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Sample records for 3d unstructured grids

  1. 3D Feature Extraction for Unstructured Grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silver, Deborah

    1996-01-01

    Visualization techniques provide tools that help scientists identify observed phenomena in scientific simulation. To be useful, these tools must allow the user to extract regions, classify and visualize them, abstract them for simplified representations, and track their evolution. Object Segmentation provides a technique to extract and quantify regions of interest within these massive datasets. This article explores basic algorithms to extract coherent amorphous regions from two-dimensional and three-dimensional scalar unstructured grids. The techniques are applied to datasets from Computational Fluid Dynamics and those from Finite Element Analysis.

  2. Recent advances in unstructured grid generation program VGRID3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parikh, Paresh; Pirzadeh, Shahyar

    1992-01-01

    A program for the generation of unstructured grids over complex configurations, VGRID3D, is described. The grid elements (triangles on the surfaces and tetrahedra in the field) are generated starting from the surface boundaries towards the interior of the computational domain using the Advancing Front Method.

  3. Unstructured grid solutions to a wing/pylon/store configuration using VGRID3D/USM3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parikh, Paresh; Pirzadeh, Shahyar; Frink, Neal T.

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to validate an inviscid flow solution package based on a new unstructured grid methodology using experimental data on a wing/pylon/store configuration. The solution package consists of an advancing front unstructured grid generator, VGRID3D, and an efficient Euler equation solver, USM3D. Comparisons of computed data versus experimental data are made for two free-stream Mach numbers at five store locations relative to the wing. Both rigid body aerodynamics and mutual interference effects are explored. A very good agreement is observed between computed and wind tunnel data.

  4. RHALE: A 3-D MMALE code for unstructured grids

    SciTech Connect

    Peery, J.S.; Budge, K.G.; Wong, M.K.W.; Trucano, T.G.

    1993-08-01

    This paper describes RHALE, a multi-material arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (MMALE) shock physics code. RHALE is the successor to CTH, Sandia`s 3-D Eulerian shock physics code, and will be capable of solving problems that CTH cannot adequately address. We discuss the Lagrangian solid mechanics capabilities of RHALE, which include arbitrary mesh connectivity, superior artificial viscosity, and improved material models. We discuss the MMALE algorithms that have been extended for arbitrary grids in both two- and three-dimensions. The MMALE addition to RHALE provides the accuracy of a Lagrangian code while allowing a calculation to proceed under very large material distortions. Coupling an arbitrary quadrilateral or hexahedral grid to the MMALE solution facilitates modeling of complex shapes with a greatly reduced number of computational cells. RHALE allows regions of a problem to be modeled with Lagrangian, Eulerian or ALE meshes. In addition, regions can switch from Lagrangian to ALE to Eulerian based on user input or mesh distortion. For ALE meshes, new node locations are determined with a variety of element based equipotential schemes. Element quantities are advected with donor, van Leer, or Super-B algorithms. Nodal quantities are advected with the second order SHALE or HIS algorithms. Material interfaces are determined with a modified Young`s high resolution interface tracker or the SLIC algorithm. RHALE has been used to model many problems of interest to the mechanics, hypervelocity impact, and shock physics communities. Results of a sampling of these problems are presented in this paper.

  5. Progress Toward Overset-Grid Moving Body Capability for USM3D Unstructured Flow Solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pandyna, Mohagna J.; Frink, Neal T.; Noack, Ralph W.

    2005-01-01

    A static and dynamic Chimera overset-grid capability is added to an established NASA tetrahedral unstructured parallel Navier-Stokes flow solver, USM3D. Modifications to the solver primarily consist of a few strategic calls to the Donor interpolation Receptor Transaction library (DiRTlib) to facilitate communication of solution information between various grids. The assembly of multiple overlapping grids into a single-zone composite grid is performed by the Structured, Unstructured and Generalized Grid AssembleR (SUGGAR) code. Several test cases are presented to verify the implementation, assess overset-grid solution accuracy and convergence relative to single-grid solutions, and demonstrate the prescribed relative grid motion capability.

  6. Simulations of implosions with a 3D, parallel, unstructured-grid, radiation-hydrodynamics code

    SciTech Connect

    Kaiser, T B; Milovich, J L; Prasad, M K; Rathkopf, J; Shestakov, A I

    1998-12-28

    An unstructured-grid, radiation-hydrodynamics code is used to simulate implosions. Although most of the problems are spherically symmetric, they are run on 3D, unstructured grids in order to test the code's ability to maintain spherical symmetry of the converging waves. Three problems, of increasing complexity, are presented. In the first, a cold, spherical, ideal gas bubble is imploded by an enclosing high pressure source. For the second, we add non-linear heat conduction and drive the implosion with twelve laser beams centered on the vertices of an icosahedron. In the third problem, a NIF capsule is driven with a Planckian radiation source.

  7. Aeroacoustic Simulation of Nose Landing Gear on Adaptive Unstructured Grids With FUN3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vatsa, Veer N.; Khorrami, Mehdi R.; Park, Michael A.; Lockhard, David P.

    2013-01-01

    Numerical simulations have been performed for a partially-dressed, cavity-closed nose landing gear configuration that was tested in NASA Langley s closed-wall Basic Aerodynamic Research Tunnel (BART) and in the University of Florida's open-jet acoustic facility known as the UFAFF. The unstructured-grid flow solver FUN3D, developed at NASA Langley Research center, is used to compute the unsteady flow field for this configuration. Starting with a coarse grid, a series of successively finer grids were generated using the adaptive gridding methodology available in the FUN3D code. A hybrid Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes/large eddy simulation (RANS/LES) turbulence model is used for these computations. Time-averaged and instantaneous solutions obtained on these grids are compared with the measured data. In general, the correlation with the experimental data improves with grid refinement. A similar trend is observed for sound pressure levels obtained by using these CFD solutions as input to a FfowcsWilliams-Hawkings noise propagation code to compute the farfield noise levels. In general, the numerical solutions obtained on adapted grids compare well with the hand-tuned enriched fine grid solutions and experimental data. In addition, the grid adaption strategy discussed here simplifies the grid generation process, and results in improved computational efficiency of CFD simulations.

  8. A package for 3-D unstructured grid generation, finite-element flow solution and flow field visualization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parikh, Paresh; Pirzadeh, Shahyar; Loehner, Rainald

    1990-01-01

    A set of computer programs for 3-D unstructured grid generation, fluid flow calculations, and flow field visualization was developed. The grid generation program, called VGRID3D, generates grids over complex configurations using the advancing front method. In this method, the point and element generation is accomplished simultaneously, VPLOT3D is an interactive, menudriven pre- and post-processor graphics program for interpolation and display of unstructured grid data. The flow solver, VFLOW3D, is an Euler equation solver based on an explicit, two-step, Taylor-Galerkin algorithm which uses the Flux Corrected Transport (FCT) concept for a wriggle-free solution. Using these programs, increasingly complex 3-D configurations of interest to aerospace community were gridded including a complete Space Transportation System comprised of the space-shuttle orbitor, the solid-rocket boosters, and the external tank. Flow solutions were obtained on various configurations in subsonic, transonic, and supersonic flow regimes.

  9. USM3D Unstructured Grid Solutions for CAWAPI at NASA LaRC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamar, John E.; Abdol-Hamid, Khaled S.

    2007-01-01

    In support the Cranked Arrow Wing Aerodynamic Project International (CAWAPI) to improve the Technology Readiness Level of flow solvers by comparing results with measured F-16XL-1 flight data, NASA Langley employed the TetrUSS unstructured grid solver, USM3D, to obtain solutions for all seven flight conditions of interest. A newly available solver version that incorporates a number of turbulence models, including the two-equation linear and non-linear k-epsilon, was used in this study. As a first test, a choice was made to utilize only a single grid resolution with the solver for the simulation of the different flight conditions. Comparisons are presented with three turbulence models in USM3D, flight data for surface pressure, boundary-layer profiles, and skin-friction results, as well as limited predictions from other solvers. A result of these comparisons is that the USM3D solver can be used in an engineering environment to predict flow physics on a complex configuration at flight Reynolds numbers with a two-equation linear k-epsilon turbulence model.

  10. Aeroacoustic Simulations of a Nose Landing Gear Using FUN3D on Pointwise Unstructured Grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vatsa, Veer N.; Khorrami, Mehdi R.; Rhoads, John; Lockard, David P.

    2015-01-01

    Numerical simulations have been performed for a partially-dressed, cavity-closed (PDCC) nose landing gear configuration that was tested in the University of Florida's open-jet acoustic facility known as the UFAFF. The unstructured-grid flow solver FUN3D is used to compute the unsteady flow field for this configuration. Mixed-element grids generated using the Pointwise(TradeMark) grid generation software are used for these simulations. Particular care is taken to ensure quality cells and proper resolution in critical areas of interest in an effort to minimize errors introduced by numerical artifacts. A hybrid Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes/large eddy simulation (RANS/LES) turbulence model is used for these simulations. Solutions are also presented for a wall function model coupled to the standard turbulence model. Time-averaged and instantaneous solutions obtained on these Pointwise grids are compared with the measured data and previous numerical solutions. The resulting CFD solutions are used as input to a Ffowcs Williams-Hawkings noise propagation code to compute the farfield noise levels in the flyover and sideline directions. The computed noise levels compare well with previous CFD solutions and experimental data.

  11. Radiation Coupling with the FUN3D Unstructured-Grid CFD Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, William A.

    2012-01-01

    The HARA radiation code is fully-coupled to the FUN3D unstructured-grid CFD code for the purpose of simulating high-energy hypersonic flows. The radiation energy source terms and surface heat transfer, under the tangent slab approximation, are included within the fluid dynamic ow solver. The Fire II flight test, at the Mach-31 1643-second trajectory point, is used as a demonstration case. Comparisons are made with an existing structured-grid capability, the LAURA/HARA coupling. The radiative surface heat transfer rates from the present approach match the benchmark values within 6%. Although radiation coupling is the focus of the present work, convective surface heat transfer rates are also reported, and are seen to vary depending upon the choice of mesh connectivity and FUN3D ux reconstruction algorithm. On a tetrahedral-element mesh the convective heating matches the benchmark at the stagnation point, but under-predicts by 15% on the Fire II shoulder. Conversely, on a mixed-element mesh the convective heating over-predicts at the stagnation point by 20%, but matches the benchmark away from the stagnation region.

  12. An efficient algorithm for mapping imaging data to 3D unstructured grids in computational biomechanics.

    PubMed

    Einstein, Daniel R; Kuprat, Andrew P; Jiao, Xiangmin; Carson, James P; Einstein, David M; Jacob, Richard E; Corley, Richard A

    2013-01-01

    Geometries for organ scale and multiscale simulations of organ function are now routinely derived from imaging data. However, medical images may also contain spatially heterogeneous information other than geometry that are relevant to such simulations either as initial conditions or in the form of model parameters. In this manuscript, we present an algorithm for the efficient and robust mapping of such data to imaging-based unstructured polyhedral grids in parallel. We then illustrate the application of our mapping algorithm to three different mapping problems: (i) the mapping of MRI diffusion tensor data to an unstructured ventricular grid; (ii) the mapping of serial cyrosection histology data to an unstructured mouse brain grid; and (iii) the mapping of computed tomography-derived volumetric strain data to an unstructured multiscale lung grid. Execution times and parallel performance are reported for each case. PMID:23293066

  13. Unstructured Grid Generation for Complex 3D High-Lift Configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pirzadeh, Shahyar Z.

    1999-01-01

    The application of an unstructured grid methodology on a three-dimensional high-lift configuration is presented. The focus of this paper is on the grid generation aspect of an integrated effort for the development of an unstructured-grid computational fluid dynamics (CFD) capability at the NASA Langley Research Center. The meshing approach is based on tetrahedral grids generated by the advancing-front and the advancing-layers procedures. The capability of the method for solving high-lift problems is demonstrated on an aircraft model referred to as the energy efficient transport configuration. The grid generation issues, including the pros and cons of the present approach, are discussed in relation to the high-lift problems. Limited viscous flow results are presented to demonstrate the viability of the generated grids. A corresponding Navier-Stokes solution capability, along with further computations on the present grid, is presented in a companion SAE paper.

  14. An Efficient Algorithm for Mapping Imaging Data to 3D Unstructured Grids in Computational Biomechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Einstein, Daniel R.; Kuprat, Andrew P.; Jiao, Xiangmin; Carson, James P.; Einstein, David M.; Corley, Richard A.; Jacob, Rick E.

    2013-01-01

    Geometries for organ scale and multiscale simulations of organ function are now routinely derived from imaging data. However, medical images may also contain spatially heterogeneous information other than geometry that are relevant to such simulations either as initial conditions or in the form of model parameters. In this manuscript, we present an algorithm for the efficient and robust mapping of such data to imaging based unstructured polyhedral grids in parallel. We then illustrate the application of our mapping algorithm to three different mapping problems: 1) the mapping of MRI diffusion tensor data to an unstuctured ventricular grid; 2) the mapping of serial cyro-section histology data to an unstructured mouse brain grid; and 3) the mapping of CT-derived volumetric strain data to an unstructured multiscale lung grid. Execution times and parallel performance are reported for each case.

  15. Mixed-hybrid and vertex-discontinuous-Galerkin finite element modeling of multiphase compositional flow on 3D unstructured grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moortgat, Joachim; Firoozabadi, Abbas

    2016-06-01

    Problems of interest in hydrogeology and hydrocarbon resources involve complex heterogeneous geological formations. Such domains are most accurately represented in reservoir simulations by unstructured computational grids. Finite element methods accurately describe flow on unstructured meshes with complex geometries, and their flexible formulation allows implementation on different grid types. In this work, we consider for the first time the challenging problem of fully compositional three-phase flow in 3D unstructured grids, discretized by any combination of tetrahedra, prisms, and hexahedra. We employ a mass conserving mixed hybrid finite element (MHFE) method to solve for the pressure and flux fields. The transport equations are approximated with a higher-order vertex-based discontinuous Galerkin (DG) discretization. We show that this approach outperforms a face-based implementation of the same polynomial order. These methods are well suited for heterogeneous and fractured reservoirs, because they provide globally continuous pressure and flux fields, while allowing for sharp discontinuities in compositions and saturations. The higher-order accuracy improves the modeling of strongly non-linear flow, such as gravitational and viscous fingering. We review the literature on unstructured reservoir simulation models, and present many examples that consider gravity depletion, water flooding, and gas injection in oil saturated reservoirs. We study convergence rates, mesh sensitivity, and demonstrate the wide applicability of our chosen finite element methods for challenging multiphase flow problems in geometrically complex subsurface media.

  16. Parallel Implementation of an Adaptive Scheme for 3D Unstructured Grids on the SP2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliker, Leonid; Biswas, Rupak; Strawn, Roger C.

    1996-01-01

    Dynamic mesh adaption on unstructured grids is a powerful tool for computing unsteady flows that require local grid modifications to efficiently resolve solution features. For this work, we consider an edge-based adaption scheme that has shown good single-processor performance on the C90. We report on our experience parallelizing this code for the SP2. Results show a 47.OX speedup on 64 processors when 10% of the mesh is randomly refined. Performance deteriorates to 7.7X when the same number of edges are refined in a highly-localized region. This is because almost all mesh adaption is confined to a single processor. However, this problem can be remedied by repartitioning the mesh immediately after targeting edges for refinement but before the actual adaption takes place. With this change, the speedup improves dramatically to 43.6X.

  17. Parallel implementation of an adaptive scheme for 3D unstructured grids on the SP2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strawn, Roger C.; Oliker, Leonid; Biswas, Rupak

    1996-01-01

    Dynamic mesh adaption on unstructured grids is a powerful tool for computing unsteady flows that require local grid modifications to efficiently resolve solution features. For this work, we consider an edge-based adaption scheme that has shown good single-processor performance on the C90. We report on our experience parallelizing this code for the SP2. Results show a 47.0X speedup on 64 processors when 10 percent of the mesh is randomly refined. Performance deteriorates to 7.7X when the same number of edges are refined in a highly-localized region. This is because almost all the mesh adaption is confined to a single processor. However, this problem can be remedied by repartitioning the mesh immediately after targeting edges for refinement but before the actual adaption takes place. With this change, the speedup improves dramatically to 43.6X.

  18. Modeling Three-Phase Compositional Flow on Complex 3D Unstructured Grids with Higher-Order Finite Element Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moortgat, J.; Firoozabadi, A.

    2013-12-01

    Most problems of interest in hydrogeology and subsurface energy resources involve complex heterogeneous geological formations. Such domains are most naturally represented in numerical reservoir simulations by unstructured computational grids. Finite element methods are a natural choice to describe fluid flow on unstructured meshes, because the governing equations can be readily discretized for any grid-element geometry. In this work, we consider the challenging problem of fully compositional three-phase flow in 3D unstructured grids, discretized by tetrahedra, prisms, or hexahedra, and compare to simulations on 3D structured grids. We employ a combination of mixed hybrid finite element methods to solve for the pressure and flux fields in a fractional flow formulation, and higher-order discontinuous Galerkin methods for the mass transport equations. These methods are well suited to simulate flow in heterogeneous and fractured reservoirs, because they provide a globally continuous pressure and flux field, while allowing for sharp discontinuities in the phase properties, such as compositions and saturations. The increased accuracy from using higher-order methods improves the modeling of highly non-linear flow, such as gravitational and viscous fingering. We present several numerical examples to study convergence rates and the (lack of) sensitivity to gridding/mesh orientation, and mesh quality. These examples consider gravity depletion, water and gas injection in oil saturated subsurface reservoirs with species exchange between up to three fluid phases. The examples demonstrate the wide applicability of our chosen finite element methods in the study of challenging multiphase flow problems in porous, geometrically complex, subsurface media.

  19. Assessment of an Unstructured-Grid Method for Predicting 3-D Turbulent Viscous Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frink, Neal T.

    1996-01-01

    A method Is presented for solving turbulent flow problems on three-dimensional unstructured grids. Spatial discretization Is accomplished by a cell-centered finite-volume formulation using an accurate lin- ear reconstruction scheme and upwind flux differencing. Time is advanced by an implicit backward- Euler time-stepping scheme. Flow turbulence effects are modeled by the Spalart-Allmaras one-equation model, which is coupled with a wall function to reduce the number of cells in the sublayer region of the boundary layer. A systematic assessment of the method is presented to devise guidelines for more strategic application of the technology to complex problems. The assessment includes the accuracy In predictions of skin-friction coefficient, law-of-the-wall behavior, and surface pressure for a flat-plate turbulent boundary layer, and for the ONERA M6 wing under a high Reynolds number, transonic, separated flow condition.

  20. Assessment of an Unstructured-Grid Method for Predicting 3-D Turbulent Viscous Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frink, Neal T.

    1996-01-01

    A method is presented for solving turbulent flow problems on three-dimensional unstructured grids. Spatial discretization is accomplished by a cell-centered finite-volume formulation using an accurate linear reconstruction scheme and upwind flux differencing. Time is advanced by an implicit backward-Euler time-stepping scheme. Flow turbulence effects are modeled by the Spalart-Allmaras one-equation model, which is coupled with a wall function to reduce the number of cells in the sublayer region of the boundary layer. A systematic assessment of the method is presented to devise guidelines for more strategic application of the technology to complex problems. The assessment includes the accuracy in predictions of skin-friction coefficient, law-of-the-wall behavior, and surface pressure for a flat-plate turbulent boundary layer, and for the ONERA M6 wing under a high Reynolds number, transonic, separated flow condition.

  1. An Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian Discretization of MHD on 3D Unstructured Grids

    SciTech Connect

    Rieben, R N; White, D A; Wallin, B K; Solberg, J M

    2006-06-12

    We present an arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) discretization of the equations of resistive magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) on unstructured hexahedral grids. The method is formulated using an operator-split approach with three distinct phases: electromagnetic diffusion, Lagrangian motion, and Eulerian advection. The resistive magnetic dynamo equation is discretized using a compatible mixed finite element method with a 2nd order accurate implicit time differencing scheme which preserves the divergence-free nature of the magnetic field. At each discrete time step, electromagnetic force and heat terms are calculated and coupled to the hydrodynamic equations to compute the Lagrangian motion of the conducting materials. By virtue of the compatible discretization method used, the invariants of Lagrangian MHD motion are preserved in a discrete sense. When the Lagrangian motion of the mesh causes significant distortion, that distortion is corrected with a relaxation of the mesh, followed by a 2nd order monotonic remap of the electromagnetic state variables. The remap is equivalent to Eulerian advection of the magnetic flux density with a fictitious mesh relaxation velocity. The magnetic advection is performed using a novel variant of constrained transport (CT) that is valid for unstructured hexahedral grids with arbitrary mesh velocities. The advection method maintains the divergence free nature of the magnetic field and is second order accurate in regions where the solution is sufficiently smooth. For regions in which the magnetic field is discontinuous (e.g. MHD shocks) the method is limited using a novel variant of algebraic flux correction (AFC) which is local extremum diminishing (LED) and divergence preserving. Finally, we verify each stage of the discretization via a set of numerical experiments.

  2. Unstructured grids in 3D and 4D for a time-dependent interface in front tracking with improved accuracy

    SciTech Connect

    Glimm, J.; Grove, J. W.; Li, X. L.; Li, Y.; Xu, Z.

    2002-01-01

    Front tracking traces the dynamic evolution of an interface separating differnt materials or fluid components. In this paper, they describe three types of the grid generation methods used in the front tracking method. One is the unstructured surface grid. The second is a structured grid-based reconstruction method. The third is a time-space grid, also grid based, for a conservative tracking algorithm with improved accuracy.

  3. Application of the FUN3D Unstructured-Grid Navier-Stokes Solver to the 4th AIAA Drag Prediction Workshop Cases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee-Rausch, Elizabeth M.; Hammond, Dana P.; Nielsen, Eric J.; Pirzadeh, S. Z.; Rumsey, Christopher L.

    2010-01-01

    FUN3D Navier-Stokes solutions were computed for the 4th AIAA Drag Prediction Workshop grid convergence study, downwash study, and Reynolds number study on a set of node-based mixed-element grids. All of the baseline tetrahedral grids were generated with the VGRID (developmental) advancing-layer and advancing-front grid generation software package following the gridding guidelines developed for the workshop. With maximum grid sizes exceeding 100 million nodes, the grid convergence study was particularly challenging for the node-based unstructured grid generators and flow solvers. At the time of the workshop, the super-fine grid with 105 million nodes and 600 million elements was the largest grid known to have been generated using VGRID. FUN3D Version 11.0 has a completely new pre- and post-processing paradigm that has been incorporated directly into the solver and functions entirely in a parallel, distributed memory environment. This feature allowed for practical pre-processing and solution times on the largest unstructured-grid size requested for the workshop. For the constant-lift grid convergence case, the convergence of total drag is approximately second-order on the finest three grids. The variation in total drag between the finest two grids is only 2 counts. At the finest grid levels, only small variations in wing and tail pressure distributions are seen with grid refinement. Similarly, a small wing side-of-body separation also shows little variation at the finest grid levels. Overall, the FUN3D results compare well with the structured-grid code CFL3D. The FUN3D downwash study and Reynolds number study results compare well with the range of results shown in the workshop presentations.

  4. A parallel dynamic load balancing algorithm for 3-D adaptive unstructured grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vidwans, A.; Kallinderis, Y.; Venkatakrishnan, V.

    1993-01-01

    Adaptive local grid refinement and coarsening results in unequal distribution of workload among the processors of a parallel system. A novel method for balancing the load in cases of dynamically changing tetrahedral grids is developed. The approach employs local exchange of cells among processors in order to redistribute the load equally. An important part of the load balancing algorithm is the method employed by a processor to determine which cells within its subdomain are to be exchanged. Two such methods are presented and compared. The strategy for load balancing is based on the Divide-and-Conquer approach which leads to an efficient parallel algorithm. This method is implemented on a distributed-memory MIMD system.

  5. Structured and unstructured grid generation.

    PubMed

    Thompson, J F; Weatherill, N P

    1992-01-01

    Current techniques in composite-block-structured grid generation and unstructured grid generation for general 3D geometries are summarized, including both algebraic and elliptic generation procedures for the former and Delaunay tessellations for the latter. Citations of relevant theory are given. Examples of applications for several geometries are included. PMID:1424687

  6. 3D DSMC Modeling of the Inner Gas Coma of Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko with an Unstructured Grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Ying; Marschall, Raphael; Su, Cheng-Chin; Wu, Jong-Shinn; Rubin, Martin; Lai, Ian-Lin; Ip, Wing-Huen; Keller, Horst Uwe; Knollenberg, Joerg; Kuehrt, Ekkehard; Skorov, Yuri; Thomas, Nicolas

    2015-04-01

    As the development of ESA's Rosetta mission started, it became clear that the physics of the outflow immediately above the surface needed to be understood. Ice sublimating from nucleus surface into vacuum forms the Knudsen layer, which is a non-equilibrium boundary layer with a scale height of about 20 mean free paths. In Rosetta's orbit around Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko (C-G), the mean free path will range from meters to kilometers. Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) is a very powerful numerical method to study gas flows inside non-equilibrium regions and has been applied to study cometary outflow by many authors over the past decade. The drawback with 3D DSMC is that it is computationally highly intensive and thus time consuming. Our aim here is to determine the gas flow-field in the innermost coma and to place constraints on the surface outgassing properties from analysis of the flow-field. For a preliminary shape model of C-G, we have identified to what extent modification of parameters influences the gas flow and temperature fields and established the reliability of inferences about the initial conditions from in situ and remote sensing measurements. The boundary conditions are implemented with a publicly available nucleus shape model and thermal models based on the surface heat balance equation. Several assumptions and different parameter sets have been investigated by DSMC runs using the PDSC++ (Parallel Direct Simulation Monte Carlo) code on an unstructured tetrahedral grid. In this work, we will present simulations of the flow field and changes resulting from modification of specific variables.

  7. A 3-D CE/SE Navier-Stokes Solver With Unstructured Hexahedral Grid for Computation of Near Field Jet Screech Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loh, Ching Y.; Himansu, Ananda; Hultgren, Lennart S.

    2003-01-01

    A 3-D space-time CE/SE Navier-Stokes solver using an unstructured hexahedral grid is described and applied to a circular jet screech noise computation. The present numerical results for an underexpanded jet, corresponding to a fully expanded Mach number of 1.42, capture the dominant and nonaxisymmetric 'B' screech mode and are generally in good agreement with existing experiments.

  8. VGRIDSG: An unstructured surface grid generation program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bockelie, Michael J.

    1993-01-01

    This report contains an overview of the VGRIDSG unstructured surface grid generation program. The VGRIDSG program was created from the VGRID3D unstructured grid generation program developed by Vigyan, Inc. The purpose of this report is to document the changes from the original VGRID3D program and to describe the capabilities of the new program.

  9. Modeling a three-dimensional river plume over continental shelf using a 3D unstructured grid model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cheng, R.T.; Casulli, V.; ,

    2004-01-01

    River derived fresh water discharging into an adjacent continental shelf forms a trapped river plume that propagates in a narrow region along the coast. These river plumes are real and they have been observed in the field. Many previous investigations have reported some aspects of the river plume properties, which are sensitive to stratification, Coriolis acceleration, winds (upwelling or downwelling), coastal currents, and river discharge. Numerical modeling of the dynamics of river plumes is very challenging, because the complete problem involves a wide range of vertical and horizontal scales. Proper simulations of river plume dynamics cannot be achieved without a realistic representation of the flow and salinity structure near the river mouth that controls the initial formation and propagation of the plume in the coastal ocean. In this study, an unstructured grid model was used for simulations of river plume dynamics allowing fine grid resolution in the river and in regions near the coast with a coarse grid in the far field of the river plume in the coastal ocean, in the vertical, fine fixed levels were used near the free surface, and coarse vertical levels were used over the continental shelf. The simulations have demonstrated the uniquely important role played by Coriolis acceleration. Without Coriolis acceleration, no trapped river plume can be formed no matter how favorable the ambient conditions might be. The simulation results show properties of the river plume and the characteristics of flow and salinity within the estuary; they are completely consistent with the physics of estuaries and coastal oceans.

  10. Computing Flows Using Chimera and Unstructured Grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, Meng-Sing; Zheng, Yao

    2006-01-01

    DRAGONFLOW is a computer program that solves the Navier-Stokes equations of flows in complexly shaped three-dimensional regions discretized by use of a direct replacement of arbitrary grid overlapping by nonstructured (DRAGON) grid. A DRAGON grid (see figure) is a combination of a chimera grid (a composite of structured subgrids) and a collection of unstructured subgrids. DRAGONFLOW incorporates modified versions of two prior Navier-Stokes-equation-solving programs: OVERFLOW, which is designed to solve on chimera grids; and USM3D, which is used to solve on unstructured grids. A master module controls the invocation of individual modules in the libraries. At each time step of a simulated flow, DRAGONFLOW is invoked on the chimera portion of the DRAGON grid in alternation with USM3D, which is invoked on the unstructured subgrids of the DRAGON grid. The USM3D and OVERFLOW modules then immediately exchange their solutions and other data. As a result, USM3D and OVERFLOW are coupled seamlessly.

  11. On unstructured grids and solvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barth, T. J.

    1990-01-01

    The fundamentals and the state-of-the-art technology for unstructured grids and solvers are highlighted. Algorithms and techniques pertinent to mesh generation are discussed. It is shown that grid generation and grid manipulation schemes rely on fast multidimensional searching. Flow solution techniques for the Euler equations, which can be derived from the integral form of the equations are discussed. Sample calculations are also provided.

  12. Computational Aerothermodynamic Simulation Issues on Unstructured Grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gnoffo, Peter A.; White, Jeffery A.

    2004-01-01

    The synthesis of physical models for gas chemistry and turbulence from the structured grid codes LAURA and VULCAN into the unstructured grid code FUN3D is described. A directionally Symmetric, Total Variation Diminishing (STVD) algorithm and an entropy fix (eigenvalue limiter) keyed to local cell Reynolds number are introduced to improve solution quality for hypersonic aeroheating applications. A simple grid-adaptation procedure is incorporated within the flow solver. Simulations of flow over an ellipsoid (perfect gas, inviscid), Shuttle Orbiter (viscous, chemical nonequilibrium) and comparisons to the structured grid solvers LAURA (cylinder, Shuttle Orbiter) and VULCAN (flat plate) are presented to show current capabilities. The quality of heating in 3D stagnation regions is very sensitive to algorithm options in general, high aspect ratio tetrahedral elements complicate the simulation of high Reynolds number, viscous flow as compared to locally structured meshes aligned with the flow.

  13. A paradigm for parallel unstructured grid generation

    SciTech Connect

    Gaither, A.; Marcum, D.; Reese, D.

    1996-12-31

    In this paper, a sequential 2D unstructured grid generator based on iterative point insertion and local reconnection is coupled with a Delauney tessellation domain decomposition scheme to create a scalable parallel unstructured grid generator. The Message Passing Interface (MPI) is used for distributed communication in the parallel grid generator. This work attempts to provide a generic framework to enable the parallelization of fast sequential unstructured grid generators in order to compute grand-challenge scale grids for Computational Field Simulation (CFS). Motivation for moving from sequential to scalable parallel grid generation is presented. Delaunay tessellation and iterative point insertion and local reconnection (advancing front method only) unstructured grid generation techniques are discussed with emphasis on how these techniques can be utilized for parallel unstructured grid generation. Domain decomposition techniques are discussed for both Delauney and advancing front unstructured grid generation with emphasis placed on the differences needed for both grid quality and algorithmic efficiency.

  14. Unstructured Cartesian/prismatic grid generation for complex geometries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karman, Steve L., Jr.

    1995-01-01

    The generation of a hybrid grid system for discretizing complex three dimensional (3D) geometries is described. The primary grid system is an unstructured Cartesian grid automatically generated using recursive cell subdivision. This grid system is sufficient for computing Euler solutions about extremely complex 3D geometries. A secondary grid system, using triangular-prismatic elements, may be added for resolving the boundary layer region of viscous flows near surfaces of solid bodies. This paper describes the grid generation processes used to generate each grid type. Several example grids are shown, demonstrating the ability of the method to discretize complex geometries, with very little pre-processing required by the user.

  15. An assessment of unstructured grid technology for timely CFD analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinard, Tom A.; Schabowski, Deanne M.

    1995-01-01

    An assessment of two unstructured methods is presented in this paper. A tetrahedral unstructured method USM3D, developed at NASA Langley Research Center is compared to a Cartesian unstructured method, SPLITFLOW, developed at Lockheed Fort Worth Company. USM3D is an upwind finite volume solver that accepts grids generated primarily from the Vgrid grid generator. SPLITFLOW combines an unstructured grid generator with an implicit flow solver in one package. Both methods are exercised on three test cases, a wing, and a wing body, and a fully expanded nozzle. The results for the first two runs are included here and compared to the structured grid method TEAM and to available test data. On each test case, the set up procedure are described, including any difficulties that were encountered. Detailed descriptions of the solvers are not included in this paper.

  16. An assessment of unstructured grid technology for timely CFD analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinard, Tom A.; Schabowski, Deanne M.

    1995-03-01

    An assessment of two unstructured methods is presented in this paper. A tetrahedral unstructured method USM3D, developed at NASA Langley Research Center is compared to a Cartesian unstructured method, SPLITFLOW, developed at Lockheed Fort Worth Company. USM3D is an upwind finite volume solver that accepts grids generated primarily from the Vgrid grid generator. SPLITFLOW combines an unstructured grid generator with an implicit flow solver in one package. Both methods are exercised on three test cases, a wing, and a wing body, and a fully expanded nozzle. The results for the first two runs are included here and compared to the structured grid method TEAM and to available test data. On each test case, the set up procedure are described, including any difficulties that were encountered. Detailed descriptions of the solvers are not included in this paper.

  17. The 3-D unstructured mesh generation using local transformations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barth, Timothy J.

    1993-01-01

    The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include the following: 3D combinatorial edge swapping; 3D incremental triangulation via local transformations; a new approach to multigrid for unstructured meshes; surface mesh generation using local transforms; volume triangulations; viscous mesh generation; and future directions.

  18. Unstructured Grid Generation Techniques and Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Posenau, Mary-Anne K. (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    The Workshop on Unstructured Grid Generation Techniques and Software was conducted for NASA to assess its unstructured grid activities, improve the coordination among NASA centers, and promote technology transfer to industry. The proceedings represent contributions from Ames, Langley, and Lewis Research Centers, and the Johnson and Marshall Space Flight Centers. This report is a compilation of the presentations made at the workshop.

  19. Investigation of advancing front method for generating unstructured grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, A. M.; Tiwari, S. N.

    1992-06-01

    The advancing front technique is used to generate an unstructured grid about simple aerodynamic geometries. Unstructured grids are generated using VGRID2D and VGRID3D software. Specific problems considered are a NACA 0012 airfoil, a bi-plane consisting of two NACA 0012 airfoil, a four element airfoil in its landing configuration, and an ONERA M6 wing. Inviscid time dependent solutions are computed on these geometries using USM3D and the results are compared with standard test results obtained by other investigators. A grid convergence study is conducted for the NACA 0012 airfoil and compared with a structured grid. A structured grid is generated using GRIDGEN software and inviscid solutions computed using CFL3D flow solver. The results obtained by unstructured grid for NACA 0012 airfoil showed an asymmetric distribution of flow quantities, and a fine distribution of grid was required to remove this asymmetry. On the other hand, the structured grid predicted a very symmetric distribution, but when the total number of points were compared to obtain the same results it was seen that structured grid required more grid points.

  20. Unstructured 3D Delaunay mesh generation applied to planes, trains and automobiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blake, Kenneth R.; Spragle, Gregory S.

    1993-01-01

    Technical issues associated with domain-tessellation production, including initial boundary node triangulation and volume mesh refinement, are presented for the 'TGrid' 3D Delaunay unstructured grid generation program. The approach employed is noted to be capable of preserving predefined triangular surface facets in the final tessellation. The capabilities of the approach are demonstrated by generating grids about an entire fighter aircraft configuration, a train, and a wind tunnel model of an automobile.

  1. 3-D UNSTRUCTURED HEXAHEDRAL-MESH Sn TRANSPORT METHODS

    SciTech Connect

    J. MOREL; J. MCGHEE; ET AL

    2000-11-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). We have developed a method for solving the neutral-particle transport equation on 3-D unstructured hexahedral meshes using a S{sub n} discretization in angle in conjunction with a discontinuous finite-element discretization in space and a multigroup discretization in energy. Previous methods for solving this equation in 3-D have been limited to rectangular meshes. The unstructured-mesh method that we have developed is far more efficient for solving problems with complex 3-D geometric features than rectangular-mesh methods. In spite of having to make several compromises in our spatial discretization technique and our iterative solution technique, our method has been found to be both accurate and efficient for a broad class of problems.

  2. Best Practices for Unstructured Grid Shock Fitting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCloud, Peter L.

    2017-01-01

    Unstructured grid solvers have well-known issues predicting surface heat fluxes when strong shocks are present. Various efforts have been made to address the underlying numerical issues that cause the erroneous predictions. The present work addresses some of the shortcomings of unstructured grid solvers, not by addressing the numerics, but by applying structured grid best practices to unstructured grids. A methodology for robust shock detection and shock fitting is outlined and applied to production relevant cases. Results achieved by using the Loci-CHEM Computational Fluid Dynamics solver are provided.

  3. Unstructured grid methods for compressible flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, K.; Peraire, J.; Peiro, J.

    1992-01-01

    The implementation of the finite element method on unstructured triangular grids is described and the development of centered finite element schemes for the solution of the compressible Euler equation on general triangular and tetrahedral grids is discussed. Explicit and implicit Lax-Wendroff type methods and a method based upon the use of explicit multistep timestepping are considered. In the latter case, the convergence behavior of the method is accelerated by the incorporation of a fully unstructured multigrid procedure. The advancing front method for generating unstructured grids of triangles and tetrahedra is described and the application of adaptive mesh techniques to both steady and transient flow analysis is illustrated.

  4. 3D unstructured mesh discontinuous finite element hydro

    SciTech Connect

    Prasad, M.K.; Kershaw, D.S.; Shaw, M.J.

    1995-07-01

    The authors present detailed features of the ICF3D hydrodynamics code used for inertial fusion simulations. This code is intended to be a state-of-the-art upgrade of the well-known fluid code, LASNEX. ICF3D employs discontinuous finite elements on a discrete unstructured mesh consisting of a variety of 3D polyhedra including tetrahedra, prisms, and hexahedra. The authors discussed details of how the ROE-averaged second-order convection was applied on the discrete elements, and how the C++ coding interface has helped to simplify implementing the many physics and numerics modules within the code package. The author emphasized the virtues of object-oriented design in large scale projects such as ICF3D.

  5. Exploring Hypersonic, Unstructured-Grid Issues through Structured Grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazaheri, Ali R.; Kleb, Bill

    2007-01-01

    Pure-tetrahedral unstructured grids have been shown to produce asymmetric heat transfer rates for symmetric problems. Meanwhile, two-dimensional structured grids produce symmetric solutions and as documented here, introducing a spanwise degree of freedom to these structured grids also yields symmetric solutions. The effects of grid skewness and other perturbations of structured-grids are investigated to uncover possible mechanisms behind the unstructured-grid solution asymmetries. By using controlled experiments around a known, good solution, the effects of particular grid pathologies are uncovered. These structured-grid experiments reveal that similar solution degradation occurs as for unstructured grids, especially for heat transfer rates. Non-smooth grids within the boundary layer is also shown to produce large local errors in heat flux but do not affect surface pressures.

  6. 3D Structured Grid Adaptation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, D. W.; Hafez, M. M.

    1996-01-01

    Grid adaptation for structured meshes is the art of using information from an existing, but poorly resolved, solution to automatically redistribute the grid points in such a way as to improve the resolution in regions of high error, and thus the quality of the solution. This involves: (1) generate a grid vis some standard algorithm, (2) calculate a solution on this grid, (3) adapt the grid to this solution, (4) recalculate the solution on this adapted grid, and (5) repeat steps 3 and 4 to satisfaction. Steps 3 and 4 can be repeated until some 'optimal' grid is converged to but typically this is not worth the effort and just two or three repeat calculations are necessary. They also may be repeated every 5-10 time steps for unsteady calculations.

  7. Unstructured grid generation using the distance function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bihari, Barna L.; Chakravarthy, Sukumar R.

    1991-01-01

    A new class of methods for obtaining level sets to generate unstructured grids is presented. The consecutive grid levels are computed using the distance functions, which corresponds to solving the Hamilton-Jacobi equations representing the equations of motion of fronts propagating with curvature-dependent speed. The relationship between the distance function and the governing equations will be discussed as well as its application to generating grids. Multi-ply connected domains and complex geometries are handled naturally, with a straightforward generalization to several space dimensions. The grid points for the unstructured grid are obtained simultaneously with the grid levels. The search involved in checking for overlapping triangles is minimized by triangulating the entire domain one level at a time.

  8. Unstructured grids on SIMD torus machines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bjorstad, Petter E.; Schreiber, Robert

    1994-01-01

    Unstructured grids lead to unstructured communication on distributed memory parallel computers, a problem that has been considered difficult. Here, we consider adaptive, offline communication routing for a SIMD processor grid. Our approach is empirical. We use large data sets drawn from supercomputing applications instead of an analytic model of communication load. The chief contribution of this paper is an experimental demonstration of the effectiveness of certain routing heuristics. Our routing algorithm is adaptive, nonminimal, and is generally designed to exploit locality. We have a parallel implementation of the router, and we report on its performance.

  9. Towards Verification of Unstructured-Grid Solvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, James L.; Diskin, Boris; Rumsey, Christopher L.

    2008-01-01

    New methodology for verification of computational methods using unstructured grids is presented. The discretization order properties are studied in computational windows, easily constructed within a collection of grids or a single grid. The windows can be adjusted to isolate the interior discretization, the boundary discretization, or singularities. A major component of the methodology is the downscaling test, introduced previously for studying the convergence rates of truncation and discretization errors of finite-volume discretization schemes on general unstructured grids. Demonstrations of the method are shown, including a comparative accuracy assessment of commonly-used schemes on general mixed grids and the identification of local accuracy deterioration at intersections of tangency and inflow/outflow boundaries. Recommendations for the use of the methodology in large-scale computational simulations are given.

  10. An automatic, unstructured grid-generation system for geologically complex reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Kocberber, S.

    1995-10-01

    This paper presents an automatic, 3D, locally unstructured hybrid-grid generation system for sloping faults. This gridding system replaces a portion of an existing finite-difference grid around sloping faults with a finite-element grid made of tetrahedrons. This innovative approach retains the finite-difference character of the grid and minimizes the decrease in computational efficiency. This paper discusses the details of the gridding techniques used and provides several example grids that demonstrate that locally unstructured grids can accurately represent geologically complex reservoirs.

  11. A perspective on unstructured grid flow solvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkatakrishnan, V.

    1995-01-01

    This survey paper assesses the status of compressible Euler and Navier-Stokes solvers on unstructured grids. Different spatial and temporal discretization options for steady and unsteady flows are discussed. The integration of these components into an overall framework to solve practical problems is addressed. Issues such as grid adaptation, higher order methods, hybrid discretizations and parallel computing are briefly discussed. Finally, some outstanding issues and future research directions are presented.

  12. Generation of unstructured grids and Euler solutions for complex geometries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loehner, Rainald; Parikh, Paresh; Salas, Manuel D.

    1989-01-01

    Algorithms are described for the generation and adaptation of unstructured grids in two and three dimensions, as well as Euler solvers for unstructured grids. The main purpose is to demonstrate how unstructured grids may be employed advantageously for the economic simulation of both geometrically as well as physically complex flow fields.

  13. A 3-D chimera grid embedding technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benek, J. A.; Buning, P. G.; Steger, J. L.

    1985-01-01

    A three-dimensional (3-D) chimera grid-embedding technique is described. The technique simplifies the construction of computational grids about complex geometries. The method subdivides the physical domain into regions which can accommodate easily generated grids. Communication among the grids is accomplished by interpolation of the dependent variables at grid boundaries. The procedures for constructing the composite mesh and the associated data structures are described. The method is demonstrated by solution of the Euler equations for the transonic flow about a wing/body, wing/body/tail, and a configuration of three ellipsoidal bodies.

  14. Towards Verification of Unstructured-Grid Solvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, James L.; Diskin, Boris; Rumsey, Christopher L.

    2008-01-01

    New methodology for verification of finite-volume computational methods using unstructured grids is presented. The discretization order properties are studied in computational windows, easily constructed within a collection of grids or a single grid. Tests are performed within each window and address a combination of problem-, solution-, and discretization/grid-related features affecting discretization error convergence. The windows can be adjusted to isolate particular elements of the computational scheme, such as the interior discretization, the boundary discretization, or singularities. Studies can use traditional grid-refinement computations within a fixed window or downscaling, a recently-introduced technique in which computations are made within windows contracting toward a focal point of interest. Grids within the windows are constrained to be consistently refined, allowing a meaningful assessment of asymptotic error convergence on unstructured grids. Demonstrations of the method are shown, including a comparative accuracy assessment of commonly-used schemes on general mixed grids and the identification of local accuracy deterioration at boundary intersections. Recommendations to enable attainment of design-order discretization errors for large-scale computational simulations are given.

  15. Implementation of Flow Tripping Capability in the USM3D Unstructured Flow Solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pandya, Mohagna J.; Abdol-Harrid, Khaled S.; Campbell, Richard L.; Frink, Neal T.

    2006-01-01

    A flow tripping capability is added to an established NASA tetrahedral unstructured parallel Navier-Stokes flow solver, USM3D. The capability is based on prescribing an appropriate profile of turbulence model variables to energize the boundary layer in a plane normal to a specified trip region on the body surface. We demonstrate this approach using the k-e two-equation turbulence model of USM3D. Modification to the solution procedure primarily consists of developing a data structure to identify all unstructured tetrahedral grid cells located in the plane normal to a specified surface trip region and computing a function based on the mean flow solution to specify the modified profile of the turbulence model variables. We leverage this data structure and also show an adjunct approach that is based on enforcing a laminar flow condition on the otherwise fully turbulent flow solution in user specified region. The latter approach is applied for the solutions obtained using other one- and two-equation turbulence models of USM3D. A key ingredient of the present capability is the use of a graphical user-interface tool PREDISC to define a trip region on the body surface in an existing grid. Verification of the present modifications is demonstrated on three cases, namely, a flat plate, the RAE2822 airfoil, and the DLR F6 wing-fuselage configuration.

  16. Implementation of Flow Tripping Capability in the USM3D Unstructured Flow Solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pandya, Mohagna J.; Abdol-Hamid, Khaled S.; Campbell, Richard L.; Frink, Neal T.

    2006-01-01

    A flow tripping capability is added to an established NASA tetrahedral unstructured parallel Navier-Stokes flow solver, USM3D. The capability is based on prescribing an appropriate profile of turbulence model variables to energize the boundary layer in a plane normal to a specified trip region on the body surface. We demonstrate this approach using the k-epsilon two-equation turbulence model of USM3D. Modification to the solution procedure primarily consists of developing a data structure to identify all unstructured tetrahedral grid cells located in the plane normal to a specified surface trip region and computing a function based on the mean flow solution to specify the modified profile of the turbulence model variables. We leverage this data structure and also show an adjunct approach that is based on enforcing a laminar flow condition on the otherwise fully turbulent flow solution in user-specified region. The latter approach is applied for the solutions obtained using other one-and two-equation turbulence models of USM3D. A key ingredient of the present capability is the use of a graphical user-interface tool PREDISC to define a trip region on the body surface in an existing grid. Verification of the present modifications is demonstrated on three cases, namely, a flat plate, the RAE2822 airfoil, and the DLR F6 wing-fuselage configuration.

  17. Efficient Unstructured Grid Adaptation Methods for Sonic Boom Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Richard L.; Carter, Melissa B.; Deere, Karen A.; Waithe, Kenrick A.

    2008-01-01

    This paper examines the use of two grid adaptation methods to improve the accuracy of the near-to-mid field pressure signature prediction of supersonic aircraft computed using the USM3D unstructured grid flow solver. The first method (ADV) is an interactive adaptation process that uses grid movement rather than enrichment to more accurately resolve the expansion and compression waves. The second method (SSGRID) uses an a priori adaptation approach to stretch and shear the original unstructured grid to align the grid with the pressure waves and reduce the cell count required to achieve an accurate signature prediction at a given distance from the vehicle. Both methods initially create negative volume cells that are repaired in a module in the ADV code. While both approaches provide significant improvements in the near field signature (< 3 body lengths) relative to a baseline grid without increasing the number of grid points, only the SSGRID approach allows the details of the signature to be accurately computed at mid-field distances (3-10 body lengths) for direct use with mid-field-to-ground boom propagation codes.

  18. Parallel algorithms for dynamically partitioning unstructured grids

    SciTech Connect

    Diniz, P.; Plimpton, S.; Hendrickson, B.; Leland, R.

    1994-10-01

    Grid partitioning is the method of choice for decomposing a wide variety of computational problems into naturally parallel pieces. In problems where computational load on the grid or the grid itself changes as the simulation progresses, the ability to repartition dynamically and in parallel is attractive for achieving higher performance. We describe three algorithms suitable for parallel dynamic load-balancing which attempt to partition unstructured grids so that computational load is balanced and communication is minimized. The execution time of algorithms and the quality of the partitions they generate are compared to results from serial partitioners for two large grids. The integration of the algorithms into a parallel particle simulation is also briefly discussed.

  19. The CIFIST 3D model atmosphere grid.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludwig, H.-G.; Caffau, E.; Steffen, M.; Freytag, B.; Bonifacio, P.; Kučinskas, A.

    Grids of stellar atmosphere models and associated synthetic spectra are numerical products which have a large impact in astronomy due to their ubiquitous application in the interpretation of radiation from individual stars and stellar populations. 3D model atmospheres are now on the verge of becoming generally available for a wide range of stellar atmospheric parameters. We report on efforts to develop a grid of 3D model atmospheres for late-type stars within the CIFIST Team at Paris Observatory. The substantial demands in computational and human labor for the model production and post-processing render this apparently mundane task a challenging logistic exercise. At the moment the CIFIST grid comprises 77 3D model atmospheres with emphasis on dwarfs of solar and sub-solar metallicities. While the model production is still ongoing, first applications are already worked upon by the CIFIST Team and collaborators.

  20. Domain decomposition multigrid for unstructured grids

    SciTech Connect

    Shapira, Yair

    1997-01-01

    A two-level preconditioning method for the solution of elliptic boundary value problems using finite element schemes on possibly unstructured meshes is introduced. It is based on a domain decomposition and a Galerkin scheme for the coarse level vertex unknowns. For both the implementation and the analysis, it is not required that the curves of discontinuity in the coefficients of the PDE match the interfaces between subdomains. Generalizations to nonmatching or overlapping grids are made.

  1. Finite Element Results Visualization for Unstructured Grids

    SciTech Connect

    Speck, Douglas E.; Dovey, Donald J.

    1996-07-15

    GRIZ is a general-purpose post-processing application supporting interactive visualization of finite element analysis results on unstructured grids. In addition to basic pseudocolor renderings of state variables over the mesh surface, GRIZ provides modern visualization techniques such as isocontours and isosurfaces, cutting planes, vector field display, and particle traces. GRIZ accepts both command-line and mouse-driven input, and is portable to virtually any UNIX platform which provides Motif and OpenGl libraries.

  2. FLAG: A multi-dimensional adaptive free-Lagrange code for fully unstructured grids

    SciTech Connect

    Burton, D.E.; Miller, D.S.; Palmer, T.

    1995-07-01

    The authors describe FLAG, a 3D adaptive free-Lagrange method for unstructured grids. The grid elements were 3D polygons, which move with the flow, and are refined or reconnected as necessary to achieve uniform accuracy. The authors stressed that they were able to construct a 3D hydro version of this code in 3 months, using an object-oriented FORTRAN approach.

  3. Recent Enhancements to USM3D Unstructured Flow Solver for Unsteady Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pandya, Mohagna J.; Frink, Neal T.; Abdol-Hamid, Khaled S.; Chung, James J.

    2004-01-01

    The NASA USM3D unstructured flow solver is undergoing extensions to address dynamic flow problems in support of NASA and NAVAIR efforts to study the applicability of Computational Fluid Dynamics tools for the prediction of aircraft stability and control characteristics. The initial extensions reported herein include two second-order time stepping schemes, Detached-Eddy Simulation, and grid motion. This paper reports the initial code verification and validation assessment of the dynamic flow capabilities of USM3D. The cases considered are the classic inviscid shock-tube problem, low Reynolds number wake shedding from a NACA 0012 airfoil, high Reynolds number DES-based wake shedding from a 4-to-1 length-to-diameter cylinder, and forced pitch oscillation of a NACA 0012 airfoil with inviscid and turbulent flow.

  4. Scalable hybrid unstructured and structured grid raycasting.

    PubMed

    Muigg, Philipp; Hadwiger, Markus; Doleisch, Helmut; Hauser, Helwig

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a scalable framework for real-time raycasting of large unstructured volumes that employs a hybrid bricking approach. It adaptively combines original unstructured bricks in important (focus) regions, with structured bricks that are resampled on demand in less important (context) regions. The basis of this focus+context approach is interactive specification of a scalar degree of interest (DOI) function. Thus, rendering always considers two volumes simultaneously: a scalar data volume, and the current DOI volume. The crucial problem of visibility sorting is solved by raycasting individual bricks and compositing in visibility order from front to back. In order to minimize visual errors at the grid boundary, it is always rendered accurately, even for resampled bricks. A variety of different rendering modes can be combined, including contour enhancement. A very important property of our approach is that it supports a variety of cell types natively, i.e., it is not constrained to tetrahedral grids, even when interpolation within cells is used. Moreover, our framework can handle multi-variate data, e.g., multiple scalar channels such as temperature or pressure, as well as time-dependent data. The combination of unstructured and structured bricks with different quality characteristics such as the type of interpolation or resampling resolution in conjunction with custom texture memory management yields a very scalable system. PMID:17968114

  5. Dynamic Load Balancing for Adaptive Unstructured Grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biswas, Rupak; Saini, Subhash (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Dynamic mesh adaptation on unstructured grids is a powerful tool for computing unsteady three-dimensional problems that require grid modifications to efficiently resolve solution features. By locally refining and coarsening the mesh to capture phenomena of interest, such procedures make standard computational methods more cost effective. Highly refined meshes are required to accurately capture shock waves, contact discontinuities, vortices, and shear layers in fluid flow problems. Adaptive meshes have also proved to be useful in several other areas of computational science and engineering like computer vision and graphics, semiconductor device modeling, and structural mechanics. Local mesh adaptation provides the opportunity to obtain solutions that are comparable to those obtained on globally-refined grids but at a much lower cost. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  6. Benchmarking an Unstructured-Grid Model for Tsunami Current Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yinglong J.; Priest, George; Allan, Jonathan; Stimely, Laura

    2016-06-01

    We present model results derived from a tsunami current benchmarking workshop held by the NTHMP (National Tsunami Hazard Mitigation Program) in February 2015. Modeling was undertaken using our own 3D unstructured-grid model that has been previously certified by the NTHMP for tsunami inundation. Results for two benchmark tests are described here, including: (1) vortex structure in the wake of a submerged shoal and (2) impact of tsunami waves on Hilo Harbor in the 2011 Tohoku event. The modeled current velocities are compared with available lab and field data. We demonstrate that the model is able to accurately capture the velocity field in the two benchmark tests; in particular, the 3D model gives a much more accurate wake structure than the 2D model for the first test, with the root-mean-square error and mean bias no more than 2 cm s-1 and 8 mm s-1, respectively, for the modeled velocity.

  7. Unstructured Cartesian refinement with sharp interface immersed boundary method for 3D unsteady incompressible flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelidis, Dionysios; Chawdhary, Saurabh; Sotiropoulos, Fotis

    2016-11-01

    A novel numerical method is developed for solving the 3D, unsteady, incompressible Navier-Stokes equations on locally refined fully unstructured Cartesian grids in domains with arbitrarily complex immersed boundaries. Owing to the utilization of the fractional step method on an unstructured Cartesian hybrid staggered/non-staggered grid layout, flux mismatch and pressure discontinuity issues are avoided and the divergence free constraint is inherently satisfied to machine zero. Auxiliary/hanging nodes are used to facilitate the discretization of the governing equations. The second-order accuracy of the solver is ensured by using multi-dimension Lagrange interpolation operators and appropriate differencing schemes at the interface of regions with different levels of refinement. The sharp interface immersed boundary method is augmented with local near-boundary refinement to handle arbitrarily complex boundaries. The discrete momentum equation is solved with the matrix free Newton-Krylov method and the Krylov-subspace method is employed to solve the Poisson equation. The second-order accuracy of the proposed method on unstructured Cartesian grids is demonstrated by solving the Poisson equation with a known analytical solution. A number of three-dimensional laminar flow simulations of increasing complexity illustrate the ability of the method to handle flows across a range of Reynolds numbers and flow regimes. Laminar steady and unsteady flows past a sphere and the oblique vortex shedding from a circular cylinder mounted between two end walls demonstrate the accuracy, the efficiency and the smooth transition of scales and coherent structures across refinement levels. Large-eddy simulation (LES) past a miniature wind turbine rotor, parameterized using the actuator line approach, indicates the ability of the fully unstructured solver to simulate complex turbulent flows. Finally, a geometry resolving LES of turbulent flow past a complete hydrokinetic turbine illustrates

  8. Implicit schemes and parallel computing in unstructured grid CFD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkatakrishnam, V.

    1995-01-01

    The development of implicit schemes for obtaining steady state solutions to the Euler and Navier-Stokes equations on unstructured grids is outlined. Applications are presented that compare the convergence characteristics of various implicit methods. Next, the development of explicit and implicit schemes to compute unsteady flows on unstructured grids is discussed. Next, the issues involved in parallelizing finite volume schemes on unstructured meshes in an MIMD (multiple instruction/multiple data stream) fashion are outlined. Techniques for partitioning unstructured grids among processors and for extracting parallelism in explicit and implicit solvers are discussed. Finally, some dynamic load balancing ideas, which are useful in adaptive transient computations, are presented.

  9. A Grid Sourcing and Adaptation Study Using Unstructured Grids for Supersonic Boom Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Melissa B.; Deere, Karen A.

    2008-01-01

    NASA created the Supersonics Project as part of the NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Program to advance technology that will make a supersonic flight over land viable. Computational flow solvers have lacked the ability to accurately predict sonic boom from the near to far field. The focus of this investigation was to establish gridding and adaptation techniques to predict near-to-mid-field (<10 body lengths below the aircraft) boom signatures at supersonic speeds using the USM3D unstructured grid flow solver. The study began by examining sources along the body the aircraft, far field sourcing and far field boundaries. The study then examined several techniques for grid adaptation. During the course of the study, volume sourcing was introduced as a new way to source grids using the grid generation code VGRID. Two different methods of using the volume sources were examined. The first method, based on manual insertion of the numerous volume sources, made great improvements in the prediction capability of USM3D for boom signatures. The second method (SSGRID), which uses an a priori adaptation approach to stretch and shear the original unstructured grid to align the grid and pressure waves, showed similar results with a more automated approach. Due to SSGRID s results and ease of use, the rest of the study focused on developing a best practice using SSGRID. The best practice created by this study for boom predictions using the CFD code USM3D involved: 1) creating a small cylindrical outer boundary either 1 or 2 body lengths in diameter (depending on how far below the aircraft the boom prediction is required), 2) using a single volume source under the aircraft, and 3) using SSGRID to stretch and shear the grid to the desired length.

  10. 3D unstructured-mesh radiation transport codes

    SciTech Connect

    Morel, J.

    1997-12-31

    Three unstructured-mesh radiation transport codes are currently being developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The first code is ATTILA, which uses an unstructured tetrahedral mesh in conjunction with standard Sn (discrete-ordinates) angular discretization, standard multigroup energy discretization, and linear-discontinuous spatial differencing. ATTILA solves the standard first-order form of the transport equation using source iteration in conjunction with diffusion-synthetic acceleration of the within-group source iterations. DANTE is designed to run primarily on workstations. The second code is DANTE, which uses a hybrid finite-element mesh consisting of arbitrary combinations of hexahedra, wedges, pyramids, and tetrahedra. DANTE solves several second-order self-adjoint forms of the transport equation including the even-parity equation, the odd-parity equation, and a new equation called the self-adjoint angular flux equation. DANTE also offers three angular discretization options: $S{_}n$ (discrete-ordinates), $P{_}n$ (spherical harmonics), and $SP{_}n$ (simplified spherical harmonics). DANTE is designed to run primarily on massively parallel message-passing machines, such as the ASCI-Blue machines at LANL and LLNL. The third code is PERICLES, which uses the same hybrid finite-element mesh as DANTE, but solves the standard first-order form of the transport equation rather than a second-order self-adjoint form. DANTE uses a standard $S{_}n$ discretization in angle in conjunction with trilinear-discontinuous spatial differencing, and diffusion-synthetic acceleration of the within-group source iterations. PERICLES was initially designed to run on workstations, but a version for massively parallel message-passing machines will be built. The three codes will be described in detail and computational results will be presented.

  11. Efficient 3D geometric and Zernike moments computation from unstructured surface meshes.

    PubMed

    Pozo, José María; Villa-Uriol, Maria-Cruz; Frangi, Alejandro F

    2011-03-01

    This paper introduces and evaluates a fast exact algorithm and a series of faster approximate algorithms for the computation of 3D geometric moments from an unstructured surface mesh of triangles. Being based on the object surface reduces the computational complexity of these algorithms with respect to volumetric grid-based algorithms. In contrast, it can only be applied for the computation of geometric moments of homogeneous objects. This advantage and restriction is shared with other proposed algorithms based on the object boundary. The proposed exact algorithm reduces the computational complexity for computing geometric moments up to order N with respect to previously proposed exact algorithms, from N(9) to N(6). The approximate series algorithm appears as a power series on the rate between triangle size and object size, which can be truncated at any desired degree. The higher the number and quality of the triangles, the better the approximation. This approximate algorithm reduces the computational complexity to N(3). In addition, the paper introduces a fast algorithm for the computation of 3D Zernike moments from the computed geometric moments, with a computational complexity N(4), while the previously proposed algorithm is of order N(6). The error introduced by the proposed approximate algorithms is evaluated in different shapes and the cost-benefit ratio in terms of error, and computational time is analyzed for different moment orders. PMID:20714011

  12. 3-D inversion of magnetotelluric data using unstructured tetrahedral elements: applicability to data affected by topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usui, Yoshiya

    2015-08-01

    A 3-D magnetotelluric (MT) inversion code using unstructured tetrahedral elements has been developed in order to correct the topographic effect by directly incorporating it into computational grids. The electromagnetic field and response functions get distorted at the observation sites of MT surveys because of the undulating surface topography, and without correcting this distortion, the subsurface structure can be misinterpreted. Of the two methods proposed to correct the topographic effect, the method incorporating topography explicitly in the inversion is applicable to a wider range of surveys. For forward problems, it has been shown that the finite element method using unstructured tetrahedral elements is useful for the incorporation of topography. Therefore, this paper shows the applicability of unstructured tetrahedral elements in MT inversion using the newly developed code. The inversion code is capable of using the impedance tensor, the vertical magnetic transfer function (VMTF), and the phase tensor as observational data, and it estimates the subsurface resistivity values and the distortion tensor of each observation site. The forward part of the code was verified using two test models, one incorporating topographic effect and one without, and the verifications showed that the results were almost the same as those of previous works. The developed inversion code was then applied to synthetic data from a MT survey, and was verified as being able to recover the resistivity structure as well as other inversion codes. Finally, to confirm its applicability to the data affected by topography, inversion was performed using the synthetic data of the model that included two overlapping mountains. In each of the cases using the impedance tensor, the VMTF and the phase tensor, by including the topography in the mesh, the subsurface resistivity was determined more proficiently than in the case using the flat-surface mesh. Although the locations of the anomalies were

  13. Parallel implicit unstructured grid Euler solvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkatakrishnan, V.

    1994-01-01

    A mesh-vertex finite volume scheme for solving the Euler equations on triangular unstructured meshes is implemented on an MIMD (multiple instruction/multiple data stream) parallel computer. An explicit four-stage Runge-Kutta scheme is used to solve two-dimensional flow problems. A family of implicit schemes is also developed to solve these problems, where the linear system that arises at each time step is solved by a preconditioned GMRES algorithm. Two partitioning strategies are employed, one that partitions triangles and the other that partitions vertices. The choice of the preconditioner in a distributed memory setting is discussed. All the methods are compared both in terms of elapsed times and convergence rates. It is shown that the implicit schemes offer adequate parallelism at the expense of minimal sequential overhead. The use of a global coarse grid to further minimize this overhead is also investigated. The schemes are implemented on a distributed memory parallel computer, the iPSC/860.

  14. Parallel implicit unstructured grid Euler solvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkatakrishnan, V.

    1994-01-01

    A mesh-vertex finite volume scheme for solving the Euler equations on triangular unstructured meshes is implemented on a multiple-instruction/multiple-data stream parallel computer. An explicit four-stage Runge-Kutta scheme is used to solve two-dimensional flow problems. A family of implicit schemes is also developed to solve these problems, where the linear system that arises at each time step is solved by a preconditioned GMRES algorithm. Two partitioning strategies are employed: one that partitions triangles and the other that partitions vertices. The choice of the preconditioner in a distributed memory setting is discussed. All of the methods are compared both in terms of elapsed times and convergence rates. It is shown that the implicit schemes offer adequate parallelism at the expense of minimal sequential overhead. The use of a global coarse grid to further minimize this overhead is also investigated. The schemes are implemented on a distributed memory parallel computer, the Intel iPSC/860.

  15. Parallel implicit unstructured grid Euler solvers

    SciTech Connect

    Venkatakrishnan, V.

    1994-10-01

    A mesh-vertex finite volume scheme for solving the Euler equations on triangular unstructured meshes is implemented on a multiple-instruction/multiple-data stream parallel computer. An explicit four-stage Runge-Kutta scheme is used to solve two-dimensional flow problems. A family of implicit schemes is also developed to solve these problems, where the linear system that arises at each time step is solved by a preconditioned GMRES algorithm. Two partitioning strategies are employed: one that partitions triangles and the other that partitions vertices. The choice of the preconditioner in a distributed memory setting is discussed. All of the methods are compared both in terms of elapsed times and convergence rates. It is shown that the implicit schemes offer adequate parallelism at the expense of minimal sequential overhead. The use of a global coarse grid to further minimize this overhead is also investigated. The schemes are implemented on a distributed memory parallel computer, the Intel iPSC/860. 23 refs.

  16. Multilevel methods for elliptic problems on unstructured grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, Tony F.; Go, Susie; Zikatanov, Ludmil

    1997-01-01

    Multilevel methods on unstructured grids for elliptic problems are reviewed. The advantages of these techniques are the flexible approximation of the boundaries of complicated physical domains and the ability to adapt the grid to the resolution of fine scaled structures. Multilevel methods, which include multigrid methods and domain decomposition methods, depend on the correct splitting of appropriate finite element spaces. The standard splittings used in the structured grid case cannot be directly extended to unstructured grids due to their requirement for a hierarchical grid structure. Issues related to the application of multilevel methods to unstructured grids are discussed, including how the coarse spaces and transfer operators are defined and how different types of boundary conditions are treated. An obvious way to generate a coarse mesh is to regrid the physical domain several times. Several alternatives are proposed and discussed: node nested coarse spaces, agglomerated coarse spaces and algebraically generated coarse spaces.

  17. Computational MHD on 3D Unstructured Lagrangian Meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rousculp, C. L.; Barnes, D. C.

    1999-11-01

    Lagrangian computational meshes are typically employed to model multi-material problems because they do not require costly interface tracking methods. Our algorithms, for ideal and non-ideal 3D MHD, are designed for use on such meshes composed of polyhedral cells with an arbitrary number of faces. This allows for mesh refinement during a calculation to prevent the well known problem of mesh tangling. The action of the magnetic vector potential, A \\cdot δ l, is centered on edges. For ideal and non-ideal flow, this maintains nabla \\cdot B = 0 to round-off error. Vertex forces are derived by the variation of magnetic energy with respect to vertex positions, F = - partial WB / partial r. This assures symmetry as well as magnetic flux, momentum, and energy conservation. The method is local so that parallelization by domain decomposition is natural for large meshes. The resistive diffusion part is calculated using the support operator method, to obtain energy conservation, symmetry. Implicit time difference equations are solved by preconditioned, conjugate gradient methods. Results of convergence tests are presented. Boundary conditions at plasma vaccuum interfaces have been incorporated. Initial results of an annular Z-pinch implosion problem are shown.

  18. Boundary-Layer Stability Analysis of the Mean Flows Obtained Using Unstructured Grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liao, Wei; Malik, Mujeeb R.; Lee-Rausch, Elizabeth M.; Li, Fei; Nielsen, Eric J.; Buning, Pieter G.; Chang, Chau-Lyan; Choudhari, Meelan M.

    2012-01-01

    Boundary-layer stability analyses of mean flows extracted from unstructured-grid Navier- Stokes solutions have been performed. A procedure has been developed to extract mean flow profiles from the FUN3D unstructured-grid solutions. Extensive code-to-code validations have been performed by comparing the extracted mean ows as well as the corresponding stability characteristics to the predictions based on structured-grid solutions. Comparisons are made on a range of problems from a simple at plate to a full aircraft configuration-a modified Gulfstream-III with a natural laminar flow glove. The future aim of the project is to extend the adjoint-based design capability in FUN3D to include natural laminar flow and laminar flow control by integrating it with boundary-layer stability analysis codes, such as LASTRAC.

  19. Large-scale Parallel Unstructured Mesh Computations for 3D High-lift Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mavriplis, Dimitri J.; Pirzadeh, S.

    1999-01-01

    A complete "geometry to drag-polar" analysis capability for the three-dimensional high-lift configurations is described. The approach is based on the use of unstructured meshes in order to enable rapid turnaround for complicated geometries that arise in high-lift configurations. Special attention is devoted to creating a capability for enabling analyses on highly resolved grids. Unstructured meshes of several million vertices are initially generated on a work-station, and subsequently refined on a supercomputer. The flow is solved on these refined meshes on large parallel computers using an unstructured agglomeration multigrid algorithm. Good prediction of lift and drag throughout the range of incidences is demonstrated on a transport take-off configuration using up to 24.7 million grid points. The feasibility of using this approach in a production environment on existing parallel machines is demonstrated, as well as the scalability of the solver on machines using up to 1450 processors.

  20. NCAR global model topography generation software for unstructured grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauritzen, P. H.; Bacmeister, J. T.; Callaghan, P. F.; Taylor, M. A.

    2015-06-01

    It is the purpose of this paper to document the NCAR global model topography generation software for unstructured grids. Given a model grid, the software computes the fraction of the grid box covered by land, the gridbox mean elevation, and associated sub-grid scale variances commonly used for gravity wave and turbulent mountain stress parameterizations. The software supports regular latitude-longitude grids as well as unstructured grids; e.g. icosahedral, Voronoi, cubed-sphere and variable resolution grids. As an example application and in the spirit of documenting model development, exploratory simulations illustrating the impacts of topographic smoothing with the NCAR-DOE CESM (Community Earth System Model) CAM5.2-SE (Community Atmosphere Model version 5.2 - Spectral Elements dynamical core) are shown.

  1. Extending the MODPATH algorithm to rectangular unstructured grids

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pollock, David W.

    2016-01-01

    The recent release of MODFLOW-USG, which allows model grids to have irregular, unstructured connections, requires a modification of the particle-tracking algorithm used by MODPATH. This paper describes a modification of the semi-analytical particle-tracking algorithm used by MODPATH that allows it to be extended to rectangular-based unstructured grids by dividing grid cells with multi-cell face connections into sub-cells. The new method will be incorporated in the next version of MODPATH which is currently under development.

  2. Extending the MODPATH Algorithm to Rectangular Unstructured Grids.

    PubMed

    Pollock, David W

    2016-01-01

    The recent release of MODFLOW-USG, which allows model grids to have irregular, unstructured connections, requires a modification of the particle-tracking algorithm used by MODPATH. This paper describes a modification of the semi-analytical particle-tracking algorithm used by MODPATH that allows it to be extended to rectangular-based unstructured grids by dividing grid cells with multi-cell face connections into sub-cells. The new method will be incorporated in the next version of MODPATH which is currently under development. PMID:25754305

  3. On Projecting Discretized Electromagnetic Fields with Unstructured Grids

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Lie-Quan; Candel, Arno; Kabel, Andrea; Li, Zenghai; /SLAC

    2008-08-13

    A new method for projecting discretized electromagnetic fields on one unstructured grid to another grid is presented in this paper. Two examples are used for studying the errors of different projection methods. The analysis shows that the new method is very effective on balancing both the error of the electric field and that of the magnetic field (or curl of the electric field).

  4. An Adaptive Unstructured Grid Method by Grid Subdivision, Local Remeshing, and Grid Movement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pirzadeh, Shahyar Z.

    1999-01-01

    An unstructured grid adaptation technique has been developed and successfully applied to several three dimensional inviscid flow test cases. The approach is based on a combination of grid subdivision, local remeshing, and grid movement. For solution adaptive grids, the surface triangulation is locally refined by grid subdivision, and the tetrahedral grid in the field is partially remeshed at locations of dominant flow features. A grid redistribution strategy is employed for geometric adaptation of volume grids to moving or deforming surfaces. The method is automatic and fast and is designed for modular coupling with different solvers. Several steady state test cases with different inviscid flow features were tested for grid/solution adaptation. In all cases, the dominant flow features, such as shocks and vortices, were accurately and efficiently predicted with the present approach. A new and robust method of moving tetrahedral "viscous" grids is also presented and demonstrated on a three-dimensional example.

  5. Implicit finite volume and discontinuous Galerkin methods for multicomponent flow in unstructured 3D fractured porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moortgat, Joachim; Amooie, Mohammad Amin; Soltanian, Mohamad Reza

    2016-10-01

    We present a new implicit higher-order finite element (FE) approach to efficiently model compressible multicomponent fluid flow on unstructured grids and in fractured porous subsurface formations. The scheme is sequential implicit: pressures and fluxes are updated with an implicit Mixed Hybrid Finite Element (MHFE) method, and the transport of each species is approximated with an implicit second-order Discontinuous Galerkin (DG) FE method. Discrete fractures are incorporated with a cross-flow equilibrium approach. This is the first investigation of all-implicit higher-order MHFE-DG for unstructured triangular, quadrilateral (2D), and hexahedral (3D) grids and discrete fractures. A lowest-order implicit finite volume (FV) transport update is also developed for the same grid types. The implicit methods are compared to an Implicit-Pressure-Explicit-Composition (IMPEC) scheme. For fractured domains, the unconditionally stable implicit transport update is shown to increase computational efficiency by orders of magnitude as compared to IMPEC, which has a time-step constraint proportional to the pore volume of discrete fracture grid cells. However, when lowest-order Euler time-discretizations are used, numerical errors increase linearly with the larger implicit time-steps, resulting in high numerical dispersion. Second-order Crank-Nicolson implicit MHFE-DG and MHFE-FV are therefore presented as well. Convergence analyses show twice the convergence rate for the DG methods as compared to FV, resulting in two to three orders of magnitude higher computational efficiency. Numerical experiments demonstrate the efficiency and robustness in modeling compressible multicomponent flow on irregular and fractured 2D and 3D grids, even in the presence of fingering instabilities.

  6. Multidimensional discretization of conservation laws for unstructured polyhedral grids

    SciTech Connect

    Burton, D.E.

    1994-08-22

    To the extent possible, a discretized system should satisfy the same conservation laws as the physical system. The author considers the conservation properties of a staggered-grid Lagrange formulation of the hydrodynamics equations (SGH) which is an extension of a ID scheme due to von Neumann and Richtmyer (VNR). The term staggered refers to spatial centering in which position, velocity, and kinetic energy are centered at nodes, while density, pressure, and internal energy are at cell centers. Traditional SGH formulations consider mass, volume, and momentum conservation, but tend to ignore conservation of total energy, conservation of angular momentum, and requirements for thermodynamic reversibility. The author shows that, once the mass and momentum discretizations have been specified, discretization for other quantities are dictated by the conservation laws and cannot be independently defined. The spatial discretization method employs a finite volume procedure that replaces differential operators with surface integrals. The method is appropriate for multidimensional formulations (1D, 2D, 3D) on unstructured grids formed from polygonal (2D) or polyhedral (3D) cells. Conservation equations can then be expressed in conservation form in which conserved currents are exchanged between control volumes. In addition to the surface integrals, the conservation equations include source terms derived from physical sources or geometrical considerations. In Cartesian geometry, mass and momentum are conserved identically. Discussion of volume conservation will be temporarily deferred. The author shows that the momentum equation leads to a form-preserving definition for kinetic energy and to an exactly conservative evolution equation for internal energy. Similarly, the author derives a form-preserving definition and corresponding conservation equation for a zone-centered angular momentum.

  7. Application of an unstructured grid flow solver to planes, trains and automobiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spragle, Gregory S.; Smith, Wayne A.; Yadlin, Yoram

    1993-01-01

    Rampant, an unstructured flow solver developed at Fluent Inc., is used to compute three-dimensional, viscous, turbulent, compressible flow fields within complex solution domains. Rampant is an explicit, finite-volume flow solver capable of computing flow fields using either triangular (2d) or tetrahedral (3d) unstructured grids. Local time stepping, implicit residual smoothing, and multigrid techniques are used to accelerate the convergence of the explicit scheme. The paper describes the Rampant flow solver and presents flow field solutions about a plane, train, and automobile.

  8. S3D: An interactive surface grid generation tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luh, Raymond Ching-Chung; Pierce, Lawrence E.; Yip, David

    1992-01-01

    S3D, an interactive software tool for surface grid generation, is described. S3D provides the means with which a geometry definition based either on a discretized curve set or a rectangular set can be quickly processed towards the generation of a surface grid for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) applications. This is made possible as a result of implementing commonly encountered surface gridding tasks in an environment with a highly efficient and user friendly graphical interface. Some of the more advanced features of S3D include surface-surface intersections, optimized surface domain decomposition and recomposition, and automated propagation of edge distributions to surrounding grids.

  9. Automatic partitioning of unstructured grids into connected components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dagum, Leonardo

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents two partitioning schemes that guarantee connected components given a connected initial grid. Connected components are important for convergence of methods such as domain decomposition or multigrid. For many of the grids tested, the schemes produce partitions as good (in terms of number of cut edges) or better than spectral partitioning and require only modest computational resources. This paper describes the two schemes in detail and presents comparison results from a number of two and three dimensional unstructured grids.

  10. Recent Results in the Study of Static Ground Effect Using an Inviscid Unstructured Grid Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yaros, Steven F.

    1999-01-01

    The TetrUSS (Tetrahedral Unstructured Software System), developed at NASA LaRC, enables one to take a vehicle from its surface definition to its analyzed solution. The important parts are the shape definition, accomplished in GRIDTOOL; the initial front and volume grid generation in VGRID; the flow solver USM3D, and the various ways used to post-process the computational results.

  11. Multigrid on unstructured grids using an auxiliary set of structured grids

    SciTech Connect

    Douglas, C.C.; Malhotra, S.; Schultz, M.H.

    1996-12-31

    Unstructured grids do not have a convenient and natural multigrid framework for actually computing and maintaining a high floating point rate on standard computers. In fact, just the coarsening process is expensive for many applications. Since unstructured grids play a vital role in many scientific computing applications, many modifications have been proposed to solve this problem. One suggested solution is to map the original unstructured grid onto a structured grid. This can be used as a fine grid in a standard multigrid algorithm to precondition the original problem on the unstructured grid. We show that unless extreme care is taken, this mapping can lead to a system with a high condition number which eliminates the usefulness of the multigrid method. Theorems with lower and upper bounds are provided. Simple examples show that the upper bounds are sharp.

  12. Validation of a Node-Centered Wall Function Model for the Unstructured Flow Code FUN3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, Jan-Renee; Vasta, Veer N.; White, Jeffery

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, the implementation of two wall function models in the Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) computational uid dynamics (CFD) code FUN3D is described. FUN3D is a node centered method for solving the three-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations on unstructured computational grids. The first wall function model, based on the work of Knopp et al., is used in conjunction with the one-equation turbulence model of Spalart-Allmaras. The second wall function model, also based on the work of Knopp, is used in conjunction with the two-equation k-! turbulence model of Menter. The wall function models compute the wall momentum and energy flux, which are used to weakly enforce the wall velocity and pressure flux boundary conditions in the mean flow momentum and energy equations. These wall conditions are implemented in an implicit form where the contribution of the wall function model to the Jacobian are also included. The boundary conditions of the turbulence transport equations are enforced explicitly (strongly) on all solid boundaries. The use of the wall function models is demonstrated on four test cases: a at plate boundary layer, a subsonic di user, a 2D airfoil, and a 3D semi-span wing. Where possible, different near-wall viscous spacing tactics are examined. Iterative residual convergence was obtained in most cases. Solution results are compared with theoretical and experimental data for several variations of grid spacing. In general, very good comparisons with data were achieved.

  13. Discontinuous Spectral Difference Method for Conservation Laws on Unstructured Grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Yen; Vinokur, Marcel

    2004-01-01

    A new, high-order, conservative, and efficient discontinuous spectral finite difference (SD) method for conservation laws on unstructured grids is developed. The concept of discontinuous and high-order local representations to achieve conservation and high accuracy is utilized in a manner similar to the Discontinuous Galerkin (DG) and the Spectral Volume (SV) methods, but while these methods are based on the integrated forms of the equations, the new method is based on the differential form to attain a simpler formulation and higher efficiency. Conventional unstructured finite-difference and finite-volume methods require data reconstruction based on the least-squares formulation using neighboring point or cell data. Since each unknown employs a different stencil, one must repeat the least-squares inversion for every point or cell at each time step, or to store the inversion coefficients. In a high-order, three-dimensional computation, the former would involve impractically large CPU time, while for the latter the memory requirement becomes prohibitive. In addition, the finite-difference method does not satisfy the integral conservation in general. By contrast, the DG and SV methods employ a local, universal reconstruction of a given order of accuracy in each cell in terms of internally defined conservative unknowns. Since the solution is discontinuous across cell boundaries, a Riemann solver is necessary to evaluate boundary flux terms and maintain conservation. In the DG method, a Galerkin finite-element method is employed to update the nodal unknowns within each cell. This requires the inversion of a mass matrix, and the use of quadratures of twice the order of accuracy of the reconstruction to evaluate the surface integrals and additional volume integrals for nonlinear flux functions. In the SV method, the integral conservation law is used to update volume averages over subcells defined by a geometrically similar partition of each grid cell. As the order of

  14. Parallel unstructured grid generation for computational aerosciences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shephard, Mark S.

    1993-01-01

    The objective of this research project is to develop efficient parallel automatic grid generation procedures for use in computational aerosciences. This effort is focused on a parallel version of the Finite Octree grid generator. Progress made during the first six months is reported.

  15. Lattice Boltzmann method on unstructured grids: further developments.

    PubMed

    Ubertini, S; Bella, G; Succi, S

    2003-07-01

    We discuss further developments of the finite-volume lattice Boltzmann formulation on unstructured grids. It is shown that the method tolerates significant grid distortions without showing any appreciable numerical viscosity effects at second order in the mesh size. A theoretical argument of plausibility for such a property is presented. In addition, a set of boundary conditions which permit to handle flows with open boundaries is also introduced and numerically demonstrated for the case of channel flows and driven cavity flows. PMID:12935281

  16. Obstacle Classification and 3D Measurement in Unstructured Environments Based on ToF Cameras

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hongshan; Zhu, Jiang; Wang, Yaonan; Jia, Wenyan; Sun, Mingui; Tang, Yandong

    2014-01-01

    Inspired by the human 3D visual perception system, we present an obstacle detection and classification method based on the use of Time-of-Flight (ToF) cameras for robotic navigation in unstructured environments. The ToF camera provides 3D sensing by capturing an image along with per-pixel 3D space information. Based on this valuable feature and human knowledge of navigation, the proposed method first removes irrelevant regions which do not affect robot's movement from the scene. In the second step, regions of interest are detected and clustered as possible obstacles using both 3D information and intensity image obtained by the ToF camera. Consequently, a multiple relevance vector machine (RVM) classifier is designed to classify obstacles into four possible classes based on the terrain traversability and geometrical features of the obstacles. Finally, experimental results in various unstructured environments are presented to verify the robustness and performance of the proposed approach. We have found that, compared with the existing obstacle recognition methods, the new approach is more accurate and efficient. PMID:24945679

  17. Obstacle classification and 3D measurement in unstructured environments based on ToF cameras.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hongshan; Zhu, Jiang; Wang, Yaonan; Jia, Wenyan; Sun, Mingui; Tang, Yandong

    2014-01-01

    Inspired by the human 3D visual perception system, we present an obstacle detection and classification method based on the use of Time-of-Flight (ToF) cameras for robotic navigation in unstructured environments. The ToF camera provides 3D sensing by capturing an image along with per-pixel 3D space information. Based on this valuable feature and human knowledge of navigation, the proposed method first removes irrelevant regions which do not affect robot's movement from the scene. In the second step, regions of interest are detected and clustered as possible obstacles using both 3D information and intensity image obtained by the ToF camera. Consequently, a multiple relevance vector machine (RVM) classifier is designed to classify obstacles into four possible classes based on the terrain traversability and geometrical features of the obstacles. Finally, experimental results in various unstructured environments are presented to verify the robustness and performance of the proposed approach. We have found that, compared with the existing obstacle recognition methods, the new approach is more accurate and efficient. PMID:24945679

  18. Obstacle classification and 3D measurement in unstructured environments based on ToF cameras.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hongshan; Zhu, Jiang; Wang, Yaonan; Jia, Wenyan; Sun, Mingui; Tang, Yandong

    2014-06-18

    Inspired by the human 3D visual perception system, we present an obstacle detection and classification method based on the use of Time-of-Flight (ToF) cameras for robotic navigation in unstructured environments. The ToF camera provides 3D sensing by capturing an image along with per-pixel 3D space information. Based on this valuable feature and human knowledge of navigation, the proposed method first removes irrelevant regions which do not affect robot's movement from the scene. In the second step, regions of interest are detected and clustered as possible obstacles using both 3D information and intensity image obtained by the ToF camera. Consequently, a multiple relevance vector machine (RVM) classifier is designed to classify obstacles into four possible classes based on the terrain traversability and geometrical features of the obstacles. Finally, experimental results in various unstructured environments are presented to verify the robustness and performance of the proposed approach. We have found that, compared with the existing obstacle recognition methods, the new approach is more accurate and efficient.

  19. Toward Verification of USM3D Extensions for Mixed Element Grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pandya, Mohagna J.; Frink, Neal T.; Ding, Ejiang; Parlette, Edward B.

    2013-01-01

    The unstructured tetrahedral grid cell-centered finite volume flow solver USM3D has been recently extended to handle mixed element grids composed of hexahedral, prismatic, pyramidal, and tetrahedral cells. Presently, two turbulence models, namely, baseline Spalart-Allmaras (SA) and Menter Shear Stress Transport (SST), support mixed element grids. This paper provides an overview of the various numerical discretization options available in the newly enhanced USM3D. Using the SA model, the flow solver extensions are verified on three two-dimensional test cases available on the Turbulence Modeling Resource website at the NASA Langley Research Center. The test cases are zero pressure gradient flat plate, planar shear, and bump-inchannel. The effect of cell topologies on the flow solution is also investigated using the planar shear case. Finally, the assessment of various cell and face gradient options is performed on the zero pressure gradient flat plate case.

  20. Adaptive refinement tools for tetrahedral unstructured grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pao, S. Paul (Inventor); Abdol-Hamid, Khaled S. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    An exemplary embodiment providing one or more improvements includes software which is robust, efficient, and has a very fast run time for user directed grid enrichment and flow solution adaptive grid refinement. All user selectable options (e.g., the choice of functions, the choice of thresholds, etc.), other than a pre-marked cell list, can be entered on the command line. The ease of application is an asset for flow physics research and preliminary design CFD analysis where fast grid modification is often needed to deal with unanticipated development of flow details.

  1. GRIZ: Finite element analysis results visualization for unstructured grids. User manual

    SciTech Connect

    Dovey, D.J.; Spelce, T.E.

    1993-10-01

    GRIZ supports interactive visualization of finite element analysis results on unstructured grids. GRIZ is a general-purpose post-processing application which is designed to work with a variety of an analysis codes. Currently, GRIZ is capable of calculating and displaying derived variables for the DYNA3D, NIKE3D and TOPAZ3D analysis codes. GRIZ reads in data files in the ``MDG plotfile`` format. GRIZ provides support for modern 3D visualization techniques such as isosurface display, cutting planes and display of vector data. GRIZ also incorporates the ability to animate data over time and to store animation frames to a video disk. GRIZ is designed to utilize the capabilities of modern graphics workstations which provide hardware support for 3D graphics, thereby giving the user as much interactive performance as possible. This should make it easier for analysts to explore and interrogate their analysis results.

  2. Implementation of Advanced Two Equation Turbulence Models in the USM3D Unstructured Flow Solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Qun-Zhen; Massey, Steven J.; Abdol-Hamid, Khaled S.

    2000-01-01

    USM3D is a widely-used unstructured flow solver for simulating inviscid and viscous flows over complex geometries. The current version (version 5.0) of USM3D, however, does not have advanced turbulence models to accurately simulate complicated flow. We have implemented two modified versions of the original Jones and Launder k-epsilon "two-equation" turbulence model and the Girimaji algebraic Reynolds stress model in USM3D. Tests have been conducted for three flat plate boundary layer cases, a RAE2822 airfoil and an ONERA M6 wing. The results are compared with those from direct numerical simulation, empirical formulae, theoretical results, and the existing Spalart-Allmaras one-equation model.

  3. Multi-Dimensional Spectral Difference Method for Unstructured Grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Yen; Vinokur, Marcel

    2005-01-01

    A new, high-order, conservative, and efficient method for conservation laws on unstructured grids is developed. It combines the best features of structured and unstructured grid methods to attain computational efficiency and geometric flexibility; it utilizes the concept of discontinuous and high-order local representations to achieve conservation and high accuracy; and it is based on the finite-difference formulation for simplicity. Universal reconstructions are obtained by distributing unknowns in a geometrically similar manner for all unstructured cells. Placements of the unknown and flux points with various order of accuracy are given for the line, triangular and tetrahedral elements. The data structure of the new method permits an optimum use of cache memory, resulting in further computational efficiency on modern computers. A new pointer system is developed that reduces memory requirements and simplifies programming for any order of accuracy. Numerical solutions are presented and compared with the exact solutions for wave propagation problems in both two and three dimensions to demonstrate the capability of the method. Excellent agreement has been found. The method is simpler and more efficient than previous discontinuous Galerkin and spectral volume methods for unstructured grids.

  4. Grid-Adapted FUN3D Computations for the Second High Lift Prediction Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee-Rausch, E. M.; Rumsey, C. L.; Park, M. A.

    2014-01-01

    Contributions of the unstructured Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes code FUN3D to the 2nd AIAA CFD High Lift Prediction Workshop are described, and detailed comparisons are made with experimental data. Using workshop-supplied grids, results for the clean wing configuration are compared with results from the structured code CFL3D Using the same turbulence model, both codes compare reasonably well in terms of total forces and moments, and the maximum lift is similarly over-predicted for both codes compared to experiment. By including more representative geometry features such as slat and flap brackets and slat pressure tube bundles, FUN3D captures the general effects of the Reynolds number variation, but under-predicts maximum lift on workshop-supplied grids in comparison with the experimental data, due to excessive separation. However, when output-based, off-body grid adaptation in FUN3D is employed, results improve considerably. In particular, when the geometry includes both brackets and the pressure tube bundles, grid adaptation results in a more accurate prediction of lift near stall in comparison with the wind-tunnel data. Furthermore, a rotation-corrected turbulence model shows improved pressure predictions on the outboard span when using adapted grids.

  5. Unstructured Grids for Sonic Boom Analysis and Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Richard L.; Nayani, Sudheer N.

    2015-01-01

    An evaluation of two methods for improving the process for generating unstructured CFD grids for sonic boom analysis and design has been conducted. The process involves two steps: the generation of an inner core grid using a conventional unstructured grid generator such as VGRID, followed by the extrusion of a sheared and stretched collar grid through the outer boundary of the core grid. The first method evaluated, known as COB, automatically creates a cylindrical outer boundary definition for use in VGRID that makes the extrusion process more robust. The second method, BG, generates the collar grid by extrusion in a very efficient manner. Parametric studies have been carried out and new options evaluated for each of these codes with the goal of establishing guidelines for best practices for maintaining boom signature accuracy with as small a grid as possible. In addition, a preliminary investigation examining the use of the CDISC design method for reducing sonic boom utilizing these grids was conducted, with initial results confirming the feasibility of a new remote design approach.

  6. Advanced Unstructured Grid Generation for Complex Aerodynamic Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pirzadeh, Shahyar Z.

    2008-01-01

    A new approach for distribution of grid points on the surface and in the volume has been developed and implemented in the NASA unstructured grid generation code VGRID. In addition to the point and line sources of prior work, the new approach utilizes surface and volume sources for automatic curvature-based grid sizing and convenient point distribution in the volume. A new exponential growth function produces smoother and more efficient grids and provides superior control over distribution of grid points in the field. All types of sources support anisotropic grid stretching which not only improves the grid economy but also provides more accurate solutions for certain aerodynamic applications. The new approach does not require a three-dimensional background grid as in the previous methods. Instead, it makes use of an efficient bounding-box auxiliary medium for storing grid parameters defined by surface sources. The new approach is less memory-intensive and more efficient computationally. The grids generated with the new method either eliminate the need for adaptive grid refinement for certain class of problems or provide high quality initial grids that would enhance the performance of many adaptation methods.

  7. Computing Axisymmetric Jet Screech Tones using Unstructured Grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jorgenson, Philip C. E.; Loh, Ching Y.

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to show that computations with an aeroacoustic feedback loop, the jet screech noise, can be obtained using truly unstructured grid technology. Numerical results are presented for a nozzle with two different lip thicknesses which will be referred to in this paper as a thin and a thick lip nozzle respectively. The space-time conservation element and solution element (CE/SE) method is used to solve the conservation laws of the compressible axisymmetric Navier-Stokes equations. The equations are time marched to predict the unsteady flow and the near-field screech tone noise issuing from an underexpanded circular jet. The CE/SE method uses an unstructured grid based data structure. The unstructured grids for these calculations are generated based on the method of Delaunay triangulation. Comparisons of numerical results with available experimental data are shown for flows corresponding to several different jet Mach numbers. Generally good agreement is obtained in terms of flow physics, screech tone frequency, and sound pressure level.

  8. Computing Axisymmetric Jet Screech Tones Using Unstructured Grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jorgenson, Philip C. E.; Loh, Ching Y.

    2002-01-01

    The space-time conservation element and solution element (CE/SE) method is used to solve the conservation law form of the compressible axisymmetric Navier-Stokes equations. The equations are time marched to predict the unsteady flow and the near-field screech tone noise issuing from an underexpanded circular jet. The CE/SE method uses an unstructured grid based data structure. The unstructured grids for these calculations are generated based on the method of Delaunay triangulation. The purpose of this paper is to show that an acoustics solution with a feedback loop can be obtained using truly unstructured grid technology. Numerical results are presented for two different nozzle geometries. The first is considered to have a thin nozzle lip and the second has a thick nozzle lip. Comparisons with available experimental data are shown for flows corresponding to several different jet Mach numbers. Generally good agreement is obtained in terms of flow physics, screech tone frequency, and sound pressure level.

  9. FUN3D Grid Refinement and Adaptation Studies for the Ares Launch Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartels, Robert E.; Vasta, Veer; Carlson, Jan-Renee; Park, Mike; Mineck, Raymond E.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents grid refinement and adaptation studies performed in conjunction with computational aeroelastic analyses of the Ares crew launch vehicle (CLV). The unstructured grids used in this analysis were created with GridTool and VGRID while the adaptation was performed using the Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) code FUN3D with a feature based adaptation software tool. GridTool was developed by ViGYAN, Inc. while the last three software suites were developed by NASA Langley Research Center. The feature based adaptation software used here operates by aligning control volumes with shock and Mach line structures and by refining/de-refining where necessary. It does not redistribute node points on the surface. This paper assesses the sensitivity of the complex flow field about a launch vehicle to grid refinement. It also assesses the potential of feature based grid adaptation to improve the accuracy of CFD analysis for a complex launch vehicle configuration. The feature based adaptation shows the potential to improve the resolution of shocks and shear layers. Further development of the capability to adapt the boundary layer and surface grids of a tetrahedral grid is required for significant improvements in modeling the flow field.

  10. Three-dimensional DC anisotropic resistivity modelling using finite elements on unstructured grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei; Wu, Xiaoping; Spitzer, Klaus

    2013-05-01

    We present a newly developed finite element program for direct current resistivity modelling, which can handle arbitrary 3-D electric anisotropy. For this purpose, it is of particular importance to construct appropriate grids because artificial anisotropy can be introduced through preferential directions associated with regular grid structures. Therefore, results from different kinds of grids (structured hexahedral, structured tetrahedral and unstructured tetrahedral) are checked for symmetry. After a series of comparisons, we conclude that unstructured tetrahedral grids generally perform best. In addition, this grid type allows for local refinement, which greatly reduces the number of nodes and, consequently, lowers the computational costs significantly. A singularity removal technique is applied, which improves the accuracy considerably. The resulting system of linear equations is solved by a conjugate gradient method with a symmetric successive overrelaxation pre-conditioner. Comparisons with analytical solutions prove the code to be highly accurate for both isotropic and anisotropic models. More complex models are investigated to analyse the response of anisotropic structures, for example, in form of the P2 tensor invariant. Finally, we apply the code to a hot dry rock scenario and show that anisotropy reveals significant information on the hydraulically induced fracture system.

  11. Multigrid and multilevel domain decomposition for unstructured grids

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, T.; Smith, B.

    1994-12-31

    Multigrid has proven itself to be a very versatile method for the iterative solution of linear and nonlinear systems of equations arising from the discretization of PDES. In some applications, however, no natural multilevel structure of grids is available, and these must be generated as part of the solution procedure. In this presentation the authors will consider the problem of generating a multigrid algorithm when only a fine, unstructured grid is given. Their techniques generate a sequence of coarser grids by first forming an approximate maximal independent set of the vertices and then applying a Cavendish type algorithm to form the coarser triangulation. Numerical tests indicate that convergence using this approach can be as fast as standard multigrid on a structured mesh, at least in two dimensions.

  12. A 3D High-Order Unstructured Finite-Volume Algorithm for Solving Maxwell's Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Yen; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    A three-dimensional finite-volume algorithm based on arbitrary basis functions for time-dependent problems on general unstructured grids is developed. The method is applied to the time-domain Maxwell equations. Discrete unknowns are volume integrals or cell averages of the electric and magnetic field variables. Spatial terms are converted to surface integrals using the Gauss curl theorem. Polynomial basis functions are introduced in constructing local representations of the fields and evaluating the volume and surface integrals. Electric and magnetic fields are approximated by linear combinations of these basis functions. Unlike other unstructured formulations used in Computational Fluid Dynamics, the new formulation actually does not reconstruct the field variables at each time step. Instead, the spatial terms are calculated in terms of unknowns by precomputing weights at the beginning of the computation as functions of cell geometry and basis functions to retain efficiency. Since no assumption is made for cell geometry, this new formulation is suitable for arbitrarily defined grids, either smooth or unsmooth. However, to facilitate the volume and surface integrations, arbitrary polyhedral cells with polygonal faces are used in constructing grids. Both centered and upwind schemes are formulated. It is shown that conventional schemes (second order in Cartesian grids) are equivalent to the new schemes using first degree polynomials as the basis functions and the midpoint quadrature for the integrations. In the new formulation, higher orders of accuracy are achieved by using higher degree polynomial basis functions. Furthermore, all the surface and volume integrations are carried out exactly. Several model electromagnetic scattering problems are calculated and compared with analytical solutions. Examples are given for cases based on 0th to 3rd degree polynomial basis functions. In all calculations, a centered scheme is applied in the interior, while an upwind

  13. Simulation of an Isolated Tiltrotor in Hover with an Unstructured Overset-Grid RANS Solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee-Rausch, Elizabeth M.; Biedron, Robert T.

    2009-01-01

    An unstructured overset-grid Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) solver, FUN3D, is used to simulate an isolated tiltrotor in hover. An overview of the computational method is presented as well as the details of the overset-grid systems. Steady-state computations within a noninertial reference frame define the performance trends of the rotor across a range of the experimental collective settings. Results are presented to show the effects of off-body grid refinement and blade grid refinement. The computed performance and blade loading trends show good agreement with experimental results and previously published structured overset-grid computations. Off-body flow features indicate a significant improvement in the resolution of the first perpendicular blade vortex interaction with background grid refinement across the collective range. Considering experimental data uncertainty and effects of transition, the prediction of figure of merit on the baseline and refined grid is reasonable at the higher collective range- within 3 percent of the measured values. At the lower collective settings, the computed figure of merit is approximately 6 percent lower than the experimental data. A comparison of steady and unsteady results show that with temporal refinement, the dynamic results closely match the steady-state noninertial results which gives confidence in the accuracy of the dynamic overset-grid approach.

  14. Discontinuous Spectral Difference Method for Conservation Laws on Unstructured Grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Yen; Vinokur, Marcel; Wang, Z. J.

    2004-01-01

    A new, high-order, conservative, and efficient method for conservation laws on unstructured grids is developed. The concept of discontinuous and high-order local representations to achieve conservation and high accuracy is utilized in a manner similar to the Discontinuous Galerkin (DG) and the Spectral Volume (SV) methods, but while these methods are based on the integrated forms of the equations, the new method is based on the differential form to attain a simpler formulation and higher efficiency. A discussion on the Discontinuous Spectral Difference (SD) Method, locations of the unknowns and flux points and numerical results are also presented.

  15. Robust and efficient overset grid assembly for partitioned unstructured meshes

    SciTech Connect

    Roget, Beatrice Sitaraman, Jayanarayanan

    2014-03-01

    This paper presents a method to perform efficient and automated Overset Grid Assembly (OGA) on a system of overlapping unstructured meshes in a parallel computing environment where all meshes are partitioned into multiple mesh-blocks and processed on multiple cores. The main task of the overset grid assembler is to identify, in parallel, among all points in the overlapping mesh system, at which points the flow solution should be computed (field points), interpolated (receptor points), or ignored (hole points). Point containment search or donor search, an algorithm to efficiently determine the cell that contains a given point, is the core procedure necessary for accomplishing this task. Donor search is particularly challenging for partitioned unstructured meshes because of the complex irregular boundaries that are often created during partitioning. Another challenge arises because of the large variation in the type of mesh-block overlap and the resulting large load imbalance on multiple processors. Desirable traits for the grid assembly method are efficiency (requiring only a small fraction of the solver time), robustness (correct identification of all point types), and full automation (no user input required other than the mesh system). Additionally, the method should be scalable, which is an important challenge due to the inherent load imbalance. This paper describes a fully-automated grid assembly method, which can use two different donor search algorithms. One is based on the use of auxiliary grids and Exact Inverse Maps (EIM), and the other is based on the use of Alternating Digital Trees (ADT). The EIM method is demonstrated to be more efficient than the ADT method, while retaining robustness. An adaptive load re-balance algorithm is also designed and implemented, which considerably improves the scalability of the method.

  16. Transonic Drag Prediction on a DLR-F6 Transport Configuration Using Unstructured Grid Solvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee-Rausch, E. M.; Frink, N. T.; Mavriplis, D. J.; Rausch, R. D.; Milholen, W. E.

    2004-01-01

    A second international AIAA Drag Prediction Workshop (DPW-II) was organized and held in Orlando Florida on June 21-22, 2003. The primary purpose was to inves- tigate the code-to-code uncertainty. address the sensitivity of the drag prediction to grid size and quantify the uncertainty in predicting nacelle/pylon drag increments at a transonic cruise condition. This paper presents an in-depth analysis of the DPW-II computational results from three state-of-the-art unstructured grid Navier-Stokes flow solvers exercised on similar families of tetrahedral grids. The flow solvers are USM3D - a tetrahedral cell-centered upwind solver. FUN3D - a tetrahedral node-centered upwind solver, and NSU3D - a general element node-centered central-differenced solver. For the wingbody, the total drag predicted for a constant-lift transonic cruise condition showed a decrease in code-to-code variation with grid refinement as expected. For the same flight condition, the wing/body/nacelle/pylon total drag and the nacelle/pylon drag increment predicted showed an increase in code-to-code variation with grid refinement. Although the range in total drag for the wingbody fine grids was only 5 counts, a code-to-code comparison of surface pressures and surface restricted streamlines indicated that the three solvers were not all converging to the same flow solutions- different shock locations and separation patterns were evident. Similarly, the wing/body/nacelle/pylon solutions did not appear to be converging to the same flow solutions. Overall, grid refinement did not consistently improve the correlation with experimental data for either the wingbody or the wing/body/nacelle pylon configuration. Although the absolute values of total drag predicted by two of the solvers for the medium and fine grids did not compare well with the experiment, the incremental drag predictions were within plus or minus 3 counts of the experimental data. The correlation with experimental incremental drag was not

  17. A Solution Adaptive Technique Using Tetrahedral Unstructured Grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pirzadeh, Shahyar Z.

    2000-01-01

    An adaptive unstructured grid refinement technique has been developed and successfully applied to several three dimensional inviscid flow test cases. The method is based on a combination of surface mesh subdivision and local remeshing of the volume grid Simple functions of flow quantities are employed to detect dominant features of the flowfield The method is designed for modular coupling with various error/feature analyzers and flow solvers. Several steady-state, inviscid flow test cases are presented to demonstrate the applicability of the method for solving practical three-dimensional problems. In all cases, accurate solutions featuring complex, nonlinear flow phenomena such as shock waves and vortices have been generated automatically and efficiently.

  18. A numerical scheme for coastal morphodynamic modelling on unstructured grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerin, Thomas; Bertin, Xavier; Dodet, Guillaume

    2016-08-01

    Over the last decade, modelling systems based on unstructured grids have been appearing increasingly attractive to investigate the dynamics of coastal zones. However, the resolution of the sediment continuity equation to simulate bed evolution is a complex problem which often leads to the development of numerical oscillations. To overcome this problem, addition of artificial diffusion or bathymetric filters are commonly employed methods, although these techniques can potentially over-smooth the bathymetry. This study aims to present a numerical scheme based on the Weighted Essentially Non-Oscillatory (WENO) formalism to solve the bed continuity equation on unstructured grids in a finite volume formulation. The new solution is compared against a classical method, which combines a basic node-centered finite volume method with artificial diffusion, for three idealized test cases. This comparison reveals that a higher accuracy is obtained with our new method while the addition of diffusion appears inappropriate mainly due to the arbitrary choice of the diffusion coefficient. Moreover, the increased computation time associated with the WENO-based method to solve the bed continuity equation is negligible when considering a fully-coupled simulation with tides and waves. Finally, the application of the new method to the pluri-monthly evolution of an idealized inlet subjected to tides and waves shows the development of realistic bed features (e.g. secondary flood channels, ebb-delta sandbars, or oblique sandbars at the adjacent beaches), that are smoothed or nonexistent when using additional diffusion.

  19. SAUNA: A system for grid generation and flow simulation using hybrid structured/unstructured grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Childs, P. N.; Shaw, J. A.; Peace, A. J.; Georgala, J. M.

    1992-05-01

    The development of a flow simulation facility for predicting the aerodynamics of complex configurations wherein the grid is composed of both structured and unstructured regions is described. Issues relating to the generation and analysis of such grids and to the accurate and efficient computation of both inviscid and viscous flows thereon are considered. Further the development of a comprehensive post-processing and visualization facility is explored. Techniques are illustrated throughout by application to realistic aircraft geometries.

  20. SAUNA: A system for grid generation and flow simulation using hybrid structured/unstructured grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Childs, P. N.; Shaw, J. A.; Peace, A. J.; Georgala, J. M.

    We describe the development of a flow simulation facility for predicting the aerodynamics of complex configurations wherein the grid is composed of both structured and unstructured regions. This paper considers issues relating to the generation and analysis of such grids and to the accurate and efficient computation of both inviscid and viscous flows thereon. Further, the development of a comprehensive post-processing and visualization facility is explored. Techniques are illustrated throughout by application to realistic aircraft geometries.

  1. Vortical Flow Prediction Using an Adaptive Unstructured Grid Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pirzadeh, Shahyar Z.

    2003-01-01

    A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) method has been employed to compute vortical flows around slender wing/body configurations. The emphasis of the paper is on the effectiveness of an adaptive grid procedure in "capturing" concentrated vortices generated at sharp edges or flow separation lines of lifting surfaces flying at high angles of attack. The method is based on a tetrahedral unstructured grid technology developed at the NASA Langley Research Center. Two steady-state, subsonic, inviscid and Navier-Stokes flow test cases are presented to demonstrate the applicability of the method for solving practical vortical flow problems. The first test case concerns vortex flow over a simple 65 delta wing with different values of leading-edge radius. Although the geometry is quite simple, it poses a challenging problem for computing vortices originating from blunt leading edges. The second case is that of a more complex fighter configuration. The superiority of the adapted solutions in capturing the vortex flow structure over the conventional unadapted results is demonstrated by comparisons with the wind-tunnel experimental data. The study shows that numerical prediction of vortical flows is highly sensitive to the local grid resolution and that the implementation of grid adaptation is essential when applying CFD methods to such complicated flow problems.

  2. Vortical Flow Prediction Using an Adaptive Unstructured Grid Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pirzadeh, Shahyar Z.

    2001-01-01

    A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) method has been employed to compute vortical flows around slender wing/body configurations. The emphasis of the paper is on the effectiveness of an adaptive grid procedure in "capturing" concentrated vortices generated at sharp edges or flow separation lines of lifting surfaces flying at high angles of attack. The method is based on a tetrahedral unstructured grid technology developed at the NASA Langley Research Center. Two steady-state, subsonic, inviscid and Navier-Stokes flow test cases are presented to demonstrate the applicability of the method for solving practical vortical flow problems. The first test case concerns vortex flow over a simple 65deg delta wing with different values of leading-edge bluntness, and the second case is that of a more complex fighter configuration. The superiority of the adapted solutions in capturing the vortex flow structure over the conventional unadapted results is demonstrated by comparisons with the windtunnel experimental data. The study shows that numerical prediction of vortical flows is highly sensitive to the local grid resolution and that the implementation of grid adaptation is essential when applying CFD methods to such complicated flow problems.

  3. M3D Simulations of Energetic Particle-driven MHD Mode with Unstructured Mesh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, G. Y.; Park, W.; Strauss, H. R.

    2001-10-01

    The energetic particle-driven MHD modes are studied using a multi-level extended MHD code M3D(W. Park et al., Phys. Plasmas 6, 1796 (1999)). In a Extended-MHD model, the plasma is divided into the bulk part and the energetic particle component. The bulk plasma is treated as either a single fluid or two fluids. The energetic particles are described by gyrokinetic particles following the self-consistent electromagnetic field. The model is self-consistent, including nonlinear effects of hot particles on the MHD dynamics and the nonlinear MHD mode coupling. Previously we had shown the results of nonlinear saturation of TAEfootnote G.Y. Fu and W. Park, Phys. Rev. Lett. 74, 1594 (1995), energetic particle stabilization of an internal kink and excitation of fishbone^2, and nonlinear saturation of fishbone in circular tokamaks (G.Y. Fu et al, 2000 Sherwood Meeting, Paper 2C2.). In this work, we extend the simulations to general geometry using unstructured mesh(H.R. Strauss and W. Park, Phys. Plasmas 5, 2676 (1998). We also use a gyrofluid model for fishbone in order to study the role of MHD nonlinearity in saturation near the marginal stability. Results of applications to tokamaks and spherical tokamaks will be presented.

  4. Solving unstructured grid problems on massively parallel computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammond, Steven W.; Schreiber, Robert

    1990-01-01

    A highly parallel graph mapping technique that enables one to efficiently solve unstructured grid problems on massively parallel computers is presented. Many implicit and explicit methods for solving discretized partial differential equations require each point in the discretization to exchange data with its neighboring points every time step or iteration. The cost of this communication can negate the high performance promised by massively parallel computing. To eliminate this bottleneck, the graph of the irregular problem is mapped into the graph representing the interconnection topology of the computer such that the sum of the distances that the messages travel is minimized. It is shown that using the heuristic mapping algorithm significantly reduces the communication time compared to a naive assignment of processes to processors.

  5. Unstructured Adaptive Grid Computations on an Array of SMPs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biswas, Rupak; Pramanick, Ira; Sohn, Andrew; Simon, Horst D.

    1996-01-01

    Dynamic load balancing is necessary for parallel adaptive methods to solve unsteady CFD problems on unstructured grids. We have presented such a dynamic load balancing framework called JOVE, in this paper. Results on a four-POWERnode POWER CHALLENGEarray demonstrated that load balancing gives significant performance improvements over no load balancing for such adaptive computations. The parallel speedup of JOVE, implemented using MPI on the POWER CHALLENCEarray, was significant, being as high as 31 for 32 processors. An implementation of JOVE that exploits 'an array of SMPS' architecture was also studied; this hybrid JOVE outperformed flat JOVE by up to 28% on the meshes and adaption models tested. With large, realistic meshes and actual flow-solver and adaption phases incorporated into JOVE, hybrid JOVE can be expected to yield significant advantage over flat JOVE, especially as the number of processors is increased, thus demonstrating the scalability of an array of SMPs architecture.

  6. Gpu Implementation of a Viscous Flow Solver on Unstructured Grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Tianhao; Chen, Long

    2016-06-01

    Graphics processing units have gained popularities in scientific computing over past several years due to their outstanding parallel computing capability. Computational fluid dynamics applications involve large amounts of calculations, therefore a latest GPU card is preferable of which the peak computing performance and memory bandwidth are much better than a contemporary high-end CPU. We herein focus on the detailed implementation of our GPU targeting Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations solver based on finite-volume method. The solver employs a vertex-centered scheme on unstructured grids for the sake of being capable of handling complex topologies. Multiple optimizations are carried out to improve the memory accessing performance and kernel utilization. Both steady and unsteady flow simulation cases are carried out using explicit Runge-Kutta scheme. The solver with GPU acceleration in this paper is demonstrated to have competitive advantages over the CPU targeting one.

  7. Load Balancing Unstructured Adaptive Grids for CFD Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biswas, Rupak; Oliker, Leonid

    1996-01-01

    Mesh adaption is a powerful tool for efficient unstructured-grid computations but causes load imbalance among processors on a parallel machine. A dynamic load balancing method is presented that balances the workload across all processors with a global view. After each parallel tetrahedral mesh adaption, the method first determines if the new mesh is sufficiently unbalanced to warrant a repartitioning. If so, the adapted mesh is repartitioned, with new partitions assigned to processors so that the redistribution cost is minimized. The new partitions are accepted only if the remapping cost is compensated by the improved load balance. Results indicate that this strategy is effective for large-scale scientific computations on distributed-memory multiprocessors.

  8. Mapping unstructured grid problems to the connection machine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammond, Steven W.; Schreiber, Robert

    1990-01-01

    We present a highly parallel graph mapping technique that enables one to solve unstructured grid problems on massively parallel computers. Many implicit and explicit methods for solving discretizated partial differential equations require each point in the discretization to exchange data with its neighboring points every time step or iteration. The time spent communicating can limit the high performance promised by massively parallel computing. To eliminate this bottleneck, we map the graph of the irregular problem to the graph representing the interconnection topology of the computer such that the sum of the distances that the messages travel is minimized. We show that, in comparison to a naive assignment of processors, our heuristic mapping algorithm significantly reduces the communication time on the Connection Machine, CM-2.

  9. Propulsion Simulations Using Advanced Turbulence Models with the Unstructured Grid CFD Tool, TetrUSS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdol-Hamid, Khaled S.; Frink, Neal T.; Deere, Karen A.; Pandya, Mohangna J.

    2004-01-01

    A computational investigation has been completed to assess the capability of TetrUSS for exhaust nozzle flows. Three configurations were chosen for this study (1) an axisymmetric supersonic jet, (2) a transonic axisymmetric boattail with solid sting operated at different Reynolds number and Mach number, and (3) an isolated non-axisymmetric nacelle with a supersonic cruise nozzle. These configurations were chosen because existing experimental data provided a means for measuring the ability of TetrUSS for simulating complex nozzle flows. The main objective of this paper is to validate the implementation of advanced two-equation turbulence models in the unstructured-grid CFD code USM3D for propulsion flow cases. USM3D is the flow solver of the TetrUSS system. Three different turbulence models, namely, Menter Shear Stress Transport (SST), basic k epsilon, and the Spalart-Allmaras (SA) are used in the present study. The results are generally in agreement with other implementations of these models in structured-grid CFD codes. Results indicate that USM3D provides accurate simulations for complex aerodynamic configurations with propulsion integration.

  10. A 3D unstructured non-hydrostatic ocean model for internal waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ai, Congfang; Ding, Weiye

    2016-10-01

    A 3D non-hydrostatic model is developed to compute internal waves. A novel grid arrangement is incorporated in the model. This not only ensures the homogenous Dirichlet boundary condition for the non-hydrostatic pressure can be precisely and easily imposed but also renders the model relatively simple in its discretized form. The Perot scheme is employed to discretize horizontal advection terms in the horizontal momentum equations, which is based on staggered grids and has the conservative property. Based on previous water wave models, the main works of the present paper are to (1) utilize a semi-implicit, fractional step algorithm to solve the Navier-Stokes equations (NSE); (2) develop a second-order flux-limiter method satisfying the max-min property; (3) incorporate a density equation, which is solved by a high-resolution finite volume method ensuring mass conservation and max-min property based on a vertical boundary-fitted coordinate system; and (4) validate the developed model by using four tests including two internal seiche waves, lock-exchange flow, and internal solitary wave breaking. Comparisons of numerical results with analytical solutions or experimental data or other model results show reasonably good agreement, demonstrating the model's capability to resolve internal waves relating to complex non-hydrostatic phenomena.

  11. A 3D unstructured non-hydrostatic ocean model for internal waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ai, Congfang; Ding, Weiye

    2016-08-01

    A 3D non-hydrostatic model is developed to compute internal waves. A novel grid arrangement is incorporated in the model. This not only ensures the homogenous Dirichlet boundary condition for the non-hydrostatic pressure can be precisely and easily imposed but also renders the model relatively simple in its discretized form. The Perot scheme is employed to discretize horizontal advection terms in the horizontal momentum equations, which is based on staggered grids and has the conservative property. Based on previous water wave models, the main works of the present paper are to (1) utilize a semi-implicit, fractional step algorithm to solve the Navier-Stokes equations (NSE); (2) develop a second-order flux-limiter method satisfying the max-min property; (3) incorporate a density equation, which is solved by a high-resolution finite volume method ensuring mass conservation and max-min property based on a vertical boundary-fitted coordinate system; and (4) validate the developed model by using four tests including two internal seiche waves, lock-exchange flow, and internal solitary wave breaking. Comparisons of numerical results with analytical solutions or experimental data or other model results show reasonably good agreement, demonstrating the model's capability to resolve internal waves relating to complex non-hydrostatic phenomena.

  12. A multipurpose 3-D grid of stellar models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maíz Apellániz, J.

    2013-05-01

    The last two decades have produced a proliferation of stellar atmosphere grids, evolutionary tracks, and isochrones which are available to the astronomical community from different internet services. However, it is not straightforward (at least for an inexperienced user) to manipulate those models to answer questions of the type: What is the spectral energy distribution of a 9000 K giant? What about its J-band magnitude for different metallicities? What can I tell about the mass of a star if I know that its unreddened B-V color is -0.05 and its luminosity in solar units is 10^5? The answers to those questions are indeed in the models but a series of transformations and combinations involving different variables and models are required to obtain them. To make the available knowledge more user friendly, I have combined a number of state-of-the-art sources to create a 3-D (effective temperature, luminosity, and metallicity) grid of stellar models for which I provide calibrated SEDs and magnitudes as well as auxiliary variables such as mass and age. Furthermore, I have generated a grid of extinguished magnitudes using the recent Maíz Apellániz et al. (2012) extinction laws and incorporated them into the Bayesian code CHORIZOS (Maíz Apellániz 2004).

  13. Cosmos++: Relativistic Magnetohydrodynamics on Unstructured Grids with Local Adaptive Refinement

    SciTech Connect

    Anninos, P; Fragile, P C; Salmonson, J D

    2005-05-06

    A new code and methodology are introduced for solving the fully general relativistic magnetohydrodynamic (GRMHD) equations using time-explicit, finite-volume discretization. The code has options for solving the GRMHD equations using traditional artificial-viscosity (AV) or non-oscillatory central difference (NOCD) methods, or a new extended AV (eAV) scheme using artificial-viscosity together with a dual energy-flux-conserving formulation. The dual energy approach allows for accurate modeling of highly relativistic flows at boost factors well beyond what has been achieved to date by standard artificial viscosity methods. it provides the benefit of Godunov methods in capturing high Lorentz boosted flows but without complicated Riemann solvers, and the advantages of traditional artificial viscosity methods in their speed and flexibility. Additionally, the GRMHD equations are solved on an unstructured grid that supports local adaptive mesh refinement using a fully threated oct-tree (in three dimensions) network to traverse the grid hierarchy across levels and immediate neighbors. A number of tests are presented to demonstrate robustness of the numerical algorithms and adaptive mesh framework over a wide spectrum of problems, boosts, and astrophysical applications, including relativistic shock tubes, shock collisions, magnetosonic shocks, Alfven wave propagation, blast waves, magnetized Bondi flow, and the magneto-rotational instability in Kerr black hole spacetimes.

  14. A parallel computational fluid dynamics unstructured grid generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Deborah E.

    1993-12-01

    This research addressed the development of a parallel computational fluid dynamics unstructured grid generator using Delaunay triangulation. The generator is applied to simple elliptical and cylindrical two-dimensional bodies. The methodologies used included Watson's point insertion algorithm, Holmes and Snyder's point creation algorithm, a discretized surface definition, Anderson's clustering function, and a Laplacian smoother. The first version of the software involved a processor boundary exchange at the end of each iteration with no inter-processor communications during the iterations. The second version used inter-processor communication during each iteration instead of the boundary exchange. Version 1 demonstrated a speedup of 1.8 for some portions of the code, but proved to be unscalable for more than two nodes due to the interdependency of the triangular elements. The results of Version 2 were similar. Two distribution methodologies, a simple 360-degree distribution and recursive spectral bisection (RSB), were examined. For the initial grid distribution, the distribution generated by the RSB code would be similar to the distribution generated by the 360-degree methodology and would require significantly more time to execute.

  15. MHD simulations on an unstructured mesh

    SciTech Connect

    Strauss, H.R.; Park, W.; Belova, E.; Fu, G.Y.; Longcope, D.W.; Sugiyama, L.E.

    1998-12-31

    Two reasons for using an unstructured computational mesh are adaptivity, and alignment with arbitrarily shaped boundaries. Two codes which use finite element discretization on an unstructured mesh are described. FEM3D solves 2D and 3D RMHD using an adaptive grid. MH3D++, which incorporates methods of FEM3D into the MH3D generalized MHD code, can be used with shaped boundaries, which might be 3D.

  16. Unstructured grid modelling of offshore wind farm impacts on seasonally stratified shelf seas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cazenave, Pierre William; Torres, Ricardo; Allen, J. Icarus

    2016-06-01

    Shelf seas comprise approximately 7% of the world's oceans and host enormous economic activity. Development of energy installations (e.g. Offshore Wind Farms (OWFs), tidal turbines) in response to increased demand for renewable energy requires a careful analysis of potential impacts. Recent remote sensing observations have identified kilometre-scale impacts from OWFs. Existing modelling evaluating monopile impacts has fallen into two camps: small-scale models with individually resolved turbines looking at local effects; and large-scale analyses but with sub-grid scale turbine parameterisations. This work straddles both scales through a 3D unstructured grid model (FVCOM): wind turbine monopiles in the eastern Irish Sea are explicitly described in the grid whilst the overall grid domain covers the south-western UK shelf. Localised regions of decreased velocity extend up to 250 times the monopile diameter away from the monopile. Shelf-wide, the amplitude of the M2 tidal constituent increases by up to 7%. The turbines enhance localised vertical mixing which decreases seasonal stratification. The spatial extent of this extends well beyond the turbines into the surrounding seas. With significant expansion of OWFs on continental shelves, this work highlights the importance of how OWFs may impact coastal (e.g. increased flooding risk) and offshore (e.g. stratification and nutrient cycling) areas.

  17. The self-organization of grid cells in 3D.

    PubMed

    Stella, Federico; Treves, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    Do we expect periodic grid cells to emerge in bats, or perhaps dolphins, exploring a three-dimensional environment? How long will it take? Our self-organizing model, based on ring-rate adaptation, points at a complex answer. The mathematical analysis leads to asymptotic states resembling face centered cubic (FCC) and hexagonal close packed (HCP) crystal structures, which are calculated to be very close to each other in terms of cost function. The simulation of the full model, however, shows that the approach to such asymptotic states involves several sub-processes over distinct time scales. The smoothing of the initially irregular multiple fields of individual units and their arrangement into hexagonal grids over certain best planes are observed to occur relatively quickly, even in large 3D volumes. The correct mutual orientation of the planes, though, and the coordinated arrangement of different units, take a longer time, with the network showing no sign of convergence towards either a pure FCC or HCP ordering. PMID:25821989

  18. Visualizing 3D Turbulence On Temporally Adaptive Wavelet Collocation Grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldstein, D. E.; Kadlec, B. J.; Yuen, D. A.; Erlebacher, G.

    2005-12-01

    Today there is an explosion in data from high-resolution computations of nonlinear phenomena in many fields, including the geo- and environmental sciences. The efficient storage and subsequent visualization of these large data sets is a trade off in storage costs versus data quality. New dynamically adaptive simulation methodologies promise significant computational cost savings and have the added benefit of producing results on adapted grids that significantly reduce storage and data manipulation costs. Yet, with these adaptive simulation methodologies come new challenges in the visualization of temporally adaptive data sets. In this work turbulence data sets from Stochastic Coherent Adaptive Large Eddy Simulations (SCALES) are visualized with the open source tool ParaView, as a challenging case study. SCALES simulations use a temporally adaptive collocation grid defined by wavelet threshold filtering to resolve the most energetic coherent structures in a turbulence field. A subgrid scale model is used to account for the effect of unresolved subgrid scale modes. The results from the SCALES simulations are saved on a thresholded dyadic wavelet collocation grid, which by its nature does not include cell information. Paraview is an open source visualization package developed by KitWare(tm) that is based on the widely used VTK graphics toolkit. The efficient generation of cell information, required with current ParaView data formats, is explored using custom algorithms and VTK toolkit routines. Adaptive 3d visualizations using isosurfaces and volume visualizations are compared with non-adaptive visualizations. To explore the localized multiscale structures in the turbulent data sets the wavelet coefficients are also visualized allowing visualization of energy contained in local physical regions as well as in local wave number space.

  19. Simulation of Unsteady Flows Using an Unstructured Navier-Stokes Solver on Moving and Stationary Grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biedron, Robert T.; Vatsa, Veer N.; Atkins, Harold L.

    2005-01-01

    We apply an unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (URANS) solver for unstructured grids to unsteady flows on moving and stationary grids. Example problems considered are relevant to active flow control and stability and control. Computational results are presented using the Spalart-Allmaras turbulence model and are compared to experimental data. The effect of grid and time-step refinement are examined.

  20. PDF modeling of turbulent flows on unstructured grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakosi, Jozsef

    In probability density function (PDF) methods of turbulent flows, the joint PDF of several flow variables is computed by numerically integrating a system of stochastic differential equations for Lagrangian particles. Because the technique solves a transport equation for the PDF of the velocity and scalars, a mathematically exact treatment of advection, viscous effects and arbitrarily complex chemical reactions is possible; these processes are treated without closure assumptions. A set of algorithms is proposed to provide an efficient solution of the PDF transport equation modeling the joint PDF of turbulent velocity, frequency and concentration of a passive scalar in geometrically complex configurations. An unstructured Eulerian grid is employed to extract Eulerian statistics, to solve for quantities represented at fixed locations of the domain and to track particles. All three aspects regarding the grid make use of the finite element method. Compared to hybrid methods, the current methodology is stand-alone, therefore it is consistent both numerically and at the level of turbulence closure without the use of consistency conditions. Since both the turbulent velocity and scalar concentration fields are represented in a stochastic way, the method allows for a direct and close interaction between these fields, which is beneficial in computing accurate scalar statistics. Boundary conditions implemented along solid bodies are of the free-slip and no-slip type without the need for ghost elements. Boundary layers at no-slip boundaries are either fully resolved down to the viscous sublayer, explicitly modeling the high anisotropy and inhomogeneity of the low-Reynolds-number wall region without damping or wall-functions or specified via logarithmic wall-functions. As in moment closures and large eddy simulation, these wall-treatments provide the usual trade-off between resolution and computational cost as required by the given application. Particular attention is focused on

  1. Kull ALE: II. Grid Motion on Unstructured Arbitrary Polyhedral Meshes

    SciTech Connect

    Anninos, P

    2002-02-11

    Several classes of mesh motion algorithms are presented for the remap phase of unstructured mesh ALE codes. The methods range from local shape optimization procedures to more complex variational minimization methods applied to arbitrary unstructured polyhedral meshes necessary for the Kull code.

  2. The 3D Euler solutions using automated Cartesian grid generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melton, John E.; Enomoto, Francis Y.; Berger, Marsha J.

    1993-01-01

    Viewgraphs on 3-dimensional Euler solutions using automated Cartesian grid generation are presented. Topics covered include: computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and the design cycle; Cartesian grid strategy; structured body fit; grid generation; prolate spheroid; and ONERA M6 wing.

  3. Efficient Unstructured Cartesian/Immersed-Boundary Method with Local Mesh Refinement to Simulate Flows in Complex 3D Geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Zelicourt, Diane; Ge, Liang; Sotiropoulos, Fotis; Yoganathan, Ajit

    2008-11-01

    Image-guided computational fluid dynamics has recently gained attention as a tool for predicting the outcome of different surgical scenarios. Cartesian Immersed-Boundary methods constitute an attractive option to tackle the complexity of real-life anatomies. However, when such methods are applied to the branching, multi-vessel configurations typically encountered in cardiovascular anatomies the majority of the grid nodes of the background Cartesian mesh end up lying outside the computational domain, increasing the memory and computational overhead without enhancing the numerical resolution in the region of interest. To remedy this situation, the method presented here superimposes local mesh refinement onto an unstructured Cartesian grid formulation. A baseline unstructured Cartesian mesh is generated by eliminating all nodes that reside in the exterior of the flow domain from the grid structure, and is locally refined in the vicinity of the immersed-boundary. The potential of the method is demonstrated by carrying out systematic mesh refinement studies for internal flow problems ranging in complexity from a 90 deg pipe bend to an actual, patient-specific anatomy reconstructed from magnetic resonance.

  4. Propulsion Simulations with the Unstructured-Grid CFD Tool TetrUSS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deere, Karen A.; Pandya, Mohagna J.

    2002-01-01

    A computational investigation has been completed to assess the capability of the NASA Tetrahedral Unstructured Software System (TetrUSS) for simulation of exhaust nozzle flows. Three configurations were chosen for this study: (1) a fluidic jet effects model, (2) an isolated nacelle with a supersonic cruise nozzle, and (3) a fluidic pitchthrust- vectoring nozzle. These configurations were chosen because existing data provided a means for measuring the ability of the TetrUSS flow solver USM3D for simulating complex nozzle flows. Fluidic jet effects model simulations were compared with structured-grid CFD (computational fluid dynamics) data at Mach numbers from 0.3 to 1.2 at nozzle pressure ratios up to 7.2. Simulations of an isolated nacelle with a supersonic cruise nozzle were compared with wind tunnel experimental data and structured-grid CFD data at Mach numbers of 0.9 and 1.2, with a nozzle pressure ratio of 5. Fluidic pitch-thrust-vectoring nozzle simulations were compared with static experimental data and structured-grid CFD data at static freestream conditions and nozzle pressure ratios from 3 to 10. A fluidic injection case was computed with the third configuration at a nozzle pressure ratio of 4.6 and a secondary pressure ratio of 0.7. Results indicate that USM3D with the S-A turbulence model provides accurate exhaust nozzle simulations at on-design conditions, but does not predict internal shock location at overexpanded conditions or pressure recovery along a boattail at transonic conditions.

  5. Unstructured grid research and use at NASA Lewis Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Potapczuk, Mark G.

    1993-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics applications of grid research at LRC include inlets, nozzles, and ducts; turbomachinery; propellers - ducted and unducted; and aircraft icing. Some issues related to internal flow grid generation are resolution requirements on several boundaries, shock resolution vs. grid periodicity, grid spacing at blade/shroud gap, grid generation in turbine blade passages, and grid generation for inlet/nozzle geometries. Aircraft icing grid generation issues include (1) small structures relative to airfoil chord must be resolved; (2) excessive number of grid points in far-field using structured grid; and (3) grid must be recreated as ice shape grows.

  6. EM modelling of arbitrary shaped anisotropic dielectric objects using an efficient 3D leapfrog scheme on unstructured meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gansen, A.; Hachemi, M. El; Belouettar, S.; Hassan, O.; Morgan, K.

    2016-09-01

    The standard Yee algorithm is widely used in computational electromagnetics because of its simplicity and divergence free nature. A generalization of the classical Yee scheme to 3D unstructured meshes is adopted, based on the use of a Delaunay primal mesh and its high quality Voronoi dual. This allows the problem of accuracy losses, which are normally associated with the use of the standard Yee scheme and a staircased representation of curved material interfaces, to be circumvented. The 3D dual mesh leapfrog-scheme which is presented has the ability to model both electric and magnetic anisotropic lossy materials. This approach enables the modelling of problems, of current practical interest, involving structured composites and metamaterials.

  7. Simulation of a Periodic Jet in a Crossflow with a RANS Solver Using an Unstructured Grid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atkins, H. L.

    2007-01-01

    A second-order unstructured-grid code, developed and used primarily for steady aerodynamic simulations, is applied to the synthetic jet in a cross flow. The code, FUN3D, is a vertex-centered finite-volume method originally developed by Anderson[1, 2], and is currently supported by members of the Fast Adaptive Aerospace Tools team at NASA Langley. Used primarily for design[3] and analysis[4] of steady aerodynamic configurations, FUN3D incorporates a discrete adjoint capability, and supports parallel computations using MPI. A detailed description of the FUN3D code can be found in the references given above. The code is under continuous development and contains a variety of flux splitting algorithms for the inviscid terms, two methods for computing gradients, several turbulence models, and several solution methodologies; all in varying states of development. Only the most robust and reliable components, based on experiences with steady aerodynamic simulations, were employed in this work. As applied in this work, FUN3D solves the Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes equations using the one equation turbulence model of Spalart and Allmaras[5]. The spatial discretization is formed on unstructured meshes using a vertex-centered approach. The inviscid terms are evaluated by a flux-difference splitting formulation using least-squares reconstruction and Roe-type approximate Riemann fluxes. Green-Gauss gradient evaluations are used for viscous and turbulence modeling terms. The discrete spatial operator is combined with a backward time operator which is then solved iteratively using point or line Gauss-Seidel and local time stepping in a pseudo time. For steady flows, the physical time step is set to infinity and the pseudo time step is ramped up with the iteration count. A second-order backward in time operator is used for time accurate flows with 20 to 50 steps in the pseudo time applied at each physical time step. For this effort, FUN3D was modified to support spatially varying

  8. Symmetric Gauss-Seidel multigrid solution of the Euler equations on structured and unstructured grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caughey, David A.

    2005-11-01

    The efficient symmetric Gauss-Seidel (SGS) algorithm for solving the Euler equations of inviscid, compressible flow on structured grids, developed in collaboration with Jameson of Stanford University, is extended to unstructured grids. The algorithm uses a nonlinear formulation of an SGS solver, implemented within the framework of multigrid. The earlier form of the algorithm used the natural (lexicographic) ordering of the mesh cells available on structured grids for the SGS sweeps, but a number of features of the method that are believed to contribute to its success can also be implemented for computations on unstructured grids. The present paper reviews, the features of the SGS multigrid solver for structured gr0ids, including its nonlinear implementation, its use of “absolute” Jacobian matrix preconditioning, and its incorporation of multigrid, and then describes the incorporation of these features into an algorithm suitable for computations on unstructured grids. The implementation on unstructured grids is based on the agglomerated multigrid method developed by Sørensen, which uses an explicit Runge-Kutta smoothing algorithm. Results of computations for steady, transonic flows past two-dimensional airfoils are presented, and the efficiency of the method is evaluated for computations on both structured and unstructured meshes.

  9. Three-dimensional unstructured grid refinement and optimization using edge-swapping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gandhi, Amar; Barth, Timothy

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents a three-dimensional (3-D) 'edge-swapping method based on local transformations. This method extends Lawson's edge-swapping algorithm into 3-D. The 3-D edge-swapping algorithm is employed for the purpose of refining and optimizing unstructured meshes according to arbitrary mesh-quality measures. Several criteria including Delaunay triangulations are examined. Extensions from two to three dimensions of several known properties of Delaunay triangulations are also discussed.

  10. A Solution Adaptive Structured/Unstructured Overset Grid Flow Solver with Applications to Helicopter Rotor Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duque, Earl P. N.; Biswas, Rupak; Strawn, Roger C.

    1995-01-01

    This paper summarizes a method that solves both the three dimensional thin-layer Navier-Stokes equations and the Euler equations using overset structured and solution adaptive unstructured grids with applications to helicopter rotor flowfields. The overset structured grids use an implicit finite-difference method to solve the thin-layer Navier-Stokes/Euler equations while the unstructured grid uses an explicit finite-volume method to solve the Euler equations. Solutions on a helicopter rotor in hover show the ability to accurately convect the rotor wake. However, isotropic subdivision of the tetrahedral mesh rapidly increases the overall problem size.

  11. A geometry-based adaptive unstructured grid generation algorithm for complex geological media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahrainian, Seyed Saied; Dezfuli, Alireza Daneh

    2014-07-01

    In this paper a novel unstructured grid generation algorithm is presented that considers the effect of geological features and well locations in grid resolution. The proposed grid generation algorithm presents a strategy for definition and construction of an initial grid based on the geological model, geometry adaptation of geological features, and grid resolution control. The algorithm is applied to seismotectonic map of the Masjed-i-Soleiman reservoir. Comparison of grid results with the “Triangle” program shows a more suitable permeability contrast. Immiscible two-phase flow solutions are presented for a fractured porous media test case using different grid resolutions. Adapted grid on the fracture geometry gave identical results with that of a fine grid. The adapted grid employed 88.2% less CPU time when compared to the solutions obtained by the fine grid.

  12. On the application of Chimera/unstructured hybrid grids for conjugate heat transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kao, Kai-Hsiung; Liou, Meng-Sing

    1995-01-01

    A hybrid grid system that combines the Chimera overset grid scheme and an unstructured grid method is developed to study fluid flow and heat transfer problems. With the proposed method, the solid structural region, in which only the heat conduction is considered, can be easily represented using an unstructured grid method. As for the fluid flow region external to the solid material, the Chimera overset grid scheme has been shown to be very flexible and efficient in resolving complex configurations. The numerical analyses require the flow field solution and material thermal response to be obtained simultaneously. A continuous transfer of temperature and heat flux is specified at the interface, which connects the solid structure and the fluid flow as an integral system. Numerical results are compared with analytical and experimental data for a flat plate and a C3X cooled turbine cascade. A simplified drum-disk system is also simulated to show the effectiveness of this hybrid grid system.

  13. 3D automatic Cartesian grid generation for Euler flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melton, John E.; Enomoto, Francis Y.; Berger, Marsha J.

    1993-01-01

    We describe a Cartesian grid strategy for the study of three dimensional inviscid flows about arbitrary geometries that uses both conventional and CAD/CAM surface geometry databases. Initial applications of the technique are presented. The elimination of the body-fitted constraint allows the grid generation process to be automated, significantly reducing the time and effort required to develop suitable computational grids for inviscid flowfield simulations.

  14. Facets : a Cloudcompare Plugin to Extract Geological Planes from Unstructured 3d Point Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewez, T. J. B.; Girardeau-Montaut, D.; Allanic, C.; Rohmer, J.

    2016-06-01

    Geological planar facets (stratification, fault, joint…) are key features to unravel the tectonic history of rock outcrop or appreciate the stability of a hazardous rock cliff. Measuring their spatial attitude (dip and strike) is generally performed by hand with a compass/clinometer, which is time consuming, requires some degree of censoring (i.e. refusing to measure some features judged unimportant at the time), is not always possible for fractures higher up on the outcrop and is somewhat hazardous. 3D virtual geological outcrop hold the potential to alleviate these issues. Efficiently segmenting massive 3D point clouds into individual planar facets, inside a convenient software environment was lacking. FACETS is a dedicated plugin within CloudCompare v2.6.2 (http://cloudcompare.org/ ) implemented to perform planar facet extraction, calculate their dip and dip direction (i.e. azimuth of steepest decent) and report the extracted data in interactive stereograms. Two algorithms perform the segmentation: Kd-Tree and Fast Marching. Both divide the point cloud into sub-cells, then compute elementary planar objects and aggregate them progressively according to a planeity threshold into polygons. The boundaries of the polygons are adjusted around segmented points with a tension parameter, and the facet polygons can be exported as 3D polygon shapefiles towards third party GIS software or simply as ASCII comma separated files. One of the great features of FACETS is the capability to explore planar objects but also 3D points with normals with the stereogram tool. Poles can be readily displayed, queried and manually segmented interactively. The plugin blends seamlessly into CloudCompare to leverage all its other 3D point cloud manipulation features. A demonstration of the tool is presented to illustrate these different features. While designed for geological applications, FACETS could be more widely applied to any planar

  15. Parallel S{sub n} Sweeps on Unstructured Grids: Algorithms for Prioritization, Grid Partitioning, and Cycle Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Plimpton, Steven J.; Hendrickson, Bruce; Burns, Shawn P.; McLendon, William III; Rauchwerger, Lawrence

    2005-07-15

    The method of discrete ordinates is commonly used to solve the Boltzmann transport equation. The solution in each ordinate direction is most efficiently computed by sweeping the radiation flux across the computational grid. For unstructured grids this poses many challenges, particularly when implemented on distributed-memory parallel machines where the grid geometry is spread across processors. We present several algorithms relevant to this approach: (a) an asynchronous message-passing algorithm that performs sweeps simultaneously in multiple ordinate directions, (b) a simple geometric heuristic to prioritize the computational tasks that a processor works on, (c) a partitioning algorithm that creates columnar-style decompositions for unstructured grids, and (d) an algorithm for detecting and eliminating cycles that sometimes exist in unstructured grids and can prevent sweeps from successfully completing. Algorithms (a) and (d) are fully parallel; algorithms (b) and (c) can be used in conjunction with (a) to achieve higher parallel efficiencies. We describe our message-passing implementations of these algorithms within a radiation transport package. Performance and scalability results are given for unstructured grids with up to 3 million elements (500 million unknowns) running on thousands of processors of Sandia National Laboratories' Intel Tflops machine and DEC-Alpha CPlant cluster.

  16. An unstructured grid, three-dimensional model based on the shallow water equations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Casulli, V.; Walters, R.A.

    2000-01-01

    A semi-implicit finite difference model based on the three-dimensional shallow water equations is modified to use unstructured grids. There are obvious advantages in using unstructured grids in problems with a complicated geometry. In this development, the concept of unstructured orthogonal grids is introduced and applied to this model. The governing differential equations are discretized by means of a semi-implicit algorithm that is robust, stable and very efficient. The resulting model is relatively simple, conserves mass, can fit complicated boundaries and yet is sufficiently flexible to permit local mesh refinements in areas of interest. Moreover, the simulation of the flooding and drying is included in a natural and straightforward manner. These features are illustrated by a test case for studies of convergence rates and by examples of flooding on a river plain and flow in a shallow estuary. Copyright ?? 2000 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Unstructured grid finite volume analysis for acoustic and pulsed wave propagation characteristics in exhaust silencer systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, J.T.; Kim, Y.M.; Maeng, J.S.; Lyu, M.S.; Ku, Y.G.

    1996-10-01

    The unstructured grid finite volume method has been applied to predict the linear and nonlinear attenuation characteristics of the expansion chamber type silencer system. In order to achieve grid flexibility and a solution adaptation for geometrically complex flow regions associated with the actual silencers, the unstructured mesh algorithm in context with the node-centered finite volume method has been employed. The validation cases for the linear and nonlinear wave propagation characteristics include the acoustic field of the concentric expansion chamber and the axisymmetric blast flow field with the open end. Effects of the chamber geometry on the nonlinear wave propagation characteristics are discussed in detail.

  18. Domain Decomposition By the Advancing-Partition Method for Parallel Unstructured Grid Generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pirzadeh, Shahyar Z.; Zagaris, George

    2009-01-01

    A new method of domain decomposition has been developed for generating unstructured grids in subdomains either sequentially or using multiple computers in parallel. Domain decomposition is a crucial and challenging step for parallel grid generation. Prior methods are generally based on auxiliary, complex, and computationally intensive operations for defining partition interfaces and usually produce grids of lower quality than those generated in single domains. The new technique, referred to as "Advancing Partition," is based on the Advancing-Front method, which partitions a domain as part of the volume mesh generation in a consistent and "natural" way. The benefits of this approach are: 1) the process of domain decomposition is highly automated, 2) partitioning of domain does not compromise the quality of the generated grids, and 3) the computational overhead for domain decomposition is minimal. The new method has been implemented in NASA's unstructured grid generation code VGRID.

  19. A Method for Flow Simulation About Complex Geometries Using Both Structured and Unstructured Grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Debonis, James R.

    1994-01-01

    A computational fluid dynamics code which utilizes both structured and unstructured grids was developed. The objective of this study was to develop and demonstrate the ability of such a code to achieve solutions about complex geometries in two dimensions. An unstructured grid generator and flow solver were incorporated into the PARC2D structured flow solver. This new unstructured grid generator capability allows for easier generation and manipulation of complex grids. Several examples of the grid generation capabilities are provided. The coupling of different grid topologies and the manipulation of individual grids is shown. Also, grids for realistic geometries, a NACA 0012 airfoil and a wing/nacelle installation, were created. The flow over a NACA 0012 airfoil was used as a test case for the flow solver. Eight separate cases were run. They were both the inviscid and viscous solutions for two freestream Mach numbers and airfoil angle of attacks of 0 to 3.86 degrees. The Mach numbers chosen were for a subsonic case, Mach 0.6, and a case where supersonic regions and a shock wave exists, Mach 0.8. These test case conditions were selected to match experimentally obtained data for code comparison. The results show that the code accurately predicts the flow field for all cases.

  20. Advanced Unstructured Grid Generation for Complex Aerodynamic Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pirzadeh, Shahyar

    2010-01-01

    A new approach for distribution of grid points on the surface and in the volume has been developed. In addition to the point and line sources of prior work, the new approach utilizes surface and volume sources for automatic curvature-based grid sizing and convenient point distribution in the volume. A new exponential growth function produces smoother and more efficient grids and provides superior control over distribution of grid points in the field. All types of sources support anisotropic grid stretching which not only improves the grid economy but also provides more accurate solutions for certain aerodynamic applications. The new approach does not require a three-dimensional background grid as in the previous methods. Instead, it makes use of an efficient bounding-box auxiliary medium for storing grid parameters defined by surface sources. The new approach is less memory-intensive and more efficient computationally. The grids generated with the new method either eliminate the need for adaptive grid refinement for certain class of problems or provide high quality initial grids that would enhance the performance of many adaptation methods.

  1. Unsteady flow simulations around complex geometries using stationary or rotating unstructured grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sezer-Uzol, Nilay

    In this research, the computational analysis of three-dimensional, unsteady, separated, vortical flows around complex geometries is studied by using stationary or moving unstructured grids. Two main engineering problems are investigated. The first problem is the unsteady simulation of a ship airwake, where helicopter operations become even more challenging, by using stationary unstructured grids. The second problem is the unsteady simulation of wind turbine rotor flow fields by using moving unstructured grids which are rotating with the whole three-dimensional rigid rotor geometry. The three dimensional, unsteady, parallel, unstructured, finite volume flow solver, PUMA2, is used for the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations considered in this research. The code is modified to have a moving grid capability to perform three-dimensional, time-dependent rotor simulations. An instantaneous log-law wall model for Large Eddy Simulations is also implemented in PUMA2 to investigate the very large Reynolds number flow fields of rotating blades. To verify the code modifications, several sample test cases are also considered. In addition, interdisciplinary studies, which are aiming to provide new tools and insights to the aerospace and wind energy scientific communities, are done during this research by focusing on the coupling of ship airwake CFD simulations with the helicopter flight dynamics and control analysis, the coupling of wind turbine rotor CFD simulations with the aeroacoustic analysis, and the analysis of these time-dependent and large-scale CFD simulations with the help of a computational monitoring, steering and visualization tool, POSSE.

  2. Numerical Solutions for the CAWAPI Configuration on Unstructured Grids at NASA LaRC, United States. Chapter 15

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamar, John E.; Abdol-Hamid, Khaled S.

    2009-01-01

    In support of the Cranked Arrow Wing Aerodynamic Project International (CAWAPI) with its goal of improving the Technology Readiness Level of flow solvers by comparing results with measured F-16XL-1 flight data, NASA Langley employed the TetrUSS unstructured grid solver, USM3D, to obtain solutions for all seven flight conditions of interest. A newly available solver version that incorporates a number of turbulence models, including the two-equation linear and non-linear k- , was used in this study. As a first test, a choice was made to utilize only a single grid resolution with the solver for the simulation of the different flight conditions. Comparisons are presented with three turbulence models in USM3D, flight data for surface pressure, boundary-layer profiles, and skin-friction distribution, as well as limited predictions from other solvers. A result of these comparisons is that the USM3D solver can be used in an engineering environment to predict vortex-flow physics on a complex configuration at flight Reynolds numbers with a two-equation linear k- turbulence model.

  3. Ray tracing for point distribution in unstructured grid generation

    SciTech Connect

    Khamayseh, A.; Ortega, F.; Trease, H.

    1995-12-31

    We present a procedure by which grid points are generated on surfaces or within three-dimensional volumes to produce high quality unstructed grids for complex geometries. The virtue of this method is based on ray-tracing approach for curved polyhedra whose faces may lie on natural quadrics (planes, cylinders, cones, or spheres) or triangular faceted surfaces. We also present an efficient point location algorithm for identifying points relative to various regions with classification of inside/on/outside.

  4. Discrete Adjoint-Based Design Optimization of Unsteady Turbulent Flows on Dynamic Unstructured Grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nielsen, Eric J.; Diskin, Boris; Yamaleev, Nail K.

    2009-01-01

    An adjoint-based methodology for design optimization of unsteady turbulent flows on dynamic unstructured grids is described. The implementation relies on an existing unsteady three-dimensional unstructured grid solver capable of dynamic mesh simulations and discrete adjoint capabilities previously developed for steady flows. The discrete equations for the primal and adjoint systems are presented for the backward-difference family of time-integration schemes on both static and dynamic grids. The consistency of sensitivity derivatives is established via comparisons with complex-variable computations. The current work is believed to be the first verified implementation of an adjoint-based optimization methodology for the true time-dependent formulation of the Navier-Stokes equations in a practical computational code. Large-scale shape optimizations are demonstrated for turbulent flows over a tiltrotor geometry and a simulated aeroelastic motion of a fighter jet.

  5. An Exact Dual Adjoint Solution Method for Turbulent Flows on Unstructured Grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nielsen, Eric J.; Lu, James; Park, Michael A.; Darmofal, David L.

    2003-01-01

    An algorithm for solving the discrete adjoint system based on an unstructured-grid discretization of the Navier-Stokes equations is presented. The method is constructed such that an adjoint solution exactly dual to a direct differentiation approach is recovered at each time step, yielding a convergence rate which is asymptotically equivalent to that of the primal system. The new approach is implemented within a three-dimensional unstructured-grid framework and results are presented for inviscid, laminar, and turbulent flows. Improvements to the baseline solution algorithm, such as line-implicit relaxation and a tight coupling of the turbulence model, are also presented. By storing nearest-neighbor terms in the residual computation, the dual scheme is computationally efficient, while requiring twice the memory of the flow solution. The scheme is expected to have a broad impact on computational problems related to design optimization as well as error estimation and grid adaptation efforts.

  6. GRID3D-v2: An updated version of the GRID2D/3D computer program for generating grid systems in complex-shaped three-dimensional spatial domains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinthorsson, E.; Shih, T. I-P.; Roelke, R. J.

    1991-01-01

    In order to generate good quality systems for complicated three-dimensional spatial domains, the grid-generation method used must be able to exert rather precise controls over grid-point distributions. Several techniques are presented that enhance control of grid-point distribution for a class of algebraic grid-generation methods known as the two-, four-, and six-boundary methods. These techniques include variable stretching functions from bilinear interpolation, interpolating functions based on tension splines, and normalized K-factors. The techniques developed in this study were incorporated into a new version of GRID3D called GRID3D-v2. The usefulness of GRID3D-v2 was demonstrated by using it to generate a three-dimensional grid system in the coolent passage of a radial turbine blade with serpentine channels and pin fins.

  7. Unstructured viscous flow solution using adaptive hybrid grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galle, Martin

    1995-01-01

    A three dimensional finite volume scheme based on hybrid grids containing both tetrahedral and hexahedral cells is presented. The application to hybrid grids offers the possibility to combine the flexibility of tetrahedral meshes with the accuracy of hexahedral grids. An algorithm to compute a dual mesh for the entire computational domain was developed. The dual mesh technique guarantees conservation in the whole flow field even at interfaces between hexahedral and tetrahedral domains and enables the employment of an accurate upwind flow solver. The hybrid mesh can be adapted to the solution by dividing cells in areas of insufficient resolution. The method is tested on different viscous and inviscid cases for hypersonic, transonic and subsonic flows.

  8. Divergence preserving discrete surface integral methods for Maxwell's curl equations using non-orthogonal unstructured grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madsen, Niel K.

    1992-01-01

    Several new discrete surface integral (DSI) methods for solving Maxwell's equations in the time-domain are presented. These methods, which allow the use of general nonorthogonal mixed-polyhedral unstructured grids, are direct generalizations of the canonical staggered-grid finite difference method. These methods are conservative in that they locally preserve divergence or charge. Employing mixed polyhedral cells, (hexahedral, tetrahedral, etc.) these methods allow more accurate modeling of non-rectangular structures and objects because the traditional stair-stepped boundary approximations associated with the orthogonal grid based finite difference methods can be avoided. Numerical results demonstrating the accuracy of these new methods are presented.

  9. Adaptive 3D single-block grids for the computation of viscous flows around wings

    SciTech Connect

    Hagmeijer, R.; Kok, J.C.

    1996-12-31

    A robust algorithm for the adaption of a 3D single-block structured grid suitable for the computation of viscous flows around a wing is presented and demonstrated by application to the ONERA M6 wing. The effects of grid adaption on the flow solution and accuracy improvements is analyzed. Reynolds number variations are studied.

  10. Domain decomposition by the advancing-partition method for parallel unstructured grid generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pirzadeh, Shahyar Z. (Inventor); Banihashemi, legal representative, Soheila (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    In a method for domain decomposition for generating unstructured grids, a surface mesh is generated for a spatial domain. A location of a partition plane dividing the domain into two sections is determined. Triangular faces on the surface mesh that intersect the partition plane are identified. A partition grid of tetrahedral cells, dividing the domain into two sub-domains, is generated using a marching process in which a front comprises only faces of new cells which intersect the partition plane. The partition grid is generated until no active faces remain on the front. Triangular faces on each side of the partition plane are collected into two separate subsets. Each subset of triangular faces is renumbered locally and a local/global mapping is created for each sub-domain. A volume grid is generated for each sub-domain. The partition grid and volume grids are then merged using the local-global mapping.

  11. Wind-US Flow Calculations for the M2129 S-Duct Using Structured and Unstructured Grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mohler, Stanley R., Jr.

    2003-01-01

    Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) flow solutions for the M2129 diffusing S-duct with and without vane effectors were computed by the Wind-US flow solver. Both structured and unstructured 3-D grids were used. Without vane effectors, the duct exhibited massive flow separation in both experiment and CFD. With vane effectors installed, the flow remained attached and aerodynamic losses were reduced. Total pressure recovery and distortion near the duct outlet were computed from the solutions and compared favorably to experimental values. These calculations are part of a validation effort for the Wind-US code. They also provide an example case to aid engineers in learning to use the Wind-US software.

  12. Numerical Modeling of Spray Combustion with an Unstructured-Grid Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shang, H. M.; Chen, Y. S.; Liaw, P.; Shih, M. H.; Wang, T. S.

    1996-01-01

    The present unstructured-grid method follows strictly the basic finite volume forms of the conservation laws of the governing equations for the entire flow domain. High-order spatially accurate formulation has been employed for the numerical solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations. A two-equation k-epsilon turbulence model is also incorporated in the unstructured-grid solver. The convergence of the resulted linear algebraic equation is accelerated with preconditioned Conjugate Gradient method. A statistical spray combustion model has been incorporated into the present unstructured-grid solver. In this model, spray is represented by discrete particles, rather than by continuous distributions. A finite number of computational particles are used to predict a sample of total population of particles. Particle trajectories are integrated using their momentum and motion equations and particles exchange mass, momentum and energy with the gas within the computational cell in which they are located. The interaction calculations are performed simultaneously and eliminate global iteration for the two-phase momentum exchange. A transient spray flame in a high pressure combustion chamber is predicted and then the solution of liquid-fuel combusting flow with a rotating cup atomizer is presented and compared with the experimental data. The major conclusion of this investigation is that the unstructured-grid method can be employed to study very complicated flow fields of turbulent spray combustion. Grid adaptation can be easily achieved in any flow domain such as droplet evaporation and combustion zone. Future applications of the present model can be found in the full three-dimensional study of flow fields of gas turbine and liquid propulsion engine combustion chambers with multi-injectors.

  13. Discrete Adjoint-Based Design for Unsteady Turbulent Flows On Dynamic Overset Unstructured Grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nielsen, Eric J.; Diskin, Boris

    2012-01-01

    A discrete adjoint-based design methodology for unsteady turbulent flows on three-dimensional dynamic overset unstructured grids is formulated, implemented, and verified. The methodology supports both compressible and incompressible flows and is amenable to massively parallel computing environments. The approach provides a general framework for performing highly efficient and discretely consistent sensitivity analysis for problems involving arbitrary combinations of overset unstructured grids which may be static, undergoing rigid or deforming motions, or any combination thereof. General parent-child motions are also accommodated, and the accuracy of the implementation is established using an independent verification based on a complex-variable approach. The methodology is used to demonstrate aerodynamic optimizations of a wind turbine geometry, a biologically-inspired flapping wing, and a complex helicopter configuration subject to trimming constraints. The objective function for each problem is successfully reduced and all specified constraints are satisfied.

  14. Anisotropic Solution Adaptive Unstructured Grid Generation Using AFLR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marcum, David L.

    2007-01-01

    An existing volume grid generation procedure, AFLR3, was successfully modified to generate anisotropic tetrahedral elements using a directional metric transformation defined at source nodes. The procedure can be coupled with a solver and an error estimator as part of an overall anisotropic solution adaptation methodology. It is suitable for use with an error estimator based on an adjoint, optimization, sensitivity derivative, or related approach. This offers many advantages, including more efficient point placement along with robust and efficient error estimation. It also serves as a framework for true grid optimization wherein error estimation and computational resources can be used as cost functions to determine the optimal point distribution. Within AFLR3 the metric transformation is implemented using a set of transformation vectors and associated aspect ratios. The modified overall procedure is presented along with details of the anisotropic transformation implementation. Multiple two-and three-dimensional examples are also presented that demonstrate the capability of the modified AFLR procedure to generate anisotropic elements using a set of source nodes with anisotropic transformation metrics. The example cases presented use moderate levels of anisotropy and result in usable element quality. Future testing with various flow solvers and methods for obtaining transformation metric information is needed to determine practical limits and evaluate the efficacy of the overall approach.

  15. A METHOD OF TREATING UNSTRUCTURED CONCAVE CELLS IN STAGGERED-GRID LAGRANGIAN HYDRODYNAMICS

    SciTech Connect

    C. ROUSCULP; D. BURTON

    2000-12-01

    A method is proposed for the treatment of concave cells in staggered-grid Lagrangian hydrodynamics. The method is general enough to be applied to two- and three-dimensional unstructured cells. Instead of defining a cell-point as the geometric average of its nodes (a cell-center), the cell-point is that which equalizes the triangular/tetrahedral area/volume in two/three dimensions. Examples are given.

  16. The benefits of unstructured grids for wave modelling in semi-enclosed domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pallares Lopez, Elena; Lopez, Jaime; Espino, Manuel; Sanchez-Arcilla, Agustin

    2016-04-01

    Traditionally wave modelling has used a sequence of nested meshes to obtain high resolution wave fields near the coast. This supposes an uncertain error due to internal boundary conditions and physics at multiple scales. Both may distort the wave energy balance and for winds blowing from land there is the additional difficulty of wave trains travelling towards the offshore being hindered by the intermediate domain boundaries. Unstructured grids avoid multiple meshes and thus the problem of internal boundary conditions but may result in inconsistent fluxes of wave energy among cells, depending on mesh size and shape. This may distort the wave energy balance. Here we analyse high resolution wave simulations for a full meteorological year where high resolution meteorological models were available in a domain off the Catalan coast. This coastal case presents sharp gradients in bathymetry and orography and therefore correspondingly sharp variations in the wind and wave fields. We have carried out simulations with SWAN using a traditional nested sequence and a regional unstructured grid with varying resolution depending on a) distance to the coast line and b) gradients in bottom topography (as a proxy of associated gradients in wind and wave fields). Also a local unstructured grid covering the Catalan coast and nested to a regular system is included in the comparison. We are interpreting the results depending on the directional sector for the wind field since that determines fetch length, suitability of generation and dissipation terms in the wave model and compatibility with mesh size and shape. The obtained simulations are being compared to wave observations from buoys near the coast and remote sensing data all over the Western Mediterranean Sea. Additionally some test have been carried out in order to analyse the computational time required for each alternative, showing an important reduction when working with the regional unstructured grid.

  17. A Reconstructed Discontinuous Galerkin Method for the Compressible Flows on Unstructured Tetrahedral Grids

    SciTech Connect

    Hong Luo; Yidong Xia; Robert Nourgaliev; Chunpei Cai

    2011-06-01

    A reconstruction-based discontinuous Galerkin (RDG) method is presented for the solution of the compressible Navier-Stokes equations on unstructured tetrahedral grids. The RDG method, originally developed for the compressible Euler equations, is extended to discretize viscous and heat fluxes in the Navier-Stokes equations using a so-called inter-cell reconstruction, where a smooth solution is locally reconstructed using a least-squares method from the underlying discontinuous DG solution. Similar to the recovery-based DG (rDG) methods, this reconstructed DG method eliminates the introduction of ad hoc penalty or coupling terms commonly found in traditional DG methods. Unlike rDG methods, this RDG method does not need to judiciously choose a proper form of a recovered polynomial, thus is simple, flexible, and robust, and can be used on unstructured grids. The preliminary results indicate that this RDG method is stable on unstructured tetrahedral grids, and provides a viable and attractive alternative for the discretization of the viscous and heat fluxes in the Navier-Stokes equations.

  18. Aerodynamic Shape Sensitivity Analysis and Design Optimization of Complex Configurations Using Unstructured Grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Arthur C., III; Newman, James C., III; Barnwell, Richard W.

    1997-01-01

    A three-dimensional unstructured grid approach to aerodynamic shape sensitivity analysis and design optimization has been developed and is extended to model geometrically complex configurations. The advantage of unstructured grids (when compared with a structured-grid approach) is their inherent ability to discretize irregularly shaped domains with greater efficiency and less effort. Hence, this approach is ideally suited for geometrically complex configurations of practical interest. In this work the nonlinear Euler equations are solved using an upwind, cell-centered, finite-volume scheme. The discrete, linearized systems which result from this scheme are solved iteratively by a preconditioned conjugate-gradient-like algorithm known as GMRES for the two-dimensional geometry and a Gauss-Seidel algorithm for the three-dimensional; similar procedures are used to solve the accompanying linear aerodynamic sensitivity equations in incremental iterative form. As shown, this particular form of the sensitivity equation makes large-scale gradient-based aerodynamic optimization possible by taking advantage of memory efficient methods to construct exact Jacobian matrix-vector products. Simple parameterization techniques are utilized for demonstrative purposes. Once the surface has been deformed, the unstructured grid is adapted by considering the mesh as a system of interconnected springs. Grid sensitivities are obtained by differentiating the surface parameterization and the grid adaptation algorithms with ADIFOR (which is an advanced automatic-differentiation software tool). To demonstrate the ability of this procedure to analyze and design complex configurations of practical interest, the sensitivity analysis and shape optimization has been performed for a two-dimensional high-lift multielement airfoil and for a three-dimensional Boeing 747-200 aircraft.

  19. Factorizable Upwind Schemes: The Triangular Unstructured Grid Formulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sidilkover, David; Nielsen, Eric J.

    2001-01-01

    The upwind factorizable schemes for the equations of fluid were introduced recently. They facilitate achieving the Textbook Multigrid Efficiency (TME) and are expected also to result in the solvers of unparalleled robustness. The approach itself is very general. Therefore, it may well become a general framework for the large-scale, Computational Fluid Dynamics. In this paper we outline the triangular grid formulation of the factorizable schemes. The derivation is based on the fact that the factorizable schemes can be expressed entirely using vector notation. without explicitly mentioning a particular coordinate frame. We, describe the resulting discrete scheme in detail and present some computational results verifying the basic properties of the scheme/solver.

  20. Application of a Scalable, Parallel, Unstructured-Grid-Based Navier-Stokes Solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parikh, Paresh

    2001-01-01

    A parallel version of an unstructured-grid based Navier-Stokes solver, USM3Dns, previously developed for efficient operation on a variety of parallel computers, has been enhanced to incorporate upgrades made to the serial version. The resultant parallel code has been extensively tested on a variety of problems of aerospace interest and on two sets of parallel computers to understand and document its characteristics. An innovative grid renumbering construct and use of non-blocking communication are shown to produce superlinear computing performance. Preliminary results from parallelization of a recently introduced "porous surface" boundary condition are also presented.

  1. Multi-Resolution Unstructured Grid-Generation for Geophysical Applications on the Sphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engwirda, Darren

    2015-01-01

    An algorithm for the generation of non-uniform unstructured grids on ellipsoidal geometries is described. This technique is designed to generate high quality triangular and polygonal meshes appropriate for general circulation modelling on the sphere, including applications to atmospheric and ocean simulation, and numerical weather predication. Using a recently developed Frontal-Delaunay-refinement technique, a method for the construction of high-quality unstructured ellipsoidal Delaunay triangulations is introduced. A dual polygonal grid, derived from the associated Voronoi diagram, is also optionally generated as a by-product. Compared to existing techniques, it is shown that the Frontal-Delaunay approach typically produces grids with near-optimal element quality and smooth grading characteristics, while imposing relatively low computational expense. Initial results are presented for a selection of uniform and non-uniform ellipsoidal grids appropriate for large-scale geophysical applications. The use of user-defined mesh-sizing functions to generate smoothly graded, non-uniform grids is discussed.

  2. Fast, memory-efficient cell location in unstructured grids for visualization.

    PubMed

    Garth, Christoph; Joy, Kenneth I

    2010-01-01

    Applying certain visualization techniques to datasets described on unstructured grids requires the interpolation of variables of interest at arbitrary locations within the dataset's domain of definition. Typical solutions to the problem of finding the grid element enclosing a given interpolation point make use of a variety of spatial subdivision schemes. However, existing solutions are memory- intensive, do not scale well to large grids, or do not work reliably on grids describing complex geometries. In this paper, we propose a data structure and associated construction algorithm for fast cell location in unstructured grids, and apply it to the interpolation problem. Based on the concept of bounding interval hierarchies, the proposed approach is memory-efficient, fast and numerically robust. We examine the performance characteristics of the proposed approach and compare it to existing approaches using a number of benchmark problems related to vector field visualization. Furthermore, we demonstrate that our approach can successfully accommodate large datasets, and discuss application to visualization on both CPUs and GPUs. PMID:20975196

  3. Fast, memory-efficient cell location in unstructured grids for visualization.

    PubMed

    Garth, Christoph; Joy, Kenneth I

    2010-01-01

    Applying certain visualization techniques to datasets described on unstructured grids requires the interpolation of variables of interest at arbitrary locations within the dataset's domain of definition. Typical solutions to the problem of finding the grid element enclosing a given interpolation point make use of a variety of spatial subdivision schemes. However, existing solutions are memory- intensive, do not scale well to large grids, or do not work reliably on grids describing complex geometries. In this paper, we propose a data structure and associated construction algorithm for fast cell location in unstructured grids, and apply it to the interpolation problem. Based on the concept of bounding interval hierarchies, the proposed approach is memory-efficient, fast and numerically robust. We examine the performance characteristics of the proposed approach and compare it to existing approaches using a number of benchmark problems related to vector field visualization. Furthermore, we demonstrate that our approach can successfully accommodate large datasets, and discuss application to visualization on both CPUs and GPUs.

  4. An unstructured-grid software system for solving complex aerodynamic problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frink, Neal T.; Pirzadeh, Shahyar; Parikh, Paresh

    1995-01-01

    A coordinated effort has been underway over the past four years to elevate unstructured-grid methodology to a mature level. The goal of this endeavor is to provide a validated capability to non-expert users for performing rapid aerodynamic analysis and design of complex configurations. The Euler component of the system is well developed, and is impacting a broad spectrum of engineering needs with capabilities such as rapid grid generation and inviscid flow analysis, inverse design, interactive boundary layers, and propulsion effects. Progress is also being made in the more tenuous Navier-Stokes component of the system. A robust grid generator is under development for constructing quality thin-layer tetrahedral grids, along with a companion Navier-Stokes flow solver. This paper presents an overview of this effort, along with a perspective on the present and future status of the methodology.

  5. Multidimensional Unstructured-Grid Liquid Rocket Engine Nozzle Performance and Heat Transfer Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Ten-See

    2004-01-01

    The objective of this study is to conduct a unified computational analysis for computing design parameters such as axial thrust, convective and radiative wall heat fluxes for regeneratively cooled liquid rocket engine nozzles, so as to develop a computational strategy for computing those parameters through parametric investigations. The computational methodology is based on a multidimensional, finite-volume, turbulent, chemically reacting, radiating, unstructured-grid, and pressure-based formulation, with grid refinement capabilities. Systematic parametric studies on effects of wall boundary conditions, combustion chemistry, radiation coupling, computational cell shape, and grid refinement were performed and assessed. Under the computational framework of this study, it is found that the computed axial thrust performance, flow features, and wall heat fluxes compared well with those of available data and calculations, using a strategy of structured-grid dominated mesh, finite-rate chemistry, and cooled wall boundary condition.

  6. Parameter investigation with line-implicit lower-upper symmetric Gauss-Seidel on 3D stretched grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otero, Evelyn; Eliasson, Peter

    2015-03-01

    An implicit lower-upper symmetric Gauss-Seidel (LU-SGS) solver has been implemented as a multigrid smoother combined with a line-implicit method as an acceleration technique for Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) simulation on stretched meshes. The computational fluid dynamics code concerned is Edge, an edge-based finite volume Navier-Stokes flow solver for structured and unstructured grids. The paper focuses on the investigation of the parameters related to our novel line-implicit LU-SGS solver for convergence acceleration on 3D RANS meshes. The LU-SGS parameters are defined as the Courant-Friedrichs-Lewy number, the left-hand side dissipation, and the convergence of iterative solution of the linear problem arising from the linearisation of the implicit scheme. The influence of these parameters on the overall convergence is presented and default values are defined for maximum convergence acceleration. The optimised settings are applied to 3D RANS computations for comparison with explicit and line-implicit Runge-Kutta smoothing. For most of the cases, a computing time acceleration of the order of 2 is found depending on the mesh type, namely the boundary layer and the magnitude of residual reduction.

  7. GRID2D/3D: A computer program for generating grid systems in complex-shaped two- and three-dimensional spatial domains. Part 1: Theory and method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, T. I.-P.; Bailey, R. T.; Nguyen, H. L.; Roelke, R. J.

    1990-01-01

    An efficient computer program, called GRID2D/3D was developed to generate single and composite grid systems within geometrically complex two- and three-dimensional (2- and 3-D) spatial domains that can deform with time. GRID2D/3D generates single grid systems by using algebraic grid generation methods based on transfinite interpolation in which the distribution of grid points within the spatial domain is controlled by stretching functions. All single grid systems generated by GRID2D/3D can have grid lines that are continuous and differentiable everywhere up to the second-order. Also, grid lines can intersect boundaries of the spatial domain orthogonally. GRID2D/3D generates composite grid systems by patching together two or more single grid systems. The patching can be discontinuous or continuous. For continuous composite grid systems, the grid lines are continuous and differentiable everywhere up to the second-order except at interfaces where different single grid systems meet. At interfaces where different single grid systems meet, the grid lines are only differentiable up to the first-order. For 2-D spatial domains, the boundary curves are described by using either cubic or tension spline interpolation. For 3-D spatial domains, the boundary surfaces are described by using either linear Coon's interpolation, bi-hyperbolic spline interpolation, or a new technique referred to as 3-D bi-directional Hermite interpolation. Since grid systems generated by algebraic methods can have grid lines that overlap one another, GRID2D/3D contains a graphics package for evaluating the grid systems generated. With the graphics package, the user can generate grid systems in an interactive manner with the grid generation part of GRID2D/3D. GRID2D/3D is written in FORTRAN 77 and can be run on any IBM PC, XT, or AT compatible computer. In order to use GRID2D/3D on workstations or mainframe computers, some minor modifications must be made in the graphics part of the program; no

  8. Solving Navier-Stokes Equations with Advanced Turbulence Models on Three-Dimensional Unstructured Grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Qun-Zhen; Massey, Steven J.; Abdol-Hamid, Khaled S.; Frink, Neal T.

    1999-01-01

    USM3D is a widely-used unstructured flow solver for simulating inviscid and viscous flows over complex geometries. The current version (version 5.0) of USM3D, however, does not have advanced turbulence models to accurately simulate complicated flows. We have implemented two modified versions of the original Jones and Launder k-epsilon two-equation turbulence model and the Girimaji algebraic Reynolds stress model in USM3D. Tests have been conducted for two flat plate boundary layer cases, a RAE2822 airfoil and an ONERA M6 wing. The results are compared with those of empirical formulae, theoretical results and the existing Spalart-Allmaras one-equation model.

  9. Numerical Simulation of Unsteady Flow Field around Helicopter in Forward Flight Using a Parallel Dynamic Overset Unstructured Grids Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Shuling; Wu, Yizhao; Xia, Jian

    A parallel Navier-Stokes solver based on dynamic overset unstructured grids method is presented to simulate the unsteady turbulent flow field around helicopter in forward flight. The grid method has the advantages of unstructured grid and Chimera grid and is suitable to deal with multiple bodies in relatively moving. Unsteady Navier-Stokes equations are solved on overset unstructured grids by an explicit dual time-stepping, finite volume method. Preconditioning method applied to inner iteration of the dual-time stepping is used to speed up the convergence of numerical simulation. The Spalart-Allmaras one-equation turbulence model is used to evaluate the turbulent viscosity. Parallel computation is based on the dynamic domain decomposition method in overset unstructured grids system at each physical time step. A generic helicopter Robin with a four-blade rotor in forward flight is considered to validate the method presented in this paper. Numerical simulation results show that the parallel dynamic overset unstructured grids method is very efficient for the simulation of helicopter flow field and the results are reliable.

  10. A three-dimensional electrostatic particle-in-cell methodology on unstructured Delaunay-Voronoi grids

    SciTech Connect

    Gatsonis, Nikolaos A. Spirkin, Anton

    2009-06-01

    The mathematical formulation and computational implementation of a three-dimensional particle-in-cell methodology on unstructured Delaunay-Voronoi tetrahedral grids is presented. The method allows simulation of plasmas in complex domains and incorporates the duality of the Delaunay-Voronoi in all aspects of the particle-in-cell cycle. Charge assignment and field interpolation weighting schemes of zero- and first-order are formulated based on the theory of long-range constraints. Electric potential and fields are derived from a finite-volume formulation of Gauss' law using the Voronoi-Delaunay dual. Boundary conditions and the algorithms for injection, particle loading, particle motion, and particle tracking are implemented for unstructured Delaunay grids. Error and sensitivity analysis examines the effects of particles/cell, grid scaling, and timestep on the numerical heating, the slowing-down time, and the deflection times. The problem of current collection by cylindrical Langmuir probes in collisionless plasmas is used for validation. Numerical results compare favorably with previous numerical and analytical solutions for a wide range of probe radius to Debye length ratios, probe potentials, and electron to ion temperature ratios. The versatility of the methodology is demonstrated with the simulation of a complex plasma microsensor, a directional micro-retarding potential analyzer that includes a low transparency micro-grid.

  11. Predicting natural-convection-dominated phase change problems by control volume unstructured triangular grid: Applications to the melting of pure metal

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Z.C.; Liou, J.H.

    1998-02-20

    Control volume methods have recently been developed for fluid flow and heat transfer on unstructured meshes. In this study, the authors extend these methods to implement the solution of natural-convection-dominated melting of gallium by a fixed-grid method. A simple, robust, and reliable explicit numerical method (MAC method) is applied for an unstructured triangular grid. This investigation also applies the implicit SIMPLER method for an unstructured triangular grid. Results obtained from the unstructured triangular grid correlate well with the structured mesh computations and experimental data. Also, the feasibility of applying the triangular grid to complex geometric problems is demonstrated by calculating two different triangular domains.

  12. Parallel volume ray-casting for unstructured-grid data on distributed-memory architectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ma, Kwan-Liu

    1995-01-01

    As computing technology continues to advance, computational modeling of scientific and engineering problems produces data of increasing complexity: large in size and unstructured in shape. Volume visualization of such data is a challenging problem. This paper proposes a distributed parallel solution that makes ray-casting volume rendering of unstructured-grid data practical. Both the data and the rendering process are distributed among processors. At each processor, ray-casting of local data is performed independent of the other processors. The global image composing processes, which require inter-processor communication, are overlapped with the local ray-casting processes to achieve maximum parallel efficiency. This algorithm differs from previous ones in four ways: it is completely distributed, less view-dependent, reasonably scalable, and flexible. Without using dynamic load balancing, test results on the Intel Paragon using from two to 128 processors show, on average, about 60% parallel efficiency.

  13. Nonlinear Projective-Iteration Methods for Solving Transport Problems on Regular and Unstructured Grids

    SciTech Connect

    Dmitriy Y. Anistratov; Adrian Constantinescu; Loren Roberts; William Wieselquist

    2007-04-30

    This is a project in the field of fundamental research on numerical methods for solving the particle transport equation. Numerous practical problems require to use unstructured meshes, for example, detailed nuclear reactor assembly-level calculations, large-scale reactor core calculations, radiative hydrodynamics problems, where the mesh is determined by hydrodynamic processes, and well-logging problems in which the media structure has very complicated geometry. Currently this is an area of very active research in numerical transport theory. main issues in developing numerical methods for solving the transport equation are the accuracy of the numerical solution and effectiveness of iteration procedure. The problem in case of unstructured grids is that it is very difficult to derive an iteration algorithm that will be unconditionally stable.

  14. 2.5D complex resistivity modeling and inversion using unstructured grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Kaijun; Sun, Jie

    2016-04-01

    The characteristic of complex resistivity on rock and ore has been recognized by people for a long time. Generally we have used the Cole-Cole Model(CCM) to describe complex resistivity. It has been proved that the electrical anomaly of geologic body can be quantitative estimated by CCM parameters such as direct resistivity(ρ0), chargeability(m), time constant(τ) and frequency dependence(c). Thus it is very important to obtain the complex parameters of geologic body. It is difficult to approximate complex structures and terrain using traditional rectangular grid. In order to enhance the numerical accuracy and rationality of modeling and inversion, we use an adaptive finite-element algorithm for forward modeling of the frequency-domain 2.5D complex resistivity and implement the conjugate gradient algorithm in the inversion of 2.5D complex resistivity. An adaptive finite element method is applied for solving the 2.5D complex resistivity forward modeling of horizontal electric dipole source. First of all, the CCM is introduced into the Maxwell's equations to calculate the complex resistivity electromagnetic fields. Next, the pseudo delta function is used to distribute electric dipole source. Then the electromagnetic fields can be expressed in terms of the primary fields caused by layered structure and the secondary fields caused by inhomogeneities anomalous conductivity. At last, we calculated the electromagnetic fields response of complex geoelectric structures such as anticline, syncline, fault. The modeling results show that adaptive finite-element methods can automatically improve mesh generation and simulate complex geoelectric models using unstructured grids. The 2.5D complex resistivity invertion is implemented based the conjugate gradient algorithm.The conjugate gradient algorithm doesn't need to compute the sensitivity matrix but directly computes the sensitivity matrix or its transpose multiplying vector. In addition, the inversion target zones are

  15. Application of an unstructured grid algorithm to artificial heart valve simulations.

    PubMed

    Hsu, A T; Yun, J X; Hwang, N H

    1999-01-01

    The time varying flow pattern in the vicinity of mechanical heart valves (MHV) is fairly complex: it involves multiple passages and moving leaflets. The numeric simulation of unsteady flows in these multiple passages with moving boundaries presents a major challenge to computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Two major difficulties in the numeric simulation of MHV flows are 1) the generation of a body fitted grid within the multipassage device and 2) moving leaflets. The conventional finite difference and finite volume scheme obtained by using a structured grid have serious deficiencies in these applications. To fit the grid lines with the various angles of the moving MHV, the grid may often become too skewed for accurate numeric solution. To overcome these deficiencies, significant effort and attention should be placed on the grid generation and moving grid scheme. We present an unstructured moving grid finite volume method for heart valve simulations. The Navier-Stokes equations are discretized on a general tetrahedral mesh by using a finite volume scheme. With this scheme, the mesh can be automatically generated with any commercial software. The method is applied to a tilting disk (Medtronic Hall 29mm, Medtronic, Inc., Minneapolis, MN) heart valve, and results are compared with that of the steady flow solutions. Significant differences between steady and unsteady flow solutions are observed. PMID:10593690

  16. Multidimensional Unstructured-Grid Liquid Rocket Engine Nozzle Performance and Heat Transfer Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Ten-See

    2004-01-01

    The objectives of this study are to conduct a unified computational analysis for computing the design parameters such as axial thrust, convective and radiative wall heat fluxes for liquid rocket engine nozzles, so as to develop a computational strategy for computing those design parameters through parametric investigations. The computational methodology is based on a multidimensional, finite-volume, turbulent, chemically reacting, radiating, unstructured-grid, and pressure-based formulation, with grid refinement capabilities. Systematic parametric studies on effects of wail boundary conditions, combustion chemistry, radiation coupling, computational cell shape, and grid refinement were performed and assessed. Comparisons of the computed axial thrust performance, flow features, and wail heat fluxes with those of available test data and design calculations are presented.

  17. Final Report - High-Order Spectral Volume Method for the Navier-Stokes Equations On Unstructured Tetrahedral Grids

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Z J

    2012-12-06

    The overriding objective for this project is to develop an efficient and accurate method for capturing strong discontinuities and fine smooth flow structures of disparate length scales with unstructured grids, and demonstrate its potentials for problems relevant to DOE. More specifically, we plan to achieve the following objectives: 1. Extend the SV method to three dimensions, and develop a fourth-order accurate SV scheme for tetrahedral grids. Optimize the SV partition by minimizing a form of the Lebesgue constant. Verify the order of accuracy using the scalar conservation laws with an analytical solution; 2. Extend the SV method to Navier-Stokes equations for the simulation of viscous flow problems. Two promising approaches to compute the viscous fluxes will be tested and analyzed; 3. Parallelize the 3D viscous SV flow solver using domain decomposition and message passing. Optimize the cache performance of the flow solver by designing data structures minimizing data access times; 4. Demonstrate the SV method with a wide range of flow problems including both discontinuities and complex smooth structures. The objectives remain the same as those outlines in the original proposal. We anticipate no technical obstacles in meeting these objectives.

  18. Thermal Protection System Cavity Heating for Simplified and Actual Geometries Using Computational Fluid Dynamics Simulations with Unstructured Grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCloud, Peter L.

    2010-01-01

    Thermal Protection System (TPS) Cavity Heating is predicted using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) on unstructured grids for both simplified cavities and actual cavity geometries. Validation was performed using comparisons to wind tunnel experimental results and CFD predictions using structured grids. Full-scale predictions were made for simplified and actual geometry configurations on the Space Shuttle Orbiter in a mission support timeframe.

  19. The sequential method for the black-oil reservoir simulation on unstructured grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Baoyan; Chen, Zhangxin; Huan, Guanren

    2003-11-01

    This paper presents new results for applying the sequential solution method to the black-oil reservoir simulation with unstructured grids. The fully implicit solution method has been successfully applied to reservoir simulation with unstructured grids. However, the complexity of the fully implicit method and the irregularity of the grids result in a very complicated structure of linear equation systems (LESs) and in high computational cost to solve them. To tackle this problem, the sequential method is applied to reduce the size of the LESs. To deal with instable problems caused by the low implicit degree of this method, some practical techniques are introduced to control convergence of Newton-Raphson's iterations which are exploited in the linearization of the governing equations of the black-oil model. These techniques are tested with the benchmark problem of the ninth comparative solution project (CSP) organized by the society of petroleum engineers (SPE) and applied to field-scale models of both saturated and undersaturated reservoirs. The simulation results show that the sequential method uses as little as 20.01% of the memory for solving the LESs and 23.89% of the total computational time of the fully implicit method to reach the same precision for the undersaturated reservoirs, when the same iteration control parameters are used for both solution methods. However, for the saturated reservoirs, the sequential method must use stricter iteration control parameters to reach the same precision as the fully implicit method.

  20. Research on Streamlines and Aerodynamic Heating for Unstructured Grids on High-Speed Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeJarnette, Fred R.; Hamilton, H. Harris (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Engineering codes are needed which can calculate convective heating rates accurately and expeditiously on the surfaces of high-speed vehicles. One code which has proven to meet these needs is the Langley Approximate Three-Dimensional Convective Heating (LATCH) code. It uses the axisymmetric analogue in an integral boundary-layer method to calculate laminar and turbulent heating rates along inviscid surface streamlines. It requires the solution of the inviscid flow field to provide the surface properties needed to calculate the streamlines and streamline metrics. The LATCH code has been used with inviscid codes which calculated the flow field on structured grids, Several more recent inviscid codes calculate flow field properties on unstructured grids. The present research develops a method to calculate inviscid surface streamlines, the streamline metrics, and heating rates using the properties calculated from inviscid flow fields on unstructured grids. Mr. Chris Riley, prior to his departure from NASA LaRC, developed a preliminary code in the C language, called "UNLATCH", to accomplish these goals. No publication was made on his research. The present research extends and improves on the code developed by Riley. Particular attention is devoted to the stagnation region, and the method is intended for programming in the FORTRAN 90 language.

  1. Exponential characteristic spatial quadrature for discrete ordinates radiation transport on an unstructured grid of triangular cells

    SciTech Connect

    Mathews, K.A.; Brennan, C.R.

    1995-12-31

    The exponential characteristic method is one of a family of nonlinear spatial quadratures which are positive and at least second order accurate. The authors initially developed the method in slab geometry, where it gave accurate results for deep penetration problems using coarse meshes. Characteristic methods are restricted to Cartesian geometries, so they next tested it with rectangular cells, where it was again a strong performer. Here the authors extend the method to unstructured grids of arbitrarily shaped and oriented triangles and report on its performance.

  2. A ROBUST ARBITRARILY HIGH ORDER TRANSPORT METHOD OF THE CHARACTERISTIC TYPE FOR UNSTRUCTURED TETRAHEDRAL GRIDS

    SciTech Connect

    R. M. Ferrer; Y. Y. Azmy

    2009-05-01

    We present a robust arbitrarily high order transport method of the characteristic type for unstructured tetrahedral grids. Previously encountered difficulties have been addressed through the reformulation of the method based on coordinate transformations, evaluation of the moments balance relation as a linear system of equations involving the expansion coefficients of the projected basis, and the asymptotic expansion of the integral kernels in the thin cell limit. The proper choice of basis functions for the high-order spatial expansion of the solution is discussed and its effect on problems involving scattering discussed. Numerical tests are presented to illustrate the beneficial effect of these improvements, and the improved robustness they yield.

  3. Stable Artificial Dissipation Operators for Finite Volume Schemes on Unstructured Grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Svard, Magnus; Gong, Jing; Nordstrom, Jan

    2006-01-01

    Our objective is to derive stable first-, second- and fourth-order artificial dissipation operators for node based finite volume schemes. Of particular interest are general unstructured grids where the strength of the finite volume method is fully utilized. A commonly used finite volume approximation of the Laplacian will be the basis in the construction of the artificial dissipation. Both a homogeneous dissipation acting in all directions with equal strength and a modification that allows different amount of dissipation in different directions are derived. Stability and accuracy of the new operators are proved and the theoretical results are supported by numerical computations.

  4. Tensor decomposition in electronic structure calculations on 3D Cartesian grids

    SciTech Connect

    Khoromskij, B.N. Khoromskaia, V.; Chinnamsetty, S.R.; Flad, H.-J.

    2009-09-01

    In this paper, we investigate a novel approach based on the combination of Tucker-type and canonical tensor decomposition techniques for the efficient numerical approximation of functions and operators in electronic structure calculations. In particular, we study applicability of tensor approximations for the numerical solution of Hartree-Fock and Kohn-Sham equations on 3D Cartesian grids. We show that the orthogonal Tucker-type tensor approximation of electron density and Hartree potential of simple molecules leads to low tensor rank representations. This enables an efficient tensor-product convolution scheme for the computation of the Hartree potential using a collocation-type approximation via piecewise constant basis functions on a uniform nxnxn grid. Combined with the Richardson extrapolation, our approach exhibits O(h{sup 3}) convergence in the grid-size h=O(n{sup -1}). Moreover, this requires O(3rn+r{sup 3}) storage, where r denotes the Tucker rank of the electron density with r=O(logn), almost uniformly in n. For example, calculations of the Coulomb matrix and the Hartree-Fock energy for the CH{sub 4} molecule, with a pseudopotential on the C atom, achieved accuracies of the order of 10{sup -6} hartree with a grid-size n of several hundreds. Since the tensor-product convolution in 3D is performed via 1D convolution transforms, our scheme markedly outperforms the 3D-FFT in both the computing time and storage requirements.

  5. A multiscale restriction-smoothed basis method for high contrast porous media represented on unstructured grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Møyner, Olav; Lie, Knut-Andreas

    2016-01-01

    A wide variety of multiscale methods have been proposed in the literature to reduce runtime and provide better scaling for the solution of Poisson-type equations modeling flow in porous media. We present a new multiscale restricted-smoothed basis (MsRSB) method that is designed to be applicable to both rectilinear grids and unstructured grids. Like many other multiscale methods, MsRSB relies on a coarse partition of the underlying fine grid and a set of local prolongation operators (multiscale basis functions) that map unknowns associated with the fine grid cells to unknowns associated with blocks in the coarse partition. These mappings are constructed by restricted smoothing: Starting from a constant, a localized iterative scheme is applied directly to the fine-scale discretization to compute prolongation operators that are consistent with the local properties of the differential operators. The resulting method has three main advantages: First of all, both the coarse and the fine grid can have general polyhedral geometry and unstructured topology. This means that partitions and good prolongation operators can easily be constructed for complex models involving high media contrasts and unstructured cell connections introduced by faults, pinch-outs, erosion, local grid refinement, etc. In particular, the coarse partition can be adapted to geological or flow-field properties represented on cells or faces to improve accuracy. Secondly, the method is accurate and robust when compared to existing multiscale methods and does not need expensive recomputation of local basis functions to account for transient behavior: Dynamic mobility changes are incorporated by continuing to iterate a few extra steps on existing basis functions. This way, the cost of updating the prolongation operators becomes proportional to the amount of change in fluid mobility and one reduces the need for expensive, tolerance-based updates. Finally, since the MsRSB method is formulated on top of a cell

  6. An assessment of the adaptive unstructured tetrahedral grid, Euler Flow Solver Code FELISA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Djomehri, M. Jahed; Erickson, Larry L.

    1994-01-01

    A three-dimensional solution-adaptive Euler flow solver for unstructured tetrahedral meshes is assessed, and the accuracy and efficiency of the method for predicting sonic boom pressure signatures about simple generic models are demonstrated. Comparison of computational and wind tunnel data and enhancement of numerical solutions by means of grid adaptivity are discussed. The mesh generation is based on the advancing front technique. The FELISA code consists of two solvers, the Taylor-Galerkin and the Runge-Kutta-Galerkin schemes, both of which are spacially discretized by the usual Galerkin weighted residual finite-element methods but with different explicit time-marching schemes to steady state. The solution-adaptive grid procedure is based on either remeshing or mesh refinement techniques. An alternative geometry adaptive procedure is also incorporated.

  7. Implicit/Multigrid Algorithms for Incompressible Turbulent Flows on Unstructured Grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, W. Kyle; Rausch, Russ D.; Bonhaus, Daryl L.

    1997-01-01

    An implicit code for computing inviscid and viscous incompressible flows on unstructured grids is described. The foundation of the code is a backward Euler time discretization for which the linear system is approximately solved at each time step with either a point implicit method or a preconditioned Generalized Minimal Residual (GMRES) technique. For the GMRES calculations, several techniques are investigated for forming the matrix-vector product. Convergence acceleration is achieved through a multigrid scheme that uses non-nested coarse grids that are generated using a technique described in the present paper. Convergence characteristics are investigated and results are compared with an exact solution for the inviscid flow over a four-element airfoil. Viscous results, which are compared with experimental data, include the turbulent flow over a NACA 4412 airfoil, a three-element airfoil for which Mach number effects are investigated, and three-dimensional flow over a wing with a partial-span flap.

  8. Aerodynamic Design Optimization on Unstructured Grids with a Continuous Adjoint Formulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, W. Kyle; Venkatakrishnan, V.

    1997-01-01

    A continuous adjoint approach for obtaining sensitivity derivatives on unstructured grids is developed and analyzed. The derivation of the costate equations is presented, and a second-order accurate discretization method is described. The relationship between the continuous formulation and a discrete formulation is explored for inviscid, as well as for viscous flow. Several limitations in a strict adherence to the continuous approach are uncovered, and an approach that circumvents these difficulties is presented. The issue of grid sensitivities, which do not arise naturally in the continuous formulation, is investigated and is observed to be of importance when dealing with geometric singularities. A method is described for modifying inviscid and viscous meshes during the design cycle to accommodate changes in the surface shape. The accuracy of the sensitivity derivatives is established by comparing with finite-difference gradients and several design examples are presented.

  9. Implicit method for the computation of unsteady flows on unstructured grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkatakrishnan, V.; Mavriplis, D. J.

    1995-01-01

    An implicit method for the computation of unsteady flows on unstructured grids is presented. Following a finite difference approximation for the time derivative, the resulting nonlinear system of equations is solved at each time step by using an agglomeration multigrid procedure. The method allows for arbitrarily large time steps and is efficient in terms of computational effort and storage. Inviscid and viscous unsteady flows are computed to validate the procedure. The issue of the mass matrix which arises with vertex-centered finite volume schemes is addressed. The present formulation allows the mass matrix to be inverted indirectly. A mesh point movement and reconnection procedure is described that allows the grids to evolve with the motion of bodies. As an example of flow over bodies in relative motion, flow over a multi-element airfoil system undergoing deployment is computed.

  10. Implicit method for the computation of unsteady flows on unstructured grids

    SciTech Connect

    Venkatakrishnan, V.; Mavriplis, D.J.

    1996-09-01

    An implicit method for the computation of unsteady flows on unstructured grids is presented. Following a finite difference approximation for the time derivative, the resulting nonlinear system of equations is solved at each time step by using an agglomeration multigrid procedure. The method allows for arbitrarily large time steps and is efficient in terms of computational effort and storage. Inviscid and viscous unsteady flows are computed to validate the procedure. The issue of the mass matrix which arises with vertex-centered finite volume schemes is addressed. The present formulation allows the mass matrix to be inverted indirectly. A mesh point movement and reconnection procedure is described that allows the grids to evolve with the motion of bodies. As an example of flow over bodies in relative motion, flow over a multi-element airfoil system undergoing deployment is computed. 48 refs., 24 figs.

  11. Storm tide simulation in the Chesapeake Bay using an unstructured grid model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Jian; Wang, Harry; Sisson, Mac; Gong, Wenping

    2006-06-01

    Hurricane Isabel made landfall near Drum Inlet, North Carolina on September 18, 2003 (UTC 17:00). Although it was classified as only a Category 2 storm (Saffir-Simpson scale), Hurricane Isabel had a significant impact on the Chesapeake Bay with a 1.5-2.0 m storm surge (above mean sea level), and was dubbed the "100-year storm". A high-resolution unstructured grid model (UnTRIM) was applied to simulate storm tide in the Chesapeake Bay. The application of an unstructured grid in the Bay offers the greatest flexibilities in representing complex estuarine geometry near the coast and encompassing a large modeling domain necessary for storm surge simulation. The resulting mesh has a total of 239,541 surface elements. The model was forced by 9 tidal harmonic constituents at the open boundary and a wind field generated by a parametric wind model. A hindcast simulation of Hurricane Isabel captures both peak storm tide and surge evolution in various sites of the Bay. Model diagnostic studies indicate that the high surge occurring in the upper Bay regions was mainly caused by the forced southerly wind, whereas the offshore surge and both the northeasterly and southeasterly winds influenced the lower Bay region more significantly.

  12. GPU accelerated cell-based adaptive mesh refinement on unstructured quadrilateral grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Xisheng; Wang, Luying; Ran, Wei; Qin, Fenghua

    2016-10-01

    A GPU accelerated inviscid flow solver is developed on an unstructured quadrilateral grid in the present work. For the first time, the cell-based adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) is fully implemented on GPU for the unstructured quadrilateral grid, which greatly reduces the frequency of data exchange between GPU and CPU. Specifically, the AMR is processed with atomic operations to parallelize list operations, and null memory recycling is realized to improve the efficiency of memory utilization. It is found that results obtained by GPUs agree very well with the exact or experimental results in literature. An acceleration ratio of 4 is obtained between the parallel code running on the old GPU GT9800 and the serial code running on E3-1230 V2. With the optimization of configuring a larger L1 cache and adopting Shared Memory based atomic operations on the newer GPU C2050, an acceleration ratio of 20 is achieved. The parallelized cell-based AMR processes have achieved 2x speedup on GT9800 and 18x on Tesla C2050, which demonstrates that parallel running of the cell-based AMR method on GPU is feasible and efficient. Our results also indicate that the new development of GPU architecture benefits the fluid dynamics computing significantly.

  13. A matrix free implicit scheme for solution of resistive magneto-hydrodynamics equations on unstructured grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sitaraman, H.; Raja, L. L.

    2013-10-01

    The resistive magneto-hydrodynamics (MHD) governing equations represent eight conservation equations for the evolution of density, momentum, energy and induced magnetic fields in an electrically conducting fluid, typically a plasma. A matrix free implicit method is developed to solve the conservation equations within the framework of an unstructured grid finite volume formulation. The analytic form of the convective flux Jacobian is derived on a general unstructured mesh and used in a Lower-Upper Symmetric Gauss Seidel (LU-SGS) technique developed as part of the implicit scheme. A grid coloring technique is also developed to create data parallelism in the algorithm. The computational efficiency of the matrix free method is compared with two common approaches: a global matrix solve technique that uses the GMRES (Generalized minimum residual) algorithm and an explicit method. The matrix-free method is observed to be overall computationally faster than the global matrix solve method and demonstrates excellent parallel scaling on multiple cores. The computational effort and memory requirements for the matrix free approach is comparable to the explicit approach which in turn is much lower than the global solve implicit approach. Both the matrix free and global solve implicit techniques exhibit superior steady state convergence compared to the explicit method.

  14. Convergence to steady state solutions of the Euler equations on unstructured grids with limiters

    SciTech Connect

    Venkatakrishnan, V.

    1995-04-01

    This paper addresses the practical problem of obtaining convergence to steady state solutions of the Euler equations when limiters are used in conjunction with upwind schemes on unstructured grids. The base scheme forms a gradient and limits it by imposing monotonicity conditions in the reconstruction stage. It is shown by analysis in one dimension that such an approach leads to various schemes meeting total-variation-diminishing requirements in one dimension. In multiple dirnensions these schemes produce steadystate solutions that are monotone and devoid of oscillations. However, convergence stalls after a few orders of reduction in the residual. A new limiter is introduced that is particularly suited for unstructured grid applications. When reduced to one dimension, it is shown that this limiter satisfies the standard theory. With this limiter, it is shown that converged steady-state solutions can be obtained. However, the solutions are not monotone. There appears to be a conflict between achieving convergence and monotone solutions with the higher order schemes that employ limiters in the framework presented.

  15. An efficient 3D traveltime calculation using coarse-grid mesh for shallow-depth source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Son, Woohyun; Pyun, Sukjoon; Lee, Ho-Young; Koo, Nam-Hyung; Shin, Changsoo

    2016-10-01

    3D Kirchhoff pre-stack depth migration requires an efficient algorithm to compute first-arrival traveltimes. In this paper, we exploited a wave-equation-based traveltime calculation algorithm, which is called the suppressed wave equation estimation of traveltime (SWEET), and the equivalent source distribution (ESD) algorithm. The motivation of using the SWEET algorithm is to solve the Laplace-domain wave equation using coarse grid spacing to calculate first-arrival traveltimes. However, if a real source is located at shallow-depth close to free surface, we cannot accurately calculate the wavefield using coarse grid spacing. So, we need an additional algorithm to correctly simulate the shallow source even for the coarse grid mesh. The ESD algorithm is a method to define a set of distributed nodal sources that approximate a point source at the inter-nodal location in a velocity model with large grid spacing. Thanks to the ESD algorithm, we can efficiently calculate the first-arrival traveltimes of waves emitted from shallow source point even when we solve the Laplace-domain wave equation using a coarse-grid mesh. The proposed algorithm is applied to the SEG/EAGE 3D salt model. From the result, we note that the combination of SWEET and ESD algorithms can be successfully used for the traveltime calculation under the condition of a shallow-depth source. We also confirmed that our algorithm using coarse-grid mesh requires less computational time than the conventional SWEET algorithm using relatively fine-grid mesh.

  16. Three-Dimensional High-Order Spectral Finite Volume Method for Unstructured Grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Yen; Vinokur, Marcel; Wang, Z. J.; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Many areas require a very high-order accurate numerical solution of conservation laws for complex shapes. This paper deals with the extension to three dimensions of the Spectral Finite Volume (SV) method for unstructured grids, which was developed to solve such problems. We first summarize the limitations of traditional methods such as finite-difference, and finite-volume for both structured and unstructured grids. We then describe the basic formulation of the spectral finite volume method. What distinguishes the SV method from conventional high-order finite-volume methods for unstructured triangular or tetrahedral grids is the data reconstruction. Instead of using a large stencil of neighboring cells to perform a high-order reconstruction, the stencil is constructed by partitioning each grid cell, called a spectral volume (SV), into 'structured' sub-cells, called control volumes (CVs). One can show that if all the SV cells are partitioned into polygonal or polyhedral CV sub-cells in a geometrically similar manner, the reconstructions for all the SVs become universal, irrespective of their shapes, sizes, orientations, or locations. It follows that the reconstruction is reduced to a weighted sum of unknowns involving just a few simple adds and multiplies, and those weights are universal and can be pre-determined once for all. The method is thus very efficient, accurate, and yet geometrically flexible. The most critical part of the SV method is the partitioning of the SV into CVs. In this paper we present the partitioning of a tetrahedral SV into polyhedral CVs with one free parameter for polynomial reconstructions up to degree of precision five. (Note that the order of accuracy of the method is one order higher than the reconstruction degree of precision.) The free parameter will be determined by minimizing the Lebesgue constant of the reconstruction matrix or similar criteria to obtain optimized partitions. The details of an efficient, parallelizable code to solve

  17. Unstructured Grid Adaptation: Status, Potential Impacts, and Recommended Investments Toward CFD Vision 2030

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Michael A.; Krakos, Joshua A.; Michal, Todd; Loseille, Adrien; Alonso, Juan J.

    2016-01-01

    Unstructured grid adaptation is a powerful tool to control discretization error for Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD). It has enabled key increases in the accuracy, automation, and capacity of some fluid simulation applications. Slotnick et al. provides a number of case studies in the CFD Vision 2030 Study: A Path to Revolutionary Computational Aerosciences to illustrate the current state of CFD capability and capacity. The authors forecast the potential impact of emerging High Performance Computing (HPC) environments forecast in the year 2030 and identify that mesh generation and adaptivity continue to be significant bottlenecks in the CFD work flow. These bottlenecks may persist because very little government investment has been targeted in these areas. To motivate investment, the impacts of improved grid adaptation technologies are identified. The CFD Vision 2030 Study roadmap and anticipated capabilities in complementary disciplines are quoted to provide context for the progress made in grid adaptation in the past fifteen years, current status, and a forecast for the next fifteen years with recommended investments. These investments are specific to mesh adaptation and impact other aspects of the CFD process. Finally, a strategy is identified to diffuse grid adaptation technology into production CFD work flows.

  18. Vortical Flow Prediction using an Adaptive Unstructured Grid Method. Chapter 11

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pirzadeh, Shahyar Z.

    2009-01-01

    A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) method has been employed to compute vortical flows around slender wing/body configurations. The emphasis of the paper is on the effectiveness of an adaptive grid procedure in "capturing" concentrated vortices generated at sharp edges or flow separation lines of lifting surfaces flying at high angles of attack. The method is based on a tetrahedral unstructured grid technology developed at the NASA Langley Research Center. Two steady-state, subsonic, inviscid and Navier-Stokes flow test cases are presented to demonstrate the applicability of the method for solving vortical flow problems. The first test case concerns vortex flow over a simple 65 delta wing with different values of leading-edge radius. Although the geometry is quite simple, it poses a challenging problem for computing vortices originating from blunt leading edges. The second case is that of a more complex fighter configuration. The superiority of the adapted solutions in capturing the vortex flow structure over the conventional unadapted results is demonstrated by comparisons with the wind-tunnel experimental data. The study shows that numerical prediction of vortical flows is highly sensitive to the local grid resolution and that the implementation of grid adaptation is essential when applying CFD methods to such complicated flow problems.

  19. Fast Probabilistic Fusion of 3d Point Clouds via Occupancy Grids for Scene Classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhn, Andreas; Huang, Hai; Drauschke, Martin; Mayer, Helmut

    2016-06-01

    High resolution consumer cameras on Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) allow for cheap acquisition of highly detailed images, e.g., of urban regions. Via image registration by means of Structure from Motion (SfM) and Multi View Stereo (MVS) the automatic generation of huge amounts of 3D points with a relative accuracy in the centimeter range is possible. Applications such as semantic classification have a need for accurate 3D point clouds, but do not benefit from an extremely high resolution/density. In this paper, we, therefore, propose a fast fusion of high resolution 3D point clouds based on occupancy grids. The result is used for semantic classification. In contrast to state-of-the-art classification methods, we accept a certain percentage of outliers, arguing that they can be considered in the classification process when a per point belief is determined in the fusion process. To this end, we employ an octree-based fusion which allows for the derivation of outlier probabilities. The probabilities give a belief for every 3D point, which is essential for the semantic classification to consider measurement noise. For an example point cloud with half a billion 3D points (cf. Figure 1), we show that our method can reduce runtime as well as improve classification accuracy and offers high scalability for large datasets.

  20. Finite-volume modelling of geophysical electromagnetic data on unstructured grids using potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jahandari, H.; Farquharson, C. G.

    2015-09-01

    The solution of the geophysical electromagnetic (EM) modelling problem on unstructured tetrahedral-Voronoï grids using EM potentials is investigated. Unstructured grids enable accurate representation of geological structures and interfaces and allow local refinements that can be beneficial in the mesh, for example, at the observation points and at the source. The time-harmonic Helmholtz equation in terms of EM potentials together with the equation of conservation of charge are discretized on staggered tetrahedral-Voronoï grids using a finite-volume method and solved in a total-field approach. The solutions are the total-field quantities of vector and scalar potentials along the edges and at the nodes of the tetrahedral elements, respectively. Two benchmark models with electric and magnetic sources are employed for verification. Also, to illustrate the versatility of the scheme, data for a model of the Ovoid ore body at Voisey's Bay, Labrador, Canada, are synthesized and compared with real helicopter-borne data. The finite-volume results show good agreement with those from the literature and with the real data. The Coulomb gauge is used for ensuring the uniqueness of the potentials in order to study the galvanic and inductive components of the solutions. The results indicate an agreement between the relative importance of these two components and the anticipated coupling of the source with the conductivity model. The solution of the gauged and ungauged schemes using iterative and direct solvers is studied and compared with the solution of a direct EM-field scheme. The results demonstrate that the potential-based schemes can be solved by iterative solvers unlike the corresponding EM-field scheme. An accuracy study is also conducted which showed the higher accuracy of the solutions from the potential method compared to those from the direct EM-field method.

  1. An axis-free overset grid in spherical polar coordinates for simulating 3D self-gravitating flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wongwathanarat, A.; Hammer, N. J.; Müller, E.

    2010-05-01

    Aims: Three dimensional explicit hydrodynamic codes based on spherical polar coordinates using a single spherical polar grid suffer from a severe restriction of the time step size due to the convergence of grid lines near the poles of the coordinate system. More importantly, numerical artifacts are encountered at the symmetry axis of the grid where boundary conditions have to be imposed that flaw the flow near the axis. The first problem can be eased and the second one avoided by applying an overlapping grid technique. Methods: A type of overlapping grid in spherical coordinates is adopted. This so called “Yin-Yang” grid is a two-patch overset grid proposed by Kageyama and Sato for geophysical simulations. Its two grid patches contain only the low-latitude regions of the usual spherical polar grid and are combined together in a simple manner. This property of the Yin-Yang grid greatly simplifies its implementation into a 3D code already employing spherical polar coordinates. It further allows for a much larger time step in 3D simulations using high angular resolution (⪉1°) than that required in 3D simulations using a regular spherical grid with the same angular resolution. Results: The Yin-Yang grid is successfully implemented into a 3D version of the explicit Eulerian grid-based code PROMETHEUS including self-gravity. The modified code successfully passed several standard hydrodynamic tests producing results which are in very good agreement with analytic solutions. Moreover, the solutions obtained with the Yin-Yang grid exhibit no peculiar behaviour at the boundary between the two grid patches. The code has also been successfully used to model astrophysically relevant situations, namely equilibrium polytropes, a Taylor-Sedov explosion, and Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities. According to our results, the usage of the Yin-Yang grid greatly enhances the suitability and efficiency of 3D explicit Eulerian codes based on spherical polar coordinates for astrophysical

  2. 3D magnetospheric parallel hybrid multi-grid method applied to planet-plasma interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leclercq, L.; Modolo, R.; Leblanc, F.; Hess, S.; Mancini, M.

    2016-03-01

    We present a new method to exploit multiple refinement levels within a 3D parallel hybrid model, developed to study planet-plasma interactions. This model is based on the hybrid formalism: ions are kinetically treated whereas electrons are considered as a inertia-less fluid. Generally, ions are represented by numerical particles whose size equals the volume of the cells. Particles that leave a coarse grid subsequently entering a refined region are split into particles whose volume corresponds to the volume of the refined cells. The number of refined particles created from a coarse particle depends on the grid refinement rate. In order to conserve velocity distribution functions and to avoid calculations of average velocities, particles are not coalesced. Moreover, to ensure the constancy of particles' shape function sizes, the hybrid method is adapted to allow refined particles to move within a coarse region. Another innovation of this approach is the method developed to compute grid moments at interfaces between two refinement levels. Indeed, the hybrid method is adapted to accurately account for the special grid structure at the interfaces, avoiding any overlapping grid considerations. Some fundamental test runs were performed to validate our approach (e.g. quiet plasma flow, Alfven wave propagation). Lastly, we also show a planetary application of the model, simulating the interaction between Jupiter's moon Ganymede and the Jovian plasma.

  3. A 3D agglomeration multigrid solver for the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations on unstructured meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marvriplis, D. J.; Venkatakrishnan, V.

    1995-01-01

    An agglomeration multigrid strategy is developed and implemented for the solution of three-dimensional steady viscous flows. The method enables convergence acceleration with minimal additional memory overheads, and is completely automated, in that it can deal with grids of arbitrary construction. The multigrid technique is validated by comparing the delivered convergence rates with those obtained by a previously developed overset-mesh multigrid approach, and by demonstrating grid independent convergence rates for aerodynamic problems on very large grids. Prospects for further increases in multigrid efficiency for high-Reynolds number viscous flows on highly stretched meshes are discussed.

  4. An Implicit Upwind Algorithm for Computing Turbulent Flows on Unstructured Grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anerson, W. Kyle; Bonhaus, Daryl L.

    1994-01-01

    An implicit, Navier-Stokes solution algorithm is presented for the computation of turbulent flow on unstructured grids. The inviscid fluxes are computed using an upwind algorithm and the solution is advanced in time using a backward-Euler time-stepping scheme. At each time step, the linear system of equations is approximately solved with a point-implicit relaxation scheme. This methodology provides a viable and robust algorithm for computing turbulent flows on unstructured meshes. Results are shown for subsonic flow over a NACA 0012 airfoil and for transonic flow over a RAE 2822 airfoil exhibiting a strong upper-surface shock. In addition, results are shown for 3 element and 4 element airfoil configurations. For the calculations, two one equation turbulence models are utilized. For the NACA 0012 airfoil, a pressure distribution and force data are compared with other computational results as well as with experiment. Comparisons of computed pressure distributions and velocity profiles with experimental data are shown for the RAE airfoil and for the 3 element configuration. For the 4 element case, comparisons of surface pressure distributions with experiment are made. In general, the agreement between the computations and the experiment is good.

  5. A Framework for Parallel Unstructured Grid Generation for Complex Aerodynamic Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zagaris, George; Pirzadeh, Shahyar Z.; Chrisochoides, Nikos

    2009-01-01

    A framework for parallel unstructured grid generation targeting both shared memory multi-processors and distributed memory architectures is presented. The two fundamental building-blocks of the framework consist of: (1) the Advancing-Partition (AP) method used for domain decomposition and (2) the Advancing Front (AF) method used for mesh generation. Starting from the surface mesh of the computational domain, the AP method is applied recursively to generate a set of sub-domains. Next, the sub-domains are meshed in parallel using the AF method. The recursive nature of domain decomposition naturally maps to a divide-and-conquer algorithm which exhibits inherent parallelism. For the parallel implementation, the Master/Worker pattern is employed to dynamically balance the varying workloads of each task on the set of available CPUs. Performance results by this approach are presented and discussed in detail as well as future work and improvements.

  6. Radiation transport calculations on unstructured grids using a spatially decomposed and threaded algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Nemanic, M K; Nowak, P

    1999-04-12

    We consider the solution of time-dependent, energy-dependent, discrete ordinates, and nonlinear radiative transfer problems on three-dimensional unstructured spatial grids. We discuss the solution of this class of transport problems, using the code TETON, on large distributed-memory multinode computers having multiple processors per ''node'' (e.g. the IBM-SP). We discuss the use of both spatial decomposition using message passing between ''nodes'' and a threading algorithm in angle on each ''node''. We present timing studies to show how this algorithm scales to hundreds and thousands of processors. We also present an energy group ''batching'' algorithm that greatly enhances cache performance. Our conclusion, after considering cache performance, storage limitations and dependencies inherent in the physics, is that a model that uses a combination of message-passing and threading is superior to one that uses message-passing alone. We present numerical evidence to support our conclusion.

  7. Laser ray tracing and power deposition on an unstructured three-dimensional grid

    PubMed

    Kaiser

    2000-01-01

    A scheme is presented for laser beam evolution and power deposition on three-dimensional unstructured grids composed of hexahedra, prisms, pyramids, and tetrahedra. The geometrical-optics approximation to the electromagnetic wave equation is used to follow propagation of a collection of discrete rays used to represent the beam(s). Ray trajectory equations are integrated using a method that is second order in time, exact for a constant electron-density gradient, and capable of dealing with density discontinuities that arise in certain hydrodynamics formulations. Power deposition by inverse-bremsstrahlung is modeled with a scheme based on Gaussian quadrature to accommodate a deposition rate whose spatial variation is highly nonuniform. Comparisons with analytic results are given for a density ramp in three dimensions, and a "quadratic-well" density trough in two dimensions. PMID:11046339

  8. Fast algorithms for visualizing fluid motion in steady flow on unstructured grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ueng, S. K.; Sikorski, K.; Ma, Kwan-Liu

    1995-01-01

    The plotting of streamlines is an effective way of visualizing fluid motion in steady flows. Additional information about the flowfield, such as local rotation and expansion, can be shown by drawing in the form of a ribbon or tube. In this paper, we present efficient algorithms for the construction of streamlines, streamribbons and streamtubes on unstructured grids. A specialized version of the Runge-Kutta method has been developed to speed up the integration of particle paths. We have also derived closed-form solutions for calculating angular rotation rate and radius to construct streamribbons and streamtubes, respectively. According to our analysis and test results, these formulations are two to four times better in performance than previous numerical methods. As a large number of traces are calculated, the improved performance could be significant.

  9. A High-Order Method Using Unstructured Grids for the Aeroacoustic Analysis of Realistic Aircraft Configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atkins, Harold L.; Lockard, David P.

    1999-01-01

    A method for the prediction of acoustic scatter from complex geometries is presented. The discontinuous Galerkin method provides a framework for the development of a high-order method using unstructured grids. The method's compact form contributes to its accuracy and efficiency, and makes the method well suited for distributed memory parallel computing platforms. Mesh refinement studies are presented to validate the expected convergence properties of the method, and to establish the absolute levels of a error one can expect at a given level of resolution. For a two-dimensional shear layer instability wave and for three-dimensional wave propagation, the method is demonstrated to be insensitive to mesh smoothness. Simulations of scatter from a two-dimensional slat configuration and a three-dimensional blended-wing-body demonstrate the capability of the method to efficiently treat realistic geometries.

  10. Progress in unstructured-grid methods development for unsteady aerodynamic applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batina, John T.

    1992-01-01

    The development of unstructured-grid methods for the solution of the equations of fluid flow and what was learned over the course of the research are summarized. The focus of the discussion is on the solution of the time-dependent Euler equations including spatial discretizations, temporal discretizations, and boundary conditions. An example calculation with an implicit upwind method using a CFL number of infinity is presented for the Boeing 747 aircraft. The results were obtained in less than one hour CPU time on a Cray-2 computer, thus, demonstrating the speed and robustness of the capability. Additional calculations for the ONERA M6 wing demonstrate the accuracy of the method through the good agreement between calculated results and experimental data for a standard transonic flow case.

  11. FUN3D Manual: 12.7

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biedron, Robert T.; Carlson, Jan-Renee; Derlaga, Joseph M.; Gnoffo, Peter A.; Hammond, Dana P.; Jones, William T.; Kleb, Bil; Lee-Rausch, Elizabeth M.; Nielsen, Eric J.; Park, Michael A.; Rumsey, Christopher L.; Thomas, James L.; Wood, William A.

    2015-01-01

    This manual describes the installation and execution of FUN3D version 12.7, including optional dependent packages. FUN3D is a suite of computational fluid dynamics simulation and design tools that uses mixed-element unstructured grids in a large number of formats, including structured multiblock and overset grid systems. A discretely-exact adjoint solver enables efficient gradient-based design and grid adaptation to reduce estimated discretization error. FUN3D is available with and without a reacting, real-gas capability. This generic gas option is available only for those persons that qualify for its beta release status.

  12. FUN3D Manual: 13.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biedron, Robert T.; Carlson, Jan-Renee; Derlaga, Joseph M.; Gnoffo, Peter A.; Hammond, Dana P.; Jones, William T.; Kleb, Bill; Lee-Rausch, Elizabeth M.; Nielsen, Eric J.; Park, Michael A.; Rumsey, Christopher L.; Thomas, James L.; Wood, William A.

    2016-01-01

    This manual describes the installation and execution of FUN3D version 13.0, including optional dependent packages. FUN3D is a suite of computational fluid dynamics simulation and design tools that uses mixed-element unstructured grids in a large number of formats, including structured multiblock and overset grid systems. A discretely-exact adjoint solver enables efficient gradient-based design and grid adaptation to reduce estimated discretization error. FUN3D is available with and without a reacting, real-gas capability. This generic gas option is available only for those persons that qualify for its beta release status.

  13. FUN3D Manual: 12.6

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biedron, Robert T.; Derlaga, Joseph M.; Gnoffo, Peter A.; Hammond, Dana P.; Jones, William T.; Kleb, William L.; Lee-Rausch, Elizabeth M.; Nielsen, Eric J.; Park, Michael A.; Rumsey, Christopher L.; Thomas, James L.; Wood, William A.

    2015-01-01

    This manual describes the installation and execution of FUN3D version 12.6, including optional dependent packages. FUN3D is a suite of computational fluid dynamics simulation and design tools that uses mixed-element unstructured grids in a large number of formats, including structured multiblock and overset grid systems. A discretely-exact adjoint solver enables efficient gradient-based design and grid adaptation to reduce estimated discretization error. FUN3D is available with and without a reacting, real-gas capability. This generic gas option is available only for those persons that qualify for its beta release status.

  14. FUN3D Manual: 12.5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biedron, Robert T.; Derlaga, Joseph M.; Gnoffo, Peter A.; Hammond, Dana P.; Jones, William T.; Kleb, William L.; Lee-Rausch, Elizabeth M.; Nielsen, Eric J.; Park, Michael A.; Rumsey, Christopher L.; Thomas, James L.; Wood, William A.

    2014-01-01

    This manual describes the installation and execution of FUN3D version 12.5, including optional dependent packages. FUN3D is a suite of computational uid dynamics simulation and design tools that uses mixed-element unstructured grids in a large number of formats, including structured multiblock and overset grid systems. A discretely-exact adjoint solver enables ecient gradient-based design and grid adaptation to reduce estimated discretization error. FUN3D is available with and without a reacting, real-gas capability. This generic gas option is available only for those persons that qualify for its beta release status.

  15. FUN3D Manual: 12.9

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biedron, Robert T.; Carlson, Jan-Renee; Derlaga, Joseph M.; Gnoffo, Peter A.; Hammond, Dana P.; Jones, William T.; Kleb, Bil; Lee-Rausch, Elizabeth M.; Nielsen, Eric J.; Park, Michael A.; Rumsey, Christopher L.; Thomas, James L.; Wood, William A.

    2016-01-01

    This manual describes the installation and execution of FUN3D version 12.9, including optional dependent packages. FUN3D is a suite of computational fluid dynamics simulation and design tools that uses mixed-element unstructured grids in a large number of formats, including structured multiblock and overset grid systems. A discretely-exact adjoint solver enables efficient gradient-based design and grid adaptation to reduce estimated discretization error. FUN3D is available with and without a reacting, real-gas capability. This generic gas option is available only for those persons that qualify for its beta release status.

  16. FUN3D Manual: 12.8

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biedron, Robert T.; Carlson, Jan-Renee; Derlaga, Joseph M.; Gnoffo, Peter A.; Hammond, Dana P.; Jones, William T.; Kleb, Bil; Lee-Rausch, Elizabeth M.; Nielsen, Eric J.; Park, Michael A.; Rumsey, Christopher L.; Thomas, James L.; Wood, William A.

    2015-01-01

    This manual describes the installation and execution of FUN3D version 12.8, including optional dependent packages. FUN3D is a suite of computational fluid dynamics simulation and design tools that uses mixed-element unstructured grids in a large number of formats, including structured multiblock and overset grid systems. A discretely-exact adjoint solver enables efficient gradient-based design and grid adaptation to reduce estimated discretization error. FUN3D is available with and without a reacting, real-gas capability. This generic gas option is available only for those persons that qualify for its beta release status.

  17. FUN3D Manual: 12.4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biedron, Robert T.; Derlaga, Joseph M.; Gnoffo, Peter A.; Hammond, Dana P.; Jones, William T.; Kleb, Bil; Lee-Rausch, Elizabeth M.; Nielsen, Eric J.; Park, Michael A.; Rumsey, Christopher L.; Thomas, James L.; Wood, William A.

    2014-01-01

    This manual describes the installation and execution of FUN3D version 12.4, including optional dependent packages. FUN3D is a suite of computational fluid dynamics simulation and design tools that uses mixedelement unstructured grids in a large number of formats, including structured multiblock and overset grid systems. A discretely-exact adjoint solver enables efficient gradient-based design and grid adaptation to reduce estimated discretization error. FUN3D is available with and without a reacting, real-gas capability. This generic gas option is available only for those persons that qualify for its beta release status.

  18. Visualizer: 3D Gridded Data Visualization Software for Geoscience Education and Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harwood, C.; Billen, M. I.; Kreylos, O.; Jadamec, M.; Sumner, D. Y.; Kellogg, L. H.; Hamann, B.

    2008-12-01

    In both research and education learning is an interactive and iterative process of exploring and analyzing data or model results. However, visualization software often presents challenges on the path to learning because it assumes the user already knows the locations and types of features of interest, instead of enabling flexible and intuitive examination of results. We present examples of research and teaching using the software, Visualizer, specifically designed to create an effective and intuitive environment for interactive, scientific analysis of 3D gridded data. Visualizer runs in a range of 3D virtual reality environments (e.g., GeoWall, ImmersaDesk, or CAVE), but also provides a similar level of real-time interactivity on a desktop computer. When using Visualizer in a 3D-enabled environment, the software allows the user to interact with the data images as real objects, grabbing, rotating or walking around the data to gain insight and perspective. On the desktop, simple features, such as a set of cross-bars marking the plane of the screen, provide extra 3D spatial cues that allow the user to more quickly understand geometric relationships within the data. This platform portability allows the user to more easily integrate research results into classroom demonstrations and exercises, while the interactivity provides an engaging environment for self-directed and inquiry-based learning by students. Visualizer software is freely available for download (www.keckcaves.org) and runs on Mac OSX and Linux platforms.

  19. Simulating hydrodynamics in a spring-fed estuary using a three-dimensional unstructured Cartesian grid model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, XinJian

    2012-12-01

    This paper presents an application of a three-dimensional unstructured Cartesian grid model (Chen, 2011) to a real-world case, namely the Crystal River/Kings Bay system located on the Gulf coast of the Florida peninsula of the United States. Crystal River/Kings Bay is a spring-fed estuarine system which is believed to be the largest natural refuge in the United States for manatees during the coldest days in winter because of the existence of a large amount of discharge out of numerous spring vents at the bottom of Kings Bay. The unstructured Cartesian grid model was used to simulate hydrodynamics, including salinity transport processes and thermodynamics, in the estuary during a 34-month period from April 2007 to February 2010. Although there are some unidentified uncertainties in quantifying flow rates from the spring vents and salinity variations in spring flows, simulated water elevations, salinities, temperatures, and cross-sectional flux all match well or very well with measured real-time field data. This suggests that the unstructured Cartesian grid model can adequately simulate hydrodynamics in a complex shallow water system such as Crystal River/Kings Bay and the numerical theory for the unstructured Cartesian grid model works properly. The successful simulation of hydrodynamics in the estuarine system also suggests that an empirical formula that relates the spring discharge with the water level in Kings Bay and the groundwater level measured in a nearby well is reasonable.

  20. Modeling tidal circulation and stratification in Skagit River estuary using an unstructured grid ocean model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhaoqing; Khangaonkar, Tarang

    Tidal circulation and river plume dynamics in shallow-water estuarine systems with large intertidal zones are complex. Strong asymmetries in tidal currents and stratification often occur in the intertidal zones and subtidal channels over a tidal cycle. The Skagit River is the largest estuary with respect to the discharge of a significant amount of freshwater and sediment into Puget Sound, Washington. It consists of a large intertidal zone with multiple tidal channels near the mouth of the estuary. To simulate the tidal circulation and salinity stratification accurately in the intertidal region, an unstructured grid numerical model with wetting-drying capability and the capability to accurately represent the bathymetry of tidal flats and the geometry of shallow distributary channels is necessary. In this paper, a modeling study for the Skagit River estuary using a three-dimensional unstructured grid, finite-volume coastal ocean model (FVCOM) supported by high-resolution LIDAR data is presented. The hydrodynamic model was validated with observed water surface elevation, velocity, and salinity data over spring and neap tidal cycles under low-river-flow and high-river-flow conditions. Wetting and drying processes in the intertidal zone and strong stratification in the estuary were simulated successfully by the model. Model results indicate that the Skagit River estuary is a highly stratified estuary, but destratification can occur during flood tide. Tides and baroclinic motion are the dominant forcing in the Skagit River estuary, but strong wind events can affect the currents in the intertidal zone significantly. Preliminary analysis also indicated that the salinity intrusion length scale is proportional to the river flow to the -¼ power.

  1. Technical note: rapid prototyping of 3D grid arrays for image guided therapy quality assurance.

    PubMed

    Kittle, David; Holshouser, Barbara; Slater, James M; Guenther, Bob D; Pitsianis, Nikos P; Pearlstein, Robert D

    2008-12-01

    Three dimensional grid phantoms offer a number of advantages for measuring imaging related spatial inaccuracies for image guided surgery and radiotherapy. The authors examined the use of rapid prototyping technology for directly fabricating 3D grid phantoms from CAD drawings. We tested three different fabrication process materials, photopolymer jet with acrylic resin (PJ/AR), selective laser sintering with polyamide (SLS/P), and fused deposition modeling with acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (FDM/ABS). The test objects consisted of rectangular arrays of control points formed by the intersections of posts and struts (2 mm rectangular cross section) and spaced 8 mm apart in the x, y, and z directions. The PJ/AR phantom expanded after immersion in water which resulted in permanent warping of the structure. The surface of the FDM/ABS grid exhibited a regular pattern of depressions and ridges from the extrusion process. SLS/P showed the best combination of build accuracy, surface finish, and stability. Based on these findings, a grid phantom for assessing machine-dependent and frame-induced MR spatial distortions was fabricated to be used for quality assurance in stereotactic neurosurgical and radiotherapy procedures. The spatial uniformity of the SLS/P grid control point array was determined by CT imaging (0.6 x 0.6 x 0.625 mm3 resolution) and found suitable for the application, with over 97.5% of the control points located within 0.3 mm of the position specified in CAD drawing and none of the points off by more than 0.4 mm. Rapid prototyping is a flexible and cost effective alternative for development of customized grid phantoms for medical physics quality assurance. PMID:19175128

  2. Technical Note: Rapid prototyping of 3D grid arrays for image guided therapy quality assurance

    SciTech Connect

    Kittle, David; Holshouser, Barbara; Slater, James M.; Guenther, Bob D.; Pitsianis, Nikos P.; Pearlstein, Robert D.

    2008-12-15

    Three dimensional grid phantoms offer a number of advantages for measuring imaging related spatial inaccuracies for image guided surgery and radiotherapy. The authors examined the use of rapid prototyping technology for directly fabricating 3D grid phantoms from CAD drawings. We tested three different fabrication process materials, photopolymer jet with acrylic resin (PJ/AR), selective laser sintering with polyamide (SLS/P), and fused deposition modeling with acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (FDM/ABS). The test objects consisted of rectangular arrays of control points formed by the intersections of posts and struts (2 mm rectangular cross section) and spaced 8 mm apart in the x, y, and z directions. The PJ/AR phantom expanded after immersion in water which resulted in permanent warping of the structure. The surface of the FDM/ABS grid exhibited a regular pattern of depressions and ridges from the extrusion process. SLS/P showed the best combination of build accuracy, surface finish, and stability. Based on these findings, a grid phantom for assessing machine-dependent and frame-induced MR spatial distortions was fabricated to be used for quality assurance in stereotactic neurosurgical and radiotherapy procedures. The spatial uniformity of the SLS/P grid control point array was determined by CT imaging (0.6x0.6x0.625 mm{sup 3} resolution) and found suitable for the application, with over 97.5% of the control points located within 0.3 mm of the position specified in CAD drawing and none of the points off by more than 0.4 mm. Rapid prototyping is a flexible and cost effective alternative for development of customized grid phantoms for medical physics quality assurance.

  3. 3D inversion based on multi-grid approach of magnetotelluric data from Northern Scandinavia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherevatova, M.; Smirnov, M.; Korja, T. J.; Egbert, G. D.

    2012-12-01

    In this work we investigate the geoelectrical structure of the cratonic margin of Fennoscandian Shield by means of magnetotelluric (MT) measurements carried out in Northern Norway and Sweden during summer 2011-2012. The project Magnetotellurics in the Scandes (MaSca) focuses on the investigation of the crust, upper mantle and lithospheric structure in a transition zone from a stable Precambrian cratonic interior to a passive continental margin beneath the Caledonian Orogen and the Scandes Mountains in western Fennoscandia. Recent MT profiles in the central and southern Scandes indicated a large contrast in resistivity between Caledonides and Precambrian basement. The alum shales as a highly conductive layers between the resistive Precambrian basement and the overlying Caledonian nappes are revealed from this profiles. Additional measurements in the Northern Scandes were required. All together data from 60 synchronous long period (LMT) and about 200 broad band (BMT) sites were acquired. The array stretches from Lofoten and Bodo (Norway) in the west to Kiruna and Skeleftea (Sweden) in the east covering an area of 500x500 square kilometers. LMT sites were occupied for about two months, while most of the BMT sites were measured during one day. We have used new multi-grid approach for 3D electromagnetic (EM) inversion and modelling. Our approach is based on the OcTree discretization where the spatial domain is represented by rectangular cells, each of which might be subdivided (recursively) into eight sub-cells. In this simplified implementation the grid is refined only in the horizontal direction, uniformly in each vertical layer. Using multi-grid we manage to have a high grid resolution near the surface (for instance, to tackle with galvanic distortions) and lower resolution at greater depth as the EM fields decay in the Earth according to the diffusion equation. We also have a benefit in computational costs as number of unknowns decrease. The multi-grid forward

  4. Assessment of the Unstructured Grid Software TetrUSS for Drag Prediction of the DLR-F4 Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pirzadeh, Shahyar Z.; Frink, Neal T.

    2002-01-01

    An application of the NASA unstructured grid software system TetrUSS is presented for the prediction of aerodynamic drag on a transport configuration. The paper briefly describes the underlying methodology and summarizes the results obtained on the DLR-F4 transport configuration recently presented in the first AIAA computational fluid dynamics (CFD) Drag Prediction Workshop. TetrUSS is a suite of loosely coupled unstructured grid CFD codes developed at the NASA Langley Research Center. The meshing approach is based on the advancing-front and the advancing-layers procedures. The flow solver employs a cell-centered, finite volume scheme for solving the Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes equations on tetrahedral grids. For the present computations, flow in the viscous sublayer has been modeled with an analytical wall function. The emphasis of the paper is placed on the practicality of the methodology for accurately predicting aerodynamic drag data.

  5. 2.5-D/3-D resistivity modelling in anisotropic media using Gaussian quadrature grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Bing; Greenhalgh, Mark; Greenhalgh, S. A.

    2009-01-01

    We present a new numerical scheme for 2.5-D/3-D direct current resistivity modelling in heterogeneous, anisotropic media. This method, named the `Gaussian quadrature grid' (GQG) method, cooperatively combines the solution of the Variational Principle of the partial differential equation, Gaussian quadrature abscissae and local cardinal functions so that it has the main advantages of the spectral element method. The formulation shows that the GQG method is a modification of the spectral element method but does not employ the constant elements or require the mesh generator to match the Earth's surface. This makes it much easier to deal with geological models having a 2-D/3-D complex topography than using traditional numerical methods. The GQG technique can achieve a similar convergence rate to the spectral element method. We show it transforms the 2.5-D/3-D resistivity modelling problem into a sparse and symmetric linear equation system that can be solved by an iterative or matrix inversion method. Comparison with analytic solutions for homogeneous isotropic and anisotropic models shows that the error depends on the Gaussian quadrature order (abscissa number) and the subdomain size. The higher the order or the smaller the subdomain size that is employed, the more accurate are the results obtained. Several other synthetic examples, both homogeneous and inhomogeneous, incorporating sloping, undulating and severe topography, are presented and found to yield results comparable to finite element solutions involving a dense mesh.

  6. A SUNTANS-based unstructured grid local exact particle tracking model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Guangliang; Chua, Vivien P.

    2016-07-01

    A parallel particle tracking model, which employs the local exact integration method to achieve high accuracy, has been developed and embedded in an unstructured-grid coastal ocean model, Stanford Unstructured Nonhydrostatic Terrain-following Adaptive Navier-Stokes Simulator (SUNTANS). The particle tracking model is verified and compared with traditional numerical integration methods, such as Runge-Kutta fourth-order methods using several test cases. In two-dimensional linear steady rotating flow, the local exact particle tracking model is able to track particles along the circular streamline accurately, while Runge-Kutta fourth-order methods produce trajectories that deviate from the streamlines. In periodically varying double-gyre flow, the trajectories produced by local exact particle tracking model with time step of 1.0 × 10- 2 s are similar to those trajectories obtained from the numerical integration methods with reduced time steps of 1.0 × 10- 4 s. In three-dimensional steady Arnold-Beltrami-Childress (ABC) flow, the trajectories integrated with the local exact particle tracking model compares well with the approximated true path. The trajectories spiral upward and their projection on the x- y plane is a periodic ellipse. The trajectories derived with the Runge-Kutta fourth-order method deviate from the approximated true path, and their projections on the x- y plane are unclosed ellipses with growing long and short axes. The spatial temporal resolution needs to be carefully chosen before particle tracking models are applied. Our results show that the developed local exact particle tracking model is accurate and suitable for marine Lagrangian (trajectory-based)-related research.

  7. The DANTE Boltzmann transport solver: An unstructured mesh, 3-D, spherical harmonics algorithm compatible with parallel computer architectures

    SciTech Connect

    McGhee, J.M.; Roberts, R.M.; Morel, J.E.

    1997-06-01

    A spherical harmonics research code (DANTE) has been developed which is compatible with parallel computer architectures. DANTE provides 3-D, multi-material, deterministic, transport capabilities using an arbitrary finite element mesh. The linearized Boltzmann transport equation is solved in a second order self-adjoint form utilizing a Galerkin finite element spatial differencing scheme. The core solver utilizes a preconditioned conjugate gradient algorithm. Other distinguishing features of the code include options for discrete-ordinates and simplified spherical harmonics angular differencing, an exact Marshak boundary treatment for arbitrarily oriented boundary faces, in-line matrix construction techniques to minimize memory consumption, and an effective diffusion based preconditioner for scattering dominated problems. Algorithm efficiency is demonstrated for a massively parallel SIMD architecture (CM-5), and compatibility with MPP multiprocessor platforms or workstation clusters is anticipated.

  8. Enhancement of USM3D Unstructured Flow Solver for High-Speed High-Temperature Shear Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pandya, Mohagna J.; Abdol-Hamid, Khaled S.; Frink, Neal T.

    2009-01-01

    Large temperature and pressure fluctuations have a profound effect on turbulence development in transonic and supersonic jets. For high-speed, high-temperature jet flows, standard turbulence models lack the ability to predict the observed mixing rate of a shear layer. Several proposals to address this deficiency have been advanced in the literature to modify the turbulence transport equations in a variety of ways. In the present study, some of the most proven and simple modifications to two-equation turbulence models have been selected and implemented in NASA's USM3D tetrahedral Navier-Stokes flow solver. The modifications include the addition of compressibility correction and pressure dilatation terms in the turbulence transport equations for high-speed flows, and the addition of a simple modification to the Boussinesq's closure model coefficient for high-temperature jets. The efficacy of the extended models is demonstrated by comparison with experimental data for two supersonic axisymmetric jet test cases at design pressure ratio.

  9. 3D Staggered-Grid Finite-Difference Simulation of Acoustic Waves in Turbulent Moving Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Symons, N. P.; Aldridge, D. F.; Marlin, D.; Wilson, D. K.; Sullivan, P.; Ostashev, V.

    2003-12-01

    Acoustic wave propagation in a three-dimensional heterogeneous moving atmosphere is accurately simulated with a numerical algorithm recently developed under the DOD Common High Performance Computing Software Support Initiative (CHSSI). Sound waves within such a dynamic environment are mathematically described by a set of four, coupled, first-order partial differential equations governing small-amplitude fluctuations in pressure and particle velocity. The system is rigorously derived from fundamental principles of continuum mechanics, ideal-fluid constitutive relations, and reasonable assumptions that the ambient atmospheric motion is adiabatic and divergence-free. An explicit, time-domain, finite-difference (FD) numerical scheme is used to solve the system for both pressure and particle velocity wavefields. The atmosphere is characterized by 3D gridded models of sound speed, mass density, and the three components of the wind velocity vector. Dependent variables are stored on staggered spatial and temporal grids, and centered FD operators possess 2nd-order and 4th-order space/time accuracy. Accurate sound wave simulation is achieved provided grid intervals are chosen appropriately. The gridding must be fine enough to reduce numerical dispersion artifacts to an acceptable level and maintain stability. The algorithm is designed to execute on parallel computational platforms by utilizing a spatial domain-decomposition strategy. Currently, the algorithm has been validated on four different computational platforms, and parallel scalability of approximately 85% has been demonstrated. Comparisons with analytic solutions for uniform and vertically stratified wind models indicate that the FD algorithm generates accurate results with either a vanishing pressure or vanishing vertical-particle velocity boundary condition. Simulations are performed using a kinematic turbulence wind profile developed with the quasi-wavelet method. In addition, preliminary results are presented

  10. Three-Dimensional High-Order Spectral Volume Method for Solving Maxwell's Equations on Unstructured Grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Yen; Vinokur, Marcel; Wang, Z. J.

    2004-01-01

    A three-dimensional, high-order, conservative, and efficient discontinuous spectral volume (SV) method for the solutions of Maxwell's equations on unstructured grids is presented. The concept of discontinuous 2nd high-order loca1 representations to achieve conservation and high accuracy is utilized in a manner similar to the Discontinuous Galerkin (DG) method, but instead of using a Galerkin finite-element formulation, the SV method is based on a finite-volume approach to attain a simpler formulation. Conventional unstructured finite-volume methods require data reconstruction based on the least-squares formulation using neighboring cell data. Since each unknown employs a different stencil, one must repeat the least-squares inversion for every cell at each time step, or to store the inversion coefficients. In a high-order, three-dimensional computation, the former would involve impractically large CPU time, while for the latter the memory requirement becomes prohibitive. In the SV method, one starts with a relatively coarse grid of triangles or tetrahedra, called spectral volumes (SVs), and partition each SV into a number of structured subcells, called control volumes (CVs), that support a polynomial expansion of a desired degree of precision. The unknowns are cell averages over CVs. If all the SVs are partitioned in a geometrically similar manner, the reconstruction becomes universal as a weighted sum of unknowns, and only a few universal coefficients need to be stored for the surface integrals over CV faces. Since the solution is discontinuous across the SV boundaries, a Riemann solver is thus necessary to maintain conservation. In the paper, multi-parameter and symmetric SV partitions, up to quartic for triangle and cubic for tetrahedron, are first presented. The corresponding weight coefficients for CV face integrals in terms of CV cell averages for each partition are analytically determined. These discretization formulas are then applied to the integral form of

  11. 3D Myocardial Contraction Imaging Based on Dynamic Grid Interpolation: Theory and Simulation Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bu, Shuhui; Shiina, Tsuyoshi; Yamakawa, Makoto; Takizawa, Hotaka

    Accurate assessment of local myocardial contraction is important for diagnosis of ischemic heart disease, because decreases of myocardial motion often appear in the early stages of the disease. Three-dimensional (3-D) assessment of the stiffness distribution is required for accurate diagnosis of ischemic heart disease. Since myocardium motion occurs radially within the left ventricle wall and the ultrasound beam propagates axially, conventional approaches, such as tissue Doppler imaging and strain-rate imaging techniques, cannot provide us with enough quantitative information about local myocardial contraction. In order to resolve this problem, we propose a novel myocardial contraction imaging system which utilizes the weighted phase gradient method, the extended combined autocorrelation method, and the dynamic grid interpolation (DGI) method. From the simulation results, we conclude that the strain image's accuracy and contrast have been improved by the proposed method.

  12. 3D Continuum Radiative Transfer. An adaptive grid construction algorithm based on the Monte Carlo method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niccolini, G.; Alcolea, J.

    Solving the radiative transfer problem is a common problematic to may fields in astrophysics. With the increasing angular resolution of spatial or ground-based telescopes (VLTI, HST) but also with the next decade instruments (NGST, ALMA, ...), astrophysical objects reveal and will certainly reveal complex spatial structures. Consequently, it is necessary to develop numerical tools being able to solve the radiative transfer equation in three dimensions in order to model and interpret these observations. I present a 3D radiative transfer program, using a new method for the construction of an adaptive spatial grid, based on the Monte Claro method. With the help of this tools, one can solve the continuum radiative transfer problem (e.g. a dusty medium), computes the temperature structure of the considered medium and obtain the flux of the object (SED and images).

  13. Assessment of an Unstructured-Grid Method for Predicting Aerodynamic Performance of Jet Flaps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruz, Josue; Anders, Scott G.

    2006-01-01

    The application of a Computational Fluid Dynamics tool to a jet flap control effector on an elliptical airfoil-section wing was investigated. The study utilized the Tetrahedral Unstructured Software System developed at NASA Langley Research Center. The Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes flow solver code used was USM3D. The CFD-based jet flap simulations were compared to experimental results from a wind tunnel test conducted at the NASA Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel. The wind tunnel model consisted of a six percent thick elliptical airfoil with a modified trailing edge. The jet flap was located at 95% chord and exited at 90 degrees to the lower surface. The experimental model was designed to promote two-dimensional flow across the wing. It was found that the CFD simulation had to model the three-dimensional geometry of the experiment in order to obtain good agreement. Tests were performed at two Mach numbers at several different jet momentum coefficients. In order to be consistent with the experimental method, the CFD lift and pitching moment values were determined by integrating the pressures over the wing.

  14. Mapping Nearby Terrain in 3D by Use of a Grid of Laser Spots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padgett, Curtis; Liebe, Carl; Chang, Johnny; Brown, Kenneth

    2007-01-01

    A proposed optoelectronic system, to be mounted aboard an exploratory robotic vehicle, would be used to generate a three-dimensional (3D) map of nearby terrain and obstacles for purposes of navigating the vehicle across the terrain and avoiding the obstacles. The difference between this system and the other systems would lie in the details of implementation. In this system, the illumination would be provided by a laser. The beam from the laser would pass through a two-dimensional diffraction grating, which would divide the beam into multiple beams propagating in different, fixed, known directions. These beams would form a grid of bright spots on the nearby terrain and obstacles. The centroid of each bright spot in the image would be computed. For each such spot, the combination of (1) the centroid, (2) the known direction of the light beam that produced the spot, and (3) the known baseline would constitute sufficient information for calculating the 3D position of the spot.

  15. Dense 3D Reconstruction from High Frame-Rate Video Using a Static Grid Pattern.

    PubMed

    Sagawa, Ryusuke; Furukawa, Ryo; Kawasaki, Hiroshi

    2014-09-01

    Dense 3D reconstruction of fast moving objects could contribute to various applications such as body structure analysis, accident avoidance, and so on. In this paper, we propose a technique based on a one-shot scanning method, which reconstructs 3D shapes for each frame of a high frame-rate video capturing the scenes projected by a static pattern. To avoid instability of image processing, we restrict the number of colors used in the pattern to less than two. The proposed technique comprises (1) an efficient algorithm to eliminate ambiguity of projected parallel-line patterns by using intersection points, (2) a batch reconstruction algorithm of multiple frames by using spatio-temporal constraints, and (3) an efficient detection method of color-encoded grid pattern based on de Bruijn sequence. In the experiments, the line detection algorithm worked effectively and the dense reconstruction algorithm produces accurate and robust results. We also show the improved results by using temporal constraints. Finally, the dense reconstructions of fast moving objects in a high frame-rate video are presented. PMID:26352228

  16. Solving the problem of non-stationary filtration of substance by the discontinuous Galerkin method on unstructured grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhalnin, R. V.; Ladonkina, M. E.; Masyagin, V. F.; Tishkin, V. F.

    2016-06-01

    A numerical algorithm is proposed for solving the problem of non-stationary filtration of substance in anisotropic media by the Galerkin method with discontinuous basis functions on unstructured triangular grids. A characteristic feature of this method is that the flux variables are considered on the dual grid. The dual grid comprises median control volumes around the nodes of the original triangular grid. The flux values of the quantities on the boundary of an element are calculated with the help of stabilizing additions. For averaging the permeability tensor over the cells of the dual grid, the method of support operators is applied. The method is studied on the example of a two-dimensional boundary value problem. The convergence and approximation of the numerical method are analyzed, and results of mathematical modeling are presented. The numerical results demonstrate the applicability of this approach for solving problems of non-stationary filtration of substance in anisotropic media by the discontinuous Galerkin method on unstructured triangular grids.

  17. Application of high resolution NVD and TVD differencing schemes to the discrete ordinates method using unstructured grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coelho, Pedro J.

    2014-08-01

    High order resolution schemes based on the NVD and TVD boundedness criteria are applied to radiative transfer problems using the DOM in two-dimensional unstructured triangular grids. The implementation of these schemes in unstructured grids requires approximations, and two implementations reported in the literature are compared with a new one. Three different methods have been used to calculate the gradient of the radiation intensity at the center of the control volumes. The various schemes are applied to several test problems, the results are compared with those obtained using the step scheme, the mean flux interpolation scheme and another high order scheme based on a truncated Taylor series expansion, and the most accurate implementations are identified. It is concluded that although the high order schemes perform much better than the others, they are not as accurate as in Cartesian coordinates, and their order of convergence is lower than in that case.

  18. Laminar and turbulent flow computations of Type 4 shock-shock interference aerothermal loads using unstructured grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vemaganti, Gururaja R.

    1994-01-01

    This report presents computations for the Type 4 shock-shock interference flow under laminar and turbulent conditions using unstructured grids. Mesh adaptation was accomplished by remeshing, refinement, and mesh movement. Two two-equation turbulence models were used to analyze turbulent flows. The mean flow governing equations and the turbulence governing equations are solved in a coupled manner. The solution algorithm and the details pertaining to its implementation on unstructured grids are described. Computations were performed at two different freestream Reynolds numbers at a freestream Mach number of 11. Effects of the variation in the impinging shock location are studied. The comparison of the results in terms of wall heat flux and wall pressure distributions is presented.

  19. A High-Order Finite Spectral Volume Method for Conservation Laws on Unstructured Grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Z. J.; Liu, Yen; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A time accurate, high-order, conservative, yet efficient method named Finite Spectral Volume (FSV) is developed for conservation laws on unstructured grids. The concept of a 'spectral volume' is introduced to achieve high-order accuracy in an efficient manner similar to spectral element and multi-domain spectral methods. In addition, each spectral volume is further sub-divided into control volumes (CVs), and cell-averaged data from these control volumes is used to reconstruct a high-order approximation in the spectral volume. Riemann solvers are used to compute the fluxes at spectral volume boundaries. Then cell-averaged state variables in the control volumes are updated independently. Furthermore, TVD (Total Variation Diminishing) and TVB (Total Variation Bounded) limiters are introduced in the FSV method to remove/reduce spurious oscillations near discontinuities. A very desirable feature of the FSV method is that the reconstruction is carried out only once, and analytically, and is the same for all cells of the same type, and that the reconstruction stencil is always non-singular, in contrast to the memory and CPU-intensive reconstruction in a high-order finite volume (FV) method. Discussions are made concerning why the FSV method is significantly more efficient than high-order finite volume and the Discontinuous Galerkin (DG) methods. Fundamental properties of the FSV method are studied and high-order accuracy is demonstrated for several model problems with and without discontinuities.

  20. Exponential characteristic nonlinear radiation transport method for unstructured grids of triangular cells

    SciTech Connect

    Mathews, K.A.; Brennan, C.R.

    1997-07-01

    The exponential characteristic (EC) method is one of a family of nonlinear spatial quadratures for discrete ordinates radiation transport that are positive and at least second-order accurate and provide accurate results for deep-penetration problems using coarse meshes. The authors use a split-cell methodology to adapt the method to unstructured grids of arbitrarily shaped and oriented triangular cells that provide efficient representation of curved surfaces. Exponential representations of the flux entering through a cell edge and of the scattering source within a cell are constructed to match average values and first moments passed from the adjacent cell (or from the boundary conditions) or obtained from the angular quadrature of the directional flux spatial moments in the previous iteration (or from an initial guess). The resulting one- and two-dimensional nonlinear rootsolving problems are efficiently solved using Newton`s method with an accurate starting approximation. Improved algorithms, presented here, have increased the efficiency of the method by a factor of 10 as compared to an initial report. The EC method now costs only twice as much per cell as does the linear characteristic method but can be accurate with many fewer cells. Numerical testing shows the EC method to be robust and effective.

  1. Computational flow visualization in vibrating flow pump type artificial heart by unstructured grid.

    PubMed

    Kato, Takuma; Kawano, Satoyuki; Nakahashi, Kazuhiro; Yambe, Tomoyuki; Nitta, Shin-ichi; Hashimoto, Hiroyuki

    2003-01-01

    Computational flow visualization in the casing of vibrating flow pump (VFP) was made for various conditions based on the novel techniques of fluid dynamics. VFP type artificial heart can generate the oscillated flow and can be applied to the left ventricular assist device. Flow pattern of blood in an artificial heart is closely connected to mechanical performance and serious biomechanical problems such as hemolysis and blood coagulation. To effectively design the VFP for a left ventricular assist device, the numerical codes for solving Navier-Stokes equations were developed for three-dimensional blood flow based on the finite volume method. Furthermore, the simulation techniques based on the artificial compressibility method and the unstructured grid were also developed here. The numerical calculations were based on the precise configurations and the flow conditions of the prototype device. From the viewpoint of computational fluid dynamics (CFD), the detailed discussion of flow patterns in the casing of VFP, which were closely connected with hemolysis and blood coagulation, was made and the computational results were visualized by the use of the recent technique of computational graphics. Some useful design data of VFP were presented. PMID:12534712

  2. Balanced Central Schemes for the Shallow Water Equations on Unstructured Grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryson, Steve; Levy, Doron

    2004-01-01

    We present a two-dimensional, well-balanced, central-upwind scheme for approximating solutions of the shallow water equations in the presence of a stationary bottom topography on triangular meshes. Our starting point is the recent central scheme of Kurganov and Petrova (KP) for approximating solutions of conservation laws on triangular meshes. In order to extend this scheme from systems of conservation laws to systems of balance laws one has to find an appropriate discretization of the source terms. We first show that for general triangulations there is no discretization of the source terms that corresponds to a well-balanced form of the KP scheme. We then derive a new variant of a central scheme that can be balanced on triangular meshes. We note in passing that it is straightforward to extend the KP scheme to general unstructured conformal meshes. This extension allows us to recover our previous well-balanced scheme on Cartesian grids. We conclude with several simulations, verifying the second-order accuracy of our scheme as well as its well-balanced properties.

  3. Unstructured-grid model for the North Sea and Baltic Sea: Validation against observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yinglong J.; Stanev, E. V.; Grashorn, S.

    2016-01-01

    A new unstructured-grid model and its application to the North Sea and Baltic Sea are described. The research focus is on the dynamics in the two basins and in the multiple straits connecting them and more specifically on how the model replicates the temporal and spatial variability of physical processes. The comparison against observed data indicates the realism in the simulations of the exchange flows. The simulations demonstrated that in contrast to the tidal variability which decreases in the strait, the role of the barotropic forcing due to weather systems increases. In this zone reversal of transport is well manifested by the increased difference between the surface and bottom salinity values. Small sub-basins like Arkona and Bornholm play the role of reservoirs for denser water which under specific conditions cascades on its way to the Gotland Deep. Unlike the intermediate and deep water salinity in the Baltic Sea, which is strongly affected by fluxes in the straits, the simulated winter-refill and evolution of cold intermediate water are rather driven by surface cooling and processes in the upper mixed layer.

  4. CartaBlanca-rapid prototyping development environment for non-linear systems on unstructured grids.

    SciTech Connect

    VanderHeyden, W. B.; Livescu, D.; Padial-Collins, N. T.

    2002-01-01

    This talk describes a component-based nonlinear physical system simulation prototyping package written entirely in Java using objectoriented design, The package provides scientists and engineers a 'developer-friendly' software environment for large-scale computational algorithm and physical model development, on the Jacobian-Free Newton-Krylov solution method surrounding a finite-volume treatment of conservation equations. This enables a clean component-like implementation. We first provide motivation for the development of the software and then discuss software structure. Discussion .includes a description of the use of Java's built-in thread facility that enables parallel, shared-memory computations on a wide variety of unstructured grids with triangular, quadrilateral, tetrahedral and hexahedral elements. We also discuss the use of Java's inheritance mechanism in the construction of a hierarchy of physics systems objects and linear and nonlinear solver objects that simplify development and foster software re-use. Following this, we show results from example calculations and then discuss plans including the extension of the software to distributed memory computer systems.

  5. Agglomeration multigrid methods with implicit Runge-Kutta smoothers applied to aerodynamic simulations on unstructured grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langer, Stefan

    2014-11-01

    For unstructured finite volume methods an agglomeration multigrid with an implicit multistage Runge-Kutta method as a smoother is developed for solving the compressible Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations. The implicit Runge-Kutta method is interpreted as a preconditioned explicit Runge-Kutta method. The construction of the preconditioner is based on an approximate derivative. The linear systems are solved approximately with a symmetric Gauss-Seidel method. To significantly improve this solution method grid anisotropy is treated within the Gauss-Seidel iteration in such a way that the strong couplings in the linear system are resolved by tridiagonal systems constructed along these directions of strong coupling. The agglomeration strategy is adapted to this procedure by taking into account exactly these anisotropies in such a way that a directional coarsening is applied along these directions of strong coupling. Turbulence effects are included by a Spalart-Allmaras model, and the additional transport-type equation is approximately solved in a loosely coupled manner with the same method. For two-dimensional and three-dimensional numerical examples and a variety of differently generated meshes we show the wide range of applicability of the solution method. Finally, we exploit the GMRES method to determine approximate spectral information of the linearized RANS equations. This approximate spectral information is used to discuss and compare characteristics of multistage Runge-Kutta methods.

  6. A Systematic Design Method for 3-D Grid Multiscroll Chaotic Attractors and Its Circuit Implementation Employing CFOAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xianming; He, Yigang

    A systematic design method for 3-D grid multiscroll chaotic attractors by using staircase nonlinear functions (SNFs) is proposed in this paper. Equations of parameters for 3-D grid multiscroll chaotic attractors are derived in the consideration of the dynamic range for the active device and the number of multiscroll chaotic attractors. 5 × 4 and 4 × 3 of 3-D grid multiscroll chaotic attractors are generated by this method. A chaotic circuit is designed only using current feedback operational amplifiers (CFOAs). The circuit consists of three integrators and two nonlinear circuits. The parameters of the circuit are calculated by the parameters of 3-D grid multiscroll chaotic attractors. The circuit can generate 3-D grid multiscroll chaotic attractors. The central frequency of the circuit is higher with fewer active devices and simpler circuit construction for the good frequency characteristic and port characteristic of the CFOA. Numerical simulation results and the circuit simulation results show that the method is feasible and the designed circuit is correct.

  7. Functional Equivalence Acceptance Testing of FUN3D for Entry Descent and Landing Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gnoffo, Peter A.; Wood, William A.; Kleb, William L.; Alter, Stephen J.; Glass, Christopher E.; Padilla, Jose F.; Hammond, Dana P.; White, Jeffery A.

    2013-01-01

    The functional equivalence of the unstructured grid code FUN3D to the the structured grid code LAURA (Langley Aerothermodynamic Upwind Relaxation Algorithm) is documented for applications of interest to the Entry, Descent, and Landing (EDL) community. Examples from an existing suite of regression tests are used to demonstrate the functional equivalence, encompassing various thermochemical models and vehicle configurations. Algorithm modifications required for the node-based unstructured grid code (FUN3D) to reproduce functionality of the cell-centered structured code (LAURA) are also documented. Challenges associated with computation on tetrahedral grids versus computation on structured-grid derived hexahedral systems are discussed.

  8. Voronoi-cell finite difference method for accurate electronic structure calculation of polyatomic molecules on unstructured grids

    SciTech Connect

    Son, Sang-Kil

    2011-03-01

    We introduce a new numerical grid-based method on unstructured grids in the three-dimensional real-space to investigate the electronic structure of polyatomic molecules. The Voronoi-cell finite difference (VFD) method realizes a discrete Laplacian operator based on Voronoi cells and their natural neighbors, featuring high adaptivity and simplicity. To resolve multicenter Coulomb singularity in all-electron calculations of polyatomic molecules, this method utilizes highly adaptive molecular grids which consist of spherical atomic grids. It provides accurate and efficient solutions for the Schroedinger equation and the Poisson equation with the all-electron Coulomb potentials regardless of the coordinate system and the molecular symmetry. For numerical examples, we assess accuracy of the VFD method for electronic structures of one-electron polyatomic systems, and apply the method to the density-functional theory for many-electron polyatomic molecules.

  9. Flow simulations about steady-complex and unsteady moving configurations using structured-overlapped and unstructured grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, James C., III

    1995-01-01

    The limiting factor in simulating flows past realistic configurations of interest has been the discretization of the physical domain on which the governing equations of fluid flow may be solved. In an attempt to circumvent this problem, many Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) methodologies that are based on different grid generation and domain decomposition techniques have been developed. However, due to the costs involved and expertise required, very few comparative studies between these methods have been performed. In the present work, the two CFD methodologies which show the most promise for treating complex three-dimensional configurations as well as unsteady moving boundary problems are evaluated. These are namely the structured-overlapped and the unstructured grid schemes. Both methods use a cell centered, finite volume, upwind approach. The structured-overlapped algorithm uses an approximately factored, alternating direction implicit scheme to perform the time integration, whereas, the unstructured algorithm uses an explicit Runge-Kutta method. To examine the accuracy, efficiency, and limitations of each scheme, they are applied to the same steady complex multicomponent configurations and unsteady moving boundary problems. The steady complex cases consist of computing the subsonic flow about a two-dimensional high-lift multielement airfoil and the transonic flow about a three-dimensional wing/pylon/finned store assembly. The unsteady moving boundary problems are a forced pitching oscillation of an airfoil in a transonic freestream and a two-dimensional, subsonic airfoil/store separation sequence. Accuracy was accessed through the comparison of computed and experimentally measured pressure coefficient data on several of the wing/pylon/finned store assembly's components and at numerous angles-of-attack for the pitching airfoil. From this study, it was found that both the structured-overlapped and the unstructured grid schemes yielded flow solutions of

  10. Time-domain analysis of planar microstrip devices using a generalized Yee-algorithm based on unstructured grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gedney, Stephen D.; Lansing, Faiza

    1993-01-01

    The generalized Yee-algorithm is presented for the temporal full-wave analysis of planar microstrip devices. This algorithm has the significant advantage over the traditional Yee-algorithm in that it is based on unstructured and irregular grids. The robustness of the generalized Yee-algorithm is that structures that contain curved conductors or complex three-dimensional geometries can be more accurately, and much more conveniently modeled using standard automatic grid generation techniques. This generalized Yee-algorithm is based on the the time-marching solution of the discrete form of Maxwell's equations in their integral form. To this end, the electric and magnetic fields are discretized over a dual, irregular, and unstructured grid. The primary grid is assumed to be composed of general fitted polyhedra distributed throughout the volume. The secondary grid (or dual grid) is built up of the closed polyhedra whose edges connect the centroid's of adjacent primary cells, penetrating shared faces. Faraday's law and Ampere's law are used to update the fields normal to the primary and secondary grid faces, respectively. Subsequently, a correction scheme is introduced to project the normal fields onto the grid edges. It is shown that this scheme is stable, maintains second-order accuracy, and preserves the divergenceless nature of the flux densities. Finally, for computational efficiency the algorithm is structured as a series of sparse matrix-vector multiplications. Based on this scheme, the generalized Yee-algorithm has been implemented on vector and parallel high performance computers in a highly efficient manner.

  11. DynEarthSol3D: An Efficient and Flexible Unstructured Finite Element Method to Study Long-Term Tectonic Deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, E.; Choi, E.; Lavier, L. L.; Calo, V. M.

    2013-12-01

    Many tectonic problems treat the lithosphere as a compressible elastic material, which can also flow viscously or break in a brittle fashion depending on the stress level applied and the temperature conditions. We present a flexible methodology to address the resulting complex material response, which imposes severe challenges on the discretization and rheological models used. This robust, adaptive, multidimensional, finite element method solves the momentum balance and the heat equation in Lagrangian form with unstructured simplicial mesh (triangles in 2D and tetrahedra in 3D). The mesh locking problem is avoided by using averaged volumetric strain rate to update the stress. The solver uses contingent mesh adaptivity in places where shear strain is focused (localization) during remeshing. A simple scheme of mesh coarsening is employed to prevent tiny elements during remeshing. Lagrangian markers are used to track multiple compositions of rocks. The code is parallelized via OpenMP with graph coloring. We detail the solver and verify it in a number of benchmark problems against analytic and numerical solutions from the literature.

  12. Unstructured-grid coastal ocean modelling in Southern Adriatic and Northern Ionian Seas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Federico, Ivan; Pinardi, Nadia; Coppini, Giovanni; Oddo, Paolo

    2016-04-01

    The Southern Adriatic Northern Ionian coastal Forecasting System (SANIFS) is a short-term forecasting system based on unstructured grid approach. The model component is built on SHYFEM finite element three-dimensional hydrodynamic model. The operational chain exploits a downscaling approach starting from the Mediterranean oceanographic-scale model MFS (Mediterranean Forecasting System, operated by INGV). The implementation set-up has been designed to provide accurate hydrodynamics and active tracer processes in the coastal waters of Southern Eastern Italy (Apulia, Basilicata and Calabria regions), where the model is characterized by a variable resolution in range of 50-500 m. The horizontal resolution is also high in open-sea areas, where the elements size is approximately 3 km. The model is forced: (i) at the lateral open boundaries through a full nesting strategy directly with the MFS (temperature, salinity, non-tidal sea surface height and currents) and OTPS (tidal forcing) fields; (ii) at surface through two alternative atmospheric forcing datasets (ECMWF and COSMOME) via MFS-bulk-formulae. Given that the coastal fields are driven by a combination of both local/coastal and deep ocean forcings propagating along the shelf, the performance of SANIFS was verified first (i) at the large and shelf-coastal scales by comparing with a large scale CTD survey and then (ii) at the coastal-harbour scale by comparison with CTD, ADCP and tide gauge data. Sensitivity tests were performed on initialization conditions (mainly focused on spin-up procedures) and on surface boundary conditions by assessing the reliability of two alternative datasets at different horizontal resolution (12.5 and 7 km). The present work highlights how downscaling could improve the simulation of the flow field going from typical open-ocean scales of the order of several km to the coastal (and harbour) scales of tens to hundreds of meters.

  13. Verification & Validation of High-Order Short-Characteristics-Based Deterministic Transport Methodology on Unstructured Grids

    SciTech Connect

    Azmy, Yousry; Wang, Yaqi

    2013-12-20

    The research team has developed a practical, high-order, discrete-ordinates, short characteristics neutron transport code for three-dimensional configurations represented on unstructured tetrahedral grids that can be used for realistic reactor physics applications at both the assembly and core levels. This project will perform a comprehensive verification and validation of this new computational tool against both a continuous-energy Monte Carlo simulation (e.g. MCNP) and experimentally measured data, an essential prerequisite for its deployment in reactor core modeling. Verification is divided into three phases. The team will first conduct spatial mesh and expansion order refinement studies to monitor convergence of the numerical solution to reference solutions. This is quantified by convergence rates that are based on integral error norms computed from the cell-by-cell difference between the code’s numerical solution and its reference counterpart. The latter is either analytic or very fine- mesh numerical solutions from independent computational tools. For the second phase, the team will create a suite of code-independent benchmark configurations to enable testing the theoretical order of accuracy of any particular discretization of the discrete ordinates approximation of the transport equation. For each tested case (i.e. mesh and spatial approximation order), researchers will execute the code and compare the resulting numerical solution to the exact solution on a per cell basis to determine the distribution of the numerical error. The final activity comprises a comparison to continuous-energy Monte Carlo solutions for zero-power critical configuration measurements at Idaho National Laboratory’s Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). Results of this comparison will allow the investigators to distinguish between modeling errors and the above-listed discretization errors introduced by the deterministic method, and to separate the sources of uncertainty.

  14. Finite volume TVD scheme on an unstructured grid system for three-dimensional MHD simulation of inhomogeneous systems including strong background potential fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, T.

    1994-04-01

    A three-dimensional (3D) high-resolution magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulation scheme on an unstructured grid system is developed for inhomogeneous systems, including strong background potential fields. The scheme is based on the finite volume method (FVM) with an upwinding numerical flux by the linearized Riemann solver. Upwindings on an unstructured grid system are realized from the fact that the MHD equations are symmetric with the rotation of the space. The equation system is modified to avoid direct inclusions of the background potential field as a dependent variable, through the use of changed dependent variables. Despite such a change of the equation system, the eigenvectors in the mode-synthesis matrix that are necessary for the evaluation of the upwinding numerical flux vectors can still be written analytically. The eigenvalues of the MHD flux Jacobian matrix that are also necessary for the upwinding calculations are derived from the well-known Alfven, fast and slow, velocities. The calculations of the eigenvectors is done with special care when the wave propagations become parallel or perpendicular to the ambient magnetic field, because degeneration of the eigenvalues occurs in these cases. To obtain a higher order of accuracy, the upwinding flux is extended to the second-order TVD numerical flux in the calculation of FVM, through the MUSCL approach and Van Leer's differentiable limiter. In order to show the efficiency of the above scheme, a numerical example is given for the interaction process of high-beta supersonic plasma flow with the region of a strong dipole field, including magnetized low-beta plasma.

  15. True-3D accentuating of grids and streets in urban topographic maps enhances human object location memory.

    PubMed

    Edler, Dennis; Bestgen, Anne-Kathrin; Kuchinke, Lars; Dickmann, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Cognitive representations of learned map information are subject to systematic distortion errors. Map elements that divide a map surface into regions, such as content-related linear symbols (e.g. streets, rivers, railway systems) or additional artificial layers (coordinate grids), provide an orientation pattern that can help users to reduce distortions in their mental representations. In recent years, the television industry has started to establish True-3D (autostereoscopic) displays as mass media. These modern displays make it possible to watch dynamic and static images including depth illusions without additional devices, such as 3D glasses. In these images, visual details can be distributed over different positions along the depth axis. Some empirical studies of vision research provided first evidence that 3D stereoscopic content attracts higher attention and is processed faster. So far, the impact of True-3D accentuating has not yet been explored concerning spatial memory tasks and cartography. This paper reports the results of two empirical studies that focus on investigations whether True-3D accentuating of artificial, regular overlaying line features (i.e. grids) and content-related, irregular line features (i.e. highways and main streets) in official urban topographic maps (scale 1/10,000) further improves human object location memory performance. The memory performance is measured as both the percentage of correctly recalled object locations (hit rate) and the mean distances of correctly recalled objects (spatial accuracy). It is shown that the True-3D accentuating of grids (depth offset: 5 cm) significantly enhances the spatial accuracy of recalled map object locations, whereas the True-3D emphasis of streets significantly improves the hit rate of recalled map object locations. These results show the potential of True-3D displays for an improvement of the cognitive representation of learned cartographic information.

  16. GRID2D/3D: A computer program for generating grid systems in complex-shaped two- and three-dimensional spatial domains. Part 2: User's manual and program listing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, R. T.; Shih, T. I.-P.; Nguyen, H. L.; Roelke, R. J.

    1990-01-01

    An efficient computer program, called GRID2D/3D, was developed to generate single and composite grid systems within geometrically complex two- and three-dimensional (2- and 3-D) spatial domains that can deform with time. GRID2D/3D generates single grid systems by using algebraic grid generation methods based on transfinite interpolation in which the distribution of grid points within the spatial domain is controlled by stretching functions. All single grid systems generated by GRID2D/3D can have grid lines that are continuous and differentiable everywhere up to the second-order. Also, grid lines can intersect boundaries of the spatial domain orthogonally. GRID2D/3D generates composite grid systems by patching together two or more single grid systems. The patching can be discontinuous or continuous. For continuous composite grid systems, the grid lines are continuous and differentiable everywhere up to the second-order except at interfaces where different single grid systems meet. At interfaces where different single grid systems meet, the grid lines are only differentiable up to the first-order. For 2-D spatial domains, the boundary curves are described by using either cubic or tension spline interpolation. For 3-D spatial domains, the boundary surfaces are described by using either linear Coon's interpolation, bi-hyperbolic spline interpolation, or a new technique referred to as 3-D bi-directional Hermite interpolation. Since grid systems generated by algebraic methods can have grid lines that overlap one another, GRID2D/3D contains a graphics package for evaluating the grid systems generated. With the graphics package, the user can generate grid systems in an interactive manner with the grid generation part of GRID2D/3D. GRID2D/3D is written in FORTRAN 77 and can be run on any IBM PC, XT, or AT compatible computer. In order to use GRID2D/3D on workstations or mainframe computers, some minor modifications must be made in the graphics part of the program; no

  17. A Spatial Discretization Scheme for Solving the Transport Equation on Unstructured Grids of Polyhedra

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, K.G.

    2000-11-01

    In this work, we develop a new spatial discretization scheme that may be used to numerically solve the neutron transport equation. This new discretization extends the family of corner balance spatial discretizations to include spatial grids of arbitrary polyhedra. This scheme enforces balance on subcell volumes called corners. It produces a lower triangular matrix for sweeping, is algebraically linear, is non-negative in a source-free absorber, and produces a robust and accurate solution in thick diffusive regions. Using an asymptotic analysis, we design the scheme so that in thick diffusive regions it will attain the same solution as an accurate polyhedral diffusion discretization. We then refine the approximations in the scheme to reduce numerical diffusion in vacuums, and we attempt to capture a second order truncation error. After we develop this Upstream Corner Balance Linear (UCBL) discretization we analyze its characteristics in several limits. We complete a full diffusion limit analysis showing that we capture the desired diffusion discretization in optically thick and highly scattering media. We review the upstream and linear properties of our discretization and then demonstrate that our scheme captures strictly non-negative solutions in source-free purely absorbing media. We then demonstrate the minimization of numerical diffusion of a beam and then demonstrate that the scheme is, in general, first order accurate. We also note that for slab-like problems our method actually behaves like a second-order method over a range of cell thicknesses that are of practical interest. We also discuss why our scheme is first order accurate for truly 3D problems and suggest changes in the algorithm that should make it a second-order accurate scheme. Finally, we demonstrate 3D UCBL's performance on several very different test problems. We show good performance in diffusive and streaming problems. We analyze truncation error in a 3D problem and demonstrate robustness in a

  18. Development of an unstructured-grid wave-current coupled model and its application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Xingru; Yin, Baoshu; Yang, Dezhou

    2016-08-01

    An unstructured grid wave-current coupled model was developed by coupling the SWAN (Simulating Waves Nearshore) wave model and ADCIRC (Advanced Circulation model) ocean model through the Model Coupling Toolkit (MCT). The developed coupled model has high spatial resolution in the coastal area and is efficient for computation. The efficiency of the newly developed SWAN + ADCIRC model was compared with that of the widely-used SWAN + ADCIRC coupled model, in which SWAN and ADCIRC are coupled directly rather than through the MCT. Results show that the directly-coupled model is more efficient when the total number of computational cores is small, but the MCT-coupled model begin to run faster than the directly-coupled model when more computational cores are used. The MCT-coupled model maintains the scalability longer and can increase the simulation efficiency more than 35% by comparing the minimum wall clock time of one day simulation in the test runs. The MCT-coupled SWAN + ADCIRC model was used to simulate the storm surge and waves during the typhoon Usagi which formed in the western Pacific on September 17, 2013 and landed at Shanwei, China. Three numerical experiments were performed to investigate the effect of wave-current interaction on the storm surge and waves. The results show that the coupled model can better simulate the storm surge and waves when considering the wave-induced radiation stress, the wave effect on the wind stress drag coefficient and the modulation of current and water level on waves. During the typhoon Usagi, the effect of wave radiation stress could result in a maximum of 0.75 m increase in the extreme storm surge, and the wave induced wind stress could cause a -0.82∼0.48 m change of the extreme storm surge near the coastal area. Besides, the radiation stress forced currents cannot be ignored either in the study of mass transport at coastal zones. Results of this study are useful for understanding the wave-current interaction processes and

  19. VizieR Online Data Catalog: STAGGER-grid of 3D stellar models. IV. (Magic+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magic, Z.; Chiavassa, A.; Collet, R.; Asplund, M.

    2014-10-01

    We compute the emergent stellar spectra from the UV to far infrared for different viewing angles using realistic 3D model atmospheres for a large range in stellar parameters to predict the stellar limb darkening. We have computed full 3D LTE synthetic spectra based on 3D radiative hydrodynamic atmosphere models from the Stagger-grid in the ranges: Teff from 4000 to 7000K, logg from 1.5 to 5.0, and [Fe/H], from -4.0 to +0.5. From the resulting intensities at different wavelength, we derived coefficients for the standard limb darkening laws considering a number of often-used photometric filters. Furthermore, we calculated theoretical transit light curves, in order to quantify the differences between predictions by the widely used 1D model atmosphere and our 3D models. (1 data file).

  20. Exact charge-conserving scatter-gather algorithm for particle-in-cell simulations on unstructured grids: A geometric perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Haksu; Teixeira, Fernando L.; Omelchenko, Yuri A.

    2015-09-01

    We describe a charge-conserving scatter-gather algorithm for particle-in-cell simulations on unstructured grids. Charge conservation is obtained from first principles, i.e., without the need for any post-processing or correction steps. This algorithm recovers, at a fundamental level, the scatter-gather algorithms presented recently by Campos-Pinto et al. (2014) (to first-order) and by Squire et al. (2012), but it is derived here in a streamlined fashion from a geometric viewpoint. Some ingredients reflecting this viewpoint are (1) the use of (discrete) differential forms of various degrees to represent fields, currents, and charged particles and provide localization rules for the degrees of freedom thereof on the various grid elements (nodes, edges, facets), (2) use of Whitney forms as basic interpolants from discrete differential forms to continuum space, and (3) use of a Galerkin formula for the discrete Hodge star operators (i.e., "mass matrices" incorporating the metric datum of the grid) applicable to generally irregular, unstructured grids. The expressions obtained for the scatter charges and scatter currents are very concise and do not involve numerical quadrature rules. Appropriate fractional areas within each grid element are identified that represent scatter charges and scatter currents within the element, and a simple geometric representation for the (exact) charge conservation mechanism is obtained by such identification. The field update is based on the coupled first-order Maxwell's curl equations to avoid spurious modes with secular growth (otherwise present in formulations that discretize the second-order wave equation). Examples are provided to verify preservation of discrete Gauss' law for all times.

  1. Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes computation on tip clearance flow in a compressor cascade using an unstructured grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Sangmook

    2001-07-01

    A three-dimensional unstructured incompressible RANS code has been developed using artificial compressibility and Spalart-Allmaras eddy viscosity model. A node-based finite volume method is used in which all flow variables are defined at the vertices of tetrahedrons in an unstructured grid. The inviscid fluxes are computed by using the Roe's flux difference splitting method, and higher order accuracy is attained by data reconstruction based on Taylor series expansion. Gauss theorem is used to formulate necessary gradients. For time integration, an implicit scheme based on linearized Euler backward method is used. A tetrahedral unstructured grid generation code has been also developed and applied to the tip clearance flow in a highly staggered cascade. Surface grids are first generated in the flow passage and blade tip by using several triangulation methods including Delaunay triangulation, advancing front method and advancing layer method. Then the whole computational domain including tip gap region is filled with prisms using the surface grids. The code has been validated by comparisons with available computational and experimental results for several test cases: inviscid flow around NACA section, laminar and turbulent flow over a flat plate, turbulent flow through double-circular arc cascade and laminar flow through a square duct with 90° bend. Finally the code is applied to a linear cascade that has GE rotor B section with tip clearance and a high stagger angle of 56.9°. The overall structure of the tip clearance flow is well predicted. Loss of loading due to tip leakage flow and reloading due to tip leakage vortex are presented. On the end wall, separation line of the tip leakage vortex and reattachment line of passage vortex are identified. Prediction of such an interaction presents a challenge to RANS computations. The effects of blade span on the flow structure have been also investigated. Two cascades with blades of aspect ratios of 0.5 and 1.0 are

  2. DSI3D-RCS: Theory manual

    SciTech Connect

    Madsen, N.; Steich, D.; Cook, G.; Eme, B.

    1995-03-16

    The DSI3D-RCS code is designed to numerically evaluate radar cross sections on complex objects by solving Maxwell`s curl equations in the time-domain and in three space dimensions. The code has been designed to run on the new parallel processing computers as well as on conventional serial computers. The DSI3D-RCS code is unique for the following reasons: Allows the use of unstructured non-orthogonal grids, allows a variety of cell or element types, reduces to be the Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) method when orthogonal grids are used, preserves charge or divergence locally (and globally), is conditionally stable, is non-dissipative, is accurate for non-orthogonal grids. This method is derived using a Discrete Surface Integration (DSI) technique. As formulated, the DSI technique can be used with essentially arbitrary unstructured grids composed of convex polyhedral cells. This implementation of the DSI algorithm allows the use of unstructured grids that are composed of combinations of non-orthogonal hexahedrons, tetrahedrons, triangular prisms and pyramids. This algorithm reduces to the conventional FDTD method when applied on a structured orthogonal hexahedral grid.

  3. A MIMD implementation of a parallel Euler solver for unstructured grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkatakrishnan, V.; Simon, Horst D.; Barth, Timothy J.

    1992-01-01

    A mesh-vertex finite volume scheme for solving the Euler equations on triangular unstructured meshes is implemented on a MIMD (multiple instruction/multiple data stream) parallel computer. Three partitioning strategies for distributing the work load onto the processors are discussed. Issues pertaining to the communication costs are also addressed. We find that the spectral bisection strategy yields the best performance. The performance of this unstructured computation on the Intel iPSC/860 compares very favorably with that on a one-processor CRAY Y-MP/1 and an earlier implementation on the Connection Machine.

  4. 3D Discontinuous Galerkin elastic seismic wave modeling based upon a grid injection method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monteiller, V.

    2015-12-01

    Full waveform inversion (FWI) is a seismic imaging method that estimates thesub-surface physical properties with a spatial resolution of the order of thewavelength. FWI is generally recast as the iterative optimization of anobjective function that measures the distance between modeled and recordeddata. In the framework of local descent methods, FWI requires to perform atleast two seismic modelings per source and per FWI iteration.Due to the resulting computational burden, applications of elastic FWI have been usuallyrestricted to 2D geometries. Despite the continuous growth of high-performancecomputing facilities, application of 3D elastic FWI to real-scale problemsremain computationally too expensive. To perform elastic seismic modeling with a reasonable amount of time, weconsider a reduced computational domain embedded in a larger background modelin which seismic sources are located. Our aim is to compute repeatedly thefull wavefield in the targeted domain after model alteration, once theincident wavefield has been computed once for all in the background model. Toachieve this goal, we use a grid injection method referred to as the Total-Field/Scattered-Field (TF/SF) technique in theelectromagnetic community. We implemented the Total-Field/Scattered-Field approach in theDiscontinuous Galerkin Finite Element method (DG-FEM) that is used to performmodeling in the local domain. We show how to interface the DG-FEM with any modeling engine (analytical solution, finite difference or finite elements methods) that is suitable for the background simulation. One advantage of the Total-Field/Scattered-Field approach is related to thefact that the scattered wavefield instead of the full wavefield enter thePMLs, hence making more efficient the absorption of the outgoing waves at theouter edges of the computational domain. The domain reduction in which theDG-FEM is applied allows us to use modest computational resources opening theway for high-resolution imaging by full

  5. A High Order Mixed Vector Finite Element Method for Solving the Time Dependent Maxwell Equations on Unstructured Grids

    SciTech Connect

    Rieben, R N; Rodrigue, G H; White, D A

    2004-03-09

    We present a mixed vector finite element method for solving the time dependent coupled Ampere and Faraday laws of Maxwell's equations on unstructured hexahedral grids that employs high order discretization in both space and time. The method is of arbitrary order accuracy in space and up to 5th order accurate in time, making it well suited for electrically large problems where grid anisotropy and numerical dispersion have plagued other methods. In addition, the method correctly models both the jump discontinuities and the divergence-free properties of the electric and magnetic fields, is charge and energy conserving, conditionally stable, and free of spurious modes. Several computational experiments are performed to demonstrate the accuracy, efficiency and benefits of the method.

  6. Three-Dimensional Incompressible Navier-Stokes Flow Computations about Complete Configurations Using a Multiblock Unstructured Grid Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheng, Chunhua; Hyams, Daniel G.; Sreenivas, Kidambi; Gaither, J. Adam; Marcum, David L.; Whitfield, David L.

    2000-01-01

    A multiblock unstructured grid approach is presented for solving three-dimensional incompressible inviscid and viscous turbulent flows about complete configurations. The artificial compressibility form of the governing equations is solved by a node-based, finite volume implicit scheme which uses a backward Euler time discretization. Point Gauss-Seidel relaxations are used to solve the linear system of equations at each time step. This work employs a multiblock strategy to the solution procedure, which greatly improves the efficiency of the algorithm by significantly reducing the memory requirements by a factor of 5 over the single-grid algorithm while maintaining a similar convergence behavior. The numerical accuracy of solutions is assessed by comparing with the experimental data for a submarine with stem appendages and a high-lift configuration.

  7. Development of a grid generator to support 3-D multizone Navier-Stokes analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holcomb, J. E.

    1987-01-01

    A three-dimensional grid generation code has been developed to support multizone Navier-Stokes analysis of flowfields associated with complex geometries. The code includes a number of features necessary for this task, including the definition of arbitrary zonal boundary surfaces using the output from a separate surface geometry program. The interior of each zone is gridded by an efficient parabolic/elliptic partial differential equation algorithm. To test the new grid generation code, grids were successfully generated for a finned missile configuration, for a hypersonic vehicle, for a fluid dynamic vortex valve, and for a three-dimensional rocket base/nozzle/plume configuration. Navier-Stokes calculations were run on these grids, with satisfactory results. The new code is expected to provide a solid basis for the extension to optimized and solution-adaptive grid generation in the future.

  8. Improved grid-noise removal in single-frame digital moiré 3D shape measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammadi, Fatemeh; Kofman, Jonathan

    2016-11-01

    A single-frame grid-noise removal technique was developed for application in single-frame digital-moiré 3D shape measurement. The ability of the stationary wavelet transform (SWT) to prevent oscillation artifacts near discontinuities, and the ability of the Fourier transform (FFT) applied to wavelet coefficients to separate grid-noise from useful image information, were combined in a new technique, SWT-FFT, to remove grid-noise from moiré-pattern images generated by digital moiré. In comparison to previous grid-noise removal techniques in moiré, SWT-FFT avoids the requirement for mechanical translation of optical components and capture of multiple frames, to enable single-frame moiré-based measurement. Experiments using FFT, Discrete Wavelet Transform (DWT), DWT-FFT, and SWT-FFT were performed on moiré-pattern images containing grid noise, generated by digital moiré, for several test objects. SWT-FFT had the best performance in removing high-frequency grid-noise, both straight and curved lines, minimizing artifacts, and preserving the moiré pattern without blurring and degradation. SWT-FFT also had the lowest noise amplitude in the reconstructed height and lowest roughness index for all test objects, indicating best grid-noise removal in comparison to the other techniques.

  9. Compact high order finite volume method on unstructured grids I: Basic formulations and one-dimensional schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qian; Ren, Yu-Xin; Li, Wanai

    2016-06-01

    The large reconstruction stencil has been the major bottleneck problem in developing high order finite volume schemes on unstructured grids. This paper presents a compact reconstruction procedure for arbitrarily high order finite volume method on unstructured grids to overcome this shortcoming. In this procedure, a set of constitutive relations are constructed by requiring the reconstruction polynomial and its derivatives on the control volume of interest to conserve their averages on face-neighboring cells. These relations result in an over-determined linear equation system, which, in the sense of least-squares, can be reduced to a block-tridiagonal system in the one-dimensional case. The one-dimensional formulations of the reconstruction are discussed in detail and a Fourier analysis is presented to study the dispersion/dissipation and stability properties. The WBAP limiter based on the secondary reconstruction is used to suppress the non-physical oscillations near discontinuities while achieve high order accuracy in smooth regions of the solution. Numerical results demonstrate the method's high order accuracy, robustness and shock capturing capability.

  10. Modeling dam-break flows using finite volume method on unstructured grid

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two-dimensional shallow water models based on unstructured finite volume method and approximate Riemann solvers for computing the intercell fluxes have drawn growing attention because of their robustness, high adaptivity to complicated geometry and ability to simulate flows with mixed regimes and di...

  11. Geometry modeling and grid generation using 3D NURBS control volume

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Tzu-Yi; Soni, Bharat K.; Shih, Ming-Hsin

    1995-01-01

    The algorithms for volume grid generation using NURBS geometric representation are presented. The parameterization algorithm is enhanced to yield a desired physical distribution on the curve, surface and volume. This approach bridges the gap between CAD surface/volume definition and surface/volume grid generation. Computational examples associated with practical configurations have shown the utilization of these algorithms.

  12. GRIDGEN Version 1.0: a computer program for generating unstructured finite-volume grids

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lien, Jyh-Ming; Liu, Gaisheng; Langevin, Christian D.

    2015-01-01

    GRIDGEN is a computer program for creating layered quadtree grids for use with numerical models, such as the MODFLOW–USG program for simulation of groundwater flow. The program begins by reading a three-dimensional base grid, which can have variable row and column widths and spatially variable cell top and bottom elevations. From this base grid, GRIDGEN will continuously divide into four any cell intersecting user-provided refinement features (points, lines, and polygons) until the desired level of refinement is reached. GRIDGEN will then smooth, or balance, the grid so that no two adjacent cells, including overlying and underlying cells, differ by more than a user-specified level tolerance. Once these gridding processes are completed, GRIDGEN saves a tree structure file so that the layered quadtree grid can be quickly reconstructed as needed. Once a tree structure file has been created, GRIDGEN can then be used to (1) export the layered quadtree grid as a shapefile, (2) export grid connectivity and cell information as ASCII text files for use with MODFLOW–USG or other numerical models, and (3) intersect the grid with shapefiles of points, lines, or polygons, and save intersection output as ASCII text files and shapefiles. The GRIDGEN program is demonstrated by creating a layered quadtree grid for the Biscayne aquifer in Miami-Dade County, Florida, using hydrologic features to control where refinement is added.

  13. Application of FUN3D Solver for Aeroacoustics Simulation of a Nose Landing Gear Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vatsa, Veer N.; Lockard, David P.; Khorrami, Mehdi R.

    2011-01-01

    Numerical simulations have been performed for a nose landing gear configuration corresponding to the experimental tests conducted in the Basic Aerodynamic Research Tunnel at NASA Langley Research Center. A widely used unstructured grid code, FUN3D, is examined for solving the unsteady flow field associated with this configuration. A series of successively finer unstructured grids has been generated to assess the effect of grid refinement. Solutions have been obtained on purely tetrahedral grids as well as mixed element grids using hybrid RANS/LES turbulence models. The agreement of FUN3D solutions with experimental data on the same size mesh is better on mixed element grids compared to pure tetrahedral grids, and in general improves with grid refinement.

  14. Global 3D-Grids Based on Great Circle Arc QTM Sphere Octree and Its Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J. X.; Li, Y. H.; Zheng, Y. S.; Liu, J. N.

    2013-10-01

    With the development of computers, network communications, scientific computing, mapping remote sensing and geographic information technologies, Discrete Global Grids (DGGs) and Earth System Spatial Grid(ESSG)have become the integrated spatial data model facing the large-scale and global-scale problems and the complex geo-computation. This paper discusses the property and character of the global spatial data at first. Then it introduces the grid division system based on large arc QTM octree and compares this scheme with degradation octree scheme. At last, it introduces the application of the scheme in land surface, underground and aerial geographic entity modeling. The study suggests that: the grid division system based on large arc QTM octree has the potential to integrate the whole spatial data of different layers of the geospatial. And it will have a broad application prospect in complex large-scale geographic computing.

  15. On the Quality of Velocity Interpolation Schemes for Marker-In-Cell Methods on 3-D Staggered Grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaus, B.; Pusok, A. E.; Popov, A.

    2015-12-01

    The marker-in-cell method is generally considered to be a flexible and robust method to model advection of heterogenous non-diffusive properties (i.e. rock type or composition) in geodynamic problems or incompressible Stokes problems. In this method, Lagrangian points carrying compositional information are advected with the ambient velocity field on an immobile, Eulerian grid. However, velocity interpolation from grid points to marker locations is often performed without preserving the zero divergence of the velocity field at the interpolated locations (i.e. non-conservative). Such interpolation schemes can induce non-physical clustering of markers when strong velocity gradients are present (Jenny et al., 2001) and this may, eventually, result in empty grid cells, a serious numerical violation of the marker-in-cell method. Solutions to this problem include: using larger mesh resolutions and/or marker densities, or repeatedly controlling the marker distribution (i.e. inject/delete), but which does not have an established physical background. To remedy this at low computational costs, Jenny et al. (2001) and Meyer and Jenny (2004) proposed a simple, conservative velocity interpolation (CVI) scheme for 2-D staggered grid, while Wang et al. (2015) extended the formulation to 3-D finite element methods. Here, we follow up with these studies and report on the quality of velocity interpolation methods for 2-D and 3-D staggered grids. We adapt the formulations from both Jenny et al. (2001) and Wang et al. (2015) for use on 3-D staggered grids, where the velocity components have different node locations as compared to finite element, where they share the same node location. We test the different interpolation schemes (CVI and non-CVI) in combination with different advection schemes (Euler, RK2 and RK4) and with/out marker control on Stokes problems with strong velocity gradients, which are discretized using a finite difference method. We show that a conservative formulation

  16. MODFLOW–USG version 1: An unstructured grid version of MODFLOW for simulating groundwater flow and tightly coupled processes using a control volume finite-difference formulation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Panday, Sorab; Langevin, Christian D.; Niswonger, Richard G.; Ibaraki, Motomu; Hughes, Joseph D.

    2013-01-01

    A new version of MODFLOW, called MODFLOW–USG (for UnStructured Grid), was developed to support a wide variety of structured and unstructured grid types, including nested grids and grids based on prismatic triangles, rectangles, hexagons, and other cell shapes. Flexibility in grid design can be used to focus resolution along rivers and around wells, for example, or to subdiscretize individual layers to better represent hydrostratigraphic units. MODFLOW–USG is based on an underlying control volume finite difference (CVFD) formulation in which a cell can be connected to an arbitrary number of adjacent cells. To improve accuracy of the CVFD formulation for irregular grid-cell geometries or nested grids, a generalized Ghost Node Correction (GNC) Package was developed, which uses interpolated heads in the flow calculation between adjacent connected cells. MODFLOW–USG includes a Groundwater Flow (GWF) Process, based on the GWF Process in MODFLOW–2005, as well as a new Connected Linear Network (CLN) Process to simulate the effects of multi-node wells, karst conduits, and tile drains, for example. The CLN Process is tightly coupled with the GWF Process in that the equations from both processes are formulated into one matrix equation and solved simultaneously. This robustness results from using an unstructured grid with unstructured matrix storage and solution schemes. MODFLOW–USG also contains an optional Newton-Raphson formulation, based on the formulation in MODFLOW–NWT, for improving solution convergence and avoiding problems with the drying and rewetting of cells. Because the existing MODFLOW solvers were developed for structured and symmetric matrices, they were replaced with a new Sparse Matrix Solver (SMS) Package developed specifically for MODFLOW–USG. The SMS Package provides several methods for resolving nonlinearities and multiple symmetric and asymmetric linear solution schemes to solve the matrix arising from the flow equations and the Newton

  17. Improved Convergence and Robustness of USM3D Solutions on Mixed Element Grids (Invited)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pandya, Mohagna J.; Diskin, Boris; Thomas, James L.; Frink, Neal T.

    2015-01-01

    Several improvements to the mixed-element USM3D discretization and defect-correction schemes have been made. A new methodology for nonlinear iterations, called the Hierarchical Adaptive Nonlinear Iteration Scheme (HANIS), has been developed and implemented. It provides two additional hierarchies around a simple and approximate preconditioner of USM3D. The hierarchies are a matrix-free linear solver for the exact linearization of Reynolds-averaged Navier Stokes (RANS) equations and a nonlinear control of the solution update. Two variants of the new methodology are assessed on four benchmark cases, namely, a zero-pressure gradient flat plate, a bump-in-channel configuration, the NACA 0012 airfoil, and a NASA Common Research Model configuration. The new methodology provides a convergence acceleration factor of 1.4 to 13 over the baseline solver technology.

  18. Euler Technology Assessment program for preliminary aircraft design employing SPLITFLOW code with Cartesian unstructured grid method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finley, Dennis B.

    1995-01-01

    This report documents results from the Euler Technology Assessment program. The objective was to evaluate the efficacy of Euler computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes for use in preliminary aircraft design. Both the accuracy of the predictions and the rapidity of calculations were to be assessed. This portion of the study was conducted by Lockheed Fort Worth Company, using a recently developed in-house Cartesian-grid code called SPLITFLOW. The Cartesian grid technique offers several advantages for this study, including ease of volume grid generation and reduced number of cells compared to other grid schemes. SPLITFLOW also includes grid adaptation of the volume grid during the solution convergence to resolve high-gradient flow regions. This proved beneficial in resolving the large vortical structures in the flow for several configurations examined in the present study. The SPLITFLOW code predictions of the configuration forces and moments are shown to be adequate for preliminary design analysis, including predictions of sideslip effects and the effects of geometry variations at low and high angles of attack. The time required to generate the results from initial surface definition is on the order of several hours, including grid generation, which is compatible with the needs of the design environment.

  19. A low order flow/acoustics interaction method for the prediction of sound propagation using 3D adaptive hybrid grids

    SciTech Connect

    Kallinderis, Yannis; Vitsas, Panagiotis A.; Menounou, Penelope

    2012-07-15

    A low-order flow/acoustics interaction method for the prediction of sound propagation and diffraction in unsteady subsonic compressible flow using adaptive 3-D hybrid grids is investigated. The total field is decomposed into the flow field described by the Euler equations, and the acoustics part described by the Nonlinear Perturbation Equations. The method is shown capable of predicting monopole sound propagation, while employment of acoustics-guided adapted grid refinement improves the accuracy of capturing the acoustic field. Interaction of sound with solid boundaries is also examined in terms of reflection, and diffraction. Sound propagation through an unsteady flow field is examined using static and dynamic flow/acoustics coupling demonstrating the importance of the latter.

  20. An Efficient 3D Cell Culture Method on Biomimetic Nanostructured Grids

    PubMed Central

    Wolun-Cholewa, Maria; Langer, Krzysztof; Szymanowski, Krzysztof; Glodek, Aleksandra; Jankowska, Anna; Warchol, Wojciech; Langer, Jerzy

    2013-01-01

    Current techniques of in vitro cell cultures are able to mimic the in vivo environment only to a limited extent, as they enable cells to grow only in two dimensions. Therefore cell culture approaches should rely on scaffolds that provide support comparable to the extracellular matrix. Here we demonstrate the advantages of novel nanostructured three-dimensional grids fabricated using electro-spinning technique, as scaffolds for cultures of neoplastic cells. The results of the study show that the fibers allow for a dynamic growth of HeLa cells, which form multi-layer structures of symmetrical and spherical character. This indicates that the applied scaffolds are nontoxic and allow proper flow of oxygen, nutrients, and growth factors. In addition, grids have been proven to be useful in in situ examination of cells ultrastructure. PMID:24023793

  1. F-16XL Hybrid Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes/Large Eddy Simulation on Unstructured Grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Michael A.; Abdol-Hamid, Khaled S.; Elmiligui, Alaa

    2015-01-01

    This study continues the Cranked Arrow Wing Aerodynamics Program, International (CAWAPI) investigation with the FUN3D and USM3D flow solvers. CAWAPI was established to study the F-16XL, because it provides a unique opportunity to fuse fight test, wind tunnel test, and simulation to understand the aerodynamic features of swept wings. The high-lift performance of the cranked-arrow wing planform is critical for recent and past supersonic transport design concepts. Simulations of the low speed high angle of attack Flight Condition 25 are compared: Detached Eddy Simulation (DES), Modi ed Delayed Detached Eddy Simulation (MDDES), and the Spalart-Allmaras (SA) RANS model. Iso- surfaces of Q criterion show the development of coherent primary and secondary vortices on the upper surface of the wing that spiral, burst, and commingle. SA produces higher pressure peaks nearer to the leading-edge of the wing than flight test measurements. Mean DES and MDDES pressures better predict the flight test measurements, especially on the outer wing section. Vorticies and vortex-vortex interaction impact unsteady surface pressures. USM3D showed many sharp tones in volume points spectra near the wing apex with low broadband noise and FUN3D showed more broadband noise with weaker tones. Spectra of the volume points near the outer wing leading-edge was primarily broadband for both codes. Without unsteady flight measurements, the flight pressure environment can not be used to validate the simulations containing tonal or broadband spectra. Mean forces and moment are very similar between FUN3D models and between USM3D models. Spectra of the unsteady forces and moment are broadband with a few sharp peaks for USM3D.

  2. FUN3D and CFL3D Computations for the First High Lift Prediction Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Michael A.; Lee-Rausch, Elizabeth M.; Rumsey, Christopher L.

    2011-01-01

    Two Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes codes were used to compute flow over the NASA Trapezoidal Wing at high lift conditions for the 1st AIAA CFD High Lift Prediction Workshop, held in Chicago in June 2010. The unstructured-grid code FUN3D and the structured-grid code CFL3D were applied to several different grid systems. The effects of code, grid system, turbulence model, viscous term treatment, and brackets were studied. The SST model on this configuration predicted lower lift than the Spalart-Allmaras model at high angles of attack; the Spalart-Allmaras model agreed better with experiment. Neglecting viscous cross-derivative terms caused poorer prediction in the wing tip vortex region. Output-based grid adaptation was applied to the unstructured-grid solutions. The adapted grids better resolved wake structures and reduced flap flow separation, which was also observed in uniform grid refinement studies. Limitations of the adaptation method as well as areas for future improvement were identified.

  3. Portable Parallel Programming for the Dynamic Load Balancing of Unstructured Grid Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biswas, Rupak; Das, Sajal K.; Harvey, Daniel; Oliker, Leonid

    1999-01-01

    The ability to dynamically adapt an unstructured -rid (or mesh) is a powerful tool for solving computational problems with evolving physical features; however, an efficient parallel implementation is rather difficult, particularly from the view point of portability on various multiprocessor platforms We address this problem by developing PLUM, tin automatic anti architecture-independent framework for adaptive numerical computations in a message-passing environment. Portability is demonstrated by comparing performance on an SP2, an Origin2000, and a T3E, without any code modifications. We also present a general-purpose load balancer that utilizes symmetric broadcast networks (SBN) as the underlying communication pattern, with a goal to providing a global view of system loads across processors. Experiments on, an SP2 and an Origin2000 demonstrate the portability of our approach which achieves superb load balance at the cost of minimal extra overhead.

  4. Three-dimensional unstructured grid Euler method applied to turbine blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwon, Oh J.; Hah, Chunill

    1993-01-01

    Flow through a turbine annular cascade is calculated using a three-dimensional Euler method based on unstructured tetrahedral meshes. The equations are integrated in time using an explicit Runge-Kutta time-stepping scheme. The inviscid flux terms are discretized using a cell-centered finite-volume formulation with upwind flux-difference splitting. The tetrahedral meshes around the turbine blade are generated using an advancing-front technique with forced geometric periodicity between the blades. Good agreement is obtained between the present calculation and the experiment for both surface pressure distribution and flow behavior in the passage between the blades, demonstrating the capability of the present methodology for turbomachinery flow applications.

  5. The Stagger-grid: A grid of 3D stellar atmosphere models. III. The relation to mixing length convection theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magic, Z.; Weiss, A.; Asplund, M.

    2015-01-01

    Aims: We investigate the relation between 1D atmosphere models that rely on the mixing length theory and models based on full 3D radiative hydrodynamic (RHD) calculations to describe convection in the envelopes of late-type stars. Methods: The adiabatic entropy value of the deep convection zone, sbot, and the entropy jump, Δs, determined from the 3D RHD models, were matched with the mixing length parameter, αMLT, from 1D hydrostatic atmosphere models with identical microphysics (opacities and equation-of-state). We also derived the mass mixing length parameter, αm, and the vertical correlation length of the vertical velocity, C[vz,vz], directly from the 3D hydrodynamical simulations of stellar subsurface convection. Results: The calibrated mixing length parameter for the Sun is α๏MLT (Sbot) = 1.98. . For different stellar parameters, αMLT varies systematically in the range of 1.7 - 2.4. In particular, αMLT decreases towards higher effective temperature, lower surface gravity and higher metallicity. We find equivalent results for α๏MLT (ΔS). In addition, we find a tight correlation between the mixing length parameter and the inverse entropy jump. We derive an analytical expression from the hydrodynamic mean-field equations that motivates the relation to the mass mixing length parameter, αm, and find that it qualitatively shows a similar variation with stellar parameter (between 1.6 and 2.4) with the solar value of α๏m = 1.83.. The vertical correlation length scaled with the pressure scale height yields 1.71 for the Sun, but only displays a small systematic variation with stellar parameters, the correlation length slightly increases with Teff. Conclusions: We derive mixing length parameters for various stellar parameters that can be used to replace a constant value. Within any convective envelope, αm and related quantities vary strongly. Our results will help to replace a constant αMLT. Appendices are available in electronic form at http

  6. Interactions of Copepods with Fractal-Grid Generated Turbulence based on Tomo-PIV and 3D-PTV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Zhengzhong; Krizan, Daniel; Longmire, Ellen

    2014-11-01

    A copepod escapes from predation by sensing fluid motion caused by the predator. It is thought that the escape reaction is elicited by a threshold value of the maximum principal strain rate (MPSR) in the flow. The present experimental work attempts to investigate and quantify the MPSR threshold value. In the experiment, copepods interact with turbulence generated by a fractal grid in a recirculating channel. The turbulent flow is measured by time-resolved Tomo-PIV, while the copepod motion is tracked simultaneously through 3D-PTV. Escape reactions are detected based on copepod trajectories and velocity vectors, while the surrounding hydrodynamic information is retrieved from the corresponding location in the 3D instantaneous flow field. Measurements are performed at three locations downstream of the fractal grid, such that various turbulence levels can be achieved. Preliminary results show that the number of escape reactions decreases at locations with reduced turbulence levels, where shorter jump distances and smaller change of swimming orientation are exhibited. Detailed quantitative results of MPSR threshold values and the dynamics of copepod escape will be presented. Supported by NSF-IDBR Grant #0852875.

  7. Spectral (Finite) Volume Method for Conservation Laws on Unstructured Grids II: Extension to Two Dimensional Scalar Equation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Z. J.; Liu, Yen; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The framework for constructing a high-order, conservative Spectral (Finite) Volume (SV) method is presented for two-dimensional scalar hyperbolic conservation laws on unstructured triangular grids. Each triangular grid cell forms a spectral volume (SV), and the SV is further subdivided into polygonal control volumes (CVs) to supported high-order data reconstructions. Cell-averaged solutions from these CVs are used to reconstruct a high order polynomial approximation in the SV. Each CV is then updated independently with a Godunov-type finite volume method and a high-order Runge-Kutta time integration scheme. A universal reconstruction is obtained by partitioning all SVs in a geometrically similar manner. The convergence of the SV method is shown to depend on how a SV is partitioned. A criterion based on the Lebesgue constant has been developed and used successfully to determine the quality of various partitions. Symmetric, stable, and convergent linear, quadratic, and cubic SVs have been obtained, and many different types of partitions have been evaluated. The SV method is tested for both linear and non-linear model problems with and without discontinuities.

  8. An unstructured-grid finite-volume surface wave model (FVCOM-SWAVE): Implementation, validations and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Jianhua; Chen, Changsheng; Beardsley, Robert C.; Perrie, Will; Cowles, Geoffrey W.; Lai, Zhigang

    The structured-grid surface wave model SWAN (Simulating Waves Nearshore) has been converted into an unstructured-grid finite-volume version (hereafter referred to as FVCOM-SWAVE) for use in coastal ocean regions with complex irregular geometry. The implementation is made using the Flux-Corrected Transport (FCT) algorithm in frequency space, the implicit Crank-Nicolson method in directional space and options of explicit or implicit second-order upwind finite-volume schemes in geographic space. FVCOM-SWAVE is validated using four idealized benchmark test problems with emphasis on numerical dispersion, wave-current interactions, wave propagation over a varying-bathymetry shallow water region, and the basic wave grow curves. Results demonstrate that in the rectangular geometric domain, the second-order finite-volume method used in FVCOM-SWAVE has the same accuracy as the third-order finite-difference method used in SWAN. FVCOM-SWAVE was then applied to simulate wind-induced surface waves on the US northeast shelf with a central focus in the Gulf of Maine and New England Shelf. Through improved geometric fitting of the complex irregular coastline, FVCOM-SWAVE was able to robustly capture the spatial and temporal variation of surface waves in both deep and shallow regions along the US northeast coast.

  9. Comparison of publically available Moho depth and crustal thickness grids with newly derived grids by 3D gravity inversion for the High Arctic region.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebedeva-Ivanova, Nina; Gaina, Carmen; Minakov, Alexander; Kashubin, Sergey

    2016-04-01

    We derived Moho depth and crustal thickness for the High Arctic region by 3D forward and inverse gravity modelling method in the spectral domain (Minakov et al. 2012) using lithosphere thermal gravity anomaly correction (Alvey et al., 2008); a vertical density variation for the sedimentary layer and lateral crustal variation density. Recently updated grids of bathymetry (Jakobsson et al., 2012), gravity anomaly (Gaina et al, 2011) and dynamic topography (Spasojevic & Gurnis, 2012) were used as input data for the algorithm. TeMAr sedimentary thickness grid (Petrov et al., 2013) was modified according to the most recently published seismic data, and was re-gridded and utilized as input data. Other input parameters for the algorithm were calibrated using seismic crustal scale profiles. The results are numerically compared with publically available grids of the Moho depth and crustal thickness for the High Arctic region (CRUST 1 and GEMMA global grids; the deep Arctic Ocean grids by Glebovsky et al., 2013) and seismic crustal scale profiles. The global grids provide coarser resolution of 0.5-1.0 geographic degrees and not focused on the High Arctic region. Our grids better capture all main features of the region and show smaller error in relation to the seismic crustal profiles compare to CRUST 1 and GEMMA grids. Results of 3D gravity modelling by Glebovsky et al. (2013) with separated geostructures approach show also good fit with seismic profiles; however these grids cover the deep part of the Arctic Ocean only. Alvey A, Gaina C, Kusznir NJ, Torsvik TH (2008). Integrated crustal thickness mapping and plate recon-structions for the high Arctic. Earth Planet Sci Lett 274:310-321. Gaina C, Werner SC, Saltus R, Maus S (2011). Circum-Arctic mapping project: new magnetic and gravity anomaly maps of the Arctic. Geol Soc Lond Mem 35, 39-48. Glebovsky V.Yu., Astafurova E.G., Chernykh A.A., Korneva M.A., Kaminsky V.D., Poselov V.A. (2013). Thickness of the Earth's crust in the

  10. EUPDF: Eulerian Monte Carlo Probability Density Function Solver for Applications With Parallel Computing, Unstructured Grids, and Sprays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raju, M. S.

    1998-01-01

    The success of any solution methodology used in the study of gas-turbine combustor flows depends a great deal on how well it can model the various complex and rate controlling processes associated with the spray's turbulent transport, mixing, chemical kinetics, evaporation, and spreading rates, as well as convective and radiative heat transfer and other phenomena. The phenomena to be modeled, which are controlled by these processes, often strongly interact with each other at different times and locations. In particular, turbulence plays an important role in determining the rates of mass and heat transfer, chemical reactions, and evaporation in many practical combustion devices. The influence of turbulence in a diffusion flame manifests itself in several forms, ranging from the so-called wrinkled, or stretched, flamelets regime to the distributed combustion regime, depending upon how turbulence interacts with various flame scales. Conventional turbulence models have difficulty treating highly nonlinear reaction rates. A solution procedure based on the composition joint probability density function (PDF) approach holds the promise of modeling various important combustion phenomena relevant to practical combustion devices (such as extinction, blowoff limits, and emissions predictions) because it can account for nonlinear chemical reaction rates without making approximations. In an attempt to advance the state-of-the-art in multidimensional numerical methods, we at the NASA Lewis Research Center extended our previous work on the PDF method to unstructured grids, parallel computing, and sprays. EUPDF, which was developed by M.S. Raju of Nyma, Inc., was designed to be massively parallel and could easily be coupled with any existing gas-phase and/or spray solvers. EUPDF can use an unstructured mesh with mixed triangular, quadrilateral, and/or tetrahedral elements. The application of the PDF method showed favorable results when applied to several supersonic

  11. Mapping unstructured grid computations to massively parallel computers. Ph.D. Thesis - Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst., Feb. 1992

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammond, Steven Warren

    1992-01-01

    Investigated here is this mapping problem: assign the tasks of a parallel program to the processors of a parallel computer such that the execution time is minimized. First, a taxonomy of objective functions and heuristics used to solve the mapping problem is presented. Next, we develop a highly parallel heuristic mapping algorithm, called Cyclic Pairwise Exchange (CPE), and discuss its place in the taxonomy. CPE uses local pairwise exchanges of processor assignments to iteratively improve an initial mapping. A variety of initial mapping schemes are tested and recursive spectral bipartitioning (RSB) followed by CPE is shown to result in the best mappings. For the test cases studied here, problems arising in computational fluid dynamics and structural mechanics on unstructured triangular and tetrahedral meshes, RSB and CPE outperform methods based on simulated annealing. Much less time is required to do the mapping and the results obtained are better. Compared with random and naive mappings, RSB and CPE reduce the communication time two fold for the test problems used. Finally, we use CPE in two applications on a CM-2. The first application is a data parallel mesh-vertex upwind finite volume scheme for solving the Euler equations on 2-D triangular unstructured meshes. CPE is used to map grid points to processors. The performance of this code is compared with a similar code on a Cray-YMP and an Intel iPSC/860. The second application is parallel sparse matrix-vector multiplication used in the iterative solution of large sparse linear systems of equations. We map rows of the matrix to processors and use an inner-product based matrix-vector multiplication. We demonstrate that this method is an order of magnitude faster than methods based on scan operations for our test cases.

  12. Algebraic turbulence models for the computation of two-dimensional high speed flows using unstructured grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rostand, Philippe

    1988-01-01

    The incorporation of algebraic turbulence models in a solver for the 2-D compressible Navier-Stokes equations using triangular grids is described. A practical way to use the Cebeci Smith model, and to modify it in separated regions is proposed. The ability of the model to predict high speed, perfect gas boundary layers is investigated from a numerical point of view.

  13. Optimal fourth-order staggered-grid finite-difference scheme for 3D frequency-domain viscoelastic wave modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y.; Han, B.; Métivier, L.; Brossier, R.

    2016-09-01

    We investigate an optimal fourth-order staggered-grid finite-difference scheme for 3D frequency-domain viscoelastic wave modeling. An anti-lumped mass strategy is incorporated to minimize the numerical dispersion. The optimal finite-difference coefficients and the mass weighting coefficients are obtained by minimizing the misfit between the normalized phase velocities and the unity. An iterative damped least-squares method, the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm, is utilized for the optimization. Dispersion analysis shows that the optimal fourth-order scheme presents less grid dispersion and anisotropy than the conventional fourth-order scheme with respect to different Poisson's ratios. Moreover, only 3.7 grid-points per minimum shear wavelength are required to keep the error of the group velocities below 1%. The memory cost is then greatly reduced due to a coarser sampling. A parallel iterative method named CARP-CG is used to solve the large ill-conditioned linear system for the frequency-domain modeling. Validations are conducted with respect to both the analytic viscoacoustic and viscoelastic solutions. Compared with the conventional fourth-order scheme, the optimal scheme generates wavefields having smaller error under the same discretization setups. Profiles of the wavefields are presented to confirm better agreement between the optimal results and the analytic solutions.

  14. Newton-Krylov-Schwarz methods for aerodynamics problems : compressible and incompressible flows on unstructured grids.

    SciTech Connect

    Kaushik, D. K.; Keyes, D. E.; Smith, B. F.

    1999-02-24

    We review and extend to the compressible regime an earlier parallelization of an implicit incompressible unstructured Euler code [9], and solve for flow over an M6 wing in subsonic, transonic, and supersonic regimes. While the parallelization philosophy of the compressible case is identical to the incompressible, we focus here on the nonlinear and linear convergence rates, which vary in different physical regimes, and on comparing the performance of currently important computational platforms. Multiple-scale problems should be marched out at desired accuracy limits, and not held hostage to often more stringent explicit stability limits. In the context of inviscid aerodynamics, this means evolving transient computations on the scale of the convective transit time, rather than the acoustic transit time, or solving steady-state problems with local CFL numbers approaching infinity. Whether time-accurate or steady, we employ Newton's method on each (pseudo-) timestep. The coupling of analysis with design in aerodynamic practice is another motivation for implicitness. Design processes that make use of sensitivity derivatives and the Hessian matrix require operations with the Jacobian matrix of the state constraints (i.e., of the governing PDE system); if the Jacobian is available for design, it may be employed with advantage in a nonlinearly implicit analysis, as well.

  15. Development of MODFLOW-USG: an un-structured grid version of MODFLOW

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Panday, Sorab

    2013-01-01

    MODFLOW was revolutionary when it was first unveiled by the USGS in 1988, and since then it has been the most widely used groundwater flow modeling program in the world. MODFLOW’s simulation capabilities have evolved substantially since its initial release and it has been an inspiration for more comprehensive analysis simulators including surface-water/groundwater interaction models (e.g., GSFLOW, SWF, MODHMS, ISGW), flow and transport analysis simulators (e.g., MT3D, MODFLOWSURFACT, MODFLOW-T), and saltwater intrusion models (e.g., SEAWAT).

  16. Overview of the NASA Glenn Flux Reconstruction Based High-Order Unstructured Grid Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spiegel, Seth C.; DeBonis, James R.; Huynh, H. T.

    2016-01-01

    A computational fluid dynamics code based on the flux reconstruction (FR) method is currently being developed at NASA Glenn Research Center to ultimately provide a large- eddy simulation capability that is both accurate and efficient for complex aeropropulsion flows. The FR approach offers a simple and efficient method that is easy to implement and accurate to an arbitrary order on common grid cell geometries. The governing compressible Navier-Stokes equations are discretized in time using various explicit Runge-Kutta schemes, with the default being the 3-stage/3rd-order strong stability preserving scheme. The code is written in modern Fortran (i.e., Fortran 2008) and parallelization is attained through MPI for execution on distributed-memory high-performance computing systems. An h- refinement study of the isentropic Euler vortex problem is able to empirically demonstrate the capability of the FR method to achieve super-accuracy for inviscid flows. Additionally, the code is applied to the Taylor-Green vortex problem, performing numerous implicit large-eddy simulations across a range of grid resolutions and solution orders. The solution found by a pseudo-spectral code is commonly used as a reference solution to this problem, and the FR code is able to reproduce this solution using approximately the same grid resolution. Finally, an examination of the code's performance demonstrates good parallel scaling, as well as an implementation of the FR method with a computational cost/degree- of-freedom/time-step that is essentially independent of the solution order of accuracy for structured geometries.

  17. A novel 3D embedded gate field effect transistor - Screen-grid FET - Device concept and modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fobelets, K.; Ding, P. W.; Velazquez-Perez, J. E.

    2007-05-01

    A novel 3D field effect transistor on SOI - screen-grid FET (SGrFET) - is proposed and an analysis of its DC behaviour is presented by means of 2D TCAD analysis. The novel feature of the SGrFET is the design of 3D insulated gate cylinders embedded in the SOI body. This novel gate topology improves efficiency and allows great flexibility in device and gate geometry to optimize DC performance. The floating body effect is avoided and the double gating row configuration controls short channel effects. The traditional intimate relationship between gate length and source-drain distance is removed, resulting in easy control of drain induced barrier lowering, improved output conductance and ideal sub-threshold slope. The separation between the gate fingers in each row is the key factor to optimize the performance, whilst downscaling of the source-drain distance and oxide thickness is not essential from an operational point of view. The device exhibits a huge potential in low power electronics as given by an efficiency of transconductance " gm/ Id" of 39 S/A at VDS = 100 mV over a large gate voltage range and at a source-drain distance of 825 nm. We present the modelling results of the influence of gate cylinder distribution in the channel, channel doping, gate oxide thickness, gate finger distance and source-drain distance on the characteristics of the device.

  18. Automatic generation of unstructured grids with Delaunay triangulation and its application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, B.; Lin, M. J.; Tao, W. Q.

    This paper is consisted of two parts. In the first part, a method is described which generates two-dimensional triangle mesh using the Delaunay triangulation criterion. An automatic algorithm was proposed which combines several advantages of the existing methods. Local mesh refinement can also be easily performed with this method. Examples of generated grids were presented for several convex, non-convex and multi-connected domains to demonstrate the effectiveness and feasibility of the proposed method. In the second part, the turbulent heat transfer in an annular space finned by wave-like longitudinal fins was numerical simulated. The proposed technique was adopted to generate the grid in the cross-section. The standard K-ɛ model in conjuction with wall function method was used to simulate the fluid flow and heat transfer in the complex geometry. The discretization of the governing equations was described. The computational results were compared with the authors' test data and the agreement was reasonably good.

  19. Compact high order finite volume method on unstructured grids II: Extension to two-dimensional Euler equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qian; Ren, Yu-Xin; Li, Wanai

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, the compact least-squares finite volume method on unstructured grids proposed in our previous paper is extended to multi-dimensional systems, namely the two-dimensional Euler equations. The key element of this scheme is the compact least-squares reconstruction in which a set of constitutive relations are constructed by requiring the reconstruction polynomial and its spatial derivatives on the control volume of interest to conserve their averages on the face-neighboring cells. These relations result in an over-determined linear equation system. A large sparse system of linear equations is resulted by using the least-squares technique. An efficient solution strategy is of crucial importance for the application of the proposed scheme in multi-dimensional problems since both direct and iterative solvers for this system are computationally very expensive. In the present paper, it is found that in the cases of steady flow simulation and unsteady flow simulation using dual time stepping technique, the present reconstruction method can be coupled with temporal discretization scheme to achieve high computational efficiency. The WBAP limiter and a problem-independent shock detector are used in the simulation of flow with discontinuities. Numerical results demonstrate the high order accuracy, high computational efficiency and capability of handling both complex physics and geometries of the proposed schemes.

  20. Unstructured Grid Viscous Flow Simulation Over High-Speed Research Technology Concept Airplane at High-Lift Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghaffari, Farhad

    1999-01-01

    Numerical viscous solutions based on an unstructured grid methodology are presented for a candidate high-speed civil transport configuration, designated as the Technology Concept Airplane (TCA), within the High-Speed Research (HSR) program. The numerical results are obtained on a representative TCA high-lift configuration that consisted of the fuselage and the wing, with deflected full-span leading-edge and trailing-edge flaps. Typical on-and off-surface flow structures, computed at high-lift conditions appropriate for the takeoff and landing, indicated features that are generally plausible. Reasonable surface pressure correlations between the numerical results and the experimental data are obtained at free-stream Mach number M(sub infinity) = 0.25 and Reynolds number based on bar-c R(sub c) = 8 x 10(exp 6) for moderate angles of attack of 9.7 deg. and 13.5 deg. However, above and below this angle-of-attack range, the correlation between computed and measured pressure distributions starts to deteriorate over the examined angle-of-attack range. The predicted longitudinal aerodynamic characteristics are shown to correlate very well with existing experimental data across the examined angle-of-attack range. An excellent agreement is also obtained between the predicted lift-to-drag ratio and the experimental data over the examined range of flow conditions.

  1. Permafrost sub-grid heterogeneity of soil properties key for 3-D soil processes and future climate projections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beer, Christian

    2016-08-01

    There are massive carbon stocks stored in permafrost-affected soils due to the 3-D soil movement process called cryoturbation. For a reliable projection of the past, recent and future Arctic carbon balance, and hence climate, a reliable concept for representing cryoturbation in a land surface model (LSM) is required. The basis of the underlying transport processes is pedon-scale heterogeneity of soil hydrological and thermal properties as well as insulating layers, such as snow and vegetation. Today we still lack a concept of how to reliably represent pedon-scale properties and processes in a LSM. One possibility could be a statistical approach. This perspective paper demonstrates the importance of sub-grid heterogeneity in permafrost soils as a pre-requisite to implement any lateral transport parametrization. Representing such heterogeneity at the sub-pixel size of a LSM is the next logical step of model advancements. As a result of a theoretical experiment, heterogeneity of thermal and hydrological soil properties alone lead to a remarkable initial sub-grid range of subsoil temperature of 2 deg C, and active-layer thickness of 150 cm in East Siberia. These results show the way forward in representing combined lateral and vertical transport of water and soil in LSMs.

  2. A multi-moment finite volume method for incompressible Navier-Stokes equations on unstructured grids: Volume-average/point-value formulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Bin; , Satoshi, Ii; Ikebata, Akio; Xiao, Feng

    2014-11-01

    A robust and accurate finite volume method (FVM) is proposed for incompressible viscous fluid dynamics on triangular and tetrahedral unstructured grids. Differently from conventional FVM where the volume integrated average (VIA) value is the only computational variable, the present formulation treats both VIA and the point value (PV) as the computational variables which are updated separately at each time step. The VIA is computed from a finite volume scheme of flux form, and is thus numerically conservative. The PV is updated from the differential form of the governing equation that does not have to be conservative but can be solved in a very efficient way. Including PV as the additional variable enables us to make higher-order reconstructions over compact mesh stencil to improve the accuracy, and moreover, the resulting numerical model is more robust for unstructured grids. We present the numerical formulations in both two and three dimensions on triangular and tetrahedral mesh elements. Numerical results of several benchmark tests are also presented to verify the proposed numerical method as an accurate and robust solver for incompressible flows on unstructured grids.

  3. The National Grid Project: A system overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaither, Adam; Gaither, Kelly; Jean, Brian; Remotigue, Michael; Whitmire, John; Soni, Bharat; Thompson, Joe; Dannenhoffer,, John; Weatherill, Nigel

    1995-01-01

    The National Grid Project (NGP) is a comprehensive numerical grid generation software system that is being developed at the National Science Foundation (NSF) Engineering Research Center (ERC) for Computational Field Simulation (CFS) at Mississippi State University (MSU). NGP is supported by a coalition of U.S. industries and federal laboratories. The objective of the NGP is to significantly decrease the amount of time it takes to generate a numerical grid for complex geometries and to increase the quality of these grids to enable computational field simulations for applications in industry. A geometric configuration can be discretized into grids (or meshes) that have two fundamental forms: structured and unstructured. Structured grids are formed by intersecting curvilinear coordinate lines and are composed of quadrilateral (2D) and hexahedral (3D) logically rectangular cells. The connectivity of a structured grid provides for trivial identification of neighboring points by incrementing coordinate indices. Unstructured grids are composed of cells of any shape (commonly triangles, quadrilaterals, tetrahedra and hexahedra), but do not have trivial identification of neighbors by incrementing an index. For unstructured grids, a set of points and an associated connectivity table is generated to define unstructured cell shapes and neighboring points. Hybrid grids are a combination of structured grids and unstructured grids. Chimera (overset) grids are intersecting or overlapping structured grids. The NGP system currently provides a user interface that integrates both 2D and 3D structured and unstructured grid generation, a solid modeling topology data management system, an internal Computer Aided Design (CAD) system based on Non-Uniform Rational B-Splines (NURBS), a journaling language, and a grid/solution visualization system.

  4. Comparison of NACA 0012 Laminar Flow Solutions: Structured and Unstructured Grid Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swanson, R. C.; Langer, S.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we consider the solution of the compressible Navier-Stokes equations for a class of laminar airfoil flows. The principal objective of this paper is to demonstrate that members of this class of laminar flows have steady-state solutions. These laminar airfoil flow cases are often used to evaluate accuracy, stability and convergence of numerical solution algorithms for the Navier-Stokes equations. In recent years, such flows have also been used as test cases for high-order numerical schemes. While generally consistent steady-state solutions have been obtained for these flows using higher order schemes, a number of results have been published with various solutions, including unsteady ones. We demonstrate with two different numerical methods and a range of meshes with a maximum density that exceeds 8 × 106 grid points that steady-state solutions are obtained. Furthermore, numerical evidence is presented that even when solving the equations with an unsteady algorithm, one obtains steady-state solutions.

  5. An implicit numerical scheme for the simulation of internal viscous flows on unstructured grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jorgenson, Philip C. E.; Pletcher, Richard H.

    1994-01-01

    The Navier-Stokes equations are solved numerically for two-dimensional steady viscous laminar flows. The grids are generated based on the method of Delaunay triangulation. A finite-volume approach is used to discretize the conservation law form of the compressible flow equations written in terms of primitive variables. A preconditioning matrix is added to the equations so that low Mach number flows can be solved economically. The equations are time marched using either an implicit Gauss-Seidel iterative procedure or a solver based on a conjugate gradient like method. A four color scheme is employed to vectorize the block Gauss-Seidel relaxation procedure. This increases the memory requirements minimally and decreases the computer time spent solving the resulting system of equations substantially. A factor of 7.6 speed up in the matrix solver is typical for the viscous equations. Numerical results are obtained for inviscid flow over a bump in a channel at subsonic and transonic conditions for validation with structured solvers. Viscous results are computed for developing flow in a channel, a symmetric sudden expansion, periodic tandem cylinders in a cross-flow, and a four-port valve. Comparisons are made with available results obtained by other investigators.

  6. Oscillation-Free Methods for Modeling Fluid-Porous Interfaces Using Segregated Solvers on Unstructured Grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanic, Milos; Nordlund, Markus; Kuczaj, Arkadiusz; Frederix, Edoardo; Geurts, Bernard

    2014-11-01

    Porous media flows can be found in a large number of fields ranging from engineering to medical applications. A volume-averaged approach to simulating porous media is often used because of its practicality and computational efficiency. Derivation of the volume-averaged porous flow equations introduces additional porous resistance terms to the momentum equation. When discretized these porous resistance terms create a body force discontinuity at the porous-fluid interface, which may lead to spurious oscillations if not accounted for properly. A variety of numerical techniques has been proposed to solve this problem, but few of them have concentrated on collocated grids and segregated solvers, which have wide applications in academia and industry. In this work we discuss the source of the spurious oscillations, quantify their amplitude and apply interface treatments methods that successfully remove the oscillations. The interface treatment methods are tested in a variety of realistic scenarios, including the porous plug and Beaver-Joseph test cases and show excellent results, minimizing or entirely removing the spurious oscillations at the porous-fluid interface. This research was financially supported by Philip Morris Products S.A.

  7. Consistent finite-volume discretization of hydrodynamic conservation laws for unstructured grids

    SciTech Connect

    Burton, D.E.

    1994-10-17

    We consider the conservation properties of a staggered-grid Lagrange formulation of the hydrodynamics equations (SGH). Hydrodynamics algorithms are often formulated in a relatively ad hoc manner in which independent discretizations are proposed for mass, momentum, energy, and so forth. We show that, once discretizations for mass and momentum are stated, the remaining discretizations are very nearly uniquely determined, so there is very little latitude for variation. As has been known for some time, the kinetic energy discretization must follow directly from the momentum equation; and the internal energy must follow directly from the energy currents affecting the kinetic energy. A fundamental requirement (termed isentropicity) for numerical hydrodynamics algorithms is the ability to remain on an isentrope in the absence of heating or viscous forces and in the limit of small timesteps. We show that the requirements of energy conservation and isentropicity lead to the replacement of the usual volume calculation with a conservation integral. They further forbid the use of higher order functional representations for either velocity or stress within zones or control volumes, forcing the use of a constant stress element and a constant velocity control volume. This, in turn, causes the point and zone coordinates to formally disappear from the Cartesian formulation. The form of the work equations and the requirement for dissipation by viscous forces strongly limits the possible algebraic forms for artificial viscosity. The momentum equation and a center-of-mass definition lead directly to an angular momentum conservation law that is satisfied by the system. With a few straightforward substitutions, the Cartesian formulation can be converted to a multidimensional curvilinear one. The formulation in 2D symmetric geometry preserves rotational symmetry.

  8. Vertical Scan (V-SCAN) for 3-D Grid Adaptive Mesh Refinement for an atmospheric Model Dynamical Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andronova, N. G.; Vandenberg, D.; Oehmke, R.; Stout, Q. F.; Penner, J. E.

    2009-12-01

    One of the major building blocks of a rigorous representation of cloud evolution in global atmospheric models is a parallel adaptive grid MPI-based communication library (an Adaptive Blocks for Locally Cartesian Topologies library -- ABLCarT), which manages the block-structured data layout, handles ghost cell updates among neighboring blocks and splits a block as refinements occur. The library has several modules that provide a layer of abstraction for adaptive refinement: blocks, which contain individual cells of user data; shells - the global geometry for the problem, including a sphere, reduced sphere, and now a 3D sphere; a load balancer for placement of blocks onto processors; and a communication support layer which encapsulates all data movement. A major performance concern with adaptive mesh refinement is how to represent calculations that have need to be sequenced in a particular order in a direction, such as calculating integrals along a specific path (e.g. atmospheric pressure or geopotential in the vertical dimension). This concern is compounded if the blocks have varying levels of refinement, or are scattered across different processors, as can be the case in parallel computing. In this paper we describe an implementation in ABLCarT of a vertical scan operation, which allows computing along vertical paths in the correct order across blocks transparent to their resolution and processor location. We test this functionality on a 2D and a 3D advection problem, which tests the performance of the model’s dynamics (transport) and physics (sources and sinks) for different model resolutions needed for inclusion of cloud formation.

  9. Towards a coastal ocean forecasting system in Southern Adriatic Northern Ionian seas based on unstructured-grid model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Federico, Ivan; Oddo, Paolo; Pinardi, Nadia; Coppini, Giovanni

    2014-05-01

    The Southern Adriatic Northern Ionian Forecasting System (SANIFS) operational chain is based on a nesting approach. The large scale model for the entire Mediterranean basin (MFS, Mediterranean Forecasting system, operated by INGV, e.g. Tonani et al. 2008, Oddo et al. 2009) provides lateral open boundary conditions to the regional model for Adriatic and Ionian seas (AIFS, Adriatic Ionian Forecasting System) which provides the open-sea fields (initial conditions and lateral open boundary conditions) to SANIFS. The latter, here presented, is a coastal ocean model based on SHYFEM (Shallow HYdrodynamics Finite Element Model) code, which is an unstructured grid, finite element three-dimensional hydrodynamic model (e.g. Umgiesser et al., 2004, Ferrarin et al., 2013). The SANIFS hydrodynamic model component has been designed to provide accurate information of hydrodynamics and active tracer fields in the coastal waters of Southern Eastern Italy (Apulia, Basilicata and Calabria regions), where the model is characterized by a resolution of about of 200-500 m. The horizontal resolution is also accurate in open-sea areas, where the elements size is approximately 3 km. During the development phase the model has been initialized and forced at the lateral open boundaries through a full nesting strategy directly with the MFS fields. The heat fluxes has been computed by bulk formulae using as input data the operational analyses of European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts. Short range pre-operational forecast tests have been performed in different seasons to evaluate the robustness of the implemented model in different oceanographic conditions. Model results are validated by means of comparison with MFS operational results and observations. The model is able to reproduce the large-scale oceanographic structures of the area (keeping similar structures of MFS in open sea), while in the coastal area significant improvements in terms of reproduced structures and dynamics are

  10. A hybrid reconstructed discontinuous Galerkin and continuous Galerkin finite element method for incompressible flows on unstructured grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandare, Aditya K.; Luo, Hong

    2016-10-01

    A hybrid reconstructed discontinuous Galerkin and continuous Galerkin method based on an incremental pressure projection formulation, termed rDG (PnPm) + CG (Pn) in this paper, is developed for solving the unsteady incompressible Navier-Stokes equations on unstructured grids. In this method, a reconstructed discontinuous Galerkin method (rDG (PnPm)) is used to discretize the velocity and a standard continuous Galerkin method (CG (Pn)) is used to approximate the pressure. The rDG (PnPm) + CG (Pn) method is designed to increase the accuracy of the hybrid DG (Pn) + CG (Pn) method and yet still satisfy Ladyženskaja-Babuška-Brezzi (LBB) condition, thus avoiding the pressure checkerboard instability. An upwind method is used to discretize the nonlinear convective fluxes in the momentum equations in order to suppress spurious oscillations in the velocity field. A number of incompressible flow problems for a variety of flow conditions are computed to numerically assess the spatial order of convergence of the rDG (PnPm) + CG (Pn) method. The numerical experiments indicate that both rDG (P0P1) + CG (P1) and rDG (P1P2) + CG (P1) methods can attain the designed 2nd order and 3rd order accuracy in space for the velocity respectively. Moreover, the 3rd order rDG (P1P2) + CG (P1) method significantly outperforms its 2nd order rDG (P0P1) + CG (P1) and rDG (P1P1) + CG (P1) counterparts: being able to not only increase the accuracy of the velocity by one order but also improve the accuracy of the pressure.

  11. The Stagger-grid: A grid of 3D stellar atmosphere models. II. Horizontal and temporal averaging and spectral line formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magic, Z.; Collet, R.; Hayek, W.; Asplund, M.

    2013-12-01

    Aims: We study the implications of averaging methods with different reference depth scales for 3D hydrodynamical model atmospheres computed with the Stagger-code. The temporally and spatially averaged (hereafter denoted as ⟨3D⟩) models are explored in the light of local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) spectral line formation by comparing spectrum calculations using full 3D atmosphere structures with those from ⟨3D⟩ averages. Methods: We explored methods for computing mean ⟨3D⟩ stratifications from the Stagger-grid time-dependent 3D radiative hydrodynamical atmosphere models by considering four different reference depth scales (geometrical depth, column-mass density, and two optical depth scales). Furthermore, we investigated the influence of alternative averages (logarithmic, enforced hydrostatic equilibrium, flux-weighted temperatures). For the line formation we computed curves of growth for Fe i and Fe ii lines in LTE. Results: The resulting ⟨3D⟩ stratifications for the four reference depth scales can be very different. We typically find that in the upper atmosphere and in the superadiabatic region just below the optical surface, where the temperature and density fluctuations are highest, the differences become considerable and increase for higher Teff, lower log g, and lower [Fe / H]. The differential comparison of spectral line formation shows distinctive differences depending on which ⟨3D⟩ model is applied. The averages over layers of constant column-mass density yield the best mean ⟨3D⟩ representation of the full 3D models for LTE line formation, while the averages on layers at constant geometrical height are the least appropriate. Unexpectedly, the usually preferred averages over layers of constant optical depth are prone to increasing interference by reversed granulation towards higher effective temperature, in particular at low metallicity. Appendix A is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.orgMean ⟨3D⟩ models are

  12. Hypocenter relocation using a fast grid search method and a 3-D seismic velocity model for the Sumatra region

    SciTech Connect

    Nugroho, Hendro; Widiyantoro, Sri; Nugraha, Andri Dian

    2013-09-09

    Determination of earthquake hypocenter in Indonesia conducted by the Meteorological, Climatological, and Geophysical Agency (MCGA) has still used a 1-D seismic velocity model. In this research, we have applied a Fast Grid Search (FGM) method and a 3-D velocity model resulting from tomographic imaging to relocate earthquakes in the Sumatran region. The data were taken from the MCGA data catalog from 2009 to 2011 comprising of subduction zone and on land fault earthquakes with magnitude greater than 4 Mw. Our preliminary results show some significant changes in the depths of the relocated earthquakes which are in general deeper than the depths of hypocenters from the MCGA data catalog. The residual times resulting from the relocation process are smaller than those prior to the relocation. Encouraged by these results, we will continue to conduct hypocenter relocation for all events from the MCGA data catalog periodically in order to produce a new data catalog with good quality. We hope that the new data catalog will be useful for further studies.

  13. An adaptive grid method for computing the high speed 3D viscous flow about a re-entry vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bockelie, Michael J.; Smith, Robert E.

    1992-01-01

    An algebraic solution adaptive grid generation method that allows adapting the grid in all three coordinate directions is presented. Techniques are described that maintain the integrity of the original vehicle definition for grid point movement on the vehicle surface and that avoid grid cross over in the boundary layer portion of the grid lying next to the vehicle surface. The adaptive method is tested by computing the Mach 6 hypersonic three dimensional viscous flow about a proposed Martian entry vehicle.

  14. Collocated approximations on unstructured grids: a comparison between General Finite Differences (GFD), Moving Least Squares (MLS), and Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasyliv, Yaroslav; Alexeev, Alexander

    2015-11-01

    In the meshfree family of methods, partial differential equations are solved on unstructured grids where a search radius establishes an implicit nodal connectivity used to determine whether to include or exclude neighboring nodes in the constructed approximation. Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) is widely attributed to be the eldest of the meshfree methods dating back to an astrophysics paper published in 1977 by Gingold and Monaghan. However, beating them by five years was Jensen when he published Finite Differences for Arbitrary Grids (FIDAG) in 1972. Ultimately this work and others were generalized by Liszka and Orkisz in 1979 as a weighted least squares formulation solving for the Taylor coefficients and is now commonly known as General Finite Differences (GFD). Shortly after in 1981, Lancaster and Salkauskas introduced the Moving Least Squares (MLS) approximation for surface reconstruction using a weighted least squares formulation where the unknown coefficients are treated as functions varying from node to node in the support domain. Here we examine important differences, similarities and limitations of each method by solving the 2D Poisson equation on unstructured grids. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship under Grant No. DGE-1148903.

  15. A dynamic mixed subgrid-scale model for large eddy simulation on unstructured grids: application to turbulent pipe flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lampitella, P.; Colombo, E.; Inzoli, F.

    2014-04-01

    The paper presents a consistent large eddy simulation (LES) framework which is particularly suited for implicitly filtered LES with unstructured finite volume (FV) codes. From the analysis of the subgrid-scale (SGS) stress tensor arising in this new LES formulation, a novel form of scale-similar SGS model is proposed and combined with a classical eddy viscosity term. The constants in the resulting mixed model are then computed trough a new, cheaper, dynamic procedure based on a consistent redefinition of the Germano identity within the new LES framework. The dynamic mixed model is implemented in a commercial, unstructured, finite volume solver and numerical tests are performed on the turbulent pipe flow at Reτ = 320-1142, showing the flexibility and improvements of the approach over classical modeling strategies. Some limitations of the proposed implementation are also highlighted.

  16. On Bi-Grid Local Mode Analysis of Solution Techniques for 3-D Euler and Navier-Stokes Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ibraheem, S. O.; Demuren, A. O.

    1994-01-01

    A procedure is presented for utilizing a bi-grid stability analysis as a practical tool for predicting multigrid performance in a range of numerical methods for solving Euler and Navier-Stokes equations. Model problems based on the convection, diffusion and Burger's equation are used to illustrate the superiority of the bi-grid analysis as a predictive tool for multigrid performance in comparison to the smoothing factor derived from conventional von Neumann analysis. For the Euler equations, bi-grid analysis is presented for three upwind difference based factorizations, namely Spatial, Eigenvalue and Combination splits, and two central difference based factorizations, namely LU and ADI methods. In the former, both the Steger-Warming and van Leer flux-vector splitting methods are considered. For the Navier-Stokes equations, only the Beam-Warming (ADI) central difference scheme is considered. In each case, estimates of multigrid convergence rates from the bi-grid analysis are compared to smoothing factors obtained from single-grid stability analysis. Effects of grid aspect ratio and flow skewness are examined. Both predictions are compared with practical multigrid convergence rates for 2-D Euler and Navier-Stokes solutions based on the Beam-Warming central scheme.

  17. Static Aeroelastic Predictions for a Transonic Transport Model Using an Unstructured-Grid Flow Solver Coupled With a Structural Plate Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allison, Dennis O.; Cavallo, Peter A.

    2003-01-01

    An equivalent-plate structural deformation technique was coupled with a steady-state unstructured-grid three-dimensional Euler flow solver and a two-dimensional strip interactive boundary-layer technique. The objective of the research was to assess the extent to which a simple accounting for static model deformations could improve correlations with measured wing pressure distributions and lift coefficients at transonic speeds. Results were computed and compared to test data for a wing-fuselage model of a generic low-wing transonic transport at a transonic cruise condition over a range of Reynolds numbers and dynamic pressures. The deformations significantly improved correlations with measured wing pressure distributions and lift coefficients. This method provided a means of quantifying the role of dynamic pressure in wind-tunnel studies of Reynolds number effects for transonic transport models.

  18. A multi-grid code for 3-D transonic potential flow about axisymmetric inlets at angle of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccarthy, D. R.; Reyhner, T. A.

    1980-01-01

    In the present work, an existing transonic potential code is adapted to utilize the Multiple Level Adaptive technique proposed by A. Brandt. It is shown that order of magnitude improvements in speed and greatly improved accuracy over the unmodified code are achieved. Consideration is given to the difficulties of multi-grid programming, and possible future applications are surveyed.

  19. Lithological 3D grid model of the Vuonos area built by using geostatistical simulation honoring the 3D fault model and structural trends of the Outokumpu association rocks in Eastern Finland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laine, Eevaliisa

    2015-04-01

    The Outokumpu mining district - a metallogenic province about 100 km long x 60 km wide - hosts a Palaeoproterozoic sulfide deposit characterized by an unusual lithological association. It is located in the North Karelia Schist Belt , which was thrust on the late Archaean gneissic-granitoid basement of the Karelian craton during the early stages of the Svecofennian Orogeny between 1.92 and 1.87 Ga (Koistinen 1981). Two major tectono-stratigraphic units can be distinguished, a lower, parautochthonous 'Lower Kaleva' unit and an upper, allochthonous 'upper Kaleva' unit or 'Outokumpu allochthon'. The latter consists of tightly-folded deep marine turbiditic mica schists and metagraywackes containing intercalations of black schist, and the Outo¬kumpu assemblage, which comprises ca. 1950 Ma old, serpentinized peridotites surrounded by carbonate-calc-silicate ('skarn')-quartz rocks. The ore body is enclosed in the Outokumpu assemblage, which is thought to be part of a disrupted and incomplete ophiolite complex (Vuollo & Piirainen 1989) that can be traced to the Kainuu schist belt further north where the well-preserved Jormua ophiolite is ex¬posed (Kontinen 1987, Peltonen & Kontinen 2004). Outokumpu can be divided into blocks divided by faults and shear zones (Saalmann and Laine, 2014). The aim of this study was to make a 3D lithological model of a small part of the Outokumpu association rocks in the Vuonos area honoring the 3D fault model built by Saalmann and Laine (2014). The Vuonos study area is also a part of the Outokumpu mining camp area (Aatos et al. 2013, 2014). Fault and shear structures was used in geostatistical gridding and simulation of the lithologies. Several possible realizations of the structural grids, conforming the main lithological trends were built. Accordingly, it was possible to build a 3D structural grid containing information of the distribution of the possible lithologies and an estimation the associated uncertainties. References: Aatos, S

  20. Unstructured hexahedral mesh generation of complex vascular trees using a multi-block grid-based approach.

    PubMed

    Bols, Joris; Taelman, L; De Santis, G; Degroote, J; Verhegghe, B; Segers, P; Vierendeels, J

    2016-01-01

    The trend towards realistic numerical models of (pathologic) patient-specific vascular structures brings along larger computational domains and more complex geometries, increasing both the computation time and the operator time. Hexahedral grids effectively lower the computational run time and the required computational infrastructure, but at high cost in terms of operator time and minimal cell quality, especially when the computational analyses are targeting complex geometries such as aneurysm necks, severe stenoses and bifurcations. Moreover, such grids generally do not allow local refinements. As an attempt to overcome these limitations, a novel approach to hexahedral meshing is proposed in this paper, which combines the automated generation of multi-block structures with a grid-based method. The robustness of the novel approach is tested on common complex geometries, such as tree-like structures (including trifurcations), stenoses, and aneurysms. Additionally, the performance of the generated grid is assessed using two numerical examples. In the first example, a grid sensitivity analysis is performed for blood flow simulated in an abdominal mouse aorta and compared to tetrahedral grids with a prismatic boundary layer. In the second example, the fluid-structure interaction in a model of an aorta with aortic coarctation is simulated and the effect of local grid refinement is analyzed. PMID:26208183

  1. Unstructured hexahedral mesh generation of complex vascular trees using a multi-block grid-based approach.

    PubMed

    Bols, Joris; Taelman, L; De Santis, G; Degroote, J; Verhegghe, B; Segers, P; Vierendeels, J

    2016-01-01

    The trend towards realistic numerical models of (pathologic) patient-specific vascular structures brings along larger computational domains and more complex geometries, increasing both the computation time and the operator time. Hexahedral grids effectively lower the computational run time and the required computational infrastructure, but at high cost in terms of operator time and minimal cell quality, especially when the computational analyses are targeting complex geometries such as aneurysm necks, severe stenoses and bifurcations. Moreover, such grids generally do not allow local refinements. As an attempt to overcome these limitations, a novel approach to hexahedral meshing is proposed in this paper, which combines the automated generation of multi-block structures with a grid-based method. The robustness of the novel approach is tested on common complex geometries, such as tree-like structures (including trifurcations), stenoses, and aneurysms. Additionally, the performance of the generated grid is assessed using two numerical examples. In the first example, a grid sensitivity analysis is performed for blood flow simulated in an abdominal mouse aorta and compared to tetrahedral grids with a prismatic boundary layer. In the second example, the fluid-structure interaction in a model of an aorta with aortic coarctation is simulated and the effect of local grid refinement is analyzed.

  2. Euler Technology Assessment for Preliminary Aircraft Design: Compressibility Predictions by Employing the Cartesian Unstructured Grid SPLITFLOW Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finley, Dennis B.; Karman, Steve L., Jr.

    1996-01-01

    The objective of the second phase of the Euler Technology Assessment program was to evaluate the ability of Euler computational fluid dynamics codes to predict compressible flow effects over a generic fighter wind tunnel model. This portion of the study was conducted by Lockheed Martin Tactical Aircraft Systems, using an in-house Cartesian-grid code called SPLITFLOW. The Cartesian grid technique offers several advantages, including ease of volume grid generation and reduced number of cells compared to other grid schemes. SPLITFLOW also includes grid adaption of the volume grid during the solution to resolve high-gradient regions. The SPLITFLOW code predictions of configuration forces and moments are shown to be adequate for preliminary design, including predictions of sideslip effects and the effects of geometry variations at low and high angles-of-attack. The transonic pressure prediction capabilities of SPLITFLOW are shown to be improved over subsonic comparisons. The time required to generate the results from initial surface data is on the order of several hours, including grid generation, which is compatible with the needs of the design environment.

  3. Calculation of three-dimensional (3-D) internal flow by means of the velocity-vorticity formulation on a staggered grid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stremel, Paul M.

    1995-01-01

    A method has been developed to accurately compute the viscous flow in three-dimensional (3-D) enclosures. This method is the 3-D extension of a two-dimensional (2-D) method developed for the calculation of flow over airfoils. The 2-D method has been tested extensively and has been shown to accurately reproduce experimental results. As in the 2-D method, the 3-D method provides for the non-iterative solution of the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations by means of a fully coupled implicit technique. The solution is calculated on a body fitted computational mesh incorporating a staggered grid methodology. In the staggered grid method, the three components of vorticity are defined at the centers of the computational cell sides, while the velocity components are defined as normal vectors at the centers of the computational cell faces. The staggered grid orientation provides for the accurate definition of the vorticity components at the vorticity locations, the divergence of vorticity at the mesh cell nodes and the conservation of mass at the mesh cell centers. The solution is obtained by utilizing a fractional step solution technique in the three coordinate directions. The boundary conditions for the vorticity and velocity are calculated implicitly as part of the solution. The method provides for the non-iterative solution of the flow field and satisfies the conservation of mass and divergence of vorticity to machine zero at each time step. To test the method, the calculation of simple driven cavity flows have been computed. The driven cavity flow is defined as the flow in an enclosure driven by a moving upper plate at the top of the enclosure. To demonstrate the ability of the method to predict the flow in arbitrary cavities, results will he shown for both cubic and curved cavities.

  4. More IMPATIENT: A Gridding-Accelerated Toeplitz-based Strategy for Non-Cartesian High-Resolution 3D MRI on GPUs

    PubMed Central

    Gai, Jiading; Obeid, Nady; Holtrop, Joseph L.; Wu, Xiao-Long; Lam, Fan; Fu, Maojing; Haldar, Justin P.; Hwu, Wen-mei W.; Liang, Zhi-Pei; Sutton, Bradley P.

    2013-01-01

    Several recent methods have been proposed to obtain significant speed-ups in MRI image reconstruction by leveraging the computational power of GPUs. Previously, we implemented a GPU-based image reconstruction technique called the Illinois Massively Parallel Acquisition Toolkit for Image reconstruction with ENhanced Throughput in MRI (IMPATIENT MRI) for reconstructing data collected along arbitrary 3D trajectories. In this paper, we improve IMPATIENT by removing computational bottlenecks by using a gridding approach to accelerate the computation of various data structures needed by the previous routine. Further, we enhance the routine with capabilities for off-resonance correction and multi-sensor parallel imaging reconstruction. Through implementation of optimized gridding into our iterative reconstruction scheme, speed-ups of more than a factor of 200 are provided in the improved GPU implementation compared to the previous accelerated GPU code. PMID:23682203

  5. More IMPATIENT: A Gridding-Accelerated Toeplitz-based Strategy for Non-Cartesian High-Resolution 3D MRI on GPUs.

    PubMed

    Gai, Jiading; Obeid, Nady; Holtrop, Joseph L; Wu, Xiao-Long; Lam, Fan; Fu, Maojing; Haldar, Justin P; Hwu, Wen-Mei W; Liang, Zhi-Pei; Sutton, Bradley P

    2013-05-01

    Several recent methods have been proposed to obtain significant speed-ups in MRI image reconstruction by leveraging the computational power of GPUs. Previously, we implemented a GPU-based image reconstruction technique called the Illinois Massively Parallel Acquisition Toolkit for Image reconstruction with ENhanced Throughput in MRI (IMPATIENT MRI) for reconstructing data collected along arbitrary 3D trajectories. In this paper, we improve IMPATIENT by removing computational bottlenecks by using a gridding approach to accelerate the computation of various data structures needed by the previous routine. Further, we enhance the routine with capabilities for off-resonance correction and multi-sensor parallel imaging reconstruction. Through implementation of optimized gridding into our iterative reconstruction scheme, speed-ups of more than a factor of 200 are provided in the improved GPU implementation compared to the previous accelerated GPU code. PMID:23682203

  6. Transonic Drag Prediction Using an Unstructured Multigrid Solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mavriplis, D. J.; Levy, David W.

    2001-01-01

    This paper summarizes the results obtained with the NSU-3D unstructured multigrid solver for the AIAA Drag Prediction Workshop held in Anaheim, CA, June 2001. The test case for the workshop consists of a wing-body configuration at transonic flow conditions. Flow analyses for a complete test matrix of lift coefficient values and Mach numbers at a constant Reynolds number are performed, thus producing a set of drag polars and drag rise curves which are compared with experimental data. Results were obtained independently by both authors using an identical baseline grid and different refined grids. Most cases were run in parallel on commodity cluster-type machines while the largest cases were run on an SGI Origin machine using 128 processors. The objective of this paper is to study the accuracy of the subject unstructured grid solver for predicting drag in the transonic cruise regime, to assess the efficiency of the method in terms of convergence, cpu time, and memory, and to determine the effects of grid resolution on this predictive ability and its computational efficiency. A good predictive ability is demonstrated over a wide range of conditions, although accuracy was found to degrade for cases at higher Mach numbers and lift values where increasing amounts of flow separation occur. The ability to rapidly compute large numbers of cases at varying flow conditions using an unstructured solver on inexpensive clusters of commodity computers is also demonstrated.

  7. Finite Volume schemes on unstructured grids for non-local models: Application to the simulation of heat transport in plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Goudon, Thierry; Parisot, Martin

    2012-10-15

    In the so-called Spitzer-Haerm regime, equations of plasma physics reduce to a nonlinear parabolic equation for the electronic temperature. Coming back to the derivation of this limiting equation through hydrodynamic regime arguments, one is led to construct a hierarchy of models where the heat fluxes are defined through a non-local relation which can be reinterpreted as well by introducing coupled diffusion equations. We address the question of designing numerical methods to simulate these equations. The basic requirement for the scheme is to be asymptotically consistent with the Spitzer-Haerm regime. Furthermore, the constraints of physically realistic simulations make the use of unstructured meshes unavoidable. We develop a Finite Volume scheme, based on Vertex-Based discretization, which reaches these objectives. We discuss on numerical grounds the efficiency of the method, and the ability of the generalized models in capturing relevant phenomena missed by the asymptotic problem.

  8. Extreme Wave Simulation due to Typhoon Bolaven based on locally Enhanced Fine-Mesh Unstructured Grid Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kyeong Ok; Choi, Byung Ho; Jung, Kyung Tae

    2016-04-01

    The performance of an integrally coupled wave-tide-surge model using the unstructured mesh system has been tested for the typhoon Bolaven which is regarded as the most powerful storm to strike the Korean Peninsula in nearly a decade with wind gusts measured up to 50 m/s, causing serious damages with 19 victims. Use of the unstructured mesh in coastal sea regions of marginal scale allows all energy from deep to shallow waters to be seamlessly followed; the physics of wave-circulation interactions can be then correctly resolved. The model covers the whole Yellow and East China Seas with locally refined meshes near the regions of Gageo Island (offshore southwestern corner of the Korean Peninsula) and south of Jeju Island (Gangjeong and Seogwipo ports). The wind and pressure fields during the passage of typhoon Bolaven are generated by the blending method. Generally the numerical atmospheric model cannot satisfactorily reproduce the strength of typhoons due to dynamic and resolution restrictions. In this study we could achieve an improved conservation of the typhoon strength by blending the Holland typhoon model result by the empirical formula onto the ambient meteorological fields of NCEP dataset. The model results are compared with the observations and the model performance is then evaluated. The computed wave spectrums for one and two dimensions are compared with the observation in Ieodo station. Results show that the wind wave significantly enhances the current intensity and surge elevation, addressing that to incorporate the wave-current interaction effect in the wave-tide-surge coupled model is important for the accurate prediction of current and sea surface elevation as well as extreme waves in shallow coastal sea regions. The resulting modeling system can be used for hindcasting and forecasting the wave-tide-surges in marine environments with complex coastlines, shallow water depth and fine sediment.

  9. Travel time calculation in regular 3D grid in local and regional scale using fast marching method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polkowski, M.

    2015-12-01

    Local and regional 3D seismic velocity models of crust and sediments are very important for numerous technics like mantle and core tomography, localization of local and regional events and others. Most of those techniques require calculation of wave travel time through the 3D model. This can be achieved using multiple approaches from simple ray tracing to advanced full waveform calculation. In this study simple and efficient implementation of fast marching method is presented. This method provides more information than ray tracing and is much less complicated than methods like full waveform being the perfect compromise. Presented code is written in C++, well commented and is easy to modify for different types of studies. Additionally performance is widely discussed including possibilities of multithreading and massive parallelism like GPU. Source code will be published in 2016 as it is part of the PhD thesis. National Science Centre Poland provided financial support for this work via NCN grant DEC-2011/02/A/ST10/00284.

  10. Finite-element analyses of blade and slot coating flows using an implicit pseudo-solid domain mapping technique coupled with unstructured grids

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, K.S.; Schunk, P.R.; Sackinger, P.A.

    1994-12-04

    In coating processes (e.g. in blade coating) the flow domain inherently contains free surfaces and three-phase contact lines, and characteristic length scales of flow features in the dimension transverse to the web-movement vary by an order of magnitude or more from a fraction of a millimeter or more to tens of microns or less). The presence of free surfaces and three-phase contact lines, and the sudden changes of flow geometry and directions create difficulties in theoretical analyses of such flows. Though simulations of coating flows via finite-element methods using structured grids have been reportedly demonstrated in the literature, achieving high efficiency of such numerical experiments remains a grand challenge -- mainly due to difficulties in local mesh-refinement and in avoiding unacceptably distorted grids. High efficiency of computing steady flow fields under various process conditions is crucial in shortening turn-around time in design and optimization of coating-flow processes. In this paper we employ a fully-implicit, pseudo-solid, domain mapping technique coupled with unstructured meshes to analyze blade and slot coating flows using Galerkin`s method with finite element basis functions. We demonstrate the robustness and efficiency of our unique technique in circumventing shortcomings of mesh-motion schemes currently being used in the coating-flow research community. Our goal is to develop an efficient numerical tool, together with a suitable optimization toolkit, that can be used routinely in design and optimization of coating-flow processes.

  11. A high-order solver for unsteady incompressible Navier-Stokes equations using the flux reconstruction method on unstructured grids with implicit dual time stepping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, Christopher; Liang, Chunlei; Plesniak, Michael

    2015-11-01

    This paper reports development of a high-order compact method for solving unsteady incompressible flow on unstructured grids with implicit time stepping. The method falls under the class of methods now referred to as flux reconstruction/correction procedure via reconstruction. The governing equations employ the classical artificial compressibility treatment, where dual time stepping is needed to solve unsteady flow problems. An implicit non-linear lower-upper symmetric Gauss-Seidel scheme with backward Euler discretization is used to efficiently march the solution in pseudo time, while a second-order backward Euler discretization is used to march in physical time. We verify and validate implementation of the high-order method coupled with our implicit time-stepping scheme. Three-dimensional results computed on many processing elements will be presented. The high-order method is very suitable for parallel computing and can easily be extended to moving and deforming grids. The current implicit time stepping scheme is proven effective in satisfying the divergence-free constraint on the velocity field in the artificial compressibility formulation within the context of the high-order flux reconstruction method. Financial support provided under the GW Presidential Merit Fellowship.

  12. Euler Technology Assessment for Preliminary Aircraft Design-Unstructured/Structured Grid NASTD Application for Aerodynamic Analysis of an Advanced Fighter/Tailless Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michal, Todd R.

    1998-01-01

    This study supports the NASA Langley sponsored project aimed at determining the viability of using Euler technology for preliminary design use. The primary objective of this study was to assess the accuracy and efficiency of the Boeing, St. Louis unstructured grid flow field analysis system, consisting of the MACGS grid generation and NASTD flow solver codes. Euler solutions about the Aero Configuration/Weapons Fighter Technology (ACWFT) 1204 aircraft configuration were generated. Several variations of the geometry were investigated including a standard wing, cambered wing, deflected elevon, and deflected body flap. A wide range of flow conditions, most of which were in the non-linear regimes of the flight envelope, including variations in speed (subsonic, transonic, supersonic), angles of attack, and sideslip were investigated. Several flowfield non-linearities were present in these solutions including shock waves, vortical flows and the resulting interactions. The accuracy of this method was evaluated by comparing solutions with test data and Navier-Stokes solutions. The ability to accurately predict lateral-directional characteristics and control effectiveness was investigated by computing solutions with sideslip, and with deflected control surfaces. Problem set up times and computational resource requirements were documented and used to evaluate the efficiency of this approach for use in the fast paced preliminary design environment.

  13. A high-order solver for unsteady incompressible Navier-Stokes equations using the flux reconstruction method on unstructured grids with implicit dual time stepping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, Christopher; Liang, Chunlei; Plesniak, Michael W.

    2016-06-01

    We report development of a high-order compact flux reconstruction method for solving unsteady incompressible flow on unstructured grids with implicit dual time stepping. The method falls under the class of methods now referred to as flux reconstruction/correction procedure via reconstruction. The governing equations employ Chorin's classic artificial compressibility formulation with dual time stepping to solve unsteady flow problems. An implicit non-linear lower-upper symmetric Gauss-Seidel scheme with backward Euler discretization is used to efficiently march the solution in pseudo time, while a second-order backward Euler discretization is used to march in physical time. We verify and validate implementation of the high-order method coupled with our implicit time stepping scheme using both steady and unsteady incompressible flow problems. The current implicit time stepping scheme is proven effective in satisfying the divergence-free constraint on the velocity field in the artificial compressibility formulation within the context of the high-order flux reconstruction method. This compact high-order method is very suitable for parallel computing and can easily be extended to moving and deforming grids.

  14. A Parallel 3D Spectral Difference Method for Solutions of Compressible Navier Stokes Equations on Deforming Grids and Simulations of Vortex Induced Vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeJong, Andrew

    Numerical models of fluid-structure interaction have grown in importance due to increasing interest in environmental energy harvesting, airfoil-gust interactions, and bio-inspired formation flying. Powered by increasingly powerful parallel computers, such models seek to explain the fundamental physics behind the complex, unsteady fluid-structure phenomena. To this end, a high-fidelity computational model based on the high-order spectral difference method on 3D unstructured, dynamic meshes has been developed. The spectral difference method constructs continuous solution fields within each element with a Riemann solver to compute the inviscid fluxes at the element interfaces and an averaging mechanism to compute the viscous fluxes. This method has shown promise in the past as a highly accurate, yet sufficiently fast method for solving unsteady viscous compressible flows. The solver is monolithically coupled to the equations of motion of an elastically mounted 3-degree of freedom rigid bluff body undergoing flow-induced lift, drag, and torque. The mesh is deformed using 4 methods: an analytic function, Laplace equation, biharmonic equation, and a bi-elliptic equation with variable diffusivity. This single system of equations -- fluid and structure -- is advanced through time using a 5-stage, 4th-order Runge-Kutta scheme. Message Passing Interface is used to run the coupled system in parallel on up to 240 processors. The solver is validated against previously published numerical and experimental data for an elastically mounted cylinder. The effect of adding an upstream body and inducing wake galloping is observed.

  15. A survey of grid-free methods for the simulation of 3-D incompressible flows in bounded domains

    SciTech Connect

    Gharakhani, A.

    1997-09-01

    The state-of-the-art in Lagrangian methods for the grid-free simulation of three-dimensional, incompressible, high Reynolds number, internal and/or external flows is surveyed. Specifically, vortex and velicity (or impulse) element methods are introduced. The relative merits of various available techniques and the outstanding challenges in simulating the processes of convection and diffusion, as well as in satisfying the wall boundary conditions are discussed individually. Issues regarding the stretch and solenoidality of vorticity are also discussed. A potentially successful algorithm for simulating the flow around a parachute is proposed as well.

  16. pySeismicFMM: Python based travel time calculation in regular 2D and 3D grids in Cartesian and geographic coordinates using Fast Marching Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polkowski, Marcin

    2016-04-01

    Seismic wave travel time calculation is the most common numerical operation in seismology. The most efficient is travel time calculation in 1D velocity model - for given source, receiver depths and angular distance time is calculated within fraction of a second. Unfortunately, in most cases 1D is not enough to encounter differentiating local and regional structures. Whenever possible travel time through 3D velocity model has to be calculated. It can be achieved using ray calculation or time propagation in space. While single ray path calculation is quick it is complicated to find the ray path that connects source with the receiver. Time propagation in space using Fast Marching Method seems more efficient in most cases, especially when there are multiple receivers. In this presentation a Python module pySeismicFMM is presented - simple and very efficient tool for calculating travel time from sources to receivers. Calculation requires regular 2D or 3D velocity grid either in Cartesian or geographic coordinates. On desktop class computer calculation speed is 200k grid cells per second. Calculation has to be performed once for every source location and provides travel time to all receivers. pySeismicFMM is free and open source. Development of this tool is a part of authors PhD thesis. National Science Centre Poland provided financial support for this work via NCN grant DEC-2011/02/A/ST10/00284.

  17. A Flow Solver for Three-Dimensional DRAGON Grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, Meng-Sing; Zheng, Yao

    2002-01-01

    DRAGONFLOW code has been developed to solve three-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations over a complex geometry whose flow domain is discretized with the DRAGON grid-a combination of Chimera grid and a collection of unstructured grids. In the DRAGONFLOW suite, both OVERFLOW and USM3D are presented in form of module libraries, and a master module controls the invoking of these individual modules. This report includes essential aspects, programming structures, benchmark tests and numerical simulations.

  18. Algebraic turbulence models for the computation of two-dimensional high-speed flows using unstructured grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rostand, Philippe

    1989-01-01

    The incorporation of algebraic turbulence models in a solver for the 2-D compressible Navier-Stokes equations using triangular grids is described. A practial way to use the Cebeci Smith model, and to modify it in separated regions is proposed. The ability of the model to predict high speed, perfect gas boundary layers is investigated from a numerical point of view.

  19. Unstructured multigrid through agglomeration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkatakrishnan, V.; Mavriplis, D. J.; Berger, M. J.

    1993-01-01

    In this work the compressible Euler equations are solved using finite volume techniques on unstructured grids. The spatial discretization employs a central difference approximation augmented by dissipative terms. Temporal discretization is done using a multistage Runge-Kutta scheme. A multigrid technique is used to accelerate convergence to steady state. The coarse grids are derived directly from the given fine grid through agglomeration of the control volumes. This agglomeration is accomplished by using a greedy-type algorithm and is done in such a way that the load, which is proportional to the number of edges, goes down by nearly a factor of 4 when moving from a fine to a coarse grid. The agglomeration algorithm has been implemented and the grids have been tested in a multigrid code. An area-weighted restriction is applied when moving from fine to coarse grids while a trivial injection is used for prolongation. Across a range of geometries and flows, it is shown that the agglomeration multigrid scheme compares very favorably with an unstructured multigrid algorithm that makes use of independent coarse meshes, both in terms of convergence and elapsed times.

  20. Defect correction based velocity reconstruction for physically consistent simulations of non-Newtonian flows on unstructured grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basumatary, Mantulal; Natarajan, Ganesh; Mishra, Subhash C.

    2014-09-01

    A new algorithm to recover centroidal velocities from face-normal data on two-dimensional unstructured staggered meshes is presented. The proposed approach uses iterative defect correction in conjunction with a lower-order accurate Gauss reconstruction to obtain second-order accurate centroidal velocities. We derive the conditions that guarantee the second-order accuracy of the velocity reconstruction and demonstrate its efficacy on arbitrary polygonal mesh topologies. The necessity of the proposed algorithm for non-Newtonian flow simulations is elucidated through numerical simulations of channel flow, driven cavity and backward facing step problems with power-law and Carreau fluids. Numerical investigations show that second-order accuracy of the reconstructed velocity field is critical to obtaining physically consistent solutions of vorticity-dominated flows on non-orthogonal meshes. It is demonstrated that the spurious solutions are not linked to discrete conservation and arise solely due to the lower order accuracy of velocity reconstruction. The importance of the proposed algorithm for hemodynamic simulations is highlighted through studies of laminar flow in an idealized stenosed artery using different blood models.

  1. Progress in Grid Generation: From Chimera to DRAGON Grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, Meng-Sing; Kao, Kai-Hsiung

    1994-01-01

    Hybrid grids, composed of structured and unstructured grids, combines the best features of both. The chimera method is a major stepstone toward a hybrid grid from which the present approach is evolved. The chimera grid composes a set of overlapped structured grids which are independently generated and body-fitted, yielding a high quality grid readily accessible for efficient solution schemes. The chimera method has been shown to be efficient to generate a grid about complex geometries and has been demonstrated to deliver accurate aerodynamic prediction of complex flows. While its geometrical flexibility is attractive, interpolation of data in the overlapped regions - which in today's practice in 3D is done in a nonconservative fashion, is not. In the present paper we propose a hybrid grid scheme that maximizes the advantages of the chimera scheme and adapts the strengths of the unstructured grid while at the same time keeps its weaknesses minimal. Like the chimera method, we first divide up the physical domain by a set of structured body-fitted grids which are separately generated and overlaid throughout a complex configuration. To eliminate any pure data manipulation which does not necessarily follow governing equations, we use non-structured grids only to directly replace the region of the arbitrarily overlapped grids. This new adaptation to the chimera thinking is coined the DRAGON grid. The nonstructured grid region sandwiched between the structured grids is limited in size, resulting in only a small increase in memory and computational effort. The DRAGON method has three important advantages: (1) preserving strengths of the chimera grid; (2) eliminating difficulties sometimes encountered in the chimera scheme, such as the orphan points and bad quality of interpolation stencils; and (3) making grid communication in a fully conservative and consistent manner insofar as the governing equations are concerned. To demonstrate its use, the governing equations are

  2. Current Status on the use of Parallel Computing in Turbulent Reacting Flow Computations Involving Sprays, Monte Carlo PDF and Unstructured Grids. Chapter 4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raju, M. S.

    1998-01-01

    The state of the art in multidimensional combustor modeling as evidenced by the level of sophistication employed in terms of modeling and numerical accuracy considerations, is also dictated by the available computer memory and turnaround times afforded by present-day computers. With the aim of advancing the current multi-dimensional computational tools used in the design of advanced technology combustors, a solution procedure is developed that combines the novelty of the coupled CFD/spray/scalar Monte Carlo PDF (Probability Density Function) computations on unstructured grids with the ability to run on parallel architectures. In this approach, the mean gas-phase velocity and turbulence fields are determined from a standard turbulence model, the joint composition of species and enthalpy from the solution of a modeled PDF transport equation, and a Lagrangian-based dilute spray model is used for the liquid-phase representation. The gas-turbine combustor flows are often characterized by a complex interaction between various physical processes associated with the interaction between the liquid and gas phases, droplet vaporization, turbulent mixing, heat release associated with chemical kinetics, radiative heat transfer associated with highly absorbing and radiating species, among others. The rate controlling processes often interact with each other at various disparate time 1 and length scales. In particular, turbulence plays an important role in determining the rates of mass and heat transfer, chemical reactions, and liquid phase evaporation in many practical combustion devices.

  3. Unstructured Grid Euler Method Assessment for Longitudinal and Lateral/Directional Stability Analysis of the HSR Reference H Configuration at Transonic Speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghaffari, Farhad

    1999-01-01

    Transonic Euler computations, based on unstructured grid methodology, are performed for a proposed High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) configuration, designated as the Reference H configuration within the High Speed Research (HSR) Program. The predicted results are correlated with appropriate experimental wind-tunnel data for the baseline configuration with and without control surface deflections for a range of angle of attack at M(sub infinity) = 0.95. Good correlations between the predictions and measured data have been obtained for the longitudinal aerodynamic characteristics of the baseline configuration. The incremental effects in the longitudinal aerodynamic characteristics due to horizontal rail deflections as well as wing leading-edge and trailing-edge flap deflections have also been predicted reasonably well. Computational results and correlations with data are also presented for the lateral and directional stability characteristics for a range of angle of attack at a constant sideslip angle as well as a range of sideslip angles at a constant angle of attack. In addition, the results are presented to assess the computational method performance and convergence characteristics.

  4. A nominally second-order cell-centered Lagrangian scheme for simulating elastic-plastic flows on two-dimensional unstructured grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maire, Pierre-Henri; Abgrall, Rémi; Breil, Jérôme; Loubère, Raphaël; Rebourcet, Bernard

    2013-02-01

    In this paper, we describe a cell-centered Lagrangian scheme devoted to the numerical simulation of solid dynamics on two-dimensional unstructured grids in planar geometry. This numerical method, utilizes the classical elastic-perfectly plastic material model initially proposed by Wilkins [M.L. Wilkins, Calculation of elastic-plastic flow, Meth. Comput. Phys. (1964)]. In this model, the Cauchy stress tensor is decomposed into the sum of its deviatoric part and the thermodynamic pressure which is defined by means of an equation of state. Regarding the deviatoric stress, its time evolution is governed by a classical constitutive law for isotropic material. The plasticity model employs the von Mises yield criterion and is implemented by means of the radial return algorithm. The numerical scheme relies on a finite volume cell-centered method wherein numerical fluxes are expressed in terms of sub-cell force. The generic form of the sub-cell force is obtained by requiring the scheme to satisfy a semi-discrete dissipation inequality. Sub-cell force and nodal velocity to move the grid are computed consistently with cell volume variation by means of a node-centered solver, which results from total energy conservation. The nominally second-order extension is achieved by developing a two-dimensional extension in the Lagrangian framework of the Generalized Riemann Problem methodology, introduced by Ben-Artzi and Falcovitz [M. Ben-Artzi, J. Falcovitz, Generalized Riemann Problems in Computational Fluid Dynamics, Cambridge Monogr. Appl. Comput. Math. (2003)]. Finally, the robustness and the accuracy of the numerical scheme are assessed through the computation of several test cases.

  5. A nominally second-order cell-centered Lagrangian scheme for simulating elastic–plastic flows on two-dimensional unstructured grids

    SciTech Connect

    Maire, Pierre-Henri; Breil, Jérôme; Loubère, Raphaël; Rebourcet, Bernard

    2013-02-15

    In this paper, we describe a cell-centered Lagrangian scheme devoted to the numerical simulation of solid dynamics on two-dimensional unstructured grids in planar geometry. This numerical method, utilizes the classical elastic-perfectly plastic material model initially proposed by Wilkins [M.L. Wilkins, Calculation of elastic–plastic flow, Meth. Comput. Phys. (1964)]. In this model, the Cauchy stress tensor is decomposed into the sum of its deviatoric part and the thermodynamic pressure which is defined by means of an equation of state. Regarding the deviatoric stress, its time evolution is governed by a classical constitutive law for isotropic material. The plasticity model employs the von Mises yield criterion and is implemented by means of the radial return algorithm. The numerical scheme relies on a finite volume cell-centered method wherein numerical fluxes are expressed in terms of sub-cell force. The generic form of the sub-cell force is obtained by requiring the scheme to satisfy a semi-discrete dissipation inequality. Sub-cell force and nodal velocity to move the grid are computed consistently with cell volume variation by means of a node-centered solver, which results from total energy conservation. The nominally second-order extension is achieved by developing a two-dimensional extension in the Lagrangian framework of the Generalized Riemann Problem methodology, introduced by Ben-Artzi and Falcovitz [M. Ben-Artzi, J. Falcovitz, Generalized Riemann Problems in Computational Fluid Dynamics, Cambridge Monogr. Appl. Comput. Math. (2003)]. Finally, the robustness and the accuracy of the numerical scheme are assessed through the computation of several test cases.

  6. Unstructured Grid Euler Method Assessment for Longitudinal and Lateral/Directional Aerodynamic Performance Analysis of the HSR Technology Concept Airplane at Supersonic Cruise Speed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghaffari, Farhad

    1999-01-01

    Unstructured grid Euler computations, performed at supersonic cruise speed, are presented for a High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) configuration, designated as the Technology Concept Airplane (TCA) within the High Speed Research (HSR) Program. The numerical results are obtained for the complete TCA cruise configuration which includes the wing, fuselage, empennage, diverters, and flow through nacelles at M (sub infinity) = 2.4 for a range of angles-of-attack and sideslip. Although all the present computations are performed for the complete TCA configuration, appropriate assumptions derived from the fundamental supersonic aerodynamic principles have been made to extract aerodynamic predictions to complement the experimental data obtained from a 1.675%-scaled truncated (aft fuselage/empennage components removed) TCA model. The validity of the computational results, derived from the latter assumptions, are thoroughly addressed and discussed in detail. The computed surface and off-surface flow characteristics are analyzed and the pressure coefficient contours on the wing lower surface are shown to correlate reasonably well with the available pressure sensitive paint results, particularly, for the complex flow structures around the nacelles. The predicted longitudinal and lateral/directional performance characteristics for the truncated TCA configuration are shown to correlate very well with the corresponding wind-tunnel data across the examined range of angles-of-attack and sideslip. The complementary computational results for the longitudinal and lateral/directional performance characteristics for the complete TCA configuration are also presented along with the aerodynamic effects due to empennage components. Results are also presented to assess the computational method performance, solution sensitivity to grid refinement, and solution convergence characteristics.

  7. Multi-scale modeling of Puget Sound using an unstructured-grid coastal ocean model: from tide flats to estuaries and coastal waters

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Zhaoqing; Khangaonkar, Tarang

    2010-11-19

    Water circulation in Puget Sound, a large complex estuary system in the Pacific Northwest coastal ocean of the United States, is governed by multiple spatially and temporally varying forcings from tides, atmosphere (wind, heating/cooling, precipitation/evaporation, pressure), and river inflows. In addition, the hydrodynamic response is affected strongly by geomorphic features, such as fjord-like bathymetry and complex shoreline features, resulting in many distinguishing characteristics in its main and sub-basins. To better understand the details of circulation features in Puget Sound and to assist with proposed nearshore restoration actions for improving water quality and the ecological health of Puget Sound, a high-resolution (around 50 m in estuaries and tide flats) hydrodynamic model for the entire Puget Sound was needed. Here, a threedimensional circulation model of Puget Sound using an unstructured-grid finite volume coastal ocean model is presented. The model was constructed with sufficient resolution in the nearshore region to address the complex coastline, multi-tidal channels, and tide flats. Model open boundaries were extended to the entrance of the Strait of Juan de Fuca and the northern end of the Strait of Georgia to account for the influences of ocean water intrusion from the Strait of Juan de Fuca and the Fraser River plume from the Strait of Georgia, respectively. Comparisons of model results, observed data, and associated error statistics for tidal elevation, velocity, temperature, and salinity indicate that the model is capable of simulating the general circulation patterns on the scale of a large estuarine system as well as detailed hydrodynamics in the nearshore tide flats. Tidal characteristics, temperature/salinity stratification, mean circulation, and river plumes in estuaries with tide flats are discussed.

  8. Simulation of annual biogeochemical cycles of nutrient balance, phytoplankton bloom(s), and DO in Puget Sound using an unstructured grid model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khangaonkar, Tarang; Sackmann, Brandon; Long, Wen; Mohamedali, Teizeen; Roberts, Mindy

    2012-09-01

    Nutrient pollution from rivers, nonpoint source runoff, and nearly 100 wastewater discharges is a potential threat to the ecological health of Puget Sound with evidence of hypoxia in some basins. However, the relative contributions of loads entering Puget Sound from natural and anthropogenic sources, and the effects of exchange flow from the Pacific Ocean are not well understood. Development of a quantitative model of Puget Sound is thus presented to help improve our understanding of the annual biogeochemical cycles in this system using the unstructured grid Finite-Volume Coastal Ocean Model framework and the Integrated Compartment Model (CE-QUAL-ICM) water quality kinetics. Results based on 2006 data show that phytoplankton growth and die-off, succession between two species of algae, nutrient dynamics, and dissolved oxygen in Puget Sound are strongly tied to seasonal variation of temperature, solar radiation, and the annual exchange and flushing induced by upwelled Pacific Ocean waters. Concentrations in the mixed outflow surface layer occupying approximately 5-20 m of the upper water column show strong effects of eutrophication from natural and anthropogenic sources, spring and summer algae blooms, accompanied by depleted nutrients but high dissolved oxygen levels. The bottom layer reflects dissolved oxygen and nutrient concentrations of upwelled Pacific Ocean water modulated by mixing with biologically active surface outflow in the Strait of Juan de Fuca prior to entering Puget Sound over the Admiralty Inlet. The effect of reflux mixing at the Admiralty Inlet sill resulting in lower nutrient and higher dissolved oxygen levels in bottom waters of Puget Sound than the incoming upwelled Pacific Ocean water is reproduced. By late winter, with the reduction in algal activity, water column constituents of interest, were renewed and the system appeared to reset with cooler temperature, higher nutrient, and higher dissolved oxygen waters from the Pacific Ocean.

  9. Simulation of annual biogeochemical cycles of nutrient balance, phytoplankton bloom(s), and DO in Puget Sound using an unstructured grid model

    SciTech Connect

    Khangaonkar, Tarang; Sackmann, Brandon; Long, Wen; Mohamedali, Teizeen; Roberts, Mindy

    2012-08-14

    Nutrient pollution from rivers, nonpoint source runoff, and nearly 100 wastewater discharges is a potential threat to the ecological health of Puget Sound with evidence of hypoxia in some basins. However, the relative contributions of loads entering Puget Sound from natural and anthropogenic sources, and the effects of exchange flow from the Pacific Ocean are not well understood. Development of a quantitative model of Puget Sound is thus presented to help improve our understanding of the annual biogeochemical cycles in this system using the unstructured grid Finite-Volume Coastal Ocean Model framework and the Integrated Compartment Model (CE-QUAL-ICM) water quality kinetics. Results based on 2006 data show that phytoplankton growth and die-off, succession between two species of algae, nutrient dynamics, and dissolved oxygen in Puget Sound are strongly tied to seasonal variation of temperature, solar radiation, and the annual exchange and flushing induced by upwelled Pacific Ocean waters. Concentrations in the mixed outflow surface layer occupying approximately 5–20 m of the upper water column show strong effects of eutrophication from natural and anthropogenic sources, spring and summer algae blooms, accompanied by depleted nutrients but high dissolved oxygen levels. The bottom layer reflects dissolved oxygen and nutrient concentrations of upwelled Pacific Ocean water modulated by mixing with biologically active surface outflow in the Strait of Juan de Fuca prior to entering Puget Sound over the Admiralty Inlet. The effect of reflux mixing at the Admiralty Inlet sill resulting in lower nutrient and higher dissolved oxygen levels in bottom waters of Puget Sound than the incoming upwelled Pacific Ocean water is reproduced. Finally, by late winter, with the reduction in algal activity, water column constituents of interest, were renewed and the system appeared to reset with cooler temperature, higher nutrient, and higher dissolved oxygen waters from the Pacific

  10. Sandia Unstructured Triangle Table Generator

    SciTech Connect

    2013-09-16

    The software generates data tables for thermodynamic and transport properties of materials as described by a set of input models. For each input model parameterization, an associated table is created on an unstructured triangular grid. These grids all conform to the same topology. A statistical accuracy guarantee is provided for the tabular representation of the model. Details of the model and table specification are given in a XML input deck.

  11. Using FUN3D for Aeroelastic, Sonic Boom, and AeroPropulsoServoElastic (APSE) Analyses of a Supersonic Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silva, Walter A.; Sanetrik, Mark D.; Chwalowski, Pawel; Connolly, Joseph; Kopasakis, George

    2016-01-01

    An overview of recent applications of the FUN3D CFD code to computational aeroelastic, sonic boom, and aeropropulsoservoelasticity (APSE) analyses of a low-boom supersonic configuration is presented. The overview includes details of the computational models developed including multiple unstructured CFD grids suitable for aeroelastic and sonic boom analyses. In addition, aeroelastic Reduced-Order Models (ROMs) are generated and used to rapidly compute the aeroelastic response and utter boundaries at multiple flight conditions.

  12. Modularization and Validation of FUN3D as a CREATE-AV Helios Near-Body Solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jain, Rohit; Biedron, Robert T.; Jones, William T.; Lee-Rausch, Elizabeth M.

    2016-01-01

    Under a recent collaborative effort between the US Army Aeroflightdynamics Directorate (AFDD) and NASA Langley, NASA's general unstructured CFD solver, FUN3D, was modularized as a CREATE-AV Helios near-body unstructured grid solver. The strategies adopted in Helios/FUN3D integration effort are described. A validation study of the new capability is performed for rotorcraft cases spanning hover prediction, airloads prediction, coupling with computational structural dynamics, counter-rotating dual-rotor configurations, and free-flight trim. The integration of FUN3D, along with the previously integrated NASA OVERFLOW solver, lays the ground for future interaction opportunities where capabilities of one component could be leveraged with those of others in a relatively seamless fashion within CREATE-AV Helios.

  13. Modeling of episodic particulate matter events using a 3-D air quality model with fine grid: Applications to a pair of cities in the US/Mexico border

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Yu-Jin; Hyde, Peter; Fernando, H. J. S.

    High (episodic) particulate matter (PM) events over the sister cities of Douglas (AZ) and Agua Prieta (Sonora), located in the US-Mexico border, were simulated using the 3D Eulerian air quality model, MODELS-3/CMAQ. The best available input information was used for the simulations, with pollution inventory specified on a fine grid. In spite of inherent uncertainties associated with the emission inventory as well as the chemistry and meteorology of the air quality simulation tool, model evaluations showed acceptable PM predictions, while demonstrating the need for including the interaction between meteorology and emissions in an interactive mode in the model, a capability currently unavailable in MODELS-3/CMAQ when dealing with PM. Sensitivity studies on boundary influence indicate an insignificant regional (advection) contribution of PM to the study area. The contribution of secondary particles to the occurrence of high PM events was trivial. High PM episodes in the study area, therefore, are purely local events that largely depend on local meteorological conditions. The major PM emission sources were identified as vehicular activities on unpaved/paved roads and wind-blown dust. The results will be of immediate utility in devising PM mitigation strategies for the study area, which is one of the US EPA-designated non-attainment areas with respect to PM.

  14. Segmentation of Unstructured Datasets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhat, Smitha

    1996-01-01

    Datasets generated by computer simulations and experiments in Computational Fluid Dynamics tend to be extremely large and complex. It is difficult to visualize these datasets using standard techniques like Volume Rendering and Ray Casting. Object Segmentation provides a technique to extract and quantify regions of interest within these massive datasets. This thesis explores basic algorithms to extract coherent amorphous regions from two-dimensional and three-dimensional scalar unstructured grids. The techniques are applied to datasets from Computational Fluid Dynamics and from Finite Element Analysis.

  15. PLOT3D user's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walatka, Pamela P.; Buning, Pieter G.; Pierce, Larry; Elson, Patricia A.

    1990-01-01

    PLOT3D is a computer graphics program designed to visualize the grids and solutions of computational fluid dynamics. Seventy-four functions are available. Versions are available for many systems. PLOT3D can handle multiple grids with a million or more grid points, and can produce varieties of model renderings, such as wireframe or flat shaded. Output from PLOT3D can be used in animation programs. The first part of this manual is a tutorial that takes the reader, keystroke by keystroke, through a PLOT3D session. The second part of the manual contains reference chapters, including the helpfile, data file formats, advice on changing PLOT3D, and sample command files.

  16. USM3D Analysis of Low Boom Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Melissa B.; Campbell, Richard L.; Nayani, Sudheer N.

    2011-01-01

    In the past few years considerable improvement was made in NASA's in house boom prediction capability. As part of this improved capability, the USM3D Navier-Stokes flow solver, when combined with a suitable unstructured grid, went from accurately predicting boom signatures at 1 body length to 10 body lengths. Since that time, the research emphasis has shifted from analysis to the design of supersonic configurations with boom signature mitigation In order to design an aircraft, the techniques for accurately predicting boom and drag need to be determined. This paper compares CFD results with the wind tunnel experimental results conducted on a Gulfstream reduced boom and drag configuration. Two different wind-tunnel models were designed and tested for drag and boom data. The goal of this study was to assess USM3D capability for predicting both boom and drag characteristics. Overall, USM3D coupled with a grid that was sheared and stretched was able to reasonably predict boom signature. The computational drag polar matched the experimental results for a lift coefficient above 0.1 despite some mismatch in the predicted lift-curve slope.

  17. PLOT3D/AMES, APOLLO UNIX VERSION USING GMR3D (WITHOUT TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P.

    1994-01-01

    PLOT3D is an interactive graphics program designed to help scientists visualize computational fluid dynamics (CFD) grids and solutions. Today, supercomputers and CFD algorithms can provide scientists with simulations of such highly complex phenomena that obtaining an understanding of the simulations has become a major problem. Tools which help the scientist visualize the simulations can be of tremendous aid. PLOT3D/AMES offers more functions and features, and has been adapted for more types of computers than any other CFD graphics program. Version 3.6b+ is supported for five computers and graphic libraries. Using PLOT3D, CFD physicists can view their computational models from any angle, observing the physics of problems and the quality of solutions. As an aid in designing aircraft, for example, PLOT3D's interactive computer graphics can show vortices, temperature, reverse flow, pressure, and dozens of other characteristics of air flow during flight. As critical areas become obvious, they can easily be studied more closely using a finer grid. PLOT3D is part of a computational fluid dynamics software cycle. First, a program such as 3DGRAPE (ARC-12620) helps the scientist generate computational grids to model an object and its surrounding space. Once the grids have been designed and parameters such as the angle of attack, Mach number, and Reynolds number have been specified, a "flow-solver" program such as INS3D (ARC-11794 or COS-10019) solves the system of equations governing fluid flow, usually on a supercomputer. Grids sometimes have as many as two million points, and the "flow-solver" produces a solution file which contains density, x- y- and z-momentum, and stagnation energy for each grid point. With such a solution file and a grid file containing up to 50 grids as input, PLOT3D can calculate and graphically display any one of 74 functions, including shock waves, surface pressure, velocity vectors, and particle traces. PLOT3D's 74 functions are organized into

  18. PLOT3D/AMES, APOLLO UNIX VERSION USING GMR3D (WITH TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P.

    1994-01-01

    PLOT3D is an interactive graphics program designed to help scientists visualize computational fluid dynamics (CFD) grids and solutions. Today, supercomputers and CFD algorithms can provide scientists with simulations of such highly complex phenomena that obtaining an understanding of the simulations has become a major problem. Tools which help the scientist visualize the simulations can be of tremendous aid. PLOT3D/AMES offers more functions and features, and has been adapted for more types of computers than any other CFD graphics program. Version 3.6b+ is supported for five computers and graphic libraries. Using PLOT3D, CFD physicists can view their computational models from any angle, observing the physics of problems and the quality of solutions. As an aid in designing aircraft, for example, PLOT3D's interactive computer graphics can show vortices, temperature, reverse flow, pressure, and dozens of other characteristics of air flow during flight. As critical areas become obvious, they can easily be studied more closely using a finer grid. PLOT3D is part of a computational fluid dynamics software cycle. First, a program such as 3DGRAPE (ARC-12620) helps the scientist generate computational grids to model an object and its surrounding space. Once the grids have been designed and parameters such as the angle of attack, Mach number, and Reynolds number have been specified, a "flow-solver" program such as INS3D (ARC-11794 or COS-10019) solves the system of equations governing fluid flow, usually on a supercomputer. Grids sometimes have as many as two million points, and the "flow-solver" produces a solution file which contains density, x- y- and z-momentum, and stagnation energy for each grid point. With such a solution file and a grid file containing up to 50 grids as input, PLOT3D can calculate and graphically display any one of 74 functions, including shock waves, surface pressure, velocity vectors, and particle traces. PLOT3D's 74 functions are organized into

  19. 3D hydrodynamical and radiative transfer modeling of η Carinae's colliding winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madura, T. I.; Clementel, N.; Gull, T. R.; Kruip, C. J. H.; Paardekooper, J.-P.; Icke, V.

    We present results of full 3D hydrodynamical and radiative transfer simulations of the colliding stellar winds in the massive binary system η Carinae. We accomplish this by applying the SimpleX algorithm for 3D radiative transfer on an unstructured Voronoi-Delaunay grid to recent 3D smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) simulations of the binary colliding winds. We use SimpleX to obtain detailed ionization fractions of hydrogen and helium, in 3D, at the resolution of the original SPH simulations. We investigate several computational domain sizes and Luminous Blue Variable primary star mass-loss rates. We furthermore present new methods of visualizing and interacting with output from complex 3D numerical simulations, including 3D interactive graphics and 3D printing. While we initially focus on η Car, the methods employed can be applied to numerous other colliding wind (WR 140, WR 137, WR 19) and dusty `pinwheel' (WR 104, WR 98a) binary systems. Coupled with 3D hydrodynamical simulations, SimpleX simulations have the potential to help determine the regions where various observed time-variable emission and absorption lines form in these unique objects.

  20. Computation of an Underexpanded 3-D Rectangular Jet by the CE/SE Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loh, Ching Y.; Himansu, Ananda; Wang, Xiao Y.; Jorgenson, Philip C. E.

    2000-01-01

    Recently, an unstructured three-dimensional space-time conservation element and solution element (CE/SE) Euler solver was developed. Now it is also developed for parallel computation using METIS for domain decomposition and MPI (message passing interface). The method is employed here to numerically study the near-field of a typical 3-D rectangular under-expanded jet. For the computed case-a jet with Mach number Mj = 1.6. with a very modest grid of 1.7 million tetrahedrons, the flow features such as the shock-cell structures and the axis switching, are in good qualitative agreement with experimental results.

  1. Parallel 3D Mortar Element Method for Adaptive Nonconforming Meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feng, Huiyu; Mavriplis, Catherine; VanderWijngaart, Rob; Biswas, Rupak

    2004-01-01

    High order methods are frequently used in computational simulation for their high accuracy. An efficient way to avoid unnecessary computation in smooth regions of the solution is to use adaptive meshes which employ fine grids only in areas where they are needed. Nonconforming spectral elements allow the grid to be flexibly adjusted to satisfy the computational accuracy requirements. The method is suitable for computational simulations of unsteady problems with very disparate length scales or unsteady moving features, such as heat transfer, fluid dynamics or flame combustion. In this work, we select the Mark Element Method (MEM) to handle the non-conforming interfaces between elements. A new technique is introduced to efficiently implement MEM in 3-D nonconforming meshes. By introducing an "intermediate mortar", the proposed method decomposes the projection between 3-D elements and mortars into two steps. In each step, projection matrices derived in 2-D are used. The two-step method avoids explicitly forming/deriving large projection matrices for 3-D meshes, and also helps to simplify the implementation. This new technique can be used for both h- and p-type adaptation. This method is applied to an unsteady 3-D moving heat source problem. With our new MEM implementation, mesh adaptation is able to efficiently refine the grid near the heat source and coarsen the grid once the heat source passes. The savings in computational work resulting from the dynamic mesh adaptation is demonstrated by the reduction of the the number of elements used and CPU time spent. MEM and mesh adaptation, respectively, bring irregularity and dynamics to the computer memory access pattern. Hence, they provide a good way to gauge the performance of computer systems when running scientific applications whose memory access patterns are irregular and unpredictable. We select a 3-D moving heat source problem as the Unstructured Adaptive (UA) grid benchmark, a new component of the NAS Parallel

  2. An interface capturing method with a continuous function: The THINC method on unstructured triangular and tetrahedral meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ii, Satoshi; Xie, Bin; Xiao, Feng

    2014-02-01

    A novel interface-capturing method is proposed to compute moving interfaces on unstructured grids with triangular (2D) and tetrahedral (3D) elements. Different from the conventional VOF (volume of fluid) method which involves geometric reconstructions of the interface, the present method is based on the algebraic reconstruction approach originally developed in the THINC (tangent of hyperbola interface capturing) scheme by Xiao et al. (2005) [17]. A continuous multidimensional hyperbolic tangent function is employed for retrieving the jump-like distribution of the indicator function, which avoids the explicit geometric representation of the interface and thus substantially reduces the algorithmic complexity in unstructured grids. Numerical diffusion and smearing are effectively eliminated, and the compact thickness of the jump transition layer in the volume fraction is retained throughout the computation even for largely deformed interface. The solution quality of the present scheme is comparable to the VOF method with PLIC (piecewise linear interface calculation) algorithm.

  3. PARTI primitives for unstructured and block structured problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sussman, Alan; Saltz, Joel; Das, Raja; Gupta, S.; Mavriplis, Dimitri; Ponnusamy, Ravi; Crowley, Kay

    1992-01-01

    Described here is a set of primitives (PARTI) developed to efficiently execute unstructured and block structured problems on distributed memory parallel machines. We present experimental data from a 3-D unstructured Euler solver run on the Intel Touchstone Delta to demonstrate the usefulness of our methods.

  4. Rotor Airloads Prediction Using Unstructured Meshes and Loose CFD/CSD Coupling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biedron, Robert T.; Lee-Rausch, Elizabeth M.

    2008-01-01

    The FUN3D unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes solver for unstructured grids has been modified to allow prediction of trimmed rotorcraft airloads. The trim of the rotorcraft and the aeroelastic deformation of the rotor blades are accounted for via loose coupling with the CAMRAD II rotorcraft computational structural dynamics code. The set of codes is used to analyze the HART-II Baseline, Minimum Noise and Minimum Vibration test conditions. The loose coupling approach is found to be stable and convergent for the cases considered. Comparison of the resulting airloads and structural deformations with experimentally measured data is presented. The effect of grid resolution and temporal accuracy is examined. Rotorcraft airloads prediction presents a very substantial challenge for Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD). Not only must the unsteady nature of the flow be accurately modeled, but since most rotorcraft blades are not structurally stiff, an accurate simulation must account for the blade structural dynamics. In addition, trim of the rotorcraft to desired thrust and moment targets depends on both aerodynamic loads and structural deformation, and vice versa. Further, interaction of the fuselage with the rotor flow field can be important, so that relative motion between the blades and the fuselage must be accommodated. Thus a complete simulation requires coupled aerodynamics, structures and trim, with the ability to model geometrically complex configurations. NASA has recently initiated a Subsonic Rotary Wing (SRW) Project under the overall Fundamental Aeronautics Program. Within the context of SRW are efforts aimed at furthering the state of the art of high-fidelity rotorcraft flow simulations, using both structured and unstructured meshes. Structured-mesh solvers have an advantage in computation speed, but even though remarkably complex configurations may be accommodated using the overset grid approach, generation of complex structured-mesh systems can require

  5. Improving the calculation of rovibrational spectra of five-atom molecules with three identical atoms by using a C3upsilonG6 symmetry-adapted grid: applied to CH3D and CHD3.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao-Gang; Carrington, Tucker

    2005-10-15

    In this paper we report two improvements on the approach we have used to compute rovibrational levels of methane and apply the new ideas to calculate rovibrational levels of two methane isotopomers CH3D and CHD3. Both improvements make the bend calculation better. The first improvement is a G6-invariant (or C3upsilon-invariant) grid which is designed such that each point on the grid is mapped to another point on the grid by any of the G6 operations. The second improvement is the use of fast Fourier transform (FFT) to compute the bend potential matrix-vector products. The FFT matrix-vector product is about three and ten times faster than the previous sequential summation method for the J=0 and J>0 cases, respectively. The calculated J=1 rovibrational levels of CH3D and CHD3 on the Schwenke and Partridge [Spectrochim. Acta, Part A 57, 887 (2001)] ab initio potential are in good agreement (within 6 cm(-1) for the levels up to 3000 cm(-1)) with the experimental data. The agreement is even better (within 0.1 cm(-1) for the levels up to 6000 cm(-1)) if the associated J=0 energies are subtracted. PMID:16252944

  6. 3-D Finite Element Code Postprocessor

    1996-07-15

    TAURUS is an interactive post-processing application supporting visualization of finite element analysis results on unstructured grids. TAURUS provides the ability to display deformed geometries and contours or fringes of a large number of derived results on meshes consisting of beam, plate, shell, and solid type finite elements. Time history plotting is also available.

  7. Livermore Unstructured Lagrange Explicit Shock Hydrodynamics

    2010-09-21

    LULESH v1.0 is a 3D unstructured Lagrange hydrodynamics simulation written specifically to solve a standard analytical test problem, known as the Sedov problem. In this problem, a quantum of energy is deposited into a gas and propagates through the gas over time.

  8. WENO schemes on arbitrary unstructured meshes for laminar, transitional and turbulent flows

    SciTech Connect

    Tsoutsanis, Panagiotis Antoniadis, Antonios Foivos Drikakis, Dimitris

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the development and implementation of weighted-essentially-non-oscillatory (WENO) schemes for viscous flows on arbitrary unstructured grids. WENO schemes up to fifth-order accurate have been implemented in conjunction with hybrid and non-hybrid unstructured grids. The schemes are investigated with reference to numerical and experimental results for the Taylor–Green vortex, as well as for laminar and turbulent flows around a sphere, and the turbulent shock-wave boundary layer interaction flow problem. The results show that the accuracy of the schemes depends on the arbitrariness of shape and orientation of the unstructured mesh elements, as well as the compactness of directional stencils. The WENO schemes provide a more accurate numerical framework compared to second-order and third-order total variation diminishing (TVD) methods, however, the fifth-order version of the schemes is computationally too expensive to make the schemes practically usable. On the other hand, the third-order variant offers an excellent numerical framework in terms of accuracy and computational cost compared to the fifth-order WENO and second-order TVD schemes. Parallelisation of the CFD code (henceforth labelled as UCNS3D), where the schemes have been implemented, shows that the present methods offer very good scalable performance.

  9. Cube Kohonen self-organizing map (CKSOM) model with new equations in organizing unstructured data.

    PubMed

    Lim, Seng Poh; Haron, Habibollah

    2013-09-01

    Surface reconstruction by using 3-D data is used to represent the surface of an object and perform important tasks. The type of data used is important and can be described as either structured or unstructured. For unstructured data, there is no connectivity information between data points. As a result, incorrect shapes will be obtained during the imaging process. Therefore, the data should be reorganized by finding the correct topology so that the correct shape can be obtained. Previous studies have shown that the Kohonen self-organizing map (KSOM) could be used to solve data organizing problems. However, 2-D Kohonen maps are limited because they are unable to cover the whole surface of closed 3-D surface data. Furthermore, the neurons inside the 3-D KSOM structure should be removed in order to create a correct wireframe model. This is because only the outside neurons are used to represent the surface of an object. The aim of this paper is to use KSOM to organize unstructured data for closed surfaces. KSOM isused in this paper by testing its ability to organize medical image data because KSOM is mostly used in constructing engineering field data. Enhancements are added to the model by introducing class number and the index vector, and new equations are created. Various grid sizes and maximum iterations are tested in the experiments. Based on the results, the number of redundancies is found to be directly proportional to the grid size. When we increase the maximum iterations, the surface of the image becomes smoother. An area formula is used and manual calculations are performed to validate the results. This model is implemented and images are created using Dev C++ and GNUPlot.

  10. Cube Kohonen self-organizing map (CKSOM) model with new equations in organizing unstructured data.

    PubMed

    Lim, Seng Poh; Haron, Habibollah

    2013-09-01

    Surface reconstruction by using 3-D data is used to represent the surface of an object and perform important tasks. The type of data used is important and can be described as either structured or unstructured. For unstructured data, there is no connectivity information between data points. As a result, incorrect shapes will be obtained during the imaging process. Therefore, the data should be reorganized by finding the correct topology so that the correct shape can be obtained. Previous studies have shown that the Kohonen self-organizing map (KSOM) could be used to solve data organizing problems. However, 2-D Kohonen maps are limited because they are unable to cover the whole surface of closed 3-D surface data. Furthermore, the neurons inside the 3-D KSOM structure should be removed in order to create a correct wireframe model. This is because only the outside neurons are used to represent the surface of an object. The aim of this paper is to use KSOM to organize unstructured data for closed surfaces. KSOM isused in this paper by testing its ability to organize medical image data because KSOM is mostly used in constructing engineering field data. Enhancements are added to the model by introducing class number and the index vector, and new equations are created. Various grid sizes and maximum iterations are tested in the experiments. Based on the results, the number of redundancies is found to be directly proportional to the grid size. When we increase the maximum iterations, the surface of the image becomes smoother. An area formula is used and manual calculations are performed to validate the results. This model is implemented and images are created using Dev C++ and GNUPlot. PMID:24808578

  11. 3D radiative transfer in colliding wind binaries: Application of the SimpleX algorithm to 3D SPH simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madura, Thomas; Clementel, Nicola; Kruip, Chael; Icke, Vincent; Gull, Theodore

    2014-09-01

    We present the first results of full 3D radiative transfer simulations of the colliding stellar winds in a massive binary system. We accomplish this by applying the SIMPLEX algorithm for 3D radiative transfer on an unstructured Delaunay grid to recent 3D smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) simulations of the colliding winds in the binary system η Carinae. We use SIMPLEX to obtain detailed ionization fractions of hydrogen and helium, in 3D, at the resolution of the original SPH simulations. We show how the SIMPLEX simulations can be used to generate synthetic spectral data cubes for comparison to data obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST)/Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph as part of a multi-cycle program to map changes in η Car's extended interacting wind structures across one binary cycle. Comparison of the HST observations to the SIMPLEX models can help lead to more accurate constraints on the orbital, stellar, and wind parameters of the η Car system, such as the primary's mass-loss rate and the companion's temperature and luminosity. While we initially focus specifically on the η Car binary, the numerical methods employed can be applied to numerous other colliding wind (WR140, WR137, WR19) and dusty 'pinwheel' (WR104, WR98a) binary systems. One of the biggest remaining mysteries is how dust can form and survive in such systems that contain a hot, luminous O star. Coupled with 3D hydrodynamical simulations, SIMPLEX simulations have the potential to help determine the regions where dust can form and survive in these unique objects.

  12. More About the Tetrahedral Unstructured Software System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdol-Hamid, Khaled S.; Frink, Neal T.; Hunter, Craig A.; Parikh, Paresh C.; Pizadeh, Shalyar Z.; Samareh, Jamshid A.; Bhat, Maharaj K.; Pandya, Mohagna J.; Grismer, Matthew J.

    2006-01-01

    TetrUSS is a comprehensive suite of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) programs that won the Software of the Year award in 1996 and has found increasing use in government, academia, and industry for solving realistic flow problems (especially in aerodynamics and aeroelastics of aircraft having complex shapes). TetrUSS includes not only programs for solving basic equations of flow but also programs that afford capabilities for efficient generation and utilization of computational grids and for graphical representation of computed flows (see figure). The 2004 version of the Tetrahedral Unstructured Software System (TetrUSS), which is one of two software systems reported in "NASA s 2004 Software of the Year," NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 28, No. 10 (October 2004), page 18, has been improved greatly since 1996. These improvements include (1) capabilities to simulate viscous flow by solving the Navier-Stokes equations on unstructured grids, (2) portability to personal computers from diverse manufacturers, (3) advanced models of turbulence, (4) a parallel-processing version of one of the unstructured-grid Navier-Stokes-equation-solving programs, and (5) advanced programs for generating unstructured grids.

  13. Building continental-scale 3D subsurface layers in the Digital Crust project: constrained interpolation and uncertainty estimation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yulaeva, E.; Fan, Y.; Moosdorf, N.; Richard, S. M.; Bristol, S.; Peters, S. E.; Zaslavsky, I.; Ingebritsen, S.

    2015-12-01

    The Digital Crust EarthCube building block creates a framework for integrating disparate 3D/4D information from multiple sources into a comprehensive model of the structure and composition of the Earth's upper crust, and to demonstrate the utility of this model in several research scenarios. One of such scenarios is estimation of various crustal properties related to fluid dynamics (e.g. permeability and porosity) at each node of any arbitrary unstructured 3D grid to support continental-scale numerical models of fluid flow and transport. Starting from Macrostrat, an existing 4D database of 33,903 chronostratigraphic units, and employing GeoDeepDive, a software system for extracting structured information from unstructured documents, we construct 3D gridded fields of sediment/rock porosity, permeability and geochemistry for large sedimentary basins of North America, which will be used to improve our understanding of large-scale fluid flow, chemical weathering rates, and geochemical fluxes into the ocean. In this talk, we discuss the methods, data gaps (particularly in geologically complex terrain), and various physical and geological constraints on interpolation and uncertainty estimation.

  14. CFL3D, FUN3d, and NSU3D Contributions to the Fifth Drag Prediction Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Michael A.; Laflin, Kelly R.; Chaffin, Mark S.; Powell, Nicholas; Levy, David W.

    2013-01-01

    Results presented at the Fifth Drag Prediction Workshop using CFL3D, FUN3D, and NSU3D are described. These are calculations on the workshop provided grids and drag adapted grids. The NSU3D results have been updated to reflect an improvement to skin friction calculation on skewed grids. FUN3D results generated after the workshop are included for custom participant generated grids and a grid from a previous workshop. Uniform grid refinement at the design condition shows a tight grouping in calculated drag, where the variation in the pressure component of drag is larger than the skin friction component. At this design condition, A fine-grid drag value was predicted with a smaller drag adjoint adapted grid via tetrahedral adaption to a metric and mixed-element subdivision. The buffet study produced larger variation than the design case, which is attributed to large differences in the predicted side-of-body separation extent. Various modeling and discretization approaches had a strong impact on predicted side-of-body separation. This large wing root separation bubble was not observed in wind tunnel tests indicating that more work is necessary in modeling wing root juncture flows to predict experiments.

  15. JAR3D Webserver: Scoring and aligning RNA loop sequences to known 3D motifs

    PubMed Central

    Roll, James; Zirbel, Craig L.; Sweeney, Blake; Petrov, Anton I.; Leontis, Neocles

    2016-01-01

    Many non-coding RNAs have been identified and may function by forming 2D and 3D structures. RNA hairpin and internal loops are often represented as unstructured on secondary structure diagrams, but RNA 3D structures show that most such loops are structured by non-Watson–Crick basepairs and base stacking. Moreover, different RNA sequences can form the same RNA 3D motif. JAR3D finds possible 3D geometries for hairpin and internal loops by matching loop sequences to motif groups from the RNA 3D Motif Atlas, by exact sequence match when possible, and by probabilistic scoring and edit distance for novel sequences. The scoring gauges the ability of the sequences to form the same pattern of interactions observed in 3D structures of the motif. The JAR3D webserver at http://rna.bgsu.edu/jar3d/ takes one or many sequences of a single loop as input, or else one or many sequences of longer RNAs with multiple loops. Each sequence is scored against all current motif groups. The output shows the ten best-matching motif groups. Users can align input sequences to each of the motif groups found by JAR3D. JAR3D will be updated with every release of the RNA 3D Motif Atlas, and so its performance is expected to improve over time. PMID:27235417

  16. On Convergence Acceleration Techniques for Unstructured Meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mavriplis, Dimitri J.

    1998-01-01

    A discussion of convergence acceleration techniques as they relate to computational fluid dynamics problems on unstructured meshes is given. Rather than providing a detailed description of particular methods, the various different building blocks of current solution techniques are discussed and examples of solution strategies using one or several of these ideas are given. Issues relating to unstructured grid CFD problems are given additional consideration, including suitability of algorithms to current hardware trends, memory and cpu tradeoffs, treatment of non-linearities, and the development of efficient strategies for handling anisotropy-induced stiffness. The outlook for future potential improvements is also discussed.

  17. Aerodynamics Simulations for the D8 ``Double Bubble'' Aircraft Using the LAVA Unstructured Solver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballinger, Sean

    2013-11-01

    The D8 ``double bubble'' is a proposed design for quieter and more efficient domestic passenger aircraft of the Boeing 737 class. It features boundary layer-ingesting engines located under a non-load-bearing π-tail and a lightweight low-sweep wing for flight around Mach 0.7. The D8's wide lifting body is expected to supply 15% of its total lift, while a Boeing 737's fuselage contributes only 8%. The tapering rear of the fuselage is also predicted to experience a negative moment resulting in positive pitch, produce a thicker boundary layer for ingestion by distortion-tolerant engines, and act as a noise shield. To investigate these predictions, unstructured grids generated over a fine surface triangulation using Star-CCM+ are used to model the unpowered D8 with flow conditions mimicking those in the MIT Wright brothers wind tunnel at angles of attack from - 2 to 14 degrees. LAVA, the recently developed Launch Ascent and Vehicle Aerodynamics solver, is used to carry out simulations on an unstructured grid. The results are compared to wind tunnel data, and to data from structured grid simulations using the LAVA, Overflow, and Cart3D solvers. Applied Modeling and Simulation Branch, NASA Advanced Supercomputing Division, funded by New York Space Grant.

  18. Towards Hybrid Overset Grid Simulations of the Launch Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moini-Yekta, Shayan

    A hybrid overset grid approach has been developed for the design and analysis of launch vehicles and facilities in the launch environment. The motivation for the hybrid grid methodology is to reduce the turn-around time of computational fluid dynamic simulations and improve the ability to handle complex geometry and flow physics. The LAVA (Launch Ascent and Vehicle Aerodynamics) hybrid overset grid scheme consists of two components: an off-body immersed-boundary Cartesian solver with block-structured adaptive mesh refinement and a near-body unstructured body-fitted solver. Two-way coupling is achieved through overset connectivity between the off-body and near-body grids. This work highlights verification using code-to-code comparisons and validation using experimental data for the individual and hybrid solver. The hybrid overset grid methodology is applied to representative unsteady 2D trench and 3D generic rocket test cases.

  19. LaMEM: a massively parallel 3D staggered-grid finite-difference code for coupled nonlinear themo-mechanical modeling of lithospheric deformation with visco-elasto-plastic rheology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, Anton; Kaus, Boris

    2015-04-01

    This software project aims at bringing the 3D lithospheric deformation modeling to a qualitatively different level. Our code LaMEM (Lithosphere and Mantle Evolution Model) is based on the following building blocks: * Massively-parallel data-distributed implementation model based on PETSc library * Light, stable and accurate staggered-grid finite difference spatial discretization * Marker-in-Cell pedictor-corector time discretization with Runge-Kutta 4-th order * Elastic stress rotation algorithm based on the time integration of the vorticity pseudo-vector * Staircase-type internal free surface boundary condition without artificial viscosity contrast * Geodynamically relevant visco-elasto-plastic rheology * Global velocity-pressure-temperature Newton-Raphson nonlinear solver * Local nonlinear solver based on FZERO algorithm * Coupled velocity-pressure geometric multigrid preconditioner with Galerkin coarsening Staggered grid finite difference, being inherently Eulerian and rather complicated discretization method, provides no natural treatment of free surface boundary condition. The solution based on the quasi-viscous sticky-air phase introduces significant viscosity contrasts and spoils the convergence of the iterative solvers. In LaMEM we are currently implementing an approximate stair-case type of the free surface boundary condition which excludes the empty cells and restores the solver convergence. Because of the mutual dependence of the stress and strain-rate tensor components, and their different spatial locations in the grid, there is no straightforward way of implementing the nonlinear rheology. In LaMEM we have developed and implemented an efficient interpolation scheme for the second invariant of the strain-rate tensor, that solves this problem. Scalable efficient linear solvers are the key components of the successful nonlinear problem solution. In LaMEM we have a range of PETSc-based preconditioning techniques that either employ a block factorization of

  20. 3D Hydrodynamical and Radiative Transfer Modeling of Eta Carinae's Colliding Winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madura, Thomas Ignatius; Clementel, Nicola; Gull, Theodore R.; Kruip, Chael J. H.; Paardekooper, Jan-Pieter; Icke, Vincent

    2015-08-01

    We present the results of full 3D hydrodynamical and radiative transfer simulations of the colliding stellar winds in the massive binary system Eta Carinae (Clementel, Madura, et al. 2014, MNRAS, 443, 2475 and Clementel, Madura, et al. 2015, MNRAS, 447, 2445). We accomplish this by applying the SimpleX algorithm for 3D radiative transfer on an unstructured Voronoi-Delaunay grid to 3D smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations of the binary colliding winds. We use SimpleX to obtain detailed ionization fractions of hydrogen and helium in 3D. We investigate several computational domain sizes and Luminous Blue Variable primary-star mass-loss rates. We show how the SimpleX simulations can be used to generate synthetic spectral data cubes for comparison to data obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST)/Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph as part of a multi-cycle program to map changes in Eta Carinae's spatially extended interacting wind structures across one binary cycle. Comparison of the HST observations to the SimpleX models can help lead to more accurate constraints on the orbital, stellar, and wind parameters of the Eta Carinae system, such as the LBV primary's mass-loss rate and the companion star's temperature and luminosity. We furthermore present new methods of visualizing and interacting with output from complex 3D numerical simulations, including 3D interactive graphics and 3D printing (Madura et al. 2015, arXiv:1503.00716). While we initially focus specifically on Eta Carinae, the methods employed can be applied to numerous other colliding wind (WR 140, WR 137, WR 19) and dusty ‘pinwheel’ (WR 112, WR 104, WR 98a) binary systems. Coupled with 3D hydrodynamical simulations, SimpleX simulations have the potential to help determine the regions where dust can form and survive in these unique objects.

  1. Europeana and 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pletinckx, D.

    2011-09-01

    The current 3D hype creates a lot of interest in 3D. People go to 3D movies, but are we ready to use 3D in our homes, in our offices, in our communication? Are we ready to deliver real 3D to a general public and use interactive 3D in a meaningful way to enjoy, learn, communicate? The CARARE project is realising this for the moment in the domain of monuments and archaeology, so that real 3D of archaeological sites and European monuments will be available to the general public by 2012. There are several aspects to this endeavour. First of all is the technical aspect of flawlessly delivering 3D content over all platforms and operating systems, without installing software. We have currently a working solution in PDF, but HTML5 will probably be the future. Secondly, there is still little knowledge on how to create 3D learning objects, 3D tourist information or 3D scholarly communication. We are still in a prototype phase when it comes to integrate 3D objects in physical or virtual museums. Nevertheless, Europeana has a tremendous potential as a multi-facetted virtual museum. Finally, 3D has a large potential to act as a hub of information, linking to related 2D imagery, texts, video, sound. We describe how to create such rich, explorable 3D objects that can be used intuitively by the generic Europeana user and what metadata is needed to support the semantic linking.

  2. Unstructured Polyhedral Mesh Thermal Radiation Diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, T.S.; Zika, M.R.; Madsen, N.K.

    2000-07-27

    Unstructured mesh particle transport and diffusion methods are gaining wider acceptance as mesh generation, scientific visualization and linear solvers improve. This paper describes an algorithm that is currently being used in the KULL code at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory to solve the radiative transfer equations. The algorithm employs a point-centered diffusion discretization on arbitrary polyhedral meshes in 3D. We present the results of a few test problems to illustrate the capabilities of the radiation diffusion module.

  3. Unstructured CFD Aerodynamic Analysis of a Generic UCAV Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frink, Neal T.; Tormalm, Magnus; Schmidt, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    Three independent studies from the United States (NASA), Sweden (FOI), and Australia (DSTO) are analyzed to assess the state of current unstructured-grid computational fluid dynamic tools and practices for predicting the complex static and dynamic aerodynamic and stability characteristics of a generic 53-degree swept, round-leading-edge uninhabited combat air vehicle configuration, called SACCON. NASA exercised the USM3D tetrahedral cell-centered flow solver, while FOI and DSTO applied the FOI/EDGE general-cell vertex-based solver. The authors primarily employ the Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) assumption, with a limited assessment of the EDGE Detached Eddy Simulation (DES) extension, to explore sensitivities to grids and turbulence models. Correlations with experimental data are provided for force and moments, surface pressure, and off-body flow measurements. The vortical flow field over SACCON proved extremely difficult to model adequately. As a general rule, the prospect of obtaining reasonable correlations of SACCON pitching moment characteristics with the RANS formulation is not promising, even for static cases. Yet, dynamic pitch oscillation results seem to produce a promising characterization of shapes for the lift and pitching moment hysteresis curves. Future studies of this configuration should include more investigation with higher-fidelity turbulence models, such as DES.

  4. 3D time-domain airborne EM forward modeling with topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Changchun; Qi, Yanfu; Liu, Yunhe; Cai, Jing

    2016-11-01

    The time-domain finite-difference method has been widely used in simulation of the electromagnetic field diffusion. However, this method is severely restricted by the mesh size and time step. To overcome the defect, we adopted edge finite-element method for unstructured grid with Backward Euler method to conduct 3D airborne electromagnetic forward modeling directly in time-domain. The tetrahedral meshes provide the flexibility required for representing the rugged topography and complex-shape anomalous bodies. We simulated the practical shape, size and attitude of transmitting source by directly setting the loop into the well-generated grids. The characteristic properties of vector basic functions guarantee automatic satisfaction of divergence-free property of electric fields. The Galerkin's method is used to discretize the governing equations and a direct solver is adopted to solve the large sparse linear system. We adopted an algorithm with constant step in each time segment to speed up the forward modeling. Further we introduced the local mesh strategy to reduce the calculations, in which an optimized grid is designed for each sounding station. We check the accuracy of our 3D modeling results against the solution for a homogenous half-space and those for a buried vertical plate model using integral equation. The numerical experiments for a hill, a valley or undulating topography model with buried anomalous bodies were further studied that show that the topography has a serious effect on airborne EM data.

  5. Hypersonic Flow Computations on Unstructured Meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bibb, K. L.; Riley, C. J.; Peraire, J.

    1997-01-01

    A method for computing inviscid hypersonic flow over complex configurations using unstructured meshes is presented. The unstructured grid solver uses an edge{based finite{volume formulation. Fluxes are computed using a flux vector splitting scheme that is capable of representing constant enthalpy solutions. Second{order accuracy in smooth flow regions is obtained by linearly reconstructing the solution, and stability near discontinuities is maintained by locally forcing the scheme to reduce to first-order accuracy. The implementation of the algorithm to parallel computers is described. Computations using the proposed method are presented for a sphere-cone configuration at Mach numbers of 5.25 and 10.6, and a complex hypersonic re-entry vehicle at Mach numbers of 4.5 and 9.8. Results are compared to experimental data and computations made with established structured grid methods. The use of the solver as a screening tool for rapid aerodynamic assessment of proposed vehicles is described.

  6. 3d-3d correspondence revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Hee-Joong; Dimofte, Tudor; Gukov, Sergei; Sułkowski, Piotr

    2016-04-01

    In fivebrane compactifications on 3-manifolds, we point out the importance of all flat connections in the proper definition of the effective 3d {N}=2 theory. The Lagrangians of some theories with the desired properties can be constructed with the help of homological knot invariants that categorify colored Jones polynomials. Higgsing the full 3d theories constructed this way recovers theories found previously by Dimofte-Gaiotto-Gukov. We also consider the cutting and gluing of 3-manifolds along smooth boundaries and the role played by all flat connections in this operation.

  7. 3d-3d correspondence revisited

    DOE PAGES

    Chung, Hee -Joong; Dimofte, Tudor; Gukov, Sergei; Sułkowski, Piotr

    2016-04-21

    In fivebrane compactifications on 3-manifolds, we point out the importance of all flat connections in the proper definition of the effective 3d N = 2 theory. The Lagrangians of some theories with the desired properties can be constructed with the help of homological knot invariants that categorify colored Jones polynomials. Higgsing the full 3d theories constructed this way recovers theories found previously by Dimofte-Gaiotto-Gukov. As a result, we also consider the cutting and gluing of 3-manifolds along smooth boundaries and the role played by all flat connections in this operation.

  8. Fs-laser microstructuring of laser-printed LiMn2O4 electrodes for manufacturing of 3D microbatteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pröll, J.; Kim, H.; Mangang, M.; Seifert, H. J.; Piqué, A.; Pfleging, W.

    2014-03-01

    Lithium manganese oxide composite cathodes are realized by laser-printing. The printed cathode is a composite and consists of active powder, binder and conductive agents. Laser-printed cathodes are first calendered and then laser structured using femtosecond-laser radiation in order to form three-dimensional (3D) micro-grids in the cathode material. Three-dimensional micro-grids in calendered/laser structured cathodes exhibit improved discharge capacity retention at a 1 C discharging rate. Calendered but unstructured cathodes indicate the poorest cycling behavior at 1 C discharge. The improved capacity retention and the reduced degradation of calendered/structured cathodes can be attributed to both the increased electrical contact through calendering as well as shortened Li-ion pathways due to laser-induced 3D microgrids.

  9. Restructuring of RELAP5-3D

    SciTech Connect

    George Mesina; Joshua Hykes

    2005-09-01

    The RELAP5-3D source code is unstructured with many interwoven logic flow paths. By restructuring the code, it becomes easier to read and understand, which reduces the time and money required for code development, debugging, and maintenance. A structured program is comprised of blocks of code with one entry and exit point and downward logic flow. IF tests and DO loops inherently create structured code, while GOTO statements are the main cause of unstructured code. FOR_STRUCT is a commercial software package that converts unstructured FORTRAN into structured programming; it was used to restructure individual subroutines. Primarily it transforms GOTO statements, ARITHMETIC IF statements, and COMPUTED GOTO statements into IF-ELSEIF-ELSE tests and DO loops. The complexity of RELAP5-3D complicated the task. First, FOR_STRUCT cannot completely restructure all the complex coding contained in RELAP5-3D. An iterative approach of multiple FOR_STRUCT applications gave some additional improvements. Second, FOR_STRUCT cannot restructure FORTRAN 90 coding, and RELAP5-3D is partially written in FORTRAN 90. Unix scripts for pre-processing subroutines into coding that FOR_STRUCT could handle and post-processing it back into FORTRAN 90 were written. Finally, FOR_STRUCT does not have the ability to restructure the RELAP5-3D code which contains pre-compiler directives. Variations of a file were processed with different pre-compiler options switched on or off, ensuring that every block of code was restructured. Then the variations were recombined to create a completely restructured source file. Unix scripts were written to perform these tasks, as well as to make some minor formatting improvements. In total, 447 files comprising some 180,000 lines of FORTRAN code were restructured. These showed significant reduction in the number of logic jumps contained as measured by reduction in the number of GOTO statements and line labels. The average number of GOTO statements per subroutine

  10. Shim3d Helmholtz Solution Package

    2009-01-29

    This suite of codes solves the Helmholtz Equation for the steady-state propagation of single-frequency electromagnetic radiation in an arbitrary 2D or 3D dielectric medium. Materials can be either transparent or absorptive (including metals) and are described entirely by their shape and complex dielectric constant. Dielectric boundaries are assumed to always fall on grid boundaries and the material within a single grid cell is considered to be uniform. Input to the problem is in the formmore » of a Dirichlet boundary condition on a single boundary, and may be either analytic (Gaussian) in shape, or a mode shape computed using a separate code (such as the included eigenmode solver vwave20), and written to a file. Solution is via the finite difference method using Jacobi iteration for 3D problems or direct matrix inversion for 2D problems. Note that 3D problems that include metals will require different iteration parameters than described in the above reference. For structures with curved boundaries not easily modeled on a rectangular grid, the auxillary codes helmholtz11(2D), helm3d (semivectoral), and helmv3d (full vectoral) are provided. For these codes the finite difference equations are specified on a topological regular triangular grid and solved using Jacobi iteration or direct matrix inversion as before. An automatic grid generator is supplied.« less

  11. 3D and Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meulien Ohlmann, Odile

    2013-02-01

    Today the industry offers a chain of 3D products. Learning to "read" and to "create in 3D" becomes an issue of education of primary importance. 25 years professional experience in France, the United States and Germany, Odile Meulien set up a personal method of initiation to 3D creation that entails the spatial/temporal experience of the holographic visual. She will present some different tools and techniques used for this learning, their advantages and disadvantages, programs and issues of educational policies, constraints and expectations related to the development of new techniques for 3D imaging. Although the creation of display holograms is very much reduced compared to the creation of the 90ies, the holographic concept is spreading in all scientific, social, and artistic activities of our present time. She will also raise many questions: What means 3D? Is it communication? Is it perception? How the seeing and none seeing is interferes? What else has to be taken in consideration to communicate in 3D? How to handle the non visible relations of moving objects with subjects? Does this transform our model of exchange with others? What kind of interaction this has with our everyday life? Then come more practical questions: How to learn creating 3D visualization, to learn 3D grammar, 3D language, 3D thinking? What for? At what level? In which matter? for whom?

  12. Tuned grid generation with ICEM CFD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wulf, Armin; Akdag, Vedat

    1995-01-01

    ICEM CFD is a CAD based grid generation package that supports multiblock structured, unstructured tetrahedral and unstructured hexahedral grids. Major development efforts have been spent to extend ICEM CFD's multiblock structured and hexahedral unstructured grid generation capabilities. The modules added are: a parametric grid generation module and a semi-automatic hexahedral grid generation module. A fully automatic version of the hexahedral grid generation module for around a set of predefined objects in rectilinear enclosures has been developed. These modules will be presented and the procedures used will be described, and examples will be discussed.

  13. Reviews Book: Marie Curie and Her Daughters Resource: Cumulus Equipment: Alpha Particle Scattering Apparatus Equipment: 3D Magnetic Tube Equipment: National Grid Transmission Model Book: Einstein's Physics Equipment: Barton's Pendulums Equipment: Weather Station Web Watch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2013-09-01

    WE RECOMMEND Marie Curie and Her Daughters An insightful study of a resilient and ingenious family and their achievements Cumulus Simple to install and operate and with obvious teaching applications, this weather station 'donationware' is as easy to recommend as it is to use Alpha Particle Scattering Apparatus Good design and construction make for good results National Grid Transmission Model Despite its expense, this resource offers excellent value Einstein's Physics A vivid, accurate, compelling and rigorous treatment, but requiring an investment of time and thought WORTH A LOOK 3D Magnetic Tube Magnetic fields in three dimensions at a low cost Barton's Pendulums A neat, well-made and handy variant, but not a replacement for the more traditional version Weather Station Though not as robust or substantial as hoped for, this can be put to good use with the right software WEB WATCH An online experiment and worksheet are useful for teaching motor efficiency, a glance at CERN, and NASA's interesting information on the alpha-magnetic spectrometer and climate change

  14. FUN3D Analyses in Support of the Second Aeroelastic Prediction Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chwalowski, Pawel; Heeg, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the computational aeroelastic results generated in support of the second Aeroelastic Prediction Workshop for the Benchmark Supercritical Wing (BSCW) configurations and compares them to the experimental data. The computational results are obtained using FUN3D, an unstructured grid Reynolds- Averaged Navier-Stokes solver developed at NASA Langley Research Center. The analysis results include aerodynamic coefficients and surface pressures obtained for steady-state, static aeroelastic equilibrium, and unsteady flow due to a pitching wing or flutter prediction. Frequency response functions of the pressure coefficients with respect to the angular displacement are computed and compared with the experimental data. The effects of spatial and temporal convergence on the computational results are examined.

  15. A flexible gridding scheme for reservoir simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Verma, S.

    1995-12-31

    This paper describes a new control volume based finite difference scheme for petroleum reservoir simulation which can be used with unstructured grids. The numerical scheme to model fluid flow is shown to be easily used for Voronoi grids in 2D. It can also be used with certain geometrical limitations for 3D Voronoi grids. The scheme can be used without any significant limitations for triangle or tetrahedron based grids where control volumes are constructed around their vertices. It assumes uniform properties inside such control volumes. Full, anisotropic and asymmetric permeability tensor can be easily handled with the proposed method. The permeability tensor can vary from block to block. Thus it will be of great value in modeling fluid flow in reservoirs where principal directions of permeability varies between beds or within a bed. The paper also presents an analysis of some of the published flexible gridding schemes which use a control volume type algebraic approximation and demonstrate the advantages of the method presented here. The technique for grid construction is also discussed. Test results presented here demonstrate the need for proper representation of reservoir geometry to predict the correct flow behavior. The gridding scheme described in this paper achieves that purpose.

  16. Contribution of 3D inversion of Electrical Resistivity Tomography data applied to volcanic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portal, Angélie; Fargier, Yannick; Lénat, Jean-François; Labazuy, Philippe

    2016-04-01

    The electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) method, initially developed for environmental and engineering exploration, is now commonly used for geological structures imaging. Such structures can present complex characteristics that conventional 2D inversion processes cannot perfectly integrate. Here we present a new 3D inversion algorithm named EResI, firstly developed for levee investigation, and presently applied to the study of a complex lava dome (the Puy de Dôme volcano, France). EResI algorithm is based on a conventional regularized Gauss-Newton inversion scheme and a 3D non-structured discretization of the model (double grid method based on tetrahedrons). This discretization allows to accurately model the topography of investigated structure (without a mesh deformation procedure) and also permits a precise location of the electrodes. Moreover, we demonstrate that a complete 3D unstructured discretization limits the number of inversion cells and is better adapted to the resolution capacity of tomography than a structured discretization. This study shows that a 3D inversion with a non-structured parametrization has some advantages compared to classical 2D inversions. The first advantage comes from the fact that a 2D inversion leads to artefacts due to 3D effects (3D topography, 3D internal resistivity). The second advantage comes from the fact that the capacity to experimentally align electrodes along an axis (for 2D surveys) depends on the constrains on the field (topography...). In this case, a 2D assumption induced by 2.5D inversion software prevents its capacity to model electrodes outside this axis leading to artefacts in the inversion result. The last limitation comes from the use of mesh deformation techniques used to accurately model the topography in 2D softwares. This technique used for structured discretization (Res2dinv) is prohibed for strong topography (>60 %) and leads to a small computational errors. A wide geophysical survey was carried out

  17. 3D Imaging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hastings, S. K.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses 3 D imaging as it relates to digital representations in virtual library collections. Highlights include X-ray computed tomography (X-ray CT); the National Science Foundation (NSF) Digital Library Initiatives; output peripherals; image retrieval systems, including metadata; and applications of 3 D imaging for libraries and museums. (LRW)

  18. Volume Rendering for Curvilinear and Unstructured Grids

    SciTech Connect

    Max, N; Williams, P; Silva, C; Cook, R

    2003-03-05

    We discuss two volume rendering methods developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The first, cell projection, renders the polygons in the projection of each cell. It requires a global visibility sort in order to composite the cells in back to front order, and we discuss several different algorithms for this sort. The second method uses regularly spaced slice planes perpendicular to the X, Y, or Z axes, which slice the cells into polygons. Both methods are supplemented with anti-aliasing techniques to deal with small cells that might fall between pixel samples or slice planes, and both have been parallelized.

  19. Structured and Unstructured Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1996

    This document contains four papers presented at a sympoisum on structured and unstructured learning moderated by Catherine Sleezer at the 1996 conference of the Academy of Human Resource Development (AHRD). "Designing Experiential Learning into Organizational Work Life: Proposing a Framework for Theory and Research" (Cheri Maben-Crouch) proposes a…

  20. The Unstructured Clinical Interview

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Karyn Dayle

    2010-01-01

    In mental health, family, and community counseling settings, master's-level counselors engage in unstructured clinical interviewing to develop diagnoses based on the "Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders" (4th ed., text rev.; "DSM-IV-TR"; American Psychiatric Association, 2000). Although counselors receive education about…

  1. A Piecewise Linear Finite Element Discretization of the Diffusion Equation for Arbitrary Polyhedral Grids

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, T S; Adams, M L; Yang, B; Zika, M R

    2005-07-15

    We develop a piecewise linear (PWL) Galerkin finite element spatial discretization for the multi-dimensional radiation diffusion equation. It uses piecewise linear weight and basis functions in the finite element approximation, and it can be applied on arbitrary polygonal (2D) or polyhedral (3D) grids. We show that this new PWL method gives solutions comparable to those from Palmer's finite-volume method. However, since the PWL method produces a symmetric positive definite coefficient matrix, it should be substantially more computationally efficient than Palmer's method, which produces an asymmetric matrix. We conclude that the Galerkin PWL method is an attractive option for solving diffusion equations on unstructured grids.

  2. Smooth surface extraction from unstructured point-based volume data using PDEs.

    PubMed

    Rosenthal, Paul; Linsen, Lars

    2008-01-01

    Smooth surface extraction using partial differential equations (PDEs) is a well-known and widely used technique for visualizing volume data. Existing approaches operate on gridded data and mainly on regular structured grids. When considering unstructured point-based volume data where sample points do not form regular patterns nor are they connected in any form, one would typically resample the data over a grid prior to applying the known PDE-based methods. We propose an approach that directly extracts smooth surfaces from unstructured point-based volume data without prior resampling or mesh generation. When operating on unstructured data one needs to quickly derive neighborhood information. The respective information is retrieved by partitioning the 3D domain into cells using a kd-tree and operating on its cells. We exploit neighborhood information to estimate gradients and mean curvature at every sample point using a four-dimensional least-squares fitting approach. Gradients and mean curvature are required for applying the chosen PDE-based method that combines hyperbolic advection to an isovalue of a given scalar field and mean curvature flow. Since we are using an explicit time-integration scheme, time steps and neighbor locations are bounded to ensure convergence of the process. To avoid small global time steps, we use asynchronous local integration. We extract the surface by successively fitting a smooth auxiliary function to the data set. This auxiliary function is initialized as a signed distance function. For each sample and for every time step we compute the respective gradient, the mean curvature, and a stable time step. With these informations the auxiliary function is manipulated using an explicit Euler time integration. The process successively continues with the next sample point in time. If the norm of the auxiliary function gradient in a sample exceeds a given threshold at some time, the auxiliary function is reinitialized to a signed distance

  3. Smooth surface extraction from unstructured point-based volume data using PDEs.

    PubMed

    Rosenthal, Paul; Linsen, Lars

    2008-01-01

    Smooth surface extraction using partial differential equations (PDEs) is a well-known and widely used technique for visualizing volume data. Existing approaches operate on gridded data and mainly on regular structured grids. When considering unstructured point-based volume data where sample points do not form regular patterns nor are they connected in any form, one would typically resample the data over a grid prior to applying the known PDE-based methods. We propose an approach that directly extracts smooth surfaces from unstructured point-based volume data without prior resampling or mesh generation. When operating on unstructured data one needs to quickly derive neighborhood information. The respective information is retrieved by partitioning the 3D domain into cells using a kd-tree and operating on its cells. We exploit neighborhood information to estimate gradients and mean curvature at every sample point using a four-dimensional least-squares fitting approach. Gradients and mean curvature are required for applying the chosen PDE-based method that combines hyperbolic advection to an isovalue of a given scalar field and mean curvature flow. Since we are using an explicit time-integration scheme, time steps and neighbor locations are bounded to ensure convergence of the process. To avoid small global time steps, we use asynchronous local integration. We extract the surface by successively fitting a smooth auxiliary function to the data set. This auxiliary function is initialized as a signed distance function. For each sample and for every time step we compute the respective gradient, the mean curvature, and a stable time step. With these informations the auxiliary function is manipulated using an explicit Euler time integration. The process successively continues with the next sample point in time. If the norm of the auxiliary function gradient in a sample exceeds a given threshold at some time, the auxiliary function is reinitialized to a signed distance

  4. An Automatic 3D Mesh Generation Method for Domains with Multiple Materials.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yongjie; Hughes, Thomas J R; Bajaj, Chandrajit L

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes an automatic and efficient approach to construct unstructured tetrahedral and hexahedral meshes for a composite domain made up of heterogeneous materials. The boundaries of these material regions form non-manifold surfaces. In earlier papers, we developed an octree-based isocontouring method to construct unstructured 3D meshes for a single-material (homogeneous) domain with manifold boundary. In this paper, we introduce the notion of a material change edge and use it to identify the interface between two or several different materials. A novel method to calculate the minimizer point for a cell shared by more than two materials is provided, which forms a non-manifold node on the boundary. We then mesh all the material regions simultaneously and automatically while conforming to their boundaries directly from volumetric data. Both material change edges and interior edges are analyzed to construct tetrahedral meshes, and interior grid points are analyzed for proper hexahedral mesh construction. Finally, edge-contraction and smoothing methods are used to improve the quality of tetrahedral meshes, and a combination of pillowing, geometric flow and optimization techniques is used for hexahedral mesh quality improvement. The shrink set of pillowing schemes is defined automatically as the boundary of each material region. Several application results of our multi-material mesh generation method are also provided. PMID:20161555

  5. M3D project for simulation studies of plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Park, W.; Belova, E.V.; Fu, G.Y.; Strauss, H.R.; Sugiyama, L.E.

    1998-12-31

    The M3D (Multi-level 3D) project carries out simulation studies of plasmas of various regimes using multi-levels of physics, geometry, and mesh schemes in one code package. This paper and papers by Strauss, Sugiyama, and Belova in this workshop describe the project, and present examples of current applications. The currently available physics models of the M3D project are MHD, two-fluids, gyrokinetic hot particle/MHD hybrid, and gyrokinetic particle ion/two-fluid hybrid models. The code can be run with both structured and unstructured meshes.

  6. USM3D Predictions of Supersonic Nozzle Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Melissa B.; Elmiligui, Alaa A.; Campbell, Richard L.; Nayani, Sudheer N.

    2014-01-01

    This study focused on the NASA Tetrahedral Unstructured Software System CFD code (USM3D) capability to predict supersonic plume flow. Previous studies, published in 2004 and 2009, investigated USM3D's results versus historical experimental data. This current study continued that comparison however focusing on the use of the volume souring to capture the shear layers and internal shock structure of the plume. This study was conducted using two benchmark axisymmetric supersonic jet experimental data sets. The study showed that with the use of volume sourcing, USM3D was able to capture and model a jet plume's shear layer and internal shock structure.

  7. A 3-D implicit finite-volume model of shallow water flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Weiming; Lin, Qianru

    2015-09-01

    A three-dimensional (3-D) model has been developed to simulate shallow water flows in large water bodies, such as coastal and estuarine waters. The eddy viscosity is determined using a newly modified mixing length model that uses different mixing length functions for the horizontal and vertical shear strain rates. The 3-D shallow water flow equations with the hydrostatic pressure assumption are solved using an implicit finite-volume method based on a quadtree (telescoping) rectangular mesh on the horizontal plane and the sigma coordinate in the vertical direction. The quadtree technique can locally refine the mesh around structures or in high-gradient regions by splitting a coarse cell into four child cells. The grid nodes are numbered with a one-dimensional index system that has unstructured grid feature for better grid flexibility. All the primary variables are arranged in a non-staggered grid system. Fluxes at cell faces are determined using a Rhie and Chow-type momentum interpolation, to avoid the possible spurious checkerboard oscillations caused by linear interpolation. Each of the discretized governing equations is solved iteratively using the flexible GMRES method with ILUT preconditioning, and coupling of water level and velocity among these equations is achieved by using the SIMPLEC algorithm with under-relaxation. The model has been tested in four cases, including steady flow near a spur-dyke, tidal flows in San Francisco Bay and Gironde Estuary, and wind-induced current in a flume. The calculated water levels and velocities are in good agreement with the measured values.

  8. Stochastic regularization operators on unstructured meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordi, Claudio; Doetsch, Joseph; Günther, Thomas; Schmelzbach, Cedric; Robertsson, Johan

    2016-04-01

    Most geophysical inverse problems require the solution of underdetermined systems of equations. In order to solve such inverse problems, appropriate regularization is required. Ideally, this regularization includes information on the expected model variability and spatial correlation. Based on geostatistical covariance functions, which can be adapted to the specific situation, stochastic regularization can be used to add auxiliary constraints to the given inverse problem. Stochastic regularization operators have been successfully applied to geophysical inverse problems formulated on regular grids. Here, we demonstrate the calculation of stochastic regularization operators for unstructured meshes. Unstructured meshes are advantageous with regards to incorporating arbitrary topography, undulating geological interfaces and complex acquisition geometries into the inversion. However, compared to regular grids, unstructured meshes have variable cell sizes, complicating the calculation of stochastic operators. The stochastic operators proposed here are based on a 2D exponential correlation function, allowing to predefine spatial correlation lengths. The regularization thus acts over an imposed correlation length rather than only taking into account neighbouring cells as in regular smoothing constraints. Correlation over a spatial length partly removes the effects of variable cell sizes of unstructured meshes on the regularization. Synthetic models having large-scale interfaces as well as small-scale stochastic variations are used to analyse the performance and behaviour of the stochastic regularization operators. The resulting inverted models obtained with stochastic regularization are compare against the results of standard regularization approaches (damping and smoothing). Besides using stochastic operators for regularization, we plan to incorporate the footprint of the stochastic operator in further applications such as the calculation of the cross-gradient functions

  9. Fallon FORGE 3D Geologic Model

    DOE Data Explorer

    Doug Blankenship

    2016-03-01

    An x,y,z scattered data file for the 3D geologic model of the Fallon FORGE site. Model created in Earthvision by Dynamic Graphic Inc. The model was constructed with a grid spacing of 100 m. Geologic surfaces were extrapolated from the input data using a minimum tension gridding algorithm. The data file is tabular data in a text file, with lithology data associated with X,Y,Z grid points. All the relevant information is in the file header (the spatial reference, the projection etc.) In addition all the fields in the data file are identified in the header.

  10. Radiochromic 3D Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oldham, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Radiochromic materials exhibit a colour change when exposed to ionising radiation. Radiochromic film has been used for clinical dosimetry for many years and increasingly so recently, as films of higher sensitivities have become available. The two principle advantages of radiochromic dosimetry include greater tissue equivalence (radiologically) and the lack of requirement for development of the colour change. In a radiochromic material, the colour change arises direct from ionising interactions affecting dye molecules, without requiring any latent chemical, optical or thermal development, with important implications for increased accuracy and convenience. It is only relatively recently however, that 3D radiochromic dosimetry has become possible. In this article we review recent developments and the current state-of-the-art of 3D radiochromic dosimetry, and the potential for a more comprehensive solution for the verification of complex radiation therapy treatments, and 3D dose measurement in general.

  11. 3-D Seismic Interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Gregory F.

    2009-05-01

    This volume is a brief introduction aimed at those who wish to gain a basic and relatively quick understanding of the interpretation of three-dimensional (3-D) seismic reflection data. The book is well written, clearly illustrated, and easy to follow. Enough elementary mathematics are presented for a basic understanding of seismic methods, but more complex mathematical derivations are avoided. References are listed for readers interested in more advanced explanations. After a brief introduction, the book logically begins with a succinct chapter on modern 3-D seismic data acquisition and processing. Standard 3-D acquisition methods are presented, and an appendix expands on more recent acquisition techniques, such as multiple-azimuth and wide-azimuth acquisition. Although this chapter covers the basics of standard time processing quite well, there is only a single sentence about prestack depth imaging, and anisotropic processing is not mentioned at all, even though both techniques are now becoming standard.

  12. The Tera Multithreaded Architecture and Unstructured Meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bokhari, Shahid H.; Mavriplis, Dimitri J.

    1998-01-01

    The Tera Multithreaded Architecture (MTA) is a new parallel supercomputer currently being installed at San Diego Supercomputing Center (SDSC). This machine has an architecture quite different from contemporary parallel machines. The computational processor is a custom design and the machine uses hardware to support very fine grained multithreading. The main memory is shared, hardware randomized and flat. These features make the machine highly suited to the execution of unstructured mesh problems, which are difficult to parallelize on other architectures. We report the results of a study carried out during July-August 1998 to evaluate the execution of EUL3D, a code that solves the Euler equations on an unstructured mesh, on the 2 processor Tera MTA at SDSC. Our investigation shows that parallelization of an unstructured code is extremely easy on the Tera. We were able to get an existing parallel code (designed for a shared memory machine), running on the Tera by changing only the compiler directives. Furthermore, a serial version of this code was compiled to run in parallel on the Tera by judicious use of directives to invoke the "full/empty" tag bits of the machine to obtain synchronization. This version achieves 212 and 406 Mflop/s on one and two processors respectively, and requires no attention to partitioning or placement of data issues that would be of paramount importance in other parallel architectures.

  13. Bootstrapping 3D fermions

    DOE PAGES

    Iliesiu, Luca; Kos, Filip; Poland, David; Pufu, Silviu S.; Simmons-Duffin, David; Yacoby, Ran

    2016-03-17

    We study the conformal bootstrap for a 4-point function of fermions <ψψψψ> in 3D. We first introduce an embedding formalism for 3D spinors and compute the conformal blocks appearing in fermion 4-point functions. Using these results, we find general bounds on the dimensions of operators appearing in the ψ × ψ OPE, and also on the central charge CT. We observe features in our bounds that coincide with scaling dimensions in the GrossNeveu models at large N. Finally, we also speculate that other features could coincide with a fermionic CFT containing no relevant scalar operators.

  14. PLOT3D Export Tool for Tecplot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alter, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    The PLOT3D export tool for Tecplot solves the problem of modified data being impossible to output for use by another computational science solver. The PLOT3D Exporter add-on enables the use of the most commonly available visualization tools to engineers for output of a standard format. The exportation of PLOT3D data from Tecplot has far reaching effects because it allows for grid and solution manipulation within a graphical user interface (GUI) that is easily customized with macro language-based and user-developed GUIs. The add-on also enables the use of Tecplot as an interpolation tool for solution conversion between different grids of different types. This one add-on enhances the functionality of Tecplot so significantly, it offers the ability to incorporate Tecplot into a general suite of tools for computational science applications as a 3D graphics engine for visualization of all data. Within the PLOT3D Export Add-on are several functions that enhance the operations and effectiveness of the add-on. Unlike Tecplot output functions, the PLOT3D Export Add-on enables the use of the zone selection dialog in Tecplot to choose which zones are to be written by offering three distinct options - output of active, inactive, or all zones (grid blocks). As the user modifies the zones to output with the zone selection dialog, the zones to be written are similarly updated. This enables the use of Tecplot to create multiple configurations of a geometry being analyzed. For example, if an aircraft is loaded with multiple deflections of flaps, by activating and deactivating different zones for a specific flap setting, new specific configurations of that aircraft can be easily generated by only writing out specific zones. Thus, if ten flap settings are loaded into Tecplot, the PLOT3D Export software can output ten different configurations, one for each flap setting.

  15. A composite structured/unstructured-mesh Euler method for complex airfoil shapes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hefazi, H.; Chen, L. T.

    1992-01-01

    A general two-dimensional Euler zonal method has been developed for computing flows about complex airfoil geometries such as multielement and iced airfoils. The method utilizes a composite structured and unstructured grid generated using conformal mapping and Delaunay triangulation, respectively. The finite-volume Euler method is then modified to couple solutions in the zones with structured and unstructured grids. Solutions about an iced airfoil and a multielement airfoil are given as examples of applications of the scheme.

  16. Venus in 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plaut, J. J.

    1993-08-01

    Stereographic images of the surface of Venus which enable geologists to reconstruct the details of the planet's evolution are discussed. The 120-meter resolution of these 3D images make it possible to construct digital topographic maps from which precise measurements can be made of the heights, depths, slopes, and volumes of geologic structures.

  17. 3D reservoir visualization

    SciTech Connect

    Van, B.T.; Pajon, J.L.; Joseph, P. )

    1991-11-01

    This paper shows how some simple 3D computer graphics tools can be combined to provide efficient software for visualizing and analyzing data obtained from reservoir simulators and geological simulations. The animation and interactive capabilities of the software quickly provide a deep understanding of the fluid-flow behavior and an accurate idea of the internal architecture of a reservoir.

  18. Parallel performance of a preconditioned CG solver for unstructured finite element applications

    SciTech Connect

    Shadid, J.N.; Hutchinson, S.A.; Moffat, H.K.

    1994-12-31

    A parallel unstructured finite element (FE) implementation designed for message passing MIMD machines is described. This implementation employs automated problem partitioning algorithms for load balancing unstructured grids, a distributed sparse matrix representation of the global finite element equations and a parallel conjugate gradient (CG) solver. In this paper a number of issues related to the efficient implementation of parallel unstructured mesh applications are presented. These include the differences between structured and unstructured mesh parallel applications, major communication kernels for unstructured CG solvers, automatic mesh partitioning algorithms, and the influence of mesh partitioning metrics on parallel performance. Initial results are presented for example finite element (FE) heat transfer analysis applications on a 1024 processor nCUBE 2 hypercube. Results indicate over 95% scaled efficiencies are obtained for some large problems despite the required unstructured data communication.

  19. PLOT3D/AMES, DEC VAX VMS VERSION USING DISSPLA (WITH TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P.

    1994-01-01

    PLOT3D is an interactive graphics program designed to help scientists visualize computational fluid dynamics (CFD) grids and solutions. Today, supercomputers and CFD algorithms can provide scientists with simulations of such highly complex phenomena that obtaining an understanding of the simulations has become a major problem. Tools which help the scientist visualize the simulations can be of tremendous aid. PLOT3D/AMES offers more functions and features, and has been adapted for more types of computers than any other CFD graphics program. Version 3.6b+ is supported for five computers and graphic libraries. Using PLOT3D, CFD physicists can view their computational models from any angle, observing the physics of problems and the quality of solutions. As an aid in designing aircraft, for example, PLOT3D's interactive computer graphics can show vortices, temperature, reverse flow, pressure, and dozens of other characteristics of air flow during flight. As critical areas become obvious, they can easily be studied more closely using a finer grid. PLOT3D is part of a computational fluid dynamics software cycle. First, a program such as 3DGRAPE (ARC-12620) helps the scientist generate computational grids to model an object and its surrounding space. Once the grids have been designed and parameters such as the angle of attack, Mach number, and Reynolds number have been specified, a "flow-solver" program such as INS3D (ARC-11794 or COS-10019) solves the system of equations governing fluid flow, usually on a supercomputer. Grids sometimes have as many as two million points, and the "flow-solver" produces a solution file which contains density, x- y- and z-momentum, and stagnation energy for each grid point. With such a solution file and a grid file containing up to 50 grids as input, PLOT3D can calculate and graphically display any one of 74 functions, including shock waves, surface pressure, velocity vectors, and particle traces. PLOT3D's 74 functions are organized into

  20. PLOT3D/AMES, DEC VAX VMS VERSION USING DISSPLA (WITHOUT TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P. G.

    1994-01-01

    PLOT3D is an interactive graphics program designed to help scientists visualize computational fluid dynamics (CFD) grids and solutions. Today, supercomputers and CFD algorithms can provide scientists with simulations of such highly complex phenomena that obtaining an understanding of the simulations has become a major problem. Tools which help the scientist visualize the simulations can be of tremendous aid. PLOT3D/AMES offers more functions and features, and has been adapted for more types of computers than any other CFD graphics program. Version 3.6b+ is supported for five computers and graphic libraries. Using PLOT3D, CFD physicists can view their computational models from any angle, observing the physics of problems and the quality of solutions. As an aid in designing aircraft, for example, PLOT3D's interactive computer graphics can show vortices, temperature, reverse flow, pressure, and dozens of other characteristics of air flow during flight. As critical areas become obvious, they can easily be studied more closely using a finer grid. PLOT3D is part of a computational fluid dynamics software cycle. First, a program such as 3DGRAPE (ARC-12620) helps the scientist generate computational grids to model an object and its surrounding space. Once the grids have been designed and parameters such as the angle of attack, Mach number, and Reynolds number have been specified, a "flow-solver" program such as INS3D (ARC-11794 or COS-10019) solves the system of equations governing fluid flow, usually on a supercomputer. Grids sometimes have as many as two million points, and the "flow-solver" produces a solution file which contains density, x- y- and z-momentum, and stagnation energy for each grid point. With such a solution file and a grid file containing up to 50 grids as input, PLOT3D can calculate and graphically display any one of 74 functions, including shock waves, surface pressure, velocity vectors, and particle traces. PLOT3D's 74 functions are organized into

  1. NUBEAM developments and 3d halo modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorelenkova, M. V.; Medley, S. S.; Kaye, S. M.

    2012-10-01

    Recent developments related to the 3D halo model in NUBEAM code are described. To have a reliable halo neutral source for diagnostic simulation, the TRANSP/NUBEAM code has been enhanced with full implementation of ADAS atomic physic ground state and excited state data for hydrogenic beams and mixed species plasma targets. The ADAS codes and database provide the density and temperature dependence of the atomic data, and the collective nature of the state excitation process. To be able to populate 3D halo output with sufficient statistical resolution, the capability to control the statistics of fast ion CX modeling and for thermal halo launch has been added to NUBEAM. The 3D halo neutral model is based on modification and extension of the ``beam in box'' aligned 3d Cartesian grid that includes the neutral beam itself, 3D fast neutral densities due to CX of partially slowed down fast ions in the beam halo region, 3D thermal neutral densities due to CX deposition and fast neutral recapture source. More details on the 3D halo simulation design will be presented.

  2. Magmatic Systems in 3-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kent, G. M.; Harding, A. J.; Babcock, J. M.; Orcutt, J. A.; Bazin, S.; Singh, S.; Detrick, R. S.; Canales, J. P.; Carbotte, S. M.; Diebold, J.

    2002-12-01

    , even if one data object lies behind another. Stereoscopic viewing is another powerful tool to investigate 3-D relationships between objects. This form of immersion is constructed through viewing two separate images that are interleaved--typically 48 frames per second, per eye--and synced through an emitter and a set of specialized polarizing eyeglasses. The polarizing lenses flicker at an equivalent rate, blanking the eye for which a particular image was not drawn, producing the desired stereo effect. Volumetric visualization of the ARAD 3-D seismic dataset will be presented. The effective use of transparency reveals detailed structure of the melt-lens beneath the 9°03'N overlapping spreading center (OSC) along the East Pacific Rise, including melt-filled fractures within the propagating rift-tip. In addition, range-gated images of seismic reflectivity will be co-registered to investigate the physical properties (melt versus mush) of the magma chamber at this locale. Surface visualization of a dense, 2-D grid of MCS seismic data beneath Axial seamount (Juan de Fuca Ridge) will also be highlighted, including relationships between the summit caldera and rift zones, and the underlying (and humongous) magma chamber. A selection of Quicktime movies will be shown. Popcorn will be served, really!

  3. PLOT3D/AMES, GENERIC UNIX VERSION USING DISSPLA (WITH TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P.

    1994-01-01

    PLOT3D is an interactive graphics program designed to help scientists visualize computational fluid dynamics (CFD) grids and solutions. Today, supercomputers and CFD algorithms can provide scientists with simulations of such highly complex phenomena that obtaining an understanding of the simulations has become a major problem. Tools which help the scientist visualize the simulations can be of tremendous aid. PLOT3D/AMES offers more functions and features, and has been adapted for more types of computers than any other CFD graphics program. Version 3.6b+ is supported for five computers and graphic libraries. Using PLOT3D, CFD physicists can view their computational models from any angle, observing the physics of problems and the quality of solutions. As an aid in designing aircraft, for example, PLOT3D's interactive computer graphics can show vortices, temperature, reverse flow, pressure, and dozens of other characteristics of air flow during flight. As critical areas become obvious, they can easily be studied more closely using a finer grid. PLOT3D is part of a computational fluid dynamics software cycle. First, a program such as 3DGRAPE (ARC-12620) helps the scientist generate computational grids to model an object and its surrounding space. Once the grids have been designed and parameters such as the angle of attack, Mach number, and Reynolds number have been specified, a "flow-solver" program such as INS3D (ARC-11794 or COS-10019) solves the system of equations governing fluid flow, usually on a supercomputer. Grids sometimes have as many as two million points, and the "flow-solver" produces a solution file which contains density, x- y- and z-momentum, and stagnation energy for each grid point. With such a solution file and a grid file containing up to 50 grids as input, PLOT3D can calculate and graphically display any one of 74 functions, including shock waves, surface pressure, velocity vectors, and particle traces. PLOT3D's 74 functions are organized into

  4. PLOT3D/AMES, GENERIC UNIX VERSION USING DISSPLA (WITHOUT TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P.

    1994-01-01

    PLOT3D is an interactive graphics program designed to help scientists visualize computational fluid dynamics (CFD) grids and solutions. Today, supercomputers and CFD algorithms can provide scientists with simulations of such highly complex phenomena that obtaining an understanding of the simulations has become a major problem. Tools which help the scientist visualize the simulations can be of tremendous aid. PLOT3D/AMES offers more functions and features, and has been adapted for more types of computers than any other CFD graphics program. Version 3.6b+ is supported for five computers and graphic libraries. Using PLOT3D, CFD physicists can view their computational models from any angle, observing the physics of problems and the quality of solutions. As an aid in designing aircraft, for example, PLOT3D's interactive computer graphics can show vortices, temperature, reverse flow, pressure, and dozens of other characteristics of air flow during flight. As critical areas become obvious, they can easily be studied more closely using a finer grid. PLOT3D is part of a computational fluid dynamics software cycle. First, a program such as 3DGRAPE (ARC-12620) helps the scientist generate computational grids to model an object and its surrounding space. Once the grids have been designed and parameters such as the angle of attack, Mach number, and Reynolds number have been specified, a "flow-solver" program such as INS3D (ARC-11794 or COS-10019) solves the system of equations governing fluid flow, usually on a supercomputer. Grids sometimes have as many as two million points, and the "flow-solver" produces a solution file which contains density, x- y- and z-momentum, and stagnation energy for each grid point. With such a solution file and a grid file containing up to 50 grids as input, PLOT3D can calculate and graphically display any one of 74 functions, including shock waves, surface pressure, velocity vectors, and particle traces. PLOT3D's 74 functions are organized into

  5. 3D rapid mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isaksson, Folke; Borg, Johan; Haglund, Leif

    2008-04-01

    In this paper the performance of passive range measurement imaging using stereo technique in real time applications is described. Stereo vision uses multiple images to get depth resolution in a similar way as Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) uses multiple measurements to obtain better spatial resolution. This technique has been used in photogrammetry for a long time but it will be shown that it is now possible to do the calculations, with carefully designed image processing algorithms, in e.g. a PC in real time. In order to get high resolution and quantitative data in the stereo estimation a mathematical camera model is used. The parameters to the camera model are settled in a calibration rig or in the case of a moving camera the scene itself can be used for calibration of most of the parameters. After calibration an ordinary TV camera has an angular resolution like a theodolite, but to a much lower price. The paper will present results from high resolution 3D imagery from air to ground. The 3D-results from stereo calculation of image pairs are stitched together into a large database to form a 3D-model of the area covered.

  6. Future earthquake source faults on deep sea-floor around the Boso triple plate junction revealed by tectonic geomorphology using 3D images produced from 150 meter grid DEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goto, H.; Nakata, T.; Watanabe, M.; Suzuki, Y.; Izumi, N.; Nishizawa, A.; Horiuchi, D.; Kido, Y. N.

    2013-12-01

    that is tilted to the west, indicating up-growing of Taito spur. Northeastern part of Izu bar on Philippine Sea plate is characterized by rather smooth extensive convex slope between 1500m-7500m for over 200km long along the trench. On the lower part of the slope below 6000m, several gullies such as Mikura canyon and Kita-Hachijo canyon dissecting the slope forms rapids, probably due to continuous up-warping by subsurface thrusting dipping to the west under the slope. It is noteworthy that we can identify prominent active tectonic features on even very deep sea-floor along the plate boundaries, by using 3D images produced from 150 meter grid DEM.

  7. PLOT3D/AMES, UNIX SUPERCOMPUTER AND SGI IRIS VERSION (WITHOUT TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P.

    1994-01-01

    PLOT3D is an interactive graphics program designed to help scientists visualize computational fluid dynamics (CFD) grids and solutions. Today, supercomputers and CFD algorithms can provide scientists with simulations of such highly complex phenomena that obtaining an understanding of the simulations has become a major problem. Tools which help the scientist visualize the simulations can be of tremendous aid. PLOT3D/AMES offers more functions and features, and has been adapted for more types of computers than any other CFD graphics program. Version 3.6b+ is supported for five computers and graphic libraries. Using PLOT3D, CFD physicists can view their computational models from any angle, observing the physics of problems and the quality of solutions. As an aid in designing aircraft, for example, PLOT3D's interactive computer graphics can show vortices, temperature, reverse flow, pressure, and dozens of other characteristics of air flow during flight. As critical areas become obvious, they can easily be studied more closely using a finer grid. PLOT3D is part of a computational fluid dynamics software cycle. First, a program such as 3DGRAPE (ARC-12620) helps the scientist generate computational grids to model an object and its surrounding space. Once the grids have been designed and parameters such as the angle of attack, Mach number, and Reynolds number have been specified, a "flow-solver" program such as INS3D (ARC-11794 or COS-10019) solves the system of equations governing fluid flow, usually on a supercomputer. Grids sometimes have as many as two million points, and the "flow-solver" produces a solution file which contains density, x- y- and z-momentum, and stagnation energy for each grid point. With such a solution file and a grid file containing up to 50 grids as input, PLOT3D can calculate and graphically display any one of 74 functions, including shock waves, surface pressure, velocity vectors, and particle traces. PLOT3D's 74 functions are organized into

  8. PLOT3D/AMES, UNIX SUPERCOMPUTER AND SGI IRIS VERSION (WITH TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P.

    1994-01-01

    PLOT3D is an interactive graphics program designed to help scientists visualize computational fluid dynamics (CFD) grids and solutions. Today, supercomputers and CFD algorithms can provide scientists with simulations of such highly complex phenomena that obtaining an understanding of the simulations has become a major problem. Tools which help the scientist visualize the simulations can be of tremendous aid. PLOT3D/AMES offers more functions and features, and has been adapted for more types of computers than any other CFD graphics program. Version 3.6b+ is supported for five computers and graphic libraries. Using PLOT3D, CFD physicists can view their computational models from any angle, observing the physics of problems and the quality of solutions. As an aid in designing aircraft, for example, PLOT3D's interactive computer graphics can show vortices, temperature, reverse flow, pressure, and dozens of other characteristics of air flow during flight. As critical areas become obvious, they can easily be studied more closely using a finer grid. PLOT3D is part of a computational fluid dynamics software cycle. First, a program such as 3DGRAPE (ARC-12620) helps the scientist generate computational grids to model an object and its surrounding space. Once the grids have been designed and parameters such as the angle of attack, Mach number, and Reynolds number have been specified, a "flow-solver" program such as INS3D (ARC-11794 or COS-10019) solves the system of equations governing fluid flow, usually on a supercomputer. Grids sometimes have as many as two million points, and the "flow-solver" produces a solution file which contains density, x- y- and z-momentum, and stagnation energy for each grid point. With such a solution file and a grid file containing up to 50 grids as input, PLOT3D can calculate and graphically display any one of 74 functions, including shock waves, surface pressure, velocity vectors, and particle traces. PLOT3D's 74 functions are organized into

  9. PLOT3D/AMES, UNIX SUPERCOMPUTER AND SGI IRIS VERSION (WITHOUT TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P.

    1994-01-01

    PLOT3D is an interactive graphics program designed to help scientists visualize computational fluid dynamics (CFD) grids and solutions. Today, supercomputers and CFD algorithms can provide scientists with simulations of such highly complex phenomena that obtaining an understanding of the simulations has become a major problem. Tools which help the scientist visualize the simulations can be of tremendous aid. PLOT3D/AMES offers more functions and features, and has been adapted for more types of computers than any other CFD graphics program. Version 3.6b+ is supported for five computers and graphic libraries. Using PLOT3D, CFD physicists can view their computational models from any angle, observing the physics of problems and the quality of solutions. As an aid in designing aircraft, for example, PLOT3D's interactive computer graphics can show vortices, temperature, reverse flow, pressure, and dozens of other characteristics of air flow during flight. As critical areas become obvious, they can easily be studied more closely using a finer grid. PLOT3D is part of a computational fluid dynamics software cycle. First, a program such as 3DGRAPE (ARC-12620) helps the scientist generate computational grids to model an object and its surrounding space. Once the grids have been designed and parameters such as the angle of attack, Mach number, and Reynolds number have been specified, a "flow-solver" program such as INS3D (ARC-11794 or COS-10019) solves the system of equations governing fluid flow, usually on a supercomputer. Grids sometimes have as many as two million points, and the "flow-solver" produces a solution file which contains density, x- y- and z-momentum, and stagnation energy for each grid point. With such a solution file and a grid file containing up to 50 grids as input, PLOT3D can calculate and graphically display any one of 74 functions, including shock waves, surface pressure, velocity vectors, and particle traces. PLOT3D's 74 functions are organized into

  10. PLOT3D/AMES, SGI IRIS VERSION (WITH TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P.

    1994-01-01

    PLOT3D is an interactive graphics program designed to help scientists visualize computational fluid dynamics (CFD) grids and solutions. Today, supercomputers and CFD algorithms can provide scientists with simulations of such highly complex phenomena that obtaining an understanding of the simulations has become a major problem. Tools which help the scientist visualize the simulations can be of tremendous aid. PLOT3D/AMES offers more functions and features, and has been adapted for more types of computers than any other CFD graphics program. Version 3.6b+ is supported for five computers and graphic libraries. Using PLOT3D, CFD physicists can view their computational models from any angle, observing the physics of problems and the quality of solutions. As an aid in designing aircraft, for example, PLOT3D's interactive computer graphics can show vortices, temperature, reverse flow, pressure, and dozens of other characteristics of air flow during flight. As critical areas become obvious, they can easily be studied more closely using a finer grid. PLOT3D is part of a computational fluid dynamics software cycle. First, a program such as 3DGRAPE (ARC-12620) helps the scientist generate computational grids to model an object and its surrounding space. Once the grids have been designed and parameters such as the angle of attack, Mach number, and Reynolds number have been specified, a "flow-solver" program such as INS3D (ARC-11794 or COS-10019) solves the system of equations governing fluid flow, usually on a supercomputer. Grids sometimes have as many as two million points, and the "flow-solver" produces a solution file which contains density, x- y- and z-momentum, and stagnation energy for each grid point. With such a solution file and a grid file containing up to 50 grids as input, PLOT3D can calculate and graphically display any one of 74 functions, including shock waves, surface pressure, velocity vectors, and particle traces. PLOT3D's 74 functions are organized into

  11. PLOT3D/AMES, SGI IRIS VERSION (WITHOUT TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P.

    1994-01-01

    PLOT3D is an interactive graphics program designed to help scientists visualize computational fluid dynamics (CFD) grids and solutions. Today, supercomputers and CFD algorithms can provide scientists with simulations of such highly complex phenomena that obtaining an understanding of the simulations has become a major problem. Tools which help the scientist visualize the simulations can be of tremendous aid. PLOT3D/AMES offers more functions and features, and has been adapted for more types of computers than any other CFD graphics program. Version 3.6b+ is supported for five computers and graphic libraries. Using PLOT3D, CFD physicists can view their computational models from any angle, observing the physics of problems and the quality of solutions. As an aid in designing aircraft, for example, PLOT3D's interactive computer graphics can show vortices, temperature, reverse flow, pressure, and dozens of other characteristics of air flow during flight. As critical areas become obvious, they can easily be studied more closely using a finer grid. PLOT3D is part of a computational fluid dynamics software cycle. First, a program such as 3DGRAPE (ARC-12620) helps the scientist generate computational grids to model an object and its surrounding space. Once the grids have been designed and parameters such as the angle of attack, Mach number, and Reynolds number have been specified, a "flow-solver" program such as INS3D (ARC-11794 or COS-10019) solves the system of equations governing fluid flow, usually on a supercomputer. Grids sometimes have as many as two million points, and the "flow-solver" produces a solution file which contains density, x- y- and z-momentum, and stagnation energy for each grid point. With such a solution file and a grid file containing up to 50 grids as input, PLOT3D can calculate and graphically display any one of 74 functions, including shock waves, surface pressure, velocity vectors, and particle traces. PLOT3D's 74 functions are organized into

  12. PLOT3D/AMES, UNIX SUPERCOMPUTER AND SGI IRIS VERSION (WITH TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P.

    1994-01-01

    PLOT3D is an interactive graphics program designed to help scientists visualize computational fluid dynamics (CFD) grids and solutions. Today, supercomputers and CFD algorithms can provide scientists with simulations of such highly complex phenomena that obtaining an understanding of the simulations has become a major problem. Tools which help the scientist visualize the simulations can be of tremendous aid. PLOT3D/AMES offers more functions and features, and has been adapted for more types of computers than any other CFD graphics program. Version 3.6b+ is supported for five computers and graphic libraries. Using PLOT3D, CFD physicists can view their computational models from any angle, observing the physics of problems and the quality of solutions. As an aid in designing aircraft, for example, PLOT3D's interactive computer graphics can show vortices, temperature, reverse flow, pressure, and dozens of other characteristics of air flow during flight. As critical areas become obvious, they can easily be studied more closely using a finer grid. PLOT3D is part of a computational fluid dynamics software cycle. First, a program such as 3DGRAPE (ARC-12620) helps the scientist generate computational grids to model an object and its surrounding space. Once the grids have been designed and parameters such as the angle of attack, Mach number, and Reynolds number have been specified, a "flow-solver" program such as INS3D (ARC-11794 or COS-10019) solves the system of equations governing fluid flow, usually on a supercomputer. Grids sometimes have as many as two million points, and the "flow-solver" produces a solution file which contains density, x- y- and z-momentum, and stagnation energy for each grid point. With such a solution file and a grid file containing up to 50 grids as input, PLOT3D can calculate and graphically display any one of 74 functions, including shock waves, surface pressure, velocity vectors, and particle traces. PLOT3D's 74 functions are organized into

  13. Aeroacoustic Simulation of a Nose Landing Gear in an Open Jet Facility Using FUN3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vatsa, Veer N.; Lockhard, David P.; Khorrami, Mehdi R.; Carlson, Jan-Renee

    2012-01-01

    Numerical simulations have been performed for a partially-dressed, cavity-closed nose landing gear configuration that was tested in NASA Langley s closed-wall Basic Aerodynamic Research Tunnel (BART) and in the University of Florida s open-jet acoustic facility known as UFAFF. The unstructured-grid flow solver, FUN3D, developed at NASA Langley Research center is used to compute the unsteady flow field for this configuration. A hybrid Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes/large eddy simulation (RANS/LES) turbulence model is used for these computations. Time-averaged and instantaneous solutions compare favorably with the measured data. Unsteady flowfield data obtained from the FUN3D code are used as input to a Ffowcs Williams-Hawkings noise propagation code to compute the sound pressure levels at microphones placed in the farfield. Significant improvement in predicted noise levels is obtained when the flowfield data from the open jet UFAFF simulations is used as compared to the case using flowfield data from the closed-wall BART configuration.

  14. PLOT3D/AMES, SGI IRIS VERSION (WITH TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P.

    1994-01-01

    PLOT3D is an interactive graphics program designed to help scientists visualize computational fluid dynamics (CFD) grids and solutions. Today, supercomputers and CFD algorithms can provide scientists with simulations of such highly complex phenomena that obtaining an understanding of the simulations has become a major problem. Tools which help the scientist visualize the simulations can be of tremendous aid. PLOT3D/AMES offers more functions and features, and has been adapted for more types of computers than any other CFD graphics program. Version 3.6b+ is supported for five computers and graphic libraries. Using PLOT3D, CFD physicists can view their computational models from any angle, observing the physics of problems and the quality of solutions. As an aid in designing aircraft, for example, PLOT3D's interactive computer graphics can show vortices, temperature, reverse flow, pressure, and dozens of other characteristics of air flow during flight. As critical areas become obvious, they can easily be studied more closely using a finer grid. PLOT3D is part of a computational fluid dynamics software cycle. First, a program such as 3DGRAPE (ARC-12620) helps the scientist generate computational grids to model an object and its surrounding space. Once the grids have been designed and parameters such as the angle of attack, Mach number, and Reynolds number have been specified, a "flow-solver" program such as INS3D (ARC-11794 or COS-10019) solves the system of equations governing fluid flow, usually on a supercomputer. Grids sometimes have as many as two million points, and the "flow-solver" produces a solution file which contains density, x- y- and z-momentum, and stagnation energy for each grid point. With such a solution file and a grid file containing up to 50 grids as input, PLOT3D can calculate and graphically display any one of 74 functions, including shock waves, surface pressure, velocity vectors, and particle traces. PLOT3D's 74 functions are organized into

  15. PLOT3D/AMES, SGI IRIS VERSION (WITHOUT TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P.

    1994-01-01

    PLOT3D is an interactive graphics program designed to help scientists visualize computational fluid dynamics (CFD) grids and solutions. Today, supercomputers and CFD algorithms can provide scientists with simulations of such highly complex phenomena that obtaining an understanding of the simulations has become a major problem. Tools which help the scientist visualize the simulations can be of tremendous aid. PLOT3D/AMES offers more functions and features, and has been adapted for more types of computers than any other CFD graphics program. Version 3.6b+ is supported for five computers and graphic libraries. Using PLOT3D, CFD physicists can view their computational models from any angle, observing the physics of problems and the quality of solutions. As an aid in designing aircraft, for example, PLOT3D's interactive computer graphics can show vortices, temperature, reverse flow, pressure, and dozens of other characteristics of air flow during flight. As critical areas become obvious, they can easily be studied more closely using a finer grid. PLOT3D is part of a computational fluid dynamics software cycle. First, a program such as 3DGRAPE (ARC-12620) helps the scientist generate computational grids to model an object and its surrounding space. Once the grids have been designed and parameters such as the angle of attack, Mach number, and Reynolds number have been specified, a "flow-solver" program such as INS3D (ARC-11794 or COS-10019) solves the system of equations governing fluid flow, usually on a supercomputer. Grids sometimes have as many as two million points, and the "flow-solver" produces a solution file which contains density, x- y- and z-momentum, and stagnation energy for each grid point. With such a solution file and a grid file containing up to 50 grids as input, PLOT3D can calculate and graphically display any one of 74 functions, including shock waves, surface pressure, velocity vectors, and particle traces. PLOT3D's 74 functions are organized into

  16. Taming supersymmetric defects in 3d-3d correspondence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gang, Dongmin; Kim, Nakwoo; Romo, Mauricio; Yamazaki, Masahito

    2016-07-01

    We study knots in 3d Chern-Simons theory with complex gauge group {SL}(N,{{C}}), in the context of its relation with 3d { N }=2 theory (the so-called 3d-3d correspondence). The defect has either co-dimension 2 or co-dimension 4 inside the 6d (2,0) theory, which is compactified on a 3-manifold \\hat{M}. We identify such defects in various corners of the 3d-3d correspondence, namely in 3d {SL}(N,{{C}}) CS theory, in 3d { N }=2 theory, in 5d { N }=2 super Yang-Mills theory, and in the M-theory holographic dual. We can make quantitative checks of the 3d-3d correspondence by computing partition functions at each of these theories. This Letter is a companion to a longer paper [1], which contains more details and more results.

  17. 3D Audio System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Ames Research Center research into virtual reality led to the development of the Convolvotron, a high speed digital audio processing system that delivers three-dimensional sound over headphones. It consists of a two-card set designed for use with a personal computer. The Convolvotron's primary application is presentation of 3D audio signals over headphones. Four independent sound sources are filtered with large time-varying filters that compensate for motion. The perceived location of the sound remains constant. Possible applications are in air traffic control towers or airplane cockpits, hearing and perception research and virtual reality development.

  18. Unstructured CFD and Noise Prediction Methods for Propulsion Airframe Aeroacoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pao, S. Paul; Abdol-Hamid, Khaled S.; Campbell, Richard L.; Hunter, Craig A.; Massey, Steven J.; Elmiligui, Alaa A.

    2006-01-01

    Using unstructured mesh CFD methods for Propulsion Airframe Aeroacoustics (PAA) analysis has the distinct advantage of precise and fast computational mesh generation for complex propulsion and airframe integration arrangements that include engine inlet, exhaust nozzles, pylon, wing, flaps, and flap deployment mechanical parts. However, accurate solution values of shear layer velocity, temperature and turbulence are extremely important for evaluating the usually small noise differentials of potential applications to commercial transport aircraft propulsion integration. This paper describes a set of calibration computations for an isolated separate flow bypass ratio five engine nozzle model and the same nozzle system with a pylon. These configurations have measured data along with prior CFD solutions and noise predictions using a proven structured mesh method, which can be used for comparison to the unstructured mesh solutions obtained in this investigation. This numerical investigation utilized the TetrUSS system that includes a Navier-Stokes solver, the associated unstructured mesh generation tools, post-processing utilities, plus some recently added enhancements to the system. New features necessary for this study include the addition of two equation turbulence models to the USM3D code, an h-refinement utility to enhance mesh density in the shear mixing region, and a flow adaptive mesh redistribution method. In addition, a computational procedure was developed to optimize both solution accuracy and mesh economy. Noise predictions were completed using an unstructured mesh version of the JeT3D code.

  19. Soundproof simulations of stratospheric gravity waves on unstructured meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smolarkiewicz, P.; Szmelter, J.

    2012-04-01

    An edge-based unstructured-mesh semi-implicit model is presented that integrates nonhydrostatic soundproof equations, inclusive of anelastic and pseudo-incompressible systems of partial differential equations. The model numerics employ nonoscillatory forward-in-time MPDATA methods [Smolarkiewicz, 2006, Int. J. Numer. Meth. Fl., 50, 1123-1144] using finite-volume spatial discretization and unstructured meshes with arbitrarily shaped cells. Implicit treatment of gravity waves benefits both accuracy and stability of the model. The unstructured-mesh solutions are compared to equivalent structured-grid results for intricate, multiscale internal-wave phenomenon of a non-Boussinesq amplification and breaking of deep stratospheric gravity waves. The departures of the anelastic and pseudo-incompressible results are quantified in reference to a recent asymptotic theory [Achatz et al., 2010, J. Fluid Mech., 663, 120-147].

  20. Parallel performance optimizations on unstructured mesh-based simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Sarje, Abhinav; Song, Sukhyun; Jacobsen, Douglas; Huck, Kevin; Hollingsworth, Jeffrey; Malony, Allen; Williams, Samuel; Oliker, Leonid

    2015-06-01

    This paper addresses two key parallelization challenges the unstructured mesh-based ocean modeling code, MPAS-Ocean, which uses a mesh based on Voronoi tessellations: (1) load imbalance across processes, and (2) unstructured data access patterns, that inhibit intra- and inter-node performance. Our work analyzes the load imbalance due to naive partitioning of the mesh, and develops methods to generate mesh partitioning with better load balance and reduced communication. Furthermore, we present methods that minimize both inter- and intranode data movement and maximize data reuse. Our techniques include predictive ordering of data elements for higher cache efficiency, as well as communication reduction approaches. We present detailed performance data when running on thousands of cores using the Cray XC30 supercomputer and show that our optimization strategies can exceed the original performance by over 2×. Additionally, many of these solutions can be broadly applied to a wide variety of unstructured grid-based computations.

  1. An Overview of Ares-I CFD Ascent Aerodynamic Data Development And Analysis Based on USM3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdol-Hamid, Khaled S.; Ghaffari, Farhad; Parlette, Edward B.

    2011-01-01

    An overview of the computational results obtained from the NASA Langley developed unstructured grid, Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes flow solver USM3D, in support of the Ares-I project within the NASA s Constellation program, are presented. The numerical data are obtained for representative flow conditions pertinent to the ascent phase of the trajectory at both wind tunnel and flight Reynolds number without including any propulsion effects. The USM3D flow solver has been designated to have the primary role within the Ares-I project in developing the computational aerodynamic data for the vehicle while other flow solvers, namely OVERFLOW and FUN3D, have supporting roles to provide complementary results for fewer cases as part of the verification process to ensure code-to-code solution consistency. Similarly, as part of the solution validation efforts, the predicted numerical results are correlated with the aerodynamic wind tunnel data that have been generated within the project in the past few years. Sample aerodynamic results and the processes established for the computational solution/data development for the evolving Ares-I design cycles are presented.

  2. Multigrid techniques for unstructured meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mavriplis, D. J.

    1995-01-01

    An overview of current multigrid techniques for unstructured meshes is given. The basic principles of the multigrid approach are first outlined. Application of these principles to unstructured mesh problems is then described, illustrating various different approaches, and giving examples of practical applications. Advanced multigrid topics, such as the use of algebraic multigrid methods, and the combination of multigrid techniques with adaptive meshing strategies are dealt with in subsequent sections. These represent current areas of research, and the unresolved issues are discussed. The presentation is organized in an educational manner, for readers familiar with computational fluid dynamics, wishing to learn more about current unstructured mesh techniques.

  3. Survey Design for Large-Scale, Unstructured Resistivity Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labrecque, D. J.; Casale, D.

    2009-12-01

    In this paper, we discuss the issues in designing data collection strategies for large-scale, poorly structured resistivity surveys. Existing or proposed applications for these types of surveys include carbon sequestration, enhanced oil recovery monitoring, monitoring of leachate from working or abandoned mines, and mineral surveys. Electrode locations are generally chosen by land access, utilities, roads, existing wells etc. Classical arrays such as the Wenner array or dipole-dipole arrays are not applicable if the electrodes cannot be placed in quasi-regular lines or grids. A new, far more generalized strategy is needed for building data collection schemes. Following the approach of earlier two-dimensional (2-D) survey designs, the proposed method begins by defining a base array. In (2-D) design, this base array is often a standard dipole-dipole array. For unstructured three-dimensional (3-D) design, determining this base array is a multi-step process. The first step is to determine a set of base dipoles with similar characteristics. For example, the base dipoles may consist of electrode pairs trending within 30 degrees of north and with a length between 100 and 250 m in length. These dipoles are then combined into a trial set of arrays. This trial set of arrays is reduced by applying a series of filters based on criteria such as separation between the dipoles. Using the base array set, additional arrays are added and tested to determine the overall improvement in resolution and to determine an optimal set of arrays. Examples of the design process are shown for a proposed carbon sequestration monitoring system.

  4. Out-of-Core Streamline Visualization on Large Unstructured Meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ueng, Shyh-Kuang; Sikorski, K.; Ma, Kwan-Liu

    1997-01-01

    It's advantageous for computational scientists to have the capability to perform interactive visualization on their desktop workstations. For data on large unstructured meshes, this capability is not generally available. In particular, particle tracing on unstructured grids can result in a high percentage of non-contiguous memory accesses and therefore may perform very poorly with virtual memory paging schemes. The alternative of visualizing a lower resolution of the data degrades the original high-resolution calculations. This paper presents an out-of-core approach for interactive streamline construction on large unstructured tetrahedral meshes containing millions of elements. The out-of-core algorithm uses an octree to partition and restructure the raw data into subsets stored into disk files for fast data retrieval. A memory management policy tailored to the streamline calculations is used such that during the streamline construction only a very small amount of data are brought into the main memory on demand. By carefully scheduling computation and data fetching, the overhead of reading data from the disk is significantly reduced and good memory performance results. This out-of-core algorithm makes possible interactive streamline visualization of large unstructured-grid data sets on a single mid-range workstation with relatively low main-memory capacity: 5-20 megabytes. Our test results also show that this approach is much more efficient than relying on virtual memory and operating system's paging algorithms.

  5. Unstructured multigrid methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loehner, R.; Morgan, K.

    1987-01-01

    The use of the multigrid procedure with a sequence of unnested coarser grids is discussed. Validity of the procedure is assessed by considering the solution of a single linear elliptic equation. It is demonstrated how a scheme with the optimum order of operations can be constructed. Application to the solution of the Euler equations is considered.

  6. 3D optical measuring technologies and systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chugui, Yuri V.

    2005-02-01

    The results of the R & D activity of TDI SIE SB RAS in the field of the 3D optical measuring technologies and systems for noncontact 3D optical dimensional inspection applied to atomic and railway industry safety problems are presented. This activity includes investigations of diffraction phenomena on some 3D objects, using the original constructive calculation method. The efficient algorithms for precise determining the transverse and longitudinal sizes of 3D objects of constant thickness by diffraction method, peculiarities on formation of the shadow and images of the typical elements of the extended objects were suggested. Ensuring the safety of nuclear reactors and running trains as well as their high exploitation reliability requires a 100% noncontact precise inspection of geometrical parameters of their components. To solve this problem we have developed methods and produced the technical vision measuring systems LMM, CONTROL, PROFIL, and technologies for noncontact 3D dimensional inspection of grid spacers and fuel elements for the nuclear reactor VVER-1000 and VVER-440, as well as automatic laser diagnostic COMPLEX for noncontact inspection of geometric parameters of running freight car wheel pairs. The performances of these systems and the results of industrial testing are presented and discussed. The created devices are in pilot operation at Atomic and Railway Companies.

  7. 3-dimensional wells and tunnels for finite element grids

    SciTech Connect

    Cherry, T.A.; Gable, C.W.; Trease, H.

    1996-12-31

    Modeling fluid, vapor, and air injection and extraction from wells poses a number of problems. The length scale of well bores is centimeters, the region of high pressure gradient may be tens of meters and the reservoir may be tens of kilometers. Furthermore, accurate representation of the path of a deviated well can be difficult. Incorporating the physics of injection and extraction can be made easier and more accurate with automated grid generation tools that incorporate wells as part of a background mesh that represents the reservoir. GEOMESH is a modeling tool developed for automating finite element grid generation. This tool maintains the geometric integrity of the geologic framework and produces optimal (Delaunay) tetrahedral grids. GEOMESH creates a 3D well as hexagonal segments formed along the path of the well. This well structure is tetrahedralized into a Delaunay mesh and then embedded into a background mesh. The well structure can be radially or vertically refined and each well layer is assigned a material property or can take on the material properties of the surrounding stratigraphy. The resulting embedded well can then be used by unstructured finite element models for gas and fluid flow in the vicinity of wells or tunnels. This 3D well representation allows the study of the free-surface of the well and surrounding stratigraphy. It reduces possible grid orientation effects, and allows better correlation between well sample data and the geologic model. The well grids also allow improved visualization for well and tunnel model analysis. 3D observation of the grids helps qualitative interpretation and can reveal features not apparent in fewer dimensions.

  8. 3-dimensional wells and tunnels for finite element grids

    SciTech Connect

    Cherry, T.A.; Gable, C.W.; Trease, H.

    1996-04-01

    Modeling fluid, vapor, and air injection and extraction from wells poses a number of problems. The length scale of well bores is centimeters, the region of high pressure gradient may be tens of meters and the reservoir may be tens of kilometers. Furthermore, accurate representation of the path of a deviated well can be difficult. Incorporating the physics of injection and extraction can be made easier and more accurate with automated grid generation tools that incorporate wells as part of a background mesh that represents the reservoir. GEOMESH is a modeling tool developed for automating finite element grid generation. This tool maintains the geometric integrity of the geologic framework and produces optimal (Delaunay) tetrahedral grids. GEOMESH creates a 3D well as hexagonal segments formed along the path of the well. This well structure is tetrahedralized into a Delaunay mesh and then embedded into a background mesh. The well structure can be radially or vertically refined and each well layer is assigned a material property or can take on the material properties of the surrounding stratigraphy. The resulting embedded well can then be used by unstructured finite element models for gas and fluid flow in the vicinity of wells or tunnels. This 3D well representation allows the study of the free- surface of the well and surrounding stratigraphy. It reduces possible grid orientation effects, and allows better correlation between well sample data and the geologic model. The well grids also allow improved visualization for well and tunnel model analysis. 3D observation of the grids helps qualitative interpretation and can reveal features not apparent in fewer dimensions.

  9. 3D Elastic Wavefield Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guasch, L.; Warner, M.; Stekl, I.; Umpleby, A.; Shah, N.

    2010-12-01

    Wavefield tomography, or waveform inversion, aims to extract the maximum information from seismic data by matching trace by trace the response of the solid earth to seismic waves using numerical modelling tools. Its first formulation dates from the early 80's, when Albert Tarantola developed a solid theoretical basis that is still used today with little change. Due to computational limitations, the application of the method to 3D problems has been unaffordable until a few years ago, and then only under the acoustic approximation. Although acoustic wavefield tomography is widely used, a complete solution of the seismic inversion problem requires that we account properly for the physics of wave propagation, and so must include elastic effects. We have developed a 3D tomographic wavefield inversion code that incorporates the full elastic wave equation. The bottle neck of the different implementations is the forward modelling algorithm that generates the synthetic data to be compared with the field seismograms as well as the backpropagation of the residuals needed to form the direction update of the model parameters. Furthermore, one or two extra modelling runs are needed in order to calculate the step-length. Our approach uses a FD scheme explicit time-stepping by finite differences that are 4th order in space and 2nd order in time, which is a 3D version of the one developed by Jean Virieux in 1986. We chose the time domain because an explicit time scheme is much less demanding in terms of memory than its frequency domain analogue, although the discussion of wich domain is more efficient still remains open. We calculate the parameter gradients for Vp and Vs by correlating the normal and shear stress wavefields respectively. A straightforward application would lead to the storage of the wavefield at all grid points at each time-step. We tackled this problem using two different approaches. The first one makes better use of resources for small models of dimension equal

  10. Prominent rocks - 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Many prominent rocks near the Sagan Memorial Station are featured in this image, taken in stereo by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) on Sol 3. 3D glasses are necessary to identify surface detail. Wedge is at lower left; Shark, Half-Dome, and Pumpkin are at center. Flat Top, about four inches high, is at lower right. The horizon in the distance is one to two kilometers away.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

    Click below to see the left and right views individually. [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Left [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Right

  11. 'Diamond' in 3-D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This 3-D, microscopic imager mosaic of a target area on a rock called 'Diamond Jenness' was taken after NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity ground into the surface with its rock abrasion tool for a second time.

    Opportunity has bored nearly a dozen holes into the inner walls of 'Endurance Crater.' On sols 177 and 178 (July 23 and July 24, 2004), the rover worked double-duty on Diamond Jenness. Surface debris and the bumpy shape of the rock resulted in a shallow and irregular hole, only about 2 millimeters (0.08 inch) deep. The final depth was not enough to remove all the bumps and leave a neat hole with a smooth floor. This extremely shallow depression was then examined by the rover's alpha particle X-ray spectrometer.

    On Sol 178, Opportunity's 'robotic rodent' dined on Diamond Jenness once again, grinding almost an additional 5 millimeters (about 0.2 inch). The rover then applied its Moessbauer spectrometer to the deepened hole. This double dose of Diamond Jenness enabled the science team to examine the rock at varying layers. Results from those grindings are currently being analyzed.

    The image mosaic is about 6 centimeters (2.4 inches) across.

  12. Martian terrain - 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This area of terrain near the Sagan Memorial Station was taken on Sol 3 by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP). 3D glasses are necessary to identify surface detail.

    The IMP is a stereo imaging system with color capability provided by 24 selectable filters -- twelve filters per 'eye.' It stands 1.8 meters above the Martian surface, and has a resolution of two millimeters at a range of two meters.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

    Click below to see the left and right views individually. [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Left [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Right

  13. Design of implicit high-order filters on unstructured grids for the identification of large-scale features in large-eddy simulation and application to a swirl burner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guedot, L.; Lartigue, G.; Moureau, V.

    2015-04-01

    The analysis of large-scale structures from highly refined unsteady simulations becomes challenging as the mesh resolution increases, and some new tools must be developed in order to perform their identification and extraction. A solution is to use filters to remove the smallest flow motions. High-order filters, characterized by their good selectivity properties, were implemented in an unstructured finite-volume solver for large-eddy simulation, and their ability to extract structures of a given scale was tested on canonical flows. Then, these filters were applied on an aeronautical swirl burner with a complex geometry. The results show that novel high-order filters are able to extract the precessing vortex core from this realistic turbulent flow. High-order filtering enables to study in detail this large-scale structure and to gain insight into the dynamic of swirl flows.

  14. Unstructured mesh generation and adaptivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mavriplis, D. J.

    1995-01-01

    An overview of current unstructured mesh generation and adaptivity techniques is given. Basic building blocks taken from the field of computational geometry are first described. Various practical mesh generation techniques based on these algorithms are then constructed and illustrated with examples. Issues of adaptive meshing and stretched mesh generation for anisotropic problems are treated in subsequent sections. The presentation is organized in an education manner, for readers familiar with computational fluid dynamics, wishing to learn more about current unstructured mesh techniques.

  15. OpenACC acceleration of an unstructured CFD solver based on a reconstructed discontinuous Galerkin method for compressible flows

    SciTech Connect

    Xia, Yidong; Lou, Jialin; Luo, Hong; Edwards, Jack; Mueller, Frank

    2015-02-09

    Here, an OpenACC directive-based graphics processing unit (GPU) parallel scheme is presented for solving the compressible Navier–Stokes equations on 3D hybrid unstructured grids with a third-order reconstructed discontinuous Galerkin method. The developed scheme requires the minimum code intrusion and algorithm alteration for upgrading a legacy solver with the GPU computing capability at very little extra effort in programming, which leads to a unified and portable code development strategy. A face coloring algorithm is adopted to eliminate the memory contention because of the threading of internal and boundary face integrals. A number of flow problems are presented to verify the implementation of the developed scheme. Timing measurements were obtained by running the resulting GPU code on one Nvidia Tesla K20c GPU card (Nvidia Corporation, Santa Clara, CA, USA) and compared with those obtained by running the equivalent Message Passing Interface (MPI) parallel CPU code on a compute node (consisting of two AMD Opteron 6128 eight-core CPUs (Advanced Micro Devices, Inc., Sunnyvale, CA, USA)). Speedup factors of up to 24× and 1.6× for the GPU code were achieved with respect to one and 16 CPU cores, respectively. The numerical results indicate that this OpenACC-based parallel scheme is an effective and extensible approach to port unstructured high-order CFD solvers to GPU computing.

  16. OpenACC acceleration of an unstructured CFD solver based on a reconstructed discontinuous Galerkin method for compressible flows

    DOE PAGES

    Xia, Yidong; Lou, Jialin; Luo, Hong; Edwards, Jack; Mueller, Frank

    2015-02-09

    Here, an OpenACC directive-based graphics processing unit (GPU) parallel scheme is presented for solving the compressible Navier–Stokes equations on 3D hybrid unstructured grids with a third-order reconstructed discontinuous Galerkin method. The developed scheme requires the minimum code intrusion and algorithm alteration for upgrading a legacy solver with the GPU computing capability at very little extra effort in programming, which leads to a unified and portable code development strategy. A face coloring algorithm is adopted to eliminate the memory contention because of the threading of internal and boundary face integrals. A number of flow problems are presented to verify the implementationmore » of the developed scheme. Timing measurements were obtained by running the resulting GPU code on one Nvidia Tesla K20c GPU card (Nvidia Corporation, Santa Clara, CA, USA) and compared with those obtained by running the equivalent Message Passing Interface (MPI) parallel CPU code on a compute node (consisting of two AMD Opteron 6128 eight-core CPUs (Advanced Micro Devices, Inc., Sunnyvale, CA, USA)). Speedup factors of up to 24× and 1.6× for the GPU code were achieved with respect to one and 16 CPU cores, respectively. The numerical results indicate that this OpenACC-based parallel scheme is an effective and extensible approach to port unstructured high-order CFD solvers to GPU computing.« less

  17. A 3-d modular gripper design tool

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, R.G.; Brost, R.C.

    1997-02-01

    Modular fixturing kits are sets of components used for flexible, rapid construction of fixtures. A modular vise is a parallel-jaw vise, each jaw of which is a modular fixture plate with a regular grid of precisely positioned holes. To fixture a part, one places pins in some of the holes so that when the vise is closed, the part is reliably located and completely constrained. The modular vise concept can be adapted easily to the design of modular parallel-jaw grippers for robots. By attaching a grid-plate to each jaw of a parallel-jaw gripper, one gains the ability to easily construct high-quality grasps for a wide variety of parts from a standard set of hardware. Wallack and Canny developed an algorithm for planning planar grasp configurations for the modular vise. In this paper, the authors expand this work to produce a 3-d fixture/gripper design tool. They describe several analyses they have added to the planar algorithm, including a 3-d grasp quality metric based on force information, 3-d geometric loading analysis, and inter-gripper interference analysis. Finally, the authors describe two applications of their code. One of these is an internal application at Sandia, while the other shows a potential use of the code for designing part of an agile assembly line.

  18. DRACO development for 3D simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fatenejad, Milad; Moses, Gregory

    2006-10-01

    The DRACO (r-z) lagrangian radiation-hydrodynamics laser fusion simulation code is being extended to model 3D hydrodynamics in (x-y-z) coordinates with hexahedral cells on a structured grid. The equation of motion is solved with a lagrangian update with optional rezoning. The fluid equations are solved using an explicit scheme based on (Schulz, 1964) while the SALE-3D algorithm (Amsden, 1981) is used as a template for computing cell volumes and other quantities. A second order rezoner has been added which uses linear interpolation of the underlying continuous functions to preserve accuracy (Van Leer, 1976). Artificial restoring force terms and smoothing algorithms are used to avoid grid distortion in high aspect ratio cells. These include alternate node couplers along with a rotational restoring force based on the Tensor Code (Maenchen, 1964). Electron and ion thermal conduction is modeled using an extension of Kershaw's method (Kershaw, 1981) to 3D geometry. Test problem simulations will be presented to demonstrate the applicability of this new version of DRACO to the study of fluid instabilities in three dimensions.

  19. An Efficient, Semi-implicit Pressure-based Scheme Employing a High-resolution Finitie Element Method for Simulating Transient and Steady, Inviscid and Viscous, Compressible Flows on Unstructured Grids

    SciTech Connect

    Richard C. Martineau; Ray A. Berry

    2003-04-01

    A new semi-implicit pressure-based Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) scheme for simulating a wide range of transient and steady, inviscid and viscous compressible flow on unstructured finite elements is presented here. This new CFD scheme, termed the PCICEFEM (Pressure-Corrected ICE-Finite Element Method) scheme, is composed of three computational phases, an explicit predictor, an elliptic pressure Poisson solution, and a semiimplicit pressure-correction of the flow variables. The PCICE-FEM scheme is capable of second-order temporal accuracy by incorporating a combination of a time-weighted form of the two-step Taylor-Galerkin Finite Element Method scheme as an explicit predictor for the balance of momentum equations and the finite element form of a time-weighted trapezoid rule method for the semi-implicit form of the governing hydrodynamic equations. Second-order spatial accuracy is accomplished by linear unstructured finite element discretization. The PCICE-FEM scheme employs Flux-Corrected Transport as a high-resolution filter for shock capturing. The scheme is capable of simulating flows from the nearly incompressible to the high supersonic flow regimes. The PCICE-FEM scheme represents an advancement in mass-momentum coupled, pressurebased schemes. The governing hydrodynamic equations for this scheme are the conservative form of the balance of momentum equations (Navier-Stokes), mass conservation equation, and total energy equation. An operator splitting process is performed along explicit and implicit operators of the semi-implicit governing equations to render the PCICE-FEM scheme in the class of predictor-corrector schemes. The complete set of semi-implicit governing equations in the PCICE-FEM scheme are cast in this form, an explicit predictor phase and a semi-implicit pressure-correction phase with the elliptic pressure Poisson solution coupling the predictor-corrector phases. The result of this predictor-corrector formulation is that the pressure Poisson

  20. 3-D visualization of ensemble weather forecasts - Part 1: The visualization tool Met.3D (version 1.0)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rautenhaus, M.; Kern, M.; Schäfler, A.; Westermann, R.

    2015-02-01

    We present Met.3D, a new open-source tool for the interactive 3-D visualization of numerical ensemble weather predictions. The tool has been developed to support weather forecasting during aircraft-based atmospheric field campaigns, however, is applicable to further forecasting, research and teaching activities. Our work approaches challenging topics related to the visual analysis of numerical atmospheric model output - 3-D visualization, ensemble visualization, and how both can be used in a meaningful way suited to weather forecasting. Met.3D builds a bridge from proven 2-D visualization methods commonly used in meteorology to 3-D visualization by combining both visualization types in a 3-D context. We address the issue of spatial perception in the 3-D view and present approaches to using the ensemble to allow the user to assess forecast uncertainty. Interactivity is key to our approach. Met.3D uses modern graphics technology to achieve interactive visualization on standard consumer hardware. The tool supports forecast data from the European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasts and can operate directly on ECMWF hybrid sigma-pressure level grids. We describe the employed visualization algorithms, and analyse the impact of the ECMWF grid topology on computing 3-D ensemble statistical quantitites. Our techniques are demonstrated with examples from the T-NAWDEX-Falcon 2012 campaign.

  1. A staggered space-time discontinuous Galerkin method for the three-dimensional incompressible Navier-Stokes equations on unstructured tetrahedral meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavelli, Maurizio; Dumbser, Michael

    2016-08-01

    unstructured meshes allows to discretize even complex physical domains with very coarse grids in both, space and time. The proposed method is verified for approximation polynomials of degree up to four in space and time by solving a series of typical 3D test problems and by comparing the obtained numerical results with available exact analytical solutions, or with other numerical or experimental reference data. To the knowledge of the authors, this is the first time that a space-time discontinuous Galerkin finite element method is presented for the three-dimensional incompressible Navier-Stokes equations on staggered unstructured tetrahedral grids.

  2. Evaluation of the UnTRIM model for 3-D tidal circulation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cheng, R.T.; Casulli, V.; ,

    2001-01-01

    A family of numerical models, known as the TRIM models, shares the same modeling philosophy for solving the shallow water equations. A characteristic analysis of the shallow water equations points out that the numerical instability is controlled by the gravity wave terms in the momentum equations and by the transport terms in the continuity equation. A semi-implicit finite-difference scheme has been formulated so that these terms and the vertical diffusion terms are treated implicitly and the remaining terms explicitly to control the numerical stability and the computations are carried out over a uniform finite-difference computational mesh without invoking horizontal or vertical coordinate transformations. An unstructured grid version of TRIM model is introduced, or UnTRIM (pronounces as "you trim"), which preserves these basic numerical properties and modeling philosophy, only the computations are carried out over an unstructured orthogonal grid. The unstructured grid offers the flexibilities in representing complex study areas so that fine grid resolution can be placed in regions of interest, and coarse grids are used to cover the remaining domain. Thus, the computational efforts are concentrated in areas of importance, and an overall computational saving can be achieved because the total number of grid-points is dramatically reduced. To use this modeling approach, an unstructured grid mesh must be generated to properly reflect the properties of the domain of the investigation. The new modeling flexibility in grid structure is accompanied by new challenges associated with issues of grid generation. To take full advantage of this new model flexibility, the model grid generation should be guided by insights into the physics of the problems; and the insights needed may require a higher degree of modeling skill.

  3. Three-Dimensional High-Lift Analysis Using a Parallel Unstructured Multigrid Solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mavriplis, Dimitri J.

    1998-01-01

    A directional implicit unstructured agglomeration multigrid solver is ported to shared and distributed memory massively parallel machines using the explicit domain-decomposition and message-passing approach. Because the algorithm operates on local implicit lines in the unstructured mesh, special care is required in partitioning the problem for parallel computing. A weighted partitioning strategy is described which avoids breaking the implicit lines across processor boundaries, while incurring minimal additional communication overhead. Good scalability is demonstrated on a 128 processor SGI Origin 2000 machine and on a 512 processor CRAY T3E machine for reasonably fine grids. The feasibility of performing large-scale unstructured grid calculations with the parallel multigrid algorithm is demonstrated by computing the flow over a partial-span flap wing high-lift geometry on a highly resolved grid of 13.5 million points in approximately 4 hours of wall clock time on the CRAY T3E.

  4. Simulation of Stagnation Region Heating in Hypersonic Flow on Tetrahedral Grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gnoffo, Peter A.

    2007-01-01

    Hypersonic flow simulations using the node based, unstructured grid code FUN3D are presented. Applications include simple (cylinder) and complex (towed ballute) configurations. Emphasis throughout is on computation of stagnation region heating in hypersonic flow on tetrahedral grids. Hypersonic flow over a cylinder provides a simple test problem for exposing any flaws in a simulation algorithm with regard to its ability to compute accurate heating on such grids. Such flaws predominantly derive from the quality of the captured shock. The importance of pure tetrahedral formulations are discussed. Algorithm adjustments for the baseline Roe / Symmetric, Total-Variation-Diminishing (STVD) formulation to deal with simulation accuracy are presented. Formulations of surface normal gradients to compute heating and diffusion to the surface as needed for a radiative equilibrium wall boundary condition and finite catalytic wall boundary in the node-based unstructured environment are developed. A satisfactory resolution of the heating problem on tetrahedral grids is not realized here; however, a definition of a test problem, and discussion of observed algorithm behaviors to date are presented in order to promote further research on this important problem.

  5. 3D Elevation Program—Virtual USA in 3D

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lukas, Vicki; Stoker, J.M.

    2016-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) 3D Elevation Program (3DEP) uses a laser system called ‘lidar’ (light detection and ranging) to create a virtual reality map of the Nation that is very accurate. 3D maps have many uses with new uses being discovered all the time.  

  6. 3D Elevation Program—Virtual USA in 3D

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lukas, Vicki; Stoker, J.M.

    2016-04-14

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) 3D Elevation Program (3DEP) uses a laser system called ‘lidar’ (light detection and ranging) to create a virtual reality map of the Nation that is very accurate. 3D maps have many uses with new uses being discovered all the time.  

  7. VISRAD, 3-D Target Design and Radiation Simulation Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golovkina, Viktoriya; Macfarlane, Joseph; Golovkin, Igor; Kulkarni, Subodh

    2014-10-01

    The 3-D view factor code VISRAD is widely used in designing HEDP experiments at major laser and pulsed-power facilities, including NIF, OMEGA, OMEGA-EP, ORION, LMJ, Z, and PLX. It simulates target designs by generating a 3-D grid of surface elements, utilizing a variety of 3-D primitives and surface removal algorithms, and can be used to compute the radiation flux throughout the surface element grid by computing element-to-element view factors and solving power balance equations. Target set-up and beam pointing are facilitated by allowing users to specify positions and angular orientations using a variety of coordinates systems (e.g., that of any laser beam, target component, or diagnostic port). Analytic modeling for laser beam spatial profiles for OMEGA DPPs and NIF CPPs is used to compute laser intensity profiles throughout the grid of surface elements. We will discuss recent improvements to the software package and plans for future developments.

  8. VISRAD, 3-D Target Design and Radiation Simulation Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yingjie; Macfarlane, Joseph; Golovkin, Igor

    2015-11-01

    The 3-D view factor code VISRAD is widely used in designing HEDP experiments at major laser and pulsed-power facilities, including NIF, OMEGA, OMEGA-EP, ORION, LMJ, Z, and PLX. It simulates target designs by generating a 3-D grid of surface elements, utilizing a variety of 3-D primitives and surface removal algorithms, and can be used to compute the radiation flux throughout the surface element grid by computing element-to-element view factors and solving power balance equations. Target set-up and beam pointing are facilitated by allowing users to specify positions and angular orientations using a variety of coordinates systems (e.g., that of any laser beam, target component, or diagnostic port). Analytic modeling for laser beam spatial profiles for OMEGA DPPs and NIF CPPs is used to compute laser intensity profiles throughout the grid of surface elements. We will discuss recent improvements to the software package and plans for future developments.

  9. FUN3D Analyses in Support of the First Aeroelastic Prediction Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chwalowski, Pawel; Heeg, Jennifer; Wieseman, Carol D.; Florance, Jennifer P.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the computational aeroelastic results generated in support of the first Aeroelastic Prediction Workshop for the Benchmark Supercritical Wing (BSCW) and the HIgh REynolds Number AeroStructural Dynamics (HIRENASD) configurations and compares them to the experimental data. The computational results are obtained using FUN3D, an unstructured grid Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes solver developed at NASA Langley Research Center. The analysis results for both configurations include aerodynamic coefficients and surface pressures obtained for steady-state or static aeroelastic equilibrium (BSCW and HIRENASD, respectively) and for unsteady flow due to a pitching wing (BSCW) or modally-excited wing (HIRENASD). Frequency response functions of the pressure coefficients with respect to displacement are computed and compared with the experimental data. For the BSCW, the shock location is computed aft of the experimentally-located shock position. The pressure distribution upstream of this shock is in excellent agreement with the experimental data, but the pressure downstream of the shock in the separated flow region does not match as well. For HIRENASD, very good agreement between the numerical results and the experimental data is observed at the mid-span wing locations.

  10. The Galicia 3D experiment: an Introduction.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reston, Timothy; Martinez Loriente, Sara; Holroyd, Luke; Merry, Tobias; Sawyer, Dale; Morgan, Julia; Jordan, Brian; Tesi Sanjurjo, Mari; Alexanian, Ara; Shillington, Donna; Gibson, James; Minshull, Tim; Karplus, Marianne; Bayracki, Gaye; Davy, Richard; Klaeschen, Dirk; Papenberg, Cord; Ranero, Cesar; Perez-Gussinye, Marta; Martinez, Miguel

    2014-05-01

    In June and July 2013, scientists from 8 institutions took part in the Galicia 3D seismic experiment, the first ever crustal -scale academic 3D MCS survey over a rifted margin. The aim was to determine the 3D structure of a critical portion of the west Galicia rifted margin. At this margin, well-defined tilted fault blocks, bound by west-dipping faults and capped by synrift sediments are underlain by a bright reflection, undulating on time sections, termed the S reflector and thought to represent a major detachment fault of some kind. Moving west, the crust thins to zero thickness and mantle is unroofed, as evidence by the "Peridotite Ridge" first reported at this margin, but since observed at many other magma-poor margins. By imaging such a margin in detail, the experiment aimed to resolve the processes controlling crustal thinning and mantle unroofing at a type example magma poor margin. The experiment set out to collect several key datasets: a 3D seismic reflection volume measuring ~20x64km and extending down to ~14s TWT, a 3D ocean bottom seismometer dataset suitable for full wavefield inversion (the recording of the complete 3D seismic shots by 70 ocean bottom instruments), the "mirror imaging" of the crust using the same grid of OBS, a single 2D combined reflection/refraction profile extending to the west to determine the transition from unroofed mantle to true oceanic crust, and the seismic imaging of the water column, calibrated by regular deployment of XBTs to measure the temperature structure of the water column. We collected 1280 km2 of seismic reflection data, consisting of 136533 shots recorded on 1920 channels, producing 260 million seismic traces, each ~ 14s long. This adds up to ~ 8 terabytes of data, representing, we believe, the largest ever academic 3D MCS survey in terms of both the area covered and the volume of data. The OBS deployment was the largest ever within an academic 3D survey.

  11. A Spectral Element Ocean Model on the Cray T3D: the interannual variability of the Mediterranean Sea general circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molcard, A. J.; Pinardi, N.; Ansaloni, R.

    A new numerical model, SEOM (Spectral Element Ocean Model, (Iskandarani et al, 1994)), has been implemented in the Mediterranean Sea. Spectral element methods combine the geometric flexibility of finite element techniques with the rapid convergence rate of spectral schemes. The current version solves the shallow water equations with a fifth (or sixth) order accuracy spectral scheme and about 50.000 nodes. The domain decomposition philosophy makes it possible to exploit the power of parallel machines. The original MIMD master/slave version of SEOM, written in F90 and PVM, has been ported to the Cray T3D. When critical for performance, Cray specific high-performance one-sided communication routines (SHMEM) have been adopted to fully exploit the Cray T3D interprocessor network. Tests performed with highly unstructured and irregular grid, on up to 128 processors, show an almost linear scalability even with unoptimized domain decomposition techniques. Results from various case studies on the Mediterranean Sea are shown, involving realistic coastline geometry, and monthly mean 1000mb winds from the ECMWF's atmospheric model operational analysis from the period January 1987 to December 1994. The simulation results show that variability in the wind forcing considerably affect the circulation dynamics of the Mediterranean Sea.

  12. Finite Volume TVD Schemes for Magnetohydrodynamics on Unstructered Grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, T.

    A three-dimensional (3-D) high-resolution magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulation scheme is developed on unstructured grid systems to solve the complex-system problems in space science and space weather in which numerical difficulties arise from inhomogeneity due to strong background potential fields, inclusion of multi-species ions, and formations of shocks and discontinuities. The ideal MHD equations are extended to the 9-component MHD equations for multi-component ions and modified soas to avoid a direct inclusion of background potential field in dependent variables through the use of new variables. The numerical scheme adopts the finite volume method (FVM) with an upwinding numerical flux based on the linearized Riemann solver. Upwindings on unstructured grid systems are realized from the fact that the MHD equations are symmetric with respect to the rotation of the space. Despite the modifications of the equation system, the eigenvectors in the mode-synthesis matrix necessary for the ev aluation of the upwinding numerical flux can still be written analytically. To get a higher order of accuracy, the upwinding flux is extended to the third-order total variation diminishing (TVD) numerical flux in the calculation of FVM, through the monotonic upstream scheme for conservation laws (MUSCL) approach and Van Leer's differentiable limiter. Three numerical examples are given in order to show the efficiency of the above scheme.

  13. CFL3D User's Manual (Version 5.0)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krist, Sherrie L.; Biedron, Robert T.; Rumsey, Christopher L.

    1998-01-01

    This document is the User's Manual for the CFL3D computer code, a thin-layer Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes flow solver for structured multiple-zone grids. Descriptions of the code's input parameters, non-dimensionalizations, file formats, boundary conditions, and equations are included. Sample 2-D and 3-D test cases are also described, and many helpful hints for using the code are provided.

  14. Prospects and expectations for unstructured methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, Timothy J.

    1995-01-01

    The last decade has witnessed a vigorous and sustained research effort on unstructured methods for computational fluid dynamics. Unstructured mesh generators and flow solvers have evolved to the point where they are now in use for design purposes throughout the aerospace industry. In this paper we survey the various mesh types, structured as well as unstructured, and examine their relative strengths and weaknesses. We argue that unstructured methodology does offer the best prospect for the next generation of computational fluid dynamics algorithms.

  15. Market study: 3-D eyetracker

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    A market study of a proposed version of a 3-D eyetracker for initial use at NASA's Ames Research Center was made. The commercialization potential of a simplified, less expensive 3-D eyetracker was ascertained. Primary focus on present and potential users of eyetrackers, as well as present and potential manufacturers has provided an effective means of analyzing the prospects for commercialization.

  16. 3D World Building System

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    This video provides an overview of the Sandia National Laboratories developed 3-D World Model Building capability that provides users with an immersive, texture rich 3-D model of their environment in minutes using a laptop and color and depth camera.

  17. 3D World Building System

    SciTech Connect

    2013-10-30

    This video provides an overview of the Sandia National Laboratories developed 3-D World Model Building capability that provides users with an immersive, texture rich 3-D model of their environment in minutes using a laptop and color and depth camera.

  18. LLNL-Earth3D

    SciTech Connect

    2013-10-01

    Earth3D is a computer code designed to allow fast calculation of seismic rays and travel times through a 3D model of the Earth. LLNL is using this for earthquake location and global tomography efforts and such codes are of great interest to the Earth Science community.

  19. [3-D ultrasound in gastroenterology].

    PubMed

    Zoller, W G; Liess, H

    1994-06-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) sonography represents a development of noninvasive diagnostic imaging by real-time two-dimensional (2D) sonography. The use of transparent rotating scans, comparable to a block of glass, generates a 3D effect. The objective of the present study was to optimate 3D presentation of abdominal findings. Additional investigations were made with a new volumetric program to determine the volume of selected findings of the liver. The results were compared with the estimated volumes of 2D sonography and 2D computer tomography (CT). For the processing of 3D images, typical parameter constellations were found for the different findings, which facilitated processing of 3D images. In more than 75% of the cases examined we found an optimal 3D presentation of sonographic findings with respect to the evaluation criteria developed by us for the 3D imaging of processed data. Great differences were found for the estimated volumes of the findings of the liver concerning the three different techniques applied. 3D ultrasound represents a valuable method to judge morphological appearance in abdominal findings. The possibility of volumetric measurements enlarges its potential diagnostic significance. Further clinical investigations are necessary to find out if definite differentiation between benign and malign findings is possible.

  20. Euro3D Science Conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, J. R.

    2004-02-01

    The Euro3D RTN is an EU funded Research Training Network to foster the exploitation of 3D spectroscopy in Europe. 3D spectroscopy is a general term for spectroscopy of an area of the sky and derives its name from its two spatial + one spectral dimensions. There are an increasing number of instruments which use integral field devices to achieve spectroscopy of an area of the sky, either using lens arrays, optical fibres or image slicers, to pack spectra of multiple pixels on the sky (``spaxels'') onto a 2D detector. On account of the large volume of data and the special methods required to reduce and analyse 3D data, there are only a few centres of expertise and these are mostly involved with instrument developments. There is a perceived lack of expertise in 3D spectroscopy spread though the astronomical community and its use in the armoury of the observational astronomer is viewed as being highly specialised. For precisely this reason the Euro3D RTN was proposed to train young researchers in this area and develop user tools to widen the experience with this particular type of data in Europe. The Euro3D RTN is coordinated by Martin M. Roth (Astrophysikalisches Institut Potsdam) and has been running since July 2002. The first Euro3D science conference was held in Cambridge, UK from 22 to 23 May 2003. The main emphasis of the conference was, in keeping with the RTN, to expose the work of the young post-docs who are funded by the RTN. In addition the team members from the eleven European institutes involved in Euro3D also presented instrumental and observational developments. The conference was organized by Andy Bunker and held at the Institute of Astronomy. There were over thirty participants and 26 talks covered the whole range of application of 3D techniques. The science ranged from Galactic planetary nebulae and globular clusters to kinematics of nearby galaxies out to objects at high redshift. Several talks were devoted to reporting recent observations with newly