Science.gov

Sample records for 3d ultrasound computer

  1. Glasses for 3D ultrasound computer tomography: phase compensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zapf, M.; Hopp, T.; Ruiter, N. V.

    2016-03-01

    Ultrasound Computer Tomography (USCT), developed at KIT, is a promising new imaging system for breast cancer diagnosis, and was successfully tested in a pilot study. The 3D USCT II prototype consists of several hundreds of ultrasound (US) transducers on a semi-ellipsoidal aperture. Spherical waves are sequentially emitted by individual transducers and received in parallel by many transducers. Reflectivity volumes are reconstructed by synthetic aperture focusing (SAFT). However, straight forward SAFT imaging leads to blurred images due to system imperfections. We present an extension of a previously proposed approach to enhance the images. This approach includes additional a priori information and system characteristics. Now spatial phase compensation was included. The approach was evaluated with a simulation and clinical data sets. An increase in the image quality was observed and quantitatively measured by SNR and other metrics.

  2. 3D ultrasound computer tomography: update from a clinical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopp, T.; Zapf, M.; Kretzek, E.; Henrich, J.; Tukalo, A.; Gemmeke, H.; Kaiser, C.; Knaudt, J.; Ruiter, N. V.

    2016-04-01

    Ultrasound Computer Tomography (USCT) is a promising new imaging method for breast cancer diagnosis. We developed a 3D USCT system and tested it in a pilot study with encouraging results: 3D USCT was able to depict two carcinomas, which were present in contrast enhanced MRI volumes serving as ground truth. To overcome severe differences in the breast shape, an image registration was applied. We analyzed the correlation between average sound speed in the breast and the breast density estimated from segmented MRIs and found a positive correlation with R=0.70. Based on the results of the pilot study we now carry out a successive clinical study with 200 patients. For this we integrated our reconstruction methods and image post-processing into a comprehensive workflow. It includes a dedicated DICOM viewer for interactive assessment of fused USCT images. A new preview mode now allows intuitive and faster patient positioning. We updated the USCT system to decrease the data acquisition time by approximately factor two and to increase the penetration depth of the breast into the USCT aperture by 1 cm. Furthermore the compute-intensive reflectivity reconstruction was considerably accelerated, now allowing a sub-millimeter volume reconstruction in approximately 16 minutes. The updates made it possible to successfully image first patients in our ongoing clinical study.

  3. [3-D ultrasound in gastroenterology].

    PubMed

    Zoller, W G; Liess, H

    1994-06-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) sonography represents a development of noninvasive diagnostic imaging by real-time two-dimensional (2D) sonography. The use of transparent rotating scans, comparable to a block of glass, generates a 3D effect. The objective of the present study was to optimate 3D presentation of abdominal findings. Additional investigations were made with a new volumetric program to determine the volume of selected findings of the liver. The results were compared with the estimated volumes of 2D sonography and 2D computer tomography (CT). For the processing of 3D images, typical parameter constellations were found for the different findings, which facilitated processing of 3D images. In more than 75% of the cases examined we found an optimal 3D presentation of sonographic findings with respect to the evaluation criteria developed by us for the 3D imaging of processed data. Great differences were found for the estimated volumes of the findings of the liver concerning the three different techniques applied. 3D ultrasound represents a valuable method to judge morphological appearance in abdominal findings. The possibility of volumetric measurements enlarges its potential diagnostic significance. Further clinical investigations are necessary to find out if definite differentiation between benign and malign findings is possible.

  4. Craniosynostosis: prenatal diagnosis by 2D/3D ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Helfer, Talita Micheletti; Peixoto, Alberto Borges; Tonni, Gabriele; Araujo Júnior, Edward

    2016-09-01

    Craniosynostosis is defined as the process of premature fusion of one or more of the cranial sutures. It is a common condition that occurs in about 1 to 2,000 live births. Craniosynostosis may be classified in primary or secondary. It is also classified as nonsyndromic or syndromic. According to suture commitment, craniosynostosis may affect a single suture or multiple sutures. There is a wide range of syndromes involving craniosynostosis and the most common are Apert, Pffeifer, Crouzon, Shaethre-Chotzen and Muenke syndromes. The underlying etiology of nonsyndromic craniosynostosis is unknown. Mutations in the fibroblast growth factor (FGF) signalling pathway play a crucial role in the etiology of craniosynostosis syndromes. Prenatal ultrasound`s detection rate of craniosynostosis is low. Nowadays, different methods can be applied for prenatal diagnosis of craniosynostosis, such as two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), computed tomography (CT) scan and, finally, molecular diagnosis. The presence of craniosynostosis may affect the birthing process. Fetuses with craniosynostosis also have higher rates of perinatal complications. In order to avoid the risks of untreated craniosynostosis, children are usually treated surgically soon after postnatal diagnosis. PMID:27622416

  5. Automated Computed Tomography-Ultrasound Cross-Modality 3-D Contouring Algorithm for Prostate.

    PubMed

    Ermacora, Denis; Pesente, Silvia; Pascoli, Francesco; Raducci, Sebastian; Mauro, Rudy; Rumeileh, Imad Abu; Verhaegen, Frank; Fontanarosa, Davide

    2015-10-01

    A novel fully automated algorithm is introduced for 3-D cross-modality image segmentation of the prostate, based on the simultaneous use of co-registered computed tomography (CT) and 3-D ultrasound (US) images. By use of a Gabor feature detector, the algorithm can outline in three dimensions and in cross-modality the prostate, and it can be trained and optimized on specific patient populations. We applied it to 16 prostate cancer patients and evaluated the conformity between the automatically segmented prostate contours and the contours manually outlined by an experienced physician, on the CT-US fusion, using the mean distance to conformity (MDC) index. When only the CT scans were used, the average MDC value was 4.5 ± 1.7 mm (maximum value = 9.0 mm). When the US scans also were considered, the mean ± standard deviation was reduced to 3.9 ± 0.7 mm (maximum value = 5.5 mm). The cross-modality approach acted on all the largest distance values, reducing them to acceptable discrepancies.

  6. A computational model for estimating tumor margins in complementary tactile and 3D ultrasound images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamsil, Arefin; Escoto, Abelardo; Naish, Michael D.; Patel, Rajni V.

    2016-03-01

    Conventional surgical methods are effective for treating lung tumors; however, they impose high trauma and pain to patients. Minimally invasive surgery is a safer alternative as smaller incisions are required to reach the lung; however, it is challenging due to inadequate intraoperative tumor localization. To address this issue, a mechatronic palpation device was developed that incorporates tactile and ultrasound sensors capable of acquiring surface and cross-sectional images of palpated tissue. Initial work focused on tactile image segmentation and fusion of position-tracked tactile images, resulting in a reconstruction of the palpated surface to compute the spatial locations of underlying tumors. This paper presents a computational model capable of analyzing orthogonally-paired tactile and ultrasound images to compute the surface circumference and depth margins of a tumor. The framework also integrates an error compensation technique and an algebraic model to align all of the image pairs and to estimate the tumor depths within the tracked thickness of a palpated tissue. For validation, an ex vivo experimental study was conducted involving the complete palpation of 11 porcine liver tissues injected with iodine-agar tumors of varying sizes and shapes. The resulting tactile and ultrasound images were then processed using the proposed model to compute the tumor margins and compare them to fluoroscopy based physical measurements. The results show a good negative correlation (r = -0.783, p = 0.004) between the tumor surface margins and a good positive correlation (r = 0.743, p = 0.009) between the tumor depth margins.

  7. Computer-generated 3D ultrasound images of the carotid artery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Selzer, Robert H.; Lee, Paul L.; Lai, June Y.; Frieden, Howard J.; Blankenhorn, David H.

    1989-01-01

    A method is under development to measure carotid artery lesions from a computer-generated three-dimensional ultrasound image. For each image, the position of the transducer in six coordinates (x, y, z, azimuth, elevation, and roll) is recorded and used to position each B-mode picture element in its proper spatial position in a three-dimensional memory array. After all B-mode images have been assembled in the memory, the three-dimensional image is filtered and resampled to produce a new series of parallel-plane two-dimensional images from which arterial boundaries are determined using edge tracking methods.

  8. Computer-generated 3D ultrasound images of the carotid artery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selzer, Robert H.; Lee, Paul L.; Lai, June Y.; Frieden, Howard J.; Blankenhorn, David H.

    A method is under development to measure carotid artery lesions from a computer-generated three-dimensional ultrasound image. For each image, the position of the transducer in six coordinates (x, y, z, azimuth, elevation, and roll) is recorded and used to position each B-mode picture element in its proper spatial position in a three-dimensional memory array. After all B-mode images have been assembled in the memory, the three-dimensional image is filtered and resampled to produce a new series of parallel-plane two-dimensional images from which arterial boundaries are determined using edge tracking methods.

  9. 3D ultrafast ultrasound imaging in vivo.

    PubMed

    Provost, Jean; Papadacci, Clement; Arango, Juan Esteban; Imbault, Marion; Fink, Mathias; Gennisson, Jean-Luc; Tanter, Mickael; Pernot, Mathieu

    2014-10-01

    Very high frame rate ultrasound imaging has recently allowed for the extension of the applications of echography to new fields of study such as the functional imaging of the brain, cardiac electrophysiology, and the quantitative imaging of the intrinsic mechanical properties of tumors, to name a few, non-invasively and in real time. In this study, we present the first implementation of Ultrafast Ultrasound Imaging in 3D based on the use of either diverging or plane waves emanating from a sparse virtual array located behind the probe. It achieves high contrast and resolution while maintaining imaging rates of thousands of volumes per second. A customized portable ultrasound system was developed to sample 1024 independent channels and to drive a 32  ×  32 matrix-array probe. Its ability to track in 3D transient phenomena occurring in the millisecond range within a single ultrafast acquisition was demonstrated for 3D Shear-Wave Imaging, 3D Ultrafast Doppler Imaging, and, finally, 3D Ultrafast combined Tissue and Flow Doppler Imaging. The propagation of shear waves was tracked in a phantom and used to characterize its stiffness. 3D Ultrafast Doppler was used to obtain 3D maps of Pulsed Doppler, Color Doppler, and Power Doppler quantities in a single acquisition and revealed, at thousands of volumes per second, the complex 3D flow patterns occurring in the ventricles of the human heart during an entire cardiac cycle, as well as the 3D in vivo interaction of blood flow and wall motion during the pulse wave in the carotid at the bifurcation. This study demonstrates the potential of 3D Ultrafast Ultrasound Imaging for the 3D mapping of stiffness, tissue motion, and flow in humans in vivo and promises new clinical applications of ultrasound with reduced intra--and inter-observer variability.

  10. 3D ultrafast ultrasound imaging in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Provost, Jean; Papadacci, Clement; Esteban Arango, Juan; Imbault, Marion; Fink, Mathias; Gennisson, Jean-Luc; Tanter, Mickael; Pernot, Mathieu

    2014-10-01

    Very high frame rate ultrasound imaging has recently allowed for the extension of the applications of echography to new fields of study such as the functional imaging of the brain, cardiac electrophysiology, and the quantitative imaging of the intrinsic mechanical properties of tumors, to name a few, non-invasively and in real time. In this study, we present the first implementation of Ultrafast Ultrasound Imaging in 3D based on the use of either diverging or plane waves emanating from a sparse virtual array located behind the probe. It achieves high contrast and resolution while maintaining imaging rates of thousands of volumes per second. A customized portable ultrasound system was developed to sample 1024 independent channels and to drive a 32  ×  32 matrix-array probe. Its ability to track in 3D transient phenomena occurring in the millisecond range within a single ultrafast acquisition was demonstrated for 3D Shear-Wave Imaging, 3D Ultrafast Doppler Imaging, and, finally, 3D Ultrafast combined Tissue and Flow Doppler Imaging. The propagation of shear waves was tracked in a phantom and used to characterize its stiffness. 3D Ultrafast Doppler was used to obtain 3D maps of Pulsed Doppler, Color Doppler, and Power Doppler quantities in a single acquisition and revealed, at thousands of volumes per second, the complex 3D flow patterns occurring in the ventricles of the human heart during an entire cardiac cycle, as well as the 3D in vivo interaction of blood flow and wall motion during the pulse wave in the carotid at the bifurcation. This study demonstrates the potential of 3D Ultrafast Ultrasound Imaging for the 3D mapping of stiffness, tissue motion, and flow in humans in vivo and promises new clinical applications of ultrasound with reduced intra—and inter-observer variability.

  11. 3D ultrafast ultrasound imaging in vivo.

    PubMed

    Provost, Jean; Papadacci, Clement; Arango, Juan Esteban; Imbault, Marion; Fink, Mathias; Gennisson, Jean-Luc; Tanter, Mickael; Pernot, Mathieu

    2014-10-01

    Very high frame rate ultrasound imaging has recently allowed for the extension of the applications of echography to new fields of study such as the functional imaging of the brain, cardiac electrophysiology, and the quantitative imaging of the intrinsic mechanical properties of tumors, to name a few, non-invasively and in real time. In this study, we present the first implementation of Ultrafast Ultrasound Imaging in 3D based on the use of either diverging or plane waves emanating from a sparse virtual array located behind the probe. It achieves high contrast and resolution while maintaining imaging rates of thousands of volumes per second. A customized portable ultrasound system was developed to sample 1024 independent channels and to drive a 32  ×  32 matrix-array probe. Its ability to track in 3D transient phenomena occurring in the millisecond range within a single ultrafast acquisition was demonstrated for 3D Shear-Wave Imaging, 3D Ultrafast Doppler Imaging, and, finally, 3D Ultrafast combined Tissue and Flow Doppler Imaging. The propagation of shear waves was tracked in a phantom and used to characterize its stiffness. 3D Ultrafast Doppler was used to obtain 3D maps of Pulsed Doppler, Color Doppler, and Power Doppler quantities in a single acquisition and revealed, at thousands of volumes per second, the complex 3D flow patterns occurring in the ventricles of the human heart during an entire cardiac cycle, as well as the 3D in vivo interaction of blood flow and wall motion during the pulse wave in the carotid at the bifurcation. This study demonstrates the potential of 3D Ultrafast Ultrasound Imaging for the 3D mapping of stiffness, tissue motion, and flow in humans in vivo and promises new clinical applications of ultrasound with reduced intra--and inter-observer variability. PMID:25207828

  12. 3D Ultrafast Ultrasound Imaging In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Provost, Jean; Papadacci, Clement; Arango, Juan Esteban; Imbault, Marion; Gennisson, Jean-Luc; Tanter, Mickael; Pernot, Mathieu

    2014-01-01

    Very high frame rate ultrasound imaging has recently allowed for the extension of the applications of echography to new fields of study such as the functional imaging of the brain, cardiac electrophysiology, and the quantitative real-time imaging of the intrinsic mechanical properties of tumors, to name a few, non-invasively and in real time. In this study, we present the first implementation of Ultrafast Ultrasound Imaging in three dimensions based on the use of either diverging or plane waves emanating from a sparse virtual array located behind the probe. It achieves high contrast and resolution while maintaining imaging rates of thousands of volumes per second. A customized portable ultrasound system was developed to sample 1024 independent channels and to drive a 32×32 matrix-array probe. Its capability to track in 3D transient phenomena occurring in the millisecond range within a single ultrafast acquisition was demonstrated for 3-D Shear-Wave Imaging, 3-D Ultrafast Doppler Imaging and finally 3D Ultrafast combined Tissue and Flow Doppler. The propagation of shear waves was tracked in a phantom and used to characterize its stiffness. 3-D Ultrafast Doppler was used to obtain 3-D maps of Pulsed Doppler, Color Doppler, and Power Doppler quantities in a single acquisition and revealed, for the first time, the complex 3-D flow patterns occurring in the ventricles of the human heart during an entire cardiac cycle, and the 3-D in vivo interaction of blood flow and wall motion during the pulse wave in the carotid at the bifurcation. This study demonstrates the potential of 3-D Ultrafast Ultrasound Imaging for the 3-D real-time mapping of stiffness, tissue motion, and flow in humans in vivo and promises new clinical applications of ultrasound with reduced intra- and inter-observer variability. PMID:25207828

  13. Computer-aided classification of liver tumors in 3D ultrasound images with combined deformable model segmentation and support vector machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Myungeun; Kim, Jong Hyo; Park, Moon Ho; Kim, Ye-Hoon; Seong, Yeong Kyeong; Cho, Baek Hwan; Woo, Kyoung-Gu

    2014-03-01

    In this study, we propose a computer-aided classification scheme of liver tumor in 3D ultrasound by using a combination of deformable model segmentation and support vector machine. For segmentation of tumors in 3D ultrasound images, a novel segmentation model was used which combined edge, region, and contour smoothness energies. Then four features were extracted from the segmented tumor including tumor edge, roundness, contrast, and internal texture. We used a support vector machine for the classification of features. The performance of the developed method was evaluated with a dataset of 79 cases including 20 cysts, 20 hemangiomas, and 39 hepatocellular carcinomas, as determined by the radiologist's visual scoring. Evaluation of the results showed that our proposed method produced tumor boundaries that were equal to or better than acceptable in 89.8% of cases, and achieved 93.7% accuracy in classification of cyst and hemangioma.

  14. A Longitudinal Study of Remodeling in a Revised Peripheral Artery Bypass Graft Using 3D Ultrasound Imaging and Computational Hemodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Leotta, Daniel F.; Beach, Kirk W.; Riley, James J.; Aliseda, Alberto

    2011-01-01

    We report a study of the role of hemodynamic shear stress in the remodeling and failure of a peripheral artery bypass graft. Three separate scans of a femoral to popliteal above-knee bypass graft were taken over the course of a 16 month period following a revision of the graft. The morphology of the lumen is reconstructed from data obtained by a custom 3D ultrasound system. Numerical simulations are performed with the patient-specific geometries and physiologically realistic flow rates. The ultrasound reconstructions reveal two significant areas of remodeling: a stenosis with over 85% reduction in area, which ultimately caused graft failure, and a poststenotic dilatation or widening of the lumen. Likewise, the simulations reveal a complicated hemodynamic environment within the graft. Preliminary comparisons with in vivo velocimetry also showed qualitative agreement with the flow dynamics observed in the simulations. Two distinct flow features are discerned and are hypothesized to directly initiate the observed in vivo remodeling. First, a flow separation occurs at the stenosis. A low shear recirculation region subsequently develops distal to the stenosis. The low shear region is thought to be conducive to smooth muscle cell proliferation and intimal growth. A poststenotic jet issues from the stenosis and subsequently impinges onto the lumen wall. The lumen dilation is thought to be a direct result of the high shear stress and high frequency pressure fluctuations associated with the jet impingement. PMID:21428682

  15. [An integrated segmentation method for 3D ultrasound carotid artery].

    PubMed

    Yang, Xin; Wu, Huihui; Liu, Yang; Xu, Hongwei; Liang, Huageng; Cai, Wenjuan; Fang, Mengjie; Wang, Yujie

    2013-07-01

    An integrated segmentation method for 3D ultrasound carotid artery was proposed. 3D ultrasound image was sliced into transverse, coronal and sagittal 2D images on the carotid bifurcation point. Then, the three images were processed respectively, and the carotid artery contours and thickness were obtained finally. This paper tries to overcome the disadvantages of current computer aided diagnosis method, such as high computational complexity, easily introduced subjective errors et al. The proposed method could get the carotid artery overall information rapidly, accurately and completely. It could be transplanted into clinical usage for atherosclerosis diagnosis and prevention. PMID:24195385

  16. MMSE Reconstruction for 3D Freehand Ultrasound Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wei; Zheng, Yibin

    2008-01-01

    The reconstruction of 3D ultrasound (US) images from mechanically registered, but otherwise irregularly positioned, B-scan slices is of great interest in image guided therapy procedures. Conventional 3D ultrasound algorithms have low computational complexity, but the reconstructed volume suffers from severe speckle contamination. Furthermore, the current method cannot reconstruct uniform high-resolution data from several low-resolution B-scans. In this paper, the minimum mean-squared error (MMSE) method is applied to 3D ultrasound reconstruction. Data redundancies due to overlapping samples as well as correlation of the target and speckle are naturally accounted for in the MMSE reconstruction algorithm. Thus, the reconstruction process unifies the interpolation and spatial compounding. Simulation results for synthetic US images are presented to demonstrate the excellent reconstruction. PMID:18382623

  17. Chest wall segmentation in automated 3D breast ultrasound scans.

    PubMed

    Tan, Tao; Platel, Bram; Mann, Ritse M; Huisman, Henkjan; Karssemeijer, Nico

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, we present an automatic method to segment the chest wall in automated 3D breast ultrasound images. Determining the location of the chest wall in automated 3D breast ultrasound images is necessary in computer-aided detection systems to remove automatically detected cancer candidates beyond the chest wall and it can be of great help for inter- and intra-modal image registration. We show that the visible part of the chest wall in an automated 3D breast ultrasound image can be accurately modeled by a cylinder. We fit the surface of our cylinder model to a set of automatically detected rib-surface points. The detection of the rib-surface points is done by a classifier using features representing local image intensity patterns and presence of rib shadows. Due to attenuation of the ultrasound signal, a clear shadow is visible behind the ribs. Evaluation of our segmentation method is done by computing the distance of manually annotated rib points to the surface of the automatically detected chest wall. We examined the performance on images obtained with the two most common 3D breast ultrasound devices in the market. In a dataset of 142 images, the average mean distance of the annotated points to the segmented chest wall was 5.59 ± 3.08 mm.

  18. Automatic 3D lesion segmentation on breast ultrasound images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Hsien-Chi; Giger, Maryellen L.; Reiser, Ingrid; Drukker, Karen; Edwards, Alexandra; Sennett, Charlene A.

    2013-02-01

    Automatically acquired and reconstructed 3D breast ultrasound images allow radiologists to detect and evaluate breast lesions in 3D. However, assessing potential cancers in 3D ultrasound can be difficult and time consuming. In this study, we evaluate a 3D lesion segmentation method, which we had previously developed for breast CT, and investigate its robustness on lesions on 3D breast ultrasound images. Our dataset includes 98 3D breast ultrasound images obtained on an ABUS system from 55 patients containing 64 cancers. Cancers depicted on 54 US images had been clinically interpreted as negative on screening mammography and 44 had been clinically visible on mammography. All were from women with breast density BI-RADS 3 or 4. Tumor centers and margins were indicated and outlined by radiologists. Initial RGI-eroded contours were automatically calculated and served as input to the active contour segmentation algorithm yielding the final lesion contour. Tumor segmentation was evaluated by determining the overlap ratio (OR) between computer-determined and manually-drawn outlines. Resulting average overlap ratios on coronal, transverse, and sagittal views were 0.60 +/- 0.17, 0.57 +/- 0.18, and 0.58 +/- 0.17, respectively. All OR values were significantly higher the 0.4, which is deemed "acceptable". Within the groups of mammogram-negative and mammogram-positive cancers, the overlap ratios were 0.63 +/- 0.17 and 0.56 +/- 0.16, respectively, on the coronal views; with similar results on the other views. The segmentation performance was not found to be correlated to tumor size. Results indicate robustness of the 3D lesion segmentation technique in multi-modality 3D breast imaging.

  19. Investigation and optimization of a finite element simulation of transducer array systems for 3D ultrasound computer tomography with respect to electrical impedance characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohout, B.; Pirinen, J.; Ruiter, N. V.

    2012-03-01

    The established standard screening method to detect breast cancer is X-ray mammography. However X-ray mammography often has low contrast for tumors located within glandular tissue. A new approach is 3D Ultrasound Computer Tomography (USCT), which is expected to detect small tumors at an early stage. This paper describes the development, improvement and the results of Finite Element Method (FEM) simulations of the Transducer Array System (TAS) used in our 3D USCT. The focus of this work is on researching the influence of meshing and material parameters on the electrical impedance curves. Thereafter, these findings are used to optimize the simulation model. The quality of the simulation was evaluated by comparing simulated impedance characteristics with measured data of the real TAS. The resulting FEM simulation model is a powerful tool to analyze and optimize transducer array systems applied for USCT. With this simulation model, the behavior of TAS for different geometry modifications was researched. It provides a means to understand the acoustical performances inside of any ultrasound transducer represented by its electrical impedance characteristic.

  20. 3D ultrasound imaging for prosthesis fabrication and diagnostic imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Morimoto, A.K.; Bow, W.J.; Strong, D.S.

    1995-06-01

    The fabrication of a prosthetic socket for a below-the-knee amputee requires knowledge of the underlying bone structure in order to provide pressure relief for sensitive areas and support for load bearing areas. The goal is to enable the residual limb to bear pressure with greater ease and utility. Conventional methods of prosthesis fabrication are based on limited knowledge about the patient`s underlying bone structure. A 3D ultrasound imaging system was developed at Sandia National Laboratories. The imaging system provides information about the location of the bones in the residual limb along with the shape of the skin surface. Computer assisted design (CAD) software can use this data to design prosthetic sockets for amputees. Ultrasound was selected as the imaging modality. A computer model was developed to analyze the effect of the various scanning parameters and to assist in the design of the overall system. The 3D ultrasound imaging system combines off-the-shelf technology for image capturing, custom hardware, and control and image processing software to generate two types of image data -- volumetric and planar. Both volumetric and planar images reveal definition of skin and bone geometry with planar images providing details on muscle fascial planes, muscle/fat interfaces, and blood vessel definition. The 3D ultrasound imaging system was tested on 9 unilateral below-the- knee amputees. Image data was acquired from both the sound limb and the residual limb. The imaging system was operated in both volumetric and planar formats. An x-ray CT (Computed Tomography) scan was performed on each amputee for comparison. Results of the test indicate beneficial use of ultrasound to generate databases for fabrication of prostheses at a lower cost and with better initial fit as compared to manually fabricated prostheses.

  1. A 3-D finite-element model for computation of temperature profiles and regions of thermal damage during focused ultrasound surgery exposures.

    PubMed

    Meaney, P M; Clarke, R L; ter Haar, G R; Rivens, I H

    1998-11-01

    Although there have been numerous models implemented for modeling thermal diffusion effects during focused ultrasound surgery (FUS), most have limited themselves to representing simple situations for which analytical solutions and the use of cylindrical geometries sufficed. For modeling single lesion formation and the heating patterns from a single exposure, good results were achieved in comparison with experimental results for predicting lesion size, shape and location. However, these types of approaches are insufficient when considering the heating of multiple sites with FUS exposures when the time interval between exposures is short. In such cases, the heat dissipation patterns from initial exposures in the lesion array formation can play a significant role in the heating patterns for later exposures. Understanding the effects of adjacent lesion formation, such as this, requires a three-dimensional (3-D) representation of the bioheat equation. Thus, we have developed a 3-D finite-element representation for modeling the thermal diffusion effects during FUS exposures in clinically relevant tissue volumes. The strength of this approach over past methods is its ability to represent arbitrarily shaped 3-D situations. Initial simulations have allowed calculation of the temperature distribution as a function of time for adjacent FUS exposures in excised bovine liver, with the individually computed point temperatures comparing favorably with published measurements. In addition to modeling these temperature distributions, the model was implemented in conjunction with an algorithm for calculating the thermal dose as a way of predicting lesion shape. Although used extensively in conventional hyperthermia applications, this thermal dose criterion has only been applied in a limited number of simulations in FUS for comparison with experimental measurements. In this study, simulations were run for focal depths 2 and 3 cm below the surface of pig's liver, using multiple

  2. Breast tumour visualization using 3D quantitative ultrasound methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gangeh, Mehrdad J.; Raheem, Abdul; Tadayyon, Hadi; Liu, Simon; Hadizad, Farnoosh; Czarnota, Gregory J.

    2016-04-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most common cancer types accounting for 29% of all cancer cases. Early detection and treatment has a crucial impact on improving the survival of affected patients. Ultrasound (US) is non-ionizing, portable, inexpensive, and real-time imaging modality for screening and quantifying breast cancer. Due to these attractive attributes, the last decade has witnessed many studies on using quantitative ultrasound (QUS) methods in tissue characterization. However, these studies have mainly been limited to 2-D QUS methods using hand-held US (HHUS) scanners. With the availability of automated breast ultrasound (ABUS) technology, this study is the first to develop 3-D QUS methods for the ABUS visualization of breast tumours. Using an ABUS system, unlike the manual 2-D HHUS device, the whole patient's breast was scanned in an automated manner. The acquired frames were subsequently examined and a region of interest (ROI) was selected in each frame where tumour was identified. Standard 2-D QUS methods were used to compute spectral and backscatter coefficient (BSC) parametric maps on the selected ROIs. Next, the computed 2-D parameters were mapped to a Cartesian 3-D space, interpolated, and rendered to provide a transparent color-coded visualization of the entire breast tumour. Such 3-D visualization can potentially be used for further analysis of the breast tumours in terms of their size and extension. Moreover, the 3-D volumetric scans can be used for tissue characterization and the categorization of breast tumours as benign or malignant by quantifying the computed parametric maps over the whole tumour volume.

  3. 3D Reconstruction of Chick Embryo Vascular Geometries Using Non-invasive High-Frequency Ultrasound for Computational Fluid Dynamics Studies.

    PubMed

    Tan, Germaine Xin Yi; Jamil, Muhammad; Tee, Nicole Gui Zhen; Zhong, Liang; Yap, Choon Hwai

    2015-11-01

    Recent animal studies have provided evidence that prenatal blood flow fluid mechanics may play a role in the pathogenesis of congenital cardiovascular malformations. To further these researches, it is important to have an imaging technique for small animal embryos with sufficient resolution to support computational fluid dynamics studies, and that is also non-invasive and non-destructive to allow for subject-specific, longitudinal studies. In the current study, we developed such a technique, based on ultrasound biomicroscopy scans on chick embryos. Our technique included a motion cancelation algorithm to negate embryonic body motion, a temporal averaging algorithm to differentiate blood spaces from tissue spaces, and 3D reconstruction of blood volumes in the embryo. The accuracy of the reconstructed models was validated with direct stereoscopic measurements. A computational fluid dynamics simulation was performed to model fluid flow in the generated construct of a Hamburger-Hamilton (HH) stage 27 embryo. Simulation results showed that there were divergent streamlines and a low shear region at the carotid duct, which may be linked to the carotid duct's eventual regression and disappearance by HH stage 34. We show that our technique has sufficient resolution to produce accurate geometries for computational fluid dynamics simulations to quantify embryonic cardiovascular fluid mechanics.

  4. Image fusion of Ultrasound Computer Tomography volumes with X-ray mammograms using a biomechanical model based 2D/3D registration.

    PubMed

    Hopp, T; Duric, N; Ruiter, N V

    2015-03-01

    Ultrasound Computer Tomography (USCT) is a promising breast imaging modality under development. Comparison to a standard method like mammography is essential for further development. Due to significant differences in image dimensionality and compression state of the breast, correlating USCT images and X-ray mammograms is challenging. In this paper we present a 2D/3D registration method to improve the spatial correspondence and allow direct comparison of the images. It is based on biomechanical modeling of the breast and simulation of the mammographic compression. We investigate the effect of including patient-specific material parameters estimated automatically from USCT images. The method was systematically evaluated using numerical phantoms and in-vivo data. The average registration accuracy using the automated registration was 11.9mm. Based on the registered images a method for analysis of the diagnostic value of the USCT images was developed and initially applied to analyze sound speed and attenuation images based on X-ray mammograms as ground truth. Combining sound speed and attenuation allows differentiating lesions from surrounding tissue. Overlaying this information on mammograms, combines quantitative and morphological information for multimodal diagnosis. PMID:25456144

  5. 3D segmentation and reconstruction of endobronchial ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zang, Xiaonan; Breslav, Mikhail; Higgins, William E.

    2013-03-01

    State-of-the-art practice for lung-cancer staging bronchoscopy often draws upon a combination of endobronchial ultrasound (EBUS) and multidetector computed-tomography (MDCT) imaging. While EBUS offers real-time in vivo imaging of suspicious lesions and lymph nodes, its low signal-to-noise ratio and tendency to exhibit missing region-of-interest (ROI) boundaries complicate diagnostic tasks. Furthermore, past efforts did not incorporate automated analysis of EBUS images and a subsequent fusion of the EBUS and MDCT data. To address these issues, we propose near real-time automated methods for three-dimensional (3D) EBUS segmentation and reconstruction that generate a 3D ROI model along with ROI measurements. Results derived from phantom data and lung-cancer patients show the promise of the methods. In addition, we present a preliminary image-guided intervention (IGI) system example, whereby EBUS imagery is registered to a patient's MDCT chest scan.

  6. A method for the calibration of 3D ultrasound transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hastenteufel, Mark; Mottl-Link, Sibylle; Wolf, Ivo; de Simone, Raffaele; Meinzer, Hans-Peter

    2003-05-01

    Background: Three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound has a great potential in medical diagnostics. However, there are also some limitations of 3D ultrasound, e.g., in some situations morphology cannot be imaged accurately due to acoustical shadows. Acquiring 3D datasets from multiple positions can overcome some of these limitations. Prior to that a calibration of the ultrasound probe is necessary. Most calibration methods descibed rely on two-dimensional data. We describe a calibration method that uses 3D data. Methods: We have developed a 3D calibration method based on single-point cross-wire calibration using registration techniques for automatic detection of cross centers. For the calibration a cross consisting of three orthogonal wires is imaged. A model-to-image registration method is used to determine the cross center. Results: Due to the use of 3D data less acquisitions and no special protocols are necessary. The influence of noise is reduced. By means of the registration method the time-consuming steps of image plane alignment and manual cross center determination becomes dispensable. Conclusion: A 3D calibration method for ultrasound transducers is described. The calibration method is the base to extend state-of-the-art 3D ultrasound devices, i.e., to acquire multiple 3D, either morphological or functional (Doppler), datasets.

  7. 3D Computations and Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Couch, R; Faux, D; Goto, D; Nikkel, D

    2004-04-05

    This project consists of two activities. Task A, Simulations and Measurements, combines all the material model development and associated numerical work with the materials-oriented experimental activities. The goal of this effort is to provide an improved understanding of dynamic material properties and to provide accurate numerical representations of those properties for use in analysis codes. Task B, ALE3D Development, involves general development activities in the ALE3D code with the focus of improving simulation capabilities for problems of mutual interest to DoD and DOE. Emphasis is on problems involving multi-phase flow, blast loading of structures and system safety/vulnerability studies.

  8. Influence of ultrasound power on acoustic streaming and micro-bubbles formations in a low frequency sono-reactor: mathematical and 3D computational simulation.

    PubMed

    Sajjadi, Baharak; Raman, Abdul Aziz Abdul; Ibrahim, Shaliza

    2015-05-01

    This paper aims at investigating the influence of ultrasound power amplitude on liquid behaviour in a low-frequency (24 kHz) sono-reactor. Three types of analysis were employed: (i) mechanical analysis of micro-bubbles formation and their activities/characteristics using mathematical modelling. (ii) Numerical analysis of acoustic streaming, fluid flow pattern, volume fraction of micro-bubbles and turbulence using 3D CFD simulation. (iii) Practical analysis of fluid flow pattern and acoustic streaming under ultrasound irradiation using Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV). In mathematical modelling, a lone micro bubble generated under power ultrasound irradiation was mechanistically analysed. Its characteristics were illustrated as a function of bubble radius, internal temperature and pressure (hot spot conditions) and oscillation (pulsation) velocity. The results showed that ultrasound power significantly affected the conditions of hotspots and bubbles oscillation velocity. From the CFD results, it was observed that the total volume of the micro-bubbles increased by about 4.95% with each 100 W-increase in power amplitude. Furthermore, velocity of acoustic streaming increased from 29 to 119 cm/s as power increased, which was in good agreement with the PIV analysis.

  9. Detection of Curved Robots using 3D Ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Ren, Hongliang; Vasilyev, Nikolay V; Dupont, Pierre E

    2011-09-25

    Three-dimensional ultrasound can be an effective imaging modality for image-guided interventions since it enables visualization of both the instruments and the tissue. For robotic applications, its realtime frame rates create the potential for image-based instrument tracking and servoing. These capabilities can enable improved instrument visualization, compensation for tissue motion as well as surgical task automation. Continuum robots, whose shape comprises a smooth curve along their length, are well suited for minimally invasive procedures. Existing techniques for ultrasound tracking, however, are limited to straight, laparoscopic-type instruments and thus are not applicable to continuum robot tracking. Toward the goal of developing tracking algorithms for continuum robots, this paper presents a method for detecting a robot comprised of a single constant curvature in a 3D ultrasound volume. Computational efficiency is achieved by decomposing the six-dimensional circle estimation problem into two sequential three-dimensional estimation problems. Simulation and experiment are used to evaluate the proposed method. PMID:22229110

  10. Detection of Curved Robots using 3D Ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Ren, Hongliang; Vasilyev, Nikolay V; Dupont, Pierre E

    2011-09-25

    Three-dimensional ultrasound can be an effective imaging modality for image-guided interventions since it enables visualization of both the instruments and the tissue. For robotic applications, its realtime frame rates create the potential for image-based instrument tracking and servoing. These capabilities can enable improved instrument visualization, compensation for tissue motion as well as surgical task automation. Continuum robots, whose shape comprises a smooth curve along their length, are well suited for minimally invasive procedures. Existing techniques for ultrasound tracking, however, are limited to straight, laparoscopic-type instruments and thus are not applicable to continuum robot tracking. Toward the goal of developing tracking algorithms for continuum robots, this paper presents a method for detecting a robot comprised of a single constant curvature in a 3D ultrasound volume. Computational efficiency is achieved by decomposing the six-dimensional circle estimation problem into two sequential three-dimensional estimation problems. Simulation and experiment are used to evaluate the proposed method.

  11. Breast tumor angiogenesis analysis using 3D power Doppler ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Ruey-Feng; Huang, Sheng-Fang; Lee, Yu-Hau; Chen, Dar-Ren; Moon, Woo Kyung

    2006-03-01

    Angiogenesis is the process that correlates to tumor growth, invasion, and metastasis. Breast cancer angiogenesis has been the most extensively studied and now serves as a paradigm for understanding the biology of angiogenesis and its effects on tumor outcome and patient prognosis. Most studies on characterization of angiogenesis focus on pixel/voxel counts more than morphological analysis. Nevertheless, in cancer, the blood flow is greatly affected by the morphological changes, such as the number of vessels, branching pattern, length, and diameter. This paper presents a computer-aided diagnostic (CAD) system that can quantify vascular morphology using 3-D power Doppler ultrasound (US) on breast tumors. We propose a scheme to extract the morphological information from angiography and to relate them to tumor diagnosis outcome. At first, a 3-D thinning algorithm helps narrow down the vessels into their skeletons. The measurements of vascular morphology significantly rely on the traversing of the vascular trees produced from skeletons. Our study of 3-D assessment of vascular morphological features regards vessel count, length, bifurcation, and diameter of vessels. Investigations into 221 solid breast tumors including 110 benign and 111 malignant cases, the p values using the Student's t-test for all features are less than 0.05 indicating that the proposed features are deemed statistically significant. Our scheme focuses on the vascular architecture without involving the technique of tumor segmentation. The results show that the proposed method is feasible, and have a good agreement with the diagnosis of the pathologists.

  12. Linear tracking for 3-D medical ultrasound imaging.

    PubMed

    Huang, Qing-Hua; Yang, Zhao; Hu, Wei; Jin, Lian-Wen; Wei, Gang; Li, Xuelong

    2013-12-01

    As the clinical application grows, there is a rapid technical development of 3-D ultrasound imaging. Compared with 2-D ultrasound imaging, 3-D ultrasound imaging can provide improved qualitative and quantitative information for various clinical applications. In this paper, we proposed a novel tracking method for a freehand 3-D ultrasound imaging system with improved portability, reduced degree of freedom, and cost. We designed a sliding track with a linear position sensor attached, and it transmitted positional data via a wireless communication module based on Bluetooth, resulting in a wireless spatial tracking modality. A traditional 2-D ultrasound probe fixed to the position sensor on the sliding track was used to obtain real-time B-scans, and the positions of the B-scans were simultaneously acquired when moving the probe along the track in a freehand manner. In the experiments, the proposed method was applied to ultrasound phantoms and real human tissues. The results demonstrated that the new system outperformed a previously developed freehand system based on a traditional six-degree-of-freedom spatial sensor in phantom and in vivo studies, indicating its merit in clinical applications for human tissues and organs. PMID:23757592

  13. Intelligent speckle reducing anisotropic diffusion algorithm for automated 3-D ultrasound images.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jun; Wang, Yuanyuan; Yu, Jinhua; Shi, Xinling; Zhang, Junhua; Chen, Yue; Pang, Yun

    2015-02-01

    A novel 3-D filtering method is presented for speckle reduction and detail preservation in automated 3-D ultrasound images. First, texture features of an image are analyzed by using the improved quadtree (QT) decomposition. Then, the optimal homogeneous and the obvious heterogeneous regions are selected from QT decomposition results. Finally, diffusion parameters and diffusion process are automatically decided based on the properties of these two selected regions. The computing time needed for 2-D speckle reduction is very short. However, the computing time required for 3-D speckle reduction is often hundreds of times longer than 2-D speckle reduction. This may limit its potential application in practice. Because this new filter can adaptively adjust the time step of iteration, the computation time is reduced effectively. Both synthetic and real 3-D ultrasound images are used to evaluate the proposed filter. It is shown that this filter is superior to other methods in both practicality and efficiency. PMID:26366596

  14. The Application of Ultrasound in 3D Bio-Printing.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yufeng

    2016-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) bioprinting is an emerging and promising technology in tissue engineering to construct tissues and organs for implantation. Alignment of self-assembly cell spheroids that are used as bioink could be very accurate after droplet ejection from bioprinter. Complex and heterogeneous tissue structures could be built using rapid additive manufacture technology and multiple cell lines. Effective vascularization in the engineered tissue samples is critical in any clinical application. In this review paper, the current technologies and processing steps (such as printing, preparation of bioink, cross-linking, tissue fusion and maturation) in 3D bio-printing are introduced, and their specifications are compared with each other. In addition, the application of ultrasound in this novel field is also introduced. Cells experience acoustic radiation force in ultrasound standing wave field (USWF) and then accumulate at the pressure node at low acoustic pressure. Formation of cell spheroids by this method is within minutes with uniform size and homogeneous cell distribution. Neovessel formation from USWF-induced endothelial cell spheroids is significant. Low-intensity ultrasound could enhance the proliferation and differentiation of stem cells. Its use is at low cost and compatible with current bioreactor. In summary, ultrasound application in 3D bio-printing may solve some challenges and enhance the outcomes. PMID:27164066

  15. The Application of Ultrasound in 3D Bio-Printing.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yufeng

    2016-05-05

    Three-dimensional (3D) bioprinting is an emerging and promising technology in tissue engineering to construct tissues and organs for implantation. Alignment of self-assembly cell spheroids that are used as bioink could be very accurate after droplet ejection from bioprinter. Complex and heterogeneous tissue structures could be built using rapid additive manufacture technology and multiple cell lines. Effective vascularization in the engineered tissue samples is critical in any clinical application. In this review paper, the current technologies and processing steps (such as printing, preparation of bioink, cross-linking, tissue fusion and maturation) in 3D bio-printing are introduced, and their specifications are compared with each other. In addition, the application of ultrasound in this novel field is also introduced. Cells experience acoustic radiation force in ultrasound standing wave field (USWF) and then accumulate at the pressure node at low acoustic pressure. Formation of cell spheroids by this method is within minutes with uniform size and homogeneous cell distribution. Neovessel formation from USWF-induced endothelial cell spheroids is significant. Low-intensity ultrasound could enhance the proliferation and differentiation of stem cells. Its use is at low cost and compatible with current bioreactor. In summary, ultrasound application in 3D bio-printing may solve some challenges and enhance the outcomes.

  16. Fast and Accurate Data Extraction for Near Real-Time Registration of 3-D Ultrasound and Computed Tomography in Orthopedic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Brounstein, Anna; Hacihaliloglu, Ilker; Guy, Pierre; Hodgson, Antony; Abugharbieh, Rafeef

    2015-12-01

    Automatic, accurate and real-time registration is an important step in providing effective guidance and successful anatomic restoration in ultrasound (US)-based computer assisted orthopedic surgery. We propose a method in which local phase-based bone surfaces, extracted from intra-operative US data, are registered to pre-operatively segmented computed tomography data. Extracted bone surfaces are downsampled and reinforced with high curvature features. A novel hierarchical simplification algorithm is used to further optimize the point clouds. The final point clouds are represented as Gaussian mixture models and iteratively matched by minimizing the dissimilarity between them using an L2 metric. For 44 clinical data sets from 25 pelvic fracture patients and 49 phantom data sets, we report mean surface registration accuracies of 0.31 and 0.77 mm, respectively, with an average registration time of 1.41 s. Our results suggest the viability and potential of the chosen method for real-time intra-operative registration in orthopedic surgery.

  17. Fast and Accurate Data Extraction for Near Real-Time Registration of 3-D Ultrasound and Computed Tomography in Orthopedic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Brounstein, Anna; Hacihaliloglu, Ilker; Guy, Pierre; Hodgson, Antony; Abugharbieh, Rafeef

    2015-12-01

    Automatic, accurate and real-time registration is an important step in providing effective guidance and successful anatomic restoration in ultrasound (US)-based computer assisted orthopedic surgery. We propose a method in which local phase-based bone surfaces, extracted from intra-operative US data, are registered to pre-operatively segmented computed tomography data. Extracted bone surfaces are downsampled and reinforced with high curvature features. A novel hierarchical simplification algorithm is used to further optimize the point clouds. The final point clouds are represented as Gaussian mixture models and iteratively matched by minimizing the dissimilarity between them using an L2 metric. For 44 clinical data sets from 25 pelvic fracture patients and 49 phantom data sets, we report mean surface registration accuracies of 0.31 and 0.77 mm, respectively, with an average registration time of 1.41 s. Our results suggest the viability and potential of the chosen method for real-time intra-operative registration in orthopedic surgery. PMID:26365924

  18. Reduction of attenuation effects in 3D transrectal ultrasound images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frimmel, Hans; Acosta, Oscar; Fenster, Aaron; Ourselin, Sébastien

    2007-03-01

    Ultrasound (US) is one of the most used imaging modalities today as it is cheap, reliable, safe and widely available. There are a number of issues with US images in general. Besides reflections which is the basis of ultrasonic imaging, other phenomena such as diffraction, refraction, attenuation, dispersion and scattering appear when ultrasound propagates through different tissues. The generated images are therefore corrupted by false boundaries, lack of signal for surface tangential to ultrasound propagation, large amount of noise giving rise to local properties, and anisotropic sampling space complicating image processing tasks. Although 3D Transrectal US (TRUS) probes are not yet widely available, within a few years they will likely be introduced in hospitals. Therefore, the improvement of automatic segmentation from 3D TRUS images, making the process independent of human factor is desirable. We introduce an algorithm for attenuation correction, reducing enhancement/shadowing effects and average attenuation effects in 3D US images, taking into account the physical properties of US. The parameters of acquisition such as logarithmic correction are unknown, therefore no additional information is available to restore the image. As the physical properties are related to the direction of each US ray, the 3D US data set is resampled into cylindrical coordinates using a fully automatic algorithm. Enhancement and shadowing effects, as well as average attenuation effects, are then removed with a rescaling process optimizing simultaneously in and perpendicular to the US ray direction. A set of tests using anisotropic diffusion are performed to illustrate the improvement in image quality, where well defined structures are visible. The evolution of both the entropy and the contrast show that our algorithm is a suitable pre-processing step for segmentation tasks.

  19. Automatic multimodal 2D/3D image fusion of ultrasound computer tomography and x-ray mammography for breast cancer diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopp, Torsten; Duric, Neb; Ruiter, Nicole V.

    2012-03-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women. The established screening method to detect breast cancer in an early state is X-ray mammography. However, X-ray frequently provides limited contrast of tumors located within glandular tissue. A new imaging approach is Ultrasound Computer Tomography generating threedimensional volumes of the breast. Three different images are available: reflectivity, attenuation and speed of sound. The correlation of USCT volumes with X-ray mammograms is of interest for evaluation of the new imaging modality as well as for a multimodal diagnosis. Yet, both modalities differ in image dimensionality, patient positioning and deformation state of the breast. In earlier work we proposed a methodology based on Finite Element Method to register speed of sound images with the according mammogram. In this work, we enhanced the methodology to register all three image types provided by USCT. Furthermore, the methodology is now completely automated using image similarity measures to estimate rotations in datasets. A fusion methodology is proposed which combines the information of the three USCT image types with the X-ray mammogram via semitransparent overlay images. The evaluation was done using 13 datasets from a clinical study. The registration accuracy was measured by the displacement of the center of a lesion marked in both modalities. Using the automated rotation estimation, a mean displacement of 10.4 mm was achieved. Due to the clinically relevant registration accuracy, the methodology provides a basis for evaluation of the new imaging device USCT as well as for multimodal diagnosis.

  20. Refraction Correction in 3D Transcranial Ultrasound Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Lindsey, Brooks D.; Smith, Stephen W.

    2014-01-01

    We present the first correction of refraction in three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound imaging using an iterative approach that traces propagation paths through a two-layer planar tissue model, applying Snell’s law in 3D. This approach is applied to real-time 3D transcranial ultrasound imaging by precomputing delays offline for several skull thicknesses, allowing the user to switch between three sets of delays for phased array imaging at the push of a button. Simulations indicate that refraction correction may be expected to increase sensitivity, reduce beam steering errors, and partially restore lost spatial resolution, with the greatest improvements occurring at the largest steering angles. Distorted images of cylindrical lesions were created by imaging through an acrylic plate in a tissue-mimicking phantom. As a result of correcting for refraction, lesions were restored to 93.6% of their original diameter in the lateral direction and 98.1% of their original shape along the long axis of the cylinders. In imaging two healthy volunteers, the mean brightness increased by 8.3% and showed no spatial dependency. PMID:24275538

  1. Mechanically assisted 3D prostate ultrasound imaging and biopsy needle-guidance system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bax, Jeffrey; Williams, Jackie; Cool, Derek; Gardi, Lori; Montreuil, Jacques; Karnik, Vaishali; Sherebrin, Shi; Romagnoli, Cesare; Fenster, Aaron

    2010-02-01

    Prostate biopsy procedures are currently limited to using 2D transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) imaging to guide the biopsy needle. Being limited to 2D causes ambiguity in needle guidance and provides an insufficient record to allow guidance to the same suspicious locations or avoid regions that are negative during previous biopsy sessions. We have developed a mechanically assisted 3D ultrasound imaging and needle tracking system, which supports a commercially available TRUS probe and integrated needle guide for prostate biopsy. The mechanical device is fixed to a cart and the mechanical tracking linkage allows its joints to be manually manipulated while fully supporting the weight of the ultrasound probe. The computer interface is provided in order to track the needle trajectory and display its path on a corresponding 3D TRUS image, allowing the physician to aim the needle-guide at predefined targets within the prostate. The system has been designed for use with several end-fired transducers that can be rotated about the longitudinal axis of the probe in order to generate 3D image for 3D navigation. Using the system, 3D TRUS prostate images can be generated in approximately 10 seconds. The system reduces most of the user variability from conventional hand-held probes, which make them unsuitable for precision biopsy, while preserving some of the user familiarity and procedural workflow. In this paper, we describe the 3D TRUS guided biopsy system and report on the initial clinical use of this system for prostate biopsy.

  2. Mechanically assisted 3D ultrasound guided prostate biopsy system.

    PubMed

    Bax, Jeffrey; Cool, Derek; Gardi, Lori; Knight, Kerry; Smith, David; Montreuil, Jacques; Sherebrin, Shi; Romagnoli, Cesare; Fenster, Aaron

    2008-12-01

    There are currently limitations associated with the prostate biopsy procedure, which is the most commonly used method for a definitive diagnosis of prostate cancer. With the use of two-dimensional (2D) transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) for needle-guidance in this procedure, the physician has restricted anatomical reference points for guiding the needle to target sites. Further, any motion of the physician's hand during the procedure may cause the prostate to move or deform to a prohibitive extent. These variations make it difficult to establish a consistent reference frame for guiding a needle. We have developed a 3D navigation system for prostate biopsy, which addresses these shortcomings. This system is composed of a 3D US imaging subsystem and a passive mechanical arm to minimize prostate motion. To validate our prototype, a series of experiments were performed on prostate phantoms. The 3D scan of the string phantom produced minimal geometric distortions, and the geometric error of the 3D imaging subsystem was 0.37 mm. The accuracy of 3D prostate segmentation was determined by comparing the known volume in a certified phantom to a reconstructed volume generated by our system and was shown to estimate the volume with less then 5% error. Biopsy needle guidance accuracy tests in agar prostate phantoms showed that the mean error was 2.1 mm and the 3D location of the biopsy core was recorded with a mean error of 1.8 mm. In this paper, we describe the mechanical design and validation of the prototype system using an in vitro prostate phantom. Preliminary results from an ongoing clinical trial show that prostate motion is small with an in-plane displacement of less than 1 mm during the biopsy procedure.

  3. Density-tapered spiral arrays for ultrasound 3-D imaging.

    PubMed

    Ramalli, Alessandro; Boni, Enrico; Savoia, Alessandro Stuart; Tortoli, Piero

    2015-08-01

    The current high interest in 3-D ultrasound imaging is pushing the development of 2-D probes with a challenging number of active elements. The most popular approach to limit this number is the sparse array technique, which designs the array layout by means of complex optimization algorithms. These algorithms are typically constrained by a few steering conditions, and, as such, cannot guarantee uniform side-lobe performance at all angles. The performance may be improved by the ungridded extensions of the sparse array technique, but this result is achieved at the expense of a further complication of the optimization process. In this paper, a method to design the layout of large circular arrays with a limited number of elements according to Fermat's spiral seeds and spatial density modulation is proposed and shown to be suitable for application to 3-D ultrasound imaging. This deterministic, aperiodic, and balanced positioning procedure attempts to guarantee uniform performance over a wide range of steering angles. The capabilities of the method are demonstrated by simulating and comparing the performance of spiral and dense arrays. A good trade-off for small vessel imaging is found, e.g., in the 60λ spiral array with 1.0λ elements and Blackman density tapering window. Here, the grating lobe level is -16 dB, the lateral resolution is lower than 6λ the depth of field is 120λ and, the average contrast is 10.3 dB, while the sensitivity remains in a 5 dB range for a wide selection of steering angles. The simulation results may represent a reference guide to the design of spiral sparse array probes for different application fields. PMID:26285181

  4. [Computer-assisted 3D phonetography].

    PubMed

    Neuschaefer-Rube, C; Klajman, S

    1996-10-01

    Profiles of fundamental frequency sound pressure levels and voice duration are measured separately in clinical practice. It was the aim of the present study to combine the two examinations, in order to estimate the relationship between pitch, sound pressure level and voice duration and to develop a new computer-assisted graph. A three-dimensional (3D) wireframe phonogram was constructed based on SPL profiles to obtain a general view of the parameters recorded. We have termed this "phonetography". Variable further projections were selected for the analysis of different aspects of parametric relationships. The results in 21 healthy volunteers and 4 patients with hyperfunctional dysphonias demonstrated that there were three typical figures of the 3D phonograms produced, depending on the relationship between voice duration when soft ("piano") compared to loud ("forte"). In one-third of the healthy volunteers, the values of the piano voice duration were greater than those of forte for almost all pitches examined. In two-thirds of the healthy subjects the values of forte voice duration were partly greater, as were those of piano voice duration. All of the patients showed voice duration values greater for forte than for piano. The results of the study demonstrate that the 3D phonogram is a useful tool for obtaining new insights into various relationships of voice parameters.

  5. A navigation system for flexible endoscopes using abdominal 3D ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, R.; Kaar, M.; Bathia, Amon; Bathia, Amar; Lampret, A.; Birkfellner, W.; Hummel, J.; Figl, M.

    2014-09-01

    A navigation system for flexible endoscopes equipped with ultrasound (US) scan heads is presented. In contrast to similar systems, abdominal 3D-US is used for image fusion of the pre-interventional computed tomography (CT) to the endoscopic US. A 3D-US scan, tracked with an optical tracking system (OTS), is taken pre-operatively together with the CT scan. The CT is calibrated using the OTS, providing the transformation from CT to 3D-US. Immediately before intervention a 3D-US tracked with an electromagnetic tracking system (EMTS) is acquired and registered intra-modal to the preoperative 3D-US. The endoscopic US is calibrated using the EMTS and registered to the pre-operative CT by an intra-modal 3D-US/3D-US registration. Phantom studies showed a registration error for the US to CT registration of 5.1 mm ± 2.8 mm. 3D-US/3D-US registration of patient data gave an error of 4.1 mm compared to 2.8 mm with the phantom. From this we estimate an error on patient experiments of 5.6 mm.

  6. Compensation of log-compressed images for 3-D ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Sanches, João M; Marques, Jorge S

    2003-02-01

    In this study, a Bayesian approach was used for 3-D reconstruction in the presence of multiplicative noise and nonlinear compression of the ultrasound (US) data. Ultrasound images are often considered as being corrupted by multiplicative noise (speckle). Several statistical models have been developed to represent the US data. However, commercial US equipment performs a nonlinear image compression that reduces the dynamic range of the US signal for visualization purposes. This operation changes the distribution of the image pixels, preventing a straightforward application of the models. In this paper, the nonlinear compression is explicitly modeled and considered in the reconstruction process, where the speckle noise present in the radio frequency (RF) US data is modeled with a Rayleigh distribution. The results obtained by considering the compression of the US data are then compared with those obtained assuming no compression. It is shown that the estimation performed using the nonlinear log-compression model leads to better results than those obtained with the Rayleigh reconstruction method. The proposed algorithm is tested with synthetic and real data and the results are discussed. The results have shown an improvement in the reconstruction results when the compression operation is included in the image formation model, leading to sharper images with enhanced anatomical details.

  7. A 3D reconstruction solution to ultrasound Joule heat density tomography based on acousto-electric effect: a simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, R.; Song, A.; Li, X. D.; Lu, Y.; Yan, R.; Xu, B.; Li, X.

    2014-10-01

    A 3D reconstruction solution to ultrasound Joule heat density tomography based on acousto-electric effect by deconvolution is proposed for noninvasive imaging of biological tissue. Compared with ultrasound current source density imaging, ultrasound Joule heat density tomography doesn't require any priori knowledge of conductivity distribution and lead fields, so it can gain better imaging result, more adaptive to environment and with wider application scope. For a general 3D volume conductor with broadly distributed current density field, in the AE equation the ultrasound pressure can't simply be separated from the 3D integration, so it is not a common modulation and basebanding (heterodyning) method is no longer suitable to separate Joule heat density from the AE signals. In the proposed method the measurement signal is viewed as the output of Joule heat density convolving with ultrasound wave. As a result, the internal 3D Joule heat density can be reconstructed by means of Wiener deconvolution. A series of computer simulations set for breast cancer imaging applications, with consideration of ultrasound beam diameter, noise level, conductivity contrast, position dependency and size of simulated tumors, have been conducted to evaluate the feasibility and performance of the proposed reconstruction method. The computer simulation results demonstrate that high spatial resolution 3D ultrasound Joule heat density imaging is feasible using the proposed method, and it has potential applications to breast cancer detection and imaging of other organs.

  8. Quantification of carotid arteries atherosclerosis using 3D ultrasound images and area-preserving flattened maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, Bernard; Egger, Micaela; Spence, J. David; Parraga, Grace; Fenster, Aaron

    2008-03-01

    Quantitative measurements of the progression (or regression) of carotid plaque burden are important in monitoring patients and evaluating new treatment options. 3D ultrasound (US) has been used to monitor the progression of carotid artery plaques in symptomatic and asymptomatic patients. Different methods of measuring various ultrasound phenotypes of atherosclerosis have been developed. In this work, we extended concepts used in intima-media thickness (IMT) measurements based on 2D images and introduced a metric called 3D vessel-wall-plus-plaque thickness (3D VWT), which was obtained by computing the distance between the carotid wall and lumen surfaces on a point-by-point basis in a 3D image of the carotid arteries. The VWT measurements were then superimposed on the arterial wall to produce the VWT map. Since the progression of plaque thickness is important in monitoring patients who are at risk for stroke, we also computed the change of VWT by comparing the VWT maps obtained for a patient at two different time points. In order to facilitate the visualization and interpretation of the 3D VWT and VWT-Change maps, we proposed a technique to flatten these maps in an area-preserving manner.

  9. METHODS FOR USING 3-D ULTRASOUND SPECKLE TRACKING IN BIAXIAL MECHANICAL TESTING OF BIOLOGICAL TISSUE SAMPLES

    PubMed Central

    Yap, Choon Hwai; Park, Dae Woo; Dutta, Debaditya; Simon, Marc; Kim, Kang

    2014-01-01

    Being multilayered and anisotropic, biological tissues such as cardiac and arterial walls are structurally complex, making full assessment and understanding of their mechanical behavior challenging. Current standard mechanical testing uses surface markers to track tissue deformations and does not provide deformation data below the surface. In the study described here, we found that combining mechanical testing with 3-D ultrasound speckle tracking could overcome this limitation. Rat myocardium was tested with a biaxial tester and was concurrently scanned with high-frequency ultrasound in three dimensions. The strain energy function was computed from stresses and strains using an iterative non-linear curve-fitting algorithm. Because the strain energy function consists of terms for the base matrix and for embedded fibers, spatially varying fiber orientation was also computed by curve fitting. Using finite-element simulations, we first validated the accuracy of the non-linear curve-fitting algorithm. Next, we compared experimentally measured rat myocardium strain energy function values with those in the literature and found a matching order of magnitude. Finally, we retained samples after the experiments for fiber orientation quantification using histology and found that the results satisfactorily matched those computed in the experiments. We conclude that 3-D ultrasound speckle tracking can be a useful addition to traditional mechanical testing of biological tissues and may provide the benefit of enabling fiber orientation computation. PMID:25616585

  10. Registration of Real-Time 3-D Ultrasound to Tomographic Images of the Abdominal Aorta.

    PubMed

    Brekken, Reidar; Iversen, Daniel Høyer; Tangen, Geir Arne; Dahl, Torbjørn

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop an image-based method for registration of real-time 3-D ultrasound to computed tomography (CT) of the abdominal aorta, targeting future use in ultrasound-guided endovascular intervention. We proposed a method in which a surface model of the aortic wall was segmented from CT, and the approximate initial location of this model relative to the ultrasound volume was manually indicated. The model was iteratively transformed to automatically optimize correspondence to the ultrasound data. Feasibility was studied using data from a silicon phantom and in vivo data from a volunteer with previously acquired CT. Through visual evaluation, the ultrasound and CT data were seen to correspond well after registration. Both aortic lumen and branching arteries were well aligned. The processing was done offline, and the registration took approximately 0.2 s per ultrasound volume. The results encourage further patient studies to investigate accuracy, robustness and clinical value of the approach. PMID:27156015

  11. Preliminary results in large bone segmentation from 3D freehand ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fanti, Zian; Torres, Fabian; Arámbula Cosío, Fernando

    2013-11-01

    Computer Assisted Orthopedic Surgery (CAOS) requires a correct registration between the patient in the operating room and the virtual models representing the patient in the computer. In order to increase the precision and accuracy of the registration a set of new techniques that eliminated the need to use fiducial markers have been developed. The majority of these newly developed registration systems are based on costly intraoperative imaging systems like Computed Tomography (CT scan) or Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). An alternative to these methods is the use of an Ultrasound (US) imaging system for the implementation of a more cost efficient intraoperative registration solution. In order to develop the registration solution with the US imaging system, the bone surface is segmented in both preoperative and intraoperative images, and the registration is done using the acquire surface. In this paper, we present the a preliminary results of a new approach to segment bone surface from ultrasound volumes acquired by means 3D freehand ultrasound. The method is based on the enhancement of the voxels that belongs to surface and its posterior segmentation. The enhancement process is based on the information provided by eigenanalisis of the multiscale 3D Hessian matrix. The preliminary results shows that from the enhance volume the final bone surfaces can be extracted using a singular value thresholding.

  12. Development of a Wireless and Near Real-Time 3D Ultrasound Strain Imaging System.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhaohong; Chen, Yongdong; Huang, Qinghua

    2016-04-01

    Ultrasound elastography is an important medical imaging tool for characterization of lesions. In this paper, we present a wireless and near real-time 3D ultrasound strain imaging system. It uses a 3D translating device to control a commercial linear ultrasound transducer to collect pre-compression and post-compression radio-frequency (RF) echo signal frames. The RF frames are wirelessly transferred to a high-performance server via a local area network (LAN). A dynamic programming strain estimation algorithm is implemented with the compute unified device architecture (CUDA) on the graphic processing unit (GPU) in the server to calculate the strain image after receiving a pre-compression RF frame and a post-compression RF frame at the same position. Each strain image is inserted into a strain volume which can be rendered in near real-time. We take full advantage of the translating device to precisely control the probe movement and compression. The GPU-based parallel computing techniques are designed to reduce the computation time. Phantom and in vivo experimental results demonstrate that our system can generate strain volumes with good quality and display an incrementally reconstructed volume image in near real-time. PMID:26954841

  13. Computing Radiative Transfer in a 3D Medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Von Allmen, Paul; Lee, Seungwon

    2012-01-01

    A package of software computes the time-dependent propagation of a narrow laser beam in an arbitrary three- dimensional (3D) medium with absorption and scattering, using the transient-discrete-ordinates method and a direct integration method. Unlike prior software that utilizes a Monte Carlo method, this software enables simulation at very small signal-to-noise ratios. The ability to simulate propagation of a narrow laser beam in a 3D medium is an improvement over other discrete-ordinate software. Unlike other direct-integration software, this software is not limited to simulation of propagation of thermal radiation with broad angular spread in three dimensions or of a laser pulse with narrow angular spread in two dimensions. Uses for this software include (1) computing scattering of a pulsed laser beam on a material having given elastic scattering and absorption profiles, and (2) evaluating concepts for laser-based instruments for sensing oceanic turbulence and related measurements of oceanic mixed-layer depths. With suitable augmentation, this software could be used to compute radiative transfer in ultrasound imaging in biological tissues, radiative transfer in the upper Earth crust for oil exploration, and propagation of laser pulses in telecommunication applications.

  14. Automated 3D whole-breast ultrasound imaging: results of a clinical pilot study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leproux, Anaïs; van Beek, Michiel; de Vries, Ute; Wasser, Martin; Bakker, Leon; Cuisenaire, Olivier; van der Mark, Martin; Entrekin, Rob

    2010-03-01

    We present the first clinical results of a novel fully automated 3D breast ultrasound system. This system was designed to match a Philips diffuse optical mammography system to enable straightforward coregistration of optical and ultrasound images. During a measurement, three 3D transducers scan the breast at 4 different views. The resulting 12 datasets are registered together into a single volume using spatial compounding. In a pilot study, benign and malignant masses could be identified in the 3D images, however lesion visibility is less compared to conventional breast ultrasound. Clear breast shape visualization suggests that ultrasound could support the reconstruction and interpretation of diffuse optical tomography images.

  15. Accuracy assessment of high frequency 3D ultrasound for digital impression-taking of prepared teeth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heger, Stefan; Vollborn, Thorsten; Tinschert, Joachim; Wolfart, Stefan; Radermacher, Klaus

    2013-03-01

    Silicone based impression-taking of prepared teeth followed by plaster casting is well-established but potentially less reliable, error-prone and inefficient, particularly in combination with emerging techniques like computer aided design and manufacturing (CAD/CAM) of dental prosthesis. Intra-oral optical scanners for digital impression-taking have been introduced but until now some drawbacks still exist. Because optical waves can hardly penetrate liquids or soft-tissues, sub-gingival preparations still need to be uncovered invasively prior to scanning. High frequency ultrasound (HFUS) based micro-scanning has been recently investigated as an alternative to optical intra-oral scanning. Ultrasound is less sensitive against oral fluids and in principal able to penetrate gingiva without invasively exposing of sub-gingival preparations. Nevertheless, spatial resolution as well as digitization accuracy of an ultrasound based micro-scanning system remains a critical parameter because the ultrasound wavelength in water-like media such as gingiva is typically smaller than that of optical waves. In this contribution, the in-vitro accuracy of ultrasound based micro-scanning for tooth geometry reconstruction is being investigated and compared to its extra-oral optical counterpart. In order to increase the spatial resolution of the system, 2nd harmonic frequencies from a mechanically driven focused single element transducer were separated and corresponding 3D surface models were calculated for both fundamentals and 2nd harmonics. Measurements on phantoms, model teeth and human teeth were carried out for evaluation of spatial resolution and surface detection accuracy. Comparison of optical and ultrasound digital impression taking indicate that, in terms of accuracy, ultrasound based tooth digitization can be an alternative for optical impression-taking.

  16. PET-directed, 3D Ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Fei, Baowei; Nieh, Peter T; Schuster, David M; Master, Viraj A

    2013-01-01

    Multimodatity imaging is a promising approach for improving prostate cancer detection and diagnosis. This article describes various concepts in PET-directed, ultrasound-guided biopsies and highlights a new PET/ultrasound fusion targeted biopsy system for prostate cancer detection. PMID:25392702

  17. Benchmarking of state-of-the-art needle detection algorithms in 3D ultrasound data volumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pourtaherian, Arash; Zinger, Svitlana; de With, Peter H. N.; Korsten, Hendrikus H. M.; Mihajlovic, Nenad

    2015-03-01

    Ultrasound-guided needle interventions are widely practiced in medical diagnostics and therapy, i.e. for biopsy guidance, regional anesthesia or for brachytherapy. Needle guidance using 2D ultrasound can be very challenging due to the poor needle visibility and the limited field of view. Since 3D ultrasound transducers are becoming more widely used, needle guidance can be improved and simplified with appropriate computer-aided analyses. In this paper, we compare two state-of-the-art 3D needle detection techniques: a technique based on line filtering from literature and a system employing Gabor transformation. Both algorithms utilize supervised classification to pre-select candidate needle voxels in the volume and then fit a model of the needle on the selected voxels. The major differences between the two approaches are in extracting the feature vectors for classification and selecting the criterion for fitting. We evaluate the performance of the two techniques using manually-annotated ground truth in several ex-vivo situations of different complexities, containing three different needle types with various insertion angles. This extensive evaluation provides better understanding on the limitations and advantages of each technique under different acquisition conditions, which is leading to the development of improved techniques for more reliable and accurate localization. Benchmarking results that the Gabor features are better capable of distinguishing the needle voxels in all datasets. Moreover, it is shown that the complete processing chain of the Gabor-based method outperforms the line filtering in accuracy and stability of the detection results.

  18. 3D visualization of strain in abdominal aortic aneurysms based on navigated ultrasound imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brekken, Reidar; Kaspersen, Jon Harald; Tangen, Geir Arne; Dahl, Torbjørn; Hernes, Toril A. N.; Myhre, Hans Olav

    2007-03-01

    The criterion for recommending treatment of an abdominal aortic aneurysm is that the diameter exceeds 50-55 mm or shows a rapid increase. Our hypothesis is that a more accurate prediction of aneurysm rupture is obtained by estimating arterial wall strain from patient specific measurements. Measuring strain in specific parts of the aneurysm reveals differences in load or tissue properties. We have previously presented a method for in vivo estimation of circumferential strain by ultrasound. In the present work, a position sensor attached to the ultrasound probe was used for combining several 2D ultrasound sectors into a 3D model. The ultrasound was registered to a computed-tomography scan (CT), and the strain values were mapped onto a model segmented from these CT data. This gave an intuitive coupling between anatomy and strain, which may benefit both data acquisition and the interpretation of strain. In addition to potentially provide information relevant for assessing the rupture risk of the aneurysm in itself, this model could be used for validating simulations of fluid-structure interactions. Further, the measurements could be integrated with the simulations in order to increase the amount of patient specific information, thus producing a more reliable and accurate model of the biomechanics of the individual aneurysm. This approach makes it possible to extract several parameters potentially relevant for predicting rupture risk, and may therefore extend the basis for clinical decision making.

  19. Measuring Femoral Torsion In Vivo Using Freehand 3-D Ultrasound Imaging.

    PubMed

    Passmore, Elyse; Pandy, Marcus G; Graham, H Kerr; Sangeux, Morgan

    2016-02-01

    Despite variation in bone geometry, muscle and joint function is often investigated using generic musculoskeletal models. Patient-specific bone geometry can be obtained from computerised tomography, which involves ionising radiation, or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which is costly and time consuming. Freehand 3-D ultrasound provides an alternative to obtain bony geometry. The purpose of this study was to determine the accuracy and repeatability of 3-D ultrasound in measuring femoral torsion. Measurements of femoral torsion were performed on 10 healthy adults using MRI and 3-D ultrasound. Measurements of femoral torsion from 3-D ultrasound were, on average, smaller than those from MRI (mean difference = 1.8°; 95% confidence interval: -3.9°, 7.5°). MRI and 3-D ultrasound had Bland and Altman repeatability coefficients of 3.1° and 3.7°, respectively. Accurate measurements of femoral torsion were obtained with 3-D ultrasound offering the potential to acquire patient-specific bone geometry for musculoskeletal modelling. Three-dimensional ultrasound is non-invasive and relatively inexpensive and can be integrated into gait analysis.

  20. Fast myocardial strain estimation from 3D ultrasound through elastic image registration with analytic regularization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Bidisha; Heyde, Brecht; Alessandrini, Martino; D'hooge, Jan

    2016-04-01

    Image registration techniques using free-form deformation models have shown promising results for 3D myocardial strain estimation from ultrasound. However, the use of this technique has mostly been limited to research institutes due to the high computational demand, which is primarily due to the computational load of the regularization term ensuring spatially smooth cardiac strain estimates. Indeed, this term typically requires evaluating derivatives of the transformation field numerically in each voxel of the image during every iteration of the optimization process. In this paper, we replace this time-consuming step with a closed-form solution directly associated with the transformation field resulting in a speed up factor of ~10-60,000, for a typical 3D B-mode image of 2503 and 5003 voxels, depending upon the size and the parametrization of the transformation field. The performance of the numeric and the analytic solutions was contrasted by computing tracking and strain accuracy on two realistic synthetic 3D cardiac ultrasound sequences, mimicking two ischemic motion patterns. Mean and standard deviation of the displacement errors over the cardiac cycle for the numeric and analytic solutions were 0.68+/-0.40 mm and 0.75+/-0.43 mm respectively. Correlations for the radial, longitudinal and circumferential strain components at end-systole were 0.89, 0.83 and 0.95 versus 0.90, 0.88 and 0.92 for the numeric and analytic regularization respectively. The analytic solution matched the performance of the numeric solution as no statistically significant differences (p>0.05) were found when expressed in terms of bias or limits-of-agreement.

  1. Mapping 3D Strains with Ultrasound Speckle Tracking: Method Validation and Initial Results in Porcine Scleral Inflation.

    PubMed

    Cruz Perez, Benjamin; Pavlatos, Elias; Morris, Hugh J; Chen, Hong; Pan, Xueliang; Hart, Richard T; Liu, Jun

    2016-07-01

    This study aimed to develop and validate a high frequency ultrasound method for measuring distributive, 3D strains in the sclera during elevations of intraocular pressure. A 3D cross-correlation based speckle-tracking algorithm was implemented to compute the 3D displacement vector and strain tensor at each tracking point. Simulated ultrasound radiofrequency data from a sclera-like structure at undeformed and deformed states with known strains were used to evaluate the accuracy and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of strain estimation. An experimental high frequency ultrasound (55 MHz) system was built to acquire 3D scans of porcine eyes inflated from 15 to 17 and then 19 mmHg. Simulations confirmed good strain estimation accuracy and SNR (e.g., the axial strains had less than 4.5% error with SNRs greater than 16.5 for strains from 0.005 to 0.05). Experimental data in porcine eyes showed increasing tensile, compressive, and shear strains in the posterior sclera during inflation, with a volume ratio close to one suggesting near-incompressibility. This study established the feasibility of using high frequency ultrasound speckle tracking for measuring 3D tissue strains and its potential to characterize physiological deformations in the posterior eye. PMID:26563101

  2. Role of 3-D ultrasound in clinical obstetric practice: evolution over 20 years.

    PubMed

    Tonni, Gabriele; Martins, Wellington P; Guimarães Filho, Hélio; Araujo Júnior, Edward

    2015-05-01

    The use of 3-D ultrasound in obstetrics has undergone dramatic development over the past 20 years. Since the first publications on this application in clinical practice, several 3-D ultrasound techniques and rendering modes have been proposed and applied to the study of fetal brain, face and cardiac anatomy. In addition, 3-D ultrasound has improved calculations of the volume of fetal organs and limbs and estimations of fetal birth weight. And furthermore, angiographic patterns of fetal organs and the placenta have been assessed using 3-D power Doppler ultrasound quantification. In this review, we aim to summarize current evidence on the clinical relevance of these methodologies and their application in obstetric practice.

  3. CASTLE3D - A Computer Aided System for Labelling Archaeological Excavations in 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houshiar, H.; Borrmann, D.; Elseberg, J.; Nüchter, A.; Näth, F.; Winkler, S.

    2015-08-01

    Documentation of archaeological excavation sites with conventional methods and tools such as hand drawings, measuring tape and archaeological notes is time consuming. This process is prone to human errors and the quality of the documentation depends on the qualification of the archaeologist on site. Use of modern technology and methods in 3D surveying and 3D robotics facilitate and improve this process. Computer-aided systems and databases improve the documentation quality and increase the speed of data acquisition. 3D laser scanning is the state of the art in modelling archaeological excavation sites, historical sites and even entire cities or landscapes. Modern laser scanners are capable of data acquisition of up to 1 million points per second. This provides a very detailed 3D point cloud of the environment. 3D point clouds and 3D models of an excavation site provide a better representation of the environment for the archaeologist and for documentation. The point cloud can be used both for further studies on the excavation and for the presentation of results. This paper introduces a Computer aided system for labelling archaeological excavations in 3D (CASTLE3D). Consisting of a set of tools for recording and georeferencing the 3D data from an excavation site, CASTLE3D is a novel documentation approach in industrial archaeology. It provides a 2D and 3D visualisation of the data and an easy-to-use interface that enables the archaeologist to select regions of interest and to interact with the data in both representations. The 2D visualisation and a 3D orthogonal view of the data provide cuts of the environment that resemble the traditional hand drawings. The 3D perspective view gives a realistic view of the environment. CASTLE3D is designed as an easy-to-use on-site semantic mapping tool for archaeologists. Each project contains a predefined set of semantic information that can be used to label findings in the data. Multiple regions of interest can be joined under

  4. Visualization of a newborn's hip joint using 3D ultrasound and automatic image processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Overhoff, Heinrich M.; Lazovic, Djordje; von Jan, Ute

    1999-05-01

    Graf's method is a successful procedure for the diagnostic screening of developmental dysplasia of the hip. In a defined 2-D ultrasound (US) scan, which virtually cuts the hip joint, landmarks are interactively identified to derive congruence indicators. As the indicators do not reflect the spatial joint structure, and the femoral head is not clearly visible in the US scan, here 3-D US is used to gain insight to the hip joint in its spatial form. Hip joints of newborns were free-hand scanned using a conventional ultrasound transducer and a localizer system fixed on the scanhead. To overcome examiner- dependent findings the landmarks were detected by automatic segmentation of the image volume. The landmark image volumes and an automatically determined virtual sphere approximating the femoral head were visualized color-coded on a computer screen. The visualization was found to be intuitive and to simplify the diagnostic substantially. By the visualization of the 3-D relations between acetabulum and femoral head the reliability of diagnostics is improved by finding the entire joint geometry.

  5. Experimental Evaluation of Ultrasound-Guided 3D Needle Steering in Biological Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Abayazid, Momen; Vrooijink, Gustaaf J.; Patil, Sachin; Alterovitz, Ron; Misra, Sarthak

    2014-01-01

    Purpose In this paper, we present a system capable of automatically steering bevel-tip flexible needles under ultrasound guidance towards stationary and moving targets in gelatin phantoms and biological tissue while avoiding stationary and moving obstacles. We use three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound to track the needle tip during the procedure. Methods Our system uses a fast sampling-based path planner to compute and periodically update a feasible path to the target that avoids obstacles. We then use a novel control algorithm to steer the needle along the path in a manner that reduces the number of needle rotations, thus reducing tissue damage. We present experimental results for needle insertion procedures for both stationary and moving targets and obstacles for up to 90 mm of needle insertion. Results We obtained a mean targeting error of 0.32 ± 0.10 mm and 0.38 ± 0.19 mm in gelatin-based phantom and biological tissue, respectively. Conclusions The achieved submillimeter accuracy suggests that our approach is sufficient to target the smallest lesions (ϕ2 mm) that can be detected using state-of-the-art ultrasound imaging systems. PMID:24562744

  6. 3-D statistical cancer atlas-based targeting of prostate biopsy using ultrasound image guidance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayanan, Ramkrishnan; Shen, Dinggang; Davatzikos, Christos A.; Crawford, E. David; Barqawi, Albaha; Werahera, Priya; Kumar, Dinesh; Suri, Jasjit S.

    2008-03-01

    Prostate cancer is a multifocal disease and lesions are not distributed uniformly within the gland. Several biopsy protocols concerning spatially specific targeting have been reported urology literature. Recently a statistical cancer atlas of the prostate was constructed providing voxelwise probabilities of cancers in the prostate. Additionally an optimized set of biopsy sites was computed with 94 - 96% detection accuracy was reported using only 6-7 needles. Here we discuss the warping of this atlas to prostate segmented side-fire ultrasound images of the patient. A shape model was used to speed up registration. The model was trained from over 38 expert segmented subjects off-line. This training yielded as few as 15-20 degrees of freedom that were optimized to warp the atlas surface to the patient's ultrasound image followed by elastic interpolation of the 3-D atlas. As a result the atlas is completely mapped to the patient's prostate anatomy along with optimal predetermined needle locations for biopsy. These do not preclude the use of additional biopsies if desired. A color overlay of the atlas is also displayed on the ultrasound image showing high cancer zones within the prostate. Finally current biopsy locations are saved in the atlas space and may be used to update the atlas based on the pathology report. In addition to the optimal atlas plan, previous biopsy locations and alternate plans can also be stored in the atlas space and warped to the patient with no additional time overhead.

  7. A Molecular Image-directed, 3D Ultrasound-guided Biopsy System for the Prostate

    PubMed Central

    Fei, Baowei; Schuster, David M.; Master, Viraj; Akbari, Hamed; Fenster, Aaron; Nieh, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Systematic transrectal ultrasound (TRUS)-guided biopsy is the standard method for a definitive diagnosis of prostate cancer. However, this biopsy approach uses two-dimensional (2D) ultrasound images to guide biopsy and can miss up to 30% of prostate cancers. We are developing a molecular image-directed, three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound image-guided biopsy system for improved detection of prostate cancer. The system consists of a 3D mechanical localization system and software workstation for image segmentation, registration, and biopsy planning. In order to plan biopsy in a 3D prostate, we developed an automatic segmentation method based wavelet transform. In order to incorporate PET/CT images into ultrasound-guided biopsy, we developed image registration methods to fuse TRUS and PET/CT images. The segmentation method was tested in ten patients with a DICE overlap ratio of 92.4% ± 1.1 %. The registration method has been tested in phantoms. The biopsy system was tested in prostate phantoms and 3D ultrasound images were acquired from two human patients. We are integrating the system for PET/CT directed, 3D ultrasound-guided, targeted biopsy in human patients. PMID:22708023

  8. 3D temperature field reconstruction using ultrasound sensing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yuqian; Ma, Tong; Cao, Chengyu; Wang, Xingwei

    2016-04-01

    3D temperature field reconstruction is of practical interest to the power, transportation and aviation industries and it also opens up opportunities for real time control or optimization of high temperature fluid or combustion process. In our paper, a new distributed optical fiber sensing system consisting of a series of elements will be used to generate and receive acoustic signals. This system is the first active temperature field sensing system that features the advantages of the optical fiber sensors (distributed sensing capability) and the acoustic sensors (non-contact measurement). Signals along multiple paths will be measured simultaneously enabled by a code division multiple access (CDMA) technique. Then a proposed Gaussian Radial Basis Functions (GRBF)-based approach can approximate the temperature field as a finite summation of space-dependent basis functions and time-dependent coefficients. The travel time of the acoustic signals depends on the temperature of the media. On this basis, the Gaussian functions are integrated along a number of paths which are determined by the number and distribution of sensors. The inversion problem to estimate the unknown parameters of the Gaussian functions can be solved with the measured times-of-flight (ToF) of acoustic waves and the length of propagation paths using the recursive least square method (RLS). The simulation results show an approximation error less than 2% in 2D and 5% in 3D respectively. It demonstrates the availability and efficiency of our proposed 3D temperature field reconstruction mechanism.

  9. Reproducibility of Acetabular Landmarks and a Standardized Coordinate System Obtained from 3D Hip Ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Mabee, Myles; Dulai, Sukhdeep; Thompson, Richard B; Jaremko, Jacob L

    2015-10-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) ultrasound detection of developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH) is limited by variation in acetabular appearance and alpha angle measurements, which change with position of the ultrasound probe. Three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound captures the entire acetabular shape, and a reproducible "standard central plane" may be generated, from two landmarks located on opposite ends of the acetabulum, for measurement of alpha angle and other indices. Two users identified landmarks on 51 3D ultrasounds, with ranging severity of disease, and inter- and intra-observer reproducibility of landmark and "standard plane" locations was compared; landmarks were chosen within 2 mm, and the "standard plane" rotation was reproducible within 10° between observers. We observed no difference in variability between alpha angles measured on the "standard plane" in comparison with 2D ultrasound. Applications of the standardized 3D ultrasound central plane will be to fuse serial ultrasounds for follow-up and development of new indices of 3D deformity. PMID:25394808

  10. Vascular Structure Identification in Intraoperative 3D Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound Data.

    PubMed

    Ilunga-Mbuyamba, Elisee; Avina-Cervantes, Juan Gabriel; Lindner, Dirk; Cruz-Aceves, Ivan; Arlt, Felix; Chalopin, Claire

    2016-04-08

    In this paper, a method of vascular structure identification in intraoperative 3D Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound (CEUS) data is presented. Ultrasound imaging is commonly used in brain tumor surgery to investigate in real time the current status of cerebral structures. The use of an ultrasound contrast agent enables to highlight tumor tissue, but also surrounding blood vessels. However, these structures can be used as landmarks to estimate and correct the brain shift. This work proposes an alternative method for extracting small vascular segments close to the tumor as landmark. The patient image dataset involved in brain tumor operations includes preoperative contrast T1MR (cT1MR) data and 3D intraoperative contrast enhanced ultrasound data acquired before (3D-iCEUS(start) and after (3D-iCEUS(end) tumor resection. Based on rigid registration techniques, a preselected vascular segment in cT1MR is searched in 3D-iCEUS(start) and 3D-iCEUS(end) data. The method was validated by using three similarity measures (Normalized Gradient Field, Normalized Mutual Information and Normalized Cross Correlation). Tests were performed on data obtained from ten patients overcoming a brain tumor operation and it succeeded in nine cases. Despite the small size of the vascular structures, the artifacts in the ultrasound images and the brain tissue deformations, blood vessels were successfully identified.

  11. Vascular Structure Identification in Intraoperative 3D Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound Data

    PubMed Central

    Ilunga-Mbuyamba, Elisee; Avina-Cervantes, Juan Gabriel; Lindner, Dirk; Cruz-Aceves, Ivan; Arlt, Felix; Chalopin, Claire

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a method of vascular structure identification in intraoperative 3D Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound (CEUS) data is presented. Ultrasound imaging is commonly used in brain tumor surgery to investigate in real time the current status of cerebral structures. The use of an ultrasound contrast agent enables to highlight tumor tissue, but also surrounding blood vessels. However, these structures can be used as landmarks to estimate and correct the brain shift. This work proposes an alternative method for extracting small vascular segments close to the tumor as landmark. The patient image dataset involved in brain tumor operations includes preoperative contrast T1MR (cT1MR) data and 3D intraoperative contrast enhanced ultrasound data acquired before (3D-iCEUSstart) and after (3D-iCEUSend) tumor resection. Based on rigid registration techniques, a preselected vascular segment in cT1MR is searched in 3D-iCEUSstart and 3D-iCEUSend data. The method was validated by using three similarity measures (Normalized Gradient Field, Normalized Mutual Information and Normalized Cross Correlation). Tests were performed on data obtained from ten patients overcoming a brain tumor operation and it succeeded in nine cases. Despite the small size of the vascular structures, the artifacts in the ultrasound images and the brain tissue deformations, blood vessels were successfully identified. PMID:27070610

  12. Real-time cylindrical curvilinear 3-D ultrasound imaging.

    PubMed

    Pua, E C; Yen, J T; Smith, S W

    2003-07-01

    In patients who are obese or exhibit signs of pulmonary disease, standard transthoracic scanning may yield poor quality cardiac images. For these conditions, two-dimensional transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) is established as an essential diagnostic tool. Current techniques in transesophageal scanning, though, are limited by incomplete visualization of cardiac structures in close proximity to the transducer. Thus, we propose a 2D curvilinear array for 3D transesophageal echocardiography in order to widen the field of view and increase visualization close to the transducer face. In this project, a 440 channel 5 MHz two-dimensional array with a 12.6 mm aperture diameter on a flexible interconnect circuit has been molded to a 4 mm radius of curvature. A 75% element yield was achieved during fabrication and an average -6dB bandwidth of 30% was observed in pulse-echo tests. Using this transducer in conjunction with modifications to the beam former delay software and scan converter display software of the our 3D scanner, we obtained cylindrical real-time curvilinear volumetric scans of tissue phantoms, including a field of view of greater than 120 degrees in the curved, azimuth direction and 65 degrees phased array sector scans in the elevation direction. These images were achieved using a stepped subaperture across the cylindrical curvilinear direction of the transducer face and phased array sector scanning in the noncurved plane. In addition, real-time volume rendered images of a tissue mimicking phantom with holes ranging from 1 cm to less than 4 mm have been obtained. 3D color flow Doppler results have also been acquired. This configuration can theoretically achieve volumes displaying 180 degrees by 120 degrees. The transducer is also capable of obtaining images through a curvilinear stepped subaperture in azimuth in conjunction with a rectilinear stepped subaperture in elevation, further increasing the field of view close to the transducer face. Future work

  13. Parallel algorithm for computing 3-D reachable workspaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alameldin, Tarek K.; Sobh, Tarek M.

    1992-03-01

    The problem of computing the 3-D workspace for redundant articulated chains has applications in a variety of fields such as robotics, computer aided design, and computer graphics. The computational complexity of the workspace problem is at least NP-hard. The recent advent of parallel computers has made practical solutions for the workspace problem possible. Parallel algorithms for computing the 3-D workspace for redundant articulated chains with joint limits are presented. The first phase of these algorithms computes workspace points in parallel. The second phase uses workspace points that are computed in the first phase and fits a 3-D surface around the volume that encompasses the workspace points. The second phase also maps the 3- D points into slices, uses region filling to detect the holes and voids in the workspace, extracts the workspace boundary points by testing the neighboring cells, and tiles the consecutive contours with triangles. The proposed algorithms are efficient for computing the 3-D reachable workspace for articulated linkages, not only those with redundant degrees of freedom but also those with joint limits.

  14. Automated 3D ultrasound image segmentation to aid breast cancer image interpretation.

    PubMed

    Gu, Peng; Lee, Won-Mean; Roubidoux, Marilyn A; Yuan, Jie; Wang, Xueding; Carson, Paul L

    2016-02-01

    Segmentation of an ultrasound image into functional tissues is of great importance to clinical diagnosis of breast cancer. However, many studies are found to segment only the mass of interest and not all major tissues. Differences and inconsistencies in ultrasound interpretation call for an automated segmentation method to make results operator-independent. Furthermore, manual segmentation of entire three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound volumes is time-consuming, resource-intensive, and clinically impractical. Here, we propose an automated algorithm to segment 3D ultrasound volumes into three major tissue types: cyst/mass, fatty tissue, and fibro-glandular tissue. To test its efficacy and consistency, the proposed automated method was employed on a database of 21 cases of whole breast ultrasound. Experimental results show that our proposed method not only distinguishes fat and non-fat tissues correctly, but performs well in classifying cyst/mass. Comparison of density assessment between the automated method and manual segmentation demonstrates good consistency with an accuracy of 85.7%. Quantitative comparison of corresponding tissue volumes, which uses overlap ratio, gives an average similarity of 74.54%, consistent with values seen in MRI brain segmentations. Thus, our proposed method exhibits great potential as an automated approach to segment 3D whole breast ultrasound volumes into functionally distinct tissues that may help to correct ultrasound speed of sound aberrations and assist in density based prognosis of breast cancer.

  15. Automated 3D ultrasound image segmentation for assistant diagnosis of breast cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuxin; Gu, Peng; Lee, Won-Mean; Roubidoux, Marilyn A.; Du, Sidan; Yuan, Jie; Wang, Xueding; Carson, Paul L.

    2016-04-01

    Segmentation of an ultrasound image into functional tissues is of great importance to clinical diagnosis of breast cancer. However, many studies are found to segment only the mass of interest and not all major tissues. Differences and inconsistencies in ultrasound interpretation call for an automated segmentation method to make results operator-independent. Furthermore, manual segmentation of entire three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound volumes is time-consuming, resource-intensive, and clinically impractical. Here, we propose an automated algorithm to segment 3D ultrasound volumes into three major tissue types: cyst/mass, fatty tissue, and fibro-glandular tissue. To test its efficacy and consistency, the proposed automated method was employed on a database of 21 cases of whole breast ultrasound. Experimental results show that our proposed method not only distinguishes fat and non-fat tissues correctly, but performs well in classifying cyst/mass. Comparison of density assessment between the automated method and manual segmentation demonstrates good consistency with an accuracy of 85.7%. Quantitative comparison of corresponding tissue volumes, which uses overlap ratio, gives an average similarity of 74.54%, consistent with values seen in MRI brain segmentations. Thus, our proposed method exhibits great potential as an automated approach to segment 3D whole breast ultrasound volumes into functionally distinct tissues that may help to correct ultrasound speed of sound aberrations and assist in density based prognosis of breast cancer.

  16. 3D ultrasound to stereoscopic camera registration through an air-tissue boundary.

    PubMed

    Yip, Michael C; Adebar, Troy K; Rohling, Robert N; Salcudean, Septimiu E; Nguan, Christopher Y

    2010-01-01

    A novel registration method between 3D ultrasound and stereoscopic cameras is proposed based on tracking a registration tool featuring both ultrasound fiducials and optical markers. The registration tool is pressed against an air-tissue boundary where it can be seen both in ultrasound and in the camera view. By localizing the fiducials in the ultrasound volume, knowing the registration tool geometry, and tracking the tool with the cameras, a registration is found. This method eliminates the need for external tracking, requires minimal setup, and may be suitable for a range of minimally invasive surgeries. A study of the appearance of ultrasound fiducials on an air-tissue boundary is presented, and an initial assessment of the ability to localize the fiducials in ultrasound with sub-millimeter accuracy is provided. The overall accuracy of registration (1.69 +/- 0.60 mm) is a noticeable improvement over other reported methods and warrants patient studies.

  17. Proximal femoral focal deficiency of the fetus - early 3D/4D prenatal ultrasound diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Kudla, Marek J; Beczkowska-Kielek, Aleksandra; Kutta, Katarzyna; Partyka-Lasota, Justyna

    2016-09-01

    Proximal Femoral Focal Deficiency (PFFD) is a rare congenital syndrome of unknown etiology. Additional disorders can be present up to 70% of PFFD cases. Management (including termination) depends on the severity of the malformation. We present a case of a 32-year-old woman referred for routine ultrasound examination in the 12th week of pregnancy. Detailed 3D/4D evaluation revealed asymmetry of lower limbs and diagnosis of isolated PFFD was established. Parents were fully informed and decided to continue the pregnancy. We stress here the importance of early 3D/4D ultrasound diagnosis. Our paper presents the earliest case where the diagnosis of PFFD was established with 3D/4D ultrasound. PMID:27622419

  18. 3D freehand ultrasound for medical assistance in diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer: preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres, Fabian; Fanti, Zian; Arambula Cosío, F.

    2013-11-01

    Image-guided interventions allow the physician to have a better planning and visualization of a procedure. 3D freehand ultrasound is a non-invasive and low-cost imaging tool that can be used to assist medical procedures. This tool can be used in the diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer. There are common medical practices that involve large needles to obtain an accurate diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer. In this study we propose the use of 3D freehand ultrasound for planning and guiding such procedures as core needle biopsy and radiofrequency ablation. The proposed system will help the physician to identify the lesion area, using image-processing techniques in the 3D freehand ultrasound images, and guide the needle to this area using the information of position and orientation of the surgical tools. We think that this system can upgrade the accuracy and efficiency of these procedures.

  19. FPGA-based real-time anisotropic diffusion filtering of 3D ultrasound images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro-Pareja, Carlos R.; Dandekar, Omkar S.; Shekhar, Raj

    2005-02-01

    Three-dimensional ultrasonic imaging, especially the emerging real-time version of it, is particularly valuable in medical applications such as echocardiography, obstetrics and surgical navigation. A known problem with ultrasound images is their high level of speckle noise. Anisotropic diffusion filtering has been shown to be effective in enhancing the visual quality of 3D ultrasound images and as preprocessing prior to advanced image processing. However, due to its arithmetic complexity and the sheer size of 3D ultrasound images, it is not possible to perform online, real-time anisotropic diffusion filtering using standard software implementations. We present an FPGA-based architecture that allows performing anisotropic diffusion filtering of 3D images at acquisition rates, thus enabling the use of this filtering technique in real-time applications, such as visualization, registration and volume rendering.

  20. Computer-aided 3D display system and its application in 3D vision test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, XiaoYun; Ma, Lan; Hou, Chunping; Wang, Jiening; Tang, Da; Li, Chang

    1998-08-01

    The computer aided 3D display system, flicker-free field sequential stereoscopic image display system, is newly developed. This system is composed of personal computer, liquid crystal glasses driving card, stereoscopic display software and liquid crystal glasses. It can display field sequential stereoscopic images at refresh rate of 70 Hz to 120 Hz. A typical application of this system, 3D vision test system, is mainly discussed in this paper. This stereoscopic vision test system can test stereoscopic acuity, cross disparity, uncross disparity and dynamic stereoscopic vision quantitatively. We have taken the use of random-dot- stereograms as stereoscopic vision test charts. Through practical test experiment between Anaglyph Stereoscopic Vision Test Charts and this stereoscopic vision test system, the statistical figures and test result is given out.

  1. DTI template-based estimation of cardiac fiber orientations from 3D ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Xulei; Fei, Baowei

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Cardiac muscle fibers directly affect the mechanical, physiological, and pathological properties of the heart. Patient-specific quantification of cardiac fiber orientations is an important but difficult problem in cardiac imaging research. In this study, the authors proposed a cardiac fiber orientation estimation method based on three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound images and a cardiac fiber template that was obtained from magnetic resonance diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). Methods: A DTI template-based framework was developed to estimate cardiac fiber orientations from 3D ultrasound images using an animal model. It estimated the cardiac fiber orientations of the target heart by deforming the fiber orientations of the template heart, based on the deformation field of the registration between the ultrasound geometry of the target heart and the MRI geometry of the template heart. In the experiments, the animal hearts were imaged by high-frequency ultrasound, T1-weighted MRI, and high-resolution DTI. Results: The proposed method was evaluated by four different parameters: Dice similarity coefficient (DSC), target errors, acute angle error (AAE), and inclination angle error (IAE). Its ability of estimating cardiac fiber orientations was first validated by a public database. Then, the performance of the proposed method on 3D ultrasound data was evaluated by an acquired database. Their average values were 95.4% ± 2.0% for the DSC of geometric registrations, 21.0° ± 0.76° for AAE, and 19.4° ± 1.2° for IAE of fiber orientation estimations. Furthermore, the feasibility of this framework was also performed on 3D ultrasound images of a beating heart. Conclusions: The proposed framework demonstrated the feasibility of using 3D ultrasound imaging to estimate cardiac fiber orientation of in vivo beating hearts and its further improvements could contribute to understanding the dynamic mechanism of the beating heart and has the potential to help diagnosis and therapy

  2. 3D reconstruction of a carotid bifurcation from 2D transversal ultrasound images.

    PubMed

    Yeom, Eunseop; Nam, Kweon-Ho; Jin, Changzhu; Paeng, Dong-Guk; Lee, Sang-Joon

    2014-12-01

    Visualizing and analyzing the morphological structure of carotid bifurcations are important for understanding the etiology of carotid atherosclerosis, which is a major cause of stroke and transient ischemic attack. For delineation of vasculatures in the carotid artery, ultrasound examinations have been widely employed because of a noninvasive procedure without ionizing radiation. However, conventional 2D ultrasound imaging has technical limitations in observing the complicated 3D shapes and asymmetric vasodilation of bifurcations. This study aims to propose image-processing techniques for better 3D reconstruction of a carotid bifurcation in a rat by using 2D cross-sectional ultrasound images. A high-resolution ultrasound imaging system with a probe centered at 40MHz was employed to obtain 2D transversal images. The lumen boundaries in each transverse ultrasound image were detected by using three different techniques; an ellipse-fitting, a correlation mapping to visualize the decorrelation of blood flow, and the ellipse-fitting on the correlation map. When the results are compared, the third technique provides relatively good boundary extraction. The incomplete boundaries of arterial lumen caused by acoustic artifacts are somewhat resolved by adopting the correlation mapping and the distortion in the boundary detection near the bifurcation apex was largely reduced by using the ellipse-fitting technique. The 3D lumen geometry of a carotid artery was obtained by volumetric rendering of several 2D slices. For the 3D vasodilatation of the carotid bifurcation, lumen geometries at the contraction and expansion states were simultaneously depicted at various view angles. The present 3D reconstruction methods would be useful for efficient extraction and construction of the 3D lumen geometries of carotid bifurcations from 2D ultrasound images.

  3. A framework for human spine imaging using a freehand 3D ultrasound system.

    PubMed

    Purnama, Ketut E; Wilkinson, Michael H F; Veldhuizen, Albert G; van Ooijen, Peter M A; Lubbers, Jaap; Burgerhof, Johannes G M; Sardjono, Tri A; Verkerke, Gijbertus J

    2010-01-01

    The use of 3D ultrasound imaging to follow the progression of scoliosis, i.e., a 3D deformation of the spine, is described. Unlike other current examination modalities, in particular based on X-ray, its non-detrimental effect enables it to be used frequently to follow the progression of scoliosis which sometimes may develop rapidly. Furthermore, 3D ultrasound imaging provides information in 3D directly in contrast to projection methods. This paper describes a feasibility study of an ultrasound system to provide a 3D image of the human spine, and presents a framework of procedures to perform this task. The framework consist of an ultrasound image acquisition procedure to image a large part of the human spine by means of a freehand 3D ultrasound system and a volume reconstruction procedure which was performed in four stages: bin-filling, hole-filling, volume segment alignment, and volume segment compounding. The overall results of the procedures in this framework show that imaging of the human spine using ultrasound is feasible. Vertebral parts such as the transverse processes, laminae, superior articular processes, and spinous process of the vertebrae appear as clouds of voxels having intensities higher than the surrounding voxels. In sagittal slices, a string of transverse processes appears representing the curvature of the spine. In the bin-filling stage the estimated mean absolute noise level of a single measurement of a single voxel was determined. Our comparative study for the hole-filling methods based on rank sum statistics proved that the pixel nearest neighbour (PNN) method with variable radius and with the proposed olympic operation is the best method. Its mean absolute grey value error was less in magnitude than the noise level of a single measurement.

  4. A compact mechatronic system for 3D ultrasound guided prostate interventions

    SciTech Connect

    Bax, Jeffrey; Smith, David; Bartha, Laura; Montreuil, Jacques; Sherebrin, Shi; Gardi, Lori; Edirisinghe, Chandima; Fenster, Aaron

    2011-02-15

    Purpose: Ultrasound imaging has improved the treatment of prostate cancer by producing increasingly higher quality images and influencing sophisticated targeting procedures for the insertion of radioactive seeds during brachytherapy. However, it is critical that the needles be placed accurately within the prostate to deliver the therapy to the planned location and avoid complications of damaging surrounding tissues. Methods: The authors have developed a compact mechatronic system, as well as an effective method for guiding and controlling the insertion of transperineal needles into the prostate. This system has been designed to allow guidance of a needle obliquely in 3D space into the prostate, thereby reducing pubic arch interference. The choice of needle trajectory and location in the prostate can be adjusted manually or with computer control. Results: To validate the system, a series of experiments were performed on phantoms. The 3D scan of the string phantom produced minimal geometric error, which was less than 0.4 mm. Needle guidance accuracy tests in agar prostate phantoms showed that the mean error of bead placement was less then 1.6 mm along parallel needle paths that were within 1.2 mm of the intended target and 1 deg. from the preplanned trajectory. At oblique angles of up to 15 deg. relative to the probe axis, beads were placed to within 3.0 mm along a trajectory that were within 2.0 mm of the target with an angular error less than 2 deg. Conclusions: By combining 3D TRUS imaging system to a needle tracking linkage, this system should improve the physician's ability to target and accurately guide a needle to selected targets without the need for the computer to directly manipulate and insert the needle. This would be beneficial as the physician has complete control of the system and can safely maneuver the needle guide around obstacles such as previously placed needles.

  5. A fast slam approach to freehand 3-d ultrasound reconstruction for catheter ablation guidance in the left atrium.

    PubMed

    Koolwal, Aditya B; Barbagli, Federico; Carlson, Christopher R; Liang, David H

    2011-12-01

    We present a method for real-time, freehand 3D ultrasound (3D-US) reconstruction of moving anatomy, with specific application towards guiding the catheter ablation procedure in the left atrium. Using an intracardiac echo (ICE) catheter with a pose (position/orientation) sensor mounted to its tip, we continually mosaic 2D-ICE images of a left atrium phantom model to form a 3D-US volume. Our mosaicing strategy employs a probabilistic framework based on simultaneous localization and mapping (SLAM), a technique commonly used in mobile robotics for creating maps of unexplored environments. The measured ICE catheter tip pose provides an initial estimate for compounding 2D-ICE image data into the 3D-US volume. However, we simultaneously consider the overlap-consistency shared between 2D-ICE images and the 3D-US volume, computing a "corrected" tip pose if need be to ensure spatially-consistent reconstruction. This allows us to compensate for anatomic movement and sensor drift that would otherwise cause motion artifacts in the 3D-US volume. Our approach incorporates 2D-ICE data immediately after acquisition, allowing us to continuously update the registration parameters linking sensor coordinates to 3D-US coordinates. This, in turn, enables real-time localization and display of sensorized therapeutic catheters within the 3D-US volume for facilitating procedural guidance.

  6. A fast slam approach to freehand 3-d ultrasound reconstruction for catheter ablation guidance in the left atrium.

    PubMed

    Koolwal, Aditya B; Barbagli, Federico; Carlson, Christopher R; Liang, David H

    2011-12-01

    We present a method for real-time, freehand 3D ultrasound (3D-US) reconstruction of moving anatomy, with specific application towards guiding the catheter ablation procedure in the left atrium. Using an intracardiac echo (ICE) catheter with a pose (position/orientation) sensor mounted to its tip, we continually mosaic 2D-ICE images of a left atrium phantom model to form a 3D-US volume. Our mosaicing strategy employs a probabilistic framework based on simultaneous localization and mapping (SLAM), a technique commonly used in mobile robotics for creating maps of unexplored environments. The measured ICE catheter tip pose provides an initial estimate for compounding 2D-ICE image data into the 3D-US volume. However, we simultaneously consider the overlap-consistency shared between 2D-ICE images and the 3D-US volume, computing a "corrected" tip pose if need be to ensure spatially-consistent reconstruction. This allows us to compensate for anatomic movement and sensor drift that would otherwise cause motion artifacts in the 3D-US volume. Our approach incorporates 2D-ICE data immediately after acquisition, allowing us to continuously update the registration parameters linking sensor coordinates to 3D-US coordinates. This, in turn, enables real-time localization and display of sensorized therapeutic catheters within the 3D-US volume for facilitating procedural guidance. PMID:22014856

  7. Image enhancement and segmentation of fluid-filled structures in 3D ultrasound images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chalana, Vikram; Dudycha, Stephen; McMorrow, Gerald

    2003-05-01

    Segmentation of fluid-filled structures, such as the urinary bladder, from three-dimensional ultrasound images is necessary for measuring their volume. This paper describes a system for image enhancement, segmentation and volume measurement of fluid-filled structures on 3D ultrasound images. The system was applied for the measurement of urinary bladder volume. Results show an average error of less than 10% in the estimation of the total bladder volume.

  8. A method for 3D reconstruction of coronary arteries using biplane angiography and intravascular ultrasound images.

    PubMed

    Bourantas, Christos V; Kourtis, Iraklis C; Plissiti, Marina E; Fotiadis, Dimitrios I; Katsouras, Christos S; Papafaklis, Michail I; Michalis, Lampros K

    2005-12-01

    The aim of this study is to describe a new method for the three-dimensional reconstruction of coronary arteries and its quantitative validation. Our approach is based on the fusion of the data provided by intravascular ultrasound images (IVUS) and biplane angiographies. A specific segmentation algorithm is used for the detection of the regions of interest in intravascular ultrasound images. A new methodology is also introduced for the accurate extraction of the catheter path. In detail, a cubic B-spline is used for approximating the catheter path in each biplane projection. Each B-spline curve is swept along the normal direction of its X-ray angiographic plane forming a surface. The intersection of the two surfaces is a 3D curve, which represents the reconstructed path. The detected regions of interest in the IVUS images are placed perpendicularly onto the path and their relative axial twist is computed using the sequential triangulation algorithm. Then, an efficient algorithm is applied to estimate the absolute orientation of the first IVUS frame. In order to obtain 3D visualization the commercial package Geomagic Studio 4.0 is used. The performance of the proposed method is assessed using a validation methodology which addresses the separate validation of each step followed for obtaining the coronary reconstruction. The performance of the segmentation algorithm was examined in 80 IVUS images. The reliability of the path extraction method was studied in vitro using a metal wire model and in vivo in a dataset of 11 patients. The performance of the sequential triangulation algorithm was tested in two gutter models and in the coronary arteries (marked with metal clips) of six cadaveric sheep hearts. Finally, the accuracy in the estimation of the first IVUS frame absolute orientation was examined in the same set of cadaveric sheep hearts. The obtained results demonstrate that the proposed reconstruction method is reliable and capable of depicting the morphology of

  9. Automated kidney detection for 3D ultrasound using scan line searching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noll, Matthias; Nadolny, Anne; Wesarg, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    Ultrasound (U/S) is a fast and non-expensive imaging modality that is used for the examination of various anatomical structures, e.g. the kidneys. One important task for automatic organ tracking or computer-aided diagnosis is the identification of the organ region. During this process the exact information about the transducer location and orientation is usually unavailable. This renders the implementation of such automatic methods exceedingly challenging. In this work we like to introduce a new automatic method for the detection of the kidney in 3D U/S images. This novel technique analyses the U/S image data along virtual scan lines. Here, characteristic texture changes when entering and leaving the symmetric tissue regions of the renal cortex are searched for. A subsequent feature accumulation along a second scan direction produces a 2D heat map of renal cortex candidates, from which the kidney location is extracted in two steps. First, the strongest candidate as well as its counterpart are extracted by heat map intensity ranking and renal cortex size analysis. This process exploits the heat map gap caused by the renal pelvis region. Substituting the renal pelvis detection with this combined cortex tissue feature increases the detection robustness. In contrast to model based methods that generate characteristic pattern matches, our method is simpler and therefore faster. An evaluation performed on 61 3D U/S data sets showed, that in 55 cases showing none or minor shadowing the kidney location could be correctly identified.

  10. Mapping cardiac fiber orientations from high-resolution DTI to high-frequency 3D ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Xulei; Wang, Silun; Shen, Ming; Zhang, Xiaodong; Wagner, Mary B.; Fei, Baowei

    2014-03-01

    The orientation of cardiac fibers affects the anatomical, mechanical, and electrophysiological properties of the heart. Although echocardiography is the most common imaging modality in clinical cardiac examination, it can only provide the cardiac geometry or motion information without cardiac fiber orientations. If the patient's cardiac fiber orientations can be mapped to his/her echocardiography images in clinical examinations, it may provide quantitative measures for diagnosis, personalized modeling, and image-guided cardiac therapies. Therefore, this project addresses the feasibility of mapping personalized cardiac fiber orientations to three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound image volumes. First, the geometry of the heart extracted from the MRI is translated to 3D ultrasound by rigid and deformable registration. Deformation fields between both geometries from MRI and ultrasound are obtained after registration. Three different deformable registration methods were utilized for the MRI-ultrasound registration. Finally, the cardiac fiber orientations imaged by DTI are mapped to ultrasound volumes based on the extracted deformation fields. Moreover, this study also demonstrated the ability to simulate electricity activations during the cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) process. The proposed method has been validated in two rat hearts and three canine hearts. After MRI/ultrasound image registration, the Dice similarity scores were more than 90% and the corresponding target errors were less than 0.25 mm. This proposed approach can provide cardiac fiber orientations to ultrasound images and can have a variety of potential applications in cardiac imaging.

  11. 3D ultrasound imaging method to assess the true spinal deformity.

    PubMed

    Vo, Quang N; Lou, Edmond H M; Le, Lawrence H

    2015-08-01

    Spinal deformity is a three-dimensional (3D) spinal disorder with a lateral deviation and coupled with axial vertebral rotation (AVR). The current clinical practice only measures its severity on postero-anterior (PA) radiographs, which may underestimate the deformity. The actual severity should be obtained on the plane of maximal curvature (PMC), which requires a 3D spinal image. There are many approaches to reconstruct 3D spinal images; however, ultrasound is one of the promising techniques with its non-ionizing characteristic. This study proposed an image processing method using the voxel-based bilinear interpolation to reconstruct a 3D spinal image from ultrasound data, from which the AVR was measured and the spinal curvature on the PMC was determined. In-vitro and in-vivo experiments were performed to determine the accuracy of the measurements from the ultrasound method. The results showed that the 3D ultrasound spinal image could be reconstructed. The curvature angle on the PA and the PMC planes could also be determined. The tilt angle of each individual vertebra in in-vitro study showed high accuracy and correlation (MAD <; 0.9° ± 0.2° and r(2) > 0.87) when comparing the measurements from CT with ultrasound. In in-vivo study, the curvature angles measured on the PA radiographs and ultrasound images yielded a small difference (MAD 3.4° ± 1.0°) and a strong correlation (r(2) = 0.63) within a clinical accepted error of 5°. PMID:26736565

  12. OVERALL PROCEDURES PROTOCOL AND PATIENT ENROLLMENT PROTOCOL: TESTING FEASIBILITY OF 3D ULTRASOUND DATA ACQUISITION AND RELIABILITY OF DATA RETRIEVAL FROM STORED 3D IMAGES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this study is to examine the feasibility of collecting, transmitting,

    and analyzing 3-D ultrasound data in the context of a multi-center study of pregnant

    women. The study will also examine the reliability of measurements obtained from 3-D

    imag...

  13. Novel 3-D laparoscopic magnetic ultrasound image guidance for lesion targeting

    PubMed Central

    Sindram, David; McKillop, Iain H; Martinie, John B; Iannitti, David A

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: Accurate laparoscopic liver lesion targeting for biopsy or ablation depends on the ability to merge laparoscopic and ultrasound images with proprioceptive instrument positioning, a skill that can be acquired only through extensive experience. The aim of this study was to determine whether using magnetic positional tracking to provide three-dimensional, real-time guidance improves accuracy during laparoscopic needle placement. Methods: Magnetic sensors were embedded into a needle and laparoscopic ultrasound transducer. These sensors interrupted the magnetic fields produced by an electromagnetic field generator, allowing for real-time, 3-D guidance on a stereoscopic monitor. Targets measuring 5 mm were embedded 3–5 cm deep in agar and placed inside a laparoscopic trainer box. Two novices (a college student and an intern) and two experts (hepatopancreatobiliary surgeons) targeted the lesions out of the ultrasound plane using either traditional or 3-D guidance. Results: Each subject targeted 22 lesions, 11 with traditional and 11 with the novel guidance (n = 88). Hit rates of 32% (14/44) and 100% (44/44) were observed with the traditional approach and the 3-D magnetic guidance approach, respectively. The novices were essentially unable to hit the targets using the traditional approach, but did not miss using the novel system. The hit rate of experts improved from 59% (13/22) to 100% (22/22) (P < 0.0001). Conclusions: The novel magnetic 3-D laparoscopic ultrasound guidance results in perfect targeting of 5-mm lesions, even by surgical novices. PMID:21083797

  14. Validity Study of Vertebral Rotation Measurement Using 3-D Ultrasound in Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qian; Li, Meng; Lou, Edmond H M; Chu, Winnie C W; Lam, Tsz-Ping; Cheng, Jack C Y; Wong, Man-Sang

    2016-07-01

    This study aimed to assess the validity of 3-D ultrasound measurements on the vertebral rotation of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) under clinical settings. Thirty curves (mean Cobb angle: 21.7° ± 15.9°) from 16 patients with AIS were recruited. 3-D ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging scans were performed at the supine position. Each of the two raters measured the apical vertebral rotation using the center of laminae (COL) method in the 3-D ultrasound images and the Aaro-Dahlborn method in the magnetic resonance images. The intra- and inter-reliability of the COL method was demonstrated by the intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) (both [2, K] >0.9, p < 0.05). The COL method showed no significant difference (p < 0.05) compared with the Aaro-Dahlborn method. Furthermore, the agreement between these two methods was demonstrated by the Bland-Altman method, and high correlation was found (r > 0.9, p < 0.05). These results validated the proposed 3-D ultrasound method in the measurements of vertebral rotation in the patients with AIS. PMID:27083978

  15. Visualization of hepatic arteries with 3D ultrasound during intra-arterial therapies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gérard, Maxime; Tang, An; Badoual, Anaïs.; Michaud, François; Bigot, Alexandre; Soulez, Gilles; Kadoury, Samuel

    2016-03-01

    Liver cancer represents the second most common cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide. The prognosis is poor with an overall mortality of 95%. Moreover, most hepatic tumors are unresectable due to their advanced stage at discovery or poor underlying liver function. Tumor embolization by intra-arterial approaches is the current standard of care for advanced cases of hepatocellular carcinoma. These therapies rely on the fact that the blood supply of primary hepatic tumors is predominantly arterial. Feedback on blood flow velocities in the hepatic arteries is crucial to ensure maximal treatment efficacy on the targeted masses. Based on these velocities, the intra-arterial injection rate is modulated for optimal infusion of the chemotherapeutic drugs into the tumorous tissue. While Doppler ultrasound is a well-documented technique for the assessment of blood flow, 3D visualization of vascular anatomy with ultrasound remains challenging. In this paper we present an image-guidance pipeline that enables the localization of the hepatic arterial branches within a 3D ultrasound image of the liver. A diagnostic Magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) is first processed to automatically segment the hepatic arteries. A non-rigid registration method is then applied on the portal phase of the MRA volume with a 3D ultrasound to enable the visualization of the 3D mesh of the hepatic arteries in the Doppler images. To evaluate the performance of the proposed workflow, we present initial results from porcine models and patient images.

  16. Modeling of multi-view 3D freehand radio frequency ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Klein, T; Hansson, M; Navab, Nassir

    2012-01-01

    Nowadays ultrasound (US) examinations are typically performed with conventional machines providing two dimensional imagery. However, there exist a multitude of applications where doctors could benefit from three dimensional ultrasound providing better judgment, due to the extended spatial view. 3D freehand US allows acquisition of images by means of a tracking device attached to the ultrasound transducer. Unfortunately, view dependency makes the 3D representation of ultrasound a non-trivial task. To address this we model speckle statistics, in envelope-detected radio frequency (RF) data, using a finite mixture model (FMM), assuming a parametric representation of data, in which the multiple views are treated as components of the FMM. The proposed model is show-cased with registration, using an ultrasound specific distribution based pseudo-distance, and reconstruction tasks, performed on the manifold of Gamma model parameters. Example field of application is neurology using transcranial US, as this domain requires high accuracy and data systematically features low SNR, making intensity based registration difficult. In particular, 3D US can be specifically used to improve differential diagnosis of Parkinson's disease (PD) compared to conventional approaches and is therefore of high relevance for future application. PMID:23285579

  17. Multitasking the code ARC3D. [for computational fluid dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barton, John T.; Hsiung, Christopher C.

    1986-01-01

    The CRAY multitasking system was developed in order to utilize all four processors and sharply reduce the wall clock run time. This paper describes the techniques used to modify the computational fluid dynamics code ARC3D for this run and analyzes the achieved speedup. The ARC3D code solves either the Euler or thin-layer N-S equations using an implicit approximate factorization scheme. Results indicate that multitask processing can be used to achieve wall clock speedup factors of over three times, depending on the nature of the program code being used. Multitasking appears to be particularly advantageous for large-memory problems running on multiple CPU computers.

  18. Semiautomatic registration of 3D transabdominal ultrasound images for patient repositioning during postprostatectomy radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Presles, Benoît Rit, Simon; Sarrut, David; Fargier-Voiron, Marie; Liebgott, Hervé; Biston, Marie-Claude; Munoz, Alexandre; Pommier, Pascal; Lynch, Rod

    2014-12-15

    Purpose: The aim of the present work is to propose and evaluate registration algorithms of three-dimensional (3D) transabdominal (TA) ultrasound (US) images to setup postprostatectomy patients during radiation therapy. Methods: Three registration methods have been developed and evaluated to register a reference 3D-TA-US image acquired during the planning CT session and a 3D-TA-US image acquired before each treatment session. The first method (method A) uses only gray value information, whereas the second one (method B) uses only gradient information. The third one (method C) combines both sets of information. All methods restrict the comparison to a region of interest computed from the dilated reference positioning volume drawn on the reference image and use mutual information as a similarity measure. The considered geometric transformations are translations and have been optimized by using the adaptive stochastic gradient descent algorithm. Validation has been carried out using manual registration by three operators of the same set of image pairs as the algorithms. Sixty-two treatment US images of seven patients irradiated after a prostatectomy have been registered to their corresponding reference US image. The reference registration has been defined as the average of the manual registration values. Registration error has been calculated by subtracting the reference registration from the algorithm result. For each session, the method has been considered a failure if the registration error was above both the interoperator variability of the session and a global threshold of 3.0 mm. Results: All proposed registration algorithms have no systematic bias. Method B leads to the best results with mean errors of −0.6, 0.7, and −0.2 mm in left–right (LR), superior–inferior (SI), and anterior–posterior (AP) directions, respectively. With this method, the standard deviations of the mean error are of 1.7, 2.4, and 2.6 mm in LR, SI, and AP directions, respectively

  19. Model based assessment of vestibular jawbone thickness using high frequency 3D ultrasound micro-scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habor, Daniel; Neuhaus, Sarah; Vollborn, Thorsten; Wolfart, Stefan; Radermacher, Klaus; Heger, Stefan

    2013-03-01

    Endosseous implants are well-established in modern dentistry. However, without appropriate therapeutic intervention, progressive peri-implant bone loss may lead to failing implants. Conventionally, the particularly relevant vestibular jawbone thickness is monitored using radiographic 3D imaging methods. Ionizing radiation, as well as imaging artifacts caused by metallic implants and superstructures are major drawbacks of these imaging modalities. In this study, a high frequency ultrasound (HFUS) based approach to assess the vestibular jawbone thickness is being introduced. It should be emphasized that the presented method does not require ultrasound penetration of the jawbone. An in-vitro study using two porcine specimens with inserted endosseous implants has been carried out to assess the accuracy of our approach. The implant of the first specimen was equipped with a gingiva former while a polymer superstructure was mounted onto the implant of the second specimen. Ultrasound data has been acquired using a 4 degree of freedom (DOF) high frequency (<50MHz) laboratory ultrasound scanner. The ultrasound raw data has been converted to polygon meshes including the surfaces of bone, gingiva, gingiva former (first specimen) and superstructure (second specimen). The meshes are matched with a-priori acquired 3D models of the implant, the superstructure and the gingiva former using a best-fit algorithm. Finally, the vestibular peri-implant bone thickness has been assessed in the resulting 3D models. The accuracy of this approach has been evaluated by comparing the ultrasound based thickness measurement with a reference measurement acquired with an optical extra-oral 3D scanner prior to covering the specimens with gingiva. As a final result, the bone thicknesses of the two specimens were measured yielding an error of -46+/-89μm (first specimen) and 70+/-93μm (second specimen).

  20. An optical system for detecting 3D high-speed oscillation of a single ultrasound microbubble

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yuan; Yuan, Baohong

    2013-01-01

    As contrast agents, microbubbles have been playing significant roles in ultrasound imaging. Investigation of microbubble oscillation is crucial for microbubble characterization and detection. Unfortunately, 3-dimensional (3D) observation of microbubble oscillation is challenging and costly because of the bubble size—a few microns in diameter—and the high-speed dynamics under MHz ultrasound pressure waves. In this study, a cost-efficient optical confocal microscopic system combined with a gated and intensified charge-coupled device (ICCD) camera were developed to detect 3D microbubble oscillation. The capability of imaging microbubble high-speed oscillation with much lower costs than with an ultra-fast framing or streak camera system was demonstrated. In addition, microbubble oscillations along both lateral (x and y) and axial (z) directions were demonstrated. Accordingly, this system is an excellent alternative for 3D investigation of microbubble high-speed oscillation, especially when budgets are limited. PMID:24049677

  1. An optical system for detecting 3D high-speed oscillation of a single ultrasound microbubble.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuan; Yuan, Baohong

    2013-01-01

    As contrast agents, microbubbles have been playing significant roles in ultrasound imaging. Investigation of microbubble oscillation is crucial for microbubble characterization and detection. Unfortunately, 3-dimensional (3D) observation of microbubble oscillation is challenging and costly because of the bubble size-a few microns in diameter-and the high-speed dynamics under MHz ultrasound pressure waves. In this study, a cost-efficient optical confocal microscopic system combined with a gated and intensified charge-coupled device (ICCD) camera were developed to detect 3D microbubble oscillation. The capability of imaging microbubble high-speed oscillation with much lower costs than with an ultra-fast framing or streak camera system was demonstrated. In addition, microbubble oscillations along both lateral (x and y) and axial (z) directions were demonstrated. Accordingly, this system is an excellent alternative for 3D investigation of microbubble high-speed oscillation, especially when budgets are limited. PMID:24049677

  2. Chest-wall segmentation in automated 3D breast ultrasound images using thoracic volume classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Tao; van Zelst, Jan; Zhang, Wei; Mann, Ritse M.; Platel, Bram; Karssemeijer, Nico

    2014-03-01

    Computer-aided detection (CAD) systems are expected to improve effectiveness and efficiency of radiologists in reading automated 3D breast ultrasound (ABUS) images. One challenging task on developing CAD is to reduce a large number of false positives. A large amount of false positives originate from acoustic shadowing caused by ribs. Therefore determining the location of the chestwall in ABUS is necessary in CAD systems to remove these false positives. Additionally it can be used as an anatomical landmark for inter- and intra-modal image registration. In this work, we extended our previous developed chestwall segmentation method that fits a cylinder to automated detected rib-surface points and we fit the cylinder model by minimizing a cost function which adopted a term of region cost computed from a thoracic volume classifier to improve segmentation accuracy. We examined the performance on a dataset of 52 images where our previous developed method fails. Using region-based cost, the average mean distance of the annotated points to the segmented chest wall decreased from 7.57±2.76 mm to 6.22±2.86 mm.art.

  3. Computational integral-imaging reconstruction-based 3-D volumetric target object recognition by using a 3-D reference object.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seung-Cheol; Park, Seok-Chan; Kim, Eun-Soo

    2009-12-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel computational integral-imaging reconstruction (CIIR)-based three-dimensional (3-D) image correlator system for the recognition of 3-D volumetric objects by employing a 3-D reference object. That is, a number of plane object images (POIs) computationally reconstructed from the 3-D reference object are used for the 3-D volumetric target recognition. In other words, simultaneous 3-D image correlations between two sets of target and reference POIs, which are depth-dependently reconstructed by using the CIIR method, are performed for effective recognition of 3-D volumetric objects in the proposed system. Successful experiments with this CIIR-based 3-D image correlator confirmed the feasibility of the proposed method.

  4. Passive Markers for Tracking Surgical Instruments in Real-Time 3-D Ultrasound Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Stoll, Jeffrey; Ren, Hongliang; Dupont, Pierre E.

    2013-01-01

    A family of passive echogenic markers is presented by which the position and orientation of a surgical instrument can be determined in a 3-D ultrasound volume, using simple image processing. Markers are attached near the distal end of the instrument so that they appear in the ultrasound volume along with the instrument tip. They are detected and measured within the ultrasound image, thus requiring no external tracking device. This approach facilitates imaging instruments and tissue simultaneously in ultrasound-guided interventions. Marker-based estimates of instrument pose can be used in augmented reality displays or for image-based servoing. Design principles for marker shapes are presented that ensure imaging system and measurement uniqueness constraints are met. An error analysis is included that can be used to guide marker design and which also establishes a lower bound on measurement uncertainty. Finally, examples of marker measurement and tracking algorithms are presented along with experimental validation of the concepts. PMID:22042148

  5. Education System Using Interactive 3D Computer Graphics (3D-CG) Animation and Scenario Language for Teaching Materials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matsuda, Hiroshi; Shindo, Yoshiaki

    2006-01-01

    The 3D computer graphics (3D-CG) animation using a virtual actor's speaking is very effective as an educational medium. But it takes a long time to produce a 3D-CG animation. To reduce the cost of producing 3D-CG educational contents and improve the capability of the education system, we have developed a new education system using Virtual Actor.…

  6. Multi-resolution Gabor wavelet feature extraction for needle detection in 3D ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pourtaherian, Arash; Zinger, Svitlana; Mihajlovic, Nenad; de With, Peter H. N.; Huang, Jinfeng; Ng, Gary C.; Korsten, Hendrikus H. M.

    2015-12-01

    Ultrasound imaging is employed for needle guidance in various minimally invasive procedures such as biopsy guidance, regional anesthesia and brachytherapy. Unfortunately, a needle guidance using 2D ultrasound is very challenging, due to a poor needle visibility and a limited field of view. Nowadays, 3D ultrasound systems are available and more widely used. Consequently, with an appropriate 3D image-based needle detection technique, needle guidance and interventions may significantly be improved and simplified. In this paper, we present a multi-resolution Gabor transformation for an automated and reliable extraction of the needle-like structures in a 3D ultrasound volume. We study and identify the best combination of the Gabor wavelet frequencies. High precision in detecting the needle voxels leads to a robust and accurate localization of the needle for the intervention support. Evaluation in several ex-vivo cases shows that the multi-resolution analysis significantly improves the precision of the needle voxel detection from 0.23 to 0.32 at a high recall rate of 0.75 (gain 40%), where a better robustness and confidence were confirmed in the practical experiments.

  7. Reconfigurable 2D cMUT-ASIC arrays for 3D ultrasound image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Jongkeun; Jung, Sungjin; Kim, Youngil; Cho, Kyungil; Kim, Baehyung; Lee, Seunghun; Na, Junseok; Yang, Ikseok; Kwon, Oh-kyong; Kim, Dongwook

    2012-03-01

    This paper describes the design and implementations of the complete 2D capacitive micromachined ultrasound transducer electronics and its analog front-end module for transmitting high voltage ultrasound pulses and receiving its echo signals to realize 3D ultrasound image. In order to minimize parasitic capacitances and ultimately improve signal-to- noise ratio (SNR), cMUT has to be integrate with Tx/Rx electronics. Additionally, in order to integrate 2D cMUT array module, significant optimized high voltage pulser circuitry, low voltage analog/digital circuit design and packaging challenges are required due to high density of elements and small pitch of each element. We designed 256(16x16)- element cMUT and reconfigurable driving ASIC composed of 120V high voltage pulser, T/R switch, low noise preamplifier and digital control block to set Tx frequency of ultrasound and pulse train in each element. Designed high voltage analog ASIC was successfully bonded with 2D cMUT array by flip-chip bonding process and it connected with analog front-end board to transmit pulse-echo signals. This implementation of reconfigurable cMUT-ASIC-AFE board enables us to produce large aperture 2D transducer array and acquire high quality of 3D ultrasound image.

  8. FUN3D and CFL3D Computations for the First High Lift Prediction Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Michael A.; Lee-Rausch, Elizabeth M.; Rumsey, Christopher L.

    2011-01-01

    Two Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes codes were used to compute flow over the NASA Trapezoidal Wing at high lift conditions for the 1st AIAA CFD High Lift Prediction Workshop, held in Chicago in June 2010. The unstructured-grid code FUN3D and the structured-grid code CFL3D were applied to several different grid systems. The effects of code, grid system, turbulence model, viscous term treatment, and brackets were studied. The SST model on this configuration predicted lower lift than the Spalart-Allmaras model at high angles of attack; the Spalart-Allmaras model agreed better with experiment. Neglecting viscous cross-derivative terms caused poorer prediction in the wing tip vortex region. Output-based grid adaptation was applied to the unstructured-grid solutions. The adapted grids better resolved wake structures and reduced flap flow separation, which was also observed in uniform grid refinement studies. Limitations of the adaptation method as well as areas for future improvement were identified.

  9. Development of a 3D ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cool, Derek; Sherebrin, Shi; Izawa, Jonathan; Fenster, Aaron

    2007-03-01

    Biopsy of the prostate using ultrasound guidance is the clinical gold standard for diagnosis of prostate adenocarinoma. However, because early stage tumors are rarely visible under US, the procedure carries high false-negative rates and often patients require multiple biopsies before cancer is detected. To improve cancer detection, it is imperative that throughout the biopsy procedure, physicians know where they are within the prostate and where they have sampled during prior biopsies. The current biopsy procedure is limited to using only 2D ultrasound images to find and record target biopsy core sample sites. This information leaves ambiguity as the physician tries to interpret the 2D information and apply it to their 3D workspace. We have developed a 3D ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy system that provides 3D intra-biopsy information to physicians for needle guidance and biopsy location recording. The system is designed to conform to the workflow of the current prostate biopsy procedure, making it easier for clinical integration. In this paper, we describe the system design and validate its accuracy by performing an in vitro biopsy procedure on US/CT multi-modal patient-specific prostate phantoms. A clinical sextant biopsy was performed by a urologist on the phantoms and the 3D models of the prostates were generated with volume errors less than 4% and mean boundary errors of less than 1 mm. Using the 3D biopsy system, needles were guided to within 1.36 +/- 0.83 mm of 3D targets and the position of the biopsy sites were accurately localized to 1.06 +/- 0.89 mm for the two prostates.

  10. Reconstruction of 3D ultrasound images based on Cyclic Regularized Savitzky-Golay filters.

    PubMed

    Toonkum, Pollakrit; Suwanwela, Nijasri C; Chinrungrueng, Chedsada

    2011-02-01

    This paper presents a new three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound reconstruction algorithm for generation of 3D images from a series of two-dimensional (2D) B-scans acquired in the mechanical linear scanning framework. Unlike most existing 3D ultrasound reconstruction algorithms, which have been developed and evaluated in the freehand scanning framework, the new algorithm has been designed to capitalize the regularity pattern of the mechanical linear scanning, where all the B-scan slices are precisely parallel and evenly spaced. The new reconstruction algorithm, referred to as the Cyclic Regularized Savitzky-Golay (CRSG) filter, is a new variant of the Savitzky-Golay (SG) smoothing filter. The CRSG filter has been improved upon the original SG filter in two respects: First, the cyclic indicator function has been incorporated into the least square cost function to enable the CRSG filter to approximate nonuniformly spaced data of the unobserved image intensities contained in unfilled voxels and reduce speckle noise of the observed image intensities contained in filled voxels. Second, the regularization function has been augmented to the least squares cost function as a mechanism to balance between the degree of speckle reduction and the degree of detail preservation. The CRSG filter has been evaluated and compared with the Voxel Nearest-Neighbor (VNN) interpolation post-processed by the Adaptive Speckle Reduction (ASR) filter, the VNN interpolation post-processed by the Adaptive Weighted Median (AWM) filter, the Distance-Weighted (DW) interpolation, and the Adaptive Distance-Weighted (ADW) interpolation, on reconstructing a synthetic 3D spherical image and a clinical 3D carotid artery bifurcation in the mechanical linear scanning framework. This preliminary evaluation indicates that the CRSG filter is more effective in both speckle reduction and geometric reconstruction of 3D ultrasound images than the other methods. PMID:20696448

  11. Dynamic 2D ultrasound and 3D CT image registration of the beating heart.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xishi; Moore, John; Guiraudon, Gerard; Jones, Douglas L; Bainbridge, Daniel; Ren, Jing; Peters, Terry M

    2009-08-01

    Two-dimensional ultrasound (US) is widely used in minimally invasive cardiac procedures due to its convenience of use and noninvasive nature. However, the low quality of US images often limits their utility as a means for guiding procedures, since it is often difficult to relate the images to their anatomical context. To improve the interpretability of the US images while maintaining US as a flexible anatomical and functional real-time imaging modality, we describe a multimodality image navigation system that integrates 2D US images with their 3D context by registering them to high quality preoperative models based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or computed tomography (CT) images. The mapping from such a model to the patient is completed using spatial and temporal registrations. Spatial registration is performed by a two-step rapid registration method that first approximately aligns the two images as a starting point to an automatic registration procedure. Temporal alignment is performed with the aid of electrocardiograph (ECG) signals and a latency compensation method. Registration accuracy is measured by calculating the TRE. Results show that the error between the US and preoperative images of a beating heart phantom is 1.7 +/-0.4 mm, with a similar performance being observed in in vivo animal experiments.

  12. Automated linking of suspicious findings between automated 3D breast ultrasound volumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gubern-Mérida, Albert; Tan, Tao; van Zelst, Jan; Mann, Ritse M.; Karssemeijer, Nico

    2016-03-01

    Automated breast ultrasound (ABUS) is a 3D imaging technique which is rapidly emerging as a safe and relatively inexpensive modality for screening of women with dense breasts. However, reading ABUS examinations is very time consuming task since radiologists need to manually identify suspicious findings in all the different ABUS volumes available for each patient. Image analysis techniques to automatically link findings across volumes are required to speed up clinical workflow and make ABUS screening more efficient. In this study, we propose an automated system to, given the location in the ABUS volume being inspected (source), find the corresponding location in a target volume. The target volume can be a different view of the same study or the same view from a prior examination. The algorithm was evaluated using 118 linkages between suspicious abnormalities annotated in a dataset of ABUS images of 27 patients participating in a high risk screening program. The distance between the predicted location and the center of the annotated lesion in the target volume was computed for evaluation. The mean ± stdev and median distance error achieved by the presented algorithm for linkages between volumes of the same study was 7.75±6.71 mm and 5.16 mm, respectively. The performance was 9.54±7.87 and 8.00 mm (mean ± stdev and median) for linkages between volumes from current and prior examinations. The proposed approach has the potential to minimize user interaction for finding correspondences among ABUS volumes.

  13. Accurate Diagnosis of Severe Hypospadias Using 2D and 3D Ultrasounds

    PubMed Central

    López Ramón y Cajal, Carlos; Marín Ortiz, Elena; Sarmiento Carrera, Nerea

    2016-01-01

    The hypospadias is the most common urogenital anomaly of male neonates but the prenatal diagnosis of this is often missed before birth. We present the prenatal diagnosis of a severe penoscrotal hypospadias using 2D and 3D ultrasounds. 3D sonography allowed us the best evaluation of the genitals and their anatomical relations. This ample detailed study allowed us to show the findings to the parents and the pediatric surgeon and to configure the best information about the prognosis and surgical treatment. PMID:27774326

  14. Computations of Emissions Using a 3-D Combustor Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivatsa, S. K.

    1983-01-01

    A general 3-D combustor performance program developed by Garrett was extended to predict soot and NOx emissions. The soot formation and oxidation rates were computed by quasi-global models, taking into account the influence of turbulence. Radiation heat transfer was computed by the six-flux radiation mode. The radiation properties include the influence of CO2 and H2O in addition to soot. NOx emissions were computed from a global four-step hydrocarbon oxidation scheme and a set of rate-controlled reactions involving radicals and nitrogen oxides.

  15. 2D array transducers for real-time 3D ultrasound guidance of interventional devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Light, Edward D.; Smith, Stephen W.

    2009-02-01

    We describe catheter ring arrays for real-time 3D ultrasound guidance of devices such as vascular grafts, heart valves and vena cava filters. We have constructed several prototypes operating at 5 MHz and consisting of 54 elements using the W.L. Gore & Associates, Inc. micro-miniature ribbon cables. We have recently constructed a new transducer using a braided wiring technology from Precision Interconnect. This transducer consists of 54 elements at 4.8 MHz with pitch of 0.20 mm and typical -6 dB bandwidth of 22%. In all cases, the transducer and wiring assembly were integrated with an 11 French catheter of a Cook Medical deployment device for vena cava filters. Preliminary in vivo and in vitro testing is ongoing including simultaneous 3D ultrasound and x-ray fluoroscopy.

  16. Advanced computational tools for 3-D seismic analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Barhen, J.; Glover, C.W.; Protopopescu, V.A.

    1996-06-01

    The global objective of this effort is to develop advanced computational tools for 3-D seismic analysis, and test the products using a model dataset developed under the joint aegis of the United States` Society of Exploration Geophysicists (SEG) and the European Association of Exploration Geophysicists (EAEG). The goal is to enhance the value to the oil industry of the SEG/EAEG modeling project, carried out with US Department of Energy (DOE) funding in FY` 93-95. The primary objective of the ORNL Center for Engineering Systems Advanced Research (CESAR) is to spearhead the computational innovations techniques that would enable a revolutionary advance in 3-D seismic analysis. The CESAR effort is carried out in collaboration with world-class domain experts from leading universities, and in close coordination with other national laboratories and oil industry partners.

  17. Random Walk Based Segmentation for the Prostate on 3D Transrectal Ultrasound Images

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Ling; Guo, Rongrong; Tian, Zhiqiang; Venkataraman, Rajesh; Sarkar, Saradwata; Liu, Xiabi; Nieh, Peter T.; Master, Viraj V.; Schuster, David M.; Fei, Baowei

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes a new semi-automatic segmentation method for the prostate on 3D transrectal ultrasound images (TRUS) by combining the region and classification information. We use a random walk algorithm to express the region information efficiently and flexibly because it can avoid segmentation leakage and shrinking bias. We further use the decision tree as the classifier to distinguish the prostate from the non-prostate tissue because of its fast speed and superior performance, especially for a binary classification problem. Our segmentation algorithm is initialized with the user roughly marking the prostate and non-prostate points on the mid-gland slice which are fitted into an ellipse for obtaining more points. Based on these fitted seed points, we run the random walk algorithm to segment the prostate on the mid-gland slice. The segmented contour and the information from the decision tree classification are combined to determine the initial seed points for the other slices. The random walk algorithm is then used to segment the prostate on the adjacent slice. We propagate the process until all slices are segmented. The segmentation method was tested in 32 3D transrectal ultrasound images. Manual segmentation by a radiologist serves as the gold standard for the validation. The experimental results show that the proposed method achieved a Dice similarity coefficient of 91.37±0.05%. The segmentation method can be applied to 3D ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy and other applications. PMID:27660383

  18. Random walk based segmentation for the prostate on 3D transrectal ultrasound images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Ling; Guo, Rongrong; Tian, Zhiqiang; Venkataraman, Rajesh; Sarkar, Saradwata; Liu, Xiabi; Nieh, Peter T.; Master, Viraj V.; Schuster, David M.; Fei, Baowei

    2016-03-01

    This paper proposes a new semi-automatic segmentation method for the prostate on 3D transrectal ultrasound images (TRUS) by combining the region and classification information. We use a random walk algorithm to express the region information efficiently and flexibly because it can avoid segmentation leakage and shrinking bias. We further use the decision tree as the classifier to distinguish the prostate from the non-prostate tissue because of its fast speed and superior performance, especially for a binary classification problem. Our segmentation algorithm is initialized with the user roughly marking the prostate and non-prostate points on the mid-gland slice which are fitted into an ellipse for obtaining more points. Based on these fitted seed points, we run the random walk algorithm to segment the prostate on the mid-gland slice. The segmented contour and the information from the decision tree classification are combined to determine the initial seed points for the other slices. The random walk algorithm is then used to segment the prostate on the adjacent slice. We propagate the process until all slices are segmented. The segmentation method was tested in 32 3D transrectal ultrasound images. Manual segmentation by a radiologist serves as the gold standard for the validation. The experimental results show that the proposed method achieved a Dice similarity coefficient of 91.37+/-0.05%. The segmentation method can be applied to 3D ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy and other applications.

  19. Automatic nipple detection on 3D images of an automated breast ultrasound system (ABUS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Javanshir Moghaddam, Mandana; Tan, Tao; Karssemeijer, Nico; Platel, Bram

    2014-03-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that applying Automated Breast Ultrasound in addition to mammography in women with dense breasts can lead to additional detection of small, early stage breast cancers which are occult in corresponding mammograms. In this paper, we proposed a fully automatic method for detecting the nipple location in 3D ultrasound breast images acquired from Automated Breast Ultrasound Systems. The nipple location is a valuable landmark to report the position of possible abnormalities in a breast or to guide image registration. To detect the nipple location, all images were normalized. Subsequently, features have been extracted in a multi scale approach and classification experiments were performed using a gentle boost classifier to identify the nipple location. The method was applied on a dataset of 100 patients with 294 different 3D ultrasound views from Siemens and U-systems acquisition systems. Our database is a representative sample of cases obtained in clinical practice by four medical centers. The automatic method could accurately locate the nipple in 90% of AP (Anterior-Posterior) views and in 79% of the other views.

  20. 3D ultrasound Nakagami imaging for radiation-induced vaginal fibrosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiaofeng; Rossi, Peter; Shelton, Joseph; Bruner, Debrorah; Tridandapani, Srini; Liu, Tian

    2014-03-01

    Radiation-induced vaginal fibrosis is a debilitating side-effect affecting up to 80% of women receiving radiotherapy for their gynecological (GYN) malignancies. Despite the significant incidence and severity, little research has been conducted to identify the pathophysiologic changes of vaginal toxicity. In a previous study, we have demonstrated that ultrasound Nakagami shape and PDF parameters can be used to quantify radiation-induced vaginal toxicity. These Nakagami parameters are derived from the statistics of ultrasound backscattered signals to capture the physical properties (e.g., arrangement and distribution) of the biological tissues. In this paper, we propose to expand this Nakagami imaging concept from 2D to 3D to fully characterize radiation-induced changes to the vaginal wall within the radiation treatment field. A pilot study with 5 post-radiotherapy GYN patients was conducted using a clinical ultrasound scanner (6 MHz) with a mechanical stepper. A serial of 2D ultrasound images, with radio-frequency (RF) signals, were acquired at 1 mm step size. The 2D Nakagami shape and PDF parameters were calculated from the RF signal envelope with a sliding window, and then 3D Nakagami parameter images were generated from the parallel 2D images. This imaging method may be useful as we try to monitor radiation-induced vaginal injury, and address vaginal toxicities and sexual dysfunction in women after radiotherapy for GYN malignancies.

  1. 3-D ultrasound-guided robotic needle steering in biological tissue.

    PubMed

    Adebar, Troy K; Fletcher, Ashley E; Okamura, Allison M

    2014-12-01

    Robotic needle steering systems have the potential to greatly improve medical interventions, but they require new methods for medical image guidance. Three-dimensional (3-D) ultrasound is a widely available, low-cost imaging modality that may be used to provide real-time feedback to needle steering robots. Unfortunately, the poor visibility of steerable needles in standard grayscale ultrasound makes automatic segmentation of the needles impractical. A new imaging approach is proposed, in which high-frequency vibration of a steerable needle makes it visible in ultrasound Doppler images. Experiments demonstrate that segmentation from this Doppler data is accurate to within 1-2 mm. An image-guided control algorithm that incorporates the segmentation data as feedback is also described. In experimental tests in ex vivo bovine liver tissue, a robotic needle steering system implementing this control scheme was able to consistently steer a needle tip to a simulated target with an average error of 1.57 mm. Implementation of 3-D ultrasound-guided needle steering in biological tissue represents a significant step toward the clinical application of robotic needle steering.

  2. Image guidance using 3D-ultrasound (3D-US) for daily positioning of lumpectomy cavity for boost irradiation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Purpose The goal of this study was to evaluate the use of 3D ultrasound (3DUS) breast IGRT for electron and photon lumpectomy site boost treatments. Materials and methods 20 patients with a prescribed photon or electron boost were enrolled in this study. 3DUS images were acquired both at time of simulation, to form a coregistered CT/3DUS dataset, and at the time of daily treatment delivery. Intrafractional motion between treatment and simulation 3DUS datasets were calculated to determine IGRT shifts. Photon shifts were evaluated isocentrically, while electron shifts were evaluated in the beam's-eye-view. Volume differences between simulation and first boost fraction were calculated. Further, to control for the effect of change in seroma/cavity volume due to time lapse between the 2 sets of images, interfraction IGRT shifts using the first boost fraction as reference for all subsequent treatment fractions were also calculated. Results For photon boosts, IGRT shifts were 1.1 ± 0.5 cm and 50% of fractions required a shift >1.0 cm. Volume change between simulation and boost was 49 ± 31%. Shifts when using the first boost fraction as reference were 0.8 ± 0.4 cm and 24% required a shift >1.0 cm. For electron boosts, shifts were 1.0 ± 0.5 cm and 52% fell outside the dosimetric penumbra. Interfraction analysis relative to the first fraction noted the shifts to be 0.8 ± 0.4 cm and 36% fell outside the penumbra. Conclusion The lumpectomy cavity can shift significantly during fractionated radiation therapy. 3DUS can be used to image the cavity and correct for interfractional motion. Further studies to better define the protocol for clinical application of IGRT in breast cancer is needed. PMID:21554697

  3. Inter-rater reliability in the classification of supraspinatus tendon tears using 3D ultrasound – a question of experience?

    PubMed Central

    Marx, Christian; Micheroli, Raphael

    2016-01-01

    Background Three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound of the shoulder is characterized by a comparable accuracy to two-dimensional (2D) ultrasound. No studies investigating 2D versus 3D inter-rater reliability in the detection of supraspinatus tendon tears taking into account the level of experience of the raters have been carried out so far. Objectives The aim of this study was to determine the inter-rater reliability in the analysis of 3D ultrasound image sets of the supraspinatus tendon between sonographer with different levels of experience. Patients and methods Non-interventional, prospective, observational pilot study of 2309 images of 127 adult patients suffering from unilateral shoulder pain. 3D ultrasound image sets were scored by three raters independently. The intra-and interrater reliabilities were calculated. Results There was an excellent intra-rater reliability of rater A in the overall classification of supraspinatus tendon tears (2D vs 3D κ = 0.892, pairwise reliability 93.81%, 3D scoring round 1 vs 3D scoring round 2 κ = 0.875, pairwise reliability 92.857%). The inter-rater reliability was only moderate compared to rater B on 3D (κ = 0.497, pairwise reliability 70.95%) and fair compared to rater C (κ = 0.238, pairwise reliability 42.38%). Conclusions The reliability of 3D ultrasound of the supraspinatus tendon depends on the level of experience of the sonographer. Experience in 2D ultrasound does not seem to be sufficient for the analysis of 3D ultrasound imaging sets. Therefore, for a 3D ultrasound analysis new diagnostic criteria have to be established and taught even to experienced 2D sonographers to improve reproducibility. PMID:27679728

  4. Inter-rater reliability in the classification of supraspinatus tendon tears using 3D ultrasound – a question of experience?

    PubMed Central

    Marx, Christian; Micheroli, Raphael

    2016-01-01

    Background Three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound of the shoulder is characterized by a comparable accuracy to two-dimensional (2D) ultrasound. No studies investigating 2D versus 3D inter-rater reliability in the detection of supraspinatus tendon tears taking into account the level of experience of the raters have been carried out so far. Objectives The aim of this study was to determine the inter-rater reliability in the analysis of 3D ultrasound image sets of the supraspinatus tendon between sonographer with different levels of experience. Patients and methods Non-interventional, prospective, observational pilot study of 2309 images of 127 adult patients suffering from unilateral shoulder pain. 3D ultrasound image sets were scored by three raters independently. The intra-and interrater reliabilities were calculated. Results There was an excellent intra-rater reliability of rater A in the overall classification of supraspinatus tendon tears (2D vs 3D κ = 0.892, pairwise reliability 93.81%, 3D scoring round 1 vs 3D scoring round 2 κ = 0.875, pairwise reliability 92.857%). The inter-rater reliability was only moderate compared to rater B on 3D (κ = 0.497, pairwise reliability 70.95%) and fair compared to rater C (κ = 0.238, pairwise reliability 42.38%). Conclusions The reliability of 3D ultrasound of the supraspinatus tendon depends on the level of experience of the sonographer. Experience in 2D ultrasound does not seem to be sufficient for the analysis of 3D ultrasound imaging sets. Therefore, for a 3D ultrasound analysis new diagnostic criteria have to be established and taught even to experienced 2D sonographers to improve reproducibility.

  5. 3D deformable organ model based liver motion tracking in ultrasound videos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jung-Bae; Hwang, Youngkyoo; Oh, Young-Taek; Bang, Won-Chul; Lee, Heesae; Kim, James D. K.; Kim, Chang Yeong

    2013-03-01

    This paper presents a novel method of using 2D ultrasound (US) cine images during image-guided therapy to accurately track the 3D position of a tumor even when the organ of interest is in motion due to patient respiration. Tracking is possible thanks to a 3D deformable organ model we have developed. The method consists of three processes in succession. The first process is organ modeling where we generate a personalized 3D organ model from high quality 3D CT or MR data sets captured during three different respiratory phases. The model includes the organ surface, vessel and tumor, which can all deform and move in accord with patient respiration. The second process is registration of the organ model to 3D US images. From 133 respiratory phase candidates generated from the deformable organ model, we resolve the candidate that best matches the 3D US images according to vessel centerline and surface. As a result, we can determine the position of the US probe. The final process is real-time tracking using 2D US cine images captured by the US probe. We determine the respiratory phase by tracking the diaphragm on the image. The 3D model is then deformed according to respiration phase and is fitted to the image by considering the positions of the vessels. The tumor's 3D positions are then inferred based on respiration phase. Testing our method on real patient data, we have found the accuracy of 3D position is within 3.79mm and processing time is 5.4ms during tracking.

  6. Double Ring Array Catheter for In Vivo Real-Time 3D Ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Smith, Stephen W; Gardea, Paul; Patel, Vivek; Douglas, Stephen J; Wolf, Patrick D

    2014-03-12

    We developed new forward-viewing matrix transducers consisting of double ring arrays of 118 total PZT elements integrated into catheters used to deploy medical interventional devices. Our goal is 3D ultrasound guidance of medical device implantation to reduce x-ray fluoroscopy exposure. The double ring arrays were fabricated on inner and outer custom polyimide flexible circuits with inter-element spacing of 0.20 mm and then wrapped around an 11 French (Fr) catheter to produce a 15 Fr catheter (outer diameter [O.D.]). We used a braided cabling technology to connect the elements to the Volumetrics Medical Imaging (VMI) real-time 3D ultrasound scanner. Transducer performance yielded an average -6 dB fractional bandwidth of 49% ± 11% centered at 4.4 MHz for 118 elements. Real-time 3D cardiac scans of the in vivo pig model yielded good image quality including en face views of the tricuspid valve and real-time 3D guidance of an endo-myocardial biopsy catheter introduced into the left ventricle. PMID:24626564

  7. 3D ultrasound volume stitching using phase symmetry and harris corner detection for orthopaedic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalvi, Rupin; Hacihaliloglu, Ilker; Abugharbieh, Rafeef

    2010-03-01

    Stitching of volumes obtained from three dimensional (3D) ultrasound (US) scanners improves visualization of anatomy in many clinical applications. Fast but accurate volume registration remains the key challenge in this area.We propose a volume stitching method based on efficient registration of 3D US volumes obtained from a tracked US probe. Since the volumes, after adjusting for probe motion, are coarsely registered, we obtain salient correspondence points in the central slices of these volumes. This is done by first removing artifacts in the US slices using intensity invariant local phase image processing and then applying the Harris Corner detection algorithm. Fast sub-volume registration on a small neighborhood around the points then gives fast, accurate 3D registration parameters. The method has been tested on 3D US scans of phantom and real human radius and pelvis bones and a phantom human fetus. The method has also been compared to volumetric registration, as well as feature based registration using 3D-SIFT. Quantitative results show average post-registration error of 0.33mm which is comparable to volumetric registration accuracy (0.31mm) and much better than 3D-SIFT based registration which failed to register the volumes. The proposed method was also much faster than volumetric registration (~4.5 seconds versus 83 seconds).

  8. Computer simulation on reconstruction of 3-D flame temperature distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Y.; Yung, K. L.; Wu, Z.; Li, T.

    To measure non-symmetric unsteady three dimensional temperature distribution in flame by simple, economic, fast and accurate means, and to apply a priori information to the measurement both sufficiently and efficiently, we conducted computer simulations. Simulation results proved that finite series-expansion reconstruction method is more suitable for measurement of temperature distribution in flame than transform method which is widely used in medical scanning and nondestructive testing. By comparing errors of simulations with different numbers of views, different domain shapes, different numbers of projections per view, different angles of views and different grid shapes, etc., we find that circle domain, triangular grid and sufficient number of projections per view, can improve the accuracy in the reconstruction of 3-D temperature distribution with limited views. With six views, errors caused by reconstruction computation are reduced, they are smaller than those caused by measurement. Therefore, a comparatively better means of measuring 3-D temperature distribution in flame with limited projection views by emission tomography is achieved. Experimental results also showed that the method we used was appropriate for measurement of 3-D temperature distribution with limited number of views [1].

  9. Local phase tensor features for 3-D ultrasound to statistical shape+pose spine model registration.

    PubMed

    Hacihaliloglu, Ilker; Rasoulian, Abtin; Rohling, Robert N; Abolmaesumi, Purang

    2014-11-01

    Most conventional spine interventions are performed under X-ray fluoroscopy guidance. In recent years, there has been a growing interest to develop nonionizing imaging alternatives to guide these procedures. Ultrasound guidance has emerged as a leading alternative. However, a challenging problem is automatic identification of the spinal anatomy in ultrasound data. In this paper, we propose a local phase-based bone feature enhancement technique that can robustly identify the spine surface in ultrasound images. The local phase information is obtained using a gradient energy tensor filter. This information is used to construct local phase tensors in ultrasound images, which highlight the spine surface. We show that our proposed approach results in a more distinct enhancement of the bone surfaces compared to recently proposed techniques based on monogenic scale-space filters and logarithmic Gabor filters. We also demonstrate that registration accuracy of a statistical shape+pose model of the spine to 3-D ultrasound images can be significantly improved, using the proposed method, compared to those obtained using monogenic scale-space filters and logarithmic Gabor filters.

  10. Simulation of MRI-Guided Transurethral Conformal 3-D Ultrasound Therapy of the Prostate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burtnyk, Mathieu; Chopra, Rajiv; Bronskill, Michael

    2007-05-01

    The capability of MRI to measure spatial heating patterns during therapy delivery with ultrasound makes adaptive thermal therapy possible. Active feedback provided by MR thermometry enables on-line adjustment of the treatment to compensate for tissue/perfusion changes during heating. The feasibility of performing 3-D conformal thermal therapy of the entire prostate gland with a multi-element transurethral ultrasound heating applicator was considered in this study. The major challenge was using MR temperature feedback to adjust simultaneously the device's rate of rotation and the power and frequency of multiple independent ultrasound transducers, to shape the region of thermal damage to the prostate gland in all spatial dimensions while sparing surrounding tissues from damage. The 3-D Bioheat Transfer Equation was used to model the ultrasound therapy using manually segmented MRI prostate geometries from 20 prostate cancer patients. Average prostate dimensions (±SD) were: length: 37.8±7.2 mm, width: 47.1±5.5 mm, height: 28.9±5.7 mm. Typical treatments of the entire prostate volume take less than 30 min. Results from various treatment strategies were compared by calculating the percentage volume of under- and over-treated tissue and the potential thermal damage incurred by important adjacent anatomical structures using "dose-effect" curves. Visualization tools were developed to investigate patient-specific prostate and periprostatic anatomy, as well as the simulated coagulated volumes in 3-D, enabling evaluation of individual patient outcomes. These simulations also enabled the investigation of the number and size of transducer segments required for accurate treatment delivery. In general, the under-treated fraction can be maintained below 1% of the prostate volume, but the over-treated fraction can range up to 15%, emphasizing the importance of accurate location of sensitive adjacent structures.

  11. 3D seismic imaging on massively parallel computers

    SciTech Connect

    Womble, D.E.; Ober, C.C.; Oldfield, R.

    1997-02-01

    The ability to image complex geologies such as salt domes in the Gulf of Mexico and thrusts in mountainous regions is a key to reducing the risk and cost associated with oil and gas exploration. Imaging these structures, however, is computationally expensive. Datasets can be terabytes in size, and the processing time required for the multiple iterations needed to produce a velocity model can take months, even with the massively parallel computers available today. Some algorithms, such as 3D, finite-difference, prestack, depth migration remain beyond the capacity of production seismic processing. Massively parallel processors (MPPs) and algorithms research are the tools that will enable this project to provide new seismic processing capabilities to the oil and gas industry. The goals of this work are to (1) develop finite-difference algorithms for 3D, prestack, depth migration; (2) develop efficient computational approaches for seismic imaging and for processing terabyte datasets on massively parallel computers; and (3) develop a modular, portable, seismic imaging code.

  12. Dynamic 3D computed tomography scanner for vascular imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Mark K.; Holdsworth, David W.; Fenster, Aaron

    2000-04-01

    A 3D dynamic computed-tomography (CT) scanner was developed for imaging objects undergoing periodic motion. The scanner system has high spatial and sufficient temporal resolution to produce quantitative tomographic/volume images of objects such as excised arterial samples perfused under physiological pressure conditions and enables the measurements of the local dynamic elastic modulus (Edyn) of the arteries in the axial and longitudinal directions. The system was comprised of a high resolution modified x-ray image intensifier (XRII) based computed tomographic system and a computer-controlled cardiac flow simulator. A standard NTSC CCD camera with a macro lens was coupled to the electro-optically zoomed XRII to acquire dynamic volumetric images. Through prospective cardiac gating and computer synchronized control, a time-resolved sequence of 20 mm thick high resolution volume images of porcine aortic specimens during one simulated cardiac cycle were obtained. Performance evaluation of the scanners illustrated that tomographic images can be obtained with resolution as high as 3.2 mm-1 with only a 9% decrease in the resolution for objects moving at velocities of 1 cm/s in 2D mode and static spatial resolution of 3.55 mm-1 with only a 14% decrease in the resolution in 3D mode for objects moving at a velocity of 10 cm/s. Application of the system for imaging of intact excised arterial specimens under simulated physiological flow/pressure conditions enabled measurements of the Edyn of the arteries with a precision of +/- kPa for the 3D scanner. Evaluation of the Edyn in the axial and longitudinal direction produced values of 428 +/- 35 kPa and 728 +/- 71 kPa, demonstrating the isotropic and homogeneous viscoelastic nature of the vascular specimens. These values obtained from the Dynamic CT systems were not statistically different (p less than 0.05) from the values obtained by standard uniaxial tensile testing and volumetric measurements.

  13. Femoroacetabular impingement with chronic acetabular rim fracture - 3D computed tomography, 3D magnetic resonance imaging and arthroscopic correlation

    PubMed Central

    Chhabra, Avneesh; Nordeck, Shaun; Wadhwa, Vibhor; Madhavapeddi, Sai; Robertson, William J

    2015-01-01

    Femoroacetabular impingement is uncommonly associated with a large rim fragment of bone along the superolateral acetabulum. We report an unusual case of femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) with chronic acetabular rim fracture. Radiographic, 3D computed tomography, 3D magnetic resonance imaging and arthroscopy correlation is presented with discussion of relative advantages and disadvantages of various modalities in the context of FAI. PMID:26191497

  14. A PET/CT Directed, 3D Ultrasound-Guided Biopsy System for Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Master, Viraj; Nieh, Peter; Akbari, Hamed; Yang, Xiaofeng; Fenster, Aaron; Schuster, David

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer affects 1 in 6 men in the USA. Systematic transrectal ultrasound (TRUS)-guided biopsy is the standard method for a definitive diagnosis of prostate cancer. However, this “blind” biopsy approach can miss at least 20% of prostate cancers. In this study, we are developing a PET/CT directed, 3D ultrasound image-guided biopsy system for improved detection of prostate cancer. In order to plan biopsy in three dimensions, we developed an automatic segmentation method based wavelet transform for 3D TRUS images of the prostate. The segmentation was tested in five patients with a DICE overlap ratio of more than 91%. In order to incorporate PET/CT images into ultrasound-guided biopsy, we developed a nonrigid registration algorithm for TRUS and PET/CT images. The registration method has been tested in a prostate phantom with a target registration error (TRE) of less than 0.4 mm. The segmentation and registration methods are two key components of the multimodality molecular image-guided biopsy system. PMID:26866061

  15. Accuracy of volume measurement using 3D ultrasound and development of CT-3D US image fusion algorithm for prostate cancer radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Baek, Jihye; Huh, Jangyoung; Hyun An, So; Oh, Yoonjin; Kim, Myungsoo; Kim, DongYoung; Chung, Kwangzoo; Cho, Sungho; Lee, Rena

    2013-02-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the accuracy of measuring volumes using three-dimensional ultrasound (3D US), and to verify the feasibility of the replacement of CT-MR fusion images with CT-3D US in radiotherapy treatment planning. Methods: Phantoms, consisting of water, contrast agent, and agarose, were manufactured. The volume was measured using 3D US, CT, and MR devices. A CT-3D US and MR-3D US image fusion software was developed using the Insight Toolkit library in order to acquire three-dimensional fusion images. The quality of the image fusion was evaluated using metric value and fusion images. Results: Volume measurement, using 3D US, shows a 2.8 {+-} 1.5% error, 4.4 {+-} 3.0% error for CT, and 3.1 {+-} 2.0% error for MR. The results imply that volume measurement using the 3D US devices has a similar accuracy level to that of CT and MR. Three-dimensional image fusion of CT-3D US and MR-3D US was successfully performed using phantom images. Moreover, MR-3D US image fusion was performed using human bladder images. Conclusions: 3D US could be used in the volume measurement of human bladders and prostates. CT-3D US image fusion could be used in monitoring the target position in each fraction of external beam radiation therapy. Moreover, the feasibility of replacing the CT-MR image fusion to the CT-3D US in radiotherapy treatment planning was verified.

  16. Breast Density Analysis with Automated Whole-Breast Ultrasound: Comparison with 3-D Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jeon-Hor; Lee, Yan-Wei; Chan, Si-Wa; Yeh, Dah-Cherng; Chang, Ruey-Feng

    2016-05-01

    In this study, a semi-automatic breast segmentation method was proposed on the basis of the rib shadow to extract breast regions from 3-D automated whole-breast ultrasound (ABUS) images. The density results were correlated with breast density values acquired with 3-D magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). MRI images of 46 breasts were collected from 23 women without a history of breast disease. Each subject also underwent ABUS. We used Otsu's thresholding method on ABUS images to obtain local rib shadow information, which was combined with the global rib shadow information (extracted from all slice projections) and integrated with the anatomy's breast tissue structure to determine the chest wall line. The fuzzy C-means classifier was used to extract the fibroglandular tissues from the acquired images. Whole-breast volume (WBV) and breast percentage density (BPD) were calculated in both modalities. Linear regression was used to compute the correlation of density results between the two modalities. The consistency of density measurement was also analyzed on the basis of intra- and inter-operator variation. There was a high correlation of density results between MRI and ABUS (R(2) = 0.798 for WBV, R(2) = 0.825 for PBD). The mean WBV from ABUS images was slightly smaller than the mean WBV from MR images (MRI: 342.24 ± 128.08 cm(3), ABUS: 325.47 ± 136.16 cm(3), p < 0.05). In addition, the BPD calculated from MR images was smaller than the BPD from ABUS images (MRI: 24.71 ± 15.16%, ABUS: 28.90 ± 17.73%, p < 0.05). The intra-operator and inter-operator variant analysis results indicated that there was no statistically significant difference in breast density measurement variation between the two modalities. Our results revealed a high correlation in WBV and BPD between MRI and ABUS. Our study suggests that ABUS provides breast density information useful in the assessment of breast health. PMID:26831342

  17. Breast Density Analysis with Automated Whole-Breast Ultrasound: Comparison with 3-D Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jeon-Hor; Lee, Yan-Wei; Chan, Si-Wa; Yeh, Dah-Cherng; Chang, Ruey-Feng

    2016-05-01

    In this study, a semi-automatic breast segmentation method was proposed on the basis of the rib shadow to extract breast regions from 3-D automated whole-breast ultrasound (ABUS) images. The density results were correlated with breast density values acquired with 3-D magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). MRI images of 46 breasts were collected from 23 women without a history of breast disease. Each subject also underwent ABUS. We used Otsu's thresholding method on ABUS images to obtain local rib shadow information, which was combined with the global rib shadow information (extracted from all slice projections) and integrated with the anatomy's breast tissue structure to determine the chest wall line. The fuzzy C-means classifier was used to extract the fibroglandular tissues from the acquired images. Whole-breast volume (WBV) and breast percentage density (BPD) were calculated in both modalities. Linear regression was used to compute the correlation of density results between the two modalities. The consistency of density measurement was also analyzed on the basis of intra- and inter-operator variation. There was a high correlation of density results between MRI and ABUS (R(2) = 0.798 for WBV, R(2) = 0.825 for PBD). The mean WBV from ABUS images was slightly smaller than the mean WBV from MR images (MRI: 342.24 ± 128.08 cm(3), ABUS: 325.47 ± 136.16 cm(3), p < 0.05). In addition, the BPD calculated from MR images was smaller than the BPD from ABUS images (MRI: 24.71 ± 15.16%, ABUS: 28.90 ± 17.73%, p < 0.05). The intra-operator and inter-operator variant analysis results indicated that there was no statistically significant difference in breast density measurement variation between the two modalities. Our results revealed a high correlation in WBV and BPD between MRI and ABUS. Our study suggests that ABUS provides breast density information useful in the assessment of breast health.

  18. A compact robotic apparatus and method for 3-D ultrasound guided prostate therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bax, Jeffrey; Gardi, Lori; Montreuil, Jacques; Smith, David; Fenster, Aaron

    2007-03-01

    Ultrasound imaging has revolutionized the treatment of prostate cancer by producing increasingly accurate models of the prostate and influencing sophisticated targeting procedures for the insertion of radioactive seeds during brachytherapy. Three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound imaging, which allows 3D models of the prostate to be constructed from a series of two-dimensional images, helps to accurately target and implant seeds into the prostate. We have developed a compact robotic apparatus, as well as an effective method for guiding and controlling the insertion of transperineal needles into the prostate. This device has been designed to accurately guide a needle in 3D space so that the needle can be inserted into the prostate at an angle that does not interfere with the pubic arch. The physician can adjust manually or automatically the position of the apparatus in order to place several radioactive seeds into the prostate at designated target locations. Because many physicians are wary of conducting robotic surgical procedures, the apparatus has been developed so that the physician can position the needle for manual insertion and apply a method for manually releasing the needle without damaging the apparatus or endangering the patient.

  19. Needle Trajectory and Tip Localization in Real-Time 3-D Ultrasound Using a Moving Stylus.

    PubMed

    Beigi, Parmida; Rohling, Robert; Salcudean, Tim; Lessoway, Victoria A; Ng, Gary C

    2015-07-01

    Described here is a novel approach to needle localization in 3-D ultrasound based on automatic detection of small changes in appearance on movement of the needle stylus. By stylus oscillation, including its full insertion into the cannula to the tip, the image processing techniques can localize the needle trajectory and the tip in the 3-D ultrasound volume. The 3-D needle localization task is reduced to two 2-D localizations using orthogonal projections. To evaluate our method, we tested it on three different ex vivo tissue types, and the preliminary results indicated that the method accuracy lies within clinical acceptance, with average error ranges of 0.9°-1.4° in needle trajectory and 0.8-1.1 mm in needle tip. Results also indicate that method performance is independent of the echogenicity of the tissue. This technique is a safe way of producing ultrasonic intensity changes and appears to introduce negligible risk to the patient, as the outer cannula remains fixed.

  20. Pitch-catch phase aberration correction of multiple isoplanatic patches for 3-D transcranial ultrasound imaging.

    PubMed

    Lindsey, Brooks D; Smith, Stephen W

    2013-03-01

    Having previously presented the ultrasound brain helmet, a system for simultaneous 3-D ultrasound imaging via both temporal bone acoustic windows, the scanning geometry of this system is utilized to allow each matrix array to serve as a correction source for the opposing array. Aberration is estimated using cross-correlation of RF channel signals, followed by least mean squares solution of the resulting overdetermined system. Delay maps are updated and real-time 3-D scanning resumes. A first attempt is made at using multiple arrival time maps to correct multiple unique aberrators within a single transcranial imaging volume, i.e., several isoplanatic patches. This adaptive imaging technique, which uses steered unfocused waves transmitted by the opposing, or beacon, array, updates the transmit and receive delays of 5 isoplanatic patches within a 64° x 64° volume. In phantom experiments, color flow voxels above a common threshold have also increased by an average of 92%, whereas color flow variance decreased by an average of 10%. This approach has been applied to both temporal acoustic windows of two human subjects, yielding increases in echo brightness in 5 isoplanatic patches with a mean value of 24.3 ± 9.1%, suggesting that such a technique may be beneficial in the future for performing noninvasive 3-D color flow imaging of cerebrovascular disease, including stroke.

  1. Pitch–Catch Phase Aberration Correction of Multiple Isoplanatic Patches for 3-D Transcranial Ultrasound Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Lindsey, Brooks D.; Smith, Stephen W.

    2013-01-01

    Having previously presented the ultrasound brain helmet, a system for simultaneous 3-D ultrasound imaging via both temporal bone acoustic windows, the scanning geometry of this system is utilized to allow each matrix array to serve as a correction source for the opposing array. Aberration is estimated using cross-correlation of RF channel signals, followed by least mean squares solution of the resulting overdetermined system. Delay maps are updated and real-time 3-D scanning resumes. A first attempt is made at using multiple arrival time maps to correct multiple unique aberrators within a single transcranial imaging volume, i.e., several isoplanatic patches. This adaptive imaging technique, which uses steered unfocused waves transmitted by the opposing, or beacon, array, updates the transmit and receive delays of 5 isoplanatic patches within a 64° × 64° volume. In phantom experiments, color flow voxels above a common threshold have also increased by an average of 92%, whereas color flow variance decreased by an average of 10%. This approach has been applied to both temporal acoustic windows of two human subjects, yielding increases in echo brightness in 5 isoplanatic patches with a mean value of 24.3 ± 9.1%, suggesting that such a technique may be beneficial in the future for performing noninvasive 3-D color flow imaging of cerebrovascular disease, including stroke. PMID:23475914

  2. Improved Visualization of Intracranial Vessels with Intraoperative Coregistration of Rotational Digital Subtraction Angiography and Intraoperative 3D Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Podlesek, Dino; Meyer, Tobias; Morgenstern, Ute; Schackert, Gabriele; Kirsch, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Ultrasound can visualize and update the vessel status in real time during cerebral vascular surgery. We studied the depiction of parent vessels and aneurysms with a high-resolution 3D intraoperative ultrasound imaging system during aneurysm clipping using rotational digital subtraction angiography as a reference. Methods We analyzed 3D intraoperative ultrasound in 39 patients with cerebral aneurysms to visualize the aneurysm intraoperatively and the nearby vascular tree before and after clipping. Simultaneous coregistration of preoperative subtraction angiography data with 3D intraoperative ultrasound was performed to verify the anatomical assignment. Results Intraoperative ultrasound detected 35 of 43 aneurysms (81%) in 39 patients. Thirty-nine intraoperative ultrasound measurements were matched with rotational digital subtraction angiography and were successfully reconstructed during the procedure. In 7 patients, the aneurysm was partially visualized by 3D-ioUS or was not in field of view. Post-clipping intraoperative ultrasound was obtained in 26 and successfully reconstructed in 18 patients (69%) despite clip related artefacts. The overlap between 3D-ioUS aneurysm volume and preoperative rDSA aneurysm volume resulted in a mean accuracy of 0.71 (Dice coefficient). Conclusions Intraoperative coregistration of 3D intraoperative ultrasound data with preoperative rotational digital subtraction angiography is possible with high accuracy. It allows the immediate visualization of vessels beyond the microscopic field, as well as parallel assessment of blood velocity, aneurysm and vascular tree configuration. Although spatial resolution is lower than for standard angiography, the method provides an excellent vascular overview, advantageous interpretation of 3D-ioUS and immediate intraoperative feedback of the vascular status. A prerequisite for understanding vascular intraoperative ultrasound is image quality and a successful match with preoperative

  3. Evaluation of Gastric Volumes: Comparison of 3-D Ultrasound and Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Buisman, Wijnand J; Mauritz, Femke A; Westerhuis, Wouter E; Gilja, Odd Helge; van der Zee, David C; van Herwaarden-Lindeboom, Maud Y A

    2016-07-01

    To investigate gastric accommodation, accurate measurements of gastric volumes are necessary. An excellent technique to measure gastric volumes is dynamic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Unfortunately, dynamic MRI is expensive and not always available. A new 3-D ultrasound (US) method using a matrix transducer was developed to measure gastric volumes. In this prospective study, 14 healthy volunteers underwent a dynamic MRI and a 3-D US. Gastric volumes were calculated with intra-gastric liquid content and total gastric volume. Mean postprandial liquid gastric content was 397 ± 96.5 mL. Mean volume difference was 1.0 mL with limits of agreement of -8.9 to 10.9 mL. When gastric air was taken into account, mean total gastric volume was 540 ± 115.4 mL SD. Mean volume difference was 2.3 mL with limits of agreement of -21.1 to 26.4 mL. The matrix 3-D US showed excellent agreement with dynamic MRI. Therefore matrix 3-D US is a reliable alternative to measure gastric volumes. PMID:27067418

  4. 3D conformal MRI-guided transurethral ultrasound therapy: results of gel phantom experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    N'Djin, W. A.; Burtnyk, M.; McCormick, S.; Bronskill, M.; Chopra, R.

    2011-09-01

    MRI-guided transurethral ultrasound therapy shows promise for minimally invasive treatment of localized prostate cancer. Previous in-vivo studies demonstrated the feasibility of performing conservative treatments using real-time temperature feedback to control accurately the establishment of coagulative lesions within circumscribed prostate regions. This in-vitro study tested device configuration and control options for achieving full prostate treatments. A multi-channel MRI compatible ultrasound therapy system was evaluated in gel phantoms using 3 canine prostate models. Prostate profiles were 5 mm-step-segmented from T2-weighted MR images performed during previous in-vivo experiments. During ultrasound exposures, each ultrasound element was controlled independently by the 3D controller. Decisions on acoustic power, frequency, and device rotation rate were made in real time based on MR thermometry feedback and prostate radii. Low and high power treatment approaches using maximum acoustic powers of 10 or 20 W.cm-2 were tested as well as single and dual-frequency strategies (4.05/13.10 MHz). The dual-frequency strategy used either the fundamental frequency or the 3rd harmonic component, depending on the prostate radius. The 20 W.cm-2 dual frequency approach was the most efficient configuration in achieving full prostate treatments. Treatment times were about half the duration of those performed with 10 W.cm-2 configurations. Full prostate coagulations were performed in 16.3±6.1 min at a rate of 1.8±0.2 cm3.min-1, and resulted in very little undertreated tissue (<3%). Surrounding organs positioned beyond a safety distance of 1.4±1.0 mm from prostate boundaries were not damaged, particularly rectal wall tissues. In this study, a 3D, MR-thermometry-guided transurethral ultrasound therapy was validated in vitro in a tissue-mimicking phantom for performing full prostate treatment. A dual-frequency configuration with 20 W.cm-2 ultrasound intensity exposure showed good

  5. Accuracy evaluation of a 3D ultrasound-guided biopsy system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wooten, Walter J.; Nye, Jonathan A.; Schuster, David M.; Nieh, Peter T.; Master, Viraj A.; Votaw, John R.; Fei, Baowei

    2013-03-01

    Early detection of prostate cancer is critical in maximizing the probability of successful treatment. Current systematic biopsy approach takes 12 or more randomly distributed core tissue samples within the prostate and can have a high potential, especially with early disease, for a false negative diagnosis. The purpose of this study is to determine the accuracy of a 3D ultrasound-guided biopsy system. Testing was conducted on prostate phantoms created from an agar mixture which had embedded markers. The phantoms were scanned and the 3D ultrasound system was used to direct the biopsy. Each phantom was analyzed with a CT scan to obtain needle deflection measurements. The deflection experienced throughout the biopsy process was dependent on the depth of the biopsy target. The results for markers at a depth of less than 20 mm, 20-30 mm, and greater than 30 mm were 3.3 mm, 4.7 mm, and 6.2 mm, respectively. This measurement encapsulates the entire biopsy process, from the scanning of the phantom to the firing of the biopsy needle. Increased depth of the biopsy target caused a greater deflection from the intended path in most cases which was due to an angular incidence of the biopsy needle. Although some deflection was present, this system exhibits a clear advantage in the targeted biopsy of prostate cancer and has the potential to reduce the number of false negative biopsies for large lesions.

  6. Parallelization of ARC3D with Computer-Aided Tools

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jin, Haoqiang; Hribar, Michelle; Yan, Jerry; Saini, Subhash (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    A series of efforts have been devoted to investigating methods of porting and parallelizing applications quickly and efficiently for new architectures, such as the SCSI Origin 2000 and Cray T3E. This report presents the parallelization of a CFD application, ARC3D, using the computer-aided tools, Cesspools. Steps of parallelizing this code and requirements of achieving better performance are discussed. The generated parallel version has achieved reasonably well performance, for example, having a speedup of 30 for 36 Cray T3E processors. However, this performance could not be obtained without modification of the original serial code. It is suggested that in many cases improving serial code and performing necessary code transformations are important parts for the automated parallelization process although user intervention in many of these parts are still necessary. Nevertheless, development and improvement of useful software tools, such as Cesspools, can help trim down many tedious parallelization details and improve the processing efficiency.

  7. Software-based geometry operations for 3D computer graphics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sima, Mihai; Iancu, Daniel; Glossner, John; Schulte, Michael; Mamidi, Suman

    2006-02-01

    In order to support a broad dynamic range and a high degree of precision, many of 3D renderings fundamental algorithms have been traditionally performed in floating-point. However, fixed-point data representation is preferable over floating-point representation in graphics applications on embedded devices where performance is of paramount importance, while the dynamic range and precision requirements are limited due to the small display sizes (current PDA's are 640 × 480 (VGA), while cell-phones are even smaller). In this paper we analyze the efficiency of a CORDIC-augmented Sandbridge processor when implementing a vertex processor in software using fixed-point arithmetic. A CORDIC-based solution for vertex processing exhibits a number of advantages over classical Multiply-and-Acumulate solutions. First, since a single primitive is used to describe the computation, the code can easily be vectorized and multithreaded, and thus fits the major Sandbridge architectural features. Second, since a CORDIC iteration consists of only a shift operation followed by an addition, the computation may be deeply pipelined. Initially, we outline the Sandbridge architecture extension which encompasses a CORDIC functional unit and the associated instructions. Then, we consider rigid-body rotation, lighting, exponentiation, vector normalization, and perspective division (which are some of the most important data-intensive 3D graphics kernels) and propose a scheme to implement them on the CORDIC-augmented Sandbridge processor. Preliminary results indicate that the performance improvement within the extended instruction set ranges from 3× to 10× (with the exception of rigid body rotation).

  8. Thermal analysis of the surrounding anatomy during 3-D MRI-guided transurethral ultrasound prostate therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burtnyk, Mathieu; Chopra, Rajiv; Bronskill, Michael

    2010-03-01

    Previous numerical simulations have shown that MRI-guided transurethral ultrasound therapy can generate highly accurate volumes of thermal coagulation conforming to 3-D human prostate geometries. The goal of this work is to simulate, quantify and evaluate the thermal impact of these treatments on the rectum, pelvic bone, neurovascular bundles (NVB) and urinary sphincters. This study used twenty 3-D anatomical models of prostate cancer patients and detailed bio-acoustic simulations incorporating an active feedback algorithm which controlled a rotating, planar ultrasound transducer (17-4×3 mm elements, 4.7/9.7 MHz, 10 Wac/cm2). Heating of the adjacent surrounding anatomy was evaluated using thermal tolerances reported in the literature. Heating of the rectum poses the most important safety concern and is influenced largely by the water temperature flowing through an endorectal cooling device; temperatures of 7-37° C are required to limit potential damage to less than 10 mm3 on the outer 1 mm layer of rectum. Significant heating of the pelvic bone was predicted in 30% of the patient models with an ultrasound frequency of 4.7 MHz; setting the frequency to 9.7 MHz when the bone is less than 10 mm away from the prostate reduced heating in all cases below the threshold for irreversible damage. Heating of the NVB was significant in 75% of the patient models in the absence of treatment planning; this proportion was reduced to 5% by using treatment margins of up to 4 mm. To avoid damaging the urinary sphincters, margins from the transducer of 2-4 mm should be used, depending on the transurethral cooling temperature. Simulations show that MRI-guided transurethral therapy can treat the entire prostate accurately. Strategies have been developed which, along with careful treatment planning, can be used to avoid causing thermal injury to the rectum, pelvic bone, NVB and urinary sphincters.

  9. Physical model from 3D ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging scan data reconstruction of lumbosacral myelomeningocele in a fetus with Chiari II malformation.

    PubMed

    Werner, Heron; Lopes, Jorge; Tonni, Gabriele; Araujo Júnior, Edward

    2015-04-01

    Rapid prototyping is becoming a fast-growing and valuable technique for physical models in case of congenital anomalies. Manufacturing models are generally built from three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound, computed tomography, and fetal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan data. Physical prototype has demonstrated to be clinically of value in case of complex fetal malformations and may improve antenatal management especially in cases of craniosynostosis, orofacial clefts, and giant epignathus. In addition, it may enhance parental bonding in visually impaired parents and have didactic value in teaching program. Hereby, the first 3D physical model from 3D ultrasound and MRI scan data reconstruction of lumbosacral myelomeningocele in a third trimester fetus affected by Chiari II malformation is reported. PMID:25686895

  10. Physical model from 3D ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging scan data reconstruction of lumbosacral myelomeningocele in a fetus with Chiari II malformation.

    PubMed

    Werner, Heron; Lopes, Jorge; Tonni, Gabriele; Araujo Júnior, Edward

    2015-04-01

    Rapid prototyping is becoming a fast-growing and valuable technique for physical models in case of congenital anomalies. Manufacturing models are generally built from three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound, computed tomography, and fetal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan data. Physical prototype has demonstrated to be clinically of value in case of complex fetal malformations and may improve antenatal management especially in cases of craniosynostosis, orofacial clefts, and giant epignathus. In addition, it may enhance parental bonding in visually impaired parents and have didactic value in teaching program. Hereby, the first 3D physical model from 3D ultrasound and MRI scan data reconstruction of lumbosacral myelomeningocele in a third trimester fetus affected by Chiari II malformation is reported.

  11. [Cesarean scar ectopic pregnancy: diagnosis with 2D, three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound and 3D power doppler of a case and review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Pavlova, E; Gunev, D; Diavolov, V; Slavchev, B

    2013-01-01

    Cesarean scar pregnancy is rare type of ectopic pregnancy. It is associated with severe complication if it is not diagnosed early in pregnancy. We present a case of difficult first-trimester diagnosis of Cesarean scar pregnancy. In this paper we discuss the incidence of this condition, the antenatal diagnosis, the prognosis and management and the importance of 2D and 3D ultrasound technique as a diagnostic tool. PMID:24501880

  12. Defining the medial-lateral axis of an anatomical femur coordinate system using freehand 3D ultrasound imaging.

    PubMed

    Passmore, Elyse; Sangeux, Morgan

    2016-03-01

    Hip rotation from gait analysis informs clinical decisions regarding correction of femoral torsional deformities. However, it is among the least repeatable due to discrepancies in determining the medial-lateral axis of the femur. Conventional or functional calibration methods may be used to define the axis but there is no benchmark to evaluate these methods. Freehand 3D ultrasound, the coupling of ultrasound with 3D motion capture, may provide such a benchmark. We measured the accuracy in vitro and repeatability in vivo of determining the femur condylar axis from freehand 3D ultrasound. The condylar axis provided the reference medial-lateral axis of the femur and was used to evaluate one conventional method and three functional calibration methods, applied to three calibration movements. Ten healthy subjects (20 limbs) underwent 3D gait analysis and freehand 3D ultrasound. The functional calibration methods were a transformation technique, a geometrical method and a method that minimises variance of knee varus-valgus kinematics (DynaKAD). The conventional method used markers over the femoral epicondyles. The condylar axis determined by 3D ultrasound showed good accuracy in vitro, 1.6° (SD: 0.3°) and good repeatability in vivo, 0.2° (RSMD: 2.3°). The DynaKAD method applied to the walking calibration movement determined the medial-lateral axis closest to the ultrasound reference. The average angular difference in the transverse plane was 3.1° (SD: 6.1°). Freehand 3D ultrasound offers an accurate, non-invasive and relatively fast method to locate the medial-lateral axis of the femur for gait analysis.

  13. Intracranial Catheter for Integrated 3D Ultrasound Imaging & Hyperthermia: Feasibility Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herickhoff, Carl D.; Light, Edward D.; Bing, Kristin Frinkley; Mukundan, Srinivasan; Grant, Gerald A.; Wolf, Patrick D.; Dixon-Tulloch, Ellen; Shih, Timothy; Hsu, Stephen J.; Smith, Stephen W.

    2009-04-01

    In this study, we investigated the feasibility of an intracranial catheter transducer capable of real-time 3D (RT3D) imaging and ultrasound hyperthermia, for application in the visualization and treatment of tumors in the brain. We designed and constructed a 12 Fr, integrated matrix and linear array catheter transducer prototype for combined RT3D imaging and heating capability. This dual-mode catheter incorporated 153 matrix array elements and 11 linear array elements, on a 0.2 mm pitch, with a total aperture size of 8.4 mm×2.3 mm. This array achieved a 3.5° C in vitro temperature rise at a 2 cm focal distance in tissue-mimicking material. The dual-mode catheter prototype was compared with a Siemens 10 Fr AcuNav™ catheter as a gold standard in experiments assessing image quality and therapeutic potential, and both probes were used in a canine brain model to image anatomical structures and color Doppler blood flow and to attempt in vivo heating.

  14. Spatiotemporal non-rigid image registration for 3D ultrasound cardiac motion estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loeckx, D.; Ector, J.; Maes, F.; D'hooge, J.; Vandermeulen, D.; Voigt, J.-U.; Heidbüchel, H.; Suetens, P.

    2007-03-01

    We present a new method to evaluate 4D (3D + time) cardiac ultrasound data sets by nonrigid spatio-temporal image registration. First, a frame-to-frame registration is performed that yields a dense deformation field. The deformation field is used to calculate local spatiotemporal properties of the myocardium, such as the velocity, strain and strain rate. The field is also used to propagate particular points and surfaces, representing e.g. the endo-cardial surface over the different frames. As such, the 4D path of these point is obtained, which can be used to calculate the velocity by which the wall moves and the evolution of the local surface area over time. The wall velocity is not angle-dependent as in classical Doppler imaging, since the 4D data allows calculating the true 3D motion. Similarly, all 3D myocardium strain components can be estimated. Combined they result in local surface area or volume changes which van be color-coded as a measure of local contractability. A diagnostic method that strongly benefits from this technique is cardiac motion and deformation analysis, which is an important aid to quantify the mechanical properties of the myocardium.

  15. The Effect of Ultrasound Stimulation on the Cytoskeletal Organization of Chondrocytes Seeded In 3D Matrices

    PubMed Central

    Noriega, Sandra; Hasanova, Gulnara; Subramanian, Anuradha

    2013-01-01

    The impact of low intensity diffuse ultrasound (LIDUS) stimulation on the cytoskeletal organization of chondrocytes seeded in 3D scaffolds was evaluated. Chondrocytes seeded on 3D chitosan matrices were exposed to LIDUS at 5.0 MHz (~15kPa, 51-secs, 4-applications/day) in order to study the organization of actin, tubulin and vimentin. The results showed that actin presented a cytosolic punctuated distribution, tubulin presented a quasi parallel organization of microtubules whereas vimentin distribution was unaffected. Chondrocytes seeded on 3D scaffolds responded to US stimulation by the disruption of actin stress fibers and were sensitive to the presence of ROCK inhibitor (Y27632). The gene expression of ROCK-I, a key element in the formation of stress fibers and mDia1, was significantly up-regulated under the application of US. We conclude that the results of both the cytoskeletal analyses and gene expression support the argument that the presence of punctuated actin upon US stimulation was accompanied by the up-regulation of the RhoA/ROCK pathway. PMID:22987069

  16. A new combined prior based reconstruction method for compressed sensing in 3D ultrasound imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uddin, Muhammad S.; Islam, Rafiqul; Tahtali, Murat; Lambert, Andrew J.; Pickering, Mark R.

    2015-03-01

    Ultrasound (US) imaging is one of the most popular medical imaging modalities, with 3D US imaging gaining popularity recently due to its considerable advantages over 2D US imaging. However, as it is limited by long acquisition times and the huge amount of data processing it requires, methods for reducing these factors have attracted considerable research interest. Compressed sensing (CS) is one of the best candidates for accelerating the acquisition rate and reducing the data processing time without degrading image quality. However, CS is prone to introduce noise-like artefacts due to random under-sampling. To address this issue, we propose a combined prior-based reconstruction method for 3D US imaging. A Laplacian mixture model (LMM) constraint in the wavelet domain is combined with a total variation (TV) constraint to create a new regularization regularization prior. An experimental evaluation conducted to validate our method using synthetic 3D US images shows that it performs better than other approaches in terms of both qualitative and quantitative measures.

  17. Visualizing ultrasound through computational modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guo, Theresa W.

    2004-01-01

    The Doppler Ultrasound Hematocrit Project (DHP) hopes to find non-invasive methods of determining a person s blood characteristics. Because of the limits of microgravity and the space travel environment, it is important to find non-invasive methods of evaluating the health of persons in space. Presently, there is no well developed method of determining blood composition non-invasively. This projects hopes to use ultrasound and Doppler signals to evaluate the characteristic of hematocrit, the percentage by volume of red blood cells within whole blood. These non-invasive techniques may also be developed to be used on earth for trauma patients where invasive measure might be detrimental. Computational modeling is a useful tool for collecting preliminary information and predictions for the laboratory research. We hope to find and develop a computer program that will be able to simulate the ultrasound signals the project will work with. Simulated models of test conditions will more easily show what might be expected from laboratory results thus help the research group make informed decisions before and during experimentation. There are several existing Matlab based computer programs available, designed to interpret and simulate ultrasound signals. These programs will be evaluated to find which is best suited for the project needs. The criteria of evaluation that will be used are 1) the program must be able to specify transducer properties and specify transmitting and receiving signals, 2) the program must be able to simulate ultrasound signals through different attenuating mediums, 3) the program must be able to process moving targets in order to simulate the Doppler effects that are associated with blood flow, 4) the program should be user friendly and adaptable to various models. After a computer program is chosen, two simulation models will be constructed. These models will simulate and interpret an RF data signal and a Doppler signal.

  18. Segmentation of the common carotid artery with active shape models from 3D ultrasound images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xin; Jin, Jiaoying; He, Wanji; Yuchi, Ming; Ding, Mingyue

    2012-03-01

    Carotid atherosclerosis is a major cause of stroke, a leading cause of death and disability. In this paper, we develop and evaluate a new segmentation method for outlining both lumen and adventitia (inner and outer walls) of common carotid artery (CCA) from three-dimensional ultrasound (3D US) images for carotid atherosclerosis diagnosis and evaluation. The data set consists of sixty-eight, 17× 2× 2, 3D US volume data acquired from the left and right carotid arteries of seventeen patients (eight treated with 80mg atorvastain and nine with placebo), who had carotid stenosis of 60% or more, at baseline and after three months of treatment. We investigate the use of Active Shape Models (ASMs) to segment CCA inner and outer walls after statin therapy. The proposed method was evaluated with respect to expert manually outlined boundaries as a surrogate for ground truth. For the lumen and adventitia segmentations, respectively, the algorithm yielded Dice Similarity Coefficient (DSC) of 93.6%+/- 2.6%, 91.8%+/- 3.5%, mean absolute distances (MAD) of 0.28+/- 0.17mm and 0.34 +/- 0.19mm, maximum absolute distances (MAXD) of 0.87 +/- 0.37mm and 0.74 +/- 0.49mm. The proposed algorithm took 4.4 +/- 0.6min to segment a single 3D US images, compared to 11.7+/-1.2min for manual segmentation. Therefore, the method would promote the translation of carotid 3D US to clinical care for the fast, safety and economical monitoring of the atherosclerotic disease progression and regression during therapy.

  19. Quantification of cerebral ventricle volume change of preterm neonates using 3D ultrasound images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yimin; Kishimoto, Jessica; Qiu, Wu; de Ribaupierre, Sandrine; Fenster, Aaron; Chiu, Bernard

    2015-03-01

    Intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH) is a major cause of brain injury in preterm neonates. Quantitative measurement of ventricular dilation or shrinkage is important for monitoring patients and in evaluation of treatment options. 3D ultrasound (US) has been used to monitor the ventricle volume as a biomarker for ventricular dilation. However, volumetric quantification does not provide information as to where dilation occurs. The location where dilation occurs may be related to specific neurological problems later in life. For example, posterior horn enlargement, with thinning of the corpus callosum and parietal white matter fibres, could be linked to poor visuo-spatial abilities seen in hydrocephalic children. In this work, we report on the development and application of a method used to analyze local surface change of the ventricles of preterm neonates with IVH from 3D US images. The technique is evaluated using manual segmentations from 3D US images acquired in two imaging sessions. The surfaces from baseline and follow-up were registered and then matched on a point-by-point basis. The distance between each pair of corresponding points served as an estimate of local surface change of the brain ventricle at each vertex. The measurements of local surface change were then superimposed on the ventricle surface to produce the 3D local surface change map that provide information on the spatio-temporal dilation pattern of brain ventricles following IVH. This tool can be used to monitor responses to different treatment options, and may provide important information for elucidating the deficiencies a patient will have later in life.

  20. 3D Vectorial Time Domain Computational Integrated Photonics

    SciTech Connect

    Kallman, J S; Bond, T C; Koning, J M; Stowell, M L

    2007-02-16

    The design of integrated photonic structures poses considerable challenges. 3D-Time-Domain design tools are fundamental in enabling technologies such as all-optical logic, photonic bandgap sensors, THz imaging, and fast radiation diagnostics. Such technologies are essential to LLNL and WFO sponsors for a broad range of applications: encryption for communications and surveillance sensors (NSA, NAI and IDIV/PAT); high density optical interconnects for high-performance computing (ASCI); high-bandwidth instrumentation for NIF diagnostics; micro-sensor development for weapon miniaturization within the Stockpile Stewardship and DNT programs; and applications within HSO for CBNP detection devices. While there exist a number of photonics simulation tools on the market, they primarily model devices of interest to the communications industry. We saw the need to extend our previous software to match the Laboratory's unique emerging needs. These include modeling novel material effects (such as those of radiation induced carrier concentrations on refractive index) and device configurations (RadTracker bulk optics with radiation induced details, Optical Logic edge emitting lasers with lateral optical inputs). In addition we foresaw significant advantages to expanding our own internal simulation codes: parallel supercomputing could be incorporated from the start, and the simulation source code would be accessible for modification and extension. This work addressed Engineering's Simulation Technology Focus Area, specifically photonics. Problems addressed from the Engineering roadmap of the time included modeling the Auston switch (an important THz source/receiver), modeling Vertical Cavity Surface Emitting Lasers (VCSELs, which had been envisioned as part of fast radiation sensors), and multi-scale modeling of optical systems (for a variety of applications). We proposed to develop novel techniques to numerically solve the 3D multi-scale propagation problem for both the microchip

  1. 3D in vivo imaging of rat hearts by high frequency ultrasound and its application in myofiber orientation wrapping

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Xulei; Wang, Silun; Shen, Ming; Zhang, Xiaodong; Lerakis, Stamatios; Wagner, Mary B.; Fei, Baowei

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac ultrasound plays an important role in the imaging of hearts in basic cardiovascular research and clinical examinations. 3D ultrasound imaging can provide the geometry or motion information of the heart. Especially, the wrapping of cardiac fiber orientations to the ultrasound volume could supply useful information on the stress distributions and electric action spreading. However, how to acquire 3D ultrasound volumes of the heart of small animals in vivo for cardiac fiber wrapping is still a challenging problem. In this study, we provide an approach to acquire 3D ultrasound volumes of the rat hearts in vivo. The comparison between both in vivo and ex vivo geometries indicated 90.1% Dice similarity. In this preliminary study, the evaluations of the cardiac fiber orientation wrapping errors were 24.7° for the acute angle error and were 22.4° for the inclination angle error. This 3D ultrasound imaging and fiber orientation estimation technique have potential applications in cardiac imaging. PMID:26412926

  2. 3D in vivo imaging of rat hearts by high frequency ultrasound and its application in myofiber orientation wrapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Xulei; Wang, Silun; Shen, Ming; Zhang, Xiaodong; Lerakis, Stamatios; Wagner, Mary B.; Fei, Baowei

    2015-03-01

    Cardiac ultrasound plays an important role in the imaging of hearts in basic cardiovascular research and clinical examinations. 3D ultrasound imaging can provide the geometry or motion information of the heart. Especially, the wrapping of cardiac fiber orientations to the ultrasound volume could supply useful information on the stress distributions and electric action spreading. However, how to acquire 3D ultrasound volumes of the heart of small animals in vivo for cardiac fiber wrapping is still a challenging problem. In this study, we provide an approach to acquire 3D ultrasound volumes of the rat hearts in vivo. The comparison between both in vivo and ex vivo geometries indicated 90.1% Dice similarity. In this preliminary study, the evaluations of the cardiac fiber orientation wrapping errors were 24.7° for the acute angle error and were 22.4° for the inclination angle error. This 3D ultrasound imaging and fiber orientation estimation technique have potential applications in cardiac imaging.

  3. Automated 3D ultrasound elastography of the breast: a phantom validation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendriks, Gijs A. G. M.; Holländer, Branislav; Menssen, Jan; Milkowski, Andy; Hansen, Hendrik H. G.; de Korte, Chris L.

    2016-04-01

    In breast cancer screening, the automated breast volume scanner (ABVS) was introduced as an alternative for mammography since the latter technique is less suitable for women with dense breasts. Although clinical studies show promising results, clinicians report two disadvantages: long acquisition times (>90 s) introducing breathing artefacts, and high recall rates due to detection of many small lesions of uncertain malignant potential. Technical improvements for faster image acquisition and better discrimination between benign and malignant lesions are thus required. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate if 3D ultrasound elastography using plane-wave imaging is feasible. Strain images of a breast elastography phantom were acquired by an ABVS-mimicking device that allowed axial and elevational movement of the attached transducer. Pre- and post-deformation volumes were acquired with different constant speeds (between 1.25 and 40.0 mm s-1) and by three protocols: Go-Go (pre- and post-volumes with identical start and end positions), Go-Return (similar to Go-Go with opposite scanning directions) and Control (pre- and post-volumes acquired per position, this protocol can be seen as reference). Afterwards, 2D and 3D cross-correlation and strain algorithms were applied to the acquired volumes and the results were compared. The Go-Go protocol was shown to be superior with better strain image quality (CNRe and SNRe) than Go-Return and to be similar as Control. This can be attributed to applying opposite mechanical forces to the phantom during the Go-Return protocol, leading to out-of-plane motion. This motion was partly compensated by using 3D cross-correlation. However, the quality was still inferior to Go-Go. Since these results were obtained in a phantom study with controlled deformations, the effect of possible uncontrolled in vivo tissue motion artefacts has to be addressed in future studies. In conclusion, it seems feasible to implement 3D ultrasound

  4. Automated 3D ultrasound elastography of the breast: a phantom validation study.

    PubMed

    Hendriks, Gijs A G M; Holländer, Branislav; Menssen, Jan; Milkowski, Andy; Hansen, Hendrik H G; de Korte, Chris L

    2016-04-01

    In breast cancer screening, the automated breast volume scanner (ABVS) was introduced as an alternative for mammography since the latter technique is less suitable for women with dense breasts. Although clinical studies show promising results, clinicians report two disadvantages: long acquisition times (>90 s) introducing breathing artefacts, and high recall rates due to detection of many small lesions of uncertain malignant potential. Technical improvements for faster image acquisition and better discrimination between benign and malignant lesions are thus required. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate if 3D ultrasound elastography using plane-wave imaging is feasible. Strain images of a breast elastography phantom were acquired by an ABVS-mimicking device that allowed axial and elevational movement of the attached transducer. Pre- and post-deformation volumes were acquired with different constant speeds (between 1.25 and 40.0 mm s(-1)) and by three protocols: Go-Go (pre- and post-volumes with identical start and end positions), Go-Return (similar to Go-Go with opposite scanning directions) and Control (pre- and post-volumes acquired per position, this protocol can be seen as reference). Afterwards, 2D and 3D cross-correlation and strain algorithms were applied to the acquired volumes and the results were compared. The Go-Go protocol was shown to be superior with better strain image quality (CNRe and SNRe) than Go-Return and to be similar as Control. This can be attributed to applying opposite mechanical forces to the phantom during the Go-Return protocol, leading to out-of-plane motion. This motion was partly compensated by using 3D cross-correlation. However, the quality was still inferior to Go-Go. Since these results were obtained in a phantom study with controlled deformations, the effect of possible uncontrolled in vivo tissue motion artefacts has to be addressed in future studies. In conclusion, it seems feasible to implement 3D

  5. 3D Prostate Segmentation of Ultrasound Images Combining Longitudinal Image Registration and Machine Learning

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xiaofeng; Fei, Baowei

    2012-01-01

    We developed a three-dimensional (3D) segmentation method for transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) images, which is based on longitudinal image registration and machine learning. Using longitudinal images of each individual patient, we register previously acquired images to the new images of the same subject. Three orthogonal Gabor filter banks were used to extract texture features from each registered image. Patient-specific Gabor features from the registered images are used to train kernel support vector machines (KSVMs) and then to segment the newly acquired prostate image. The segmentation method was tested in TRUS data from five patients. The average surface distance between our and manual segmentation is 1.18 ± 0.31 mm, indicating that our automatic segmentation method based on longitudinal image registration is feasible for segmenting the prostate in TRUS images. PMID:24027622

  6. GPCA vs. PCA in recognition and 3-D localization of ultrasound reflectors.

    PubMed

    Luna, Carlos A; Jiménez, José A; Pizarro, Daniel; Losada, Cristina; Rodriguez, José M

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, a new method of classification and localization of reflectors, using the time-of-flight (TOF) data obtained from ultrasonic transducers, is presented. The method of classification and localization is based on Generalized Principal Component Analysis (GPCA) applied to the TOF values obtained from a sensor that contains four ultrasound emitters and 16 receivers. Since PCA works with vectorized representations of TOF, it does not take into account the spatial locality of receivers. The GPCA works with two-dimensional representations of TOF, taking into account information on the spatial position of the receivers. This report includes a detailed description of the method of classification and localization and the results of achieved tests with three types of reflectors in 3-D environments: planes, edges, and corners. The results in terms of processing time, classification and localization were very satisfactory for the reflectors located in the range of 50-350 cm.

  7. Constitutive Modeling of Porcine Liver in Indentation Using 3D Ultrasound Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, P.; Socrate, S.; Zickler, T.E.; Howe, R.D.

    2009-01-01

    In this work we present an inverse finite-element modeling framework for constitutive modeling and parameter estimation of soft tissues using full-field volumetric deformation data obtained from 3D ultrasound. The finite-element model is coupled to full-field visual measurements by regularization springs attached at nodal locations. The free ends of the springs are displaced according to the locally estimated tissue motion and the normalized potential energy stored in all springs serves as a measure of model-experiment agreement for material parameter optimization. We demonstrate good accuracy of estimated parameters and consistent convergence properties on synthetically generated data. We present constitutive model selection and parameter estimation for perfused porcine liver in indentation and demonstrate that a quasilinear viscoelastic model with shear modulus relaxation offers good model-experiment agreement in terms of indenter displacement (0.19 mm RMS error) and tissue displacement field (0.97 mm RMS error). PMID:19627823

  8. 3D transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) prostate segmentation based on optimal feature learning framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiaofeng; Rossi, Peter J.; Jani, Ashesh B.; Mao, Hui; Curran, Walter J.; Liu, Tian

    2016-03-01

    We propose a 3D prostate segmentation method for transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) images, which is based on patch-based feature learning framework. Patient-specific anatomical features are extracted from aligned training images and adopted as signatures for each voxel. The most robust and informative features are identified by the feature selection process to train the kernel support vector machine (KSVM). The well-trained SVM was used to localize the prostate of the new patient. Our segmentation technique was validated with a clinical study of 10 patients. The accuracy of our approach was assessed using the manual segmentations (gold standard). The mean volume Dice overlap coefficient was 89.7%. In this study, we have developed a new prostate segmentation approach based on the optimal feature learning framework, demonstrated its clinical feasibility, and validated its accuracy with manual segmentations.

  9. Catheter-Based Ultrasound for 3D Control of Thermal Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diederich, Chris; Chen, Xin; Wootton, Jeffery; Juang, Titania; Nau, Will H.; Kinsey, Adam; Hsu, I.-Chow; Rieke, Viola; Pauly, Kim Butts; Sommer, Graham; Bouley, Donna

    2009-04-01

    Catheter-based ultrasound applicators have been investigated for delivering hyperthermia and thermal ablation for the treatment of cancer and benign diseases. Technology includes an intrauterine applicator integrated with an HDR ring applicator, interstitial applicators for hyperthermia delivery during brachytherapy, interstitial applicators for tumor ablation, and transurethral devices for conformal prostate ablation. Arrays of multiple sectored tubular transducers have been fabricated for interstitial and intrauterine hyperthermia applicators. High-power interstitial versions have been evaluated for percutaneous implantation with directional or dynamic angular control of thermal ablation. Transurethral applicators include curvilinear transducers with rotational sweeping of narrow heating patterns, and multi-sectored tubular devices capable of dynamic angular control without applicator movement. Performance was evaluated in phantom, excised tissue, in vivo experiments in canine prostate under MR temperature monitoring, clinical hyperthermia, and 3D-biothermal simulations with patient anatomy. Interstitial and intrauterine devices can tailor hyperthermia to large treatment volumes, with multisectored control useful to limit exposure to rectum and bladder. Curvilinear transurethral devices with sequential rotation produce target conforming coagulation zones that can cover either the whole gland or defined focal regions. Multi-sectored transurethral applicators can dynamically control the angular heating profile and target large regions of the prostate without applicator manipulation. High-power interstitial implants with directional devices can be used to effectively ablate defined target regions while avoiding sensitive tissues. MR temperature monitoring can effectively define the extent of thermal damage and provided a means for real-time control of the applicators. In summary, these catheter-based ultrasound devices allow for dynamic control of heating profiles

  10. Comparison of 3-D synthetic aperture phased-array ultrasound imaging and parallel beamforming.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Morten Fischer; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2014-10-01

    This paper demonstrates that synthetic aperture imaging (SAI) can be used to achieve real-time 3-D ultrasound phased-array imaging. It investigates whether SAI increases the image quality compared with the parallel beamforming (PB) technique for real-time 3-D imaging. Data are obtained using both simulations and measurements with an ultrasound research scanner and a commercially available 3.5- MHz 1024-element 2-D transducer array. To limit the probe cable thickness, 256 active elements are used in transmit and receive for both techniques. The two imaging techniques were designed for cardiac imaging, which requires sequences designed for imaging down to 15 cm of depth and a frame rate of at least 20 Hz. The imaging quality of the two techniques is investigated through simulations as a function of depth and angle. SAI improved the full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) at low steering angles by 35%, and the 20-dB cystic resolution by up to 62%. The FWHM of the measured line spread function (LSF) at 80 mm depth showed a difference of 20% in favor of SAI. SAI reduced the cyst radius at 60 mm depth by 39% in measurements. SAI improved the contrast-to-noise ratio measured on anechoic cysts embedded in a tissue-mimicking material by 29% at 70 mm depth. The estimated penetration depth on the same tissue-mimicking phantom shows that SAI increased the penetration by 24% compared with PB. Neither SAI nor PB achieved the design goal of 15 cm penetration depth. This is likely due to the limited transducer surface area and a low SNR of the experimental scanner used.

  11. CISUS: an integrated 3D ultrasound system for IGT using a modular tracking API

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boctor, Emad M.; Viswanathan, Anand; Pieper, Steve; Choti, Michael A.; Taylor, Russell H.; Kikinis, Ron; Fichtinger, Gabor

    2004-05-01

    Ultrasound has become popular in clinical/surgical applications, both as the primary image guidance modality and also in conjunction with other modalities like CT or MRI. Three dimensional ultrasound (3DUS) systems have also demonstrated usefulness in image-guided therapy (IGT). At the same time, however, current lack of open-source and open-architecture multi-modal medical visualization systems prevents 3DUS from fulfilling its potential. Several stand-alone 3DUS systems, like Stradx or In-Vivo exist today. Although these systems have been found to be useful in real clinical setting, it is difficult to augment their functionality and integrate them in versatile IGT systems. To address these limitations, a robotic/freehand 3DUS open environment (CISUS) is being integrated into the 3D Slicer, an open-source research tool developed for medical image analysis and surgical planning. In addition, the system capitalizes on generic application programming interfaces (APIs) for tracking devices and robotic control. The resulting platform-independent open-source system may serve as a valuable tool to the image guided surgery community. Other researchers could straightforwardly integrate the generic CISUS system along with other functionalities (i.e. dual view visualization, registration, real-time tracking, segmentation, etc) to rapidly create their medical/surgical applications. Our current driving clinical application is robotically assisted and freehand 3DUS-guided liver ablation, which is fully being integrated under the CISUS-3D Slicer. Initial functionality and pre-clinical feasibility are demonstrated on phantom and ex-vivo animal models.

  12. Transvaginal 3D Image-Guided High Intensity Focused Ultrasound Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Held, Robert; Nguyen, Thuc Nghi; Vaezy, Shahram

    2005-03-01

    The goal of this project is to develop a transvaginal image-guided High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) device using piezocomposite HIFU array technology, and commercially-available ultrasound imaging. Potential applications include treatment of uterine fibroids and abnormal uterine bleeding. The HIFU transducer was an annular phased array, with a focal length range of 30-60 mm, an elliptically-shaped aperture of 35×60 mm, and an operating frequency of 3 MHz. A pillow-shaped bag with water circulation will be used for coupling the HIFU energy into the tissue. An intra-cavity imaging probe (C9-5, Philips) was integrated with the HIFU array such that the focal axis of the HIFU transducer was within the image plane. The entire device will be covered by a gel-filled condom when inserted in the vaginal cavity. To control it, software packages were developed in the LabView programming environment. An imaging algorithm processed the ultrasound image to remove noise patterns due to the HIFU signal. The device will be equipped with a three-dimensional tracking system, using a six-degrees-of-freedom articulating arm. Necrotic lesions were produced in a tissue-mimicking phantom and a turkey breast sample for all focal lengths. Various HIFU doses allow various necrotic lesion shapes, including thin ellipsoidal, spherical, wide cylindrical, and teardrop-shaped. Software control of the device allows multiple foci to be activated sequentially for desired lesion patterns. Ultrasound imaging synchronization can be achieved using hardware signals obtained from the imaging system, or software signals determined empirically for various imaging probes. The image-guided HIFU device will provide a valuable tool in visualization of uterine fibroid tumors for the purposes of planning and subsequent HIFU treatment of the tumor, all in a 3D environment. The control system allows for various lesions of different shapes to be optimally positioned in the tumor to cover the entire tumor

  13. Computational MHD on 3D Unstructured Lagrangian Meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rousculp, C. L.; Barnes, D. C.

    1999-11-01

    Lagrangian computational meshes are typically employed to model multi-material problems because they do not require costly interface tracking methods. Our algorithms, for ideal and non-ideal 3D MHD, are designed for use on such meshes composed of polyhedral cells with an arbitrary number of faces. This allows for mesh refinement during a calculation to prevent the well known problem of mesh tangling. The action of the magnetic vector potential, A \\cdot δ l, is centered on edges. For ideal and non-ideal flow, this maintains nabla \\cdot B = 0 to round-off error. Vertex forces are derived by the variation of magnetic energy with respect to vertex positions, F = - partial WB / partial r. This assures symmetry as well as magnetic flux, momentum, and energy conservation. The method is local so that parallelization by domain decomposition is natural for large meshes. The resistive diffusion part is calculated using the support operator method, to obtain energy conservation, symmetry. Implicit time difference equations are solved by preconditioned, conjugate gradient methods. Results of convergence tests are presented. Boundary conditions at plasma vaccuum interfaces have been incorporated. Initial results of an annular Z-pinch implosion problem are shown.

  14. Accurate 3D reconstruction of complex blood vessel geometries from intravascular ultrasound images: in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Subramanian, K R; Thubrikar, M J; Fowler, B; Mostafavi, M T; Funk, M W

    2000-01-01

    We present a technique that accurately reconstructs complex three dimensional blood vessel geometry from 2D intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) images. Biplane x-ray fluoroscopy is used to image the ultrasound catheter tip at a few key points along its path as the catheter is pulled through the blood vessel. An interpolating spline describes the continuous catheter path. The IVUS images are located orthogonal to the path, resulting in a non-uniform structured scalar volume of echo densities. Isocontour surfaces are used to view the vessel geometry, while transparency and clipping enable interactive exploration of interior structures. The two geometries studied are a bovine artery vascular graft having U-shape and a constriction, and a canine carotid artery having multiple branches and a constriction. Accuracy of the reconstructions is established by comparing the reconstructions to (1) silicone moulds of the vessel interior, (2) biplane x-ray images, and (3) the original echo images. Excellent shape and geometry correspondence was observed in both geometries. Quantitative measurements made at key locations of the 3D reconstructions also were in good agreement with those made in silicone moulds. The proposed technique is easily adoptable in clinical practice, since it uses x-rays with minimal exposure and existing IVUS technology. PMID:11105284

  15. Ultrasound and 3D Skin Imaging: Methods to Evaluate Efficacy of Striae Distensae Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Bleve, Mariella; Capra, Priscilla; Pavanetto, Franca; Perugini, Paola

    2012-01-01

    Background. Over time, the striae rubra develop into striae alba that appear white, flat, and depressed. It is very important to determine the optimum striae management. In order to evaluate the effectiveness of these therapies, objective measurement tools are necessary. Objective. The aim of this study is to evaluate if ultrasonography and PRIMOS can be used to obtain an objective assessment of stretch marks type and stage; furthermore, we aim to apply these techniques to evaluate the efficacy of a topical treatment. Methods. 20 volunteers were enrolled with a two-month study. A marketed cosmetic product was used as the active over one body area. The controlateral area with stretch marks was treated with a “placebo” formulation without active, as a control. The instrumental evaluation was carried out at the beginning of the trial (baseline values or t0), after 1 month (t1), and at the end of the study (t2). Results. PRIMOS was able to measure and document striae distensae maturation; furthermore, ultrasound imaging permitted to visualize and diagnose the striae. Statistical analysis of skin roughness demonstrated a statistically significant reduction of Rp value only in a treated group. In fact, the Rp value represented a maximum peak height in the area selected. These results demonstrated that after two months of treatment only the striae rubra can be treated successfully. Conclusions. This work demonstrated that the 22MHz ultrasound can diagnose stretch marks; PRIMOS device can detect and measure striae distensae type and maturation. Furthermore, the high-frequency ultrasound and the 3D image device, described in this work, can be successfully employed in order to evaluate the efficacy of a topical treatment. PMID:22203840

  16. A preliminary evaluation work on a 3D ultrasound imaging system for 2D array transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Xiaoli; Li, Xu; Yang, Jiali; Li, Chunyu; Song, Junjie; Ding, Mingyue; Yuchi, Ming

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents a preliminary evaluation work on a pre-designed 3-D ultrasound imaging system. The system mainly consists of four parts, a 7.5MHz, 24×24 2-D array transducer, the transmit/receive circuit, power supply, data acquisition and real-time imaging module. The row-column addressing scheme is adopted for the transducer fabrication, which greatly reduces the number of active channels . The element area of the transducer is 4.6mm by 4.6mm. Four kinds of tests were carried out to evaluate the imaging performance, including the penetration depth range, axial and lateral resolution, positioning accuracy and 3-D imaging frame rate. Several strong reflection metal objects , fixed in a water tank, were selected for the purpose of imaging due to a low signal-to-noise ratio of the transducer. The distance between the transducer and the tested objects , the thickness of aluminum, and the seam width of the aluminum sheet were measured by a calibrated micrometer to evaluate the penetration depth, the axial and lateral resolution, respectively. The experiment al results showed that the imaging penetration depth range was from 1.0cm to 6.2cm, the axial and lateral resolution were 0.32mm and 1.37mm respectively, the imaging speed was up to 27 frames per second and the positioning accuracy was 9.2%.

  17. Tracking the interframe deformation of structures in 3D ultrasound imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syn, M.; Gosling, J. P.; Prager, Richard W.; Berman, Laurence; Crowley, J.

    1994-09-01

    Three dimensional ultrasound imaging with a freehand probe allows a flexible approach to medical visualization and diagnosis. Given the imperfect accuracy of proprioceptive devices used to log the position and tilt of the probe, it is important to utilize the position constraints provided by image evidence. This is also important if we wish to consider the visualization of structures which move significantly during acquisition, such as a heart of fetus. We present here an initial approach to more robust segmentation and shape recovery in a particularly noisy modality. We consider 2D segmentation based on edge evidence, using first an active contour, then finding an optimal segmentation using simulated annealing. Correspondence between contours in adjacent frames can only be solved in general cases by use of a 3D prior model. Dynamic physics-based mesh models as used by Pentland [20] and Nastar [17], allow for shape modelling, then over-constrained 3D shape recovery can be performed using the intrinsic vibration modes of the model.

  18. Automatic 3D ultrasound calibration for image guided therapy using intramodality image registration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlosser, Jeffrey; Kirmizibayrak, Can; Shamdasani, Vijay; Metz, Steve; Hristov, Dimitre

    2013-11-01

    Many real time ultrasound (US) guided therapies can benefit from management of motion-induced anatomical changes with respect to a previously acquired computerized anatomy model. Spatial calibration is a prerequisite to transforming US image information to the reference frame of the anatomy model. We present a new method for calibrating 3D US volumes using intramodality image registration, derived from the ‘hand-eye’ calibration technique. The method is fully automated by implementing data rejection based on sensor displacements, automatic registration over overlapping image regions, and a self-consistency error metric evaluated continuously during calibration. We also present a novel method for validating US calibrations based on measurement of physical phantom displacements within US images. Both calibration and validation can be performed on arbitrary phantoms. Results indicate that normalized mutual information and localized cross correlation produce the most accurate 3D US registrations for calibration. Volumetric image alignment is more accurate and reproducible than point selection for validating the calibrations, yielding <1.5 mm root mean square error, a significant improvement relative to previously reported hand-eye US calibration results. Comparison of two different phantoms for calibration and for validation revealed significant differences for validation (p = 0.003) but not for calibration (p = 0.795).

  19. Characterization of neonatal patients with intraventricular hemorrhage using 3D ultrasound cerebral ventricle volumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishimoto, Jessica; Fenster, Aaron; Lee, David S. C.; de Ribaupierre, Sandrine

    2015-03-01

    One of the major non-congenital cause of neurological impairment among neonates born very preterm is intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH) - bleeding within the lateral ventricles. Most IVH patients will have a transient period of ventricle dilation that resolves spontaneously. However, those patients most at risk of long-term impairment are those who have progressive ventricle dilation as this causes macrocephaly, an abnormally enlarged head, then later causes increases intracranial pressure (ICP). 2D ultrasound (US) images through the fontanelles of the patients are serially acquired to monitor the progression of the ventricle dilation. These images are used to determine when interventional therapies such as needle aspiration of the built up CSF might be indicated for a patient. Initial therapies usually begin during the third week of life. Such interventions have been shown to decrease morbidity and mortality in IVH patients; however, this comes with risks of further hemorrhage or infection; therefore only patients requiring it should be treated. Previously we have developed and validated a 3D US system to monitor the progression of ventricle volumes (VV) in IVH patients. This system has been validated using phantoms and a small set of patient images. The aim of this work is to determine the ability of 3D US generated VV to categorize patients into those who will require interventional therapies, and those who will have spontaneous resolution. Patients with higher risks could therefore be monitored better, by re-allocating some of the resources as the low risks infants would need less monitoring.

  20. 2-D array for 3-D Ultrasound Imaging Using Synthetic Aperture Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Daher, Nadim M.; Yen, Jesse T.

    2010-01-01

    A 2-D array of 256 × 256 = 65,536 elements, with total area 4 × 4 = 16 cm2, serves as a flexible platform for developing acquisition schemes for 3-D rectilinear ultrasound imaging at 10 MHz using synthetic aperture techniques. This innovative system combines a simplified interconnect scheme and synthetic aperture techniques with a 2-D array for 3-D imaging. A row-column addressing scheme is used to access different elements for different transmit events. This addressing scheme is achieved through a simple interconnect, consisting of one top, one bottom single layer flex circuits, which, compared to multi-layer flex circuits, are simpler to design, cheaper to manufacture and thinner so their effect on the acoustic response is minimized. We present three designs that prioritize different design objectives: volume acquisiton time, resolution, and sensitivity, while maintaining acceptable figures for the other design objectives. For example, one design overlooks time acquisition requirements, assumes good noise conditions, and optimizes for resolution, achieving −6 dB and −20 dB beamwidths of less than 0.2 and 0.5 millimeters, respectively, for an F/2 aperture. Another design can acquire an entire volume in 256 transmit events, with −6dB and −20 dB beamwidths in the order of 0.4 and 0.8 millimeters, respectively. PMID:16764446

  1. 3D ultrasound system to investigate intraventricular hemorrhage in preterm neonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishimoto, J.; de Ribaupierre, S.; Lee, D. S. C.; Mehta, R.; St. Lawrence, K.; Fenster, A.

    2013-11-01

    Intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH) is a common disorder among preterm neonates that is routinely diagnosed and monitored by 2D cranial ultrasound (US). The cerebral ventricles of patients with IVH often have a period of ventricular dilation (ventriculomegaly). This initial increase in ventricle size can either spontaneously resolve, which often shows clinically as a period of stabilization in ventricle size and eventual decline back towards a more normal size, or progressive ventricular dilation that does not stabilize and which may require interventional therapy to reduce symptoms relating to increased intracranial pressure. To improve the characterization of ventricle dilation, we developed a 3D US imaging system that can be used with a conventional clinical US scanner to image the ventricular system of preterm neonates at risk of ventriculomegaly. A motorized transducer housing was designed specifically for hand-held use inside an incubator using a transducer commonly used for cranial 2D US scans. This system was validated using geometric phantoms, US/MRI compatible ventricle volume phantoms, and patient images to determine 3D reconstruction accuracy and inter- and intra-observer volume estimation variability. 3D US geometric reconstruction was found to be accurate with an error of <0.2%. Measured volumes of a US/MRI compatible ventricle-like phantom were within 5% of gold standard water displacement measurements. Intra-class correlation for the three observers was 0.97, showing very high agreement between observers. The coefficient of variation was between 1.8-6.3% for repeated segmentations of the same patient. The minimum detectable difference was calculated to be 0.63 cm3 for a single observer. Results from ANOVA for three observers segmenting three patients of IVH grade II did not show any significant differences (p > 0.05) for the measured ventricle volumes between observers. This 3D US system can reliably produce 3D US images of the neonatal ventricular

  2. Transvaginal 3-d power Doppler ultrasound evaluation of the fetal brain at 10-13 weeks' gestation.

    PubMed

    Hata, Toshiyuki; Tanaka, Hirokazu; Noguchi, Junko

    2012-03-01

    The objective of this study was to measure the fetal brain volume (FBV) and vascularization and blood flow using transvaginal 3-D power Doppler (3DPD) ultrasound late in the first trimester of pregnancy. 3DPD ultrasound examinations with the VOCAL imaging analysis program were performed on 36 normal fetuses from 10-13 weeks' gestation. FBV and 3DPD indices related to the fetal brain vascularization (vascularization index [VI], flow index [FI] and vascularization flow index [VFI]) were calculated in each fetus. Intra- and interclass correlation coefficients and intra- and interobserver agreements of measurements were assessed. FBV was curvilinearly correlated well with the gestational age (R2 = 0.861, p < 0.0001). All 3-D power Doppler indices (VI, FI and VFI) showed no change at 10-13 weeks' gestation. FBV and all 3-D power Doppler indices (VI, FI and VFI) showed a correlation > 0.82, with good intra- and interobserver agreement. Our findings suggest that 3-D ultrasound is a superior means of evaluating the FBV in utero, and that 3-D power Doppler ultrasound histogram analysis may provide new information on the assessment of fetal brain perfusion.

  3. Estimation of 3D cardiac deformation using spatio-temporal elastic registration of non-scanconverted ultrasound data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elen, An; Loeckx, Dirk; Choi, Hon Fai; Gao, Hang; Claus, Piet; Maes, Frederik; Suetens, Paul; D'hooge, Jan

    2008-03-01

    Current ultrasound methods for measuring myocardial strain are often limited to measurements in one or two dimensions. Spatio-temporal elastic registration of 3D cardiac ultrasound data can however be used to estimate the 3D motion and full 3D strain tensor. In this work, the spatio-temporal elastic registration method was validated for both non-scanconverted and scanconverted images. This was done using simulated 3D pyramidal ultrasound data sets based on a thick-walled deforming ellipsoid and an adapted convolution model. A B-spline based frame-to-frame elastic registration method was applied to both the scanconverted and non-scanconverded data sets and the accuracy of the resulting deformation fields was quantified. The mean accuracy of the estimated displacement was very similar for the scanconverted and non-scanconverted data sets and thus, it was shown that 3D elastic registration to estimate the cardiac deformation from ultrasound images can be performed on non-scanconverted images, but that avoiding of the scanconversion step does not significantly improve the results of the displacement estimation.

  4. In vitro in-stent restenoses evaluated by 3D ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Lécart, Myriam; Cardinal, Marie-Hélène Roy; Qin, Zhao; Soulez, Gilles; Cloutier, Guy

    2009-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantify in-stent restenoses with 3D B mode and power Doppler ultrasound (U.S.) imaging. In-stent restenoses were mimicked with vascular phantoms in which a nonferromagnetic prototype stent (Boston Scientific) and a ferromagnetic clinical stainless steel stent (Palmaz P295) were embedded. Each phantom had an 80% in-stent stenosis and a 75% stenosis located outside the stent. These phantoms were compared to a reference phantom reproducing both stenoses without stent. Data sets of 2D cross-sectional U.S. images were acquired in freehand scanning using a magnetic sensor attached to the U.S. probe and in mechanical linear scanning with the probe attached to a step motor device. Each 2D image was automatically segmented before 3D reconstruction of the vessel. Results indicate that the reference phantom (without stent) was accurately assessed with errors below 1.8% for the 75% stenosis and 3.2% for the 80% stenosis in both B mode and power Doppler for the two scanning methods. The 80% in-stent stenoses in Boston Scientific and Palmaz stents were, respectively, evaluated at 73.8 (+/-3.2)% and 75.8 (+/- 3)% in B mode and at 82 (+/- 2.5)% and 86.2 (+/- 6.4)% in power Doppler when freehand scans were used. For comparison, when linear scans were selected, in-stent stenoses in the Boston Scientific or Palmaz stent were, respectively, evaluated at 77.4 (+/- 2.0)% and 73.8 (+/- 2.5)% in B mode and at 87.0 (+/- 1.3)% and 85.6 (+/- 5.8)% in power Doppler. To conclude, 3D freehand U.S. is a valuable method to quantify in-stent restenoses, particularly in B mode. It is thus hoped that, in the clinical setting, noninvasive 3D U.S. may provide sufficient precision to grade in-stent restenoses. PMID:19291990

  5. Histological Evaluation of 3D MRI-Guided Transurethral Ultrasound Therapy in the Prostate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vedula, Siddharth; Boyes, Aaron; Chopra, Rajiv; Bronskill, Michael

    2010-03-01

    Previous work from our group has shown that transurethral ultrasound therapy, with a single ultrasound transducer guided by temperature feedback from a single MRI plane (slice), can be used to treat a targeted region accurately in the prostate gland. We have extended this approach to a larger, 3D, targeted volume within the prostate, using a multi-element transducer controlled concurrently by temperature feedback from multiple imaging planes. Animals were placed supine in a 1.5 T clinical MRI, and the transurethral heating device was positioned with image guidance. A four-element transducer (each element was 5 mm long, operating at ˜8 MHz) was rotated to treat a targeted volume around the device. Temperature maps transverse to each element were acquired during heating and used to control the acoustic power of each element and the rate of rotation of the device. T2-weighted and contrast-enhanced (CE) MR images were obtained pre- and post-heating. Following the treatment, prostates were removed and fixed, axially sliced, stained with H&E, and digitally imaged at high-resolution to outline boundaries of cell death. Slice alignment and image registration techniques were developed to enable quantitative comparison of the axial MRI images and matching histological sections. Prostate sections showed clear regions of coagulative necrosis, extending ˜20 mm along the urethra, which correlated well with CE MRI data and transducer length. After registration, the outer border of coagulative necrosis on H&E conformed well to the target isotherm, similar to results from our previous (single element) acute studies. These results confirm that our previous analysis techniques for a single transducer can be extended to multiple elements, and that a large volumetric ablation of the prostate gland is feasible with a high degree of accuracy.

  6. Anechoic Sphere Phantoms for Estimating 3-D Resolution of Very High Frequency Ultrasound Scanners

    PubMed Central

    Madsen, Ernest L.; Frank, Gary R.; McCormick, Matthew M.; Deaner, Meagan E.; Stiles, Timothy A.

    2013-01-01

    Two phantoms have been constructed for assessing the performance of high frequency ultrasound imagers. They also allow for periodic quality assurance tests. The phantoms contain eight blocks of tissue-mimicking material where each block contains a spatially random distribution of suitably small anechoic spheres having a small distribution of diameters. The eight mean sphere diameters are distributed from 0.10 to 1.09 mm. The two phantoms differ primarily in terms of the backscatter coefficient of the background material in which the spheres are suspended. The mean scatterer diameter for one phantom is larger than that for the other phantom resulting in a lesser increase in backscatter coefficient for the second phantom; however, the backscatter curves cross at about 35 MHz. Since spheres have no preferred orientation, all three (spatial) dimensions of resolution contribute to sphere detection on an equal basis; thus, the resolution is termed 3-D. Two high frequency scanners are compared. One employs single-element (fixed focus) transducers, and the other employs variable focus linear arrays. The nominal frequency for the single element transducers were 25 and 55 MHz and for the linear array transducers were 20, 30 and 40 MHz. The depth range for detection of spheres of each size is determined corresponding to determination of 3-D resolution as a function of depth. As expected, the single-element transducers are severely limited in useful imaging depth ranges compared with the linear arrays. Note that these phantoms could also be useful for training technicians in using higher frequency scanners. PMID:20889416

  7. Compressed Sensing Reconstruction of 3D Ultrasound Data Using Dictionary Learning and Line-Wise Subsampling.

    PubMed

    Lorintiu, Oana; Liebgott, Hervé; Alessandrini, Martino; Bernard, Olivier; Friboulet, Denis

    2015-12-01

    In this paper we present a compressed sensing (CS) method adapted to 3D ultrasound imaging (US). In contrast to previous work, we propose a new approach based on the use of learned overcomplete dictionaries that allow for much sparser representations of the signals since they are optimized for a particular class of images such as US images. In this study, the dictionary was learned using the K-SVD algorithm and CS reconstruction was performed on the non-log envelope data by removing 20% to 80% of the original data. Using numerically simulated images, we evaluate the influence of the training parameters and of the sampling strategy. The latter is done by comparing the two most common sampling patterns, i.e., point-wise and line-wise random patterns. The results show in particular that line-wise sampling yields an accuracy comparable to the conventional point-wise sampling. This indicates that CS acquisition of 3D data is feasible in a relatively simple setting, and thus offers the perspective of increasing the frame rate by skipping the acquisition of RF lines. Next, we evaluated this approach on US volumes of several ex vivo and in vivo organs. We first show that the learned dictionary approach yields better performances than conventional fixed transforms such as Fourier or discrete cosine. Finally, we investigate the generality of the learned dictionary approach and show that it is possible to build a general dictionary allowing to reliably reconstruct different volumes of different ex vivo or in vivo organs.

  8. Improved Human Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cell Osteogenesis in 3D Bioprinted Tissue Scaffolds with Low Intensity Pulsed Ultrasound Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xuan; Castro, Nathan J.; Zhu, Wei; Cui, Haitao; Aliabouzar, Mitra; Sarkar, Kausik; Zhang, Lijie Grace

    2016-01-01

    3D printing and ultrasound techniques are showing great promise in the evolution of human musculoskeletal tissue repair and regeneration medicine. The uniqueness of the present study was to combine low intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) and advanced 3D printing techniques to synergistically improve growth and osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (MSC). Specifically, polyethylene glycol diacrylate bioinks containing cell adhesive Arginine-Glycine-Aspartic acid-Serene (RGDS) peptide and/or nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite (nHA) were used to fabricate 3D scaffolds with different geometric patterns via novel table-top stereolithography 3D printer. The resultant scaffolds provide a highly porous and interconnected 3D environment to support cell proliferation. Scaffolds with small square pores were determined to be the optimal geometric pattern for MSC attachment and growth. The optimal LIPUS working parameters were determined to be 1.5 MHz, 20% duty cycle with 150 mW/cm2 intensity. Results demonstrated that RGDS peptide and nHA containing 3D printed scaffolds under LIPUS treatment can greatly promote MSC proliferation, alkaline phosphatase activity, calcium deposition and total protein content. These results illustrate the effectiveness of the combination of LIPUS and biomimetic 3D printing scaffolds as a valuable combinatorial tool for improved MSC function, thus make them promising for future clinical and various regenerative medicine application. PMID:27597635

  9. Improved Human Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cell Osteogenesis in 3D Bioprinted Tissue Scaffolds with Low Intensity Pulsed Ultrasound Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xuan; Castro, Nathan J; Zhu, Wei; Cui, Haitao; Aliabouzar, Mitra; Sarkar, Kausik; Zhang, Lijie Grace

    2016-01-01

    3D printing and ultrasound techniques are showing great promise in the evolution of human musculoskeletal tissue repair and regeneration medicine. The uniqueness of the present study was to combine low intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) and advanced 3D printing techniques to synergistically improve growth and osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (MSC). Specifically, polyethylene glycol diacrylate bioinks containing cell adhesive Arginine-Glycine-Aspartic acid-Serene (RGDS) peptide and/or nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite (nHA) were used to fabricate 3D scaffolds with different geometric patterns via novel table-top stereolithography 3D printer. The resultant scaffolds provide a highly porous and interconnected 3D environment to support cell proliferation. Scaffolds with small square pores were determined to be the optimal geometric pattern for MSC attachment and growth. The optimal LIPUS working parameters were determined to be 1.5 MHz, 20% duty cycle with 150 mW/cm(2) intensity. Results demonstrated that RGDS peptide and nHA containing 3D printed scaffolds under LIPUS treatment can greatly promote MSC proliferation, alkaline phosphatase activity, calcium deposition and total protein content. These results illustrate the effectiveness of the combination of LIPUS and biomimetic 3D printing scaffolds as a valuable combinatorial tool for improved MSC function, thus make them promising for future clinical and various regenerative medicine application. PMID:27597635

  10. Improved Human Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cell Osteogenesis in 3D Bioprinted Tissue Scaffolds with Low Intensity Pulsed Ultrasound Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xuan; Castro, Nathan J; Zhu, Wei; Cui, Haitao; Aliabouzar, Mitra; Sarkar, Kausik; Zhang, Lijie Grace

    2016-09-06

    3D printing and ultrasound techniques are showing great promise in the evolution of human musculoskeletal tissue repair and regeneration medicine. The uniqueness of the present study was to combine low intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) and advanced 3D printing techniques to synergistically improve growth and osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (MSC). Specifically, polyethylene glycol diacrylate bioinks containing cell adhesive Arginine-Glycine-Aspartic acid-Serene (RGDS) peptide and/or nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite (nHA) were used to fabricate 3D scaffolds with different geometric patterns via novel table-top stereolithography 3D printer. The resultant scaffolds provide a highly porous and interconnected 3D environment to support cell proliferation. Scaffolds with small square pores were determined to be the optimal geometric pattern for MSC attachment and growth. The optimal LIPUS working parameters were determined to be 1.5 MHz, 20% duty cycle with 150 mW/cm(2) intensity. Results demonstrated that RGDS peptide and nHA containing 3D printed scaffolds under LIPUS treatment can greatly promote MSC proliferation, alkaline phosphatase activity, calcium deposition and total protein content. These results illustrate the effectiveness of the combination of LIPUS and biomimetic 3D printing scaffolds as a valuable combinatorial tool for improved MSC function, thus make them promising for future clinical and various regenerative medicine application.

  11. Computed 3D visualisation of an extinct cephalopod using computer tomographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukeneder, Alexander

    2012-08-01

    The first 3D visualisation of a heteromorph cephalopod species from the Southern Alps (Dolomites, northern Italy) is presented. Computed tomography, palaeontological data and 3D reconstructions were included in the production of a movie, which shows a life reconstruction of the extinct organism. This detailed reconstruction is according to the current knowledge of the shape and mode of life as well as habitat of this animal. The results are based on the most complete shell known thus far of the genus Dissimilites. Object-based combined analyses from computed tomography and various computed 3D facility programmes help to understand morphological details as well as their ontogentical changes in fossil material. In this study, an additional goal was to show changes in locomotion during different ontogenetic phases of such fossil, marine shell-bearing animals (ammonoids). Hence, the presented models and tools can serve as starting points for discussions on morphology and locomotion of extinct cephalopods in general, and of the genus Dissimilites in particular. The heteromorph ammonoid genus Dissimilites is interpreted here as an active swimmer of the Tethyan Ocean. This study portrays non-destructive methods of 3D visualisation applied on palaeontological material, starting with computed tomography resulting in animated, high-quality video clips. The here presented 3D geometrical models and animation, which are based on palaeontological material, demonstrate the wide range of applications, analytical techniques and also outline possible limitations of 3D models in earth sciences and palaeontology. The realistic 3D models and motion pictures can easily be shared amongst palaeontologists. Data, images and short clips can be discussed online and, if necessary, adapted in morphological details and motion-style to better represent the cephalopod animal.

  12. Portable high-intensity focused ultrasound system with 3D electronic steering, real-time cavitation monitoring, and 3D image reconstruction algorithms: a preclinical study in pigs

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the safety and accuracy of a new portable ultrasonography-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (USg-HIFU) system with a 3-dimensional (3D) electronic steering transducer, a simultaneous ablation and imaging module, real-time cavitation monitoring, and 3D image reconstruction algorithms. Methods: To address the accuracy of the transducer, hydrophones in a water chamber were used to assess the generation of sonic fields. An animal study was also performed in five pigs by ablating in vivo thighs by single-point sonication (n=10) or volume sonication (n=10) and ex vivo kidneys by single-point sonication (n=10). Histological and statistical analyses were performed. Results: In the hydrophone study, peak voltages were detected within 1.0 mm from the targets on the y- and z-axes and within 2.0-mm intervals along the x-axis (z-axis, direction of ultrasound propagation; y- and x-axes, perpendicular to the direction of ultrasound propagation). Twenty-nine of 30 HIFU sessions successfully created ablations at the target. The in vivo porcine thigh study showed only a small discrepancy (width, 0.5-1.1 mm; length, 3.0 mm) between the planning ultrasonograms and the pathological specimens. Inordinate thermal damage was not observed in the adjacent tissues or sonic pathways in the in vivo thigh and ex vivo kidney studies. Conclusion: Our study suggests that this new USg-HIFU system may be a safe and accurate technique for ablating soft tissues and encapsulated organs. PMID:25038809

  13. Learning Projectile Motion with the Computer Game ``Scorched 3D``

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurcevic, John S.

    2008-01-01

    For most of our students, video games are a normal part of their lives. We should take advantage of this medium to teach physics in a manner that is engrossing for our students. In particular, modern video games incorporate accurate physics in their game engines, and they allow us to visualize the physics through flashy and captivating graphics. I recently used the game "Scorched 3D" to help my students understand projectile motion.

  14. Computation of optimized arrays for 3-D electrical imaging surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loke, M. H.; Wilkinson, P. B.; Uhlemann, S. S.; Chambers, J. E.; Oxby, L. S.

    2014-12-01

    3-D electrical resistivity surveys and inversion models are required to accurately resolve structures in areas with very complex geology where 2-D models might suffer from artefacts. Many 3-D surveys use a grid where the number of electrodes along one direction (x) is much greater than in the perpendicular direction (y). Frequently, due to limitations in the number of independent electrodes in the multi-electrode system, the surveys use a roll-along system with a small number of parallel survey lines aligned along the x-direction. The `Compare R' array optimization method previously used for 2-D surveys is adapted for such 3-D surveys. Offset versions of the inline arrays used in 2-D surveys are included in the number of possible arrays (the comprehensive data set) to improve the sensitivity to structures in between the lines. The array geometric factor and its relative error are used to filter out potentially unstable arrays in the construction of the comprehensive data set. Comparisons of the conventional (consisting of dipole-dipole and Wenner-Schlumberger arrays) and optimized arrays are made using a synthetic model and experimental measurements in a tank. The tests show that structures located between the lines are better resolved with the optimized arrays. The optimized arrays also have significantly better depth resolution compared to the conventional arrays.

  15. Quantitative assessment of cancer vascular architecture by skeletonization of high-resolution 3-D contrast-enhanced ultrasound images: role of liposomes and microbubbles.

    PubMed

    Molinari, F; Meiburger, K M; Giustetto, P; Rizzitelli, S; Boffa, C; Castano, M; Terreno, E

    2014-12-01

    The accurate characterization and description of the vascular network of a cancer lesion is of paramount importance in clinical practice and cancer research in order to improve diagnostic accuracy or to assess the effectiveness of a treatment. The aim of this study was to show the effectiveness of liposomes as an ultrasound contrast agent to describe the 3-D vascular architecture of a tumor. Eight C57BL/6 mice grafted with syngeneic B16-F10 murine melanoma cells were injected with a bolus of 1,2-Distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocoline (DSPC)-based non-targeted liposomes and with a bolus of microbubbles. 3-D contrast-enhanced images of the tumor lesions were acquired in three conditions: pre-contrast, after the injection of microbubbles, and after the injection of liposomes. By using a previously developed reconstruction and characterization image processing technique, we obtained the 3-D representation of the vascular architecture in these three conditions. Six descriptive parameters of these networks were also computed: the number of vascular trees (NT), the vascular density (VD), the number of branches, the 2-D curvature measure, the number of vascular flexes of the vessels, and the 3-D curvature. Results showed that all the vascular descriptors obtained by liposome-based images were statistically equal to those obtained by using microbubbles, except the VD which was found to be lower for liposome images. All the six descriptors computed in pre-contrast conditions had values that were statistically lower than those computed in presence of contrast, both for liposomes and microbubbles. Liposomes have already been used in cancer therapy for the selective ultrasound-mediated delivery of drugs. This work demonstrated their effectiveness also as vascular diagnostic contrast agents, therefore proving that liposomes can be used as efficient "theranostic" (i.e. therapeutic 1 diagnostic) ultrasound probes.

  16. Quantitative assessment of cancer vascular architecture by skeletonization of high-resolution 3-D contrast-enhanced ultrasound images: role of liposomes and microbubbles.

    PubMed

    Molinari, F; Meiburger, K M; Giustetto, P; Rizzitelli, S; Boffa, C; Castano, M; Terreno, E

    2014-12-01

    The accurate characterization and description of the vascular network of a cancer lesion is of paramount importance in clinical practice and cancer research in order to improve diagnostic accuracy or to assess the effectiveness of a treatment. The aim of this study was to show the effectiveness of liposomes as an ultrasound contrast agent to describe the 3-D vascular architecture of a tumor. Eight C57BL/6 mice grafted with syngeneic B16-F10 murine melanoma cells were injected with a bolus of 1,2-Distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocoline (DSPC)-based non-targeted liposomes and with a bolus of microbubbles. 3-D contrast-enhanced images of the tumor lesions were acquired in three conditions: pre-contrast, after the injection of microbubbles, and after the injection of liposomes. By using a previously developed reconstruction and characterization image processing technique, we obtained the 3-D representation of the vascular architecture in these three conditions. Six descriptive parameters of these networks were also computed: the number of vascular trees (NT), the vascular density (VD), the number of branches, the 2-D curvature measure, the number of vascular flexes of the vessels, and the 3-D curvature. Results showed that all the vascular descriptors obtained by liposome-based images were statistically equal to those obtained by using microbubbles, except the VD which was found to be lower for liposome images. All the six descriptors computed in pre-contrast conditions had values that were statistically lower than those computed in presence of contrast, both for liposomes and microbubbles. Liposomes have already been used in cancer therapy for the selective ultrasound-mediated delivery of drugs. This work demonstrated their effectiveness also as vascular diagnostic contrast agents, therefore proving that liposomes can be used as efficient "theranostic" (i.e. therapeutic 1 diagnostic) ultrasound probes. PMID:24206210

  17. Quantitative Analysis of Vascular Heterogeneity in Breast Lesions Using Contrast-Enhanced 3-D Harmonic and Subharmonic Ultrasound Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Sridharan, Anush; Eisenbrey, John R.; Machado, Priscilla; Ojeda-Fournier, Haydee; Wilkes, Annina; Sevrukov, Alexander; Mattrey, Robert F.; Wallace, Kirk; Chalek, Carl L.; Thomenius, Kai E.; Forsberg, Flemming

    2015-01-01

    Ability to visualize breast lesion vascularity and quantify the vascular heterogeneity using contrast-enhanced 3-D harmonic (HI) and subharmonic (SHI) ultrasound imaging was investigated in a clinical population. Patients (n = 134) identified with breast lesions on mammography were scanned using power Doppler imaging, contrast-enhanced 3-D HI, and 3-D SHI on a modified Logiq 9 scanner (GE Healthcare). A region of interest corresponding to ultrasound contrast agent flow was identified in 4D View (GE Medical Systems) and mapped to raw slice data to generate a map of time-intensity curves for the lesion volume. Time points corresponding to baseline, peak intensity, and washout of ultrasound contrast agent were identified and used to generate and compare vascular heterogeneity plots for malignant and benign lesions. Vascularity was observed with power Doppler imaging in 84 lesions (63 benign and 21 malignant). The 3-D HI showed flow in 8 lesions (5 benign and 3 malignant), whereas 3-D SHI visualized flow in 68 lesions (49 benign and 19 malignant). Analysis of vascular heterogeneity in the 3-D SHI volumes found benign lesions having a significant difference in vascularity between central and peripheral sections (1.71 ± 0.96 vs. 1.13 ± 0.79 dB, p < 0.001, respectively), whereas malignant lesions showed no difference (1.66 ± 1.39 vs. 1.24 ± 1.14 dB, p = 0.24), indicative of more vascular coverage. These preliminary results suggest quantitative evaluation of vascular heterogeneity in breast lesions using contrast-enhanced 3-D SHI is feasible and able to detect variations in vascularity between central and peripheral sections for benign and malignant lesions. PMID:25935933

  18. 3D thoracoscopic ultrasound volume measurement validation in an ex vivo and in vivo porcine model of lung tumours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hornblower, V. D. M.; Yu, E.; Fenster, A.; Battista, J. J.; Malthaner, R. A.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to validate the accuracy and reliability of volume measurements obtained using three-dimensional (3D) thoracoscopic ultrasound (US) imaging. Artificial 'tumours' were created by injecting a liquid agar mixture into spherical moulds of known volume. Once solidified, the 'tumours' were implanted into the lung tissue in both a porcine lung sample ex vivo and a surgical porcine model in vivo. 3D US images were created by mechanically rotating the thoracoscopic ultrasound probe about its long axis while the transducer was maintained in close contact with the tissue. Volume measurements were made by one observer using the ultrasound images and a manual-radial segmentation technique and these were compared with the known volumes of the agar. In vitro measurements had average accuracy and precision of 4.76% and 1.77%, respectively; in vivo measurements had average accuracy and precision of 8.18% and 1.75%, respectively. The 3D thoracoscopic ultrasound can be used to accurately and reproducibly measure 'tumour' volumes both in vivo and ex vivo.

  19. High-resolution 3D ultrasound jawbone surface imaging for diagnosis of periodontal bony defects: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Mahmoud, Ahmed M; Ngan, Peter; Crout, Richard; Mukdadi, Osama M

    2010-11-01

    Although medical specialties have recognized the importance of using ultrasonic imaging, dentistry is only beginning to discover its benefit. This has particularly been important in the field of periodontics which studies infections in the gum and bone tissues that surround the teeth. This study investigates the feasibility of using a custom-designed high-frequency ultrasound imaging system to reconstruct high-resolution (< 50 μm) three-dimensional (3D) surface images of periodontal defects in human jawbone. The system employs single-element focused ultrasound transducers with center frequencies ranging from 30 to 60 MHz. Continuous acquisition using a 1 GHz data acquisition card is synchronized with a high-precision two-dimensional (2D) positioning system of ±1 μm resolution for acquiring accurate measurements of the mandible, in vitro. Signal and image processing algorithms are applied to reconstruct high-resolution ultrasound images and extract the jawbone surface in each frame. Then, all edges are combined and smoothed in order to render a 3D surface image of the jawbone. In vitro experiments were performed to assess the system performance using mandibles with teeth (dentate) or without (nondentate). The system was able to reconstruct 3D images for the mandible's outer surface with superior spatial resolution down to 24 μm, and to perform the whole scanning in < 30 s. Major anatomical landmarks on the images were confirmed with the anatomical structures on the mandibles. All the anatomical landmarks were detected and fully described as 3D images using this novel ultrasound imaging technique, whereas the 2D X-ray radiographic images suffered from poor contrast. These results indicate the great potential of utilizing high-resolution ultrasound as a noninvasive, nonionizing imaging technique for the early diagnosis of the more severe form of periodontal disease.

  20. New fabrication techniques for ring-array transducers for real-time 3D intravascular ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Light, Edward D; Lieu, Victor; Smith, Stephen W

    2009-10-01

    We have previously described miniature 2D array transducers integrated into a Cook Medical, Inc. vena cava filter deployment device. While functional, the fabrication technique was very labor intensive and did not lend itself well to efficient fabrication of large numbers of devices. We developed two new fabrication methods that we believe can be used to efficiently manufacture these types of devices in greater than prototype numbers. One transducer consisted of 55 elements operating near 5 MHz. The interelement spacing is 0.20 mm. It was constructed on a flat piece of copper-clad polyimide and then wrapped around an 11 French catheter of a Cook Medical, Inc. inferior vena cava (IVC) filter deployment device. We used a braided wiring technology from Tyco Electronics Corp. to connect the elements to our real-time 3D ultrasound scanner. Typical measured transducer element bandwidth was 20% centered at 4.7 MHz and the 50 Omega round trip insertion loss was --82 dB. The mean of the nearest neighbor cross talk was -37.0 dB. The second method consisted of a 46-cm long single layer flex circuit from MicroConnex that terminates in an interconnect that plugs directly into our system cable. This transducer had 70 elements at 0.157 mm interelement spacing operating at 4.8 MHz. Typical measured transducer element bandwidth was 29% and the 50 Omega round trip insertion loss was -83 dB. The mean of the nearest neighbor cross talk was -33.0 dB. PMID:20458877

  1. Critical assessment of intramodality 3D ultrasound imaging for prostate IGRT compared to fiducial markers

    SciTech Connect

    Meer, Skadi van der; Bloemen-van Gurp, Esther; Hermans, Jolanda; Voncken, Robert; Heuvelmans, Denys; Gubbels, Carol; Fontanarosa, Davide; Visser, Peter; Lutgens, Ludy; Gils, Francis van; Verhaegen, Frank

    2013-07-15

    Purpose: A quantitative 3D intramodality ultrasound (US) imaging system was verified for daily in-room prostate localization, and compared to prostate localization based on implanted fiducial markers (FMs).Methods: Thirteen prostate patients underwent multiple US scans during treatment. A total of 376 US-scans and 817 matches were used to determine the intra- and interoperator variability. Additionally, eight other patients underwent daily prostate localization using both US and electronic portal imaging (EPI) with FMs resulting in 244 combined US-EPI scans. Scanning was performed with minimal probe pressure and a correction for the speed of sound aberration was performed. Uncertainties of both US and FM methods were assessed. User variability of the US method was assessed.Results: The overall US user variability is 2.6 mm. The mean differences between US and FM are: 2.5 {+-} 4.0 mm (LR), 0.6 {+-} 4.9 mm (SI), and -2.3 {+-} 3.6 mm (AP). The intramodality character of this US system mitigates potential errors due to transducer pressure and speed of sound aberrations.Conclusions: The overall accuracy of US (3.0 mm) is comparable to our FM workflow (2.2 mm). Since neither US nor FM can be considered a gold standard no conclusions can be drawn on the superiority of either method. Because US imaging captures the prostate itself instead of surrogates no invasive procedure is required. It requires more effort to standardize US imaging than FM detection. Since US imaging does not involve a radiation burden, US prostate imaging offers an alternative for FM EPI positioning.

  2. 3D perfused brain phantom for interstitial ultrasound thermal therapy and imaging: design, construction and characterization.

    PubMed

    Martínez, José M; Jarosz, Boguslaw J

    2015-03-01

    Thermal therapy has emerged as an independent modality of treating some tumors. In many clinics the hyperthermia, one of the thermal therapy modalities, has been used adjuvant to radio- or chemotherapy to substantially improve the clinical treatment outcomes. In this work, a methodology for building a realistic brain phantom for interstitial ultrasound low dose-rate thermal therapy of the brain is proposed. A 3D brain phantom made of the tissue mimicking material (TMM) had the acoustic and thermal properties in the 20-32 °C range, which is similar to that of a brain at 37 °C. The phantom had 10-11% by mass of bovine gelatin powder dissolved in ethylene glycol. The TMM sonicated at 1 MHz, 1.6 MHz and 2.5 MHz yielded the amplitude attenuation coefficients of 62  ±  1 dB m(-1), 115  ±  4 dB m(-1) and 175  ±  9 dB m(-1), respectively. The density and acoustic speed determination at room temperature (~24 °C) gave 1040  ±  40 kg m(-3) and 1545  ±  44 m s(-1), respectively. The average thermal conductivity was 0.532 W m(-1) K(-1). The T1 and T2 values of the TMM were 207  ±  4 and 36.2  ±  0.4 ms, respectively. We envisage the use of our phantom for treatment planning and for quality assurance in MRI based temperature determination. Our phantom preparation methodology may be readily extended to other thermal therapy technologies.

  3. 3D perfused brain phantom for interstitial ultrasound thermal therapy and imaging: design, construction and characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez, José M.; Jarosz, Boguslaw J.

    2015-03-01

    Thermal therapy has emerged as an independent modality of treating some tumors. In many clinics the hyperthermia, one of the thermal therapy modalities, has been used adjuvant to radio- or chemotherapy to substantially improve the clinical treatment outcomes. In this work, a methodology for building a realistic brain phantom for interstitial ultrasound low dose-rate thermal therapy of the brain is proposed. A 3D brain phantom made of the tissue mimicking material (TMM) had the acoustic and thermal properties in the 20-32 °C range, which is similar to that of a brain at 37 °C. The phantom had 10-11% by mass of bovine gelatin powder dissolved in ethylene glycol. The TMM sonicated at 1 MHz, 1.6 MHz and 2.5 MHz yielded the amplitude attenuation coefficients of 62  ±  1 dB m-1, 115  ±  4 dB m-1 and 175  ±  9 dB m-1, respectively. The density and acoustic speed determination at room temperature (~24 °C) gave 1040  ±  40 kg m-3 and 1545  ±  44 m s-1, respectively. The average thermal conductivity was 0.532 W m-1 K-1. The T1 and T2 values of the TMM were 207  ±  4 and 36.2  ±  0.4 ms, respectively. We envisage the use of our phantom for treatment planning and for quality assurance in MRI based temperature determination. Our phantom preparation methodology may be readily extended to other thermal therapy technologies.

  4. Non-rigid registration between 3D ultrasound and CT images of the liver based on intensity and gradient information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Duhgoon; Nam, Woo Hyun; Lee, Jae Young; Ra, Jong Beom

    2011-01-01

    In order to utilize both ultrasound (US) and computed tomography (CT) images of the liver concurrently for medical applications such as diagnosis and image-guided intervention, non-rigid registration between these two types of images is an essential step, as local deformation between US and CT images exists due to the different respiratory phases involved and due to the probe pressure that occurs in US imaging. This paper introduces a voxel-based non-rigid registration algorithm between the 3D B-mode US and CT images of the liver. In the proposed algorithm, to improve the registration accuracy, we utilize the surface information of the liver and gallbladder in addition to the information of the vessels inside the liver. For an effective correlation between US and CT images, we treat those anatomical regions separately according to their characteristics in US and CT images. Based on a novel objective function using a 3D joint histogram of the intensity and gradient information, vessel-based non-rigid registration is followed by surface-based non-rigid registration in sequence, which improves the registration accuracy. The proposed algorithm is tested for ten clinical datasets and quantitative evaluations are conducted. Experimental results show that the registration error between anatomical features of US and CT images is less than 2 mm on average, even with local deformation due to different respiratory phases and probe pressure. In addition, the lesion registration error is less than 3 mm on average with a maximum of 4.5 mm that is considered acceptable for clinical applications.

  5. GPU accelerated registration of a statistical shape model of the lumbar spine to 3D ultrasound images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khallaghi, Siavash; Abolmaesumi, Purang; Gong, Ren Hui; Chen, Elvis; Gill, Sean; Boisvert, Jonathan; Pichora, David; Borschneck, Dan; Fichtinger, Gabor; Mousavi, Parvin

    2011-03-01

    We present a parallel implementation of a statistical shape model registration to 3D ultrasound images of the lumbar vertebrae (L2-L4). Covariance Matrix Adaptation Evolution Strategy optimization technique, along with Linear Correlation of Linear Combination similarity metric have been used, to improve the robustness and capture range of the registration approach. Instantiation and ultrasound simulation have been implemented on a graphics processing unit for a faster registration. Phantom studies show a mean target registration error of 3.2 mm, while 80% of all the cases yield target registration error of below 3.5 mm.

  6. Elsevier Trophoblast Research Award Lecture: Searching for an early pregnancy 3-D morphometric ultrasound marker to predict fetal growth restriction.

    PubMed

    Collins, S L; Stevenson, G N; Noble, J A; Impey, L

    2013-03-01

    Fetal growth restriction (FGR) is a major cause of perinatal morbidity and mortality, even in term babies. An effective screening test to identify pregnancies at risk of FGR, leading to increased antenatal surveillance with timely delivery, could decrease perinatal mortality and morbidity. Placental volume, measured with commercially available packages and a novel, semi-automated technique, has been shown to predict small for gestational age babies. Placental morphology measured in 2-D in the second trimester and ex-vivo post delivery, correlates with FGR. This has also been investigated using 2-D estimates of diameter and site of cord insertion obtained using the Virtual Organ Computer-aided AnaLysis (VOCAL) software. Data is presented describing a pilot study of a novel 3-D method for defining compactness of placental shape. We prospectively recruited women with a singleton pregnancy and BMI of <35. A 3-D ultrasound scan was performed between 11 and 13 + 6 weeks' gestation. The placental volume, total placental surface area and the area of the utero-placental interface were calculated using our validated technique. From these we generated dimensionless indices including sphericity (ψ), standardised placental volume (sPlaV) and standardised functional area (sFA) using Buckingham π theorem. The marker for FGR used was small for gestational age, defined as <10th customised birth weight centile (cSGA). Regression analysis examined which of the morphometric indices were independent predictors of cSGA. Data were collected for 143 women, 20 had cSGA babies. Only sPlaV and sFA were significantly correlated to birth weight (p < 0.001). Regression demonstrated all dimensionless indices were inter-dependent co-factors. ROC curves showed no advantage for using sFA over the simpler sPlaV. The generated placental indices are not independent of placental volume this early in gestation. It is hoped that another placental ultrasound marker based on vascularity can improve the

  7. Computer-assisted three-dimensional surgical planning and simulation: 3D virtual osteotomy.

    PubMed

    Xia, J; Ip, H H; Samman, N; Wang, D; Kot, C S; Yeung, R W; Tideman, H

    2000-02-01

    A computer-assisted three-dimensional virtual osteotomy system for orthognathic surgery (CAVOS) is presented. The virtual reality workbench is used for surgical planning. The surgeon immerses in a virtual reality environment with stereo eyewear, holds a virtual "scalpel" (3D Mouse) and operates on a "real" patient (3D visualization) to obtain pre-surgical prediction (3D bony segment movements). Virtual surgery on a computer-generated 3D head model is simulated and can be visualized from any arbitrary viewing point in a personal computer system.

  8. Low intensity pulse ultrasound stimulate chondrocytes growth in a 3-D alginate scaffold through improved porosity and permeability.

    PubMed

    Guo, Gepu; Lu, Lu; Ji, Hongfei; Ma, Yong; Dong, Rui; Tu, Juan; Guo, Xiasheng; Qiu, Yuanyuan; Wu, Junru; Zhang, Dong

    2015-04-01

    A 3-D scaffold culture system has been used to promote in producing functional chondrocytes for repairing damaged cartilage. In the present study, the low intensity pulse ultrasound (LIPUS) (P(-)=0, 0.055, 0.085 and 0.11 MPa) was applied to improve the porosity and permeability of a 3-D alginate scaffold which was beneficial for the nutrition supply and metabolism during cell growth in 3-D alginate scaffold. The porosity and permeability of the scaffold was quantitatively analyzed based on scanning electron microscopy examination and fluorescence image observation. The results suggest that, for the scaffold exposed to LIPUS, its porosity and permeability could be significantly enhanced by the increasing LIPUS amplitude, which might be induced by the microstreaming shear stress generated by ultrasound-driven microbubble oscillations. Furthermore, the assessments of cell proliferation and collagen II expression confirmed that chondrocytes growth could be effectively promoted in 3-D alginate scaffolds treated by LIPUS, because of the improved scaffold porosity and permeability might benefit cell growth space and nutrition supply. It should also be noticed that appropriate LIPUS driving parameters should be adapted to achieve optimized chondrocytes culture effect in 3-D alginate scaffold. PMID:25543661

  9. Low intensity pulse ultrasound stimulate chondrocytes growth in a 3-D alginate scaffold through improved porosity and permeability.

    PubMed

    Guo, Gepu; Lu, Lu; Ji, Hongfei; Ma, Yong; Dong, Rui; Tu, Juan; Guo, Xiasheng; Qiu, Yuanyuan; Wu, Junru; Zhang, Dong

    2015-04-01

    A 3-D scaffold culture system has been used to promote in producing functional chondrocytes for repairing damaged cartilage. In the present study, the low intensity pulse ultrasound (LIPUS) (P(-)=0, 0.055, 0.085 and 0.11 MPa) was applied to improve the porosity and permeability of a 3-D alginate scaffold which was beneficial for the nutrition supply and metabolism during cell growth in 3-D alginate scaffold. The porosity and permeability of the scaffold was quantitatively analyzed based on scanning electron microscopy examination and fluorescence image observation. The results suggest that, for the scaffold exposed to LIPUS, its porosity and permeability could be significantly enhanced by the increasing LIPUS amplitude, which might be induced by the microstreaming shear stress generated by ultrasound-driven microbubble oscillations. Furthermore, the assessments of cell proliferation and collagen II expression confirmed that chondrocytes growth could be effectively promoted in 3-D alginate scaffolds treated by LIPUS, because of the improved scaffold porosity and permeability might benefit cell growth space and nutrition supply. It should also be noticed that appropriate LIPUS driving parameters should be adapted to achieve optimized chondrocytes culture effect in 3-D alginate scaffold.

  10. ORPHEE 3D: Static and dynamic tridimensional BHA computer models

    SciTech Connect

    Birades, M.

    1986-01-01

    Elf Aquitaine, within an ARTEP research project granted by EEC, has developed two three-dimensional mathematical models to predict the directional behavior of bottom hole assemblies (BHAs). Both models simulate BHAs by finite element methods. The first model describes dynamically their transient behavior step by step during short time intervals which are continuously adjusted to attain the required precision. Displacements and lateral forces, computed for each step, integrate friction against the borehole wall through a sophisticated shock algorithm. The second model computes a static equilibrium of the BHA while assuming simplified friction forces at the contact points between the wellbore and the BHA. The lateral forces and displacements are found to be an average of the highly varying ones computed by the dynamic model and the static computer run is much faster.

  11. FINAL INTERIM REPORT, CANDIDATE SITES, MACHINES IN USE, DATA STORAGE AND TRANSMISSION METHODS: TESTING FEASIBILITY OF 3D ULTRASOUND DATA ACQUISITION AND RELIABILITY OF DATA RETRIEVAL FROM STORED 3D IMAGES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this Work Assignment, 02-03, is to examine the feasibility of collecting transmitting, and analyzing 3-D ultrasound data in the context of a multi-center study of pregnant women. The study will also examine the reliability of measurements obtained from 3-D images< ...

  12. Computation of tooth axes of existent and missing teeth from 3D CT images.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yang; Wu, Lin; Guo, Huayan; Qiu, Tiantian; Huang, Yuanliang; Lin, Bin; Wang, Lisheng

    2015-12-01

    Orientations of tooth axes are important quantitative information used in dental diagnosis and surgery planning. However, their computation is a complex problem, and the existing methods have respective limitations. This paper proposes new methods to compute 3D tooth axes from 3D CT images for existent teeth with single root or multiple roots and to estimate 3D tooth axes from 3D CT images for missing teeth. The tooth axis of a single-root tooth will be determined by segmenting the pulp cavity of the tooth and computing the principal direction of the pulp cavity, and the estimation of tooth axes of the missing teeth is modeled as an interpolation problem of some quaternions along a 3D curve. The proposed methods can either avoid the difficult teeth segmentation problem or improve the limitations of existing methods. Their effectiveness and practicality are demonstrated by experimental results of different 3D CT images from the clinic.

  13. Theoretical Analysis of the Accuracy and Safety of MRI-Guided Transurethral 3-D Conformal Ultrasound Prostate Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burtnyk, Mathieu; Chopra, Rajiv; Bronskill, Michael

    2009-04-01

    MRI-guided transurethral ultrasound therapy is a promising new approach for the treatment of localized prostate cancer. Several studies have demonstrated the feasibility of producing large regions of thermal coagulation adequate for prostate therapy; however, the quantitative assessment of shaping these regions to complex 3-D human prostate geometries has not been fully explored. This study used numerical simulations and twenty manually-segmented pelvic anatomical models derived from high-quality MR images of prostate cancer patients to evaluate the treatment accuracy and safety of 3-D conformal MRI-guided transurethral ultrasound therapy. The simulations incorporated a rotating multi-element planar dual-frequency ultrasound transducer (seventeen 4×3 mm elements) operating at 4.7/9.7 MHz and 10 W/cm2 maximum acoustic power. Results using a novel feedback control algorithm which modulated the ultrasound frequency, power and device rate of rotation showed that regions of thermal coagulation could be shaped to predefined prostate volumes within 1.0 mm across the vast majority of these glands. Treatment times were typically 30 min and remained below 60 min for large 60 cc prostates. With a rectal cooling temperature of 15° C, the rectal wall did not exceed 30EM43 in half of the twenty patient models with only a few 1 mm3 voxels above this threshold in the other cases. At 4.7 MHz, heating of the pelvic bone can become significant when it is located less than 10 mm from the prostate. Numerical simulations show that MRI-guided transurethral ultrasound therapy can thermally coagulate whole prostate glands accurately and safely in 3-D.

  14. The 3d International Workshop on Computational Electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodnick, Stephen M.

    1994-09-01

    The Third International Workshop on Computational Electronics (IWCE) was held at the Benson Hotel in downtown Portland, Oregon, on May 18, 19, and 20, 1994. The workshop was devoted to a broad range of topics in computational electronics related to the simulation of electronic transport in semiconductors and semiconductor devices, particularly those which use large computational resources. The workshop was supported by the National Science Foundation (NSF), the Office of Naval Research and the Army Research Office, as well as local support from the Oregon Joint Graduate Schools of Engineering and the Oregon Center for Advanced Technology Education. There were over 100 participants in the Portland workshop, of which more than one quarter represented research groups outside of the United States from Austria, Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, Switzerland, and the United Kingdom. There were a total 81 papers presented at the workshop, 9 invited talks, 26 oral presentations and 46 poster presentations. The emphasis of the contributions reflected the interdisciplinary nature of computational electronics with researchers from the Chemistry, Computer Science, Mathematics, Engineering, and Physics communities participating in the workshop.

  15. Register cardiac fiber orientations from 3D DTI volume to 2D ultrasound image of rat hearts

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Xulei; Wang, Silun; Shen, Ming; Zhang, Xiaodong; Lerakis, Stamatios; Wagner, Mary B.; Fei, Baowei

    2015-01-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) ultrasound or echocardiography is one of the most widely used examinations for the diagnosis of cardiac diseases. However, it only supplies the geometric and structural information of the myocardium. In order to supply more detailed microstructure information of the myocardium, this paper proposes a registration method to map cardiac fiber orientations from three-dimensional (3D) magnetic resonance diffusion tensor imaging (MR-DTI) volume to the 2D ultrasound image. It utilizes a 2D/3D intensity based registration procedure including rigid, log-demons, and affine transformations to search the best similar slice from the template volume. After registration, the cardiac fiber orientations are mapped to the 2D ultrasound image via fiber relocations and reorientations. This method was validated by six images of rat hearts ex vivo. The evaluation results indicated that the final Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) achieved more than 90% after geometric registrations; and the inclination angle errors (IAE) between the mapped fiber orientations and the gold standards were less than 15 degree. This method may provide a practical tool for cardiologists to examine cardiac fiber orientations on ultrasound images and have the potential to supply additional information for diagnosis of cardiac diseases. PMID:26855466

  16. Register cardiac fiber orientations from 3D DTI volume to 2D ultrasound image of rat hearts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Xulei; Wang, Silun; Shen, Ming; Zhang, Xiaodong; Lerakis, Stamatios; Wagner, Mary B.; Fei, Baowei

    2015-03-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) ultrasound or echocardiography is one of the most widely used examinations for the diagnosis of cardiac diseases. However, it only supplies the geometric and structural information of the myocardium. In order to supply more detailed microstructure information of the myocardium, this paper proposes a registration method to map cardiac fiber orientations from three-dimensional (3D) magnetic resonance diffusion tensor imaging (MR-DTI) volume to the 2D ultrasound image. It utilizes a 2D/3D intensity based registration procedure including rigid, log-demons, and affine transformations to search the best similar slice from the template volume. After registration, the cardiac fiber orientations are mapped to the 2D ultrasound image via fiber relocations and reorientations. This method was validated by six images of rat hearts ex vivo. The evaluation results indicated that the final Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) achieved more than 90% after geometric registrations; and the inclination angle errors (IAE) between the mapped fiber orientations and the gold standards were less than 15 degree. This method may provide a practical tool for cardiologists to examine cardiac fiber orientations on ultrasound images and have the potential to supply additional information for diagnosis of cardiac diseases.

  17. Computational 3-D Model of the Human Respiratory System

    EPA Science Inventory

    We are developing a comprehensive, morphologically-realistic computational model of the human respiratory system that can be used to study the inhalation, deposition, and clearance of contaminants, while being adaptable for age, race, gender, and health/disease status. The model ...

  18. Tools for 3D scientific visualization in computational aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bancroft, Gordon; Plessel, Todd; Merritt, Fergus; Watson, Val

    1989-01-01

    The purpose is to describe the tools and techniques in use at the NASA Ames Research Center for performing visualization of computational aerodynamics, for example visualization of flow fields from computer simulations of fluid dynamics about vehicles such as the Space Shuttle. The hardware used for visualization is a high-performance graphics workstation connected to a super computer with a high speed channel. At present, the workstation is a Silicon Graphics IRIS 3130, the supercomputer is a CRAY2, and the high speed channel is a hyperchannel. The three techniques used for visualization are post-processing, tracking, and steering. Post-processing analysis is done after the simulation. Tracking analysis is done during a simulation but is not interactive, whereas steering analysis involves modifying the simulation interactively during the simulation. Using post-processing methods, a flow simulation is executed on a supercomputer and, after the simulation is complete, the results of the simulation are processed for viewing. The software in use and under development at NASA Ames Research Center for performing these types of tasks in computational aerodynamics is described. Workstation performance issues, benchmarking, and high-performance networks for this purpose are also discussed as well as descriptions of other hardware for digital video and film recording.

  19. Tensor3D: A computer graphics program to simulate 3D real-time deformation and visualization of geometric bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pallozzi Lavorante, Luca; Dirk Ebert, Hans

    2008-07-01

    Tensor3D is a geometric modeling program with the capacity to simulate and visualize in real-time the deformation, specified through a tensor matrix and applied to triangulated models representing geological bodies. 3D visualization allows the study of deformational processes that are traditionally conducted in 2D, such as simple and pure shears. Besides geometric objects that are immediately available in the program window, the program can read other models from disk, thus being able to import objects created with different open-source or proprietary programs. A strain ellipsoid and a bounding box are simultaneously shown and instantly deformed with the main object. The principal axes of strain are visualized as well to provide graphical information about the orientation of the tensor's normal components. The deformed models can also be saved, retrieved later and deformed again, in order to study different steps of progressive strain, or to make this data available to other programs. The shape of stress ellipsoids and the corresponding Mohr circles defined by any stress tensor can also be represented. The application was written using the Visualization ToolKit, a powerful scientific visualization library in the public domain. This development choice, allied to the use of the Tcl/Tk programming language, which is independent on the host computational platform, makes the program a useful tool for the study of geometric deformations directly in three dimensions in teaching as well as research activities.

  20. Quantification of Coupled Stiffness and Fiber Orientation Remodeling in Hypertensive Rat Right-Ventricular Myocardium Using 3D Ultrasound Speckle Tracking with Biaxial Testing

    PubMed Central

    Park, Dae Woo; Sebastiani, Andrea; Yap, Choon Hwai; Simon, Marc A.; Kim, Kang

    2016-01-01

    Mechanical and structural changes of right ventricular (RV) in response to pulmonary hypertension (PH) are inadequately understood. While current standard biaxial testing provides information on the mechanical behavior of RV tissues using surface markers, it is unable to fully assess structural and mechanical properties across the full tissue thickness. In this study, the mechanical and structural properties of normotensive and pulmonary hypertension right ventricular (PHRV) myocardium through its full thickness were examined using mechanical testing combined with 3D ultrasound speckle tracking (3D-UST). RV pressure overload was induced in Sprague–Dawley rats by pulmonary artery (PA) banding. The second Piola–Kirchhoff stress tensors and Green-Lagrangian strain tensors were computed in the RV myocardium using the biaxial testing combined with 3D-UST. A previously established non-linear curve-fitting algorithm was applied to fit experimental data to a Strain Energy Function (SEF) for computation of myofiber orientation. The fiber orientations obtained by the biaxial testing with 3D-UST compared well with the fiber orientations computed from the histology. In addition, the re-orientation of myofiber in the right ventricular free wall (RVFW) along longitudinal direction (apex-to-outflow-tract direction) was noticeable in response to PH. For normotensive RVFW samples, the average fiber orientation angles obtained by 3D-UST with biaxial test spiraled from 20° at the endo-cardium to -42° at the epi-cardium (Δ = 62°). For PHRV samples, the average fiber orientation angles obtained by 3D-UST with biaxial test had much less spiral across tissue thickness: 3° at endo-cardium to -7° at epi-cardium (Δ = 10°, P<0.005 compared to normotensive). PMID:27780271

  1. Requirements for mesh resolution in 3D computational hemodynamics.

    PubMed

    Prakash, S; Ethier, C R

    2001-04-01

    Computational techniques are widely used for studying large artery hemodynamics. Current trends favor analyzing flow in more anatomically realistic arteries. A significant obstacle to such analyses is generation of computational meshes that accurately resolve both the complex geometry and the physiologically relevant flow features. Here we examine, for a single arterial geometry, how velocity and wall shear stress patterns depend on mesh characteristics. A well-validated Navier-Stokes solver was used to simulate flow in an anatomically realistic human right coronary artery (RCA) using unstructured high-order tetrahedral finite element meshes. Velocities, wall shear stresses (WSS), and wall shear stress gradients were computed on a conventional "high-resolution" mesh series (60,000 to 160,000 velocity nodes) generated with a commercial meshing package. Similar calculations were then performed in a series of meshes generated through an adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) methodology. Mesh-independent velocity fields were not very difficult to obtain for both the conventional and adaptive mesh series. However, wall shear stress fields, and, in particular, wall shear stress gradient fields, were much more difficult to accurately resolve. The conventional (nonadaptive) mesh series did not show a consistent trend towards mesh-independence of WSS results. For the adaptive series, it required approximately 190,000 velocity nodes to reach an r.m.s. error in normalized WSS of less than 10 percent. Achieving mesh-independence in computed WSS fields requires a surprisingly large number of nodes, and is best approached through a systematic solution-adaptive mesh refinement technique. Calculations of WSS, and particularly WSS gradients, show appreciable errors even on meshes that appear to produce mesh-independent velocity fields.

  2. A 3D Freehand Ultrasound System for Multi-view Reconstructions from Sparse 2D Scanning Planes

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background A significant limitation of existing 3D ultrasound systems comes from the fact that the majority of them work with fixed acquisition geometries. As a result, the users have very limited control over the geometry of the 2D scanning planes. Methods We present a low-cost and flexible ultrasound imaging system that integrates several image processing components to allow for 3D reconstructions from limited numbers of 2D image planes and multiple acoustic views. Our approach is based on a 3D freehand ultrasound system that allows users to control the 2D acquisition imaging using conventional 2D probes. For reliable performance, we develop new methods for image segmentation and robust multi-view registration. We first present a new hybrid geometric level-set approach that provides reliable segmentation performance with relatively simple initializations and minimum edge leakage. Optimization of the segmentation model parameters and its effect on performance is carefully discussed. Second, using the segmented images, a new coarse to fine automatic multi-view registration method is introduced. The approach uses a 3D Hotelling transform to initialize an optimization search. Then, the fine scale feature-based registration is performed using a robust, non-linear least squares algorithm. The robustness of the multi-view registration system allows for accurate 3D reconstructions from sparse 2D image planes. Results Volume measurements from multi-view 3D reconstructions are found to be consistently and significantly more accurate than measurements from single view reconstructions. The volume error of multi-view reconstruction is measured to be less than 5% of the true volume. We show that volume reconstruction accuracy is a function of the total number of 2D image planes and the number of views for calibrated phantom. In clinical in-vivo cardiac experiments, we show that volume estimates of the left ventricle from multi-view reconstructions are found to be in better

  3. 3D optical imagery for motion compensation in a limb ultrasound system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranger, Bryan J.; Feigin, Micha; Zhang, Xiang; Mireault, Al; Raskar, Ramesh; Herr, Hugh M.; Anthony, Brian W.

    2016-04-01

    Conventional processes for prosthetic socket fabrication are heavily subjective, often resulting in an interface to the human body that is neither comfortable nor completely functional. With nearly 100% of amputees reporting that they experience discomfort with the wearing of their prosthetic limb, designing an effective interface to the body can significantly affect quality of life and future health outcomes. Active research in medical imaging and biomechanical tissue modeling of residual limbs has led to significant advances in computer aided prosthetic socket design, demonstrating an interest in moving toward more quantifiable processes that are still patient-specific. In our work, medical ultrasonography is being pursued to acquire data that may quantify and improve the design process and fabrication of prosthetic sockets while greatly reducing cost compared to an MRI-based framework. This paper presents a prototype limb imaging system that uses a medical ultrasound probe, mounted to a mechanical positioning system and submerged in a water bath. The limb imaging is combined with three-dimensional optical imaging for motion compensation. Images are collected circumferentially around the limb and combined into cross-sectional axial image slices, resulting in a compound image that shows tissue distributions and anatomical boundaries similar to magnetic resonance imaging. In this paper we provide a progress update on our system development, along with preliminary results as we move toward full volumetric imaging of residual limbs for prosthetic socket design. This demonstrates a novel multi-modal approach to residual limb imaging.

  4. Semi-automatic assessment of pediatric hydronephrosis severity in 3D ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerrolaza, Juan J.; Otero, Hansel; Yao, Peter; Biggs, Elijah; Mansoor, Awais; Ardon, Roberto; Jago, James; Peters, Craig A.; Linguraru, Marius George

    2016-03-01

    Hydronephrosis is the most common abnormal finding in pediatric urology. Thanks to its non-ionizing nature, ultrasound (US) imaging is the preferred diagnostic modality for the evaluation of the kidney and the urinary track. However, due to the lack of correlation of US with renal function, further invasive and/or ionizing studies might be required (e.g., diuretic renograms). This paper presents a computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) tool for the accurate and objective assessment of pediatric hydronephrosis based on morphological analysis of kidney from 3DUS scans. The integration of specific segmentation tools in the system, allows to delineate the relevant renal structures from 3DUS scans of the patients with minimal user interaction, and the automatic computation of 90 anatomical features. Using the washout half time (T1/2) as indicative of renal obstruction, an optimal subset of predictive features is selected to differentiate, with maximum sensitivity, those severe cases where further attention is required (e.g., in the form of diuretic renograms), from the noncritical ones. The performance of this new 3DUS-based CAD system is studied for two clinically relevant T1/2 thresholds, 20 and 30 min. Using a dataset of 20 hydronephrotic cases, pilot experiments show how the system outperforms previous 2D implementations by successfully identifying all the critical cases (100% of sensitivity), and detecting up to 100% (T1/2 = 20 min) and 67% (T1/2 = 30 min) of non-critical ones for T1/2 thresholds of 20 and 30 min, respectively.

  5. Characterization of controlled bone defects using 2D and 3D ultrasound imaging techniques.

    PubMed

    Parmar, Biren J; Longsine, Whitney; Sabonghy, Eric P; Han, Arum; Tasciotti, Ennio; Weiner, Bradley K; Ferrari, Mauro; Righetti, Raffaella

    2010-08-21

    Ultrasound is emerging as an attractive alternative modality to standard x-ray and CT methods for bone assessment applications. As of today, however, there is a lack of systematic studies that investigate the performance of diagnostic ultrasound techniques in bone imaging applications. This study aims at understanding the performance limitations of new ultrasound techniques for imaging bones in controlled experiments in vitro. Experiments are performed on samples of mammalian and non-mammalian bones with controlled defects with size ranging from 400 microm to 5 mm. Ultrasound findings are statistically compared with those obtained from the same samples using standard x-ray imaging modalities and optical microscopy. The results of this study demonstrate that it is feasible to use diagnostic ultrasound imaging techniques to assess sub-millimeter bone defects in real time and with high accuracy and precision. These results also demonstrate that ultrasound imaging techniques perform comparably better than x-ray imaging and optical imaging methods, in the assessment of a wide range of controlled defects both in mammalian and non-mammalian bones. In the future, ultrasound imaging techniques might provide a cost-effective, real-time, safe and portable diagnostic tool for bone imaging applications.

  6. GEO3D - Three-Dimensional Computer Model of a Ground Source Heat Pump System

    SciTech Connect

    James Menart

    2013-06-07

    This file is the setup file for the computer program GEO3D. GEO3D is a computer program written by Jim Menart to simulate vertical wells in conjunction with a heat pump for ground source heat pump (GSHP) systems. This is a very detailed three-dimensional computer model. This program produces detailed heat transfer and temperature field information for a vertical GSHP system.

  7. [3D computer-assisted ENT biopsies of the Iceman].

    PubMed

    Thumfart, W F; Freysinger, W; Gunkel, A R; Truppe, M J; Platzer, W

    1997-02-01

    The University of Innsbruck possesses a unique prehistoric, completely conserved 5300-year-old human cadaver. We report our experiences during which ENT specialists collected samples from various cavities inside the Iceman. Guidance of biopsy instruments was accomplished with computer-assisted navigation based on Interventional Video Tomography. This technology allows surgical guidance by interlinking currently available imaging modalities with live endoscopic video. The system operates without patient fixation and is practically free of external contact. Apart from sterility, special precautionary measures were necessary to avoid contamination with heavy metals or microorganisms. Visual inspection of the samples of mucosa from the nose, maxillary sinus and larynx revealed the typical patterns of a human cadaver without overt pathology.

  8. Recent advances in 3D computed tomography techniques for simulation and navigation in hepatobiliary pancreatic surgery.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Masafumi

    2014-04-01

    A few years ago it could take several hours to complete a 3D image using a 3D workstation. Thanks to advances in computer science, obtaining results of interest now requires only a few minutes. Many recent 3D workstations or multimedia computers are equipped with onboard 3D virtual patient modeling software, which enables patient-specific preoperative assessment and virtual planning, navigation, and tool positioning. Although medical 3D imaging can now be conducted using various modalities, including computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), positron emission tomography (PET), and ultrasonography (US) among others, the highest quality images are obtained using CT data, and CT images are now the most commonly used source of data for 3D simulation and navigation image. If the 2D source image is bad, no amount of 3D image manipulation in software will provide a quality 3D image. In this exhibition, the recent advances in CT imaging technique and 3D visualization of the hepatobiliary and pancreatic abnormalities are featured, including scan and image reconstruction technique, contrast-enhanced techniques, new application of advanced CT scan techniques, and new virtual reality simulation and navigation imaging.

  9. Computer-generated hologram for 3D scene from multi-view images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Eun-Young; Kang, Yun-Suk; Moon, KyungAe; Ho, Yo-Sung; Kim, Jinwoong

    2013-05-01

    Recently, the computer generated hologram (CGH) calculated from real existing objects is more actively investigated to support holographic video and TV applications. In this paper, we propose a method of generating a hologram of the natural 3-D scene from multi-view images in order to provide motion parallax viewing with a suitable navigation range. After a unified 3-D point source set describing the captured 3-D scene is obtained from multi-view images, a hologram pattern supporting motion-parallax is calculated from the set using a point-based CGH method. We confirmed that 3-D scenes are faithfully reconstructed using numerical reconstruction.

  10. Simultaneous bilateral real-time 3-d transcranial ultrasound imaging at 1 MHz through poor acoustic windows.

    PubMed

    Lindsey, Brooks D; Nicoletto, Heather A; Bennett, Ellen R; Laskowitz, Daniel T; Smith, Stephen W

    2013-04-01

    Ultrasound imaging has been proposed as a rapid, portable alternative imaging modality to examine stroke patients in pre-hospital or emergency room settings. However, in performing transcranial ultrasound examinations, 8%-29% of patients in a general population may present with window failure, in which case it is not possible to acquire clinically useful sonographic information through the temporal bone acoustic window. In this work, we describe the technical considerations, design and fabrication of low-frequency (1.2 MHz), large aperture (25.3 mm) sparse matrix array transducers for 3-D imaging in the event of window failure. These transducers are integrated into a system for real-time 3-D bilateral transcranial imaging-the ultrasound brain helmet-and color flow imaging capabilities at 1.2 MHz are directly compared with arrays operating at 1.8 MHz in a flow phantom with attenuation comparable to the in vivo case. Contrast-enhanced imaging allowed visualization of arteries of the Circle of Willis in 5 of 5 subjects and 8 of 10 sides of the head despite probe placement outside of the acoustic window. Results suggest that this type of transducer may allow acquisition of useful images either in individuals with poor windows or outside of the temporal acoustic window in the field.

  11. Development of a 3D patient-specific planning platform for interstitial and transurethral ultrasound thermal therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prakash, Punit; Diederich, Chris J.

    2010-03-01

    Interstitial and transurethral catheter-based ultrasound devices are under development for treatment of prostate cancer and BPH, uterine fibroids, liver tumors and other soft tissue disease. Accurate 3D thermal modeling is essential for designing site-specific applicators, exploring treatment delivery strategies, and integration of patient-specific treatment planning of thermal ablations. We are developing a comprehensive 3D modeling and treatment planning platform for ultrasound ablation of tissue using catheter-based applicators. We explored the applicability of assessing thermal effects in tissue using critical temperature, thermal dose and Arrhenius thermal damage thresholds and performed a comparative analysis of dynamic tissue properties critical to accurate modeling. We used the model to assess the feasibility of automatic feedback control with MR thermometry, and demonstrated the utility of the modeling platform for 3D patient-specific treatment planning. We have identified critical temperature, thermal dose and thermal damage thresholds for assessing treatment endpoint. Dynamic changes in tissue attenuation/absorption and perfusion must be included for accurate prediction of temperature profiles and extents of the ablation zone. Lastly, we demonstrated use of the modeling platform for patient-specific treatment planning.

  12. Automatic registration between 3D intra-operative ultrasound and pre-operative CT images of the liver based on robust edge matching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nam, Woo Hyun; Kang, Dong-Goo; Lee, Duhgoon; Lee, Jae Young; Ra, Jong Beom

    2012-01-01

    The registration of a three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound (US) image with a computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance image is beneficial in various clinical applications such as diagnosis and image-guided intervention of the liver. However, conventional methods usually require a time-consuming and inconvenient manual process for pre-alignment, and the success of this process strongly depends on the proper selection of initial transformation parameters. In this paper, we present an automatic feature-based affine registration procedure of 3D intra-operative US and pre-operative CT images of the liver. In the registration procedure, we first segment vessel lumens and the liver surface from a 3D B-mode US image. We then automatically estimate an initial registration transformation by using the proposed edge matching algorithm. The algorithm finds the most likely correspondences between the vessel centerlines of both images in a non-iterative manner based on a modified Viterbi algorithm. Finally, the registration is iteratively refined on the basis of the global affine transformation by jointly using the vessel and liver surface information. The proposed registration algorithm is validated on synthesized datasets and 20 clinical datasets, through both qualitative and quantitative evaluations. Experimental results show that automatic registration can be successfully achieved between 3D B-mode US and CT images even with a large initial misalignment.

  13. Fraunhofer computer-generated hologram for diffused 3D scene in Fresnel region.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuan-Zhi; Dong, Jian-Wen; Pu, Yi-Ying; He, He-Xiang; Chen, Bing-Chu; Wang, He-Zhou; Zheng, Huadong; Yu, Yingjie

    2011-06-01

    A Fraunhofer computer-generated hologram (CGH) is proved to be valid in display for three-dimensional (3D) objects from the Fresnel to the far-field region without a Fourier lens for reconstruction. To quickly compute large and complicated 3D objects that consist of slanted diffused surfaces in the Fresnel region, a Fraunhofer-based analytical approach using a basic-triangle tiling diffuser is developed. Both theoretical and experimental results reveal that Fraunhofer CGH can perform the same effects as Fresnel CGH but require less calculation time. Impressive 3D solid effects are achieved in the Fresnel region.

  14. Computer-Designed Splints for Surgical Transfer of 3D Orthognathic Planning.

    PubMed

    Zinser, Max; Zoeller, Joachim

    2015-10-01

    Advances in computers and imaging have permitted the adoption of three-dimensional (3D) planning protocols in orthognathic surgery, which may allow a paradigm shift when the computer-assisted planning can be transferred properly. The purpose of this investigation was to introduce an innovative clinical protocol using computer-aided designed and computer-aided manufactured (CAD/CAM) surgical splints for surgical transfer of 3D orthognathic planning compared with the classic technique using arbitrary occlusal splints. The clinical protocols consisted of computed tomography (CT) or cone-beam CT (CBCT) maxillofacial imaging, bone segmentation, 3D diagnosis, computer-assisted surgical treatment planning, and CAD/CAM surgical splints (group A) and manufacture of arbitrary occlusal splints (group B) for intraoperative surgical planning transfer. The observed patients underwent bimaxillary osteotomies and, if necessary, an additional genioplasty. Both techniques were evaluated by applying 13 hard tissue parameters to compare the 3D orthognathic planning (T0) with the postoperative result (T1) using 3D cephalometry. The CAD/CAM splints showed significant better precision for the maxilla (ΔT < 0.23 mm) and mandible (ΔT < 0.33 mm) compared with a maxillary deviation of 1.3 mm and a mandibular deviation of 1.8 mm when using the arbitrary splints. Computer-assisted diagnosis and preoperative surgical planning provide clinicians with valuable tools and allow 3D imagination. CAD/CAM splints provide a reliable, innovative, and precise approach for the transfer of 3D orthognathic planning, which is more precise compared with the conventional arbitrary occlusal splints.

  15. In vivo validation of a 3D ultrasound system for imaging the lateral ventricles of neonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishimoto, J.; Fenster, A.; Chen, N.; Lee, D.; de Ribaupierre, S.

    2014-03-01

    Dilated lateral ventricles in neonates can be due to many different causes, such as brain loss, or congenital malformation; however, the main cause is hydrocephalus, which is the accumulation of fluid within the ventricular system. Hydrocephalus can raise intracranial pressure resulting in secondary brain damage, and up to 25% of patients with severely enlarged ventricles have epilepsy in later life. Ventricle enlargement is clinically monitored using 2D US through the fontanels. The sensitivity of 2D US to dilation is poor because it cannot provide accurate measurements of irregular volumes such as the ventricles, so most clinical evaluations are of a qualitative nature. We developed a 3D US system to image the cerebral ventricles of neonates within the confines of incubators that can be easily translated to more open environments. Ventricle volumes can be segmented from these images giving a quantitative volumetric measurement of ventricle enlargement without moving the patient into an imaging facility. In this paper, we report on in vivo validation studies: 1) comparing 3D US ventricle volumes before and after clinically necessary interventions removing CSF, and 2) comparing 3D US ventricle volumes to those from MRI. Post-intervention ventricle volumes were less than pre-intervention measurements for all patients and all interventions. We found high correlations (R = 0.97) between the difference in ventricle volume and the reported removed CSF with the slope not significantly different than 1 (p < 0.05). Comparisons between ventricle volumes from 3D US and MR images taken 4 (±3.8) days of each other did not show significant difference (p=0.44) between 3D US and MRI through paired t-test.

  16. Tubular structure enhancement for surgical instrument detection in 3D ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Ren, Hongliang; Dupont, Pierre E

    2011-01-01

    Three-dimensional ultrasound has been an effective imaging modality for diagnostics and is now an emerging modality for image-guided minimally-invasive interventions since it enables visualization of both instruments and tissue. Challenges to ultrasound-guided interventions arise, however, due to the low signal-to-noise ratio and the imaging artifacts created by the interventional instruments. Metallic instruments, in particular, are strong scatters and so produce a variety of artifacts. For many interventions, the manual or robotic instrument is comprised of a long curved tubular structure with specialized tooling at its tip. Toward the goal of developing a surgical navigation system, this paper proposes an image processing algorithm for enhancing the tubular structure of imaged instruments while also reducing imaging artifacts. Experiments are presented to evaluate the effectiveness of the approach in the context of robotic instruments whose shape comprises a smooth curve along their length.

  17. Time- and Computation-Efficient Calibration of MEMS 3D Accelerometers and Gyroscopes

    PubMed Central

    Stančin, Sara; Tomažič, Sašo

    2014-01-01

    We propose calibration methods for microelectromechanical system (MEMS) 3D accelerometers and gyroscopes that are efficient in terms of time and computational complexity. The calibration process for both sensors is simple, does not require additional expensive equipment, and can be performed in the field before or between motion measurements. The methods rely on a small number of defined calibration measurements that are used to obtain the values of 12 calibration parameters. This process enables the static compensation of sensor inaccuracies. The values detected by the 3D sensor are interpreted using a generalized 3D sensor model. The model assumes that the values detected by the sensor are equal to the projections of the measured value on the sensor sensitivity axes. Although this finding is trivial for 3D accelerometers, its validity for 3D gyroscopes is not immediately apparent; thus, this paper elaborates on this latter topic. For an example sensor device, calibration parameters were established using calibration measurements of approximately 1.5 min in duration for the 3D accelerometer and 2.5 min in duration for the 3D gyroscope. Correction of each detected 3D value using the established calibration parameters in further measurements requires only nine addition and nine multiplication operations. PMID:25123469

  18. Time- and computation-efficient calibration of MEMS 3D accelerometers and gyroscopes.

    PubMed

    Stančin, Sara; Tomažič, Sašo

    2014-01-01

    We propose calibration methods for microelectromechanical system (MEMS) 3D accelerometers and gyroscopes that are efficient in terms of time and computational complexity. The calibration process for both sensors is simple, does not require additional expensive equipment, and can be performed in the field before or between motion measurements. The methods rely on a small number of defined calibration measurements that are used to obtain the values of 12 calibration parameters. This process enables the static compensation of sensor inaccuracies. The values detected by the 3D sensor are interpreted using a generalized 3D sensor model. The model assumes that the values detected by the sensor are equal to the projections of the measured value on the sensor sensitivity axes. Although this finding is trivial for 3D accelerometers, its validity for 3D gyroscopes is not immediately apparent; thus, this paper elaborates on this latter topic. For an example sensor device, calibration parameters were established using calibration measurements of approximately 1.5 min in duration for the 3D accelerometer and 2.5 min in duration for the 3D gyroscope. Correction of each detected 3D value using the established calibration parameters in further measurements requires only nine addition and nine multiplication operations.

  19. SU-E-J-135: An Investigation of Ultrasound Imaging for 3D Intra-Fraction Prostate Motion Estimation

    SciTech Connect

    O'Shea, T; Harris, E; Bamber, J; Evans, P

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: This study investigates the use of a mechanically swept 3D ultrasound (US) probe to estimate intra-fraction motion of the prostate during radiation therapy using an US phantom and simulated transperineal imaging. Methods: A 3D motion platform was used to translate an US speckle phantom while simulating transperineal US imaging. Motion patterns for five representative types of prostate motion, generated from patient data previously acquired with a Calypso system, were using to move the phantom in 3D. The phantom was also implanted with fiducial markers and subsequently tracked using the CyberKnife kV x-ray system for comparison. A normalised cross correlation block matching algorithm was used to track speckle patterns in 3D and 2D US data. Motion estimation results were compared with known phantom translations. Results: Transperineal 3D US could track superior-inferior (axial) and anterior-posterior (lateral) motion to better than 0.8 mm root-mean-square error (RMSE) at a volume rate of 1.7 Hz (comparable with kV x-ray tracking RMSE). Motion estimation accuracy was poorest along the US probe's swept axis (right-left; RL; RMSE < 4.2 mm) but simple regularisation methods could be used to improve RMSE (< 2 mm). 2D US was found to be feasible for slowly varying motion (RMSE < 0.5 mm). 3D US could also allow accurate radiation beam gating with displacement thresholds of 2 mm and 5 mm exhibiting a RMSE of less than 0.5 mm. Conclusion: 2D and 3D US speckle tracking is feasible for prostate motion estimation during radiation delivery. Since RL prostate motion is small in magnitude and frequency, 2D or a hybrid (2D/3D) US imaging approach which also accounts for potential prostate rotations could be used. Regularisation methods could be used to ensure the accuracy of tracking data, making US a feasible approach for gating or tracking in standard or hypo-fractionated prostate treatments.

  20. Investigation on reconstruction methods applied to 3D terahertz computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Recur, B; Younus, A; Salort, S; Mounaix, P; Chassagne, B; Desbarats, P; Caumes, J-P; Abraham, E

    2011-03-14

    3D terahertz computed tomography has been performed using a monochromatic millimeter wave imaging system coupled with an infrared temperature sensor. Three different reconstruction methods (standard back-projection algorithm and two iterative analysis) have been compared in order to reconstruct large size 3D objects. The quality (intensity, contrast and geometric preservation) of reconstructed cross-sectional images has been discussed together with the optimization of the number of projections. Final demonstration to real-life 3D objects has been processed to illustrate the potential of the reconstruction methods for applied terahertz tomography.

  1. 3D-SoftChip: A Novel Architecture for Next-Generation Adaptive Computing Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Chul; Rassau, Alex; Lachowicz, Stefan; Lee, Mike Myung-Ok; Eshraghian, Kamran

    2006-12-01

    This paper introduces a novel architecture for next-generation adaptive computing systems, which we term 3D-SoftChip. The 3D-SoftChip is a 3-dimensional (3D) vertically integrated adaptive computing system combining state-of-the-art processing and 3D interconnection technology. It comprises the vertical integration of two chips (a configurable array processor and an intelligent configurable switch) through an indium bump interconnection array (IBIA). The configurable array processor (CAP) is an array of heterogeneous processing elements (PEs), while the intelligent configurable switch (ICS) comprises a switch block, 32-bit dedicated RISC processor for control, on-chip program/data memory, data frame buffer, along with a direct memory access (DMA) controller. This paper introduces the novel 3D-SoftChip architecture for real-time communication and multimedia signal processing as a next-generation computing system. The paper further describes the advanced HW/SW codesign and verification methodology, including high-level system modeling of the 3D-SoftChip using SystemC, being used to determine the optimum hardware specification in the early design stage.

  2. A new 3D computational model for shaped charge jet breakup

    SciTech Connect

    Zernow, L.; Chapyak, E.J.; Mosso, S.J.

    1996-09-01

    This paper reviews prior 1D and 2D axisymmetric, analytical and computational studies, as well as empirical studies of the shaped charge jet particulation problem and discusses their associated insights and problems. It proposes a new 3D computational model of the particulation process, based upon a simplified version of the observed counter-rotating, double helical surface perturbations, found on softly recovered shaped charge jet particles, from both copper and tantalum jets. This 3D approach contrasts with the random, axisymmetric surface perturbations which have previously been used, to try to infer the observed length distribution of jet particles, on the basis of the most unstable wavelength concept, which leads to the expectation of a continuous distribution of particle lengths. The 3D model, by its very nature, leads to a non-random, periodic distribution of potential initial necking loci, on alternate sides of the stretching jet. This in turn infers a potentially periodic, overlapping, multi-modal distribution of associated jet particle lengths. Since it is unlikely that all potential initial necking sites will be activated simultaneously, the 3D model also suggests that longer jet particles containing partial, but unseparated necks, should be observed fairly often. The computational analysis is in its very early stages and the problems involved in inserting the two helical grooves and in defining the initial conditions and boundary conditions for the computation will be discussed. Available initial results from the 3D computation will be discussed and interpreted.

  3. 3D Slicer as an Image Computing Platform for the Quantitative Imaging Network

    PubMed Central

    Fedorov, Andriy; Beichel, Reinhard; Kalpathy-Cramer, Jayashree; Finet, Julien; Fillion-Robin, Jean-Christophe; Pujol, Sonia; Bauer, Christian; Jennings, Dominique; Fennessy, Fiona; Sonka, Milan; Buatti, John; Aylward, Stephen; Miller, James V.; Pieper, Steve; Kikinis, Ron

    2012-01-01

    Quantitative analysis has tremendous but mostly unrealized potential in healthcare to support objective and accurate interpretation of the clinical imaging. In 2008, the National Cancer Institute began building the Quantitative Imaging Network (QIN) initiative with the goal of advancing quantitative imaging in the context of personalized therapy and evaluation of treatment response. Computerized analysis is an important component contributing to reproducibility and efficiency of the quantitative imaging techniques. The success of quantitative imaging is contingent on robust analysis methods and software tools to bring these methods from bench to bedside. 3D Slicer is a free open source software application for medical image computing. As a clinical research tool, 3D Slicer is similar to a radiology workstation that supports versatile visualizations but also provides advanced functionality such as automated segmentation and registration for a variety of application domains. Unlike a typical radiology workstation, 3D Slicer is free and is not tied to specific hardware. As a programming platform, 3D Slicer facilitates translation and evaluation of the new quantitative methods by allowing the biomedical researcher to focus on the implementation of the algorithm, and providing abstractions for the common tasks of data communication, visualization and user interface development. Compared to other tools that provide aspects of this functionality, 3D Slicer is fully open source and can be readily extended and redistributed. In addition, 3D Slicer is designed to facilitate the development of new functionality in the form of 3D Slicer extensions. In this paper, we present an overview of 3D Slicer as a platform for prototyping, development and evaluation of image analysis tools for clinical research applications. To illustrate the utility of the platform in the scope of QIN, we discuss several use cases of 3D Slicer by the existing QIN teams, and we elaborate on the future

  4. 3D non-rigid registration using surface and local salient features for transrectal ultrasound image-guided prostate biopsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiaofeng; Akbari, Hamed; Halig, Luma; Fei, Baowei

    2011-03-01

    We present a 3D non-rigid registration algorithm for the potential use in combining PET/CT and transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) images for targeted prostate biopsy. Our registration is a hybrid approach that simultaneously optimizes the similarities from point-based registration and volume matching methods. The 3D registration is obtained by minimizing the distances of corresponding points at the surface and within the prostate and by maximizing the overlap ratio of the bladder neck on both images. The hybrid approach not only capture deformation at the prostate surface and internal landmarks but also the deformation at the bladder neck regions. The registration uses a soft assignment and deterministic annealing process. The correspondences are iteratively established in a fuzzy-to-deterministic approach. B-splines are used to generate a smooth non-rigid spatial transformation. In this study, we tested our registration with pre- and postbiopsy TRUS images of the same patients. Registration accuracy is evaluated using manual defined anatomic landmarks, i.e. calcification. The root-mean-squared (RMS) of the difference image between the reference and floating images was decreased by 62.6+/-9.1% after registration. The mean target registration error (TRE) was 0.88+/-0.16 mm, i.e. less than 3 voxels with a voxel size of 0.38×0.38×0.38 mm3 for all five patients. The experimental results demonstrate the robustness and accuracy of the 3D non-rigid registration algorithm.

  5. Using High Frequency Focused Water-Coupled Ultrasound for 3-D Surface Depression Profiling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, Don J.; Whalen, Mike F.; Hendricks, J. Lynne; Bodis, James R.

    1999-01-01

    Surface topography is an important variable in the performance of many industrial components and is normally measured with diamond-tip profilometry over a small area or using optical scattering methods for larger area measurement. A prior study was performed demonstrating that focused air-coupled ultrasound at 1 MHz was capable of profiling surfaces with 25 micron depth resolution and 400 micron lateral resolution over a 1.4 mm depth range. In this article, the question of whether higher-frequency focused water-coupled ultrasound can improve on these specifications is addressed. 10 and 25 MHz focused ultrasonic transducers were employed in the water-coupled mode. Time-of-flight images of the sample surface were acquired and converted to depth / surface profile images using the simple relation (d = V*t/2) between distance (d), time-of-flight (t), and the velocity of sound in water (V). Results are compared for the two frequencies used and with those from the 1 MHz air-coupled configuration.

  6. Computer-aided microtomography with true 3-D display in electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Nelson, A C

    1986-01-01

    A novel research system has been designed to permit three-dimensional (3-D) viewing of high resolution image data from transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The system consists of front-end primary data acquisition devices, such as TEM and SEM machines, which are equipped with computer-controlled specimen tilt stages. The output from these machines is in analogue form, where a video camera attached to the TEM provides the sequential analogue image output while the SEM direct video output is utilized. A 10 MHz digitizer transforms the video image to a digital array of 512 X 512 pixel units of 8 bits deep-stored in a frame buffer. Digital images from multiple projections are reconstructed into 3-D image boxes in a dedicated computer. Attached to the computer is a powerful true 3-D display device which has hardware for graphic manipulations including tilt and rotate on any axis and for probing the image with a 3-D cursor. Data editing and automatic contouring functions are used to enhance areas of interest, and specialized software is available for measurement of numbers, distances, areas, and volumes. With proper archiving of reconstructed image sequences, a dynamic 3-D presentation is possible. The microtomography system is highly versatile and can process image data on-line or from remote sites from which data records would typically be transported on computer tape, video tape, or floppy disk. PMID:3753610

  7. Computer-aided 3D-shape construction of hearts from CT images for rapid prototyping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuzawa, Masayuki; Kato, Yutaro; Nakamori, Nobuyuki; Ozawa, Seiichiro; Shiraishi, Isao

    2012-03-01

    By developing a computer-aided modeling system, the 3D shapes of infant's heart have been constructed interactively from quality-limited CT images for rapid prototyping of biomodels. The 3D model was obtained by following interactive steps: (1) rough region cropping, (2) outline extraction in each slice with locally-optimized threshold, (3) verification and correction of outline overlap, (4) 3D surface generation of inside wall, (5) connection of inside walls, (6) 3D surface generation of outside wall, (7) synthesis of self-consistent 3D surface. The manufactured biomodels revealed characteristic 3D shapes of heart such as left atrium and ventricle, aortic arch and right auricle. Their real shape of cavity and vessel is suitable for surgery planning and simulation. It is a clear advantage over so-called "blood-pool" model which is massive and often found in 3D visualization of CT images as volume rendering perspective. The developed system contributed both to quality improvement and to modeling-time reduction, which may suggest a practical approach to establish a routine process for manufacturing heart biomodels. Further study on the system performance is now still in progress.

  8. Enhancement of 3D modeling and classification of microcalcifications in breast computed tomography (BCT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alquran, Hiam; Shaheen, Eman; O'Connor, J. Michael; Mahd, Mufeed

    2014-03-01

    Current computer aided diagnosis (CADx) software for digital mammography relies mainly on 2D techniques. With the emergence of three-dimensional (3D) breast imaging modalities such as breast Computed Tomography (BCT), there is an opportunity to analyze 3D features in the classification of calcifications. We previously reported our initial work on automated 3D feature detection and classification based on morphological descriptions for single microcalcifications within clusters [1]. In this work, we propose the expansion of the 3D classification methods to include novel microcalcification morphological feature detection such as including more morphological classes and replacing the 2D Radon transform by a 3D Radon transform. Results show that the classification rate improved compared to the previously reported results from a total of 546 to 559 consistently classified calcifications out of 635 total calcifications. This slight improvement is due to the use of the 3D Radon transform and incorporating methods to detect two classes not previously implemented. Future work will focus on adding feature detection and classification of cluster patterns.

  9. Meta!Blast computer game: a pipeline from science to 3D art to education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneller, William; Campbell, P. J.; Bassham, Diane; Wurtele, Eve Syrkin

    2012-03-01

    Meta!Blast (http://www.metablast.org) is designed to address the challenges students often encounter in understanding cell and metabolic biology. Developed by faculty and students in biology, biochemistry, computer science, game design, pedagogy, art and story, Meta!Blast is being created using Maya (http://usa.autodesk.com/maya/) and the Unity 3D (http://unity3d.com/) game engine, for Macs and PCs in classrooms; it has also been exhibited in an immersive environment. Here, we describe the pipeline from protein structural data and holographic information to art to the threedimensional (3D) environment to the game engine, by which we provide a publicly-available interactive 3D cellular world that mimics a photosynthetic plant cell.

  10. 3D computer data capture and imaging applied to the face and jaws.

    PubMed

    Spencer, R; Hathaway, R; Speculand, B

    1996-02-01

    There have been few attempts in the past at 3D computer modelling of facial deformity because of the difficulties with generating accurate three-dimensional data and subsequent image regeneration and manipulation. We report the application of computer aided engineering techniques to the study of jaw deformity. The construction of a 3D image of the mandible using a Ferranti co-ordinate measuring machine for data capture and the 'DUCT5' surface modelling programme for image regeneration is described. The potential application of this work will be discussed. PMID:8645664

  11. High-speed dynamic 3D photoacoustic imaging of sentinel lymph node in a murine model using an ultrasound array.

    PubMed

    Song, Liang; Kim, Chulhong; Maslov, Konstantin; Shung, K Kirk; Wang, Lihong V

    2009-08-01

    Noninvasive photoacoustic sentinel lymph node (SLN) mapping with high spatial resolution has the potential to improve the false negative rate and eliminate the use of radioactive tracers in SLN identification. In addition, the demonstrated high spatial resolution may enable physicians to replace SLN biopsy with fine needle aspiration biopsy, and thus reduce the risk of associated morbidity. The primary goal of this study is to demonstrate the feasibility of high-speed 3D photoacoustic imaging of the uptake and clearance dynamics of Evans blue dye in SLNs. The photoacoustic imaging system was developed with a 30 MHz ultrasound array and a kHz repetition rate laser system. It acquires one 3D photoacoustic image of 166 B-scan frames in 1 s, with axial, lateral, and elevational resolutions of 25, 70, and 200 microm, respectively. With optic-fiber based light delivery, the entire system is compact and is convenient to use. Upon injection of Evans blue, a blue dye currently used in clinical SLN biopsy, SLNs in mice and rats were accurately and noninvasively mapped in vivo using our imaging system. In our experiments, the SLNs were found to be located at approximately 0.65 mm below the skin surface in mice and approximately 1.2 mm in rats. In some cases, lymph vessels and lymphatic valves were also imaged. The dye dynamics--accumulation and clearance--in SLNs were quantitatively monitored by sequential 3D imaging with temporal resolution of as high as approximately 6 s. The demonstrated capability suggests that high-speed 3D photoacoustic imaging should facilitate the understanding of the dynamics of various dyes in SLNs and potentially help identify SLNs with high accuracy. PMID:19746805

  12. Development of 3D ultrasound needle guidance for high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy of gynaecological cancers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodgers, J.; Tessier, D.; D'Souza, D.; Leung, E.; Hajdok, G.; Fenster, A.

    2016-04-01

    High-dose-rate (HDR) interstitial brachytherapy is often included in standard-of-care for gynaecological cancers. Needles are currently inserted through a perineal template without any standard real-time imaging modality to assist needle guidance, causing physicians to rely on pre-operative imaging, clinical examination, and experience. While two-dimensional (2D) ultrasound (US) is sometimes used for real-time guidance, visualization of needle placement and depth is difficult and subject to variability and inaccuracy in 2D images. The close proximity to critical organs, in particular the rectum and bladder, can lead to serious complications. We have developed a three-dimensional (3D) transrectal US system and are investigating its use for intra-operative visualization of needle positions used in HDR gynaecological brachytherapy. As a proof-of-concept, four patients were imaged with post-insertion 3D US and x-ray CT. Using software developed in our laboratory, manual rigid registration of the two modalities was performed based on the perineal template's vaginal cylinder. The needle tip and a second point along the needle path were identified for each needle visible in US. The difference between modalities in the needle trajectory and needle tip position was calculated for each identified needle. For the 60 needles placed, the mean trajectory difference was 3.23 +/- 1.65° across the 53 visible needle paths and the mean difference in needle tip position was 3.89 +/- 1.92 mm across the 48 visible needles tips. Based on the preliminary results, 3D transrectal US shows potential for the development of a 3D US-based needle guidance system for interstitial gynaecological brachytherapy.

  13. Introduction of the ASP3D Computer Program for Unsteady Aerodynamic and Aeroelastic Analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batina, John T.

    2005-01-01

    A new computer program has been developed called ASP3D (Advanced Small Perturbation 3D), which solves the small perturbation potential flow equation in an advanced form including mass-consistent surface and trailing wake boundary conditions, and entropy, vorticity, and viscous effects. The purpose of the program is for unsteady aerodynamic and aeroelastic analyses, especially in the nonlinear transonic flight regime. The program exploits the simplicity of stationary Cartesian meshes with the movement or deformation of the configuration under consideration incorporated into the solution algorithm through a planar surface boundary condition. The new ASP3D code is the result of a decade of developmental work on improvements to the small perturbation formulation, performed while the author was employed as a Senior Research Scientist in the Configuration Aerodynamics Branch at the NASA Langley Research Center. The ASP3D code is a significant improvement to the state-of-the-art for transonic aeroelastic analyses over the CAP-TSD code (Computational Aeroelasticity Program Transonic Small Disturbance), which was developed principally by the author in the mid-1980s. The author is in a unique position as the developer of both computer programs to compare, contrast, and ultimately make conclusions regarding the underlying formulations and utility of each code. The paper describes the salient features of the ASP3D code including the rationale for improvements in comparison with CAP-TSD. Numerous results are presented to demonstrate the ASP3D capability. The general conclusion is that the new ASP3D capability is superior to the older CAP-TSD code because of the myriad improvements developed and incorporated.

  14. Development of a 3D ultrasound system to investigate post-hemorrhagic hydrocephalus in pre-term neonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishimoto, J.; Lee, D.; St. Lawrence, K.; Romano, W.; Fenster, A.; de Ribaupierre, S.

    2013-03-01

    Clinical intracranial ultrasound (US) is performed as a standard of care on neonates at risk of intraventricular hemorrhaging (IVH) and is also used after a diagnosis to monitor for potential ventricular dilation. However, it is difficult to estimate the volume of ventricles with 2D US due to their irregular shape. We developed a 3D US system to be used as an adjunct to a clinical system to investigate volumetric changes in the ventricles of neonates with IVH. Our system has been found have an error of within 1% of actual distance measurements in all three directions and volume measurements of manually segmented volumes from phantoms were not statistically significantly different from the actual values (p>0.3). Interobserver volume measurements of the lateral ventricles in a patient with grade III IVH found no significant differences between measurements. There is the potential to use this system in IVH patients to monitor the progression of ventriculomegaly over time.

  15. Models the Electromagnetic Response of a 3D Distribution using MP COMPUTERS

    1999-05-01

    EM3D models the electromagnetic response of a 3D distribution of conductivity, dielectric permittivity and magnetic permeability within the earth for geophysical applications using massively parallel computers. The simulations are carried out in the frequency domain for either electric or magnetic sources for either scattered or total filed formulations of Maxwell''s equations. The solution is based on the method of finite differences and includes absorbing boundary conditions so that responses can be modeled up into themore » radar range where wave propagation is dominant. Recent upgrades in the software include the incorporation of finite size sources, that in addition to dipolar source fields, and a low induction number preconditioner that can significantly reduce computational run times. A graphical user interface (GUI) is bundled with the software so that complicated 3D models can be easily constructed and simulated with the software. The GUI also allows for plotting of the output.« less

  16. Automatic left-atrial segmentation from cardiac 3D ultrasound: a dual-chamber model-based approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almeida, Nuno; Sarvari, Sebastian I.; Orderud, Fredrik; Gérard, Olivier; D'hooge, Jan; Samset, Eigil

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we present an automatic solution for segmentation and quantification of the left atrium (LA) from 3D cardiac ultrasound. A model-based framework is applied, making use of (deformable) active surfaces to model the endocardial surfaces of cardiac chambers, allowing incorporation of a priori anatomical information in a simple fashion. A dual-chamber model (LA and left ventricle) is used to detect and track the atrio-ventricular (AV) plane, without any user input. Both chambers are represented by parametric surfaces and a Kalman filter is used to fit the model to the position of the endocardial walls detected in the image, providing accurate detection and tracking during the whole cardiac cycle. This framework was tested in 20 transthoracic cardiac ultrasound volumetric recordings of healthy volunteers, and evaluated using manual traces of a clinical expert as a reference. The 3D meshes obtained with the automatic method were close to the reference contours at all cardiac phases (mean distance of 0.03+/-0.6 mm). The AV plane was detected with an accuracy of -0.6+/-1.0 mm. The LA volumes assessed automatically were also in agreement with the reference (mean +/-1.96 SD): 0.4+/-5.3 ml, 2.1+/-12.6 ml, and 1.5+/-7.8 ml at end-diastolic, end-systolic and pre-atrial-contraction frames, respectively. This study shows that the proposed method can be used for automatic volumetric assessment of the LA, considerably reducing the analysis time and effort when compared to manual analysis.

  17. Novel fully integrated computer system for custom footwear: from 3D digitization to manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houle, Pascal-Simon; Beaulieu, Eric; Liu, Zhaoheng

    1998-03-01

    This paper presents a recently developed custom footwear system, which integrates 3D digitization technology, range image fusion techniques, a 3D graphical environment for corrective actions, parametric curved surface representation and computer numerical control (CNC) machining. In this system, a support designed with the help of biomechanics experts can stabilize the foot in a correct and neutral position. The foot surface is then captured by a 3D camera using active ranging techniques. A software using a library of documented foot pathologies suggests corrective actions on the orthosis. Three kinds of deformations can be achieved. The first method uses previously scanned pad surfaces by our 3D scanner, which can be easily mapped onto the foot surface to locally modify the surface shape. The second kind of deformation is construction of B-Spline surfaces by manipulating control points and modifying knot vectors in a 3D graphical environment to build desired deformation. The last one is a manual electronic 3D pen, which may be of different shapes and sizes, and has an adjustable 'pressure' information. All applied deformations should respect a G1 surface continuity, which ensure that the surface can accustom a foot. Once the surface modification process is completed, the resulting data is sent to manufacturing software for CNC machining.

  18. Multi-atlas-based automatic 3D segmentation for prostate brachytherapy in transrectal ultrasound images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nouranian, Saman; Mahdavi, S. Sara; Spadinger, Ingrid; Morris, William J.; Salcudean, S. E.; Abolmaesumi, P.

    2013-03-01

    One of the commonly used treatment methods for early-stage prostate cancer is brachytherapy. The standard of care for planning this procedure is segmentation of contours from transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) images, which closely follow the prostate boundary. This process is currently performed either manually or using semi-automatic techniques. This paper introduces a fully automatic segmentation algorithm which uses a priori knowledge of contours in a reference data set of TRUS volumes. A non-parametric deformable registration method is employed to transform the atlas prostate contours to a target image coordinates. All atlas images are sorted based on their registration results and the highest ranked registration results are selected for decision fusion. A Simultaneous Truth and Performance Level Estimation algorithm is utilized to fuse labels from registered atlases and produce a segmented target volume. In this experiment, 50 patient TRUS volumes are obtained and a leave-one-out study on TRUS volumes is reported. We also compare our results with a state-of-the-art semi-automatic prostate segmentation method that has been clinically used for planning prostate brachytherapy procedures and we show comparable accuracy and precision within clinically acceptable runtime.

  19. The Effects of 3D Computer Simulation on Biology Students' Achievement and Memory Retention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elangovan, Tavasuria; Ismail, Zurida

    2014-01-01

    A quasi experimental study was conducted for six weeks to determine the effectiveness of two different 3D computer simulation based teaching methods, that is, realistic simulation and non-realistic simulation on Form Four Biology students' achievement and memory retention in Perak, Malaysia. A sample of 136 Form Four Biology students in Perak,…

  20. Analyzing 3D xylem networks in Vitis vinifera using High Resolution Computed Tomography (HRCT)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recent developments in High Resolution Computed Tomography (HRCT) have made it possible to visualize three dimensional (3D) xylem networks without time consuming, labor intensive physical sectioning. Here we describe a new method to visualize complex vessel networks in plants and produce a quantitat...

  1. Analysis of thoracic aorta hemodynamics using 3D particle tracking velocimetry and computational fluid dynamics.

    PubMed

    Gallo, Diego; Gülan, Utku; Di Stefano, Antonietta; Ponzini, Raffaele; Lüthi, Beat; Holzner, Markus; Morbiducci, Umberto

    2014-09-22

    Parallel to the massive use of image-based computational hemodynamics to study the complex flow establishing in the human aorta, the need for suitable experimental techniques and ad hoc cases for the validation and benchmarking of numerical codes has grown more and more. Here we present a study where the 3D pulsatile flow in an anatomically realistic phantom of human ascending aorta is investigated both experimentally and computationally. The experimental study uses 3D particle tracking velocimetry (PTV) to characterize the flow field in vitro, while finite volume method is applied to numerically solve the governing equations of motion in the same domain, under the same conditions. Our findings show that there is an excellent agreement between computational and measured flow fields during the forward flow phase, while the agreement is poorer during the reverse flow phase. In conclusion, here we demonstrate that 3D PTV is very suitable for a detailed study of complex unsteady flows as in aorta and for validating computational models of aortic hemodynamics. In a future step, it will be possible to take advantage from the ability of 3D PTV to evaluate velocity fluctuations and, for this reason, to gain further knowledge on the process of transition to turbulence occurring in the thoracic aorta.

  2. Using 3D Computer Graphics Multimedia to Motivate Preservice Teachers' Learning of Geometry and Pedagogy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodson-Espy, Tracy; Lynch-Davis, Kathleen; Schram, Pamela; Quickenton, Art

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the genesis and purpose of our geometry methods course, focusing on a geometry-teaching technology we created using NVIDIA[R] Chameleon demonstration. This article presents examples from a sequence of lessons centered about a 3D computer graphics demonstration of the chameleon and its geometry. In addition, we present data…

  3. Adaptive 3D single-block grids for the computation of viscous flows around wings

    SciTech Connect

    Hagmeijer, R.; Kok, J.C.

    1996-12-31

    A robust algorithm for the adaption of a 3D single-block structured grid suitable for the computation of viscous flows around a wing is presented and demonstrated by application to the ONERA M6 wing. The effects of grid adaption on the flow solution and accuracy improvements is analyzed. Reynolds number variations are studied.

  4. 3D image fusion and guidance for computer-assisted bronchoscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higgins, W. E.; Rai, L.; Merritt, S. A.; Lu, K.; Linger, N. T.; Yu, K. C.

    2005-11-01

    The standard procedure for diagnosing lung cancer involves two stages. First, the physician evaluates a high-resolution three-dimensional (3D) computed-tomography (CT) chest image to produce a procedure plan. Next, the physician performs bronchoscopy on the patient, which involves navigating the the bronchoscope through the airways to planned biopsy sites. Unfortunately, the physician has no link between the 3D CT image data and the live video stream provided during bronchoscopy. In addition, these data sources differ greatly in what they physically give, and no true 3D planning tools exist for planning and guiding procedures. This makes it difficult for the physician to translate a CT-based procedure plan to the video domain of the bronchoscope. Thus, the physician must essentially perform biopsy blindly, and the skill levels between different physicians differ greatly. We describe a system that enables direct 3D CT-based procedure planning and provides direct 3D guidance during bronchoscopy. 3D CT-based information on biopsy sites is provided interactively as the physician moves the bronchoscope. Moreover, graphical information through a live fusion of the 3D CT data and bronchoscopic video is provided during the procedure. This information is coupled with a series of computer-graphics tools to give the physician a greatly augmented reality of the patient's interior anatomy during a procedure. Through a series of controlled tests and studies with human lung-cancer patients, we have found that the system not only reduces the variation in skill level between different physicians, but also increases biopsy success rate.

  5. Noninvasive quantification of in vitro osteoblastic differentiation in 3D engineered tissue constructs using spectral ultrasound imaging.

    PubMed

    Gudur, Madhu Sudhan Reddy; Rao, Rameshwar R; Peterson, Alexis W; Caldwell, David J; Stegemann, Jan P; Deng, Cheri X

    2014-01-01

    Non-destructive monitoring of engineered tissues is needed for translation of these products from the lab to the clinic. In this study, non-invasive, high resolution spectral ultrasound imaging (SUSI) was used to monitor the differentiation of MC3T3 pre-osteoblasts seeded within collagen hydrogels. SUSI was used to measure the diameter, concentration and acoustic attenuation of scatterers within such constructs cultured in either control or osteogenic medium over 21 days. Conventional biochemical assays were used on parallel samples to determine DNA content and calcium deposition. Construct volume and morphology were accurately imaged using ultrasound. Cell diameter was estimated to be approximately 12.5-15.5 µm using SUSI, which corresponded well to measurements of fluorescently stained cells. The total number of cells per construct assessed by quantitation of DNA content decreased from 5.6±2.4×10(4) at day 1 to 0.9±0.2×10(4) at day 21. SUSI estimation of the equivalent number of acoustic scatters showed a similar decreasing trend, except at day 21 in the osteogenic samples, which showed a marked increase in both scatterer number and acoustic impedance, suggestive of mineral deposition by the differentiating MC3T3 cells. Estimation of calcium content by SUSI was 41.7±11.4 µg/ml, which agreed well with the biochemical measurement of 38.7±16.7 µg/ml. Color coded maps of parameter values were overlaid on B-mode images to show spatiotemporal changes in cell diameter and calcium deposition. This study demonstrates the use of non-destructive ultrasound imaging to provide quantitative information on the number and differentiated state of cells embedded within 3D engineered constructs, and therefore presents a valuable tool for longitudinal monitoring of engineered tissue development.

  6. The Ultrasound Brain Helmet: New Transducers and Volume Registration for In Vivo Simultaneous Multi-Transducer 3-D Transcranial Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Lindsey, Brooks D.; Light, Edward D.; Nicoletto, Heather A.; Bennett, Ellen R.; Laskowitz, Daniel T.; Smith, Stephen W.

    2012-01-01

    Because stroke remains an important and time-sensitive health concern in developed nations, we present a system capable of fusing 3-D transcranial ultrasound volumes acquired from two sides of the head. This system uses custom sparse array transducers built on flexible multilayer circuits that can be positioned for simultaneous imaging through both temporal acoustic windows, allowing for potential registration of multiple real-time 3-D scans of cerebral vasculature. We examine hardware considerations for new matrix arrays—transducer design and interconnects—in this application. Specifically, it is proposed that SNR may be increased by reducing the length of probe cables. This claim is evaluated as part of the presented system through simulation, experimental data, and in vivo imaging. Ultimately, gains in SNR of 7 dB are realized by replacing a standard probe cable with a much shorter flex interconnect; higher gains may be possible using ribbon-based probe cables. In vivo images are presented, showing cerebral arteries with and without the use of microbubble contrast agent; they have been registered and fused using a simple algorithm which maximizes normalized cross-correlation. PMID:21693401

  7. Accurate quantification of local changes for carotid arteries in 3D ultrasound images using convex optimization-based deformable registration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Jieyu; Qiu, Wu; Yuan, Jing; Fenster, Aaron; Chiu, Bernard

    2016-03-01

    Registration of longitudinally acquired 3D ultrasound (US) images plays an important role in monitoring and quantifying progression/regression of carotid atherosclerosis. We introduce an image-based non-rigid registration algorithm to align the baseline 3D carotid US with longitudinal images acquired over several follow-up time points. This algorithm minimizes the sum of absolute intensity differences (SAD) under a variational optical-flow perspective within a multi-scale optimization framework to capture local and global deformations. Outer wall and lumen were segmented manually on each image, and the performance of the registration algorithm was quantified by Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) and mean absolute distance (MAD) of the outer wall and lumen surfaces after registration. In this study, images for 5 subjects were registered initially by rigid registration, followed by the proposed algorithm. Mean DSC generated by the proposed algorithm was 79:3+/-3:8% for lumen and 85:9+/-4:0% for outer wall, compared to 73:9+/-3:4% and 84:7+/-3:2% generated by rigid registration. Mean MAD of 0:46+/-0:08mm and 0:52+/-0:13mm were generated for lumen and outer wall respectively by the proposed algorithm, compared to 0:55+/-0:08mm and 0:54+/-0:11mm generated by rigid registration. The mean registration time of our method per image pair was 143+/-23s.

  8. Quantitative 3-d diagnostic ultrasound imaging using a modified transducer array and an automated image tracking technique.

    PubMed

    Hossack, John A; Sumanaweera, Thilaka S; Napel, Sandy; Ha, Jun S

    2002-08-01

    An approach for acquiring dimensionally accurate three-dimensional (3-D) ultrasound data from multiple 2-D image planes is presented. This is based on the use of a modified linear-phased array comprising a central imaging array that acquires multiple, essentially parallel, 2-D slices as the transducer is translated over the tissue of interest. Small, perpendicularly oriented, tracking arrays are integrally mounted on each end of the imaging transducer. As the transducer is translated in an elevational direction with respect to the central imaging array, the images obtained by the tracking arrays remain largely coplanar. The motion between successive tracking images is determined using a minimum sum of absolute difference (MSAD) image matching technique with subpixel matching resolution. An initial phantom scanning-based test of a prototype 8 MHz array indicates that linear dimensional accuracy of 4.6% (2 sigma) is achievable. This result compares favorably with those obtained using an assumed average velocity [31.5% (2 sigma) accuracy] and using an approach based on measuring image-to-image decorrelation [8.4% (2 sigma) accuracy]. The prototype array and imaging system were also tested in a clinical environment, and early results suggest that the approach has the potential to enable a low cost, rapid, screening method for detecting carotid artery stenosis. The average time for performing a screening test for carotid stenosis was reduced from an average of 45 minutes using 2-D duplex Doppler to 12 minutes using the new 3-D scanning approach.

  9. Mapping and characterizing endometrial implants by registering 2D transvaginal ultrasound to 3D pelvic magnetic resonance images.

    PubMed

    Yavariabdi, Amir; Bartoli, Adrien; Samir, Chafik; Artigues, Maxime; Canis, Michel

    2015-10-01

    We propose a new deformable slice-to-volume registration method to register a 2D Transvaginal Ultrasound (TVUS) to a 3D Magnetic Resonance (MR) volume. Our main goal is to find a cross-section of the MR volume such that the endometrial implants and their depth of infiltration can be mapped from TVUS to MR. The proposed TVUS-MR registration method uses contour to surface correspondences through a novel variational one-step deformable Iterative Closest Point (ICP) method. Specifically, we find a smooth deformation field while establishing point correspondences automatically. We demonstrate the accuracy of the proposed method by quantitative and qualitative tests on both semi-synthetic and clinical data. To generate semi-synthetic data sets, 3D surfaces are deformed with 4-40% degrees of deformation and then various intersection curves are obtained at 0-20° cutting angles. Results show an average mean square error of 5.7934±0.4615mm, average Hausdorff distance of 2.493±0.14mm, and average Dice similarity coefficient of 0.9750±0.0030.

  10. Initial results obtained from a 3D computational model of the shaped charge jet particulation process

    SciTech Connect

    Zernow, L.; Chapyak, E.J.

    1998-02-01

    In a previous paper, the authors discussed a 3D computational model for the particulation of a stretching shaped charge jet, based on the experimentally observed double-helix surface perturbations on softly recovered jet particles. The 3D problem was derived from the unperturbed 2D problem, which was first used to generate a stretching jet. A portion of this 2D jet was selected for study in the cylindrical 3D mode, and the double-helix perturbations were placed on the cylinder surface. This initial computation was greatly simplified, to make it feasible to run on a CM 200 massively parallel processor. The initial output of this computation, which is being published here for the first time, leads to a significant simplification of the analysis of the particulation process, by avoiding the search for the elusive ``most favored wavelength`` which is characteristic of 2D axi-symmetric analyses. Previously unnoticed characteristics of flash radiographs from Viper jets, appear to support the computational results obtained, despite a counter-intuitive prediction of the location of necking loci, relative to the perturbing helices. The approximations used in this initial computation are discussed critically. Planned improvements are defined. A vision of future fundamental computations, which become possible with more powerful ASCI machines, is projected.

  11. Mechanically assisted 3D ultrasound for pre-operative assessment and guiding percutaneous treatment of focal liver tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadeghi Neshat, Hamid; Bax, Jeffery; Barker, Kevin; Gardi, Lori; Chedalavada, Jason; Kakani, Nirmal; Fenster, Aaron

    2014-03-01

    Image-guided percutaneous ablation is the standard treatment for focal liver tumors deemed inoperable and is commonly used to maintain eligibility for patients on transplant waitlists. Radiofrequency (RFA), microwave (MWA) and cryoablation technologies are all delivered via one or a number of needle-shaped probes inserted directly into the tumor. Planning is mostly based on contrast CT/MRI. While intra-procedural CT is commonly used to confirm the intended probe placement, 2D ultrasound (US) remains the main, and in some centers the only imaging modality used for needle guidance. Corresponding intraoperative 2D US with planning and other intra-procedural imaging modalities is essential for accurate needle placement. However, identification of matching features of interest among these images is often challenging given the limited field-of-view (FOV) and low quality of 2D US images. We have developed a passive tracking arm with a motorized scan-head and software tools to improve guiding capabilities of conventional US by large FOV 3D US scans that provides more anatomical landmarks that can facilitate registration of US with both planning and intra-procedural images. The tracker arm is used to scan the whole liver with a high geometrical accuracy that facilitates multi-modality landmark based image registration. Software tools are provided to assist with the segmentation of the ablation probes and tumors, find the 2D view that best shows the probe(s) from a 3D US image, and to identify the corresponding image from planning CT scans. In this paper, evaluation results from laboratory testing and a phase 1 clinical trial for planning and guiding RFA and MWA procedures using the developed system will be presented. Early clinical results show a comparable performance to intra-procedural CT that suggests 3D US as a cost-effective alternative with no side-effects in centers where CT is not available.

  12. 3-D visualization and non-linear tissue classification of breast tumors using ultrasound elastography in vivo.

    PubMed

    Sayed, Ahmed; Layne, Ginger; Abraham, Jame; Mukdadi, Osama M

    2014-07-01

    The goal of the study described here was to introduce new methods for the classification and visualization of human breast tumors using 3-D ultrasound elastography. A tumor's type, shape and size are key features that can help the physician to decide the sort and extent of necessary treatment. In this work, tumor type, being either benign or malignant, was classified non-invasively for nine volunteer patients. The classification was based on estimating four parameters that reflect the tumor's non-linear biomechanical behavior, under multi-compression levels. Tumor prognosis using non-linear elastography was confirmed with biopsy as a gold standard. Three tissue classification parameters were found to be statistically significant with a p-value < 0.05, whereas the fourth non-linear parameter was highly significant, having a p-value < 0.001. Furthermore, each breast tumor's shape and size were estimated in vivo using 3-D elastography, and were enhanced using interactive segmentation. Segmentation with level sets was used to isolate the stiff tumor from the surrounding soft tissue. Segmentation also provided a reliable means to estimate tumors volumes. Four volumetric strains were investigated: the traditional normal axial strain, the first principal strain, von Mises strain and maximum shear strain. It was noted that these strains can provide varying degrees of boundary enhancement to the stiff tumor in the constructed elastograms. The enhanced boundary improved the performance of the segmentation process. In summary, the proposed methods can be employed as a 3-D non-invasive tool for characterization of breast tumors, and may provide early prognosis with minimal pain, as well as diminish the risk of late-stage breast cancer.

  13. Efficient 3D geometric and Zernike moments computation from unstructured surface meshes.

    PubMed

    Pozo, José María; Villa-Uriol, Maria-Cruz; Frangi, Alejandro F

    2011-03-01

    This paper introduces and evaluates a fast exact algorithm and a series of faster approximate algorithms for the computation of 3D geometric moments from an unstructured surface mesh of triangles. Being based on the object surface reduces the computational complexity of these algorithms with respect to volumetric grid-based algorithms. In contrast, it can only be applied for the computation of geometric moments of homogeneous objects. This advantage and restriction is shared with other proposed algorithms based on the object boundary. The proposed exact algorithm reduces the computational complexity for computing geometric moments up to order N with respect to previously proposed exact algorithms, from N(9) to N(6). The approximate series algorithm appears as a power series on the rate between triangle size and object size, which can be truncated at any desired degree. The higher the number and quality of the triangles, the better the approximation. This approximate algorithm reduces the computational complexity to N(3). In addition, the paper introduces a fast algorithm for the computation of 3D Zernike moments from the computed geometric moments, with a computational complexity N(4), while the previously proposed algorithm is of order N(6). The error introduced by the proposed approximate algorithms is evaluated in different shapes and the cost-benefit ratio in terms of error, and computational time is analyzed for different moment orders. PMID:20714011

  14. Non-rigid registration of a 3D ultrasound and a MR image data set of the female pelvic floor using a biomechanical model

    PubMed Central

    Verhey, Janko F; Wisser, Josef; Warfield, Simon K; Rexilius, Jan; Kikinis, Ron

    2005-01-01

    Background The visual combination of different modalities is essential for many medical imaging applications in the field of Computer-Assisted medical Diagnosis (CAD) to enhance the clinical information content. Clinically, incontinence is a diagnosis with high clinical prevalence and morbidity rate. The search for a method to identify risk patients and to control the success of operations is still a challenging task. The conjunction of magnetic resonance (MR) and 3D ultrasound (US) image data sets could lead to a new clinical visual representation of the morphology as we show with corresponding data sets of the female anal canal with this paper. Methods We present a feasibility study for a non-rigid registration technique based on a biomechanical model for MR and US image data sets of the female anal canal as a base for a new innovative clinical visual representation. Results It is shown in this case study that the internal and external sphincter region could be registered elastically and the registration partially corrects the compression induced by the ultrasound transducer, so the MR data set showing the native anatomy is used as a frame for the US data set showing the same region with higher resolution but distorted by the transducer Conclusion The morphology is of special interest in the assessment of anal incontinence and the non-rigid registration of normal clinical MR and US image data sets is a new field of the adaptation of this method incorporating the advantages of both technologies. PMID:15777475

  15. Application of the ASP3D Computer Program to Unsteady Aerodynamic and Aeroelastic Analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batina, John T.

    2006-01-01

    A new computer program has been developed called ASP3D (Advanced Small Perturbation - 3D), which solves the small perturbation potential flow equation in an advanced form including mass-consistent surface and trailing wake boundary conditions, and entropy, vorticity, and viscous effects. The purpose of the program is for unsteady aerodynamic and aeroelastic analyses, especially in the nonlinear transonic flight regime. The program exploits the simplicity of stationary Cartesian meshes with the movement or deformation of the configuration under consideration incorporated into the solution algorithm through a planar surface boundary condition. The paper presents unsteady aerodynamic and aeroelastic applications of ASP3D to assess the time dependent capability and demonstrate various features of the code.

  16. Computational study of 3-D hot-spot initiation in shocked insensitive high-explosive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Najjar, F. M.; Howard, W. M.; Fried, L. E.; Manaa, M. R.; Nichols, A., III; Levesque, G.

    2012-03-01

    High-explosive (HE) material consists of large-sized grains with micron-sized embedded impurities and pores. Under various mechanical/thermal insults, these pores collapse generating hightemperature regions leading to ignition. A hydrodynamic study has been performed to investigate the mechanisms of pore collapse and hot spot initiation in TATB crystals, employing a multiphysics code, ALE3D, coupled to the chemistry module, Cheetah. This computational study includes reactive dynamics. Two-dimensional high-resolution large-scale meso-scale simulations have been performed. The parameter space is systematically studied by considering various shock strengths, pore diameters and multiple pore configurations. Preliminary 3-D simulations are undertaken to quantify the 3-D dynamics.

  17. Organ printing: computer-aided jet-based 3D tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Mironov, Vladimir; Boland, Thomas; Trusk, Thomas; Forgacs, Gabor; Markwald, Roger R

    2003-04-01

    Tissue engineering technology promises to solve the organ transplantation crisis. However, assembly of vascularized 3D soft organs remains a big challenge. Organ printing, which we define as computer-aided, jet-based 3D tissue-engineering of living human organs, offers a possible solution. Organ printing involves three sequential steps: pre-processing or development of "blueprints" for organs; processing or actual organ printing; and postprocessing or organ conditioning and accelerated organ maturation. A cell printer that can print gels, single cells and cell aggregates has been developed. Layer-by-layer sequentially placed and solidified thin layers of a thermo-reversible gel could serve as "printing paper". Combination of an engineering approach with the developmental biology concept of embryonic tissue fluidity enables the creation of a new rapid prototyping 3D organ printing technology, which will dramatically accelerate and optimize tissue and organ assembly. PMID:12679063

  18. Synesthetic art through 3-D projection: The requirements of a computer-based supermedium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mallary, Robert

    1989-01-01

    A computer-based form of multimedia art is proposed that uses the computer to fuse aspects of painting, sculpture, dance, music, film, and other media into a one-to-one synthesia of image and sound for spatially synchronous 3-D projection. Called synesthetic art, this conversion of many varied media into an aesthetically unitary experience determines the character and requirements of the system and its software. During the start-up phase, computer stereographic systems are unsuitable for software development. Eventually, a new type of illusory-projective supermedium will be required to achieve the needed combination of large-format projection and convincing real life presence, and to handle the vast amount of 3-D visual and acoustic information required. The influence of the concept on the author's research and creative work is illustrated through two examples.

  19. Using the CAVE virtual-reality environment as an aid to 3-D electromagnetic field computation

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, L.R.; Levine, D.; Huang, M.; Papka, M; Kettunen, L.

    1995-08-01

    One of the major problems in three-dimensional (3-D) field computation is visualizing the resulting 3-D field distributions. A virtual-reality environment, such as the CAVE, (CAVE Automatic Virtual Environment) is helping to overcome this problem, thus making the results of computation more usable for designers and users of magnets and other electromagnetic devices. As a demonstration of the capabilities of the CAVE, the elliptical multipole wiggler (EMW), an insertion device being designed for the Advanced Photon Source (APS) now being commissioned at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), wa made visible, along with its fields and beam orbits. Other uses of the CAVE in preprocessing and postprocessing computation for electromagnetic applications are also discussed.

  20. Performance assessment of KORAT-3D on the ANL IBM-SP computer

    SciTech Connect

    Alexeyev, A.V.; Zvenigorodskaya, O.A.; Shagaliev, R.M.; Taiwo, T.A.

    1999-09-01

    The TENAR code is currently being developed at the Russian Federal Nuclear Center (VNIIEF) as a coupled dynamics code for the simulation of transients in VVER and RBMK systems and other nuclear systems. The neutronic module in this code system is KORAT-3D. This module is also one of the most computationally intensive components of the code system. A parallel version of KORAT-3D has been implemented to achieve the goal of obtaining transient solutions in reasonable computational time, particularly for RBMK calculations that involve the application of >100,000 nodes. An evaluation of the KORAT-3D code performance was recently undertaken on the Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) IBM ScalablePower (SP) parallel computer located in the Mathematics and Computer Science Division of ANL. At the time of the study, the ANL IBM-SP computer had 80 processors. This study was conducted under the auspices of a technical staff exchange program sponsored by the International Nuclear Safety Center (INSC).

  1. Hemifacial microsomia with spinal and rib anomalies: prenatal diagnosis and postmortem confirmation using 3-D computed tomography reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Haratz, Karina; Vinkler, Chana; Lev, Dorit; Schreiber, Letizia; Malinger, Gustavo

    2011-01-01

    Hemifacial microsomia (OMIM164210) is a condition featuring unilateral ear anomalies and ocular epibulbar dermoids associated with unilateral underdevelopment of the craniofacial bony structures. Other associated anomalies have also been described, especially spinal malformations, and the term oculoauriculovertebral dysplasia spectrum (OVAS) was suggested to include the three predominant systems involved. Both genetic and environmental causes are implied in the pathogenesis of the syndrome, with a 3% recurrence rate according to reports of both vertical transmission and affected siblings. No specific gene was identified, albeit mutations in chromosome 10 and deficiencies of genes in the endothelin pathway in mice exhibited the same clinical features. We hereby describe the first case of prenatal diagnosis of spinal and rib malformations associated to hemifacial microsomia by means of 2-D and 3-D ultrasound in a 23-week fetus. The sonographic study depicted fetal scoliosis due to the presence of hemivertebrae, Sprengel's deformity of the left shoulder, ribs fusion, asymmetric ears with unilateral microtia, mandible unilateral hypoplasia as well as single umbilical artery and a 'golf ball' sign in the left ventricle of the heart. The diagnosis of OVAS was suggested and the family received proper genetic consultation. After termination of the pregnancy, the syndrome was confirmed by postmortem 3-D computed tomography study. In view of the grim outcome, prenatal death rate and high mortality and morbidity when three or more systems are involved, prenatal diagnosis and appropriate counseling are warranted.

  2. Computational optical-sectioning microscopy for 3D quantization of cell motion: results and challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNally, James G.

    1994-09-01

    How cells move and navigate within a 3D tissue mass is of central importance in such diverse problems as embryonic development, wound healing and metastasis. This locomotion can now be visualized and quantified by using computation optical-sectioning microscopy. In this approach, a series of 2D images at different depths in a specimen are stacked to construct a 3D image, and then with a knowledge of the microscope's point-spread function, the actual distribution of fluorescent intensity in the specimen is estimated via computation. When coupled with wide-field optics and a cooled CCD camera, this approach permits non-destructive 3D imaging of living specimens over long time periods. With these techniques, we have observed a complex diversity of motile behaviors in a model embryonic system, the cellular slime mold Dictyostelium. To understand the mechanisms which control these various behaviors, we are examining motion in various Dictyostelium mutants with known defects in proteins thought to be essential for signal reception, cell-cell adhesion or locomotion. This application of computational techniques to analyze 3D cell locomotion raises several technical challenges. Image restoration techniques must be fast enough to process numerous 1 Gbyte time-lapse data sets (16 Mbytes per 3D image X 60 time points). Because some cells are weakly labeled and background intensity is often high due to unincorporated dye, the SNR in some of these images is poor. Currently, the images are processed by a regularized linear least- squares restoration method, and occasionally by a maximum-likelihood method. Also required for these studies are accurate automated- tracking procedures to generate both 3D trajectories for individual cells and 3D flows for a group of cells. Tracking is currently done independently for each cell, using a cell's image as a template to search for a similar image at the next time point. Finally, sophisticated visualization techniques are needed to view the

  3. Analysis of 3-D images of dental imprints using computer vision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubin, Michele; Cote, Jean; Laurendeau, Denis; Poussart, Denis

    1992-05-01

    This paper addressed two important aspects of dental analysis: (1) location and (2) identification of the types of teeth by means of 3-D image acquisition and segmentation. The 3-D images of both maxillaries are acquired using a wax wafer as support. The interstices between teeth are detected by non-linear filtering of the 3-D and grey-level data. Two operators are presented: one for the detection of the interstices between incisors, canines, and premolars and one for those between molars. Teeth are then identified by mapping the imprint under analysis on the computer model of an 'ideal' imprint. For the mapping to be valid, a set of three reference points is detected on the imprint. Then, the points are put in correspondence with similar points on the model. Two such points are chosen based on a least-squares fit of a second-order polynomial of the 3-D data in the area of canines. This area is of particular interest since the canines show a very characteristic shape and are easily detected on the imprint. The mapping technique is described in detail in the paper as well as pre-processing of the 3-D profiles. Experimental results are presented for different imprints.

  4. Evaluation of a prototype 3D ultrasound system for multimodality imaging of cervical nodes for adaptive radiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraser, Danielle; Fava, Palma; Cury, Fabio; Vuong, Te; Falco, Tony; Verhaegen, Frank

    2007-03-01

    Sonography has good topographic accuracy for superficial lymph node assessment in patients with head and neck cancers. It is therefore an ideal non-invasive tool for precise inter-fraction volumetric analysis of enlarged cervical nodes. In addition, when registered with computed tomography (CT) images, ultrasound information may improve target volume delineation and facilitate image-guided adaptive radiation therapy. A feasibility study was developed to evaluate the use of a prototype ultrasound system capable of three dimensional visualization and multi-modality image fusion for cervical node geometry. A ceiling-mounted optical tracking camera recorded the position and orientation of a transducer in order to synchronize the transducer's position with respect to the room's coordinate system. Tracking systems were installed in both the CT-simulator and radiation therapy treatment rooms. Serial images were collected at the time of treatment planning and at subsequent treatment fractions. Volume reconstruction was performed by generating surfaces around contours. The quality of the spatial reconstruction and semi-automatic segmentation was highly dependent on the system's ability to track the transducer throughout each scan procedure. The ultrasound information provided enhanced soft tissue contrast and facilitated node delineation. Manual segmentation was the preferred method to contour structures due to their sonographic topography.

  5. 3D Quantitative Assessment of Lesion Response to MR-guided High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound Treatment of Uterine Fibroids

    PubMed Central

    Savic, Lynn J.; Lin, MingDe; Duran, Rafael; Schernthaner, Rüdiger E.; Hamm, Bernd; Geschwind, Jean-François; Hong, Kelvin; Chapiro, Julius

    2015-01-01

    Rationale and Objectives To investigate the response after MR-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (MRgHIFU) treatment of uterine fibroids (UF) using a 3D quantification of total and enhancing lesion volume (TLV, ELV) on contrast-enhanced MRI (ceMRI) scans. Methods and Materials In a total of 24 patients, ceMRI scans were obtained at baseline and 24 hrs, 6, 12 and 24 months after MRgHIFU treatment. The dominant lesion was assessed using a semi-automatic quantitative 3D segmentation technique. Agreement between software-assisted and manual measurements was then analyzed using a linear regression model. Patients were classified as responders (R) or non-responders (NR) based on their symptom report after 6 months. Statistical analysis included the paired t-test and Mann-Whitney-test. Results Preprocedurally, the median TLV and ELV were 263.74cm3 (30.45–689.56cm3) and 210.13cm3 (14.43–689.53cm3), respectively. The 6-month follow-up demonstrated a reduction of TLV in 21 patients (87.5%) with a median TLV of 171.7cm3 (8.5–791.2cm3) (p<.0001). TLV remained stable with significant differences compared to baseline (p<.001 and p=.047 after 12 and 24 months). A reduction of ELV was apparent in 16 patients (66.6%) with a median ELV of 158.91cm3 (8.55–779.61cm3) after 6 months (p=.065). 3D quantification and manual measurements showed strong intermethod-agreement for fibroid volumes (R2=.889 and R2=.917) but greater discrepancy for enhancement calculations (R2=.659 and R2=.419) at baseline and 6 mo. No significant differences in TLV or ELV were observed between clinical R (n=15) and NR (n=3). Conclusion The 3D assessment has proven feasible and accurate in the quantification of fibroid response to MRgHIFU. Contrary to ELV, changes in TLV may be representative of the clinical outcome. PMID:26160057

  6. Visualization of anthropometric measures of workers in computer 3D modeling of work place.

    PubMed

    Mijović, B; Ujević, D; Baksa, S

    2001-12-01

    In this work, 3D visualization of a work place by means of a computer-made 3D-machine model and computer animation of a worker have been performed. By visualization of 3D characters in inverse kinematic and dynamic relation with the operating part of a machine, the biomechanic characteristics of worker's body have been determined. The dimensions of a machine have been determined by an inspection of technical documentation as well as by direct measurements and recordings of the machine by camera. On the basis of measured body height of workers all relevant anthropometric measures have been determined by a computer program developed by the authors. By knowing the anthropometric measures, the vision fields and the scope zones while forming work places, exact postures of workers while performing technological procedures were determined. The minimal and maximal rotation angles and the translation of upper and lower arm which are basis for the analysis of worker burdening were analyzed. The dimensions of the seized space of a body are obtained by computer anthropometric analysis of movement, e.g. range of arms, position of legs, head, back. The influence of forming of a work place on correct postures of workers during work has been reconsidered and thus the consumption of energy and fatigue can be reduced to a minimum. PMID:11811295

  7. User's guide to the NOZL3D and NOZLIC computer programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, P. D.

    1980-01-01

    Complete FORTRAN listings and running instructions are given for a set of computer programs that perform an implicit numerical solution to the unsteady Navier-Stokes equations to predict the flow characteristics and performance of nonaxisymmetric nozzles. The set includes the NOZL3D program, which performs the flow computations; the NOZLIC program, which sets up the flow field initial conditions for general nozzle configurations, and also generates the computational grid for simple two dimensional and axisymmetric configurations; and the RGRIDD program, which generates the computational grid for complicated three dimensional configurations. The programs are designed specifically for the NASA-Langley CYBER 175 computer, and employ auxiliary disk files for primary data storage. Input instructions and computed results are given for four test cases that include two dimensional, three dimensional, and axisymmetric configurations.

  8. Automatic short axis orientation of the left ventricle in 3D ultrasound recordings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedrosa, João.; Heyde, Brecht; Heeren, Laurens; Engvall, Jan; Zamorano, Jose; Papachristidis, Alexandros; Edvardsen, Thor; Claus, Piet; D'hooge, Jan

    2016-04-01

    The recent advent of three-dimensional echocardiography has led to an increased interest from the scientific community in left ventricle segmentation frameworks for cardiac volume and function assessment. An automatic orientation of the segmented left ventricular mesh is an important step to obtain a point-to-point correspondence between the mesh and the cardiac anatomy. Furthermore, this would allow for an automatic division of the left ventricle into the standard 17 segments and, thus, fully automatic per-segment analysis, e.g. regional strain assessment. In this work, a method for fully automatic short axis orientation of the segmented left ventricle is presented. The proposed framework aims at detecting the inferior right ventricular insertion point. 211 three-dimensional echocardiographic images were used to validate this framework by comparison to manual annotation of the inferior right ventricular insertion point. A mean unsigned error of 8, 05° +/- 18, 50° was found, whereas the mean signed error was 1, 09°. Large deviations between the manual and automatic annotations (> 30°) only occurred in 3, 79% of cases. The average computation time was 666ms in a non-optimized MATLAB environment, which potentiates real-time application. In conclusion, a successful automatic real-time method for orientation of the segmented left ventricle is proposed.

  9. NOTE: A 3D MRI sequence for computer assisted surgery of the lumbar spine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoad, C. L.; Martel, A. L.; Kerslake, R.; Grevitt, M.

    2001-08-01

    The aim of this research was to develop a magnetic resonance (MR) sequence capable of producing images suitable for use with computer assisted surgery (CAS) of the lumbar spine. These images needed good tissue contrast between bone and soft tissue to allow for image segmentation and generation of a 3D-surface model of the bone for surface registration. A 3D double echo fast gradient echo sequence was designed. Images were filtered for noise and non-uniformity and combined into a single data set. Registration experiments were carried out to directly compare segmentation of MR and computed tomography (CT) images using a physical model of a spine. These experiments showed the MR data produced adequate surface registration in 90% of the experiments compared to 100% with CT data. The MR images acquired using the sequence and processing described in this article are suitable to be used with CAS of the spine.

  10. The computer simulation of 3d gas dynamics in a gas centrifuge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borman, V. D.; Bogovalov, S. V.; Borisevich, V. D.; Tronin, I. V.; Tronin, V. N.

    2016-09-01

    We argue on the basis of the results of 2D analysis of the gas flow in gas centrifuges that a reliable calculation of the circulation of the gas and gas content in the gas centrifuge is possible only in frameworks of 3D numerical simulation of gas dynamics in the gas centrifuge (hereafter GC). The group from National research nuclear university, MEPhI, has created a computer code for 3D simulation of the gas flow in GC. The results of the computer simulations of the gas flows in GC are presented. A model Iguassu centrifuge is explored for the simulations. A nonaxisymmetric gas flow is produced due to interaction of the hypersonic rotating flow with the scoops for extraction of the product and waste flows from the GC. The scoops produce shock waves penetrating into a working camera of the GC and form spiral waves there.

  11. Gust Acoustics Computation with a Space-Time CE/SE Parallel 3D Solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, X. Y.; Himansu, A.; Chang, S. C.; Jorgenson, P. C. E.; Reddy, D. R. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The benchmark Problem 2 in Category 3 of the Third Computational Aero-Acoustics (CAA) Workshop is solved using the space-time conservation element and solution element (CE/SE) method. This problem concerns the unsteady response of an isolated finite-span swept flat-plate airfoil bounded by two parallel walls to an incident gust. The acoustic field generated by the interaction of the gust with the flat-plate airfoil is computed by solving the 3D (three-dimensional) Euler equations in the time domain using a parallel version of a 3D CE/SE solver. The effect of the gust orientation on the far-field directivity is studied. Numerical solutions are presented and compared with analytical solutions, showing a reasonable agreement.

  12. Confocal 3D DNA Cytometry: Assessment of Required Coefficient of Variation by Computer Simulation

    PubMed Central

    Ploeger, Lennert S.; Beliën, Jeroen A.M.; Poulin, Neal M.; Grizzle, William; van Diest, Paul J.

    2004-01-01

    Background: Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy (CLSM) provides the opportunity to perform 3D DNA content measurements on intact cells in thick histological sections. So far, sample size has been limited by the time consuming nature of the technology. Since the power of DNA histograms to resolve different stemlines depends on both the sample size and the coefficient of variation (CV) of histogram peaks, interpretation of 3D CLSM DNA histograms might be hampered by both a small sample size and a large CV. The aim of this study was to analyze the required CV for 3D CLSM DNA histograms given a realistic sample size. Methods: By computer simulation, virtual histograms were composed for sample sizes of 20000, 10000, 5000, 1000, and 273 cells and CVs of 30, 25, 20, 15, 10 and 5%. By visual inspection, the histogram quality with respect to resolution of G0/1 and G2/M peaks of a diploid stemline was assessed. Results: As expected, the interpretability of DNA histograms deteriorated with decreasing sample sizes and higher CVs. For CVs of 15% and lower, a clearly bimodal peak pattern with well distinguishable G0/1 and G2/M peaks were still seen at a sample size of 273 cells, which is our current average sample size with 3D CLSM DNA cytometry. Conclusions: For unambiguous interpretation of DNA histograms obtained using 3D CLSM, a CV of at most 15% is tolerable at currently achievable sample sizes. To resolve smaller near diploid stemlines, a CV of 10% or better should be aimed at. With currently available 3D imaging technology, this CV is achievable. PMID:15371645

  13. Integration of 3D anatomical data obtained by CT imaging and 3D optical scanning for computer aided implant surgery

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background A precise placement of dental implants is a crucial step to optimize both prosthetic aspects and functional constraints. In this context, the use of virtual guiding systems has been recognized as a fundamental tool to control the ideal implant position. In particular, complex periodontal surgeries can be performed using preoperative planning based on CT data. The critical point of the procedure relies on the lack of accuracy in transferring CT planning information to surgical field through custom-made stereo-lithographic surgical guides. Methods In this work, a novel methodology is proposed for monitoring loss of accuracy in transferring CT dental information into periodontal surgical field. The methodology is based on integrating 3D data of anatomical (impression and cast) and preoperative (radiographic template) models, obtained by both CT and optical scanning processes. Results A clinical case, relative to a fully edentulous jaw patient, has been used as test case to assess the accuracy of the various steps concurring in manufacturing surgical guides. In particular, a surgical guide has been designed to place implants in the bone structure of the patient. The analysis of the results has allowed the clinician to monitor all the errors, which have been occurring step by step manufacturing the physical templates. Conclusions The use of an optical scanner, which has a higher resolution and accuracy than CT scanning, has demonstrated to be a valid support to control the precision of the various physical models adopted and to point out possible error sources. A case study regarding a fully edentulous patient has confirmed the feasibility of the proposed methodology. PMID:21338504

  14. Position tracking of moving liver lesion based on real-time registration between 2D ultrasound and 3D preoperative images

    SciTech Connect

    Weon, Chijun; Hyun Nam, Woo; Lee, Duhgoon; Ra, Jong Beom; Lee, Jae Young

    2015-01-15

    Purpose: Registration between 2D ultrasound (US) and 3D preoperative magnetic resonance (MR) (or computed tomography, CT) images has been studied recently for US-guided intervention. However, the existing techniques have some limits, either in the registration speed or the performance. The purpose of this work is to develop a real-time and fully automatic registration system between two intermodal images of the liver, and subsequently an indirect lesion positioning/tracking algorithm based on the registration result, for image-guided interventions. Methods: The proposed position tracking system consists of three stages. In the preoperative stage, the authors acquire several 3D preoperative MR (or CT) images at different respiratory phases. Based on the transformations obtained from nonrigid registration of the acquired 3D images, they then generate a 4D preoperative image along the respiratory phase. In the intraoperative preparatory stage, they properly attach a 3D US transducer to the patient’s body and fix its pose using a holding mechanism. They then acquire a couple of respiratory-controlled 3D US images. Via the rigid registration of these US images to the 3D preoperative images in the 4D image, the pose information of the fixed-pose 3D US transducer is determined with respect to the preoperative image coordinates. As feature(s) to use for the rigid registration, they may choose either internal liver vessels or the inferior vena cava. Since the latter is especially useful in patients with a diffuse liver disease, the authors newly propose using it. In the intraoperative real-time stage, they acquire 2D US images in real-time from the fixed-pose transducer. For each US image, they select candidates for its corresponding 2D preoperative slice from the 4D preoperative MR (or CT) image, based on the predetermined pose information of the transducer. The correct corresponding image is then found among those candidates via real-time 2D registration based on a

  15. Computed Tomography and its Application for the 3D Characterization of Coarse Grained Meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillies, Donald C.; Engel, H. P.; Carpenter, P. K.

    2004-01-01

    With judicious selection of parameters, computed tomography can provide high precision density data. Such data can lead to a non-destructive determination of the phases and phase distribution within large solid objects. Of particular interest is the structure of the Mundrabilla meteorite, which has 25 volumes, percent of a sulfide within a metallic meteorite. 3D digital imaging has enabled a quantitative evaluation of the distribution and contiguity of the phases to be determined.

  16. Comparison of traditional methods with 3D computer models in the instruction of hepatobiliary anatomy.

    PubMed

    Keedy, Alexander W; Durack, Jeremy C; Sandhu, Parmbir; Chen, Eric M; O'Sullivan, Patricia S; Breiman, Richard S

    2011-01-01

    This study was designed to determine whether an interactive three-dimensional presentation depicting liver and biliary anatomy is more effective for teaching medical students than a traditional textbook format presentation of the same material. Forty-six medical students volunteered for participation in this study. Baseline demographic information, spatial ability, and knowledge of relevant anatomy were measured. Participants were randomized into two groups and presented with a computer-based interactive learning module comprised of animations and still images to highlight various anatomical structures (3D group), or a computer-based text document containing the same images and text without animation or interactive features (2D group). Following each teaching module, students completed a satisfaction survey and nine-item anatomic knowledge post-test. The 3D group scored higher on the post-test than the 2D group, with a mean score of 74% and 64%, respectively; however, when baseline differences in pretest scores were accounted for, this difference was not statistically significant (P = 0.33). Spatial ability did not statistically significantly correlate with post-test scores for the 3D group or the 2D group. In the post-test satisfaction survey the 3D group expressed a statistically significantly higher overall satisfaction rating compared to students in the 2D control group (4.5 versus 3.7 out of 5, P = 0.02). While the interactive 3D multimedia module received higher satisfaction ratings from students, it neither enhanced nor inhibited learning of complex hepatobiliary anatomy compared to an informationally equivalent traditional textbook style approach. .

  17. Computer assisted 3D pre-operative planning tool for femur fracture orthopedic surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamage, Pavan; Xie, Sheng Quan; Delmas, Patrice; Xu, Wei Liang

    2010-02-01

    Femur shaft fractures are caused by high impact injuries and can affect gait functionality if not treated correctly. Until recently, the pre-operative planning for femur fractures has relied on two-dimensional (2D) radiographs, light boxes, tracing paper, and transparent bone templates. The recent availability of digital radiographic equipment has to some extent improved the workflow for preoperative planning. Nevertheless, imaging is still in 2D X-rays and planning/simulation tools to support fragment manipulation and implant selection are still not available. Direct three-dimensional (3D) imaging modalities such as Computed Tomography (CT) are also still restricted to a minority of complex orthopedic procedures. This paper proposes a software tool which allows orthopedic surgeons to visualize, diagnose, plan and simulate femur shaft fracture reduction procedures in 3D. The tool utilizes frontal and lateral 2D radiographs to model the fracture surface, separate a generic bone into the two fractured fragments, identify the pose of each fragment, and automatically customize the shape of the bone. The use of 3D imaging allows full spatial inspection of the fracture providing different views through the manipulation of the interactively reconstructed 3D model, and ultimately better pre-operative planning.

  18. CELSS-3D: a broad computer model simulating a controlled ecological life support system.

    PubMed

    Schneegurt, M A; Sherman, L A

    1997-01-01

    CELSS-3D is a dynamic, deterministic, and discrete computer simulation of a controlled ecological life support system (CELSS) focusing on biological issues. A series of linear difference equations within a graphic-based modeling environment, the IThink program, was used to describe a modular CELSS system. The overall model included submodels for crop growth chambers, food storage reservoirs, the human crew, a cyanobacterial growth chamber, a waste processor, fixed nitrogen reservoirs, and the atmospheric gases, CO, O2, and N2. The primary process variable was carbon, although oxygen and nitrogen flows were also modeled. Most of the input data used in CELSS-3D were from published sources. A separate linear optimization program, What'sBest!, was used to compare options for the crew's vegetarian diet. CELSS-3D simulations were run for the equivalent of 3 years with a 1-h time interval. Output from simulations run under nominal conditions was used to illustrate dynamic changes in the concentrations of atmospheric gases. The modular design of CELSS-3D will allow other configurations and various failure scenarios to be tested and compared.

  19. 3D animation of facial plastic surgery based on computer graphics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zonghua; Zhao, Yan

    2013-12-01

    More and more people, especial women, are getting desired to be more beautiful than ever. To some extent, it becomes true because the plastic surgery of face was capable in the early 20th and even earlier as doctors just dealing with war injures of face. However, the effect of post-operation is not always satisfying since no animation could be seen by the patients beforehand. In this paper, by combining plastic surgery of face and computer graphics, a novel method of simulated appearance of post-operation will be given to demonstrate the modified face from different viewpoints. The 3D human face data are obtained by using 3D fringe pattern imaging systems and CT imaging systems and then converted into STL (STereo Lithography) file format. STL file is made up of small 3D triangular primitives. The triangular mesh can be reconstructed by using hash function. Top triangular meshes in depth out of numbers of triangles must be picked up by ray-casting technique. Mesh deformation is based on the front triangular mesh in the process of simulation, which deforms interest area instead of control points. Experiments on face model show that the proposed 3D animation facial plastic surgery can effectively demonstrate the simulated appearance of post-operation.

  20. CELSS-3D: a broad computer model simulating a controlled ecological life support system.

    PubMed

    Schneegurt, M A; Sherman, L A

    1997-01-01

    CELSS-3D is a dynamic, deterministic, and discrete computer simulation of a controlled ecological life support system (CELSS) focusing on biological issues. A series of linear difference equations within a graphic-based modeling environment, the IThink program, was used to describe a modular CELSS system. The overall model included submodels for crop growth chambers, food storage reservoirs, the human crew, a cyanobacterial growth chamber, a waste processor, fixed nitrogen reservoirs, and the atmospheric gases, CO, O2, and N2. The primary process variable was carbon, although oxygen and nitrogen flows were also modeled. Most of the input data used in CELSS-3D were from published sources. A separate linear optimization program, What'sBest!, was used to compare options for the crew's vegetarian diet. CELSS-3D simulations were run for the equivalent of 3 years with a 1-h time interval. Output from simulations run under nominal conditions was used to illustrate dynamic changes in the concentrations of atmospheric gases. The modular design of CELSS-3D will allow other configurations and various failure scenarios to be tested and compared. PMID:11540449

  1. 3D fast adaptive correlation imaging for large-scale gravity data based on GPU computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Z.; Meng, X.; Guo, L.; Liu, G.

    2011-12-01

    In recent years, large scale gravity data sets have been collected and employed to enhance gravity problem-solving abilities of tectonics studies in China. Aiming at the large scale data and the requirement of rapid interpretation, previous authors have carried out a lot of work, including the fast gradient module inversion and Euler deconvolution depth inversion ,3-D physical property inversion using stochastic subspaces and equivalent storage, fast inversion using wavelet transforms and a logarithmic barrier method. So it can be say that 3-D gravity inversion has been greatly improved in the last decade. Many authors added many different kinds of priori information and constraints to deal with nonuniqueness using models composed of a large number of contiguous cells of unknown property and obtained good results. However, due to long computation time, instability and other shortcomings, 3-D physical property inversion has not been widely applied to large-scale data yet. In order to achieve 3-D interpretation with high efficiency and precision for geological and ore bodies and obtain their subsurface distribution, there is an urgent need to find a fast and efficient inversion method for large scale gravity data. As an entirely new geophysical inversion method, 3D correlation has a rapid development thanks to the advantage of requiring no a priori information and demanding small amount of computer memory. This method was proposed to image the distribution of equivalent excess masses of anomalous geological bodies with high resolution both longitudinally and transversely. In order to tranform the equivalence excess masses into real density contrasts, we adopt the adaptive correlation imaging for gravity data. After each 3D correlation imaging, we change the equivalence into density contrasts according to the linear relationship, and then carry out forward gravity calculation for each rectangle cells. Next, we compare the forward gravity data with real data, and

  2. Full 3-D OCT-based pseudophakic custom computer eye model.

    PubMed

    Sun, M; Pérez-Merino, P; Martinez-Enriquez, E; Velasco-Ocana, M; Marcos, S

    2016-03-01

    We compared measured wave aberrations in pseudophakic eyes implanted with aspheric intraocular lenses (IOLs) with simulated aberrations from numerical ray tracing on customized computer eye models, built using quantitative 3-D OCT-based patient-specific ocular geometry. Experimental and simulated aberrations show high correlation (R = 0.93; p<0.0001) and similarity (RMS for high order aberrations discrepancies within 23.58%). This study shows that full OCT-based pseudophakic custom computer eye models allow understanding the relative contribution of optical geometrical and surgically-related factors to image quality, and are an excellent tool for characterizing and improving cataract surgery. PMID:27231608

  3. Full 3-D OCT-based pseudophakic custom computer eye model

    PubMed Central

    Sun, M.; Pérez-Merino, P.; Martinez-Enriquez, E.; Velasco-Ocana, M.; Marcos, S.

    2016-01-01

    We compared measured wave aberrations in pseudophakic eyes implanted with aspheric intraocular lenses (IOLs) with simulated aberrations from numerical ray tracing on customized computer eye models, built using quantitative 3-D OCT-based patient-specific ocular geometry. Experimental and simulated aberrations show high correlation (R = 0.93; p<0.0001) and similarity (RMS for high order aberrations discrepancies within 23.58%). This study shows that full OCT-based pseudophakic custom computer eye models allow understanding the relative contribution of optical geometrical and surgically-related factors to image quality, and are an excellent tool for characterizing and improving cataract surgery. PMID:27231608

  4. Computation of an Underexpanded 3-D Rectangular Jet by the CE/SE Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loh, Ching Y.; Himansu, Ananda; Wang, Xiao Y.; Jorgenson, Philip C. E.

    2000-01-01

    Recently, an unstructured three-dimensional space-time conservation element and solution element (CE/SE) Euler solver was developed. Now it is also developed for parallel computation using METIS for domain decomposition and MPI (message passing interface). The method is employed here to numerically study the near-field of a typical 3-D rectangular under-expanded jet. For the computed case-a jet with Mach number Mj = 1.6. with a very modest grid of 1.7 million tetrahedrons, the flow features such as the shock-cell structures and the axis switching, are in good qualitative agreement with experimental results.

  5. An algorithm to correct 2D near-infrared fluorescence signals using 3D intravascular ultrasound architectural information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallas, Georgios; Brooks, Dana H.; Rosenthal, Amir; Vinegoni, Claudio; Calfon, Marcella A.; Razansky, R. Nika; Jaffer, Farouc A.; Ntziachristos, Vasilis

    2011-03-01

    Intravascular Near-Infrared Fluorescence (NIRF) imaging is a promising imaging modality to image vessel biology and high-risk plaques in vivo. We have developed a NIRF fiber optic catheter and have presented the ability to image atherosclerotic plaques in vivo, using appropriate NIR fluorescent probes. Our catheter consists of a 100/140 μm core/clad diameter housed in polyethylene tubing, emitting NIR laser light at a 90 degree angle compared to the fiber's axis. The system utilizes a rotational and a translational motor for true 2D imaging and operates in conjunction with a coaxial intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) device. IVUS datasets provide 3D images of the internal structure of arteries and are used in our system for anatomical mapping. Using the IVUS images, we are building an accurate hybrid fluorescence-IVUS data inversion scheme that takes into account photon propagation through the blood filled lumen. This hybrid imaging approach can then correct for the non-linear dependence of light intensity on the distance of the fluorescence region from the fiber tip, leading to quantitative imaging. The experimental and algorithmic developments will be presented and the effectiveness of the algorithm showcased with experimental results in both saline and blood-like preparations. The combined structural and molecular information obtained from these two imaging modalities are positioned to enable the accurate diagnosis of biologically high-risk atherosclerotic plaques in the coronary arteries that are responsible for heart attacks.

  6. Automatic procedure for realistic 3D finite element modelling of human brain for bioelectromagnetic computations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aristovich, K. Y.; Khan, S. H.

    2010-07-01

    Realistic computer modelling of biological objects requires building of very accurate and realistic computer models based on geometric and material data, type, and accuracy of numerical analyses. This paper presents some of the automatic tools and algorithms that were used to build accurate and realistic 3D finite element (FE) model of whole-brain. These models were used to solve the forward problem in magnetic field tomography (MFT) based on Magnetoencephalography (MEG). The forward problem involves modelling and computation of magnetic fields produced by human brain during cognitive processing. The geometric parameters of the model were obtained from accurate Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) data and the material properties - from those obtained from Diffusion Tensor MRI (DTMRI). The 3D FE models of the brain built using this approach has been shown to be very accurate in terms of both geometric and material properties. The model is stored on the computer in Computer-Aided Parametrical Design (CAD) format. This allows the model to be used in a wide a range of methods of analysis, such as finite element method (FEM), Boundary Element Method (BEM), Monte-Carlo Simulations, etc. The generic model building approach presented here could be used for accurate and realistic modelling of human brain and many other biological objects.

  7. A hybrid method for the computation of quasi-3D seismograms.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masson, Yder; Romanowicz, Barbara

    2013-04-01

    The development of powerful computer clusters and efficient numerical computation methods, such as the Spectral Element Method (SEM) made possible the computation of seismic wave propagation in a heterogeneous 3D earth. However, the cost of theses computations is still problematic for global scale tomography that requires hundreds of such simulations. Part of the ongoing research effort is dedicated to the development of faster modeling methods based on the spectral element method. Capdeville et al. (2002) proposed to couple SEM simulations with normal modes calculation (C-SEM). Nissen-Meyer et al. (2007) used 2D SEM simulations to compute 3D seismograms in a 1D earth model. Thanks to these developments, and for the first time, Lekic et al. (2011) developed a 3D global model of the upper mantle using SEM simulations. At the local and continental scale, adjoint tomography that is using a lot of SEM simulation can be implemented on current computers (Tape, Liu et al. 2009). Due to their smaller size, these models offer higher resolution. They provide us with images of the crust and the upper part of the mantle. In an attempt to teleport such local adjoint tomographic inversions into the deep earth, we are developing a hybrid method where SEM computation are limited to a region of interest within the earth. That region can have an arbitrary shape and size. Outside this region, the seismic wavefield is extrapolated to obtain synthetic data at the Earth's surface. A key feature of the method is the use of a time reversal mirror to inject the wavefield induced by distant seismic source into the region of interest (Robertsson and Chapman 2000). We compute synthetic seismograms as follow: Inside the region of interest, we are using regional spectral element software RegSEM to compute wave propagation in 3D. Outside this region, the wavefield is extrapolated to the surface by convolution with the Green's functions from the mirror to the seismic stations. For now, these

  8. Multiscale segmentation method for small inclusion detection in 3D industrial computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zauner, G.; Harrer, B.; Angermaier, D.; Reiter, M.; Kastner, J.

    2007-06-01

    In this paper a new segmentation method for highly precise inclusion detection in 3D X-ray computed tomography (CT), based on multiresolution denoising methods, is presented. The aim of this work is the automatic 3D-segmentation of small graphite inclusions in cast iron samples. Industrial X-ray computed tomography of metallic samples often suffers from imaging artifacts (e.g. cupping effects) which result in unwanted background image structures, making automated segmentation a difficult task. Additionally, small spatial structures (inclusions and voids) are generally difficult to detect e.g. by standard region based methods like watershed segmentation. Finally, image noise (assuming a Poisson noise characteristic) and the large amount of 3D data have to be considered to obtain good results. The approach presented is based on image subtraction of two different representations of the image under consideration. The first image represents the low spatial frequency content derived by means of wavelet filtering based on the 'a trous' algorithm (i.e. the 'background' content) assuming standard Gaussian noise. The second image is derived by applying a multiresolution denoising scheme based on 'platelet'-filtering, which can produce highly accurate intensity and density estimates assuming Poisson noise. It is shown that the resulting arithmetic difference between these two images can give highly accurate segmentation results with respect to finding small spatial structures in heavily cluttered background structures. Experimental results of industrial CT measurements are presented showing the practicability and reliability of this approach for the proposed task.

  9. The RNA 3D Motif Atlas: Computational methods for extraction, organization and evaluation of RNA motifs.

    PubMed

    Parlea, Lorena G; Sweeney, Blake A; Hosseini-Asanjan, Maryam; Zirbel, Craig L; Leontis, Neocles B

    2016-07-01

    RNA 3D motifs occupy places in structured RNA molecules that correspond to the hairpin, internal and multi-helix junction "loops" of their secondary structure representations. As many as 40% of the nucleotides of an RNA molecule can belong to these structural elements, which are distinct from the regular double helical regions formed by contiguous AU, GC, and GU Watson-Crick basepairs. With the large number of atomic- or near atomic-resolution 3D structures appearing in a steady stream in the PDB/NDB structure databases, the automated identification, extraction, comparison, clustering and visualization of these structural elements presents an opportunity to enhance RNA science. Three broad applications are: (1) identification of modular, autonomous structural units for RNA nanotechnology, nanobiology and synthetic biology applications; (2) bioinformatic analysis to improve RNA 3D structure prediction from sequence; and (3) creation of searchable databases for exploring the binding specificities, structural flexibility, and dynamics of these RNA elements. In this contribution, we review methods developed for computational extraction of hairpin and internal loop motifs from a non-redundant set of high-quality RNA 3D structures. We provide a statistical summary of the extracted hairpin and internal loop motifs in the most recent version of the RNA 3D Motif Atlas. We also explore the reliability and accuracy of the extraction process by examining its performance in clustering recurrent motifs from homologous ribosomal RNA (rRNA) structures. We conclude with a summary of remaining challenges, especially with regard to extraction of multi-helix junction motifs. PMID:27125735

  10. A Computational Model for Suspended Large Rigid Bodies in 3D Unsteady Viscous Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Feng

    1999-11-01

    A 3D numerical model for computing large rigid objects suspended in fluid flow has been developed. Rather than calculating the surface pressure upon the solid body, we evaluate the net force and torque based on a volume force formulation. The total effective force is obtained by summing up the forces at the Eulerian grids occupied by the rigid body. The effects of the moving bodies are coupled to the fluid flow by imposing the velocity field of the bodies to the fluid. A Poisson equation is used to compute the pressure over the whole domain. The objects are identified by color functions and calculated by the PPM scheme and a tangent function transformation which scales the transition region of the computed interface to a compact thickness. The model is then implemented on a parallel computer of distributed memory and validated with Stokes and low Reynolds number flows.

  11. Effect of Random Geometric Uncertainty on the Computational Design of a 3-D Flexible Wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gumbert, C. R.; Newman, P. A.; Hou, G. J.-W.

    2002-01-01

    The effect of geometric uncertainty due to statistically independent, random, normally distributed shape parameters is demonstrated in the computational design of a 3-D flexible wing. A first-order second-moment statistical approximation method is used to propagate the assumed input uncertainty through coupled Euler CFD aerodynamic / finite element structural codes for both analysis and sensitivity analysis. First-order sensitivity derivatives obtained by automatic differentiation are used in the input uncertainty propagation. These propagated uncertainties are then used to perform a robust design of a simple 3-D flexible wing at supercritical flow conditions. The effect of the random input uncertainties is shown by comparison with conventional deterministic design results. Sample results are shown for wing planform, airfoil section, and structural sizing variables.

  12. User's manual for PELE3D: a computer code for three-dimensional incompressible fluid dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    McMaster, W H

    1982-05-07

    The PELE3D code is a three-dimensional semi-implicit Eulerian hydrodynamics computer program for the solution of incompressible fluid flow coupled to a structure. The fluid and coupling algorithms have been adapted from the previously developed two-dimensional code PELE-IC. The PELE3D code is written in both plane and cylindrical coordinates. The coupling algorithm is general enough to handle a variety of structural shapes. The free surface algorithm is able to accommodate a top surface and several independent bubbles. The code is in a developmental status since all the intended options have not been fully implemented and tested. Development of this code ended in 1980 upon termination of the contract with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission.

  13. Computer-assisted three-dimensional surgical planning: 3D virtual articulator: technical note.

    PubMed

    Ghanai, S; Marmulla, R; Wiechnik, J; Mühling, J; Kotrikova, B

    2010-01-01

    This study presents a computer-assisted planning system for dysgnathia treatment. It describes the process of information gathering using a virtual articulator and how the splints are constructed for orthognathic surgery. The deviation of the virtually planned splints is shown in six cases on the basis of conventionally planned cases. In all cases the plaster models were prepared and scanned using a 3D laser scanner. Successive lateral and posterior-anterior cephalometric images were used for reconstruction before surgery. By identifying specific points on the X-rays and marking them on the virtual models, it was possible to enhance the 2D images to create a realistic 3D environment and to perform virtual repositioning of the jaw. A hexapod was used to transfer the virtual planning to the real splints. Preliminary results showed that conventional repositioning could be replicated using the virtual articulator.

  14. Parallel Adaptive Computation of Blood Flow in a 3D ``Whole'' Body Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, M.; Figueroa, C. A.; Taylor, C. A.; Sahni, O.; Jansen, K. E.

    2008-11-01

    Accurate numerical simulations of vascular trauma require the consideration of a larger portion of the vasculature than previously considered, due to the systemic nature of the human body's response. A patient-specific 3D model composed of 78 connected arterial branches extending from the neck to the lower legs is constructed to effectively represent the entire body. Recently developed outflow boundary conditions that appropriately represent the downstream vasculature bed which is not included in the 3D computational domain are applied at 78 outlets. In this work, the pulsatile blood flow simulations are started on a fairly uniform, unstructured mesh that is subsequently adapted using a solution-based approach to efficiently resolve the flow features. The adapted mesh contains non-uniform, anisotropic elements resulting in resolution that conforms with the physical length scales present in the problem. The effects of the mesh resolution on the flow field are studied, specifically on relevant quantities of pressure, velocity and wall shear stress.

  15. NOTE: Adaptation of a 3D prostate cancer atlas for transrectal ultrasound guided target-specific biopsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayanan, R.; Werahera, P. N.; Barqawi, A.; Crawford, E. D.; Shinohara, K.; Simoneau, A. R.; Suri, J. S.

    2008-10-01

    Due to lack of imaging modalities to identify prostate cancer in vivo, current TRUS guided prostate biopsies are taken randomly. Consequently, many important cancers are missed during initial biopsies. The purpose of this study was to determine the potential clinical utility of a high-speed registration algorithm for a 3D prostate cancer atlas. This 3D prostate cancer atlas provides voxel-level likelihood of cancer and optimized biopsy locations on a template space (Zhan et al 2007). The atlas was constructed from 158 expert annotated, 3D reconstructed radical prostatectomy specimens outlined for cancers (Shen et al 2004). For successful clinical implementation, the prostate atlas needs to be registered to each patient's TRUS image with high registration accuracy in a time-efficient manner. This is implemented in a two-step procedure, the segmentation of the prostate gland from a patient's TRUS image followed by the registration of the prostate atlas. We have developed a fast registration algorithm suitable for clinical applications of this prostate cancer atlas. The registration algorithm was implemented on a graphical processing unit (GPU) to meet the critical processing speed requirements for atlas guided biopsy. A color overlay of the atlas superposed on the TRUS image was presented to help pick statistically likely regions known to harbor cancer. We validated our fast registration algorithm using computer simulations of two optimized 7- and 12-core biopsy protocols to maximize the overall detection rate. Using a GPU, patient's TRUS image segmentation and atlas registration took less than 12 s. The prostate cancer atlas guided 7- and 12-core biopsy protocols had cancer detection rates of 84.81% and 89.87% respectively when validated on the same set of data. Whereas the sextant biopsy approach without the utility of 3D cancer atlas detected only 70.5% of the cancers using the same histology data. We estimate 10-20% increase in prostate cancer detection rates

  16. Computational 3D reconstructions by optimization for cryo-electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Zhye; Zheng, Yili; Doerschuk, Peter C.; Johnson, John E.

    2003-06-01

    An algorithm for the simultaneous 3-D reconstruction of several types of object, where each type of object may possibly have a rotational symmetry, from 2-D projection images, where for each image the type of object imaged, the projection orientation used to create the image, and the location of the object in the image are unknown, is described. The motivating application is the determination of the 3-D structure of small spherical viruses from cryo electron microscopy images. The algorithm is a maximum likelihood estimator which is computed by expectation maximization (EM). Due to the structure of the statistical model, the maximization step of EM can be easily computed but the expectation step requires 5-D numerical quadrature. The computational burden of the quadratures necessitates parallel computation and three different implementations of two different types of parallelism have been developed using pthreads (for shared memory processors) and MPI (for distributed memory processors). An example applying one of the MPI implementations, running on a 32 node PC cluster, to experimental images of Flock House Virus with comparison to the x-ray crystal diffraction structure of the virus is described.

  17. Development of computer program NAS3D using Vector processing for geometric nonlinear analysis of structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mangalgiri, P. D.; Prabhakaran, R.

    1986-01-01

    An algorithm for vectorized computation of stiffness matrices of an 8 noded isoparametric hexahedron element for geometric nonlinear analysis was developed. This was used in conjunction with the earlier 2-D program GAMNAS to develop the new program NAS3D for geometric nonlinear analysis. A conventional, modified Newton-Raphson process is used for the nonlinear analysis. New schemes for the computation of stiffness and strain energy release rates is presented. The organization the program is explained and some results on four sample problems are given. The study of CPU times showed that savings by a factor of 11 to 13 were achieved when vectorized computation was used for the stiffness instead of the conventional scalar one. Finally, the scheme of inputting data is explained.

  18. Computational Analysis of the Transonic Dynamics Tunnel Using FUN3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chwalowski, Pawel; Quon, Eliot; Brynildsen, Scott E.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents results from an exploratory two-year effort of applying Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) to analyze the empty-tunnel flow in the NASA Langley Research Center Transonic Dynamics Tunnel (TDT). The TDT is a continuous-flow, closed circuit, 16- x 16-foot slotted-test-section wind tunnel, with capabilities to use air or heavy gas as a working fluid. In this study, experimental data acquired in the empty tunnel using the R-134a test medium was used to calibrate the computational data. The experimental calibration data includes wall pressures, boundary-layer profiles, and the tunnel centerline Mach number profiles. Subsonic and supersonic flow regimes were considered, focusing on Mach 0.5, 0.7 and Mach 1.1 in the TDT test section. This study discusses the computational domain, boundary conditions, and initial conditions selected and the resulting steady-state analyses using NASA's FUN3D CFD software.

  19. 3D cephalometric analysis obtained from computed tomography. Review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Rossini, Giulia; Cavallini, Costanza; Cassetta, Michele; Barbato, Ersilia

    2012-01-01

    Summary Introduction The aim of this systematic review is to estimate accuracy and reproducibility of craniometric measurements and reliability of landmarks identified with computed tomography (CT) techniques in 3D cephalometric analysis. Methods Computerized and manual searches were conducted up to 2011 for studies that addressed these objectives. The selection criteria were: (1) the use of human specimen; (2) the comparison between 2D and 3D cephalometric analysis; (3) the assessment of accuracy, reproducibility of measurements and reliability of landmark identification with CT images compared with two-dimensional conventional radiographs. The Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions was used as the guideline for this article. Results Twenty-seven articles met the inclusion criteria. Most of them demonstrated high measurements accuracy and reproducibility, and landmarks reliability, but their cephalometric analysis methodology varied widely. Conclusion These differencies among the studies in making measurements don’t permit a direct comparison between them. The future developments in the knowledge of these techniques should provide a standardized method to conduct the 3D CT cephalometric analysis. PMID:22545187

  20. Traveltime computation and imaging from rugged topography in 3D TTI media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shaoyong; Wang, Huazhong; Yang, Qinyong; Fang, Wubao

    2014-02-01

    Foothill areas with rugged topography are of great potential for oil and gas seismic exploration, but subsurface imaging in these areas is very challenging. Seismic acquisition with larger offset and wider azimuth is necessary for seismic imaging in complex areas. However, the scale anisotropy in this case must be taken into account. To generalize the pre-stack depth migration (PSDM) to 3D transversely isotropic media with vertical symmetry axes (VTI) and tilted symmetry axes (TTI) from rugged topography, a new dynamic programming approach for the first-arrival traveltime computation method is proposed. The first-arrival time on every uniform mesh point is calculated based on Fermat's principle with simple calculus techniques and a systematic mapping scheme. In order to calculate the minimum traveltime, a set of nonlinear equations is solved on each mesh point, where the group velocity is determined by the group angle. Based on the new first-arrival time calculation method, the corresponding PSDM and migration velocity analysis workflow for 3D anisotropic media from rugged surface is developed. Numerical tests demonstrate that the proposed traveltime calculation method is effective in both VTI and TTI media. The migration results for 3D field data show that it is necessary to choose a smooth datum to remove the high wavenumber move-out components for PSDM with rugged topography and take anisotropy into account to achieve better images.

  1. Generic camera model and its calibration for computational integral imaging and 3D reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Li, Weiming; Li, Youfu

    2011-03-01

    Integral imaging (II) is an important 3D imaging technology. To reconstruct 3D information of the viewed objects, modeling and calibrating the optical pickup process of II are necessary. This work focuses on the modeling and calibration of an II system consisting of a lenslet array, an imaging lens, and a charge-coupled device camera. Most existing work on such systems assumes a pinhole array model (PAM). In this work, we explore a generic camera model that accommodates more generality. This model is an empirical model based on measurements, and we constructed a setup for its calibration. Experimental results show a significant difference between the generic camera model and the PAM. Images of planar patterns and 3D objects were computationally reconstructed with the generic camera model. Compared with the images reconstructed using the PAM, the images present higher fidelity and preserve more high spatial frequency components. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first attempt in applying a generic camera model to an II system.

  2. Knowledge-based system for computer-aided process planning of laser sensor 3D digitizing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernard, Alain; Davillerd, Stephane; Sidot, Benoit

    1999-11-01

    This paper introduces some results of a research work carried out on the automation of digitizing process of complex part using a precision 3D-laser sensor. Indeed, most of the operations are generally still manual to perform digitalization. In fact, redundancies, lacks or forgetting in point acquisition are possible. Moreover, digitization time of a part, i.e. immobilization of the machine, is thus not optimized overall. So, it is important, for time- compression during product development, to minimize time consuming of reverse engineering step. A new way to scan automatically a complex 3D part is presented to order to measure and to compare the acquired data with the reference CAD model. After introducing digitization, the environment used for the experiments is presented, based on a CMM machine and a plane laser sensor. Then the proposed strategy is introduced for the adaptation of this environment to a robotic CAD software in order to be able to simulate and validate 3D-laser-scanning paths. The CAPP (Computer Aided Process Planning) system used for the automatic generation of the laser scanning process is also presented.

  3. Computational-optical microscopy for 3D biological imaging beyond the diffraction limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grover, Ginni

    In recent years, super-resolution imaging has become an important fluorescent microscopy tool. It has enabled imaging of structures smaller than the optical diffraction limit with resolution less than 50 nm. Extension to high-resolution volume imaging has been achieved by integration with various optical techniques. In this thesis, development of a fluorescent microscope to enable high resolution, extended depth, three dimensional (3D) imaging is discussed; which is achieved by integration of computational methods with optical systems. In the first part of the thesis, point spread function (PSF) engineering for volume imaging is discussed. A class of PSFs, referred to as double-helix (DH) PSFs, is generated. The PSFs exhibit two focused spots in the image plane which rotate about the optical axis, encoding depth in rotation of the image. These PSFs extend the depth-of-field up to a factor of ˜5. Precision performance of the DH-PSFs, based on an information theoretical analysis, is compared with other 3D methods with conclusion that the DH-PSFs provide the best precision and the longest depth-of-field. Out of various possible DH-PSFs, a suitable PSF is obtained for super-resolution microscopy. The DH-PSFs are implemented in imaging systems, such as a microscope, with a special phase modulation at the pupil plane. Surface-relief elements which are polarization-insensitive and ˜90% light efficient are developed for phase modulation. The photon-efficient DH-PSF microscopes thus developed are used, along with optimal position estimation algorithms, for tracking and super-resolution imaging in 3D. Imaging at depths-of-field of up to 2.5 microm is achieved without focus scanning. Microtubules were imaged with 3D resolution of (6, 9, 39) nm, which is in close agreement with the theoretical limit. A quantitative study of co-localization of two proteins in volume was conducted in live bacteria. In the last part of the thesis practical aspects of the DH-PSF microscope are

  4. Topological evolutionary computing in the optimal design of 2D and 3D structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burczynski, T.; Poteralski, A.; Szczepanik, M.

    2007-10-01

    An application of evolutionary algorithms and the finite-element method to the topology optimization of 2D structures (plane stress, bending plates, and shells) and 3D structures is described. The basis of the topological evolutionary optimization is the direct control of the density material distribution (or thickness for 2D structures) by the evolutionary algorithm. The structures are optimized for stress, mass, and compliance criteria. The numerical examples demonstrate that this method is an effective technique for solving problems in computer-aided optimal design.

  5. Multigrid Computations of 3-D Incompressible Internal and External Viscous Rotating Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheng, Chunhua; Taylor, Lafayette K.; Chen, Jen-Ping; Jiang, Min-Yee; Whitfield, David L.

    1996-01-01

    This report presents multigrid methods for solving the 3-D incompressible viscous rotating flows in a NASA low-speed centrifugal compressor and a marine propeller 4119. Numerical formulations are given in both the rotating reference frame and the absolute frame. Comparisons are made for the accuracy, efficiency, and robustness between the steady-state scheme and the time-accurate scheme for simulating viscous rotating flows for complex internal and external flow applications. Prospects for further increase in efficiency and accuracy of unsteady time-accurate computations are discussed.

  6. Determining inter-fractional motion of the uterus using 3D ultrasound imaging during radiotherapy for cervical cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Mariwan; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Behrens, Claus F.

    2014-03-01

    Uterine positional changes can reduce the accuracy of radiotherapy for cervical cancer patients. The purpose of this study was to; 1) Quantify the inter-fractional uterine displacement using a novel 3D ultrasound (US) imaging system, and 2) Compare the result with the bone match shift determined by Cone- Beam CT (CBCT) imaging.Five cervical cancer patients were enrolled in the study. Three of them underwent weekly CBCT imaging prior to treatment and bone match shift was applied. After treatment delivery they underwent a weekly US scan. The transabdominal scans were conducted using a Clarity US system (Clarity® Model 310C00). Uterine positional shifts based on soft-tissue match using US was performed and compared to bone match shifts for the three directions. Mean value (+/-1 SD) of the US shifts were (mm); anterior-posterior (A/P): (3.8+/-5.5), superior-inferior (S/I) (-3.5+/-5.2), and left-right (L/R): (0.4+/-4.9). The variations were larger than the CBCT shifts. The largest inter-fractional displacement was from -2 mm to +14 mm in the AP-direction for patient 3. Thus, CBCT bone matching underestimates the uterine positional displacement due to neglecting internal uterine positional change to the bone structures. Since the US images were significantly better than the CBCT images in terms of soft-tissue visualization, the US system can provide an optional image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) system. US imaging might be a better IGRT system than CBCT, despite difficulty in capturing the entire uterus. Uterine shifts based on US imaging contains relative uterus-bone displacement, which is not taken into consideration using CBCT bone match.

  7. "Let's get physical": advantages of a physical model over 3D computer models and textbooks in learning imaging anatomy.

    PubMed

    Preece, Daniel; Williams, Sarah B; Lam, Richard; Weller, Renate

    2013-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) information plays an important part in medical and veterinary education. Appreciating complex 3D spatial relationships requires a strong foundational understanding of anatomy and mental 3D visualization skills. Novel learning resources have been introduced to anatomy training to achieve this. Objective evaluation of their comparative efficacies remains scarce in the literature. This study developed and evaluated the use of a physical model in demonstrating the complex spatial relationships of the equine foot. It was hypothesized that the newly developed physical model would be more effective for students to learn magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) anatomy of the foot than textbooks or computer-based 3D models. Third year veterinary medicine students were randomly assigned to one of three teaching aid groups (physical model; textbooks; 3D computer model). The comparative efficacies of the three teaching aids were assessed through students' abilities to identify anatomical structures on MR images. Overall mean MRI assessment scores were significantly higher in students utilizing the physical model (86.39%) compared with students using textbooks (62.61%) and the 3D computer model (63.68%) (P < 0.001), with no significant difference between the textbook and 3D computer model groups (P = 0.685). Student feedback was also more positive in the physical model group compared with both the textbook and 3D computer model groups. Our results suggest that physical models may hold a significant advantage over alternative learning resources in enhancing visuospatial and 3D understanding of complex anatomical architecture, and that 3D computer models have significant limitations with regards to 3D learning.

  8. Integration of ultrasound-based registration with statistical shape models for computer-assisted orthopaedic surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Carolyn S. K.; Edwards, Philip J.; Hawkes, David J.

    2003-05-01

    We present the first use of ultrasound to instantiate and register a statistical shape model of bony structures. Our aim is to provide accurate image-guided total hip replacement without the need for a preoperative computed tomography (CT) scan. We propose novel methods to determine the location of the bone surface intraoperatively using percutaneous ultrasound and, with the aid of a statistical shape model, reconstruct a complete three-dimensional (3D) model of relevant anatomy. The centre of the femoral head is used as a further constraint to improve accuracy in regions not accessible to ultrasound. CT scans of the femur from a database were aligned to one target CT scan using a non-rigid registration algorithm. The femur surface from the target scan was then propagated to each of the subjects and used to produce a statistical shape model. A cadaveric femur not used in the shape model construction was scanned using freehand 3D ultrasound. The iterative closest point (ICP) algorithm was used to match points corresponding to the bone Surface derived from ultrasound with the statistical bone surface model. We used the mean shape and the first five modes of variation of the shape model. The resulting root mean square (RMS) point-to-surface distance from ICP was minimised to provide the best fit of the model to the ultrasound data.

  9. Quick, Accurate, Smart: 3D Computer Vision Technology Helps Assessing Confined Animals’ Behaviour

    PubMed Central

    Calderara, Simone; Pistocchi, Simone; Cucchiara, Rita; Podaliri-Vulpiani, Michele; Messori, Stefano; Ferri, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    Mankind directly controls the environment and lifestyles of several domestic species for purposes ranging from production and research to conservation and companionship. These environments and lifestyles may not offer these animals the best quality of life. Behaviour is a direct reflection of how the animal is coping with its environment. Behavioural indicators are thus among the preferred parameters to assess welfare. However, behavioural recording (usually from video) can be very time consuming and the accuracy and reliability of the output rely on the experience and background of the observers. The outburst of new video technology and computer image processing gives the basis for promising solutions. In this pilot study, we present a new prototype software able to automatically infer the behaviour of dogs housed in kennels from 3D visual data and through structured machine learning frameworks. Depth information acquired through 3D features, body part detection and training are the key elements that allow the machine to recognise postures, trajectories inside the kennel and patterns of movement that can be later labelled at convenience. The main innovation of the software is its ability to automatically cluster frequently observed temporal patterns of movement without any pre-set ethogram. Conversely, when common patterns are defined through training, a deviation from normal behaviour in time or between individuals could be assessed. The software accuracy in correctly detecting the dogs’ behaviour was checked through a validation process. An automatic behaviour recognition system, independent from human subjectivity, could add scientific knowledge on animals’ quality of life in confinement as well as saving time and resources. This 3D framework was designed to be invariant to the dog’s shape and size and could be extended to farm, laboratory and zoo quadrupeds in artificial housing. The computer vision technique applied to this software is innovative in non

  10. Quick, Accurate, Smart: 3D Computer Vision Technology Helps Assessing Confined Animals' Behaviour.

    PubMed

    Barnard, Shanis; Calderara, Simone; Pistocchi, Simone; Cucchiara, Rita; Podaliri-Vulpiani, Michele; Messori, Stefano; Ferri, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    Mankind directly controls the environment and lifestyles of several domestic species for purposes ranging from production and research to conservation and companionship. These environments and lifestyles may not offer these animals the best quality of life. Behaviour is a direct reflection of how the animal is coping with its environment. Behavioural indicators are thus among the preferred parameters to assess welfare. However, behavioural recording (usually from video) can be very time consuming and the accuracy and reliability of the output rely on the experience and background of the observers. The outburst of new video technology and computer image processing gives the basis for promising solutions. In this pilot study, we present a new prototype software able to automatically infer the behaviour of dogs housed in kennels from 3D visual data and through structured machine learning frameworks. Depth information acquired through 3D features, body part detection and training are the key elements that allow the machine to recognise postures, trajectories inside the kennel and patterns of movement that can be later labelled at convenience. The main innovation of the software is its ability to automatically cluster frequently observed temporal patterns of movement without any pre-set ethogram. Conversely, when common patterns are defined through training, a deviation from normal behaviour in time or between individuals could be assessed. The software accuracy in correctly detecting the dogs' behaviour was checked through a validation process. An automatic behaviour recognition system, independent from human subjectivity, could add scientific knowledge on animals' quality of life in confinement as well as saving time and resources. This 3D framework was designed to be invariant to the dog's shape and size and could be extended to farm, laboratory and zoo quadrupeds in artificial housing. The computer vision technique applied to this software is innovative in non

  11. Quick, Accurate, Smart: 3D Computer Vision Technology Helps Assessing Confined Animals' Behaviour.

    PubMed

    Barnard, Shanis; Calderara, Simone; Pistocchi, Simone; Cucchiara, Rita; Podaliri-Vulpiani, Michele; Messori, Stefano; Ferri, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    Mankind directly controls the environment and lifestyles of several domestic species for purposes ranging from production and research to conservation and companionship. These environments and lifestyles may not offer these animals the best quality of life. Behaviour is a direct reflection of how the animal is coping with its environment. Behavioural indicators are thus among the preferred parameters to assess welfare. However, behavioural recording (usually from video) can be very time consuming and the accuracy and reliability of the output rely on the experience and background of the observers. The outburst of new video technology and computer image processing gives the basis for promising solutions. In this pilot study, we present a new prototype software able to automatically infer the behaviour of dogs housed in kennels from 3D visual data and through structured machine learning frameworks. Depth information acquired through 3D features, body part detection and training are the key elements that allow the machine to recognise postures, trajectories inside the kennel and patterns of movement that can be later labelled at convenience. The main innovation of the software is its ability to automatically cluster frequently observed temporal patterns of movement without any pre-set ethogram. Conversely, when common patterns are defined through training, a deviation from normal behaviour in time or between individuals could be assessed. The software accuracy in correctly detecting the dogs' behaviour was checked through a validation process. An automatic behaviour recognition system, independent from human subjectivity, could add scientific knowledge on animals' quality of life in confinement as well as saving time and resources. This 3D framework was designed to be invariant to the dog's shape and size and could be extended to farm, laboratory and zoo quadrupeds in artificial housing. The computer vision technique applied to this software is innovative in non

  12. 3D modeling method for computer animate based on modified weak structured light method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Hanwei; Pan, Ming; Zhang, Xiangwei

    2010-11-01

    A simple and affordable 3D scanner is designed in this paper. Three-dimensional digital models are playing an increasingly important role in many fields, such as computer animate, industrial design, artistic design and heritage conservation. For many complex shapes, optical measurement systems are indispensable to acquiring the 3D information. In the field of computer animate, such an optical measurement device is too expensive to be widely adopted, and on the other hand, the precision is not as critical a factor in that situation. In this paper, a new cheap 3D measurement system is implemented based on modified weak structured light, using only a video camera, a light source and a straight stick rotating on a fixed axis. For an ordinary weak structured light configuration, one or two reference planes are required, and the shadows on these planes must be tracked in the scanning process, which destroy the convenience of this method. In the modified system, reference planes are unnecessary, and size range of the scanned objects is expanded widely. A new calibration procedure is also realized for the proposed method, and points cloud is obtained by analyzing the shadow strips on the object. A two-stage ICP algorithm is used to merge the points cloud from different viewpoints to get a full description of the object, and after a series of operations, a NURBS surface model is generated in the end. A complex toy bear is used to verify the efficiency of the method, and errors range from 0.7783mm to 1.4326mm comparing with the ground truth measurement.

  13. A new method for real-time co-registration of 3D coronary angiography and intravascular ultrasound or optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Carlier, Stéphane; Didday, Rich; Slots, Tristan; Kayaert, Peter; Sonck, Jeroen; El-Mourad, Mike; Preumont, Nicolas; Schoors, Dany; Van Camp, Guy

    2014-06-01

    We present a new clinically practical method for online co-registration of 3D quantitative coronary angiography (QCA) and intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) or optical coherence tomography (OCT). The workflow is based on two modified commercially available software packages. Reconstruction steps are explained and compared to previously available methods. The feasibility for different clinical scenarios is illustrated. The co-registration appears accurate, robust and induced a minimal delay on the normal cath lab activities. This new method is based on the 3D angiographic reconstruction of the catheter path and does not require operator's identification of landmarks to establish the image synchronization.

  14. High performance computing approaches for 3D reconstruction of complex biological specimens.

    PubMed

    da Silva, M Laura; Roca-Piera, Javier; Fernández, José-Jesús

    2010-01-01

    Knowledge of the structure of specimens is crucial to determine the role that they play in cellular and molecular biology. To yield the three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction by means of tomographic reconstruction algorithms, we need the use of large projection images and high processing time. Therefore, we propose the use of the high performance computing (HPC) to cope with the huge computational demands of this problem. We have implemented a HPC strategy where the distribution of tasks follows the master-slave paradigm. The master processor distributes a slab of slices, a piece of the final 3D structure to reconstruct, among the slave processors and receives reconstructed slices of the volume. We have evaluated the performance of our HPC approach using different sizes of the slab. We have observed that it is possible to find out an optimal size of the slab for the number of processor used that minimize communications time while maintaining a reasonable grain of parallelism to be exploited by the set of processors.

  15. High performance computing approaches for 3D reconstruction of complex biological specimens.

    PubMed

    da Silva, M Laura; Roca-Piera, Javier; Fernández, José-Jesús

    2010-01-01

    Knowledge of the structure of specimens is crucial to determine the role that they play in cellular and molecular biology. To yield the three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction by means of tomographic reconstruction algorithms, we need the use of large projection images and high processing time. Therefore, we propose the use of the high performance computing (HPC) to cope with the huge computational demands of this problem. We have implemented a HPC strategy where the distribution of tasks follows the master-slave paradigm. The master processor distributes a slab of slices, a piece of the final 3D structure to reconstruct, among the slave processors and receives reconstructed slices of the volume. We have evaluated the performance of our HPC approach using different sizes of the slab. We have observed that it is possible to find out an optimal size of the slab for the number of processor used that minimize communications time while maintaining a reasonable grain of parallelism to be exploited by the set of processors. PMID:20865517

  16. Computer-aided assessment of anomalies in the scoliotic spine in 3-D MRI images.

    PubMed

    Jäger, Florian; Hornegger, Joachim; Schwab, Siegfried; Janka, Rolf

    2009-01-01

    The assessment of anomalies in the scoliotic spine using Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is an essential task during the planning phase of a patient's treatment and operations. Due to the pathologic bending of the spine, this is an extremely time consuming process as an orthogonal view onto every vertebra is required. In this article we present a system for computer-aided assessment (CAA) of anomalies in 3-D MRI images of the spine relying on curved planar reformations (CPR). We introduce all necessary steps, from the pre-processing of the data to the visualization component. As the core part of the framework is based on a segmentation of the spinal cord we focus on this. The proposed segmentation method is an iterative process. In every iteration the segmentation is updated by an energy based scheme derived from Markov random field (MRF) theory. We evaluate the segmentation results on public available clinical relevant 3-D MRI data sets of scoliosis patients. In order to assess the quality of the segmentation we use the angle between automatically computed planes through the vertebra and planes estimated by medical experts. This results in a mean angle difference of less than six degrees.

  17. Using Computer-Aided Design Software and 3D Printers to Improve Spatial Visualization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katsio-Loudis, Petros; Jones, Millie

    2015-01-01

    Many articles have been published on the use of 3D printing technology. From prefabricated homes and outdoor structures to human organs, 3D printing technology has found a niche in many fields, but especially education. With the introduction of AutoCAD technical drawing programs and now 3D printing, learners can use 3D printed models to develop…

  18. A new 3-D integral code for computation of accelerator magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, L.R.; Kettunen, L.

    1991-01-01

    For computing accelerator magnets, integral codes have several advantages over finite element codes; far-field boundaries are treated automatically, and computed field in the bore region satisfy Maxwell's equations exactly. A new integral code employing edge elements rather than nodal elements has overcome the difficulties associated with earlier integral codes. By the use of field integrals (potential differences) as solution variables, the number of unknowns is reduced to one less than the number of nodes. Two examples, a hollow iron sphere and the dipole magnet of Advanced Photon Source injector synchrotron, show the capability of the code. The CPU time requirements are comparable to those of three-dimensional (3-D) finite-element codes. Experiments show that in practice it can realize much of the potential CPU time saving that parallel processing makes possible. 8 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Tools for 3D scientific visualization in computational aerodynamics at NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bancroft, Gordon; Plessel, Todd; Merritt, Fergus; Watson, Val

    1989-01-01

    Hardware, software, and techniques used by the Fluid Dynamics Division (NASA) for performing visualization of computational aerodynamics, which can be applied to the visualization of flow fields from computer simulations of fluid dynamics about the Space Shuttle, are discussed. Three visualization techniques applied, post-processing, tracking, and steering, are described, as well as the post-processing software packages used, PLOT3D, SURF (Surface Modeller), GAS (Graphical Animation System), and FAST (Flow Analysis software Toolkit). Using post-processing methods a flow simulation was executed on a supercomputer and, after the simulation was complete, the results were processed for viewing. It is shown that the high-resolution, high-performance three-dimensional workstation combined with specially developed display and animation software provides a good tool for analyzing flow field solutions obtained from supercomputers.

  20. A review of automated image understanding within 3D baggage computed tomography security screening.

    PubMed

    Mouton, Andre; Breckon, Toby P

    2015-01-01

    Baggage inspection is the principal safeguard against the transportation of prohibited and potentially dangerous materials at airport security checkpoints. Although traditionally performed by 2D X-ray based scanning, increasingly stringent security regulations have led to a growing demand for more advanced imaging technologies. The role of X-ray Computed Tomography is thus rapidly expanding beyond the traditional materials-based detection of explosives. The development of computer vision and image processing techniques for the automated understanding of 3D baggage-CT imagery is however, complicated by poor image resolutions, image clutter and high levels of noise and artefacts. We discuss the recent and most pertinent advancements and identify topics for future research within the challenging domain of automated image understanding for baggage security screening CT. PMID:26409422

  1. A review of automated image understanding within 3D baggage computed tomography security screening.

    PubMed

    Mouton, Andre; Breckon, Toby P

    2015-01-01

    Baggage inspection is the principal safeguard against the transportation of prohibited and potentially dangerous materials at airport security checkpoints. Although traditionally performed by 2D X-ray based scanning, increasingly stringent security regulations have led to a growing demand for more advanced imaging technologies. The role of X-ray Computed Tomography is thus rapidly expanding beyond the traditional materials-based detection of explosives. The development of computer vision and image processing techniques for the automated understanding of 3D baggage-CT imagery is however, complicated by poor image resolutions, image clutter and high levels of noise and artefacts. We discuss the recent and most pertinent advancements and identify topics for future research within the challenging domain of automated image understanding for baggage security screening CT.

  2. Parallel I/O and computation for 3D post-stack depth migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosher, Charles C.; Joyner, Calvin L.

    1994-09-01

    Scalable parallel algorithms for seismic imaging remain a significant challenge for the oil and gas industry. Scalability must address both the computational and the input/output portions of the algorithm in question. These issues are addressed by the ARCO Seismic Benchmark Suite, a public domain software system that provides an environment for development and performance analysis of parallel seismic processing algorithm. We illustrate some of the issues in the design of scalable parallel imaging algorithms with an example process, 3D post-stack depth migration. The algorithm used is based on an implicit finite difference formulation described by Zhiming Li. Scalability is obtained by designing computation, communication between processors, and input/output as parallel operations. The resulting application runs efficiently on both distributed memory and shared memory hardware platforms with processor counts from 1 - 128 nodes.

  3. Fully 3D-computations of submarine turbid surges : comparison with flume experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cayocca, F.; Le Hir, P.

    2003-04-01

    Most numerical models of submarine gravity currents use layer-averaged equations. The description of the flow properties then requires the use of empirical terms to include 1) water entrainment at the surface of the dense layer and 2) entrainment of sediment by erosion of the seafloor. SiAM3D is a three-dimensional numerical model based on the hydrostatic approximation to solve the mass and momentum conservation equations for highly concentrated mixtures. Stratification turbulence damping, hindered settling and increase of molecular viscosity with concentration (which can lead to a visco-plastic behaviour) are included. Water entrainment results here from the turbulent behaviour of the flow and does not require empirical coefficients as in vertically integrated models. A mixing length turbulence closure is also used to compute bottom friction. Erosion and deposition can be taken into account. The model is used to simulate slope-failure-induced submarine turbid surges. It is compared with data from flume experiments carried out with saline or sediment laden flows. Front velocity, length and concentration of the flow can therefore be validated for various values of slope angle, surge volume and initial density. The hard bottoms used in the experiments found in the literature do not allow the validation of erosion computations. 3D computations were carried out to simulate the submarine landslide generated by the collapse of Nice airport landfill in 1979. Large computation times do not allow simulations long enough for the flow to reach distances where data are available. However the results compare well with simulations produced by a more complex model, the results of which were validated by observed hydraulic effects in front of the airport (landslide-generated tsunami).

  4. The Effects of 3D Computer Modelling on Conceptual Change about Seasons and Phases of the Moon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kucukozer, Huseyin

    2008-01-01

    In this study, prospective science teachers' misconceptions about the seasons and the phases of the Moon were determined, and then the effects of 3D computer modelling on their conceptual changes were investigated. The topics were covered in two classes with a total of 76 students using a predict-observe-explain strategy supported by 3D computer…

  5. Feasibility of Using Volumetric Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound with a 3-D Transducer to Evaluate Therapeutic Response after Targeted Therapy in Rabbit Hepatic VX2 Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeehyun; Kim, Jung Hoon; Yoon, Soon Ho; Choi, Won Seok; Kim, Young Jae; Han, Joon Koo; Choi, Byung-Ihn

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility of using dynamic contrast-enhanced ultrasound (DCE-US) with a 3-D transducer to evaluate therapeutic responses to targeted therapy. Rabbits with hepatic VX2 carcinomas, divided into a treatment group (n = 22, 30 mg/kg/d sorafenib) and a control group (n = 13), were evaluated with DCE-US using 2-D and 3-D transducers and computed tomography (CT) perfusion imaging at baseline and 1 d after the first treatment. Perfusion parameters were collected, and correlations between parameters were analyzed. In the treatment group, both volumetric and 2-D DCE-US perfusion parameters, including peak intensity (33.2 ± 19.9 vs. 16.6 ± 10.7, 63.7 ± 20.0 vs. 30.1 ± 19.8), slope (15.3 ± 12.4 vs. 5.7 ± 4.5, 37.3 ± 20.4 vs. 15.7 ± 13.0) and area under the curve (AUC; 1004.1 ± 560.3 vs. 611.4 ± 421.1, 1332.2 ± 708.3 vs. 670.4 ± 388.3), had significantly decreased 1 d after the first treatment (p = 0.00). In the control group, 2-D DCE-US revealed that peak intensity, time to peak and slope had significantly changed (p < 0.05); however, volumetric DCE-US revealed that peak intensity, time-intensity AUC, AUC during wash-in and AUC during wash-out had significantly changed (p = 0.00). CT perfusion imaging parameters, including blood flow, blood volume and permeability of the capillary vessel surface, had significantly decreased in the treatment group (p = 0.00); however, in the control group, peak intensity and blood volume had significantly increased (p = 0.00). It is feasible to use DCE-US with a 3-D transducer to predict early therapeutic response after targeted therapy because perfusion parameters, including peak intensity, slope and AUC, significantly decreased, which is similar to the trend observed for 2-D DCE-US and CT perfusion imaging parameters. PMID:26365926

  6. Measurement of a PAGAT gel dosimeter by ultrasound computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khoei, S.; Trapp, J. V.; Langton, C. M.

    2013-06-01

    In this work we used a 3D quantitative CT ultrasound imaging system to characterise polymer gel dosimeters. The system comprised of two identical 5 MHz 128 element phased-array ultrasound transducers co-axially aligned and submerged in water as a coupling agent. Rotational and translational movement of the gel dosimeter sample between the transducers were performed using a robotic arm. Ultrasound signals were generated and received using an Olympus Omniscan unit. Dose sensitivity of attenuation and time of flight ultrasonic parameters were assessed using this system.

  7. Electromagnetically navigated laparoscopic ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Wilheim, Dirk; Feussner, Hubertus; Schneider, Armin; Harms, Jens

    2003-01-01

    A three-dimensional (3D) representation of laparoscopic ultrasound examinations could be helpful in diagnostic and therapeutic laparoscopy, but has not yet been realised with flexible laparoscopic ultrasound probes. Therefore, an electromagnetic navigation system was integrated into the tip of a conventional laparoscopic ultrasound probe. Navigated 3D laparoscopic ultrasound was compared with the imaging data of 3D navigated transcutaneous ultrasound and 3D computed tomography (CT) scan. The 3D CT scan served as the "gold standard". Clinical applicability in standardized operating room (OR) settings, imaging quality, diagnostic potential, and accuracy in volumetric assessment of various well-defined hepatic lesions were analyzed. Navigated 3D laparoscopic ultrasound facilitates exact definition of tumor location and margins. As compared with the "gold standard" of the 3D CT scans, 3D laparoscopic ultrasound has a tendency to underestimate the volume of the region of interest (ROI) (Delta3.1%). A comparison of 3D laparoscopy and transcutaneous 3D ultrasonography demonstrated clearly that the former is more accurate for volumetric assessment of the ROI and facilitates a more detailed display of the lesions. 3D laparoscopic ultrasound imaging with a navigated probe is technically feasible. The technique facilitates detailed ultrasound evaluation of laparoscopic procedures that involve visual, in-depth, and volumetric perception of complex liver pathologies. Navigated 3D laparoscopic ultrasound may have the potential to promote the practical role of laparoscopic ultrasonography, and become a valuable tool for local ablative therapy. In this article, our clinical experiences with a certified prototype of a 3D laparoscopic ultrasound probe, as well as its in vitro and in vivo evaluation, is reported.

  8. Computer modeling of 3D structures of cytochrome P450s.

    PubMed

    Chang, Y T; Stiffelman, O B; Loew, G H

    1996-01-01

    The understanding of structure-function relationship of enzymes requires detailed information of their three-dimensional structure. Protein structure determination by X-ray and NMR methods, the two most frequently used experimental procedures, are often difficult and time-consuming. Thus computer modeling of protein structures has become an increasingly active and attractive option for obtaining predictive models of three-dimensional protein structures. Specifically, for the ubiquitous metabolizing heme proteins, the cytochrome P450s, the X-ray structures of four isozymes of bacterial origin, P450cam, P450terp, P450BM-3 and P450eryF have now been determined. However, attempts to obtain the structure of mammalian forms by experimental means have thus far not been successful. Thus, there have been numerous attempts to construct models of mammalian P450s using homology modeling methods in which the known structures have been used to various extents and in various strategies to build models of P450 isozymes. In this paper, we review these efforts and then describe a strategy for structure building and assessment of 3D models of P450s recently developed in our laboratory that corrects many of the weaknesses in the previous procedures. The results are 3D models that for the first time are stable to unconstrained molecular dynamics simulations. The use of this method is demonstrated by the construction and validation of a 3D model for rabbit liver microsomal P450 isozyme 2B4, responsible for the oxidative metabolism of diverse xenobiotics including widely used inhalation anesthetics. Using this 2B4 model, the substrate access channel, substrate binding site and plausible surface regions for binding with P450 redox partners were identified. PMID:9010606

  9. Soft computing approach to 3D lung nodule segmentation in CT.

    PubMed

    Badura, P; Pietka, E

    2014-10-01

    This paper presents a novel, multilevel approach to the segmentation of various types of pulmonary nodules in computed tomography studies. It is based on two branches of computational intelligence: the fuzzy connectedness (FC) and the evolutionary computation. First, the image and auxiliary data are prepared for the 3D FC analysis during the first stage of an algorithm - the masks generation. Its main goal is to process some specific types of nodules connected to the pleura or vessels. It consists of some basic image processing operations as well as dedicated routines for the specific cases of nodules. The evolutionary computation is performed on the image and seed points in order to shorten the FC analysis and improve its accuracy. After the FC application, the remaining vessels are removed during the postprocessing stage. The method has been validated using the first dataset of studies acquired and described by the Lung Image Database Consortium (LIDC) and by its latest release - the LIDC-IDRI (Image Database Resource Initiative) database.

  10. Computational time analysis of the numerical solution of 3D electrostatic Poisson's equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamboh, Shakeel Ahmed; Labadin, Jane; Rigit, Andrew Ragai Henri; Ling, Tech Chaw; Amur, Khuda Bux; Chaudhary, Muhammad Tayyab

    2015-05-01

    3D Poisson's equation is solved numerically to simulate the electric potential in a prototype design of electrohydrodynamic (EHD) ion-drag micropump. Finite difference method (FDM) is employed to discretize the governing equation. The system of linear equations resulting from FDM is solved iteratively by using the sequential Jacobi (SJ) and sequential Gauss-Seidel (SGS) methods, simulation results are also compared to examine the difference between the results. The main objective was to analyze the computational time required by both the methods with respect to different grid sizes and parallelize the Jacobi method to reduce the computational time. In common, the SGS method is faster than the SJ method but the data parallelism of Jacobi method may produce good speedup over SGS method. In this study, the feasibility of using parallel Jacobi (PJ) method is attempted in relation to SGS method. MATLAB Parallel/Distributed computing environment is used and a parallel code for SJ method is implemented. It was found that for small grid size the SGS method remains dominant over SJ method and PJ method while for large grid size both the sequential methods may take nearly too much processing time to converge. Yet, the PJ method reduces computational time to some extent for large grid sizes.

  11. Breast density measurement: 3D cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) images versus 2D digital mammograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Tao; Lai, Chao-Jen; Chen, Lingyun; Liu, Xinming; Shen, Youtao; Zhong, Yuncheng; Ge, Shuaiping; Yi, Ying; Wang, Tianpeng; Yang, Wei T.; Shaw, Chris C.

    2009-02-01

    Breast density has been recognized as one of the major risk factors for breast cancer. However, breast density is currently estimated using mammograms which are intrinsically 2D in nature and cannot accurately represent the real breast anatomy. In this study, a novel technique for measuring breast density based on the segmentation of 3D cone beam CT (CBCT) images was developed and the results were compared to those obtained from 2D digital mammograms. 16 mastectomy breast specimens were imaged with a bench top flat-panel based CBCT system. The reconstructed 3D CT images were corrected for the cupping artifacts and then filtered to reduce the noise level, followed by using threshold-based segmentation to separate the dense tissue from the adipose tissue. For each breast specimen, volumes of the dense tissue structures and the entire breast were computed and used to calculate the volumetric breast density. BI-RADS categories were derived from the measured breast densities and compared with those estimated from conventional digital mammograms. The results show that in 10 of 16 cases the BI-RADS categories derived from the CBCT images were lower than those derived from the mammograms by one category. Thus, breasts considered as dense in mammographic examinations may not be considered as dense with the CBCT images. This result indicates that the relation between breast cancer risk and true (volumetric) breast density needs to be further investigated.

  12. e-LEA3D: a computational-aided drug design web server.

    PubMed

    Douguet, Dominique

    2010-07-01

    e-LEA3D web server integrates three complementary tools to perform computer-aided drug design based on molecular fragments. In drug discovery projects, there is a considerable interest in identifying novel and diverse molecular scaffolds to enhance chances of success. The de novo drug design tool is used to invent new ligands to optimize a user-specified scoring function. The composite scoring function includes both structure- and ligand-based evaluations. The de novo approach is an alternative to a blind virtual screening of large compound collections. A heuristic based on a genetic algorithm rapidly finds which fragments or combination of fragments fit a QSAR model or the binding site of a protein. While the approach is ideally suited for scaffold-hopping, this module also allows a scan for possible substituents to a user-specified scaffold. The second tool offers a traditional virtual screening and filtering of an uploaded library of compounds. The third module addresses the combinatorial library design that is based on a user-drawn scaffold and reactants coming, for example, from a chemical supplier. The e-LEA3D server is available at: http://bioinfo.ipmc.cnrs.fr/lea.html.

  13. e-LEA3D: a computational-aided drug design web server

    PubMed Central

    Douguet, Dominique

    2010-01-01

    e-LEA3D web server integrates three complementary tools to perform computer-aided drug design based on molecular fragments. In drug discovery projects, there is a considerable interest in identifying novel and diverse molecular scaffolds to enhance chances of success. The de novo drug design tool is used to invent new ligands to optimize a user-specified scoring function. The composite scoring function includes both structure- and ligand-based evaluations. The de novo approach is an alternative to a blind virtual screening of large compound collections. A heuristic based on a genetic algorithm rapidly finds which fragments or combination of fragments fit a QSAR model or the binding site of a protein. While the approach is ideally suited for scaffold-hopping, this module also allows a scan for possible substituents to a user-specified scaffold. The second tool offers a traditional virtual screening and filtering of an uploaded library of compounds. The third module addresses the combinatorial library design that is based on a user-drawn scaffold and reactants coming, for example, from a chemical supplier. The e-LEA3D server is available at: http://bioinfo.ipmc.cnrs.fr/lea.html. PMID:20444867

  14. Using Gabor filter banks and temporal-spatial constraints to compute 3D myocardium strain.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ting; Axel, Leon

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we describe a new approach for reconstructing 3D strains in the myocardium using tagged MR images. We first segment the myocardium using a 3D deformable model driven by image gradients and Gabor filter responses. Tags are automatically detected and tracked as deformable thin plates during systole and early diastole. To keep the tracking results more stable and consistent, we use a combination of gradient information, an intensity probabilistic model, the phase information, and a temporal-spatial smoothness constraint. Based on the tag deformation, we compute a dense displacement in the myocardium around both ventricles. The displacements in x-, y-, and z- directions are calculated separately and are combined to form the final displacement maps. We do not use the information outside the segmented surface of the myocardium to avoid displacement errors caused by noises, artifacts, and correlations between different regions in the myocardium. The strain in the myocardium during the heart cycle is derived from the displacement. This method accepts images of either a tag grid or separate horizontal and vertical tag lines as its input. Experimental results on phantom and real data demonstrate good performance of this method in calculating the myocardial strain.

  15. 3D robust Chan-Vese model for industrial computed tomography volume data segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Linghui; Zeng, Li; Luan, Xiao

    2013-11-01

    Industrial computed tomography (CT) has been widely applied in many areas of non-destructive testing (NDT) and non-destructive evaluation (NDE). In practice, CT volume data to be dealt with may be corrupted by noise. This paper addresses the segmentation of noisy industrial CT volume data. Motivated by the research on the Chan-Vese (CV) model, we present a region-based active contour model that draws upon intensity information in local regions with a controllable scale. In the presence of noise, a local energy is firstly defined according to the intensity difference within a local neighborhood. Then a global energy is defined to integrate local energy with respect to all image points. In a level set formulation, this energy is represented by a variational level set function, where a surface evolution equation is derived for energy minimization. Comparative analysis with the CV model indicates the comparable performance of the 3D robust Chan-Vese (RCV) model. The quantitative evaluation also shows the segmentation accuracy of 3D RCV. In addition, the efficiency of our approach is validated under several types of noise, such as Poisson noise, Gaussian noise, salt-and-pepper noise and speckle noise.

  16. Computational Study of 3-D Hot-Spot Initiation in Shocked Insensitive High-Explosive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Najjar, F. M.; Howard, W. M.; Fried, L. E.

    2011-06-01

    High explosive shock sensitivity is controlled by a combination of mechanical response, thermal properties, and chemical properties. The interplay of these physical phenomena in realistic condensed energetic materials is currently lacking. A multiscale computational framework is developed investigating hot spot (void) ignition in a single crystal of an insensitive HE, TATB. Atomistic MD simulations are performed to provide the key chemical reactions and these reaction rates are used in 3-D multiphysics simulations. The multiphysics code, ALE3D, is linked to the chemistry software, Cheetah, and a three-way coupled approach is pursued including hydrodynamics, thermal and chemical analyses. A single spherical air bubble is embedded in the insensitive HE and its collapse due to shock initiation is evolved numerically in time; while the ignition processes due chemical reactions are studied. Our current predictions showcase several interesting features regarding hot spot dynamics including the formation of a ``secondary'' jet. Results obtained with hydro-thermo-chemical processes leading to ignition growth will be discussed for various pore sizes and different shock pressures. LLNL-ABS-471438. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  17. More effective antimicrobial mastoparan derivatives, generated by 3D-QSAR-Almond and computational mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Avram, Speranta; Buiu, Catalin; Borcan, Florin; Milac, Adina-Luminita

    2012-02-01

    Antimicrobial peptides are drugs used against a wide range of pathogens which present a great advantage: in contrast with antibiotics they do not develop resistance. The wide spectrum of antimicrobial peptides advertises them in the research and pharmaceutical industry as attractive starting points for obtaining new, more effective analogs. Here we predict the antimicrobial activity against Bacillus subtilis (expressed as minimal inhibitory concentration values) for 33 mastoparan analogs and their new derivatives by a non-aligned 3D-QSAR (quantitative structure-activity relationship) method. We establish the contribution to antimicrobial activity of molecular descriptors (hydrophobicity, hydrogen bond donor and steric), correlated with contributions from the membrane environment (sodium, potassium, chloride). Our best QSAR models show significant cross-validated correlation q(2) (0.55-0.75), fitted correlation r(2) (greater than 0.90) coefficients and standard error of prediction SDEP (less than 0.250). Moreover, based on our most accurate 3D-QSAR models, we propose nine new mastoparan analogs, obtained by computational mutagenesis, some of them predicted to have significantly improved antimicrobial activity compared to the parent compound.

  18. Automatic segmentation of pulmonary fissures in computed tomography images using 3D surface features.

    PubMed

    Yu, Mali; Liu, Hong; Gong, Jianping; Jin, Renchao; Han, Ping; Song, Enmin

    2014-02-01

    Pulmonary interlobar fissures are important anatomic structures in human lungs and are useful in locating and classifying lung abnormalities. Automatic segmentation of fissures is a difficult task because of their low contrast and large variability. We developed a fully automatic training-free approach for fissure segmentation based on the local bending degree (LBD) and the maximum bending index (MBI). The LBD is determined by the angle between the eigenvectors of two Hessian matrices for a pair of adjacent voxels. It is used to construct a constraint to extract the candidate surfaces in three-dimensional (3D) space. The MBI is a measure to discriminate cylindrical surfaces from planar surfaces in 3D space. Our approach for segmenting fissures consists of five steps, including lung segmentation, plane-like structure enhancement, surface extraction with LBD, initial fissure identification with MBI, and fissure extension based on local plane fitting. When applying our approach to 15 chest computed tomography (CT) scans, the mean values of the positive predictive value, the sensitivity, the root-mean square (RMS) distance, and the maximal RMS are 91 %, 88 %, 1.01 ± 0.99 mm, and 11.56 mm, respectively, which suggests that our algorithm can efficiently segment fissures in chest CT scans.

  19. Evaluating the extent of cell death in 3D high frequency ultrasound by registration with whole-mount tumor histopathology

    SciTech Connect

    Vlad, Roxana M.; Kolios, Michael C.; Moseley, Joanne L.; Czarnota, Gregory J.; Brock, Kristy K.

    2010-08-15

    Purpose: High frequency ultrasound imaging, 10-30 MHz, has the capability to assess tumor response to radiotherapy in mouse tumors as early as 24 h after treatment administration. The advantage of this technique is that the image contrast is generated by changes in the physical properties of dying cells. Therefore, a subject can be imaged before and multiple times during the treatment without the requirement of injecting specialized contrast agents. This study is motivated by a need to provide metrics of comparison between the volume and localization of cell death, assessed from histology, with the volume and localization of cell death surrogate, assessed as regions with increased echogeneity from ultrasound images. Methods: The mice were exposed to radiation doses of 2, 4, and 8 Gy. Ultrasound images were collected from each tumor before and 24 h after exposure to radiation using a broadband 25 MHz center frequency transducer. After radiotherapy, tumors exhibited hyperechoic regions in ultrasound images that corresponded to areas of cell death in histology. The ultrasound and histological images were rigidly registered. The tumors and regions of cell death were manually outlined on histological images. Similarly, the tumors and hyperechoic regions were outlined on the ultrasound images. Each set of contours was converted to a volumetric mesh in order to compare the volumes and the localization of cell death in histological and ultrasound images. Results: A shrinkage factor of 17{+-}2% was calculated from the difference in the tumor volumes evaluated from histological and ultrasound images. This was used to correct the tumor and cell death volumes assessed from histology. After this correction, the average absolute difference between the volume of cell death assessed from ultrasound and histological images was 11{+-}14% and the volume overlap was 70{+-}12%. Conclusions: The method provided metrics of comparison between the volume of cell death assessed from

  20. A 3-D Computational Study of a Variable Camber Continuous Trailing Edge Flap (VCCTEF) Spanwise Segment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaul, Upender K.; Nguyen, Nhan T.

    2015-01-01

    Results of a computational study carried out to explore the effects of various elastomer configurations joining spanwise contiguous Variable Camber Continuous Trailing Edge Flap (VCCTEF) segments are reported here. This research is carried out as a proof-of-concept study that will seek to push the flight envelope in cruise with drag optimization as the objective. The cruise conditions can be well off design such as caused by environmental conditions, maneuvering, etc. To handle these off-design conditions, flap deflection is used so when the flap is deflected in a given direction, the aircraft angle of attack changes accordingly to maintain a given lift. The angle of attack is also a design parameter along with the flap deflection. In a previous 2D study,1 the effect of camber was investigated and the results revealed some insight into the relative merit of various camber settings of the VCCTEF. The present state of the art has not advanced sufficiently to do a full 3-D viscous analysis of the whole NASA Generic Transport Model (GTM) wing with VCCTEF deployed with elastomers. Therefore, this study seeks to explore the local effects of three contiguous flap segments on lift and drag of a model devised here to determine possible trades among various flap deflections to achieve desired lift and drag results. Although this approach is an approximation, it provides new insights into the "local" effects of the relative deflections of the contiguous spanwise flap systems and various elastomer segment configurations. The present study is a natural extension of the 2-D study to assess these local 3-D effects. Design cruise condition at 36,000 feet at free stream Mach number of 0.797 and a mean aerodynamic chord (MAC) based Reynolds number of 30.734x10(exp 6) is simulated for an angle of attack (AoA) range of 0 to 6 deg. In the previous 2-D study, the calculations revealed that the parabolic arc camber (1x2x3) and circular arc camber (VCCTEF222) offered the best L

  1. Infrared thermography and ultrasound C-scan for non-destructive evaluation of 3D carbon fiber materials: a comparative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hai; Genest, Marc; Robitaille, Francois; Maldague, Xavier; West, Lucas; Joncas, Simon; Leduc, Catherine

    2015-05-01

    3D Carbon fiber polymer matrix composites (3D CF PMCs) are increasingly used for aircraft construction due to their exceptional stiffness and strength-to-mass ratios. However, defects are common in the 3D combining areas and are challenging to inspect. In this paper, Stitching is used to decrease these defects, but causes some new types of defects. Infrared NDT (non-destructive testing) and ultrasound NDT are used. In particular, a micro-laser line thermography technique (micro-LLT) and a micro-laser spot thermography (micro-LST) with locked-in technique are used to detect the micro-defects. In addition, a comparative study is conducted by using pulsed thermography (PT), vibrothermography (VT). In order to confirm the types of the defects, microscopic inspection is carried out before NDT work, after sectioning and polishing a small part of the sample..

  2. An improved version of NCOREL: A computer program for 3-D nonlinear supersonic potential flow computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siclari, Michael J.

    1988-01-01

    A computer code called NCOREL (for Nonconical Relaxation) has been developed to solve for supersonic full potential flows over complex geometries. The method first solves for the conical at the apex and then marches downstream in a spherical coordinate system. Implicit relaxation techniques are used to numerically solve the full potential equation at each subsequent crossflow plane. Many improvements have been made to the original code including more reliable numerics for computing wing-body flows with multiple embedded shocks, inlet flow through simulation, wake model and entropy corrections. Line relaxation or approximate factorization schemes are optionally available. Improved internal grid generation using analytic conformal mappings, supported by a simple geometric Harris wave drag input that was originally developed for panel methods and internal geometry package are some of the new features.

  3. Computer-aided detection of clustered microcalcifications in digital breast tomosynthesis: A 3D approach

    PubMed Central

    Sahiner, Berkman; Chan, Heang-Ping; Hadjiiski, Lubomir M.; Helvie, Mark A.; Wei, Jun; Zhou, Chuan; Lu, Yao

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To design a computer-aided detection (CADe) system for clustered microcalcifications in reconstructed digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) volumes and to perform a preliminary evaluation of the CADe system. Methods: IRB approval and informed consent were obtained in this study. A data set of two-view DBT of 72 breasts containing microcalcification clusters was collected from 72 subjects who were scheduled to undergo breast biopsy. Based on tissue sampling results, 17 cases had breast cancer and 55 were benign. A separate data set of two-view DBT of 38 breasts free of clustered microcalcifications from 38 subjects was collected to independently estimate the number of false-positives (FPs) generated by the CADe system. A radiologist experienced in breast imaging marked the biopsied cluster of microcalcifications with a 3D bounding box using all available clinical and imaging information. A CADe system was designed to detect microcalcification clusters in the reconstructed volume. The system consisted of prescreening, clustering, and false-positive reduction stages. In the prescreening stage, the conspicuity of microcalcification-like objects was increased by an enhancement-modulated 3D calcification response function. An iterative thresholding and 3D object growing method was used to detect cluster seed objects, which were used as potential centers of microcalcification clusters. In the cluster detection stage, microcalcification candidates were identified using a second iterative thresholding procedure, which was applied to the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) enhanced image voxels with a positive calcification response. Starting with each cluster seed object as the initial cluster center, a dynamic clustering algorithm formed a cluster candidate by including microcalcification candidates within a 3D neighborhood of the cluster seed object that satisfied the clustering criteria. The number, size, and SNR of the microcalcifications in a cluster candidate and the

  4. The NCOREL computer program for 3D nonlinear supersonic potential flow computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siclari, M. J.

    1983-01-01

    An innovative computational technique (NCOREL) was established for the treatment of three dimensional supersonic flows. The method is nonlinear in that it solves the nonconservative finite difference analog of the full potential equation and can predict the formation of supercritical cross flow regions, embedded and bow shocks. The method implicitly computes a conical flow at the apex (R = 0) of a spherical coordinate system and uses a fully implicit marching technique to obtain three dimensional cross flow solutions. This implies that the radial Mach number must remain supersonic. The cross flow solutions are obtained by using type dependent transonic relaxation techniques with the type dependency linked to the character of the cross flow velocity (i.e., subsonic/supersonic). The spherical coordinate system and marching on spherical surfaces is ideally suited to the computation of wing flows at low supersonic Mach numbers due to the elimination of the subsonic axial Mach number problems that exist in other marching codes that utilize Cartesian transverse marching planes.

  5. Real-time computer-generated integral imaging and 3D image calibration for augmented reality surgical navigation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Junchen; Suenaga, Hideyuki; Liao, Hongen; Hoshi, Kazuto; Yang, Liangjing; Kobayashi, Etsuko; Sakuma, Ichiro

    2015-03-01

    Autostereoscopic 3D image overlay for augmented reality (AR) based surgical navigation has been studied and reported many times. For the purpose of surgical overlay, the 3D image is expected to have the same geometric shape as the original organ, and can be transformed to a specified location for image overlay. However, how to generate a 3D image with high geometric fidelity and quantitative evaluation of 3D image's geometric accuracy have not been addressed. This paper proposes a graphics processing unit (GPU) based computer-generated integral imaging pipeline for real-time autostereoscopic 3D display, and an automatic closed-loop 3D image calibration paradigm for displaying undistorted 3D images. Based on the proposed methods, a novel AR device for 3D image surgical overlay is presented, which mainly consists of a 3D display, an AR window, a stereo camera for 3D measurement, and a workstation for information processing. The evaluation on the 3D image rendering performance with 2560×1600 elemental image resolution shows the rendering speeds of 50-60 frames per second (fps) for surface models, and 5-8 fps for large medical volumes. The evaluation of the undistorted 3D image after the calibration yields sub-millimeter geometric accuracy. A phantom experiment simulating oral and maxillofacial surgery was also performed to evaluate the proposed AR overlay device in terms of the image registration accuracy, 3D image overlay accuracy, and the visual effects of the overlay. The experimental results show satisfactory image registration and image overlay accuracy, and confirm the system usability.

  6. 3-D reconstruction of an ancient Egyptian mummy using X-ray computer tomography.

    PubMed

    Baldock, C; Hughes, S W; Whittaker, D K; Taylor, J; Davis, R; Spencer, A J; Tonge, K; Sofat, A

    1994-12-01

    Computer tomography has been used to image and reconstruct in 3-D an Egyptian mummy from the collection of the British Museum. This study of Tjentmutengebtiu, a priestess from the 22nd dynasty (945-715 BC) revealed invaluable information of a scientific, Egyptological and palaeopathological nature without mutilation and destruction of the painted cartonnage case or linen wrappings. Precise details on the removal of the brain through the nasal cavity and the viscera from the abdominal cavity were obtained. The nature and composition of the false eyes were investigated. The detailed analysis of the teeth provided a much closer approximation of age at death. The identification of materials used for the various amulets including that of the figures placed in the viscera was graphically demonstrated using this technique.

  7. 3-D reconstruction of an ancient Egyptian mummy using X-ray computer tomography.

    PubMed Central

    Baldock, C; Hughes, S W; Whittaker, D K; Taylor, J; Davis, R; Spencer, A J; Tonge, K; Sofat, A

    1994-01-01

    Computer tomography has been used to image and reconstruct in 3-D an Egyptian mummy from the collection of the British Museum. This study of Tjentmutengebtiu, a priestess from the 22nd dynasty (945-715 BC) revealed invaluable information of a scientific, Egyptological and palaeopathological nature without mutilation and destruction of the painted cartonnage case or linen wrappings. Precise details on the removal of the brain through the nasal cavity and the viscera from the abdominal cavity were obtained. The nature and composition of the false eyes were investigated. The detailed analysis of the teeth provided a much closer approximation of age at death. The identification of materials used for the various amulets including that of the figures placed in the viscera was graphically demonstrated using this technique. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3. Figure 4. Figure 5. PMID:7853321

  8. An ultrasound tomography system with polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) moldings for coupling: in vivo results for 3-D pulse-echo imaging of the female breast.

    PubMed

    Koch, Andreas; Stiller, Florian; Lerch, Reinhard; Ermert, Helmut

    2015-02-01

    Full-angle spatial compounding (FASC) is a concept for pulse-echo imaging using an ultrasound tomography (UST) system. With FASC, resolution is increased and speckles are suppressed by averaging pulse-echo data from 360°. In vivo investigations have already shown a great potential for 2-D FASC in the female breast as well as for finger-joint imaging. However, providing a small number of images of parallel cross-sectional planes with enhanced image quality is not sufficient for diagnosis. Therefore, volume data (3-D) is needed. For this purpose, we further developed our UST add-on system to automatically rotate a motorized array (3-D probe) around the object of investigation. Full integration of external motor and ultrasound electronics control in a custom-made program allows acquisition of 3-D pulse-echo RF datasets within 10 min. In case of breast cancer imaging, this concept also enables imaging of near-thorax tissue regions which cannot be achieved by 2-D FASC. Furthermore, moldings made of polyvinyl alcohol hydrogel (PVA-H) have been developed as a new acoustic coupling concept. It has a great potential to replace the water bath technique in UST, which is a critical concept with respect to clinical investigations. In this contribution, we present in vivo results for 3-D FASC applied to imaging a female breast which has been placed in a PVA-H molding during data acquisition. An algorithm is described to compensate time-of-flight and consider refraction at the water-PVA-H molding and molding-tissue interfaces. Therefore, the mean speed of sound (SOS) for the breast tissue is estimated with an image-based method. Our results show that the PVA-H molding concept is applicable and feasible and delivers good results. 3-D FASC is superior to 2-D FASC and provides 3-D volume data at increased image quality.

  9. A 3D computer-aided design system applied to diagnosis and treatment planning in orthodontics and orthognathic surgery.

    PubMed

    Motohashi, N; Kuroda, T

    1999-06-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe a newly developed 3D computer-aided design (CAD) system for the diagnostic set-up of casts in orthodontic diagnosis and treatment planning, and its preliminary clinical applications. The system comprises a measuring unit which obtains 3D information from the dental model using laser scanning, and a personal computer to generate the 3D graphics. When measuring the 3D shape of the model, to minimize blind sectors, the model is scanned from two different directions with the slit-ray laser beam by rotating the mounting angle of the model on the measuring device. For computed simulation of tooth movement, the representative planes, defined by the anatomical reference points, are formed for each individual tooth and are arranged along a guideline descriptive of the individual arch form. Subsequently, the 3D shape is imparted to each of the teeth arranged on the representative plane to form an arrangement of the 3D profile. When necessary, orthognathic surgery can be simulated by moving the mandibular dental arch three-dimensionally to establish the optimum occlusal relationship. Compared with hand-made set-up models, the computed diagnostic cast has advantages such as high-speed processing and quantitative evaluation on the amount of 3D movement of the individual tooth relative to the craniofacial plane. Trial clinical applications demonstrated that the use of this system facilitated the otherwise complicated and time-consuming mock surgery for treatment planning in orthognathic surgery.

  10. Analysis of bite marks in foodstuffs by computer tomography (cone beam CT)--3D reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Marques, Jeidson; Musse, Jamilly; Caetano, Catarina; Corte-Real, Francisco; Corte-Real, Ana Teresa

    2013-12-01

    The use of three-dimensional (3D) analysis of forensic evidence is highlighted in comparison with traditional methods. This three-dimensional analysis is based on the registration of the surface from a bitten object. The authors propose to use Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT), which is used in dental practice, in order to study the surface and interior of bitten objects and dental casts of suspects. In this study, CBCT is applied to the analysis of bite marks in foodstuffs, which may be found in a forensic case scenario. 6 different types of foodstuffs were used: chocolate, cheese, apple, chewing gum, pizza and tart (flaky pastry and custard). The food was bitten into and dental casts of the possible suspects were made. The dental casts and bitten objects were registered using an x-ray source and the CBCT equipment iCAT® (Pennsylvania, EUA). The software InVivo5® (Anatomage Inc, EUA) was used to visualize and analyze the tomographic slices and 3D reconstructions of the objects. For each material an estimate of its density was assessed by two methods: HU values and specific gravity. All the used materials were successfully reconstructed as good quality 3D images. The relative densities of the materials in study were compared. Amongst the foodstuffs, the chocolate had the highest density (median value 100.5 HU and 1,36 g/cm(3)), while the pizza showed to have the lowest (median value -775 HU and 0,39 g/cm(3)), on both scales. Through tomographic slices and three-dimensional reconstructions it was possible to perform the metric analysis of the bite marks in all the foodstuffs, except for the pizza. These measurements could also be obtained from the dental casts. The depth of the bite mark was also successfully determined in all the foodstuffs except for the pizza. Cone Beam Computed Tomography has the potential to become an important tool for forensic sciences, namely for the registration and analysis of bite marks in foodstuffs that may be found in a crime

  11. Analysis of bite marks in foodstuffs by computer tomography (cone beam CT)--3D reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Marques, Jeidson; Musse, Jamilly; Caetano, Catarina; Corte-Real, Francisco; Corte-Real, Ana Teresa

    2013-12-01

    The use of three-dimensional (3D) analysis of forensic evidence is highlighted in comparison with traditional methods. This three-dimensional analysis is based on the registration of the surface from a bitten object. The authors propose to use Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT), which is used in dental practice, in order to study the surface and interior of bitten objects and dental casts of suspects. In this study, CBCT is applied to the analysis of bite marks in foodstuffs, which may be found in a forensic case scenario. 6 different types of foodstuffs were used: chocolate, cheese, apple, chewing gum, pizza and tart (flaky pastry and custard). The food was bitten into and dental casts of the possible suspects were made. The dental casts and bitten objects were registered using an x-ray source and the CBCT equipment iCAT® (Pennsylvania, EUA). The software InVivo5® (Anatomage Inc, EUA) was used to visualize and analyze the tomographic slices and 3D reconstructions of the objects. For each material an estimate of its density was assessed by two methods: HU values and specific gravity. All the used materials were successfully reconstructed as good quality 3D images. The relative densities of the materials in study were compared. Amongst the foodstuffs, the chocolate had the highest density (median value 100.5 HU and 1,36 g/cm(3)), while the pizza showed to have the lowest (median value -775 HU and 0,39 g/cm(3)), on both scales. Through tomographic slices and three-dimensional reconstructions it was possible to perform the metric analysis of the bite marks in all the foodstuffs, except for the pizza. These measurements could also be obtained from the dental casts. The depth of the bite mark was also successfully determined in all the foodstuffs except for the pizza. Cone Beam Computed Tomography has the potential to become an important tool for forensic sciences, namely for the registration and analysis of bite marks in foodstuffs that may be found in a crime

  12. 3D conformal MRI-controlled transurethral ultrasound prostate therapy: validation of numerical simulations and demonstration in tissue-mimicking gel phantoms.

    PubMed

    Burtnyk, Mathieu; N'Djin, William Apoutou; Kobelevskiy, Ilya; Bronskill, Michael; Chopra, Rajiv

    2010-11-21

    MRI-controlled transurethral ultrasound therapy uses a linear array of transducer elements and active temperature feedback to create volumes of thermal coagulation shaped to predefined prostate geometries in 3D. The specific aims of this work were to demonstrate the accuracy and repeatability of producing large volumes of thermal coagulation (>10 cc) that conform to 3D human prostate shapes in a tissue-mimicking gel phantom, and to evaluate quantitatively the accuracy with which numerical simulations predict these 3D heating volumes under carefully controlled conditions. Eleven conformal 3D experiments were performed in a tissue-mimicking phantom within a 1.5T MR imager to obtain non-invasive temperature measurements during heating. Temperature feedback was used to control the rotation rate and ultrasound power of transurethral devices with up to five 3.5 × 5 mm active transducer elements. Heating patterns shaped to human prostate geometries were generated using devices operating at 4.7 or 8.0 MHz with surface acoustic intensities of up to 10 W cm(-2). Simulations were informed by transducer surface velocity measurements acquired with a scanning laser vibrometer enabling improved calculations of the acoustic pressure distribution in a gel phantom. Temperature dynamics were determined according to a FDTD solution to Pennes' BHTE. The 3D heating patterns produced in vitro were shaped very accurately to the prostate target volumes, within the spatial resolution of the MRI thermometry images. The volume of the treatment difference falling outside ± 1 mm of the target boundary was, on average, 0.21 cc or 1.5% of the prostate volume. The numerical simulations predicted the extent and shape of the coagulation boundary produced in gel to within (mean ± stdev [min, max]): 0.5 ± 0.4 [-1.0, 2.1] and -0.05 ± 0.4 [-1.2, 1.4] mm for the treatments at 4.7 and 8.0 MHz, respectively. The temperatures across all MRI thermometry images were predicted within -0.3 ± 1.6 °C and 0

  13. Linear traveltime perturbation interpolation: a novel method to compute 3-D traveltimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jianzhong; Shi, Junjie; Song, Lin-Ping; Zhou, Hua-wei

    2015-10-01

    The linear traveltime interpolation has been a routine method to compute first arrivals of seismic waves and trace rays in complex media. The method assumes that traveltimes follow a linear distribution on each boundary of cells. The linearity assumption of traveltimes facilitates the numerical implementation but its violation may result in large computational errors. In this paper, we propose a new way to mitigate the potential shortcoming hidden in the linear traveltime interpolation. We use the vertex traveltimes in a calculated cell to introduce an equivalent homogeneous medium that is specific to the cell boundary from a source. Therefore, we can decompose the traveltime at a point on the cell boundary into two parts: (1) a reference traveltime propagating in the equivalent homogeneous medium and (2) a perturbation traveltime that is defined as the difference between the original and reference traveltimes. We now treat that the traveltime perturbation is linear along each boundary of cells instead of the traveltime. With the new assumption, we carry out the bilinear interpolation over traveltime perturbation to complete traveltime computation in a 3-D heterogeneous model. The numerical experiments show that the new method, the linear traveltime perturbation interpolation, is able to achieve much higher accuracy than that based on the linear traveltime interpolation.

  14. Enabling 3D-Liver Perfusion Mapping from MR-DCE Imaging Using Distributed Computing.

    PubMed

    Leporq, Benjamin; Camarasu-Pop, Sorina; Davila-Serrano, Eduardo E; Pilleul, Frank; Beuf, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    An MR acquisition protocol and a processing method using distributed computing on the European Grid Infrastructure (EGI) to allow 3D liver perfusion parametric mapping after Magnetic Resonance Dynamic Contrast Enhanced (MR-DCE) imaging are presented. Seven patients (one healthy control and six with chronic liver diseases) were prospectively enrolled after liver biopsy. MR-dynamic acquisition was continuously performed in free-breathing during two minutes after simultaneous intravascular contrast agent (MS-325 blood pool agent) injection. Hepatic capillary system was modeled by a 3-parameters one-compartment pharmacokinetic model. The processing step was parallelized and executed on the EGI. It was modeled and implemented as a grid workflow using the Gwendia language and the MOTEUR workflow engine. Results showed good reproducibility in repeated processing on the grid. The results obtained from the grid were well correlated with ROI-based reference method ran locally on a personal computer. The speed-up range was 71 to 242 with an average value of 126. In conclusion, distributed computing applied to perfusion mapping brings significant speed-up to quantification step to be used for further clinical studies in a research context. Accuracy would be improved with higher image SNR accessible on the latest 3T MR systems available today.

  15. FURN3D: A computer code for radiative heat transfer in pulverized coal furnaces

    SciTech Connect

    Ahluwalia, R.K.; Im, K.H.

    1992-08-01

    A computer code FURN3D has been developed for assessing the impact of burning different coals on heat absorption pattern in pulverized coal furnaces. The code is unique in its ability to conduct detailed spectral calculations of radiation transport in furnaces fully accounting for the size distributions of char, soot and ash particles, ash content, and ash composition. The code uses a hybrid technique of solving the three-dimensional radiation transport equation for absorbing, emitting and anisotropically scattering media. The technique achieves an optimal mix of computational speed and accuracy by combining the discrete ordinate method (S[sub 4]), modified differential approximation (MDA) and P, approximation in different range of optical thicknesses. The code uses spectroscopic data for estimating the absorption coefficients of participating gases C0[sub 2], H[sub 2]0 and CO. It invokes Mie theory for determining the extinction and scattering coefficients of combustion particulates. The optical constants of char, soot and ash are obtained from dispersion relations derived from reflectivity, transmissivity and extinction measurements. A control-volume formulation is adopted for determining the temperature field inside the furnace. A simple char burnout model is employed for estimating heat release and evolution of particle size distribution. The code is written in Fortran 77, has modular form, and is machine-independent. The computer memory required by the code depends upon the number of grid points specified and whether the transport calculations are performed on spectral or gray basis.

  16. FURN3D: A computer code for radiative heat transfer in pulverized coal furnaces

    SciTech Connect

    Ahluwalia, R.K.; Im, K.H.

    1992-08-01

    A computer code FURN3D has been developed for assessing the impact of burning different coals on heat absorption pattern in pulverized coal furnaces. The code is unique in its ability to conduct detailed spectral calculations of radiation transport in furnaces fully accounting for the size distributions of char, soot and ash particles, ash content, and ash composition. The code uses a hybrid technique of solving the three-dimensional radiation transport equation for absorbing, emitting and anisotropically scattering media. The technique achieves an optimal mix of computational speed and accuracy by combining the discrete ordinate method (S{sub 4}), modified differential approximation (MDA) and P, approximation in different range of optical thicknesses. The code uses spectroscopic data for estimating the absorption coefficients of participating gases C0{sub 2}, H{sub 2}0 and CO. It invokes Mie theory for determining the extinction and scattering coefficients of combustion particulates. The optical constants of char, soot and ash are obtained from dispersion relations derived from reflectivity, transmissivity and extinction measurements. A control-volume formulation is adopted for determining the temperature field inside the furnace. A simple char burnout model is employed for estimating heat release and evolution of particle size distribution. The code is written in Fortran 77, has modular form, and is machine-independent. The computer memory required by the code depends upon the number of grid points specified and whether the transport calculations are performed on spectral or gray basis.

  17. Interaction of 3d transition metal atoms with charged ion projectiles from Electron Nuclear Dynamics computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagelberg, Frank

    2003-03-01

    Computational results on atomic scattering between charged projectiles and transition metal target atoms are presented. This work aims at obtaining detailed information about charge, spin and energy transfer processes that occur between the interacting particles. An in-depth understanding of these phenomena is expected to provide a theoretical basis for the interpretation of various types of ion beam experiments, ranging from gas phase chromatography to spectroscopic observations of fast ions in ferromagnetic media. This contribution focuses on the scattering of light projectiles ranging from He to O, that are prepared in various initial charge states, by 3d transition metal atoms. The presented computations are performed in the framework of Electron Nuclear Dynamics (END)^1 theory which incorporates the coupling between electronic and nuclear degrees of freedom without reliance on the computationally cumbersome and frequently intractable determination of potential energy surfaces. In the present application of END theory to ion - transition metal atom scattering, a supermolecule approach is utilized in conjunction with a spin-unrestricted single determinantal wave function describing the electronic system. Integral scattering, charge and spin exchange cross sections are discussed as functions of the elementary parameters of the problem, such as projectile and target atomic numbers as well as projectile charge and initial kinetic energy. ^1 E.Deumens, A.Diz, R.Longo, Y.Oehrn, Rev.Mod.Phys. 66, 917 (1994)

  18. Automated Lung Segmentation and Image Quality Assessment for Clinical 3-D/4-D-Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Li, Guang

    2014-01-01

    4-D-computed tomography (4DCT) provides not only a new dimension of patient-specific information for radiation therapy planning and treatment, but also a challenging scale of data volume to process and analyze. Manual analysis using existing 3-D tools is unable to keep up with vastly increased 4-D data volume, automated processing and analysis are thus needed to process 4DCT data effectively and efficiently. In this paper, we applied ideas and algorithms from image/signal processing, computer vision, and machine learning to 4DCT lung data so that lungs can be reliably segmented in a fully automated manner, lung features can be visualized and measured on the fly via user interactions, and data quality classifications can be computed in a robust manner. Comparisons of our results with an established treatment planning system and calculation by experts demonstrated negligible discrepancies (within ±2%) for volume assessment but one to two orders of magnitude performance enhancement. An empirical Fourier-analysis-based quality measure-delivered performances closely emulating human experts. Three machine learners are inspected to justify the viability of machine learning techniques used to robustly identify data quality of 4DCT images in the scalable manner. The resultant system provides a toolkit that speeds up 4-D tasks in the clinic and facilitates clinical research to improve current clinical practice. PMID:25621194

  19. A Fast Full Tensor Gravity computation algorithm for High Resolution 3D Geologic Interpretations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayaram, V.; Crain, K.; Keller, G. R.

    2011-12-01

    We present an algorithm to rapidly calculate the vertical gravity and full tensor gravity (FTG) values due to a 3-D geologic model. This algorithm can be implemented on single, multi-core CPU and graphical processing units (GPU) architectures. Our technique is based on the line element approximation with a constant density within each grid cell. This type of parameterization is well suited for high-resolution elevation datasets with grid size typically in the range of 1m to 30m. The large high-resolution data grids in our studies employ a pre-filtered mipmap pyramid type representation for the grid data known as the Geometry clipmap. The clipmap was first introduced by Microsoft Research in 2004 to do fly-through terrain visualization. This method caches nested rectangular extents of down-sampled data layers in the pyramid to create view-dependent calculation scheme. Together with the simple grid structure, this allows the gravity to be computed conveniently on-the-fly, or stored in a highly compressed format. Neither of these capabilities has previously been available. Our approach can perform rapid calculations on large topographies including crustal-scale models derived from complex geologic interpretations. For example, we used a 1KM Sphere model consisting of 105000 cells at 10m resolution with 100000 gravity stations. The line element approach took less than 90 seconds to compute the FTG and vertical gravity on an Intel Core i7 CPU at 3.07 GHz utilizing just its single core. Also, unlike traditional gravity computational algorithms, the line-element approach can calculate gravity effects at locations interior or exterior to the model. The only condition that must be met is the observation point cannot be located directly above the line element. Therefore, we perform a location test and then apply appropriate formulation to those data points. We will present and compare the computational performance of the traditional prism method versus the line element

  20. A supervisor for the successive 3D computations of magnetic, mechanical and acoustic quantities in power oil inductors and transformers

    SciTech Connect

    Reyne, G.; Magnin, H.; Berliat, G.; Clerc, C.

    1994-09-01

    A supervisor has been developed so as to allow successive 3D computations of different quantities by different softwares on the same physical problem. Noise of a given power oil transformer can be deduced from the surface vibrations of the tank. These vibrations are obtained through a mechanic computation whose Inputs are the electromagnetic forces provided . by an electromagnetic computation. Magnetic, mechanic and acoustic experimental data are compared with the results of the 3D computations. Stress Is put on the main characteristics of the supervisor such as the transfer of a given quantity from one mesh to the other.

  1. Potential hazards of viewing 3-D stereoscopic television, cinema and computer games: a review.

    PubMed

    Howarth, Peter A

    2011-03-01

    The visual stimulus provided by a 3-D stereoscopic display differs from that of the real world because the image provided to each eye is produced on a flat surface. The distance from the screen to the eye remains fixed, providing a single focal distance, but the introduction of disparity between the images allows objects to be located geometrically in front of, or behind, the screen. Unlike in the real world, the stimulus to accommodation and the stimulus to convergence do not match. Although this mismatch is used positively in some forms of Orthoptic treatment, a number of authors have suggested that it could negatively lead to the development of asthenopic symptoms. From knowledge of the zone of clear, comfortable, single binocular vision one can predict that, for people with normal binocular vision, adverse symptoms will not be present if the discrepancy is small, but are likely if it is large, and that what constitutes 'large' and 'small' are idiosyncratic to the individual. The accommodation-convergence mismatch is not, however, the only difference between the natural and the artificial stimuli. In the former case, an object located in front of, or behind, a fixated object will not only be perceived as double if the images fall outside Panum's fusional areas, but it will also be defocused and blurred. In the latter case, however, it is usual for the producers of cinema, TV or computer game content to provide an image that is in focus over the whole of the display, and as a consequence diplopic images will be sharply in focus. The size of Panum's fusional area is spatial frequency-dependent, and because of this the high spatial frequencies present in the diplopic 3-D image will provide a different stimulus to the fusion system from that found naturally.

  2. 3-D Computational Modelling of Oblique Continental Collision near South Island, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karatun, L.; Pysklywec, R. N.

    2015-12-01

    The research explores the highly oblique continental convergence at the South Island of New Zealand, considering the fundamental geodynamic mechanisms of sub-crustal lithospheric deformation during the orogenesis. In addition to the high velocity of along-strike plate motion, the oppositely verging subduction zones bounding the collision make the problem inherently three-dimensional. To study such factors during orogenesis, we conduct 3D computational modelling and present the results of a series of new experiments configured for the oblique South Island collision. The geodynamic modelling uses ASPECT - a robust highly-scalable and extendable geodynamic code featuring adaptive mesh refinement and complex rheologies. The model domain is defined by a box with prescribed velocities on the left and right faces with varied ratio of convergent versus strike-slip components, periodic boundary conditions for the front and back faces, free surface on top, and free slip at the bottom. Two different rheology types are used: brittle (pressure-, strain rate-, and material strength-dependent) for crust and visco-plastic (temperature-, pressure- and strain rate-dependent) for mantle. The obtained results provide insight into the behaviour of the lithosphere under the situation of young oblique convergence. We focus on the development of the mantle lithosphere, considering how the morphology of the sub-crustal orogenic root evolves during the convergent/strike-slip plate motions. The numerical experiments explore the dependence of this process on such factors as ratio of convergent versus strike-slip motion at the plate boundary, and rheological parameters of crust and mantle. The behaviour of the crust is also tracked to determine how the deep 3D tectonics may manifest at the surface.

  3. Parallel computing simulation of electrical excitation and conduction in the 3D human heart.

    PubMed

    Di Yu; Dongping Du; Hui Yang; Yicheng Tu

    2014-01-01

    A correctly beating heart is important to ensure adequate circulation of blood throughout the body. Normal heart rhythm is produced by the orchestrated conduction of electrical signals throughout the heart. Cardiac electrical activity is the resulted function of a series of complex biochemical-mechanical reactions, which involves transportation and bio-distribution of ionic flows through a variety of biological ion channels. Cardiac arrhythmias are caused by the direct alteration of ion channel activity that results in changes in the AP waveform. In this work, we developed a whole-heart simulation model with the use of massive parallel computing with GPGPU and OpenGL. The simulation algorithm was implemented under several different versions for the purpose of comparisons, including one conventional CPU version and two GPU versions based on Nvidia CUDA platform. OpenGL was utilized for the visualization / interaction platform because it is open source, light weight and universally supported by various operating systems. The experimental results show that the GPU-based simulation outperforms the conventional CPU-based approach and significantly improves the speed of simulation. By adopting modern computer architecture, this present investigation enables real-time simulation and visualization of electrical excitation and conduction in the large and complicated 3D geometry of a real-world human heart.

  4. Parallel 3D computation of unsteady wake flows with complex geometries and fluid-structure interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osawa, Yasuo

    New powerful parallel computational tools are developed for 3D simulation of unsteady wake flows with complex geometries and fluid-structure interactions. The base method for flow simulation is a finite element formulation for the Navier-Stokes equations. The finite element formulation is based on the streamline-upwind/Petrov-Galerkin (SUPG) and pressure-stabilizing/Petrov-Galerkin (PSPG) techniques. These stabilization techniques facilitate simulation of flows with high Reynolds numbers, and allow us to use equal-order interpolation functions for velocity and pressure without generating numerical oscillations. A multi-domain computational method is developed to simulate wake flow both in the near and far downstream. The formulations lead to coupled nonlinear equation systems which are solved, at every time step, with the Newton-Raphson method. The overall formulation and solution techniques are implemented on parallel platforms such as the CRAY T3E and SGI PowerChallenge. Two phases of vortex shedding for flow past a cylinder is simulated to verify the accuracy of this method. The Enhanced-Discretization Interface Capturing Technique (EDICT) is utilized to simulate wake flow accurately. Fluid-structure coupling solution method based on the Deforming-Spatial-Domain/Stabilized Space-Time (DSD/SST) formulation is applied to simulate a parachute behavior in the unsteady wake.

  5. Toward virtual anatomy: a stereoscopic 3-D interactive multimedia computer program for cranial osteology.

    PubMed

    Trelease, R B

    1996-01-01

    Advances in computer visualization and user interface technologies have enabled development of "virtual reality" programs that allow users to perceive and to interact with objects in artificial three-dimensional environments. Such technologies were used to create an image database and program for studying the human skull, a specimen that has become increasingly expensive and scarce. Stereoscopic image pairs of a museum-quality skull were digitized from multiple views. For each view, the stereo pairs were interlaced into a single, field-sequential stereoscopic picture using an image processing program. The resulting interlaced image files are organized in an interactive multimedia program. At run-time, gray-scale 3-D images are displayed on a large-screen computer monitor and observed through liquid-crystal shutter goggles. Users can then control the program and change views with a mouse and cursor to point-and-click on screen-level control words ("buttons"). For each view of the skull, an ID control button can be used to overlay pointers and captions for important structures. Pointing and clicking on "hidden buttons" overlying certain structures triggers digitized audio spoken word descriptions or mini lectures.

  6. Multiple capture locations for 3D ultrasound-guided robotic retrieval of moving bodies from a beating heart

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thienphrapa, Paul; Ramachandran, Bharat; Elhawary, Haytham; Taylor, Russell H.; Popovic, Aleksandra

    2012-02-01

    Free moving bodies in the heart pose a serious health risk as they may be released in the arteries causing blood flow disruption. These bodies may be the result of various medical conditions and trauma. The conventional approach to removing these objects involves open surgery with sternotomy, the use of cardiopulmonary bypass, and a wide resection of the heart muscle. We advocate a minimally invasive surgical approach using a flexible robotic end effector guided by 3D transesophageal echocardiography. In a phantom study, we track a moving body in a beating heart using a modified normalized cross-correlation method, with mean RMS errors of 2.3 mm. We previously found the foreign body motion to be fast and abrupt, rendering infeasible a retrieval method based on direct tracking. We proposed a strategy based on guiding a robot to the most spatially probable location of the fragment and securing it upon its reentry to said location. To improve efficacy in the context of a robotic retrieval system, we extend this approach by exploring multiple candidate capture locations. Salient locations are identified based on spatial probability, dwell time, and visit frequency; secondary locations are also examined. Aggregate results indicate that the location of highest spatial probability (50% occupancy) is distinct from the longest-dwelled location (0.84 seconds). Such metrics are vital in informing the design of a retrieval system and capture strategies, and they can be computed intraoperatively to select the best capture location based on constraints such as workspace, time, and device manipulability. Given the complex nature of fragment motion, the ability to analyze multiple capture locations is a desirable capability in an interventional system.

  7. 3D printing meets computational astrophysics: deciphering the structure of η Carinae's inner colliding winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madura, T. I.; Clementel, N.; Gull, T. R.; Kruip, C. J. H.; Paardekooper, J.-P.

    2015-06-01

    We present the first 3D prints of output from a supercomputer simulation of a complex astrophysical system, the colliding stellar winds in the massive (≳120 M⊙), highly eccentric (e ˜ 0.9) binary star system η Carinae. We demonstrate the methodology used to incorporate 3D interactive figures into a PDF (Portable Document Format) journal publication and the benefits of using 3D visualization and 3D printing as tools to analyse data from multidimensional numerical simulations. Using a consumer-grade 3D printer (MakerBot Replicator 2X), we successfully printed 3D smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations of η Carinae's inner (r ˜ 110 au) wind-wind collision interface at multiple orbital phases. The 3D prints and visualizations reveal important, previously unknown `finger-like' structures at orbital phases shortly after periastron (φ ˜ 1.045) that protrude radially outwards from the spiral wind-wind collision region. We speculate that these fingers are related to instabilities (e.g. thin-shell, Rayleigh-Taylor) that arise at the interface between the radiatively cooled layer of dense post-shock primary-star wind and the fast (3000 km s-1), adiabatic post-shock companion-star wind. The success of our work and easy identification of previously unrecognized physical features highlight the important role 3D printing and interactive graphics can play in the visualization and understanding of complex 3D time-dependent numerical simulations of astrophysical phenomena.

  8. A new approach of building 3D visualization framework for multimodal medical images display and computed assisted diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhenwei; Sun, Jianyong; Zhang, Jianguo

    2012-02-01

    As more and more CT/MR studies are scanning with larger volume of data sets, more and more radiologists and clinician would like using PACS WS to display and manipulate these larger data sets of images with 3D rendering features. In this paper, we proposed a design method and implantation strategy to develop 3D image display component not only with normal 3D display functions but also with multi-modal medical image fusion as well as compute-assisted diagnosis of coronary heart diseases. The 3D component has been integrated into the PACS display workstation of Shanghai Huadong Hospital, and the clinical practice showed that it is easy for radiologists and physicians to use these 3D functions such as multi-modalities' (e.g. CT, MRI, PET, SPECT) visualization, registration and fusion, and the lesion quantitative measurements. The users were satisfying with the rendering speeds and quality of 3D reconstruction. The advantages of the component include low requirements for computer hardware, easy integration, reliable performance and comfortable application experience. With this system, the radiologists and the clinicians can manipulate with 3D images easily, and use the advanced visualization tools to facilitate their work with a PACS display workstation at any time.

  9. 3-D visualization and identification of biological microorganisms using partially temporal incoherent light in-line computational holographic imaging.

    PubMed

    Moon, Inkyu; Javidi, Bahram

    2008-12-01

    We present a new method for three-dimensional (3-D) visualization and identification of biological microorganisms using partially temporal incoherent light in-line (PTILI) computational holographic imaging and multivariate statistical methods. For 3-D data acquisition of biological microorganisms, the band-pass filtered white light is used to illuminate a biological sample. The transversely and longitudinally diffracted pattern of the biological sample is magnified by microscope objective (MO) and is optically recorded with an image sensor array interfaced with a computer. Three-dimensional reconstruction of the biological sample from the diffraction pattern is accomplished by using computational Fresnel propagation method. Principal components analysis and nonparametric inference algorithms are applied to the 3-D complex amplitude biological sample for identification purposes. Experiments indicate that the proposed system can be useful for identifying biological microorganisms. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on using PTILI computational holographic microscopy for identification of biological microorganisms.

  10. Real-time 3D computed tomographic reconstruction using commodity graphics hardware

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Fang; Mueller, Klaus

    2007-07-01

    The recent emergence of various types of flat-panel x-ray detectors and C-arm gantries now enables the construction of novel imaging platforms for a wide variety of clinical applications. Many of these applications require interactive 3D image generation, which cannot be satisfied with inexpensive PC-based solutions using the CPU. We present a solution based on commodity graphics hardware (GPUs) to provide these capabilities. While GPUs have been employed for CT reconstruction before, our approach provides significant speedups by exploiting the various built-in hardwired graphics pipeline components for the most expensive CT reconstruction task, backprojection. We show that the timings so achieved are superior to those obtained when using the GPU merely as a multi-processor, without a drop in reconstruction quality. In addition, we also show how the data flow across the graphics pipeline can be optimized, by balancing the load among the pipeline components. The result is a novel streaming CT framework that conceptualizes the reconstruction process as a steady flow of data across a computing pipeline, updating the reconstruction result immediately after the projections have been acquired. Using a single PC equipped with a single high-end commodity graphics board (the Nvidia 8800 GTX), our system is able to process clinically-sized projection data at speeds meeting and exceeding the typical flat-panel detector data production rates, enabling throughput rates of 40-50 projections s-1 for the reconstruction of 5123 volumes.

  11. Computer-Assisted 3D Kinematic Analysis of All Leg Joints in Walking Insects

    PubMed Central

    Bender, John A.; Simpson, Elaine M.; Ritzmann, Roy E.

    2010-01-01

    High-speed video can provide fine-scaled analysis of animal behavior. However, extracting behavioral data from video sequences is a time-consuming, tedious, subjective task. These issues are exacerbated where accurate behavioral descriptions require analysis of multiple points in three dimensions. We describe a new computer program written to assist a user in simultaneously extracting three-dimensional kinematics of multiple points on each of an insect's six legs. Digital video of a walking cockroach was collected in grayscale at 500 fps from two synchronized, calibrated cameras. We improved the legs' visibility by painting white dots on the joints, similar to techniques used for digitizing human motion. Compared to manual digitization of 26 points on the legs over a single, 8-second bout of walking (or 106,496 individual 3D points), our software achieved approximately 90% of the accuracy with 10% of the labor. Our experimental design reduced the complexity of the tracking problem by tethering the insect and allowing it to walk in place on a lightly oiled glass surface, but in principle, the algorithms implemented are extensible to free walking. Our software is free and open-source, written in the free language Python and including a graphical user interface for configuration and control. We encourage collaborative enhancements to make this tool both better and widely utilized. PMID:21049024

  12. GBM Volumetry using the 3D Slicer Medical Image Computing Platform

    PubMed Central

    Egger, Jan; Kapur, Tina; Fedorov, Andriy; Pieper, Steve; Miller, James V.; Veeraraghavan, Harini; Freisleben, Bernd; Golby, Alexandra J.; Nimsky, Christopher; Kikinis, Ron

    2013-01-01

    Volumetric change in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) over time is a critical factor in treatment decisions. Typically, the tumor volume is computed on a slice-by-slice basis using MRI scans obtained at regular intervals. (3D)Slicer – a free platform for biomedical research – provides an alternative to this manual slice-by-slice segmentation process, which is significantly faster and requires less user interaction. In this study, 4 physicians segmented GBMs in 10 patients, once using the competitive region-growing based GrowCut segmentation module of Slicer, and once purely by drawing boundaries completely manually on a slice-by-slice basis. Furthermore, we provide a variability analysis for three physicians for 12 GBMs. The time required for GrowCut segmentation was on an average 61% of the time required for a pure manual segmentation. A comparison of Slicer-based segmentation with manual slice-by-slice segmentation resulted in a Dice Similarity Coefficient of 88.43 ± 5.23% and a Hausdorff Distance of 2.32 ± 5.23 mm. PMID:23455483

  13. Computed Tomography 3-D Imaging of the Metal Deformation Flow Path in Friction Stir Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Judy; Beshears, Ronald; Nunes, Arthur C., Jr.

    2005-01-01

    In friction stir welding (FSW), a rotating threaded pin tool is inserted into a weld seam and literally stirs the edges of the seam together. To determine optimal processing parameters for producing a defect free weld, a better understanding of the resulting metal deformation flow path is required. Marker studies are the principal method of studying the metal deformation flow path around the FSW pin tool. In our study, we have used computed tomography (CT) scans to reveal the flow pattern of a lead wire embedded in a FSW weld seam. At the welding temperature of aluminum, the lead becomes molten and is carried with the macro-flow of the weld metal. By using CT images, a 3-dimensional (3D) image of the lead flow pattern can be reconstructed. CT imaging was found to be a convenient and comprehensive way of collecting and displaying tracer data. It marks an advance over previous more tedious and ambiguous radiographic/metallographic data collection methods.

  14. Detectability of hepatic tumors during 3D post-processed ultrafast cone-beam computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Jijo; Vogl, Thomas J.; Chacko, Annamma

    2015-10-01

    To evaluate hepatic tumor detection using ultrafast cone-beam computed tomography (UCBCT) cross-sectional and 3D post-processed image datasets. 657 patients were examined using UCBCT during hepatic transarterial chemoembolization (TACE), and data were collected retrospectively from January 2012 to September 2014. Tumor detectability, diagnostic ability, detection accuracy and sensitivity were examined for different hepatic tumors using UCBCT cross-sectional, perfusion blood volume (PBV) and UCBCT-MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) fused image datasets. Appropriate statistical tests were used to compare collected sample data. Fused image data showed the significantly higher (all P  <  0.05) diagnostic ability for hepatic tumors compared to UCBCT or PBV image data. The detectability of small hepatic tumors (<5 mm) was significantly reduced (all P  <  0.05) using UCBCT cross-sectional images compared to MRI or fused image data; however, PBV improved tumor detectability using a color display. Fused image data produced 100% tumor sensitivity due to the simultaneous availability of MRI and UCBCT information during tumor diagnosis. Fused image data produced excellent hepatic tumor sensitivity, detectability and diagnostic ability compared to other datasets assessed. Fused image data is extremely reliable and useful compared to UCBCT cross-sectional or PBV image datasets to depict hepatic tumors during TACE. Partial anatomical visualization on cross-sectional images was compensated by fused image data during tumor diagnosis.

  15. Estimating Mass Properties of Dinosaurs Using Laser Imaging and 3D Computer Modelling

    PubMed Central

    Bates, Karl T.; Manning, Phillip L.; Hodgetts, David; Sellers, William I.

    2009-01-01

    Body mass reconstructions of extinct vertebrates are most robust when complete to near-complete skeletons allow the reconstruction of either physical or digital models. Digital models are most efficient in terms of time and cost, and provide the facility to infinitely modify model properties non-destructively, such that sensitivity analyses can be conducted to quantify the effect of the many unknown parameters involved in reconstructions of extinct animals. In this study we use laser scanning (LiDAR) and computer modelling methods to create a range of 3D mass models of five specimens of non-avian dinosaur; two near-complete specimens of Tyrannosaurus rex, the most complete specimens of Acrocanthosaurus atokensis and Strutiomimum sedens, and a near-complete skeleton of a sub-adult Edmontosaurus annectens. LiDAR scanning allows a full mounted skeleton to be imaged resulting in a detailed 3D model in which each bone retains its spatial position and articulation. This provides a high resolution skeletal framework around which the body cavity and internal organs such as lungs and air sacs can be reconstructed. This has allowed calculation of body segment masses, centres of mass and moments or inertia for each animal. However, any soft tissue reconstruction of an extinct taxon inevitably represents a best estimate model with an unknown level of accuracy. We have therefore conducted an extensive sensitivity analysis in which the volumes of body segments and respiratory organs were varied in an attempt to constrain the likely maximum plausible range of mass parameters for each animal. Our results provide wide ranges in actual mass and inertial values, emphasizing the high level of uncertainty inevitable in such reconstructions. However, our sensitivity analysis consistently places the centre of mass well below and in front of hip joint in each animal, regardless of the chosen combination of body and respiratory structure volumes. These results emphasize that future

  16. Estimating mass properties of dinosaurs using laser imaging and 3D computer modelling.

    PubMed

    Bates, Karl T; Manning, Phillip L; Hodgetts, David; Sellers, William I

    2009-01-01

    Body mass reconstructions of extinct vertebrates are most robust when complete to near-complete skeletons allow the reconstruction of either physical or digital models. Digital models are most efficient in terms of time and cost, and provide the facility to infinitely modify model properties non-destructively, such that sensitivity analyses can be conducted to quantify the effect of the many unknown parameters involved in reconstructions of extinct animals. In this study we use laser scanning (LiDAR) and computer modelling methods to create a range of 3D mass models of five specimens of non-avian dinosaur; two near-complete specimens of Tyrannosaurus rex, the most complete specimens of Acrocanthosaurus atokensis and Strutiomimum sedens, and a near-complete skeleton of a sub-adult Edmontosaurus annectens. LiDAR scanning allows a full mounted skeleton to be imaged resulting in a detailed 3D model in which each bone retains its spatial position and articulation. This provides a high resolution skeletal framework around which the body cavity and internal organs such as lungs and air sacs can be reconstructed. This has allowed calculation of body segment masses, centres of mass and moments or inertia for each animal. However, any soft tissue reconstruction of an extinct taxon inevitably represents a best estimate model with an unknown level of accuracy. We have therefore conducted an extensive sensitivity analysis in which the volumes of body segments and respiratory organs were varied in an attempt to constrain the likely maximum plausible range of mass parameters for each animal. Our results provide wide ranges in actual mass and inertial values, emphasizing the high level of uncertainty inevitable in such reconstructions. However, our sensitivity analysis consistently places the centre of mass well below and in front of hip joint in each animal, regardless of the chosen combination of body and respiratory structure volumes. These results emphasize that future

  17. Estimating mass properties of dinosaurs using laser imaging and 3D computer modelling.

    PubMed

    Bates, Karl T; Manning, Phillip L; Hodgetts, David; Sellers, William I

    2009-01-01

    Body mass reconstructions of extinct vertebrates are most robust when complete to near-complete skeletons allow the reconstruction of either physical or digital models. Digital models are most efficient in terms of time and cost, and provide the facility to infinitely modify model properties non-destructively, such that sensitivity analyses can be conducted to quantify the effect of the many unknown parameters involved in reconstructions of extinct animals. In this study we use laser scanning (LiDAR) and computer modelling methods to create a range of 3D mass models of five specimens of non-avian dinosaur; two near-complete specimens of Tyrannosaurus rex, the most complete specimens of Acrocanthosaurus atokensis and Strutiomimum sedens, and a near-complete skeleton of a sub-adult Edmontosaurus annectens. LiDAR scanning allows a full mounted skeleton to be imaged resulting in a detailed 3D model in which each bone retains its spatial position and articulation. This provides a high resolution skeletal framework around which the body cavity and internal organs such as lungs and air sacs can be reconstructed. This has allowed calculation of body segment masses, centres of mass and moments or inertia for each animal. However, any soft tissue reconstruction of an extinct taxon inevitably represents a best estimate model with an unknown level of accuracy. We have therefore conducted an extensive sensitivity analysis in which the volumes of body segments and respiratory organs were varied in an attempt to constrain the likely maximum plausible range of mass parameters for each animal. Our results provide wide ranges in actual mass and inertial values, emphasizing the high level of uncertainty inevitable in such reconstructions. However, our sensitivity analysis consistently places the centre of mass well below and in front of hip joint in each animal, regardless of the chosen combination of body and respiratory structure volumes. These results emphasize that future

  18. Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... reflect off body structures. A computer receives the waves and uses them to create a picture. Unlike with an x-ray or CT scan, this test does not use ionizing radiation. The test is done in the ultrasound ...

  19. Auto-masked 2D/3D image registration and its validation with clinical cone-beam computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steininger, P.; Neuner, M.; Weichenberger, H.; Sharp, G. C.; Winey, B.; Kametriser, G.; Sedlmayer, F.; Deutschmann, H.

    2012-07-01

    Image-guided alignment procedures in radiotherapy aim at minimizing discrepancies between the planned and the real patient setup. For that purpose, we developed a 2D/3D approach which rigidly registers a computed tomography (CT) with two x-rays by maximizing the agreement in pixel intensity between the x-rays and the corresponding reconstructed radiographs from the CT. Moreover, the algorithm selects regions of interest (masks) in the x-rays based on 3D segmentations from the pre-planning stage. For validation, orthogonal x-ray pairs from different viewing directions of 80 pelvic cone-beam CT (CBCT) raw data sets were used. The 2D/3D results were compared to corresponding standard 3D/3D CBCT-to-CT alignments. Outcome over 8400 2D/3D experiments showed that parametric errors in root mean square were <0.18° (rotations) and <0.73 mm (translations), respectively, using rank correlation as intensity metric. This corresponds to a mean target registration error, related to the voxels of the lesser pelvis, of <2 mm in 94.1% of the cases. From the results we conclude that 2D/3D registration based on sequentially acquired orthogonal x-rays of the pelvis is a viable alternative to CBCT-based approaches if rigid alignment on bony anatomy is sufficient, no volumetric intra-interventional data set is required and the expected error range fits the individual treatment prescription.

  20. Computation of neutron fluxes in clusters of fuel pins arranged in hexagonal assemblies (2D and 3D)

    SciTech Connect

    Prabha, H.; Marleau, G.

    2012-07-01

    For computations of fluxes, we have used Carvik's method of collision probabilities. This method requires tracking algorithms. An algorithm to compute tracks (in 2D and 3D) has been developed for seven hexagonal geometries with cluster of fuel pins. This has been implemented in the NXT module of the code DRAGON. The flux distribution in cluster of pins has been computed by using this code. For testing the results, they are compared when possible with the EXCELT module of the code DRAGON. Tracks are plotted in the NXT module by using MATLAB, these plots are also presented here. Results are presented with increasing number of lines to show the convergence of these results. We have numerically computed volumes, surface areas and the percentage errors in these computations. These results show that 2D results converge faster than 3D results. The accuracy on the computation of fluxes up to second decimal is achieved with fewer lines. (authors)

  1. Validation of computational fluid dynamics methods with anatomically exact, 3D printed MRI phantoms and 4D pcMRI.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Jeff R; Diaz, Orlando; Klucznik, Richard; Zhang, Y Jonathan; Britz, Gavin W; Grossman, Robert G; Lv, Nan; Huang, Qinghai; Karmonik, Christof

    2014-01-01

    A new concept of rapid 3D prototyping was implemented using cost-effective 3D printing for creating anatomically correct replica of cerebral aneurysms. With a dedicated flow loop set-up in a full body human MRI scanner, flow measurements were performed using 4D phase contrast magnetic resonance imaging to visualize and quantify intra-aneurysmal flow patterns. Ultrashort TE sequences were employed to obtain high-resolution 3D image data to visualize the lumen inside the plastic replica. In-vitro results were compared with retrospectively obtained in-vivo data and results from computational fluid dynamics simulations (CFD). Rapid prototyping of anatomically realistic 3D models may have future impact in treatment planning, design of image acquisition methods for MRI and angiographic systems and for the design and testing of advanced image post-processing technologies.

  2. Computer numerical control (CNC) lithography: light-motion synchronized UV-LED lithography for 3D microfabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jungkwun; Yoon, Yong-Kyu; Allen, Mark G.

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents a computer-numerical-controlled ultraviolet light-emitting diode (CNC UV-LED) lithography scheme for three-dimensional (3D) microfabrication. The CNC lithography scheme utilizes sequential multi-angled UV light exposures along with a synchronized switchable UV light source to create arbitrary 3D light traces, which are transferred into the photosensitive resist. The system comprises a switchable, movable UV-LED array as a light source, a motorized tilt-rotational sample holder, and a computer-control unit. System operation is such that the tilt-rotational sample holder moves in a pre-programmed routine, and the UV-LED is illuminated only at desired positions of the sample holder during the desired time period, enabling the formation of complex 3D microstructures. This facilitates easy fabrication of complex 3D structures, which otherwise would have required multiple manual exposure steps as in the previous multidirectional 3D UV lithography approach. Since it is batch processed, processing time is far less than that of the 3D printing approach at the expense of some reduction in the degree of achievable 3D structure complexity. In order to produce uniform light intensity from the arrayed LED light source, the UV-LED array stage has been kept rotating during exposure. UV-LED 3D fabrication capability was demonstrated through a plurality of complex structures such as V-shaped micropillars, micropanels, a micro-‘hi’ structure, a micro-‘cat’s claw,’ a micro-‘horn,’ a micro-‘calla lily,’ a micro-‘cowboy’s hat,’ and a micro-‘table napkin’ array.

  3. Conceptual detector development and Monte Carlo simulation of a novel 3D breast computed tomography system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziegle, Jens; Müller, Bernhard H.; Neumann, Bernd; Hoeschen, Christoph

    2016-03-01

    A new 3D breast computed tomography (CT) system is under development enabling imaging of microcalcifications in a fully uncompressed breast including posterior chest wall tissue. The system setup uses a steered electron beam impinging on small tungsten targets surrounding the breast to emit X-rays. A realization of the corresponding detector concept is presented in this work and it is modeled through Monte Carlo simulations in order to quantify first characteristics of transmission and secondary photons. The modeled system comprises a vertical alignment of linear detectors hold by a case that also hosts the breast. Detectors are separated by gaps to allow the passage of X-rays towards the breast volume. The detectors located directly on the opposite side of the gaps detect incident X-rays. Mechanically moving parts in an imaging system increase the duration of image acquisition and thus can cause motion artifacts. So, a major advantage of the presented system design is the combination of the fixed detectors and the fast steering electron beam which enable a greatly reduced scan time. Thereby potential motion artifacts are reduced so that the visualization of small structures such as microcalcifications is improved. The result of the simulation of a single projection shows high attenuation by parts of the detector electronics causing low count levels at the opposing detectors which would require a flat field correction, but it also shows a secondary to transmission ratio of all counted X-rays of less than 1 percent. Additionally, a single slice with details of various sizes was reconstructed using filtered backprojection. The smallest detail which was still visible in the reconstructed image has a size of 0.2mm.

  4. 3D printing of preclinical X-ray computed tomographic data sets.

    PubMed

    Doney, Evan; Krumdick, Lauren A; Diener, Justin M; Wathen, Connor A; Chapman, Sarah E; Stamile, Brian; Scott, Jeremiah E; Ravosa, Matthew J; Van Avermaete, Tony; Leevy, W Matthew

    2013-01-01

    Three-dimensional printing allows for the production of highly detailed objects through a process known as additive manufacturing. Traditional, mold-injection methods to create models or parts have several limitations, the most important of which is a difficulty in making highly complex products in a timely, cost-effective manner.(1) However, gradual improvements in three-dimensional printing technology have resulted in both high-end and economy instruments that are now available for the facile production of customized models.(2) These printers have the ability to extrude high-resolution objects with enough detail to accurately represent in vivo images generated from a preclinical X-ray CT scanner. With proper data collection, surface rendering, and stereolithographic editing, it is now possible and inexpensive to rapidly produce detailed skeletal and soft tissue structures from X-ray CT data. Even in the early stages of development, the anatomical models produced by three-dimensional printing appeal to both educators and researchers who can utilize the technology to improve visualization proficiency. (3, 4) The real benefits of this method result from the tangible experience a researcher can have with data that cannot be adequately conveyed through a computer screen. The translation of pre-clinical 3D data to a physical object that is an exact copy of the test subject is a powerful tool for visualization and communication, especially for relating imaging research to students, or those in other fields. Here, we provide a detailed method for printing plastic models of bone and organ structures derived from X-ray CT scans utilizing an Albira X-ray CT system in conjunction with PMOD, ImageJ, Meshlab, Netfabb, and ReplicatorG software packages. PMID:23542702

  5. 3D printing of preclinical X-ray computed tomographic data sets.

    PubMed

    Doney, Evan; Krumdick, Lauren A; Diener, Justin M; Wathen, Connor A; Chapman, Sarah E; Stamile, Brian; Scott, Jeremiah E; Ravosa, Matthew J; Van Avermaete, Tony; Leevy, W Matthew

    2013-03-22

    Three-dimensional printing allows for the production of highly detailed objects through a process known as additive manufacturing. Traditional, mold-injection methods to create models or parts have several limitations, the most important of which is a difficulty in making highly complex products in a timely, cost-effective manner.(1) However, gradual improvements in three-dimensional printing technology have resulted in both high-end and economy instruments that are now available for the facile production of customized models.(2) These printers have the ability to extrude high-resolution objects with enough detail to accurately represent in vivo images generated from a preclinical X-ray CT scanner. With proper data collection, surface rendering, and stereolithographic editing, it is now possible and inexpensive to rapidly produce detailed skeletal and soft tissue structures from X-ray CT data. Even in the early stages of development, the anatomical models produced by three-dimensional printing appeal to both educators and researchers who can utilize the technology to improve visualization proficiency. (3, 4) The real benefits of this method result from the tangible experience a researcher can have with data that cannot be adequately conveyed through a computer screen. The translation of pre-clinical 3D data to a physical object that is an exact copy of the test subject is a powerful tool for visualization and communication, especially for relating imaging research to students, or those in other fields. Here, we provide a detailed method for printing plastic models of bone and organ structures derived from X-ray CT scans utilizing an Albira X-ray CT system in conjunction with PMOD, ImageJ, Meshlab, Netfabb, and ReplicatorG software packages.

  6. Improved image guidance technique for minimally invasive mitral valve repair using real-time tracked 3D ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rankin, Adam; Moore, John; Bainbridge, Daniel; Peters, Terry

    2016-03-01

    In the past ten years, numerous new surgical and interventional techniques have been developed for treating heart valve disease without the need for cardiopulmonary bypass. Heart valve repair is now being performed in a blood-filled environment, reinforcing the need for accurate and intuitive imaging techniques. Previous work has demonstrated how augmenting ultrasound with virtual representations of specific anatomical landmarks can greatly simplify interventional navigation challenges and increase patient safety. These techniques often complicate interventions by requiring additional steps taken to manually define and initialize virtual models. Furthermore, overlaying virtual elements into real-time image data can also obstruct the view of salient image information. To address these limitations, a system was developed that uses real-time volumetric ultrasound alongside magnetically tracked tools presented in an augmented virtuality environment to provide a streamlined navigation guidance platform. In phantom studies simulating a beating-heart navigation task, procedure duration and tool path metrics have achieved comparable performance to previous work in augmented virtuality techniques, and considerable improvement over standard of care ultrasound guidance.

  7. Development, Verification and Use of Gust Modeling in the NASA Computational Fluid Dynamics Code FUN3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartels, Robert E.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the implementation of gust modeling capability in the CFD code FUN3D. The gust capability is verified by computing the response of an airfoil to a sharp edged gust. This result is compared with the theoretical result. The present simulations will be compared with other CFD gust simulations. This paper also serves as a users manual for FUN3D gust analyses using a variety of gust profiles. Finally, the development of an Auto-Regressive Moving-Average (ARMA) reduced order gust model using a gust with a Gaussian profile in the FUN3D code is presented. ARMA simulated results of a sequence of one-minus-cosine gusts is shown to compare well with the same gust profile computed with FUN3D. Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD) is combined with the ARMA modeling technique to predict the time varying pressure coefficient increment distribution due to a novel gust profile. The aeroelastic response of a pitch/plunge airfoil to a gust environment is computed with a reduced order model, and compared with a direct simulation of the system in the FUN3D code. The two results are found to agree very well.

  8. A comparison of needle tip localization accuracy using 2D and 3D trans-rectal ultrasound for high-dose-rate prostate cancer brachytherapy treatment planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hrinivich, W. Thomas; Hoover, Douglas A.; Surry, Kathleen; Edirisinghe, Chandima; Montreuil, Jacques; D'Souza, David; Fenster, Aaron; Wong, Eugene

    2016-03-01

    Background: High-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT) is a prostate cancer treatment option involving the insertion of hollow needles into the gland through the perineum to deliver a radioactive source. Conventional needle imaging involves indexing a trans-rectal ultrasound (TRUS) probe in the superior/inferior (S/I) direction, using the axial transducer to produce an image set for organ segmentation. These images have limited resolution in the needle insertion direction (S/I), so the sagittal transducer is used to identify needle tips, requiring a manual registration with the axial view. This registration introduces a source of uncertainty in the final segmentations and subsequent treatment plan. Our lab has developed a device enabling 3D-TRUS guided insertions with high S/I spatial resolution, eliminating the need to align axial and sagittal views. Purpose: To compare HDR-BT needle tip localization accuracy between 2D and 3D-TRUS. Methods: 5 prostate cancer patients underwent conventional 2D TRUS guided HDR-BT, during which 3D images were also acquired for post-operative registration and segmentation. Needle end-length measurements were taken, providing a gold standard for insertion depths. Results: 73 needles were analyzed from all 5 patients. Needle tip position differences between imaging techniques was found to be largest in the S/I direction with mean+/-SD of -2.5+/-4.0 mm. End-length measurements indicated that 3D TRUS provided statistically significantly lower mean+/-SD insertion depth error of -0.2+/-3.4 mm versus 2.3+/-3.7 mm with 2D guidance (p < .001). Conclusions: 3D TRUS may provide more accurate HDR-BT needle localization than conventional 2D TRUS guidance for the majority of HDR-BT needles.

  9. User's Guide for Subroutine PLOT3D. Physical Processes in Terrestrial and Aquatic Ecosystems, Computer Programs and Graphics Capabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gales, Larry

    This module is part of a series designed to be used by life science students for instruction in the application of physical theory to ecosystem operation. Most modules contain computer programs which are built around a particular application of a physical process. PLOT3D is a subroutine package which generates a variety of three dimensional hidden…

  10. DEVELOPMENT OF 3-D COMPUTER MODELS OF HUMAN LUNG MORPHOLOGY FOR IMPROOVED RISK ASSESSMENT OF INHALED PARTICULATE MATTER

    EPA Science Inventory

    DEVELOPMENT OF 3-D COMPUTER MODELS OF HUMAN LUNG MORPHOLOGY FOR IMPROVED RISK ASSESSMENT OF INHALED PARTICULATE MATTER

    Jeffry D. Schroeter, Curriculum in Toxicology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599; Ted B. Martonen, ETD, NHEERL, USEPA, RTP, NC 27711; Do...

  11. Programmer's Guide for Subroutine PRNT3D. Physical Processes in Terrestrial and Aquatic Ecosystems, Computer Programs and Graphics Capabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gales, Larry

    These materials were designed to be used by life science students for instruction in the application of physical theory to ecosystem operation. Most modules contain computer programs which are built around a particular application of a physical process. PRNT3D is a subroutine package which generates a variety of printed plot displays. The displays…

  12. User's Guide for Subroutine PRNT3D. Physical Processes in Terrestrial and Aquatic Ecosystems, Computer Programs and Graphics Capabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gales, Larry

    These materials were designed to be used by life science students for instruction in the application of physical theory to ecosystem operation. Most modules contain computer programs which are built around a particular application of a physical process. PRNT3D is a subroutine package which generates a variety of printer plot displays. The displays…

  13. Programmer's Guide for Subroutine PLOT3D. Physical Processes in Terrestrial and Aquatic Ecosystems, Computer Programs and Graphics Capabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gales, Larry

    This module is part of a series designed to be used by life science students for instruction in the application of physical theory to ecosystem operation. Most modules contain computer programs which are built around a particular application of a physical process. PLOT3D is a subroutine package which generates a variety of three-dimensional hidden…

  14. A collaborative computing framework of cloud network and WBSN applied to fall detection and 3-D motion reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Lai, Chin-Feng; Chen, Min; Pan, Jeng-Shyang; Youn, Chan-Hyun; Chao, Han-Chieh

    2014-03-01

    As cloud computing and wireless body sensor network technologies become gradually developed, ubiquitous healthcare services prevent accidents instantly and effectively, as well as provides relevant information to reduce related processing time and cost. This study proposes a co-processing intermediary framework integrated cloud and wireless body sensor networks, which is mainly applied to fall detection and 3-D motion reconstruction. In this study, the main focuses includes distributed computing and resource allocation of processing sensing data over the computing architecture, network conditions and performance evaluation. Through this framework, the transmissions and computing time of sensing data are reduced to enhance overall performance for the services of fall events detection and 3-D motion reconstruction.

  15. 3D Printing Meets Computational Astrophysics: Deciphering the Structure of Eta Carinae’s Colliding Winds Using 3D Prints of Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madura, Thomas; Gull, Theodore R.; Clementel, Nicola; Paardekooper, Jan-Pieter; Kruip, Chael; Corcoran, Michael F.; Hamaguchi, Kenji; Teodoro, Mairan

    2015-01-01

    We present the first 3D prints of output from a supercomputer simulation of a complex astrophysical system, the colliding stellar winds in the massive (>120 MSun), highly eccentric (e ~ 0.9) binary Eta Carinae. Using a consumer-grade 3D printer (Makerbot Replicator 2X), we successfully printed 3D smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations of Eta Carinae's inner (r ~110 AU) wind-wind collision interface at multiple orbital phases. These 3D prints reveal important, previously unknown 'finger-like' structures at orbital phases shortly after periastron (φ ~1.045) that protrude radially outward from the spiral wind-wind collision region. We speculate that these fingers are related to instabilities (e.g. Rayleigh-Taylor) that arise at the interface between the radiatively-cooled layer of dense post-shock primary-star wind and the hot, adiabatic post-shock companion-star wind. The success of our work and easy identification of previously unknown physical features highlight the important role 3D printing can play in the visualization and understanding of complex 3D time-dependent numerical simulations of astrophysical phenomena.

  16. Comparison of Computational Aeroacoustics Prediction of Acoustic Transmission Through a 3D Stator with Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hixon, Ray; Envia, Edmane; Dahl, Milo; Sutliff, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, numerical predictions of acoustic transmission through a 3D stator obtained using the NASA BASS code are compared with experimentally measured data. The influence of vane count and stagger as well as frequency and mode order on the transmission loss is investigated. The data-theory comparisons indicate that BASS can predict all the important trends observed in the experimental data.

  17. Comparison of Computational Aeroacoustics Prediction of Acoustic Transmission Through a 3D Stator With Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hixon, Ray; Envia, Edmane; Dahl, Milo; Sutliff, Daniel L.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, numerical predictions of acoustic transmission through a 3D stator obtained using the NASA BASS code are compared with experimentally measured data. The influence of vane count and stagger as well as frequency and mode order on the transmission loss is investigated. The data-theory comparisons indicate that BASS can predict all the important trends observed in the experimental data.

  18. Grid-Adapted FUN3D Computations for the Second High Lift Prediction Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee-Rausch, E. M.; Rumsey, C. L.; Park, M. A.

    2014-01-01

    Contributions of the unstructured Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes code FUN3D to the 2nd AIAA CFD High Lift Prediction Workshop are described, and detailed comparisons are made with experimental data. Using workshop-supplied grids, results for the clean wing configuration are compared with results from the structured code CFL3D Using the same turbulence model, both codes compare reasonably well in terms of total forces and moments, and the maximum lift is similarly over-predicted for both codes compared to experiment. By including more representative geometry features such as slat and flap brackets and slat pressure tube bundles, FUN3D captures the general effects of the Reynolds number variation, but under-predicts maximum lift on workshop-supplied grids in comparison with the experimental data, due to excessive separation. However, when output-based, off-body grid adaptation in FUN3D is employed, results improve considerably. In particular, when the geometry includes both brackets and the pressure tube bundles, grid adaptation results in a more accurate prediction of lift near stall in comparison with the wind-tunnel data. Furthermore, a rotation-corrected turbulence model shows improved pressure predictions on the outboard span when using adapted grids.

  19. TBIEM3D: A Computer Program for Predicting Ducted Fan Engine Noise. Version 1.1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunn, M. H.

    1997-01-01

    This document describes the usage of the ducted fan noise prediction program TBIEM3D (Thin duct - Boundary Integral Equation Method - 3 Dimensional). A scattering approach is adopted in which the acoustic pressure field is split into known incident and unknown scattered parts. The scattering of fan-generated noise by a finite length circular cylinder in a uniform flow field is considered. The fan noise is modeled by a collection of spinning point thrust dipoles. The program, based on a Boundary Integral Equation Method (BIEM), calculates circumferential modal coefficients of the acoustic pressure at user-specified field locations. The duct interior can be of the hard wall type or lined. The duct liner is axisymmetric, locally reactive, and can be uniform or axially segmented. TBIEM3D is written in the FORTRAN programming language. Input to TBIEM3D is minimal and consists of geometric and kinematic parameters. Discretization and numerical parameters are determined automatically by the code. Several examples are presented to demonstrate TBIEM3D capabilities.

  20. Development and validation of a multiecho computer simulation of ultrasound propagation through cancellous bone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langton, Christian; Church, Luke

    2002-05-01

    Cancellous bone consists of a porous open-celled framework of trabeculae interspersed with marrow. Although the measurement of broadband ultrasound attenuation (BUA) has been shown to be sensitive to osteoporotic changes, the exact dependence on material and structural parameters has not been elucidated. A 3-D computer simulation of ultrasound propagation through cancellous bone has been developed, based upon simple reflective behavior at the multitude of trabecular/marrow interfaces. A cancellous bone framework is initially described by an array of bone and marrow elements. An ultrasound pulse is launched along each row of the model with partial reflection occurring at each bone/marrow interface. If a reverse direction wave hits an interface, a further forward (echo) wave is created, with phase inversion implemented if appropriate. This process is monitored for each wave within each row. The effective received signal is created by summing the time domain data, thus simulating detection by a phase-sensitive ultrasound transducer, as incorporated in clinical systems. The simulation has been validated on a hexagonal honeycomb design of variable mesh size, first against a commercial computer simulation solution (Wave 2000 Pro), and second, via experimental measurement of physical replicas produced by stereolithography.

  1. Computer-aided diagnosis of pulmonary nodules on CT scans: Segmentation and classification using 3D active contours

    PubMed Central

    Way, Ted W.; Hadjiiski, Lubomir M.; Sahiner, Berkman; Chan, Heang-Ping; Cascade, Philip N.; Kazerooni, Ella A.; Bogot, Naama; Zhou, Chuan

    2009-01-01

    We are developing a computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) system to classify malignant and benign lung nodules found on CT scans. A fully automated system was designed to segment the nodule from its surrounding structured background in a local volume of interest (VOI) and to extract image features for classification. Image segmentation was performed with a three-dimensional (3D) active contour (AC) method. A data set of 96 lung nodules (44 malignant, 52 benign) from 58 patients was used in this study. The 3D AC model is based on two-dimensional AC with the addition of three new energy components to take advantage of 3D information: (1) 3D gradient, which guides the active contour to seek the object surface, (2) 3D curvature, which imposes a smoothness constraint in the z direction, and (3) mask energy, which penalizes contours that grow beyond the pleura or thoracic wall. The search for the best energy weights in the 3D AC model was guided by a simplex optimization method. Morphological and gray-level features were extracted from the segmented nodule. The rubber band straightening transform (RBST) was applied to the shell of voxels surrounding the nodule. Texture features based on run-length statistics were extracted from the RBST image. A linear discriminant analysis classifier with stepwise feature selection was designed using a second simplex optimization to select the most effective features. Leave-one-case-out resampling was used to train and test the CAD system. The system achieved a test area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (Az) of 0.83±0.04. Our preliminary results indicate that use of the 3D AC model and the 3D texture features surrounding the nodule is a promising approach to the segmentation and classification of lung nodules with CAD. The segmentation performance of the 3D AC model trained with our data set was evaluated with 23 nodules available in the Lung Image Database Consortium (LIDC). The lung nodule volumes segmented by the 3D AC

  2. GeoBuilder: a geometric algorithm visualization and debugging system for 2D and 3D geometric computing.

    PubMed

    Wei, Jyh-Da; Tsai, Ming-Hung; Lee, Gen-Cher; Huang, Jeng-Hung; Lee, Der-Tsai

    2009-01-01

    Algorithm visualization is a unique research topic that integrates engineering skills such as computer graphics, system programming, database management, computer networks, etc., to facilitate algorithmic researchers in testing their ideas, demonstrating new findings, and teaching algorithm design in the classroom. Within the broad applications of algorithm visualization, there still remain performance issues that deserve further research, e.g., system portability, collaboration capability, and animation effect in 3D environments. Using modern technologies of Java programming, we develop an algorithm visualization and debugging system, dubbed GeoBuilder, for geometric computing. The GeoBuilder system features Java's promising portability, engagement of collaboration in algorithm development, and automatic camera positioning for tracking 3D geometric objects. In this paper, we describe the design of the GeoBuilder system and demonstrate its applications. PMID:19147888

  3. Generating 3D anatomically detailed models of the retina from OCT data sets: implications for computational modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shalbaf, Farzaneh; Dokos, Socrates; Lovell, Nigel H.; Turuwhenua, Jason; Vaghefi, Ehsan

    2015-12-01

    Retinal prosthesis has been proposed to restore vision for those suffering from the retinal pathologies that mainly affect the photoreceptors layer but keep the inner retina intact. Prior to costly risky experimental studies computational modelling of the retina will help to optimize the device parameters and enhance the outcomes. Here, we developed an anatomically detailed computational model of the retina based on OCT data sets. The consecutive OCT images of individual were subsequently segmented to provide a 3D representation of retina in the form of finite elements. Thereafter, the electrical properties of the retina were modelled by implementing partial differential equation on the 3D mesh. Different electrode configurations, that is bipolar and hexapolar configurations, were implemented and the results were compared with the previous computational and experimental studies. Furthermore, the possible effects of the curvature of retinal layers on the current steering through the retina were proposed and linked to the clinical observations.

  4. A review of computer-aided body surface area determination: SAGE II and EPRI's 3D Burn Vision.

    PubMed

    Neuwalder, J M; Sampson, C; Breuing, K H; Orgill, D P

    2002-01-01

    Estimates of percent body surface area (%BSA) burns correlate well with fluid needs, nutritional requirements, and prognosis. Most burn centers rely on the Lund Browder chart and "rule of nines," to calculate the %BSA. Computer-based methods may improve precision and data analysis. We studied two new methods of determining %BSA: a two-dimensional Web-based program (Sage II) and a three-dimensional computer-aided design program (EPRI 3D Burn Vision). Members of our burn team found the Sage II program easy to use and found many of the features useful for patient care. The EPRI program has the advantage of 3D images and different body morphologies but required training to use. Computer-aided methods offer the potential for improved precision and data analysis of %BSA measurements.

  5. Technical Note: Guidelines for the digital computation of 2D and 3D enamel thickness in hominoid teeth.

    PubMed

    Benazzi, Stefano; Panetta, Daniele; Fornai, Cinzia; Toussaint, Michel; Gruppioni, Giorgio; Hublin, Jean-Jacques

    2014-02-01

    The study of enamel thickness has received considerable attention in regard to the taxonomic, phylogenetic and dietary assessment of human and non-human primates. Recent developments based on two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) digital techniques have facilitated accurate analyses, preserving the original object from invasive procedures. Various digital protocols have been proposed. These include several procedures based on manual handling of the virtual models and technical shortcomings, which prevent other scholars from confidently reproducing the entire digital protocol. There is a compelling need for standard, reproducible, and well-tailored protocols for the digital analysis of 2D and 3D dental enamel thickness. In this contribution we provide essential guidelines for the digital computation of 2D and 3D enamel thickness in hominoid molars, premolars, canines and incisors. We modify previous techniques suggested for 2D analysis and we develop a new approach for 3D analysis that can also be applied to premolars and anterior teeth. For each tooth class, the cervical line should be considered as the fundamental morphological feature both to isolate the crown from the root (for 3D analysis) and to define the direction of the cross-sections (for 2D analysis).

  6. A computational model that recovers the 3D shape of an object from a single 2D retinal representation.

    PubMed

    Li, Yunfeng; Pizlo, Zygmunt; Steinman, Robert M

    2009-05-01

    Human beings perceive 3D shapes veridically, but the underlying mechanisms remain unknown. The problem of producing veridical shape percepts is computationally difficult because the 3D shapes have to be recovered from 2D retinal images. This paper describes a new model, based on a regularization approach, that does this very well. It uses a new simplicity principle composed of four shape constraints: viz., symmetry, planarity, maximum compactness and minimum surface. Maximum compactness and minimum surface have never been used before. The model was tested with random symmetrical polyhedra. It recovered their 3D shapes from a single randomly-chosen 2D image. Neither learning, nor depth perception, was required. The effectiveness of the maximum compactness and the minimum surface constraints were measured by how well the aspect ratio of the 3D shapes was recovered. These constraints were effective; they recovered the aspect ratio of the 3D shapes very well. Aspect ratios recovered by the model were compared to aspect ratios adjusted by four human observers. They also adjusted aspect ratios very well. In those rare cases, in which the human observers showed large errors in adjusted aspect ratios, their errors were very similar to the errors made by the model. PMID:18621410

  7. Computer-aided multiple-head 3D printing system for printing of heterogeneous organ/tissue constructs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Jin Woo; Lee, Jung-Seob; Cho, Dong-Woo

    2016-02-01

    Recently, much attention has focused on replacement or/and enhancement of biological tissues via the use of cell-laden hydrogel scaffolds with an architecture that mimics the tissue matrix, and with the desired three-dimensional (3D) external geometry. However, mimicking the heterogeneous tissues that most organs and tissues are formed of is challenging. Although multiple-head 3D printing systems have been proposed for fabricating heterogeneous cell-laden hydrogel scaffolds, to date only the simple exterior form has been realized. Here we describe a computer-aided design and manufacturing (CAD/CAM) system for this application. We aim to develop an algorithm to enable easy, intuitive design and fabrication of a heterogeneous cell-laden hydrogel scaffolds with a free-form 3D geometry. The printing paths of the scaffold are automatically generated from the 3D CAD model, and the scaffold is then printed by dispensing four materials; i.e., a frame, two kinds of cell-laden hydrogel and a support. We demonstrated printing of heterogeneous tissue models formed of hydrogel scaffolds using this approach, including the outer ear, kidney and tooth tissue. These results indicate that this approach is particularly promising for tissue engineering and 3D printing applications to regenerate heterogeneous organs and tissues with tailored geometries to treat specific defects or injuries.

  8. Classification and quantification of pore shapes in sandstone reservoir rocks with 3-D X-ray micro-computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, M.; Halisch, M.; Müller, C.; Fernandes, C. P.

    2015-12-01

    Recent years have seen a growing interest in the characterization of the pore morphologies of reservoir rocks and how the spatial organization of pore traits affects the macro behaviour of rock-fluid systems. With the availability of 3-D high-resolution imaging (e.g. μ-CT), the detailed quantification of particle shapes has been facilitated by progress in computer science. Here, we show how the shapes of irregular rock particles (pores) can be classified and quantified based on binary 3-D images. The methodology requires the measurement of basic 3-D particle descriptors and a shape classification that involves the similarity of artificial objects, which is based on main pore network detachments and 3-D sample sizes. The results were validated for three sandstones (S1, S2 and S3) from distinct reservoirs, and most of the pore shapes were found to be plate- and cube-like. Furthermore, this study generalizes a practical way to correlate specific particle shapes, such as rods, blades, cuboids, plates and cubes, to characterize asymmetric particles of any material type with 3-D image analysis.

  9. Computer-aided multiple-head 3D printing system for printing of heterogeneous organ/tissue constructs.

    PubMed

    Jung, Jin Woo; Lee, Jung-Seob; Cho, Dong-Woo

    2016-01-01

    Recently, much attention has focused on replacement or/and enhancement of biological tissues via the use of cell-laden hydrogel scaffolds with an architecture that mimics the tissue matrix, and with the desired three-dimensional (3D) external geometry. However, mimicking the heterogeneous tissues that most organs and tissues are formed of is challenging. Although multiple-head 3D printing systems have been proposed for fabricating heterogeneous cell-laden hydrogel scaffolds, to date only the simple exterior form has been realized. Here we describe a computer-aided design and manufacturing (CAD/CAM) system for this application. We aim to develop an algorithm to enable easy, intuitive design and fabrication of a heterogeneous cell-laden hydrogel scaffolds with a free-form 3D geometry. The printing paths of the scaffold are automatically generated from the 3D CAD model, and the scaffold is then printed by dispensing four materials; i.e., a frame, two kinds of cell-laden hydrogel and a support. We demonstrated printing of heterogeneous tissue models formed of hydrogel scaffolds using this approach, including the outer ear, kidney and tooth tissue. These results indicate that this approach is particularly promising for tissue engineering and 3D printing applications to regenerate heterogeneous organs and tissues with tailored geometries to treat specific defects or injuries. PMID:26899876

  10. Computer-aided multiple-head 3D printing system for printing of heterogeneous organ/tissue constructs

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Jin Woo; Lee, Jung-Seob; Cho, Dong-Woo

    2016-01-01

    Recently, much attention has focused on replacement or/and enhancement of biological tissues via the use of cell-laden hydrogel scaffolds with an architecture that mimics the tissue matrix, and with the desired three-dimensional (3D) external geometry. However, mimicking the heterogeneous tissues that most organs and tissues are formed of is challenging. Although multiple-head 3D printing systems have been proposed for fabricating heterogeneous cell-laden hydrogel scaffolds, to date only the simple exterior form has been realized. Here we describe a computer-aided design and manufacturing (CAD/CAM) system for this application. We aim to develop an algorithm to enable easy, intuitive design and fabrication of a heterogeneous cell-laden hydrogel scaffolds with a free-form 3D geometry. The printing paths of the scaffold are automatically generated from the 3D CAD model, and the scaffold is then printed by dispensing four materials; i.e., a frame, two kinds of cell-laden hydrogel and a support. We demonstrated printing of heterogeneous tissue models formed of hydrogel scaffolds using this approach, including the outer ear, kidney and tooth tissue. These results indicate that this approach is particularly promising for tissue engineering and 3D printing applications to regenerate heterogeneous organs and tissues with tailored geometries to treat specific defects or injuries. PMID:26899876

  11. Computer-aided multiple-head 3D printing system for printing of heterogeneous organ/tissue constructs.

    PubMed

    Jung, Jin Woo; Lee, Jung-Seob; Cho, Dong-Woo

    2016-02-22

    Recently, much attention has focused on replacement or/and enhancement of biological tissues via the use of cell-laden hydrogel scaffolds with an architecture that mimics the tissue matrix, and with the desired three-dimensional (3D) external geometry. However, mimicking the heterogeneous tissues that most organs and tissues are formed of is challenging. Although multiple-head 3D printing systems have been proposed for fabricating heterogeneous cell-laden hydrogel scaffolds, to date only the simple exterior form has been realized. Here we describe a computer-aided design and manufacturing (CAD/CAM) system for this application. We aim to develop an algorithm to enable easy, intuitive design and fabrication of a heterogeneous cell-laden hydrogel scaffolds with a free-form 3D geometry. The printing paths of the scaffold are automatically generated from the 3D CAD model, and the scaffold is then printed by dispensing four materials; i.e., a frame, two kinds of cell-laden hydrogel and a support. We demonstrated printing of heterogeneous tissue models formed of hydrogel scaffolds using this approach, including the outer ear, kidney and tooth tissue. These results indicate that this approach is particularly promising for tissue engineering and 3D printing applications to regenerate heterogeneous organs and tissues with tailored geometries to treat specific defects or injuries.

  12. Use of micro computed-tomography and 3D printing for reverse engineering of mouse embryo nasal capsule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tesařová, M.; Zikmund, T.; Kaucká, M.; Adameyko, I.; Jaroš, J.; Paloušek, D.; Škaroupka, D.; Kaiser, J.

    2016-03-01

    Imaging of increasingly complex cartilage in vertebrate embryos is one of the key tasks of developmental biology. This is especially important to study shape-organizing processes during initial skeletal formation and growth. Advanced imaging techniques that are reflecting biological needs give a powerful impulse to push the boundaries of biological visualization. Recently, techniques for contrasting tissues and organs have improved considerably, extending traditional 2D imaging approaches to 3D . X-ray micro computed tomography (μCT), which allows 3D imaging of biological objects including their internal structures with a resolution in the micrometer range, in combination with contrasting techniques seems to be the most suitable approach for non-destructive imaging of embryonic developing cartilage. Despite there are many software-based ways for visualization of 3D data sets, having a real solid model of the studied object might give novel opportunities to fully understand the shape-organizing processes in the developing body. In this feasibility study we demonstrated the full procedure of creating a real 3D object of mouse embryo nasal capsule, i.e. the staining, the μCT scanning combined by the advanced data processing and the 3D printing.

  13. Computer-aided diagnosis for osteoporosis using chest 3D CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoneda, K.; Matsuhiro, M.; Suzuki, H.; Kawata, Y.; Niki, N.; Nakano, Y.; Ohmatsu, H.; Kusumoto, M.; Tsuchida, T.; Eguchi, K.; Kaneko, M.

    2016-03-01

    The patients of osteoporosis comprised of about 13 million people in Japan and it is one of the problems the aging society has. In order to prevent the osteoporosis, it is necessary to do early detection and treatment. Multi-slice CT technology has been improving the three dimensional (3-D) image analysis with higher body axis resolution and shorter scan time. The 3-D image analysis using multi-slice CT images of thoracic vertebra can be used as a support to diagnose osteoporosis and at the same time can be used for lung cancer diagnosis which may lead to early detection. We develop automatic extraction and partitioning algorithm for spinal column by analyzing vertebral body structure, and the analysis algorithm of the vertebral body using shape analysis and a bone density measurement for the diagnosis of osteoporosis. Osteoporosis diagnosis support system obtained high extraction rate of the thoracic vertebral in both normal and low doses.

  14. A Pipeline for 3D Multimodality Image Integration and Computer-assisted Planning in Epilepsy Surgery.

    PubMed

    Nowell, Mark; Rodionov, Roman; Zombori, Gergely; Sparks, Rachel; Rizzi, Michele; Ourselin, Sebastien; Miserocchi, Anna; McEvoy, Andrew; Duncan, John

    2016-01-01

    Epilepsy surgery is challenging and the use of 3D multimodality image integration (3DMMI) to aid presurgical planning is well-established. Multimodality image integration can be technically demanding, and is underutilised in clinical practice. We have developed a single software platform for image integration, 3D visualization and surgical planning. Here, our pipeline is described in step-by-step fashion, starting with image acquisition, proceeding through image co-registration, manual segmentation, brain and vessel extraction, 3D visualization and manual planning of stereoEEG (SEEG) implantations. With dissemination of the software this pipeline can be reproduced in other centres, allowing other groups to benefit from 3DMMI. We also describe the use of an automated, multi-trajectory planner to generate stereoEEG implantation plans. Preliminary studies suggest this is a rapid, safe and efficacious adjunct for planning SEEG implantations. Finally, a simple solution for the export of plans and models to commercial neuronavigation systems for implementation of plans in the operating theater is described. This software is a valuable tool that can support clinical decision making throughout the epilepsy surgery pathway.

  15. A Pipeline for 3D Multimodality Image Integration and Computer-assisted Planning in Epilepsy Surgery.

    PubMed

    Nowell, Mark; Rodionov, Roman; Zombori, Gergely; Sparks, Rachel; Rizzi, Michele; Ourselin, Sebastien; Miserocchi, Anna; McEvoy, Andrew; Duncan, John

    2016-01-01

    Epilepsy surgery is challenging and the use of 3D multimodality image integration (3DMMI) to aid presurgical planning is well-established. Multimodality image integration can be technically demanding, and is underutilised in clinical practice. We have developed a single software platform for image integration, 3D visualization and surgical planning. Here, our pipeline is described in step-by-step fashion, starting with image acquisition, proceeding through image co-registration, manual segmentation, brain and vessel extraction, 3D visualization and manual planning of stereoEEG (SEEG) implantations. With dissemination of the software this pipeline can be reproduced in other centres, allowing other groups to benefit from 3DMMI. We also describe the use of an automated, multi-trajectory planner to generate stereoEEG implantation plans. Preliminary studies suggest this is a rapid, safe and efficacious adjunct for planning SEEG implantations. Finally, a simple solution for the export of plans and models to commercial neuronavigation systems for implementation of plans in the operating theater is described. This software is a valuable tool that can support clinical decision making throughout the epilepsy surgery pathway. PMID:27286266

  16. A Pipeline for 3D Multimodality Image Integration and Computer-assisted Planning in Epilepsy Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Nowell, Mark; Rodionov, Roman; Zombori, Gergely; Sparks, Rachel; Rizzi, Michele; Ourselin, Sebastien; Miserocchi, Anna; McEvoy, Andrew; Duncan, John

    2016-01-01

    Epilepsy surgery is challenging and the use of 3D multimodality image integration (3DMMI) to aid presurgical planning is well-established. Multimodality image integration can be technically demanding, and is underutilised in clinical practice. We have developed a single software platform for image integration, 3D visualization and surgical planning. Here, our pipeline is described in step-by-step fashion, starting with image acquisition, proceeding through image co-registration, manual segmentation, brain and vessel extraction, 3D visualization and manual planning of stereoEEG (SEEG) implantations. With dissemination of the software this pipeline can be reproduced in other centres, allowing other groups to benefit from 3DMMI. We also describe the use of an automated, multi-trajectory planner to generate stereoEEG implantation plans. Preliminary studies suggest this is a rapid, safe and efficacious adjunct for planning SEEG implantations. Finally, a simple solution for the export of plans and models to commercial neuronavigation systems for implementation of plans in the operating theater is described. This software is a valuable tool that can support clinical decision making throughout the epilepsy surgery pathway. PMID:27286266

  17. Computational Identification of Genomic Features That Influence 3D Chromatin Domain Formation

    PubMed Central

    Mourad, Raphaël; Cuvier, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in long-range Hi-C contact mapping have revealed the importance of the 3D structure of chromosomes in gene expression. A current challenge is to identify the key molecular drivers of this 3D structure. Several genomic features, such as architectural proteins and functional elements, were shown to be enriched at topological domain borders using classical enrichment tests. Here we propose multiple logistic regression to identify those genomic features that positively or negatively influence domain border establishment or maintenance. The model is flexible, and can account for statistical interactions among multiple genomic features. Using both simulated and real data, we show that our model outperforms enrichment test and non-parametric models, such as random forests, for the identification of genomic features that influence domain borders. Using Drosophila Hi-C data at a very high resolution of 1 kb, our model suggests that, among architectural proteins, BEAF-32 and CP190 are the main positive drivers of 3D domain borders. In humans, our model identifies well-known architectural proteins CTCF and cohesin, as well as ZNF143 and Polycomb group proteins as positive drivers of domain borders. The model also reveals the existence of several negative drivers that counteract the presence of domain borders including P300, RXRA, BCL11A and ELK1. PMID:27203237

  18. Numerical modeling of the 3D dynamics of ultrasound contrast agent microbubbles using the boundary integral method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qianxi; Manmi, Kawa; Calvisi, Michael L.

    2015-02-01

    Ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) are microbubbles stabilized with a shell typically of lipid, polymer, or protein and are emerging as a unique tool for noninvasive therapies ranging from gene delivery to tumor ablation. While various models have been developed to describe the spherical oscillations of contrast agents, the treatment of nonspherical behavior has received less attention. However, the nonspherical dynamics of contrast agents are thought to play an important role in therapeutic applications, for example, enhancing the uptake of therapeutic agents across cell membranes and tissue interfaces, and causing tissue ablation. In this paper, a model for nonspherical contrast agent dynamics based on the boundary integral method is described. The effects of the encapsulating shell are approximated by adapting Hoff's model for thin-shell, spherical contrast agents. A high-quality mesh of the bubble surface is maintained by implementing a hybrid approach of the Lagrangian method and elastic mesh technique. The numerical model agrees well with a modified Rayleigh-Plesset equation for encapsulated spherical bubbles. Numerical analyses of the dynamics of UCAs in an infinite liquid and near a rigid wall are performed in parameter regimes of clinical relevance. The oscillation amplitude and period decrease significantly due to the coating. A bubble jet forms when the amplitude of ultrasound is sufficiently large, as occurs for bubbles without a coating; however, the threshold amplitude required to incite jetting increases due to the coating. When a UCA is near a rigid boundary subject to acoustic forcing, the jet is directed towards the wall if the acoustic wave propagates perpendicular to the boundary. When the acoustic wave propagates parallel to the rigid boundary, the jet direction has components both along the wave direction and towards the boundary that depend mainly on the dimensionless standoff distance of the bubble from the boundary. In all cases, the jet

  19. Ligand mapping on protein surfaces by the 3D-RISM theory: toward computational fragment-based drug design.

    PubMed

    Imai, Takashi; Oda, Koji; Kovalenko, Andriy; Hirata, Fumio; Kidera, Akinori

    2009-09-01

    In line with the recent development of fragment-based drug design, a new computational method for mapping of small ligand molecules on protein surfaces is proposed. The method uses three-dimensional (3D) spatial distribution functions of the atomic sites of the ligand calculated using the molecular theory of solvation, known as the 3D reference interaction site model (3D-RISM) theory, to identify the most probable binding modes of ligand molecules. The 3D-RISM-based method is applied to the binding of several small organic molecules to thermolysin, in order to show its efficiency and accuracy in detecting binding sites. The results demonstrate that our method can reproduce the major binding modes found by X-ray crystallographic studies with sufficient precision. Moreover, the method can successfully identify some binding modes associated with a known inhibitor, which could not be detected by X-ray analysis. The dependence of ligand-binding modes on the ligand concentration, which essentially cannot be treated with other existing computational methods, is also investigated. The results indicate that some binding modes are readily affected by the ligand concentration, whereas others are not significantly altered. In the former case, it is the subtle balance in the binding affinity between the ligand and water that determines the dominant ligand-binding mode.

  20. Validation of a 3D computational fluid-structure interaction model simulating flow through an elastic aperture

    PubMed Central

    Quaini, A.; Canic, S.; Glowinski, R.; Igo, S.; Hartley, C.J.; Zoghbi, W.; Little, S.

    2011-01-01

    This work presents a validation of a fluid-structure interaction computational model simulating the flow conditions in an in vitro mock heart chamber modeling mitral valve regurgitation during the ejection phase during which the trans-valvular pressure drop and valve displacement are not as large. The mock heart chamber was developed to study the use of 2D and 3D color Doppler techniques in imaging the clinically relevant complex intra-cardiac flow events associated with mitral regurgitation. Computational models are expected to play an important role in supporting, refining, and reinforcing the emerging 3D echocardiographic applications. We have developed a 3D computational fluid-structure interaction algorithm based on a semi-implicit, monolithic method, combined with an arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian approach to capture the fluid domain motion. The mock regurgitant mitral valve corresponding to an elastic plate with a geometric orifice, was modeled using 3D elasticity, while the blood flow was modeled using the 3D Navier-Stokes equations for an incompressible, viscous fluid. The two are coupled via the kinematic and dynamic conditions describing the two-way coupling. The pressure, the flow rate, and orifice plate displacement were measured and compared with numerical simulation results. In-line flow meter was used to measure the flow, pressure transducers were used to measure the pressure, and a Doppler method developed by one of the authors was used to measure the axial displacement of the orifice plate. The maximum recorded difference between experiment and numerical simulation for the flow rate was 4%, the pressure 3.6%, and for the orifice displacement 15%, showing excellent agreement between the two. PMID:22138194

  1. Computer-aided segmentation and 3D analysis of in vivo MRI examinations of the human vocal tract during phonation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wismüller, Axel; Behrends, Johannes; Hoole, Phil; Leinsinger, Gerda L.; Meyer-Baese, Anke; Reiser, Maximilian F.

    2008-03-01

    We developed, tested, and evaluated a 3D segmentation and analysis system for in vivo MRI examinations of the human vocal tract during phonation. For this purpose, six professionally trained speakers, age 22-34y, were examined using a standardized MRI protocol (1.5 T, T1w FLASH, ST 4mm, 23 slices, acq. time 21s). The volunteers performed a prolonged (>=21s) emission of sounds of the German phonemic inventory. Simultaneous audio tape recording was obtained to control correct utterance. Scans were made in axial, coronal, and sagittal planes each. Computer-aided quantitative 3D evaluation included (i) automated registration of the phoneme-specific data acquired in different slice orientations, (ii) semi-automated segmentation of oropharyngeal structures, (iii) computation of a curvilinear vocal tract midline in 3D by nonlinear PCA, (iv) computation of cross-sectional areas of the vocal tract perpendicular to this midline. For the vowels /a/,/e/,/i/,/o/,/ø/,/u/,/y/, the extracted area functions were used to synthesize phoneme sounds based on an articulatory-acoustic model. For quantitative analysis, recorded and synthesized phonemes were compared, where area functions extracted from 2D midsagittal slices were used as a reference. All vowels could be identified correctly based on the synthesized phoneme sounds. The comparison between synthesized and recorded vowel phonemes revealed that the quality of phoneme sound synthesis was improved for phonemes /a/ and /y/, if 3D instead of 2D data were used, as measured by the average relative frequency shift between recorded and synthesized vowel formants (p<0.05, one-sided Wilcoxon rank sum test). In summary, the combination of fast MRI followed by subsequent 3D segmentation and analysis is a novel approach to examine human phonation in vivo. It unveils functional anatomical findings that may be essential for realistic modelling of the human vocal tract during speech production.

  2. An interactive 3D visualization and manipulation tool for effective assessment of angiogenesis and arteriogenesis using computed tomographic angiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Li; Gao, Ling; Zhuang, Zhenwu; DeMuinck, Ebo; Huang, Heng; Makedon, Fillia; Pearlman, Justin

    2005-04-01

    This paper presents IVM, an Interactive Vessel Manipulation tool that can help make effective and efficient assessment of angiogenesis and arteriogenesis in computed tomographic angiography (CTA) studies. IVM consists of three fundamental components: (1) a visualization component, (2) a tracing component, and (3) a measurement component. Given a user-specified threshold, IVM can create a 3D surface visualization based on it. Since vessels are thin and tubular structures, using standard isosurface extraction techniques usually cannot yield satisfactory reconstructions. Instead, IVM directly renders the surface of a derived binary 3D image. The image volumes collected in CTA studies often have a relatively high resolution. Thus, compared with more complicated vessel extraction and visualization techniques, rendering the binary image surface has the advantages of being effective, simple and fast. IVM employs a semi-automatic approach to determine the threshold: a user can adjust the threshold by checking the corresponding 3D surface reconstruction and make the choice. Typical tracing software often defines ROIs on 3D image volumes using three orthogonal views. The tracing component in IVM takes one step further: it can perform tracing not only on image slices but also in a 3D view. We observe that directly operating on a 3D view can help a tracer identify ROIs more easily. After setting a threshold and tracing an ROI, a user can use IVM's measurement component to estimate the volume and other parameters of vessels in the ROI. The effectiveness of the IVM tool is demonstrated on rat vessel/bone images collected in a previous CTA study.

  3. Development of transrectal diffuse optical tomography combined with 3D-transrectal ultrasound imaging to monitor the photocoagulation front during interstitial photothermal therapy of primary focal prostate cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Jie; Weersink, Robert; Veilleux, Israel; Mayo, Kenwrick; Zhang, Anqi; Piao, Daqing; Alam, Adeel; Trachtenberg, John; Wilson, Brian C.

    2013-03-01

    Interstitial near-infrared laser thermal therapy (LITT) is currently undergoing clinical trials as an alternative to watchful waiting or radical surgery in patients with low-risk focal prostate cancer. Currently, we use magnetic resonance image (MRI)-based thermography to monitor treatment delivery and determine indirectly the completeness of the target tissue destruction while avoiding damage to adjacent normal tissues, particularly the rectal wall. However, incomplete tumor destruction has occurred in a significant fraction of patients due to premature termination of treatment, since the photocoagulation zone is not directly observed. Hence, we are developing transrectal diffuse optical tomography (TRDOT), in combination with transrectal 3D ultrasound (3D-TRUS), to address his limitation. This is based on the large changes in optical scattering expected upon tissue coagulation. Here, we present forward simulations of a growing coagulated lesion with optical scattering contrast, using an established finite element analysis software platform (NIRFAST). The simulations were validated in tissue-simulating phantoms, with measurements acquired by a state-of-the-art continuous wave (CW) TRDOT system and a recently assembled bench-top CW-DOT system, with specific source-detector configurations. Two image reconstruction schemes were investigated and evaluated, specifically for the accurate delineation of the posterior boundary of the coagulation zone as the critical parameter for treatment guidance in this clinical application.

  4. Isoparametric 3-D Finite Element Mesh Generation Using Interactive Computer Graphics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kayrak, C.; Ozsoy, T.

    1985-01-01

    An isoparametric 3-D finite element mesh generator was developed with direct interface to an interactive geometric modeler program called POLYGON. POLYGON defines the model geometry in terms of boundaries and mesh regions for the mesh generator. The mesh generator controls the mesh flow through the 2-dimensional spans of regions by using the topological data and defines the connectivity between regions. The program is menu driven and the user has a control of element density and biasing through the spans and can also apply boundary conditions, loads interactively.

  5. 3D-computation of a thermal process in a superconducting coil

    SciTech Connect

    Netter, D.; Leveque, J.; Rezzoug, A.; Caron, J.P.; Sargos, F.M.

    1995-11-01

    This study deals with the resistive zone propagation in a superconducting coil during a quench, taking into account both the flux density distribution and the anisotropy of the thermal parameters. A Finite Difference Method is used to solve the heat diffusion equation and the flux density is calculated by means of a semi-analytical method. The 3-D model is suitable to describe the quench of thick coils and it can be applied to the study of thermal stability. As an application, a 10 kJ-solenoid is studied.

  6. Implementation of Headtracking and 3D Stereo with Unity and VRPN for Computer Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noyes, Matthew A.

    2013-01-01

    This paper explores low-cost hardware and software methods to provide depth cues traditionally absent in monocular displays. The use of a VRPN server in conjunction with a Microsoft Kinect and/or Nintendo Wiimote to provide head tracking information to a Unity application, and NVIDIA 3D Vision for retinal disparity support, is discussed. Methods are suggested to implement this technology with NASA's EDGE simulation graphics package, along with potential caveats. Finally, future applications of this technology to astronaut crew training, particularly when combined with an omnidirectional treadmill for virtual locomotion and NASA's ARGOS system for reduced gravity simulation, are discussed.

  7. Scanning transmission and computer-aided volumic electron microscopy: 3-D modeling of entire cells by electronic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bron, Christophe; Gremillet, Philip; Launay, D.; Jourlin, Michel; Gautschi, H. P.; Baechi, Thomas; Schuepbach, Joerg

    1990-05-01

    The digital processing of electron microscopic images from serial sections containing laser-induced topographical references allows a 3-D reconstruction at a depth resolution of 30 to 40 nm of entire cells by the use of image analysis methods, as already demonstrated for Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) coupled with a video camera. We decided to use a Scanning Transmission Electron Microscope (STEM) to get higher contrast and better resolution at medium magnification. The scanning of our specimens at video frequencies is an attractive and easy way to link a STEM with an image processing system but the hysteresis of the electronic spools responsible for the magnetic deviation of the scanning electron beam induces deformations of images which have to be modelized and corrected before registration. Computer algorithms developed for image analysis and treatment correct the artifacts caused by the use of STEM and by serial sectioning to automatically reconstruct the third dimension of the cells. They permit the normalization of the images through logarithmic processing of the original grey level infonnation. The automatic extraction of cell limits allows to link the image analysis and treatments with image synthesis methods by minimal human intervention. The surface representation and the registered images provide an ultrastructural data base from which quantitative 3-D morphological parameters, as well as otherwise impossible visualizations, can be computed. This 3-D image processing named C.A.V.U.M. for Computer Aided Volumic Ultra-Microscopy offers a new tool for the documentation and analysis of cell ultrastructure and for 3-D morphometric studies at EM magnifications. Further, a virtual observer can be computed in such a way as to simulate a visit of the reconstructed object.

  8. Computing and monitoring potential of public spaces by shading analysis using 3d lidar data and advanced image analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zwolinski, A.; Jarzemski, M.

    2015-04-01

    The paper regards specific context of public spaces in "shadow" of tall buildings located in European cities. Majority of tall buildings in European cities were built in last 15 years. Tall buildings appear mainly in city centres, directly at important public spaces being viable environment for inhabitants with variety of public functions (open spaces, green areas, recreation places, shops, services etc.). All these amenities and services are under direct impact of extensive shading coming from the tall buildings. The paper focuses on analyses and representation of impact of shading from tall buildings on various public spaces in cities using 3D city models. Computer environment of 3D city models in cityGML standard uses 3D LiDAR data as one of data types for definition of 3D cities. The structure of cityGML allows analytic applications using existing computer tools, as well as developing new techniques to estimate extent of shading coming from high-risers, affecting life in public spaces. These measurable shading parameters in specific time are crucial for proper functioning, viability and attractiveness of public spaces - finally it is extremely important for location of tall buildings at main public spaces in cities. The paper explores impact of shading from tall buildings in different spatial contexts on the background of using cityGML models based on core LIDAR data to support controlled urban development in sense of viable public spaces. The article is prepared within research project 2TaLL: Application of 3D Virtual City Models in Urban Analyses of Tall Buildings, realized as a part of Polish-Norway Grants.

  9. Novel low-cost 2D/3D switchable autostereoscopic system for notebook computers and other portable devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichenlaub, Jesse B.

    1995-03-01

    Mounting a lenticular lens in front of a flat panel display is a well known, inexpensive, and easy way to create an autostereoscopic system. Such a lens produces half resolution 3D images because half the pixels on the LCD are seen by the left eye and half by the right eye. This may be acceptable for graphics, but it makes full resolution text, as displayed by common software, nearly unreadable. Very fine alignment tolerances normally preclude the possibility of removing and replacing the lens in order to switch between 2D and 3D applications. Lenticular lens based displays are therefore limited to use as dedicated 3D devices. DTI has devised a technique which removes this limitation, allowing switching between full resolution 2D and half resolution 3D imaging modes. A second element, in the form of a concave lenticular lens array whose shape is exactly the negative of the first lens, is mounted on a hinge so that it can be swung down over the first lens array. When so positioned the two lenses cancel optically, allowing the user to see full resolution 2D for text or numerical applications. The two lenses, having complementary shapes, naturally tend to nestle together and snap into perfect alignment when pressed together--thus obviating any need for user operated alignment mechanisms. This system represents an ideal solution for laptop and notebook computer applications. It was devised to meet the stringent requirements of a laptop computer manufacturer including very compact size, very low cost, little impact on existing manufacturing or assembly procedures, and compatibility with existing full resolution 2D text- oriented software as well as 3D graphics. Similar requirements apply to high and electronic calculators, several models of which now use LCDs for the display of graphics.

  10. Classification and quantification of pore shapes in sandstone reservoir rocks with 3-D X-ray micro-computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, Mayka; Halisch, Matthias; Müller, Cornelia; Peres Fernandes, Celso

    2016-02-01

    Recent years have seen a growing interest in the characterization of the pore morphologies of reservoir rocks and how the spatial organization of pore traits affects the macro behavior of rock-fluid systems. With the availability of 3-D high-resolution imaging, such as x-ray micro-computed tomography (µ-CT), the detailed quantification of particle shapes has been facilitated by progress in computer science. Here, we show how the shapes of irregular rock particles (pores) can be classified and quantified based on binary 3-D images. The methodology requires the measurement of basic 3-D particle descriptors (length, width, and thickness) and a shape classification that involves the similarity of artificial objects, which is based on main pore network detachments and 3-D sample sizes. Two main pore components were identified from the analyzed volumes: pore networks and residual pore ganglia. A watershed algorithm was applied to preserve the pore morphology after separating the main pore networks, which is essential for the pore shape characterization. The results were validated for three sandstones (S1, S2, and S3) from distinct reservoirs, and most of the pore shapes were found to be plate- and cube-like, ranging from 39.49 to 50.94 % and from 58.80 to 45.18 % when the Feret caliper descriptor was investigated in a 10003 voxel volume. Furthermore, this study generalizes a practical way to correlate specific particle shapes, such as rods, blades, cuboids, plates, and cubes to characterize asymmetric particles of any material type with 3-D image analysis.

  11. 3D Quantification of Mandibular Asymmetry through Cone Beam Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Cevidanes, Lucia H.S.; Alhadidi, Abeer; Paniagua, Beatriz; Styner, Martin; Ludlow, John; Mol, Andre; Turvey, Timothy; Proffit, William R.; Rossouw, Paul Emile

    2011-01-01

    Objective To determine if 3D shape analysis precisely diagnoses right and left differences in asymmetry patients Study Design Cone-beam CT data was acquired pretreatment from 20 patients with mandibular asymmetry. 3D shape analysis was used to localize and quantify the extent of virtually simulated asymmetry. Two approaches were used: (1) mirroring on the midsagittal plane determined from landmarks and (2) mirroring on an arbitrary plane, then registering on the cranial base of the original image. The validation presented in this study used simulated data and has been applied to three clinical cases. Results For mirroring on the midsagittal plane there was a >99% probability that the difference between measured and simulated asymmetry was less than 0.5 mm. For mirroring with cranial base registration, there was a >84% probability of differences less than 0.5 mm. Conclusions Mandibular asymmetry can be precisely quantified with both mirroring methods. Cranial base registration has the potential to be used for patients with trauma situations or when key landmarks are unreliable or absent. PMID:21497527

  12. Fabrication of computationally designed scaffolds by low temperature 3D printing.

    PubMed

    Castilho, Miguel; Dias, Marta; Gbureck, Uwe; Groll, Jürgen; Fernandes, Paulo; Pires, Inês; Gouveia, Barbara; Rodrigues, Jorge; Vorndran, Elke

    2013-09-01

    The development of artificial bone substitutes that mimic the properties of bone and simultaneously promote the desired tissue regeneration is a current issue in bone tissue engineering research. An approach to create scaffolds with such characteristics is based on the combination of novel design and additive manufacturing processes. The objective of this work is to characterize the microstructural and the mechanical properties of scaffolds developed by coupling both topology optimization and a low temperature 3D printing process. The scaffold design was obtained using a topology optimization approach to maximize the permeability with constraints on the mechanical properties. This procedure was studied to be suitable for the fabrication of a cage prototype for tibial tuberosity advancement application, which is one of the most recent and promising techniques to treat cruciate ligament rupture in dogs. The microstructural and mechanical properties of the scaffolds manufactured by reacting α/β-tricalcium phosphate with diluted phosphoric acid were then assessed experimentally and the scaffolds strength reliability was determined. The results demonstrate that the low temperature 3D printing process is a reliable option to create synthetic scaffolds with tailored properties, and when coupled with topology optimization design it can be a powerful tool for the fabrication of patient-specific bone implants. PMID:23887064

  13. Computation of elastic properties of 3D digital cores from the Longmaxi shale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wen-Hui; Fu, Li-Yun; Zhang, Yan; Jin, Wei-Jun

    2016-06-01

    The dependence of elastic moduli of shales on the mineralogy and microstructure of shales is important for the prediction of sweet spots and shale gas production. Based on 3D digital images of the microstructure of Longmaxi black shale samples using X-ray CT, we built detailed 3D digital images of cores with porosity properties and mineral contents. Next, we used finite-element (FE) methods to derive the elastic properties of the samples. The FE method can accurately model the shale mineralogy. Particular attention is paid to the derived elastic properties and their dependence on porosity and kerogen. The elastic moduli generally decrease with increasing porosity and kerogen, and there is a critical porosity (0.75) and kerogen content (ca. ≤3%) over which the elastic moduli decrease rapidly and slowly, respectively. The derived elastic moduli of gas- and oil-saturated digital cores differ little probably because of the low porosity (4.5%) of the Longmaxi black shale. Clearly, the numerical experiments demonstrated the feasibility of combining microstructure images of shale samples with elastic moduli calculations to predict shale properties.

  14. Modeling and Analysis of a Lunar Space Reactor with the Computer Code RELAP5-3D/ATHENA

    SciTech Connect

    Carbajo, Juan J; Qualls, A L

    2008-01-01

    The transient analysis 3-dimensional (3-D) computer code RELAP5-3D/ATHENA has been employed to model and analyze a space reactor of 180 kW(thermal), 40 kW (net, electrical) with eight Stirling engines (SEs). Each SE will generate over 6 kWe; the excess power will be needed for the pumps and other power management devices. The reactor will be cooled by NaK (a eutectic mixture of sodium and potassium which is liquid at ambient temperature). This space reactor is intended to be deployed over the surface of the Moon or Mars. The reactor operating life will be 8 to 10 years. The RELAP5-3D/ATHENA code is being developed and maintained by Idaho National Laboratory. The code can employ a variety of coolants in addition to water, the original coolant employed with early versions of the code. The code can also use 3-D volumes and 3-D junctions, thus allowing for more realistic representation of complex geometries. A combination of 3-D and 1-D volumes is employed in this study. The space reactor model consists of a primary loop and two secondary loops connected by two heat exchangers (HXs). Each secondary loop provides heat to four SEs. The primary loop includes the nuclear reactor with the lower and upper plena, the core with 85 fuel pins, and two vertical heat exchangers (HX). The maximum coolant temperature of the primary loop is 900 K. The secondary loops also employ NaK as a coolant at a maximum temperature of 877 K. The SEs heads are at a temperature of 800 K and the cold sinks are at a temperature of ~400 K. Two radiators will be employed to remove heat from the SEs. The SE HXs surrounding the SE heads are of annular design and have been modeled using 3-D volumes. These 3-D models have been used to improve the HX design by optimizing the flows of coolant and maximizing the heat transferred to the SE heads. The transients analyzed include failure of one or more Stirling engines, trip of the reactor pump, and trips of the secondary loop pumps feeding the HXs of the

  15. Ultrasound attenuation computed tomography assessment of PAGAT gel dose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khoei, S.; Trapp, J. V.; Langton, C. M.

    2014-08-01

    Ultrasound has been previously investigated as an alternative readout method for irradiated polymer gel dosimeters, with authors reporting varying dose responses. We extend previous work utilizing a new computed tomography ultrasound scanner comprising of two identical 5 MHz, 128-element linear-array ultrasound transducers, co-axially aligned and submerged in water as a coupling agent, with rotational of the gel dosimeter between the transducers facilitated by a robotic arm. We have investigated the dose-dependence of both ultrasound bulk attenuation and broadband ultrasound attenuation (BUA) for the PAGAT gel dosimeter. The ultrasound bulk attenuation dose sensitivity was found to be 1.46  ±  0.04 dB m -1 Gy -1, being in agreement with previously published results for PAG and MAGIC gels. BUA was also found to be dose dependent and was measured to be 0.024  ±  0.003 dB MHz -1 Gy -1 the advantage of BUA being its insensitivity to frequency-independent attenuation mechanisms including reflection and refraction, thereby minimizing image reconstruction artefacts.

  16. Improved Algorithms and Methods for Solving Strongly Variable-Viscosity 3D Stokes flow and Strongly Variable Permeability 3D D’Arcy flow on a Parallel Computer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, J. P.; Hasenclever, J.; Shi, C.

    2009-12-01

    Computational studies of mantle convection face large challenges to obtain fast and accurate solutions for variable viscosity 3d flow. Recently we have been using parallel (MPI-based) MATLAB to more thoroughly explore possible pitfalls and algorithmic improvements to current ‘best-practice’ variable viscosity Stokes and D’Arcy flow solvers. Here we focus on study of finite-element solvers based on a decomposition of the equations for incompressible Stokes flow: Ku + Gp = f and G’u = 0 (K-velocity stiffness matrix, G-discretized gradient operator, G’=transpose(G)-discretized divergence operator) into a single equation for pressure Sp==G’K^-1Gp =G’K^-1f, in which the velocity is also updated as part of each pressure iteration. The outer pressure iteration is solved with preconditioned conjugate gradients (CG) (Maday and Patera, 1989), with a multigrid-preconditioned CG solver for the z=K^-1 (Gq) step of each pressure iteration. One fairly well-known pitfall (Fortin, 1985) is that constant-pressure elements can generate a spurious non-zero flow under a constant body force within non-rectangular geometries. We found a new pitfall when using an iterative method to solve the Kz=y operation in evaluating each G’K^-1Gq product -- even if the residual of the outer pressure equation converges to zero, the discrete divergence of this equation does not correspondingly converge; the error in the incompressibility depends on roughly the square of the tolerance used to solve each Kz=y vel