Science.gov

Sample records for 3d user interfaces

  1. Social Circles: A 3D User Interface for Facebook

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, Diego; Oakley, Ian

    Online social network services are increasingly popular web applications which display large amounts of rich multimedia content: contacts, status updates, photos and event information. Arguing that this quantity of information overwhelms conventional user interfaces, this paper presents Social Circles, a rich interactive visualization designed to support real world users of social network services in everyday tasks such as keeping up with friends and organizing their network. It achieves this by using 3D UIs, fluid animations and a spatial metaphor to enable direct manipulation of a social network.

  2. An interactive 3D user interface for guided bronchoscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atmosukarto, Indriyati; Soper, Timothy D.; Glenny, Robb W.; Seibel, Eric J.; Shapiro, Linda G.

    2007-03-01

    Recent studies have shown that more than 5 million bronchoscopy procedures are performed each year worldwide. The procedure usually involves biopsy of possible cancerous tissues from the lung. Standard bronchoscopes are too large to reach into the peripheral lung, where cancerous nodules are often found. The University of Washington has developed an ultrathin and flexible scanning fiber endoscope that is able to advance into the periphery of the human lungs without sacrificing image quality. To accompany the novel endoscope, we have developed a user interface that serves as a navigation guide for doctors when performing a bronchoscopy. The navigation system consists of a virtual surface mesh of the airways extracted from computed-tomography (CT) scan and an electromagnetic tracking system (EMTS). The complete system can be viewed as a global positioning system for the lung that provides pre-procedural planning functionalities, virtual bronchoscopy navigation, and real time tracking of the endoscope inside the lung. The real time virtual navigation is complemented by a particle filter algorithm to compensate for registration errors and outliers, and to prevent going through surfaces of the virtual lung model. The particle filter method tracks the endoscope tip based on real time tracking data and attaches the virtual endoscopic view to the skeleton that runs inside the virtual airway surface. Experiment results on a dried sheep lung show that the particle filter method converges and is able to accurately track the endoscope tip in real time when the endoscope is inserted both at slow and fast insertion speeds.

  3. A Method for Developing 3D User Interfaces of Information Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calleros, Juan Manuel González; Vanderdonckt, Jean; Arteaga, Jaime Muñoz

    A transformational method for developing tri-dimensional user interfaces of interactive information systems is presented that starts from a task model and a domain model to progressively derive a final user interface. This method consists of three steps: deriving one or many abstract user interfaces from a task model and a domain model, deriving one or many concrete user interfaces from each abstract interface, and producing the code of the final user interfaces corresponding to each concrete interface. To ensure the two first steps, trans-formations are encoded as graph transformations performed on the involved models expressed in their graph equivalent. In addition, a graph grammar gathers relevant graph transformations for accomplishing the sub-steps involved in each step. Once a concrete user interface is resulting from these two first steps, it is converted in a development environment for 3D user interfaces where it can be edited for fine tuning and personalization. From this environment, the user interface code is automatically generated. The method is defined by its steps, input/output, and exemplified on a case study. By expressing the steps of the method through transformations between models, the method adheres to Model-Driven Engineering paradigm where models and transformations are explicitly defined and used

  4. Design of user interface in medical imaging: lessons of 3-D application definition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jannin, Pierre; Mevel, G.; Gandon, Yves; Cordonnier, Emmanuel

    1992-05-01

    Modern dedicated image processing workstations and even general purpose computers offer enhanced user interface capabilities. Hardware management of the user interface allows a fast, easy, and powerful dialogue between man and machine. The application design must take into account these new possibilities in order to make optimal use of the hardware. Physicians are special users in that they need to customize their working environment to carry out specific tasks. Specific medical applications in the area of 3-D display and multimodality imaging need to accommodate a sequential organization of the physician's tasks, access to the various tools (image processing features, 3-D display, environment configuration, etc. ...) and the powerful dedicated workstations the physician may require. This paper sets out a number of general rules applicable to user interface design and defines the specific features of medical imaging brought into play in the definition of the environment we have developed for medical imaging user interface design. Examples in 2-D and 3-D display mode are presented.

  5. Development and New Directions for the RELAP5-3D Graphical Users Interface

    SciTech Connect

    Mesina, George Lee

    2001-09-01

    The direction of development for the RELAP5 Graphical User Interfaces (RGUI) has been extended. In addition to existing plans for displaying all aspects of RELAP5 calculations, the plan now includes plans to display the calculations of a variety of codes including SCDAP, RETRAN and FLUENT. Recent work has included such extensions along with the previously planned and user-requested improvements and extensions. Visualization of heat-structures has been added. Adaptations were made for another computer program, SCDAP-3D, including plant core views. An input model builder for generating RELAP5-3D input files was partially implemented. All these are reported. Plans for future work are also summarized. These include an input processor that transfers steady-state conditions into an input file.

  6. Flow Web: a graph based user interface for 3D flow field exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Lijie; Shen, Han-Wei

    2010-01-01

    While there have been intensive efforts in developing better 3D flow visualization techniques, little attention has been paid to the design of better user interfaces and more effective data exploration work flow. In this paper, we propose a novel graph-based user interface called Flow Web to enable more systematic explorations of 3D flow data. The Flow Web is a node-link graph that is constructed to highlight the essential flow structures where a node represents a region in the field and a link connects two nodes if there exist particles traveling between the regions. The direction of an edge implies the flow path, and the weight of an edge indicates the number of particles traveling through the connected nodes. Hierarchical flow webs are created by splitting or merging nodes and edges to allow for easy understanding of the underlying flow structures. To draw the Flow Web, we adopt force based graph drawing algorithms to minimize edge crossings, and use a hierarchical layout to facilitate the study of flow patterns step by step. The Flow Web also supports user queries to the properties of nodes and links. Examples of the queries for node properties include the degrees, complexity, and some associated physical attributes such as velocity magnitude. Queries for edges include weights, flow path lengths, existence of circles and so on. It is also possible to combine multiple queries using operators such as and , or, not. The FlowWeb supports several types of user interactions. For instance, the user can select nodes from the subgraph returned by a query and inspect the nodes with more details at different levels of detail. There are multiple advantages of using the graph-based user interface. One is that the user can identify regions of interest much more easily since, unlike inspecting 3D regions, there is very little occlusion. It is also much more convenient for the user to query statistical information about the nodes and links at different levels of detail. With

  7. User Guide for the R5EXEC Coupling Interface in the RELAP5-3D Code

    SciTech Connect

    Forsmann, J. Hope; Weaver, Walter L.

    2015-04-01

    This report describes the R5EXEC coupling interface in the RELAP5-3D computer code from the users perspective. The information in the report is intended for users who want to couple RELAP5-3D to other thermal-hydraulic, neutron kinetics, or control system simulation codes.

  8. A graphical user interface for calculation of 3D dose distribution using Monte Carlo simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chow, J. C. L.; Leung, M. K. K.

    2008-02-01

    A software graphical user interface (GUI) for calculation of 3D dose distribution using Monte Carlo (MC) simulation is developed using MATLAB. This GUI (DOSCTP) provides a user-friendly platform for DICOM CT-based dose calculation using EGSnrcMP-based DOSXYZnrc code. It offers numerous features not found in DOSXYZnrc, such as the ability to use multiple beams from different phase-space files, and has built-in dose analysis and visualization tools. DOSCTP is written completely in MATLAB, with integrated access to DOSXYZnrc and CTCREATE. The program function may be divided into four subgroups, namely, beam placement, MC simulation with DOSXYZnrc, dose visualization, and export. Each is controlled by separate routines. The verification of DOSCTP was carried out by comparing plans with different beam arrangements (multi-beam/photon arc) on an inhomogeneous phantom as well as patient CT between the GUI and Pinnacle3. DOSCTP was developed and verified with the following features: (1) a built-in voxel editor to modify CT-based DOSXYZnrc phantoms for research purposes; (2) multi-beam placement is possible, which cannot be achieved using the current DOSXYZnrc code; (3) the treatment plan, including the dose distributions, contours and image set can be exported to a commercial treatment planning system such as Pinnacle3 or to CERR using RTOG format for plan evaluation and comparison; (4) a built-in RTOG-compatible dose reviewer for dose visualization and analysis such as finding the volume of hot/cold spots in the 3D dose distributions based on a user threshold. DOSCTP greatly simplifies the use of DOSXYZnrc and CTCREATE, and offers numerous features that not found in the original user-code. Moreover, since phase-space beams can be defined and generated by the user, it is a particularly useful tool to carry out plans using specifically designed irradiators/accelerators that cannot be found in the Linac library of commercial treatment planning systems.

  9. Comparative analysis of 3-D robot teleoperation interfaces with novice users.

    PubMed

    Labonte, Daniel; Boissy, Patrick; Michaud, François

    2010-10-01

    Being able to act remotely in our homes could be very useful in providing various services such as surveillance and remote interventions, which are key features for telehomecare applications. In addition to navigation and environmental challenges that a telepresence robot would face in home settings, the system requires an appropriate teleoperation interface for safe and efficient usage by novice users. This paper describes the design criteria and characterizes visualization and control modalities of user interfaces with a real robot. By considering the user's needs along with the current state of the art in teleoperation interfaces, two novel mixed-reality visualization modalities are compared with standard video-centric and map-centric perspectives. We report teleoperation trials under six different task scenarios with a sample of 37 novice operators in homelike conditions. The results based on three quantitative metrics and one qualitative metric outline under which conditions the novel mixed-reality visualization modalities significantly improve the performance of novice users.

  10. RGUI 1.0, New Graphical User Interface for RELAP5-3D

    SciTech Connect

    Mesina, George Lee; Galbraith, James Andrew

    1999-04-01

    With the advent of three-dimensional modeling in nuclear safety analysis codes, the need has arisen for a new display methodology. Currently, analysts either sort through voluminous numerical displays of data at points in a region, or view color coded interpretations of the data on a two-dimensional rendition of the plant. RGUI 1.0 provides 3D capability for displaying data. The 3D isometric hydrodynamic image is built automatically from the input deck without additional input from the user. Standard view change features allow the user to focus on only the important data. Familiar features that are standard to the nuclear industry, such as run, interact, and monitor, are included. RGUI 1.0 reduces the difficulty of analyzing complex three dimensional plants.

  11. RGUI 1.0, New Graphical User Interface for RELAP5-3D

    SciTech Connect

    G. L. Mesina; J. Galbraith

    1999-04-01

    With the advent of three-dimensional modeling in nuclear safety analysis codes, the need has arisen for a new display methodology. Currently, analysts either sort through voluminous numerical displays of data at points in a region, or view color coded interpretations of the data on a two-dimensional rendition of the plant. RGUI 1.0 provides 3D capability for displaying data. The 3D isometric hydrodynamic image is built automatically from the input deck without additional input from the user. Standard view change features allow the user to focus on only the important data. Familiar features that are standard to the nuclear industry, such as run, interact, and monitor, are included. RGUI 1.0 reduces the difficulty of analyzing complex three-dimensional plants.

  12. An AR system with intuitive user interface for manipulation and visualization of 3D medical data.

    PubMed

    Vogt, Sebastian; Khamene, Ali; Niemann, Heinrich; Sauer, Frank

    2004-01-01

    We report on a stereoscopic video-see-through augmented reality system which we developed for medical applications. Our system allows interactive in-situ visualization of 3D medical imaging data. For high-quality rendering of the augmented scene we utilize the capabilities of the latest graphics card generations. Fast high-precision MPR generation ("multiplanar reconstruction") and volume rendering is realized with OpenGL 3D textures. We provide a tracked hand-held tool to interact with the medical imaging data in its actual location. This tool is represented as a virtual tool in the space of the medical data. The user can assign different functionality to it: select arbitrary MPR cross-sections, guide a local volume rendered cube through the medical data, change the transfer function, etc. Tracking works in conjunction with retroreflective markers, which frame the workspace for head tracking respectively are attached to instruments for tool tracking. We use a single head-mounted tracking camera, which is rigidly fixed to the stereo pair of cameras that provide the live video view of the real scene. The user's spatial perception is based on stereo depth cues as well as on the kinetic depth cues that he receives with the viewpoint variations and the interactive data visualization. The AR system has a compelling real-time performance with 30 stereo-frames/second and exhibits no time lag between the video images and the augmenting graphics. Thus, the physician can interactively explore the medical imaging information in-situ.

  13. Software Development: 3D Animations and Creating User Interfaces for Realistic Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordillo, Orlando Enrique

    2015-01-01

    My fall 2015 semester was spent at the Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center working in the Integrated Graphics, Operations, and Analysis Laboratory (IGOAL). My first project was to create a video animation that could tell the story of OMICS. OMICS is a term being used in the field of biomedical science to describe the collective technologies that study biological systems, such as what makes up a cell and how it functions with other systems. In the IGOAL I used a large 23 inch Wacom monitor to draw storyboards, graphics, and line art animations. I used Blender as the 3D environment to sculpt, shape, cut or modify the several scenes and models for the video. A challenge creating this video was to take a term used in biomedical science and describe it in such a way that an 8th grade student can understand. I used a line art style because it would visually set the tone for what we thought was an educational style. In order to get a handle on the perspective and overall feel for the animation without overloading my workspace, I split up the 2 minute animation into several scenes. I used Blender's python scripting capabilities which allowed for the addition of plugins to add or modify tools. The scripts can also directly interact with the objects to create naturalistic patterns or movements. After collecting the rendered scenes, I used Blender's built-in video editing workspace to output the animation. My second project was to write software that emulates a physical system's interface. The interface was to simulate a boat, ROV, and winch system. Simulations are a time and cost effective way to test complicated data and provide training for operators without having to use expensive hardware. We created the virtual controls with 3-D Blender models and 2-D graphics, and then add functionality in C# using the Unity game engine. The Unity engine provides several essential behaviors of a simulator, such as the start and update functions. A framework for Unity, which was developed in

  14. Cross-Platform Graphical User Interface with fast 3-D Rendering for Particle-in-Cell Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruhwiler, David; Luetkemeyer, Kelly; Cary, John

    1999-11-01

    The Graphical User Interface (GUI) for XOOPIC (X11-based Object-Oriented Particle-in-Cell) is being ported to Qt, a cross-platform C++ windowing toolkit, thus permitting the code to run on PC's running both Windows 95/98/NT and Linux, as well as all commercial Unix platforms. All 3-D graphics will be handled through OpenGL, the cross-platform standard for fast 3-D rendering. The use of object-oriented design (OOD) techniques keeps the GUI/physics interface clean, and minimizes the impact of GUI development on the physics code. OOD also improves the maintainability and extensibility of large scientific simulation codes, while allowing for cross-platform portability and ready interchange of individual algorithms or entire physics kernels. Planned new GUI features include interactive modifications of the simulation parameters, including generation of a slowly-varying mesh and automatic updating of a corresponding input file. Improved modeling of high-power microwave tubes is one of the primary applications being targeted by this project.

  15. RT3D tutorials for GMS users

    SciTech Connect

    Clement, T.P.; Jones, N.L.

    1998-02-01

    RT3D (Reactive Transport in 3-Dimensions) is a computer code that solves coupled partial differential equations that describe reactive-flow and transport of multiple mobile and/or immobile species in a three dimensional saturated porous media. RT3D was developed from the single-species transport code, MT3D (DoD-1.5, 1997 version). As with MT3D, RT3D also uses the USGS groundwater flow model MODFLOW for computing spatial and temporal variations in groundwater head distribution. This report presents a set of tutorial problems that are designed to illustrate how RT3D simulations can be performed within the Department of Defense Groundwater Modeling System (GMS). GMS serves as a pre- and post-processing interface for RT3D. GMS can be used to define all the input files needed by RT3D code, and later the code can be launched from within GMS and run as a separate application. Once the RT3D simulation is completed, the solution can be imported to GMS for graphical post-processing. RT3D v1.0 supports several reaction packages that can be used for simulating different types of reactive contaminants. Each of the tutorials, described below, provides training on a different RT3D reaction package. Each reaction package has different input requirements, and the tutorials are designed to describe these differences. Furthermore, the tutorials illustrate the various options available in GMS for graphical post-processing of RT3D results. Users are strongly encouraged to complete the tutorials before attempting to use RT3D and GMS on a routine basis.

  16. PLOT3D user's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walatka, Pamela P.; Buning, Pieter G.; Pierce, Larry; Elson, Patricia A.

    1990-01-01

    PLOT3D is a computer graphics program designed to visualize the grids and solutions of computational fluid dynamics. Seventy-four functions are available. Versions are available for many systems. PLOT3D can handle multiple grids with a million or more grid points, and can produce varieties of model renderings, such as wireframe or flat shaded. Output from PLOT3D can be used in animation programs. The first part of this manual is a tutorial that takes the reader, keystroke by keystroke, through a PLOT3D session. The second part of the manual contains reference chapters, including the helpfile, data file formats, advice on changing PLOT3D, and sample command files.

  17. A computer-controlled near-field electrospinning setup and its graphic user interface for precision patterning of functional nanofibers on 2D and 3D substrates.

    PubMed

    Bisht, Gobind; Nesterenko, Sergiy; Kulinsky, Lawrence; Madou, Marc

    2012-08-01

    Electrospinning is a versatile technique for production of nanofibers. However, it lacks the precision and control necessary for fabrication of nanofiber-based devices. The positional control of the nanofiber placement can be dramatically improved using low-voltage near-field electrospinning (LV-NFES). LV-NFES allows nanofibers to be patterned on 2D and 3D substrates. However, use of NFES requires low working distance between the electrospinning nozzle and substrate, manual jet initiation, and precise substrate movement to control fiber deposition. Environmental factors such as humidity also need to be controlled. We developed a computer-controlled automation strategy for LV-NFES to improve performance and reliability. With this setup, the user is able to control the relevant sensor and actuator parameters through a custom graphic user interface application programmed on the C#.NET platform. The stage movement can be programmed as to achieve any desired nanofiber pattern and thickness. The nanofiber generation step is initiated through a software-controlled linear actuator. Parameter setting files can be saved into an Excel sheet and can be used subsequently in running multiple experiments. Each experiment is automatically video recorded and stamped with the pertinent real-time parameters. Humidity is controlled with ±3% accuracy through a feedback loop. Further improvements, such as real-time droplet size control for feed rate regulation are in progress.

  18. User interface user's guide for HYPGEN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiu, Ing-Tsau

    1992-01-01

    The user interface (UI) of HYPGEN is developed using Panel Library to shorten the learning curve for new users and provide easier ways to run HYPGEN for casual users as well as for advanced users. Menus, buttons, sliders, and type-in fields are used extensively in UI to allow users to point and click with a mouse to choose various available options or to change values of parameters. On-line help is provided to give users information on using UI without consulting the manual. Default values are set for most parameters and boundary conditions are determined by UI to further reduce the effort needed to run HYPGEN; however, users are free to make any changes and save it in a file for later use. A hook to PLOT3D is built in to allow graphics manipulation. The viewpoint and min/max box for PLOT3D windows are computed by UI and saved in a PLOT3D journal file. For large grids which take a long time to generate on workstations, the grid generator (HYPGEN) can be run on faster computers such as Crays, while UI stays at the workstation.

  19. User interface support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Clayton; Wilde, Nick

    1989-01-01

    Space construction will require heavy investment in the development of a wide variety of user interfaces for the computer-based tools that will be involved at every stage of construction operations. Using today's technology, user interface development is very expensive for two reasons: (1) specialized and scarce programming skills are required to implement the necessary graphical representations and complex control regimes for high-quality interfaces; (2) iteration on prototypes is required to meet user and task requirements, since these are difficult to anticipate with current (and foreseeable) design knowledge. We are attacking this problem by building a user interface development tool based on extensions to the spreadsheet model of computation. The tool provides high-level support for graphical user interfaces and permits dynamic modification of interfaces, without requiring conventional programming concepts and skills.

  20. Rethinking Design Process: Using 3D Digital Models as an Interface in Collaborative Session

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ding, Suining

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes a pilot study for an alternative design process by integrating a designer-user collaborative session with digital models. The collaborative session took place in a 3D AutoCAD class for a real world project. The 3D models served as an interface for designer-user collaboration during the design process. Students not only learned…

  1. SB3D User Manual, Santa Barbara 3D Radiative Transfer Model

    SciTech Connect

    O'Hirok, William

    1999-01-01

    SB3D is a three-dimensional atmospheric and oceanic radiative transfer model for the Solar spectrum. The microphysics employed in the model are the same as used in the model SBDART. It is assumed that the user of SB3D is familiar with SBDART and IDL. SB3D differs from SBDART in that computations are conducted on media in three-dimensions rather than a single column (i.e. plane-parallel), and a stochastic method (Monte Carlo) is employed instead of a numerical approach (Discrete Ordinates) for estimating a solution to the radiative transfer equation. Because of these two differences between SB3D and SBDART, the input and running of SB3D is more unwieldy and requires compromises between model performance and computational expense. Hence, there is no one correct method for running the model and the user must develop a sense to the proper input and configuration of the model.

  2. Genome3D: exploiting structure to help users understand their sequences

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Tony E.; Sillitoe, Ian; Andreeva, Antonina; Blundell, Tom L.; Buchan, Daniel W.A.; Chothia, Cyrus; Cozzetto, Domenico; Dana, José M.; Filippis, Ioannis; Gough, Julian; Jones, David T.; Kelley, Lawrence A.; Kleywegt, Gerard J.; Minneci, Federico; Mistry, Jaina; Murzin, Alexey G.; Ochoa-Montaño, Bernardo; Oates, Matt E.; Punta, Marco; Rackham, Owen J.L.; Stahlhacke, Jonathan; Sternberg, Michael J.E.; Velankar, Sameer; Orengo, Christine

    2015-01-01

    Genome3D (http://www.genome3d.eu) is a collaborative resource that provides predicted domain annotations and structural models for key sequences. Since introducing Genome3D in a previous NAR paper, we have substantially extended and improved the resource. We have annotated representatives from Pfam families to improve coverage of diverse sequences and added a fast sequence search to the website to allow users to find Genome3D-annotated sequences similar to their own. We have improved and extended the Genome3D data, enlarging the source data set from three model organisms to 10, and adding VIVACE, a resource new to Genome3D. We have analysed and updated Genome3D's SCOP/CATH mapping. Finally, we have improved the superposition tools, which now give users a more powerful interface for investigating similarities and differences between structural models. PMID:25348407

  3. Simion 3D Version 6.0 User`s Manual

    SciTech Connect

    Dahl, D.A.

    1995-11-01

    The original SIMION was an electrostatic lens analysis and design program developed by D.C. McGilvery at Latrobe University, Bundoora Victoria, Australia, 1977. SIMION for the PC, developed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, shares little more than its name with the original McGilvery version. INEL`s fifth major SIMION release, version 6.0, represents a quantum improvement over previous versions. This C based program can model complex problems using an ion optics workbench that can hold up to 200 2D and/or 3D electrostatic/magnetic potential arrays. Arrays can have up to 10,000,000 points. SIMION 3D`s 32 bit virtual Graphics User Interface provides a highly interactive advanced user environment. All potential arrays are visualized as 3D objects that the user can cut away to inspect ion trajectories and potential energy surfaces. User programs have been greatly extended in versatility and power. A new geometry file option supports the definition of highly complex array geometry. Extensive algorithm modifications have dramatically improved this version`s computational speed and accuracy.

  4. CFL3D User's Manual (Version 5.0)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krist, Sherrie L.; Biedron, Robert T.; Rumsey, Christopher L.

    1998-01-01

    This document is the User's Manual for the CFL3D computer code, a thin-layer Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes flow solver for structured multiple-zone grids. Descriptions of the code's input parameters, non-dimensionalizations, file formats, boundary conditions, and equations are included. Sample 2-D and 3-D test cases are also described, and many helpful hints for using the code are provided.

  5. User benefits of visualization with 3-D stereoscopic displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wichansky, Anna M.

    1991-08-01

    The power of today''s supercomputers promises tremendous benefits to users in terms of productivity, creativity, and excitement in computing. A study of a stereoscopic display system for computer workstations was conducted with 20 users and third-party software developers, to determine whether 3-D stereo displays were perceived as better than flat, 2- 1/2D displays. Users perceived more benefits of 3-D stereo in applications such as molecular modeling and cell biology, which involved viewing of complex, abstract, amorphous objects. Users typically mentioned clearer visualization and better understanding of data, easier recognition of form and pattern, and more fun and excitement at work as the chief benefits of stereo displays. Human factors issues affecting the usefulness of stereo included use of 3-D glasses over regular eyeglasses, difficulties in group viewing, lack of portability, and need for better input devices. The future marketability of 3-D stereo displays would be improved by eliminating the need for users to wear equipment, reducing cost, and identifying markets where the abstract display value can be maximized.

  6. User Interface Software Tools

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-08-01

    97. 19. Mark A. Flecchia and R. Daniel Bergeron. Specifying Complex Dialogs in ALGAE. Human Factors in Computing Systems, CHI+GI󈨛, Toronto, Ont...Spreadsheet Model. Tech. Rept. GIT-GVU-93-20, Georgia Tech Graphics, Visualization and Usability Center, May, 1993. 35. Daniel H.H. Ingalls. "I’he Smalltalk...Interactive Graphical Applications". Comm. ACM 36,4 (April 1993), 41-55. User Interface Software Tools -39 38. Anthony Karrer and Walt Scacchi . Requirements

  7. User Interface Design Patterns

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-07-01

    the beginning of our research) led us to Glade (glade.gnome.org), a cross- platform GUI builder platform that saves its descriptive files in XML format...Major consideration was initially given to Java Netbeans and Java Eclipse, and later extended to Glade .) The saved XML files fully describe... Glade -designed user interfaces. Glade libraries are available for numerous programming languages on many computing platforms. This makes the choice of

  8. Gestures in an Intelligent User Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fikkert, Wim; van der Vet, Paul; Nijholt, Anton

    In this chapter we investigated which hand gestures are intuitive to control a large display multimedia interface from a user's perspective. Over the course of two sequential user evaluations, we defined a simple gesture set that allows users to fully control a large display multimedia interface, intuitively. First, we evaluated numerous gesture possibilities for a set of commands that can be issued to the interface. These gestures were selected from literature, science fiction movies, and a previous exploratory study. Second, we implemented a working prototype with which the users could interact with both hands and the preferred hand gestures with 2D and 3D visualizations of biochemical structures. We found that the gestures are influenced to significant extent by the fast paced developments in multimedia interfaces such as the Apple iPhone and the Nintendo Wii and to no lesser degree by decades of experience with the more traditional WIMP-based interfaces.

  9. Power User Interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pfister, Robin; McMahon, Joe

    2006-01-01

    Power User Interface 5.0 (PUI) is a system of middleware, written for expert users in the Earth-science community, PUI enables expedited ordering of data granules on the basis of specific granule-identifying information that the users already know or can assemble. PUI also enables expert users to perform quick searches for orderablegranule information for use in preparing orders. PUI 5.0 is available in two versions (note: PUI 6.0 has command-line mode only): a Web-based application program and a UNIX command-line- mode client program. Both versions include modules that perform data-granule-ordering functions in conjunction with external systems. The Web-based version works with Earth Observing System Clearing House (ECHO) metadata catalog and order-entry services and with an open-source order-service broker server component, called the Mercury Shopping Cart, that is provided separately by Oak Ridge National Laboratory through the Department of Energy. The command-line version works with the ECHO metadata and order-entry process service. Both versions of PUI ultimately use ECHO to process an order to be sent to a data provider. Ordered data are provided through means outside the PUI software system.

  10. User interfaces for voice applications.

    PubMed Central

    Kamm, C

    1995-01-01

    This paper discusses some of the aspects of task requirements, user expectations, and technological capabilities that influence the design of a voice interface and then identifies several components of user interfaces that are particularly critical in successful voice applications. Examples from several applications are provided to demonstrate how these components are used to produce effective voice interfaces. PMID:7479721

  11. User interfaces for voice applications.

    PubMed

    Kamm, C

    1995-10-24

    This paper discusses some of the aspects of task requirements, user expectations, and technological capabilities that influence the design of a voice interface and then identifies several components of user interfaces that are particularly critical in successful voice applications. Examples from several applications are provided to demonstrate how these components are used to produce effective voice interfaces.

  12. User Interfaces for Voice Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamm, Candace

    1995-10-01

    This paper discusses some of the aspects of task requirements, user expectations, and technological capabilities that influence the design of a voice interface and then identifies several components of user interfaces that are particularly critical in successful voice applications. Examples from several applications are provided to demonstrate how these components are used to produce effective voice interfaces.

  13. User interface enhancement report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badler, N. I.; Gangel, J.; Shields, G.; Fala, G.

    1985-01-01

    The existing user interfaces to TEMPUS, Plaid, and other systems in the OSDS are fundamentally based on only two modes of communication: alphanumeric commands or data input and grapical interaction. The latter are especially suited to the types of interaction necessary for creating workstation objects with BUILD and with performing body positioning in TEMPUS. Looking toward the future application of TEMPUS, however, the long-term goals of OSDS will include the analysis of extensive tasks in space involving one or more individuals working in concert over a period of time. In this context, the TEMPUS body positioning capability, though extremely useful in creating and validating a small number of particular body positions, will become somewhat tedious to use. The macro facility helps somewhat, since frequently used positions may be easily applied by executing a stored macro. The difference between body positioning and task execution, though subtle, is important. In the case of task execution, the important information at the user's level is what actions are to be performed rather than how the actions are performed. Viewed slightly differently, the what is constant over a set of individuals though the how may vary.

  14. User-Appropriate Viewer for High Resolution Interactive Engagement with 3d Digital Cultural Artefacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillespie, D.; La Pensée, A.; Cooper, M.

    2013-07-01

    presents results of research that aims to provide a methodology for museums and cultural institutions for prototyping a 3D viewer within a webpage, thereby not only allowing institutions to promote their collections via the internet but also providing a tool for users to engage in a meaningful way with cultural heritage datasets. The design process encompasses evaluation as the central part of the design methodology; focusing on how slight changes to navigation, object engagement and aesthetic appearance can influence the user's experience. The prototype used in this paper, was created using WebGL with the Three.Js (Three.JS, 2013) library and datasets were loaded as the OpenCTM (Geelnard, 2010) file format. The overall design is centred on creating an easy-tolearn interface allowing non-skilled users to interact with the datasets, and also providing tools allowing skilled users to discover more about the cultural heritage object. User testing was carried out, allowing users to interact with 3D datasets within the interactive viewer. The results are analysed and the insights learned are discussed in relation to an interface designed to interact with 3D content. The results will lead to the design of interfaces for interacting with 3D objects, which allow for both skilled and non skilled users to engage with 3D cultural heritage objects in a meaningful way.

  15. IGES Interface for Medical 3-D Volume Data.

    PubMed

    Chen, Gong; Yi, Hong; Ni, Zhonghua

    2005-01-01

    Although there are many medical image processing and virtual surgery systems that provide rather consummate 3D-visualization and data manipulation techniques, few of them can export the volume data for engineering analyze. The thesis presents an interface implementing IGES (initial graphics exchange specification). Volume data such as bones, skins and other tissues can be exported as IGES files to be directly used for engineering analysis.

  16. User's manuals for DYNA3D and DYNAP: nonlinear dynamic analysis of solids in three dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Hallquist, J.O.

    1981-07-01

    This report provides a user's manual for DYNA3D, an explicit three-dimensional finite element code for analyzing the large deformation dynamic response of inelastic solids. A contact-impact algorithm permits gaps and sliding along material interfaces. By a specialization of this algorithm, such interfaces can be rigidly tied to admit variable zoning without the need of transition regions. Spatial discretization is achieved by the use of 8-node solid elements, and the equations-of-motion are integrated by the central difference method. Post-processors for DYNA3D include GRAPE for plotting deformed shapes and stress contours and DYNAP for plotting time histories. A user's manual for DYNAP is also provided in this report.

  17. Overview of Graphical User Interfaces.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hulser, Richard P.

    1993-01-01

    Discussion of graphical user interfaces for online public access catalogs (OPACs) covers the history of OPACs; OPAC front-end design, including examples from Indiana University and the University of Illinois; and planning and implementation of a user interface. (10 references) (EA)

  18. User Interface Technology Transfer to NASA's Virtual Wind Tunnel System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    vanDam, Andries

    1998-01-01

    Funded by NASA grants for four years, the Brown Computer Graphics Group has developed novel 3D user interfaces for desktop and immersive scientific visualization applications. This past grant period supported the design and development of a software library, the 3D Widget Library, which supports the construction and run-time management of 3D widgets. The 3D Widget Library is a mechanism for transferring user interface technology from the Brown Graphics Group to the Virtual Wind Tunnel system at NASA Ames as well as the public domain.

  19. Additive manufacturing. Continuous liquid interface production of 3D objects.

    PubMed

    Tumbleston, John R; Shirvanyants, David; Ermoshkin, Nikita; Janusziewicz, Rima; Johnson, Ashley R; Kelly, David; Chen, Kai; Pinschmidt, Robert; Rolland, Jason P; Ermoshkin, Alexander; Samulski, Edward T; DeSimone, Joseph M

    2015-03-20

    Additive manufacturing processes such as 3D printing use time-consuming, stepwise layer-by-layer approaches to object fabrication. We demonstrate the continuous generation of monolithic polymeric parts up to tens of centimeters in size with feature resolution below 100 micrometers. Continuous liquid interface production is achieved with an oxygen-permeable window below the ultraviolet image projection plane, which creates a "dead zone" (persistent liquid interface) where photopolymerization is inhibited between the window and the polymerizing part. We delineate critical control parameters and show that complex solid parts can be drawn out of the resin at rates of hundreds of millimeters per hour. These print speeds allow parts to be produced in minutes instead of hours.

  20. DIRAC: Secure web user interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casajus Ramo, A.; Sapunov, M.

    2010-04-01

    Traditionally the interaction between users and the Grid is done with command line tools. However, these tools are difficult to use by non-expert users providing minimal help and generating outputs not always easy to understand especially in case of errors. Graphical User Interfaces are typically limited to providing access to the monitoring or accounting information and concentrate on some particular aspects failing to cover the full spectrum of grid control tasks. To make the Grid more user friendly more complete graphical interfaces are needed. Within the DIRAC project we have attempted to construct a Web based User Interface that provides means not only for monitoring the system behavior but also allows to steer the main user activities on the grid. Using DIRAC's web interface a user can easily track jobs and data. It provides access to job information and allows performing actions on jobs such as killing or deleting. Data managers can define and monitor file transfer activity as well as check requests set by jobs. Production managers can define and follow large data productions and react if necessary by stopping or starting them. The Web Portal is build following all the grid security standards and using modern Web 2.0 technologies which allow to achieve the user experience similar to the desktop applications. Details of the DIRAC Web Portal architecture and User Interface will be presented and discussed.

  1. A Voice and Mouse Input Interface for 3D Virtual Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kao, David L.; Bryson, Steve T.

    2003-01-01

    There have been many successful stories on how 3D input devices can be fully integrated into an immersive virtual environment. Electromagnetic trackers, optical trackers, gloves, and flying mice are just some of these input devices. Though we can use existing 3D input devices that are commonly used for VR applications, there are several factors that prevent us from choosing these input devices for our applications. One main factor is that most of these tracking devices are not suitable for prolonged use due to human fatigue associated with using them. A second factor is that many of them would occupy additional office space. Another factor is that many of the 3D input devices are expensive due to the unusual hardware that are required. For our VR applications, we want a user interface that would work naturally with standard equipment. In this paper, we demonstrate applications or our proposed muitimodal interface using a 3D dome display. We also show that effective data analysis can be achieved while the scientists view their data rendered inside the dome display and perform user interactions simply using the mouse and voice input. Though the sphere coordinate grid seems to be ideal for interaction using a 3D dome display, we can also use other non-spherical grids as well.

  2. User experience while viewing stereoscopic 3D television

    PubMed Central

    Read, Jenny C.A.; Bohr, Iwo

    2014-01-01

    3D display technologies have been linked to visual discomfort and fatigue. In a lab-based study with a between-subjects design, 433 viewers aged from 4 to 82 years watched the same movie in either 2D or stereo 3D (S3D), and subjectively reported on a range of aspects of their viewing experience. Our results suggest that a minority of viewers, around 14%, experience adverse effects due to viewing S3D, mainly headache and eyestrain. A control experiment where participants viewed 2D content through 3D glasses suggests that around 8% may report adverse effects which are not due directly to viewing S3D, but instead are due to the glasses or to negative preconceptions about S3D (the ‘nocebo effect'). Women were slightly more likely than men to report adverse effects with S3D. We could not detect any link between pre-existing eye conditions or low stereoacuity and the likelihood of experiencing adverse effects with S3D. Practitioner Summary: Stereoscopic 3D (S3D) has been linked to visual discomfort and fatigue. Viewers watched the same movie in either 2D or stereo 3D (between-subjects design). Around 14% reported effects such as headache and eyestrain linked to S3D itself, while 8% report adverse effects attributable to 3D glasses or negative expectations. PMID:24874550

  3. Medical workstation design: enhancing graphical interface with 3D anatomical atlas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoo, Kent S., Jr.; Wong, Stephen T. C.; Grant, Ellen

    1997-05-01

    The huge data archive of the UCSF Hospital Integrated Picture Archiving and Communication System gives healthcare providers access to diverse kinds of images and text for diagnosis and patient management. Given the mass of information accessible, however, conventional graphical user interface (GUI) approach overwhelms the user with forms, menus, fields, lists, and other widgets and causes 'information overloading.' This article describes a new approach that complements the conventional GUI with 3D anatomical atlases and presents the usefulness of this approach with a clinical neuroimaging application.

  4. 3D silicone rubber interfaces for individually tailored implants.

    PubMed

    Stieghorst, Jan; Bondarenkova, Alexandra; Burblies, Niklas; Behrens, Peter; Doll, Theodor

    2015-01-01

    For the fabrication of customized silicone rubber based implants, e.g. cochlear implants or electrocortical grid arrays, it is required to develop high speed curing systems, which vulcanize the silicone rubber before it runs due to a heating related viscosity drop. Therefore, we present an infrared radiation based cross-linking approach for the 3D-printing of silicone rubber bulk and carbon nanotube based silicone rubber electrode materials. Composite materials were cured in less than 120 s and material interfaces were evaluated with scanning electron microscopy. Furthermore, curing related changes in the mechanical and cell-biological behaviour were investigated with tensile and WST-1 cell biocompatibility tests. The infrared absorption properties of the silicone rubber materials were analysed with fourier transform infrared spectroscopy in transmission and attenuated total reflection mode. The heat flux was calculated by using the FTIR data, emissivity data from the infrared source manufacturer and the geometrical view factor of the system.

  5. User interfaces to expert systems

    SciTech Connect

    Agarwal, A.; Emrich, M.L.

    1988-10-01

    Expert Systems are becoming increasingly popular in environments where the user is not well versed in computers or the subject domain. They offer expert advice and can also explain their lines of reasoning. As these systems are applied to highly technical areas, they become complex and large. Therefore, User Systems Interfaces (USIs) become critical. This paper discusses recent technologies that can be applied to improved user communication. In particular, bar menus/graphics, mouse interfaces, touch screens, and voice links will be highlighted. Their applications in the context of SOFTMAN (The Software Manager Apprentice) a knowledge-based system are discussed. 18 refs., 2 figs.

  6. Rapid prototyping 3D virtual world interfaces within a virtual factory environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kosta, Charles Paul; Krolak, Patrick D.

    1993-01-01

    On-going work into user requirements analysis using CLIPS (NASA/JSC) expert systems as an intelligent event simulator has led to research into three-dimensional (3D) interfaces. Previous work involved CLIPS and two-dimensional (2D) models. Integral to this work was the development of the University of Massachusetts Lowell parallel version of CLIPS, called PCLIPS. This allowed us to create both a Software Bus and a group problem-solving environment for expert systems development. By shifting the PCLIPS paradigm to use the VEOS messaging protocol we have merged VEOS (HlTL/Seattle) and CLIPS into a distributed virtual worlds prototyping environment (VCLIPS). VCLIPS uses the VEOS protocol layer to allow multiple experts to cooperate on a single problem. We have begun to look at the control of a virtual factory. In the virtual factory there are actors and objects as found in our Lincoln Logs Factory of the Future project. In this artificial reality architecture there are three VCLIPS entities in action. One entity is responsible for display and user events in the 3D virtual world. Another is responsible for either simulating the virtual factory or communicating with the real factory. The third is a user interface expert. The interface expert maps user input levels, within the current prototype, to control information for the factory. The interface to the virtual factory is based on a camera paradigm. The graphics subsystem generates camera views of the factory on standard X-Window displays. The camera allows for view control and object control. Control or the factory is accomplished by the user reaching into the camera views to perform object interactions. All communication between the separate CLIPS expert systems is done through VEOS.

  7. 3D-CDTI User Manual v2.1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Walter; Battiste, Vernol

    2016-01-01

    The 3D-Cockpit Display of Traffic Information (3D-CDTI) is a flight deck tool that presents aircrew with: proximal traffic aircraft location, their current status and flight plan data; strategic conflict detection and alerting; automated conflict resolution strategies; the facility to graphically plan manual route changes; time-based, in-trail spacing on approach. The CDTI is manipulated via a touchpad on the flight deck, and by mouse when presented as part of a desktop flight simulator.

  8. A non-expert-user interface for posing signing avatars.

    PubMed

    Adamo-Villani, Nicoletta; Popescu, Voicu; Lestina, Jason

    2013-05-01

    We describe a graphical user interface designed to allow non-expert users to pose 3D characters to create American Sign Language (ASL) computer animation. The interface is an important component of a software system that allows educators of the Deaf to add sign language translation, in the form of 3D character animations, to digital learning materials, thus making them accessible to deaf learners. A study indicates that users with no computer animation expertize can create animated ASL signs quickly and accurately.

  9. Opportunistic tangible user interfaces for augmented reality.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Steven; Feiner, Steven

    2010-01-01

    Opportunistic Controls are a class of user interaction techniques that we have developed for augmented reality (AR) applications to support gesturing on, and receiving feedback from, otherwise unused affordances already present in the domain environment. By leveraging characteristics of these affordances to provide passive haptics that ease gesture input, Opportunistic Controls simplify gesture recognition, and provide tangible feedback to the user. In this approach, 3D widgets are tightly coupled with affordances to provide visual feedback and hints about the functionality of the control. For example, a set of buttons can be mapped to existing tactile features on domain objects. We describe examples of Opportunistic Controls that we have designed and implemented using optical marker tracking, combined with appearance-based gesture recognition. We present the results of two user studies. In the first, participants performed a simulated maintenance inspection of an aircraft engine using a set of virtual buttons implemented both as Opportunistic Controls and using simpler passive haptics. Opportunistic Controls allowed participants to complete their tasks significantly faster and were preferred over the baseline technique. In the second, participants proposed and demonstrated user interfaces incorporating Opportunistic Controls for two domains, allowing us to gain additional insights into how user interfaces featuring Opportunistic Controls might be designed.

  10. 3D print of polymer bonded rare-earth magnets, and 3D magnetic field scanning with an end-user 3D printer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, C.; Abert, C.; Bruckner, F.; Groenefeld, M.; Muthsam, O.; Schuschnigg, S.; Sirak, K.; Thanhoffer, R.; Teliban, I.; Vogler, C.; Windl, R.; Suess, D.

    2016-10-01

    3D print is a recently developed technique, for single-unit production, and for structures that have been impossible to build previously. The current work presents a method to 3D print polymer bonded isotropic hard magnets with a low-cost, end-user 3D printer. Commercially available isotropic NdFeB powder inside a PA11 matrix is characterized, and prepared for the printing process. An example of a printed magnet with a complex shape that was designed to generate a specific stray field is presented, and compared with finite element simulation solving the macroscopic Maxwell equations. For magnetic characterization, and comparing 3D printed structures with injection molded parts, hysteresis measurements are performed. To measure the stray field outside the magnet, the printer is upgraded to a 3D magnetic flux density measurement system. To skip an elaborate adjusting of the sensor, a simulation is used to calibrate the angles, sensitivity, and the offset of the sensor. With this setup, a measurement resolution of 0.05 mm along the z-axes is achievable. The effectiveness of our calibration method is shown. With our setup, we are able to print polymer bonded magnetic systems with the freedom of having a specific complex shape with locally tailored magnetic properties. The 3D scanning setup is easy to mount, and with our calibration method we are able to get accurate measuring results of the stray field.

  11. A brain-computer interface method combined with eye tracking for 3D interaction.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eui Chul; Woo, Jin Cheol; Kim, Jong Hwa; Whang, Mincheol; Park, Kang Ryoung

    2010-07-15

    With the recent increase in the number of three-dimensional (3D) applications, the need for interfaces to these applications has increased. Although the eye tracking method has been widely used as an interaction interface for hand-disabled persons, this approach cannot be used for depth directional navigation. To solve this problem, we propose a new brain computer interface (BCI) method in which the BCI and eye tracking are combined to analyze depth navigation, including selection and two-dimensional (2D) gaze direction, respectively. The proposed method is novel in the following five ways compared to previous works. First, a device to measure both the gaze direction and an electroencephalogram (EEG) pattern is proposed with the sensors needed to measure the EEG attached to a head-mounted eye tracking device. Second, the reliability of the BCI interface is verified by demonstrating that there is no difference between the real and the imaginary movements for the same work in terms of the EEG power spectrum. Third, depth control for the 3D interaction interface is implemented by an imaginary arm reaching movement. Fourth, a selection method is implemented by an imaginary hand grabbing movement. Finally, for the independent operation of gazing and the BCI, a mode selection method is proposed that measures a user's concentration by analyzing the pupil accommodation speed, which is not affected by the operation of gazing and the BCI. According to experimental results, we confirmed the feasibility of the proposed 3D interaction method using eye tracking and a BCI.

  12. PLUTO 3-D Grid Generator (User’s Manual)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-06-01

    PLUTO (Poisson Laplace U TFI Orthogonal), is a three dimensional gridding and smoothing program developed in-house at WL/FIMM. Its purpose is to: (1...spacing, smoothness and orthogonality, and (4) output grids in user selected ascii or binary formats. Initial grids are established by PLUTO with a three

  13. Multi-user 3D film on a time-multiplexed side-emission backlight system.

    PubMed

    Ting, Chih-Hung; Chang, Yu-Cheng; Chen, Chun-Ho; Huang, Yi-Pai; Tsai, Han-Wen

    2016-10-01

    The desirable features for a portable 3D display include displaying 2D and 3D images without resolution degradation for multiple users, a 2D/3D switchable functionality, and, in particular, a compact volume. To produce a portable 3D display with these desirable features, we propose here a multi-user 3D film combined with a side-emission backlight system that has a directional-sequential light distribution. According to the simulation and experimental results, the multi-user 3D film successfully uses an inverted trapezoid structure to separate the rays of each light source and increases the number of observers from one to three. Additionally, the specification of the inverted trapezoid structure can be determined via equations for different designated viewing positions of the side observer and for the ratio of light intensities for the central and side observers.

  14. A virtual interface for interactions with 3D models of the human body.

    PubMed

    De Paolis, Lucio T; Pulimeno, Marco; Aloisio, Giovanni

    2009-01-01

    The developed system is the first prototype of a virtual interface designed to avoid contact with the computer so that the surgeon is able to visualize 3D models of the patient's organs more effectively during surgical procedure or to use this in the pre-operative planning. The doctor will be able to rotate, to translate and to zoom in on 3D models of the patient's organs simply by moving his finger in free space; in addition, it is possible to choose to visualize all of the organs or only some of them. All of the interactions with the models happen in real-time using the virtual interface which appears as a touch-screen suspended in free space in a position chosen by the user when the application is started up. Finger movements are detected by means of an optical tracking system and are used to simulate touch with the interface and to interact by pressing the buttons present on the virtual screen.

  15. Towards automation of user interface design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gastner, Rainer; Kraetzschmar, Gerhard K.; Lutz, Ernst

    1992-01-01

    This paper suggests an approach to automatic software design in the domain of graphical user interfaces. There are still some drawbacks in existing user interface management systems (UIMS's) which basically offer only quantitative layout specifications via direct manipulation. Our approach suggests a convenient way to get a default graphical user interface which may be customized and redesigned easily in further prototyping cycles.

  16. Interaction Design and Usability of Learning Spaces in 3D Multi-user Virtual Worlds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minocha, Shailey; Reeves, Ahmad John

    Three-dimensional virtual worlds are multimedia, simulated environments, often managed over the Web, which users can 'inhabit' and interact via their own graphical, self-representations known as 'avatars'. 3D virtual worlds are being used in many applications: education/training, gaming, social networking, marketing and commerce. Second Life is the most widely used 3D virtual world in education. However, problems associated with usability, navigation and way finding in 3D virtual worlds may impact on student learning and engagement. Based on empirical investigations of learning spaces in Second Life, this paper presents design guidelines to improve the usability and ease of navigation in 3D spaces. Methods of data collection include semi-structured interviews with Second Life students, educators and designers. The findings have revealed that design principles from the fields of urban planning, Human- Computer Interaction, Web usability, geography and psychology can influence the design of spaces in 3D multi-user virtual environments.

  17. Intelligent user interface concept for space station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Comer, Edward; Donaldson, Cameron; Bailey, Elizabeth; Gilroy, Kathleen

    1986-01-01

    The space station computing system must interface with a wide variety of users, from highly skilled operations personnel to payload specialists from all over the world. The interface must accommodate a wide variety of operations from the space platform, ground control centers and from remote sites. As a result, there is a need for a robust, highly configurable and portable user interface that can accommodate the various space station missions. The concept of an intelligent user interface executive, written in Ada, that would support a number of advanced human interaction techniques, such as windowing, icons, color graphics, animation, and natural language processing is presented. The user interface would provide intelligent interaction by understanding the various user roles, the operations and mission, the current state of the environment and the current working context of the users. In addition, the intelligent user interface executive must be supported by a set of tools that would allow the executive to be easily configured and to allow rapid prototyping of proposed user dialogs. This capability would allow human engineering specialists acting in the role of dialog authors to define and validate various user scenarios. The set of tools required to support development of this intelligent human interface capability is discussed and the prototyping and validation efforts required for development of the Space Station's user interface are outlined.

  18. Interface requirements to couple thermal-hydraulic codes to 3D neutronic codes

    SciTech Connect

    Langenbuch, S.; Austregesilo, H.; Velkov, K.

    1997-07-01

    The present situation of thermalhydraulics codes and 3D neutronics codes is briefly described and general considerations for coupling of these codes are discussed. Two different basic approaches of coupling are identified and their relative advantages and disadvantages are discussed. The implementation of the coupling for 3D neutronics codes in the system ATHLET is presented. Meanwhile, this interface is used for coupling three different 3D neutronics codes.

  19. Three-dimensional user interfaces for scientific visualization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandam, Andries

    1995-01-01

    The main goal of this project is to develop novel and productive user interface techniques for creating and managing visualizations of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) datasets. We have implemented an application framework in which we can visualize computational fluid dynamics user interfaces. This UI technology allows users to interactively place visualization probes in a dataset and modify some of their parameters. We have also implemented a time-critical scheduling system which strives to maintain a constant frame-rate regardless of the number of visualization techniques. In the past year, we have published parts of this research at two conferences, the research annotation system at Visualization 1994, and the 3D user interface at UIST 1994. The real-time scheduling system has been submitted to SIGGRAPH 1995 conference. Copies of these documents are included with this report.

  20. A Simple Interface for 3D Position Estimation of a Mobile Robot with Single Camera

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Chun-Tang; Chung, Ming-Hsuan; Chiou, Juing-Shian; Wang, Chi-Jo

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, there has been an increase in the number of mobile robots controlled by a smart phone or tablet. This paper proposes a visual control interface for a mobile robot with a single camera to easily control the robot actions and estimate the 3D position of a target. In this proposal, the mobile robot employed an Arduino Yun as the core processor and was remote-controlled by a tablet with an Android operating system. In addition, the robot was fitted with a three-axis robotic arm for grasping. Both the real-time control signal and video transmission are transmitted via Wi-Fi. We show that with a properly calibrated camera and the proposed prototype procedures, the users can click on a desired position or object on the touchscreen and estimate its 3D coordinates in the real world by simple analytic geometry instead of a complicated algorithm. The results of the measurement verification demonstrates that this approach has great potential for mobile robots. PMID:27023556

  1. Reasoning about Users' Actions in a Graphical User Interface.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Virvou, Maria; Kabassi, Katerina

    2002-01-01

    Describes a graphical user interface called IFM (Intelligent File Manipulator) that provides intelligent help to users. Explains two underlying reasoning mechanisms, one an adaptation of human plausible reasoning and one that performs goal recognition based on the effects of users' commands; and presents results of an empirical study that…

  2. Vision as a user interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koenderink, Jan

    2011-03-01

    The egg-rolling behavior of the graylag goose is an often quoted example of a fixed-action pattern. The bird will even attempt to roll a brick back to its nest! Despite excellent visual acuity it apparently takes a brick for an egg." Evolution optimizes utility, not veridicality. Yet textbooks take it for a fact that human vision evolved so as to approach veridical perception. How do humans manage to dodge the laws of evolution? I will show that they don't, but that human vision is an idiosyncratic user interface. By way of an example I consider the case of pictorial perception. Gleaning information from still images is an important human ability and is likely to remain so for the foreseeable future. I will discuss a number of instances of extreme non-veridicality and huge inter-observer variability. Despite their importance in applications (information dissemination, personnel selection,...) such huge effects have remained undocumented in the literature, although they can be traced to artistic conventions. The reason appears to be that conventional psychophysics-by design-fails to address the qualitative, that is the meaningful, aspects of visual awareness whereas this is the very target of the visual arts.

  3. Understanding Human Perception of Building Categories in Virtual 3d Cities - a User Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tutzauer, P.; Becker, S.; Niese, T.; Deussen, O.; Fritsch, D.

    2016-06-01

    Virtual 3D cities are becoming increasingly important as a means of visually communicating diverse urban-related information. To get a deeper understanding of a human's cognitive experience of virtual 3D cities, this paper presents a user study on the human ability to perceive building categories (e.g. residential home, office building, building with shops etc.) from geometric 3D building representations. The study reveals various dependencies between geometric properties of the 3D representations and the perceptibility of the building categories. Knowledge about which geometries are relevant, helpful or obstructive for perceiving a specific building category is derived. The importance and usability of such knowledge is demonstrated based on a perception-guided 3D building abstraction process.

  4. User Interface Design for Dynamic Geometry Software

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kortenkamp, Ulrich; Dohrmann, Christian

    2010-01-01

    In this article we describe long-standing user interface issues with Dynamic Geometry Software and common approaches to address them. We describe first prototypes of multi-touch-capable DGS. We also give some hints on the educational benefits of proper user interface design.

  5. Key Procedures in User Interface Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, E. Vance; Connolly, James R.

    Information systems (IS) professionals are called on to produce increasingly sophisticated user interfaces as a part of software development. Although IS education includes coverage of user interface (UI) development, classroom presentation of this topic frequently is cursory and does not provide any particular methodology for the task. In this…

  6. New User Interface Capabilities for Control Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kasemir, Kay

    2009-01-01

    Latest technologies promise new control system User Interface (UI) features and greater interoperability of applications. New developments using Java and Eclipse aim to unify diverse control systems and make communication between applications seamless. Web based user interfaces can improve portability and remote access. Modern programming tools improve efficiency, support testing and facilitate shared code. This paper will discuss new developments aimed at improving control system interfaces and their development environment.

  7. The Rise of the Graphical User Interface.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Alastair D. N.

    1996-01-01

    Discusses the history of the graphical user interface (GUI) and the growing realization that adaptations must be made to it lest its visual nature discriminate against nonsighted or sight-impaired users. One of the most popular commercially developed adaptations is to develop sounds that signal the location of icons or menus to mouse users.…

  8. Why 3D Cameras are Not Popular: A Qualitative User Study on Stereoscopic Photography Acceptance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakala, Jussi; Westman, Stina; Salmimaa, Marja; Pölönen, Monika; Järvenpää, Toni; Häkkinen, Jukka

    2014-03-01

    Digital stereoscopic 3D cameras have entered the consumer market in recent years, but the acceptance of this novel technology has not yet been studied. The aim of this study was to identify the benefits and problems that novice users encounter in 3D photography by equipping five users with 3D cameras for a 4-week trial. We gathered data using a weekly questionnaire, an exit interview, and a stereoscopic disparity analysis of the 699 photographs taken during the trial. The results indicate that the participants took photographs at too-close distances, which caused excessive disparities. They learned to avoid the problem to some extent; the number of failed photographs due to excessive stereoscopic disparity decreased 70 % in 4 weeks. The participants also developed a preference for subjects that included clear depth differences and started to avoid photographing people because they looked unnatural in 3D photographs. They also regarded flash-induced shadows and edge violations problematic because of the unnatural effects in the photographs. We propose in-camera assistance tools for 3D cameras to make 3D photography easier.

  9. Socialisation for Learning at a Distance in a 3-D Multi-User Virtual Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edirisingha, Palitha; Nie, Ming; Pluciennik, Mark; Young, Ruth

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports findings of a pilot study that examined the pedagogical potential of "Second Life" (SL), a popular three-dimensional multi-user virtual environment (3-D MUVE) developed by the Linden Lab. The study is part of a 1-year research and development project titled "Modelling of Secondlife Environments"…

  10. Applying Cognitive Psychology to User Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durrani, Sabeen; Durrani, Qaiser S.

    This paper explores some key aspects of cognitive psychology that may be mapped onto user interfaces. Major focus in existing user interface guidelines is on consistency, simplicity, feedback, system messages, display issues, navigation, colors, graphics, visibility and error prevention [8-10]. These guidelines are effective indesigning user interfaces. However, these guidelines do not handle the issues that may arise due to the innate structure of human brain and human limitations. For example, where to place graphics on the screen so that user can easily process them and what kind of background should be given on the screen according to the limitation of human motor system. In this paper we have collected some available guidelines from the area of cognitive psychology [1, 5, 7]. In addition, we have extracted few guidelines from theories and studies of cognitive psychology [3, 11] which may be mapped to user interfaces.

  11. CARE 3 user-friendly interface user's guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martensen, A. L.

    1987-01-01

    CARE 3 predicts the unreliability of highly reliable reconfigurable fault-tolerant systems that include redundant computers or computer systems. CARE3MENU is a user-friendly interface used to create an input for the CARE 3 program. The CARE3MENU interface has been designed to minimize user input errors. Although a CARE3MENU session may be successfully completed and all parameters may be within specified limits or ranges, the CARE 3 program is not guaranteed to produce meaningful results if the user incorrectly interprets the CARE 3 stochastic model. The CARE3MENU User Guide provides complete information on how to create a CARE 3 model with the interface. The CARE3MENU interface runs under the VAX/VMS operating system.

  12. User Interface Technology for Formal Specification Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowry, Michael; Philpot, Andrew; Pressburger, Thomas; Underwood, Ian; Lum, Henry, Jr. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Formal specification development and modification are an essential component of the knowledge-based software life cycle. User interface technology is needed to empower end-users to create their own formal specifications. This paper describes the advanced user interface for AMPHION1 a knowledge-based software engineering system that targets scientific subroutine libraries. AMPHION is a generic, domain-independent architecture that is specialized to an application domain through a declarative domain theory. Formal specification development and reuse is made accessible to end-users through an intuitive graphical interface that provides semantic guidance in creating diagrams denoting formal specifications in an application domain. The diagrams also serve to document the specifications. Automatic deductive program synthesis ensures that end-user specifications are correctly implemented. The tables that drive AMPHION's user interface are automatically compiled from a domain theory; portions of the interface can be customized by the end-user. The user interface facilitates formal specification development by hiding syntactic details, such as logical notation. It also turns some of the barriers for end-user specification development associated with strongly typed formal languages into active sources of guidance, without restricting advanced users. The interface is especially suited for specification modification. AMPHION has been applied to the domain of solar system kinematics through the development of a declarative domain theory. Testing over six months with planetary scientists indicates that AMPHION's interactive specification acquisition paradigm enables users to develop, modify, and reuse specifications at least an order of magnitude more rapidly than manual program development.

  13. 3D Brain Segmentation Using Dual-Front Active Contours with Optional User Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Yezzi, Anthony; Cohen, Laurent D.

    2006-01-01

    Important attributes of 3D brain cortex segmentation algorithms include robustness, accuracy, computational efficiency, and facilitation of user interaction, yet few algorithms incorporate all of these traits. Manual segmentation is highly accurate but tedious and laborious. Most automatic techniques, while less demanding on the user, are much less accurate. It would be useful to employ a fast automatic segmentation procedure to do most of the work but still allow an expert user to interactively guide the segmentation to ensure an accurate final result. We propose a novel 3D brain cortex segmentation procedure utilizing dual-front active contours which minimize image-based energies in a manner that yields flexibly global minimizers based on active regions. Region-based information and boundary-based information may be combined flexibly in the evolution potentials for accurate segmentation results. The resulting scheme is not only more robust but much faster and allows the user to guide the final segmentation through simple mouse clicks which add extra seed points. Due to the flexibly global nature of the dual-front evolution model, single mouse clicks yield corrections to the segmentation that extend far beyond their initial locations, thus minimizing the user effort. Results on 15 simulated and 20 real 3D brain images demonstrate the robustness, accuracy, and speed of our scheme compared with other methods. PMID:23165037

  14. Interfacing graphene and related 2D materials with the 3D world.

    PubMed

    Tománek, David

    2015-04-10

    An important prerequisite to translating the exceptional intrinsic performance of 2D materials such as graphene and transition metal dichalcogenides into useful devices precludes their successful integration within the current 3D technology. This review provides theoretical insight into nontrivial issues arising from interfacing 2D materials with 3D systems including epitaxy and ways to accommodate lattice mismatch, the key role of contact resistance and the effect of defects in electrical and thermal transport.

  15. Graphical User Interfaces and Library Systems: End-User Reactions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zorn, Margaret; Marshall, Lucy

    1995-01-01

    Describes a study by Parke-Davis Pharmaceutical Research Library to determine user satisfaction with the graphical user interface-based (GUI) Dynix Marquis compared with the text-based Dynix Classic Online Public Access Catalog (OPAC). Results show that the GUI-based OPAC was preferred by endusers over the text-based OPAC. (eight references) (DGM)

  16. Uncovering the structural basis of protein interactions with efficient clustering of 3-D interaction interfaces.

    PubMed

    Aung, Z; Tan, S-H; Ng, S-K; Tan, K-L

    2007-01-01

    The biological mechanisms with which proteins interact with one another are best revealed by studying the structural interfaces between interacting proteins. Protein-protein interfaces can be extracted from 3-D structural data of protein complexes and then clustered to derive biological insights. However, conventional protein interface clustering methods lack computational scalability and statistical support. In this work, we present a new method named "PPiClust" to systematically encode, cluster and analyze similar 3-D interface patterns in protein complexes efficiently. Experimental results showed that our method is effective in discovering visually consistent and statistically significant clusters of interfaces, and at the same time sufficiently time-efficient to be performed on a single computer. The interface clusters are also useful for uncovering the structural basis of protein interactions. Analysis of the resulting interface clusters revealed groups of structurally diverse proteins having similar interface patterns. We also found, in some of the interface clusters, the presence of well-known linear binding motifs which were non-contiguous in the primary sequences. These results suggest that PPiClust can discover not only statistically significant but also biologically significant protein interface clusters from protein complex structural data.

  17. CLIPS application user interface for the PC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, Jim; Holbrook, Rebecca; Shewhart, Mark; Crouse, Joey; Yarost, Stuart

    1991-01-01

    The majority of applications that utilize expert system development programs for their knowledge representation and inferencing capability require some form of interface with the end user. This interface is more than likely an interaction through the computer screen. When building an application the user interface can prove to be the most difficult and time consuming aspect to program. Commercial products currently exist which address this issue. To keep pace C Language Integrated Production System (CLIPS) will need to find a solution for their lack of an easy to use Application User Interface (AUI). This paper represents a survey of the DoD CLIPS' user community and provides the backbone of a possible solution.

  18. Developing a 3D Road Cadastral System: Comparing Legal Requirements and User Needs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gristina, S.; Ellul, C.; Scianna, A.

    2016-10-01

    Road transport has always played an important role in a country's growth and, in order to manage road networks and ensure a high standard of road performance (e.g. durability, efficiency and safety), both public and private road inventories have been implemented using databases and Geographical Information Systems. They enable registering and managing significant amounts of different road information, but to date do not focus on 3D road information, data integration and interoperability. In an increasingly complex 3D urban environment, and in the age of smart cities, however, applications including intelligent transport systems, mobility and traffic management, road maintenance and safety require digital data infrastructures to manage road data: thus new inventories based on integrated 3D road models (queryable, updateable and shareable on line) are required. This paper outlines the first step towards the implementation of 3D GIS-based road inventories. Focusing on the case study of the "Road Cadastre" (the Italian road inventory as established by law), it investigates current limitations and required improvements, and also compares the required data structure imposed by cadastral legislation with real road users' needs. The study aims to: a) determine whether 3D GIS would improve road cadastre (for better management of data through the complete life-cycle infrastructure projects); b) define a conceptual model for a 3D road cadastre for Italy (whose general principles may be extended also to other countries).

  19. Formalizing the potential of stereoscopic 3D user experience in interactive entertainment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schild, Jonas; Masuch, Maic

    2015-03-01

    The use of stereoscopic 3D vision affects how interactive entertainment has to be developed as well as how it is experienced by the audience. The large amount of possibly impacting factors and variety as well as a certain subtlety of measured effects on user experience make it difficult to grasp the overall potential of using S3D vision. In a comprehensive approach, we (a) present a development framework which summarizes possible variables in display technology, content creation and human factors, and (b) list a scheme of S3D user experience effects concerning initial fascination, emotions, performance, and behavior as well as negative feelings of discomfort and complexity. As a major contribution we propose a qualitative formalization which derives dependencies between development factors and user effects. The argumentation is based on several previously published user studies. We further show how to apply this formula to identify possible opportunities and threats in content creation as well as how to pursue future steps for a possible quantification.

  20. User's manual for the HYPGEN hyperbolic grid generator and the HGUI graphical user interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, William M.; Chiu, Ing-Tsau; Buning, Pieter G.

    1993-01-01

    The HYPGEN program is used to generate a 3-D volume grid over a user-supplied single-block surface grid. This is accomplished by solving the 3-D hyperbolic grid generation equations consisting of two orthogonality relations and one cell volume constraint. In this user manual, the required input files and parameters and output files are described. Guidelines on how to select the input parameters are given. Illustrated examples are provided showing a variety of topologies and geometries that can be treated. HYPGEN can be used in stand-alone mode as a batch program or it can be called from within a graphical user interface HGUI that runs on Silicon Graphics workstations. This user manual provides a description of the menus, buttons, sliders, and typein fields in HGUI for users to enter the parameters needed to run HYPGEN. Instructions are given on how to configure the interface to allow HYPGEN to run either locally or on a faster remote machine through the use of shell scripts on UNIX operating systems. The volume grid generated is copied back to the local machine for visualization using a built-in hook to PLOT3D.

  1. Second order Method for Solving 3D Elasticity Equations with Complex Interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bao; Xia, Kelin; Wei, Guo-Wei

    2015-01-01

    Elastic materials are ubiquitous in nature and indispensable components in man-made devices and equipments. When a device or equipment involves composite or multiple elastic materials, elasticity interface problems come into play. The solution of three dimensional (3D) elasticity interface problems is significantly more difficult than that of elliptic counterparts due to the coupled vector components and cross derivatives in the governing elasticity equation. This work introduces the matched interface and boundary (MIB) method for solving 3D elasticity interface problems. The proposed MIB elasticity interface scheme utilizes fictitious values on irregular grid points near the material interface to replace function values in the discretization so that the elasticity equation can be discretized using the standard finite difference schemes as if there were no material interface. The interface jump conditions are rigorously enforced on the intersecting points between the interface and the mesh lines. Such an enforcement determines the fictitious values. A number of new techniques has been developed to construct efficient MIB elasticity interface schemes for dealing with cross derivative in coupled governing equations. The proposed method is extensively validated over both weak and strong discontinuity of the solution, both piecewise constant and position-dependent material parameters, both smooth and nonsmooth interface geometries, and both small and large contrasts in the Poisson’s ratio and shear modulus across the interface. Numerical experiments indicate that the present MIB method is of second order convergence in both L∞ and L2 error norms for handling arbitrarily complex interfaces, including biomolecular surfaces. To our best knowledge, this is the first elasticity interface method that is able to deliver the second convergence for the molecular surfaces of proteins.. PMID:25914422

  2. Utilizing Bayesian Techniques for User Interface Intelligence

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-12-01

    rea - soning and knowledge) have placed little or no emphasis on the expert system user interface. These developers spend most resources perfecting the...1994). 24. Cesta, Amedeo and Daniela DAloisi. "Building Interfaces as Personal Assis- tants," SIGCHI Bulletin, 28(3):108-113 (1996). 25. Chappel, H

  3. Visual User Interfaces for Information Exploration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shneiderman, Ben

    1991-01-01

    Discussion of human-computer interfaces focuses on the use of graphical and direct manipulation approaches to improve the user interface. Topics discussed include information seeking; computerized search capabilities, including full-text string searches, index searches, and hypertext; Boolean expressions; dynamic or direct manipulation queries;…

  4. The Green Bank Telescope: User Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maddalena, R. J.; Fisher, J. R.

    1999-12-01

    The NRAO-Green Bank Telescope is composed of a unique, versatile, and complex suite of instrumentation. Observers and staff members will require intuitive user interfaces that can exploit the full capabilities of the instrument. The object-oriented monitor and control system which underlies all of the GBT user interfaces provides a uniform software interface to each GBT device, from receivers to detectors. The control system allows the creation of high-level user interfaces in a wide range of programming languages with less effort than normally encountered in the creation of such interfaces. We will present at least two of the graphical user interfaces astronomers will encounter when observing with the GBT. One interface, written in Glish/Tk, is designed for astronomers and used for specifying observations. A demonstration will be given of another interface, written in Tcl/Tk, designed for the monitoring and debugging of telescope component and which will be used predominantly by telescope operators, engineers, and other staff members. The National Radio Astronomy Observatory is a facility of the National Science Foundation, operated under cooperative agreement by Associated Universities, Inc.

  5. Student Preferences toward Microcomputer User Interfaces.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hazari, Sunil I.; Reaves, Rita R.

    1994-01-01

    Describes a study of undergraduates that was conducted to determine students' preferences toward Graphical User Interface versus Command Line Interface during computer-assisted instruction. Previous experience, comfort level, performance scores, and student attitudes are examined and compared, and the computer use survey is appended. (Contains 13…

  6. EPICS system: system structure and user interface

    SciTech Connect

    West, R.E.; Bartlett, J.F.; Bobbitt, J.S.; Lahey, T.E.; Kramper, B.J.; MacKinnon, B.A.

    1984-02-01

    This paper present the user's view of and the general organization of the EPICS control system at Fermilab. Various subsystems of the EPICS control system are discussed. These include the user command language, software protection, the device database, remote computer interfaces, and several application utilities. This paper is related to two other papers on EPICS: an overview paper and a detailed implementation paper.

  7. User interfaces in space science instrumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCalden, Alec John

    This thesis examines user interaction with instrumentation in the specific context of space science. It gathers together existing practice in machine interfaces with a look at potential future usage and recommends a new approach to space science projects with the intention of maximising their science return. It first takes a historical perspective on user interfaces and ways of defining and measuring the science return of a space instrument. Choices of research methodology are considered. Implementation details such as the concepts of usability, mental models, affordance and presentation of information are described, and examples of existing interfaces in space science are given. A set of parameters for use in analysing and synthesizing a user interface is derived by using a set of case studies of diverse failures and from previous work. A general space science user analysis is made by looking at typical practice, and an interview plus persona technique is used to group users with interface designs. An examination is made of designs in the field of astronomical instrumentation interfaces, showing the evolution of current concepts and including ideas capable of sustaining progress in the future. The parameters developed earlier are then tested against several established interfaces in the space science context to give a degree of confidence in their use. The concept of a simulator that is used to guide the development of an instrument over the whole lifecycle is described, and the idea is proposed that better instrumentation would result from more efficient use of the resources available. The previous ideas in this thesis are then brought together to describe a proposed new approach to a typical development programme, with an emphasis on user interaction. The conclusion shows that there is significant room for improvement in the science return from space instrumentation by attention to the user interface.

  8. Superpose3D: A Local Structural Comparison Program That Allows for User-Defined Structure Representations

    PubMed Central

    Gherardini, Pier Federico; Ausiello, Gabriele; Helmer-Citterich, Manuela

    2010-01-01

    Local structural comparison methods can be used to find structural similarities involving functional protein patches such as enzyme active sites and ligand binding sites. The outcome of such analyses is critically dependent on the representation used to describe the structure. Indeed different categories of functional sites may require the comparison program to focus on different characteristics of the protein residues. We have therefore developed superpose3D, a novel structural comparison software that lets users specify, with a powerful and flexible syntax, the structure description most suited to the requirements of their analysis. Input proteins are processed according to the user's directives and the program identifies sets of residues (or groups of atoms) that have a similar 3D position in the two structures. The advantages of using such a general purpose program are demonstrated with several examples. These test cases show that no single representation is appropriate for every analysis, hence the usefulness of having a flexible program that can be tailored to different needs. Moreover we also discuss how to interpret the results of a database screening where a known structural motif is searched against a large ensemble of structures. The software is written in C++ and is released under the open source GPL license. Superpose3D does not require any external library, runs on Linux, Mac OSX, Windows and is available at http://cbm.bio.uniroma2.it/superpose3D. PMID:20700534

  9. User interface devices for mission control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boatman, Wayne

    1987-01-01

    The Mission Control Center (MCC) at Johnson Space Center (JSC) in Houston, Texas, is being upgraded with new technology engineering/scientific workstations. These workstations will replace the existing consoles and will emulate the present hardware input and display media. The workstations will be using new and different input devices for the flight controller to interact with the workstation and mainframes. This paper presents the results of the User Interface survey conducted by the Workstation Prototype Lab (WPL). The WPL offered the opportunity for users to do hands-on evaluations of a number of user interface options prototyped by lab personnel.

  10. The Input-Interface of Webcam Applied in 3D Virtual Reality Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sun, Huey-Min; Cheng, Wen-Lin

    2009-01-01

    Our research explores a virtual reality application based on Web camera (Webcam) input-interface. The interface can replace with the mouse to control direction intention of a user by the method of frame difference. We divide a frame into nine grids from Webcam and make use of the background registration to compute the moving object. In order to…

  11. Hund's Rule-Driven Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya Interaction at 3 d -5 d Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belabbes, A.; Bihlmayer, G.; Bechstedt, F.; Blügel, S.; Manchon, A.

    2016-12-01

    Using relativistic first-principles calculations, we show that the chemical trend of the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction (DMI) in 3 d -5 d ultrathin films follows Hund's first rule with a tendency similar to their magnetic moments in either the unsupported 3 d monolayers or 3 d -5 d interfaces. We demonstrate that, besides the spin-orbit coupling (SOC) effect in inversion asymmetric noncollinear magnetic systems, the driving force is the 3 d orbital occupations and their spin-flip mixing processes with the spin-orbit active 5 d states control directly the sign and magnitude of the DMI. The magnetic chirality changes are discussed in the light of the interplay between SOC, Hund's first rule, and the crystal-field splitting of d orbitals.

  12. Ultra-low-cost 3D gaze estimation: an intuitive high information throughput compliment to direct brain-machine interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbott, W. W.; Faisal, A. A.

    2012-08-01

    Eye movements are highly correlated with motor intentions and are often retained by patients with serious motor deficiencies. Despite this, eye tracking is not widely used as control interface for movement in impaired patients due to poor signal interpretation and lack of control flexibility. We propose that tracking the gaze position in 3D rather than 2D provides a considerably richer signal for human machine interfaces by allowing direct interaction with the environment rather than via computer displays. We demonstrate here that by using mass-produced video-game hardware, it is possible to produce an ultra-low-cost binocular eye-tracker with comparable performance to commercial systems, yet 800 times cheaper. Our head-mounted system has 30 USD material costs and operates at over 120 Hz sampling rate with a 0.5-1 degree of visual angle resolution. We perform 2D and 3D gaze estimation, controlling a real-time volumetric cursor essential for driving complex user interfaces. Our approach yields an information throughput of 43 bits s-1, more than ten times that of invasive and semi-invasive brain-machine interfaces (BMIs) that are vastly more expensive. Unlike many BMIs our system yields effective real-time closed loop control of devices (10 ms latency), after just ten minutes of training, which we demonstrate through a novel BMI benchmark—the control of the video arcade game ‘Pong’.

  13. Ultra-low-cost 3D gaze estimation: an intuitive high information throughput compliment to direct brain-machine interfaces.

    PubMed

    Abbott, W W; Faisal, A A

    2012-08-01

    Eye movements are highly correlated with motor intentions and are often retained by patients with serious motor deficiencies. Despite this, eye tracking is not widely used as control interface for movement in impaired patients due to poor signal interpretation and lack of control flexibility. We propose that tracking the gaze position in 3D rather than 2D provides a considerably richer signal for human machine interfaces by allowing direct interaction with the environment rather than via computer displays. We demonstrate here that by using mass-produced video-game hardware, it is possible to produce an ultra-low-cost binocular eye-tracker with comparable performance to commercial systems, yet 800 times cheaper. Our head-mounted system has 30 USD material costs and operates at over 120 Hz sampling rate with a 0.5-1 degree of visual angle resolution. We perform 2D and 3D gaze estimation, controlling a real-time volumetric cursor essential for driving complex user interfaces. Our approach yields an information throughput of 43 bits s(-1), more than ten times that of invasive and semi-invasive brain-machine interfaces (BMIs) that are vastly more expensive. Unlike many BMIs our system yields effective real-time closed loop control of devices (10 ms latency), after just ten minutes of training, which we demonstrate through a novel BMI benchmark--the control of the video arcade game 'Pong'.

  14. 3D hierarchical interface-enriched finite element method: Implementation and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soghrati, Soheil; Ahmadian, Hossein

    2015-10-01

    A hierarchical interface-enriched finite element method (HIFEM) is proposed for the mesh-independent treatment of 3D problems with intricate morphologies. The HIFEM implements a recursive algorithm for creating enrichment functions that capture gradient discontinuities in nonconforming finite elements cut by arbitrary number and configuration of materials interfaces. The method enables the mesh-independent simulation of multiphase problems with materials interfaces that are in close proximity or contact while providing a straightforward general approach for evaluating the enrichments. In this manuscript, we present a detailed discussion on the implementation issues and required computational geometry considerations associated with the HIFEM approximation of thermal and mechanical responses of 3D problems. A convergence study is provided to investigate the accuracy and convergence rate of the HIFEM and compare them with standard FEM benchmark solutions. We will also demonstrate the application of this mesh-independent method for simulating the thermal and mechanical responses of two composite materials systems with complex microstructures.

  15. Language workbench user interfaces for data analysis.

    PubMed

    Benson, Victoria M; Campagne, Fabien

    2015-01-01

    Biological data analysis is frequently performed with command line software. While this practice provides considerable flexibility for computationally savy individuals, such as investigators trained in bioinformatics, this also creates a barrier to the widespread use of data analysis software by investigators trained as biologists and/or clinicians. Workflow systems such as Galaxy and Taverna have been developed to try and provide generic user interfaces that can wrap command line analysis software. These solutions are useful for problems that can be solved with workflows, and that do not require specialized user interfaces. However, some types of analyses can benefit from custom user interfaces. For instance, developing biomarker models from high-throughput data is a type of analysis that can be expressed more succinctly with specialized user interfaces. Here, we show how Language Workbench (LW) technology can be used to model the biomarker development and validation process. We developed a language that models the concepts of Dataset, Endpoint, Feature Selection Method and Classifier. These high-level language concepts map directly to abstractions that analysts who develop biomarker models are familiar with. We found that user interfaces developed in the Meta-Programming System (MPS) LW provide convenient means to configure a biomarker development project, to train models and view the validation statistics. We discuss several advantages of developing user interfaces for data analysis with a LW, including increased interface consistency, portability and extension by language composition. The language developed during this experiment is distributed as an MPS plugin (available at http://campagnelab.org/software/bdval-for-mps/).

  16. A JAVA User Interface for the Virtual Human

    SciTech Connect

    Easterly, C E; Strickler, D J; Tolliver, J S; Ward, R C

    1999-10-13

    A human simulation environment, the Virtual Human (VH), is under development at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Virtual Human connects three-dimensional (3D) anatomical models of the body with dynamic physiological models to investigate a wide range of human biological and physical responses to stimuli. We have utilized the Java programming language to develop a flexible user interface to the VH. The Java prototype interface has been designed to display dynamic results from selected physiological models, with user control of the initial model parameters and ability to steer the simulation as it is proceeding. Taking advantage of Java's Remote Method Invocation (RMI) features, the interface runs as a Java client that connects to a Java RMI server process running on a remote server machine. The RMI server can couple to physiological models written in Java, or in other programming languages, including C and FORTRAN. Future versions of the interface will be linked to 3D anatomical models of the human body to complete the development of the VH.

  17. User interface for ground-water modeling: Arcview extension

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tsou, M.-S.; Whittemore, D.O.

    2001-01-01

    Numerical simulation for ground-water modeling often involves handling large input and output data sets. A geographic information system (GIS) provides an integrated platform to manage, analyze, and display disparate data and can greatly facilitate modeling efforts in data compilation, model calibration, and display of model parameters and results. Furthermore, GIS can be used to generate information for decision making through spatial overlay and processing of model results. Arc View is the most widely used Windows-based GIS software that provides a robust user-friendly interface to facilitate data handling and display. An extension is an add-on program to Arc View that provides additional specialized functions. An Arc View interface for the ground-water flow and transport models MODFLOW and MT3D was built as an extension for facilitating modeling. The extension includes preprocessing of spatially distributed (point, line, and polygon) data for model input and postprocessing of model output. An object database is used for linking user dialogs and model input files. The Arc View interface utilizes the capabilities of the 3D Analyst extension. Models can be automatically calibrated through the Arc View interface by external linking to such programs as PEST. The efficient pre- and postprocessing capabilities and calibration link were demonstrated for ground-water modeling in southwest Kansas.

  18. Touch Interaction with 3D Geographical Visualization on Web: Selected Technological and User Issues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herman, L.; Stachoň, Z.; Stuchlík, R.; Hladík, J.; Kubíček, P.

    2016-10-01

    The use of both 3D visualization and devices with touch displays is increasing. In this paper, we focused on the Web technologies for 3D visualization of spatial data and its interaction via touch screen gestures. At the first stage, we compared the support of touch interaction in selected JavaScript libraries on different hardware (desktop PCs with touch screens, tablets, and smartphones) and software platforms. Afterward, we realized simple empiric test (within-subject design, 6 participants, 2 simple tasks, LCD touch monitor Acer and digital terrain models as stimuli) focusing on the ability of users to solve simple spatial tasks via touch screens. An in-house testing web tool was developed and used based on JavaScript, PHP, and X3DOM languages and Hammer.js libraries. The correctness of answers, speed of users' performances, used gestures, and a simple gesture metric was recorded and analysed. Preliminary results revealed that the pan gesture is most frequently used by test participants and it is also supported by the majority of 3D libraries. Possible gesture metrics and future developments including the interpersonal differences are discussed in the conclusion.

  19. The iterative image foresting transform and its application to user-steered 3D segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falcao, Alexandre X.; Bergo, Felipe P. G.

    2003-05-01

    Segmentation and 3D visualization at interactive speeds are highly desirable for routine use in clinical settings. We circumvent this problem in the framework of the image foresting transform (IFT) - a graph-based approach to the design of image processing operators. In this paper we introduce the iterative image foresting transform (IFT+), which computes sequences of IFTs in a differencial way, present the general IFT+ algorithm, and instantiate it to be a watershed transform. The IFT+-watershed transform is evaluated in the context of interactive segmentation, where the user makes corrections by adding/removing scene regions with mouse clicks. The IFT+-watershed requires time proportional to the number of voxels in the modified regions, while the conventional algorithm computes one watershed transform over the entire scene for each iteration. The IFT+-watershed is 5.75 times faster than the watershed and considerably reduces from 17.7 to 3.16 seconds the user's waiting time in segmentation with 3D visualization. These results were obtained in an 1.5GHz Pentium-IV PC over 10 MR scenes of the head, requiring 12 to 28 corrections to segment cerebellum, pons-medulla, ventricle, and the rest of the brain, simultaneously. These results indicate that the IFT+ is a significant contribution toward interactive segmentation and 3D visualization.

  20. PRONTO3D users` instructions: A transient dynamic code for nonlinear structural analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Attaway, S.W.; Mello, F.J.; Heinstein, M.W.; Swegle, J.W.; Ratner, J.A.; Zadoks, R.I.

    1998-06-01

    This report provides an updated set of users` instructions for PRONTO3D. PRONTO3D is a three-dimensional, transient, solid dynamics code for analyzing large deformations of highly nonlinear materials subjected to extremely high strain rates. This Lagrangian finite element program uses an explicit time integration operator to integrate the equations of motion. Eight-node, uniform strain, hexahedral elements and four-node, quadrilateral, uniform strain shells are used in the finite element formulation. An adaptive time step control algorithm is used to improve stability and performance in plasticity problems. Hourglass distortions can be eliminated without disturbing the finite element solution using either the Flanagan-Belytschko hourglass control scheme or an assumed strain hourglass control scheme. All constitutive models in PRONTO3D are cast in an unrotated configuration defined using the rotation determined from the polar decomposition of the deformation gradient. A robust contact algorithm allows for the impact and interaction of deforming contact surfaces of quite general geometry. The Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics method has been embedded into PRONTO3D using the contact algorithm to couple it with the finite element method.

  1. Hackable User Interfaces In Astronomy with Glue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaumont, C.; Goodman, A.; Greenfield, P.

    2015-09-01

    Astronomers typically choose between Graphical User Interfaces and custom-written computer code when exploring and analyzing data. Few tools are designed to encourage both of these workflows, despite their complementary strengths. We believe that such hybrid hackable user interfaces could enable more agile data exploration, combining the fluidity that comes from a GUI with the precision and reproducibility that comes from writing code. In this article we articulate the different strengths and weaknesses of both workflows and discuss how to enable both in a single tool. We focus on Glue (http://glue-viz.org) as a case study and examine how the goal of creating a hackable user interface has influenced the design of Glue.

  2. User-friendly 3D bioassays with cell-containing hydrogel modules: narrowing the gap between microfluidic bioassays and clinical end-users' needs.

    PubMed

    Lee, Do-Hyun; Bae, Chae Yun; Kwon, Seyong; Park, Je-Kyun

    2015-06-07

    Cell-containing hydrogel modules as cell-hydrogel microunits for creating a physiologically relevant 3D in vivo-like microenvironment with multiple cell types and unique extracellular matrix (ECM) compositions facilitate long-term cell maintenance and bioassays. To date, there have been many important advances in microfluidic bioassays, which incorporate hydrogel scaffolds into surface-accessible microchambers, driven by the strong demand for the application of spatiotemporally defined biochemical stimuli to construct in vivo-like conditions and perform real-time imaging of cell-matrix interactions. In keeping with the trend of fostering collaborations among biologists, clinicians, and microfluidic engineers, it is essential to create a simpler approach for coupling cell-containing hydrogel modules and an automated bioassay platform in a user-friendly format. In this article, we review recent progress in hydrogel-incorporated microfluidics for long-term cell maintenance and discuss some of the simpler and user-friendly 3D bioassay techniques combined with cell-containing hydrogel modules that can be applied to mutually beneficial collaborations with non-engineers. We anticipate that this modular and user-friendly format interfaced with existing laboratory infrastructure will help address several clinical questions in ways that extend well beyond the current 2D cell-culture systems.

  3. Graphical interface for the physics-based generation of inputs to 3D MEEC SGEMP and SREMP simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Bland, M; Wondra, J; Nunan, S; Walters, D

    1998-12-01

    A graphical user interface (GUI) is under development for the MEEC family of SGEMP and SREMP simulation codes. These codes are workhorse legacy codes that have been in use for nearly two decades, with modifications and enhanced physics models added throughout the years. The MEEC codes are currently being evaluated for use by the DOE in the Dual Revalidation program and experiments at NIF. The new GUI makes the codes more accessible and less prone to input errors by automatically generating the parameters and grids that previously had to be designed by hand. physics-based algorithms define the simulation volume with expanding meshes. Users are able to specify objects, materials, and emission surfaces through dialogs and input boxes. 3D and orthographic views are available to view objects in the volume. Zone slice views are available for stepping through the overlay of objects on the mesh in planes aligned with the primary axes.

  4. Graphical interface for the physics-based generation of inputs to 3D MEEC SGEMP and SREMP simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Bland, M; Walters, D; Wondra, J

    1999-06-01

    A graphical user interface (GUI) is under development for the MEEC family of SGEMP and SREMP simulation codes [1,2]. These codes are ''workhorse'' legacy codes that have been in use for nearly two decades, with modifications and enhanced physics models added throughout the years. The MEEC codes are currently being evaluated for use by the DOE in the Dual Revalidation Program and experiments at NIF. The new GUI makes the codes more accessible and less prone to input errors by automatically generating the parameters and grids that previously had to be designed ''by hand''. Physics-based algorithms define the simulation volume with expanding meshes. Users are able to specify objects, materials, and emission surfaces through dialogs and input boxes. 3D and orthographic views are available to view objects in the volume. Zone slice views are available for stepping through the overlay of objects on the mesh in planes aligned with the primary axes.

  5. Interface Strength in NiAl-Mo Composites from 3D X-ray Microdiffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Barabash, Rozaliya; Bei, Hongbin; Gao, Yanfei; Ice, Gene E

    2011-01-01

    The depth-dependent strain gradients near buried interfaces in a model system of NiAl-Mo composite were nondestructively probed with 3-D X-ray microdiffraction. Coupled with micromechanical analysis, our study shows that the relaxation of the residual thermal strains in the NiAl-Mo composites results in the formation of a near-surface 'slip zone' with large strain gradients in both the reinforcing Mo fibers and NiAl matrix. Based on these results an approach to calculate the fiber-matrix interface strength for composite materials is suggested.

  6. Multi-user 3D display using a head tracker and RGB laser illumination source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surman, Phil; Sexton, Ian; Hopf, Klaus; Bates, Richard; Lee, Wing Kai; Buckley, Edward

    2007-05-01

    A glasses-free (auto-stereoscopic) 3D display that will serve several viewers who have freedom of movement over a large viewing region is described. This operates on the principle of employing head position tracking to provide regions referred to as exit pupils that follow the positions ofthe viewers' eyes in order for appropriate left and right images to be seen. A non-intrusive multi-user head tracker controls the light sources of a specially designed backlight that illuminates a direct-view LCD.

  7. Characterisation of dynamic couplings at lower limb residuum/socket interface using 3D motion capture.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jinghua; McGrath, Michael; Laszczak, Piotr; Jiang, Liudi; Bader, Dan L; Moser, David; Zahedi, Saeed

    2015-12-01

    Design and fitting of artificial limbs to lower limb amputees are largely based on the subjective judgement of the prosthetist. Understanding the science of three-dimensional (3D) dynamic coupling at the residuum/socket interface could potentially aid the design and fitting of the socket. A new method has been developed to characterise the 3D dynamic coupling at the residuum/socket interface using 3D motion capture based on a single case study of a trans-femoral amputee. The new model incorporated a Virtual Residuum Segment (VRS) and a Socket Segment (SS) which combined to form the residuum/socket interface. Angular and axial couplings between the two segments were subsequently determined. Results indicated a non-rigid angular coupling in excess of 10° in the quasi-sagittal plane and an axial coupling of between 21 and 35 mm. The corresponding angular couplings of less than 4° and 2° were estimated in the quasi-coronal and quasi-transverse plane, respectively. We propose that the combined experimental and analytical approach adopted in this case study could aid the iterative socket fitting process and could potentially lead to a new socket design.

  8. A user-system interface agent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wakim, Nagi T.; Srivastava, Sadanand; Bousaidi, Mehdi; Goh, Gin-Hua

    1995-01-01

    Agent-based technologies answer to several challenges posed by additional information processing requirements in today's computing environments. In particular, (1) users desire interaction with computing devices in a mode which is similar to that used between people, (2) the efficiency and successful completion of information processing tasks often require a high-level of expertise in complex and multiple domains, (3) information processing tasks often require handling of large volumes of data and, therefore, continuous and endless processing activities. The concept of an agent is an attempt to address these new challenges by introducing information processing environments in which (1) users can communicate with a system in a natural way, (2) an agent is a specialist and a self-learner and, therefore, it qualifies to be trusted to perform tasks independent of the human user, and (3) an agent is an entity that is continuously active performing tasks that are either delegated to it or self-imposed. The work described in this paper focuses on the development of an interface agent for users of a complex information processing environment (IPE). This activity is part of an on-going effort to build a model for developing agent-based information systems. Such systems will be highly applicable to environments which require a high degree of automation, such as, flight control operations and/or processing of large volumes of data in complex domains, such as the EOSDIS environment and other multidisciplinary, scientific data systems. The concept of an agent as an information processing entity is fully described with emphasis on characteristics of special interest to the User-System Interface Agent (USIA). Issues such as agent 'existence' and 'qualification' are discussed in this paper. Based on a definition of an agent and its main characteristics, we propose an architecture for the development of interface agents for users of an IPE that is agent-oriented and whose resources

  9. DYNA3D: A nonlinear, explicit, three-dimensional finite element code for solid and structural mechanics, User manual. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Whirley, R.G.; Engelmann, B.E.

    1993-11-01

    This report is the User Manual for the 1993 version of DYNA3D, and also serves as a User Guide. DYNA3D is a nonlinear, explicit, finite element code for analyzing the transient dynamic response of three-dimensional solids and structures. The code is fully vectorized and is available on several computer platforms. DYNA3D includes solid, shell, beam, and truss elements to allow maximum flexibility in modeling physical problems. Many material models are available to represent a wide range of material behavior, including elasticity, plasticity, composites, thermal effects, and rate dependence. In addition, DYNA3D has a sophisticated contact interface capability, including frictional sliding and single surface contact. Rigid materials provide added modeling flexibility. A material model driver with interactive graphics display is incorporated into DYNA3D to permit accurate modeling of complex material response based on experimental data. Along with the DYNA3D Example Problem Manual, this document provides the information necessary to apply DYNA3D to solve a wide range of engineering analysis problems.

  10. The Promise of Zoomable User Interfaces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bederson, Benjamin B.

    2011-01-01

    Zoomable user interfaces (ZUIs) have received a significant amount of attention in the 18 years since they were introduced. They have enjoyed some success, and elements of ZUIs are widely used in computers today, although the grand vision of a zoomable desktop has not materialised. This paper describes the premise and promise of ZUIs along with…

  11. Comparison of User Performance with Interactive and Static 3d Visualization - Pilot Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herman, L.; Stachoň, Z.

    2016-06-01

    Interactive 3D visualizations of spatial data are currently available and popular through various applications such as Google Earth, ArcScene, etc. Several scientific studies have focused on user performance with 3D visualization, but static perspective views are used as stimuli in most of the studies. The main objective of this paper is to try to identify potential differences in user performance with static perspective views and interactive visualizations. This research is an exploratory study. An experiment was designed as a between-subject study and a customized testing tool based on open web technologies was used for the experiment. The testing set consists of an initial questionnaire, a training task and four experimental tasks. Selection of the highest point and determination of visibility from the top of a mountain were used as the experimental tasks. Speed and accuracy of each task performance of participants were recorded. The movement and actions in the virtual environment were also recorded within the interactive variant. The results show that participants deal with the tasks faster when using static visualization. The average error rate was also higher in the static variant. The findings from this pilot study will be used for further testing, especially for formulating of hypotheses and designing of subsequent experiments.

  12. Accurate gradient approximation for complex interface problems in 3D by an improved coupling interface method

    SciTech Connect

    Shu, Yu-Chen; Chern, I-Liang; Chang, Chien C.

    2014-10-15

    Most elliptic interface solvers become complicated for complex interface problems at those “exceptional points” where there are not enough neighboring interior points for high order interpolation. Such complication increases especially in three dimensions. Usually, the solvers are thus reduced to low order accuracy. In this paper, we classify these exceptional points and propose two recipes to maintain order of accuracy there, aiming at improving the previous coupling interface method [26]. Yet the idea is also applicable to other interface solvers. The main idea is to have at least first order approximations for second order derivatives at those exceptional points. Recipe 1 is to use the finite difference approximation for the second order derivatives at a nearby interior grid point, whenever this is possible. Recipe 2 is to flip domain signatures and introduce a ghost state so that a second-order method can be applied. This ghost state is a smooth extension of the solution at the exceptional point from the other side of the interface. The original state is recovered by a post-processing using nearby states and jump conditions. The choice of recipes is determined by a classification scheme of the exceptional points. The method renders the solution and its gradient uniformly second-order accurate in the entire computed domain. Numerical examples are provided to illustrate the second order accuracy of the presently proposed method in approximating the gradients of the original states for some complex interfaces which we had tested previous in two and three dimensions, and a real molecule ( (1D63)) which is double-helix shape and composed of hundreds of atoms.

  13. Monitoring the solid-liquid interface in tanks using profiling sonar and 3D visualization techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sood, Nitin; Zhang, Jinsong; Roelant, David; Srivastava, Rajiv

    2005-03-01

    Visualization of the interface between settled solids and the optically opaque liquid above is necessary to facilitate efficient retrieval of the high-level radioactive waste (HLW) from underground storage tanks. A profiling sonar was used to generate 2-D slices across the settled solids at the bottom of the tank. By incrementally rotating the sonar about its centerline, slices of the solid-liquid interface can be imaged and a 3-D image of the settled solids interface generated. To demonstrate the efficacy of the sonar in real-time solid-liquid interface monitoring systems inside HLW tanks, two sets of experiments were performed. First, various solid objects and kaolin clay (10 μm dia) were successfully imaged while agitating with 30% solids (by weight) entrained in the liquid. Second, a solid with a density similar to that of the immersed fluid density was successfully imaged. Two dimensional (2-D) sonar images and the accuracy and limitations of the in-tank imaging will be presented for these two experiments. In addition, a brief review of how to utilize a 2-D sonar image to generate a 3-D surface of the settled layer within a tank will be discussed.

  14. Users manual for the NASA Lewis three-dimensional ice accretion code (LEWICE 3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bidwell, Colin S.; Potapczuk, Mark G.

    1993-01-01

    A description of the methodology, the algorithms, and the input and output data along with an example case for the NASA Lewis 3D ice accretion code (LEWICE3D) has been produced. The manual has been designed to help the user understand the capabilities, the methodologies, and the use of the code. The LEWICE3D code is a conglomeration of several codes for the purpose of calculating ice shapes on three-dimensional external surfaces. A three-dimensional external flow panel code is incorporated which has the capability of calculating flow about arbitrary 3D lifting and nonlifting bodies with external flow. A fourth order Runge-Kutta integration scheme is used to calculate arbitrary streamlines. An Adams type predictor-corrector trajectory integration scheme has been included to calculate arbitrary trajectories. Schemes for calculating tangent trajectories, collection efficiencies, and concentration factors for arbitrary regions of interest for single droplets or droplet distributions have been incorporated. A LEWICE 2D based heat transfer algorithm can be used to calculate ice accretions along surface streamlines. A geometry modification scheme is incorporated which calculates the new geometry based on the ice accretions generated at each section of interest. The three-dimensional ice accretion calculation is based on the LEWICE 2D calculation. Both codes calculate the flow, pressure distribution, and collection efficiency distribution along surface streamlines. For both codes the heat transfer calculation is divided into two regions, one above the stagnation point and one below the stagnation point, and solved for each region assuming a flat plate with pressure distribution. Water is assumed to follow the surface streamlines, hence starting at the stagnation zone any water that is not frozen out at a control volume is assumed to run back into the next control volume. After the amount of frozen water at each control volume has been calculated the geometry is modified by

  15. Contact Interface Verification for DYNA3D Scenario 2: Multi-Surface Contact

    SciTech Connect

    McMichael, L D

    2006-05-10

    A suite of test problems has been developed to examine contact behavior within the nonlinear, three-dimensional, explicit finite element analysis (FEA) code DYNA3D (Lin, 2005). The test problems use multiple interfaces and a combination of enforcement methods to assess the basic functionality of the contact algorithms. The results from the DYNA3D analyses are compared to closed form solutions to verify the contact behavior. This work was performed as part of the Verification and Validation efforts of LLNL W Program within the NNSA's Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) Program. DYNA3D models the transient dynamic response of solids and structures including the interactions between disjoint bodies (parts). A wide variety of contact surfaces are available to represent the diverse interactions possible during an analysis, including relative motion (sliding), separation and gap closure (voids), and fixed relative position (tied). The problem geometry may be defined using a combination of element formulations, including one-dimensional beam and truss elements, two-dimensional shell elements, and three-dimensional solid elements. Consequently, it is necessary to consider various element interactions during contact. This report and associated test problems examine the scenario where multiple bodies interact with each other via multiple interfaces. The test problems focus on whether any ordering issues exist in the contact logic by using a combination of interface types, contact enforcement options (i.e., penalty, Lagrange, and kinematic), and element interactions within each problem. The influence of rigid materials on interface behavior is also examined. The companion report (McMichael, 2006) and associated test problems address the basic contact scenario where one contact surface exists between two disjoint bodies. The test problems are analyzed using version 5.2 (compiled on 12/22/2005) of DYNA3D. The analytical results are used to form baseline solutions for

  16. Contact Interface Verification for DYNA3D Scenario 1: Basic Contact

    SciTech Connect

    McMichael, L D

    2006-05-10

    A suite of test problems has been developed to examine contact behavior within the nonlinear, three-dimensional, explicit finite element analysis (FEA) code DYNA3D (Lin, 2005). The test problems address the basic functionality of the contact algorithms, including the behavior of various kinematic, penalty, and Lagrangian enforcement formulations. The results from the DYNA3D analyses are compared to closed form solutions to verify the contact behavior. This work was performed as part of the Verification and Validation efforts of LLNL W Program within the NNSA's Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) Program. DYNA3D models the transient dynamic response of solids and structures including the interactions between disjoint bodies (parts). A wide variety of contact surfaces are available to represent the diverse interactions possible during an analysis, including relative motion (sliding), separation and gap closure (voids), and fixed relative position (tied). The problem geometry may be defined using a combination of element formulations, including one-dimensional beam and truss elements, two-dimensional shell elements, and three-dimensional solid elements. Consequently, it is necessary to consider various element interactions for each contact algorithm being verified. Most of the contact algorithms currently available in DYNA3D are examined; the exceptions are the Type 4--Single Surface Contact and Type 11--SAND algorithms. It is likely that these algorithms will be removed since their functionality is embodied in other, more robust, contact algorithms. The automatic contact algorithm is evaluated using the Type 12 interface. Two other variations of automatic contact, Type 13 and Type 14, offer additional means to adapt the interface domain, but share the same search and restoration algorithms as Type 12. The contact algorithms are summarized in Table 1. This report and associated test problems examine the scenario where one contact surface exists between two

  17. 3D-nanostructured boron-doped diamond for microelectrode array neural interfacing.

    PubMed

    Piret, Gaëlle; Hébert, Clément; Mazellier, Jean-Paul; Rousseau, Lionel; Scorsone, Emmanuel; Cottance, Myline; Lissorgues, Gaelle; Heuschkel, Marc O; Picaud, Serge; Bergonzo, Philippe; Yvert, Blaise

    2015-06-01

    The electrode material is a key element in the design of long-term neural implants and neuroprostheses. To date, the ideal electrode material offering high longevity, biocompatibility, low-noise recording and high stimulation capabilities remains to be found. We show that 3D-nanostructured boron doped diamond (BDD), an innovative material consisting in a chemically stable material with a high aspect ratio structure obtained by encapsulation of a carbon nanotube template within two BDD nanolayers, allows neural cell attachment, survival and neurite extension. Further, we developed arrays of 20-μm-diameter 3D-nanostructured BDD microelectrodes for neural interfacing. These microelectrodes exhibited low impedances and low intrinsic recording noise levels. In particular, they allowed the detection of low amplitude (10-20 μV) local-field potentials, single units and multiunit bursts neural activity in both acute whole embryonic hindbrain-spinal cord preparations and long-term hippocampal cell cultures. Also, cyclic voltammetry measurements showed a wide potential window of about 3 V and a charge storage capacity of 10 mC.cm(-2), showing high potentiality of this material for neural stimulation. These results demonstrate the attractiveness of 3D-nanostructured BDD as a novel material for neural interfacing, with potential applications for the design of biocompatible neural implants for the exploration and rehabilitation of the nervous system.

  18. Simulations of Coalescence and Breakup of Interfaces Using a 3D Front-tracking Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Jiacai; Tryggvason, Gretar

    2015-11-01

    Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) of complex multiphase flows with coalescing and breaking-up of interfaces are conducted using a 3D front-tracking method. Front-tracking method has been successfully used in DNS of turbulent channel bubbly flows and many other multiphase flows, but as the void fraction increases changes in the interface topology, though coalescence and breakup, become more common and have to be accounted for. Topology changes have often been identified as a challenge for front tracking, where the interface is represented using a triangular mesh, but here we present an efficient algorithm to change the topology of triangular elements of interfaces. In the current implementation we have not included any small-scale attractive forces so thin films coalesce either at prescribed times or when their thickness reaches a given value. Simulations of the collisions of two drops and comparisons with experimental results have been used to validate the algorithm but the main applications have been to flow regime transitions in gas-liquid flows in pressure driven channel flows. The evolution of flow, including flow rate, wall shear, projected interface areas, pseudo-turbulence, and the average size of the various flow structures, is examined as the topology of the interface changes through coalescence and breakup. Research supported by DOE (CASL).

  19. AXAF user interfaces for heterogeneous analysis environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mandel, Eric; Roll, John; Ackerman, Mark S.

    1992-01-01

    The AXAF Science Center (ASC) will develop software to support all facets of data center activities and user research for the AXAF X-ray Observatory, scheduled for launch in 1999. The goal is to provide astronomers with the ability to utilize heterogeneous data analysis packages, that is, to allow astronomers to pick the best packages for doing their scientific analysis. For example, ASC software will be based on IRAF, but non-IRAF programs will be incorporated into the data system where appropriate. Additionally, it is desired to allow AXAF users to mix ASC software with their own local software. The need to support heterogeneous analysis environments is not special to the AXAF project, and therefore finding mechanisms for coordinating heterogeneous programs is an important problem for astronomical software today. The approach to solving this problem has been to develop two interfaces that allow the scientific user to run heterogeneous programs together. The first is an IRAF-compatible parameter interface that provides non-IRAF programs with IRAF's parameter handling capabilities. Included in the interface is an application programming interface to manipulate parameters from within programs, and also a set of host programs to manipulate parameters at the command line or from within scripts. The parameter interface has been implemented to support parameter storage formats other than IRAF parameter files, allowing one, for example, to access parameters that are stored in data bases. An X Windows graphical user interface called 'agcl' has been developed, layered on top of the IRAF-compatible parameter interface, that provides a standard graphical mechanism for interacting with IRAF and non-IRAF programs. Users can edit parameters and run programs for both non-IRAF programs and IRAF tasks. The agcl interface allows one to communicate with any command line environment in a transparent manner and without any changes to the original environment. For example, the authors

  20. Understanding and Improving the Quality of Inter-Layer Interfaces in FDM 3-D Printing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duranty, Edward; Spradlin, Brandon; Stark, Madeline; Dadmun, Mark

    We have studied the effect of thermal history and material diffusion on inter-filament bonding in FDM 3D printed parts and developed methods to improve interlayer adhesion in 3D printed samples. The available thermal energy during the FDM print environment was determined quantitatively by tracking the temperature of the bottom most printed layer using a thermocouple attached to the print bed. The role of the thermal history of the filaments during the deposition process on the quality of inter-layer bonding in an FDM ABS part was monitored using a T-peel test and an innovative sample design. Additionally, the interfacial adhesion between 3D printed layers was improved by the addition of a chemical cross-linking agent 4,4 '-diaminodiphenylmethane (DADPM). These studies have increased our understanding of the importance of the complex thermal history of a filament in the 3D printing process and its impact on the interfaces that form during the fused deposition modeling print process. Furthermore, the chemical crosslinking process demonstrates a potential method to covalently link layers in FDM printed parts, improving the bulk strength of the part. The insight provided in this work may aid in the development of techniques that can produce FDM parts that could be used as replacement parts in structural applications, or as completely standalone products.

  1. Shape Analysis of 3D Head Scan Data for U.S. Respirator Users

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuang, Ziqing; Slice, DennisE; Benson, Stacey; Lynch, Stephanie; Viscusi, DennisJ

    2010-12-01

    In 2003, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) conducted a head-and-face anthropometric survey of diverse, civilian respirator users. Of the 3,997 subjects measured using traditional anthropometric techniques, surface scans and 26 three-dimensional (3D) landmark locations were collected for 947 subjects. The objective of this study was to report the size and shape variation of the survey participants using the 3D data. Generalized Procrustes Analysis (GPA) was conducted to standardize configurations of landmarks associated with individuals into a common coordinate system. The superimposed coordinates for each individual were used as commensurate variables that describe individual shape and were analyzed using Principal Component Analysis (PCA) to identify population variation. The first four principal components (PC) account for 49% of the total sample variation. The first PC indicates that overall size is an important component of facial variability. The second PC accounts for long and narrow or short and wide faces. Longer narrow orbits versus shorter wider orbits can be described by PC3, and PC4 represents variation in the degree of ortho/prognathism. Geometric Morphometrics provides a detailed and interpretable assessment of morphological variation that may be useful in assessing respirators and devising new test and certification standards.

  2. SF3M 2.0: improvement of 3D photo-reconstruction interface based on freely available software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castillo, Carlos; James, Michael R.; Pérez, Rafael; Gómez, Jose A.

    2016-04-01

    During recent years, a number of tools based on Structure-from-Motion algorithms have been released for full image-based 3D reconstruction either freely (e.g. Bundler, PMVS2, VisualSFM, MicMac) or commercially (e.g. Agisoft PhotoScan). The SF3M interface was developed in Matlab® to use link software developments (VisualSFM, CloudCompare) and new applications to create a semi-automated workflow including reconstruction, georeferencing and point-cloud filtering, and has been tested for gully erosion assessment with terrestrial images (Castillo et al., 2015). The main aim of this work to provide an improved freely-available and easy-to-use alternative for 3D reconstruction intended for public agencies, non-profit organisations, researchers and other stakeholders interested in 3D modelling. In this communication we present SF3M 2.0, a new version of the graphical user interface. In this case, the SfM module is based on MicMac, an open-software tool (Pierrot-Deseilligny and Cléry, 2011) which provides advanced features such as camera calibration and constrained bundle adjustment using ground control points. SF3M 2.0 will be tested in two scenarios: a) using the same ground-based image set tested in Castillo et al. (2015) to compare the performance of both versions and b) using aerial images taken from a helium balloon to assess a gully network in a 40-hectares catchment. In this study we explore the advantages of SF3M 2.0, explain its operation and evaluate its accuracy and performance. This tool will be also available for free download. References Castillo, C., James, M.R., Redel-Macías, M. D., Pérez, R., and Gómez, J.A.: SF3M software: 3-D photo-reconstruction for non-expert users and its application to a gully network, SOIL, 1, 583-594. Pierrot-Deseilligny, M and Cléry, I. APERO, an Open Source Bundle Adjusment Software for Automatic Calibration and Orientation of a Set of Images. Proceedings of the ISPRS Commission V Symposium, Image Engineering and Vision

  3. User interface for a tele-operated robotic hand system

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, Anthony L

    2015-03-24

    Disclosed here is a user interface for a robotic hand. The user interface anchors a user's palm in a relatively stationary position and determines various angles of interest necessary for a user's finger to achieve a specific fingertip location. The user interface additionally conducts a calibration procedure to determine the user's applicable physiological dimensions. The user interface uses the applicable physiological dimensions and the specific fingertip location, and treats the user's finger as a two link three degree-of-freedom serial linkage in order to determine the angles of interest. The user interface communicates the angles of interest to a gripping-type end effector which closely mimics the range of motion and proportions of a human hand. The user interface requires minimal contact with the operator and provides distinct advantages in terms of available dexterity, work space flexibility, and adaptability to different users.

  4. Mapping of user interfaces on electronic appliances.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chang-Franw; Tsai, Wang-Chin

    2007-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate mapping of user interfaces on consumer electronic appliances. A digital clock with five different interface modes was chosen for the experiment. Forty elderly subjects (above 65 years) and 40 middle-aged subjects (45-64 years) participated in the study. Every subject had to complete three different tasks, namely time setting, alarm time setting and date setting. The researchers investigated what problems were encountered when performing these tasks and collected data such as operational time, the number of total inputs, subjective estimation and interview information. The findings of this study indicated that the interface modes had significant effects on operational time, the number of total inputs and subjective estimation. Finally, the study confirms that when the spatial relationship between buttons and display contents are clearly indicated, the operation is easier to complete.

  5. User Interface Program for secure electronic tags

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Y.; Koehl, E.R.; Carlson, R.D.; Raptis, A.C.

    1995-05-01

    This report summarizes and documents the efforts of Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) in developing a secure tag communication user interface program comprising a tag monitor and a communication tool. This program can perform the same functions as the software that was developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), but it is enhanced with a user-friendly screen. It represents the first step in updating the TRANSCOM Tracking System (TRANSCOM) by incorporating a tag communication screen menu into the main menu of the TRANSCOM user program. A working version of TRANSCOM, enhanced with ANL secure-tag graphics, will strongly support the Department of Energy Warhead Dismantlement/Special Nuclear Materials Control initiatives. It will allow commercial satellite tracking of the movements and operational activities of treaty-limited items and transportation vehicles throughout Europe and the former USSR, as well as the continental US.

  6. The crustal dynamics intelligent user interface anthology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Short, Nicholas M., Jr.; Campbell, William J.; Roelofs, Larry H.; Wattawa, Scott L.

    1987-01-01

    The National Space Science Data Center (NSSDC) has initiated an Intelligent Data Management (IDM) research effort which has, as one of its components, the development of an Intelligent User Interface (IUI). The intent of the IUI is to develop a friendly and intelligent user interface service based on expert systems and natural language processing technologies. The purpose of such a service is to support the large number of potential scientific and engineering users that have need of space and land-related research and technical data, but have little or no experience in query languages or understanding of the information content or architecture of the databases of interest. This document presents the design concepts, development approach and evaluation of the performance of a prototype IUI system for the Crustal Dynamics Project Database, which was developed using a microcomputer-based expert system tool (M. 1), the natural language query processor THEMIS, and the graphics software system GSS. The IUI design is based on a multiple view representation of a database from both the user and database perspective, with intelligent processes to translate between the views.

  7. PACS-based interface for 3D anatomical structure visualization and surgical planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koehl, Christophe; Soler, Luc; Marescaux, Jacques

    2002-05-01

    The interpretation of radiological image is routine but it remains a rather difficult task for physicians. It requires complex mental processes, that permit translation from 2D slices into 3D localization and volume determination of visible diseases. An easier and more extensive visualization and exploitation of medical images can be reached through the use of computer-based systems that provide real help from patient admission to post-operative followup. In this way, we have developed a 3D visualization interface linked to a PACS database that allows manipulation and interaction on virtual organs delineated from CT-scan or MRI. This software provides the 3D real-time surface rendering of anatomical structures, an accurate evaluation of volumes and distances and the improvement of radiological image analysis and exam annotation through a negatoscope tool. It also provides a tool for surgical planning allowing the positioning of an interactive laparoscopic instrument and the organ resection. The software system could revolutionize the field of computerized imaging technology. Indeed, it provides a handy and portable tool for pre-operative and intra-operative analysis of anatomy and pathology in various medical fields. This constitutes the first step of the future development of augmented reality and surgical simulation systems.

  8. CAST: Effective and Efficient User Interaction for Context-Aware Selection in 3D Particle Clouds.

    PubMed

    Yu, Lingyun; Efstathiou, Konstantinos; Isenberg, Petra; Isenberg, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    We present a family of three interactive Context-Aware Selection Techniques (CAST) for the analysis of large 3D particle datasets. For these datasets, spatial selection is an essential prerequisite to many other analysis tasks. Traditionally, such interactive target selection has been particularly challenging when the data subsets of interest were implicitly defined in the form of complicated structures of thousands of particles. Our new techniques SpaceCast, TraceCast, and PointCast improve usability and speed of spatial selection in point clouds through novel context-aware algorithms. They are able to infer a user's subtle selection intention from gestural input, can deal with complex situations such as partially occluded point clusters or multiple cluster layers, and can all be fine-tuned after the selection interaction has been completed. Together, they provide an effective and efficient tool set for the fast exploratory analysis of large datasets. In addition to presenting Cast, we report on a formal user study that compares our new techniques not only to each other but also to existing state-of-the-art selection methods. Our results show that Cast family members are virtually always faster than existing methods without tradeoffs in accuracy. In addition, qualitative feedback shows that PointCast and TraceCast were strongly favored by our participants for intuitiveness and efficiency.

  9. A 3D biomimetic model of tissue stiffness interface for cancer drug testing.

    PubMed

    Lam, Chee Ren Ivan; Wong, Hui Kian; Nai, Spencer; Chua, Chee Kai; Tan, Nguan Soon; Tan, Lay Poh

    2014-07-07

    Contrary to oversimplified preclinical drug screens that derive treatment responses of cancer cells grown on plastic cell culturing surfaces, the actual in vivo scenario for cancer cell invasion is confronted with a diversity of tissue stiffness. After all, the packing of organs and tissues in the body translates to the abundant presence of tissue stiffness interfaces. The invasive dissemination of cancer cells in vivo might be encouraged by favorable tissue stiffness gradients, likely explaining the preferential spread of cancer cells which is subjective to the cancer type and origin of the primary site. Yet these critical tumor microenvironmental influences cannot be recapitulated in 2D preclinical drug screens, hence omitting potentially invaluable in vivo patterns of drug responses that may support safer clinical dosage implementation of cancer drugs. Current attempts to study stiffness implications on cancer cells are largely confined to 2D surfaces of tunable stiffness. While these studies collectively show that cancer cells migrate better on a stiffer matrix, the generation of a biomimetic 3D tissue stiffness interface for cancer cell migration would clearly give a more definitive understanding on the probable push and pull influences of the 3D ECM. Herein, we developed a biomimetic platform which enables the precise placement of spheroids at tissue stiffness interfaces constructed with natural ECM collagen type I. This enables a standardized comparison of spheroid invasion under a 3D stiffness gradient influence. We found that cancer cells in 3D infiltrated more extensively into a softer matrix of 300 Pa while showing significantly reduced invasion into stiffer matrix of 1200 and 6000 Pa. These biomimetic spheroid cultures postinvasion were suitably subjected to paclitaxel treatment and subsequent daily live quantification of apoptotic cells to evaluate the implications of tissue stiffness on chemotherapeutic treatment. We importantly found that cancer

  10. An interface reconstruction method based on an analytical formula for 3D arbitrary convex cells

    DOE PAGES

    Diot, Steven; François, Marianne M.

    2015-10-22

    In this study, we are interested in an interface reconstruction method for 3D arbitrary convex cells that could be used in multi-material flow simulations for instance. We assume that the interface is represented by a plane whose normal vector is known and we focus on the volume-matching step that consists in finding the plane constant so that it splits the cell according to a given volume fraction. We follow the same approach as in the recent authors' publication for 2D arbitrary convex cells in planar and axisymmetrical geometries, namely we derive an analytical formula for the volume of the specificmore » prismatoids obtained when decomposing the cell using the planes that are parallel to the interface and passing through all the cell nodes. This formula is used to bracket the interface plane constant such that the volume-matching problem is rewritten in a single prismatoid in which the same formula is used to find the final solution. Finally, the proposed method is tested against an important number of reproducible configurations and shown to be at least five times faster.« less

  11. An interface reconstruction method based on an analytical formula for 3D arbitrary convex cells

    SciTech Connect

    Diot, Steven; François, Marianne M.

    2015-10-22

    In this study, we are interested in an interface reconstruction method for 3D arbitrary convex cells that could be used in multi-material flow simulations for instance. We assume that the interface is represented by a plane whose normal vector is known and we focus on the volume-matching step that consists in finding the plane constant so that it splits the cell according to a given volume fraction. We follow the same approach as in the recent authors' publication for 2D arbitrary convex cells in planar and axisymmetrical geometries, namely we derive an analytical formula for the volume of the specific prismatoids obtained when decomposing the cell using the planes that are parallel to the interface and passing through all the cell nodes. This formula is used to bracket the interface plane constant such that the volume-matching problem is rewritten in a single prismatoid in which the same formula is used to find the final solution. Finally, the proposed method is tested against an important number of reproducible configurations and shown to be at least five times faster.

  12. LSST Data Products and User Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, Richard A.; Axelrod, T.; Becker, A. C.; Bickerton, S.; Juric, M.; Kantor, J.; Krughoff, S.; Lupton, R. H.; Van Dyk, S.; Data Management, LSST; Simulations Teams

    2012-01-01

    The LSST will produce the richest sets of astronomical data ever created, which will open up an unparalleled temporal discovery space. The data products will include deep imaging of half of the sky in 6 passbands; catalogs of all detected sources including stars, galaxies, solar system objects; lightcurves of variable objects; and alerts of transient sources that will be generated within a minute of their detection. The LSST Project is currently prototyping a scalable Data Management System (DMS) capable of processing, archiving, and serving these data to the astronomical community. We anticipate that individual investigators and research teams will, during the course of their analysis, generate scientific datasets using data products from LSST (possibly combined with data from other resources) that will be of great value to the LSST community. The LSST Project plans to support these community-based science activities by: providing direct compute and storage resources, use of portions of the LSST software stack, and the development of user and programmatic interfaces that enable the discovery, exploration, and analysis of LSST data products. In addition to science data products, a number of data products will be generated to assess science quality. Although science data quality assessment will be highly automated, even the limited human interaction required to assess and diagnose problems drives the need to prototype user interfaces that enable efficient data exploration and analysis. Much of this capability is also needed for generating and evaluating calibration products, documenting survey progress, supporting science analysis for users, etc. In this presentation we describe the data products, pipeline processing, and user interface prototypes that have been developed so far to explore algorithms, validate LSST image simulations, and assess output data quality.

  13. Representing Graphical User Interfaces with Sound: A Review of Approaches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ratanasit, Dan; Moore, Melody M.

    2005-01-01

    The inability of computer users who are visually impaired to access graphical user interfaces (GUIs) has led researchers to propose approaches for adapting GUIs to auditory interfaces, with the goal of providing access for visually impaired people. This article outlines the issues involved in nonvisual access to graphical user interfaces, reviews…

  14. Graphical User Interface Programming in Introductory Computer Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skolnick, Michael M.; Spooner, David L.

    Modern computing systems exploit graphical user interfaces for interaction with users; as a result, introductory computer science courses must begin to teach the principles underlying such interfaces. This paper presents an approach to graphical user interface (GUI) implementation that is simple enough for beginning students to understand, yet…

  15. User Interface Improvements in Computer-Assisted Instruction, the Challenge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chalmers, P. A.

    2000-01-01

    Identifies user interface problems as they relate to computer-assisted instruction (CAI); reviews the learning theories and instructional theories related to CAI user interface; and presents potential CAI user interface improvements for research and development based on learning and instructional theory. Focuses on screen design improvements.…

  16. Starting Over: Current Issues in Online Catalog User Interface Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crawford, Walt

    1992-01-01

    Discussion of online catalogs focuses on issues in interface design. Issues addressed include understanding the user base; common user access (CUA) with personal computers; common command language (CCL); hyperlinks; screen design issues; differences from card catalogs; indexes; graphic user interfaces (GUIs); color; online help; and remote users.…

  17. Filtered chorochronic interface as a capability for 3-D unsteady throughflow analysis of multistage turbomachinery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerolymos, G. A.

    2013-02-01

    This note reviews the widely used phased-lagged [Erdos, J. L., E. Alzner, and W. McNally. 1977. AIAA Journal 15: 1559-68.] approach and corresponding chorochronic interface relations [Gerolymos G. A., G. J. Michon, and J. Neubauer. 2002. Journal of Propulsion and Power 18: 1139-52.] and explores its potential extension to the approximate unsteady throughflow analysis of multistage turbomachinery. The basic relations pertaining to the binary blade-row interaction case, for which chorochronic periodicity is exact in a phase-averaged rans framework, are briefly formulated, and selected computational examples illustrate the application of the method. Then, the filtered chorochronic interface is defined as the unsteady counterpart of the well-known mixing-plane concept. This interface takes into account only those tθ-waves which are compatible with the interaction of the immediately upstream and downstream blade-rows. The concept, which is similar to the decomposition-and-superposition method [Li, H. D., and L. He. 2005. ASME J ournal of Turbomachinery 127: 589-98.], is illustrated by 3-D computations of a ½-stage transonic compressor.

  18. PAMLX: a graphical user interface for PAML.

    PubMed

    Xu, Bo; Yang, Ziheng

    2013-12-01

    This note announces pamlX, a graphical user interface/front end for the paml (for Phylogenetic Analysis by Maximum Likelihood) program package (Yang Z. 1997. PAML: a program package for phylogenetic analysis by maximum likelihood. Comput Appl Biosci. 13:555-556; Yang Z. 2007. PAML 4: Phylogenetic analysis by maximum likelihood. Mol Biol Evol. 24:1586-1591). pamlX is written in C++ using the Qt library and communicates with paml programs through files. It can be used to create, edit, and print control files for paml programs and to launch paml runs. The interface is available for free download at http://abacus.gene.ucl.ac.uk/software/paml.html.

  19. Vertically aligned carbon nanofiber architecture as a multifunctional 3-D neural electrical interface.

    PubMed

    Nguyen-Vu, T D Barbara; Chen, Hua; Cassell, Alan M; Andrews, Russell J; Meyyappan, M; Li, Jun

    2007-06-01

    Developing biomaterial constructs that closely mimic the natural tissue microenvironment with its complex chemical and physical cues is essential for improving the function and reliability of implantable devices, especially those that require direct neural-electrical interfaces. Here we demonstrate that free-standing vertically aligned carbon nanofiber (VACNF) arrays can be used as a multifunctional 3-D brush-like nanoengineered matrix that interpenetrates the neuronal network of PC12 cells. We found that PC12 neuron cells cultured on VACNF substrates can form extended neural network upon proper chemical and biochemical modifications. The soft 3-D VACNF architecture provides a new platform to fine-tune the topographical, mechanical, chemical, and electrical cues at subcellular nanoscale. This new biomaterial platform can be used for both fundamental studies of material-cell interactions and the development of chronically stable implantable neural devices. Micropatterned multiplex VACNF arrays can be selectively controlled by electrical and electrochemical methods to provide localized stimulation with extraordinary spatiotemporal resolution. Further development of this technology may potentially result in a highly multiplex closed-loop system with multifunctions for neuromodulation and neuroprostheses.

  20. A representational framework and user-interface for an image understanding workstation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schroeder, Joyce D.

    1988-01-01

    Problems in image understanding involve a wide variety of data (e.g., image arrays, edge maps, 3-D shape models) and processes or algorithms (e.g., convolution, feature extraction, rendering). The underlying structure of an Image Understanding Workstation designed to support mulitple levels and types of representations for both data and processes is described, also the user-interface. The Image Understanding Workstation consists of two parts: the Image Understanding (IU) Framework, and the user-interface. The IU Framework is the set of data and process representations. It includes multiple levels of representation for data such as images (2-D), sketches (2-D), surfaces (2 1/2 D), and models (3-D). The representation scheme for processes characterizes their inputs, outputs, and parameters. Data and processes may reside on different classes of machines. The user-interface to the IU Workstation gives the user convenient access for creating, manipulating, transforming, and displaying image data. The user-interface follows the structure of the IU Framework and gives the user control over multiple types of data and processes. Both the IU Framework and user-interface are implemented on a LISP machine.

  1. A Real-Time Magnetoencephalography Brain-Computer Interface Using Interactive 3D Visualization and the Hadoop Ecosystem.

    PubMed

    McClay, Wilbert A; Yadav, Nancy; Ozbek, Yusuf; Haas, Andy; Attias, Hagaii T; Nagarajan, Srikantan S

    2015-09-30

    Ecumenically, the fastest growing segment of Big Data is human biology-related data and the annual data creation is on the order of zetabytes. The implications are global across industries, of which the treatment of brain related illnesses and trauma could see the most significant and immediate effects. The next generation of health care IT and sensory devices are acquiring and storing massive amounts of patient related data. An innovative Brain-Computer Interface (BCI) for interactive 3D visualization is presented utilizing the Hadoop Ecosystem for data analysis and storage. The BCI is an implementation of Bayesian factor analysis algorithms that can distinguish distinct thought actions using magneto encephalographic (MEG) brain signals. We have collected data on five subjects yielding 90% positive performance in MEG mid- and post-movement activity. We describe a driver that substitutes the actions of the BCI as mouse button presses for real-time use in visual simulations. This process has been added into a flight visualization demonstration. By thinking left or right, the user experiences the aircraft turning in the chosen direction. The driver components of the BCI can be compiled into any software and substitute a user's intent for specific keyboard strikes or mouse button presses. The BCI's data analytics OPEN ACCESS Brain. Sci. 2015, 5 420 of a subject's MEG brainwaves and flight visualization performance are stored and analyzed using the Hadoop Ecosystem as a quick retrieval data warehouse.

  2. EnergyPlus Graphical User Interface

    SciTech Connect

    2011-01-04

    LBNL, Infosys Technologies and Digital Alchemy are developing a free, comprehensive graphical user interface (GUI) that will enable EnergyPlus to be used more easily and effectively by building designers and other professionals, facilitating its widespread adoption. User requirements have been defined through a series of practitioner workshops. A new schematic editor for HVAC systems will be combined with different building envelope geometry generation tools and IFC-based BIM import and export. LBNL and Digital Alchemy have generated a detailed function requirements specification, which is being implemented in software by Infosys, LBNL and and Digital Alchemy. LBNL and practitioner subcontractors will develop a comprehensive set of templates and libraries and will perform extensive testing of the GUI before it is released in Q3 2011. It is planned to use an Open Platfom approach, in which a comprehensive set of well documented Application Programming Interfaces (API's) would be provided to facilitate both the development of third party contributions to the official, standard GUI and the development of derivative works.

  3. Mobile tele-echography: user interface design.

    PubMed

    Cañero, Cristina; Thomos, Nikolaos; Triantafyllidis, George A; Litos, George C; Strintzis, Michael Gerassimos

    2005-03-01

    Ultrasound imaging allows the evaluation of the degree of emergency of a patient. However, in some instances, a well-trained sonographer is unavailable to perform such echography. To cope with this issue, the Mobile Tele-Echography Using an Ultralight Robot (OTELO) project aims to develop a fully integrated end-to-end mobile tele-echography system using an ultralight remote-controlled robot for population groups that are not served locally by medical experts. This paper focuses on the user interface of the OTELO system, consisting of the following parts: an ultrasound video transmission system providing real-time images of the scanned area, an audio/video conference to communicate with the paramedical assistant and with the patient, and a virtual-reality environment, providing visual and haptic feedback to the expert, while capturing the expert's hand movements. These movements are reproduced by the robot at the patient site while holding the ultrasound probe against the patient skin. In addition, the user interface includes an image processing facility for enhancing the received images and the possibility to include them into a database.

  4. The MHOST finite element program: 3-D inelastic analysis methods for hot section components. Volume 2: User's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakazawa, Shohei

    1989-01-01

    The user options available for running the MHOST finite element analysis package is described. MHOST is a solid and structural analysis program based on the mixed finite element technology, and is specifically designed for 3-D inelastic analysis. A family of 2- and 3-D continuum elements along with beam and shell structural elements can be utilized, many options are available in the constitutive equation library, the solution algorithms and the analysis capabilities. The outline of solution algorithms is discussed along with the data input and output, analysis options including the user subroutines and the definition of the finite elements implemented in the program package.

  5. Interface engineered HfO2-based 3D vertical ReRAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudec, Boris; Wang, I.-Ting; Lai, Wei-Li; Chang, Che-Chia; Jančovič, Peter; Fröhlich, Karol; Mičušík, Matej; Omastová, Mária; Hou, Tuo-Hung

    2016-06-01

    We demonstrate a double-layer 3D vertical resistive random access memory (ReRAM) stack implementing a Pt/HfO2/TiN memory cell. The HfO2 switching layer is grown by atomic layer deposition on the sidewall of a SiO2/TiN/SiO2/TiN/SiO2 multilayer pillar. A steep vertical profile was achieved using CMOS-compatible TiN dry etching. We employ in situ TiN bottom interface engineering by ozone, which results in (a) significant forming voltage reduction which allows for forming-free operation in AC pulsed mode, and (b) non-linearity tuning of low resistance state by current compliance during Set operation. The vertical ReRAM shows excellent read and write disturb immunity between vertically stacked cells, retention over 104 s and excellent switching stability at 400 K. Endurance of 107 write cycles was achieved using 100 ns wide AC pulses while fast switching speed using pulses of only 10 ns width is also demonstrated. The active switching region was evaluated to be located closer to the bottom interface which allows for the observed high endurance.

  6. How to Develop a User Interface That Your Real Users Will Love

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Donald

    2012-01-01

    A "user interface" is the part of an interactive system that bridges the user and the underlying functionality of the system. But people sometimes forget that the best interfaces will provide a platform to optimize the users' interactions so that they support and extend the users' activities in effective, useful, and usable ways. To look at it…

  7. User's Manual for the Object User Interface (OUI): An Environmental Resource Modeling Framework

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Markstrom, Steven L.; Koczot, Kathryn M.

    2008-01-01

    The Object User Interface is a computer application that provides a framework for coupling environmental-resource models and for managing associated temporal and spatial data. The Object User Interface is designed to be easily extensible to incorporate models and data interfaces defined by the user. Additionally, the Object User Interface is highly configurable through the use of a user-modifiable, text-based control file that is written in the eXtensible Markup Language. The Object User Interface user's manual provides (1) installation instructions, (2) an overview of the graphical user interface, (3) a description of the software tools, (4) a project example, and (5) specifications for user configuration and extension.

  8. User interface issues in supporting human-computer integrated scheduling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, Lynne P.; Biefeld, Eric W.

    1991-01-01

    The topics are presented in view graph form and include the following: characteristics of Operations Mission Planner (OMP) schedule domain; OMP architecture; definition of a schedule; user interface dimensions; functional distribution; types of users; interpreting user interaction; dynamic overlays; reactive scheduling; and transitioning the interface.

  9. Microcomputer-Based User Interface for Library Online Catalogue.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheng, Chin-Chuan

    A microcomputer-based user interface was developed and programmed for the library computer systems at the University of Illinois. Designed to provide user-friendly access to the two components of the online catalog on the library's IBM 3081 mainframe computer, the interface program resides on the IBM PC and queries the user in natural written…

  10. User interface issues in supporting human-computer integrated scheduling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, Lynne P.; Biefeld, Eric W.

    1991-09-01

    The topics are presented in view graph form and include the following: characteristics of Operations Mission Planner (OMP) schedule domain; OMP architecture; definition of a schedule; user interface dimensions; functional distribution; types of users; interpreting user interaction; dynamic overlays; reactive scheduling; and transitioning the interface.

  11. Spatial issues in user interface design from a graphic design perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marcus, Aaron

    1989-01-01

    The user interface of a computer system is a visual display that provides information about the status of operations on data within the computer and control options to the user that enable adjustments to these operations. From the very beginning of computer technology the user interface was a spatial display, although its spatial features were not necessarily complex or explicitly recognized by the users. All text and nonverbal signs appeared in a virtual space generally thought of as a single flat plane of symbols. Current technology of high performance workstations permits any element of the display to appear as dynamic, multicolor, 3-D signs in a virtual 3-D space. The complexity of appearance and the user's interaction with the display provide significant challenges to the graphic designer of current and future user interfaces. In particular, spatial depiction provides many opportunities for effective communication of objects, structures, processes, navigation, selection, and manipulation. Issues are presented that are relevant to the graphic designer seeking to optimize the user interface's spatial attributes for effective visual communication.

  12. User Control and Task Authenticity for Spatial Learning in 3D Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dalgarno, Barney; Harper, Barry

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes two empirical studies which investigated the importance for spatial learning of view control and object manipulation within 3D environments. A 3D virtual chemistry laboratory was used as the research instrument. Subjects, who were university undergraduate students (34 in the first study and 80 in the second study), undertook…

  13. 3D Inhabited Virtual Worlds: Interactivity and Interaction between Avatars, Autonomous Agents, and Users.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jensen, Jens F.

    This paper addresses some of the central questions currently related to 3-Dimensional Inhabited Virtual Worlds (3D-IVWs), their virtual interactions, and communication, drawing from the theory and methodology of sociology, interaction analysis, interpersonal communication, semiotics, cultural studies, and media studies. First, 3D-IVWs--seen as a…

  14. Graphical user interface concepts for tactical augmented reality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Argenta, Chris; Murphy, Anne; Hinton, Jeremy; Cook, James; Sherrill, Todd; Snarski, Steve

    2010-04-01

    Applied Research Associates and BAE Systems are working together to develop a wearable augmented reality system under the DARPA ULTRA-Vis program†. Our approach to achieve the objectives of ULTRAVis, called iLeader, incorporates a full color 40° field of view (FOV) see-thru holographic waveguide integrated with sensors for full position and head tracking to provide an unobtrusive information system for operational maneuvers. iLeader will enable warfighters to mark-up the 3D battle-space with symbologic identification of graphical control measures, friendly force positions and enemy/target locations. Our augmented reality display provides dynamic real-time painting of symbols on real objects, a pose-sensitive 360° representation of relevant object positions, and visual feedback for a variety of system activities. The iLeader user interface and situational awareness graphical representations are highly intuitive, nondisruptive, and always tactically relevant. We used best human-factors practices, system engineering expertise, and cognitive task analysis to design effective strategies for presenting real-time situational awareness to the military user without distorting their natural senses and perception. We present requirements identified for presenting information within a see-through display in combat environments, challenges in designing suitable visualization capabilities, and solutions that enable us to bring real-time iconic command and control to the tactical user community.

  15. Simulation Control Graphical User Interface Logging Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hewling, Karl B., Jr.

    2012-01-01

    One of the many tasks of my project was to revise the code of the Simulation Control Graphical User Interface (SIM GUI) to enable logging functionality to a file. I was also tasked with developing a script that directed the startup and initialization flow of the various LCS software components. This makes sure that a software component will not spin up until all the appropriate dependencies have been configured properly. Also I was able to assist hardware modelers in verifying the configuration of models after they have been upgraded to a new software version. I developed some code that analyzes the MDL files to determine if any error were generated due to the upgrade process. Another one of the projects assigned to me was supporting the End-to-End Hardware/Software Daily Tag-up meeting.

  16. iVirtualWorld: A Domain-Oriented End-User Development Environment for Building 3D Virtual Chemistry Experiments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhong, Ying

    2013-01-01

    Virtual worlds are well-suited for building virtual laboratories for educational purposes to complement hands-on physical laboratories. However, educators may face technical challenges because developing virtual worlds requires skills in programming and 3D design. Current virtual world building tools are developed for users who have programming…

  17. Interfacing the expert: Characteristics and requirements for the user interface in expert systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Potter, Andrew

    1987-01-01

    Because expert systems deal with new sets of problems presenting unique interface requirements, special issues requiring special attention are presented to user interface designers. External knowledge representation (how knowdedge is represented across the user interface), modes of user-system interdependence (advisory, cooperative, and autonomous), and management of uncertainty (deciding what actions to take or recommend based on incomplete evidence) are discussed.

  18. Graphical user interface for intraoperative neuroimage updating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rick, Kyle R.; Hartov, Alex; Roberts, David W.; Lunn, Karen E.; Sun, Hai; Paulsen, Keith D.

    2003-05-01

    Image-guided neurosurgery typically relies on preoperative imaging information that is subject to errors resulting from brain shift and deformation in the OR. A graphical user interface (GUI) has been developed to facilitate the flow of data from OR to image volume in order to provide the neurosurgeon with updated views concurrent with surgery. Upon acquisition of registration data for patient position in the OR (using fiducial markers), the Matlab GUI displays ultrasound image overlays on patient specific, preoperative MR images. Registration matrices are also applied to patient-specific anatomical models used for image updating. After displaying the re-oriented brain model in OR coordinates and digitizing the edge of the craniotomy, gravitational sagging of the brain is simulated using the finite element method. Based on this model, interpolation to the resolution of the preoperative images is performed and re-displayed to the surgeon during the procedure. These steps were completed within reasonable time limits and the interface was relatively easy to use after a brief training period. The techniques described have been developed and used retrospectively prior to this study. Based on the work described here, these steps can now be accomplished in the operating room and provide near real-time feedback to the surgeon.

  19. Support for User Interfaces for Distributed Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eychaner, Glenn; Niessner, Albert

    2005-01-01

    An extensible Java(TradeMark) software framework supports the construction and operation of graphical user interfaces (GUIs) for distributed computing systems typified by ground control systems that send commands to, and receive telemetric data from, spacecraft. Heretofore, such GUIs have been custom built for each new system at considerable expense. In contrast, the present framework affords generic capabilities that can be shared by different distributed systems. Dynamic class loading, reflection, and other run-time capabilities of the Java language and JavaBeans component architecture enable the creation of a GUI for each new distributed computing system with a minimum of custom effort. By use of this framework, GUI components in control panels and menus can send commands to a particular distributed system with a minimum of system-specific code. The framework receives, decodes, processes, and displays telemetry data; custom telemetry data handling can be added for a particular system. The framework supports saving and later restoration of users configurations of control panels and telemetry displays with a minimum of effort in writing system-specific code. GUIs constructed within this framework can be deployed in any operating system with a Java run-time environment, without recompilation or code changes.

  20. FGB: A Graphical and Haptic User Interface for Creating Graphical, Haptic User Interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    ANDERSON,THOMAS G.; BRECKENRIDGE,ARTHURINE; DAVIDSON,GEORGE S.

    1999-10-18

    The emerging field of haptics represents a fundamental change in human-computer interaction (HCI), and presents solutions to problems that are difficult or impossible to solve with a two-dimensional, mouse-based interface. To take advantage of the potential of haptics, however, innovative interaction techniques and programming environments are needed. This paper describes FGB (FLIGHT GHUI Builder), a programming tool that can be used to create an application specific graphical and haptic user interface (GHUI). FGB is itself a graphical and haptic user interface with which a programmer can intuitively create and manipulate components of a GHUI in real time in a graphical environment through the use of a haptic device. The programmer can create a GHUI without writing any programming code. After a user interface is created, FGB writes the appropriate programming code to a file, using the FLIGHT API, to recreate what the programmer created in the FGB interface. FGB saves programming time and increases productivity, because a programmer can see the end result as it is created, and FGB does much of the programming itself. Interestingly, as FGB was created, it was used to help build itself. The further FGB was in its development, the more easily and quickly it could be used to create additional functionality and improve its own design. As a finished product, FGB can be used to recreate itself in much less time than it originally required, and with much less programming. This paper describes FGB's GHUI components, the techniques used in the interface, how the output code is created, where programming additions and modifications should be placed, and how it can be compared to and integrated with existing API's such as MFC and Visual C++, OpenGL, and GHOST.

  1. An OpenGL-based Interface to 3D PowerPoint-like Presentations of OpenGL Projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mokhov, Serguei A.; Song, Miao

    We present a multimedia 3D interface to powerpoint-like presentations in OpenGL. The presentations of such kind are useful to demonstrate projects or conference talks with the demonstration results of a 3D animation, effects, and others alongside the presentation 'in situ' instead of switching between a regular presentation software to the demo and back - the demo and the presentation can be one and the same, embedded together.

  2. Band structure and spin texture of Bi2Se3 3 d ferromagnetic metal interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jia; Velev, Julian P.; Dang, Xiaoqian; Tsymbal, Evgeny Y.

    2016-07-01

    The spin-helical surface states in a three-dimensional topological insulator (TI), such as Bi2Se3 , are predicted to have superior efficiency in converting charge current into spin polarization. This property is said to be responsible for the giant spin-orbit torques observed in ferromagnetic metal/TI structures. In this work, using first-principles and model tight-binding calculations, we investigate the interface between the topological insulator Bi2Se3 and 3 d -transition ferromagnetic metals Ni and Co. We find that the difference in the work functions of the topological insulator and the ferromagnetic metals shift the topological surface states down about 0.5 eV below the Fermi energy where the hybridization of these surface states with the metal bands destroys their helical spin structure. The band alignment of Bi2Se3 and Ni (Co) places the Fermi energy far in the conduction band of bulk Bi2Se3 , where the spin of the carriers is aligned with the magnetization in the metal. Our results indicate that the topological surface states are unlikely to be responsible for the huge spin-orbit torque effect observed experimentally in these systems.

  3. User Acceptance of a Haptic Interface for Learning Anatomy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yeom, Soonja; Choi-Lundberg, Derek; Fluck, Andrew; Sale, Arthur

    2013-01-01

    Visualizing the structure and relationships in three dimensions (3D) of organs is a challenge for students of anatomy. To provide an alternative way of learning anatomy engaging multiple senses, we are developing a force-feedback (haptic) interface for manipulation of 3D virtual organs, using design research methodology, with iterations of system…

  4. BEST3D user's manual: Boundary Element Solution Technology, 3-Dimensional Version 3.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The theoretical basis and programming strategy utilized in the construction of the computer program BEST3D (boundary element solution technology - three dimensional) and detailed input instructions are provided for the use of the program. An extensive set of test cases and sample problems is included in the manual and is also available for distribution with the program. The BEST3D program was developed under the 3-D Inelastic Analysis Methods for Hot Section Components contract (NAS3-23697). The overall objective of this program was the development of new computer programs allowing more accurate and efficient three-dimensional thermal and stress analysis of hot section components, i.e., combustor liners, turbine blades, and turbine vanes. The BEST3D program allows both linear and nonlinear analysis of static and quasi-static elastic problems and transient dynamic analysis for elastic problems. Calculation of elastic natural frequencies and mode shapes is also provided.

  5. MuSim, a Graphical User Interface for Multiple Simulation Programs

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, Thomas; Cummings, Mary Anne; Johnson, Rolland; Neuffer, David

    2016-06-01

    MuSim is a new user-friendly program designed to interface to many different particle simulation codes, regardless of their data formats or geometry descriptions. It presents the user with a compelling graphical user interface that includes a flexible 3-D view of the simulated world plus powerful editing and drag-and-drop capabilities. All aspects of the design can be parametrized so that parameter scans and optimizations are easy. It is simple to create plots and display events in the 3-D viewer (with a slider to vary the transparency of solids), allowing for an effortless comparison of different simulation codes. Simulation codes: G4beamline, MAD-X, and MCNP; more coming. Many accelerator design tools and beam optics codes were written long ago, with primitive user interfaces by today's standards. MuSim is specifically designed to make it easy to interface to such codes, providing a common user experience for all, and permitting the construction and exploration of models with very little overhead. For today's technology-driven students, graphical interfaces meet their expectations far better than text-based tools, and education in accelerator physics is one of our primary goals.

  6. Cooperative processing user interfaces for AdaNET

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gutzmann, Kurt M.

    1991-01-01

    A cooperative processing user interface (CUI) system shares the task of graphical display generation and presentation between the user's computer and a remote host. The communications link between the two computers is typically a modem or Ethernet. The two main purposes of a CUI are reduction of the amount of data transmitted between user and host machines, and provision of a graphical user interface system to make the system easier to use.

  7. A Real-Time Magnetoencephalography Brain-Computer Interface Using Interactive 3D Visualization and the Hadoop Ecosystem

    PubMed Central

    McClay, Wilbert A.; Yadav, Nancy; Ozbek, Yusuf; Haas, Andy; Attias, Hagaii T.; Nagarajan, Srikantan S.

    2015-01-01

    Ecumenically, the fastest growing segment of Big Data is human biology-related data and the annual data creation is on the order of zetabytes. The implications are global across industries, of which the treatment of brain related illnesses and trauma could see the most significant and immediate effects. The next generation of health care IT and sensory devices are acquiring and storing massive amounts of patient related data. An innovative Brain-Computer Interface (BCI) for interactive 3D visualization is presented utilizing the Hadoop Ecosystem for data analysis and storage. The BCI is an implementation of Bayesian factor analysis algorithms that can distinguish distinct thought actions using magneto encephalographic (MEG) brain signals. We have collected data on five subjects yielding 90% positive performance in MEG mid- and post-movement activity. We describe a driver that substitutes the actions of the BCI as mouse button presses for real-time use in visual simulations. This process has been added into a flight visualization demonstration. By thinking left or right, the user experiences the aircraft turning in the chosen direction. The driver components of the BCI can be compiled into any software and substitute a user’s intent for specific keyboard strikes or mouse button presses. The BCI’s data analytics of a subject’s MEG brainwaves and flight visualization performance are stored and analyzed using the Hadoop Ecosystem as a quick retrieval data warehouse. PMID:26437432

  8. The SF3M approach to 3-D photo-reconstruction for non-expert users: application to a gully network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castillo, C.; James, M. R.; Redel-Macías, M. D.; Pérez, R.; Gómez, J. A.

    2015-04-01

    3-D photo-reconstruction (PR) techniques have been successfully used to produce high resolution elevation models for different applications and over different spatial scales. However, innovative approaches are required to overcome some limitations that this technique may present in challenging scenarios. Here, we evaluate SF3M, a new graphical user interface for implementing a complete PR workflow based on freely available software (including external calls to VisualSFM and CloudCompare), in combination with a low-cost survey design for the reconstruction of a several-hundred-meters-long gully network. SF3M provided a semi-automated workflow for 3-D reconstruction requiring ~ 49 h (of which only 17% required operator assistance) for obtaining a final gully network model of > 17 million points over a gully plan area of 4230 m2. We show that a walking itinerary along the gully perimeter using two light-weight automatic cameras (1 s time-lapse mode) and a 6 m-long pole is an efficient method for 3-D monitoring of gullies, at a low cost (about EUR 1000 budget for the field equipment) and time requirements (~ 90 min for image collection). A mean error of 6.9 cm at the ground control points was found, mainly due to model deformations derived from the linear geometry of the gully and residual errors in camera calibration. The straightforward image collection and processing approach can be of great benefit for non-expert users working on gully erosion assessment.

  9. T:XML: A Tool Supporting User Interface Model Transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Jaquero, Víctor; Montero, Francisco; González, Pascual

    Model driven development of user interfaces is based on the transformation of an abstract specification into the final user interface the user will interact with. The design of transformation rules to carry out this transformation process is a key issue in any model-driven user interface development approach. In this paper, we introduce T:XML, an integrated development environment for managing, creating and previewing transformation rules. The tool supports the specification of transformation rules by using a graphical notation that works on the basis of the transformation of the input model into a graph-based representation. T:XML allows the design and execution of transformation rules in an integrated development environment. Furthermore, the designer can also preview how the generated user interface looks like after the transformations have been applied. These previewing capabilities can be used to quickly create prototypes to discuss with the users in user-centered design methods.

  10. User's manual for three dimensional boundary layer (BL3-D) code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, O. L.; Caplin, B.

    1985-01-01

    An assessment has been made of the applicability of a 3-D boundary layer analysis to the calculation of heat transfer, total pressure losses, and streamline flow patterns on the surface of both stationary and rotating turbine passages. In support of this effort, an analysis has been developed to calculate a general nonorthogonal surface coordinate system for arbitrary 3-D surfaces and also to calculate the boundary layer edge conditions for compressible flow using the surface Euler equations and experimental data to calibrate the method, calculations are presented for the pressure endwall, and suction surfaces of a stationary cascade and for the pressure surface of a rotating turbine blade. The results strongly indicate that the 3-D boundary layer analysis can give good predictions of the flow field, loss, and heat transfer on the pressure, suction, and endwall surface of a gas turbine passage.

  11. User's manual for three dimensional boundary layer (BL3-D) code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, O. L.; Caplin, B.

    1985-08-01

    An assessment has been made of the applicability of a 3-D boundary layer analysis to the calculation of heat transfer, total pressure losses, and streamline flow patterns on the surface of both stationary and rotating turbine passages. In support of this effort, an analysis has been developed to calculate a general nonorthogonal surface coordinate system for arbitrary 3-D surfaces and also to calculate the boundary layer edge conditions for compressible flow using the surface Euler equations and experimental data to calibrate the method, calculations are presented for the pressure endwall, and suction surfaces of a stationary cascade and for the pressure surface of a rotating turbine blade. The results strongly indicate that the 3-D boundary layer analysis can give good predictions of the flow field, loss, and heat transfer on the pressure, suction, and endwall surface of a gas turbine passage.

  12. GoPhast: a graphical user interface for PHAST

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Winston, Richard B.

    2006-01-01

    GoPhast is a graphical user interface (GUI) for the USGS model PHAST. PHAST simulates multicomponent, reactive solute transport in three-dimensional, saturated, ground-water flow systems. PHAST can model both equilibrium and kinetic geochemical reactions. PHAST is derived from HST3D (flow and transport) and PHREEQC (geochemical calculations). The flow and transport calculations are restricted to constant fluid density and constant temperature. The complexity of the input required by PHAST makes manual construction of its input files tedious and error-prone. GoPhast streamlines the creation of the input file and helps reduce errors. GoPhast allows the user to define the spatial input for the PHAST flow and transport data file by drawing points, lines, or polygons on top, front, and side views of the model domain. These objects can have up to two associated formulas that define their extent perpendicular to the view plane, allowing the objects to be three-dimensional. Formulas are also used to specify the values of spatial data (data sets) both globally and for individual objects. Objects can be used to specify the values of data sets independent of the spatial and temporal discretization of the model. Thus, the grid and simulation periods for the model can be changed without respecifying spatial data pertaining to the hydrogeologic framework and boundary conditions. This report describes the operation of GoPhast and demonstrates its use with examples. GoPhast runs on Windows 2000, Windows XP, and Linux operating systems.

  13. Coolant side heat transfer with rotation: User manual for 3D-TEACH with rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Syed, S. A.; James, R. H.

    1989-01-01

    This program solves the governing transport equations in Reynolds average form for the flow of a 3-D, steady state, viscous, heat conducting, multiple species, single phase, Newtonian fluid with combustion. The governing partial differential equations are solved in physical variables in either a Cartesian or cylindrical coordinate system. The effects of rotation on the momentum and enthalpy calculations modeled in Cartesian coordinates are examined. The flow of the fluid should be confined and subsonic with a maximum Mach number no larger than 0.5. This manual describes the operating procedures and input details for executing a 3D-TEACH computation.

  14. Unstructured Cartesian refinement with sharp interface immersed boundary method for 3D unsteady incompressible flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelidis, Dionysios; Chawdhary, Saurabh; Sotiropoulos, Fotis

    2016-11-01

    A novel numerical method is developed for solving the 3D, unsteady, incompressible Navier-Stokes equations on locally refined fully unstructured Cartesian grids in domains with arbitrarily complex immersed boundaries. Owing to the utilization of the fractional step method on an unstructured Cartesian hybrid staggered/non-staggered grid layout, flux mismatch and pressure discontinuity issues are avoided and the divergence free constraint is inherently satisfied to machine zero. Auxiliary/hanging nodes are used to facilitate the discretization of the governing equations. The second-order accuracy of the solver is ensured by using multi-dimension Lagrange interpolation operators and appropriate differencing schemes at the interface of regions with different levels of refinement. The sharp interface immersed boundary method is augmented with local near-boundary refinement to handle arbitrarily complex boundaries. The discrete momentum equation is solved with the matrix free Newton-Krylov method and the Krylov-subspace method is employed to solve the Poisson equation. The second-order accuracy of the proposed method on unstructured Cartesian grids is demonstrated by solving the Poisson equation with a known analytical solution. A number of three-dimensional laminar flow simulations of increasing complexity illustrate the ability of the method to handle flows across a range of Reynolds numbers and flow regimes. Laminar steady and unsteady flows past a sphere and the oblique vortex shedding from a circular cylinder mounted between two end walls demonstrate the accuracy, the efficiency and the smooth transition of scales and coherent structures across refinement levels. Large-eddy simulation (LES) past a miniature wind turbine rotor, parameterized using the actuator line approach, indicates the ability of the fully unstructured solver to simulate complex turbulent flows. Finally, a geometry resolving LES of turbulent flow past a complete hydrokinetic turbine illustrates

  15. Interfacing polymeric scaffolds with primary pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma cells to develop 3D cancer models

    PubMed Central

    Ricci, Claudio; Mota, Carlos; Moscato, Stefania; D’Alessandro, Delfo; Ugel, Stefano; Sartoris, Silvia; Bronte, Vincenzo; Boggi, Ugo; Campani, Daniela; Funel, Niccola; Moroni, Lorenzo; Danti, Serena

    2014-01-01

    We analyzed the interactions between human primary cells from pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) and polymeric scaffolds to develop 3D cancer models useful for mimicking the biology of this tumor. Three scaffold types based on two biocompatible polymeric formulations, such as poly(vinyl alcohol)/gelatin (PVA/G) mixture and poly(ethylene oxide terephthalate)/poly(butylene terephthalate) (PEOT/PBT) copolymer, were obtained via different techniques, namely, emulsion and freeze-drying, compression molding followed by salt leaching, and electrospinning. In this way, primary PDAC cells interfaced with different pore topographies, such as sponge-like pores of different shape and size or nanofiber interspaces. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence played by the scaffold architecture over cancerous cell growth and function. In all scaffolds, primary PDAC cells showed good viability and synthesized tumor-specific metalloproteinases (MMPs) such as MMP-2, and MMP-9. However, only sponge-like pores, obtained via emulsion-based and salt leaching-based techniques allowed for an organized cellular aggregation very similar to the native PDAC morphological structure. Differently, these cell clusters were not observed on PEOT/PBT electrospun scaffolds. MMP-2 and MMP-9, as active enzymes, resulted to be increased in PVA/G and PEOT/PBT sponges, respectively. These findings suggested that spongy scaffolds supported the generation of pancreatic tumor models with enhanced aggressiveness. In conclusion, primary PDAC cells showed diverse behaviors while interacting with different scaffold types that can be potentially exploited to create stage-specific pancreatic cancer models likely to provide new knowledge on the modulation and drug susceptibility of MMPs. PMID:25482337

  16. Interfacing polymeric scaffolds with primary pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma cells to develop 3D cancer models.

    PubMed

    Ricci, Claudio; Mota, Carlos; Moscato, Stefania; D'Alessandro, Delfo; Ugel, Stefano; Sartoris, Silvia; Bronte, Vincenzo; Boggi, Ugo; Campani, Daniela; Funel, Niccola; Moroni, Lorenzo; Danti, Serena

    2014-01-01

    We analyzed the interactions between human primary cells from pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) and polymeric scaffolds to develop 3D cancer models useful for mimicking the biology of this tumor. Three scaffold types based on two biocompatible polymeric formulations, such as poly(vinyl alcohol)/gelatin (PVA/G) mixture and poly(ethylene oxide terephthalate)/poly(butylene terephthalate) (PEOT/PBT) copolymer, were obtained via different techniques, namely, emulsion and freeze-drying, compression molding followed by salt leaching, and electrospinning. In this way, primary PDAC cells interfaced with different pore topographies, such as sponge-like pores of different shape and size or nanofiber interspaces. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence played by the scaffold architecture over cancerous cell growth and function. In all scaffolds, primary PDAC cells showed good viability and synthesized tumor-specific metalloproteinases (MMPs) such as MMP-2, and MMP-9. However, only sponge-like pores, obtained via emulsion-based and salt leaching-based techniques allowed for an organized cellular aggregation very similar to the native PDAC morphological structure. Differently, these cell clusters were not observed on PEOT/PBT electrospun scaffolds. MMP-2 and MMP-9, as active enzymes, resulted to be increased in PVA/G and PEOT/PBT sponges, respectively. These findings suggested that spongy scaffolds supported the generation of pancreatic tumor models with enhanced aggressiveness. In conclusion, primary PDAC cells showed diverse behaviors while interacting with different scaffold types that can be potentially exploited to create stage-specific pancreatic cancer models likely to provide new knowledge on the modulation and drug susceptibility of MMPs.

  17. Reflections on Andes' Goal-Free User Interface

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    VanLehn, Kurt

    2016-01-01

    Although the Andes project produced many results over its 18 years of activity, this commentary focuses on its contributions to understanding how a goal-free user interface impacts the overall design and performance of a step-based tutoring system. Whereas a goal-aligned user interface displays relevant goals as blank boxes or empty locations that…

  18. The Graphical User Interface: Crisis, Danger, and Opportunity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyd, L. H.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    This article describes differences between the graphical user interface and traditional character-based interface systems, identifies potential problems posed by graphic computing environments for blind computer users, and describes some programs and strategies that are being developed to provide access to those environments. (Author/JDD)

  19. Advanced Perceptual User Interfaces: Applications for Disabled and Elderly People

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López, Francisco J. Perales

    The research of new human-computer interfaces has become a growing field in computer science, which aims to attain the development of more natural, intuitive, unobtrusive and efficient interfaces. This objective has come up with the concept of Perceptual User Interfaces (PUIs) that are turning out to be very popular as they seek to make the user interface more natural and compelling by taking advantage of the ways in which people naturally interact with each other and with the world. PUIs can use speech and sound recognition and generation, computer vision, graphical animation and visualization, language understanding, touch-based sensing and feedback (haptics), learning, user modeling and dialog management.

  20. Web GIS in practice X: a Microsoft Kinect natural user interface for Google Earth navigation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    This paper covers the use of depth sensors such as Microsoft Kinect and ASUS Xtion to provide a natural user interface (NUI) for controlling 3-D (three-dimensional) virtual globes such as Google Earth (including its Street View mode), Bing Maps 3D, and NASA World Wind. The paper introduces the Microsoft Kinect device, briefly describing how it works (the underlying technology by PrimeSense), as well as its market uptake and application potential beyond its original intended purpose as a home entertainment and video game controller. The different software drivers available for connecting the Kinect device to a PC (Personal Computer) are also covered, and their comparative pros and cons briefly discussed. We survey a number of approaches and application examples for controlling 3-D virtual globes using the Kinect sensor, then describe Kinoogle, a Kinect interface for natural interaction with Google Earth, developed by students at Texas A&M University. Readers interested in trying out the application on their own hardware can download a Zip archive (included with the manuscript as additional files 1, 2, &3) that contains a 'Kinnogle installation package for Windows PCs'. Finally, we discuss some usability aspects of Kinoogle and similar NUIs for controlling 3-D virtual globes (including possible future improvements), and propose a number of unique, practical 'use scenarios' where such NUIs could prove useful in navigating a 3-D virtual globe, compared to conventional mouse/3-D mouse and keyboard-based interfaces. PMID:21791054

  1. Web GIS in practice X: a Microsoft Kinect natural user interface for Google Earth navigation.

    PubMed

    Boulos, Maged N Kamel; Blanchard, Bryan J; Walker, Cory; Montero, Julio; Tripathy, Aalap; Gutierrez-Osuna, Ricardo

    2011-07-26

    This paper covers the use of depth sensors such as Microsoft Kinect and ASUS Xtion to provide a natural user interface (NUI) for controlling 3-D (three-dimensional) virtual globes such as Google Earth (including its Street View mode), Bing Maps 3D, and NASA World Wind. The paper introduces the Microsoft Kinect device, briefly describing how it works (the underlying technology by PrimeSense), as well as its market uptake and application potential beyond its original intended purpose as a home entertainment and video game controller. The different software drivers available for connecting the Kinect device to a PC (Personal Computer) are also covered, and their comparative pros and cons briefly discussed. We survey a number of approaches and application examples for controlling 3-D virtual globes using the Kinect sensor, then describe Kinoogle, a Kinect interface for natural interaction with Google Earth, developed by students at Texas A&M University. Readers interested in trying out the application on their own hardware can download a Zip archive (included with the manuscript as additional files 1, 2, &3) that contains a 'Kinnogle installation package for Windows PCs'. Finally, we discuss some usability aspects of Kinoogle and similar NUIs for controlling 3-D virtual globes (including possible future improvements), and propose a number of unique, practical 'use scenarios' where such NUIs could prove useful in navigating a 3-D virtual globe, compared to conventional mouse/3-D mouse and keyboard-based interfaces.

  2. Interfacing 3D micro/nanochannels with a branch-shaped reservoir enhances fluid and mass transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Prasoon; Gandhi, Prasanna S.; Majumder, Mainak

    2017-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) micro/nanofluidic devices can accelerate progress in numerous fields such as tissue engineering, drug delivery, self-healing and cooling devices. However, efficient connections between networks of micro/nanochannels and external fluidic ports are key to successful applications of 3D micro/nanofluidic devices. Therefore, in this work, the extent of the role of reservoir geometry in interfacing with vascular (micro/nanochannel) networks, and in the enabling of connections with external fluidic ports while maintaining the compactness of devices, has been experimentally and theoretically investigated. A statistical modelling suggested that a branch-shaped reservoir demonstrates enhanced interfacing with vascular networks when compared to other regular geometries of reservoirs. Time-lapse dye flow experiments by capillary action through fabricated 3D micro/nanofluidic devices confirmed the connectivity of branch-shaped reservoirs with micro/nanochannel networks in fluidic devices. This demonstrated a ~2.2-fold enhancement of the volumetric flow rate in micro/nanofluidic networks when interfaced to branch-shaped reservoirs over rectangular reservoirs. The enhancement is due to a ~2.8-fold increase in the perimeter of the reservoirs. In addition, the mass transfer experiments exhibited a ~1.7-fold enhancement in solute flux across 3D micro/nanofluidic devices that interfaced with branch-shaped reservoirs when compared to rectangular reservoirs. The fabrication of 3D micro/nanofluidic devices and their efficient interfacing through branch-shaped reservoirs to an external fluidic port can potentially enable their use in complex applications, in which enhanced surface-to-volume interactions are desirable.

  3. User interface issues in supporting human-computer integrated scheduling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, Lynne P.; Biefeld, Eric W.

    1991-01-01

    Explored here is the user interface problems encountered with the Operations Missions Planner (OMP) project at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). OMP uses a unique iterative approach to planning that places additional requirements on the user interface, particularly to support system development and maintenance. These requirements are necessary to support the concepts of heuristically controlled search, in-progress assessment, and iterative refinement of the schedule. The techniques used to address the OMP interface needs are given.

  4. User-guided segmentation of preterm neonate ventricular system from 3-D ultrasound images using convex optimization.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Wu; Yuan, Jing; Kishimoto, Jessica; McLeod, Jonathan; Chen, Yimin; de Ribaupierre, Sandrine; Fenster, Aaron

    2015-02-01

    A three-dimensional (3-D) ultrasound (US) system has been developed to monitor the intracranial ventricular system of preterm neonates with intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH) and the resultant dilation of the ventricles (ventriculomegaly). To measure ventricular volume from 3-D US images, a semi-automatic convex optimization-based approach is proposed for segmentation of the cerebral ventricular system in preterm neonates with IVH from 3-D US images. The proposed semi-automatic segmentation method makes use of the convex optimization technique supervised by user-initialized information. Experiments using 58 patient 3-D US images reveal that our proposed approach yielded a mean Dice similarity coefficient of 78.2% compared with the surfaces that were manually contoured, suggesting good agreement between these two segmentations. Additional metrics, the mean absolute distance of 0.65 mm and the maximum absolute distance of 3.2 mm, indicated small distance errors for a voxel spacing of 0.22 × 0.22 × 0.22 mm(3). The Pearson correlation coefficient (r = 0.97, p < 0.001) indicated a significant correlation of algorithm-generated ventricular system volume (VSV) with the manually generated VSV. The calculated minimal detectable difference in ventricular volume change indicated that the proposed segmentation approach with 3-D US images is capable of detecting a VSV difference of 6.5 cm(3) with 95% confidence, suggesting that this approach might be used for monitoring IVH patients' ventricular changes using 3-D US imaging. The mean segmentation times of the graphics processing unit (GPU)- and central processing unit-implemented algorithms were 50 ± 2 and 205 ± 5 s for one 3-D US image, respectively, in addition to 120 ± 10 s for initialization, less than the approximately 35 min required by manual segmentation. In addition, repeatability experiments indicated that the intra-observer variability ranges from 6.5% to 7.5%, and the inter-observer variability is 8.5% in terms

  5. Facility Interface Capability Assessment (FICA) user manual

    SciTech Connect

    Pope, R.B.; MacDonald, R.R.; Massaglia, J.L.; Williamson, D.A.; Viebrock, J.M.; Mote, N.

    1995-09-01

    The US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) is responsible for developing the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS) to accept spent nuclear fuel from commercial facilities. The objective of the Facility Interface Capability Assessment (FICA) project was to assess the capability of each commercial spent nuclear fuel (SNF) storage facility, at which SNF is stored, to handle various SNF shipping casks. The purpose of this report is describe the FICA computer software and to provide the FICA user with a guide on how to use the FICA system. The FICA computer software consists of two executable programs: the FICA Reactor Report program and the FICA Summary Report program (written in the Ca-Clipper version 5.2 development system). The complete FICA software system is contained on either a 3.5 in. (double density) or a 5.25 in. (high density) diskette and consists of the two FICA programs and all the database files (generated using dBASE III). The FICA programs are provided as ``stand alone`` systems and neither the Ca-Clipper compiler nor dBASE III is required to run the FICA programs. The steps for installing the FICA software system and executing the FICA programs are described in this report. Instructions are given on how to install the FICA software system onto the hard drive of the PC and how to execute the FICA programs from the FICA subdirectory on the hard drive. Both FICA programs are menu driven with the up-arrow and down-arrow keys used to move the cursor to the desired selection.

  6. CDROM User Interface Evaluation: The Appropriateness of GUIs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bosch, Victoria Manglano; Hancock-Beaulieu, Micheline

    1995-01-01

    Assesses the appropriateness of GUIs (graphical user interfaces), more specifically Windows-based interfaces for CD-ROM. An evaluation model is described that was developed to carry out an expert evaluation of the interfaces of seven CD-ROM products. Results are discussed in light of HCI (human-computer interaction) usability criteria and design…

  7. Mark-It : a marking user interface for cutting decomposition time.

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Nicholas C.; Garcia, Ricardo M.; Shepherd, Jason Farrell; Forsberg, Andrew S.; Merkley, Karl

    2004-05-01

    We present Mark-It, a marking user interface that reduced the time to decompose a set of CAD models exhibiting a range of decomposition problems by as much as fifty percent. Instead of performing about 50 mesh decomposition operations using a conventional UI, Mark-It allows users to perform the same operations by drawing 2D marks in the context of the 3D model. The motivation for this study was to test the potential of a marking user interface for the decomposition aspect of the meshing process. To evaluate Mark-It, we designed a user study that consisted of a brief tutorial of both the non-marking and marking UIs, performing the steps to decompose four models contributed to us by experienced meshers at Sandia National Laboratories, and a post-study debriefing to rate the speed, preference, and overall learnability of the two interfaces. Our primary contributions are a practical user interface design for speeding-up mesh decomposition and an evaluation that helps characterize the pros and cons of the new user interface.

  8. Computer-Based Tools for Evaluating Graphical User Interfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Loretta A.

    1997-01-01

    The user interface is the component of a software system that connects two very complex system: humans and computers. Each of these two systems impose certain requirements on the final product. The user is the judge of the usability and utility of the system; the computer software and hardware are the tools with which the interface is constructed. Mistakes are sometimes made in designing and developing user interfaces because the designers and developers have limited knowledge about human performance (e.g., problem solving, decision making, planning, and reasoning). Even those trained in user interface design make mistakes because they are unable to address all of the known requirements and constraints on design. Evaluation of the user inter-face is therefore a critical phase of the user interface development process. Evaluation should not be considered the final phase of design; but it should be part of an iterative design cycle with the output of evaluation being feed back into design. The goal of this research was to develop a set of computer-based tools for objectively evaluating graphical user interfaces. The research was organized into three phases. The first phase resulted in the development of an embedded evaluation tool which evaluates the usability of a graphical user interface based on a user's performance. An expert system to assist in the design and evaluation of user interfaces based upon rules and guidelines was developed during the second phase. During the final phase of the research an automatic layout tool to be used in the initial design of graphical inter- faces was developed. The research was coordinated with NASA Marshall Space Flight Center's Mission Operations Laboratory's efforts in developing onboard payload display specifications for the Space Station.

  9. Some computer graphical user interfaces in radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Chow, James C L

    2016-03-28

    In this review, five graphical user interfaces (GUIs) used in radiation therapy practices and researches are introduced. They are: (1) the treatment time calculator, superficial X-ray treatment time calculator (SUPCALC) used in the superficial X-ray radiation therapy; (2) the monitor unit calculator, electron monitor unit calculator (EMUC) used in the electron radiation therapy; (3) the multileaf collimator machine file creator, sliding window intensity modulated radiotherapy (SWIMRT) used in generating fluence map for research and quality assurance in intensity modulated radiation therapy; (4) the treatment planning system, DOSCTP used in the calculation of 3D dose distribution using Monte Carlo simulation; and (5) the monitor unit calculator, photon beam monitor unit calculator (PMUC) used in photon beam radiation therapy. One common issue of these GUIs is that all user-friendly interfaces are linked to complex formulas and algorithms based on various theories, which do not have to be understood and noted by the user. In that case, user only needs to input the required information with help from graphical elements in order to produce desired results. SUPCALC is a superficial radiation treatment time calculator using the GUI technique to provide a convenient way for radiation therapist to calculate the treatment time, and keep a record for the skin cancer patient. EMUC is an electron monitor unit calculator for electron radiation therapy. Instead of doing hand calculation according to pre-determined dosimetric tables, clinical user needs only to input the required drawing of electron field in computer graphical file format, prescription dose, and beam parameters to EMUC to calculate the required monitor unit for the electron beam treatment. EMUC is based on a semi-experimental theory of sector-integration algorithm. SWIMRT is a multileaf collimator machine file creator to generate a fluence map produced by a medical linear accelerator. This machine file controls

  10. Some computer graphical user interfaces in radiation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Chow, James C L

    2016-01-01

    In this review, five graphical user interfaces (GUIs) used in radiation therapy practices and researches are introduced. They are: (1) the treatment time calculator, superficial X-ray treatment time calculator (SUPCALC) used in the superficial X-ray radiation therapy; (2) the monitor unit calculator, electron monitor unit calculator (EMUC) used in the electron radiation therapy; (3) the multileaf collimator machine file creator, sliding window intensity modulated radiotherapy (SWIMRT) used in generating fluence map for research and quality assurance in intensity modulated radiation therapy; (4) the treatment planning system, DOSCTP used in the calculation of 3D dose distribution using Monte Carlo simulation; and (5) the monitor unit calculator, photon beam monitor unit calculator (PMUC) used in photon beam radiation therapy. One common issue of these GUIs is that all user-friendly interfaces are linked to complex formulas and algorithms based on various theories, which do not have to be understood and noted by the user. In that case, user only needs to input the required information with help from graphical elements in order to produce desired results. SUPCALC is a superficial radiation treatment time calculator using the GUI technique to provide a convenient way for radiation therapist to calculate the treatment time, and keep a record for the skin cancer patient. EMUC is an electron monitor unit calculator for electron radiation therapy. Instead of doing hand calculation according to pre-determined dosimetric tables, clinical user needs only to input the required drawing of electron field in computer graphical file format, prescription dose, and beam parameters to EMUC to calculate the required monitor unit for the electron beam treatment. EMUC is based on a semi-experimental theory of sector-integration algorithm. SWIMRT is a multileaf collimator machine file creator to generate a fluence map produced by a medical linear accelerator. This machine file controls

  11. Climate Users Interface Platform: some preliminary ideas from EUPORIAS experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buontempo, Carlo; Dell'Aquila, Alessandro

    2016-04-01

    One of the most important and yet least developed component of the GFCS is probably the Climate Users Interface Platform (CUIP). At front of its centrality in the framework, the development of this component has suffered from the existence of a series of pre-conceived ideas of what a users interface should look like. The FP7 project EUPORIAS promised in its description of work to develop and deliver an online users interface platform. This paper summarises the process EUPORIAS has been through to define and deliver the CUIP. The paper also highlighted what are the characteristics that a CUIP must have to ensure its ability to engage the users. Finally the paper identifies a number of errors that are often committed when thinking about user interface and try to identifies a set of key principles that should be considered when developing the CUIP.

  12. Fast and Efficient Radiological Interventions via a Graphical User Interface Commanded Magnetic Resonance Compatible Robotic Device

    PubMed Central

    Özcan, Alpay; Christoforou, Eftychios; Brown, Daniel; Tsekos, Nikolaos

    2011-01-01

    The graphical user interface for an MR compatible robotic device has the capability of displaying oblique MR slices in 2D and a 3D virtual environment along with the representation of the robotic arm in order to swiftly complete the intervention. Using the advantages of the MR modality the device saves time and effort, is safer for the medical staff and is more comfortable for the patient. PMID:17946067

  13. Eucalyptus: Integrating Natural Language Input with a Graphical User Interface

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-02-25

    these is discourse processing. the human ability to track and maintain continuity of topic, reference, and reasoning in extended sequences of natural...interface medium of choice. The success of the graphical user interface (GUI) in the intervening years now suggests that each of these interface media has...implicit understanding of the principles of effective communication, a human-computer interface having these capabilities falls into a category that in

  14. Accessing the influence of repositioning on the pelvis' 3-D orientation in wheelchair users.

    PubMed

    Lalonde, Nadine Michele; Dansereau, Jean; Pauget, Pierre; Cinquin, Philippe; Aissaoui, Rachid

    2006-03-01

    This study aimed at evaluating the effects of mechanical repositioning, obtained by the increase in seat-to-back (STB) and system tilt angles, on the position of the pelvis with spinal-cord injured subjects seated in a wheelchair. The noninvasive method used combined magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) images of the whole pelvis obtained in a supine posture and ultrasound images of the pelvic iliac crests obtained in four seating positions. The matching of the two image data sets enabled the location of fourteen pelvic landmarks in the seated positions. From these landmarks, the pelvic tilt, obliquity, and transverse rotation, and the three-dimensional (3-D) motion of the pelvis were calculated. Results showed that the increase in STB angle is not equal to the calculated increase in pelvic tilt and that the pelvis rotated posteriorly, moved forward and downwards. An increase in the system tilt moved the pelvis rearwards and downwards, which counter-balanced the movement seen with the increase in STB. At the return to the first position, no significant changes were observed in the pelvis' position and orientation compared to the initial posture. Results also demonstrated the importance in calculating the total 3-D rotations and translations to characterize adequately the pelvic movement.

  15. NIKE3D a nonlinear, implicit, three-dimensional finite element code for solid and structural mechanics user's manual update summary

    SciTech Connect

    Puso, M; Maker, B N; Ferencz, R M; Hallquist, J O

    2000-03-24

    This report provides the NIKE3D user's manual update summary for changes made from version 3.0.0 April 24, 1995 to version 3.3.6 March 24,2000. The updates are excerpted directly from the code printed output file (hence the Courier font and formatting), are presented in chronological order and delineated by NIKE3D version number. NIKE3D is a fully implicit three-dimensional finite element code for analyzing the finite strain static and dynamic response of inelastic solids, shells, and beams. Spatial discretization is achieved by the use of 8-node solid elements, 2-node truss and beam elements, and 4-node membrane and shell elements. Thirty constitutive models are available for representing a wide range of elastic, plastic, viscous, and thermally dependent material behavior. Contact-impact algorithms permit gaps, frictional sliding, and mesh discontinuities along material interfaces. Several nonlinear solution strategies are available, including Full-, Modified-, and Quasi-Newton methods. The resulting system of simultaneous linear equations is either solved iteratively by an element-by-element method, or directly by a direct factorization method.

  16. A 2-D Interface Element for Coupled Analysis of Independently Modeled 3-D Finite Element Subdomains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kandil, Osama A.

    1998-01-01

    Over the past few years, the development of the interface technology has provided an analysis framework for embedding detailed finite element models within finite element models which are less refined. This development has enabled the use of cascading substructure domains without the constraint of coincident nodes along substructure boundaries. The approach used for the interface element is based on an alternate variational principle often used in deriving hybrid finite elements. The resulting system of equations exhibits a high degree of sparsity but gives rise to a non-positive definite system which causes difficulties with many of the equation solvers in general-purpose finite element codes. Hence the global system of equations is generally solved using, a decomposition procedure with pivoting. The research reported to-date for the interface element includes the one-dimensional line interface element and two-dimensional surface interface element. Several large-scale simulations, including geometrically nonlinear problems, have been reported using the one-dimensional interface element technology; however, only limited applications are available for the surface interface element. In the applications reported to-date, the geometry of the interfaced domains exactly match each other even though the spatial discretization within each domain may be different. As such, the spatial modeling of each domain, the interface elements and the assembled system is still laborious. The present research is focused on developing a rapid modeling procedure based on a parametric interface representation of independently defined subdomains which are also independently discretized.

  17. Interface traction stress of 3D dislocation loop in anisotropic bimaterial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Wenwang; Lv, Cunjing; Zhang, JinHuan

    2016-02-01

    By applying discrete Fast Fourier Transformation (FFT), semi-analytical solutions are developed to calculate the interface elastic fields of anisotropic bimaterial systems with perfect bonding, dislocation-like, force-like and linear spring-like interface models. Interface elastic fields are the linear superimposition of bulk stress, free surface relaxation image stress and interface traction stress (ITS) fields. Interface image energy of perfect bonding bimaterials can be solved through area integral over the interface plane, including the contribution of several componential stress fields. Calculation examples on dislocation loops within Cu-Nb bimaterial are performed to demonstrate the efficiency of such approaches. Effects of Ku = [kiju] for the dislocation-like, Kt = [kijt] for the force-like and Ks = diag [KT , KN ] for the linear spring-like imperfect interface models are investigated. Differences between perfect bonding and imperfect interface models, isotropic and anisotropic models are also studied. It is found that interface conditions and anisotropy have drastic effects on the interface elastic fields.

  18. Formalisms for user interface specification and design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Auernheimer, Brent J.

    1989-01-01

    The application of formal methods to the specification and design of human-computer interfaces is described. A broad outline of human-computer interface problems, a description of the field of cognitive engineering and two relevant research results, the appropriateness of formal specification techniques, and potential NASA application areas are described.

  19. User's guide to the NOZL3D and NOZLIC computer programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, P. D.

    1980-01-01

    Complete FORTRAN listings and running instructions are given for a set of computer programs that perform an implicit numerical solution to the unsteady Navier-Stokes equations to predict the flow characteristics and performance of nonaxisymmetric nozzles. The set includes the NOZL3D program, which performs the flow computations; the NOZLIC program, which sets up the flow field initial conditions for general nozzle configurations, and also generates the computational grid for simple two dimensional and axisymmetric configurations; and the RGRIDD program, which generates the computational grid for complicated three dimensional configurations. The programs are designed specifically for the NASA-Langley CYBER 175 computer, and employ auxiliary disk files for primary data storage. Input instructions and computed results are given for four test cases that include two dimensional, three dimensional, and axisymmetric configurations.

  20. Users manual for CAFE-3D : a computational fluid dynamics fire code.

    SciTech Connect

    Khalil, Imane; Lopez, Carlos; Suo-Anttila, Ahti Jorma

    2005-03-01

    The Container Analysis Fire Environment (CAFE) computer code has been developed to model all relevant fire physics for predicting the thermal response of massive objects engulfed in large fires. It provides realistic fire thermal boundary conditions for use in design of radioactive material packages and in risk-based transportation studies. The CAFE code can be coupled to commercial finite-element codes such as MSC PATRAN/THERMAL and ANSYS. This coupled system of codes can be used to determine the internal thermal response of finite element models of packages to a range of fire environments. This document is a user manual describing how to use the three-dimensional version of CAFE, as well as a description of CAFE input and output parameters. Since this is a user manual, only a brief theoretical description of the equations and physical models is included.

  1. Mobile 3D television: development of core technological elements and user-centered evaluation methods toward an optimized system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gotchev, Atanas; Smolic, Aljoscha; Jumisko-Pyykkö, Satu; Strohmeier, Dominik; Bozdagi Akar, Gozde; Merkle, Philipp; Daskalov, Nikolai

    2009-02-01

    A European consortium of six partners has been developing core technological components of a mobile 3D television system over DVB-H channel. In this overview paper, we present our current results on developing optimal methods for stereo-video content creation, coding and transmission and emphasize their significance for the power-constrained mobile platform, equipped with auto-stereoscopic display. We address the user requirements by applying modern usercentered approaches taking into account different user groups and usage contexts in contrast to the laboratory assessment methods which, though standardized, offer limited applicability to real applications. To this end, we have been aiming at developing a methodological framework for the whole system development process. One of our goals has been to further develop the user-centered approach towards experienced quality of critical system components. In this paper, we classify different research methods and technological solutions analyzing their pros and constraints. Based on this analysis we present the user-centered methodological framework being used throughout the whole development process of the system and aimed at achieving the best performance and quality appealing to the end user.

  2. Conservative multizonal interface algorithm for the 3-D Navier-Stokes equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klopfer, G. H.; Molvik, G. A.

    1991-01-01

    A conservative zonal interface algorithm using features of both structured and unstructured mesh CFD technology is presented. The flow solver within each of the zones is based on structured mesh CFD technology. The interface algorithm was implemented into two three-dimensional Navier-Stokes finite volume codes and was found to yield good results.

  3. Interactive Sketching for the Early Stages of User Interface Design

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-07-22

    implied, of the U.S. Government. 94-31624f ll~ I//ll/ll /i/ //i Iii/ l, KEYWORDS User interfaces, design, sketching, gesture recognition , interaction...that are embodied in the sketch. Recognizing Widget Components The recognition engine uses Rubine’s gesture recognition algorithm [25] to identify the...User Interface Toolkit to Support Gesture Recognition . In Adjunct Proceedings of INTERCHI 󈨡: Human Factors in Computing Systems, Amsterdam, The

  4. The Instrumentation of the Multimodel and Multilingual User Interface

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-03-01

    MULTILINGUAL USER INTERFACE by Paul Alan Bourgeois March 1993 Thesis Advisor: David K. Hsiao Approved for public release; distribution is unlimitei. 93-125519 3...Classification) THE INSTRUMENTATION OF THE MULTIMODEL AND MULTILINGUAL USER INTERFACE (U) 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) Bourgeois, Paul A. 13a. TYPE OF REPORT 13b. TIME... monolingual database systems represents a homogeneous database system, since only one data model-language can be supported on a single database system. The

  5. Three-dimensional user interfaces for scientific visualization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanDam, Andries (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    The focus of this grant was to experiment with novel user interfaces for scientific visualization applications using both desktop and virtual reality (VR) systems, and thus to advance the state of the art of user interface technology for this domain. This technology has been transferred to NASA via periodic status reports and papers relating to this grant that have been published in conference proceedings. This final report summarizes the research completed over the past three years, and subsumes all prior reports.

  6. The intelligent user interface for NASA's advanced information management systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, William J.; Short, Nicholas, Jr.; Rolofs, Larry H.; Wattawa, Scott L.

    1987-01-01

    NASA has initiated the Intelligent Data Management Project to design and develop advanced information management systems. The project's primary goal is to formulate, design and develop advanced information systems that are capable of supporting the agency's future space research and operational information management needs. The first effort of the project was the development of a prototype Intelligent User Interface to an operational scientific database, using expert systems and natural language processing technologies. An overview of Intelligent User Interface formulation and development is given.

  7. A resource from 3D electron microscopy of hippocampal neuropil for user training and tool development

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Kristen M.; Spacek, Josef; Bell, Maria Elizabeth; Parker, Patrick H.; Lindsey, Laurence F.; Baden, Alexander D.; Vogelstein, Joshua T.; Burns, Randal

    2015-01-01

    Resurgent interest in synaptic circuitry and plasticity has emphasized the importance of 3D reconstruction from serial section electron microscopy (3DEM). Three volumes of hippocampal CA1 neuropil from adult rat were imaged at X-Y resolution of ~2 nm on serial sections of ~50–60 nm thickness. These are the first densely reconstructed hippocampal volumes. All axons, dendrites, glia, and synapses were reconstructed in a cube (~10 μm3) surrounding a large dendritic spine, a cylinder (~43 μm3) surrounding an oblique dendritic segment (3.4 μm long), and a parallelepiped (~178 μm3) surrounding an apical dendritic segment (4.9 μm long). The data provide standards for identifying ultrastructural objects in 3DEM, realistic reconstructions for modeling biophysical properties of synaptic transmission, and a test bed for enhancing reconstruction tools. Representative synapses are quantified from varying section planes, and microtubules, polyribosomes, smooth endoplasmic reticulum, and endosomes are identified and reconstructed in a subset of dendrites. The original images, traces, and Reconstruct software and files are freely available and visualized at the Open Connectome Project (Data Citation 1). PMID:26347348

  8. Role of interfaces on the trapping of He in 2D and 3D Cu-Nb nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lach, Timothy G.; Ekiz, Elvan H.; Averback, Robert S.; Mara, Nathan A.; Bellon, Pascal

    2015-11-01

    The role of interface structure on the trapping of He in Cu-Nb nanocomposites was investigated by comparing He bubble formation in nano-multilayers grown by PVD, nanolaminates fabricated by accumulative roll bonding (ARB), and 3D nanocomposites obtained by high pressure torsion (HPT). All samples were implanted with 1 MeV He ions at room temperature and characterized by cross section transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The critical He concentration leading to bubble formation was determined by correlating the He bubble depth distribution detected by TEM with the implanted He depth profile obtained by SRIM. The critical He dose per unit interfacial area for bubble formation was largest for the PVD multilayers, lower by a factor of ∼1.4 in the HPT nanocomposites annealed at 500 °C, and lower by a factor of ∼4.6 in the ARB nanolaminates relative to the PVD multilayers. The results indicate that the (111)FCC||(110)BCC Kurdjumov-Sachs (KS) interfaces predominant in PVD and annealed HPT samples provide more effective traps than the (112)KS interfaces predominant in ARB nanolaminates; however, the good trapping efficiency and high interface area of 3D HPT structures make them most attractive for applications.

  9. Cognitive User Profile and Its Involvement into Adaptive Interface.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halima, Habieb Mammar

    An adaptation technique of multimodal interfaces based on a cognitive modeling of users is presented in this paper. The adaptation process tries to select a combination of modalities that best fits the cognitive profile of each user. This profile contains indicators of cognitive abilities and styles. This paper focuses on output modalities and…

  10. Advanced Displays and Natural User Interfaces to Support Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin-SanJose, Juan-Fernando; Juan, M. -Carmen; Mollá, Ramón; Vivó, Roberto

    2017-01-01

    Advanced displays and natural user interfaces (NUI) are a very suitable combination for developing systems to provide an enhanced and richer user experience. This combination can be appropriate in several fields and has not been extensively exploited. One of the fields that this combination is especially suitable for is education. Nowadays,…

  11. A User-Centred Design and Evaluation of IR Interfaces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahmed, S. M. Zabed; McKnight, Cliff; Oppenheim, Charles

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a user-centred design and evaluation methodology for ensuring the usability of IR interfaces. The methodology is based on sequentially performing: a competitive analysis, user task analysis, heuristic evaluation, formative evaluation and a summative comparative evaluation. These techniques are described, and their application…

  12. User Interface to an ICAI System That Teaches Discrete Math

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-06-01

    info reset title COMPLETED: 4/12/90 PERSONS: Keith Calcote & Rick Howard PURPOSE: Provides a the user with a leraning tool that drills the...Provides a the user with a leraning tool that drills the relationship between logic expressions and venn diagrams 274 /* header files */ #include...ADDING GRAPHICS TO LESSONS ........................................................ 13 H. ADDING LESSONS, EXAMS AND TOOLS TO THE INTERFACE

  13. Inspiring Equal Contribution and Opportunity in a 3D Multi-User Virtual Environment: Bringing Together Men Gamers and Women Non-Gamers in Second Life[R

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    deNoyelles, Aimee; Seo, Kay Kyeong-Ju

    2012-01-01

    A 3D multi-user virtual environment holds promise to support and enhance student online learning communities due to its ability to promote global synchronous interaction and collaboration, rich multisensory experience and expression, and elaborate design capabilities. Second Life[R], a multi-user virtual environment intended for adult users 18 and…

  14. Customization of user interfaces to reduce errors and enhance user acceptance.

    PubMed

    Burkolter, Dina; Weyers, Benjamin; Kluge, Annette; Luther, Wolfram

    2014-03-01

    Customization is assumed to reduce error and increase user acceptance in the human-machine relation. Reconfiguration gives the operator the option to customize a user interface according to his or her own preferences. An experimental study with 72 computer science students using a simulated process control task was conducted. The reconfiguration group (RG) interactively reconfigured their user interfaces and used the reconfigured user interface in the subsequent test whereas the control group (CG) used a default user interface. Results showed significantly lower error rates and higher acceptance of the RG compared to the CG while there were no significant differences between the groups regarding situation awareness and mental workload. Reconfiguration seems to be promising and therefore warrants further exploration.

  15. Software architecture as a freedom for 3D content providers and users along with independency on purposes and used devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sultana, Razia; Christ, Andreas; Meyrueis, Patrick

    2014-05-01

    The improvements in the hardware and software of communication devices have allowed running Virtual Reality (VR) and Augmented Reality (AR) applications on those. Nowadays, it is possible to overlay synthetic information on real images, or even to play 3D on-line games on smart phones or some other mobile devices. Hence the use of 3D data for business and specially for education purposes is ubiquitous. Due to always available at hand and always ready to use properties of mobile phones, those are considered as most potential communication devices. The total numbers of mobile phone users are increasing all over the world every day and that makes mobile phones the most suitable device to reach a huge number of end clients either for education or for business purposes. There are different standards, protocols and specifications to establish the communication among different communication devices but there is no initiative taken so far to make it sure that the send data through this communication process will be understood and used by the destination device. Since all the devices are not able to deal with all kind of 3D data formats and it is also not realistic to have different version of the same data to make it compatible with the destination device, it is necessary to have a prevalent solution. The proposed architecture in this paper describes a device and purpose independent 3D data visibility any time anywhere to the right person in suitable format. There is no solution without limitation. The architecture is implemented in a prototype to make an experimental validation of the architecture which also shows the difference between theory and practice.

  16. User's Manual for DuctE3D: A Program for 3D Euler Unsteady Aerodynamic and Aeroelastic Analysis of Ducted Fans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, R.; Reddy, T. S. R.

    1997-01-01

    The program DuctE3D is used for steady or unsteady aerodynamic and aeroelastic analysis of ducted fans. This guide describes the input data required and the output files generated, in using DuctE3D. The analysis solves three dimensional unsteady, compressible Euler equations to obtain the aerodynamic forces. A normal mode structural analysis is used to obtain the aeroelastic equations, which are solved using either the time domain or the frequency domain solution method. Sample input and output files are included in this guide for steady aerodynamic analysis and aeroelastic analysis of an isolated fan row.

  17. The effect of interface microstructure on interfacial shear strength for osteochondral scaffolds based on biomimetic design and 3D printing.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weijie; Lian, Qin; Li, Dichen; Wang, Kunzheng; Hao, Dingjun; Bian, Weiguo; Jin, Zhongmin

    2015-01-01

    Interface integration between chondral phase and osseous phase is crucial in engineered osteochondral scaffolds. However, the integration was poorly understood and commonly failed to meet the need of osteochondral scaffolds. In this paper, a biphasic polyethylene glycol (PEG)/β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) scaffold with enhanced interfacial integration was developed. The chondral phase was a PEG hydrogel. The osseous phase was a β-TCP ceramic scaffold. The PEG hydrogel was directly cured on the ceramic interface layer by layer to fabricate osteochondral scaffolds by 3D printing technology. Meanwhile, a series of interface structure were designed with different interface pore area percentages (0/10/20/30/40/50/60%), and interfacial shear test was applied for interface structure optimization (n=6 samples/group). The interfacial shear strength of 30% pore area group was nearly three folds improved compared with that of 0% pore area percentage group, and more than fifty folds improved compared with that of traditional integration (5.91±0.59 kPa). In conclusion, the biomimetic PEG/β-TCP scaffolds with interface structure enhanced integration show promising potential application for osteochondral tissue engineering.

  18. User Interface Framework for the National Ignition Facility (NIF)

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, J M; Bowers, G A; Carey, R W; Daveler, S A; Herndon Ford, K B; Ho, J C; Lagin, L J; Lambert, C J; Mauvais, J; Stout, E A; West, S L

    2007-10-01

    A user interface (UI) framework supports the development of user interfaces to operate the National Ignition Facility (NIF) using the Integrated Computer Control System (ICCS). [1] This framework simplifies UI development and ensures consistency for NIF operators. A comprehensive, layered collection of UIs in ICCS provides interaction with system-level processes, shot automation, and subsystem-specific devices. All user interfaces are written in Java, employing CORBA to interact with other ICCS components. ICCS developers use these frameworks to compose two major types of user interfaces: broadviews and control panels. Broadviews provide a visual representation of the NIF beamlines through interactive schematic drawings. Control panels provide status and control at a device level. The UI framework includes a suite of display components to standardize user interaction through data entry behaviors, common connection and threading mechanisms, and a common appearance. With these components, ICCS developers can more efficiently address usability issues in the facility when needed. The ICCS UI framework helps developers create consistent and easy-to-understand user interfaces for NIF operators.

  19. Designing a Facebook interface for senior users.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Gonçalo; Duarte, Carlos; Coelho, José; Matos, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    The adoption of social networks by older adults has increased in recent years. However, many still cannot make use of social networks as these are simply not adapted to them. Through a series of direct observations, interviews, and focus groups, we identified recommendations for the design of social networks targeting seniors. Based on these, we developed a prototype for tablet devices, supporting sharing and viewing Facebook content. We then conducted a user study comparing our prototype with Facebook's native mobile application. We have found that Facebook's native application does not meet senior users concerns, like privacy and family focus, while our prototype, designed in accordance with the collected recommendations, supported relevant use cases in a usable and accessible manner.

  20. Interfacing 2D and 3D Topological Insulators: Bi(111) Bilayer on Bi2Te3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirahara, Toru; Bihlmayer, Gustav; Sakamoto, Yusuke; Yamada, Manabu; Miyazaki, Hidetoshi; Kimura, Shin-Ichi; Blügel, Stefan; Hasegawa, Shuji

    2012-02-01

    Topological insulators (TI) are insulating materials but have metallic edge states that carry spin currents and are robust against nonmagnetic impurities [1]. While there have been a large number of reports on three-dimensional (3D) TI, only few works have been done in terms of two-dimensional (2D) TI. In the present paper, we report the successful formation of bilayer Bi, which was theoretically predicted to be a 2D TI [2]. We deposited bilayer Bi on a 3D TI Bi2Te3, which the lattice mismatch is very small. From angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy measurements and ab initio calculations, the electronic structure of the system can be understood as an overlap of the band dispersions of bilayer Bi and Bi2Te3. Our results show that the Dirac cone is actually robust against nonmagnetic perturbations and imply a unique situation where the topologically protected one- and two-dimensional edge states are coexisting at the surface [3]. [0pt] [1] M. Z. Hasan and C. L. Kane, Rev. Mod. Phys. 82, 3045 (2010).[0pt] [2] S. Murakami, Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 236805 (2006).[0pt] [3] T. Hirahara et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 166801 (2011).

  1. Brownian nanoimaging of interface dynamics and ligand-receptor binding at cell surfaces in 3-D.

    PubMed

    Kuznetsov, Igor R; Evans, Evan A

    2013-04-01

    We describe a method for nanoimaging interfacial dynamics and ligand-receptor binding at surfaces of live cells in 3-D. The imaging probe is a 1-μm diameter glass bead confined by a soft laser trap to create a "cloud" of fluctuating states. Using a facile on-line method of video image analysis, the probe displacements are reported at ~10 ms intervals with bare precisions (±SD) of 4-6 nm along the optical axis (elevation) and 2 nm in the transverse directions. We demonstrate how the Brownian distributions are analyzed to characterize the free energy potential of each small probe in 3-D taking into account the blur effect of its motions during CCD image capture. Then, using the approach to image interactions of a labeled probe with lamellae of leukocytic cells spreading on cover-glass substrates, we show that deformations of the soft distribution in probe elevations provide both a sensitive long-range sensor for defining the steric topography of a cell lamella and a fast telemetry for reporting rare events of probe binding with its surface receptors. Invoking established principles of Brownian physics and statistical thermodynamics, we describe an off-line method of super resolution that improves precision of probe separations from a non-reactive steric boundary to ~1 nm.

  2. An Air-Liquid Interface Culture System for 3D Organoid Culture of Diverse Primary Gastrointestinal Tissues.

    PubMed

    Li, Xingnan; Ootani, Akifumi; Kuo, Calvin

    2016-01-01

    Conventional in vitro analysis of gastrointestinal epithelium usually relies on two-dimensional (2D) culture of epithelial cell lines as monolayer on impermeable surfaces. However, the lack of context of differentiation and tissue architecture in 2D culture can hinder the faithful recapitulation of the phenotypic and morphological characteristics of native epithelium. Here, we describe a robust long-term three-dimensional (3D) culture methodology for gastrointestinal culture, which incorporates both epithelial and mesenchymal/stromal components into a collagen-based air-liquid interface 3D culture system. This system allows vigorously expansion of primary gastrointestinal epithelium for over 60 days as organoids with both proliferation and multilineage differentiation, indicating successful long-term intestinal culture within a microenvironment accurately recapitulating the stem cell niche.

  3. High-Density 3D-Boron Nitride and 3D-Graphene for High-Performance Nano-Thermal Interface Material.

    PubMed

    Loeblein, Manuela; Tsang, Siu Hon; Pawlik, Matthieu; Phua, Eric Jian Rong; Yong, Han; Zhang, Xiao Wu; Gan, Chee Lip; Teo, Edwin Hang Tong

    2017-02-28

    Compression studies on three-dimensional foam-like graphene and h-BN (3D-C and 3D-BN) revealed their high cross-plane thermal conductivity (62-86 W m(-1) K(-1)) and excellent surface conformity, characteristics essential for thermal management needs. Comparative studies to state-of-the-art materials and other materials currently under research for heat dissipation revealed 3D-foam's improved performance (20-30% improved cooling, temperature decrease by ΔT of 44-24 °C).

  4. Human Computer Interface Design Criteria. Volume 1. User Interface Requirements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-19

    Software that makes use of commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) tools or integrates COTS products shall be configured to comply with these requirements as...Pointer Name and Function Selection Pointers Arrow pointer (selects objects). I-beam pointer (selects text). Sighting pointer ( makes ...guidelines apply to error feedback:  If users make multiple errors within a single action, they should be notified of each occurrence of an error

  5. Microwave Induced Welding of Carbon Nanotube-Thermoplastic Interfaces for Enhanced Mechanical Strength of 3D Printed Parts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sweeney, Charles; Lackey, Blake; Saed, Mohammad; Green, Micah

    Three-dimensional (3D) printed parts produced by fused-filament fabrication of a thermoplastic polymer have become increasingly popular at both the commercial and consumer level. The mechanical integrity of these rapid-prototyped parts however, is severely limited by the interfillament bond strength between adjacent extruded layers. In this report we propose for the first time a method for welding thermoplastic interfaces of 3D printed parts using the extreme heating response of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) to microwave energy. To achieve this, we developed a coaxial printer filament with a pure polylactide (PLA) core and a CNT composite sheath. This produces parts with a thin electrically percolating network of CNTs at the interfaces between adjacent extruded layers. These interfaces are then welded together upon microwave irradiation at 2.45GHz. Our patent-pending method has been shown to increase the tensile toughness by 1000% and tensile strength by 35%. We investigated the dielectric properties of the PLA/CNT composites at microwave frequencies and performed in-situ microwave thermometry using a forward-looking infrared (FLIR) camera to characterize the heating response of the PLA/CNT composites upon microwave irradiation.

  6. Hypertext-based design of a user interface for scheduling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woerner, Irene W.; Biefeld, Eric

    1993-01-01

    Operations Mission Planner (OMP) is an ongoing research project at JPL that utilizes AI techniques to create an intelligent, automated planning and scheduling system. The information space reflects the complexity and diversity of tasks necessary in most real-world scheduling problems. Thus the problem of the user interface is to present as much information as possible at a given moment and allow the user to quickly navigate through the various types of displays. This paper describes a design which applies the hypertext model to solve these user interface problems. The general paradigm is to provide maps and search queries to allow the user to quickly find an interesting conflict or problem, and then allow the user to navigate through the displays in a hypertext fashion.

  7. Designing a Binding Interface for Control of Cancer Cell Adhesion via 3D Topography and Metabolic Oligosaccharide Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Du, Jian; Che, Pao-Lin; Wang, Zhi-Yun; Aich, Udayanath; Yarema, Kevin J.

    2011-01-01

    This study combines metabolic oligosaccharide engineering (MOE), a technology where the glycocalyx of living cells is endowed with chemical features not normally found in sugars, with custom-designed three dimensional biomaterial substrates to enhance the adhesion of cancer cells and control their morphology and gene expression. Specifically, Ac5ManNTGc, a thiol-bearing analogue of N-acetyl-d-mannosamine (ManNAc) was used to introduce thiolated sialic acids into the glycocalyx of human Jurkat T-lymphoma derived cells. In parallel 2D films and 3D electrospun nanofibrous scaffolds were prepared from polyethersulfone (PES) and (as controls) left unmodified or aminated. Alternately, the materials were malemided or gold-coated to provide bioorthogonal binding partners for the thiol groups newly expressed on the cell surface. Cell attachment was modulated by both the topography of the substrate surface and by the chemical compatibility of the binding interface between the cell and the substrate; a substantial increase in binding for normally non-adhesive Jurkat line for 3D scaffold compared to 2D surfaces with an added degree of adhesion resulting from chemoselective binding to malemidede-derivatived or gold-coated surfaces. In addition, the morphology of the cells attached to the 3D scaffolds via MOE-mediated adhesion was dramatically altered and the expression of genes involved in cell adhesion changed in a time-dependent manner. This study showed that cell adhesion could be enhanced, gene expression modulated, and cell fate controlled by introducing the 3D topograhical cues into the growth substrate and by creating a glycoengineered binding interface where the chemistry of both the cell surface and biomaterials scaffold was controlled to facilitate a new mode of carbohydrate-mediated adhesion. PMID:21549424

  8. TODS BioCast User Manual, Forecasting 3D Satellite Derived Optical Properties Using Eulerian Advection Procedure, Version 1.0

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-17

    BioCast User Manual Forecasting 3D Satellite Derived Optical Properties Using Eulerian Advection Procedure Version 1.0 Sean Mccarthy Sherwin Ladner JaSon...18. NUMBER OF PAGES 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT TODS BioCast User Manual Forecasting 3D Satellite Derived Optical Properties Using Eulerian Advection...defined by the AOPS input file. BioCast is designed to apply a simple advection approach to satellite derived products in order to forecast the

  9. Business Performer-Centered Design of User Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sousa, Kênia; Vanderdonckt, Jean

    Business Performer-Centered Design of User Interfaces is a new design methodology that adopts business process (BP) definition and a business performer perspective for managing the life cycle of user interfaces of enterprise systems. In this methodology, when the organization has a business process culture, the business processes of an organization are firstly defined according to a traditional methodology for this kind of artifact. These business processes are then transformed into a series of task models that represent the interactive parts of the business processes that will ultimately lead to interactive systems. When the organization has its enterprise systems, but not yet its business processes modeled, the user interfaces of the systems help derive tasks models, which are then used to derive the business processes. The double linking between a business process and a task model, and between a task model and a user interface model makes it possible to ensure traceability of the artifacts in multiple paths and enables a more active participation of business performers in analyzing the resulting user interfaces. In this paper, we outline how a human-perspective is used tied to a model-driven perspective.

  10. Topographical guidance of 3D tumor cell migration at an interface of collagen densities.

    PubMed

    Bordeleau, Francois; Tang, Lauren N; Reinhart-King, Cynthia A

    2013-12-01

    During cancer progression, metastatic cells leave the primary tumor and invade into the fibrous extracellular matrix (ECM) within the surrounding stroma. This ECM network is highly heterogeneous, and interest in understanding how this network can affect cell behavior has increased in the past several decades. However, replicating this heterogeneity has proven challenging. Here, we designed and utilized a method to create a well-defined interface between two distinct regions of high- and low-density collagen gels to mimic the heterogeneities in density found in the tumor stroma. We show that cells will invade preferentially from the high-density side into the low-density side. We also demonstrate that the net cell migration is a function of the density of the collagen in which the cells are embedded, and the difference in density between the two regions has minimal effect on cell net displacement and distance travelled. Our data further indicate that a low-to-high density interface promotes directional migration and induces formation of focal adhesion on the interface surface. Together, the current results demonstrate how ECM heterogeneities, in the form of interfacial boundaries, can affect cell migration.

  11. Practical haptic navigation with clickable 3D region input interface for supporting master-slave type robotic surgery.

    PubMed

    Nakao, Megumi; Imanishi, Keiho; Kuroda, Tomohiro; Oyama, Hiroshi

    2004-01-01

    Conventional display in robotic surgery such as flat displays or stereoscopic displays decreases obtainable information around target tissue. For supporting manipulation and performing safe surgery, this paper proposes a haptic navigation method, which enables surgeons to avoid collision with untouchable regions around target tissue by producing force feedback through a master manipulator. This paper also developed an input interface for assignment of 3D untouchable regions through 2D device. Simulator based experiment clears effectiveness of the proposed haptic navigation for improving safety of robotic surgery.

  12. The Chandra Source Catalog: User Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonaventura, Nina; Evans, I. N.; Harbo, P. N.; Rots, A. H.; Tibbetts, M. S.; Van Stone, D. W.; Zografou, P.; Anderson, C. S.; Chen, J. C.; Davis, J. E.; Doe, S. M.; Evans, J. D.; Fabbiano, G.; Galle, E.; Gibbs, D. G.; Glotfelty, K. J.; Grier, J. D.; Hain, R.; Hall, D. M.; He, X.; Houck, J. C.; Karovska, M.; Lauer, J.; McCollough, M. L.; McDowell, J. C.; Miller, J. B.; Mitschang, A. W.; Morgan, D. L.; Nichols, J. S.; Nowak, M. A.; Plummer, D. A.; Primini, F. A.; Refsdal, B. L.; Siemiginowska, A. L.; Sundheim, B. A.; Winkelman, S. L.

    2009-01-01

    The Chandra Source Catalog (CSC) is the definitive catalog of all X-ray sources detected by Chandra. The CSC is presented to the user in two tables: the Master Chandra Source Table and the Table of Individual Source Observations. Each distinct X-ray source identified in the CSC is represented by a single master source entry and one or more individual source entries. If a source is unaffected by confusion and pile-up in multiple observations, the individual source observations are merged to produce a master source. In each table, a row represents a source, and each column a quantity that is officially part of the catalog. The CSC contains positions and multi-band fluxes for the sources, as well as derived spatial, spectral, and temporal source properties. The CSC also includes associated source region and full-field data products for each source, including images, photon event lists, light curves, and spectra. The master source properties represent the best estimates of the properties of a source, and are presented in the following categories: Position and Position Errors, Source Flags, Source Extent and Errors, Source Fluxes, Source Significance, Spectral Properties, and Source Variability. The CSC Data Access GUI provides direct access to the source properties and data products contained in the catalog. The user may query the catalog database via a web-style search or an SQL command-line query. Each query returns a table of source properties, along with the option to browse and download associated data products. The GUI is designed to run in a web browser with Java version 1.5 or higher, and may be accessed via a link on the CSC website homepage (http://cxc.harvard.edu/csc/). As an alternative to the GUI, the contents of the CSC may be accessed directly through a URL, using the command-line tool, cURL. Support: NASA contract NAS8-03060 (CXC).

  13. SF3M software: 3-D photo-reconstruction for non-expert users and its application to a gully network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castillo, C.; James, M. R.; Redel-Macías, M. D.; Pérez, R.; Gómez, J. A.

    2015-08-01

    Three-dimensional photo-reconstruction (PR) techniques have been successfully used to produce high-resolution surface models for different applications and over different spatial scales. However, innovative approaches are required to overcome some limitations that this technique may present for field image acquisition in challenging scene geometries. Here, we evaluate SF3M, a new graphical user interface for implementing a complete PR workflow based on freely available software (including external calls to VisualSFM and CloudCompare), in combination with a low-cost survey design for the reconstruction of a several-hundred-metres-long gully network. SF3M provided a semi-automated workflow for 3-D reconstruction requiring ~ 49 h (of which only 17 % required operator assistance) for obtaining a final gully network model of > 17 million points over a gully plan area of 4230 m2. We show that a walking itinerary along the gully perimeter using two lightweight automatic cameras (1 s time-lapse mode) and a 6 m long pole is an efficient method for 3-D monitoring of gullies, at a low cost (~ EUR 1000 budget for the field equipment) and the time requirements (~ 90 min for image collection). A mean error of 6.9 cm at the ground control points was found, mainly due to model deformations derived from the linear geometry of the gully and residual errors in camera calibration. The straightforward image collection and processing approach can be of great benefit for non-expert users working on gully erosion assessment.

  14. Three-Dimensional User Interfaces for Immersive Virtual Reality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    vanDam, Andries

    1997-01-01

    The focus of this grant was to experiment with novel user interfaces for immersive Virtual Reality (VR) systems, and thus to advance the state of the art of user interface technology for this domain. Our primary test application was a scientific visualization application for viewing Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) datasets. This technology has been transferred to NASA via periodic status reports and papers relating to this grant that have been published in conference proceedings. This final report summarizes the research completed over the past year, and extends last year's final report of the first three years of the grant.

  15. Acoustic user interfaces for ambient-assisted living technologies.

    PubMed

    Goetze, Stefan; Moritz, Niko; Appell, Jens-E; Meis, Markus; Bartsch, Christian; Bitzer, Jörg

    2010-01-01

    This contribution discusses technologies for acoustic user interaction in ambient-assisted living (AAL) scenarios. Acoustic user interfaces allow for a natural and convenient way to interact with technical systems e.g. via sound or speech presentation or via speech input by means of automatic speech recognition (ASR) as well as by detection and classification of acoustic events. Older persons targeted by AAL technologies especially need more easy-to-use methods to interact with inherently complex supporting technology. As an example we designed and evaluated an application for acoustic user interaction with a multi-media reminder and calendar system. For this purpose, mainly older participants were involved in user studies to continuously evaluate and support the development strictly following a user-centred design process. The results suggest a wide acceptance of acoustic user interfaces by older users either for controlling inherently complex AAL systems by using robust ASR technologies or as a natural and ambient way of presenting information to the user. However, further research is needed to increase the robustness of ASR systems when using hands-free equipment, i.e. to provide a real ambient way of interaction, and to introduce personalised speech and sound presentation schemes accounting for the individual hearing capabilities and sound preferences.

  16. User interface development for semiautomated imagery exploitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connor, R. P.; Bohling, Edward H.

    1991-08-01

    Operational reconnaissance technical organizations are burdened by greatly increasing workloads due to expanding capabilities for collection and delivery of large-volume near-real- time multisensor/multispectral softcopy imagery. Related to the tasking of reconnaissance platforms to provide the imagery are more stringent timelines for exploiting the imagery in response to the rapidly changing threat environment being monitored. The development of a semi-automated softcopy multisensor image exploitation capability is a critical step toward integrating existing advanced image processing techniques in conjunction with appropriate intelligence and cartographic data for next-generation image exploitation systems. This paper discusses the results of a recent effort to develop computer-assisted aids for the image analyst (IA) in order to rapidly and accurately exploit multispectral/multisensor imagery in combination with intelligence support data and cartographic information for the purpose of target detection and identification. A key challenge of the effort was to design and implement an effective human-computer interface that would satisfy any generic IA task and readily accommodate the needs of a broad range of IAs.

  17. Designing the User Interface: Considering the Concept of Complexity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-09-01

    user, or, more fundamentally, what makes an interface complex. 2. The Issue of Complexity The subject of complexity was examined by Kieras and Polson...selection rules. In the previously mentioned work by Kieras and Polson, an explanation was given as they applied to the GOMS model a model called the...behave in response to actions on his part. He knows something of the internal structure or functionality of the interface ( Kieras and Poison, 1985: p

  18. Earthdata User Interface Patterns: Building Usable Web Interfaces Through a Shared UI Pattern Library

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siarto, J.

    2014-12-01

    As more Earth science software tools and services move to the web--the design and usability of those tools become ever more important. A good user interface is becoming expected and users are becoming increasingly intolerant of websites and web applications that work against them. The Earthdata UI Pattern Library attempts to give these scientists and developers the design tools they need to make usable, compelling user interfaces without the associated overhead of using a full design team. Patterns are tested and functional user interface elements targeted specifically at the Earth science community and will include web layouts, buttons, tables, typography, iconography, mapping and visualization/graphing widgets. These UI elements have emerged as the result of extensive user testing, research and software development within the NASA Earthdata team over the past year.

  19. Analysis of performance improvements for host and GPU interface of the APENet+ 3D Torus network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ammendola A, R.; Biagioni, A.; Frezza, O.; Lo Cicero, F.; Lonardo, A.; Paolucci, P. S.; Rossetti, D.; Simula, F.; Tosoratto, L.; Vicini, P.

    2014-06-01

    APEnet+ is an INFN (Italian Institute for Nuclear Physics) project aiming to develop a custom 3-Dimensional torus interconnect network optimized for hybrid clusters CPU-GPU dedicated to High Performance scientific Computing. The APEnet+ interconnect fabric is built on a FPGA-based PCI-express board with 6 bi-directional off-board links showing 34 Gbps of raw bandwidth per direction, and leverages upon peer-to-peer capabilities of Fermi and Kepler-class NVIDIA GPUs to obtain real zero-copy, GPU-to-GPU low latency transfers. The minimization of APEnet+ transfer latency is achieved through the adoption of RDMA protocol implemented in FPGA with specialized hardware blocks tightly coupled with embedded microprocessor. This architecture provides a high performance low latency offload engine for both trasmit and receive side of data transactions: preliminary results are encouraging, showing 50% of bandwidth increase for large packet size transfers. In this paper we describe the APEnet+ architecture, detailing the hardware implementation and discuss the impact of such RDMA specialized hardware on host interface latency and bandwidth.

  20. A Graphical User-Interface for Propulsion System Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curlett, Brian P.; Ryall, Kathleen

    1992-01-01

    NASA LeRC uses a series of computer codes to calculate installed propulsion system performance and weight. The need to evaluate more advanced engine concepts with a greater degree of accuracy has resulted in an increase in complexity of this analysis system. Therefore, a graphical user interface was developed to allow the analyst to more quickly and easily apply these codes. The development of this interface and the rationale for the approach taken are described. The interface consists of a method of pictorially representing and editing the propulsion system configuration, forms for entering numerical data, on-line help and documentation, post processing of data, and a menu system to control execution.

  1. ShowMe3D

    SciTech Connect

    Sinclair, Michael B

    2012-01-05

    ShowMe3D is a data visualization graphical user interface specifically designed for use with hyperspectral image obtained from the Hyperspectral Confocal Microscope. The program allows the user to select and display any single image from a three dimensional hyperspectral image stack. By moving a slider control, the user can easily move between images of the stack. The user can zoom into any region of the image. The user can select any pixel or region from the displayed image and display the fluorescence spectrum associated with that pixel or region. The user can define up to 3 spectral filters to apply to the hyperspectral image and view the image as it would appear from a filter-based confocal microscope. The user can also obtain statistics such as intensity average and variance from selected regions.

  2. 3D touchable holographic light-field display.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Masahiro; Higashida, Ryo

    2016-01-20

    We propose a new type of 3D user interface: interaction with a light field reproduced by a 3D display. The 3D display used in this work reproduces a 3D light field, and a real image can be reproduced in midair between the display and the user. When using a finger to touch the real image, the light field from the display will scatter. Then, the 3D touch sensing is realized by detecting the scattered light by a color camera. In the experiment, the light-field display is constructed with a holographic screen and a projector; thus, a preliminary implementation of a 3D touch is demonstrated.

  3. Challenges for user-interface designers of telemedicine systems.

    PubMed

    Salvemini, A V

    1999-01-01

    Problems associated with telemedicine systems include high telecommunications costs, lack of physician interest, and failure to build evaluation into the design process from the onset of the telemedicine project. An overview of the human-factors engineering approach to systems design and how it can be applied to the development of telemedicine systems is described. Design of an interface is based on an analysis of user capabilities, tasks, and work environment. Task analyses are performed to understand and document the interaction between a user's work activities and a system. Two characteristics of a human factors approach that are important for telemedicine are: (1) defining and measuring user performance, and (2) involving users in the design and testing of a system. Usability goals are operationally defined and tracked to quantify performance. Having users participate in the design, testing, and critique of a system also increases the likelihood that the system will be accepted and used after it is released.

  4. The essential role of spin-memory loss at 3d/5d metallic interfaces in spin pumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaffres, Henri

    2015-03-01

    I will present a review of experiments and theory of spin-pumping in Co/(Cu)/Pt 3d/5d metallic systems in the ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) regime of spin injection. By combining i) FMR analyses of the resonance linewidth of the Co spectra in contact with the Pt (or Cu/Pt) reservoir and ii) detection of the inverse spin-hall effect signal vs. Pt thickness, we were able to evidence two different lengthscales for the spin-current profile generated or absorbed at the interfaces. The first lenghscale, extracted from FMR analyses and of the order of 2 nm, represents a typical interface length characteristic of a spin memory loss at the Co/Pt and Co/Cu/Pt interfaces. This represent a typical region of spin-current dissipation by which almost 60-70 % of the total current generated is lost before conversion in bulk Pt. The second lengthscale, roughly equal to 3.4 nm, like determined by Inverse Spin Hall Effect (ISHE) transverse voltage measurement, is more characteristic of the spin-diffusion length of the bulk Pt that governs a part of the spin-to-charge conversion efficiency by ISHE. After careful analyses, we determined a spin-hall angle of 5.6 % for Pt and an intrinsic spin hall conductivity of 3200 (Ohm.cm)-1 for our corresponding Pt resistivity. In the end, I will focus on the physical description of our experiments within a derived Valet-Fert model describing the spin transport/relaxation in a diffusive approach and using relevant boundary conditions for spin-pumping (constant spin accumulation in the ferromagnet). The origin of the spin-memory loss and spin-current discontinuity, also proposed in a very recent work, will be explained in terms of atomic intermixing at interfaces or possible Rashba-split states at Co/Pt interfaces.

  5. Simplification of 3D Graphics for Mobile Devices: Exploring the Trade-off Between Energy Savings and User Perceptions of Visual Quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vatjus-Anttila, Jarkko; Koskela, Timo; Lappalainen, Tuomas; Häkkilä, Jonna

    2017-03-01

    3D graphics have quickly become a popular form of media that can also be accessed with today's mobile devices. However, the use of 3D applications with mobile devices is typically a very energy-consuming task due to the processing complexity and the large file size of 3D graphics. As a result, their use may lead to rapid depletion of the limited battery life. In this paper, we investigate how much energy savings can be gained in the transmission and rendering of 3D graphics by simplifying geometry data. In this connection, we also examine users' perceptions on the visual quality of the simplified 3D models. The results of this paper provide new knowledge on the energy savings that can be gained through geometry simplification, as well as on how much the geometry can be simplified before the visual quality of 3D models becomes unacceptable for the mobile users. Based on the results, it can be concluded that geometry simplification can provide significant energy savings for mobile devices without disturbing the users. When geometry simplification is combined with distance based adjustment of detail, up to 52% energy savings were gained in our experiments compared to using only a single high quality 3D model.

  6. Multipath Transformational Development of User Interfaces with Graph Transformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Limbourg, Quentin; Vanderdonckt, Jean

    In software engineering, transformational development is aimed at developing computer systems by transforming a coarse-grained specification of a system to its final code through a series of transformation steps. Transformational development is known to bring benefits such as: correctness by construction, explicit mappings between development steps, and reversibility of transformations. No comparable piece exists in the literature that provides a formal system applying transformational development in the area of user interface engineering. This chapter defines such a system. For this purpose, a mathematical system for expressing specifications and transformation rules is introduced. This system is based on graph transformations. The problem of managing the transformation rules is detailed, e.g., how to enable a developer to access, define, extend, restrict or relax, test, verify, and apply appropriate transformations. A tool supporting this development paradigm is also described and exemplified. Transformational development, applied to the development of user interfaces of interactive systems, allows reusability of design knowledge used to develop user interfaces and fosters incremental development of user interfaces by applying alternative transformations.

  7. An Enhanced User Interface for the SABER Wargame

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-12-01

    A238825). 16. Molich, Rolf and Jakob Nielsen . "Improving a Human-Computer Dialogue," Commu- nications of the ACM, 33:338-348 (March 1990). 100 17. Ness...AU), Wright-Patterson AFB OH, June 1990 (AD-A223087). 18. Nielsen , Jakob . "Traditional Dialogue Design Applied to Modern User Interfaces

  8. Applying Minimal Manual Principles for Documentation of Graphical User Interfaces.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nowaczyk, Ronald H.; James, E. Christopher

    1993-01-01

    Investigates the need to include computer screens in documentation for software using a graphical user interface. Describes the uses and purposes of "minimal manuals" and their principles. Studies student reaction to their use of one of three on-screen manuals: screens, icon, and button. Finds some benefit for including icon and button…

  9. The Graphical User Interface Crisis: Danger and Opportunity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyd, Lawrence H.; And Others

    This paper examines graphic computing environments, identifies potential problems in providing access to blind people, and describes programs and strategies being developed to provide this access. The paper begins with an explanation of how graphic user interfaces differ from character-based systems in their use of pixels, visual metaphors such as…

  10. An approach to developing user interfaces for space systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shackelford, Keith; McKinney, Karen

    1993-08-01

    Inherent weakness in the traditional waterfall model of software development has led to the definition of the spiral model. The spiral model software development lifecycle model, however, has not been applied to NASA projects. This paper describes its use in developing real time user interface software for an Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) Process Control Prototype at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center.

  11. CATO--A General User Interface for CAS

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Janetzko, Hans-Dieter

    2015-01-01

    CATO is a new user interface, developed by the author as a response to the significant difficulties faced by scientists, engineers, and students in their usage of computer algebra (CA) systems. Their tendency to use CA systems only occasionally means that they are unfamiliar with requisite grammar and syntax these systems require. The author…

  12. Circumventing Graphical User Interfaces in Chemical Engineering Plant Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Romey, Noel; Schwartz, Rachel M.; Behrend, Douglas; Miao, Peter; Cheung, H. Michael; Beitle, Robert

    2007-01-01

    Graphical User Interfaces (GUIs) are pervasive elements of most modern technical software and represent a convenient tool for student instruction. For example, GUIs are used for [chemical] process design software (e.g., CHEMCAD, PRO/II and ASPEN) typically encountered in the senior capstone course. Drag and drop aspects of GUIs are challenging for…

  13. GRID2D/3D: A computer program for generating grid systems in complex-shaped two- and three-dimensional spatial domains. Part 2: User's manual and program listing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, R. T.; Shih, T. I.-P.; Nguyen, H. L.; Roelke, R. J.

    1990-01-01

    An efficient computer program, called GRID2D/3D, was developed to generate single and composite grid systems within geometrically complex two- and three-dimensional (2- and 3-D) spatial domains that can deform with time. GRID2D/3D generates single grid systems by using algebraic grid generation methods based on transfinite interpolation in which the distribution of grid points within the spatial domain is controlled by stretching functions. All single grid systems generated by GRID2D/3D can have grid lines that are continuous and differentiable everywhere up to the second-order. Also, grid lines can intersect boundaries of the spatial domain orthogonally. GRID2D/3D generates composite grid systems by patching together two or more single grid systems. The patching can be discontinuous or continuous. For continuous composite grid systems, the grid lines are continuous and differentiable everywhere up to the second-order except at interfaces where different single grid systems meet. At interfaces where different single grid systems meet, the grid lines are only differentiable up to the first-order. For 2-D spatial domains, the boundary curves are described by using either cubic or tension spline interpolation. For 3-D spatial domains, the boundary surfaces are described by using either linear Coon's interpolation, bi-hyperbolic spline interpolation, or a new technique referred to as 3-D bi-directional Hermite interpolation. Since grid systems generated by algebraic methods can have grid lines that overlap one another, GRID2D/3D contains a graphics package for evaluating the grid systems generated. With the graphics package, the user can generate grid systems in an interactive manner with the grid generation part of GRID2D/3D. GRID2D/3D is written in FORTRAN 77 and can be run on any IBM PC, XT, or AT compatible computer. In order to use GRID2D/3D on workstations or mainframe computers, some minor modifications must be made in the graphics part of the program; no

  14. Hardness and microstructural inhomogeneity at the epitaxial interface of laser 3D-printed Ni-based superalloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Dan; Zhang, Anfeng; Zhu, Jianxue; Li, Yao; Zhu, Wenxin; Qi, Baolu; Tamura, Nobumichi; Li, Dichen; Song, Zhongxiao; Chen, Kai

    2016-09-01

    In this letter, microstructural and mechanical inhomogeneities, a great concern for single crystal Ni-based superalloys repaired by laser assisted 3D printing, have been probed near the epitaxial interface. Nanoindentation tests show the hardness to be uniformly lower in the bulk of the substrate and constantly higher in the epitaxial cladding layer. A gradient of hardness through the heat affected zone is also observed, resulting from an increase in dislocation density, as indicated by the broadening of the synchrotron X-ray Laue microdiffraction reflections. The hardening mechanism of the cladding region, on the other hand, is shown to originate not only from high dislocation density but also and more importantly from the fine γ/γ' microstructure.

  15. Steady-State VEP-Based Brain-Computer Interface Control in an Immersive 3D Gaming Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lalor, E. C.; Kelly, S. P.; Finucane, C.; Burke, R.; Smith, R.; Reilly, R. B.; McDarby, G.

    2005-12-01

    This paper presents the application of an effective EEG-based brain-computer interface design for binary control in a visually elaborate immersive 3D game. The BCI uses the steady-state visual evoked potential (SSVEP) generated in response to phase-reversing checkerboard patterns. Two power-spectrum estimation methods were employed for feature extraction in a series of offline classification tests. Both methods were also implemented during real-time game play. The performance of the BCI was found to be robust to distracting visual stimulation in the game and relatively consistent across six subjects, with 41 of 48 games successfully completed. For the best performing feature extraction method, the average real-time control accuracy across subjects was 89%. The feasibility of obtaining reliable control in such a visually rich environment using SSVEPs is thus demonstrated and the impact of this result is discussed.

  16. SRB-3D Solid Rocket Booster performance prediction program. Volume 1: Engineering description/users information manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winkler, J. C.

    1976-01-01

    The modified Solid Rocket Booster Performance Evaluation Model (SRB-3D) was developed as an extension to the internal ballistics module of the SRB-2 performance program. This manual contains the engineering description of SRB-3D which describes the approach used to develop the 3D concept and an explanation of the modifications which were necessary to implement these concepts.

  17. Spatial Analytic Interfaces: Spatial User Interfaces for In-Situ Visual Analytics.

    PubMed

    Ens, Barrett; Irani, Pourang

    2016-03-18

    As wearable devices gain acceptance, we ask "What do user interfaces look like in a post-smartphone world?" and "Can these future interfaces support sophisticated interactions in a mobile context?" In stark contrast to the micro-interactions of current wearable interfaces lies visual analytics. A hallmark of such platforms is the ability to simultaneously view multiple linked visualizations of diverse datasets. We draw from visual analytic concepts to address the growing need of individuals to manage information on personal devices. We propose Spatial Analytic Interfaces to leverage the benefits of spatial interaction to enable everyday visual analytic tasks to be performed in-situ, at the most beneficial place and time. We explore the possibilities for such interfaces using head-worn display technology, to integrate multiple information views into the user's physical environment. We discuss current developments and propose research goals for the successful development of SUI for in-situ visual analytics.

  18. Macro-to-micro interfacing to microfluidic channels using 3D-printed templates: application to time-resolved secretion sampling of endocrine tissue.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Jessica C; Ford, Katarena I; Holder, Dylan H; Holtan, Mark D; Easley, Christopher J

    2016-10-21

    Employing 3D-printed templates for macro-to-micro interfacing, a passively operated polydimethysiloxane (PDMS) microfluidic device was designed for time-resolved secretion sampling from primary murine islets and epidiymal white adipose tissue explants. Interfacing in similar devices is typically accomplished through manually punched or drilled fluidic reservoirs. We previously introduced the concept of using hand fabricated polymer inserts to template cell culture and sampling reservoirs into PDMS devices, allowing rapid stimulation and sampling of endocrine tissue. However, fabrication of the fluidic reservoirs was time consuming, tedious, and was prone to errors during device curing. Here, we have implemented computer-aided design and 3D printing to circumvent these fabrication obstacles. In addition to rapid prototyping and design iteration advantages, the ability to match these 3D-printed interface templates with channel patterns is highly beneficial. By digitizing the template fabrication process, more robust components can be produced with reduced fabrication variability. Herein, 3D-printed templates were used for sculpting millimetre-scale reservoirs into the above-channel, bulk PDMS in passively-operated, eight-channel devices designed for time-resolved secretion sampling of murine tissue. Devices were proven functional by temporally assaying glucose-stimulated insulin secretion from <10 pancreatic islets and glycerol secretion from 2 mm adipose tissue explants, suggesting that 3D-printed interface templates could be applicable to a variety of cells and tissue types. More generally, this work validates desktop 3D printers as versatile interfacing tools in microfluidic laboratories.

  19. Dynamic User Interfaces for Service Oriented Architectures in Healthcare.

    PubMed

    Schweitzer, Marco; Hoerbst, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Electronic Health Records (EHRs) play a crucial role in healthcare today. Considering a data-centric view, EHRs are very advanced as they provide and share healthcare data in a cross-institutional and patient-centered way adhering to high syntactic and semantic interoperability. However, the EHR functionalities available for the end users are rare and hence often limited to basic document query functions. Future EHR use necessitates the ability to let the users define their needed data according to a certain situation and how this data should be processed. Workflow and semantic modelling approaches as well as Web services provide means to fulfil such a goal. This thesis develops concepts for dynamic interfaces between EHR end users and a service oriented eHealth infrastructure, which allow the users to design their flexible EHR needs, modeled in a dynamic and formal way. These are used to discover, compose and execute the right Semantic Web services.

  20. NLEdit: A generic graphical user interface for Fortran programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curlett, Brian P.

    1994-01-01

    NLEdit is a generic graphical user interface for the preprocessing of Fortran namelist input files. The interface consists of a menu system, a message window, a help system, and data entry forms. A form is generated for each namelist. The form has an input field for each namelist variable along with a one-line description of that variable. Detailed help information, default values, and minimum and maximum allowable values can all be displayed via menu picks. Inputs are processed through a scientific calculator program that allows complex equations to be used instead of simple numeric inputs. A custom user interface is generated simply by entering information about the namelist input variables into an ASCII file. There is no need to learn a new graphics system or programming language. NLEdit can be used as a stand-alone program or as part of a larger graphical user interface. Although NLEdit is intended for files using namelist format, it can be easily modified to handle other file formats.

  1. The cognitive demands of an innovative query user interface.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Di; Kaufman, David R.; Mendonca, Eneida A.; Seol, Yoon-Hu; Johnson, Stephen B.; Cimino, James J.

    2002-01-01

    Too often, online searches for health information are time consuming and produce results that are not sufficiently precise to answer clinicians' or patients' questions. The PERSIVAL project is designed to circumvent this problem by personalizing and tailoring searches and presentation to the demands of the user and the particular clinical context. This paper focuses on a cognitive evaluation of one component of this project, a Query User Interface (QUI). The study examines the system's ability to allow users to easily and intuitively express their information needs. We performed several analyses including a cognitive walkthrough of the interface and quantitative estimations of cognitive load. The paper also presents a preliminary analysis of usability testing. The analyses suggest that there are features in the QUI that contribute to a greater cognitive load and result in greater effort on the part of the subject. The results of usability testing are consistent with these findings. However, subjects found it to be relatively easy and intuitive to generate well-formed queries using the interface. This study contributed to the iterative design of the interface and to the next generation of the PERSIVAL system. PMID:12463945

  2. The cognitive demands of an innovative query user interface.

    PubMed

    Wang, Di; Kaufman, David R; Mendonca, Eneida A; Seol, Yoon-Hu; Johnson, Stephen B; Cimino, James J

    2002-01-01

    Too often, online searches for health information are time consuming and produce results that are not sufficiently precise to answer clinicians' or patients' questions. The PERSIVAL project is designed to circumvent this problem by personalizing and tailoring searches and presentation to the demands of the user and the particular clinical context. This paper focuses on a cognitive evaluation of one component of this project, a Query User Interface (QUI). The study examines the system's ability to allow users to easily and intuitively express their information needs. We performed several analyses including a cognitive walkthrough of the interface and quantitative estimations of cognitive load. The paper also presents a preliminary analysis of usability testing. The analyses suggest that there are features in the QUI that contribute to a greater cognitive load and result in greater effort on the part of the subject. The results of usability testing are consistent with these findings. However, subjects found it to be relatively easy and intuitive to generate well-formed queries using the interface. This study contributed to the iterative design of the interface and to the next generation of the PERSIVAL system.

  3. Design of natural user interface of indoor surveillance system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Lili; Liu, Dan; Jiang, Mu-Jin; Cao, Ning

    2015-03-01

    Conventional optical video surveillance systems usually just record what they view, but they can't make sense of what they are viewing. With lots of useless video information stored and transmitted, waste of memory space and increasing the bandwidth are produced every day. In order to reduce the overall cost of the system, and improve the application value of the monitoring system, we use the Kinect sensor with CMOS infrared sensor, as a supplement to the traditional video surveillance system, to establish the natural user interface system for indoor surveillance. In this paper, the architecture of the natural user interface system, complex background monitoring object separation, user behavior analysis algorithms are discussed. By the analysis of the monitoring object, instead of the command language grammar, when the monitored object need instant help, the system with the natural user interface sends help information. We introduce the method of combining the new system and traditional monitoring system. In conclusion, theoretical analysis and experimental results in this paper show that the proposed system is reasonable and efficient. It can satisfy the system requirements of non-contact, online, real time, higher precision and rapid speed to control the state of affairs at the scene.

  4. Development of a task analysis tool to facilitate user interface design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scholtz, Jean C.

    1992-01-01

    A good user interface is one that facilitates the user in carrying out his task. Such interfaces are difficult and costly to produce. The most important aspect in producing a good interface is the ability to communicate to the software designers what the user's task is. The Task Analysis Tool is a system for cooperative task analysis and specification of the user interface requirements. This tool is intended to serve as a guide to development of initial prototypes for user feedback.

  5. Bed occupancy monitoring: data processing and clinician user interface design.

    PubMed

    Pouliot, Melanie; Joshi, Vilas; Goubran, Rafik; Knoefel, Frank

    2012-01-01

    Unobtrusive and continuous monitoring of patients, especially at their place of residence, is becoming a significant part of the healthcare model. A variety of sensors are being used to monitor different patient conditions. Bed occupancy monitoring provides clinicians a quantitative measure of bed entry/exit patterns and may provide information relating to sleep quality. This paper presents a bed occupancy monitoring system using a bed pressure mat sensor. A clinical trial was performed involving 8 patients to collect bed occupancy data. The trial period for each patient ranged from 5-10 weeks. This data was analyzed using a participatory design methodology incorporating clinician feedback to obtain bed occupancy parameters. The parameters extracted include the number of bed exits per night, the bed exit weekly average (including minimum and maximum), the time of day of a particular exit, and the amount of uninterrupted bed occupancy per night. The design of a clinical user interface plays a significant role in the acceptance of such patient monitoring systems by clinicians. The clinician user interface proposed in this paper was designed to be intuitive, easy to navigate and not cause information overload. An iterative design methodology was used for the interface design. The interface design is extendible to incorporate data from multiple sensors. This allows the interface to be part of a comprehensive remote patient monitoring system.

  6. ShipMo3D Version 1.0 User Manual for Simulating Time Domain Motions of a Freely Maneuvering Ship in a Seaway

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-10-01

    from) in earth -fixed axes ν mean wave direction (from) in earth -fixed axes νi mean wave direction (from) for spectral component i ρ water density {σ...Kennedy Abstract This report serves as a user manual for simulating ship motions in waves and in calm water using ShipMo3D Version 1.0. ShipMo3D is...with associated user applica- tions for predicting ship motions in calm water and in waves. Motion predictions are available in both the frequency

  7. A Hybrid Tool for User Interface Modeling and Prototyping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trætteberg, Hallvard

    Although many methods have been proposed, model-based development methods have only to some extent been adopted for UI design. In particular, they are not easy to combine with user-centered design methods. In this paper, we present a hybrid UI modeling and GUI prototyping tool, which is designed to fit better with IS development and UI design traditions. The tool includes a diagram editor for domain and UI models and an execution engine that integrates UI behavior, live UI components and sample data. Thus, both model-based user interface design and prototyping-based iterative design are supported

  8. MATLAB and graphical user interfaces: tools for experimental management.

    PubMed

    Harley, E M; Loftus, G R

    2000-05-01

    MATLAB is a convenient platform for the development and management of psychological experiments because of its easy-to-use programming language, sophisticated graphics features, and statistics and optimization tools. Through implementation of the Brainard-Pelli Psychophysics Toolbox, the MATLAB user gains close temporal and spatial control over the CRT, while retaining the simplicity of an interpreted language conductive to rapid program development. MATLAB's abilities can be further utilized through easily programmable graphical user interfaces (GUIs). We illustrate how a GUI can serve as a powerful and intuitive tool for organizing and controlling all aspects of a psychological experiment, including design, data collection, data analysis, and theory fitting.

  9. User Interface Design in Medical Distributed Web Applications.

    PubMed

    Serban, Alexandru; Crisan-Vida, Mihaela; Mada, Leonard; Stoicu-Tivadar, Lacramioara

    2016-01-01

    User interfaces are important to facilitate easy learning and operating with an IT application especially in the medical world. An easy to use interface has to be simple and to customize the user needs and mode of operation. The technology in the background is an important tool to accomplish this. The present work aims to creating a web interface using specific technology (HTML table design combined with CSS3) to provide an optimized responsive interface for a complex web application. In the first phase, the current icMED web medical application layout is analyzed, and its structure is designed using specific tools, on source files. In the second phase, a new graphic adaptable interface to different mobile terminals is proposed, (using HTML table design (TD) and CSS3 method) that uses no source files, just lines of code for layout design, improving the interaction in terms of speed and simplicity. For a complex medical software application a new prototype layout was designed and developed using HTML tables. The method uses a CSS code with only CSS classes applied to one or multiple HTML table elements, instead of CSS styles that can be applied to just one DIV tag at once. The technique has the advantage of a simplified CSS code, and a better adaptability to different media resolutions compared to DIV-CSS style method. The presented work is a proof that adaptive web interfaces can be developed just using and combining different types of design methods and technologies, using HTML table design, resulting in a simpler to learn and use interface, suitable for healthcare services.

  10. A convertor and user interface to import CAD files into worldtoolkit virtual reality systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Peter Hor-Ching

    1996-01-01

    Virtual Reality (VR) is a rapidly developing human-to-computer interface technology. VR can be considered as a three-dimensional computer-generated Virtual World (VW) which can sense particular aspects of a user's behavior, allow the user to manipulate the objects interactively, and render the VW at real-time accordingly. The user is totally immersed in the virtual world and feel the sense of transforming into that VW. NASA/MSFC Computer Application Virtual Environments (CAVE) has been developing the space-related VR applications since 1990. The VR systems in CAVE lab are based on VPL RB2 system which consists of a VPL RB2 control tower, an LX eyephone, an Isotrak polhemus sensor, two Fastrak polhemus sensors, a folk of Bird sensor, and two VPL DG2 DataGloves. A dynamics animator called Body Electric from VPL is used as the control system to interface with all the input/output devices and to provide the network communications as well as VR programming environment. The RB2 Swivel 3D is used as the modelling program to construct the VW's. A severe limitation of the VPL VR system is the use of RB2 Swivel 3D, which restricts the files to a maximum of 1020 objects and doesn't have the advanced graphics texture mapping. The other limitation is that the VPL VR system is a turn-key system which does not provide the flexibility for user to add new sensors and C language interface. Recently, NASA/MSFC CAVE lab provides VR systems built on Sense8 WorldToolKit (WTK) which is a C library for creating VR development environments. WTK provides device drivers for most of the sensors and eyephones available on the VR market. WTK accepts several CAD file formats, such as Sense8 Neutral File Format, AutoCAD DXF and 3D Studio file format, Wave Front OBJ file format, VideoScape GEO file format, Intergraph EMS stereolithographics and CATIA Stereolithographics STL file formats. WTK functions are object-oriented in their naming convention, are grouped into classes, and provide easy C

  11. The hybridizations of cobalt 3 d bands with the electron band structure of the graphene/cobalt interface on a tungsten substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Jinwoong; Hwang, Choongyu; Chung, Nak-Kwan; N'Diaye, A. D.; Schmid, A. K.; Denlinger, Jonathan

    2016-08-01

    The interface between graphene and a ferromagnetic substrate has attracted recent research interests due to its potential for spintronic applications. We report an angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy study on the interface between graphene and cobalt epitaxially grown on a tungsten substrate. We find that the electron band structure of the interface exhibits clear discontinuities at the crossing points with cobalt 3 d bands. These observations indicate strong hybridizations between the electronic states in the interface and provide an important clue to understand the intriguing electromagnetic properties of the graphene/ferromagnet interface.

  12. Robotic and user interface solutions for hazardous and remote applications

    SciTech Connect

    Schempf, H.

    1997-12-01

    Carnegie Mellon University (CMU) is developing novel robotic and user interface systems to assist in the cleanup activities undertaken by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Under DOE`s EM-50 funding and administered by the Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC), CMU has developed a novel asbestos pipe-insulation abatement robot system, called BOA, and a novel generic user interface control and training console, dubbed RoboCon. The use of BOA will allow the speedier abatement of the vast DOE piping networks clad with hazardous and contaminated asbestos insulation by which overall job costs can be reduced by as much as 50%. RoboCon will allow the DOE to evaluate different remote and robotic system technologies from the overall man-machine performance standpoint, as well as provide a standardized training platform for training site operators in the operation of remote and robotic equipment.

  13. ModelMate - A graphical user interface for model analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Banta, Edward R.

    2011-01-01

    ModelMate is a graphical user interface designed to facilitate use of model-analysis programs with models. This initial version of ModelMate supports one model-analysis program, UCODE_2005, and one model software program, MODFLOW-2005. ModelMate can be used to prepare input files for UCODE_2005, run UCODE_2005, and display analysis results. A link to the GW_Chart graphing program facilitates visual interpretation of results. ModelMate includes capabilities for organizing directories used with the parallel-processing capabilities of UCODE_2005 and for maintaining files in those directories to be identical to a set of files in a master directory. ModelMate can be used on its own or in conjunction with ModelMuse, a graphical user interface for MODFLOW-2005 and PHAST.

  14. Twinlist: novel user interface designs for medication reconciliation.

    PubMed

    Plaisant, Catherine; Chao, Tiffany; Wu, Johnny; Hettinger, A Zach; Herskovic, Jorge R; Johnson, Todd R; Bernstam, Elmer V; Markowitz, Eliz; Powsner, Seth; Shneiderman, Ben

    2013-01-01

    Medication reconciliation is an important and complex task for which careful user interface design has the potential to help reduce errors and improve quality of care. In this paper we focus on the hospital discharge scenario and first describe a novel interface called Twinlist. Twinlist illustrates the novel use of spatial layout combined with multi-step animation, to help medical providers see what is different and what is similar between the lists (e.g., intake list and hospital list), and rapidly choose the drugs they want to include in the reconciled list. We then describe a series of variant designs and discuss their comparative advantages and disadvantages. Finally we report on a pilot study that suggests that animation might help users learn new spatial layouts such as the one used in Twinlist.

  15. A general graphical user interface for automatic reliability modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liceaga, Carlos A.; Siewiorek, Daniel P.

    1991-01-01

    Reported here is a general Graphical User Interface (GUI) for automatic reliability modeling of Processor Memory Switch (PMS) structures using a Markov model. This GUI is based on a hierarchy of windows. One window has graphical editing capabilities for specifying the system's communication structure, hierarchy, reconfiguration capabilities, and requirements. Other windows have field texts, popup menus, and buttons for specifying parameters and selecting actions. An example application of the GUI is given.

  16. Development of a User Interface for a Regression Analysis Software Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulbrich, Norbert Manfred; Volden, Thomas R.

    2010-01-01

    An easy-to -use user interface was implemented in a highly automated regression analysis tool. The user interface was developed from the start to run on computers that use the Windows, Macintosh, Linux, or UNIX operating system. Many user interface features were specifically designed such that a novice or inexperienced user can apply the regression analysis tool with confidence. Therefore, the user interface s design minimizes interactive input from the user. In addition, reasonable default combinations are assigned to those analysis settings that influence the outcome of the regression analysis. These default combinations will lead to a successful regression analysis result for most experimental data sets. The user interface comes in two versions. The text user interface version is used for the ongoing development of the regression analysis tool. The official release of the regression analysis tool, on the other hand, has a graphical user interface that is more efficient to use. This graphical user interface displays all input file names, output file names, and analysis settings for a specific software application mode on a single screen which makes it easier to generate reliable analysis results and to perform input parameter studies. An object-oriented approach was used for the development of the graphical user interface. This choice keeps future software maintenance costs to a reasonable limit. Examples of both the text user interface and graphical user interface are discussed in order to illustrate the user interface s overall design approach.

  17. Top ten list of user-hostile interface design

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, D.P.

    1994-10-01

    This report describes ten of the most frequent ergonomic problems found in human-computer interfaces (HCIs) associated with complex industrial machines. In contrast with being thought of as ``user friendly,`` many of these machines are seen as exhibiting ``user-hostile`` attributes by the author. The historical lack of consistent application of ergonomic principles in the HCIs has led to a breed of very sophisticated, complex manufacturing equipment that few people can operate without extensive orientation, training, or experience. This design oversight has produced the need for extensive training programs and help documentation, unnecessary machine downtime, and reduced productivity resulting from operator stress and confusion. Ergonomic considerations affect industrial machines in at least three important areas: (1) the physical package including CRT and keyboard, maintenance access areas, and dedicated hardware selection, layout, and labeling; (2) the software by which the user interacts with the computer that controls the equipment; and (3) the supporting documentation.

  18. Description of the PRISM system architecture and user interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Constanza, P.; Larsson, C.; Thiemann, H.; Wedi, N.

    2003-04-01

    The PRISM system architecture enables the user to perform numerical experiments, allowing to couple interchangeable model components, e.g. atmosphere, ocean, biosphere, chemistry, via standardised interfaces. The coupler is based on standard interfaces implemented in the different model components. The exchange of data between the components will occur either in a direct way between components or through the coupler. The general architecture provides the infrastructure to configure, submit, monitor and subsequently post process, archive and diagnose the results of these coupled model experiments. There is an emphasis on choosing an architectural design that allows these activities to be done remotely, e.g. without the user physically being in the same place where the numerical computations take place. The PRISM general architecture gives the choice to the user either to work locally or to work through a central PRISM site where the user will be registered. Locally or via the Internet, the user will be able to use the same graphical user interface. The choice will depend of the local availability of the required resources. In addition a supervisor monitor program (SMS) gives full control over model simulations during run-time. The technology that realises the proposed architecture is known as "Web services". This includes the use of web servers, application servers, resource directories, discovery mechanisms and messages services. Currently there is no client software that can be used with browsers that does not build on Java technology. Java supports all the mechanisms needed for implementing web services using available standards. From a system maintenance point of view using one technology, Java, is the preferred way as this simplifies the task of adhering to multiple standards. The issue of standardisation of interfaces is important for complex and configurable systems such as PRISM. For example the extensible Markup Language (XML) allows for standardisation of

  19. An Accessible User Interface for Geoscience and Programming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sevre, E. O.; Lee, S.

    2012-12-01

    The goal of this research is to develop an interface that will simplify user interaction with software for scientists. The motivating factor of the research is to develop tools that assist scientists with limited motor skills with the efficient generation and use of software tools. Reliance on computers and programming is increasing in the world of geology, and it is increasingly important for geologists and geophysicists to have the computational resources to use advanced software and edit programs for their research. I have developed a prototype of a program to help geophysicists write programs using a simple interface that requires only simple single-mouse-clicks to input code. It is my goal to minimize the amount of typing necessary to create simple programs and scripts to increase accessibility for people with disabilities limiting fine motor skills. This interface can be adapted for various programming and scripting languages. Using this interface will simplify development of code for C/C++, Java, and GMT, and can be expanded to support any other text based programming language. The interface is designed around the concept of maximizing the amount of code that can be written using a minimum number of clicks and typing. The screen is split into two sections: a list of click-commands is on the left hand side, and a text area is on the right hand side. When the user clicks on a command on the left hand side the applicable code is automatically inserted at the insertion point in the text area. Currently in the C/C++ interface, there are commands for common code segments that are often used, such as for loops, comments, print statements, and structured code creation. The primary goal is to provide an interface that will work across many devices for developing code. A simple prototype has been developed for the iPad. Due to the limited number of devices that an iOS application can be used with, the code has been re-written in Java to run on a wider range of devices

  20. A compact 3D-printed interface for coupling open digital microchips with Venturi easy ambient sonic-spray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jie-Bi; Chen, Ting-Ru; Chang, Chia-Hsien; Cheng, Ji-Yen; Chen, Yu-Chie; Urban, Pawel L

    2015-03-07

    Digital microfluidics (DMF) based on the electrowetting-on-dielectric phenomenon is a convenient way of handling microlitre-volume aliquots of solutions prior to analysis. Although it was shown to be compatible with on-line mass spectrometric detection, due to numerous technical obstacles, the implementation of DMF in conjunction with MS is still beyond the reach of many analytical laboratories. Here we present a facile method for coupling open DMF microchips to mass spectrometers using Venturi easy ambient sonic-spray ionization operated at atmospheric pressure. The proposed interface comprises a 3D-printed body that can easily be "clipped" at the inlet of a standard mass spectrometer. The accessory features all the necessary connections for an open-architecture DMF microchip with T-shaped electrode arrangement, thermostatting of the microchip, purification of air (to prevent accidental contamination of the microchip), a Venturi pump, and two microfluidic pumps to facilitate transfer of samples and reagents onto the microchip. The system also incorporates a touch-screen panel and remote control for user-friendly operation. It is based on the use of popular open-source electronic modules, and can readily be assembled at low expense.

  1. An SML Driven Graphical User Interface and Application Management Toolkit

    SciTech Connect

    White, Greg R

    2002-01-18

    In the past, the features of a user interface were limited by those available in the existing graphical widgets it used. Now, improvements in processor speed have fostered the emergence of interpreted languages, in which the appropriate method to render a given data object can be loaded at runtime. XML can be used to precisely describe the association of data types with their graphical handling (beans), and Java provides an especially rich environment for programming the graphics. We present a graphical user interface builder based on Java Beans and XML, in which the graphical screens are described textually (in files or a database) in terms of their screen components. Each component may be a simple text read back, or a complex plot. The programming model provides for dynamic data pertaining to a component to be forwarded synchronously or asynchronously, to the appropriate handler, which may be a built-in method, or a complex applet. This work was initially motivated by the need to move the legacy VMS display interface of the SLAC Control Program to another platform while preserving all of its existing functionality. However the model allows us a powerful and generic system for adding new kinds of graphics, such as Matlab, data sources, such as EPICS, middleware, such as AIDA[1], and transport, such as XML and SOAP. The system will also include a management console, which will be able to report on the present usage of the system, for instance who is running it where and connected to which channels.

  2. An XML Driven Graphical User Interface and Application Management Toolkit

    SciTech Connect

    White, Greg R

    2002-01-18

    In the past, the features of a user interface were limited by those available in the existing graphical widgets it used. Now, improvements in processor speed have fostered the emergence of interpreted languages, in which the appropriate method to render a given data object can be loaded at runtime. XML can be used to precisely describe the association of data types with their graphical handling (beans), and Java provides an especially rich environment for programming the graphics. We present a graphical user interface builder based on Java Beans and XML, in which the graphical screens are described textually (in files or a database) in terms of their screen components. Each component may be a simple text read back, or a complex plot. The programming model provides for dynamic data pertaining to a component to be forwarded synchronously or asynchronously, to the appropriate handler, which may be a built-in method, or a complex applet. This work was initially motivated by the need to move the legacy VMS display interface of the SLAC Control Program to another platform while preserving all of its existing functionality. However the model allows us a powerful and generic system for adding new kinds of graphics, such as Matlab, data sources, such as EPICS, middleware, such as AIDA[1], and transport, such as XML and SOAP. The system will also include a management console, which will be able to report on the present usage of the system, for instance who is running it where and connected to which channels.

  3. A graphical user interface for infant ERP analysis.

    PubMed

    Kaatiala, Jussi; Yrttiaho, Santeri; Forssman, Linda; Perdue, Katherine; Leppänen, Jukka

    2014-09-01

    Recording of event-related potentials (ERPs) is one of the best-suited technologies for examining brain function in human infants. Yet the existing software packages are not optimized for the unique requirements of analyzing artifact-prone ERP data from infants. We developed a new graphical user interface that enables an efficient implementation of a two-stage approach to the analysis of infant ERPs. In the first stage, video records of infant behavior are synchronized with ERPs at the level of individual trials to reject epochs with noncompliant behavior and other artifacts. In the second stage, the interface calls MATLAB and EEGLAB (Delorme & Makeig, Journal of Neuroscience Methods 134(1):9-21, 2004) functions for further preprocessing of the ERP signal itself (i.e., filtering, artifact removal, interpolation, and rereferencing). Finally, methods are included for data visualization and analysis by using bootstrapped group averages. Analyses of simulated and real EEG data demonstrated that the proposed approach can be effectively used to establish task compliance, remove various types of artifacts, and perform representative visualizations and statistical comparisons of ERPs. The interface is available for download from http://www.uta.fi/med/icl/methods/eeg.html in a format that is widely applicable to ERP studies with special populations and open for further editing by users.

  4. Developing Concept-Based User Interfaces for Scientific Computing

    SciTech Connect

    Chin, George; Stephan, Eric G.; Gracio, Deborah K.; Kuchar, Olga A.; Whitney, Paul D.; Schuchardt, Karen L.

    2006-09-01

    From our interactions with researchers from different scientific fields and disciplines, we have observed that scientists often describe and convey concepts, theories, processes, and results using basic graphs and diagrams. Semantic graphs such as these provide a universal language that all scientists may apply to document their scientific knowledge and to communicate this knowledge to others. Furthermore, studies have shown that the cognitive processing of complex subject matter is improved when the structure of ideas and concepts are made explicit [39] and that semantic graphs may serve as effective “scaffolds” for cognitive processing [29]. At Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, we are deploying semantic graphs within scientific computing systems as central user representations of scientific knowledge. These systems provide concept-based user interfaces that allow scientists to visually define and capture conceptual models of their scientific problems, hypotheses, theories, and processes. Once defined, the visual models then become interaction framework for accessing and applying scientific and computational resources and capabilities. In this paper, through the examination of three visual research systems, we illustrate different ways concept-based user interfaces and semantic graph knowledge representations may make scientific knowledge concrete, usable, shareable, and computable in scientific computing systems.

  5. Computer-aided fit testing: an approach for examining the user/equipment interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corner, Brian D.; Beecher, Robert M.; Paquette, Steven

    1997-03-01

    Developments in laser digitizing technology now make it possible to capture very accurate 3D images of the surface of the human body in less than 20 seconds. Applications for the images range from animation of movie characters to the design and visualization of clothing and individual equipment (CIE). In this paper we focus on modeling the user/equipment interface. Defining the relative geometry between user and equipment provides a better understanding of equipment performance, and can make the design cycle more efficient. Computer-aided fit testing (CAFT) is the application of graphical and statistical techniques to visualize and quantify the human/equipment interface in virtual space. In short, CAFT looks to measure the relative geometry between a user and his or her equipment. The design cycle changes with the introducing CAFT; now some evaluation may be done in the CAD environment prior to prototyping. CAFT may be applied in two general ways: (1) to aid in the creation of new equipment designs and (2) to evaluate current designs for compliance to performance specifications. We demonstrate the application of CAFT with two examples. First, we show how a prototype helmet may be evaluated for fit, and second we demonstrate how CAFT may be used to measure body armor coverage.

  6. The impact of stereo 3D sports TV broadcasts on user's depth perception and spatial presence experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weigelt, K.; Wiemeyer, J.

    2014-03-01

    This work examines the impact of content and presentation parameters in 2D versus 3D on depth perception and spatial presence, and provides guidelines for stereoscopic content development for 3D sports TV broadcasts and cognate subjects. Under consideration of depth perception and spatial presence experience, a preliminary study with 8 participants (sports: soccer and boxing) and a main study with 31 participants (sports: soccer and BMX-Miniramp) were performed. The dimension (2D vs. 3D) and camera position (near vs. far) were manipulated for soccer and boxing. In addition for soccer, the field of view (small vs. large) was examined. Moreover, the direction of motion (horizontal vs. depth) was considered for BMX-Miniramp. Subjective assessments, behavioural tests and qualitative interviews were implemented. The results confirm a strong effect of 3D on both depth perception and spatial presence experience as well as selective influences of camera distance and field of view. The results can improve understanding of the perception and experience of 3D TV as a medium. Finally, recommendations are derived on how to use various 3D sports ideally as content for TV broadcasts.

  7. Graphical user interface for image acquisition and processing

    DOEpatents

    Goldberg, Kenneth A.

    2002-01-01

    An event-driven GUI-based image acquisition interface for the IDL programming environment designed for CCD camera control and image acquisition directly into the IDL environment where image manipulation and data analysis can be performed, and a toolbox of real-time analysis applications. Running the image acquisition hardware directly from IDL removes the necessity of first saving images in one program and then importing the data into IDL for analysis in a second step. Bringing the data directly into IDL creates an opportunity for the implementation of IDL image processing and display functions in real-time. program allows control over the available charge coupled device (CCD) detector parameters, data acquisition, file saving and loading, and image manipulation and processing, all from within IDL. The program is built using IDL's widget libraries to control the on-screen display and user interface.

  8. Natural User Interface Sensors for Human Body Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boehm, J.

    2012-08-01

    The recent push for natural user interfaces (NUI) in the entertainment and gaming industry has ushered in a new era of low cost three-dimensional sensors. While the basic idea of using a three-dimensional sensor for human gesture recognition dates some years back it is not until recently that such sensors became available on the mass market. The current market leader is PrimeSense who provide their technology for the Microsoft Xbox Kinect. Since these sensors are developed to detect and observe human users they should be ideally suited to measure the human body. We describe the technology of a line of NUI sensors and assess their performance in terms of repeatability and accuracy. We demonstrate the implementation of a prototype scanner integrating several NUI sensors to achieve full body coverage. We present the results of the obtained surface model of a human body.

  9. NASA Access Mechanism - Graphical user interface information retrieval system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Judy F.; Generous, Curtis; Duncan, Denise

    1993-01-01

    Access to online information sources of aerospace, scientific, and engineering data, a mission focus for NASA's Scientific and Technical Information Program, has always been limited by factors such as telecommunications, query language syntax, lack of standardization in the information, and the lack of adequate tools to assist in searching. Today, the NASA STI Program's NASA Access Mechanism (NAM) prototype offers a solution to these problems by providing the user with a set of tools that provide a graphical interface to remote, heterogeneous, and distributed information in a manner adaptable to both casual and expert users. Additionally, the NAM provides access to many Internet-based services such as Electronic Mail, the Wide Area Information Servers system, Peer Locating tools, and electronic bulletin boards.

  10. NASA access mechanism: Graphical user interface information retrieval system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Judy; Generous, Curtis; Duncan, Denise

    1993-01-01

    Access to online information sources of aerospace, scientific, and engineering data, a mission focus for NASA's Scientific and Technical Information Program, has always been limited to factors such as telecommunications, query language syntax, lack of standardization in the information, and the lack of adequate tools to assist in searching. Today, the NASA STI Program's NASA Access Mechanism (NAM) prototype offers a solution to these problems by providing the user with a set of tools that provide a graphical interface to remote, heterogeneous, and distributed information in a manner adaptable to both casual and expert users. Additionally, the NAM provides access to many Internet-based services such as Electronic Mail, the Wide Area Information Servers system, Peer Locating tools, and electronic bulletin boards.

  11. SRF Test Areas Cryogenic System Controls Graphical User Interface

    SciTech Connect

    DeGraff, B.D.; Ganster, G.; Klebaner, A.; Petrov, A.D.; Soyars, W.M.; /Fermilab

    2011-06-09

    Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory has constructed a superconducting 1.3 GHz cavity test facility at Meson Detector Building (MDB) and a superconducting 1.3 GHz cryomodule test facility located at the New Muon Lab Building (NML). The control of these 2K cryogenic systems is accomplished by using a Synoptic graphical user interface (GUI) to interact with the underlying Fermilab Accelerator Control System. The design, testing and operational experience of employing the Synoptic client-server system for graphical representation will be discussed. Details on the Synoptic deployment to the MDB and NML cryogenic sub-systems will also be discussed. The implementation of the Synoptic as the GUI for both NML and MDB has been a success. Both facilities are currently fulfilling their individual roles in SCRF testing as a result of successful availability of the cryogenic systems. The tools available for creating Synoptic pages will continue to be developed to serve the evolving needs of users.

  12. Evaluating 3D printing to solve the sample-to-device interface for LRS and POC diagnostics: example of an interlock meter-mix device for metering and lysing clinical urine samples.

    PubMed

    Jue, Erik; Schoepp, Nathan G; Witters, Daan; Ismagilov, Rustem F

    2016-05-21

    This paper evaluates the potential of 3D printing, a semi-automated additive prototyping technology, as a means to design and prototype a sample-to-device interface, amenable to diagnostics in limited-resource settings, where speed, accuracy and user-friendly design are critical components. As a test case, we built and validated an interlock meter-mix device for accurately metering and lysing human urine samples for use in downstream nucleic acid amplification. Two plungers and a multivalve generated and controlled fluid flow through the device and demonstrate the utility of 3D printing to create leak-free seals. Device operation consists of three simple steps that must be performed sequentially, eliminating manual pipetting and vortexing to provide rapid (5 to 10 s) and accurate metering and mixing. Bretherton's prediction was applied, using the bond number to guide a design that prevents potentially biohazardous samples from leaking from the device. We employed multi-material 3D printing technology, which allows composites with rigid and elastomeric properties to be printed as a single part. To validate the meter-mix device with a clinically relevant sample, we used urine spiked with inactivated Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae. A downstream nucleic acid amplification by quantitative PCR (qPCR) confirmed there was no statistically significant difference between samples metered and mixed using the standard protocol and those prepared with the meter-mix device, showing the 3D-printed device could accurately meter, mix and dispense a human urine sample without loss of nucleic acids. Although there are some limitations to 3D printing capabilities (e.g. dimension limitations related to support material used in the printing process), the advantages of customizability, modularity and rapid prototyping illustrate the utility of 3D printing for developing sample-to-device interfaces for diagnostics.

  13. A spatial user interface to the astronomical literature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poincot, P.; Lesteven, S.; Murtagh, F.

    1998-05-01

    We recall the properties of the Kohonen self-organizing feature map (SOM or SOFM), and explain how such maps can be used for information retrieval. We present an application to a bibliographic database. Our neural net can contain more than one level when necessary, which allows users to modify its spatial configuration. It is available for interactive use on the World-Wide Web (http://simbad.u-strasbg.fr/A+A/map.pl). The interface that we have designed for browsing in the documentary database will be explained in detail.

  14. Graphic user interface-based nuclear medicine reporting system.

    PubMed

    Sanger, J J

    1993-03-01

    A graphically based, computerized report generation program has been developed and deployed at a dozen nuclear medicine facilities. The system is based on the Macintosh graphical user interface (GUI) and has been designed to be easy to learn and use. The system allows the nuclear medicine practitioner to generate reports for any nuclear medicine or nuclear cardiology procedure without transcriptionist support, dramatically decreasing report turnaround time. The system includes a relational database engine that allows cost-effective storage and rapid retrieval of final reports and also supports facsimile transmission of reports directly to referring clinicians' offices.

  15. New kind of user interface for controlling MFTF diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Preckshot, G.G.; Saroyan, R.A.; Mead, J.E.

    1983-11-29

    The Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is faced with the problem of controlling a multitude of plasma diagnostics instruments from a central, multiprocessor computer facility. A 16-bit microprocessor-based workstation allows each physicist entree into the central multiprocessor, which consists of nine Perkin-Elmer 32-bit minicomputers. The workstation provides the user interface to the larger system, with display graphics, windowing, and a physics notebook. Controlling a diagnostic is now equivalent to making entries into a traditional physics notebook.

  16. Graphical user interface for wireless sensor networks simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paczesny, Tomasz; Paczesny, Daniel; Weremczuk, Jerzy

    2008-01-01

    Wireless Sensor Networks (WSN) are currently very popular area of development. It can be suited in many applications form military through environment monitoring, healthcare, home automation and others. Those networks, when working in dynamic, ad-hoc model, need effective protocols which must differ from common computer networks algorithms. Research on those protocols would be difficult without simulation tool, because real applications often use many nodes and tests on such a big networks take much effort and costs. The paper presents Graphical User Interface (GUI) for simulator which is dedicated for WSN studies, especially in routing and data link protocols evaluation.

  17. LTCP 2D Graphical User Interface. Application Description and User's Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ball, Robert; Navaz, Homayun K.

    1996-01-01

    A graphical user interface (GUI) written for NASA's LTCP (Liquid Thrust Chamber Performance) 2 dimensional computational fluid dynamic code is described. The GUI is written in C++ for a desktop personal computer running under a Microsoft Windows operating environment. Through the use of common and familiar dialog boxes, features, and tools, the user can easily and quickly create and modify input files for the LTCP code. In addition, old input files used with the LTCP code can be opened and modified using the GUI. The application is written in C++ for a desktop personal computer running under a Microsoft Windows operating environment. The program and its capabilities are presented, followed by a detailed description of each menu selection and the method of creating an input file for LTCP. A cross reference is included to help experienced users quickly find the variables which commonly need changes. Finally, the system requirements and installation instructions are provided.

  18. User's manual for FRAC3D: Supplement to report on stress analysis for structures with surface cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, J. C.; Hopper, A. T.; Hayes, P. A.

    1978-01-01

    The FRAC3D computer program, designed for use in analyzing stresses in structures (including plates, bars, or blocks) which may contain part-circular surface cracks or embedded circular cracks is described. Instructions are provided for preparing input, including that for the supporting programs LATTICE and MATSOL as well as for FRAC3D. The course of a substantial illustrative calculation is shown with both input and output. The formulas underlying the calculations are summarized and related to the subroutines in which they are used. Many issues of strategy in using this program for analysing stresses around surface cracks are elucidated.

  19. Neural correlates of user-initiated motor success and failure - A brain-computer interface perspective.

    PubMed

    Yazmir, Boris; Reiner, Miriam

    2016-11-02

    Any motor action is, by nature, potentially accompanied by human errors. In order to facilitate development of error-tailored Brain-Computer Interface (BCI) correction systems, we focused on internal, human-initiated errors, and investigated EEG correlates of user outcome successes and errors during a continuous 3D virtual tennis game against a computer player. We used a multisensory, 3D, highly immersive environment. Missing and repelling the tennis ball were considered, as 'error' (miss) and 'success' (repel). Unlike most previous studies, where the environment "encouraged" the participant to perform a mistake, here errors happened naturally, resulting from motor-perceptual-cognitive processes of incorrect estimation of the ball kinematics, and can be regarded as user internal, self-initiated errors. Results show distinct and well-defined Event-Related Potentials (ERPs), embedded in the ongoing EEG, that differ across conditions by waveforms, scalp signal distribution maps, source estimation results (sLORETA) and time-frequency patterns, establishing a series of typical features that allow valid discrimination between user internal outcome success and error. The significant delay in latency between positive peaks of error- and success-related ERPs, suggests a cross-talk between top-down and bottom-up processing, represented by an outcome recognition process, in the context of the game world. Success-related ERPs had a central scalp distribution, while error-related ERPs were centro-parietal. The unique characteristics and sharp differences between EEG correlates of error/success provide the crucial components for an improved BCI system. The features of the EEG waveform can be used to detect user action outcome, to be fed into the BCI correction system.

  20. SPIKY: a graphical user interface for monitoring spike train synchrony.

    PubMed

    Kreuz, Thomas; Mulansky, Mario; Bozanic, Nebojsa

    2015-05-01

    Techniques for recording large-scale neuronal spiking activity are developing very fast. This leads to an increasing demand for algorithms capable of analyzing large amounts of experimental spike train data. One of the most crucial and demanding tasks is the identification of similarity patterns with a very high temporal resolution and across different spatial scales. To address this task, in recent years three time-resolved measures of spike train synchrony have been proposed, the ISI-distance, the SPIKE-distance, and event synchronization. The Matlab source codes for calculating and visualizing these measures have been made publicly available. However, due to the many different possible representations of the results the use of these codes is rather complicated and their application requires some basic knowledge of Matlab. Thus it became desirable to provide a more user-friendly and interactive interface. Here we address this need and present SPIKY, a graphical user interface that facilitates the application of time-resolved measures of spike train synchrony to both simulated and real data. SPIKY includes implementations of the ISI-distance, the SPIKE-distance, and the SPIKE-synchronization (an improved and simplified extension of event synchronization) that have been optimized with respect to computation speed and memory demand. It also comprises a spike train generator and an event detector that makes it capable of analyzing continuous data. Finally, the SPIKY package includes additional complementary programs aimed at the analysis of large numbers of datasets and the estimation of significance levels.

  1. Bringing Control System User Interfaces to the Web

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Xihui; Kasemir, Kay

    2013-01-01

    With the evolution of web based technologies, especially HTML5 [1], it becomes possible to create web-based control system user interfaces (UI) that are cross-browser and cross-device compatible. This article describes two technologies that facilitate this goal. The first one is the WebOPI [2], which can seamlessly display CSS BOY [3] Operator Interfaces (OPI) in web browsers without modification to the original OPI file. The WebOPI leverages the powerful graphical editing capabilities of BOY and provides the convenience of re-using existing OPI files. On the other hand, it uses generic JavaScript and a generic communication mechanism between the web browser and web server. It is not optimized for a control system, which results in unnecessary network traffic and resource usage. Our second technology is the WebSocket-based Process Data Access (WebPDA) [4]. It is a protocol that provides efficient control system data communication using WebSocket [5], so that users can create web-based control system UIs using standard web page technologies such as HTML, CSS and JavaScript. WebPDA is control system independent, potentially supporting any type of control system.

  2. User's Guide for Subroutine PLOT3D. Physical Processes in Terrestrial and Aquatic Ecosystems, Computer Programs and Graphics Capabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gales, Larry

    This module is part of a series designed to be used by life science students for instruction in the application of physical theory to ecosystem operation. Most modules contain computer programs which are built around a particular application of a physical process. PLOT3D is a subroutine package which generates a variety of three dimensional hidden…

  3. User's Guide for Subroutine PRNT3D. Physical Processes in Terrestrial and Aquatic Ecosystems, Computer Programs and Graphics Capabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gales, Larry

    These materials were designed to be used by life science students for instruction in the application of physical theory to ecosystem operation. Most modules contain computer programs which are built around a particular application of a physical process. PRNT3D is a subroutine package which generates a variety of printer plot displays. The displays…

  4. Europeana and 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pletinckx, D.

    2011-09-01

    The current 3D hype creates a lot of interest in 3D. People go to 3D movies, but are we ready to use 3D in our homes, in our offices, in our communication? Are we ready to deliver real 3D to a general public and use interactive 3D in a meaningful way to enjoy, learn, communicate? The CARARE project is realising this for the moment in the domain of monuments and archaeology, so that real 3D of archaeological sites and European monuments will be available to the general public by 2012. There are several aspects to this endeavour. First of all is the technical aspect of flawlessly delivering 3D content over all platforms and operating systems, without installing software. We have currently a working solution in PDF, but HTML5 will probably be the future. Secondly, there is still little knowledge on how to create 3D learning objects, 3D tourist information or 3D scholarly communication. We are still in a prototype phase when it comes to integrate 3D objects in physical or virtual museums. Nevertheless, Europeana has a tremendous potential as a multi-facetted virtual museum. Finally, 3D has a large potential to act as a hub of information, linking to related 2D imagery, texts, video, sound. We describe how to create such rich, explorable 3D objects that can be used intuitively by the generic Europeana user and what metadata is needed to support the semantic linking.

  5. Historical Buildings Models and Their Handling via 3d Survey: from Points Clouds to User-Oriented Hbim

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiabrando, F.; Sammartano, G.; Spanò, A.

    2016-06-01

    This paper retraces some research activities and application of 3D survey techniques and Building Information Modelling (BIM) in the environment of Cultural Heritage. It describes the diffusion of as-built BIM approach in the last years in Heritage Assets management, the so-called Built Heritage Information Modelling/Management (BHIMM or HBIM), that is nowadays an important and sustainable perspective in documentation and administration of historic buildings and structures. The work focuses the documentation derived from 3D survey techniques that can be understood like a significant and unavoidable knowledge base for the BIM conception and modelling, in the perspective of a coherent and complete management and valorisation of CH. It deepens potentialities, offered by 3D integrated survey techniques, to acquire productively and quite easilymany 3D information, not only geometrical but also radiometric attributes, helping the recognition, interpretation and characterization of state of conservation and degradation of architectural elements. From these data, they provide more and more high descriptive models corresponding to the geometrical complexity of buildings or aggregates in the well-known 5D (3D + time and cost dimensions). Points clouds derived from 3D survey acquisition (aerial and terrestrial photogrammetry, LiDAR and their integration) are reality-based models that can be use in a semi-automatic way to manage, interpret, and moderately simplify geometrical shapes of historical buildings that are examples, as is well known, of non-regular and complex geometry, instead of modern constructions with simple and regular ones. In the paper, some of these issues are addressed and analyzed through some experiences regarding the creation and the managing of HBIMprojects on historical heritage at different scales, using different platforms and various workflow. The paper focuses on LiDAR data handling with the aim to manage and extract geometrical information; on

  6. An intuitive graphical user interface for small UAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stroumtsos, Nicholas; Gilbreath, Gary; Przybylski, Scott

    2013-05-01

    Thousands of small UAVs are in active use by the US military and are generally operated by trained but not necessarily skilled personnel. The user interfaces for these devices often seem to be more engineering-focused than usability-focused, which can lead to operator frustration, poor mission effectiveness, reduced situational awareness, and sometimes loss of the vehicle. In addition, coordinated control of both air and ground vehicles is a frequently desired objective, usually with the intent of increasing situational awareness for the ground vehicle. The Space and Naval Warfare Systems Center Pacific (SSCPAC) is working under a Naval Innovative Science and Engineering project to address these topics. The UAS currently targeted are the Raven/Puma/Wasp family of air vehicles as they are small, all share the same communications protocol, and are in wide-spread use. The stock ground control station (GCS) consists of a hand control unit, radio, interconnect hub, and laptop. The system has been simplified to an X-box controller, radio and a laptop, resulting in a smaller hardware footprint, but most importantly the number of personnel required to operate the system has been reduced from two to one. The stock displays, including video with text overlay on one and FalconView on the other, are replaced with a single, graphics-based, integrated user interface, providing the user with much improved situational awareness. The SSCPAC government-developed GCS (the Multi-robot Operator Control Unit) already has the ability to control ground robots and this is leveraged to realize simultaneous multi-vehicle operations including autonomous UAV over-watch for enhanced UGV situational awareness.

  7. SN_GUI: a graphical user interface for snowpack modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spreitzhofer, G.; Fierz, C.; Lehning, M.

    2004-10-01

    SNOWPACK is a physical snow cover model. The model not only serves as a valuable research tool, but also runs operationally on a network of high Alpine automatic weather and snow measurement sites. In order to facilitate the operation of SNOWPACK and the interpretation of the results obtained by this model, a user-friendly graphical user interface for snowpack modeling, named SN_GUI, was created. This Java-based and thus platform-independent tool can be operated in two modes, one designed to fulfill the requirements of avalanche warning services (e.g. by providing information about critical layers within the snowpack that are closely related to the avalanche activity), and the other one offering a variety of additional options satisfying the needs of researchers. The user of SN_GUI is graphically guided through the entire process of creating snow cover simulations. The starting point is the efficient creation of input parameter files for SNOWPACK, followed by the launching of SNOWPACK with a variety of parameter settings. Finally, after the successful termination of the run, a number of interactive display options may be used to visualize the model output. Among these are vertical profiles and time profiles for many parameters. Besides other features, SN_GUI allows the use of various color, time and coordinate scales, and the comparison of measured and observed parameters.

  8. Development of output user interface software to support analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Wahanani, Nursinta Adi Natsir, Khairina Hartini, Entin

    2014-09-30

    Data processing software packages such as VSOP and MCNPX are softwares that has been scientifically proven and complete. The result of VSOP and MCNPX are huge and complex text files. In the analyze process, user need additional processing like Microsoft Excel to show informative result. This research develop an user interface software for output of VSOP and MCNPX. VSOP program output is used to support neutronic analysis and MCNPX program output is used to support burn-up analysis. Software development using iterative development methods which allow for revision and addition of features according to user needs. Processing time with this software 500 times faster than with conventional methods using Microsoft Excel. PYTHON is used as a programming language, because Python is available for all major operating systems: Windows, Linux/Unix, OS/2, Mac, Amiga, among others. Values that support neutronic analysis are k-eff, burn-up and mass Pu{sup 239} and Pu{sup 241}. Burn-up analysis used the mass inventory values of actinide (Thorium, Plutonium, Neptunium and Uranium). Values are visualized in graphical shape to support analysis.

  9. Development of output user interface software to support analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahanani, Nursinta Adi; Natsir, Khairina; Hartini, Entin

    2014-09-01

    Data processing software packages such as VSOP and MCNPX are softwares that has been scientifically proven and complete. The result of VSOP and MCNPX are huge and complex text files. In the analyze process, user need additional processing like Microsoft Excel to show informative result. This research develop an user interface software for output of VSOP and MCNPX. VSOP program output is used to support neutronic analysis and MCNPX program output is used to support burn-up analysis. Software development using iterative development methods which allow for revision and addition of features according to user needs. Processing time with this software 500 times faster than with conventional methods using Microsoft Excel. PYTHON is used as a programming language, because Python is available for all major operating systems: Windows, Linux/Unix, OS/2, Mac, Amiga, among others. Values that support neutronic analysis are k-eff, burn-up and mass Pu239 and Pu241. Burn-up analysis used the mass inventory values of actinide (Thorium, Plutonium, Neptunium and Uranium). Values are visualized in graphical shape to support analysis.

  10. Emerging human-computer interface (HCI) design guidelines for graphical user interface (GUI)

    SciTech Connect

    Bowser, S.E.; Adams, S.M.

    1993-10-01

    The requirement to establish baseline style references for Graphical User Interfaces (GUIs) is recognized. The ability to obtain consensus among user communities has been limited to nonexistent. The authors are part of a team that has developed a generic baseline human-computer interface (HCI) style guide for the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD). The DoD HCI Style Guide has its origin in a style guide developed by the intelligence community and in human factors design guidelines developed for Army tactical command and control systems. The DoD HCI Style Guide is intended to be a baseline style reference for the design of HCIs within DoD. The needs of specific user communities have been addressed by including addenda that expand on the baseline and address focus areas of interest. The conclusion is that an overall or general style guide should be adopted for GUIs with allowance for specialized user group requirements and additions. The anticipated results would be higher productivity and reduced training and development time.

  11. User interface guidelines for the Integrated Booking System prototype (IBS-P)

    SciTech Connect

    Truett, T.; Yow, T. ); Wheeler, V.; Stamm, S.; Valentine, D. . Transportation Center)

    1991-05-01

    The User Interface Guidelines for the Integrated Booking System -- Prototype (IBS-P) describes the design requirements for the human- computer interface. The user interface design conforms to standards reported in the open literature as well as to standards provided through Department of Defense guidelines. The IBS-P interface was evaluated by personnel at Headquarters Military Traffic Management Command (MTMC) and at each of the MTMC Area Commands. As a result of comments received during demonstrations of the prototype at these sites, modifications to the design were made, as appropriate. The user interfaces was well accepted by the end users.

  12. Presentation of dynamically overlapping auditory messages in user interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Papp, III, Albert Louis

    1997-09-01

    This dissertation describes a methodology and example implementation for the dynamic regulation of temporally overlapping auditory messages in computer-user interfaces. The regulation mechanism exists to schedule numerous overlapping auditory messages in such a way that each individual message remains perceptually distinct from all others. The method is based on the research conducted in the area of auditory scene analysis. While numerous applications have been engineered to present the user with temporally overlapped auditory output, they have generally been designed without any structured method of controlling the perceptual aspects of the sound. The method of scheduling temporally overlapping sounds has been extended to function in an environment where numerous applications can present sound independently of each other. The Centralized Audio Presentation System is a global regulation mechanism that controls all audio output requests made from all currently running applications. The notion of multimodal objects is explored in this system as well. Each audio request that represents a particular message can include numerous auditory representations, such as musical motives and voice. The Presentation System scheduling algorithm selects the best representation according to the current global auditory system state, and presents it to the user within the request constraints of priority and maximum acceptable latency. The perceptual conflicts between temporally overlapping audio messages are examined in depth through the Computational Auditory Scene Synthesizer. At the heart of this system is a heuristic-based auditory scene synthesis scheduling method. Different schedules of overlapped sounds are evaluated and assigned penalty scores. High scores represent presentations that include perceptual conflicts between over-lapping sounds. Low scores indicate fewer and less serious conflicts. A user study was conducted to validate that the perceptual difficulties predicted by

  13. Implementing a Multiple Criteria Model Base in Co-Op with a Graphical User Interface Generator

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-09-23

    Decision Support System (Co-op) for Windows. The algorithms and the graphical user interfaces for these modules are implemented using Microsoft Visual ... Basic under the Windows based environment operating in a IBM compatible microcomputer. Design of the MCDM programs interface is based on general interface design principles of user control, screen design, and layout.

  14. Brain-Computer Interface Users Speak Up: The Virtual Users' Forum at the 2013 International Brain-Computer Interface Meeting

    PubMed Central

    Peters, B; Bieker, G; Heckman, SM; Huggins, JE; Wolf, C; Zeitlin, D; Fried-Oken, M

    2015-01-01

    Over 300 researchers gathered at the 2013 International Brain-Computer Interface (BCI) Meeting to discuss current practice and future goals for BCI research and development. The authors organized the Virtual Users’ Forum at the meeting to provide the BCI community with feedback from users. We report on the Virtual Users’ Forum, including initial results from ongoing research being conducted by two BCI groups. Online surveys and in-person interviews were used to solicit feedback from people with disabilities who are expert and novice BCI users. For the Virtual Users’ Forum, their responses were organized into four major themes: current (non-BCI) communication methods, experiences with BCI research, challenges of current BCIs, and future BCI developments. Two authors with severe disabilities gave presentations during the Virtual Users’ Forum, and their comments are integrated with the other results. While participants’ hopes for BCIs of the future remain high, their comments about available systems mirror those made by consumers about conventional assistive technology. They reflect concerns about reliability (e.g. typing accuracy/speed), utility (e.g. applications and the desire for real-time interactions), ease of use (e.g. portability and system setup), and support (e.g. technical support and caregiver training). People with disabilities, as target users of BCI systems, can provide valuable feedback and input on the development of BCI as an assistive technology. To this end, participatory action research (PAR) should be considered as a valuable methodology for future BCI research. PMID:25721545

  15. A user friendly interface for microwave tomography enhanced GPR surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catapano, Ilaria; Affinito, Antonio; Soldovieri, Francesco

    2013-04-01

    Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) systems are nowadays widely used in civil applications among which structural monitoring is one of the most critical issues due to its importance in terms of risks prevents and cost effective management of the structure itself. Despite GPR systems are assessed devices, there is a continuous interest towards their optimization, which involves both hardware and software aspects, with the common final goal to achieve accurate and highly informative images while keeping as low as possible difficulties and times involved in on field surveys. As far as data processing is concerned, one of the key aims is the development of imaging approaches capable of providing images easily interpretable by not expert users while keeping feasible the requirements in terms of computational resources. To satisfy this request or at least improve the reconstruction capabilities of data processing tools actually available in commercial GPR systems, microwave tomographic approaches based on the Born approximation have been developed and tested in several practical conditions, such as civil and archeological investigations, sub-service monitoring, security surveys and so on [1-3]. However, the adoption of these approaches is subjected to the involvement of expert workers, which have to be capable of properly managing the gathered data and their processing, which involves the solution of a linear inverse scattering problem. In order to overcome this drawback, aim of this contribution is to present an end-user friendly software interface that makes possible a simple management of the microwave tomographic approaches. In particular, the proposed interface allows us to upload both synthetic and experimental data sets saved in .txt, .dt and .dt1 formats, to perform all the steps needed to obtain tomographic images and to display raw-radargrams, intermediate and final results. By means of the interface, the users can apply time gating, back-ground removal or both to

  16. 3D printed, bio-inspired prototypes and analytical models for structured suture interfaces with geometrically-tuned deformation and failure behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Erica; Li, Yaning; Ortiz, Christine; Boyce, Mary C.

    2014-12-01

    Geometrically structured interfaces in nature possess enhanced, and often surprising, mechanical properties, and provide inspiration for materials design. This paper investigates the mechanics of deformation and failure mechanisms of suture interface designs through analytical models and experiments on 3D printed polymer physical prototypes. Suture waveforms with generalized trapezoidal geometries (trapezoidal, rectangular, anti-trapezoidal, and triangular) are studied and characterized by several important geometric parameters: the presence or absence of a bonded tip region, the tip angle, and the geometry. It is shown that a wide range (in some cases as great as an order of magnitude) in stiffness, strength, and toughness is achievable dependent on tip bonding, tip angle, and geometry. Suture interfaces with a bonded tip region exhibit a higher initial stiffness due to the greater load bearing by the skeletal teeth, a double peak in the stress-strain curve corresponding to the failure of the bonded tip and the failure of the slanted interface region or tooth, respectively, and an additional failure and toughening mechanism due to the failure of the bonded tip. Anti-trapezoidal geometries promote the greatest amplification of properties for suture interfaces with a bonded tip due the large tip interface area. The tip angle and geometry govern the stress distributions in the teeth and the ratio of normal to shear stresses in the interfacial layers, which together determine the failure mechanism of the interface and/or the teeth. Rectangular suture interfaces fail by simple shearing of the interfaces. Trapezoidal and triangular suture interfaces fail by a combination of shear and tensile normal stresses in the interface, leading to plastic deformation, cavitation events, and subsequent stretching of interface ligaments with mostly elastic deformation in the teeth. Anti-trapezoidal suture interfaces with small tip angles have high stress concentrations in the teeth

  17. Interacting with a security system: The Argus user interface

    SciTech Connect

    Behrin, E.; Davis, G.E.

    1993-12-31

    In the mid-1980s the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) developed the Argus Security System. Key requirements were to eliminate the telephone as a verification device for opening and closing alarm stations and to allow need-to-know access through local enrollment at alarm stations. Resulting from these requirements was an LLNL-designed user interface called the Remote Access Panel (RAP). The Argus RAP interacts with Argus field processors to allow secure station mode changes and local station enrollment, provides user direction and response, and assists station maintenance personnel. It consists of a tamper-detecting housing containing a badge reader, a keypad with sight screen, special-purpose push buttons and a liquid-crystal display. This paper discusses Argus system concepts, RAP design, functional characteristics and its physical configurations. The paper also describes the RAP`s use in access-control booths, it`s integration with biometrics and its operation for multi-person-rule stations and compartmented facilities.

  18. Graphical User Interface Development for Representing Air Flow Patterns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chaudhary, Nilika

    2004-01-01

    In the Turbine Branch, scientists carry out experimental and computational work to advance the efficiency and diminish the noise production of jet engine turbines. One way to do this is by decreasing the heat that the turbine blades receive. Most of the experimental work is carried out by taking a single turbine blade and analyzing the air flow patterns around it, because this data indicates the sections of the turbine blade that are getting too hot. Since the cost of doing turbine blade air flow experiments is very high, researchers try to do computational work that fits the experimental data. The goal of computational fluid dynamics is for scientists to find a numerical way to predict the complex flow patterns around different turbine blades without physically having to perform tests or costly experiments. When visualizing flow patterns, scientists need a way to represent the flow conditions around a turbine blade. A researcher will assign specific zones that surround the turbine blade. In a two-dimensional view, the zones are usually quadrilaterals. The next step is to assign boundary conditions which define how the flow enters or exits one side of a zone. way of setting up computational zones and grids, visualizing flow patterns, and storing all the flow conditions in a file on the computer for future computation. Such a program is necessary because the only method for creating flow pattern graphs is by hand, which is tedious and time-consuming. By using a computer program to create the zones and grids, the graph would be faster to make and easier to edit. Basically, the user would run a program that is an editable graph. The user could click and drag with the mouse to form various zones and grids, then edit the locations of these grids, add flow and boundary conditions, and finally save the graph for future use and analysis. My goal this summer is to create a graphical user interface (GUI) that incorporates all of these elements. I am writing the program in

  19. Designing a user interface for service operations of an intelligent mobile manipulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Hong; Van Brussel, Hendrik; Moreas, R.

    1997-12-01

    User interfaces play an increasingly important role in robot applications. This paper presents the design and implementation of a multi-modal user interface for a mobile manipulator, consisting of an autonomous vehicle with a manipulator on it. It is capable of navigating in a real world and doing useful manipulations. The system is intended to provide services for handicapped people. The user interface is crucial for such a user to benefit from the services. The user interface designed for the system makes advantage of multimedia technology and combines graphics, speech and visualization into a coherent multi-modal interface. It serves as a user command interpreter, robot monitor and simulator. A user-centered design approach is adopted for enhanced understandability and usability.

  20. Developing the Multimedia User Interface Component (MUSIC) for the Icarus Presentation System (IPS)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-12-01

    AD-A276 341 In-House Report December 1993 DEVELOPING THE MULTIMEDIA USER INTERFACE COMPONENT ( MUSIC ) FOR THE ICARUS PRESENTATION SYSTEM (IPS) Ingrid...DATEs COVERED 7 December 1993 Ina-House Jun - Aug 93 4 TWLE AM SL1sM1E & FUNDING NUMBERS DEVELOPING THE MULTIMEDIA USER INTERFACE COMPONENT ( MUSIC ) PE...the Multimedia User Interface Component ( MUSIC ). This report documents the initial research, design and implementation of a prototype of the MUSIC

  1. Probabilistic rainfall warning system with an interactive user interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koistinen, Jarmo; Hohti, Harri; Kauhanen, Janne; Kilpinen, Juha; Kurki, Vesa; Lauri, Tuomo; Nurmi, Pertti; Rossi, Pekka; Jokelainen, Miikka; Heinonen, Mari; Fred, Tommi; Moisseev, Dmitri; Mäkelä, Antti

    2013-04-01

    citizens and professional end users applies SMS messages and, in near future, smartphone maps. The present interactive user interface facilitates free selection of alert sites and two warning thresholds (any rain, heavy rain) at any location in Finland. The pilot service was tested by 1000-3000 users during summers 2010 and 2012. As an example of dedicated end-user services gridded exceedance scenarios (of probabilities 5 %, 50 % and 90 %) of hourly rainfall accumulations for the next 3 hours have been utilized as an online input data for the influent model at the Greater Helsinki Wastewater Treatment Plant.

  2. Stand-alone digital data storage control system including user control interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, Kenneth D. (Inventor); Gray, David L. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A storage control system includes an apparatus and method for user control of a storage interface to operate a storage medium to store data obtained by a real-time data acquisition system. Digital data received in serial format from the data acquisition system is first converted to a parallel format and then provided to the storage interface. The operation of the storage interface is controlled in accordance with instructions based on user control input from a user. Also, a user status output is displayed in accordance with storage data obtained from the storage interface. By allowing the user to control and monitor the operation of the storage interface, a stand-alone, user-controllable data storage system is provided for storing the digital data obtained by a real-time data acquisition system.

  3. 3D Time Dependent Stokes Vector Radiative Transfer in an Atmosphere-Ocean System Including a Stochastic Interface

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    phase matrix were determined by letting the elements of the reduced phase matrix ( ˜ P ij = Pij /P11) be equal to those of the reduced Rayleigh...for the solution of 3-D Radiative Transfer Problems”, JQSRT. 45. 47-56, (1991) 3. A. Sánchez, T.F. Smith, and W. F. Krajewski “A three-dimensional...F. Krajewski , “A Multi-dimensional Discrete Ordinates Method for Polarized Radiative Transfer, Part I: Validation for Randomly Oriented

  4. 3D Time Dependent Stokes Vector Radiative Transfer in an Atmosphere-Ocean System Including a Stochastic Interface

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-30

    vector Monte Carlo code to calculate what is known as SOES (Spatial Offset Elastic Scattering ). We have used our method to calculate the SOES signal... scattering properties, such as different single scattering albedo, different phase function and different phase matrix. Our new 3D vector Monte Carlo ...feature about the asymptotic light field is that it depends profoundly on both the single scattering albedo as well as the phase function of the medium

  5. A method of designing smartphone interface based on the extended user's mental model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Wei; Li, Fengmin; Bian, Jiali; Pan, Juchen; Song, Song

    2017-01-01

    The user's mental model is the core guiding theory of product design, especially practical products. The essence of practical product is a tool which is used by users to meet their needs. Then, the most important feature of a tool is usability. The design method based on the user's mental model provides a series of practical and feasible theoretical guidance for improving the usability of the product according to the user's awareness of things. In this paper, we propose a method of designing smartphone interface based on the extended user's mental model according to further research on user groups. This approach achieves personalized customization of smartphone application interface and enhance application using efficiency.

  6. A 3D immersed finite element method with non-homogeneous interface flux jump for applications in particle-in-cell simulations of plasma-lunar surface interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Daoru; Wang, Pu; He, Xiaoming; Lin, Tao; Wang, Joseph

    2016-09-01

    Motivated by the need to handle complex boundary conditions efficiently and accurately in particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations, this paper presents a three-dimensional (3D) linear immersed finite element (IFE) method with non-homogeneous flux jump conditions for solving electrostatic field involving complex boundary conditions using structured meshes independent of the interface. This method treats an object boundary as part of the simulation domain and solves the electric field at the boundary as an interface problem. In order to resolve charging on a dielectric surface, a new 3D linear IFE basis function is designed for each interface element to capture the electric field jump on the interface. Numerical experiments are provided to demonstrate the optimal convergence rates in L2 and H1 norms of the IFE solution. This new IFE method is integrated into a PIC method for simulations involving charging of a complex dielectric surface in a plasma. A numerical study of plasma-surface interactions at the lunar terminator is presented to demonstrate the applicability of the new method.

  7. Hand Controlled Manipulation of Single Molecules via a Scanning Probe Microscope with a 3D Virtual Reality Interface.

    PubMed

    Leinen, Philipp; Green, Matthew F B; Esat, Taner; Wagner, Christian; Tautz, F Stefan; Temirov, Ruslan

    2016-10-02

    Considering organic molecules as the functional building blocks of future nanoscale technology, the question of how to arrange and assemble such building blocks in a bottom-up approach is still open. The scanning probe microscope (SPM) could be a tool of choice; however, SPM-based manipulation was until recently limited to two dimensions (2D). Binding the SPM tip to a molecule at a well-defined position opens an opportunity of controlled manipulation in 3D space. Unfortunately, 3D manipulation is largely incompatible with the typical 2D-paradigm of viewing and generating SPM data on a computer. For intuitive and efficient manipulation we therefore couple a low-temperature non-contact atomic force/scanning tunneling microscope (LT NC-AFM/STM) to a motion capture system and fully immersive virtual reality goggles. This setup permits "hand controlled manipulation" (HCM), in which the SPM tip is moved according to the motion of the experimenter's hand, while the tip trajectories as well as the response of the SPM junction are visualized in 3D. HCM paves the way to the development of complex manipulation protocols, potentially leading to a better fundamental understanding of nanoscale interactions acting between molecules on surfaces. Here we describe the setup and the steps needed to achieve successful hand-controlled molecular manipulation within the virtual reality environment.

  8. Building a Relationship between Robot Characteristics and Teleoperation User Interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Mortimer, Michael; Horan, Ben; Seyedmahmoudian, Mehdi

    2017-01-01

    The Robot Operating System (ROS) provides roboticists with a standardized and distributed framework for real-time communication between robotic systems using a microkernel environment. This paper looks at how ROS metadata, Unified Robot Description Format (URDF), Semantic Robot Description Format (SRDF), and its message description language, can be used to identify key robot characteristics to inform User Interface (UI) design for the teleoperation of heterogeneous robot teams. Logical relationships between UI components and robot characteristics are defined by a set of relationship rules created using relevant and available information including developer expertise and ROS metadata. This provides a significant opportunity to move towards a rule-driven approach for generating the designs of teleoperation UIs; in particular the reduction of the number of different UI configurations required to teleoperate each individual robot within a heterogeneous robot team. This approach is based on using an underlying rule set identifying robots that can be teleoperated using the same UI configuration due to having the same or similar robot characteristics. Aside from reducing the number of different UI configurations an operator needs to be familiar with, this approach also supports consistency in UI configurations when a teleoperator is periodically switching between different robots. To achieve this aim, a Matlab toolbox is developed providing users with the ability to define rules specifying the relationship between robot characteristics and UI components. Once rules are defined, selections that best describe the characteristics of the robot type within a particular heterogeneous robot team can be made. A main advantage of this approach is that rather than specifying discrete robots comprising the team, the user can specify characteristics of the team more generally allowing the system to deal with slight variations that may occur in the future. In fact, by using the

  9. Evaluation of tangible user interfaces for command and control in virtual environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Havig, Paul; McIntire, John; Compton, Andrew; Heft, Eric

    2008-04-01

    One of the difficulties that arise in trying to navigate through or interact with a 3D virtual environment is the fact that the standard 2D mouse with only two degrees of freedom does not lend itself to being used effectively where six degrees of motion are possible. Through the use of both a mouse and keyboard, one is able to interact in three degrees but never in all six at the same time, thus making interaction cumbersome at best. We test out a series of both commercial-off-the-shelf and in-house prototype tangible user interfaces (TUIs) to characterize multiple interaction methods within a virtual environment for command and control applications. Various aspects of navigation, including moving through the virtual world, as well as directly manipulating the world itself, are compared. We attempt to determine which interfaces are most appropriate for specific types of command and control tasks. We conclude with recommendations for the use of TUIs as well as ideas for future research.

  10. Influence of Learning Styles on Graphical User Interface Preferences for e-Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dedic, Velimir; Markovic, Suzana

    2012-01-01

    Implementing Web-based educational environment requires not only developing appropriate architectures, but also incorporating human factors considerations. User interface becomes the major channel to convey information in e-learning context: a well-designed and friendly enough interface is thus the key element in helping users to get the best…

  11. Integrating User Interface and Personal Innovativeness into the TAM for Mobile Learning in Cyber University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joo, Young Ju; Lee, Hyeon Woo; Ham, Yookyoung

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to add new variables, namely user interface, personal innovativeness, and satisfaction in learning, to Davis's technology acceptance model and also examine whether learners are willing to adopt mobile learning. Thus, this study attempted to explain the structural causal relationships among user interface, personal…

  12. 3D Time Dependent Stokes Vector Radiative Transfer in an Atmosphere-Ocean System Including a Stochastic Interface

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-09-30

    An efficient method for the solution of 3-D Radiative Transfer Problems”, JQSRT. 45. 47-56, (1991) 3. A. Sánchez, T.F. Smith, and W. F. Krajewski ...Haferman, T. F. Smith, and W. F. Krajewski , “A Multi-dimensional Discrete Ordinates Method for Polarized Radiative Transfer, Part I: Validation for...Operator Theory of Radiative Transfer. II. Scattering from Maritime Haze,” Appl. Opt. l2, 1071-1084 (1973). PUBLICATIONS 1. P . Zhai, G. W. Kattawar

  13. 3D polyaniline porous layer anchored pillared graphene sheets: enhanced interface joined with high conductivity for better charge storage applications.

    PubMed

    Sekar, Pandiaraj; Anothumakkool, Bihag; Kurungot, Sreekumar

    2015-04-15

    Here, we report synthesis of a 3-dimensional (3D) porous polyaniline (PANI) anchored on pillared graphene (G-PANI-PA) as an efficient charge storage material for supercapacitor applications. Benzoic acid (BA) anchored graphene, having spatially separated graphene layers (G-Bz-COOH), was used as a structure controlling support whereas 3D PANI growth has been achieved by a simple chemical oxidation of aniline in the presence of phytic acid (PA). The BA groups on G-Bz-COOH play a critical role in preventing the restacking of graphene to achieve a high surface area of 472 m(2)/g compared to reduced graphene oxide (RGO, 290 m(2)/g). The carboxylic acid (-COOH) group controls the rate of polymerization to achieve a compact polymer structure with micropores whereas the chelating nature of PA plays a crucial role to achieve the 3D growth pattern of PANI. This type of controlled interplay helps G-PANI-PA to achieve a high conductivity of 3.74 S/cm all the while maintaining a high surface area of 330 m(2)/g compared to PANI-PA (0.4 S/cm and 60 m(2)/g). G-PANI-PA thus conceives the characteristics required for facile charge mobility during fast charge-discharge cycles, which results in a high specific capacitance of 652 F/g for the composite. Owing to the high surface area along with high conductivity, G-PANI-PA displays a stable specific capacitance of 547 F/g even with a high mass loading of 3 mg/cm(2), an enhanced areal capacitance of 1.52 F/cm(2), and a volumetric capacitance of 122 F/cm(3). The reduced charge-transfer resistance (RCT) of 0.67 Ω displayed by G-PANI-PA compared to pure PANI (0.79 Ω) stands out as valid evidence of the improved charge mobility achieved by the system by growing the 3D PANI layer along the spatially separated layers of the graphene sheets. The low RCT helps the system to display capacitance retention as high as 65% even under a high current dragging condition of 10 A/g. High charge/discharge rates and good cycling stability are the other

  14. Guidelines for the integration of audio cues into computer user interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Sumikawa, D.A.

    1985-06-01

    Throughout the history of computers, vision has been the main channel through which information is conveyed to the computer user. As the complexities of man-machine interactions increase, more and more information must be transferred from the computer to the user and then successfully interpreted by the user. A logical next step in the evolution of the computer-user interface is the incorporation of sound and thereby using the sense of ''hearing'' in the computer experience. This allows our visual and auditory capabilities to work naturally together in unison leading to more effective and efficient interpretation of all information received by the user from the computer. This thesis presents an initial set of guidelines to assist interface developers in designing an effective sight and sound user interface. This study is a synthesis of various aspects of sound, human communication, computer-user interfaces, and psychoacoustics. We introduce the notion of an earcon. Earcons are audio cues used in the computer-user interface to provide information and feedback to the user about some computer object, operation, or interaction. A possible construction technique for earcons, the use of earcons in the interface, how earcons are learned and remembered, and the affects of earcons on their users are investigated. This study takes the point of view that earcons are a language and human/computer communication issue and are therefore analyzed according to the three dimensions of linguistics; syntactics, semantics, and pragmatics.

  15. DiAs User Interface: A Patient-Centric Interface for Mobile Artificial Pancreas Systems

    PubMed Central

    Keith-Hynes, Patrick; Guerlain, Stephanie; Mize, Benton; Hughes-Karvetski, Colleen; Khan, Momin; McElwee-Malloy, Molly; Kovatchev, Boris P.

    2013-01-01

    Background Recent in-hospital studies of artificial pancreas (AP) systems have shown promising results in improving glycemic control in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus. The next logical step in AP development is to conduct transitional outpatient clinical trials with a mobile system that is controlled by the patient. In this article, we present the user interface (UI) of the Diabetes Assistant (DiAs), an experimental smartphone-based mobile AP system, and describe the reactions of a round of focus groups to the UI. This work is an initial inquiry involving a relatively small number of potential users, many of whom had never seen an AP system before, and the results should be understood in that light. Methods We began by considering how the UI of an AP system could be designed to make use of the familiar touch-based graphical UI of a consumer smartphone. After developing a working prototype UI, we enlisted a human factors specialist to perform a heuristic expert analysis. Next we conducted a formative evaluation of the UI through a series of three focus groups with N = 13 potential end users as participants. The UI was modified based upon the results of these studies, and the resulting DiAs system was used in transitional outpatient AP studies of adults in the United States and Europe. Results The DiAs UI was modified based on focus group feedback from potential users. The DiAs was subsequently used in JDRF- and AP@Home-sponsored transitional outpatient AP studies in the United States and Europe by 40 subjects for 2400 h with no adverse events. Conclusions Adult patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus are able to control an AP system successfully using a patient-centric UI on a commercial smartphone in a transitional outpatient environment. PMID:24351168

  16. Tilted planes in 3D image analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pargas, Roy P.; Staples, Nancy J.; Malloy, Brian F.; Cantrell, Ken; Chhatriwala, Murtuza

    1998-03-01

    Reliable 3D wholebody scanners which output digitized 3D images of a complete human body are now commercially available. This paper describes a software package, called 3DM, being developed by researchers at Clemson University and which manipulates and extracts measurements from such images. The focus of this paper is on tilted planes, a 3DM tool which allows a user to define a plane through a scanned image, tilt it in any direction, and effectively define three disjoint regions on the image: the points on the plane and the points on either side of the plane. With tilted planes, the user can accurately take measurements required in applications such as apparel manufacturing. The user can manually segment the body rather precisely. Tilted planes assist the user in analyzing the form of the body and classifying the body in terms of body shape. Finally, titled planes allow the user to eliminate extraneous and unwanted points often generated by a 3D scanner. This paper describes the user interface for tilted planes, the equations defining the plane as the user moves it through the scanned image, an overview of the algorithms, and the interaction of the tilted plane feature with other tools in 3DM.

  17. SNL3dFace

    SciTech Connect

    Russ, Trina; Koch, Mark; Koudelka, Melissa; Peters, Ralph; Little, Charles; Boehnen, Chris; Peters, Tanya

    2007-07-20

    This software distribution contains MATLAB and C++ code to enable identity verification using 3D images that may or may not contain a texture component. The code is organized to support system performance testing and system capability demonstration through the proper configuration of the available user interface. Using specific algorithm parameters the face recognition system has been demonstrated to achieve a 96.6% verification rate (Pd) at 0.001 false alarm rate. The system computes robust facial features of a 3D normalized face using Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Fisher Linear Discriminant Analysis (FLDA). A 3D normalized face is obtained by alighning each face, represented by a set of XYZ coordinated, to a scaled reference face using the Iterative Closest Point (ICP) algorithm. The scaled reference face is then deformed to the input face using an iterative framework with parameters that control the deformed surface regulation an rate of deformation. A variety of options are available to control the information that is encoded by the PCA. Such options include the XYZ coordinates, the difference of each XYZ coordinates from the reference, the Z coordinate, the intensity/texture values, etc. In addition to PCA/FLDA feature projection this software supports feature matching to obtain similarity matrices for performance analysis. In addition, this software supports visualization of the STL, MRD, 2D normalized, and PCA synthetic representations in a 3D environment.

  18. Development and Evaluation of Nursing User Interface Screens Using Multiple Methods

    PubMed Central

    Hyun, Sookyung; Johnson, Stephen B.; Stetson, Peter D.; Bakken, Suzanne

    2009-01-01

    Building upon the foundation of the Structured Narrative electronic health record (EHR) model, we applied theory-based (combined Technology Acceptance Model and Task-Technology Fit Model) and user-centered methods to explore nurses’ perceptions of functional requirements for an electronic nursing documentation system, design user interface screens reflective of the nurses’ perspectives, and assess nurses’ perceptions of the usability of the prototype user interface screens. The methods resulted in user interface screens that were perceived to be easy to use, potentially useful, and well-matched to nursing documentation tasks associated with Nursing Admission Assessment, Blood Administration, and Nursing Discharge Summary. The methods applied in this research may serve as a guide for others wishing to implement user-centered processes to develop or extend EHR systems. In addition, some of the insights obtained in this study may be informative to the development of safe and efficient user interface screens for nursing document templates in EHRs. PMID:19460464

  19. A new 3-D ray tracing method based on LTI using successive partitioning of cell interfaces and traveltime gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Dong; Zhang, Ting-Ting; Zhang, Xiao-Lei; Yang, Yan; Hu, Ying; Qin, Qian-Qing

    2013-05-01

    We present a new method of three-dimensional (3-D) seismic ray tracing, based on an improvement to the linear traveltime interpolation (LTI) ray tracing algorithm. This new technique involves two separate steps. The first involves a forward calculation based on the LTI method and the dynamic successive partitioning scheme, which is applied to calculate traveltimes on cell boundaries and assumes a wavefront that expands from the source to all grid nodes in the computational domain. We locate several dynamic successive partition points on a cell's surface, the traveltimes of which can be calculated by linear interpolation between the vertices of the cell's boundary. The second is a backward step that uses Fermat's principle and the fact that the ray path is always perpendicular to the wavefront and follows the negative traveltime gradient. In this process, the first-arriving ray path can be traced from the receiver to the source along the negative traveltime gradient, which can be calculated by reconstructing the continuous traveltime field with cubic B-spline interpolation. This new 3-D ray tracing method is compared with the LTI method and the shortest path method (SPM) through a number of numerical experiments. These comparisons show obvious improvements to computed traveltimes and ray paths, both in precision and computational efficiency.

  20. Urbanisation and 3d Spatial - a Geometric Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duncan, E. E.; Rahman, A. Abdul

    2013-09-01

    Urbanisation creates immense competition for space, this may be attributed to an increase in population owing to domestic and external tourism. Most cities are constantly exploring all avenues in maximising its limited space. Hence, urban or city authorities need to plan, expand and use such three dimensional (3D) space above, on and below the city space. Thus, difficulties in property ownership and the geometric representation of the 3D city space is a major challenge. This research, investigates the concept of representing a geometric topological 3D spatial model capable of representing 3D volume parcels for man-made constructions above and below the 3D surface volume parcel. A review of spatial data models suggests that the 3D TIN (TEN) model is significant and can be used as a unified model. The concepts, logical and physical models of 3D TIN for 3D volumes using tetrahedrons as the base geometry is presented and implemented to show man-made constructions above and below the surface parcel within a user friendly graphical interface. Concepts for 3D topology and 3D analysis are discussed. Simulations of this model for 3D cadastre are implemented. This model can be adopted by most countries to enhance and streamline geometric 3D property ownership for urban centres. 3D TIN concept for spatial modelling can be adopted for the LA_Spatial part of the Land Administration Domain Model (LADM) (ISO/TC211, 2012), this satisfies the concept of 3D volumes.

  1. 3D-GNOME: an integrated web service for structural modeling of the 3D genome.

    PubMed

    Szalaj, Przemyslaw; Michalski, Paul J; Wróblewski, Przemysław; Tang, Zhonghui; Kadlof, Michal; Mazzocco, Giovanni; Ruan, Yijun; Plewczynski, Dariusz

    2016-07-08

    Recent advances in high-throughput chromosome conformation capture (3C) technology, such as Hi-C and ChIA-PET, have demonstrated the importance of 3D genome organization in development, cell differentiation and transcriptional regulation. There is now a widespread need for computational tools to generate and analyze 3D structural models from 3C data. Here we introduce our 3D GeNOme Modeling Engine (3D-GNOME), a web service which generates 3D structures from 3C data and provides tools to visually inspect and annotate the resulting structures, in addition to a variety of statistical plots and heatmaps which characterize the selected genomic region. Users submit a bedpe (paired-end BED format) file containing the locations and strengths of long range contact points, and 3D-GNOME simulates the structure and provides a convenient user interface for further analysis. Alternatively, a user may generate structures using published ChIA-PET data for the GM12878 cell line by simply specifying a genomic region of interest. 3D-GNOME is freely available at http://3dgnome.cent.uw.edu.pl/.

  2. 3D-GNOME: an integrated web service for structural modeling of the 3D genome

    PubMed Central

    Szalaj, Przemyslaw; Michalski, Paul J.; Wróblewski, Przemysław; Tang, Zhonghui; Kadlof, Michal; Mazzocco, Giovanni; Ruan, Yijun; Plewczynski, Dariusz

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in high-throughput chromosome conformation capture (3C) technology, such as Hi-C and ChIA-PET, have demonstrated the importance of 3D genome organization in development, cell differentiation and transcriptional regulation. There is now a widespread need for computational tools to generate and analyze 3D structural models from 3C data. Here we introduce our 3D GeNOme Modeling Engine (3D-GNOME), a web service which generates 3D structures from 3C data and provides tools to visually inspect and annotate the resulting structures, in addition to a variety of statistical plots and heatmaps which characterize the selected genomic region. Users submit a bedpe (paired-end BED format) file containing the locations and strengths of long range contact points, and 3D-GNOME simulates the structure and provides a convenient user interface for further analysis. Alternatively, a user may generate structures using published ChIA-PET data for the GM12878 cell line by simply specifying a genomic region of interest. 3D-GNOME is freely available at http://3dgnome.cent.uw.edu.pl/. PMID:27185892

  3. Graphical User Interface for Simulink Integrated Performance Analysis Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durham, R. Caitlyn

    2009-01-01

    The J-2X Engine (built by Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne,) in the Upper Stage of the Ares I Crew Launch Vehicle, will only start within a certain range of temperature and pressure for Liquid Hydrogen and Liquid Oxygen propellants. The purpose of the Simulink Integrated Performance Analysis Model is to verify that in all reasonable conditions the temperature and pressure of the propellants are within the required J-2X engine start boxes. In order to run the simulation, test variables must be entered at all reasonable values of parameters such as heat leak and mass flow rate. To make this testing process as efficient as possible in order to save the maximum amount of time and money, and to show that the J-2X engine will start when it is required to do so, a graphical user interface (GUI) was created to allow the input of values to be used as parameters in the Simulink Model, without opening or altering the contents of the model. The GUI must allow for test data to come from Microsoft Excel files, allow those values to be edited before testing, place those values into the Simulink Model, and get the output from the Simulink Model. The GUI was built using MATLAB, and will run the Simulink simulation when the Simulate option is activated. After running the simulation, the GUI will construct a new Microsoft Excel file, as well as a MATLAB matrix file, using the output values for each test of the simulation so that they may graphed and compared to other values.

  4. UIVerify: A Web-Based Tool for Verification and Automatic Generation of User Interfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shiffman, Smadar; Degani, Asaf; Heymann, Michael

    2004-01-01

    In this poster, we describe a web-based tool for verification and automatic generation of user interfaces. The verification component of the tool accepts as input a model of a machine and a model of its interface, and checks that the interface is adequate (correct). The generation component of the tool accepts a model of a given machine and the user's task, and then generates a correct and succinct interface. This write-up will demonstrate the usefulness of the tool by verifying the correctness of a user interface to a flight-control system. The poster will include two more examples of using the tool: verification of the interface to an espresso machine, and automatic generation of a succinct interface to a large hypothetical machine.

  5. A Practical Study on the Design of a User-Interface Robot Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saerbeck, Martin; Bleuzé, Benoît; van Breemen, Albert

    People are striving for easy, natural interfaces. Robotic user interfaces aim at providing this kind of interface by using human like interaction modalities. However, many applications fail, not because of fundamental problems of addressing social interaction but due to an unbalanced design. In this paper we derive a balancing framework for designing robotic user interfaces that balances four key dimensions: user, application, interface and technology. We investigate applicability of the the framework by means of two experiments. The first experiment demonstrates that violations to the balancing framework can negate the efforts to improve an interface with natural interaction modalities. In the second experiment we present a real world application that adheres to the balancing concepts. Our results show that a balanced design is a key factor for the success or failure of a given robotic interface.

  6. Use of Design Patterns According to Hand Dominance in a Mobile User Interface

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Samarraie, Hosam; Ahmad, Yusof

    2016-01-01

    User interface (UI) design patterns for mobile applications provide a solution to design problems and can improve the usage experience for users. However, there is a lack of research categorizing the uses of design patterns according to users' hand dominance in a learning-based mobile UI. We classified the main design patterns for mobile…

  7. Dynamic Distribution and Layouting of Model-Based User Interfaces in Smart Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roscher, Dirk; Lehmann, Grzegorz; Schwartze, Veit; Blumendorf, Marco; Albayrak, Sahin

    The developments in computer technology in the last decade change the ways of computer utilization. The emerging smart environments make it possible to build ubiquitous applications that assist users during their everyday life, at any time, in any context. But the variety of contexts-of-use (user, platform and environment) makes the development of such ubiquitous applications for smart environments and especially its user interfaces a challenging and time-consuming task. We propose a model-based approach, which allows adapting the user interface at runtime to numerous (also unknown) contexts-of-use. Based on a user interface modelling language, defining the fundamentals and constraints of the user interface, a runtime architecture exploits the description to adapt the user interface to the current context-of-use. The architecture provides automatic distribution and layout algorithms for adapting the applications also to contexts unforeseen at design time. Designers do not specify predefined adaptations for each specific situation, but adaptation constraints and guidelines. Furthermore, users are provided with a meta user interface to influence the adaptations according to their needs. A smart home energy management system serves as running example to illustrate the approach.

  8. Simulation of 3-D radiation beam patterns propagated through a planar interface from ultrasonic phased array transducers.

    PubMed

    Song, Sung-Jin; Kim, Chang-Hwan

    2002-05-01

    Phased array transducers are quite often mounted on solid wedges with specific angles in many practical ultrasonic inspections of thin plates <10 mm in their thickness or welded joints with convex crowns. For the reliable application of phased array techniques with testing set-up, it is essential to have thorough understanding on the characteristics of radiation beam pattern produced in the interrogated medium. To address such a need, this paper proposes a systematic way to calculate full 3-D radiation beam patterns produced in the interrogated solid medium by phased array transducers mounted on a solid wedge. In order to investigate the characteristics of radiation beam patterns in steel, simulation is carried out for 7.5 MHz array transducers mounted on an acrylic wedge with the angle of 15.45 degrees with various of steering angles and/or focal planes.

  9. Development of 3D space-sharing interface using augmented reality technology for domestic tele-echography.

    PubMed

    Yoshinaga, Takashi; Horiguchi, Tomohiro; Miyazaki, Wataru; Masuda, Kohji

    2009-01-01

    We propose a domestic tele-echography system linking between the patient's home and a hospital because of the demand due to increase in the number of patients by aging society and recent progress in portable echography enabled us to develop this system. In previous researches three-dimensional position of the ultrasound probe was difficult to specify because a remote doctor observe the patient through a video camera. Therefore we have developed a reproduction system of the probe position and angle using the ARToolKit and GUI interface using OpenGL. Only an USB camera and two markers for the body surface and the probe are necessary to memorize and transfer three-dimensional position of the probe. We have also designed a doctor side interface including echogram, patient scene and CG to instruct probe operation. As a result of evaluation experiments, guided position was satisfied to reproduce the echogram for diagnosis.

  10. Unstructured grids in 3D and 4D for a time-dependent interface in front tracking with improved accuracy

    SciTech Connect

    Glimm, J.; Grove, J. W.; Li, X. L.; Li, Y.; Xu, Z.

    2002-01-01

    Front tracking traces the dynamic evolution of an interface separating differnt materials or fluid components. In this paper, they describe three types of the grid generation methods used in the front tracking method. One is the unstructured surface grid. The second is a structured grid-based reconstruction method. The third is a time-space grid, also grid based, for a conservative tracking algorithm with improved accuracy.

  11. SEM-EDX analysis and TOF-SIMS 3D imaging of a textile/rubber interface undergoing fatigue loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valantin, C.; Benoit, R.; M. P., D.; Lacroix, F.; Gomez, E.; Phalip, P.; Morcel, J.; Tricoche, D.; Hocine, N. Aït

    2016-01-01

    Unidirectional textile⿿rubber composites must exhibit a strong interface to reach admissible lifetime expectancy. Usually, this is achieved by coating the textile with Resorcinol-Formaldehyde-Latex (RFL). Nevertheless, former SEM observations of our composite revealed microcracks at the RFL/rubber interface. They appeared to propagate through fatigue loading, in correlation with hardening of RFL and interfacial rubber, both highlighted by nanoindentation tests. This mechanical damage was not correlated to chemical structure degradation which limited the development of more reliable interfacial materials⿿ formulations. In this perspective, EDX and ToF-SIMS are used in the present study to characterize RFL coated textile and composite's textile/rubber interface compositions, before and after different numbers of cycles of fatigue loading. Those analyses allow the identification of textile contaminants, potentially responsible for composite's initial interfacial microcracks: inorganic grains, polysiloxanes, fatty acids, latex surfactants and esters contaminants, attributed to diffusion from the RFL layer or from textile sizing. Concerning RFL hardening, four potential mechanisms can be raised: VP-latex complexation with metallic ions coming from rubber formulation, RF post-condensation or disproportion, migration of latex surfactants and thermo-oxidative degradations. This last mechanism seems to be the main one responsible for the hardening of interfacial rubber.

  12. R3D-2-MSA: the RNA 3D structure-to-multiple sequence alignment server

    PubMed Central

    Cannone, Jamie J.; Sweeney, Blake A.; Petrov, Anton I.; Gutell, Robin R.; Zirbel, Craig L.; Leontis, Neocles

    2015-01-01

    The RNA 3D Structure-to-Multiple Sequence Alignment Server (R3D-2-MSA) is a new web service that seamlessly links RNA three-dimensional (3D) structures to high-quality RNA multiple sequence alignments (MSAs) from diverse biological sources. In this first release, R3D-2-MSA provides manual and programmatic access to curated, representative ribosomal RNA sequence alignments from bacterial, archaeal, eukaryal and organellar ribosomes, using nucleotide numbers from representative atomic-resolution 3D structures. A web-based front end is available for manual entry and an Application Program Interface for programmatic access. Users can specify up to five ranges of nucleotides and 50 nucleotide positions per range. The R3D-2-MSA server maps these ranges to the appropriate columns of the corresponding MSA and returns the contents of the columns, either for display in a web browser or in JSON format for subsequent programmatic use. The browser output page provides a 3D interactive display of the query, a full list of sequence variants with taxonomic information and a statistical summary of distinct sequence variants found. The output can be filtered and sorted in the browser. Previous user queries can be viewed at any time by resubmitting the output URL, which encodes the search and re-generates the results. The service is freely available with no login requirement at http://rna.bgsu.edu/r3d-2-msa. PMID:26048960

  13. R3D-2-MSA: the RNA 3D structure-to-multiple sequence alignment server.

    PubMed

    Cannone, Jamie J; Sweeney, Blake A; Petrov, Anton I; Gutell, Robin R; Zirbel, Craig L; Leontis, Neocles

    2015-07-01

    The RNA 3D Structure-to-Multiple Sequence Alignment Server (R3D-2-MSA) is a new web service that seamlessly links RNA three-dimensional (3D) structures to high-quality RNA multiple sequence alignments (MSAs) from diverse biological sources. In this first release, R3D-2-MSA provides manual and programmatic access to curated, representative ribosomal RNA sequence alignments from bacterial, archaeal, eukaryal and organellar ribosomes, using nucleotide numbers from representative atomic-resolution 3D structures. A web-based front end is available for manual entry and an Application Program Interface for programmatic access. Users can specify up to five ranges of nucleotides and 50 nucleotide positions per range. The R3D-2-MSA server maps these ranges to the appropriate columns of the corresponding MSA and returns the contents of the columns, either for display in a web browser or in JSON format for subsequent programmatic use. The browser output page provides a 3D interactive display of the query, a full list of sequence variants with taxonomic information and a statistical summary of distinct sequence variants found. The output can be filtered and sorted in the browser. Previous user queries can be viewed at any time by resubmitting the output URL, which encodes the search and re-generates the results. The service is freely available with no login requirement at http://rna.bgsu.edu/r3d-2-msa.

  14. Scalable Multi-Platform Distribution of Spatial 3d Contents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimke, J.; Hagedorn, B.; Döllner, J.

    2013-09-01

    Virtual 3D city models provide powerful user interfaces for communication of 2D and 3D geoinformation. Providing high quality visualization of massive 3D geoinformation in a scalable, fast, and cost efficient manner is still a challenging task. Especially for mobile and web-based system environments, software and hardware configurations of target systems differ significantly. This makes it hard to provide fast, visually appealing renderings of 3D data throughout a variety of platforms and devices. Current mobile or web-based solutions for 3D visualization usually require raw 3D scene data such as triangle meshes together with textures delivered from server to client, what makes them strongly limited in terms of size and complexity of the models they can handle. In this paper, we introduce a new approach for provisioning of massive, virtual 3D city models on different platforms namely web browsers, smartphones or tablets, by means of an interactive map assembled from artificial oblique image tiles. The key concept is to synthesize such images of a virtual 3D city model by a 3D rendering service in a preprocessing step. This service encapsulates model handling and 3D rendering techniques for high quality visualization of massive 3D models. By generating image tiles using this service, the 3D rendering process is shifted from the client side, which provides major advantages: (a) The complexity of the 3D city model data is decoupled from data transfer complexity (b) the implementation of client applications is simplified significantly as 3D rendering is encapsulated on server side (c) 3D city models can be easily deployed for and used by a large number of concurrent users, leading to a high degree of scalability of the overall approach. All core 3D rendering techniques are performed on a dedicated 3D rendering server, and thin-client applications can be compactly implemented for various devices and platforms.

  15. Scoops3D: software to analyze 3D slope stability throughout a digital landscape

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reid, Mark E.; Christian, Sarah B.; Brien, Dianne L.; Henderson, Scott T.

    2015-01-01

    The computer program, Scoops3D, evaluates slope stability throughout a digital landscape represented by a digital elevation model (DEM). The program uses a three-dimensional (3D) method of columns approach to assess the stability of many (typically millions) potential landslides within a user-defined size range. For each potential landslide (or failure), Scoops3D assesses the stability of a rotational, spherical slip surface encompassing many DEM cells using a 3D version of either Bishop’s simplified method or the Ordinary (Fellenius) method of limit-equilibrium analysis. Scoops3D has several options for the user to systematically and efficiently search throughout an entire DEM, thereby incorporating the effects of complex surface topography. In a thorough search, each DEM cell is included in multiple potential failures, and Scoops3D records the lowest stability (factor of safety) for each DEM cell, as well as the size (volume or area) associated with each of these potential landslides. It also determines the least-stable potential failure for the entire DEM. The user has a variety of options for building a 3D domain, including layers or full 3D distributions of strength and pore-water pressures, simplistic earthquake loading, and unsaturated suction conditions. Results from Scoops3D can be readily incorporated into a geographic information system (GIS) or other visualization software. This manual includes information on the theoretical basis for the slope-stability analysis, requirements for constructing and searching a 3D domain, a detailed operational guide (including step-by-step instructions for using the graphical user interface [GUI] software, Scoops3D-i) and input/output file specifications, practical considerations for conducting an analysis, results of verification tests, and multiple examples illustrating the capabilities of Scoops3D. Easy-to-use software installation packages are available for the Windows or Macintosh operating systems; these packages

  16. In situ and real time characterization of interface microstructure in 3D alloy solidification: benchmark microgravity experiments in the DECLIC-Directional Solidification Insert on ISS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramirez, A.; Chen, L.; Bergeon, N.; Billia, B.; Gu, Jiho; Trivedi, R.

    2012-01-01

    Dynamical microstructure formation and selection during solidification processing, which has a major influence on the properties in the use of elaborated materials, occur during the growth process. In situ observation of the solid-liquid interface morphology evolution is thus necessary. On earth, convection effects dominate in bulk samples and may strongly interact with microstructure dynamics and alter pattern characterization. Series of solidification experiments with 3D cylindrical sample geometry were conducted in succinonitrile (SCN) -0.24 wt%camphor (model transparent system), in microgravity environment in the Directional Solidification Insert of the DECLIC facility of CNES (French space agency) on the International Space Station (ISS). Microgravity enabled homogeneous values of control parameters over the whole interface allowing the obtaining of homogeneous patterns suitable to get quantitative benchmark data. First analyses of the characteristics of the pattern (spacing, order, etc.) and of its dynamics in microgravity will be presented.

  17. Enhanced zero-bias conductance peak and splitting at mesoscopic interfaces between an s-wave superconductor and a 3D Dirac semimetal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aggarwal, Leena; Gayen, Sirshendu; Das, Shekhar; Thakur, Gohil S.; Ganguli, Ashok K.; Sheet, Goutam

    2016-12-01

    Mesoscopic point contacts between elemental metals and the topological 3D Dirac semimetal Cd3As2 have been recently shown to be superconducting with unconventional pairing while Cd3As2 itself does not superconduct. Here we show that the same superconducting phase at mesoscopic interfaces on Cd3As2 can be induced with a known conventional superconductor Nb where a pronounced zero-bias conductance peak is observed which undergoes splitting in energy under certain conditions. The observations are consistent with the theory of the emergence of Andreev bound states due to the presence of a pair potential with broken time reversal symmetry. The data also indicate the possibility of Majorana bound states as expected at the interfaces between s-wave superconductors and topologically non-trivial materials with a high degree of spin-orbit coupling.

  18. Remodeling of the epithelial-connective tissue interface (ECTI) in oral epithelial dysplasia as visualized by noninvasive 3D imaging

    PubMed Central

    Pal, Rahul; Shilagard, Tuya; Yang, Jinping; Villarreal, Paula; Brown, Tyra; Qiu, Suimin; McCammon, Susan; Resto, Vicente; Vargas, Gracie

    2016-01-01

    Early neoplastic features in oral epithelial dysplasia are first evident at the basal epithelium positioned at the epithelial-connective tissue interface (ECTI), separating the basal epithelium from the underlying lamina propria. The ECTI undergoes significant deformation in early neoplasia due to focal epithelial expansion and proteolytic remodeling of the lamina propria but few studies have examined these changes. In the present study, we quantitated alterations in ECTI topography in dysplasia using in vivo volumetric multiphoton autofluorescence microscopy and second harmonic generation microscopy. The label-free method allows direct noninvasive visualization of the ECTI surface without perturbing the epithelium. An image-based parameter, ‘ECTI contour’, is described that indicates deformation of the ECTI surface. ECTI contour was higher in dysplasia than control or inflammed specimens, indicating transition from flat to a deformed surface. Cellular parameters of nuclear area, nuclear density, coefficient of variation in nuclear area in the basal epithelium and collagen density in areas adjacent to ECTI were measured. ECTI contour differentiated dysplasia from control/benign mucosa with higher sensitivity and specificity than basal nuclear density or basal nuclear area, comparable to coefficient of variation in nuclear area and collagen density. The presented method offers a unique opportunity to study ECTI in intact mucosa with simultaneous assessment of cellular and extracellular matrix features, expanding opportunities for studies of early neoplastic events near this critical interface and potentially leading to development of new approaches for detecting neoplasia in vivo. PMID:27302162

  19. User interface development and metadata considerations for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) archive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singley, P. T.; Bell, J. D.; Daugherty, P. F.; Hubbs, C. A.; Tuggle, J. G.

    1993-01-01

    This paper will discuss user interface development and the structure and use of metadata for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Archive. The ARM Archive, located at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, is the data repository for the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) ARM Project. After a short description of the ARM Project and the ARM Archive's role, we will consider the philosophy and goals, constraints, and prototype implementation of the user interface for the archive. We will also describe the metadata that are stored at the archive and support the user interface.

  20. Transportable Applications Environment (TAE) Plus: A NASA tool for building and managing graphical user interfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szczur, Martha R.

    1991-01-01

    The Transportable Applications Environment (TAE) Plus, developed at GSFC, is an advanced portable user interface development environment which simplifies the process of creating and managing complex application graphical user interfaces (GUI's), supports prototyping, allows applications to be ported easily between different platforms and encourages appropriate levels of user interface consistency between applications. The following topics are discussed: the capabilities of the TAE Plus tool; how the implementation has utilized state-of-the-art technologies within graphic workstations; and how it has been used both within and outside of NASA.

  1. Transportable Applications Environment (TAE) Plus: A NASA user interface development and management system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szczur, Martha R.

    1991-01-01

    The transportable Applications Environment Plus (TAE Plus), developed at the NASA Goddard Space FLight Center, is a portable, What you see is what you get (WYSIWYG) user interface development and management system. Its primary objective is to provide an integrated software environment that allows interactive prototyping and development of graphical user interfaces, as well as management of the user interface within the operational domain. TAE Plus is being applied to many types of applications, and what TAE Plus provides, how the implementation has utilizes state-of-the-art technologies within graphic workstations, and how it has been used both within and without NASA are discussed.

  2. A simple technology for CuO/TiO2 3D interface fabrication using nanocrystalline oxide powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forcade, Fresnel; Snyders, Rony; Noirfalise, Xavier; González, Bernardo; Laza, Camila; Vigil, Elena

    2017-03-01

    A CuO/TiO2 interface with potential use for solar light conversion is studied. Thin films are synthesized using a mixture of commercially available nanocrystalline TiO2 and CuO powders. Samples with mass concentrations from 5 to 10% of CuO in TiO2 were prepared from a colloidal suspension using a ‘doctor blade’ technique. Heat treatment (500 °C, 1 h) was used to generate crystals necking and improve adhesion to substrates. X-ray diffraction analysis and scanning electron microscopy indicate that the CuO nanocrystals are smaller than those of TiO2. Since TiO2 does not absorb light in the spectral range where the CuO absorption edge is located, it was possible to obtain an effective CuO absorption coefficient spectra and then extract the bandgap energy. The results confirm the potential use of CuO as a TiO2 inorganic sensitizer for solar light. SEM images show a mesoporous structure for all samples that would facilitate penetration of a hole conductor and guarantee a large three-dimensional interface. Photocurrent direction with no bias confirms electron transfer from the CuO to the TiO2 when CuO/TiO2 films are used as photoelectrodes. Therefore, excited electrons in the CuO conduction band occupy levels with energy greater than the empty states in the TiO2 conduction band. Possible technological improvements to increase electron collection are discussed.

  3. Scalable 3D GIS environment managed by 3D-XML-based modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Beiqi; Rui, Jianxun; Chen, Neng

    2008-10-01

    Nowadays, the namely 3D GIS technologies become a key factor in establishing and maintaining large-scale 3D geoinformation services. However, with the rapidly increasing size and complexity of the 3D models being acquired, a pressing needed for suitable data management solutions has become apparent. This paper outlines that storage and exchange of geospatial data between databases and different front ends like 3D models, GIS or internet browsers require a standardized format which is capable to represent instances of 3D GIS models, to minimize loss of information during data transfer and to reduce interface development efforts. After a review of previous methods for spatial 3D data management, a universal lightweight XML-based format for quick and easy sharing of 3D GIS data is presented. 3D data management based on XML is a solution meeting the requirements as stated, which can provide an efficient means for opening a new standard way to create an arbitrary data structure and share it over the Internet. To manage reality-based 3D models, this paper uses 3DXML produced by Dassault Systemes. 3DXML uses opening XML schemas to communicate product geometry, structure and graphical display properties. It can be read, written and enriched by standard tools; and allows users to add extensions based on their own specific requirements. The paper concludes with the presentation of projects from application areas which will benefit from the functionality presented above.

  4. Cognitive Awareness Prototype Development on User Interface Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosli, D'oria Islamiah

    2015-01-01

    Human error is a crucial problem in manufacturing industries. Due to the misinterpretation of information on interface system design, accidents or death may occur at workplace. Lack of human cognition criteria in interface system design is also one of the contributions to the failure in using the system effectively. Therefore, this paper describes…

  5. Designing the user interface: strategies for effective human-computer interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shneiderman, B.

    1998-03-01

    In revising this popular book, Ben Shneiderman again provides a complete, current and authoritative introduction to user-interface design. The user interface is the part of every computer system that determines how people control and operate that system. When the interface is well designed, it is comprehensible, predictable, and controllable; users feel competent, satisfied, and responsible for their actions. Shneiderman discusses the principles and practices needed to design such effective interaction. Based on 20 years experience, Shneiderman offers readers practical techniques and guidelines for interface design. He also takes great care to discuss underlying issues and to support conclusions with empirical results. Interface designers, software engineers, and product managers will all find this book an invaluable resource for creating systems that facilitate rapid learning and performance, yield low error rates, and generate high user satisfaction. Coverage includes the human factors of interactive software (with a new discussion of diverse user communities), tested methods to develop and assess interfaces, interaction styles such as direct manipulation for graphical user interfaces, and design considerations such as effective messages, consistent screen design, and appropriate color.

  6. Fast assembling of neuron fragments in serial 3D sections.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hanbo; Iascone, Daniel Maxim; da Costa, Nuno Maçarico; Lein, Ed S; Liu, Tianming; Peng, Hanchuan

    2017-04-01

    Reconstructing neurons from 3D image-stacks of serial sections of thick brain tissue is very time-consuming and often becomes a bottleneck in high-throughput brain mapping projects. We developed NeuronStitcher, a software suite for stitching non-overlapping neuron fragments reconstructed in serial 3D image sections. With its efficient algorithm and user-friendly interface, NeuronStitcher has been used successfully to reconstruct very large and complex human and mouse neurons.

  7. The 3D widgets for exploratory scientific visualization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herndon, Kenneth P.; Meyer, Tom

    1995-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) techniques are used to simulate flows of fluids like air or water around such objects as airplanes and automobiles. These techniques usually generate very large amounts of numerical data which are difficult to understand without using graphical scientific visualization techniques. There are a number of commercial scientific visualization applications available today which allow scientists to control visualization tools via textual and/or 2D user interfaces. However, these user interfaces are often difficult to use. We believe that 3D direct-manipulation techniques for interactively controlling visualization tools will provide opportunities for powerful and useful interfaces with which scientists can more effectively explore their datasets. A few systems have been developed which use these techniques. In this paper, we will present a variety of 3D interaction techniques for manipulating parameters of visualization tools used to explore CFD datasets, and discuss in detail various techniques for positioning tools in a 3D scene.

  8. ModelMuse - A Graphical User Interface for MODFLOW-2005 and PHAST

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Winston, Richard B.

    2009-01-01

    ModelMuse is a graphical user interface (GUI) for the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) models MODFLOW-2005 and PHAST. This software package provides a GUI for creating the flow and transport input file for PHAST and the input files for MODFLOW-2005. In ModelMuse, the spatial data for the model is independent of the grid, and the temporal data is independent of the stress periods. Being able to input these data independently allows the user to redefine the spatial and temporal discretization at will. This report describes the basic concepts required to work with ModelMuse. These basic concepts include the model grid, data sets, formulas, objects, the method used to assign values to data sets, and model features. The ModelMuse main window has a top, front, and side view of the model that can be used for editing the model, and a 3-D view of the model that can be used to display properties of the model. ModelMuse has tools to generate and edit the model grid. It also has a variety of interpolation methods and geographic functions that can be used to help define the spatial variability of the model. ModelMuse can be used to execute both MODFLOW-2005 and PHAST and can also display the results of MODFLOW-2005 models. An example of using ModelMuse with MODFLOW-2005 is included in this report. Several additional examples are described in the help system for ModelMuse, which can be accessed from the Help menu.

  9. User interface to administrative DRMS within a distributed environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, L. D.; Kirk, R. D.

    1983-01-01

    The implementation of a data base management system (DBMS) into a communications office to control and report on communication leased service contracts is discussed. The system user executes online programs to update five files residing on a UNIVAC 1100/82, through the forms mode features of the Tektronix 4025 terminal and IMSAI 8080 microcomputer. This user can select the appropriate form to the Tektronix 4025 screen, and enter new data, update existing data, or discontinue service. Selective online printing of 40 reports is accomplished by the system user to satisfy management, budget, and bill payment reporting requirements.

  10. An Object-Oriented Graphical User Interface for a Reusable Rocket Engine Intelligent Control System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litt, Jonathan S.; Musgrave, Jeffrey L.; Guo, Ten-Huei; Paxson, Daniel E.; Wong, Edmond; Saus, Joseph R.; Merrill, Walter C.

    1994-01-01

    An intelligent control system for reusable rocket engines under development at NASA Lewis Research Center requires a graphical user interface to allow observation of the closed-loop system in operation. The simulation testbed consists of a real-time engine simulation computer, a controls computer, and several auxiliary computers for diagnostics and coordination. The system is set up so that the simulation computer could be replaced by the real engine and the change would be transparent to the control system. Because of the hard real-time requirement of the control computer, putting a graphical user interface on it was not an option. Thus, a separate computer used strictly for the graphical user interface was warranted. An object-oriented LISP-based graphical user interface has been developed on a Texas Instruments Explorer 2+ to indicate the condition of the engine to the observer through plots, animation, interactive graphics, and text.

  11. Developing A Web-based User Interface for Semantic Information Retrieval

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berrios, Daniel C.; Keller, Richard M.

    2003-01-01

    While there are now a number of languages and frameworks that enable computer-based systems to search stored data semantically, the optimal design for effective user interfaces for such systems is still uncle ar. Such interfaces should mask unnecessary query detail from users, yet still allow them to build queries of arbitrary complexity without significant restrictions. We developed a user interface supporting s emantic query generation for Semanticorganizer, a tool used by scient ists and engineers at NASA to construct networks of knowledge and dat a. Through this interface users can select node types, node attribute s and node links to build ad-hoc semantic queries for searching the S emanticOrganizer network.

  12. An Efficient User Interface Design for Nursing Information System Based on Integrated Patient Order Information.

    PubMed

    Chu, Chia-Hui; Kuo, Ming-Chuan; Weng, Shu-Hui; Lee, Ting-Ting

    2016-01-01

    A user friendly interface can enhance the efficiency of data entry, which is crucial for building a complete database. In this study, two user interfaces (traditional pull-down menu vs. check boxes) are proposed and evaluated based on medical records with fever medication orders by measuring the time for data entry, steps for each data entry record, and the complete rate of each medical record. The result revealed that the time for data entry is reduced from 22.8 sec/record to 3.2 sec/record. The data entry procedures also have reduced from 9 steps in the traditional one to 3 steps in the new one. In addition, the completeness of medical records is increased from 20.2% to 98%. All these results indicate that the new user interface provides a more user friendly and efficient approach for data entry than the traditional interface.

  13. Depth perception and user interface in digital holographic television

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barabas, James; Jolly, Sundeep; Smalley, Daniel E.; Bove, V. Michael, Jr.

    2012-03-01

    A holographic television system, featuring realtime incoherent 3D capture and live holographic display is used for experiments in depth perception. Holographic television has the potential to provide more complete visual representations, including latency-free motion parallax and more natural affordances for accommodation. Although this technology has potential to improve realism in many display applications, we investigate benefits in uses where direct vision of a workspace is not possible. Applications of this nature include work with hazardous materials, teleoperation over distance, and laparoscopic surgery. In this study, subjects perform manual 3D object manipulation tasks where they can only see the workspace through holographic closed-circuit television. This study is designed to compare performance at manual tasks using holographic television compared to performance with displays that mimic 2D, and stereoscopic television.

  14. Development of a graphical user interface for the global land information system (GLIS)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Alstad, Susan R.; Jackson, David A.

    1993-01-01

    The process of developing a Motif Graphical User Interface for the Global Land Information System (GLIS) involved incorporating user requirements, in-house visual and functional design requirements, and Open Software Foundation (OSF) Motif style guide standards. Motif user interface windows have been developed using the software to support Motif window functions war written using the C programming language. The GLIS architecture was modified to support multiple servers and remote handlers running the X Window System by forming a network of servers and handlers connected by TCP/IP communications. In April 1993, prior to release the GLIS graphical user interface and system architecture modifications were test by developers and users located at the EROS Data Center and 11 beta test sites across the country.

  15. PLOT3D Export Tool for Tecplot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alter, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    The PLOT3D export tool for Tecplot solves the problem of modified data being impossible to output for use by another computational science solver. The PLOT3D Exporter add-on enables the use of the most commonly available visualization tools to engineers for output of a standard format. The exportation of PLOT3D data from Tecplot has far reaching effects because it allows for grid and solution manipulation within a graphical user interface (GUI) that is easily customized with macro language-based and user-developed GUIs. The add-on also enables the use of Tecplot as an interpolation tool for solution conversion between different grids of different types. This one add-on enhances the functionality of Tecplot so significantly, it offers the ability to incorporate Tecplot into a general suite of tools for computational science applications as a 3D graphics engine for visualization of all data. Within the PLOT3D Export Add-on are several functions that enhance the operations and effectiveness of the add-on. Unlike Tecplot output functions, the PLOT3D Export Add-on enables the use of the zone selection dialog in Tecplot to choose which zones are to be written by offering three distinct options - output of active, inactive, or all zones (grid blocks). As the user modifies the zones to output with the zone selection dialog, the zones to be written are similarly updated. This enables the use of Tecplot to create multiple configurations of a geometry being analyzed. For example, if an aircraft is loaded with multiple deflections of flaps, by activating and deactivating different zones for a specific flap setting, new specific configurations of that aircraft can be easily generated by only writing out specific zones. Thus, if ten flap settings are loaded into Tecplot, the PLOT3D Export software can output ten different configurations, one for each flap setting.

  16. From 2-D CuO nanosheets to 3-D hollow nanospheres: interface-assisted synthesis, surface photovoltage properties and photocatalytic activity

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu Jun; Qian Xuefeng

    2010-07-15

    CuO hierarchical hollow nanostructures, assembled by nanosheets, were successfully prepared in n-octanol/aqueous liquid system through a microwave approach. Controlled experiments revealed that both bubble and interface play key roles in determining the self-assembly process of CuO hierarchical hollow nanostructures, and the morphology/size of building blocks and final products could be readily tuned by adjusting reaction parameters. Furthermore, a self-assembly mechanism of aggregation-then-growth process through bubble template was proposed for the formation of the hollow hierarchical architectures. Photocatalytic performance evidenced that the obtained CuO hierarchical hollow nanostructures possessed superior photocatalytic efficiency on RhB than that of non-hollow nanostructures, which could be easily demonstrated by SPS response about the separation and recombination situation of photogenerated charges. - Graphical abstract: From 2-D CuO nanosheets to 3-D hollow nanospheres: interface-assisted synthesis, surface photovoltage properties and photocatalytic activity. Various CuO architectures with different morphologies and sizes, including hierarchical hollow nanostructures were prepared through a synergic bubble-template and interface-assisted approach.

  17. Developing a Graphical User Interface for the ALSS Crop Planning Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koehlert, Erik

    1997-01-01

    The goal of my project was to create a graphical user interface for a prototype crop scheduler. The crop scheduler was developed by Dr. Jorge Leon and Laura Whitaker for the ALSS (Advanced Life Support System) program. The addition of a system-independent graphical user interface to the crop planning tool will make the application more accessible to a wider range of users and enhance its value as an analysis, design, and planning tool. My presentation will demonstrate the form and functionality of this interface. This graphical user interface allows users to edit system parameters stored in the file system. Data on the interaction of the crew, crops, and waste processing system with the available system resources is organized and labeled. Program output, which is stored in the file system, is also presented to the user in performance-time plots and organized charts. The menu system is designed to guide the user through analysis and decision making tasks, providing some help if necessary. The Java programming language was used to develop this interface in hopes of providing portability and remote operation.

  18. Introducing a new open source GIS user interface for the SWAT model

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) model is a robust watershed modelling tool. It typically uses the ArcSWAT interface to create its inputs. ArcSWAT is public domain software which works in the licensed ArcGIS environment. The aim of this paper was to develop an open source user interface ...

  19. A Framework and Implementation of User Interface and Human-Computer Interaction Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peslak, Alan

    2005-01-01

    Researchers have suggested that up to 50 % of the effort in development of information systems is devoted to user interface development (Douglas, Tremaine, Leventhal, Wills, & Manaris, 2002; Myers & Rosson, 1992). Yet little study has been performed on the inclusion of important interface and human-computer interaction topics into a current…

  20. The evaluation and extension of TAE in the development of a user interface management system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burkhart, Brenda; Sugar, Ross

    1986-01-01

    The development of a user interface management system (UIMS) for an information gathering and display system is discussed. The system interface requirements are outlined along with the UIMS functional characteristics. Those systems requirements which are supported by the current Transportable Applications Executive (TAE) are listed and necessary modifications to the TAE are described.

  1. Research and Development for an Operational Information Ecology: The User-System Interface Agent Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, Sadanand; deLamadrid, James

    1998-01-01

    The User System Interface Agent (USIA) is a special type of software agent which acts as the "middle man" between a human user and an information processing environment. USIA consists of a group of cooperating agents which are responsible for assisting users in obtaining information processing services intuitively and efficiently. Some of the main features of USIA include: (1) multiple interaction modes and (2) user-specific and stereotype modeling and adaptation. This prototype system provides us with a development platform towards the realization of an operational information ecology. In the first phase of this project we focus on the design and implementation of prototype system of the User-System Interface Agent (USIA). The second face of USIA allows user interaction via a restricted query language as well as through a taxonomy of windows. In third phase the USIA system architecture was revised.

  2. Interfacing Media: User-Centered Design for Media-Rich Web Sites.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horton, Sarah

    2000-01-01

    Discusses multimedia Web site design that may include images, animations, audio, and video. Highlights include interfaces that stress user-centered design; using only relevant media; placing high-demand content on secondary pages and keeping the home page simpler; providing information about the media; considering users with disabilities; and user…

  3. The Design and Evaluation of a Front-End User Interface for Energy Researchers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borgman, Christine L.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Reports on the Online Access to Knowledge (OAK) Project, which developed software to support end user access to a Department of Energy database based on the skill levels and needs of energy researchers. The discussion covers issues in development, evaluation, and the study of user behavior in designing an interface tailored to a special…

  4. Preparing for Future Learning with a Tangible User Interface: The Case of Neuroscience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schneider, B.; Wallace, J.; Blikstein, P.; Pea, R.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we describe the development and evaluation of a microworld-based learning environment for neuroscience. Our system, BrainExplorer, allows students to discover the way neural pathways work by interacting with a tangible user interface. By severing and reconfiguring connections, users can observe how the visual field is impaired and,…

  5. An intelligent user interface for browsing satellite data catalogs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cromp, Robert F.; Crook, Sharon

    1989-01-01

    A large scale domain-independent spatial data management expert system that serves as a front-end to databases containing spatial data is described. This system is unique for two reasons. First, it uses spatial search techniques to generate a list of all the primary keys that fall within a user's spatial constraints prior to invoking the database management system, thus substantially decreasing the amount of time required to answer a user's query. Second, a domain-independent query expert system uses a domain-specific rule base to preprocess the user's English query, effectively mapping a broad class of queries into a smaller subset that can be handled by a commercial natural language processing system. The methods used by the spatial search module and the query expert system are explained, and the system architecture for the spatial data management expert system is described. The system is applied to data from the International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) satellite, and results are given.

  6. Interruption as a test of the user-computer interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kreifeldt, J. G.; Mccarthy, M. E.

    1981-01-01

    In order to study the effects different logic systems might have on interrupted operation, an algebraic calculator and a reverse polish notation calculator were compared when trained users were interrupted during problem entry. The RPN calculator showed markedly superior resistance to interruption effects compared to the AN calculator although no significant differences were found when the users were not interrupted. Causes and possible remedies for interruption effects are speculated. It is proposed that because interruption is such a common occurrence, it be incorporated into comparative evaluation tests of different logic system and control/display system and that interruption resistance be adopted as a specific design criteria for such design.

  7. The Design and Implementation of a Visual User Interface for a Structured Model Management System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-03-01

    Marshall McLuhan and Quentin Fiore The Medium is the Message (1967) We could easily continue that the computer interface is an extension of the user. To...OR) [Ref.2, p.1]. Managers may feel overly dependent on these MS/OR practitioners who more fully understand the underlying concepts of modeling...point. The program presupposes that the user understands struc- tured modeling concepts, but makes no further assumptions regarding the user’s computer

  8. Constructing a starting 3D shear velocity model with sharp interfaces for SEM-based upper mantle tomography in North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calo, M.; Bodin, T.; Yuan, H.; Romanowicz, B. A.; Larmat, C. S.; Maceira, M.

    2013-12-01

    this work we propose instead to directly tackle the non-linearity of the inverse problem by using stochastic methods to construct a 3D starting model with a good estimate of the depths of the main layering interfaces. We present preliminary results of the construction of such a starting 3D model based on: (1) Regionalizing the study area to define provinces within which lateral variations are smooth; (2) Applying trans-dimensional stochastic inversion (Bodin et al., 2012) to obtain accurate 1D models in each province as well as the corresponding error distribution, constrained by receiver function and surface wave dispersion data as well as the previously constructed 3D model (name), and (3) connecting these models laterally using data-driven smoothing operators to obtain a starting 3D model with errors. References Bodin, T.,et al. 2012, Transdimensional inversion of receiver functions and surface wave dispersion, J. Geophys. Res., 117, B02301, doi:10.1029/2011JB008560. Yuan and Romanowicz, 2013, in revison. Yuan, H., et al. 2011, 3-D shear wave radially and azimuthally anisotropic velocity model of the North American upper mantle. Geophysical Journal International, 184: 1237-1260. doi: 10.1111/j.1365-246X.2010.04901.x Yuan, H. & Romanowicz, B., 2010. Lithospheric layering in the North American Craton, Nature, 466, 1063-1068.

  9. Building an Integrated User Interface to Electronic Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caswell, Jerry V.

    1997-01-01

    Client/server computing and the adoption of the World Wide Web make it possible for academic libraries to build automated library systems that present locally mounted and remote resources through a common interface. This article recounts issues encountered by the Iowa State University Library as it undertook this process. (Author/LRW)

  10. Creating Interactive User Feedback in DGS Using Scripting Interfaces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fest, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    Feedback is an important component of interactive learning software. A conclusion from cognitive learning theory is that good software must give the learner more information about what he did. Following the ideas of constructivist learning theory the user should be in control of both the time and the level of feedback he receives. At the same time…

  11. ANALYTICAL TOOLS INTERFACE FOR LANDSCAPE ASSESSMENTS (ATTILA) USER MANUAL

    EPA Science Inventory

    ATtlLA is an ArcView extension that allows users to easily calculate many common landscape metrics. GIS expertise is not required, but some experience with ArcView is recommended. Four metric groups are currently included in ATtILA: landscape characteristics, riparian characteris...

  12. Workshop AccessibleTV "Accessible User Interfaces for Future TV Applications"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, Volker; Hamisu, Pascal; Jung, Christopher; Heinrich, Gregor; Duarte, Carlos; Langdon, Pat

    Approximately half of the elderly people over 55 suffer from some type of typically mild visual, auditory, motor or cognitive impairment. For them interaction, especially with PCs and other complex devices is sometimes challenging, although accessible ICT applications could make much of a difference for their living quality. Basically they have the potential to enable or simplify participation and inclusion in their surrounding private and professional communities. However, the availability of accessible user interfaces being capable to adapt to the specific needs and requirements of users with individual impairments is very limited. Although there are a number of APIs [1, 2, 3, 4] available for various platforms that allow developers to provide accessibility features within their applications, today none of them provides features for the automatic adaptation of multimodal interfaces being capable to automatically fit the individual requirements of users with different kinds of impairments. Moreover, the provision of accessible user interfaces is still expensive and risky for application developers, as they need special experience and effort for user tests. Today many implementations simply neglect the needs of elderly people, thus locking out a large portion of their potential users. The workshop is organized as part of the dissemination activity for the European-funded project GUIDE "Gentle user interfaces for elderly people", which aims to address this situation with a comprehensive approach for the realization of multimodal user interfaces being capable to adapt to the needs of users with different kinds of mild impairments. As application platform, GUIDE will mainly target TVs and Set-Top Boxes, such as the emerging Connected-TV or WebTV platforms, as they have the potential to address the needs of the elderly users with applications such as for home automation, communication or continuing education.

  13. User productivity as a function of AutoCAD interface design.

    PubMed

    Mitta, D A; Flores, P L

    1995-12-01

    Increased operator productivity is a desired outcome of user-CAD interaction scenarios. Two objectives of this research were to (1) define a measure of operator productivity and (2) empirically investigate the potential effects of CAD interface design on operator productivity, where productivity is defined as the percentage of a drawing session correctly completed per unit time. Here, AutoCAD provides the CAD environment of interest. Productivity with respect to two AutoCAD interface designs (menu, template) and three task types (draw, dimension, display) was investigated. Analysis of user productivity data revealed significantly higher productivity under the menu interface condition than under the template interface condition. A significant effect of task type was also discovered, where user productivity under display tasks was higher than productivity under the draw and dimension tasks. Implications of these results are presented.

  14. Cognitive evaluation of the user interface and vocabulary of an outpatient information system.

    PubMed Central

    Kushniruk, A.; Patel, V.; Cimino, J. J.; Barrows, R. A.

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes an innovative approach to the evaluation of the user interface and vocabulary of a medical information system. The use of video recording for collecting usability data is detailed. The technique employed involves the collection of data consisting of transcripts of physicians as they "think aloud" while interacting with the system, along with a video record of the complete user-computer interaction. Using methods of analysis from cognitive science, the study was able to distinguish the source of physician problems in using the system's interface and in interacting with its controlled medical vocabulary. Analysis of the protocols indicated that all subjects encountered several generic problems, the most common ones indicative of a need for greater consistency in the interface design. Based on this evaluation, parts of the user interface have been re-implemented in an ongoing process of iterative system development. PMID:8947620

  15. Design of electronic medical record user interfaces: a matrix-based method for improving usability.

    PubMed

    Kuqi, Kushtrim; Eveleigh, Tim; Holzer, Thomas; Sarkani, Shahryar; Levin, James E; Crowley, Rebecca S

    2013-01-01

    This study examines a new approach of using the Design Structure Matrix (DSM) modeling technique to improve the design of Electronic Medical Record (EMR) user interfaces. The usability of an EMR medication dosage calculator used for placing orders in an academic hospital setting was investigated. The proposed method captures and analyzes the interactions between user interface elements of the EMR system and groups elements based on information exchange, spatial adjacency, and similarity to improve screen density and time-on-task. Medication dose adjustment task time was recorded for the existing and new designs using a cognitive simulation model that predicts user performance. We estimate that the design improvement could reduce time-on-task by saving an average of 21 hours of hospital physicians' time over the course of a month. The study suggests that the application of DSM can improve the usability of an EMR user interface.

  16. User Manual for Graphical User Interface Version 2.10 with Fire and Smoke Simulation Model (FSSIM) Version 1.2

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-05-10

    Naval Research Laboratory Washington, DC 20375-5320 NRL/MR/6180--10-9244 User Manual for Graphical User Interface Version 2.10 with Fire and Smoke...ABSTRACT User Manual for Graphical User Interface Version 2.10 with Fire and Smoke Simulation Model (FSSIM) Version 1.2 Tomasz A. Haupt,* Gregory J...runtime environment for a third-party simulation package, Fire and Smoke Simulation (FSSIM) developed by HAI. This updated user’s manual for the

  17. A Generic Approach for Pen-Based User Interface Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macé, Sébastien; Anquetil, Éric

    Pen-based interaction is an intuitive way to realize hand drawn structured documents, but few applications take advantage of it. Indeed, the interpretation of the user hand drawn strokes in the context of document is a complex problem. In this paper, we propose a new generic approach to develop such systems based on three independent components. The first one is a set of graphical and editing functions adapted to pen interaction. The second one is a rule-based formalism that models structured document composition and the corresponding interpretation process. The last one is a hand drawn stroke analyzer that is able to interpret strokes progressively, directly while the user is drawing. We highlight in particular the human-computer interaction induced from this progressive interpretation process. Thanks to this generic approach, three pen-based system prototypes have already been developed, for musical score editing, for graph editing, and for UML class diagram editing

  18. HERITAGE: the concept of a giant flux neutron reflectometer for the exploration of 3-d structure of free-liquid and solid interfaces in thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattauch, S.; Ioffe, A.; Lott, D.; Bottyán, L.; Daillant, J.; Markó, M.; Menelle, A.; Sajti, S.; Veres, T.

    2017-01-01

    The instrumental concept of HERITAGE - a reflectometer with a horizontal sample geometry - well fitted to the long pulse structure of a neutron source is presented. It is constitutes a new class of reflectometers achieving the unprecedentedly high flux for classical specular reflectometry combined with off-specular reflectometry and grazing incidence small-angle scattering (GISANS), thus resulting in a complete 3-d exploration of lateral and in depth structures in thin films. This is achieved by specially designed neutron guides. In the horizontal direction (perpendicular to the scattering plane) the guide's elliptic shape focusses the neutrons onto the sample. In the vertical direction a multichannel geometry provides a smooth divergence distribution at the sample position while accepting the entire beam from a compact high-brilliance flat moderator. The modular collimation setup of HERITAGE provides extremely high flexibility in respect to sample geometries and environments, including the possibility to study virtually all types of solid and liquid interfaces, statically or kinetically. The use of multiple beam illumination allows for reflectivity and GISANS measurements at liquid interfaces both from above and below without a need to move the sample. This concept assures the delivery of the maximum possible and usable flux to the sample in both reflectivity and GISANS measurement regimes. The presented design outperforms the flux of all present-day and already for the ESS planned reflectometers and GISANS setups in flux and in measuring time for standard samples.

  19. 3-D visualization of geologic structures and processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pflug, R.; Klein, H.; Ramshorn, Ch.; Genter, M.; Stärk, A.

    Interactive 3-D computer graphics techniques are used to visualize geologic structures and simulated geologic processes. Geometric models that serve as input to 3-D viewing programs are generated from contour maps, from serial sections, or directly from simulation program output. Choice of viewing parameters strongly affects the perception of irregular surfaces. An interactive 3-D rendering program and its graphical user interface provide visualization tools for structural geology, seismic interpretation, and visual post-processing of simulations. Dynamic display of transient ground-water simulations and sedimentary process simulations can visualize processes developing through time.

  20. SutraGUI, a graphical-user interface for SUTRA, a model for ground-water flow with solute or energy transport

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Winston, Richard B.; Voss, Clifford I.

    2004-01-01

    This report describes SutraGUI, a flexible graphical user-interface (GUI) that supports two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) simulation with the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) SUTRA ground-water-flow and transport model (Voss and Provost, 2002). SutraGUI allows the user to create SUTRA ground-water models graphically. SutraGUI provides all of the graphical functionality required for setting up and running SUTRA simulations that range from basic to sophisticated, but it is also possible for advanced users to apply programmable features within Argus ONE to meet the unique demands of particular ground-water modeling projects. SutraGUI is a public-domain computer program designed to run with the proprietary Argus ONE? package, which provides 2D Geographic Information System (GIS) and meshing support. For 3D simulation, GIS and meshing support is provided by programming contained within SutraGUI. When preparing a 3D SUTRA model, the model and all of its features are viewed within Argus 1 in 2D projection. For 2D models, SutraGUI is only slightly changed in functionality from the previous 2D-only version (Voss and others, 1997) and it provides visualization of simulation results. In 3D, only model preparation is supported by SutraGUI, and 3D simulation results may be viewed in SutraPlot (Souza, 1999) or Model Viewer (Hsieh and Winston, 2002). A comprehensive online Help system is included in SutraGUI. For 3D SUTRA models, the 3D model domain is conceptualized as bounded on the top and bottom by 2D surfaces. The 3D domain may also contain internal surfaces extending across the model that divide the domain into tabular units, which can represent hydrogeologic strata or other features intended by the user. These surfaces can be non-planar and non-horizontal. The 3D mesh is defined by one or more 2D meshes at different elevations that coincide with these surfaces. If the nodes in the 3D mesh are vertically aligned, only a single 2D mesh is needed. For nonaligned

  1. CARE3MENU- A CARE III USER FRIENDLY INTERFACE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierce, J. L.

    1994-01-01

    CARE3MENU generates an input file for the CARE III program. CARE III is used for reliability prediction of complex, redundant, fault-tolerant systems including digital computers, aircraft, nuclear and chemical control systems. The CARE III input file often becomes complicated and is not easily formatted with a text editor. CARE3MENU provides an easy, interactive method of creating an input file by automatically formatting a set of user-supplied inputs for the CARE III system. CARE3MENU provides detailed on-line help for most of its screen formats. The reliability model input process is divided into sections using menu-driven screen displays. Each stage, or set of identical modules comprising the model, must be identified and described in terms of number of modules, minimum number of modules for stage operation, and critical fault threshold. The fault handling and fault occurence models are detailed in several screens by parameters such as transition rates, propagation and detection densities, Weibull or exponential characteristics, and model accuracy. The system fault tree and critical pairs fault tree screens are used to define the governing logic and to identify modules affected by component failures. Additional CARE3MENU screens prompt the user for output options and run time control values such as mission time and truncation values. There are fourteen major screens, many with default values and HELP options. The documentation includes: 1) a users guide with several examples of CARE III models, the dialog required to input them to CARE3MENU, and the output files created; and 2) a maintenance manual for assistance in changing the HELP files and modifying any of the menu formats or contents. CARE3MENU is written in FORTRAN 77 for interactive execution and has been implemented on a DEC VAX series computer operating under VMS. This program was developed in 1985.

  2. When soft controls get slippery: User interfaces and human error

    SciTech Connect

    Stubler, W.F.; O`Hara, J.M.

    1998-12-01

    Many types of products and systems that have traditionally featured physical control devices are now being designed with soft controls--input formats appearing on computer-based display devices and operated by a variety of input devices. A review of complex human-machine systems found that soft controls are particularly prone to some types of errors and may affect overall system performance and safety. This paper discusses the application of design approaches for reducing the likelihood of these errors and for enhancing usability, user satisfaction, and system performance and safety.

  3. Summary of Tactile User Interfaces Techniques and Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spirkovska, Lilly

    2005-01-01

    Mental workload can be de.ned as the ratio of demand to allocated resources. Multiple-resource theory stresses the importance of distribution of tasks and information across various human sensory channels to reduce mental workload. One sensory channel that has been of interest since the late 1800s is touch. Unlike the more typical displays that target vision or hearing, tactile displays present information to the user s sense of touch. We present a summary of different methods for tactile display, historic and more recent systems that incorporate tactile display for information presentation, advantages and disadvantages of targeting the tactile channel, and future directions in tactile display research.

  4. Summary of Tactile User Interfaces Techniques and Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spirkovska, Lilly

    2004-01-01

    Mental workload can be defined as the ratio of demand to allocated resources. Multiple- resource theory stresses the importance of distribution of tasks and information across various sensory channels of the human to reduce mental workload. One sensory channel that has been of interest since the late 1800s is touch. Unlike the more typical displays that target vision or hearing, tactile displays present information to the user s sense of touch. We present a summary of different methods for tactile display; historic and more recent systems that incorporate tactile display for information presentation; advantages and disadvantages of targeting the tactile channel; and future directions in tactile display research.

  5. Java-based Graphical User Interface for MAVERIC-II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seo, Suk Jai

    2005-01-01

    A computer program entitled "Marshall Aerospace Vehicle Representation in C II, (MAVERIC-II)" is a vehicle flight simulation program written primarily in the C programming language. It is written by James W. McCarter at NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center. The goal of the MAVERIC-II development effort is to provide a simulation tool that facilitates the rapid development of high-fidelity flight simulations for launch, orbital, and reentry vehicles of any user-defined configuration for all phases of flight. MAVERIC-II has been found invaluable in performing flight simulations for various Space Transportation Systems. The flexibility provided by MAVERIC-II has allowed several different launch vehicles, including the Saturn V, a Space Launch Initiative Two-Stage-to-Orbit concept and a Shuttle-derived launch vehicle, to be simulated during ascent and portions of on-orbit flight in an extremely efficient manner. It was found that MAVERIC-II provided the high fidelity vehicle and flight environment models as well as the program modularity to allow efficient integration, modification and testing of advanced guidance and control algorithms. In addition to serving as an analysis tool for techno logy development, many researchers have found MAVERIC-II to be an efficient, powerful analysis tool that evaluates guidance, navigation, and control designs, vehicle robustness, and requirements. MAVERIC-II is currently designed to execute in a UNIX environment. The input to the program is composed of three segments: 1) the vehicle models such as propulsion, aerodynamics, and guidance, navigation, and control 2) the environment models such as atmosphere and gravity, and 3) a simulation framework which is responsible for executing the vehicle and environment models and propagating the vehicle s states forward in time and handling user input/output. MAVERIC users prepare data files for the above models and run the simulation program. They can see the output on screen and/or store in

  6. WDMET Numeric and Descriptive Data User Interface Development Project

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-07-01

    restrictions and be freely distributable. Unfortunately, to integrate the multimedia aspects of the WDMET collection and to provide a user friendly...if other archive research activities will conflict with the proposed research, if the materials will be available when needed, if any restrictions ...Bldldoss M 20 9 Pericard A 40 1 0 PeIw’CIV A 40 I I AbdCav A 40 12 Rtr-Irtni A 40 13 CN S A 40 14 Other NI 20 15 Remarks NI 20 16 NnSld~rml S 17

  7. Using Multiple Dialog Modes in a User-System Interface to Accomodate Different Levels of User Experience: An Experimental Study.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-01-01

    an expert has gained through studying and experience. Hayes’ [861 study of great painters and composers who are considered to be experts in their...Underlying Concepts: A great deal of flexibility exists in this component or dimension of a user-system interface but these concepts apply to all dialog...Total maximum points available for a raw performance score was 92. A subject’s raw score was then devided by the number of actions (23) to get the average

  8. Graphical User Interface for Simplified Neutron Transport Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Schwarz, Randolph; Carter, Leland L

    2011-07-18

    A number of codes perform simple photon physics calculations. The nuclear industry is lacking in similar tools to perform simplified neutron physics shielding calculations. With the increased importance of performing neutron calculations for homeland security applications and defense nuclear nonproliferation tasks, having an efficient method for performing simple neutron transport calculations becomes increasingly important. Codes such as Monte Carlo N-particle (MCNP) can perform the transport calculations; however, the technical details in setting up, running, and interpreting the required simulations are quite complex and typically go beyond the abilities of most users who need a simple answer to a neutron transport calculation. The work documented in this report resulted in the development of the NucWiz program, which can create an MCNP input file for a set of simple geometries, source, and detector configurations. The user selects source, shield, and tally configurations from a set of pre-defined lists, and the software creates a complete MCNP input file that can be optionally run and the results viewed inside NucWiz.

  9. Gender Differences between Graphical User Interfaces and Command Line Interfaces in Computer Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barker, Dan L.

    This study focused primarily on two types of computer interfaces and the differences in academic performance that resulted from their use; it was secondarily designed to examine gender differences that may have existed before and after any change in interface. Much of the basic research in computer use was conducted with command line interface…

  10. Discrete Abstractions of Hybrid Systems: Verification of Safety and Application to User-Interface Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oishi, Meeko; Tomlin, Claire; Degani, Asaf

    2003-01-01

    Human interaction with complex hybrid systems involves the user, the automation's discrete mode logic, and the underlying continuous dynamics of the physical system. Often the user-interface of such systems displays a reduced set of information about the entire system. In safety-critical systems, how can we identify user-interface designs which do not have adequate information, or which may confuse the user? Here we describe a methodology, based on hybrid system analysis, to verify that a user-interface contains information necessary to safely complete a desired procedure or task. Verification within a hybrid framework allows us to account for the continuous dynamics underlying the simple, discrete representations displayed to the user. We provide two examples: a car traveling through a yellow light at an intersection and an aircraft autopilot in a landing/go-around maneuver. The examples demonstrate the general nature of this methodology, which is applicable to hybrid systems (not fully automated) which have operational constraints we can pose in terms of safety. This methodology differs from existing work in hybrid system verification in that we directly account for the user's interactions with the system.

  11. The use of affective interaction design in car user interfaces.

    PubMed

    Gkouskos, Dimitrios; Chen, Fang

    2012-01-01

    Recent developments in the car industry have put Human Machine Interfaces under the spotlight. Developing gratifying human-car interactions has become one of the more prominent areas that car manufacturers want to invest in. However, concepts like emotional design remain foreign to the industry. In this study 12 experts on the field of automobile HMI design were interviewed in order to investigate their needs and opinions of emotional design. Results show that emotional design has yet to be introduced for this context of use. Designers need a tool customized for the intricacies of the car HMI field that can provide them with support and guidance so that they can create emotionally attractive experiences for drivers and passengers alike.

  12. User Interface Developed for Controls/CFD Interdisciplinary Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center, in conjunction with the University of Akron, is developing analytical methods and software tools to create a cross-discipline "bridge" between controls and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) technologies. Traditionally, the controls analyst has used simulations based on large lumping techniques to generate low-order linear models convenient for designing propulsion system controls. For complex, high-speed vehicles such as the High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT), simulations based on CFD methods are required to capture the relevant flow physics. The use of CFD should also help reduce the development time and costs associated with experimentally tuning the control system. The initial application for this research is the High Speed Civil Transport inlet control problem. A major aspect of this research is the development of a controls/CFD interface for non-CFD experts, to facilitate the interactive operation of CFD simulations and the extraction of reduced-order, time-accurate models from CFD results. A distributed computing approach for implementing the interface is being explored. Software being developed as part of the Integrated CFD and Experiments (ICE) project provides the basis for the operating environment, including run-time displays and information (data base) management. Message-passing software is used to communicate between the ICE system and the CFD simulation, which can reside on distributed, parallel computing systems. Initially, the one-dimensional Large-Perturbation Inlet (LAPIN) code is being used to simulate a High Speed Civil Transport type inlet. LAPIN can model real supersonic inlet features, including bleeds, bypasses, and variable geometry, such as translating or variable-ramp-angle centerbodies. Work is in progress to use parallel versions of the multidimensional NPARC code.

  13. Transportable Applications Environment (TAE) Plus - A NASA productivity tool used to develop graphical user interfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szczur, Martha R.

    1991-01-01

    The Transportable Applications Environment (TAE) Plus, developed at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, is an advanced portable user interface development environment which simplifies the process of creating and managing complex application graphical user interfaces (GUIs), supports prototyping, allows applications to be oported easily between different platforms, and encourages appropriate levels of user interface consistency between applications. This paper discusses the capabilities of the TAE Plus tool, and how it makes the job of designing and developing GUIs easier for the application developers. The paper also explains how tools like TAE Plus provide for reusability and ensure reliability of UI software components, as well as how they aid in the reduction of development and maintenance costs.

  14. A mobile phone user interface for image-based dietary assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Ziad; Khanna, Nitin; Kerr, Deborah A.; Boushey, Carol J.; Delp, Edward J.

    2014-02-01

    Many chronic diseases, including obesity and cancer, are related to diet. Such diseases may be prevented and/or successfully treated by accurately monitoring and assessing food and beverage intakes. Existing dietary assessment methods such as the 24-hour dietary recall and the food frequency questionnaire, are burdensome and not generally accurate. In this paper, we present a user interface for a mobile telephone food record that relies on taking images, using the built-in camera, as the primary method of recording. We describe the design and implementation of this user interface while stressing the solutions we devised to meet the requirements imposed by the image analysis process, yet keeping the user interface easy to use.

  15. A user-friendly, graphical interface for the Monte Carlo neutron optics code MCLIB

    SciTech Connect

    Thelliez, T.; Daemen, L.; Hjelm, R.P.; Seeger, P.A.

    1995-12-01

    The authors describe a prototype of a new user interface for the Monte Carlo neutron optics simulation program MCLIB. At this point in its development the interface allows the user to define an instrument as a set of predefined instrument elements. The user can specify the intrinsic parameters of each element, its position and orientation. The interface then writes output to the MCLIB package and starts the simulation. The present prototype is an early development stage of a comprehensive Monte Carlo simulations package that will serve as a tool for the design, optimization and assessment of performance of new neutron scattering instruments. It will be an important tool for understanding the efficacy of new source designs in meeting the needs of these instruments.

  16. 3D World Building System

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    This video provides an overview of the Sandia National Laboratories developed 3-D World Model Building capability that provides users with an immersive, texture rich 3-D model of their environment in minutes using a laptop and color and depth camera.

  17. 3D World Building System

    SciTech Connect

    2013-10-30

    This video provides an overview of the Sandia National Laboratories developed 3-D World Model Building capability that provides users with an immersive, texture rich 3-D model of their environment in minutes using a laptop and color and depth camera.

  18. Market study: 3-D eyetracker

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    A market study of a proposed version of a 3-D eyetracker for initial use at NASA's Ames Research Center was made. The commercialization potential of a simplified, less expensive 3-D eyetracker was ascertained. Primary focus on present and potential users of eyetrackers, as well as present and potential manufacturers has provided an effective means of analyzing the prospects for commercialization.

  19. The Philosophy of User Interfaces in HELIO and the Importance of CASSIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonnin, X.; Aboudarham, J.; Renié, C.; Csillaghy, A.; Messerotti, M.; Bentley, R. D.

    2012-09-01

    HELIO is a European project funded under FP7 (Project No. 238969). One of its goals as a Heliospheric Virtual Observatory is to provide an easy access to many datasets scattered all over the world, in the fields of Solar physics, Heliophysics, and Planetary magnetospheres. The efficiency of such a tool is very much related to the quality of the user interface. HELIO infrastructure is based on a Service Oriented Architecture (SOA), regrouping a network of standalone components, which allows four main types of interfaces: - HELIO Front End (HFE) is a browser-based user interface, which offers a centralized access to the HELIO main functionalities. Especially, it provides the possibility to reach data directly, or to refine selection by determination of observing characteristics, such as which instrument was observing at that time, which instrument was at this location, etc. - Many services/components provide their own standalone graphical user interface. While one can directly access individually each of these interfaces, they can also be connected together. - Most services also provide direct access for any tools through a public interface. A small java library, called Java API, simplifies this access by providing client stubs for services and shields the user from security, discovery and failover issues. - Workflows capabilities are available in HELIO, allowing complex combination of queries over several services. We want the user to be able to navigate easily, at his needs, through the various interfaces, and possibly use a specific one in order to make much-dedicated queries. We will also emphasize the importance of the CASSIS project (Coordination Action for the integration of Solar System Infrastructure and Science) in encouraging the interoperability necessary to undertake scientific studies that span disciplinary boundaries. If related projects follow the guidelines being developed by CASSIS then using external resources with HELIO will be greatly simplified.

  20. Independent Verification and Validation of Complex User Interfaces: A Human Factors Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitmore, Mihriban; Berman, Andrea; Chmielewski, Cynthia

    1996-01-01

    The Usability Testing and Analysis Facility (UTAF) at the NASA Johnson Space Center has identified and evaluated a potential automated software interface inspection tool capable of assessing the degree to which space-related critical and high-risk software system user interfaces meet objective human factors standards across each NASA program and project. Testing consisted of two distinct phases. Phase 1 compared analysis times and similarity of results for the automated tool and for human-computer interface (HCI) experts. In Phase 2, HCI experts critiqued the prototype tool's user interface. Based on this evaluation, it appears that a more fully developed version of the tool will be a promising complement to a human factors-oriented independent verification and validation (IV&V) process.

  1. Towards automatically generating graphical user interfaces from openEHR archetypes.

    PubMed

    Schuler, Thilo; Garde, Sebastian; Heard, Sam; Beale, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    One of the main challenges in the field of Electronic Health Records (EHRs) is semantic interoperability. To utilise the full potential of interoperable EHR systems they have to be accepted by their users, the health care providers. Good Graphical User Interfaces (GUIs) that support customisation and data validation play a decisive role for user acceptance and data quality. This study investigates the use of openEHR archetypes to automatically generate coherent, customizable, data-validating GUIs. Using the Mozilla XML User Interface Language (XUL) a series of prototypes has been developed. The results show that the automatic generation of GUIs from openEHR archetypes is feasible in principle. Although XUL revealed some problems, the advantages of XML-based GUI languages are evident.

  2. Analysis of the energy distribution of interface traps related to tunnel oxide degradation using charge pumping techniques for 3D NAND flash applications

    SciTech Connect

    An, Ho-Myoung; Kim, Hee-Dong; Kim, Tae Geun

    2013-12-15

    Graphical abstract: The degradation tendency extracted by CP technique was almost the same in both the bulk-type and TFT-type cells. - Highlights: • D{sub it} is directly investigated from bulk-type and TFT-type CTF memory. • Charge pumping technique was employed to analyze the D{sub it} information. • To apply the CP technique to monitor the reliability of the 3D NAND flash. - Abstract: The energy distribution and density of interface traps (D{sub it}) are directly investigated from bulk-type and thin-film transistor (TFT)-type charge trap flash memory cells with tunnel oxide degradation, under program/erase (P/E) cycling using a charge pumping (CP) technique, in view of application in a 3-demension stackable NAND flash memory cell. After P/E cycling in bulk-type devices, the interface trap density gradually increased from 1.55 × 10{sup 12} cm{sup −2} eV{sup −1} to 3.66 × 10{sup 13} cm{sup −2} eV{sup −1} due to tunnel oxide damage, which was consistent with the subthreshold swing and transconductance degradation after P/E cycling. Its distribution moved toward shallow energy levels with increasing cycling numbers, which coincided with the decay rate degradation with short-term retention time. The tendency extracted with the CP technique for D{sub it} of the TFT-type cells was similar to those of bulk-type cells.

  3. US NDC Modernization Iteration E2 Prototyping Report: User Interface Framework

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, Jennifer E.; Palmer, Melanie A.; Vickers, James Wallace; Voegtli, Ellen M.

    2014-12-01

    During the second iteration of the US NDC Modernization Elaboration phase (E2), the SNL US NDC Modernization project team completed follow-on Rich Client Platform (RCP) exploratory prototyping related to the User Interface Framework (UIF). The team also developed a survey of browser-based User Interface solutions and completed exploratory prototyping for selected solutions. This report presents the results of the browser-based UI survey, summarizes the E2 browser-based UI and RCP prototyping work, and outlines a path forward for the third iteration of the Elaboration phase (E3).

  4. Transportable Applications Environment (TAE) Plus: A NASA tool for building and managing graphical user interfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szczur, Martha R.

    1993-01-01

    The Transportable Applications Environment (TAE) Plus, developed at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, is an advanced portable user interface development which simplifies the process of creating and managing complex application graphical user interfaces (GUI's). TAE Plus supports the rapid prototyping of GUI's and allows applications to be ported easily between different platforms. This paper will discuss the capabilities of the TAE Plus tool, and how it makes the job of designing and developing GUI's easier for application developers. TAE Plus is being applied to many types of applications, and this paper discusses how it has been used both within and outside NASA.

  5. The Intelligent Monitoring System: Generic Database Interface (GDI). User Manual. Revision

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-01-03

    SUBTITLE -- -S. FUNDING NUMBERS The Intelligent monitoring System Generic Database Interface (GDI) User Manual MDA972-92-.C-0026 6. AUTHOR(S) Jean ...1992 Load 8plus Database Interface by typing 1lbsdit(vendor)’. "oracle" (default) or amontagew Working data will be in /bame/gyoer/ jean /.Data...FILE gdi cbannel.c SEE ALSO gdlabort) AUTHOR Jean T. Anderson, SAIC Geophysical Systems Operation, Open Systems Division Sun Release 4.1 Last change

  6. Graphical user interfaces for McCellan Nuclear Radiation Center (MNRC).

    SciTech Connect

    Brown-VanHoozer, S. A.

    1998-08-27

    McClellan's Nuclear Radiation Center (MNRC) control console is in the process of being replaced due to spurious scrams, outdated software, and obsolete parts. The intent of the new control console is to eliminate the existing problems by installing a UNIX-based computer system with industry-standard interface software and incorporating human factors during all stages of the graphical user interface (GUI) development and control console design.

  7. The Effect of the Use of the 3-D Multi-User Virtual Environment "Second Life" on Student Motivation and Language Proficiency in Courses of Spanish as a Foreign Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pares-Toral, Maria T.

    2013-01-01

    The ever increasing popularity of virtual worlds, also known as 3-D multi-user virtual environments (MUVEs) or simply virtual worlds provides language instructors with a new tool they can exploit in their courses. For now, "Second Life" is one of the most popular MUVEs used for teaching and learning, and although "Second Life"…

  8. StarView: The object oriented design of the ST DADS user interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, J. D.; Pollizzi, J. A.

    1992-01-01

    StarView is the user interface being developed for the Hubble Space Telescope Data Archive and Distribution Service (ST DADS). ST DADS is the data archive for HST observations and a relational database catalog describing the archived data. Users will use StarView to query the catalog and select appropriate datasets for study. StarView sends requests for archived datasets to ST DADS which processes the requests and returns the database to the user. StarView is designed to be a powerful and extensible user interface. Unique features include an internal relational database to navigate query results, a form definition language that will work with both CRT and X interfaces, a data definition language that will allow StarView to work with any relational database, and the ability to generate adhoc queries without requiring the user to understand the structure of the ST DADS catalog. Ultimately, StarView will allow the user to refine queries in the local database for improved performance and merge in data from external sources for correlation with other query results. The user will be able to create a query from single or multiple forms, merging the selected attributes into a single query. Arbitrary selection of attributes for querying is supported. The user will be able to select how query results are viewed. A standard form or table-row format may be used. Navigation capabilities are provided to aid the user in viewing query results. Object oriented analysis and design techniques were used in the design of StarView to support the mechanisms and concepts required to implement these features. One such mechanism is the Model-View-Controller (MVC) paradigm. The MVC allows the user to have multiple views of the underlying database, while providing a consistent mechanism for interaction regardless of the view. This approach supports both CRT and X interfaces while providing a common mode of user interaction. Another powerful abstraction is the concept of a Query Model. This

  9. The development of a prototype intelligent user interface subsystem for NASA's scientific database systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, William J.; Roelofs, Larry H.; Short, Nicholas M., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    The National Space Science Data Center (NSSDC) has initiated an Intelligent Data Management (IDM) research effort which has as one of its components the development of an Intelligent User Interface (IUI).The intent of the latter is to develop a friendly and intelligent user interface service that is based on expert systems and natural language processing technologies. The purpose is to support the large number of potential scientific and engineering users presently having need of space and land related research and technical data but who have little or no experience in query languages or understanding of the information content or architecture of the databases involved. This technical memorandum presents prototype Intelligent User Interface Subsystem (IUIS) using the Crustal Dynamics Project Database as a test bed for the implementation of the CRUDDES (Crustal Dynamics Expert System). The knowledge base has more than 200 rules and represents a single application view and the architectural view. Operational performance using CRUDDES has allowed nondatabase users to obtain useful information from the database previously accessible only to an expert database user or the database designer.

  10. User-customized brain computer interfaces using Bayesian optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bashashati, Hossein; Ward, Rabab K.; Bashashati, Ali

    2016-04-01

    Objective. The brain characteristics of different people are not the same. Brain computer interfaces (BCIs) should thus be customized for each individual person. In motor-imagery based synchronous BCIs, a number of parameters (referred to as hyper-parameters) including the EEG frequency bands, the channels and the time intervals from which the features are extracted should be pre-determined based on each subject’s brain characteristics. Approach. To determine the hyper-parameter values, previous work has relied on manual or semi-automatic methods that are not applicable to high-dimensional search spaces. In this paper, we propose a fully automatic, scalable and computationally inexpensive algorithm that uses Bayesian optimization to tune these hyper-parameters. We then build different classifiers trained on the sets of hyper-parameter values proposed by the Bayesian optimization. A final classifier aggregates the results of the different classifiers. Main Results. We have applied our method to 21 subjects from three BCI competition datasets. We have conducted rigorous statistical tests, and have shown the positive impact of hyper-parameter optimization in improving the accuracy of BCIs. Furthermore, We have compared our results to those reported in the literature. Significance. Unlike the best reported results in the literature, which are based on more sophisticated feature extraction and classification methods, and rely on prestudies to determine the hyper-parameter values, our method has the advantage of being fully automated, uses less sophisticated feature extraction and classification methods, and yields similar or superior results compared to the best performing designs in the literature.

  11. Interactive 3D Mars Visualization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, Mark W.

    2012-01-01

    The Interactive 3D Mars Visualization system provides high-performance, immersive visualization of satellite and surface vehicle imagery of Mars. The software can be used in mission operations to provide the most accurate position information for the Mars rovers to date. When integrated into the mission data pipeline, this system allows mission planners to view the location of the rover on Mars to 0.01-meter accuracy with respect to satellite imagery, with dynamic updates to incorporate the latest position information. Given this information so early in the planning process, rover drivers are able to plan more accurate drive activities for the rover than ever before, increasing the execution of science activities significantly. Scientifically, this 3D mapping information puts all of the science analyses to date into geologic context on a daily basis instead of weeks or months, as was the norm prior to this contribution. This allows the science planners to judge the efficacy of their previously executed science observations much more efficiently, and achieve greater science return as a result. The Interactive 3D Mars surface view is a Mars terrain browsing software interface that encompasses the entire region of exploration for a Mars surface exploration mission. The view is interactive, allowing the user to pan in any direction by clicking and dragging, or to zoom in or out by scrolling the mouse or touchpad. This set currently includes tools for selecting a point of interest, and a ruler tool for displaying the distance between and positions of two points of interest. The mapping information can be harvested and shared through ubiquitous online mapping tools like Google Mars, NASA WorldWind, and Worldwide Telescope.

  12. Upgrade to MODFLOW-GUI; addition of MODPATH, ZONEBDGT, and additional MODFLOW packages to the U.S. Geological Survey MODFLOW-96 Graphical-User Interface

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Winston, R.B.

    1999-01-01

    This report describes enhancements to a Graphical-User Interface (GUI) for MODFLOW-96, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) modular, three-dimensional, finitedifference ground-water flow model, and MOC3D, the USGS three-dimensional, method-ofcharacteristics solute-transport model. The GUI is a plug-in extension (PIE) for the commercial program Argus ONEe. The GUI has been modified to support MODPATH (a particle tracking post-processing package for MODFLOW), ZONEBDGT (a computer program for calculating subregional water budgets), and the Stream, Horizontal-Flow Barrier, and Flow and Head Boundary packages in MODFLOW. Context-sensitive help has been added to make the GUI easier to use and to understand. In large part, the help consists of quotations from the relevant sections of this report and its predecessors. The revised interface includes automatic creation of geospatial information layers required for the added programs and packages, and menus and dialog boxes for input of parameters for simulation control. The GUI creates formatted ASCII files that can be read by MODFLOW-96, MOC3D, MODPATH, and ZONEBDGT. All four programs can be executed within the Argus ONEe application (Argus Interware, Inc., 1997). Spatial results of MODFLOW-96, MOC3D, and MODPATH can be visualized within Argus ONEe. Results from ZONEBDGT can be visualized in an independent program that can also be used to view budget data from MODFLOW, MOC3D, and SUTRA. Another independent program extracts hydrographs of head or drawdown at individual cells from formatted MODFLOW head and drawdown files. A web-based tutorial on the use of MODFLOW with Argus ONE has also been updated. The internal structure of the GUI has been modified to make it possible for advanced users to easily customize the GUI. Two additional, independent PIE?s were developed to allow users to edit the positions of nodes and to facilitate exporting the grid geometry to external programs.

  13. PHREEQCI; a graphical user interface for the geochemical computer program PHREEQC

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Charlton, Scott R.; Macklin, Clifford L.; Parkhurst, David L.

    1997-01-01

    PhreeqcI is a Windows-based graphical user interface for the geochemical computer program PHREEQC. PhreeqcI provides the capability to generate and edit input data files, run simulations, and view text files containing simulation results, all within the framework of a single interface. PHREEQC is a multipurpose geochemical program that can perform speciation, inverse, reaction-path, and 1D advective reaction-transport modeling. Interactive access to all of the capabilities of PHREEQC is available with PhreeqcI. The interface is written in Visual Basic and will run on personal computers under the Windows(3.1), Windows95, and WindowsNT operating systems.

  14. Extreme C2 and Multi-Touch, Multi-User Collaborative User Interfaces

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-06-01

    because of the notion that two people can do more work together than singly is counter-intuitive in a software development environment. Indeed... disabled people ( disabled by ALS for example). They are able to read email and browse the web using only their eyes as controllers. Neural Interfaces...servicemen to work side by side. These two people can work together as described in the pair programming practice described earlier. Their differing

  15. A Framework for the Development of Context-Adaptable User Interfaces for Ubiquitous Computing Systems

    PubMed Central

    Varela, Gervasio; Paz-Lopez, Alejandro; Becerra, Jose A.; Duro, Richard

    2016-01-01

    This paper addresses the problem of developing user interfaces for Ubiquitous Computing (UC) and Ambient Intelligence (AmI) systems. These kind of systems are expected to provide a natural user experience, considering interaction modalities adapted to the user abilities and preferences and using whatever interaction devices are present in the environment. These interaction devices are not necessarily known at design time. The task is quite complicated due to the variety of devices and technologies, and the diversity of scenarios, and it usually burdens the developer with the need to create many different UIs in order to consider the foreseeable user-environment combinations. Here, we propose an UI abstraction framework for UC and AmI systems that effectively improves the portability of those systems between different environments and for different users. It allows developers to design and implement a single UI capable of being deployed with different devices and modalities regardless the physical location. PMID:27399711

  16. A Framework for the Development of Context-Adaptable User Interfaces for Ubiquitous Computing Systems.

    PubMed

    Varela, Gervasio; Paz-Lopez, Alejandro; Becerra, Jose A; Duro, Richard

    2016-07-07

    This paper addresses the problem of developing user interfaces for Ubiquitous Computing (UC) and Ambient Intelligence (AmI) systems. These kind of systems are expected to provide a natural user experience, considering interaction modalities adapted to the user abilities and preferences and using whatever interaction devices are present in the environment. These interaction devices are not necessarily known at design time. The task is quite complicated due to the variety of devices and technologies, and the diversity of scenarios, and it usually burdens the developer with the need to create many different UIs in order to consider the foreseeable user-environment combinations. Here, we propose an UI abstraction framework for UC and AmI systems that effectively improves the portability of those systems between different environments and for different users. It allows developers to design and implement a single UI capable of being deployed with different devices and modalities regardless the physical location.

  17. Closing the User Feedback Loop; Effective and Swift Interface Development at ASF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garron, J.; Simmons, D.; Crevensten, B.

    2011-12-01

    Matching user preferences with advancements in data visualization, access and manipulation methodologies can propel or mire any given data provider. Implementation of open standard technologies increases the rate at which these data providers can deploy new functionality designed to improve the user experience. In this environment of data and technological synthesis, meeting the perceived preferences of the user community for data access improvements must therefore be precise, functional, innovative and finite in scope for quick and successful implementation. ASF receives feedback directly from users, within and without the formalities of the ASF User Working Group, which is catalogued to create a backlog of general and discrete improvements requested for data access. Metrics are collected on hardware and software accessing our systems, data products downloaded, rates of data delivery, and other variables of interest, all of which in turn define requirements of new open source features implemented. Vertex: ASF's Data Portal, powered by the ASF API, is designed and implemented on user feedback, collected metrics and the open standard technology concept, under the mandate of future flexibility. Initial design was focused on the coupling of catalogued user requests and preferences, and geospatial metadata hooks of the ASF Datapool. Secondary iterations enhance user abilities to peruse the contents of the ASF archive as interactive data layers which accept user shapefiles and imported geospatially referenced data, allowing for manipulation and fusion of data within Vertex. These new data interface manifestations, employing open standards technologies, allows for minimized but effective novel interface development, propelling ASF forward in user driven data access enhancements.

  18. US NDC Modernization Iteration E1 Prototyping Report: User Interface Framework

    SciTech Connect

    Lober, Randall R.

    2014-12-01

    During the first iteration of the US NDC Modernization Elaboration phase (E1), the SNL US NDC modernization project team completed an initial survey of applicable COTS solutions, and established exploratory prototyping related to the User Interface Framework (UIF) in support of system architecture definition. This report summarizes these activities and discusses planned follow-on work.

  19. Information Practices and User Interfaces: Student Use of an iOS Application in Special Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Demmans Epp, Carrie; McEwen, Rhonda; Campigotto, Rachelle; Moffatt, Karyn

    2016-01-01

    A framework connecting concepts from user interface design with those from information studies is applied in a study that integrated a location-aware mobile application into two special education classes at different schools; this application had two support modes (one general and one location specific). The five-month study revealed several…

  20. Design and Evaluation of a User Interface Supporting Multiple Image Query Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mostafa, Javed; Dillon, Andrew

    1996-01-01

    Describes the ViewFinder interface, designed at Indiana University as a client to a database server; it supports querying based on both visual and verbal clues. Presents results of usability analysis performed on ViewFinder with 18 users. High search success rates were achieved through both types of querying means; verbal clues were used more than…

  1. Toward User Interfaces and Data Visualization Criteria for Learning Design of Digital Textbooks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Railean, Elena

    2014-01-01

    User interface and data visualisation criteria are central issues in digital textbooks design. However, when applying mathematical modelling of learning process to the analysis of the possible solutions, it could be observed that results differ. Mathematical learning views cognition in on the base on statistics and probability theory, graph…

  2. The Use of Spatialized Speech in Auditory Interfaces for Computer Users Who Are Visually Impaired

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sodnik, Jaka; Jakus, Grega; Tomazic, Saso

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: This article reports on a study that explored the benefits and drawbacks of using spatially positioned synthesized speech in auditory interfaces for computer users who are visually impaired (that is, are blind or have low vision). The study was a practical application of such systems--an enhanced word processing application compared…

  3. Graphical User Interface Development and Design to Support Airport Runway Configuration Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Debra G.; Lenox, Michelle; Onal, Emrah; Latorella, Kara A.; Lohr, Gary W.; Le Vie, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this effort was to develop a graphical user interface (GUI) for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) System Oriented Runway Management (SORM) decision support tool to support runway management. This tool is expected to be used by traffic flow managers and supervisors in the Airport Traffic Control Tower (ATCT) and Terminal Radar Approach Control (TRACON) facilities.

  4. Challenges Associated with Providing Speech Recognition User Interfaces for Computer-Based Educational Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergeron, Bryan

    1991-01-01

    Discussion of speech recognition technology and its use in computer-assisted instruction focuses on prototype systems designed for medical education. Commercial speech recognition systems are described, hardware and software requirements are examined, and the use of a speech recognition system to streamline an existing user interface is discussed.…

  5. Assessment of Application Technology of Natural User Interfaces in the Creation of a Virtual Chemical Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jagodzinski, Piotr; Wolski, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Natural User Interfaces (NUI) are now widely used in electronic devices such as smartphones, tablets and gaming consoles. We have tried to apply this technology in the teaching of chemistry in middle school and high school. A virtual chemical laboratory was developed in which students can simulate the performance of laboratory activities similar…

  6. Hypermedia User-Interface Design: The Role of Individual Differences in Placement of Icon Buttons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marquez, Mark E.; Lehman, James D.

    1992-01-01

    Describes a study of students at Purdue University that examined the roles of gender, right- versus left-handedness, and mouse experience in preferences concerning the placement of icon buttons within hypermedia user-interface designs. Response rate is examined, order of presentation is discussed, and further research is suggested. (11 references)…

  7. Towards a Taxonomy of Metaphorical Graphical User Interfaces: Demands and Implementations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cates, Ward Mitchell

    The graphical user interface (GUI) has become something of a standard for instructional programs in recent years. One type of GUI is the metaphorical type. For example, the Macintosh GUI is based on the "desktop" metaphor where objects one manipulates within the GUI are implied to be objects one might find in a real office's desktop.…

  8. A Monthly Water-Balance Model Driven By a Graphical User Interface

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCabe, Gregory J.; Markstrom, Steven L.

    2007-01-01

    This report describes a monthly water-balance model driven by a graphical user interface, referred to as the Thornthwaite monthly water-balance program. Computations of monthly water-balance components of the hydrologic cycle are made for a specified location. The program can be used as a research tool, an assessment tool, and a tool for classroom instruction.

  9. The Design of a Graphical User Interface for an Electronic Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cahalan, Kathleen J.; Levin, Jacques

    2000-01-01

    Describes the design of a prototype for the graphical user interface component of an electronic classroom (ECR) application that supports real-time lectures and question-and-answer sessions between an instructor and students. Based on requirements analysis and an analysis of competing products, a Web-based ECR prototype was produced. Findings show…

  10. Guidance from the Graphical User Interface (GUI) Experience: What GUI Teaches about Technology Access.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Council on Disability, Washington, DC.

    This report investigates the use of the graphical user interface (GUI) in computer programs, the problems it creates for individuals with visual impairments or blindness, and advocacy efforts concerning this issue, which have been targeted primarily at Microsoft, producer of Windows. The report highlights the concerns of individuals with visual…

  11. 47 CFR 79.107 - User interfaces provided by digital apparatus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... SERVICES ACCESSIBILITY OF VIDEO PROGRAMMING Apparatus § 79.107 User interfaces provided by digital... States and designed to receive or play back video programming transmitted in digital format simultaneously with sound, including apparatus designed to receive or display video programming transmitted...

  12. Social Benefits of a Tangible User Interface for Children with Autistic Spectrum Conditions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farr, William; Yuill, Nicola; Raffle, Hayes

    2010-01-01

    Tangible user interfaces (TUIs) embed computer technology in graspable objects. This study assessed the potential of Topobo, a construction toy with programmable movement, to support social interaction in children with Autistic Spectrum Conditions (ASC). Groups of either typically developing (TD) children or those with ASC had group play sessions…

  13. User Interface Preferences in the Design of a Camera-Based Navigation and Wayfinding Aid

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arditi, Aries; Tian, YingLi

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Development of a sensing device that can provide a sufficient perceptual substrate for persons with visual impairments to orient themselves and travel confidently has been a persistent rehabilitation technology goal, with the user interface posing a significant challenge. In the study presented here, we enlist the advice and ideas of…

  14. 78 FR 77209 - Accessibility of User Interfaces, and Video Programming Guides and Menus

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-20

    ...Pursuant to the Twenty-First Century Communications and Video Accessibility Act of 2010 (``CVAA''), the Federal Communications Commission (Commission) adopts rules requiring the accessibility of user interfaces on digital apparatus and video programming guides and menus on navigation devices for individuals with disabilities. These rules will enable individuals who are blind or visually......

  15. Novice Use of a Dimensional Scale for the Evaluation of the Hypermedia User Interface: Caveat Emptor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harmon, Stephen W.

    1995-01-01

    Discusses a dimensional scale for the evaluation of the multimedia user interface. Reports on a study of the use of the scale by novice graduate students at the University of Houston Clear Lake. Discusses hypermedia as a subset of multimedia, and investigates dependent measures including navigation. (LRW)

  16. Using R in Introductory Statistics Courses with the pmg Graphical User Interface

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Verzani, John

    2008-01-01

    The pmg add-on package for the open source statistics software R is described. This package provides a simple to use graphical user interface (GUI) that allows introductory statistics students, without advanced computing skills, to quickly create the graphical and numeric summaries expected of them. (Contains 9 figures.)

  17. imDEV: a graphical user interface to R multivariate analysis tools in Microsoft Excel

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Interactive modules for data exploration and visualization (imDEV) is a Microsoft Excel spreadsheet embedded application providing an integrated environment for the analysis of omics data sets with a user-friendly interface. Individual modules were designed to provide toolsets to enable interactive ...

  18. Moving towards the Assessment of Collaborative Problem Solving Skills with a Tangible User Interface

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ras, Eric; Krkovic, Katarina; Greiff, Samuel; Tobias, Eric; Maquil, Valérie

    2014-01-01

    The research on the assessment of collaborative problem solving (ColPS), as one crucial 21st Century Skill, is still in its beginnings. Using Tangible User Interfaces (TUI) for this purpose has only been marginally investigated in technology-based assessment. Our first empirical studies focused on light-weight performance measurements, usability,…

  19. Navstar GPS Space Segment/Navigation User Interfaces (Public Release Version)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-07-03

    Global Positioning System , GPS , ICD- GPS -200 . UNCLASSIFIED UNCLASSIFIED...Alterable Read-Only Memory GPS - Global Positioning System HOW - Handover Word ICD - Interface Control Document ID - Identification IODC - Issue of... Positioning System and the Navigation User Segment (US) of the GPS . The exception is that this ICD does not define characteristics of the Selective

  20. Touch in Computer-Mediated Environments: An Analysis of Online Shoppers' Touch-Interface User Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chung, Sorim

    2016-01-01

    Over the past few years, one of the most fundamental changes in current computer-mediated environments has been input devices, moving from mouse devices to touch interfaces. However, most studies of online retailing have not considered device environments as retail cues that could influence users' shopping behavior. In this research, I examine the…

  1. User Interfaces for Patient-Centered Communication of Health Status and Care Progress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilcox-Patterson, Lauren

    2013-01-01

    The recent trend toward patients participating in their own healthcare has opened up numerous opportunities for computing research. This dissertation focuses on how technology can foster this participation, through user interfaces to effectively communicate personal health status and care progress to hospital patients. I first characterize the…

  2. Eye-gaze determination of user intent at the computer interface

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, J.H.; Schryver, J.C.

    1993-12-31

    Determination of user intent at the computer interface through eye-gaze monitoring can significantly aid applications for the disabled, as well as telerobotics and process control interfaces. Whereas current eye-gaze control applications are limited to object selection and x/y gazepoint tracking, a methodology was developed here to discriminate a more abstract interface operation: zooming-in or out. This methodology first collects samples of eve-gaze location looking at controlled stimuli, at 30 Hz, just prior to a user`s decision to zoom. The sample is broken into data frames, or temporal snapshots. Within a data frame, all spatial samples are connected into a minimum spanning tree, then clustered, according to user defined parameters. Each cluster is mapped to one in the prior data frame, and statistics are computed from each cluster. These characteristics include cluster size, position, and pupil size. A multiple discriminant analysis uses these statistics both within and between data frames to formulate optimal rules for assigning the observations into zooming, zoom-out, or no zoom conditions. The statistical procedure effectively generates heuristics for future assignments, based upon these variables. Future work will enhance the accuracy and precision of the modeling technique, and will empirically test users in controlled experiments.

  3. Topological Galleries: A High Level User Interface for Topology Controlled Volume Rendering

    SciTech Connect

    MacCarthy, Brian; Carr, Hamish; Weber, Gunther H.

    2011-06-30

    Existing topological interfaces to volume rendering are limited by their reliance on sophisticated knowledge of topology by the user. We extend previous work by describing topological galleries, an interface for novice users that is based on the design galleries approach. We report three contributions: an interface based on hierarchical thumbnail galleries to display the containment relationships between topologically identifiable features, the use of the pruning hierarchy instead of branch decomposition for contour tree simplification, and drag-and-drop transfer function assignment for individual components. Initial results suggest that this approach suffers from limitations due to rapid drop-off of feature size in the pruning hierarchy. We explore these limitations by providing statistics of feature size as function of depth in the pruning hierarchy of the contour tree.

  4. Improvements to the User Interface for LHCb's Software continuous integration system.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clemencic, M.; Couturier, B.; Kyriazi, S.

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this paper is to identify a set of steps leading to an improved interface for LHCb's Nightly Builds Dashboard. The goal is to have an efficient application that meets the needs of both the project developers, by providing them with a user friendly interface, as well as those of the computing team supporting the system, by providing them with a dashboard allowing for better monitoring of the build job themselves. In line with what is already used by LHCb, the web interface has been implemented with the Flask Python framework for future maintainability and code clarity. The Database chosen to host the data is the schema-less CouchDB[7], serving the purpose of flexibility in document form changes. To improve the user experience, we use JavaScript libraries such as JQuery[11].

  5. The NASA Astrophysics Data System: The search engine and its user interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichhorn, Guenther; Kurtz, Michael J.; Accomazzi, Alberto; Grant, Carolyn S.; Murray, Stephen S.

    2000-04-01

    The ADS Abstract and Article Services provide access to the astronomical literature through the World Wide Web (WWW). The forms based user interface provides access to sophisticated searching capabilities that allow our users to find references in the fields of Astronomy, Physics/Geophysics, and astronomical Instrumentation and Engineering. The returned information includes links to other on-line information sources, creating an extensive astronomical digital library. Other interfaces to the ADS databases provide direct access to the ADS data to allow developers of other data systems to integrate our data into their system. The search engine is a custom-built software system that is specifically tailored to search astronomical references. It includes an extensive synonym list that contains discipline specific knowledge about search term equivalences. Search request logs show the usage pattern of the various search system capabilities. Access logs show the world-wide distribution of ADS users. The ADS can be accessed at: http://adswww.harvard.edu

  6. Graphical User Interface for the NASA FLOPS Aircraft Performance and Sizing Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lavelle, Thomas M.; Curlett, Brian P.

    1994-01-01

    XFLOPS is an X-Windows/Motif graphical user interface for the aircraft performance and sizing code FLOPS. This new interface simplifies entering data and analyzing results, thereby reducing analysis time and errors. Data entry is simpler because input windows are used for each of the FLOPS namelists. These windows contain fields to input the variable's values along with help information describing the variable's function. Analyzing results is simpler because output data are displayed rapidly. This is accomplished in two ways. First, because the output file has been indexed, users can view particular sections with the click of a mouse button. Second, because menu picks have been created, users can plot engine and aircraft performance data. In addition, XFLOPS has a built-in help system and complete on-line documentation for FLOPS.

  7. Renewable Electric Plant Information System user interface manual: Paradox 7 Runtime for Windows

    SciTech Connect

    1996-11-01

    The Renewable Electric Plant Information System (REPiS) is a comprehensive database with detailed information on grid-connected renewable electric plants in the US. The current version, REPiS3 beta, was developed in Paradox for Windows. The user interface (UI) was developed to facilitate easy access to information in the database, without the need to have, or know how to use, Paradox for Windows. The UI is designed to provide quick responses to commonly requested sorts of the database. A quick perusal of this manual will familiarize one with the functions of the UI and will make use of the system easier. There are six parts to this manual: (1) Quick Start: Instructions for Users Familiar with Database Applications; (2) Getting Started: The Installation Process; (3) Choosing the Appropriate Report; (4) Using the User Interface; (5) Troubleshooting; (6) Appendices A and B.

  8. Transportable Applications Environment (TAE) Plus: A NASA tool used to develop and manage graphical user interfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szczur, Martha R.

    1992-01-01

    The Transportable Applications Environment (TAE) Plus was built to support the construction of graphical user interfaces (GUI's) for highly interactive applications, such as real-time processing systems and scientific analysis systems. It is a general purpose portable tool that includes a 'What You See Is What You Get' WorkBench that allows user interface designers to layout and manipulate windows and interaction objects. The WorkBench includes both user entry objects (e.g., radio buttons, menus) and data-driven objects (e.g., dials, gages, stripcharts), which dynamically change based on values of realtime data. Discussed here is what TAE Plus provides, how the implementation has utilized state-of-the-art technologies within graphic workstations, and how it has been used both within and without NASA.

  9. Design criteria for a PC-based common user interface to remote information systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dominick, Wayne D. (Editor); Hall, Philip P.

    1984-01-01

    A set of design criteria are presented which will allow the implementation of an interface to multiple remote information systems on a microcomputer. The focus of the design description is on providing the user with the functionality required to retrieve, store and manipulate data residing in remote information systems through the utilization of a standardized interface system. The intent is to spare the user from learning the details of retrieval from specific systems while retaining the full capabilities of each system. The system design includes multi-level capabilities to enhance usability by a wide range of users and utilizes microcomputer graphics capabilities where applicable. A data collection subsystem for evaluation purposes is also described.

  10. R3D Align web server for global nucleotide to nucleotide alignments of RNA 3D structures

    PubMed Central

    Rahrig, Ryan R.; Petrov, Anton I.; Leontis, Neocles B.; Zirbel, Craig L.

    2013-01-01

    The R3D Align web server provides online access to ‘RNA 3D Align’ (R3D Align), a method for producing accurate nucleotide-level structural alignments of RNA 3D structures. The web server provides a streamlined and intuitive interface, input data validation and output that is more extensive and easier to read and interpret than related servers. The R3D Align web server offers a unique Gallery of Featured Alignments, providing immediate access to pre-computed alignments of large RNA 3D structures, including all ribosomal RNAs, as well as guidance on effective use of the server and interpretation of the output. By accessing the non-redundant lists of RNA 3D structures provided by the Bowling Green State University RNA group, R3D Align connects users to structure files in the same equivalence class and the best-modeled representative structure from each group. The R3D Align web server is freely accessible at http://rna.bgsu.edu/r3dalign/. PMID:23716643

  11. The Gains Design Process: How to do Structured Design of User Interfaces in Any Software Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindeman, Martha J.

    This paper describes a user-interaction design process created and used by a consultant to solve two challenges: (1) how to decrease the need for changes in the user interface by subsequent system releases without doing big design up-front and (2) how to apply a structured user-interaction design process no matter when brought into a project or what software methodology was being used. The four design levels in the process parallel Beck and Fowler’s four planning levels described in their book Planning Extreme Programming. The design process is called “GAINS” because the user-interaction designer has only Attraction, Information and Navigation to connect users’ Goals with the project sponsors’ criteria for Success. Thus there are five questions, one for each letter of the acronym GAINS, asked at each of four levels of design: The first two design levels, Rough Plan and Big Plan, focus on business-process actions and objects that define users’ goals. The next two levels, Release Planning and Iteration Planning, focus on the user interface objects that support the tasks necessary to achieve those goals. Release Planning identifies the displays the user sees for each goal included in that release, and also the across-display navigation for the proposed functionality. Iteration Planning focuses at a lower level of interaction, such as the within-display navigation among ontrols. For a voice system, the word “sees” would be changed to “hears,” but the design rocess and the levels of focus are the same for user interfaces that are vision output (e.g., GUIs), voice output (e.g., VRs), or multimodal.

  12. User-interfaces for hybrid systems: Analysis and design through hybrid reachability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oishi, Meeko Mitsuko Karen

    Hybrid systems combine discrete state dynamics, which model mode switching, with continuous state dynamics, which model the physical processes themselves. Applications of hybrid system theory to automated systems have traditionally assumed that the controller itself is an automaton which runs in parallel with the system under control. We model human interaction with hybrid systems, which involves the user; the automation's discrete mode-logic, and the underlying continuous dynamics of the physical system. Often in safety-critical systems, user-interfaces display a reduced set of information about the entire system, however must still provide adequate information and must not confuse the user. We present (1) a method of designing a discrete event system abstraction of the hybrid system, in order to verify or design user-interfaces for hybrid human-automation systems, and (2) the relationship between user-interfaces and discrete observability properties. Using a hybrid computational tool for reachability, we find the largest region in which the system can always remain---this is the safe region of operation. By implementing a controller which arises from this computation, we mathematically guarantee that this safe region is invariant. Assigning discrete states to the computed invariant regions, we create a discrete event system from this hybrid system with safety restrictions. This abstraction can then be used in existing interface verification and design methods. A user-interface, modeled as a discrete system, must, not only be reduced (extraneous information has been eliminated), but also "immediately observable". We derive conditions for immediate observability, in which the current state can be constructed from the current output and last occurring event. Based on finite state machine state-reduction techniques, we synthesize an output for remote user-interfaces which fulfills this property. Aircraft are prime examples of complex, safety-critical systems. In

  13. 3D and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fung, Y. C.

    1995-05-01

    This conference on physiology and function covers a wide range of subjects, including the vasculature and blood flow, the flow of gas, water, and blood in the lung, the neurological structure and function, the modeling, and the motion and mechanics of organs. Many technologies are discussed. I believe that the list would include a robotic photographer, to hold the optical equipment in a precisely controlled way to obtain the images for the user. Why are 3D images needed? They are to achieve certain objectives through measurements of some objects. For example, in order to improve performance in sports or beauty of a person, we measure the form, dimensions, appearance, and movements.

  14. Co-Evolution of User and Organizational Interfaces: A Longitudinal Case Study of WWW Dissemination of National Statistics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marchionini, Gary

    2002-01-01

    Describes how user interfaces for the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) web site evolved over a 5-year period along with the larger organizational interface and how this co-evolution has influenced the institution. Interviews with BLS staff and transaction log analysis are the foci of this study, as well as user information-seeking studies and user…

  15. Control software and user interface for the Canarias Infrared Camera Experiment (CIRCE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marín-Franch, Antonio; Eikenberry, Stephen S.; Charcos-Llorens, Miguel V.; Edwards, Michelle L.; Varosi, Frank; Hon, David B.; Raines, Steven N.; Warner, Craig D.; Rashkin, David

    2006-06-01

    The Canarias InfraRed Camera Experiment (CIRCE) is a near-infrared visitor instrument for the 10.4-meter Gran Telescopio Canarias (GTC). This document shows CIRCE software. It will have two major functions: instrument control and observatory interface. The instrument control software is based on the UFLIB library, currently used to operate FLAMINGOS-1 and T-ReCS (as well as the CanariCam and FLAMINGOS-2 instruments under development in the University of Florida). The software interface with the telescope will be based on a CORBA server-client architecture. Finally, the user interface will consist of two java-based interfaces for the mechanism/detector control, and for quick look and analysis of data.

  16. UIMX: A User Interface Management System For Scientific Computing With X Windows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foody, Michael

    1989-09-01

    Applications with iconic user interfaces, (for example, interfaces with pulldown menus, radio buttons, and scroll bars), such as those found on Apple's Macintosh computer and the IBM PC under Microsoft's Presentation Manager, have become very popular, and for good reason. They are much easier to use than applications with traditional keyboard-oriented interfaces, so training costs are much lower and just about anyone can use them. They are standardized between applications, so once you learn one application you are well along the way to learning another. The use of one reinforces the common elements between applications of the interface, and, as a result, you remember how to use them longer. Finally, for the developer, their support costs can be much lower because of their ease of use.

  17. GUIdock: Using Docker Containers with a Common Graphics User Interface to Address the Reproducibility of Research.

    PubMed

    Hung, Ling-Hong; Kristiyanto, Daniel; Lee, Sung Bong; Yeung, Ka Yee

    2016-01-01

    Reproducibility is vital in science. For complex computational methods, it is often necessary, not just to recreate the code, but also the software and hardware environment to reproduce results. Virtual machines, and container software such as Docker, make it possible to reproduce the exact environment regardless of the underlying hardware and operating system. However, workflows that use Graphical User Interfaces (GUIs) remain difficult to replicate on different host systems as there is no high level graphical software layer common to all platforms. GUIdock allows for the facile distribution of a systems biology application along with its graphics environment. Complex graphics based workflows, ubiquitous in systems biology, can now be easily exported and reproduced on many different platforms. GUIdock uses Docker, an open source project that provides a container with only the absolutely necessary software dependencies and configures a common X Windows (X11) graphic interface on Linux, Macintosh and Windows platforms. As proof of concept, we present a Docker package that contains a Bioconductor application written in R and C++ called networkBMA for gene network inference. Our package also includes Cytoscape, a java-based platform with a graphical user interface for visualizing and analyzing gene networks, and the CyNetworkBMA app, a Cytoscape app that allows the use of networkBMA via the user-friendly Cytoscape interface.

  18. GUIdock: Using Docker Containers with a Common Graphics User Interface to Address the Reproducibility of Research

    PubMed Central

    Yeung, Ka Yee

    2016-01-01

    Reproducibility is vital in science. For complex computational methods, it is often necessary, not just to recreate the code, but also the software and hardware environment to reproduce results. Virtual machines, and container software such as Docker, make it possible to reproduce the exact environment regardless of the underlying hardware and operating system. However, workflows that use Graphical User Interfaces (GUIs) remain difficult to replicate on different host systems as there is no high level graphical software layer common to all platforms. GUIdock allows for the facile distribution of a systems biology application along with its graphics environment. Complex graphics based workflows, ubiquitous in systems biology, can now be easily exported and reproduced on many different platforms. GUIdock uses Docker, an open source project that provides a container with only the absolutely necessary software dependencies and configures a common X Windows (X11) graphic interface on Linux, Macintosh and Windows platforms. As proof of concept, we present a Docker package that contains a Bioconductor application written in R and C++ called networkBMA for gene network inference. Our package also includes Cytoscape, a java-based platform with a graphical user interface for visualizing and analyzing gene networks, and the CyNetworkBMA app, a Cytoscape app that allows the use of networkBMA via the user-friendly Cytoscape interface. PMID:27045593

  19. NASA Langley Atmospheric Science Data Center Toolsets for Airborne Data (TAD): User Interface Design and Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beach, A. L., III; Early, A. B.; Chen, G.; Parker, L.

    2014-12-01

    NASA has conducted airborne tropospheric chemistry studies for about three decades. These field campaigns have generated a great wealth of observations, which are characterized by a wide range of trace gases and aerosol properties. The airborne observational data have often been used in assessment and validation of models and satellite instruments. The ASDC Toolset for Airborne Data (TAD) is being designed to meet the user community needs for manipulating aircraft data for scientific research on climate change and air quality relevant issues. Given the sheer volume of data variables across field campaigns and instruments reporting data on different time scales, this data is often difficult and time-intensive for researchers to analyze. The TAD web application is designed to provide an intuitive user interface (UI) to facilitate quick and efficient discovery from a vast number of airborne variables and data. Users are given the option to search based on high-level parameter groups, individual common names, mission and platform, as well as date ranges. Experienced users can immediately filter by keyword using the global search option. Once the user has chosen their required variables, they are given the option to either request PI data files based on their search criteria or create merged data, i.e. geo-located data from one or more measurement PIs. The purpose of the merged data feature is to allow users to compare data from one flight, as not all data from each flight is taken on the same time scale. Time bases can be continuous or based on the time base from one of the measurement time scales and intervals. After an order is submitted and processed, an ASDC email is sent to the user with a link for data download. The TAD user interface design, application architecture, and proposed future enhancements will be presented.

  20. A user-centered model for web site design: needs assessment, user interface design, and rapid prototyping.

    PubMed

    Kinzie, Mable B; Cohn, Wendy F; Julian, Marti F; Knaus, William A

    2002-01-01

    As the Internet continues to grow as a delivery medium for health information, the design of effective Web sites becomes increasingly important. In this paper, the authors provide an overview of one effective model for Web site design, a user-centered process that includes techniques for needs assessment, goal/task analysis, user interface design, and rapid prototyping. They detail how this approach was employed to design a family health history Web site, Health Heritage . This Web site helps patients record and maintain their family health histories in a secure, confidential manner. It also supports primary care physicians through analysis of health histories, identification of potential risks, and provision of health care recommendations. Visual examples of the design process are provided to show how the use of this model resulted in an easy-to-use Web site that is likely to meet user needs. The model is effective across diverse content arenas and is appropriate for applications in varied media.

  1. Three Dimensional (3D) Printing: A Straightforward, User-Friendly Protocol to Convert Virtual Chemical Models to Real-Life Objects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rossi, Sergio; Benaglia, Maurizio; Brenna, Davide; Porta, Riccardo; Orlandi, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    A simple procedure to convert protein data bank files (.pdb) into a stereolithography file (.stl) using VMD software (Virtual Molecular Dynamic) is reported. This tutorial allows generating, with a very simple protocol, three-dimensional customized structures that can be printed by a low-cost 3D-printer, and used for teaching chemical education…

  2. Classification of user interfaces for graph-based online analytical processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michaelis, James R.

    2016-05-01

    In the domain of business intelligence, user-oriented software for conducting multidimensional analysis via Online- Analytical Processing (OLAP) is now commonplace. In this setting, datasets commonly have well-defined sets of dimensions and measures around which analysis tasks can be conducted. However, many forms of data used in intelligence operations - deriving from social networks, online communications, and text corpora - will consist of graphs with varying forms of potential dimensional structure. Hence, enabling OLAP over such data collections requires explicit definition and extraction of supporting dimensions and measures. Further, as Graph OLAP remains an emerging technique, limited research has been done on its user interface requirements. Namely, on effective pairing of interface designs to different types of graph-derived dimensions and measures. This paper presents a novel technique for pairing of user interface designs to Graph OLAP datasets, rooted in Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP) driven comparisons. Attributes of the classification strategy are encoded through an AHP ontology, developed in our alternate work and extended to support pairwise comparison of interfaces. Specifically, according to their ability, as perceived by Subject Matter Experts, to support dimensions and measures corresponding to Graph OLAP dataset attributes. To frame this discussion, a survey is provided both on existing variations of Graph OLAP, as well as existing interface designs previously applied in multidimensional analysis settings. Following this, a review of our AHP ontology is provided, along with a listing of corresponding dataset and interface attributes applicable toward SME recommendation structuring. A walkthrough of AHP-based recommendation encoding via the ontology-based approach is then provided. The paper concludes with a short summary of proposed future directions seen as essential for this research area.

  3. Icon and user interface design for emergency medical information systems: a case study.

    PubMed

    Salman, Y Batu; Cheng, Hong-In; Patterson, Patrick E

    2012-01-01

    A usable medical information system should allow for reliable and accurate interaction between users and the system in emergencies. A participatory design approach was used to develop a medical information system in two Turkish hospitals. The process consisted of task and user analysis, an icon design survey, initial icon design, final icon design and evaluation, and installation of the iconic medical information system with the icons. We observed work sites to note working processes and tasks related to the information system and interviewed medical personnel. Emergency personnel then participated in the design process to develop a usable graphical user interface, by drawing icon sketches for 23 selected tasks. Similar sketches were requested for specific tasks such as family medical history, contact information, translation, addiction, required inspections, requests and applications, and nurse observations. The sketches were analyzed and redesigned into computer icons by professional designers and the research team. A second group of physicians and nurses then tested the understandability of the icons. The user interface layout was examined and evaluated by system users, followed by the system's installation. Medical personnel reported the participatory design process was interesting and believed the resulting designs would be more familiar and friendlier.

  4. User participation in the development of the human/computer interface for control centers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broome, Richard; Quick-Campbell, Marlene; Creegan, James; Dutilly, Robert

    1996-01-01

    Technological advances coupled with the requirements to reduce operations staffing costs led to the demand for efficient, technologically-sophisticated mission operations control centers. The control center under development for the earth observing system (EOS) is considered. The users are involved in the development of a control center in order to ensure that it is cost-efficient and flexible. A number of measures were implemented in the EOS program in order to encourage user involvement in the area of human-computer interface development. The following user participation exercises carried out in relation to the system analysis and design are described: the shadow participation of the programmers during a day of operations; the flight operations personnel interviews; and the analysis of the flight operations team tasks. The user participation in the interface prototype development, the prototype evaluation, and the system implementation are reported on. The involvement of the users early in the development process enables the requirements to be better understood and the cost to be reduced.

  5. Marine Web Portal as an Interface between Users and Marine Data and Information Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palazov, A.; Stefanov, A.; Marinova, V.; Slabakova, V.

    2012-04-01

    Fundamental elements of the success of marine data and information management system and an effective support of marine and maritime economic activities are the speed and the ease with which users can identify, locate, get access, exchange and use oceanographic and marine data and information. There are a lot of activities and bodies have been identified as marine data and information users, such as: science, government and local authorities, port authorities, shipping, marine industry, fishery and aquaculture, tourist industry, environmental protection, coast protection, oil spills combat, Search and Rescue, national security, civil protection, and general public. On other hand diverse sources of real-time and historical marine data and information exist and generally they are fragmented, distributed in different places and sometimes unknown for the users. The marine web portal concept is to build common web based interface which will provide users fast and easy access to all available marine data and information sources, both historical and real-time such as: marine data bases, observing systems, forecasting systems, atlases etc. The service is regionally oriented to meet user needs. The main advantage of the portal is that it provides general look "at glance" on all available marine data and information as well as direct user to easy discover data and information in interest. It is planned to provide personalization ability, which will give the user instrument to tailor visualization according its personal needs.

  6. A standard format and a graphical user interface for spin system specification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biternas, A. G.; Charnock, G. T. P.; Kuprov, Ilya

    2014-03-01

    We introduce a simple and general XML format for spin system description that is the result of extensive consultations within Magnetic Resonance community and unifies under one roof all major existing spin interaction specification conventions. The format is human-readable, easy to edit and easy to parse using standard XML libraries. We also describe a graphical user interface that was designed to facilitate construction and visualization of complicated spin systems. The interface is capable of generating input files for several popular spin dynamics simulation packages.

  7. An Evaluation and Redesign of the Conflict Prediction and Trial Planning Planview Graphical User Interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laudeman, Irene V.; Brasil, Connie L.; Stassart, Philippe

    1998-01-01

    The Planview Graphical User Interface (PGUI) is the primary display of air traffic for the Conflict Prediction and Trial Planning, function of the Center TRACON Automation System. The PGUI displays air traffic information that assists the user in making decisions related to conflict detection, conflict resolution, and traffic flow management. The intent of this document is to outline the human factors issues related to the design of the conflict prediction and trial planning portions of the PGUI, document all human factors related design changes made to the PGUI from December 1996 to September 1997, and outline future plans for the ongoing PGUI design.

  8. PRay - A graphical user interface for interactive visualization and modification of rayinvr models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fromm, T.

    2016-01-01

    PRay is a graphical user interface for interactive displaying and editing of velocity models for seismic refraction. It is optimized for editing rayinvr models but can also be used as a dynamic viewer for ray tracing results from other software. The main features are the graphical editing of nodes and fast adjusting of the display (stations and phases). It can be extended by user-defined shell scripts and links to phase picking software. PRay is open source software written in the scripting language Perl, runs on Unix-like operating systems including Mac OS X and provides a version controlled source code repository for community development.

  9. New Graphical User Interface for EXAFS analysis with the GNXAS suite of programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatada, Keisuke; Iesari, Fabio; Properzi, Leonardo; Minicucci, M.; di Cicco, Andrea

    2016-05-01

    GNXAS is a suite of programs based on multiple scattering calculations which performs a structural refinement of EXAFS spectra. It can be used for any system although it has been mainly developed to determine the local structure of disordered substances. We developed a user-friendly graphical user interface (GUI) to facilitate use of the codes by using wxPython. The developed GUI and the codes are multiplatform running on Windows, Macintosh and Linux systems, and are free shareware (http://gnxas.unicam.it). In this work we illustrate features and potentials of this newly developed version of GNXAS (w-GNXAS).

  10. An interactive multiview 3D display system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhaoxing; Geng, Zheng; Zhang, Mei; Dong, Hui

    2013-03-01

    The progresses in 3D display systems and user interaction technologies will help more effective 3D visualization of 3D information. They yield a realistic representation of 3D objects and simplifies our understanding to the complexity of 3D objects and spatial relationship among them. In this paper, we describe an autostereoscopic multiview 3D display system with capability of real-time user interaction. Design principle of this autostereoscopic multiview 3D display system is presented, together with the details of its hardware/software architecture. A prototype is built and tested based upon multi-projectors and horizontal optical anisotropic display structure. Experimental results illustrate the effectiveness of this novel 3D display and user interaction system.

  11. Voice and gesture-based 3D multimedia presentation tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukutake, Hiromichi; Akazawa, Yoshiaki; Okada, Yoshihiro

    2007-09-01

    This paper proposes a 3D multimedia presentation tool that allows the user to manipulate intuitively only through the voice input and the gesture input without using a standard keyboard or a mouse device. The authors developed this system as a presentation tool to be used in a presentation room equipped a large screen like an exhibition room in a museum because, in such a presentation environment, it is better to use voice commands and the gesture pointing input rather than using a keyboard or a mouse device. This system was developed using IntelligentBox, which is a component-based 3D graphics software development system. IntelligentBox has already provided various types of 3D visible, reactive functional components called boxes, e.g., a voice input component and various multimedia handling components. IntelligentBox also provides a dynamic data linkage mechanism called slot-connection that allows the user to develop 3D graphics applications by combining already existing boxes through direct manipulations on a computer screen. Using IntelligentBox, the 3D multimedia presentation tool proposed in this paper was also developed as combined components only through direct manipulations on a computer screen. The authors have already proposed a 3D multimedia presentation tool using a stage metaphor and its voice input interface. This time, we extended the system to make it accept the user gesture input besides voice commands. This paper explains details of the proposed 3D multimedia presentation tool and especially describes its component-based voice and gesture input interfaces.

  12. Lung Segmentation Refinement based on Optimal Surface Finding Utilizing a Hybrid Desktop/Virtual Reality User Interface

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Shanhui; Sonka, Milan; Beichel, Reinhard R.

    2013-01-01

    Recently, the optimal surface finding (OSF) and layered optimal graph image segmentation of multiple objects and surfaces (LOGISMOS) approaches have been reported with applications to medical image segmentation tasks. While providing high levels of performance, these approaches may locally fail in the presence of pathology or other local challenges. Due to the image data variability, finding a suitable cost function that would be applicable to all image locations may not be feasible. This paper presents a new interactive refinement approach for correcting local segmentation errors in the automated OSF-based segmentation. A hybrid desktop/virtual reality user interface was developed for efficient interaction with the segmentations utilizing state-of-the-art stereoscopic visualization technology and advanced interaction techniques. The user interface allows a natural and interactive manipulation on 3-D surfaces. The approach was evaluated on 30 test cases from 18 CT lung datasets, which showed local segmentation errors after employing an automated OSF-based lung segmentation. The performed experiments exhibited significant increase in performance in terms of mean absolute surface distance errors (2.54 ± 0.75 mm prior to refinement vs. 1.11 ± 0.43 mm post-refinement, p ≪ 0.001). Speed of the interactions is one of the most important aspects leading to the acceptance or rejection of the approach by users expecting real-time interaction experience. The average algorithm computing time per refinement iteration was 150 ms, and the average total user interaction time required for reaching complete operator satisfaction per case was about 2 min. This time was mostly spent on human-controlled manipulation of the object to identify whether additional refinement was necessary and to approve the final segmentation result. The reported principle is generally applicable to segmentation problems beyond lung segmentation in CT scans as long as the underlying segmentation

  13. Make E-Learning Effortless! Impact of a Redesigned User Interface on Usability through the Application of an Affordance Design Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Hyungjoo; Song, Hae-Deok

    2015-01-01

    Given that a user interface interacts with users, a critical factor to be considered in improving the usability of an e-learning user interface is user-friendliness. Affordances enable users to more easily approach and engage in learning tasks because they strengthen positive, activating emotions. However, most studies on affordances limit…

  14. Microcomputer spacecraft thermal analysis routines (MSTAR) Phase I: The user interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teti, Nicholas M.

    1993-01-01

    The Microcomputer Spacecraft Thermal Analysis Routines (MSTAR) software package is being developed for NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center by Swales and Associates, Inc. (S&AI). In December 1992, S&AI was awarded a phase I Small Business Inovative Research contract fronm NASA to develop a microcomputer based thermal analysis program to replace the current SSPTA and TRASYS programs. Phase I consists of a six month effort which will focus on developing geometric model generation and visualization capabilities using a graphical user interface (GUI). The information contained in this paper encompasses the work performed during the Phase I development cycle; with emphasis on the development of the graphical user interface (GUI). This includes both the theory behind and specific examples of how the MSTAR GUI was implemented. Furthermore, this report discusses new applications and enhancements which will improve the capabilities and commercialization of the MSTAR program.

  15. Reducing wrong patient selection errors: exploring the design space of user interface techniques.

    PubMed

    Sopan, Awalin; Plaisant, Catherine; Powsner, Seth; Shneiderman, Ben

    2014-01-01

    Wrong patient selection errors are a major issue for patient safety; from ordering medication to performing surgery, the stakes are high. Widespread adoption of Electronic Health Record (EHR) and Computerized Provider Order Entry (CPOE) systems makes patient selection using a computer screen a frequent task for clinicians. Careful design of the user interface can help mitigate the problem by helping providers recall their patients' identities, accurately select their names, and spot errors before orders are submitted. We propose a catalog of twenty seven distinct user interface techniques, organized according to a task analysis. An associated video demonstrates eighteen of those techniques. EHR designers who consider a wider range of human-computer interaction techniques could reduce selection errors, but verification of efficacy is still needed.

  16. Development of a Common User Interface for the Launch Decision Support System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scholtz, Jean C.

    1991-01-01

    The Launch Decision Support System (LDSS) is software to be used by the NASA Test Director (NTD) in the firing room during countdown. This software is designed to assist the NTD with time management, that is, when to resume from a hold condition. This software will assist the NTD in making and evaluating alternate plans and will keep him advised of the existing situation. As such, the interface to this software must be designed to provide the maximum amount of information in the clearest fashion and in a timely manner. This research involves applying user interface guidelines to a mature prototype of LDSS and developing displays that will enable the users to easily and efficiently obtain information from the LDSS displays. This research also extends previous work on organizing and prioritizing human-computer interaction knowledge.

  17. Automating a human factors evaluation of graphical user interfaces for NASA applications: An update on CHIMES

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jiang, Jian-Ping; Murphy, Elizabeth D.; Bailin, Sidney C.; Truszkowski, Walter F.

    1993-01-01

    Capturing human factors knowledge about the design of graphical user interfaces (GUI's) and applying this knowledge on-line are the primary objectives of the Computer-Human Interaction Models (CHIMES) project. The current CHIMES prototype is designed to check a GUI's compliance with industry-standard guidelines, general human factors guidelines, and human factors recommendations on color usage. Following the evaluation, CHIMES presents human factors feedback and advice to the GUI designer. The paper describes the approach to modeling human factors guidelines, the system architecture, a new method developed to convert quantitative RGB primaries into qualitative color representations, and the potential for integrating CHIMES with user interface management systems (UIMS). Both the conceptual approach and its implementation are discussed. This paper updates the presentation on CHIMES at the first International Symposium on Ground Data Systems for Spacecraft Control.

  18. A distributed, graphical user interface based, computer control system for atomic physics experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keshet, Aviv; Ketterle, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    Atomic physics experiments often require a complex sequence of precisely timed computer controlled events. This paper describes a distributed graphical user interface-based control system designed with such experiments in mind, which makes use of off-the-shelf output hardware from National Instruments. The software makes use of a client-server separation between a user interface for sequence design and a set of output hardware servers. Output hardware servers are designed to use standard National Instruments output cards, but the client-server nature should allow this to be extended to other output hardware. Output sequences running on multiple servers and output cards can be synchronized using a shared clock. By using a field programmable gate array-generated variable frequency clock, redundant buffers can be dramatically shortened, and a time resolution of 100 ns achieved over effectively arbitrary sequence lengths.

  19. TOOKUIL: A case study in user interface development for safety code application

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, D.L.; Harkins, C.K.; Hoole, J.G.

    1997-07-01

    Traditionally, there has been a very high learning curve associated with using nuclear power plant (NPP) analysis codes. Even for seasoned plant analysts and engineers, the process of building or modifying an input model for present day NPP analysis codes is tedious, error prone, and time consuming. Current cost constraints and performance demands place an additional burden on today`s safety analysis community. Advances in graphical user interface (GUI) technology have been applied to obtain significant productivity and quality assurance improvements for the Transient Reactor Analysis Code (TRAC) input model development. KAPL Inc. has developed an X Windows-based graphical user interface named TOOKUIL which supports the design and analysis process, acting as a preprocessor, runtime editor, help system, and post processor for TRAC. This paper summarizes the objectives of the project, the GUI development process and experiences, and the resulting end product, TOOKUIL.

  20. NFS as a user interface to a high-performance data system

    SciTech Connect

    Mercier, C.W.

    1991-01-01

    The Network File System (NFS) will be the user interface to a High-Performance Data System (HPDS) being developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). HPDS will manage high-capacity, high-performance storage systems connected directly to a high-speed network from distributed workstations. NFS will be modified to maximize performance and to manage massive amounts of data. 6 refs., 3 figs.