collide in a central region where very large fluctuations are produced, generating a turbulent drag that transfers the external torque between different fluid layers. PMID:25166809

  7. Finite volume and finite element methods applied to 3D laminar and turbulent channel flows

    SciTech Connect

    Louda, Petr; Příhoda, Jaromír; Sváček, Petr; Kozel, Karel

    2014-12-10

    The work deals with numerical simulations of incompressible flow in channels with rectangular cross section. The rectangular cross section itself leads to development of various secondary flow patterns, where accuracy of simulation is influenced by numerical viscosity of the scheme and by turbulence modeling. In this work some developments of stabilized finite element method are presented. Its results are compared with those of an implicit finite volume method also described, in laminar and turbulent flows. It is shown that numerical viscosity can cause errors of same magnitude as different turbulence models. The finite volume method is also applied to 3D turbulent flow around backward facing step and good agreement with 3D experimental results is obtained.

  8. Mimicking Natural Laminar to Turbulent Flow Transition: A Systematic CFD Study Using PAB3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pao, S. Paul; Abdol-Hamid, Khaled S.

    2005-01-01

    For applied aerodynamic computations using a general purpose Navier-Stokes code, the common practice of treating laminar to turbulent flow transition over a non-slip surface is somewhat arbitrary by either treating the entire flow as turbulent or forcing the flow to undergo transition at given trip locations in the computational domain. In this study, the possibility of using the PAB3D code, standard k-epsilon turbulence model, and the Girimaji explicit algebraic stresses model to mimic natural laminar to turbulent flow transition was explored. The sensitivity of flow transition with respect to two limiters in the standard k-epsilon turbulence model was examined using a flat plate and a 6:1 aspect ratio prolate spheroid for our computations. For the flat plate, a systematic dependence of transition Reynolds number on background turbulence intensity was found. For the prolate spheroid, the transition patterns in the three-dimensional boundary layer at different flow conditions were sensitive to the free stream turbulence viscosity limit, the reference Reynolds number and the angle of attack, but not to background turbulence intensity below a certain threshold value. The computed results showed encouraging agreements with the experimental measurements at the corresponding geometry and flow conditions.

  9. 3D Simulation of Velocity Profile of Turbulent Flow in Open Channel with Complex Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamel, Benoumessad; Ilhem, Kriba; Ali, Fourar; Abdelbaki, Djebaili

    Simulation of open channel flow or river flow presents unique challenge to numerical simulators, which is widely used in the applications of computational fluid dynamics. The prediction is extremely difficult because the flow in open channel is usually transient and turbulent, the geometry is irregular and curved, and the free-surface elevation is varying with time. The results from a 3D non-linear k- ɛ turbulence model are presented to investigate the flow structure, the velocity distribution and mass transport process in a meandering compound open channel and a straight open channel. The 3D numerical model for calculating flow is set up in cylinder coordinates in order to calculate the complex boundary channel. The finite volume method is used to disperse the governing equations and the SIMPLE algorithm is applied to acquire the coupling of velocity and pressure. The non-linear k- ɛ turbulent model has good useful value because of taking into account the anisotropy and not increasing the computational time. The main contributions of this study are developing a numerical method that can be applied to predict the flow in river bends with various bend curvatures and different width-depth ratios. This study demonstrates that the 3D non-linear k- ɛ turbulence model can be used for analyzing flow structures, the velocity distribution and pollutant transport in the complex boundary open channel, this model is applicable for real river and wetland problem.

  10. Implementation of Advanced Two Equation Turbulence Models in the USM3D Unstructured Flow Solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Qun-Zhen; Massey, Steven J.; Abdol-Hamid, Khaled S.

    2000-01-01

    USM3D is a widely-used unstructured flow solver for simulating inviscid and viscous flows over complex geometries. The current version (version 5.0) of USM3D, however, does not have advanced turbulence models to accurately simulate complicated flow. We have implemented two modified versions of the original Jones and Launder k-epsilon "two-equation" turbulence model and the Girimaji algebraic Reynolds stress model in USM3D. Tests have been conducted for three flat plate boundary layer cases, a RAE2822 airfoil and an ONERA M6 wing. The results are compared with those from direct numerical simulation, empirical formulae, theoretical results, and the existing Spalart-Allmaras one-equation model.

  11. Quantitative visualization of high-speed 3D turbulent flow structures using holographic interferometric tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timmerman, B. H.; Watt, D. W.; Bryanston-Cross, P. J.

    1999-02-01

    Using holographic interferometry the three-dimensional structure of unsteady and large-scale motions within subsonic and transonic turbulent jet flows has been studied. The instantaneous 3D flow structure is obtained by tomographic reconstruction techniques from quantitative phase maps recorded using a rapid-switching, double reference beam, double pulse laser system. The reconstruction of the jets studied here reveal a three-dimensional nature of the flow. In particular an increasing complexity can be seen in the turbulence as the flow progresses from the jet nozzle. Furthermore, a coherent three-dimensional, possibly rotating, structure can be seen to exist within these jets. The type of flow features illustrated here are not just of fundamental importance for understanding the behavior of free jet flows, but are also common to a number of industrial applications, ranging from the combustion flow within an IC engine to the transonic flow through the stages of a gas turbine.

  12. Numerical simulation of a combined oxidation ditch flow using 3D k-epsilon turbulence model.

    PubMed

    Luo, Lin; Li, Wei-min; Deng, Yong-sen; Wang, Tao

    2005-01-01

    The standard three dimensional(3D) k-epsilon turbulence model was applied to simulate the flow field of a small scale combined oxidation ditch. The moving mesh approach was used to model the rotor of the ditch. Comparison of the computed and the measured data is acceptable. A vertical reverse flow zone in the ditch was found, and it played a very important role in the ditch flow behavior. The flow pattern in the ditch is discussed in detail, and approaches are suggested to improve the hydrodynamic performance in the ditch. PMID:16313008

  13. Correlations of Surface Deformation and 3D Flow Field in a Compliant Wall Turbulent Channel Flow.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jin; Zhang, Cao; Katz, Joseph

    2015-11-01

    This study focuses on the correlations between surface deformation and flow features, including velocity, vorticity and pressure, in a turbulent channel flow over a flat, compliant Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) wall. The channel centerline velocity is 2.5 m/s, and the friction Reynolds number is 2.3x103. Analysis is based on simultaneous measurements of the time resolved 3D velocity and surface deformation using tomographic PIV and Mach-Zehnder Interferometry. The volumetric pressure distribution is calculated plane by plane by spatially integrating the material acceleration using virtual boundary, omni-directional method. Conditional sampling based on local high/low pressure and deformation events reveals the primary flow structures causing the deformation. High pressure peaks appear at the interface between sweep and ejection, whereas the negative deformations peaks (dent) appear upstream, under the sweeps. The persistent phase lag between flow and deformations are presumably caused by internal damping within the PDMS. Some of the low pressure peaks and strong ejections are located under the head of hairpin vortices, and accordingly, are associated with positive deformation (bump). Others bumps and dents are correlated with some spanwise offset large inclined quasi-streamwise vortices that are not necessarily associated with hairpins. Sponsored by ONR.

  14. Experimental Investigation of the Near Wall Flow Structure of a Low Reynolds Number 3-D Turbulent Boundary Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleming, J. L.; Simpson, R. L.

    1997-01-01

    Laser Doppler velocimetry (LDV) measurements and hydrogen bubble flow visualization techniques were used to examine the near-wall flow structure of 2D and 3D turbulent boundary layers (TBLs) over a range of low Reynolds numbers. The goals of this research were (1) an increased understanding of the flow physics in the near wall region of turbulent boundary layers,(2) to observe and quantify differences between 2D and 3D TBL flow structures, and (3) to document Reynolds number effects for 3D TBLs. The LDV data have provided results detailing the turbulence structure of the 2D and 3D TBLs. These results include mean Reynolds stress distributions, flow skewing results, and U and V spectra. Effects of Reynolds number for the 3D flow were also examined. Comparison to results with the same 3D flow geometry but at a significantly higher Reynolds number provided unique insight into the structure of 3D TBLs. While the 3D mean and fluctuating velocities were found to be highly dependent on Reynolds number, a previously defined shear stress parameter was discovered to be invariant with Reynolds number. The hydrogen bubble technique was used as a flow visualization tool to examine the near-wall flow structure of 2D and 3D TBLs. Both the quantitative and qualitative results displayed larger turbulent fluctuations with more highly concentrated vorticity regions for the 2D flow.

  15. Large-eddy simulation of 3D turbulent flow past a complete marine hydrokinetic turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, S.; Sotiropoulos, F.

    2011-12-01

    A high-resolution computational framework was recently developed by Kang et al (Adv. Water Resour., submitted) for simulating three-dimensional (3D), turbulent flow past real-life, complete marine hydrokinetic (MHK) turbine configurations. In this model the complex turbine geometry is resolved by employing the curvilinear immersed boundary (CURVIB) method, which solves the 3D unsteady incompressible Navier-Stokes equations in generalized curvilinear domains with embedded arbitrarily complex, moving and/or stationary immersed boundaries (Ge and Sotiropoulos, 2007). Turbulence is simulated using the large-eddy simulation (LES) approach adapted in the context of the CURVIB method, with a wall model based on solving the simplified boundary layer equations used to reconstruct boundary conditions near all solid surfaces (Kang et al., 2011). The model can resolve the flow patterns generated by the rotor and all stationary components of the turbine as well as the interactions of the flow structures with the channel bed. We apply this model to carry out LES of the flow past the model-size hydrokinetic turbine deployed in the St. Anthony Falls Laboratory main channel. The mean velocities and second-order turbulence statistics measured in the downstream wake using acoustic Doppler velocimetry (ADV) are compared with the LES results. The comparisons show that the computed mean velocities and turbulent stresses are in good agreement with the measurements. The high-resolution LES data are used to explore physically important downstream flow characteristics such as the time-averaged wake structure, recovery of cross-sectionally averaged power potential, near-bed scour potential, etc. This work is supported by Verdant Power.

  16. 3D conformation of a flexible fiber in a turbulent flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verhille, Gautier; Bartoli, Adrien

    2016-07-01

    A growing number of studies is devoted to anisotropic particles in turbulent flows. In most cases, the particles are assumed to be rigid and their deformations are neglected. We present an adaptation of classical computer vision tools to reconstruct from two different images the 3D conformation of a fiber distorted by the turbulent fluctuations in a von Kármán flow. This technique allows us notably to characterize the fiber deformation by computing the correlation function of the orientation of the tangent vector. This function allows us to tackle the analogy between polymers and flexible fibers proposed by Brouzet et al. (Phys Rev Lett 112(7):074501, 2014). We show that this function depends on an elastic length ℓ _e which characterizes the particle flexibility, as is the case for polymers, but also on the fiber length L, contrary to polymers.

  17. An explicit Runge-Kutta method for 3D turbulent incompressible flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sung, Chao-Ho; Lin, Cheng-Wen; Hung, C. M.

    1988-01-01

    A computer code has been developed to solve for the steady-state solution of the 3D incompressible Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations. The approach is based on the cell-center, central-difference, finite-volume formulation and an explicit one-step, multistage Runge-Kutta time-stepping scheme. The Baldwin-Lomax turbulence model is used. Techniques to accelerate the rate of convergence to a steady-state solution include the preconditioned method, the local time stepping, and the implicit residual smoothing. Improvements in computational efficiency have been demonstrated in several areas. This numerical procedure has been used to simulate the turbulent horseshoe vortex flow around an airfoil/flat-plate juncture.

  18. Turbulence modeling for subsonic separated flows over 2-D airfoils and 3-D wings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosen, Aaron M.

    Accurate predictions of turbulent boundary layers and flow separation through computational fluid dynamics (CFD) are becoming more and more essential for the prediction of loads in the design of aerodynamic flight components. Standard eddy viscosity models used in many commercial codes today do not capture the nonequilibrium effects seen in a separated flow and thus do not generally make accurate separation predictions. Part of the reason for this is that under nonequilibrium conditions such as a strong adverse pressure gradient, the history effects of the flow play an important role in the growth and decay of turbulence. More recent turbulence models such as Olsen and Coakley's Lag model and Lillard's lagRST model seek to simulate these effects by lagging the turbulent variables when nonequilibrium effects become important. The purpose of the current research is to assess how these nonequilibrium turbulence models capture the separated regions on various 2-D airfoils and 3-D wings. Nonequilibrium models including the Lag model and the lagRST model are evaluated in comparison with three baseline models (Spalart-Allmaras, Wilcox's k-omega, and Menter's SST) using a modified version of the OVERFLOW code. Tuning the model coefficients of the Lag and lagRST models is also explored. Results show that the various lagRST formulations display an improvement in velocity profile predictions over the standard RANS models, but have trouble capturing the edge of the boundary layer. Experimental separation location measurements were not available, but several trends are noted which may be useful to tuning the model coefficients in the future.

  19. Calculation by the finite element method of 3-D turbulent flow in a centrifugal pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Combes, J. F.

    1992-02-01

    In order to solve industrial flow problems in complex geometries, a finite element code, N3S, was developed. It allows the computation of a wide variety of 2-D or 3-D unsteady incompressible flows, by solving the Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes equations together with a k-epsilon turbulence model. Some recent developments of this code concern turbomachinery flows, where one has to take into account periodic boundary conditions, as well as Coriolis and centrifugal forces. The numerical treatment is based on a fractional step method: at each time step, an advection step is solved successively by means of a characteristic method; a diffusion step for the scalar terms; and finally, a Generalized Stokes Problem by using a preconditioned Uzawa algorithm. The space discretization uses a standard Galerkin finite element method with a mixed formulation for the velocity and pressure. An application is presented of this code to the flow inside a centrifugal pump which was extensively tested on several air and water test rigs, and for which many quasi-3-D or Euler calculations were reported. The present N3S calculation is made on a finite element mesh comprising about 28000 tetrahedrons and 43000 nodes.

  20. Measuring the orientation and rotation rate of 3D printed particles in turbulent flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voth, Greg; Marcus, Guy G.; Parsa, Shima; Kramel, Stefan; Ni, Rui; Cole, Brendan

    2014-11-01

    The orientation distribution and rotations of anisotropic particles plays a key role in many applications ranging from icy clouds to papermaking and drag reduction in pipe flow. Experimental access to time resolved orientations of anisotropic particles has not been easy to achieve. We have found that 3D printing technology can be used to fabricate a wide range of particle shapes with smallest dimension down to 300 μm. So far we have studied rods, crosses, jacks, tetrads, and helical shapes. We extract the particle orientations from stereoscopic video images using a method of least squares optimization in Euler angle space. We find that in turbulence the orientation and rotation rate of many particles can be understood using a simple picture of alignment of both the vorticity and a long axis of the particle with the Lagrangian stretching direction of the flow. This research is supported by NSF Grant DMR-1208990.

  1. Measuring the orientation and rotation rate of 3D printed particles in turbulent flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voth, Greg; Kramel, Stefan; Cole, Brendan

    2015-03-01

    The orientation distribution and rotations of anisotropic particles plays a key role in many applications ranging from icy clouds to papermaking and drag reduction in pipe flow. Experimental access to time resolved orientations of anisotropic particles has not been easy to achieve. We have found that 3D printing technology can be used to fabricate a wide range of particle shapes with smallest dimension down to 300 ?m. So far we have studied rods, crosses, jacks, tetrads, and helical shapes. We extract the particle orientations from stereoscopic video images using a method of least squares optimization in Euler angle space. We find that in turbulence the orientation and rotation rate of many particles can be understood using a simple picture of alignment of both the vorticity and a long axis of the particle with the Lagrangian stretching direction of the flow.

  2. Multilevel local refinement and multigrid methods for 3-D turbulent flow

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, C.; Liu, C.; Sung, C.H.; Huang, T.T.

    1996-12-31

    A numerical approach based on multigrid, multilevel local refinement, and preconditioning methods for solving incompressible Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations is presented. 3-D turbulent flow around an underwater vehicle is computed. 3 multigrid levels and 2 local refinement grid levels are used. The global grid is 24 x 8 x 12. The first patch is 40 x 16 x 20 and the second patch is 72 x 32 x 36. 4th order artificial dissipation are used for numerical stability. The conservative artificial compressibility method are used for further improvement of convergence. To improve the accuracy of coarse/fine grid interface of local refinement, flux interpolation method for refined grid boundary is used. The numerical results are in good agreement with experimental data. The local refinement can improve the prediction accuracy significantly. The flux interpolation method for local refinement can keep conservation for a composite grid, therefore further modify the prediction accuracy.

  3. 3D Numerical Simulation of Turbulent Buoyant Flow and Heat Transport in a Curved Open Channel

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A three-dimensional buoyancy-extended version of kappa-epsilon turbulence model was developed for simulating the turbulent flow and heat transport in a curved open channel. The density- induced buoyant force was included in the model, and the influence of temperature stratification on flow field was...

  4. Assessment of an Unstructured-Grid Method for Predicting 3-D Turbulent Viscous Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frink, Neal T.

    1996-01-01

    A method Is presented for solving turbulent flow problems on three-dimensional unstructured grids. Spatial discretization Is accomplished by a cell-centered finite-volume formulation using an accurate lin- ear reconstruction scheme and upwind flux differencing. Time is advanced by an implicit backward- Euler time-stepping scheme. Flow turbulence effects are modeled by the Spalart-Allmaras one-equation model, which is coupled with a wall function to reduce the number of cells in the sublayer region of the boundary layer. A systematic assessment of the method is presented to devise guidelines for more strategic application of the technology to complex problems. The assessment includes the accuracy In predictions of skin-friction coefficient, law-of-the-wall behavior, and surface pressure for a flat-plate turbulent boundary layer, and for the ONERA M6 wing under a high Reynolds number, transonic, separated flow condition.

  5. PAB3D: Its History in the Use of Turbulence Models in the Simulation of Jet and Nozzle Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdol-Hamid, Khaled S.; Pao, S. Paul; Hunter, Craig A.; Deere, Karen A.; Massey, Steven J.; Elmiligui, Alaa

    2006-01-01

    This is a review paper for PAB3D s history in the implementation of turbulence models for simulating jet and nozzle flows. We describe different turbulence models used in the simulation of subsonic and supersonic jet and nozzle flows. The time-averaged simulations use modified linear or nonlinear two-equation models to account for supersonic flow as well as high temperature mixing. Two multiscale-type turbulence models are used for unsteady flow simulations. These models require modifications to the Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations. The first scheme is a hybrid RANS/LES model utilizing the two-equation (k-epsilon) model with a RANS/LES transition function, dependent on grid spacing and the computed turbulence length scale. The second scheme is a modified version of the partially averaged Navier-Stokes (PANS) formulation. All of these models are implemented in the three-dimensional Navier-Stokes code PAB3D. This paper discusses computational methods, code implementation, computed results for a wide range of nozzle configurations at various operating conditions, and comparisons with available experimental data. Very good agreement is shown between the numerical solutions and available experimental data over a wide range of operating conditions.

  6. Validation Analysis for the Calculation of a Turbulent Free Jet in Water Using CFDS-FLOW 3-D and FLUENT

    SciTech Connect

    Dimenna, R.A.; Lee, S.Y.

    1995-05-01

    The application of computational fluid dynamics methods to the analysis of mixing in the high level waste tanks at the Savannah River Site requires a demonstration that the computer codes can properly represent the behavior of fluids in the tanks. The motive force for mixing the tanks is a set of jet pumps taking suction from the tank fluid and discharging turbulent jets near the bottom of the tank. The work described here focuses on the free turbulent jet in water as the simplest case of jet behavior for which data could be found in the open literature. Calculations performed with both CFDS-FLOW3D and FLUENT were compared with data as well as classical jet theory. Results showed both codes agreed reasonably well with each other and with the data, but that results were sensitive to the computational mesh and, to a lesser degree, the selection of turbulence models.

  7. PNS calculations for 3-D hypersonic corner flow with two turbulence models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Gregory E.; Liou, May-Fun; Benson, Thomas J.

    1988-01-01

    A three-dimensional parabolized Navier-Stokes code has been used as a testbed to investigate two turbulence models, the McDonald Camarata and Bushnell Beckwith model, in the hypersonic regime. The Bushnell Beckwith form factor correction to the McDonald Camarata mixing length model has been extended to three-dimensional flow by use of an inverse averaging of the resultant length scale contributions from each wall. Two-dimensional calculations are compared with experiment for Mach 18 helium flow over a 4-deg wedge. Corner flow calculations have been performed at Mach 11.8 for a Reynolds number of .67 x 10 to the 6th, based on the duct half-width, and a freestream stagnation temperature of 1750-deg Rankine.

  8. Noise and Turbulence Generate 3D Zombie Vortices in Stably Stratified Rotating Shear Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pei, Suyang; Marcus, Philip S.; Jiang, Chung-Hsiang; Hassanzadeh, Pedram; Lecoanet, Daniel; Barranco, Joseph A.

    2013-11-01

    We showed previously that a linearly stable shearing, rotating, stably stratified flow has a finite-amplitude instability creating ``zombie vortices'' that self-replicate and fill the domain. Our flows were initialized with perturbations of one or two vortices. Our motivation was to determine whether ``dead zones'' in protoplanetary disks were stable, or whether they could be de-stabilized to produce vortices necessary for the final part of star formation and for planet formation. To be more relevant to astrophysics, we choose the initial conditions to be noise or turbulence with a Kolmogorov spectrum with small kinetic energy and Mach number. In a Kolmogorov spectrum, the largest eddies determine the kinetic energy and Mach number, while the smallest determine the vorticity and Rossby number Ro ≡ ω / f , where ω is the vertical vorticity and f is the Coriolis parameter. The protoplanetary disks (which have large inertial ranges due to their large Reynolds numbers), can have large Rossby numbers, but weak Mach numbers and kinetic energies. It is important to know whether the triggering of the finite-amplitude instability that creates zombie vortices depends on threshold values of Mach number, kinetic energy, or the Rossby number. Here, we show it is the latter.

  9. The 3D flow structures generated by a pair of cubic roughness elements in a turbulent channel flow resolved using holographic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Jian; Katz, Joseph

    2015-11-01

    In studies of turbulent flows over rough walls, considerable efforts have been put on the overall effects of roughness parameters such as roughness height and spatial arrangement on the mean profiles and turbulence statistics. However there is very little experimental data on the generation, evolution, and interaction among roughness-initiated turbulent structures, which are essential for elucidating the near-wall turbulence production. As a first step, we approach this problem experimentally by applying digital holographic microscopy (DHM) to measure the flow and turbulence around a pair of cubic roughness elements embedded in the inner part of a high Reynolds number turbulent channel flow (Reτ = 2000 - 5000). The ratio of half-channel height (h) to cube height (a) is 25, and the cubes are aligned in the spanwise direction, and separated by 1.5 a. DHM provides high-resolution three-dimensional (3D) three-component (3C) velocity distributions. The presentation discusses methods to improve the data accuracy, both during the hologram acquisition and particle tracking phases. First, we compare and mutually validate velocity fields obtained from a two-view DHM system. Subsequently, during data processing, the seven criteria used for particle tracking is validated and augmented by planar tracking of particle image projections. Sample results reveal instantaneous 3D velocity fields and vortical structures resolved in fine details of several wall units. Funded by NSF and ONR.

  10. Heat Transfer and Friction-Factor Methods Turbulent Flow Inside Pipes 3d Rough

    1994-01-21

    Three-dimensional roughened internally enhanced tubes have been shown to be one of the most energy efficient for turbulent, forced convection applications. However, there is only one prediction method presented in the open literature and that is restricted to three-dimensional sand-grain roughness. Other roughness types are being proposed: hemispherical sectors, truncated cones, and full and truncated pyramids. There are no validated heat-transfer and friction-factor prediction methods for these different roughness shapes that can be used inmore » the transition and fully rough region. This program calculates the Nusselt number and friction factor values, for a broad range of three-dimensional roughness types such as hemispherical sectors, truncated cones, and full and truncated pyramids. Users of this program are heat-exchangers designers, enhanced tubing suppliers, and research organizations or academia who are developing or validating prediction methods.« less

  11. Breakup of Finite-Size Colloidal Aggregates in Turbulent Flow Investigated by Three-Dimensional (3D) Particle Tracking Velocimetry.

    PubMed

    Saha, Debashish; Babler, Matthaus U; Holzner, Markus; Soos, Miroslav; Lüthi, Beat; Liberzon, Alex; Kinzelbach, Wolfgang

    2016-01-12

    Aggregates grown in mild shear flow are released, one at a time, into homogeneous isotropic turbulence, where their motion and intermittent breakup is recorded by three-dimensional particle tracking velocimetry (3D-PTV). The aggregates have an open structure with a fractal dimension of ∼2.2, and their size is 1.4 ± 0.4 mm, which is large, compared to the Kolmogorov length scale (η = 0.15 mm). 3D-PTV of flow tracers allows for the simultaneous measurement of aggregate trajectories and the full velocity gradient tensor along their pathlines, which enables us to access the Lagrangian stress history of individual breakup events. From this data, we found no consistent pattern that relates breakup to the local flow properties at the point of breakup. Also, the correlation between the aggregate size and both shear stress and normal stress at the location of breakage is found to be weaker, when compared with the correlation between size and drag stress. The analysis suggests that the aggregates are mostly broken due to the accumulation of the drag stress over a time lag on the order of the Kolmogorov time scale. This finding is explained by the fact that the aggregates are large, which gives their motion inertia and increases the time for stress propagation inside the aggregate. Furthermore, it is found that the scaling of the largest fragment and the accumulated stress at breakup follows an earlier established power law, i.e., dfrag ∼ σ(-0.6) obtained from laminar nozzle experiments. This indicates that, despite the large size and the different type of hydrodynamic stress, the microscopic mechanism causing breakup is consistent over a wide range of aggregate size and stress magnitude. PMID:26646289

  12. Application of Navier-Stokes code PAB3D with kappa-epsilon turbulence model to attached and separated flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdol-Hamid, Khaled S.; Lakshmanan, B.; Carlson, John R.

    1995-01-01

    A three-dimensional Navier-Stokes solver was used to determine how accurately computations can predict local and average skin friction coefficients for attached and separated flows for simple experimental geometries. Algebraic and transport equation closures were used to model turbulence. To simulate anisotropic turbulence, the standard two-equation turbulence model was modified by adding nonlinear terms. The effects of both grid density and the turbulence model on the computed flow fields were also investigated and compared with available experimental data for subsonic and supersonic free-stream conditions.

  13. Numerical simulation of heat transfer and flow structure in 3-D turbulent boundary layer with imbedded longitudinal vortex

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, J.Y.; Ryou, H.S.

    1997-03-01

    Heat transfer characteristics and flow structure in turbulent flows through a flat plate three-dimensional turbulent boundary layer containing built-in vortex generators have been analyzed by means of the space marching Crank-Nicolson finite difference method. The method solves the slender flow approximation of the steady three-dimensional Navier-Stokes and energy equations. This study used the eddy diffusivity model and standard {kappa}-{epsilon} model to predict heat transfer and flow field in the turbulent flow with imbedded longitudinal vortex. The results show boundary layer distortion due to vortices, such as strong spanwise flow divergence and boundary layer thinning. The heat transfer and skin friction show relatively good results in comparison with experimental data. The vortex core moves slightly away from the wall and grows slowly; consequently, the vortex influences the flow over a very long distance downstream. The enhancement of the heat transfer in the vicinity of the wall is due to the increasing spanwise separation of the vortices as they develop in the streamwise direction.

  14. A 3-D numerical study of turbulent flow and solidification of a direct chill caster fitted with a channel bag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Begum, Latifa; Hasan, Mainul

    2015-06-01

    3-D CFD simulations were carried out for a vertical direct chill slab caster for an aluminum-alloy AA-1050. The code was verified with an experimental study and reasonably good agreements were obtained. The casting speed and the metal-mold contact heat transfer coefficient were varied from 40 to 100 mm/min and from 750 to 3,000 W/m2 K), respectively. The velocity field, temperature contours and important quantities for different casting speeds are predicted.

  15. Intermittency growth in 3D turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Y.

    1991-07-01

    Recently increasing attention has been paid to the non-Gaussian properties of small scales in turbulent flows as a manifestation of intermittency. Past numerical studies were, however, almost always restricted to simulations with external forces or to results after several eddy-turn-over times. This is because the equilibrium shapes of the Probability Density Functions (PDFs) of velocity and velocity gradients were the main concern. As a theoretical tool to analyze non-Gaussianity, Kraichnan and his co-workers developed a systematic technique called mapping closure. The working hypothesis of the technique is that the shape of PDF is determined by a balance between advection which produces active small eddies and dissipation which wipes them out. At these processes have different time scales, different shapes of PDF are possible as a result of combinations of the processes. Accurate statistical calculations for decaying turbulence with the initial Gaussian distribution is vital, in the examination of the hypothesis. In this article, we shall present numerical results on the development of the shape of PDFs of the velocity components and transverse velocity gradients of Navier-Stokes turbulence. The possibility of controlling intermittency will be discussed. We used three-dimensional pseudospectral simulations with 64(sup 3) periodic grid points. To get clean statistical information, averages over a large number of ensembles of different initial conditions satisfying the same energy spectrum were taken.

  16. Turbulence and transport in a 3D magnetic boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agostini, Matteo; Carraro, Lorella; Ciaccio, Giovanni; de Masi, Gianluca; Rea, Cristina; Scarin, Paolo; Spizzo, Gianluca; Spolaore, Monica; Vianello, Nicola

    2014-10-01

    In present fusion devices the interaction between 3D magnetic field, edge kinetic properties and turbulence is a crucial issue; not only in intrinsically 3D configurations such as the stellarators, but also in tokamaks, where magnetic perturbations are applied to control ELMs and plasma wall interaction. In the RFX-mod reversed field pinch the spontaneous development at high plasma current of a helical magnetic state displays strong analogies with the aforementioned configurations. At the edge the presence of a stochastic layer and magnetic islands with a well-defined helical symmetry leads to a helical pattern of flow, pressure gradients and turbulent fluctuations: larger fluctuations and shorter correlation lengths are observed near the X-point of the magnetic island, where also a flow slowing-down occurs. Aim of this work is to study the effect of edge turbulence on particle transport in a 3D magnetic boundary, characterizing the properties of the edge blobs along the helical deformation. The magnetic topology also modifies kinetic properties, with higher pressure gradients observed close to the O-point of the island. The measurement of the time evolution of pressure gradient and blob characteristics, can clarify the mutual relation between these two quantities.

  17. 3D Flow Visualization Using Texture Advection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kao, David; Zhang, Bing; Kim, Kwansik; Pang, Alex; Moran, Pat (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Texture advection is an effective tool for animating and investigating 2D flows. In this paper, we discuss how this technique can be extended to 3D flows. In particular, we examine the use of 3D and 4D textures on 3D synthetic and computational fluid dynamics flow fields.

  18. Simultaneous 3D measurement of the translation and rotation of finite size particles and the flow field in a fully developed turbulent water flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibert, Mathieu; Klein, Simon; Bodenschatz, Eberhard

    2012-11-01

    We report a novel experimental technique that measures simultaneously in three dimensions the trajectories, the translation, and the rotation of finite size inertial particles together with the turbulent flow. The flow field is analyzed by tracking the temporal evolution of small fluorescent tracer particles. The inertial particles consist of a super-absorbent polymer that renders them index and density matched with water and thus invisible. The particles are marked by inserting at various locations tracer particles into the polymer. Translation and rotation, as well as the flow field around the particle are recovered dynamically from the analysis of the marker and tracer particle trajectories. We apply this technique to study the dynamics of inertial particles much larger in size (Rp / η ~ 100) than the Kolmogorov length scale η in a von Kármán swirling water flow (Rλ ~ 400). We show, using the mixed (particle/fluid) Eulerian second order velocity structure function, that the interaction zone between the particle and the flow develops in a spherical shell of width 2Rp around the particle of radius Rp. This we interpret as an indication of a wake induced by the particle. (http://arxiv.org/abs/1205.2181) This work was funded generously by the Max Planck Society and the Marie Curie Fellowship, Program PEOPLE - Call FP7-PEOPLE-IEF-2008 Proposal No 237521. Support from COST Action MP0806 is kindly acknowledged.

  19. Simultaneous 3D measurement of the translation and rotation of finite-size particles and the flow field in a fully developed turbulent water flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, Simon; Gibert, Mathieu; Bérut, Antoine; Bodenschatz, Eberhard

    2013-02-01

    We report a novel experimental technique that measures simultaneously in three dimensions the trajectories, the translation and the rotation of finite-size inertial particles together with the turbulent flow. The flow field is analyzed by tracking the temporal evolution of small fluorescent tracer particles. The inertial particles consist of a super-absorbent polymer that renders them index and density matched with water and thus invisible. The particles are marked by inserting at various locations tracer particles into the polymer. Translation and rotation, as well as the flow field around the particle are recovered dynamically from the analysis of the marker and tracer particle trajectories. We apply this technique to study the dynamics of inertial particles much larger in size (Rp/η ≈ 100) than the Kolmogorov length scale η in a von Kármán swirling water flow (Rλ ≈ 400). We show, using the mixed (particle/fluid) Eulerian second-order velocity structure function, that the interaction zone between the particle and the flow develops in a spherical shell of width 2Rp around the particle of radius Rp. This we interpret as an indication of a wake induced by the particle. This measurement technique has many additional advantages that will make it useful to address other problems such as particle collisions, dynamics of non-spherical solid objects, or even of wet granular matter.

  20. Coherent Vortex Simulations of 3D isotropic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldstein, Daniel E.; Vasilyev, Oleg V.; Kevlahan, Nicholas K.-R.

    2006-11-01

    This is the first of three talks on the wavelet filter based dynamically adaptive eddy capturing computational methodology that unifies variable fidelity simulation approaches such as wavelet-based DNS, Coherent Vortex Simulation (CVS), and Stochastic Coherent Adaptive Large Eddy Simulation. The commonality of these approaches is their ability to identify and ``track" on an adaptive mesh energetic coherent vortical structures. In CVS the velocity field is decomposed into two orthogonal parts: a coherent, inhomogeneous, non-Gaussian component and an incoherent, homogeneous, Gaussian component. This separation of coherent and incoherent components is achieved by wavelet thresholding which can be viewed as a non-linear filter that depends on each flow realization. The essence of the CVS approach is to solve for the coherent non-Gaussian component of a turbulent flow field. It has been shown previously that second generation bi-orthogonal wavelet threshold filtering is able to decompose a turbulent velocity field such that the total resulting SGS dissipation is approximately zero. This physically allows a CVS simulation to recover low order statistics with no SGS model. In this work CVS simulations of decaying incompressible 3D isotropic turbulence are compared to DNS results. -6pt

  1. Numerical model of sonic boom in 3D kinematic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coulouvrat, François; Luquet, David; Marchiano, Régis

    2015-10-01

    stratified wind superimposed to a 3D random turbulent realization. Propagation is performed either in the case of a shadow zone or of an atmospheric waveguide. To model the turbulent ABL, the mean flow and the fluctuations are handled separately. The wind fluctuations are generated using the Random Fluctuations Generation method assuming a von Kármán spectrum and a homogeneous and isotropic turbulence. The mean stratified wind is modeled based on the Monin-Obhukov Similarity Theory (MOST). To illustrate the method, the typical case of a sunny day with a strong wind has been chosen. Statistics are obtained on several parameters. It shows the importance of turbulence, which leads to an increase of the mean maximum peak pressure in the shadow zone and to its decrease in the waveguide. Moreover, the formation of random caustics that can lead to an increase of the noise perceived locally is outlined.

  2. Application of rank-ordered multifractal analysis (ROMA) to intermittent fluctuations in 3D turbulent flows, 2D MHD simulation and solar wind data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, C.; Chang, T.

    2010-12-01

    A new method in describing the multifractal characteristics of intermittent events was introduced by Cheng and Wu [Chang T. and Wu C.C., Physical Rev, E77, 045401(R), 2008]. The procedure provides a natural connection between the rank-ordered spectrum and the idea of one-parameter scaling for monofractals. This technique has been demonstrated using results obtained from a 2D MHD simulation. It has also been successfully applied to in-situ solar wind observations [Chang T., Wu, C.C. and Podesta, J., AIP Conf Proc. 1039, 75, 2008], and the broadband electric field oscillations from the auroral zone [Tam, S.W.Y. et al., Physical Rev, E81, 036414, 2010]. We take the next step in this procedure. By using the ROMA spectra and the scaled probability distribution functions (PDFs), raw PDFs can be calculated, which can be compared directly with PDFs from observations or simulation results. In addition to 2D MHD simulation results and in-situ solar wind observation, we show clearly using the ROMA analysis the multifractal character of the 3D fluid simulation data obtained from the JHU turbulence database cluster at http://turbulence.pha.jhu.edu. In particular, we show the scaling of the non-symmetrical PDF for the parallel-velocity fluctuations of this 3D fluid data.

  3. CVS Decomposition of 3D Homogeneous Turbulence Using Orthogonal Wavelets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farge, Marie; Schneider, Kai; Pellegrino, Giulio; Wray, A. A.; Rogallo, R. S.

    2000-01-01

    This paper compares the filtering used in Coherent Vortex Simulation (CVS) decomposition with an orthogonal wavelet basis, with the Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD) or Fourier filtering. Both methods are applied to a field of Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) data of 3D forced homogeneous isotropic turbulence at microscale Reynolds number R(sub lambda) = 168. We show that, with only 3%N retained modes, CVS filtering separates the coherent vortex tubes from the incoherent background flow. The latter is structureless, has an equipartition energy spectrum, and has a Gaussian velocity probability distribution function (PDF) and an exponential vorticity PDF. On the other hand, the Fourier basis does not extract the coherent vortex tubes cleanly and leaves organized structures in the residual high wavenumber modes whose PDFs are stretched exponentials for both the velocity and the vorticity.

  4. 3-D Flow Visualization with a Light-field Camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thurow, B.

    2012-12-01

    Light-field cameras have received attention recently due to their ability to acquire photographs that can be computationally refocused after they have been acquired. In this work, we describe the development of a light-field camera system for 3D visualization of turbulent flows. The camera developed in our lab, also known as a plenoptic camera, uses an array of microlenses mounted next to an image sensor to resolve both the position and angle of light rays incident upon the camera. For flow visualization, the flow field is seeded with small particles that follow the fluid's motion and are imaged using the camera and a pulsed light source. The tomographic MART algorithm is then applied to the light-field data in order to reconstruct a 3D volume of the instantaneous particle field. 3D, 3C velocity vectors are then determined from a pair of 3D particle fields using conventional cross-correlation algorithms. As an illustration of the concept, 3D/3C velocity measurements of a turbulent boundary layer produced on the wall of a conventional wind tunnel are presented. Future experiments are planned to use the camera to study the influence of wall permeability on the 3-D structure of the turbulent boundary layer.Schematic illustrating the concept of a plenoptic camera where each pixel represents both the position and angle of light rays entering the camera. This information can be used to computationally refocus an image after it has been acquired. Instantaneous 3D velocity field of a turbulent boundary layer determined using light-field data captured by a plenoptic camera.

  5. Turbulence in Compressible Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Lecture notes for the AGARD Fluid Dynamics Panel (FDP) Special Course on 'Turbulence in Compressible Flows' have been assembled in this report. The following topics were covered: Compressible Turbulent Boundary Layers, Compressible Turbulent Free Shear Layers, Turbulent Combustion, DNS/LES and RANS Simulations of Compressible Turbulent Flows, and Case Studies of Applications of Turbulence Models in Aerospace.

  6. Turbulent boundary layer over 2D and 3D large-scale wavy walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamorro, Leonardo P.; Hamed, Ali M.; Castillo, Luciano

    2015-11-01

    In this work, an experimental investigation of the developing and developed flow over two- and three-dimensional large-scale wavy walls was performed using high-resolution planar particle image velocimetry in a refractive-index-matching flume. The 2D wall is described by a sinusoidal wave in the streamwise direction with amplitude to wavelength ratio a/ λx = 0.05. The 3D wall is defined with an additional wave superimposed on the 2D wall in the spanwise direction with a/ λy = 0.1. The flow was characterized at Reynolds numbers of 4000 and 40000, based on the bulk velocity and the flume half height. Instantaneous velocity fields and time-averaged turbulence quantities reveal strong coupling between large-scale topography and the turbulence dynamics near the wall. Turbulence statistics show the presence of a well-structured shear layer that enhances the turbulence for the 2D wavy wall, whereas the 3D wall exhibits different flow dynamics and significantly lower turbulence levels, particularly for which shows about 30% reduction. The likelihood of recirculation bubbles, levels and spatial distribution of turbulence, and the rate of the turbulent kinetic energy production are shown to be severely affected when a single spanwise mode is superimposed on the 2D wall. POD analysis was also performed to further understand distinctive features of the flow structures due to surface topography.

  7. 3D two-fluid simulations of turbulence in LAPD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, Dustin M.

    The Large Plasma Device (LAPD) is modeled using a modified version of the 3D Global Braginskii Solver code (GBS) for a nominal Helium plasma. The unbiased low-flow regime is explored in simulations where there is an intrinsic E x B rotation of the plasma. In the simulations this rotation is caused primarily by sheath effects with the Reynolds stress and J x B torque due to a cross-field Pederson conductivity having little effect. Explicit biasing simulations are also explored for the first time where the intrinsic rotation of the plasma is modified through boundary conditions that mimic the biasable limiter used in LAPD. Comparisons to experimental measurements in the unbiased case show strong qualitative agreement with the data, particularly the radial dependence of the density fluctuations, cross-correlation lengths, radial flux dependence outside of the cathode edge, and camera imagery. Kelvin Helmholtz (KH) turbulence at relatively large scales is the dominant driver of cross-field transport in these simulations with smaller-scale drift waves and sheath modes playing a secondary role. Plasma holes and blobs arising from KH vortices are consistent with the scale sizes and overall appearance of those in LAPD camera images. The addition of ion-neutral collisions in the unbiased simulations at previously theorized values reduces the radial particle flux due to a modest stabilizing contribution of the collisions on the KH-modes driving the turbulent transport. In the biased runs the ion-neutral collisions have a much smaller effect due to the modification of the potential from sheath terms. In biasing the plasma to increase the intrinsic rotation, simulations show the emergence of a nonlinearly saturated coherent mode of order m = 6. In addition, the plasma inside of the cathode edge becomes quiescent due to the strong influence of the wall bias in setting up the equilibrium plasma potential. Biasing in the direction opposite to the intrinsic flow reduces the

  8. Intermittent dissipation and heating in 3D kinetic plasma turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, M.; Matthaeus, W. H.; Roytershteyn, V.; Karimabadi, H.; Parashar, T.; Wu, P.; Shay, M. A.

    2014-12-01

    The nature of collisionless dissipation has been hotlydebated in recent years, with alternative ideas posed interms of various wave modes, such as kinetic Alfven waves,whistlers, linear Vlasov instabilities, cyclotron resonance,and Landau damping. Here we use large scale, fully kinetic3D simulations of collisionless plasma turbulence which showthe development of turbulence characterized by sheet-likecurrent density structures spanning a range of scales.We present evidence that these structures are sites for heatingand dissipation, and that stronger current structures signifyhigher dissipation rates. The analyses focus on quantities such as J.E, electron and proton temperatures, and PVI of the magnetic field. Evidently, kinetic scale plasma,like magnetohydrodynamics, becomes intermittent due tocurrent sheet formation, leading to the expectationthat heating and dissipation in astrophysical and space plasmasmay be highly nonuniform. Comparison with previousresults from 2D kinetic simulations, as well as high frequencysolar wind observational data will also be discussed.

  9. Intermittent Dissipation and Heating in 3D Kinetic Plasma Turbulence.

    PubMed

    Wan, M; Matthaeus, W H; Roytershteyn, V; Karimabadi, H; Parashar, T; Wu, P; Shay, M

    2015-05-01

    High resolution, fully kinetic, three dimensional (3D) simulation of collisionless plasma turbulence shows the development of turbulence characterized by sheetlike current density structures spanning a range of scales. The nonlinear evolution is initialized with a long wavelength isotropic spectrum of fluctuations having polarizations transverse to an imposed mean magnetic field. We present evidence that these current sheet structures are sites for heating and dissipation, and that stronger currents signify higher dissipation rates. The analyses focus on quantities such as J·E, electron, and proton temperatures, and conditional averages of these quantities based on local electric current density. Evidently, kinetic scale plasma, like magnetohydrodynamics, becomes intermittent due to current sheet formation, leading to the expectation that heating and dissipation in astrophysical and space plasmas may be highly nonuniform. Comparison with previous results from 2D kinetic simulations, as well as high frequency solar wind observational data, are discussed. PMID:25978241

  10. Global stability analysis of turbulent 3D wakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rigas, Georgios; Sipp, Denis; Juniper, Matthew

    2015-11-01

    At low Reynolds numbers, corresponding to laminar and transitional regimes, hydrodynamic stability theory has aided the understanding of the dynamics of bluff body wake-flows and the application of effective control strategies. However, flows of fundamental importance to many industries, in particular the transport industry, involve high Reynolds numbers and turbulent wakes. Despite their turbulence, such wake flows exhibit organisation which is manifested as coherent structures. Recent work has shown that the turbulent coherent structures retain the shape of the symmetry-breaking laminar instabilities and only those manifest as large-scale structures in the near wake (Rigas et al., JFM vol. 750:R5 2014, JFM vol. 778:R2 2015). Based on the findings of the persistence of the laminar instabilities at high Reynolds numbers, we investigate the global stability characteristics of a turbulent wake generated behind a bluff three-dimensional axisymmetric body. We perform a linear global stability analysis on the experimentally obtained mean flow and we recover the dynamic characteristics and spatial structure of the coherent structures, which are linked to the transitional instabilities. A detailed comparison of the predictions with the experimental measurements will be provided.

  11. Methods for Measuring the Orientation and Rotation Rate of 3D-printed Particles in Turbulence.

    PubMed

    Cole, Brendan C; Marcus, Guy G; Parsa, Shima; Kramel, Stefan; Ni, Rui; Voth, Greg A

    2016-01-01

    Experimental methods are presented for measuring the rotational and translational motion of anisotropic particles in turbulent fluid flows. 3D printing technology is used to fabricate particles with slender arms connected at a common center. Shapes explored are crosses (two perpendicular rods), jacks (three perpendicular rods), triads (three rods in triangular planar symmetry), and tetrads (four arms in tetrahedral symmetry). Methods for producing on the order of 10,000 fluorescently dyed particles are described. Time-resolved measurements of their orientation and solid-body rotation rate are obtained from four synchronized videos of their motion in a turbulent flow between oscillating grids with Rλ = 91. In this relatively low-Reynolds number flow, the advected particles are small enough that they approximate ellipsoidal tracer particles. We present results of time-resolved 3D trajectories of position and orientation of the particles as well as measurements of their rotation rates. PMID:27404898

  12. Implementation of Flow Tripping Capability in the USM3D Unstructured Flow Solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pandya, Mohagna J.; Abdol-Hamid, Khaled S.; Campbell, Richard L.; Frink, Neal T.

    2006-01-01

    A flow tripping capability is added to an established NASA tetrahedral unstructured parallel Navier-Stokes flow solver, USM3D. The capability is based on prescribing an appropriate profile of turbulence model variables to energize the boundary layer in a plane normal to a specified trip region on the body surface. We demonstrate this approach using the k-epsilon two-equation turbulence model of USM3D. Modification to the solution procedure primarily consists of developing a data structure to identify all unstructured tetrahedral grid cells located in the plane normal to a specified surface trip region and computing a function based on the mean flow solution to specify the modified profile of the turbulence model variables. We leverage this data structure and also show an adjunct approach that is based on enforcing a laminar flow condition on the otherwise fully turbulent flow solution in user-specified region. The latter approach is applied for the solutions obtained using other one-and two-equation turbulence models of USM3D. A key ingredient of the present capability is the use of a graphical user-interface tool PREDISC to define a trip region on the body surface in an existing grid. Verification of the present modifications is demonstrated on three cases, namely, a flat plate, the RAE2822 airfoil, and the DLR F6 wing-fuselage configuration.

  13. Implementation of Flow Tripping Capability in the USM3D Unstructured Flow Solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pandya, Mohagna J.; Abdol-Harrid, Khaled S.; Campbell, Richard L.; Frink, Neal T.

    2006-01-01

    A flow tripping capability is added to an established NASA tetrahedral unstructured parallel Navier-Stokes flow solver, USM3D. The capability is based on prescribing an appropriate profile of turbulence model variables to energize the boundary layer in a plane normal to a specified trip region on the body surface. We demonstrate this approach using the k-e two-equation turbulence model of USM3D. Modification to the solution procedure primarily consists of developing a data structure to identify all unstructured tetrahedral grid cells located in the plane normal to a specified surface trip region and computing a function based on the mean flow solution to specify the modified profile of the turbulence model variables. We leverage this data structure and also show an adjunct approach that is based on enforcing a laminar flow condition on the otherwise fully turbulent flow solution in user specified region. The latter approach is applied for the solutions obtained using other one- and two-equation turbulence models of USM3D. A key ingredient of the present capability is the use of a graphical user-interface tool PREDISC to define a trip region on the body surface in an existing grid. Verification of the present modifications is demonstrated on three cases, namely, a flat plate, the RAE2822 airfoil, and the DLR F6 wing-fuselage configuration.

  14. Impulsive reconnection: 3D onset and stagnation in turbulent paradigms

    SciTech Connect

    Sears, Jason A; Intrator, Thomas P; Weber, Tom; Lapenta, Giovanni; Lazarian, Alexander

    2010-12-14

    Reconnection processes are ubiquitous in solar coronal loops, the earth's magnetotail, galactic jets, and laboratory configurations such as spheromaks and Z pinches. It is believed that reconnection dynamics are often closely linked to turbulence. In these phenomena, the bursty onset of reconnection is partly determined by a balance of macroscopic MHD forces. In a turbulent paradigm, it is reasonable to suppose that there exist many individual reconnection sites, each X-line being finite in axial extent and thus intrinsically three-dimensional (3D) in structure. The balance between MHD forces and flux pile-up continuously shifts as mutually tangled flux ropes merge or bounce. The spatial scale and thus the rate of reconnection are therefore intimately related to the turbulence statistics both in space and in time. We study intermittent 3D reconnection along spatially localized X-lines between two or more flux ropes. The threshold of MHD instability which in this case is the kink threshold is varied by modifying the line-tying boundary conditions. For fast inflow speed of approaching ropes, there is merging and magnetic reconnection which is a well known and expected consequence of the 2D coalescence instability. On the other hand, for slower inflow speed the flux ropes bounce. The threshold appears to be the Sweet Parker speed v{sub A}/S{sup 1/2}, where v{sub A} is the Alfven speed and S is the Lundquist number. Computations by collaborators at University of Wisconsin, Madison, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, and LANL complement the experiment.

  15. Finite element solver for 3-D compressible viscous flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, K. C.; Reddy, J. N.

    1986-01-01

    The space shuttle main engine (SSME) has extremely complex internal flow structure. The geometry of the flow domain is three-dimensional with complicated topology. The flow is compressible, viscous, and turbulent with large gradients in flow quantities and regions of recirculations. The analysis of the flow field in SSME involves several tedious steps. One is the geometrical modeling of the particular zone of the SSME being studied. Accessing the geometry definition, digitalizing it, and developing surface interpolations suitable for an interior grid generator require considerable amount of manual labor. There are several types of grid generators available with some general-purpose finite element programs. An efficient and robust computational scheme for solving 3D Navier-Stokes equations has to be implemented. Post processing software has to be adapted to visualize and analyze the computed 3D flow field. The progress made in a project to develop software for the analysis of the flow is discussed. The technical approach to the development of the finite element scheme and the relaxation procedure are discussed. The three dimensional finite element code for the compressible Navier-Stokes equations is listed.

  16. Vorticity, turbulence production, and turbulence induced accelerations in a rectangular jet as measured using 3-D LDA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Gerald L.; Swan, David H.

    1990-01-01

    The flow field of a rectangular jet with a 4:1 aspect ratio (50.4 x 12.7 mm) was studied at a Reynolds number of 100,000 (Mach number 0.09) using a 3-D laser Doppler anemometer system. Measurements were performed along the major and minor axis planes and at various downstream cross-sections of the jet. The mean velocity vector and entire Reynolds stress tensor were measured and presented in a previous publication. The present work presents the vorticity vector, turbulence production, and turbulence induced acceleration vector distributions which were calculated from the previously presented data.

  17. XML3D and Xflow: combining declarative 3D for the Web with generic data flows.

    PubMed

    Klein, Felix; Sons, Kristian; Rubinstein, Dmitri; Slusallek, Philipp

    2013-01-01

    Researchers have combined XML3D, which provides declarative, interactive 3D scene descriptions based on HTML5, with Xflow, a language for declarative, high-performance data processing. The result lets Web developers combine a 3D scene graph with data flows for dynamic meshes, animations, image processing, and postprocessing. PMID:24808080

  18. 3-D turbulent particle dispersion submodel development. Quarterly progress report No. 1, 5 April--5 July 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, P.J.

    1991-12-31

    The lack of a mathematical description of the interactions of fluid turbulence with other physics-chemical processes is a major obstacle in modeling many industrial program. Turbulent two-phase flow is a phenomenon that is of significant practical importance to coal combustion as well as other disciplines. The interactions of fluid turbulence with the particulate phase has yet to be accurately and efficiently modeled for these industrial applications. On 15 May 1991 work was initiated to cover four major tasks toward the development of a computational submodel for turbulent particle dispersion that would be applicable to coal combustion simulations. Those four tasks are: 1. A critical evaluation of the 2-D Lagrangian particle dispersion submodel, 2. Development of a 3-D submodel for turbulent particle dispersion, 3. Evaluation of the 3-D submodel for turbulent particle dispersion, 4.Exploration of extensions of the Lagrangian dispersion theory to other applications including chemistry-turbulence interactions.

  19. Holographic particle velocimetry - A 3D measurement technique for vortex interactions, coherent structures and turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Hui; Hussain, Fazle

    1991-10-01

    To understand the topology and dynamics of coherent structures (CS), the interactions of CS with fine-scale turbulence, and the effects of CS on entrainment, mixing and combustion, experimental tools are needed that can measure velocity (preferably vorticity) vector fields in both 3D space and time. While traditional measurement techniques are not able to serve this purpose, holographic particle velocimetry (HPV) appears to be promising. In a demonstration experiment, the instantaneous 3D velocity vector fields in some simple vortical flows have been obtained using the HPV technique. In this preliminary report, the principles of the HPV technique are illustrated and the key issues in its implementation are discussed.

  20. First 3-D simulations of meteor plasma dynamics and turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oppenheim, Meers M.; Dimant, Yakov S.

    2015-02-01

    Millions of small but detectable meteors hit the Earth's atmosphere every second, creating trails of hot plasma that turbulently diffuse into the background atmosphere. For over 60 years, radars have detected meteor plasmas and used these signals to infer characteristics of the meteoroid population and upper atmosphere, but, despite the importance of meteor radar measurements, the complex processes by which these plasmas evolve have never been thoroughly explained or modeled. In this paper, we present the first fully 3-D simulations of meteor evolution, showing meteor plasmas developing instabilities, becoming turbulent, and inhomogeneously diffusing into the background ionosphere. These instabilities explain the characteristics and strength of many radar observations, in particular the high-resolution nonspecular echoes made by large radars. The simulations reveal how meteors create strong electric fields that dig out deep plasma channels along the Earth's magnetic fields. They also allow researchers to explore the impacts of the intense winds and wind shears, commonly found at these altitudes, on meteor plasma evolution. This study will allow the development of more sophisticated models of meteor radar signals, enabling the extraction of detailed information about the properties of meteoroid particles and the atmosphere.

  1. Numerical study of elastic turbulence in a 3D curvilinear micro-channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hongna; Kunugi, Tomoaki; Li, Fengchen

    2012-11-01

    Elastic turbulence is an intriguing phenomenon of viscoelastic fluid flow, and dominated by the strong nonlinear elasticity due to the existence of flexible microstructures. It implies the possibility to generate a turbulent state (so-called an elastic turbulence) in the micro-scale devices by introducing the viscoelastic fluids, which could significantly enhance the mixing efficiency therein. Several experiments have been carried out to study its characteristics and underlying physics. However, the difficulty in measuring the flow information and behaviors of the microstructures, especially in the cross section normal to the mean flow direction, limits our current understanding and controlling. In the present study, the nondimensionalization method in which the characteristic velocity is defined as the ratio of the solution viscosity to the width of the channel was adopted to simulate the elastic turbulence in the micro-scale devices. And the elastic turbulent flow was obtained numerically in the 3D curvilinear micro-channel. Therein, the characteristics of the velocity field and polymer's behavior are discussed. Moreover, the energy transfer between the kinetic energy and the polymer's elastic energy is also investigated to understand its physical mechanism. Supported by the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science research fellowship and the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology via `Energy Science in the Age of Global Warming' of Global Center of Excellence (G-COE) program (J-051).

  2. Multi-scale self-organisation of edge plasma turbulent transport in 3D global simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamain, P.; Ghendrih, Ph; Bufferand, H.; Ciraolo, G.; Colin, C.; Fedorczak, N.; Nace, N.; Schwander, F.; Serre, E.

    2015-05-01

    The 3D global edge turbulence code TOKAM3X is used to study the properties of edge particle turbulent transport in circular limited plasmas, including both closed and open flux surfaces. Turbulence is driven by an incoming particle flux from the core plasma and no scale separation between the equilibrium and the fluctuations is assumed. Simulations show the existence of a complex self-organization of turbulence transport coupling scales ranging from a few Larmor radii up to the machine scale. Particle transport is largely dominated by small scale turbulence with fluctuations forming quasi field-aligned filaments. Radial particle transport is intermittent and associated with the propagation of coherent structures on long distances via avalanches. Long range correlations are also found in the poloidal and toroidal direction. The statistical properties of fluctuations vary with the radial and poloidal directions, with larger fluctuation levels and intermittency found in the outboard scrape-off layer (SOL). Radial turbulent transport is strongly ballooned, with 90% of the flux at the separatrix flowing through the low-field side. One of the main consequences is the existence of quasi-sonic asymmetric parallel flows driving a net rotation of the plasma. Simulations also show the spontaneous onset of an intermittent E × B rotation characterized by a larger shear at the separatrix. Strong correlation is found between the turbulent particle flux and the E × B flow shear in a phenomenology reminiscent of H-mode physics. The poloidal position of the limiter is a key player in the observed dynamics.

  3. 3D flow focusing for microfluidic flow cytometry with ultrasonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gnyawali, Vaskar; Strohm, Eric M.; Daghighi, Yasaman; van de Vondervoort, Mia; Kolios, Michael C.; Tsai, Scott S. H.

    2015-11-01

    We are developing a flow cytometer that detects unique acoustic signature waves generated from single cells due to interactions between the cells and ultrasound waves. The generated acoustic waves depend on the size and biomechanical properties of the cells and are sufficient for identifying cells in the medium. A microfluidic system capable of focusing cells through a 10 x 10 μm ultrasound beam cross section was developed to facilitate acoustic measurements of single cells. The cells are streamlined in a hydro-dynamically 3D focused flow in a 300 x 300 μm channel made using PDMS. 3D focusing is realized by lateral sheath flows and an inlet needle (inner diameter 100 μm). The accuracy of the 3D flow focusing is measured using a dye and detecting its localization using confocal microscopy. Each flowing cell would be probed by an ultrasound pulse, which has a center frequency of 375 MHz and bandwidth of 250 MHz. The same probe would also be used for recording the scattered waves from the cells, which would be processed to distinguish the physical and biomechanical characteristics of the cells, eventually identifying them. This technique has potential applications in detecting circulating tumor cells, blood cells and blood-related diseases.

  4. Integrating Mach-Zehnder interferometry with TPIV to measure the time-resolved deformation of a compliant wall along with the 3D velocity field in a turbulent channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Cao; Miorini, Rinaldo; Katz, Joseph

    2015-11-01

    A system combining tomographic PIV (TPIV) and Mach-Zehnder interferometry (MZI) simultaneously measures the time- resolved 3D flow field and 2D distribution of wall-normal deformation in a turbulent channel flow over a transparent compliant surface. This paper focuses on the experimental techniques and data analysis procedures, but includes sample results. Standard TPIV analysis resolves the log layer of the mean velocity and the linear decrease in total shear stress with distance from the wall. Single-pixel ensemble correlations reveal the buffer layer and top of the viscous sublayer. Analysis of the MZI data consists of two steps, namely critical spatial filtering of interferograms to remove noise and phase demodulation to calculate the surface shape. A new technique to improve the filtration of noise from interferograms based on spatial correlations of small windows is introduced and optimized. Taking advantage of this enhancement, the phase/deformation distribution is calculated directly from arccosines of the intensity, which avoids edge artifacts affecting spectral calculations. Validations using synthetic noisy interferograms indicate that errors associated with correlation-based enhancement are consistently lower and much less sensitive to fringe shape than spectral band-pass filtering. The experimental wavenumber-frequency spectra show that the deformation consists of patterns that are larger than the field of view, surface waves and small-scale patterns. Some of the latter are advected at the freestream velocity, but mostly at 70 % of the freestream, the mean speed at 10 % of the channel half height. Indeed, spatial correlations of the deformation with velocity components peak at this elevation.

  5. Multigrid acceleration and turbulence models for computations of 3D turbulent jets in crossflow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demuren, A. O.

    1992-01-01

    A multigrid method is presented for the calculation of three-dimensional turbulent jets in crossflow. Turbulence closure is achieved with either the standard k-epsilon model or a Reynolds stress model (RSM). Multigrid acceleration enables convergence rates which are far superior to that for a single grid method to be obtained with both turbulence models. With the k-epsilon model the rate approaches that for laminar flow, but with RSM it is somewhat slower. The increased stiffness of the system of equation in the latter may be responsible. Computed results with both turbulence models are compared to experimental data for a pair of opposed jets in crossflow. Both models yield reasonable agreement for the mean flow velocity, but RSM yields better predictions of the Reynolds stresses.

  6. Characterization of Turbulent Flows for Turbulence Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, W. C.; Haire, S. L.

    1998-11-01

    A diagram for the characterization of turbulent flows using the invariants of the mean velocity gradient tensor is introduced. All mean flows, from irrotationally strained flows to shearing flows, to purely rotational flows, can be identified on this diagram. Different flow fields which occupy the same region on the diagram are said to be comprised of the same topological features. The current state of turbulence modeling can be identified on the diagram based on the type of mean flow fields which can be accurately computed. Regions on the diagram can be shown for which current capabilities in turbulence modeling fail to accurately resolve the turbulent structures. Relevant mean field topology is identified for future work in turbulence modeling. Using this analysis, we suggest a number of flows to be computed by DNS or LES and used as testing cases for new models.

  7. Recent Enhancements to USM3D Unstructured Flow Solver for Unsteady Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pandya, Mohagna J.; Frink, Neal T.; Abdol-Hamid, Khaled S.; Chung, James J.

    2004-01-01

    The NASA USM3D unstructured flow solver is undergoing extensions to address dynamic flow problems in support of NASA and NAVAIR efforts to study the applicability of Computational Fluid Dynamics tools for the prediction of aircraft stability and control characteristics. The initial extensions reported herein include two second-order time stepping schemes, Detached-Eddy Simulation, and grid motion. This paper reports the initial code verification and validation assessment of the dynamic flow capabilities of USM3D. The cases considered are the classic inviscid shock-tube problem, low Reynolds number wake shedding from a NACA 0012 airfoil, high Reynolds number DES-based wake shedding from a 4-to-1 length-to-diameter cylinder, and forced pitch oscillation of a NACA 0012 airfoil with inviscid and turbulent flow.

  8. Slat Cove Unsteadiness Effect of 3D Flow Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choudhari, Meelan M.; Khorrami, Mehdi R.

    2006-01-01

    Previous studies have indicated that 2D, time accurate computations based on a pseudo-laminar zonal model of the slat cove region (within the framework of the Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes equations) are inadequate for predicting the full unsteady dynamics of the slat cove flow field. Even though such computations could capture the large-scale, unsteady vorticity structures in the slat cove region without requiring any external forcing, the simulated vortices were excessively strong and the recirculation zone was unduly energetic in comparison with the PIV measurements for a generic high-lift configuration. To resolve this discrepancy and to help enable physics based predictions of slat aeroacoustics, the present paper is focused on 3D simulations of the slat cove flow over a computational domain of limited spanwise extent. Maintaining the pseudo-laminar approach, current results indicate that accounting for the three-dimensionality of flow fluctuations leads to considerable improvement in the accuracy of the unsteady, nearfield solution. Analysis of simulation data points to the likely significance of turbulent fluctuations near the reattachment region toward the generation of broadband slat noise. The computed acoustic characteristics (in terms of the frequency spectrum and spatial distribution) within short distances from the slat resemble the previously reported, subscale measurements of slat noise.

  9. Verification and Validation of the k-kL Turbulence Model in FUN3D and CFL3D Codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdol-Hamid, Khaled S.; Carlson, Jan-Renee; Rumsey, Christopher L.

    2015-01-01

    The implementation of the k-kL turbulence model using multiple computational uid dy- namics (CFD) codes is reported herein. The k-kL model is a two-equation turbulence model based on Abdol-Hamid's closure and Menter's modi cation to Rotta's two-equation model. Rotta shows that a reliable transport equation can be formed from the turbulent length scale L, and the turbulent kinetic energy k. Rotta's equation is well suited for term-by-term mod- eling and displays useful features compared to other two-equation models. An important di erence is that this formulation leads to the inclusion of higher-order velocity derivatives in the source terms of the scale equations. This can enhance the ability of the Reynolds- averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) solvers to simulate unsteady ows. The present report documents the formulation of the model as implemented in the CFD codes Fun3D and CFL3D. Methodology, veri cation and validation examples are shown. Attached and sepa- rated ow cases are documented and compared with experimental data. The results show generally very good comparisons with canonical and experimental data, as well as matching results code-to-code. The results from this formulation are similar or better than results using the SST turbulence model.

  10. Insights from a 3-D temperature sensors mooring on stratified ocean turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haren, Hans; Cimatoribus, Andrea A.; Cyr, Frédéric; Gostiaux, Louis

    2016-05-01

    A unique small-scale 3-D mooring array has been designed consisting of five parallel lines, 100 m long and 4 m apart, and holding up to 550 high-resolution temperature sensors. It is built for quantitative studies on the evolution of stratified turbulence by internal wave breaking in geophysical flows at scales which go beyond that of a laboratory. Here we present measurements from above a steep slope of Mount Josephine, NE Atlantic where internal wave breaking occurs regularly. Vertical and horizontal coherence spectra show an aspect ratio of 0.25-0.5 near the buoyancy frequency, evidencing anisotropy. At higher frequencies, the transition to isotropy (aspect ratio of 1) is found within the inertial subrange. Above the continuous turbulence spectrum in this subrange, isolated peaks are visible that locally increase the spectral width, in contrast with open ocean spectra. Their energy levels are found to be proportional to the tidal energy level.

  11. Magnetosheath Flow Anomalies in 3-D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaisberg, O. L.; Burch, J. L.; Smirnov, V. N.; Avanov, L. A.; Moore, T. E.; Waite, J. H., Jr.; Skalsky, A. A.; Borodkova, N. L.; Coffey, V. N.; Gallagher, D. L.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Measurements of the plasma and magnetic field with high temporal resolution on the Interball Tail probe reveal many flow anomalies in the magnetosheath. They are usually seen as flow direction and number density variations, accompanied by magnetic field discontinuities. Large flow anomalies with number density variations of factor of 2 or more and velocity variations of 100 km/s or more are seen with periodicity of about I per hour. The cases of flow anomalies following in succession are also observed, and suggest their decay while propagating through the magnetosheath. Some magnetospheric disturbances observed in the outer magnetosphere after the satellite has crossed the magnetopause on the inbound orbit suggest their association with magnetosheath flow anomalies observed in the magnetosheath prior to magnetopause crossing.

  12. Multigrid acceleration and turbulence models for computations of 3D turbulent jets in crossflow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demuren, A. O.

    1991-01-01

    A multigrid method is presented for the calculation of three-dimensional turbulent jets in crossflow. Turbulence closure is achieved with either the standard k-epsilon model or a Reynolds Stress Model (RSM). Multigrid acceleration enables convergence rates which are far superior to that for a single grid method. With the k-epsilon model the rate approaches that for laminar flow, but with RSM it is somewhat slower. The increased stiffness of the system of equations in the latter may be responsible. Computed results with both turbulence models are compared with experimental data for a pair of opposed jets in crossflow. Both models yield reasonable agreement with mean flow velocity but RSM yields better prediction of the Reynolds stresses.

  13. Measurements of the solid-body rotation of anisotropic particles in 3D turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcus, Guy G.; Parsa, Shima; Kramel, Stefan; Ni, Rui; Voth, Greg A.

    2014-10-01

    We introduce a new method to measure Lagrangian vorticity and the rotational dynamics of anisotropic particles in a turbulent fluid flow. We use 3D printing technology to fabricate crosses (two perpendicular rods) and jacks (three mutually perpendicular rods). Time-resolved measurements of their orientation and solid-body rotation rate are obtained from four video images of their motion in a turbulent flow between oscillating grids with {{R}λ } = 91. The advected particles have a largest dimension of 6 times the Kolmogorov length, making them a good approximation to anisotropic tracer particles. Crosses rotate like disks and jacks rotate like spheres, so these measurements, combined with previous measurements of tracer rods, allow experimental study of axisymmetric ellipsoids across the full range of aspect ratios. The measured mean square tumbling rate, < {{\\dot{p}}i}{{\\dot{p}}i}> , confirms previous direct numerical simulations that indicate that disks tumble much more rapidly than rods. Measurements of the alignment of a unit vector defining the orientation of crosses with the direction of their solid-body rotation rate vector provide the first direct observation of the alignment of anisotropic particles by the velocity gradients in a turbulent flow.

  14. Recent Advances in Visualizing 3D Flow with LIC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Interrante, Victoria; Grosch, Chester

    1998-01-01

    Line Integral Convolution (LIC), introduced by Cabral and Leedom in 1993, is an elegant and versatile technique for representing directional information via patterns of correlation in a texture. Although most commonly used to depict 2D flow, or flow over a surface in 3D, LIC methods can equivalently be used to portray 3D flow through a volume. However, the popularity of LIC as a device for illustrating 3D flow has historically been limited both by the computational expense of generating and rendering such a 3D texture and by the difficulties inherent in clearly and effectively conveying the directional information embodied in the volumetric output textures that are produced. In an earlier paper, we briefly discussed some of the factors that may underlie the perceptual difficulties that we can encounter with dense 3D displays and outlined several strategies for more effectively visualizing 3D flow with volume LIC. In this article, we review in more detail techniques for selectively emphasizing critical regions of interest in a flow and for facilitating the accurate perception of the 3D depth and orientation of overlapping streamlines, and we demonstrate new methods for efficiently incorporating an indication of orientation into a flow representation and for conveying additional information about related scalar quantities such as temperature or vorticity over a flow via subtle, continuous line width and color variations.

  15. 3D Flow reconstruction using ultrasound PIV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poelma, C.; Mari, J. M.; Foin, N.; Tang, M.-X.; Krams, R.; Caro, C. G.; Weinberg, P. D.; Westerweel, J.

    2011-04-01

    Ultrasound particle image velocimetry (PIV) can be used to obtain velocity fields in non-transparent geometries and/or fluids. In the current study, we use this technique to document the flow in a curved tube, using ultrasound contrast bubbles as flow tracer particles. The performance of the technique is first tested in a straight tube, with both steady laminar and pulsatile flows. Both experiments confirm that the technique is capable of reliable measurements. A number of adaptations are introduced that improve the accuracy and applicability of ultrasound PIV. Firstly, due to the method of ultrasound image acquisition, a correction is required for the estimation of velocities from tracer displacements. This correction accounts for the fact that columns in the image are recorded at slightly different instances. The second improvement uses a slice-by-slice scanning approach to obtain three-dimensional velocity data. This approach is here demonstrated in a strongly curved tube. The resulting flow profiles and wall shear stress distribution shows a distinct asymmetry. To meaningfully interpret these three-dimensional results, knowledge of the measurement thickness is required. Our third contribution is a method to determine this quantity, using the correlation peak heights. The latter method can also provide the third (out-of-plane) component if the measurement thickness is known, so that all three velocity components are available using a single probe.

  16. Turbulent flow through screens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, R. D.

    1984-01-01

    A detailed experimental investigation has been carried out on the effects of different types of screens on turbulent flow, in particular turbulent boundary layers. The effect of a screen on a turbulent boundary layer is to give it a 'new lease of life'. The boundary layer turbulence is reorganized and the thickness reduced, thus making it less susceptible to separation. The aerodynamic properties of plastic screens are found to differ significantly from those of the conventional metal screens, evidently because of differences in the weaving properties. The 'overshoot' in mean velocity profile near the boudnary layer edge is shown to be a result of the effect of screen inclination on pressure drop coefficient. A more accurate formulation for the deflection coefficient of a screen is also proposed.

  17. 3D outflow jets originating from turbulence in the reconnection current layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujimoto, Keizo

    2016-07-01

    Satellite observations in the Earth's magnetosphere and in solar flares have suggested that the reconnection outflow jets are fully three dimensional, consisting of a series of narrow channels. The jet structure is important in evaluating the energy and flux transport in the reconnection process. Previous theoretical models based on fluid simulations have relied on patchy reconnection where reconnection takes place predominantly in patchy portions of the current layer. The problem of the previous models is that the gross reconnection rate is much smaller than that in the 2D reconnection case. The present study shows a large-scale 3D PIC simulation revealing that the 3D outflow jets are generated through the 3D flux ropes formed in the turbulent electron current layer around the x-line. Reconnection proceeds almost uniformly along the x-line, so that the gross reconnection rate is comparable to that in the 2D reconnection case. The flux ropes and resultant outflow channels have a typical current-aligned scale provided by the wavelength of an electron shear mode that is much larger than the typical kinetic scales. It is found that the structure of the 3D outflow jets obtained in the simulation is consistent with the bursty bulk flow observed in the Earth's magnetotail.

  18. Turbulent multiphase flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faeth, G. M.

    1989-01-01

    Measurements and predictions of the structure of several multiphase flows are considered. The properties of dense sprays near the exits of pressure-atomizing injectors and of noncombusting and combusting dilute dispersed flows in round-jet configurations are addressed. It is found that the properties of dense sprays exhibit structure and mixing properties similar to variable-density single-phase flows at high Reynolds numbers within the atomization regime. The degree of development and turbulence levels at the injector exit have a surprisingly large effect on the structure and mixing properties of pressure-atomized sprays, particularly when the phase densities are large. Contemporary stochastic analysis of dilute multiphase flows provides encouraging predictions of turbulent dispersion for a wide variety of jetlike flows, particle-laden jets in gases and liquids, noncondensing and condensing bubbly jets, and nonevaporating, evaporating, and combusting sprays.

  19. Slope instability in complex 3D topography promoted by convergent 3D groundwater flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, M. E.; Brien, D. L.

    2012-12-01

    Slope instability in complex topography is generally controlled by the interaction between gravitationally induced stresses, 3D strengths, and 3D pore-fluid pressure fields produced by flowing groundwater. As an example of this complexity, coastal bluffs sculpted by landsliding commonly exhibit a progression of undulating headlands and re-entrants. In this landscape, stresses differ between headlands and re-entrants and 3D groundwater flow varies from vertical rainfall infiltration to lateral groundwater flow on lower permeability layers with subsequent discharge at the curved bluff faces. In plan view, groundwater flow converges in the re-entrant regions. To investigate relative slope instability induced by undulating topography, we couple the USGS 3D limit-equilibrium slope-stability model, SCOOPS, with the USGS 3D groundwater flow model, MODFLOW. By rapidly analyzing the stability of millions of potential failures, the SCOOPS model can determine relative slope stability throughout the 3D domain underlying a digital elevation model (DEM), and it can utilize both fully 3D distributions of pore-water pressure and material strength. The two models are linked by first computing a groundwater-flow field in MODFLOW, and then computing stability in SCOOPS using the pore-pressure field derived from groundwater flow. Using these two models, our analyses of 60m high coastal bluffs in Seattle, Washington showed augmented instability in topographic re-entrants given recharge from a rainy season. Here, increased recharge led to elevated perched water tables with enhanced effects in the re-entrants owing to convergence of groundwater flow. Stability in these areas was reduced about 80% compared to equivalent dry conditions. To further isolate these effects, we examined groundwater flow and stability in hypothetical landscapes composed of uniform and equally spaced, oscillating headlands and re-entrants with differing amplitudes. The landscapes had a constant slope for both

  20. Lattice Boltzmann Method for 3-D Flows with Curved Boundary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mei, Renwei; Shyy, Wei; Yu, Dazhi; Luo, Li-Shi

    2002-01-01

    In this work, we investigate two issues that are important to computational efficiency and reliability in fluid dynamics applications of the lattice, Boltzmann equation (LBE): (1) Computational stability and accuracy of different lattice Boltzmann models and (2) the treatment of the boundary conditions on curved solid boundaries and their 3-D implementations. Three athermal 3-D LBE models (D3QI5, D3Ql9, and D3Q27) are studied and compared in terms of efficiency, accuracy, and robustness. The boundary treatment recently developed by Filippova and Hanel and Met et al. in 2-D is extended to and implemented for 3-D. The convergence, stability, and computational efficiency of the 3-D LBE models with the boundary treatment for curved boundaries were tested in simulations of four 3-D flows: (1) Fully developed flows in a square duct, (2) flow in a 3-D lid-driven cavity, (3) fully developed flows in a circular pipe, and (4) a uniform flow over a sphere. We found that while the fifteen-velocity 3-D (D3Ql5) model is more prone to numerical instability and the D3Q27 is more computationally intensive, the 63Q19 model provides a balance between computational reliability and efficiency. Through numerical simulations, we demonstrated that the boundary treatment for 3-D arbitrary curved geometry has second-order accuracy and possesses satisfactory stability characteristics.

  1. Swirl flow turbulence modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abujelala, M. T.; Jackson, T. W.; Lilley, D. G.

    1984-01-01

    Confined turbulent swirling flow data obtained from a single hot-wire using a six-orientation technique are analyzed numerically. The effects of swirl strength and the presence of a strong contraction nozzle further downstream on deduced parameters is also presented and discussed for the case of chamber-to-inlet diameter ratio D/d = 2. Three swirl strengths are considered with inlet swirl vane angles of 0, 45 and 70 deg. A strong contraction nozzle with an area ratio of 4 is located two chamber-diameters downstream of the inlet to the flowfield. It is found that both the swirl strength and the contraction have strong effects on the turbulence parameters. Generally, the most dramatic effect of increase of swirl strength is the considerable increase in values of all the parameters considered, (rx-viscosity, kinetic energy of turbulence, length scales, and degree of nonisotropy). The presence of a strong contraction nozzle tends to increase the turbulence parameter values in regions of acceleration and to reduce them in deceleration regions. Based on similarity of viscosity and length scale profiles, a C sub mu formulation is deduced which is shown to improve the predictive capability of the standard k-epsilon turbulence model in swirling recirculating flows.

  2. Terascale direct numerical simulations of turbulent combustion using S3D.

    SciTech Connect

    Sankaran, Ramanan; Mellor-Crummy, J.; DeVries, M.; Yoo, Chun Sang; Ma, K. L.; Podhorski, N.; Liao, W. K.; Klasky, S.; de Supinski, B.; Choudhary, A.; Hawkes, Evatt R.; Chen, Jacqueline H.; Shende, Sameer

    2008-08-01

    Computational science is paramount to the understanding of underlying processes in internal combustion engines of the future that will utilize non-petroleum-based alternative fuels, including carbon-neutral biofuels, and burn in new combustion regimes that will attain high efficiency while minimizing emissions of particulates and nitrogen oxides. Next-generation engines will likely operate at higher pressures, with greater amounts of dilution and utilize alternative fuels that exhibit a wide range of chemical and physical properties. Therefore, there is a significant role for high-fidelity simulations, direct numerical simulations (DNS), specifically designed to capture key turbulence-chemistry interactions in these relatively uncharted combustion regimes, and in particular, that can discriminate the effects of differences in fuel properties. In DNS, all of the relevant turbulence and flame scales are resolved numerically using high-order accurate numerical algorithms. As a consequence terascale DNS are computationally intensive, require massive amounts of computing power and generate tens of terabytes of data. Recent results from terascale DNS of turbulent flames are presented here, illustrating its role in elucidating flame stabilization mechanisms in a lifted turbulent hydrogen/air jet flame in a hot air co-flow, and the flame structure of a fuel-lean turbulent premixed jet flame. Computing at this scale requires close collaborations between computer and combustion scientists to provide optimized scaleable algorithms and software for terascale simulations, efficient collective parallel I/O, tools for volume visualization of multiscale, multivariate data and automating the combustion workflow. The enabling computer science, applied to combustion science, is also required in many other terascale physics and engineering simulations. In particular, performance monitoring is used to identify the performance of key kernels in the DNS code, S3D and especially memory

  3. Navier-Stokes solutions for rotating 3-D duct flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, B. N.

    1988-07-01

    This paper deals with the computation of three-dimensional viscous turbulent flow in a rotating rectangular duct of low aspect ratio using thin-layer Navier-Stokes equations. Scalar form of an approximate factorization implicit scheme along with a modified q-omega turbulence model has been utilized for mean flow predictions. The predicted mean flow behavior has been favorably compared with the experimental data for mean axial velocity, channel pressure and cross-flow velocities at a flow Mach number of 0.05 and a rotational speed of 300 rpm.

  4. Enhancement of USM3D Unstructured Flow Solver for High-Speed High-Temperature Shear Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pandya, Mohagna J.; Abdol-Hamid, Khaled S.; Frink, Neal T.

    2009-01-01

    Large temperature and pressure fluctuations have a profound effect on turbulence development in transonic and supersonic jets. For high-speed, high-temperature jet flows, standard turbulence models lack the ability to predict the observed mixing rate of a shear layer. Several proposals to address this deficiency have been advanced in the literature to modify the turbulence transport equations in a variety of ways. In the present study, some of the most proven and simple modifications to two-equation turbulence models have been selected and implemented in NASA's USM3D tetrahedral Navier-Stokes flow solver. The modifications include the addition of compressibility correction and pressure dilatation terms in the turbulence transport equations for high-speed flows, and the addition of a simple modification to the Boussinesq's closure model coefficient for high-temperature jets. The efficacy of the extended models is demonstrated by comparison with experimental data for two supersonic axisymmetric jet test cases at design pressure ratio.

  5. Flow over bio-inspired 3D herringbone wall riblets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Huawei; Rao, Fugang; Shang, Xiaopeng; Zhang, Deyuan; Hagiwara, Ichiro

    2014-03-01

    Under the inspiration of small riblets of shark skin, the microgroove drag reduction riblets whose direction set along fluid flow have been widely investigated. Herringbone-type riblets of bird flight feather are seldom exploited although bird also has excellent flight performance. Inspired from the flight feather, novel bio-inspired plane-3D (p-3D) and spatial-3D (s-3D) herringbone wall riblets are proposed. Through experiment measurement of drag reduction in water tunnel, maximum drag reduction of p-3D and s-3D herringbone riblets was about 17 and 20 %, higher than traditional microgroove riblets. Moreover, significant change of drag reduction was also found by change of the angle between herringbone riblets. In particular, maximum drag reduction occurred as angle between herringbone riblets was about 60° close to real flight feather, which indicates that microstructure of bird flight feather has great impact on flight performance.

  6. Turbulent bubbly flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Berg, Thomas H.; Luther, Stefan; Mazzitelli, Irene M.; Rensen, Judith M.; Toschi, Federico; Lohse, Detlef

    The effect of bubbles on fully developed turbulent flow is investigated numerically and experimentally, summarizing the results of our previous papers (Mazzitelli et al., 2003, Physics of Fluids15, L5. and Journal of Fluid Mechanics488, 283; Rensen, J. et al. 2005, Journal of Fluid Mechanics538, 153). On the numerical side, we simulate Navier Stokes turbulence with a Taylor Reynolds number of Re?˜60, a large large-scale forcing, and periodic boundary conditions. The point-like bubbles follow their Lagrangian paths and act as point forces on the flow. As a consequence, the spectral slope is less steep as compared to the Kolmogorov case. The slope decrease is identified as a lift force effect. On the experimental side, we do hot-film anemometry in a turbulent water channel with Re? ˜ 200 in which we have injected small bubbles up to a volume percentage of 3%. Here the challenge is to disentangle the bubble spikes from the hot-film velocity signal. To achieve this goal, we have developed a pattern recognition scheme. Furthermore, we injected microbubbles up to a volume percentage of 0.3%. Both in the counter flowing situation with small bubbles and in the co-flow situation with microbubbles, we obtain a less spectral slope, in agreement with the numerical result.

  7. Characteristics of 3D turbulent jets in crossflow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demuren, A. O.

    1991-01-01

    Three dimensional turbulent jets in crossflow at low to medium jet-to-crossflow velocity ratios are computed with a finite volume numerical procedure which utilizes a second-moment closure model to approximate the Reynolds stresses. A multigrid method is used to accelerate the convergence rate of the procedure. Comparison of the computations to measured data show good qualitative agreement. All trends are correctly predicted, though there is some uncertainty on the height of penetration of the jet. The evolution of the vorticity field is used to explore the jet-crossflow interaction.

  8. Numerical analysis of 3-D potential flow in centrifugal turbomachines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daiguji, H.

    1983-09-01

    A numerical method is developed for analysing a three-dimensional steady incompressible potential flow through an impeller in centrifugal turbomachines. The method is the same as the previous method which was developed for the axial flow turbomachines, except for some treatments in the downstream region. In order to clarify the validity and limitation of the method, a comparison with the existing experimental data and numerical results is made for radial flow compressor impellers. The calculated blade surface pressure distributions almost coincide with the quasi-3-D calculation by Krimerman and Adler (1978), but are different partly from the quasi-3-D calculation using one meridional flow analysis. It is suggested from this comparison that the flow through an impeller with high efficiency near the design point can be predicted by this fully 3-D numerical method.

  9. Implementation of a kappa-epsilon turbulence model to RPLUS3D code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chitsomboon, Tawit

    1992-01-01

    The RPLUS3D code has been developed at the NASA Lewis Research Center to support the National Aerospace Plane (NASP) project. The code has the ability to solve three dimensional flowfields with finite rate combustion of hydrogen and air. The combustion process of the hydrogen-air system are simulated by an 18 reaction path, 8 species chemical kinetic mechanism. The code uses a Lower-Upper (LU) decomposition numerical algorithm as its basis, making it a very efficient and robust code. Except for the Jacobian matrix for the implicit chemistry source terms, there is no inversion of a matrix even though a fully implicit numerical algorithm is used. A k-epsilon turbulence model has recently been incorporated into the code. Initial validations have been conducted for a flow over a flat plate. Results of the validation studies are shown. Some difficulties in implementing the k-epsilon equations to the code are also discussed.

  10. USM3D Predictions of Supersonic Nozzle Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Melissa B.; Elmiligui, Alaa A.; Campbell, Richard L.; Nayani, Sudheer N.

    2014-01-01

    This study focused on the NASA Tetrahedral Unstructured Software System CFD code (USM3D) capability to predict supersonic plume flow. Previous studies, published in 2004 and 2009, investigated USM3D's results versus historical experimental data. This current study continued that comparison however focusing on the use of the volume souring to capture the shear layers and internal shock structure of the plume. This study was conducted using two benchmark axisymmetric supersonic jet experimental data sets. The study showed that with the use of volume sourcing, USM3D was able to capture and model a jet plume's shear layer and internal shock structure.

  11. An elliptic calculation procedure for 3-D viscous flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, J. G.

    1985-05-01

    The computation of 3-D internal transonic flows by means of a 3-D Euler Code is discussed. A multidomain approach for time hyperbolic system is presented. This technique, based on the decomposition of the computational domain into several subdomains which may overlap one another, makes it possible to simplify some mesh generation problems and to fit discontinuities such as shocks and slip surfaces. A description of the 3-D Euler Code is given. The space discretization method and the treatment of boundary conditions are emphasized. Various applications of this code in turbomachinery are discussed.

  12. MODELING STATISTICAL PROPERTIES OF SOLAR ACTIVE REGIONS THROUGH DIRECT NUMERICAL SIMULATIONS OF 3D-MHD TURBULENCE

    SciTech Connect

    Malapaka, Shiva Kumar; Mueller, Wolf-Christian

    2013-09-01

    Statistical properties of the Sun's photospheric turbulent magnetic field, especially those of the active regions (ARs), have been studied using the line-of-sight data from magnetograms taken by the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory and several other instruments. This includes structure functions and their exponents, flatness curves, and correlation functions. In these works, the dependence of structure function exponents ({zeta}{sub p}) of the order of the structure functions (p) was modeled using a non-intermittent K41 model. It is now well known that the ARs are highly turbulent and are associated with strong intermittent events. In this paper, we compare some of the observations from Abramenko et al. with the log-Poisson model used for modeling intermittent MHD turbulent flows. Next, we analyze the structure function data obtained from the direct numerical simulations (DNS) of homogeneous, incompressible 3D-MHD turbulence in three cases: sustained by forcing, freely decaying, and a flow initially driven and later allowed to decay (case 3). The respective DNS replicate the properties seen in the plots of {zeta}{sub p} against p of ARs. We also reproduce the trends and changes observed in intermittency in flatness and correlation functions of ARs. It is suggested from this analysis that an AR in the onset phase of a flare can be treated as a forced 3D-MHD turbulent system in its simplest form and that the flaring stage is representative of decaying 3D-MHD turbulence. It is also inferred that significant changes in intermittency from the initial onset phase of a flare to its final peak flaring phase are related to the time taken by the system to reach the initial onset phase.

  13. VAWT (Vertical-Axis Wind Turbines) stochastic loads using a 3-D turbulence simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Homicz, G.F.

    1988-01-01

    The stochastic (i.e., random) aerodynamic loads created by atmospheric turbulence are thought to be a primary cause of premature blade fatigue in Vertical-Axis Wind Turbines (VAWTs). This paper describes a computer program for the prediction of these stochastic loads, based on a full 3-D simulation of the turbulence field. Computed results using this model are compared with the deterministic (periodic) loads which occur in the absence of turbulence, and with the predictions of an earlier model which employed a 1-D simulation of the turbulence. The results show that not only are instantaneous loads significantly influenced by turbulence, but that load distributions averaged over numerous revolutions are affected as well. A particularly interesting finding is that, for the same mean wind speed, the average output power is altered by turbulence. 16 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  14. VAWT (Vertical-Axis Wind Turbines) stochastic loads using a 3-D turbulence simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homicz, Gregory F.

    The stochastic (i.e., random) aerodynamic loads created by atmospheric turbulence are thought to be a primary cause of premature blade fatigue in Vertical-Axis Wind Turbines (VAWTs). This paper describes a computer program for the prediction of these stochastic loads, based on a full 3-D simulation of the turbulence field. Computed results using this model are compared with the deterministic (periodic) loads which occur in the absence of turbulence, and with the predictions of an earlier model which employed a 1-D simulation of the turbulence. The results show that not only are instantaneous loads significantly influenced by turbulence, but that load distributions averaged over numerous revolutions are affected as well. A particularly interesting finding is that, for the same mean wind speed, the average output power is altered by turbulence.

  15. 3D Printed Micro Free-Flow Electrophoresis Device.

    PubMed

    Anciaux, Sarah K; Geiger, Matthew; Bowser, Michael T

    2016-08-01

    The cost, time, and restrictions on creative flexibility associated with current fabrication methods present significant challenges in the development and application of microfluidic devices. Additive manufacturing, also referred to as three-dimensional (3D) printing, provides many advantages over existing methods. With 3D printing, devices can be made in a cost-effective manner with the ability to rapidly prototype new designs. We have fabricated a micro free-flow electrophoresis (μFFE) device using a low-cost, consumer-grade 3D printer. Test prints were performed to determine the minimum feature sizes that could be reproducibly produced using 3D printing fabrication. Microfluidic ridges could be fabricated with dimensions as small as 20 μm high × 640 μm wide. Minimum valley dimensions were 30 μm wide × 130 μm wide. An acetone vapor bath was used to smooth acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene (ABS) surfaces and facilitate bonding of fully enclosed channels. The surfaces of the 3D-printed features were profiled and compared to a similar device fabricated in a glass substrate. Stable stream profiles were obtained in a 3D-printed μFFE device. Separations of fluorescent dyes in the 3D-printed device and its glass counterpart were comparable. A μFFE separation of myoglobin and cytochrome c was also demonstrated on a 3D-printed device. Limits of detection for rhodamine 110 were determined to be 2 and 0.3 nM for the 3D-printed and glass devices, respectively. PMID:27377354

  16. Simulation of a 3D unsteady flow in an axial turbine stage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Straka, Petr

    2012-04-01

    The contribution deals with a numerical simulation of an unsteady flow in an axial turbine stage. The solution is performed using an in-house numerical code developed in the Aeronautical and Test Institute, Plc. in Prague. The numerical code is based on a finite volume discretization of governing equations (Favre averaged Navier-Stokes equations) and a two-equations turbulence model. The temporal integration is based on the implicit second-order backward Euler formula, which is realized through the iteration process in dual time. The proposed numerical method is used for solution of the 3D, unsteady, viscous turbulent flow of a perfect gas in the axial turbine stage. The flow path consists of an input nozzle, stator blade-wheel, rotor blade-wheel, a shroud-seal gap and a diffuser. Attention is paid to the influence of a secondary flow structures, such as generated vortices and flow in shroud-seal gap.

  17. Role of stable eignmodes in 3D ETG-driven turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Juhyung; Terry, Paul W.

    2009-05-01

    The role of stable eigenmodes in Electron-Temperature-Gradient driven (ETG) turbulence is investigated. Low-wavenumber stable eigenmodes are thought to play a role in the dissipation mechanism leading to saturation of CTEM[1] and ITG[2] turbulence. Evidence has been found that the formation of magnetic coherent structures and the transition to a turbulence regime with stronger magnetic fluctuations are dependent of the ETG low k stable modes in 2D fixed-kz fluid simulations[3]. A 3D code has been constructed to investigate the role of stable modes in 3D sheared slab geometry. Magnetic structure formation and electromagnetic ETG turbulence will be discussed in detail. [1] P. W. Terry, D. A. Baver and S. Gupta, Phys. Plasmas 13, 022307 (2006). [2] R. Gatto, P. W. Terry and D. A. Baver, Phys. Plasmas 13 022306 (2006). [3] J.-H. Kim and P. W. Terry (2008), 50th Annual Meeting of the Division of Plasma Physics, APS.

  18. Turbulence in pure superfluid flow

    SciTech Connect

    Ashton, R.A.; Opatowsky, L.B.; Tough, J.T.

    1981-03-09

    A series of experiments is described which provide an unambiguous description of the steady-state properties of turbulence in pure superfluid flow. The turbulence is qualitatively different from that observed in counterflow but comparable to the homogeneous turbulence described by theory.

  19. Vertical Flow Lithography for Fabrication of 3D Anisotropic Particles.

    PubMed

    Habasaki, Shohei; Lee, Won Chul; Yoshida, Shotaro; Takeuchi, Shoji

    2015-12-22

    A microfluidics-based method for the 3D fabrication of anisotropic particles is reported. The method uses a vertical microchannel where tunable light patterns solidify photocurable resins for stacking multiple layers of the resins, thus enabling an application of stereolithography concepts to conventional flow lithography. Multilayered, tapered, and angular compartmental microparticles are demonstrated. PMID:26551590

  20. Joint 3d Estimation of Vehicles and Scene Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menze, M.; Heipke, C.; Geiger, A.

    2015-08-01

    driving. While much progress has been made in recent years, imaging conditions in natural outdoor environments are still very challenging for current reconstruction and recognition methods. In this paper, we propose a novel unified approach which reasons jointly about 3D scene flow as well as the pose, shape and motion of vehicles in the scene. Towards this goal, we incorporate a deformable CAD model into a slanted-plane conditional random field for scene flow estimation and enforce shape consistency between the rendered 3D models and the parameters of all superpixels in the image. The association of superpixels to objects is established by an index variable which implicitly enables model selection. We evaluate our approach on the challenging KITTI scene flow dataset in terms of object and scene flow estimation. Our results provide a prove of concept and demonstrate the usefulness of our method.

  1. Numerical simulation of unsteady flow characteristics for cavitation around a 3-D hydrofoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, S. H.; Xiao, Y. X.; Wang, Z. W.

    2015-01-01

    At present it is possible to predict more accurately by various numerical methods established for cavitation simulation around a hydrofoil. However, for the solution of the complex unsteady cavity flow, it is still marginal. In this paper, numerical method is adopted to simulate cavitation around 3-D NACA0015 hydrofoil with homogeneous two-phase flow calculation using commercial code CFX-solver with two turbulence models, the standard RNG k-epsilon turbulence model and the modified RNG k-epsilon turbulence model respectively. First, pressure coefficient for non-cavitating flow, time averaged values of unsteady cavity flow around a hydrofoil are verified to simulate more closely to an actual cavity flow. And then frequency analysis is performed with Fast Fourier Transform. The results show that the calculation results with modified RNG k-epsilon turbulence model agree with experimental results in terms of mean cavity length and pressure drop, but the unsteady flow characteristics of oscillating cavitation still deviate slightly in terms of unsteady cavity flow.

  2. Grid Convergence for Turbulent Flows(Invited)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diskin, Boris; Thomas, James L.; Rumsey, Christopher L.; Schwoppe, Axel

    2015-01-01

    A detailed grid convergence study has been conducted to establish accurate reference solutions corresponding to the one-equation linear eddy-viscosity Spalart-Allmaras turbulence model for two dimensional turbulent flows around the NACA 0012 airfoil and a flat plate. The study involved three widely used codes, CFL3D (NASA), FUN3D (NASA), and TAU (DLR), and families of uniformly refined structured grids that differ in the grid density patterns. Solutions computed by different codes on different grid families appear to converge to the same continuous limit, but exhibit different convergence characteristics. The grid resolution in the vicinity of geometric singularities, such as a sharp trailing edge, is found to be the major factor affecting accuracy and convergence of discrete solutions, more prominent than differences in discretization schemes and/or grid elements. The results reported for these relatively simple turbulent flows demonstrate that CFL3D, FUN3D, and TAU solutions are very accurate on the finest grids used in the study, but even those grids are not sufficient to conclusively establish an asymptotic convergence order.

  3. Schlieren “PIV” for turbulent flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jonassen, Dennis R.; Settles, Gary S.; Tronosky, Michael D.

    2006-03-01

    The possibility of using commercial PIV equipment combined with schlieren optics to measure the velocity fields of turbulent flows is explored. Given a sufficiently high Reynolds number and adequate refractive flow differences, turbulent eddies can serve as the PIV "particles" in a schlieren image or shadowgram. The PIV software analyzes motion between consecutive schlieren or shadowgraph frames to obtain velocity fields. Velocimetry examples of an axisymmetric sonic helium jet in air and a 2D turbulent boundary layer at Mach 3 are shown. Due to optical path integration, axisymmetric flows require the inverse Abel transform to extract center-plane velocity data. Conditions for optimum schlieren sensitivity are examined. In its present embodiment, "schlieren PIV" is not useful for laminar flows nor for fully 3D flows. Otherwise it functions much like standard PIV under conditions where individual particles are not resolved and velocimetry is instead based on correlation of the motion of turbulent structures. "Schlieren PIV" shows significant promise for general refractive turbulent flow velocimetry if its integrative nature can be overcome through sharp-focusing optics.

  4. An annotation system for 3D fluid flow visualization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loughlin, Maria M.; Hughes, John F.

    1995-01-01

    Annotation is a key activity of data analysis. However, current systems for data analysis focus almost exclusively on visualization. We propose a system which integrates annotations into a visualization system. Annotations are embedded in 3D data space, using the Post-it metaphor. This embedding allows contextual-based information storage and retrieval, and facilitates information sharing in collaborative environments. We provide a traditional database filter and a Magic Lens filter to create specialized views of the data. The system has been customized for fluid flow applications, with features which allow users to store parameters of visualization tools and sketch 3D volumes.

  5. Verification of internal flow analyses in complex 3-D geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, S. K.; Buggeln, R. C.

    1992-11-01

    Analysis of internal flow in advanced rocket propulsion systems is complicated by hardware geometry, high Reynolds numbers, rotation, high frequency phenomena, and near incompressibility. Typical of such a problem is the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) hot gas manifold (HGM). Previous analyses of flow in the SSME HGM have been compared to air flow data and found to be inaccurate with respect to system losses, outer wall static pressures, and transfer duct environments. Such discrepancies could arise from flow measurement methodology, low order algorithms, turbulence modeling, and/or inadequate grid resolution. The objective of this work is to compare internal flow computational analyses to LDV flow measurements for the MSFC HGM pilot model configuration using two grids of different node density in the near wall region. Grids were generated with the EAGLE grid generator and calculations were made with the SRA MINT code. The calculated results were compared with HGM experimental data obtained in the MSFC water flow facility.

  6. Complex flow dynamics around 3D microbot prototypes.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Aranda, Sergio; Galindo-Rosales, Francisco J; Campo-Deaño, Laura

    2016-02-28

    A new experimental setup for the study of the complex flow dynamics around 3D microbot prototypes in a straight microchannel has been developed and assessed. The ultimate aim of this work is focused on the analysis of the morphology of different microbot prototypes to get a better insight into their efficiency when they swim through the main conduits of the human circulatory system. The setup consists of a fused silica straight microchannel with a 3D microbot prototype fastened in the center of the channel cross-section by an extremely thin support. Four different prototypes were considered: a cube, a sphere and two ellipsoids with aspect ratios of 1 : 2 and 1 : 4, respectively. Flow visualization and micro-particle image velocimetry (μPIV) measurements were performed using Newtonian and viscoelastic blood analogue fluids. An efficiency parameter, ℑ, to discriminate the prototypes in terms of flow disturbance has been proposed. PMID:26790959

  7. High fidelity digital inline holographic method for 3D flow measurements.

    PubMed

    Toloui, Mostafa; Hong, Jiarong

    2015-10-19

    Among all the 3D optical flow diagnostic techniques, digital inline holographic particle tracking velocimetry (DIH-PTV) provides the highest spatial resolution with low cost, simple and compact optical setups. Despite these advantages, DIH-PTV suffers from major limitations including poor longitudinal resolution, human intervention (i.e. requirement for manually determined tuning parameters during tracer field reconstruction and extraction), limited tracer concentration, and expensive computations. These limitations prevent this technique from being widely used for high resolution 3D flow measurements. In this study, we present a novel holographic particle extraction method with the goal of overcoming all the major limitations of DIH-PTV. The proposed method consists of multiple steps involving 3D deconvolution, automatic signal-to-noise ratio enhancement and thresholding, and inverse iterative particle extraction. The entire method is implemented using GPU-based algorithm to increase the computational speed significantly. Validated with synthetic particle holograms, the proposed method can achieve particle extraction rate above 95% with fake particles less than 3% and maximum position error below 1.6 particle diameter for holograms with particle concentration above 3000 particles/mm3. The applicability of the proposed method for DIH-PTV has been further validated using the experiment of laminar flow in a microchannel and the synthetic tracer flow fields generated using a DNS turbulent channel flow database. Such improvements will substantially enhance the implementation of DIH-PTV for 3D flow measurements and enable the potential commercialization of this technique. PMID:26480377

  8. The 3D Flow Field Around an Embedded Planet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fung, Jeffrey; Artymowicz, Pawel; Wu, Yanqin

    2015-10-01

    3D modifications to the well-studied 2D flow topology around an embedded planet have the potential to resolve long-standing problems in planet formation theory. We present a detailed analysis of the 3D isothermal flow field around a 5 Earth-mass planet on a fixed circular orbit, simulated using our graphics processing unit hydrodynamics code PEnGUIn. We find that, overall, the horseshoe region has a columnar structure extending vertically much beyond the Hill sphere of the planet. This columnar structure is only broken for some of the widest horseshoe streamlines, along which high altitude fluid descends rapidly into the planet’s Bondi sphere, performs one horseshoe turn, and exits the Bondi sphere radially in the midplane. A portion of this flow exits the horseshoe region altogether, which we refer to as the “transient” horseshoe flow. The flow continues as it rolls up into a pair of up-down symmetric horizontal vortex lines shed into the wake of the planet. This flow, unique to 3D, affects both planet accretion and migration. It prevents the planet from sustaining a hydrostatic atmosphere due to its intrusion into the Bondi sphere, and leads to a significant corotation torque on the planet, unanticipated by 2D analysis. In the reported simulation, starting with a {{Σ }}˜ {r}-3/2 radial surface density profile, this torque is positive and partially cancels with the negative differential Lindblad torque, resulting in a factor of three slower planet migration rate. Finally, we report 3D effects can be suppressed by a sufficiently large disk viscosity, leading to results similar to 2D.

  9. Coherent vortex extraction in 3D homogeneous turbulence: comparison between orthogonal and biorthogonal wavelet decompositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roussel, O.; Schneider, K.; Farge, M.

    A comparison between two different ways of extracting coherent vortices in three-dimensional (3D) homogeneous isotropic turbulence is performed, using either orthogonal or biorthogonal wavelets. The method is based on a wavelet decomposition of the vorticity field and a subsequent thresholding of the wavelet coefficients. The coherent vorticity is reconstructed from a few strong wavelet coefficients, while the incoherent vorticity is reconstructed from the remaining weak coefficients. The choice of the threshold, which has no adjustable parameters, is motivated for the orthogonal case from the denoising theory. Using only 3 % of the coefficients we show that both decompositions, that is orthogonal and biorthogonal, extract the coherent vortices. They contain most of the energy (around 99 % in both cases) and retain 74 % and 68 % of the enstrophy in the orthogonal and biorthogonal cases, respectively. The incoherent background flow for the orthogonal decomposition, which corresponds to 97 % of the wavelet coefficients, is structureless, decorrelated, and has a Gaussian velocity probability distribution function (PDF). In contrast, for the biorthogonal decomposition, the background flow exhibits quasi-two-dimensional (2D) structures and yields an exponential velocity PDF. Moreover, the biorthogonal decomposition loses 3.7% of both enstrophy and helicity, while they are conserved by the orthogonal decomposition.

  10. Measuring Actin Flow in 3D Cell Protrusions

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Chi-Li; Digman, Michelle A.; Gratton, Enrico

    2013-01-01

    Actin dynamics is important in determining cell shape, tension, and migration. Methods such as fluorescent speckle microscopy and spatial temporal image correlation spectroscopy have been used to capture high-resolution actin turnover dynamics within cells in two dimensions. However, these methods are not directly applicable in 3D due to lower resolution and poor contrast. Here, we propose to capture actin flow in 3D with high spatial-temporal resolution by combining nanoscale precise imaging by rapid beam oscillation and fluctuation spectroscopy techniques. To measure the actin flow along cell protrusions in cell expressing actin-eGFP cultured in a type I collagen matrix, the laser was orbited around the protrusion and its trajectory was modulated in a clover-shaped pattern perpendicularly to the protrusion. Orbits were also alternated at two positions closely spaced along the protrusion axis. The pair cross-correlation function was applied to the fluorescence fluctuation from these two positions to capture the flow of actin. Measurements done on nonmoving cellular protrusion tips showed no pair-correlation at two orbital positions indicating a lack of flow of F-actin bundles. However, in some protrusions, the pair-correlation approach revealed directional flow of F-actin bundles near the protrusion surface with flow rates in the range of ∼1 μm/min, comparable to results in two dimensions using fluorescent speckle microscopy. Furthermore, we found that the actin flow rate is related to the distance to the protrusion tip. We also observed collagen deformation by concomitantly detecting collagen fibers with reflectance detection during these actin motions. The implementation of the nanoscale precise imaging by rapid beam oscillation method with a cloverleaf-shaped trajectory in conjunction with the pair cross-correlation function method provides a quantitative way of capturing dynamic flows and organization of proteins during cell migration in 3D in conditions of

  11. A finite element solver for 3-D compressible viscous flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, K. C.; Reddy, J. N.; Nayani, S.

    1990-01-01

    Computation of the flow field inside a space shuttle main engine (SSME) requires the application of state of the art computational fluid dynamic (CFD) technology. Several computer codes are under development to solve 3-D flow through the hot gas manifold. Some algorithms were designed to solve the unsteady compressible Navier-Stokes equations, either by implicit or explicit factorization methods, using several hundred or thousands of time steps to reach a steady state solution. A new iterative algorithm is being developed for the solution of the implicit finite element equations without assembling global matrices. It is an efficient iteration scheme based on a modified nonlinear Gauss-Seidel iteration with symmetric sweeps. The algorithm is analyzed for a model equation and is shown to be unconditionally stable. Results from a series of test problems are presented. The finite element code was tested for couette flow, which is flow under a pressure gradient between two parallel plates in relative motion. Another problem that was solved is viscous laminar flow over a flat plate. The general 3-D finite element code was used to compute the flow in an axisymmetric turnaround duct at low Mach numbers.

  12. Turbulence modeling for separated flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durbin, Paul A.

    1994-01-01

    Two projects are described in this report. The first involves assessing turbulence models in separated flow. The second addresses the anomalous behavior of certain turbulence models in stagnation point flow. The primary motivation for developing turbulent transport models is to provide tools for computing non-equilibrium, or complex, turbulent flows. Simple flows can be analyzed using data correlations or algebraic eddy viscosities, but in more complicated flows such as a massively separated boundary layer, a more elaborate level of modeling is required. It is widely believed that at least a two-equation transport model is required in such cases. The transport equations determine the evolution of suitable velocity and time-scales of the turbulence. The present study included assessment of second-moment closures in several separated flows, including sharp edge separation; smooth wall, pressure driven separation; and unsteady vortex shedding. Flows with mean swirl are of interest for their role in enhancing mixing both by turbulent and mean motion. The swirl can have a stabilizing effect on the turbulence. An axi-symmetric extension to the INS-2D computer program was written adding the capability of computing swirling flow. High swirl can produce vortex breakdown on the centerline of the jet and it occurs in various combustors.

  13. Numerical methods for turbulent flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, James C., Jr.

    1988-09-01

    It has generally become accepted that the Navier-Strokes equations predict the dynamic behavior of turbulent as well as laminar flows of a fluid at a point in space away form a discontinuity such as a shock wave. Turbulence is also closely related to the phenomena of non-uniqueness of solutions of the Navier-Strokes equations. These second order, nonlinear partial differential equations can be solved analytically for only a few simple flows. Turbulent flow fields are much to complex to lend themselves to these few analytical methods. Numerical methods, therefore, offer the only possibility of achieving a solution of turbulent flow equations. In spite of recent advances in computer technology, the direct solution, by discrete methods, of the Navier-Strokes equations for turbulent flow fields is today, and in the foreseeable future, impossible. Thus the only economically feasible way to solve practical turbulent flow problems numerically is to use statistically averaged equations governing mean-flow quantities. The objective is to study some recent developments relating to the use of numerical methods to study turbulent flow.

  14. Organized motion in turbulent flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cantwell, B. J.

    1981-01-01

    A review of organized motion in turbulent flow indicates that the transport properties of most shear flows are dominated by large-scale vortex nonrandom motions. The mean velocity profile of a turbulent boundary layer consists of a viscous sublayer, buffer layer, and a logarithmic outer layer; an empirical formula of Coles (1956) applies to various pressure gradients. The boundary layer coherent structure was isolated by the correlation methods of Townsend (1956) and flow visualization by direct observations of complex unsteady turbulent motions. The near-wall studies of Willmart and Wooldridge (1962) used the space-time correlation for pressure fluctuations at the wall under a thick turbulent boundary layer; finally, organized motion in free shear flows and transition-control of mixing demonstrated that the Reynolds number invariance of turbulence shows wide scatter.

  15. Modeling 3D conjugate heat and mass transfer for turbulent air drying of Chilean papaya in a direct contact dryer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemus-Mondaca, Roberto A.; Vega-Gálvez, Antonio; Zambra, Carlos E.; Moraga, Nelson O.

    2016-03-01

    A 3D model considering heat and mass transfer for food dehydration inside a direct contact dryer is studied. The k- ɛ model is used to describe turbulent air flow. The samples thermophysical properties as density, specific heat, and thermal conductivity are assumed to vary non-linearly with temperature. FVM, SIMPLE algorithm based on a FORTRAN code are used. Results unsteady velocity, temperature, moisture, kinetic energy and dissipation rate for the air flow are presented, whilst temperature and moisture values for the food also are presented. The validation procedure includes a comparison with experimental and numerical temperature and moisture content results obtained from experimental data, reaching a deviation 7-10 %. In addition, this turbulent k- ɛ model provided a better understanding of the transport phenomenon inside the dryer and sample.

  16. 3-D High-Lift Flow-Physics Experiment - Transition Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGinley, Catherine B.; Jenkins, Luther N.; Watson, Ralph D.; Bertelrud, Arild

    2005-01-01

    An analysis of the flow state on a trapezoidal wing model from the NASA 3-D High Lift Flow Physics Experiment is presented. The objective of the experiment was to characterize the flow over a non-proprietary semi-span three-element high-lift configuration to aid in assessing the state of the art in the computation of three-dimensional high-lift flows. Surface pressures and hot-film sensors are used to determine the flow conditions on the slat, main, and flap. The locations of the attachments lines and the values of the attachment line Reynolds number are estimated based on the model surface pressures. Data from the hot-films are used to determine if the flow is laminar, transitional, or turbulent by examining the hot-film time histories, statistics, and frequency spectra.

  17. Challenges in Lagrangian transport and predictability in 3D flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Branicki, M.; Wiggins, S.; Kirwan, A. D.; Malek-Madani, R.

    2011-12-01

    The interplay between the geometrical theory of dynamical systems and the trajectory-based description of aperiodically time-dependent fluid flows has led to significant advances in understanding the role of chaotic transport in geophysical flows at scales dominated by advection. Lagrangian transport analysis utilizing either the time-dependent geometry of intersecting stable and unstable manifolds of the so-called Distinguished Hyperbolic Trajectories (DHT), or ridges of finite-time Lyapunov exponent fields (LCS), provide a much needed and complementary insight into ephemeral mechanisms responsible for the existence of `leaky' transport barriers and 'leaky' mesoscale eddies. However, to date most oceanic applications have been confined to 2D analysis of near surface regions in 'perfect' flows not accounting for model or measurement error, and with the tacit assumption of negligible vertical velocities. I will systematically address issues concerning the regimes of applicability of two-dimensional analysis in 3D aperiodically time-dependent flows, as well as outstanding challenges in fully 3D Lagrangian transport analysis. Even for perfect horizontal velocities, little is known about the vertical extent of stable/unstable manifolds associated with DHTs and/or other special structures relevant to stratified 3D flows. In particular, their sensitivity to errors in the vertical velocities and data assimilation methods has been little studied. Rigorous results regarding the above issues will be illustrated by revealing and mathematically tractable toy models, as well as examples from a detailed study in an eddy-rich region from the Gulf of Mexico and the Mediterranean. New ways of quantifying the uncertainty in Lagrangian predictions will also be presented.

  18. 3D Global Braginskii Simulations of Plasma Dynamics and Turbulence in LAPD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, Dustin; Rogers, Barrett

    2013-10-01

    3D global two-fluid simulations are presented in an ongoing effort to identify and understand the plasma dynamics in the Large Plasma Device (LAPD) at UCLA's Basic Science Facility. Modeling is done using a modified version of the Global Braginskii Solver (GBS) that models the plasma from source to edge region on a field-aligned grid using a finite difference method and 4th order Runge-Kutta time stepping. Progress has been made to account for the thermionic cathode emission of fast electrons at the source, the axial dependence of the plasma source, and biasing the front and side walls. Along with trying to understand the effect sheath's and neutrals have in setting the plasma potential, work is being done to model the biasable limiter recently used by colleagues at UCLA to better understand flow shear and particle transport in the LAPD. Comparisons of the zero bias case are presented along with analysis of the growth and dynamics of turbulent structures (such as drift waves) seen in the simulations. Supported through CICART under the auspices of the DOE's EPSCoR Grant No. DE-FG02-10ER46372.

  19. Calculations of turbulent separated flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, J.; Shih, T. H.

    1993-01-01

    A numerical study of incompressible turbulent separated flows is carried out by using two-equation turbulence models of the K-epsilon type. On the basis of realizability analysis, a new formulation of the eddy-viscosity is proposed which ensures the positiveness of turbulent normal stresses - a realizability condition that most existing two-equation turbulence models are unable to satisfy. The present model is applied to calculate two backward-facing step flows. Calculations with the standard K-epsilon model and a recently developed RNG-based K-epsilon model are also made for comparison. The calculations are performed with a finite-volume method. A second-order accurate differencing scheme and sufficiently fine grids are used to ensure the numerical accuracy of solutions. The calculated results are compared with the experimental data for both mean and turbulent quantities. The comparison shows that the present model performs quite well for separated flows.

  20. Calculations of turbulent separated flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, J.; Shih, T. H.

    1993-08-01

    A numerical study of incompressible turbulent separated flows is carried out by using two-equation turbulence models of the K-epsilon type. On the basis of realizability analysis, a new formulation of the eddy-viscosity is proposed which ensures the positiveness of turbulent normal stresses - a realizability condition that most existing two-equation turbulence models are unable to satisfy. The present model is applied to calculate two backward-facing step flows. Calculations with the standard K-epsilon model and a recently developed RNG-based K-epsilon model are also made for comparison. The calculations are performed with a finite-volume method. A second-order accurate differencing scheme and sufficiently fine grids are used to ensure the numerical accuracy of solutions. The calculated results are compared with the experimental data for both mean and turbulent quantities. The comparison shows that the present model performs quite well for separated flows.

  1. Predictions of bubbly flows in vertical pipes using two-fluid models in CFDS-FLOW3D code

    SciTech Connect

    Banas, A.O.; Carver, M.B.; Unrau, D.

    1995-09-01

    This paper reports the results of a preliminary study exploring the performance of two sets of two-fluid closure relationships applied to the simulation of turbulent air-water bubbly upflows through vertical pipes. Predictions obtained with the default CFDS-FLOW3D model for dispersed flows were compared with the predictions of a new model (based on the work of Lee), and with the experimental data of Liu. The new model, implemented in the CFDS-FLOW3D code, included additional source terms in the {open_quotes}standard{close_quotes} {kappa}-{epsilon} transport equations for the liquid phase, as well as modified model coefficients and wall functions. All simulations were carried out in a 2-D axisymmetric format, collapsing the general multifluid framework of CFDS-FLOW3D to the two-fluid (air-water) case. The newly implemented model consistently improved predictions of radial-velocity profiles of both phases, but failed to accurately reproduce the experimental phase-distribution data. This shortcoming was traced to the neglect of anisotropic effects in the modelling of liquid-phase turbulence. In this sense, the present investigation should be considered as the first step toward the ultimate goal of developing a theoretically sound and universal CFD-type two-fluid model for bubbly flows in channels.

  2. Optic flow aided navigation and 3D scene reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rollason, Malcolm

    2013-10-01

    An important enabler for low cost airborne systems is the ability to exploit low cost inertial instruments. An Inertial Navigation System (INS) can provide a navigation solution, when GPS is denied, by integrating measurements from inertial sensors. However, the gyrometer and accelerometer biases of low cost inertial sensors cause compound errors in the integrated navigation solution. This paper describes experiments to establish whether (and to what extent) the navigation solution can be aided by fusing measurements from an on-board video camera with measurements from the inertial sensors. The primary aim of the work was to establish whether optic flow aided navigation is beneficial even when the 3D structure within the observed scene is unknown. A further aim was to investigate whether an INS can help to infer 3D scene content from video. Experiments with both real and synthetic data have been conducted. Real data was collected using an AR Parrot quadrotor. Empirical results illustrate that optic flow provides a useful aid to navigation even when the 3D structure of the observed scene is not known. With optic flow aiding of the INS, the computed trajectory is consistent with the true camera motion, whereas the unaided INS yields a rapidly increasing position error (the data represents ~40 seconds, after which the unaided INS is ~50 metres in error and has passed through the ground). The results of the Monte Carlo simulation concur with the empirical result. Position errors, which grow as a quadratic function of time when unaided, are substantially checked by the availability of optic flow measurements.

  3. Kinetic turbulence in 3D collisionless magnetic reconnection with a guide magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alejandro Munoz Sepulveda, Patricio; Kilian, Patrick; Jain, Neeraj; Büchner, Jörg

    2016-04-01

    The features of kinetic plasma turbulence developed during non-relativistic 3D collisionless magnetic reconnection are still not fully understood. This is specially true under the influence of a strong magnetic guide field, a scenario common in space plasmas such as in the solar corona and also in laboratory experiments such as MRX or VINETA II. Therefore, we study the mechanisms and micro-instabilities leading to the development of turbulence during 3D magnetic reconnection with a fully kinetic PIC code, emphasizing the role of the guide field with an initial setup suitable for the aforementioned environments. We also clarify the relations between these processes and the generation of non-thermal populations and particle acceleration.

  4. Turbulence computations with 3-D small-scale additive turbulent decomposition and data-fitting using chaotic map combinations

    SciTech Connect

    Mukerji, S.

    1997-12-31

    Although the equations governing turbulent fluid flow, the Navier-Stokes (N.S.) equations, have been known for well over a century and there is a clear technological necessity in obtaining solutions to these equations, turbulence remains one of the principal unsolved problems in physics today. It is still not possible to make accurate quantitative predictions about turbulent flows without relying heavily on empirical data. In principle, it is possible to obtain turbulent solutions from a direct numerical simulation (DNS) of the N.-S. equations. The author first provides a brief introduction to the dynamics of turbulent flows. The N.-S. equations which govern fluid flow, are described thereafter. Then he gives a brief overview of DNS calculations and where they stand at present. He next introduces the two most popular approaches for doing turbulent computations currently in use, namely, the Reynolds averaging of the N.-S. equations (RANS) and large-eddy simulation (LES). Approximations, often ad hoc ones, are present in these methods because use is made of heuristic models for turbulence quantities (the Reynolds stresses) which are otherwise unknown. They then introduce a new computational method called additive turbulent decomposition (ATD), the small-scale version of which is the topic of this research. The rest of the thesis is organized as follows. In Chapter 2 he describes the ATD procedure in greater detail; how dependent variables are split and the decomposition into large- and small-scale sets of equations. In Chapter 3 the spectral projection of the small-scale momentum equations are derived in detail. In Chapter 4 results of the computations with the small-scale ATD equations are presented. In Chapter 5 he describes the data-fitting procedure which can be used to directly specify the parameters of a chaotic-map turbulence model.

  5. Colloidal particle deposition in turbulent flow

    SciTech Connect

    Morton, D.S.

    1994-05-01

    A theoretical analysis is presented which describes the initial deposition of monodispersed spherical colloidal particles from a steady fully developed turbulent flow onto conduit walls. When the net particle-conduit electrical interaction potential is attractive, particle deposition is shown to be often governed by turbulent hydrodynamics. When the net particle-conduit electrical interaction potential possess a repulsive maximum, particle deposition to first order is uniform and depends solely on electrical interaction effects. The developed theoretical model specialized to orifice deposition with the use of Harwell Flow3D turbulence modelling software qualitatively described the deposition of 0.5 {mu}m silica particles onto glass orifices from an aqueous suspension. The effect of the electrical double layer on the rate of colloidal particle deposition in laminar flow has been described by Spielman and Friedlander (1), Dahneke (2), Bowen et al. (3) and Bowen and Epstein (4). This article describes the extension of their work to colloidal particle deposition under steady fully developed turbulent flow conditions. This article also reports the results of orifice particle deposition experiments which were conducted to qualitatively investigate the developed theoretical model.

  6. Colloidal particle deposition in turbulent flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morton, D. S.

    1994-05-01

    A theoretical analysis is presented which describes the initial deposition of monodispersed spherical colloidal particles from a steady fully developed turbulent flow onto conduit walls. When the net particle-conduit electrical interaction potential is attractive, particle deposition is shown to be often governed by turbulent hydrodynamics. When the net particle-conduit electrical interaction potential possess a repulsive maximum, particle deposition to first order is uniform and depends solely on electrical interaction effects. The developed theoretical model specialized to orifice deposition with the use of Harwell Flow 3D turbulence modelling software qualitatively described the deposition of 0.5 (mu)m silica particles onto glass orifices from an aqueous suspension. The effect of the electrical double layer on the rate of colloidal particle deposition in laminar flow has been described by Spielman and Friedlander, Dahneke, Bowen et al. and Bowen and Epstein. This article describes the extension of their work to colloidal particle deposition under steady fully developed turbulent flow conditions. This article also reports the results of orifice particle deposition experiments which were conducted to qualitatively investigate the developed theoretical model.

  7. Patterns of 3D flow in a rotating cylinder array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craig, Anna; Dabiri, John; Koseff, Jeffrey

    2015-11-01

    Experimental data are presented for large arrays of rotating, finite-height cylinders, which show that the three-dimensional flows are strongly dependent on the geometric and rotational configurations of the array. Two geometric configurations of the cylinders, each with two rotational configurations, were examined for a total of four arrays. 2D PIV was conducted in multiple intersecting horizontal and vertical sheets at a location far downstream of the leading edge of the array in order to build up a picture of the 3D developed flow patterns. It was found that the rotation of the cylinders drives the formation of streamwise and transverse flow patterns between cylinders. These horizontal flow patterns, by conservation of mass, drive vertical flows through the top of the array. As the array of rotating cylinders may provide insight into the flow kinematics of an array of vertical axis wind turbines, this planform flux is of particular interest as it would bring down into the array high kinetic energy fluid from above the array, thus increasing the energy resource available to turbines far downstream of the leading edge of the array.

  8. Modeling of Turbulent Swirling Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, Tsan-Hsing; Zhu, Jiang; Liou, William; Chen, Kuo-Huey; Liu, Nan-Suey; Lumley, John L.

    1997-01-01

    Aircraft engine combustors generally involve turbulent swirling flows in order to enhance fuel-air mixing and flame stabilization. It has long been recognized that eddy viscosity turbulence models are unable to appropriately model swirling flows. Therefore, it has been suggested that, for the modeling of these flows, a second order closure scheme should be considered because of its ability in the modeling of rotational and curvature effects. However, this scheme will require solution of many complicated second moment transport equations (six Reynolds stresses plus other scalar fluxes and variances), which is a difficult task for any CFD implementations. Also, this scheme will require a large amount of computer resources for a general combustor swirling flow. This report is devoted to the development of a cubic Reynolds stress-strain model for turbulent swirling flows, and was inspired by the work of Launder's group at UMIST. Using this type of model, one only needs to solve two turbulence equations, one for the turbulent kinetic energy k and the other for the dissipation rate epsilon. The cubic model developed in this report is based on a general Reynolds stress-strain relationship. Two flows have been chosen for model evaluation. One is a fully developed rotating pipe flow, and the other is a more complex flow with swirl and recirculation.

  9. New 3-D flow interpolation method on moving ADCP data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsubaki, R.; Kawahara, Y.; Muto, Y.; Fujita, I.

    2012-05-01

    A simple but accurate interpolation procedure for obtaining the three-dimensional distribution of three-component velocity data, from moving acoustic doppler current profiler (ADCP) observation data, is proposed. For understanding actual flow structure within a river with complex bathymetry, the three-dimensional mean velocity field provides a basic picture of the flow. For obtaining the three-dimensional distribution of three-component velocity data, in this work, anisotropic gridding was introduced in order to remove the random component of measured velocity data caused by the turbulence of the flow and measurement error. A continuity correction based on the pressure equation was used to reduce both random and systematic errors. The accuracy of the developed method was evaluated using three-dimensional flow simulation data from a detached-eddy simulation (DES). By using the procedure developed, the complex flow structure surrounding the spur dikes section in the Uji River was successfully visualized and explored. The proposed method shows superiorities in both accuracy and consistency for the interpolated velocity field, as compared to the kriging and inverse-distance weighted (IDW) methods.

  10. Numerical Calculations of 3-D High-Lift Flows and Comparison with Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Compton, William B, III

    2015-01-01

    Solutions were obtained with the Navier-Stokes CFD code TLNS3D to predict the flow about the NASA Trapezoidal Wing, a high-lift wing composed of three elements: the main-wing element, a deployed leading-edge slat, and a deployed trailing-edge flap. Turbulence was modeled by the Spalart-Allmaras one-equation turbulence model. One case with massive separation was repeated using Menter's two-equation SST (Menter's Shear Stress Transport) k-omega turbulence model in an attempt to improve the agreement with experiment. The investigation was conducted at a free stream Mach number of 0.2, and at angles of attack ranging from 10.004 degrees to 34.858 degrees. The Reynolds number based on the mean aerodynamic chord of the wing was 4.3 x 10 (sup 6). Compared to experiment, the numerical procedure predicted the surface pressures very well at angles of attack in the linear range of the lift. However, computed maximum lift was 5% low. Drag was mainly under predicted. The procedure correctly predicted several well-known trends and features of high-lift flows, such as off-body separation. The two turbulence models yielded significantly different solutions for the repeated case.

  11. PDF approach for compressible turbulent reacting flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, A. T.; Tsai, Y.-L. P.; Raju, M. S.

    1993-01-01

    The objective of the present work is to develop a probability density function (pdf) turbulence model for compressible reacting flows for use with a CFD flow solver. The probability density function of the species mass fraction and enthalpy are obtained by solving a pdf evolution equation using a Monte Carlo scheme. The pdf solution procedure is coupled with a compressible CFD flow solver which provides the velocity and pressure fields. A modeled pdf equation for compressible flows, capable of capturing shock waves and suitable to the present coupling scheme, is proposed and tested. Convergence of the combined finite-volume Monte Carlo solution procedure is discussed, and an averaging procedure is developed to provide smooth Monte-Carlo solutions to ensure convergence. Two supersonic diffusion flames are studied using the proposed pdf model and the results are compared with experimental data; marked improvements over CFD solutions without pdf are observed. Preliminary applications of pdf to 3D flows are also reported.

  12. Development and application of a zonal k-epsilon turbulence model for complex 3-D flowfields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ladd, J. A.; Kral, L. D.

    1992-07-01

    A compressible, low Reynolds number two-equation turbulence model is applied to complex engineering problems. An upwind, implicit, factored algorithm with an optional TVD operator is used to solve both the mean-flow equations and the k-epsilon equations for three-dimensional turbulenct flow. A zonal approach is used for solution of both the mean flow variables and the turbulence variables. The zonal method allows complex geometries to be broken down into smaller blocks which are then computed sequentially. Several low Reynolds number k-epsilon models are implemented and validated for a subsonic and supersonic flat plate boundary layer. Calculations using the k-epsilon turbulence model are also presented for an axisymmetric jet plume, a supersonic combusting shear layer, a multislot ejector nozzle, and an F/A-18 forebody at high angle of attack. Comparison of the two-equation turbulence model results is made with results using algebraic turbulence models as well as experimental measurements. The two-equation turbulence model predicts better many of the flowfield characteristics for these complex geometries when compared with the algebraic solutions.

  13. Reference Solutions for Benchmark Turbulent Flows in Three Dimensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diskin, Boris; Thomas, James L.; Pandya, Mohagna J.; Rumsey, Christopher L.

    2016-01-01

    A grid convergence study is performed to establish benchmark solutions for turbulent flows in three dimensions (3D) in support of turbulence-model verification campaign at the Turbulence Modeling Resource (TMR) website. The three benchmark cases are subsonic flows around a 3D bump and a hemisphere-cylinder configuration and a supersonic internal flow through a square duct. Reference solutions are computed for Reynolds Averaged Navier Stokes equations with the Spalart-Allmaras turbulence model using a linear eddy-viscosity model for the external flows and a nonlinear eddy-viscosity model based on a quadratic constitutive relation for the internal flow. The study involves three widely-used practical computational fluid dynamics codes developed and supported at NASA Langley Research Center: FUN3D, USM3D, and CFL3D. Reference steady-state solutions computed with these three codes on families of consistently refined grids are presented. Grid-to-grid and code-to-code variations are described in detail.

  14. MPSalsa 3D Simulations of Chemically Reacting Flows

    DOE Data Explorer

    Many important scientific and engineering applications require a detailed analysis of complex systems with coupled fluid flow, thermal energy transfer, mass transfer and nonequilibrium chemical reactions. Currently, computer simulations of these complex reacting flow problems are limited to idealized systems in one or two spatial dimensions when coupled with a detailed, fundamental chemistry model. The goal of our research is to develop, analyze and implement advanced MP numerical algorithms that will allow high resolution 3D simulations with an equal emphasis on fluid flow and chemical kinetics modeling. In our research, we focus on the development of new, fully coupled, implicit solution strategies that are based on robust MP iterative solution methods (copied from http://www.cs.sandia.gov/CRF/MPSalsa/). These simulations are needed for scientific and technical areas such as: combustion research for transportation, atmospheric chemistry modeling for pollution studies, chemically reacting flow models for analysis and control of manufacturing processes, surface catalytic reactors for methane to methanol conversion and chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process modeling for production of advanced semiconductor materials (http://www.cs.sandia.gov/CRF/MPSalsa/).

    This project website provides six QuickTime videos of these simulations, along with a small image gallery and slideshow animations. A list of related publications and conference presentations is also made available.

  15. Modeling Electric Current Flow in 3D Fractured Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demirel, S.; Roubinet, D.; Irving, J.

    2014-12-01

    The study of fractured rocks is extremely important in a variety of research fields and applications such as hydrogeology, hydrocarbon extraction and long-term storage of toxic waste. As fractures are highly conductive structures in comparison to the surrounding rock, their presence can be either an advantage or a drawback. For hydrocarbon extraction, fractures allow for quick and easy access to the resource whereas for toxic waste storage their presence increases the risk of leakage and migration of pollutants. In both cases, the identification of fracture network characteristics is an essential step. Recently, we have developed an approach for modeling electric current flow in 2D fractured media. This approach is based on a discrete-dual-porosity model where fractures are represented explicitly, the matrix is coarsely discretized into blocks, and current flow exchange between the fractures and matrix is analytically evaluated at the fracture-scale and integrated at the block-scale [1]. Although this approach has shown much promise and has proven its efficiency for 2D simulations, its extension to 3D remains to be addressed. To this end, we assume that fractures can be represented as two-dimensional finite planes embedded in the surrounding matrix, and we express analytically the distribution of electric potential at the fracture scale. This fracture-scale expression takes into account the electric-current-flow exchange with the surrounding matrix and flow conservation is enforced at the fracture intersections. The fracture-matrix exchange is then integrated at the matrix-block scale where the electric current flow conservation at the block boundaries is formulated with a modified finite volume method. With the objective of providing a low-computational-cost modeling approach adapted to 3D simulations in fractured media, our model is (i) validated and compared to existing modeling approaches and, (ii) used to evaluate the impact of the presence of fractures on

  16. DNSLab: A gateway to turbulent flow simulation in Matlab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vuorinen, V.; Keskinen, K.

    2016-06-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) research is increasingly much focused towards computationally intensive, eddy resolving simulation techniques of turbulent flows such as large-eddy simulation (LES) and direct numerical simulation (DNS). Here, we present a compact educational software package called DNSLab, tailored for learning partial differential equations of turbulence from the perspective of DNS in Matlab environment. Based on educational experiences and course feedback from tens of engineering post-graduate students and industrial engineers, DNSLab can offer a major gateway to turbulence simulation with minimal prerequisites. Matlab implementation of two common fractional step projection methods is considered: the 2d Fourier pseudo-spectral method, and the 3d finite difference method with 2nd order spatial accuracy. Both methods are based on vectorization in Matlab and the slow for-loops are thus avoided. DNSLab is tested on two basic problems which we have noted to be of high educational value: 2d periodic array of decaying vortices, and 3d turbulent channel flow at Reτ = 180. To the best of our knowledge, the present study is possibly the first to investigate efficiency of a 3d turbulent, wall bounded flow in Matlab. The accuracy and efficiency of DNSLab is compared with a customized OpenFOAM solver called rk4projectionFoam. Based on our experiences and course feedback, the main contribution of DNSLab consists of the following features. (i) The very compact Matlab implementation of present Navier-Stokes solvers provides a gateway to efficient learning of both, physics of turbulent flows, and simulation of turbulence. (ii) Only relatively minor prerequisites on fluid dynamics and numerical methods are required for using DNSLab. (iii) In 2d, interactive results for turbulent flow cases can be obtained. Even for a 3d channel flow, the solver is fast enough for nearly interactive educational use. (iv) DNSLab is made openly available and thus contributing to

  17. Turbulence modeling for compressible flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marvin, J. G.

    1977-01-01

    Material prepared for a course on Applications and Fundamentals of Turbulence given at the University of Tennessee Space Institute, January 10 and 11, 1977, is presented. A complete concept of turbulence modeling is described, and examples of progess for its use in computational aerodynimics are given. Modeling concepts, experiments, and computations using the concepts are reviewed in a manner that provides an up-to-date statement on the status of this problem for compressible flows.

  18. Energy flow in passive and active 3D cochlear model

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yanli; Steele, Charles; Puria, Sunil

    2015-12-31

    Energy flow in the cochlea is an important characteristic of the cochlear traveling wave, and many investigators, such as von Békésy and Lighthill, have discussed this phenomenon. Particularly after the discovery of the motility of the outer hair cells (OHCs), the nature of the power gain of the cochlea has been a fundamental research question. In the present work, direct three-dimensional (3D) calculations of the power on cross sections of the cochlea and on the basilar membrane are performed based on a box model of the mouse cochlea. The distributions of the fluid pressure and fluid velocity in the scala vestibuli are presented. The power output from the OHCs and the power loss due to fluid viscous damping are calculated along the length of the cochlea. This work provides a basis for theoretical calculations of the power gain of the OHCs from mechanical considerations.

  19. Energy flow in passive and active 3D cochlear model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yanli; Puria, Sunil; Steele, Charles

    2015-12-01

    Energy flow in the cochlea is an important characteristic of the cochlear traveling wave, and many investigators, such as von Békésy and Lighthill, have discussed this phenomenon. Particularly after the discovery of the motility of the outer hair cells (OHCs), the nature of the power gain of the cochlea has been a fundamental research question. In the present work, direct three-dimensional (3D) calculations of the power on cross sections of the cochlea and on the basilar membrane are performed based on a box model of the mouse cochlea. The distributions of the fluid pressure and fluid velocity in the scala vestibuli are presented. The power output from the OHCs and the power loss due to fluid viscous damping are calculated along the length of the cochlea. This work provides a basis for theoretical calculations of the power gain of the OHCs from mechanical considerations.

  20. On the turbulent flow in piston engines: Coupling of statistical theory quantities and instantaneous turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zentgraf, Florian; Baum, Elias; Böhm, Benjamin; Dreizler, Andreas; Peterson, Brian

    2016-04-01

    Planar particle image velocimetry (PIV) and tomographic PIV (TPIV) measurements are utilized to analyze turbulent statistical theory quantities and the instantaneous turbulence within a single-cylinder optical engine. Measurements are performed during the intake and mid-compression stroke at 800 and 1500 RPM. TPIV facilitates the evaluation of spatially resolved Reynolds stress tensor (RST) distributions, anisotropic Reynolds stress invariants, and instantaneous turbulent vortical structures. The RST analysis describes distributions of individual velocity fluctuation components that arise from unsteady turbulent flow behavior as well as cycle-to-cycle variability (CCV). A conditional analysis, for which instantaneous PIV images are sampled by their tumble center location, reveals that CCV and turbulence have similar contributions to RST distributions at the mean tumble center, but turbulence is dominant in regions peripheral to the tumble center. Analysis of the anisotropic Reynolds stress invariants reveals the spatial distribution of axisymmetric expansion, axisymmetric contraction, and 3D isotropy within the cylinder. Findings indicate that the mid-compression flow exhibits a higher tendency toward 3D isotropy than the intake flow. A novel post-processing algorithm is utilized to classify the geometry of instantaneous turbulent vortical structures and evaluate their frequency of occurrence within the cylinder. Findings are coupled with statistical theory quantities to provide a comprehensive understanding of the distribution of turbulent velocity components, the distribution of anisotropic states of turbulence, and compare the turbulent vortical flow distribution that is theoretically expected to what is experimentally observed. The analyses reveal requisites of important turbulent flow quantities and discern their sensitivity to the local flow topography and engine operation.

  1. Advances in turbulence studies. [Magnetohydrodynamic flows

    SciTech Connect

    Branover, H.; Unger, Y.

    1993-01-01

    Important contemporary trends in both experimental and theoretical turbulence research are reported. Particular attention is given to vortex reconnection, cascade, and mixing in turbulent flows; intermittent turbulence from closures; tearing instabilities in 2D MHD turbulence; axisymmetric hydromagnetic dynamo; bifurcations in MHD flow generated by electric current discharge; renormalization group analysis of MHD turbulence with low magnetic Reynolds number; Solution for turbulent primary azimuthal velocity in liquid-metal flows in sliding electric contacts; analogies between geophysical and hydromagnetic flows; turbulent electrically-induced vortical flows; dissipation length scale dynamics; two-phase grid turbulence; abridged octave wavenumber ring models for 2D turbulence; rag theory of magnetic fluctuations in turbulent flow; and instabilities of the nonuniform flows of a low-temperature plasma in MHD channels.

  2. The 3-D CFD modeling of gas turbine combustor-integral bleed flow interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, D. Y.; Reynolds, R. S.

    1993-01-01

    An advanced 3-D Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model was developed to analyze the flow interaction between a gas turbine combustor and an integral bleed plenum. In this model, the elliptic governing equations of continuity, momentum and the k-e turbulence model were solved on a boundary-fitted, curvilinear, orthogonal grid system. The model was first validated against test data from public literature and then applied to a gas turbine combustor with integral bleed. The model predictions agreed well with data from combustor rig testing. The model predictions also indicated strong flow interaction between the combustor and the integral bleed. Integral bleed flow distribution was found to have a great effect on the pressure distribution around the gas turbine combustor.

  3. Spatial Convergence of Three Dimensional Turbulent Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Michael A.; Anderson, W. Kyle

    2016-01-01

    Finite-volume and finite-element schemes, both implemented within the FUN3D flow solver, are evaluated for several test cases described on the Turbulence-Modeling Resource (TMR) web site. The cases include subsonic flow over a hemisphere cylinder, subsonic flow over a swept bump configuration, and supersonic flow in a square duct. The finite- volume and finite-element schemes are both used to obtain solutions for the first two cases, whereas only the finite-volume scheme is used for the supersonic duct. For the hemisphere cylinder, finite-element solutions obtained on tetrahedral meshes are compared with finite- volume solutions on mixed-element meshes. For the swept bump, finite-volume solutions have been obtained for both hexahedral and tetrahedral meshes and are compared with finite-element solutions obtained on tetrahedral meshes. For the hemisphere cylinder and the swept bump, solutions are obtained on a series of meshes with varying grid density and comparisons are made between drag coefficients, pressure distributions, velocity profiles, and profiles of the turbulence working variable. The square duct shows small variation due to element type or the spatial accuracy of turbulence model convection. It is demonstrated that the finite-element scheme on tetrahedral meshes yields similar accuracy as the finite- volume scheme on mixed-element and hexahedral grids, and demonstrates less sensitivity to the mesh topology (biased tetrahedral grids) than the finite-volume scheme.

  4. A diagonally inverted LU implicit multigrid scheme for the 3-D Navier-Stokes equations and a two equation model of turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yokota, Jeffrey W.

    1988-01-01

    An LU implicit multigrid algorithm is developed to calculate 3-D compressible viscous flows. This scheme solves the full 3-D Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes equation with a two-equation kappa-epsilon model of turbulence. The flow equations are integrated by an efficient, diagonally inverted, LU implicit multigrid scheme while the kappa-epsilon equations are solved, uncoupled from the flow equations, by a block LU implicit algorithm. The flow equations are solved within the framework of the multigrid method using a four-grid level W-cycle, while the kappa-epsilon equations are iterated only on the finest grid. This treatment of the Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes equations proves to be an efficient method for calculating 3-D compressible viscous flows.

  5. Field structure of collapsing wave packets in 3D strong Langmuir turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, D. L.; Robinson, P. A.; Goldman, M. V.

    1989-01-01

    A simple model is constructed for the electric fields in the collapsing wave packets found in 3D simulations of driven and damped isotropic strong Langmuir turbulence. This model, based on a spherical-harmonic decomposition of the electrostatic potential, accounts for the distribution of wave-packet shapes observed in the simulations, particularly the predominance of oblate wave packets. In contrast with predictions for undamped and undriven subsonic collapse of scalar fields, oblate vector-field wave packets do not flatten during collapse but, instead, remain approximately self-similar and rigid.

  6. 3D MHD simulations of planet migration in turbulent stratified disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uribe, Ana; Klahr, Hubert; Flock, Mario; Henning, Thomas

    2011-11-01

    We performed 3D MHD numerical simulations of planet migration in stratified disks using the Godunov code PLUTO (Mignone et al. 2007). The disk is invaded by turbulence generated by the magnetorotational instability (MRI). We study the migration for planets with different mass to primary mass ratio. The migration of the low-mass planet (q=Mp/Ms=10-5) is dominated by random fluctuations in the torque and there is no defined direction of migration on timescales of 100 orbits. The intermediate-mass planet (q=Mp/Ms=10-4) can experience systematic outwards migration that was sustained for the times we were able to simulate.

  7. Terascale direct numerical simulations of turbulent combustion using S3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, J. H.; Choudhary, A.; de Supinski, B.; DeVries, M.; Hawkes, E. R.; Klasky, S.; Liao, W. K.; Ma, K. L.; Mellor-Crummey, J.; Podhorszki, N.; Sankaran, R.; Shende, S.; Yoo, C. S.

    2009-01-01

    Computational science is paramount to the understanding of underlying processes in internal combustion engines of the future that will utilize non-petroleum-based alternative fuels, including carbon-neutral biofuels, and burn in new combustion regimes that will attain high efficiency while minimizing emissions of particulates and nitrogen oxides. Next-generation engines will likely operate at higher pressures, with greater amounts of dilution and utilize alternative fuels that exhibit a wide range of chemical and physical properties. Therefore, there is a significant role for high-fidelity simulations, direct numerical simulations (DNS), specifically designed to capture key turbulence-chemistry interactions in these relatively uncharted combustion regimes, and in particular, that can discriminate the effects of differences in fuel properties. In DNS, all of the relevant turbulence and flame scales are resolved numerically using high-order accurate numerical algorithms. As a consequence terascale DNS are computationally intensive, require massive amounts of computing power and generate tens of terabytes of data. Recent results from terascale DNS of turbulent flames are presented here, illustrating its role in elucidating flame stabilization mechanisms in a lifted turbulent hydrogen/air jet flame in a hot air coflow, and the flame structure of a fuel-lean turbulent premixed jet flame. Computing at this scale requires close collaborations between computer and combustion scientists to provide optimized scaleable algorithms and software for terascale simulations, efficient collective parallel I/O, tools for volume visualization of multiscale, multivariate data and automating the combustion workflow. The enabling computer science, applied to combustion science, is also required in many other terascale physics and engineering simulations. In particular, performance monitoring is used to identify the performance of key kernels in the DNS code, S3D and especially memory

  8. Simulations of soluble surfactants in 3D multiphase flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muradoglu, Metin; Tryggvason, Gretar

    2014-10-01

    A finite-difference/front-tracking method is developed for simulations of soluble surfactants in 3D multiphase flows. The interfacial and bulk surfactant concentration evolution equations are solved fully coupled with the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. A non-linear equation of state is used to relate interfacial surface tension to surfactant concentration at the interface. Simple test cases are designed to validate different parts of the numerical algorithm and the computational results are found to be in a good agreement with the analytical solutions. The numerical algorithm is parallelized using a domain-decomposition method. It is then applied to study the effects of soluble surfactants on the motion of buoyancy-driven bubbles in a straight square channel in nearly undeformable (spherical) and deformable (ellipsoidal) regimes. Finally the method is used to examine the effects of soluble surfactants on the lateral migration of bubbles in a pressure-driven channel flow. It is found that surfactant-induced Marangoni stresses counteract the shear-induced lift force and can reverse the lateral bubble migration completely, i.e., the contaminated bubble drifts away from the channel wall and stabilizes at the center of the channel when the surfactant-induced Marangoni stresses are sufficiently large.

  9. ICEd-ALE Treatment of 3-D Fluid Flow.

    1999-09-13

    Version: 00 SALE3D calculates three-dimensional fluid flow at all speeds, from the incompressible limit to highly supersonic. An implicit treatment of the pressure calculation similar to that in the Implicit Continuous-fluid Eulerian (ICE) technique provides this flow speed flexibility. In addition, the computing mesh may move with the fluid in a typical Lagrangian fashion, be held in an Eulerian manner, or move in some arbitrarily specified way to provide a continuous rezoning capability. This latitudemore » results from use of an Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) treatment of the mesh. The partial differential equations solved are the Navier-Stokes equations and the mass and internal energy equations. The fluid pressure is determined from an equation of state and supplemented with an artificial viscous pressure for the computation of shock waves. The computing mesh consists of a three-dimensional network of arbitrarily shaped, six-sided deformable cells, and a variety of user-selectable boundary conditions are provided in the program.« less

  10. CVS Filtering of 3D Turbulent Mixing Layers Using Orthogonal Wavelets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Kai; Farge, Marie; Pellegrino, Giulio; Rogers, Michael

    2000-01-01

    Coherent Vortex Simulation (CVS) filtering has been applied to Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) data of forced and unforced time-developing turbulent mixing layers. CVS filtering splits the turbulent flow into two orthogonal parts, one corresponding to coherent vortices and the other to incoherent background flow. We have shown that the coherent vortices can be represented by few wavelet modes and that these modes are sufficient to reproduce the vorticity probability distribution function (PDF) and the energy spectrum over the entire inertial range. The remaining incoherent background flow is homogeneous, has small amplitude, and is uncorrelated. These results are compared with those obtained for the same compression rate using large eddy simulation (LES) filtering. In contrast to the incoherent background flow of CVS filtering, the LES subgrid scales have a much larger amplitude and are correlated, which makes their statistical modeling more difficult.

  11. Semiempirical methods for computing turbulent flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belov, I. A.; Ginzburg, I. P.

    1986-01-01

    Two semiempirical theories which provide a basis for determining the turbulent friction and heat exchange near a wall are presented: (1) the Prandtl-Karman theory, and (2) the theory utilizing an equation for the energy of turbulent pulsations. A comparison is made between exact numerical methods and approximate integral methods for computing the turbulent boundary layers in the presence of pressure, blowing, or suction gradients. Using the turbulent flow around a plate as an example, it is shown that, when computing turbulent flows with external turbulence, it is preferable to construct a turbulence model based on the equation for energy of turbulent pulsations.

  12. 2-D/3-D ECE imaging data for validation of turbulence simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Minjun; Lee, Jaehyun; Yun, Gunsu; Lee, Woochang; Park, Hyeon K.; Park, Young-Seok; Sabbagh, Steve A.; Wang, Weixing; Luhmann, Neville C., Jr.

    2015-11-01

    The 2-D/3-D KSTAR ECEI diagnostic can provide a local 2-D/3-D measurement of ECE intensity. Application of spectral analysis techniques to the ECEI data allows local estimation of frequency spectra S (f) , wavenumber spectra S (k) , wavernumber and frequency spectra S (k , f) , and bispectra b (f1 ,f2) of ECE intensity over the 2-D/3-D space, which can be used to validate turbulence simulations. However, the minimum detectable fluctuation amplitude and the maximum detectable wavenumber are limited by the temporal and spatial resolutions of the diagnostic system, respectively. Also, the finite measurement area of the diagnostic channel could introduce uncertainty in the spectra estimation. The limitations and accuracy of the ECEI estimated spectra have been tested by a synthetic ECEI diagnostic with the model and/or fluctuations calculated by GTS. Supported by the NRF of Korea under Contract No. NRF-2014M1A7A1A03029881 and NRF-2014M1A7A1A03029865 and by U.S. DOE grant DE-FG02-99ER54524.

  13. Flexible fibers in turbulent flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verhille, Gautier; Brouzet, Christophe; Le Gal, Patrice; Irphe Team

    2014-11-01

    We describe, for the first time, an experiment devoted to the study of the spatial conformation of a flexible fiber in a turbulent flow. We propose a model for the transition from rigid to flexible regimes as the intensity of turbulence is increased or the elastic energy of the fiber is decreased. This transition occurs for a fiber typical length which is observed experimentally and recovered by our analysis. We also demonstrate that the conformations of flexible fibers in a turbulent flow are analog to conformations of flexible polymers in a good solvent. This last result opens some new and creative ways to model flexible fiber distortions in turbulent flows while addressing fundamental problems in polymer dynamics. This work has been carried out in the framework of the Labex MEC Project (No. ANR-10-LABX-0092) and of the A*MIDEX Project (No. ANR-11-IDEX-0001-02), funded by the `Investissements d'Avenir' French Government program managed by the French National Research.

  14. Turbulent Flow Between Rotating Cylinders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih-I, Pai

    1943-01-01

    The turbulent air flow between rotating cylinders was investigated. The distributions of mean speed and of turbulence were measured in the gap between a rotating inner and a stationary outer cylinder. The measurements led to the conclusion that the turbulent flow in the gap cannot be considered two dimensional, but that a particular type of secondary motion takes place. It is shown that the experimentally found velocity distribution can be fully understood under the assumption that this secondary motion consists of three-dimensional ring-shape vortices. The vortices occur only in pairs, and their number and size depend on the speed of the rotating cylinder; the number was found to decrease with increasing speed. The secondary motion has an essential part in the transmission of the moment of momentum. In regions where the secondary motion is negligible, the momentum transfer follows the laws known for homologous turbulence. Ring-shape vortices are known to occur in the laminar flow between rotating cylinders, but it was hitherto unknown that they exist even at speeds that are several hundred times the critical limit.

  15. Suppression of turbulent resistivity in turbulent Couette flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Si, Jiahe; Colgate, Stirling A.; Sonnenfeld, Richard G.; Nornberg, Mark D.; Li, Hui; Colgate, Arthur S.; Westpfahl, David J.; Romero, Van D.; Martinic, Joe

    2015-07-01

    Turbulent transport in rapidly rotating shear flow very efficiently transports angular momentum, a critical feature of instabilities responsible both for the dynamics of accretion disks and the turbulent power dissipation in a centrifuge. Turbulent mixing can efficiently transport other quantities like heat and even magnetic flux by enhanced diffusion. This enhancement is particularly evident in homogeneous, isotropic turbulent flows of liquid metals. In the New Mexico dynamo experiment, the effective resistivity is measured using both differential rotation and pulsed magnetic field decay to demonstrate that at very high Reynolds number rotating shear flow can be described entirely by mean flow induction with very little contribution from correlated velocity fluctuations.

  16. Suppression of turbulent resistivity in turbulent Couette flow

    SciTech Connect

    Si, Jiahe Sonnenfeld, Richard G.; Colgate, Arthur S.; Westpfahl, David J.; Romero, Van D.; Martinic, Joe; Colgate, Stirling A.; Li, Hui; Nornberg, Mark D.

    2015-07-15

    Turbulent transport in rapidly rotating shear flow very efficiently transports angular momentum, a critical feature of instabilities responsible both for the dynamics of accretion disks and the turbulent power dissipation in a centrifuge. Turbulent mixing can efficiently transport other quantities like heat and even magnetic flux by enhanced diffusion. This enhancement is particularly evident in homogeneous, isotropic turbulent flows of liquid metals. In the New Mexico dynamo experiment, the effective resistivity is measured using both differential rotation and pulsed magnetic field decay to demonstrate that at very high Reynolds number rotating shear flow can be described entirely by mean flow induction with very little contribution from correlated velocity fluctuations.

  17. Resonances in the forced turbulent wake past a 3D blunt body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barros, Diogo; Borée, Jacques; Noack, Bernd R.; Spohn, Andreas

    2016-06-01

    We study the resonances of a forced turbulent wake past a flat-based bluff body using symmetric and antisymmetric actuation modes. The natural, unforced wake flow exhibits broadband dynamics superimposed on oscillatory motions linked to the reminiscent laminar Bénard-von Kármán instability in the turbulent flow. Harmonic and subharmonic resonances can be controlled by the phase relationship of periodic forcing and are linked to the symmetry properties of vortex shedding. Symmetric forcing leads to a strong subharmonic amplification of vortex shedding in the wake, but no harmonic excitation. The robustness of the subharmonic resonance is confirmed at different Reynolds numbers. Antisymmetric actuation, however, promotes a harmonic resonance with very similar wake and drag features.

  18. On the prediction of turbulent secondary flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Speziale, C. G.; So, R. M. C.; Younis, B. A.

    1992-01-01

    The prediction of turbulent secondary flows, with Reynolds stress models, in circular pipes and non-circular ducts is reviewed. Turbulence-driven secondary flows in straight non-circular ducts are considered along with turbulent secondary flows in pipes and ducts that arise from curvature or a system rotation. The physical mechanisms that generate these different kinds of secondary flows are outlined and the level of turbulence closure required to properly compute each type is discussed in detail. Illustrative computations of a variety of different secondary flows obtained from two-equation turbulence models and second-order closures are provided to amplify these points.

  19. 3D geometric modeling and simulation of laser propagation through turbulence with plenoptic functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chensheng; Nelson, William; Davis, Christopher C.

    2014-10-01

    Plenoptic functions are functions that preserve all the necessary light field information of optical events. Theoretical work has demonstrated that geometric based plenoptic functions can serve equally well in the traditional wave propagation equation known as the "scalar stochastic Helmholtz equation". However, in addressing problems of 3D turbulence simulation, the dominant methods using phase screen models have limitations both in explaining the choice of parameters (on the transverse plane) in real-world measurements, and finding proper correlations between neighboring phase screens (the Markov assumption breaks down). Though possible corrections to phase screen models are still promising, the equivalent geometric approach based on plenoptic functions begins to show some advantages. In fact, in these geometric approaches, a continuous wave problem is reduced to discrete trajectories of rays. This allows for convenience in parallel computing and guarantees conservation of energy. Besides the pairwise independence of simulated rays, the assigned refractive index grids can be directly tested by temperature measurements with tiny thermoprobes combined with other parameters such as humidity level and wind speed. Furthermore, without loss of generality one can break the causal chain in phase screen models by defining regional refractive centers to allow rays that are less affected to propagate through directly. As a result, our work shows that the 3D geometric approach serves as an efficient and accurate method in assessing relevant turbulence problems with inputs of several environmental measurements and reasonable guesses (such as Cn 2 levels). This approach will facilitate analysis and possible corrections in lateral wave propagation problems, such as image de-blurring, prediction of laser propagation over long ranges, and improvement of free space optic communication systems. In this paper, the plenoptic function model and relevant parallel algorithm computing

  20. Simultaneous measurement of 3D zooplankton trajectories and surrounding fluid velocity field in complex flows.

    PubMed

    Adhikari, Deepak; Gemmell, Brad J; Hallberg, Michael P; Longmire, Ellen K; Buskey, Edward J

    2015-11-01

    We describe an automated, volumetric particle image velocimetry (PIV) and tracking method that measures time-resolved, 3D zooplankton trajectories and surrounding volumetric fluid velocity fields simultaneously and non-intrusively. The method is demonstrated for groups of copepods flowing past a wall-mounted cylinder. We show that copepods execute escape responses when subjected to a strain rate threshold upstream of a cylinder, but the same threshold range elicits no escape responses in the turbulent wake downstream. The method was also used to document the instantaneous slip velocity of zooplankton and the resulting differences in trajectory between zooplankton and non-inertial fluid particles in the unsteady wake flow, showing the method's capability to quantify drift for both passive and motile organisms in turbulent environments. Applications of the method extend to any group of organisms interacting with the surrounding fluid environment, where organism location, larger-scale eddies and smaller-scale fluid deformation rates can all be tracked and analyzed. PMID:26486364

  1. Turbulence in homogeneous shear flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pumir, Alain

    1996-11-01

    Homogeneous shear flows with an imposed mean velocity U=Syx̂ are studied in a period box of size Lx×Ly×Lz, in the statistically stationary turbulent state. In contrast with unbounded shear flows, the finite size of the system constrains the large-scale dynamics. The Reynolds number, defined by Re≡SL2y/ν varies in the range 2600⩽Re⩽11300. The total kinetic energy and enstrophy in the volume of numerical integration have large peaks, resulting in fluctuations of kinetic energy of order 30%-50%. The mechanism leading to these fluctuations is very reminiscent of the ``streaks'' responsible for the violent bursts observed in turbulent boundary layers. The large scale anisotropy of the flow, characterized by the two-point correlation tensor depends on the aspect ratio of the system. The probability distribution functions (PDF) of the components of the velocity are found to be close to Gaussian. The physics of the Reynolds stress tensor, uv, is very similar to what is found experimentally in wall bounded shear flows. The study of the two-point correlation tensor of the vorticity <ωiωj> suggests that the small scales become isotropic when the Reynolds number increases, as observed in high Reynolds number turbulent boundary layers. However, the skewness of the z component of vorticity is independent of the Reynolds number in this range, suggesting that some small scale anisotropy remains even at very high Reynolds numbers. An analogy is drawn with the problem of turbulent mixing, where a similar anisotropy is observed.

  2. 3D Global Two-Fluid Simulations of Turbulence in LAPD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, Dustin; Rogers, Barrett; Ricci, Paolo

    2012-10-01

    3D global two-fluid simulations are presented in an ongoing effort to identify and understand the physics of instabilities that arise in the Large Plasma Device (LAPD) at UCLA's Basic Science Facility. The LAPD, with its wide range of tunable parameters and device configurations, is ideally suited for studying space and laboratory plasmas. Moreover, the highly detailed and reproducible measurements of the LAPD lend themselves amicably to comparisons with simulations. Ongoing modeling is done using a modified version of the Global Braginskii Solver (GBS) [1] that models the plasma from source to edge region in a fully 3D two-fluid code. The reduced Braginskii equations are solved on a field-aligned grid using a finite difference method and 4th order Runge-Kutta time stepping and are parallelized on Dartmouth's Discovery cluster. Recent progress has been made to account for the thermionic cathode emission of fast electrons at the source, the axial dependence of the plasma source, and it is now possible to vary the potential on the front and side walls. Preliminary results, seen from the density and temperature profiles, show that the low frequency Kelvin Helmholtz instability still dominates the turbulence in the device.[4pt] [1] B. Rogers and P. Ricci. Phys. Rev. Lett. 104:225002, 2010

  3. Eulerian and Lagrangian methods for vortex tracking in 2D and 3D flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yangzi; Green, Melissa

    2014-11-01

    Coherent structures are a key component of unsteady flows in shear layers. Improvement of experimental techniques has led to larger amounts of data and requires of automated procedures for vortex tracking. Many vortex criteria are Eulerian, and identify the structures by an instantaneous local swirling motion in the field, which are indicated by closed or spiral streamlines or pathlines in a reference frame. Alternatively, a Lagrangian Coherent Structures (LCS) analysis is a Lagrangian method based on the quantities calculated along fluid particle trajectories. In the current work, vortex detection is demonstrated on data from the simulation of two cases: a 2D flow with a flat plate undergoing a 45 ° pitch-up maneuver and a 3D wall-bounded turbulence channel flow. Vortices are visualized and tracked by their centers and boundaries using Γ1, the Q criterion, and LCS saddle points. In the cases of 2D flow, saddle points trace showed a rapid acceleration of the structure which indicates the shedding from the plate. For channel flow, saddle points trace shows that average structure convection speed exhibits a similar trend as a function of wall-normal distance as the mean velocity profile, and leads to statistical quantities of vortex dynamics. Dr. Jeff Eldredge and his research group at UCLA are gratefully acknowledged for sharing the database of simulation for the current research. This work was supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research under AFOSR Award No. FA9550-14-1-0210.

  4. 3d Modelling of Convective Flow In The Rhine Graben

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bächler, D.; Kohl, T.; Rybach, L.

    Detailed investigations of the temperature distribution in the Rhine Graben indi- cate regular pattern of thermal anomalies following major north-south striking faults. These anomalies remain unexplained by conventional Rhine Graben studies based on 2D east-west striking sections. First analytical solutions for convective flow in vertical faults are applied for a clearly observable anomalous temperature pattern along ma- jor Rhine Graben faults. By these calculations the fault height, fault aperture, minimal fault permeability and time to convective onset is derived from the observed distances. Since analytical solutions are limited to simple model geometries further improvement was achieved by numerical model simulations, which allow to assume more com- plex initial and boundary conditions. Using the finite volume code TOUGH2 series of anomalies following the same fault were simulated by a 3D numerical model. Fo- cussing on the predominant north-south permeability structure the model consists of a vertical north-south striking fault and surrounding matrix. The fault geometries are based on the analytically predicted fault geometries (aperture=200m, height=3500m) and on the observed temperatures. Comparison of simulation results with observed temperatures shows that the fault is situated between 500 to 600m and 4200m. The fault permeability is taken as 5*10-13m2 and the fluid velocity in the fault is calcu- lated as 10-9 to 10-10 m/s. These results indicate the importance of our considerations since mass flux is much higher in the faults than across them. The minimal age of the anomaly is considered to be 77'000 years, since steady state is reached after this time span. The study proves that the observed temperature anomaly pattern along the gamma fault at Landau can be explained by north-south striking convection systems within fault zones. Similar situations have been found at Soultz. This may be a hint on a general feature of the major north-south striking

  5. Basic studies of microstructure of combusting turbulent flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain, Fazle

    1991-03-01

    The goal is to develop a state-of-the-art measurement technique, Holographic Particle Displacement Velocimetry (HPV), which can provide instantaneous velocities everywhere in the flow field simultaneously. Another goal is to use the power of supercomputers to simulate 3D flows with heat release to study the physics of combusting turbulent flows. Computations suffer from limited flow times and Reynolds number but can provide flow properties in more detail than possible by any existing experimental techniques. Moreover, numerical simulations can provide quantities almost impossible to measure experimentally. This article discusses efforts to develop the holographic particle displacement velocimetry system and results of direct numerical numerical simulations of combusting flows.

  6. Turbulent flows near flat plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kambe, R.; Imamura, T.; Doi, M.

    1980-08-01

    The method to study the effect of the plate moving in the homogeneous or isotropic turbulence is presented. The crucial point of this method is to solve the Orr-Sommerfeld like equation, which is satisfied by the kernel of the Wiener-Hermite expansion of the velocity field, under the inhomogeneous boundary condition. In the special case of constant mean flow, our method gives the same result as that of Hunt and Graham and succeeds in explaining the experimental results of Thomas and Hancock. The method is also applied to the case of nonuniform mean flow, where the shear effect comes up.

  7. Using 3D Printing and Stereoscopic Imaging to Measure the Alignment and Rotation of Anisotropic Particles in Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcus, Guy

    2014-03-01

    We have developed a general methodology to experimentally measure the time-resolved Lagrangian orientation and solid body rotation rate of anisotropic particles with arbitrary aspect ratio from standard stereoscopic video image data. We apply these techniques to particles advected in a Rλ ~ 110 fluid flow, where turbulence is generated by two grids oscillating in phase. We use 3D printing technology to design and fabricate neutrally buoyant rods, crosses (two perpendicular rods), and jacks (three mutually perpendicular rods) with a largest dimension of 7 times the Kolmogorov length scale, which makes them good approximations to tracer particles. We have measured the mean square rotation rate, p˙ip˙i , of particles spanning the full range of aspect ratios and obtained results that agree with direct numerical simulations. Our measurements of the full solid-body rotation of jacks, in particular, are of broad experimental relevance because they demonstrate a new and extensible way to directly probe the Lagrangian vorticity of a fluid. Lastly, we will present our direct measurements of the alignment of crosses with the direction of their solid body rotation rate vector, demonstrating how turbulence aligns particles along their longest dimension. This work was completed while at Wesleyan University.

  8. Confined Turbulent Swirling Recirculating Flow Predictions. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abujelala, M. T.

    1984-01-01

    Turbulent swirling flow, the STARPIC computer code, turbulence modeling of turbulent flows, the k-xi turbulence model and extensions, turbulence parameters deduction from swirling confined flow measurements, extension of the k-xi to confined swirling recirculating flows, and general predictions for confined turbulent swirling flow are discussed.

  9. PDF methods for turbulent reactive flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, Andrew T.

    1995-01-01

    Viewgraphs are presented on computation of turbulent combustion, governing equations, closure problem, PDF modeling of turbulent reactive flows, validation cases, current projects, and collaboration with industry and technology transfer.

  10. Laminar and Turbulent Flow in Water

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riveros, H. G.; Riveros-Rosas, D.

    2010-01-01

    There are many ways to visualize flow, either for laminar or turbulent flows. A very convincing way to show laminar and turbulent flows is by the perturbations on the surface of a beam of water coming out of a cylindrical tube. Photographs, taken with a flash, show the nature of the flow of water in pipes. They clearly show the difference between…

  11. Stochastic models for turbulent reacting flows

    SciTech Connect

    Kerstein, A.

    1993-12-01

    The goal of this program is to develop and apply stochastic models of various processes occurring within turbulent reacting flows in order to identify the fundamental mechanisms governing these flows, to support experimental studies of these flows, and to further the development of comprehensive turbulent reacting flow models.

  12. Formation of turbulence around flow singularities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zak, M.

    1983-01-01

    The formation of turbulence around singular points of a flow such as stagnation points, tangential jumps of velocity, are analyzed. It is proved that turbulence is inevitably generated by the rear stagnation point, but cannot be generated by the nose stagnation point of a streamlined body. Special attention is paid to an evolution of turbulence induced by a tangential jump of velocity. A qualitative analysis of a turbulent flow between two rotating concentric cylinders and around a streamlined cylinder is given.

  13. A 3D velocimetry study of the flow through prosthetic heart valves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ledesma, R.; Zenit, R.; Pulos, G.; Sanchez, E.; Juarez, A.

    2006-11-01

    Blood damage commonly appears in medical valve prothesis. It is a mayor concern for the designers and surgeons. It is well known that this damage and other complications result from the modified fluid dynamics through the replacement valve. To evaluate the performance of prosthetic heart valves, it is necessary to study the flow through them. To conduct this study , we have built a flow channel that emulates cardiac conditions and allows optical access such that a 3D-PIV velocimetry system could be used. The experiments are aimed to reconstruct the downstream structure of the flow through a mechanical and a bio-material tricuspid heart valve prothesis. Preliminary results show that the observed coherent structures can be related with haemolysis and trombosis, illnesses commonly found in valve prothesis recipients. The mean flow, the levels of strain rate and the turbulence intensity generated by the valves can also be directly related to blood damage. In general, bio-material made valves tend to reduce these complications.

  14. Effects of Presence, Copresence, and Flow on Learning Outcomes in 3D Learning Spaces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hassell, Martin D.; Goyal, Sandeep; Limayem, Moez; Boughzala, Imed

    2012-01-01

    The level of satisfaction and effectiveness of 3D virtual learning environments were examined. Additionally, 3D virtual learning environments were compared with face-to-face learning environments. Students that experienced higher levels of flow and presence also experienced more satisfaction but not necessarily more effectiveness with 3D virtual…

  15. Quasi 3D modeling of water flow in vadose zone and groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, M.; Yakirevich, A.; Pachepsky, Y. A.; Sorek, S.; Weisbrod, N.

    2012-07-01

    SummaryThe complexity of subsurface flow systems calls for a variety of concepts leading to the multiplicity of simplified flow models. One habitual simplification is based on the assumption that lateral flow and transport in unsaturated zone are not significant unless the capillary fringe is involved. In such cases the flow and transport in the unsaturated zone above groundwater level can be simulated as a 1D phenomenon, whereas the flow and transport through groundwater are viewed as 2D or 3D phenomena. A new approach for a numerical scheme for 3D variably saturated flow using quasi 3D Richards' equation and finite difference scheme is presented. The corresponding numerical algorithm and the QUASI-3D computer code were developed. Results of the groundwater level simulations were compared with transient laboratory experimental data for 2D data constant-flux infiltration, quasi-3D HYDRUS-MODFLOW numerical model and a FULL-3D numerical model using Richards' equation. Hypothetical 3D examples of infiltration, pumping and groundwater mound dissipation for different spatial-time scales are presented. Water flow simulation for the Alto Piura aquifer (Peru) demonstrates the QUASI-3D model application at the regional scale. Computationally the QUASI-3D code was found to be more efficient by an order of 10-300%, while being accurate with respect to the benchmark fully 3D variable saturation code, when the capillary fringe was considered.

  16. Turbulent Flow Past Spinning Cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehmedagic, Igbal; Carlucci, Donald; Carlucci, Pasquale; Thangam, Siva

    2009-11-01

    Flow past cylinders aligned along their axis where a base freely spins while attached to a non-spinning forebody is considered from a computational and experimental point of view. The time-averaged equations of motion and energy are solved using the modeled form of transport equations for the turbulence kinetic energy and the scalar form of turbulence dissipation with an efficient finite-volume algorithm. An anisotropic two-equation Reynolds-stress model that incorporates the effect of rotation-modified energy spectrum and swirl is used to perform computations for the flow past axially rotating cylinders. Both rigid cylinders as well as that of cylinders with free-spinning base are considered from a computational point of view. A subsonic wind tunnel with a forward-sting mounted spinning cylinder is used for experiments. Experiments are performed for a range of spin rates and free stream flow conditions. The experimental results of Carlucci & Thangam (2001) are used to benchmark flow over spinning cylinders. The data is extended to munitions spinning in the wake of other munitions. Applications involving the design of projectiles are discussed.

  17. On turbulent spots in plane Poiseuille flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henningson, Dan S.; Kim, John

    1992-01-01

    Turbulence characteristics inside a turbulent spot in plume Poiseuille flow are investigated by analyzing a data base obtained from a direct numerical simulation. The spot is found to consist of two distinct regions - a turbulent area and a wave area. The flow inside the turbulent area has a strong resemblance to that found in the fully developed turbulent channel. Suitably defined mean and rms fluctuations as well as the internal shear layer structures are found to be similar to the turbulent counterpart. In the wave area, the inflexional mean spanwise profiles cause a rapid growth of oblique waves, which break down to turbulence. The breakdown process of the oblique waves is reminiscent of the secondary instability observed during transition to turbulence in channel and boundary layer flows. Other detailed characteristics associated with the Poiseuille spot are presented and are compared with experimental results.

  18. A prediction of 3-D viscous flow and performance of the NASA low-speed centrifugal compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, John; Moore, Joan G.

    1989-01-01

    A prediction of the 3-D turbulent flow in the NASA Low-Speed Centrifugal Compressor Impeller has been made. The calculation was made for the compressor design conditions with the specified uniform tip clearance gap. The predicted performance is significantly worse than that predicted in the NASA design study. This is explained by the high tip leakage flow in the present calculation and by the different model adopted for tip leakage flow mixing. The calculation gives an accumulation for high losses in the shroud/pressure-side quadrant near the exit of the impeller. It also predicts a region of meridional backflow near the shroud wall. Both of these flow features should be extensive enough in the NASA impeller to allow detailed flow measurements, leading to improved flow modelling. Recommendations are made for future flow studies in the NASA impeller.

  19. Modeling 3-D Slope Stability of Coastal Bluffs Using 3-D Ground-Water Flow, Southwestern Seattle, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brien, Dianne L.; Reid, Mark E.

    2007-01-01

    Landslides are a common problem on coastal bluffs throughout the world. Along the coastal bluffs of the Puget Sound in Seattle, Washington, landslides range from small, shallow failures to large, deep-seated landslides. Landslides of all types can pose hazards to human lives and property, but deep-seated landslides are of significant concern because their large areal extent can cause extensive property damage. Although many geomorphic processes shape the coastal bluffs of Seattle, we focus on large (greater than 3,000 m3), deepseated, rotational landslides that occur on the steep bluffs along Puget Sound. Many of these larger failures occur in advance outwash deposits of the Vashon Drift (Qva); some failures extend into the underlying Lawton Clay Member of the Vashon Drift (Qvlc). The slope stability of coastal bluffs is controlled by the interplay of three-dimensional (3-D) variations in gravitational stress, strength, and pore-water pressure. We assess 3-D slope-stability using SCOOPS (Reid and others, 2000), a computer program that allows us to search a high-resolution digital-elevation model (DEM) to quantify the relative stability of all parts of the landscape by computing the stability and volume of thousands of potential spherical failures. SCOOPS incorporates topography, 3-D strength variations, and 3-D pore pressures. Initially, we use our 3-D analysis methods to examine the effects of topography and geology by using heterogeneous material properties, as defined by stratigraphy, without pore pressures. In this scenario, the least-stable areas are located on the steepest slopes, commonly in Qva or Qvlc. However, these locations do not agree well with observations of deep-seated landslides. Historically, both shallow colluvial landslides and deep-seated landslides have been observed near the contact between Qva and Qvlc, and commonly occur in Qva. The low hydraulic conductivity of Qvlc impedes ground-water flow, resulting in elevated pore pressures at the

  20. Turbulence modeling for hypersonic flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marvin, J. G.; Coakley, T. J.

    1989-01-01

    Turbulence modeling for high speed compressible flows is described and discussed. Starting with the compressible Navier-Stokes equations, methods of statistical averaging are described by means of which the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations are developed. Unknown averages in these equations are approximated using various closure concepts. Zero-, one-, and two-equation eddy viscosity models, algebraic stress models and Reynolds stress transport models are discussed. Computations of supersonic and hypersonic flows obtained using several of the models are discussed and compared with experimental results. Specific examples include attached boundary layer flows, shock wave boundary layer interactions and compressible shear layers. From these examples, conclusions regarding the status of modeling and recommendations for future studies are discussed.

  1. 3D topographic correction of the BSR heat flow and detection of focused fluid flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Tao; Li, Hong-Lin; Zou, Chang-Chun

    2014-06-01

    The bottom-simulating reflector (BSR) is a seismic indicator of the bottom of a gas hydrate stability zone. Its depth can be used to calculate the seafloor surface heat flow. The calculated BSR heat flow variations include disturbances from two important factors: (1) seafloor topography, which focuses the heat flow over regions of concave topography and defocuses it over regions of convex topography, and (2) the focused warm fluid flow within the accretionary prism coming from depths deeper than BSR. The focused fluid flow can be detected if the contribution of the topography to the BSR heat flow is removed. However, the analytical equation cannot solve the topographic effect at complex seafloor regions. We prove that 3D finite element method can model the topographic effect on the regional background heat flow with high accuracy, which can then be used to correct the topographic effect and obtain the BSR heat flow under the condition of perfectly flat topography. By comparing the corrected BSR heat flow with the regional background heat flow, focused fluid flow regions can be detected that are originally too small and cannot be detected using present-day equipment. This method was successfully applied to the midslope region of northern Cascadia subducting margin. The results suggest that the Cucumber Ridge and its neighboring area are positive heat flow anomalies, about 10%-20% higher than the background heat flow after 3D topographic correction. Moreover, the seismic imaging associated the positive heat flow anomaly areas with seabed fracture-cavity systems. This suggests flow of warm gas-carrying fluids along these high-permeability pathways, which could result in higher gas hydrate concentrations.

  2. Turbulent Flow Computations in Ejectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gogoi, A.; Siddesha, H.

    2010-09-01

    The paper presents computations in ejectors using in-house code NUMBERS. Computations are carried out in a 2D ejector and in a cylindrical ejector. Computations on the cylindrical ejector are done for various nozzle pressure ratios. The ejector flow is dominated by complex mixing of primary and secondary jets. The Spalart-Allmaras and Menter SST turbulence models are used. The results with the Menter SST model are superior to Spalart-Allmaras model at higher nozzle pressure ratios for the cylindrical ejector.

  3. Ergodic theory and experimental visualization of chaos in 3D flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotiropoulos, Fotis; Mezic, Igor

    2000-11-01

    In his motivation for the ergodic hypothesis Gibbs invoked an analogy with fluid mixing: “…Yet no fact is more familiar to us than that stirring tends to bring a liquid to a state of uniform mixture, or uniform densities of its components…”. Although proof of the ergodic hypothesis is possible only for the simplest of systems using methods from ergodic theory, the use of the hypothesis has led to many accurate predictions in statistical mechanics. The problem of fluid mixing, however, turned out to be considerably more complicated than Gibbs envisioned. Chaotic advection can indeed lead to efficient mixing even in non-turbulent flows, but many non-mixed islands are known to persist within well-mixed regions. In numerical studies, Poincaré maps can be used to reveal the structure of such islands but their visualization in the laboratory requires laborious experimental procedures and is possible only for certain types of flows. Here we propose the first non-intrusive, simple to implement, and generally applicable technique for constructing experimental Poincaré maps and apply it to a steady, 3D, vortex breakdown bubble. We employ standard laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) and construct Poincaré maps by time averaging a sufficiently long sequence of instantaneous LIF images. We also show that ergodic theory methods provide a rigorous theoretical justification for this approach whose main objective is to reveal the non-ergodic regions of the flow.

  4. 3D Wind Reconstruction and Turbulence Estimation in the Boundary Layer from Doppler Lidar Measurements using Particle Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rottner, L.; Baehr, C.

    2014-12-01

    Turbulent phenomena in the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) are characterized by small spatial and temporal scales which make them difficult to observe and to model.New remote sensing instruments, like Doppler Lidar, give access to fine and high-frequency observations of wind in the ABL. This study suggests to use a method of nonlinear estimation based on these observations to reconstruct 3D wind in a hemispheric volume, and to estimate atmospheric turbulent parameters. The wind observations are associated to particle systems which are driven by a local turbulence model. The particles have both fluid and stochastic properties. Therefore, spatial averages and covariances may be deduced from the particles. Among the innovative aspects, we point out the absence of the common hypothesis of stationary-ergodic turbulence and the non-use of particle model closure hypothesis. Every time observations are available, 3D wind is reconstructed and turbulent parameters such as turbulent kinectic energy, dissipation rate, and Turbulent Intensity (TI) are provided. This study presents some results obtained using real wind measurements provided by a five lines of sight Lidar. Compared with classical methods (e.g. eddy covariance) our technic renders equivalent long time results. Moreover it provides finer and real time turbulence estimations. To assess this new method, we suggest computing independently TI using different observation types. First anemometer data are used to have TI reference.Then raw and filtered Lidar observations have also been compared. The TI obtained from raw data is significantly higher than the reference one, whereas the TI estimated with the new algorithm has the same order.In this study we have presented a new class of algorithm to reconstruct local random media. It offers a new way to understand turbulence in the ABL, in both stable or convective conditions. Later, it could be used to refine turbulence parametrization in meteorological meso-scale models.

  5. Imaging of 3D Ocean Turbulence Microstructure Using Low Frequency Acoustic Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minakov, Alexander; Kolyukhin, Dmitriy; Keers, Henk

    2015-04-01

    In the past decade the technique of imaging the ocean structure with low-frequency signal (Hz), produced by air-guns and typically employed during conventional multichannel seismic data acquisition, has emerged. The method is based on extracting and stacking the acoustic energy back-scattered by the ocean temperature and salinity micro- and meso-structure (1 - 100 meters). However, a good understanding of the link between the scattered wavefield utilized by the seismic oceanography and physical processes in the ocean is still lacking. We describe theory and the numerical implementation of a 3D time-dependent stochastic model of ocean turbulence. The velocity and temperature are simulated as homogeneous Gaussian isotropic random fields with the Kolmogorov-Obukhov energy spectrum in the inertial subrange. Numerical modeling technique is employed for sampling of realizations of random fields with a given spatial-temporal spectral tensor. The model used is shown to be representative for a wide range of scales. Using this model, we provide a framework to solve the forward and inverse acoustic scattering problem using marine seismic data. Our full-waveform inversion method is based on the ray-Born approximation which is specifically suitable for the modelling of small velocity perturbations in the ocean. This is illustrated by showing a good match between synthetic seismograms computed using ray-Born and synthetic seismograms produced with a more computationally expensive finite-difference method.

  6. Validation of a Node-Centered Wall Function Model for the Unstructured Flow Code FUN3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, Jan-Renee; Vasta, Veer N.; White, Jeffery

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, the implementation of two wall function models in the Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) computational uid dynamics (CFD) code FUN3D is described. FUN3D is a node centered method for solving the three-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations on unstructured computational grids. The first wall function model, based on the work of Knopp et al., is used in conjunction with the one-equation turbulence model of Spalart-Allmaras. The second wall function model, also based on the work of Knopp, is used in conjunction with the two-equation k-! turbulence model of Menter. The wall function models compute the wall momentum and energy flux, which are used to weakly enforce the wall velocity and pressure flux boundary conditions in the mean flow momentum and energy equations. These wall conditions are implemented in an implicit form where the contribution of the wall function model to the Jacobian are also included. The boundary conditions of the turbulence transport equations are enforced explicitly (strongly) on all solid boundaries. The use of the wall function models is demonstrated on four test cases: a at plate boundary layer, a subsonic di user, a 2D airfoil, and a 3D semi-span wing. Where possible, different near-wall viscous spacing tactics are examined. Iterative residual convergence was obtained in most cases. Solution results are compared with theoretical and experimental data for several variations of grid spacing. In general, very good comparisons with data were achieved.

  7. Gas flow environment and heat transfer nonrotating 3D program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schulz, R. J.

    1982-01-01

    A complete set of benchmark quality data for the flow and heat transfer within a large rectangular turning duct is provided. These data are to be used to evaluate, and verify, three-dimensional internal viscous flow models and computational codes. The analytical contract objective is to select a computational code and define the capabilities of this code to predict the experimental results obtained. Details of the proper code operation will be defined and improvements to the code modeling capabilities will be formulated. Internal flow in a large rectangular cross-sectioned 90 deg. bend turning duct was studied. The duct construction was designed to allow detailed measurements to be made for the following three duct wall conditions: (1) an isothermal wall with isothermal flow; (2) an adiabatic wall with convective heat transfer by mixing between an unheated surrounding flow; and (3) an isothermal wall with heat transfer from a uniformly hot inlet flow.

  8. Approximate Model for Turbulent Stagnation Point Flow.

    SciTech Connect

    Dechant, Lawrence

    2016-01-01

    Here we derive an approximate turbulent self-similar model for a class of favorable pressure gradient wedge-like flows, focusing on the stagnation point limit. While the self-similar model provides a useful gross flow field estimate this approach must be combined with a near wall model is to determine skin friction and by Reynolds analogy the heat transfer coefficient. The combined approach is developed in detail for the stagnation point flow problem where turbulent skin friction and Nusselt number results are obtained. Comparison to the classical Van Driest (1958) result suggests overall reasonable agreement. Though the model is only valid near the stagnation region of cylinders and spheres it nonetheless provides a reasonable model for overall cylinder and sphere heat transfer. The enhancement effect of free stream turbulence upon the laminar flow is used to derive a similar expression which is valid for turbulent flow. Examination of free stream enhanced laminar flow suggests that the rather than enhancement of a laminar flow behavior free stream disturbance results in early transition to turbulent stagnation point behavior. Excellent agreement is shown between enhanced laminar flow and turbulent flow behavior for high levels, e.g. 5% of free stream turbulence. Finally the blunt body turbulent stagnation results are shown to provide realistic heat transfer results for turbulent jet impingement problems.

  9. Laminar and turbulent flow in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riveros, H. G.; Riveros-Rosas, D.

    2010-05-01

    There are many ways to visualize flow, either for laminar or turbulent flows. A very convincing way to show laminar and turbulent flows is by the perturbations on the surface of a beam of water coming out of a cylindrical tube. Photographs, taken with a flash, show the nature of the flow of water in pipes. They clearly show the difference between turbulent and laminar flow, and let, in an accessible way, data be taken to analyse the conditions under which both flows are present. We found research articles about turbulence measurements, using sophisticated equipment, but they do not use the perturbation of the free surface of the flowing liquid to show or measure the turbulence.

  10. Gas flow environmental and heat transfer nonrotating 3D program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geil, T.; Steinhoff, J.

    1983-01-01

    A complete set of benchmark quality data for the flow and heat transfer within a large rectangular turning duct is being compiled. These data will be used to evaluate and verify three dimensional internal viscous flow models and computational codes. The analytical objective is to select such a computational code and define the capabilities of this code to predict the experimental results. Details of the proper code operation will be defined and improvements to the code modeling capabilities will be formulated.

  11. Turbulent structures in Kolmogorovian shear flows: DNS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuckerman, Laurette S.; Chantry, Matthew; Barkley, Dwight

    2015-11-01

    Patterns of turbulent and laminar flow form a vital step in the transition to turbulent in wall-bounded shear flows. In flows with two unconstrained directions these patterns form oblique bands, whereas in pipe flow the structures are streamwise-localized puffs. To understand these structures we examine Waleffe flow, a sinusoidal shear flow, Usinπ/2 y , driven by a body force and stress-free boundary conditions at y = +/- 1 . Introduced as a model for plane Couette flow we demonstrate the existence of turbulence bands which match those found in plane Couette flow, excluding the boundary layer regions of the latter flow. This agreement is reiterated in the studies of uniform turbulence and linear stability; highlighting the surprising unimportance of this region to transitional turbulence. Building upon this we consider two other canonical flows: plane Pouiseuille flow and pipe flow. Attacking these flows with the approach that succeeded in plane Couette flow we attempt to clarify the role of boundary layers to transitionally turbulent shear flows.

  12. Transonic Turbulent Flow Predictions With Two-Equation Turbulence Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, William W.; Shih, Tsan-Hsing

    1996-01-01

    Solutions of the Favre-averaged Navier-Stokes equations for two well-documented transonic turbulent flows are compared in detail with existing experimental data. While the boundary layer in the first case remains attached, a region of extensive flow separation has been observed in the second case. Two recently developed k-epsilon, two-equation, eddy-viscosity models are used to model the turbulence field. These models satisfy the realizability constraints of the Reynolds stresses. Comparisons with the measurements are made for the wall pressure distribution, the mean streamwise velocity profiles, and turbulent quantities. Reasonably good agreement is obtained with the experimental data.

  13. USM3D Simulations of Saturn V Plume Induced Flow Separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deere, Karen; Elmlilgui, Alaa; Abdol-Hamid, K. S.

    2011-01-01

    The NASA Constellation Program included the Ares V heavy lift cargo vehicle. During the design stage, engineers questioned if the Plume Induced Flow Separation (PIFS) that occurred along Saturn V rocket during moon missions at some flight conditions, would also plague the newly proposed rocket. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) was offered as a tool for initiating the investigation of PIFS along the Ares V rocket. However, CFD best practice guidelines were not available for such an investigation. In an effort to establish a CFD process and define guidelines for Ares V powered simulations, the Saturn V vehicle was used because PIFS flight data existed. The ideal gas, computational flow solver USM3D was evaluated for its viability in computing PIFS along the Saturn V vehicle with F-1 engines firing. Solutions were computed at supersonic freestream conditions, zero degree angle of attack, zero degree sideslip, and at flight Reynolds numbers. The effects of solution sensitivity to grid refinement, turbulence models, and the engine boundary conditions on the predicted PIFS distance along the Saturn V were discussed and compared to flight data from the Apollo 11 mission AS-506.

  14. Segmented Domain Decomposition Multigrid For 3-D Turbomachinery Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Celestina, M. L.; Adamczyk, J. J.; Rubin, S. G.

    2001-01-01

    A Segmented Domain Decomposition Multigrid (SDDMG) procedure was developed for three-dimensional viscous flow problems as they apply to turbomachinery flows. The procedure divides the computational domain into a coarse mesh comprised of uniformly spaced cells. To resolve smaller length scales such as the viscous layer near a surface, segments of the coarse mesh are subdivided into a finer mesh. This is repeated until adequate resolution of the smallest relevant length scale is obtained. Multigrid is used to communicate information between the different grid levels. To test the procedure, simulation results will be presented for a compressor and turbine cascade. These simulations are intended to show the ability of the present method to generate grid independent solutions. Comparisons with data will also be presented. These comparisons will further demonstrate the usefulness of the present work for they allow an estimate of the accuracy of the flow modeling equations independent of error attributed to numerical discretization.

  15. Laser direct writing 3D structures for microfluidic channels: flow meter and mixer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chih-Lang; Liu, Yi-Jui; Lin, Zheng-Da; Wu, Bo-Long; Lee, Yi-Hsiung; Shin, Chow-Shing; Baldeck, Patrice L.

    2015-03-01

    The 3D laser direct-writing technology is aimed at the modeling of arbitrary three-dimensional (3D) complex microstructures by scanning a laser-focusing point along predetermined trajectories. Through the perspective technique, the details of designed 3D structures can be properly fabricated in a microchannel. This study introduces a direct reading flow meter and a 3D passive mixer fabricated by laser direct writing for microfluidic applications. The flow meter consists of two rod-shaped springs, a pillar, an anchor, and a wedge-shaped indicator, installed inside a microfluidic channel. The indicator is deflected by the flowing fluid while restrained by the spring to establish an equilibrium indication according to the flow rate. The measurement is readily carried out by optical microscopy observation. The 3D passive Archimedes-screw-shaped mixer is designed to disturb the laminar flow 3D direction for enhancing the mixing efficiency. The simulation results indicate that the screw provides 3D disturbance of streamlines in the microchannel. The mixing demonstration for fluids flowing in the micrchannel approximately agrees with the simulation result. Thanks to the advantage of the laser direct writing technology, this study performs the ingenious applications of 3D structures for microchannels.

  16. Linear stability analysis of swirling turbulent flows with turbulence models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Vikrant; Juniper, Matthew

    2013-11-01

    In this paper, we consider the growth of large scale coherent structures in turbulent flows by performing linear stability analysis around a mean flow. Turbulent flows are characterized by fine-scale stochastic perturbations. The momentum transfer caused by these perturbations affects the development of larger structures. Therefore, in a linear stability analysis, it is important to include the perturbations' influence. One way to do this is to include a turbulence model in the stability analysis. This is done in the literature by using eddy viscosity models (EVMs), which are first order turbulence models. We extend this approach by using second order turbulence models, in this case explicit algebraic Reynolds stress models (EARSMs). EARSMs are more versatile than EVMs, in that they can be applied to a wider range of flows, and could also be more accurate. We verify our EARSM-based analysis by applying it to a channel flow and then comparing the results with those from an EVM-based analysis. We then apply the EARSM-based stability analysis to swirling pipe flows and Taylor-Couette flows, which demonstrates the main benefit of EARSM-based analysis. This project is supported by EPSRC and Rolls-Royce through a Dorothy Hodgkin Research Fellowship.

  17. Turbulence in unsteady flow at high frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhn, Gary D.

    1990-01-01

    Turbulent flows subjected to oscillations of the mean flow were simulated using a large-eddy simulation computer code for flow in a channel. The objective of the simulations was to provide better understanding of the effects of time-dependent disturbances on the turbulence of a boundary layer and of the underlying physical phenomena regarding the basic interaction between the turbulence and external disturbances. The results confirmed that turbulence is sensitive to certain ranges of frequencies of disturbances. However, no direct connection was found between the frequency of imposed disturbances and the characteristic 'burst' frequency of turbulence. New insight into the nature of turbulence at high frequencies was found. Viscous phenomena near solid walls were found to be the dominant influence for high-frequency perturbations.

  18. Approximate analytic solutions to 3D unconfined groundwater flow within regional 2D models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luther, K.; Haitjema, H. M.

    2000-04-01

    We present methods for finding approximate analytic solutions to three-dimensional (3D) unconfined steady state groundwater flow near partially penetrating and horizontal wells, and for combining those solutions with regional two-dimensional (2D) models. The 3D solutions use distributed singularities (analytic elements) to enforce boundary conditions on the phreatic surface and seepage faces at vertical wells, and to maintain fixed-head boundary conditions, obtained from the 2D model, at the perimeter of the 3D model. The approximate 3D solutions are analytic (continuous and differentiable) everywhere, including on the phreatic surface itself. While continuity of flow is satisfied exactly in the infinite 3D flow domain, water balance errors can occur across the phreatic surface.

  19. Improvements on Digital Inline Holographic PIV for Turbulent Flow Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Jiarong; Toloui, Mostafa; Mallery, Kevin

    2015-11-01

    Among all the 3D PIV techniques used in wall-bounded turbulent flow measurements, digital inline holographic (DIH) PIV provides the highest spatial resolution for near-wall flow diagnostics with low-cost, simple and compact optical set-ups. Despite these advantages, DIH-PIV suffers from major limitations including poor longitudinal resolution, human intervention (i.e. requirement for manually determined tuning parameters during tracer field reconstruction and extraction), limited tracer concentration, and expensive computations. These limitations prevent this technique from being widely implemented for high resolution 3D flow measurements. In this study, we present our work on improving holographic particle extraction algorithm with the goal of overcoming some of abovementioned limitations. Our new DIH-PIV processing method has been successfully implemented on multiple experimental cases ranging from 3D flow measurement within a micro-channel to imaging near-wall coherent structures in smooth and rough wall turbulent channel flows. This work is supported by the startup package of Jiarong Hong and the MnDrive Fellowship of Mostafa Toloui from University of Minnesota.

  20. Shock-induced turbulent flow in baffle systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhl, A.L.; Reichenbach, H.

    1993-07-01

    Experiments are described on shock propagation through 2-D aligned and staggered baffle systems. Flow visualization was provided by shadow and schlieren photography, recorded by the Cranz-Schardin camera. Also single-frame, infinite-fringe, color interferograms were used. Intuition suggests that this is a rather simple 2-D shock diffraction problem. However, flow visualization reveals that the flow rapidly evolved into a complex 3-D turbulent mixing problem. Mushroom-shaped mixing regions blocked the flow into the next baffle orifice. Thus energy was transferred from the directed kinetic energy (induced by the shock) to rotational energy of turbulent mixing, and then dissipated by molecular effects. These processes dramatically dissipate the strength of the shock wave. The experiments provide an excellent test case that could be used to assess the accuracy of computer code calculations of such problems.

  1. Patterns in simulated turbulent channel flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stretch, D.

    1990-01-01

    The surface stress is a key diagnostic in wall bounded turbulent flows. Large fluctuations in the stress are believed to be associated with intermittent 'bursting' events during which a large proportion of the turbulence production takes place. If this is so, then a detailed investigation of the structure of the surface stress and its spatial relationship to events within the flow could have wide application in drag reduction and other aspects of flow control. The initial phase of this project, therefore, concentrated on the surface stress field. The first objective is to carry out a statistical analysis of the instantaneous surface stress in a simulated turbulent channel flow, including comparison with multipoint experimental data from a zero pressure gradient turbulent boundary layer. The second objective is to apply a simple pattern recognition procedure to educe the characteristic spatial structure of various flow diagnostics. The final objective is to extend the pattern recognition analysis to examine the whole three dimensional structure of the flow.

  2. Experimental Investigation of Material Flows Within FSWs Using 3D Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Charles R. Tolle; Timothy A. White; Karen S. Miller; Denis E. Clark; Herschel B. Smartt

    2008-06-01

    There exists significant prior work using tracers or pre-placed hardened markers within friction stir welding (FSWing) to experimentally explore material flow within the FSW process. Our experiments replaced markers with a thin sheet of copper foil placed between the 6061 aluminum lap and butt joints that were then welded. The absorption characteristics of x-rays for copper and aluminum are significantly different allowing for non-destructive evaluation (NDE) methods such as x-ray computed tomography (CT) to be used to demonstrate the material movement within the weldment on a much larger scale than previously shown. 3D CT reconstruction of the copper components of the weldment allows for a unique view into the final turbulent state of the welding process as process parameters are varied. The x-ray CT data of a section of the weld region was collected using a cone-beam x-ray imaging system developed at the INL. Six-hundred projections were collected over 360-degrees using a 160-kVp Bremsstrahlung x-ray generator (25-micrometer focal spot) and amorphoussilicon x-ray detector. The region of the object that was imaged was about 3cm tall and 1.5cm x 1cm in cross section, and was imaged at a magnification of about 3.6x. The data were reconstructed on a 0.5x0.5x0.5 mm3 voxel grid. After reconstruction, the aluminum and copper could be easily discriminated using a gray level threshold allowing visualization of the copper components. Fractal analysis of the tomographic reconstructed material topology is investigated as a means to quantify macro level material flow based on process parameters. The results of multi-pass FSWs show increased refinement of the copper trace material. Implications of these techniques for quantifying process flow are discussed.

  3. Temporal Evolution of the 3-D Flow Field In a Mixing Tank with a Two-Bladed Impeller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Woong-Chul; Guezennec, Yann G.

    1998-11-01

    The evolution of the 3-D flow field inside a cylindrical mixing vessel was measured using 3-D Cinematic Particle Tracking Velocimetry. The mixing vessel consisted of a cylindrical chamber with a two-bladed impeller axially centered in the vessel. The impeller was a simple paddle wheel-type and its height in the vessel could be externally adjusted. The fluid inside the chamber was seeded by small neutrally buoyant particles. The entire vessel volume was illuminated by a high-power, collimated strobe light located under the vessel and the particle motion was imaged by a pair of synchronized high-speed (up to 500 fps) digital cameras. Prior to the actual experiments, an in situ calibration of the cameras was performed to automatically account for the optical distortion resulting from the curved vessel boundaries and index of refraction mismatch. The long, high-speed video sequences were analyzed using the FloDyne(tm) 3-D Particle Tracking software. This typically resulted in 500-600 instantaneous 3-D velocity vectors over the entire vessel. The image sequences were then processed for a large number of impeller rotations (50, typically). The resulting velocity fields were then post-processed to obtain the evolution of the phase-averaged 3-D velocity field as well as estimates of the intrinsic turbulence intensities. Animation of the reconstructed 3-D flow fields will be shown. Under some geometrical configurations of the impeller at low Reynolds numbers, the results show the presence of quasi-stable recirculating regions inhibiting the overall mixing.

  4. 3D-Flow processor for a programmable Level-1 trigger (feasibility study)

    SciTech Connect

    Crosetto, D.

    1992-10-01

    A feasibility study has been made to use the 3D-Flow processor in a pipelined programmable parallel processing architecture to identify particles such as electrons, jets, muons, etc., in high-energy physics experiments.

  5. Swimming in turbulent flow - profitable or costly ?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enders, E. C.; Roy, A. G.

    2004-05-01

    Fish swimming performance has long been of interest to researchers. Experiments on swimming performance are generally performed under conditions which minimise flow heterogeneity. However, fish live in environments were intense fluctuations of flow velocity and pressure occur. Only recently, studies emerged that consider the effect of turbulence on the swimming performance of fish. Research has shown that fish may benefit from turbulence. For example, rainbow trout swimming behind an obstacle which produced stable vortex shedding, profited from the energy of these vortices. Fish adjusted their swimming patterns to slalom between the vortices which resulted in a reduction in muscle activity suggesting that fish reduced energy expenditure of swimming. Similarly, sockeye salmon exploited recirculation zones during upriver spawning migration to minimise energy expenditure. In contrast to these investigations showing that fish may actually profit from turbulence, several studies suggested that turbulence increases energy expenditure of swimming. Sustained swimming speed of fish decreased with increasing turbulence intensity suggesting an increase in swimming costs. Similarly, Atlantic salmon swimming in turbulent flow have 2- to 4-fold increased energy expenditure in comparison to estimates obtained under minimised flow heterogeneity. We will give an overview of recent studies and of new experimental evidence showing how turbulence affects fish behaviour, energetics and distribution and we discuss the relevant scales at which turbulent flow structures affect fish depending on its size. These results are from special interest not only for fisheries management, habitat restoration and biodiversity conservation but also for conceptualisation and construction of migratory fish pathways.

  6. Velocity measurements on highly turbulent free surface flow using ADV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cea, L.; Puertas, J.; Pena, L.

    2007-03-01

    The 3D instantaneous velocity recorded with an acoustic Doppler velocimeter (ADV) in a highly turbulent free surface flow is analysed using several filters in order to eliminate the corrupted data from the sample. The filters used include the minimum/maximum threshold, the acceleration threshold, and the phase-space threshold. Following some ideas of the phase-space filter, a new method based on the 3D velocity cross-correlation is proposed and tested. A way of computing the constants of the acceleration threshold method is proposed, so no parameters need to be fixed by the user, which makes the filtering process simpler, more objective and more efficient. All the samples analysed are highly turbulent. Nevertheless, the turbulence intensity and the air entrainment vary widely in the flow under study, which produces data records of different quality depending on the measurement point. The performance of the filtering methods when applied to samples of different quality, and the effects of the filtering process in the mean velocity, turbulent kinetic energy and frequency spectra are discussed.

  7. A package for 3-D unstructured grid generation, finite-element flow solution and flow field visualization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parikh, Paresh; Pirzadeh, Shahyar; Loehner, Rainald

    1990-01-01

    A set of computer programs for 3-D unstructured grid generation, fluid flow calculations, and flow field visualization was developed. The grid generation program, called VGRID3D, generates grids over complex configurations using the advancing front method. In this method, the point and element generation is accomplished simultaneously, VPLOT3D is an interactive, menudriven pre- and post-processor graphics program for interpolation and display of unstructured grid data. The flow solver, VFLOW3D, is an Euler equation solver based on an explicit, two-step, Taylor-Galerkin algorithm which uses the Flux Corrected Transport (FCT) concept for a wriggle-free solution. Using these programs, increasingly complex 3-D configurations of interest to aerospace community were gridded including a complete Space Transportation System comprised of the space-shuttle orbitor, the solid-rocket boosters, and the external tank. Flow solutions were obtained on various configurations in subsonic, transonic, and supersonic flow regimes.

  8. Turbulence characteristics inside a turbulent spot in plane Poiseuille flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henningson, D. S.; Kim, John; Alfredsson, P. Henrik

    1988-01-01

    In wall-bounded shear flows the transition to turbulence through localized disturbances goes through a pattern starting with a development of shear layers. The localized normal velocity fluctuations induce normal vorticity through the lift-up effect. These shear layers become unstable to secondary disturbances, and if the amplitudes of the disturbances are large enough, a turbulent spot develops. Investigations of the spot in boundary layers has shown that the turbulent part of the spot is very similar to a fully developed boundary layer. Wygnanski et al. (1976) showed that the mean profile at the center-symmetry plane has a logarithmic region and Johansson et al. (1987) showed that both the higher-order statistics and flow structures in the spot were the same as in the corresponding fully developed flow. In what respects the turbulence inside the Poiseuille spot is similar to fully developed turbulent channel flow is studied. The numerically simulated spot is used, where the characteristics inside the spot are compared to those of the wave packet in the wingtip area. A recent experimental investigation of the velocity field associated with the Poiseuille spot by Klingmann et al. is used for comparison.

  9. Exploiting similarity in turbulent shear flows for turbulence modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, David F.; Harris, Julius E.; Hassan, H. A.

    1992-01-01

    It is well known that current k-epsilon models cannot predict the flow over a flat plate and its wake. In an effort to address this issue and other issues associated with turbulence closure, a new approach for turbulence modeling is proposed which exploits similarities in the flow field. Thus, if we consider the flow over a flat plate and its wake, then in addition to taking advantage of the log-law region, we can exploit the fact that the flow becomes self-similar in the far wake. This latter behavior makes it possible to cast the governing equations as a set of total differential equations. Solutions of this set and comparison with measured shear stress and velocity profiles yields the desired set of model constants. Such a set is, in general, different from other sets of model constants. The rational for such an approach is that if we can correctly model the flow over a flat plate and its far wake, then we can have a better chance of predicting the behavior in between. It is to be noted that the approach does not appeal, in any way, to the decay of homogeneous turbulence. This is because the asymptotic behavior of the flow under consideration is not representative of the decay of homogeneous turbulence.

  10. On Combustion in a Turbulent Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shelkin, K. I.

    1947-01-01

    The characteristics introduced by the turbulence in the process of the flame propagation are considered. On the basis of geometrical and dimensional considerations an expression is obtained for the velocity of the flame propagation in a flow of large scale of turbulence.

  11. Determining 3D Flow Fields via Multi-camera Light Field Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Truscott, Tadd T.; Belden, Jesse; Nielson, Joseph R.; Daily, David J.; Thomson, Scott L.

    2013-01-01

    In the field of fluid mechanics, the resolution of computational schemes has outpaced experimental methods and widened the gap between predicted and observed phenomena in fluid flows. Thus, a need exists for an accessible method capable of resolving three-dimensional (3D) data sets for a range of problems. We present a novel technique for performing quantitative 3D imaging of many types of flow fields. The 3D technique enables investigation of complicated velocity fields and bubbly flows. Measurements of these types present a variety of challenges to the instrument. For instance, optically dense bubbly multiphase flows cannot be readily imaged by traditional, non-invasive flow measurement techniques due to the bubbles occluding optical access to the interior regions of the volume of interest. By using Light Field Imaging we are able to reparameterize images captured by an array of cameras to reconstruct a 3D volumetric map for every time instance, despite partial occlusions in the volume. The technique makes use of an algorithm known as synthetic aperture (SA) refocusing, whereby a 3D focal stack is generated by combining images from several cameras post-capture 1. Light Field Imaging allows for the capture of angular as well as spatial information about the light rays, and hence enables 3D scene reconstruction. Quantitative information can then be extracted from the 3D reconstructions using a variety of processing algorithms. In particular, we have developed measurement methods based on Light Field Imaging for performing 3D particle image velocimetry (PIV), extracting bubbles in a 3D field and tracking the boundary of a flickering flame. We present the fundamentals of the Light Field Imaging methodology in the context of our setup for performing 3DPIV of the airflow passing over a set of synthetic vocal folds, and show representative results from application of the technique to a bubble-entraining plunging jet. PMID:23486112

  12. Three-fluid, 3D MHD solar wind modeling with turbulence transport and eddy viscosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usmanov, A. V.; Goldstein, M. L.; Matthaeus, W. H.

    2014-12-01

    We present results from a three-fluid, fully three-dimensional MHD solar wind model that includes turbulence transport, eddy viscosity, turbulent resistivity, and turbulent heating. The solar wind plasma is described as a co-moving system of three species: the solar wind protons, electrons, and interstellar pickup protons. Separate energy equations are employed for each species. We obtain numerical solutions of Reynolds-averaged solar wind equations coupled with turbulence transport equations in the region from 0.3 to 100 AU. The integrated system of equations includes the effects of electron heat conduction, Coulomb collisions, photoionization of interstellar hydrogen atoms and their charge exchange with the solar wind protons, turbulence energy generation by pickup protons, and turbulent heating of solar wind protons and electrons. Using either a dipole approximation for the solar magnetic field or synoptic solar magnetograms from the Wilcox Solar Observatory for assigning boundary conditions at the coronal base, we apply the model to study the global structure of the solar wind and its three-dimensional properties, including turbulence parameters, throughout the heliosphere. The model results are compared with observations on WIND, Ulysses and Voyager 2 spacecraft. This work is partially supported by LWS and Heliophysics Grand Challenges programs.

  13. Turbulence and turbulence spectra in complex fluid flows

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, T.T.; Chen, Shi-Yi; Turner, L.; Zemach, C.

    1997-11-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Our objective was to develop a theoretical model of fluid turbulence in parallel with a series of direct numerical simulations of increasingly complex test environments to establish limits of error and regimes of applicability, and to guide improvements. The aim is to produce methods of tested accuracy, with tractable numerical approximations, for turbulent fluids of constant density, and then for variable densities and multimaterial flows. We proceed from a recent spectral model that describes turbulent energy and stress densities in terms of a range of length scales. This should lead not only to improved engineering models, but also to a basic conceptual improvement because the spectral approach accounts for the variation of evolution rates with turbulence length scales.

  14. BOOK REVIEW: Statistical Mechanics of Turbulent Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cambon, C.

    2004-10-01

    results from both non-linearity and non-locality of Navier-Stokes equations, the latter coming from, e.g., the nonlocal relationship of velocity and pressure in the quasi-incompressible case. These two aspects are often intricately linked. It is well known that non-linearity alone is not responsible for the `problem', as evidenced by 1D turbulence without pressure (`Burgulence' from the Burgers equation) and probably 3D (cosmological gas). A local description in terms of pdf for the velocity can resolve the `non-linear' problem, which instead yields an infinite hierarchy of equations in terms of moments. On the other hand, non-locality yields a hierarchy of unclosed equations, with the single-point pdf equation for velocity derived from NS incompressible equations involving a two-point pdf, and so on. The general relationship was given by Lundgren (1967, Phys. Fluids 10 (5), 969-975), with the equation for pdf at n points involving the pdf at n+1 points. The nonlocal problem appears in various statistical models which are not discussed in the book. The simplest example is full RST or ASM models, in which the closure of pressure-strain correlations is pivotal (their counterpart ought to be identified and discussed in equations (5-21) and the following ones). The book does not address more sophisticated non-local approaches, such as two-point (or spectral) non-linear closure theories and models, `rapid distortion theory' for linear regimes, not to mention scaling and intermittency based on two-point structure functions, etc. The book sometimes mixes theoretical modelling and pure empirical relationships, the empirical character coming from the lack of a nonlocal (two-point) approach.) In short, the book is orientated more towards applications than towards turbulence theory; it is written clearly and concisely and should be useful to a large community, interested either in the underlying stochastic formalism or in CFD applications.

  15. Reacting Multi-Species Gas Capability for USM3D Flow Solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frink, Neal T.; Schuster, David M.

    2012-01-01

    The USM3D Navier-Stokes flow solver contributed heavily to the NASA Constellation Project (CxP) as a highly productive computational tool for generating the aerodynamic databases for the Ares I and V launch vehicles and Orion launch abort vehicle (LAV). USM3D is currently limited to ideal-gas flows, which are not adequate for modeling the chemistry or temperature effects of hot-gas jet flows. This task was initiated to create an efficient implementation of multi-species gas and equilibrium chemistry into the USM3D code to improve its predictive capabilities for hot jet impingement effects. The goal of this NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) assessment was to implement and validate a simulation capability to handle real-gas effects in the USM3D code. This document contains the outcome of the NESC assessment.

  16. Strategies for Effectively Visualizing a 3D Flow Using Volume Line Integral Convolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Interrante, Victoria; Grosch, Chester

    1997-01-01

    This paper discusses strategies for effectively portraying 3D flow using volume line integral convolution. Issues include defining an appropriate input texture, clarifying the distinct identities and relative depths of the advected texture elements, and selectively highlighting regions of interest in both the input and output volumes. Apart from offering insights into the greater potential of 3D LIC as a method for effectively representing flow in a volume, a principal contribution of this work is the suggestion of a technique for generating and rendering 3D visibility-impeding 'halos' that can help to intuitively indicate the presence of depth discontinuities between contiguous elements in a projection and thereby clarify the 3D spatial organization of elements in the flow. The proposed techniques are applied to the visualization of a hot, supersonic, laminar jet exiting into a colder, subsonic coflow.

  17. Turbulent motion of mass flows. Mathematical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eglit, Margarita; Yakubenko, Alexander; Yakubenko, Tatiana

    2016-04-01

    New mathematical models for unsteady turbulent mass flows, e.g., dense snow avalanches and landslides, are presented. Such models are important since most of large scale flows are turbulent. In addition to turbulence, the two other important points are taken into account: the entrainment of the underlying material by the flow and the nonlinear rheology of moving material. The majority of existing models are based on the depth-averaged equations and the turbulent character of the flow is accounted by inclusion of drag proportional to the velocity squared. In this paper full (not depth-averaged) equations are used. It is assumed that basal entrainment takes place if the bed friction equals the shear strength of the underlying layer (Issler D, M. Pastor Peréz. 2011). The turbulent characteristics of the flow are calculated using a three-parameter differential model (Lushchik et al., 1978). The rheological properties of moving material are modeled by one of the three types of equations: 1) Newtonian fluid with high viscosity, 2) power-law fluid and 3) Bingham fluid. Unsteady turbulent flows down long homogeneous slope are considered. The flow dynamical parameters and entrainment rate behavior in time as well as their dependence on properties of moving and underlying materials are studied numerically. REFERENCES M.E. Eglit and A.E. Yakubenko, 2014. Numerical modeling of slope flows entraining bottom material. Cold Reg. Sci. Technol., 108, 139-148 Margarita E. Eglit and Alexander E. Yakubenko, 2016. The effect of bed material entrainment and non-Newtonian rheology on dynamics of turbulent slope flows. Fluid Dynamics, 51(3) Issler D, M. Pastor Peréz. 2011. Interplay of entrainment and rheology in snow avalanches; a numerical study. Annals of Glaciology, 52(58), 143-147 Lushchik, V.G., Paveliev, A.A. , and Yakubenko, A.E., 1978. Three-parameter model of shear turbulence. Fluid Dynamics, 13, (3), 350-362

  18. Three-dimensional potential flows from functions of a 3D complex variable

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, Patrick; Panton, Ronald L.; Martin, E. D.

    1990-01-01

    Potential, or ideal, flow velocities can be found from the gradient of an harmonic function. An ordinary complex valued analytic function can be written as the sum of two real valued functions, both of which are harmonic. Thus, 2D complex valued functions serve as a source of functions that describe two-dimensional potential flows. However, this use of complex variables has been limited to two-dimensions. Recently, a new system of three-dimensional complex variables has been developed at the NASA Ames Research Center. As a step toward application of this theory to the analysis of 3D potential flow, several functions of a three-dimensional complex variable have been investigated. The results for two such functions, the 3D exponential and 3D logarithm, are presented in this paper. Potential flows found from these functions are investigated. Important characteristics of these flows fields are noted.

  19. Turbulent dispersion via fan-generated flows

    PubMed Central

    Halloran, Siobhan K.; Wexler, Anthony S.; Ristenpart, William D.

    2014-01-01

    Turbulent dispersion of passive scalar quantities has been extensively studied in wind tunnel settings, where the flow is carefully conditioned using flow straighteners and grids. Much less is known about turbulent dispersion in the “unconditioned” flows generated by fans that are ubiquitous in indoor environments, despite the importance of these flows to pathogen and contaminant transport. Here, we demonstrate that a point source of scalars released into an airflow generated by an axial fan yields a plume whose width is invariant with respect to the fan speed. The results point toward a useful simplification in modeling of disease and pollution spread via fan-generated flows. PMID:24932096

  20. POD analysis of turbulent pipe flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smits, Alexander J.; Hellström, Leo; Ganapathisubramani, Bharathram

    2015-11-01

    Proper Orthogonal Decomposition was introduced into the analysis of turbulent flow by Lumley (1967, 1981). Turbulent flows pose particular challenges for POD analysis because the energy is distributed over a wide range of scales. It has recently been found, however, that POD can be a powerful experimental tool for identifying the largest scales, especially the Large Scale Motions (LSMs) and Very Large Scale Motions (VLSMs) in turbulent pipe flow. It has also been useful, for example, to identify the large-scale motions that dominate the unsteady behavior of the flow downstream of a right-angled bend. Here, we summarize some of these experimental results, and discuss their implications for the understanding of turbulence structure. Supported under ONR Grant N00014-13-1-0174 and ERC Grant No. 277472.

  1. Turbulent flow separation in three-dimensional asymmetric diffusers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeyapaul, Elbert

    2011-12-01

    Turbulent three-dimensional flow separation is more complicated than 2-D. The physics of the flow is not well understood. Turbulent flow separation is nearly independent of the Reynolds number, and separation in 3-D occurs at singular points and along convergence lines emanating from these points. Most of the engineering turbulence research is driven by the need to gain knowledge of the flow field that can be used to improve modeling predictions. This work is motivated by the need for a detailed study of 3-D separation in asymmetric diffusers, to understand the separation phenomena using eddy-resolving simulation methods, assess the predictability of existing RANS turbulence models and propose modeling improvements. The Cherry diffuser has been used as a benchmark. All existing linear eddy-viscosity RANS models k--o SST,k--epsilon and v2- f fail in predicting such flows, predicting separation on the wrong side. The geometry has a doubly-sloped wall, with the other two walls orthogonal to each other and aligned with the diffuser inlet giving the diffuser an asymmetry. The top and side flare angles are different and this gives rise to different pressure gradient in each transverse direction. Eddyresolving simulations using the Scale adaptive simulation (SAS) and Large Eddy Simulation (LES) method have been used to predict separation in benchmark diffuser and validated. A series of diffusers with the same configuration have been generated, each having the same streamwise pressure gradient and parametrized only by the inlet aspect ratio. The RANS models were put to test and the flow physics explored using SAS-generated flow field. The RANS model indicate a transition in separation surface from top sloped wall to the side sloped wall at an inlet aspect ratio much lower than observed in LES results. This over-sensitivity of RANS models to transverse pressure gradients is due to lack of anisotropy in the linear Reynolds stress formulation. The complexity of the flow

  2. Advanced Numerical Modeling of Turbulent Atmospheric Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kühnlein, Christian; Dörnbrack, Andreas; Gerz, Thomas

    The present chapter introduces the method of computational simulation to predict and study turbulent atmospheric flows. This includes a description of the fundamental approach to computational simulation and the practical implementation using the technique of large-eddy simulation. In addition, selected contributions from IPA scientists to computational model development and various examples for applications are given. These examples include homogeneous turbulence, convective boundary layers, heated forest canopy, buoyant thermals, and large-scale flows with baroclinic wave instability.

  3. Examining In-Cloud Convective Turbulence in Relation to Total Lightning and the 3D Wind Field of Severe Thunderstorms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Momar, S. A.; Deierling, W.; Williams, J. K.; Hoffman, E. G.

    2014-12-01

    Convectively induced turbulence (CIT) is commonly listed as a cause or factor in weather-related commercial aviation accidents. In-cloud CIT is generated in part by shears between convective updrafts and downdrafts. Total lightning is also dependent on a robust updraft and the resulting storm electrification. The relationship between total lightning and turbulence could prove useful in operational aviation settings with the use of future measurements from the geostationary lightning mapper (GLM) onboard the GOES-R satellite. Providing nearly hemispheric coverage of total lightning, the GLM could help identify CIT in otherwise data-sparse locations. For a severe thunderstorm case on 7 June 2012 in northeast Colorado, in-cloud eddy dissipation rate estimates from the NCAR/NEXRAD Turbulence Detection Algorithm were compared with cloud electrification data from the Colorado Lightning Mapping Array and radar products from the Denver, Colorado WSR-88D. These comparisons showed that high concentrations of very high frequency (VHF) source densities emitted by lightning occurred near and downstream of the storm's convective core. Severe turbulence was also shown to occur near this area, extending near the melting level of the storm and spreading upward and outward. Additionally, increases/decreases in VHF sources and turbulence volumes occurred within a few minutes of each other; although, light turbulence was shown to increase near one storm's dissipation. This may be due to increased shear from the now downdraft dominate storm. The 3D wind field from this case, obtained by either a dual-Doppler or a Variational Doppler Radar Assimilation System (VDRAS) analysis, will also be examined to further study the relationships between total lightning and thunderstorm kinematics. If these results prove to be robust, lightning may serve as a strong indicator of the location of moderate or greater turbulence.

  4. Turbulent momentum transport due to neoclassical flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jungpyo; Barnes, Michael; Parra, Felix I.; Belli, Emily; Candy, Jeff

    2015-12-01

    Intrinsic toroidal rotation in a tokamak can be driven by turbulent momentum transport due to neoclassical flow effects breaking a symmetry of turbulence. In this paper we categorize the contributions due to neoclassical effects to the turbulent momentum transport, and evaluate each contribution using gyrokinetic simulations. We find that the relative importance of each contribution changes with collisionality. For low collisionality, the dominant contributions come from neoclassical particle and parallel flows. For moderate collisionality, there are non-negligible contributions due to neoclassical poloidal electric field and poloidal gradients of density and temperature, which are not important for low collisionality.

  5. Compressible turbulent flows: Modeling and similarity considerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeman, Otto

    1991-01-01

    With the recent revitalization of high speed flow research, compressibility presents a new set of challenging problems to turbulence researchers. Questions arise as to what extent compressibility affects turbulence dynamics, structures, the Reynolds stress-mean velocity (constitutive) relation, and the accompanying processes of heat transfer and mixing. In astrophysical applications, compressible turbulence is believed to play an important role in intergalactic gas cloud dynamics and in accretion disk convection. Understanding and modeling of the compressibility effects in free shear flows, boundary layers, and boundary layer/shock interactions is discussed.

  6. Linear and nonlinear instability and ligament dynamics in 3D laminar two-layer liquid/liquid flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ó Náraigh, Lennon; Valluri, Prashant; Scott, David; Bethune, Iain; Spelt, Peter

    2013-11-01

    We consider the linear and nonlinear stability of two-phase density-matched but viscosity contrasted fluids subject to laminar Poiseuille flow in a channel, paying particular attention to the formation of three-dimensional waves. The Orr-Sommerfeld-Squire analysis is used along with DNS of the 3D two-phase Navier-Stokes equations using our newly launched TPLS Solver (http://edin.ac/10cRKzS). For the parameter regimes considered, we demonstrate the existence of two distinct mechanisms whereby 3D waves enter the system, and dominate at late time. There exists a direct route, whereby 3D waves are amplified by the standard linear mechanism; for certain parameter classes, such waves grow at a rate less than but comparable to that of most-dangerous two-dimensional mode. Additionally, there is a weakly nonlinear route, whereby a purely spanwise wave couples to a streamwise mode and grows exponentially. We demonstrate these mechanisms in isolation and in concert. Consideration is also given to the ultimate state of these waves: persistent three-dimensional nonlinear waves are stretched and distorted by the base flow, thereby producing regimes of ligaments, ``sheets,'' or ``interfacial turbulence.'' HECToR RAP/dCSE Project e174, HPC-Europa 2.

  7. Surface waves propagating on a turbulent flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutiérrez, Pablo; Aumaître, Sébastien

    2016-02-01

    We study the propagation of monochromatic surface waves on a turbulent flow of liquid metal, when the waves are much less energetic than the background flow. Electromagnetic forcing drives quasi-two-dimensional turbulence with strong vertical vorticity. To isolate the surface-wave field, we remove the surface deformation induced by the background turbulent flow using coherent-phase averaging at the wave frequency. We observe a significant increase in wavelength, when the latter is smaller than the forcing length scale. This phenomenon has not been reported before and can be explained by multiple random wave deflections induced by the turbulent velocity gradients. The shift in wavelength thus provides an estimate of the fluctuations in deflection angle. Local measurements of the wave frequency far from the wavemaker do not reveal such systematic behavior, although a small shift is visible. Finally, we quantify the damping enhancement induced by the turbulent flow and compare it to the existing theoretical predictions. Most of them suggest that the damping increases as the square of the Froude number, whereas our experimental data show a linear increase with the Froude number. We interpret this linear relationship as a balance between the time for a wave to cross a turbulent structure and the turbulent mixing time. The larger the ratio of these two times, the more energy is extracted from the wave. We conclude with possible mechanisms for energy exchange.

  8. Flow topologies and turbulence scales in a jet-in-cross-flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz, A. M.; Lacaze, G.; Oefelein, J. C.

    2015-04-01

    This paper presents a detailed analysis of the flow topologies and turbulence scales in the jet-in-cross-flow experiment of Su and Mungal ["Simultaneous measurements of scalar and velocity field evolution in turbulent crossflowing jets," J. Fluid Mech. 513(1), 1-45 (2004)]. The analysis is performed using the Large Eddy Simulation (LES) technique with a highly resolved grid and time-step and well controlled boundary conditions. This enables quantitative agreement with the first and second moments of turbulence statistics measured in the experiment. LES is used to perform the analysis since experimental measurements of time-resolved 3D fields are still in their infancy and because sampling periods are generally limited with direct numerical simulation. A major focal point is the comprehensive characterization of the turbulence scales and their evolution. Time-resolved probes are used with long sampling periods to obtain maps of the integral scales, Taylor microscales, and turbulent kinetic energy spectra. Scalar-fluctuation scales are also quantified. In the near-field, coherent structures are clearly identified, both in physical and spectral space. Along the jet centerline, turbulence scales grow according to a classical one-third power law. However, the derived maps of turbulence scales reveal strong inhomogeneities in the flow. From the modeling perspective, these insights are useful to design optimized grids and improve numerical predictions in similar configurations.

  9. Turbulent Mixing of Multiphase Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Y.-N.; Ferziger, J.; Ham, F. E.; Herrmann, M.

    2003-01-01

    Thus we conduct numerical simulations of multiphase fluids stirred by two-dimensional turbulence to assess the possibility of self-similar drop size distribution in turbulence. In our turbulence simulations, we also explore the non-diffusive limit, where molecular mobility for the interface is vanishing. Special care is needed to transport the non-diffusive interface. Numerically, we use the particle level set method to evolve the interface. Instead of using the usual methods to calculate the surface tension force from the level set function, we reconstruct the interface based on phase- field modeling, and calculate the continuum surface tension forcing from the reconstructed interface.

  10. Transition to Turbulence and Effect of Initial Conditions on 3D Compressible Mixing in Planar Blast-wave-driven Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Miles, A R; Edwards, M J; Greenough, J A

    2004-11-08

    Perturbations on an interface driven by a strong blast wave grow in time due to a combination of Rayleigh-Taylor, Richtmyer-Meshkov, and decompression effects. In this paper, results from three-dimensional numerical simulations of such a system under drive conditions to be attainable on the National Ignition Facility [E. M. Campbell, Laser Part. Beams, 9(2), 209 (1991)] are presented. Using the multi-physics, adaptive mesh refinement, higher order Godunov Eulerian hydrocode, Raptor [L. H. Howell and J.A. Greenough, J. Comp. Phys. 184, 53 (2003)], the late nonlinear instability evolution, including transition to turbulence, is considered for various multimode perturbation spectra. The 3D post-transition state differs from the 2D result, but the process of transition proceeds similarly in both 2D and 3D. The turbulent mixing transition results in a reduction in the growth rate of the mixing layer relative to its pre-transition value and, in the case of the bubble front, relative to the 2D result. The post-transition spike front velocity is approximately the same in 2D and 3D. Implications for hydrodynamic mixing in core-collapse supernova are discussed.

  11. 3D-printed devices for continuous-flow organic chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Dragone, Vincenza; Sans, Victor; Rosnes, Mali H; Kitson, Philip J

    2013-01-01

    Summary We present a study in which the versatility of 3D-printing is combined with the processing advantages of flow chemistry for the synthesis of organic compounds. Robust and inexpensive 3D-printed reactionware devices are easily connected using standard fittings resulting in complex, custom-made flow systems, including multiple reactors in a series with in-line, real-time analysis using an ATR-IR flow cell. As a proof of concept, we utilized two types of organic reactions, imine syntheses and imine reductions, to show how different reactor configurations and substrates give different products. PMID:23766811

  12. The computation of steady 3-D separated flows over aerodynamic bodies at incidence and yaw

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pulliam, T. H.; Pan, D.

    1986-01-01

    This paper describes the implementation of a general purpose 3-D NS code and its application to simulated 3-D separated vortical flows over aerodynamic bodies. The thin-layer Reynolds-averaged NS equations are solved by an implicit approximate factorization scheme. The pencil data structure enables the code to run on very fine grids using only limited incore memories. Solutions of a low subsonic flow over an inclined ellipsoid are compared with experimental data to validate the code. Transonic flows over a yawed elliptical wing at incidence are computed and separations occurred at different yaw angles are discussed.

  13. Model studies of blood flow in basilar artery with 3D laser Doppler anemometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frolov, S. V.; Sindeev, S. V.; Liepsch, D.; Balasso, A.; Proskurin, S. G.; Potlov, A. Y.

    2015-03-01

    It is proposed an integrated approach to the study of basilar artery blood flow using 3D laser Doppler anemometer for identifying the causes of the formation and development of cerebral aneurysms. Feature of the work is the combined usage of both mathematical modeling and experimental methods. Described the experimental setup and the method of measurement of basilar artery blood flow, carried out in an interdisciplinary laboratory of Hospital Rechts der Isar of Technical University of Munich. The experimental setup used to simulate the blood flow in the basilar artery and to measure blood flow characteristics using 3D laser Doppler anemometer (3D LDA). Described a method of numerical studies carried out in Tambov State Technical University and the Bakoulev Center for Cardiovascular Surgery. Proposed an approach for sharing experimental and numerical methods of research to identify the causes of the basilar artery aneurysms.

  14. 3D vector flow using a row-column addressed CMUT array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holbek, Simon; Christiansen, Thomas Lehrmann; Engholm, Mathias; Lei, Anders; Stuart, Mathias Bo; Beers, Christopher; Moesner, Lars Nordahl; Bagge, Jan Peter; Thomsen, Erik Vilain; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents an in-house developed 2-D capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer (CMUT) applied for 3-D blood flow estimation. The probe breaks with conventional transducers in two ways; first, the ultrasonic pressure field is generated from thousands of small vibrating micromachined cells, and second, elements are accessed by row and/or column indices. The 62+62 2-D row-column addressed prototype CMUT probe was used for vector flow estimation by transmitting focused ultrasound into a flow-rig with a fully developed parabolic flow. The beam-to-flow angle was 90°. The received data was beamformed and processed offline. A transverse oscillation (TO) velocity estimator was used to estimate the 3-D vector flow along a line originating from the center of the transducer. The estimated velocities in the lateral and axial direction were close to zero as expected. In the transverse direction a characteristic parabolic velocity profile was estimated with a peak velocity of 0.48 m/s +/- 0.02 m/s in reference to the expected 0.54 m/s. The results presented are the first 3-D vector flow estimates obtained with a row-column CMUT probe, which demonstrates that the CMUT technology is feasible for 3-D flow estimation.

  15. The performance & flow visualization studies of three-dimensional (3-D) wind turbine blade models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutrisno, Prajitno, Purnomo, W., Setyawan B.

    2016-06-01

    Recently, studies on the design of 3-D wind turbine blades have a less attention even though 3-D blade products are widely sold. In contrary, advanced studies in 3-D helicopter blade tip have been studied rigorously. Studies in wind turbine blade modeling are mostly assumed that blade spanwise sections behave as independent two-dimensional airfoils, implying that there is no exchange of momentum in the spanwise direction. Moreover, flow visualization experiments are infrequently conducted. Therefore, a modeling study of wind turbine blade with visualization experiment is needed to be improved to obtain a better understanding. The purpose of this study is to investigate the performance of 3-D wind turbine blade models with backward-forward swept and verify the flow patterns using flow visualization. In this research, the blade models are constructed based on the twist and chord distributions following Schmitz's formula. Forward and backward swept are added to the rotating blades. Based on this, the additional swept would enhance or diminish outward flow disturbance or stall development propagation on the spanwise blade surfaces to give better blade design. Some combinations, i. e., b lades with backward swept, provide a better 3-D favorable rotational force of the rotor system. The performance of the 3-D wind turbine system model is measured by a torque meter, employing Prony's braking system. Furthermore, the 3-D flow patterns around the rotating blade models are investigated by applying "tuft-visualization technique", to study the appearance of laminar, separated, and boundary layer flow patterns surrounding the 3-dimentional blade system.

  16. Supersonic boundary-layer flow turbulence modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Chi-Rong

    1993-01-01

    Baldwin-Lomax and kappa-epsilon turbulence models were modified for use in Navier-Stokes numerical computations of Mach 2.9 supersonic turbulent boundary layer flows along compression ramps. The computational results of Reynolds shear stress profiles were compared with experimental data. The Baldwin-Lomax model was modified to account for the Reynolds shear stress amplification within the flow field. A hybrid kappa-epsilon model with viscous sublayer turbulence treatment was constructed to predict the Reynolds shear stress profiles within the entire flow field. These modified turbulence models were effective for the computations of the surface pressure and the skin friction factor variations along an 8 deg ramp surface. The hybrid kappa-epsilon model could improve the predictions of the Reynolds shear stress profile and the skin friction factor near the corner of a 16 deg ramp.

  17. Transition phenomena in unstably stratified turbulent flows.

    PubMed

    Bukai, M; Eidelman, A; Elperin, T; Kleeorin, N; Rogachevskii, I; Sapir-Katiraie, I

    2011-03-01

    We study experimentally and theoretically the transition phenomena caused by external forcing from Rayleigh-Bénard convection with large-scale circulation (LSC) to the limiting regime of unstably stratified turbulent flow without LSC, where the temperature field behaves like a passive scalar. In the experiments we use the Rayleigh-Bénard apparatus with an additional source of turbulence produced by two oscillating grids located near the sidewalls of the chamber. When the frequency of the grid oscillations is larger than 2 Hz, the LSC in turbulent convection is destroyed, and the destruction of the LSC is accompanied by a strong change of the mean temperature distribution. However, in all regimes of the unstably stratified turbulent flow the ratio [(ℓ{x}∇{x}T)²+(ℓ{y}∇{y}T)² + (ℓ{z}∇{z}T)²]/<θ²> varies slightly (even in the range of parameters where the behavior of the temperature field is different from that of the passive scalar). Here ℓ{i} are the integral scales of turbulence along the x,y,z directions, and T and θ are the mean and fluctuating parts of the fluid temperature. At all frequencies of the grid oscillations we have detected long-term nonlinear oscillations of the mean temperature. The theoretical predictions based on the budget equations for turbulent kinetic energy, turbulent temperature fluctuations, and turbulent heat flux, are in agreement with the experimental results. PMID:21517582

  18. Summary of EASM Turbulence Models in CFL3D With Validation Test Cases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rumsey, Christopher L.; Gatski, Thomas B.

    2003-01-01

    This paper summarizes the Explicit Algebraic Stress Model in k-omega form (EASM-ko) and in k-epsilon form (EASM-ke) in the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes code CFL3D. These models have been actively used over the last several years in CFL3D, and have undergone some minor modifications during that time. Details of the equations and method for coding the latest versions of the models are given, and numerous validation cases are presented. This paper serves as a validation archive for these models.

  19. Development of discrete gas kinetic scheme for simulation of 3D viscous incompressible and compressible flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, L. M.; Shu, C.; Wang, Y.; Sun, Y.

    2016-08-01

    The sphere function-based gas kinetic scheme (GKS), which was presented by Shu and his coworkers [23] for simulation of inviscid compressible flows, is extended to simulate 3D viscous incompressible and compressible flows in this work. Firstly, we use certain discrete points to represent the spherical surface in the phase velocity space. Then, integrals along the spherical surface for conservation forms of moments, which are needed to recover 3D Navier-Stokes equations, are approximated by integral quadrature. The basic requirement is that these conservation forms of moments can be exactly satisfied by weighted summation of distribution functions at discrete points. It was found that the integral quadrature by eight discrete points on the spherical surface, which forms the D3Q8 discrete velocity model, can exactly match the integral. In this way, the conservative variables and numerical fluxes can be computed by weighted summation of distribution functions at eight discrete points. That is, the application of complicated formulations resultant from integrals can be replaced by a simple solution process. Several numerical examples including laminar flat plate boundary layer, 3D lid-driven cavity flow, steady flow through a 90° bending square duct, transonic flow around DPW-W1 wing and supersonic flow around NACA0012 airfoil are chosen to validate the proposed scheme. Numerical results demonstrate that the present scheme can provide reasonable numerical results for 3D viscous flows.

  20. Fdf in US3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otis, Collin; Ferrero, Pietro; Candler, Graham; Givi, Peyman

    2013-11-01

    The scalar filtered mass density function (SFMDF) methodology is implemented into the computer code US3D. This is an unstructured Eulerian finite volume hydrodynamic solver and has proven very effective for simulation of compressible turbulent flows. The resulting SFMDF-US3D code is employed for large eddy simulation (LES) on unstructured meshes. Simulations are conducted of subsonic and supersonic flows under non-reacting and reacting conditions. The consistency and the accuracy of the simulated results are assessed along with appraisal of the overall performance of the methodology. The SFMDF-US3D is now capable of simulating high speed flows in complex configurations.

  1. Entrainment-Zone Restratification and Flow Structures in Stratified Shear Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reif, B. Anders Pettersson; Werne, Joseph; Andreassen, Oyvind; Meyer, Christian; Davis-Mansour, Melissa

    2002-01-01

    Late-time dynamics and morphology of a stratified turbulent shear layer are examined using 1) Reynolds-stress and heat-flux budgets, 2) the single-point structure tensors introduced by Kassinos et al. (2001), and 3) flow visualization via 3D volume rendering. Flux reversal is observed during restratification in the edges of the turbulent layer. We present a first attempt to quantify the turbulence-mean-flow interaction and to characterize the predominant flow structures. Future work will extend this analysis to earlier times and different values of the Reynolds and Richardson numbers.

  2. Review and assessment of turbulence models for hypersonic flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Christopher J.; Blottner, Frederick G.

    2006-10-01

    Accurate aerodynamic prediction is critical for the design and optimization of hypersonic vehicles. Turbulence modeling remains a major source of uncertainty in the computational prediction of aerodynamic forces and heating for these systems. The first goal of this article is to update the previous comprehensive review of hypersonic shock/turbulent boundary-layer interaction experiments published in 1991 by Settles and Dodson (Hypersonic shock/boundary-layer interaction database. NASA CR 177577, 1991). In their review, Settles and Dodson developed a methodology for assessing experiments appropriate for turbulence model validation and critically surveyed the existing hypersonic experiments. We limit the scope of our current effort by considering only two-dimensional (2D)/axisymmetric flows in the hypersonic flow regime where calorically perfect gas models are appropriate. We extend the prior database of recommended hypersonic experiments (on four 2D and two 3D shock-interaction geometries) by adding three new geometries. The first two geometries, the flat plate/cylinder and the sharp cone, are canonical, zero-pressure gradient flows which are amenable to theory-based correlations, and these correlations are discussed in detail. The third geometry added is the 2D shock impinging on a turbulent flat plate boundary layer. The current 2D hypersonic database for shock-interaction flows thus consists of nine experiments on five different geometries. The second goal of this study is to review and assess the validation usage of various turbulence models on the existing experimental database. Here we limit the scope to one- and two-equation turbulence models where integration to the wall is used (i.e., we omit studies involving wall functions). A methodology for validating turbulence models is given, followed by an extensive evaluation of the turbulence models on the current hypersonic experimental database. A total of 18 one- and two-equation turbulence models are reviewed

  3. Analysis and statistics of discontinuities as obtained from 3D simulation of MHD turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lei; He, Jian-Sen; Tu, Chuan-Yi; Yang, Li-Ping; Wang, Xin; Marsch, Eckart; Wang, Ling-Hua

    2016-03-01

    The turbulent solar wind abounds with MHD discontinuities, and such discontinuities are often found in close connection with turbulence intermittency, constituting a possible main contributor to the turbulence dissipation and solar wind heating. Among the discontinuities, tangential (TD) and rotational (RD) ones are two most important types. Recently, the connection between turbulence intermittency and proton thermodynamics has been being intensively investigated. Such connections are founded to be involved with MHD instablilities, but the difference of TDs an RDs in this process has not yet been covered. Herewith we define new methods for identifying TDs and RDs obtained from a three-dimensional MHD simulation with pressure anisotropy. Especially, we define the Total Variance of Increments (TVI) as a new measure of magnetic field changes. Based on the identified cases, we compare their occurrence rates and heating effects. More specifically, we find that the thermal states embedding TDs, compared with their RD counterparts, tend to be more associated with extreme plasma parameters or instabilites. Some other possible applications of TVI-like norms are also herewith discussed.

  4. Instability, Turbulence, and 3D Magnetic Reconnection in a Line-Tied, Zero Net Current Screw Pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brookhart, Matthew I.; Stemo, Aaron; Zuberbier, Amanda; Zweibel, Ellen; Forest, Cary B.

    2015-04-01

    This Letter reports the first experimental investigation into a line-tied plasma with a reversed current profile. Discrete current sources create a cylindrical plasma equilibrium with an axial field and zero net current. Detailed magnetic measurements show that an internal m =1 mode with no external character grows exponentially. The nonlinear evolution of the mode drives 3D reconnection events that reorganize the plasma equilibrium. The plasma is turbulent and exhibits reconnection events on a range of scales. These data are consistent with recent simulations of coronal loops and the nanoflare coronal heating mechanism.

  5. Single point modeling of rotating turbulent flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hadid, A. H.; Mansour, N. N.; Zeman, O.

    1994-01-01

    A model for the effects of rotation on turbulence is proposed and tested. These effects which influence mainly the rate of turbulence decay are modeled in a modified turbulent energy dissipation rate equation that has explicit dependence on the mean rotation rate. An appropriate definition of the rotation rate derived from critical point theory and based on the invariants of the deformation tensor is proposed. The modeled dissipation rate equation is numerically well behaved and can be used in conjunction with any level of turbulence closure. The model is applied to the two-equation kappa-epsilon turbulence model and is used to compute separated flows in a backward-facing step and an axisymmetric swirling coaxial jets into a sudden expansion. In general, the rotation modified dissipation rate model shows some improvements over the standard kappa-epsilon model.

  6. Single point modeling of rotating turbulent flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadid, A. H.; Mansour, N. N.; Zeman, O.

    1994-12-01

    A model for the effects of rotation on turbulence is proposed and tested. These effects which influence mainly the rate of turbulence decay are modeled in a modified turbulent energy dissipation rate equation that has explicit dependence on the mean rotation rate. An appropriate definition of the rotation rate derived from critical point theory and based on the invariants of the deformation tensor is proposed. The modeled dissipation rate equation is numerically well behaved and can be used in conjunction with any level of turbulence closure. The model is applied to the two-equation kappa-epsilon turbulence model and is used to compute separated flows in a backward-facing step and an axisymmetric swirling coaxial jets into a sudden expansion. In general, the rotation modified dissipation rate model shows some improvements over the standard kappa-epsilon model.

  7. Asymmetries in an obstructed turbulent channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Khoury, George K.; Pettersen, Bjørnar; Andersson, Helge I.; Barri, Mustafa

    2010-09-01

    The asymmetric flow pattern caused by a single thin-plate obstruction in a plane channel has been explored by means of direct numerical simulations. The blockage ratio was 1:2 and the bulk Reynolds number about 5700. In order to mimic an infinitely long channel section upstream of the obstruction, realistic dynamic inflow conditions were provided by a promising technique proposed by Barri et al. ["Inflow conditions for inhomogeneous turbulent flows," Int. J. Numer. Methods Fluids 60, 227 (2009)]. The fluid downstream of the symmetric obstruction was sucked toward one side where a modestly long region of rather strong recirculating flow was observed. The weaker recirculation bubble formed at the opposite side was 17 times longer than the obstruction height and almost four times the size of the shorter bubble. The overall flow pattern turned out to be rather different from that observed in a similar study of channel flow subjected to periodically repeating obstructions by Makino et al. ["Turbulent structures and statistics in turbulent channel flow with two-dimensional slits," Int. J. Heat Fluid Flow 29, 602 (2008)]. An anomalous variation of the pressure coefficient was observed with an excessively low pressure below the shorter of the bubbles. A locally high pressure occurred where the deflected jet flow impinges on the wall, whereas another pressure minimum could be associated with the flow acceleration caused by the severe blockage due to the major recirculation bubble. The turbulent fluctuations were suppressed due to the acceleration through the obstruction and high levels of streamwise velocity persisted far downstream. Exceptionally high turbulence levels were observed in the mixing-layers emanating from the two sides of the obstruction. The turbulence in these mixing-layers turned out to be qualitatively and quantitatively different on the two sides and exhibited distinctly different anisotropies.

  8. Time-lapse 3-D seismic imaging of shallow subsurface contaminant flow.

    PubMed

    McKenna, J; Sherlock, D; Evans, B

    2001-12-01

    This paper presents a physical modelling study outlining a technique whereby buoyant contaminant flow within water-saturated unconsolidated sand was remotely monitored utilizing the time-lapse 3-D (TL3-D) seismic response. The controlled temperature and pressure conditions, along with the high level of acquisition repeatability attainable using sandbox physical models, allow the TL3-D seismic response to pore fluid movement to be distinguished from all other effects. TL3-D seismic techniques are currently being developed to monitor hydrocarbon reserves within producing reservoirs in an endeavour to improve overall recovery. However, in many ways, sandbox models under atmospheric conditions more accurately simulate the shallow subsurface than petroleum reservoirs. For this reason, perhaps the greatest application for analogue sandbox modelling is to improve our understanding of shallow groundwater and environmental flow mechanisms. Two fluid flow simulations were conducted whereby air and kerosene were injected into separate water-saturated unconsolidated sand models. In both experiments, a base 3-D seismic volume was recorded and compared with six later monitor surveys recorded while the injection program was conducted. Normal incidence amplitude and P-wave velocity information were extracted from the TL3-D seismic data to provide visualization of contaminant migration. Reflection amplitudes displayed qualitative areal distribution of fluids when a suitable impedance contrast existed between pore fluids. TL3-D seismic reflection tomography can potentially monitor the change in areal distribution of fluid contaminants over time, indicating flow patterns. However, other research and this current work have not established a quantifiable relationship between either normal reflection amplitudes and attenuation and fluid saturation. Generally, different pore fluids will have unique seismic velocities due to differences in compressibility and density. The predictable

  9. A moving mesh algorithm for 3-D regional groundwater flow with water table and seepage face

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knupp, P.

    A numerical algorithm is described for solving the free-surface groundwater flow equations in 3-D large-scale unconfined aquifers with strongly heterogeneous conductivity and surface recharge. The algorithm uses a moving mesh to track the water-table as it evolves according to kinematic and seepage face boundary conditions. Both steady-state and transient algorithms are implemented in the SECO-Flow 3-D code and demonstrated on stratigraphy based on the Delaware Basin of south-eastern New Mexico.

  10. Elasto-Inertial Turbulence in polymeric flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terrapon, Vincent; Dubief, Yves; Soria, Julio

    2013-11-01

    The dynamics of elasto-inertial turbulence (EIT) is investigated numerically from the perspective of the coupling between polymer dynamics and flow structures. In particular, direct numerical simulations of channel flow with Reynolds numbers ranging from 1000 to 6000 are used to study the formation and dynamics of elastic instabilities and their effects on the flow. Based on the splitting of the pressure into inertial and polymeric contributions, it is shown that the trains of cylindrical structures around thin sheets of high polymer extension that are characteristics to elasto-inertial turbulence are mostly driven by polymeric contributions. Also King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah.

  11. Transition to turbulence in pulsating pipe flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hof, Bjorn; Warnecke, Sascha; Xu, Duo

    2013-11-01

    We report an experimental study of the transition to turbulence in a pulsating pipe flow the most important example of pulsating flows is the cardiovascular system where the onset of fluctuations and turbulence can be a possible cause for various diseases such as the formation of aneurysms. The present study is limited to a straight rigid pipe, sinusoidal modulation of the flow rate and a Newtonian fluid. The dimensionless parameters (Womersley and Reynolds numbers) were chosen to include the parameter range encountered in larger arteries. We observe that at large frequencies the critical point for the onset of turbulence remains completely unaffected by pulsation for all amplitudes investigated (up to 40%). However for smaller frequencies (Womersley numbers below 10) the critical point considerably increases. Furthermore we investigate how the transition scenario is affected for a fixed frequency and increasing amplitudes (approaching oscillatory flow).

  12. The pdf approach to turbulent flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kollmann, W.

    1990-01-01

    This paper provides a detailed discussion of the theory and application of probability density function (pdf) methods, which provide a complete statistical description of turbulent flow fields at a single point or a finite number of points. The basic laws governing the flow of Newtonian fluids are set up in the Eulerian and the Lagrangian frame, and the exact and linear equations for the characteristic functionals in those frames are discussed. Pdf equations in both frames are derived as Fourier transforms of the equations of the characteristic functions. Possible formulations for the nonclosed terms in the pdf equation are discussed, their properties are assessed, and closure modes for the molecular-transport and the fluctuating pressure-gradient terms are reviewed. The application of pdf methods to turbulent combustion flows, supersonic flows, and the interaction of turbulence with shock waves is discussed.

  13. Study on turbulence in interior ballistics flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heiser, R.; Garloff, J.

    1992-02-01

    The compressible, viscous, turbulent gas expansion flow behind an accelerating projectile moving in a gun tube is investigated by solving the Navier-Stokes equations. For future theoretical investigations of the heat transfer from the hot gases to the walls, a reliable modeling of the turbulence is needed. Turbulence is described by two algebraic models, namely, the models by Cebeci-Smith-Mosinskis and Baldwin-Lomax, as well as by a one-equation model for the turbulent kinetic energy. Computational results obtained by application of these models are compared to experimental data obtained with two low-pressure gun simulators. Also, numerical predictions are reported for the flow behind a projectile under more realistic interior ballistic conditions.

  14. Schlieren "PIV" for Turbulent Flows, Progress Report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jonassen, Dennis; Settles, Gary

    2003-11-01

    The possibility of using commercial PIV equipment with schlieren optics to measure the velocity fields of turbulent flows was discussed previously (BAPS 47, 10, 2002, p. 175, KN8). Given sufficient Reynolds number and refractive flow differences, turbulent eddies can serve as the PIV "particles" in a shadowgram, schlieren image, or interferogram. Here, the PIV software analyzes motion between consecutive schlieren images to obtain velocity fields. The evolution of turbulent eddies is shown to be insignificant when the delay between the two PIV frames is kept to a few microseconds. However, excess schlieren sensitivity is detrimental to the velocity measurement and the use of a graded filter rather than a knife-edge cutoff improves the results. "Focused" shadowgraph PIV also yields similar results. Velocimetry examples of an axisymmetric sonic helium jet in air and a 2-D turbulent boundary layer at Mach 3 are shown.

  15. Using flow information to support 3D vessel reconstruction from rotational angiography

    SciTech Connect

    Waechter, Irina; Bredno, Joerg; Weese, Juergen; Barratt, Dean C.; Hawkes, David J.

    2008-07-15

    For the assessment of cerebrovascular diseases, it is beneficial to obtain three-dimensional (3D) morphologic and hemodynamic information about the vessel system. Rotational angiography is routinely used to image the 3D vascular geometry and we have shown previously that rotational subtraction angiography has the potential to also give quantitative information about blood flow. Flow information can be determined when the angiographic sequence shows inflow and possibly outflow of contrast agent. However, a standard volume reconstruction assumes that the vessel tree is uniformly filled with contrast agent during the whole acquisition. If this is not the case, the reconstruction exhibits artifacts. Here, we show how flow information can be used to support the reconstruction of the 3D vessel centerline and radii in this case. Our method uses the fast marching algorithm to determine the order in which voxels are analyzed. For every voxel, the rotational time intensity curve (R-TIC) is determined from the image intensities at the projection points of the current voxel. Next, the bolus arrival time of the contrast agent at the voxel is estimated from the R-TIC. Then, a measure of the intensity and duration of the enhancement is determined, from which a speed value is calculated that steers the propagation of the fast marching algorithm. The results of the fast marching algorithm are used to determine the 3D centerline by backtracking. The 3D radius is reconstructed from 2D radius estimates on the projection images. The proposed method was tested on computer simulated rotational angiography sequences with systematically varied x-ray acquisition, blood flow, and contrast agent injection parameters and on datasets from an experimental setup using an anthropomorphic cerebrovascular phantom. For the computer simulation, the mean absolute error of the 3D centerline and 3D radius estimation was 0.42 and 0.25 mm, respectively. For the experimental datasets, the mean absolute

  16. Turbulence Spreading through Shear Flow Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahm, T. S.; Diamond, P. H.; Lin, Z.

    2005-10-01

    A recent study of turbulence spreading [1] has shown that a significant level of turbulence can penetrate from the linearly unstable region to the region dominated by self-generated zonal flows. In this work, we study turbulence spreading through a mean ExB shear layer using both simple analytic model and nonlinear gyrokinetic particle (GTC) simulations. [1] T.S. Hahm, P.H. Diamond, Z. Lin et al., On the dynamics of edge-core coupling, To appear in Phys. Plasmas (2005).

  17. The Characteristics of Turbulent Flows on Forested Floodplains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darby, S. E.; Richardson, K.; Sear, D. A.

    2008-12-01

    deployed within the flume immediately downstream of a 8m long hydraulically smooth 'run-in' section with a steady discharge replicating an over bank flow observed in the field, thus achieving 1:1 hydraulic scaling. Above the PTM 3D flow velocity time-series were acquired at each node on a dense (5-10cm horizontal spatial resolution) sampling grid using Acoustic Doppler Velocimeters (ADVs). The data were analysed by visualising the 3D structure of flow velocity and derivative statistics (turbulent intensity, turbulent kinetic energy, Reynolds stresses, etc), combined with quadrant analysis to identify the spatial variation of each quadrant's contribution to the turbulence intensity. These analyses have been used to delineate flow regions dominated by different structures, and construct an empirical model that will be helpful in defining relevant modelling strategies in future research.

  18. Blob Dynamics in 3D BOUT Simulations of Tokamak Edge Turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, D; D'Ippolito, D; Myra, J; Nevins, W; Xu, X

    2004-08-23

    Propagating filaments of enhanced plasma density, or blobs, observed in 3D numerical simulations of a diverted, neutral-fueled tokamak are studied. Fluctuations of vorticity, electrical potential {phi}, temperature T{sub e} and current density J{sub {parallel}} associated with the blobs have a dipole structure perpendicular to the magnetic field and propagate radially with large E {center_dot} B drift velocities (> 1 km/s). The simulation results are consistent with a 3D blob dynamics model that incorporates increased parallel plasma resistivity (from neutral cooling of the X-point region), blob disconnection from the divertor sheath, X-point closure of the current loops, and collisional physics to sustain the {phi}, T{sub e}, J{sub {parallel}} dipoles.

  19. Flow topologies and turbulence scales in a jet-in-cross-flow

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Oefelein, Joseph C.; Ruiz, Anthony M.; Lacaze, Guilhem

    2015-04-03

    This study presents a detailed analysis of the flow topologies and turbulence scales in the jet-in-cross-flow experiment of [Su and Mungal JFM 2004]. The analysis is performed using the Large Eddy Simulation (LES) technique with a highly resolved grid and time-step and well controlled boundary conditions. This enables quantitative agreement with the first and second moments of turbulence statistics measured in the experiment. LES is used to perform the analysis since experimental measurements of time-resolved 3D fields are still in their infancy and because sampling periods are generally limited with direct numerical simulation. A major focal point is the comprehensivemore » characterization of the turbulence scales and their evolution. Time-resolved probes are used with long sampling periods to obtain maps of the integral scales, Taylor microscales, and turbulent kinetic energy spectra. Scalar-fluctuation scales are also quantified. In the near-field, coherent structures are clearly identified, both in physical and spectral space. Along the jet centerline, turbulence scales grow according to a classical one-third power law. However, the derived maps of turbulence scales reveal strong inhomogeneities in the flow. From the modeling perspective, these insights are useful to design optimized grids and improve numerical predictions in similar configurations.« less

  20. Flow topologies and turbulence scales in a jet-in-cross-flow

    SciTech Connect

    Oefelein, Joseph C.; Ruiz, Anthony M.; Lacaze, Guilhem

    2015-04-03

    This study presents a detailed analysis of the flow topologies and turbulence scales in the jet-in-cross-flow experiment of [Su and Mungal JFM 2004]. The analysis is performed using the Large Eddy Simulation (LES) technique with a highly resolved grid and time-step and well controlled boundary conditions. This enables quantitative agreement with the first and second moments of turbulence statistics measured in the experiment. LES is used to perform the analysis since experimental measurements of time-resolved 3D fields are still in their infancy and because sampling periods are generally limited with direct numerical simulation. A major focal point is the comprehensive characterization of the turbulence scales and their evolution. Time-resolved probes are used with long sampling periods to obtain maps of the integral scales, Taylor microscales, and turbulent kinetic energy spectra. Scalar-fluctuation scales are also quantified. In the near-field, coherent structures are clearly identified, both in physical and spectral space. Along the jet centerline, turbulence scales grow according to a classical one-third power law. However, the derived maps of turbulence scales reveal strong inhomogeneities in the flow. From the modeling perspective, these insights are useful to design optimized grids and improve numerical predictions in similar configurations.

  1. 3-D model of a radial flow sub-watt methanol fuel processor

    SciTech Connect

    Holladay, J. D.; Wang, Y.

    2015-10-01

    A 3-D model is presented for a novel sub-watt packed bed reactor. The reactor uses an annular inlet flow combined with a radial flow packed bed reactor. The baseline reactor is compared to a reactor with multiple outlets and a reactor with 3 internal fins. Increasing the outlets from 1 to 4 did improve the flow distribution, but did not increase the performance in the simulation. However, inserting fins allowed a decrease in temperature with same inlet flow of approximately 35K. Or the inlet flow rate could be increased by a factor of 2.8x while maintaining >99% conversion.

  2. On Numerical Methods For Hypersonic Turbulent Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yee, H. C.; Sjogreen, B.; Shu, C. W.; Wang, W.; Magin, T.; Hadjadj, A.

    2011-05-01

    Proper control of numerical dissipation in numerical methods beyond the standard shock-capturing dissipation at discontinuities is an essential element for accurate and stable simulation of hypersonic turbulent flows, including combustion, and thermal and chemical nonequilibrium flows. Unlike rapidly developing shock interaction flows, turbulence computations involve long time integrations. Improper control of numerical dissipation from one time step to another would be compounded over time, resulting in the smearing of turbulent fluctuations to an unrecognizable form. Hypersonic turbulent flows around re- entry space vehicles involve mixed steady strong shocks and turbulence with unsteady shocklets that pose added computational challenges. Stiffness of the source terms and material mixing in combustion pose yet other types of numerical challenges. A low dissipative high order well- balanced scheme, which can preserve certain non-trivial steady solutions of the governing equations exactly, may help minimize some of these difficulties. For stiff reactions it is well known that the wrong propagation speed of discontinuities occurs due to the under-resolved numerical solutions in both space and time. Schemes to improve the wrong propagation speed of discontinuities for systems of stiff reacting flows remain a challenge for algorithm development. Some of the recent algorithm developments for direct numerical simulations (DNS) and large eddy simulations (LES) for the subject physics, including the aforementioned numerical challenges, will be discussed.

  3. Combination 3D TOP with 2D PC MRA Techique for cerebral blood flow volume measurement.

    PubMed

    Guo, G; Wu, R H; Zhang, Y P; Guan, J T; Guo, Y L; Cheng, Y; terBrugge, K; Mikulis, D J

    2006-01-01

    To demonstrate the discrepancy of cerebral blood flow volume (BFV) estimation with 2D phase-contrast (2D PC) MRA guided with 3D time-of-flight (3D TOF) MR localization by using an "internal" standard. 20 groups of the common (CCA), internal (ICA), and external (ECA) carotid arteries in 10 healthy subjects were examined with 2D PC MRA guided by 3D TOF MR angiograms. The sum BFV of the internal and external carotid arteries was then compared with the ipsilateral common carotid artery flow. An accurate technique would demonstrate no difference. The difference was therefore a measure of accuracy of the method. 3D TOF MRA localization is presented to allow the determination of a slice orientation to improve the accuracy of 2D PC MRA in estimate the BFV. By using the combined protocols, there was better correlation in BFV estimate between the sum of ICA+ECA with the ipsilateral CCA (R2=0.729, P=0.000). The inconsistency (mean +/- SD) was found to be 6.95 +/- 5.95% for estimate the BFV in ICA+ECA and ipsilateral CCA. The main inconsistency was contributed to the ECA and its branches. Guided with 3D TOF MRA localization, 2D PC MRA is more accurate in the determination of blood flow volume in the carotid arteries. PMID:17946401

  4. Numerical Optimization Strategy for Determining 3D Flow Fields in Microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eden, Alex; Sigurdson, Marin; Mezic, Igor; Meinhart, Carl

    2015-11-01

    We present a hybrid experimental-numerical method for generating 3D flow fields from 2D PIV experimental data. An optimization algorithm is applied to a theory-based simulation of an alternating current electrothermal (ACET) micromixer in conjunction with 2D PIV data to generate an improved representation of 3D steady state flow conditions. These results can be used to investigate mixing phenomena. Experimental conditions were simulated using COMSOL Multiphysics to solve the temperature and velocity fields, as well as the quasi-static electric fields. The governing equations were based on a theoretical model for ac electrothermal flows. A Nelder-Mead optimization algorithm was used to achieve a better fit by minimizing the error between 2D PIV experimental velocity data and numerical simulation results at the measurement plane. By applying this hybrid method, the normalized RMS velocity error between the simulation and experimental results was reduced by more than an order of magnitude. The optimization algorithm altered 3D fluid circulation patterns considerably, providing a more accurate representation of the 3D experimental flow field. This method can be generalized to a wide variety of flow problems. This research was supported by the Institute for Collaborative Biotechnologies through grant W911NF-09-0001 from the U.S. Army Research Office.

  5. 3D positional tracking of ellipsoidal particles in a microtube flow using holographic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byeon, Hyeok Jun; Seo, Kyung Won; Lee, Sang Joon

    2014-11-01

    Understanding of micro-scale flow phenomena is getting large attention under advances in micro-scale measurement technologies. Especially, the dynamics of particles suspended in a fluid is essential in both scientific and industrial fields. Moreover, most particles handled in research and industrial fields have non-spherical shapes rather than a simple spherical shape. Under various flow conditions, these non-spherical particles exhibit unique dynamic behaviors. To analyze these dynamic behaviors in a fluid flow, 3D positional information of the particles should be measured accurately. In this study, digital holographic microscopy (DHM) is employed to measure the 3D positional information of non-spherical particles, which are fabricated by stretching spherical polystyrene particles. 3D motions of those particles are obtained by interpreting the holograms captured from particles. Ellipsoidal particles with known size and shape are observed to verify the performance of the DHM technique. In addition, 3D positions of particles in a microtube flow are traced. This DHM technique exhibits promising potential in the analysis of dynamic behaviors of non-spherical particles suspended in micro-scale fluid flows.

  6. One-layer microfluidic device for hydrodynamic 3D self-flow-focusing operating in low flow speed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daghighi, Yasaman; Gnyawali, Vaskar; Strohm, Eric M.; Tsai, Scott S. H.; Kolios, Michael C.

    2016-03-01

    Hydrodynamic 3D flow-focusing techniques in microfluidics are categorized as (a) sheathless techniques which require high flow rates and long channels, resulting in high operating cost and high flow rates which are inappropriate for applications with flow rate limitations, and (b) sheath-flow based techniques which usually require excessive sheath flow rate to achieve hydrodynamic 3D flow-focusing. Many devices based on these principles use complicated fabrication methods to create multi-layer microchannels. We have developed a sheath-flow based microfluidic device that is capable of hydrodynamic 3D self-flow-focusing. In this device the main flow (black ink) in a low speed, and a sheath flow, enter through two inlets and enter a 180 degree curved channel (300 × 300 μm cross-section). Main flow migrates outwards into the sheath-flow due to centrifugal effects and consequently, vertical focusing is achieved at the end of the curved channel. Then, two other sheath flows horizontally confine the main flow to achieve horizontal focusing. Thus, the core flow is three-dimensionally focused at the center of the channel at the downstream. Using centrifugal force for 3D flow-focusing in a single-layer fabricated microchannel has been previously investigated by few groups. However, their demonstrated designs required high flow speed (>1 m/s) which is not suitable for many applications that live biomedical specie are involved. Here, we introduce a new design which is operational in low flow speed (<0.05 m/s) and is suitable for applications involving live cells. This microfluidic device can be used in detecting, counting and isolating cells in many biomedical applications.

  7. 3D separation over a wall-mounted hemisphere in steady and pulsatile flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, Ian A.; Plesniak, Michael W.

    2014-11-01

    Flow separation over a surface-mounted hemispheriod is prevalent in countless applications, both under steady (constant freestream velocity) and unsteady flow over the protuberance. Previous studies of 3D separation have been limited to steady inflow conditions. In biological and geophysical flows, pulsatile flow conditions are much more commonly observed, yet such conditions have not been well studied. Primarily motivated by previous studies of the flow observed in various human vocal fold pathologies, such as polyps, our research aims to fill the knowledge gap in unsteady 3D flow separation. This is achieved by characterizing surface pressure fields and velocity fields, focused primarily on the vortical flow structures and dynamics that occur around a hemispheroid protuberance under pulsatile flow conditions. Surface static pressure and two-dimensional, instantaneous and phase-averaged, particle image velocimetry data in steady and pulsatile flow are presented and compared. Coherent vortical flow structures have been identified using the λci vortex identification criterion. This analysis has revealed a novel set of flow structures dependent on the pulsatile flow forcing function. This material is based in part upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant Number CBET-1236351.

  8. Modeling blood flow circulation in intracranial arterial networks: a comparative 3D/1D simulation study.

    PubMed

    Grinberg, L; Cheever, E; Anor, T; Madsen, J R; Karniadakis, G E

    2011-01-01

    We compare results from numerical simulations of pulsatile blood flow in two patient-specific intracranial arterial networks using one-dimensional (1D) and three-dimensional (3D) models. Specifically, we focus on the pressure and flowrate distribution at different segments of the network computed by the two models. Results obtained with 1D and 3D models with rigid walls show good agreement in massflow distribution at tens of arterial junctions and also in pressure drop along the arteries. The 3D simulations with the rigid walls predict higher amplitude of the flowrate and pressure temporal oscillations than the 1D simulations with compliant walls at various segments even for small time-variations in the arterial cross-sectional areas. Sensitivity of the flow and pressure with respect to variation in the elasticity parameters is investigated with the 1D model. PMID:20661645

  9. Numerical investigation of turbulent channel flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moin, P.; Kim, J.

    1981-01-01

    Fully developed turbulent channel flow was simulated numerically at Reynolds number 13800, based on centerline velocity and channel halt width. The large-scale flow field was obtained by directly integrating the filtered, three dimensional, time dependent, Navier-Stokes equations. The small-scale field motions were simulated through an eddy viscosity model. The calculations were carried out on the ILLIAC IV computer with up to 516,096 grid points. The computed flow field was used to study the statistical properties of the flow as well as its time dependent features. The agreement of the computed mean velocity profile, turbulence statistics, and detailed flow structures with experimental data is good. The resolvable portion of the statistical correlations appearing in the Reynolds stress equations are calculated. Particular attention is given to the examination of the flow structure in the vicinity of the wall.

  10. Transition to turbulence in pulsating pipe flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Duo; Warnecke, Sascha; Hof, Bjoern; Avila, Marc

    2014-11-01

    We report an experimental investigation of the transition to turbulence in a pulsating pipe flow. This flow is a prototype of various pulsating flows in both nature and engineering, such as in the cardiovascular system where the onset of turbulence is often possibly related to various diseases (e.g., the formation of aneurysms). The experiments are carried out in a straight rigid pipe using water with a sinusoidal modulation of the flow rate. The governing parameters, Reynolds number, Womersley number α (dimensionless pulsating frequency) and the pulsating amplitude A, cover a wide range 3 < α < 23 and 0 < A < 1 . To characterize the transition to turbulence, we determine how the characteristic lifetime of turbulent spots (/puffs) are affected by the pulsation. While at high pulsation frequencies (α > 12) lifetimes of turbulent spots are entirely unaffected by the pulsation, at lower frequencies they are substantially affected. With decreasing frequency much larger Reynolds numbers are needed to obtain spots of the same characteristic lifetime. Hence at low frequency transition is delayed significantly. In addition the effect of the pulsation amplitude on the transition delay is quantified. Duo Xu would like to acknowledge the support from Humboldt Foundation.

  11. Commercial turbofan engine exhaust nozzle flow analyses using PAB3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdol-Hamid, Khaled S.; Uenishi, K.; Carlson, John R.; Keith, B. D.

    1992-01-01

    Recent developments of a three-dimensional (PAB3D) code have paved the way for a computational investigation of complex aircraft aerodynamic components. The PAB3D code was developed for solving the simplified Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes equations in a three-dimensional multiblock/multizone structured mesh domain. The present analysis was applied to commercial turbofan exhaust flow systems. Solution sensitivity to grid density is presented. Laminar flow solutions were developed for all grids and two-equation k-epsilon solutions were developed for selected grids. Static pressure distributions, mass flow and thrust quantities were calculated for on-design engine operating conditions. Good agreement between predicted surface static pressures and experimental data was observed at different locations. Mass flow was predicted within 0.2 percent of experimental data. Thrust forces were typically within 0.4 percent of experimental data.

  12. Turbulent Convection: Is 2D a good proxy of 3D?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canuto, V. M.

    2000-01-01

    Several authors have recently carried out 2D simulations of turbulent convection for both solar and massive stars. Fitting the 2D results with the MLT, they obtain that alpha(sub MLT) greater than 1 specifically, 1.4 less than alpha(sub MLT) less than 1.8. The authors further suggest that this methodology could be used to calibrate the MLT used in stellar evolutionary codes. We suggest the opposite viewpoint: the 2D results show that MLT is internally inconsistent because the resulting alpha(sub MLT) greater than 1 violates the MLT basic assumption that alpha(sub MLT) less than 1. When the 2D results are fitted with the CM model, alpha(sub CMT) less than 1, in accord with the basic tenet of the model. On the other hand, since both MLT and CM are local models, they should be replaced by the next generation of non-local, time dependent turbulence models which we discuss in some detail.

  13. Low Wavenumber Statistics in Turbulent Pipe Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guilkey, James; McMurtry, Patrick; Kerstein, Alan; Klewicki, Joseph

    1996-11-01

    An experimental investigation of passive scalar mixing in turbulent pipe-flow has been carried out using a new scalar initialization technique. The measurements support predictions which have been made analytically and upheld numerically regarding low wavenumber scalar statistics in flows that are unbounded in one direction. Specifically, similarity scalings are verified and a power law scalar variance decay is measured in the far field. This indicates that the traditional plug-flow reactor picture of mixing in turbulent pipe-flow omits important physical mechanisms. By examining the similarities as well as the differences between this work and that carried out analytically and numerically, a clearer picture of the mechanisms responible for mixing in a pipe-flow is emerging. This work supported by NSF Grant # CTS 9258445 and the Division of Chemical Sciences, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, U.S. Department of Energy.

  14. Hierarchical structures in a turbulent pipe flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Zhengping; Zhu, Yuanjie; Zhou, Mingde; She, Zhen-Su

    2003-12-01

    A hierarchical structure (HS) analysis ( β-test and γ-test) is applied to a fully developed turbulent pipe flow. Velocity signals are measured at two cross sections in the pipe and at a series of radial locations from the pipe wall. Particular attention is paid to the variation of turbulent statistics at wall units 10< y+<3000. It is shown that at all locations the velocity fluctuations satisfy the She-Leveque hierarchical symmetry (Phys. Rev. Lett. 72 (1994) 336). The measured HS parameters, β and γ, are interpreted in terms of the variation of fluid structures. Intense anisotropic fluid structures generated near the wall appear to be more singular than the most intermittent structures in isotropic turbulence and appear to be more outstanding compared to the background fluctuations; this yields a more intermittent velocity signal with smaller γ and β. As turbulence migrates into the logarithmic region, small-scale motions are generated by an energy cascade and large-scale organized structures emerge which are also less singular than the most intermittent structures of isotropic turbulence. At the center, turbulence is nearly isotropic, and β and γ are close to the 1994 She-Leveque predictions. A transition is observed from the logarithmic region to the center in which γ drops and the large-scale organized structures break down. We speculate that it is due to the growing eddy viscosity effects of widely spread turbulent fluctuations in a similar way as in the breakdown of the Taylor vortices in a turbulent Couette-Taylor flow at high Reynolds numbers.

  15. Numerical simulation of 3D Kinetic Alfvén Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Qian; Boldyrev, Stanislav; Perez, Jean

    2013-10-01

    In our model for strong kinetic Alfvén plasma turbulence, the spectrum of Kinetic-Alfvén waves was found to scale as k - 8 / 3 at scales smaller than the ion gyroscale. This was close to the recent magnetic fluctuation observation at sub-proton scales. It also showed that the scaling would be changed with different viscosity setup. It suggested that von Kármán similarity is not valid beyond the inertial range. In this region, the dynamic of the outer scale (MHD) and the smaller scale (electron inertial range) may affect the spectrum. Hyperviscosity results showed that the electron Landau damping was not the reason for the steepening of the spectrum. This work was supported by CMSO at U. Wisconsin-Madison.

  16. An improved parallel SPH approach to solve 3D transient generalized Newtonian free surface flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Jinlian; Jiang, Tao; Lu, Weigang; Li, Gang

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, a corrected parallel smoothed particle hydrodynamics (C-SPH) method is proposed to simulate the 3D generalized Newtonian free surface flows with low Reynolds number, especially the 3D viscous jets buckling problems are investigated. The proposed C-SPH method is achieved by coupling an improved SPH method based on the incompressible condition with the traditional SPH (TSPH), that is, the improved SPH with diffusive term and first-order Kernel gradient correction scheme is used in the interior of the fluid domain, and the TSPH is used near the free surface. Thus the C-SPH method possesses the advantages of two methods. Meanwhile, an effective and convenient boundary treatment is presented to deal with 3D multiple-boundary problem, and the MPI parallelization technique with a dynamic cells neighbor particle searching method is considered to improve the computational efficiency. The validity and the merits of the C-SPH are first verified by solving several benchmarks and compared with other results. Then the viscous jet folding/coiling based on the Cross model is simulated by the C-SPH method and compared with other experimental or numerical results. Specially, the influences of macroscopic parameters on the flow are discussed. All the numerical results agree well with available data, and show that the C-SPH method has higher accuracy and better stability for solving 3D moving free surface flows over other particle methods.

  17. Boundary Layer Theory. Part 2; Turbulent Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlichting, H.

    1949-01-01

    The flow laws of the actual flows at high Reynolds numbers differ considerably from those of the laminar flows treated in the preceding part. These actual flows show a special characteristic, denoted as turbulence. The character of a turbulent flow is most easily understood the case of the pipe flow. Consider the flow through a straight pipe of circular cross section and with a smooth wall. For laminar flow each fluid particle moves with uniform velocity along a rectilinear path. Because of viscosity, the velocity of the particles near the wall is smaller than that of the particles at the center. i% order to maintain the motion, a pressure decrease is required which, for laminar flow, is proportional to the first power of the mean flow velocity. Actually, however, one oberves that, for larger Reynolds numbers, the pressure drop increases almost with the square of the velocity and is very much larger then that given by the Hagen Poiseuille law. One may conclude that the actual flow is very different from that of the Poiseuille flow.

  18. Turbulence modeling in supersonic combusting flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chitsomboon, Tawit

    1991-01-01

    To support the National Aerospace Plane project, the RPLUS3D CFD code has been developed at NASA Lewis. The code has the ability to solve three-dimensional flowfields with finite rate combustion of hydrogen and air. The combustion processes of the hydrogen-air system are simulated by an 18-reaction path, 8-species chemical kinetic mechanism. The code uses a Lower-Upper (LU) decomposition numerical algorithm as its basis, making it a very efficient and robust code. Except for the Jacobian matrix for the implicit chemistry source terms, there is no inversion of a matrix even though it uses a fully implicit numerical algorithm. A k-epsilon (two equation) turbulence model is incorporated into the RPLUS3D code.

  19. Intuitive Visualization of Transient Flow: Towards a Full 3D Tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, Isabel; Schröder, Simon; Seidel, Torsten; König, Christoph

    2015-04-01

    Visualization of geoscientific data is a challenging task especially when targeting a non-professional audience. In particular, the graphical presentation of transient vector data can be a significant problem. With STRING Fraunhofer ITWM (Kaiserslautern, Germany) in collaboration with delta h Ingenieurgesellschaft mbH (Witten, Germany) developed a commercial software for intuitive 2D visualization of 3D flow problems. Through the intuitive character of the visualization experts can more easily transport their findings to non-professional audiences. In STRING pathlets moving with the flow provide an intuition of velocity and direction of both steady-state and transient flow fields. The visualization concept is based on the Lagrangian view of the flow which means that the pathlets' movement is along the direction given by pathlines. In order to capture every detail of the flow an advanced method for intelligent, time-dependent seeding of the pathlets is implemented based on ideas of the Finite Pointset Method (FPM) originally conceived at and continuously developed by Fraunhofer ITWM. Furthermore, by the same method pathlets are removed during the visualization to avoid visual cluttering. Additional scalar flow attributes, for example concentration or potential, can either be mapped directly to the pathlets or displayed in the background of the pathlets on the 2D visualization plane. The extensive capabilities of STRING are demonstrated with the help of different applications in groundwater modeling. We will discuss the strengths and current restrictions of STRING which have surfaced during daily use of the software, for example by delta h. Although the software focusses on the graphical presentation of flow data for non-professional audiences its intuitive visualization has also proven useful to experts when investigating details of flow fields. Due to the popular reception of STRING and its limitation to 2D, the need arises for the extension to a full 3D tool

  20. A fast and accurate method to predict 2D and 3D aerodynamic boundary layer flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bijleveld, H. A.; Veldman, A. E. P.

    2014-12-01

    A quasi-simultaneous interaction method is applied to predict 2D and 3D aerodynamic flows. This method is suitable for offshore wind turbine design software as it is a very accurate and computationally reasonably cheap method. This study shows the results for a NACA 0012 airfoil. The two applied solvers converge to the experimental values when the grid is refined. We also show that in separation the eigenvalues remain positive thus avoiding the Goldstein singularity at separation. In 3D we show a flow over a dent in which separation occurs. A rotating flat plat is used to show the applicability of the method for rotating flows. The shown capabilities of the method indicate that the quasi-simultaneous interaction method is suitable for design methods for offshore wind turbine blades.

  1. Parallel Adaptive Computation of Blood Flow in a 3D ``Whole'' Body Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, M.; Figueroa, C. A.; Taylor, C. A.; Sahni, O.; Jansen, K. E.

    2008-11-01

    Accurate numerical simulations of vascular trauma require the consideration of a larger portion of the vasculature than previously considered, due to the systemic nature of the human body's response. A patient-specific 3D model composed of 78 connected arterial branches extending from the neck to the lower legs is constructed to effectively represent the entire body. Recently developed outflow boundary conditions that appropriately represent the downstream vasculature bed which is not included in the 3D computational domain are applied at 78 outlets. In this work, the pulsatile blood flow simulations are started on a fairly uniform, unstructured mesh that is subsequently adapted using a solution-based approach to efficiently resolve the flow features. The adapted mesh contains non-uniform, anisotropic elements resulting in resolution that conforms with the physical length scales present in the problem. The effects of the mesh resolution on the flow field are studied, specifically on relevant quantities of pressure, velocity and wall shear stress.

  2. 3D flow past transonic turbine cascade SE 1050 — Experiment and numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šimurda, D.; Fürst, J.; Luxa, M.

    2013-08-01

    This paper is concerned with experimental and numerical research on 3D flow past prismatic turbine cascade SE1050 (known in QNET network as open test case SE1050). The primary goal was to assess the influence of the inlet velocity profile on the flow structures in the interblade channel and on the flow field parameters at the cascade exit and to compare these findings to results of numerical simulations. Investigations of 3D flow past the cascade with non-uniform inlet velocity profile were carried out both experimentally and numerically at subsonic ( M 2is = 0.8) and at transonic ( M 2is = 1.2) regime at design angle of incidence. Experimental data was obtained using a traversing device with a five-hole conical probe. Numerically, the 3D flow was simulated by open source code OpenFOAM and in-house code. Analyses of experimental data and CFD simulations have revealed the development of distinctive vortex structures resulting from non-uniform inlet velocity profile. Origin of these structures results in increased loss of kinetic energy and spanwise shift of kinetic energy loss coefficient distribution. Differences found between the subsonic and the transonic case confirm earlier findings available in the literature. Results of CFD and experiments agree reasonably well.

  3. Turbulent reacting flow computations including turbulence-chemistry interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narayan, J. R.; Girimaji, S. S.

    1992-01-01

    A two-equation (k-epsilon) turbulence model has been extended to be applicable for compressible reacting flows. A compressibility correction model based on modeling the dilatational terms in the Reynolds stress equations has been used. A turbulence-chemistry interaction model is outlined. In this model, the effects of temperature and species mass concentrations fluctuations on the species mass production rates are decoupled. The effect of temperature fluctuations is modeled via a moment model, and the effect of concentration fluctuations is included using an assumed beta-pdf model. Preliminary results obtained using this model are presented. A two-dimensional reacting mixing layer has been used as a test case. Computations are carried out using the Navier-Stokes solver SPARK using a finite rate chemistry model for hydrogen-air combustion.

  4. Turbulence and modeling in transonic flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubesin, Morris W.; Viegas, John R.

    1989-01-01

    A review is made of the performance of a variety of turbulence models in the evaluation of a particular well documented transonic flow. This is done to supplement a previous attempt to calibrate and verify transonic airfoil codes by including many more turbulence models than used in the earlier work and applying the calculations to an experiment that did not suffer from uncertainties in angle of attack and was free of wind tunnel interference. It is found from this work, as well as in the earlier study, that the Johnson-King turbulence model is superior for transonic flows over simple aerodynamic surfaces, including moderate separation. It is also shown that some field equation models with wall function boundary conditions can be competitive with it.

  5. Numerical modelling of gravel unconstrained flow experiments with the DAN3D and RASH3D codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauthier, Claire; Pirulli, Marina; Pisani, Gabriele; Scavia, Claudio; Labiouse, Vincent

    2015-12-01

    Landslide continuum dynamic models have improved considerably in the last years, but a consensus on the best method of calibrating the input resistance parameter values for predictive analyses has not yet emerged. In the present paper, numerical simulations of a series of laboratory experiments performed at the Laboratory for Rock Mechanics of the EPF Lausanne were undertaken with the RASH3D and DAN3D numerical codes. They aimed at analysing the possibility to use calibrated ranges of parameters (1) in a code different from that they were obtained from and (2) to simulate potential-events made of a material with the same characteristics as back-analysed past-events, but involving a different volume and propagation path. For this purpose, one of the four benchmark laboratory tests was used as past-event to calibrate the dynamic basal friction angle assuming a Coulomb-type behaviour of the sliding mass, and this back-analysed value was then used to simulate the three other experiments, assumed as potential-events. The computational findings show good correspondence with experimental results in terms of characteristics of the final deposits (i.e., runout, length and width). Furthermore, the obtained best fit values of the dynamic basal friction angle for the two codes turn out to be close to each other and within the range of values measured with pseudo-dynamic tilting tests.

  6. Delft3D-FLOW on PRACE infrastructures for real life hydrodynamic applications.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donners, John; Genseberger, Menno; Jagers, Bert; de Goede, Erik; Mourits, Adri

    2013-04-01

    PRACE, the Partnership for Advanced Computing in Europe, offers access to the largest high-performance computing systems in Europe. PRACE invites and helps industry to increase their innovative potential through the use of the PRACE infrastructure. This poster describes different efforts to assist Deltares with porting the open-source simulation software Delft3D-FLOW to PRACE infrastructures. Analysis of the performance on these infrastructures has been done for real life flow applications. Delft3D-FLOW is a 2D and 3D shallow water solver which calculates non-steady flow and transport phenomena resulting from tidal and meteorological forcing on a curvilinear, boundary fitted grid in Cartesian or spherical coordinates. It also includes a module which sediment transport (both suspended and bed total load) and morphological changes for an arbitrary number of cohesive and non-cohesive fractions. As Delft3D-FLOW has been developed over several decades, with a variety of functionality and over 350k lines of source code, porting to PRACE infrastructures needs some effort. At the moment Delft3D-FLOW uses MPI with domain decomposition in one direction as its parallellisation approach. Because it is hard to identify scaling issues if one immediately starts with a complex case with many features enabled, different cases with increasing complexity have been used to investigate scaling of this parallellisation approach on several PRACE platforms. As a base reference case we started with a schematic high-resolution 2D hydrodynamic model of the river Waal that turned out to be surprisingly well-suited to the highly-parallel PRACE machines. Although Delft3D-FLOW employs a sophisticated build system, several modifications were required to port it to most PRACE systems due to the use of specific, highly-tuned compilers and MPI-libraries. After this we moved to a 3D hydrodynamic model of Rotterdam harbour that includes sections of the rivers Rhine and Meuse and a part of the North

  7. A 3D model of a reverse vortex flow gliding arc reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trenchev, G.; Kolev, St.; Bogaerts, A.

    2016-06-01

    In this computational study, a gliding arc plasma reactor with a reverse-vortex flow stabilization is modelled for the first time by a fluid plasma description. The plasma reactor operates with argon gas at atmospheric pressure. The gas flow is simulated using the k-ε Reynolds-averaged Navier–Stokes turbulent model. A quasi-neutral fluid plasma model is used for computing the plasma properties. The plasma arc movement in the reactor is observed, and the results for the gas flow, electrical characteristics, plasma density, electron temperature, and gas temperature are analyzed.

  8. Turbulence in slurry pipe flow

    SciTech Connect

    Gore, R.A. ); Crowe, C.T. . Dept. of Mechanical and Materials Engineering)

    1990-01-01

    The present state of knowledge of liquid-solid flows (slurries) is far behind than that for single phase flows. Very few geometries have been examined with a slurry and only with a limited variation of system parameters i.e. fluid viscosity, particle diameter, etc. This paper presents the first part of a study which examines the effects of the addition of a solid to the flow through a confined coaxial jet. Presented here will be the initial conditions for the jet which correspond to fully developed pipe flow. 6 refs., 9 figs.

  9. Secondary reconnection, energisation and turbulence in dipolarisation fronts: results of a 3D kinetic simulation campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapenta, Giovanni; Goldman, Martin; Newman, David; olshevskyi, Vyacheslav; Markidis, Stefano

    2016-04-01

    Dipolarization fronts (DF) are formed by reconnection outflows interacting with the pre-existing environment. These regions are host of important energy exchanges [1], particle acceleration [2] and a complex structure and evolution [3]. Our recent work has investigated these regions via fully kinetic 3D simulations [4]. As reported recently on Nature Physics [3], based on 3D fully kinetic simulations started with a well defined x-line, we observe that in the DF reconnection transitions towards a more chaotic regime. In the fronts an instability devel- ops caused by the local gradients of the density and by the unfavourable acceleration and field line curvature. The consequence is the break up of the fronts in a fashion similar to the classical fluid Rayleigh-Taylor instability with the formation of "fingers" of plasma and embedded magnetic fields. These fingers interact and produce secondary reconnection sites. We present several different diagnostics that prove the existence of these secondary reconnection sites. Each site is surrounded by its own electron diffusion region. At the fronts the ions are generally not magnetized and considerable ion slippage is present. The discovery we present is that electrons are also slipping, forming localized diffusion regions near secondary reconnection sites [1]. The consequence of this discovery is twofold. First, the instability in the fronts has strong energetic implications. We observe that the energy transfer locally is very strong, an order of magnitude stronger than in the "X" line. However, this energy transfer is of both signs as it is natural for a wavy rippling with regions of magnetic to kinetic and regions of kinetic to magnetic energy conversion. Second, and most important for this session, is that MMS should not limit the search for electron diffusion regions to the location marked with X in all reconnection cartoons. Our simulations predict more numerous and perhaps more easily measurable electron diffusion

  10. Optimal feedback control of turbulent channel flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bewley, Thomas; Choi, Haecheon; Temam, Roger; Moin, Parviz

    1993-01-01

    Feedback control equations were developed and tested for computing wall normal control velocities to control turbulent flow in a channel with the objective of reducing drag. The technique used is the minimization of a 'cost functional' which is constructed to represent some balance of the drag integrated over the wall and the net control effort. A distribution of wall velocities is found which minimizes this cost functional some time shortly in the future based on current observations of the flow near the wall. Preliminary direct numerical simulations of the scheme applied to turbulent channel flow indicates it provides approximately 17 percent drag reduction. The mechanism apparent when the scheme is applied to a simplified flow situation is also discussed.

  11. Instability and Turbulence of Propagating Particulate Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balachandar, S.

    2015-11-01

    Propagation of particle-laden fluid into an ambient is a common fluid mechanical process that can be observed in many industrial and environmental applications. Sedimentation fronts, volcanic plumes, dust storms, powder snow avalanches, submarine turbidity currents, explosive powder dispersal and supernovae offer fascinating examples of advancing particulate fronts. The propagating interface can undergo Rayleigh-Taylor, Kelvin-Helmholtz and double-diffusive instabilities and result in the formation of lobes and clefts, spikes and bubbles, and particulate fingers. The interplay between suspended particles and turbulence is often complex due to interaction of competing mechanisms. In problems such as turbidity currents, turbulence controls sediment concentration through resuspension and settling of particles at the bed. Also, turbulent entrainment at the propagating front is observed to be influenced by the sediments. Stable stratification due to suspended sediment concentration can damp and even kill turbulence. This complex turbulence-sediment interaction offers possible explanation for massive sediment deposits observed in nature. The talk will also address challenges and recent advancements in the modeling and simulation of such particle-laden turbulent flows.

  12. Hierarchical structures in a turbulent pipe flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    She, Zhen-Su; Zou, Zhengping; Zhu, Yuanjie; Zhou, Mingde

    2003-11-01

    Statistical structures of a series of longitudinal velocity fluctuation signals at different distances (10flow are analyzed in the framework of a hierarchical structural (HS) model. The so-called beta-test and gamma-test are designed to study the correlation between intermittent structures of different intensities and the similarity property of the most intense structures. It is shown that at all locations the velocity fluctuations satisfy the She-Leveque hierarchical symmetry (She and Leveque, 1994). The measured HS parameters, beta and gamma, are interpreted in a fluid structure dynamics context. For instance, intense anisotropic fluid structures generated near the wall show smaller gamma and beta. As turbulence migrates into the logarithmic region, small-scale motions are generated by an energy cascade and large-scale organized structures emerge with a less singular character than the most intermittent structures of isotropic turbulence. At the center, turbulence is nearly isotropic, and beta and gamma are close to the 1994 She-Leveque predictions. A transition is observed from the logarithmic region to the center in which gamma drops and the large-scale organized structures break down. We speculate that it is due to the growing eddy viscosity effects of widely spread turbulent fluctuations. Similar effects are observed in the breakdown of the Taylor vortices in a turbulent Couette-Taylor flow at moderately high Reynolds numbers.

  13. Direct numerical simulation of turbulent reacting flows

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, J.H.

    1993-12-01

    The development of turbulent combustion models that reflect some of the most important characteristics of turbulent reacting flows requires knowledge about the behavior of key quantities in well defined combustion regimes. In turbulent flames, the coupling between the turbulence and the chemistry is so strong in certain regimes that is is very difficult to isolate the role played by one individual phenomenon. Direct numerical simulation (DNS) is an extremely useful tool to study in detail the turbulence-chemistry interactions in certain well defined regimes. Globally, non-premixed flames are controlled by two limiting cases: the fast chemistry limit, where the turbulent fluctuations. In between these two limits, finite-rate chemical effects are important and the turbulence interacts strongly with the chemical processes. This regime is important because industrial burners operate in regimes in which, locally the flame undergoes extinction, or is at least in some nonequilibrium condition. Furthermore, these nonequilibrium conditions strongly influence the production of pollutants. To quantify the finite-rate chemistry effect, direct numerical simulations are performed to study the interaction between an initially laminar non-premixed flame and a three-dimensional field of homogeneous isotropic decaying turbulence. Emphasis is placed on the dynamics of extinction and on transient effects on the fine scale mixing process. Differential molecular diffusion among species is also examined with this approach, both for nonreacting and reacting situations. To address the problem of large-scale mixing and to examine the effects of mean shear, efforts are underway to perform large eddy simulations of round three-dimensional jets.

  14. Simulation of 3-D Nonequilibrium Seeded Air Flow in the NASA-Ames MHD Channel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, Sumeet; Tannehill, John C.; Mehta, Unmeel B.

    2004-01-01

    The 3-D nonequilibrium seeded air flow in the NASA-Ames experimental MHD channel has been numerically simulated. The channel contains a nozzle section, a center section, and an accelerator section where magnetic and electric fields can be imposed on the flow. In recent tests, velocity increases of up to 40% have been achieved in the accelerator section. The flow in the channel is numerically computed us ing a 3-D parabolized Navier-Stokes (PNS) algorithm that has been developed to efficiently compute MHD flows in the low magnetic Reynolds number regime: The MHD effects are modeled by introducing source terms into the PNS equations which can then be solved in a very efficient manner. The algorithm has been extended in the present study to account for nonequilibrium seeded air flows. The electrical conductivity of the flow is determined using the program of Park. The new algorithm has been used to compute two test cases that match the experimental conditions. In both cases, magnetic and electric fields are applied to the seeded flow. The computed results are in good agreement with the experimental data.

  15. Disturbance Dynamics in Transitional and Turbulent Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grosch, Chester E.

    1999-01-01

    In order to expand the predictive capability of single-point turbulence closure models to account for the early-stage transition regime, a methodology for the formulation and calibration of model equations for the ensemble-averaged disturbance kinetic energy and energy dissipation rate is presented. First the decay of laminar disturbances and turbulence in mean shear-free flows is studied. In laminar flows, such disturbances are linear superpositions of modes governed by the Orr-Sommerfeld equation. In turbulent flows, disturbances are described through transport equations for representative mean quantities. The link between a description based on a deterministic evolution equation and a probability based mean transport equation is established. Because an uncertainty in initial conditions exists in the laminar as well as the turbulent regime, a probability distribution must be defined even in the laminar case. Using this probability distribution, it is shown that the exponential decay of the linear modes in the laminar regime can be related to a power law decay of both the (ensemble) mean disturbance kinetic energy and the dissipation rate. The evolution of these mean disturbance quantities is then described by transport equations similar to those for the corresponding turbulent decaying flow. Second, homogeneous shear flow, where disturbances can be described by rapid distortion theory (RDT), is studied. The relationship between RDT and linear stability theory is exploited in order to obtain a closed set of modeled equations. The linear disturbance equations are solved directly so that the numerical simulation yields a database from which the closure coefficients in the ensemble-averaged disturbance equations can be determined.

  16. Evaluation of the 3-D channeling flow in a fractured type of oil/gas reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishibashi, T.; Watanabe, N.; Tsuchiya, N.; Tamagawa, T.

    2013-12-01

    An understanding of the flow and transport characteristics through rock fracture networks is of critical importance in many engineering and scientific applications. These include effective recovery of targeted fluid such as oil/gas, geothermal, or potable waters, and isolation of hazardous materials. Here, the formation of preferential flow path (i.e. channeling flow) is one of the most significant characteristics in considering fluid flow through rock fracture networks; however, the impact of channeling flow remains poorly understood. In order to deepen our understanding of channeling flow, the authors have developed a novel discrete fracture network (DFN) model simulator, GeoFlow. Different from the conventional DFN model simulators, we can characterize each fracture not by a single aperture value but by a heterogeneous aperture distribution in GeoFlow [Ishibashi et al., 2012]. As a result, the formation of 3-D preferential flow paths within fracture network can be considered by using this simulator. Therefore, we would challenge to construct the precise fracture networks whose fractures have heterogeneous aperture distributions in field scale, and to analyze fluid flows through the fracture networks by GeoFlow. In the present study, the Yufutsu oil/gas field in Hokkaido, Japan is selected as the subject area for study. This field is known as the fractured type of reservoir, and reliable DFN models can be constructed for this field based on the 3-D seismic data, well logging, in-situ stress measurement, and acoustic emission data [Tamagawa et al., 2012]. Based on these DFN models, new DFN models for 1,080 (East-West) × 1,080 (North-South) × 1,080 (Depth) m^3, where fractures are represented by squares of 44-346 m on a side, are re-constructed. In these new models, scale-dependent aperture distributions are considered for all fractures constructing the fracture networks. Note that the multi-scale modeling of fracture flow has been developed by the authors

  17. Computation of unsteady turbulent boundary layers with flow reversal and evaluation of two separate turbulence models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cebeci, T.; Carr, L. W.

    1981-01-01

    A procedure which solves the governing boundary layer equations within Keller's box method was developed for calculating unsteady laminar flows with flow reversal. This method is extended to turbulent boundary layers with flow reversal. Test cases are used to investigate the proposition that unsteady turbulent boundary layers also remain free of singularities. Turbulent flow calculations are performed. The governing equations for both models are solved. As in laminar flows, the unsteady turbulent boundary layers are free from singularities, but there is a clear indication of rapid thickening of the boundary layer with increasing flow reversal. Predictions of both turbulence models are the same for all practical purposes.

  18. Quasi 3D modeling of water flow and solute transport in vadose zone and groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakirevich, A.; Kuznetsov, M.; Weisbrod, N.; Pachepsky, Y. A.

    2013-12-01

    The complexity of subsurface flow systems calls for a variety of concepts leading to the multiplicity of simplified flow models. One commonly used simplification is based on the assumption that lateral flow and transport in unsaturated zone is insignificant unless the capillary fringe is involved. In such cases the flow and transport in the unsaturated zone above groundwater level can be simulated as a 1D phenomenon, whereas through groundwater they are viewed as 2D or 3D phenomena. A new approach for a numerical scheme for 3D variably saturated flow and transport is presented. A Quasi-3D approach allows representing flow in the 'vadose zone - aquifer' system by a series of 1D Richards' equations solved in variably-saturated zone and by 3D-saturated flow equation in groundwater (modified MODFLOW code). The 1D and 3D equations are coupled at the phreatic surface in a way that aquifer replenishment is calculated using the Richards' equation, and solving for the moving water table does not require definition of the specific yield parameter. The 3D advection-dispersion equation is solved in the entire domain by the MT3D code. Using implicit finite differences approximation to couple processes in the vadose zone and groundwater provides mass conservation and increase of computational efficiency. The above model was applied to simulate the impact of irrigation on groundwater salinity in the Alto Piura aquifer (Northern Peru). Studies on changing groundwater quality in arid and semi-arid lands show that irrigation return flow is one of the major factors contributing to aquifer salinization. Existing mathematical models do not account explicitly for the solute recycling during irrigation on a daily scale. Recycling occurs throughout the unsaturated and saturated zones, as function of the solute mass extracted from pumping wells. Salt concentration in irrigation water is calculated at each time step as a function of concentration of both surface water and groundwater

  19. Modeling 3-D flow in the mantle wedge with complex slab geometries: Comparisons with seismic anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kincaid, C. R.; MacDougall, J. G.; Druken, K. A.; Fischer, K. M.

    2010-12-01

    Understanding patterns in plate scale mantle flow in subduction zones is key to models of thermal structure, dehydration reactions, volatile distributions and magma generation and transport in convergent margins. Different patterns of flow in the mantle wedge can generate distinct signatures in seismological observables. Observed shear wave fast polarization directions in several subduction zones are inconsistent with predictions of simple 2-D wedge corner flow. Geochemical signatures in a number of subduction zones also indicate 3-D flow and entrainment patterns in the wedge. We report on a series of laboratory experiments on subduction driven flow to characterize spatial and temporal variability in 3-D patterns in flow and shear-induced finite strain. Cases focus on how rollback subduction, along-strike dip changes in subducting plates and evolving gaps or tears in subduction zones control temporal-spatial patterns in 3-D wedge flow. Models utilize a glucose working fluid with a temperature dependent viscosity to represent the upper 2000 km of the mantle. Subducting lithosphere is modeled with two rubber-reinforced continuous belts. Belts pass around trench and upper/lower mantle rollers. The deeper rollers can move laterally to allow for time varying dip angle. Each belt has independent speed control and dip adjustment, allowing for along-strike changes in convergence rate and the evolution of slab gaps. Rollback is modeled using a translation system to produce either uniform and asymmetric lateral trench motion. Neutral density finite strain markers are distributed throughout the fluid and used as proxies for tracking the evolution of anisotropy through space and time in the evolving flow fields. Particle image velocimetry methods are also used to track time varying 3-D velocity fields for directly calculating anisotropy patterns. Results show that complex plate motions (rollback, steepening) and morphologies (gaps) in convergent margins produce flows with

  20. Applying and validating the RANS-3D flow-solver for evaluating a subsonic serpentine diffuser geometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fletcher, Michael J.; Won, Mark J.; Cosentino, Gary B.; Te, Alexander

    1993-01-01

    Subsonic inlet ducts for advanced, high-performance aircraft are evolving towards complex three-dimensional shapes for reasons of overall integration and weight. These factors lead to diffuser geometries that may sacrifice inlet performance, unless careful attention to design details and boundary layer management techniques are employed. The ability of viscous computational fluid dynamic (CFD) analysis of such geometries to aid the aircraft configurator in this complex design problem is herein examined. The RANS-3D Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes solver is applied to model the complex flowfield occurring in a representative diffuser geometry and the solutions are compared to experimental results from a static test of the inlet duct. The computational results are shown to compare very favorably with experimental results over a range of mass flow rates, including those involving large amounts of separation in the diffuser. In addition, a novel grid topology is presented, and two turbulence models are evaluated in this study as part of the RANS-3D code.

  1. Generation of sound in turbulent shear flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, M. E.

    1983-01-01

    An alternative to the Lighthill acoustic analogy for jet noise is discussed. It involves calculating the unsteady flow that produces the sound along with its resulting sound field starting from a prescribed upstream state that, ideally, is specified just ahead of the region where the sound generation takes place. Sound generation by turbulence interacting with solid obstacles is considered. It is shown that the process can be described by linear theory. Sound generated by turbulence interacting with itself is discussed. The processes are nonlinear and the theory is incomplete. Theories of sound generation are compared with experiment and the inadequacies of each are indicated. Additional mechanisms that appear at supersonic speeds are discussed.

  2. 3D Particle image velocimetry test of inner flow in a double blade pump impeller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Houlin; Wang, Kai; Yuan, Shouqi; Tan, Minggao; Wang, Yong; Ru, Weimin

    2012-05-01

    The double blade pump is widely used in sewage treatment industry, however, the research on the internal flow characteristics of the double blade pump with particle image velocimetry (PIV) technology is very little at present. To reveal inner flow characteristics in double blade pump impeller under off-design and design conditions, inner flows in a double blade pump impeller, whose specific speed is 111, are measured under the five off-design conditions and design condition by using 3D PIV test technology. In order to ensure the accuracy of the 3D PIV test, the external trigger synchronization system which makes use of fiber optic and equivalent calibration method are applied. The 3D PIV relative velocity synthesis procedure is compiled by using Visual C++ 2005. Then absolute velocity distribution and relative velocity distribution in the double blade pump impeller are obtained. Test results show that vortex exists in each condition, but the location, size and velocity of vortex core are different. Average absolute velocity value of impeller outlet increases at first, then decreases, and then increases again with increase of flow rate. Again average relative velocity values under 0.4, 0.8, and 1.2 design condition are higher than that under 1.0 design condition, while under 0.6 and 1.4 design condition it is lower. Under low flow rate conditions, radial vectors of absolute velocities at impeller outlet and blade inlet near the pump shaft decrease with increase of flow rate, while that of relative velocities at the suction side near the pump shaft decreases. Radial vectors of absolute velocities and relative velocities change slightly under the two large flow rate conditions. The research results can be applied to instruct the hydraulic optimization design of double blade pumps.

  3. Numerical simulation of internal and external inviscid and viscous 3-D flow fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leicher, Stefan

    1986-11-01

    A numerical method for solving the 3-D Euler equations in geometrical complex domains was developed. The approach divides the computational space into multiple blocks whose structure follows the natural lines of the conficuration. A systematic, multi-block grid generation scheme is used to produce the grid. The flow solutions are obtained by solving the Euler equations by a finite volume discretization and a Runge-Kutta time stepping scheme. The main advantage of this method is the applicability to complex geometries, for example complete aircraft configurations including wing, fuselage, canard and tail. The coupling with a 3-D boundary layer method allows to account for viscous effects. Another application for the method was the simulation of flows in the presence of a propeller.

  4. Optical monitor for observing turbulent flow

    DOEpatents

    Albrecht, Georg F.; Moore, Thomas R.

    1992-01-01

    The present invention provides an apparatus and method for non-invasively monitoring turbulent fluid flows including anisotropic flows. The present invention uses an optical technique to filter out the rays travelling in a straight line, while transmitting rays with turbulence induced fluctuations in time. The output is two dimensional, and can provide data regarding the spectral intensity distribution, or a view of the turbulence in real time. The optical monitor of the present invention comprises a laser that produces a coherent output beam that is directed through a fluid flow, which phase-modulates the beam. The beam is applied to a temporal filter that filters out the rays in the beam that are straight, while substantially transmitting the fluctuating, turbulence-induced rays. The temporal filter includes a lens and a photorefractive crystal such as BaTiO.sub.3 that is positioned in the converging section of the beam near the focal plane. An imaging system is used to observe the filtered beam. The imaging system may take a photograph, or it may include a real time camera that is connected to a computer. The present invention may be used for many purposes including research and design in aeronautics, hydrodynamics, and combustion.

  5. Turbulent Heat Transfer in Ribbed Pipe Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Changwoo; Yang, Kyung-Soo

    2012-11-01

    From the view point of heat transfer control, surface roughness is one of the popular ways adopted for enhancing heat transfer in turbulent pipe flow. Such a surface roughness is often modeled with a rib. In the current investigation, Large Eddy Simulation has been performed for turbulent flow in a pipe with periodically-mounted ribs at Reτ=700, Pr=0.71, and p / k =2, 4, and 8. Here, p and k represent the pitch and rib height, respectively. The rib height is fixed as one tenth of the pipe radius. The profiles of mean velocity components, mean temperature, root-mean-squares (rms) of temperature fluctuation are presented at the selected streamwise locations. In comparison with the smooth-pipe case at the same Re and Pr, the effects of the ribs are clearly identified, leading to overall enhancement of turbulent heat transfer in terms of Nu. The budget of temperature variance is presented in the form of contours. The results of an Octant analysis are also given to elucidate the dominant events. Our LES results shed light on a complete understanding of the heat-transfer mechanisms in turbulent ribbed-pipe flow which has numerous applications in engineering. This work was supported by the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) grant funded by the Korea government (MEST) (No. 2012013019).

  6. Turbulence modeling for complex hypersonic flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, P. G.; Coakley, T. J.

    1993-01-01

    The paper presents results of calculations for a range of 2D turbulent hypersonic flows using two-equation models. The baseline models and the model corrections required for good hypersonic-flow predictions will be illustrated. Three experimental data sets were chosen for comparison. They are: (1) the hypersonic flare flows of Kussoy and Horstman, (2) a 2D hypersonic compression corner flow of Coleman and Stollery, and (3) the ogive-cylinder impinging shock-expansion flows of Kussoy and Horstman. Comparisons with the experimental data have shown that baseline models under-predict the extent of flow separation but over-predict the heat transfer rate near flow reattachment. Modifications to the models are described which remove the above-mentioned deficiencies. Although we have restricted the discussion only to the selected baseline models in this paper, the modifications proposed are universal and can in principle be transferred to any existing two-equation model formulation.

  7. Numerical analysis of the aeroelastic behaviour for the last turbine stage in 3D transonic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gnesin, Vitaly; Kolodyazhnaya, Lyubov

    2004-11-01

    An understanding of the physics of the mutual interaction between gas flow and oscillating blades, and the development of predictive capabilities is essential for improving overall efficiency, durability and reliability. In this study presented the algorithm proposed involving the coupled solution of 3D unsteady flow through a turbine stage and dynamic problem for rotor blades motion by action of aerodynamic forces without separating outer and inner flow fluctuations. There has been performed the calculations for the last stage of the steam turbine under design and off-design regimes. It has investigated the mutual influence of both outer flow non-uniformity and blades oscillations. It has shown that amplitude-frequency spectrum of blade oscillations contains the high frequency harmonics, corresponding to rotor moving one stator blade pitch, and low frequency harmonics caused by blade oscillations and flow non-uniformity downstream from the blade row.

  8. Turbulent diamagnetism in flowing liquid sodium.

    PubMed

    Spence, E J; Nornberg, M D; Jacobson, C M; Parada, C A; Taylor, N Z; Kendrick, R D; Forest, C B

    2007-04-20

    The nature of Ohm's law is examined in a turbulent flow of liquid sodium. A magnetic field is applied to the flowing sodium, and the resulting magnetic field is measured. The mean velocity field of the sodium is also measured in an identical-scale water model of the experiment. These two fields are used to determine the terms in Ohm's law, indicating the presence of currents driven by a turbulent electromotive force. These currents result in a diamagnetic effect, generating magnetic field in opposition to the dominant fields of the experiment. The magnitude of the fluctuation-driven magnetic field is comparable to that of the field induced by the sodium's mean flow. PMID:17501423

  9. Intermittent turbulence in flowing bacterial suspensions.

    PubMed

    Secchi, Eleonora; Rusconi, Roberto; Buzzaccaro, Stefano; Salek, M Mehdi; Smriga, Steven; Piazza, Roberto; Stocker, Roman

    2016-06-01

    Dense suspensions of motile bacteria, possibly including the human gut microbiome, exhibit collective dynamics akin to those observed in classic, high Reynolds number turbulence with important implications for chemical and biological transport, yet this analogy has remained primarily qualitative. Here, we present experiments in which a dense suspension of Bacillus subtilis bacteria was flowed through microchannels and the velocity statistics of the flowing suspension were quantified using a recently developed velocimetry technique coupled with vortex identification methods. Observations revealed a robust intermittency phenomenon, whereby the average velocity profile of the suspension fluctuated between a plug-like flow and a parabolic flow profile. This intermittency is a hallmark of the onset of classic turbulence and Lagrangian tracking revealed that it here originates from the presence of transient vortices in the active, collective motion of the bacteria locally reinforcing the externally imposed flow. These results link together two entirely different manifestations of turbulence and show the potential of the microfluidic approach to mimic the environment characteristic of certain niches of the human microbiome. PMID:27307513

  10. Modeling of Turbulent Free Shear Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoder, Dennis A.; DeBonis, James R.; Georgiadis, Nicolas J.

    2013-01-01

    The modeling of turbulent free shear flows is crucial to the simulation of many aerospace applications, yet often receives less attention than the modeling of wall boundary layers. Thus, while turbulence model development in general has proceeded very slowly in the past twenty years, progress for free shear flows has been even more so. This paper highlights some of the fundamental issues in modeling free shear flows for propulsion applications, presents a review of past modeling efforts, and identifies areas where further research is needed. Among the topics discussed are differences between planar and axisymmetric flows, development versus self-similar regions, the effect of compressibility and the evolution of compressibility corrections, the effect of temperature on jets, and the significance of turbulent Prandtl and Schmidt numbers for reacting shear flows. Large eddy simulation greatly reduces the amount of empiricism in the physical modeling, but is sensitive to a number of numerical issues. This paper includes an overview of the importance of numerical scheme, mesh resolution, boundary treatment, sub-grid modeling, and filtering in conducting a successful simulation.

  11. Ultrarapid detection of pathogenic bacteria using a 3D immunomagnetic flow assay.

    PubMed

    Lee, Wonjae; Kwon, Donghoon; Chung, Boram; Jung, Gyoo Yeol; Au, Anthony; Folch, Albert; Jeon, Sangmin

    2014-07-01

    We developed a novel 3D immunomagnetic flow assay for the rapid detection of pathogenic bacteria in a large-volume food sample. Antibody-functionalized magnetic nanoparticle clusters (AbMNCs) were magnetically immobilized on the surfaces of a 3D-printed cylindrical microchannel. The injection of a Salmonella-spiked sample solution into the microchannel produced instant binding between the AbMNCs and the Salmonella bacteria due to their efficient collisions. Nearly perfect capture of the AbMNCs and AbMNCs-Salmonella complexes was achieved under a high flow rate by stacking permanent magnets with spacers inside the cylindrical separator to maximize the magnetic force. The concentration of the bacteria in solution was determined using ATP luminescence measurements. The detection limit was better than 10 cfu/mL, and the overall assay time, including the binding, rinsing, and detection steps for a 10 mL sample took less than 3 min. To our knowledge, the 3D immunomagnetic flow assay described here provides the fastest high-sensitivity, high-capacity method for the detection of pathogenic bacteria. PMID:24856003

  12. Ultrarapid Detection of Pathogenic Bacteria Using a 3D Immunomagnetic Flow Assay

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Wonjae; Kwon, Donghoon; Chung, Boram; Jung, Gyoo Yeol; Au, Anthony; Folch, Albert; Jeon, Sangmin

    2015-01-01

    We developed a novel 3D immunomagnetic flow assay for the rapid detection of pathogenic bacteria in a large-volume food sample. Antibody-functionalized magnetic nanoparticle clusters (AbMNCs) were magnetically immobilized on the surfaces of a 3D-printed cylindrical microchannel. The injection of a Salmonella-spiked sample solution into the microchannel produced instant binding between the AbMNCs and the Salmonella bacteria due to their efficient collisions. Nearly perfect capture of the AbMNCs and AbMNCs-Salmonella complexes was achieved under a high flow rate by stacking permanent magnets with spacers inside the cylindrical separator to maximize the magnetic force. The concentration of the bacteria in solution was determined using ATP luminescence measurements. The detection limit was better than 10 cfu/mL, and the overall assay time, including the binding, rinsing, and detection steps for a 10 mL sample took less than 3 min. To our knowledge, the 3D immunomagnetic flow assay described here provides the fastest high-sensitivity, high-capacity method for the detection of pathogenic bacteria. PMID:24856003

  13. Random porous media flow on large 3-D grids: Numerics, performance, and application to homogenization

    SciTech Connect

    Ababou, R.

    1996-12-31

    Subsurface flow processes are inherently three-dimensional and heterogeneous over many scales. Taking this into account, for instance assuming random heterogeneity in 3-D space, puts heavy constraints on numerical models. An efficient numerical code has been developed for solving the porous media flow equations, appropriately generalized to account for 3-D, random-like heterogeneity. The code is based on implicit finite differences (or finite volumes), and uses specialized versions of pre-conditioned iterative solvers that take advantage of sparseness. With Diagonally Scaled Conjugate Gradients, in particular, large systems on the order of several million equations, with randomly variable coefficients, have been solved efficiently on Cray-2 and Cray-Y/MP8 machines, in serial mode as well as parallel mode (autotasking). The present work addresses, first, the numerical aspects and computational issues associated with detailed 3-D flow simulations, and secondly, presents a specific application related to the conductivity homogenization problem (identifying a macroscale conduction law, and an equivalent or effective conductivity). Analytical expressions of effective conductivities are compared with empirical values obtained from several large scale simulations conducted for single realizations of random porous media.

  14. On stability and turbulence of fluid flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heisenberg, Werner

    1951-01-01

    This investigation is divided into two parts, the treatment of the stability problem of fluid flows on the one hand, and that of the turbulent motion on the other. The first part summarizes all previous investigations under a unified point of view, that is, sets up as generally as possible the conditions under which a profile possesses unstable or stable characteristics, and indicates the methods for solution of the stability equation for any arbitrary velocity profile and for calculation of the critical Reynolds number for unstable profiles. In the second part, under certain greatly idealizing assumptions, differential equations for the turbulent motions are derived and from them qualitative information about several properties of the turbulent velocity distribution is obtained.

  15. Scalewise investigation of two-phase flow turbulence in upward turbulent bubbly pipe flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jun Ho; Kim, Hyunseok; Park, Hyungmin

    2015-11-01

    In the present study, the two-phase flow turbulence in upward turbulent bubbly pipe flows (at the Reynolds number of 5300) is invesgitated, especially focusing on the changes in flow structures with bubbles depending on the length scales. For the scalewise investigation, we perform the wavelet multi-resolution analysis on the velocity fields at three streamwise locations, measured with high-speed two-phase particle image velocimetry technology. While we intentaionlly introduce asymmetrically distributed bubbles at the pipe inlet, the mean volume void fraction is varied from from 0.3% to 1.86% and the considered mean bubble diameter is roughly maintained at 3.8 mm. With the present condition, turbulence enhancement is achieived for most cases but the turbulent suppression is also captured near the wall for the smallest void fraction case. Comparing the scalewise energy contribution, it is understood that the flow structures with length scales between bubble radius and bubble wake size are enhanced due to bubbles, resulting in the turbulence enhancement. On the other hand, flow structure with smaller length scales (mostly existing near the wall) may decrease depending on the bubble condition, which may be one of the explanations in turbulence suppression with bubbles. Supported by the NRF grant funded by the Korea government (NRF-2012M2A8A4055647) via SNU-IAMD.

  16. A full 3D model of fluid flow and heat transfer in an E.B. heated liquid metal bath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matveichev, A.; Jardy, A.; Bellot, J. P.

    2016-07-01

    In order to study the dissolution of exogeneous inclusions in the liquid metal during processing of titanium alloys, a series of dipping experiments has been performed in an Electron Beam Melting laboratory furnace. Precise determination of the dissolution kinetics requires knowing and mastering the exact thermohydrodynamic behavior of the melt pool, which implies full 3D modeling of the process. To achieve this goal, one needs to describe momentum and heat transfer, phase change, as well as the development of flow turbulence in the liquid. EB power input, thermal radiation, heat loss through the cooling circuit, surface tension effects (i.e. Marangoni-induced flow) must also be addressed in the model. Therefore a new solver dealing with all these phenomena was implemented within OpenFOAM platform. Numerical results were compared with experimental data from actual Ti melting, showing a pretty good agreement. In the second stage, the immersion of a refractory sample rod in the liquid pool was simulated. Results of the simulations showed that the introduction of the sample slightly disturbs the flow field inside the bath. The amount of such disturbance depends on the exact location of the dipping.

  17. 3-D Numerical Modeling of MHD Flows in Variable Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullina, K. I.; Bogovalov, S. V.

    3-D numerical simulation of the liquid metal flow affected by the electromagnetic field in the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) devices is performed. Software package ANSYS has been used for the numerical calculations. The non-stationary problem has been solved taking into account the influence of the metal flow on the electromagnetic field and nonlinear magnetic permeability of the ferromagnetic cores. Simplified calculations with constant magnetic permeability of the ferromagnetic cores have been performed as well. Comparison of these calculations shows that the simulation of the MHD pump can be performed in the linear approximation. The pump performance curve has been derived in this approximation.

  18. 3-D flow and scour near a submerged wing dike: ADCP measurements on the Missouri River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jamieson, E.C.; Rennie, C.D.; Jacobson, R.B.; Townsend, R.D.

    2011-01-01

    Detailed mapping of bathymetry and three-dimensional water velocities using a boat-mounted single-beam sonar and acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) was carried out in the vicinity of two submerged wing dikes located in the Lower Missouri River near Columbia, Missouri. During high spring flows the wing dikes become submerged, creating a unique combination of vertical flow separation and overtopping (plunging) flow conditions, causing large-scale three-dimensional turbulent flow structures to form. On three different days and for a range of discharges, sampling transects at 5 and 20 m spacing were completed, covering the area adjacent to and upstream and downstream from two different wing dikes. The objectives of this research are to evaluate whether an ADCP can identify and measure large-scale flow features such as recirculating flow and vortex shedding that develop in the vicinity of a submerged wing dike; and whether or not moving-boat (single-transect) data are sufficient for resolving complex three-dimensional flow fields. Results indicate that spatial averaging from multiple nearby single transects may be more representative of an inherently complex (temporally and spatially variable) three-dimensional flow field than repeated single transects. Results also indicate a correspondence between the location of calculated vortex cores (resolved from the interpolated three-dimensional flow field) and the nearby scour holes, providing new insight into the connections between vertically oriented coherent structures and local scour, with the unique perspective of flow and morphology in a large river.

  19. Turbulent jet patterns in accelerating flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lipshitz, A.; Greber, I.

    1981-01-01

    Results of flow visualization experiments, and a semi-empirical model of a single turbulent jet injected perpendicularly to a different density cross flow are presented. The model is based on integral conservation equations, including the pressure terms appropriate to accelerating flow. It uses an entrainment correlation obtained from previous experiments of a jet in a cross stream. The results show trajectories and spreading rates, and are typified by a set of three parameters: momentum ratio, Froude number and density ratio. Agreement between test and calculated results is encouraging, but tend to be poorer with increasing momentum ratio.

  20. Nonhydrostatic granular flow over 3-D terrain: New Boussinesq-type gravity waves?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro-Orgaz, Oscar; Hutter, Kolumban; Giraldez, Juan V.; Hager, Willi H.

    2015-01-01

    granular mass flow is a basic step in the prediction and control of natural or man-made disasters related to avalanches on the Earth. Savage and Hutter (1989) pioneered the mathematical modeling of these geophysical flows introducing Saint-Venant-type mass and momentum depth-averaged hydrostatic equations using the continuum mechanics approach. However, Denlinger and Iverson (2004) found that vertical accelerations in granular mass flows are of the same order as the gravity acceleration, requiring the consideration of nonhydrostatic modeling of granular mass flows. Although free surface water flow simulations based on nonhydrostatic depth-averaged models are commonly used since the works of Boussinesq (1872, 1877), they have not yet been applied to the modeling of debris flow. Can granular mass flow be described by Boussinesq-type gravity waves? This is a fundamental question to which an answer is required, given the potential to expand the successful Boussinesq-type water theory to granular flow over 3-D terrain. This issue is explored in this work by generalizing the basic Boussinesq-type theory used in civil and coastal engineering for more than a century to an arbitrary granular mass flow using the continuum mechanics approach. Using simple test cases, it is demonstrated that the above question can be answered in the affirmative way, thereby opening a new framework for the physical and mathematical modeling of granular mass flow in geophysics, whereby the effect of vertical motion is mathematically included without the need of ad hoc assumptions.

  1. Reconstruction of the 3D flow field in a differentially heated rotating annulus laboratory experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harlander, U.; Wright, G. B.; Egbers, C.

    2012-04-01

    In the earth's atmosphere baroclinic instability is responsible for the heat and momentum transport from low to high latitudes. In the fifties, Raymond Hide used a rather simple laboratory experiment to study such vortices in the lab. The experiment is comprised by a cooled inner and heated outer cylinder mounted on a rotating platform, which mimics the heated tropical and cooled polar regions of the earth's atmosphere. The experiment shows rich dynamics that have been studied by varying the radial temperature difference and the rate of annulus revolution. At the Brandenburg University of Technology (BTU) Cottbus the differentially heated rotating annulus is a reference experiment of the DFG priority program 'MetStröm'. The 3D structure of the annulus flow field has been numerically simulated but, to our knowledge, has not been measured in the laboratory. In the present paper we use novel interpolation techniques to reconstruct the 3D annulus flow field from synchronous Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) and Infrared Thermography (IRT) measurements. The PIV system is used to measure the horizontal velocity components at 40, 60, 80, 100, and 120 mm above the bottom. The uppermost level is thus 15 mm below the fluid's surface. The surface temperature is simultaneously measured by an infrared (IR) camera. The PIV and infrared cameras have been mounted above the annulus and they co-rotate with the annulus. From the PIV observations alone a coherent 3D picture of the flow cannot be constructed since the PIV measurements have been taken at different instants of time. Therefore a corresponding IR image has been recorded for each PIV measurement. These IR images can be used to reconstruct the correct phase of the measured velocity fields. Each IR and PIV image for which t>0 is rotated back to the position at t=0. Then all surface waves have the same phase. In contrast, the PIV velocity fields generally have different phases since they have been taken at different vertical

  2. Numerical Simulation of 3-D Supersonic Viscous Flow in an Experimental MHD Channel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kato, Hiromasa; Tannehill, John C.; Gupta, Sumeet; Mehta, Unmeel B.

    2004-01-01

    The 3-D supersonic viscous flow in an experimental MHD channel has been numerically simulated. The experimental MHD channel is currently in operation at NASA Ames Research Center. The channel contains a nozzle section, a center section, and an accelerator section where magnetic and electric fields can be imposed on the flow. In recent tests, velocity increases of up to 40% have been achieved in the accelerator section. The flow in the channel is numerically computed using a new 3-D parabolized Navier-Stokes (PNS) algorithm that has been developed to efficiently compute MHD flows in the low magnetic Reynolds number regime. The MHD effects are modeled by introducing source terms into the PNS equations which can then be solved in a very e5uent manner. To account for upstream (elliptic) effects, the flowfield can be computed using multiple streamwise sweeps with an iterated PNS algorithm. The new algorithm has been used to compute two test cases that match the experimental conditions. In both cases, magnetic and electric fields are applied to the flow. The computed results are in good agreement with the available experimental data.

  3. Flow measurements in a model centrifugal pump by 3-D PIV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, H.; Xu, H. R.; Liu, C.

    2012-11-01

    PIV (Particle Image Velocimetry), as an non-intrusive flow measurements technology, is widely used to investigate the flow fields in many areas. 3-D (three Dimensional) PIV has seldom been used to measure flow field in rotational impeller of centrifugal pump due to the difficulty of calibration in samll space. In this article, a specially manufactured water tank was used to perform the calibration for 3-D PIV measurement. The instantaneous absolute velocity in one impeller passage was obtained by merging of three sub zones and the relative velocity was acquired by velocity decomposition. The result shows that, when the pump runs at the condition of design flow rate, the radial component velocity Wr appears a concave distribution except the condition of R=45 mm. With the increase of radius, the circumference location of the minimum radial component velocity Wr moves from the pressure side to the suction side. At the same time, the tangential component velocity Wθ on the suction side decreases gradually with the increase of radius, while the component on the pressure side increases gradually. The secondary flow in different radius section has also been shown. At last, the error of PIV measurements was analyzed, which shows that the test results are accurate and the measured data is reliable.

  4. Evaluation of Turbulence-Model Performance in Jet Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodruff, S. L.; Seiner, J. M.; Hussaini, M. Y.; Erlebacher, G.

    2001-01-01

    The importance of reducing jet noise in both commercial and military aircraft applications has made jet acoustics a significant area of research. A technique for jet noise prediction commonly employed in practice is the MGB approach, based on the Lighthill acoustic analogy. This technique requires as aerodynamic input mean flow quantities and turbulence quantities like the kinetic energy and the dissipation. The purpose of the present paper is to assess existing capabilities for predicting these aerodynamic inputs. Two modern Navier-Stokes flow solvers, coupled with several modern turbulence models, are evaluated by comparison with experiment for their ability to predict mean flow properties in a supersonic jet plume. Potential weaknesses are identified for further investigation. Another comparison with similar intent is discussed by Barber et al. The ultimate goal of this research is to develop a reliable flow solver applicable to the low-noise, propulsion-efficient, nozzle exhaust systems being developed in NASA focused programs. These programs address a broad range of complex nozzle geometries operating in high temperature, compressible, flows. Seiner et al. previously discussed the jet configuration examined here. This convergent-divergent nozzle with an exit diameter of 3.6 inches was designed for an exhaust Mach number of 2.0 and a total temperature of 1680 F. The acoustic and aerodynamic data reported by Seiner et al. covered a range of jet total temperatures from 104 F to 2200 F at the fully-expanded nozzle pressure ratio. The aerodynamic data included centerline mean velocity and total temperature profiles. Computations were performed independently with two computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes, ISAAC and PAB3D. Turbulence models employed include the k-epsilon model, the Gatski-Speziale algebraic-stress model and the Girimaji model, with and without the Sarkar compressibility correction. Centerline values of mean velocity and mean temperature are

  5. Intermittency in a tidal river turbulent flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, Francois G.; Le Kien, Trung; Thiébaut, Maxime; Sentchev, Alexei

    2016-04-01

    We consider here fixed point measurements of the turbulent velocity recorded in the Sea Schelde river at Temse, 10 km south-west of Antwerp (Belgium). An Acoustic Doppler Velocimeter (ADV) was recording 3 components of the flow velocity at 32 Hz, 1 m below the surface, during 2 tidal cycles (25h)s. At this position, the river flow is still strongly influenced by the tide. The measurements cover different tidal current regimes: strong ebb and flood flow with velocity of 1.5m/s, and also a flow reversal. The Taylor based Reynolds number is estimated to be 530. The intermittency during the flow reversal period is studied using cumulants approach, and during stationary flows in both directions, the intermittency is studied using traditional scaling approaches. The scale invariant moment functions obtained are compared to laboratory experiments.

  6. Mathematical and Numerical Modeling of Turbulent Flows.

    PubMed

    Vedovoto, João M; Serfaty, Ricardo; Da Silveira Neto, Aristeu

    2015-01-01

    The present work is devoted to the development and implementation of a computational framework to perform numerical simulations of low Mach number turbulent flows over complex geometries. The algorithm under consideration is based on a classical predictor-corrector time integration scheme that employs a projection method for the momentum equations. The domain decomposition strategy is adopted for distributed computing, displaying very satisfactory levels of speed-up and efficiency. The Immersed Boundary Methodology is used to characterize the presence of a complex geometry. Such method demands two separate grids: An Eulerian, where the transport equations are solved with a Finite Volume, second order discretization and a Lagrangian domain, represented by a non-structured shell grid representing the immersed geometry. The in-house code developed was fully verified by the Method of Manufactured Solutions, in both Eulerian and Lagrangian domains. The capabilities of the resulting computational framework are illustrated on four distinct cases: a turbulent jet, the Poiseuille flow, as a matter of validation of the implemented Immersed Boundary methodology, the flow over a sphere covering a wide range of Reynolds numbers, and finally, with the intention of demonstrating the applicability of Large Eddy Simulations - LES - in an industrial problem, the turbulent flow inside an industrial fan. PMID:26131642

  7. MEMS applications in turbulence and flow control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Löfdahl, Lennart; Gad-el-Hak, Mohamed

    1999-02-01

    Manufacturing processes that can create extremely small machines have been developed in recent years. Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) refer to devices that have characteristic length of less than 1 mm but more than 1 μm, that combine electrical and mechanical components and that are fabricated using integrated circuit batch-processing techniques. Electrostatic, magnetic, pneumatic and thermal actuators, motors, valves, gears and tweezers of less than 100 μm size have been fabricated. These have been used as sensors for pressure, temperature, mass flow, velocity and sound, as actuators for linear and angular motions, and as simple components for complex systems such as micro-heat-engines and micro-heat-pumps. In this paper, we focus on the use of microelectromechanical systems for the diagnosis and control of turbulent shear flows. We survey the status and outlook of microsensors and microactuators as used for those particular applications, and compare the minute devices to their larger cousins. Microsensors can resolve all relevant scales even in high-Reynolds-number turbulent flows. Arrays of microsensors and microactuators make it feasible, for the first time, to achieve effective reactive control targeted toward specific small-scale coherent structures in turbulent wall-bounded flows.

  8. Large eddy simulation of turbulent cavitating flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gnanaskandan, A.; Mahesh, K.

    2015-12-01

    Large Eddy Simulation is employed to study two turbulent cavitating flows: over a cylinder and a wedge. A homogeneous mixture model is used to treat the mixture of water and water vapor as a compressible fluid. The governing equations are solved using a novel predictor- corrector method. The subgrid terms are modeled using the Dynamic Smagorinsky model. Cavitating flow over a cylinder at Reynolds number (Re) = 3900 and cavitation number (σ) = 1.0 is simulated and the wake characteristics are compared to the single phase results at the same Reynolds number. It is observed that cavitation suppresses turbulence in the near wake and delays three dimensional breakdown of the vortices. Next, cavitating flow over a wedge at Re = 200, 000 and σ = 2.0 is presented. The mean void fraction profiles obtained are compared to experiment and good agreement is obtained. Cavity auto-oscillation is observed, where the sheet cavity breaks up into a cloud cavity periodically. The results suggest LES as an attractive approach for predicting turbulent cavitating flows.

  9. Studies in Transition and Time Varying Turbulent Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grosch, Chester E.

    2004-01-01

    The research focused on two areas: (a) the dynamics of forced turbulent flows and (b) time filtered Large Eddy Simulations (TLES). The dynamics of turbulent flows arising from external forcing of the turbulence are poorly understood. In particular, here are many unanswered questions relating the basic dynamical balances and the existence or nonexistence of statistical equilibrium of forced turbulent flows. The research used direct numerical simulations to explore these questions. The properties of the temporally filtered Navier-Stokes equations were also studied.

  10. Variational formulation of hybrid problems for fully 3-D transonic flow with shocks in rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Gao-Lian

    1991-01-01

    Based on previous research, the unified variable domain variational theory of hybrid problems for rotor flow is extended to fully 3-D transonic rotor flow with shocks, unifying and generalizing the direct and inverse problems. Three variational principles (VP) families were established. All unknown boundaries and flow discontinuities (such as shocks, free trailing vortex sheets) are successfully handled via functional variations with variable domain, converting almost all boundary and interface conditions, including the Rankine Hugoniot shock relations, into natural ones. This theory provides a series of novel ways for blade design or modification and a rigorous theoretical basis for finite element applications and also constitutes an important part of the optimal design theory of rotor bladings. Numerical solutions to subsonic flow by finite elements with self-adapting nodes given in Refs., show good agreement with experimental results.

  11. 3D-PTV measurement of the phototactic movement of algae in shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeda, Tatsuyuki; Ishikawa, Takuji; Ueno, Hironori; Numayama-Tsuruta, Keiko; Imai, Yosuke; Yamaguchi, Takami

    2012-11-01

    Recently, swimming motion of algae cells is researched actively, because algae fuel is one of the hottest topic in engineering. It is known that algae swim toward the light for photosynthesis however, the effect of a background flow on the unidirectional swimming is unclear. In this study, we used Volvox as a model alga and placed them in a simple shear flow with or without light stimulus. The shear flow was generated by moving two flat sheets in the opposite direction tangentially. A red LED light (wave length 660 nm) was used as an observation light source, and a white LED light was used to stimulate cells for the phototaxis. The trajectories of individual cells were measured by a 3D-PTV system, consists of a pair of high-speed camera with macro lenses. The results were analyzed to understand the effect of the background shear flow on the phototaxis of cells.

  12. Volume average technique for turbulent flow simulation and its application to room airflow prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xianmin

    defined in the coarse-graining procedure, and responsible for most of the energy dissipation. (4) A new 3-D collocated scheme for the solution of viscous incompressible fluid flow, based on the SIMPLE and fractional-step methods is developed for the LES. Benchmark tests of the VAT are performed based on 2-D and 3-D lid-driven and 3-D buoyancy-driven cavity flows. Finally, as an example of a practical calculation, the VAT is applied to the LES of airflow in an enclosed air- conditioned room with a wall-mounted cooling inlet and an outlet on the opposite wall.

  13. Incorporating preferential flow into a 3D model of a forested headwater catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glaser, Barbara; Jackisch, Conrad; Hopp, Luisa; Pfister, Laurent; Klaus, Julian

    2016-04-01

    Preferential flow plays an important role for water flow and solute transport. The inclusion of preferential flow, for example with dual porosity or dual permeability approaches, is a common feature in transport simulations at the plot scale. But at hillslope and catchment scales, incorporation of macropore and fracture flow into distributed hydrologic 3D models is rare, often due to limited data availability for model parameterisation. In this study, we incorporated preferential flow into an existing 3D integrated surface subsurface hydrologic model (HydroGeoSphere) of a headwater region (6 ha) of the forested Weierbach catchment in western Luxembourg. Our model philosophy was a strong link between measured data and the model setup. The model setup we used previously had been parameterised and validated based on various field data. But existing macropores and fractures had not been considered in this initial model setup. The multi-criteria validation revealed a good model performance but also suggested potential for further improvement by incorporating preferential flow as additional process. In order to pursue the data driven model philosophy for the implementation of preferential flow, we analysed the results of plot scale bromide sprinkling and infiltration experiments carried out in the vicinity of the Weierbach catchment. Three 1 sqm plots were sprinkled for one hour and excavated one day later for bromide depth profile sampling. We simulated these sprinkling experiments at the soil column scale, using the parameterisation of the base headwater model extended by a second permeability domain. Representing the bromide depth profiles was successful without changing this initial parameterisation. Moreover, to explain the variability between the three bromide depth profiles it was sufficient to adapt the dual permeability properties, indicating the spatial heterogeneity of preferential flow. Subsequently, we incorporated the dual permeability simulation in the

  14. 3D imaging of particle-scale rotational motion in cyclically driven granular flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrington, Matt; Powers, Dylan; Cooper, Eric; Losert, Wolfgang

    Recent experimental advances have enabled three-dimensional (3D) imaging of motion, structure, and failure within granular systems. 3D imaging allows researchers to directly characterize bulk behaviors that arise from particle- and meso-scale features. For instance, segregation of a bidisperse system of spheres under cyclic shear can originate from microscopic irreversibilities and the development of convective secondary flows. Rotational motion and frictional rotational coupling, meanwhile, have been less explored in such experimental 3D systems, especially under cyclic forcing. In particular, relative amounts of sliding and/or rolling between pairs of contacting grains could influence the reversibility of both trajectories, in terms of both position and orientation. In this work, we apply the Refractive Index Matched Scanning technique to a granular system that is cyclically driven and measure both translational and rotational motion of individual grains. We relate measured rotational motion to resulting shear bands and convective flows, further indicating the degree to which pairs and neighborhoods of grains collectively rotate.

  15. On the growth of enstrophy in axisymmetric 3D Euler flows with swirl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayala, Diego; Doering, Charles

    2015-11-01

    By numerically solving suitable PDE-constrained optimization problems, we study a family of axisymmetric vector fields, having the structure of a pair of vortex rings with swirl, that maximize the instantaneous production of enstrophy in the context of 3-dimensional (3D) incompressible Euler flows. The axisymmetric fields are parametrized by their energy K , enstrophy E and helicity H . The imposed symmetry is justified by the results from the seminal work of Doering & Lu (2008), recently confirmed independently by Ayala & Protas (2015), where highly localized pairs of colliding vortex rings were found to be instantaneously optimal for enstrophy production in 3D Navier-Stokes flows. The axial symmetry allows for an exhaustive exploration of the parameter space (K , E , H , as the 3D problem is effectively reduced to a 2-dimensional system of partial differential equations for the modified azimuthal vorticity and the azimuthal circulation density, with the corresponding reduction in computational complexity. Possible connections between these optimal axisymmetric fields with swirl and the ``blow-up'' problem are discussed.

  16. RV functional imaging: 3-D echo-derived dynamic geometry and flow field simulations.

    PubMed

    Pasipoularides, Ares D; Shu, Ming; Womack, Michael S; Shah, Ashish; Von Ramm, Olaf; Glower, Donald D

    2003-01-01

    We describe a novel functional imaging approach for quantitative analysis of right ventricular (RV) blood flow patterns in specific experimental animals (or humans) using real-time, three-dimensional (3-D) echocardiography (RT3D). The method is independent of the digital imaging modality used. It comprises three parts. First, a semiautomated segmentation aided by intraluminal contrast medium locates the RV endocardial surface. Second, a geometric scheme for dynamic RV chamber reconstruction applies a time interpolation procedure to the RT3D data to quantify wall geometry and motion at 400 Hz. A volumetric prism method validated the dynamic geometric reconstruction against simultaneous sonomicrometric canine measurements. Finally, the RV endocardial border motion information is used for mesh generation on a computational fluid dynamics solver to simulate development of the early RV diastolic inflow field. Boundary conditions (tessellated endocardial surface nodal velocities) for the solver are directly derived from the endocardial geometry and motion information. The new functional imaging approach may yield important kinematic information on the distribution of instantaneous velocities in the RV diastolic flow field of specific normal or diseased hearts. PMID:12388220

  17. Intrathoracic tumour motion estimation from CT imaging using the 3D optical flow method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerrero, Thomas; Zhang, Geoffrey; Huang, Tzung-Chi; Lin, Kang-Ping

    2004-09-01

    The purpose of this work was to develop and validate an automated method for intrathoracic tumour motion estimation from breath-hold computed tomography (BH CT) imaging using the three-dimensional optical flow method (3D OFM). A modified 3D OFM algorithm provided 3D displacement vectors for each voxel which were used to map tumour voxels on expiration BH CT onto inspiration BH CT images. A thoracic phantom and simulated expiration/inspiration BH CT pairs were used for validation. The 3D OFM was applied to the measured inspiration and expiration BH CT images from one lung cancer and one oesophageal cancer patient. The resulting displacements were plotted in histogram format and analysed to provide insight regarding the tumour motion. The phantom tumour displacement was measured as 1.20 and 2.40 cm with full-width at tenth maximum (FWTM) for the distribution of displacement estimates of 0.008 and 0.006 cm, respectively. The maximum error of any single voxel's motion estimate was 1.1 mm along the z-dimension or approximately one-third of the z-dimension voxel size. The simulated BH CT pairs revealed an rms error of less than 0.25 mm. The displacement of the oesophageal tumours was nonuniform and up to 1.4 cm, this was a new finding. A lung tumour maximum displacement of 2.4 cm was found in the case evaluated. In conclusion, 3D OFM provided an accurate estimation of intrathoracic tumour motion, with estimated errors less than the voxel dimension in a simulated motion phantom study. Surprisingly, oesophageal tumour motion was large and nonuniform, with greatest motion occurring at the gastro-oesophageal junction. Presented at The IASTED Second International Conference on Biomedical Engineering (BioMED 2004), Innsbruck, Austria, 16-18 February 2004.

  18. A 3D pseudospectral method for cylindrical coordinates. Application to the simulations of rotating cavity flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peres, Noele; Poncet, Sébastien; Serre, Eric

    2012-08-01

    The present work proposes a collocation spectral method for solving the three-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations using cylindrical coordinates. The whole diameter -R⩽r⩽R is discretized with an even number of radial Gauss-Lobatto collocation points and an angular shift is introduced in the Fourier transform that avoid pole and parity conditions usually required. The method keeps the spectral convergence that reduces the number of grid points with respect to lower-order numerical methods. The grid-points distribution densifies the mesh only near the boundaries that makes the algorithm well-suited to simulate rotating cavity flows where thin layers develop along the walls. Comparisons with reliable experimental and numerical results of the literature show good quantitative agreements for flows driven by rotating discs in tall cylinders and thin inter-disc cavities. Associated to a spectral vanishing viscosity [E. Séverac, E. Serre, A spectral vanishing viscosity for the LES of turbulent flows within rotating cavities, J. Comp. Phys. 226 (2007) 1234-1255], the method provides very promising LES results of turbulent cavity flows.

  19. Disturbance Dynamics in Transitional and Turbulent Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grosch, C. E.

    2001-01-01

    The dynamics of an ensemble of linear disturbances with a known probability distribution associated with the initial mode amplitudes are studied in boundary-layer flows through an analysis of the transport equations for the mean disturbance kinetic energy and disturbance energy dissipation rate. Effects of adverse and favorable pressure-gradients on the disturbance dynamics are also included in the analysis. Unlike the fully turbulent regime where nonlinear phase scrambling of the fluctuations affects the flow field in proximity to the wall, the laminar regime fluctuations studied here are influenced across the boundary layer by the solid boundary. In addition to the low Reynolds number, early stage transition regime, the dynamics of these disturbance fields can be related in some respects to the near-wall dynamics of the fully turbulent regime.

  20. Turbulent Flow Past Projectiles: A Computational Investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehmedagic, Igbal; Carlucci, Donald; Buckley, Liam; Carlucci, Pasquale; Thangam, Siva

    2010-11-01

    Projectiles with free spinning bases are often used for smart munitions to provide effective control, stability and terminal guidance. Computational investigations are performed for flow past cylinders aligned along their axis where a base freely spins while attached to and separated at various distances from a non-spinning fore-body. The energy spectrum is modified to incorporate the effects of swirl and rotation using a parametric characterization of the model coefficients. An efficient finite-volume algorithm is used to solve the time-averaged equations of motion and energy along with the modeled form of transport equations for the turbulence kinetic energy and the scalar form of turbulence dissipation. Computations are performed for both rigid cylinders as well as cylinders with free-spinning bases. Experimental data for a range of spin rates and free stream flow conditions obtained from subsonic wind tunnel with sting-mounted spinning cylinders is used for validating the computational findings.

  1. Some practical turbulence modeling options for Reynolds-averaged full Navier-Stokes calculations of three-dimensional flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bui, Trong T.

    1993-01-01

    New turbulence modeling options recently implemented for the 3-D version of Proteus, a Reynolds-averaged compressible Navier-Stokes code, are described. The implemented turbulence models include: the Baldwin-Lomax algebraic model, the Baldwin-Barth one-equation model, the Chien k-epsilon model, and the Launder-Sharma k-epsilon model. Features of this turbulence modeling package include: well documented and easy to use turbulence modeling options, uniform integration of turbulence models from different classes, automatic initialization of turbulence variables for calculations using one- or two-equation turbulence models, multiple solid boundaries treatment, and fully vectorized L-U solver for one- and two-equation models. Validation test cases include the incompressible and compressible flat plate turbulent boundary layers, turbulent developing S-duct flow, and glancing shock wave/turbulent boundary layer interaction. Good agreement is obtained between the computational results and experimental data. Sensitivity of the compressible turbulent solutions with the method of y(sup +) computation, the turbulent length scale correction, and some compressibility corrections are examined in detail. The test cases show that the highly optimized one-and two-equation turbulence models can be used in routine 3-D Navier-Stokes computations with no significant increase in CPU time as compared with the Baldwin-Lomax algebraic model.

  2. The Aeroacoustics of Turbulent Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, M. E.

    2008-01-01

    Aerodynamic noise prediction has been an important and challenging research area since James Lighthill first introduced his Acoustic Analogy Approach over fifty years ago. This talk attempts to provide a unified framework for the subsequent theoretical developments in this field. It assumes that there is no single approach that is optimal in all situations and uses the framework as a basis for discussing the strengths weaknesses of the various approaches to this topic. But the emphasis here will be on the important problem of predicting the noise from high speed air jets. Specific results will presented for round jets in the 0.5 to 1.4 Mach number range and compared with experimental data taken on the Glenn SHAR rig. It is demonstrated that nonparallel mean flow effects play an important role in predicting the noise at the supersonic Mach numbers. The results explain the failure of previous attempts based on the parallel flow Lilley model (which has served as the foundation for most jet noise analyses during past two decades).

  3. 3D FEM Geometry and Material Flow Optimization of Porthole-Die Extrusion

    SciTech Connect

    Ceretti, Elisabetta; Mazzoni, Luca; Giardini, Claudio

    2007-05-17

    The aim of this work is to design and to improve the geometry of a porthole-die for the production of aluminum components by means of 3D FEM simulations. In fact, the use of finite element models will allow to investigate the effects of the die geometry (webs, extrusion cavity) on the material flow and on the stresses acting on the die so to reduce the die wear and to improve the tool life. The software used to perform the simulations was a commercial FEM code, Deform 3D. The technological data introduced in the FE model have been furnished by METRA S.p.A. Company, partner in this research. The results obtained have been considered valid and helpful by the Company for building a new optimized extrusion porthole-die.

  4. Cauchy's almost forgotten Lagrangian formulation of the Euler equation for 3D incompressible flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frisch, Uriel; Villone, Barbara

    2014-09-01

    Two prized papers, one by Augustin Cauchy in 1815, presented to the French Academy and the other by Hermann Hankel in 1861, presented to Göttingen University, contain major discoveries on vorticity dynamics whose impact is now quickly increasing. Cauchy found a Lagrangian formulation of 3D ideal incompressible flow in terms of three invariants that generalize to three dimensions the now well-known law of conservation of vorticity along fluid particle trajectories for two-dimensional flow. This has very recently been used to prove analyticity in time of fluid particle trajectories for 3D incompressible Euler flow and can be extended to compressible flow, in particular to cosmological dark matter. Hankel showed that Cauchy's formulation gives a very simple Lagrangian derivation of the Helmholtz vorticity-flux invariants and, in the middle of the proof, derived an intermediate result which is the conservation of the circulation of the velocity around a closed contour moving with the fluid. This circulation theorem was to be rediscovered independently by William Thomson (Kelvin) in 1869. Cauchy's invariants were only occasionally cited in the 19th century - besides Hankel, foremost by George Stokes and Maurice Lévy - and even less so in the 20th until they were rediscovered via Emmy Noether's theorem in the late 1960, but reattributed to Cauchy only at the end of the 20th century by Russian scientists.

  5. Holographic measurement of wall stress distribution and 3D flow over a surface textured by microfibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bocanegra, Humberto; Gorumlu, Seder; Aksak, Burak; Castillo, Luciano; Sheng, Jian

    2015-11-01

    Understanding how fluid flow interacts with micro-textured surfaces is crucial for a broad range of key biological processes and engineering applications including particle dispersion, pathogenic infections, and drag manipulation by surface topology. Existing methods, such as μPIV, suffers from low spatial resolution and fail to track tracer particle motion very close to a rough surface and within roughness elements. In this paper, we present a technique that combines high speed digital holographic microscopy (DHM) with a correlation based de-noising algorithm to overcome the optical interference generated by surface roughness and to capture a large number of 3D particle trajectories. It allows us to obtain a 3D velocity field with an uncertainty of 0.01% and 2D wall shear stress distribution at the resolution of ~ 65 μPa. Applying the technique to a microfluidics with a surface textured by microfibers, we find that the flow is three-dimensional and complex. While the microfibers affect the velocity flow field locally, their presence is felt globally in terms of wall shear stresses. The study of effect of microfiber patterns and flow characteristics on skin frictions are ongoing and will be reported.

  6. Recent advancement of turbulent flow measurement techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Battle, T.; Wang, P.; Cheng, D. Y.

    1974-01-01

    Advancements of the fluctuating density gradient cross beam laser Schlieren technique, the fluctuating line-reversal temperature measurement and the development of the two-dimensional drag-sensing probe to a three-dimensional drag-sensing probe are discussed. The three-dimensionality of the instantaneous momentum vector can shed some light on the nature of turbulence especially with swirling flow. All three measured fluctuating quantities (density, temperature, and momentum) can provide valuable information for theoreticians.

  7. Statistical theory of turbulent incompressible multimaterial flow

    SciTech Connect

    Kashiwa, B.

    1987-10-01

    Interpenetrating motion of incompressible materials is considered. ''Turbulence'' is defined as any deviation from the mean motion. Accordingly a nominally stationary fluid will exhibit turbulent fluctuations due to a single, slowly moving sphere. Mean conservation equations for interpenetrating materials in arbitrary proportions are derived using an ensemble averaging procedure, beginning with the exact equations of motion. The result is a set of conservation equations for the mean mass, momentum and fluctuational kinetic energy of each material. The equation system is at first unclosed due to integral terms involving unknown one-point and two-point probability distribution functions. In the mean momentum equation, the unclosed terms are clearly identified as representing two physical processes. One is transport of momentum by multimaterial Reynolds stresses, and the other is momentum exchange due to pressure fluctuations and viscous stress at material interfaces. Closure is approached by combining careful examination of multipoint statistical correlations with the traditional physical technique of kappa-epsilon modeling for single-material turbulence. This involves representing the multimaterial Reynolds stress for each material as a turbulent viscosity times the rate of strain based on the mean velocity of that material. The multimaterial turbulent viscosity is related to the fluctuational kinetic energy kappa, and the rate of fluctuational energy dissipation epsilon, for each material. Hence a set of kappa and epsilon equations must be solved, together with mean mass and momentum conservation equations, for each material. Both kappa and the turbulent viscosities enter into the momentum exchange force. The theory is applied to (a) calculation of the drag force on a sphere fixed in a uniform flow, (b) calculation of the settling rate in a suspension and (c) calculation of velocity profiles in the pneumatic transport of solid particles in a pipe.

  8. A 3-D nonisothermal flow simulation and pulling force model for injection pultrusion processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mustafa, Ibrahim

    1998-12-01

    Injected Pultrusion (IP) is an efficient way of producing high quality, low cost, high volume and constant cross-section polymeric composites. This process has been developed recently, and the efforts to optimize it are still underway. This work is related to the development of a 3-D non-isothermal flow model for the IP processes. The governing equations for transport of mass, momentum and, energy are formulated by using a local volume averaging approach, and the Finite Element/Control Volume method is used to solve the system of equations numerically. The chemical species balance equation is solved in the Lagrangian frame of reference whereas the energy equation is solved using Galerkin, SU (Streamline Upwind), and SUPG (Streamline Upwind Petrov Galerkin) approaches. By varying degrees of freedom and the flow rates of the resin, it is shown that at high Peclet numbers the SUPG formulation performs better than the SU and the Galerkin methods in all cases. The 3-D model predictions for degree of cure and temperature are compared with a one dimensional analytical solution and the results are found satisfactory. Moreover, by varying the Brinkman Number, it is shown that the effect of viscous dissipation is insignificant. The 3-D flow simulations have been carried out for both thin and thick parts and the results are compared with the 2-D model. It is shown that for thick parts 2-D simulations render erroneous results. The effect of changing permeability on the flow fronts is also addressed. The effect of increasing taper angle on the model prediction is also investigated. A parametric study is conducted to isolate optimum conditions for both isothermal and non-isothermal cases using a straight rectangular die and a die with a tapered inlet. Finally, a simple pulling force model is developed and the pulling force required to pull the carbon-epoxy fiber resin system is estimated for dies of varying tapered inlet.

  9. 3-D Particle Tracking Velocimetry: Development and Applications in Small Scale Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tien, Wei-Hsin

    The thesis contains two parts of studies. In part I, a novel volumetric velocimetry technique is developed to measure the 3-D flow field of small-scale flows. The technique utilizes a color-coded pinhole plate with multiple light sources aligned to each pinhole to achieve high particle image density and large measurable depth on a single lens microscope system. A color separation algorithm and an improved particle identification algorithm are developed to identify individual particle images from each pinhole view. Furthermore, a calibration-based technique based on epi-polar line search method is developed to reconstruct the spatial coordinates of the particle, and a new two-frame tracking particle-tracking algorithm is developed to calculate the velocity field. The system was setup to achieve a magnification of 2.69, resulting in an imaging volume of 3.35 x 2.5 x 1.5 mm3 and showed satisfactory measurement accuracy. The technique was then further miniaturized to achieve a magnification of 10, resulting in a imaging volume of 600 x 600 x 600 microm3. The system was applied to a backward-facing step flow to test its ability to reconstruct the unsteady flow field with two-frame tracking. Finally, this technique was applied to a steady streaming flow field in a microfluidic device used to trap particles. The results revealed the three-dimensional flow structure that has not been observed in previous studies, and provided insights to the design of a more efficient trapping device. In part II, an in-vitro study was carried out to investigate the flow around a prosthetic venous valve. Using 2-D PIV, the dynamics of the valve motion was captured and the velocity fields were measured to investigate the effect of the sinus pocket and the coupling effect of a pair of valves. The PIV and hemodynamic results showed that the sinus pocket around the valve functioned as a flow regulator to smooth the entrained velocity profile and suppress the jet width. For current prosthetic

  10. North Cascadia heat flux and fluid flow from gas hydrates: Modeling 3-D topographic effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hong-lin; He, Tao; Spence, George D.

    2014-01-01

    The bottom-simulating reflector (BSR) of gas hydrate is well imaged from two perpendicular seismic grids in the region of a large carbonate mound, informally called Cucumber Ridge off Vancouver Island. We use a new method to calculate 3-D heat flow map from the BSR depths, in which we incorporate 3-D topographic corrections after calibrated by the drilling results from nearby (Integrated) Ocean Drilling Program Site 889 and Site U1327. We then estimate the associated fluid flow by relating it to the topographically corrected heat flux anomalies. In the midslope region, a heat flux anomaly of 1 mW/m2 can be associated with an approximate focused fluid flow rate of 0.09 mm/yr. Around Cucumber Ridge, high rates of focused fluid flow were observed at steep slopes with values more than double the average regional diffusive fluid discharge rate of 0.56 mm/yr. As well, in some areas of relatively flat seafloor, the focused fluid flow rates still exceeded 0.5 mm/yr. On the seismic lines the regions of focused fluid flow were commonly associated with seismic blanking zones above the BSR and sometimes with strong reflectors below the BSR, indicating that the faults/fractures provide high-permeability pathways for fluids to carry methane from BSR depths to the seafloor. These high fluid flow regions cover mostly the western portion of our area with gas hydrate concentration estimations of ~6% based on empirical correlations from Hydrate Ridge in south off Oregon, significantly higher than previously recognized values of ~2.5% in the eastern portion determined from Site U1327.

  11. Simulations of turbulent mixing and reacting flows and their applications to turbulence modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferziger, J. H.; Cantwell, B. J.

    1986-01-01

    The method of full simulation is applied to reacting turbulent flows. Full simulation has proven of great value as a complement to experiments for the study of nonreacting turbulent flows. It provides insight into the physics of turbulent flows and their modeling. It is natural to try to extend these methods to the simulation of reacting turbulent flows. Because this is one of the first attempts at this type of simulation, a subsidiary goal of this work is to demonstrate the feasibility of using simulation to study turbulent reacting flows. In addition, it is shown that such simulations can be used to provide physical insight into the nature of turbulent combustion and to provide data that will help to construct models that can be used in engineering simulations of turbulent reacting flows.

  12. Numerical Simulation of High-Speed Turbulent Reacting Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Givi, P.; Taulbee, D. B.; Madnia, C. K.; Jaberi, F. A.; Colucci, P. J.; Gicquel, L. Y. M.; Adumitroaie, V.; James, S.

    1999-01-01

    The objectives of this research are: (1) to develop and implement a new methodology for large eddy simulation of (LES) of high-speed reacting turbulent flows. (2) To develop algebraic turbulence closures for statistical description of chemically reacting turbulent flows.

  13. Driver gas flow with fluctuations. [shock tube turbulent bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, J. A., III; Jones, W. R.; Santiago, J.

    1980-01-01

    A shock tube's driver gas can apparently provide flow with turbulent bursts. The fluctuations are interpreted using a boundary layer model of contact surface flow and results form a kinetic theory of turbulence. With this, a lower limit of 4 on the ratio of maximum to minimum turbulent intensities in contact surface instabilities has been estimated.

  14. A 3D-CFD code for accurate prediction of fluid flows and fluid forces in seals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Athavale, M. M.; Przekwas, A. J.; Hendricks, R. C.

    1994-01-01

    Current and future turbomachinery requires advanced seal configurations to control leakage, inhibit mixing of incompatible fluids and to control the rotodynamic response. In recognition of a deficiency in the existing predictive methodology for seals, a seven year effort was established in 1990 by NASA's Office of Aeronautics Exploration and Technology, under the Earth-to-Orbit Propulsion program, to develop validated Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) concepts, codes and analyses for seals. The effort will provide NASA and the U.S. Aerospace Industry with advanced CFD scientific codes and industrial codes for analyzing and designing turbomachinery seals. An advanced 3D CFD cylindrical seal code has been developed, incorporating state-of-the-art computational methodology for flow analysis in straight, tapered and stepped seals. Relevant computational features of the code include: stationary/rotating coordinates, cylindrical and general Body Fitted Coordinates (BFC) systems, high order differencing schemes, colocated variable arrangement, advanced turbulence models, incompressible/compressible flows, and moving grids. This paper presents the current status of code development, code demonstration for predicting rotordynamic coefficients, numerical parametric study of entrance loss coefficients for generic annular seals, and plans for code extensions to labyrinth, damping, and other seal configurations.

  15. A Computational Model for Suspended Large Rigid Bodies in 3D Unsteady Viscous Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Feng

    1999-11-01

    A 3D numerical model for computing large rigid objects suspended in fluid flow has been developed. Rather than calculating the surface pressure upon the solid body, we evaluate the net force and torque based on a volume force formulation. The total effective force is obtained by summing up the forces at the Eulerian grids occupied by the rigid body. The effects of the moving bodies are coupled to the fluid flow by imposing the velocity field of the bodies to the fluid. A Poisson equation is used to compute the pressure over the whole domain. The objects are identified by color functions and calculated by the PPM scheme and a tangent function transformation which scales the transition region of the computed interface to a compact thickness. The model is then implemented on a parallel computer of distributed memory and validated with Stokes and low Reynolds number flows.

  16. Flow control on a 3D backward facing ramp by pulsed jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joseph, Pierric; Bortolus, Dorian; Grasso, Francesco

    2014-06-01

    This paper presents an experimental study of flow separation control over a 3D backward facing ramp by means of pulsed jets. Such geometry has been selected to reproduce flow phenomena of interest for the automotive industry. The base flow has been characterised using PIV and pressure measurements. The results show that the classical notchback topology is correctly reproduced. A control system based on magnetic valves has been used to produce the pulsed jets whose properties have been characterised by hot wire anemometry. In order to shed some light on the role of the different parameters affecting the suppression of the slant recirculation area, a parametric study has been carried out by varying the frequency and the momentum coefficient of the jets for several Reynolds numbers. xml:lang="fr"

  17. Waves in Turbulent Stably Stratified Shear Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobitz, F. G.; Rogers, M. M.; Ferziger, J. H.; Parks, John W. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Two approaches for the identification of internal gravity waves in sheared and unsheared homogeneous stratified turbulence are investigated. First, the phase angle between the vertical velocity and density fluctuations is considered. It was found, however, that a continuous distribution of the phase angle is present in weakly and strongly stratified flow. Second, a projection onto the solution of the linearized inviscid equations of motion of unsheared stratified flow is investigated. It was found that a solution of the fully nonlinear viscous Navier-Stokes equations can be represented by the linearized inviscid solution. The projection yields a decomposition into vertical wave modes and horizontal vortical modes.

  18. A Baroclinic Model of turbulent dusty flows

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhl, A.L.

    1992-04-01

    The problem considered here is the numerical simulation of the turbulent dusty flow induced by explosions over soil surfaces. Some of the unresolved issues are: (1) how much dust is scoured from such surfaces; (2) where does the dust go in the boundary layer; (3) what is the dusty boundary layer height versus time; (4) what are the dusty boundary layer profiles; (5) how much of the dust mass becomes entrained into the dust stem; and (6) where does the dust go in the buoyant cloud? The author proposes a Baroclinic Model for flows with large density variations that actually calculates the turbulent mixing and transport of dust on an adaptive grid. The model is based on the following idealizations: (1) a loose dust bed; (2) an instantaneous shock fluidization of the dust layer; (3) the dust and air are in local equilibrium (so air viscosity enforces the no-slip condition); (4) the dust-air mixture is treated as a continuum dense fluid with zero viscosity; and (5) the turbulent mixing is dominated by baroclinically-generated vorticity. These assumptions lead to an inviscid set of conservation laws for the mixture, which are solved by means of a high-order Godunov algorithm for gasdynamics. Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR) is used to capture the turbulent mixing processes on the grid. One of the unique characteristics of these flows is that mixing occurs because vorticity is produced by an inviscid, baroclinic mechanism. A number of examples are presented to illustrate these baroclinic effects including shock interactions with dense-gas layers and dust beds, and dusty wall jets of airblast precursors. The conclusion of these studies is that dusty boundary layers grow because of mass entrainment from the fluidized bed (and not because of viscous wall drag) as proven by the Mass Integral Equation.

  19. A new high-performance 3D multiphase flow code to simulate volcanic blasts and pyroclastic density currents: example from the Boxing Day event, Montserrat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ongaro, T. E.; Clarke, A.; Neri, A.; Voight, B.; Widiwijayanti, C.

    2005-12-01

    For the first time the dynamics of directed blasts from explosive lava-dome decompression have been investigated by means of transient, multiphase flow simulations in 2D and 3D. Multiphase flow models developed for the analysis of pyroclastic dispersal from explosive eruptions have been so far limited to 2D axisymmetric or Cartesian formulations which cannot properly account for important 3D features of the volcanic system such as complex morphology and fluid turbulence. Here we use a new parallel multiphase flow code, named PDAC (Pyroclastic Dispersal Analysis Code) (Esposti Ongaro et al., 2005), able to simulate the transient and 3D thermofluid-dynamics of pyroclastic dispersal produced by collapsing columns and volcanic blasts. The code solves the equations of the multiparticle flow model of Neri et al. (2003) on 3D domains extending up to several kilometres in 3D and includes a new description of the boundary conditions over topography which is automatically acquired from a DEM. The initial conditions are represented by a compact volume of gas and pyroclasts, with clasts of different sizes and densities, at high temperature and pressure. Different dome porosities and pressurization models were tested in 2D to assess the sensitivity of the results to the distribution of initial gas pressure, and to the total mass and energy stored in the dome, prior to 3D modeling. The simulations have used topographies appropriate for the 1997 Boxing Day directed blast on Montserrat, which eradicated the village of St. Patricks. Some simulations tested the runout of pyroclastic density currents over the ocean surface, corresponding to observations of over-water surges to several km distances at both locations. The PDAC code was used to perform 3D simulations of the explosive event on the actual volcano topography. The results highlight the strong topographic control on the propagation of the dense pyroclastic flows, the triggering of thermal instabilities, and the elutriation

  20. Reconstruction and Visualization of Coordinated 3D Cell Migration Based on Optical Flow.

    PubMed

    Kappe, Christopher P; Schütz, Lucas; Gunther, Stefan; Hufnagel, Lars; Lemke, Steffen; Leitte, Heike

    2016-01-01

    Animal development is marked by the repeated reorganization of cells and cell populations, which ultimately determine form and shape of the growing organism. One of the central questions in developmental biology is to understand precisely how cells reorganize, as well as how and to what extent this reorganization is coordinated. While modern microscopes can record video data for every cell during animal development in 3D+t, analyzing these videos remains a major challenge: reconstruction of comprehensive cell tracks turned out to be very demanding especially with decreasing data quality and increasing cell densities. In this paper, we present an analysis pipeline for coordinated cellular motions in developing embryos based on the optical flow of a series of 3D images. We use numerical integration to reconstruct cellular long-term motions in the optical flow of the video, we take care of data validation, and we derive a LIC-based, dense flow visualization for the resulting pathlines. This approach allows us to handle low video quality such as noisy data or poorly separated cells, and it allows the biologists to get a comprehensive understanding of their data by capturing dynamic growth processes in stills. We validate our methods using three videos of growing fruit fly embryos. PMID:26529743

  1. Simulation of the 3D viscoelastic free surface flow by a parallel corrected particle scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin-Lian, Ren; Tao, Jiang

    2016-02-01

    In this work, the behavior of the three-dimensional (3D) jet coiling based on the viscoelastic Oldroyd-B model is investigated by a corrected particle scheme, which is named the smoothed particle hydrodynamics with corrected symmetric kernel gradient and shifting particle technique (SPH_CS_SP) method. The accuracy and stability of SPH_CS_SP method is first tested by solving Poiseuille flow and Taylor-Green flow. Then the capacity for the SPH_CS_SP method to solve the viscoelastic fluid is verified by the polymer flow through a periodic array of cylinders. Moreover, the convergence of the SPH_CS_SP method is also investigated. Finally, the proposed method is further applied to the 3D viscoelastic jet coiling problem, and the influences of macroscopic parameters on the jet coiling are discussed. The numerical results show that the SPH_CS_SP method has higher accuracy and better stability than the traditional SPH method and other corrected SPH method, and can improve the tensile instability. Project supported by the Natural Science Foundation of Jiangsu Province, China (Grant Nos. BK20130436 and BK20150436) and the Natural Science Foundation of the Higher Education Institutions of Jiangsu Province, China (Grant No. 15KJB110025).

  2. Directed percolation phase transition to sustained turbulence in Couette flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemoult, Grégoire; Shi, Liang; Avila, Kerstin; Jalikop, Shreyas V.; Avila, Marc; Hof, Björn

    2016-03-01

    Turbulence is one of the most frequently encountered non-equilibrium phenomena in nature, yet characterizing the transition that gives rise to turbulence in basic shear flows has remained an elusive task. Although, in recent studies, critical points marking the onset of sustained turbulence have been determined for several such flows, the physical nature of the transition could not be fully explained. In extensive experimental and computational studies we show for the example of Couette flow that the onset of turbulence is a second-order phase transition and falls into the directed percolation universality class. Consequently, the complex laminar-turbulent patterns distinctive for the onset of turbulence in shear flows result from short-range interactions of turbulent domains and are characterized by universal critical exponents. More generally, our study demonstrates that even high-dimensional systems far from equilibrium such as turbulence exhibit universality at onset and that here the collective dynamics obeys simple rules.

  3. Segmentation of bone structures in 3D CT images based on continuous max-flow optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Carrasco, J. A.; Acha-Piñero, B.; Serrano, C.

    2015-03-01

    In this paper an algorithm to carry out the automatic segmentation of bone structures in 3D CT images has been implemented. Automatic segmentation of bone structures is of special interest for radiologists and surgeons to analyze bone diseases or to plan some surgical interventions. This task is very complicated as bones usually present intensities overlapping with those of surrounding tissues. This overlapping is mainly due to the composition of bones and to the presence of some diseases such as Osteoarthritis, Osteoporosis, etc. Moreover, segmentation of bone structures is a very time-consuming task due to the 3D essence of the bones. Usually, this segmentation is implemented manually or with algorithms using simple techniques such as thresholding and thus providing bad results. In this paper gray information and 3D statistical information have been combined to be used as input to a continuous max-flow algorithm. Twenty CT images have been tested and different coefficients have been computed to assess the performance of our implementation. Dice and Sensitivity values above 0.91 and 0.97 respectively were obtained. A comparison with Level Sets and thresholding techniques has been carried out and our results outperformed them in terms of accuracy.

  4. Computing 3-D steady supersonic flow via a new Lagrangian approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loh, C. Y.; Liou, M.-S.

    1993-01-01

    The new Lagrangian method introduced by Loh and Hui (1990) is extended for 3-D steady supersonic flow computation. Details of the conservation form, the implementation of the local Riemann solver, and the Godunov and the high resolution TVD schemes are presented. The new approach is robust yet accurate, capable of handling complicated geometry and reactions between discontinuous waves. It keeps all the advantages claimed in the 2-D method of Loh and Hui, e.g., crisp resolution for a slip surface (contact discontinuity) and automatic grid generation along the stream.

  5. Exact Relativistic Ideal Hydrodynamical Solutions in (1+3)D with Longitudinal and Transverse Flows

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, Jinfeng; Koch, Volker

    2009-05-20

    A new method for solving relativistic ideal hydrodynamics in (1+3)D is developed. Longitudinal and transverse radial flows are explicitly embedded into the ansatz for velocity field and the hydrodynamic equations are reduced to a single equation for the transverse velocity field only, which is analytically more tractable as compared with the full hydrodynamic equations. As an application we use the method to find analytically all possible solutions whose transverse velocity fields have power dependence on proper time and transverse radius. Possible application to the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collisions and possible generalizations of the method are discussed.

  6. Reactive Flow Modeling of Liquid Explosives via ALE3D/Cheetah Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Kuo, I W; Bastea, S; Fried, L E

    2010-03-10

    We carried out reactive flow simulations of liquid explosives such as nitromethane using the hydrodynamic code ALE3D coupled with equations of state and reaction kinetics modeled by the thermochemical code Cheetah. The simulation set-up was chosen to mimic cylinder experiments. For pure unconfined nitromethane we find that the failure diameter and detonation velocity dependence on charge diameter are in agreement with available experimental results. Such simulations are likely to be useful for determining detonability and failure behavior for a wide range of experimental conditions and explosive compounds.

  7. Rotary slanted single wire CTA - a useful tool for 3D flows investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jonáš, P.

    2013-04-01

    The procedure is described of experimental investigation of a statistically stationary generally nonisothermal 3D flow by means of a constant temperature anemometer (CTA) using single slanted heated wire, rotary round the fixed axis. The principle of this procedure is quite clear. The change of the heated wire temperature modifies ratio of CTA sensitivities to temperature and velocity fluctuations. Turning the heated wire through a proper angle changes the sensitivity to components of the instantaneous velocity vector. Some recommendations are presented based on long time experiences, e.g. on the choice of probe, on the probe calibration, to the measurement organization and to the evaluation of results.

  8. Computation of turbulent flows using an extended k-epsilon turbulence closure model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Y.-S.; Kim, S.-W.

    1987-01-01

    An extended kappa-epsilon turbulence model is proposed and tested with successful results. An improved transport equation for the rate of dissipation of the turbulent kinetic energy, epsilon, is proposed. The proposed model gives more effective response to the energy production rate than does the standard kappa-epsilon turbulence model. An extra time scale of the production range is included in the dissipation rate equation. This enables the present model to perform equally well for several turbulent flows with different characteristics, e.g., plane and axisymmetric jets, turbulent boundary layer flow, turbulent flow over a backward-facing step, and a confined turbulent swirling flow. A second-order accurate finite difference boundary layer code and a nearly second-order accurate finite difference elliptic flow solver are used for the present numerical computations.

  9. 3-D flow and scour near a submerged wing dike: ADCP measurements on the Missouri River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jamieson, E.C.; Rennie, C.D.; Jacobson, R.B.; Townsend, R.D.

    2011-01-01

    Detailed mapping of bathymetry and three-dimensional water velocities using a boat-mounted single-beam sonar and acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) was carried out in the vicinity of two submerged wing dikes located in the Lower Missouri River near Columbia, Missouri. During high spring flows the wing dikes become submerged, creating a unique combination of vertical flow separation and overtopping (plunging) flow conditions, causing large-scale three-dimensional turbulent flow structures to form. On three different days and for a range of discharges, sampling transects at 5 and 20 m spacing were completed, covering the area adjacent to and upstream and downstream from two different wing dikes. The objectives of this research are to evaluate whether an ADCP can identify and measure large-scale flow features such as recirculating flow and vortex shedding that develop in the vicinity of a submerged wing dike; and whether or not moving-boat (single-transect) data are sufficient for resolving complex three-dimensional flow fields. Results indicate that spatial averaging from multiple nearby single transects may be more representative of an inherently complex (temporally and spatially variable) three-dimensional flow field than repeated single transects. Results also indicate a correspondence between the location of calculated vortex cores (resolved from the interpolated three-dimensional flow field) and the nearby scour holes, providing new insight into the connections between vertically oriented coherent structures and local scour, with the unique perspective of flow and morphology in a large river. Copyright 2011 by the American Geophysical Union.

  10. Simulation of turbulent flows using nodal integral method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Suneet

    Nodal methods are the backbone of the production codes for neutron-diffusion and transport equations. Despite their high accuracy, use of these methods for simulation of fluid flow is relatively new. Recently, a modified nodal integral method (MNIM) has been developed for simulation of laminar flows. In view of its high accuracy and efficiency, extension of this method for the simulation of turbulent flows is a logical step forward. In this dissertation, MNIM is extended in two ways to simulate incompressible turbulent flows---a new MNIM is developed for the 2D k-epsilon equations; and 3D, parallel MNIM is developed for direct numerical simulations. Both developments are validated, and test problems are solved. In this dissertation, a new nodal numerical scheme is developed to solve the k-epsilon equations to simulate turbulent flows. The MNIM developed earlier for laminar flow equations is modified to incorporate eddy viscosity approximation and coupled with the above mentioned schemes for the k and epsilon equations, to complete the implementation of the numerical scheme for the k-epsilon model. The scheme developed is validated by comparing the results obtained by the developed method with the results available in the literature obtained using direct numerical simulations (DNS). The results of current simulations match reasonably well with the DNS results. The discrepancies in the results are mainly due to the limitations of the k-epsilon model rather than the deficiency in the developed MNIM. A parallel version of the MNIM is needed to enhance its capability, in order to carry out DNS of the turbulent flows. The parallelization of the scheme, however, presents some unique challenges as dependencies of the discrete variables are different from those that exist in other schemes (for example in finite volume based schemes). Hence, a parallel MNIM (PMNIM) is developed and implemented into a computer code with communication strategies based on the above mentioned

  11. Condensation of Coherent Structures in Turbulent Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chong, Kai Leong; Huang, Shi-Di; Kaczorowski, Matthias; Xia, Ke-Qing

    2015-12-01

    Coherent structures are ubiquitous in turbulent flows and play a key role in transport. The most important coherent structures in thermal turbulence are plumes. Despite being the primary heat carriers, the potential of manipulating thermal plumes to transport more heat has been overlooked so far. Unlike some other forms of energy transport, such as electromagnetic or sound waves, heat flow in fluids is generally difficult to manipulate, as it is associated with the random motion of molecules and atoms. Here we report how a simple geometrical confinement can lead to the condensation of elementary plumes. The result is the formation of highly coherent system-sized plumes and the emergence of a new regime of convective thermal turbulence characterized by universal temperature profiles and significantly enhanced heat transfer. It is also found that the universality of the temperature profiles and heat transport originate from the geometrical properties of the coherent structures, i.e., the thermal plumes. Therefore, in contrast to the classical regime, boundary layers in this plume-controlled regime are being controlled, rather than controlling.

  12. Condensation of Coherent Structures in Turbulent Flows.

    PubMed

    Chong, Kai Leong; Huang, Shi-Di; Kaczorowski, Matthias; Xia, Ke-Qing

    2015-12-31

    Coherent structures are ubiquitous in turbulent flows and play a key role in transport. The most important coherent structures in thermal turbulence are plumes. Despite being the primary heat carriers, the potential of manipulating thermal plumes to transport more heat has been overlooked so far. Unlike some other forms of energy transport, such as electromagnetic or sound waves, heat flow in fluids is generally difficult to manipulate, as it is associated with the random motion of molecules and atoms. Here we report how a simple geometrical confinement can lead to the condensation of elementary plumes. The result is the formation of highly coherent system-sized plumes and the emergence of a new regime of convective thermal turbulence characterized by universal temperature profiles and significantly enhanced heat transfer. It is also found that the universality of the temperature profiles and heat transport originate from the geometrical properties of the coherent structures, i.e., the thermal plumes. Therefore, in contrast to the classical regime, boundary layers in this plume-controlled regime are being controlled, rather than controlling. PMID:26764994

  13. Optical flow 3D segmentation and interpretation: a variational method with active curve evolution and level sets.

    PubMed

    Mitiche, Amar; Sekkati, Hicham

    2006-11-01

    This study investigates a variational, active curve evolution method for dense three-dimentional (3D) segmentation and interpretation of optical flow in an image sequence of a scene containing moving rigid objects viewed by a possibly moving camera. This method jointly performs 3D motion segmentation, 3D interpretation (recovery of 3D structure and motion), and optical flow estimation. The objective functional contains two data terms for each segmentation region, one based on the motion-only equation which relates the essential parameters of 3D rigid body motion to optical flow, and the other on the Horn and Schunck optical flow constraint. It also contains two regularization terms for each region, one for optical flow, the other for the region boundary. The necessary conditions for a minimum of the functional result in concurrent 3D-motion segmentation, by active curve evolution via level sets, and linear estimation of each region essential parameters and optical flow. Subsequently, the screw of 3D motion and regularized relative depth are recovered analytically for each region from the estimated essential parameters and optical flow. Examples are provided which verify the method and its implementation. PMID:17063686

  14. Numerical analysis of three complex three-dimensional shock wave / turbulent boundary layer interaction flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grosvenor, A. D.; Zheltovodov, A. A.; Matheson, M. A.; Sailer, L. M.; Krzysztopik, M.; Gutzwiller, D. P.

    2013-06-01

    A set of Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) computations with turbulence closure provided by the Spalart-Allmaras (SA) model have been carried out for prediction of shock-induced three-dimensional (3D) turbulent separated flows. The experimental data for different aerodynamic test configurations have been used for assessing credibility of the numerical method employed. Particularly, shock wave / turbulent boundary layer interactions (SWTBLI) in the vicinity of an asymmetric sharp double-fin (DF) with different (7° and 11°) deflection angles mounted on a flat plate and two conically sharp cylindrical bodies at varying interbody distances and nose cone angles 60° and 40° mounted over a flat plate at freestream Mach number 4, as well as a transonic fan stage operating in the near-stall regime are considered. The gas dynamic structure and topology of 3D separated flows, surface flow patterns, and pressure distributions as well as body aerodynamic force prediction are analyzed. A transonic fan stage operating in the near-stall regime and a possibility of applying flow control is investigated. High Performance Computing was employed to make high resolution computations of these flows possible, and advanced 3D visualization techniques were employed in order to improve understanding of the separating flow phenomena.

  15. Interactions between bedforms, turbulence and pore flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blois, G.; Best, J.; Sambrook Smith, G.; Hardy, R. J.; Lead, J.

    2010-12-01

    A widespread occurrence of flow-form interaction in rivers is represented by subaqueous bedforms such as dunes. Many models have been proposed to explain how bedform generation and evolution are driven by turbulent flow structures that control the incipient motion of cohesionless sediments and later bedform development. However, most of these models have assumed such bedforms to be migrating over an impermeable bed, and that any surface-subsurface flow interaction is negligible. However, for some gravel-bed rivers the porosity can be high, up to 43%, which may result in significant flow both through the permeable bed (hyporheic flow) and across the surface-subsurface interface. The mass and momentum exchange occurring at the interface may have a strong impact on the structure of turbulent flow in the near-bed region. In the case of a dune, its topography induces a local pressure gradient that enhances flow across the interface. This results in a flow structure that may be radically different from that commonly proposed by past work. This paper presents results from a simplified laboratory model akin to a fine-grained bedform generated on top of a coarser sediment bed. Particle imaging velocimetry (PIV) measurements were conducted in order to characterise flow both over and underneath an idealised 2-dimensional dune (0.41 m long, 0.056 m high and having a leeside angle of 27°) overlaying a packed bed of uniform size spheres (D = 0.04 m diameter). Experiments were conducted in free surface flow conditions (Froude number = 0.1; Reynolds number = 25,000) for one bedform height: flow depth ratio (0.31). The flow above the dune was measured using a standard PIV technique while a novel endoscopic PIV (EPIV) system allowed collection of flow data within the pore spaces beneath the dune. The results show that topographically-induced subsurface flow significantly modifies the structure of flow in the leeside of the dune, resulting in a flow field that is radically different

  16. Adaptive LES Methodology for Turbulent Flow Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Oleg V. Vasilyev

    2008-06-12

    Although turbulent flows are common in the world around us, a solution to the fundamental equations that govern turbulence still eludes the scientific community. Turbulence has often been called one of the last unsolved problem in classical physics, yet it is clear that the need to accurately predict the effect of turbulent flows impacts virtually every field of science and engineering. As an example, a critical step in making modern computational tools useful in designing aircraft is to be able to accurately predict the lift, drag, and other aerodynamic characteristics in numerical simulations in a reasonable amount of time. Simulations that take months to years to complete are much less useful to the design cycle. Much work has been done toward this goal (Lee-Rausch et al. 2003, Jameson 2003) and as cost effective accurate tools for simulating turbulent flows evolve, we will all benefit from new scientific and engineering breakthroughs. The problem of simulating high Reynolds number (Re) turbulent flows of engineering and scientific interest would have been solved with the advent of Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) techniques if unlimited computing power, memory, and time could be applied to each particular problem. Yet, given the current and near future computational resources that exist and a reasonable limit on the amount of time an engineer or scientist can wait for a result, the DNS technique will not be useful for more than 'unit' problems for the foreseeable future (Moin & Kim 1997, Jimenez & Moin 1991). The high computational cost for the DNS of three dimensional turbulent flows results from the fact that they have eddies of significant energy in a range of scales from the characteristic length scale of the flow all the way down to the Kolmogorov length scale. The actual cost of doing a three dimensional DNS scales as Re{sup 9/4} due to the large disparity in scales that need to be fully resolved. State-of-the-art DNS calculations of isotropic turbulence

  17. Stochastic modeling of turbulent reacting flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, R. O.; Hill, J. C.; Gao, F.; Moser, R. D.; Rogers, M. M.

    1992-01-01

    Direct numerical simulations of a single-step irreversible chemical reaction with non-premixed reactants in forced isotropic turbulence at R(sub lambda) = 63, Da = 4.0, and Sc = 0.7 were made using 128 Fourier modes to obtain joint probability density functions (pdfs) and other statistical information to parameterize and test a Fokker-Planck turbulent mixing model. Preliminary results indicate that the modeled gradient stretching term for an inert scalar is independent of the initial conditions of the scalar field. The conditional pdf of scalar gradient magnitudes is found to be a function of the scalar until the reaction is largely completed. Alignment of concentration gradients with local strain rate and other features of the flow were also investigated.

  18. Improved Algorithms and Methods for Solving Strongly Variable-Viscosity 3D Stokes flow and Strongly Variable Permeability 3D D’Arcy flow on a Parallel Computer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, J. P.; Hasenclever, J.; Shi, C.

    2009-12-01

    Computational studies of mantle convection face large challenges to obtain fast and accurate solutions for variable viscosity 3d flow. Recently we have been using parallel (MPI-based) MATLAB to more thoroughly explore possible pitfalls and algorithmic improvements to current ‘best-practice’ variable viscosity Stokes and D’Arcy flow solvers. Here we focus on study of finite-element solvers based on a decomposition of the equations for incompressible Stokes flow: Ku + Gp = f and G’u = 0 (K-velocity stiffness matrix, G-discretized gradient operator, G’=transpose(G)-discretized divergence operator) into a single equation for pressure Sp==G’K^-1Gp =G’K^-1f, in which the velocity is also updated as part of each pressure iteration. The outer pressure iteration is solved with preconditioned conjugate gradients (CG) (Maday and Patera, 1989), with a multigrid-preconditioned CG solver for the z=K^-1 (Gq) step of each pressure iteration. One fairly well-known pitfall (Fortin, 1985) is that constant-pressure elements can generate a spurious non-zero flow under a constant body force within non-rectangular geometries. We found a new pitfall when using an iterative method to solve the Kz=y operation in evaluating each G’K^-1Gq product -- even if the residual of the outer pressure equation converges to zero, the discrete divergence of this equation does not correspondingly converge; the error in the incompressibility depends on roughly the square of the tolerance used to solve each Kz=y velocity-like subproblem. Our current best recipe is: (1) Use flexible CG (cf. Notay, 2001) to solve the outer pressure problem. This is analogous to GMRES for a symmetric positive definite problem. It allows use of numerically unsymmetric and/or inexact preconditioners with CG. (2) In this outer-iteration, use an ‘alpha-bar’ technique to find the appropriate magnitude alpha to change the solution in each search direction. This improvement allows a similar iterative tolerance of

  19. Organized motions underlying turbulent shear flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waleffe, F.

    1990-01-01

    The objective of this project is to determine the nature and significance of the organized motions underlying turbulent shear flow. There is considerable experimental evidence for the existence of such motions. In particular, one consistently observes longitudinal streaks with a spacing of about 100 in wall units in the near-wall region of wall-bounded shear flows. Recently, an analysis based on the direct resonance mechanism has predicted the appearance of streaks with precisely such a spacing. Also, the minimum channel simulations of Jimenez and Moin have given a strong dynamical significance to that spanwise length scale. They have shown that turbulent-like flows can not be maintained when the spanwise wavelength of the motion is constrained to be less than about that critical number. A critical review of the direct resonance ideas and the non-linear theory of Benney and Gustavsson is presented first. It is shown how this leads to the later mean flow-first harmonic theory of Benney. Finally, we note that a different type of analysis has led to the prediction streaks with a similar spacing. This latter approach consists of looking for optimum fields and directly provides deep insights into why a particular structure or a particular scale should be preferred.

  20. Experimental observation of steady inertial wave turbulence in deep rotating flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yarom, Ehud; Sharon, Eran

    2015-11-01

    We present experimental evidence of inertial wave turbulence in deep rotating fluid. Experiments were performed in a rotating cylindrical water tank, where previous work showed statistics similar to 2D turbulence (specifically an inverse energy cascade). Using Fourier analysis of high resolution data in both space (3D) and time we show that most of the energy of a steady state flow is contained around the inertial wave dispersion relation. The nonlinear interaction between the waves is manifested by the widening of the time spectrum around the dispersion relation. We show that as the Rossby number increases so does the spectrum width, with a strong dependence on wave number. Our results suggest that in some parameters range, rotating turbulence velocity field can be represented as a field of interacting waves (wave turbulence). Such formalism may provide a better understanding of the flow statistics. This work was supported by the Israel Science Foundation, Grant No. 81/12.

  1. 3D Numerical Analysis of Flow Control on Wind Turbine Blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahni, Onkar; Karaismail, Ertan

    2011-11-01

    Wind turbine blades are exposed to unsteady and spatially-varying loadings in a real field. These loadings result in fluctuating structural forces which in turn lead to failure of blades as well as gearbox. In this study, we perform numerical analysis of flow over a wind turbine blade placed in a wind tunnel; where dynamic motions are imposed to the blade in order to emulate scenarios observed in a real field. Furthermore, we also study the effect of active flow control (via synthetic-jets) on unsteady aerodynamic characteristics of the blade under dynamic motions; the idea is to be able to control aerodynamic loads and mitigate failures. Numerical analysis is based on massively parallel simulations using hybrid turbulence models. Comparisons with experimental data will also be included.

  2. Incompressible Turbulent Wing-Body Junction Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krishnamurthy, R.; Cagle, Corey D.; Chandra, S.

    1998-01-01

    -stream flow. The lateral curvature of the wing/strat causes the oncoming turbulent layer to skew about am axis (x-axis) parallel to the plane (xz-plane) of the mean shear. This is the principle mechanism for the generation of secondary flow. Such skew-induced secondary flows are slow to be attenuated by Reynolds stresses. Additional contribution to the generation of secondary flow comes from anisotropies in Reynolds stresses. Upstream of the strut, the mean-vorticity is directed span wise (along the y-direction). The presence of secondary flow in the vicinity of the strut causes the vorticity to stretch around the obstacle in a horse-shoe shape, with each leg having a vorticity of the opposite sense. The blockage effect of the strut imposes a severe adverse pressure gradient on the oncoming turbulent shear layer, causing boundary layer separation ahead of the leading edge, resulting in a vortex that rolls up and flows downstream into the juncture region. The separation vortices trailing in the wake of the wing can alter the lift or drag characteristics of the surfaces downstream of the wing-body juncture. Likewise, on submarines, the wake flow behind the appendage can degrade the performance of the propeller located downstream. The complex nature of this flow is caused by the presence of all six components of Reynolds stresses. Devenport and Simpson report that in the vicinity of the horse-shoe vortex there is intense recirculation with turbulent stresses being much larger than those normally observed in turbulent flows. These features contribute to making this flow a challenge to predict numerically. Some of the past studies provide useful insights into this flow that would guide our numerical efforts. In measurements reported by Shabaka and Bradshaw, the eddy viscosity tensor is seen to be non-isotropic and has negative components in certain regions. In an effort to evaluate the closure assumptions of various turbulence models, Devenport and Simpson used their own extensive

  3. Direct numerical simulation of wall turbulent flows with microbubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanai, Akihiro; Miyata, Hideaki

    2001-03-01

    The marker-density-function (MDF) method has been developed to conduct direct numerical simulation (DNS) for bubbly flows. The method is applied to turbulent bubbly channel flows to elucidate the interaction between bubbles and wall turbulence. The simulation is designed to clarify the structure of the turbulent boundary layer containing microbubbles and the mechanism of frictional drag reduction. It is deduced from the numerical tests that the interaction between bubbles and wall turbulence depends on the Weber and Froude numbers. The reduction of the frictional resistance on the wall is attained and its mechanism is explained from the modulation of the three-dimensional structure of the turbulent flow. Copyright

  4. Dynamic Multiscale Averaging (DMA) of Turbulent Flow

    SciTech Connect

    Richard W. Johnson

    2012-09-01

    A new approach called dynamic multiscale averaging (DMA) for computing the effects of turbulent flow is described. The new method encompasses multiple applications of temporal and spatial averaging, that is, multiscale operations. Initially, a direct numerical simulation (DNS) is performed for a relatively short time; it is envisioned that this short time should be long enough to capture several fluctuating time periods of the smallest scales. The flow field variables are subject to running time averaging during the DNS. After the relatively short time, the time-averaged variables are volume averaged onto a coarser grid. Both time and volume averaging of the describing equations generate correlations in the averaged equations. These correlations are computed from the flow field and added as source terms to the computation on the next coarser mesh. They represent coupling between the two adjacent scales. Since they are computed directly from first principles, there is no modeling involved. However, there is approximation involved in the coupling correlations as the flow field has been computed for only a relatively short time. After the time and spatial averaging operations are applied at a given stage, new computations are performed on the next coarser mesh using a larger time step. The process continues until the coarsest scale needed is reached. New correlations are created for each averaging procedure. The number of averaging operations needed is expected to be problem dependent. The new DMA approach is applied to a relatively low Reynolds number flow in a square duct segment. Time-averaged stream-wise velocity and vorticity contours from the DMA approach appear to be very similar to a full DNS for a similar flow reported in the literature. Expected symmetry for the final results is produced for the DMA method. The results obtained indicate that DMA holds significant potential in being able to accurately compute turbulent flow without modeling for practical

  5. Flow-Through Stream Modeling with MODFLOW and MT3D: Certainties and Limitations.

    PubMed

    Ben Simon, Rose; Bernard, Stéphane; Meurville, Charles; Rebour, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    This paper aims to assess MODFLOW and MT3D capabilities for simulating the spread of contaminants from a river exhibiting an unusual relationship with an alluvial aquifer, with the groundwater head higher than the river head on one side and lower on the other (flow-through stream). A series of simulation tests is conducted using a simple hypothetical model so as to characterize and quantify these limitations. Simulation results show that the expected contaminant spread could be achieved with a specific configuration composed of two sets of parameters: (1) modeled object parameters (hydraulic groundwater gradient, hydraulic conductivity values of aquifer and streambed), and (2) modeling parameters (vertical discretization of aquifer, horizontal refinement of stream modeled with River [RIV] package). The influence of these various parameters on simulation results is investigated, and potential complications and errors are identified. Contaminant spread from stream to aquifer is not always reproduced by MT3D due to the RIV package's inability to simulate lateral exchange fluxes between stream and aquifer. This paper identifies the need for a MODFLOW streamflow package allowing lateral stream-aquifer interactions and streamflow routine calculations. Such developments could be of particular interest for modeling contaminated flow-through streams. PMID:25557038

  6. Coupled aeroelastic oscillations of a turbine blade row in 3D transonic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gnesin, Vitaly; Kolodyazhnaya, Lyubov; Rzadkowski, Romuald

    2001-10-01

    This paper presents the mutual time - marching method to predict the aeroelastic stability of an oscillating blade row in 3D transonic flow. The ideal gas flow through a blade row is governed by the time dependent Euler equations in conservative form which are integrated by using the explicit monotonous second order accurate Godunov-Kolgan finite volume scheme and moving hybrid H-O grid. The structure analysis uses the modal approach and 3D finite element dynamic model of blade. The blade movement is assumed as a linear combination of the first modes of blade natural oscillations with the modal coefficients depending on time. To demonstrate the capability and correctness of the method, two experimentally investigated test cases have been selected, in which the blades had performed tuned harmonic bending or torsional vibrations (The 1st and 4th standard configurations of the “Workshop on Aeroelasticity in Turbomachines” by Bolcs and Fransson, 1986). The calculated results of aeroelastic behaviour of the blade row (4th standard configuration), are presented over a wide frequency range under different start regimes of interblade phase angle.

  7. Fluid flow pathways study from the 3D seismic data offshore southwestern Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, L.; Chi, W. C.; Chiang, H. T.; Lin, S.

    2014-12-01

    3D seismic reflection data provide detailed information on the physical properties of the crust, which can be used for hydrocarbon exploration. Recently, scientists from Taiwan and Germany are collaborating on a project to use a portable 3D seismic system, called P-Cable, to study gas hydrates offshore southwest Taiwan. We have collected 3 cubes, covering the active and passive margins. At these three sites, there is a wide-spread bottom-simulating reflector (BSR). We use the BSR to study the shallow thermal structures of these prospect sites, and use the temperature field information to study fluid migration patterns. We have also done in-situ heat flow measurements, and found similar results, showing focused fluid flow migrations in some pathways. Some of the high temperature fields also correlate with gas chimneys found through seismic attribute analyses. Preliminary results show that there might be active fluid migration above the BSR in the gas hydrate stability zone. In September and October of 2014, we will collect additional P-Cable datasets to be incorporated into this study. Such results will be used to evaluate some proposed sites for future drilling programs.

  8. Real-time tracking with a 3D-Flow processor array

    SciTech Connect

    Crosetto, D.

    1993-06-01

    The problem of real-time track-finding has been performed to date with CAM (Content Addressable Memories) or with fast coincidence logic, because the processing scheme was thought to have much slower performance. Advances in technology together with a new architectural approach make it feasible to also explore the computing technique for real-time track finding thus giving the advantages of implementing algorithms that can find more parameters such as calculate the sagitta, curvature, pt, etc., with respect to the CAM approach. The report describes real-time track finding using new computing approach technique based on the 3D-Flow array processor system. This system consists of a fixed interconnection architecture scheme, allowing flexible algorithm implementation on a scalable platform. The 3D-Flow parallel processing system for track finding is scalable in size and performance by either increasing the number of processors, or increasing the speed or else the number of pipelined stages. The present article describes the conceptual idea and the design stage of the project.

  9. Brightness-compensated 3-D optical flow algorithm for monitoring cochlear motion patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Tiedemann, Miriam; Fridberger, Anders; Ulfendahl, Mats; de Monvel, Jacques Boutet

    2010-09-01

    A method for three-dimensional motion analysis designed for live cell imaging by fluorescence confocal microscopy is described. The approach is based on optical flow computation and takes into account brightness variations in the image scene that are not due to motion, such as photobleaching or fluorescence variations that may reflect changes in cellular physiology. The 3-D optical flow algorithm allowed almost perfect motion estimation on noise-free artificial sequences, and performed with a relative error of <10% on noisy images typical of real experiments. The method was applied to a series of 3-D confocal image stacks from an in vitro preparation of the guinea pig cochlea. The complex motions caused by slow pressure changes in the cochlear compartments were quantified. At the surface of the hearing organ, the largest motion component was the transverse one (normal to the surface), but significant radial and longitudinal displacements were also present. The outer hair cell displayed larger radial motion at their basolateral membrane than at their apical surface. These movements reflect mechanical interactions between different cellular structures, which may be important for communicating sound-evoked vibrations to the sensory cells. A better understanding of these interactions is important for testing realistic models of cochlear mechanics.

  10. Decay of the 3D inviscid liquid-gas two-phase flow model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yinghui

    2016-06-01

    We establish the optimal {Lp-L2(1 ≤ p < 6/5)} time decay rates of the solution to the Cauchy problem for the 3D inviscid liquid-gas two-phase flow model and analyze the influences of the damping on the qualitative behaviors of solution. Compared with the viscous liquid-gas two-phase flow model (Zhang and Zhu in J Differ Equ 258:2315-2338, 2015), our results imply that the friction effect of the damping is stronger than the dissipation effect of the viscosities and enhances the decay rate of the velocity. Our proof is based on Hodge decomposition technique, the {Lp-L2} estimates for the linearized equations and an elaborate energy method.

  11. A numerical solution of 3D inviscid rotational flow in turbines and ducts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oktay, Erdal; Akmandor, Sinan; Üçer, Ahmet

    1998-04-01

    The numerical solutions of inviscid rotational (Euler) flows were obtained using an explicit hexahedral unstructured cell vertex finite volume method. A second-order-accurate, one-step Lax-Wendroff scheme was used to solve the unsteady governing equations discretized in conservative form. The transonic circular bump, in which the location and the strength of the captured shock are well predicted, was used as the first test case. The nozzle guide vanes of the VKI low-speed turbine facility were used to validate the Euler code in highly 3D environment. Despite the high turning and the secondary flows which develop, close agreements have been obtained with experimental and numerical results associated with these test cases.

  12. Lagrangian 3D particle tracking in high-speed flows: Shake-The-Box for multi-pulse systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novara, Matteo; Schanz, Daniel; Reuther, Nico; Kähler, Christian J.; Schröder, Andreas

    2016-08-01

    The Shake-The-Box (STB) particle tracking technique, recently introduced for time-resolved 3D particle image velocimetry (PIV) images, is applied here to data from a multi-pulse investigation of a turbulent boundary layer flow with adverse pressure gradient in air at 36 m/s ( Re τ = 10,650). The multi-pulse acquisition strategy allows for the recording of four-pulse long time-resolved sequences with a time separation of a few microseconds. The experimental setup consists of a dual-imaging system and a dual-double-cavity laser emitting orthogonal polarization directions to separate the four pulses. The STB particle triangulation and tracking strategy is adapted here to cope with the limited amount of realizations available along the time sequence and to take advantage of the ghost track reduction offered by the use of two independent imaging systems. Furthermore, a correction scheme to compensate for camera vibrations is discussed, together with a method to accurately identify the position of the wall within the measurement domain. Results show that approximately 80,000 tracks can be instantaneously reconstructed within the measurement volume, enabling the evaluation of both dense velocity fields, suitable for spatial gradients evaluation, and highly spatially resolved boundary layer profiles. Turbulent boundary layer profiles obtained from ensemble averaging of the STB tracks are compared to results from 2D-PIV and long-range micro particle tracking velocimetry; the comparison shows the capability of the STB approach in delivering accurate results across a wide range of scales.

  13. A 3-D implicit finite-volume model of shallow water flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Weiming; Lin, Qianru

    2015-09-01

    A three-dimensional (3-D) model has been developed to simulate shallow water flows in large water bodies, such as coastal and estuarine waters. The eddy viscosity is determined using a newly modified mixing length model that uses different mixing length functions for the horizontal and vertical shear strain rates. The 3-D shallow water flow equations with the hydrostatic pressure assumption are solved using an implicit finite-volume method based on a quadtree (telescoping) rectangular mesh on the horizontal plane and the sigma coordinate in the vertical direction. The quadtree technique can locally refine the mesh around structures or in high-gradient regions by splitting a coarse cell into four child cells. The grid nodes are numbered with a one-dimensional index system that has unstructured grid feature for better grid flexibility. All the primary variables are arranged in a non-staggered grid system. Fluxes at cell faces are determined using a Rhie and Chow-type momentum interpolation, to avoid the possible spurious checkerboard oscillations caused by linear interpolation. Each of the discretized governing equations is solved iteratively using the flexible GMRES method with ILUT preconditioning, and coupling of water level and velocity among these equations is achieved by using the SIMPLEC algorithm with under-relaxation. The model has been tested in four cases, including steady flow near a spur-dyke, tidal flows in San Francisco Bay and Gironde Estuary, and wind-induced current in a flume. The calculated water levels and velocities are in good agreement with the measured values.

  14. Computed Tomography 3-D Imaging of the Metal Deformation Flow Path in Friction Stir Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Judy; Beshears, Ronald; Nunes, Arthur C., Jr.

    2005-01-01

    In friction stir welding (FSW), a rotating threaded pin tool is inserted into a weld seam and literally stirs the edges of the seam together. To determine optimal processing parameters for producing a defect free weld, a better understanding of the resulting metal deformation flow path is required. Marker studies are the principal method of studying the metal deformation flow path around the FSW pin tool. In our study, we have used computed tomography (CT) scans to reveal the flow pattern of a lead wire embedded in a FSW weld seam. At the welding temperature of aluminum, the lead becomes molten and is carried with the macro-flow of the weld metal. By using CT images, a 3-dimensional (3D) image of the lead flow pattern can be reconstructed. CT imaging was found to be a convenient and comprehensive way of collecting and displaying tracer data. It marks an advance over previous more tedious and ambiguous radiographic/metallographic data collection methods.

  15. Test Problems for Reactive Flow HE Model in the ALE3D Code and Limited Sensitivity Study

    SciTech Connect

    Gerassimenko, M.

    2000-03-01

    We document quick running test problems for a reactive flow model of HE initiation incorporated into ALE3D. A quarter percent change in projectile velocity changes the outcome from detonation to HE burn that dies down. We study the sensitivity of calculated HE behavior to several parameters of practical interest where modeling HE initiation with ALE3D.

  16. Viscous Incompressible Flow Computations for 3-D Steady and Unsteady Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwak, Dochan

    2001-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation gives an overview of viscous incompressible flow computations for three-dimensional steady and unsteady flows. Details are given on the use of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) as an engineering tool, solution methods for incompressible Navier-Stokes equations, numerical and physical characteristics of the primitive variable approach, and the role of CFD in the past and in current engineering and research applications.

  17. Navier-Stokes Computations With One-Equation Turbulence Model for Flows Along Concave Wall Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Chi R.

    2005-01-01

    This report presents the use of a time-marching three-dimensional compressible Navier-Stokes equation numerical solver with a one-equation turbulence model to simulate the flow fields developed along concave wall surfaces without and with a downstream extension flat wall surface. The 3-D Navier- Stokes numerical solver came from the NASA Glenn-HT code. The one-equation turbulence model was derived from the Spalart and Allmaras model. The computational approach was first calibrated with the computations of the velocity and Reynolds shear stress profiles of a steady flat plate boundary layer flow. The computational approach was then used to simulate developing boundary layer flows along concave wall surfaces without and with a downstream extension wall. The author investigated the computational results of surface friction factors, near surface velocity components, near wall temperatures, and a turbulent shear stress component in terms of turbulence modeling, computational mesh configurations, inlet turbulence level, and time iteration step. The computational results were compared with existing measurements of skin friction factors, velocity components, and shear stresses of the developing boundary layer flows. With a fine computational mesh and a one-equation model, the computational approach could predict accurately the skin friction factors, near surface velocity and temperature, and shear stress within the flows. The computed velocity components and shear stresses also showed the vortices effect on the velocity variations over a concave wall. The computed eddy viscosities at the near wall locations were also compared with the results from a two equation turbulence modeling technique. The inlet turbulence length scale was found to have little effect on the eddy viscosities at locations near the concave wall surface. The eddy viscosities, from the one-equation and two-equation modeling, were comparable at most stream-wise stations. The present one

  18. Minimal flow units for magnetohydrodynamic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlandi, P.

    2016-08-01

    We present direct numerical simulations of two minimal flow units (MFUs) to investigate the differences between inviscid and viscous simulations, and the different behavior of the evolution for conducting fluids. In these circumstances the introduction of the Lorentz force in the momentum equation produces different scenarios. The Taylor–Green vortex, in the past, was an MFU widely considered for both conducting and non-conducting fluids. The simulations were performed by pseudo-spectral numerical methods; these are repeated here by using a finite difference second-order accurate, energy-conserving scheme for ν =0. Having observed that this initial condition could be inefficient for capturing the eventual occurrence of a finite time singularity a potentially more efficient MFU consisting of two interacting Lamb dipoles was considered. It was found that the two flows have a different time evolution in the vortical dominated stage. In this stage, turbulent structures of different size are generated leading to spectra, in the inviscid conditions, with a {k}-3 range. In real conditions the viscosity produces smaller scales characteristic of fully developed turbulence with energy spectra with well defined exponential and inertial ranges. In the presence of non-conducting conditions the passive vector behaves as the vorticity. The evolution is different in the presence of conducting conditions. Although the time evolution is different, both flows lead to spectra in Kolmogorov units with the same shape at high and intermediate wave numbers.

  19. Multiple states in highly turbulent Taylor-Couette flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huisman, Sander G.; van der Veen, Roeland C. A.; Sun, Chao; Lohse, Detlef

    2014-05-01

    The ubiquity of turbulent flows in nature and technology makes it of utmost importance to fundamentally understand turbulence. Kolmogorov’s 1941 paradigm suggests that for strongly turbulent flows with many degrees of freedom and large fluctuations, there would only be one turbulent state as the large fluctuations would explore the entire higher dimensional phase space. Here we report the first conclusive evidence of multiple turbulent states for large Reynolds number, Re(106) (Taylor number Ta(1012)) Taylor-Couette flow in the regime of ultimate turbulence, by probing the phase space spanned by the rotation rates of the inner and outer cylinder. The manifestation of multiple turbulent states is exemplified by providing combined global torque- and local-velocity measurements. This result verifies the notion that bifurcations can occur in high-dimensional flows (that is, very large Re) and questions Kolmogorov’s paradigm.

  20. Multiple states in highly turbulent Taylor-Couette flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huisman, Sander; van der Veen, Roeland; Sun, Chao; Lohse, Detlef

    2014-11-01

    The ubiquity of turbulent flows in nature and technology makes it of utmost importance to fundamentally understand turbulence. Kolmogorov's 1941 paradigm suggests that for strongly turbulent flows with many degrees of freedom and its large fluctuations, there would only be one turbulent state as the large fluctuations would explore the entire higher-dimensional phase space. Here we report the first conclusive evidence of multiple turbulent states for large Reynolds number Re = O (106) (Taylor number Ta = O (1012) Taylor-Couette flow in the regime of ultimate turbulence, by probing the phase space spanned by the rotation rates of the inner and outer cylinder. The manifestation of multiple turbulent states is exemplified by providing combined global torque and local velocity measurements. This result verifies the notion that bifurcations can occur in high-dimensional flows (i.e. very large Re) and questions Kolmogorov's paradigm.

  1. Turbulence measurements in high-speed flows by resonant fluoresence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miles, R. B.

    1982-01-01

    Both mean flow and turbulence measurements were investigated using the resonant Doppler velocimeter in a Mach 3.2 nitrogen flow. Data are presented showing velocity, temperature and pressure measured point by point across the flow field. This data is compared with conventional pitot and temperature surveys. Turbulence was induced by a small metal tab in the flow and observed by both hot wire and RDV techniques. Photographs of the flow field demonstrate the utility of the RDV for quantitative flow field visualization.

  2. Canopy-scale turbulence under oscillatory flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pujol, Dolors; Casamitjana, Xavier; Serra, Teresa; Colomer, Jordi

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this study is to understand the turbulent flow structure within diverse canopy models dominated by progressive waves. A set of experimental conditions were considered in a laboratory flume: three vegetation models (submerged rigid, submerged flexible and emergent rigid), three canopy densities (128, 640 and 1280 stems/m2) and three wave frequencies (f=0.8, 1 and 1.4 Hz). The canopy morphology through both the plant flexibility and height and the canopy density were the characteristic parameters that exerted a control on wave induced turbulence within the canopy bed. In the flexible canopy model, sheltering at the bed was observed and was associated with the movement of the blades. In contrast, in the rigid canopy model larger TKE was found as compared with the case without canopy. The increase of TKE was associated with the production of the stem-wake turbulence. Sheltering in the submerged rigid canopy model was found at the lower layer for the largest canopy density and highest wave frequency because of a great loss of wave velocity, confined below the top of the canopy. Sweeps and ejections were the predominant events, enhancing the transfer of momentum at the top of the canopy. Therefore, below the top of the submerged rigid canopy was characterized by a vertical energy exchange zone. Unlike the submerged model, sheltering was always found for emergent rigid vegetation, and attributed to the inhibition of the wave energy at all depths.

  3. Some Basic Laws of Isotropic Turbulent Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loitsianskii, L. G.

    1945-01-01

    An Investigation is made of the diffusion of artificially produced turbulence behind screens or other turbulence producers. The method is based on the author's concept of disturbance moment as a certain theoretically well-founded measure of turbulent disturbances.

  4. The mantle wedge's transient 3-D flow regime and thermal structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, D. R.; Le Voci, G.; Goes, S.; Kramer, S. C.; Wilson, C. R.

    2016-01-01

    Arc volcanism, volatile cycling, mineralization, and continental crust formation are likely regulated by the mantle wedge's flow regime and thermal structure. Wedge flow is often assumed to follow a regular corner-flow pattern. However, studies that incorporate a hydrated rheology and thermal buoyancy predict internal small-scale-convection (SSC). Here, we systematically explore mantle-wedge dynamics in 3-D simulations. We find that longitudinal "Richter-rolls" of SSC (with trench-perpendicular axes) commonly occur if wedge hydration reduces viscosities to Pa s, although transient transverse rolls (with trench-parallel axes) can dominate at viscosities of Pa s. Rolls below the arc and back arc differ. Subarc rolls have similar trench-parallel and trench-perpendicular dimensions of 100-150 km and evolve on a 1-5 Myr time-scale. Subback-arc instabilities, on the other hand, coalesce into elongated sheets, usually with a preferential trench-perpendicular alignment, display a wavelength of 150-400 km and vary on a 5-10 Myr time scale. The modulating influence of subback-arc ridges on the subarc system increases with stronger wedge hydration, higher subduction velocity, and thicker upper plates. We find that trench-parallel averages of wedge velocities and temperature are consistent with those predicted in 2-D models. However, lithospheric thinning through SSC is somewhat enhanced in 3-D, thus expanding hydrous melting regions and shifting dehydration boundaries. Subarc Richter-rolls generate time-dependent trench-parallel temperature variations of up to K, which exceed the transient 50-100 K variations predicted in 2-D and may contribute to arc-volcano spacing and the variable seismic velocity structures imaged beneath some arcs.

  5. Simulation of abrasive flow machining process for 2D and 3D mixture models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dash, Rupalika; Maity, Kalipada

    2015-12-01

    Improvement of surface finish and material removal has been quite a challenge in a finishing operation such as abrasive flow machining (AFM). Factors that affect the surface finish and material removal are media viscosity, extrusion pressure, piston velocity, and particle size in abrasive flow machining process. Performing experiments for all the parameters and accurately obtaining an optimized parameter in a short time are difficult to accomplish because the operation requires a precise finish. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation was employed to accurately determine optimum parameters. In the current work, a 2D model was designed, and the flow analysis, force calculation, and material removal prediction were performed and compared with the available experimental data. Another 3D model for a swaging die finishing using AFM was simulated at different viscosities of the media to study the effects on the controlling parameters. A CFD simulation was performed by using commercially available ANSYS FLUENT. Two phases were considered for the flow analysis, and multiphase mixture model was taken into account. The fluid was considered to be a

  6. Simulation of a Synthetic Jet in Quiescent Air Using TLNS3D Flow Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vatsa, Veer N.; Turkel, Eli

    2007-01-01

    Although the actuator geometry is highly three-dimensional, the outer flowfield is nominally two-dimensional because of the high aspect ratio of the rectangular slot. For the present study, this configuration is modeled as a two-dimensional problem. A multi-block structured grid available at the CFDVAL2004 website is used as a baseline grid. The periodic motion of the diaphragm is simulated by specifying a sinusoidal velocity at the diaphragm surface with a frequency of 450 Hz, corresponding to the experimental setup. The amplitude is chosen so that the maximum Mach number at the jet exit is approximately 0.1, to replicate the experimental conditions. At the solid walls zero slip, zero injection, adiabatic temperature and zero pressure gradient conditions are imposed. In the external region, symmetry conditions are imposed on the side (vertical) boundaries and far-field conditions are imposed on the top boundary. A nominal free-stream Mach number of 0.001 is imposed in the free stream to simulate incompressible flow conditions in the TLNS3D code, which solves compressible flow equations. The code was run in unsteady (URANS) mode until the periodicity was established. The time-mean quantities were obtained by running the code for at least another 15 periods and averaging the flow quantities over these periods. The phase-locked average of flow quantities were assumed to be coincident with their values during the last full time period.

  7. Flow properties along field lines in a 3-D tilted-dipole geometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pizzo, V. J.

    1995-01-01

    A 3-D MHD simulation of a global, tilted-dipole solar wind flow pattern is analyzed to determine flow properties along individual magnetic field lines. In the model, flow conditions near the Sun are chosen to provide a reasonable match to the interplanetary configuration prevailing during the recent south polar passage by Ulysses, i.e., a streamer belt inclined approximately 30 deg to the solar equator and speeds ranging from 325-800 km/s. Field lines all across the stream pattern are traced from 1 to 10 AU by following the motion of marker particles embedded in the flow. It is found that those field lines threading the core of the interaction region are subject to significant latitudinal and relative longitudinal displacement over this range of heliocentric distance. Thus, observations taken at a fixed latitude in the inner solar system sample, over the course of a solar rotation, field lines which connect to a range of latitudes in the outer heliosphere. Maps of the field line displacements are presented to help visualize these connections. In addition, it is found that depending upon the location relative to the CIR structure, the radial evolution of fluid elements frozen to different field lines can deviate considerably from that of the canonical solar wind. That is, for selected subsets of field lines, large speed changes (not just at shocks) can be experienced; the density variation can be far from 1/r(exp 2), and the magnetic field intensity need not decay monotonically with distance.

  8. Simulation of 3D flows past hypersonic vehicles in FlowVision software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aksenov, A. A.; Zhluktov, S. V.; Savitskiy, D. V.; Bartenev, G. Y.; Pokhilko, V. I.

    2015-11-01

    A new implicit velocity-pressure split method is discussed in the given presentation. The method implies using conservative velocities, obtained at the given time step, for integration of the momentum equation and other convection-diffusion equations. This enables simulation of super- and hypersonic flows with account of motion of solid boundaries. Calculations of known test cases performed in the FlowVision software are demonstrated. It is shown that the method allows one to carry out calculations at high Mach numbers with integration step essentially exceeding the explicit time step.

  9. Multiscale modeling of mechanosensing channels on vesicles and cell membranes in 3D constricted flows and shear flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Zhangli; Pak, On Shun; Young, Yuan-Nan; Liu, Allen; Stone, Howard

    2015-11-01

    We investigate the gating of mechanosensing channels (Mscls) on vesicles and cell membranes under different flow conditions using a multiscale approach. At the cell level (microns), the membrane tension is calculated using a 3D two-component whole-cell membrane model based on dissipative particle dynamics (DPD), including the cortex cytoskeleton and its interactions with the lipid bilayer. At the Mscl level (nanometers), we predict the relation between channel gating and the membrane tension obtained from a cell-level model using a semi-analytical model based on the bilayer hydrophobic mismatch energy. We systematically study the gating of Mscls of vesicles and cell membranes in constricted channel flows and shear flows, and explore the dependence of the gating on flow rate, cell shape and size. The results provide guidance for future experiments in inducing Mscl opening for various purposes such as drug delivery.

  10. CFD modeling of turbulent flows around the SSME main injector assembly using porosity formulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, Gary C.; Chen, Y. S.; Farmer, Richard C.

    1992-01-01

    Hot gas turbulent flow distribution around the main injector assembly of the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) and LOX flow distribution through the LOX posts have a great effect on the combustion phenomena inside the main combustion chamber. In order to design a CFD model to be an effective engineering analysis tool with good computational turn-around time (especially for 3-D flow problems) and still maintain good accuracy in describing the flow features, the concept of porosity was employed to describe the effects of blockage and drag force due to the presence of the LOX posts in the turbulent flow field around the main injector assembly of the SSME. Two-dimensional numerical studies were conducted to identify the drag coefficients of the flows, both through tube banks and round the shielded posts, over a wide range of Reynolds numbers. Empirical, analytical expressions of the drag coefficients as a function of local flow Reynolds number were then deduced. The porosity model was applied to the turbulent flow around the main injector assembly of the SSME, and analyses were performed. The 3-D CFD analysis was divided into three parts: LOX dome, hot gas injector assembly, and hydrogen cavity. The numerical results indicate that the mixture ratio at the downstream of injector face was close to stoichiometric around baffle elements.

  11. Experiments performed with bubbly flow in vertical pipes at different flow conditions covering the transition region: simulation by coupling Eulerian, Lagrangian and 3D random walks models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muñoz-Cobo, José; Chiva, Sergio; El Aziz Essa, Mohamed; Mendes, Santos

    2012-08-01

    Two phase flow experiments with different superficial velocities of gas and water were performed in a vertical upward isothermal cocurrent air-water flow column with conditions ranging from bubbly flow, with very low void fraction, to transition flow with some cap and slug bubbles and void fractions around 25%. The superficial velocities of the liquid and the gas phases were varied from 0.5 to 3 m/s and from 0 to 0.6 m/s, respectively. Also to check the effect of changing the surface tension on the previous experiments small amounts of 1-butanol were added to the water. These amounts range from 9 to 75 ppm and change the surface tension. This study is interesting because in real cases the surface tension of the water diminishes with temperature, and with this kind of experiments we can study indirectly the effect of changing the temperature on the void fraction distribution. The following axial and radial distributions were measured in all these experiments: void fraction, interfacial area concentration, interfacial velocity, Sauter mean diameter and turbulence intensity. The range of values of the gas superficial velocities in these experiments covered the range from bubbly flow to the transition to cap/slug flow. Also with transition flow conditions we distinguish two groups of bubbles in the experiments, the small spherical bubbles and the cap/slug bubbles. Special interest was devoted to the transition region from bubbly to cap/slug flow; the goal was to understand the physical phenomena that take place during this transition A set of numerical simulations of some of these experiments for bubbly flow conditions has been performed by coupling a Lagrangian code, that tracks the three dimensional motion of the individual bubbles in cylindrical coordinates inside the field of the carrier liquid, to an Eulerian model that computes the magnitudes of continuous phase and to a 3D random walk model that takes on account the fluctuation in the velocity field of the

  12. Incompressible Turbulent Wing-Body Junction Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krishnamurthy, R.; Cagle, Corey D.; Chandra, S.

    1998-01-01

    -stream flow. The lateral curvature of the wing/strat causes the oncoming turbulent layer to skew about am axis (x-axis) parallel to the plane (xz-plane) of the mean shear. This is the principle mechanism for the generation of secondary flow. Such skew-induced secondary flows are slow to be attenuated by Reynolds stresses. Additional contribution to the generation of secondary flow comes from anisotropies in Reynolds stresses. Upstream of the strut, the mean-vorticity is directed span wise (along the y-direction). The presence of secondary flow in the vicinity of the strut causes the vorticity to stretch around the obstacle in a horse-shoe shape, with each leg having a vorticity of the opposite sense. The blockage effect of the strut imposes a severe adverse pressure gradient on the oncoming turbulent shear layer, causing boundary layer separation ahead of the leading edge, resulting in a vortex that rolls up and flows downstream into the juncture region. The separation vortices trailing in the wake of the wing can alter the lift or drag characteristics of the surfaces downstream of the wing-body juncture. Likewise, on submarines, the wake flow behind the appendage can degrade the performance of the propeller located downstream. The complex nature of this flow is caused by the presence of all six components of Reynolds stresses. Devenport and Simpson report that in the vicinity of the horse-shoe vortex there is intense recirculation with turbulent stresses being much larger than those normally observed in turbulent flows. These features contribute to making this flow a challenge to predict numerically. Some of the past studies provide useful insights into this flow that would guide our numerical efforts. In measurements reported by Shabaka and Bradshaw, the eddy viscosity tensor is seen to be non-isotropic and has negative components in certain regions. In an effort to evaluate the closure assumptions of various turbulence models, Devenport and Simpson used their own extensive

  13. 3D Structure and Internal Circulation of Pancake Vortices in Rotating Stratified Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassanzadeh, Pedram; Marcus, Philip; Aubert, Oriane; Le Bars, Michael; Le Gal, Patrice

    2011-11-01

    Jovian vortices, Atlantic meddies, and vortices of the protoplanetrary disks are examples of weakly-forced or unforced long-lived vortices in rotating stratified flows. Knowing the 3D structure and internal circulation of these vortices is essential in understanding their physics, which is not well-understood. For example, the aspect ratio of these vortices has been long thought to be f / N where f is the Coriolis parameter and N is the Brunt-Vaisala frequency. However, our recent theoretical and experimental study has shown that the aspect ratio in fact depends not only on f and N but also on the Rossby number and density mixing inside the vortex. The new scaling law also agrees with the available measurements of the meddies and Jupiter's Great Red Spot. High resolution 3D numerical simulations of the Navier-Stokes equation are carried out to confirm this new scaling law for a slowly (viscously) decaying anticyclonic vortex in which the Rossby number and stratification inside the vortex evolve in time. For a wide range of parameters and different distributions of density anomaly, the secondary circulations within the vortices are studied. The effect of a non-uniform background stratification is investigated, and the small cyclonic vortices that form above and below the anticyclone are studied.

  14. Numerical investigation of separated transonic turbulent flows with a multiple-time-scale turbulence model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, S.-W.

    1990-01-01

    A numerical investigation of transonic turbulent flows separated by curvature and shock wave - boundary layer interaction is presented. The free stream Mach numbers considered are 0.4, 0.5, 0.6, 0.7, 0.8, 0.825, 0.85, 0.875, 0.90, and 0.925. In the numerical method, the conservation of mass equation is replaced by a pressure correction equation for compressible flows and thus incremental pressure is solved for instead of density. The turbulence is described by a multiple-time-scale turbulence model supplemented with a near-wall turbulence model. The present numerical results show that there exists a reversed flow region at all free stream Mach numbers considered whereas various k-epsilon turbulence models fail to predict such a reversed flow region at low free stream Mach numbers. The numerical results also show that the size of the reversed flow region grows extensively due to the shock wave - turbulent boundary layer interaction as the free stream Mach number is increased. These numerical results show that the turbulence model can resolve the turbulence field subjected to extra strains caused by the curvature and the shock wave - turbulent boundary layer interaction and that the numerical method yields a significantly accurate solution for the complex compressible turbulent flow.

  15. Apker Prize Lecture: Using 3D Printing and Stereoscopic Imaging to Measure the Alignment and Rotation of Anisotropic Particles in Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcus, Guy; Parsa, Shima; Kramel, Stefan; Ni, Rui; Voth, Greg

    2013-11-01

    We have developed a general methodology to experimentally measure the time-resolved Lagrangian orientation and solid body rotation rate of anisotropic particles with arbitrary aspect ratio from standard stereoscopic video image data. We apply these techniques to particles advected in a Rλ ~ 110 fluid flow, where turbulence is generated by two grids oscillating in phase. We use 3D printing technology to design and fabricate neutrally buoyant rods, crosses (two perpendicular rods), and jacks (three mutually perpendicular rods) with a largest dimension of 7 times the Kolmogorov length scale, which makes them good approximations to tracer particles. We have measured the mean square rotation rate, ṗiṗi , of particles spanning the full range of aspect ratios and obtained results that agree with direct numerical simulations. By measuring the full solid-body rotation of jacks, we provide a new, extensible way to directly probe the Lagrangian vorticity of a fluid. We also present direct measurements of the alignment of crosses with the direction of their solid body rotation rate vector--in agreement with direct numerical simulations. Supported by NSF grant DMR­1208990.

  16. Rayleigh Light Scattering for Concentration Measurements in Turbulent Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pitts, William M.

    1996-01-01

    Despite intensive research over a number of years, an understanding of scalar mixing in turbulent flows remains elusive. An understanding is required because turbulent mixing has a pivotal role in a wide variety of natural and technologically important processes. As an example, the mixing and transport of pollutants in the atmosphere and in bodies of water are often dependent on turbulent mixing processes. Turbulent mixing is also central to turbulent combustion which underlies most hydrocarbon energy use in modern societies as well as in unwanted fire behavior. Development of models for combusting flows is therefore crucial, however, an understanding of scalar mixing is required before useful models of turbulent mixing and, ultimately, turbulent combustion can be developed. An important subset of turbulent flows is axisymmetric turbulent jets and plumes because they are relatively simple to generate, and because the provide an appropriate test bed for the development of general theories of turbulent mixing which can be applied to more complex geometries and flows. This paper focuses on a number of experimental techniques which have been developed at the National Institute of Standards and Development for measuring concentration in binary axisymmetric turbulent jets. In order to demonstrate the value of these diagnostics, some of the more important results from earlier and on-going investigations are summarized. Topics addressed include the similarity behavior of variable density axisymmetric jets, the behavior of absolutely unstable axisymmetric helium jets, and the role of large scale structures and scalar dissipation in these flows.

  17. A turbulence model for buoyant flows based on vorticity generation.

    SciTech Connect

    Domino, Stefan Paul; Nicolette, Vernon F.; O'Hern, Timothy John; Tieszen, Sheldon R.; Black, Amalia Rebecca

    2005-10-01

    A turbulence model for buoyant flows has been developed in the context of a k-{var_epsilon} turbulence modeling approach. A production term is added to the turbulent kinetic energy equation based on dimensional reasoning using an appropriate time scale for buoyancy-induced turbulence taken from the vorticity conservation equation. The resulting turbulence model is calibrated against far field helium-air spread rate data, and validated with near source, strongly buoyant helium plume data sets. This model is more numerically stable and gives better predictions over a much broader range of mesh densities than the standard k-{var_epsilon} model for these strongly buoyant flows.

  18. Turbulence Modeling for Unsteady Transonic Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marvin, J. G.; Levy, L. L., Jr.; Seegmiller, H. L.

    1980-01-01

    Conditionally sampled, ensemble-averaged velocity measurements, made with a laser velocimeter, were taken in the flowfield over the rear half of an 18% thick circular arc airfoil at zero incidence tested at M = 0.76 and at a Reynolds number based on chord of 11 x 10(exp 6). Data for one cycle of periodic unsteady flow having a reduced frequency f of 0.49 are analyzed. A series of compression waves, which develop in the early stages of the cycle, strengthen and coalesce into a strong shock wave that moves toward the airfoil leading edge. A thick shear layer forms downstream of the shock wave. The kinetic energy and shear stresses increase dramatically, reach a maximum when dissipation and diffusion of the turbulence exceed production, and then decrease substantially. The response lime of the turbulence to the changes brought about by the shock-wave passage upstream depends on the shock-wave strength and position in the boundary layer. The cycle completes itself when the shock wave passes the midchord, weakens, and the shear layer collapses. Remarkably good comparisons are found with computations that employ the time-dependent Reynolds averaged form of the Navier-Stokes equations using an algebraic eddy viscosity model, developed for steady flows.

  19. Improved engineering models for turbulent wall flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    She, Zhen-Su; Chen, Xi; Zou, Hong-Yue; Hussain, Fazle

    2015-11-01

    We propose a new approach, called structural ensemble dynamics (SED), involving new concepts to describe the mean quantities in wall-bounded flows, and its application to improving the existing engineering turbulence models, as well as its physical interpretation. First, a revised k - ω model for pipe flows is obtained, which accurately predicts, for the first time, both mean velocity and (streamwise) kinetic energy for a wide range of the Reynolds number (Re), validated by Princeton experimental data. In particular, a multiplicative factor is introduced in the dissipation term to model an anomaly in the energy cascade in a meso-layer, predicting the outer peak of agreeing with data. Secondly, a new one-equation model is obtained for compressible turbulent boundary layers (CTBL), building on a multi-layer formula of the stress length function and a generalized temperature-velocity relation. The former refines the multi-layer description - viscous sublayer, buffer layer, logarithmic layer and a newly defined bulk zone - while the latter characterizes a parabolic relation between the mean velocity and temperature. DNS data show our predictions to have a 99% accuracy for several Mach numbers Ma = 2.25, 4.5, improving, up to 10%, a previous similar one-equation model (Baldwin & Lomax, 1978). Our results promise notable improvements in engineering models.

  20. Potential for 3-D hyporheic exchange flow along a succession of pool-riffle sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Käser, Daniel; Binley, Andrew; Krause, Stefan; Heathwaite, Louise

    2010-05-01

    Pool-riffle sequences are key geomorphological features that can influence the ecology of streams by inducing a flow exchange between surface water and groundwater - a process called hyporheic exchange flow (HEF). The objective of this research was to test the suitability of a simple 3-D groundwater model for characterizing HEF induced by pool-riffle sequences that had been the focus of experimental study. Three reaches of 20 m were modelled separately. While the bed topography was surveyed and represented at a high resolution, the permeability distribution referred to a simple conceptual model consisting of two superposed layers. One hypothesis was that, despite its simplicity, the calibrated model would produce an acceptable fit between observed and simulated heads because its permeability structure resembled the natural system. The potential complexity of hyporheic flow patterns is well-known, yet this study highlights the usefulness of a simple conceptual model coupled to mechanistic flow equations for describing HEF in 3-D. The error structure of the calibrated model provides insight into various site-specific features. The root mean square error between computed and observed hydraulic heads (relative to the head drop over the structure) is comparable to other studies with more elaborate permeability structures. After calibration, a sensitivity analysis was conducted in order to determine the influence of permeability contrast between the layers, depth of the permeability interface, and basal flux on three HEF characteristics: residence time, lateral and vertical extent, and total flux. Results indicate that permeability characteristics can affect HEF in different ways. For example, the vertical extent is deepest in homogeneous conditions, whereas the lateral extent is not significantly affected by permeability contrast, or by the depth of the interface between the two layers. Thus bank piezometers may be insufficient to calibrate groundwater models of HEF

  1. Agglomeration multigrid for viscous turbulent flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mavriplis, D. J.; Venkatakrishnan, V.

    1994-01-01

    Agglomeration multigrid, which has been demonstrated as an efficient and automatic technique for the solution of the Euler equations on unstructured meshes, is extended to viscous turbulent flows. For diffusion terms, coarse grid discretizations are not possible, and more accurate grid transfer operators are required as well. A Galerkin coarse grid operator construction and an implicit prolongation operator are proposed. Their suitability is evaluated by examining their effect on the solution of Laplace's equation. The resulting strategy is employed to solve the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations for aerodynamic flows. Convergence rates comparable to those obtained by a previously developed non-nested mesh multigrid approach are demonstrated, and suggestions for further improvements are given.

  2. Drag reduction in turbulent MHD pipe flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orlandi, P.

    1996-01-01

    This is a preliminary study devoted to verifying whether or not direct simulations of turbulent Magneto-Hydro-Dynamic (MHD) flows in liquid metals reproduce experimental observations of drag reduction. Two different cases have been simulated by a finite difference scheme which is second order accurate in space and time. In the first case, an external azimuthal magnetic field is imposed. In this case, the magnetic field acts on the mean axial velocity and complete laminarization of the flow at N(sub a) = 30 has been achieved. In the second case, an axial magnetic field is imposed which affects only fluctuating velocities, and thus the action is less efficient. This second case is more practical, but comparison between numerical and experimental results is only qualitative.

  3. Turbulence modeling for impinging jet flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Childs, Robert E.; Rodman, Laura C.; Bradshaw, Peter; Bott, Donald M.; Shoemaker, William C.

    1992-01-01

    The objective of the present work is to improve the accuracy of the k-epsilon turbulence model for flows involving one or more jets impinging on a plate in a crossflow which generate a horseshoe vortex. The k-epsilon model is modified by adding source terms to the epsilon equation, which enables it to more accurately predict the shear stress in flows subject to streamline curvature and vortex stretching (or lateral divergence). Calculations with the modified model predict the ground vortex core to be about 15 percent upstream of its experimental location. This is a significant improvement over the standard model which yields higher errors for calculation of the vortex-core location.

  4. The role of freestream turbulence scale in subsonic flow separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Potter, J. L.; Seebaugh, W. R.; Fisher, C. E.; Barnett, R. J.; Gokhale, R. B.

    1985-01-01

    The clarification of the role of freestream turbulence scale in determining the location of boundary layer separation is discussed. Modifications to the test facility were completed. Wind tunnel flow characteristics, including turbulence parameters, were determined with two turbulence generating grids, as well as no grid. These results are summarized. Initial results on the role of scale on turbulent boundary layer separation on the upper surface of an airfoil model are also discussed.

  5. 3D YSO accretion shock simulations: a study of the magnetic, chromospheric and stochastic flow effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsakos, T.; Chièze, J.-P.; Stehlé, C.; González, M.; Ibgui, L.; de Sá, L.; Lanz, T.; Orlando, S.; Bonito, R.; Argiroffi, C.; Reale, F.; Peres, G.

    2014-08-01

    The structure and dynamics of young stellar object (YSO) accretion shocks depend strongly on the local magnetic field strength and configuration, as well as on the radiative transfer effects responsible for the energy losses. We present the first 3D YSO shock simulations of the interior of the stream, assuming a uniform background magnetic field, a clumpy infalling gas, and an acoustic energy flux flowing at the base of the chromosphere. We study the dynamical evolution and the post-shock structure as a function of the plasma-beta (thermal pressure over magnetic pressure). We find that a strong magnetic field (~hundreds of Gauss) leads to the formation of fibrils in the shocked gas due to the plasma confinement within flux tubes. The corresponding emission is smooth and fully distinguishable from the case of a weak magnetic field (~tenths of Gauss) where the hot slab demonstrates chaotic motion and oscillates periodically.

  6. Electroosmotic flow through a microparallel channel with 3D wall roughness.

    PubMed

    Chang, Long; Jian, Yongjun; Buren, Mandula; Sun, Yanjun

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, a perturbation method is introduced to study the EOF in a microparallel channel with 3D wall roughness. The corrugations of the two walls are periodic sinusoidal waves of small amplitude in two directions either in phase or half-period out of phase. Based on linearized Poisson-Boltzmann equation, Laplace equation, and the Navier-Stokes equations, the perturbation solutions of velocity, electrical potential, and volume flow rate are obtained. By using numerical computation, the influences of the wall corrugations on the mean velocity are analyzed. The variations of electrical potential, velocity profile, mean velocity, and their dependences on the wave number α and β of wall corrugations in two directions, the nondimensional electrokinetic width K, and the zeta potential ratio between the lower wall and the upper wall ς are analyzed graphically. PMID:26333852

  7. Progress Toward Overset-Grid Moving Body Capability for USM3D Unstructured Flow Solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pandyna, Mohagna J.; Frink, Neal T.; Noack, Ralph W.

    2005-01-01

    A static and dynamic Chimera overset-grid capability is added to an established NASA tetrahedral unstructured parallel Navier-Stokes flow solver, USM3D. Modifications to the solver primarily consist of a few strategic calls to the Donor interpolation Receptor Transaction library (DiRTlib) to facilitate communication of solution information between various grids. The assembly of multiple overlapping grids into a single-zone composite grid is performed by the Structured, Unstructured and Generalized Grid AssembleR (SUGGAR) code. Several test cases are presented to verify the implementation, assess overset-grid solution accuracy and convergence relative to single-grid solutions, and demonstrate the prescribed relative grid motion capability.

  8. Generation of 3D Spatially Variable Anisotropy for Groundwater Flow Simulations.

    PubMed

    Borghi, Andrea; Renard, Philippe; Courrioux, Gabriel

    2015-01-01

    Sedimentary units generally present anisotropy in their hydraulic properties, with higher hydraulic conductivity along bedding planes, rather than perpendicular to them. This common property leads to a modeling challenge if the sedimentary structure is folded. In this paper, we show that the gradient of the geological potential used by implicit geological modeling techniques can be used to compute full hydraulic conductivity tensors varying in space according to the geological orientation. For that purpose, the gradient of the potential, a vector normal to the bedding, is used to construct a rotation matrix that allows the estimation of the 3D hydraulic conductivity tensor in a single matrix operation. A synthetic 2D cross section example is used to illustrate the method and show that flow simulations performed in such a folded environment are highly influenced by this rotating anisotropy. When using the proposed method, the streamlines follow very closely the folded formation. This is not the case with an isotropic model. PMID:25648610

  9. Symmetries in Turbulent Boundary Layer Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oberlack, M.

    1996-01-01

    The objective is the development of a new theory which enables the algorithmic computation of all self-similar mean velocity profiles. The theory is based on Liegroup analysis and unifies a large set of self-similar solutions for the mean velocity of stationary parallel turbulent shear flows. The results include the logarithmic law of the wall, an algebraic law, the viscous sublayer, the linear region in the middle of a Couette flow and in the middle of a rotating channel flow, and a new exponential mean velocity profile not previously reported. Experimental results taken in the outer parts of a high Reynolds number flat-plate boundary layer, strongly support the exponential profile. From experimental as well as from DNS data of a turbulent channel flow the algebraic scaling law could be confirmed in both the center region and in the near wall region. In the case of the logarithmic law of the wall, the scaling with the wall distance arises as a result of the analysis and has not been assumed in the derivation. The crucial part of the derivation of all the different mean velocity profiles is to consider the invariance of the equation for the velocity fluctuations at the same time as the invariance of the equation for the velocity product equations. The latter is the dyad product of the velocity fluctuations with the equation for the velocity fluctuations. It has been proven that all the invariant solutions are also consistent with similarity of all velocity moment equations up to any arbitrary order.

  10. Multigrid direct numerical simulation of the whole process of flow transition in 3-D boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Chaoqun; Liu, Zhining

    1993-01-01

    A new technology was developed in this study which provides a successful numerical simulation of the whole process of flow transition in 3-D boundary layers, including linear growth, secondary instability, breakdown, and transition at relatively low CPU cost. Most other spatial numerical simulations require high CPU cost and blow up at the stage of flow breakdown. A fourth-order finite difference scheme on stretched and staggered grids, a fully implicit time marching technique, a semi-coarsening multigrid based on the so-called approximate line-box relaxation, and a buffer domain for the outflow boundary conditions were all used for high-order accuracy, good stability, and fast convergence. A new fine-coarse-fine grid mapping technique was developed to keep the code running after the laminar flow breaks down. The computational results are in good agreement with linear stability theory, secondary instability theory, and some experiments. The cost for a typical case with 162 x 34 x 34 grid is around 2 CRAY-YMP CPU hours for 10 T-S periods.

  11. Lattice Boltzmann Model of 3D Multiphase Flow in Artery Bifurcation Aneurysm Problem

    PubMed Central

    Abas, Aizat; Mokhtar, N. Hafizah; Ishak, M. H. H.; Abdullah, M. Z.; Ho Tian, Ang

    2016-01-01

    This paper simulates and predicts the laminar flow inside the 3D aneurysm geometry, since the hemodynamic situation in the blood vessels is difficult to determine and visualize using standard imaging techniques, for example, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Three different types of Lattice Boltzmann (LB) models are computed, namely, single relaxation time (SRT), multiple relaxation time (MRT), and regularized BGK models. The results obtained using these different versions of the LB-based code will then be validated with ANSYS FLUENT, a commercially available finite volume- (FV-) based CFD solver. The simulated flow profiles that include velocity, pressure, and wall shear stress (WSS) are then compared between the two solvers. The predicted outcomes show that all the LB models are comparable and in good agreement with the FVM solver for complex blood flow simulation. The findings also show minor differences in their WSS profiles. The performance of the parallel implementation for each solver is also included and discussed in this paper. In terms of parallelization, it was shown that LBM-based code performed better in terms of the computation time required. PMID:27239221

  12. Magnetic Damping of g-Jitter Driven Flows: 3-D Calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shang, D. Y.; Li, B. Q.; deGroh, H. C.

    1997-01-01

    A 3-D numerical model is developed to represent the oscillating natural convection induced in a cylindrical cavity filled with Ga-doped germanium with and without the presence of an external magnetic field. The model is developed based on the penalty-finite element solution of the equations describing the transport of momentum, heat and solutal element as well as the electromagnetic field distribution in the melt pool. Automatic time step control is applied to help speed up the calculations. Numerical simulations are conducted to study the convection and magnetic damping effects as a function of frequency, directions and amplitudes of g-jitter and also the direction and magnitudes of the applied magnetic fields. The results show that the g-jitter driven flow is time dependent and exhibits a complex recirculating convection pattern in three dimensions and that an applied magnetic field can be employed to suppress this deleterious convective flow and both magnitude and orientation of the applied field are important in magnetic damping of the g-jitter induced convective flows.

  13. Lattice Boltzmann Model of 3D Multiphase Flow in Artery Bifurcation Aneurysm Problem.

    PubMed

    Abas, Aizat; Mokhtar, N Hafizah; Ishak, M H H; Abdullah, M Z; Ho Tian, Ang

    2016-01-01

    This paper simulates and predicts the laminar flow inside the 3D aneurysm geometry, since the hemodynamic situation in the blood vessels is difficult to determine and visualize using standard imaging techniques, for example, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Three different types of Lattice Boltzmann (LB) models are computed, namely, single relaxation time (SRT), multiple relaxation time (MRT), and regularized BGK models. The results obtained using these different versions of the LB-based code will then be validated with ANSYS FLUENT, a commercially available finite volume- (FV-) based CFD solver. The simulated flow profiles that include velocity, pressure, and wall shear stress (WSS) are then compared between the two solvers. The predicted outcomes show that all the LB models are comparable and in good agreement with the FVM solver for complex blood flow simulation. The findings also show minor differences in their WSS profiles. The performance of the parallel implementation for each solver is also included and discussed in this paper. In terms of parallelization, it was shown that LBM-based code performed better in terms of the computation time required. PMID:27239221

  14. Dynamic coupling between fluid flow and vein growth in fractures: a 3D numerical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, J.-O.; Enzmann, F.

    2012-04-01

    Fluid flow is one of the main mass transport mechanisms in the Earth's crust and abundant mineral vein networks are important indicators for fluid flow and fluid rock interaction. These systems are dynamic and part of the so called RTM processes (reaction-transport-mechanics). Understanding of mineral vein systems requires coupling of these processes. Here we present a conceptional model for dynamic vein growth of syntaxial, posttectonic veins generated by advective fluid flow and show first results of a numerical model for this scenario. Vein generation requires three processes to occur: (i) fracture generation by mechanical stress e.g. hydro-fracturing, (ii) flow of a supersaturated fluid on that fracture and (iii) crystallization of phase(s) on or in the fracture. 3D synthetic fractures are generated with the SynFrac code (Ogilvie, et al. 2006). Subsequently solutions of the Navier-Stokes equation for this fracture are computed by a computational fluid dynamics code called GeoDict (Wiegmann 2007). Transport (advective and diffusive) of chemical species to growth sites in the fracture and vein growth are computed by a self-written MATLAB script. The numerical model discretizes the wall rock and fracture geometry by volumetric pixels (voxels). Based on this representation, the model computes the three basic functions for vein generation: (a) nucleation, (b) fluid flow with transport of chemical species and (c) growth. The following conditions were chosen for these three modules. Nucleation is heterogeneous and occurs instantaneously at the wall rock/fracture interface. Advective and diffusive flow of a supersaturated fluid and related transport of chemical species occurs according to the computed fluid flow field by GeoDict. Concentration of chemical species at the inflow is constant, representing external fluid buffering. Changes/decrease in the concentration of chemical species occurs only due to vein growth. Growth of nuclei is limited either by transport of

  15. Predictability of Turbulent Flow in Street Canyons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, K. W.; Ngan, K.

    2015-08-01

    Although predictability is a subject of great importance in atmospheric modelling, there has been little research on urban boundary-layer flows. Here the predictability of street-canyon flow is examined numerically via large-eddy simulation of a unit-aspect-ratio canyon and neutrally stratified atmosphere. In spectral space there is indication of cascade-like behaviour away from the canyon at early times, but the error growth is essentially independent of scale inside the canyon; in physical space the error field is rather inhomogeneous and shows clear differences among the canyon, shear layer and inertial sublayer. The error growth is largely driven by the shear layer: errors generated above roof level are advected into the canyon while contributions from intermittent bursting and in situ development within the canyon play a relatively minor role. This work highlights differences between the predictability of urban flows and canonical turbulent flows and should be useful in developing modelling strategies for more realistic time-dependent urban flows.

  16. Compound cooling flow turbulator for turbine component

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Ching-Pang; Jiang, Nan; Marra, John J; Rudolph, Ronald J

    2014-11-25

    Multi-scale turbulation features, including first turbulators (46, 48) on a cooling surface (44), and smaller turbulators (52, 54, 58, 62) on the first turbulators. The first turbulators may be formed between larger turbulators (50). The first turbulators may be alternating ridges (46) and valleys (48). The smaller turbulators may be concave surface features such as dimples (62) and grooves (54), and/or convex surface features such as bumps (58) and smaller ridges (52). An embodiment with convex turbulators (52, 58) in the valleys (48) and concave turbulators (54, 62) on the ridges (46) increases the cooling surface area, reduces boundary layer separation, avoids coolant shadowing and stagnation, and reduces component mass.

  17. Investigation of the effect of wall friction on the flow rate in 2D and 3D Granular Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carballo-Ramirez, Brenda; Pleau, Mollie; Easwar, Nalini; Birwa, Sumit; Shah, Neil; Tewari, Shubha

    We have measured the mass flow rate of spherical steel spheres under gravity in vertical, straight-walled 2 and 3-dimensional hoppers, where the flow velocity is controlled by the opening size. Our measurements focus on the role of friction and its placement along the walls of the hopper. In the 2D case, an increase in the coefficient of static friction from μ = 0.2 to 0.6 is seen to decrease the flow rate significantly. We have changed the placement of frictional boundaries/regions from the front and back walls of the 2D hopper to the side walls and floor to investigate the relative importance of the different regions in determining the flow rate. Fits to the Beverloo equation show significant departure from the expected exponent of 1.5 in the case of 2D flow. In contrast, 3D flow rates do not show much dependence on wall friction and its placement. We compare the experimental data to numerical simulations of gravity driven hopper granular flow with varying frictional walls constructed using LAMMPS*. *http://lammps.sandia.gov Supported by NSF MRSEC DMR 0820506.

  18. An implicit finite-difference code for a two-equation turbulence model for three-dimensional flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaul, U. K.

    1985-01-01

    An implicit finite difference code was developed which solves the transport equations for the turbulence kinetic energy and its dissipation rate in generalized coordinates in three dimensions. The finite difference equations are solved using the Beam-Warming algorithm. The kinetic energy-dissipation code, KEM, provides the closure; i.e., the turbulent viscosity for calculation of either compressible or incompressible flows. Turbulent internal flow over a backward-facing step has been calculated using the present code in conjunction with the Incompressible Navier-Stokes Code, INS3D. The results are in good agreement with experiments and two dimensional computations of other researchers.

  19. 3D real-time visualization of blood flow in cerebral aneurysms by light field particle image velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlsohn, Matthias F.; Kemmling, André; Petersen, Arne; Wietzke, Lennart

    2016-04-01

    Cerebral aneurysms require endovascular treatment to eliminate potentially lethal hemorrhagic rupture by hemostasis of blood flow within the aneurysm. Devices (e.g. coils and flow diverters) promote homeostasis, however, measurement of blood flow within an aneurysm or cerebral vessel before and after device placement on a microscopic level has not been possible so far. This would allow better individualized treatment planning and improve manufacture design of devices. For experimental analysis, direct measurement of real-time microscopic cerebrovascular flow in micro-structures may be an alternative to computed flow simulations. An application of microscopic aneurysm flow measurement on a regular basis to empirically assess a high number of different anatomic shapes and the corresponding effect of different devices would require a fast and reliable method at low cost with high throughout assessment. Transparent three dimensional 3D models of brain vessels and aneurysms may be used for microscopic flow measurements by particle image velocimetry (PIV), however, up to now the size of structures has set the limits for conventional 3D-imaging camera set-ups. On line flow assessment requires additional computational power to cope with the processing large amounts of data generated by sequences of multi-view stereo images, e.g. generated by a light field camera capturing the 3D information by plenoptic imaging of complex flow processes. Recently, a fast and low cost workflow for producing patient specific three dimensional models of cerebral arteries has been established by stereo-lithographic (SLA) 3D printing. These 3D arterial models are transparent an exhibit a replication precision within a submillimeter range required for accurate flow measurements under physiological conditions. We therefore test the feasibility of microscopic flow measurements by PIV analysis using a plenoptic camera system capturing light field image sequences. Averaging across a sequence of

  20. Turbulent plane Couette flow subject to strong system rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bech, Knut H.; Andersson, Helge I.

    1997-09-01

    System rotation is known to substantially affect the mean flow pattern as well as the turbulence structure in rotating channel flows. In a numerical study of plane Couette flow rotating slowly about an axis aligned with the mean vorticity, Bech & Andersson (1996a) found that the turbulence level was damped in the presence of anticyclonic system rotation, in spite of the occurrence of longitudinal counter-rotating roll cells. Moreover, the turbulence anisotropy was practically unaffected by the weak rotation, for which the rotation number Ro, defined as the ratio of twice the imposed angular vorticity [Omega] to the shear rate of the corresponding laminar flow, was ±0.01. The aim of the present paper is to explore the effects of stronger anticyclonic system rotation on directly simulated turbulent plane Couette flow. Turbulence statistics like energy, enstrophy and Taylor lengthscales, both componental and directional, were computed from the statistically steady flow fields and supplemented by structural information obtained by conditional sampling.

  1. Convection Heat Transfer in Three-Dimensional Turbulent Separated/Reattached Flow

    SciTech Connect

    Bassem F. Armaly

    2007-10-31

    The measurements and the simulation of convective heat transfer in separated flow have been a challenge to researchers for many years. Measurements have been limited to two-dimensional flow and simulations failed to predict accurately turbulent heat transfer in the separated and reattached flow region (prediction are higher than measurements by more than 50%). A coordinated experimental and numerical effort has been initiated under this grant for examining the momentum and thermal transport in three-dimensional separated and reattached flow in an effort to provide new measurements that can be used for benchmarking and for improving the simulation capabilities of 3-D convection in separated/reattached flow regime. High-resolution and non-invasive measurements techniques are developed and employed in this study to quantify the magnitude and the behavior of the three velocity components and the resulting convective heat transfer. In addition, simulation capabilities are developed and employed for improving the simulation of 3-D convective separated/reattached flow. Such basic measurements and simulation capabilities are needed for improving the design and performance evaluation of complex (3-D) heat exchanging equipment. Three-dimensional (3-D) convective air flow adjacent to backward-facing step in rectangular channel is selected for the experimental component of this study. This geometry is simple but it exhibits all the complexities that appear in any other separated/reattached flow, thus making the results generated in this study applicable to any other separated and reattached flow. Boundary conditions, inflow, outflow, and wall thermal treatment in this geometry can be well measured and controlled. The geometry can be constructed with optical access for non-intrusive measurements of the flow and thermal fields. A three-component laser Doppler velocimeter (LDV) is employed to measure simultaneously the three-velocity components and their turbulent fluctuations

  2. Studies in Forced and Time Varying Turbulent Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grosch, Chester E.

    2005-01-01

    The reasearch focused on two areas; (a) the dynamics of forced turbulent flows and (b) time filtered Large Eddy Simulations (TLES). The dynamics of turbulent flows arising from external forcing of the turbulence are poorly understood. In particular, here are many unanswered questions relating the basic dynamical balances and the existence or nonexistence of statistical equilibrium of forced turbulent flows. This research used rapid distortion theory and direct numerical simulations to explore these questions. The properties of the temporally filtered Navier-Stokes equations were also studied.

  3. Control of turbulent boundary layer flows by sound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahuja, K. K.; Whipkey, R. R.; Jones, G. S.

    1983-04-01

    The effects of acoustic excitation on the turbulent boundary-layer characteristics over an airfoil were examined as a function of excitation frequency and level and also flow velocity. The measured data primarily consisted of: (1) lift coefficients, (2) mean velocities and turbulence intensities as measured by a laser velocimeter, and (3) flow visualization. The experiments successfully demonstrated that separation of turbulent boundary layer flows can be controlled by sound in both pre- and post-stall regions. In addition, it was shown that, with high-frequency acoustic excitation, the turbulence levels in the boundary layer at a fixed measurement point can be reduced considerably.

  4. Turbulence modeling for high speed compressible flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandra, Suresh

    1993-01-01

    The following grant objectives were delineated in the proposal to NASA: to offer course work in computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and related areas to enable mechanical engineering students at North Carolina A&T State University (N.C. A&TSU) to pursue M.S. studies in CFD, and to enable students and faculty to engage in research in high speed compressible flows. Since no CFD-related activity existed at N.C. A&TSU before the start of the NASA grant period, training of students in the CFD area and initiation of research in high speed compressible flows were proposed as the key aspects of the project. To that end, graduate level courses in CFD, boundary layer theory, and fluid dynamics were offered. This effort included initiating a CFD course for graduate students. Also, research work was performed on studying compressibility effects in high speed flows. Specifically, a modified compressible dissipation model, which included a fourth order turbulent Mach number term, was incorporated into the SPARK code and verified for the air-air mixing layer case. The results obtained for this case were compared with a wide variety of experimental data to discern the trends in the mixing layer growth rates with varying convective Mach numbers. Comparison of the predictions of the study with the results of several analytical models was also carried out. The details of the research study are described in the publication entitled 'Compressibility Effects in Modeling Turbulent High Speed Mixing Layers,' which is attached to this report.

  5. Turbulence modeling for high speed compressible flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra, Suresh

    1993-08-01

    The following grant objectives were delineated in the proposal to NASA: to offer course work in computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and related areas to enable mechanical engineering students at North Carolina A&T State University (N.C. A&TSU) to pursue M.S. studies in CFD, and to enable students and faculty to engage in research in high speed compressible flows. Since no CFD-related activity existed at N.C. A&TSU before the start of the NASA grant period, training of students in the CFD area and initiation of research in high speed compressible flows were proposed as the key aspects of the project. To that end, graduate level courses in CFD, boundary layer theory, and fluid dynamics were offered. This effort included initiating a CFD course for graduate students. Also, research work was performed on studying compressibility effects in high speed flows. Specifically, a modified compressible dissipation model, which included a fourth order turbulent Mach number term, was incorporated into the SPARK code and verified for the air-air mixing layer case. The results obtained for this case were compared with a wide variety of experimental data to discern the trends in the mixing layer growth rates with varying convective Mach numbers. Comparison of the predictions of the study with the results of several analytical models was also carried out. The details of the research study are described in the publication entitled 'Compressibility Effects in Modeling Turbulent High Speed Mixing Layers,' which is attached to this report.

  6. Effect of Turbulence Models on Two Massively-Separated Benchmark Flow Cases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rumsey, Christopher L.

    2003-01-01

    Two massively-separated flow cases (the 2-D hill and the 3-D Ahmed body) were computed with several different turbulence models in the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes code CFL3D as part of participation in a turbulence modeling workshop held in Poitiers, France in October, 2002. Overall, results were disappointing, but were consistent with results from other RANS codes and other turbulence models at the workshop. For the 2-D hill case, those turbulence models that predicted separation location accurately ended up yielding a too-long separation extent downstream. The one model that predicted a shorter separation extent in better agreement with LES data did so only by coincidence: its prediction of earlier reattachment was due to a too-late prediction of the separation location. For the Ahmed body, two slant angles were computed, and CFD performed fairly well for one of the cases (the larger slant angle). Both turbulence models tested in this case were very similar to each other. For the smaller slant angle, CFD predicted massive separation, whereas the experiment showed reattachment about half-way down the center of the face. These test cases serve as reminders that state- of-the-art CFD is currently not a reliable predictor of massively-separated flow physics, and that further validation studies in this area would be beneficial.

  7. Numerical Simulation of High-Speed Turbulent Reacting Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Givi, P.; Taulbee, D. B.; Madnia, C. K.; Jaberi, F. A.; Colucci, P. J.; Gicquel, L. Y. M.; Adumitroaie, V.; James, S.

    1999-01-01

    The objectives of this research are: (1) to develop and implement a new methodology for large eddy simulation of (LES) of high-speed reacting turbulent flows. (2) To develop algebraic turbulence closures for statistical description of chemically reacting turbulent flows. We have just completed the third year of Phase III of this research. This is the Final Report of our activities on this research sponsored by the NASA LaRC.

  8. Elastic turbulence in high Reynolds number polymer drag reduced flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubief, Yves; White, Christopher

    2011-11-01

    The present study discusses the existence of small scale dynamics resembling elastic turbulence in polymeric transitional and maximum drag reduction (MDR) flows. The observed flow patterns are driven by elastic stress and occur in regions of very low turbulence found before and after the breakdown of nonlinear instabilities in polymeric transitional flows leading to MDR. A state of polymer-dominated spanwise instabilities was found, resulting in a structure of the wall shear quite different than the structures observed in transitional Newtonian flow. Similar instabilities are observed in the wake of the head of hairpin vortices in simulated MDR flows, an extended region of extensional flow of the order of the Kolmogorov scale in the normal direction. The important Reynolds number is not that of flow (Reτ = 300 and 600 for the Newtonian flows) but that of the local turbulent flow, which according to Kolmogorov approaches unity in the above mentioned flows, a reasonable magnitude for elastic turbulence. The existence of small scale elastic turbulence in transitional and MDR flows explains the phenomenon of early turbulence first observed in the 70s and challenges the notion that, in drag reduced flows, the energy flows only from large to small scales and never goes back from polymers to flow.

  9. PLOT3D/AMES, APOLLO UNIX VERSION USING GMR3D (WITH TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P.

    1994-01-01

    five groups: 1) Grid Functions for grids, grid-checking, etc.; 2) Scalar Functions for contour or carpet plots of density, pressure, temperature, Mach number, vorticity magnitude, helicity, etc.; 3) Vector Functions for vector plots of velocity, vorticity, momentum, and density gradient, etc.; 4) Particle Trace Functions for rake-like plots of particle flow or vortex lines; and 5) Shock locations based on pressure gradient. TURB3D is a modification of PLOT3D which is used for viewing CFD simulations of incompressible turbulent flow. Input flow data consists of pressure, velocity and vorticity. Typical quantities to plot include local fluctuations in flow quantities and turbulent production terms, plotted in physical or wall units. PLOT3D/TURB3D includes both TURB3D and PLOT3D because the operation of TURB3D is identical to PLOT3D, and there is no additional sample data or printed documentation for TURB3D. Graphical capabilities of PLOT3D version 3.6b+ vary among the implementations available through COSMIC. Customers are encouraged to purchase and carefully review the PLOT3D manual before ordering the program for a specific computer and graphics library. There is only one manual for use with all implementations of PLOT3D, and although this manual generally assumes that the Silicon Graphics Iris implementation is being used, informative comments concerning other implementations appear throughout the text. With all implementations, the visual representation of the object and flow field created by PLOT3D consists of points, lines, and polygons. Points can be represented with dots or symbols, color can be used to denote data values, and perspective is used to show depth. Differences among implementations impact the program's ability to use graphical features that are based on 3D polygons, the user's ability to manipulate the graphical displays, and the user's ability to obtain alternate forms of output. The Apollo implementation of PLOT3D uses some of the capabilities of

  10. PLOT3D/AMES, APOLLO UNIX VERSION USING GMR3D (WITHOUT TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P.

    1994-01-01

    five groups: 1) Grid Functions for grids, grid-checking, etc.; 2) Scalar Functions for contour or carpet plots of density, pressure, temperature, Mach number, vorticity magnitude, helicity, etc.; 3) Vector Functions for vector plots of velocity, vorticity, momentum, and density gradient, etc.; 4) Particle Trace Functions for rake-like plots of particle flow or vortex lines; and 5) Shock locations based on pressure gradient. TURB3D is a modification of PLOT3D which is used for viewing CFD simulations of incompressible turbulent flow. Input flow data consists of pressure, velocity and vorticity. Typical quantities to plot include local fluctuations in flow quantities and turbulent production terms, plotted in physical or wall units. PLOT3D/TURB3D includes both TURB3D and PLOT3D because the operation of TURB3D is identical to PLOT3D, and there is no additional sample data or printed documentation for TURB3D. Graphical capabilities of PLOT3D version 3.6b+ vary among the implementations available through COSMIC. Customers are encouraged to purchase and carefully review the PLOT3D manual before ordering the program for a specific computer and graphics library. There is only one manual for use with all implementations of PLOT3D, and although this manual generally assumes that the Silicon Graphics Iris implementation is being used, informative comments concerning other implementations appear throughout the text. With all implementations, the visual representation of the object and flow field created by PLOT3D consists of points, lines, and polygons. Points can be represented with dots or symbols, color can be used to denote data values, and perspective is used to show depth. Differences among implementations impact the program's ability to use graphical features that are based on 3D polygons, the user's ability to manipulate the graphical displays, and the user's ability to obtain alternate forms of output. The Apollo implementation of PLOT3D uses some of the capabilities of

  11. Influence of fracture scale heterogeneity on the flow properties of 3D Discrete Fracture Networks (DFN)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meheust, Y.; De Dreuzy, J.; Pichot, G.

    2011-12-01

    Flow channeling and permeability scaling in fractured media have been classically addressed either at the fracture- or at the network- scales. In the latter case they are linked to the topological structure of the network, while at the fracture scale they are controlled by the variability of the local aperture distribution inside individual fractures. In this study we analyze these two combined effects, investigating how flow localization below the scale of individual fractures influences that at the network scale and the resulting medium permeability. This is done by use of a new highly-resolved 3D discrete fracture network model (DFN). The local apertures of individual fractures are distributed according to a truncated Gaussian law, and exhibit self-affine spatial correlations that are bounded by an upper cutoff scale Lc; Lc and the fracture closure, defined as the ratio of the aperture fluctuations at scale Lc to the mean aperture, are considered homogeneous over the DFN. The network topology is controlled by a homogeneous scalar fracture density and a power law fracture length distribution. We have varied these features to investigate a large variety of DFN topologies, from sparse networks with varying degrees of fracture interconnections, flow bottlenecks and dead-ends (Fig. 1a), to dense well-connected networks (Fig. 1b). We have also investigated a large range of fracture closures, performing extensive simulations of about 105 different DFN realizations. At the fracture scale, accounting for local aperture fluctuations leads to a monotical deviation (which can exceed 50%) of the equivalent fracture transmissivity from the parallel plate behavior. At the network scale we observe a complex interaction between flow channeling within fracture planes and flow localization in the network. This interaction is controlled by the location of fracture interactions with respect to that of low local transmissivity zones (particularly the closed zones), in the fracture

  12. Computer modelling of turbulent recirculating flows in engineering applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalil, E. E.; Assaf, H. M. W.

    A numerical computation procedure for solving the partial differential equations governing turbulent flows is presented, with an emphasis on swirling flows. The conservation equations for mass and momentum are defined, noting the inclusion of turbulence characteristics in Reynolds stress terms. A two-dimensional turbulence model is used, based on an eddy viscosity concept, with the Reynolds stress described in terms of the mean velocity gradient and the eddy viscosity. The model is used for the flow in a rotary air garbage classifier and the flow in a vortex tube. The flexibility of the technique is demonstrated through variations of the initial flow parameters.

  13. Computation of turbulent flows over backward-facing step

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mansour, N. N.; Kim, J.; Moin, P.

    1983-01-01

    A numerical method for computing incompressible turbulent flows is presented. The method is tested by calculating laminar recirculating flows and is applied in conjunction with a modified Kappa-epsilon model to compute the flow over a backward-facing step. In the laminar regime, the computational results are in good agreement with the experimental data. The turbulent flow study shows that the reattachment length is underpredicted by the standard Kappa-epsilon model. The addition of a term to the standard model that accounts for the effects of rotation on turbulent flow improves the results in the recirculation region and increases the computed reattachment length.

  14. A PDF closure model for compressible turbulent chemically reacting flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kollmann, W.

    1992-01-01

    The objective of the proposed research project was the analysis of single point closures based on probability density function (pdf) and characteristic functions and the development of a prediction method for the joint velocity-scalar pdf in turbulent reacting flows. Turbulent flows of boundary layer type and stagnation point flows with and without chemical reactions were be calculated as principal applications. Pdf methods for compressible reacting flows were developed and tested in comparison with available experimental data. The research work carried in this project was concentrated on the closure of pdf equations for incompressible and compressible turbulent flows with and without chemical reactions.

  15. Free turbulent shear flows. Volume 2: Summary of data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birch, S. F.

    1973-01-01

    The proceedings of a conference on free turbulent shear flows are presented. Objectives of the conference are as follows: (1) collect and process data for a variety of free mixing problems, (2) assess present theoretical capability for predicting mean velocity, concentration, and temperature distributions in free turbulent flows, (3) identify and recommend experimental studies to advance knowledge of free shear flows, and (4) increase understanding of basic turbulent mixing process for application to free shear flows. Examples of specific cases of jet flow are included.

  16. 3D Markov Process for Traffic Flow Prediction in Real-Time.

    PubMed

    Ko, Eunjeong; Ahn, Jinyoung; Kim, Eun Yi

    2016-01-01

    Recently, the correct estimation of traffic flow has begun to be considered an essential component in intelligent transportation systems. In this paper, a new statistical method to predict traffic flows using time series analyses and geometric correlations is proposed. The novelty of the proposed method is two-fold: (1) a 3D heat map is designed to describe the traffic conditions between roads, which can effectively represent the correlations between spatially- and temporally-adjacent traffic states; and (2) the relationship between the adjacent roads on the spatiotemporal domain is represented by cliques in MRF and the clique parameters are obtained by example-based learning. In order to assess the validity of the proposed method, it is tested using data from expressway traffic that are provided by the Korean Expressway Corporation, and the performance of the proposed method is compared with existing approaches. The results demonstrate that the proposed method can predict traffic conditions with an accuracy of 85%, and this accuracy can be improved further. PMID:26821025

  17. CFD Simulation of 3D Flow field in a Gas Centrifuge

    SciTech Connect

    Dongjun Jiang; Shi Zeng

    2006-07-01

    A CFD method was used to study the whole flow field in a gas centrifuge. In this paper, the VSM (Vector Splitting Method) of the FVM (Finite Volume Method) was used to solve the 3D Navier-Stokes equations. An implicit second-order upwind scheme was adopted. The numerical simulation was successfully performed on a parallel cluster computer and a convergence result was obtained. The simulation shows that: in the withdrawal chamber, a strong detached shock wave is formed in front of the scoop; as the radial position increases, the shock becomes stronger and the distance to scoop front surface is smaller. An oblique shock forms in the clearance between the scoop and the centrifuge wall; behind the shock-wave, the radially-inward motion of gas is induced because of the imbalance of the pressure gradient and the centrifugal force. In the separation chamber, a countercurrent is introduced. This indicates that CFD method can be used to study the complex three-dimensional flow field of gas centrifuges. (authors)

  18. 3D Markov Process for Traffic Flow Prediction in Real-Time

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Eunjeong; Ahn, Jinyoung; Kim, Eun Yi

    2016-01-01

    Recently, the correct estimation of traffic flow has begun to be considered an essential component in intelligent transportation systems. In this paper, a new statistical method to predict traffic flows using time series analyses and geometric correlations is proposed. The novelty of the proposed method is two-fold: (1) a 3D heat map is designed to describe the traffic conditions between roads, which can effectively represent the correlations between spatially- and temporally-adjacent traffic states; and (2) the relationship between the adjacent roads on the spatiotemporal domain is represented by cliques in MRF and the clique parameters are obtained by example-based learning. In order to assess the validity of the proposed method, it is tested using data from expressway traffic that are provided by the Korean Expressway Corporation, and the performance of the proposed method is compared with existing approaches. The results demonstrate that the proposed method can predict traffic conditions with an accuracy of 85%, and this accuracy can be improved further. PMID:26821025

  19. Ghost Particle Velocimetry: Accurate 3D Flow Visualization Using Standard Lab Equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buzzaccaro, Stefano; Secchi, Eleonora; Piazza, Roberto

    2013-07-01

    We describe and test a new approach to particle velocimetry, based on imaging and cross correlating the scattering speckle pattern generated on a near-field plane by flowing tracers with a size far below the diffraction limit, which allows reconstructing the velocity pattern in microfluidic channels without perturbing the flow. As a matter of fact, adding tracers is not even strictly required, provided that the sample displays sufficiently refractive-index fluctuations. For instance, phase separation in liquid mixtures in the presence of shear is suitable to be directly investigated by this “ghost particle velocimetry” technique, which just requires a microscope with standard lamp illumination equipped with a low-cost digital camera. As a further bonus, the peculiar spatial coherence properties of the illuminating source, which displays a finite longitudinal coherence length, allows for a 3D reconstruction of the profile with a resolution of few tenths of microns and makes the technique suitable to investigate turbid samples with negligible multiple scattering effects.

  20. A digital holography set-up for 3D vortex flow dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebon, Benoît; Perret, Gaële; Coëtmellec, Sébastien; Godard, Gilles; Gréhan, Gérard; Lebrun, Denis; Brossard, Jérôme

    2016-06-01

    In the present paper, a digital in-line holography (DIH) set-up, with a converging beam, is used to take three-dimensional (3D) velocity measurements of vortices. The vortices are formed periodically at the edges of a submerged horizontal plate submitted to regular waves. They take the form of vortex filaments that extend from side to side of the channel. They undergo strongly three-dimensional instability mechanisms that remain very complicated to characterize experimentally. The experiments are performed in a 10 × 0.3 × 0.3 m3 wave flume. The DIH set-up is performed using a modulated laser diode emitting at the wavelength of 640 nm and a lensless CCD camera. The beam crosses the channel side to side. To reveal the flow dynamics, 30-μm hydrogen bubbles are generated at the edge of the plate to serve as tracers. Their locations are recorded on the holograms multiple times to access the dynamics of the flow. This method leads to an accuracy in the order of 100 μm on the axial location. Those measurements have been validated with stereo-PIV measurements. A very good agreement is found on time-averaged velocity fields between the two techniques.

  1. Prediction of Transonic Vortex Flows Using Linear and Nonlinear Turbulent Eddy Viscosity Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartels, Robert E.; Gatski, Thomas B.

    2000-01-01

    Three-dimensional transonic flow over a delta wing is investigated with a focus on the effect of transition and influence of turbulence stress anisotropies. The performance of linear eddy viscosity models and an explicit algebraic stress model is assessed at the start of vortex flow, and the results compared with experimental data. To assess the effect of transition location, computations that either fix transition or are fully turbulent are performed. To assess the effect of the turbulent stress anisotropy, comparisons are made between predictions from the algebraic stress model and the linear eddy viscosity models. Both transition location and turbulent stress anisotropy significantly affect the 3D flow field. The most significant effect is found to be the modeling of transition location. At a Mach number of 0.90, the computed solution changes character from steady to unsteady depending on transition onset. Accounting for the anisotropies in the turbulent stresses also considerably impacts the flow, most notably in the outboard region of flow separation.

  2. Suppression of turbulence and transport by sheared flow

    SciTech Connect

    Terry, P. W.

    2000-01-01

    The role of stable shear flow in suppressing turbulence and turbulent transport in plasmas and neutral fluids is reviewed. Localized stable flow shear produces transport barriers whose extensive and highly successful utilization in fusion devices has made them the primary experimental technique for reducing and even eliminating the rapid turbulent losses of heat and particles that characterize fusion-grade plasmas. These transport barriers occur in different plasma regions with disparate physical properties and in a range of confining configurations, indicating a physical process of unusual universality. Flow shear suppresses turbulence by speeding up turbulent decorrelation. This is a robust feature of advection whenever the straining rate of stable mean flow shear exceeds the nonlinear decorrelation rate. Shear straining lowers correlation lengths in the direction of shear and reduces turbulent amplitudes. It also disrupts other processes that feed into or result from turbulence, including the linear instability of important collective modes, the transport-producing correlations between advecting fluid and advectants, and large-scale spatially connected avalanchelike transport events. In plasmas, regions of stable flow shear can be externally driven, but most frequently are created spontaneously in critical transitions between different plasma states. Shear suppression occurs in hydrodynamics and represents an extension of rapid-distortion theory to a long-time-scale nonlinear regime in two-dimensional stable shear flow. Examples from hydrodynamics include the emergence of coherent vortices in decaying two-dimensional Navier-Stokes turbulence and the reduction of turbulent transport in the stratosphere. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  3. High-Resolution 3D Seismic Imaging of Fluid Flow Anomalies in the Southwest Barents Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planke, S.; Eriksen, F. N.; Eriksen, O. K.; Assad, M.; Stokke, H. H.

    2014-12-01

    Fluid flow features imaged as gas flares in the water column, pockmarks and mud volcanoes on the seabed, and high-amplitude cross-cutting reflections and bright spots in the sub-surface are abundant in the SW Barents Sea offshore northern Norway. This region is covered by extensive conventional 2D and 3D deep penetration seismic reflection data and multibeam bathymetry. High-resolution 3D P-Cable seismic data have been acquired in the SW Barents Sea over the past few years to image the uppermost ca. 500 m of the sub-surface. The P-Cable system consist of 12 to 16 short streamers (25 m) that are towed on a cross-cable perpendicular to the vessel's steaming direction. This configuration allows for acquisition of seismic data with high trace density, typically with 6 m in-line separation. The vertical resolution is a good as 1-2 m using conventional site survey air gun configurations. The sedimentary succession in the SW Barents Sea consists of upper Paleozoic evaporites overlaid by Mesozoic and Cenozoic clastic sediments. There are several organic-rich intervals in the sequence, including Paleozoic coals and Triassic and Jurassic marine source rocks that are locally in the oil or gas maturation windows. Glacial erosion has locally removed kilometer thick Cenozoic and Mesozoic successions, leaving the Mesozoic and Paleozoic strata in shallow sub-surface. The new high-resolution 3D surveys have targeted shallow fluid anomalies in the subsurface. These are imaged as high-amplitude reflections in fault blocks and structural highs, locally cross-cutting well-defined Mesozoic reflections. Commonly, disturbed reflections are present in overlying sequences, or high-amplitude reflections are imaged in the glacial overburden sediments. Locally, hundreds of pockmarks are imaged by the seafloor reflection. The deep cross-cutting reflections are interpreted as hydrocarbon accumulations that locally migrate towards the surface. The fluids are stored in shallow gas pockets or

  4. A multiple-scale model for compressible turbulent flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, William W.; Shih, Tsan-Hsing

    1993-01-01

    A multiple-scale model for compressible turbulent flows is proposed. It is assumed that turbulent eddy shocklets are formed primarily by the 'collisions' of large energetic eddies. The extra straining of the large eddy, due to their interactions with shocklets, enhances the energy cascade to smaller eddies. Model transport equations are developed for the turbulent kinetic energies and the energy transfer rates of the different scale. The turbulent eddy viscosity is determined by the total turbulent kinetic energy and the rate of energy transfer from the large scale to the small scale, which is different from the energy dissipation rate. The model coefficients in the modeled turbulent transport equations depend on the ratio of the turbulent kinetic energy of the large scale to that of the small scale, which renders the model more adaptive to the characteristics of individual flow. The model is tested against compressible free shear layers. The results agree satisfactorily with measurements.

  5. Simulation of bacteria transport processes in a river with Flow3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarzwälder, Kordula; Bui, Minh Duc; Rutschmann, Peter

    2014-05-01

    Water quality aspects are getting more and more important due to the European water Framework directive (WFD). One problem related to this topic is the inflow of untreated wastewater due to combined sewer overflows into a river. The wastewater mixture contains even bacteria like E. coli and Enterococci which are markers for water quality. In our work we investigated the transport of these bacteria in river Isar by using a large-scale flume in the outside area of our lab (Oskar von Miller Institute). Therefor we could collect basic data and knowledge about the processes which occur during bacteria sedimentation and remobilisation. In our flume we could use the real grain with the exact size distribution curve as in the river Isar which we want to simulate and we had the chance to nurture a biofilm which is realistic for the analysed situation. This biofilm plays an important role in the remobilisation processes, because the bacteria are hindered to be washed out back into the bulk phase as fast and in such an amount as this would happen without biofilm. The results of our experiments are now used for a module in the 3D software Flow3D to simulate the effects of a point source inlet of raw wastewater on the water quality. Therefor we have to implement the bacteria not as a problem of concentration with advection and diffusion but as single particles which can be inactivated during the process of settling and need to be hindered from remobilisation by the biofilm. This biofilm has special characteristic, it is slippery and has a special thickness which influences the chance of bacteria being removed. To achieve realistic results we have to include the biofilm with more than a probabilistic-tool to make sure that our module is transferable. The module should be as flexible as possible to be improved step by step with increasing quality of dataset.

  6. Viscoelastic polymer flows and elastic turbulence in three-dimensional porous structures.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Jonathan; Lyons, Kyle; Howe, Andrew M; Clarke, Andrew

    2016-01-14

    Viscoelastic polymer solutions flowing through reservoir rocks have been found to improve oil displacement efficiency when the aqueous-phase shear-rate exceeds a critical value. A possible mechanism for this enhanced recovery is elastic turbulence that causes breakup and mobilization of trapped oil ganglia. Here, we apply nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) pulsed field gradient (PFG) diffusion measurements in a novel way to detect increased motion of disconnected oil ganglia. The data are acquired directly from a three-dimensional (3D) opaque porous structure (sandstone) when viscoelastic fluctuations are expected to be present in the continuous phase. The measured increase in motion of trapped ganglia provides unequivocal evidence of fluctuations in the flowing phase in a fully complex 3D system. This work provides direct evidence of elastic turbulence in a realistic reservoir rock - a measurement that cannot be readily achieved by conventional laboratory methods. We support the NMR data with optical microscopy studies of fluctuating ganglia in simple two-dimensional (2D) microfluidic networks, with consistent apparent rheological behaviour of the aqueous phase, to provide conclusive evidence of elastic turbulence in the 3D structure and hence validate the proposed flow-fluctuation mechanism for enhanced oil recovery. PMID:26477403

  7. Survey of Turbulence Models for the Computation of Turbulent Jet Flow and Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nallasamy, N.

    1999-01-01

    The report presents an overview of jet noise computation utilizing the computational fluid dynamic solution of the turbulent jet flow field. The jet flow solution obtained with an appropriate turbulence model provides the turbulence characteristics needed for the computation of jet mixing noise. A brief account of turbulence models that are relevant for the jet noise computation is presented. The jet flow solutions that have been directly used to calculate jet noise are first reviewed. Then, the turbulent jet flow studies that compute the turbulence characteristics that may be used for noise calculations are summarized. In particular, flow solutions obtained with the k-e model, algebraic Reynolds stress model, and Reynolds stress transport equation model are reviewed. Since, the small scale jet mixing noise predictions can be improved by utilizing anisotropic turbulence characteristics, turbulence models that can provide the Reynolds stress components must now be considered for jet flow computations. In this regard, algebraic stress models and Reynolds stress transport models are good candidates. Reynolds stress transport models involve more modeling and computational effort and time compared to algebraic stress models. Hence, it is recommended that an algebraic Reynolds stress model (ASM) be implemented in flow solvers to compute the Reynolds stress components.

  8. Large-eddy simulation of unidirectional turbulent flow over dunes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omidyeganeh, Mohammad

    We performed large eddy simulation of the flow over a series of two- and three-dimensional dune geometries at laboratory scale using the Lagrangian dynamic eddy-viscosity subgrid-scale model. First, we studied the flow over a standard 2D transverse dune geometry, then bedform three-dimensionality was imposed. Finally, we investigated the turbulent flow over barchan dunes. The results are validated by comparison with simulations and experiments for the 2D dune case, while the results of the 3D dunes are validated qualitatively against experiments. The flow over transverse dunes separates at the dune crest, generating a shear layer that plays a crucial role in the transport of momentum and energy, as well as the generation of coherent structures. Spanwise vortices are generated in the separated shear; as they are advected, they undergo lateral instabilities and develop into horseshoe-like structures and finally reach the surface. The ejection that occurs between the legs of the vortex creates the upwelling and downdrafting events on the free surface known as "boils". The three-dimensional separation of flow at the crestline alters the distribution of wall pressure, which may cause secondary flow across the stream. The mean flow is characterized by a pair of counter-rotating streamwise vortices, with core radii of the order of the flow depth. Staggering the crestlines alters the secondary motion; two pairs of streamwise vortices appear (a strong one, centred about the lobe, and a weaker one, coming from the previous dune, centred around the saddle). The flow over barchan dunes presents significant differences to that over transverse dunes. The flow near the bed, upstream of the dune, diverges from the centerline plane; the flow close to the centerline plane separates at the crest and reattaches on the bed. Away from the centerline plane and along the horns, flow separation occurs intermittently. The flow in the separation bubble is routed towards the horns and leaves

  9. A universal transition to turbulence in channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sano, Masaki; Tamai, Keiichi

    2016-03-01

    Transition from laminar to turbulent flow drastically changes the mixing, transport, and drag properties of fluids, yet when and how turbulence emerges is elusive even for simple flow within pipes and rectangular channels. Unlike the onset of temporal disorder, which is identified as the universal route to chaos in confined flows, characterization of the onset of spatiotemporal disorder has been an outstanding challenge because turbulent domains irregularly decay or spread as they propagate downstream. Here, through extensive experimental investigation of channel flow, we identify a distinctive transition with critical behaviour. Turbulent domains continuously injected from an inlet ultimately decayed, or in contrast, spread depending on flow rates. Near a transition point, critical behaviour was observed. We investigate both spatial and temporal dynamics of turbulent clusters, measuring four critical exponents, a universal scaling function and a scaling relation, all in agreement with the (2 + 1)-dimensional directed percolation universality class.

  10. Numerical modeling of pulsatile turbulent flow in stenotic vessels.

    PubMed

    Varghese, Sonu S; Frankel, Steven H

    2003-08-01

    Pulsatile turbulent flow in stenotic vessels has been numerically modeled using the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equation approach. The commercially available computational fluid dynamics code (CFD), FLUENT, has been used for these studies. Two different experiments were modeled involving pulsatile flow through axisymmetric stenoses. Four different turbulence models were employed to study their influence on the results. It was found that the low Reynolds number k-omega turbulence model was in much better agreement with previous experimental measurements than both the low and high Reynolds number versions of the RNG (renormalization-group theory) k-epsilon turbulence model and the standard k-epsilon model, with regard to predicting the mean flow distal to the stenosis including aspects of the vortex shedding process and the turbulent flow field. All models predicted a wall shear stress peak at the throat of the stenosis with minimum values observed distal to the stenosis where flow separation occurred. PMID:12968569

  11. High-resolution 3D seismic data characterize fluid flow systems in the SW Barents Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bünz, Stefan; Mienert, Jürgen; Rajan, Anupama

    2010-05-01

    The flow of fluids through marine sediments is one of the most dominant and pervasive processes in continental margins. These processes control the evolution of a sedimentary basin and its seafloor environment, and have implications for hydrocarbon exploration and seabed ecosystems. Many seep sites at the seafloor are associated with large but complex faunal communities that have received significant attention in recent years. However, there is a need for a better understanding of the driving mechanism of fluid flow in various geological settings, the accumulation of fluids in the subsurface and their focused flow through conduits and/or faults to the seabed. The Barents Sea is a large hydrocarbon-prone basin of the Norwegian Arctic region. A significant portion of the hydrocarbons has leaked or migrated into the shallow subsurface and is now trapped in gas-hydrate and shallow-gas reservoirs. Furthermore, there are few places in the Barents Sea, where methane gas is leaking from the seafloor into the oceanosphere. Accumulations of free gas in the shallow subsurface are considered a geohazard. They constitute a risk for safe drilling operations and they may pose a threat to global climate if the seal that is trapping them is breached. P-Cable 3D high-resolution seismic data from the Ringvassøya Fault Complex and the Polheim Sub-Platform provide new and detailed insight into fluid flow controls and accumulation mechanisms. The data shows a wide variety of fluid flow features, mostly in the form of pockmarks, bright spots, wipe-out zones or vertical zones of disturbed reflectivity. Fluids migrate by both diapiric mechanism and channelized along sedimentary layers. Glacigenic sediments generally form a strong boundary for fluid flow in the very shallow section. However, we can recognize pockmarks not only at the seafloor but also at one subsurface layer approximately 50 m below sea floor indicating a former venting period in the SW Barents Sea. At few locations high

  12. Prediction of the ullage gas thermal stratification in a NASP vehicle propellant tank experimental simulation using FLOW-3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardy, Terry L.; Tomsik, Thomas M.

    1990-01-01

    As part of the National Aero-Space Plane (NASP) project, the multi-dimensional effects of gravitational force, initial tank pressure, initial ullage temperature, and heat transfer rate on the 2-D temperature profiles were studied. FLOW-3D, a commercial finite difference fluid flow model, was used for the evaluation. These effects were examined on the basis of previous liquid hydrogen experimental data with gaseous hydrogen pressurant. FLOW-3D results were compared against an existing 1-D model. In addition, the effects of mesh size and convergence criteria on the analytical results were investigated. Suggestions for future modifications and uses of FLOW-3D for modeling of a NASP tank are also presented.

  13. Heat Flow Partitioning Between Continents and Oceans - from 2D to 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moresi, L. N.; Cooper, C. M.; Lenardic, A.

    2010-12-01

    Scalings derived from thermal network theory explain how the presence of continents can influence the Earth’s overall heat loss. Intuitively, it may seem that increasing the proportion of a planet’s surface area covered by continents would decrease the efficiency of heat transfer given that continents do not participate in convective overturn. However, this ignores the potential feedback between the insulating effect of continents and the temperature-dependent viscosity of the mantle (Lenardic et al, 2005, Cooper et al, 2007). When this feedback is considered, a clear regime exists in which the partial stagnation and insulation of the surface by buoyant continental crust can lead to an increase in heat flow compared to the uninsulated case. The numerical results used to verify the scalings have mostly been conducted in two dimensions in order to cover a very wide range of Rayleigh number, fraction of continental coverage, and continental thickness. However as more recent results show that the configuration of the crust also plays a role in determining the heat flow partitioning and global heat flow (See Lenardic et al, “Continents, Super-Continents, Mantle Thermal Mixing, and Mantle Thermal Isolation” in this session), we have begun to repeat this exhaustive and exhausting 2D study in 3D. Cooper, C.M., A. Lenardic, and L.-N. Moresi "Effects of continental insulation and the partioning of heat producing elements on the Earth's heat loss." Geophys. Res. Lett., 33 ,10.1029, 2006. Lenardic, A., L.-N. Moresi, A.M. Jellinek, and M. Manga "Continental insulation, mantle cooling, and the surface area of oceans and continents." Earth Planet. Sci. Lett., 234 ,317-333, 2005.

  14. Quantitative imaging of turbulent and reacting flows

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, P.H.

    1993-12-01

    Quantitative digital imaging, using planar laser light scattering techniques is being developed for the analysis of turbulent and reacting flows. Quantitative image data, implying both a direct relation to flowfield variables as well as sufficient signal and spatial dynamic range, can be readily processed to yield two-dimensional distributions of flowfield scalars and in turn two-dimensional images of gradients and turbulence scales. Much of the development of imaging techniques to date has concentrated on understanding the requisite molecular spectroscopy and collision dynamics to be able to determine how flowfield variable information is encoded into the measured signal. From this standpoint the image is seen as a collection of single point measurements. The present effort aims at realizing necessary improvements in signal and spatial dynamic range, signal-to-noise ratio and spatial resolution in the imaging system as well as developing excitation/detection strategies which provide for a quantitative measure of particular flowfield scalars. The standard camera used for the study is an intensified CCD array operated in a conventional video format. The design of the system was based on detailed modeling of signal and image transfer properties of fast UV imaging lenses, image intensifiers and CCD detector arrays. While this system is suitable for direct scalar imaging, derived quantities (e.g. temperature or velocity images) require an exceptionally wide dynamic range imaging detector. To apply these diagnostics to reacting flows also requires a very fast shuttered camera. The authors have developed and successfully tested a new type of gated low-light level detector. This system relies on fast switching of proximity focused image-diode which is direct fiber-optic coupled to a cooled CCD array. Tests on this new detector show significant improvements in detection limit, dynamic range and spatial resolution as compared to microchannel plate intensified arrays.

  15. Borders of disorder: in turbulent channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malkus, Willem V. R.

    2003-08-01

    A quantitative theory of the average features of turbulent flow in a channel is described without the introduction of empirical parameters. The qualitative problem consists of maximizing the dissipation rate of the mean flow subject to the Rayleigh condition that the mean flow has no inflections. The quantitative features result from a boundary stability study which determines a smallest scale of motion in the transport of momentum. The velocity fields satisfying these conditions, the averaged equations and the boundary conditions uniquely determine an entire mean velocity profile at all Reynolds numbers within ten per cent of the data. The maximizing condition for the reproducibility of averages emerges from the Navier Stokes equations as a consequence of a novel definition of nonlinear instability. The smallest scale of motion results from a theory for a time-dependent re-stabilization of the boundary layer following a disruptive instability. Computer reassessment of the several asymptotic estimates of the critical boundary eigenstructure can establish the limits of validity of the quantitative results.

  16. Turbulence generation in homogeneous dilute particle- laden flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jeng-Horng

    Homogeneous turbulence generated by the motion of particles in dispersed multiphase flows was studied both theoretically and experimentally, motivated by applications to sprays, particle-laden jets, bubble plumes and rainstorms, among others. The experiments involved uniform fluxes of monodisperse spherical particles falling through a slow upflow of air. Particle fluxes and phase velocities were measured by sampling and phase-discriminating laser Doppler velocimetry (LDV), respectively. Measured particle velocities included mean and fluctuating streamwise and cross-stream velocities and probability density functions (PDF's). Measured continuous-phase velocities included mean and fluctuating streamwise and cross-stream velocities, PDF's and the higher moments of velocity fluctuations such as skewness and kurtosis, energy spectra of velocity fluctuations and integral length scales based on streamwise velocity fluctuations. Continuous-phase velocity measurements included conditional averages for particle wake disturbances and the turbulent inter-wake region surrounding these disturbances as well as overall flow properties. Present and earlier results in the literature provided particle Reynolds numbers of 38-990, particle volume fractions less than 0.01% and turbulence intensities (normalized by mean particle relative velocities) of 0.1-10.0%. Theory included characterization of particle wake disturbances as laminar-like turbulent wakes observed for intermediate particle Reynolds numbers in turbulent environments, characterization of the turbulent inter-wake region by analogy to grid-generated isotropic turbulence, and estimation of overall flow properties by conditional averaging of the properties of the wake disturbances and the turbulent inter-wake region. Present measurements showed that particle wake disturbances during turbulence generation were properly characterized by the properties of laminar-like turbulent wakes. The turbulent inter-wake region was

  17. Surface Flow and Turbulence in an Estuarine River Channel (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chickadel, C.; Talke, S. A.; Horner-Devine, A. R.; Jessup, A. T.

    2010-12-01

    Open channel flow, as in rivers and estuaries, produces turbulence at a range of scales and is due to flow over bathymetric features, obstructions, and rough bottoms, or from strongly sheared flow. This turbulence is often visible at the surface as eddies, boils, and surface deflections. Measurement and analysis of open channel turbulence including turbulent kinetic energy, Reynolds stress, and dissipation is critical to understanding mixing and transport, and is important for testing and constraining hydrodynamic models. In situ measurements of turbulence using current meters and scalar tracers are difficult to make and often lack the spatial resolution needed to assess complex flow patterns. A new generation of remote measurements based on thermal infrared (IR) imaging of the water surface is presented here, and has the benefits of high temporal and spatial resolution. Turbulence measurements are explored in a recent experiment in the Snohomish River estuary which has documented turbulent features in IR images of the surface flow. Specifically, the images show a range of rapidly evolving turbulent structures (boils, vortices and fronts) made evident by disruption of the thin skin layer of cool water by turbulent straining and upwelling. We examine thermal imaging data of surface turbulence collected from a nested set of cameras covering scales from millimeters to tens of meters. We show that infrared remote sensing reveals significant turbulent dissipation at the air-water interface. Results reveal that the spatial thermal patterns follow the expected Kolmogorov cascade of turbulent energy below O(1 m) scales even at the water surface, where vertical turbulent length scales are suppressed. Furthermore, application of particle imaging velocimetry (PIV) to IR video show variable surface flow patterns associated with individual coherent features such as erupting boils and eddies. We groundtruth both the spatial and velocity patterns from IR imagery against time

  18. Measurement of the Turbulence Kinetic Energy Budget of a Turbulent Planar Wake Flow in Pressure Gradients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Xiao-Feng; Thomas, Flint O.; Nelson, Robert C.

    2001-01-01

    Turbulence kinetic energy (TKE) is a very important quantity for turbulence modeling and the budget of this quantity in its transport equation can provide insight into the flow physics. Turbulence kinetic energy budget measurements were conducted for a symmetric turbulent wake flow subjected to constant zero, favorable and adverse pressure gradients in year-three of research effort. The purpose of this study is to clarify the flow physics issues underlying the demonstrated influence of pressure gradient on wake development and provide experimental support for turbulence modeling. To ensure the reliability of these notoriously difficult measurements, the experimental procedure was carefully designed on the basis of an uncertainty analysis. Four different approaches, based on an isotropic turbulence assumption, a locally axisymmetric homogeneous turbulence assumption, a semi-isotropy assumption and a forced balance of the TKE equation, were applied for the estimate of the dissipation term. The pressure transport term is obtained from a forced balance of the turbulence kinetic energy equation. This report will present the results of the turbulence kinetic energy budget measurement and discuss their implication on the development of strained turbulent wakes.

  19. Numerical simulation of 3D flow past a real-life marine hydrokinetic turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Seokkoo; Borazjani, Iman; Colby, Jonathan A.; Sotiropoulos, Fotis

    2012-04-01

    We simulate three-dimensional, turbulent flow past an axial-flow marine hydrokinetic (MHK) turbine mounted on the bed of a rectangular open channel by adapting a computational framework developed for carrying out high-resolution large-eddy simulation (LES) in arbitrarily complex domains involving moving or stationary boundaries. The complex turbine geometry, including the rotor and all stationary components, is handled by employing the curvilinear immersed boundary (CURVIB) method [1,2]. Velocity boundary conditions near all solid surfaces are reconstructed using a wall model based on solving the simplified boundary layer equations [2]. To demonstrate the capabilities of the model we apply it to simulate the flow past a Gen4 axial flow MHK turbine developed by Verdant Power for the Roosevelt Island Tidal Energy (RITE) project in the East River in New York City, USA. We carry out systematic grid refinement studies, using grids with up to 185 million nodes, for only the turbine rotor placed in an infinite free stream to show that the computed torque converges to a grid insensitive value, which is in good agreement with field measurements. We also carry out LES for the complete turbine configuration, including the pylon, nacelle and rotor, mounted on the bed of a straight rectangular open channel. The computed results illustrate the complexity of the flow and show that the power output of the complete turbine is primarily dependent on the rotor geometry and tip speed ratio, and is not affected by the stationary components of the turbine and the presence of the channel bed. The complete turbine simulation also reveals that the downstream wake of the turbine consists of three main regions: (1) the outer layer with the spiral blade tip vortices rotating in the same direction as the blades; (2) the counter-rotating inner layer surrounded by the spiral tip vortices; and (3) the core layer co-rotating with respect to the tip vortices. This study is the first to report the

  20. Turbulence Modeling of Non-equilibrium Flows Using Turbulent Body Force Potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hudong; Perot, Blair

    1998-11-01

    Results of a new turbulence model for non-equilibrium flow which is based on turbulent body force potentials are presented. Initial predictions of the model for basic turbulent flows produced promising results. This work concentrates on predicting more complex and realistic turbulent flows that are similar to the problems in design and manufacturing process. Three major cases are presented and the computational results are compared with existing experimental data and DNS data whenever possible. First, backwards-facing step flows at both high and low Reynolds numbers are investigated in order to evaluate the model's ability for correctly predicting separation and reattachment. Second, two adverse pressure gradient flows are analyzed, namely, the classic Samuel & Joubert flow and more severe case documented by Schubauer & Spangenberg. Finally, the performance of the model in predicting stagnation flows is evaluated by investigating planar and axisymmetric impinging jets. Comparisons show that model predictions match well with experimental data and DNS data. It is demonstrated that by introducing turbulent body force potentials this new non-equilibrium turbulence model is able to predict complex turbulent flows as well as Reynolds stress transport models with significant less computational cost and complexity.

  1. PDF methods for combustion in high-speed turbulent flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pope, Stephen B.

    1995-01-01

    This report describes the research performed during the second year of this three-year project. The ultimate objective of the project is extend the applicability of probability density function (pdf) methods from incompressible to compressible turbulent reactive flows. As described in subsequent sections, progress has been made on: (1) formulation and modelling of pdf equations for compressible turbulence, in both homogeneous and inhomogeneous inert flows; and (2) implementation of the compressible model in various flow configurations, namely decaying isotropic turbulence, homogeneous shear flow and plane mixing layer.

  2. Homogeneous turbulence subjected to mean flow with elliptic streamlines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blaisdell, G. A.; Shariff, K.

    1994-01-01

    Direct numerical simulations are performed for homogeneous turbulence with a mean flow having elliptic streamlines. This flow combines the effects of rotation and strain on the turbulence. Qualitative comparisons are made with linear theory for cases with high Rossby number. The nonlinear transfer process is monitored using a generalized skewness. In general, rotation turns off the nonlinear cascade; however, for moderate ellipticities and rotation rates the nonlinear cascade is turned off and then reestablished. Turbulence statistics of interest in turbulence modeling are calculated, including full Reynolds stress budgets.

  3. A method for reconstructing the PDF of a 3D turbulent density field from 2D observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunt, Christopher M.; Federrath, Christoph; Price, Daniel J.

    2010-06-01

    We introduce a method for calculating the probability density function (PDF) of a turbulent density field in three dimensions using only information contained in the projected two-dimensional column density field. We test the method by applying it to numerical simulations of hydrodynamic and magnetohydrodynamic turbulence in molecular clouds. To a good approximation, the PDF of log(normalized column density) is a compressed, shifted version of the PDF of log(normalized density). The degree of compression can be determined observationally from the column density power spectrum, under the assumption of statistical isotropy of the turbulence.

  4. Calculation of 3D turbulent jets in crossflow with a multigrid method and a second-moment closure model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demuren, A. O.

    1990-01-01

    A multigrid method is presented for calculating turbulent jets in crossflow. Fairly rapid convergence is obtained with the k-epsilon turbulence model, but computations with a full Reynolds stress turbulence model (RSM) are not yet very efficient. Grid dependency tests show that there are slight differences between results obtained on the two finest grid levels. Computations using the RSM are significantly different from those with k-epsilon model and compare better to experimental data. Some work is still required to improve the efficiency of the computations with the RSM.

  5. Using a magnetite/thermoplastic composite in 3D printing of direct replacements for commercially available flow sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leigh, S. J.; Purssell, C. P.; Billson, D. R.; Hutchins, D. A.

    2014-09-01

    Flow sensing is an essential technique required for a wide range of application environments ranging from liquid dispensing to utility monitoring. A number of different methodologies and deployment strategies have been devised to cover the diverse range of potential application areas. The ability to easily create new bespoke sensors for new applications is therefore of natural interest. Fused deposition modelling is a 3D printing technology based upon the fabrication of 3D structures in a layer-by-layer fashion using extruded strands of molten thermoplastic. The technology was developed in the late 1980s but has only recently come to more wide-scale attention outside of specialist applications and rapid prototyping due to the advent of low-cost 3D printing platforms such as the RepRap. Due to the relatively low-cost of the printers and feedstock materials, these printers are ideal candidates for wide-scale installation as localized manufacturing platforms to quickly produce replacement parts when components fail. One of the current limitations with the technology is the availability of functional printing materials to facilitate production of complex functional 3D objects and devices beyond mere concept prototypes. This paper presents the formulation of a simple magnetite nanoparticle-loaded thermoplastic composite and its incorporation into a 3D printed flow-sensor in order to mimic the function of a commercially available flow-sensing device. Using the multi-material printing capability of the 3D printer allows a much smaller amount of functional material to be used in comparison to the commercial flow sensor by only placing the material where it is specifically required. Analysis of the printed sensor also revealed a much more linear response to increasing flow rate of water showing that 3D printed devices have the potential to at least perform as well as a conventionally produced sensor.

  6. The spatio-temporal spectrum of turbulent flows.

    PubMed

    Clark di Leoni, P; Cobelli, P J; Mininni, P D

    2015-12-01

    Identification and extraction of vortical structures and of waves in a disorganised flow is a mayor challenge in the study of turbulence. We present a study of the spatio-temporal behavior of turbulent flows in the presence of different restitutive forces. We show how to compute and analyse the spatio-temporal spectrum from data stemming from numerical simulations and from laboratory experiments. Four cases are considered: homogeneous and isotropic turbulence, rotating turbulence, stratified turbulence, and water wave turbulence. For homogeneous and isotropic turbulence, the spectrum allows identification of sweeping by the large-scale flow. For rotating and for stratified turbulence, the spectrum allows identification of the waves, precise quantification of the energy in the waves and in the turbulent eddies, and identification of physical mechanisms such as Doppler shift and wave absorption in critical layers. Finally, in water wave turbulence the spectrum shows a transition from gravity-capillary waves to bound waves as the amplitude of the forcing is increased. PMID:26701711

  7. A numerical investigation of the 3-D flow in shell and tube heat exchangers

    SciTech Connect

    Prithiviraj, M.; Andrews, M.J.

    1996-12-31

    A three-dimensional computer program for simulation of the flow and heat transfer inside Shell and Tube Heat Exchangers has been developed. The simulation of shell and tube heat exchangers is based on a distributed resistance method that uses a modified two equation {kappa}-{epsilon} turbulence model along with non-equilibrium wall functions. Volume porosities and non-homogeneous surface permeabilities account for the obstructions due to the tubes and arbitrary arrangement of baffles. Sub-models are described for baffle-shell and baffle-tube leakage, shellside and tubeside heat transfer, with geometry generators for tubes, baffles, and nozzle inlets and outlets. The sub-models in HEATX use parameters that have not been altered from their published values. Computed heat transfer and pressure drop are compared with experimental data from the Delaware project (Bell, 1963). Numerically computed pressure drops are also compared for different baffle cuts, and different number of baffles with the experiments of Halle et al. (1984) which were performed in an industrial sized heat exchanger at Argonne National Labs. Discussion of the results is given with particular reference to global and local properties such as pressure drop, temperature variation, and heat transfer coefficients. Good agreement is obtained between the experiments and HEATX computations for the shellside pressure drop and outlet temperatures for the shellside and tubeside streams.

  8. Numerical simulation of turbulent flow in a cyclonic separator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogdanov, Dmitry; Poniaev, Sergey

    2014-12-01

    Numerical simulation of a turbulent flow of air with dispersed particles through a cyclonic separator is presented. Because of a high streamline curvature in the separator it is difficult to simulate the flow by using the conventional turbulent models. In this work the curvature correction term was included into the k - ω - SST turbulence model implemented in the OpenFOAM® software. Experimental data and results of numerical simulation by the commercial ANSYS Fluent® solver for a turbulent flow in a U-duct were used to validate the model. The numerical simulation of the flow in the cyclonic separator demonstrates that the implemented turbulence model successfully predicts the cyclonic separator efficiency.

  9. Applications of a new wall function to turbulent flow computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Y. S.

    1986-01-01

    A new wall function approach is developed based on a wall law suitable for incompressible turbulent boundary layers under strong adverse pressure gradients. This wall law was derived from a one-dimensional analysis of the turbulent kinetic energy equation with gradient diffusion concept employed in modeling the near-wall shear stress gradient. Numerical testing cases for the present wall functions include turbulent separating flows around an airfoil and turbulent recirculating flows in several confined regions. Improvements on the predictions using the present wall functions are illustrated. For cases of internal recirculating flows, one modification factor for improving the performance of the k-epsilon turbulence model in the flow recirculation regions is also included.

  10. Effects of flow control over a 3D turret -- Part II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, Ryan; Andino, Marlyn; Schmit, Ryan; Camphouse, Chris; Myatt, James; Glauser, Mark

    2007-11-01

    Building upon the 3D turret work done at Syracuse University an extended study was conducted in the Air Force Research Laboratory's Subsonic Aerodynamic Research Laboratory (SARL) wind tunnel at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base. The SARL experiments were performed at higher Reynolds and Mach numbers and therefore present a more complex, more challenging flow. Synthetic jets mounted upstream of the aperture were used to generate multiple actuation cases in order to provide a rich ensemble for plant model development based on the split POD method of Camphouse (2007). PIV velocity data was acquired along with simultaneous surface pressure data at various planes across the turret with and without open-loop control. In addition, a simple proportional closed-loop control was performed using the bandpass filtered first POD mode coefficient of the surface pressure as the feedback signal. The amplitude of the feedback signal was calibrated using the open-loop results which were the most effective in reducing the separation zone of the turret.

  11. A Quasi-3-D Theory for Impedance Eduction in Uniform Grazing Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, W. R.; Jones, M. G.; Parrott, T. L.

    2005-01-01

    A 2-D impedance eduction methodology is extended to quasi-3-D sound fields in uniform or shearing mean flow. We introduce a nonlocal, nonreflecting boundary condition to terminate the duct and then educe the impedance by minimizing an objective function. The introduction of a parallel, sparse, equation solver significantly reduces the wall clock time for educing the impedance when compared to that of the sequential band solver used in the 2-D methodology. The accuracy, efficiency, and robustness of the methodology is demonstrated using two examples. In the first example, we show that the method reproduces the known impedance of a ceramic tubular test liner. In the second example, we illustrate that the approach educes the impedance of a four-segment liner where the first, second, and fourth segments consist of a perforated face sheet bonded to honeycomb, and the third segment is a cut from the ceramic tubular test liner. The ability of the method to educe the impedances of multisegmented liners has the potential to significantly reduce the amount of time and cost required to determine the impedance of several uniform liners by allowing them to be placed in series in the test section and to educe the impedance of each segment using a single numerical experiment. Finally, we probe the objective function in great detail and show that it contains a single minimum. Thus, our objective function is ideal for use with local, inexpensive, gradient-based optimizers.

  12. A 3-D Vortex Code for Parachute Flow Predictions: VIPAR Version 1.0

    SciTech Connect

    STRICKLAND, JAMES H.; HOMICZ, GREGORY F.; PORTER, VICKI L.; GOSSLER, ALBERT A.

    2002-07-01

    This report describes a 3-D fluid mechanics code for predicting flow past bluff bodies whose surfaces can be assumed to be made up of shell elements that are simply connected. Version 1.0 of the VIPAR code (Vortex Inflation PARachute code) is described herein. This version contains several first order algorithms that we are in the process of replacing with higher order ones. These enhancements will appear in the next version of VIPAR. The present code contains a motion generator that can be used to produce a large class of rigid body motions. The present code has also been fully coupled to a structural dynamics code in which the geometry undergoes large time dependent deformations. Initial surface geometry is generated from triangular shell elements using a code such as Patran and is written into an ExodusII database file for subsequent input into VIPAR. Surface and wake variable information is output into two ExodusII files that can be post processed and viewed using software such as EnSight{trademark}.

  13. Thermocapillary bubble flow and coalescence in a rotating cylinder: A 3D study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alhendal, Yousuf; Turan, A.; Al-mazidi, M.

    2015-12-01

    The process of thermocapillary bubbles rising in a rotating 3D cylinder in zero gravity was analysed and presented numerically with the aid of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) by means of the volume of fluid (VOF) method. Calculations were carried out to investigate in detail the effect of the rotational speed of the hosted liquid on the trajectory of both single and group bubbles driven by the Marangoni force in zero-gravity conditions. For rotational speeds from 0.25 to 2 rad/s, bubble displacement with angular motion was found to be directed between the hotter surface and the rotational axis. This is contrary to the conventional bubble flow from areas of high pressure to low pressure, radial direction, or from cold to hot regions, axial direction. The results demonstrate that for the ratio of rotational speeds to the thermocapillary bubble velocity larger than unity, the surface tension gradient is the dominant force and the bubble motion towards the hotter. On the other hand, for ratio less than 1, the bubble motion is dominated and is significantly affected by centrifugal force. As rotation speed increases, the amount of deflection increases and the Marangoni effect vanishes. The current study is novel in the sense that single- and multi-bubble motion incorporating thermocapillary forces in a rotating liquid in a zero-gravity environment has never been numerically investigated.

  14. Permanganate oxidation of DNAPL in a large 3-D flow tank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, E.; Seol, Y.; Fang, Y. C.; Schwartz, F. W.

    2002-05-01

    Potassium permanganate (KMnO4), as a metal-oxo reagent, can attack a double carbon-carbon bond and therefore oxidize common chlorinated ethylenes, such as trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene (PCE). This feature of metal-oxo reagents facilitates the use of permanganate to remediation of chlorinated solvents in soil and groundwater. In this study, we evaluated the efficiency of TCE removal by permanganate oxidation in large three-dimensional flooding schemes. We constructed a large 3-D flow tank (L x W x D = 180 cm x 60 cm x 90 cm) where TCE source zone was installed in a saturated porous sandy medium. The tank was flushed at a flow rate of 51 L/day with permanganate solution (1,250 mg/L) for 63 days. Using chemical, electrical, and optical monitoring techniques we estimated temporal and areal variations in TCE, permanganate, MnO2 precipitates, conductivity, and chloride concentrations. TCE emplaced as DNAPL in a upstream source zone gradually moved downstream forming a TCE plume of about 120 cm long, 30 cm wide, and 55 cm deep. This TCE plume diminished considerably over time due to the in situ oxidation of the DNAPL. However, TCE was not completely destroyed and TCE concentration remained high (63 to 228 mg/L) in the shrunken TCE plume downstream after 63 days of permanganate flushing. Mass balance calculation indicated about 28% of TCE still remained in the system. This was attributed to the precipitation of low-permeability reaction by-product, i.e., MnO2, which caused flushing to become less efficient with time. Findings of this study are useful for developing a practical technique for enhancing the efficacy of the oxidative treatment of TCE using permanganate in the field conditions.

  15. Laminar/turbulent oscillating flow in circular pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Kyung H.; Ibrahim, Mounir B.

    1992-12-01

    A two-dimensional oscillating flow analysis was conducted simulating the gas flow inside Stirling engine heat exchangers. Both laminar and turbulent oscillating pipe flow were investigated numerically for Re(max) = 1920 (Va = 80), 10,800 (Va = 272), 19,300 (Va = 272), and 60,800 (Va = 126). The results are compared with experimental results of previous investigators. Predictions of the flow regime are also checked by comparing velocity amplitudes and phase difference with those from laminar theory and quasi-steady profile. A high Reynolds number k-epsilon turbulence model was used for turbulent oscillating pipe flow. Finally, the performance of the k-epsilon model was evaluated to explore the applicability of quasi-steady turbulent models to unsteady oscillating flow analysis.

  16. Transition to turbulence in plane channel flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biringen, S.; Goglia, G. L.

    1983-01-01

    A numerical simulation of the final stages of transition to turbulence in plane channel flow is reported. Three dimensional, incompressible Navier-Stokes equations are numerically integrated to obtain the time-evolution of two and three dimensional finite amplitude disturbances. Computations are performed on the CYBER-203 vector processor for a 32x51x32 grid. Results are presented for no-slip boundary conditions at the solid walls as well as for periodic suction-blowing to simulate active control of transition by mass transfer. Solutions indicate that the method is capable of simulating the complex character of vorticity dynamics during the various stages of transition and final breakdown. In particular, evidence points to the formation of a lambda-shape vortex and the subsequent system of horseshoe vortices inclined to the main flow direction as the main elements of transition. Calculations involving suction-blowing indicate that interference with a wave of suitable phase and amplitude reduces the disturbance growth rates.

  17. Transition to turbulence in plane channel flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biringen, S.

    1984-01-01

    Results obtained from a numerical simulation of the final stages of transition to turbulence in plane channel flow are described. Three dimensional, incompressible Navier-Stokes equations are numerically integrated to obtain the time evolution of two and three dimensional finite amplitude disturbances. Computations are performed on CYBER-203 vector processor for a 32x51x32 grid. Results are presented for no-slip boundary conditions at the solid walls as well as for periodic suction blowing to simulate active control of transition by mass transfer. Solutions indicate that the method is capable of simulating the complex character of vorticity dynamics during the various stages of transition and final breakdown. In particular, evidence points to the formation of a lambda-shape vortex and the subsequent system of horseshoe vortices inclined to the main flow direction as the main elements of transition. Calculations involving periodic suction-blowing indicate that interference with a wave of suitable phase and amplitude reduces the disturbance growth rates.

  18. Transition to turbulence in plane channel flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biringen, S.

    1984-02-01

    Results obtained from a numerical simulation of the final stages of transition to turbulence in plane channel flow are described. Three dimensional, incompressible Navier-Stokes equations are numerically integrated to obtain the time evolution of two and three dimensional finite amplitude disturbances. Computations are performed on CYBER-203 vector processor for a 32x51x32 grid. Results are presented for no-slip boundary conditions at the solid walls as well as for periodic suction blowing to simulate active control of transition by mass transfer. Solutions indicate that the method is capable of simulating the complex character of vorticity dynamics during the various stages of transition and final breakdown. In particular, evidence points to the formation of a lambda-shape vortex and the subsequent system of horseshoe vortices inclined to the main flow direction as the main elements of transition. Calculations involving periodic suction-blowing indicate that interference with a wave of suitable phase and amplitude reduces the disturbance growth rates.

  19. Transition to turbulence in plane channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biringen, S.; Goglia, G. L.

    1983-12-01

    A numerical simulation of the final stages of transition to turbulence in plane channel flow is reported. Three dimensional, incompressible Navier-Stokes equations are numerically integrated to obtain the time-evolution of two and three dimensional finite amplitude disturbances. Computations are performed on the CYBER-203 vector processor for a 32x51x32 grid. Results are presented for no-slip boundary conditions at the solid walls as well as for periodic suction-blowing to simulate active control of transition by mass transfer. Solutions indicate that the method is capable of simulating the complex character of vorticity dynamics during the various stages of transition and final breakdown. In particular, evidence points to the formation of a lambda-shape vortex and the subsequent system of horseshoe vortices inclined to the main flow direction as the main elements of transition. Calculations involving suction-blowing indicate that interference with a wave of suitable phase and amplitude reduces the disturbance growth rates.