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Sample records for 3d unsteady flow

  1. Slat Cove Unsteadiness Effect of 3D Flow Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choudhari, Meelan M.; Khorrami, Mehdi R.

    2006-01-01

    Previous studies have indicated that 2D, time accurate computations based on a pseudo-laminar zonal model of the slat cove region (within the framework of the Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes equations) are inadequate for predicting the full unsteady dynamics of the slat cove flow field. Even though such computations could capture the large-scale, unsteady vorticity structures in the slat cove region without requiring any external forcing, the simulated vortices were excessively strong and the recirculation zone was unduly energetic in comparison with the PIV measurements for a generic high-lift configuration. To resolve this discrepancy and to help enable physics based predictions of slat aeroacoustics, the present paper is focused on 3D simulations of the slat cove flow over a computational domain of limited spanwise extent. Maintaining the pseudo-laminar approach, current results indicate that accounting for the three-dimensionality of flow fluctuations leads to considerable improvement in the accuracy of the unsteady, nearfield solution. Analysis of simulation data points to the likely significance of turbulent fluctuations near the reattachment region toward the generation of broadband slat noise. The computed acoustic characteristics (in terms of the frequency spectrum and spatial distribution) within short distances from the slat resemble the previously reported, subscale measurements of slat noise.

  2. Unsteady 3D flow simulations in cranial arterial tree

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grinberg, Leopold; Anor, Tomer; Madsen, Joseph; Karniadakis, George

    2008-11-01

    High resolution unsteady 3D flow simulations in major cranial arteries have been performed. Two cases were considered: 1) a healthy volunteer with a complete Circle of Willis (CoW); and 2) a patient with hydrocephalus and an incomplete CoW. Computation was performed on 3344 processors of the new half petaflop supercomputer in TACC. Two new numerical approaches were developed and implemented: 1) a new two-level domain decomposition method, which couples continuous and discontinuous Galerkin discretization of the computational domain; and 2) a new type of outflow boundary conditions, which imposes, in an accurate and computationally efficient manner, clinically measured flow rates. In the first simulation, a geometric model of 65 cranial arteries was reconstructed. Our simulation reveals a high degree of asymmetry in the flow at the left and right parts of the CoW and the presence of swirling flow in most of the CoW arteries. In the second simulation, one of the main findings was a high pressure drop at the right anterior communicating artery (PCA). Due to the incompleteness of the CoW and the pressure drop at the PCA, the right internal carotid artery supplies blood to most regions of the brain.

  3. Simultaneous 3D Strain and Flow Fields Measurement of a Model Artery under Unsteady Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toloui, Mostafa; Sheng, Jian

    2011-11-01

    Fluid-Structure Interaction imposes challenges in both aero-elasticity and biomedical studies. A simultaneous solid deformation and fluid flow measurement technique based on digital in-line holographic particle tracking velocimetry (PTV) has been developed. It allows us to measure concurrently 3D strain field of a deforming structure and the unsteady flow near it. To facilitate the measurement, both wall and flow are seeded with tracer particles distinguished by size. The motion of these tracers provides the 3D deformation of the wall and the 3D velocity distribution of the flow separately. A fully index matched facility including transparent artery and NaI solution is constructed to enable observations near the wall or through the complex geometry. An arterial model with the inner diameter of 9.5 mm and the thickness of 0.9 mm is manufactured from the cross-linked transparent PDMS at the mixing ratio of 1:10 and doped with mono-dispersed 19 μm polystyrene particles. A cinematic holographic PTV system is used to trace the 3D particle motion in the model and flow simultaneously. Preliminary study is performed within a sample volume of 15 × 15 × 75 mm with the spatial resolution of 7.4 μm in lateral and 10 μm in depth. Uncertainty and accuracy analysis will be reported. NSF Grant No: CBET-0844647.

  4. Numerical simulation of unsteady flow characteristics for cavitation around a 3-D hydrofoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, S. H.; Xiao, Y. X.; Wang, Z. W.

    2015-01-01

    At present it is possible to predict more accurately by various numerical methods established for cavitation simulation around a hydrofoil. However, for the solution of the complex unsteady cavity flow, it is still marginal. In this paper, numerical method is adopted to simulate cavitation around 3-D NACA0015 hydrofoil with homogeneous two-phase flow calculation using commercial code CFX-solver with two turbulence models, the standard RNG k-epsilon turbulence model and the modified RNG k-epsilon turbulence model respectively. First, pressure coefficient for non-cavitating flow, time averaged values of unsteady cavity flow around a hydrofoil are verified to simulate more closely to an actual cavity flow. And then frequency analysis is performed with Fast Fourier Transform. The results show that the calculation results with modified RNG k-epsilon turbulence model agree with experimental results in terms of mean cavity length and pressure drop, but the unsteady flow characteristics of oscillating cavitation still deviate slightly in terms of unsteady cavity flow.

  5. Simulation of a 3D unsteady flow in an axial turbine stage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Straka, Petr

    2012-04-01

    The contribution deals with a numerical simulation of an unsteady flow in an axial turbine stage. The solution is performed using an in-house numerical code developed in the Aeronautical and Test Institute, Plc. in Prague. The numerical code is based on a finite volume discretization of governing equations (Favre averaged Navier-Stokes equations) and a two-equations turbulence model. The temporal integration is based on the implicit second-order backward Euler formula, which is realized through the iteration process in dual time. The proposed numerical method is used for solution of the 3D, unsteady, viscous turbulent flow of a perfect gas in the axial turbine stage. The flow path consists of an input nozzle, stator blade-wheel, rotor blade-wheel, a shroud-seal gap and a diffuser. Attention is paid to the influence of a secondary flow structures, such as generated vortices and flow in shroud-seal gap.

  6. Parallel 3D computation of unsteady wake flows with complex geometries and fluid-structure interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osawa, Yasuo

    New powerful parallel computational tools are developed for 3D simulation of unsteady wake flows with complex geometries and fluid-structure interactions. The base method for flow simulation is a finite element formulation for the Navier-Stokes equations. The finite element formulation is based on the streamline-upwind/Petrov-Galerkin (SUPG) and pressure-stabilizing/Petrov-Galerkin (PSPG) techniques. These stabilization techniques facilitate simulation of flows with high Reynolds numbers, and allow us to use equal-order interpolation functions for velocity and pressure without generating numerical oscillations. A multi-domain computational method is developed to simulate wake flow both in the near and far downstream. The formulations lead to coupled nonlinear equation systems which are solved, at every time step, with the Newton-Raphson method. The overall formulation and solution techniques are implemented on parallel platforms such as the CRAY T3E and SGI PowerChallenge. Two phases of vortex shedding for flow past a cylinder is simulated to verify the accuracy of this method. The Enhanced-Discretization Interface Capturing Technique (EDICT) is utilized to simulate wake flow accurately. Fluid-structure coupling solution method based on the Deforming-Spatial-Domain/Stabilized Space-Time (DSD/SST) formulation is applied to simulate a parachute behavior in the unsteady wake.

  7. Viscous Incompressible Flow Computations for 3-D Steady and Unsteady Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwak, Dochan

    2001-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation gives an overview of viscous incompressible flow computations for three-dimensional steady and unsteady flows. Details are given on the use of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) as an engineering tool, solution methods for incompressible Navier-Stokes equations, numerical and physical characteristics of the primitive variable approach, and the role of CFD in the past and in current engineering and research applications.

  8. Recent Enhancements to USM3D Unstructured Flow Solver for Unsteady Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pandya, Mohagna J.; Frink, Neal T.; Abdol-Hamid, Khaled S.; Chung, James J.

    2004-01-01

    The NASA USM3D unstructured flow solver is undergoing extensions to address dynamic flow problems in support of NASA and NAVAIR efforts to study the applicability of Computational Fluid Dynamics tools for the prediction of aircraft stability and control characteristics. The initial extensions reported herein include two second-order time stepping schemes, Detached-Eddy Simulation, and grid motion. This paper reports the initial code verification and validation assessment of the dynamic flow capabilities of USM3D. The cases considered are the classic inviscid shock-tube problem, low Reynolds number wake shedding from a NACA 0012 airfoil, high Reynolds number DES-based wake shedding from a 4-to-1 length-to-diameter cylinder, and forced pitch oscillation of a NACA 0012 airfoil with inviscid and turbulent flow.

  9. Unstructured Cartesian refinement with sharp interface immersed boundary method for 3D unsteady incompressible flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelidis, Dionysios; Chawdhary, Saurabh; Sotiropoulos, Fotis

    2016-11-01

    A novel numerical method is developed for solving the 3D, unsteady, incompressible Navier-Stokes equations on locally refined fully unstructured Cartesian grids in domains with arbitrarily complex immersed boundaries. Owing to the utilization of the fractional step method on an unstructured Cartesian hybrid staggered/non-staggered grid layout, flux mismatch and pressure discontinuity issues are avoided and the divergence free constraint is inherently satisfied to machine zero. Auxiliary/hanging nodes are used to facilitate the discretization of the governing equations. The second-order accuracy of the solver is ensured by using multi-dimension Lagrange interpolation operators and appropriate differencing schemes at the interface of regions with different levels of refinement. The sharp interface immersed boundary method is augmented with local near-boundary refinement to handle arbitrarily complex boundaries. The discrete momentum equation is solved with the matrix free Newton-Krylov method and the Krylov-subspace method is employed to solve the Poisson equation. The second-order accuracy of the proposed method on unstructured Cartesian grids is demonstrated by solving the Poisson equation with a known analytical solution. A number of three-dimensional laminar flow simulations of increasing complexity illustrate the ability of the method to handle flows across a range of Reynolds numbers and flow regimes. Laminar steady and unsteady flows past a sphere and the oblique vortex shedding from a circular cylinder mounted between two end walls demonstrate the accuracy, the efficiency and the smooth transition of scales and coherent structures across refinement levels. Large-eddy simulation (LES) past a miniature wind turbine rotor, parameterized using the actuator line approach, indicates the ability of the fully unstructured solver to simulate complex turbulent flows. Finally, a geometry resolving LES of turbulent flow past a complete hydrokinetic turbine illustrates

  10. Lift force time delays on 2D and 3D wings in unsteady flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, David; Colling, Jesse; Quach, Vien; Colonius, Tim; Tadmor, Gilead

    2008-11-01

    Active flow control (AFC) used for enhancing the maneuverability of wings is usually applied during conditions of steady external flow. However, when the external flow is unsteady or the wing is maneuvering, then at least two time delays become important; namely, the time delay of the lift to changes in external flow, τf, and the time delay to changes in AFC actuation, τa. These time delays were measured in wind tunnel experiments using two- and three-dimensional wings in an oscillating freestream and with variable duty cycle actuation. Dimensionless freestream oscillation frequencies from k = 0.01 to k = 0.2 with amplitudes of 5 percent of the mean speed were used to characterize the system. As a demonstration of the important role of the two time constants, AFC is used to damp lift force oscillations occurring in an unsteady freestream using a feed forward control system. The instantaneous velocity provides input to a control algorithm which adjusts the duty cycle of the AFC actuator to suppress lift fluctuations.

  11. A Computational Model for Suspended Large Rigid Bodies in 3D Unsteady Viscous Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Feng

    1999-11-01

    A 3D numerical model for computing large rigid objects suspended in fluid flow has been developed. Rather than calculating the surface pressure upon the solid body, we evaluate the net force and torque based on a volume force formulation. The total effective force is obtained by summing up the forces at the Eulerian grids occupied by the rigid body. The effects of the moving bodies are coupled to the fluid flow by imposing the velocity field of the bodies to the fluid. A Poisson equation is used to compute the pressure over the whole domain. The objects are identified by color functions and calculated by the PPM scheme and a tangent function transformation which scales the transition region of the computed interface to a compact thickness. The model is then implemented on a parallel computer of distributed memory and validated with Stokes and low Reynolds number flows.

  12. Texture-based visualization of unsteady 3D flow by real-time advection and volumetric illumination.

    PubMed

    Weiskopf, Daniel; Schafhitzel, Tobias; Ertl, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents an interactive technique for the dense texture-based visualization of unsteady 3D flow, taking into account issues of computational efficiency and visual perception. High efficiency is achieved by a 3D graphics processing unit (GPU)-based texture advection mechanism that implements logical 3D grid structures by physical memory in the form of 2D textures. This approach results in fast read and write access to physical memory, independent of GPU architecture. Slice-based direct volume rendering is used for the final display. We investigate two alternative methods for the volumetric illumination of the result of texture advection: First, gradient-based illumination that employs a real-time computation of gradients, and, second, line-based lighting based on illumination in codimension 2. In addition to the Phong model, perception-guided rendering methods are considered, such as cool/warm shading, halo rendering, or color-based depth cueing. The problems of clutter and occlusion are addressed by supporting a volumetric importance function that enhances features of the flow and reduces visual complexity in less interesting regions. GPU implementation aspects, performance measurements, and a discussion of results are included to demonstrate our visualization approach.

  13. Unsteady Turbopump Flow Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Centin, Kiris C.; Kwak, Dochan

    2001-01-01

    The objective of the current effort is two-fold: 1) to provide a computational framework for design and analysis of the entire fuel supply system of a liquid rocket engine; and 2) to provide high-fidelity unsteady turbopump flow analysis capability to support the design of pump sub-systems for advanced space transportation vehicle. Since the space launch systems in the near future are likely to involve liquid propulsion system, increasing the efficiency and reliability of the turbopump components is an important task. To date, computational tools for design/analysis of turbopump flow are based on relatively lower fidelity methods. Unsteady, three-dimensional viscous flow analysis tool involving stationary and rotational components for the entire turbopump assembly has not been available, at least, for real-world engineering applications. Present effort is an attempt to provide this capability so that developers of the vehicle will be able to extract such information as transient flow phenomena for start up, impact of non-uniform inflow, system vibration and impact on the structure. Those quantities are not readily available from simplified design tools. In this presentation, the progress being made toward complete turbo-pump simulation capability for a liquid rocket engine is reported. Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) turbo-pump is used as a test case for the performance evaluation of the hybrid MPI/Open-MP and MLP versions of the INS3D code. Relative motion of the grid system for rotor-stator interaction was obtained by employing overset grid techniques. Time-accuracy of the scheme has been evaluated by using simple test cases. Unsteady computations for SSME turbopump, which contains 106 zones with 34.5 Million grid points, are currently underway on Origin 2000 systems at NASA Ames Research Center. Results from these time-accurate simulations with moving boundary capability and the performance of the parallel versions of the code will be presented.

  14. Development of Unsteady Aerodynamic and Aeroelastic Reduced-Order Models Using the FUN3D Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silva, Walter A.; Vatsa, Veer N.; Biedron, Robert T.

    2009-01-01

    Recent significant improvements to the development of CFD-based unsteady aerodynamic reduced-order models (ROMs) are implemented into the FUN3D unstructured flow solver. These improvements include the simultaneous excitation of the structural modes of the CFD-based unsteady aerodynamic system via a single CFD solution, minimization of the error between the full CFD and the ROM unsteady aero- dynamic solution, and computation of a root locus plot of the aeroelastic ROM. Results are presented for a viscous version of the two-dimensional Benchmark Active Controls Technology (BACT) model and an inviscid version of the AGARD 445.6 aeroelastic wing using the FUN3D code.

  15. Application of the ASP3D Computer Program to Unsteady Aerodynamic and Aeroelastic Analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batina, John T.

    2006-01-01

    A new computer program has been developed called ASP3D (Advanced Small Perturbation - 3D), which solves the small perturbation potential flow equation in an advanced form including mass-consistent surface and trailing wake boundary conditions, and entropy, vorticity, and viscous effects. The purpose of the program is for unsteady aerodynamic and aeroelastic analyses, especially in the nonlinear transonic flight regime. The program exploits the simplicity of stationary Cartesian meshes with the movement or deformation of the configuration under consideration incorporated into the solution algorithm through a planar surface boundary condition. The paper presents unsteady aerodynamic and aeroelastic applications of ASP3D to assess the time dependent capability and demonstrate various features of the code.

  16. Unsteady symmetry-plane boundary layer and 3-D unsteady separation. Part 1: High incidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, K. C.; Fan, Z. Q.

    1982-01-01

    The symmetry-plane laminar boundary layer of an impulsively-started ellipsoid of revolution at high incidence is solved to shed light on some basic characteristics of three dimensional, unsteady flows. The governing equations are formally similar to those for the 3-dimensional, steady case, so the same method of solution and computer programs previously developed were employed in the present work. The most important result obtained is concerned with the meridional skin friction c(fu). The zero-c(fu) point (at which c(fu) vanishes) does not, as expected, move forward as time increases, instead it remains over the rear body. As t approaches infinity, it jumps to the front nose. This implies that there is no flow separation over the symmetry-plane at finite times. In the meanwhile, it is argued that separation must occur on two sides of the body. This situation leads us to propose a new unsteady separation sequence, i.e. an open type separation prevails at earlier times, while a closed type of separation occurs only at the steady-state condition. This sequence presents a sharp contrast to the conventional notion of unsteady separation which consists of a series of closed separations only. Furthermore, this sequence with the time as the parameter is found to be similar to that for previously-studied steady flows with varying incidences.

  17. Unsteady transonic flow in cascades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Surampudi, S. P.; Adamczyk, J. J.

    1984-01-01

    There is a need for methods to predict the unsteady air loads associated with flutter of turbomachinery blading at transonic speeds. The results of such an analysis in which the steady relative flow approaching a cascade of thin airfoils is assumed to be transonic, irrotational, and isentropic is presented. The blades in the cascade are allowed to undergo a small amplitude harmonic oscillation which generates a small unsteady flow superimposed on the existing steady flow. The blades are assumed to oscillate with a prescribed motion of constant amplitude and interblade phase angle. The equations of motion are obtained by linearizing about a uniform flow the inviscid nonheat conducting continuity and momentum equations. The resulting equations are solved by employing the Weiner Hopf technique. The solution yields the unsteady aerodynamic forces acting on the cascade at Mach number equal to 1. Making use of an unsteady transonic similarity law, these results are compared with the results obtained from linear unsteady subsonic and supersonic cascade theories. A parametric study is conducted to find the effects of reduced frequency, solidity, stagger angle, and position of pitching axis on the flutter.

  18. 3D Flow Visualization Using Texture Advection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kao, David; Zhang, Bing; Kim, Kwansik; Pang, Alex; Moran, Pat (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Texture advection is an effective tool for animating and investigating 2D flows. In this paper, we discuss how this technique can be extended to 3D flows. In particular, we examine the use of 3D and 4D textures on 3D synthetic and computational fluid dynamics flow fields.

  19. Software Aids Visualization of Computed Unsteady Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kao, David; Kenwright, David

    2003-01-01

    Unsteady Flow Analysis Toolkit (UFAT) is a computer program that synthesizes motions of time-dependent flows represented by very large sets of data generated in computational fluid dynamics simulations. Prior to the development of UFAT, it was necessary to rely on static, single-snapshot depictions of time-dependent flows generated by flow-visualization software designed for steady flows. Whereas it typically takes weeks to analyze the results of a largescale unsteady-flow simulation by use of steady-flow visualization software, the analysis time is reduced to hours when UFAT is used. UFAT can be used to generate graphical objects of flow visualization results using multi-block curvilinear grids in the format of a previously developed NASA data-visualization program, PLOT3D. These graphical objects can be rendered using FAST, another popular flow visualization software developed at NASA. Flow-visualization techniques that can be exploited by use of UFAT include time-dependent tracking of particles, detection of vortex cores, extractions of stream ribbons and surfaces, and tetrahedral decomposition for optimal particle tracking. Unique computational features of UFAT include capabilities for automatic (batch) processing, restart, memory mapping, and parallel processing. These capabilities significantly reduce analysis time and storage requirements, relative to those of prior flow-visualization software. UFAT can be executed on a variety of supercomputers.

  20. Introduction of the ASP3D Computer Program for Unsteady Aerodynamic and Aeroelastic Analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batina, John T.

    2005-01-01

    A new computer program has been developed called ASP3D (Advanced Small Perturbation 3D), which solves the small perturbation potential flow equation in an advanced form including mass-consistent surface and trailing wake boundary conditions, and entropy, vorticity, and viscous effects. The purpose of the program is for unsteady aerodynamic and aeroelastic analyses, especially in the nonlinear transonic flight regime. The program exploits the simplicity of stationary Cartesian meshes with the movement or deformation of the configuration under consideration incorporated into the solution algorithm through a planar surface boundary condition. The new ASP3D code is the result of a decade of developmental work on improvements to the small perturbation formulation, performed while the author was employed as a Senior Research Scientist in the Configuration Aerodynamics Branch at the NASA Langley Research Center. The ASP3D code is a significant improvement to the state-of-the-art for transonic aeroelastic analyses over the CAP-TSD code (Computational Aeroelasticity Program Transonic Small Disturbance), which was developed principally by the author in the mid-1980s. The author is in a unique position as the developer of both computer programs to compare, contrast, and ultimately make conclusions regarding the underlying formulations and utility of each code. The paper describes the salient features of the ASP3D code including the rationale for improvements in comparison with CAP-TSD. Numerous results are presented to demonstrate the ASP3D capability. The general conclusion is that the new ASP3D capability is superior to the older CAP-TSD code because of the myriad improvements developed and incorporated.

  1. Introduction to unsteady flow in turbomachines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greitzer, E. M.

    In this lecture some of the fluid dynamic phenomena that are associated with unsteady flow in turbomachines will be examined. It will be seen that there are several different sources of this unsteadiness, and that which of these is most important will depend on which aspect of the overall performance of the turbomachine is being examined. This discussion is intended to be an introduction to the subject and to provide an appreciation for the basic fluid mechanic concepts, rather than to be an exhaustive review. The topics to be covered are: (1) the Inherent Unsteadiness of Turbomachinery Flows; (2) Sources of Flow Unsteadiness in Turbomachines; and (3) Introductory Discussion of Unsteady Viscous Flows.

  2. Simulation of unsteady state performance of a secondary air system by the 1D-3D-Structure coupled method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Hong; Li, Peng; Li, Yulong

    2016-02-01

    This paper describes the calculation method for unsteady state conditions in the secondary air systems in gas turbines. The 1D-3D-Structure coupled method was applied. A 1D code was used to model the standard components that have typical geometric characteristics. Their flow and heat transfer were described by empirical correlations based on experimental data or CFD calculations. A 3D code was used to model the non-standard components that cannot be described by typical geometric languages, while a finite element analysis was carried out to compute the structural deformation and heat conduction at certain important positions. These codes were coupled through their interfaces. Thus, the changes in heat transfer and structure and their interactions caused by exterior disturbances can be reflected. The results of the coupling method in an unsteady state showed an apparent deviation from the existing data, while the results in the steady state were highly consistent with the existing data. The difference in the results in the unsteady state was caused primarily by structural deformation that cannot be predicted by the 1D method. Thus, in order to obtain the unsteady state performance of a secondary air system more accurately and efficiently, the 1D-3D-Structure coupled method should be used.

  3. Unsteady diffusional screening in 3D pulmonary acinar structures: from infancy to adulthood.

    PubMed

    Hofemeier, Philipp; Shachar-Berman, Lihi; Tenenbaum-Katan, Janna; Filoche, Marcel; Sznitman, Josué

    2016-07-26

    Diffusional screening in the lungs is a physical phenomenon where the specific topological arrangement of alveolated airways of the respiratory region leads to a depletion, or 'screening', of oxygen molecules with increasing acinar generation. Here, we revisit diffusional screening phenomena in anatomically-inspired pulmonary acinar models under realistic breathing maneuvers. By modelling 3D bifurcating alveolated airways capturing both convection and diffusion, unsteady oxygen transport is investigated under cyclic breathing motion. To evaluate screening characteristics in the developing lungs during growth, four representative stages of lung development were chosen (i.e. 3 months, 1 year and 9 months, 3 years and adulthood) that capture distinct morphological acinar changes spanning alveolarization phases to isotropic alveolar growth. Numerical simulations unveil the dramatic changes in O2 transport occurring during lung development, where young infants exhibit highest acinar efficiencies that rapidly converge with age to predictions at adulthood. With increased ventilatory effort, transient dynamics of oxygen transport is fundamentally altered compared to tidal breathing and emphasizes the augmented role of convection. Resolving the complex convective acinar flow patterns in 3D acinar trees allows for the first time a spatially-localized and time-resolved characterization of oxygen transport in the pulmonary acinus, from infancy to adulthood.

  4. 3D visualization of unsteady 2D airplane wake vortices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ma, Kwan-Liu; Zheng, Z. C.

    1994-01-01

    Air flowing around the wing tips of an airplane forms horizontal tornado-like vortices that can be dangerous to following aircraft. The dynamics of such vortices, including ground and atmospheric effects, can be predicted by numerical simulation, allowing the safety and capacity of airports to be improved. In this paper, we introduce three-dimensional techniques for visualizing time-dependent, two-dimensional wake vortex computations, and the hazard strength of such vortices near the ground. We describe a vortex core tracing algorithm and a local tiling method to visualize the vortex evolution. The tiling method converts time-dependent, two-dimensional vortex cores into three-dimensional vortex tubes. Finally, a novel approach calculates the induced rolling moment on the following airplane at each grid point within a region near the vortex tubes and thus allows three-dimensional visualization of the hazard strength of the vortices. We also suggest ways of combining multiple visualization methods to present more information simultaneously.

  5. Unsteady Flows in Axial Turbomachines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marble, F. E.; Rannie, W. D.

    1957-01-01

    Of the various unsteady flows that occur in axial turbomachines certain asymmetric disturbances, of wave length large in comparison with blade spacing, have become understood to a certain extent. These disturbances divide themselves into two categories: self-induced oscillations and force disturbances. A special type of propagating stall appears as a self-induced disturbance; an asymmetric velocity profile introduced at the compressor inlet constitutes a forced disturbance. Both phenomena have been treated from a unified theoretical point of view in which the asymmetric disturbances are linearized and the blade characteristics are assumed quasi-steady. Experimental results are in essential agreement with this theory wherever the limitations of the theory are satisfied. For the self-induced disturbances and the more interesting examples of the forced disturbances, the dominant blade characteristic is the dependence of total pressure loss, rather than the turning angle, upon the local blade inlet angle.

  6. Evolution of Unsteady Groundwater Flow Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Xing; Jin, Menggui; Niu, Hong

    2016-04-01

    Natural groundwater flow is usually transient, especially in long time scale. A theoretical approach on unsteady groundwater flow systems was adopted to highlight some of the knowledge gaps in the evolution of groundwater flow systems. The specific consideration was focused on evolution of groundwater flow systems from unsteady to steady under natural and mining conditions. Two analytical solutions were developed, using segregation variable method to calculate the hydraulic head under steady and unsteady flow conditions. The impact of anisotropy ratio, hydraulic conductivity (K) and specific yield (μs) on the flow patterns were analyzed. The results showed that the area of the equal velocity region increased and the penetrating depth of the flow system decreased while the anisotropy ratio (ɛ = °Kx-/Kz--) increased. Stagnant zones were found in the flow field where the directions of streamlines were opposite. These stagnant zones moved up when the horizontal hydraulic conductivity increased. The results of the study on transient flow indicated a positive impact on hydraulic head with an increase of hydraulic conductivity, while a negative effect on hydraulic head was observed when the specific yield was enhanced. An unsteady numerical model of groundwater flow systems with annual periodic recharge was developed using MODFLOW. It was observed that the transient groundwater flow patterns were different from that developed in the steady flow under the same recharge intensity. The water table fluctuated when the recharge intensity altered. The monitoring of hydraulic head and concentration migration revealed that the unsteady recharge affected the shallow local flow system more than the deep regional flow system. The groundwater flow systems fluctuated with the action of one or more pumping wells. The comparison of steady and unsteady groundwater flow observation indicated that the unsteady flow patterns cannot be simulated by the steady model when the condition

  7. Numerical simulations of unsteady flows in turbomachines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorney, Daniel Joseph

    The performance of axial and centrifugal turbomachines is significantly affected by the presence of unsteady and viscous flow mechanisms. Most contemporary design systems, however, use steady or linearized unsteady inviscid flow analyses to generate new blade shapes. In an effort to increase the understanding of unsteady viscous flows in turbomachinery blade rows, and to determine the limitations of linearized inviscid flow analyses, a two-part investigation was conducted. In the first portion of this investigation, a nonlinear viscous flow analysis was developed for the prediction of unsteady flows in two dimensional axial turbomachinery blade rows. The boundary conditions were formulated to allow the specification of vortical, entropic and acoustic excitations at the inlet, and acoustic excitations at exit, of a cascade. Numerical simulations were performed for flat plate and compressor exit guide vane cascades, and the predicted results were compared with solutions from classical linearized theory and linearized inviscid flow analysis. The unsteady pressure fields predicted with the current analysis showed close agreement with the linearized solutions for low to moderate temporal frequency vortical and acoustic excitations. As the temporal frequency of the excitations was increased, nonlinear effects caused discrepancies to develop between the linearized and Navier-Stokes solution sets. The inclusion of viscosity had a significant impact on the unsteady vorticity field, but only a minimal effect on the unsteady pressure field. In the second part of this investigation, a quasi-three-dimensional Navier-Stokes analysis was modified and applied to flows in centrifugal turbomachinery blade rows. Inviscid and viscous flow simulations were performed for a centrifugal impeller at three operating conditions. By comparing the predicted and experimental circumferential distributions of the relative frame velocity and flow angle downstream of the impeller, it was

  8. High Fidelity Simulations of Unsteady Flow through Turbopumps and Flowliners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiris, Cetin C.; Kwak, dochan; Chan, William; Housman, Jeff

    2006-01-01

    High fidelity computations were carried out to analyze the orbiter LH2 feedline flowliner. Computations were performed on the Columbia platform which is a 10,240-processor supercluster consisting of 20 Altix nodes with 512 processor each. Various computational models were used to characterize the unsteady flow features in the turbopump, including the orbiter Low-Pressure-Fuel-Turbopump (LPFTP) inducer, the orbiter manifold and a test article used to represent the manifold. Unsteady flow originating from the orbiter LPFTP inducer is one of the major contributors to the high frequency cyclic loading that results in high cycle fatigue damage to the gimbal flowliners just upstream of the LPFTP. The flow fields for the orbiter manifold and representative test article are computed and analyzed for similarities and differences. The incompressible Navier-Stokes flow solver INS3D, based on the artificial compressibility method, was used to compute the flow of liquid hydrogen in each test article.

  9. Current Issues in Unsteady Turbomachinery Flows (Images)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Povinelli, Louis

    2004-01-01

    Among the numerous causes for unsteadiness in turbo machinery flows are turbulence and flow environment, wakes from stationary and rotating vanes, boundary layer separation, boundary layer/shear layer instabilities, presence of shock waves and deliberate unsteadiness for flow control purposes. These unsteady phenomena may lead to flow-structure interactions such as flutter and forced vibration as well as system instabilities such as stall and surge. A major issue of unsteadiness relates to the fact that a fundamental understanding of unsteady flow physics is lacking and requires continued attention. Accurate simulations and sufficient high fidelity experimental data are not available. The Glenn Research Center plan for Engine Component Flow Physics Modeling is part of the NASA 21st Century Aircraft Program. The main components of the plan include Low Pressure Turbine National Combustor Code. The goals, technical output and benefits/impacts of each element are described in the presentation. The specific areas selected for discussion in this presentation are blade wake interactions, flow control, and combustor exit turbulence and modeling.

  10. User's Manual for DuctE3D: A Program for 3D Euler Unsteady Aerodynamic and Aeroelastic Analysis of Ducted Fans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, R.; Reddy, T. S. R.

    1997-01-01

    The program DuctE3D is used for steady or unsteady aerodynamic and aeroelastic analysis of ducted fans. This guide describes the input data required and the output files generated, in using DuctE3D. The analysis solves three dimensional unsteady, compressible Euler equations to obtain the aerodynamic forces. A normal mode structural analysis is used to obtain the aeroelastic equations, which are solved using either the time domain or the frequency domain solution method. Sample input and output files are included in this guide for steady aerodynamic analysis and aeroelastic analysis of an isolated fan row.

  11. Research on unsteady transonic flow theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Revell, J. D.

    1973-01-01

    A two-dimensional theory is considered for the unsteady flow disturbances caused by aeroelastic deformations of a thick wing at high subsonic freestream Mach numbers, having a single, internally embedded supercritical (locally supersonic) steady flow region adjacent to the low pressure side of the wing. The theory develops a matrix of unsteady aerodynamic influence coefficients (AICs) suitable as a strip theory for aeroelastic analysis of large aspect ratio thick wings of moderate sweep, typical of a wide class of current and future aircraft. The theory derives the linearized unsteady flow solutions separately for both the subcritical and supercritical regions. These solutions are coupled together to give the requisite (wing pressure-downwash) AICs by the intermediate step of defining flow disturbances on the sonic line, and at the shock wave; these intermediate quantities are then algebraically eliminated by expressing them in terms of the wing surface downwash.

  12. Unsteady separated flows - Novel experimental approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krothapalli, A.; Lourenco, L.

    1987-01-01

    A novel experimental technique, commonly referred to as laser speckle velocimetry or particle image displacement velocimetry (PIDV), is developed for the measurement of instantaneous velocity fields in unsteady and steady flows. The main advantage of this technique is the fact that the velocity field is measured with sufficient accuracy so that the distribution of vorticity can be calculated with accuracy. The PIDV technique, which is ideally suited for the study of unsteady separated flows, has been utilized to measure the development of the separated flow field generated by a high angle-of-attack (alpha = 30 deg) NACA 0012 airfoil, started impulsively from rest.

  13. Unsteady granular flows down an inclined plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parez, Stanislav; Aharonov, Einat; Toussaint, Renaud

    2016-04-01

    The continuum description of granular flows is still a challenge despite their importance in many geophysical and industrial applications. We extend previous works, which have explored steady flow properties, by focusing on unsteady flows accelerating or decelerating down an inclined plane in the simple shear configuration. We solve the flow kinematics analytically, including predictions of evolving velocity and stress profiles and the duration of the transient stage. The solution shows why and how granular materials reach steady flow on slopes steeper than the angle of repose and how they decelerate on shallower slopes. The model might facilitate development of natural hazard assessment and may be modified in the future to explore unsteady granular flows in different configurations.

  14. Unsteady granular flows down an inclined plane.

    PubMed

    Parez, Stanislav; Aharonov, Einat; Toussaint, Renaud

    2016-04-01

    The continuum description of granular flows is still a challenge despite their importance in many geophysical and industrial applications. We extend previous works, which have explored steady flow properties, by focusing on unsteady flows accelerating or decelerating down an inclined plane in the simple shear configuration. We solve the flow kinematics analytically, including predictions of evolving velocity and stress profiles and the duration of the transient stage. The solution shows why and how granular materials reach steady flow on slopes steeper than the angle of repose and how they decelerate on shallower slopes. The model might facilitate development of natural hazard assessment and may be modified in the future to explore unsteady granular flows in different configurations. PMID:27176375

  15. Unsteady granular flows down an inclined plane.

    PubMed

    Parez, Stanislav; Aharonov, Einat; Toussaint, Renaud

    2016-04-01

    The continuum description of granular flows is still a challenge despite their importance in many geophysical and industrial applications. We extend previous works, which have explored steady flow properties, by focusing on unsteady flows accelerating or decelerating down an inclined plane in the simple shear configuration. We solve the flow kinematics analytically, including predictions of evolving velocity and stress profiles and the duration of the transient stage. The solution shows why and how granular materials reach steady flow on slopes steeper than the angle of repose and how they decelerate on shallower slopes. The model might facilitate development of natural hazard assessment and may be modified in the future to explore unsteady granular flows in different configurations.

  16. Progress in Unsteady Turbopump Flow Simulations Using Overset Grid Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiris, Cetin C.; Chan, William; Kwak, Dochan

    2002-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation provides information on unsteady flow simulations for the Second Generation RLV (Reusable Launch Vehicle) baseline turbopump. Three impeller rotations were simulated by using a 34.3 million grid points model. MPI/OpenMP hybrid parallelism and MLP shared memory parallelism has been implemented and benchmarked in INS3D, an incompressible Navier-Stokes solver. For RLV turbopump simulations a speed up of more than 30 times has been obtained. Moving boundary capability is obtained by using the DCF module. Scripting capability from CAD geometry to solution is developed. Unsteady flow simulations for advanced consortium impeller/diffuser by using a 39 million grid points model are currently underway. 1.2 impeller rotations are completed. The fluid/structure coupling is initiated.

  17. Unsteady separation experiments on 2-D airfoils, 3-D wings, and model helicopter rotors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorber, Peter F.; Carta, Franklin O.

    1992-01-01

    Information on unsteady separation and dynamic stall is being obtained from two experimental programs that have been underway at United Technologies Research Center since 1984. The first program is designed to obtain detailed surface pressure and boundary layer condition information during high amplitude pitching oscillations of a large (17.3 in. chord) model wing in a wind tunnel. The second program involves the construction and testing of a pressure-instrumented model helicopter rotor. This presentation describes some of the results of these experiments, and in particular compares the detailed dynamic stall inception information obtained from the oscillating wing with the unsteady separation and reverse flow results measured on the retreating blade side of the model rotor during wind tunnel testing.

  18. A numerical method for solving the 3D unsteady incompressible Navier Stokes equations in curvilinear domains with complex immersed boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Liang; Sotiropoulos, Fotis

    2007-08-01

    A novel numerical method is developed that integrates boundary-conforming grids with a sharp interface, immersed boundary methodology. The method is intended for simulating internal flows containing complex, moving immersed boundaries such as those encountered in several cardiovascular applications. The background domain (e.g. the empty aorta) is discretized efficiently with a curvilinear boundary-fitted mesh while the complex moving immersed boundary (say a prosthetic heart valve) is treated with the sharp-interface, hybrid Cartesian/immersed-boundary approach of Gilmanov and Sotiropoulos [A. Gilmanov, F. Sotiropoulos, A hybrid cartesian/immersed boundary method for simulating flows with 3d, geometrically complex, moving bodies, Journal of Computational Physics 207 (2005) 457-492.]. To facilitate the implementation of this novel modeling paradigm in complex flow simulations, an accurate and efficient numerical method is developed for solving the unsteady, incompressible Navier-Stokes equations in generalized curvilinear coordinates. The method employs a novel, fully-curvilinear staggered grid discretization approach, which does not require either the explicit evaluation of the Christoffel symbols or the discretization of all three momentum equations at cell interfaces as done in previous formulations. The equations are integrated in time using an efficient, second-order accurate fractional step methodology coupled with a Jacobian-free, Newton-Krylov solver for the momentum equations and a GMRES solver enhanced with multigrid as preconditioner for the Poisson equation. Several numerical experiments are carried out on fine computational meshes to demonstrate the accuracy and efficiency of the proposed method for standard benchmark problems as well as for unsteady, pulsatile flow through a curved, pipe bend. To demonstrate the ability of the method to simulate flows with complex, moving immersed boundaries we apply it to calculate pulsatile, physiological flow

  19. Progress in Unsteady Turbopump Flow Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiris, Cetin C.; Chan, William; Kwak, Dochan; Williams, Robert

    2002-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation discusses unsteady flow simulations for a turbopump intended for a reusable launch vehicle (RLV). The simulation process makes use of computational grids and parallel processing. The architecture of the parallel computers used is discussed, as is the scripting of turbopump simulations.

  20. PROP3D: A Program for 3D Euler Unsteady Aerodynamic and Aeroelastic (Flutter and Forced Response) Analysis of Propellers. Version 1.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, R.; Reddy, T. S. R.

    1996-01-01

    This guide describes the input data required, for steady or unsteady aerodynamic and aeroelastic analysis of propellers and the output files generated, in using PROP3D. The aerodynamic forces are obtained by solving three dimensional unsteady, compressible Euler equations. A normal mode structural analysis is used to obtain the aeroelastic equations, which are solved using either time domain or frequency domain solution method. Sample input and output files are included in this guide for steady aerodynamic analysis of single and counter-rotation propellers, and aeroelastic analysis of single-rotation propeller.

  1. Filtered chorochronic interface as a capability for 3-D unsteady throughflow analysis of multistage turbomachinery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerolymos, G. A.

    2013-02-01

    This note reviews the widely used phased-lagged [Erdos, J. L., E. Alzner, and W. McNally. 1977. AIAA Journal 15: 1559-68.] approach and corresponding chorochronic interface relations [Gerolymos G. A., G. J. Michon, and J. Neubauer. 2002. Journal of Propulsion and Power 18: 1139-52.] and explores its potential extension to the approximate unsteady throughflow analysis of multistage turbomachinery. The basic relations pertaining to the binary blade-row interaction case, for which chorochronic periodicity is exact in a phase-averaged rans framework, are briefly formulated, and selected computational examples illustrate the application of the method. Then, the filtered chorochronic interface is defined as the unsteady counterpart of the well-known mixing-plane concept. This interface takes into account only those tθ-waves which are compatible with the interaction of the immediately upstream and downstream blade-rows. The concept, which is similar to the decomposition-and-superposition method [Li, H. D., and L. He. 2005. ASME J ournal of Turbomachinery 127: 589-98.], is illustrated by 3-D computations of a ½-stage transonic compressor.

  2. XML3D and Xflow: combining declarative 3D for the Web with generic data flows.

    PubMed

    Klein, Felix; Sons, Kristian; Rubinstein, Dmitri; Slusallek, Philipp

    2013-01-01

    Researchers have combined XML3D, which provides declarative, interactive 3D scene descriptions based on HTML5, with Xflow, a language for declarative, high-performance data processing. The result lets Web developers combine a 3D scene graph with data flows for dynamic meshes, animations, image processing, and postprocessing. PMID:24808080

  3. Unsteady Airloads on Airfoils in Reverse Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lind, Andrew; Jones, Anya

    2014-11-01

    This work gives insight into the influence of airfoil characteristics on unsteady airloads for rotor applications where local airfoil sections may operate at high and/or reverse flow angles of attack. Two-dimensional wind tunnel experiments have been performed on four airfoil sections to investigate the effects of thickness, camber, and trailing edge shape on unsteady airloads (lift, pressure drag, and pitching moment). These model rotor blades were tested through 360 deg of incidence for 104 <=Re <=106 . Unsteady pressure transducers were mounted on the airfoil surface to measure the high frequency, dynamic pressure variations. The temporal evolution of chordwise pressure distributions and resulting airloads is quantified for each airfoil in each of the three unsteady wake regimes present in reverse flow. Specifically, the influence of the formation, growth, and shedding of vortices on the surface pressure distribution is quantified and compared between airfoils with a sharp geometric trailing edge and those with a blunt geometric trailing edge. These findings are integral to mitigation of rotor blade vibrations for applications where airfoil sections are subjected to reverse flow, such as high-speed helicopters and tidal turbines.

  4. Unsteady jet flow computation towards noise prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soh, Woo-Yung

    1994-01-01

    An attempt has been made to combine a wave solution method and an unsteady flow computation to produce an integrated aeroacoustic code to predict far-field jet noise. An axisymmetric subsonic jet is considered for this purpose. A fourth order space accurate Pade compact scheme is used for the unsteady Navier-Stokes solution. A Kirchhoff surface integral for the wave equation is employed through the use of an imaginary surface which is a circular cylinder enclosing the jet at a distance. Information such as pressure and its time and normal derivatives is provided on the surface. The sound prediction is performed side by side with the jet flow computation. Retarded time is also taken into consideration since the cylinder body is not acoustically compact. The far-field sound pressure has the directivity and spectra show that low frequency peaks shift toward higher frequency region as the observation angle increases from the jet flow axis.

  5. Flow Fields Over Unsteady Three Dimensional Dunes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardy, R. J.; Reesink, A.; Parsons, D. R.; Ashworth, P. J.; Best, J.

    2013-12-01

    The flow field over dunes has been extensively measured in laboratory conditions and there is general understanding on the nature of the flow over dunes formed under equilibrium flow conditions. However, fluvial systems typically experience unsteady flow and therefore the sediment-water interface is constantly responding and reorganizing to these unsteady flows, over a range of both spatial and temporal scales. This is primarily through adjustment of bed forms (including ripples, dunes and bar forms) which then subsequently alter the flow field. This paper investigates, through the application of a numerical model, the influence of these roughness elements on the overall flow and the increase in flow resistance. A series of experiments were undertaken in a flume, 16m long and 2m wide, where a fine sand (D50 of 239μm) mobile bed was water worked under a range of unsteady hydraulic conditions to generate a series of quasi-equilibrium three dimensional bed forms. During the experiments flow was measured with acoustic Doppler velocimeters, (aDv's). On four occasions the flume was drained and the bed topography measured with terrestrial LiDAR to create digital elevation models. This data provide the necessary boundary conditions and validation data for a Large Eddy Simulation (LES) model, which provided a three dimensional time dependent prediction of flow over the four static beds. The numerical predicted flow is analyzed through a series of approaches, and included: i) standard Reynolds decomposition to the flow fields; ii) Eulerian coherent structure detection methods based on the invariants of the velocity gradient tensor; iii) Lagrangian coherent structure identification methods based upon direct Lyapunov exponents (DLE). The results show that superimposed bed forms can cause changes in the nature of the classical separated flow region in particularly the number of locations where vortices are shed and the point of flow reattachment, which may be important for

  6. Unsteady granular flows in a rotating tumbler.

    PubMed

    Pohlman, Nicholas A; Ottino, Julio M; Lueptow, Richard M

    2009-09-01

    The characteristics of steady granular flow in quasi-two-dimensional rotating tumblers have been thoroughly investigated and are fairly well understood. However, unsteady time-varying flow has not been studied in detail. The linear response of granular flow in quasi-two-dimensional rotating tumblers is presented for periodic forcing protocols via sinusoidal variation in the rotational speed of the tumbler and for step changes in rotational speed. Variations in the tumbler radius, particle size, and forcing frequency are explored. Similarities to steady flow include the fastest flow occurring at the free surface of the flowing layer and an instantaneous approximately linear velocity profile through the depth. The flowing layer depth varies by 2-5 particle diameters between minimum and maximum rotation rates. However, unsteady forcing also causes the flow to exhibit dynamic properties. For periodic rotational speeds, the phase lag of the flowing layer depth increases linearly with increasing input forcing frequency up to nearly 2.0 rad over 0-20 cycles per tumbler revolution. The amplitude responses of the velocity and shear rate show a resonance behavior unique to the system level parameters. The phase lag of all flow properties appears to be related to the number of particle contacts from the edge of the rotating tumbler. Characterization via step changes in rotational speed shows dynamic properties of overshoot (up to 35%) and rise times on the order of 0.2-0.7 s. The results suggest that the unsteady granular flow analysis may be beneficial for characterizing the "flowability" and "rheology" of granular materials based on particle size, moisture content, or other properties. PMID:19905105

  7. MODELING STRATEGIES FOR UNSTEADY TURBULENT FLOWS IN THE LOWER PLENUM OF THE VHTR

    SciTech Connect

    Richard W. Johnson

    2006-09-01

    Validation simulations are presented for turbulent flow in a staggered tube bank, geometry similar to that in the lower plenum of a block very high temperature reactor. Steady 2D RANS predictions are compared to unsteady 2D RANS results and experiment. The unsteady calculations account for the fact that nonturbulent fluctuations (due to vortex-shedding) are present in the flow. The unsteady computations are shown to predict the mean variables and the total shear stress quite well. Previous workers have presented results that indicated that 3D simulations were necessary to obtain reasonable results. Best practices are based on requirements for the ASME Journal of Fluids Engineering.

  8. Structure of unsteady flows at leading- and trailing-edges: Flow visualization and its interpretation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rockwell, D.; Atta, R.; Kramer, L.; Lawson, R.; Lusseyran, D.; Magness, C.; Sohn, D.; Staubli, T.

    1987-01-01

    Unsteady two- and three-dimensional flow structure at leading and trailing edges of bodies can be characterized effectively using recently developed techniques for acquisition and interpretation of flow visualization. The techniques addressed here include: flow image/surface pressure correlations; 3-D reconstruction of flow structure from flow images; and interactive interpretation of flow images with theoretical simulations. These techniques can be employed in conjunction with: visual correlation and ensemble-averaging, both within a given image and between images; recognition of patterns from images; and estimates of velocity eigenfunctions from images.

  9. Courant number and unsteady flow computation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lai, Chintu; ,

    1993-01-01

    The Courant number C, the key to unsteady flow computation, is a ratio of physical wave velocity, ??, to computational signal-transmission velocity, ??, i.e., C = ??/??. In this way, it uniquely relates a physical quantity to a mathematical quantity. Because most unsteady open-channel flows are describable by a set of n characteristic equations along n characteristic paths, each represented by velocity ??i, i = 1,2,....,n, there exist as many as n components for the numerator of C. To develop a numerical model, a numerical integration must be made on each characteristic curve from an earlier point to a later point on the curve. Different numerical methods are available in unsteady flow computation due to the different paths along which the numerical integration is actually performed. For the denominator of C, the ?? defined as ?? = ?? 0 = ??x/??t has been customarily used; thus, the Courant number has the familiar form of C?? = ??/??0. This form will be referred to as ???common Courant number??? in this paper. The commonly used numerical criteria C?? for stability, neutral stability and instability, are imprecise or not universal in the sense that r0 does not always reflect the true maximum computational data-transmission speed of the scheme at hand, i.e., Ctau is no indication for the Courant constraint. In view of this , a new Courant number, called the ???natural Courant number???, Cn, that truly reflects the Courant constraint, has been defined. However, considering the numerous advantages inherent in the traditional C??, a useful and meaningful composite Courant number, denoted by C??* has been formulated from C??. It is hoped that the new aspects of the Courant number discussed herein afford the hydraulician a broader perspective, consistent criteria, and unified guidelines, with which to model various unsteady flows.

  10. Unsteady Flow in Stenotic Blood Vessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rayz, Vitaliy L.; Devi Williamson, Shobha; Berger, Stanley A.; Saloner, David

    2003-11-01

    Recent studies show that many heart attacks and strokes occur from sudden rupture of partially occluding atherosclerotic plaque rather than total vessel occlusion. Our goal is to understand how the mechanical forces induced by blood flow on specific plaque deposits makes them vulnerable to rupture. Models of severely stenotic carotid bifurcations are created from MR images and grids generated for the flow domains. The three-dimensional, unsteady, incompressible Navier-Stokes equations in finite-volume form are solved numerically using physiological boundary conditions. During systole a high velocity jet forms at the stenotic throat in one of the branches, and a long recirculation zone is observed downstream of the plaque. During diastole the flow is more stagnant. The flow is highly three-dimensional and unsteady with chaotic streamlines. Whereas flow in healthy arteries is laminar, irregular geometries and sharp changes in vessel diameter of a severely stenotic artery significantly disrupt the flow, with consequences for shear and normal wall stresses at the wall, and important implications for plaque stability. Supported by NIH Grant HL61823

  11. 3D flow focusing for microfluidic flow cytometry with ultrasonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gnyawali, Vaskar; Strohm, Eric M.; Daghighi, Yasaman; van de Vondervoort, Mia; Kolios, Michael C.; Tsai, Scott S. H.

    2015-11-01

    We are developing a flow cytometer that detects unique acoustic signature waves generated from single cells due to interactions between the cells and ultrasound waves. The generated acoustic waves depend on the size and biomechanical properties of the cells and are sufficient for identifying cells in the medium. A microfluidic system capable of focusing cells through a 10 x 10 μm ultrasound beam cross section was developed to facilitate acoustic measurements of single cells. The cells are streamlined in a hydro-dynamically 3D focused flow in a 300 x 300 μm channel made using PDMS. 3D focusing is realized by lateral sheath flows and an inlet needle (inner diameter 100 μm). The accuracy of the 3D flow focusing is measured using a dye and detecting its localization using confocal microscopy. Each flowing cell would be probed by an ultrasound pulse, which has a center frequency of 375 MHz and bandwidth of 250 MHz. The same probe would also be used for recording the scattered waves from the cells, which would be processed to distinguish the physical and biomechanical characteristics of the cells, eventually identifying them. This technique has potential applications in detecting circulating tumor cells, blood cells and blood-related diseases.

  12. A Finite-Time Thermodynamics of Unsteady Fluid Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noack, Bernd R.; Schlegel, Michael; Ahlborn, Boye; Mutschke, Gerd; Morzyński, Marek; Comte, Pierre; Tadmor, Gilead

    2008-06-01

    Turbulent fluid has often been conceptualized as a transient thermodynamic phase. Here, a finite-time thermodynamics (FTT) formalism is proposed to compute mean flow and fluctuation levels of unsteady incompressible flows. The proposed formalism builds upon the Galerkin model framework, which simplifies a continuum 3D fluid motion into a finite-dimensional phase-space dynamics and, subsequently, into a thermodynamics energy problem. The Galerkin model consists of a velocity field expansion in terms of flow configuration dependent modes and of a dynamical system describing the temporal evolution of the mode coefficients. Each mode is treated as one thermodynamic degree of freedom, characterized by an energy level. The dynamical system approaches local thermal equilibrium (LTE) where each mode has the same energy if it is governed only by internal (triadic) mode interactions. However, in the generic case of unsteady flows, the full system approaches only partial LTE with unequal energy levels due to strongly mode-dependent external interactions. The FTT model is first illustrated by a traveling wave governed by a 1D Burgers equation. It is then applied to two flow benchmarks: the relatively simple laminar vortex shedding, which is dominated by two eigenmodes, and the homogeneous shear turbulence, which has been modeled with 1459 modes.

  13. Numerical and experimental study of unsteady flow field and vibration in radial inflow turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Kreuz-Ihli, T.; Filsinger, D.; Schulz, A.; Wittig, S.

    2000-04-01

    The blades of turbocharger impellers are exposed to unsteady aerodynamic forces, which cause blade vibrations and may lead to failures. An indispensable requirement for a safe design of radial inflow turbines is a detailed knowledge of the exciting forces. Up to now, only a few investigations relating to unsteady aerodynamic forces in radial turbines have been presented. To give a detailed insight into the complex phenomena, a comprehensive research project was initiated at the Institut fuer Thermische Stroemungsmaschinen, at the University of Karlsruhe. A turbocharger test rig was installed in the high-pressure, high-temperature laboratory of the institute. The present paper gives a description of the test rig design and the measuring techniques. The flow field in a vaneless radial inflow turbine was analyzed using laser-Doppler anemometry. First results of unsteady flow field investigations in the turbine scroll and unsteady phase-resolved measurements of the flow field in the turbine rotor will be discussed. Moreover, results from finite element calculations analyzing frequencies and mode shapes are presented. As vibrations in turbines of turbochargers are assumed to be predominantly excited by unsteady aerodynamic forces, a method to predict the actual transient flow in a radial turbine utilizing the commercial Navier-Stokes solver TASCflow3d was developed. Results of the unsteady calculations are presented and comparisons with the measured unsteady flow field are made. As a major result, the excitation effect of the tongue region in a vaneless radial inflow turbine can be demonstrated.

  14. Vortex identification and tracking in unsteady flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berson, Arganthaël; Michard, Marc; Blanc-Benon, Philippe

    2009-02-01

    The present Note deals with the identification and tracking of vortices in a time-resolved unsteady flow. The approach is based on the combination of two existing post-processing tools that are Galilean invariant functions: feature flow field f and vortex identification algorithm γ. An analytical development shows that the joint use of γ and the streamlines of f allows to identify and track the location of the center of a vortex core with a non-zero convection velocity. We discuss the applicability of this procedure to actual flows for which the assumptions of the analytical approach may not be strictly valid. The procedure is validated using PIV measurements performed in an oscillating flow in a model of thermoacoustic refrigerator. This method proves to be efficient for the automated analysis of convection processes when large numbers of vortices are involved. To cite this article: A. Berson et al., C. R. Mecanique 337 (2009).

  15. Unsteady Analysis of Turbine Main Flow Coupled with Secondary Air Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hah, Chunill

    2006-01-01

    Two numerical approaches are used to model the interaction between the turbine main gas flow and the wheelspace cavity seal flow. The 3-D, unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations are solved with a CFD code based on a structured grid to study the interaction between the turbine main gas flow and the wheelspace cavity seal flow. A CFD code based on an unstructured grid is used to solve detailed flow feature in the cavity seal which has a complex geometry. The numerical results confirm various observations from earlier experimental studies under similar flow conditions. When the flow rate through the rim cavity seal is increased, the ingestion of the main turbine flow into the rim seal area decreases drastically. However, a small amount of main gas flow is ingested to the rim seal area even with very high level of seal flow rate. This is due to the complex nature of 3-D, unsteady flow interaction near the hub of the turbine stage.

  16. Multigrid Computations of 3-D Incompressible Internal and External Viscous Rotating Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheng, Chunhua; Taylor, Lafayette K.; Chen, Jen-Ping; Jiang, Min-Yee; Whitfield, David L.

    1996-01-01

    This report presents multigrid methods for solving the 3-D incompressible viscous rotating flows in a NASA low-speed centrifugal compressor and a marine propeller 4119. Numerical formulations are given in both the rotating reference frame and the absolute frame. Comparisons are made for the accuracy, efficiency, and robustness between the steady-state scheme and the time-accurate scheme for simulating viscous rotating flows for complex internal and external flow applications. Prospects for further increase in efficiency and accuracy of unsteady time-accurate computations are discussed.

  17. Magnetosheath Flow Anomalies in 3-D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaisberg, O. L.; Burch, J. L.; Smirnov, V. N.; Avanov, L. A.; Moore, T. E.; Waite, J. H., Jr.; Skalsky, A. A.; Borodkova, N. L.; Coffey, V. N.; Gallagher, D. L.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Measurements of the plasma and magnetic field with high temporal resolution on the Interball Tail probe reveal many flow anomalies in the magnetosheath. They are usually seen as flow direction and number density variations, accompanied by magnetic field discontinuities. Large flow anomalies with number density variations of factor of 2 or more and velocity variations of 100 km/s or more are seen with periodicity of about I per hour. The cases of flow anomalies following in succession are also observed, and suggest their decay while propagating through the magnetosheath. Some magnetospheric disturbances observed in the outer magnetosphere after the satellite has crossed the magnetopause on the inbound orbit suggest their association with magnetosheath flow anomalies observed in the magnetosheath prior to magnetopause crossing.

  18. Flow unsteadiness effects on boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, Sreedhara V.

    1989-01-01

    The development of boundary layers at high subsonic speeds in the presence of either mass flux fluctuations or acoustic disturbances (the two most important parameters in the unsteadiness environment affecting the aerodynamics of a flight vehicle) was investigated. A high quality database for generating detailed information concerning free-stream flow unsteadiness effects on boundary layer growth and transition in high subsonic and transonic speeds is described. The database will be generated with a two-pronged approach: (1) from a detailed review of existing literature on research and wind tunnel calibration database, and (2) from detailed tests in the Boundary Layer Apparatus for Subsonic and Transonic flow Affected by Noise Environment (BLASTANE). Special instrumentation, including hot wire anemometry, the buried wire gage technique, and laser velocimetry were used to obtain skin friction and turbulent shear stress data along the entire boundary layer for various free stream noise levels, turbulence content, and pressure gradients. This database will be useful for improving the correction methodology of applying wind tunnel test data to flight predictions and will be helpful for making improvements in turbulence modeling laws.

  19. Rolling with the flow: bumblebees flying in unsteady wakes.

    PubMed

    Ravi, Sridhar; Crall, James D; Fisher, Alex; Combes, Stacey A

    2013-11-15

    Our understanding of how variable wind in natural environments affects flying insects is limited because most studies of insect flight are conducted in either smooth flow or still air conditions. Here, we investigate the effects of structured, unsteady flow (the von Karman vortex street behind a cylinder) on the flight performance of bumblebees (Bombus impatiens). Bumblebees are 'all-weather' foragers and thus frequently experience variable aerial conditions, ranging from fully mixed, turbulent flow to unsteady, structured vortices near objects such as branches and stems. We examined how bumblebee flight performance differs in unsteady versus smooth flow, as well as how the orientation of unsteady flow structures affects their flight performance, by filming bumblebees flying in a wind tunnel under various flow conditions. The three-dimensional flight trajectories and orientations of bumblebees were quantified in each of three flow conditions: (1) smooth flow, (2) the unsteady wake of a vertical cylinder (inducing strong lateral disturbances) and (3) the unsteady wake of a horizontal cylinder (inducing strong vertical disturbances). In both unsteady conditions, bumblebees attenuated the disturbances induced by the wind quite effectively, but still experienced significant translational and rotational fluctuations as compared with flight in smooth flow. Bees appeared to be most sensitive to disturbance along the lateral axis, displaying large lateral accelerations, translations and rolling motions in response to both unsteady flow conditions, regardless of orientation. Bees also displayed the greatest agility around the roll axis, initiating voluntary casting maneuvers and correcting for lateral disturbances mainly through roll in all flow conditions. Both unsteady flow conditions reduced the upstream flight speed of bees, suggesting an increased cost of flight in unsteady flow, with potential implications for foraging patterns and colony energetics in natural

  20. Rolling with the flow: bumblebees flying in unsteady wakes.

    PubMed

    Ravi, Sridhar; Crall, James D; Fisher, Alex; Combes, Stacey A

    2013-11-15

    Our understanding of how variable wind in natural environments affects flying insects is limited because most studies of insect flight are conducted in either smooth flow or still air conditions. Here, we investigate the effects of structured, unsteady flow (the von Karman vortex street behind a cylinder) on the flight performance of bumblebees (Bombus impatiens). Bumblebees are 'all-weather' foragers and thus frequently experience variable aerial conditions, ranging from fully mixed, turbulent flow to unsteady, structured vortices near objects such as branches and stems. We examined how bumblebee flight performance differs in unsteady versus smooth flow, as well as how the orientation of unsteady flow structures affects their flight performance, by filming bumblebees flying in a wind tunnel under various flow conditions. The three-dimensional flight trajectories and orientations of bumblebees were quantified in each of three flow conditions: (1) smooth flow, (2) the unsteady wake of a vertical cylinder (inducing strong lateral disturbances) and (3) the unsteady wake of a horizontal cylinder (inducing strong vertical disturbances). In both unsteady conditions, bumblebees attenuated the disturbances induced by the wind quite effectively, but still experienced significant translational and rotational fluctuations as compared with flight in smooth flow. Bees appeared to be most sensitive to disturbance along the lateral axis, displaying large lateral accelerations, translations and rolling motions in response to both unsteady flow conditions, regardless of orientation. Bees also displayed the greatest agility around the roll axis, initiating voluntary casting maneuvers and correcting for lateral disturbances mainly through roll in all flow conditions. Both unsteady flow conditions reduced the upstream flight speed of bees, suggesting an increased cost of flight in unsteady flow, with potential implications for foraging patterns and colony energetics in natural

  1. Recent Advances in Visualizing 3D Flow with LIC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Interrante, Victoria; Grosch, Chester

    1998-01-01

    Line Integral Convolution (LIC), introduced by Cabral and Leedom in 1993, is an elegant and versatile technique for representing directional information via patterns of correlation in a texture. Although most commonly used to depict 2D flow, or flow over a surface in 3D, LIC methods can equivalently be used to portray 3D flow through a volume. However, the popularity of LIC as a device for illustrating 3D flow has historically been limited both by the computational expense of generating and rendering such a 3D texture and by the difficulties inherent in clearly and effectively conveying the directional information embodied in the volumetric output textures that are produced. In an earlier paper, we briefly discussed some of the factors that may underlie the perceptual difficulties that we can encounter with dense 3D displays and outlined several strategies for more effectively visualizing 3D flow with volume LIC. In this article, we review in more detail techniques for selectively emphasizing critical regions of interest in a flow and for facilitating the accurate perception of the 3D depth and orientation of overlapping streamlines, and we demonstrate new methods for efficiently incorporating an indication of orientation into a flow representation and for conveying additional information about related scalar quantities such as temperature or vorticity over a flow via subtle, continuous line width and color variations.

  2. Lattice Boltzmann Method for 3-D Flows with Curved Boundary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mei, Renwei; Shyy, Wei; Yu, Dazhi; Luo, Li-Shi

    2002-01-01

    In this work, we investigate two issues that are important to computational efficiency and reliability in fluid dynamics applications of the lattice, Boltzmann equation (LBE): (1) Computational stability and accuracy of different lattice Boltzmann models and (2) the treatment of the boundary conditions on curved solid boundaries and their 3-D implementations. Three athermal 3-D LBE models (D3QI5, D3Ql9, and D3Q27) are studied and compared in terms of efficiency, accuracy, and robustness. The boundary treatment recently developed by Filippova and Hanel and Met et al. in 2-D is extended to and implemented for 3-D. The convergence, stability, and computational efficiency of the 3-D LBE models with the boundary treatment for curved boundaries were tested in simulations of four 3-D flows: (1) Fully developed flows in a square duct, (2) flow in a 3-D lid-driven cavity, (3) fully developed flows in a circular pipe, and (4) a uniform flow over a sphere. We found that while the fifteen-velocity 3-D (D3Ql5) model is more prone to numerical instability and the D3Q27 is more computationally intensive, the 63Q19 model provides a balance between computational reliability and efficiency. Through numerical simulations, we demonstrated that the boundary treatment for 3-D arbitrary curved geometry has second-order accuracy and possesses satisfactory stability characteristics.

  3. Turbulence modelling for unsteady separated flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradshaw, Peter

    1992-01-01

    The exact transport equations for turbulent (Reynolds) stresses have left-hand sides representing the 'substantial derivatives' of the Reynolds stresses, i.e., the rates of change of stress with respect to time, as seen by an observer following the mean motion of the fluid. Here the 'mean' is a statistical average for the turbulent motion, distinguished from the ordered unsteadiness on which it is superimposed: for a turbomachine blade or a cyclically-pitching airfoil, the mean is a phase average. Written in coordinates fixed with respect to a solid surface, the substantial derivative appears partly as an Eulerian time derivative at given spatial coordinate position and partly as a spatial derivative. Separation presents two specific problems to a turbulence model: (1) prediction of the flow near separation depends critically on the 'near-wall' part of the turbulence model, and (2) downstream of separation, a boundary layer changes gradually to a mixing layer.

  4. UFLIC: A Line Integral Convolution Algorithm for Visualizing Unsteady Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, Han-Wei; Kao, David L.; Chancellor, Marisa K. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    This paper presents an algorithm, UFLIC (Unsteady Flow LIC), to visualize vector data in unsteady flow fields. Using the Line Integral Convolution (LIC) as the underlying method, a new convolution algorithm is proposed that can effectively trace the flow's global features over time. The new algorithm consists of a time-accurate value depositing scheme and a successive feed-forward method. The value depositing scheme accurately models the flow advection, and the successive feed-forward method maintains the coherence between animation frames. Our new algorithm can produce time-accurate, highly coherent flow animations to highlight global features in unsteady flow fields. CFD scientists, for the first time, are able to visualize unsteady surface flows using our algorithm.

  5. Unsteady Flow Field in a Multistage Axial Flow Compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suryavamshi, N.; Lakshminarayana, B.; Prato, J.

    1997-01-01

    The flow field in a multistage compressor is three-dimensional, unsteady, and turbulent with substantial viscous effects. Some of the specific phenomena that has eluded designers include the effects of rotor-stator and rotor-rotor interactions and the physics of mixing of velocity, pressure, temperature and velocity fields. An attempt was made, to resolve experimentally, the unsteady pressure and temperature fields downstream of the second stator of a multistage axial flow compressor which will provide information on rotor-stator interaction effects and the nature of the unsteadiness in an embedded stator of a three stage axial flow compressor. Detailed area traverse measurements using pneumatic five hole probe, thermocouple probe, semi-conductor total pressure probe (Kulite) and an aspirating probe downstream of the second stator were conducted at the peak efficiency operating condition. The unsteady data was then reduced through an ensemble averaging technique which splits the signal into deterministic and unresolved components. Auto and cross correlation techniques were used to correlate the deterministic total temperature and velocity components (acquired using a slanted hot-film probe at the same measurement locations) and the gradients, distributions and relative weights of each of the terms of the average passage equation were then determined. Based on these measurements it was observed that the stator wakes, hub leakage flow region, casing endwall suction surface corner region, and the casing endwall region away from the blade surfaces were the regions of highest losses in total pressure, lowest efficiency and highest levels of unresolved unsteadiness. The deterministic unsteadiness was found to be high in the hub and casing endwall regions as well as on the pressure side of the stator wake. The spectral distribution of hot-wire and kulite voltages shows that at least eight harmonics of all three rotor blade passing frequencies are present at this

  6. Multigrid calculations of 3-D turbulent viscous flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yokota, Jeffrey W.

    1989-01-01

    Convergence properties of a multigrid algorithm, developed to calculate compressible viscous flows, are analyzed by a vector sequence eigenvalue estimate. The full 3-D Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations are integrated by an implicit multigrid scheme while a k-epsilon turbulence model is solved, uncoupled from the flow equations. Estimates of the eigenvalue structure for both single and multigrid calculations are compared in an attempt to analyze the process as well as the results of the multigrid technique. The flow through an annular turbine is used to illustrate the scheme's ability to calculate complex 3-D flows.

  7. Code verification for unsteady 3-D fluid-solid interaction problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Kintak Raymond; Étienne, Stéphane; Hay, Alexander; Pelletier, Dominique

    2015-12-01

    This paper describes a procedure to synthesize Manufactured Solutions for Code Verification of an important class of Fluid-Structure Interaction (FSI) problems whose behaviors can be modeled as rigid body vibrations in incompressible fluids. We refer this class of FSI problems as Fluid-Solid Interaction problems, which can be found in many practical engineering applications. The methodology can be utilized to develop Manufactured Solutions for both 2-D and 3-D cases. We demonstrate the procedure with our numerical code. We present details of the formulation and methodology. We also provide the reasonings behind our proposed approach. Results from grid and time step refinement studies confirm the verification of our solver and demonstrate the versatility of the simple synthesis procedure. In addition, the results also demonstrate that the modified decoupled approach to verify flow problems with high-order time-stepping schemes can be employed equally well to verify code for multi-physics problems (here, those of the Fluid-Solid Interaction) when the numerical discretization is based on the Method of Lines.

  8. Development of a nonlinear unsteady transonic flow theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahara, S. S.; Spreiter, J. R.

    1973-01-01

    A nonlinear, unsteady, small-disturbance theory capable of predicting inviscid transonic flows about aerodynamic configurations undergoing both rigid body and elastic oscillations was developed. The theory is based on the concept of dividing the flow into steady and unsteady components and then solving, by method of local linearization, the coupled differential equation for unsteady surface pressure distribution. The equations, valid at all frequencies, were derived for two-dimensional flows, numerical results, were obtained for two classses of airfoils and two types of oscillatory motions.

  9. Numerical studies of unsteady transonic flow over oscillating airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chyu, W. J.; Davis, S. S.

    1985-01-01

    A finite difference solution to the Navier-Stokes equations combined with a time varying grid generation technique was used to compute unsteady transonic flow over an oscillating airfoil. These computations were compared with experimental data (obtained at Ames Research Center) which form part of the AGARD standard configuration for aeroelastic analysis. A variety of approximations to the full Navier-Stokes equations was used to determine the effect of frequency, shock wave motion, flow separation, and airfoil geometry on unsteady pressures and overall air loads. Good agreement is shown between experiment and theory with the limiting factor being the lack of a reliable turbulence model for high Reynolds number, unsteady transonic flows.

  10. Incorporating unsteady flow-effects in flamelet-generated manifolds

    SciTech Connect

    Delhaye, S.; Somers, L.M.T.; van Oijen, J.A.; de Goey, L.P.H.

    2008-10-15

    Detailed simulations are performed for a series of steady and unsteady nonpremixed flames. A specific type of unsteady flamelet simulations are considered, i.e., flamelets subjected to (temporally) varying strain-rates. It is observed that the unsteady flame trajectories move closely along a 2D manifold describing the set of steady diffusion flames in composition space. Using the 2D manifold, unsteady simulations are performed. It is shown that there is a phase shift in the species mass fractions between the detailed simulations and the 2D FGM simulations. This phase shift can be avoided when an additional controlling variable is used. Using unsteady flamelet simulations, a 3D manifold is generated, which is parameterized using three controlling variables. Furthermore, this 3D FGM accurately predicts a broad range of the strain-rate parameters: the mean strain-rate, the applied amplitude, and the frequency of the sinusoidally varying strain-rate. Finally, it is shown that the aforementioned phase shift between the detailed simulations and the 3D FGM simulations disappears. (author)

  11. A multilevel adaptive projection method for unsteady incompressible flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howell, Louis H.

    1993-01-01

    There are two main requirements for practical simulation of unsteady flow at high Reynolds number: the algorithm must accurately propagate discontinuous flow fields without excessive artificial viscosity, and it must have some adaptive capability to concentrate computational effort where it is most needed. We satisfy the first of these requirements with a second-order Godunov method similar to those used for high-speed flows with shocks, and the second with a grid-based refinement scheme which avoids some of the drawbacks associated with unstructured meshes. These two features of our algorithm place certain constraints on the projection method used to enforce incompressibility. Velocities are cell-based, leading to a Laplacian stencil for the projection which decouples adjacent grid points. We discuss features of the multigrid and multilevel iteration schemes required for solution of the resulting decoupled problem. Variable-density flows require use of a modified projection operator--we have found a multigrid method for this modified projection that successfully handles density jumps of thousands to one. Numerical results are shown for the 2D adaptive and 3D variable-density algorithms.

  12. USM3D Predictions of Supersonic Nozzle Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Melissa B.; Elmiligui, Alaa A.; Campbell, Richard L.; Nayani, Sudheer N.

    2014-01-01

    This study focused on the NASA Tetrahedral Unstructured Software System CFD code (USM3D) capability to predict supersonic plume flow. Previous studies, published in 2004 and 2009, investigated USM3D's results versus historical experimental data. This current study continued that comparison however focusing on the use of the volume souring to capture the shear layers and internal shock structure of the plume. This study was conducted using two benchmark axisymmetric supersonic jet experimental data sets. The study showed that with the use of volume sourcing, USM3D was able to capture and model a jet plume's shear layer and internal shock structure.

  13. Unsteady flow separation in a turbine diffuser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duquesne, Pierre; Maciel, Yvan; Deschênes, Claire

    2015-08-01

    A three-dimensional unsteady flow separation in the straight diffuser of a model bulb turbine is investigated with planar two-component PIV measurements near the wall. The turbine is operated in two selected conditions that give rise to separation zones of different size and shape. The blockage effect induced by separation leads to a sudden drop in turbine efficiency and power extraction. The separation front fluctuates significantly both in location and in shape with no periodicity. From conditionally averaged results, it is deduced that the mean separation front is tilted azimuthally and that the mean separation skin friction line is composed of a saddle point on the diffuser side with one of its branches running along the diffuser bottom. Vortices and separation front critical points are analysed with POD-reconstructed instantaneous velocity fields. Separation surface vortices are generally bigger and stronger than turbulent vortices within or outside the separation zone, which suggests that different roll-up mechanisms are involved. The separation surface is irregular and is populated near the wall by a succession of foci and saddle points.

  14. Exact variational principle for 3-D unsteady heat conduction with second sound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Gaolian

    2006-12-01

    The exact variational formulation of the extended unsteady heat conduction equation with finite propagation speed (the 2nd sound speed) of hyperbolic type is derived herein via a systematic and natural way. Moreover, the boundary-and the physically acceptable initial-value conditions are accommodated in the variational principle by a novel method suggested just recently. In this way a perfect justification of the variational theory of transient heat conduction and a rigorous theoretical basis for the finite element analysis of heat conduction are provided.

  15. A flux-split solution procedure for unsteady flow calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pordal, H. S.; Khosla, P. K.; Rubin, S. G.

    1990-01-01

    The solution of reduced Navier Stokes (RNS) equations is considered using a flux-split procedure. Unsteady flow in a two dimensional engine inlet is computed. The problems of unstart and restart are investigated. A sparse matrix direct solver combined with domain decomposition strategy is used to compute the unsteady flow field at each instant of time. Strong shock-boundary layer interaction, time varying shocks and time varying recirculation regions are efficiently captured.

  16. Unsteady aerodynamics of vortical flows: Early and recent developments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atassi, H. M.

    1994-01-01

    The development of aerodynamic theories of streaming motions around bodies with unsteady vortical and entropic disturbances is reviewed. The basic concepts associated with such motions, their interaction with solid boundaries and their noise generating mechanisms are described. The theory was first developed in the approximation wherein the unsteady flow is linearized about a uniform mean lfow. This approach has been extensively developed and used in aeroelastic and aeroacoustic calculations. The theory was recently extended to account for the effect of distortion of the incident disturbances by the nonuniform mean flow around the body. This effect is found to have a significant influence on the unsteady aerodynamic force along the body surface and the sound radiated in the far field. Finally, the nonlinear characteristics of unsteady transonic flows are reviewed and recent results of linear and nonlinear computations are presented.

  17. High Fidelity Simulations for Unsteady Flow Through the Orbiter LH2 Feedline Flowliner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiris, Cetin C.; Kwak, Dochan; Chan, William; Housman, Jeffrey

    2005-01-01

    High fidelity computations were carried out to analyze the orbiter M2 feedline flowliner. Various computational models were used to characterize the unsteady flow features in the turbopump, including the orbiter Low-Pressure-Fuel-Turbopump (LPFTP) inducer, the orbiter manifold and a test article used to represent the manifold. Unsteady flow originating from the orbiter LPFTP inducer is one of the major contributors to the high frequency cyclic loading that results in high cycle fatigue damage to the gimbal flowliners just upstream of the LPFTP. The flow fields for the orbiter manifold and representative test article are computed and analyzed for similarities and differences. An incompressible Navier-Stokes flow solver INS3D, based on the artificial compressibility method, was used to compute the flow of liquid hydrogen in each test article.

  18. 3D Printed Micro Free-Flow Electrophoresis Device.

    PubMed

    Anciaux, Sarah K; Geiger, Matthew; Bowser, Michael T

    2016-08-01

    The cost, time, and restrictions on creative flexibility associated with current fabrication methods present significant challenges in the development and application of microfluidic devices. Additive manufacturing, also referred to as three-dimensional (3D) printing, provides many advantages over existing methods. With 3D printing, devices can be made in a cost-effective manner with the ability to rapidly prototype new designs. We have fabricated a micro free-flow electrophoresis (μFFE) device using a low-cost, consumer-grade 3D printer. Test prints were performed to determine the minimum feature sizes that could be reproducibly produced using 3D printing fabrication. Microfluidic ridges could be fabricated with dimensions as small as 20 μm high × 640 μm wide. Minimum valley dimensions were 30 μm wide × 130 μm wide. An acetone vapor bath was used to smooth acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene (ABS) surfaces and facilitate bonding of fully enclosed channels. The surfaces of the 3D-printed features were profiled and compared to a similar device fabricated in a glass substrate. Stable stream profiles were obtained in a 3D-printed μFFE device. Separations of fluorescent dyes in the 3D-printed device and its glass counterpart were comparable. A μFFE separation of myoglobin and cytochrome c was also demonstrated on a 3D-printed device. Limits of detection for rhodamine 110 were determined to be 2 and 0.3 nM for the 3D-printed and glass devices, respectively.

  19. 3D Printed Micro Free-Flow Electrophoresis Device.

    PubMed

    Anciaux, Sarah K; Geiger, Matthew; Bowser, Michael T

    2016-08-01

    The cost, time, and restrictions on creative flexibility associated with current fabrication methods present significant challenges in the development and application of microfluidic devices. Additive manufacturing, also referred to as three-dimensional (3D) printing, provides many advantages over existing methods. With 3D printing, devices can be made in a cost-effective manner with the ability to rapidly prototype new designs. We have fabricated a micro free-flow electrophoresis (μFFE) device using a low-cost, consumer-grade 3D printer. Test prints were performed to determine the minimum feature sizes that could be reproducibly produced using 3D printing fabrication. Microfluidic ridges could be fabricated with dimensions as small as 20 μm high × 640 μm wide. Minimum valley dimensions were 30 μm wide × 130 μm wide. An acetone vapor bath was used to smooth acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene (ABS) surfaces and facilitate bonding of fully enclosed channels. The surfaces of the 3D-printed features were profiled and compared to a similar device fabricated in a glass substrate. Stable stream profiles were obtained in a 3D-printed μFFE device. Separations of fluorescent dyes in the 3D-printed device and its glass counterpart were comparable. A μFFE separation of myoglobin and cytochrome c was also demonstrated on a 3D-printed device. Limits of detection for rhodamine 110 were determined to be 2 and 0.3 nM for the 3D-printed and glass devices, respectively. PMID:27377354

  20. Unsteady Shear Disturbances Within a Two Dimensional Stratified Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yokota, Jeffrey W.

    1992-01-01

    The origin and evolution of shear disturbances within a stratified, inviscid, incompressible flow are investigated numerically by a Clebsch/Weber decomposition based scheme. In contrast to homogeneous flows, within which vorticity can be redistributed but not generated, the presence of a density stratification can render an otherwise irrotational flow vortical. In this work, a kinematic decomposition of the unsteady Euler equations separates the unsteady velocity field into rotational and irrotational components. The subsequent evolution of these components is used to study the influence various velocity disturbances have on both stratified and homogeneous flows. In particular, the flow within a two-dimensional channel is used to investigate the evolution of rotational disturbances, generated or convected, downstream from an unsteady inflow condition. Contrasting simulations of both stratified and homogeneous flows are used to distinguish between redistributed inflow vorticity and that which is generated by a density stratification.

  1. Unsteady Flow in a Supersonic Turbine with Variable Specific Heats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorney, Daniel J.; Griffin, Lisa W.; Huber, Frank; Sondak, Douglas L.; Turner, James (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Modern high-work turbines can be compact, transonic, supersonic, counter-rotating, or use a dense drive gas. The vast majority of modern rocket turbine designs fall into these Categories. These turbines usually have large temperature variations across a given stage, and are characterized by large amounts of flow unsteadiness. The flow unsteadiness can have a major impact on the turbine performance and durability. For example, the Space Transportation Main Engine (STME) fuel turbine, a high work, transonic design, was found to have an unsteady inter-row shock which reduced efficiency by 2 points and increased dynamic loading by 24 percent. The Revolutionary Reusable Technology Turbopump (RRTT), which uses full flow oxygen for its drive gas, was found to shed vortices with such energy as to raise serious blade durability concerns. In both cases, the sources of the problems were uncovered (before turbopump testing) with the application of validated, unsteady computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to the designs. In the case of the RRTT and the Alternate Turbopump Development (ATD) turbines, the unsteady CFD codes have been used not just to identify problems, but to guide designs which mitigate problems due to unsteadiness. Using unsteady flow analyses as a part of the design process has led to turbine designs with higher performance (which affects temperature and mass flow rate) and fewer dynamics problems. One of the many assumptions made during the design and analysis of supersonic turbine stages is that the values of the specific heats are constant. In some analyses the value is based on an average of the expected upstream and downstream temperatures. In stages where the temperature can vary by 300 to 500 K, however, the assumption of constant fluid properties may lead to erroneous performance and durability predictions. In this study the suitability of assuming constant specific heats has been investigated by performing three-dimensional unsteady Navier

  2. Effects of 3D PIV post-processing on impulse and force analysis in vortical flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendelson, Leah; Techet, Alexandra

    2014-11-01

    Vortical flows measured using 3D PIV techniques are fundamentally filtered versions of physical phenomena, with velocity information lost below the length and time scales of the measurement system. In the context of propulsive vortices, such as those generated during biological locomotion, these factors, combined with experimental noise and error, can lead to inaccuracies in analysis of the vortex momentum and net thrust. As a result, while 3D velocity measurements remove many of the assumptions required to analyze planar PIV data, they should not be considered absolute physical quantities. Our work focuses on post-processing for 3D PIV data sets to enable the extraction of accurate, quantitative 3D force measurements for unsteady vortical propulsion. In this study, we compare utilizing measurement signal processing techniques, orthogonal decomposition, and identification of coherent structures to measure the impulse of a canonical vortex ring generated by a mechanical piston. In particular, we consider the ability of these methods to confront the influences of limited spatial resolution and arbitrary geometries, and make recommendations for a general procedure for propulsion analysis from 3D PIV data, regardless of which PIV technique is used to obtain the velocity fields.

  3. Joint 3d Estimation of Vehicles and Scene Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menze, M.; Heipke, C.; Geiger, A.

    2015-08-01

    driving. While much progress has been made in recent years, imaging conditions in natural outdoor environments are still very challenging for current reconstruction and recognition methods. In this paper, we propose a novel unified approach which reasons jointly about 3D scene flow as well as the pose, shape and motion of vehicles in the scene. Towards this goal, we incorporate a deformable CAD model into a slanted-plane conditional random field for scene flow estimation and enforce shape consistency between the rendered 3D models and the parameters of all superpixels in the image. The association of superpixels to objects is established by an index variable which implicitly enables model selection. We evaluate our approach on the challenging KITTI scene flow dataset in terms of object and scene flow estimation. Our results provide a prove of concept and demonstrate the usefulness of our method.

  4. Numerical simulation of swirling flow in complex hydroturbine draft tube using unsteady statistical turbulence models

    SciTech Connect

    Paik, Joongcheol; Sotiropoulos, Fotis; Sale, Michael J

    2005-06-01

    A numerical method is developed for carrying out unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (URANS) simulations and detached-eddy simulations (DESs) in complex 3D geometries. The method is applied to simulate incompressible swirling flow in a typical hydroturbine draft tube, which consists of a strongly curved 90 degree elbow and two piers. The governing equations are solved with a second-order-accurate, finite-volume, dual-time-stepping artificial compressibility approach for a Reynolds number of 1.1 million on a mesh with 1.8 million nodes. The geometrical complexities of the draft tube are handled using domain decomposition with overset (chimera) grids. Numerical simulations show that unsteady statistical turbulence models can capture very complex 3D flow phenomena dominated by geometry-induced, large-scale instabilities and unsteady coherent structures such as the onset of vortex breakdown and the formation of the unsteady rope vortex downstream of the turbine runner. Both URANS and DES appear to yield the general shape and magnitude of mean velocity profiles in reasonable agreement with measurements. Significant discrepancies among the DES and URANS predictions of the turbulence statistics are also observed in the straight downstream diffuser.

  5. Validation of TVD-schemes for unsteady turbomachinery flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engel, K.; Eulitzl, F.; Faden, M.; Pokorny, S.

    Well documented explicit TVD schemes are assessed in terms of time accuracy, propagation properties and computational work load with emphasis on their application to unsteady turbomachinery flow computations. Non-reflecting boundary conditions are in use for the flow entry and exit boundaries. As inviscid test cases serve the flow through a flat plate cascade excited by oscillating back pressure and the unsteady flow past an oscillating NACA-0012 profile. The shock induced turbulent boundary layer separation on an arc profile in a channel is studied qualitatively.

  6. A low order flow/acoustics interaction method for the prediction of sound propagation using 3D adaptive hybrid grids

    SciTech Connect

    Kallinderis, Yannis; Vitsas, Panagiotis A.; Menounou, Penelope

    2012-07-15

    A low-order flow/acoustics interaction method for the prediction of sound propagation and diffraction in unsteady subsonic compressible flow using adaptive 3-D hybrid grids is investigated. The total field is decomposed into the flow field described by the Euler equations, and the acoustics part described by the Nonlinear Perturbation Equations. The method is shown capable of predicting monopole sound propagation, while employment of acoustics-guided adapted grid refinement improves the accuracy of capturing the acoustic field. Interaction of sound with solid boundaries is also examined in terms of reflection, and diffraction. Sound propagation through an unsteady flow field is examined using static and dynamic flow/acoustics coupling demonstrating the importance of the latter.

  7. An annotation system for 3D fluid flow visualization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loughlin, Maria M.; Hughes, John F.

    1995-01-01

    Annotation is a key activity of data analysis. However, current systems for data analysis focus almost exclusively on visualization. We propose a system which integrates annotations into a visualization system. Annotations are embedded in 3D data space, using the Post-it metaphor. This embedding allows contextual-based information storage and retrieval, and facilitates information sharing in collaborative environments. We provide a traditional database filter and a Magic Lens filter to create specialized views of the data. The system has been customized for fluid flow applications, with features which allow users to store parameters of visualization tools and sketch 3D volumes.

  8. Formation of coherent structures in 3D laminar mixing flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Speetjens, Michel; Clercx, Herman

    2009-11-01

    Mixing under laminar flow conditions is key to a wide variety of industrial systems of size extending from microns to meters. Examples range from the traditional (and still very relevant) mixing of viscous fluids via compact processing equipment down to emerging micro-fluidics applications. Profound insight into laminar mixing mechanisms is imperative for further advancement of mixing technology (particularly for complex micro-fluidics systems) yet remains limited to date. The present study concentrates on a fundamental transport phenomenon of potential relevance to laminar mixing: the formation of coherent structures in the web of 3D fluid trajectories due to fluid inertia. Such coherent structures geometrically determine the transport properties of the flow and better understanding of their formation and characteristics may offer ways to control and manipulate the mixing properties of laminar flows. The formation of coherent structures and its impact upon 3D transport properties is demonstrated by way of examples.

  9. Complex flow dynamics around 3D microbot prototypes.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Aranda, Sergio; Galindo-Rosales, Francisco J; Campo-Deaño, Laura

    2016-02-28

    A new experimental setup for the study of the complex flow dynamics around 3D microbot prototypes in a straight microchannel has been developed and assessed. The ultimate aim of this work is focused on the analysis of the morphology of different microbot prototypes to get a better insight into their efficiency when they swim through the main conduits of the human circulatory system. The setup consists of a fused silica straight microchannel with a 3D microbot prototype fastened in the center of the channel cross-section by an extremely thin support. Four different prototypes were considered: a cube, a sphere and two ellipsoids with aspect ratios of 1 : 2 and 1 : 4, respectively. Flow visualization and micro-particle image velocimetry (μPIV) measurements were performed using Newtonian and viscoelastic blood analogue fluids. An efficiency parameter, ℑ, to discriminate the prototypes in terms of flow disturbance has been proposed.

  10. Circulation methods in unsteady and three-dimensional flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Jiankun

    The largely unstudied extension of ultrasonic circulation measurement techniques (UCMT) to determine instantaneous lift in unsteady and three-dimensional flows has been addressed in this work. A combined analytical-numerical-experimental approach was undertaken with the goal of developing methods to properly convert the measurable time-dependent bound circulation to instantaneous lift force in unsteady flows. The measurement of mean sectional lift distribution along structure spans in three-dimensional flows was also studied. An unsteady correction method for thin airfoils was developed analytically and validated numerically (with finite element solutions) to properly convert bound circulation to instantaneous lift based on unsteady potential flow theory. Results show that the unsteady correction method can provide increased accuracy for unsteady lift prediction over the Kutta-Joukowski method used in previous unsteady flow studies. The unsteady correction model generally should be included for instantaneous lift prediction as long as the bound circulation is time-dependent. Using the same framework, we also studied determination of instantaneous lift forces on stationary bluff bodies (circular cylinders) at low Reynolds number (Re = 100). Various force models, including an approximate vortex force model, were studied. A new unsteady model, similar to that developed for the thin airfoils, using instantaneous bound circulation values, was proposed. Another important issue studied in this thesis is the effect of acoustic path sensitivity on bound circulation determination, which we found to be crucial for accurately predicting the instantaneous lift in both unsteady flat plate and cylinder flows. Proper path selection should take into account the location of boundary layers, attached and shed vortices. These findings will be useful in future experimental design of UCMT, PIV and LDV methods. Finally, we used the UCMT method to experimentally study the mean spatial

  11. A Volume Rendering Framework for Visualizing 3D Flow Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Hsien-Hsi; Li, Liya; Shen, Han-Wei; Tai, Wen-Kai

    In this paper, we present a volume rendering framework for visualizing 3D flow fields. We introduce the concept of coherence field which evaluates the representativeness of a given streamline set for the underlying 3D vector field. Visualization of the coherence field can provide effective visual feedback to the user for incremental insertion of more streamline seeds. Given an initial set of streamlines, a coherence volume is constructed from a distance field to measure the similarity between the existing streamlines and those in their nearby regions based on the difference between the approximate and the actual vector directions. With the visual feedback obtained from rendering the coherence volume, new streamline seeds can be selected by the user or by a heuristic seed selection algorithm to adaptively improve the coherence volume. An improved volume rendering technique that can render user-defined appearance textures is proposed to facilitate macro-visualization of 3D vector fields.

  12. The 3D Flow Field Around an Embedded Planet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fung, Jeffrey; Artymowicz, Pawel; Wu, Yanqin

    2015-10-01

    3D modifications to the well-studied 2D flow topology around an embedded planet have the potential to resolve long-standing problems in planet formation theory. We present a detailed analysis of the 3D isothermal flow field around a 5 Earth-mass planet on a fixed circular orbit, simulated using our graphics processing unit hydrodynamics code PEnGUIn. We find that, overall, the horseshoe region has a columnar structure extending vertically much beyond the Hill sphere of the planet. This columnar structure is only broken for some of the widest horseshoe streamlines, along which high altitude fluid descends rapidly into the planet’s Bondi sphere, performs one horseshoe turn, and exits the Bondi sphere radially in the midplane. A portion of this flow exits the horseshoe region altogether, which we refer to as the “transient” horseshoe flow. The flow continues as it rolls up into a pair of up-down symmetric horizontal vortex lines shed into the wake of the planet. This flow, unique to 3D, affects both planet accretion and migration. It prevents the planet from sustaining a hydrostatic atmosphere due to its intrusion into the Bondi sphere, and leads to a significant corotation torque on the planet, unanticipated by 2D analysis. In the reported simulation, starting with a {{Σ }}˜ {r}-3/2 radial surface density profile, this torque is positive and partially cancels with the negative differential Lindblad torque, resulting in a factor of three slower planet migration rate. Finally, we report 3D effects can be suppressed by a sufficiently large disk viscosity, leading to results similar to 2D.

  13. Lattice Boltzmann Simulation of a Flow over a 3D Cube in a wind Tunnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shock, Richard; Chen, Hudong; Yakhot, Victor

    2001-06-01

    It is argued that even a simplified version of the Boltzmann equation in a relaxation time approximation is equivalent to the hydrodynamic equations, involving infinite number of non-linear terms. Used for turbulence modelling, where the relaxation time and mean -free path are both space and field dependent, this equation is equivalent to the classic Navier-Stokes + turbulent model representations, provided the gradients are small. If, however, the non-equilibrium effects are strong, all higher non-linearities cannot be neglected. Thus, the Boltmann approximation can be extremely usefull for description of strongly non-equilibrium and time - dependent flows. This fact has been demonstrated on a wide variety of flows of both academic and industrial interest ranging from a simple 2D channel flow to 3D flows over various production cars. In this talk the quality of the approach is demonstrated on a simulation of the flow over a 3D cube in a wind tunnel. The predicted parameters of this strongly unsteady flow are compared with experimental data. The agreement is very good.

  14. Theory and Low-Order Modeling of Unsteady Airfoil Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramesh, Kiran

    Unsteady flow phenomena are prevalent in a wide range of problems in nature and engineering. These include, but are not limited to, aerodynamics of insect flight, dynamic stall in rotorcraft and wind turbines, leading-edge vortices in delta wings, micro-air vehicle (MAV) design, gust handling and flow control. The most significant characteristics of unsteady flows are rapid changes in the circulation of the airfoil, apparent-mass effects, flow separation and the leading-edge vortex (LEV) phenomenon. Although experimental techniques and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methods have enabled the detailed study of unsteady flows and their underlying features, a reliable and inexpensive loworder method for fast prediction and for use in control and design is still required. In this research, a low-order methodology based on physical principles rather than empirical fitting is proposed. The objective of such an approach is to enable insights into unsteady phenomena while developing approaches to model them. The basis of the low-order model developed here is unsteady thin-airfoil theory. A time-stepping approach is used to solve for the vorticity on an airfoil camberline, allowing for large amplitudes and nonplanar wakes. On comparing lift coefficients from this method against data from CFD and experiments for some unsteady test cases, it is seen that the method predicts well so long as LEV formation does not occur and flow over the airfoil is attached. The formation of leading-edge vortices (LEVs) in unsteady flows is initiated by flow separation and the formation of a shear layer at the airfoil's leading edge. This phenomenon has been observed to have both detrimental (dynamic stall in helicopters) and beneficial (high-lift flight in insects) effects. To predict the formation of LEVs in unsteady flows, a Leading Edge Suction Parameter (LESP) is proposed. This parameter is calculated from inviscid theory and is a measure of the suction at the airfoil's leading edge. It

  15. Numerical simulation of steady and unsteady asymmetric vortical flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kandil, Osama A.; Wong, Tin-Chee; Liu, C. H.

    1992-01-01

    The unsteady, compressible, thin-layer, Navier-Stokes (NS) equations are solved to simulate steady and unsteady, asymmetric, vortical laminar flow around cones at high incidences and supersonic Mach numbers. The equations are solved by using an implicit, upwind, flux-difference splitting (FDS), finite-volume scheme. The locally conical flow assumption is used and the solutions are obtained by forcing the conserved components of the flowfield vector to be equal at two axial stations located at 0.95 and 1.0. Computational examples cover steady and unsteady asymmetric flows around a circular cone and its control using side strakes. The unsteady asymmetric flow solution around the circular cone has also been validated using the upwind, flux-vector splitting (FVS) scheme with the thin-layer NS equations and the upwind FDS with the full NS equations. The results are in excellent agreement with each other. Unsteady asymmetric flows are also presented for elliptic- and diamond-section cones, which model asymmetric vortex shedding around round- and sharp-edged delta winds.

  16. Unsteady flow motions in the supraglottal region during phonation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Haoxiang; Dai, Hu

    2008-11-01

    The highly unsteady flow motions in the larynx are not only responsible for producing the fundamental frequency tone in phonation, but also have a significant contribution to the broadband noise in the human voice. In this work, the laryngeal flow is modeled either as an incompressible pulsatile jet confined in a two-dimensional channel, or a pressure-driven flow modulated by a pair of viscoelastic vocal folds through the flow--structure interaction. The flow in the supraglottal region is found to be dominated by large-scale vortices whose unsteady motions significantly deflect the glottal jet. In the flow--structure interaction, a hybrid model based on the immersed-boundary method is developed to simulate the flow-induced vocal fold vibration, which involves a three-dimensional vocal fold prototype and a two-dimensional viscous flow. Both the flow behavior and the vibratory characteristics of the vocal folds will be presented.

  17. Magma rheology from 3D geometry of martian lava flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allemand, P.; Deschamps, A.; Lesaout, M.; Delacourt, C.; Quantin, C.; Clenet, H.

    2012-04-01

    Volcanism is an important geologic agent which has been recently active at the surface of Mars. The composition of individual lava flows is difficult to infer from spectroscopic data because of the absence of crystallized minerals and the possible cover of the flows by dust. The 3D geometry of lava flows provides an interesting alternative to infer the chemical composition of lavas and effusion rates. Indeed, chemical composition exerts a strong control on the viscosity and yield strength of the magma and global geometry of lava flow reflects its emplacement rate. Until recently, these studies where realized from 2D data. The third dimension, which is a key parameter, was deduced or supposed from local shadow measurements on MGS Themis IR images with an uncertainty of more than 500%. Recent CTX data (MRO mission) allow to compute Digital Elevation Model at a resolution of 1 or 2 pixels (5 to 10 m) with the help of Isis and the Ames Stereo Pipeline pipe line. The CTX images are first transformed in format readable by Isis. The external geometric parameters of the CTX camera are computed and added to the image header with Isis. During a correlation phase, the homologous pixels are searched on the pair of stereo images. Finally, the DEM is computed from the position of the homologous pixels and the geometrical parameters of the CTX camera. Twenty DEM have been computed from stereo images showing lava flows of various ages on the region of Cerberus, Elyseum, Daedalia and Amazonis planitia. The 3D parameters of the lava flows have been measured on the DEMs and tested against shadows measurement. These 3D parameters have been inverted to estimate the viscosity and the yield strength of the flow. The effusion rate has also been estimated. These parameters have been compared to those of similar lava flows of the East Pacific rise.

  18. Finite element solver for 3-D compressible viscous flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, K. C.; Reddy, J. N.

    1986-01-01

    The space shuttle main engine (SSME) has extremely complex internal flow structure. The geometry of the flow domain is three-dimensional with complicated topology. The flow is compressible, viscous, and turbulent with large gradients in flow quantities and regions of recirculations. The analysis of the flow field in SSME involves several tedious steps. One is the geometrical modeling of the particular zone of the SSME being studied. Accessing the geometry definition, digitalizing it, and developing surface interpolations suitable for an interior grid generator require considerable amount of manual labor. There are several types of grid generators available with some general-purpose finite element programs. An efficient and robust computational scheme for solving 3D Navier-Stokes equations has to be implemented. Post processing software has to be adapted to visualize and analyze the computed 3D flow field. The progress made in a project to develop software for the analysis of the flow is discussed. The technical approach to the development of the finite element scheme and the relaxation procedure are discussed. The three dimensional finite element code for the compressible Navier-Stokes equations is listed.

  19. Three-dimensional Lagrangian transport phenomena in unsteady laminar flows driven by a rotating sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moharana, N. R.; Speetjens, M. F. M.; Trieling, R. R.; Clercx, H. J. H.

    2013-09-01

    Magnetic actuation of microscopic beads is a promising technique for enhancement and manipulation of scalar transport in micro-fluidic systems. This implies laminar and essentially three-dimensional (3D) unsteady flow conditions. The present study addresses fundamental transport phenomena in such configurations in terms of 3D coherent structures formed by the Lagrangian fluid trajectories in a 3D time-periodic flow driven by a rotating sphere. The flow field is represented by an exact Stokes solution superimposed by a nonlinear closed-form perturbation. This facilitates systematic "activation" and exploration of two fundamental states: (i) invariant spheroidal surfaces accommodating essentially 2D Hamiltonian dynamics; (ii) formation of intricate 3D coherent structures (spheroidal shells interconnected by tubes) and onset to 3D dynamics upon weak perturbation of the former state. Key to the latter state is emergence of isolated periodic points and the particular foliation and interaction of the associated manifolds, which relates intimately to coherent structures of the unperturbed state. The occurrence of such fundamental states and corresponding dynamics is (qualitative) similar to findings on a realistic 3D lid-driven flow subject to weak fluid inertia. This implies, first, a universal response scenario to weak perturbations and, second, an adequate representation of physical effects by the in essence artificial perturbation. The study thus offers important new insights into a class of flow configurations with great practical potential.

  20. Unsteady Analysis of Inlet-Compressor Acoustic Interactions Using Coupled 3-D and 1-D CFD Codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suresh, A.; Cole, G. L.

    2000-01-01

    It is well known that the dynamic response of a mixed compression supersonic inlet is very sensitive to the boundary condition imposed at the subsonic exit (engine face) of the inlet. In previous work, a 3-D computational fluid dynamics (CFD) inlet code (NPARC) was coupled at the engine face to a 3-D turbomachinery code (ADPAC) simulating an isolated rotor and the coupled simulation used to study the unsteady response of the inlet. The main problem with this approach is that the high fidelity turbomachinery simulation becomes prohibitively expensive as more stages are included in the simulation. In this paper, an alternative approach is explored, wherein the inlet code is coupled to a lesser fidelity 1-D transient compressor code (DYNTECC) which simulates the whole compressor. The specific application chosen for this evaluation is the collapsing bump experiment performed at the University of Cincinnati, wherein reflections of a large-amplitude acoustic pulse from a compressor were measured. The metrics for comparison are the pulse strength (time integral of the pulse amplitude) and wave form (shape). When the compressor is modeled by stage characteristics the computed strength is about ten percent greater than that for the experiment, but the wave shapes are in poor agreement. An alternate approach that uses a fixed rise in duct total pressure and temperature (so-called 'lossy' duct) to simulate a compressor gives good pulse shapes but the strength is about 30 percent low.

  1. Modeling of Unsteady Three-dimensional Flows in Multistage Machines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Kenneth C.; Pratt, Edmund T., Jr.; Kurkov, Anatole (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    Despite many years of development, the accurate and reliable prediction of unsteady aerodynamic forces acting on turbomachinery blades remains less than satisfactory, especially when viewed next to the great success investigators have had in predicting steady flows. Hall and Silkowski (1997) have proposed that one of the main reasons for the discrepancy between theory and experiment and/or industrial experience is that many of the current unsteady aerodynamic theories model a single blade row in an infinitely long duct, ignoring potentially important multistage effects. However, unsteady flows are made up of acoustic, vortical, and entropic waves. These waves provide a mechanism for the rotors and stators of multistage machines to communicate with one another. In other words, wave behavior makes unsteady flows fundamentally a multistage (and three-dimensional) phenomenon. In this research program, we have has as goals (1) the development of computationally efficient computer models of the unsteady aerodynamic response of blade rows embedded in a multistage machine (these models will ultimately be capable of analyzing three-dimensional viscous transonic flows), and (2) the use of these computer codes to study a number of important multistage phenomena.

  2. Minnowbrook V: 2006 Workshop on Unsteady Flows in Turbomachinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LaGraff, John E.; Ashpis, David E.; Oldfield, Martin L. G.; Gostelow, J. Paul

    2006-01-01

    This CD-ROM contain materials presented at the Minnowbrook V 2006 Workshop on Unsteady Flows in Turbomachinery, held at the Syracuse University Minnowbrook Conference Center, New York, on August 20-23, 2006. The workshop organizers were John E. LaGraff (Syracuse University), Martin L.G. Oldfield (Oxford University), and J. Paul Gostelow (University of Leicester). The workshop followed the theme, venue, and informal format of four earlier workshops: Minnowbrook I (1993), Minnowbrook II (1997), Minnowbrook III (2000), and Minnowbrook IV (2003). The workshop was focused on physical understanding of unsteady flows in turbomachinery, with the specific goal of contributing to engineering application of improving design codes for turbomachinery. The workshop participants included academic researchers from the United States and abroad and representatives from the gas-turbine industry and U.S. Government laboratories. The physical mechanisms discussed were related to unsteady wakes, active flow control, turbulence, bypass and natural transition, separation bubbles and turbulent spots, modeling of turbulence and transition, heat transfer and cooling, surface roughness, unsteady CFD, and DNS. This CD-ROM contains copies of the viewgraphs presented, organized according to the workshop sessions. Full-color viewgraphs and animations are included. The workshop summary and the plenary discussion transcripts clearly highlight the need for continued vigorous research in the technologically important area of unsteady flows in turbomachines.

  3. Stability limits of unsteady open capillary channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grah, Aleksander; Haake, Dennis; Rosendahl, Uwe; Klatte, J.?Rg; Dreyer, Michael E.

    This paper is concerned with steady and unsteady flow rate limitations in open capillary channels under low-gravity conditions. Capillary channels are widely used in Space technology for liquid transportation and positioning, e.g. in fuel tanks and life support systems. The channel observed in this work consists of two parallel plates bounded by free liquid surfaces along the open sides. The capillary forces of the free surfaces prevent leaking of the liquid and gas ingestion into the flow.In the case of steady stable flow the capillary pressure balances the differential pressure between the liquid and the surrounding constant-pressure gas phase. Increasing the flow rate in small steps causes a decrease of the liquid pressure. A maximum steady flow rate is achieved when the flow rate exceeds a certain limit leading to a collapse of the free surfaces due to the choking effect. In the case of unsteady flow additional dynamic effects take place due to flow rate transition and liquid acceleration. The maximum flow rate is smaller than in the case of steady flow. On the other hand, the choking effect does not necessarily cause surface collapse and stable temporarily choked flow is possible under certain circumstances.To determine the limiting volumetric flow rate and stable flow dynamic properties, a new stability theory for both steady and unsteady flow is introduced. Subcritical and supercritical (choked) flow regimes are defined. Stability criteria are formulated for each flow type. The steady (subcritical) criterion corresponds to the speed index defined by the limiting longitudinal small-amplitude wave speed, similar to the Mach number. The unsteady (supercritical) criterion for choked flow is defined by a new characteristic number, the dynamic index. It is based on pressure balances and reaches unity at the stability limit.The unsteady model based on the Bernoulli equation and the mass balance equation is solved numerically for perfectly wetting incompressible

  4. COMPUTATION OF UNSTEADY FLOWS IN THE ALABAMA RIVER.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jeffcoat, Hillary H.; Jennings, Marshall E.

    1987-01-01

    An application is described of the branch-network flow model, BRANCH, to the upper Alabama River system in central Alabama. The model is used to simulate one-dimensional unsteady flows and water surface elevations in approximately 60 river miles of the Alabama River system. Preliminary calibration was made using 72 hours of observed data. Simulated discharges are about 10 percent lower than observed discharges at higher discharge rates and computer flows lag observed flows by about 30 minutes.

  5. Unsteady transonic flow calculations for realistic aircraft configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batina, John T.; Seidel, David A.; Bland, Samuel R.; Bennett, Robert M.

    1987-01-01

    A transonic unsteady aerodynamic and aeroelasticity code has been developed for application to realistic aircraft configurations. The new code is called CAP-TSD which is an acronym for Computational Aeroelasticity Program - Transonic Small Disturbance. The CAP-TSD code uses a time-accurate approximate factorization (AF) algorithm for solution of the unsteady transonic small-disturbance equation. The AF algorithm is very efficient for solution of steady and unsteady transonic flow problems. It can provide accurate solutions in only several hundred time steps yielding a significant computational cost savings when compared to alternative methods. The new code can treat complete aircraft geometries with multiple lifting surfaces and bodies including canard, wing, tail, control surfaces, launchers, pylons, fuselage, stores, and nacelles. Applications are presented for a series of five configurations of increasing complexity to demonstrate the wide range of geometrical applicability of CAP-TSD. These results are in good agreement with available experimental steady and unsteady pressure data. Calculations for the General Dynamics one-ninth scale F-16C aircraft model are presented to demonstrate application to a realistic configuration. Unsteady results for the entire F-16C aircraft undergoing a rigid pitching motion illustrated the capability required to perform transonic unsteady aerodynamic and aeroelastic analyses for such configurations.

  6. Unsteady potential flow past a propeller blade section

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takallu, M. A.

    1990-01-01

    An analytical study was conducted to predict the effect of an oscillating stream on the time dependent sectional pressure and lift coefficients of a model propeller blade. The assumption is that as the blade sections encounter a wake, the actual angles of attack vary in a sinusoidal manner through the wake, thus each blade is exposed to an unsteady stream oscillating about a mean value at a certain reduced frequency. On the other hand, an isolated propeller at some angle of attack can experience periodic changes in the value of the flow angle causing unsteady loads on the blades. Such a flow condition requires the inclusion of new expressions in the formulation of the unsteady potential flow around the blade sections. These expressions account for time variation of angle of attack and total shed vortices in the wake of each airfoil section. It was found that the final expressions for the unsteady pressure distribution on each blade section are periodic and that the unsteady circulation and lift coefficients exhibit a hysteresis loop.

  7. Unsteady transonic flow over cascade blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Surampudi, S. P.; Adamczyk, J. J.

    1986-01-01

    An attempt is made to develop an efficient staggered cascade blade unsteady aerodynamics model for the neighborhood of March 1, representing the blade row by a rectilinear two-dimensional cascade of thin, flat plate airfoils. The equations of motion are derived on the basis of linearized transonic small perturbation theory, and an analytical solution is obtained by means of the Wiener-Hopf procedure. Making use of the transonic similarity law, the results obtained are compared with those of other linearized cascade analyses. A parametric study is conducted to find the effects of reduced frequency, stagger angle, solidity, and the location of the pitching axis on cascade stability.

  8. Unsteady transonic flow control around an airfoil in a channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamid, Md. Abdul; Hasan, A. B. M. Toufique; Ali, Mohammad; Mitsutake, Yuichi; Setoguchi, Toshiaki; Yu, Shen

    2016-04-01

    Transonic internal flow around an airfoil is associated with self-excited unsteady shock wave oscillation. This unsteady phenomenon generates buffet, high speed impulsive noise, non-synchronous vibration, high cycle fatigue failure and so on. Present study investigates the effectiveness of perforated cavity to control this unsteady flow field. The cavity has been incorporated on the airfoil surface. The degree of perforation of the cavity is kept constant as 30%. However, the number of openings (perforation) at the cavity upper wall has been varied. Results showed that this passive control reduces the strength of shock wave compared to that of baseline airfoil. As a result, the intensity of shock wave/boundary layer interaction and the root mean square (RMS) of pressure oscillation around the airfoil have been reduced with the control method.

  9. 3-D Flow Visualization of a Turbulent Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thurow, Brian; Williams, Steven; Lynch, Kyle

    2009-11-01

    A recently developed 3-D flow visualization technique is used to visualize large-scale structures in a turbulent boundary layer. The technique is based on the scanning of a laser light sheet through the flow field similar to that of Delo and Smits (1997). High-speeds are possible using a recently developed MHz rate pulse burst laser system, an ultra-high-speed camera capable of 500,000 fps and a galvanometric scanning mirror yielding a total acquisition time of 136 microseconds for a 220 x 220 x 68 voxel image. In these experiments, smoke is seeded into the boundary layer formed on the wall of a low-speed wind tunnel. The boundary layer is approximately 1.5'' thick at the imaging location with a free stream velocity of 24 ft/s yielding a Reynolds number of 18,000 based on boundary layer thickness. The 3-D image volume is approximately 4'' x 4'' x 4''. Preliminary results using 3-D iso-surface visualizations show a collection of elongated large-scale structures inclined in the streamwise direction. The spanwise width of the structures, which are located in the outer region, is on the order of 25 -- 50% of the boundary layer thickness.

  10. Optic flow aided navigation and 3D scene reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rollason, Malcolm

    2013-10-01

    An important enabler for low cost airborne systems is the ability to exploit low cost inertial instruments. An Inertial Navigation System (INS) can provide a navigation solution, when GPS is denied, by integrating measurements from inertial sensors. However, the gyrometer and accelerometer biases of low cost inertial sensors cause compound errors in the integrated navigation solution. This paper describes experiments to establish whether (and to what extent) the navigation solution can be aided by fusing measurements from an on-board video camera with measurements from the inertial sensors. The primary aim of the work was to establish whether optic flow aided navigation is beneficial even when the 3D structure within the observed scene is unknown. A further aim was to investigate whether an INS can help to infer 3D scene content from video. Experiments with both real and synthetic data have been conducted. Real data was collected using an AR Parrot quadrotor. Empirical results illustrate that optic flow provides a useful aid to navigation even when the 3D structure of the observed scene is not known. With optic flow aiding of the INS, the computed trajectory is consistent with the true camera motion, whereas the unaided INS yields a rapidly increasing position error (the data represents ~40 seconds, after which the unaided INS is ~50 metres in error and has passed through the ground). The results of the Monte Carlo simulation concur with the empirical result. Position errors, which grow as a quadratic function of time when unaided, are substantially checked by the availability of optic flow measurements.

  11. Forced unsteady separated flows on a 45 degree delta wing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huyer, Stephen Albert

    A great deal of current research activities has focused on possible exploitation of forced unsteady separated flows to provide enhanced lift and maneuvering characteristics. The formal and intentional utilization of these flows is currently being manifested in the form of the Advanced Tactical Fighter. The wing planform geometry of the ATF and other fighter aircraft is a delta wing. Under steady conditions, leading edge vortices are formed on each side of a delta wing. These vortices are mostly responsible for the attainment of lift to high angles of attack. Unsteady motion histories will likely alter the characteristics of this vortex as well as its development history. This will then present new difficulties in terms of lift enhancement and control. In order to successfully predict and optimally exploit the flight regimes offered by the ATF, greater understanding of the underlying physical mechanisms responsible for these unsteady flow fields must be obtained. The vortex dominated flow fields produced by an oscillating 45 degree delta wing were examined across a wide range of unsteady motion histories. Still and high speed video photography were employed to document the flow development processes and cortex kinematics. Force balance data recorded the unsteady aerodynamic loading produced. These methods allowed for a thorough qualitative and quantitative examination of the flow fields elicited by a pitching delta wing. The wide range of motion histories employed were found to have a tremendous impact in terms of flow development lift enhancement, drag reduction, and overall aerodynamic performance. Integrations of the data permitted speculation regarding the underlying physical mechanisms responsible for the observed phenomena. Experimental evidence allowed for hypotheses regarding the physical mechanisms of vorticity production, accumulation, convection, and diffusion.

  12. Development of iterative techniques for the solution of unsteady compressible viscous flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hixon, Duane; Sankar, L. N.

    1993-01-01

    During the past two decades, there has been significant progress in the field of numerical simulation of unsteady compressible viscous flows. At present, a variety of solution techniques exist such as the transonic small disturbance analyses (TSD), transonic full potential equation-based methods, unsteady Euler solvers, and unsteady Navier-Stokes solvers. These advances have been made possible by developments in three areas: (1) improved numerical algorithms; (2) automation of body-fitted grid generation schemes; and (3) advanced computer architectures with vector processing and massively parallel processing features. In this work, the GMRES scheme has been considered as a candidate for acceleration of a Newton iteration time marching scheme for unsteady 2-D and 3-D compressible viscous flow calculation; from preliminary calculations, this will provide up to a 65 percent reduction in the computer time requirements over the existing class of explicit and implicit time marching schemes. The proposed method has ben tested on structured grids, but is flexible enough for extension to unstructured grids. The described scheme has been tested only on the current generation of vector processor architecture of the Cray Y/MP class, but should be suitable for adaptation to massively parallel machines.

  13. Unsteady Newton-Busemann flow theory. I - Airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hui, W. H.; Tobak, M.

    1981-01-01

    Newtonian flow theory for unsteady flow at very high Mach numbers is completed by the addition of a centrifugal force correction to the impact pressures. The correction term is the unsteady counterpart of Busemann's centrifugal force correction to impact pressures in steady flow. For airfoils of arbitary shape, exact formulas for the unsteady pressure and stiffness and damping-in-pitch derivatives are obtained in closed form, which require only numerical quadratures of terms involving the airfoil shape. They are applicable to airfoils of arbitrary thickness having sharp or blunt leading edges. For wedges and thin airfoils these formulas are greatly simplified, and it is proved that the pitching motions of thin airfoils of convex shape and of wedges of arbitrary thickness are always dynamically stable according to Newton-Busemann theory. Leading-edge bluntness is shown to have a favorable effect on the dynamic stability; on the other hand, airfoils of concave shape tend toward dynamic instability over a range of axis positions if the surface curvature exceeds a certain limit. As a byproduct, it is also shown that a pressure formula recently given by Barron and Mandl for unsteady Newtonian flow over a pitching power-law shaped airfoil is erroneous and that their conclusion regarding the effect of pivot position on the dynamic stability is misleading.

  14. An alternating-direction implicit algorithm for unsteady potential flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chipman, R.; Jameson, A.

    1981-01-01

    An implicit finite-difference scheme is presented for the efficient computation of unsteady potential flow about airfoils. The formulation uses density and the velocity potential as dependent variables and is cast in conservation form to assure the theoretically correct determination of shockwave location and speed. To enable boundary conditions to be imposed directly on the airfoil surface, a time-varying sheared-rectilinear coordinate transformation is employed. Calculated time-history solutions on a pulsating airfoil are compared with the results of other unsteady transonic codes, including a previous method of the authors. The present method is demonstrated to be unconditionally stable and to give accurate solutions with sharply resolved shocks.

  15. Patterns of 3D flow in a rotating cylinder array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craig, Anna; Dabiri, John; Koseff, Jeffrey

    2015-11-01

    Experimental data are presented for large arrays of rotating, finite-height cylinders, which show that the three-dimensional flows are strongly dependent on the geometric and rotational configurations of the array. Two geometric configurations of the cylinders, each with two rotational configurations, were examined for a total of four arrays. 2D PIV was conducted in multiple intersecting horizontal and vertical sheets at a location far downstream of the leading edge of the array in order to build up a picture of the 3D developed flow patterns. It was found that the rotation of the cylinders drives the formation of streamwise and transverse flow patterns between cylinders. These horizontal flow patterns, by conservation of mass, drive vertical flows through the top of the array. As the array of rotating cylinders may provide insight into the flow kinematics of an array of vertical axis wind turbines, this planform flux is of particular interest as it would bring down into the array high kinetic energy fluid from above the array, thus increasing the energy resource available to turbines far downstream of the leading edge of the array.

  16. FLDA: Latent Dirichlet Allocation Based Unsteady Flow Analysis.

    PubMed

    Hong, Fan; Lai, Chufan; Guo, Hanqi; Shen, Enya; Yuan, Xiaoru; Li, Sikun

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, we present a novel feature extraction approach called FLDA for unsteady flow fields based on Latent Dirichlet allocation (LDA) model. Analogous to topic modeling in text analysis, in our approach, pathlines and features in a given flow field are defined as documents and words respectively. Flow topics are then extracted based on Latent Dirichlet allocation. Different from other feature extraction methods, our approach clusters pathlines with probabilistic assignment, and aggregates features to meaningful topics at the same time. We build a prototype system to support exploration of unsteady flow field with our proposed LDA-based method. Interactive techniques are also developed to explore the extracted topics and to gain insight from the data. We conduct case studies to demonstrate the effectiveness of our proposed approach. PMID:26356968

  17. Robustness of de Saint Venant equations for simulating unsteady flows

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baltzer, Robert A.; Schaffranek, Raymond W.; Lai, Chintu; ,

    1995-01-01

    Long-wave motion in open channels can be expressed mathematically by the one-dimensional de Saint Venant equations describing conservation of fluid mass and momentum. Numerical simulation models, based on either depth/velocity or water-level/discharge dependent-variable formulations of these equations, are typically used to simulate unsteady open-channel flow. However, the implications and significance of selecting either dependent-variable form - on model development, discretization and numerical solution processes, and ultimately on the range-of-application and simulation utility of resulting models - are not well known. Results obtained from a set of numerical experiments employing two models - one based on depth/velocity and the other on water-level/discharge equation formulations - reveal the sensitivity of the two equation sets to various channel properties and dynamic flow conditions. In particular, the effects of channel gradient, channel width-to-depth ratio, flow-resistance coefficient, and flow unsteadiness are analyzed and discussed.

  18. Fluid mechanics of dynamic stall. I - Unsteady flow concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ericsson, L. E.; Reding, J. P.

    1988-01-01

    Advanced military aircraft 'supermaneuverability' requirements entail the sustained operation of airfoils at stalled flow conditions. The present work addresses the effects of separated flow on vehicle dynamics; an analytic method is presented which employs static experimental data to predict the separated flow effect on incompressible unsteady aerodynamics. The key parameters in the analytic relationship between steady and nonsteady aerodynamics are the time-lag before a change of flow conditions can affect the separation-induced aerodynamic loads, the accelerated flow effect, and the moving wall effect.

  19. Two-dimensional unsteady flow in Comprex rotor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, H.

    1984-08-01

    A two-dimensional model of the unsteady compressible inviscid adiabatic flow in the meridional plane of a Comprex rotor of the type used as a Diesel supercharger is developed. The Euler equations governing the flow are solved numerically by the difference-scheme approach of MacCormack (1969, 1975), and numerical results are compared with experimental data in graphs and tables: good agreement is found.

  20. UNSTEADY DISPERSION IN RANDOM INTERMITTENT FLOW

    EPA Science Inventory

    The longitudinal dispersion coefficient of a conservative tracer was calculated from flow tests in a dead-end pipe loop system. Flow conditions for these tests ranged from laminar to transitional flow, and from steady to intermittent and random. Two static mixers linked in series...

  1. Unsteady flow phenomena in industrial centrifugal compressor stage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonciani, L.; Terrinoni, L.; Tesei, A.

    1982-01-01

    The results of an experimental investigation on a typical centrifugal compressor stage running on an atmospheric pressure test rig are shown. Unsteady flow was invariably observed at low flow well before surge. In order to determine the influence of the statoric components, the same impeller was repeatedly tested with the same vaneless diffuser, but varying return channel geometry. Experimental results show the strong effect exerted by the return channel, both on onset and on the behavior of unsteady flow. Observed phenomena have been found to confirm well the observed dynamic behavior of full load tested machines when gas density is high enough to cause appreciable mechanical vibrations. Therefore, testing of single stages at atmospheric pressure may provide a fairly accurate prediction of this kind of aerodynamic excitation.

  2. Unsteady Cavitation Simulation in Transient Process of Turbine Flow Meter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Gang; Liu, Shuhong; Cao, Guangjun

    In a turbine flow meter, cavitation will take place when local pressure falls below the vapor pressure of liquid products and it usually speeds up the rotor at the given high flow rate. In order to study its effects on meter factor, numerical simulation on transient unsteady turbulent flow is carried out based on the mixture homogeneous two phase cavitation model which is deduced from the theory of evaporation and condensation on a plane. The momentum source terms from the variation rotating speed of transient processes and the cavitation mass transport source terms are introduced into the transient unsteady governing equations. The results show that the meter factor grows with the increase of the cavitation number and meter factor will be affected by cavitation.

  3. A predictor-corrector technique for visualizing unsteady flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, David C.; Singer, Bart A.

    1995-01-01

    We present a method for visualizing unsteady flow by displaying its vortices. The vortices are identified by using a vorticity-predictor pressure-corrector scheme that follows vortex cores. The cross-sections of a vortex at each point along the core can be represented by a Fourier series. A vortex can be faithfully reconstructed from the series as a simple quadrilateral mesh, or its reconstruction can be enhanced to indicate helical motion. The mesh can reduce the representation of the flow features by a factor of one thousand or more compared with the volumetric dataset. With this amount of reduction it is possible to implement an interactive system on a graphics workstation to permit a viewer to examine, in three dimensions, the evolution of the vortical structures in a complex, unsteady flow.

  4. MPSalsa 3D Simulations of Chemically Reacting Flows

    DOE Data Explorer

    Many important scientific and engineering applications require a detailed analysis of complex systems with coupled fluid flow, thermal energy transfer, mass transfer and nonequilibrium chemical reactions. Currently, computer simulations of these complex reacting flow problems are limited to idealized systems in one or two spatial dimensions when coupled with a detailed, fundamental chemistry model. The goal of our research is to develop, analyze and implement advanced MP numerical algorithms that will allow high resolution 3D simulations with an equal emphasis on fluid flow and chemical kinetics modeling. In our research, we focus on the development of new, fully coupled, implicit solution strategies that are based on robust MP iterative solution methods (copied from http://www.cs.sandia.gov/CRF/MPSalsa/). These simulations are needed for scientific and technical areas such as: combustion research for transportation, atmospheric chemistry modeling for pollution studies, chemically reacting flow models for analysis and control of manufacturing processes, surface catalytic reactors for methane to methanol conversion and chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process modeling for production of advanced semiconductor materials (http://www.cs.sandia.gov/CRF/MPSalsa/).

    This project website provides six QuickTime videos of these simulations, along with a small image gallery and slideshow animations. A list of related publications and conference presentations is also made available.

  5. Modeling Electric Current Flow in 3D Fractured Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demirel, S.; Roubinet, D.; Irving, J.

    2014-12-01

    The study of fractured rocks is extremely important in a variety of research fields and applications such as hydrogeology, hydrocarbon extraction and long-term storage of toxic waste. As fractures are highly conductive structures in comparison to the surrounding rock, their presence can be either an advantage or a drawback. For hydrocarbon extraction, fractures allow for quick and easy access to the resource whereas for toxic waste storage their presence increases the risk of leakage and migration of pollutants. In both cases, the identification of fracture network characteristics is an essential step. Recently, we have developed an approach for modeling electric current flow in 2D fractured media. This approach is based on a discrete-dual-porosity model where fractures are represented explicitly, the matrix is coarsely discretized into blocks, and current flow exchange between the fractures and matrix is analytically evaluated at the fracture-scale and integrated at the block-scale [1]. Although this approach has shown much promise and has proven its efficiency for 2D simulations, its extension to 3D remains to be addressed. To this end, we assume that fractures can be represented as two-dimensional finite planes embedded in the surrounding matrix, and we express analytically the distribution of electric potential at the fracture scale. This fracture-scale expression takes into account the electric-current-flow exchange with the surrounding matrix and flow conservation is enforced at the fracture intersections. The fracture-matrix exchange is then integrated at the matrix-block scale where the electric current flow conservation at the block boundaries is formulated with a modified finite volume method. With the objective of providing a low-computational-cost modeling approach adapted to 3D simulations in fractured media, our model is (i) validated and compared to existing modeling approaches and, (ii) used to evaluate the impact of the presence of fractures on

  6. Energy flow in passive and active 3D cochlear model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yanli; Puria, Sunil; Steele, Charles

    2015-12-01

    Energy flow in the cochlea is an important characteristic of the cochlear traveling wave, and many investigators, such as von Békésy and Lighthill, have discussed this phenomenon. Particularly after the discovery of the motility of the outer hair cells (OHCs), the nature of the power gain of the cochlea has been a fundamental research question. In the present work, direct three-dimensional (3D) calculations of the power on cross sections of the cochlea and on the basilar membrane are performed based on a box model of the mouse cochlea. The distributions of the fluid pressure and fluid velocity in the scala vestibuli are presented. The power output from the OHCs and the power loss due to fluid viscous damping are calculated along the length of the cochlea. This work provides a basis for theoretical calculations of the power gain of the OHCs from mechanical considerations.

  7. Energy flow in passive and active 3D cochlear model

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yanli; Steele, Charles; Puria, Sunil

    2015-12-31

    Energy flow in the cochlea is an important characteristic of the cochlear traveling wave, and many investigators, such as von Békésy and Lighthill, have discussed this phenomenon. Particularly after the discovery of the motility of the outer hair cells (OHCs), the nature of the power gain of the cochlea has been a fundamental research question. In the present work, direct three-dimensional (3D) calculations of the power on cross sections of the cochlea and on the basilar membrane are performed based on a box model of the mouse cochlea. The distributions of the fluid pressure and fluid velocity in the scala vestibuli are presented. The power output from the OHCs and the power loss due to fluid viscous damping are calculated along the length of the cochlea. This work provides a basis for theoretical calculations of the power gain of the OHCs from mechanical considerations.

  8. Unsteady aerodynamics and flow control for flapping wing flyers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Steven; Nassef, Hany; Pornsinsirirak, Nick; Tai, Yu-Chong; Ho, Chih-Ming

    2003-11-01

    The creation of micro air vehicles (MAVs) of the same general sizes and weight as natural fliers has spawned renewed interest in flapping wing flight. With a wingspan of approximately 15 cm and a flight speed of a few meters per second, MAVs experience the same low Reynolds number (10 4-10 5) flight conditions as their biological counterparts. In this flow regime, rigid fixed wings drop dramatically in aerodynamic performance while flexible flapping wings gain efficacy and are the preferred propulsion method for small natural fliers. Researchers have long realized that steady-state aerodynamics does not properly capture the physical phenomena or forces present in flapping flight at this scale. Hence, unsteady flow mechanisms must dominate this regime. Furthermore, due to the low flight speeds, any disturbance such as gusts or wind will dramatically change the aerodynamic conditions around the MAV. In response, a suitable feedback control system and actuation technology must be developed so that the wing can maintain its aerodynamic efficiency in this extremely dynamic situation; one where the unsteady separated flow field and wing structure are tightly coupled and interact nonlinearly. For instance, birds and bats control their flexible wings with muscle tissue to successfully deal with rapid changes in the flow environment. Drawing from their example, perhaps MAVs can use lightweight actuators in conjunction with adaptive feedback control to shape the wing and achieve active flow control. This article first reviews the scaling laws and unsteady flow regime constraining both biological and man-made fliers. Then a summary of vortex dominated unsteady aerodynamics follows. Next, aeroelastic coupling and its effect on lift and thrust are discussed. Afterwards, flow control strategies found in nature and devised by man to deal with separated flows are examined. Recent work is also presented in using microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) actuators and angular speed

  9. Simulation of a Synthetic Jet in Quiescent Air Using TLNS3D Flow Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vatsa, Veer N.; Turkel, Eli

    2007-01-01

    Although the actuator geometry is highly three-dimensional, the outer flowfield is nominally two-dimensional because of the high aspect ratio of the rectangular slot. For the present study, this configuration is modeled as a two-dimensional problem. A multi-block structured grid available at the CFDVAL2004 website is used as a baseline grid. The periodic motion of the diaphragm is simulated by specifying a sinusoidal velocity at the diaphragm surface with a frequency of 450 Hz, corresponding to the experimental setup. The amplitude is chosen so that the maximum Mach number at the jet exit is approximately 0.1, to replicate the experimental conditions. At the solid walls zero slip, zero injection, adiabatic temperature and zero pressure gradient conditions are imposed. In the external region, symmetry conditions are imposed on the side (vertical) boundaries and far-field conditions are imposed on the top boundary. A nominal free-stream Mach number of 0.001 is imposed in the free stream to simulate incompressible flow conditions in the TLNS3D code, which solves compressible flow equations. The code was run in unsteady (URANS) mode until the periodicity was established. The time-mean quantities were obtained by running the code for at least another 15 periods and averaging the flow quantities over these periods. The phase-locked average of flow quantities were assumed to be coincident with their values during the last full time period.

  10. Unsteady Properties of a Separated and Reattaching Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackmar, Sarah

    2005-11-01

    Separated flows are commonly responsible for buffet on buildings, cars, and aircraft. The process of separation and reattachment that occurs in these instances is highly unsteady and turbulent, inducing large pressure fluctuations on the surface below. These unsteady effects are poorly understood and cannot be accurately predicted for many common practical problems. Low speed wind tunnel experiments (Re = 1x10^5 based on model diameter) have studied the unsteady properties of the separated and reattaching flow around a blunt-faced circular cylinder axially aligned with the freestream. The model was configurable with three different nose pieces: one flat front face, and two circular domed front faces, altogether providing three different flow separation angles. Extensive coverage of surface pressure fluctuation data provides detailed streamwise and spanwise distributions for mean and RMS pressure distributions, autospectra, streamwise and spanwise correlations, and cross-spectra. The separated shear layer is largely characterized by the low-frequency `flapping' of the shear layer as a whole and the development of large-scale vortices within the shear layer. Correlations between surface pressure fluctuations and flow field velocity fluctuation are used to relate these shear layer vortex structures to the mechanism of pressure generation.

  11. Experimental investigation of unsteady fan flow interaction with downstream struts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ng, W. F.; Obrien, W. F.; Olsen, T. L.

    1986-01-01

    In the present study of the unsteady pressure field produced on fan rotor blades by interaction with downstream struts, a single stage, low speed axial-flow fan was instrumented with blade-mounted high frequency pressure transducers. In addition, stationary pressure problems were used to map out the flowfield. Fluctuating pressure measurements are presented for blade midspan and 85-percent span on both the suction and pressure surfaces of the rotor blades at several positions of the downstream struts, and for two different flow coefficients. The strut is found to produce an effect on the unsteady pressure field on the rotor blades; this effect exceeds that due to the stator at design rotor-stator-strut spacing, but it rapidly declines as the struts are moved downstream.

  12. Unsteady Simulation of a Landing-Gear Flow Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Fei; Khorrami, Mehdi R.; Malik, Mujeeb R.

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents results of an unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes simulation of a landing-gear flow field. The geometry of the four-wheel landing gear assembly consists of several of the fine details including the oleo-strut, two diagonal struts, a door, yokes/pin and a flat-plate simulating the wing surface. The computational results, obtained by using 13.3 million grid points, are presented with an emphasis on the characteristics of the unsteadiness ensuing from different parts of the landing-gear assembly, including vortex shedding patterns and frequencies of dominant oscillations. The results show that the presence of the diagonal struts and the door significantly influence the flow field. Owing to the induced asymmetry, vortices are shed only from one of the rear wheels and not the other. Present computations also capture streamwise vortices originating from the upstream corners of the door.

  13. Unsteady Newton-Busemann flow theory. II - Bodies of revolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hui, W. H.; Tobak, M.

    1981-01-01

    A complete Newtonian flow theory is presented for unsteady flow past oscillating bodies of revolution of general shape at very high Mach numbers, consideration being given to a centrifugal force correction to the impact pressures. Expressions are obtained for the unsteady pressure and the stability derivatives are presented in closed form. It is stressed that the correction for the centrifugal force, which arises because of the curved trajectories that fluid particles follow along the surface subsequent to their impact, must not be neglected. If the correction is included, the theory is shown to be in excellent agreement with experimental results for relatively sharp cones. Theoretical results are in poor agreement with experimental results in air for bodies having moderate or large-nose bluntness.

  14. Conservation-form equations of unsteady open-channel flow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lai, C.; Baltzer, R.A.; Schaffranek, R.W.

    2002-01-01

    The unsteady open-channel flow equations are typically expressed in a variety of forms due to the imposition of differing assumptions, use of varied dependent variables, and inclusion of different source/sink terms. Questions often arise as to whether a particular equation set is expressed in a form consistent with the conservation-law definition. The concept of conservation form is developed to clarify the meaning mathematically. Six sets of unsteady-flow equations typically used in engineering practice are presented and their conservation properties are identified and discussed. Results of the theoretical development and analysis of the equations are substantiated in a set of numerical experiments conducted using alternate equation forms. Findings of these analytical and numerical efforts demonstrate that the choice of dependent variable is the fundamental factor determining the nature of the conservation properties of any particular equation form.

  15. MHD unsteady squeezing flow over a porous stretching plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayat, T.; Qayyum, A.; Alsaedi, A.

    2013-12-01

    This article is concerned with the unsteady squeezing flow of non-Newtonian fluid between two parallel plates. A rheological equation of second grade fluid is used. The fluid is electrically conducting in the presence of a magnetic field. A transformation procedure reduces the partial differential equations into the ordinary differential equations. A series solution is developed using a modern mathematical scheme. The solution expressions for velocity components are computed and discussed. In addition, the skin friction coefficient is analyzed through tabulated values.

  16. Some examples of unsteady transonic flows over airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ballhaus, W. F.; Magnus, R.; Yoshihara, H.

    1975-01-01

    A finite difference flutter analysis is presented for the NACA 64A-410 airfoil at M equals 0.72, where the incidence is abruptly changed from 2 to 4 degrees. The effect of gust loads is studied, and the unsteady flow adjusting process is displayed. The semi-implicit procedure of Ballhaus and Lomax (1974) is used to solve the small disturbance transonic potential equation. The physical aspects of the results, rather than the numerical details, are emphasized.

  17. Stabilized finite elements for 3D reactive flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braack, M.; Richter, Th.

    2006-07-01

    Objective of this work is the numerical solution of chemically reacting flows in three dimensions described by detailed reaction mechanism. The contemplated problems include, e.g. burners with 3D geometry. Contrary to the usual operator splitting method the equations are treated fully coupled with a Newton solver. This leads to the necessity of the solution of large linear non-symmetric, indefinite systems. Due to the complexity of the regarded problems we combine a variety of numerical methods, as there are goal-oriented adaptive mesh refinement, a parallel multigrid solver for the linear systems and economical stabilization techniques for the stiff problems.By blocking the solution components for every ansatz function and applying special matrix structures for each block of degrees of freedom, we can significantly reduce the required memory effort without worsening the convergence. Considering the Galerkin formulation of the regarded problems this is established by using lumping of the mass matrix and the chemical source terms. However, this technique is not longer feasible for standard stabilized finite elements as for instance Galerkin least squares techniques or streamline diffusion. Those stabilized schemes are well established for Navier-Stokes flows but for reactive flows, they introduce many further couplings into the system compared to Galerkin formulations. In this work, we discuss this issue in connection with combustion in more detail and propose the local projection stabilization technique for reactive flows. Beside the robustness of the arising linear systems we are able to maintain the problem-adapted matrix structures presented above. Finally, we will present numerical results for the proposed methods. In particular, we simulate a methane burner with a detailed reaction system involving 15 chemical species and 84 elementary reactions.

  18. Unsteady flow over flexible wings at different low Reynolds numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genç, Mustafa Serdar; Özden, Mustafa; Hakan Açikel, Halil; Demir, Hacımurat; Isabekov, Iliasbek

    2016-03-01

    In this study, unsteady flow around flexible membrane wing which had aspect ratio of 1 (AR=1) was investigated experimentally at various Reynolds numbers (Re = 25000 and Re = 50000). Smoke-wire technique for flow visualization over the flexible membrane wing was utilized in the experiments. Digital Image Correlation system (DIC) was used for measuring deformation of AR = 1 flexible membrane wing. Instantaneous deformation measurements of membrane wing were combined with the flow field measurements. In low aspect ratio flexible membrane wings, unsteadiness includes tip vortices and vortex shedding, and the combination of tip vortices. In these types of wings, complex unsteady deformations occurred due to vortex shedding. The results showed that the increasing angle of attack results in increase of membrane deformation. Moreover, it was concluded that analysis of the instantaneous deformation revealed chordwise and spanwise, modes which were due to the shedding of leading-edge vortices as well as tip vortices. Consequently, vibrational mode decreased and maximum standard deviation location approached to the trailing edge by reason of increasing angle of attack.

  19. ICEd-ALE Treatment of 3-D Fluid Flow.

    1999-09-13

    Version: 00 SALE3D calculates three-dimensional fluid flow at all speeds, from the incompressible limit to highly supersonic. An implicit treatment of the pressure calculation similar to that in the Implicit Continuous-fluid Eulerian (ICE) technique provides this flow speed flexibility. In addition, the computing mesh may move with the fluid in a typical Lagrangian fashion, be held in an Eulerian manner, or move in some arbitrarily specified way to provide a continuous rezoning capability. This latitudemore » results from use of an Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) treatment of the mesh. The partial differential equations solved are the Navier-Stokes equations and the mass and internal energy equations. The fluid pressure is determined from an equation of state and supplemented with an artificial viscous pressure for the computation of shock waves. The computing mesh consists of a three-dimensional network of arbitrarily shaped, six-sided deformable cells, and a variety of user-selectable boundary conditions are provided in the program.« less

  20. Unsteady flow about porous cambered plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindsey, Paul J.

    1988-06-01

    The current parachute-canopy design methodology is mainly empirical. Under certain conditions, parachutes have been observed to collapse during periods of rapid deceleration, subsequent to the initial inflation of the canopy with a resulting loss of drag and ultimately the payload. Studies began with a two-dimensional model of flow about a rigid, nonporous camber. Even though highly idealized, the purpose of the investigation was not a solution of an immediate practical problem but to understand the physics of the problem.

  1. 3D RECONNECTION AND FLOW DYNAMICS IN THE SSX EXPERIMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, M. R.; Cothran, C. D.; Cohen, D. H.; Horwitz, J.; Chaplin, V.

    2009-07-26

    Several new experimental results are reported from plasma merging studies at the Swarthmore Spheromak Experiment (SSX) with relevance to collisionless three-dimensional magnetic reconnection in laboratory and space plasmas. First, recent high-resolution velocity measurements of impurity ions using ion Doppler spectroscopy (IDS) show bi-directional outflow jets at 40 km/s (nearly the Alfven speed). The SSX IDS instrument measures with 1 mus or better time resolution the width and Doppler shift of the C{sub III} impurity (H plasma) 229.7 nm line to determine the temperature and line-averaged flow velocity during spheromak merging events. High flow speeds are corroborated using an in situ Mach probe. Second, ion heating to nearly 10{sup 6} K is observed after reconnection events in a low-density kinetic regime. Transient electron heating is inferred from bursts on a 4-channel soft x-ray array as well as vacuum ultraviolet spectroscopy. Third, the out-of-plane magnetic field and the in-plane Lorentz force in a reconnection volume both show a quadrupolar structure at the ion inertial scale (c/omega{sub pi}). Time resolved vector magnetic field measurements on a 3D lattice B(r, t)) enables this measurement. Earlier work at SSX has shown that formation of three-dimensional structure at the ion inertial scale is temporally and spatially correlated with the observation of superthermal, super-Alfvenic ions accelerated along the X-line normal to the local 2D plane of reconnection. Each of these measurements will be related to and compared with similar observations in a solar or space context. Keywords: spheromak, flow, heating.

  2. Unsteady Euler/Lagrange simulation of a confined bluff-body gas-solid turbulent flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chrigui, Mouldi; Hidouri, Ammar; Sadiki, Amsini; Janicka, Johannes

    2013-10-01

    An unsteady Euler-Lagrangian approach is adopted to predict the gaseous carrier and disperse phases flow dynamics. The turbulence is captured using two different methods, i.e. the unsteady Reynolds averaging based numerical simulation (URANS) and the large eddy simulation (LES). In the latter one, the dynamic Smagorinsky approach is used to model the sub-grid scale stresses. The time-dependent solid particle and gas phase flow properties of a confined bluff-body turbulent flow including two-way coupling effects are evaluated through comparisons with experimental data. The configuration under study features an important recirculation zone and has a mass loading of 22%. So, collision effects are not considered while tracking the disperse phase that consists of glass beads. A thermodynamically consistent turbulence modulation approach is applied for the determination of the source terms that account for the effect of particles on the turbulence level of the carrier phase. Within the URANS technique the dispersion of particles is captured by the Markov sequence approach; this model is modified by integrating a drift factor term while modeling the pressure gradient. A particular emphasis is put on the disperse phase feedback on the carrier phase and coupling procedure within each Eulerian time step along with an unsteady coupling of both codes, the (Eulerian) FASTEST3D and the (Lagrangian) LAG3D codes. Quantitative results of the disperse phase properties as well as those of the carrier phase are presented at different positions around the recirculation zone. The numerical results using both, the LES and/or the URANS delivered comparable results that agree reasonably with experimental data. However, a slight advantage of LES over URANS could be observed.

  3. Long time behavior of unsteady flow computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hariharan, S. I.

    1992-01-01

    This paper addresses a specific issue of time accuracy in the calculation of external aerodynamic problems. The class of problems discussed consists of inviscid compressible subsonic flows. These problems are governed by a convective equation. A key issue that is not understood is the long time behavior of the solution. This is important if one desires transient calculations of problems governed by the Euler equations or its derivatives such as the small disturbance equations or the potential formulations for the gust problem. Difficulties arise for two dimensional problems where the time rate decay solutions of the wave equation is slow. In concert with the above mentioned problem, exterior flows require proper modeling of the boundary conditions. In particular, this requires the truncation of infinite regions into finite regions with the aid of artificial boundaries. These boundary conditions must be consistent with the physics of the unbounded problem as well as consistent in time and space. Our treatment of the problem is discussed in detail and examples are given to verify the results.

  4. Boundary Conditions for Unsteady Compressible Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hariharan, S. I.; Johnson, D. K.

    1994-01-01

    This paper explores solutions to the spherically symmetric Euler equations. Motivated by the work of Hagstrom and Hariharan and Geer and Pope, we modeled the effect of a pulsating sphere in a compressible medium. The literature available on this suggests that an accurate numerical solution requires artificial boundary conditions which simulate the propagation of nonlinear waves in open domains. Until recently, the boundary conditions available were in general linear and based on nonreflection. Exceptions to this are the nonlinear nonreflective conditions of Thompson, and the nonlinear reflective conditions of Hagstrom and Hariharan. The former are based on the rate of change of the incoming characteristics; the latter rely on asymptotic analysis and the method of characteristics and account for the coupling of incoming and outgoing characteristics. Furthermore, Hagstrom and Hariharan have shown that, in a test situation in which the flow would reach a steady state over a long time, Thompson's method could lead to an incorrect steady state. The current study considers periodic flows and includes all possible types and techniques of boundary conditions. The technique recommended by Hagstrom and Hariharan proved superior to all others considered and matched the results of asymptotic methods that are valid for low subsonic Mach numbers.

  5. Pressure distribution in unsteady sink and source flows.

    PubMed

    Voropayev, S I

    2015-05-01

    Basic flow generated in a viscous incompressible fluid by a "point" sink (source) of mass is revised. In practice, such flow can be modeled by sucking (pushing) fluid from a thin tube with a small porous sphere at one end. Intuitively, by sucking (pushing) fluid, one creates low (high) pressure near the origin and a positive (negative) radial pressure gradient drives the fluid to (from) the origin. A simple analysis, however, shows that the pressure distribution for both steady flows is the same. Then a question arises: How does the fluid "know" in what direction to flow? To explain this "paradox" an unsteady flow is considered and the pressure terms responsible for the flow direction are derived. PMID:26066255

  6. Unsteadiness of Flow Structure on Low Swept Delta Wing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zharfa, Mohammadreza; Ozturk, Ilhan; Yavuz, Mehmet Metin

    2013-11-01

    The flow structure of low-sweep 35 degree delta wing has been analyzed experimentally using flow visualization and flow measurement techniques. Laser illuminated smoke visualization, Laser Doppler Anemometry (LDA), and surface pressure measurements are performed to understand the steady and unsteady behavior of the flow regimes. Reynolds number varying from 10,000 to 100,000 and attack angles varying from 3 to 10 are tested. For the corresponding Reynolds Numbers and attack angles, prestall and poststall regimes are identified. The amplitude and frequency of the pressure and velocity fluctuations at different locations are compared with the regions of reattachment, vortex breakdown, and stall. Using statistics and spectral analysis, the unsteadiness of flow is studied in detail. Both the lift performance of the wing and the regions possibly exposed to surface buffeting are tried to be interpreted. Using the results of the study, an effective active flow control strategy to delay stall and to reduce surface buffeting is going to be determined next. The project was supported by the Turkish Scientific and Technological Research Council of Turkey (3501 - 111M732).

  7. Observations and Measurements on Unsteady Cloud Cavitation Flow Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, L. X.; Yan, G. J.; Huang, B.

    2015-12-01

    The objectives of this paper are to investigate the unsteady structures and hydrodynamics of cavitating flows. Experimental results are presented for a Clark-Y hydrofoil, which is fixed at α=0°, 5° and 8°. The high-speed video camera and Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) are applied to investigate the transient flow structures. The dynamic measurement system is used to record the dynamic characteristics. The cloud cavitation exhibits noticeable unsteady characteristics. For the case of α=0°, there exit strong interactions between the attached cavity and the re-entrant flow. While for the case of α=8°, the re-entrant flow is relatively thin and the interaction between the cavity and re-entrant flow is limited. The results also present that the periodic collapse and shedding of the large-scale cloud cavitation, which leads to substantial increase of turbulent velocity fluctuations in the cavity region. Experimental evidence indicates that the hydrodynamics are clearly affected by the cavitating flow structures, the amplitude of load fluctuation are much higher for the cloud cavitating cases.

  8. The solving of one dimensional unsteady flow with difference methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Guangri; Shang, Yu; Wang, Rongsheng

    In this paper, one-dimensional unsteady gas flow equations are formulated with Riemann variables as the functions of time and space to be solved. By using the 'de Haller' test and a simple pipe flow with a temperature discontinuity, the equations are solved by difference methods of first-order accuracy and second-order accuracy for non-homentropic cases. As compared with the commonly used characteristic method, the results show the above-mentioned formulation and difference methods have the advantages of consuming less computer time and being easier to reach higher order accuracy. The application to turbocharged internal combustion engines is also discussed in this paper.

  9. A note on the unsteady cavity flow in a tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, J. H.; Acosta, A. J.

    1973-01-01

    The unsteady internal cavitating flow such as the one observed in a pump or a turbine is studied for a simple two-dimensional model of a base-cavitating wedge in an infinite tunnel and it is shown how the cavitation compliance can be calculated using the linearized free streamline theory. Numerical values are obtained for the limiting case of a free jet. Two important features are: First, the cavitation compliance is found to be of complex form, having additional resistive and reactive terms beyond the purely inertial oscillation of the whole channel in 'slug flow.' Second, the compliance has a strong dependence on frequency.

  10. Unsteady transonic aerodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Nixon, D.

    1989-01-01

    Various papers on unsteady transonic aerodynamics are presented. The topics addressed include: physical phenomena associated with unsteady transonic flows, basic equations for unsteady transonic flow, practical problems concerning aircraft, basic numerical methods, computational methods for unsteady transonic flows, application of transonic flow analysis to helicopter rotor problems, unsteady aerodynamics for turbomachinery aeroelastic applications, alternative methods for modeling unsteady transonic flows.

  11. Unsteady design-point flow phenomena in transonic compressors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gertz, J. B.; Epstein, A. H.

    1986-01-01

    High-frequency response probes which had previously been used exclusively in the MIT Blowndown Facility were successfully employed in two conventional steady state axial flow compressor facilities to investigate the unsteady flowfields of highly loaded transonic compressors at design point operation. Laser anemometry measurements taken simultaneously with the high response data were also analyzed. The time averaged high response data of static and total pressure agreed quite well with the conventional steady state instrumentation except for flow angle which showed a large spread in values at all radii regardless of the type of instrumentation used. In addition, the time resolved measurements confirmed earlier test results obtained in the MIT Blowdown Facility for the same compressor. The results of these tests have further revealed that the flowfields of highly loaded transonic compressors are heavily influenced by unsteady flow phenomena. The high response measurements exhibited large variations in the blade to blade flow and in the blade passage flow. The observed unsteadiness in the blade wakes is explained in terms of the rotor blades' shed vorticity in periodic vortex streets. The wakes were modeled as two-dimensional vortex streets with finite size cores. The model fit the data quite well as it was able to reproduce the average wake shape and bi-modal probability density distributions seen in the laser anemometry data. The presence of vortex streets in the blade wakes also explains the large blade to blade fluctuations seen by the high response probes which is simply due to the intermittent sampling of the vortex street as it is swept past a stationary probe.

  12. A rapid-distortion-theory turbulence model for developed unsteady wall-bounded flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brereton, G. J.; Mankbadi, R. R.

    1993-01-01

    A new approach to turbulence modeling in unsteady developed flows has recently been introduced, based on results of rapid distortion theory. The approach involves closing the k-epsilon equations for the organized unsteady component of the flow by modeling local unsteadiness as a rapid distortion of the local structure of the parent turbulent flow, in terms of an effective strain parameter alpha(sub eff). In this paper, the phase-conditioned equations of motion are developed to accommodate a new unsteady dissipation model and local effects of the slow-relaxation time scale of the parent flow. The model equations are tested against measurements of the response of a fully-developed turbulent pipe flow to the superposition of sinusoidal streamwise oscillation. Good agreement is found between measurements and predictions over a wide range of frequencies of unsteadiness, indicating that this approach may be particularly well suited to modeling of unsteady turbulent flows which are perturbations about a well characterized mean.

  13. Unsteadiness of the internal flow in an effervescent atomizer nozzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Moongeun; Fleck, Brian A.; Nobes, David S.

    2014-12-01

    In order to better understand the mechanisms that effect spray unsteadiness of effervescent atomizers and therefore to efficiently eliminate it, the two-phase flow pattern within the nozzle has been studied by pressure measurement and flow visualization. We found that the speed of sound in the two-phase flow can be predicted by the model suggested by Nguyen et al. (Int J Multiphase Flow 7:311-320, 1981) using an averaged void fraction value. Dominant peak frequencies of pressure fluctuations both inside and outside the mixing chamber become synchronized in the slug flow regime. We show that the slug passage frequency is linearly proportional to the speed of sound and almost equal to the fundamental frequency of the mixing chamber. At a constant liquid flow rate and as the gas flow rate is increased, pressure fluctuations reach a maximum value with the appearance of a synchronized peak frequency. The amplitude of pressure fluctuation is then insensitive to further increases in the gas flow rate. For a constant gas flow rate, the pressure fluctuation increases with the increment of the liquid flow rate, reaching the maximum value at the moment of transition from slug flow to the bubbly flow.

  14. Unsteady flow through in-vitro models of the glottis.

    PubMed

    Hofmans, G C J; Groot, G; Ranucci, M; Graziani, G; Hirschberg, A

    2003-03-01

    The unsteady two-dimensional flow through fixed rigid in vitro models of the glottis is studied in some detail to validate a more accurate model based on the prediction of boundary-layer separation. The study is restricted to the flow phenomena occurring within the glottis and does not include effects of vocal-fold movement on the flow. Pressure measurements have been carried out for a transient flow through a rigid scale model of the glottis. The rigid model with a fixed geometry driven by an unsteady pressure is used in order to achieve a high accuracy in the specification of the geometry of the glottis. The experimental study is focused on flow phenomena as they might occur in the glottis, such as the asymmetry of the flow due to the Coanda effect and the transition to turbulent flow. It was found that both effects need a relatively long time to establish themselves and are therefore unlikely to occur during the production of normal voiced speech when the glottis closes completely during part of the oscillation cycle. It is shown that when the flow is still laminar and symmetric the prediction of the boundary-layer model and the measurement of the pressure drop from the throat of the glottis to the exit of the glottis agree within 40%. Results of the boundary-layer model are compared with a two-dimensional vortex-blob method for viscous flow. The difference between the results of the simpiflied boundary-layer model and the experimental results is explained by an additional pressure difference between the separation point and the far field within the jet downstream of the separation point. The influence of the movement of the vocal folds on our conclusions is still unclear. PMID:12656399

  15. Unsteady flow through in-vitro models of the glottis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmans, G. C. J.; Groot, G.; Ranucci, M.; Graziani, G.; Hirschberg, A.

    2003-03-01

    The unsteady two-dimensional flow through fixed rigid in vitro models of the glottis is studied in some detail to validate a more accurate model based on the prediction of boundary-layer separation. The study is restricted to the flow phenomena occurring within the glottis and does not include effects of vocal-fold movement on the flow. Pressure measurements have been carried out for a transient flow through a rigid scale model of the glottis. The rigid model with a fixed geometry driven by an unsteady pressure is used in order to achieve a high accuracy in the specification of the geometry of the glottis. The experimental study is focused on flow phenomena as they might occur in the glottis, such as the asymmetry of the flow due to the Coanda effect and the transition to turbulent flow. It was found that both effects need a relatively long time to establish themselves and are therefore unlikely to occur during the production of normal voiced speech when the glottis closes completely during part of the oscillation cycle. It is shown that when the flow is still laminar and symmetric the prediction of the boundary-layer model and the measurement of the pressure drop from the throat of the glottis to the exit of the glottis agree within 40%. Results of the boundary-layer model are compared with a two-dimensional vortex-blob method for viscous flow. The difference between the results of the simpiflied boundary-layer model and the experimental results is explained by an additional pressure difference between the separation point and the far field within the jet downstream of the separation point. The influence of the movement of the vocal folds on our conclusions is still unclear.

  16. Reconstruction of unsteady viscous flows using data assimilation schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mons, V.; Chassaing, J.-C.; Gomez, T.; Sagaut, P.

    2016-07-01

    This paper investigates the use of various data assimilation (DA) approaches for the reconstruction of the unsteady flow past a cylinder in the presence of incident coherent gusts. Variational, ensemble Kalman filter-based and ensemble-based variational DA techniques are deployed along with a 2D compressible Navier-Stokes flow solver, which is also used to generate synthetic observations of a reference flow. The performance of these DA schemes is thoroughly analyzed for various types of observations ranging from the global aerodynamic coefficients of the cylinder to the full 2D flow field. Moreover, different reconstruction scenarios are investigated in order to assess the robustness of these methods for large scale DA problems with up to 105 control variables. In particular, we show how an iterative procedure can be used within the framework of ensemble-based methods to deal with both non-uniform unsteady boundary conditions and initial field reconstruction. The different methodologies developed and assessed in this work give a review of what can be done with DA schemes in computational fluid dynamics (CFD) paradigm. In the same time, this work also provides useful information which can also turn out to be rational arguments in the DA scheme choice dedicated to a specific CFD application.

  17. Modeling the effect of unsteady flows on the time average flow field of a blade row embedded in an axial flow multistage turbomachine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adamczyk, John J.

    1996-01-01

    The role of unsteady flow processes in establishing the performance of axial flow turbomachinery was investigated. The development of the flow model, as defined by the time average flow equations associated with the passage of the blade row embedded in a multistage configuration, is presented. The mechanisms for unsteady momentum and energy transport is outlined. The modeling of the unsteady momentum and energy transport are discussed. The procedure for simulating unsteady multistage turbomachinery flows is described.

  18. Unsteady Thermocapillary Migration of Isolated Drops in Creeping Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dill, Loren H.; Balasubramaniam, R.

    1992-01-01

    The problem of an isolated immiscible drop that slowly migrates due to unsteady thermocapillary stresses is considered. All physical properties except for interfacial tension are assumed constant for the two Newtonian fluids. Explicit expressions are found for the migration rate and stream functions in the Laplace domain. The resulting microgravity theory is useful, e.g., in predicting the distance a drop will migrate due to an impulsive interfacial temperature gradient as well as the time required to attain steady flow conditions from an initially resting state.

  19. OPUS: A Fortran Program for Unsteady Opposed-Flowed Flames

    SciTech Connect

    H. G. Im; L. L. Raja; R. J. Kee; A. E. Lutz; L. R. Petzold

    2000-07-01

    OPUS is a Fortran program for computing unsteady combustion problems in an opposed-flow configuration using one-dimensional similarity coordinate. The code is an extension of the steady counterpart, OPPDIF, to transient problems by modifying the formulation to accommodate gasdynamic compressibility effects, allowing high-accuracy time integration with adaptive time stepping. Time integration of the differential-algebraic system of equations is performed by the DASPK software package, while the Chemkin packages are used to compute chemical reaction rates and thermodynamic/transport properties. This document describes the details of the mathematical formulation and instruction for using the code.

  20. Computation of rapidly varied unsteady, free-surface flow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Basco, D.R.

    1987-01-01

    Many unsteady flows in hydraulics occur with relatively large gradients in free surface profiles. The assumption of hydrostatic pressure distribution with depth is no longer valid. These are rapidly-varied unsteady flows (RVF) of classical hydraulics and also encompass short wave propagation of coastal hydraulics. The purpose of this report is to present an introductory review of the Boussinnesq-type differential equations that describe these flows and to discuss methods for their numerical integration. On variable slopes and for large scale (finite-amplitude) disturbances, three independent derivational methods all gave differences in the motion equation for higher order terms. The importance of these higher-order terms for riverine applications must be determined by numerical experiments. Care must be taken in selection of the appropriate finite-difference scheme to minimize truncation error effects and the possibility of diverging (double mode) numerical solutions. It is recommended that practical hydraulics cases be established and tested numerically to demonstrate the order of differences in solution with those obtained from the long wave equations of St. Venant. (USGS)

  1. Deterministic approach for unsteady rarefied flow simulations in complex geometries and its application to gas flows in microsystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chigullapalli, Sruti

    based on the finite volume method in the physical space and the discrete ordinate method in the velocity space with an implicit time discretization. A conservative discretization of the collision term has been incorporated. Verification was carried out for an unsteady approach to equilibrium, steady one-dimensional Couette and Fourier flows and a two-dimensional quasi-steady gas damping for a moving microbeam. The solver was directly compared with a 2D steady ESBGK solver using reduced distribution functions (rdf) for the squeeze film damping problem and was compared to theory for a 2D conduction in a thin rectangular plate. The solver was also validated with experiments for a free cantilever damping problem. An approach for coupling with other deterministic solvers such as the Navier-Stokes solver in MEMOSA has been presented. A new equilibrium breakdown parameter based on entropy generation rate is introduced. The proposed continuum-rarefied coupling scheme was verified with analytical solution for Couette flow. An immersed boundary method was formulated for the ES-BGK equations and the implementation in 1D Couette flow was carried out. Finally, the application of the full 3D parallel solver is considered to simulate unsteady microscale gas damping in a micro-electro-mechanical system switch. Simulation results with half a billion unknowns on 128 processors are presented and suggest that, with the advent of petascale computing platforms, it has become practical to solve full 3D unsteady rarefied flow problems for complex geometries.

  2. Unsteady flow past an airfoil pitched at constant rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lourenco, L.; Vandommelen, L.; Shib, C.; Krothapalli, A.

    1992-01-01

    The unsteady flow past a NACA 0012 airfoil that is undertaking a constant-rate pitching up motion is investigated experimentally by the PIDV technique in a water towing tank. The Reynolds number is 5000, based upon the airfoil's chord and the free-stream velocity. The airfoil is pitching impulsively from 0 to 30 deg. with a dimensionless pitch rate alpha of 0.131. Instantaneous velocity and associated vorticity data have been acquired over the entire flow field. The primary vortex dominates the flow behavior after it separates from the leading edge of the airfoil. Complete stall emerges after this vortex detaches from the airfoil and triggers the shedding of a counter-rotating vortex near the trailing edge. A parallel computational study using the discrete vortex, random walk approximation has also been conducted. In general, the computational results agree very well with the experiment.

  3. On the Physics of Flow Separation Along a Low Pressure Turbine Blade Under Unsteady Flow Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schobeiri, Meinhard T.; Ozturk, Burak; Ashpis, David E.

    2005-01-01

    The present study, which is the first of a series of investigations dealing with specific issues of low pressure turbine (LPT) boundary layer aerodynamics, is aimed at providing detailed unsteady boundary flow information to understand the underlying physics of the inception, onset, and extent of the separation zone. A detailed experimental study on the behavior of the separation zone on the suction surface of a highly loaded LPT-blade under periodic unsteady wake flow is presented. Experimental investigations were performed at Texas A&M Turbomachinery Performance and Flow Research Laboratory using a large-scale unsteady turbine cascade research facility with an integrated wake generator and test section unit. To account for a high flow deflection of LPT-cascades at design and off-design operating points, the entire wake generator and test section unit including the traversing system is designed to allow a precise angle adjustment of the cascade relative to the incoming flow. This is done by a hydraulic platform, which simultaneously lifts and rotates the wake generator and test section unit. The unit is then attached to the tunnel exit nozzle with an angular accuracy of better than 0.05 , which is measured electronically. Utilizing a Reynolds number of 110,000 based on the blade suction surface length and the exit velocity, one steady and two different unsteady inlet flow conditions with the corresponding passing frequencies, wake velocities and turbulence intensities are investigated using hot-wire anemometry. In addition to the unsteady boundary layer measurements, blade surface pressure measurements were performed at Re=50,000, 75,000, 100,000, and 125,000 at one steady and two periodic unsteady inlet flow conditions. Detailed unsteady boundary layer measurement identifies the onset and extent of the separation zone as well as its behavior under unsteady wake flow. The results presented in ensemble-averaged and contour plot forms contribute to understanding the

  4. Unsteady Analysis of Particle Transport and Deposition in the Human Lung: A Hybrid 3D/0D Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haworth, Daniel C.; Kunz, Robert F.; Leemhuis, Laura S.; Banks, Syreeta S.; Kriete, Andres

    2003-11-01

    Three-dimensional CFD meshes including up the sixteenth generation of branching in a human tracheo-bronchial tree have been generated from surface data extracted using novel high-resolution bio-medical imaging and rendering methods. A zero-dimensional model for the deeper generations has been coupled with the three-dimensional model at each of the truncated branches. The 0D model imposes a time-varying volume to simulate realistic breathing cycles; it also includes a simple model for particle deposition. The resulting hybrid 3D/0D model has been exercised to compute the transport and deposition rates of particles of different sizes through full breathing cycles. Results are compared to earlier steady-flow CFD results, to results obtained using one-dimensional functional models of the human lung, and to experimental and modeling results for idealized branching-duct configurations. The aim of the research is to develop a virtual human respiratory system that can be used to address issues in pulmonary health in

  5. Analysis and dynamic 3D visualization of cerebral blood flow combining 3D and 4D MR image sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forkert, Nils Daniel; Säring, Dennis; Fiehler, Jens; Illies, Till; Möller, Dietmar; Handels, Heinz

    2009-02-01

    In this paper we present a method for the dynamic visualization of cerebral blood flow. Spatio-temporal 4D magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) image datasets and 3D MRA datasets with high spatial resolution were acquired for the analysis of arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). One of the main tasks is the combination of the information of the 3D and 4D MRA image sequences. Initially, in the 3D MRA dataset the vessel system is segmented and a 3D surface model is generated. Then, temporal intensity curves are analyzed voxelwise in the 4D MRA image sequences. A curve fitting of the temporal intensity curves to a patient individual reference curve is used to extract the bolus arrival times in the 4D MRA sequences. After non-linear registration of both MRA datasets the extracted hemodynamic information is transferred to the surface model where the time points of inflow can be visualized color coded dynamically over time. The dynamic visualizations computed using the curve fitting method for the estimation of the bolus arrival times were rated superior compared to those computed using conventional approaches for bolus arrival time estimation. In summary the procedure suggested allows a dynamic visualization of the individual hemodynamic situation and better understanding during the visual evaluation of cerebral vascular diseases.

  6. On the Physics of Flow Separation Along a Low Pressure Turbine Blade Under Unsteady Flow Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schobeiri, Meinhard T.; Ozturk, Burak; Ashpis, David E.

    2003-01-01

    The present study, which is the first of a series of investigations dealing with specific issues of low pressure turbine (LPT) boundary layer aerodynamics, is aimed at providing detailed unsteady boundary flow information to understand the underlying physics of the inception, onset, and extent of the separation zone. A detailed experimental study on the behavior of the separation zone on the suction surface of a highly loaded LPT-blade under periodic unsteady wake flow is presented. Experimental investigations were performed at Texas A&M Turbomachinery Performance and Flow Research Laboratory using a large-scale unsteady turbine cascade research facility with an integrated wake generator and test section unit. To account for a high flow deflection of LPT-cascades at design and off-design operating points, the entire wake generator and test section unit including the traversing system is designed to allow a precise angle adjustment of the cascade relative to the incoming flow. This is done by a hydraulic platform, which simultaneously lifts and rotates the wake generator and test section unit. The unit is then attached to the tunnel exit nozzle with an angular accuracy of better than 0.05 , which is measured electronically. Utilizing a Reynolds number of 110,000 based on the blade suction surface length and the exit velocity, one steady and two different unsteady inlet flowconditions with the corresponding passing frequencies, wake velocities and turbulence intensities are investigated using hot-wire anemometry. In addition to the unsteady boundary layer measurements, blade surface pressure measurements were performed at Re=50,000, 75,000, 100,000, and 125,000 at one steady and two periodic unsteady inlet flow conditions. Detailed unsteady boundary layer measurement identifies the onset and extent of the separation zone as well as its behavior under unsteady wake flow. The results presented in ensemble-averaged and contour plot forms contribute to understanding the

  7. Unsteady entrance flow development in a straight tube.

    PubMed

    He, X; Ku, D N

    1994-08-01

    The entrance conditions for pulsatile flow are important in the understanding blood flow out of the heart and in developing regions at branches. The pulsatile entrance flow was solved using a spectral element simulation of the full unsteady Navier-Stokes equations. A mean Reynolds number of 200 and a range of Womersley parameters from 1.8 to 12.5 was used for a sinusoidal inlet flow waveform 1 + sin (omega t). Variations in the entrance length were observed during the pulsatile cycle. The amplitude of the entrance length variation decreased with an increase in the Womersley parameter. The phase lag between the entrance length and the inlet flow waveform increased for Womersley parameter alpha up to 5.0 and decreased for alpha larger than 5.0. For low alpha, the maximum entrance length during pulsatile flow was approximately the same as the steady entrance length for the peak flow. For high varies; is directly proportional to, the pulsatile entrance length was more uniform during the cycle and tended to the entrance length for the mean flow. The wall shear rate reached its far downstream value after only about half of the entrance length and also exhibited a dependence on alpha. The results quantify the entrance conditions typically encountered in studies of the arterial system. PMID:7799639

  8. Unsteady Validation of a Mean Flow Boundary Condition for Computational Aeroacoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hixon, R.; Zhen, F.; Nallasamy, M.; Sawyer, S> ; Dyson, R.

    2004-01-01

    In this work, a previously developed mean flow boundary condition will be validated for unsteady flows. The test cases will be several reference benchmark flows consisting of vortical gusts convecting in a uniform mean flow, as well as the more realistic case of a vortical gust impinging on a loaded 2D cascade. The results will verify that the mean flow boundary condition both imposes the desired mean flow as well as having little or no effect on the instantaneous unsteady solution.

  9. Unsteady magnetohydrodynamic blood flow through irregular multi-stenosed arteries.

    PubMed

    Mustapha, Norzieha; Amin, Norsarahaida; Chakravarty, Santabrata; Mandal, Prashanta Kumar

    2009-10-01

    Flow of an electrically conducting fluid characterizing blood through the arteries having irregular shaped multi-stenoses in the environment of a uniform transverse magnetic-field is analysed. The flow is considered to be axisymmetric with an outline of the irregular stenoses obtained from a three-dimensional casting of a mild stenosed artery, so that the physical problem becomes more realistic from the physiological point of view. The marker and cell (MAC) and successive-over-relaxation (SOR) methods are respectively used to solve the governing unsteady magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations and pressure-Poisson equation quantitatively and to observe the flow separation. The results obtained show that the flow separates mostly towards the downstream of the multi-stenoses. However, the flow separation region keeps on shrinking with the increasing intensity of the magnetic-field which completely disappears with sufficiently large value of the Hartmann number. The present observations certainly have some clinical implications relating to magnetotherapy which help reducing the complex flow separation zones causing flow disorder leading to the formation and progression of the arterial diseases.

  10. Unsteady magnetohydrodynamic blood flow through irregular multi-stenosed arteries.

    PubMed

    Mustapha, Norzieha; Amin, Norsarahaida; Chakravarty, Santabrata; Mandal, Prashanta Kumar

    2009-10-01

    Flow of an electrically conducting fluid characterizing blood through the arteries having irregular shaped multi-stenoses in the environment of a uniform transverse magnetic-field is analysed. The flow is considered to be axisymmetric with an outline of the irregular stenoses obtained from a three-dimensional casting of a mild stenosed artery, so that the physical problem becomes more realistic from the physiological point of view. The marker and cell (MAC) and successive-over-relaxation (SOR) methods are respectively used to solve the governing unsteady magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations and pressure-Poisson equation quantitatively and to observe the flow separation. The results obtained show that the flow separates mostly towards the downstream of the multi-stenoses. However, the flow separation region keeps on shrinking with the increasing intensity of the magnetic-field which completely disappears with sufficiently large value of the Hartmann number. The present observations certainly have some clinical implications relating to magnetotherapy which help reducing the complex flow separation zones causing flow disorder leading to the formation and progression of the arterial diseases. PMID:19665698

  11. Unsteady Squeezing Flow of Carbon Nanotubes with Convective Boundary Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Hayat, Tasawar; Muhammad, Khursheed; Farooq, Muhammad; Alsaedi, Ahmad

    2016-01-01

    Unsteady flow of nanofluids squeezed between two parallel plates is discussed in the presence of viscous dissipation. Heat transfer phenomenon is disclosed via convective boundary conditions. Carbon nanotubes (single-wall and multi-wall) are used as nanoparticles which are homogeneously distributed in the base fluid (water). A system of non-linear differential equations for the flow is obtained by utilizing similarity transformations through the conservation laws. Influence of various emerging parameters on the velocity and temperature profiles are sketched graphically and discussed comprehensively. Analyses of skin fraction coefficient and Nusselt number are also elaborated numerically. It is found out that velocity is smaller for squeezing parameter in the case of multi-wall carbon nanotubes when compared with single-wall carbon nanotubes. PMID:27149208

  12. Unsteady Squeezing Flow of Carbon Nanotubes with Convective Boundary Conditions.

    PubMed

    Hayat, Tasawar; Muhammad, Khursheed; Farooq, Muhammad; Alsaedi, Ahmad

    2016-01-01

    Unsteady flow of nanofluids squeezed between two parallel plates is discussed in the presence of viscous dissipation. Heat transfer phenomenon is disclosed via convective boundary conditions. Carbon nanotubes (single-wall and multi-wall) are used as nanoparticles which are homogeneously distributed in the base fluid (water). A system of non-linear differential equations for the flow is obtained by utilizing similarity transformations through the conservation laws. Influence of various emerging parameters on the velocity and temperature profiles are sketched graphically and discussed comprehensively. Analyses of skin fraction coefficient and Nusselt number are also elaborated numerically. It is found out that velocity is smaller for squeezing parameter in the case of multi-wall carbon nanotubes when compared with single-wall carbon nanotubes. PMID:27149208

  13. NONHOMOGENEOUS TERMS IN THE UNSTEADY FLOW EQUATIONS: MODELING ASPECTS.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lai, Chintu; Schaffranek, Raymond W.; Baltzer, Robert A.

    1987-01-01

    A study is in progress to identify the relative significance, effects, and benefits attributable to the use of one-dimensional, unsteady, open-channel, flow-simulation models employing a variety of nonhomogeneous terms in their equation formulations. Nonhomogeneous terms being analyzed include those representing bed slope, frictional resistance, nonprismatic channel geometry, lateral flow, and (surface) wind stress. After an initial theoretical discussion, the results of a set of numerical experiments are presented that demonstrate cause-and-effect relationships and intercomparisons achieved by neglect or improper treatment of important nonhomogeneous terms. Preliminary results of this study are discussed and presented in this paper, both in the form of qualitative considerations and quantitative tabular findings. These results are expected to yield a definitive set of guidelines and suggestions useful to model engineers.

  14. Time-dependent local density measurements in unsteady flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckenzie, R. L.; Monson, D. J.; Exberger, R. J.

    1979-01-01

    A laser-induced fluorescence technique for measuring the relative time-dependent density fluctuations in unsteady or turbulent flows is demonstrated. Using a 1.5-W continuous-wave Kr(+) laser, measurements have been obtained in 0.1-mm diameter by 1-mm-long sampling volumes in a Mach 3 flow of N2 seeded with biacetyl vapor. A signal amplitude resolution of 2% was achieved for a detection frequency bandwidth of 10 kHz. The measurement uncertainty was found to be dominated by noise behaving as photon statistical noise. The practical limits of signal-to-noise ratios have been characterized for a wide range of detection frequency bandwidths that encompasses those of interest in supersonic turbulence measurements.

  15. Time-dependent local density measurements in unsteady flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckenzie, R. L.; Monson, D. J.; Exberger, R. J.

    1979-01-01

    A laser-induced fluorescence technique for measuring the relative time-dependent density fluctuations in unsteady or turbulent flows is demonstrated. Using a 1.5-W continuous-wave Kr(+) laser, measurements have been obtained in 0.1-mm-diameter by 1-mm-long sampling volumes in a Mach 3 flow of N2 seeded with biacetyl vapor. A signal amplitude resolution of 2% was achieved for a detection frequency bandwidth of 10 kHz. The measurement uncertainty was found to be dominated by noise behaving as photon statistical noise. The practical limits of signal-to-noise ratios have been characterized for a wide range of detection frequency bandwidths that encompasses those of interest in supersonic turbulence measurements.

  16. Effects of Presence, Copresence, and Flow on Learning Outcomes in 3D Learning Spaces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hassell, Martin D.; Goyal, Sandeep; Limayem, Moez; Boughzala, Imed

    2012-01-01

    The level of satisfaction and effectiveness of 3D virtual learning environments were examined. Additionally, 3D virtual learning environments were compared with face-to-face learning environments. Students that experienced higher levels of flow and presence also experienced more satisfaction but not necessarily more effectiveness with 3D virtual…

  17. Numerical Simulation of Unsteady Blood Flow through Capillary Networks.

    PubMed

    Davis, J M; Pozrikidis, C

    2011-08-01

    A numerical method is implemented for computing unsteady blood flow through a branching capillary network. The evolution of the discharge hematocrit along each capillary segment is computed by integrating in time a one-dimensional convection equation using a finite-difference method. The convection velocity is determined by the local and instantaneous effective capillary blood viscosity, while the tube to discharge hematocrit ratio is deduced from available correlations. Boundary conditions for the discharge hematocrit at divergent bifurcations arise from the partitioning law proposed by Klitzman and Johnson involving a dimensionless exponent, q≥1. When q=1, the cells are partitioned in proportion to the flow rate; as q tends to infinity, the cells are channeled into the branch with the highest flow rate. Simulations are performed for a tree-like, perfectly symmetric or randomly perturbed capillary network with m generations. When the tree involves more than a few generations, a supercritical Hopf bifurcation occurs at a critical value of q, yielding spontaneous self-sustained oscillations in the absence of external forcing. A phase diagram in the m-q plane is presented to establish conditions for unsteady flow, and the effect of various geometrical and physical parameters is examined. For a given network tree order, m, oscillations can be induced for a sufficiently high value of q by increasing the apparent intrinsic viscosity, decreasing the ratio of the vessel diameter from one generation to the next, or by decreasing the diameter of the terminal vessels. With other parameters fixed, oscillations are inhibited by increasing m. The results of the continuum model are in excellent agreement with the predictions of a discrete model where the motion of individual cells is followed from inlet to outlet.

  18. Investigation of Unsteady Flow Behavior in Transonic Compressor Rotors with LES and PIV Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hah, Chunill; Voges, Melanie; Mueller, Martin; Schiffer, Heinz-Peter

    2009-01-01

    In the present study, unsteady flow behavior in a modern transonic axial compressor rotor is studied in detail with large eddy simulation (LES) and particle image velocimetry (PIV). The main purpose of the study is to advance the current understanding of the flow field near the blade tip in an axial transonic compressor rotor near the stall and peak-efficiency conditions. Flow interaction between the tip leakage vortex and the passage shock is inherently unsteady in a transonic compressor. Casing-mounted unsteady pressure transducers have been widely applied to investigate steady and unsteady flow behavior near the casing. Although many aspects of flow have been revealed, flow structures below the casing cannot be studied with casing-mounted pressure transducers. In the present study, unsteady velocity fields are measured with a PIV system and the measured unsteady flow fields are compared with LES simulations. The currently applied PIV measurements indicate that the flow near the tip region is not steady even at the design condition. This self-induced unsteadiness increases significantly as the compressor rotor operates near the stall condition. Measured data from PIV show that the tip clearance vortex oscillates substantially near stall. The calculated unsteady characteristics of the flow from LES agree well with the PIV measurements. Calculated unsteady flow fields show that the formation of the tip clearance vortex is intermittent and the concept of vortex breakdown from steady flow analysis does not seem to apply in the current flow field. Fluid with low momentum near the pressure side of the blade close to the leading edge periodically spills over into the adjacent blade passage. The present study indicates that stall inception is heavily dependent on unsteady behavior of the flow field near the leading edge of the blade tip section for the present transonic compressor rotor.

  19. Computation of unsteady turbulent boundary layers with flow reversal and evaluation of two separate turbulence models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cebeci, T.; Carr, L. W.

    1981-01-01

    A procedure which solves the governing boundary layer equations within Keller's box method was developed for calculating unsteady laminar flows with flow reversal. This method is extended to turbulent boundary layers with flow reversal. Test cases are used to investigate the proposition that unsteady turbulent boundary layers also remain free of singularities. Turbulent flow calculations are performed. The governing equations for both models are solved. As in laminar flows, the unsteady turbulent boundary layers are free from singularities, but there is a clear indication of rapid thickening of the boundary layer with increasing flow reversal. Predictions of both turbulence models are the same for all practical purposes.

  20. Modeling 3-D Slope Stability of Coastal Bluffs Using 3-D Ground-Water Flow, Southwestern Seattle, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brien, Dianne L.; Reid, Mark E.

    2007-01-01

    Landslides are a common problem on coastal bluffs throughout the world. Along the coastal bluffs of the Puget Sound in Seattle, Washington, landslides range from small, shallow failures to large, deep-seated landslides. Landslides of all types can pose hazards to human lives and property, but deep-seated landslides are of significant concern because their large areal extent can cause extensive property damage. Although many geomorphic processes shape the coastal bluffs of Seattle, we focus on large (greater than 3,000 m3), deepseated, rotational landslides that occur on the steep bluffs along Puget Sound. Many of these larger failures occur in advance outwash deposits of the Vashon Drift (Qva); some failures extend into the underlying Lawton Clay Member of the Vashon Drift (Qvlc). The slope stability of coastal bluffs is controlled by the interplay of three-dimensional (3-D) variations in gravitational stress, strength, and pore-water pressure. We assess 3-D slope-stability using SCOOPS (Reid and others, 2000), a computer program that allows us to search a high-resolution digital-elevation model (DEM) to quantify the relative stability of all parts of the landscape by computing the stability and volume of thousands of potential spherical failures. SCOOPS incorporates topography, 3-D strength variations, and 3-D pore pressures. Initially, we use our 3-D analysis methods to examine the effects of topography and geology by using heterogeneous material properties, as defined by stratigraphy, without pore pressures. In this scenario, the least-stable areas are located on the steepest slopes, commonly in Qva or Qvlc. However, these locations do not agree well with observations of deep-seated landslides. Historically, both shallow colluvial landslides and deep-seated landslides have been observed near the contact between Qva and Qvlc, and commonly occur in Qva. The low hydraulic conductivity of Qvlc impedes ground-water flow, resulting in elevated pore pressures at the

  1. Some remarks on the design of transonic tunnels with low levels of flow unsteadiness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mabey, D. G.

    1976-01-01

    The principal sources of flow unsteadiness in the circuit of a transonic wind tunnel are presented. Care must be taken to avoid flow separations, acoustic resonances and large scale turbulence. Some problems discussed are the elimination of diffuser separations, the aerodynamic design of coolers and the unsteadiness generated in ventilated working sections.

  2. Simulation of Unsteady Flows Using an Unstructured Navier-Stokes Solver on Moving and Stationary Grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biedron, Robert T.; Vatsa, Veer N.; Atkins, Harold L.

    2005-01-01

    We apply an unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (URANS) solver for unstructured grids to unsteady flows on moving and stationary grids. Example problems considered are relevant to active flow control and stability and control. Computational results are presented using the Spalart-Allmaras turbulence model and are compared to experimental data. The effect of grid and time-step refinement are examined.

  3. Coherent Lagrangian vortices in three-dimensional unsteady flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blazevski, Daniel; Haller, George

    2014-05-01

    Detecting barriers to, and facilitators of, transport is a fundamental problem in studying the behavior of Lagrangian trajectories in a fluid. A recent extension of two-dimensional results provides transport barriers in 3D flows as locally most attracting, repelling or shearing surfaces. This provides an objective definition of a Lagrangian vortex boundary as an outermost member of a family of most shearing cylindrical material surfaces. The detection of such a 3D vortex boundary yields an accurate estimate on the volume the vortex transports. We compute 3D Lagrangian vortices in kinematic models, and also use a global circulation model to extract sharp boundaries for coherent three-dimensional Agulhas rings in the South Atlantic.

  4. Unsteady flow phenomena associated with leading-edge vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breitsamter, C.

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents selected results from extensive experimental investigations on turbulent flow fields and unsteady surface pressures caused by leading-edge vortices, in particular, for vortex breakdown flow. Such turbulent flows may cause severe dynamic aeroelastic problems like wing and/or fin buffeting on fighter-type aircraft. The wind tunnel models used include a generic delta wing as well as a detailed aircraft configuration of canard-delta wing type. The turbulent flow structures are analyzed by root-mean-square and spectral distributions of velocity and pressure fluctuations. Downstream of bursting local maxima of velocity fluctuations occur in a limited radial range around the vortex center. The corresponding spectra exhibit significant peaks indicating that turbulent kinetic energy is channeled into a narrow band. These quasi-periodic velocity oscillations arise from a helical mode instability of the breakdown flow. Due to vortex bursting there is a characteristic increase in surface pressure fluctuations with increasing angle of attack, especially when the burst location moves closer to the apex. The pressure fluctuations also show dominant frequencies corresponding to those of the velocity fluctuations. Using the measured flow field data, scaling parameters are derived for design purposes. It is shown that a frequency parameter based on the local semi-span and the sinus of angle of attack can be used to estimate the frequencies of dynamic loads evoked by vortex bursting.

  5. Parallel Computation of Unsteady Flows on a Network of Workstations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Parallel computation of unsteady flows requires significant computational resources. The utilization of a network of workstations seems an efficient solution to the problem where large problems can be treated at a reasonable cost. This approach requires the solution of several problems: 1) the partitioning and distribution of the problem over a network of workstation, 2) efficient communication tools, 3) managing the system efficiently for a given problem. Of course, there is the question of the efficiency of any given numerical algorithm to such a computing system. NPARC code was chosen as a sample for the application. For the explicit version of the NPARC code both two- and three-dimensional problems were studied. Again both steady and unsteady problems were investigated. The issues studied as a part of the research program were: 1) how to distribute the data between the workstations, 2) how to compute and how to communicate at each node efficiently, 3) how to balance the load distribution. In the following, a summary of these activities is presented. Details of the work have been presented and published as referenced.

  6. Building a 3D Virtual Liver: Methods for Simulating Blood Flow and Hepatic Clearance on 3D Structures.

    PubMed

    White, Diana; Coombe, Dennis; Rezania, Vahid; Tuszynski, Jack

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we develop a spatio-temporal modeling approach to describe blood and drug flow, as well as drug uptake and elimination, on an approximation of the liver. Extending on previously developed computational approaches, we generate an approximation of a liver, which consists of a portal and hepatic vein vasculature structure, embedded in the surrounding liver tissue. The vasculature is generated via constrained constructive optimization, and then converted to a spatial grid of a selected grid size. Estimates for surrounding upscaled lobule tissue properties are then presented appropriate to the same grid size. Simulation of fluid flow and drug metabolism (hepatic clearance) are completed using discretized forms of the relevant convective-diffusive-reactive partial differential equations for these processes. This results in a single stage, uniformly consistent method to simulate equations for blood and drug flow, as well as drug metabolism, on a 3D structure representative of a liver. PMID:27649537

  7. Building a 3D Virtual Liver: Methods for Simulating Blood Flow and Hepatic Clearance on 3D Structures

    PubMed Central

    Rezania, Vahid; Tuszynski, Jack

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we develop a spatio-temporal modeling approach to describe blood and drug flow, as well as drug uptake and elimination, on an approximation of the liver. Extending on previously developed computational approaches, we generate an approximation of a liver, which consists of a portal and hepatic vein vasculature structure, embedded in the surrounding liver tissue. The vasculature is generated via constrained constructive optimization, and then converted to a spatial grid of a selected grid size. Estimates for surrounding upscaled lobule tissue properties are then presented appropriate to the same grid size. Simulation of fluid flow and drug metabolism (hepatic clearance) are completed using discretized forms of the relevant convective-diffusive-reactive partial differential equations for these processes. This results in a single stage, uniformly consistent method to simulate equations for blood and drug flow, as well as drug metabolism, on a 3D structure representative of a liver. PMID:27649537

  8. 3D topographic correction of the BSR heat flow and detection of focused fluid flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Tao; Li, Hong-Lin; Zou, Chang-Chun

    2014-06-01

    The bottom-simulating reflector (BSR) is a seismic indicator of the bottom of a gas hydrate stability zone. Its depth can be used to calculate the seafloor surface heat flow. The calculated BSR heat flow variations include disturbances from two important factors: (1) seafloor topography, which focuses the heat flow over regions of concave topography and defocuses it over regions of convex topography, and (2) the focused warm fluid flow within the accretionary prism coming from depths deeper than BSR. The focused fluid flow can be detected if the contribution of the topography to the BSR heat flow is removed. However, the analytical equation cannot solve the topographic effect at complex seafloor regions. We prove that 3D finite element method can model the topographic effect on the regional background heat flow with high accuracy, which can then be used to correct the topographic effect and obtain the BSR heat flow under the condition of perfectly flat topography. By comparing the corrected BSR heat flow with the regional background heat flow, focused fluid flow regions can be detected that are originally too small and cannot be detected using present-day equipment. This method was successfully applied to the midslope region of northern Cascadia subducting margin. The results suggest that the Cucumber Ridge and its neighboring area are positive heat flow anomalies, about 10%-20% higher than the background heat flow after 3D topographic correction. Moreover, the seismic imaging associated the positive heat flow anomaly areas with seabed fracture-cavity systems. This suggests flow of warm gas-carrying fluids along these high-permeability pathways, which could result in higher gas hydrate concentrations.

  9. Navier-Stokes simulations of unsteady transonic flow phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atwood, C. A.

    1992-01-01

    Numerical simulations of two classes of unsteady flows are obtained via the Navier-Stokes equations: a blast-wave/target interaction problem class and a transonic cavity flow problem class. The method developed for the viscous blast-wave/target interaction problem assumes a laminar, perfect gas implemented in a structured finite-volume framework. The approximately factored implicit scheme uses Newton subiterations to obtain the spatially and temporally second-order accurate time history of the blast-waves with stationary targets. The inviscid flux is evaluated using either of two upwind techniques, while the full viscous terms are computed by central differencing. Comparisons of unsteady numerical, analytical, and experimental results are made in two- and three-dimensions for Couette flows, a starting shock-tunnel, and a shock-tube blockage study. The results show accurate wave speed resolution and nonoscillatory discontinuity capturing of the predominantly inviscid flows. Viscous effects were increasingly significant at large post-interaction times. While the blast-wave/target interaction problem benefits from high-resolution methods applied to the Euler terms, the transonic cavity flow problem requires the use of an efficient scheme implemented in a geometrically flexible overset mesh environment. Hence, the Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes equations implemented in a diagonal form are applied to the cavity flow class of problems. Comparisons between numerical and experimental results are made in two-dimensions for free shear layers and both rectangular and quieted cavities, and in three-dimensions for Stratospheric Observatory For Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) geometries. The acoustic behavior of the rectangular and three-dimensional cavity flows compare well with experiment in terms of frequency, magnitude, and quieting trends. However, there is a more rapid decrease in computed acoustic energy with frequency than observed experimentally owing to numerical

  10. Implementation of Flow Tripping Capability in the USM3D Unstructured Flow Solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pandya, Mohagna J.; Abdol-Harrid, Khaled S.; Campbell, Richard L.; Frink, Neal T.

    2006-01-01

    A flow tripping capability is added to an established NASA tetrahedral unstructured parallel Navier-Stokes flow solver, USM3D. The capability is based on prescribing an appropriate profile of turbulence model variables to energize the boundary layer in a plane normal to a specified trip region on the body surface. We demonstrate this approach using the k-e two-equation turbulence model of USM3D. Modification to the solution procedure primarily consists of developing a data structure to identify all unstructured tetrahedral grid cells located in the plane normal to a specified surface trip region and computing a function based on the mean flow solution to specify the modified profile of the turbulence model variables. We leverage this data structure and also show an adjunct approach that is based on enforcing a laminar flow condition on the otherwise fully turbulent flow solution in user specified region. The latter approach is applied for the solutions obtained using other one- and two-equation turbulence models of USM3D. A key ingredient of the present capability is the use of a graphical user-interface tool PREDISC to define a trip region on the body surface in an existing grid. Verification of the present modifications is demonstrated on three cases, namely, a flat plate, the RAE2822 airfoil, and the DLR F6 wing-fuselage configuration.

  11. Implementation of Flow Tripping Capability in the USM3D Unstructured Flow Solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pandya, Mohagna J.; Abdol-Hamid, Khaled S.; Campbell, Richard L.; Frink, Neal T.

    2006-01-01

    A flow tripping capability is added to an established NASA tetrahedral unstructured parallel Navier-Stokes flow solver, USM3D. The capability is based on prescribing an appropriate profile of turbulence model variables to energize the boundary layer in a plane normal to a specified trip region on the body surface. We demonstrate this approach using the k-epsilon two-equation turbulence model of USM3D. Modification to the solution procedure primarily consists of developing a data structure to identify all unstructured tetrahedral grid cells located in the plane normal to a specified surface trip region and computing a function based on the mean flow solution to specify the modified profile of the turbulence model variables. We leverage this data structure and also show an adjunct approach that is based on enforcing a laminar flow condition on the otherwise fully turbulent flow solution in user-specified region. The latter approach is applied for the solutions obtained using other one-and two-equation turbulence models of USM3D. A key ingredient of the present capability is the use of a graphical user-interface tool PREDISC to define a trip region on the body surface in an existing grid. Verification of the present modifications is demonstrated on three cases, namely, a flat plate, the RAE2822 airfoil, and the DLR F6 wing-fuselage configuration.

  12. Unsteady hydrodynamic forces acting on a robotic arm and its flow field: application to the crawl stroke.

    PubMed

    Takagi, Hideki; Nakashima, Motomu; Ozaki, Takashi; Matsuuchi, Kazuo

    2014-04-11

    This study aims to clarify the mechanisms by which unsteady hydrodynamic forces act on the hand of a swimmer during a crawl stroke. Measurements were performed for a hand attached to a robotic arm with five degrees of freedom independently controlled by a computer. The computer was programmed so the hand and arm mimicked a human performing the stroke. We directly measured forces on the hand and pressure distributions around it at 200 Hz; flow fields underwater near the hand were obtained via 2D particle image velocimetry (PIV). The data revealed two mechanisms that generate unsteady forces during a crawl stroke. One is the unsteady lift force generated when hand movement changes direction during the stroke, leading to vortex shedding and bound vortex created around it. This bound vortex circulation results in a lift that contributes to the thrust. The other occurs when the hand moves linearly with a large angle of attack, creating a Kármán vortex street. This street alternatively sheds clockwise and counterclockwise vortices, resulting in a quasi-steady drag contributing to the thrust. We presume that professional swimmers benefit from both mechanisms. Further studies are necessary in which 3D flow fields are measured using a 3D PIV system and a human swimmer.

  13. PAB3D: Its History in the Use of Turbulence Models in the Simulation of Jet and Nozzle Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdol-Hamid, Khaled S.; Pao, S. Paul; Hunter, Craig A.; Deere, Karen A.; Massey, Steven J.; Elmiligui, Alaa

    2006-01-01

    This is a review paper for PAB3D s history in the implementation of turbulence models for simulating jet and nozzle flows. We describe different turbulence models used in the simulation of subsonic and supersonic jet and nozzle flows. The time-averaged simulations use modified linear or nonlinear two-equation models to account for supersonic flow as well as high temperature mixing. Two multiscale-type turbulence models are used for unsteady flow simulations. These models require modifications to the Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations. The first scheme is a hybrid RANS/LES model utilizing the two-equation (k-epsilon) model with a RANS/LES transition function, dependent on grid spacing and the computed turbulence length scale. The second scheme is a modified version of the partially averaged Navier-Stokes (PANS) formulation. All of these models are implemented in the three-dimensional Navier-Stokes code PAB3D. This paper discusses computational methods, code implementation, computed results for a wide range of nozzle configurations at various operating conditions, and comparisons with available experimental data. Very good agreement is shown between the numerical solutions and available experimental data over a wide range of operating conditions.

  14. Unsteady flow and dynamic response analyses for helicopter rotor blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bratanow, T.

    1979-01-01

    Research is presented on helicopter rotor blade vibration and on two and three dimensional analyses of unsteady incompressible viscous flow past oscillating helicopter rotor blades. A summary is presented of the two international research collaborations which resulted from the NASA project: the collaboration under the auspices of NATO between the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of Brussels, Belgium and the Aerodynamics Research Establishment in Goettingen, West Germany, and the collaboration under the auspices of the National Science Foundation between UWM and the University of Hamburg and the Ship Research Establishment in Hamburg, West Germany. A summary is given of the benefits from the NASA project to UWM, the College of Engineering and Applied Science, and the participants on the project.

  15. Decomposing the Unsteady Flow Routing in River Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez Cunya, L. A.; Leon, A.; Gibson, N. L.; Vasylkivska, V.

    2014-12-01

    This work presents an optimization-based domain decomposition strategy for unsteady flow routing in complex river systems. This strategy couples the domain decomposition technique with a Precomputed Channel Hydraulics Ensemble approach, known also as HydraulicPerformance Graph (HPG), which utilizes precomputed solutions along reaches on a river system. These solutions are stored in a database. While efficient and robust, HPGs requires extensive memory allocation, especially for high resolution simulations. Decomposing the river system into subdomains reduces computer memory constraints as each sub-domain is solved independently. Further, an optimization method is used to couple the sub-domains using the stored precomputed solution. In turn, the computational efficiency of the HPG approach allows the optimization-based scheme to be competitive with a whole domain methodology. The combined strategy is expected to reduce the overall computational time for large-scale problems. This work discusses the results of the application to the Columbia River (Northwest USA).

  16. A cavitation model for computations of unsteady cavitating flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yu; Wang, Guoyu; Huang, Biao

    2016-04-01

    A local vortical cavitation (LVC) model for the computation of unsteady cavitation is proposed. The model is derived from the Rayleigh-Plesset equations, and takes into account the relations between the cavitation bubble radius and local vortical effects. Calculations of unsteady cloud cavitating flows around a Clark-Y hydrofoil are performed to assess the predictive capability of the LVC model using well-documented experimental data. Compared with the conventional Zwart's model, better agreement is observed between the predictions of the LVC model and experimental data, including measurements of time-averaged flow structures, instantaneous cavity shapes and the frequency of the cloud cavity shedding process. Based on the predictions of the LVC model, it is demonstrated that the evaporation process largely concentrates in the core region of the leading edge vorticity in accordance with the growth in the attached cavity, and the condensation process concentrates in the core region of the trailing edge vorticity, which corresponds to the spread of the rear component of the attached cavity. When the attached cavity breaks up and moves downstream, the condensation area fully transports to the wake region, which is in accordance with the dissipation of the detached cavity. Furthermore, using vorticity transport equations, we also find that the periodic formation, breakup, and shedding of the sheet/cloud cavities, along with the associated baroclinic torque, are important mechanisms for vorticity production and modification. When the attached cavity grows, the liquid-vapour interface that moves towards the trailing edge enhances the vorticity in the attached cavity closure region. As the re-entrant jet moves upstream, the wavy/bubbly cavity interface enhances the vorticity near the trailing edge. At the end of the cycle, the break-up of the stable attached cavity is the main reason for the vorticity enhancement near the suction surface.

  17. SSME 3-D Turnaround Duct flow analysis - CFD predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brankovic, Andreja; Stowers, Steven T.; Mcconnaughey, Paul

    1988-01-01

    CFD analysis is presently employed to obtain an improved flowfield for an individual flowpath in the case of the Space Shuttle Main Engine's High Pressure Fuel Turbopump Turn-Around Duct (TAD), which conducts the flow exiting from the gas turbines into the fuel bowl. It is demonstrated that the application of CFD to TAD flow analysis, giving attention to the duct's configuration and to the number, shape, and alignment of the diffuser struts, can enhance understanding of flow physics and result in improved duct design and performance.

  18. Gas flow environmental and heat transfer nonrotating 3D program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geil, T.; Steinhoff, J.

    1983-01-01

    A complete set of benchmark quality data for the flow and heat transfer within a large rectangular turning duct is being compiled. These data will be used to evaluate and verify three dimensional internal viscous flow models and computational codes. The analytical objective is to select such a computational code and define the capabilities of this code to predict the experimental results. Details of the proper code operation will be defined and improvements to the code modeling capabilities will be formulated.

  19. Stability analysis for capillary channel flow: 1d and 3d computations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grah, Aleksander; Klatte, Jörg; Dreyer, Michael E.

    The subject of the presentation are numerical studies on capillary channel flow, based on results of the sounding rocket TEXUS experiments. The flow through a capillary channel is established by a gear pump at the outlet. The channel, consists of two parallel glass plates with a width of 25 mm, a gap of 10 mm and a length of 12 mm. The meniscus of a compensation tube maintains a constant system pressure. Steady and dynamic pressure effects in the system force the surfaces to bend inwards. A maximum flow rate is achieved when the free surface collapses and gas ingestion occurs at the outlet. This critical flow rate depends on the channel geometry, the flow regime and the liquid properties. The aim of the experiments is the determination of the free surface shape and to find the maximum flow rate. In order to study the unsteady liquid loop behavior, a dimensionless one-dimensional model and a corresponding three-dimensional model were developed. The one-dimensional model is based on the unsteady Bernoulli equation, the unsteady continuity equation and geometrical conditions for the surface curvature and the flow cross-section. The experimental and evaluated contour data show good agreement for a sequence of transient flow rate perturbations. In the case of steady flow at maximum flow rate, when the "choking" effect occurs, the surfaces collapse and cause gas ingestion into the channel. This effect is related to the Speed Index. At the critical flow rate the Speed Index reaches the value 1, in analogy to the Mach Number. Unsteady choking does not necessarily cause surface collapse. We show, that temporarily Speed Index values exceeding One may be achieved for a perfectly stable supercritical dynamic flow. As a supercritical criterion for the dynamic free surface stability we define a Dynamic Index considering the local capillary pressure and the convective pressure, which is a function of the local velocity. The Dynamic Index is below One for stable flow while D = 1

  20. Segmented Domain Decomposition Multigrid For 3-D Turbomachinery Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Celestina, M. L.; Adamczyk, J. J.; Rubin, S. G.

    2001-01-01

    A Segmented Domain Decomposition Multigrid (SDDMG) procedure was developed for three-dimensional viscous flow problems as they apply to turbomachinery flows. The procedure divides the computational domain into a coarse mesh comprised of uniformly spaced cells. To resolve smaller length scales such as the viscous layer near a surface, segments of the coarse mesh are subdivided into a finer mesh. This is repeated until adequate resolution of the smallest relevant length scale is obtained. Multigrid is used to communicate information between the different grid levels. To test the procedure, simulation results will be presented for a compressor and turbine cascade. These simulations are intended to show the ability of the present method to generate grid independent solutions. Comparisons with data will also be presented. These comparisons will further demonstrate the usefulness of the present work for they allow an estimate of the accuracy of the flow modeling equations independent of error attributed to numerical discretization.

  1. Unsteady flow analysis of a two-phase hydraulic coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hur, N.; Kwak, M.; Lee, W. J.; Moshfeghi, M.; Chang, C.-S.; Kang, N.-W.

    2016-06-01

    Hydraulic couplings are being widely used for torque transmitting between separate shafts. A mechanism for controlling the transmitted torque of a hydraulic system is to change the amount of working fluid inside the system. This paper numerically investigates three-dimensional turbulent flow in a real hydraulic coupling with different ratios of charged working fluid. Working fluid is assumed to be water and the Realizable k-ɛ turbulence model together with the VOF method are used to investigate two-phase flow inside the wheels. Unsteady simulations are conducted using the sliding mesh technique. The primary wheel is rotating at a fixed speed of 1780 rpm and the secondary wheel rotates at different speeds for simulating different speed ratios. Results are investigated for different blade angles, speed ratios and also different water volume fractions, and are presented in the form of flow patterns, fluid average velocity and also torques values. According to the results, blade angle severely affects the velocity vector and the transmitted torque. Also in the partially-filled cases, air is accumulated in the center of the wheel forming a toroidal shape wrapped by water and the transmitted torque sensitively depends on the water volume fraction. In addition, in the fully-filled case the transmitted torque decreases as the speed ration increases and the average velocity associated with lower speed ratios are higher.

  2. Gas flow environmental and heat transfer nonrotating 3D program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crawford, R. A.

    1984-01-01

    The experimental contract objective is to provide a complete set of benchmark quality data for the flow within a large rectangular turning duct. The data are to be used to evaluate and verify three-dimensional internal viscous flow models and computational codes. The analytical contract objective is to select such a computational code and define the capabilities of this code to predict the experimental results. Details of the proper code operation will be defined and improvements to the code modeling capabilities will be formulated.

  3. Laser direct writing 3D structures for microfluidic channels: flow meter and mixer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chih-Lang; Liu, Yi-Jui; Lin, Zheng-Da; Wu, Bo-Long; Lee, Yi-Hsiung; Shin, Chow-Shing; Baldeck, Patrice L.

    2015-03-01

    The 3D laser direct-writing technology is aimed at the modeling of arbitrary three-dimensional (3D) complex microstructures by scanning a laser-focusing point along predetermined trajectories. Through the perspective technique, the details of designed 3D structures can be properly fabricated in a microchannel. This study introduces a direct reading flow meter and a 3D passive mixer fabricated by laser direct writing for microfluidic applications. The flow meter consists of two rod-shaped springs, a pillar, an anchor, and a wedge-shaped indicator, installed inside a microfluidic channel. The indicator is deflected by the flowing fluid while restrained by the spring to establish an equilibrium indication according to the flow rate. The measurement is readily carried out by optical microscopy observation. The 3D passive Archimedes-screw-shaped mixer is designed to disturb the laminar flow 3D direction for enhancing the mixing efficiency. The simulation results indicate that the screw provides 3D disturbance of streamlines in the microchannel. The mixing demonstration for fluids flowing in the micrchannel approximately agrees with the simulation result. Thanks to the advantage of the laser direct writing technology, this study performs the ingenious applications of 3D structures for microchannels.

  4. 3D automatic Cartesian grid generation for Euler flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melton, John E.; Enomoto, Francis Y.; Berger, Marsha J.

    1993-01-01

    We describe a Cartesian grid strategy for the study of three dimensional inviscid flows about arbitrary geometries that uses both conventional and CAD/CAM surface geometry databases. Initial applications of the technique are presented. The elimination of the body-fitted constraint allows the grid generation process to be automated, significantly reducing the time and effort required to develop suitable computational grids for inviscid flowfield simulations.

  5. Vorticity Generation on a Flat Surface in 3D Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casciola, C. M.; Piva, R.; Bassanini, P.

    1996-12-01

    Vortex methods, based on the splitting into Euler and Stokes operators, have been successfully adopted in numerical solutions of three-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations in free-space. Here we deal with their application to flows bounded by solid walls, discussing in particular the boundary conditions for vorticity and their approximation. In two dimensions this has been accomplished by introducing a vortex sheet at the wall, determined by the local slip-velocity, as an approximation of the vorticity source. For three-dimensional flows, we analyze in the context of the Stokes substep the integral equation for the vorticity source and its connection with the creation algorithm adopted in vortex methods. The present analysis leads to a formulation which shows the connection between the exact vorticity source at the wall and the discrete vorticity creation operator adopted in the Chorin-Marsden formula. In particular, the slip velocity at the wall is identified as an approximate solution of the integral equation for the vorticity source and the corresponding error estimate is also discussed. Besides showing the consistency of this approximation, we indicate a numerical procedure which provides a wall-generation of solenoidal vorticity. This is a crucial issue for an accurate application of vortex methods to three-dimensional flows.

  6. Unsteady three-dimensional incompressible flow interaction in multiple-blade-row turbomachinery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busby, Judy Ann

    Marine propulsors operate in an inherently unsteady flowfield. To design a propulsor that meets the conditions imposed by hydrodynamic and hydroacoustic requirements, knowledge of component interactions and unsteady flow patterns throughout the propulsor is essential. At the present time, the effect of the unsteady flow on the performance of the propulsor is not thoroughly understood. The goal of this work is to use computational fluid dynamics (CFD) coupled with measurements and analytic methods to provide some insight into the physics associated with unsteady propulsor flows. The unsteady, incompressible Reynolds-Averaged Navier Stokes (RANS) code developed at Mississippi State University has been extended for use in analyzing the unsteady flow interaction between blade rows in relative motion. The approach used to model the dynamic interface between the blade rows is the localized grid distortion technique of Janus. The spatial and temporal discretizations result in third order spatial accuracy and second order (implicit) temporal accuracy. To validate the dynamic grid capabilities, computed results for the unsteady flow around a two-dimensional hydrofoil undergoing a high, reduced-frequency gust loading are compared with measured data. The unsteady gusts are generated by a pair of oscillating foils (flappers) upstream of the hydrofoil. A dynamic grid is used around the oscillating foils. The results from a parametric study indicate that 500 time steps per flapper period with three subiterations at each time step are sufficient to capture the time-accurate behavior of both the inviscid and viscous flow fields. The algorithm is then used to compute the unsteady flow through a three-dimensional, high Reynolds number pump consisting of 13 stator blades and 7 rotor blades. A detailed analysis of the primary, secondary and unsteady flow effects is presented along with an investigation of the effects of sub-iterations on the time-accuracy on the solution. The unsteady

  7. Broadband measuring system for unsteady flow investigation in wind tunnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biriukov, V. I.; Garifullin, M. F.; Korneeva, D. B.; Slitinskaya, A. Ju.

    2016-10-01

    Due to increasingly tough requirements to the accuracy and informativity of the wind tunnel experiments, the urgency has grown of the unsteady flows research. A distinctive feature of such studies is synchronous multichannel measurements of rapidly changing in time process parameters (with a broadband spectrum and characteristic frequencies of 0 Hz to 1000 Hz and above) and also the need for fast processing and storage of large volumes of the data received. To solve these problems and to meet the requirements, TsAGI has developed a measuring system (MS) and the corresponding software. The basic purpose of MS is to conduct transonic buffeting research in T-128 wind tunnel. Besides, it can be used to study separated flow regimes, aeroelastic vibrations, including: classic flutter, stall flutter, limit cycle oscillations, etc. The MS can be used also to study a variety of transient regimes. It is possible to expand the system further on to enhance its performance without introducing any fundamental changes in its structure and software, and without breaking its operability for the period of modernization.

  8. Axisymmetric Granular Collapse: a Transient 3D flow Test of Viscoplasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerswell, Rich; Lacaze, Laurent

    2008-11-01

    The collapse of a stationary cylinder of granular material onto a horizontal plan is a deceptively simple experiment rich in flow behaviour. Using 3-dimensional soft particle simulations, we reproduce the observed scaling laws for the maximum final runout and height of the deposit as a function of the initial aspect ratio. The flow simulations of this unsteady, largely axisymmetric flow are then used to confront a recently-introduced visco-plastic continuum theory (Jop, Forterre & Pouliquen, Nature, 441,727,2006) which has seen some success modelling steady, unidirectional flows.

  9. Digital-Particle-Image-Velocimetry (DPIV) in a scanning light-sheet: 3D starting flow around a short cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brücker, Ch.

    1995-08-01

    Scanning-Particle-Image-Velocimetry Technique (SPIV), introduced by Brücker (1992) and Brücker and Althaus (1992), offers the quantitative investigation of three-dimensional vortical structures in unsteady flows. On principle, this technique combines classical Particle-Image-Velocimetry (PIV) with volume scanning using a scanning light-sheet. In our previous studies, single scans obtained from photographic frame series were evaluated to show the instantaneous vortical structure of the respective flow phenomena. Here, continuous video recordings are processed to capture also the temporal information for the study of the set-up of 3D effects in the cylinder wake. The flow is continuously sampled in depth by the scanning light-sheet and in each of the parallel planes frame-to-frame cross-correlation of the video images (DPIV) is applied to obtain the 2D velocity field. Because the scanning frequency and repetition rate is high in comparison with the characteristic time-scale of the flow, the evaluation provides a complete time-record of the 3D flow during the starting process. With use of the continuity concept as described by Robinson and Rockwell (1993), we obtained in addition the out-of-plane component of the velocity in spanwise direction. This in view, the described technique enabled the reconstruction of the three-dimensional time-dependent velocity and vorticity field. The visualization of the dynamical behaviour of these quantities as, e.g. by video, gave a good impression of the spanwise flow showing the “tornado-like” suction effect of the starting vortices.

  10. Visualizing Time-Varying Phenomena In Numerical Simulations Of Unsteady Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lane, David A.

    1996-01-01

    Streamlines, contour lines, vector plots, and volume slices (cutting planes) are commonly used for flow visualization. These techniques are sometimes referred to as instantaneous flow visualization techniques because calculations are based on an instant of the flowfield in time. Although instantaneous flow visualization techniques are effective for depicting phenomena in steady flows,they sometimes do not adequately depict time-varying phenomena in unsteady flows. Streaklines and timelines are effective visualization techniques for depicting vortex shedding, vortex breakdown, and shock waves in unsteady flows. These techniques are examples of time-dependent flow visualization techniques, which are based on many instants of the flowfields in time. This paper describes the algorithms for computing streaklines and timelines. Using numerically simulated unsteady flows, streaklines and timelines are compared with streamlines, contour lines, and vector plots. It is shown that streaklines and timelines reveal vortex shedding and vortex breakdown more clearly than instantaneous flow visualization techniques.

  11. Experimental Study of the Effects of Periodic Unsteady Wakes on Flow Separation in Low Pressure Turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ozturk, Burak; Schobeiri, Meinhard T.

    2009-01-01

    The present study, which is the first of a series of investigations of low pressure turbine (LPT) boundary layer aerodynamics, is aimed at providing detailed unsteady boundary layer flow information to understand the underlying physics of the inception, onset, and extent of the separation zone. A detailed experimental study on the behavior of the separation zone on the suction surface of a highly loaded LPT-blade under periodic unsteady wake flow is presented. Experimental investigations were performed on a large-scale, high-subsonic unsteady turbine cascade research facility with an integrated wake generator and test section unit. Blade Pak B geometry was used in the cascade. The wakes were generated by continuously moving cylindrical bars device. Boundary layer investigations were performed using hot wire anemometry at Reynolds number of 110,000, based on the blade suction surface length and the exit velocity, for one steady and two unsteady inlet flow conditions, with the corresponding passing frequencies, wake velocities, and turbulence intensities. The reduced frequencies cover the entire operation range of LP-turbines. In addition to the unsteady boundary layer measurements, blade surface pressure measurements were performed at Re = 50,000, 75,000, 100,000, 110,000, and 125,000. For each Reynolds number, surface pressure measurements are carried out at one steady and two periodic unsteady inlet flow conditions. Detailed unsteady boundary layer measurement identifies the onset and extension of the separation zone as well as its behavior under unsteady wake flow. The results, presented in ensemble-averaged and contour plot forms, help to understand the physics of the separation phenomenon under periodic unsteady wake flow.

  12. Evolution of 3-D geologic framework modeling and its application to groundwater flow studies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blome, Charles D.; Smith, David V.

    2012-01-01

    In this Fact Sheet, the authors discuss the evolution of project 3-D subsurface framework modeling, research in hydrostratigraphy and airborne geophysics, and methodologies used to link geologic and groundwater flow models.

  13. 3D-Flow processor for a programmable Level-1 trigger (feasibility study)

    SciTech Connect

    Crosetto, D.

    1992-10-01

    A feasibility study has been made to use the 3D-Flow processor in a pipelined programmable parallel processing architecture to identify particles such as electrons, jets, muons, etc., in high-energy physics experiments.

  14. Axisymmetric and 3D calculations of melt flow during VCz growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bänsch, E.; Davis, D.; Langmach, H.; Miller, W.; Rehse, U.; Reinhardt, G.; Uhle, M.

    2004-05-01

    Axisymmetric and 3D calculations of melt flow have been performed for a configuration used at the vapour-pressure-controlled Czochalski growth of GaAs single crystals. Thermal boundary conditions were adapted from a global simulation of the temperature field. The axisymmetric calculations with the code NAVIER confirmed the ones previously perfomed with FIDAP TM. The 3D calculations showed that the flow exhibits an asymmetric transient behaviour beyond a certain critical Reynolds number.

  15. Simulation of 3-D viscous flow within a multi-stage turbine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adamczyk, John J.; Celestina, Mark L.; Beach, Tim A.; Barnett, Mark

    1989-01-01

    This work outlines a procedure for simulating the flow field within multistage turbomachinery which includes the effects of unsteadiness, compressibility, and viscosity. The associated modeling equations are the average passage equation system which governs the time-averaged flow field within a typical passage of a blade row embedded within a multistage configuration. The results from a simulation of a low aspect ratio stage and a one-half turbine will be presented and compared with experimental measurements. It will be shown that the secondary flow field generated by the rotor causes the aerodynamic performance of the downstream vane to be significantly different from that of an isolated blade row.

  16. Extended 3D Approach for Quantification of Abnormal Ascending Aortic Flow

    PubMed Central

    Sigovan, Monica; Dyverfeldt, Petter; Wrenn, Jarrett; Tseng, Elaine E.; Saloner, David; Hope, Michael D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Flow displacement quantifies eccentric flow, a potential risk factor for aneurysms in the ascending aorta, but only at a single anatomic location. The aim of this study is to extend flow displacement analysis to 3D in patients with aortic and aortic valve pathologies. Methods 43 individuals were studied with 4DFlow MRI in 6 groups: healthy, tricuspid aortic valve (TAV) with aortic stenosis (AS) but no dilatation, TAV with dilatation but no AS, and TAV with both AS and dilatation, BAV without AS or dilatation, BAV without AS but with dilation. The protocol was approved by our institutional review board, and informed consent was obtained. Flow displacement was calculated for multiple planes along the ascending aorta, and 2D and 3D analyses were compared. Results Good correlation was found between 2D flow displacement and both maximum and average 3D values (r>0.8). Healthy controls had significantly lower flow displacement values with all approaches (p<0.05). The highest flow displacement was seen with stenotic TAV and aortic dilation (0.24±0.02 with maximum flow displacement). The 2D approach underestimated the maximum flow displacement by more than 20% in 13 out of 36 patients (36%). Conclusions The extended 3D flow displacement analysis offers a more comprehensive quantitative evaluation of abnormal systolic flow in the ascending aorta than 2D analysis. Differences between patient subgroups are better demonstrated, and maximum flow displacement is more reliable assessed. PMID:25721998

  17. A package for 3-D unstructured grid generation, finite-element flow solution and flow field visualization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parikh, Paresh; Pirzadeh, Shahyar; Loehner, Rainald

    1990-01-01

    A set of computer programs for 3-D unstructured grid generation, fluid flow calculations, and flow field visualization was developed. The grid generation program, called VGRID3D, generates grids over complex configurations using the advancing front method. In this method, the point and element generation is accomplished simultaneously, VPLOT3D is an interactive, menudriven pre- and post-processor graphics program for interpolation and display of unstructured grid data. The flow solver, VFLOW3D, is an Euler equation solver based on an explicit, two-step, Taylor-Galerkin algorithm which uses the Flux Corrected Transport (FCT) concept for a wriggle-free solution. Using these programs, increasingly complex 3-D configurations of interest to aerospace community were gridded including a complete Space Transportation System comprised of the space-shuttle orbitor, the solid-rocket boosters, and the external tank. Flow solutions were obtained on various configurations in subsonic, transonic, and supersonic flow regimes.

  18. Effect of steady and unsteady flow on chemoattractant plume formation and sperm taxis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Allison F.; Crimaldi, John P.

    2015-08-01

    The formation of chemoattractant plumes around benthic invertebrate eggs in steady and unsteady shear flows is investigated for a range of shear rates, and the ability of sperm to navigate within these plumes is assessed using several chemotactic strategies. Although many of the details of sperm taxis remain uncertain, we investigate the role of basic processes using a toy model in two dimensions. Search strategies in 2D are intrinsically less complex than 3D, but many of the basic components are similar, and the simplified geometry permits an understanding and identification of the key factors of navigation tactics. Numerical simulations are used to model the advection and diffusion of the chemoattractant within the different flows, using three different sperm swimming behaviors. A Monte-Carlo approach is then used to determine the probability of a sperm reaching an egg for a range of flow conditions, initial conditions, and swimming behaviors. The spatial structure of chemoattractant plumes at the scale of the gametes is also investigated. Success rates for locating an egg decrease monotonically with increasing shear rates, and a definitive hierarchical ordering of the tested swimming strategies is identified. A conceptual framework to study and identify important aspects of this fundamental process to support further studies is provided.

  19. Paleoseismograms: Can Turbidite Deposits Record Flow Unsteadiness Imparted by Earthquakes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldfinger, C.; Garrett, A.; Patton, J. R.; Morey, A. E.

    2012-12-01

    In paleoseismic investigations in Cascadia, Sumatra, Chile, and the Northern San Andreas Fault, we have found that it is possible to correlate individual turbidites between isolated sites using high resolution physical property data such as CT and Gamma density, P-wave velocity and magnetic susceptibility. The magnetic and density "fingerprints" of each turbidite are a reflection of grain size distributions in many lithologies. In our studies, we commonly observe "stacked" repetitions of coarse Bouma lower divisions, followed by the fining upward tail. However the long distance correlations between isolated sites and the level of detail possible are not well explained. It is difficult to explain the observation that individual events can be correlated in detail between separate channels, slope basins and onshore lakes that are not connected. To investigate this phenomenon, we have investigated several historic earthquake deposits, and have also generated turbidity currents in flume tanks to test the dynamics of transport and deposition of unsteady turbidity currents. Flume experiments commonly attempt to eliminate source heterogeneity, and assume that hydrodynamics, sediment character, and topography are the primary controls on deposition downstream. Longitudinal flow variability is rarely considered, but is predicted to have an important role in deposition (Kneller and McCaffrey, 2003), and is sometimes invoked for waxing and waning flood deposits. We question the starting assumption of no input variability, and input variable longitudinal flow regimes to simulate several common input scenarios including storm (hyperpycnal), dam breach, and long earthquake inputs. We use calibrated sediment, color coded by grain size and used photographic techniques to extract detailed grain size plots of each turbidite deposition compare to the input flow hydrograph. When compared to the input sources of the turbidity currents, we found that there is an excellent correlation

  20. Investigation of the unsteady pressure distribution on the blades of an axial flow fan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, R. E.; Franke, G. F.

    1978-01-01

    The unsteady response of a stator blade caused by the interaction of the stator with the wakes of an upstream rotor was investigated. Unsteady pressure distributions were measured using a blade instrumented with a series miniature pressure transducers. The influence of several geometrical and flow parameters - rotor/stator spacing, stator solidity and stator incidence angle - were studied to determine the unsteady response of the stator to these parameters. A major influence on the stator unsteady response is due to the stator solidity. At high solidities the blade-to-blade interference has a larger contribution. While the range of rotor/stator spacings investigated had a minor influence, the effect of stator incidence angle is significant. The data indicate the existence of an optimum positive incidence which minimizes the unsteady response.

  1. Unsteady transonic flow calculations for two-dimensional canard-wing configurations with aeroelastic applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batina, J. T.

    1985-01-01

    Unsteady transonic flow calculations for aerodynamically interfering airfoil configurations are performed as a first-step toward solving the three-dimensional canard-wing interaction problem. These calculations are performed by extending the XTRAN2L two-dimensional unsteady transonic small-disturbance code to include an additional airfoil. Unsteady transonic forces due to plunge and pitch motions of a two-dimensional canard and wing are presented. Results for a variety of canard-wing separation distances reveal the effects of aerodynamic interference on unsteady transonic airloads. Aeroelastic analyses employing these unsteady airloads demonstrate the effects of aerodynamic interference on aeroelastic stability and flutter. For the configurations studied, increases in wing flutter speed result with the inclusion of the aerodynamically interfering canard.

  2. Unsteady transonic flow calculations for two-dimensional canard-wing configurations with aeroelastic applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batina, J. T.

    1985-01-01

    Unsteady transonic flow calculations for aerodynamically interfering airfoil configurations are performed as a first step toward solving the three dimensional canard wing interaction problem. These calculations are performed by extending the XTRAN2L two dimensional unsteady transonic small disturbance code to include an additional airfoil. Unsteady transonic forces due to plunge and pitch motions of a two dimensional canard and wing are presented. Results for a variety of canard wing separation distances reveal the effects of aerodynamic interference on unsteady transonic airloads. Aeroelastic analyses employing these unsteady airloads demonstrate the effects of aerodynamic interference on aeroelastic stability and flutter. For the configurations studied, increases in wing flutter speed result with the inclusion of the aerodynamically interfering canard.

  3. A Numerical Method for Solving the 3D Unsteady Incompressible Navier-Stokes Equations in Curvilinear Domains with Complex Immersed Boundaries

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Liang; Sotiropoulos, Fotis

    2008-01-01

    A novel numerical method is developed that integrates boundary-conforming grids with a sharp interface, immersed boundary methodology. The method is intended for simulating internal flows containing complex, moving immersed boundaries such as those encountered in several cardiovascular applications. The background domain (e.g the empty aorta) is discretized efficiently with a curvilinear boundary-fitted mesh while the complex moving immersed boundary (say a prosthetic heart valve) is treated with the sharp-interface, hybrid Cartesian/immersed-boundary approach of Gilmanov and Sotiropoulos [1]. To facilitate the implementation of this novel modeling paradigm in complex flow simulations, an accurate and efficient numerical method is developed for solving the unsteady, incompressible Navier-Stokes equations in generalized curvilinear coordinates. The method employs a novel, fully-curvilinear staggered grid discretization approach, which does not require either the explicit evaluation of the Christoffel symbols or the discretization of all three momentum equations at cell interfaces as done in previous formulations. The equations are integrated in time using an efficient, second-order accurate fractional step methodology coupled with a Jacobian-free, Newton-Krylov solver for the momentum equations and a GMRES solver enhanced with multigrid as preconditioner for the Poisson equation. Several numerical experiments are carried out on fine computational meshes to demonstrate the accuracy and efficiency of the proposed method for standard benchmark problems as well as for unsteady, pulsatile flow through a curved, pipe bend. To demonstrate the ability of the method to simulate flows with complex, moving immersed boundaries we apply it to calculate pulsatile, physiological flow through a mechanical, bileaflet heart valve mounted in a model straight aorta with an anatomical-like triple sinus. PMID:19194533

  4. Determining 3D flow fields via multi-camera light field imaging.

    PubMed

    Truscott, Tadd T; Belden, Jesse; Nielson, Joseph R; Daily, David J; Thomson, Scott L

    2013-03-06

    In the field of fluid mechanics, the resolution of computational schemes has outpaced experimental methods and widened the gap between predicted and observed phenomena in fluid flows. Thus, a need exists for an accessible method capable of resolving three-dimensional (3D) data sets for a range of problems. We present a novel technique for performing quantitative 3D imaging of many types of flow fields. The 3D technique enables investigation of complicated velocity fields and bubbly flows. Measurements of these types present a variety of challenges to the instrument. For instance, optically dense bubbly multiphase flows cannot be readily imaged by traditional, non-invasive flow measurement techniques due to the bubbles occluding optical access to the interior regions of the volume of interest. By using Light Field Imaging we are able to reparameterize images captured by an array of cameras to reconstruct a 3D volumetric map for every time instance, despite partial occlusions in the volume. The technique makes use of an algorithm known as synthetic aperture (SA) refocusing, whereby a 3D focal stack is generated by combining images from several cameras post-capture (1). Light Field Imaging allows for the capture of angular as well as spatial information about the light rays, and hence enables 3D scene reconstruction. Quantitative information can then be extracted from the 3D reconstructions using a variety of processing algorithms. In particular, we have developed measurement methods based on Light Field Imaging for performing 3D particle image velocimetry (PIV), extracting bubbles in a 3D field and tracking the boundary of a flickering flame. We present the fundamentals of the Light Field Imaging methodology in the context of our setup for performing 3DPIV of the airflow passing over a set of synthetic vocal folds, and show representative results from application of the technique to a bubble-entraining plunging jet.

  5. Determining 3D Flow Fields via Multi-camera Light Field Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Truscott, Tadd T.; Belden, Jesse; Nielson, Joseph R.; Daily, David J.; Thomson, Scott L.

    2013-01-01

    In the field of fluid mechanics, the resolution of computational schemes has outpaced experimental methods and widened the gap between predicted and observed phenomena in fluid flows. Thus, a need exists for an accessible method capable of resolving three-dimensional (3D) data sets for a range of problems. We present a novel technique for performing quantitative 3D imaging of many types of flow fields. The 3D technique enables investigation of complicated velocity fields and bubbly flows. Measurements of these types present a variety of challenges to the instrument. For instance, optically dense bubbly multiphase flows cannot be readily imaged by traditional, non-invasive flow measurement techniques due to the bubbles occluding optical access to the interior regions of the volume of interest. By using Light Field Imaging we are able to reparameterize images captured by an array of cameras to reconstruct a 3D volumetric map for every time instance, despite partial occlusions in the volume. The technique makes use of an algorithm known as synthetic aperture (SA) refocusing, whereby a 3D focal stack is generated by combining images from several cameras post-capture 1. Light Field Imaging allows for the capture of angular as well as spatial information about the light rays, and hence enables 3D scene reconstruction. Quantitative information can then be extracted from the 3D reconstructions using a variety of processing algorithms. In particular, we have developed measurement methods based on Light Field Imaging for performing 3D particle image velocimetry (PIV), extracting bubbles in a 3D field and tracking the boundary of a flickering flame. We present the fundamentals of the Light Field Imaging methodology in the context of our setup for performing 3DPIV of the airflow passing over a set of synthetic vocal folds, and show representative results from application of the technique to a bubble-entraining plunging jet. PMID:23486112

  6. ODTLES : a model for 3D turbulent flow based on one-dimensional turbulence modeling concepts.

    SciTech Connect

    McDermott, Randy; Kerstein, Alan R.; Schmidt, Rodney Cannon

    2005-01-01

    This report describes an approach for extending the one-dimensional turbulence (ODT) model of Kerstein [6] to treat turbulent flow in three-dimensional (3D) domains. This model, here called ODTLES, can also be viewed as a new LES model. In ODTLES, 3D aspects of the flow are captured by embedding three, mutually orthogonal, one-dimensional ODT domain arrays within a coarser 3D mesh. The ODTLES model is obtained by developing a consistent approach for dynamically coupling the different ODT line sets to each other and to the large scale processes that are resolved on the 3D mesh. The model is implemented computationally and its performance is tested and evaluated by performing simulations of decaying isotropic turbulence, a standard turbulent flow benchmarking problem.

  7. Strategies for Effectively Visualizing a 3D Flow Using Volume Line Integral Convolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Interrante, Victoria; Grosch, Chester

    1997-01-01

    This paper discusses strategies for effectively portraying 3D flow using volume line integral convolution. Issues include defining an appropriate input texture, clarifying the distinct identities and relative depths of the advected texture elements, and selectively highlighting regions of interest in both the input and output volumes. Apart from offering insights into the greater potential of 3D LIC as a method for effectively representing flow in a volume, a principal contribution of this work is the suggestion of a technique for generating and rendering 3D visibility-impeding 'halos' that can help to intuitively indicate the presence of depth discontinuities between contiguous elements in a projection and thereby clarify the 3D spatial organization of elements in the flow. The proposed techniques are applied to the visualization of a hot, supersonic, laminar jet exiting into a colder, subsonic coflow.

  8. Reacting Multi-Species Gas Capability for USM3D Flow Solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frink, Neal T.; Schuster, David M.

    2012-01-01

    The USM3D Navier-Stokes flow solver contributed heavily to the NASA Constellation Project (CxP) as a highly productive computational tool for generating the aerodynamic databases for the Ares I and V launch vehicles and Orion launch abort vehicle (LAV). USM3D is currently limited to ideal-gas flows, which are not adequate for modeling the chemistry or temperature effects of hot-gas jet flows. This task was initiated to create an efficient implementation of multi-species gas and equilibrium chemistry into the USM3D code to improve its predictive capabilities for hot jet impingement effects. The goal of this NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) assessment was to implement and validate a simulation capability to handle real-gas effects in the USM3D code. This document contains the outcome of the NESC assessment.

  9. Advanced Small Perturbation Potential Flow Theory for Unsteady Aerodynamic and Aeroelastic Analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batina, John T.

    2005-01-01

    An advanced small perturbation (ASP) potential flow theory has been developed to improve upon the classical transonic small perturbation (TSP) theories that have been used in various computer codes. These computer codes are typically used for unsteady aerodynamic and aeroelastic analyses in the nonlinear transonic flight regime. The codes exploit the simplicity of stationary Cartesian meshes with the movement or deformation of the configuration under consideration incorporated into the solution algorithm through a planar surface boundary condition. The new ASP theory was developed methodically by first determining the essential elements required to produce full-potential-like solutions with a small perturbation approach on the requisite Cartesian grid. This level of accuracy required a higher-order streamwise mass flux and a mass conserving surface boundary condition. The ASP theory was further developed by determining the essential elements required to produce results that agreed well with Euler solutions. This level of accuracy required mass conserving entropy and vorticity effects, and second-order terms in the trailing wake boundary condition. Finally, an integral boundary layer procedure, applicable to both attached and shock-induced separated flows, was incorporated for viscous effects. The resulting ASP potential flow theory, including entropy, vorticity, and viscous effects, is shown to be mathematically more appropriate and computationally more accurate than the classical TSP theories. The formulaic details of the ASP theory are described fully and the improvements are demonstrated through careful comparisons with accepted alternative results and experimental data. The new theory has been used as the basis for a new computer code called ASP3D (Advanced Small Perturbation - 3D), which also is briefly described with representative results.

  10. Correlations of Surface Deformation and 3D Flow Field in a Compliant Wall Turbulent Channel Flow.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jin; Zhang, Cao; Katz, Joseph

    2015-11-01

    This study focuses on the correlations between surface deformation and flow features, including velocity, vorticity and pressure, in a turbulent channel flow over a flat, compliant Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) wall. The channel centerline velocity is 2.5 m/s, and the friction Reynolds number is 2.3x103. Analysis is based on simultaneous measurements of the time resolved 3D velocity and surface deformation using tomographic PIV and Mach-Zehnder Interferometry. The volumetric pressure distribution is calculated plane by plane by spatially integrating the material acceleration using virtual boundary, omni-directional method. Conditional sampling based on local high/low pressure and deformation events reveals the primary flow structures causing the deformation. High pressure peaks appear at the interface between sweep and ejection, whereas the negative deformations peaks (dent) appear upstream, under the sweeps. The persistent phase lag between flow and deformations are presumably caused by internal damping within the PDMS. Some of the low pressure peaks and strong ejections are located under the head of hairpin vortices, and accordingly, are associated with positive deformation (bump). Others bumps and dents are correlated with some spanwise offset large inclined quasi-streamwise vortices that are not necessarily associated with hairpins. Sponsored by ONR.

  11. On the unsteady inviscid force on cylinders and spheres in subcritical compressible flow.

    PubMed

    Parmar, M; Haselbacher, A; Balachandar, S

    2008-06-28

    The unsteady inviscid force on cylinders and spheres in subcritical compressible flow is investigated. In the limit of incompressible flow, the unsteady inviscid force on a cylinder or sphere is the so-called added-mass force that is proportional to the product of the mass displaced by the body and the instantaneous acceleration. In compressible flow, the finite acoustic propagation speed means that the unsteady inviscid force arising from an instantaneously applied constant acceleration develops gradually and reaches steady values only for non-dimensional times c(infinity)t/R approximately >10, where c(infinity) is the freestream speed of sound and R is the radius of the cylinder or sphere. In this limit, an effective added-mass coefficient may be defined. The main conclusion of our study is that the freestream Mach number has a pronounced effect on both the peak value of the unsteady force and the effective added-mass coefficient. At a freestream Mach number of 0.5, the effective added-mass coefficient is about twice as large as the incompressible value for the sphere. Coupled with an impulsive acceleration, the unsteady inviscid force in compressible flow can be more than four times larger than that predicted from incompressible theory. Furthermore, the effect of the ratio of specific heats on the unsteady force becomes more pronounced as the Mach number increases. PMID:18348968

  12. 3D-printed devices for continuous-flow organic chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Dragone, Vincenza; Sans, Victor; Rosnes, Mali H; Kitson, Philip J

    2013-01-01

    Summary We present a study in which the versatility of 3D-printing is combined with the processing advantages of flow chemistry for the synthesis of organic compounds. Robust and inexpensive 3D-printed reactionware devices are easily connected using standard fittings resulting in complex, custom-made flow systems, including multiple reactors in a series with in-line, real-time analysis using an ATR-IR flow cell. As a proof of concept, we utilized two types of organic reactions, imine syntheses and imine reductions, to show how different reactor configurations and substrates give different products. PMID:23766811

  13. Model studies of blood flow in basilar artery with 3D laser Doppler anemometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frolov, S. V.; Sindeev, S. V.; Liepsch, D.; Balasso, A.; Proskurin, S. G.; Potlov, A. Y.

    2015-03-01

    It is proposed an integrated approach to the study of basilar artery blood flow using 3D laser Doppler anemometer for identifying the causes of the formation and development of cerebral aneurysms. Feature of the work is the combined usage of both mathematical modeling and experimental methods. Described the experimental setup and the method of measurement of basilar artery blood flow, carried out in an interdisciplinary laboratory of Hospital Rechts der Isar of Technical University of Munich. The experimental setup used to simulate the blood flow in the basilar artery and to measure blood flow characteristics using 3D laser Doppler anemometer (3D LDA). Described a method of numerical studies carried out in Tambov State Technical University and the Bakoulev Center for Cardiovascular Surgery. Proposed an approach for sharing experimental and numerical methods of research to identify the causes of the basilar artery aneurysms.

  14. 3D vector flow using a row-column addressed CMUT array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holbek, Simon; Christiansen, Thomas Lehrmann; Engholm, Mathias; Lei, Anders; Stuart, Mathias Bo; Beers, Christopher; Moesner, Lars Nordahl; Bagge, Jan Peter; Thomsen, Erik Vilain; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents an in-house developed 2-D capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer (CMUT) applied for 3-D blood flow estimation. The probe breaks with conventional transducers in two ways; first, the ultrasonic pressure field is generated from thousands of small vibrating micromachined cells, and second, elements are accessed by row and/or column indices. The 62+62 2-D row-column addressed prototype CMUT probe was used for vector flow estimation by transmitting focused ultrasound into a flow-rig with a fully developed parabolic flow. The beam-to-flow angle was 90°. The received data was beamformed and processed offline. A transverse oscillation (TO) velocity estimator was used to estimate the 3-D vector flow along a line originating from the center of the transducer. The estimated velocities in the lateral and axial direction were close to zero as expected. In the transverse direction a characteristic parabolic velocity profile was estimated with a peak velocity of 0.48 m/s +/- 0.02 m/s in reference to the expected 0.54 m/s. The results presented are the first 3-D vector flow estimates obtained with a row-column CMUT probe, which demonstrates that the CMUT technology is feasible for 3-D flow estimation.

  15. Adaptive 3D single-block grids for the computation of viscous flows around wings

    SciTech Connect

    Hagmeijer, R.; Kok, J.C.

    1996-12-31

    A robust algorithm for the adaption of a 3D single-block structured grid suitable for the computation of viscous flows around a wing is presented and demonstrated by application to the ONERA M6 wing. The effects of grid adaption on the flow solution and accuracy improvements is analyzed. Reynolds number variations are studied.

  16. The performance & flow visualization studies of three-dimensional (3-D) wind turbine blade models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutrisno, Prajitno, Purnomo, W., Setyawan B.

    2016-06-01

    Recently, studies on the design of 3-D wind turbine blades have a less attention even though 3-D blade products are widely sold. In contrary, advanced studies in 3-D helicopter blade tip have been studied rigorously. Studies in wind turbine blade modeling are mostly assumed that blade spanwise sections behave as independent two-dimensional airfoils, implying that there is no exchange of momentum in the spanwise direction. Moreover, flow visualization experiments are infrequently conducted. Therefore, a modeling study of wind turbine blade with visualization experiment is needed to be improved to obtain a better understanding. The purpose of this study is to investigate the performance of 3-D wind turbine blade models with backward-forward swept and verify the flow patterns using flow visualization. In this research, the blade models are constructed based on the twist and chord distributions following Schmitz's formula. Forward and backward swept are added to the rotating blades. Based on this, the additional swept would enhance or diminish outward flow disturbance or stall development propagation on the spanwise blade surfaces to give better blade design. Some combinations, i. e., b lades with backward swept, provide a better 3-D favorable rotational force of the rotor system. The performance of the 3-D wind turbine system model is measured by a torque meter, employing Prony's braking system. Furthermore, the 3-D flow patterns around the rotating blade models are investigated by applying "tuft-visualization technique", to study the appearance of laminar, separated, and boundary layer flow patterns surrounding the 3-dimentional blade system.

  17. Improving segmentation of 3D touching cell nuclei using flow tracking on surface meshes.

    PubMed

    Li, Gang; Guo, Lei

    2012-01-01

    Automatic segmentation of touching cell nuclei in 3D microscopy images is of great importance in bioimage informatics and computational biology. This paper presents a novel method for improving 3D touching cell nuclei segmentation. Given binary touching nuclei by the method in Li et al. (2007), our method herein consists of several steps: surface mesh reconstruction and curvature information estimation; direction field diffusion on surface meshes; flow tracking on surface meshes; and projection of surface mesh segmentation to volumetric images. The method is validated on both synthesised and real 3D touching cell nuclei images, demonstrating its validity and effectiveness.

  18. Transient simulation of hydropower station with consideration of three-dimensional unsteady flow in turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, W. D.; Fan, H. G.; Chen, N. X.

    2012-11-01

    To study the interaction between the transient flow in pipe and the unsteady turbulent flow in turbine, a coupled model of the transient flow in the pipe and three-dimensional unsteady flow in the turbine is developed based on the method of characteristics and the fluid governing equation in the accelerated rotational relative coordinate. The load-rejection process under the closing of guide vanes of the hydraulic power plant is simulated by the coupled method, the traditional transient simulation method and traditional three-dimensional unsteady flow calculation method respectively and the results are compared. The pressure, unit flux and rotation speed calculated by three methods show a similar change trend. However, because the elastic water hammer in the pipe and the pressure fluctuation in the turbine have been considered in the coupled method, the increase of pressure at spiral inlet is higher and the pressure fluctuation in turbine is stronger.

  19. Development of discrete gas kinetic scheme for simulation of 3D viscous incompressible and compressible flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, L. M.; Shu, C.; Wang, Y.; Sun, Y.

    2016-08-01

    The sphere function-based gas kinetic scheme (GKS), which was presented by Shu and his coworkers [23] for simulation of inviscid compressible flows, is extended to simulate 3D viscous incompressible and compressible flows in this work. Firstly, we use certain discrete points to represent the spherical surface in the phase velocity space. Then, integrals along the spherical surface for conservation forms of moments, which are needed to recover 3D Navier-Stokes equations, are approximated by integral quadrature. The basic requirement is that these conservation forms of moments can be exactly satisfied by weighted summation of distribution functions at discrete points. It was found that the integral quadrature by eight discrete points on the spherical surface, which forms the D3Q8 discrete velocity model, can exactly match the integral. In this way, the conservative variables and numerical fluxes can be computed by weighted summation of distribution functions at eight discrete points. That is, the application of complicated formulations resultant from integrals can be replaced by a simple solution process. Several numerical examples including laminar flat plate boundary layer, 3D lid-driven cavity flow, steady flow through a 90° bending square duct, transonic flow around DPW-W1 wing and supersonic flow around NACA0012 airfoil are chosen to validate the proposed scheme. Numerical results demonstrate that the present scheme can provide reasonable numerical results for 3D viscous flows.

  20. Realistic evaluation of hull performance for rowing shells, canoes, and kayaks in unsteady flow.

    PubMed

    Day, Alexander; Campbell, Ian; Clelland, David; Doctors, Lawrence J; Cichowicz, Jakub

    2011-07-01

    In this study, we investigated the effect of hull dynamics in shallow water on the hydrodynamic performance of rowing shells as well as canoes and kayaks. An approach was developed to generate data in a towing tank using a test rig capable of reproducing realistic speed profiles. The impact of unsteady shallow-water effects on wave-making resistance was examined via experimental measurements on a benchmark hull. The data generated were used to explore the validity of a computational approach developed to predict unsteady shallow-water wave resistance. Comparison of measured and predicted results showed that the computational approach correctly predicted complex unsteady wave-resistance phenomena at low oscillation frequency and speed, but that total resistance was substantially under-predicted at moderate oscillation frequency and speed. It was postulated that this discrepancy arose from unsteady viscous effects. This was investigated via hot-film measurements for a full-scale single scull in unsteady flow in both towing-tank and field-trial conditions. Results suggested a strong link between acceleration and turbulence and demonstrated that the measured real-world viscous-flow behaviour could be successfully reproduced in the tank. Thus a suitable tank-test approach could provide a reliable guide to hull performance characterization in unsteady flow. PMID:21756127

  1. Global Pressure Measurement of Unsteady-State Flow and Motion on Fluttering Airfoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okabe, Taika; Miyazaki, Takeshi; Saitoh, Kenichi; Sakaue, Hirotaka

    2012-11-01

    Pressure-sensitive paint (PSP) measurement has been applied to a fluid dynamic measurement. It can be applied to a steady-state flow in the transonic and supersonic wind tunnels. To extend the PSP measurement, an unsteady-state measurement is paid attention. It can be categorized by the unsteady-state flow and unsteady motion of the PSP-coated model. The former can be captured by using a porous PSP. The fastest PSP gives the response time on the order of ten microseconds. For the latter, the motion-capturing PSP method is studied to capture the unsteady motion. It consists of a two-color PSP and color camera. One color corresponds to the pressure-independent luminescence, and the other to the pressure-dependent luminescence. The former is used to cancel the pressure-independent distribution of a pressure-dependent image. The two-color images are simultaneously captured by the color camera. A combination of the unsteady-state flow and the motion can be occurred for an unsteady-state measurement. We present one of the cases, which is a flutter on an airfoil. By combining a porous PSP and the motion-capturing method, a pressure distribution on a fluttering airfoil (2-D YXX 30% span) is captured.

  2. Simulations of the unsteady flow through the Fastrac Supersonic Turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Griffin, L.W.; Dorney, D.J.

    2000-04-01

    Analysis of the unsteady aerodynamic environment in the Fastrac supersonic turbine is presented. Modal analysis of the turbine blades indicated possible resonance in crucial operating ranges of the turbopump. Unsteady computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis was conducted to support the aerodynamic and structural dynamic assessments of the turbine. Before beginning the analysis, two major problems with current unsteady analytical capabilities had to be addressed: modeling a straight centerline nozzle with the turbine blades and exit guide vanes (EGVs), and reducing run times significantly while maintaining physical accuracy. Modifications were made to the CFD code used in this study to allow the coupled nozzle/blade/EGV analysis and to incorporate Message Passing Interface (MPI) software. Because unsteadiness is a key issue for the Fastrac turbine [and future rocket engine turbines such as the Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV)], calculations were performed for two nozzle-to-blade axial gaps. Calculations were also performed for the nozzle alone, and the results were imposed as an inlet boundary condition for a blade/EGV calculation for the large gap case. These results are compared to the nozzle/blade/EGV results.

  3. Unsteady aerodynamic flow field analysis of the space shuttle configuration. Part 3: Unsteady aerodynamics of bodies with concave nose geometries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ericsson, L. E.; Reding, J. P.

    1976-01-01

    An analysis of the unsteady aerodynamics of bodies with concave nose geometries was performed. The results show that the experimentally observed pulsating flow on spiked bodies and in forward facing cavities can be described by the developed simple mathematical model of the phenomenon. Static experimental data is used as a basis for determination of the oscillatory frequency of spike-induced flow pulsations. The agreement between predicted and measured reduced frequencies is generally very good. The spiked-body mathematical model is extended to describe the pulsations observed in forward facing cavities and it is shown that not only the frequency but also the pressure time history can be described with the accuracy needed to predict the experimentally observed time average effects. This implies that it should be possible to determine analytically the impact of the flow pulsation on the structural integrity of the nozzles for the jettisoned empty SRM-shells.

  4. Implementation of Advanced Two Equation Turbulence Models in the USM3D Unstructured Flow Solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Qun-Zhen; Massey, Steven J.; Abdol-Hamid, Khaled S.

    2000-01-01

    USM3D is a widely-used unstructured flow solver for simulating inviscid and viscous flows over complex geometries. The current version (version 5.0) of USM3D, however, does not have advanced turbulence models to accurately simulate complicated flow. We have implemented two modified versions of the original Jones and Launder k-epsilon "two-equation" turbulence model and the Girimaji algebraic Reynolds stress model in USM3D. Tests have been conducted for three flat plate boundary layer cases, a RAE2822 airfoil and an ONERA M6 wing. The results are compared with those from direct numerical simulation, empirical formulae, theoretical results, and the existing Spalart-Allmaras one-equation model.

  5. 3D Structures: Microfluidic Stamping on Sheath Flow (Small 24/2016).

    PubMed

    Yoon, Dong Hyun; Tanaka, Daiki; Sekiguchi, Tetsushi; Shoji, Shuichi

    2016-06-01

    A microfluidic stamping method to form functional shapes on a cross section in fibre-shaped flow is presented by D. H. Yoon and co-workers on page 3224. Microfluidic stamping and overstamping allowed various cross sectional shapes on the three-dimensional flow. Dimension of the flows is controlled via a change in combination of 3D structures and fluidic conditions, which correspond to stamp type and stamping force. PMID:27306739

  6. High fidelity digital inline holographic method for 3D flow measurements.

    PubMed

    Toloui, Mostafa; Hong, Jiarong

    2015-10-19

    Among all the 3D optical flow diagnostic techniques, digital inline holographic particle tracking velocimetry (DIH-PTV) provides the highest spatial resolution with low cost, simple and compact optical setups. Despite these advantages, DIH-PTV suffers from major limitations including poor longitudinal resolution, human intervention (i.e. requirement for manually determined tuning parameters during tracer field reconstruction and extraction), limited tracer concentration, and expensive computations. These limitations prevent this technique from being widely used for high resolution 3D flow measurements. In this study, we present a novel holographic particle extraction method with the goal of overcoming all the major limitations of DIH-PTV. The proposed method consists of multiple steps involving 3D deconvolution, automatic signal-to-noise ratio enhancement and thresholding, and inverse iterative particle extraction. The entire method is implemented using GPU-based algorithm to increase the computational speed significantly. Validated with synthetic particle holograms, the proposed method can achieve particle extraction rate above 95% with fake particles less than 3% and maximum position error below 1.6 particle diameter for holograms with particle concentration above 3000 particles/mm3. The applicability of the proposed method for DIH-PTV has been further validated using the experiment of laminar flow in a microchannel and the synthetic tracer flow fields generated using a DNS turbulent channel flow database. Such improvements will substantially enhance the implementation of DIH-PTV for 3D flow measurements and enable the potential commercialization of this technique. PMID:26480377

  7. Time-lapse 3-D seismic imaging of shallow subsurface contaminant flow.

    PubMed

    McKenna, J; Sherlock, D; Evans, B

    2001-12-01

    This paper presents a physical modelling study outlining a technique whereby buoyant contaminant flow within water-saturated unconsolidated sand was remotely monitored utilizing the time-lapse 3-D (TL3-D) seismic response. The controlled temperature and pressure conditions, along with the high level of acquisition repeatability attainable using sandbox physical models, allow the TL3-D seismic response to pore fluid movement to be distinguished from all other effects. TL3-D seismic techniques are currently being developed to monitor hydrocarbon reserves within producing reservoirs in an endeavour to improve overall recovery. However, in many ways, sandbox models under atmospheric conditions more accurately simulate the shallow subsurface than petroleum reservoirs. For this reason, perhaps the greatest application for analogue sandbox modelling is to improve our understanding of shallow groundwater and environmental flow mechanisms. Two fluid flow simulations were conducted whereby air and kerosene were injected into separate water-saturated unconsolidated sand models. In both experiments, a base 3-D seismic volume was recorded and compared with six later monitor surveys recorded while the injection program was conducted. Normal incidence amplitude and P-wave velocity information were extracted from the TL3-D seismic data to provide visualization of contaminant migration. Reflection amplitudes displayed qualitative areal distribution of fluids when a suitable impedance contrast existed between pore fluids. TL3-D seismic reflection tomography can potentially monitor the change in areal distribution of fluid contaminants over time, indicating flow patterns. However, other research and this current work have not established a quantifiable relationship between either normal reflection amplitudes and attenuation and fluid saturation. Generally, different pore fluids will have unique seismic velocities due to differences in compressibility and density. The predictable

  8. Reflectional symmetry breaking of the separated flow over 3D bluff bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grandemange, Mathieu; Gohlke, Marc; Cadot, Olivier

    2012-11-01

    The first experimental observation of a permanent reflectional symmetry breaking (RSB) is reported for a laminar three-dimensional wake. Based on flow visualizations, a first bifurcation from the trivial steady symmetric state to a steady RSB state is characterized at Re = 340. The RSB state becomes unsteady after a second bifurcation at Re = 410. It is found that this RSB regime is persistent at large Reynolds numbers and responsible for a bi-stable turbulent wake. The authors are indebted to R. Godoy Diana, V. Raspa and B. Thiria from ESPCI (Paris, France) for lending their low speed hydrodynamics tunnel.

  9. Parallel Finite Element Solution of 3D Rayleigh-Benard-Marangoni Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carey, G. F.; McLay, R.; Bicken, G.; Barth, B.; Pehlivanov, A.

    1999-01-01

    A domain decomposition strategy and parallel gradient-type iterative solution scheme have been developed and implemented for computation of complex 3D viscous flow problems involving heat transfer and surface tension effects. Details of the implementation issues are described together with associated performance and scalability studies. Representative Rayleigh-Benard and microgravity Marangoni flow calculations and performance results on the Cray T3D and T3E are presented. The work is currently being extended to tightly-coupled parallel "Beowulf-type" PC clusters and we present some preliminary performance results on this platform. We also describe progress on related work on hierarchic data extraction for visualization.

  10. Using flow information to support 3D vessel reconstruction from rotational angiography

    SciTech Connect

    Waechter, Irina; Bredno, Joerg; Weese, Juergen; Barratt, Dean C.; Hawkes, David J.

    2008-07-15

    For the assessment of cerebrovascular diseases, it is beneficial to obtain three-dimensional (3D) morphologic and hemodynamic information about the vessel system. Rotational angiography is routinely used to image the 3D vascular geometry and we have shown previously that rotational subtraction angiography has the potential to also give quantitative information about blood flow. Flow information can be determined when the angiographic sequence shows inflow and possibly outflow of contrast agent. However, a standard volume reconstruction assumes that the vessel tree is uniformly filled with contrast agent during the whole acquisition. If this is not the case, the reconstruction exhibits artifacts. Here, we show how flow information can be used to support the reconstruction of the 3D vessel centerline and radii in this case. Our method uses the fast marching algorithm to determine the order in which voxels are analyzed. For every voxel, the rotational time intensity curve (R-TIC) is determined from the image intensities at the projection points of the current voxel. Next, the bolus arrival time of the contrast agent at the voxel is estimated from the R-TIC. Then, a measure of the intensity and duration of the enhancement is determined, from which a speed value is calculated that steers the propagation of the fast marching algorithm. The results of the fast marching algorithm are used to determine the 3D centerline by backtracking. The 3D radius is reconstructed from 2D radius estimates on the projection images. The proposed method was tested on computer simulated rotational angiography sequences with systematically varied x-ray acquisition, blood flow, and contrast agent injection parameters and on datasets from an experimental setup using an anthropomorphic cerebrovascular phantom. For the computer simulation, the mean absolute error of the 3D centerline and 3D radius estimation was 0.42 and 0.25 mm, respectively. For the experimental datasets, the mean absolute

  11. A simulation of the unsteady interaction of a centrifugal impeller with its vaned diffuser: Flow analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Dawes, W.N.

    1995-04-01

    The aim of this paper is to help advance one`s understanding of the complex, three-dimensional, unsteady flow associated with the interaction of a splittered centrifugal impeller and its vaned diffuser. A time-resolved simulation is presented of the Krain stage performed using a time-accurate, three-dimensional, unstructured mesh, solution-adaptive Navier-Stokes solver. The predicted flowfield, compared with experiment where available, displays a complex, unsteady interaction, especially in the neighborhood of the diffuser entry zone, which experiences large periodic flow unsteadiness. Downstream of the throat, although the magnitude of this unsteadiness diminishes rapidly, the flow has a highly distorted three-dimensional character. The loss levels in the diffuser are then investigated to try and determine how time-mean loss levels compare with the levels expected from equivalent steady flow analysis performed by using the circumferentially averaged exit flow from the impeller as inlet to the diffuser. It is concluded that little loss could be attributed directly to unsteady effects but rather that the principal cause of the rather high loss levels observed in the diffuser is the strong spanwise distortion in swirl angle at inlet, which initiates a strong hub/corner stall.

  12. Simulation of the unsteady interaction of a centrifugal impeller with its vaned diffuser: flow analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawes, W. N.

    1995-04-01

    The aim of this paper is to help advance our understanding of the complex, three-dimensional, unsteady flow associated with the interaction of a splittered centrifugal impeller and its vaned diffuser. A time-resolved simulation is presented of the Krain stage performed using a time-accurate, three-dimensional, unstructured mesh, solution-adaptive Navier-Stokes solver. The predicted flowfield, compared with experiment where available, displays a complex, unsteady interaction, especially in the neighborhood of the diffuser entry zone, which experiences large periodic flow unsteadiness. Downstream of the throat, although the magnitude of this unsteadiness diminishes rapidly, the flow has a highly distorted three-dimensional character. The loss levels in the diffuser are then investigated to try and determine how time-mean loss levels compare with the levels expected from 'equivalent' steady flow analysis performed by using the circumferentially averaged exit flow from the impeller as inlet to the diffuser. It is concluded that little loss could be attributed directly to unsteady effects but rather that the principal cause of the rather high loss levels observed in the diffuser is the strong spanwise distortion in swirl angle at inlet, which initiates a strong hub/corner stall.

  13. 3-D model of a radial flow sub-watt methanol fuel processor

    SciTech Connect

    Holladay, J. D.; Wang, Y.

    2015-10-01

    A 3-D model is presented for a novel sub-watt packed bed reactor. The reactor uses an annular inlet flow combined with a radial flow packed bed reactor. The baseline reactor is compared to a reactor with multiple outlets and a reactor with 3 internal fins. Increasing the outlets from 1 to 4 did improve the flow distribution, but did not increase the performance in the simulation. However, inserting fins allowed a decrease in temperature with same inlet flow of approximately 35K. Or the inlet flow rate could be increased by a factor of 2.8x while maintaining >99% conversion.

  14. 3D-printed and CNC milled flow-cells for chemiluminescence detection.

    PubMed

    Spilstead, Kara B; Learey, Jessica J; Doeven, Egan H; Barbante, Gregory J; Mohr, Stephan; Barnett, Neil W; Terry, Jessica M; Hall, Robynne M; Francis, Paul S

    2014-08-01

    Herein we explore modern fabrication techniques for the development of chemiluminescence detection flow-cells with features not attainable using the traditional coiled tubing approach. This includes the first 3D-printed chemiluminescence flow-cells, and a milled flow-cell designed to split the analyte stream into two separate detection zones within the same polymer chip. The flow-cells are compared to conventional detection systems using flow injection analysis (FIA) and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), with the fast chemiluminescence reactions of an acidic potassium permanganate reagent with morphine and a series of adrenergic phenolic amines. PMID:24881540

  15. Flow and axial dispersion in a sinusoidal-walled tube: Effects of inertial and unsteady flows

    SciTech Connect

    Richmond, Marshall C.; Perkins, William A.; Scheibe, Timothy D.; Lambert, Adam; Wood, Brian D.

    2013-12-01

    Dispersion in porous media flows has been the subject of much experimental, theoretical and numerical study. Here we consider a wavy-walled tube (a three-dimensional tube with sinusoidally-varying diameter) as a simplified conceptualization of flow in porous media, where constrictions represent pore throats and expansions pore bodies. A theoretical model for effective (macroscopic) longitudinal dispersion in this system has been developed by volume averaging the microscale velocity field. Direct numerical simulation using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methods was used to compute velocity fields by solving the Navier-Stokes equations, and also to numerically solve the volume averaging closure problem, for a range of Reynolds numbers (Re) spanning the low-Re to inertial flow regimes, including one simulation at Re = 449 for which unsteady flow was observed. Dispersion values were computed using both the volume averaging solution and a random walk particle tracking method, and results of the two methods were shown to be consistent. Our results are compared to experimental measurements of dispersion in porous media and to previous theoretical results for the low-Re, Stokes flow regime. In the steady inertial regime we observe an power-law increase in effective longitudinal dispersion (DL) with Re, consistent with previous results. This rapid rate of increase is caused by trapping of solute in expansions due to flow separation (eddies). For the unsteady case (Re = 449), the rate of increase of DL with Re was smaller than that observed at lower Re. Velocity fluctuations in this regime lead to increased rates of solute mass transfer between the core flow and separated flow regions, thus diminishing the amount of tailing caused by solute trapping in eddies and thereby reducing longitudinal dispersion.

  16. Numerical Optimization Strategy for Determining 3D Flow Fields in Microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eden, Alex; Sigurdson, Marin; Mezic, Igor; Meinhart, Carl

    2015-11-01

    We present a hybrid experimental-numerical method for generating 3D flow fields from 2D PIV experimental data. An optimization algorithm is applied to a theory-based simulation of an alternating current electrothermal (ACET) micromixer in conjunction with 2D PIV data to generate an improved representation of 3D steady state flow conditions. These results can be used to investigate mixing phenomena. Experimental conditions were simulated using COMSOL Multiphysics to solve the temperature and velocity fields, as well as the quasi-static electric fields. The governing equations were based on a theoretical model for ac electrothermal flows. A Nelder-Mead optimization algorithm was used to achieve a better fit by minimizing the error between 2D PIV experimental velocity data and numerical simulation results at the measurement plane. By applying this hybrid method, the normalized RMS velocity error between the simulation and experimental results was reduced by more than an order of magnitude. The optimization algorithm altered 3D fluid circulation patterns considerably, providing a more accurate representation of the 3D experimental flow field. This method can be generalized to a wide variety of flow problems. This research was supported by the Institute for Collaborative Biotechnologies through grant W911NF-09-0001 from the U.S. Army Research Office.

  17. One-layer microfluidic device for hydrodynamic 3D self-flow-focusing operating in low flow speed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daghighi, Yasaman; Gnyawali, Vaskar; Strohm, Eric M.; Tsai, Scott S. H.; Kolios, Michael C.

    2016-03-01

    Hydrodynamic 3D flow-focusing techniques in microfluidics are categorized as (a) sheathless techniques which require high flow rates and long channels, resulting in high operating cost and high flow rates which are inappropriate for applications with flow rate limitations, and (b) sheath-flow based techniques which usually require excessive sheath flow rate to achieve hydrodynamic 3D flow-focusing. Many devices based on these principles use complicated fabrication methods to create multi-layer microchannels. We have developed a sheath-flow based microfluidic device that is capable of hydrodynamic 3D self-flow-focusing. In this device the main flow (black ink) in a low speed, and a sheath flow, enter through two inlets and enter a 180 degree curved channel (300 × 300 μm cross-section). Main flow migrates outwards into the sheath-flow due to centrifugal effects and consequently, vertical focusing is achieved at the end of the curved channel. Then, two other sheath flows horizontally confine the main flow to achieve horizontal focusing. Thus, the core flow is three-dimensionally focused at the center of the channel at the downstream. Using centrifugal force for 3D flow-focusing in a single-layer fabricated microchannel has been previously investigated by few groups. However, their demonstrated designs required high flow speed (>1 m/s) which is not suitable for many applications that live biomedical specie are involved. Here, we introduce a new design which is operational in low flow speed (<0.05 m/s) and is suitable for applications involving live cells. This microfluidic device can be used in detecting, counting and isolating cells in many biomedical applications.

  18. Unsteady transonic potential flow over a flexible fuselage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibbons, Michael D.

    1993-01-01

    A flexible fuselage capability has been developed and implemented within version 1.2 of the CAP-TSD code. The capability required adding time dependent terms to the fuselage surface boundary conditions and the fuselage surface pressure coefficient. The new capability will allow modeling the effect of a flexible fuselage on the aeroelastic stability of complex configurations. To assess the flexible fuselage capability several steady and unsteady calculations have been performed for slender fuselages with circular cross-sections. Steady surface pressures are compared with experiment at transonic flight conditions. Unsteady cross-sectional lift is compared with other analytical results at a low subsonic speed and a transonic case has been computed. The comparisons demonstrate the accuracy of the flexible fuselage modifications.

  19. A class of unsteady, three-dimensional flow structures in turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ash, R. L.

    1981-01-01

    A restricted class of mathematically admissible, unsteady, three dimensional flows was identified which may constitute part of the structure observed in turbulent boundary layers. The development of the model and some general results are discussed. The resulting solution has characteristics which suggest how upwelling low speed flow can trigger a downward jetting of irrotational high speed fluid into the boundary layer.

  20. Minnowbrook V: 2006 Workshop on Unsteady Flows in Turbomachinery. (Conference Abstracts)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LaGraff, John E. (Editor); Ashpis, David E. (Editor); Oldfield, Martin L. G. (Editor); Gostelow, J. Paul (Editor)

    2006-01-01

    This volume contains materials presented at the Minnowbrook V 2006 Workshop on Unsteady Flows in Turbomachinery, held at the Syracuse University Minnowbrook Conference Center, New York, on August 20-23, 2006. The workshop organizers were John E. LaGraff (Syracuse University), Martin L.G. Oldfield (Oxford University), and J. Paul Gostelow (University of Leicester). The workshop followed the theme, venue, and informal format of four earlier workshops: Minnowbrook I (1993), Minnowbrook II (1997), Minnowbrook III (2000), and Minnowbrook IV (2003). The workshop was focused on physical understanding of unsteady flows in turbomachinery, with the specific goal of contributing to engineering application of improving design codes for turbomachinery. The workshop participants included academic researchers from the United States and abroad and representatives from the gas-turbine industry and U.S. Government laboratories. The physical mechanisms discussed were related to unsteady wakes, active flow control, turbulence, bypass and natural transition, separation bubbles and turbulent spots, modeling of turbulence and transition, heat transfer and cooling, surface roughness, unsteady CFD, and DNS. The workshop summary and the plenary discussion transcripts clearly highlight the need for continued vigorous research in the technologically important area of unsteady flows in turbomachines. This volume contains abstracts and copies of select viewgraphs organized according to the workshop sessions. Full-color viewgraphs and animations are included in the CD-ROM version only (Doc.ID 20070024781).

  1. Unsteady flow damping force prediction of MR dampers subjected to sinusoidal loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, M.; Wang, S. Q.; Fu, J.; Peng, Y. X.

    2013-02-01

    So far quasi-steady models are usually used to design magnetorheological (MR) dampers, but these models are not sufficient to describe the MR damper behavior under unsteady dynamic loading, for fluid inertia is neglected in quasi-steady models, which will bring more error between computer simulation and experimental results. Under unsteady flow model, the fluid inertia terms will bring error calculated upto 10%, so it is necessary to be considered in the governing equation. In this paper, force-stroke behavior of MR damper with flow mode due to sinusoidal loading excitation is mainly investigated, to simplify the analysis, the one-dimensional axisymmetric annular duct geometry of MR dampers is approximated as a rectangular duct. The rectangular duct can be divided into 3 regions for the velocity profile of the incompressible MR fluid flow, in each region, a partial differential equation is composed of by Navier-Stokes equations, boundary conditions and initial conditions to determine the velocity solution. In addition, in this work, not only Bingham plastic model but the Herschel—Bulkley model is adopted to analyze the MR damper performance. The damping force resulting from the pressure drop of unsteady MR dampers can be obtained and used to design or size MR dampers. Compared with the quasi-steady flow damping force, the damping force of unsteady MR dampers is more close to practice, particularly for the high-speed unsteady movement of MR dampers.

  2. Unsteady Newton-Busemann flow theory. Part 2: Bodies of revolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hui, W. H.; Tobak, M.

    1981-01-01

    Newtonian flow theory for unsteady flow past oscillating bodies of revolution at very high Mach numbers is completed by adding a centrifugal force correction to the impact pressures. Exact formulas for the unsteady pressure and the stability derivatives are obtained in closed form and are applicable to bodies of revolution that have arbitrary shapes, arbitrary thicknesses, and either sharp or blunt noses. The centrifugal force correction arising from the curved trajectories followed by the fluid particles in unsteady flow cannot be neglected even for the case of a circular cone. With this correction, the present theory is in excellent agreement with experimental results for sharp cones and for cones with small nose bluntness; gives poor agreement with the results of experiments in air for bodies with moderate or large nose bluntness. The pitching motions of slender power-law bodies of revulution are shown to be always dynamically stable according to Newton-Busemann theory.

  3. Numerical study of the unsteady flow and heat transfer in channels with periodically mounted square bars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valencia, A.; Martin, J. S.; Gormaz, R.

    Numerical investigations of unsteady laminar flow and heat transfer in a channel of height H with periodically mounted square bars of height d = 0.2H arranged side by side to the approaching flow have been conducted for different transverse separation distances of the bars. Five cases with transverse separation distance of 0, 0.5, 1, 1.5 and 2d for a Reynolds number of 300 in a channel with a periodicity length of 2H were studied. The unsteady Navier-Stokes equations and the energy equation have been solved by a finite volume code with staggered grids combined with the SIMPLEC algorithm and a fine grid resolution. Due to the arrangement of bars detached from the channel walls the flow is unsteady with vortex shedding from the bars. The amplitude and mean values of the drag coefficients, skin friction coefficients, friction factor and Nusselt numbers have a strong dependence of the transverse separation distance of the bars.

  4. Applications of a curvature correction turbulent model for computations of unsteady cavitating flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Y.; Wang, G. Y.; Huang, B.; Hu, C. L.

    2015-01-01

    A Curvature Correction model (CCM) based on the original k-epsilon model is proposed to simulate unsteady cavitating flows. The objective of this study is to validate the CCM model and further investigate the unsteady vortex behaviors of cavitating flows around a Clark-Y hydrofoil. Compared with the original k-epsilon model, predicted results are improved in terms of the cavity detachment and hydrofoil fluctuations. Results show that streamline curvature correction of CCM model overcomes the over-predictions of turbulence kinetic energy and eddy viscosity in cavitating vertical region with the original k-epsilon model, which leads to better simulation abilities for the unsteady cavitating flow computations. Based on computations, it is proved that the vortex structure is significantly modified by the transient cavitation, especially with respect to the cavity shedding behaviors. Complex vortex interactions and corresponding cavity shedding process near hydrofoil trailing edge lead to various load frequencies.

  5. Experimental Investigation of the Unsteady Flow Structures of Two Interacting Pitching Wings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurt, Melike; Moored, Keith

    2015-11-01

    Birds, insects and fish propel themselves with unsteady motions of their wings and fins. Many of these animals are also found to fly or swim in three-dimensional flocks and schools. Numerous studies have explored the three-dimensional steady flow interactions and the two-dimensional unsteady flow interactions in collectives. Yet, the characterization of the three-dimensional unsteady interactions remains relatively unexplored. This study aims to characterize the flow structures and interactions between two sinusoidally pitching finite-span wings. The arrangement of the wings varies from a tandem to a bi-plane configuration. The vortex structures for these various arrangements are quantified by using particle image velocimetry. The vortex-wing interactions are also characterized as the synchrony between the wings is modified.

  6. Fast computation of finite-time Lyapunov exponent fields for unsteady flows.

    PubMed

    Brunton, Steven L; Rowley, Clarence W

    2010-03-01

    This paper presents new efficient methods for computing finite-time Lyapunov exponent (FTLE) fields in unsteady flows. The methods approximate the particle flow map, eliminating redundant particle integrations in neighboring flow map calculations. Two classes of flow map approximations are investigated based on composition of intermediate flow maps; unidirectional approximation constructs a time-T map by composing a number of smaller time-h maps, while bidirectional approximation constructs a flow map by composing both positive- and negative-time maps. The unidirectional method is shown to be fast and accurate, although it is memory intensive. The bidirectional method is also fast and uses significantly less memory; however, it is prone to error which is large in regions where the opposite-time FTLE field is large, rendering it unusable. The algorithms are implemented and compared on three example fluid flows: a double gyre, a low Reynolds number pitching flat plate, and an unsteady ABC flow.

  7. Building Chondrites: SPH Simulations of a Jet Flow in a 3D Protoplanetary Disc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pignatale, F. C.; Gonzalez, J.-F.; Cuello, N.; Bourdon, B.; Fitoussi, C.

    2016-08-01

    We present SPH simulations of jet flows in 3D discs to investigate the transport of refractory material toward the outer cold disc regions. Dust grains are captured by the disc at distances up to 40 AU, with dust aggregates mimicking chondrites.

  8. Tracking left ventricular borders in 3D echocardiographic sequences using motion-guided optical flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leung, K. Y. Esther; Danilouchkine, Mikhail G.; van Stralen, Marijn; de Jong, Nico; van der Steen, Antonius F. W.; Bosch, Johan G.

    2009-02-01

    For obtaining quantitative and objective functional parameters from three-dimensional (3D) echocardiographic sequences, automated segmentation methods may be preferable to cumbersome manual delineation of 3D borders. In this study, a novel optical-flow based tracking method is proposed for propagating 3D endocardial contours of the left ventricle throughout the cardiac cycle. To take full advantage of the time-continuous nature of cardiac motion, a statistical motion model was explicitly embedded in the optical flow solution. The cardiac motion was modeled as frame-to-frame affine transforms, which were extracted using Procrustes analysis on a set of training contours. Principal component analysis was applied to obtain a compact model of cardiac motion throughout the whole cardiac cycle. The parameters of this model were resolved in an optical flow manner, via spatial and temporal gradients in image intensity. The algorithm was tested on 36 noncontrast and 28 contrast enhanced 3D echocardiographic sequences in a leave-one-out manner. Good results were obtained using a combination of the proposed motion-guided method and a purely data-driven optical flow approach. The improvement was particularly noticeable in areas where the LV wall was obscured by image artifacts. In conclusion, the results show the applicability of the proposed method in clinical quality echocardiograms.

  9. Finite volume and finite element methods applied to 3D laminar and turbulent channel flows

    SciTech Connect

    Louda, Petr; Příhoda, Jaromír; Sváček, Petr; Kozel, Karel

    2014-12-10

    The work deals with numerical simulations of incompressible flow in channels with rectangular cross section. The rectangular cross section itself leads to development of various secondary flow patterns, where accuracy of simulation is influenced by numerical viscosity of the scheme and by turbulence modeling. In this work some developments of stabilized finite element method are presented. Its results are compared with those of an implicit finite volume method also described, in laminar and turbulent flows. It is shown that numerical viscosity can cause errors of same magnitude as different turbulence models. The finite volume method is also applied to 3D turbulent flow around backward facing step and good agreement with 3D experimental results is obtained.

  10. Inlet Flow Distortion and Unsteady Blade Response in a Transonic Axial-Compressor Rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rabe, D. C.; Williams, C.; Hah, C.

    1999-01-01

    This paper describes the unsteady blade surface pressures on the first-stage rotor blades of a two-stage transonic axial flow compressor experiencing inlet flow distortion. This study was conducted to demonstrate the ability of a full annulus unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes numerical technique to predict unsteady pressures on the rotor blades operating in a distorted inflow. A total pressure distortion produced by a variable mesh screen mounted near the inlet was used to excite the unsteady blade loading on the rotor. On-blade pressure transducers were used to measure the unsteady blade surface pressure. These pressures and the resulting transient load on the rotor blades were compared to the numerical prediction. It is important to develop numerical techniques to predict these transient loads to better understand the response of compressor blades to forcing functions. With this enhanced understanding and ability to predict these transient forces, more robust compressors can be developed. In the study, a high definition of the inlet flow distortion was achieved by rotating the distortion screens. In this manner the inlet flow distortion and the distortion at the first stage stator leading edge were measured at approximately every 0.7 degrees. This full annulus high definition of the inlet flow distortion was used as the inlet boundary condition for the numerical technique. The experimental measurements and numerical analyses are highly complementary in this study. Detailed comparisons between the measurements and the numerical analyses indicate that the current numerical procedure calculates the unsteady aerodynamic pressure on the blade surfaces reasonably well. Further, the agreement of the measured and predicted rotor exit flow distortion at the first stage stator leading edge provides verification of the numerical technique.

  11. Comparison of Tomo-PIV and 3D-PTV for microfluidic flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyoungsoo; Westerweel, Jerry; Elsinga, Gerrit E.

    2013-02-01

    Two 3D-3C velocimetry techniques for micro-scale measurements are compared: tomographic particle image velocimetry (Tomo-PIV) and 3D particle-tracking velocimetry (3D-PTV). Both methods are applied to experimental data from a confined shear-driven liquid droplet over a moving surface. The droplet has 200 μm height and 2 mm diameter. Micro 3D-PTV and Tomo-PIV are used to obtain the tracer particle distribution and the flow velocity field for the same set of images. It is shown that the reconstructed particle distributions are distinctly different, where Tomo-PIV returns a nearly uniform distribution over the height of the volume, as expected, and PTV reveals a clear peak in the particle distribution near the plane of focus. In Tomo-PIV, however, the reconstructed particle peak intensity decreases in proportion to the distance from the plane of focus. Due to the differences in particle distributions, the measured flow velocities are also different. In particular, we observe Tomo-PIV to be in closer agreement with mass conservation. Furthermore, the random noise level is found to increase with distance to the plane of focus at a higher rate for 3D-PTV as compared to Tomo-PIV. Thus, for a given noise threshold value, the latter method can measure reliably over a thicker volume.

  12. Examination of forced unsteady separated flow fields on a rotating wind turbine blade

    SciTech Connect

    Huyer, S. )

    1993-04-01

    The wind turbine industry faces many problems regarding the construction of efficient and predictable wind turbine machines. Steady state, two-dimensional wind tunnel data are generally used to predict aerodynamic loads on wind turbine blades. Preliminary experimental evidence indicates that some of the underlying fluid dynamic phenomena could be attributed to dynamic stall, or more specifically to generation of forced unsteady separated flow fields. A collaborative research effort between the University of Colorado and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory was conducted to systematically categorize the local and global effects of three- dimensional forced unsteady flow fields.

  13. Effects of Unsteady Flow Interactions on the Performance of a Highly-Loaded Transonic Compressor Stage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hah, Chunill

    2015-01-01

    Effects of unsteady flow interactions on the aerodynamic performance of a highly-loaded transonic axial compressor are investigated in the present study. The primary focus of the study is to investigate how unsteady flow interactions between blade rows affect the aerodynamic performance of a highly-loaded transonic axial compressor. Recent experimental and numerical studies of current highly-loaded axial compressor performance indicated that predicting calculating the loss generation is very challenging with various analysis tools. In the present study, the effects of generation and transport of shock induced vortices on the compressor performance is investigated in detail.

  14. 3-D Flow Field Diagnostics and Validation Studies using Stereoscopic Tracking Velocimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cha, Soyoung Stephen; Ramachandran, Narayanan; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The measurement of 3-D three-component velocity fields is of great importance in both ground and space experiments for understanding materials processing and fluid physics. Here, we present the investigation results of stereoscopic tracking velocimetry (STV) for measuring 3-D velocity fields. The effort includes diagnostic technology development, experimental velocity measurement, and comparison with analytical and numerical computation. The advantages of STV stems from the system simplicity for building compact hardware and in software efficiency for continual near-real-time process monitoring. It also has illumination flexibility for observing volumetric flow fields from arbitrary directions. STV is based on stereoscopic CCD observations of particles seeded in a flow. Neural networks are used for data analysis. The developed diagnostic tool is tested with a simple directional solidification apparatus using Succinonitrile. The 3-D velocity field in the liquid phase is measured and compared with results from detailed numerical computations. Our theoretical, numerical, and experimental effort has shown STV to be a viable candidate for reliably quantifying the 3-D flow field in materials processing and fluids experiments.

  15. An improved parallel SPH approach to solve 3D transient generalized Newtonian free surface flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Jinlian; Jiang, Tao; Lu, Weigang; Li, Gang

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, a corrected parallel smoothed particle hydrodynamics (C-SPH) method is proposed to simulate the 3D generalized Newtonian free surface flows with low Reynolds number, especially the 3D viscous jets buckling problems are investigated. The proposed C-SPH method is achieved by coupling an improved SPH method based on the incompressible condition with the traditional SPH (TSPH), that is, the improved SPH with diffusive term and first-order Kernel gradient correction scheme is used in the interior of the fluid domain, and the TSPH is used near the free surface. Thus the C-SPH method possesses the advantages of two methods. Meanwhile, an effective and convenient boundary treatment is presented to deal with 3D multiple-boundary problem, and the MPI parallelization technique with a dynamic cells neighbor particle searching method is considered to improve the computational efficiency. The validity and the merits of the C-SPH are first verified by solving several benchmarks and compared with other results. Then the viscous jet folding/coiling based on the Cross model is simulated by the C-SPH method and compared with other experimental or numerical results. Specially, the influences of macroscopic parameters on the flow are discussed. All the numerical results agree well with available data, and show that the C-SPH method has higher accuracy and better stability for solving 3D moving free surface flows over other particle methods.

  16. Effect of Trailing Edge Shape on the Unsteady Aerodynamics of Reverse Flow Dynamic Stall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lind, Andrew; Jones, Anya

    2015-11-01

    This work considers dynamic stall in reverse flow, where flow travels over an oscillating airfoil from the geometric trailing edge towards the leading edge. An airfoil with a sharp geometric trailing edge causes early formation of a primary dynamic stall vortex since the sharp edge acts as the aerodynamic leading edge in reverse flow. The present work experimentally examines the potential merits of using an airfoil with a blunt geometric trailing edge to delay flow separation and dynamic stall vortex formation while undergoing oscillations in reverse flow. Time-resolved and phase-averaged flow fields and pressure distributions are compared for airfoils with different trailing edge shapes. Specifically, the evolution of unsteady flow features such as primary, secondary, and trailing edge vortices is examined. The influence of these flow features on the unsteady pressure distributions and integrated unsteady airloads provide insight on the torsional loading of rotor blades as they oscillate in reverse flow. The airfoil with a blunt trailing edge delays reverse flow dynamic stall, but this leads to greater downward-acting lift and pitching moment. These results are fundamental to alleviating vibrations of high-speed helicopters, where much of the rotor operates in reverse flow.

  17. Unsteady rotor flow analysis using a diagonally implicit harmonic balance method and an overset mesh topology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Im, Dong-Kyun; Choi, Seongim; Hyuck Kwon, Jang

    2015-01-01

    The diagonally implicit harmonic balance method is developed in an overset mesh topology and applied to unsteady rotor flows analysis. Its efficiency is by reducing the complexity of a fully implicit harmonic balance method which becomes more flexible in handling the higher harmonics of the flow solutions. Applied to the overset mesh topology, the efficiency of the method becomes greater by reducing the number of solution interpolations required during the entire solution procedure as the method reduces the unsteady computation into periodic steady state. To verify the accuracy and efficiency of the method, both hovering and unsteady forward flight of Caradonna and Tung and AH-1G rotors are solved. Compared with wind-tunnel experiments, the numerical results demonstrate good agreements at computational cost an order of magnitude more efficient than the conventional time-accurate computation method. The proposed method has great potential in other engineering applications, including flapping wing vehicles, turbo-machinery, wind-turbines, etc.

  18. Time domain numerical calculations of unsteady vortical flows about a flat plate airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hariharan, S. I.; Yu, Ping; Scott, J. R.

    1989-01-01

    A time domain numerical scheme is developed to solve for the unsteady flow about a flat plate airfoil due to imposed upstream, small amplitude, transverse velocity perturbations. The governing equation for the resulting unsteady potential is a homogeneous, constant coefficient, convective wave equation. Accurate solution of the problem requires the development of approximate boundary conditions which correctly model the physics of the unsteady flow in the far field. A uniformly valid far field boundary condition is developed, and numerical results are presented using this condition. The stability of the scheme is discussed, and the stability restriction for the scheme is established as a function of the Mach number. Finally, comparisons are made with the frequency domain calculation by Scott and Atassi, and the relative strengths and weaknesses of each approach are assessed.

  19. A fast and accurate method to predict 2D and 3D aerodynamic boundary layer flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bijleveld, H. A.; Veldman, A. E. P.

    2014-12-01

    A quasi-simultaneous interaction method is applied to predict 2D and 3D aerodynamic flows. This method is suitable for offshore wind turbine design software as it is a very accurate and computationally reasonably cheap method. This study shows the results for a NACA 0012 airfoil. The two applied solvers converge to the experimental values when the grid is refined. We also show that in separation the eigenvalues remain positive thus avoiding the Goldstein singularity at separation. In 3D we show a flow over a dent in which separation occurs. A rotating flat plat is used to show the applicability of the method for rotating flows. The shown capabilities of the method indicate that the quasi-simultaneous interaction method is suitable for design methods for offshore wind turbine blades.

  20. Parallel Adaptive Computation of Blood Flow in a 3D ``Whole'' Body Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, M.; Figueroa, C. A.; Taylor, C. A.; Sahni, O.; Jansen, K. E.

    2008-11-01

    Accurate numerical simulations of vascular trauma require the consideration of a larger portion of the vasculature than previously considered, due to the systemic nature of the human body's response. A patient-specific 3D model composed of 78 connected arterial branches extending from the neck to the lower legs is constructed to effectively represent the entire body. Recently developed outflow boundary conditions that appropriately represent the downstream vasculature bed which is not included in the 3D computational domain are applied at 78 outlets. In this work, the pulsatile blood flow simulations are started on a fairly uniform, unstructured mesh that is subsequently adapted using a solution-based approach to efficiently resolve the flow features. The adapted mesh contains non-uniform, anisotropic elements resulting in resolution that conforms with the physical length scales present in the problem. The effects of the mesh resolution on the flow field are studied, specifically on relevant quantities of pressure, velocity and wall shear stress.

  1. Incompressible Navier-Stokes Solvers in Primative Variables and their Applications to Steady and Unsteady Flow Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiris, Cetin C.; Kwak, Dochan; Rogers, Stuart E.

    2002-01-01

    This paper reviews recent progress made in incompressible Navier-Stokes simulation procedures and their application to problems of engineering interest. Discussions are focused on the methods designed for complex geometry applications in three dimensions, and thus are limited to primitive variable formulation. A summary of efforts in flow solver development is given followed by numerical studies of a few example problems of current interest. Both steady and unsteady solution algorithms and their salient features are discussed. Solvers discussed here are based on a structured-grid approach using either a finite -difference or a finite-volume frame work. As a grand-challenge application of these solvers, an unsteady turbopump flow simulation procedure has been developed which utilizes high performance computing platforms. In the paper, the progress toward the complete simulation capability of the turbo-pump for a liquid rocket engine is reported. The Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) turbo-pump is used as a test case for evaluation of two parallel computing algorithms that have been implemented in the INS3D code. The relative motion of the grid systems for the rotorstator interaction was obtained using overact grid techniques. Unsteady computations for the SSME turbo-pump, which contains 114 zones with 34.5 million grid points, are carried out on SCSI Origin 3000 systems at NASA Ames Research Center. The same procedure has been extended to the development of NASA-DeBakey Ventricular Assist Device (VAD) that is based on an axial blood pump. Computational, and clinical analysis of this device are presented.

  2. Delft3D-FLOW on PRACE infrastructures for real life hydrodynamic applications.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donners, John; Genseberger, Menno; Jagers, Bert; de Goede, Erik; Mourits, Adri

    2013-04-01

    PRACE, the Partnership for Advanced Computing in Europe, offers access to the largest high-performance computing systems in Europe. PRACE invites and helps industry to increase their innovative potential through the use of the PRACE infrastructure. This poster describes different efforts to assist Deltares with porting the open-source simulation software Delft3D-FLOW to PRACE infrastructures. Analysis of the performance on these infrastructures has been done for real life flow applications. Delft3D-FLOW is a 2D and 3D shallow water solver which calculates non-steady flow and transport phenomena resulting from tidal and meteorological forcing on a curvilinear, boundary fitted grid in Cartesian or spherical coordinates. It also includes a module which sediment transport (both suspended and bed total load) and morphological changes for an arbitrary number of cohesive and non-cohesive fractions. As Delft3D-FLOW has been developed over several decades, with a variety of functionality and over 350k lines of source code, porting to PRACE infrastructures needs some effort. At the moment Delft3D-FLOW uses MPI with domain decomposition in one direction as its parallellisation approach. Because it is hard to identify scaling issues if one immediately starts with a complex case with many features enabled, different cases with increasing complexity have been used to investigate scaling of this parallellisation approach on several PRACE platforms. As a base reference case we started with a schematic high-resolution 2D hydrodynamic model of the river Waal that turned out to be surprisingly well-suited to the highly-parallel PRACE machines. Although Delft3D-FLOW employs a sophisticated build system, several modifications were required to port it to most PRACE systems due to the use of specific, highly-tuned compilers and MPI-libraries. After this we moved to a 3D hydrodynamic model of Rotterdam harbour that includes sections of the rivers Rhine and Meuse and a part of the North

  3. Calculation of unsteady transonic flows with mild separation by viscous-inviscid interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howlett, James T.

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents a method for calculating viscous effects in two- and three-dimensional unsteady transonic flow fields. An integral boundary-layer method for turbulent viscous flow is coupled with the transonic small-disturbance potential equation in a quasi-steady manner. The viscous effects are modeled with Green's lag-entrainment equations for attached flow and an inverse boundary-layer method for flows that involve mild separation. The boundary-layer method is used stripwise to approximate three-dimensional effects. Applications are given for two-dimensional airfoils, aileron buzz, and a wing planform. Comparisons with inviscid calculations, other viscous calculation methods, and experimental data are presented. The results demonstrate that the present technique can economically and accurately calculate unsteady transonic flow fields that have viscous-inviscid interactions with mild flow separation.

  4. Low-Reynolds-number k-epsilon model for unsteady turbulent boundary-layer flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fan, Sixin; Lakshminarayana, Budugur; Barnett, Mark

    1993-01-01

    An assessment of the near-wall and low-Reynolds-number functions used in low-Reynolds-number k-epsilon models suggests that they are not suitable for the near-wall region of unsteady turbulent boundary layers, where the flow is characterized by rapid changes in phase. An improved low-Reynolds-number k-epsilon model is developed in this paper. The near-wall and low-Reynolds-number functions in this model are formulated as functions of the local turbulent Reynolds numbers instead of the inner variable y(+). The present model also has the correct asymptotic behavior in the near-wall region. The turbulence model has been incorporated in an unsteady boundary-layer code and validated for unsteady turbulent boundary layers with and without adverse pressure gradients. The predictions agree well with the experimental data and the theoretical analysis. For the cases tested, the present model correctly predicts the unsteady near-wall flow and the unsteady shin friction at various frequencies.

  5. Experimental Investigation of the Near Wall Flow Structure of a Low Reynolds Number 3-D Turbulent Boundary Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleming, J. L.; Simpson, R. L.

    1997-01-01

    Laser Doppler velocimetry (LDV) measurements and hydrogen bubble flow visualization techniques were used to examine the near-wall flow structure of 2D and 3D turbulent boundary layers (TBLs) over a range of low Reynolds numbers. The goals of this research were (1) an increased understanding of the flow physics in the near wall region of turbulent boundary layers,(2) to observe and quantify differences between 2D and 3D TBL flow structures, and (3) to document Reynolds number effects for 3D TBLs. The LDV data have provided results detailing the turbulence structure of the 2D and 3D TBLs. These results include mean Reynolds stress distributions, flow skewing results, and U and V spectra. Effects of Reynolds number for the 3D flow were also examined. Comparison to results with the same 3D flow geometry but at a significantly higher Reynolds number provided unique insight into the structure of 3D TBLs. While the 3D mean and fluctuating velocities were found to be highly dependent on Reynolds number, a previously defined shear stress parameter was discovered to be invariant with Reynolds number. The hydrogen bubble technique was used as a flow visualization tool to examine the near-wall flow structure of 2D and 3D TBLs. Both the quantitative and qualitative results displayed larger turbulent fluctuations with more highly concentrated vorticity regions for the 2D flow.

  6. Steady and Unsteady Flow Effects of Circumferential Grooves Casing Treatment in a Transonic Compressor Rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hah, Chunill

    2011-01-01

    The current paper reports on an investigation of steady and unsteady flow effects of circumferential grooves casing treatment in a transonic compressor rotor. Circumferential grooves casing treatment is used mainly to increase stall margin in axial compressors with a relatively small decrease in aerodynamic efficiency. It is widely believed that flow mechanisms of circumferential grooves casing treatment near stall conditions are not yet well understood even though this treatment has been used widely in real engines. Numerical analysis based on steady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) has been the primary tool used to understand flow mechanism for circumferential grooves casing treatment. Although steady RANS explains some flow effects of circumferential grooves casing treatment, it does not calculate all the measured changes in the compressor characteristics. Therefore, design optimization of circumferential grooves with steady RANS has not been very successful. As a compressor operates toward the stall condition, the flow field becomes transient. Major sources of self-generated flow unsteadiness are shock oscillation and interaction between the passage shock and the tip leakage vortex. In the present paper, an unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (URANS) approach is applied to study the effects of circumferential grooves in a transonic compressor. The results from URANS are compared with the results from RANS and measured data. The current investigation shows that there are significant unsteady flow effects on the performance of the circumferential grooves casing treatment. For the currently investigated rotor, the unsteady effects are of the same magnitude as the steady effects in terms of extending the compressor stall margin.

  7. 3-D High-Lift Flow-Physics Experiment - Transition Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGinley, Catherine B.; Jenkins, Luther N.; Watson, Ralph D.; Bertelrud, Arild

    2005-01-01

    An analysis of the flow state on a trapezoidal wing model from the NASA 3-D High Lift Flow Physics Experiment is presented. The objective of the experiment was to characterize the flow over a non-proprietary semi-span three-element high-lift configuration to aid in assessing the state of the art in the computation of three-dimensional high-lift flows. Surface pressures and hot-film sensors are used to determine the flow conditions on the slat, main, and flap. The locations of the attachments lines and the values of the attachment line Reynolds number are estimated based on the model surface pressures. Data from the hot-films are used to determine if the flow is laminar, transitional, or turbulent by examining the hot-film time histories, statistics, and frequency spectra.

  8. Aspects of Turbulent Flow over 2D and 3D Bedforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venditti, J. G.; Church, M. A.

    2004-05-01

    Sediment transport in sand bedded alluvial channels is strongly conditioned by bedforms. Understanding the turbulent flow field over bedforms is crucial to understanding flow resistance in rivers. Most of the research on flow over bedforms has focused on straight crested, two-dimensional bedforms, and the characteristics of the turbulent flow field are fairly well understood. In contrast, few studies have examined flow over 3D bedforms, which typically have irregular heights, lengths, and crestlines. This paper reports on experiments undertaken to examine how 3D dune morphology affects the turbulent flow field and, ultimately, flow resistance. An experiment was designed to examine flow over fixed bedforms 0.45 m long and 25 mm high in a 0.5 m wide and 17 m long flume. In each experimental run, discharge and dune size were held constant, but the crest shape was varied. Flow over six bedform crest shapes was examined, including a 2D crest, a saddle shaped crest, a lobe shaped crest, a regular 3D crest alignment, an irregular 3D crest alignment and a sinuous crest. Measurements of velocity were made at a sampling rate of 50 Hz using an acoustic Doppler velocimeter at 350-500 points over a dune in each morphology. Three-dimensional bedforms significantly modify the flow field over a dune. Lobe shaped configurations cause lateral and vertical divergence of momentum and turbulent energy, thereby enhancing the level of turbulence compared to a 2D bedform. Saddle shaped crestlines cause lateral and vertical convergence of momentum and turbulent energy towards a small area in the lee, thereby reducing the level of turbulence. Other bedform morphologies (regular, irregular and sinuous crests) exhibited characteristics of both lobes and saddles, but the net effect was to reduce levels of turbulence. Total drag, calculated from spatially averaged Reynolds stress profiles, can be enhanced or reduced by as much as 50 %. These results suggest that current conceptions of bedforms

  9. Flow and axial dispersion in a sinusoidal-walled tube: Effects of inertial and unsteady flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richmond, Marshall C.; Perkins, William A.; Scheibe, Timothy D.; Lambert, Adam; Wood, Brian D.

    2013-12-01

    In this work, we consider a sinusoidal-walled tube (a three-dimensional tube with sinusoidally-varying diameter) as a simplified conceptualization of flow in porous media. Direct numerical simulation using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methods was used to compute velocity fields by solving the Navier-Stokes equations, and also to numerically solve the volume averaging closure problem, for a range of Reynolds numbers (Re) spanning the low-Re to inertial flow regimes, including one simulation at Re=449 for which unsteady flow was observed. The longitudinal dispersion observed for the flow was computed using a random walk particle tracking method, and this was compared to the longitudinal dispersion predicted from a volume-averaged macroscopic mass balance using the method of volume averaging; the results of the two methods were consistent. Our results are compared to experimental measurements of dispersion in porous media and to previous theoretical results for both the low-Re, Stokes flow regime and for values of Re representing the steady inertial regime. In the steady inertial regime, a power-law increase in the effective longitudinal dispersion (DL) with Re was found, and this is consistent with previous results. This rapid rate of increase is caused by trapping of solute in expansions due to flow separation (eddies). One unsteady (but non-turbulent) flow case (Re=449) was also examined. For this case, the rate of increase of DL with Re was smaller than that observed at lower Re. Velocity fluctuations in this regime lead to increased rates of solute mass transfer between the core flow and separated flow regions, thus diminishing the amount of tailing caused by solute trapping in eddies and thereby reducing longitudinal dispersion. The observed tailing was further explored through analysis of concentration skewness (third moment) and its assymptotic convergence to conventional advection-dispersion behavior (skewness = 0). The method of volume averaging was

  10. Unsteady Flow Interactions Between the LH2 Feed Line and SSME LPFP Inducer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorney, Dan; Griffin, Lisa; Marcu, Bogdan; Williams, Morgan

    2006-01-01

    An extensive computational effort has been performed in order to investigate the nature of unsteady flow in the fuel line supplying the three Space Shuttle Main Engines during flight. Evidence of high cycle fatigue (HCF) in the flow liner one diameter upstream of the Low Pressure Fuel Pump inducer has been observed in several locations. The analysis presented in this report has the objective of determining the driving mechanisms inducing HCF and the associated fluid flow phenomena. The simulations have been performed using two different computational codes, the NASA MSFC PHANTOM code and the Pratt and Whitney Rocketdyne ENIGMA code. The fuel flow through the flow liner and the pump inducer have been modeled in full three-dimensional geometry, and the results of the computations compared with test data taken during hot fire tests at NASA Stennis Space Center, and cold-flow water flow test data obtained at NASA MSFC. The numerical results indicate that unsteady pressure fluctuations at specific frequencies develop in the duct at the flow-liner location. Detailed frequency analysis of the flow disturbances is presented. The unsteadiness is believed to be an important source for fluctuating pressures generating high cycle fatigue.

  11. Simulation of 3-D Nonequilibrium Seeded Air Flow in the NASA-Ames MHD Channel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, Sumeet; Tannehill, John C.; Mehta, Unmeel B.

    2004-01-01

    The 3-D nonequilibrium seeded air flow in the NASA-Ames experimental MHD channel has been numerically simulated. The channel contains a nozzle section, a center section, and an accelerator section where magnetic and electric fields can be imposed on the flow. In recent tests, velocity increases of up to 40% have been achieved in the accelerator section. The flow in the channel is numerically computed us ing a 3-D parabolized Navier-Stokes (PNS) algorithm that has been developed to efficiently compute MHD flows in the low magnetic Reynolds number regime: The MHD effects are modeled by introducing source terms into the PNS equations which can then be solved in a very efficient manner. The algorithm has been extended in the present study to account for nonequilibrium seeded air flows. The electrical conductivity of the flow is determined using the program of Park. The new algorithm has been used to compute two test cases that match the experimental conditions. In both cases, magnetic and electric fields are applied to the seeded flow. The computed results are in good agreement with the experimental data.

  12. Quasi 3D modeling of water flow and solute transport in vadose zone and groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakirevich, A.; Kuznetsov, M.; Weisbrod, N.; Pachepsky, Y. A.

    2013-12-01

    The complexity of subsurface flow systems calls for a variety of concepts leading to the multiplicity of simplified flow models. One commonly used simplification is based on the assumption that lateral flow and transport in unsaturated zone is insignificant unless the capillary fringe is involved. In such cases the flow and transport in the unsaturated zone above groundwater level can be simulated as a 1D phenomenon, whereas through groundwater they are viewed as 2D or 3D phenomena. A new approach for a numerical scheme for 3D variably saturated flow and transport is presented. A Quasi-3D approach allows representing flow in the 'vadose zone - aquifer' system by a series of 1D Richards' equations solved in variably-saturated zone and by 3D-saturated flow equation in groundwater (modified MODFLOW code). The 1D and 3D equations are coupled at the phreatic surface in a way that aquifer replenishment is calculated using the Richards' equation, and solving for the moving water table does not require definition of the specific yield parameter. The 3D advection-dispersion equation is solved in the entire domain by the MT3D code. Using implicit finite differences approximation to couple processes in the vadose zone and groundwater provides mass conservation and increase of computational efficiency. The above model was applied to simulate the impact of irrigation on groundwater salinity in the Alto Piura aquifer (Northern Peru). Studies on changing groundwater quality in arid and semi-arid lands show that irrigation return flow is one of the major factors contributing to aquifer salinization. Existing mathematical models do not account explicitly for the solute recycling during irrigation on a daily scale. Recycling occurs throughout the unsaturated and saturated zones, as function of the solute mass extracted from pumping wells. Salt concentration in irrigation water is calculated at each time step as a function of concentration of both surface water and groundwater

  13. Evaluation of the 3-D channeling flow in a fractured type of oil/gas reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishibashi, T.; Watanabe, N.; Tsuchiya, N.; Tamagawa, T.

    2013-12-01

    An understanding of the flow and transport characteristics through rock fracture networks is of critical importance in many engineering and scientific applications. These include effective recovery of targeted fluid such as oil/gas, geothermal, or potable waters, and isolation of hazardous materials. Here, the formation of preferential flow path (i.e. channeling flow) is one of the most significant characteristics in considering fluid flow through rock fracture networks; however, the impact of channeling flow remains poorly understood. In order to deepen our understanding of channeling flow, the authors have developed a novel discrete fracture network (DFN) model simulator, GeoFlow. Different from the conventional DFN model simulators, we can characterize each fracture not by a single aperture value but by a heterogeneous aperture distribution in GeoFlow [Ishibashi et al., 2012]. As a result, the formation of 3-D preferential flow paths within fracture network can be considered by using this simulator. Therefore, we would challenge to construct the precise fracture networks whose fractures have heterogeneous aperture distributions in field scale, and to analyze fluid flows through the fracture networks by GeoFlow. In the present study, the Yufutsu oil/gas field in Hokkaido, Japan is selected as the subject area for study. This field is known as the fractured type of reservoir, and reliable DFN models can be constructed for this field based on the 3-D seismic data, well logging, in-situ stress measurement, and acoustic emission data [Tamagawa et al., 2012]. Based on these DFN models, new DFN models for 1,080 (East-West) × 1,080 (North-South) × 1,080 (Depth) m^3, where fractures are represented by squares of 44-346 m on a side, are re-constructed. In these new models, scale-dependent aperture distributions are considered for all fractures constructing the fracture networks. Note that the multi-scale modeling of fracture flow has been developed by the authors

  14. The Chimera Method of Simulation for Unsteady Three-Dimensional Viscous Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meakin, Robert L.

    1996-01-01

    The Chimera overset grid method is reviewed and discussed in the context of a method of solution and analysis of unsteady three-dimensional viscous flows. The state of maturity of the various pieces of support software required to use the approach is discussed. A variety of recent applications of the method is presented. Current limitations of the approach are defined.

  15. Unsteady flow simulations around complex geometries using stationary or rotating unstructured grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sezer-Uzol, Nilay

    In this research, the computational analysis of three-dimensional, unsteady, separated, vortical flows around complex geometries is studied by using stationary or moving unstructured grids. Two main engineering problems are investigated. The first problem is the unsteady simulation of a ship airwake, where helicopter operations become even more challenging, by using stationary unstructured grids. The second problem is the unsteady simulation of wind turbine rotor flow fields by using moving unstructured grids which are rotating with the whole three-dimensional rigid rotor geometry. The three dimensional, unsteady, parallel, unstructured, finite volume flow solver, PUMA2, is used for the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations considered in this research. The code is modified to have a moving grid capability to perform three-dimensional, time-dependent rotor simulations. An instantaneous log-law wall model for Large Eddy Simulations is also implemented in PUMA2 to investigate the very large Reynolds number flow fields of rotating blades. To verify the code modifications, several sample test cases are also considered. In addition, interdisciplinary studies, which are aiming to provide new tools and insights to the aerospace and wind energy scientific communities, are done during this research by focusing on the coupling of ship airwake CFD simulations with the helicopter flight dynamics and control analysis, the coupling of wind turbine rotor CFD simulations with the aeroacoustic analysis, and the analysis of these time-dependent and large-scale CFD simulations with the help of a computational monitoring, steering and visualization tool, POSSE.

  16. Slip effects on unsteady non-Newtonian blood flow through an inclined catheterized overlapping stenotic artery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaman, Akbar; Ali, Nasir; Sajid, M.

    2016-01-01

    Slip effects on unsteady non-Newtonian blood hydro-magnetic flow through an inclined catheterized overlapping stenotic artery are analyzed. The constitutive equation of power law model is employed to simulate the rheological characteristics of the blood. The governing equations giving the flow derived by assuming the flow to be unsteady and two-dimensional. Mild stenosis approximation is employed to obtain the reduced form of the governing equations. Finite difference method is employed to obtain the solution of the non-linear partial differential equation in the presence of slip at the surface. An extensive quantitative analysis is performed for the effects of slip parameter, Hartmann number, cathetered parameter and arterial geometrical parameters of stenosis on the quantities of interest such as axial velocity, flow rate, resistance impedance and wall shear stress. The streamlines for the blood flow through the artery are also included.

  17. Viscous effect on airfoils for unsteady transonic flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, S. C.

    1982-01-01

    The viscous effect on aerodynamic performance of an arbitrary airfoil executing low frequency maneuvers during transonic flight was investigated. The small disturbance code, LTRAN2, was modified by using a conventional integral method, BLAYER, for the boundary layer and an empirical relation, viscous wedge, for simulating the suddenly thickened boundary layer behind the shock. Before the shock, only the boundary layer displacement thickness was evaluated. After the shock, the empirical wedge thickness was superimposed on the boundary layer thickness along the surface as well as in the wake region. The pressure coefficients were calculated for both steady and unsteady states. The viscous solution takes fewer iterations to obtain the converged steady state solution. Comparisons made with experimental data and the inviscid solution show that the viscous solution agrees better with the experimental data with about the same (or slightly less) amount of computational time.

  18. A New Procedure for Simulating Unsteady Flows Through Turbomachinery Blade Passages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Jen Ping; Celestina, M. L.; Adamczyk, John J.

    1996-01-01

    The development of two new unsteady wake-blade row aerodynamic interaction models and of a rotor-stator unsteady aerodynamic interaction model are outlined. The solutions of Adamczyk's average-passage flow model were used. The responses to the potential disturbances through a blade row were calculated using the MSUTC code. This code can run with and without the use of wall functions. The solver is an implicit finite volume method with flux Jacobians which are evaluated by the flux-vector splitting and the residual fluxes by the Roe's flux-difference splitting.

  19. Measurements of the unsteady flow field within the stator row of a transonic axial-flow fan. I - Measurement and analysis technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suder, K. L.; Strazisar, A. J.; Adamczyk, J. J.; Hathaway, M. D.; Okiishi, T. H.

    1987-01-01

    This two-part paper presents laser anemometer measurements of the unsteady velocity field within the stator row of a transonic axial-flow fan. The objective is to provide additional insight into unsteady blade-row interactions within highspeed compressors which affect stage efficiency, energy transfer, and other design considerations. Part 1 describes the measurement and analysis techniques used for resolving the unsteady flow field features. The ensemble-average and variance of the measured velocities are used to identify the rotor wake generated and unresolved unsteadiness, respectively. (Rotor wake generated unsteadiness refers to the unsteadiness generated by the rotor wake velocity deficit and the term unresolved unsteadiness refers to all remaining contributions to unsteadiness such as vortex shedding, turbulence, mass flow fluctutions, etc.). A procedure for calculating auto and cross correlations of the rotor wake generated and unresolved unsteady velocity fluctuations is described. These unsteady-velocity correlations have significance since they also result from a decomposition of the Navier-Stokes equations. This decomposition of the Navier-Stokes equations resulting in the velocity correlations used to describe the unsteady velocity field will also be outlined in this paper.

  20. Numerical analysis on the cavitation and unsteady flow in a scroll hydraulic pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, S. H.; Guo, P. C.; Huang, Y.; Zuo, J. L.; Luo, X. Q.

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents numerical analysis of unsteady flow in a scroll hydraulic pump to discover its flow mechanism. The dynamic mesh model has to be used to simulate the flow field unsteadily. The unsteady flow patterns and pressure distributions in the suction, squeezing and discharge chamber are analysed. The suction process continues until the crank angle reaches the 320 degree. Then the pressure in the chamber rises instantaneously, and the fluid begins to flow out from the chamber. Because of the high pressure difference at the clearance, the jet flow and the vortex appear, and the large flow losses generates with them. In addition, the velocity and static pressure distribution in the two symmetry crescent suction chamber is different remarkably. One reason is that the location of suction port cannot be set symmetrically for the simplification of the pump structure. Another reason for that is the fluid is impelled by different part of the orbiting scroll. The asymmetric pressure distribution will result in the extra force on the scroll. The cavitation generates at the negative pressure region. Therefore, the unsteady simulation shows some important phenomena. The structure of the scroll pump need to be optimized to reduce the maximum pressure, weaken the jet flow, vortex and the uneven pressure distribution to ensure the pump working safely and efficiently.

  1. Investigation of Unsteady Flow Field in a Low-Speed One and a Half Stage Axial Compressor. Part 2; Effects of Tip Gap Size On the Tip Clearance Flow Structure at Near Stall Operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hah, Chunill; Hathaway, Michael; Katz, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    The primary focus of this paper is to investigate the effect of rotor tip gap size on how the rotor unsteady tip clearance flow structure changes in a low speed one and half stage axial compressor at near stall operation (for example, where maximum pressure rise is obtained). A Large Eddy Simulation (LES) is applied to calculate the unsteady flow field at this flow condition with both a small and a large tip gaps. The numerically obtained flow fields at the small clearance matches fairly well with the available initial measurements obtained at the Johns Hopkins University with 3-D unsteady PIV in an index-matched test facility which renders the compressor blades and casing optically transparent. With this setup, the unsteady velocity field in the entire flow domain, including the flow inside the tip gap, can be measured. The numerical results are also compared with previously published measurements in a low speed single stage compressor (Maerz et al. [2002]). The current study shows that, with the smaller rotor tip gap, the tip clearance vortex moves to the leading edge plane at near stall operating condition, creating a nearly circumferentially aligned vortex that persists around the entire rotor. On the other hand, with a large tip gap, the clearance vortex stays inside the blade passage at near stall operation. With the large tip gap, flow instability and related large pressure fluctuation at the leading edge are observed in this one and a half stage compressor. Detailed examination of the unsteady flow structure in this compressor stage reveals that the flow instability is due to shed vortices near the leading edge, and not due to a three-dimensional separation vortex originating from the suction side of the blade, which is commonly referred to during a spike-type stall inception. The entire tip clearance flow is highly unsteady. Many vortex structures in the tip clearance flow, including the sheet vortex system near the casing, interact with each other. The

  2. An Experimental Investigation of Steady and Unsteady Flow Field in an Axial Flow Turbine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaccaria, M.; Lakshminarayana, B.

    1997-01-01

    Measurements were made in a large scale single stage turbine facility. Within the nozzle passage measurements were made using a five hole probe, a two-component Laser Doppler Velocimeter (LDV), and a single sensor hot wire probe. These measurements showed weak secondary flows at midchord, and two secondary flow loss cores at the nozzle exit. The casing vortex loss core was the larger of the two. At the exit radial inward flow was found over the entire passage, and was more pronounced in the wake. Nozzle wake decay was found to be more rapid than for an isolated vane row due to the rotor's presence. The midspan rotor flow field was measured using a two-component LDV. Measurements were made from upstream of the rotor to a chord behind the rotor. The distortion of the nozzle wake as it passed through the rotor blade row was determined. The unsteadiness in the rotor flow field was determined. The decay of the rotor wake was also characterized.

  3. Ultrarapid Detection of Pathogenic Bacteria Using a 3D Immunomagnetic Flow Assay

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Wonjae; Kwon, Donghoon; Chung, Boram; Jung, Gyoo Yeol; Au, Anthony; Folch, Albert; Jeon, Sangmin

    2015-01-01

    We developed a novel 3D immunomagnetic flow assay for the rapid detection of pathogenic bacteria in a large-volume food sample. Antibody-functionalized magnetic nanoparticle clusters (AbMNCs) were magnetically immobilized on the surfaces of a 3D-printed cylindrical microchannel. The injection of a Salmonella-spiked sample solution into the microchannel produced instant binding between the AbMNCs and the Salmonella bacteria due to their efficient collisions. Nearly perfect capture of the AbMNCs and AbMNCs-Salmonella complexes was achieved under a high flow rate by stacking permanent magnets with spacers inside the cylindrical separator to maximize the magnetic force. The concentration of the bacteria in solution was determined using ATP luminescence measurements. The detection limit was better than 10 cfu/mL, and the overall assay time, including the binding, rinsing, and detection steps for a 10 mL sample took less than 3 min. To our knowledge, the 3D immunomagnetic flow assay described here provides the fastest high-sensitivity, high-capacity method for the detection of pathogenic bacteria. PMID:24856003

  4. 3D hydro-mechanically coupled groundwater flow modelling of Pleistocene glaciation effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rühaak, Wolfram; Bense, Victor F.; Sass, Ingo

    2014-06-01

    Pleistocene glaciation led to temporal and spatial variations of sub-surface pore fluid pressure. In basins covered by ice sheets, fluid flow and recharge rates are strongly elevated during glaciations as compared to inter-glacial periods. Present-day hydrogeological conditions across formerly glaciated areas are likely to still reflect the impact of glaciations that ended locally more than 10 thousand years before present. 3D hydro-mechanical coupled modelling of glaciation can help to improve the management of groundwater resources in formerly glaciated basins. An open source numerical code for solving linear elasticity, which is based on the finite element method (FEM) in 3D, has been developed. By coupling this code with existing 3D flow codes it is possible to enable hydro-mechanical coupled modelling. Results of two benchmark simulations are compared to existing analytical solutions to demonstrate the performance of the newly developed code. While the result for a fluid-structure coupled case is in reasonable agreement with the analytical model, the result for a classical structure-fluid coupled benchmark showed that the analytical solution only matches the numerical result when the relevant coupling parameter (loading efficiency) is known in advance. This indicates that the applicability of widely applied approaches using an extra term in the groundwater flow equation for vertical stress to simulate hydro-mechanical coupling might have to be re-evaluated. A case study with the commercial groundwater simulator FEFLOW demonstrates the newly developed solution.

  5. Ultrarapid detection of pathogenic bacteria using a 3D immunomagnetic flow assay.

    PubMed

    Lee, Wonjae; Kwon, Donghoon; Chung, Boram; Jung, Gyoo Yeol; Au, Anthony; Folch, Albert; Jeon, Sangmin

    2014-07-01

    We developed a novel 3D immunomagnetic flow assay for the rapid detection of pathogenic bacteria in a large-volume food sample. Antibody-functionalized magnetic nanoparticle clusters (AbMNCs) were magnetically immobilized on the surfaces of a 3D-printed cylindrical microchannel. The injection of a Salmonella-spiked sample solution into the microchannel produced instant binding between the AbMNCs and the Salmonella bacteria due to their efficient collisions. Nearly perfect capture of the AbMNCs and AbMNCs-Salmonella complexes was achieved under a high flow rate by stacking permanent magnets with spacers inside the cylindrical separator to maximize the magnetic force. The concentration of the bacteria in solution was determined using ATP luminescence measurements. The detection limit was better than 10 cfu/mL, and the overall assay time, including the binding, rinsing, and detection steps for a 10 mL sample took less than 3 min. To our knowledge, the 3D immunomagnetic flow assay described here provides the fastest high-sensitivity, high-capacity method for the detection of pathogenic bacteria.

  6. Unsteady flow field in a mini VAWT with relative rotation blades: analysis of temporal results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayeul-Lainé, A. C.; Simonet, S.; Bois, G.

    2013-12-01

    The present wind turbine is a small one which can be used on roofs or in gardens. This turbine has a vertical axis. Each turbine blade combines a rotating movement around its own axis and around the main rotor axis. Due to this combination of movements, flow around this turbine is highly unsteady and needs to be modelled by unsteady calculation. The present work is an extended study starting in 2009. The benefits of combined rotating blades have been shown. The performance coefficient of this kind of turbine is very good for some blade stagger angles. Spectral analysis of unsteady results on specific points in the domain and temporal forces on blades was already presented for elliptic blades. The main aim here is to compare two kinds of blades in case of the best performances.

  7. Helicopter Rotor Blade Computation in Unsteady Flows Using Moving Overset Grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahmad, Jasim; Duque, Earl P. N.

    1996-01-01

    An overset grid thin-layer Navier-Stokes code has been extended to include dynamic motion of helicopter rotor blades through relative grid motion. The unsteady flowfield and airloads on an AH-IG rotor in forward flight were computed to verify the methodology and to demonstrate the method's potential usefulness towards comprehensive helicopter codes. In addition, the method uses the blade's first harmonics measured in the flight test to prescribe the blade motion. The solution was impulsively started and became periodic in less than three rotor revolutions. Detailed unsteady numerical flow visualization techniques were applied to the entire unsteady data set of five rotor revolutions and exhibited flowfield features such as blade vortex interaction and wake roll-up. The unsteady blade loads and surface pressures compare well against those from flight measurements. Details of the method, a discussion of the resulting predicted flowfield, and requirements for future work are presented. Overall, given the proper blade dynamics, this method can compute the unsteady flowfield of a general helicopter rotor in forward flight.

  8. Fluid dynamics of unsteady separated flow. I - Bodies of revolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ericsson, L. E.; Reding, J. P.

    1986-01-01

    An analytic method is described that uses static experimental data to predict the separated flow effect on rigid and elastic aerospace-vehicle dynamics. Spike-induced flow separation, nose-induced flow separation, shock-induced flow separation, and base flow effects are studied. It is observed that the time lag occurring before a change of flow conditions causes a statically stabilizing load to produce negative aerodynanamic damping and an unstabilizing load causes a positive aerodynamic damping. The time-lagged quasi-steady theory predictions are compared with dynamic experimental results and good correlation exists for a large variety of vehicle geometries and types of flow separation.

  9. Three-dimensional unsteady flow calculations in an advanced gas generator turbine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rangwalla, Akil A.

    1993-01-01

    This paper deals with the application of a three-dimensional, unsteady Navier-Stokes code for predicting the unsteady flow in a single stage of an advanced gas generator turbine. The numerical method solves the three-dimensional thin-layer Navier-Stokes equations, using a system of overlaid grids, which allow for relative motion between the rotor and stator airfoils. Results in the form of time averaged pressures and pressure amplitudes on the airfoil surfaces will be shown. In addition, instantaneous contours of pressure, Mach number, etc. will be presented in order to provide a greater understanding of the inviscid as well as the viscous aspects of the flowfield. Also, relevant secondary flow features such as cross-plane velocity vectors and total pressure contours will be presented. Prior work in two-dimensions has indicated that for the advanced designs, the unsteady interactions can play a significant role in turbine performance. These interactions affect not only the stage efficiency but can substantially alter the time-averaged features of the flow. This work is a natural extension of the work done in two-dimensions and hopes to address some of the issues raised by the two-dimensional calculations. These calculations are being performed as an integral part of an actual design process and demonstrate the value of unsteady rotor-stator interaction calculations in the design of turbomachines.

  10. Mathematical modeling and simulation of biologically inspired hair receptor arrays in laminar unsteady flow separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickinson, B. T.; Singler, J. R.; Batten, B. A.

    2012-02-01

    Bats possess arrays of distributed flow-sensitive hair-like mechanoreceptors on their dorsal and ventral wing surfaces. Bat wing hair receptors are known to play a significant role in flight maneuverability and are directionally most sensitive to reversed flow over the wing. In this work, we consider the mechanics of flexible hair-like structures for the time accurate detection and visualization of hydrodynamic images associated with unsteady near surface flow phenomena. A nonlinear viscoelastic model of a hair-like structure coupled to an unsteady nonuniform flow is proposed. Writing the hair model in nondimensional form, we identify five dimensionless groups that govern hair behavior. An order of magnitude analysis of the physical forces involved in the fluid-structure hair response is performed. Through the choice of hair material properties, we show how a local measure of near surface flow velocity may be obtained from hair tip displacement and resultant moment. When hair structures are placed into an array, time and space accurate hydrodynamic images may be obtained. We illustrate the imaging of reversed flow that occurs during a laminar unsteady flow separation with an array of hair-like structures.

  11. A comparison between implicit and hybrid methods for the calculation of steady and unsteady inlet flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coakley, T. J.; Hsieh, T.

    1985-01-01

    Numerical simulation of steady and unsteady transonic diffuser flows using two different computer codes are discussed and compared with experimental data. The codes solve the Reynolds-averaged, compressible, Navier-Stokes equations using various turbulence models. One of the codes has been applied extensively to diffuser flows and uses the hybrid method of MacCormack. This code is relatively inefficient numerically. The second code, which was developed more recently, is fully implicit and is relatively efficient numerically. Simulations of steady flows using the implicit code are shown to be in good agreement with simulations using the hybrid code. Both simulations are in good agreement with experimental results. Simulations of unsteady flows using the two codes are in good qualitative agreement with each other, although the quantitative agreement is not as good as in the steady flow cases. The implicit code is shown to be eight times faster than the hybrid code for unsteady flow calculations and up to 32 times faster for steady flow calculations. Results of calculations using alternative turbulence models are also discussed.

  12. Variable High Order Multiblock Overlapping Grid Methods for Mixed Steady and Unsteady Multiscale Viscous Flows

    SciTech Connect

    Sjogreen, B; Yee, H C

    2007-12-12

    Flows containing steady or nearly steady strong shocks in parts of the flow field, and unsteady turbulence with shocklets on other parts of the flow field are difficult to capture accurately and efficiently employing the same numerical scheme even under the multiblock grid or adaptive grid refinement framework. On one hand, sixth-order or higher shock-capturing methods are appropriate for unsteady turbulence with shocklets. On the other hand, lower order shock-capturing methods are more effective for strong steady shocks in terms of convergence. In order to minimize the shortcomings of low order and high order shock-capturing schemes for the subject flows, a multi-block overlapping grid with different orders of accuracy on different blocks is proposed. Test cases to illustrate the performance of the new solver are included.

  13. On the steady and unsteady blood flows in an artery with an overlapping stenosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Ranadhir; Riahi, Daniel N.

    2012-12-01

    The problems of steady and unsteady blood flow in an artery with an overlapping symmetric stenosis are considered. The governing equations for the mass conservation and momentum are used for blood flow system, but here the dynamic viscosity of the fluid is a function of the radial variable as modeled by Einstein to take into account the hematocrit. Hematocrit is the percentage of the red cells by volume in the whole blood fluid. Mathematical models for steady and unsteady blood flow are developed for the leading order flow velocity, pressure gradient, impedance and shear stress, and investigate the dependence of these quantities on the hematoocrit, frequency, height of stenosis, parameter determining the shape of the constriction. It was observed that the higher value of the frequency, hematocrit, height of stenonis leads to higher values of the axial velocity, the impedance and the wall shear stress in the stenosis zone.

  14. Implicit method for the computation of unsteady flows on unstructured grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkatakrishnan, V.; Mavriplis, D. J.

    1995-01-01

    An implicit method for the computation of unsteady flows on unstructured grids is presented. Following a finite difference approximation for the time derivative, the resulting nonlinear system of equations is solved at each time step by using an agglomeration multigrid procedure. The method allows for arbitrarily large time steps and is efficient in terms of computational effort and storage. Inviscid and viscous unsteady flows are computed to validate the procedure. The issue of the mass matrix which arises with vertex-centered finite volume schemes is addressed. The present formulation allows the mass matrix to be inverted indirectly. A mesh point movement and reconnection procedure is described that allows the grids to evolve with the motion of bodies. As an example of flow over bodies in relative motion, flow over a multi-element airfoil system undergoing deployment is computed.

  15. Implicit method for the computation of unsteady flows on unstructured grids

    SciTech Connect

    Venkatakrishnan, V.; Mavriplis, D.J.

    1996-09-01

    An implicit method for the computation of unsteady flows on unstructured grids is presented. Following a finite difference approximation for the time derivative, the resulting nonlinear system of equations is solved at each time step by using an agglomeration multigrid procedure. The method allows for arbitrarily large time steps and is efficient in terms of computational effort and storage. Inviscid and viscous unsteady flows are computed to validate the procedure. The issue of the mass matrix which arises with vertex-centered finite volume schemes is addressed. The present formulation allows the mass matrix to be inverted indirectly. A mesh point movement and reconnection procedure is described that allows the grids to evolve with the motion of bodies. As an example of flow over bodies in relative motion, flow over a multi-element airfoil system undergoing deployment is computed. 48 refs., 24 figs.

  16. A modular segmented-flow platform for 3D cell cultivation.

    PubMed

    Lemke, Karen; Förster, Tobias; Römer, Robert; Quade, Mandy; Wiedemeier, Stefan; Grodrian, Andreas; Gastrock, Gunter

    2015-07-10

    In vitro 3D cell cultivation is promised to equate tissue in vivo more realistically than 2D cell cultivation corresponding to cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions. Therefore, a scalable 3D cultivation platform was developed. This platform, called pipe-based bioreactors (pbb), is based on the segmented-flow technology: aqueous droplets are embedded in a water-immiscible carrier fluid. The droplet volumes range from 60 nL to 20 μL and are used as bioreactors lined up in a tubing like pearls on a string. The modular automated platform basically consists of several modules like a fluid management for a high throughput droplet generation for self-assembly or scaffold-based 3D cell cultivation, a storage module for incubation and storage, and an analysis module for monitoring cell aggregation and proliferation basing on microscopy or photometry. In this report, the self-assembly of murine embryonic stem cells (mESCs) to uniformly sized embryoid bodies (EBs), the cell proliferation, the cell viability as well as the influence on the cell differentiation to cardiomyocytes are described. The integration of a dosage module for medium exchange or agent addition will enable pbb as long-term 3D cell cultivation system for studying stem cell differentiation, e.g. cardiac myogenesis or for diagnostic and therapeutic testing in personalized medicine.

  17. Contact Effects in thin 3D-Topological Insulators: How does the current flow?

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Gaurav; Jalil, Mansoor Bin Abdul; Liang, Gengchiau

    2015-01-01

    The effect of different contact configurations (semi-infinite extended-channel, normal metal and ferromagnetic metal) on quantum transport through thin Bi2Se3 three-dimensional (3D) topological insulator (TI) slab (channel) has been investigated through Non-Equilibrium Green Function. The issue of contact dependent current flow and distribution across quintuple layers of 3D-TI has been addressed in this work and applied to expound the explanation for recent experimental work on electrical detection of spin-momentum locking on topological surface for long channel device. A theoretical model is propounded to develop a microscopic understanding of transport in 3D-TI in which contact type and magnetization concur with helical surface states of the TI channel to manifest seemingly counter-intuitive current distribution across layers. The quantum transport calculations for short channel devices with magnetic source and drain contacts postulate negative surface current for anti-phase magnetization whose axis is transverse to both current and quintuple layers. For in-phase magnetization at the two terminals, it is shown that observations can change fundamentally to result in anomalous current distribution. Such results are explained to stem from the confinement of 3D-TI between ferromagnetic contacts along the transport direction. A simple mechanism to validate topological insulators via quantum transport experiments has also been suggested. PMID:25820460

  18. Nonhydrostatic granular flow over 3-D terrain: New Boussinesq-type gravity waves?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro-Orgaz, Oscar; Hutter, Kolumban; Giraldez, Juan V.; Hager, Willi H.

    2015-01-01

    granular mass flow is a basic step in the prediction and control of natural or man-made disasters related to avalanches on the Earth. Savage and Hutter (1989) pioneered the mathematical modeling of these geophysical flows introducing Saint-Venant-type mass and momentum depth-averaged hydrostatic equations using the continuum mechanics approach. However, Denlinger and Iverson (2004) found that vertical accelerations in granular mass flows are of the same order as the gravity acceleration, requiring the consideration of nonhydrostatic modeling of granular mass flows. Although free surface water flow simulations based on nonhydrostatic depth-averaged models are commonly used since the works of Boussinesq (1872, 1877), they have not yet been applied to the modeling of debris flow. Can granular mass flow be described by Boussinesq-type gravity waves? This is a fundamental question to which an answer is required, given the potential to expand the successful Boussinesq-type water theory to granular flow over 3-D terrain. This issue is explored in this work by generalizing the basic Boussinesq-type theory used in civil and coastal engineering for more than a century to an arbitrary granular mass flow using the continuum mechanics approach. Using simple test cases, it is demonstrated that the above question can be answered in the affirmative way, thereby opening a new framework for the physical and mathematical modeling of granular mass flow in geophysics, whereby the effect of vertical motion is mathematically included without the need of ad hoc assumptions.

  19. Numerical Simulation of 3-D Supersonic Viscous Flow in an Experimental MHD Channel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kato, Hiromasa; Tannehill, John C.; Gupta, Sumeet; Mehta, Unmeel B.

    2004-01-01

    The 3-D supersonic viscous flow in an experimental MHD channel has been numerically simulated. The experimental MHD channel is currently in operation at NASA Ames Research Center. The channel contains a nozzle section, a center section, and an accelerator section where magnetic and electric fields can be imposed on the flow. In recent tests, velocity increases of up to 40% have been achieved in the accelerator section. The flow in the channel is numerically computed using a new 3-D parabolized Navier-Stokes (PNS) algorithm that has been developed to efficiently compute MHD flows in the low magnetic Reynolds number regime. The MHD effects are modeled by introducing source terms into the PNS equations which can then be solved in a very e5uent manner. To account for upstream (elliptic) effects, the flowfield can be computed using multiple streamwise sweeps with an iterated PNS algorithm. The new algorithm has been used to compute two test cases that match the experimental conditions. In both cases, magnetic and electric fields are applied to the flow. The computed results are in good agreement with the available experimental data.

  20. Unsteady boundary-layer flow over jerked plate moving in a free stream of viscoelastic fluid.

    PubMed

    Munawar, Sufian; Mehmood, Ahmer; Ali, Asif; Saleem, Najma

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the unsteady boundary-layer flow of a viscoelastic non-Newtonian fluid over a flat surface. The plate is suddenly jerked to move with uniform velocity in a uniform stream of non-Newtonian fluid. Purely analytic solution to governing nonlinear equation is obtained. The solution is highly accurate and valid for all values of the dimensionless time 0 ≤ τ < ∞. Flow properties of the viscoelastic fluid are discussed through graphs. PMID:24892060

  1. Unsteady Boundary-Layer Flow over Jerked Plate Moving in a Free Stream of Viscoelastic Fluid

    PubMed Central

    Mehmood, Ahmer; Ali, Asif; Saleem, Najma

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the unsteady boundary-layer flow of a viscoelastic non-Newtonian fluid over a flat surface. The plate is suddenly jerked to move with uniform velocity in a uniform stream of non-Newtonian fluid. Purely analytic solution to governing nonlinear equation is obtained. The solution is highly accurate and valid for all values of the dimensionless time 0 ≤ τ < ∞. Flow properties of the viscoelastic fluid are discussed through graphs. PMID:24892060

  2. Variational formulation of hybrid problems for fully 3-D transonic flow with shocks in rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Gao-Lian

    1991-01-01

    Based on previous research, the unified variable domain variational theory of hybrid problems for rotor flow is extended to fully 3-D transonic rotor flow with shocks, unifying and generalizing the direct and inverse problems. Three variational principles (VP) families were established. All unknown boundaries and flow discontinuities (such as shocks, free trailing vortex sheets) are successfully handled via functional variations with variable domain, converting almost all boundary and interface conditions, including the Rankine Hugoniot shock relations, into natural ones. This theory provides a series of novel ways for blade design or modification and a rigorous theoretical basis for finite element applications and also constitutes an important part of the optimal design theory of rotor bladings. Numerical solutions to subsonic flow by finite elements with self-adapting nodes given in Refs., show good agreement with experimental results.

  3. 3D-PTV measurement of the phototactic movement of algae in shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeda, Tatsuyuki; Ishikawa, Takuji; Ueno, Hironori; Numayama-Tsuruta, Keiko; Imai, Yosuke; Yamaguchi, Takami

    2012-11-01

    Recently, swimming motion of algae cells is researched actively, because algae fuel is one of the hottest topic in engineering. It is known that algae swim toward the light for photosynthesis however, the effect of a background flow on the unidirectional swimming is unclear. In this study, we used Volvox as a model alga and placed them in a simple shear flow with or without light stimulus. The shear flow was generated by moving two flat sheets in the opposite direction tangentially. A red LED light (wave length 660 nm) was used as an observation light source, and a white LED light was used to stimulate cells for the phototaxis. The trajectories of individual cells were measured by a 3D-PTV system, consists of a pair of high-speed camera with macro lenses. The results were analyzed to understand the effect of the background shear flow on the phototaxis of cells.

  4. Incorporating preferential flow into a 3D model of a forested headwater catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glaser, Barbara; Jackisch, Conrad; Hopp, Luisa; Pfister, Laurent; Klaus, Julian

    2016-04-01

    Preferential flow plays an important role for water flow and solute transport. The inclusion of preferential flow, for example with dual porosity or dual permeability approaches, is a common feature in transport simulations at the plot scale. But at hillslope and catchment scales, incorporation of macropore and fracture flow into distributed hydrologic 3D models is rare, often due to limited data availability for model parameterisation. In this study, we incorporated preferential flow into an existing 3D integrated surface subsurface hydrologic model (HydroGeoSphere) of a headwater region (6 ha) of the forested Weierbach catchment in western Luxembourg. Our model philosophy was a strong link between measured data and the model setup. The model setup we used previously had been parameterised and validated based on various field data. But existing macropores and fractures had not been considered in this initial model setup. The multi-criteria validation revealed a good model performance but also suggested potential for further improvement by incorporating preferential flow as additional process. In order to pursue the data driven model philosophy for the implementation of preferential flow, we analysed the results of plot scale bromide sprinkling and infiltration experiments carried out in the vicinity of the Weierbach catchment. Three 1 sqm plots were sprinkled for one hour and excavated one day later for bromide depth profile sampling. We simulated these sprinkling experiments at the soil column scale, using the parameterisation of the base headwater model extended by a second permeability domain. Representing the bromide depth profiles was successful without changing this initial parameterisation. Moreover, to explain the variability between the three bromide depth profiles it was sufficient to adapt the dual permeability properties, indicating the spatial heterogeneity of preferential flow. Subsequently, we incorporated the dual permeability simulation in the

  5. 3D imaging of particle-scale rotational motion in cyclically driven granular flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrington, Matt; Powers, Dylan; Cooper, Eric; Losert, Wolfgang

    Recent experimental advances have enabled three-dimensional (3D) imaging of motion, structure, and failure within granular systems. 3D imaging allows researchers to directly characterize bulk behaviors that arise from particle- and meso-scale features. For instance, segregation of a bidisperse system of spheres under cyclic shear can originate from microscopic irreversibilities and the development of convective secondary flows. Rotational motion and frictional rotational coupling, meanwhile, have been less explored in such experimental 3D systems, especially under cyclic forcing. In particular, relative amounts of sliding and/or rolling between pairs of contacting grains could influence the reversibility of both trajectories, in terms of both position and orientation. In this work, we apply the Refractive Index Matched Scanning technique to a granular system that is cyclically driven and measure both translational and rotational motion of individual grains. We relate measured rotational motion to resulting shear bands and convective flows, further indicating the degree to which pairs and neighborhoods of grains collectively rotate.

  6. RV functional imaging: 3-D echo-derived dynamic geometry and flow field simulations.

    PubMed

    Pasipoularides, Ares D; Shu, Ming; Womack, Michael S; Shah, Ashish; Von Ramm, Olaf; Glower, Donald D

    2003-01-01

    We describe a novel functional imaging approach for quantitative analysis of right ventricular (RV) blood flow patterns in specific experimental animals (or humans) using real-time, three-dimensional (3-D) echocardiography (RT3D). The method is independent of the digital imaging modality used. It comprises three parts. First, a semiautomated segmentation aided by intraluminal contrast medium locates the RV endocardial surface. Second, a geometric scheme for dynamic RV chamber reconstruction applies a time interpolation procedure to the RT3D data to quantify wall geometry and motion at 400 Hz. A volumetric prism method validated the dynamic geometric reconstruction against simultaneous sonomicrometric canine measurements. Finally, the RV endocardial border motion information is used for mesh generation on a computational fluid dynamics solver to simulate development of the early RV diastolic inflow field. Boundary conditions (tessellated endocardial surface nodal velocities) for the solver are directly derived from the endocardial geometry and motion information. The new functional imaging approach may yield important kinematic information on the distribution of instantaneous velocities in the RV diastolic flow field of specific normal or diseased hearts. PMID:12388220

  7. Slip flow through a converging microchannel: experiments and 3D simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varade, Vijay; Agrawal, Amit; Pradeep, A. M.

    2015-02-01

    An experimental and 3D numerical study of gaseous slip flow through a converging microchannel is presented in this paper. The measurements reported are with nitrogen gas flowing through the microchannel with convergence angles (4°, 8° and 12°), hydraulic diameters (118, 147 and 177 µm) and lengths (10, 20 and 30 mm). The measurements cover the entire slip flow regime and a part of the continuum and transition regimes (the Knudsen number is between 0.0004 and 0.14); the flow is laminar (the Reynolds number is between 0.5 and 1015). The static pressure drop is measured for various mass flow rates. The overall pressure drop increases with a decrease in the convergence angle and has a relatively large contribution of the viscous component. The numerical solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations with Maxwell’s slip boundary condition explore two different flow behaviors: uniform centerline velocity with linear pressure variation in the initial and the middle part of the microchannel and flow acceleration with nonlinear pressure variation in the last part of the microchannel. The centerline velocity and the wall shear stress increase with a decrease in the convergence angle. The concept of a characteristic length scale for a converging microchannel is also explored. The location of the characteristic length is a function of the Knudsen number and approaches the microchannel outlet with rarefaction. These results on gaseous slip flow through converging microchannels are observed to be considerably different than continuum flow.

  8. Three-dimensional unsteady viscous flow analysis over airfoil sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinberg, B. C.; Shamroth, S. J.

    1984-01-01

    A three-dimensional solution procedure for the approximate form of the Navier-Stokes equation was exercised in the two- and three-dimensional modes to compute the unsteady turbulent boundary layer on a flat plate corresponding to the data of Karlsson. The procedure is based on the use of a consistently split Linearized Block Implicit technique in conjunction with a QR operator scheme. New time-dependent upstream boundary conditions were developed that yielded realistic solutions for the interior in the vicinity of the upstream boundary. Comparisons of the computation employing these boundary conditions with the data indicate that both qualitative and quantitative agreement was obtained for the mean velocity and the in phase and out of phase components of the first harmonic of the velocity. In addition, the calculation gave results for the skin friction phase angle that had expected physical behavior for large distances downstream of the inflow boundary. For the three-dimensional case, the two-dimensional data of Karlsson was considered, but in a coordinate system skewed at 45 deg to the free stream direction. The results of the calculations were in excellent agreement with the data and the two-dimensional computations.

  9. Numerical simulation of steady and unsteady viscous flow in turbomachinery using pressure based algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lakshminarayana, B.; Ho, Y.; Basson, A.

    1993-01-01

    The objective of this research is to simulate steady and unsteady viscous flows, including rotor/stator interaction and tip clearance effects in turbomachinery. The numerical formulation for steady flow developed here includes an efficient grid generation scheme, particularly suited to computational grids for the analysis of turbulent turbomachinery flows and tip clearance flows, and a semi-implicit, pressure-based computational fluid dynamics scheme that directly includes artificial dissipation, and is applicable to both viscous and inviscid flows. The values of these artificial dissipation is optimized to achieve accuracy and convergency in the solution. The numerical model is used to investigate the structure of tip clearance flows in a turbine nozzle. The structure of leakage flow is captured accurately, including blade-to-blade variation of all three velocity components, pitch and yaw angles, losses and blade static pressures in the tip clearance region. The simulation also includes evaluation of such quantities of leakage mass flow, vortex strength, losses, dominant leakage flow regions and the spanwise extent affected by the leakage flow. It is demonstrated, through optimization of grid size and artificial dissipation, that the tip clearance flow field can be captured accurately. The above numerical formulation was modified to incorporate time accurate solutions. An inner loop iteration scheme is used at each time step to account for the non-linear effects. The computation of unsteady flow through a flat plate cascade subjected to a transverse gust reveals that the choice of grid spacing and the amount of artificial dissipation is critical for accurate prediction of unsteady phenomena. The rotor-stator interaction problem is simulated by starting the computation upstream of the stator, and the upstream rotor wake is specified from the experimental data. The results show that the stator potential effects have appreciable influence on the upstream rotor wake

  10. Intrathoracic tumour motion estimation from CT imaging using the 3D optical flow method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerrero, Thomas; Zhang, Geoffrey; Huang, Tzung-Chi; Lin, Kang-Ping

    2004-09-01

    The purpose of this work was to develop and validate an automated method for intrathoracic tumour motion estimation from breath-hold computed tomography (BH CT) imaging using the three-dimensional optical flow method (3D OFM). A modified 3D OFM algorithm provided 3D displacement vectors for each voxel which were used to map tumour voxels on expiration BH CT onto inspiration BH CT images. A thoracic phantom and simulated expiration/inspiration BH CT pairs were used for validation. The 3D OFM was applied to the measured inspiration and expiration BH CT images from one lung cancer and one oesophageal cancer patient. The resulting displacements were plotted in histogram format and analysed to provide insight regarding the tumour motion. The phantom tumour displacement was measured as 1.20 and 2.40 cm with full-width at tenth maximum (FWTM) for the distribution of displacement estimates of 0.008 and 0.006 cm, respectively. The maximum error of any single voxel's motion estimate was 1.1 mm along the z-dimension or approximately one-third of the z-dimension voxel size. The simulated BH CT pairs revealed an rms error of less than 0.25 mm. The displacement of the oesophageal tumours was nonuniform and up to 1.4 cm, this was a new finding. A lung tumour maximum displacement of 2.4 cm was found in the case evaluated. In conclusion, 3D OFM provided an accurate estimation of intrathoracic tumour motion, with estimated errors less than the voxel dimension in a simulated motion phantom study. Surprisingly, oesophageal tumour motion was large and nonuniform, with greatest motion occurring at the gastro-oesophageal junction. Presented at The IASTED Second International Conference on Biomedical Engineering (BioMED 2004), Innsbruck, Austria, 16-18 February 2004.

  11. 3D FEM Geometry and Material Flow Optimization of Porthole-Die Extrusion

    SciTech Connect

    Ceretti, Elisabetta; Mazzoni, Luca; Giardini, Claudio

    2007-05-17

    The aim of this work is to design and to improve the geometry of a porthole-die for the production of aluminum components by means of 3D FEM simulations. In fact, the use of finite element models will allow to investigate the effects of the die geometry (webs, extrusion cavity) on the material flow and on the stresses acting on the die so to reduce the die wear and to improve the tool life. The software used to perform the simulations was a commercial FEM code, Deform 3D. The technological data introduced in the FE model have been furnished by METRA S.p.A. Company, partner in this research. The results obtained have been considered valid and helpful by the Company for building a new optimized extrusion porthole-die.

  12. Application of IR thermography for unsteady fluid-flow research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koppel, Tiit; Lahdeniemi, Matti; Ekholm, Ari

    1998-03-01

    In the recent years the IR thermography technique has been sued successfully as a new contactless instrument for gas and fluid flow research in pipes and on the surface of a flat plate. It is well known that most energy changes in the flow take place in the boundary layer. This is in turn important for the intensity of convective heat transfer in pipe flows and enables to measure processes connected with energy changes in the flow from outside the pipe. Series of measurements of suddenly accelerated and pulsating pipe flow were made at Satakunta Polytechnic, Technology Pori, Finland. The theoretical criterion describing the transition from laminar to turbulent regime is found depending on the critical thickness of the boundary layer of suddenly accelerated flow. At the moment of transition of the 'plug' type flow into turbulent flow, the velocities in the wall region diminish and this can be detected using the IR thermography from the wall temperature changes. the experimental results of the mean velocity development and transition criteria correspond to the theoretical calculations. The changes of the internal structure of the flow affect the convective heat transfer and this in turn influences the pipe wall temperature. IR thermography measures pipe wall temperature changes and consequently we can detect flow structure changes in the boundary layer in the accelerated and decelerated phase of the pulsating pipe flow.

  13. Verification of software codes for simulation of unsteady flows in a gas centrifuge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramov, V. A.; Bogovalov, S. V.; Borisevich, V. D.; Borman, V. D.; Kislov, V. A.; Tronin, I. V.; Tronin, V. N.; Yupatov, S. V.

    2013-06-01

    A simple semi-analytical solution is proposed for the problem of an unsteady gas flow in a gas centrifuge. The circulation in the centrifuge is driven by a source/sink of energy and by an external force (deceleration/acceleration of the gas rotation) acting on the gas at a given frequency. In the semi-analytical solution, the rotor is infinite, while the given forces vary harmonically with a given wave-length along the axial coordinate. As a result, the unsteady flow problem is reduced to a system of ordinary differential equations, which can be quickly solved to any prescribed accuracy. This problem is proposed for verifying numerical codes designed for the simulation of unsteady processes in gas centrifuges. A similar unsteady problem is solved numerically, in which case the cylinder is finite with the rotor length equal to the wavelength of the external force along the axis of rotation. The periodicity of the solution is set at end faces of the cylinder. As an example, the semi-analytical solution is compared with the numerical one obtained with these boundary conditions. The comparison confirms that the problem formulations are equivalent in both cases.

  14. Calcium signaling in response to fluid flow by chondrocytes in 3D alginate culture.

    PubMed

    Degala, Satish; Williams, Rebecca; Zipfel, Warren; Bonassar, Lawrence J

    2012-05-01

    Quantifying the effects of mechanical loading on the metabolic response of chondrocytes is difficult due to complicated structure of cartilage ECM and the coupled nature of the mechanical stimuli presented to the cells. In this study we describe the effects of fluid flow, particularly hydrostatic pressure and wall shear stress, on the Ca(2+) signaling response of bovine articular chondrocytes in 3D culture. Using well-established alginate hydrogel system to maintain spherical chondrocyte morphology, we altered solid volume fraction to change scaffold mechanics. Fluid velocities in the bulk of the scaffolds were directly measured via an optical technique and scaffold permeability and aggregate modulus was characterized to quantify the mechanical stimuli presented to cells. Ca(2+) signaling response to direct perfusion of chondrocyte-seeded scaffolds increased monotonically with flow rate and was found more directly dependent on fluid velocity rather than shear stress or hydrostatic pressure. Chondrocytes in alginate scaffolds responded to fluid flow at velocities and shear stresses 2-3 orders of magnitude lower than seen in previous monolayer studies. Our data suggest that flow-induced Ca(2+) signaling response of chondrocytes in alginate culture may be due to mechanical signaling pathways, which is influenced by the 3D nature of cell shape.

  15. Cauchy's almost forgotten Lagrangian formulation of the Euler equation for 3D incompressible flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frisch, Uriel; Villone, Barbara

    2014-09-01

    Two prized papers, one by Augustin Cauchy in 1815, presented to the French Academy and the other by Hermann Hankel in 1861, presented to Göttingen University, contain major discoveries on vorticity dynamics whose impact is now quickly increasing. Cauchy found a Lagrangian formulation of 3D ideal incompressible flow in terms of three invariants that generalize to three dimensions the now well-known law of conservation of vorticity along fluid particle trajectories for two-dimensional flow. This has very recently been used to prove analyticity in time of fluid particle trajectories for 3D incompressible Euler flow and can be extended to compressible flow, in particular to cosmological dark matter. Hankel showed that Cauchy's formulation gives a very simple Lagrangian derivation of the Helmholtz vorticity-flux invariants and, in the middle of the proof, derived an intermediate result which is the conservation of the circulation of the velocity around a closed contour moving with the fluid. This circulation theorem was to be rediscovered independently by William Thomson (Kelvin) in 1869. Cauchy's invariants were only occasionally cited in the 19th century - besides Hankel, foremost by George Stokes and Maurice Lévy - and even less so in the 20th until they were rediscovered via Emmy Noether's theorem in the late 1960, but reattributed to Cauchy only at the end of the 20th century by Russian scientists.

  16. A 3-D nonisothermal flow simulation and pulling force model for injection pultrusion processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mustafa, Ibrahim

    1998-12-01

    Injected Pultrusion (IP) is an efficient way of producing high quality, low cost, high volume and constant cross-section polymeric composites. This process has been developed recently, and the efforts to optimize it are still underway. This work is related to the development of a 3-D non-isothermal flow model for the IP processes. The governing equations for transport of mass, momentum and, energy are formulated by using a local volume averaging approach, and the Finite Element/Control Volume method is used to solve the system of equations numerically. The chemical species balance equation is solved in the Lagrangian frame of reference whereas the energy equation is solved using Galerkin, SU (Streamline Upwind), and SUPG (Streamline Upwind Petrov Galerkin) approaches. By varying degrees of freedom and the flow rates of the resin, it is shown that at high Peclet numbers the SUPG formulation performs better than the SU and the Galerkin methods in all cases. The 3-D model predictions for degree of cure and temperature are compared with a one dimensional analytical solution and the results are found satisfactory. Moreover, by varying the Brinkman Number, it is shown that the effect of viscous dissipation is insignificant. The 3-D flow simulations have been carried out for both thin and thick parts and the results are compared with the 2-D model. It is shown that for thick parts 2-D simulations render erroneous results. The effect of changing permeability on the flow fronts is also addressed. The effect of increasing taper angle on the model prediction is also investigated. A parametric study is conducted to isolate optimum conditions for both isothermal and non-isothermal cases using a straight rectangular die and a die with a tapered inlet. Finally, a simple pulling force model is developed and the pulling force required to pull the carbon-epoxy fiber resin system is estimated for dies of varying tapered inlet.

  17. Morphodynamic Response of Laboratory Stream Beds to Unsteady Flow Events of Varying Magnitude and Duration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binns, A. D.; Gunsolus, E. H.

    2014-12-01

    Natural processes and anthropogenic activities can cause short-term flow increases in rivers. These changes in flow, such as those caused by extreme rainfall events or seasonal variation in precipitation patterns, can result in substantial, and sometimes quite rapid, adjustments in sediment regime and alluvial stream morphology. Such morphological adjustments can pose short-term erosion hazards, increased risk of flooding, degradation to aquatic habitat, damage to in-stream engineering infrastructure, and re-mobilization of pollutants. Alterations in river hydraulics, sediment transport and stream morphology from specific unsteady events prove challenging to accurately predict and assess. This research quantifies the morphodynamic response of stream beds to unsteady flow events of varying magnitude and duration. For this purpose, a series of experimental runs is conducted in a 0.31 m-wide, 5.0 m-long laboratory sediment transport flume comprised of a well-sorted medium sand. All runs start from flat-bed initial conditions with a given longitudinal slope. The bed is allowed to develop under constant base-flow (antecedent) conditions until equilibrium conditions are reached. For each run a prescribed increase in flow rate for a pre-determined duration is applied to simulate the unsteady flow event. The magnitude of the increase in flow rate and the duration of the event are systematically varied from run to run. In each run measurements of bed morphology are conducted prior to the event (during antecedent flow conditions), at the conclusion of the event, and following a return base-flow (antecedent) conditions. Sediment transport rates are monitored throughout each run. The morphological response and the time-scale of the bed adjustments to unsteady events is quantified. The effect of the magnitude and duration of the flow increase on this increase is evaluated. This study contributes to the development of predictive tools for engineers and hydrologists to better

  18. Discrete Adjoint-Based Design Optimization of Unsteady Turbulent Flows on Dynamic Unstructured Grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nielsen, Eric J.; Diskin, Boris; Yamaleev, Nail K.

    2009-01-01

    An adjoint-based methodology for design optimization of unsteady turbulent flows on dynamic unstructured grids is described. The implementation relies on an existing unsteady three-dimensional unstructured grid solver capable of dynamic mesh simulations and discrete adjoint capabilities previously developed for steady flows. The discrete equations for the primal and adjoint systems are presented for the backward-difference family of time-integration schemes on both static and dynamic grids. The consistency of sensitivity derivatives is established via comparisons with complex-variable computations. The current work is believed to be the first verified implementation of an adjoint-based optimization methodology for the true time-dependent formulation of the Navier-Stokes equations in a practical computational code. Large-scale shape optimizations are demonstrated for turbulent flows over a tiltrotor geometry and a simulated aeroelastic motion of a fighter jet.

  19. Spectral element-Fourier method for unsteady conjugate heat transfer in complex geometry flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amon, Cristina H.

    1995-04-01

    A spectral-element Fourier method (SEFM) is presented for the direct numerical simulation of forced convective heat transfer and conjugate conduction/convection in transitional internal flows in complex geometries. The SEFM is employed for the spatial discretization of the unsteady, incompressible, three-dimensional Navier-Stokes and energy equations. The resulting discrete equations are solved by a semi-implicit method in time treating explicitly the convection operator and implicitly the remaining pressure and viscous contributions. This methodology is illustrated by performing direct numerical simulations to investigate forced convective heat transfer in supercritical self-sustained oscillatory flows and conjugate effects in multimaterial domains. Highly unsteady flows in complex geometries are considered, including modified channels with periodic inhomogeneities such as spanwise rectangular and triangular grooves encountered in electronic equipment and compact heat exchangers.

  20. Flow Over AN Unsteady Shrinking Sheet with Suction in a Nanofluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohni, Azizah Mohd; Ahmad, Syakila; Ismail, Ahmad Izani Md.; Pop, Ioan

    The unsteady flow over a continuously shrinking sheet with wall mass suction in a nanofluid is numerically studied. The governing boundary layer equations are transformed into a set of nonlinear ordinary differential equations by using similarity transformation. The resulting similarity equations are then solved by the shooting method for three types of nanofluid: copper-water, alumina-water and titania-water to investigate the effect of nanoparticle volume fraction parameter ɸ to the flow in nanofluid. The skin friction coefficient and velocity profiles are presented and results show that dual solutions exist for a certain range of unsteadiness parameter A. It is also found that the nanoparticle volume fraction parameter ɸ and types of nanofluid play an important role to significantly determine the flow behaviour.

  1. Verification of a one-dimensional, unsteady-flow model for the Fox River in Illinois

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ishii, Audrey; Turner, Mary J.

    1996-01-01

    The previously-calibrated application of the Full EQuations (FEQ) model of one-dimensional, unsteady flow to a 30.7-mile reach of the Fox River in northeastern Illinois was verified with discharge, stage, and dye-transport data collected during a 12-day period in October-November 1990. The period included unsteady flow induced by the operation of a sluice gate dam located at the upstream end of the reach. The model flow field was input to the Branched Lagrangian Transport Model (BLTM) for the simulation of dye transport. The results of the FEQ and BLTM model simulations are compared with the measured data and sensitivity analyses of the model parameters for this application are presented.

  2. Measurements of the unsteady vortex flow over a wing-body at angle of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Debry, Benoit; Komerath, Narayanan M.; Liou, Shiuh-Guang; Caplin, J.; Lenakos, Jason

    1992-01-01

    Measurements of the unsteady vortex flow over a wing-body at high angles of attack were carried out on a generic test model of a pointed body of revolution with double-delta wings. Vortex patterns and trajectories were quantified from digitized laser sheet video images. The velocity-field measurements showed the jetlike flow in the unburst vortex, unsteady secondary structures below the primary core, and then the reversed flow in the burst vortex. Results of hot-film anemometry revealed the presence of peak frequencies in the velocity spectra over the wing and near the trailing edge, which varied linearly with freestream speed and increased as the measurement point moved upstream. Good Strouhal correlation was found with previous results obtained for a smaller generic wing-body model.

  3. Unsteady transonic flow past airfoils in rigid-body motion. [UFLO5

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, I C

    1981-03-01

    With the aim of developing a fast and accurate computer code for predicting the aerodynamic forces needed for a flutter analysis, some basic concepts in computational transonics are reviewed. The unsteady transonic flow past airfoils in rigid body motion is adequately described by the potential flow equation as long as the boundary layer remains attached. The two dimensional unsteady transonic potential flow equation in quasilinear form with first order radiation boundary conditions is solved by an alternating direction implicit scheme in an airfoil attached sheared parabolic coordinate system. Numerical experiments show that the scheme is very stable and is able to resolve the higher nonlinear transonic effects for filter analysis within the context of an inviscid theory.

  4. High-Speed Unsteady Flows around Concave Axisymmetric Bodies: Flow Instabilities and their Suppression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panaras, A.; Drikakis, D.

    2009-01-01

    The axisymmetric concave body, i.e. a body in which the normals to its surface intersect, is a typical configuration about which shock/shock interactions appear. Various shapes of axisymmetric concave bodies are used in a variety of applications in aeronautics. For exampe: axisymmetric jet inlets with conical centerbody, ballistic missiles drag reduction by spike, plasma or hot gas injection, parachutes for pilot-ejection capsules. However, it is well known that two distinct modes of instability appear around a concave body in the high-speed flow regime, for a certain range of geometric parameters. These instabilities can cause undesirable effects such as severe vibration of the structure, heating and pressure loads. According to the experimental evidence, the unsteady flow is characterized by periodic radial inflation and collapse of the conical separation bubble formed around the forebody (pulsation). Various explanations have been given for the driving mechanism of the instabilities. They are based on interpretation of experimental results or on numerical simulation of the related flows. A merging of the leading explanations is done, and basic rules for the passive suppression of the instabilities are applied, in order to enforce the proposed driving mechanism of the instabilities. Most of the analysis is based on numerical simulations.

  5. North Cascadia heat flux and fluid flow from gas hydrates: Modeling 3-D topographic effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hong-lin; He, Tao; Spence, George D.

    2014-01-01

    The bottom-simulating reflector (BSR) of gas hydrate is well imaged from two perpendicular seismic grids in the region of a large carbonate mound, informally called Cucumber Ridge off Vancouver Island. We use a new method to calculate 3-D heat flow map from the BSR depths, in which we incorporate 3-D topographic corrections after calibrated by the drilling results from nearby (Integrated) Ocean Drilling Program Site 889 and Site U1327. We then estimate the associated fluid flow by relating it to the topographically corrected heat flux anomalies. In the midslope region, a heat flux anomaly of 1 mW/m2 can be associated with an approximate focused fluid flow rate of 0.09 mm/yr. Around Cucumber Ridge, high rates of focused fluid flow were observed at steep slopes with values more than double the average regional diffusive fluid discharge rate of 0.56 mm/yr. As well, in some areas of relatively flat seafloor, the focused fluid flow rates still exceeded 0.5 mm/yr. On the seismic lines the regions of focused fluid flow were commonly associated with seismic blanking zones above the BSR and sometimes with strong reflectors below the BSR, indicating that the faults/fractures provide high-permeability pathways for fluids to carry methane from BSR depths to the seafloor. These high fluid flow regions cover mostly the western portion of our area with gas hydrate concentration estimations of ~6% based on empirical correlations from Hydrate Ridge in south off Oregon, significantly higher than previously recognized values of ~2.5% in the eastern portion determined from Site U1327.

  6. Study of unsteady flow conditions for slurry fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Ekmann, J.M.; Wildman, D.J.; Klinzing, G.E.

    1985-01-01

    During the past three years, transport characteristics of coal-water mixtures (CWMs) have been studied at the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center. The effort has concentrated predominantly on studying flow conditions in straight horizontal and vertical sections, and to a lesser extent on studying the flow patterns around elbows of a one-inch-diameter loop and a two-inch-diameter loop. Steady-state flow was characterized for in-house prepared slurries and commercially prepared slurries. For lower concentrated slurries (55 wt % to 60 wt %) and coarse particle size distributions (50% finer than 75 microns), nonhomogeneous flow conditions were encountered across horizontal test sections. Since nonhomogeneous conditions existed in straight sections during steady-state flow, it was decided to further investigate flow conditions during changes in velocity (magnitude and direction). This paper concentrates on nonuniform flow conditions of two types. The first nonuniform flow condition arises from sudden increases in the magnitude of the flow velocity. Pressure measurements recorded at a fixed position in the vertical section of the two-inch-diameter loop during sudden changes in velocity can be analyzed via classic control theory to evaluate the dynamic properties of the CWM. The second nonuniform flow condition occurs as the CWM passes through a bend. Both long-radius bends and 90-degree elbows made of glass and steel have been studied. Pressure-loss data around the long-radius bends and elbows were analyzed with a modified version of the model developed by Ito for single-phase flow around bends. Flow patterns around glass bends and elbows were observed for slurries prepared of vinyl coating powder and water. They are described in an effort to increase understanding of the pressure-loss data. 8 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Unsteady fluid dynamic model for propeller induced flow fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, Joseph; Ashby, Dale L.; Yon, Steven

    1991-01-01

    A potential flow based three-dimensional panel method was modified to treat time dependent flow conditions in which the body's geometry may vary with time. The main objective of this effort was the study of a flow field due to a propeller rotating relative to a nonrotating body which is otherwise moving at a constant forward speed. Calculated surface pressure, thrust and torque coefficient data for a four-bladed marine propeller/body compared favorably with previously published experimental results.

  8. Unsteady shock-wave reflection and interaction in viscous flow with thermal and chemical nonequilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furumoto, Gregory Hideyo

    Numerical simulations were used to study steady shock/boundary layer interactions and self-sustained unsteady hypersonic type IV shock-shock interference heating problems with nonequilibrium real gas effects. The emphasis of the investigation was on the effects of internal thermochemical excitation on surface heating rates, skin friction, and flow field unsteadiness of the viscous shock interactions. The multicomponent Navier-Stokes equations with nonequilibrium rotational, vibrational, and chemical models for five-species air were solved using a finite-volume, second-order TVD scheme together with a new third-order semi-implicit Runge-Kutta scheme. For a steady shock/boundary layer interaction on a flat plate, it was found that the real gas effects reduced the size of the shock induced separation bubble and the magnitude of the surface heating rates. For the shock-shock interference flow of nitrogen over a cylinder at Mach 8, the results showed that type IV shock-shock interference heating flows with real gas effects were inherently unsteady. The degree of the unsteadiness was related to the location of the jet impingement on the cylinder relative to the stagnation point. For certain impingement positions, vortices were generated and shed off near the jet impingement point. This periodic shedding of the vortices contributed to the self-sustained oscillations of both the jet and other parts of the flow field. The effect of thermochemical nonequilibrium was observed to be a decrease in the peak surface pressure enhancement and an increase in peak surface heating enhancement, relative to a perfect gas flow of the same freestream conditions. The nonequilibrium cases exhibited a higher oscillation frequency and wider range of variation over a cycle than did the perfect gas flows.

  9. Predictions of bubbly flows in vertical pipes using two-fluid models in CFDS-FLOW3D code

    SciTech Connect

    Banas, A.O.; Carver, M.B.; Unrau, D.

    1995-09-01

    This paper reports the results of a preliminary study exploring the performance of two sets of two-fluid closure relationships applied to the simulation of turbulent air-water bubbly upflows through vertical pipes. Predictions obtained with the default CFDS-FLOW3D model for dispersed flows were compared with the predictions of a new model (based on the work of Lee), and with the experimental data of Liu. The new model, implemented in the CFDS-FLOW3D code, included additional source terms in the {open_quotes}standard{close_quotes} {kappa}-{epsilon} transport equations for the liquid phase, as well as modified model coefficients and wall functions. All simulations were carried out in a 2-D axisymmetric format, collapsing the general multifluid framework of CFDS-FLOW3D to the two-fluid (air-water) case. The newly implemented model consistently improved predictions of radial-velocity profiles of both phases, but failed to accurately reproduce the experimental phase-distribution data. This shortcoming was traced to the neglect of anisotropic effects in the modelling of liquid-phase turbulence. In this sense, the present investigation should be considered as the first step toward the ultimate goal of developing a theoretically sound and universal CFD-type two-fluid model for bubbly flows in channels.

  10. Calculation of unsteady transonic flows using the integral equation method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nixon, D.

    1978-01-01

    The basic integral equations for a harmonically oscillating airfoil in a transonic flow with shock waves are derived; the reduced frequency is assumed to be small. The problems associated with shock wave motion are treated using a strained coordinate system. The integral equation is linear and consists of both line integrals and surface integrals over the flow field which are evaluated by quadrature. This leads to a set of linear algebraic equations that can be solved directly. The shock motion is obtained explicitly by enforcing the condition that the flow is continuous except at a shock wave. Results obtained for both lifting and nonlifting oscillatory flows agree satisfactorily with other accurate results.

  11. Unsteady motion and transition to turbulence in developing curved duct flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnal, M.; Firmino, F.; Humphrey, J. A. C.

    1987-01-01

    An experiment was performed to further the understanding of developing flows in curved ducts of square cross-section. Unlike most earlier works, attention was paid to investigating the time-dependent character of the motion. Mean and unsteady flow characteristics were determined using flow visualization and a laser-Doppler velocimeter. Only one velocity component, that aligned in the longitudinal (streamwise) coordinate direction, was measured. Notwithstanding, the time histories, autocorrelations and spectra derived reveal a time-periodic motion that becomes turbulent with increasing Reynolds number. The results are of intrinsic fundamental value and also illustrate the danger of imposing symmetry of the conservation equations on numerical solutions of this flow.

  12. Calculation of unsteady fan rotor response caused by downstream flow distortions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obrien, W. F.; Richardson, S. M.; Ng, W. F.

    1984-01-01

    The present model for fan rotor/support strut airfoil interaction uses a time-marching code for the rotor flow, coupled with a potential flow model for the stator-strut region. Study of the effect of strut design variables indicates that rotor flow disturbance is increased by the primary variables of larger strut thickness and circumferential spacing, while decreasing exponentially with increased rotor-strut separation. The time-marching code predicts local rotor pressure and flow perturbations in response to an unsteady downstream boundary condition.

  13. Turbulence Model Sensitivity and Scour Gap Effect of Unsteady Flow around Pipe: A CFD Study

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Abbod; Sharma, R. K.; Ganesan, P.

    2014-01-01

    A numerical investigation of incompressible and transient flow around circular pipe has been carried out at different five gap phases. Flow equations such as Navier-Stokes and continuity equations have been solved using finite volume method. Unsteady horizontal velocity and kinetic energy square root profiles are plotted using different turbulence models and their sensitivity is checked against published experimental results. Flow parameters such as horizontal velocity under pipe, pressure coefficient, wall shear stress, drag coefficient, and lift coefficient are studied and presented graphically to investigate the flow behavior around an immovable pipe and scoured bed. PMID:25136666

  14. Minnowbrook IV: 2003 Workshop on Transition and Unsteady Aspects of Turbomachinery Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LaGraff, John E. (Editor); Ashpis, David E.

    2004-01-01

    This Minnowbrook IV 2003 workshop on Transition and Unsteady Aspects of Turbomachinery Flows includes the following topics: 1) Current Issues in Unsteady Turbomachinery Flows; 2) Global Instability and Control of Low-Pressure Turbine Flows; 3) Influence of End Wall Leakage on Secondary Flow Development in Axial Turbines; 4) Active and Passive Flow Control on Low Pressure Turbine Airfoils; 5) Experimental and Numerical Investigation of Transitional Flows as Affected by Passing Wakes; 6) Effects of Freestream Turbulence on Turbine Blade Heat Transfer; 7) Bypass Transition Via Continuous Modes and Unsteady Effects on Film Cooling; 8) High Frequency Surface Heat Flux Imaging of Bypass Transition; 9) Skin Friction and Heat Flux Oscillations in Upstream Moving Wave Packets; 10) Transition Mechanisms and Use of Surface Roughness to Enhance the Benefits of Wake Passing in LP Turbines; 11) Transient Growth Approach to Roughness-Induced Transition; 12) Roughness- and Freestream-Turbulence-Induced Transient Growth as a Bypass Transition Mechanism; 13) Receptivity Calculations as a Means to Predicting Transition; 14) On Streamwise Vortices in a Curved Wall Jet and Their Effect on the Mean Flow; 15) Plasma Actuators for Separation Control of Low Pressure Turbine Blades; 16) Boundary-Layer Separation Control Under Low-Pressure-Turbine Conditions Using Glow-Discharge Plasma Actuators; 17) Control of Separation for Low Pressure Turbine Blades: Numerical Simulation; 18) Effects of Elevated Free-Stream Turbulence on Active Control of a Separation Bubble; 19) Wakes, Calming and Transition Under Strong Adverse Pressure Gradients; 20) Transitional Bubble in Periodic Flow Phase Shift; 21) Modelling Spots: The Calmed Region, Pressure Gradient Effects and Background; 22) Modeling of Unsteady Transitional Flow on Axial Compressor Blades; 23) Challenges in Predicting Component Efficiencies in Turbomachines With Low Reynolds Number Blading; 24) Observations on the Causal Relationship Between

  15. The 3-D CFD modeling of gas turbine combustor-integral bleed flow interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, D. Y.; Reynolds, R. S.

    1993-01-01

    An advanced 3-D Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model was developed to analyze the flow interaction between a gas turbine combustor and an integral bleed plenum. In this model, the elliptic governing equations of continuity, momentum and the k-e turbulence model were solved on a boundary-fitted, curvilinear, orthogonal grid system. The model was first validated against test data from public literature and then applied to a gas turbine combustor with integral bleed. The model predictions agreed well with data from combustor rig testing. The model predictions also indicated strong flow interaction between the combustor and the integral bleed. Integral bleed flow distribution was found to have a great effect on the pressure distribution around the gas turbine combustor.

  16. Flow control on a 3D backward facing ramp by pulsed jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joseph, Pierric; Bortolus, Dorian; Grasso, Francesco

    2014-06-01

    This paper presents an experimental study of flow separation control over a 3D backward facing ramp by means of pulsed jets. Such geometry has been selected to reproduce flow phenomena of interest for the automotive industry. The base flow has been characterised using PIV and pressure measurements. The results show that the classical notchback topology is correctly reproduced. A control system based on magnetic valves has been used to produce the pulsed jets whose properties have been characterised by hot wire anemometry. In order to shed some light on the role of the different parameters affecting the suppression of the slant recirculation area, a parametric study has been carried out by varying the frequency and the momentum coefficient of the jets for several Reynolds numbers. xml:lang="fr"

  17. Flowfield Establishment and Unsteadiness in Hypervelocity Double Wedge Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swantek, A. B.; Knisely, A. M.; Austin, J. M.

    Significant discrepancies between experiments and simulations have been reported in the normalized establishment times for hypervelocity double wedge and double cone flows. Experimental results for flow establishment times based on heat transfer measurements have been reported by Holden and Mallinson, Gai, and Mudford [1, 2].

  18. Mimicking Natural Laminar to Turbulent Flow Transition: A Systematic CFD Study Using PAB3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pao, S. Paul; Abdol-Hamid, Khaled S.

    2005-01-01

    For applied aerodynamic computations using a general purpose Navier-Stokes code, the common practice of treating laminar to turbulent flow transition over a non-slip surface is somewhat arbitrary by either treating the entire flow as turbulent or forcing the flow to undergo transition at given trip locations in the computational domain. In this study, the possibility of using the PAB3D code, standard k-epsilon turbulence model, and the Girimaji explicit algebraic stresses model to mimic natural laminar to turbulent flow transition was explored. The sensitivity of flow transition with respect to two limiters in the standard k-epsilon turbulence model was examined using a flat plate and a 6:1 aspect ratio prolate spheroid for our computations. For the flat plate, a systematic dependence of transition Reynolds number on background turbulence intensity was found. For the prolate spheroid, the transition patterns in the three-dimensional boundary layer at different flow conditions were sensitive to the free stream turbulence viscosity limit, the reference Reynolds number and the angle of attack, but not to background turbulence intensity below a certain threshold value. The computed results showed encouraging agreements with the experimental measurements at the corresponding geometry and flow conditions.

  19. Reconstruction and Visualization of Coordinated 3D Cell Migration Based on Optical Flow.

    PubMed

    Kappe, Christopher P; Schütz, Lucas; Gunther, Stefan; Hufnagel, Lars; Lemke, Steffen; Leitte, Heike

    2016-01-01

    Animal development is marked by the repeated reorganization of cells and cell populations, which ultimately determine form and shape of the growing organism. One of the central questions in developmental biology is to understand precisely how cells reorganize, as well as how and to what extent this reorganization is coordinated. While modern microscopes can record video data for every cell during animal development in 3D+t, analyzing these videos remains a major challenge: reconstruction of comprehensive cell tracks turned out to be very demanding especially with decreasing data quality and increasing cell densities. In this paper, we present an analysis pipeline for coordinated cellular motions in developing embryos based on the optical flow of a series of 3D images. We use numerical integration to reconstruct cellular long-term motions in the optical flow of the video, we take care of data validation, and we derive a LIC-based, dense flow visualization for the resulting pathlines. This approach allows us to handle low video quality such as noisy data or poorly separated cells, and it allows the biologists to get a comprehensive understanding of their data by capturing dynamic growth processes in stills. We validate our methods using three videos of growing fruit fly embryos.

  20. Simulation of the 3D viscoelastic free surface flow by a parallel corrected particle scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin-Lian, Ren; Tao, Jiang

    2016-02-01

    In this work, the behavior of the three-dimensional (3D) jet coiling based on the viscoelastic Oldroyd-B model is investigated by a corrected particle scheme, which is named the smoothed particle hydrodynamics with corrected symmetric kernel gradient and shifting particle technique (SPH_CS_SP) method. The accuracy and stability of SPH_CS_SP method is first tested by solving Poiseuille flow and Taylor-Green flow. Then the capacity for the SPH_CS_SP method to solve the viscoelastic fluid is verified by the polymer flow through a periodic array of cylinders. Moreover, the convergence of the SPH_CS_SP method is also investigated. Finally, the proposed method is further applied to the 3D viscoelastic jet coiling problem, and the influences of macroscopic parameters on the jet coiling are discussed. The numerical results show that the SPH_CS_SP method has higher accuracy and better stability than the traditional SPH method and other corrected SPH method, and can improve the tensile instability. Project supported by the Natural Science Foundation of Jiangsu Province, China (Grant Nos. BK20130436 and BK20150436) and the Natural Science Foundation of the Higher Education Institutions of Jiangsu Province, China (Grant No. 15KJB110025).

  1. A reduced model for unsteady laminar flow past a solid body using matched asymptotics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vadivelnadar Kartheeswaran, Ponnulakshmi; Guo, Xinjun; Mandre, Shreyas

    2014-11-01

    We present a reduced order method for unsteady, laminar flow past a smooth but otherwise arbitrarily shaped body at high Reynolds number. Inspired by matched asymptotic expansion of Navier-Stokes equation, the flow domain is divided into two regimes: (i) an outer inviscid region where the flow field is represented using potential flow and point vortices, and (ii) a boundary layer around the body where the flow field obeys Prandtl's boundary layer equations. Since both representations of the flow field are governed by identical process (viscous effects becoming negligible sufficiently away from the solid body), it is possible to match the flow field at the interface between the two domains. Matching the flow field at the interface dictates the strength and location of vorticity shed from the boundary layer to the outer region. An approximately 100-fold increase in computational speed may be achieved using this method. In this talk, we present results for the flow surrounding a 2D oscillating elliptic hydrofoil, a configuration employed for energy extraction from tides. Simulations are performed for various pitching and heaving parameters in an effort to optimize the stroke for maximum energy extraction. A reduced model for unsteady laminar flow past a solid body using matched asymptotics.

  2. Slanted channel microfluidic chip for 3D fluorescence imaging of cells in flow.

    PubMed

    Jagannadh, Veerendra Kalyan; Mackenzie, Mark D; Pal, Parama; Kar, Ajoy K; Gorthi, Sai Siva

    2016-09-19

    Three-dimensional cellular imaging techniques have become indispensable tools in biological research and medical diagnostics. Conventional 3D imaging approaches employ focal stack collection to image different planes of the cell. In this work, we present the design and fabrication of a slanted channel microfluidic chip for 3D fluorescence imaging of cells in flow. The approach employs slanted microfluidic channels fabricated in glass using ultrafast laser inscription. The slanted nature of the microfluidic channels ensures that samples come into and go out of focus, as they pass through the microscope imaging field of view. This novel approach enables the collection of focal stacks in a straight-forward and automated manner, even with off-the-shelf microscopes that are not equipped with any motorized translation/rotation sample stages. The presented approach not only simplifies conventional focal stack collection, but also enhances the capabilities of a regular widefield fluorescence microscope to match the features of a sophisticated confocal microscope. We demonstrate the retrieval of sectioned slices of microspheres and cells, with the use of computational algorithms to enhance the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in the collected raw images. The retrieved sectioned images have been used to visualize fluorescent microspheres and bovine sperm cell nucleus in 3D while using a regular widefield fluorescence microscope. We have been able to achieve sectioning of approximately 200 slices per cell, which corresponds to a spatial translation of ∼ 15 nm per slice along the optical axis of the microscope. PMID:27661949

  3. Slanted channel microfluidic chip for 3D fluorescence imaging of cells in flow.

    PubMed

    Jagannadh, Veerendra Kalyan; Mackenzie, Mark D; Pal, Parama; Kar, Ajoy K; Gorthi, Sai Siva

    2016-09-19

    Three-dimensional cellular imaging techniques have become indispensable tools in biological research and medical diagnostics. Conventional 3D imaging approaches employ focal stack collection to image different planes of the cell. In this work, we present the design and fabrication of a slanted channel microfluidic chip for 3D fluorescence imaging of cells in flow. The approach employs slanted microfluidic channels fabricated in glass using ultrafast laser inscription. The slanted nature of the microfluidic channels ensures that samples come into and go out of focus, as they pass through the microscope imaging field of view. This novel approach enables the collection of focal stacks in a straight-forward and automated manner, even with off-the-shelf microscopes that are not equipped with any motorized translation/rotation sample stages. The presented approach not only simplifies conventional focal stack collection, but also enhances the capabilities of a regular widefield fluorescence microscope to match the features of a sophisticated confocal microscope. We demonstrate the retrieval of sectioned slices of microspheres and cells, with the use of computational algorithms to enhance the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in the collected raw images. The retrieved sectioned images have been used to visualize fluorescent microspheres and bovine sperm cell nucleus in 3D while using a regular widefield fluorescence microscope. We have been able to achieve sectioning of approximately 200 slices per cell, which corresponds to a spatial translation of ∼ 15 nm per slice along the optical axis of the microscope.

  4. Segmentation of bone structures in 3D CT images based on continuous max-flow optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Carrasco, J. A.; Acha-Piñero, B.; Serrano, C.

    2015-03-01

    In this paper an algorithm to carry out the automatic segmentation of bone structures in 3D CT images has been implemented. Automatic segmentation of bone structures is of special interest for radiologists and surgeons to analyze bone diseases or to plan some surgical interventions. This task is very complicated as bones usually present intensities overlapping with those of surrounding tissues. This overlapping is mainly due to the composition of bones and to the presence of some diseases such as Osteoarthritis, Osteoporosis, etc. Moreover, segmentation of bone structures is a very time-consuming task due to the 3D essence of the bones. Usually, this segmentation is implemented manually or with algorithms using simple techniques such as thresholding and thus providing bad results. In this paper gray information and 3D statistical information have been combined to be used as input to a continuous max-flow algorithm. Twenty CT images have been tested and different coefficients have been computed to assess the performance of our implementation. Dice and Sensitivity values above 0.91 and 0.97 respectively were obtained. A comparison with Level Sets and thresholding techniques has been carried out and our results outperformed them in terms of accuracy.

  5. Rotary slanted single wire CTA - a useful tool for 3D flows investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jonáš, P.

    2013-04-01

    The procedure is described of experimental investigation of a statistically stationary generally nonisothermal 3D flow by means of a constant temperature anemometer (CTA) using single slanted heated wire, rotary round the fixed axis. The principle of this procedure is quite clear. The change of the heated wire temperature modifies ratio of CTA sensitivities to temperature and velocity fluctuations. Turning the heated wire through a proper angle changes the sensitivity to components of the instantaneous velocity vector. Some recommendations are presented based on long time experiences, e.g. on the choice of probe, on the probe calibration, to the measurement organization and to the evaluation of results.

  6. Reactive Flow Modeling of Liquid Explosives via ALE3D/Cheetah Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Kuo, I W; Bastea, S; Fried, L E

    2010-03-10

    We carried out reactive flow simulations of liquid explosives such as nitromethane using the hydrodynamic code ALE3D coupled with equations of state and reaction kinetics modeled by the thermochemical code Cheetah. The simulation set-up was chosen to mimic cylinder experiments. For pure unconfined nitromethane we find that the failure diameter and detonation velocity dependence on charge diameter are in agreement with available experimental results. Such simulations are likely to be useful for determining detonability and failure behavior for a wide range of experimental conditions and explosive compounds.

  7. Line relaxation methods for the solution of 2D and 3D compressible flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hassan, O.; Probert, E. J.; Morgan, K.; Peraire, J.

    1993-01-01

    An implicit finite element based algorithm for the compressible Navier-Stokes equations is outlined, and the solution of the resulting equation by a line relaxation on general meshes of triangles or tetrahedra is described. The problem of generating and adapting unstructured meshes for viscous flows is reexamined, and an approach for both 2D and 3D simulations is proposed. An efficient approach appears to be the use of an implicit/explicit procedure, with the implicit treatment being restricted to those regions of the mesh where viscous effects are known to be dominant. Numerical examples demonstrating the computational performance of the proposed techniques are given.

  8. Decay of the 3D viscous liquid-gas two-phase flow model with damping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yinghui

    2016-08-01

    We establish the optimal Lp - L2(1 ≤ p < 6/5) time decay rates of the solution to the Cauchy problem for the 3D viscous liquid-gas two-phase flow model with damping and analyse the influences of the damping on the qualitative behaviors of solution. It is observed that the fraction effect of the damping affects the dispersion of fluids and enhances the time decay rate of solution. Our method of proof consists of Hodge decomposition technique, Lp - L2 estimates for the linearized equations, and delicate energy estimates.

  9. Definition of the unsteady vortex flow over a wing/body configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, S. G.; Debry, B.; Lenakos, J.; Caplin, J.; Komerath, N. M.

    1991-01-01

    A problem of current interest in computational aerodynamics is the prediction of unsteady vortex flows over aircraft at high angles of attack. A six-month experimental effort was conducted at the John H. Harper Wind Tunnel to acquire qualitative and quantitative information on the unsteady vortex flow over a generic wing-body configuration at high angles of attack. A double-delta flat-plate wing with beveled edges was combined with a slender sharp-nosed body-of-revolution fuselage to form the generic configuration. This configuration produces a strong attached leading edge vortex on the wing, as well as sharply-peaked flow velocity spectra above the wing. While it thus produces flows with several well-defined features of current interest, the model was designed for efficiency of representation in computational codes. A moderate number of surface pressure ports and two unsteady pressure sensors were used to study the pressure distribution over the wing and body surface at high angles of attack; the unsteady pressure sensing did not succeed because of inadequate signal-to-noise ratio. A pulsed copper vapor laser sheet was used to visualize the vortex flow over the model, and vortex trajectories, burst locations, mutual induction of vortex systems from the forebody, strake, and wing, were quantified. Laser Doppler velocimetry was used to quantify all 3 components of the time-average velocity in 3 data planes perpendicular to the freestream direction. Statistics of the instantaneous velocity were used to study intermittency and fluctuation intensity. Hot-film anemometry was used to study the fluctuation energy content in the velocity field, and the spectra of these fluctuations. In addition, a successful attempt was made to measure velocity spectra, component by component, using laser velocimetry, and these were compared with spectra measured by hot-film anemometry at several locations.

  10. Unsteady flows in milli- and microsystems: analysis of wall shear rate fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huchet, F.; Legentilhomme, P.; Legrand, J.; Montillet, A.; Comiti, J.

    2011-09-01

    The particular benefits of microfluidic systems, in terms of heat and mass transfer enhancement, require conducting local flow diagnostics, especially when unsteady properties of the microflow can play a critical role at the reaction interface, as currently observed in the fields of bioengineering and chemical engineering. The present paper focuses on unsteady confined flows within microsystems characterized by various geometries of crossing channels and exhibiting high surface-to-volume ratios. An experimental analysis of the signal measured at microsensors embedded to the wall of microsystems is discussed. In the objective of performing flow diagnostics, including regime identification and wall flow structure recognition, two methods for electrochemical signal processing are investigated and compared within an experimental network of crossing minichannels. One method is based on the use of a transfer function, while the other, the so-called Sobolik solution (Sobolik et al . in Coll Czech Chem Commun 52:913-928, 1987), consists of finding a direct solution to the mass balance equation. Sobolik's method has been selected given its ability to provide a description, over a wide range of Reynolds numbers (317 < Re < 3,535), for all wall shear rate fluctuations, as well as for the associated mixing scales in the power spectra density (PSD). This technique is then applied to flow within micromixers composed of two crossing microchannels in order to study highly unsteady and inhomogeneous microflows. The hydraulic diameters of the studied channels are 500 and 833 μm, respectively. Two flow patterns are investigated herein: the crossing-flow type and the impinging flow (or so called co-flow) for a Reynolds number range between 173 and 3,356. The PSD of wall shear rate fluctuations reveals various flow characteristics depending on the microchannel aspect ratio.

  11. Unsteady hydrodynamic forces acting on a hand and its flow field during sculling motion.

    PubMed

    Takagi, Hideki; Shimada, Shohei; Miwa, Takahiro; Kudo, Shigetada; Sanders, Ross; Matsuuchi, Kazuo

    2014-12-01

    The goal of this research is to clarify the mechanism by which unsteady forces are generated during sculling by a skilled swimmer and thereby to contribute to improving propulsive techniques. We used particle image velocimetry (PIV) to acquire data on the kinematics of the hand during sculling, such as fluid forces and flow field. By investigating the correlations between these data, we expected to find a new propulsion mechanism. The experiment was performed in a flow-controlled water channel. The participant executed sculling motions to remain at a fixed position despite constant water flow. PIV was used to visualize the flow-field cross-section in the plane of hand motion. Moreover, the fluid forces acting on the hand were estimated from pressure distribution measurements performed on the hand and simultaneous three-dimensional motion analysis. By executing the sculling motion, a skilled swimmer produces large unsteady fluid forces when the leading-edge vortex occurs on the dorsal side of the hand and wake capture occurs on the palm side. By using a new approach, we observed interesting unsteady fluid phenomena similar to those of flying insects. The study indicates that it is essential for swimmers to fully exploit vortices. A better understanding of these phenomena might lead to an improvement in sculling techniques.

  12. Unsteady hydrodynamic forces acting on a robotic hand and its flow field.

    PubMed

    Takagi, Hideki; Nakashima, Motomu; Ozaki, Takashi; Matsuuchi, Kazuo

    2013-07-26

    This study aims to clarify the mechanism of generating unsteady hydrodynamic forces acting on a hand during swimming in order to directly measure the forces, pressure distribution, and flow field around the hand by using a robotic arm and particle image velocimetry (PIV). The robotic arm consisted of the trunk, shoulder, upper arm, forearm, and hand, and it was independently computer controllable in five degrees of freedom. The elbow-joint angle of the robotic arm was fixed at 90°, and the arm was moved in semicircles around the shoulder joint in a plane perpendicular to the water surface. Two-component PIV was used for flow visualization around the hand. The data of the forces and pressure acting on the hand were sampled at 200Hz and stored on a PC. When the maximum resultant force acting on the hand was observed, a pair of counter-rotating vortices appeared on the dorsal surface of the hand. A vortex attached to the hand increased the flow velocity, which led to decreased surface pressure, increasing the hydrodynamic forces. This phenomenon is known as the unsteady mechanism of force generation. We found that the drag force was 72% greater and the lift force was 4.8 times greater than the values estimated under steady flow conditions. Therefore, it is presumable that swimmers receive the benefits of this unsteady hydrodynamic force.

  13. Influence of unsteady flows on pseudo-meandering river morphodynamics: An experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Visconti, Francesco; Camporeale, Carlo; Ridolfi, Luca

    2010-05-01

    Natural channel patterns arise from the interaction between a turbulent open-channel flow and an erodible boundary. These interactions are usually studied by assuming a steady discharge. Nevertheless, the discharge unsteadiness is a fundamental feature of river flows. Water discharge, besides exhibiting its natural stochastic variability from daily to centenarian scale, is also influenced by river regulation and climatic changes. It is acknowledged that fluvial morphological features at short-scale are influenced by flow unsteadiness, notwithstanding a few experimental or field studies are available to clarify the modification of macroform (bends) and mesoform (bars) under unsteady discharge. Our experimental research focuses on the effect of unsteady flow on the behavior of pseudo-meandering rivers. These single-thread gravel bed rivers are characterized by a low-sinuosity planimetric shape and by a sinuous thalweg which bends around large point bars. Pseudo-meandering rivers are widespread in the piedmont area and are very interesting because several aspects of both meandering channel - presence of point bar, evolving bends, and asymmetrical cross-section - and braiding (tendency to flow diversion and to create secondary channel) interact in the same reach. We present the experimental results about the free initiation and development of the pseudo-meandering pattern, under unsteady flows. Runs with periodic step-like hydrograms characterized by a maximum, Qmax, and a minimum, Qmin, discharge, have been performed in an 18 m long and 4 m wide sand flume. Two set of parameters have been investigated, in order to simulate hydrograms with the ratio Qmax/Qmin ranging from 1.5 to 2 and the ratio of the durations of the discharges TQmin/TQmax ranging from 1 to 2. We compare these runs with the ones performed with a steady discharge equal to the mean value. All the runs have a Shields parameter two or three time greater than the critical threshold. We concentrated on the

  14. Experimental Studies of Unsteady Flow through Compliant Vessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sturgeon, Victoria; Tsai, William; Saloner, David; Savas, Omer

    2004-11-01

    Hemodynamic forces are a significant cause of device failure when stent-grafts are used to treat abdominal aortic aneurysms and even have a causative relationship with the formation and rupture of atherosclerosis. A better comprehension of the forces at play in this environment would help further the understanding and treatment of aneurysmal diseases. In this experimental study, we characterize the behavior of physiologically correct pulsatile input flow in an straight compliant vessel as an analog for the hemodynamic behavior in an abdominal aorta. Flow visualization and particle image velocimetry are used to study the flow in simplified geometries simulating segments of human abdominal aorta in various stages of disease progression. The effects of external pressure are examined to shed light on the interactions between pressure differential across the vessel wall, blood flow, and vessel deformation.

  15. Experimental studies of unsteady flow through compliant vessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sturgeon, Victoria; Saloner, David; Savas, Omer

    2003-11-01

    Hemodynamic forces are a significant cause of device failure when stent-grafts are used to treat abdominal aortic aneurysms and even have a strong causative relationship with the very formation and rupture of atherosclerosis. A better comprehension of the forces at play in this environment is highly desirable in furthering the understanding and treatment of aneurysmal diseases. The purpose of this experimental study is to characterize the behavior of physiologically correct pulsatile input flow in a straight compliant vessel as an analog for the behavior in an abdominal aorta. Flow visualization and particle image velocimetry are used to study the flow in simplified geometries replicating healthy and diseased segments of human abdominal aorta. The effects of external pressure are examined to shed light on the interactions between pressure differential across the vessel wall, blood flow, and vessel deformation.

  16. Kinetic depth effect and optic flow--I. 3D shape from Fourier motion.

    PubMed

    Dosher, B A; Landy, M S; Sperling, G

    1989-01-01

    Fifty-three different 3D shapes were defined by sequences of 2D views (frames) of dots on a rotating 3D surface. (1) Subjects' accuracy of shape identifications dropped from over 90% to less than 10% when either the polarity of the stimulus dots was alternated from light-on-gray to dark-on-gray on successive frames or when neutral gray interframe intervals were interposed. Both manipulations interfere with motion extraction by spatio-temporal (Fourier) and gradient first-order detectors. Second-order (non-Fourier) detectors that use full-wave rectification are unaffected by alternating-polarity but disrupted by interposed gray frames. (2) To equate the accuracy of two-alternative forced-choice (2AFC) planar direction-of-motion discrimination in standard and polarity-alternated stimuli, standard contrast was reduced. 3D shape discrimination survived contrast reduction in standard stimuli whereas it failed completely with polarity-alternation even at full contrast. (3) When individual dots were permitted to remain in the image sequence for only two frames, performance showed little loss compared to standard displays where individual dots had an expected lifetime of 20 frames, showing that 3D shape identification does not require continuity of stimulus tokens. (4) Performance in all discrimination tasks is predicted (up to a monotone transformation) by considering the quality of first-order information (as given by a simple computation on Fourier power) and the number of locations at which motion information is required. Perceptual first-order analysis of optic flow is the primary substrate for structure-from-motion computations in random dot displays because only it offers sufficient quality of perceptual motion at a sufficient number of locations.

  17. A harmonic analysis method for unsteady transonic flow and its application to the flutter of airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ehlers, F. E.; Weatherill, W. H.

    1982-01-01

    A finite difference method for solving the unsteady transonic flow about harmonically oscillating wings is investigated. The procedure is based on separating the velocity potential into steady and unsteady parts and linearizing the resulting unsteady differential equation for small disturbances. The differential equation for the unsteady velocity potential is linear with spatially varying coefficients and with the time variable eliminated by assuming harmonic motion. A study is presented of the shock motion associated with an oscillating airfoil and its representation by the harmonic procedure. The effects of the shock motion and the resulting pressure pulse are shown to be included in the harmonic pressure distributions and the corresponding generalized forces. Analytical and experimental pressure distributions for the NACA 64A010 airfoil are compared for Mach numbers of 0.75, 0.80 and 0.842. A typical section, two-degree-of-freedom flutter analysis of a NACA 64A010 airfoil is performed. The results show a sharp transonic bucket in one case and abrupt changes in instability modes.

  18. Numerical simulations of unsteady reactive flows in a combustion chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Kailasanath, K.; Gardner, J.H.; Oran, E.S.; Boris, J.P. )

    1991-07-01

    This paper reports on a potentially important source of large-pressure oscillations in combustors that is an instability induced by the interactions between large-scale vortex structures, acoustic waves, and chemical energy release. To study these interactions, we have performed time-dependent, compressible numerical simulations of the flow field in an idealized ramjet consisting of an axisymmetric inlet and combustor and a choked nozzle. Both reactive and nonreactive flows have been simulated. The nonreactive flow calculations show complex interactions among the natural instability frequency of the shear layer at the inlet-combustor junction and the acoustics of both the inlet and the combustor. Vortex shedding occurs at the natural instability frequency of the shear layer but vortex mergings are affected by the acoustic frequencies of the system. The entire flow oscillates at a low frequency that corresponds to that of a quarter-wave mode in the inlet. For the particular reactive flow case studies, energy release alters the flow field substantially.

  19. Study on 3-D simulation of flow and turbidity in an oxbow lake in tidal compartment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokoyama, H.; Momonoe, H.; Hamamoto, S.

    2010-12-01

    We aimed to make flow and turbidity simulation model for an oxbow lake in tidal compartment. The oxbow has two bottle-necks and inflow river from urban district. Bed topography of the oxbow is former meandering channel of large-basin river. Therefore characteristic of flow and water quality is complex. First, field observation was conducted to clarify the characteristics of flow and water quality in the oxbow. From observation results, flow and resuspension phenomena in the oxbow were affected by wind and tide, and the balance of the two factors changed longitudinally. Next, we built 3-D simulation model of flow which took account of the field observation results. In order to investigate effective water quality improvement, we set some test cases: condition of wind, inflow river were changed. From the simulation results, tide was the most important factor, however at the upper part of the oxbow, where the tidal power seemed to be weaker, flow and turbidity were clearly affected by the wind.

  20. Unsteady flow and heat transfer analysis of an impinging synthetic jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazdidi-Tehrani, Farzad; Karami, Mahdi; Jahromi, Mehdi

    2011-11-01

    The present paper focuses on the analysis of unsteady flow and heat transfer regarding an axisymmetric impinging synthetic jet on a constant heat flux disc. Synthetic jet is a zero net mass flux jet that provides an unsteady flow without any external source of fluid. Present results are validated against the available experimental data showing that the SST/ k - ω turbulence model is more accurate and reliable than the standard and low- Re k - ɛ models for predicting heat transfer from an impinging synthetic jet. It is found that the time-averaged Nusselt number enhances as the nozzle-to-plate distance is increased. As the oscillation frequency in the range of 16-400 Hz is increased, the heat transfer is enhanced. It is shown that the instantaneous Nu distribution along the wall is influenced mainly by the interaction of produced vortex ring and wall boundary layer. Also, the fluctuation level of Nu decreases as the frequency is raised.

  1. Electro-Luminescence based Pressure-Sensitive Paint System for Unsteady Flow Field Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iijima, Yoshimi; Sakaue, Hirotaka

    2011-11-01

    Electro-luminescence (EL) based pressure-sensitive paint (PSP) system is developed for capturing unsteady flow fields. It has advantages in uniform distribution in the illumination without remotely apply the illumination source from the testing object. The resultant system can be applied directly onto a testing object surface. It consists of an inorganic EL and a PSP. The EL emits blue illumination uniformly applied onto the PSP layer. Because of a sheet illumination, the EL gives uniform distribution, while a point illumination gives a spot in illumination. The PSP is developed to provide a fast response to a change in pressure. It uses a porous particle and a polymer to create porous-polymer PSP. The response time characterization of the developed system is included in the presentation. The developed system is applied to an unsteady flow field, such as a sound field in a resonance tube.

  2. Simultaneous, Unsteady PIV and Photogrammetry Measurements of a Tension-Cone Decelerator in Subsonic Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schairer, Edward T.; Heineck, James T.; Walker, Louise Ann; Kushner, Laura Kathryn; Zilliac, Gregory

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes simultaneous, synchronized, high-frequency measurements of both unsteady flow in the wake of a tension-cone decelerator in subsonic flow (by PIV) and the unsteady shape of the decelerator (by photogrammetry). The purpose of these measurements was to develop the test techniques necessary to validate numerical methods for computing fluid-structure interactions of flexible decelerators. A critical need for this effort is to map fabric surfaces that have buckled or wrinkled so that code developers can accurately represent them. This paper describes a new photogrammetric technique that performs this measurement. The work was done in support of the Entry, Descent, and Landing discipline within the Supersonics Project of NASA s Fundamental Aeronautics Program.

  3. Unsteady Mixed Bioconvection Flow of a Nanofluid Between Two Contracting or Expanding Rotating Discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jiao Jiao; Xu, Hang; Raees, Ammarah; Zhao, Qing Kai

    2016-03-01

    An investigation is made for a three-dimensional unsteady mixed nano-bioconvection flow between two contracting or expanding rotating discs. The passively controlled nanofluid model in which Brownian diffusion and thermophoresis are considered as the two dominant factors for nanoparticle/base-fluid slip mechanisms is introduced for description of this flow problem. A novel similarity transformation is introduced so that the governing equations embodying the conservation of total mass, momentum, thermal energy, nanoparticle volume fraction, and microorganisms are reduced to a set of five fully coupled ordinary differential equations. Exact solutions are then obtained analytically for this complex nonlinear system. Besides, the influences of various physical parameters on distributions of velocity, temperature, nanoparticle volume fraction, and the density of motile microorganisms, along with the local Nusselt number and the local wall motile microorganisms flux, are presented and discussed. It is expected that this study can provide a theoretical base for understanding the transport mechanisms of unsteady bioconvection in nanofluids.

  4. A comparison of two incompressible Navier-Stokes algorithms for unsteady internal flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiltberger, N. Lyn; Rogers, Stuart E.; Kwak, Dochan

    1993-01-01

    A comparative study of two different incompressible Navier-Stokes algorithms for solving an unsteady, incompressible, internal flow problem is performed. The first algorithm uses an artificial compressibility method coupled with upwind differencing and a line relaxation scheme. The second algorithm uses a fractional step method with a staggered grid, finite volume approach. Unsteady, viscous, incompressible, internal flow through a channel with a constriction is computed using the first algorithm. A grid resolution study and parameter studies on the artificial compressibility coefficient and the maximum allowable residual of the continuity equation are performed. The periodicity of the solution is examined and several periodic data sets are generated using the first algorithm. These computational results are compared with previously published results computed using the second algorithm and experimental data.

  5. Analysis of transient storage subject to unsteady flow: Diel flow variation in an Antarctic stream

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Runkel, R.L.; McKnight, Diane M.; Andrews, E.D.

    1998-01-01

    Transport of dissolved material in streams and small rivers may be characterized using tracer-dilution methods and solute transport models. Recent studies have quantified stream/substream interactions using models of transient storage. These studies are based on tracer-dilution data obtained during periods of steady flow. We present a modeling framework for the analysis of transient storage in stream systems with unsteady flows. The framework couples a kinematic wave routing model with a solute transport model that includes transient storage. The routing model provides time-varying flows and cross-sectional areas that are used as input to the solute transport model. The modeling framework was used to quantify stream/substream interaction in Huey Creek, an Antarctic stream fed exclusively by glacial meltwater. Analysis of tracer-dilution data indicates that there was substantial interaction between the flowing surface water and the hyporheic (substream) zone. The ratio of storage zone area to stream cross-sectional area (A(s)/A) was >1 in all stream reaches, indicating that the substream area contributing to hyporheic exchange was large relative to stream cross-sectional area. The rate of exchange, as governed by the transient storage exchange coefficient (??), was rapid because of a high stream gradient and porous alluvial materials. Estimates of ?? generally exceed those determined for other small streams. The high degree of hyporheic exchange supports the hypothesis that weathering reactions within the hyporheos account for observed increases in solute concentration with stream length, as noted in other studies of Antarctic streams.

  6. Improved Algorithms and Methods for Solving Strongly Variable-Viscosity 3D Stokes flow and Strongly Variable Permeability 3D D’Arcy flow on a Parallel Computer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, J. P.; Hasenclever, J.; Shi, C.

    2009-12-01

    Computational studies of mantle convection face large challenges to obtain fast and accurate solutions for variable viscosity 3d flow. Recently we have been using parallel (MPI-based) MATLAB to more thoroughly explore possible pitfalls and algorithmic improvements to current ‘best-practice’ variable viscosity Stokes and D’Arcy flow solvers. Here we focus on study of finite-element solvers based on a decomposition of the equations for incompressible Stokes flow: Ku + Gp = f and G’u = 0 (K-velocity stiffness matrix, G-discretized gradient operator, G’=transpose(G)-discretized divergence operator) into a single equation for pressure Sp==G’K^-1Gp =G’K^-1f, in which the velocity is also updated as part of each pressure iteration. The outer pressure iteration is solved with preconditioned conjugate gradients (CG) (Maday and Patera, 1989), with a multigrid-preconditioned CG solver for the z=K^-1 (Gq) step of each pressure iteration. One fairly well-known pitfall (Fortin, 1985) is that constant-pressure elements can generate a spurious non-zero flow under a constant body force within non-rectangular geometries. We found a new pitfall when using an iterative method to solve the Kz=y operation in evaluating each G’K^-1Gq product -- even if the residual of the outer pressure equation converges to zero, the discrete divergence of this equation does not correspondingly converge; the error in the incompressibility depends on roughly the square of the tolerance used to solve each Kz=y velocity-like subproblem. Our current best recipe is: (1) Use flexible CG (cf. Notay, 2001) to solve the outer pressure problem. This is analogous to GMRES for a symmetric positive definite problem. It allows use of numerically unsymmetric and/or inexact preconditioners with CG. (2) In this outer-iteration, use an ‘alpha-bar’ technique to find the appropriate magnitude alpha to change the solution in each search direction. This improvement allows a similar iterative tolerance of

  7. Study of Unsteady Flows with Concave Wall Effect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Chi R.

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents computational fluid dynamic studies of the inlet turbulence and wall curvature effects on the flow steadiness at near wall surface locations in boundary layer flows. The time-stepping RANS numerical solver of the NASA Glenn-HT RANS code and a one-equation turbulence model, with a uniform inlet turbulence modeling level of the order of 10 percent of molecular viscosity, were used to perform the numerical computations. The approach was first calibrated for its predictabilities of friction factor, velocity, and temperature at near surface locations within a transitional boundary layer over concave wall. The approach was then used to predict the velocity and friction factor variations in a boundary layer recovering from concave curvature. As time iteration proceeded in the computations, the computed friction factors converged to their values from existing experiments. The computed friction factors, velocity, and static temperatures at near wall surface locations oscillated periodically in terms of time iteration steps and physical locations along the span-wise direction. At the upstream stations, the relationship among the normal and tangential velocities showed vortices effects on the velocity variations. Coherent vortices effect on the velocity components broke down at downstream stations. The computations also predicted the vortices effects on the velocity variations within a boundary layer flow developed along a concave wall surface with a downstream recovery flat wall surface. It was concluded that the computational approach might have the potential to analyze the flow steadiness in a turbine blade flow.

  8. Numerical simulation of steady and unsteady flow for generalized Newtonian fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keslerová, Radka; Trdlička, David; Řezníček, Hynek

    2016-08-01

    This work presents the numerical solution of laminar incompressible viscous flow in a three dimensional branching channel with circle cross section for generalized Newtonian fluids. The governing system of equations is based on the system of balance laws for mass and momentum. Numerical solution is based on cetral finite volume method using explicit Runge- Kutta time integration. In the case of unsteady computation artificial compressibility method is considered.

  9. Mass Transfer Effects on the Unsteady Flow of UCM Fluid Over a Stretching Sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayat, T.; Awais, M.; Sajid, M.

    This paper looks at the mass transfer effects on the unsteady two-dimensional and magnetohydrodynamic flow of an upper-convected Maxwell fluid bounded by a stretching surface. Homotopy analysis method is used for the development of series solution of the arising nonlinear problem. Plots of velocity and concentration fields are displayed and discussed. The values of surface mass transfer and gradient of mass transfer are also tabulated.

  10. 3D High-Resolution Seismic Imaging of Fluid Flow Anomalies on the Norwegian Continental Shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planke, S.; Eriksen, F. N.; Eriksen, O. K.; Myklebust, R.; Stokke, H. H.

    2015-12-01

    Fluid flow anomalies are common on the Norwegian Continental Shelf. Such features are imaged by multiple P-Cable high resolution seismic 2D lines and 3D cubes in the Norwegian Barents Sea. P-Cable is a high resolution 3D seismic system consisting of multiple streamers attached to a cross cable that is towed perpendicular to the vessels steaming direction. The short offset, high frequency source and closely spaced streamers facilitates for excellent vertical and horizontal resolution that provides key information for understanding the sub-surface. Recent data have been broadband processed, and the method has proven to enhance the imaging of the sub-surface significantly. Barents Sea P-Cable surveys have targeted shallow fluid anomalies in the uppermost ca. 500 meters of the sub-surface. New data have been acquired in 2012, 2014 and 2015. The most recent data focus on the southeast part of the Norwegian Barents Sea where P-Cable data give a new insight into the subsurface not provided by conventional seismic data in the region. Geologically, the Barents Sea region is characterized by Paleozoic and Mesozoic siliciclastic successions overlaid in most areas by a thin cover of Cenozoic glacial sediments. Hydrocarbon-rich Jurassic and Triassic sequences are locally situated in the shallow sub-surface as a result of extensive late Cenozoic uplift and erosion. The unloading has been reported to reactivate and create new faults in addition to initiate further migration of fluids in the sub-surface (Chand et al., 2012). The presence of shallow hydrocarbon systems creates an optimal setting for imaging fluid flow anomalies with high resolution 3D seismic data. The Barents Sea P-Cable data image a range of fluid related features such as cross-cutting reflections and bright spots, chimney structures, acoustic masking, pockmarks and mud volcanoes.

  11. Study of 3-D Dynamic Roughness Effects on Flow Over a NACA 0012 Airfoil Using Large Eddy Simulations at Low Reynolds Numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guda, Venkata Subba Sai Satish

    There have been several advancements in the aerospace industry in areas of design such as aerodynamics, designs, controls and propulsion; all aimed at one common goal i.e. increasing efficiency --range and scope of operation with lesser fuel consumption. Several methods of flow control have been tried. Some were successful, some failed and many were termed as impractical. The low Reynolds number regime of 104 - 105 is a very interesting range. Flow physics in this range are quite different than those of higher Reynolds number range. Mid and high altitude UAV's, MAV's, sailplanes, jet engine fan blades, inboard helicopter rotor blades and wind turbine rotors are some of the aerodynamic applications that fall in this range. The current study deals with using dynamic roughness as a means of flow control over a NACA 0012 airfoil at low Reynolds numbers. Dynamic 3-D surface roughness elements on an airfoil placed near the leading edge aim at increasing the efficiency by suppressing the effects of leading edge separation like leading edge stall by delaying or totally eliminating flow separation. A numerical study of the above method has been carried out by means of a Large Eddy Simulation, a mathematical model for turbulence in Computational Fluid Dynamics, owing to the highly unsteady nature of the flow. A user defined function has been developed for the 3-D dynamic roughness element motion. Results from simulations have been compared to those from experimental PIV data. Large eddy simulations have relatively well captured the leading edge stall. For the clean cases, i.e. with the DR not actuated, the LES was able to reproduce experimental results in a reasonable fashion. However DR simulation results show that it fails to reattach the flow and suppress flow separation compared to experiments. Several novel techniques of grid design and hump creation are introduced through this study.

  12. Further studies of unsteady boundary layers with flow reversal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nash, J. F.

    1976-01-01

    One set of calculations was performed using the first order, time dependent turbulent boundary layer equations, and extended earlier work by Nash and Patel to a wider range of flows. Another set of calculations was performed for laminar flow using the time dependent Navier-Stokes equations. The results of the calculations confirm previous conclusions concerning the existence of a regime of unseparated flow, containing an embedded region of reversal, which is accessible to first order boundary layer theory. However, certain doubts are cast on the precise nature of the events which accompany the eventual breakdown of the theory due to singularity onset. The earlier view that the singularity appears as the final event in a sequence involving rapid thickening of the boundary layer and the formation of a localized region of steep gradients is called into question by the present results. It appears that singularity onset is not necessarily preceded by rapid boundary layer thickening, or even necessarily produces immediate thickening.

  13. Unsteady turbulent shear flow in shock tube discontinuities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, J. A., III; Ramaiah, R.; Lin, I.

    1981-01-01

    A pressure-ruptured shock tube and an arc driven shock tube, have been used to study the evolution of turbulent fluctuations at contact surfaces with N2O4-2NO2 mixtures and at ionizing shock fronts in argon. The study has focused on point density diagnostics derived from crossed light beam correlations and electric probes. Turbulent bursts are found for which dynamical and spectral analyses suggest a particle-like evolution of fluctuation segments with a unique and characteristic frequency, independent of flow history and overall flow conditions.

  14. Brightness-compensated 3-D optical flow algorithm for monitoring cochlear motion patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Tiedemann, Miriam; Fridberger, Anders; Ulfendahl, Mats; de Monvel, Jacques Boutet

    2010-09-01

    A method for three-dimensional motion analysis designed for live cell imaging by fluorescence confocal microscopy is described. The approach is based on optical flow computation and takes into account brightness variations in the image scene that are not due to motion, such as photobleaching or fluorescence variations that may reflect changes in cellular physiology. The 3-D optical flow algorithm allowed almost perfect motion estimation on noise-free artificial sequences, and performed with a relative error of <10% on noisy images typical of real experiments. The method was applied to a series of 3-D confocal image stacks from an in vitro preparation of the guinea pig cochlea. The complex motions caused by slow pressure changes in the cochlear compartments were quantified. At the surface of the hearing organ, the largest motion component was the transverse one (normal to the surface), but significant radial and longitudinal displacements were also present. The outer hair cell displayed larger radial motion at their basolateral membrane than at their apical surface. These movements reflect mechanical interactions between different cellular structures, which may be important for communicating sound-evoked vibrations to the sensory cells. A better understanding of these interactions is important for testing realistic models of cochlear mechanics.

  15. Flow-Through Stream Modeling with MODFLOW and MT3D: Certainties and Limitations.

    PubMed

    Ben Simon, Rose; Bernard, Stéphane; Meurville, Charles; Rebour, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    This paper aims to assess MODFLOW and MT3D capabilities for simulating the spread of contaminants from a river exhibiting an unusual relationship with an alluvial aquifer, with the groundwater head higher than the river head on one side and lower on the other (flow-through stream). A series of simulation tests is conducted using a simple hypothetical model so as to characterize and quantify these limitations. Simulation results show that the expected contaminant spread could be achieved with a specific configuration composed of two sets of parameters: (1) modeled object parameters (hydraulic groundwater gradient, hydraulic conductivity values of aquifer and streambed), and (2) modeling parameters (vertical discretization of aquifer, horizontal refinement of stream modeled with River [RIV] package). The influence of these various parameters on simulation results is investigated, and potential complications and errors are identified. Contaminant spread from stream to aquifer is not always reproduced by MT3D due to the RIV package's inability to simulate lateral exchange fluxes between stream and aquifer. This paper identifies the need for a MODFLOW streamflow package allowing lateral stream-aquifer interactions and streamflow routine calculations. Such developments could be of particular interest for modeling contaminated flow-through streams.

  16. 3D conformation of a flexible fiber in a turbulent flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verhille, Gautier; Bartoli, Adrien

    2016-07-01

    A growing number of studies is devoted to anisotropic particles in turbulent flows. In most cases, the particles are assumed to be rigid and their deformations are neglected. We present an adaptation of classical computer vision tools to reconstruct from two different images the 3D conformation of a fiber distorted by the turbulent fluctuations in a von Kármán flow. This technique allows us notably to characterize the fiber deformation by computing the correlation function of the orientation of the tangent vector. This function allows us to tackle the analogy between polymers and flexible fibers proposed by Brouzet et al. (Phys Rev Lett 112(7):074501, 2014). We show that this function depends on an elastic length ℓ _e which characterizes the particle flexibility, as is the case for polymers, but also on the fiber length L, contrary to polymers.

  17. Measuring the orientation and rotation rate of 3D printed particles in turbulent flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voth, Greg; Marcus, Guy G.; Parsa, Shima; Kramel, Stefan; Ni, Rui; Cole, Brendan

    2014-11-01

    The orientation distribution and rotations of anisotropic particles plays a key role in many applications ranging from icy clouds to papermaking and drag reduction in pipe flow. Experimental access to time resolved orientations of anisotropic particles has not been easy to achieve. We have found that 3D printing technology can be used to fabricate a wide range of particle shapes with smallest dimension down to 300 μm. So far we have studied rods, crosses, jacks, tetrads, and helical shapes. We extract the particle orientations from stereoscopic video images using a method of least squares optimization in Euler angle space. We find that in turbulence the orientation and rotation rate of many particles can be understood using a simple picture of alignment of both the vorticity and a long axis of the particle with the Lagrangian stretching direction of the flow. This research is supported by NSF Grant DMR-1208990.

  18. Measuring the orientation and rotation rate of 3D printed particles in turbulent flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voth, Greg; Kramel, Stefan; Cole, Brendan

    2015-03-01

    The orientation distribution and rotations of anisotropic particles plays a key role in many applications ranging from icy clouds to papermaking and drag reduction in pipe flow. Experimental access to time resolved orientations of anisotropic particles has not been easy to achieve. We have found that 3D printing technology can be used to fabricate a wide range of particle shapes with smallest dimension down to 300 ?m. So far we have studied rods, crosses, jacks, tetrads, and helical shapes. We extract the particle orientations from stereoscopic video images using a method of least squares optimization in Euler angle space. We find that in turbulence the orientation and rotation rate of many particles can be understood using a simple picture of alignment of both the vorticity and a long axis of the particle with the Lagrangian stretching direction of the flow.

  19. MRI-based aortic blood flow model in 3D ballistocardiography.

    PubMed

    Lejeune, L; Prisk, G K; Nonclercq, A; Migeotte, P-F

    2015-01-01

    Ballistocardiography (BCG) is a non-invasive technique which measures the acceleration of a body induced by cardiovascular activity, namely the force exerted by the beating heart. A one dimensional aortic flow model based on the transmission lines theory is developped and applied to the simulation of three dimensional BCG. A four-element Windkessel model is used to generate the pressure-wave. Using transverse MRI slices of a human subject, a reconstruction of the aorta allows the extraction of parameters used to relate the local change in mass of the 1D flow model to 3D acceleration BCG. Simulated BCG curves are then compared qualitatively with the ensemble average curves of the same subject recorded in sustained microgravity. Confirming previous studies, the main features of the y-axis are well simulated. The simulated z-axis, never attempted before, shows important similarities. The simulated x-axis is less faithful and suggests the presence of reflections. PMID:26737946

  20. Decay of the 3D inviscid liquid-gas two-phase flow model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yinghui

    2016-06-01

    We establish the optimal {Lp-L2(1 ≤ p < 6/5)} time decay rates of the solution to the Cauchy problem for the 3D inviscid liquid-gas two-phase flow model and analyze the influences of the damping on the qualitative behaviors of solution. Compared with the viscous liquid-gas two-phase flow model (Zhang and Zhu in J Differ Equ 258:2315-2338, 2015), our results imply that the friction effect of the damping is stronger than the dissipation effect of the viscosities and enhances the decay rate of the velocity. Our proof is based on Hodge decomposition technique, the {Lp-L2} estimates for the linearized equations and an elaborate energy method.

  1. Numerical Simulations of Unsteady Low-Reynolds-Number Flows Over the APEX Airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tatineni, Mahidhar; Zhong, Xiao-Lin

    1998-01-01

    Laminar and transitional separation bubbles are an important feature of low-Reynolds-number flows over airfoils. The separation bubbles are unsteady and have a significant impact on the aerodynamic properties of the airfoils. In this paper unsteady low-Reynolds-number separated flows over the APEX airfoil are calculated using a Navier-Stokes solver. The numerical results show the presence of unsteady separation bubbles in the flowfield. An analysis of the numerical results shows that flowfield disturbances are amplified significantly in the separation bubble, leading to periodic vortex shedding. A linear stability analysis of the separated boundary layer is performed and the results show that the dominant wavenumber and frequency in the numerical simulations agree with the most unstable wavenumber and frequency from the linear stability analysis. The numerical results also show the growth and interaction of disturbance waves in the separation bubble. For transonic flows over the APEX airfoil, the calculations show that the presence of shocks causes significant changes in the separation location and consequently, the overall flowfield.

  2. Minnowbrook III: 2000 Workshop on Boundary Layer Transition and Unsteady Aspects of Turbomachinery Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LaGraff, John E. (Editor); Ashpis, David E. (Editor)

    2002-01-01

    This volume and its accompanying CD-ROM contain materials presented at the Minnowbrook III-2000 Workshop on Boundary Layer Transition and Unsteady Aspects of Turbomachinery Flows held at the Syracuse University Minnowbrook Conference Center, Blue Mountain Lake, New York, August 20-23, 2000. Workshop organizers were John E. LaGraff (Syracuse University), Terry V Jones (Oxford University), and J. Paul Gostelow (University of Leicester). The workshop followed the theme, venue, and informal format of two earlier workshops: Minnowbrook I (1993) and Minnowbrook II (1997). The workshop was focused on physical understanding the late stage (final breakdown) boundary layer transition, separation, and effects of unsteady wakes with the specific goal of contributing to engineering application of improving design codes for turbomachinery. The workshop participants included academic researchers from the USA and abroad, and representatives from the gas-turbine industry and government laboratories. The physical mechanisms discussed included turbulence disturbance environment in turbomachinery, flow instabilities, bypass and natural transition, turbulent spots and calmed regions, wake interactions with attached and separated boundary layers, turbulence and transition modeling and CFD, and DNS. This volume contains abstracts and copies of the viewgraphs presented, organized according to the workshop sessions. The viewgraphs are included on the CD-ROM only. The workshop summary and the plenary-discussion transcripts clearly highlight the need for continued vigorous research in the technologically important area of transition, separated and unsteady flows in turbomachines.

  3. Toward Design Guidelines for Stream Restoration Structures: Measuring and Modeling Unsteady Turbulent Flows in Natural Streams with Complex Hydraulic Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lightbody, A.; Sotiropoulos, F.; Kang, S.; Diplas, P.

    2009-12-01

    Despite their widespread application to prevent lateral river migration, stabilize banks, and promote aquatic habitat, shallow transverse flow training structures such as rock vanes and stream barbs lack quantitative design guidelines. Due to the lack of fundamental knowledge about the interaction of the flow field with the sediment bed, existing engineering standards are typically based on various subjective criteria or on cross-sectionally-averaged shear stresses rather than local values. Here, we examine the performance and stability of in-stream structures within a field-scale single-threaded sand-bed meandering stream channel in the newly developed Outdoor StreamLab (OSL) at the St. Anthony Falls Laboratory (SAFL). Before and after the installation of a rock vane along the outer bank of the middle meander bend, high-resolution topography data were obtained for the entire 50-m-long reach at 1-cm spatial scale in the horizontal and sub-millimeter spatial scale in the vertical. In addition, detailed measurements of flow and turbulence were obtained using acoustic Doppler velocimetry at twelve cross-sections focused on the vicinity of the structure. Measurements were repeated at a range of extreme events, including in-bank flows with an approximate flow rate of 44 L/s (1.4 cfs) and bankfull floods with an approximate flow rate of 280 L/s (10 cfs). Under both flow rates, the structure reduced near-bank shear stresses and resulted in both a deeper thalweg and near-bank aggradation. The resulting comprehensive dataset has been used to validate a large eddy simulation carried out by SAFL’s computational fluid dynamics model, the Virtual StreamLab (VSL). This versatile computational framework is able to efficiently simulate 3D unsteady turbulent flows in natural streams with complex in-stream structures and as a result holds promise for the development of much-needed quantitative design guidelines.

  4. Unsteady aerodynamics of reverse flow dynamic stall on an oscillating blade section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lind, Andrew H.; Jones, Anya R.

    2016-07-01

    Wind tunnel experiments were performed on a sinusoidally oscillating NACA 0012 blade section in reverse flow. Time-resolved particle image velocimetry and unsteady surface pressure measurements were used to characterize the evolution of reverse flow dynamic stall and its sensitivity to pitch and flow parameters. The effects of a sharp aerodynamic leading edge on the fundamental flow physics of reverse flow dynamic stall are explored in depth. Reynolds number was varied up to Re = 5 × 105, reduced frequency was varied up to k = 0.511, mean pitch angle was varied up to 15∘, and two pitch amplitudes of 5∘ and 10∘ were studied. It was found that reverse flow dynamic stall of the NACA 0012 airfoil is weakly sensitive to the Reynolds numbers tested due to flow separation at the sharp aerodynamic leading edge. Reduced frequency strongly affects the onset and persistence of dynamic stall vortices. The type of dynamic stall observed (i.e., number of vortex structures) increases with a decrease in reduced frequency and increase in maximum pitch angle. The characterization and parameter sensitivity of reverse flow dynamic stall given in the present work will enable the development of a physics-based analytical model of this unsteady aerodynamic phenomenon.

  5. A 3-D implicit finite-volume model of shallow water flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Weiming; Lin, Qianru

    2015-09-01

    A three-dimensional (3-D) model has been developed to simulate shallow water flows in large water bodies, such as coastal and estuarine waters. The eddy viscosity is determined using a newly modified mixing length model that uses different mixing length functions for the horizontal and vertical shear strain rates. The 3-D shallow water flow equations with the hydrostatic pressure assumption are solved using an implicit finite-volume method based on a quadtree (telescoping) rectangular mesh on the horizontal plane and the sigma coordinate in the vertical direction. The quadtree technique can locally refine the mesh around structures or in high-gradient regions by splitting a coarse cell into four child cells. The grid nodes are numbered with a one-dimensional index system that has unstructured grid feature for better grid flexibility. All the primary variables are arranged in a non-staggered grid system. Fluxes at cell faces are determined using a Rhie and Chow-type momentum interpolation, to avoid the possible spurious checkerboard oscillations caused by linear interpolation. Each of the discretized governing equations is solved iteratively using the flexible GMRES method with ILUT preconditioning, and coupling of water level and velocity among these equations is achieved by using the SIMPLEC algorithm with under-relaxation. The model has been tested in four cases, including steady flow near a spur-dyke, tidal flows in San Francisco Bay and Gironde Estuary, and wind-induced current in a flume. The calculated water levels and velocities are in good agreement with the measured values.

  6. Computed Tomography 3-D Imaging of the Metal Deformation Flow Path in Friction Stir Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Judy; Beshears, Ronald; Nunes, Arthur C., Jr.

    2005-01-01

    In friction stir welding (FSW), a rotating threaded pin tool is inserted into a weld seam and literally stirs the edges of the seam together. To determine optimal processing parameters for producing a defect free weld, a better understanding of the resulting metal deformation flow path is required. Marker studies are the principal method of studying the metal deformation flow path around the FSW pin tool. In our study, we have used computed tomography (CT) scans to reveal the flow pattern of a lead wire embedded in a FSW weld seam. At the welding temperature of aluminum, the lead becomes molten and is carried with the macro-flow of the weld metal. By using CT images, a 3-dimensional (3D) image of the lead flow pattern can be reconstructed. CT imaging was found to be a convenient and comprehensive way of collecting and displaying tracer data. It marks an advance over previous more tedious and ambiguous radiographic/metallographic data collection methods.

  7. Measurements With a Split-Fiber Probe in Complex Unsteady Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lepicovsky, Jan

    2004-01-01

    A split-fiber probe was used to acquire unsteady data in a research compressor. A calibration method was devised for a split-fiber probe, and a new algorithm was developed to decompose split-fiber probe signals into velocity magnitude and direction. The algorithm is based on the minimum value of a merit function that is built over the entire range of flow velocities for which the probe was calibrated. The split-fiber probe performance and signal decomposition was first verified in a free-jet facility by comparing the data from three thermo-anemometric probes, namely a single-wire, a single-fiber, and the split-fiber probe. All three probes performed extremely well as far as the velocity magnitude was concerned. However, there are differences in the peak values of measured velocity unsteadiness in the jet shear layer. The single-wire probe indicates the highest unsteadiness level, followed closely by the split-fiber probe. The single-fiber probe indicates a noticeably lower level of velocity unsteadiness. Experiments in the NASA Low Speed Axial Compressor facility revealed similar results. The mean velocities agreed well, and differences in the velocity unsteadiness are similar to the case of a free jet. A reason for these discrepancies is in the different frequency response characteristics of probes used. It follows that the single-fiber probe has the slowest frequency response. In summary, the split-fiber probe worked reliably during the entire program. The acquired data averaged in time followed closely data acquired by conventional pneumatic probes.

  8. Solution of 3-dimensional time-dependent viscous flows. Part 3: Application to turbulent and unsteady flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinberg, B. C.; Mcdonald, H.

    1982-01-01

    A numerical scheme is developed for solving the time dependent, three dimensional compressible viscous flow equations to be used as an aid in the design of helicopter rotors. In order to further investigate the numerical procedure, the computer code developed to solve an approximate form of the three dimensional unsteady Navier-Stokes equations employing a linearized block implicit technique in conjunction with a QR operator scheme is tested. Results of calculations are presented for several two dimensional boundary layer flows including steady turbulent and unsteady laminar cases. A comparison of fourth order and second order solutions indicate that increased accuracy can be obtained without any significant increases in cost (run time). The results of the computations also indicate that the computer code can be applied to more complex flows such as those encountered on rotating airfoils. The geometry of a symmetric NACA four digit airfoil is considered and the appropriate geometrical properties are computed.

  9. Test Problems for Reactive Flow HE Model in the ALE3D Code and Limited Sensitivity Study

    SciTech Connect

    Gerassimenko, M.

    2000-03-01

    We document quick running test problems for a reactive flow model of HE initiation incorporated into ALE3D. A quarter percent change in projectile velocity changes the outcome from detonation to HE burn that dies down. We study the sensitivity of calculated HE behavior to several parameters of practical interest where modeling HE initiation with ALE3D.

  10. Formation of scalloped cross-bedding without unsteady flows.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rubin, D.M.

    1987-01-01

    Scalloped cross-bedding formed by fluctuating flow superficially resembles that formed by superimposed or intersecting bedforms, but, as illustrated in three-dimensional computer plots, the two kinds of structures commonly can be distinguished by directional properties of the bedding. Scallops deposited by alongslope-migrating, superimposed bedforms have cross-bed and bounding-surface dip patterns that lack bilateral symmetry and have cross-bed dips that are asymmetrically distributed relative to bounding-surface dips. Scallops with dip patterns that are bilaterally symmetrically distributed relative to the bounding-surface dips can be produced either by fluctuating flow or by downslope or upslope migration of superimposed bedforms. An example of nearshore-marine scalloped cross-bedding of Pleistocene age was examined in detail in a coastal terrace of Monterey Bay, California. -from Author

  11. Electrokinetic transport in unsteady flow through peristaltic microchannel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathi, Dharmendra; Mulchandani, Janak; Jhalani, Shubham

    2016-04-01

    We analyze the electrokinetic transport of aqueous electrolyte fluids with Newtonian model in presence of peristalsis through microchannel. Debye-Hückel linearization is employed to simplify the problem. Low Reynolds number and large wavelength approximations are taken into account subjected to microfluidics applications. Electrical double layer (EDL) is considered very thin and electroosmotic slip velocity (i.e. Helmholtz-Smoluchowski velocity) at the wall is subjected to study the effect of applied electrical field. The solutions for axial velocity and pressure difference along the channel length are obtained analytically and the effects of adding and opposing the flow by applied electric field have been discussed. It is revealed that the axial velocity and pressure gradient enhances with adding electric field and an opposite behavior is found in the flow direction on opposing the electric field. These results may also help towards designing organ-on-a-chip like devices for better drug design.

  12. Simulating unsteady flow and sediment transport in vegetated channel network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Yang; Duan, Jennifer G.

    2014-07-01

    This paper presents a one-dimensional model for simulating flood routing and sediment transport over mobile alluvium in a vegetated channel network. The modified St. Venant equations together with the governing equations for suspended sediment and bed load transport were solved simultaneously to obtain flow properties and sediment transport rate. The Godunov-type finite volume method is employed to discretize the governing equations. Then, the Exner equation was solved for bed elevation change. Since sediment transport is non-equilibrium when bed is degrading or aggrading, a recovery coefficient for suspended sediment and an adaptation length for bed load transport were used to quantify the differences between equilibrium and non-equilibrium sediment transport rate. The influence of vegetation on floodplain and main channel was accounted for by adjusting resistance terms in the momentum equations for flow field. A procedure to separate the grain resistance from the total resistance was proposed and implemented to calculate sediment transport rate. The model was tested by a flume experiment case and an unprecedented flood event occurred in the Santa Cruz River, Tucson, Arizona, in July 2006. Simulated results of flow discharge and bed elevation changes showed satisfactory agreements with the measurements. The impacts of vegetation density on sediment transport and significance of non-equilibrium sediment transport model were discussed.

  13. Coherent and random apparent stresses in periodically unsteady flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kehoe, Anthony Byrd

    1990-08-01

    The transitional flow field downstream of a smooth, symmetrically constricted Sylgard pipe was measured with a two color, two component Laser Doppler Anemometer for both pulsatile and steady flows. Vibrations in the flow system were induced with an exciter/shaker and were monitored with an accelerator. The vibration has little effect on the value of the maximum axial and radial turbulence intensities. A frequency domain signal processing technique to separate the disturbance velocity into coherent and random components was modified to guarantee that the sum of the decomposed velocity components equaled the original disturbance velocity. Results of the velocity separation demonstrated that the velocity disturbances prior to turbulent transition consisted almost entirely of coherent velocity fluctuations. The maximum apparent shear stress was found to occur just after the turbulent transition and consisted almost entirely of the random component. The data suggest that if the absolute magnitude of the apparent stress is the determining factor in red blood cell destruction, then the coherent apparent stress is not a significant destruction mechanism. However, the exact mechanism in hemolysis are not identified.

  14. Unsteady laminar flow with convective heat transfer through a rotating curved square duct with small curvature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondal, Rabindra Nath; Roy, Titob; Shaha, Poly Rani; Yanase, Shinichiro

    2016-07-01

    Unsteady laminar flow with convective heat transfer through a curved square duct rotating at a constant angular velocity about the center of curvature is investigated numerically by using a spectral method, and covering a wide range of the Taylor number -300≤Tr≤1000 for the Dean number Dn = 1000. A temperature difference is applied across the vertical sidewalls for the Grashof number Gr = 100, where the outer wall is heated and the inner wall cooled, the top and bottom walls being adiabatic. Flow characteristics are investigated with the effects of rotational parameter, Tr, and the pressure-driven parameter, Dn, for the constant curvature 0.001. Time evolution calculations as well as their phase spaces show that the unsteady flow undergoes through various flow instabilities in the scenario `multi-periodic → chaotic → steady-state → periodic → multi-periodic → chaotic', if Tr is increased in the positive direction. For negative rotation, however, time evolution calculations show that the flow undergoes in the scenario `multi-periodic → periodic → steady-state', if Tr is increased in the negative direction. Typical contours of secondary flow patterns and temperature profiles are obtained at several values of Tr, and it is found that the unsteady flow consists of two- to six-vortex solutions if the duct rotation is involved. External heating is shown to generate a significant temperature gradient at the outer wall of the duct. This study also shows that there is a strong interaction between the heating-induced buoyancy force and the centrifugal-Coriolis instability in the curved channel that stimulates fluid mixing and consequently enhances heat transfer in the fluid.

  15. Unsteady immiscible multiphase flow validation of a multiple-relaxation-time lattice Boltzmann method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leclaire, S.; Pellerin, N.; Reggio, M.; Trépanier, J.-Y.

    2014-03-01

    The lattice Boltzmann modeling of immiscible multiphase flows needs to be further validated, especially when density variation occurs between the different flow phases. From this perspective, the goal of this research is to introduce the multiple-relaxation-time operator into a lattice Boltzmann model in order to improve its numerical stability in the presence of large density and viscosity ratios. Essentially, this research shows that the introduction of this operator greatly improves the numerical stability of the approach compared to the original single-relaxation-time collision operator. In many lattice Boltzmann research studies, multiphase lattice Boltzmann methods are validated using a reduced number of test cases, and unsteady flow test cases are frequently omitted before much more complex flow configurations are simulated. In this context, several test cases are proposed to evaluate the behavior of a lattice Boltzmann method for simulating immiscible multiphase flows with high density and viscosity ratios. These are: (1) two-phase Couette flow; (2) three-phase Laplace law; (3) three-phase Zalesak disk; (4) two-phase flow between oscillating plates; (5) two-phase capillary wave; and (6) the two-phase oscillating cylindrical bubble. The first two involve a steady regime, and the remaining four an unsteady regime.

  16. Chaotic advection and heat transfer in two similar 2-D periodic flows and in their corresponding 3-D periodic flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinsard, G.; Dufour, S.; Saatdjian, E.; Mota, J. P. B.

    2016-03-01

    Chaotic advection can effectively enhance the heat transfer rate between a boundary and fluids with high Prandtl number. These fluids are usually highly viscous and thus turbulent agitation is not a viable solution since the energy required to mix the fluid would be prohibitive. Here, we analyze previously obtained results on chaotic advection and heat transfer in two similar 2-D periodic flows and on their corresponding 3-D periodic flows when an axial velocity component is superposed. The two flows studied are the flow between eccentric rotating cylinders and the flow between confocal ellipses. For both of these flows the analysis is simplified because the Stokes equations can be solved analytically to obtain a closed form solution. For both 2-D periodic flows, we show that chaotic heat transfer is enhanced by the displacement of the saddle point location during one period. Furthermore, the enhancement by chaotic advection in the elliptical geometry is approximately double that obtained in the cylindrical geometry because there are two saddle points instead of one. We also explain why, for high eccentricity ratios, there is no heat transfer enhancement in the cylindrical geometry. When an axial velocity component is added to both of these flows so that they become 3-D, previous work has shown that there is an optimum modulation frequency for which chaotic advection and heat transfer enhancement is a maximum. Here we show that the optimum modulation frequency can be derived from results without an axial flow. We also explain by physical arguments other previously unanswered questions in the published data.

  17. The mantle wedge's transient 3-D flow regime and thermal structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, D. R.; Le Voci, G.; Goes, S.; Kramer, S. C.; Wilson, C. R.

    2016-01-01

    Arc volcanism, volatile cycling, mineralization, and continental crust formation are likely regulated by the mantle wedge's flow regime and thermal structure. Wedge flow is often assumed to follow a regular corner-flow pattern. However, studies that incorporate a hydrated rheology and thermal buoyancy predict internal small-scale-convection (SSC). Here, we systematically explore mantle-wedge dynamics in 3-D simulations. We find that longitudinal "Richter-rolls" of SSC (with trench-perpendicular axes) commonly occur if wedge hydration reduces viscosities to Pa s, although transient transverse rolls (with trench-parallel axes) can dominate at viscosities of Pa s. Rolls below the arc and back arc differ. Subarc rolls have similar trench-parallel and trench-perpendicular dimensions of 100-150 km and evolve on a 1-5 Myr time-scale. Subback-arc instabilities, on the other hand, coalesce into elongated sheets, usually with a preferential trench-perpendicular alignment, display a wavelength of 150-400 km and vary on a 5-10 Myr time scale. The modulating influence of subback-arc ridges on the subarc system increases with stronger wedge hydration, higher subduction velocity, and thicker upper plates. We find that trench-parallel averages of wedge velocities and temperature are consistent with those predicted in 2-D models. However, lithospheric thinning through SSC is somewhat enhanced in 3-D, thus expanding hydrous melting regions and shifting dehydration boundaries. Subarc Richter-rolls generate time-dependent trench-parallel temperature variations of up to K, which exceed the transient 50-100 K variations predicted in 2-D and may contribute to arc-volcano spacing and the variable seismic velocity structures imaged beneath some arcs.

  18. Calculation of unsteady small disturbance transonic flow at arbitrary reduced frequency using an extended integral equation method.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamah, C. A.; Harris, W. L.

    1983-01-01

    A novel analytical-numerical method for calculating unsteady small disturbance transonic flow over airfoils has been developed. The method uses an extended integral equation technique, based on both the velocity potential and the acceleration potential, to predict unsteady aerodynamic loading on airfoils oscillating in subcritical transonic free stream conditions. The formulation is an extension of the work of Sivaneri and Harris (1980) for steady, non-lifting flows and utilizes the linear theory of Landahl (1961) for decoupling of steady and unsteady components. The analytical-numerical procedure involves several intnegrating schemes and applies to general frequencies of oscillations. The technique is illustrated by computing the transonic flow about parabolic arc airfoils. Specific unsteady results for reduced frequencies based on semi-chord of 0.01, 0.1, 0.3, 0.4 and 0.6 are given. Comparison of results with those obtained by an ADI finite difference scheme is made.

  19. Origin of hysteresis in bed form response to unsteady flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Raleigh L.; Jerolmack, Douglas J.

    2013-03-01

    Field and laboratory studies indicate that changes in riverbed morphology often lag changes in water discharge. This lagged response produces hysteresis in the relationship between water discharge and bed form geometry. To understand these phenomena, we performed flume experiments to observe the response of a sand bed to step increases and decreases in water discharge. For an abrupt rise in discharge, we observed that bed forms grew rapidly by collision and merger of bed forms migrating with different celerities. Growth rate slowed as bed forms approached equilibrium with the higher discharge regime. After an abrupt discharge drop, bed form decay occurred through formation of smaller secondary bed forms, in equilibrium with the lower discharge, which cannibalized the original, relict features. We present a simple model framework to quantitatively predict time scales of bed form adjustment to flow changes, based on equilibrium bed form heights, lengths, and celerities at low and high flows. For rising discharge, the model assumes that all bed form collisions result in irreversible merger, due to a dispersion of initial celerities. For falling discharge, we derive a diffusion model for the decay of relict high-stage features. Our models predict the form and time scale of experimental bed form adjustments. Additional experiments applying slow and fast triangular flood waves show that bed form hysteresis occurs only when the time scale of flow change is faster than the modeled (and measured) bed form adjustment time. We show that our predicted adjustment time scales can also be used to predict the occurrence of bed form hysteresis in natural floods.

  20. Separated flow over bodies of revolution using an unsteady discrete-vorticity cross wake. Part 1: Theory and application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, F. J.; Deffenbaugh, F. D.

    1974-01-01

    A method is developed to determine the flow field of a body of revolution in separated flow. The technique employed is the use of the computer to integrate various solutions and solution properties of the sub-flow fields which made up the entire flow field without resorting to a finite difference solution to the complete Navier-Stokes equations. The technique entails the use of the unsteady cross flow analogy and a new solution to the required two-dimensional unsteady separated flow problem based upon an unsteady, discrete-vorticity wake. Data for the forces and moments on aerodynamic bodies at low speeds and high angle of attack (outside the range of linear inviscid theories) such that the flow is substantially separated are produced which compare well with experimental data. In addition, three dimensional steady separation regions and wake vortex patterns are determined.

  1. Inverse cascades sustained by the transfer rate of angular momentum in a 3D turbulent flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burguete, Javier; Lopez-Caballero, Miguel

    2013-11-01

    The existence of energy cascades as signatures of conserved magnitudes is one of the universal characteristics of turbulent flows. In this work we present the evidence of an inverse cascade in a fully developed 3D experimental turbulent flow where the conserved magnitude is the angular momentum. We analyze the behavior of a fluid in a closed cavity where two inhomogeneous and strongly turbulent flows collide in a thin region. The experimental volume is a closed cylinder (diameter of 20 cm) where two impellers rotate in opposite directions. A key characteristic of this setup the high stability of the propellers (the instantaneous fluctuations are below 0 . 1 %). We have performed PIV and LDA measurements of the velocity fields. Typical characteristics of the turbulent flow in this setup are: turbulence intensity 50 % , the Reλ = 900 , the Taylor microscale λT = 1 . 8 mm and the integral scale LI = 15 mm. The analysis of the data series reveal that below the injection scales an inverse cascade can be identified (-1/3 in time, -7/3 in space) that can be explained as the transfer of angular momentum between the diferent fluid layers. A. de la Torre, J. Burguete, Phys Rev Lett 99 (2007) 054101. M. Lopez-Caballero, J. Burguete, Phys Rev Lett 110 (2013) 124501.

  2. Simulation of abrasive flow machining process for 2D and 3D mixture models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dash, Rupalika; Maity, Kalipada

    2015-12-01

    Improvement of surface finish and material removal has been quite a challenge in a finishing operation such as abrasive flow machining (AFM). Factors that affect the surface finish and material removal are media viscosity, extrusion pressure, piston velocity, and particle size in abrasive flow machining process. Performing experiments for all the parameters and accurately obtaining an optimized parameter in a short time are difficult to accomplish because the operation requires a precise finish. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation was employed to accurately determine optimum parameters. In the current work, a 2D model was designed, and the flow analysis, force calculation, and material removal prediction were performed and compared with the available experimental data. Another 3D model for a swaging die finishing using AFM was simulated at different viscosities of the media to study the effects on the controlling parameters. A CFD simulation was performed by using commercially available ANSYS FLUENT. Two phases were considered for the flow analysis, and multiphase mixture model was taken into account. The fluid was considered to be a

  3. Simulation of 3D flows past hypersonic vehicles in FlowVision software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aksenov, A. A.; Zhluktov, S. V.; Savitskiy, D. V.; Bartenev, G. Y.; Pokhilko, V. I.

    2015-11-01

    A new implicit velocity-pressure split method is discussed in the given presentation. The method implies using conservative velocities, obtained at the given time step, for integration of the momentum equation and other convection-diffusion equations. This enables simulation of super- and hypersonic flows with account of motion of solid boundaries. Calculations of known test cases performed in the FlowVision software are demonstrated. It is shown that the method allows one to carry out calculations at high Mach numbers with integration step essentially exceeding the explicit time step.

  4. Multiscale modeling of mechanosensing channels on vesicles and cell membranes in 3D constricted flows and shear flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Zhangli; Pak, On Shun; Young, Yuan-Nan; Liu, Allen; Stone, Howard

    2015-11-01

    We investigate the gating of mechanosensing channels (Mscls) on vesicles and cell membranes under different flow conditions using a multiscale approach. At the cell level (microns), the membrane tension is calculated using a 3D two-component whole-cell membrane model based on dissipative particle dynamics (DPD), including the cortex cytoskeleton and its interactions with the lipid bilayer. At the Mscl level (nanometers), we predict the relation between channel gating and the membrane tension obtained from a cell-level model using a semi-analytical model based on the bilayer hydrophobic mismatch energy. We systematically study the gating of Mscls of vesicles and cell membranes in constricted channel flows and shear flows, and explore the dependence of the gating on flow rate, cell shape and size. The results provide guidance for future experiments in inducing Mscl opening for various purposes such as drug delivery.

  5. Impact of Periodic Unsteadiness on Performance and Heat Load in Axial Flow Turbomachines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, Om P.; Stetson, Gary M.; Daniels, William A,; Greitzer, Edward M.; Blair, Michael F.; Dring, Robert P.

    1997-01-01

    Results of an analytical and experimental investigation, directed at the understanding of the impact of periodic unsteadiness on the time-averaged flows in axial flow turbomachines, are presented. Analysis of available experimental data, from a large-scale rotating rig (LSRR) (low speed rig), shows that in the time-averaged axisymmetric equations the magnitude of the terms representing the effect of periodic unsteadiness (deterministic stresses) are as large or larger than those due to random unsteadiness (turbulence). Numerical experiments, conducted to highlight physical mechanisms associated with the migration of combustor generated hot-streaks in turbine rotors, indicated that the effect can be simulated by accounting for deterministic stress like terms in the time-averaged mass and energy conservation equations. The experimental portion of this program shows that the aerodynamic loss for the second stator in a 1-1/2 stage turbine are influenced by the axial spacing between the second stator leading edge and the rotor trailing edge. However, the axial spacing has little impact on the heat transfer coefficient. These performance changes are believed to be associated with the change in deterministic stress at the inlet to the second stator. Data were also acquired to quantify the impact of indexing the first stator relative to the second stator. For the range of parameters examined, this effect was found to be of the same order as the effect of axial spacing.

  6. Numerical Investigations of Two Typical Unsteady Flows in Turbomachinery Using the Multi-Passage Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Di; Lu, Zhiliang; Guo, Tongqing; Shen, Ennan

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, the research on two types of unsteady flow problems in turbomachinery including blade flutter and rotor-stator interaction is made by means of numerical simulation. For the former, the energy method is often used to predict the aeroelastic stability by calculating the aerodynamic work per vibration cycle. The inter-blade phase angle (IBPA) is an important parameter in computation and may have significant effects on aeroelastic behavior. For the latter, the numbers of blades in each row are usually not equal and the unsteady rotor-stator interactions could be strong. An effective way to perform multi-row calculations is the domain scaling method (DSM). These two cases share a common point that the computational domain has to be extended to multi passages (MP) considering their respective features. The present work is aimed at modeling these two issues with the developed MP model. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) technique is applied to resolve the unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations and simulate the flow fields. With the parallel technique, the additional time cost due to modeling more passages can be largely decreased. Results are presented on two test cases including a vibrating rotor blade and a turbine stage.

  7. A mechanism for unsteady separation in over-expanded nozzle flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, Britton J.; Lele, Sanjiva K.

    2013-11-01

    Shock wave induced separation in an over-expanded planar nozzle is studied through numerical simulation. These Large-Eddy Simulations (LES) model previous experiments which have shown unsteady motion of the shock wave in flows with similar geometries but offered little insight into the underlying mechanism. Unsteady separation in nozzle flow leads to "side loads" in the rocket engine which can adversely affect the stability of the rocket. A mechanism for the low-frequency shock motion is identified and explained using the LES data. This mechanism is analyzed for a series of over-expanded planar nozzles of various area ratios and nozzle pressure ratios. The effect of grid resolution and Reynolds number on the instability is discussed. A simple reduced order model for the unsteady shock behavior is used to further validate the proposed mechanism. This model is derived from first principles and uses data from the LES calculations to capture the effects of the turbulent boundary layer and shear layer.

  8. Study of unsteady flow field over a forward-looking endoatmospheric hit-to-kill interceptor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, H. Q.; Antonison, Mark

    1993-01-01

    Forward-looking recessed aperture interceptor has significant aero-optical and aero-thermal advantages. Previous experimental studies have shown that the flow field in front of a forward-looking cavity is unsteady and the bow shock oscillates at the cavity fundamental resonant frequency. In this study, an advanced CFD code is applied to study the above unsteady phenomena. The code is first validated against the experiments and good comparisons are found. The numerical parametric study shows that the existence of oscillatory bow shock is very sensitive to the cavity geometry. At a FOV of 60 deg, the initial transient quickly dampens out to a steady state. With a decrease of FOV, an unsteady oscillatory flow field is sustained after initial transient and the amplitude of oscillation is a function of FOV. For FOV of 20 deg, the amplitude of pressure oscillation is 25 percent of the mean value in the cavity. For a FOV of 10 deg, it can be as high as 50 percent.

  9. Unsteady Aerodynamic Flow Control of a Suspended Axisymmetric Moving Platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambert, Thomas; Vukasinovic, Bojan; Glezer, Ari

    2011-11-01

    The aerodynamic forces on an axisymmetric wind tunnel model are altered by fluidic interaction of an azimuthal array of integrated synthetic jet actuators with the cross flow. Four-quadrant actuators are integrated into a Coanda surface on the aft section of the body, and the jets emanate from narrow, azimuthally segmented slots equally distributed around the model's perimeter. The model is suspended in the tunnel using eight wires each comprising miniature in-line force sensors and shape-memory-alloy (SMA) strands that are used to control the instantaneous forces and moments on the model and its orientation. The interaction of the actuation jets with the flow over the moving model is investigated using PIV and time-resolved force measurements to assess the transitory aerodynamic loading effected by coupling between the induced motion of the aerodynamic surface and the fluid dynamics that is driven by the actuation. It is shown that these interactions can lead to effective control of the aerodynamic forces and moments, and thereby of the model's motion. Supported by ARO.

  10. Stability of unsteady flow in a rotating torus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hewitt, Richard; Hazel, Andrew; Clarke, Richard; Denier, James

    2011-11-01

    We consider the temporal evolution of a viscous incompressible fluid in a torus of finite curvature; a problem first investigated experimentally by Madden and Mullin (1994), herein referred to as MM. The system is initially in a state of rigid-body rotation (about the axis of rotational symmetry) and the container's rotation rate is then changed impulsively. We describe the transient flow that is induced at small values of the Ekman number, over a time scale that is comparable to one complete rotation of the container. We show that (rotationally symmetric) eruptive singularities (of the boundary layer) occur at the inner or outer bend of the pipe for a decrease or an increase in rotation rate respectively. Moreover, there is a ratio of initial-to-final rotation frequencies for which eruptive singularities can occur at both the inner and outer bend simultaneously. We also demonstrate that the flow is susceptible to non-axisymmetric inflectional instabilities. The inflectional instability arises as a consequence of the developing eruption and is shown to be in qualitative agreement with the experimental observations of MM. Detailed quantitative comparisons are made between asymptotic predictions and finite (but small) Ekman number Navier-Stokes computations using a finite-element method.

  11. Hydraulic modeling of unsteady debris-flow surges with solid-fluid interactions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Iverson, Richard M.

    1997-01-01

    Interactions of solid and fluid constituents produce the unique style of motion that typifies debris flows. To simulate this motion, a new hydraulic model represents debris flows as deforming masses of granular solids variably liquefied by viscous pore fluid. The momentum equation of the model describes how internal and boundary forces change as coarse-grained surge heads dominated by grain-contact friction grade into muddy debris-flow bodies more strongly influenced by fluid viscosity and pressure. Scaling analysis reveals that pore-pressure variations can cause flow resistance in surge heads to surpass that in debris-flow bodies by orders of magnitude. Numerical solutions of the coupled momentum and continuity equations provide good predictions of unsteady, nonuniform motion of experimental debris flows from initiation through deposition.

  12. Unsteady Analysis of Separated Aerodynamic Flows Using an Unstructured Multigrid Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pelaez, Juan; Mavriplis, Dimitri J.; Kandil, Osama

    2001-01-01

    An implicit method for the computation of unsteady flows on unstructured grids is presented. The resulting nonlinear system of equations is solved at each time step using an agglomeration multigrid procedure. The method allows for arbitrarily large time steps and is efficient in terms of computational effort and storage. Validation of the code using a one-equation turbulence model is performed for the well-known case of flow over a cylinder. A Detached Eddy Simulation model is also implemented and its performance compared to the one equation Spalart-Allmaras Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) turbulence model. Validation cases using DES and RANS include flow over a sphere and flow over a NACA 0012 wing including massive stall regimes. The project was driven by the ultimate goal of computing separated flows of aerodynamic interest, such as massive stall or flows over complex non-streamlined geometries.

  13. Status and prospects of computational fluid dynamics for unsteady transonic viscous flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccroskey, W. J.; Kutler, P.; Bridgeman, J. O.

    1984-01-01

    Applications of computational aerodynamics to aeronautical research, design, and analysis have increased rapidly over the past decade, and these applications offer significant benefits to aeroelasticians. The past developments are traced by means of a number of specific examples, and the trends are projected over the next several years. The crucial factors that limit the present capabilities for unsteady analyses are identified; they include computer speed and memory, algorithm and solution methods, grid generation, turbulence modeling, vortex modeling, data processing, and coupling of the aerodynamic and structural dynamic analyses. The prospects for overcoming these limitations are presented, and many improvements appear to be readily attainable. If so, a complete and reliable numerical simulation of the unsteady, transonic viscous flow around a realistic fighter aircraft configuration could become possible within the next decade. The possibilities of using artificial intelligence concepts to hasten the achievement of this goal are also discussed.

  14. Status and prospects of computational fluid dynamics for unsteady transonic flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccroskey, W. J.; Kutler, P.; Bridgman, J. C.

    1985-01-01

    Applications of computational aerodynamics to aeronautical research, design, and analysis have increased rapidly over the past decade, and these applications offer significant benefits to aeroelasticians. The past developments are traced by means of a number of specific examples, and the trends are projected over the next several years. The crucial factors that limit the present capabilities for unsteady analyses are identified; they include computer speed and memory, algorithm and solution methods, grid generation, turbulence modeling, vortex modeling, data processing, and coupling of the aerodynamic and structural dynamic analyses. The prospects for overcoming these limitations are presented, and many improvements appear to be readily attainable. If so, a complete and reliable numerical simulation of the unsteady, transonic viscous flow around a realistic fighter aircraft configuration could become possible within the next decade. The possibilities of using artificial intelligence concepts to hasten the achievement of this goal are also discussed.

  15. A fully unsteady prescribed wake model for HAWT performance prediction in yawed flow

    SciTech Connect

    Coton, F.N.; Tongguang, Wang; Galbraith, R.A.M.; Lee, D.

    1997-12-31

    This paper describes the development of a fast, accurate, aerodynamic prediction scheme for yawed flow on horizontal axis wind turbines (HAWTs). The method is a fully unsteady three-dimensional model which has been developed over several years and is still being enhanced in a number of key areas. The paper illustrates the current ability of the method by comparison with field data from the NREL combined experiment and also describes the developmental work in progress. In particular, an experimental test programme designed to yield quantitative wake convection information is summarised together with modifications to the numerical model which are necessary for meaningful comparison with the experiments. Finally, current and future work on aspects such as tower-shadow and improved unsteady aerodynamic modelling are discussed.

  16. Unsteady flow in a supersonic cascade with two in-passage shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braun, W. H.

    1985-01-01

    A model for a supersonic blade row with two in-passage shock waves is developed. It accounts for three-dimensional effects in real flows by using an altered blade shape in a two-dimensional cascade. There is enough flexibility in the choice of blade shape to accommodate a desired entrance angle, exit angle, boundary-layer thickness and stage pressure ratio at a given entrance Mach number. The model divides the mean flow into regions of uniform or one-dimensional flow in which the solutions for the unsteady flow may be formed successively. The analysis makes use of previous solutions for unsteady flow in cascades and over an oscillation wedge. Six flow conditions are chosen in the range of parameters for which the two-shock model is valid for studies of flutter in torsion and bending. It is found, in keeping with previous results from a single-shock model, that in each case there is increasing instability with decreasing frequency.

  17. VALIDATION OF CFD PREDICTIONS OF FLOW IN A 3D ALVEOLATED BEND WITH EXPERIMENTAL DATA

    PubMed Central

    VAN ERTBRUGGEN, C.; CORIERI, P.; THEUNISSEN, R.; RIETHMULLER, M.L.; DARQUENNE, C.

    2008-01-01

    Verifying numerical predictions with experimental data is an important aspect of any modeling studies. In the case of the lung, the absence of direct in-vivo flow measurements makes such verification almost impossible. We performed computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations in a 3D scaled-up model of an alveolated bend with rigid walls that incorporated essential geometrical characteristics of human alveolar structures and compared numerical predictions with experimental flow measurements made in the same model by Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV). Flow in both models was representative of acinar flow during normal breathing (0.82 ml/s). The experimental model was built in silicone and silicone oil was used as the carrier fluid. Flow measurements were obtained by an ensemble averaging procedure. CFD simulation was performed with STAR-CCM+ (CD-Adapco) using a polyhedral unstructured mesh. Velocity profiles in the central duct were parabolic and no bulk convection existed between the central duct and the alveoli. Velocities inside the alveoli were ∼2 orders of magnitude smaller than the mean velocity in the central duct. CFD data agreed well with those obtained by PIV. In the central duct, data agreed within 1%. The maximum simulated velocity along the centerline of the model was 0.5% larger than measured experimentally. In the alveolar cavities, data agreed within 15% on average. This suggests that CFD techniques can satisfactorily predict acinar-type flow. Such a validation ensure a great degree of confidence in the accuracy of predictions made in more complex models of the alveolar region of the lung using similar CFD techniques. PMID:17915225

  18. Assessing GPR Signal Polarization for 3D Imaging of Fracture Flow Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsoflias, G. P.; Baker, M.; Becker, M. W.

    2011-12-01

    Ground penetrating radar (GPR) is an effective geophysical method for imaging fractures. Recent studies have employed GPR to image flow paths in fractured aquifers and have demonstrated the potential for relating radar signal attributes to tracer concentration and fracture hydraulic properties. Flow in natural fractures is highly heterogeneous and occurs through channeled paths of varying direction, width and aperture. Therefore, radar imaging of channeled flow may exhibit polarization effects analogous to imaging pipes in the subsurface. Electromagnetic wave polarization properties have been recognized for their significance in imaging buried pipes and rebar, as well as heterogeneous geologic environments including dipping layers and faults. In this study we explore EM wavefield polarization effects for 3D imaging of flow channels along a sub-horizontal water-saturated fracture in bedrock. Three-dimensional 50 and 100 MHz GPR reflection data were acquired using broadside and cross-polarized dipole antenna pairs oriented at 0, 45, 90 and 135 degrees to the survey grid lines. Although the sub-horizontal fracture surface was imaged by all surveys, significant differences in spatial variability of reflector amplitude strength is observed among the data grids suggesting strong signal polarization dependence. One approach for compensating dipole source radiation effects is to sum orthogonal orientation components to simulate circular source radiation. Comparison of summed orthogonal component grids shows very good agreement in imaging high amplitude features of the fracture reflector, delineating the position of channels along the fracture. We conclude that GPR polarization properties are important for accurate imaging of flow channeling along fractures. Acquisition of two orthogonal orientation broadside data using dipole source-receiver pairs is shown to be adequate for imaging flow channeling.

  19. Some aspects regarding unsteady fluid flow with time dependent boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotaru, Constantin; Cîrciu, Ionicǎ

    2016-02-01

    This study explores the dynamic characteristics of the unsteady fluid flow around an airfoil where the time dependency is introduced through the boundary conditions. The models of the vortex wake's shape and strength were based on the time dependency history of the motion and the methods of solution that were developed for these models included the treatment of the zero normal flow on a solid surface. A numerical investigation has been performed using Maplesoft environment. As a result of the nonuniform motion, the path along which the airfoil moves was assumed to be prescribed. In the paper the wake shed from the trailing edge of the lifting surfaces was modeled by vortex distribution.

  20. Unsteady flow in a supersonic cascade with subsonic leading-edge locus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adamczyk, J. J.; Goldstein, M. E.

    1978-01-01

    Linearized theory is used to predict the unsteady flow in a supersonic cascade with subsonic axial flow velocity. A closed-form analytical solution is obtained by using a double application of the Wiener-Hopf technique. Although numerical and semianalytical solutions of this problem have already appeared in the literature, this paper contains the first completely analytical solution. It has been stated in the literature that the blade source should vanish at the infinite duct resonance condition. The present analysis shows that this does not occur. This apparent discrepancy is explained in the paper.

  1. Steady and unsteady three-dimensional transonic flow computations by integral equation method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hu, Hong

    1994-01-01

    This is the final technical report of the research performed under the grant: NAG1-1170, from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The report consists of three parts. The first part presents the work on unsteady flows around a zero-thickness wing. The second part presents the work on steady flows around non-zero thickness wings. The third part presents the massively parallel processing implementation and performance analysis of integral equation computations. At the end of the report, publications resulting from this grant are listed and attached.

  2. Multilevel local refinement and multigrid methods for 3-D turbulent flow

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, C.; Liu, C.; Sung, C.H.; Huang, T.T.

    1996-12-31

    A numerical approach based on multigrid, multilevel local refinement, and preconditioning methods for solving incompressible Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations is presented. 3-D turbulent flow around an underwater vehicle is computed. 3 multigrid levels and 2 local refinement grid levels are used. The global grid is 24 x 8 x 12. The first patch is 40 x 16 x 20 and the second patch is 72 x 32 x 36. 4th order artificial dissipation are used for numerical stability. The conservative artificial compressibility method are used for further improvement of convergence. To improve the accuracy of coarse/fine grid interface of local refinement, flux interpolation method for refined grid boundary is used. The numerical results are in good agreement with experimental data. The local refinement can improve the prediction accuracy significantly. The flux interpolation method for local refinement can keep conservation for a composite grid, therefore further modify the prediction accuracy.

  3. Progress Toward Overset-Grid Moving Body Capability for USM3D Unstructured Flow Solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pandyna, Mohagna J.; Frink, Neal T.; Noack, Ralph W.

    2005-01-01

    A static and dynamic Chimera overset-grid capability is added to an established NASA tetrahedral unstructured parallel Navier-Stokes flow solver, USM3D. Modifications to the solver primarily consist of a few strategic calls to the Donor interpolation Receptor Transaction library (DiRTlib) to facilitate communication of solution information between various grids. The assembly of multiple overlapping grids into a single-zone composite grid is performed by the Structured, Unstructured and Generalized Grid AssembleR (SUGGAR) code. Several test cases are presented to verify the implementation, assess overset-grid solution accuracy and convergence relative to single-grid solutions, and demonstrate the prescribed relative grid motion capability.

  4. Electroosmotic flow through a microparallel channel with 3D wall roughness.

    PubMed

    Chang, Long; Jian, Yongjun; Buren, Mandula; Sun, Yanjun

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, a perturbation method is introduced to study the EOF in a microparallel channel with 3D wall roughness. The corrugations of the two walls are periodic sinusoidal waves of small amplitude in two directions either in phase or half-period out of phase. Based on linearized Poisson-Boltzmann equation, Laplace equation, and the Navier-Stokes equations, the perturbation solutions of velocity, electrical potential, and volume flow rate are obtained. By using numerical computation, the influences of the wall corrugations on the mean velocity are analyzed. The variations of electrical potential, velocity profile, mean velocity, and their dependences on the wave number α and β of wall corrugations in two directions, the nondimensional electrokinetic width K, and the zeta potential ratio between the lower wall and the upper wall ς are analyzed graphically. PMID:26333852

  5. Ergodic theory and experimental visualization of chaos in 3D flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotiropoulos, Fotis; Mezic, Igor

    2000-11-01

    In his motivation for the ergodic hypothesis Gibbs invoked an analogy with fluid mixing: “…Yet no fact is more familiar to us than that stirring tends to bring a liquid to a state of uniform mixture, or uniform densities of its components…”. Although proof of the ergodic hypothesis is possible only for the simplest of systems using methods from ergodic theory, the use of the hypothesis has led to many accurate predictions in statistical mechanics. The problem of fluid mixing, however, turned out to be considerably more complicated than Gibbs envisioned. Chaotic advection can indeed lead to efficient mixing even in non-turbulent flows, but many non-mixed islands are known to persist within well-mixed regions. In numerical studies, Poincaré maps can be used to reveal the structure of such islands but their visualization in the laboratory requires laborious experimental procedures and is possible only for certain types of flows. Here we propose the first non-intrusive, simple to implement, and generally applicable technique for constructing experimental Poincaré maps and apply it to a steady, 3D, vortex breakdown bubble. We employ standard laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) and construct Poincaré maps by time averaging a sufficiently long sequence of instantaneous LIF images. We also show that ergodic theory methods provide a rigorous theoretical justification for this approach whose main objective is to reveal the non-ergodic regions of the flow.

  6. Lattice Boltzmann Model of 3D Multiphase Flow in Artery Bifurcation Aneurysm Problem.

    PubMed

    Abas, Aizat; Mokhtar, N Hafizah; Ishak, M H H; Abdullah, M Z; Ho Tian, Ang

    2016-01-01

    This paper simulates and predicts the laminar flow inside the 3D aneurysm geometry, since the hemodynamic situation in the blood vessels is difficult to determine and visualize using standard imaging techniques, for example, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Three different types of Lattice Boltzmann (LB) models are computed, namely, single relaxation time (SRT), multiple relaxation time (MRT), and regularized BGK models. The results obtained using these different versions of the LB-based code will then be validated with ANSYS FLUENT, a commercially available finite volume- (FV-) based CFD solver. The simulated flow profiles that include velocity, pressure, and wall shear stress (WSS) are then compared between the two solvers. The predicted outcomes show that all the LB models are comparable and in good agreement with the FVM solver for complex blood flow simulation. The findings also show minor differences in their WSS profiles. The performance of the parallel implementation for each solver is also included and discussed in this paper. In terms of parallelization, it was shown that LBM-based code performed better in terms of the computation time required. PMID:27239221

  7. Multigrid direct numerical simulation of the whole process of flow transition in 3-D boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Chaoqun; Liu, Zhining

    1993-01-01

    A new technology was developed in this study which provides a successful numerical simulation of the whole process of flow transition in 3-D boundary layers, including linear growth, secondary instability, breakdown, and transition at relatively low CPU cost. Most other spatial numerical simulations require high CPU cost and blow up at the stage of flow breakdown. A fourth-order finite difference scheme on stretched and staggered grids, a fully implicit time marching technique, a semi-coarsening multigrid based on the so-called approximate line-box relaxation, and a buffer domain for the outflow boundary conditions were all used for high-order accuracy, good stability, and fast convergence. A new fine-coarse-fine grid mapping technique was developed to keep the code running after the laminar flow breaks down. The computational results are in good agreement with linear stability theory, secondary instability theory, and some experiments. The cost for a typical case with 162 x 34 x 34 grid is around 2 CRAY-YMP CPU hours for 10 T-S periods.

  8. Lattice Boltzmann Model of 3D Multiphase Flow in Artery Bifurcation Aneurysm Problem

    PubMed Central

    Abas, Aizat; Mokhtar, N. Hafizah; Ishak, M. H. H.; Abdullah, M. Z.; Ho Tian, Ang

    2016-01-01

    This paper simulates and predicts the laminar flow inside the 3D aneurysm geometry, since the hemodynamic situation in the blood vessels is difficult to determine and visualize using standard imaging techniques, for example, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Three different types of Lattice Boltzmann (LB) models are computed, namely, single relaxation time (SRT), multiple relaxation time (MRT), and regularized BGK models. The results obtained using these different versions of the LB-based code will then be validated with ANSYS FLUENT, a commercially available finite volume- (FV-) based CFD solver. The simulated flow profiles that include velocity, pressure, and wall shear stress (WSS) are then compared between the two solvers. The predicted outcomes show that all the LB models are comparable and in good agreement with the FVM solver for complex blood flow simulation. The findings also show minor differences in their WSS profiles. The performance of the parallel implementation for each solver is also included and discussed in this paper. In terms of parallelization, it was shown that LBM-based code performed better in terms of the computation time required. PMID:27239221

  9. Dynamic coupling between fluid flow and vein growth in fractures: a 3D numerical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, J.-O.; Enzmann, F.

    2012-04-01

    Fluid flow is one of the main mass transport mechanisms in the Earth's crust and abundant mineral vein networks are important indicators for fluid flow and fluid rock interaction. These systems are dynamic and part of the so called RTM processes (reaction-transport-mechanics). Understanding of mineral vein systems requires coupling of these processes. Here we present a conceptional model for dynamic vein growth of syntaxial, posttectonic veins generated by advective fluid flow and show first results of a numerical model for this scenario. Vein generation requires three processes to occur: (i) fracture generation by mechanical stress e.g. hydro-fracturing, (ii) flow of a supersaturated fluid on that fracture and (iii) crystallization of phase(s) on or in the fracture. 3D synthetic fractures are generated with the SynFrac code (Ogilvie, et al. 2006). Subsequently solutions of the Navier-Stokes equation for this fracture are computed by a computational fluid dynamics code called GeoDict (Wiegmann 2007). Transport (advective and diffusive) of chemical species to growth sites in the fracture and vein growth are computed by a self-written MATLAB script. The numerical model discretizes the wall rock and fracture geometry by volumetric pixels (voxels). Based on this representation, the model computes the three basic functions for vein generation: (a) nucleation, (b) fluid flow with transport of chemical species and (c) growth. The following conditions were chosen for these three modules. Nucleation is heterogeneous and occurs instantaneously at the wall rock/fracture interface. Advective and diffusive flow of a supersaturated fluid and related transport of chemical species occurs according to the computed fluid flow field by GeoDict. Concentration of chemical species at the inflow is constant, representing external fluid buffering. Changes/decrease in the concentration of chemical species occurs only due to vein growth. Growth of nuclei is limited either by transport of

  10. Coupling between entropy and unsteady heat release in a thermoacoustic system with a mean flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lei; Zhao, Dan

    2016-11-01

    In this work, the coupling between entropy and unsteady heat release in a one dimensional duct in the presence of a mean flow is considered. As acoustic disturbances impinge on a compact heat source enclosed in the duct, entropy disturbances are generated. The transfer function between the generated entropy waves and oncoming flow velocity fluctuations is deduced by conducting order analysis of the linearized governing equations. The effects of the mean flow are emphasized for different forms of unsteady heat release model. It is shown that there is a strong coupling between entropy, heat release, mean flow and acoustic impedance at the heat source. To validate our theoretical analysis, numerical investigation is conducted by using a low order model. Comparing the theoretical and the low order model's results reveals that a good agreement is observed. It is found that when the mean flow Mach number is not negligible, the term of O(M1) in the identified entropy transfer function is as important as that of O(M0). Neglecting the term of O(M1) may lead to wrong prediction of the entropy waves produced in the system.

  11. Numerical solution of three-dimensional unsteady transonic flow over wings including inviscid/viscous interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rizzetta, D. P.; Borland, C. J.

    1983-01-01

    A numerical procedure is presented for computing the unsteady transonic flow field about three dimensional swept wings undergoing general time dependent motion. The outer inviscid portion of the flow is assumed to be governed by the modified unsteady transonic small disturbance potential equation which is integrated in the time domain by means of an efficient alternating direction implicit approximate factorization algorithm. Gross dominant effects of the shock boundary layer interaction are accounted for by a simple empirically defined model. Viscous flow regions adjacent to the wing surface and in the trailing wake are described by a set of integral equations appropriate for compressible turbulent shear layers. The two dimensional boundary layer equations are applied quasi-statically stripwise across the span. Coupling with the outer inviscid flow is implemented through use of the displacement thickness concept within the limitations of small disturbance theory. Validity of the assumptions underlying the method is established by comparison with experimental data for the flow about a high aspect ratio transport wing having an advanced airfoil section.

  12. Unsteady numerical simulation of the flow in the U9 Kaplan turbine model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Javadi, Ardalan; Nilsson, Håkan

    2014-03-01

    The Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations with the RNG k-ε turbulence model closure are utilized to simulate the unsteady turbulent flow throughout the whole flow passage of the U9 Kaplan turbine model. The U9 Kaplan turbine model comprises 20 stationary guide vanes and 6 rotating blades (696.3 RPM), working at best efficiency load (0.71 m3/s). The computations are conducted using a general finite volume method, using the OpenFOAM CFD code. A dynamic mesh is used together with a sliding GGI interface to include the effect of the rotating runner. The clearance is included in the guide vane. The hub and tip clearances are also included in the runner. An analysis is conducted of the unsteady behavior of the flow field, the pressure fluctuation in the draft tube, and the coherent structures of the flow. The tangential and axial velocity distributions at three sections in the draft tube are compared against LDV measurements. The numerical result is in reasonable agreement with the experimental data, and the important flow physics close to the hub in the draft tube is captured. The hub and tip vortices and an on-axis forced vortex are captured. The numerical results show that the frequency of the forced vortex in 1/5 of the runner rotation.

  13. Comparison of SMAC, PISO, and iterative time-advancing schemes for unsteady flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Sang-Wook; Benson, Thomas J.

    1991-01-01

    Calculations of unsteady flows using a simplified marker and cell (SMAC), a pressure implicit splitting of operators (PSIO), and an iterative time advancing scheme (ITA) are presented. A partial differential equation for incremental pressure is used in each time advancing scheme. Example flows considered are a polar cavity flow starting from rest and self-sustained oscillating flows over a circular and a square cylinder. For a large time step size, the SMAC and ITA are more strongly convergent and yield more accurate results than PSIO. The SMAC is the most efficient computationally. For a small time step size, the three time advancing schemes yield equally accurate Strouhal numbers. The capability of each time advancing scheme to accurately resolve unsteady flows is attributed to the use of new pressure correction algorithm that can strongly enforce the conservation of mass. The numerical results show that the low frequency of the vortex shedding is caused by the growth time of each vortex shed into the wake region.

  14. Calculation of fully three-dimensional separated flow with an unsteady viscous-inviscid interaction method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leballeur, J. C.; Girodroux-Lavigne, P.

    1992-01-01

    Three previous papers have shown that the viscous inviscid numerical methods were capable of calculating separated turbulent flows. The 'Semi-inverse method' and the models of the first author allow the computation of massive separations, stalled flows, and shock wave-boundary layer interactions, in two-dimensional or quasi-three-dimensional conditions, from low speeds to supersonic speeds. The 'Semi-implicit' method for time-consistent coupling allows for the computation of time-accurate transonic separated flow and buffer computations in two-dimensions. The present paper shows that the viscous-inviscid interaction approach is also able to compute the fully three-dimensional flow separation phenomena. The method is based on a thin-layer approximation of the theory of 'Defect-Formulation' that provides the viscous-inviscid splitting of the Navier-Stokes equations. A parametric analytical modelling of the 3D-turbulent velocity profiles is involved. Numerically, the 3D-velocity profiles are discretized in the normal z-direction and driven by parametric integral 3D-equations in direct or inverse modes in the x-direction. The viscous-inviscid coupling is fully 3D and solved the time-consistency problem with an extension of the 'Semi-implicit' method previously suggested in two-dimensions. A 3D inviscid subroutine with TSP approximation is used. Results are obtained for transonic steady flows over wings with shock-induced transonic separation. The method provides results for highly three-dimensional flow separations, such as induced by a three-dimensional through at the wall of a flat plate. The 3D viscous-inviscid coupling and the 3D model of the velocity field provide three-dimensional instantaneous skin-friction lines whose patterns exhibit the same complex topology as Navier-Stokes solvers, with foci, nodes, and saddle-points.

  15. Topics in structural dynamics: Nonlinear unsteady transonic flows and Monte Carlo methods in acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haviland, J. K.

    1974-01-01

    The results are reported of two unrelated studies. The first was an investigation of the formulation of the equations for non-uniform unsteady flows, by perturbation of an irrotational flow to obtain the linear Green's equation. The resulting integral equation was found to contain a kernel which could be expressed as the solution of the adjoint flow equation, a linear equation for small perturbations, but with non-constant coefficients determined by the steady flow conditions. It is believed that the non-uniform flow effects may prove important in transonic flutter, and that in such cases, the use of doublet type solutions of the wave equation would then prove to be erroneous. The second task covered an initial investigation into the use of the Monte Carlo method for solution of acoustical field problems. Computed results are given for a rectangular room problem, and for a problem involving a circular duct with a source located at the closed end.

  16. Enhancement of USM3D Unstructured Flow Solver for High-Speed High-Temperature Shear Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pandya, Mohagna J.; Abdol-Hamid, Khaled S.; Frink, Neal T.

    2009-01-01

    Large temperature and pressure fluctuations have a profound effect on turbulence development in transonic and supersonic jets. For high-speed, high-temperature jet flows, standard turbulence models lack the ability to predict the observed mixing rate of a shear layer. Several proposals to address this deficiency have been advanced in the literature to modify the turbulence transport equations in a variety of ways. In the present study, some of the most proven and simple modifications to two-equation turbulence models have been selected and implemented in NASA's USM3D tetrahedral Navier-Stokes flow solver. The modifications include the addition of compressibility correction and pressure dilatation terms in the turbulence transport equations for high-speed flows, and the addition of a simple modification to the Boussinesq's closure model coefficient for high-temperature jets. The efficacy of the extended models is demonstrated by comparison with experimental data for two supersonic axisymmetric jet test cases at design pressure ratio.

  17. Development of seismic anisotropy during subduction-induced 3D mantle flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faccenda, M.; capitanio, F. A.

    2012-12-01

    Subduction zones are convergent margins where the rigid lithosphere sinks into the Earth's mantle inducing complex 3D flow patterns. Seismic anisotropy generated by strain-induced lattice/crystal preferred orientation (LPO/CPO) of intrinsically anisotropic minerals is commonly used to study flow in the mantle and its relations with plate motions. As the development of seismic anisotropy due to upper and lower plate motions occurs at depths and timescales such that it is not directly observable, numerical modelling provides a useful tool to investigate these processes. We computed the seismic anisotropy of dry olivine-enstatite aggregates due to strain-induced LPO in 3D mechanical models of dynamic subduction by using, respectively, D-Rex and Underworld. Subsequently, FSTRACK was used to compute seismogram synthetics and SKS splitting patterns. We found that for relatively narrow subducting plates, retreat motions are maximized producing strong subslab trench-parallel anisotropy. Here, synthetic data reproduce quite well the observations in analogous subduction systems like Calabria and South Sandwich, where the fast azimuths orients parallel to the trench in the forearc and follow the toroidal flow patterns on the slab edges. Furthermore, we found that the amount of anisotropy is proportional to the amount of subduction, while it does not depend on the rate at which the plate subducts. On the other hand, larger subducting plates subducts mainly by plate advance, favoring poloidal motions and trench-perpendicular anisotropy. Additional Earth-like plate geometries involving along-trench variation of the subducting plate age that induces differential slab retreat motions are considered. We also tested different olivine fabrics (A, B, C, E type), yielding distinct SKS splitting patterns that may help to constrain the composition of the upper mantle. Although more sophisticated numerical modelling taking into account temperature-dependent mantle rock rheologies and P

  18. Investigation of the effect of wall friction on the flow rate in 2D and 3D Granular Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carballo-Ramirez, Brenda; Pleau, Mollie; Easwar, Nalini; Birwa, Sumit; Shah, Neil; Tewari, Shubha

    We have measured the mass flow rate of spherical steel spheres under gravity in vertical, straight-walled 2 and 3-dimensional hoppers, where the flow velocity is controlled by the opening size. Our measurements focus on the role of friction and its placement along the walls of the hopper. In the 2D case, an increase in the coefficient of static friction from μ = 0.2 to 0.6 is seen to decrease the flow rate significantly. We have changed the placement of frictional boundaries/regions from the front and back walls of the 2D hopper to the side walls and floor to investigate the relative importance of the different regions in determining the flow rate. Fits to the Beverloo equation show significant departure from the expected exponent of 1.5 in the case of 2D flow. In contrast, 3D flow rates do not show much dependence on wall friction and its placement. We compare the experimental data to numerical simulations of gravity driven hopper granular flow with varying frictional walls constructed using LAMMPS*. *http://lammps.sandia.gov Supported by NSF MRSEC DMR 0820506.

  19. 3D real-time visualization of blood flow in cerebral aneurysms by light field particle image velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlsohn, Matthias F.; Kemmling, André; Petersen, Arne; Wietzke, Lennart

    2016-04-01

    Cerebral aneurysms require endovascular treatment to eliminate potentially lethal hemorrhagic rupture by hemostasis of blood flow within the aneurysm. Devices (e.g. coils and flow diverters) promote homeostasis, however, measurement of blood flow within an aneurysm or cerebral vessel before and after device placement on a microscopic level has not been possible so far. This would allow better individualized treatment planning and improve manufacture design of devices. For experimental analysis, direct measurement of real-time microscopic cerebrovascular flow in micro-structures may be an alternative to computed flow simulations. An application of microscopic aneurysm flow measurement on a regular basis to empirically assess a high number of different anatomic shapes and the corresponding effect of different devices would require a fast and reliable method at low cost with high throughout assessment. Transparent three dimensional 3D models of brain vessels and aneurysms may be used for microscopic flow measurements by particle image velocimetry (PIV), however, up to now the size of structures has set the limits for conventional 3D-imaging camera set-ups. On line flow assessment requires additional computational power to cope with the processing large amounts of data generated by sequences of multi-view stereo images, e.g. generated by a light field camera capturing the 3D information by plenoptic imaging of complex flow processes. Recently, a fast and low cost workflow for producing patient specific three dimensional models of cerebral arteries has been established by stereo-lithographic (SLA) 3D printing. These 3D arterial models are transparent an exhibit a replication precision within a submillimeter range required for accurate flow measurements under physiological conditions. We therefore test the feasibility of microscopic flow measurements by PIV analysis using a plenoptic camera system capturing light field image sequences. Averaging across a sequence of

  20. A summary of measured hydraulic data for the series of steady and unsteady flow experiments over uniform grass roughness

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Collins, Dannie L.; Flynn, Kathleen M.

    1978-01-01

    The measured hydraulic data collected in the Flood Plain Simulation Facility located at the Gulf Coast Hydroscience Center, near Bay St. Louis, Miss., are summarized for a series of experiments designed to study steady and unsteady flow over uniform grass roughness. All experiments were conducted during the 1973 and 1974 test seasons. Tables of measured ground-surface elevations, water-surface elevations, and point velocities are included for all experiments. A total of 19 steady flow experiments and 7 unsteady flow experiments for varying grass heights are included. The tabulated point velocities and water-surface elevations for the unsteady flow experiments were selected to represent the general changes in the flow variables as the flood wave passed through the facility but do not include all collected data. However, all data that were collected have been stored on computer disk storage and may be retrieved using the listing programs and memory locations. (Woodard-USGS)

  1. Oscillatory Excitation of Unsteady Compressible Flows over Airfoils at Flight Reynolds Numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seifert, Avi; Pack, LaTunia G.

    1999-01-01

    An experimental investigation, aimed at delaying flow separation due to the occurrence of a shock-wave-boundary-layer interaction, is reported. The experiment was performed using a NACA 0012 airfoil and a NACA 0015 airfoil at high Reynolds number incompressible and compressible flow conditions. The effects of Mach and Reynolds numbers were identified, using the capabilities of the cryogenic-pressurized facility to maintain one parameter fixed and change the other. Significant Reynolds number effects were identified in the baseline compressible flow conditions even at Reynolds number of 10 and 20 million. The main objectives of the experiment were to study the effects of periodic excitation on airfoil drag-divergence and to alleviate the severe unsteadiness associated with shock-induced separation (known as "buffeting"). Zero-mass-flux oscillatory blowing was introduced through a downstream directed slot located at 10% chord on the upper surface of the NACA 0015 airfoil. The effective frequencies generated 2-4 vortices over the separated region, regardless of the Mach number. Even though the excitation was introduced upstream of the shock-wave, due to experimental limitations, it had pronounced effects downstream of it. Wake deficit (associated with drag) and unsteadiness (associated with buffeting) were significantly reduced. The spectral content of the wake pressure fluctuations indicates of steadier flow throughout the frequency range when excitation was applied. This is especially important at low frequencies which are more likely to interact with the airframe.

  2. A fish perspective: detecting flow features while moving using an artificial lateral line in steady and unsteady flow.

    PubMed

    Chambers, L D; Akanyeti, O; Venturelli, R; Ježov, J; Brown, J; Kruusmaa, M; Fiorini, P; Megill, W M

    2014-10-01

    For underwater vehicles to successfully detect and navigate turbulent flows, sensing the fluid interactions that occur is required. Fish possess a unique sensory organ called the lateral line. Sensory units called neuromasts are distributed over their body, and provide fish with flow-related information. In this study, a three-dimensional fish-shaped head, instrumented with pressure sensors, was used to investigate the pressure signals for relevant hydrodynamic stimuli to an artificial lateral line system. Unsteady wakes were sensed with the objective to detect the edges of the hydrodynamic trail and then explore and characterize the periodicity of the vorticity. The investigated wakes (Kármán vortex streets) were formed behind a range of cylinder diameter sizes (2.5, 4.5 and 10 cm) and flow velocities (9.9, 19.6 and 26.1 cm s(-1)). Results highlight that moving in the flow is advantageous to characterize the flow environment when compared with static analysis. The pressure difference from foremost to side sensors in the frontal plane provides us a useful measure of transition from steady to unsteady flow. The vortex shedding frequency (VSF) and its magnitude can be used to differentiate the source size and flow speed. Moreover, the distribution of the sensing array vertically as well as the laterally allows the Kármán vortex paired vortices to be detected in the pressure signal as twice the VSF.

  3. A fish perspective: detecting flow features while moving using an artificial lateral line in steady and unsteady flow

    PubMed Central

    Chambers, L. D.; Akanyeti, O.; Venturelli, R.; Ježov, J.; Brown, J.; Kruusmaa, M.; Fiorini, P.; Megill, W. M.

    2014-01-01

    For underwater vehicles to successfully detect and navigate turbulent flows, sensing the fluid interactions that occur is required. Fish possess a unique sensory organ called the lateral line. Sensory units called neuromasts are distributed over their body, and provide fish with flow-related information. In this study, a three-dimensional fish-shaped head, instrumented with pressure sensors, was used to investigate the pressure signals for relevant hydrodynamic stimuli to an artificial lateral line system. Unsteady wakes were sensed with the objective to detect the edges of the hydrodynamic trail and then explore and characterize the periodicity of the vorticity. The investigated wakes (Kármán vortex streets) were formed behind a range of cylinder diameter sizes (2.5, 4.5 and 10 cm) and flow velocities (9.9, 19.6 and 26.1 cm s−1). Results highlight that moving in the flow is advantageous to characterize the flow environment when compared with static analysis. The pressure difference from foremost to side sensors in the frontal plane provides us a useful measure of transition from steady to unsteady flow. The vortex shedding frequency (VSF) and its magnitude can be used to differentiate the source size and flow speed. Moreover, the distribution of the sensing array vertically as well as the laterally allows the Kármán vortex paired vortices to be detected in the pressure signal as twice the VSF. PMID:25079867

  4. Application of fast-responding pressure-sensitive paint to a hemispherical dome in unsteady transonic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Shuo; Disotell, Kevin J.; Long, Samuel R.; Gregory, James W.; Semmelmayer, Frank C.; Guyton, Robert W.

    2011-06-01

    The current work focuses on the development and application of fast-responding polymer/ceramic pressure-sensitive paint (PSP) as an advanced surface pressure measurement technique for unsteady flow fields in large-scale wind tunnels. To demonstrate the unsteady PSP technique, the unsteady surface pressure distribution over a hemispherical dome placed in the United States Air Force Research Laboratory's Trisonic Gasdynamics Facility (TGF) was studied by phase-locking to the characteristic frequency in the flow caused by an unsteady separated shear layer shed from the dome. The wind tunnel was operated at stagnation pressures of 23.92 and 71.84 kPa, with the test section flow at Mach 0.6. Under the two operating conditions, the predominant shear layer frequency was measured to be 272 and 400 Hz, respectively. The quasi-periodic shear layer frequency enabled a phase-averaged method to be employed for capturing the unsteady shock motion on the hemisphere. Unsteady pressure data resulting from this technique are shown to correlate well with measurements acquired by conventional measurement techniques. Measurement uncertainty in the phase-averaging technique will be discussed. To address measurement uncertainties from temperature sensitivity and model movement, a new implementation of an AC-coupled data representation is offered.

  5. CFD Simulation of 3D Flow field in a Gas Centrifuge

    SciTech Connect

    Dongjun Jiang; Shi Zeng

    2006-07-01

    A CFD method was used to study the whole flow field in a gas centrifuge. In this paper, the VSM (Vector Splitting Method) of the FVM (Finite Volume Method) was used to solve the 3D Navier-Stokes equations. An implicit second-order upwind scheme was adopted. The numerical simulation was successfully performed on a parallel cluster computer and a convergence result was obtained. The simulation shows that: in the withdrawal chamber, a strong detached shock wave is formed in front of the scoop; as the radial position increases, the shock becomes stronger and the distance to scoop front surface is smaller. An oblique shock forms in the clearance between the scoop and the centrifuge wall; behind the shock-wave, the radially-inward motion of gas is induced because of the imbalance of the pressure gradient and the centrifugal force. In the separation chamber, a countercurrent is introduced. This indicates that CFD method can be used to study the complex three-dimensional flow field of gas centrifuges. (authors)

  6. Numerical Calculations of 3-D High-Lift Flows and Comparison with Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Compton, William B, III

    2015-01-01

    Solutions were obtained with the Navier-Stokes CFD code TLNS3D to predict the flow about the NASA Trapezoidal Wing, a high-lift wing composed of three elements: the main-wing element, a deployed leading-edge slat, and a deployed trailing-edge flap. Turbulence was modeled by the Spalart-Allmaras one-equation turbulence model. One case with massive separation was repeated using Menter's two-equation SST (Menter's Shear Stress Transport) k-omega turbulence model in an attempt to improve the agreement with experiment. The investigation was conducted at a free stream Mach number of 0.2, and at angles of attack ranging from 10.004 degrees to 34.858 degrees. The Reynolds number based on the mean aerodynamic chord of the wing was 4.3 x 10 (sup 6). Compared to experiment, the numerical procedure predicted the surface pressures very well at angles of attack in the linear range of the lift. However, computed maximum lift was 5% low. Drag was mainly under predicted. The procedure correctly predicted several well-known trends and features of high-lift flows, such as off-body separation. The two turbulence models yielded significantly different solutions for the repeated case.

  7. USM3D Simulations of Saturn V Plume Induced Flow Separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deere, Karen; Elmlilgui, Alaa; Abdol-Hamid, K. S.

    2011-01-01

    The NASA Constellation Program included the Ares V heavy lift cargo vehicle. During the design stage, engineers questioned if the Plume Induced Flow Separation (PIFS) that occurred along Saturn V rocket during moon missions at some flight conditions, would also plague the newly proposed rocket. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) was offered as a tool for initiating the investigation of PIFS along the Ares V rocket. However, CFD best practice guidelines were not available for such an investigation. In an effort to establish a CFD process and define guidelines for Ares V powered simulations, the Saturn V vehicle was used because PIFS flight data existed. The ideal gas, computational flow solver USM3D was evaluated for its viability in computing PIFS along the Saturn V vehicle with F-1 engines firing. Solutions were computed at supersonic freestream conditions, zero degree angle of attack, zero degree sideslip, and at flight Reynolds numbers. The effects of solution sensitivity to grid refinement, turbulence models, and the engine boundary conditions on the predicted PIFS distance along the Saturn V were discussed and compared to flight data from the Apollo 11 mission AS-506.

  8. 3D Markov Process for Traffic Flow Prediction in Real-Time

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Eunjeong; Ahn, Jinyoung; Kim, Eun Yi

    2016-01-01

    Recently, the correct estimation of traffic flow has begun to be considered an essential component in intelligent transportation systems. In this paper, a new statistical method to predict traffic flows using time series analyses and geometric correlations is proposed. The novelty of the proposed method is two-fold: (1) a 3D heat map is designed to describe the traffic conditions between roads, which can effectively represent the correlations between spatially- and temporally-adjacent traffic states; and (2) the relationship between the adjacent roads on the spatiotemporal domain is represented by cliques in MRF and the clique parameters are obtained by example-based learning. In order to assess the validity of the proposed method, it is tested using data from expressway traffic that are provided by the Korean Expressway Corporation, and the performance of the proposed method is compared with existing approaches. The results demonstrate that the proposed method can predict traffic conditions with an accuracy of 85%, and this accuracy can be improved further. PMID:26821025

  9. A digital holography set-up for 3D vortex flow dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebon, Benoît; Perret, Gaële; Coëtmellec, Sébastien; Godard, Gilles; Gréhan, Gérard; Lebrun, Denis; Brossard, Jérôme

    2016-06-01

    In the present paper, a digital in-line holography (DIH) set-up, with a converging beam, is used to take three-dimensional (3D) velocity measurements of vortices. The vortices are formed periodically at the edges of a submerged horizontal plate submitted to regular waves. They take the form of vortex filaments that extend from side to side of the channel. They undergo strongly three-dimensional instability mechanisms that remain very complicated to characterize experimentally. The experiments are performed in a 10 × 0.3 × 0.3 m3 wave flume. The DIH set-up is performed using a modulated laser diode emitting at the wavelength of 640 nm and a lensless CCD camera. The beam crosses the channel side to side. To reveal the flow dynamics, 30-μm hydrogen bubbles are generated at the edge of the plate to serve as tracers. Their locations are recorded on the holograms multiple times to access the dynamics of the flow. This method leads to an accuracy in the order of 100 μm on the axial location. Those measurements have been validated with stereo-PIV measurements. A very good agreement is found on time-averaged velocity fields between the two techniques.

  10. Flow effects of blood constitutive equations in 3D models of vascular anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neofytou, Panagiotis; Tsangaris, Sokrates

    2006-06-01

    The effects of different blood rheological models are investigated numerically utilizing two three- dimensional (3D) models of vascular anomalies, namely a stenosis and an abdominal aortic aneurysm model. The employed CFD code incorporates the SIMPLE scheme in conjunction with the finite-volume method with collocated arrangement of variables. The approximation of the convection terms is carried out using the QUICK differencing scheme, whereas the code enables also multi-block computations, which are useful in order to cope with the two-block grid structure of the current computational domain. Three non-Newtonian models are employed, namely the Casson, Power-Law and Quemada models, which have been introduced in the past for modelling the rheological behaviour of blood and cover both the viscous as well as the two-phase character of blood. In view of the haemodynamical mechanisms related to abnormalities in the vascular network and the role of the wall shear stress in initiating and further developing of arterial diseases, the present study focuses on the 3D flow field and in particular on the distribution as well as on both low and high values of the wall shear stress in the vicinity of the anomaly. Finally, a comparison is made between the effects of each rheological model on the aforementioned parameters. Results show marked differences between simulating blood as Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluid and furthermore the Power-Law model exhibits different behaviour in all cases compared to the other models whereas Quemada and Casson models exhibit similar behaviour in the case of the stenosis but different behaviour in the case of the aneurysm.

  11. Simulation of bacteria transport processes in a river with Flow3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarzwälder, Kordula; Bui, Minh Duc; Rutschmann, Peter

    2014-05-01

    Water quality aspects are getting more and more important due to the European water Framework directive (WFD). One problem related to this topic is the inflow of untreated wastewater due to combined sewer overflows into a river. The wastewater mixture contains even bacteria like E. coli and Enterococci which are markers for water quality. In our work we investigated the transport of these bacteria in river Isar by using a large-scale flume in the outside area of our lab (Oskar von Miller Institute). Therefor we could collect basic data and knowledge about the processes which occur during bacteria sedimentation and remobilisation. In our flume we could use the real grain with the exact size distribution curve as in the river Isar which we want to simulate and we had the chance to nurture a biofilm which is realistic for the analysed situation. This biofilm plays an important role in the remobilisation processes, because the bacteria are hindered to be washed out back into the bulk phase as fast and in such an amount as this would happen without biofilm. The results of our experiments are now used for a module in the 3D software Flow3D to simulate the effects of a point source inlet of raw wastewater on the water quality. Therefor we have to implement the bacteria not as a problem of concentration with advection and diffusion but as single particles which can be inactivated during the process of settling and need to be hindered from remobilisation by the biofilm. This biofilm has special characteristic, it is slippery and has a special thickness which influences the chance of bacteria being removed. To achieve realistic results we have to include the biofilm with more than a probabilistic-tool to make sure that our module is transferable. The module should be as flexible as possible to be improved step by step with increasing quality of dataset.

  12. Unsteady non-Newtonian blood flow through a tapered overlapping stenosed catheterized vessel.

    PubMed

    Ali, N; Zaman, A; Sajid, M; Nieto, J J; Torres, A

    2015-11-01

    The unsteady flow characteristics of blood in a catheterized overlapping stenosed artery are analyzed in presence of body acceleration and magnetic field. The stenosed arterial segment is modeled as a rigid constricted tube. An improved shape of stenosis in the realm of the formulation of the arterial narrowing caused by atheroma is integrated in the present study. The catheter inside the artery is approximated by a thin rigid tube of small radius while the streaming blood in the artery is characterized by the Carreau model. Employing mild stenosis condition, the governing equation of the flow is derived which is then solving numerically using finite difference scheme. The variation of axial velocity, flow rate, resistance impendence and wall shear stress is shown graphically for various parameters of interest. The flow patterns illustrating the global behavior of blood are also presented. PMID:26361287

  13. Prediction of unsteady airloads for oblique blade-gust interaction in compressible flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, S.; Widnall, S. E.

    1974-01-01

    The techniques of Galilean-Lorentz transformation and matched asymptotic expansions are used to simplify the procedure of calculating the lift and pressure distribution induced on an infinite-span thin wing interacting with an oblique sinusoidal gust in subsonic flow. This technique requires that the product of the flow Mach number and the reduced frequency be small. Under this condition, the inner region of the transformed space behaves as an incompressible flow, so that existing incompressible flow theories can be used as a basis to construct closed-form solutions for the airload induced on the wing. This approach is an extension of the GASP approximation developed by Amiet and Sears (1970). Results are obtained for both the magnitude and the phase of the unsteady lift due to interaction with gust. These results are compared with available numerical results. Some discrepancies are noted and discussed.

  14. Unsteady non-Newtonian blood flow through a tapered overlapping stenosed catheterized vessel.

    PubMed

    Ali, N; Zaman, A; Sajid, M; Nieto, J J; Torres, A

    2015-11-01

    The unsteady flow characteristics of blood in a catheterized overlapping stenosed artery are analyzed in presence of body acceleration and magnetic field. The stenosed arterial segment is modeled as a rigid constricted tube. An improved shape of stenosis in the realm of the formulation of the arterial narrowing caused by atheroma is integrated in the present study. The catheter inside the artery is approximated by a thin rigid tube of small radius while the streaming blood in the artery is characterized by the Carreau model. Employing mild stenosis condition, the governing equation of the flow is derived which is then solving numerically using finite difference scheme. The variation of axial velocity, flow rate, resistance impendence and wall shear stress is shown graphically for various parameters of interest. The flow patterns illustrating the global behavior of blood are also presented.

  15. Time-marching methods for three-dimensional steady and unsteady viscous imcompressible flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, C.-H.; Chen, Y.-M.; Liu, C. H.

    1991-01-01

    An implicit algorithm for the solution of three-dimensional, steady and unsteady, viscous, incompressible flows is presented. The algorithm is based on an upwind-relaxation finite-difference method. Steady-state solutions are carried out using a time-marching solution technique in combination with a local time-stepping strategy. To obtain time-accurate solutions, a subiterative procedure is employed at each physical time step using a global time step to ensure the divergence-free condition. Steady-state flows in several straight ducts and in a square duct with a 90-degree bend are computed and compared with analytical and experimental results. The classical problem of starting flow in a circular pipe is chosen to verify the time accuracy of the present scheme. Finally, the three-dimensional bubble-type vortex breakdown of a slender cylindrical vortex in an unbounded flow is investigated.

  16. Development of a configurable unsteady compressible flow analysis using a generic programming approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noll, Christopher Thomas

    The development of an unsteady compressible flow analysis and configurable code design is presented. The design is based on the generic programming approach and is implemented using the C++ programming language. The generic programming approach heralds a revolution in software engineering, when high-performance programs will be assembled rapidly from readily available, mass-produced software components and generic algorithms. Using this approach, researchers will be able to share the burden of software development across research groups and disciplines allowing more difficult problems and more complex numerical methods to be used than previously practical. The computational fluid dynamics code design presented here consists of numerous component types (concepts) and specifications for the way that they interact in an assembled program (generic algorithms). The generic nature of the design allows for numerous flow codes to be developed from it using components specific to the particular task at hand. Numerous elliptic grid generation and flow codes were developed from this design, which allows for various numerical methods to be used interchangeably. The application of particular codes, assembled using this design, to problems of interest to the fluid dynamicist is discussed. The cases include the unsteady flow simulation for flow past a circular cylinder, flow past a maneuvering airfoil, and flow generated by a multi-finned mixer geometry. A commonly used approach for generating elliptic grids is shown to be overdetermined. This analysis is corrected and used as the basis of an improved automatic elliptic grid generation system. Grid generation codes based on this system are used to generate the grids necessary for the flow simulations.

  17. On rating curve variability in presence of movable bed and unsteady flow. Applications to Tuscan rivers.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minatti, Lorenzo; Nicoletta De Cicco, Pina; Paris, Enio

    2014-05-01

    In common engineering practice, rating curves are obtained from direct stage-discharge measurements or, more often, from stage measurements coupled with flow simulations. The present work mainly focuses on the latter technique, where stage-measuring gauges are usually installed on bridges with flow conditions likely to be influenced by local geometry constraints. In such cases, backwater flow and flow transition to supercritical state may occur, influencing sediment transport capacity and triggering more intense changes in river morphology. The unsteadiness of the flow hydrograph may play an important role too, according to the velocity of its rising and falling limbs. Nevertheless, the simulations conducted to build a rating curve are often carried out with steady flow and fixed bed conditions where the afore-mentioned effects are not taken into account at all. Numerical simulations with mobile bed and different unsteady flow conditions have been conducted on some real case studies in the rivers of Tuscany (Italy), in order to assess how rating curves change with respect to the "standard" one (that is, the classical steady flow rating curve). A 1D finite volume numerical model (REMo, River Evolution Modeler) has been employed for the simulations. The model solves the 1D Shallow Water equations coupled with the sediments continuity equation in composite channels, where the overbanks are treated with fixed bed conditions while the main channel can either aggrade or be scoured. The model employs an explicit scheme with 2nd order accuracy in both space and time: this allows the correct handling of moderately stiff source terms via a local corrector step. Such capability is very important for the applications of the present work as it allows the modelling of abrupt contractions and jumps in bed bottom elevations which often occur near bridges. The outcomes of the simulations are critically analyzed in order to provide a first insight on the conditions inducing

  18. Experimental study on unsteady open channel flow and bedload transport based on a physical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, W.

    2015-12-01

    Flow in a nature river are usually unsteady, while nearly all the theories about bedload transport are on the basis of steady, uniform flow, and also with supposed equilibrium state of sediment transport. This is may be one of the main reasons why the bedload transport formulas are notoriously poor accuracy to predict the bedload. The aim of this research is to shed light on the effect of unsteadiness on the bedload transport based on experimental studies. The novel of this study is that the experiments were not carried out in a conventional flume but in a physical model, which are more similar to the actual river. On the other hand, in our experiments, multiple consecutive flood wave were reproduced in the physical model, and all the flow and sediment parameters are based on a large number of data obtained from many of identical flood waves. This method allow us to get more data for one flood, efficiently avoids the uncertainty of bedload rate only for one single flood wave, due to the stochastic fluctuation of the bedload transport. Three different flood waves were selected in the experiments. During each run of experiment, the water level of five different positions along the model were measured by ultrasonic water level gauge, flow velocity at the middle of the channel were measured by two dimensional electromagnetic current meter. Moreover, the bedload transport rate was measured by a unique automatic trap collecting and weighing system at the end of the physical model. The results shows that the celerity of flood wave propagate varies for different flow conditions. The velocity distribution was approximately accord with log-law profile during the entire rising and falling limb of flood. The bedload transport rate show intensity fluctuation in all the experiments, moreover, for different flood waves, the moment when the shear stress reaches its maximum value is not the exact moment when the sediment transport rate reaches its maximum value, which indicates

  19. Experiments and 3D simulations of flow structures in junctions and their influence on location of flowmeters.

    PubMed

    Mignot, E; Bonakdari, H; Knothe, P; Lipeme Kouyi, G; Bessette, A; Rivière, N; Bertrand-Krajewski, J-L

    2012-01-01

    Open-channel junctions are common occurrences in sewer networks and flow rate measurement often occurs near these singularities. Local flow structures are 3D, impact on the representativeness of the local flow measurements and thus lead to deviations in the flow rate estimation. The present study aims (i) to measure and simulate the flow pattern in a junction flow, (ii) to analyse the impact of the junction on the velocity distribution according to the distance from the junction and thus (iii) to evaluate the typical error derived from the computation of the flow rate close to the junction. PMID:22828313

  20. Heat Flow Partitioning Between Continents and Oceans - from 2D to 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moresi, L. N.; Cooper, C. M.; Lenardic, A.

    2010-12-01

    Scalings derived from thermal network theory explain how the presence of continents can influence the Earth’s overall heat loss. Intuitively, it may seem that increasing the proportion of a planet’s surface area covered by continents would decrease the efficiency of heat transfer given that continents do not participate in convective overturn. However, this ignores the potential feedback between the insulating effect of continents and the temperature-dependent viscosity of the mantle (Lenardic et al, 2005, Cooper et al, 2007). When this feedback is considered, a clear regime exists in which the partial stagnation and insulation of the surface by buoyant continental crust can lead to an increase in heat flow compared to the uninsulated case. The numerical results used to verify the scalings have mostly been conducted in two dimensions in order to cover a very wide range of Rayleigh number, fraction of continental coverage, and continental thickness. However as more recent results show that the configuration of the crust also plays a role in determining the heat flow partitioning and global heat flow (See Lenardic et al, “Continents, Super-Continents, Mantle Thermal Mixing, and Mantle Thermal Isolation” in this session), we have begun to repeat this exhaustive and exhausting 2D study in 3D. Cooper, C.M., A. Lenardic, and L.-N. Moresi "Effects of continental insulation and the partioning of heat producing elements on the Earth's heat loss." Geophys. Res. Lett., 33 ,10.1029, 2006. Lenardic, A., L.-N. Moresi, A.M. Jellinek, and M. Manga "Continental insulation, mantle cooling, and the surface area of oceans and continents." Earth Planet. Sci. Lett., 234 ,317-333, 2005.

  1. Experimental Investigation of Material Flows Within FSWs Using 3D Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Charles R. Tolle; Timothy A. White; Karen S. Miller; Denis E. Clark; Herschel B. Smartt

    2008-06-01

    There exists significant prior work using tracers or pre-placed hardened markers within friction stir welding (FSWing) to experimentally explore material flow within the FSW process. Our experiments replaced markers with a thin sheet of copper foil placed between the 6061 aluminum lap and butt joints that were then welded. The absorption characteristics of x-rays for copper and aluminum are significantly different allowing for non-destructive evaluation (NDE) methods such as x-ray computed tomography (CT) to be used to demonstrate the material movement within the weldment on a much larger scale than previously shown. 3D CT reconstruction of the copper components of the weldment allows for a unique view into the final turbulent state of the welding process as process parameters are varied. The x-ray CT data of a section of the weld region was collected using a cone-beam x-ray imaging system developed at the INL. Six-hundred projections were collected over 360-degrees using a 160-kVp Bremsstrahlung x-ray generator (25-micrometer focal spot) and amorphoussilicon x-ray detector. The region of the object that was imaged was about 3cm tall and 1.5cm x 1cm in cross section, and was imaged at a magnification of about 3.6x. The data were reconstructed on a 0.5x0.5x0.5 mm3 voxel grid. After reconstruction, the aluminum and copper could be easily discriminated using a gray level threshold allowing visualization of the copper components. Fractal analysis of the tomographic reconstructed material topology is investigated as a means to quantify macro level material flow based on process parameters. The results of multi-pass FSWs show increased refinement of the copper trace material. Implications of these techniques for quantifying process flow are discussed.

  2. A vortex panel analysis of circular-arc bluff-bodies in unsteady flow

    SciTech Connect

    Strickland, J.H.

    1989-01-01

    A method which is capable of calculating the unsteady flow field around circular-arc bluff bodies of zero thickness is presented. This method utilizes linear vortex panels to model the body surface and a portion of the wake surfaces. Discrete vortices are used to model the remainder of the wake surfaces. Separation is assumed to occur at the sharp edges of the bodies. Numerical results for circular-arc bodies with included angles of less than 180/degree/ are compared with experimental data and found to be in good agreement. 31 refs., 15 figs.

  3. Minnowbrook IV: 2003 Workshop on Transition and Unsteady Aspects of Turbomachinery Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LaGraff, John E. (Editor); Ashpis, David E. (Editor)

    2004-01-01

    On August 17 to 20, 2003, over 40 attendees participated in a workshop entitled "Minnowbrook IV.2003 Workshop on Transition and Unsteady Aspects of Turbomachinery Flows. Earlier themes focused on improving the understanding of late stage (final breakdown) of boundary layer transition. The specific engineering application of improving design codes for turbomachinery was encouraged by the attendance of representatives from gas turbine manufacturers. Written papers were not requested. Abstracts and copies of figures were the only written record of the workshop aside from specifically commissioned transcriptions of a workshop summary and the extensive working group reports, discussions, and summary that followed on the final morning of the workshop.

  4. Heat and mass transfer in unsteady rotating fluid flow with binary chemical reaction and activation energy.

    PubMed

    Awad, Faiz G; Motsa, Sandile; Khumalo, Melusi

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the Spectral Relaxation Method (SRM) is used to solve the coupled highly nonlinear system of partial differential equations due to an unsteady flow over a stretching surface in an incompressible rotating viscous fluid in presence of binary chemical reaction and Arrhenius activation energy. The velocity, temperature and concentration distributions as well as the skin-friction, heat and mass transfer coefficients have been obtained and discussed for various physical parametric values. The numerical results obtained by (SRM) are then presented graphically and discussed to highlight the physical implications of the simulations. PMID:25250830

  5. Heat and Mass Transfer in Unsteady Rotating Fluid Flow with Binary Chemical Reaction and Activation Energy

    PubMed Central

    Awad, Faiz G.; Motsa, Sandile; Khumalo, Melusi

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the Spectral Relaxation Method (SRM) is used to solve the coupled highly nonlinear system of partial differential equations due to an unsteady flow over a stretching surface in an incompressible rotating viscous fluid in presence of binary chemical reaction and Arrhenius activation energy. The velocity, temperature and concentration distributions as well as the skin-friction, heat and mass transfer coefficients have been obtained and discussed for various physical parametric values. The numerical results obtained by (SRM) are then presented graphically and discussed to highlight the physical implications of the simulations. PMID:25250830

  6. Unsteady MHD Thin Film Flow of an Oldroyd-B Fluid over an Oscillating Inclined Belt

    PubMed Central

    Gul, Taza; Islam, Saeed; Shah, Rehan Ali; Khalid, Asma; Khan, Ilyas; Shafie, Sharidan

    2015-01-01

    This paper studies the unsteady magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) thin film flow of an incompressible Oldroyd-B fluid over an oscillating inclined belt making a certain angle with the horizontal. The problem is modeled in terms of non-linear partial differential equations with some physical initial and boundary conditions. This problem is solved for the exact analytic solutions using two efficient techniques namely the Optimal Homotopy Asymptotic Method (OHAM) and Homotopy Perturbation Method (HPM). Both of these solutions are presented graphically and compared. This comparison is also shown in tabular form. An excellent agreement is observed. The effects of various physical parameters on velocity have also been studied graphically. PMID:26147287

  7. Investigation of Unsteady Flow Interaction Between an Ultra-Compact Inlet and a Transonic Fan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hah, Chunill; Rabe, Douglas; Scribben, Angie

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, unsteady flow interaction between an ultra-compact inlet and a transonic fan stage is investigated. Future combat aircraft require ultra-compact inlet ducts as part of an integrated, advanced propulsion system to improve air vehicle capability and effectiveness to meet future mission needs. The main purpose of the study is to advance the current understanding of the flow interaction between two different ultra-compact inlets and a transonic fan for future design applications. Both URANS and LES approaches are used to calculate the unsteady flow field and are compared with the available measured data. The present study indicates that stall inception is mildly affected by the distortion pattern generated by the inlet with the current test set-up. The numerical study indicates that the inlet distortion pattern decays significantly before it reaches the fan face for the current configuration. Numerical results with a shorter distance between the inlet and fan show that counter-rotating vortices near the rotor tip due to the serpentine diffuser affects fan characteristics significantly.

  8. Estimation of Time Scales in Unsteady Flows in a Turbomachinery Rig

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewalle, Jacques; Ashpis, David E.

    2004-01-01

    Time scales in turbulent and transitional flow provide a link between experimental data and modeling, both in terms of physical content and for quantitative assessment. The problem of interest here is the definition of time scales in an unsteady flow. Using representative samples of data from GEAE low pressure turbine experiment in low speed research turbine facility with wake-induced transition, we document several methods to extract dominant frequencies, and compare the results. We show that conventional methods of time scale evaluation (based on autocorrelation functions and on Fourier spectra) and wavelet-based methods provide similar information when applied to stationary signals. We also show the greater flexibility of the wavelet-based methods when dealing with intermittent or strongly modulated data, as are encountered in transitioning boundary layers and in flows with unsteady forcing associated with wake passing. We define phase-averaged dominant frequencies that characterize the turbulence associated with freestream conditions and with the passing wakes downstream of a rotor. The relevance of these results for modeling is discussed in the paper.

  9. A first-order time-domain Green's function approach to supersonic unsteady flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freedman, M. I.; Tseng, K.

    1985-01-01

    A time-domain Green's Function Method for unsteady supersonic potential flow around complex aircraft configurations is presented. The focus is on the supersonic range wherein the linear potential flow assumption is valid. The Green's function method is employed in order to convert the potential-flow differential equation into an integral one. This integral equation is then discretized, in space through standard finite-element technique, and in time through finite-difference, to yield a linear algebraic system of equations relating the unknown potential to its prescribed co-normalwash (boundary condition) on the surface of the aircraft. The arbitrary complex aircraft configuration is discretized into hyperboloidal (twisted quadrilateral) panels. The potential and co-normalwash are assumed to vary linearly within each panel. Consistent with the spatial linear (first-order) finite-element approximations, the potential and co-normalwash are assumed to vary linearly in time. The long range goal of our research is to develop a comprehensive theory for unsteady supersonic potential aerodynamics which is capable of yielding accurate results even in the low supersonic (i.e., high transonic) range.

  10. Transition of a Three-Dimensional Unsteady Viscous Flow Analysis from a Research Environment to the Design Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorney, Suzanne; Dorney, Daniel J.; Huber, Frank; Sheffler, David A.; Turner, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The advent of advanced computer architectures and parallel computing have led to a revolutionary change in the design process for turbomachinery components. Two- and three-dimensional steady-state computational flow procedures are now routinely used in the early stages of design. Unsteady flow analyses, however, are just beginning to be incorporated into design systems. This paper outlines the transition of a three-dimensional unsteady viscous flow analysis from the research environment into the design environment. The test case used to demonstrate the analysis is the full turbine system (high-pressure turbine, inter-turbine duct and low-pressure turbine) from an advanced turboprop engine.

  11. River bedform inception by flow unsteadiness: A modal and nonmodal analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caruso, Alice; Vesipa, Riccardo; Camporeale, Carlo; Ridolfi, Luca; Schmid, Peter J.

    2016-05-01

    River bedforms arise as a result of morphological instabilities of the stream-sediment interface. Dunes and antidunes constitute the most typical patterns, and their occurrence and dynamics are relevant for a number of engineering and environmental applications. Although flow variability is a typical feature of all rivers, the bedform-triggering morphological instabilities have generally been studied under the assumption of a constant flow rate. In order to partially address this shortcoming, we here discuss the influence of (periodic) flow unsteadiness on bedform inception. To this end, our recent one-dimensional validated model coupling Dressler's equations with a refined mechanistic sediment transport formulation is adopted, and both the asymptotic and transient dynamics are investigated by modal and nonmodal analyses.

  12. Unsteady flow in a supersonic cascade with strong in-passage shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, M. E.; Braun, W.; Adamczyk, J. J.

    1977-01-01

    Linearized theory is used to study the unsteady flow in a supersonic cascade with in-passage shock waves. We use the Wiener-Hopf technique to obtain a closed-form analytical solution for the supersonic region. To obtain a solution for the rotational flow in the subsonic region we must solve an infinite set of linear algebraic equations. The analysis shows that it is possible to correlate quantitatively the oscillatory shock motion with the Kutta condition at the trailing edges of the blades. This feature allows us to account for the effect of shock motion on the stability of the cascade. Unlike the theory for a completely supersonic flow, the present study predicts the occurrence of supersonic bending flutter. It therefore provides a possible explanation for the bending flutter that has recently been detected in aircraft-engine compressors at higher blade loadings.

  13. Control of unsteady separated flow associated with the dynamic stall of airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilder, M. C.

    1994-01-01

    A unique active flow-control device is proposed for the control of unsteady separated flow associated with the dynamic stall of airfoils. The device is an adaptive-geometry leading-edge which will allow controlled, dynamic modification of the leading-edge profile of an airfoil while the airfoil is executing an angle-of-attack pitch-up maneuver. A carbon-fiber composite skin has been bench tested, and a wind tunnel model is under construction. A baseline parameter study of compressible dynamic stall was performed for flow over an NACA 0012 airfoil. Parameters included Mach number, pitch rate, pitch history, and boundary layer tripping. Dynamic stall data were recorded via point-diffraction interferometry and the interferograms were analyzed with in-house developed image processing software. A new high-speed phase-locked photographic image recording system was developed for real-time documentation of dynamic stall.

  14. Unsteady viscous effects in the flow over an oscillating surface. [mathematical model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lerner, J. I.

    1972-01-01

    A theoretical model for the interaction of a turbulent boundary layer with an oscillating wavy surface over which a fluid is flowing is developed, with an application to wind-driven water waves and to panel flutter in low supersonic flow. A systematic methodology is developed to obtain the surface pressure distribution by considering separately the effects on the perturbed flow of a mean shear velocity profile, viscous stresses, the turbulent Reynolds stresses, compressibility, and three-dimensionality. The inviscid theory is applied to the wind-water wave problem by specializing to traveling-wave disturbances, and the pressure magnitude and phase shift as a function of the wave phase speed are computed for a logarithmic mean velocity profile and compared with inviscid theory and experiment. The results agree with experimental evidence for the stabilization of the panel motion due to the influence of the unsteady boundary layer.

  15. Unsteady magnetohydrodynamics mixed convection flow in a rotating medium with double diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Jiann, Lim Yeou; Ismail, Zulkhibri; Khan, Ilyas; Shafie, Sharidan

    2015-05-15

    Exact solutions of an unsteady Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) flow over an impulsively started vertical plate in a rotating medium are presented. The effects of thermal radiative and thermal diffusion on the fluid flow are also considered. The governing equations are modelled and solved for velocity, temperature and concentration using Laplace transforms technique. Expressions of velocity, temperature and concentration profiles are obtained and their numerical results are presented graphically. Skin friction, Sherwood number and Nusselt number are also computed and presented in tabular forms. The determined solutions can generate a large class of solutions as special cases corresponding to different motions with technical relevance. The results obtained herein may be used to verify the validation of obtained numerical solutions for more complicated fluid flow problems.

  16. Transonic flow analysis for rotors. Part 2: Three-dimensional, unsteady, full-potential calculation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, I. C.

    1985-01-01

    A numerical method is presented for calculating the three-dimensional unsteady, transonic flow past a helicopter rotor blade of arbitrary geometry. The method solves the full-potential equations in a blade-fixed frame of reference by a time-marching implicit scheme. At the far-field, a set of first-order radiation conditions is imposed, thus minimizing the reflection of outgoing wavelets from computational boundaries. Computed results are presented to highlight radial flow effects in three dimensions, to compare surface pressure distributions to quasi-steady predictions, and to predict the flow field on a swept-tip blade. The results agree well with experimental data for both straight- and swept-tip blade geometries.

  17. Using a magnetite/thermoplastic composite in 3D printing of direct replacements for commercially available flow sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leigh, S. J.; Purssell, C. P.; Billson, D. R.; Hutchins, D. A.

    2014-09-01

    Flow sensing is an essential technique required for a wide range of application environments ranging from liquid dispensing to utility monitoring. A number of different methodologies and deployment strategies have been devised to cover the diverse range of potential application areas. The ability to easily create new bespoke sensors for new applications is therefore of natural interest. Fused deposition modelling is a 3D printing technology based upon the fabrication of 3D structures in a layer-by-layer fashion using extruded strands of molten thermoplastic. The technology was developed in the late 1980s but has only recently come to more wide-scale attention outside of specialist applications and rapid prototyping due to the advent of low-cost 3D printing platforms such as the RepRap. Due to the relatively low-cost of the printers and feedstock materials, these printers are ideal candidates for wide-scale installation as localized manufacturing platforms to quickly produce replacement parts when components fail. One of the current limitations with the technology is the availability of functional printing materials to facilitate production of complex functional 3D objects and devices beyond mere concept prototypes. This paper presents the formulation of a simple magnetite nanoparticle-loaded thermoplastic composite and its incorporation into a 3D printed flow-sensor in order to mimic the function of a commercially available flow-sensing device. Using the multi-material printing capability of the 3D printer allows a much smaller amount of functional material to be used in comparison to the commercial flow sensor by only placing the material where it is specifically required. Analysis of the printed sensor also revealed a much more linear response to increasing flow rate of water showing that 3D printed devices have the potential to at least perform as well as a conventionally produced sensor.

  18. Steady and Unsteady Flow Field Measurements Within a NASA 22-Inch Fan Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Podboy, Gary G.; Krupar, Martin J.; Helland, Stephen M.; Hughes, Christopher E.

    2003-01-01

    Results are presented of an experiment conducted to investigate possible sources of fan noise in the flow developed by a 22-in. (55.9 cm) diameter turbofan model. Flow diagnostic data were acquired to identify possible sources of both tone and broadband noise. Laser Doppler velocimetry was used to characterize the tip flows that develop within the rotor blade passages, the wake flow downstream of the rotor, and the shock waves that develop on the blades when operated at transonic relative tip speeds. Single-point hot-wire measurements were made in the rotor wake to determine the frequency content and the length scales of the flow unsteadiness. The results document the changes in the rotor wake flow with both rotor speed and axial distance downstream of the rotor. The data also show the tip flow development within the blade passage, its migration downstream, and (at high rotor speeds) its merging with the blade wake of the following blade. Data also depict the variation of the tip flow with tip clearance. LDV data obtained within the blade passages at high rotor speeds illustrate the passage-to-passage variation of the mean shock position. Spectra computed from the single-point hot-wire measurements illustrate how the energy in the flow oscillations is split between periodic and random components, and how this split varies with both radial and axial position in the rotor wake.

  19. Controlled vortical flow on delta wings through unsteady leading edge blowing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, K. T.; Roberts, Leonard

    1990-01-01

    The vortical flow over a delta wing contributes an important part of the lift - the so called nonlinear lift. Controlling this vortical flow with its favorable influence would enhance aircraft maneuverability at high angle of attack. Several previous studies have shown that control of the vortical flow field is possible through the use of blowing jets. The present experimental research studies vortical flow control by applying a new blowing scheme to the rounded leading edge of a delta wing; this blowing scheme is called Tangential Leading Edge Blowing (TLEB). Vortical flow response both to steady blowing and to unsteady blowing is investigated. It is found that TLEB can redevelop stable, strong vortices even in the post-stall angle of attack regime. Analysis of the steady data shows that the effect of leading edge blowing can be interpreted as an effective change in angle of attack. The examination of the fundamental time scales for vortical flow re-organization after the application of blowing for different initial states of the flow field is studied. Different time scales for flow re-organization are shown to depend upon the effective angle of attack. A faster response time can be achieved at angles of attack beyond stall by a suitable choice of the initial blowing momentum strength. Consequently, TLEB shows the potential of controlling the vortical flow over a wide range of angles of attack; i.e., in both for pre-stall and post-stall conditions.

  20. Thermocapillary bubble flow and coalescence in a rotating cylinder: A 3D study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alhendal, Yousuf; Turan, A.; Al-mazidi, M.

    2015-12-01

    The process of thermocapillary bubbles rising in a rotating 3D cylinder in zero gravity was analysed and presented numerically with the aid of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) by means of the volume of fluid (VOF) method. Calculations were carried out to investigate in detail the effect of the rotational speed of the hosted liquid on the trajectory of both single and group bubbles driven by the Marangoni force in zero-gravity conditions. For rotational speeds from 0.25 to 2 rad/s, bubble displacement with angular motion was found to be directed between the hotter surface and the rotational axis. This is contrary to the conventional bubble flow from areas of high pressure to low pressure, radial direction, or from cold to hot regions, axial direction. The results demonstrate that for the ratio of rotational speeds to the thermocapillary bubble velocity larger than unity, the surface tension gradient is the dominant force and the bubble motion towards the hotter. On the other hand, for ratio less than 1, the bubble motion is dominated and is significantly affected by centrifugal force. As rotation speed increases, the amount of deflection increases and the Marangoni effect vanishes. The current study is novel in the sense that single- and multi-bubble motion incorporating thermocapillary forces in a rotating liquid in a zero-gravity environment has never been numerically investigated.