Science.gov

Sample records for 3d variable range

  1. 3D scene modeling from multiple range views

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sequeira, Vitor; Goncalves, Joao G. M.; Ribeiro, M. Isabel

    1995-09-01

    This paper presents a new 3D scene analysis system that automatically reconstructs the 3D geometric model of real-world scenes from multiple range images acquired by a laser range finder on board of a mobile robot. The reconstruction is achieved through an integrated procedure including range data acquisition, geometrical feature extraction, registration, and integration of multiple views. Different descriptions of the final 3D scene model are obtained: a polygonal triangular mesh, a surface description in terms of planar and biquadratics surfaces, and a 3D boundary representation. Relevant experimental results from the complete 3D scene modeling are presented. Direct applications of this technique include 3D reconstruction and/or update of architectual or industrial plans into a CAD model, design verification of buildings, navigation of autonomous robots, and input to virtual reality systems.

  2. 3D gesture recognition from serial range image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsui, Yasuyuki; Miyasaka, Takeo; Hirose, Makoto; Araki, Kazuo

    2001-10-01

    In this research, the recognition of gesture in 3D space is examined by using serial range images obtained by a real-time 3D measurement system developed in our laboratory. Using this system, it is possible to obtain time sequences of range, intensity and color data for a moving object in real-time without assigning markers to the targets. At first, gestures are tracked in 2D space by calculating 2D flow vectors at each points using an ordinal optical flow estimation method, based on time sequences of the intensity data. Then, location of each point after 2D movement is detected on the x-y plane using thus obtained 2D flow vectors. Depth information of each point after movement is then obtained from the range data and 3D flow vectors are assigned to each point. Time sequences of thus obtained 3D flow vectors allow us to track the 3D movement of the target. So, based on time sequences of 3D flow vectors of the targets, it is possible to classify the movement of the targets using continuous DP matching technique. This tracking of 3D movement using time sequences of 3D flow vectors may be applicable for a robust gesture recognition system.

  3. Inspection of 3D parts using high accuracy range data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prieto, Flavio; Lepage, Richard; Boulanger, Pierre; Redarce, Tanneguy

    2000-03-01

    The use of a laser range sensor in the 3D part digitalization process for inspection tasks allows very significant improvement in acquisition speed and in 3D measurement points density but does not equal the accuracy obtained with a coordinate measuring machine (CMM). Inspection consists in verifying the accuracy of a part related to a given set of tolerances. It is thus necessary that the 3D measurements be accurate. In the 3D capture of a part, several sources of error can alter the measured values. So, we have to find and model the most influent parameters affecting the accuracy of the range sensor in the digitalization process. This model is used to produce a sensing plan to acquire completely and accurately the geometry of a part. The sensing plan is composed of the set of viewpoints which defines the exact position and orientation of the camera relative to the part. The 3D cloud obtained from the sensing plan is registered with the CAD model of the part and then segmented according to the different surfaces. Segmentation results are used to check tolerances of the part. By using the noise model, we introduce a dispersion value for each 3D point acquired according to the sensing plan. This value of dispersion is shown as a weight factor in the inspection results.

  4. 1024 pixels single photon imaging array for 3D ranging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellisai, S.; Guerrieri, F.; Tisa, S.; Zappa, F.; Tosi, A.; Giudice, A.

    2011-01-01

    Three dimensions (3D) acquisition systems are driving applications in many research field. Nowadays 3D acquiring systems are used in a lot of applications, such as cinema industry or in automotive (for active security systems). Depending on the application, systems present different features, for example color sensitivity, bi-dimensional image resolution, distance measurement accuracy and acquisition frame rate. The system we developed acquires 3D movie using indirect Time of Flight (iTOF), starting from phase delay measurement of a sinusoidally modulated light. The system acquires live movie with a frame rate up to 50frame/s in a range distance between 10 cm up to 7.5 m.

  5. Advanced 3D imaging lidar concepts for long range sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, K. J.; Hiskett, P. A.; Lamb, R. A.

    2014-06-01

    Recent developments in 3D imaging lidar are presented. Long range 3D imaging using photon counting is now a possibility, offering a low-cost approach to integrated remote sensing with step changing advantages in size, weight and power compared to conventional analogue active imaging technology. We report results using a Geiger-mode array for time-of-flight, single photon counting lidar for depth profiling and determination of the shape and size of tree canopies and distributed surface reflections at a range of 9km, with 4μJ pulses with a frame rate of 100kHz using a low-cost fibre laser operating at a wavelength of λ=1.5 μm. The range resolution is less than 4cm providing very high depth resolution for target identification. This specification opens up several additional functionalities for advanced lidar, for example: absolute rangefinding and depth profiling for long range identification, optical communications, turbulence sensing and time-of-flight spectroscopy. Future concepts for 3D time-of-flight polarimetric and multispectral imaging lidar, with optical communications in a single integrated system are also proposed.

  6. Design of 3D eye-safe middle range vibrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polulyakh, Valeriy; Poutivski, Iouri

    2014-05-01

    Laser Doppler Vibrometer and Range Meter (3D-MRV) is designed for middle range distances [1-100 meters]. 3D-MRV combines more than one laser in one device for a simultaneous real time measuring the distance and movement of the targets. The first laser has a short pulse (t˜30psec) and low energy (E˜200nJ) for distance measurement and the second one is a CW (continuous wave) single frequency laser for the velocity measurement with output power (P˜30mW). Both lasers perform on the eye-safe wavelength 1.5 μm. 3D-MRV uses the same mono-static optical transmitting and receiving channel for both lasers including an output telescope and a scanning angular system. 3D-MRV has an optical polarization switch to combine linear polarized laser beams from two lasers into one optical channel. The laser beams from both lasers by turns illuminate the target and the scattered laser radiation is collected by the telescope on a photo detector. The electrical signal from photo detector is used for measuring the distance to the target and its movement. For distance measurement the time of flight method is employed. For targets movement the optical heterodyne method is employed. The received CW laser radiation is mixed on a photo detector with the frequency-shifted laser radiation that is taken from CW laser and passed through an acousto-optic cell. The electrical signal from a photo detector on the difference frequency and phase has information about movement of the scattered targets. 3D-MVR may be used for the real time picturing of vibration of the extensive targets like bridges or aircrafts.

  7. Design of 3D eye-safe middle range vibrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Polulyakh, Valeriy; Poutivski, Iouri

    2014-05-27

    Laser Doppler Vibrometer and Range Meter (3D-MRV) is designed for middle range distances [1–100 meters]. 3D-MRV combines more than one laser in one device for a simultaneous real time measuring the distance and movement of the targets. The first laser has a short pulse (t∼30psec) and low energy (E∼200nJ) for distance measurement and the second one is a CW (continuous wave) single frequency laser for the velocity measurement with output power (P∼30mW). Both lasers perform on the eye-safe wavelength 1.5 μm. 3D-MRV uses the same mono-static optical transmitting and receiving channel for both lasers including an output telescope and a scanning angular system. 3D-MRV has an optical polarization switch to combine linear polarized laser beams from two lasers into one optical channel. The laser beams from both lasers by turns illuminate the target and the scattered laser radiation is collected by the telescope on a photo detector. The electrical signal from photo detector is used for measuring the distance to the target and its movement. For distance measurement the time of flight method is employed. For targets movement the optical heterodyne method is employed. The received CW laser radiation is mixed on a photo detector with the frequency-shifted laser radiation that is taken from CW laser and passed through an acousto-optic cell. The electrical signal from a photo detector on the difference frequency and phase has information about movement of the scattered targets. 3D-MVR may be used for the real time picturing of vibration of the extensive targets like bridges or aircrafts.

  8. Sonification of range information for 3-D space perception.

    PubMed

    Milios, Evangelos; Kapralos, Bill; Kopinska, Agnieszka; Stergiopoulos, Sotirios

    2003-12-01

    We present a device that allows three-dimensional (3-D) space perception by sonification of range information obtained via a point laser range sensor. The laser range sensor is worn by a blindfolded user, who scans space by pointing the laser beam in different directions. The resulting stream of range measurements is then converted to an auditory signal whose frequency or amplitude varies with the range. Our device differs from existing navigation aids for the visually impaired. Such devices use sonar ranging whose primary purpose is to detect obstacles for navigation, a task to which sonar is well suited due to its wide beam width. In contrast, the purpose of our device is to allow users to perceive the details of 3-D space that surrounds them, a task to which sonar is ill suited, due to artifacts generated by multiple reflections and due to its limited range. Preliminary trials demonstrate that the user is able to easily and accurately detect corners and depth discontinuities and to perceive the size of the surrounding space. PMID:14960118

  9. 3D sensor for indirect ranging with pulsed laser source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bronzi, D.; Bellisai, S.; Villa, F.; Scarcella, C.; Bahgat Shehata, A.; Tosi, A.; Padovini, G.; Zappa, F.; Tisa, S.; Durini, D.; Weyers, S.; Brockherde, W.

    2012-10-01

    The growing interest for fast, compact and cost-effective 3D ranging imagers for automotive applications has prompted to explore many different techniques for 3D imaging and to develop new system for this propose. CMOS imagers that exploit phase-resolved techniques provide accurate 3D ranging with no complex optics and are rugged and costeffective. Phase-resolved techniques indirectly measure the round-trip return of the light emitted by a laser and backscattered from a distant target, computing the phase delay between the modulated light and the detected signal. Singlephoton detectors, with their high sensitivity, allow to actively illuminate the scene with a low power excitation (less than 10W with diffused daylight illumination). We report on a 4x4 array of CMOS SPAD (Single Photon Avalanche Diodes) designed in a high-voltage 0.35 μm CMOS technology, for pulsed modulation, in which each pixel computes the phase difference between the laser and the reflected pulse. Each pixel comprises a high-performance 30 μm diameter SPAD, an analog quenching circuit, two 9 bit up-down counters and memories to store data during the readout. The first counter counts the photons detected by the SPAD in a time window synchronous with the laser pulse and integrates the whole echoed signal. The second counter accumulates the number of photon detected in a window shifted with respect to the laser pulse, and acquires only a portion of the reflected signal. The array is readout with a global shutter architecture, using a 100 MHz clock; the maximal frame rate is 3 Mframe/s.

  10. 3D range scan enhancement using image-based methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herbort, Steffen; Gerken, Britta; Schugk, Daniel; Wöhler, Christian

    2013-10-01

    This paper addresses the problem of 3D surface scan refinement, which is desirable due to noise, outliers, and missing measurements being present in the 3D surfaces obtained with a laser scanner. We present a novel algorithm for the fusion of absolute laser scanner depth profiles and photometrically estimated surface normal data, which yields a noise-reduced and highly detailed depth profile with large scale shape robustness. In contrast to other approaches published in the literature, the presented algorithm (1) regards non-Lambertian surfaces, (2) simultaneously computes surface reflectance (i.e. BRDF) parameters required for 3D reconstruction, (3) models pixelwise incident light and viewing directions, and (4) accounts for interreflections. The algorithm as such relies on the minimization of a three-component error term, which penalizes intensity deviations, integrability deviations, and deviations from the known large-scale surface shape. The solution of the error minimization is obtained iteratively based on a calculus of variations. BRDF parameters are estimated by initially reducing and then iteratively refining the optical resolution, which provides the required robust data basis. The 3D reconstruction of concave surface regions affected by interreflections is improved by compensating global illumination in the image data. The algorithm is evaluated based on eight objects with varying albedos and reflectance behaviors (diffuse, specular, metallic). The qualitative evaluation shows a removal of outliers and a strong reduction of noise, while the large scale shape is preserved. Fine surface details Which are previously not contained in the surface scans, are incorporated through using image data. The algorithm is evaluated with respect to its absolute accuracy using two caliper objects of known shape, and based on synthetically generated data. The beneficial effect of interreflection compensation on the reconstruction accuracy is evaluated quantitatively in a

  11. A new approach towards image based virtual 3D city modeling by using close range photogrammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, S. P.; Jain, K.; Mandla, V. R.

    2014-05-01

    3D city model is a digital representation of the Earth's surface and it's related objects such as building, tree, vegetation, and some manmade feature belonging to urban area. The demand of 3D city modeling is increasing day to day for various engineering and non-engineering applications. Generally three main image based approaches are using for virtual 3D city models generation. In first approach, researchers used Sketch based modeling, second method is Procedural grammar based modeling and third approach is Close range photogrammetry based modeling. Literature study shows that till date, there is no complete solution available to create complete 3D city model by using images. These image based methods also have limitations This paper gives a new approach towards image based virtual 3D city modeling by using close range photogrammetry. This approach is divided into three sections. First, data acquisition process, second is 3D data processing, and third is data combination process. In data acquisition process, a multi-camera setup developed and used for video recording of an area. Image frames created from video data. Minimum required and suitable video image frame selected for 3D processing. In second section, based on close range photogrammetric principles and computer vision techniques, 3D model of area created. In third section, this 3D model exported to adding and merging of other pieces of large area. Scaling and alignment of 3D model was done. After applying the texturing and rendering on this model, a final photo-realistic textured 3D model created. This 3D model transferred into walk-through model or in movie form. Most of the processing steps are automatic. So this method is cost effective and less laborious. Accuracy of this model is good. For this research work, study area is the campus of department of civil engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Roorkee. This campus acts as a prototype for city. Aerial photography is restricted in many country

  12. PHT3D-UZF: A reactive transport model for variably-saturated porous media

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wu, Ming Zhi; Post, Vincent E. A.; Salmon, S. Ursula; Morway, Eric; Prommer, H.

    2016-01-01

    A modified version of the MODFLOW/MT3DMS-based reactive transport model PHT3D was developed to extend current reactive transport capabilities to the variably-saturated component of the subsurface system and incorporate diffusive reactive transport of gaseous species. Referred to as PHT3D-UZF, this code incorporates flux terms calculated by MODFLOW's unsaturated-zone flow (UZF1) package. A volume-averaged approach similar to the method used in UZF-MT3DMS was adopted. The PHREEQC-based computation of chemical processes within PHT3D-UZF in combination with the analytical solution method of UZF1 allows for comprehensive reactive transport investigations (i.e., biogeochemical transformations) that jointly involve saturated and unsaturated zone processes. Intended for regional-scale applications, UZF1 simulates downward-only flux within the unsaturated zone. The model was tested by comparing simulation results with those of existing numerical models. The comparison was performed for several benchmark problems that cover a range of important hydrological and reactive transport processes. A 2D simulation scenario was defined to illustrate the geochemical evolution following dewatering in a sandy acid sulfate soil environment. Other potential applications include the simulation of biogeochemical processes in variably-saturated systems that track the transport and fate of agricultural pollutants, nutrients, natural and xenobiotic organic compounds and micropollutants such as pharmaceuticals, as well as the evolution of isotope patterns.

  13. PHT3D-UZF: A Reactive Transport Model for Variably-Saturated Porous Media.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ming Zhi; Post, Vincent E A; Salmon, S Ursula; Morway, Eric D; Prommer, Henning

    2016-01-01

    A modified version of the MODFLOW/MT3DMS-based reactive transport model PHT3D was developed to extend current reactive transport capabilities to the variably-saturated component of the subsurface system and incorporate diffusive reactive transport of gaseous species. Referred to as PHT3D-UZF, this code incorporates flux terms calculated by MODFLOW's unsaturated-zone flow (UZF1) package. A volume-averaged approach similar to the method used in UZF-MT3DMS was adopted. The PHREEQC-based computation of chemical processes within PHT3D-UZF in combination with the analytical solution method of UZF1 allows for comprehensive reactive transport investigations (i.e., biogeochemical transformations) that jointly involve saturated and unsaturated zone processes. Intended for regional-scale applications, UZF1 simulates downward-only flux within the unsaturated zone. The model was tested by comparing simulation results with those of existing numerical models. The comparison was performed for several benchmark problems that cover a range of important hydrological and reactive transport processes. A 2D simulation scenario was defined to illustrate the geochemical evolution following dewatering in a sandy acid sulfate soil environment. Other potential applications include the simulation of biogeochemical processes in variably-saturated systems that track the transport and fate of agricultural pollutants, nutrients, natural and xenobiotic organic compounds and micropollutants such as pharmaceuticals, as well as the evolution of isotope patterns. PMID:25628017

  14. 3D optoelectronic analysis of interfractional patient setup variability in frameless extracranial stereotactic radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Baroni, Guido . E-mail: guido.baroni@polimi.it; Garibaldi, Cristina; Riboldi, Marco; Spadea, Maria F.; Catalano, Gianpiero; Tagaste, Barbara B.S.; Tosi, Giampiero; Orecchia, Roberto; Pedotti, Antonio

    2006-02-01

    Purpose: To investigate size and frequency of interfractional patient setup variability in hypofractionated stereotactic extracranial radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Infrared optical 3D tracking of surface markers was applied to quantify setup variability on 51 patients. Isocenter position repeatability was assessed by means of frameless anatomic calibration and was compared with portal image evaluation. Specific data analysis allowed for compensation of patients' breathing movements and for separation of the effects of operator-dependent misalignments and respiration-induced displacements. Effects of patient position (supine vs. prone) and treatment table configuration were investigated. Results: Patient positioning assisted by the optical tracking device allowed reducing displacements of surface control points within the 3-mm range. Errors in isocenter localization were in the range of a few millimeters. This was in agreement with the portal image evaluation. Breathing motion introduced appreciable errors, which increased control points and isocenter 3D variability. This effect was significantly higher than those related to other investigated factors. Conclusions: The role of infrared optical tracking devices for patient positioning is assessed on a large patient population. Their use in the frame of high-precision radiotherapy is emphasized by the application of related methodologies for breathing phase detection and frameless isocenter localization.

  15. 3D Printing Variable Stiffness Foams Using Viscous Thread Instability

    PubMed Central

    Lipton, Jeffrey I.; Lipson, Hod

    2016-01-01

    Additive manufacturing of cellular structures has numerous applications ranging from fabrication of biological scaffolds and medical implants, to mechanical weight reduction and control over mechanical properties. Various additive manufacturing processes have been used to produce open regular cellular structures limited only by the resolution of the printer. These efforts have focused on printing explicitly designed cells or explicitly planning offsets between strands. Here we describe a technique for producing cellular structures implicitly by inducing viscous thread instability when extruding material. This process allows us to produce complex cellular structures at a scale that is finer than the native resolution of the printer. We demonstrate tunable effective elastic modulus and density that span two orders of magnitude. Fine grained cellular structures allow for fabrication of foams for use in a wide range of fields ranging from bioengineering, to robotics to food printing. PMID:27503148

  16. 3D Printing Variable Stiffness Foams Using Viscous Thread Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipton, Jeffrey I.; Lipson, Hod

    2016-08-01

    Additive manufacturing of cellular structures has numerous applications ranging from fabrication of biological scaffolds and medical implants, to mechanical weight reduction and control over mechanical properties. Various additive manufacturing processes have been used to produce open regular cellular structures limited only by the resolution of the printer. These efforts have focused on printing explicitly designed cells or explicitly planning offsets between strands. Here we describe a technique for producing cellular structures implicitly by inducing viscous thread instability when extruding material. This process allows us to produce complex cellular structures at a scale that is finer than the native resolution of the printer. We demonstrate tunable effective elastic modulus and density that span two orders of magnitude. Fine grained cellular structures allow for fabrication of foams for use in a wide range of fields ranging from bioengineering, to robotics to food printing.

  17. 3D Printing Variable Stiffness Foams Using Viscous Thread Instability.

    PubMed

    Lipton, Jeffrey I; Lipson, Hod

    2016-01-01

    Additive manufacturing of cellular structures has numerous applications ranging from fabrication of biological scaffolds and medical implants, to mechanical weight reduction and control over mechanical properties. Various additive manufacturing processes have been used to produce open regular cellular structures limited only by the resolution of the printer. These efforts have focused on printing explicitly designed cells or explicitly planning offsets between strands. Here we describe a technique for producing cellular structures implicitly by inducing viscous thread instability when extruding material. This process allows us to produce complex cellular structures at a scale that is finer than the native resolution of the printer. We demonstrate tunable effective elastic modulus and density that span two orders of magnitude. Fine grained cellular structures allow for fabrication of foams for use in a wide range of fields ranging from bioengineering, to robotics to food printing. PMID:27503148

  18. Analysis and Processing the 3D-Range-Image-Data for Robot Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohoutek, Tobias

    2008-09-01

    Industrial robots are commonly used for physically stressful jobs in complex environments. In any case collisions with heavy and high dynamic machines need to be prevented. For this reason the operational range has to be monitored precisely, reliably and meticulously. The advantage of the SwissRanger® SR-3000 is that it delivers intensity images and 3D-information simultaneously of the same scene that conveniently allows 3D-monitoring. Due to that fact automatic real time collision prevention within the robots working space is possible by working with 3D-coordinates.

  19. A 2D range Hausdorff approach for 3D face recognition.

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, Mark William; Russ, Trina Denise; Little, Charles Quentin

    2005-04-01

    This paper presents a 3D facial recognition algorithm based on the Hausdorff distance metric. The standard 3D formulation of the Hausdorff matching algorithm has been modified to operate on a 2D range image, enabling a reduction in computation from O(N2) to O(N) without large storage requirements. The Hausdorff distance is known for its robustness to data outliers and inconsistent data between two data sets, making it a suitable choice for dealing with the inherent problems in many 3D datasets due to sensor noise and object self-occlusion. For optimal performance, the algorithm assumes a good initial alignment between probe and template datasets. However, to minimize the error between two faces, the alignment can be iteratively refined. Results from the algorithm are presented using 3D face images from the Face Recognition Grand Challenge database version 1.0.

  20. A 2D range Hausdorff approach to 3D facial recognition.

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, Mark William; Russ, Trina Denise; Little, Charles Quentin

    2004-11-01

    This paper presents a 3D facial recognition algorithm based on the Hausdorff distance metric. The standard 3D formulation of the Hausdorff matching algorithm has been modified to operate on a 2D range image, enabling a reduction in computation from O(N2) to O(N) without large storage requirements. The Hausdorff distance is known for its robustness to data outliers and inconsistent data between two data sets, making it a suitable choice for dealing with the inherent problems in many 3D datasets due to sensor noise and object self-occlusion. For optimal performance, the algorithm assumes a good initial alignment between probe and template datasets. However, to minimize the error between two faces, the alignment can be iteratively refined. Results from the algorithm are presented using 3D face images from the Face Recognition Grand Challenge database version 1.0.

  1. 3D reconstruction of outdoor environments from omnidirectional range and color images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asai, Toshihiro; Kanbara, Masayuki; Yokoya, Naokazu

    2005-03-01

    This paper describes a 3D modeling method for wide area outdoor environments which is based on integrating omnidirectional range and color images. In the proposed method, outdoor scenes can be efficiently digitized by an omnidirectional laser rangefinder which can obtain a 3D shape with high-accuracy and an omnidirectional multi-camera system (OMS) which can capture a high-resolution color image. Multiple range images are registered by minimizing the distances between corresponding points in the different range images. In order to register multiple range images stably, the points on the plane portions detected from the range data are used in registration process. The position and orientation acquired by the RTK-GPS and the gyroscope are used as initial value of simultaneous registration. The 3D model which is obtained by registration of range data is mapped by the texture selected from omnidirectional images in consideration of the resolution of the texture and occlusions of the model. In experiments, we have carried out 3D modeling of our campus with the proposed method.

  2. The application of camera calibration in range-gated 3D imaging technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiao-quan; Wang, Xian-wei; Zhou, Yan

    2013-09-01

    Range-gated laser imaging technology was proposed in 1966 by LF Gillespiethe in U.S. Army Night Vision Laboratory(NVL). Using pulse laser and intensified charge-coupled device(ICCD) as light source and detector respectively, range-gated laser imaging technology can realize space-slice imaging while restraining the atmospheric backs-catter, and in turn detect the target effectively, by controlling the delay between the laser pulse and strobe. Owing to the constraints of the development of key components such as narrow pulse laser and gated imaging devices, the research has been progressed slowly in the next few decades. Until the beginning of this century, as the hardware technology continues to mature, this technology has developed rapidly in fields such as night vision, underwater imaging, biomedical imaging, three-dimensional imaging, especially range-gated three-dimensional(3-D) laser imaging field purposing of access to target spatial information. 3-D reconstruction is the processing of restoration of 3-D objects visible surface geometric structure from three-dimensional(2-D) image. Range-gated laser imaging technology can achieve gated imaging of slice space to form a slice image, and in turn provide the distance information corresponding to the slice image. But to inverse the information of 3-D space, we need to obtain the imaging visual field of system, that is, the focal length of the system. Then based on the distance information of the space slice, the spatial information of each unit space corresponding to each pixel can be inversed. Camera calibration is an indispensable step in 3-D reconstruction, including analysis of the internal structure of camera parameters and the external parameters . In order to meet the technical requirements of the range-gated 3-D imaging, this paper intends to study the calibration of the zoom lens system. After summarizing the camera calibration technique comprehensively, a classic calibration method based on line is

  3. First Experiences with Kinect v2 Sensor for Close Range 3d Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lachat, E.; Macher, H.; Mittet, M.-A.; Landes, T.; Grussenmeyer, P.

    2015-02-01

    RGB-D cameras, also known as range imaging cameras, are a recent generation of sensors. As they are suitable for measuring distances to objects at high frame rate, such sensors are increasingly used for 3D acquisitions, and more generally for applications in robotics or computer vision. This kind of sensors became popular especially since the Kinect v1 (Microsoft) arrived on the market in November 2010. In July 2014, Windows has released a new sensor, the Kinect for Windows v2 sensor, based on another technology as its first device. However, due to its initial development for video games, the quality assessment of this new device for 3D modelling represents a major investigation axis. In this paper first experiences with Kinect v2 sensor are related, and the ability of close range 3D modelling is investigated. For this purpose, error sources on output data as well as a calibration approach are presented.

  4. Evaluating the performance of close-range 3D active vision systems for industrial design applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beraldin, J.-Angelo; Gaiani, Marco

    2004-12-01

    In recent years, active three-dimensional (3D) active vision systems or range cameras for short have come out of research laboratories to find niche markets in application fields as diverse as industrial design, automotive manufacturing, geomatics, space exploration and cultural heritage to name a few. Many publications address different issues link to 3D sensing and processing but currently these technologies pose a number of challenges to many recent users, i.e., "what are they, how good are they and how do they compare?". The need to understand, test and integrate those range cameras with other technologies, e.g. photogrammetry, CAD, etc. is driven by the quest for optimal resolution, accuracy, speed and cost. Before investing, users want to be certain that a given range camera satisfy their operational requirements. The understanding of the basic theory and best practices associated with those cameras are in fact fundamental to fulfilling the requirements listed above in an optimal way. This paper addresses the evaluation of active 3D range cameras as part of a study to better understand and select one or a number of them to fulfill the needs of industrial design applications. In particular, object material and surface features effect, calibration and performance evaluation are discussed. Results are given for six different range cameras for close range applications.

  5. Evaluating the performance of close-range 3D active vision systems for industrial design applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beraldin, J.-Angelo; Gaiani, Marco

    2005-01-01

    In recent years, active three-dimensional (3D) active vision systems or range cameras for short have come out of research laboratories to find niche markets in application fields as diverse as industrial design, automotive manufacturing, geomatics, space exploration and cultural heritage to name a few. Many publications address different issues link to 3D sensing and processing but currently these technologies pose a number of challenges to many recent users, i.e., "what are they, how good are they and how do they compare?". The need to understand, test and integrate those range cameras with other technologies, e.g. photogrammetry, CAD, etc. is driven by the quest for optimal resolution, accuracy, speed and cost. Before investing, users want to be certain that a given range camera satisfy their operational requirements. The understanding of the basic theory and best practices associated with those cameras are in fact fundamental to fulfilling the requirements listed above in an optimal way. This paper addresses the evaluation of active 3D range cameras as part of a study to better understand and select one or a number of them to fulfill the needs of industrial design applications. In particular, object material and surface features effect, calibration and performance evaluation are discussed. Results are given for six different range cameras for close range applications.

  6. Vision-Based Long-Range 3D Tracking, applied to Underground Surveying Tasks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mossel, Annette; Gerstweiler, Georg; Vonach, Emanuel; Kaufmann, Hannes; Chmelina, Klaus

    2014-04-01

    To address the need of highly automated positioning systems in underground construction, we present a long-range 3D tracking system based on infrared optical markers. It provides continuous 3D position estimation of static or kinematic targets with low latency over a tracking volume of 12 m x 8 m x 70 m (width x height x depth). Over the entire volume, relative 3D point accuracy with a maximal deviation ≤ 22 mm is ensured with possible target rotations of yaw, pitch = 0 - 45° and roll = 0 - 360°. No preliminary sighting of target(s) is necessary since the system automatically locks onto a target without user intervention and autonomously starts tracking as soon as a target is within the view of the system. The proposed system needs a minimal hardware setup, consisting of two machine vision cameras and a standard workstation for data processing. This allows for quick installation with minimal disturbance of construction work. The data processing pipeline ensures camera calibration and tracking during on-going underground activities. Tests in real underground scenarios prove the system's capabilities to act as 3D position measurement platform for multiple underground tasks that require long range, low latency and high accuracy. Those tasks include simultaneously tracking of personnel, machines or robots.

  7. Optimization of 3D laser scanning speed by use of combined variable step

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Cruz, X. M.; Sergiyenko, O. Yu.; Tyrsa, Vera; Rivas-Lopez, M.; Hernandez-Balbuena, D.; Rodriguez-Quiñonez, J. C.; Basaca-Preciado, L. C.; Mercorelli, P.

    2014-03-01

    The problem of 3D TVS slow functioning caused by constant small scanning step becomes its solution in the presented research. It can be achieved by combined scanning step application for the fast search of n obstacles in unknown surroundings. Such a problem is of keynote importance in automatic robot navigation. To maintain a reasonable speed robots must detect dangerous obstacles as soon as possible, but all known scanners able to measure distances with sufficient accuracy are unable to do it in real time. So, the related technical task of the scanning with variable speed and precise digital mapping only for selected spatial sectors is under consideration. A wide range of simulations in MATLAB 7.12.0 of several variants of hypothetic scenes with variable n obstacles in each scene (including variation of shapes and sizes) and scanning with incremented angle value (0.6° up to 15°) is provided. The aim of such simulation was to detect which angular values of interval still permit getting the maximal information about obstacles without undesired time losses. Three of such local maximums were obtained in simulations and then rectified by application of neuronal network formalism (Levenberg-Marquradt Algorithm). The obtained results in its turn were applied to MET (Micro-Electro-mechanical Transmission) design for practical realization of variable combined step scanning on an experimental prototype of our previously known laser scanner.

  8. Three-dimensional potential flows from functions of a 3D complex variable

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, Patrick; Panton, Ronald L.; Martin, E. D.

    1990-01-01

    Potential, or ideal, flow velocities can be found from the gradient of an harmonic function. An ordinary complex valued analytic function can be written as the sum of two real valued functions, both of which are harmonic. Thus, 2D complex valued functions serve as a source of functions that describe two-dimensional potential flows. However, this use of complex variables has been limited to two-dimensions. Recently, a new system of three-dimensional complex variables has been developed at the NASA Ames Research Center. As a step toward application of this theory to the analysis of 3D potential flow, several functions of a three-dimensional complex variable have been investigated. The results for two such functions, the 3D exponential and 3D logarithm, are presented in this paper. Potential flows found from these functions are investigated. Important characteristics of these flows fields are noted.

  9. A 3-D Computational Study of a Variable Camber Continuous Trailing Edge Flap (VCCTEF) Spanwise Segment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaul, Upender K.; Nguyen, Nhan T.

    2015-01-01

    Results of a computational study carried out to explore the effects of various elastomer configurations joining spanwise contiguous Variable Camber Continuous Trailing Edge Flap (VCCTEF) segments are reported here. This research is carried out as a proof-of-concept study that will seek to push the flight envelope in cruise with drag optimization as the objective. The cruise conditions can be well off design such as caused by environmental conditions, maneuvering, etc. To handle these off-design conditions, flap deflection is used so when the flap is deflected in a given direction, the aircraft angle of attack changes accordingly to maintain a given lift. The angle of attack is also a design parameter along with the flap deflection. In a previous 2D study,1 the effect of camber was investigated and the results revealed some insight into the relative merit of various camber settings of the VCCTEF. The present state of the art has not advanced sufficiently to do a full 3-D viscous analysis of the whole NASA Generic Transport Model (GTM) wing with VCCTEF deployed with elastomers. Therefore, this study seeks to explore the local effects of three contiguous flap segments on lift and drag of a model devised here to determine possible trades among various flap deflections to achieve desired lift and drag results. Although this approach is an approximation, it provides new insights into the "local" effects of the relative deflections of the contiguous spanwise flap systems and various elastomer segment configurations. The present study is a natural extension of the 2-D study to assess these local 3-D effects. Design cruise condition at 36,000 feet at free stream Mach number of 0.797 and a mean aerodynamic chord (MAC) based Reynolds number of 30.734x10(exp 6) is simulated for an angle of attack (AoA) range of 0 to 6 deg. In the previous 2-D study, the calculations revealed that the parabolic arc camber (1x2x3) and circular arc camber (VCCTEF222) offered the best L

  10. Bore-Sight Calibration of Multiple Laser Range Finders for Kinematic 3D Laser Scanning Systems

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Jaehoon; Kim, Jeonghyun; Yoon, Sanghyun; Kim, Sangmin; Cho, Hyoungsig; Kim, Changjae; Heo, Joon

    2015-01-01

    The Simultaneous Localization and Mapping (SLAM) technique has been used for autonomous navigation of mobile systems; now, its applications have been extended to 3D data acquisition of indoor environments. In order to reconstruct 3D scenes of indoor space, the kinematic 3D laser scanning system, developed herein, carries three laser range finders (LRFs): one is mounted horizontally for system-position correction and the other two are mounted vertically to collect 3D point-cloud data of the surrounding environment along the system’s trajectory. However, the kinematic laser scanning results can be impaired by errors resulting from sensor misalignment. In the present study, the bore-sight calibration of multiple LRF sensors was performed using a specially designed double-deck calibration facility, which is composed of two half-circle-shaped aluminum frames. Moreover, in order to automatically achieve point-to-point correspondences between a scan point and the target center, a V-shaped target was designed as well. The bore-sight calibration parameters were estimated by a constrained least squares method, which iteratively minimizes the weighted sum of squares of residuals while constraining some highly-correlated parameters. The calibration performance was analyzed by means of a correlation matrix. After calibration, the visual inspection of mapped data and residual calculation confirmed the effectiveness of the proposed calibration approach. PMID:25946627

  11. Bore-Sight Calibration of Multiple Laser Range Finders for Kinematic 3D Laser Scanning Systems.

    PubMed

    Jung, Jaehoon; Kim, Jeonghyun; Yoon, Sanghyun; Kim, Sangmin; Cho, Hyoungsig; Kim, Changjae; Heo, Joon

    2015-01-01

    The Simultaneous Localization and Mapping (SLAM) technique has been used for autonomous navigation of mobile systems; now, its applications have been extended to 3D data acquisition of indoor environments. In order to reconstruct 3D scenes of indoor space, the kinematic 3D laser scanning system, developed herein, carries three laser range finders (LRFs): one is mounted horizontally for system-position correction and the other two are mounted vertically to collect 3D point-cloud data of the surrounding environment along the system's trajectory. However, the kinematic laser scanning results can be impaired by errors resulting from sensor misalignment. In the present study, the bore-sight calibration of multiple LRF sensors was performed using a specially designed double-deck calibration facility, which is composed of two half-circle-shaped aluminum frames. Moreover, in order to automatically achieve point-to-point correspondences between a scan point and the target center, a V-shaped target was designed as well. The bore-sight calibration parameters were estimated by a constrained least squares method, which iteratively minimizes the weighted sum of squares of residuals while constraining some highly-correlated parameters. The calibration performance was analyzed by means of a correlation matrix. After calibration, the visual inspection of mapped data and residual calculation confirmed the effectiveness of the proposed calibration approach. PMID:25946627

  12. Determining the 3-D structure and motion of objects using a scanning laser range sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nandhakumar, N.; Smith, Philip W.

    1993-01-01

    In order for the EVAHR robot to autonomously track and grasp objects, its vision system must be able to determine the 3-D structure and motion of an object from a sequence of sensory images. This task is accomplished by the use of a laser radar range sensor which provides dense range maps of the scene. Unfortunately, the currently available laser radar range cameras use a sequential scanning approach which complicates image analysis. Although many algorithms have been developed for recognizing objects from range images, none are suited for use with single beam, scanning, time-of-flight sensors because all previous algorithms assume instantaneous acquisition of the entire image. This assumption is invalid since the EVAHR robot is equipped with a sequential scanning laser range sensor. If an object is moving while being imaged by the device, the apparent structure of the object can be significantly distorted due to the significant non-zero delay time between sampling each image pixel. If an estimate of the motion of the object can be determined, this distortion can be eliminated; but, this leads to the motion-structure paradox - most existing algorithms for 3-D motion estimation use the structure of objects to parameterize their motions. The goal of this research is to design a rigid-body motion recovery technique which overcomes this limitation. The method being developed is an iterative, linear, feature-based approach which uses the non-zero image acquisition time constraint to accurately recover the motion parameters from the distorted structure of the 3-D range maps. Once the motion parameters are determined, the structural distortion in the range images is corrected.

  13. Modeling variably saturated multispecies reactive groundwater solute transport with MODFLOW-UZF and RT3D

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bailey, Ryan T.; Morway, Eric D.; Niswonger, Richard G.; Gates, Timothy K.

    2013-01-01

    A numerical model was developed that is capable of simulating multispecies reactive solute transport in variably saturated porous media. This model consists of a modified version of the reactive transport model RT3D (Reactive Transport in 3 Dimensions) that is linked to the Unsaturated-Zone Flow (UZF1) package and MODFLOW. Referred to as UZF-RT3D, the model is tested against published analytical benchmarks as well as other published contaminant transport models, including HYDRUS-1D, VS2DT, and SUTRA, and the coupled flow and transport modeling system of CATHY and TRAN3D. Comparisons in one-dimensional, two-dimensional, and three-dimensional variably saturated systems are explored. While several test cases are included to verify the correct implementation of variably saturated transport in UZF-RT3D, other cases are included to demonstrate the usefulness of the code in terms of model run-time and handling the reaction kinetics of multiple interacting species in variably saturated subsurface systems. As UZF1 relies on a kinematic-wave approximation for unsaturated flow that neglects the diffusive terms in Richards equation, UZF-RT3D can be used for large-scale aquifer systems for which the UZF1 formulation is reasonable, that is, capillary-pressure gradients can be neglected and soil parameters can be treated as homogeneous. Decreased model run-time and the ability to include site-specific chemical species and chemical reactions make UZF-RT3D an attractive model for efficient simulation of multispecies reactive transport in variably saturated large-scale subsurface systems.

  14. Modeling variably saturated multispecies reactive groundwater solute transport with MODFLOW-UZF and RT3D.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Ryan T; Morway, Eric D; Niswonger, Richard G; Gates, Timothy K

    2013-01-01

    A numerical model was developed that is capable of simulating multispecies reactive solute transport in variably saturated porous media. This model consists of a modified version of the reactive transport model RT3D (Reactive Transport in 3 Dimensions) that is linked to the Unsaturated-Zone Flow (UZF1) package and MODFLOW. Referred to as UZF-RT3D, the model is tested against published analytical benchmarks as well as other published contaminant transport models, including HYDRUS-1D, VS2DT, and SUTRA, and the coupled flow and transport modeling system of CATHY and TRAN3D. Comparisons in one-dimensional, two-dimensional, and three-dimensional variably saturated systems are explored. While several test cases are included to verify the correct implementation of variably saturated transport in UZF-RT3D, other cases are included to demonstrate the usefulness of the code in terms of model run-time and handling the reaction kinetics of multiple interacting species in variably saturated subsurface systems. As UZF1 relies on a kinematic-wave approximation for unsaturated flow that neglects the diffusive terms in Richards equation, UZF-RT3D can be used for large-scale aquifer systems for which the UZF1 formulation is reasonable, that is, capillary-pressure gradients can be neglected and soil parameters can be treated as homogeneous. Decreased model run-time and the ability to include site-specific chemical species and chemical reactions make UZF-RT3D an attractive model for efficient simulation of multispecies reactive transport in variably saturated large-scale subsurface systems. PMID:23131109

  15. Long-range laser scanning and 3D imaging for the Gneiss quarries survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schenker, Filippo Luca; Spataro, Alessio; Pozzoni, Maurizio; Ambrosi, Christian; Cannata, Massimiliano; Günther, Felix; Corboud, Federico

    2016-04-01

    In Canton Ticino (Southern Switzerland), the exploitation of natural stone, mostly gneisses, is an important activity of valley's economies. Nowadays, these economic activities are menaced by (i) the exploitation costs related to geological phenomena such as fractures, faults and heterogeneous rocks that hinder the processing of the stone product, (ii) continuously changing demand because of the evolving natural stone fashion and (iii) increasing administrative limits and rules acting to protect the environment. Therefore, the sustainable development of the sector for the next decades needs new and effective strategies to regulate and plan the quarries. A fundamental step in this process is the building of a 3D geological model of the quarries to constrain the volume of commercial natural stone and the volume of waste. In this context, we conducted Terrestrial Laser Scanning surveys of the quarries in the Maggia Valley to obtain a detailed 3D topography onto which the geological units were mapped. The topographic 3D model was obtained with a long-range laser scanning Riegl VZ4000 that can measure from up to 4 km of distance with a speed of 147,000 points per second. It operates with the new V-line technology, which defines the surface relief by sensing differentiated signals (echoes), even in the presence of obstacles such as vegetation. Depending on the esthetics of the gneisses, we defined seven types of natural stones that, together with faults and joints, were mapped onto the 3D models of the exploitation sites. According to the orientation of the geological limits and structures, we projected the different rock units and fractures into the excavation front. This way, we obtained a 3D geological model from which we can quantitatively estimate the volume of the seven different natural stones (with different commercial value) and waste (with low commercial value). To verify the 3D geological models and to quantify exploited rock and waste volumes the same

  16. 3D reconstruction in laparoscopy with close-range photometric stereo.

    PubMed

    Collins, Toby; Bartoli, Adrien

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we present the first solution to 3D reconstruction in monocular laparoscopy using methods based on Photometric Stereo (PS). Our main contributions are to provide the new theory and practical solutions to successfully apply PS in close-range imaging conditions. We are specifically motivated by a solution with minimal hardware modification to existing laparoscopes. In fact the only physical modification we make is to adjust the colour of the laparoscope's illumination via three colour filters placed at its tip. Once calibrated, our approach can compute 3D from a single image, does not require correspondence estimation, and computes absolute depth densely. We demonstrate the potential of our approach with ground truth ex-vivo and in-vivo experimentation. PMID:23286102

  17. Detecting falls with 3D range camera in ambient assisted living applications: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Leone, Alessandro; Diraco, Giovanni; Siciliano, Pietro

    2011-07-01

    In recent years several world-wide ambient assisted living (AAL) programs have been activated in order to improve the quality of life of older people, and to strengthen the industrial base through the use of information and communication technologies. An important issue is extending the time that older people can live in their home environment, by increasing their autonomy and helping them to carry out activities of daily living (ADLs). Research in the automatic detection of falls has received a lot of attention, with the object of enhancing safety, emergency response and independence of the elderly, at the same time comparing the social and economic costs related to fall accidents. In this work, an algorithmic framework to detect falls by using a 3D time-of-flight vision technology is presented. The proposed system presented complementary working requirements with respect to traditional worn and non-worn fall-detection devices. The vision system used a state-of-the-art 3D range camera for elderly movement measurement and detection of critical events, such as falls. The depth images provided by the active sensor allowed reliable segmentation and tracking of elderly movements, by using well-established imaging methods. Moreover, the range camera provided 3D metric information in all illumination conditions (even night vision), allowing the overcoming of some typical limitations of passive vision (shadows, camouflage, occlusions, brightness fluctuations, perspective ambiguity). A self-calibration algorithm guarantees different setup mountings of the range camera by non-technical users. A large dataset of simulated fall events and ADLs in real dwellings was collected and the proposed fall-detection system demonstrated high performance in terms of sensitivity and specificity. PMID:21382737

  18. Interpretation of a 3D Seismic-Reflection Volume in the Basin and Range, Hawthorne, Nevada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Louie, J. N.; Kell, A. M.; Pullammanappallil, S.; Oldow, J. S.; Sabin, A.; Lazaro, M.

    2009-12-01

    A collaborative effort by the Great Basin Center for Geothermal Energy at the University of Nevada, Reno, and Optim Inc. of Reno has interpreted a 3d seismic data set recorded by the U.S. Navy Geothermal Programs Office (GPO) at the Hawthorne Army Depot, Nevada. The 3d survey incorporated about 20 NNW-striking lines covering an area of approximately 3 by 10 km. The survey covered an alluvial area below the eastern flank of the Wassuk Range. In the reflection volume the most prominent events are interpreted to be the base of Quaternary alluvium, the Quaternary Wassuk Range-front normal fault zone, and sequences of intercalated Tertiary volcanic flows and sediments. Such a data set is rare in the Basin and Range. Our interpretation reveals structural and stratigraphic details that form a basis for rapid development of the geothermal-energy resources underlying the Depot. We interpret a map of the time-elevation of the Wassuk Range fault and its associated splays and basin-ward step faults. The range-front fault is the deepest, and its isochron map provides essentially a map of "economic basement" under the prospect area. There are three faults that are the most readily picked through vertical sections. The fault reflections show an uncertainty in the time-depth that we can interpret for them of 50 to 200 ms, due to the over-migrated appearance of the processing contractor’s prestack time-migrated data set. Proper assessment of velocities for mitigating the migration artifacts through prestack depth migration is not possible from this data set alone, as the offsets are not long enough for sufficiently deep velocity tomography. The three faults we interpreted appear as gradients in potential-field maps. In addition, the southern boundary of a major Tertiary graben may be seen within the volume as the northward termination of the strong reflections from older Tertiary volcanics. Using a transparent volume view across the survey gives a view of the volcanics in full

  19. A novel window based method for approximating the Hausdorff in 3D range imagery.

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, Mark William

    2004-10-01

    Matching a set of 3D points to another set of 3D points is an important part of any 3D object recognition system. The Hausdorff distance is known for it robustness in the face of obscuration, clutter, and noise. We show how to approximate the 3D Hausdorff fraction with linear time complexity and quadratic space complexity. We empirically demonstrate that the approximation is very good when compared to actual Hausdorff distances.

  20. Domain Decomposition PN Solutions to the 3D Transport Benchmark over a Range in Parameter Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Criekingen, S.

    2014-06-01

    The objectives of this contribution are twofold. First, the Domain Decomposition (DD) method used in the parafish parallel transport solver is re-interpreted as a Generalized Schwarz Splitting as defined by Tang [SIAM J Sci Stat Comput, vol.13 (2), pp. 573-595, 1992]. Second, parafish provides spherical harmonic (i.e., PN) solutions to the NEA benchmark suite for 3D transport methods and codes over a range in parameter space. To the best of the author's knowledge, these are the first spherical harmonic solutions provided for this demanding benchmark suite. They have been obtained using 512 CPU cores of the JuRoPa machine installed at the Jülich Computing Center (Germany).

  1. How to find what you don't know: Visualising variability in 3D geological models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindsay, Mark; Wellmann, Florian; Jessell, Mark; Ailleres, Laurent

    2014-05-01

    Uncertainties in input data can have compounding effects on the predictive reliability of three-dimensional (3D) geological models. Resource exploration, tectonic studies and environmental modelling can be compromised by using 3D models that misrepresent the target geology, and drilling campaigns that attempt to intersect particular geological units guided by 3D models are at risk of failure if the exploration geologist is unaware of inherent uncertainties. In addition, the visual inspection of 3D models is often the first contact decision makers have with the geology, thus visually communicating the presence and magnitude of uncertainties contained within geological 3D models is critical. Unless uncertainties are presented early in the relationship between decision maker and model, the model will be considered more truthful than the uncertainties allow with each subsequent viewing. We present a selection of visualisation techniques that provide the viewer with an insight to the location and amount of uncertainty contained within a model, and the geological characteristics which are most affected. A model of the Gippsland Basin, southeastern Australia is used as a case study to demonstrate the concepts of information entropy, stratigraphic variability and geodiversity. Central to the techniques shown here is the creation of a model suite, performed by creating similar (but not the same) version of the original model through perturbation of the input data. Specifically, structural data in the form of strike and dip measurements is perturbed in the creation of the model suite. The visualisation techniques presented are: (i) information entropy; (ii) stratigraphic variability and (iii) geodiversity. Information entropy is used to analyse uncertainty in a spatial context, combining the empirical probability distributions of multiple outcomes with a single quantitative measure. Stratigraphic variability displays the number of possible lithologies that may exist at a

  2. High Efficiency, Low Distortion 3D Diffusion Tensor Imaging with Variable Density Spiral Fast Spin Echoes (3D DW VDS RARE)

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Lawrence R.; Jung, Youngkyoo; Inati, Souheil; Tyszka, J. Michael; Wong, Eric C.

    2009-01-01

    We present an acquisition and reconstruction method designed to acquire high resolution 3D fast spin echo diffusion tensor images while mitigating the major sources of artifacts in DTI - field distortions, eddy currents and motion. The resulting images, being 3D, are of high SNR, and being fast spin echoes, exhibit greatly reduced field distortions. This sequence utilizes variable density spiral acquisition gradients, which allow for the implementation of a self-navigation scheme by which both eddy current and motion artifacts are removed. The result is that high resolution 3D DTI images are produced without the need for eddy current compensating gradients or B0 field correction. In addition, a novel method for fast and accurate reconstruction of the non-Cartesian data is employed. Results are demonstrated in the brains of normal human volunteers. PMID:19778618

  3. A contest of sensors in close range 3D imaging: performance evaluation with a new metric test object

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hess, M.; Robson, S.; Hosseininaveh Ahmadabadian, A.

    2014-06-01

    An independent means of 3D image quality assessment is introduced, addressing non-professional users of sensors and freeware, which is largely characterized as closed-sourced and by the absence of quality metrics for processing steps, such as alignment. A performance evaluation of commercially available, state-of-the-art close range 3D imaging technologies is demonstrated with the help of a newly developed Portable Metric Test Artefact. The use of this test object provides quality control by a quantitative assessment of 3D imaging sensors. It will enable users to give precise specifications which spatial resolution and geometry recording they expect as outcome from their 3D digitizing process. This will lead to the creation of high-quality 3D digital surrogates and 3D digital assets. The paper is presented in the form of a competition of teams, and a possible winner will emerge.

  4. High linearity SPAD and TDC array for TCSPC and 3D ranging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villa, Federica; Lussana, Rudi; Bronzi, Danilo; Dalla Mora, Alberto; Contini, Davide; Tisa, Simone; Tosi, Alberto; Zappa, Franco

    2015-01-01

    An array of 32x32 Single-Photon Avalanche-Diodes (SPADs) and Time-to-Digital Converters (TDCs) has been fabricated in a 0.35 μm automotive-certified CMOS technology. The overall dimension of the chip is 9x9 mm2. Each pixel is able to detect photons in the 300 nm - 900 nm wavelength range with a fill-factor of 3.14% and either to count them or to time stamp their arrival time. In photon-counting mode an in-pixel 6-bit counter provides photon-numberresolved intensity movies at 100 kfps, whereas in photon-timing mode the 10-bit in-pixel TDC provides time-resolved maps (Time-Correlated Single-Photon Counting measurements) or 3D depth-resolved (through direct time-of-flight technique) images and movies, with 312 ps resolution. The photodetector is a 30 μm diameter SPAD with low Dark Count Rate (120 cps at room temperature, 3% hot-pixels) and 55% peak Photon Detection Efficiency (PDE) at 450 nm. The TDC has a 6-bit counter and a 4-bit fine interpolator, based on a Delay Locked Loop (DLL) line, which makes the TDC insensitive to process, voltage, and temperature drifts. The implemented sliding-scale technique improves linearity, giving 2% LSB DNL and 10% LSB INL. The single-shot precision is 260 ps rms, comprising SPAD, TDC and driving board jitter. Both optical and electrical crosstalk among SPADs and TDCs are negligible. 2D fast movies and 3D reconstructions with centimeter resolution are reported.

  5. Holovideo: Real-time 3D range video encoding and decoding on GPU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpinsky, Nikolaus; Zhang, Song

    2012-02-01

    We present a 3D video-encoding technique called Holovideo that is capable of encoding high-resolution 3D videos into standard 2D videos, and then decoding the 2D videos back into 3D rapidly without significant loss of quality. Due to the nature of the algorithm, 2D video compression such as JPEG encoding with QuickTime Run Length Encoding (QTRLE) can be applied with little quality loss, resulting in an effective way to store 3D video at very small file sizes. We found that under a compression ratio of 134:1, Holovideo to OBJ file format, the 3D geometry quality drops at a negligible level. Several sets of 3D videos were captured using a structured light scanner, compressed using the Holovideo codec, and then uncompressed and displayed to demonstrate the effectiveness of the codec. With the use of OpenGL Shaders (GLSL), the 3D video codec can encode and decode in realtime. We demonstrated that for a video size of 512×512, the decoding speed is 28 frames per second (FPS) with a laptop computer using an embedded NVIDIA GeForce 9400 m graphics processing unit (GPU). Encoding can be done with this same setup at 18 FPS, making this technology suitable for applications such as interactive 3D video games and 3D video conferencing.

  6. Study of hybrid driven micromirrors for 3-D variable optical attenuator applications.

    PubMed

    Koh, Kah How; Soon, Bo Woon; Tsai, Julius Minglin; Danner, Aaron J; Lee, Chengkuo

    2012-09-10

    Aluminium-coated micromirrors driven by electrothermal and electromagnetic actuations have been demonstrated for 3-D variable optical attenuation applications. Three types of attenuation schemes based on electrothermal, electromagnetic and hybrid, i.e. combination of electrothermal and electromagnetic, actuations have been developed. In addition, two different designs have been fabricated and characterized to investigate the effects of the variations made to both the actuators on the optical attenuation performances of the micromirror. Our unique design of using both ET and EM actuators simultaneously to achieve attenuation is the first demonstration of such hybrid driven CMOS compatible MEMS VOA device. PMID:23037278

  7. High-Resolution Variable-Density 3D Cones Coronary MRA

    PubMed Central

    Addy, Nii Okai; Ingle, R. Reeve; Wu, Holden H.; Hu, Bob S.; Nishimura, Dwight G.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To improve the spatial/temporal resolution of whole-heart coronary MR angiography (CMRA) by developing a variable-density (VD) 3D cones acquisition suitable for image reconstruction with parallel imaging and compressed sensing techniques. Methods A VD 3D cones trajectory design incorporates both radial and spiral trajectory undersampling techniques to achieve higher resolution. This design is used to generate a VD cones trajectory with 0.8 mm/66 ms isotropic spatial/temporal resolution, using a similar number of readouts as our previous fully sampled cones trajectory (1.2 mm/100 ms). Scans of volunteers and patients are performed to evaluate the performance of the VD trajectory, using non-Cartesian L1-ESPIRiT for high-resolution image reconstruction. Results With gridding reconstruction, the high-resolution scans experience an expected drop in signal-to-noise and contrast-to-noise ratios, but with L1-ESPIRiT, the apparent noise is substantially reduced. Compared to 1.2 mm images, in each volunteer, the L1-ESPIRiT 0.8 mm images exhibit higher vessel sharpness values in the right and left anterior descending arteries. Conclusion CMRA with isotropic sub-millimeter spatial resolution and high temporal resolution can be performed with VD 3D cones to improve the depiction of coronary arteries. PMID:26172829

  8. Feasibility of RACT for 3D dose measurement and range verification in a water phantom

    SciTech Connect

    Alsanea, Fahed; Moskvin, Vadim; Stantz, Keith M.

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: The objective of this study is to establish the feasibility of using radiation-induced acoustics to measure the range and Bragg peak dose from a pulsed proton beam. Simulation studies implementing a prototype scanner design based on computed tomographic methods were performed to investigate the sensitivity to proton range and integral dose. Methods: Derived from thermodynamic wave equation, the pressure signals generated from the dose deposited from a pulsed proton beam with a 1 cm lateral beam width and a range of 16, 20, and 27 cm in water using Monte Carlo methods were simulated. The resulting dosimetric images were reconstructed implementing a 3D filtered backprojection algorithm and the pressure signals acquired from a 71-transducer array with a cylindrical geometry (30 × 40 cm) rotated over 2π about its central axis. Dependencies on the detector bandwidth and proton beam pulse width were performed, after which, different noise levels were added to the detector signals (using 1 μs pulse width and a 0.5 MHz cutoff frequency/hydrophone) to investigate the statistical and systematic errors in the proton range (at 20 cm) and Bragg peak dose (of 1 cGy). Results: The reconstructed radioacoustic computed tomographic image intensity was shown to be linearly correlated to the dose within the Bragg peak. And, based on noise dependent studies, a detector sensitivity of 38 mPa was necessary to determine the proton range to within 1.0 mm (full-width at half-maximum) (systematic error < 150 μm) for a 1 cGy Bragg peak dose, where the integral dose within the Bragg peak was measured to within 2%. For existing hydrophone detector sensitivities, a Bragg peak dose of 1.6 cGy is possible. Conclusions: This study demonstrates that computed tomographic scanner based on ionizing radiation-induced acoustics can be used to verify dose distribution and proton range with centi-Gray sensitivity. Realizing this technology into the clinic has the potential to significantly

  9. Towards 3D and Multilayer Electromagnetic Metamaterials Structures in the THz Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casse, B. D. F.; Moser, H. O.; Lee, J. W.; Inglis, S.; Bahou, M.; Jian, L. K.

    2007-03-01

    V. G. Veselago predicted that left-handed materials would exhibit a plethora of unusual effects such as a negative index of refraction as used in Snell's law, a reverse Doppler and Cerenkov effect. This novel class of materials, following Pendry's recipes, can potentially restore evanescent waves to focus subwavelength details in an image. Micron-size electromagnetic metamaterials (EM^3) structures which exist so far were produced and characterized as single layer structures. Furthermore the structures were produced with a low yield. In the first part of the talk, we will present techniques for producing copious amount of EM^3 chips via the LIGA process using Synchrotron radiation and demonstrate assembly of the first multilayer THz EM^3 structures. The planar micro- or nanoEM^3 produced so far are also highly anisotropic. Recently, we proposed schemes to produce more isotropic structures, within the same matrix, via tilted X-ray exposures that were introduced in the LIGA process years ago. In the second part of the talk, we will show the results of microfabrication of nearly 3D EM^3 structures for the THz range.

  10. Communication: Accurate hydration free energies at a wide range of temperatures from 3D-RISM.

    PubMed

    Misin, Maksim; Fedorov, Maxim V; Palmer, David S

    2015-03-01

    We present a new model for computing hydration free energies by 3D reference interaction site model (3D-RISM) that uses an appropriate initial state of the system (as suggested by Sergiievskyi et al.). The new adjustment to 3D-RISM theory significantly improves hydration free energy predictions for various classes of organic molecules at both ambient and non-ambient temperatures. An extensive benchmarking against experimental data shows that the accuracy of the model is comparable to (much more computationally expensive) molecular dynamics simulations. The calculations can be readily performed with a standard 3D-RISM algorithm. In our work, we used an open source package AmberTools; a script to automate the whole procedure is available on the web (https://github.com/MTS-Strathclyde/ISc). PMID:25747054

  11. Improved Algorithms and Methods for Solving Strongly Variable-Viscosity 3D Stokes flow and Strongly Variable Permeability 3D D’Arcy flow on a Parallel Computer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, J. P.; Hasenclever, J.; Shi, C.

    2009-12-01

    Computational studies of mantle convection face large challenges to obtain fast and accurate solutions for variable viscosity 3d flow. Recently we have been using parallel (MPI-based) MATLAB to more thoroughly explore possible pitfalls and algorithmic improvements to current ‘best-practice’ variable viscosity Stokes and D’Arcy flow solvers. Here we focus on study of finite-element solvers based on a decomposition of the equations for incompressible Stokes flow: Ku + Gp = f and G’u = 0 (K-velocity stiffness matrix, G-discretized gradient operator, G’=transpose(G)-discretized divergence operator) into a single equation for pressure Sp==G’K^-1Gp =G’K^-1f, in which the velocity is also updated as part of each pressure iteration. The outer pressure iteration is solved with preconditioned conjugate gradients (CG) (Maday and Patera, 1989), with a multigrid-preconditioned CG solver for the z=K^-1 (Gq) step of each pressure iteration. One fairly well-known pitfall (Fortin, 1985) is that constant-pressure elements can generate a spurious non-zero flow under a constant body force within non-rectangular geometries. We found a new pitfall when using an iterative method to solve the Kz=y operation in evaluating each G’K^-1Gq product -- even if the residual of the outer pressure equation converges to zero, the discrete divergence of this equation does not correspondingly converge; the error in the incompressibility depends on roughly the square of the tolerance used to solve each Kz=y velocity-like subproblem. Our current best recipe is: (1) Use flexible CG (cf. Notay, 2001) to solve the outer pressure problem. This is analogous to GMRES for a symmetric positive definite problem. It allows use of numerically unsymmetric and/or inexact preconditioners with CG. (2) In this outer-iteration, use an ‘alpha-bar’ technique to find the appropriate magnitude alpha to change the solution in each search direction. This improvement allows a similar iterative tolerance of

  12. Close-Range Photogrammetric Tools for Small 3d Archeological Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samaan, M.; Héno, R.; Pierrot-Deseilligny, M.

    2013-07-01

    This article will focus on the first experiments carried out for our PHD thesis, which is meant to make the new image-based methods available for archeologists. As a matter of fact, efforts need to be made to find cheap, efficient and user-friendly procedures for image acquisition, data processing and quality control. Among the numerous tasks that archeologists have to face daily is the 3D recording of very small objects. The Apero/MicMac tools were used for the georeferencing and the dense correlation procedures. Relatively standard workflows lead to depth maps, which can be represented either as 3D point clouds or shaded relief images.

  13. Soil water content variability in the 3D 'support-spacing-extent' space of scale metrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pachepsky, Yakov; Martinez, Gonzalo; Vereecken, Harry

    2014-05-01

    Knowledge of soil water content variability provides important insight into soil functioning, and is essential in many applications. This variability is known to be scale-dependent, and divergent statements about the change of the variability magnitude with scale can be found in literature. We undertook a systematic review to see how the definition of scale can affect conclusions about the scale-dependence in soil water content variability. Support, spacing, and extent are three metrics used to characterize scale in hydrology. Available data sets describe changes in soil moisture variability with changes in one or more of these scale metrics. We found six types of experiments with the scale change. With data obtained without a change in extent, the scale change in some cases consisted in the simultaneous change of support and spacing. This was done with remote sensing data, and the power law decrease in variance with support increase was found. Datasets that were collected with different support or sample volumes for the same extent and spacing showed the decrease of variance as the sample size increased. A variance increase was common when the scale change consisted in change in spacing without the change in supports and extents. An increase in variance with the extent of the study area was demonstrated with data an evolution of variability with increasing size of the area under investigation (extent) without modification of support. The variance generally increased with the extent when the spacing was changed so that the change in variability at areas of different sizes was studied with the same number of samples with equal support. Finally, there are remote sensing datasets that document decrease in variability with a change in extent for a given support without modification of spacing. Overall, published information on the effect of scale on soil water content variability in the 3D space of scale metrics did not contain controversies in qualitative terms

  14. Jupiter Magnetotail Interaction with a Variable Solar Wind: A 3D MHD Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranquist, D. A.; Bagenal, F.; Delamere, P. A.; Ma, X.

    2015-12-01

    Jupiter's magnetosphere is the largest object within the heliosphere. Voyager 2 detected its influence at Saturn's orbit, 4.3 AU away. It takes considerable time, therefore, for the solar wind to propagate such lengths down the tail. This propagation time is much greater than typical periods between changes in direction of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF). We expect these variable magnetic fields to create a jumbled structure in Jupiter's magnetotail, resulting in magnetic reconnection and other magnetic processes. We simulate the global interaction of the solar wind with Jupiter's magnetosphere using a 3D magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) code. Delamere & Bagenal (2010) argue that the interaction is largely viscous, so we simulate the jovian magnetosphere as a region where the momentum equation has an added loss term. We also use in situ data gathered by the Ulysses spacecraft near Jupiter's orbit for solar wind input. Here, we report on the simulated dynamics in Jupiter's tail region.

  15. 3D models automatic reconstruction of selected close range objects. (Polish Title: Automatyczna rekonstrukcja modeli 3D małych obiektów bliskiego zasiegu)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaweiska, D.

    2013-12-01

    Reconstruction of three-dimensional, realistic models of objects from digital images has been the topic of research in many areas of science for many years. This development is stimulated by new technologies and tools, which appeared recently, such as digital photography, laser scanners, increase in the equipment efficiency and Internet. The objective of this paper is to present results of automatic modeling of selected close range objects, with the use of digital photographs acquired by the Hasselblad H4D50 camera. The author's software tool was utilized for calculations; it performs successive stages of the 3D model creation. The modeling process was presented as the complete process which starts from acquisition of images and which is completed by creation of a photorealistic 3D model in the same software environment. Experiments were performed for selected close range objects, with appropriately arranged image geometry, creating a ring around the measured object. The Area Base Matching (CC/LSM) method, the RANSAC algorithm, with the use of tensor calculus, were utilized form automatic matching of points detected with the SUSAN algorithm. Reconstruction of the surface of model generation is one of the important stages of 3D modeling. Reconstruction of precise surfaces, performed on the basis of a non-organized cloud of points, acquired from automatic processing of digital images, is a difficult task, which has not been finally solved. Creation of poly-angular models, which may meet high requirements concerning modeling and visualization is required in many applications. The polynomial method is usually the best way to precise representation of measurement results, and, at the same time, to achieving the optimum description of the surface. Three algorithm were tested: the volumetric method (VCG), the Poisson method and the Ball pivoting method. Those methods are mostly applied to modeling of uniform grids of points. Results of experiments proved that incorrect

  16. Joint Cross-Range Scaling and 3D Geometry Reconstruction of ISAR Targets Based on Factorization Method.

    PubMed

    Lei Liu; Feng Zhou; Xue-Ru Bai; Ming-Liang Tao; Zi-Jing Zhang

    2016-04-01

    Traditionally, the factorization method is applied to reconstruct the 3D geometry of a target from its sequential inverse synthetic aperture radar images. However, this method requires performing cross-range scaling to all the sub-images and thus has a large computational burden. To tackle this problem, this paper proposes a novel method for joint cross-range scaling and 3D geometry reconstruction of steadily moving targets. In this method, we model the equivalent rotational angular velocity (RAV) by a linear polynomial with time, and set its coefficients randomly to perform sub-image cross-range scaling. Then, we generate the initial trajectory matrix of the scattering centers, and solve the 3D geometry and projection vectors by the factorization method with relaxed constraints. After that, the coefficients of the polynomial are estimated from the projection vectors to obtain the RAV. Finally, the trajectory matrix is re-scaled using the estimated rotational angle, and accurate 3D geometry is reconstructed. The two major steps, i.e., the cross-range scaling and the factorization, are performed repeatedly to achieve precise 3D geometry reconstruction. Simulation results have proved the effectiveness and robustness of the proposed method. PMID:26886991

  17. Generation of arbitrary order Bessel beams via 3D printed axicons at the terahertz frequency range.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xuli; Liu, Changming; Niu, Liting; Zhang, Zhongqi; Wang, Kejia; Yang, Zhengang; Liu, Jinsong

    2015-12-20

    We present the generation of arbitrary order Bessel beams at 0.3 THz through the implementation of suitably designed axicons based on 3D printing technology. The helical axicons, which possess thickness gradients in both radial and azimuthal directions, can convert the incident Gaussian beam into a high-order Bessel beam with spiral phase structure. The evolution of the generated Bessel beams are characterized experimentally with a three-dimensional field scanner. Moreover, the topological charges carried by the high-order Bessel beams are determined by the fork-like interferograms. This 3D-printing-based Bessel beam generation technique is useful not only for THz imaging systems with zero-order Bessel beams but also for future orbital-angular-momentum-based THz free-space communication with higher-order Bessel beams. PMID:26837031

  18. A Comparative Analysis between Active and Passive Techniques for Underwater 3D Reconstruction of Close-Range Objects

    PubMed Central

    Bianco, Gianfranco; Gallo, Alessandro; Bruno, Fabio; Muzzupappa, Maurizio

    2013-01-01

    In some application fields, such as underwater archaeology or marine biology, there is the need to collect three-dimensional, close-range data from objects that cannot be removed from their site. In particular, 3D imaging techniques are widely employed for close-range acquisitions in underwater environment. In this work we have compared in water two 3D imaging techniques based on active and passive approaches, respectively, and whole-field acquisition. The comparison is performed under poor visibility conditions, produced in the laboratory by suspending different quantities of clay in a water tank. For a fair comparison, a stereo configuration has been adopted for both the techniques, using the same setup, working distance, calibration, and objects. At the moment, the proposed setup is not suitable for real world applications, but it allowed us to conduct a preliminary analysis on the performances of the two techniques and to understand their capability to acquire 3D points in presence of turbidity. The performances have been evaluated in terms of accuracy and density of the acquired 3D points. Our results can be used as a reference for further comparisons in the analysis of other 3D techniques and algorithms. PMID:23966193

  19. A comparative analysis between active and passive techniques for underwater 3D reconstruction of close-range objects.

    PubMed

    Bianco, Gianfranco; Gallo, Alessandro; Bruno, Fabio; Muzzupappa, Maurizio

    2013-01-01

    In some application fields, such as underwater archaeology or marine biology, there is the need to collect three-dimensional, close-range data from objects that cannot be removed from their site. In particular, 3D imaging techniques are widely employed for close-range acquisitions in underwater environment. In this work we have compared in water two 3D imaging techniques based on active and passive approaches, respectively, and whole-field acquisition. The comparison is performed under poor visibility conditions, produced in the laboratory by suspending different quantities of clay in a water tank. For a fair comparison, a stereo configuration has been adopted for both the techniques, using the same setup, working distance, calibration, and objects. At the moment, the proposed setup is not suitable for real world applications, but it allowed us to conduct a preliminary analysis on the performances of the two techniques and to understand their capability to acquire 3D points in presence of turbidity. The performances have been evaluated in terms of accuracy and density of the acquired 3D points. Our results can be used as a reference for further comparisons in the analysis of other 3D techniques and algorithms. PMID:23966193

  20. 3D hydrodynamics and shear rates' variability in the United States Pharmacopeia Paddle Dissolution Apparatus.

    PubMed

    Ameur, Houari; Bouzit, Mohamed

    2013-08-16

    The 3D hydrodynamics and shear rates distributions within the United States Pharmacopeia Apparatus 2 have been investigated in this paper. With the help of a CFD package, several geometric modifications to the device were evaluated in this study. Specially, we examine the influence of impeller clearance, blade diameter, shape of the vessel base and shape of the lower part of blade. Increasing the impeller clearance was observed to exacerbate the heterogeneity in shear and would likely result in greater variability in dissolution measurements. Use of moderate blade diameter and dished bottom were observed to reduce shear heterogeneity in the regions where tablets are most likely to visit during testing. The comparative analysis shows better reproducibility and accelerated dissolution rates with the modified vessel shape, the dished bottom can enhance mixing near the vessel base when compared with the flat bottom. Increasing length of the lower edge of the paddle was observed to generate high radial pumping and to enlarge the dead zone located at the center of the vessel base. PMID:23680733

  1. Improving Three-Dimensional (3D) Range Gated Reconstruction Through Time-of-Flight (TOF) Imaging Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chua, S. Y.; Wang, X.; Guo, N.; Tan, C. S.; Chai, T. Y.; Seet, G. L.

    2016-04-01

    This paper performs an experimental investigation on the TOF imaging profile which strongly influences the quality of reconstruction to accomplish accurate range sensing. From our analysis, the reflected intensity profile recorded appears to deviate from Gaussian model which is commonly assumed and can be perceived as a mixture of noises and actual reflected signal. Noise-weighted Average range calculation is therefore proposed to alleviate noise influence based on the signal detection threshold and system noises. From our experimental result, this alternative range solution demonstrates better accuracy as compared to the conventional weighted average method and proven as a para-axial correction to improve range reconstruction in 3D gated imaging system.

  2. Appearance of bony lesions on 3-D CT reconstructions: a case study in variable renderings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mankovich, Nicholas J.; White, Stuart C.

    1992-05-01

    This paper discusses conventional 3-D reconstruction for bone visualization and presents a case study to demonstrate the dangers of performing 3-D reconstructions without careful selection of the bone threshold. The visualization of midface bone lesions directly from axial CT images is difficult because of the complex anatomic relationships. Three-dimensional reconstructions made from the CT to provide graphic images showing lesions in relation to adjacent facial bones. Most commercially available 3-D image reconstruction requires that the radiologist or technologist identify a threshold image intensity value that can be used to distinguish bone from other tissues. Much has been made of the many disadvantages of this technique, but it continues as the predominant method in producing 3-D pictures for clinical use. This paper is intended to provide a clear demonstration for the physician of the caveats that should accompany 3-D reconstructions. We present a case of recurrent odontogenic keratocyst in the anterior maxilla where the 3-D reconstructions, made with different bone thresholds (windows), are compared to the resected specimen. A DMI 3200 computer was used to convert the scan data from a GE 9800 CT into a 3-D shaded surface image. Threshold values were assigned to (1) generate the most clinically pleasing image, (2) produce maximum theoretical fidelity (using the midpoint image intensity between average cortical bone and average soft tissue), and (3) cover stepped threshold intensities between these two methods. We compared the computer lesions with the resected specimen and noted measurement errors of up to 44 percent introduced by inappropriate bone threshold levels. We suggest clinically applicable standardization techniques in the 3-D reconstruction as well as cautionary language that should accompany the 3-D images.

  3. Implementation of a close range photogrammetric system for 3D reconstruction of a scoliotic torso

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Detchev, Ivan Denislavov

    Scoliosis is a deformity of the human spine most commonly encountered with children. After being detected, periodic examinations via x-rays are traditionally used to measure its progression. However, due to the increased risk of cancer, a non-invasive and radiation-free scoliosis detection and progression monitoring methodology is needed. Quantifying the scoliotic deformity through the torso surface is a valid alternative, because of its high correlation with the internal spine curvature. This work proposes a low-cost multi-camera photogrammetric system for semi-automated 3D reconstruction of a torso surface with sub-millimetre level accuracy. The thesis describes the system design and calibration for optimal accuracy. It also covers the methodology behind the reconstruction and registration procedures. The experimental results include the complete reconstruction of a scoliotic torso mannequin. The final accuracy is evaluated through the goodness of fit between the reconstructed surface and a more accurate set of points measured by a coordinate measuring machine.

  4. 3-D GRMHD Simulations of Disk-Jet Coupling and Associated Variabilities and Emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, K. I.

    2005-01-01

    We have performed the fully three-dimensional general relativistic magnetohydrodynamic (GRMHD) simulation of jet formation from a thin accretion disk around a Schwarzschild black hole with a free-falling corona. The initial simulation results show that a bipolar jet is created as shown by previous two-dimensional axisymmetric simulations with mirror symmetry at the equator. The 3-D simulation ran over one hundred light-crossing time units which is considerably longer than the previous simulations. We show that the jet is initially formed as predicted due in part to magnetic pressure from the twisting the initially uniform magnetic field and from gas pressure associated with shock formation in the region around r = 3 r_S. At later times, the accretion disk becomes thick and the jet fades resulting in a wind that is ejected from the surface of the thickened (torus-like) disk. It should be noted that no streaming matter from a donor is included at the outer boundary in the simulation (an isolated black hole not binary black hole). The wind flows outwards with a wider angle than the initial jet. The widening of the jet is consistent with the outward moving torsional Alfven waves (TAWs). This evolution of disk-jet coupling suggests that the jet fades with a thickened accretion disk due to the lack of streaming material from an accompanying star. We will report initial results of emission calculated based on simulations with Kerr metric using a new ray-tracing method developed by S. Feurst and K. Wu. Images include free-free emission, absorption, and electron scattering. Fluorescent iron line emission and its variabilities from black holes will also be calculated based on simulation results.

  5. Optical phase conjugation assisted scattering lens: variable focusing and 3D patterning

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Jihee; Jang, Mooseok; Eom, Tae Joong; Yang, Changhuei; Chung, Euiheon

    2016-01-01

    Variable light focusing is the ability to flexibly select the focal distance of a lens. This feature presents technical challenges, but is significant for optical interrogation of three-dimensional objects. Numerous lens designs have been proposed to provide flexible light focusing, including zoom, fluid, and liquid-crystal lenses. Although these lenses are useful for macroscale applications, they have limited utility in micron-scale applications due to restricted modulation range and exacting requirements for fabrication and control. Here, we present a holographic focusing method that enables variable light focusing without any physical modification to the lens element. In this method, a scattering layer couples low-angle (transverse wave vector) components into a full angular spectrum, and a digital optical phase conjugation (DOPC) system characterizes and plays back the wavefront that focuses through the scattering layer. We demonstrate micron-scale light focusing and patterning over a wide range of focal distances of 22–51 mm. The interferometric nature of the focusing scheme also enables an aberration-free scattering lens. The proposed method provides a unique variable focusing capability for imaging thick specimens or selective photoactivation of neuronal networks. PMID:27049442

  6. Optical phase conjugation assisted scattering lens: variable focusing and 3D patterning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Jihee; Jang, Mooseok; Eom, Tae Joong; Yang, Changhuei; Chung, Euiheon

    2016-04-01

    Variable light focusing is the ability to flexibly select the focal distance of a lens. This feature presents technical challenges, but is significant for optical interrogation of three-dimensional objects. Numerous lens designs have been proposed to provide flexible light focusing, including zoom, fluid, and liquid-crystal lenses. Although these lenses are useful for macroscale applications, they have limited utility in micron-scale applications due to restricted modulation range and exacting requirements for fabrication and control. Here, we present a holographic focusing method that enables variable light focusing without any physical modification to the lens element. In this method, a scattering layer couples low-angle (transverse wave vector) components into a full angular spectrum, and a digital optical phase conjugation (DOPC) system characterizes and plays back the wavefront that focuses through the scattering layer. We demonstrate micron-scale light focusing and patterning over a wide range of focal distances of 22–51 mm. The interferometric nature of the focusing scheme also enables an aberration-free scattering lens. The proposed method provides a unique variable focusing capability for imaging thick specimens or selective photoactivation of neuronal networks.

  7. Optical phase conjugation assisted scattering lens: variable focusing and 3D patterning.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Jihee; Jang, Mooseok; Eom, Tae Joong; Yang, Changhuei; Chung, Euiheon

    2016-01-01

    Variable light focusing is the ability to flexibly select the focal distance of a lens. This feature presents technical challenges, but is significant for optical interrogation of three-dimensional objects. Numerous lens designs have been proposed to provide flexible light focusing, including zoom, fluid, and liquid-crystal lenses. Although these lenses are useful for macroscale applications, they have limited utility in micron-scale applications due to restricted modulation range and exacting requirements for fabrication and control. Here, we present a holographic focusing method that enables variable light focusing without any physical modification to the lens element. In this method, a scattering layer couples low-angle (transverse wave vector) components into a full angular spectrum, and a digital optical phase conjugation (DOPC) system characterizes and plays back the wavefront that focuses through the scattering layer. We demonstrate micron-scale light focusing and patterning over a wide range of focal distances of 22-51 mm. The interferometric nature of the focusing scheme also enables an aberration-free scattering lens. The proposed method provides a unique variable focusing capability for imaging thick specimens or selective photoactivation of neuronal networks. PMID:27049442

  8. NCC-RANSAC: A Fast Plane Extraction Method for 3-D Range Data Segmentation

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Xiangfei; Ye, Cang

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a new plane extraction (PE) method based on the random sample consensus (RANSAC) approach. The generic RANSAC-based PE algorithm may over-extract a plane, and it may fail in case of a multistep scene where the RANSAC procedure results in multiple inlier patches that form a slant plane straddling the steps. The CC-RANSAC PE algorithm successfully overcomes the latter limitation if the inlier patches are separate. However, it fails if the inlier patches are connected. A typical scenario is a stairway with a stair wall where the RANSAC plane-fitting procedure results in inliers patches in the tread, riser, and stair wall planes. They connect together and form a plane. The proposed method, called normal-coherence CC-RANSAC (NCC-RANSAC), performs a normal coherence check to all data points of the inlier patches and removes the data points whose normal directions are contradictory to that of the fitted plane. This process results in separate inlier patches, each of which is treated as a candidate plane. A recursive plane clustering process is then executed to grow each of the candidate planes until all planes are extracted in their entireties. The RANSAC plane-fitting and the recursive plane clustering processes are repeated until no more planes are found. A probabilistic model is introduced to predict the success probability of the NCC-RANSAC algorithm and validated with real data of a 3-D time-of-flight camera–SwissRanger SR4000. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method extracts more accurate planes with less computational time than the existing RANSAC-based methods. PMID:24771605

  9. Flattop beam illumination for 3D imaging ladar with simple optical devices in the wide distance range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuji, Hidenobu; Nakano, Takayuki; Matsumoto, Yoshihiro; Kameyama, Shumpei

    2016-04-01

    We have developed an illumination optical system for 3D imaging ladar (laser detection and ranging) which forms flattop beam shape by transformation of the Gaussian beam in the wide distance range. The illumination is achieved by beam division and recombination using a prism and a negative powered lens. The optimum condition of the transformation by the optical system is derived. It is confirmed that the flattop distribution can be formed in the wide range of the propagation distance from 1 to 1000 m. The experimental result with the prototype is in good agreement with the calculation result.

  10. Rn3D: A finite element code for simulating gas flow and radon transport in variably saturated, nonisothermal porous media. User`s manual, Version 1.0

    SciTech Connect

    Holford, D.J.

    1994-01-01

    This document is a user`s manual for the Rn3D finite element code. Rn3D was developed to simulate gas flow and radon transport in variably saturated, nonisothermal porous media. The Rn3D model is applicable to a wide range of problems involving radon transport in soil because it can simulate either steady-state or transient flow and transport in one-, two- or three-dimensions (including radially symmetric two-dimensional problems). The porous materials may be heterogeneous and anisotropic. This manual describes all pertinent mathematics related to the governing, boundary, and constitutive equations of the model, as well as the development of the finite element equations used in the code. Instructions are given for constructing Rn3D input files and executing the code, as well as a description of all output files generated by the code. Five verification problems are given that test various aspects of code operation, complete with example input files, FORTRAN programs for the respective analytical solutions, and plots of model results. An example simulation is presented to illustrate the type of problem Rn3D is designed to solve. Finally, instructions are given on how to convert Rn3D to simulate systems other than radon, air, and water.

  11. 2-D and 3-D oscillating wing aerodynamics for a range of angles of attack including stall

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piziali, R. A.

    1994-01-01

    A comprehensive experimental investigation of the pressure distribution over a semispan wing undergoing pitching motions representative of a helicopter rotor blade was conducted. Testing the wing in the nonrotating condition isolates the three-dimensional (3-D) blade aerodynamic and dynamic stall characteristics from the complications of the rotor blade environment. The test has generated a very complete, detailed, and accurate body of data. These data include static and dynamic pressure distributions, surface flow visualizations, two-dimensional (2-D) airfoil data from the same model and installation, and important supporting blockage and wall pressure distributions. This body of data is sufficiently comprehensive and accurate that it can be used for the validation of rotor blade aerodynamic models over a broad range of the important parameters including 3-D dynamic stall. This data report presents all the cycle-averaged lift, drag, and pitching moment coefficient data versus angle of attack obtained from the instantaneous pressure data for the 3-D wing and the 2-D airfoil. Also presented are examples of the following: cycle-to-cycle variations occurring for incipient or lightly stalled conditions; 3-D surface flow visualizations; supporting blockage and wall pressure distributions; and underlying detailed pressure results.

  12. Single-plane versus three-plane methods for relative range error evaluation of medium-range 3D imaging systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacKinnon, David K.; Cournoyer, Luc; Beraldin, J.-Angelo

    2015-05-01

    Within the context of the ASTM E57 working group WK12373, we compare the two methods that had been initially proposed for calculating the relative range error of medium-range (2 m to 150 m) optical non-contact 3D imaging systems: the first is based on a single plane (single-plane assembly) and the second on an assembly of three mutually non-orthogonal planes (three-plane assembly). Both methods are evaluated for their utility in generating a metric to quantify the relative range error of medium-range optical non-contact 3D imaging systems. We conclude that the three-plane assembly is comparable to the single-plane assembly with regard to quantification of relative range error while eliminating the requirement to isolate the edges of the target plate face.

  13. Flexible range finding applied to 3D surface synthesis: A pseudo-trinocular approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Tongminh

    An important area in machine vision and computer graphics is surface modeling, which involves the issue of data acquisition. A new range finding system is proposed which exploits perspective invariance (cross ratio), the targeting capability of structural lighting (slide projector), and epipolar planes' geometry (trinocular strategy). The system allows a fully autonomous calibration process and is highly efficient in terms of speed and accuracy. The system eliminates the ambiguity in disparity matching experienced in stereopsis, the extra image processing encountered in the trinocular system, the tedious reorganization of range data into a rectangular domain for surface modeling, and the scanning process of most active range finders that are not suitable for moving objects. Research described includes the development of several new camera calibration techniques, reformulation of the epipolar lines geometry method, and a rigorous study of the orientation constraints of the sensors (cameras and projector) in order to enhance the robustness of the vision system. The superiority of this new pseudo trinocular approach over the active structural lighting method and the passive binocular and/or trinocular techniques is convincing. It is believed that the proposed range finder has considerable potential for surface modeling.

  14. A Compact 3D Omnidirectional Range Sensor of High Resolution for Robust Reconstruction of Environments

    PubMed Central

    Marani, Roberto; Renò, Vito; Nitti, Massimiliano; D'Orazio, Tiziana; Stella, Ettore

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, an accurate range sensor for the three-dimensional reconstruction of environments is designed and developed. Following the principles of laser profilometry, the device exploits a set of optical transmitters able to project a laser line on the environment. A high-resolution and high-frame-rate camera assisted by a telecentric lens collects the laser light reflected by a parabolic mirror, whose shape is designed ad hoc to achieve a maximum measurement error of 10 mm when the target is placed 3 m away from the laser source. Measurements are derived by means of an analytical model, whose parameters are estimated during a preliminary calibration phase. Geometrical parameters, analytical modeling and image processing steps are validated through several experiments, which indicate the capability of the proposed device to recover the shape of a target with high accuracy. Experimental measurements show Gaussian statistics, having standard deviation of 1.74 mm within the measurable range. Results prove that the presented range sensor is a good candidate for environmental inspections and measurements. PMID:25621605

  15. PGD and separated space variables representation for linear elasticity in 3D representation of plate domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bognet, B.; Leygue, A.; Chinesta, F.; Poitou, A.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we focus on the simulation of linear elastic behaviour of plates using a 3D approach which numerical cost only scales like a 2D one. In the case of plates, the kinematic hypothesis introduced in plate theories to go from 3D to 2D is usually unsatisfactory where one cannot rely on St Venant's principle (usually close to the plate edges). We propose to apply the PGD (Proper Generalized Decomposition) method [1] to the simulation of the linear elastic behavior of plates. This method allows us to separately search for the in-plane and the out-of plane contributions to the 3D solution, yielding significant savings in computational cost. The method is validated on a simple case and its full potential is then presented for the simulation of the behavior of laminated composite plates.

  16. Occluded human recognition for a leader following system using 3D range and image data in forest environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Kuk; Ilyas, Muhammad; Baeg, Seung-Ho; Park, Sangdeok

    2014-06-01

    This paper describes the occluded target recognition and tracking method for a leader-following system by fusing 3D range and image data acquired from 3D light detection and ranging (LIDAR) and a color camera installed on an autonomous vehicle in forest environment. During 3D data processing, the distance-based clustering method has an instinctive problem in close encounters. In the tracking phase, we divide an object tracking process into three phases based on occlusion scenario; before an occlusion (BO) phase, a partially or fully occlusion phase and after an occlusion (AO) phase. To improve the data association performance, we use camera's rich information to find correspondence among objects during above mentioned three phases of occlusion. In this paper, we solve a correspondence problem using the color features of human objects with the sum of squared distance (SSD) and the normalized cross correlation (NCC). The features are integrated with derived windows from Harris corner. The experimental results for a leader following on an autonomous vehicle are shown with LIDAR and camera for improving a data association problem in a multiple object tracking system.

  17. Variability of the hydrogen in the martian upper atmosphere as simulated by a 3D atmosphere-exosphere coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaufray, J.-Y.; Gonzalez-Galindo, F.; Forget, F.; Lopez-Valverde, M. A.; Leblanc, F.; Modolo, R.; Hess, S.

    2015-01-01

    We present the temporal variability of the atomic and molecular hydrogen density derived from a 3D General Circulation Model describing the martian atmosphere from the surface to the exobase. A kinetic exospheric model is used to compute the hydrogen density above the exobase. We use these models to study the diurnal and seasonal variations of the hydrogen density and the Jeans escape rate as well as their variations with solar activity, assuming a classic dust scenario. We find that the diurnal variations of the hydrogen density are important with a peak in the dawn region during equinoxes and a peak on the nightside during solstices. These features result from the dynamics of the martian upper atmosphere. The variations of the atomic hydrogen Jeans escape with seasons and solar activity are in the range 1.3 × 1025 s-1-4.4 × 1026 s-1. A factor ∼8 is due to the seasonal variations with a maximum during the winter solstice in the northern hemisphere and a minimum during the summer solstice in the northern hemisphere that we attribute to the variation of the Mars-Sun distance. A factor ∼5 is due to the solar cycle with a maximum escape rate at high solar activity. The variations of the molecular hydrogen Jeans escape with seasons and solar activity are in the range 3 × 1022 s-1-6 × 1024 s-1. A factor ∼10 is due to the seasonal variations with a maximum during the winter solstice in the northern hemisphere and a minimum during the summer solstice in the northern hemisphere. A factor ∼20 is due to the solar cycle with a maximum escape rate at high solar activity. If Jeans escape is the major escape channel for hydrogen, the hydrogen escape is never limited by diffusion. The hydrogen density above 10,000 km presents seasonal and solar cycle variations similar to the Jeans escape rate at all latitudes and local times. This 3D temporal model of the hydrogen thermosphere/exosphere will be useful to interpret future MAVEN observations and the consequences of the

  18. Nanoporous Anodic Alumina 3D FDTD Modelling for a Broad Range of Inter-pore Distances.

    PubMed

    Bertó-Roselló, Francesc; Xifré-Pérez, Elisabet; Ferré-Borrull, Josep; Pallarès, Josep; Marsal, Lluis F

    2016-12-01

    The capability of the finite difference time domain (FDTD) method for the numerical modelling of the optical properties of nanoporous anodic alumina (NAA) in a broad range of inter-pore distances is evaluated. FDTD permits taking into account in the same numerical framework all the structural features of NAA, such as the texturization of the interfaces or the incorporation of electrolyte anions in the aluminium oxide host. The evaluation is carried out by comparing reflectance measurements from two samples with two very different inter-pore distances with the simulation results. Results show that considering the texturization is crucial to obtain good agreement with the measurements. On the other hand, including the anionic layer in the model leads to a second-order contribution to the reflectance spectrum. PMID:27518230

  19. A 3D Model of Double-Helical DNA Showing Variable Chemical Details

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cady, Susan G.

    2005-01-01

    Since the first DNA model was created approximately 50 years ago using molecular models, students and teachers have been building simplified DNA models from various practical materials. A 3D double-helical DNA model, made by placing beads on a wire and stringing beads through holes in plastic canvas, is described. Suggestions are given to enhance…

  20. Optimized design of a LED-array-based TOF range imaging sensor for fast 3-D shape measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Huanqin; Wang, Ying; Xu, Jun; He, Deyong; Zhao, Tianpeng; Ming, Hai; Kong, Deyi

    2011-06-01

    A LED-array-based range imaging sensor using Time-of-Flight (TOF) distance measurement was developed to capture the depth information of three-dimensional (3-D) object. By time-division electronic scanning of the LED heterodyne phase-shift TOF range finders in array, the range images were fast obtained without any mechanical moving parts. The design of LED-array-based range imaging sensor was adequately described and a range imaging theoretical model based on photoelectric signal processing was built, which showed there was mutual restriction relationship among the measurement time of a depth pixel, the bandwidth of receiver and the sensor's signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). In order to improve the key parameters of sensor such as range resolution and measurement speed simultaneously, some optimized designs needed to be done for the proposed range imaging sensor, including choosing proper parameters for the filters in receiver, adopting special structure feedback automatic gain control (AGC) circuit with short response time, etc. The final experiment results showed the sensor after optimization could acquire the range images at a rate of 10 frames per second with a range resolution as high as +/-2mm in the range of 50-1200mm. The essential advantages of the proposed range imaging sensor were construction with simple structure, high range resolution, short measurement time and low cost, which was sufficient for many robotic and industrial automation applications.

  1. Recognition of 3-D symmetric objects from range images in automated assembly tasks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alvertos, Nicolas; Dcunha, Ivan

    1990-01-01

    A new technique is presented for the three dimensional recognition of symmetric objects from range images. Beginning from the implicit representation of quadrics, a set of ten coefficients is determined for symmetric objects like spheres, cones, cylinders, ellipsoids, and parallelepipeds. Instead of using these ten coefficients trying to fit them to smooth surfaces (patches) based on the traditional way of determining curvatures, a new approach based on two dimensional geometry is used. For each symmetric object, a unique set of two dimensional curves is obtained from the various angles at which the object is intersected with a plane. Using the same ten coefficients obtained earlier and based on the discriminant method, each of these curves is classified as a parabola, circle, ellipse, or hyperbola. Each symmetric object is found to possess a unique set of these two dimensional curves whereby it can be differentiated from the others. It is shown that instead of using the three dimensional discriminant which involves evaluation of the rank of its matrix, it is sufficient to use the two dimensional discriminant which only requires three arithmetic operations.

  2. 3D silicon sensors with variable electrode depth for radiation hard high resolution particle tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Da Vià, C.; Borri, M.; Dalla Betta, G.; Haughton, I.; Hasi, J.; Kenney, C.; Povoli, M.; Mendicino, R.

    2015-04-01

    3D sensors, with electrodes micro-processed inside the silicon bulk using Micro-Electro-Mechanical System (MEMS) technology, were industrialized in 2012 and were installed in the first detector upgrade at the LHC, the ATLAS IBL in 2014. They are the radiation hardest sensors ever made. A new idea is now being explored to enhance the three-dimensional nature of 3D sensors by processing collecting electrodes at different depths inside the silicon bulk. This technique uses the electric field strength to suppress the charge collection effectiveness of the regions outside the p-n electrodes' overlap. Evidence of this property is supported by test beam data of irradiated and non-irradiated devices bump-bonded with pixel readout electronics and simulations. Applications include High-Luminosity Tracking in the high multiplicity LHC forward regions. This paper will describe the technical advantages of this idea and the tracking application rationale.

  3. 3D Virtual Reality Applied in Tectonic Geomorphic Study of the Gombori Range of Greater Caucasus Mountains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhishvili, Lasha; Javakhishvili, Zurab

    2016-04-01

    Gombori Range represents the southern part of the young Greater Caucasus Mountains and stretches from NW to SE. The range separates Alazani and Iori basins within the eastern Georgian province of Kakheti. The active phase of Caucasian orogeny started in the Pliocene, but according to alluvial sediments of Gombori range (mapped in the Soviet geologic map), we observe its uplift process to be Quaternary event. The highest peak of the Gombori range has an absolute elevation of 1991 m, while its neighboring Alazani valley gains only 400 m. We assume the range has a very fast uplift rate and it could trigger streams flow direction course reverse in Quaternary. To check this preliminary assumptions we are going to use a tectonic and fluvial geomorphic and stratigraphic approaches including paleocurrent analyses and various affordable absolute dating techniques to detect the evidence of river course reverses and date them. For these purposes we have selected river Turdo outcrop. The river itself flows northwards from the Gombori range and nearby region`s main city of Telavi generates 30-40 m high continuous outcrop along 1 km section. Turdo outcrop has very steep walls and requires special climbing skills to work on it. The goal of this particularly study is to avoid time and resource consuming ground survey process of this steep, high and wide outcrop and test 3D aerial and ground base photogrammetric modelling and analyzing approaches in initial stage of the tectonic geomorphic study. Using this type of remote sensing and virtual lab analyses of 3D outcrop model, we roughly delineated stratigraphic layers, selected exact locations for applying various research techniques and planned safe and suitable climbing routes for getting to the investigation sites.

  4. Low-power 20-meter 3D ranging SPAD camera based on continuous-wave indirect time-of-flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellisai, S.; Ferretti, L.; Villa, F.; Ruggeri, A.; Tisa, S.; Tosi, A.; Zappa, F.

    2012-06-01

    Three dimensional (3D) image acquisitions is the enabling technology of a great number of applications; culture heritage morphology study, industrial robotics, automotive active safety and security access control are example of applications. The most important feature is the high frame-rate, to detect very fast events within the acquired scenes. In order to reduce the computational complexity, Time-of-Flight algorithms for single sensor cameras are used. To achieve high-frame rate and high distance measurement accuracy it is important to collect the most part of the reflected light using sensor with very high sensitivity, allowing the implementation of a low-power light source. We designed and developed a single-photon detection based 3D ranging camera, capable to acquire distance image up to 22.5 m, with a resolution down to one centimeter. The light source used in this prototype employs 8 laser diodes sinusoidally modulated. The imager used in the application is based on Single-Photon Avalanche Diodes (SPADs) fabricated in a standard CMOS 0.35 μm technology. The sensor has 1024 pixels arranged in a 32x32 squared layout, with overall dimensions of 3.5mm x 3.5mm. The camera acquires 3D images through the continuous-wave indirect Time of Flight (cw-iTOF) technique. The typical frame-rate is 20 fps while the theoretical maximum frame-rate is 5 kfps. The precision is better than 5 cm within 22.5 m range, and can be effectively used in indoor applications, e.g. in industrial environment.

  5. 3-D Numerical Modeling of MHD Flows in Variable Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullina, K. I.; Bogovalov, S. V.

    3-D numerical simulation of the liquid metal flow affected by the electromagnetic field in the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) devices is performed. Software package ANSYS has been used for the numerical calculations. The non-stationary problem has been solved taking into account the influence of the metal flow on the electromagnetic field and nonlinear magnetic permeability of the ferromagnetic cores. Simplified calculations with constant magnetic permeability of the ferromagnetic cores have been performed as well. Comparison of these calculations shows that the simulation of the MHD pump can be performed in the linear approximation. The pump performance curve has been derived in this approximation.

  6. Tracking naturally occurring indoor features in 2-D and 3-D with lidar range/amplitude data

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, M.D.; Kerstens, A.

    1998-09-01

    Sensor-data processing for the interpretation of a mobile robot`s indoor environment, and the manipulation of this data for reliable localization, are still some of the most important issues in robotics. This article presents algorithms that determine the true position of a mobile robot, based on real 2-D and 3-D optical range and intensity data. The authors start with the physics of the particular type of sensor used, so that the extraction of reliable and repeatable information (namely, edge coordinates) can be determined, taking into account the noise associated with each range sample and the possibility of optical multiple-path effects. Again, applying the physical model of the sensor, the estimated positions of the mobile robot and the uncertainty in these positions are determined. They demonstrate real experiments using 2-D and 3-D scan data taken in indoor environments. To update the robot`s position reliably, the authors address the problem of matching the information recorded in a scan to, first, an a priori map, and second, to information recorded in previous scans, eliminating the need for an a priori map.

  7. Generation of 3D Spatially Variable Anisotropy for Groundwater Flow Simulations.

    PubMed

    Borghi, Andrea; Renard, Philippe; Courrioux, Gabriel

    2015-01-01

    Sedimentary units generally present anisotropy in their hydraulic properties, with higher hydraulic conductivity along bedding planes, rather than perpendicular to them. This common property leads to a modeling challenge if the sedimentary structure is folded. In this paper, we show that the gradient of the geological potential used by implicit geological modeling techniques can be used to compute full hydraulic conductivity tensors varying in space according to the geological orientation. For that purpose, the gradient of the potential, a vector normal to the bedding, is used to construct a rotation matrix that allows the estimation of the 3D hydraulic conductivity tensor in a single matrix operation. A synthetic 2D cross section example is used to illustrate the method and show that flow simulations performed in such a folded environment are highly influenced by this rotating anisotropy. When using the proposed method, the streamlines follow very closely the folded formation. This is not the case with an isotropic model. PMID:25648610

  8. An assessment of the evidence from ATLAS3D for a variable initial mass function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clauwens, Bart; Schaye, Joop; Franx, Marijn

    2015-06-01

    The ATLAS3D Survey has reported evidence for a non-universal stellar initial mass function (IMF) for early-type galaxies (ETGs). The IMF was constrained by comparing stellar mass measurements from kinematic data with those from spectral energy distribution (SED) fitting. Here, we investigate possible effects of scatter in the reported stellar mass measurements and their potential impact on the IMF determination. We find that a trend of the IMF mismatch parameter with the kinematic mass-to-light ratio, comparable to the trend observed by Cappellari et al., could arise if the Gaussian errors of the kinematic mass determination are typically 30 per cent. Without additional data, it is hard to separate between the option that the IMF has a true large intrinsic variation or the option that the errors in the determination are larger than anticipated. A correlation of the IMF with other properties would help to make this distinction, but no strong correlation has been found yet. The strongest correlation is with velocity dispersion. However, it has a large scatter and the correlation depends on sample selection and distance measurements. The correlation with velocity dispersion could be partly caused by the colour-dependent calibration of the surface brightness fluctuation distances of Tonry et al. We find that the K-band luminosity-limited ATLAS3D Survey is incomplete for the highest M/L galaxies below 1010.3 M⊙. There is a significant IMF-velocity dispersion trend for galaxies with SED masses above this limit, but no trend for galaxies with kinematic masses above this limit. We also find an IMF trend with distance, but no correlation between nearest neighbour ETGs, which excludes a large environmental dependence. Our findings do not rule out the reported IMF variations, but they suggest that further study is needed.

  9. Focus Variation - A New Technology for High Resolution Optical 3D Surface Metrology in the Micro- and Nanometer Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, O.

    2009-04-01

    Focus Variation - A New Technology for High Resolution Optical 3D Surface Metrology in the Micro- and Nanometer Range S. Scherer1, E. Cristea1, O. Huber1, A. Krenn1 1 ALICONA GmbH Graz, Austria The need for increasing accuracy is a characteristic of all geo-applications, and hence of the instruments contributing to obtaining relevant data. Small and fine sensors are being developed, measuring different parameters of our geosystem and requiring continuous validation and calibration. These sensors have often very small components (fine sensors able to sense dust, atmospheric water vapour characteristics, pressure change, gravimeters, satellite micro-components), showing complex topographies including steep flanks and having varying reflective properties. In order to get valid and reliable results, quality assurance of these instruments and sensors is required. The optical technology Focus-Variation, developed by Alicona and added in the latest draft of the upcoming ISO standard 25178, provides high resolution 3D surface metrology even at those complex topographies. The technique of Focus-Variation combines the small depth of focus of an optical system with vertical scanning to provide topographical and color information from the variation of focus. It is used for high-resolution optical 3D surface measurements. The traceable and repeatable measurement results are further being used for e.g. calibration and validation purposes. Some of the characteristics of the technology are: - Measurement of instruments / samples with steep flanks up to 80° - Measurement of materials with strongly varying reflection properties - Measurement of surfaces presenting fine (from 10nm) or strong roughness Here, we present the operating principle and possible applications of the optical 3D measurement system "InfiniteFocus", which is based on the technology of Focus-Variation. With the vertical resolution of up to 10nm, InfiniteFocus yields meaningful form and roughness measurements. The

  10. Monitoring the long-range transport effects on urban PM10 levels using 3D clusters of backward trajectories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makra, László; Matyasovszky, István; Guba, Zoltán; Karatzas, Kostas; Anttila, Pia

    2011-05-01

    The purpose of the study is to identify long-range transport patterns that may have an important influence on PM10 levels in three European cities at different latitudes, namely Thessaloniki, Szeged and Helsinki. A further aim is to separate medium- and long-range PM10 transport for these cities. 4-day, 6-hourly three-dimensional (3D) backward trajectories arriving at these locations at 1200 GMT were computed using the HYSPLIT model over a 5-year period from 2001 to 2005. A k-means clustering algorithm using the Mahalanobis metric was applied in order to develop trajectory types. The 3D delimination of the clusters by the function "convhull" is a novel approach. Two statistical indices were used to evaluate and compare critical daily PM10 exceedances corresponding to the trajectory clusters. For Thessaloniki, the major PM10 transport can be clearly associated with air masses arriving from Central and Southern Europe. Occasional North African dust intrusions over Greece are also found. The transport of particulate matter from North-western Europe to Thessaloniki is of limited importance. For Szeged, Central Europe, Southern Europe and Mid-eastern Europe are the most important sources of PM10. The occasional appearance of North African-origin dust over Hungary is also detected. Local PM10 levels tend to be diluted when air masses arrive at the Carpathian Basin from North-western Europe, the Mid-Atlantic - Western Europe and Northern Europe. For Helsinki, high PM10 concentrations are due to air masses coming from Northern and Eastern Europe including North-western Russia. An occasional Caspian Sea desert influence on particulate levels can also be identified. However, air currents coming from the Northern Atlantics, Northern and North-western Europe tend to dilute PM10 levels. A simple approach is developed in order to separate medium- and long-range PM10 transport for each city.

  11. Biologic variability of human foreskin fibroblasts in 2D and 3D culture: implications for a wound healing model

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background The fibroblast-populated 3D collagen matrix is a model of tissue and healing which has been used since the 1980's. It was hypothesized that anchorage disruption of the collagen matrix would produce p53-dependent apoptosis in the embedded fibroblasts, but results of hypothesis testing were variant. Findings The response of p53 to anchorage disruption in 3D culture or to UV irradiation in 2D culture was influenced both by fibroblast strain and culture conditions. It also was determined that data scatter in a collagen matrix contraction assay was related to fibroblast strain and possibly to technical factors, such as cell culture technician and/or number of matrices utilized. Subsequent analysis suggested that phenotypic drift and/or inter-strain genetic variability may have been responsible for the data scatter. In addition, several technical factors were identified that may have contributed to the scatter. Conclusion Experimentation with human foreskin fibroblasts in both 2D and 3D culture can produce variant data. The underlying cause of the data scatter appears to be partially due to the biologic variability of the fibroblast. PMID:19922655

  12. Multi-sensor super-resolution for hybrid range imaging with application to 3-D endoscopy and open surgery.

    PubMed

    Köhler, Thomas; Haase, Sven; Bauer, Sebastian; Wasza, Jakob; Kilgus, Thomas; Maier-Hein, Lena; Stock, Christian; Hornegger, Joachim; Feußner, Hubertus

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, we propose a multi-sensor super-resolution framework for hybrid imaging to super-resolve data from one modality by taking advantage of additional guidance images of a complementary modality. This concept is applied to hybrid 3-D range imaging in image-guided surgery, where high-quality photometric data is exploited to enhance range images of low spatial resolution. We formulate super-resolution based on the maximum a-posteriori (MAP) principle and reconstruct high-resolution range data from multiple low-resolution frames and complementary photometric information. Robust motion estimation as required for super-resolution is performed on photometric data to derive displacement fields of subpixel accuracy for the associated range images. For improved reconstruction of depth discontinuities, a novel adaptive regularizer exploiting correlations between both modalities is embedded to MAP estimation. We evaluated our method on synthetic data as well as ex-vivo images in open surgery and endoscopy. The proposed multi-sensor framework improves the peak signal-to-noise ratio by 2 dB and structural similarity by 0.03 on average compared to conventional single-sensor approaches. In ex-vivo experiments on porcine organs, our method achieves substantial improvements in terms of depth discontinuity reconstruction. PMID:26201876

  13. A 3-D probabilistic stability model incorporating the variability of root reinforcement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cislaghi, Alessio; Chiaradia, Enrico; Battista Bischetti, Gian

    2016-04-01

    Process-oriented models of hillslope stability have a great potentiality to improve spatially-distributed landslides hazard analyses. At the same time, they may have severe limitations and among them the variability and uncertainty of the parameters play a key role. In this context, the application of a probabilistic approach through Monte Carlo techniques can be the right practice to deal with the variability of each input parameter by considering a proper probability distribution. In forested areas an additional point must be taken into account: the reinforcement due to roots permeating the soil and its variability and uncertainty. While the probability distributions of geotechnical and hydrological parameters have been widely investigated, little is known concerning the variability and the spatial heterogeneity of root reinforcement. Moreover, there are still many difficulties in measuring and in evaluating such a variable. In our study we aim to: i) implement a robust procedure to evaluate the variability of root reinforcement as a probabilistic distribution, according to the stand characteristics of forests, such as the trees density, the average diameter at breast height, the minimum distance among trees, and (ii) combine a multidimensional process-oriented model with a Monte Carlo Simulation technique, to obtain a probability distribution of the Factor of Safety. The proposed approach has been applied to a small Alpine area, mainly covered by a coniferous forest and characterized by steep slopes and a high landslide hazard. The obtained results show a good reliability of the model according to the landslide inventory map. At the end, our findings contribute to improve the reliability of landslide hazard mapping in forested areas and help forests managers to evaluate different management scenarios.

  14. Verification of proton range, position, and intensity in IMPT with a 3D liquid scintillator detector system

    PubMed Central

    Archambault, L.; Poenisch, F.; Sahoo, N.; Robertson, D.; Lee, A.; Gillin, M. T.; Mohan, R.; Beddar, S.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) using spot scanned proton beams relies on the delivery of a large number of beamlets to shape the dose distribution in a highly conformal manner. The authors have developed a 3D system based on liquid scintillator to measure the spatial location, intensity, and depth of penetration (energy) of the proton beamlets in near real-time. Methods: The detector system consists of a 20 × 20 × 20 cc liquid scintillator (LS) material in a light tight enclosure connected to a CCD camera. This camera has a field of view of 25.7 by 19.3 cm and a pixel size of 0.4 mm. While the LS is irradiated, the camera continuously acquires images of the light distribution produced inside the LS. Irradiations were made with proton pencil beams produced with a spot-scanning nozzle. Pencil beams with nominal ranges in water between 9.5 and 17.6 cm were scanned to irradiate an area of 10 × 10 cm square on the surface of the LS phantom. Image frames were acquired at 50 ms per frame. Results: The signal to noise ratio of a typical Bragg peak was about 170. Proton range measured from the light distribution produced in the LS was accurate to within 0.3 mm on average. The largest deviation seen between the nominal and measured range was 0.6 mm. Lateral position of the measured pencil beam was accurate to within 0.4 mm on average. The largest deviation seen between the nominal and measured lateral position was 0.8 mm; however, the accuracy of this measurement could be improved by correcting light scattering artifacts. Intensity of single proton spots were measured with precision ranging from 3 % for the smallest spot intensity (0.005 MU) to 0.5 % for the largest spot (0.04 MU). Conclusions: Our LS detector system has been shown to be capable of fast, submillimeter spatial localization of proton spots delivered in a 3D volume. This system could be used for beam range, intensity and position verification in IMPT. PMID:22380355

  15. Verification of proton range, position, and intensity in IMPT with a 3D liquid scintillator detector system

    SciTech Connect

    Archambault, L.; Poenisch, F.; Sahoo, N.; Robertson, D.; Lee, A.; Gillin, M. T.; Mohan, R.; Beddar, S.

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: Intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) using spot scanned proton beams relies on the delivery of a large number of beamlets to shape the dose distribution in a highly conformal manner. The authors have developed a 3D system based on liquid scintillator to measure the spatial location, intensity, and depth of penetration (energy) of the proton beamlets in near real-time. Methods: The detector system consists of a 20 x 20 x 20 cc liquid scintillator (LS) material in a light tight enclosure connected to a CCD camera. This camera has a field of view of 25.7 by 19.3 cm and a pixel size of 0.4 mm. While the LS is irradiated, the camera continuously acquires images of the light distribution produced inside the LS. Irradiations were made with proton pencil beams produced with a spot-scanning nozzle. Pencil beams with nominal ranges in water between 9.5 and 17.6 cm were scanned to irradiate an area of 10 x 10 cm square on the surface of the LS phantom. Image frames were acquired at 50 ms per frame. Results: The signal to noise ratio of a typical Bragg peak was about 170. Proton range measured from the light distribution produced in the LS was accurate to within 0.3 mm on average. The largest deviation seen between the nominal and measured range was 0.6 mm. Lateral position of the measured pencil beam was accurate to within 0.4 mm on average. The largest deviation seen between the nominal and measured lateral position was 0.8 mm; however, the accuracy of this measurement could be improved by correcting light scattering artifacts. Intensity of single proton spots were measured with precision ranging from 3 % for the smallest spot intensity (0.005 MU) to 0.5 % for the largest spot (0.04 MU). Conclusions: Our LS detector system has been shown to be capable of fast, submillimeter spatial localization of proton spots delivered in a 3D volume. This system could be used for beam range, intensity and position verification in IMPT.

  16. WE-F-16A-02: Design, Fabrication, and Validation of a 3D-Printed Proton Filter for Range Spreading

    SciTech Connect

    Remmes, N; Courneyea, L; Corner, S; Beltran, C; Kemp, B; Kruse, J; Herman, M; Stoker, J

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To design, fabricate and test a 3D-printed filter for proton range spreading in scanned proton beams. The narrow Bragg peak in lower-energy synchrotron-based scanned proton beams can result in longer treatment times for shallow targets due to energy switching time and plan quality degradation due to minimum monitor unit limitations. A filter with variable thicknesses patterned on the same scale as the beam's lateral spot size will widen the Bragg peak. Methods: The filter consists of pyramids dimensioned to have a Gaussian distribution in thickness. The pyramids are 2.5mm wide at the base, 0.6 mm wide at the peak, 5mm tall, and are repeated in a 2.5mm pseudo-hexagonal lattice. Monte Carlo simulations of the filter in a proton beam were run using TOPAS to assess the change in depth profiles and lateral beam profiles. The prototypes were constrained to a 2.5cm diameter disk to allow for micro-CT imaging of promising prototypes. Three different 3D printers were tested. Depth-doses with and without the prototype filter were then measured in a ~70MeV proton beam using a multilayer ion chamber. Results: The simulation results were consistent with design expectations. Prototypes printed on one printer were clearly unacceptable on visual inspection. Prototypes on a second printer looked acceptable, but the micro-CT image showed unacceptable voids within the pyramids. Prototypes from the third printer appeared acceptable visually and on micro-CT imaging. Depth dose scans using the prototype from the third printer were consistent with simulation results. Bragg peak width increased by about 3x. Conclusions: A prototype 3D printer pyramid filter for range spreading was successfully designed, fabricated and tested. The filter has greater design flexibility and lower prototyping and production costs compared to traditional ridge filters. Printer and material selection played a large role in the successful development of the filter.

  17. 3D numerical simulation of the long range propagation of acoustical shock waves through a heterogeneous and moving medium

    SciTech Connect

    Luquet, David; Marchiano, Régis; Coulouvrat, François

    2015-10-28

    Many situations involve the propagation of acoustical shock waves through flows. Natural sources such as lightning, volcano explosions, or meteoroid atmospheric entries, emit loud, low frequency, and impulsive sound that is influenced by atmospheric wind and turbulence. The sonic boom produced by a supersonic aircraft and explosion noises are examples of intense anthropogenic sources in the atmosphere. The Buzz-Saw-Noise produced by turbo-engine fan blades rotating at supersonic speed also propagates in a fast flow within the engine nacelle. Simulating these situations is challenging, given the 3D nature of the problem, the long range propagation distances relative to the central wavelength, the strongly nonlinear behavior of shocks associated to a wide-band spectrum, and finally the key role of the flow motion. With this in view, the so-called FLHOWARD (acronym for FLow and Heterogeneous One-Way Approximation for Resolution of Diffraction) method is presented with three-dimensional applications. A scalar nonlinear wave equation is established in the framework of atmospheric applications, assuming weak heterogeneities and a slow wind. It takes into account diffraction, absorption and relaxation properties of the atmosphere, quadratic nonlinearities including weak shock waves, heterogeneities of the medium in sound speed and density, and presence of a flow (assuming a mean stratified wind and 3D turbulent ? flow fluctuations of smaller amplitude). This equation is solved in the framework of the one-way method. A split-step technique allows the splitting of the non-linear wave equation into simpler equations, each corresponding to a physical effect. Each sub-equation is solved using an analytical method if possible, and finite-differences otherwise. Nonlinear effects are solved in the time domain, and others in the frequency domain. Homogeneous diffraction is handled by means of the angular spectrum method. Ground is assumed perfectly flat and rigid. Due to the 3D

  18. 3D numerical simulation of the long range propagation of acoustical shock waves through a heterogeneous and moving medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luquet, David; Marchiano, Régis; Coulouvrat, François

    2015-10-01

    Many situations involve the propagation of acoustical shock waves through flows. Natural sources such as lightning, volcano explosions, or meteoroid atmospheric entries, emit loud, low frequency, and impulsive sound that is influenced by atmospheric wind and turbulence. The sonic boom produced by a supersonic aircraft and explosion noises are examples of intense anthropogenic sources in the atmosphere. The Buzz-Saw-Noise produced by turbo-engine fan blades rotating at supersonic speed also propagates in a fast flow within the engine nacelle. Simulating these situations is challenging, given the 3D nature of the problem, the long range propagation distances relative to the central wavelength, the strongly nonlinear behavior of shocks associated to a wide-band spectrum, and finally the key role of the flow motion. With this in view, the so-called FLHOWARD (acronym for FLow and Heterogeneous One-Way Approximation for Resolution of Diffraction) method is presented with three-dimensional applications. A scalar nonlinear wave equation is established in the framework of atmospheric applications, assuming weak heterogeneities and a slow wind. It takes into account diffraction, absorption and relaxation properties of the atmosphere, quadratic nonlinearities including weak shock waves, heterogeneities of the medium in sound speed and density, and presence of a flow (assuming a mean stratified wind and 3D turbulent ? flow fluctuations of smaller amplitude). This equation is solved in the framework of the one-way method. A split-step technique allows the splitting of the non-linear wave equation into simpler equations, each corresponding to a physical effect. Each sub-equation is solved using an analytical method if possible, and finite-differences otherwise. Nonlinear effects are solved in the time domain, and others in the frequency domain. Homogeneous diffraction is handled by means of the angular spectrum method. Ground is assumed perfectly flat and rigid. Due to the 3D

  19. A new method to enlarge a range of continuously perceived depth in DFD (depth-fused 3D) display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsunakawa, Atsuhiro; Soumiya, Tomoki; Horikawa, Yuta; Yamamoto, Hirotsugu; Suyama, Shiro

    2013-03-01

    We can successfully solve the problem in DFD display that the maximum depth difference of front and rear planes is limited because depth fusing from front and rear images to one 3-D image becomes impossible. The range of continuously perceived depth was estimated as depth difference of front and rear planes increases. When the distance was large enough, perceived depth was near front plane at 0~40 % of rear luminance and near rear plane at 60~100 % of rear luminance. This maximum depth range can be successfully enlarged by spatial-frequency modulation of front and rear images. The change of perceived depth dependence was evaluated when high frequency component of front and rear images is cut off using Fourier Transformation at the distance between front and rear plane of 5 and 10 cm (4.9 and 9.4 minute of arc). When high frequency component does not cut off enough at the distance of 5 cm, perceived depth was separated to near front plane and near rear plane. However, when the images are blurred enough by cutting high frequency component, the perceived depth has a linear dependency on luminance ratio. When the images are not blurred at the distance of 10 cm, perceived depth is separated to near front plane at 0~30% of rear luminance, near rear plane at 80~100 % and near midpoint at 40~70 %. However, when the images are blurred enough, perceived depth successfully has a linear dependency on luminance ratio.

  20. Variable Quality Compression of Fluid Dynamical Data Sets Using a 3D DCT Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loddoch, A.; Schmalzl, J.

    2005-12-01

    In this work we present a data compression scheme that is especially suited for the compression of data sets resulting from computational fluid dynamics (CFD). By adopting the concept of the JPEG compression standard and extending the approach of Schmalzl (Schmalzl, J. Using standard image compression algorithms to store data from computational fluid dynamics. Computers and Geosciences, 29, 10211031, 2003) we employ a three-dimensional discrete cosine transform of the data. The resulting frequency components are rearranged, quantized and finally stored using Huffman-encoding and standard variable length integer codes. The compression ratio and also the introduced loss of accuracy can be adjusted by means of two compression parameters to give the desired compression profile. Using the proposed technique compression ratios of more than 60:1 are possible with an mean error of the compressed data of less than 0.1%.

  1. Three-Dimensional Rotation, Twist and Torsion Analyses Using Real-Time 3D Speckle Tracking Imaging: Feasibility, Reproducibility, and Normal Ranges in Pediatric Population

    PubMed Central

    Han, Wei; Gao, Jun; He, Lin; Yang, Yali; Yin, Ping; Xie, Mingxing; Ge, Shuping

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objective The specific aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility, reproducibility and maturational changes of LV rotation, twist and torsion variables by real-time 3D speckle-tracking echocardiography (RT3DSTE) in children. Methods A prospective study was conducted in 347 consecutive healthy subjects (181 males/156 females, mean age 7.12 ± 5.3 years, and range from birth to 18-years) using RT 3D echocardiography (3DE). The LV rotation, twist and torsion measurements were made off-line using TomTec software. Manual landmark selection and endocardial border editing were performed in 3 planes (apical “2”-, “4”-, and “3”- chamber views) and semi-automated tracking yielded LV rotation, twist and torsion measurements. LV rotation, twist and torsion analysis by RT 3DSTE were feasible in 307 out of 347 subjects (88.5%). Results There was no correlation between rotation or twist and age, height, weight, BSA or heart rate, respectively. However, there was statistically significant, but very modest correlation between LV torsion and age (R2 = 0.036, P< 0.001). The normal ranges were defined for rotation and twist in this cohort, and for torsion for each age group. The intra-observer and inter-observer variabilities for apical and basal rotation, twist and torsion ranged from 7.3% ± 3.8% to 12.3% ± 8.8% and from 8.8% ± 4.6% to 15.7% ± 10.1%, respectively. Conclusions We conclude that analysis of LV rotation, twist and torsion by this new RT3D STE is feasible and reproducible in pediatric population. There is no maturational change in rotation and twist, but torsion decreases with age in this cohort. Further refinement is warranted to validate the utility of this new methodology in more sensitive and quantitative evaluation of congenital and acquired heart diseases in children. PMID:27427968

  2. Comparison of the Variability of Constituents from a 3D Simulation with Observations in the Tropics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Douglass, A. R.; Strahan, S. E.; Rood, R. B.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Fields from chemical transport models (CTMs) driven by assimilated winds have been shown to represent many aspects of observations at middle and high latitudes. Comparisons of modeled fields with observations have been much poorer in the tropics. Noise in the tropical winds produces variability in constituents in the tropics that greatly exceeds what is observed, Constituent gradients between the tropics, subtropics and middle latitudes are weaker than observed in the lower stratosphere. Tropical transport is shown to be much more realistic using a CTM driven by winds from the assimilation system that has recently been developed by the Data Assimilation Office at Goddard Space Flight Center. The Finite Volume Community Climate Model (FV-CCM), a general circulation model model that uses the NCAR CCM physics and the Lin and Rood dynamical core, is at the core of the new assimilation system. Realistic transport in the tropics, particularly troposphere to stratosphere exchange, is an obvious requirement for realistic representation of the stratosphere to troposphere transport of ozone and other stratospheric constituents to the middle latitude upper troposphere.

  3. Shoulder 3D range of motion and humerus rotation in two volleyball spike techniques: injury prevention and performance.

    PubMed

    Seminati, Elena; Marzari, Alessandra; Vacondio, Oreste; Minetti, Alberto E

    2015-06-01

    Repetitive stresses and movements on the shoulder in the volleyball spike expose this joint to overuse injuries, bringing athletes to a career threatening injury. Assuming that specific spike techniques play an important role in injury risk, we compared the kinematic of the traditional (TT) and the alternative (AT) techniques in 21 elite athletes, evaluating their safety with respect to performance. Glenohumeral joint was set as the centre of an imaginary sphere, intersected by the distal end of the humerus at different angles. Shoulder range of motion and angular velocities were calculated and compared to the joint limits. Ball speed and jump height were also assessed. Results indicated the trajectory of the humerus to be different for the TT, with maximal flexion of the shoulder reduced by 10 degrees, and horizontal abduction 15 degrees higher. No difference was found for external rotation angles, while axial rotation velocities were significantly higher in AT, with a 5% higher ball speed. Results suggest AT as a potential preventive solution to shoulder chronic pathologies, reducing shoulder flexion during spiking. The proposed method allows visualisation of risks associated with different overhead manoeuvres, by depicting humerus angles and velocities with respect to joint limits in the same 3D space. PMID:26151344

  4. 3D Inversion of Gravity Anomalies for the Interpretation of Sedimentary Basins using Variable Density Contrast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekinci, Yunus Levent; Ertekin, Can

    2015-04-01

    . Additionally, some applications with real residual gravity data sets from Los Angeles Basin (California, USA), Pannonian Basin (East-Central Europe), Saros Bay (Thrace, Northwestern Turkey) and the Aegean Graben System (Western Anatolia, Turkey) have produced geologically reasonable results which are in close agreement with those of previously published studies in the literature. Therefore it is mentioned here that the developed MATLAB-based inversion code is suitable to estimate the depths to the basement of sedimentary basins. Keywords: Sedimentary basins, Gravity anomalies, Inversion, Variable density contrast

  5. Parametric 3D Atmospheric Reconstruction in Highly Variable Terrain with Recycled Monte Carlo Paths and an Adapted Bayesian Inference Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langmore, Ian; Davis, Anthony B.; Bal, Guillaume; Marzouk, Youssef M.

    2012-01-01

    We describe a method for accelerating a 3D Monte Carlo forward radiative transfer model to the point where it can be used in a new kind of Bayesian retrieval framework. The remote sensing challenge is to detect and quantify a chemical effluent of a known absorbing gas produced by an industrial facility in a deep valley. The available data is a single low resolution noisy image of the scene in the near IR at an absorbing wavelength for the gas of interest. The detected sunlight has been multiply reflected by the variable terrain and/or scattered by an aerosol that is assumed partially known and partially unknown. We thus introduce a new class of remote sensing algorithms best described as "multi-pixel" techniques that call necessarily for a 3D radaitive transfer model (but demonstrated here in 2D); they can be added to conventional ones that exploit typically multi- or hyper-spectral data, sometimes with multi-angle capability, with or without information about polarization. The novel Bayesian inference methodology uses adaptively, with efficiency in mind, the fact that a Monte Carlo forward model has a known and controllable uncertainty depending on the number of sun-to-detector paths used.

  6. A Spectral Element Ocean Model on the Cray T3D: the interannual variability of the Mediterranean Sea general circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molcard, A. J.; Pinardi, N.; Ansaloni, R.

    A new numerical model, SEOM (Spectral Element Ocean Model, (Iskandarani et al, 1994)), has been implemented in the Mediterranean Sea. Spectral element methods combine the geometric flexibility of finite element techniques with the rapid convergence rate of spectral schemes. The current version solves the shallow water equations with a fifth (or sixth) order accuracy spectral scheme and about 50.000 nodes. The domain decomposition philosophy makes it possible to exploit the power of parallel machines. The original MIMD master/slave version of SEOM, written in F90 and PVM, has been ported to the Cray T3D. When critical for performance, Cray specific high-performance one-sided communication routines (SHMEM) have been adopted to fully exploit the Cray T3D interprocessor network. Tests performed with highly unstructured and irregular grid, on up to 128 processors, show an almost linear scalability even with unoptimized domain decomposition techniques. Results from various case studies on the Mediterranean Sea are shown, involving realistic coastline geometry, and monthly mean 1000mb winds from the ECMWF's atmospheric model operational analysis from the period January 1987 to December 1994. The simulation results show that variability in the wind forcing considerably affect the circulation dynamics of the Mediterranean Sea.

  7. SU-C-213-02: Characterizing 3D Printing in the Fabrication of Variable Density Phantoms

    SciTech Connect

    Madamesila, J; McGeachy, P; Villarreal-Barajas, J; Khan, R

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: In this work, we present characterization, process flow, quality control and application of 3D fabricated low density phantoms for radiotherapy quality assurance. Methods: A Rostock delta 3D printer using polystyrene filament of diameter 1.75 mm was used to print geometric volumes of 2×2×1 cm{sup 3} of varying densities. The variable densities of 0.1 to 0.75 g/cm {sup 3} were created by modulating the infill. A computed tomography (CT) scan was performed to establish an infill-density calibration curve as well as characterize the quality of the print such as uniformity and the infill pattern. The time required to print these volumes was also recorded. Using the calibration, two low density cones (0.19, 0.52 g/cm{sup 3}) were printed and benchmarked against commercially available phantoms. The dosimetric validation of the low density scaling of Anisotropic Analytical Algorithm (AAA) was performed by using a 0.5 g/cm{sup 3} slab of 10×10×2.4 cm{sup 3} with EBT3 GafChromic film. The gamma analysis at 3%/3mm criteria were compared for the measured and computed dose planes. Results: Analysis of the volume of air pockets in the infill resulted in a reasonable uniformity for densities 0.4 to 0.75 g/cm{sup 3}. Printed phantoms with densities below 0.4 g/cm{sup 3} exhibited a higher ratio of air to polystyrene resulting in large non-uniformity. Compared to the commercial inserts, good agreement was observed only for the printed 0.52 g/cm{sup 3} cone. Dosimetric comparison for a printed low density volume placed in-between layers of solid water resulted in >95% gamma agreement between AAA calculated dose planes and measured EBT3 films for a 6MV 5×5 cm{sup 2} clinical beam. The comparison showed disagreement in the penumbra region. Conclusion: In conclusion, 3D printing technology opens the door to desktop fabrication of variable density phantoms at economical prices in an efficient manner for the quality assurance needs of a small clinic.

  8. 3D full-waveform inversion of time-lapse horizontal borehole GPR data to map soil water content variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klotzsche, A.; Van Der Kruk, J.; Oberroehrmann, M.; Vanderborght, J.; Vereecken, H.

    2015-12-01

    Soil moisture is a key state variable that controls water and mass fluxes in soil-plant systems and is variable in space and time. Over the last year's, hydrogeophysical methods such as ground penetrating radar (GPR) have been used to determine electromagnetic properties as proxies for soil water content (SWC). Here, we combined zero-offset-profiles (ZOP) GPR measurements within multiple horizontal minirhizotubes at different depths to determine the spatial and temporal variability of SWC under a winter wheat stand at the Selhausen test site (Germany). We studied spatio-temporal variations of SWC under three different treatments: rainfed, irrigated and sheltered. We acquired 15 time-lapse ZOP GPR dataset during the growing season of the wheat in the rhizotron facility using horizontal boreholes with a separation of 0.75m and a length of 6m at six depths between 0.1-1.2m. The obtained radar velocities were converted to SWC using the 4-phase volumetric complex refractive index model. SWC values obtained using standard ray-based processing methods were not reliable close to the surface (0.1-0.2m depth) because of the inference of the critically refracted air wave and the direct wave through the subsurface. Therefore, we implemented a full-waveform inversion that uses accurate 3D forward modeling of GPRMax that incorporates the air and soil interactions. The shuffled complex evolution (SCE) method allowed us to retrieve quantitative medium properties that explained the measured data with a R² of at least 0.95, and improved SWC estimates at all depths. The final SWC distributions for wet and dry conditions showed that the vertical variability is significantly larger than the lateral variability caused by strong influence of precipitation and irrigation events.

  9. Characterization and 3-D modeling of Ni60Ti SMA for actuation of a variable geometry jet engine chevron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartl, Darren J.; Lagoudas, Dimitris C.

    2007-04-01

    This work describes the thermomechanical characterization and FEA modeling of commercial jet engine chevrons incorporating active Shape Memory Alloy (SMA) beam components. The reduction of community noise at airports generated during aircraft take-off has become a major research goal. Serrated aerodynamic devices along the trailing edge of a jet engine primary and secondary exhaust nozzle, known as chevrons, have been shown to greatly reduce jet noise by encouraging advantageous mixing of the streams. To achieve the noise reduction, the secondary exhaust nozzle chevrons are typically immersed into the fan flow which results in drag, or thrust losses during cruise. SMA materials have been applied to this problem of jet engine noise. Active chevrons, utilizing SMA components, have been developed and tested to create maximum deflection during takeoff and landing while minimizing deflection into the flow during the remainder of flight, increasing efficiency. Boeing has flight tested one Variable Geometry Chevron (VGC) system which includes active SMA beams encased in a composite structure with a complex 3-D configuration. The SMA beams, when activated, induce the necessary bending forces on the chevron structure to deflect it into the fan flow and reduce noise. The SMA composition chosen for the fabrication of these beams is a Ni60Ti40 (wt%) alloy. In order to calibrate the material parameters of the constitutive SMA model, various thermomechanical experiments are performed on trained (stabilized) standard SMA tensile specimens. Primary among these tests are thermal cycles at various constant stress levels. Material properties for the shape memory alloy components are derived from this tensile experimentation. Using this data, a 3-D FEA implementation of a phenomenological SMA model is calibrated and used to analyze the response of the chevron. The primary focus of this work is the full 3-D modeling of the active chevron system behavior by considering the SMA beams as

  10. A semi-automatic image-based close range 3D modeling pipeline using a multi-camera configuration.

    PubMed

    Rau, Jiann-Yeou; Yeh, Po-Chia

    2012-01-01

    The generation of photo-realistic 3D models is an important task for digital recording of cultural heritage objects. This study proposes an image-based 3D modeling pipeline which takes advantage of a multi-camera configuration and multi-image matching technique that does not require any markers on or around the object. Multiple digital single lens reflex (DSLR) cameras are adopted and fixed with invariant relative orientations. Instead of photo-triangulation after image acquisition, calibration is performed to estimate the exterior orientation parameters of the multi-camera configuration which can be processed fully automatically using coded targets. The calibrated orientation parameters of all cameras are applied to images taken using the same camera configuration. This means that when performing multi-image matching for surface point cloud generation, the orientation parameters will remain the same as the calibrated results, even when the target has changed. Base on this invariant character, the whole 3D modeling pipeline can be performed completely automatically, once the whole system has been calibrated and the software was seamlessly integrated. Several experiments were conducted to prove the feasibility of the proposed system. Images observed include that of a human being, eight Buddhist statues, and a stone sculpture. The results for the stone sculpture, obtained with several multi-camera configurations were compared with a reference model acquired by an ATOS-I 2M active scanner. The best result has an absolute accuracy of 0.26 mm and a relative accuracy of 1:17,333. It demonstrates the feasibility of the proposed low-cost image-based 3D modeling pipeline and its applicability to a large quantity of antiques stored in a museum. PMID:23112656

  11. A Semi-Automatic Image-Based Close Range 3D Modeling Pipeline Using a Multi-Camera Configuration

    PubMed Central

    Rau, Jiann-Yeou; Yeh, Po-Chia

    2012-01-01

    The generation of photo-realistic 3D models is an important task for digital recording of cultural heritage objects. This study proposes an image-based 3D modeling pipeline which takes advantage of a multi-camera configuration and multi-image matching technique that does not require any markers on or around the object. Multiple digital single lens reflex (DSLR) cameras are adopted and fixed with invariant relative orientations. Instead of photo-triangulation after image acquisition, calibration is performed to estimate the exterior orientation parameters of the multi-camera configuration which can be processed fully automatically using coded targets. The calibrated orientation parameters of all cameras are applied to images taken using the same camera configuration. This means that when performing multi-image matching for surface point cloud generation, the orientation parameters will remain the same as the calibrated results, even when the target has changed. Base on this invariant character, the whole 3D modeling pipeline can be performed completely automatically, once the whole system has been calibrated and the software was seamlessly integrated. Several experiments were conducted to prove the feasibility of the proposed system. Images observed include that of a human being, eight Buddhist statues, and a stone sculpture. The results for the stone sculpture, obtained with several multi-camera configurations were compared with a reference model acquired by an ATOS-I 2M active scanner. The best result has an absolute accuracy of 0.26 mm and a relative accuracy of 1:17,333. It demonstrates the feasibility of the proposed low-cost image-based 3D modeling pipeline and its applicability to a large quantity of antiques stored in a museum. PMID:23112656

  12. 3D coaxial out-of-plane metallic antennas for filtering and multi-spectral imaging in the infrared range

    PubMed Central

    Jacassi, Andrea; Bozzola, Angelo; Zilio, Pierfrancesco; Tantussi, Francesco; De Angelis, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    We fabricated and investigated a new configuration of 3D coaxial metallic antennas working in the infrared which combines the strong lateral light scattering of vertical plasmonic structures with the selective spectral transmission of 2D arrays of coaxial apertures. The coaxial structures are fabricated with a top-down method based on a template of hollow 3D antennas. Each antenna has a multilayer radial structure consisting of dielectric and metallic materials not achievable in a 2D configuration. A planar metallic layer is inserted normally to the antennas. The outer dielectric shell of the antenna defines a nanometric gap between the horizontal plane and the vertical walls. Thanks to this aperture, light can tunnel to the other side of the plane, and be transmitted to the far field in a set of resonances. These are investigated with finite-elements electromagnetic calculations and with Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy measurements. The spectral position of the resonances can be tuned by changing the lattice period and/or the antenna length. Thanks to the strong scattering provided by the 3D geometry, the transmission peaks possess a high signal-to-noise ratio even when the illuminated area is less than 2 × 2 times the operation wavelength. This opens new possibilities for multispectral imaging in the IR with wavelength-scale spatial resolution. PMID:27345517

  13. 3D coaxial out-of-plane metallic antennas for filtering and multi-spectral imaging in the infrared range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacassi, Andrea; Bozzola, Angelo; Zilio, Pierfrancesco; Tantussi, Francesco; de Angelis, Francesco

    2016-06-01

    We fabricated and investigated a new configuration of 3D coaxial metallic antennas working in the infrared which combines the strong lateral light scattering of vertical plasmonic structures with the selective spectral transmission of 2D arrays of coaxial apertures. The coaxial structures are fabricated with a top-down method based on a template of hollow 3D antennas. Each antenna has a multilayer radial structure consisting of dielectric and metallic materials not achievable in a 2D configuration. A planar metallic layer is inserted normally to the antennas. The outer dielectric shell of the antenna defines a nanometric gap between the horizontal plane and the vertical walls. Thanks to this aperture, light can tunnel to the other side of the plane, and be transmitted to the far field in a set of resonances. These are investigated with finite-elements electromagnetic calculations and with Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy measurements. The spectral position of the resonances can be tuned by changing the lattice period and/or the antenna length. Thanks to the strong scattering provided by the 3D geometry, the transmission peaks possess a high signal-to-noise ratio even when the illuminated area is less than 2 × 2 times the operation wavelength. This opens new possibilities for multispectral imaging in the IR with wavelength-scale spatial resolution.

  14. 3D coaxial out-of-plane metallic antennas for filtering and multi-spectral imaging in the infrared range.

    PubMed

    Jacassi, Andrea; Bozzola, Angelo; Zilio, Pierfrancesco; Tantussi, Francesco; De Angelis, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    We fabricated and investigated a new configuration of 3D coaxial metallic antennas working in the infrared which combines the strong lateral light scattering of vertical plasmonic structures with the selective spectral transmission of 2D arrays of coaxial apertures. The coaxial structures are fabricated with a top-down method based on a template of hollow 3D antennas. Each antenna has a multilayer radial structure consisting of dielectric and metallic materials not achievable in a 2D configuration. A planar metallic layer is inserted normally to the antennas. The outer dielectric shell of the antenna defines a nanometric gap between the horizontal plane and the vertical walls. Thanks to this aperture, light can tunnel to the other side of the plane, and be transmitted to the far field in a set of resonances. These are investigated with finite-elements electromagnetic calculations and with Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy measurements. The spectral position of the resonances can be tuned by changing the lattice period and/or the antenna length. Thanks to the strong scattering provided by the 3D geometry, the transmission peaks possess a high signal-to-noise ratio even when the illuminated area is less than 2 × 2 times the operation wavelength. This opens new possibilities for multispectral imaging in the IR with wavelength-scale spatial resolution. PMID:27345517

  15. Without gaps - 3D photo-reconstruction of gully headcuts by combined utilisation of UAV and close-range photogrammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stöcker, Claudia; Karrasch, Pierre; Eltner, Anette

    2015-04-01

    Gully erosion is a worldwide phenomenon causing permanent degradation of fertile land. Especially in the Mediterranean, gullies contribute to high soil loss rates which necessitate multi-temporal and high resolution monitoring. Gullies naturally exhibit complex surface morphologies and hence are difficult to measure. Images acquired airborne or terrestrial are possible data sources for digital gully modelling due to availing of photogrammetric methods to achieve 3D models. In this regard unmanned airborne vehicles (UAVs) allow for low cost, flexible and frequent areal gully monitoring, but exhibit limitations as a result of the birds-eye view - i.e. at steep sidewalls and overhanging areas. Terrestrial images offer advantages at local assessments and can be obtained spontaneously as needed. However, images acquired from ground are not able to ensure areal coverage. To integrate the advantages of both data sources and to overcome the above mentioned limitations, this study introduces a methodological approach of combined utilisation of nadir UAV data and oblique terrestrial images for 3D photo reconstruction. Two gully headcuts in Andalusia (Spain) are analysed to confirm the suitability of the synergetic data usage. The results show that the UAV model of the gully, generated from images from flying heights of 15 m, implies inconsistency of data at slope gradients of 50 to 60 °. To eliminate these gaps additional terrestrial images can be integrated, which are geo-referenced solely using information of the already calculated 3D model and orthophoto from the UAV images. Referencing errors of the terrestrial point clouds are fixed by applying fine registration. The final merged digital gully model reveals a resolution of 0.5 cm and an accuracy of 1 cm. Concluding, high density point clouds based on the fusion of UAV and terrestrial image data show a significant improvement of 3D photo-reconstruction of two gully headcuts compared to detached processing of single data

  16. An algorithm for the calculation of 3-D ICRF (Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequencies) fields in tokamak geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Smithe, D.N.; Colestock, P.L.; Kashuba, R.J.; Kammash, T.

    1987-04-01

    A computational scheme is developed which permits tractable calculation of three-dimensional full-wave solutions to the Maxwell-Vlasov equations under typical Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequencies (ICRF) experimental conditions. The method is unique in that power deposition to the plasma is determined via the anti-Hermitian part of a truncated warm-plasma dielectric operator, rather than as the result of an assumed phenomenological collision frequency. The resulting computer code allows arbitrary variation of density, temperature, magnetic field, and minority concentration in the poloidal plane by performing a convolution of poloidal modes to produce a coupled system of differential equations in the radial variable. By assuming no inhomogeneity along the toroidal axis, an inverse transform over k/sub parallel/ is performed to yield the full three-dimensional field solutions. The application of the code to TFTR-like plasmas shows a mild resonance structure in antenna loading related to the changing number of wavelengths between antenna and the resonance layer. 48 figs.

  17. Increase of Readability and Accuracy of 3d Models Using Fusion of Close Range Photogrammetry and Laser Scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gašparović, M.; Malarić, I.

    2012-07-01

    The development of laser scanning technology has opened a new page in geodesy and enabled an entirely new way of presenting data. Products obtained by the method of laser scanning are used in many sciences, as well as in archaeology. It should be noted that 3D models of archaeological artefacts obtained by laser scanning are fully measurable, written in 1:1 scale and have high accuracy. On the other hand, texture and RGB values of the surface of the object obtained by a laser scanner have lower resolution and poorer radiometric characteristics in relation to the textures captured with a digital camera. Scientific research and the goal of this paper are to increase the accuracy and readability of the 3D model with textures obtained with a digital camera. Laser scanning was performed with triangulation scanner of high accuracy, Vivid 9i (Konica Minolta), while for photogrammetric recording digital camera Nikon D90 with a lens of fixed focal length 20 mm, was used. It is important to stress that a posteriori accuracy score of the global registration of point clouds in the form of the standard deviation was ± 0.136 mm while the average distance was only ± 0.080 mm. Also research has proven that the quality projection texture model increases readability. Recording of archaeological artefacts and making their photorealistic 3D model greatly contributes to archaeology as a science, accelerates processing and reconstruction of the findings. It also allows the presentation of findings to the general public, not just to the experts.

  18. 3D finite element simulation of microstructure evolution in blade forging of Ti-6Al-4V alloy based on the internal state variable models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Jiao; Wu, Bin; Li, Miao-Quan

    2012-02-01

    The physically-based internal state variable (ISV) models were used to describe the changes of dislocation density, grain size, and flow stress in the high temperature deformation of titanium alloys in this study. The constants of the present models could be identified based on experimental results, which were conducted at deformation temperatures ranging from 1093 K to 1303 K, height reductions ranging from 20% to 60%, and the strain rates of 0.001, 0.01, 0.1, 1.0, and 10.0 s-1. The physically-based internal state variable models were implemented into the commercial finite element (FE) code. Then, a three-dimensional (3D) FE simulation system coupling of deformation, heat transfer, and microstructure evolution was developed for the blade forging of Ti-6Al-4V alloy. FE analysis was carried out to simulate the microstructure evolution in the blade forging of Ti-6Al-4V alloy. Finally, the blade forging tests of Ti-6Al-4V alloy were performed to validate the results of FE simulation. According to the tensile tests, it is seen that the mechanical properties, such as tensile strength and elongation, satisfy the application requirements well. The maximum and minimum differences between the calculated and experimental grain size of primary α phase are 11.71% and 4.23%, respectively. Thus, the industrial trials show a good agreement with FE simulation of blade forging.

  19. A 3-D model analysis of the slowdown and interannual variability in the methane growth rate from 1988 to 1997

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, James S.; Logan, Jennifer A.; McElroy, Michael B.; Duncan, Bryan N.; Megretskaia, Inna A.; Yantosca, Robert M.

    2004-09-01

    Methane has exhibited significant interannual variability with a slowdown in its growth rate beginning in the 1980s. We use a 3-D chemical transport model accounting for interannually varying emissions, transport, and sinks to analyze trends in CH4 from 1988 to 1997. Variations in CH4 sources were based on meteorological and country-level socioeconomic data. An inverse method was used to optimize the strengths of sources and sinks for a base year, 1994. We present a best-guess budget along with sensitivity tests. The analysis suggests that the sum of emissions from animals, fossil fuels, landfills, and wastewater estimated using Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change default methodology is too high. Recent bottom-up estimates of the source from rice paddies appear to be too low. Previous top-down estimates of emissions from wetlands may be a factor of 2 higher than bottom-up estimates because of possible overestimates of OH. The model captures the general decrease in the CH4 growth rate observed from 1988 to 1997 and the anomalously low growth rates during 1992-1993. The slowdown in the growth rate is attributed to a combination of slower growth of sources and increases in OH. The economic downturn in the former Soviet Union and Eastern Europe made a significant contribution to the decrease in the growth rate of emissions. The 1992-1993 anomaly can be explained by fluctuations in wetland emissions and OH after the eruption of Mount Pinatubo. The results suggest that the recent slowdown of CH4 may be temporary.

  20. Compact range for variable-zone measurements

    DOEpatents

    Burnside, Walter D.; Rudduck, Roger C.; Yu, Jiunn S.

    1988-01-01

    A compact range for testing antennas or radar targets includes a source for directing energy along a feedline toward a parabolic reflector. The reflected wave is a spherical wave with a radius dependent on the distance of the source from the focal point of the reflector.

  1. Compact range for variable-zone measurements

    DOEpatents

    Burnside, W.D.; Rudduck, R.C.; Yu, J.S.

    1987-02-27

    A compact range for testing antennas or radar targets includes a source for directing energy along a feedline toward a parabolic reflector. The reflected wave is a spherical wave with a radius dependent on the distance of the source from the focal point of the reflector. 2 figs.

  2. Compact range for variable-zone measurements

    DOEpatents

    Burnside, Walter D.; Rudduck, Roger C.; Yu, Jiunn S.

    1988-08-02

    A compact range for testing antennas or radar targets includes a source for directing energy along a feedline toward a parabolic reflector. The reflected wave is a spherical wave with a radius dependent on the distance of the source from the focal point of the reflector.

  3. Surface-based matching of 3D point clouds with variable coordinates in source and target system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Xuming; Wunderlich, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The automatic co-registration of point clouds, representing three-dimensional (3D) surfaces, is an important technique in 3D reconstruction and is widely applied in many different disciplines. An alternative approach is proposed here that estimates the transformation parameters of one or more 3D search surfaces with respect to a 3D template surface. The approach uses the nonlinear Gauss-Helmert model, minimizing the quadratically constrained least squares problem. This approach has the ability to match arbitrarily oriented 3D surfaces captured from a number of different sensors, on different time-scales and at different resolutions. In addition to the 3D surface-matching paths, the mathematical model allows the precision of the point clouds to be assessed after adjustment. The error behavior of surfaces can also be investigated based on the proposed approach. Some practical examples are presented and the results are compared with the iterative closest point and the linear least-squares approaches to demonstrate the performance and benefits of the proposed technique.

  4. Geostatistical analysis of 3D microCT images of porous media for stochastic upscaling of spatially variable reactive surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Lucia, Marco; Kühn, Michael

    2015-04-01

    The 3D imaging of porous media through micro tomography allows the characterization of porous space and mineral abundances with unprecedented resolution. Such images can be used to perform computational determination of permeability and to obtain a realistic measure of the mineral surfaces exposed to fluid flow and thus to chemical interactions. However, the volume of the plugs that can be analysed with such detail is in the order of 1 cm3, so that their representativity at a larger scale, i.e. as needed for reactive transport modelling at Darcy scale, is questionable at best. In fact, the fine scale heterogeneity (from plug to plug at few cm distance within the same core) would originate substantially different readings of the investigated properties. Therefore, a comprehensive approach including the spatial variability and heterogeneity at the micro- and plug scale needs to be adopted to gain full advantage from the high resolution images in view of the upscaling to Darcy scale. In the framework of the collaborative project H2STORE, micro-CT imaging of different core samples from potential H2-storage sites has been performed by partners at TU Clausthal and Jena University before and after treatment with H2/CO2 mixtures in pressurized autoclaves. We present here the workflow which has been implemented to extract the relevant features from the available data concerning the heterogeneity of the medium at the microscopic and plug scale and to correlate the observed chemical reactions and changes in the porous structure with the geometrical features of the medium. First, a multivariate indicator-based geostatistical model for the microscopic structure of the plugs has been built and fitted to the available images. This involved the implementation of exploratory analysis algorithms such as experimental indicator variograms and cross-variograms. The implemented methods are able to efficiently deal with images in the order of 10003 voxels making use of parallelization

  5. Impact of assimilation of INSAT-3D retrieved atmospheric motion vectors on short-range forecast of summer monsoon 2014 over the South Asian region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Prashant; Deb, Sanjib K.; Kishtawal, C. M.; Pal, P. K.

    2016-01-01

    The Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model and its three-dimensional variational data assimilation system are used in this study to assimilate the INSAT-3D, a recently launched Indian geostationary meteorological satellite derived from atmospheric motion vectors (AMVs) over the South Asian region during peak Indian summer monsoon month (i.e., July 2014). A total of four experiments were performed daily with and without assimilation of INSAT-3D-derived AMVs and the other AMVs available through Global Telecommunication System (GTS) for the entire month of July 2014. Before assimilating these newly derived INSAT-3D AMVs in the numerical model, a preliminary evaluation of these AMVs is performed with National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) final model analyses. The preliminary validation results show that root-mean-square vector difference (RMSVD) for INSAT-3D AMVs is ˜3.95, 6.66, and 5.65 ms-1 at low, mid, and high levels, respectively, and slightly more RMSVDs are noticed in GTS AMVs (˜4.0, 8.01, and 6.43 ms-1 at low, mid, and high levels, respectively). The assimilation of AMVs has improved the WRF model of produced wind speed, temperature, and moisture analyses as well as subsequent model forecasts over the Indian Ocean, Arabian Sea, Australia, and South Africa. Slightly more improvements are noticed in the experiment where only the INSAT-3D AMVs are assimilated compared to the experiment where only GTS AMVs are assimilated. The results also show improvement in rainfall predictions over the Indian region after AMV assimilation. Overall, the assimilation of INSAT-3D AMVs improved the WRF model short-range predictions over the South Asian region as compared to control experiments.

  6. Mitigation of Variability among 3D Echocardiography-Derived Regional Strain Values Acquired by Multiple Ultrasound Systems by Vendor Independent Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Streiff, Cole; Zhu, Meihua; Shimada, Eriko; Sahn, David J.; Ashraf, Muhammad

    2016-01-01

    Introduction This study compared the variability of 3D echo derived circumferential and longitudinal strain values computed from vendor-specific and vendor-independent analyses of images acquired using ultrasound systems from different vendors. Methods Ten freshly harvested porcine hearts were studied. Each heart was mounted on a custom designed phantom and driven to simulate normal cardiac motion. Cardiac rotation was digitally controlled and held constant at 5°, while pumped stroke volume (SV) ranged from 30-70ml. Full-volume image data was acquired using three different ultrasound systems from different vendors. The image data was analyzed for longitudinal and circumferential strains (LS, CS) using both vendor-specific and vendor-independent analysis packages. Results Good linear relationships were observed for each vendor-specific analysis package for both CS and LS at the mid-anterior segment, with correlation coefficients ranging from 0.82–0.91 (CS) and 0.86–0.89 (LS). Comparable linear regressions were observed for results determined by a vendor independent program (CS: R = 0.82–0.89; LS: R = 0.86–0.89). Variability between analysis packages was examined via a series of ANOVA tests. A statistical difference was found between vendor-specific analysis packages (p<0.001), while no such difference was observed between ultrasound systems when using the vendor-independent program (p>0.05). Conclusions Circumferential and longitudinal regional strain values differ when quantified by vendor-specific analysis packages; however, this variability is mitigated by use of a vendor-independent quantification method. These results suggest that echocardiograms acquired using different ultrasound systems could be meaningfully compared using vendor-independent software. PMID:27149685

  7. Evaluation of expansion algorithm of measurement range suited for 3D shape measurement using two pitches of projected grating with light source-stepping method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakaguchi, Toshimasa; Fujigaki, Motoharu; Murata, Yorinobu

    2015-03-01

    Accurate and wide-range shape measurement method is required in industrial field. The same technique is possible to be used for a shape measurement of a human body for the garment industry. Compact 3D shape measurement equipment is also required for embedding in the inspection system. A shape measurement by a phase shifting method can measure the shape with high spatial resolution because the coordinates can be obtained pixel by pixel. A key-device to develop compact equipment is a grating projector. Authors developed a linear LED projector and proposed a light source stepping method (LSSM) using the linear LED projector. The shape measurement euipment can be produced with low-cost and compact without any phase-shifting mechanical systems by using this method. Also it enables us to measure 3D shape in very short time by switching the light sources quickly. A phase unwrapping method is necessary to widen the measurement range with constant accuracy for phase shifting method. A general phase unwrapping method with difference grating pitches is often used. It is one of a simple phase unwrapping method. It is, however, difficult to apply the conventional phase unwrapping algorithm to the LSSM. Authors, therefore, developed an expansion unwrapping algorithm for the LSSM. In this paper, an expansion algorithm of measurement range suited for 3D shape measurement using two pitches of projected grating with the LSSM was evaluated.

  8. Image-Based and Range-Based 3d Modelling of Archaeological Cultural Heritage: the Telamon of the Temple of Olympian ZEUS in Agrigento (italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo Brutto, M.; Spera, M. G.

    2011-09-01

    The Temple of Olympian Zeus in Agrigento (Italy) was one of the largest temple and at the same time one of the most original of all the Greek architecture. We don't know exactly how it was because the temple is now almost completely destroyed but it is very well-known for the presence of the Telamons. The Telamons were giant statues (about 8 meters high) probably located outside the temple to fill the interval between the columns. In accordance with the theory most accredited by archaeologists the Telamons were a decorative element and also a support for the structure. However, this hypothesis has never been scientifically proven. One Telamon has been reassembled and is shown at the Archaeological Museum of Agrigento. In 2009 a group of researchers at the University of Palermo has begun a study to test the hypothesis that the Telamons support the weight of the upper part of the temple. The study consists of a 3D survey of the Telamon, to reconstruct a detailed 3D digital model, and of a structural analysis with the Finite Element Method (FEM) to test the possibility that the Telamon could to support the weight of the upper portion of the temple. In this work the authors describe the 3D survey of Telamon carry out with Range-Based Modelling (RBM) and Image-Based Modeling (IBM). The RBM was performed with a TOF laser scanner while the IBM with the ZScan system of Menci Software and Image Master of Topcon. Several tests were conducted to analyze the accuracy of the different 3D models and to evaluate the difference between laser scanning and photogrammetric data. Moreover, an appropriate data reduction to generate a 3D model suitable for FEM analysis was tested.

  9. Boresight calibration of construction misalignments for 3D scanners built with a 2D laser range finder rotating on its optical center.

    PubMed

    Morales, Jesús; Martínez, Jorge L; Mandow, Anthony; Reina, Antonio J; Pequeño-Boter, Alejandro; García-Cerezo, Alfonso

    2014-01-01

    Many applications, like mobile robotics, can profit from acquiring dense, wide-ranging and accurate 3D laser data. Off-the-shelf 2D scanners are commonly customized with an extra rotation as a low-cost, lightweight and low-power-demanding solution. Moreover, aligning the extra rotation axis with the optical center allows the 3D device to maintain the same minimum range as the 2D scanner and avoids offsets in computing Cartesian coordinates. The paper proposes a practical procedure to estimate construction misalignments based on a single scan taken from an arbitrary position in an unprepared environment that contains planar surfaces of unknown dimensions. Inherited measurement limitations from low-cost 2D devices prevent the estimation of very small translation misalignments, so the calibration problem reduces to obtaining boresight parameters. The distinctive approach with respect to previous plane-based intrinsic calibration techniques is the iterative maximization of both the flatness and the area of visible planes. Calibration results are presented for a case study. The method is currently being applied as the final stage in the production of a commercial 3D rangefinder. PMID:25347585

  10. Documenting a Complex Modern Heritage Building Using Multi Image Close Range Photogrammetry and 3d Laser Scanned Point Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vianna Baptista, M. L.

    2013-07-01

    Integrating different technologies and expertises help fill gaps when optimizing documentation of complex buildings. Described below is the process used in the first part of a restoration project, the architectural survey of Theatre Guaira Cultural Centre in Curitiba, Brazil. To diminish time on fieldwork, the two-person-field-survey team had to juggle, during three days, the continuous artistic activities and performers' intense schedule. Both technologies (high definition laser scanning and close-range photogrammetry) were used to record all details in the least amount of time without disturbing the artists' rehearsals and performances. Laser Scanning was ideal to record the monumental stage structure with all of its existing platforms, light fixtures, scenery walls and curtains. Although scanned with high-definition, parts of the exterior façades were also recorded using Close Range Photogrammetry. Tiny cracks on the marble plaques and mosaic tiles, not visible in the point clouds, were then able to be precisely documented in order to create the exterior façades textures and damages mapping drawings. The combination of technologies and the expertise of service providers, knowing how and what to document, and what to deliver to the client, enabled maximum benefits to the following restoration project.

  11. Recent improvements to an unstructured mesh 3D Navier-Stokes solver aimed at extending the range of geometric capability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawes, W. N.

    This paper describes some recent improvements made to an unstructed mesh, solution-adaptive three-dimensional Navier-Stokes solver aimed at extending the range of geometric complexity which can be handled in the general context of turbomachinery. The methodology involves generation of a topologically cuboidal mesh, and then the detetion of cells which are not required to allow the formation of relatively complex geometries. This comparatively simple approach permits much of the benefits of an unstructured solution environment to be achieved with minimal complication. Solutions are presented for the highly three-dimensional flows associated with a truncated cylinder in a cross flow, a periodic array of coolant ejection holes, and the overtip leakage flow in an annular cascade of turbine blades.

  12. Numerical modelling of the aeroelastic behaviour and variable loads for the turbine stage in 3D transonic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gnesin, V. I.; Kolodyazhnaya, L. V.; Rzadkowski, R.

    2005-09-01

    In this study presented the algorithm proposed involves the coupled solution of 3-D unsteady flow through a turbine stage and the dynamics problem for rotor-blade motion by the action of aerodynamic forces, without separating the outer and inner flow fluctuations. The partially integrated method involves the solution of the fluid and structural equations separately, but information is exchanged at each time step, so that solution from one domain is used as a boundary condition for the other domain. 3-D transonic gas flow through the stator and rotor blades in relative motion with periodicity on the whole annulus is described by the unsteady Euler conservation equations, which are integrated using the explicit monotonous finite-volume difference scheme of Godunov-Kolgan. The structural analysis uses the modal approach and a 3-D finite element model of a blade. A calculation has been done for the last stage of the steam turbine, under design and off-design regimes. It is shown that the amplitude-frequency spectrum of blade oscillations contains the high frequency harmonics, corresponding to the rotor moving past one stator blade pitch, and low frequency harmonics caused by blade oscillations and flow nonuniformity downstream from the blade row; moreover, the spectrum involves the harmonics which are not multiples of the rotation frequency.

  13. Development of a 3D optical scanning-based automatic quality assurance system for proton range compensators

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, MinKyu; Ju, Sang Gyu E-mail: doho.choi@samsung.com; Chung, Kwangzoo; Hong, Chae-Seon; Kim, Jinsung; Ahn, Sung Hwan; Jung, Sang Hoon; Han, Youngyih; Chung, Yoonsun; Cho, Sungkoo; Choi, Doo Ho E-mail: doho.choi@samsung.com; Kim, Jungkuk; Shin, Dongho

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: A new automatic quality assurance (AutoRCQA) system using a three-dimensional scanner (3DS) with system automation was developed to improve the accuracy and efficiency of the quality assurance (QA) procedure for proton range compensators (RCs). The system performance was evaluated for clinical implementation. Methods: The AutoRCQA system consists of a three-dimensional measurement system (3DMS) based on 3DS and in-house developed verification software (3DVS). To verify the geometrical accuracy, the planned RC data (PRC), calculated with the treatment planning system (TPS), were reconstructed and coregistered with the measured RC data (MRC) based on the beam isocenter. The PRC and MRC inner surfaces were compared with composite analysis (CA) using 3DVS, using the CA pass rate for quantitative analysis. To evaluate the detection accuracy of the system, the authors designed a fake PRC by artificially adding small cubic islands with side lengths of 1.5, 2.5, and 3.5 mm on the inner surface of the PRC and performed CA with the depth difference and distance-to-agreement tolerances of [1 mm, 1 mm], [2 mm, 2 mm], and [3 mm, 3 mm]. In addition, the authors performed clinical tests using seven RCs [computerized milling machine (CMM)-RCs] manufactured by CMM, which were designed for treating various disease sites. The systematic offsets of the seven CMM-RCs were evaluated through the automatic registration function of AutoRCQA. For comparison with conventional technique, the authors measured the thickness at three points in each of the seven CMM-RCs using a manual depth measurement device and calculated thickness difference based on the TPS data (TPS-manual measurement). These results were compared with data obtained from 3DVS. The geometrical accuracy of each CMM-RC inner surface was investigated using the TPS data by performing CA with the same criteria. The authors also measured the net processing time, including the scan and analysis time. Results: The Auto

  14. Stiffness of the microenvironment upregulates ERBB2 expression in 3D cultures of MCF10A within the range of mammographic density.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Qingsu; Bilgin, Cemal Cagatay; Fonteney, Gerald; Chang, Hang; Henderson, Matthew; Han, Ju; Parvin, Bahram

    2016-01-01

    The effects of the stiffness of the microenvironment on the molecular response of 3D colony organization, at the maximum level of mammographic density (MD), are investigated. Phenotypic profiling reveals that 3D colony formation is heterogeneous and increased stiffness of the microenvironment, within the range of the MD, correlates with the increased frequency of aberrant 3D colony formation. Further integrative analysis of the genome-wide transcriptome and phenotypic profiling hypothesizes overexpression of ERBB2 in the premalignant MCF10A cell lines at a stiffness value that corresponds to the collagen component at high mammographic density. Subsequently, ERBB2 overexpression has been validated in the same cell line. Similar experiments with a more genetically stable cell line of 184A1 also revealed an increased frequency of aberrant colony formation with the increased stiffness; however, 184A1 did not demonstrate overexpression of ERBB2 at the same stiffness value of the high MD. These results suggest that stiffness exacerbates premalignant cell line of MCF10A. PMID:27383056

  15. Stiffness of the microenvironment upregulates ERBB2 expression in 3D cultures of MCF10A within the range of mammographic density

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Qingsu; Bilgin, Cemal Cagatay; Fonteney, Gerald; Chang, Hang; Henderson, Matthew; Han, Ju; Parvin, Bahram

    2016-01-01

    The effects of the stiffness of the microenvironment on the molecular response of 3D colony organization, at the maximum level of mammographic density (MD), are investigated. Phenotypic profiling reveals that 3D colony formation is heterogeneous and increased stiffness of the microenvironment, within the range of the MD, correlates with the increased frequency of aberrant 3D colony formation. Further integrative analysis of the genome-wide transcriptome and phenotypic profiling hypothesizes overexpression of ERBB2 in the premalignant MCF10A cell lines at a stiffness value that corresponds to the collagen component at high mammographic density. Subsequently, ERBB2 overexpression has been validated in the same cell line. Similar experiments with a more genetically stable cell line of 184A1 also revealed an increased frequency of aberrant colony formation with the increased stiffness; however, 184A1 did not demonstrate overexpression of ERBB2 at the same stiffness value of the high MD. These results suggest that stiffness exacerbates premalignant cell line of MCF10A. PMID:27383056

  16. Opacity of iron, nickel, and copper plasmas in the x-ray wavelength range: Theoretical interpretation of 2p-3d absorption spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blenski, T.; Loisel, G.; Poirier, M.; Thais, F.; Arnault, P.; Caillaud, T.; Fariaut, J.; Gilleron, F.; Pain, J.-C.; Porcherot, Q.; Reverdin, C.; Silvert, V.; Villette, B.; Bastiani-Ceccotti, S.; Turck-Chièze, S.; Foelsner, W.; de Gaufridy de Dortan, F.

    2011-09-01

    This paper deals with theoretical studies on the 2p-3d absorption in iron, nickel, and copper plasmas related to LULI2000 (Laboratoire pour l'Utilisation des Lasers Intenses, 2000J facility) measurements in which target temperatures were of the order of 20 eV and plasma densities were in the range 0.004-0.01 g/cm3. The radiatively heated targets were close to local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE). The structure of 2p-3d transitions has been studied with the help of the statistical superconfiguration opacity code sco and with the fine-structure atomic physics codes hullac and fac. A new mixed version of the sco code allowing one to treat part of the configurations by detailed calculation based on the Cowan’s code rcg has been also used in these comparisons. Special attention was paid to comparisons between theory and experiment concerning the term features which cannot be reproduced by sco. The differences in the spin-orbit splitting and the statistical (thermal) broadening of the 2p-3d transitions have been investigated as a function of the atomic number Z. It appears that at the conditions of the experiment the role of the term and configuration broadening was different in the three analyzed elements, this broadening being sensitive to the atomic number. Some effects of the temperature gradients and possible non-LTE effects have been studied with the help of the radiative-collisional code scric. The sensitivity of the 2p-3d structures with respect to temperature and density in medium-Z plasmas may be helpful for diagnostics of LTE plasmas especially in future experiments on the Δn=0 absorption in medium-Z plasmas for astrophysical applications.

  17. Opacity of iron, nickel, and copper plasmas in the x-ray wavelength range: Theoretical interpretation of 2p-3d absorption spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Blenski, T.; Loisel, G.; Poirier, M.; Thais, F.; Arnault, P.; Caillaud, T.; Fariaut, J.; Gilleron, F.; Pain, J.-C.; Porcherot, Q.; Reverdin, C.; Silvert, V.; Villette, B.; Bastiani-Ceccotti, S.; Turck-Chieze, S.; Foelsner, W.; Gaufridy de Dortan, F. de

    2011-09-15

    This paper deals with theoretical studies on the 2p-3d absorption in iron, nickel, and copper plasmas related to LULI2000 (Laboratoire pour l'Utilisation des Lasers Intenses, 2000J facility) measurements in which target temperatures were of the order of 20 eV and plasma densities were in the range 0.004-0.01 g/cm{sup 3}. The radiatively heated targets were close to local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE). The structure of 2p-3d transitions has been studied with the help of the statistical superconfiguration opacity code sco and with the fine-structure atomic physics codes hullac and fac. A new mixed version of the sco code allowing one to treat part of the configurations by detailed calculation based on the Cowan's code rcg has been also used in these comparisons. Special attention was paid to comparisons between theory and experiment concerning the term features which cannot be reproduced by sco. The differences in the spin-orbit splitting and the statistical (thermal) broadening of the 2p-3d transitions have been investigated as a function of the atomic number Z. It appears that at the conditions of the experiment the role of the term and configuration broadening was different in the three analyzed elements, this broadening being sensitive to the atomic number. Some effects of the temperature gradients and possible non-LTE effects have been studied with the help of the radiative-collisional code scric. The sensitivity of the 2p-3d structures with respect to temperature and density in medium-Z plasmas may be helpful for diagnostics of LTE plasmas especially in future experiments on the {Delta}n=0 absorption in medium-Z plasmas for astrophysical applications.

  18. Simulation of Tritium Transport and Groundwater Age in a Variably Saturated 3D Model, Lake Rotorua Catchment, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daughney, C.; Toews, M. W.; Morgenstern, U.; Cornaton, F. J.; Jackson, B. M.

    2013-12-01

    Lake Rotorua is a focus of culture and tourism in New Zealand. The lake's water quality has declined since the 1970s, partly due to nutrient inputs that reach the lake via the groundwater system. Improved land use management within the catchment requires prediction of the spatial variations of groundwater transit time from land surface to the lake, and from this the prediction of current and future nutrient inflows to the lake. This study combines the two main methods currently available for determination of water age: numerical groundwater models and hydrological tracers. A steady-state 3D finite element model was constructed to simulate groundwater flow and transport of tritium and age at the catchment scale (555 km2). The model materials were defined using a 3D geologic model and included ignimbrites, rhyolites, alluvial and lake bottom sediments. The steady-state saturated groundwater flow model was calibrated using observed groundwater levels in boreholes (111 locations) and stream flow measurements from groundwater-fed streams and springs (61 locations). Hydraulic conductivities and Cauchy boundary conditions associated with the streams, springs and lake were parameterized. The transport parameters for the model were calibrated using 191 tritium samples from 105 locations (springs, streams and boreholes), with most locations having two sample dates. The transport model used steady-state flow, but simulated the transient transport and decay of tritium from rainfall recharge between 1945 and 2012. An additional 1D unsaturated sub-model was added to account for tritium decay from the ground surface to the water table. The sub-model is linked on top of the 3D model, and uses the water table depths and material properties from the 3D model. The adjustable calibration parameters for the transport model were porosity and van Genuchten parameters related to the unsaturated sub-models. Calibration of the flow model was achieved using a combination of automated least

  19. Mott variable range hopping conduction mechanism in single-phase CZTS thin film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansari, Mohd Zubair; Khare, Neeraj

    2015-06-01

    Single-phase Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS) thin film has been deposited by ultrasonic assisted chemical vapor deposition method on glass substrate at 325 °C substrate temperature. The temperature dependent of electrical conductivity of the CZTS thin film has been measured in order to identify the dominant conduction mechanism. In the high temperature range, the dominance of thermally activated band conduction is observed, whereas in the lower temperature region (70K-230K) the Mott 3D Variable Range Hopping is found to dominate.

  20. Detection of unlabeled particles in the low micrometer size range using light scattering and hydrodynamic 3D focusing in a microfluidic system.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Guisheng; Jensen, Thomas G; Kutter, Jörg P

    2012-07-01

    In this paper, we describe a microfluidic device composed of integrated microoptical elements and a two-layer microchannel structure for highly sensitive light scattering detection of micro/submicrometer-sized particles. In the two-layer microfluidic system, a sample flow stream is first constrained in the out-of-plane direction into a narrow sheet, and then focused in-plane into a small core region, obtaining on-chip three-dimensional (3D) hydrodynamic focusing. All the microoptical elements, including waveguides, microlens, and fiber-to-waveguide couplers, and the in-plane focusing channels are fabricated in one SU-8 layer by standard photolithography. The channels for out-of-plane focusing are made in a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) layer by a single cast using a SU-8 master. Numerical and experimental results indicate that the device can realize 3D hydrodynamic focusing reliably over a wide range of Reynolds numbers (0.5 < Re < 20). Polystyrene particles of three sizes (2, 1, and 0.5 μm) were measured in the microfluidic device with integrated optics, demonstrating the feasibility of this approach to detect particles in the low micrometer size range by light scattering detection. PMID:22740459

  1. Zooplankton mortality in 3D ecosystem modelling considering variable spatial-temporal fish consumptions in the North Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maar, Marie; Rindorf, Anna; Møller, Eva Friis; Christensen, Asbjørn; Madsen, Kristine S.; van Deurs, Mikael

    2014-05-01

    We tested the feasibility of imposing mesozooplankton mortality into a 3D model based on estimated consumption rates of the dominant planktivorous fish in the North Sea-Kattegat area. The spatial biomass distribution of Atlantic herring (Clupea harengus), horse mackerel (Trachurus trachurus), Atlantic mackerel (Scomber scombrus), sandeel (Ammodytidae) and European sprat (Sprattus sprattus) was derived from quarterly scientific trawl surveys and Danish commercial catches. Spatio-temporal indices of mortality were created based on the estimated biomasses and ingestion rates from the literature. The fish larvae grazing pressure was obtained from a spatial, size-based larval community model. In this model, larvae, herring and sandeel were the most important fish predators on mesozooplankton, but these groups had different spatial and temporal (seasonal) distributions. Fish larvae were particularly dominant in the eastern and southern areas in early summer. Herring and sandeel had the highest consumption in the central and north-western areas and were more important in late summer. The fish index changed the perceived annual, seasonal and spatial patterns in modelled mesozooplankton biomass, production and mortality. In the present study, the index was kept relatively simple and can be further developed with respect to the description of fish as well carnivorous zooplankton ingestion rates. The data input required to create the fish index is (i) planktivorous fish stock biomasses and (ii) relative fish spawning distribution information and (iii) physics (ocean currents and temperatures) for the region and situation of interest. The fish index seems promising as a realistic mortality term for lower trophic levels in 3D ecosystem models in areas with available data on fish stocks to improve management of marine resources.

  2. Range expansion through fragmented landscapes under a variable climate

    PubMed Central

    Bennie, Jonathan; Hodgson, Jenny A; Lawson, Callum R; Holloway, Crispin TR; Roy, David B; Brereton, Tom; Thomas, Chris D; Wilson, Robert J

    2013-01-01

    Ecological responses to climate change may depend on complex patterns of variability in weather and local microclimate that overlay global increases in mean temperature. Here, we show that high-resolution temporal and spatial variability in temperature drives the dynamics of range expansion for an exemplar species, the butterfly Hesperia comma. Using fine-resolution (5 m) models of vegetation surface microclimate, we estimate the thermal suitability of 906 habitat patches at the species' range margin for 27 years. Population and metapopulation models that incorporate this dynamic microclimate surface improve predictions of observed annual changes to population density and patch occupancy dynamics during the species' range expansion from 1982 to 2009. Our findings reveal how fine-scale, short-term environmental variability drives rates and patterns of range expansion through spatially localised, intermittent episodes of expansion and contraction. Incorporating dynamic microclimates can thus improve models of species range shifts at spatial and temporal scales relevant to conservation interventions. PMID:23701124

  3. Language Background as a Variable in NAEP Mathematics Performance. NAEP TRP Task 3d: Language Background Study. Final Deliverable.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abedi, Jamal; And Others

    This study examines the linguistic features of the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) mathematics test items and investigates the significance of language-related variables for NAEP's assessment in the content area of mathematics. The continuing increase in the number of language minority students in classrooms nationwide has…

  4. Near-infrared spectro-interferometry of Mira variables and comparisons to 1D dynamic model atmospheres and 3D convection simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wittkowski, M.; Chiavassa, A.; Freytag, B.; Scholz, M.; Höfner, S.; Karovicova, I.; Whitelock, P. A.

    2016-03-01

    Aims: We aim at comparing spectro-interferometric observations of Mira variable asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars with the latest 1D dynamic model atmospheres based on self-excited pulsation models (CODEX models) and with 3D dynamic model atmospheres including pulsation and convection (CO5BOLD models) to better understand the processes that extend the molecular atmosphere to radii where dust can form. Methods: We obtained a total of 20 near-infrared K-band spectro-interferometric snapshot observations of the Mira variables o Cet, R Leo, R Aqr, X Hya, W Vel, and R Cnc with a spectral resolution of about 1500. We compared observed flux and visibility spectra with predictions by CODEX 1D dynamic model atmospheres and with azimuthally averaged intensities based on CO5BOLD 3D dynamic model atmospheres. Results: Our visibility data confirm the presence of spatially extended molecular atmospheres located above the continuum radii with large-scale inhomogeneities or clumps that contribute a few percent of the total flux. The detailed structure of the inhomogeneities or clumps show a variability on time scales of 3 months and above. Both modeling attempts provided satisfactory fits to our data. In particular, they are both consistent with the observed decrease in the visibility function at molecular bands of water vapor and CO, indicating a spatially extended molecular atmosphere. Observational variability phases are mostly consistent with those of the best-fit CODEX models, except for near-maximum phases, where data are better described by near-minimum models. Rosseland angular diameters derived from the model fits are broadly consistent between those based on the 1D and the 3D models and with earlier observations. We derived fundamental parameters including absolute radii, effective temperatures, and luminosities for our sources. Conclusions: Our results provide a first observational support for theoretical results that shocks induced by convection and pulsation in the

  5. Flood variability east of Australia’s Great Dividing Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rustomji, Paul; Bennett, Neil; Chiew, Francis

    2009-08-01

    SummaryThe variability of flow in river channels influences the spatial and temporal variability of many biophysical processes including the transport of sediment and waterborne pollutants and the recruitment of aquatic animals and plants. In this study, inter- and intra-basin patterns of flood variability are examined for catchments east of Australia's Great Dividing Range. Three measures of flood variability are explored with uncertainty quantified using bootstrap resampling. The two preferred measures of flood variability (namely a flood quantile ratio and a power law scaling coefficient) produced similar results. Catchments in the wet tropics of far north Queensland experience low flood variability. Flood variability increased southwards through Queensland, reaching a maximum in the vicinity of the Fitzroy and Burnett River basins. The small near-coast catchments of southern Queensland and northern New Wales experience low flood variability. Flood variability is also high in the southern Hunter River and Hawkesbury-Nepean basins. Using L-moment ratio diagrams with data from 424 streamflow stations, we also conclude that the Generalised Pareto distribution is preferable for modelling flood frequency curves for this region. These results provide a regional perspective that can be used to develop new hypotheses about the effects of hydrologic variability on the biophysical characteristics of these Australian rivers.

  6. 3D ultrafast ultrasound imaging in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Provost, Jean; Papadacci, Clement; Esteban Arango, Juan; Imbault, Marion; Fink, Mathias; Gennisson, Jean-Luc; Tanter, Mickael; Pernot, Mathieu

    2014-10-01

    Very high frame rate ultrasound imaging has recently allowed for the extension of the applications of echography to new fields of study such as the functional imaging of the brain, cardiac electrophysiology, and the quantitative imaging of the intrinsic mechanical properties of tumors, to name a few, non-invasively and in real time. In this study, we present the first implementation of Ultrafast Ultrasound Imaging in 3D based on the use of either diverging or plane waves emanating from a sparse virtual array located behind the probe. It achieves high contrast and resolution while maintaining imaging rates of thousands of volumes per second. A customized portable ultrasound system was developed to sample 1024 independent channels and to drive a 32  ×  32 matrix-array probe. Its ability to track in 3D transient phenomena occurring in the millisecond range within a single ultrafast acquisition was demonstrated for 3D Shear-Wave Imaging, 3D Ultrafast Doppler Imaging, and, finally, 3D Ultrafast combined Tissue and Flow Doppler Imaging. The propagation of shear waves was tracked in a phantom and used to characterize its stiffness. 3D Ultrafast Doppler was used to obtain 3D maps of Pulsed Doppler, Color Doppler, and Power Doppler quantities in a single acquisition and revealed, at thousands of volumes per second, the complex 3D flow patterns occurring in the ventricles of the human heart during an entire cardiac cycle, as well as the 3D in vivo interaction of blood flow and wall motion during the pulse wave in the carotid at the bifurcation. This study demonstrates the potential of 3D Ultrafast Ultrasound Imaging for the 3D mapping of stiffness, tissue motion, and flow in humans in vivo and promises new clinical applications of ultrasound with reduced intra—and inter-observer variability.

  7. An Approach to 3d Digital Modeling of Surfaces with Poor Texture by Range Imaging Techniques. `SHAPE from Stereo' VS. `SHAPE from Silhouette' in Digitizing Jorge Oteiza's Sculptures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García Fernández, J.; Álvaro Tordesillas, A.; Barba, S.

    2015-02-01

    Despite eminent development of digital range imaging techniques, difficulties persist in the virtualization of objects with poor radiometric information, in other words, objects consisting of homogeneous colours (totally white, black, etc.), repetitive patterns, translucence, or materials with specular reflection. This is the case for much of the Jorge Oteiza's works, particularly in the sculpture collection of the Museo Fundación Jorge Oteiza (Navarra, Spain). The present study intend to analyse and asses the performance of two digital 3D-modeling methods based on imaging techniques, facing cultural heritage in singular cases, determined by radiometric characteristics as mentioned: Shape from Silhouette and Shape from Stereo. On the other hand, the text proposes the definition of a documentation workflow and presents the results of its application in the collection of sculptures created by Oteiza.

  8. Effect of Experimental Variables of Abrasive Wear on 3D Surface Roughness and Wear Rate of Al-4.5 % Cu Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Debashis; Mallik, Manab; Mandal, Nilrudra; Dutta, Samik; Roy, Himadri; Lohar, Aditya Kumar

    2016-05-01

    This investigation was primarily carried out to examine the abrasive wear behavior of as cast Al-4.5 % Cu alloy. Wear tests have been carried out using an abrasive wear machine with emery paper embedded with SiC particles acting as abrasive medium. The experiments were planned using central composite design, with, load, cycle and grit size as input variables, whereas wear rate and 3D roughness were considered as output variable. Analysis of variance was applied to check the adequacy of the mathematical model and their respective parameters. Microstructural investigations of the worn surfaces have been carried out to explain the observed results and to understand the wear micro-mechanisms as per the planned experiments. Desirability function optimization technique was finally employed to optimize the controlling factors. The observed results revealed that, grit size plays a significant role in the variation of wear rate and 3D roughness as compared to load and cycles. Based on the significance of interactions, the regression equations were derived and verified further with a number of confirmation runs to assess the adequacy of the model. A close agreement (±10 %) between the predicted and experimentally measured results was obtained from this investigation.

  9. 3D Ultrafast Ultrasound Imaging In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Provost, Jean; Papadacci, Clement; Arango, Juan Esteban; Imbault, Marion; Gennisson, Jean-Luc; Tanter, Mickael; Pernot, Mathieu

    2014-01-01

    Very high frame rate ultrasound imaging has recently allowed for the extension of the applications of echography to new fields of study such as the functional imaging of the brain, cardiac electrophysiology, and the quantitative real-time imaging of the intrinsic mechanical properties of tumors, to name a few, non-invasively and in real time. In this study, we present the first implementation of Ultrafast Ultrasound Imaging in three dimensions based on the use of either diverging or plane waves emanating from a sparse virtual array located behind the probe. It achieves high contrast and resolution while maintaining imaging rates of thousands of volumes per second. A customized portable ultrasound system was developed to sample 1024 independent channels and to drive a 32×32 matrix-array probe. Its capability to track in 3D transient phenomena occurring in the millisecond range within a single ultrafast acquisition was demonstrated for 3-D Shear-Wave Imaging, 3-D Ultrafast Doppler Imaging and finally 3D Ultrafast combined Tissue and Flow Doppler. The propagation of shear waves was tracked in a phantom and used to characterize its stiffness. 3-D Ultrafast Doppler was used to obtain 3-D maps of Pulsed Doppler, Color Doppler, and Power Doppler quantities in a single acquisition and revealed, for the first time, the complex 3-D flow patterns occurring in the ventricles of the human heart during an entire cardiac cycle, and the 3-D in vivo interaction of blood flow and wall motion during the pulse wave in the carotid at the bifurcation. This study demonstrates the potential of 3-D Ultrafast Ultrasound Imaging for the 3-D real-time mapping of stiffness, tissue motion, and flow in humans in vivo and promises new clinical applications of ultrasound with reduced intra- and inter-observer variability. PMID:25207828

  10. Switched-capacitor neuromorphs with wide-range variable dynamics.

    PubMed

    Elias, J G; Northmore, D M

    1995-01-01

    The use of switched capacitors as wide-range, programmable resistive elements in spatially extensive artificial dendritic trees (ADT's) is described. We show that silicon neuro-morphs with ADT's can produce impulse responses that last millions of times longer than the initiating impulse and that dynamical responses are tunable in both shape and duration over a wide range. The switched-capacitor resistors forming a dendritic tree are shown indirectly to have a useful programmable resistance range between 500 KOmega and 1000 GOmega. Experimental results are presented that show variable impulse response functions, tunable frequency selectivity, and rate-invariance of spatiotemporal pattern responses. PMID:18263448

  11. Use of stereoscopic satellite imagery for 3D mapping of bedrock structure in West Antarctica: An example from the northern Ford Ranges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contreras, A.; Siddoway, C. S.; Porter, C.; Gottfried, M.

    2012-12-01

    In coastal West Antarctica, crustal-scale faults have been minimally mapped using traditional ground-based methods but regional scale structures are inferred mainly on the basis of low resolution potential fields data from airborne geophysical surveys (15 km flightline spacing). We use a new approach to detailed mapping of faults, shear zones, and intrusive relationships using panchromatic and multispectral imagery draped upon a digital elevation model (DEM). Our work focuses on the Fosdick Mountains, a culmination of lower middle crustal rocks exhumed at c. 100 Ma by dextral oblique detachment faulting. Ground truth exists for extensive areas visited during field studies in 2005-2011, providing a basis for spectral analysis of 8-band WorldView-02 imagery for detailed mapping of complex granite- migmatite relationships on the north side of the Fosdick range. A primary aim is the creation of a 3D geological map using the results of spectral analysis merged with a DEM computed from a stereographic pair of high resolution panchromatic images (sequential scenes, acquired 45 seconds apart). DEMs were computed using ERDAS Imagine™ LPS eATE, refined by MATLAB-based interpolation scripts to remove artifacts in the terrain model according to procedures developed by the Polar Geospatial Center (U. Minnesota). Orthorectified satellite imagery that covers the area of the DEMs was subjected to principal component analysis in ESRI ArcGIS™ 10.1, then the different rock types were identified using various combinations of spectral bands in order to map the geology of rock exposures that could not be accessed directly from the ground. Renderings in 3D of the satellite scenes draped upon the DEMs were created using Global Mapper™. The 3D perspective views reveal structural and geological features that are not observed in either the DEM nor the satellite imagery alone. The detailed map is crucial for an ongoing petrological / geochemical investigation of Cretaceous crustal

  12. A New Accurate 3D Measurement Tool to Assess the Range of Motion of the Tongue in Oral Cancer Patients: A Standardized Model.

    PubMed

    van Dijk, Simone; van Alphen, Maarten J A; Jacobi, Irene; Smeele, Ludwig E; van der Heijden, Ferdinand; Balm, Alfons J M

    2016-02-01

    In oral cancer treatment, function loss such as speech and swallowing deterioration can be severe, mostly due to reduced lingual mobility. Until now, there is no standardized measurement tool for tongue mobility and pre-operative prediction of function loss is based on expert opinion instead of evidence based insight. The purpose of this study was to assess the reliability of a triple-camera setup for the measurement of tongue range of motion (ROM) in healthy adults and its feasibility in patients with partial glossectomy. A triple-camera setup was used, and 3D coordinates of the tongue in five standardized tongue positions were achieved in 15 healthy volunteers. Maximum distances between the tip of the tongue and the maxillary midline were calculated. Each participant was recorded twice, and each movie was analysed three times by two separate raters. Intrarater, interrater and test-retest reliability were the main outcome measures. Secondly, feasibility of the method was tested in ten patients treated for oral tongue carcinoma. Intrarater, interrater and test-retest reliability all showed high correlation coefficients of >0.9 in both study groups. All healthy subjects showed perfect symmetrical tongue ROM. In patients, significant differences in lateral tongue movements were found, due to restricted tongue mobility after surgery. This triple-camera setup is a reliable measurement tool to assess three-dimensional information of tongue ROM. It constitutes an accurate tool for objective grading of reduced tongue mobility after partial glossectomy. PMID:26516075

  13. Paramagnetic shimming for wide-range variable-field NMR.

    PubMed

    Ichijo, Naoki; Takeda, Kazuyuki; Takegoshi, K

    2014-09-01

    We propose a new passive shimming strategy for variable-field NMR experiments, in which the magnetic field produced by paramagnetic shim pieces placed inside the magnet bore compensates the inhomogeneity of a variable-field magnet for a wide range of magnet currents. Paramagnetic shimming is demonstrated in (7)Li, (87)Rb, and (45)Sc NMR of a liquid solution sample in magnetic fields of 3.4, 4.0, and 5.4T at a fixed carrier frequency of 56.0MHz. Since both the main-field inhomogeneity and the paramagnetic magnetization are proportional to the main-magnet current, the resonance lines are equally narrowed by the improved field homogeneity with an identical configuration of the paramagnetic shim pieces. Paramagnetic shimming presented in this work opens the possibility of high-resolution variable-field NMR experiments. PMID:25080372

  14. Analytical solution to 3D SPECT reconstruction with non-uniform attenuation, scatter, and spatially-variant resolution variation for variable focal-length fan-beam collimators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Junhai; Lu, Hongbing; Li, Tianfang; Liang, Zhengrong

    2003-05-01

    In the past decades, analytical (non-iterative) methods have been extensively investigated and developed for the reconstruction of three-dimensional (3D) single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). However, it becomes possible only recently when the exact analytic non-uniform attenuation reconstruction algorithm was derived. Based on the explicit inversion formula for the attenuated Radon transform discovered by Novikov (2000), we extended the previous researches of inverting the attenuated Radon transform of parallel-beam collimation geometry to fan-beam and variable focal-length fan-beam (VFF) collimators and proposed an efficient, analytical solution to 3D SPECT reconstruction with VFF collimators, which compensates simultaneously for non-uniform attenuation, scatter, and spatially-variant or distance-dependent resolution variation (DDRV), as well as suppression of signal-dependent non-stationary Poisson noise. In this procedure, to avoid the reconstructed images being corrupted by the presence of severe noise, we apply a Karhune-Loève (K-L) domain adaptive Wiener filter, which accurately treats the non-stationary Poisson noise. The scatter is then removed by our scatter estimation method, which is based on the energy spectrum and modified from the triple-energy-window acquisition protocol. For the correction of DDRV, a distance-dependent deconvolution is adapted to provide a solution that realistically characterizes the resolution kernel in a real SPECT system. Finally image is reconstructed using our VFF non-uniform attenuation inversion formula.

  15. 3D Elevation Program—Virtual USA in 3D

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lukas, Vicki; Stoker, J.M.

    2016-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) 3D Elevation Program (3DEP) uses a laser system called ‘lidar’ (light detection and ranging) to create a virtual reality map of the Nation that is very accurate. 3D maps have many uses with new uses being discovered all the time.  

  16. Efros-Shklovskii variable range hopping conductivity without Coulomb gap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Tianran; Skinner, Brian

    In doped semiconductors and Coulomb glasses, in the limit of weak coupling, the electron conductivity primarily proceeds by phonon-assisted tunneling or hopping between different sites through the insulating gaps that separate them. Electron conduction can occur both through nearest-neighbor hopping and through cotunneling of electrons between distant sites via a chain of intermediate virtual states. In the presence of some disorder, the latter mechanism dominates at low temperatures, where the length of the hops grows to optimize the conductivity. This transport mechanism was introduced by Mott, and is called variable range hopping. When the Coulomb interaction between localized electrons is taken into account, it can be shown that at a sufficiently low temperature, variable range hopping conductivity obeys the Efros-Shklovskii (ES) law, which has been observed in a number of amorphous semiconductors and granular metal systems at low temperatures. ES conductivity has been long understood as the result of a soft, Coulomb gap at the Fermi level. However, such a theory overlooks the presence of spatial correlations between site energies and their possible effects on electrical conductivity. In this talk, we show both analytically and numerically that in systems where spatial correlations must be taken into account, ES conductivity may persist far outside the Coulomb gap, in contrast to conventional transport theory for doped semiconductors and Coulomb glasses where ES conductivity only occurs within the Coulomb gap.

  17. Variable-Range Hopping through Marginally Localized Phonons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Sumilan; Altman, Ehud

    2016-03-01

    We investigate the effect of coupling Anderson localized particles in one dimension to a system of marginally localized phonons having a symmetry protected delocalized mode at zero frequency. This situation is naturally realized for electrons coupled to phonons in a disordered nanowire as well as for ultracold fermions coupled to phonons of a superfluid in a one-dimensional disordered trap. To determine if the coupled system can be many-body localized we analyze the phonon-mediated hopping transport for both the weak and strong coupling regimes. We show that the usual variable-range hopping mechanism involving a low-order phonon process is ineffective at low temperature due to discreteness of the bath at the required energy. Instead, the system thermalizes through a many-body process involving exchange of a diverging number n ∝-log T of phonons in the low temperature limit. This effect leads to a highly singular prefactor to Mott's well-known formula and strongly suppresses the variable range hopping rate. Finally, we comment on possible implications of this physics in higher dimensional electron-phonon coupled systems.

  18. Heterodyne 3D ghost imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xu; Zhang, Yong; Yang, Chenghua; Xu, Lu; Wang, Qiang; Zhao, Yuan

    2016-06-01

    Conventional three dimensional (3D) ghost imaging measures range of target based on pulse fight time measurement method. Due to the limit of data acquisition system sampling rate, range resolution of the conventional 3D ghost imaging is usually low. In order to take off the effect of sampling rate to range resolution of 3D ghost imaging, a heterodyne 3D ghost imaging (HGI) system is presented in this study. The source of HGI is a continuous wave laser instead of pulse laser. Temporal correlation and spatial correlation of light are both utilized to obtain the range image of target. Through theory analysis and numerical simulations, it is demonstrated that HGI can obtain high range resolution image with low sampling rate.

  19. SUTRA: A model for 2D or 3D saturated-unsaturated, variable-density ground-water flow with solute or energy transport

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Voss, Clifford I.; Provost, A.M.

    2002-01-01

    SUTRA (Saturated-Unsaturated Transport) is a computer program that simulates fluid movement and the transport of either energy or dissolved substances in a subsurface environment. This upgraded version of SUTRA adds the capability for three-dimensional simulation to the former code (Voss, 1984), which allowed only two-dimensional simulation. The code employs a two- or three-dimensional finite-element and finite-difference method to approximate the governing equations that describe the two interdependent processes that are simulated: 1) fluid density-dependent saturated or unsaturated ground-water flow; and 2) either (a) transport of a solute in the ground water, in which the solute may be subject to: equilibrium adsorption on the porous matrix, and both first-order and zero-order production or decay; or (b) transport of thermal energy in the ground water and solid matrix of the aquifer. SUTRA may also be used to simulate simpler subsets of the above processes. A flow-direction-dependent dispersion process for anisotropic media is also provided by the code and is introduced in this report. As the primary calculated result, SUTRA provides fluid pressures and either solute concentrations or temperatures, as they vary with time, everywhere in the simulated subsurface system. SUTRA flow simulation may be employed for two-dimensional (2D) areal, cross sectional and three-dimensional (3D) modeling of saturated ground-water flow systems, and for cross sectional and 3D modeling of unsaturated zone flow. Solute-transport simulation using SUTRA may be employed to model natural or man-induced chemical-species transport including processes of solute sorption, production, and decay. For example, it may be applied to analyze ground-water contaminant transport problems and aquifer restoration designs. In addition, solute-transport simulation with SUTRA may be used for modeling of variable-density leachate movement, and for cross sectional modeling of saltwater intrusion in

  20. Soil process-oriented modelling of within-field variability based on high-resolution 3D soil type distribution maps.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bönecke, Eric; Lück, Erika; Gründling, Ralf; Rühlmann, Jörg; Franko, Uwe

    2016-04-01

    Today, the knowledge of within-field variability is essential for numerous purposes, including practical issues, such as precision and sustainable soil management. Therefore, process-oriented soil models have been applied for a considerable time to answer question of spatial soil nutrient and water dynamics, although, they can only be as consistent as their variation and resolution of soil input data. Traditional approaches, describe distribution of soil types, soil texture or other soil properties for greater soil units through generalised point information, e.g. from classical soil survey maps. Those simplifications are known to be afflicted with large uncertainties. Varying soil, crop or yield conditions are detected even within such homogenised soil units. However, recent advances of non-invasive soil survey and on-the-go monitoring techniques, made it possible to obtain vertical and horizontal dense information (3D) about various soil properties, particularly soil texture distribution which serves as an essential soil key variable affecting various other soil properties. Thus, in this study we based our simulations on detailed 3D soil type distribution (STD) maps (4x4 m) to adjacently built-up sufficient informative soil profiles including various soil physical and chemical properties. Our estimates of spatial STD are based on high-resolution lateral and vertical changes of electrical resistivity (ER), detected by a relatively new multi-sensor on-the-go ER monitoring device. We performed an algorithm including fuzzy-c-mean (FCM) logic and traditional soil classification to estimate STD from those inverted and layer-wise available ER data. STD is then used as key input parameter for our carbon, nitrogen and water transport model. We identified Pedological horizon depths and inferred hydrological soil variables (field capacity, permanent wilting point) from pedotransferfunctions (PTF) for each horizon. Furthermore, the spatial distribution of soil organic carbon

  1. Efficient workflows for 3D building full-color model reconstruction using LIDAR long-range laser and image-based modeling techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shih, Chihhsiong

    2004-12-01

    Two efficient workflow are developed for the reconstruction of a 3D full color building model. One uses a point wise sensing device to sample an unknown object densely and attach color textures from a digital camera separately. The other uses an image based approach to reconstruct the model with color texture automatically attached. The point wise sensing device reconstructs the CAD model using a modified best view algorithm that collects the maximum number of construction faces in one view. The partial views of the point clouds data are then glued together using a common face between two consecutive views. Typical overlapping mesh removal and coarsening procedures are adapted to generate a unified 3D mesh shell structure. A post processing step is then taken to combine the digital image content from a separate camera with the 3D mesh shell surfaces. An indirect uv mapping procedure first divide the model faces into groups within which every face share the same normal direction. The corresponding images of these faces in a group is then adjusted using the uv map as a guidance. The final assembled image is then glued back to the 3D mesh to present a full colored building model. The result is a virtual building that can reflect the true dimension and surface material conditions of a real world campus building. The image based modeling procedure uses a commercial photogrammetry package to reconstruct the 3D model. A novel view planning algorithm is developed to guide the photos taking procedure. This algorithm successfully generate a minimum set of view angles. The set of pictures taken at these view angles can guarantee that each model face shows up at least in two of the pictures set and no more than three. The 3D model can then be reconstructed with minimum amount of labor spent in correlating picture pairs. The finished model is compared with the original object in both the topological and dimensional aspects. All the test cases show exact same topology and

  2. Efficient workflows for 3D building full-color model reconstruction using LIDAR long-range laser and image-based modeling techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shih, Chihhsiong

    2005-01-01

    Two efficient workflow are developed for the reconstruction of a 3D full color building model. One uses a point wise sensing device to sample an unknown object densely and attach color textures from a digital camera separately. The other uses an image based approach to reconstruct the model with color texture automatically attached. The point wise sensing device reconstructs the CAD model using a modified best view algorithm that collects the maximum number of construction faces in one view. The partial views of the point clouds data are then glued together using a common face between two consecutive views. Typical overlapping mesh removal and coarsening procedures are adapted to generate a unified 3D mesh shell structure. A post processing step is then taken to combine the digital image content from a separate camera with the 3D mesh shell surfaces. An indirect uv mapping procedure first divide the model faces into groups within which every face share the same normal direction. The corresponding images of these faces in a group is then adjusted using the uv map as a guidance. The final assembled image is then glued back to the 3D mesh to present a full colored building model. The result is a virtual building that can reflect the true dimension and surface material conditions of a real world campus building. The image based modeling procedure uses a commercial photogrammetry package to reconstruct the 3D model. A novel view planning algorithm is developed to guide the photos taking procedure. This algorithm successfully generate a minimum set of view angles. The set of pictures taken at these view angles can guarantee that each model face shows up at least in two of the pictures set and no more than three. The 3D model can then be reconstructed with minimum amount of labor spent in correlating picture pairs. The finished model is compared with the original object in both the topological and dimensional aspects. All the test cases show exact same topology and

  3. Effect of anionic surfactant concentration on the variable range hopping conduction in polypyrrole nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rawal, Ishpal; Kaur, Amarjeet

    2014-01-01

    The mechanism of charge transport in polypyrrole (PPy) nanoparticles prepared with different concentrations (5 to 30 mM) of anionic surfactant (sodium dodecyl sulfate) is reported. Transmission electron microscopy technique confirms the formation of PPy nanoparticles of sizes ˜52 to 28 nm under surfactant directed approach. The room temperature electrical conductivity of the prepared nanoparticles found to increase from 3 to 22 S/cm with surfactant concentration. The temperature dependent activation energy rules out the possibility of band conduction mechanism in the prepared PPy nanoparticles and thus the synthesized nanoparticles are analyzed under variable range hopping (VRH) model for conduction mechanism. The PPy nanoparticles, reduced with liquid ammonia, hold 3D VRH conduction mechanism for the charge transport. However, in the doped samples, some deviation from 3D VRH conduction behavior at higher temperatures (>150 K) has been observed. This may be attributed to the presence of anionic surfactant in these samples. The doping of anionic surfactant causes rise in conducting islands, which may lead to the change in the shape/distribution of density of states governed by Gaussian or exponential type near Fermi level.

  4. Effect of anionic surfactant concentration on the variable range hopping conduction in polypyrrole nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Rawal, Ishpal; Kaur, Amarjeet

    2014-01-28

    The mechanism of charge transport in polypyrrole (PPy) nanoparticles prepared with different concentrations (5 to 30 mM) of anionic surfactant (sodium dodecyl sulfate) is reported. Transmission electron microscopy technique confirms the formation of PPy nanoparticles of sizes ∼52 to 28 nm under surfactant directed approach. The room temperature electrical conductivity of the prepared nanoparticles found to increase from 3 to 22 S/cm with surfactant concentration. The temperature dependent activation energy rules out the possibility of band conduction mechanism in the prepared PPy nanoparticles and thus the synthesized nanoparticles are analyzed under variable range hopping (VRH) model for conduction mechanism. The PPy nanoparticles, reduced with liquid ammonia, hold 3D VRH conduction mechanism for the charge transport. However, in the doped samples, some deviation from 3D VRH conduction behavior at higher temperatures (>150 K) has been observed. This may be attributed to the presence of anionic surfactant in these samples. The doping of anionic surfactant causes rise in conducting islands, which may lead to the change in the shape/distribution of density of states governed by Gaussian or exponential type near Fermi level.

  5. Understanding Mountain Range Spatial Variability of Surface Hoar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendrikx, J.

    2014-12-01

    Surface hoar, once buried often produce a persistent weak layer that is a common instability problem in the snow pack in SW Montana and many other areas around the world. Surface hoar is a common weak layer type in avalanche accidents in a continental and intermountain snowpack. It is however relatively well understood that aspect plays an important role in the spatial location of the growth, and survival of these grain forms, due to the unequal distribution of incoming radiation. However this factor alone does not explain the complex and often confusing spatial pattern of these grains forms throughout the landscape at larger, mountain range spatial scales. In this paper we present a unique data set including over one hundred days of manual observations of surface hoar at sixteen locations on Pioneer Mountain at the Yellowstone Club in southwestern Montana. Using this wealth of observational data located on different aspects, elevations and exposures, coupled with detailed meteorological observations, detailed site scale observations (e.g. Sky view plots) we examine the spatial variability of surface hoar at this scale, and examine the factors that control its spatial distribution. Our results further supports our preliminary work, which shows that small-scale meteorological differences, site scale differences, and local scale lapse rates can greatly influence the spatial variability of surface hoar, over and above that which aspect alone can explain. These results highlight our incomplete understanding of the processes at this large, mountain range scale, and are likely to have implications for both regional and local scale avalanche forecasting in environments where surface hoar cause ongoing instabilities.

  6. Europeana and 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pletinckx, D.

    2011-09-01

    The current 3D hype creates a lot of interest in 3D. People go to 3D movies, but are we ready to use 3D in our homes, in our offices, in our communication? Are we ready to deliver real 3D to a general public and use interactive 3D in a meaningful way to enjoy, learn, communicate? The CARARE project is realising this for the moment in the domain of monuments and archaeology, so that real 3D of archaeological sites and European monuments will be available to the general public by 2012. There are several aspects to this endeavour. First of all is the technical aspect of flawlessly delivering 3D content over all platforms and operating systems, without installing software. We have currently a working solution in PDF, but HTML5 will probably be the future. Secondly, there is still little knowledge on how to create 3D learning objects, 3D tourist information or 3D scholarly communication. We are still in a prototype phase when it comes to integrate 3D objects in physical or virtual museums. Nevertheless, Europeana has a tremendous potential as a multi-facetted virtual museum. Finally, 3D has a large potential to act as a hub of information, linking to related 2D imagery, texts, video, sound. We describe how to create such rich, explorable 3D objects that can be used intuitively by the generic Europeana user and what metadata is needed to support the semantic linking.

  7. Euro3D Science Conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, J. R.

    2004-02-01

    The Euro3D RTN is an EU funded Research Training Network to foster the exploitation of 3D spectroscopy in Europe. 3D spectroscopy is a general term for spectroscopy of an area of the sky and derives its name from its two spatial + one spectral dimensions. There are an increasing number of instruments which use integral field devices to achieve spectroscopy of an area of the sky, either using lens arrays, optical fibres or image slicers, to pack spectra of multiple pixels on the sky (``spaxels'') onto a 2D detector. On account of the large volume of data and the special methods required to reduce and analyse 3D data, there are only a few centres of expertise and these are mostly involved with instrument developments. There is a perceived lack of expertise in 3D spectroscopy spread though the astronomical community and its use in the armoury of the observational astronomer is viewed as being highly specialised. For precisely this reason the Euro3D RTN was proposed to train young researchers in this area and develop user tools to widen the experience with this particular type of data in Europe. The Euro3D RTN is coordinated by Martin M. Roth (Astrophysikalisches Institut Potsdam) and has been running since July 2002. The first Euro3D science conference was held in Cambridge, UK from 22 to 23 May 2003. The main emphasis of the conference was, in keeping with the RTN, to expose the work of the young post-docs who are funded by the RTN. In addition the team members from the eleven European institutes involved in Euro3D also presented instrumental and observational developments. The conference was organized by Andy Bunker and held at the Institute of Astronomy. There were over thirty participants and 26 talks covered the whole range of application of 3D techniques. The science ranged from Galactic planetary nebulae and globular clusters to kinematics of nearby galaxies out to objects at high redshift. Several talks were devoted to reporting recent observations with newly

  8. Revisiting the TORT Solutions to the NEA Suite of Benchmarks for 3D Transport Methods and Codes Over a Range in Parameter Space

    SciTech Connect

    Bekar, Kursat B; Azmy, Yousry

    2009-01-01

    Improved TORT solutions to the 3D transport codes' suite of benchmarks exercise are presented in this study. Preliminary TORT solutions to this benchmark indicate that the majority of benchmark quantities for most benchmark cases are computed with good accuracy, and that accuracy improves with model refinement. However, TORT fails to compute accurate results for some benchmark cases with aspect ratios drastically different from 1, possibly due to ray effects. In this work, we employ the standard approach of splitting the solution to the transport equation into an uncollided flux and a fully collided flux via the code sequence GRTUNCL3D and TORT to mitigate ray effects. The results of this code sequence presented in this paper show that the accuracy of most benchmark cases improved substantially. Furthermore, the iterative convergence problems reported for the preliminary TORT solutions have been resolved by bringing the computational cells' aspect ratio closer to unity and, more importantly, by using 64-bit arithmetic precision in the calculation sequence. Results of this study are also reported.

  9. 3d-3d correspondence revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Hee-Joong; Dimofte, Tudor; Gukov, Sergei; Sułkowski, Piotr

    2016-04-01

    In fivebrane compactifications on 3-manifolds, we point out the importance of all flat connections in the proper definition of the effective 3d {N}=2 theory. The Lagrangians of some theories with the desired properties can be constructed with the help of homological knot invariants that categorify colored Jones polynomials. Higgsing the full 3d theories constructed this way recovers theories found previously by Dimofte-Gaiotto-Gukov. We also consider the cutting and gluing of 3-manifolds along smooth boundaries and the role played by all flat connections in this operation.

  10. Radiologists' interpretive efficiency and variability in true- and false-positive detection when screen-reading with tomosynthesis (3D-mammography) relative to standard mammography in population screening.

    PubMed

    Svahn, Tony M; Macaskill, Petra; Houssami, Nehmat

    2015-12-01

    We examined interpretive efficiency and variability in true- and false-positive detection (TP, FP) for radiologists screen-reading with digital breast tomosynthesis as adjunct to full-field digital mammography (2D/3D) relative to 2D alone in population-based screening studies. A systematic literature search was performed to identify screening studies that provided radiologist-specific data for TP and FP detection. Radiologist interpretive efficiency (trade-off between TPs and FPs) was calculated using the FP:TP ratio which expresses the number of FP recalls for each screen-detected breast cancer. We modeled a pooled FP:TP ratio to assess variability in radiologists' interpretive efficiency at study-level using random effects logistic regression. FP:TP ratio improved (ratio decreased) for 2D/3D screen-reading (relative to 2D) for a majority of radiologists (18 of 22) across all studies. Variability in radiologists' FP:TP ratio was consistently lower in all studies for 2D/3D screen-reading, as suggested by lower variance in ratios. Study-level pooled FP:TP ratio for 2D- and 2D/3D-mammography respectively, were 5.96 (95%CI: 4.08 to 8.72) and 3.17 (95%CI: 2.25 to 4.47) for the STORM trial; 10.25 (95%CI: 6.42 to 16.35) and 7.07 (95%CI: 4.99 to 10.02) for the Oslo trial; and 20.84 (95%CI: 13.95 to 31.12) and 8.37 (95%CI: 5.87 to 11.93) for the Houston study. This transfers into study-level improved interpretative efficiencies of 48%, 30% and 55%, respectively, for 2D/3D screen-reading (relative to 2D). In summary, study-level FP:TP trade-off improved using 2D/3D-mammography for all studies, which was also seen for most individual radiologists. There was variability in the FP:TP trade-off between readers and studies for 2D-as well as for 2D/3D-interpretations but variability in radiologists' interpretive efficiency was relatively lower using 2D/3D-mammography. PMID:26433751

  11. 3D and Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meulien Ohlmann, Odile

    2013-02-01

    Today the industry offers a chain of 3D products. Learning to "read" and to "create in 3D" becomes an issue of education of primary importance. 25 years professional experience in France, the United States and Germany, Odile Meulien set up a personal method of initiation to 3D creation that entails the spatial/temporal experience of the holographic visual. She will present some different tools and techniques used for this learning, their advantages and disadvantages, programs and issues of educational policies, constraints and expectations related to the development of new techniques for 3D imaging. Although the creation of display holograms is very much reduced compared to the creation of the 90ies, the holographic concept is spreading in all scientific, social, and artistic activities of our present time. She will also raise many questions: What means 3D? Is it communication? Is it perception? How the seeing and none seeing is interferes? What else has to be taken in consideration to communicate in 3D? How to handle the non visible relations of moving objects with subjects? Does this transform our model of exchange with others? What kind of interaction this has with our everyday life? Then come more practical questions: How to learn creating 3D visualization, to learn 3D grammar, 3D language, 3D thinking? What for? At what level? In which matter? for whom?

  12. Teaching Geography with 3-D Visualization Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anthamatten, Peter; Ziegler, Susy S.

    2006-01-01

    Technology that helps students view images in three dimensions (3-D) can support a broad range of learning styles. "Geo-Wall systems" are visualization tools that allow scientists, teachers, and students to project stereographic images and view them in 3-D. We developed and presented 3-D visualization exercises in several undergraduate courses.…

  13. WE-F-16A-03: 3D Printer Application in Proton Therapy: A Novel Method to Deliver Passive-Scattering Proton Beams with a Fixed Range and Modulation for SRS and SRT

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, X; Witztum, A; Liang, X; Reiche, M; Lin, H; Teo, B; Yin, L; Fiene, J; McDonough, J; Kassaee, A

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To present a novel technique to deliver passive-scattering proton beam with fixed range and modulation using a 3D printed patient-specific bolus for proton stereotactic radiosurgery and radiotherapy. Methods: A CIRS head phantom was used to simulate a patient with a small brain lesion. A custom bolus was created in the Eclipse Treatment Planning System (TPS) to compensate for the different water equivalent depths from the patient surface to the target from multiple beam directions. To simulate arc therapy, a plan was created on the initial CT using three passive-scattering proton beams with a fixed range and modulations irradiating from different angles. The DICOM-RT structure file of the bolus was exported from the TPS and converted to STL format for 3D printing. The phantom was rescanned with the printed custom bolus and head cup to verify the dose distribution comparing to the initial plan. EBT3 films were placed in the sagital plane of the target to verify the delivered dose distribution. The relative stopping power of the printing material(ABSplus-P430) was measured using the Zebra multi-plate ion chamber. Results: The relative stopping power of the 3D printing material, ABSplus-P430 was 1.05 which is almost water equivalent. The dose difference between verification CT and Initial CT is almost negligible. Film measurement also confirmed the accuracy for this new proton delivery technique. Conclusion: Our method using 3D printed range modifiers simplify the treatment delivery of multiple passive-scattering beams in treatment of small lesion in brain. This technique makes delivery of multiple beam more efficient and can be extended to allow arc therapy with proton beams. The ability to create and construct complex patient specific bolus structures provides a new dimension in creating optimized quality treatment plans not only for proton therapy but also for electron and photon therapy.

  14. 3D Imaging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hastings, S. K.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses 3 D imaging as it relates to digital representations in virtual library collections. Highlights include X-ray computed tomography (X-ray CT); the National Science Foundation (NSF) Digital Library Initiatives; output peripherals; image retrieval systems, including metadata; and applications of 3 D imaging for libraries and museums. (LRW)

  15. Return-to-launch-site variable range-velocity line

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bown, R. L.

    1976-01-01

    The effect of moving the return-to-launch-site (RTLS) range-velocity (R-V) line closer to the landing site was studied. Results are presented which show that a five nautical mile shift in R-V line causes the last RTLS abort to occur approximately one second earlier and that the excess range capability to terminal-area-energy-management interface can be dissipated without an excessive roll angle history.

  16. [Visualization of Anterolateral Ligament of the Knee Using 3D Reconstructed Variable Refocus Flip Angle-Turbo Spin Echo T2 Weighted Image].

    PubMed

    Yokosawa, Kenta; Sasaki, Kana; Muramatsu, Koichi; Ono, Tomoya; Izawa, Hiroyuki; Hachiya, Yudo

    2016-05-01

    Anterolateral ligament (ALL) is one of the lateral structures in the knee that contributes to the internal rotational stability of tibia. ALL has been referred to in some recent reports to re-emphasize its importance. We visualized the ALL on 3D-MRI in 32 knees of 27 healthy volunteers (23 male knees, 4 female knees; mean age: 37 years). 3D-MRIs were performed using 1.5-T scanner [T(2) weighted image (WI), SPACE: Sampling Perfection with Application optimized Contrast using different flip angle Evolutions] in the knee extended positions. The visualization rate of the ALL, the mean angle to the lateral collateral ligament (LCL), and the width and the thickness of the ALL at the joint level were investigated. The visualization rate was 100%. The mean angle to the LCL was 10.6 degrees. The mean width and the mean thickness of the ALL were 6.4 mm and 1.0 mm, respectively. The ALL is a very thin ligament with a somewhat oblique course between the lateral femoral epicondyle and the mid-third area of lateral tibial condyle. Therefore, the slice thickness and the slice angle can easily affect the ALL visualization. 3D-MRI enables acquiring thin-slice imaging data over a relatively short time, and arbitrary sections aligned with the course of the ALL can later be selected. PMID:27211087

  17. Intra-event and Inter-event Ground Motion Variability from 3-D Broadband (0-8 Hz) Ensemble Simulations of Mw 6.7 Thrust Events Including Rough Fault Descriptions, Small-Scale Heterogeneities and Q(f)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Withers, K.; Olsen, K. B.; Shi, Z.; Day, S. M.

    2015-12-01

    We model blind thrust scenario earthquakes matching the fault geometry of 1994 Mw 6.7 Northridge earthquake up to 8 Hz by first performing dynamic rupture propagation using a support operator method (SORD). We extend the ground motion by converting the slip-rate data to a kinematic source for the finite difference wave propagation code AWP-ODC, which incorporates an improved frequency-dependent attenuation approach. This technique has high accuracy for Q values down to 15. The desired Q function is fit to the 'effective' Q over the coarse grained-cell for low Q, and a simple interpolation formula is used to interpolate the weights for arbitrary Q. Here, we use a power-law model Q above a reference frequency in the form Q 0 f^n with exponents ranging from 0.0-0.9. We find envelope and phase misfits only slightly larger than that of the elastic case when compared with that of the frequency-wavenumber solution for both a homogenous and a layered model with a large-velocity contrast. We also include small-scale medium complexity in both a 1D layered model and a 3D medium extracted from SCEC CVM-S4 including a surface geotechnical layer (GTL). We model additional realizations of the scenario by varying the hypocenter location, and find that similar moment magnitudes are generated. We observe that while the ground motion pattern changes, the median ground motion is not affected significantly, when binned as a function of distance, and is within 1 interevent standard deviation from the median GMPEs. We find that intra-event variability for the layered model simulations is similar to observed values of single-station standard deviation. We show that small-scale heterogeneity can significantly affect the intra-event variability at frequencies greater than ~1 Hz, becoming increasingly important at larger distances from the source. We perform a parameter space study by varying statistical parameters and find that the variability is fairly independent of the correlation length

  18. 3D laser-written silica glass step-index high-contrast waveguides for the 3.5 μm mid-infrared range.

    PubMed

    Martínez, Javier; Ródenas, Airán; Fernandez, Toney; Vázquez de Aldana, Javier R; Thomson, Robert R; Aguiló, Magdalena; Kar, Ajoy K; Solis, Javier; Díaz, Francesc

    2015-12-15

    We report on the direct laser fabrication of step-index waveguides in fused silica substrates for operation in the 3.5 μm mid-infrared wavelength range. We demonstrate core-cladding index contrasts of 0.7% at 3.39 μm and propagation losses of 1.3 (6.5) dB/cm at 3.39 (3.68) μm, close to the intrinsic losses of the glass. We also report on the existence of three different laser modified SiO₂ glass volumes, their different micro-Raman spectra, and their different temperature-dependent populations of color centers, tentatively clarifying the SiO₂ lattice changes that are related to the large index changes. PMID:26670520

  19. Dissociative double-photoionization of butadiene in the 25-45 eV energy range using 3-D multi-coincidence ion momentum imaging spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Oghbaie, Shabnam; Gisselbrecht, Mathieu; Laksman, Joakim; Månsson, Erik P.; Sankari, Anna; Sorensen, Stacey L.

    2015-09-21

    Dissociative double-photoionization of butadiene in the 25-45 eV energy range has been studied with tunable synchrotron radiation using full three-dimensional ion momentum imaging. Using ab initio calculations, the electronic states of the molecular dication below 33 eV are identified. The results of the measurement and calculation show that double ionization from π orbitals selectively triggers twisting about the terminal or central C–C bonds. We show that this conformational rearrangement depends upon the dication electronic state, which effectively acts as a gateway for the dissociation reaction pathway. For photon energies above 33 eV, three-body dissociation channels where neutral H-atom evaporation precedes C–C charge-separation in the dication species appear in the correlation map. The fragment angular distributions support a model where the dication species is initially aligned with the molecular backbone parallel to the polarization vector of the light, indicating a high probability for double-ionization to the “gateway states” for molecules with this orientation.

  20. Dissociative double-photoionization of butadiene in the 25-45 eV energy range using 3-D multi-coincidence ion momentum imaging spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Oghbaie, Shabnam; Gisselbrecht, Mathieu; Laksman, Joakim; Månsson, Erik P; Sankari, Anna; Sorensen, Stacey L

    2015-09-21

    Dissociative double-photoionization of butadiene in the 25-45 eV energy range has been studied with tunable synchrotron radiation using full three-dimensional ion momentum imaging. Using ab initio calculations, the electronic states of the molecular dication below 33 eV are identified. The results of the measurement and calculation show that double ionization from π orbitals selectively triggers twisting about the terminal or central C-C bonds. We show that this conformational rearrangement depends upon the dication electronic state, which effectively acts as a gateway for the dissociation reaction pathway. For photon energies above 33 eV, three-body dissociation channels where neutral H-atom evaporation precedes C-C charge-separation in the dication species appear in the correlation map. The fragment angular distributions support a model where the dication species is initially aligned with the molecular backbone parallel to the polarization vector of the light, indicating a high probability for double-ionization to the "gateway states" for molecules with this orientation. PMID:26395707

  1. 3D Position and Velocity Vector Computations of Objects Jettisoned from the International Space Station Using Close-Range Photogrammetry Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papanyan, Valeri; Oshle, Edward; Adamo, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    Measurement of the jettisoned object departure trajectory and velocity vector in the International Space Station (ISS) reference frame is vitally important for prompt evaluation of the object s imminent orbit. We report on the first successful application of photogrammetric analysis of the ISS imagery for the prompt computation of the jettisoned object s position and velocity vectors. As post-EVA analyses examples, we present the Floating Potential Probe (FPP) and the Russian "Orlan" Space Suit jettisons, as well as the near-real-time (provided in several hours after the separation) computations of the Video Stanchion Support Assembly Flight Support Assembly (VSSA-FSA) and Early Ammonia Servicer (EAS) jettisons during the US astronauts space-walk. Standard close-range photogrammetry analysis was used during this EVA to analyze two on-board camera image sequences down-linked from the ISS. In this approach the ISS camera orientations were computed from known coordinates of several reference points on the ISS hardware. Then the position of the jettisoned object for each time-frame was computed from its image in each frame of the video-clips. In another, "quick-look" approach used in near-real time, orientation of the cameras was computed from their position (from the ISS CAD model) and operational data (pan and tilt) then location of the jettisoned object was calculated only for several frames of the two synchronized movies. Keywords: Photogrammetry, International Space Station, jettisons, image analysis.

  2. Dissociative double-photoionization of butadiene in the 25-45 eV energy range using 3-D multi-coincidence ion momentum imaging spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oghbaie, Shabnam; Gisselbrecht, Mathieu; Laksman, Joakim; Mânsson, Erik P.; Sankari, Anna; Sorensen, Stacey L.

    2015-09-01

    Dissociative double-photoionization of butadiene in the 25-45 eV energy range has been studied with tunable synchrotron radiation using full three-dimensional ion momentum imaging. Using ab initio calculations, the electronic states of the molecular dication below 33 eV are identified. The results of the measurement and calculation show that double ionization from π orbitals selectively triggers twisting about the terminal or central C-C bonds. We show that this conformational rearrangement depends upon the dication electronic state, which effectively acts as a gateway for the dissociation reaction pathway. For photon energies above 33 eV, three-body dissociation channels where neutral H-atom evaporation precedes C-C charge-separation in the dication species appear in the correlation map. The fragment angular distributions support a model where the dication species is initially aligned with the molecular backbone parallel to the polarization vector of the light, indicating a high probability for double-ionization to the "gateway states" for molecules with this orientation.

  3. Fusion of a Variable Baseline System and a Range Finder

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Aceituno, Javier; Acosta, Leopoldo; Arnay, Rafael

    2012-01-01

    One of the greatest difficulties in stereo vision is the appearance of ambiguities when matching similar points from different images. In this article we analyze the effectiveness of using a fusion of multiple baselines and a range finder from a theoretical point of view, focusing on the results of using both prismatic and rotational articulations for baseline generation, and offer a practical case to prove its efficiency on an autonomous vehicle. PMID:22368469

  4. Fusion of a variable baseline system and a range finder.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Aceituno, Javier; Acosta, Leopoldo; Arnay, Rafael

    2012-01-01

    One of the greatest difficulties in stereo vision is the appearance of ambiguities when matching similar points from different images. In this article we analyze the effectiveness of using a fusion of multiple baselines and a range finder from a theoretical point of view, focusing on the results of using both prismatic and rotational articulations for baseline generation, and offer a practical case to prove its efficiency on an autonomous vehicle. PMID:22368469

  5. 3D-Printed Microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Au, Anthony K; Huynh, Wilson; Horowitz, Lisa F; Folch, Albert

    2016-03-14

    The advent of soft lithography allowed for an unprecedented expansion in the field of microfluidics. However, the vast majority of PDMS microfluidic devices are still made with extensive manual labor, are tethered to bulky control systems, and have cumbersome user interfaces, which all render commercialization difficult. On the other hand, 3D printing has begun to embrace the range of sizes and materials that appeal to the developers of microfluidic devices. Prior to fabrication, a design is digitally built as a detailed 3D CAD file. The design can be assembled in modules by remotely collaborating teams, and its mechanical and fluidic behavior can be simulated using finite-element modeling. As structures are created by adding materials without the need for etching or dissolution, processing is environmentally friendly and economically efficient. We predict that in the next few years, 3D printing will replace most PDMS and plastic molding techniques in academia. PMID:26854878

  6. Remote 3D Medical Consultation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welch, Greg; Sonnenwald, Diane H.; Fuchs, Henry; Cairns, Bruce; Mayer-Patel, Ketan; Yang, Ruigang; State, Andrei; Towles, Herman; Ilie, Adrian; Krishnan, Srinivas; Söderholm, Hanna M.

    Two-dimensional (2D) video-based telemedical consultation has been explored widely in the past 15-20 years. Two issues that seem to arise in most relevant case studies are the difficulty associated with obtaining the desired 2D camera views, and poor depth perception. To address these problems we are exploring the use of a small array of cameras to synthesize a spatially continuous range of dynamic three-dimensional (3D) views of a remote environment and events. The 3D views can be sent across wired or wireless networks to remote viewers with fixed displays or mobile devices such as a personal digital assistant (PDA). The viewpoints could be specified manually or automatically via user head or PDA tracking, giving the remote viewer virtual head- or hand-slaved (PDA-based) remote cameras for mono or stereo viewing. We call this idea remote 3D medical consultation (3DMC). In this article we motivate and explain the vision for 3D medical consultation; we describe the relevant computer vision/graphics, display, and networking research; we present a proof-of-concept prototype system; and we present some early experimental results supporting the general hypothesis that 3D remote medical consultation could offer benefits over conventional 2D televideo.

  7. TRACE 3-D documentation

    SciTech Connect

    Crandall, K.R.

    1987-08-01

    TRACE 3-D is an interactive beam-dynamics program that calculates the envelopes of a bunched beam, including linear space-charge forces, through a user-defined transport system. TRACE 3-D provides an immediate graphics display of the envelopes and the phase-space ellipses and allows nine types of beam-matching options. This report describes the beam-dynamics calculations and gives detailed instruction for using the code. Several examples are described in detail.

  8. 3D 'atomistic' simulations of dopant induced variability in nanoscale implant free In0.75Ga0.25As MOSFETs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seoane, N.; Aldegunde, M.; García-Loureiro, A.; Valin, R.; Kalna, K.

    2012-03-01

    A detailed simulation study of the impact of quantum effects on random dopant induced fluctuations in a 15 nm gate length, implant free In0.75Ga0.25As MOSFET is carried out using parallel 3D finite-element drift-diffusion (DD) device simulations and a mesh with atomistic resolution. The DD device simulations are calibrated against finite element heterostructure ensemble Monte Carlo simulations. Three figures of merit for the off-state have been investigated: threshold voltage, off-current, and sub-threshold slope. Quantum confinement effects are taken into account through the density gradient approximation meticulously calibrating carrier density in the channel against 1D Poisson-Schrödinger solutions. We have shown that the net result of including quantum effects, while considering statistical dopant fluctuations, is a decrease in both threshold voltage fluctuations and threshold voltage shift. These results show the opposite trend generally seen in bulk Si MOSFETs simulated using 3D quantum corrected DD simulations with random discrete dopants in the channel region.

  9. Hybrid 3D laser sensor based on a high-performance long-range wide-field-of-view laser scanner and a calibrated high-resolution digital camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullrich, Andreas; Studnicka, Nikolaus; Riegl, Johannes

    2004-09-01

    We present a hybrid sensor consisting of a high-performance 3D imaging laser sensor and a high-resolution digital camera. The laser sensor uses the time-of-flight principle based on near-infrared pulses. We demonstrate the performance capabilities of the system by presenting example data and we describe the software package used for data acquisition, data merging and visualization. The advantages of using both, near range photogrammetry and laser scanning, for data registration and data extraction are discussed.

  10. The 3-D collagen structure of equine articular cartilage, characterized using variable-angle-of-incidence polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ugryumova, Nadya; Gangnus, Sergei V.; Matcher, Stephen J.

    2005-08-01

    Polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography has been used to spatially map the birefringence of equine articular cartilage. Images obtained in the vicinity of visible osteoarthritic lesions display a characteristic disruption of the regular birefringence bands shown by normal cartilage. We also note that significant (e.g. ×2) variations in the apparent birefringence of samples taken from young (18 month) animals that otherwise appear visually homogeneous are found over spatial scales of a few millimeters. We suggest that whilst some of this variation may be due to changes in the intrinsic birefringence of the tissue, the 3-D orientation of the collagen fibers relative to the plane of the joint surface should also be taken into account. We propose a method based on multiple angles of illumination to determine the polar angle of the collagen fibers.

  11. An Experimental Approach to Assess the Impact of Post Processing Variables on the Mechanical Characteristics of 3D Printed (Powder Binding Process) Parts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Impens, David

    The study is designed to provide a robust understanding of the mechanical characteristic of a 3D printed part for selected post processing conditions. The `green' printed parts are generally very brittle and porous, therefore, infiltrates are introduced to alter the mechanical characteristics, which will introduce new opportunities for this technology. Exploratory testing is performed to shape the choices for post processing with the infiltrates. Specimen geometry, specific for tensile, compression and flexural testing were rendered in CAD software and printed on the Z-printer 450 (Zp150 powder / Zb59 binder) with three different build orientations (horizontal/ angled /vertical). Results show that infiltrates can significantly improve the mechanical characteristics and material-infiltrate performance varies per build orientation. It is now understood that this material does not react similar to other materials and cannot be easily predicted. Additional physical testing should be performed and this complete test set should be conducted for new infiltrates.

  12. Bound constrained bundle adjustment for reliable 3D reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Gong, Yuanzheng; Meng, De; Seibel, Eric J

    2015-04-20

    Bundle adjustment (BA) is a common estimation algorithm that is widely used in machine vision as the last step in a feature-based three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction algorithm. BA is essentially a non-convex non-linear least-square problem that can simultaneously solve the 3D coordinates of all the feature points describing the scene geometry, as well as the parameters of the camera. The conventional BA takes a parameter either as a fixed value or as an unconstrained variable based on whether the parameter is known or not. In cases where the known parameters are inaccurate but constrained in a range, conventional BA results in an incorrect 3D reconstruction by using these parameters as fixed values. On the other hand, these inaccurate parameters can be treated as unknown variables, but this does not exploit the knowledge of the constraints, and the resulting reconstruction can be erroneous since the BA optimization halts at a dramatically incorrect local minimum due to its non-convexity. In many practical 3D reconstruction applications, unknown variables with range constraints are usually available, such as a measurement with a range of uncertainty or a bounded estimate. Thus to better utilize these pre-known, constrained, but inaccurate parameters, a bound constrained bundle adjustment (BCBA) algorithm is proposed, developed and tested in this study. A scanning fiber endoscope (the camera) is used to capture a sequence of images above a surgery phantom (the object) of known geometry. 3D virtual models are reconstructed based on these images and then compared with the ground truth. The experimental results demonstrate BCBA can achieve a more reliable, rapid, and accurate 3D reconstruction than conventional bundle adjustment. PMID:25969115

  13. Bound constrained bundle adjustment for reliable 3D reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Yuanzheng; Meng, De; Seibel, Eric J.

    2015-01-01

    Bundle adjustment (BA) is a common estimation algorithm that is widely used in machine vision as the last step in a feature-based three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction algorithm. BA is essentially a non-convex non-linear least-square problem that can simultaneously solve the 3D coordinates of all the feature points describing the scene geometry, as well as the parameters of the camera. The conventional BA takes a parameter either as a fixed value or as an unconstrained variable based on whether the parameter is known or not. In cases where the known parameters are inaccurate but constrained in a range, conventional BA results in an incorrect 3D reconstruction by using these parameters as fixed values. On the other hand, these inaccurate parameters can be treated as unknown variables, but this does not exploit the knowledge of the constraints, and the resulting reconstruction can be erroneous since the BA optimization halts at a dramatically incorrect local minimum due to its non-convexity. In many practical 3D reconstruction applications, unknown variables with range constraints are usually available, such as a measurement with a range of uncertainty or a bounded estimate. Thus to better utilize these pre-known, constrained, but inaccurate parameters, a bound constrained bundle adjustment (BCBA) algorithm is proposed, developed and tested in this study. A scanning fiber endoscope (the camera) is used to capture a sequence of images above a surgery phantom (the object) of known geometry. 3D virtual models are reconstructed based on these images and then compared with the ground truth. The experimental results demonstrate BCBA can achieve a more reliable, rapid, and accurate 3D reconstruction than conventional bundle adjustment. PMID:25969115

  14. Radiochromic 3D Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oldham, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Radiochromic materials exhibit a colour change when exposed to ionising radiation. Radiochromic film has been used for clinical dosimetry for many years and increasingly so recently, as films of higher sensitivities have become available. The two principle advantages of radiochromic dosimetry include greater tissue equivalence (radiologically) and the lack of requirement for development of the colour change. In a radiochromic material, the colour change arises direct from ionising interactions affecting dye molecules, without requiring any latent chemical, optical or thermal development, with important implications for increased accuracy and convenience. It is only relatively recently however, that 3D radiochromic dosimetry has become possible. In this article we review recent developments and the current state-of-the-art of 3D radiochromic dosimetry, and the potential for a more comprehensive solution for the verification of complex radiation therapy treatments, and 3D dose measurement in general.

  15. Bootstrapping 3D fermions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iliesiu, Luca; Kos, Filip; Poland, David; Pufu, Silviu S.; Simmons-Duffin, David; Yacoby, Ran

    2016-03-01

    We study the conformal bootstrap for a 4-point function of fermions < ψψψψ> in 3D. We first introduce an embedding formalism for 3D spinors and compute the conformal blocks appearing in fermion 4-point functions. Using these results, we find general bounds on the dimensions of operators appearing in the ψ × ψ OPE, and also on the central charge C T . We observe features in our bounds that coincide with scaling dimensions in the GrossNeveu models at large N . We also speculate that other features could coincide with a fermionic CFT containing no relevant scalar operators.

  16. Pathway studies in the fragmentation of Ge(CH 3) 4 involving Ge(3d,3p,3s) and C(1s) inner-shell photoexcitation in the range 49.5-450 eV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boo, Bong Hyun; Saito, Norio; Suzuki, Isao H.; Koyano, Inosuke

    2002-06-01

    The dissociative multiple photoionization of tetramethylgermane (Ge(CH 3) 4) in the valence, and in the Ge(3d,3p,3s) and C(1s) inner-shell regions has been studied by using time-of-flight mass spectrometry coupled to synchrotron radiation in the range 49.5-450 eV. Total and individual photoion yields have been recorded as a function of the incident photon energy. Several discrete resonances over a structureless giant resonance are observed below the Ge(3p), Ge(3s) and C(1s) threshold regions. The structureless giant resonance corresponding to the Ge(3d) presumably arises from the continuum enhancement caused by the 3d→ɛf transition. Various monocations of H +, H 2+, CH n+ ( n=0-4), C 2H n+ ( n=0-5), GeH n+, GeCH n+, GeC 2H n+, and GeC 3H n+ are detected in the whole energy range. Dissociation processes have also been investigated by photoelectron-photoion and photoion-photoion coincidence methods. The dominant dissociation channel is found to be CH n+-GeCH n+ in the whole energy examined. Specific energy dependence of dissociation processes is observed in the Ge(3p) and Ge(3s) regions. With the help of ab initio HF/6-311++G(2df,p) calculation, we roughly estimated the photoabsorption positions and symmetries for the discrete core hole states.

  17. Implementation of a 3D porcine lumbar finite element model for the simulation of monolithic spinal rods with variable flexural stiffness.

    PubMed

    Brummund, Martin; Brailovski, Vladimir; Facchinello, Yann; Petit, Yvan; Mac-Thiong, Jean-Marc

    2015-08-01

    Monolithic superelastic-elastoplastic spinal rods (MSER) are promising candidates to provide (i) dynamic stabilisation in spinal segments prone to mechanical stress concentration and adjacent segment disease and (ii) to provide fusion-ready stabilization in spinal segments at risk of implant failure. However, the stiffness distributions along the rod's longitudinal axis that best meet clinical requirements remain unknown. The present study is part of a mixed numerical experimental research project and aims at the implementation of a 3D finite element model of the porcine lumbar spine to study the role of MSER material properties and stiffness distributions on the intradiscal pressure distribution in the adjacent segment. In this paper, preliminary intradiscal pressure predictions obtained at one functional spinal unit are presented. Due to a lack of porcine material property data, these predictions were obtained on the basis of uncalibrated human vertebral disc data which were taken from the literature. The results indicate that human annulus and nucleus data predict experimental porcine in vivo and in vitro data reasonably well for the compressive forces of varying magnitudes. PMID:26736412

  18. Thermally activated band conduction and variable range hopping conduction in Cu2ZnSnS4 thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zubair Ansari, Mohd; Khare, Neeraj

    2015-01-01

    The temperature dependence of electrical conductivity of the Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS) thin films has been measured in order to identify the dominant conduction mechanism. These CZTS film have been deposited by ultrasonic assisted chemical vapor deposition method at different substrate temperatures in a single step process. All the films exhibit p-type semiconducting behaviour. In the high temperature range (> 250 K), the dominance of thermally activated band conduction is observed, whereas in the lower temperature region (250-70 K), the hopping conduction is present. Detailed analysis of the temperature dependence of conductivity of the films reveals that in the temperature range from 250-170 K, nearest neighbour hopping dominates, whereas in the lower temperature region (170-70 K), the dominant hopping conduction is Mott's 3D variable range hopping and not Efros-Shklovskii variable range hopping. The value of Mott's temperature is found to decrease for the CZTS films deposited at higher temperature, which has been attributed to enhanced density of states at the Fermi level.

  19. TACO3D. 3-D Finite Element Heat Transfer Code

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, W.E.

    1992-03-04

    TACO3D is a three-dimensional, finite-element program for heat transfer analysis. An extension of the two-dimensional TACO program, it can perform linear and nonlinear analyses and can be used to solve either transient or steady-state problems. The program accepts time-dependent or temperature-dependent material properties, and materials may be isotropic or orthotropic. A variety of time-dependent and temperature-dependent boundary conditions and loadings are available including temperature, flux, convection, and radiation boundary conditions and internal heat generation. Additional specialized features treat enclosure radiation, bulk nodes, and master/slave internal surface conditions (e.g., contact resistance). Data input via a free-field format is provided. A user subprogram feature allows for any type of functional representation of any independent variable. A profile (bandwidth) minimization option is available. The code is limited to implicit time integration for transient solutions. TACO3D has no general mesh generation capability. Rows of evenly-spaced nodes and rows of sequential elements may be generated, but the program relies on separate mesh generators for complex zoning. TACO3D does not have the ability to calculate view factors internally. Graphical representation of data in the form of time history and spatial plots is provided through links to the POSTACO and GRAPE postprocessor codes.

  20. 2D and 3D modelling of the Linking Zone between the Iberian and the Catalan Coastal Ranges (NE Spain): Characterizing basement and cover deformation from geological and geophysical cross sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izquierdo-Llavall, Esther; Ayala, Concepción; Rubio, Félix Manuel; Pueyo, Emilio; Casas, Antonio; Oliva-Urcia, Belén; Rodríguez-Pintó, Adriana; Rey-Moral, Carmen

    2015-04-01

    New geological, geophysical and petrophysical information is presented in this work in order to improve the understanding of the Linking Zone, an E-W-trending fold and thrust system that connects the northeastern part of the Iberian Range (WNW-ESE-striking) and the Catalan Coastal Ranges (NNE-SSW-striking). It was formed during the Alpine Orogeny and it is characterized by (1) thick-skinned tectonics, partly controlled by reactivation of faults inherited from Mesozoic times and (2) thin-skinned tectonics, affecting the cover sequences above the regional detachment levels (Triassic gypsum and shales). The present study aims to obtain a 3D image of the structure of this area through the construction of balanced geological and geophysical cross sections. In the Linking Zone scarce subsurface information is available. Therefore, we have conducted data acquisition campaigns to improve this knowledge: A) about 3000 gravity stations distributed along 8 main profiles were measured, and these new stations were complemented with gravity data from IGME databases. These data were analyzed and processed to obtain a Bouguer anomaly map and a residual gravity map with reasonably good coverage; B) a petrophysical survey was also carried out; rock samples were acquired and analyzed obtaining density and susceptibility values of the main lithologies. The statistics of these physical properties is of key importance during the combined geophysical/geological modelling. Petrophysical data indicate a weak, progressive increase of density mean values from the top to the base of the stratigraphic pile with the exception of Triassic gypsum and shales, where the lowest density was obtained. The modelling has been made in three steps: First, a set of eight geological cross-sections based on surface geology and structural information were built, controlled and improved through gravity modelling and balanced to make them geometrically correct, consistent throughout the sections and closer to

  1. Photogrammetric measurement of 3D freeform millimetre-sized objects with micro features: an experimental validation of the close-range camera calibration model for narrow angles of view

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Percoco, Gianluca; Sánchez Salmerón, Antonio J.

    2015-09-01

    The measurement of millimetre and micro-scale features is performed by high-cost systems based on technologies with narrow working ranges to accurately control the position of the sensors. Photogrammetry would lower the costs of 3D inspection of micro-features and would be applicable to the inspection of non-removable micro parts of large objects too. Unfortunately, the behaviour of photogrammetry is not known when photogrammetry is applied to micro-features. In this paper, the authors address these issues towards the application of digital close-range photogrammetry (DCRP) to the micro-scale, taking into account that in literature there are research papers stating that an angle of view (AOV) around 10° is the lower limit to the application of the traditional pinhole close-range calibration model (CRCM), which is the basis of DCRP. At first a general calibration procedure is introduced, with the aid of an open-source software library, to calibrate narrow AOV cameras with the CRCM. Subsequently the procedure is validated using a reflex camera with a 60 mm macro lens, equipped with extension tubes (20 and 32 mm) achieving magnification of up to 2 times approximately, to verify literature findings with experimental photogrammetric 3D measurements of millimetre-sized objects with micro-features. The limitation experienced by the laser printing technology, used to produce the bi-dimensional pattern on common paper, has been overcome using an accurate pattern manufactured with a photolithographic process. The results of the experimental activity prove that the CRCM is valid for AOVs down to 3.4° and that DCRP results are comparable with the results of existing and more expensive commercial techniques.

  2. [Real time 3D echocardiography].

    PubMed

    Bauer, F; Shiota, T; Thomas, J D

    2001-07-01

    Three-dimensional representation of the heart is an old concern. Usually, 3D reconstruction of the cardiac mass is made by successive acquisition of 2D sections, the spatial localisation and orientation of which require complex guiding systems. More recently, the concept of volumetric acquisition has been introduced. A matricial emitter-receiver probe complex with parallel data processing provides instantaneous of a pyramidal 64 degrees x 64 degrees volume. The image is restituted in real time and is composed of 3 planes (planes B and C) which can be displaced in all spatial directions at any time during acquisition. The flexibility of this system of acquisition allows volume and mass measurement with greater accuracy and reproducibility, limiting inter-observer variability. Free navigation of the planes of investigation allows reconstruction for qualitative and quantitative analysis of valvular heart disease and other pathologies. Although real time 3D echocardiography is ready for clinical usage, some improvements are still necessary to improve its conviviality. Then real time 3D echocardiography could be the essential tool for understanding, diagnosis and management of patients. PMID:11494630

  3. [Real time 3D echocardiography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, F.; Shiota, T.; Thomas, J. D.

    2001-01-01

    Three-dimensional representation of the heart is an old concern. Usually, 3D reconstruction of the cardiac mass is made by successive acquisition of 2D sections, the spatial localisation and orientation of which require complex guiding systems. More recently, the concept of volumetric acquisition has been introduced. A matricial emitter-receiver probe complex with parallel data processing provides instantaneous of a pyramidal 64 degrees x 64 degrees volume. The image is restituted in real time and is composed of 3 planes (planes B and C) which can be displaced in all spatial directions at any time during acquisition. The flexibility of this system of acquisition allows volume and mass measurement with greater accuracy and reproducibility, limiting inter-observer variability. Free navigation of the planes of investigation allows reconstruction for qualitative and quantitative analysis of valvular heart disease and other pathologies. Although real time 3D echocardiography is ready for clinical usage, some improvements are still necessary to improve its conviviality. Then real time 3D echocardiography could be the essential tool for understanding, diagnosis and management of patients.

  4. 3D microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iizuka, Keigo

    2008-02-01

    In order to circumvent the fact that only one observer can view the image from a stereoscopic microscope, an attachment was devised for displaying the 3D microscopic image on a large LCD monitor for viewing by multiple observers in real time. The principle of operation, design, fabrication, and performance are presented, along with tolerance measurements relating to the properties of the cellophane half-wave plate used in the design.

  5. Colour-variable birds have broader ranges, wider niches and are less likely to be threatened.

    PubMed

    Delhey, K; Smith, J; Peters, A

    2013-07-01

    Coloration fulfils a variety of adaptive functions in animals. Colour variability, both between and within species, can be caused by different colours being favoured for different functions and in different environments. Thus, species with highly variable coloration may have greater potential to persist in new and changing environments. As a consequence, such colour-variable species may be more able to adapt, colonize new areas and niches, occupy larger ranges, speciate more readily and in general be less vulnerable to environmental change and extinction. These predictions have been supported by comparative analyses on amphibians and reptiles. However, as coloration in ectotherms plays a key role in thermoregulation, it is unclear whether these results can be generalized to endotherms, such as birds and mammals. Here, we test the hypothesis that more colour-variable endotherms occupy larger ranges/niches and are less vulnerable to the threat of extinction by focussing on colour variation in Australian parrots and passerine birds. As predicted, colour variability was correlated with range size (parrots and passerines) and niche breadth (dietary heterogeneity, parrots only). These relationships support the predicted link between colour variability and adaptability, whereby range size and niche breadth may be a cause of colour variability or vice versa. Irrespective, and as predicted, colour variability was lower in threatened species, even after statistically controlling for other confounding variables. Hence, our study supports the hypothesis that colour-variable species in general are more resilient to environmental change. PMID:23663162

  6. On the spatial variability of the hyporheic zone: in-situ investigation of porosity and grain size using diving bells and 3D photogrammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frings, R. M.; Vollmer, S.

    2012-04-01

    In order to improve the ecological status of rivers, lakes and other water bodies, recent legislation, such as the European Water Framework Directive, requires for each water body an assessment of its suitability as habitat for organisms. Such an assessment, though, is not easy. This is especially true for the lowest part of the water body: the substrate or hyporheic zone. Even if it is known which kind of hyporheic zone is preferred by an organism, it remains difficult to determine where it can be found, because it is often impossible to observe the hyporheic zone from the banks or shores. It has become common to classify an entire water body as suitable or unsuitable as habitat, using only limited field observations of the hyporheic zone. This is a doubtful practice, which disregards the huge spatial variability of this zone. The objective of this study was to quantify the spatial variability in hyporheic-zone characteristics in the river Rhine. We focused on two basic characteristics: grain size and porosity, the latter being a primary control on the transport of nutrients, heat, oxygen and organic matter. A diving bell (caisson) was used to obtain access to the river bed, which enabled undisturbed sampling of the hyporheic zone. Between 1968 and 2009 6436 sediment samples were taken and sieved to determine their grain size distribution. Furthermore, in 2009 and 2011 about 100 porosity measurements were carried out, using a novel technique based on a combination of field measurements using three-dimensional photogrammetry and laboratory measurements using the water displacement method. The measurements revealed a strong cross-sectional variability in porosity and grain size. Each river cross-section contains spots with high porosity (order 0.40) and spots with low porosity (order 0.10). The large cross-sectional variability made it impossible to recognize systematic streamwise porosity trends from the data. Therefore we investigated if porosity was correlated to

  7. Multivariate 3D modelling of Scottish soil properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poggio, Laura; Gimona, Alessandro

    2015-04-01

    Information regarding soil properties across landscapes at national or continental scales is critical for better soil and environmental management and for climate regulation and adaptation policy. The prediction of soil properties variation in space and time and their uncertainty is an important part of environmental modelling. Soil properties, and in particular the 3 fractions of soil texture, exhibit strong co-variation among themselves and therefore taking into account this correlation leads to spatially more accurate results. In this study the continuous vertical and lateral distributions of relevant soil properties in Scottish soils were modelled with a multivariate 3D-GAM+GS approach. The approach used involves 1) modelling the multivariate trend with full 3D spatial correlation, i.e., exploiting the values of the neighbouring pixels in 3D-space, and 2) 3D kriging to interpolate the residuals. The values at each cell for each of the considered depth layers were defined using a hybrid GAM-geostatistical 3D model, combining the fitting of a GAM (generalised Additive Models) to estimate multivariate trend of the variables, using a 3D smoother with related covariates. Gaussian simulations of the model residuals were used as spatial component to account for local details. A dataset of about 26,000 horizons (7,800 profiles) was used for this study. A validation set was randomly selected as 25% of the full dataset. Numerous covariates derived from globally available data, such as MODIS and SRTM, are considered. The results of the 3D-GAM+kriging showed low RMSE values, good R squared and an accurate reproduction of the spatial structure of the data for a range of soil properties. The results have an out-of-sample RMSE between 10 to 15% of the observed range when taking into account the whole profile. The approach followed allows the assessment of the uncertainty of both the trend and the residuals.

  8. Multiviewer 3D monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostrzewski, Andrew A.; Aye, Tin M.; Kim, Dai Hyun; Esterkin, Vladimir; Savant, Gajendra D.

    1998-09-01

    Physical Optics Corporation has developed an advanced 3-D virtual reality system for use with simulation tools for training technical and military personnel. This system avoids such drawbacks of other virtual reality (VR) systems as eye fatigue, headaches, and alignment for each viewer, all of which are due to the need to wear special VR goggles. The new system is based on direct viewing of an interactive environment. This innovative holographic multiplexed screen technology makes it unnecessary for the viewer to wear special goggles.

  9. 3D Audio System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Ames Research Center research into virtual reality led to the development of the Convolvotron, a high speed digital audio processing system that delivers three-dimensional sound over headphones. It consists of a two-card set designed for use with a personal computer. The Convolvotron's primary application is presentation of 3D audio signals over headphones. Four independent sound sources are filtered with large time-varying filters that compensate for motion. The perceived location of the sound remains constant. Possible applications are in air traffic control towers or airplane cockpits, hearing and perception research and virtual reality development.

  10. Ab initio and long-range investigation of the Ω(+/-) states of NaK dissociating adiabatically up to Na(3s 2S1/2) + K(3d 2D3/2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allouche, A. R.; Aubert-Frécon, M.

    2011-07-01

    A theoretical investigation of the electronic structure of the NaK molecule including spin-orbit effects has been performed for the 34 Ω(+/-) states dissociating adiabatically into the limits up to Na(3s2S1/2) + K(3d2D3/2) from both an ab initio approach and a long-range model. Equilibrium distances, transition energies, harmonic frequencies as well as depths of wells and heights of humps are reported for all the states. Formulas for calculating the long-range energies for all the 0+/-, 1, 2, and 3 states under investigation are also displayed. They are expressed in terms of the Cn (n = 6,8, …) long-range coefficients and exchange integrals for the 2S+1Λ(+) parent states, available from literature. As present data could help experimentalists we make available extensive tables of energy values versus internuclear distances in our database at the web address: http://www-lasim.univ-lyon1.fr/spip.php?rubrique99.

  11. Temporal Variability of Upper-level Winds at the Eastern Range, Western Range and Wallops Flight Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, Ryan; Barbre, Robert E.

    2014-01-01

    Space launch vehicles incorporate upper-level wind profiles to determine wind effects on the vehicle and for a commit to launch decision. These assessments incorporate wind profiles measured hours prior to launch and may not represent the actual wind the vehicle will fly through. Uncertainty in the upper-level winds over the time period between the assessment and launch can be mitigated by a statistical analysis of wind change over time periods of interest using historical data from the launch range. Five sets of temporal wind pairs at various times (.75, 1.5, 2, 3 and 4-hrs) at the Eastern Range, Western Range and Wallops Flight Facility were developed for use in upper-level wind assessments. Database development procedures as well as statistical analysis of temporal wind variability at each launch range will be presented.

  12. 3D Surgical Simulation

    PubMed Central

    Cevidanes, Lucia; Tucker, Scott; Styner, Martin; Kim, Hyungmin; Chapuis, Jonas; Reyes, Mauricio; Proffit, William; Turvey, Timothy; Jaskolka, Michael

    2009-01-01

    This paper discusses the development of methods for computer-aided jaw surgery. Computer-aided jaw surgery allows us to incorporate the high level of precision necessary for transferring virtual plans into the operating room. We also present a complete computer-aided surgery (CAS) system developed in close collaboration with surgeons. Surgery planning and simulation include construction of 3D surface models from Cone-beam CT (CBCT), dynamic cephalometry, semi-automatic mirroring, interactive cutting of bone and bony segment repositioning. A virtual setup can be used to manufacture positioning splints for intra-operative guidance. The system provides further intra-operative assistance with the help of a computer display showing jaw positions and 3D positioning guides updated in real-time during the surgical procedure. The CAS system aids in dealing with complex cases with benefits for the patient, with surgical practice, and for orthodontic finishing. Advanced software tools for diagnosis and treatment planning allow preparation of detailed operative plans, osteotomy repositioning, bone reconstructions, surgical resident training and assessing the difficulties of the surgical procedures prior to the surgery. CAS has the potential to make the elaboration of the surgical plan a more flexible process, increase the level of detail and accuracy of the plan, yield higher operative precision and control, and enhance documentation of cases. Supported by NIDCR DE017727, and DE018962 PMID:20816308

  13. PLOT3D- DRAWING THREE DIMENSIONAL SURFACES

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canright, R. B.

    1994-01-01

    PLOT3D is a package of programs to draw three-dimensional surfaces of the form z = f(x,y). The function f and the boundary values for x and y are the input to PLOT3D. The surface thus defined may be drawn after arbitrary rotations. However, it is designed to draw only functions in rectangular coordinates expressed explicitly in the above form. It cannot, for example, draw a sphere. Output is by off-line incremental plotter or online microfilm recorder. This package, unlike other packages, will plot any function of the form z = f(x,y) and portrays continuous and bounded functions of two independent variables. With curve fitting; however, it can draw experimental data and pictures which cannot be expressed in the above form. The method used is division into a uniform rectangular grid of the given x and y ranges. The values of the supplied function at the grid points (x, y) are calculated and stored; this defines the surface. The surface is portrayed by connecting successive (y,z) points with straight-line segments for each x value on the grid and, in turn, connecting successive (x,z) points for each fixed y value on the grid. These lines are then projected by parallel projection onto the fixed yz-plane for plotting. This program has been implemented on the IBM 360/67 with on-line CDC microfilm recorder.

  14. Concept and Practice of Teaching Technical University Students to Modern Technologies of 3d Data Acquisition and Processing: a Case Study of Close-Range Photogrammetry and Terrestrial Laser Scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kravchenko, Iulia; Luhmann, Thomas; Shults, Roman

    2016-06-01

    For the preparation of modern specialists in the acquisition and processing of three-dimensional data, a broad and detailed study of related modern methods and technologies is necessary. One of the most progressive and effective methods of acquisition and analyzing spatial data is terrestrial laser scanning. The study of methods and technologies for terrestrial laser scanning is of great importance not only for GIS specialists, but also for surveying engineers who make decisions in traditional engineering tasks (monitoring, executive surveys, etc.). The understanding and formation of the right approach in preparing new professionals need to develop a modern and variable educational program. This educational program must provide effective practical and laboratory work and the student's coursework. The resulting knowledge of the study should form the basis for practical or research of young engineers. In 2014, the Institute of Applied Sciences (Jade University Oldenburg, Germany) and Kyiv National University of Construction and Architecture (Kiev, Ukraine) had launched a joint educational project for the introduction of terrestrial laser scanning technology for collection and processing of spatial data. As a result of this project practical recommendations have been developed for the organization of educational processes in the use of terrestrial laser scanning. An advanced project-oriented educational program was developed which is presented in this paper. In order to demonstrate the effectiveness of the program a 3D model of the big and complex main campus of Kyiv National University of Construction and Architecture has been generated.

  15. Objective assessment of the contribution of the RECOPESCA network to the monitoring of 3D coastal ocean variables in the Bay of Biscay and the English Channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamouroux, Julien; Charria, Guillaume; De Mey, Pierre; Raynaud, Stéphane; Heyraud, Catherine; Craneguy, Philippe; Dumas, Franck; Le Hénaff, Matthieu

    2016-04-01

    In the Bay of Biscay and the English Channel, in situ observations represent a key element to monitor and to understand the wide range of processes in the coastal ocean and their direct impacts on human activities. An efficient way to measure the hydrological content of the water column over the main part of the continental shelf is to consider ships of opportunity as the surface to cover is wide and could be far from the coast. In the French observation strategy, the RECOPESCA programme, as a component of the High frequency Observation network for the environment in coastal SEAs (HOSEA), aims to collect environmental observations from sensors attached to fishing nets. In the present study, we assess that network using the Array Modes (ArM) method (a stochastic implementation of Le Hénaff et al. Ocean Dyn 59: 3-20. doi: 10.1007/s10236-008-0144-7, 2009). That model ensemble-based method is used here to compare model and observation errors and to quantitatively evaluate the performance of the observation network at detecting prior (model) uncertainties, based on hypotheses on error sources. A reference network, based on fishing vessel observations in 2008, is assessed using that method. Considering the various seasons, we show the efficiency of the network at detecting the main model uncertainties. Moreover, three scenarios, based on the reference network, a denser network in 2010 and a fictive network aggregated from a pluri-annual collection of profiles, are also analysed. Our sensitivity study shows the importance of the profile positions with respect to the sheer number of profiles for ensuring the ability of the network to describe the main error modes. More generally, we demonstrate the capacity of this method, with a low computational cost, to assess and to design new in situ observation networks.

  16. 3-D SAR image formation from sparse aperture data using 3-D target grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhalla, Rajan; Li, Junfei; Ling, Hao

    2005-05-01

    The performance of ATR systems can potentially be improved by using three-dimensional (3-D) SAR images instead of the traditional two-dimensional SAR images or one-dimensional range profiles. 3-D SAR image formation of targets from radar backscattered data collected on wide angle, sparse apertures has been identified by AFRL as fundamental to building an object detection and recognition capability. A set of data has been released as a challenge problem. This paper describes a technique based on the concept of 3-D target grids aimed at the formation of 3-D SAR images of targets from sparse aperture data. The 3-D target grids capture the 3-D spatial and angular scattering properties of the target and serve as matched filters for SAR formation. The results of 3-D SAR formation using the backhoe public release data are presented.

  17. 3D polarimetric purity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gil, José J.; San José, Ignacio

    2010-11-01

    From our previous definition of the indices of polarimetric purity for 3D light beams [J.J. Gil, J.M. Correas, P.A. Melero and C. Ferreira, Monogr. Semin. Mat. G. de Galdeano 31, 161 (2004)], an analysis of their geometric and physical interpretation is presented. It is found that, in agreement with previous results, the first parameter is a measure of the degree of polarization, whereas the second parameter (called the degree of directionality) is a measure of the mean angular aperture of the direction of propagation of the corresponding light beam. This pair of invariant, non-dimensional, indices of polarimetric purity contains complete information about the polarimetric purity of a light beam. The overall degree of polarimetric purity is obtained as a weighted quadratic average of the degree of polarization and the degree of directionality.

  18. 3D field harmonics

    SciTech Connect

    Caspi, S.; Helm, M.; Laslett, L.J.

    1991-03-30

    We have developed an harmonic representation for the three dimensional field components within the windings of accelerator magnets. The form by which the field is presented is suitable for interfacing with other codes that make use of the 3D field components (particle tracking and stability). The field components can be calculated with high precision and reduced cup time at any location (r,{theta},z) inside the magnet bore. The same conductor geometry which is used to simulate line currents is also used in CAD with modifications more readily available. It is our hope that the format used here for magnetic fields can be used not only as a means of delivering fields but also as a way by which beam dynamics can suggest correction to the conductor geometry. 5 refs., 70 figs.

  19. 'Bonneville' in 3-D!

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The Mars Exploration Rover Spirit took this 3-D navigation camera mosaic of the crater called 'Bonneville' after driving approximately 13 meters (42.7 feet) to get a better vantage point. Spirit's current position is close enough to the edge to see the interior of the crater, but high enough and far enough back to get a view of all of the walls. Because scientists and rover controllers are so pleased with this location, they will stay here for at least two more martian days, or sols, to take high resolution panoramic camera images of 'Bonneville' in its entirety. Just above the far crater rim, on the left side, is the rover's heatshield, which is visible as a tiny reflective speck.

  20. Comparing a quasi-3D to a full 3D nearshore circulation model: SHORECIRC and ROMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haas, Kevin A.; Warner, John C.

    Predictions of nearshore and surf zone processes are important for determining coastal circulation, impacts of storms, navigation, and recreational safety. Numerical modeling of these systems facilitates advancements in our understanding of coastal changes and can provide predictive capabilities for resource managers. There exists many nearshore coastal circulation models, however they are mostly limited or typically only applied as depth integrated models. SHORECIRC is an established surf zone circulation model that is quasi-3D to allow the effect of the variability in the vertical structure of the currents while maintaining the computational advantage of a 2DH model. Here we compare SHORECIRC to ROMS, a fully 3D ocean circulation model which now includes a three dimensional formulation for the wave-driven flows. We compare the models with three different test applications for: (i) spectral waves approaching a plane beach with an oblique angle of incidence; (ii) monochromatic waves driving longshore currents in a laboratory basin; and (iii) monochromatic waves on a barred beach with rip channels in a laboratory basin. Results identify that the models are very similar for the depth integrated flows and qualitatively consistent for the vertically varying components. The differences are primarily the result of the vertically varying radiation stress utilized by ROMS and the utilization of long wave theory for the radiation stress formulation in vertical varying momentum balance by SHORECIRC. The quasi-3D model is faster, however the applicability of the fully 3D model allows it to extend over a broader range of processes, temporal, and spatial scales.

  1. Comparing a quasi-3D to a full 3D nearshore circulation model: SHORECIRC and ROMS

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haas, K.A.; Warner, J.C.

    2009-01-01

    Predictions of nearshore and surf zone processes are important for determining coastal circulation, impacts of storms, navigation, and recreational safety. Numerical modeling of these systems facilitates advancements in our understanding of coastal changes and can provide predictive capabilities for resource managers. There exists many nearshore coastal circulation models, however they are mostly limited or typically only applied as depth integrated models. SHORECIRC is an established surf zone circulation model that is quasi-3D to allow the effect of the variability in the vertical structure of the currents while maintaining the computational advantage of a 2DH model. Here we compare SHORECIRC to ROMS, a fully 3D ocean circulation model which now includes a three dimensional formulation for the wave-driven flows. We compare the models with three different test applications for: (i) spectral waves approaching a plane beach with an oblique angle of incidence; (ii) monochromatic waves driving longshore currents in a laboratory basin; and (iii) monochromatic waves on a barred beach with rip channels in a laboratory basin. Results identify that the models are very similar for the depth integrated flows and qualitatively consistent for the vertically varying components. The differences are primarily the result of the vertically varying radiation stress utilized by ROMS and the utilization of long wave theory for the radiation stress formulation in vertical varying momentum balance by SHORECIRC. The quasi-3D model is faster, however the applicability of the fully 3D model allows it to extend over a broader range of processes, temporal, and spatial scales. ?? 2008 Elsevier Ltd.

  2. 3-D Relativistic MHD Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishikaw, K.-I.; Frank, J.; Christodoulou, D. M.; Koide, S.; Sakai, J.-I.; Sol, H.; Mutel, R. L.

    1998-12-01

    We present 3-D numerical simulations of moderately hot, supersonic jets propagating initially along or obliquely to the field lines of a denser magnetized background medium with Lorentz factors of W=4.56 and evolving in a four-dimensional spacetime. The new results are understood as follows: Relativistic simulations have consistently shown that these jets are effectively heavy and so they do not suffer substantial momentum losses and are not decelerated as efficiently as their nonrelativistic counterparts. In addition, the ambient magnetic field, however strong, can be pushed aside with relative ease by the beam, provided that the degrees of freedom associated with all three spatial dimensions are followed self-consistently in the simulations. This effect is analogous to pushing Japanese ``noren'' or vertical Venetian blinds out of the way while the slats are allowed to bend in 3-D space rather than as a 2-D slab structure. We also simulate jets with the more realistic initial conditions for injecting jets for helical mangetic field, perturbed density, velocity, and internal energy, which are supposed to be caused in the process of jet generation. Three possible explanations for the observed variability are (i) tidal disruption of a star falling into the black hole, (ii) instabilities in the relativistic accretion disk, and (iii) jet-related PRocesses. New results will be reported at the meeting.

  3. The psychology of the 3D experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janicke, Sophie H.; Ellis, Andrew

    2013-03-01

    With 3D televisions expected to reach 50% home saturation as early as 2016, understanding the psychological mechanisms underlying the user response to 3D technology is critical for content providers, educators and academics. Unfortunately, research examining the effects of 3D technology has not kept pace with the technology's rapid adoption, resulting in large-scale use of a technology about which very little is actually known. Recognizing this need for new research, we conducted a series of studies measuring and comparing many of the variables and processes underlying both 2D and 3D media experiences. In our first study, we found narratives within primetime dramas had the power to shift viewer attitudes in both 2D and 3D settings. However, we found no difference in persuasive power between 2D and 3D content. We contend this lack of effect was the result of poor conversion quality and the unique demands of 3D production. In our second study, we found 3D technology significantly increased enjoyment when viewing sports content, yet offered no added enjoyment when viewing a movie trailer. The enhanced enjoyment of the sports content was shown to be the result of heightened emotional arousal and attention in the 3D condition. We believe the lack of effect found for the movie trailer may be genre-related. In our final study, we found 3D technology significantly enhanced enjoyment of two video games from different genres. The added enjoyment was found to be the result of an increased sense of presence.

  4. Magmatic Systems in 3-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kent, G. M.; Harding, A. J.; Babcock, J. M.; Orcutt, J. A.; Bazin, S.; Singh, S.; Detrick, R. S.; Canales, J. P.; Carbotte, S. M.; Diebold, J.

    2002-12-01

    , even if one data object lies behind another. Stereoscopic viewing is another powerful tool to investigate 3-D relationships between objects. This form of immersion is constructed through viewing two separate images that are interleaved--typically 48 frames per second, per eye--and synced through an emitter and a set of specialized polarizing eyeglasses. The polarizing lenses flicker at an equivalent rate, blanking the eye for which a particular image was not drawn, producing the desired stereo effect. Volumetric visualization of the ARAD 3-D seismic dataset will be presented. The effective use of transparency reveals detailed structure of the melt-lens beneath the 9°03'N overlapping spreading center (OSC) along the East Pacific Rise, including melt-filled fractures within the propagating rift-tip. In addition, range-gated images of seismic reflectivity will be co-registered to investigate the physical properties (melt versus mush) of the magma chamber at this locale. Surface visualization of a dense, 2-D grid of MCS seismic data beneath Axial seamount (Juan de Fuca Ridge) will also be highlighted, including relationships between the summit caldera and rift zones, and the underlying (and humongous) magma chamber. A selection of Quicktime movies will be shown. Popcorn will be served, really!

  5. Prominent rocks - 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Many prominent rocks near the Sagan Memorial Station are featured in this image, taken in stereo by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) on Sol 3. 3D glasses are necessary to identify surface detail. Wedge is at lower left; Shark, Half-Dome, and Pumpkin are at center. Flat Top, about four inches high, is at lower right. The horizon in the distance is one to two kilometers away.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

    Click below to see the left and right views individually. [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Left [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Right

  6. 'Diamond' in 3-D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This 3-D, microscopic imager mosaic of a target area on a rock called 'Diamond Jenness' was taken after NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity ground into the surface with its rock abrasion tool for a second time.

    Opportunity has bored nearly a dozen holes into the inner walls of 'Endurance Crater.' On sols 177 and 178 (July 23 and July 24, 2004), the rover worked double-duty on Diamond Jenness. Surface debris and the bumpy shape of the rock resulted in a shallow and irregular hole, only about 2 millimeters (0.08 inch) deep. The final depth was not enough to remove all the bumps and leave a neat hole with a smooth floor. This extremely shallow depression was then examined by the rover's alpha particle X-ray spectrometer.

    On Sol 178, Opportunity's 'robotic rodent' dined on Diamond Jenness once again, grinding almost an additional 5 millimeters (about 0.2 inch). The rover then applied its Moessbauer spectrometer to the deepened hole. This double dose of Diamond Jenness enabled the science team to examine the rock at varying layers. Results from those grindings are currently being analyzed.

    The image mosaic is about 6 centimeters (2.4 inches) across.

  7. Impact of coarse-grained measurement with finite range on continuous-variable quantum key distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tianyi; Yu, Song; Gu, Wanyi

    2016-03-01

    In continuous-variable quantum key distribution, detectors are necessarily coarse grained and of finite range. We analyze the impact of both features and demonstrate that while coarse graining adds a fixed error to the estimated excess noise, finite range degrades the estimation accuracy of both transmission and excess noise. Moreover, the inaccurate estimation due to finite range may results in secret key rate underestimation, even misjudgment of security. To compensate these consequences, tuning the modulation variance is a possible way.

  8. A high capacity 3D steganography algorithm.

    PubMed

    Chao, Min-Wen; Lin, Chao-hung; Yu, Cheng-Wei; Lee, Tong-Yee

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we present a very high-capacity and low-distortion 3D steganography scheme. Our steganography approach is based on a novel multilayered embedding scheme to hide secret messages in the vertices of 3D polygon models. Experimental results show that the cover model distortion is very small as the number of hiding layers ranges from 7 to 13 layers. To the best of our knowledge, this novel approach can provide much higher hiding capacity than other state-of-the-art approaches, while obeying the low distortion and security basic requirements for steganography on 3D models. PMID:19147891

  9. Explicit 3-D Hydrodynamic FEM Program

    2000-11-07

    DYNA3D is a nonlinear explicit finite element code for analyzing 3-D structures and solid continuum. The code is vectorized and available on several computer platforms. The element library includes continuum, shell, beam, truss and spring/damper elements to allow maximum flexibility in modeling physical problems. Many materials are available to represent a wide range of material behavior, including elasticity, plasticity, composites, thermal effects and rate dependence. In addition, DYNA3D has a sophisticated contact interface capability, includingmore » frictional sliding, single surface contact and automatic contact generation.« less

  10. Explicit 3-D Hydrodynamic FEM Program

    SciTech Connect

    2000-11-07

    DYNA3D is a nonlinear explicit finite element code for analyzing 3-D structures and solid continuum. The code is vectorized and available on several computer platforms. The element library includes continuum, shell, beam, truss and spring/damper elements to allow maximum flexibility in modeling physical problems. Many materials are available to represent a wide range of material behavior, including elasticity, plasticity, composites, thermal effects and rate dependence. In addition, DYNA3D has a sophisticated contact interface capability, including frictional sliding, single surface contact and automatic contact generation.

  11. Positional Awareness Map 3D (PAM3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, Monica; Allen, Earl L.; Yount, John W.; Norcross, April Louise

    2012-01-01

    The Western Aeronautical Test Range of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration s Dryden Flight Research Center needed to address the aging software and hardware of its current situational awareness display application, the Global Real-Time Interactive Map (GRIM). GRIM was initially developed in the late 1980s and executes on older PC architectures using a Linux operating system that is no longer supported. Additionally, the software is difficult to maintain due to its complexity and loss of developer knowledge. It was decided that a replacement application must be developed or acquired in the near future. The replacement must provide the functionality of the original system, the ability to monitor test flight vehicles in real-time, and add improvements such as high resolution imagery and true 3-dimensional capability. This paper will discuss the process of determining the best approach to replace GRIM, and the functionality and capabilities of the first release of the Positional Awareness Map 3D.

  12. Spectroradiometric characterization of autostereoscopic 3D displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubiño, Manuel; Salas, Carlos; Pozo, Antonio M.; Castro, J. J.; Pérez-Ocón, Francisco

    2013-11-01

    Spectroradiometric measurements have been made for the experimental characterization of the RGB channels of autostereoscopic 3D displays, giving results for different measurement angles with respect to the normal direction of the plane of the display. In the study, 2 different models of autostereoscopic 3D displays of different sizes and resolutions were used, making measurements with a spectroradiometer (model PR-670 SpectraScan of PhotoResearch). From the measurements made, goniometric results were recorded for luminance contrast, and the fundamental hypotheses have been evaluated for the characterization of the displays: independence of the RGB channels and their constancy. The results show that the display with the lower angle variability in the contrast-ratio value and constancy of the chromaticity coordinates nevertheless presented the greatest additivity deviations with the measurement angle. For both displays, when the parameters evaluated were taken into account, lower angle variability consistently resulted in the 2D mode than in the 3D mode.

  13. Simulation analyses of space use: Home range estimates, variability, and sample size

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bekoff, M.; Mech, L.D.

    1984-01-01

    Simulations of space use by animals were run to determine the relationship among home range area estimates, variability, and sample size {number of locations}. As sample size increased, home range size increased asymptotically, whereas variability decreased among mean home range area estimates generated by multiple simulations for the same sample size. Our results suggest that field workers should ascertain between 100 and 200 locations in order to estimate reliably home range area. In some cases, this suggested guideline is higher than values found in the few published studies in which the relationship between home range area and number of locations is addressed. Sampling differences for small species occupying relatively small home ranges indicate that fewer locations may be sufficient to allow for a reliable estimate of home range. Intraspecffic variability in social status (group member, loner, resident, transient), age, sex, reproductive condition, and food resources also have to be considered, as do season, habitat, and differences in sampling and analytical methods. Comparative data still are needed.

  14. Continuous Bulk FeCuC Aerogel with Ultradispersed Metal Nanoparticles: An Efficient 3D Heterogeneous Electro-Fenton Cathode over a Wide Range of pH 3-9.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hongying; Qian, Lin; Guan, Xiaohong; Wu, Deli; Zhao, Guohua

    2016-05-17

    Novel iron-copper-carbon (FeCuC) aerogel was fabricated through a one-step process from metal-resin precursors and then activated with CO2 and N2 in environmentally friendly way. The activated FeCuC aerogel was applied in a heterogeneous electro-Fenton (EF) process and exhibited higher mineralization efficiency than homogeneous EF technology. High total organic carbon (TOC) removal of organic pollutants with activated FeCuC aerogel was achieved at a wide range of pH values (3-9). The chemical oxygen demand (COD) of real dyeing wastewater was below China's discharge standard after 30 min of treatment, and the specific energy consumption was low (9.2 kW·h·kg(-1)COD(-1)), corresponding to a power consumption of only ∼0.34 kW·h per ton of wastewater. The enhanced mineralization efficiency of FeCuC aerogel was mostly attributable to ultradispersed metallic Fe-Cu nanoparticles embedded in 3D carbon matrix and the CO2-N2 treatment. The CO2 activation enhanced the accessibility of the aerogel's pores, and the secondary N2 activation enlarged the porosity and regenerated the ultradispersed zerovalent iron (Fe(0)) with reductive carbon. Cu(0) acted as a reduction promoter for interfacial electron transfer. Moreover, activated FeCuC aerogel presented low iron leaching (<0.1 ppm) in acidic solution and can be molded into different sizes with high flexibility. Thus, this material could be used as a low-cost cathode and efficient heterogeneous EF technology for actual wastewater treatment. PMID:27082750

  15. R3D-2-MSA: the RNA 3D structure-to-multiple sequence alignment server.

    PubMed

    Cannone, Jamie J; Sweeney, Blake A; Petrov, Anton I; Gutell, Robin R; Zirbel, Craig L; Leontis, Neocles

    2015-07-01

    The RNA 3D Structure-to-Multiple Sequence Alignment Server (R3D-2-MSA) is a new web service that seamlessly links RNA three-dimensional (3D) structures to high-quality RNA multiple sequence alignments (MSAs) from diverse biological sources. In this first release, R3D-2-MSA provides manual and programmatic access to curated, representative ribosomal RNA sequence alignments from bacterial, archaeal, eukaryal and organellar ribosomes, using nucleotide numbers from representative atomic-resolution 3D structures. A web-based front end is available for manual entry and an Application Program Interface for programmatic access. Users can specify up to five ranges of nucleotides and 50 nucleotide positions per range. The R3D-2-MSA server maps these ranges to the appropriate columns of the corresponding MSA and returns the contents of the columns, either for display in a web browser or in JSON format for subsequent programmatic use. The browser output page provides a 3D interactive display of the query, a full list of sequence variants with taxonomic information and a statistical summary of distinct sequence variants found. The output can be filtered and sorted in the browser. Previous user queries can be viewed at any time by resubmitting the output URL, which encodes the search and re-generates the results. The service is freely available with no login requirement at http://rna.bgsu.edu/r3d-2-msa. PMID:26048960

  16. R3D-2-MSA: the RNA 3D structure-to-multiple sequence alignment server

    PubMed Central

    Cannone, Jamie J.; Sweeney, Blake A.; Petrov, Anton I.; Gutell, Robin R.; Zirbel, Craig L.; Leontis, Neocles

    2015-01-01

    The RNA 3D Structure-to-Multiple Sequence Alignment Server (R3D-2-MSA) is a new web service that seamlessly links RNA three-dimensional (3D) structures to high-quality RNA multiple sequence alignments (MSAs) from diverse biological sources. In this first release, R3D-2-MSA provides manual and programmatic access to curated, representative ribosomal RNA sequence alignments from bacterial, archaeal, eukaryal and organellar ribosomes, using nucleotide numbers from representative atomic-resolution 3D structures. A web-based front end is available for manual entry and an Application Program Interface for programmatic access. Users can specify up to five ranges of nucleotides and 50 nucleotide positions per range. The R3D-2-MSA server maps these ranges to the appropriate columns of the corresponding MSA and returns the contents of the columns, either for display in a web browser or in JSON format for subsequent programmatic use. The browser output page provides a 3D interactive display of the query, a full list of sequence variants with taxonomic information and a statistical summary of distinct sequence variants found. The output can be filtered and sorted in the browser. Previous user queries can be viewed at any time by resubmitting the output URL, which encodes the search and re-generates the results. The service is freely available with no login requirement at http://rna.bgsu.edu/r3d-2-msa. PMID:26048960

  17. Inter-annual variability influences the eco-evolutionary dynamics of range-shifting

    PubMed Central

    Bocedi, Greta; Dytham, Calvin; Travis, Justin M.J.

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the eco-evolutionary dynamics of species under rapid climate change is vital for both accurate forecasting of biodiversity responses and for developing effective management strategies. Using an individual-based model we demonstrate that the presence and form (colour) of inter-annual variability in environmental conditions can impact the evolution of dispersal during range shifts. Under stable climate, temporal variability typically results in higher dispersal. However, at expanding margins, inter-annual variability actually inhibits the evolution of higher emigration propensities by disrupting the spatial sorting and natural selection processes. These results emphasize the need for future theoretical studies, as well as predictive modelling, to account for the potential impacts of inter-annual variability. PMID:24498572

  18. A study of engine variable geometry systems for an advanced high subsonic long range commercial aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Compagnon, M. A.

    1973-01-01

    Several variable geometry high Mach inlet concepts, aimed at meeting a system noise objective of 15 EPNdB below FAR part 36, for a long range, Mach 0.9 advanced commercial transport are assessed and compared to a fixed geometry inlet with multiple splitters. The effects of a variable exhaust nozzle (mixed exhaust engine) on noise, inlet geometry requirements, and economics are also presented. The best variable geometry inlet configuration identified is a variable cowl design which relies on a high throat Mach number for additional inlet noise suppression only at takeoff, and depends entirely on inlet wall treatment for noise suppression at approach power. Relative economic penalties as a function of noise level are also presented.

  19. 3D Spectroscopy in Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mediavilla, Evencio; Arribas, Santiago; Roth, Martin; Cepa-Nogué, Jordi; Sánchez, Francisco

    2011-09-01

    Preface; Acknowledgements; 1. Introductory review and technical approaches Martin M. Roth; 2. Observational procedures and data reduction James E. H. Turner; 3. 3D Spectroscopy instrumentation M. A. Bershady; 4. Analysis of 3D data Pierre Ferruit; 5. Science motivation for IFS and galactic studies F. Eisenhauer; 6. Extragalactic studies and future IFS science Luis Colina; 7. Tutorials: how to handle 3D spectroscopy data Sebastian F. Sánchez, Begona García-Lorenzo and Arlette Pécontal-Rousset.

  20. Hexagonal liquid crystal lens array for 3D endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Hassanfiroozi, Amir; Huang, Yi-Pai; Javidi, Bahram; Shieh, Han-Ping D

    2015-01-26

    A liquid crystal lens array with a hexagonal arrangement is investigated experimentally. The uniqueness of this study exists in the fact that using convex-ring electrode provides a smooth and controllable applied potential profile across the aperture to manage the phase profile. We observed considerable differences between flat electrode and convex-ring electrode; in particular the lens focal length is variable in a wider range from 2.5cm to infinity. This study presents several noteworthy characteristics such as low driving voltage; 30 μm cell gap and the lens is electrically switchable between 2D/3D modes. We demonstrate a hexagonal LC-lens array for capturing 3D images by using single sensor using integral imaging. PMID:25835856

  1. Compact 3D flash lidar video cameras and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stettner, Roger

    2010-04-01

    The theory and operation of Advanced Scientific Concepts, Inc.'s (ASC) latest compact 3D Flash LIDAR Video Cameras (3D FLVCs) and a growing number of technical problems and solutions are discussed. The solutions range from space shuttle docking, planetary entry, decent and landing, surveillance, autonomous and manned ground vehicle navigation and 3D imaging through particle obscurants.

  2. Variability of the isotopic lapse rate across the mountain ranges in Wyoming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brian, H.; Fan, M.

    2012-12-01

    Stable isotope based paleoaltimetry studies require knowledge of the isotope-elevation gradient during the time of interest, but this information is rarely available. As a result, many studies often apply the modern local lapse rate or a global average lapse rate and assume these values are valid for the area of interest and that they hold through time. However, natural variability in local-scale climate and mountain geometry and morphology can influence the isotope-elevation (and temperature-elevation) gradient. We evaluate the inter- and intra-mountain range variability of modern climate and isotope values of stream water for three Laramide ranges in Wyoming (Wind River Range, Bighorn and Laramie Mountains), as well as for a regional elevation transect across the central Rocky mountain front. Samples of steam water were taken from major catchments across Wyoming in 2007, 2011, and 2012. We find that the modern lapse rate for these ranges is -1.7‰/km, -2.2‰/km and -1.8‰/km respectively. Although these values are very similar to one another and to the global isotopic lapse rate (-2.1‰/km), large variation (up to 6‰/km) exists among individual small river catchments of the Bighorn Mountains. The variability in catchment-scale lapse rate does not appear to be systematically related to annual, or seasonal surface air temperature, precipitation amount, or catchment area. However, the range-scale lapse rates may yet reflect the regional climate, which is generally coolest and driest in the Wind River Range (lowest lapse rate) and warmest and wettest in the Bighorn Mountains (highest lapse rate). Similar d-excess values exist across individual mountain ranges, but inter-mountain range differences indicate that the Laramie Mountains (and regions of western Nebraska) receive evaporatively enriched rainwater compared to those in the Wind River Range and Bighorn Mountains. These differences do not necessarily require separate vapor sources as the lower d

  3. User experience while viewing stereoscopic 3D television

    PubMed Central

    Read, Jenny C.A.; Bohr, Iwo

    2014-01-01

    3D display technologies have been linked to visual discomfort and fatigue. In a lab-based study with a between-subjects design, 433 viewers aged from 4 to 82 years watched the same movie in either 2D or stereo 3D (S3D), and subjectively reported on a range of aspects of their viewing experience. Our results suggest that a minority of viewers, around 14%, experience adverse effects due to viewing S3D, mainly headache and eyestrain. A control experiment where participants viewed 2D content through 3D glasses suggests that around 8% may report adverse effects which are not due directly to viewing S3D, but instead are due to the glasses or to negative preconceptions about S3D (the ‘nocebo effect'). Women were slightly more likely than men to report adverse effects with S3D. We could not detect any link between pre-existing eye conditions or low stereoacuity and the likelihood of experiencing adverse effects with S3D. Practitioner Summary: Stereoscopic 3D (S3D) has been linked to visual discomfort and fatigue. Viewers watched the same movie in either 2D or stereo 3D (between-subjects design). Around 14% reported effects such as headache and eyestrain linked to S3D itself, while 8% report adverse effects attributable to 3D glasses or negative expectations. PMID:24874550

  4. Methods for comparing 3D surface attributes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Alex; Freeman, Adam

    1996-03-01

    A common task in data analysis is to compare two or more sets of data, statistics, presentations, etc. A predominant method in use is side-by-side visual comparison of images. While straightforward, it burdens the user with the task of discerning the differences between the two images. The user if further taxed when the images are of 3D scenes. This paper presents several methods for analyzing the extent, magnitude, and manner in which surfaces in 3D differ in their attributes. The surface geometry are assumed to be identical and only the surface attributes (color, texture, etc.) are variable. As a case in point, we examine the differences obtained when a 3D scene is rendered progressively using radiosity with different form factor calculation methods. The comparison methods include extensions of simple methods such as mapping difference information to color or transparency, and more recent methods including the use of surface texture, perturbation, and adaptive placements of error glyphs.

  5. Deep-Seated Landslides Influence Topographic Variability and Salmon Habitat in the Oregon Coast Range, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beeson, H. W.; Fonstad, M. A.; Roering, J. J.

    2014-12-01

    A well-accepted idea in geomorphology is that landforms control the type and distribution of biological habitat. However, the linkages between geomorphology and ecology remain poorly understood. In rivers, the geomorphic template controls the hydraulic environment, partly shaping the river ecosystem. But what processes shape the geomorphic template? Here, I examine how two hillslope processes dominant in the Oregon Coast Range, debris flows and deep-seated landslides, affect valley floor width and channel slope, key components of the geomorphic template in riverine ecosystems. I then investigate how patterns in potential salmon habitat differ between eleven streams dominated by deep-seated landslides and eleven streams dominated by debris flows. I show that terrain influenced by deep-seated landslides exhibits (1) valley widths that are more variable throughout the network but less locally variable, (2) more variable channel slopes, and (3) more potential salmon habitat as well as significantly more connectivity between habitat types.

  6. Modular 3-D Transport model

    EPA Science Inventory

    MT3D was first developed by Chunmiao Zheng in 1990 at S.S. Papadopulos & Associates, Inc. with partial support from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA). Starting in 1990, MT3D was released as a pubic domain code from the USEPA. Commercial versions with enhanced capab...

  7. Market study: 3-D eyetracker

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    A market study of a proposed version of a 3-D eyetracker for initial use at NASA's Ames Research Center was made. The commercialization potential of a simplified, less expensive 3-D eyetracker was ascertained. Primary focus on present and potential users of eyetrackers, as well as present and potential manufacturers has provided an effective means of analyzing the prospects for commercialization.

  8. LLNL-Earth3D

    2013-10-01

    Earth3D is a computer code designed to allow fast calculation of seismic rays and travel times through a 3D model of the Earth. LLNL is using this for earthquake location and global tomography efforts and such codes are of great interest to the Earth Science community.

  9. [3-D ultrasound in gastroenterology].

    PubMed

    Zoller, W G; Liess, H

    1994-06-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) sonography represents a development of noninvasive diagnostic imaging by real-time two-dimensional (2D) sonography. The use of transparent rotating scans, comparable to a block of glass, generates a 3D effect. The objective of the present study was to optimate 3D presentation of abdominal findings. Additional investigations were made with a new volumetric program to determine the volume of selected findings of the liver. The results were compared with the estimated volumes of 2D sonography and 2D computer tomography (CT). For the processing of 3D images, typical parameter constellations were found for the different findings, which facilitated processing of 3D images. In more than 75% of the cases examined we found an optimal 3D presentation of sonographic findings with respect to the evaluation criteria developed by us for the 3D imaging of processed data. Great differences were found for the estimated volumes of the findings of the liver concerning the three different techniques applied. 3D ultrasound represents a valuable method to judge morphological appearance in abdominal findings. The possibility of volumetric measurements enlarges its potential diagnostic significance. Further clinical investigations are necessary to find out if definite differentiation between benign and malign findings is possible. PMID:7919882

  10. 3D World Building System

    SciTech Connect

    2013-10-30

    This video provides an overview of the Sandia National Laboratories developed 3-D World Model Building capability that provides users with an immersive, texture rich 3-D model of their environment in minutes using a laptop and color and depth camera.

  11. 3D World Building System

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2014-02-26

    This video provides an overview of the Sandia National Laboratories developed 3-D World Model Building capability that provides users with an immersive, texture rich 3-D model of their environment in minutes using a laptop and color and depth camera.

  12. Establishment of normal reference ranges for glycemic variability in Chinese subjects using continuous glucose monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jian; Li, Hong; Ran, Xingwu; Yang, Wenying; Li, Qiang; Peng, Yongde; Li, Yanbing; Gao, Xin; Luan, Xiaojun; Wang, Weiqing; Jia, Weiping

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background Glycemic variability is increasingly recognized as an important issue in diabetes management. However, the lack of normative values may limit its applicability in the clinical setting. The objective of this study was to establish preliminary normal reference ranges for glycemic variability by analyzing continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) data obtained from healthy Chinese adults. Material/Methods Three-day CGM data were obtained from 434 healthy adults at 10 academic hospitals throughout China. Glycemic variability was calculated as the 24-hour mean amplitude of glycemic excursions (MAGE) and standard deviations (SD) of blood glucose readings. Results 434 healthy subjects (male 213, female 221; age 43±14, 20–69 years old; BMI 21.8±1.7 kg/m2, 18.5–24.9 kg/m2) completed the study. MAGE and SD values for the 434 healthy subjects were 1.73 (1.08) mmol/L and 0.75 (0.42) mmol/L [median (interquartile range)], respectively. In both men and women, MAGE and SD tended to increase with age. Neither MAGE nor SD showed a significant difference between men and women. Values for both parameters were non-normally distributed within the population. The 95th percentiles of MAGE and SD were 3.86 and 1.40 mmol/L, respectively. These values were adopted as the upper limits of normal. Conclusions MAGE <3.9 mmol/L and SD <1.4 mmol/L are recommended as the normal reference ranges for glycemic variability in Chinese adults. The values established in this study may facilitate the adoption of glycemic variability as a metric of overall glycemic control in diabetes. PMID:21169911

  13. Metrological characterization of 3D imaging devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guidi, G.

    2013-04-01

    Manufacturers often express the performance of a 3D imaging device in various non-uniform ways for the lack of internationally recognized standard requirements for metrological parameters able to identify the capability of capturing a real scene. For this reason several national and international organizations in the last ten years have been developing protocols for verifying such performance. Ranging from VDI/VDE 2634, published by the Association of German Engineers and oriented to the world of mechanical 3D measurements (triangulation-based devices), to the ASTM technical committee E57, working also on laser systems based on direct range detection (TOF, Phase Shift, FM-CW, flash LADAR), this paper shows the state of the art about the characterization of active range devices, with special emphasis on measurement uncertainty, accuracy and resolution. Most of these protocols are based on special objects whose shape and size are certified with a known level of accuracy. By capturing the 3D shape of such objects with a range device, a comparison between the measured points and the theoretical shape they should represent is possible. The actual deviations can be directly analyzed or some derived parameters can be obtained (e.g. angles between planes, distances between barycenters of spheres rigidly connected, frequency domain parameters, etc.). This paper shows theoretical aspects and experimental results of some novel characterization methods applied to different categories of active 3D imaging devices based on both principles of triangulation and direct range detection.

  14. Negative magnetoresistance in the variable-range-hopping regime in n-type CdSe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Youzhu; Sarachik, M. P.

    1991-03-01

    The magnetoresistance in the variable-range-hopping regime of compensated, n-type CdSe measured between 1.6 and 6 K in the Ohmic regime at small magnetic fields is negative and obeys the expression ΔR/R=f(T)B2, with f(T)~T-α and α=1.32+/-0.04. As in recent experiments by Tremblay et al. on GaAs, this temperature dependence is observed for all samples independently of whether the resistivity at zero field indicates Mott hopping or variable-range hopping in the presence of a Coulomb gap. This implies either that the relevant dephasing time is not the hopping time, or that our current understanding of the negative magnetoresistance in these materials is incomplete.

  15. PLOT3D user's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walatka, Pamela P.; Buning, Pieter G.; Pierce, Larry; Elson, Patricia A.

    1990-01-01

    PLOT3D is a computer graphics program designed to visualize the grids and solutions of computational fluid dynamics. Seventy-four functions are available. Versions are available for many systems. PLOT3D can handle multiple grids with a million or more grid points, and can produce varieties of model renderings, such as wireframe or flat shaded. Output from PLOT3D can be used in animation programs. The first part of this manual is a tutorial that takes the reader, keystroke by keystroke, through a PLOT3D session. The second part of the manual contains reference chapters, including the helpfile, data file formats, advice on changing PLOT3D, and sample command files.

  16. 3D printing in dentistry.

    PubMed

    Dawood, A; Marti Marti, B; Sauret-Jackson, V; Darwood, A

    2015-12-01

    3D printing has been hailed as a disruptive technology which will change manufacturing. Used in aerospace, defence, art and design, 3D printing is becoming a subject of great interest in surgery. The technology has a particular resonance with dentistry, and with advances in 3D imaging and modelling technologies such as cone beam computed tomography and intraoral scanning, and with the relatively long history of the use of CAD CAM technologies in dentistry, it will become of increasing importance. Uses of 3D printing include the production of drill guides for dental implants, the production of physical models for prosthodontics, orthodontics and surgery, the manufacture of dental, craniomaxillofacial and orthopaedic implants, and the fabrication of copings and frameworks for implant and dental restorations. This paper reviews the types of 3D printing technologies available and their various applications in dentistry and in maxillofacial surgery. PMID:26657435

  17. Scoops3D: software to analyze 3D slope stability throughout a digital landscape

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reid, Mark E.; Christian, Sarah B.; Brien, Dianne L.; Henderson, Scott T.

    2015-01-01

    The computer program, Scoops3D, evaluates slope stability throughout a digital landscape represented by a digital elevation model (DEM). The program uses a three-dimensional (3D) method of columns approach to assess the stability of many (typically millions) potential landslides within a user-defined size range. For each potential landslide (or failure), Scoops3D assesses the stability of a rotational, spherical slip surface encompassing many DEM cells using a 3D version of either Bishop’s simplified method or the Ordinary (Fellenius) method of limit-equilibrium analysis. Scoops3D has several options for the user to systematically and efficiently search throughout an entire DEM, thereby incorporating the effects of complex surface topography. In a thorough search, each DEM cell is included in multiple potential failures, and Scoops3D records the lowest stability (factor of safety) for each DEM cell, as well as the size (volume or area) associated with each of these potential landslides. It also determines the least-stable potential failure for the entire DEM. The user has a variety of options for building a 3D domain, including layers or full 3D distributions of strength and pore-water pressures, simplistic earthquake loading, and unsaturated suction conditions. Results from Scoops3D can be readily incorporated into a geographic information system (GIS) or other visualization software. This manual includes information on the theoretical basis for the slope-stability analysis, requirements for constructing and searching a 3D domain, a detailed operational guide (including step-by-step instructions for using the graphical user interface [GUI] software, Scoops3D-i) and input/output file specifications, practical considerations for conducting an analysis, results of verification tests, and multiple examples illustrating the capabilities of Scoops3D. Easy-to-use software installation packages are available for the Windows or Macintosh operating systems; these packages

  18. Missing data outside the detector range: Continuous-variable entanglement verification and quantum cryptography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, Megan R.; van Enk, S. J.

    2013-10-01

    In continuous-variable quantum information processing, detectors are necessarily coarse grained and of finite range. We discuss how, especially, the latter feature is a bug and may easily lead to overoptimistic estimates of entanglement and of security when missed data outside the detector range are ignored. We demonstrate that a straightforward worst-case analysis is sufficient to avoid false positive statements about entanglement. We show that, for our worst-case analysis, entropic separability or security criteria are much superior to variance-based criteria.

  19. A comparative analysis of recruitment variability in North Atlantic flatfishes — testing the species range hypothesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leggett, William C.; Frank, Kenneth T.

    1997-11-01

    The hypothesis that recruitment variation in flatfishes should be most variable at the northern edge of the species range, least near the centre of the range, and intermediate near the southern limit was tested using stock and recruitment data generated from sequential population analysis for several different flatfish stocks involving four species (plaice Pleuronectes platessa, sole Solea vulgaris from the eastern Atlantic, American plaice Hippoglossoides platessoides, and yellowtail flounder Limanda ferruginae from the western Atlantic). Several groundfish species have been found to conform to this so-called species range hypothesis with the suggestion that density-independent processes predominate at the edges of the distributional range and density-dependent processes dominate in the centre of the range. Our results were generally inconsistent with the hypothesis: the coefficient of variation (CV) of recruitment for plaice in the eastern Atlantic was independent of latitude, the CV of recruitment for sole exhibited a dome-shaped relationship with latitude with the highest CVs occurring at the mid-point of the range, and the CV of recruitment for the western Atlantic stocks exhibited a monotonic decrease with latitude. We extended our latitudinal analyses by assessing both the degree of dependency of recruitment on spawning stock biomass and the spatial and temporal scales of variability in recruitment and pre-recruit survival for the eastern Atlantic stocks. In general our analysis revealed no evidence of a strong stock and recruitment relationship for any of the stocks examined, and previously published analyses revealed no such patterns with latitude. Analysis of both de-trended recruitment and pre-recruit survival time series over the species ranges of sole and plaice revealed strong positive correlations among adjacent stocks and inverse correlations among stocks at the extremes of the range. Recruitment variation in the flatfish stocks examined appears to

  20. PLOT3D/AMES, APOLLO UNIX VERSION USING GMR3D (WITH TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P.

    1994-01-01

    PLOT3D is an interactive graphics program designed to help scientists visualize computational fluid dynamics (CFD) grids and solutions. Today, supercomputers and CFD algorithms can provide scientists with simulations of such highly complex phenomena that obtaining an understanding of the simulations has become a major problem. Tools which help the scientist visualize the simulations can be of tremendous aid. PLOT3D/AMES offers more functions and features, and has been adapted for more types of computers than any other CFD graphics program. Version 3.6b+ is supported for five computers and graphic libraries. Using PLOT3D, CFD physicists can view their computational models from any angle, observing the physics of problems and the quality of solutions. As an aid in designing aircraft, for example, PLOT3D's interactive computer graphics can show vortices, temperature, reverse flow, pressure, and dozens of other characteristics of air flow during flight. As critical areas become obvious, they can easily be studied more closely using a finer grid. PLOT3D is part of a computational fluid dynamics software cycle. First, a program such as 3DGRAPE (ARC-12620) helps the scientist generate computational grids to model an object and its surrounding space. Once the grids have been designed and parameters such as the angle of attack, Mach number, and Reynolds number have been specified, a "flow-solver" program such as INS3D (ARC-11794 or COS-10019) solves the system of equations governing fluid flow, usually on a supercomputer. Grids sometimes have as many as two million points, and the "flow-solver" produces a solution file which contains density, x- y- and z-momentum, and stagnation energy for each grid point. With such a solution file and a grid file containing up to 50 grids as input, PLOT3D can calculate and graphically display any one of 74 functions, including shock waves, surface pressure, velocity vectors, and particle traces. PLOT3D's 74 functions are organized into

  1. PLOT3D/AMES, APOLLO UNIX VERSION USING GMR3D (WITHOUT TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P.

    1994-01-01

    PLOT3D is an interactive graphics program designed to help scientists visualize computational fluid dynamics (CFD) grids and solutions. Today, supercomputers and CFD algorithms can provide scientists with simulations of such highly complex phenomena that obtaining an understanding of the simulations has become a major problem. Tools which help the scientist visualize the simulations can be of tremendous aid. PLOT3D/AMES offers more functions and features, and has been adapted for more types of computers than any other CFD graphics program. Version 3.6b+ is supported for five computers and graphic libraries. Using PLOT3D, CFD physicists can view their computational models from any angle, observing the physics of problems and the quality of solutions. As an aid in designing aircraft, for example, PLOT3D's interactive computer graphics can show vortices, temperature, reverse flow, pressure, and dozens of other characteristics of air flow during flight. As critical areas become obvious, they can easily be studied more closely using a finer grid. PLOT3D is part of a computational fluid dynamics software cycle. First, a program such as 3DGRAPE (ARC-12620) helps the scientist generate computational grids to model an object and its surrounding space. Once the grids have been designed and parameters such as the angle of attack, Mach number, and Reynolds number have been specified, a "flow-solver" program such as INS3D (ARC-11794 or COS-10019) solves the system of equations governing fluid flow, usually on a supercomputer. Grids sometimes have as many as two million points, and the "flow-solver" produces a solution file which contains density, x- y- and z-momentum, and stagnation energy for each grid point. With such a solution file and a grid file containing up to 50 grids as input, PLOT3D can calculate and graphically display any one of 74 functions, including shock waves, surface pressure, velocity vectors, and particle traces. PLOT3D's 74 functions are organized into

  2. Debris Dispersion Model Using Java 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thirumalainambi, Rajkumar; Bardina, Jorge

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes web based simulation of Shuttle launch operations and debris dispersion. Java 3D graphics provides geometric and visual content with suitable mathematical model and behaviors of Shuttle launch. Because the model is so heterogeneous and interrelated with various factors, 3D graphics combined with physical models provides mechanisms to understand the complexity of launch and range operations. The main focus in the modeling and simulation covers orbital dynamics and range safety. Range safety areas include destruct limit lines, telemetry and tracking and population risk near range. If there is an explosion of Shuttle during launch, debris dispersion is explained. The shuttle launch and range operations in this paper are discussed based on the operations from Kennedy Space Center, Florida, USA.

  3. 3D modeling of optically challenging objects.

    PubMed

    Park, Johnny; Kak, Avinash

    2008-01-01

    We present a system for constructing 3D models of real-world objects with optically challenging surfaces. The system utilizes a new range imaging concept called multi-peak range imaging, which stores multiple candidates of range measurements for each point on the object surface. The multiple measurements include the erroneous range data caused by various surface properties that are not ideal for structured-light range sensing. False measurements generated by spurious reflections are eliminated by applying a series of constraint tests. The constraint tests based on local surface and local sensor visibility are applied first to individual range images. The constraint tests based on global consistency of coordinates and visibility are then applied to all range images acquired from different viewpoints. We show the effectiveness of our method by constructing 3D models of five different optically challenging objects. To evaluate the performance of the constraint tests and to examine the effects of the parameters used in the constraint tests, we acquired the ground truth data by painting those objects to suppress the surface-related properties that cause difficulties in range sensing. Experimental results indicate that our method significantly improves upon the traditional methods for constructing reliable 3D models of optically challenging objects. PMID:18192707

  4. Bioprinting of 3D hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Stanton, M M; Samitier, J; Sánchez, S

    2015-08-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) bioprinting has recently emerged as an extension of 3D material printing, by using biocompatible or cellular components to build structures in an additive, layer-by-layer methodology for encapsulation and culture of cells. These 3D systems allow for cell culture in a suspension for formation of highly organized tissue or controlled spatial orientation of cell environments. The in vitro 3D cellular environments simulate the complexity of an in vivo environment and natural extracellular matrices (ECM). This paper will focus on bioprinting utilizing hydrogels as 3D scaffolds. Hydrogels are advantageous for cell culture as they are highly permeable to cell culture media, nutrients, and waste products generated during metabolic cell processes. They have the ability to be fabricated in customized shapes with various material properties with dimensions at the micron scale. 3D hydrogels are a reliable method for biocompatible 3D printing and have applications in tissue engineering, drug screening, and organ on a chip models. PMID:26066320

  5. Unassisted 3D camera calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atanassov, Kalin; Ramachandra, Vikas; Nash, James; Goma, Sergio R.

    2012-03-01

    With the rapid growth of 3D technology, 3D image capture has become a critical part of the 3D feature set on mobile phones. 3D image quality is affected by the scene geometry as well as on-the-device processing. An automatic 3D system usually assumes known camera poses accomplished by factory calibration using a special chart. In real life settings, pose parameters estimated by factory calibration can be negatively impacted by movements of the lens barrel due to shaking, focusing, or camera drop. If any of these factors displaces the optical axes of either or both cameras, vertical disparity might exceed the maximum tolerable margin and the 3D user may experience eye strain or headaches. To make 3D capture more practical, one needs to consider unassisted (on arbitrary scenes) calibration. In this paper, we propose an algorithm that relies on detection and matching of keypoints between left and right images. Frames containing erroneous matches, along with frames with insufficiently rich keypoint constellations, are detected and discarded. Roll, pitch yaw , and scale differences between left and right frames are then estimated. The algorithm performance is evaluated in terms of the remaining vertical disparity as compared to the maximum tolerable vertical disparity.

  6. 3D ultrafast laser scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahjoubfar, A.; Goda, K.; Wang, C.; Fard, A.; Adam, J.; Gossett, D. R.; Ayazi, A.; Sollier, E.; Malik, O.; Chen, E.; Liu, Y.; Brown, R.; Sarkhosh, N.; Di Carlo, D.; Jalali, B.

    2013-03-01

    Laser scanners are essential for scientific research, manufacturing, defense, and medical practice. Unfortunately, often times the speed of conventional laser scanners (e.g., galvanometric mirrors and acousto-optic deflectors) falls short for many applications, resulting in motion blur and failure to capture fast transient information. Here, we present a novel type of laser scanner that offers roughly three orders of magnitude higher scan rates than conventional methods. Our laser scanner, which we refer to as the hybrid dispersion laser scanner, performs inertia-free laser scanning by dispersing a train of broadband pulses both temporally and spatially. More specifically, each broadband pulse is temporally processed by time stretch dispersive Fourier transform and further dispersed into space by one or more diffractive elements such as prisms and gratings. As a proof-of-principle demonstration, we perform 1D line scans at a record high scan rate of 91 MHz and 2D raster scans and 3D volumetric scans at an unprecedented scan rate of 105 kHz. The method holds promise for a broad range of scientific, industrial, and biomedical applications. To show the utility of our method, we demonstrate imaging, nanometer-resolved surface vibrometry, and high-precision flow cytometry with real-time throughput that conventional laser scanners cannot offer due to their low scan rates.

  7. Arena3D: visualization of biological networks in 3D

    PubMed Central

    Pavlopoulos, Georgios A; O'Donoghue, Seán I; Satagopam, Venkata P; Soldatos, Theodoros G; Pafilis, Evangelos; Schneider, Reinhard

    2008-01-01

    Background Complexity is a key problem when visualizing biological networks; as the number of entities increases, most graphical views become incomprehensible. Our goal is to enable many thousands of entities to be visualized meaningfully and with high performance. Results We present a new visualization tool, Arena3D, which introduces a new concept of staggered layers in 3D space. Related data – such as proteins, chemicals, or pathways – can be grouped onto separate layers and arranged via layout algorithms, such as Fruchterman-Reingold, distance geometry, and a novel hierarchical layout. Data on a layer can be clustered via k-means, affinity propagation, Markov clustering, neighbor joining, tree clustering, or UPGMA ('unweighted pair-group method with arithmetic mean'). A simple input format defines the name and URL for each node, and defines connections or similarity scores between pairs of nodes. The use of Arena3D is illustrated with datasets related to Huntington's disease. Conclusion Arena3D is a user friendly visualization tool that is able to visualize biological or any other network in 3D space. It is free for academic use and runs on any platform. It can be downloaded or lunched directly from . Java3D library and Java 1.5 need to be pre-installed for the software to run. PMID:19040715

  8. MOM3D/EM-ANIMATE - MOM3D WITH ANIMATION CODE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaeffer, J. F.

    1994-01-01

    MOM3D (LAR-15074) is a FORTRAN method-of-moments electromagnetic analysis algorithm for open or closed 3-D perfectly conducting or resistive surfaces. Radar cross section with plane wave illumination is the prime analysis emphasis; however, provision is also included for local port excitation for computing antenna gain patterns and input impedances. The Electric Field Integral Equation form of Maxwell's equations is solved using local triangle couple basis and testing functions with a resultant system impedance matrix. The analysis emphasis is not only for routine RCS pattern predictions, but also for phenomenological diagnostics: bistatic imaging, currents, and near scattered/total electric fields. The images, currents, and near fields are output in form suitable for animation. MOM3D computes the full backscatter and bistatic radar cross section polarization scattering matrix (amplitude and phase), body currents and near scattered and total fields for plane wave illumination. MOM3D also incorporates a new bistatic k space imaging algorithm for computing down range and down/cross range diagnostic images using only one matrix inversion. MOM3D has been made memory and cpu time efficient by using symmetric matrices, symmetric geometry, and partitioned fixed and variable geometries suitable for design iteration studies. MOM3D may be run interactively or in batch mode on 486 IBM PCs and compatibles, UNIX workstations or larger computers. A 486 PC with 16 megabytes of memory has the potential to solve a 30 square wavelength (containing 3000 unknowns) symmetric configuration. Geometries are described using a triangular mesh input in the form of a list of spatial vertex points and a triangle join connection list. The EM-ANIMATE (LAR-15075) program is a specialized visualization program that displays and animates the near-field and surface-current solutions obtained from an electromagnetics program, in particular, that from MOM3D. The EM-ANIMATE program is windows based and

  9. Pregnancy-specific reference ranges for haematological variables in a Scottish population.

    PubMed

    Shields, R C; Caric, V; Hair, M; Jones, O; Wark, L; McColl, M D; Ramsay, J E

    2011-05-01

    Using laboratory reference ranges, B₁₂ deficiency is inappropriately diagnosed and treated in pregnancy. We aim to define reference ranges for ferritin, folate, haemoglobin and B₁₂ in a pregnant population with advancing gestation. A total of 190 women participated in a cross-sectional study, 113 in the 1st and 77 in the 3rd trimester. All variables studied except red cell folate, decreased significantly from the 1st to the 3rd trimester. A total of 34% (64/190) of women were found to have 'low' B₁₂ as defined by traditional ranges. In women with anaemia and apparent B₁₂ deficiency, co-existing ferritin deficiency was demonstrated. All women with 'low' B₁₂ levels were invited to attend postnatally for re-testing. A total of 28% (18/64) attended, in whom all B₁₂ levels spontaneously increased. The use of gestation specific reference ranges for haematological variables may reduce inappropriate diagnosis of B₁₂ deficiency. In most women with apparent low B₁₂ levels and anaemia, ferritin deficiency was demonstrated. Therefore iron should be the initial management therapy. PMID:21534746

  10. Fdf in US3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otis, Collin; Ferrero, Pietro; Candler, Graham; Givi, Peyman

    2013-11-01

    The scalar filtered mass density function (SFMDF) methodology is implemented into the computer code US3D. This is an unstructured Eulerian finite volume hydrodynamic solver and has proven very effective for simulation of compressible turbulent flows. The resulting SFMDF-US3D code is employed for large eddy simulation (LES) on unstructured meshes. Simulations are conducted of subsonic and supersonic flows under non-reacting and reacting conditions. The consistency and the accuracy of the simulated results are assessed along with appraisal of the overall performance of the methodology. The SFMDF-US3D is now capable of simulating high speed flows in complex configurations.

  11. Emotion rendering in music: range and characteristic values of seven musical variables.

    PubMed

    Bresin, Roberto; Friberg, Anders

    2011-10-01

    Many studies on the synthesis of emotional expression in music performance have focused on the effect of individual performance variables on perceived emotional quality by making a systematical variation of variables. However, most of the studies have used a predetermined small number of levels for each variable, and the selection of these levels has often been done arbitrarily. The main aim of this research work is to improve upon existing methodologies by taking a synthesis approach. In a production experiment, 20 performers were asked to manipulate values of 7 musical variables simultaneously (tempo, sound level, articulation, phrasing, register, timbre, and attack speed) for communicating 5 different emotional expressions (neutral, happy, scary, peaceful, sad) for each of 4 scores. The scores were compositions communicating four different emotions (happiness, sadness, fear, calmness). Emotional expressions and music scores were presented in combination and in random order for each performer for a total of 5 × 4 stimuli. The experiment allowed for a systematic investigation of the interaction between emotion of each score and intended expressed emotions by performers. A two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), repeated measures, with factors emotion and score was conducted on the participants' values separately for each of the seven musical factors. There are two main results. The first one is that musical variables were manipulated in the same direction as reported in previous research on emotional expressive music performance. The second one is the identification for each of the five emotions the mean values and ranges of the five musical variables tempo, sound level, articulation, register, and instrument. These values resulted to be independent from the particular score and its emotion. The results presented in this study therefore allow for both the design and control of emotionally expressive computerized musical stimuli that are more ecologically valid than

  12. Multi-scale variability and long-range memory in indoor Radon concentrations from Coimbra, Portugal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donner, Reik V.; Potirakis, Stelios; Barbosa, Susana

    2014-05-01

    The presence or absence of long-range correlations in the variations of indoor Radon concentrations has recently attracted considerable interest. As a radioactive gas naturally emitted from the ground in certain geological settings, understanding environmental factors controlling Radon concentrations and their dynamics is important for estimating its effect on human health and the efficiency of possible measures for reducing the corresponding exposition. In this work, we re-analyze two high-resolution records of indoor Radon concentrations from Coimbra, Portugal, each of which spans several months of continuous measurements. In order to evaluate the presence of long-range correlations and fractal scaling, we utilize a multiplicity of complementary methods, including power spectral analysis, ARFIMA modeling, classical and multi-fractal detrended fluctuation analysis, and two different estimators of the signals' fractal dimensions. Power spectra and fluctuation functions reveal some complex behavior with qualitatively different properties on different time-scales: white noise in the high-frequency part, indications of some long-range correlated process dominating time scales of several hours to days, and pronounced low-frequency variability associated with tidal and/or meteorological forcing. In order to further decompose these different scales of variability, we apply two different approaches. On the one hand, applying multi-resolution analysis based on the discrete wavelet transform allows separately studying contributions on different time scales and characterize their specific correlation and scaling properties. On the other hand, singular system analysis (SSA) provides a reconstruction of the essential modes of variability. Specifically, by considering only the first leading SSA modes, we achieve an efficient de-noising of our environmental signals, highlighting the low-frequency variations together with some distinct scaling on sub-daily time-scales resembling

  13. Numerical simulation of 3D breaking waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraunie, Philippe; Golay, Frederic

    2015-04-01

    Numerical methods dealing with two phase flows basically can be classified in two ways : the "interface tracking" methods when the two phases are resolved separately including boundary conditions fixed at the interface and the "interface capturing" methods when a single flow is considered with variable density. Physical and numerical properties of the two approaches are discussed, based on some numerical experiments performed concerning 3D breaking waves. Acknowledgements : This research was supported by the Modtercom program of Region PACA.

  14. Structured light field 3D imaging.

    PubMed

    Cai, Zewei; Liu, Xiaoli; Peng, Xiang; Yin, Yongkai; Li, Ameng; Wu, Jiachen; Gao, Bruce Z

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we propose a method by means of light field imaging under structured illumination to deal with high dynamic range 3D imaging. Fringe patterns are projected onto a scene and modulated by the scene depth then a structured light field is detected using light field recording devices. The structured light field contains information about ray direction and phase-encoded depth, via which the scene depth can be estimated from different directions. The multidirectional depth estimation can achieve high dynamic 3D imaging effectively. We analyzed and derived the phase-depth mapping in the structured light field and then proposed a flexible ray-based calibration approach to determine the independent mapping coefficients for each ray. Experimental results demonstrated the validity of the proposed method to perform high-quality 3D imaging for highly and lowly reflective surfaces. PMID:27607639

  15. Wavefront construction in 3-D

    SciTech Connect

    Chilcoat, S.R. Hildebrand, S.T.

    1995-12-31

    Travel time computation in inhomogeneous media is essential for pre-stack Kirchhoff imaging in areas such as the sub-salt province in the Gulf of Mexico. The 2D algorithm published by Vinje, et al, has been extended to 3D to compute wavefronts in complicated inhomogeneous media. The 3D wavefront construction algorithm provides many advantages over conventional ray tracing and other methods of computing travel times in 3D. The algorithm dynamically maintains a reasonably consistent ray density without making a priori guesses at the number of rays to shoot. The determination of caustics in 3D is a straight forward geometric procedure. The wavefront algorithm also enables the computation of multi-valued travel time surfaces.

  16. Miniaturized 3D microscope imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Yung-Sung; Chang, Chir-Weei; Sung, Hsin-Yueh; Wang, Yen-Chang; Chang, Cheng-Yi

    2015-05-01

    We designed and assembled a portable 3-D miniature microscopic image system with the size of 35x35x105 mm3 . By integrating a microlens array (MLA) into the optical train of a handheld microscope, the biological specimen's image will be captured for ease of use in a single shot. With the light field raw data and program, the focal plane can be changed digitally and the 3-D image can be reconstructed after the image was taken. To localize an object in a 3-D volume, an automated data analysis algorithm to precisely distinguish profundity position is needed. The ability to create focal stacks from a single image allows moving or specimens to be recorded. Applying light field microscope algorithm to these focal stacks, a set of cross sections will be produced, which can be visualized using 3-D rendering. Furthermore, we have developed a series of design rules in order to enhance the pixel using efficiency and reduce the crosstalk between each microlens for obtain good image quality. In this paper, we demonstrate a handheld light field microscope (HLFM) to distinguish two different color fluorescence particles separated by a cover glass in a 600um range, show its focal stacks, and 3-D position.

  17. Combinatorial 3D Mechanical Metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coulais, Corentin; Teomy, Eial; de Reus, Koen; Shokef, Yair; van Hecke, Martin

    2015-03-01

    We present a class of elastic structures which exhibit 3D-folding motion. Our structures consist of cubic lattices of anisotropic unit cells that can be tiled in a complex combinatorial fashion. We design and 3d-print this complex ordered mechanism, in which we combine elastic hinges and defects to tailor the mechanics of the material. Finally, we use this large design space to encode smart functionalities such as surface patterning and multistability.

  18. Geodiversity: Exploration of 3D geological model space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindsay, M. D.; Jessell, M. W.; Ailleres, L.; Perrouty, S.; de Kemp, E.; Betts, P. G.

    2013-05-01

    The process of building a 3D model necessitates the reconciliation of field observations, geophysical interpretation, geological data uncertainty and the prevailing tectonic evolution hypotheses and interpretations. Uncertainty is compounded when clustered data points collected at local scales are statistically upscaled to one or two points for use in regional models. Interpretation is required to interpolate between sparse field data points using ambiguous geophysical data in covered terranes. It becomes clear that multiple interpretations are possible during model construction. The various interpretations are considered as potential natural representatives, but pragmatism typically dictates that just a single interpretation is offered by the modelling process. Uncertainties are introduced into the 3D model during construction from a variety of sources and through data set optimisation that produces a single model. Practices such as these are likely to result in a model that does not adequately represent the target geology. A set of geometrical ‘geodiversity’ metrics are used to analyse a 3D model of the Gippsland Basin, southeastern Australia after perturbing geological input data via uncertainty simulation. The resulting sets of perturbed geological observations are used to calculate a suite of geological 3D models that display a range of geological architectures. The concept of biodiversity has been adapted for the geosciences to quantify geometric variability, or geodiversity, between models in order to understand the effect uncertainty has models geometry. Various geometrical relationships (depth, volume, contact surface area, curvature and geological complexity) are used to describe the range of possibilities exhibited throughout the model suite. End-member models geodiversity metrics are classified in a similar manner to taxonomic descriptions. Further analysis of the model suite is performed using principal component analysis (PCA) to determine

  19. Concurrent 3-D motion segmentation and 3-D interpretation of temporal sequences of monocular images.

    PubMed

    Sekkati, Hicham; Mitiche, Amar

    2006-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate a variational method for joint multiregion three-dimensional (3-D) motion segmentation and 3-D interpretation of temporal sequences of monocular images. Interpretation consists of dense recovery of 3-D structure and motion from the image sequence spatiotemporal variations due to short-range image motion. The method is direct insomuch as it does not require prior computation of image motion. It allows movement of both viewing system and multiple independently moving objects. The problem is formulated following a variational statement with a functional containing three terms. One term measures the conformity of the interpretation within each region of 3-D motion segmentation to the image sequence spatiotemporal variations. The second term is of regularization of depth. The assumption that environmental objects are rigid accounts automatically for the regularity of 3-D motion within each region of segmentation. The third and last term is for the regularity of segmentation boundaries. Minimization of the functional follows the corresponding Euler-Lagrange equations. This results in iterated concurrent computation of 3-D motion segmentation by curve evolution, depth by gradient descent, and 3-D motion by least squares within each region of segmentation. Curve evolution is implemented via level sets for topology independence and numerical stability. This algorithm and its implementation are verified on synthetic and real image sequences. Viewers presented with anaglyphs of stereoscopic images constructed from the algorithm's output reported a strong perception of depth. PMID:16519351

  20. 3D-GNOME: an integrated web service for structural modeling of the 3D genome

    PubMed Central

    Szalaj, Przemyslaw; Michalski, Paul J.; Wróblewski, Przemysław; Tang, Zhonghui; Kadlof, Michal; Mazzocco, Giovanni; Ruan, Yijun; Plewczynski, Dariusz

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in high-throughput chromosome conformation capture (3C) technology, such as Hi-C and ChIA-PET, have demonstrated the importance of 3D genome organization in development, cell differentiation and transcriptional regulation. There is now a widespread need for computational tools to generate and analyze 3D structural models from 3C data. Here we introduce our 3D GeNOme Modeling Engine (3D-GNOME), a web service which generates 3D structures from 3C data and provides tools to visually inspect and annotate the resulting structures, in addition to a variety of statistical plots and heatmaps which characterize the selected genomic region. Users submit a bedpe (paired-end BED format) file containing the locations and strengths of long range contact points, and 3D-GNOME simulates the structure and provides a convenient user interface for further analysis. Alternatively, a user may generate structures using published ChIA-PET data for the GM12878 cell line by simply specifying a genomic region of interest. 3D-GNOME is freely available at http://3dgnome.cent.uw.edu.pl/. PMID:27185892

  1. 3D-GNOME: an integrated web service for structural modeling of the 3D genome.

    PubMed

    Szalaj, Przemyslaw; Michalski, Paul J; Wróblewski, Przemysław; Tang, Zhonghui; Kadlof, Michal; Mazzocco, Giovanni; Ruan, Yijun; Plewczynski, Dariusz

    2016-07-01

    Recent advances in high-throughput chromosome conformation capture (3C) technology, such as Hi-C and ChIA-PET, have demonstrated the importance of 3D genome organization in development, cell differentiation and transcriptional regulation. There is now a widespread need for computational tools to generate and analyze 3D structural models from 3C data. Here we introduce our 3D GeNOme Modeling Engine (3D-GNOME), a web service which generates 3D structures from 3C data and provides tools to visually inspect and annotate the resulting structures, in addition to a variety of statistical plots and heatmaps which characterize the selected genomic region. Users submit a bedpe (paired-end BED format) file containing the locations and strengths of long range contact points, and 3D-GNOME simulates the structure and provides a convenient user interface for further analysis. Alternatively, a user may generate structures using published ChIA-PET data for the GM12878 cell line by simply specifying a genomic region of interest. 3D-GNOME is freely available at http://3dgnome.cent.uw.edu.pl/. PMID:27185892

  2. Entanglement growth and correlation spreading with variable-range interactions in spin and fermionic tunneling models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buyskikh, Anton S.; Fagotti, Maurizio; Schachenmayer, Johannes; Essler, Fabian; Daley, Andrew J.

    2016-05-01

    We investigate the dynamics following a global parameter quench for two one-dimensional models with variable-range power-law interactions: a long-range transverse Ising model, which has recently been realized in chains of trapped ions, and a long-range lattice model for spinless fermions with long-range tunneling. For the transverse Ising model, the spreading of correlations and growth of entanglement are computed using numerical matrix product state techniques, and are compared with exact solutions for the fermionic tunneling model. We identify transitions between regimes with and without an apparent linear light cone for correlations, which correspond closely between the two models. For long-range interactions (in terms of separation distance r , decaying slower than 1 /r ), we find that despite the lack of a light cone, correlations grow slowly as a power law at short times, and that—depending on the structure of the initial state—the growth of entanglement can also be sublinear. These results are understood through analytical calculations, and should be measurable in experiments with trapped ions.

  3. From 3D view to 3D print

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dima, M.; Farisato, G.; Bergomi, M.; Viotto, V.; Magrin, D.; Greggio, D.; Farinato, J.; Marafatto, L.; Ragazzoni, R.; Piazza, D.

    2014-08-01

    In the last few years 3D printing is getting more and more popular and used in many fields going from manufacturing to industrial design, architecture, medical support and aerospace. 3D printing is an evolution of bi-dimensional printing, which allows to obtain a solid object from a 3D model, realized with a 3D modelling software. The final product is obtained using an additive process, in which successive layers of material are laid down one over the other. A 3D printer allows to realize, in a simple way, very complex shapes, which would be quite difficult to be produced with dedicated conventional facilities. Thanks to the fact that the 3D printing is obtained superposing one layer to the others, it doesn't need any particular work flow and it is sufficient to simply draw the model and send it to print. Many different kinds of 3D printers exist based on the technology and material used for layer deposition. A common material used by the toner is ABS plastics, which is a light and rigid thermoplastic polymer, whose peculiar mechanical properties make it diffusely used in several fields, like pipes production and cars interiors manufacturing. I used this technology to create a 1:1 scale model of the telescope which is the hardware core of the space small mission CHEOPS (CHaracterising ExOPlanets Satellite) by ESA, which aims to characterize EXOplanets via transits observations. The telescope has a Ritchey-Chrétien configuration with a 30cm aperture and the launch is foreseen in 2017. In this paper, I present the different phases for the realization of such a model, focusing onto pros and cons of this kind of technology. For example, because of the finite printable volume (10×10×12 inches in the x, y and z directions respectively), it has been necessary to split the largest parts of the instrument in smaller components to be then reassembled and post-processed. A further issue is the resolution of the printed material, which is expressed in terms of layers

  4. Automated classification of RNA 3D motifs and the RNA 3D Motif Atlas

    PubMed Central

    Petrov, Anton I.; Zirbel, Craig L.; Leontis, Neocles B.

    2013-01-01

    The analysis of atomic-resolution RNA three-dimensional (3D) structures reveals that many internal and hairpin loops are modular, recurrent, and structured by conserved non-Watson–Crick base pairs. Structurally similar loops define RNA 3D motifs that are conserved in homologous RNA molecules, but can also occur at nonhomologous sites in diverse RNAs, and which often vary in sequence. To further our understanding of RNA motif structure and sequence variability and to provide a useful resource for structure modeling and prediction, we present a new method for automated classification of internal and hairpin loop RNA 3D motifs and a new online database called the RNA 3D Motif Atlas. To classify the motif instances, a representative set of internal and hairpin loops is automatically extracted from a nonredundant list of RNA-containing PDB files. Their structures are compared geometrically, all-against-all, using the FR3D program suite. The loops are clustered into motif groups, taking into account geometric similarity and structural annotations and making allowance for a variable number of bulged bases. The automated procedure that we have implemented identifies all hairpin and internal loop motifs previously described in the literature. All motif instances and motif groups are assigned unique and stable identifiers and are made available in the RNA 3D Motif Atlas (http://rna.bgsu.edu/motifs), which is automatically updated every four weeks. The RNA 3D Motif Atlas provides an interactive user interface for exploring motif diversity and tools for programmatic data access. PMID:23970545

  5. High-throughput 3D tracking of bacteria on a standard phase contrast microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taute, K. M.; Gude, S.; Tans, S. J.; Shimizu, T. S.

    2015-11-01

    Bacteria employ diverse motility patterns in traversing complex three-dimensional (3D) natural habitats. 2D microscopy misses crucial features of 3D behaviour, but the applicability of existing 3D tracking techniques is constrained by their performance or ease of use. Here we present a simple, broadly applicable, high-throughput 3D bacterial tracking method for use in standard phase contrast microscopy. Bacteria are localized at micron-scale resolution over a range of 350 × 300 × 200 μm by maximizing image cross-correlations between their observed diffraction patterns and a reference library. We demonstrate the applicability of our technique to a range of bacterial species and exploit its high throughput to expose hidden contributions of bacterial individuality to population-level variability in motile behaviour. The simplicity of this powerful new tool for bacterial motility research renders 3D tracking accessible to a wider community and paves the way for investigations of bacterial motility in complex 3D environments.

  6. High-throughput 3D tracking of bacteria on a standard phase contrast microscope

    PubMed Central

    Taute, K.M.; Gude, S.; Tans, S.J.; Shimizu, T.S.

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria employ diverse motility patterns in traversing complex three-dimensional (3D) natural habitats. 2D microscopy misses crucial features of 3D behaviour, but the applicability of existing 3D tracking techniques is constrained by their performance or ease of use. Here we present a simple, broadly applicable, high-throughput 3D bacterial tracking method for use in standard phase contrast microscopy. Bacteria are localized at micron-scale resolution over a range of 350 × 300 × 200 μm by maximizing image cross-correlations between their observed diffraction patterns and a reference library. We demonstrate the applicability of our technique to a range of bacterial species and exploit its high throughput to expose hidden contributions of bacterial individuality to population-level variability in motile behaviour. The simplicity of this powerful new tool for bacterial motility research renders 3D tracking accessible to a wider community and paves the way for investigations of bacterial motility in complex 3D environments. PMID:26522289

  7. YouDash3D: exploring stereoscopic 3D gaming for 3D movie theaters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schild, Jonas; Seele, Sven; Masuch, Maic

    2012-03-01

    Along with the success of the digitally revived stereoscopic cinema, events beyond 3D movies become attractive for movie theater operators, i.e. interactive 3D games. In this paper, we present a case that explores possible challenges and solutions for interactive 3D games to be played by a movie theater audience. We analyze the setting and showcase current issues related to lighting and interaction. Our second focus is to provide gameplay mechanics that make special use of stereoscopy, especially depth-based game design. Based on these results, we present YouDash3D, a game prototype that explores public stereoscopic gameplay in a reduced kiosk setup. It features live 3D HD video stream of a professional stereo camera rig rendered in a real-time game scene. We use the effect to place the stereoscopic effigies of players into the digital game. The game showcases how stereoscopic vision can provide for a novel depth-based game mechanic. Projected trigger zones and distributed clusters of the audience video allow for easy adaptation to larger audiences and 3D movie theater gaming.

  8. R3D Align: global pairwise alignment of RNA 3D structures using local superpositions

    PubMed Central

    Rahrig, Ryan R.; Leontis, Neocles B.; Zirbel, Craig L.

    2010-01-01

    Motivation: Comparing 3D structures of homologous RNA molecules yields information about sequence and structural variability. To compare large RNA 3D structures, accurate automatic comparison tools are needed. In this article, we introduce a new algorithm and web server to align large homologous RNA structures nucleotide by nucleotide using local superpositions that accommodate the flexibility of RNA molecules. Local alignments are merged to form a global alignment by employing a maximum clique algorithm on a specially defined graph that we call the ‘local alignment’ graph. Results: The algorithm is implemented in a program suite and web server called ‘R3D Align’. The R3D Align alignment of homologous 3D structures of 5S, 16S and 23S rRNA was compared to a high-quality hand alignment. A full comparison of the 16S alignment with the other state-of-the-art methods is also provided. The R3D Align program suite includes new diagnostic tools for the structural evaluation of RNA alignments. The R3D Align alignments were compared to those produced by other programs and were found to be the most accurate, in comparison with a high quality hand-crafted alignment and in conjunction with a series of other diagnostics presented. The number of aligned base pairs as well as measures of geometric similarity are used to evaluate the accuracy of the alignments. Availability: R3D Align is freely available through a web server http://rna.bgsu.edu/R3DAlign. The MATLAB source code of the program suite is also freely available for download at that location. Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. Contact: r-rahrig@onu.edu PMID:20929913

  9. Speaking Volumes About 3-D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    In 1999, Genex submitted a proposal to Stennis Space Center for a volumetric 3-D display technique that would provide multiple users with a 360-degree perspective to simultaneously view and analyze 3-D data. The futuristic capabilities of the VolumeViewer(R) have offered tremendous benefits to commercial users in the fields of medicine and surgery, air traffic control, pilot training and education, computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing, and military/battlefield management. The technology has also helped NASA to better analyze and assess the various data collected by its satellite and spacecraft sensors. Genex capitalized on its success with Stennis by introducing two separate products to the commercial market that incorporate key elements of the 3-D display technology designed under an SBIR contract. The company Rainbow 3D(R) imaging camera is a novel, three-dimensional surface profile measurement system that can obtain a full-frame 3-D image in less than 1 second. The third product is the 360-degree OmniEye(R) video system. Ideal for intrusion detection, surveillance, and situation management, this unique camera system offers a continuous, panoramic view of a scene in real time.

  10. A comparison of 2D and 3D digital image correlation for a membrane under inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murienne, Barbara J.; Nguyen, Thao D.

    2016-02-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) digital image correlation (DIC) is becoming widely used to characterize the behavior of structures undergoing 3D deformations. However, the use of 3D-DIC can be challenging under certain conditions, such as high magnification, and therefore small depth of field, or a highly controlled environment with limited access for two-angled cameras. The purpose of this study is to compare 2D-DIC and 3D-DIC for the same inflation experiment and evaluate whether 2D-DIC can be used when conditions discourage the use of a stereo-vision system. A latex membrane was inflated vertically to 5.41 kPa (reference pressure), then to 7.87 kPa (deformed pressure). A two-camera stereo-vision system acquired top-down images of the membrane, while a single camera system simultaneously recorded images of the membrane in profile. 2D-DIC and 3D-DIC were used to calculate horizontal (in the membrane plane) and vertical (out of the membrane plane) displacements, and meridional strain. Under static conditions, the baseline uncertainty in horizontal displacement and strain were smaller for 3D-DIC than 2D-DIC. However, the opposite was observed for the vertical displacement, for which 2D-DIC had a smaller baseline uncertainty. The baseline absolute error in vertical displacement and strain were similar for both DIC methods, but it was larger for 2D-DIC than 3D-DIC for the horizontal displacement. Under inflation, the variability in the measurements were larger than under static conditions for both DIC methods. 2D-DIC showed a smaller variability in displacements than 3D-DIC, especially for the vertical displacement, but a similar strain uncertainty. The absolute difference in the average displacements and strain between 3D-DIC and 2D-DIC were in the range of the 3D-DIC variability. Those findings suggest that 2D-DIC might be used as an alternative to 3D-DIC to study the inflation response of materials under certain conditions.

  11. 3D Computations and Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Couch, R; Faux, D; Goto, D; Nikkel, D

    2004-04-05

    This project consists of two activities. Task A, Simulations and Measurements, combines all the material model development and associated numerical work with the materials-oriented experimental activities. The goal of this effort is to provide an improved understanding of dynamic material properties and to provide accurate numerical representations of those properties for use in analysis codes. Task B, ALE3D Development, involves general development activities in the ALE3D code with the focus of improving simulation capabilities for problems of mutual interest to DoD and DOE. Emphasis is on problems involving multi-phase flow, blast loading of structures and system safety/vulnerability studies.

  12. 3D Computations and Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Couch, R; Faux, D; Goto, D; Nikkel, D

    2003-05-12

    This project is in its first full year after the combining of two previously funded projects: ''3D Code Development'' and ''Dynamic Material Properties''. The motivation behind this move was to emphasize and strengthen the ties between the experimental work and the computational model development in the materials area. The next year's activities will indicate the merging of the two efforts. The current activity is structured in two tasks. Task A, ''Simulations and Measurements'', combines all the material model development and associated numerical work with the materials-oriented experimental activities. Task B, ''ALE3D Development'', is a continuation of the non-materials related activities from the previous project.

  13. The EISCAT_3D Science Case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tjulin, A.; Mann, I.; McCrea, I.; Aikio, A. T.

    2013-05-01

    EISCAT_3D will be a world-leading international research infrastructure using the incoherent scatter technique to study the atmosphere in the Fenno-Scandinavian Arctic and to investigate how the Earth's atmosphere is coupled to space. The EISCAT_3D phased-array multistatic radar system will be operated by EISCAT Scientific Association and thus be an integral part of an organisation that has successfully been running incoherent scatter radars for more than thirty years. The baseline design of the radar system contains a core site with transmitting and receiving capabilities located close to the intersection of the Swedish, Norwegian and Finnish borders and five receiving sites located within 50 to 250 km from the core. The EISCAT_3D project is currently in its Preparatory Phase and can smoothly transit into implementation in 2014, provided sufficient funding. Construction can start 2016 and first operations in 2018. The EISCAT_3D Science Case is prepared as part of the Preparatory Phase. It is regularly updated with annual new releases, and it aims at being a common document for the whole future EISCAT_3D user community. The areas covered by the Science Case are atmospheric physics and global change; space and plasma physics; solar system research; space weather and service applications; and radar techniques, new methods for coding and analysis. Two of the aims for EISCAT_3D are to understand the ways natural variability in the upper atmosphere, imposed by the Sun-Earth system, can influence the middle and lower atmosphere, and to improve the predictivity of atmospheric models by providing higher resolution observations to replace the current parametrised input. Observations by EISCAT_3D will also be used to monitor the direct effects from the Sun on the ionosphere-atmosphere system and those caused by solar wind magnetosphere-ionosphere interaction. In addition, EISCAT_3D will be used for remote sensing the large-scale behaviour of the magnetosphere from its

  14. Unlocking the scientific potential of complex 3D point cloud dataset : new classification and 3D comparison methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lague, D.; Brodu, N.; Leroux, J.

    2012-12-01

    Ground based lidar and photogrammetric techniques are increasingly used to track the evolution of natural surfaces in 3D at an unprecedented resolution and precision. The range of applications encompass many type of natural surfaces with different geometries and roughness characteristics (landslides, cliff erosion, river beds, bank erosion,....). Unravelling surface change in these contexts requires to compare large point clouds in 2D or 3D. The most commonly used method in geomorphology is based on a 2D difference of the gridded point clouds. Yet this is hardly adapted to many 3D natural environments such as rivers (with horizontal beds and vertical banks), while gridding complex rough surfaces is a complex task. On the other hand, tools allowing to perform 3D comparison are scarce and may require to mesh the point clouds which is difficult on rough natural surfaces. Moreover, existing 3D comparison tools do not provide an explicit calculation of confidence intervals that would factor in registration errors, roughness effects and instrument related position uncertainties. To unlock this problem, we developed the first algorithm combining a 3D measurement of surface change directly on point clouds with an estimate of spatially variable confidence intervals (called M3C2). The method has two steps : (1) surface normal estimation and orientation in 3D at a scale consistent with the local roughness ; (2) measurement of mean surface change along the normal direction with explicit calculation of a local confidence interval. Comparison with existing 3D methods based on a closest-point calculation demonstrates the higher precision of the M3C2 method when mm changes needs to be detected. The M3C2 method is also simple to use as it does not require surface meshing or gridding, and is not sensitive to missing data or change in point density. We also present a 3D classification tool (CANUPO) for vegetation removal based on a new geometrical measure: the multi

  15. SNL3dFace

    2007-07-20

    This software distribution contains MATLAB and C++ code to enable identity verification using 3D images that may or may not contain a texture component. The code is organized to support system performance testing and system capability demonstration through the proper configuration of the available user interface. Using specific algorithm parameters the face recognition system has been demonstrated to achieve a 96.6% verification rate (Pd) at 0.001 false alarm rate. The system computes robust facial featuresmore » of a 3D normalized face using Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Fisher Linear Discriminant Analysis (FLDA). A 3D normalized face is obtained by alighning each face, represented by a set of XYZ coordinated, to a scaled reference face using the Iterative Closest Point (ICP) algorithm. The scaled reference face is then deformed to the input face using an iterative framework with parameters that control the deformed surface regulation an rate of deformation. A variety of options are available to control the information that is encoded by the PCA. Such options include the XYZ coordinates, the difference of each XYZ coordinates from the reference, the Z coordinate, the intensity/texture values, etc. In addition to PCA/FLDA feature projection this software supports feature matching to obtain similarity matrices for performance analysis. In addition, this software supports visualization of the STL, MRD, 2D normalized, and PCA synthetic representations in a 3D environment.« less

  16. Making Inexpensive 3-D Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manos, Harry

    2016-01-01

    Visual aids are important to student learning, and they help make the teacher's job easier. Keeping with the "TPT" theme of "The Art, Craft, and Science of Physics Teaching," the purpose of this article is to show how teachers, lacking equipment and funds, can construct a durable 3-D model reference frame and a model gravity…

  17. SNL3dFace

    SciTech Connect

    Russ, Trina; Koch, Mark; Koudelka, Melissa; Peters, Ralph; Little, Charles; Boehnen, Chris; Peters, Tanya

    2007-07-20

    This software distribution contains MATLAB and C++ code to enable identity verification using 3D images that may or may not contain a texture component. The code is organized to support system performance testing and system capability demonstration through the proper configuration of the available user interface. Using specific algorithm parameters the face recognition system has been demonstrated to achieve a 96.6% verification rate (Pd) at 0.001 false alarm rate. The system computes robust facial features of a 3D normalized face using Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Fisher Linear Discriminant Analysis (FLDA). A 3D normalized face is obtained by alighning each face, represented by a set of XYZ coordinated, to a scaled reference face using the Iterative Closest Point (ICP) algorithm. The scaled reference face is then deformed to the input face using an iterative framework with parameters that control the deformed surface regulation an rate of deformation. A variety of options are available to control the information that is encoded by the PCA. Such options include the XYZ coordinates, the difference of each XYZ coordinates from the reference, the Z coordinate, the intensity/texture values, etc. In addition to PCA/FLDA feature projection this software supports feature matching to obtain similarity matrices for performance analysis. In addition, this software supports visualization of the STL, MRD, 2D normalized, and PCA synthetic representations in a 3D environment.

  18. 3D Printing: Exploring Capabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samuels, Kyle; Flowers, Jim

    2015-01-01

    As 3D printers become more affordable, schools are using them in increasing numbers. They fit well with the emphasis on product design in technology and engineering education, allowing students to create high-fidelity physical models to see and test different iterations in their product designs. They may also help students to "think in three…

  19. Humans and seasonal climate variability threaten large-bodied coral reef fish with small ranges.

    PubMed

    Mellin, C; Mouillot, D; Kulbicki, M; McClanahan, T R; Vigliola, L; Bradshaw, C J A; Brainard, R E; Chabanet, P; Edgar, G J; Fordham, D A; Friedlander, A M; Parravicini, V; Sequeira, A M M; Stuart-Smith, R D; Wantiez, L; Caley, M J

    2016-01-01

    Coral reefs are among the most species-rich and threatened ecosystems on Earth, yet the extent to which human stressors determine species occurrences, compared with biogeography or environmental conditions, remains largely unknown. With ever-increasing human-mediated disturbances on these ecosystems, an important question is not only how many species can inhabit local communities, but also which biological traits determine species that can persist (or not) above particular disturbance thresholds. Here we show that human pressure and seasonal climate variability are disproportionately and negatively associated with the occurrence of large-bodied and geographically small-ranging fishes within local coral reef communities. These species are 67% less likely to occur where human impact and temperature seasonality exceed critical thresholds, such as in the marine biodiversity hotspot: the Coral Triangle. Our results identify the most sensitive species and critical thresholds of human and climatic stressors, providing opportunity for targeted conservation intervention to prevent local extinctions. PMID:26839155

  20. Humans and seasonal climate variability threaten large-bodied coral reef fish with small ranges

    PubMed Central

    Mellin, C.; Mouillot, D.; Kulbicki, M.; McClanahan, T. R.; Vigliola, L.; Bradshaw, C. J. A.; Brainard, R. E.; Chabanet, P.; Edgar, G. J.; Fordham, D. A.; Friedlander, A. M.; Parravicini, V.; Sequeira, A. M. M.; Stuart-Smith, R. D.; Wantiez, L.; Caley, M. J.

    2016-01-01

    Coral reefs are among the most species-rich and threatened ecosystems on Earth, yet the extent to which human stressors determine species occurrences, compared with biogeography or environmental conditions, remains largely unknown. With ever-increasing human-mediated disturbances on these ecosystems, an important question is not only how many species can inhabit local communities, but also which biological traits determine species that can persist (or not) above particular disturbance thresholds. Here we show that human pressure and seasonal climate variability are disproportionately and negatively associated with the occurrence of large-bodied and geographically small-ranging fishes within local coral reef communities. These species are 67% less likely to occur where human impact and temperature seasonality exceed critical thresholds, such as in the marine biodiversity hotspot: the Coral Triangle. Our results identify the most sensitive species and critical thresholds of human and climatic stressors, providing opportunity for targeted conservation intervention to prevent local extinctions. PMID:26839155

  1. Memory effects, two color percolation, and the temperature dependence of Mott variable-range hopping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agam, Oded; Aleiner, Igor L.

    2014-06-01

    There are three basic processes that determine hopping transport: (a) hopping between normally empty sites (i.e., having exponentially small occupation numbers at equilibrium), (b) hopping between normally occupied sites, and (c) transitions between normally occupied and unoccupied sites. In conventional theories all these processes are considered Markovian and the correlations of occupation numbers of different sites are believed to be small (i.e., not exponential in temperature). We show that, contrary to this belief, memory effects suppress the processes of type (c) and manifest themselves in a subleading exponential temperature dependence of the variable-range hopping conductivity. This temperature dependence originates from the property that sites of type (a) and (b) form two independent resistor networks that are weakly coupled to each other by processes of type (c). This leads to a two-color percolation problem which we solve in the critical region.

  2. On the variability of extragalactic sources in the decimeter range and their correlation with galactic structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shapirovskaya, N. Y.

    1979-01-01

    It is shown that all of the extragalactic radio sources presently known are variable in the decimeter range (lambda or = 30 cm) and are projected on the large continuum radio structure of the galaxy: loops, spurs, ridges. Probability that coordinates could coincide is or = 10 to the minus 7 power. The variations in the intensity are explained by scintillations (regime of focusing radiation) on the large-scale irregularities of electron density in the medium of loops, spurs and ridges with the dimension a magnitude of approximately 10 to the 13th power cm. A correlation of the characteristics of radiation of the sources with their position relative to the galactic loop is considered. Based on the known experimental data, it is shown that the angle of scattering of extragalactic radiation and the dispersion measures of pulsars projecting on the loops is considerably larger than those of the sources lying outside the loops.

  3. a Study of a Two-Dimensional Electron System in the Variable-Range Hopping Regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Xuelong

    A two-dimensional electron system is investigated in a gated heterostructure of GaAs/rm Al _{x}Ga_{1-x}As in the variable-range hopping regime. We report the first convincing evidence of a Coulomb gap in the density of states in a two-dimensional electron system and the screening of the Coulomb gap by a metallic gate for large hopping lengths. The Coulomb gap in the density of states is observed from measurements of the hopping conductivity. For large hopping lengths, Mott hopping is observed. The general expression for the hopping conductivity can be described in the form sigma_{xx} = sigma_1(T_{p}/T)^ {0.8} exp(-T_{p}/T) ^{p}, with p = 1/2 in the Coulomb gap and p = 1/3 in the Mott hopping regimes, respectively. For the temperature range investigated the transition between the Coulomb gap and Mott hopping regimes occurs at localization lengths in the range of 1 mum, which is about three times the separation of electron layer from the metallic gate. The behavior of the transition is in good agreement with the theoretical predictions by Aleiner and Shklovskii. The scaled conductivity prefactor sigma_1 is found to be independent of magnetic field but dependent on the degree of disorder. A divergence of the dielectric constant with localization length is not observed in this experiment. The dependence of the localization length on the electron density is consistent with the scaling theory of localization. A giant negative magnetoresistance with R(0)/R(B) as great as 100 is observed in the variable-range hopping regime at 24 mK. The experiment agrees with the quantum interference model in the sense that the magnetoresistance varies with the magnetic field as ln(R(B)/R(0)) = - gamma r_{M}/l_{B} ~ - B^{1/2} at low fields, where r_{M} is the Mott hopping length and l_ {B} = sqrt{eB/h} is the magnetic length. The numerical parameter gamma extrapolated from the experiment increases with an increase in the degree of disorder. This contradicts the prediction from a computer

  4. Inter-Individual Variability and Conspecific Densities: Consequences for Population Regulation and Range Expansion

    PubMed Central

    Cardador, Laura; Carrete, Martina; Mañosa, Santi

    2012-01-01

    The presence of conspecifics can strongly modulate the quality of a breeding site. Both positive and negative effects of conspecifics can act on the same individuals, with the final balance between its costs and benefits depending on individual characteristics. A particular case of inter-individual variation found in many avian species is chromatic variability. Among birds, plumage coloration can co-vary with morphology, physiology and behavior as well as with age. These relationships suggest that cost-benefit balances of conspecific presence may be different for individuals with different colorations. We investigated whether inter-individual variability affects population regulation and expansion processes by analyzing potential differences in density-dependent productivity and settlement patterns in relation to plumage coloration in a population of a long-lived avian species recently undergoing a notable increase in numbers and distribution range. Our results show strong variation in the effect of density on productivity of breeding pairs depending on plumage coloration of their members. Productivity of dark birds decreased along the breeding density gradient while that of lighter breeders remained unchanged with conspecific density. In a similar way, our results showed an uneven occupation of localities by individuals with different plumage coloration in relation to local densities, with the breeding of lighter harriers more aggregated than that of dark-brown ones. At a population scale, darker birds had higher probability of colonization of the most isolated, empty sites. Explanations for species range expansion and population regulation usually make the inferred assumption that species traits are similar among individuals. However, in most species, there could be individual variation in niche requirements or dispersal propensities among individuals with different traits. Our results contribute to the growing appreciation that the individual traits, but not the

  5. Full 3D microwave quasi-holographic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castelli, Juan-Carlos; Tardivel, Francois

    A full 3D quasi-holographic image processing technique developed by ONERA is described. A complex backscattering coefficient of a drone scale model was measured for discrete values of the 3D backscattered wave vector in a frequency range between 4.5-8 GHz. The 3D image processing is implemented on a HP 1000 mini-computer and will be part of LASER 2 software to be used in three RCS measurement indoor facilities.

  6. Quasi-3D Multi-scale Modeling Framework Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arakawa, A.; Jung, J.

    2008-12-01

    When models are truncated in or near an energetically active range of the spectrum, model physics must be changed as the resolution changes. The model physics of GCMs and that of CRMs are, however, quite different from each other and at present there is no unified formulation of model physics that automatically provides transition between these model physics. The Quasi-3D (Q3D) Multi-scale Modeling Framework (MMF) is an attempt to bridge this gap. Like the recently proposed Heterogeneous Multiscale Method (HMM) (E and Engquist 2003), MMF combines a macroscopic model, GCM, and a microscopic model, CRM. Unlike the traditional multiscale methods such as the multi-grid and adapted mesh refinement techniques, HMM and MMF are for solving multi-physics problems. They share the common objective "to design combined macroscopic-microscopic computational methods that are much more efficient than solving the full microscopic model and at the same time give the information we need" (E et al. 2008). The question is then how to meet this objective in practice, which can be highly problem dependent. In HHM, the efficiency is gained typically by localization of the microscale problem. Following the pioneering work by Grabowski and Smolarkiewicz (1999) and Grabowski (2001), MMF takes advantage of the fact that 2D CRMs are reasonably successful in simulating deep clouds. In this approach, the efficiency is gained by sacrificing the three-dimensionality of cloud-scale motion. It also "localizes" the algorithm through embedding a CRM in each GCM grid box using cyclic boundary condition. The Q3D MMF is an attempt to reduce the expense due to these constraints by partially including the cloud-scale 3D effects and extending the CRM beyond individual GCM grid boxes. As currently formulated, the Q3D MMF is a 4D estimation/prediction framework that combines a GCM with a 3D anelastic cloud-resolving vector vorticity equation model (VVM) applied to a network of horizontal grids. The network

  7. How do hydrodynamic instabilities affect 3D transport in geophysical vortices?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Peng; Özgökmen, Tamay M.

    2015-03-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) transport within geophysical vortices (e.g. ocean eddies) is important in understanding processes at a variety of scales, ranging from plankton production to climate variability. 3D transport can be affected by hydrodynamic instabilities of geophysical vortices; however, how the instabilities affecting 3D transport is not clear. Focusing on barotropic, inertial and 3D instabilities, we investigate the joint impacts of instabilities on 3D transport by using analytical methods and direct numerical simulations. We discover for the first time that material can be exchanged through 3D pathways which link a family of vortices generated by the instabilities in a single, initially unstable vortex. We also show that instabilities can increase the magnitude of vertical velocity, mixing rate and vertical material exchange. Besides, we find that instabilities can cause the kinetic energy wavenumber spectrum to have a power-law regime different than the classic regimes of k - 5 / 3 and k-3, and propose a new energy spectrum to interpret the non-classic regime.

  8. Electrical and Thermoelectric Transport by Variable Range Hopping in Thin Black Phosphorus Devices.

    PubMed

    Choi, Seon Jae; Kim, Bum-Kyu; Lee, Tae-Ho; Kim, Yun Ho; Li, Zuanyi; Pop, Eric; Kim, Ju-Jin; Song, Jong Hyun; Bae, Myung-Ho

    2016-07-13

    The moderate band gap of black phosphorus (BP) in the range of 0.3-2 eV, along a high mobility of a few hundred cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) provides a bridge between the gapless graphene and relatively low-mobility transition metal dichalcogenides. Here, we study the mechanism of electrical and thermoelectric transport in 10-30 nm thick BP devices by measurements of electrical conductance and thermopower (S) with various temperatures (T) and gate-electric fields. The T dependences of S and the sheet conductance (σ□) of the BP devices show behaviors of T(1/3) and exp[-(1/T)(1/3)], respectively, where S reaches ∼0.4 mV/K near room T. This result indicates that two-dimensional (2D) Mott's variable range hopping (VRH) is a dominant mechanism in the thermoelectric and electrical transport in our examined thin BP devices. We consider the origin of the 2D Mott's VRH transport in our BPs as trapped charges at the surface of the underlying SiO2 based on the analysis with observed multiple quantum dots. PMID:27223230

  9. All CMOS Low-Power Wide-Gain Range Variable Gain Amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duong, Quoc-Hoang; Kim, Chang-Wan; Lee, Sang-Gug

    Two variable gain amplifiers (VGAs) that adopt new approximated exponential equations are proposed in this paper. The dB-linear range of the proposed VGAs is extended more than what the approximated exponential equations predict by a bias circuit technique that adopts negative feedback. The proposed VGAs feature wide gain variation, low-power, high linearity, wide control signal range, and small chip size. One of the proposed VGAs is fabricated in 0.18μm CMOS technology and measurements show a gain variation of 83dB (-36-47dB) with a gain error of less than ±2dB, and P1dB/IIP3 from -55/8 to -20/20.5dBm, while consuming an average current of 3.4mA from a 1.8V supply; the chip occupies 0.4mm2. The other VGA is simulated in 0.18μm CMOS technology and simulations show a gain variation of 91dB (-41-50dB), and P1dB/IIP3 from -50/-25 to -33/0dBm, while consuming an average current of 1.5mA from a 1.8V supply.

  10. A 3-D chimera grid embedding technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benek, J. A.; Buning, P. G.; Steger, J. L.

    1985-01-01

    A three-dimensional (3-D) chimera grid-embedding technique is described. The technique simplifies the construction of computational grids about complex geometries. The method subdivides the physical domain into regions which can accommodate easily generated grids. Communication among the grids is accomplished by interpolation of the dependent variables at grid boundaries. The procedures for constructing the composite mesh and the associated data structures are described. The method is demonstrated by solution of the Euler equations for the transonic flow about a wing/body, wing/body/tail, and a configuration of three ellipsoidal bodies.

  11. Optoplasmonics: hybridization in 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosa, L.; Gervinskas, G.; Žukauskas, A.; Malinauskas, M.; Brasselet, E.; Juodkazis, S.

    2013-12-01

    Femtosecond laser fabrication has been used to make hybrid refractive and di ractive micro-optical elements in photo-polymer SZ2080. For applications in micro- uidics, axicon lenses were fabricated (both single and arrays), for generation of light intensity patterns extending through the entire depth of a typically tens-of-micrometers deep channel. Further hybridisation of an axicon with a plasmonic slot is fabricated and demonstrated nu- merically. Spiralling chiral grooves were inscribed into a 100-nm-thick gold coating sputtered over polymerized micro-axicon lenses, using a focused ion beam. This demonstrates possibility of hybridisation between optical and plasmonic 3D micro-optical elements. Numerical modelling of optical performance by 3D-FDTD method is presented.

  12. 3-D Relativistic MHD Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishikawa, K.-I.; Frank, J.; Koide, S.; Sakai, J.-I.; Christodoulou, D. M.; Sol, H.; Mutel, R. L.

    1998-12-01

    We present 3-D numerical simulations of moderately hot, supersonic jets propagating initially along or obliquely to the field lines of a denser magnetized background medium with Lorentz factors of W = 4.56 and evolving in a four-dimensional spacetime. The new results are understood as follows: Relativistic simulations have consistently shown that these jets are effectively heavy and so they do not suffer substantial momentum losses and are not decelerated as efficiently as their nonrelativistic counterparts. In addition, the ambient magnetic field, however strong, can be pushed aside with relative ease by the beam, provided that the degrees of freedom associated with all three spatial dimensions are followed self-consistently in the simulations. This effect is analogous to pushing Japanese ``noren'' or vertical Venetian blinds out of the way while the slats are allowed to bend in 3-D space rather than as a 2-D slab structure.

  13. Forensic 3D Scene Reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    LITTLE,CHARLES Q.; PETERS,RALPH R.; RIGDON,J. BRIAN; SMALL,DANIEL E.

    1999-10-12

    Traditionally law enforcement agencies have relied on basic measurement and imaging tools, such as tape measures and cameras, in recording a crime scene. A disadvantage of these methods is that they are slow and cumbersome. The development of a portable system that can rapidly record a crime scene with current camera imaging, 3D geometric surface maps, and contribute quantitative measurements such as accurate relative positioning of crime scene objects, would be an asset to law enforcement agents in collecting and recording significant forensic data. The purpose of this project is to develop a feasible prototype of a fast, accurate, 3D measurement and imaging system that would support law enforcement agents to quickly document and accurately record a crime scene.

  14. Forensic 3D scene reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Little, Charles Q.; Small, Daniel E.; Peters, Ralph R.; Rigdon, J. B.

    2000-05-01

    Traditionally law enforcement agencies have relied on basic measurement and imaging tools, such as tape measures and cameras, in recording a crime scene. A disadvantage of these methods is that they are slow and cumbersome. The development of a portable system that can rapidly record a crime scene with current camera imaging, 3D geometric surface maps, and contribute quantitative measurements such as accurate relative positioning of crime scene objects, would be an asset to law enforcement agents in collecting and recording significant forensic data. The purpose of this project is to develop a fieldable prototype of a fast, accurate, 3D measurement and imaging system that would support law enforcement agents to quickly document and accurately record a crime scene.

  15. 360-degree 3D profilometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Yuanhe; Zhao, Hong; Chen, Wenyi; Tan, Yushan

    1997-12-01

    A new method of 360 degree turning 3D shape measurement in which light sectioning and phase shifting techniques are both used is presented in this paper. A sine light field is applied in the projected light stripe, meanwhile phase shifting technique is used to calculate phases of the light slit. Thereafter wrapped phase distribution of the slit is formed and the unwrapping process is made by means of the height information based on the light sectioning method. Therefore phase measuring results with better precision can be obtained. At last the target 3D shape data can be produced according to geometric relationships between phases and the object heights. The principles of this method are discussed in detail and experimental results are shown in this paper.

  16. 3D Printable Graphene Composite.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xiaojun; Li, Dong; Jiang, Wei; Gu, Zheming; Wang, Xiaojuan; Zhang, Zengxing; Sun, Zhengzong

    2015-01-01

    In human being's history, both the Iron Age and Silicon Age thrived after a matured massive processing technology was developed. Graphene is the most recent superior material which could potentially initialize another new material Age. However, while being exploited to its full extent, conventional processing methods fail to provide a link to today's personalization tide. New technology should be ushered in. Three-dimensional (3D) printing fills the missing linkage between graphene materials and the digital mainstream. Their alliance could generate additional stream to push the graphene revolution into a new phase. Here we demonstrate for the first time, a graphene composite, with a graphene loading up to 5.6 wt%, can be 3D printable into computer-designed models. The composite's linear thermal coefficient is below 75 ppm·°C(-1) from room temperature to its glass transition temperature (Tg), which is crucial to build minute thermal stress during the printing process. PMID:26153673

  17. 3D Printed Robotic Hand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pizarro, Yaritzmar Rosario; Schuler, Jason M.; Lippitt, Thomas C.

    2013-01-01

    Dexterous robotic hands are changing the way robots and humans interact and use common tools. Unfortunately, the complexity of the joints and actuations drive up the manufacturing cost. Some cutting edge and commercially available rapid prototyping machines now have the ability to print multiple materials and even combine these materials in the same job. A 3D model of a robotic hand was designed using Creo Parametric 2.0. Combining "hard" and "soft" materials, the model was printed on the Object Connex350 3D printer with the purpose of resembling as much as possible the human appearance and mobility of a real hand while needing no assembly. After printing the prototype, strings where installed as actuators to test mobility. Based on printing materials, the manufacturing cost of the hand was $167, significantly lower than other robotic hands without the actuators since they have more complex assembly processes.

  18. 3D light scanning macrography.

    PubMed

    Huber, D; Keller, M; Robert, D

    2001-08-01

    The technique of 3D light scanning macrography permits the non-invasive surface scanning of small specimens at magnifications up to 200x. Obviating both the problem of limited depth of field inherent to conventional close-up macrophotography and the metallic coating required by scanning electron microscopy, 3D light scanning macrography provides three-dimensional digital images of intact specimens without the loss of colour, texture and transparency information. This newly developed technique offers a versatile, portable and cost-efficient method for the non-invasive digital and photographic documentation of small objects. Computer controlled device operation and digital image acquisition facilitate fast and accurate quantitative morphometric investigations, and the technique offers a broad field of research and educational applications in biological, medical and materials sciences. PMID:11489078

  19. 3D-graphite structure

    SciTech Connect

    Belenkov, E. A. Ali-Pasha, V. A.

    2011-01-15

    The structure of clusters of some new carbon 3D-graphite phases have been calculated using the molecular-mechanics methods. It is established that 3D-graphite polytypes {alpha}{sub 1,1}, {alpha}{sub 1,3}, {alpha}{sub 1,5}, {alpha}{sub 2,1}, {alpha}{sub 2,3}, {alpha}{sub 3,1}, {beta}{sub 1,2}, {beta}{sub 1,4}, {beta}{sub 1,6}, {beta}{sub 2,1}, and {beta}{sub 3,2} consist of sp{sup 2}-hybridized atoms, have hexagonal unit cells, and differ in regards to the structure of layers and order of their alternation. A possible way to experimentally synthesize new carbon phases is proposed: the polymerization and carbonization of hydrocarbon molecules.

  20. 3D-printed microfluidic devices.

    PubMed

    Amin, Reza; Knowlton, Stephanie; Hart, Alexander; Yenilmez, Bekir; Ghaderinezhad, Fariba; Katebifar, Sara; Messina, Michael; Khademhosseini, Ali; Tasoglu, Savas

    2016-06-01

    Microfluidics is a flourishing field, enabling a wide range of biochemical and clinical applications such as cancer screening, micro-physiological system engineering, high-throughput drug testing, and point-of-care diagnostics. However, fabrication of microfluidic devices is often complicated, time consuming, and requires expensive equipment and sophisticated cleanroom facilities. Three-dimensional (3D) printing presents a promising alternative to traditional techniques such as lithography and PDMS-glass bonding, not only by enabling rapid design iterations in the development stage, but also by reducing the costs associated with institutional infrastructure, equipment installation, maintenance, and physical space. With the recent advancements in 3D printing technologies, highly complex microfluidic devices can be fabricated via single-step, rapid, and cost-effective protocols, making microfluidics more accessible to users. In this review, we discuss a broad range of approaches for the application of 3D printing technology to fabrication of micro-scale lab-on-a-chip devices. PMID:27321137

  1. 3D Face Modeling Using the Multi-Deformable Method

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Jinkyu; Yu, Sunjin; Kim, Joongrock; Lee, Sangyoun

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we focus on the problem of the accuracy performance of 3D face modeling techniques using corresponding features in multiple views, which is quite sensitive to feature extraction errors. To solve the problem, we adopt a statistical model-based 3D face modeling approach in a mirror system consisting of two mirrors and a camera. The overall procedure of our 3D facial modeling method has two primary steps: 3D facial shape estimation using a multiple 3D face deformable model and texture mapping using seamless cloning that is a type of gradient-domain blending. To evaluate our method's performance, we generate 3D faces of 30 individuals and then carry out two tests: accuracy test and robustness test. Our method shows not only highly accurate 3D face shape results when compared with the ground truth, but also robustness to feature extraction errors. Moreover, 3D face rendering results intuitively show that our method is more robust to feature extraction errors than other 3D face modeling methods. An additional contribution of our method is that a wide range of face textures can be acquired by the mirror system. By using this texture map, we generate realistic 3D face for individuals at the end of the paper. PMID:23201976

  2. 3D Elevation Program: summary for Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carswell, William J., Jr.

    2015-01-01

    The National Enhanced Elevation Assessment evaluated multiple elevation data acquisition options to determine the optimal data quality and data replacement cycle relative to cost to meet the identified requirements of the user community. The evaluation demonstrated that lidar acquisition at quality level 2 for the conterminous United States and quality level 5 interferometric synthetic aperture radar (ifsar) data for Alaska with a 6- to 10-year acquisition cycle provided the highest benefit/cost ratios. The 3D Elevation Program (3DEP) initiative selected an 8-year acquisition cycle for the respective quality levels. 3DEP, managed by the U.S. Geological Survey, the Office of Management and Budget Circular A–16 lead agency for terrestrial elevation data, responds to the growing need for high-quality topographic data and a wide range of other 3D representations of the Nation’s natural and constructed features.

  3. 3D Elevation Program: summary for Nebraska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carswell, William J., Jr.

    2015-01-01

    The National Enhanced Elevation Assessment evaluated multiple elevation data acquisition options to determine the optimal data quality and data replacement cycle relative to cost to meet the identified requirements of the user community. The evaluation demonstrated that lidar acquisition at quality level 2 for the conterminous United States and quality level 5 interferometric synthetic aperture radar (ifsar) data for Alaska with a 6- to 10-year acquisition cycle provided the highest benefit/cost ratios. The 3D Elevation Program (3DEP) initiative selected an 8-year acquisition cycle for the respective quality levels. 3DEP, managed by the U.S. Geological Survey, the Office of Management and Budget Circular A–16 lead agency for terrestrial elevation data, responds to the growing need for high-quality topographic data and a wide range of other 3D representations of the Nation’s natural and constructed features.

  4. Unit cell geometry of 3-D braided structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Du, Guang-Wu; Ko, Frank K.

    1993-01-01

    The traditional approach used in modeling of composites reinforced by three-dimensional (3-D) braids is to assume a simple unit cell geometry of a 3-D braided structure with known fiber volume fraction and orientation. In this article, we first examine 3-D braiding methods in the light of braid structures, followed by the development of geometric models for 3-D braids using a unit cell approach. The unit cell geometry of 3-D braids is identified and the relationship of structural parameters such as yarn orientation angle and fiber volume fraction with the key processing parameters established. The limiting geometry has been computed by establishing the point at which yarns jam against each other. Using this factor makes it possible to identify the complete range of allowable geometric arrangements for 3-D braided preforms. This identified unit cell geometry can be translated to mechanical models which relate the geometrical properties of fabric preforms to the mechanical responses of composite systems.

  5. Kilovoltage energy imaging with a radiotherapy linac with a continuously variable energy range

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, D. A.; Hansen, V. N.; Thompson, M. G.; Poludniowski, G.; Niven, A.; Seco, J.; Evans, P. M.

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: In this paper, the effect on image quality of significantly reducing the primary electron energy of a radiotherapy accelerator is investigated using a novel waveguide test piece. The waveguide contains a novel variable coupling device (rotovane), allowing for a wide continuously variable energy range of between 1.4 and 9 MeV suitable for both imaging and therapy.Method: Imaging at linac accelerating potentials close to 1 MV was investigated experimentally and via Monte Carlo simulations. An imaging beam line was designed, and planar and cone beam computed tomography images were obtained to enable qualitative and quantitative comparisons with kilovoltage and megavoltage imaging systems. The imaging beam had an electron energy of 1.4 MeV, which was incident on a water cooled electron window consisting of stainless steel, a 5 mm carbon electron absorber and 2.5 mm aluminium filtration. Images were acquired with an amorphous silicon detector sensitive to diagnostic x-ray energies. Results: The x-ray beam had an average energy of 220 keV and half value layer of 5.9 mm of copper. Cone beam CT images with the same contrast to noise ratio as a gantry mounted kilovoltage imaging system were obtained with doses as low as 2 cGy. This dose is equivalent to a single 6 MV portal image. While 12 times higher than a 100 kVp CBCT system (Elekta XVI), this dose is 140 times lower than a 6 MV cone beam imaging system and 6 times lower than previously published LowZ imaging beams operating at higher (4-5 MeV) energies. Conclusions: The novel coupling device provides for a wide range of electron energies that are suitable for kilovoltage quality imaging and therapy. The imaging system provides high contrast images from the therapy portal at low dose, approaching that of gantry mounted kilovoltage x-ray systems. Additionally, the system provides low dose imaging directly from the therapy portal, potentially allowing for target tracking during radiotherapy treatment. There is

  6. GPU-Accelerated Denoising in 3D (GD3D)

    2013-10-01

    The raw computational power GPU Accelerators enables fast denoising of 3D MR images using bilateral filtering, anisotropic diffusion, and non-local means. This software addresses two facets of this promising application: what tuning is necessary to achieve optimal performance on a modern GPU? And what parameters yield the best denoising results in practice? To answer the first question, the software performs an autotuning step to empirically determine optimal memory blocking on the GPU. To answer themore » second, it performs a sweep of algorithm parameters to determine the combination that best reduces the mean squared error relative to a noiseless reference image.« less

  7. Inferential modeling of 3D chromatin structure

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Siyu; Xu, Jinbo; Zeng, Jianyang

    2015-01-01

    For eukaryotic cells, the biological processes involving regulatory DNA elements play an important role in cell cycle. Understanding 3D spatial arrangements of chromosomes and revealing long-range chromatin interactions are critical to decipher these biological processes. In recent years, chromosome conformation capture (3C) related techniques have been developed to measure the interaction frequencies between long-range genome loci, which have provided a great opportunity to decode the 3D organization of the genome. In this paper, we develop a new Bayesian framework to derive the 3D architecture of a chromosome from 3C-based data. By modeling each chromosome as a polymer chain, we define the conformational energy based on our current knowledge on polymer physics and use it as prior information in the Bayesian framework. We also propose an expectation-maximization (EM) based algorithm to estimate the unknown parameters of the Bayesian model and infer an ensemble of chromatin structures based on interaction frequency data. We have validated our Bayesian inference approach through cross-validation and verified the computed chromatin conformations using the geometric constraints derived from fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) experiments. We have further confirmed the inferred chromatin structures using the known genetic interactions derived from other studies in the literature. Our test results have indicated that our Bayesian framework can compute an accurate ensemble of 3D chromatin conformations that best interpret the distance constraints derived from 3C-based data and also agree with other sources of geometric constraints derived from experimental evidence in the previous studies. The source code of our approach can be found in https://github.com/wangsy11/InfMod3DGen. PMID:25690896

  8. Temporal Variability of Upper-level Winds at the Eastern Range, Western Range and Wallops Flight Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, Ryan K.; Barbre, Robert E., Jr.

    2014-01-01

    Space launch vehicle commit-to-launch decisions include an assessment of the upper-level (UL) atmospheric wind environment to assess the vehicle's controllability and structural integrity during ascent. These assessments occur at predetermined times during the launch countdown based on measured wind data obtained prior to the assessment. However, the pre-launch measured winds may not represent the wind environment during the vehicle ascent. Uncertainty in the UL winds over the time period between the assessment and launch can be mitigated by a statistical analysis of wind change over time periods of interest using historical data from the launch range. Without historical data, theoretical wind models must be used, which can result in inaccurate wind placards that misrepresent launch availability. Using an overconservative model could result in overly restrictive vehicle wind placards, thus potentially reducing launch availability. Conversely, using an under-conservative model could result in launching into winds that might damage or destroy the vehicle. A large sample of measured wind profiles best characterizes the wind change environment. These historical databases consist of a certain number of wind pairs, where two wind profile measurements spaced by the time period of interest define a pair.

  9. Utilizing multiple state variables to improve the dynamic range of analog switching in a memristor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, YeonJoo; Kim, Sungho; Lu, Wei D.

    2015-10-01

    Memristors and memristive systems have been extensively studied for data storage and computing applications such as neuromorphic systems. To act as synapses in neuromorphic systems, the memristor needs to exhibit analog resistive switching (RS) behavior with incremental conductance change. In this study, we show that the dynamic range of the analog RS behavior can be significantly enhanced in a tantalum-oxide-based memristor. By controlling different state variables enabled by different physical effects during the RS process, the gradual filament expansion stage can be selectively enhanced without strongly affecting the abrupt filament length growth stage. Detailed physics-based modeling further verified the observed experimental effects and revealed the roles of oxygen vacancy drift and diffusion processes, and how the diffusion process can be selectively enhanced during the filament expansion stage. These findings lead to more desirable and reliable memristor behaviors for analog computing applications. Additionally, the ability to selectively control different internal physical processes demonstrated in the current study provides guidance for continued device optimization of memristor devices in general.

  10. Utilizing multiple state variables to improve the dynamic range of analog switching in a memristor

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, YeonJoo; Kim, Sungho; Lu, Wei D.

    2015-10-26

    Memristors and memristive systems have been extensively studied for data storage and computing applications such as neuromorphic systems. To act as synapses in neuromorphic systems, the memristor needs to exhibit analog resistive switching (RS) behavior with incremental conductance change. In this study, we show that the dynamic range of the analog RS behavior can be significantly enhanced in a tantalum-oxide-based memristor. By controlling different state variables enabled by different physical effects during the RS process, the gradual filament expansion stage can be selectively enhanced without strongly affecting the abrupt filament length growth stage. Detailed physics-based modeling further verified the observed experimental effects and revealed the roles of oxygen vacancy drift and diffusion processes, and how the diffusion process can be selectively enhanced during the filament expansion stage. These findings lead to more desirable and reliable memristor behaviors for analog computing applications. Additionally, the ability to selectively control different internal physical processes demonstrated in the current study provides guidance for continued device optimization of memristor devices in general.

  11. Low Complexity Mode Decision for 3D-HEVC

    PubMed Central

    Li, Nana; Gan, Yong

    2014-01-01

    High efficiency video coding- (HEVC-) based 3D video coding (3D-HEVC) developed by joint collaborative team on 3D video coding (JCT-3V) for multiview video and depth map is an extension of HEVC standard. In the test model of 3D-HEVC, variable coding unit (CU) size decision and disparity estimation (DE) are introduced to achieve the highest coding efficiency with the cost of very high computational complexity. In this paper, a fast mode decision algorithm based on variable size CU and DE is proposed to reduce 3D-HEVC computational complexity. The basic idea of the method is to utilize the correlations between depth map and motion activity in prediction mode where variable size CU and DE are needed, and only in these regions variable size CU and DE are enabled. Experimental results show that the proposed algorithm can save about 43% average computational complexity of 3D-HEVC while maintaining almost the same rate-distortion (RD) performance. PMID:25254237

  12. 3D visualization of polymer nanostructure

    SciTech Connect

    Werner, James H

    2009-01-01

    at {approx} 10 nm resolution over hundreds of microns in 3 spatial dimensions. Super-resolution microcopy methods based upon single molecule localization were originally limited to 2D slices. Recent advances in this field have extended these methods to three dimensions. However, the 3D rendering was limited to viewing sparsely labeled cellular structures over a z-depth of less than 1 micron. Our first goal is to extend super resolution microscopy to z-depths of hundreds of microns. This substantial improvement is needed to image polymer nanostructure over functionally relevant length scales. (2) Benchmark this instrument by studying the 3D nanostructure of diblock co-polymer morphologies. We will test and benchmark our instrument by imaging fluorescently labeled diblock copolymers, molecules that self-assemble into a variety of 3D nano-structures. We reiterate these polymers are useful for a variety of applications ranging from lithography to light harvesting.

  13. 3D RoboMET Characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Madison, Jonathan D.; Susan, Donald F.; Kilgo, Alice C.

    2015-10-01

    The goal of this project is to generate 3D microstructural data by destructive and non-destructive means and provide accompanying characterization and quantitative analysis of such data. This work is a continuing part of a larger effort to relate material performance variability to microstructural variability. That larger effort is called “Predicting Performance Margins” or PPM. In conjunction with that overarching initiative, the RoboMET.3D™ is a specific asset of Center 1800 and is an automated serialsectioning system for destructive analysis of microstructure, which is called upon to provide direct customer support to 1800 and non-1800 customers. To that end, data collection, 3d reconstruction and analysis of typical and atypical microstructures have been pursued for the purposes of qualitative and quantitative characterization with a goal toward linking microstructural defects and/or microstructural features with mechanical response. Material systems examined in FY15 include precipitation hardened 17-4 steel, laser-welds of 304L stainless steel, thermal spray coatings of 304L and geological samples of sandstone.

  14. Interactive 3D Mars Visualization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, Mark W.

    2012-01-01

    The Interactive 3D Mars Visualization system provides high-performance, immersive visualization of satellite and surface vehicle imagery of Mars. The software can be used in mission operations to provide the most accurate position information for the Mars rovers to date. When integrated into the mission data pipeline, this system allows mission planners to view the location of the rover on Mars to 0.01-meter accuracy with respect to satellite imagery, with dynamic updates to incorporate the latest position information. Given this information so early in the planning process, rover drivers are able to plan more accurate drive activities for the rover than ever before, increasing the execution of science activities significantly. Scientifically, this 3D mapping information puts all of the science analyses to date into geologic context on a daily basis instead of weeks or months, as was the norm prior to this contribution. This allows the science planners to judge the efficacy of their previously executed science observations much more efficiently, and achieve greater science return as a result. The Interactive 3D Mars surface view is a Mars terrain browsing software interface that encompasses the entire region of exploration for a Mars surface exploration mission. The view is interactive, allowing the user to pan in any direction by clicking and dragging, or to zoom in or out by scrolling the mouse or touchpad. This set currently includes tools for selecting a point of interest, and a ruler tool for displaying the distance between and positions of two points of interest. The mapping information can be harvested and shared through ubiquitous online mapping tools like Google Mars, NASA WorldWind, and Worldwide Telescope.

  15. A Clean Adirondack (3-D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This is a 3-D anaglyph showing a microscopic image taken of an area measuring 3 centimeters (1.2 inches) across on the rock called Adirondack. The image was taken at Gusev Crater on the 33rd day of the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit's journey (Feb. 5, 2004), after the rover used its rock abrasion tool brush to clean the surface of the rock. Dust, which was pushed off to the side during cleaning, can still be seen to the left and in low areas of the rock.

  16. Making Inexpensive 3-D Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manos, Harry

    2016-03-01

    Visual aids are important to student learning, and they help make the teacher's job easier. Keeping with the TPT theme of "The Art, Craft, and Science of Physics Teaching," the purpose of this article is to show how teachers, lacking equipment and funds, can construct a durable 3-D model reference frame and a model gravity well tailored to specific class lessons. Most of the supplies are readily available in the home or at school: rubbing alcohol, a rag, two colors of spray paint, art brushes, and masking tape. The cost of these supplies, if you don't have them, is less than 20.

  17. What Lies Ahead (3-D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This 3-D cylindrical-perspective mosaic taken by the navigation camera on the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit on sol 82 shows the view south of the large crater dubbed 'Bonneville.' The rover will travel toward the Columbia Hills, seen here at the upper left. The rock dubbed 'Mazatzal' and the hole the rover drilled in to it can be seen at the lower left. The rover's position is referred to as 'Site 22, Position 32.' This image was geometrically corrected to make the horizon appear flat.

  18. Vacant Lander in 3-D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This 3-D image captured by the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity's rear hazard-identification camera shows the now-empty lander that carried the rover 283 million miles to Meridiani Planum, Mars. Engineers received confirmation that Opportunity's six wheels successfully rolled off the lander and onto martian soil at 3:01 a.m. PST, January 31, 2004, on the seventh martian day, or sol, of the mission. The rover is approximately 1 meter (3 feet) in front of the lander, facing north.

  19. DNA Assembly in 3D Printed Fluidics.

    PubMed

    Patrick, William G; Nielsen, Alec A K; Keating, Steven J; Levy, Taylor J; Wang, Che-Wei; Rivera, Jaime J; Mondragón-Palomino, Octavio; Carr, Peter A; Voigt, Christopher A; Oxman, Neri; Kong, David S

    2015-01-01

    The process of connecting genetic parts-DNA assembly-is a foundational technology for synthetic biology. Microfluidics present an attractive solution for minimizing use of costly reagents, enabling multiplexed reactions, and automating protocols by integrating multiple protocol steps. However, microfluidics fabrication and operation can be expensive and requires expertise, limiting access to the technology. With advances in commodity digital fabrication tools, it is now possible to directly print fluidic devices and supporting hardware. 3D printed micro- and millifluidic devices are inexpensive, easy to make and quick to produce. We demonstrate Golden Gate DNA assembly in 3D-printed fluidics with reaction volumes as small as 490 nL, channel widths as fine as 220 microns, and per unit part costs ranging from $0.61 to $5.71. A 3D-printed syringe pump with an accompanying programmable software interface was designed and fabricated to operate the devices. Quick turnaround and inexpensive materials allowed for rapid exploration of device parameters, demonstrating a manufacturing paradigm for designing and fabricating hardware for synthetic biology. PMID:26716448

  20. FELIX: a volumetric 3D laser display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahr, Detlef; Langhans, Knut; Gerken, Martin; Vogt, Carsten; Bezecny, Daniel; Homann, Dennis

    1996-03-01

    In this paper, an innovative approach of a true 3D image presentation in a space filling, volumetric laser display will be described. The introduced prototype system is based on a moving target screen that sweeps the display volume. Net result is the optical equivalent of a 3D array of image points illuminated to form a model of the object which occupies a physical space. Wireframe graphics are presented within the display volume which a group of people can walk around and examine simultaneously from nearly any orientation and without any visual aids. Further to the detailed vector scanning mode, a raster scanned system and a combination of both techniques are under development. The volumetric 3D laser display technology for true reproduction of spatial images can tremendously improve the viewers ability to interpret data and to reliably determine distance, shape and orientation. Possible applications for this development range from air traffic control, where moving blips of light represent individual aircrafts in a true to scale projected airspace of an airport, to various medical applications (e.g. electrocardiography, computer-tomography), to entertainment and education visualization as well as imaging in the field of engineering and Computer Aided Design.

  1. DNA Assembly in 3D Printed Fluidics

    PubMed Central

    Patrick, William G.; Nielsen, Alec A. K.; Keating, Steven J.; Levy, Taylor J.; Wang, Che-Wei; Rivera, Jaime J.; Mondragón-Palomino, Octavio; Carr, Peter A.; Voigt, Christopher A.; Oxman, Neri; Kong, David S.

    2015-01-01

    The process of connecting genetic parts—DNA assembly—is a foundational technology for synthetic biology. Microfluidics present an attractive solution for minimizing use of costly reagents, enabling multiplexed reactions, and automating protocols by integrating multiple protocol steps. However, microfluidics fabrication and operation can be expensive and requires expertise, limiting access to the technology. With advances in commodity digital fabrication tools, it is now possible to directly print fluidic devices and supporting hardware. 3D printed micro- and millifluidic devices are inexpensive, easy to make and quick to produce. We demonstrate Golden Gate DNA assembly in 3D-printed fluidics with reaction volumes as small as 490 nL, channel widths as fine as 220 microns, and per unit part costs ranging from $0.61 to $5.71. A 3D-printed syringe pump with an accompanying programmable software interface was designed and fabricated to operate the devices. Quick turnaround and inexpensive materials allowed for rapid exploration of device parameters, demonstrating a manufacturing paradigm for designing and fabricating hardware for synthetic biology. PMID:26716448

  2. Space-Based Erbium-Doped Fiber Amplifier Transmitters for Coherent, Ranging, 3D-Imaging, Altimetry, Topology, and Carbon Dioxide Lidar and Earth and Planetary Optical Laser Communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storm, Mark; Engin, Doruk; Mathason, Brian; Utano, Rich; Gupta, Shantanu

    2016-06-01

    This paper describes Fibertek, Inc.'s progress in developing space-qualified Erbium-doped fiber amplifier (EDFA) transmitters for laser communications and ranging/topology, and CO2 integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) lidar. High peak power (1 kW) and 6 W of average power supporting multiple communications formats has been demonstrated with 17% efficiency in a compact 3 kg package. The unit has been tested to Technology Readiness Level (TRL) 6 standards. A 20 W EDFA suitable for CO2 lidar has been demonstrated with ~14% efficiency (electrical to optical [e-o]) and its performance optimized for 1571 nm operation.

  3. 3D Imaging with Holographic Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheppard, Colin J. R.; Kou, Shan Shan

    2010-04-01

    There are two main types of tomography that enable the 3D internal structures of objects to be reconstructed from scattered data. The commonly known computerized tomography (CT) give good results in the x-ray wavelength range where the filtered back-projection theorem and Radon transform can be used. These techniques rely on the Fourier projection-slice theorem where rays are considered to propagate straight through the object. Another type of tomography called `diffraction tomography' applies in applications in optics and acoustics where diffraction and scattering effects must be taken into account. The latter proves to be a more difficult problem, as light no longer travels straight through the sample. Holographic tomography is a popular way of performing diffraction tomography and there has been active experimental research on reconstructing complex refractive index data using this approach recently. However, there are two distinct ways of doing tomography: either by rotation of the object or by rotation of the illumination while fixing the detector. The difference between these two setups is intuitive but needs to be quantified. From Fourier optics and information transformation point of view, we use 3D transfer function analysis to quantitatively describe how spatial frequencies of the object are mapped to the Fourier domain. We first employ a paraxial treatment by calculating the Fourier transform of the defocused OTF. The shape of the calculated 3D CTF for tomography, by scanning the illumination in one direction only, takes on a form that we might call a 'peanut,' compared to the case of object rotation, where a diablo is formed, the peanut exhibiting significant differences and non-isotropy. In particular, there is a line singularity along one transverse direction. Under high numerical aperture conditions, the paraxial treatment is not accurate, and so we make use of 3D analytical geometry to calculate the behaviour in the non-paraxial case. This time, we

  4. New portable FELIX 3D display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langhans, Knut; Bezecny, Daniel; Homann, Dennis; Bahr, Detlef; Vogt, Carsten; Blohm, Christian; Scharschmidt, Karl-Heinz

    1998-04-01

    An improved generation of our 'FELIX 3D Display' is presented. This system is compact, light, modular and easy to transport. The created volumetric images consist of many voxels, which are generated in a half-sphere display volume. In that way a spatial object can be displayed occupying a physical space with height, width and depth. The new FELIX generation uses a screen rotating with 20 revolutions per second. This target screen is mounted by an easy to change mechanism making it possible to use appropriate screens for the specific purpose of the display. An acousto-optic deflection unit with an integrated small diode pumped laser draws the images on the spinning screen. Images can consist of up to 10,000 voxels at a refresh rate of 20 Hz. Currently two different hardware systems are investigated. The first one is based on a standard PCMCIA digital/analog converter card as an interface and is controlled by a notebook. The developed software is provided with a graphical user interface enabling several animation features. The second, new prototype is designed to display images created by standard CAD applications. It includes the development of a new high speed hardware interface suitable for state-of-the- art fast and high resolution scanning devices, which require high data rates. A true 3D volume display as described will complement the broad range of 3D visualization tools, such as volume rendering packages, stereoscopic and virtual reality techniques, which have become widely available in recent years. Potential applications for the FELIX 3D display include imaging in the field so fair traffic control, medical imaging, computer aided design, science as well as entertainment.

  5. 3D Printable Graphene Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Xiaojun; Li, Dong; Jiang, Wei; Gu, Zheming; Wang, Xiaojuan; Zhang, Zengxing; Sun, Zhengzong

    2015-07-01

    In human being’s history, both the Iron Age and Silicon Age thrived after a matured massive processing technology was developed. Graphene is the most recent superior material which could potentially initialize another new material Age. However, while being exploited to its full extent, conventional processing methods fail to provide a link to today’s personalization tide. New technology should be ushered in. Three-dimensional (3D) printing fills the missing linkage between graphene materials and the digital mainstream. Their alliance could generate additional stream to push the graphene revolution into a new phase. Here we demonstrate for the first time, a graphene composite, with a graphene loading up to 5.6 wt%, can be 3D printable into computer-designed models. The composite’s linear thermal coefficient is below 75 ppm·°C-1 from room temperature to its glass transition temperature (Tg), which is crucial to build minute thermal stress during the printing process.

  6. 3D acoustic atmospheric tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, Kevin; Finn, Anthony

    2014-10-01

    This paper presents a method for tomographically reconstructing spatially varying 3D atmospheric temperature profiles and wind velocity fields based. Measurements of the acoustic signature measured onboard a small Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) are compared to ground-based observations of the same signals. The frequency-shifted signal variations are then used to estimate the acoustic propagation delay between the UAV and the ground microphones, which are also affected by atmospheric temperature and wind speed vectors along each sound ray path. The wind and temperature profiles are modelled as the weighted sum of Radial Basis Functions (RBFs), which also allow local meteorological measurements made at the UAV and ground receivers to supplement any acoustic observations. Tomography is used to provide a full 3D reconstruction/visualisation of the observed atmosphere. The technique offers observational mobility under direct user control and the capacity to monitor hazardous atmospheric environments, otherwise not justifiable on the basis of cost or risk. This paper summarises the tomographic technique and reports on the results of simulations and initial field trials. The technique has practical applications for atmospheric research, sound propagation studies, boundary layer meteorology, air pollution measurements, analysis of wind shear, and wind farm surveys.

  7. 3D Printed Bionic Ears

    PubMed Central

    Mannoor, Manu S.; Jiang, Ziwen; James, Teena; Kong, Yong Lin; Malatesta, Karen A.; Soboyejo, Winston O.; Verma, Naveen; Gracias, David H.; McAlpine, Michael C.

    2013-01-01

    The ability to three-dimensionally interweave biological tissue with functional electronics could enable the creation of bionic organs possessing enhanced functionalities over their human counterparts. Conventional electronic devices are inherently two-dimensional, preventing seamless multidimensional integration with synthetic biology, as the processes and materials are very different. Here, we present a novel strategy for overcoming these difficulties via additive manufacturing of biological cells with structural and nanoparticle derived electronic elements. As a proof of concept, we generated a bionic ear via 3D printing of a cell-seeded hydrogel matrix in the precise anatomic geometry of a human ear, along with an intertwined conducting polymer consisting of infused silver nanoparticles. This allowed for in vitro culturing of cartilage tissue around an inductive coil antenna in the ear, which subsequently enables readout of inductively-coupled signals from cochlea-shaped electrodes. The printed ear exhibits enhanced auditory sensing for radio frequency reception, and complementary left and right ears can listen to stereo audio music. Overall, our approach suggests a means to intricately merge biologic and nanoelectronic functionalities via 3D printing. PMID:23635097

  8. 3D printed bionic ears.

    PubMed

    Mannoor, Manu S; Jiang, Ziwen; James, Teena; Kong, Yong Lin; Malatesta, Karen A; Soboyejo, Winston O; Verma, Naveen; Gracias, David H; McAlpine, Michael C

    2013-06-12

    The ability to three-dimensionally interweave biological tissue with functional electronics could enable the creation of bionic organs possessing enhanced functionalities over their human counterparts. Conventional electronic devices are inherently two-dimensional, preventing seamless multidimensional integration with synthetic biology, as the processes and materials are very different. Here, we present a novel strategy for overcoming these difficulties via additive manufacturing of biological cells with structural and nanoparticle derived electronic elements. As a proof of concept, we generated a bionic ear via 3D printing of a cell-seeded hydrogel matrix in the anatomic geometry of a human ear, along with an intertwined conducting polymer consisting of infused silver nanoparticles. This allowed for in vitro culturing of cartilage tissue around an inductive coil antenna in the ear, which subsequently enables readout of inductively-coupled signals from cochlea-shaped electrodes. The printed ear exhibits enhanced auditory sensing for radio frequency reception, and complementary left and right ears can listen to stereo audio music. Overall, our approach suggests a means to intricately merge biologic and nanoelectronic functionalities via 3D printing. PMID:23635097

  9. 3D Printable Graphene Composite

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Xiaojun; Li, Dong; Jiang, Wei; Gu, Zheming; Wang, Xiaojuan; Zhang, Zengxing; Sun, Zhengzong

    2015-01-01

    In human being’s history, both the Iron Age and Silicon Age thrived after a matured massive processing technology was developed. Graphene is the most recent superior material which could potentially initialize another new material Age. However, while being exploited to its full extent, conventional processing methods fail to provide a link to today’s personalization tide. New technology should be ushered in. Three-dimensional (3D) printing fills the missing linkage between graphene materials and the digital mainstream. Their alliance could generate additional stream to push the graphene revolution into a new phase. Here we demonstrate for the first time, a graphene composite, with a graphene loading up to 5.6 wt%, can be 3D printable into computer-designed models. The composite’s linear thermal coefficient is below 75 ppm·°C−1 from room temperature to its glass transition temperature (Tg), which is crucial to build minute thermal stress during the printing process. PMID:26153673

  10. 3D medical thermography device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moghadam, Peyman

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, a novel handheld 3D medical thermography system is introduced. The proposed system consists of a thermal-infrared camera, a color camera and a depth camera rigidly attached in close proximity and mounted on an ergonomic handle. As a practitioner holding the device smoothly moves it around the human body parts, the proposed system generates and builds up a precise 3D thermogram model by incorporating information from each new measurement in real-time. The data is acquired in motion, thus it provides multiple points of view. When processed, these multiple points of view are adaptively combined by taking into account the reliability of each individual measurement which can vary due to a variety of factors such as angle of incidence, distance between the device and the subject and environmental sensor data or other factors influencing a confidence of the thermal-infrared data when captured. Finally, several case studies are presented to support the usability and performance of the proposed system.

  11. 3D Ion Temperature Reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanabe, Hiroshi; You, Setthivoine; Balandin, Alexander; Inomoto, Michiaki; Ono, Yasushi

    2009-11-01

    The TS-4 experiment at the University of Tokyo collides two spheromaks to form a single high-beta compact toroid. Magnetic reconnection during the merging process heats and accelerates the plasma in toroidal and poloidal directions. The reconnection region has a complex 3D topology determined by the pitch of the spheromak magnetic fields at the merging plane. A pair of multichord passive spectroscopic diagnostics have been established to measure the ion temperature and velocity in the reconnection volume. One setup measures spectral lines across a poloidal plane, retrieving velocity and temperature from Abel inversion. The other, novel setup records spectral lines across another section of the plasma and reconstructs velocity and temperature from 3D vector and 2D scalar tomography techniques. The magnetic field linking both measurement planes is determined from in situ magnetic probe arrays. The ion temperature is then estimated within the volume between the two measurement planes and at the reconnection region. The measurement is followed over several repeatable discharges to follow the heating and acceleration process during the merging reconnection.

  12. User experience while viewing stereoscopic 3D television.

    PubMed

    Read, Jenny C A; Bohr, Iwo

    2014-01-01

    3D display technologies have been linked to visual discomfort and fatigue. In a lab-based study with a between-subjects design, 433 viewers aged from 4 to 82 years watched the same movie in either 2D or stereo 3D (S3D), and subjectively reported on a range of aspects of their viewing experience. Our results suggest that a minority of viewers, around 14%, experience adverse effects due to viewing S3D, mainly headache and eyestrain. A control experiment where participants viewed 2D content through 3D glasses suggests that around 8% may report adverse effects which are not due directly to viewing S3D, but instead are due to the glasses or to negative preconceptions about S3D (the 'nocebo effect'). Women were slightly more likely than men to report adverse effects with S3D. We could not detect any link between pre-existing eye conditions or low stereoacuity and the likelihood of experiencing adverse effects with S3D. PMID:24874550

  13. LOTT RANCH 3D PROJECT

    SciTech Connect

    Larry Lawrence; Bruce Miller

    2004-09-01

    The Lott Ranch 3D seismic prospect located in Garza County, Texas is a project initiated in September of 1991 by the J.M. Huber Corp., a petroleum exploration and production company. By today's standards the 126 square mile project does not seem monumental, however at the time it was conceived it was the most intensive land 3D project ever attempted. Acquisition began in September of 1991 utilizing GEO-SEISMIC, INC., a seismic data contractor. The field parameters were selected by J.M. Huber, and were of a radical design. The recording instruments used were GeoCor IV amplifiers designed by Geosystems Inc., which record the data in signed bit format. It would not have been practical, if not impossible, to have processed the entire raw volume with the tools available at that time. The end result was a dataset that was thought to have little utility due to difficulties in processing the field data. In 1997, Yates Energy Corp. located in Roswell, New Mexico, formed a partnership to further develop the project. Through discussions and meetings with Pinnacle Seismic, it was determined that the original Lott Ranch 3D volume could be vastly improved upon reprocessing. Pinnacle Seismic had shown the viability of improving field-summed signed bit data on smaller 2D and 3D projects. Yates contracted Pinnacle Seismic Ltd. to perform the reprocessing. This project was initiated with high resolution being a priority. Much of the potential resolution was lost through the initial summing of the field data. Modern computers that are now being utilized have tremendous speed and storage capacities that were cost prohibitive when this data was initially processed. Software updates and capabilities offer a variety of quality control and statics resolution, which are pertinent to the Lott Ranch project. The reprocessing effort was very successful. The resulting processed data-set was then interpreted using modern PC-based interpretation and mapping software. Production data, log data

  14. Long-range correlations in heart rate variability during computer-mouse work under time pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Dineng; He, Mulu; Qiu, Yihong; Zhu, Yisheng; Tong, Shanbao

    2009-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influences of time pressure on long-range correlations in heart rate variability (HRV), the effects of relaxation on the cardiovascular regulation system and the advantages of detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) over the conventional power spectral analysis in discriminating states of the cardiovascular systems under different levels of time pressure. Volunteer subjects ( n=10, male/female=5/5) participated in a computer-mouse task consisting of five sessions, i.e. baseline session (BSS) which was free of time pressure, followed by sessions with 80% (SS80), 100% (SS100), 90% (SS90) and 150% (SS150) of the baseline time. Electrocardiogram (ECG) and task performance were recorded throughout the experiments. Two rest sessions before and after the computer-mouse work, i.e. RS1 and RS2, were also recorded as comparison. HRV series were subsequently analyzed by both conventional power spectral analysis and detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA). The long-term scaling exponent α2 by DFA was significantly lower in SS80 than that in other sessions. It was also found that short-term release of time pressure had positive influences on the cardiovascular system, i.e. the α2 in RS2 was significantly higher than that in SS80, SS100 and SS90. No significant differences were found between any two sessions by conventional power spectral analysis. Our results showed that DFA performed better in discriminating the states of cardiovascular autonomic modulation under time pressure than the conventional power spectral analysis.

  15. Reproducibility of 3D kinematics and surface electromyography measurements of mastication.

    PubMed

    Remijn, Lianne; Groen, Brenda E; Speyer, Renée; van Limbeek, Jacques; Nijhuis-van der Sanden, Maria W G

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the measurement reproducibility for a procedure evaluating the mastication process and to estimate the smallest detectable differences of 3D kinematic and surface electromyography (sEMG) variables. Kinematics of mandible movements and sEMG activity of the masticatory muscles were obtained over two sessions with four conditions: two food textures (biscuit and bread) of two sizes (small and large). Twelve healthy adults (mean age 29.1 years) completed the study. The second to the fifth chewing cycle of 5 bites were used for analyses. The reproducibility per outcome variable was calculated with an intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) and a Bland-Altman analysis was applied to determine the standard error of measurement relative error of measurement and smallest detectable differences of all variables. ICCs ranged from 0.71 to 0.98 for all outcome variables. The outcome variables consisted of four bite and fourteen chewing cycle variables. The relative standard error of measurement of the bite variables was up to 17.3% for 'time-to-swallow', 'time-to-transport' and 'number of chewing cycles', but ranged from 31.5% to 57.0% for 'change of chewing side'. The relative standard error of measurement ranged from 4.1% to 24.7% for chewing cycle variables and was smaller for kinematic variables than sEMG variables. In general, measurements obtained with 3D kinematics and sEMG are reproducible techniques to assess the mastication process. The duration of the chewing cycle and frequency of chewing were the best reproducible measurements. Change of chewing side could not be reproduced. The published measurement error and smallest detectable differences will aid the interpretation of the results of future clinical studies using the same study variables. PMID:26617403

  16. Construction of programmable interconnected 3D microfluidic networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunziker, Patrick R.; Wolf, Marc P.; Wang, Xueya; Zhang, Bei; Marsch, Stephan; Salieb-Beugelaar, Georgette B.

    2015-02-01

    Microfluidic systems represent a key-enabling platform for novel diagnostic tools for use at the point-of-care in clinical contexts as well as for evolving single cell diagnostics. The design of 3D microfluidic systems is an active field of development, but construction of true interconnected 3D microfluidic networks is still a challenge, in particular when the goal is rapid prototyping, accurate design and flexibility. We report a novel approach for the construction of programmable 3D microfluidic systems consisting of modular 3D template casting of interconnected threads to allow user-programmable flow paths and examine its structural characteristics and its modular function. To overcome problems with thread template casting reported in the literature, low-surface-energy polymer threads were used, that allow solvent-free production. Connected circular channels with excellent roundness and low diameter variability were created. Variable channel termination allowed programming a flow path on-the-fly, thus rendering the resulting 3D microfluidic systems highly customizable even after production. Thus, construction of programmable/reprogrammable fully 3D microfluidic systems by template casting of a network of interconnecting threads is feasible, leads to high-quality and highly reproducible, complex 3D geometries.

  17. Status of CFDLIB performance tests on the T3D

    SciTech Connect

    Padial, N.T.; Kashiwa, B.A.; Kothe, D.B.

    1994-11-01

    CFDLIB is a collection of two- and three-dimensional computer codes for problems in computational fluid dynamics. The library handles a wide range of flow regimes both single and multiphase, from fully incompressible to hypersonic, chemically reacting or inert materials. The method uses the Implicity Continuous-fluid Eulerian scheme (ICE) which becomes essentially identical to the Marker and Cell (MAC) method in the incompressible limit. The method, a Finite-Volume scheme, with cell-centered state variables, utilizes an Arbitrary-Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) split computational cycle in the sense that the mesh is allowed to move in an arbitrary fashion. In addition, CFDLIB employs a multiblock data structure that proved extremely convenient for implementation on parallel computers. CFDLIB is now available in sequential or parallel environments, is written in standard FORTRAN 77, and is highly portable. Results are given for a selection of specialized applications that illustrate the kind of problems of interest to CFDLIB users. Finally, initial results are given for performance studies comparing the Cray Y-MP, T3D, and an IBM workstation cluster. For certain problems, a Y-MP-equivalent real solution time is achieved with less than eight processors on the T3D.

  18. 3D Printed Microscope for Mobile Devices that Cost Pennies

    ScienceCinema

    Erikson, Rebecca; Baird, Cheryl; Hutchinson, Janine

    2015-06-23

    Scientists at PNNL have designed a 3D-printable microscope for mobile devices using pennies worth of plastic and glass materials. The microscope has a wide range of uses, from education to in-the-field science.

  19. 3D Printed Microscope for Mobile Devices that Cost Pennies

    SciTech Connect

    Erikson, Rebecca; Baird, Cheryl; Hutchinson, Janine

    2014-09-15

    Scientists at PNNL have designed a 3D-printable microscope for mobile devices using pennies worth of plastic and glass materials. The microscope has a wide range of uses, from education to in-the-field science.

  20. Advanced Data Visualization in Astrophysics: The X3D Pathway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogt, Frédéric P. A.; Owen, Chris I.; Verdes-Montenegro, Lourdes; Borthakur, Sanchayeeta

    2016-02-01

    Most modern astrophysical data sets are multi-dimensional; a characteristic that can nowadays generally be conserved and exploited scientifically during the data reduction/simulation and analysis cascades. However, the same multi-dimensional data sets are systematically cropped, sliced, and/or projected to printable two-dimensional diagrams at the publication stage. In this article, we introduce the concept of the “X3D pathway” as a mean of simplifying and easing the access to data visualization and publication via three-dimensional (3D) diagrams. The X3D pathway exploits the facts that (1) the X3D 3D file format lies at the center of a product tree that includes interactive HTML documents, 3D printing, and high-end animations, and (2) all high-impact-factor and peer-reviewed journals in astrophysics are now published (some exclusively) online. We argue that the X3D standard is an ideal vector for sharing multi-dimensional data sets because it provides direct access to a range of different data visualization techniques, is fully open source, and is a well-defined standard from the International Organization for Standardization. Unlike other earlier propositions to publish multi-dimensional data sets via 3D diagrams, the X3D pathway is not tied to specific software (prone to rapid and unexpected evolution), but instead is compatible with a range of open-source software already in use by our community. The interactive HTML branch of the X3D pathway is also actively supported by leading peer-reviewed journals in the field of astrophysics. Finally, this article provides interested readers with a detailed set of practical astrophysical examples designed to act as a stepping stone toward the implementation of the X3D pathway for any other data set.

  1. 3D Printing of Graphene Aerogels.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiangqiang; Zhang, Feng; Medarametla, Sai Pradeep; Li, Hui; Zhou, Chi; Lin, Dong

    2016-04-01

    3D printing of a graphene aerogel with true 3D overhang structures is highlighted. The aerogel is fabricated by combining drop-on-demand 3D printing and freeze casting. The water-based GO ink is ejected and freeze-cast into designed 3D structures. The lightweight (<10 mg cm(-3) ) 3D printed graphene aerogel presents superelastic and high electrical conduction. PMID:26861680

  2. Met.3D - a new open-source tool for interactive 3D visualization of ensemble weather forecasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rautenhaus, Marc; Kern, Michael; Schäfler, Andreas; Westermann, Rüdiger

    2015-04-01

    We introduce Met.3D, a new open-source tool for the interactive 3D visualization of numerical ensemble weather predictions. The tool has been developed to support weather forecasting during aircraft-based atmospheric field campaigns, however, is applicable to further forecasting, research and teaching activities. Our work approaches challenging topics related to the visual analysis of numerical atmospheric model output -- 3D visualisation, ensemble visualization, and how both can be used in a meaningful way suited to weather forecasting. Met.3D builds a bridge from proven 2D visualization methods commonly used in meteorology to 3D visualization by combining both visualization types in a 3D context. It implements methods that address the issue of spatial perception in the 3D view as well as approaches to using the ensemble in order to assess forecast uncertainty. Interactivity is key to the Met.3D approach. The tool uses modern graphics hardware technology to achieve interactive visualization of present-day numerical weather prediction datasets on standard consumer hardware. Met.3D supports forecast data from the European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasts and operates directly on ECMWF hybrid sigma-pressure level grids. In this presentation, we provide an overview of the software --illustrated with short video examples--, and give information on its availability.

  3. 3-D visualization of ensemble weather forecasts - Part 1: The visualization tool Met.3D (version 1.0)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rautenhaus, M.; Kern, M.; Schäfler, A.; Westermann, R.

    2015-02-01

    We present Met.3D, a new open-source tool for the interactive 3-D visualization of numerical ensemble weather predictions. The tool has been developed to support weather forecasting during aircraft-based atmospheric field campaigns, however, is applicable to further forecasting, research and teaching activities. Our work approaches challenging topics related to the visual analysis of numerical atmospheric model output - 3-D visualization, ensemble visualization, and how both can be used in a meaningful way suited to weather forecasting. Met.3D builds a bridge from proven 2-D visualization methods commonly used in meteorology to 3-D visualization by combining both visualization types in a 3-D context. We address the issue of spatial perception in the 3-D view and present approaches to using the ensemble to allow the user to assess forecast uncertainty. Interactivity is key to our approach. Met.3D uses modern graphics technology to achieve interactive visualization on standard consumer hardware. The tool supports forecast data from the European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasts and can operate directly on ECMWF hybrid sigma-pressure level grids. We describe the employed visualization algorithms, and analyse the impact of the ECMWF grid topology on computing 3-D ensemble statistical quantitites. Our techniques are demonstrated with examples from the T-NAWDEX-Falcon 2012 campaign.

  4. 3D Inverse problem: Seawater intrusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steklova, K.; Haber, E.

    2013-12-01

    Modeling of seawater intrusions (SWI) is challenging as it involves solving the governing equations for variable density flow, multiple time scales and varying boundary conditions. Due to the nonlinearity of the equations and the large aquifer domains, 3D computations are a costly process, particularly when solving the inverse SWI problem. In addition the heads and concentration measurements are difficult to obtain due to mixing, saline wedge location is sensitive to aquifer topography, and there is general uncertainty in initial and boundary conditions and parameters. Some of these complications can be overcome by using indirect geophysical data next to standard groundwater measurements, however, the inverse problem is usually simplified, e.g. by zonation for the parameters based on geological information, steady state substitution of the unknown initial conditions, decoupling the equations or reducing the amount of unknown parameters by covariance analysis. In our work we present a discretization of the flow and solute mass balance equations for variable groundwater (GW) flow. A finite difference scheme is to solve pressure equation and a Semi - Lagrangian method for solute transport equation. In this way we are able to choose an arbitrarily large time step without losing stability up to an accuracy requirement coming from the coupled character of the variable density flow equations. We derive analytical sensitivities of the GW model for parameters related to the porous media properties and also the initial solute distribution. Analytically derived sensitivities reduce the computational cost of inverse problem, but also give insight for maximizing information in collected data. If the geophysical data are available it also enables simultaneous calibration in a coupled hydrogeophysical framework. The 3D inverse problem was tested on artificial time dependent data for pressure and solute content coming from a GW forward model and/or geophysical forward model. Two

  5. ShowMe3D

    2012-01-05

    ShowMe3D is a data visualization graphical user interface specifically designed for use with hyperspectral image obtained from the Hyperspectral Confocal Microscope. The program allows the user to select and display any single image from a three dimensional hyperspectral image stack. By moving a slider control, the user can easily move between images of the stack. The user can zoom into any region of the image. The user can select any pixel or region from themore » displayed image and display the fluorescence spectrum associated with that pixel or region. The user can define up to 3 spectral filters to apply to the hyperspectral image and view the image as it would appear from a filter-based confocal microscope. The user can also obtain statistics such as intensity average and variance from selected regions.« less

  6. ShowMe3D

    SciTech Connect

    Sinclair, Michael B

    2012-01-05

    ShowMe3D is a data visualization graphical user interface specifically designed for use with hyperspectral image obtained from the Hyperspectral Confocal Microscope. The program allows the user to select and display any single image from a three dimensional hyperspectral image stack. By moving a slider control, the user can easily move between images of the stack. The user can zoom into any region of the image. The user can select any pixel or region from the displayed image and display the fluorescence spectrum associated with that pixel or region. The user can define up to 3 spectral filters to apply to the hyperspectral image and view the image as it would appear from a filter-based confocal microscope. The user can also obtain statistics such as intensity average and variance from selected regions.

  7. 3D Elastic Wavefield Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guasch, L.; Warner, M.; Stekl, I.; Umpleby, A.; Shah, N.

    2010-12-01

    Wavefield tomography, or waveform inversion, aims to extract the maximum information from seismic data by matching trace by trace the response of the solid earth to seismic waves using numerical modelling tools. Its first formulation dates from the early 80's, when Albert Tarantola developed a solid theoretical basis that is still used today with little change. Due to computational limitations, the application of the method to 3D problems has been unaffordable until a few years ago, and then only under the acoustic approximation. Although acoustic wavefield tomography is widely used, a complete solution of the seismic inversion problem requires that we account properly for the physics of wave propagation, and so must include elastic effects. We have developed a 3D tomographic wavefield inversion code that incorporates the full elastic wave equation. The bottle neck of the different implementations is the forward modelling algorithm that generates the synthetic data to be compared with the field seismograms as well as the backpropagation of the residuals needed to form the direction update of the model parameters. Furthermore, one or two extra modelling runs are needed in order to calculate the step-length. Our approach uses a FD scheme explicit time-stepping by finite differences that are 4th order in space and 2nd order in time, which is a 3D version of the one developed by Jean Virieux in 1986. We chose the time domain because an explicit time scheme is much less demanding in terms of memory than its frequency domain analogue, although the discussion of wich domain is more efficient still remains open. We calculate the parameter gradients for Vp and Vs by correlating the normal and shear stress wavefields respectively. A straightforward application would lead to the storage of the wavefield at all grid points at each time-step. We tackled this problem using two different approaches. The first one makes better use of resources for small models of dimension equal

  8. Supernova Remnant in 3-D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    wavelengths. Since the amount of the wavelength shift is related to the speed of motion, one can determine how fast the debris are moving in either direction. Because Cas A is the result of an explosion, the stellar debris is expanding radially outwards from the explosion center. Using simple geometry, the scientists were able to construct a 3-D model using all of this information. A program called 3-D Slicer modified for astronomical use by the Astronomical Medicine Project at Harvard University in Cambridge, Mass. was used to display and manipulate the 3-D model. Commercial software was then used to create the 3-D fly-through.

    The blue filaments defining the blast wave were not mapped using the Doppler effect because they emit a different kind of light synchrotron radiation that does not emit light at discrete wavelengths, but rather in a broad continuum. The blue filaments are only a representation of the actual filaments observed at the blast wave.

    This visualization shows that there are two main components to this supernova remnant: a spherical component in the outer parts of the remnant and a flattened (disk-like) component in the inner region. The spherical component consists of the outer layer of the star that exploded, probably made of helium and carbon. These layers drove a spherical blast wave into the diffuse gas surrounding the star. The flattened component that astronomers were unable to map into 3-D prior to these Spitzer observations consists of the inner layers of the star. It is made from various heavier elements, not all shown in the visualization, such as oxygen, neon, silicon, sulphur, argon and iron.

    High-velocity plumes, or jets, of this material are shooting out from the explosion in the plane of the disk-like component mentioned above. Plumes of silicon appear in the northeast and southwest, while those of iron are seen in the southeast and north. These jets were already known and Doppler velocity measurements have been made for these

  9. Characterizing targets and backgrounds for 3D laser radars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinvall, Ove K.; Larsson, Hakan; Gustafsson, Frank; Chevalier, Tomas R.; Persson, Asa; Klasen, Lena M.

    2004-12-01

    Exciting development is taking place in 3 D sensing laser radars. Scanning systems are well established for mapping from airborne and ground sensors. 3 D sensing focal plane arrays (FPAs) enable a full range and intensity image can be captured in one laser shot. Gated viewing systems also produces 3 D target information. Many applications for 3 D laser radars are found in robotics, rapid terrain visualization, augmented vision, reconnaissance and target recognition, weapon guidance including aim point selection and others. The net centric warfare will demand high resolution geo-data for a common description of the environment. At FOI we have a measurement program to collect data relevant for 3 D laser radars using airborne and tripod mounted equipment for data collection. Data collection spans from single pixel waveform collection (1 D) over 2 D using range gated imaging to full 3 D imaging using scanning systems. This paper will describe 3 D laser data from different campaigns with emphasis on range distribution and reflections properties for targets and background during different seasonal conditions. Example of the use of the data for system modeling, performance prediction and algorithm development will be given. Different metrics to characterize the data set will also be discussed.

  10. Highly compressible 3D periodic graphene aerogel microlattices.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Cheng; Han, T Yong-Jin; Duoss, Eric B; Golobic, Alexandra M; Kuntz, Joshua D; Spadaccini, Christopher M; Worsley, Marcus A

    2015-01-01

    Graphene is a two-dimensional material that offers a unique combination of low density, exceptional mechanical properties, large surface area and excellent electrical conductivity. Recent progress has produced bulk 3D assemblies of graphene, such as graphene aerogels, but they possess purely stochastic porous networks, which limit their performance compared with the potential of an engineered architecture. Here we report the fabrication of periodic graphene aerogel microlattices, possessing an engineered architecture via a 3D printing technique known as direct ink writing. The 3D printed graphene aerogels are lightweight, highly conductive and exhibit supercompressibility (up to 90% compressive strain). Moreover, the Young's moduli of the 3D printed graphene aerogels show an order of magnitude improvement over bulk graphene materials with comparable geometric density and possess large surface areas. Adapting the 3D printing technique to graphene aerogels realizes the possibility of fabricating a myriad of complex aerogel architectures for a broad range of applications. PMID:25902277

  11. Highly compressible 3D periodic graphene aerogel microlattices

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Cheng; Han, T. Yong-Jin; Duoss, Eric B.; Golobic, Alexandra M.; Kuntz, Joshua D.; Spadaccini, Christopher M.; Worsley, Marcus A.

    2015-01-01

    Graphene is a two-dimensional material that offers a unique combination of low density, exceptional mechanical properties, large surface area and excellent electrical conductivity. Recent progress has produced bulk 3D assemblies of graphene, such as graphene aerogels, but they possess purely stochastic porous networks, which limit their performance compared with the potential of an engineered architecture. Here we report the fabrication of periodic graphene aerogel microlattices, possessing an engineered architecture via a 3D printing technique known as direct ink writing. The 3D printed graphene aerogels are lightweight, highly conductive and exhibit supercompressibility (up to 90% compressive strain). Moreover, the Young's moduli of the 3D printed graphene aerogels show an order of magnitude improvement over bulk graphene materials with comparable geometric density and possess large surface areas. Adapting the 3D printing technique to graphene aerogels realizes the possibility of fabricating a myriad of complex aerogel architectures for a broad range of applications. PMID:25902277

  12. 3D-printing technologies for electrochemical applications.

    PubMed

    Ambrosi, Adriano; Pumera, Martin

    2016-05-21

    Since its conception during the 80s, 3D-printing, also known as additive manufacturing, has been receiving unprecedented levels of attention and interest from industry and research laboratories. This is in addition to end users, who have benefited from the pervasiveness of desktop-size and relatively cheap printing machines available. 3D-printing enables almost infinite possibilities for rapid prototyping. Therefore, it has been considered for applications in numerous research fields, ranging from mechanical engineering, medicine, and materials science to chemistry. Electrochemistry is another branch of science that can certainly benefit from 3D-printing technologies, paving the way for the design and fabrication of cheaper, higher performing, and ubiquitously available electrochemical devices. Here, we aim to provide a general overview of the most commonly available 3D-printing methods along with a review of recent electrochemistry related studies adopting 3D-printing as a possible rapid prototyping fabrication tool. PMID:27048921

  13. Highly compressible 3D periodic graphene aerogel microlattices

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Cheng; Han, T. Yong-Jin; Duoss, Eric B.; Golobic, Alexandra M.; Kuntz, Joshua D.; Spadaccini, Christopher M.; Worsley, Marcus A.

    2015-04-22

    Graphene is a two-dimensional material that offers a unique combination of low density, exceptional mechanical properties, large surface area and excellent electrical conductivity. Recent progress has produced bulk 3D assemblies of graphene, such as graphene aerogels, but they possess purely stochastic porous networks, which limit their performance compared with the potential of an engineered architecture. Here we report the fabrication of periodic graphene aerogel microlattices, possessing an engineered architecture via a 3D printing technique known as direct ink writing. The 3D printed graphene aerogels are lightweight, highly conductive and exhibit supercompressibility (up to 90% compressive strain). Moreover, the Young’s moduli of the 3D printed graphene aerogels show an order of magnitude improvement over bulk graphene materials with comparable geometric density and possess large surface areas. Ultimately, adapting the 3D printing technique to graphene aerogels realizes the possibility of fabricating a myriad of complex aerogel architectures for a broad range of applications.

  14. 3D laser gated viewing from a moving submarine platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christnacher, F.; Laurenzis, M.; Monnin, D.; Schmitt, G.; Metzger, Nicolas; Schertzer, Stéphane; Scholtz, T.

    2014-10-01

    Range-gated active imaging is a prominent technique for night vision, remote sensing or vision through obstacles (fog, smoke, camouflage netting…). Furthermore, range-gated imaging not only informs on the scene reflectance but also on the range for each pixel. In this paper, we discuss 3D imaging methods for underwater imaging applications. In this situation, it is particularly difficult to stabilize the imaging platform and these 3D reconstruction algorithms suffer from the motion between the different images in the recorded sequence. To overcome this drawback, we investigated a new method based on a combination between image registration by homography and 3D scene reconstruction through tomography or two-image technique. After stabilisation, the 3D reconstruction is achieved by using the two upper-mentioned techniques. In the different experimental examples given in this paper, a centimetric resolution could be achieved.

  15. Supernova Remnant in 3-D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    wavelengths. Since the amount of the wavelength shift is related to the speed of motion, one can determine how fast the debris are moving in either direction. Because Cas A is the result of an explosion, the stellar debris is expanding radially outwards from the explosion center. Using simple geometry, the scientists were able to construct a 3-D model using all of this information. A program called 3-D Slicer modified for astronomical use by the Astronomical Medicine Project at Harvard University in Cambridge, Mass. was used to display and manipulate the 3-D model. Commercial software was then used to create the 3-D fly-through.

    The blue filaments defining the blast wave were not mapped using the Doppler effect because they emit a different kind of light synchrotron radiation that does not emit light at discrete wavelengths, but rather in a broad continuum. The blue filaments are only a representation of the actual filaments observed at the blast wave.

    This visualization shows that there are two main components to this supernova remnant: a spherical component in the outer parts of the remnant and a flattened (disk-like) component in the inner region. The spherical component consists of the outer layer of the star that exploded, probably made of helium and carbon. These layers drove a spherical blast wave into the diffuse gas surrounding the star. The flattened component that astronomers were unable to map into 3-D prior to these Spitzer observations consists of the inner layers of the star. It is made from various heavier elements, not all shown in the visualization, such as oxygen, neon, silicon, sulphur, argon and iron.

    High-velocity plumes, or jets, of this material are shooting out from the explosion in the plane of the disk-like component mentioned above. Plumes of silicon appear in the northeast and southwest, while those of iron are seen in the southeast and north. These jets were already known and Doppler velocity measurements have been made for these

  16. Laser 3D micro-manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piqué, Alberto; Auyeung, Raymond C. Y.; Kim, Heungsoo; Charipar, Nicholas A.; Mathews, Scott A.

    2016-06-01

    Laser-based materials processing techniques are gaining widespread use in micro-manufacturing applications. The use of laser microfabrication techniques enables the processing of micro- and nanostructures from a wide range of materials and geometries without the need for masking and etching steps commonly associated with photolithography. This review aims to describe the broad applications space covered by laser-based micro- and nanoprocessing techniques and the benefits offered by the use of lasers in micro-manufacturing processes. Given their non-lithographic nature, these processes are also referred to as laser direct-write and constitute some of the earliest demonstrations of 3D printing or additive manufacturing at the microscale. As this review will show, the use of lasers enables precise control of the various types of processing steps—from subtractive to additive—over a wide range of scales with an extensive materials palette. Overall, laser-based direct-write techniques offer multiple modes of operation including the removal (via ablative processes) and addition (via photopolymerization or printing) of most classes of materials using the same equipment in many cases. The versatility provided by these multi-function, multi-material and multi-scale laser micro-manufacturing processes cannot be matched by photolithography nor with other direct-write microfabrication techniques and offer unique opportunities for current and future 3D micro-manufacturing applications.

  17. Backhoe 3D "gold standard" image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorham, LeRoy; Naidu, Kiranmai D.; Majumder, Uttam; Minardi, Michael A.

    2005-05-01

    ViSUAl-D (VIsual Sar Using ALl Dimensions), a 2004 DARPA/IXO seedling effort, is developing a capability for reliable high confidence ID from standoff ranges. Recent conflicts have demonstrated that the warfighter would greatly benefit from the ability to ID targets beyond visual and electro-optical ranges[1]. Forming optical-quality SAR images while exploiting full polarization, wide angles, and large bandwidth would be key evidence such a capability is achievable. Using data generated by the Xpatch EM scattering code, ViSUAl-D investigates all degrees of freedom available to the radar designer, including 6 GHz bandwidth, full polarization and angle sampling over 2π steradians (upper hemisphere), in order to produce a "literal" image or representation of the target. This effort includes the generation of a "Gold Standard" image that can be produced at X-band utilizing all available target data. This "Gold Standard" image of the backhoe will serve as a test bed for future more relevant military targets and their image development. The seedling team produced a public release data which was released at the 2004 SPIE conference, as well as a 3D "Gold Standard" backhoe image using a 3D image formation algorithm. This paper describes the full backhoe data set, the image formation algorithm, the visualization process and the resulting image.

  18. 3D multiplexed immunoplasmonics microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergeron, Éric; Patskovsky, Sergiy; Rioux, David; Meunier, Michel

    2016-07-01

    Selective labelling, identification and spatial distribution of cell surface biomarkers can provide important clinical information, such as distinction between healthy and diseased cells, evolution of a disease and selection of the optimal patient-specific treatment. Immunofluorescence is the gold standard for efficient detection of biomarkers expressed by cells. However, antibodies (Abs) conjugated to fluorescent dyes remain limited by their photobleaching, high sensitivity to the environment, low light intensity, and wide absorption and emission spectra. Immunoplasmonics is a novel microscopy method based on the visualization of Abs-functionalized plasmonic nanoparticles (fNPs) targeting cell surface biomarkers. Tunable fNPs should provide higher multiplexing capacity than immunofluorescence since NPs are photostable over time, strongly scatter light at their plasmon peak wavelengths and can be easily functionalized. In this article, we experimentally demonstrate accurate multiplexed detection based on the immunoplasmonics approach. First, we achieve the selective labelling of three targeted cell surface biomarkers (cluster of differentiation 44 (CD44), epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and voltage-gated K+ channel subunit KV1.1) on human cancer CD44+ EGFR+ KV1.1+ MDA-MB-231 cells and reference CD44- EGFR- KV1.1+ 661W cells. The labelling efficiency with three stable specific immunoplasmonics labels (functionalized silver nanospheres (CD44-AgNSs), gold (Au) NSs (EGFR-AuNSs) and Au nanorods (KV1.1-AuNRs)) detected by reflected light microscopy (RLM) is similar to the one with immunofluorescence. Second, we introduce an improved method for 3D localization and spectral identification of fNPs based on fast z-scanning by RLM with three spectral filters corresponding to the plasmon peak wavelengths of the immunoplasmonics labels in the cellular environment (500 nm for 80 nm AgNSs, 580 nm for 100 nm AuNSs and 700 nm for 40 nm × 92 nm AuNRs). Third, the developed

  19. Bringing 3D Printing to Geophysical Science Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boghosian, A.; Turrin, M.; Porter, D. F.

    2014-12-01

    3D printing technology has been embraced by many technical fields, and is rapidly making its way into peoples' homes and schools. While there is a growing educational and hobbyist community engaged in the STEM focused technical and intellectual challenges associated with 3D printing, there is unrealized potential for the earth science community to use 3D printing to communicate scientific research to the public. Moreover, 3D printing offers scientists the opportunity to connect students and the public with novel visualizations of real data. As opposed to introducing terrestrial measurements through the use of colormaps and gradients, scientists can represent 3D concepts with 3D models, offering a more intuitive education tool. Furthermore, the tactile aspect of models make geophysical concepts accessible to a wide range of learning styles like kinesthetic or tactile, and learners including both visually impaired and color-blind students.We present a workflow whereby scientists, students, and the general public will be able to 3D print their own versions of geophysical datasets, even adding time through layering to include a 4th dimension, for a "4D" print. This will enable scientists with unique and expert insights into the data to easily create the tools they need to communicate their research. It will allow educators to quickly produce teaching aids for their students. Most importantly, it will enable the students themselves to translate the 2D representation of geophysical data into a 3D representation of that same data, reinforcing spatial reasoning.

  20. NIF Ignition Target 3D Point Design

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, O; Marinak, M; Milovich, J; Callahan, D

    2008-11-05

    We have developed an input file for running 3D NIF hohlraums that is optimized such that it can be run in 1-2 days on parallel computers. We have incorporated increasing levels of automation into the 3D input file: (1) Configuration controlled input files; (2) Common file for 2D and 3D, different types of capsules (symcap, etc.); and (3) Can obtain target dimensions, laser pulse, and diagnostics settings automatically from NIF Campaign Management Tool. Using 3D Hydra calculations to investigate different problems: (1) Intrinsic 3D asymmetry; (2) Tolerance to nonideal 3D effects (e.g. laser power balance, pointing errors); and (3) Synthetic diagnostics.

  1. 3D multiplexed immunoplasmonics microscopy.

    PubMed

    Bergeron, Éric; Patskovsky, Sergiy; Rioux, David; Meunier, Michel

    2016-07-21

    Selective labelling, identification and spatial distribution of cell surface biomarkers can provide important clinical information, such as distinction between healthy and diseased cells, evolution of a disease and selection of the optimal patient-specific treatment. Immunofluorescence is the gold standard for efficient detection of biomarkers expressed by cells. However, antibodies (Abs) conjugated to fluorescent dyes remain limited by their photobleaching, high sensitivity to the environment, low light intensity, and wide absorption and emission spectra. Immunoplasmonics is a novel microscopy method based on the visualization of Abs-functionalized plasmonic nanoparticles (fNPs) targeting cell surface biomarkers. Tunable fNPs should provide higher multiplexing capacity than immunofluorescence since NPs are photostable over time, strongly scatter light at their plasmon peak wavelengths and can be easily functionalized. In this article, we experimentally demonstrate accurate multiplexed detection based on the immunoplasmonics approach. First, we achieve the selective labelling of three targeted cell surface biomarkers (cluster of differentiation 44 (CD44), epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and voltage-gated K(+) channel subunit KV1.1) on human cancer CD44(+) EGFR(+) KV1.1(+) MDA-MB-231 cells and reference CD44(-) EGFR(-) KV1.1(+) 661W cells. The labelling efficiency with three stable specific immunoplasmonics labels (functionalized silver nanospheres (CD44-AgNSs), gold (Au) NSs (EGFR-AuNSs) and Au nanorods (KV1.1-AuNRs)) detected by reflected light microscopy (RLM) is similar to the one with immunofluorescence. Second, we introduce an improved method for 3D localization and spectral identification of fNPs based on fast z-scanning by RLM with three spectral filters corresponding to the plasmon peak wavelengths of the immunoplasmonics labels in the cellular environment (500 nm for 80 nm AgNSs, 580 nm for 100 nm AuNSs and 700 nm for 40 nm × 92 nm AuNRs). Third

  2. Multirate 3-D subband coding of video.

    PubMed

    Taubman, D; Zakhor, A

    1994-01-01

    We propose a full color video compression strategy, based on 3-D subband coding with camera pan compensation, to generate a single embedded bit stream supporting multiple decoder display formats and a wide, finely gradated range of bit rates. An experimental implementation of our algorithm produces a single bit stream, from which suitable subsets are extracted to be compatible with many decoder frame sizes and frame rates and to satisfy transmission bandwidth constraints ranging from several tens of kilobits per second to several megabits per second. Reconstructed video quality from any of these bit stream subsets is often found to exceed that obtained from an MPEG-1 implementation, operated with equivalent bit rate constraints, in both perceptual quality and mean squared error. In addition, when restricted to 2-D, the algorithm produces some of the best results available in still image compression. PMID:18291953

  3. Historic range of variability in landscape structure in subalpine forests of the Greater Yellowstone Area, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tinker, D.B.; Romme, W.H.; Despain, D.G.

    2003-01-01

    A measure of the historic range of variability (HRV) in landscape structure is essential for evaluating current landscape patterns of Rocky Mountain coniferous forests that have been subjected to intensive timber harvest. We used a geographic information system (GIS) and FRAGSTATS to calculate key landscape metrics on two ???130,000-ha landscapes in the Greater Yellowstone Area, USA: one in Yellowstone National Park (YNP), which has been primarily shaped by natural fires, and a second in the adjacent Targhee National Forest (TNF), which has undergone intensive clearcutting for nearly 30 years. Digital maps of the current and historical landscape in YNP were developed from earlier stand age maps developed by Romme and Despain. Maps of the TNF landscape were adapted from United States Forest Service Resource Information System (RIS) data. Key landscape metrics were calculated at 20-yr intervals for YNP for the period from 1705-1995. These metrics were used to first evaluate the relative effects of small vs. large fire events on landscape structure and were then compared to similar metrics calculated for both pre- and post-harvest landscapes of the TNF. Large fires, such as those that burned in 1988, produced a structurally different landscape than did previous, smaller fires (1705-1985). The total number of patches of all types was higher after 1988 (694 vs. 340-404 before 1988), and mean patch size was reduced by almost half (186 ha vs. 319-379 ha). The amount of unburned forest was less following the 1988 fires (63% vs. 72-90% prior to 1988), yet the number of unburned patches increased by nearly an order of magnitude (230 vs. a maximum of 41 prior to 1988). Total core area and mean core area per patch decreased after 1988 relative to smaller fires (???73,700 ha vs. 87,000-110,000 ha, and 320 ha vs. 2,123 ha, respectively). Notably, only edge density was similar (17 m ha-1 after 1988) to earlier landscapes (9.8-14.2 m ha-1). Three decades of timber harvesting

  4. How Do Hydrodynamic Instabilities Affect 3D Transport in Geophysical Vortices?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, P.; Ozgokmen, T. M.

    2014-12-01

    Understanding three-dimensional (3D) transport in ocean eddies is important for processes at a variety of scales, ranging from plankton production to climate variability. It is well known that geophysical vortices are subject to various hydrodynamic instabilities. Yet the influence of these instabilities on 3D material transport in vortex systems is not well investigated. Focusing on barotropic, inertial and 3D instabilities, we analyze these instabilities with normal-mode method, and reproduce their characteristics via highly-resolved numerical simulations using a spectral element Navier-Stokes solver. By comparing the simulation results of stable and unstable vortices, we investigate the joint impacts of instabilities on 3D transport through three major aspects: (i) energy transfer, (ii) overturning transport of the secondary circulation, and (iii) rates of vertical exchange and mixing. It is found that instabilities can enhance local nonlinear interactions and cause the kinetic energy wavenumber spectrum to have slopes between the conventional -5/3 and -3 at inertial ranges. The cascade of a new quantity is proposed to explain these non-conventional slopes. One of our main results is the discovery of material exchange between the central vortex and satellite vortices through 3D pathways, called funnels. These funnels modify the concept of elliptic regions that can trap material when confined to 2D dynamics. Thus, we show that a family of vortices, created by the hydrodynamic instabilities of the initially unstable vortex, can still continue to operate in unity in order to complete the 3D transport in these systems. We also show that flow instabilities can double the magnitude of vertical velocity, increase the rate of vertical exchange by an order of magnitude and enhance mixing rate more than 100%.

  5. Technical note: 3D representation and analysis of enthesis morphology.

    PubMed

    Noldner, Lara K; Edgar, Heather J H

    2013-11-01

    This comparison of methods for assessing the development of muscle insertion sites, or entheses, suggests that three-dimensional (3D) quantification of enthesis morphology can produce a picture of habitual muscle use patterns in a past population that is similar to one produced by ordinal scores for describing enthesis morphology. Upper limb skeletal elements (humeri, radii, and ulnae) from a sample of 24 middle-aged adult males from the Pottery Mound site in New Mexico were analyzed for both fibrous and fibrocartilaginous enthesis development with three different methods: ordinal scores, two-dimensional (2D) area measurements, and 3D surface areas. The methods were compared using tests for asymmetry and correlations among variables in each quantitative data set. 2D representations of enthesis area did not agree as closely as ordinal scores and 3D surface areas did regarding which entheses were significantly asymmetrical. There was significant correlation between 3D and 2D data, but correlation coefficients were not consistently high. Intraobserver error was also assessed for the 3D method. Cronbach's alpha values fell between 0.68 and 0.73, and error rates for all entheses fell between 10% and 15%. Marginally acceptable intraobserver error and the analytic versatility of 3D images encourage further investigation of using 3D scanning technology for quantifying enthesis development. PMID:24105032

  6. 3D Kitaev spin liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermanns, Maria

    The Kitaev honeycomb model has become one of the archetypal spin models exhibiting topological phases of matter, where the magnetic moments fractionalize into Majorana fermions interacting with a Z2 gauge field. In this talk, we discuss generalizations of this model to three-dimensional lattice structures. Our main focus is the metallic state that the emergent Majorana fermions form. In particular, we discuss the relation of the nature of this Majorana metal to the details of the underlying lattice structure. Besides (almost) conventional metals with a Majorana Fermi surface, one also finds various realizations of Dirac semi-metals, where the gapless modes form Fermi lines or even Weyl nodes. We introduce a general classification of these gapless quantum spin liquids using projective symmetry analysis. Furthermore, we briefly outline why these Majorana metals in 3D Kitaev systems provide an even richer variety of Dirac and Weyl phases than possible for electronic matter and comment on possible experimental signatures. Work done in collaboration with Kevin O'Brien and Simon Trebst.

  7. Yogi the rock - 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Yogi, a rock taller than rover Sojourner, is the subject of this image, taken in stereo by the deployed Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) on Sol 3. 3D glasses are necessary to identify surface detail. The soil in the foreground has been the location of multiple soil mechanics experiments performed by Sojourner's cleated wheels. Pathfinder scientists were able to control the force inflicted on the soil beneath the rover's wheels, giving them insight into the soil's mechanical properties. The soil mechanics experiments were conducted after this image was taken.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

    Click below to see the left and right views individually. [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Left [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Right

  8. Crowdsourcing Based 3d Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somogyi, A.; Barsi, A.; Molnar, B.; Lovas, T.

    2016-06-01

    Web-based photo albums that support organizing and viewing the users' images are widely used. These services provide a convenient solution for storing, editing and sharing images. In many cases, the users attach geotags to the images in order to enable using them e.g. in location based applications on social networks. Our paper discusses a procedure that collects open access images from a site frequently visited by tourists. Geotagged pictures showing the image of a sight or tourist attraction are selected and processed in photogrammetric processing software that produces the 3D model of the captured object. For the particular investigation we selected three attractions in Budapest. To assess the geometrical accuracy, we used laser scanner and DSLR as well as smart phone photography to derive reference values to enable verifying the spatial model obtained from the web-album images. The investigation shows how detailed and accurate models could be derived applying photogrammetric processing software, simply by using images of the community, without visiting the site.

  9. 3D multiplexed immunoplasmonics microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergeron, Éric; Patskovsky, Sergiy; Rioux, David; Meunier, Michel

    2016-07-01

    Selective labelling, identification and spatial distribution of cell surface biomarkers can provide important clinical information, such as distinction between healthy and diseased cells, evolution of a disease and selection of the optimal patient-specific treatment. Immunofluorescence is the gold standard for efficient detection of biomarkers expressed by cells. However, antibodies (Abs) conjugated to fluorescent dyes remain limited by their photobleaching, high sensitivity to the environment, low light intensity, and wide absorption and emission spectra. Immunoplasmonics is a novel microscopy method based on the visualization of Abs-functionalized plasmonic nanoparticles (fNPs) targeting cell surface biomarkers. Tunable fNPs should provide higher multiplexing capacity than immunofluorescence since NPs are photostable over time, strongly scatter light at their plasmon peak wavelengths and can be easily functionalized. In this article, we experimentally demonstrate accurate multiplexed detection based on the immunoplasmonics approach. First, we achieve the selective labelling of three targeted cell surface biomarkers (cluster of differentiation 44 (CD44), epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and voltage-gated K+ channel subunit KV1.1) on human cancer CD44+ EGFR+ KV1.1+ MDA-MB-231 cells and reference CD44- EGFR- KV1.1+ 661W cells. The labelling efficiency with three stable specific immunoplasmonics labels (functionalized silver nanospheres (CD44-AgNSs), gold (Au) NSs (EGFR-AuNSs) and Au nanorods (KV1.1-AuNRs)) detected by reflected light microscopy (RLM) is similar to the one with immunofluorescence. Second, we introduce an improved method for 3D localization and spectral identification of fNPs based on fast z-scanning by RLM with three spectral filters corresponding to the plasmon peak wavelengths of the immunoplasmonics labels in the cellular environment (500 nm for 80 nm AgNSs, 580 nm for 100 nm AuNSs and 700 nm for 40 nm × 92 nm AuNRs). Third, the developed

  10. Choice of Stimulus Range and Size Can Reduce Test-Retest Variability in Glaucomatous Visual Field Defects

    PubMed Central

    Swanson, William H.; Horner, Douglas G.; Dul, Mitchell W.; Malinovsky, Victor E.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To develop guidelines for engineering perimetric stimuli to reduce test-retest variability in glaucomatous defects. Methods Perimetric testing was performed on one eye for 62 patients with glaucoma and 41 age-similar controls on size III and frequency-doubling perimetry and three custom tests with Gaussian blob and Gabor sinusoid stimuli. Stimulus range was controlled by values for ceiling (maximum sensitivity) and floor (minimum sensitivity). Bland-Altman analysis was used to derive 95% limits of agreement on test and retest, and bootstrap analysis was used to test the hypotheses about peak variability. Results Limits of agreement for the three custom stimuli were similar in width (0.72 to 0.79 log units) and peak variability (0.22 to 0.29 log units) for a stimulus range of 1.7 log units. The width of the limits of agreement for size III decreased from 1.78 to 1.37 to 0.99 log units for stimulus ranges of 3.9, 2.7, and 1.7 log units, respectively (F = 3.23, P < 0.001); peak variability was 0.99, 0.54, and 0.34 log units, respectively (P < 0.01). For a stimulus range of 1.3 log units, limits of agreement were narrowest with Gabor and widest with size III stimuli, and peak variability was lower (P < 0.01) with Gabor (0.18 log units) and frequency-doubling perimetry (0.24 log units) than with size III stimuli (0.38 log units). Conclusions Test-retest variability in glaucomatous visual field defects was substantially reduced by engineering the stimuli. Translational Relevance The guidelines should allow developers to choose from a wide range of stimuli. PMID:25371855

  11. Glnemo2: Interactive Visualization 3D Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambert, Jean-Charles

    2011-10-01

    Glnemo2 is an interactive 3D visualization program developed in C++ using the OpenGL library and Nokia QT 4.X API. It displays in 3D the particles positions of the different components of an nbody snapshot. It quickly gives a lot of information about the data (shape, density area, formation of structures such as spirals, bars, or peanuts). It allows for in/out zooms, rotations, changes of scale, translations, selection of different groups of particles and plots in different blending colors. It can color particles according to their density or temperature, play with the density threshold, trace orbits, display different time steps, take automatic screenshots to make movies, select particles using the mouse, and fly over a simulation using a given camera path. All these features are accessible from a very intuitive graphic user interface. Glnemo2 supports a wide range of input file formats (Nemo, Gadget 1 and 2, phiGrape, Ramses, list of files, realtime gyrfalcON simulation) which are automatically detected at loading time without user intervention. Glnemo2 uses a plugin mechanism to load the data, so that it is easy to add a new file reader. It's powered by a 3D engine which uses the latest OpenGL technology, such as shaders (glsl), vertex buffer object, frame buffer object, and takes in account the power of the graphic card used in order to accelerate the rendering. With a fast GPU, millions of particles can be rendered in real time. Glnemo2 runs on Linux, Windows (using minGW compiler), and MaxOSX, thanks to the QT4API.

  12. 3D-Printing for Analytical Ultracentrifugation.

    PubMed

    Desai, Abhiksha; Krynitsky, Jonathan; Pohida, Thomas J; Zhao, Huaying; Schuck, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Analytical ultracentrifugation (AUC) is a classical technique of physical biochemistry providing information on size, shape, and interactions of macromolecules from the analysis of their migration in centrifugal fields while free in solution. A key mechanical element in AUC is the centerpiece, a component of the sample cell assembly that is mounted between the optical windows to allow imaging and to seal the sample solution column against high vacuum while exposed to gravitational forces in excess of 300,000 g. For sedimentation velocity it needs to be precisely sector-shaped to allow unimpeded radial macromolecular migration. During the history of AUC a great variety of centerpiece designs have been developed for different types of experiments. Here, we report that centerpieces can now be readily fabricated by 3D printing at low cost, from a variety of materials, and with customized designs. The new centerpieces can exhibit sufficient mechanical stability to withstand the gravitational forces at the highest rotor speeds and be sufficiently precise for sedimentation equilibrium and sedimentation velocity experiments. Sedimentation velocity experiments with bovine serum albumin as a reference molecule in 3D printed centerpieces with standard double-sector design result in sedimentation boundaries virtually indistinguishable from those in commercial double-sector epoxy centerpieces, with sedimentation coefficients well within the range of published values. The statistical error of the measurement is slightly above that obtained with commercial epoxy, but still below 1%. Facilitated by modern open-source design and fabrication paradigms, we believe 3D printed centerpieces and AUC accessories can spawn a variety of improvements in AUC experimental design, efficiency and resource allocation. PMID:27525659

  13. 3D-Printing for Analytical Ultracentrifugation

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Abhiksha; Krynitsky, Jonathan; Pohida, Thomas J.; Zhao, Huaying

    2016-01-01

    Analytical ultracentrifugation (AUC) is a classical technique of physical biochemistry providing information on size, shape, and interactions of macromolecules from the analysis of their migration in centrifugal fields while free in solution. A key mechanical element in AUC is the centerpiece, a component of the sample cell assembly that is mounted between the optical windows to allow imaging and to seal the sample solution column against high vacuum while exposed to gravitational forces in excess of 300,000 g. For sedimentation velocity it needs to be precisely sector-shaped to allow unimpeded radial macromolecular migration. During the history of AUC a great variety of centerpiece designs have been developed for different types of experiments. Here, we report that centerpieces can now be readily fabricated by 3D printing at low cost, from a variety of materials, and with customized designs. The new centerpieces can exhibit sufficient mechanical stability to withstand the gravitational forces at the highest rotor speeds and be sufficiently precise for sedimentation equilibrium and sedimentation velocity experiments. Sedimentation velocity experiments with bovine serum albumin as a reference molecule in 3D printed centerpieces with standard double-sector design result in sedimentation boundaries virtually indistinguishable from those in commercial double-sector epoxy centerpieces, with sedimentation coefficients well within the range of published values. The statistical error of the measurement is slightly above that obtained with commercial epoxy, but still below 1%. Facilitated by modern open-source design and fabrication paradigms, we believe 3D printed centerpieces and AUC accessories can spawn a variety of improvements in AUC experimental design, efficiency and resource allocation. PMID:27525659

  14. 3D toroidal physics: Testing the boundaries of symmetry breakinga)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spong, Donald A.

    2015-05-01

    Toroidal symmetry is an important concept for plasma confinement; it allows the existence of nested flux surface MHD equilibria and conserved invariants for particle motion. However, perfect symmetry is unachievable in realistic toroidal plasma devices. For example, tokamaks have toroidal ripple due to discrete field coils, optimized stellarators do not achieve exact quasi-symmetry, the plasma itself continually seeks lower energy states through helical 3D deformations, and reactors will likely have non-uniform distributions of ferritic steel near the plasma. Also, some level of designed-in 3D magnetic field structure is now anticipated for most concepts in order to provide the plasma control needed for a stable, steady-state fusion reactor. Such planned 3D field structures can take many forms, ranging from tokamaks with weak 3D edge localized mode suppression fields to stellarators with more dominant 3D field structures. This motivates the development of physics models that are applicable across the full range of 3D devices. Ultimately, the questions of how much symmetry breaking can be tolerated and how to optimize its design must be addressed for all fusion concepts. A closely coupled program of simulation, experimental validation, and design optimization is required to determine what forms and amplitudes of 3D shaping and symmetry breaking will be compatible with the requirements of future fusion reactors.

  15. 3D toroidal physics: Testing the boundaries of symmetry breaking

    SciTech Connect

    Spong, Donald A.

    2015-05-15

    Toroidal symmetry is an important concept for plasma confinement; it allows the existence of nested flux surface MHD equilibria and conserved invariants for particle motion. However, perfect symmetry is unachievable in realistic toroidal plasma devices. For example, tokamaks have toroidal ripple due to discrete field coils, optimized stellarators do not achieve exact quasi-symmetry, the plasma itself continually seeks lower energy states through helical 3D deformations, and reactors will likely have non-uniform distributions of ferritic steel near the plasma. Also, some level of designed-in 3D magnetic field structure is now anticipated for most concepts in order to provide the plasma control needed for a stable, steady-state fusion reactor. Such planned 3D field structures can take many forms, ranging from tokamaks with weak 3D edge localized mode suppression fields to stellarators with more dominant 3D field structures. This motivates the development of physics models that are applicable across the full range of 3D devices. Ultimately, the questions of how much symmetry breaking can be tolerated and how to optimize its design must be addressed for all fusion concepts. A closely coupled program of simulation, experimental validation, and design optimization is required to determine what forms and amplitudes of 3D shaping and symmetry breaking will be compatible with the requirements of future fusion reactors.

  16. Local and long range contributions to Congo Basin precipitation seasonality and variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyer, Ellen; Jones, Dylan; Noone, David; Nusbaumer, Jesse

    2015-04-01

    The Congo Basin is an extremely interesting and dynamic hydrological region. Regionally it most resembles the Amazon but in comparison it is greatly understudied. Local evaporation plays an important role in the bulk of Congo Basin precipitation, but the variability and seasonality of the precipitation cannot be attributed mainly to local sources. We examine the relative importance of the neighbouring ocean basins to precipitation variability in the Congo Basin, using a new water tracer capability in the Community Earth System Model (CESM1.2), in which water is tagged as it is evaporated in geographically defined regions. In this approach, regional vapor tracers are tracked through phase changes until the vapor is precipitated. We employ a small ensemble using CESM1.2 in an AMIP configuration, and results are compared with the ECMWF Interim reanalysis and the Climate Research Unit rainfall data set. We find that variability in Indian Ocean sea surface temperatures (SSTs) is significant, with the Indian Ocean dipole providing a important contribution to variability in Congo Basin precipitation. We also examine the difference between the two rainy seasons and find that they are a function of the moisture source contribution and the vertical structure of moisture flux convergence. This structure is further examined in the context of local seasonal circulation features such as the African Easterly Jet.

  17. Diffractive 3D XUV optics at Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin, recent developments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brzhezinskaya, Maria; Firsov, Alexander; Erko, Alexei

    2014-09-01

    The 2-Dimensional and 3-Dimensional variable line spacing (VLS) gratings based on total external reflection give the unique possibility for spectroscopy and focusing in application to 4th and 5th generation synchrotron sources. We focus on the elaboration of novel approaches for design and fabrication of 3D VLS working in the entire energy range, from THz to hard X-rays. These optical elements have unique combination of properties and can operate at all XUV sources including Free Electron Lasers (FELs), Energy Recovery Linacs (ERLs) and High Harmonic Generators (HHGs). Such 3D DOEs are able to cover the energy range of up to 20 keV with energy resolution λ/Δλ ≥ 1000 for soft x-ray and λ/Δλ ≥ 10000 for hard x-ray. We fabricate 3D VLS for time-resolved spectroscopy (energy range 100 - 2000 eV, 7500-9500 eV), FELs and ERLs (energy range up to 3 keV), and HHGs (energy range 10 - 200 eV).

  18. 3-D Cavern Enlargement Analyses

    SciTech Connect

    EHGARTNER, BRIAN L.; SOBOLIK, STEVEN R.

    2002-03-01

    Three-dimensional finite element analyses simulate the mechanical response of enlarging existing caverns at the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR). The caverns are located in Gulf Coast salt domes and are enlarged by leaching during oil drawdowns as fresh water is injected to displace the crude oil from the caverns. The current criteria adopted by the SPR limits cavern usage to 5 drawdowns (leaches). As a base case, 5 leaches were modeled over a 25 year period to roughly double the volume of a 19 cavern field. Thirteen additional leaches where then simulated until caverns approached coalescence. The cavern field approximated the geometries and geologic properties found at the West Hackberry site. This enabled comparisons are data collected over nearly 20 years to analysis predictions. The analyses closely predicted the measured surface subsidence and cavern closure rates as inferred from historic well head pressures. This provided the necessary assurance that the model displacements, strains, and stresses are accurate. However, the cavern field has not yet experienced the large scale drawdowns being simulated. Should they occur in the future, code predictions should be validated with actual field behavior at that time. The simulations were performed using JAS3D, a three dimensional finite element analysis code for nonlinear quasi-static solids. The results examine the impacts of leaching and cavern workovers, where internal cavern pressures are reduced, on surface subsidence, well integrity, and cavern stability. The results suggest that the current limit of 5 oil drawdowns may be extended with some mitigative action required on the wells and later on to surface structure due to subsidence strains. The predicted stress state in the salt shows damage to start occurring after 15 drawdowns with significant failure occurring at the 16th drawdown, well beyond the current limit of 5 drawdowns.

  19. Validation of 3D multimodality roadmapping in interventional neuroradiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruijters, Daniel; Homan, Robert; Mielekamp, Peter; van de Haar, Peter; Babic, Drazenko

    2011-08-01

    Three-dimensional multimodality roadmapping is entering clinical routine utilization for neuro-vascular treatment. Its purpose is to navigate intra-arterial and intra-venous endovascular devices through complex vascular anatomy by fusing pre-operative computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance (MR) with the live fluoroscopy image. The fused image presents the real-time position of the intra-vascular devices together with the patient's 3D vascular morphology and its soft-tissue context. This paper investigates the effectiveness, accuracy, robustness and computation times of the described methods in order to assess their suitability for the intended clinical purpose: accurate interventional navigation. The mutual information-based 3D-3D registration proved to be of sub-voxel accuracy and yielded an average registration error of 0.515 mm and the live machine-based 2D-3D registration delivered an average error of less than 0.2 mm. The capture range of the image-based 3D-3D registration was investigated to characterize its robustness, and yielded an extent of 35 mm and 25° for >80% of the datasets for registration of 3D rotational angiography (3DRA) with CT, and 15 mm and 20° for >80% of the datasets for registration of 3DRA with MR data. The image-based 3D-3D registration could be computed within 8 s, while applying the machine-based 2D-3D registration only took 1.5 µs, which makes them very suitable for interventional use.

  20. Validation of 3D multimodality roadmapping in interventional neuroradiology.

    PubMed

    Ruijters, Daniel; Homan, Robert; Mielekamp, Peter; van de Haar, Peter; Babic, Drazenko

    2011-08-21

    Three-dimensional multimodality roadmapping is entering clinical routine utilization for neuro-vascular treatment. Its purpose is to navigate intra-arterial and intra-venous endovascular devices through complex vascular anatomy by fusing pre-operative computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance (MR) with the live fluoroscopy image. The fused image presents the real-time position of the intra-vascular devices together with the patient's 3D vascular morphology and its soft-tissue context. This paper investigates the effectiveness, accuracy, robustness and computation times of the described methods in order to assess their suitability for the intended clinical purpose: accurate interventional navigation. The mutual information-based 3D-3D registration proved to be of sub-voxel accuracy and yielded an average registration error of 0.515 mm and the live machine-based 2D-3D registration delivered an average error of less than 0.2 mm. The capture range of the image-based 3D-3D registration was investigated to characterize its robustness, and yielded an extent of 35 mm and 25° for >80% of the datasets for registration of 3D rotational angiography (3DRA) with CT, and 15 mm and 20° for >80% of the datasets for registration of 3DRA with MR data. The image-based 3D-3D registration could be computed within 8 s, while applying the machine-based 2D-3D registration only took 1.5 µs, which makes them very suitable for interventional use. PMID:21799235

  1. Virtual 3d City Modeling: Techniques and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, S. P.; Jain, K.; Mandla, V. R.

    2013-08-01

    3D city model is a digital representation of the Earth's surface and it's related objects such as Building, Tree, Vegetation, and some manmade feature belonging to urban area. There are various terms used for 3D city models such as "Cybertown", "Cybercity", "Virtual City", or "Digital City". 3D city models are basically a computerized or digital model of a city contains the graphic representation of buildings and other objects in 2.5 or 3D. Generally three main Geomatics approach are using for Virtual 3-D City models generation, in first approach, researcher are using Conventional techniques such as Vector Map data, DEM, Aerial images, second approach are based on High resolution satellite images with LASER scanning, In third method, many researcher are using Terrestrial images by using Close Range Photogrammetry with DSM & Texture mapping. We start this paper from the introduction of various Geomatics techniques for 3D City modeling. These techniques divided in to two main categories: one is based on Automation (Automatic, Semi-automatic and Manual methods), and another is Based on Data input techniques (one is Photogrammetry, another is Laser Techniques). After details study of this, finally in short, we are trying to give the conclusions of this study. In the last, we are trying to give the conclusions of this research paper and also giving a short view for justification and analysis, and present trend for 3D City modeling. This paper gives an overview about the Techniques related with "Generation of Virtual 3-D City models using Geomatics Techniques" and the Applications of Virtual 3D City models. Photogrammetry, (Close range, Aerial, Satellite), Lasergrammetry, GPS, or combination of these modern Geomatics techniques play a major role to create a virtual 3-D City model. Each and every techniques and method has some advantages and some drawbacks. Point cloud model is a modern trend for virtual 3-D city model. Photo-realistic, Scalable, Geo-referenced virtual 3

  2. 3D printing of microscopic bacterial communities

    PubMed Central

    Connell, Jodi L.; Ritschdorff, Eric T.; Whiteley, Marvin; Shear, Jason B.

    2013-01-01

    Bacteria communicate via short-range physical and chemical signals, interactions known to mediate quorum sensing, sporulation, and other adaptive phenotypes. Although most in vitro studies examine bacterial properties averaged over large populations, the levels of key molecular determinants of bacterial fitness and pathogenicity (e.g., oxygen, quorum-sensing signals) may vary over micrometer scales within small, dense cellular aggregates believed to play key roles in disease transmission. A detailed understanding of how cell–cell interactions contribute to pathogenicity in natural, complex environments will require a new level of control in constructing more relevant cellular models for assessing bacterial phenotypes. Here, we describe a microscopic three-dimensional (3D) printing strategy that enables multiple populations of bacteria to be organized within essentially any 3D geometry, including adjacent, nested, and free-floating colonies. In this laser-based lithographic technique, microscopic containers are formed around selected bacteria suspended in gelatin via focal cross-linking of polypeptide molecules. After excess reagent is removed, trapped bacteria are localized within sealed cavities formed by the cross-linked gelatin, a highly porous material that supports rapid growth of fully enclosed cellular populations and readily transmits numerous biologically active species, including polypeptides, antibiotics, and quorum-sensing signals. Using this approach, we show that a picoliter-volume aggregate of Staphylococcus aureus can display substantial resistance to β-lactam antibiotics by enclosure within a shell composed of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. PMID:24101503

  3. 3D printed rapid disaster response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacaze, Alberto; Murphy, Karl; Mottern, Edward; Corley, Katrina; Chu, Kai-Dee

    2014-05-01

    Under the Department of Homeland Security-sponsored Sensor-smart Affordable Autonomous Robotic Platforms (SAARP) project, Robotic Research, LLC is developing an affordable and adaptable method to provide disaster response robots developed with 3D printer technology. The SAARP Store contains a library of robots, a developer storefront, and a user storefront. The SAARP Store allows the user to select, print, assemble, and operate the robot. In addition to the SAARP Store, two platforms are currently being developed. They use a set of common non-printed components that will allow the later design of other platforms that share non-printed components. During disasters, new challenges are faced that require customized tools or platforms. Instead of prebuilt and prepositioned supplies, a library of validated robots will be catalogued to satisfy various challenges at the scene. 3D printing components will allow these customized tools to be deployed in a fraction of the time that would normally be required. While the current system is focused on supporting disaster response personnel, this system will be expandable to a range of customers, including domestic law enforcement, the armed services, universities, and research facilities.

  4. Virtual VMASC: A 3D Game Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manepalli, Suchitra; Shen, Yuzhong; Garcia, Hector M.; Lawsure, Kaleen

    2010-01-01

    The advantages of creating interactive 3D simulations that allow viewing, exploring, and interacting with land improvements, such as buildings, in digital form are manifold and range from allowing individuals from anywhere in the world to explore those virtual land improvements online, to training military personnel in dealing with war-time environments, and to making those land improvements available in virtual worlds such as Second Life. While we haven't fully explored the true potential of such simulations, we have identified a requirement within our organization to use simulations like those to replace our front-desk personnel and allow visitors to query, naVigate, and communicate virtually with various entities within the building. We implemented the Virtual VMASC 3D simulation of the Virginia Modeling Analysis and Simulation Center (VMASC) office building to not only meet our front-desk requirement but also to evaluate the effort required in designing such a simulation and, thereby, leverage the experience we gained in future projects of this kind. This paper describes the goals we set for our implementation, the software approach taken, the modeling contribution made, and the technologies used such as XNA Game Studio, .NET framework, Autodesk software packages, and, finally, the applicability of our implementation on a variety of architectures including Xbox 360 and PC. This paper also summarizes the result of our evaluation and the lessons learned from our effort.

  5. Imaging a Sustainable Future in 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuhr, W.; Lee, J. D.; Kanngieser, E.

    2012-07-01

    It is the intention of this paper, to contribute to a sustainable future by providing objective object information based on 3D photography as well as promoting 3D photography not only for scientists, but also for amateurs. Due to the presentation of this article by CIPA Task Group 3 on "3D Photographs in Cultural Heritage", the presented samples are masterpieces of historic as well as of current 3D photography concentrating on cultural heritage. In addition to a report on exemplarily access to international archives of 3D photographs, samples for new 3D photographs taken with modern 3D cameras, as well as by means of a ground based high resolution XLITE staff camera and also 3D photographs taken from a captive balloon and the use of civil drone platforms are dealt with. To advise on optimum suited 3D methodology, as well as to catch new trends in 3D, an updated synoptic overview of the 3D visualization technology, even claiming completeness, has been carried out as a result of a systematic survey. In this respect, e.g., today's lasered crystals might be "early bird" products in 3D, which, due to lack in resolution, contrast and color, remember to the stage of the invention of photography.

  6. 3D Printing and Its Urologic Applications

    PubMed Central

    Soliman, Youssef; Feibus, Allison H; Baum, Neil

    2015-01-01

    3D printing is the development of 3D objects via an additive process in which successive layers of material are applied under computer control. This article discusses 3D printing, with an emphasis on its historical context and its potential use in the field of urology. PMID:26028997

  7. 3D Flow Visualization Using Texture Advection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kao, David; Zhang, Bing; Kim, Kwansik; Pang, Alex; Moran, Pat (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Texture advection is an effective tool for animating and investigating 2D flows. In this paper, we discuss how this technique can be extended to 3D flows. In particular, we examine the use of 3D and 4D textures on 3D synthetic and computational fluid dynamics flow fields.

  8. 3D Elastic Seismic Wave Propagation Code

    1998-09-23

    E3D is capable of simulating seismic wave propagation in a 3D heterogeneous earth. Seismic waves are initiated by earthquake, explosive, and/or other sources. These waves propagate through a 3D geologic model, and are simulated as synthetic seismograms or other graphical output.

  9. 3D Printing and Its Urologic Applications.

    PubMed

    Soliman, Youssef; Feibus, Allison H; Baum, Neil

    2015-01-01

    3D printing is the development of 3D objects via an additive process in which successive layers of material are applied under computer control. This article discusses 3D printing, with an emphasis on its historical context and its potential use in the field of urology. PMID:26028997

  10. Long range correlations in the heart rate variability following the injury of cardiac arrest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Shanbao; Jiang, Dineng; Wang, Ziming; Zhu, Yisheng; Geocadin, Romeryko G.; Thakor, Nitish V.

    2007-07-01

    Cardiovascular and neurological recovery following cardiac arrest (CA) largely influence the morbidity and mortality of the patients. Monitoring the cardiovascular system has been an important clinical issue in intensive care unit (ICU). On the other hand, the rhythms of the heart rate variability following CA are still not fully understood, and there are limited number of literatures reporting the cardiovascular function recovery following CA. In this paper, we studied the scaling properties of heart rate variability (HRV) after CA by centered-moving-average-based detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA). Our results showed that the scaling factor of the baseline HRV is close to that of Brownian motion, and after a CA event it shifts to a 1/f noise-like rhythm. DFA could be a promising tool in evaluating the cardiovascular long term recovery following CA injury.

  11. Triangulation Based 3D Laser Imaging for Fracture Orientation Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mah, J.; Claire, S.; Steve, M.

    2009-05-01

    Laser imaging has recently been identified as a potential tool for rock mass characterization. This contribution focuses on the application of triangulation based, short-range laser imaging to determine fracture orientation and surface texture. This technology measures the distance to the target by triangulating the projected and reflected laser beams, and also records the reflection intensity. In this study, we acquired 3D laser images of rock faces using the Laser Camera System (LCS), a portable instrument developed by Neptec Design Group (Ottawa, Canada). The LCS uses an infrared laser beam and is immune to the lighting conditions. The maximum image resolution is 1024 x 1024 volumetric image elements. Depth resolution is 0.5 mm at 5 m. An above ground field trial was conducted at a blocky road cut with well defined joint sets (Kingston, Ontario). An underground field trial was conducted at the Inco 175 Ore body (Sudbury, Ontario) where images were acquired in the dark and the joint set features were more subtle. At each site, from a distance of 3 m away from the rock face, a grid of six images (approximately 1.6 m by 1.6 m) was acquired at maximum resolution with 20% overlap between adjacent images. This corresponds to a density of 40 image elements per square centimeter. Polyworks, a high density 3D visualization software tool, was used to align and merge the images into a single digital triangular mesh. The conventional method of determining fracture orientations is by manual measurement using a compass. In order to be accepted as a substitute for this method, the LCS should be capable of performing at least to the capabilities of manual measurements. To compare fracture orientation estimates derived from the 3D laser images to manual measurements, 160 inclinometer readings were taken at the above ground site. Three prominent joint sets (strike/dip: 236/09, 321/89, 325/01) were identified by plotting the joint poles on a stereonet. Underground, two main joint

  12. 3D imaging using projected dynamic fringes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, Michael M.; Atkinson, John T.; Harvey, David M.; Hobson, Clifford A.; Lalor, Michael J.

    1994-12-01

    An instrument capable of highly accurate, non-contact range measurement has been developed, which is based upon the principle of projected rotating fringes. More usually known as dynamic fringe projection, it is this technique which is exploited in the dynamic automated range transducer (DART). The intensity waveform seen at the target and sensed by the detector, contains all the information required to accurately determine the fringe order. This, in turn, allows the range to be evaluated by the substitution of the fringe order into a simple algebraic expression. Various techniques for the analysis of the received intensity signals from the surface of the target have been investigated. The accuracy to which the range can be determined ultimately depends upon the accuracy to which the fringe order can be evaluated from the received intensity waveform. It is extremely important to be able to closely determine the fractional fringe order value, to achieve any meaningful results. This paper describes a number of techniques which have been used to analyze the intensity waveform, and critically appraises their suitability in terms of accuracy and required speed of operation. This work also examines the development of this instrument for three-dimensional measurements based on single or two beam systems. Using CCD array detectors, a 3-D range map of the object's surface may be produced.

  13. Depth discrimination from occlusions in 3D clutter.

    PubMed

    Langer, Michael S; Zheng, Haomin; Rezvankhah, Shayan

    2016-09-01

    Objects such as trees, shrubs, and tall grass consist of thousands of small surfaces that are distributed over a three-dimensional (3D) volume. To perceive the depth of surfaces within 3D clutter, a visual system can use binocular stereo and motion parallax. However, such parallax cues are less reliable in 3D clutter because surfaces tend to be partly occluded. Occlusions provide depth information, but it is unknown whether visual systems use occlusion cues to aid depth perception in 3D clutter, as previous studies have addressed occlusions for simple scene geometries only. Here, we present a set of depth discrimination experiments that examine depth from occlusion cues in 3D clutter, and how these cues interact with stereo and motion parallax. We identify two probabilistic occlusion cues. The first is based on the fraction of an object that is visible. The second is based on the depth range of the occluders. We show that human observers use both of these occlusion cues. We also define ideal observers that are based on these occlusion cues. Human observer performance is close to ideal using the visibility cue but far from ideal using the range cue. A key reason for the latter is that the range cue depends on depth estimation of the clutter itself which is unreliable. Our results provide new fundamental constraints on the depth information that is available from occlusions in 3D clutter, and how the occlusion cues are combined with binocular stereo and motion parallax cues. PMID:27618514

  14. 3-D Perspective Pasadena, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This perspective view shows the western part of the city of Pasadena, California, looking north towards the San Gabriel Mountains. Portions of the cities of Altadena and La Canada, Flintridge are also shown. The image was created from three datasets: the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) supplied the elevation data; Landsat data from November 11, 1986 provided the land surface color (not the sky) and U.S. Geological Survey digital aerial photography provides the image detail. The Rose Bowl, surrounded by a golf course, is the circular feature at the bottom center of the image. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory is the cluster of large buildings north of the Rose Bowl at the base of the mountains. A large landfill, Scholl Canyon, is the smooth area in the lower left corner of the scene. This image shows the power of combining data from different sources to create planning tools to study problems that affect large urban areas. In addition to the well-known earthquake hazards, Southern California is affected by a natural cycle of fire and mudflows. Wildfires strip the mountains of vegetation, increasing the hazards from flooding and mudflows for several years afterwards. Data such as shown on this image can be used to predict both how wildfires will spread over the terrain and also how mudflows will be channeled down the canyons. The Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), launched on February 11, 2000, uses the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. The mission was designed to collect three dimensional measurements of the Earth's surface. To collect the 3-D data, engineers added a 60-meter-long (200-foot) mast, an additional C-band imaging antenna and improved tracking and navigation devices. The mission is a cooperative project between the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the National Imagery and Mapping Agency

  15. The Esri 3D city information model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reitz, T.; Schubiger-Banz, S.

    2014-02-01

    With residential and commercial space becoming increasingly scarce, cities are going vertical. Managing the urban environments in 3D is an increasingly important and complex undertaking. To help solving this problem, Esri has released the ArcGIS for 3D Cities solution. The ArcGIS for 3D Cities solution provides the information model, tools and apps for creating, analyzing and maintaining a 3D city using the ArcGIS platform. This paper presents an overview of the 3D City Information Model and some sample use cases.

  16. Implementation of a long range, distributed-volume, continuously variable turbulence generator.

    PubMed

    DiComo, Gregory; Helle, Michael; Peñano, Joe; Ting, Antonio; Schmitt-Sody, Andreas; Elle, Jennifer

    2016-07-01

    We have constructed a 180-m-long distributed, continuously variable atmospheric turbulence generator to study high-power laser beam propagation. This turbulence generator operates on the principle of free convection from a heated surface placed below the entire propagation path of the beam, similar to the situation in long-distance horizontal propagation for laser communications, power beaming, or directed energy applications. The turbulence produced by this generator has been characterized through constant-temperature anemometry, as well as by the scintillation of a low-power laser beam. PMID:27409209

  17. [Genetic variability in Scotch pine in the southeastern part of its range].

    PubMed

    Larionova, A Ia

    2002-12-01

    The main parameters of genetic variability have been determined in an isolated natural Scotch pine population from Chita oblast' (Tsasuchei Forest) by analysis of 19 genes coding for nine enzymes: GDH, IDH, LAP, PGM, AAT, ADH, MDH, 6-PGD, and DIA. Polymorphic genes constituted 63.2% of all structural genes studied in the population at the 99% polymorphism criterion. The mean number of alleles per locus was 1.63. The observed and expected heterozygosities were 0.237 and 0.251, respectively. These estimates are close to the corresponding mean values for Scotch pine according to the data on 18 or more structural genes. PMID:12575449

  18. Case study: Beauty and the Beast 3D: benefits of 3D viewing for 2D to 3D conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Handy Turner, Tara

    2010-02-01

    From the earliest stages of the Beauty and the Beast 3D conversion project, the advantages of accurate desk-side 3D viewing was evident. While designing and testing the 2D to 3D conversion process, the engineering team at Walt Disney Animation Studios proposed a 3D viewing configuration that not only allowed artists to "compose" stereoscopic 3D but also improved efficiency by allowing artists to instantly detect which image features were essential to the stereoscopic appeal of a shot and which features had minimal or even negative impact. At a time when few commercial 3D monitors were available and few software packages provided 3D desk-side output, the team designed their own prototype devices and collaborated with vendors to create a "3D composing" workstation. This paper outlines the display technologies explored, final choices made for Beauty and the Beast 3D, wish-lists for future development and a few rules of thumb for composing compelling 2D to 3D conversions.

  19. A synchrotron-radiation-based variable angle ellipsometer for the visible to vacuum ultraviolet spectral range

    SciTech Connect

    Neumann, M. D. Cobet, C.; Esser, N.; Kaser, H.; Kolbe, M.; Gottwald, A.; Richter, M.

    2014-05-15

    A rotating analyzer spectroscopic polarimeter and ellipsometer with a wide-range θ-2θ goniometer installed at the Insertion Device Beamline of the Metrology Light Source in Berlin is presented. With a combination of transmission- and reflection-based polarizing elements and the inherent degree of polarization of the undulator radiation, this ellipsometer is able to cover photon energies from about 2 eV up to 40 eV. Additionally, a new compensator design based on a CaF{sub 2} Fresnel rhomb is presented. This compensator allows ellipsometric measurements with circular polarization in the vacuum ultraviolet spectral range and thus, for example, the characterization of depolarizing samples. The new instrument was initially used for the characterization of the polarization of the beamline. The technical capabilities of the ellipsometer are demonstrated by a cohesive wide-range measurement of the dielectric function of epitaxially grown ZnO.

  20. Simulation of the Burridge-Knopoff Model of Earthquakes with Variable Range Stress Transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Xia Junchao; Gould, Harvey; Klein, W.; Rundle, J.B.

    2005-12-09

    Simple models of earthquake faults are important for understanding the mechanisms for their observed behavior, such as Gutenberg-Richter scaling and the relation between large and small events, which is the basis for various forecasting methods. Although cellular automaton models have been studied extensively in the long-range stress transfer limit, this limit has not been studied for the Burridge-Knopoff model, which includes more realistic friction forces and inertia. We find that the latter model with long-range stress transfer exhibits qualitatively different behavior than both the long-range cellular automaton models and the usual Burridge-Knopoff model with nearest-neighbor springs, depending on the nature of the velocity-weakening friction force. These results have important implications for our understanding of earthquakes and other driven dissipative systems.

  1. Development of an automultiscopic true 3D display (Invited Paper)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurtz, Russell M.; Pradhan, Ranjit D.; Aye, Tin M.; Yu, Kevin H.; Okorogu, Albert O.; Chua, Kang-Bin; Tun, Nay; Win, Tin; Schindler, Axel

    2005-05-01

    True 3D displays, whether generated by volume holography, merged stereopsis (requiring glasses), or autostereoscopic methods (stereopsis without the need for special glasses), are useful in a great number of applications, ranging from training through product visualization to computer gaming. Holography provides an excellent 3D image but cannot yet be produced in real time, merged stereopsis results in accommodation-convergence conflict (where distance cues generated by the 3D appearance of the image conflict with those obtained from the angular position of the eyes) and lacks parallax cues, and autostereoscopy produces a 3D image visible only from a small region of space. Physical Optics Corporation is developing the next step in real-time 3D displays, the automultiscopic system, which eliminates accommodation-convergence conflict, produces 3D imagery from any position around the display, and includes true image parallax. Theory of automultiscopic display systems is presented, together with results from our prototype display, which produces 3D video imagery with full parallax cues from any viewing direction.

  2. Real time 3D and heterogeneous data fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Little, C.Q.; Small, D.E.

    1998-03-01

    This project visualizes characterization data in a 3D setting, in real time. Real time in this sense means collecting the data and presenting it before it delays the user, and processing faster than the acquisition systems so no bottlenecks occur. The goals have been to build a volumetric viewer to display 3D data, demonstrate projecting other data, such as images, onto the 3D data, and display both the 3D and projected images as fast as the data became available. The authors have examined several ways to display 3D surface data. The most effective was generating polygonal surface meshes. They have created surface maps form a continuous stream of 3D range data, fused image data onto the geometry, and displayed the data with a standard 3D rendering package. In parallel with this, they have developed a method to project real-time images onto the surface created. A key component is mapping the data on the correct surfaces, which requires a-priori positional information along with accurate calibration of the camera and lens system.

  3. Emergence of 3D Printed Dosage Forms: Opportunities and Challenges.

    PubMed

    Alhnan, Mohamed A; Okwuosa, Tochukwu C; Sadia, Muzna; Wan, Ka-Wai; Ahmed, Waqar; Arafat, Basel

    2016-08-01

    The recent introduction of the first FDA approved 3D-printed drug has fuelled interest in 3D printing technology, which is set to revolutionize healthcare. Since its initial use, this rapid prototyping (RP) technology has evolved to such an extent that it is currently being used in a wide range of applications including in tissue engineering, dentistry, construction, automotive and aerospace. However, in the pharmaceutical industry this technology is still in its infancy and its potential yet to be fully explored. This paper presents various 3D printing technologies such as stereolithographic, powder based, selective laser sintering, fused deposition modelling and semi-solid extrusion 3D printing. It also provides a comprehensive review of previous attempts at using 3D printing technologies on the manufacturing dosage forms with a particular focus on oral tablets. Their advantages particularly with adaptability in the pharmaceutical field have been highlighted, which enables the preparation of dosage forms with complex designs and geometries, multiple actives and tailored release profiles. An insight into the technical challenges facing the different 3D printing technologies such as the formulation and processing parameters is provided. Light is also shed on the different regulatory challenges that need to be overcome for 3D printing to fulfil its real potential in the pharmaceutical industry. PMID:27194002

  4. Accuracy of 3D scanners in tooth mark analysis.

    PubMed

    Molina, Ana; Martin-de-las-Heras, Stella

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the accuracy of contact and laser 3D scanners in tooth mark analysis. Ten dental casts were scanned with both 3D scanners. Seven linear measurements were made from the 3D images of dental casts and biting edges generated with DentalPrint© software (University of Granada, Granada, Spain). The uncertainty value for contact 3D scanning was 0.833 for the upper dental cast and 0.660 mm for the lower cast; similar uncertainty values were found for 3D-laser scanning. Slightly higher uncertainty values were obtained for the 3D biting edges generated. The uncertainty values for single measurements ranged from 0.1 to 0.3 mm with the exception of the intercanine distance, in which higher values were obtained. Knowledge of the error rate in the 3D scanning of dental casts and biting edges is especially relevant to be applied in practical forensic cases. PMID:25388960

  5. 3D Model Segmentation and Representation with Implicit Polynomials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Bo; Takamatsu, Jun; Ikeuchi, Katsushi

    When large-scale and complex 3D objects are obtained by range finders, it is often necessary to represent them by algebraic surfaces for such purposes as data compression, multi-resolution, noise elimination, and 3D recognition. Representing the 3D data with algebraic surfaces of an implicit polynomial (IP) has proved to offer the advantages that IP representation is capable of encoding geometric properties easily with desired smoothness, few parameters, algebraic/geometric invariants, and robustness to noise and missing data. Unfortunately, generating a high-degree IP surface for a whole complex 3D shape is impossible because of high computational cost and numerical instability. In this paper we propose a 3D segmentation method based on a cut-and-merge approach. Two cutting procedures adopt low-degree IPs to divide and fit the surface segments simultaneously, while avoiding generating high-curved segments. A merging procedure merges the similar adjacent segments to avoid over-segmentation. To prove the effectiveness of this segmentation method, we open up some new vistas for 3D applications such as 3D matching, recognition, and registration.

  6. 3D laptop for defense applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edmondson, Richard; Chenault, David

    2012-06-01

    Polaris Sensor Technologies has developed numerous 3D display systems using a US Army patented approach. These displays have been developed as prototypes for handheld controllers for robotic systems and closed hatch driving, and as part of a TALON robot upgrade for 3D vision, providing depth perception for the operator for improved manipulation and hazard avoidance. In this paper we discuss the prototype rugged 3D laptop computer and its applications to defense missions. The prototype 3D laptop combines full temporal and spatial resolution display with the rugged Amrel laptop computer. The display is viewed through protective passive polarized eyewear, and allows combined 2D and 3D content. Uses include robot tele-operation with live 3D video or synthetically rendered scenery, mission planning and rehearsal, enhanced 3D data interpretation, and simulation.

  7. Tomographic system for 3D temperature reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antos, Martin; Malina, Radomir

    2003-11-01

    The novel laboratory system for the optical tomography is used to obtain three-dimensional temperature field around a heated element. The Mach-Zehnder holographic interferometers with diffusive illumination of the phase object provide the possibility to scan of multidirectional holographic interferograms in the range of viewing angles from 0 deg to 108 deg. These interferograms form the input data for the computer tomography of the 3D distribution of the refractive index variation, which characterizes the physical state of the studied medium. The configuration of the system allows automatic projection scanning of the studied phase object. The computer calculates the wavefront deformation for each projection, making use of different methods of Fourier-transform and phase-sampling evaluations. The experimental set-up together with experimental results is presented.

  8. Visualization of 3D optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hoseong; Clemens, James

    2016-05-01

    We describe the visualization of 3D optical lattices based on Sisyphus cooling implemented with open source software. We plot the adiabatic light shift potentials found by diagonalizing the effective Hamiltonian for the light shift operator. Our program incorporates a variety of atomic ground state configurations with total angular momentum ranging from j = 1 / 2 to j = 4 and a variety of laser beam configurations including the two-beam lin ⊥ lin configuration, the four-beam umbrella configuration, and four beams propagating in two orthogonal planes. In addition to visualizing the lattice the program also evaluates lattice parameters such as the oscillation frequency for atoms trapped deep in the wells. The program is intended to help guide experimental implementations of optical lattices.

  9. Role of multidecadal climate variability in a range extension of pinyon pine

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gray, Stephen T.; Betancourt, Julio L.; Jackson, Stephen T.; Eddy, Robert G.

    2006-01-01

    Evidence from woodrat middens and tree rings at Dutch John Mountain (DJM) in northeastern Utah reveal spatiotemporal patterns of pinyon pine (Pinus edulis Engelm.) colonization and expansion in the past millennium. The DJM population, a northern outpost of pinyon, was established by long-distance dispersal (~40 km). Growth of this isolate was markedly episodic and tracked multidecadal variability in precipitation. Initial colonization occurred by AD 1246, but expansion was forestalled by catastrophic drought (1250–1288), which we speculate produced extensive mortality of Utah Juniper (Juniperus osteosperma (Torr.) Little), the dominant tree at DJM for the previous ~8700 years. Pinyon then quickly replaced juniper across DJM during a few wet decades (1330–1339 and 1368–1377). Such alternating decadal-scale droughts and pluvial events play a key role in structuring plant communities at the landscape to regional level. These decadal-length precipitation anomalies tend to be regionally coherent and can synchronize physical and biological processes across large areas. Vegetation forecast models must incorporate these temporal and geographic aspects of climate variability to accurately predict the effects of future climate change.

  10. The High Variability of Hydrologic Response in Mountain Watersheds: Snowy Range, Wyoming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, S. N.

    2015-12-01

    Three adjacent mountain streams that coalesce to form a single river have been monitored with a nested watershed design comprised of ten runoff stations for the past three years. Some of the stations are co-located on previous monitoring sites that allow for an extended period of record. Stage-discharge relationships have been built with high degrees of confidence at each station, and stream isotope data have been taken to better determine sources of water and fractionation of precipitation into runoff components. In addition to runoff observations we have multiple weather stations and use geophysical methods to investigate the subsurface and better characterize potential flow pathways and remote sensing and field methods to characterize the watersheds. From these data we have observed a high degree in variability in runoff characteristics among these sites, including significant differences in annual runoff, proportion of baseflow, rainfall/runoff efficiency, and hydrologic regime. Analyses of nested runoff data reveal longitudinal and seasonal changes in surface and subsurface flow, which allow us to identify the timing and location of groundwater contributions and channel transmission to regional aquifers. Differences among the watershed responses are augmented by precipitation, and we identify stream reaches that change from effluent to influent depending on timing and magnitude of runoff. We explored physical interpretations for the observed variability, including management, beetle impacts, and subsurface characteristics as inferred from geophysical data.

  11. Image based 3D city modeling : Comparative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, S. P.; Jain, K.; Mandla, V. R.

    2014-06-01

    3D city model is a digital representation of the Earth's surface and it's related objects such as building, tree, vegetation, and some manmade feature belonging to urban area. The demand of 3D city modeling is increasing rapidly for various engineering and non-engineering applications. Generally four main image based approaches were used for virtual 3D city models generation. In first approach, researchers were used Sketch based modeling, second method is Procedural grammar based modeling, third approach is Close range photogrammetry based modeling and fourth approach is mainly based on Computer Vision techniques. SketchUp, CityEngine, Photomodeler and Agisoft Photoscan are the main softwares to represent these approaches respectively. These softwares have different approaches & methods suitable for image based 3D city modeling. Literature study shows that till date, there is no complete such type of comparative study available to create complete 3D city model by using images. This paper gives a comparative assessment of these four image based 3D modeling approaches. This comparative study is mainly based on data acquisition methods, data processing techniques and output 3D model products. For this research work, study area is the campus of civil engineering department, Indian Institute of Technology, Roorkee (India). This 3D campus acts as a prototype for city. This study also explains various governing parameters, factors and work experiences. This research work also gives a brief introduction, strengths and weakness of these four image based techniques. Some personal comment is also given as what can do or what can't do from these softwares. At the last, this study shows; it concluded that, each and every software has some advantages and limitations. Choice of software depends on user requirements of 3D project. For normal visualization project, SketchUp software is a good option. For 3D documentation record, Photomodeler gives good result. For Large city

  12. Geographic range and morphological and chromosomal variability of Carex molestiformis (Cyperaceae) east of the Mississippi River

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Carex molestiformis (frightful sedge), described in 1997 as an endemic to the Ozark and Ouachita Mountain regions, is newly collected from Georgia, Mississippi, and Ohio. Herbarium records have also confirmed this species from North Carolina, Virginia, and West Virginia bringing the overall range of...

  13. Comparison of 2D and 3D gamma analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Pulliam, Kiley B.; Huang, Jessie Y.; Howell, Rebecca M.; Followill, David; Kry, Stephen F.; Bosca, Ryan; O’Daniel, Jennifer

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: As clinics begin to use 3D metrics for intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) quality assurance, it must be noted that these metrics will often produce results different from those produced by their 2D counterparts. 3D and 2D gamma analyses would be expected to produce different values, in part because of the different search space available. In the present investigation, the authors compared the results of 2D and 3D gamma analysis (where both datasets were generated in the same manner) for clinical treatment plans. Methods: Fifty IMRT plans were selected from the authors’ clinical database, and recalculated using Monte Carlo. Treatment planning system-calculated (“evaluated dose distributions”) and Monte Carlo-recalculated (“reference dose distributions”) dose distributions were compared using 2D and 3D gamma analysis. This analysis was performed using a variety of dose-difference (5%, 3%, 2%, and 1%) and distance-to-agreement (5, 3, 2, and 1 mm) acceptance criteria, low-dose thresholds (5%, 10%, and 15% of the prescription dose), and data grid sizes (1.0, 1.5, and 3.0 mm). Each comparison was evaluated to determine the average 2D and 3D gamma, lower 95th percentile gamma value, and percentage of pixels passing gamma. Results: The average gamma, lower 95th percentile gamma value, and percentage of passing pixels for each acceptance criterion demonstrated better agreement for 3D than for 2D analysis for every plan comparison. The average difference in the percentage of passing pixels between the 2D and 3D analyses with no low-dose threshold ranged from 0.9% to 2.1%. Similarly, using a low-dose threshold resulted in a difference between the mean 2D and 3D results, ranging from 0.8% to 1.5%. The authors observed no appreciable differences in gamma with changes in the data density (constant difference: 0.8% for 2D vs 3D). Conclusions: The authors found that 3D gamma analysis resulted in up to 2.9% more pixels passing than 2D analysis. It must

  14. Demographic variability and density-dependent dynamics of a free-ranging rhesus macaque population

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Pacheco, Raisa; Rawlins, Richard G.; Kessler, Matthew J.; Williams, Lawrence E.; Ruiz-Maldonado, Tagrid M.; González-Martínez, Janis; Ruiz-Lambides, Angelina V.; Sabat, Alberto M.

    2014-01-01

    Density-dependence is hypothesized as the major mechanism of population regulation. However, the lack of long-term demographic data has hampered the use of density-dependent models in nonhuman primates. In this study, we make use of the long-term demographic data from Cayo Santiago’s rhesus macaques to parameterize and analyze both a density-independent and a density-dependent population matrix model, and compare their projections with the observed population changes. We also employ a retrospective analysis to determine how variance in vital rates, and covariance among them, contributed to the observed variation in long-term fitness across different levels of population density. The population exhibited negative density-dependence in fertility and the model incorporating this relationship accounted for 98% of the observed population dynamics. Variation in survival and fertility of sexually active individuals contributed the most to the variation in long-term fitness, while vital rates displaying high temporal variability exhibited lower sensitivities. Our findings are novel in describing density-dependent dynamics in a provisioned primate population, and in suggesting that selection is acting to lower the variance in the population growth rate by minimizing the variation in adult survival at high density. Because density-dependent mechanisms may become stronger in wild primate populations due to increasing habitat loss and food scarcity, our study demonstrates it is important to incorporate variation in population size, as well as demographic variability into population viability analyses for a better understanding of the mechanisms regulating the growth of primate populations. PMID:23847126

  15. Modelling the Geographical Range of a Species with Variable Life-History

    PubMed Central

    Macfadyen, Sarina; Kriticos, Darren J.

    2012-01-01

    We show how a climatic niche model can be used to describe the potential geographic distribution of a pest species with variable life-history, and illustrate how to estimate biogeographic pest threats that vary across space. The models were used to explore factors that affect pest risk (irrigation and presences of host plant). A combination of current distribution records and published experimental data were used to construct separate models for the asexual and sexual lineages of Rhopalosiphum padi (Linnaeus) (Hemiptera: Aphididae). The two models were combined with knowledge of host plant presence to classify the global pest risk posed by R. padi. Whilst R. padi has a relatively limited area in which sexual lineages can persist year round, a much larger area is suitable for transient sexual and asexual lineages to exist. The greatest risk of establishment of persistent sexual and asexual populations is in areas with warm temperate climates. At the global scale the models show very little difference in risk patterns between natural rainfall and irrigation scenarios, but in Australia, the amount of land suitable for persistent asexual and transient sexual populations decreases (by 20%) if drought stress is no longer alleviated by irrigation. This approach proved useful for modelling the potential distribution of a species that has a variable life-history. We were able to use the model outputs to examine factors such as irrigation practices and host plant presence that altered the nature (transient or permanent) and extent of pest risk. The composite niche maps indicate pest risk in terms that are useful to both biosecurity agencies and pest managers. PMID:22808133

  16. Electrostatic Steering Accelerates C3d:CR2 Association.

    PubMed

    Mohan, Rohith R; Huber, Gary A; Morikis, Dimitrios

    2016-08-25

    Electrostatic effects are ubiquitous in protein interactions and are found to be pervasive in the complement system as well. The interaction between complement fragment C3d and complement receptor 2 (CR2) has evolved to become a link between innate and adaptive immunity. Electrostatic interactions have been suggested to be the driving factor for the association of the C3d:CR2 complex. In this study, we investigate the effects of ionic strength and mutagenesis on the association of C3d:CR2 through Brownian dynamics simulations. We demonstrate that the formation of the C3d:CR2 complex is ionic strength-dependent, suggesting the presence of long-range electrostatic steering that accelerates the complex formation. Electrostatic steering occurs through the interaction of an acidic surface patch in C3d and the positively charged CR2 and is supported by the effects of mutations within the acidic patch of C3d that slow or diminish association. Our data are in agreement with previous experimental mutagenesis and binding studies and computational studies. Although the C3d acidic patch may be locally destabilizing because of unfavorable Coulombic interactions of like charges, it contributes to the acceleration of association. Therefore, acceleration of function through electrostatic steering takes precedence to stability. The site of interaction between C3d and CR2 has been the target for delivery of CR2-bound nanoparticle, antibody, and small molecule biomarkers, as well as potential therapeutics. A detailed knowledge of the physicochemical basis of C3d:CR2 association may be necessary to accelerate biomarker and drug discovery efforts. PMID:27092816

  17. 3D Printing technologies for drug delivery: a review.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Leena Kumari; Smyth, Hugh

    2016-07-01

    With the FDA approval of the first 3D printed tablet, Spritam®, there is now precedence set for the utilization of 3D printing for the preparation of drug delivery systems. The capabilities for dispensing low volumes with accuracy, precise spatial control and layer-by-layer assembly allow for the preparation of complex compositions and geometries. The high degree of flexibility and control with 3D printing enables the preparation of dosage forms with multiple active pharmaceutical ingredients with complex and tailored release profiles. A unique opportunity for this technology for the preparation of personalized doses to address individual patient needs. This review will highlight the 3D printing technologies being utilized for the fabrication of drug delivery systems, as well as the formulation and processing parameters for consideration. This article will also summarize the range of dosage forms that have been prepared using these technologies, specifically over the last 10 years. PMID:26625986

  18. Target surface finding using 3D SAR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiter, Jason R.; Burns, Joseph W.; Subotic, Nikola S.

    2005-05-01

    Methods of generating more literal, easily interpretable imagery from 3-D SAR data are being studied to provide all weather, near-visual target identification and/or scene interpretation. One method of approaching this problem is to automatically generate shape-based geometric renderings from the SAR data. In this paper we describe the application of the Marching Tetrahedrons surface finding algorithm to 3-D SAR data. The Marching Tetrahedrons algorithm finds a surface through the 3-D data cube, which provides a recognizable representation of the target surface. This algorithm was applied to the public-release X-patch simulations of a backhoe, which provided densely sampled 3-D SAR data sets. The performance of the algorithm to noise and spatial resolution were explored. Surface renderings were readily recognizable over a range of spatial resolution, and maintained their fidelity even under relatively low Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR) conditions.

  19. Electrically tunable lens speeds up 3D orbital tracking

    PubMed Central

    Annibale, Paolo; Dvornikov, Alexander; Gratton, Enrico

    2015-01-01

    3D orbital particle tracking is a versatile and effective microscopy technique that allows following fast moving fluorescent objects within living cells and reconstructing complex 3D shapes using laser scanning microscopes. We demonstrated notable improvements in the range, speed and accuracy of 3D orbital particle tracking by replacing commonly used piezoelectric stages with Electrically Tunable Lens (ETL) that eliminates mechanical movement of objective lenses. This allowed tracking and reconstructing shape of structures extending 500 microns in the axial direction. Using the ETL, we tracked at high speed fluorescently labeled genomic loci within the nucleus of living cells with unprecedented temporal resolution of 8ms using a 1.42NA oil-immersion objective. The presented technology is cost effective and allows easy upgrade of scanning microscopes for fast 3D orbital tracking. PMID:26114037

  20. Bukliball and Beyond: 3-D Soft Auxetic Metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shim, Jongmin; Babaee, Sahab; Weaver, James C.; Patel, Nikita; Chen, Elizabeth R.; Bertoldi, Katia

    2013-03-01

    We present a new class of 3-D soft metamaterials whose microstructure can be dramatically changed in response to mechanical loading. Patterned spherical shells, the Buckliballs (PNAS 109(16):5978) which undergo undergoing a buckling-induced structural transformation under pressure, are employed as building blocks, and are assembled to construct 3-D super-structures. We present procedures to guide the selection of both the building blocks and their arrangement, and design materials with tunable 3-D auxetic behavior that exploit buckling as the actuation mechanism. The validity of the proposed material design is demonstrated through both experiments and finite element simulations. This pattern transformation induced by a mechanical instability opens the possibility for fabrication of 3-D auxetic materials/structures over a wide range of length scales.

  1. A 3D-printed high power nuclear spin polarizer.

    PubMed

    Nikolaou, Panayiotis; Coffey, Aaron M; Walkup, Laura L; Gust, Brogan M; LaPierre, Cristen D; Koehnemann, Edward; Barlow, Michael J; Rosen, Matthew S; Goodson, Boyd M; Chekmenev, Eduard Y

    2014-01-29

    Three-dimensional printing with high-temperature plastic is used to enable spin exchange optical pumping (SEOP) and hyperpolarization of xenon-129 gas. The use of 3D printed structures increases the simplicity of integration of the following key components with a variable temperature SEOP probe: (i) in situ NMR circuit operating at 84 kHz (Larmor frequencies of (129)Xe and (1)H nuclear spins), (ii) <0.3 nm narrowed 200 W laser source, (iii) in situ high-resolution near-IR spectroscopy, (iv) thermoelectric temperature control, (v) retroreflection optics, and (vi) optomechanical alignment system. The rapid prototyping endowed by 3D printing dramatically reduces production time and expenses while allowing reproducibility and integration of "off-the-shelf" components and enables the concept of printing on demand. The utility of this SEOP setup is demonstrated here to obtain near-unity (129)Xe polarization values in a 0.5 L optical pumping cell, including ∼74 ± 7% at 1000 Torr xenon partial pressure, a record value at such high Xe density. Values for the (129)Xe polarization exponential build-up rate [(3.63 ± 0.15) × 10(-2) min(-1)] and in-cell (129)Xe spin-lattice relaxation time (T1 = 2.19 ± 0.06 h) for 1000 Torr Xe were in excellent agreement with the ratio of the gas-phase polarizations for (129)Xe and Rb (PRb ∼ 96%). Hyperpolarization-enhanced (129)Xe gas imaging was demonstrated with a spherical phantom following automated gas transfer from the polarizer. Taken together, these results support the development of a wide range of chemical, biochemical, material science, and biomedical applications. PMID:24400919

  2. A 3D-Printed High Power Nuclear Spin Polarizer

    PubMed Central

    Nikolaou, Panayiotis; Coffey, Aaron M.; Walkup, Laura L.; Gust, Brogan M.; LaPierre, Cristen D.; Koehnemann, Edward; Barlow, Michael J.; Rosen, Matthew S.; Goodson, Boyd M.; Chekmenev, Eduard Y.

    2015-01-01

    Three-dimensional printing with high-temperature plastic is used to enable spin exchange optical pumping (SEOP) and hyperpolarization of xenon-129 gas. The use of 3D printed structures increases the simplicity of integration of the following key components with a variable temperature SEOP probe: (i) in situ NMR circuit operating at 84 kHz (Larmor frequencies of 129Xe and 1H nuclear spins), (ii) <0.3 nm narrowed 200 W laser source, (iii) in situ high-resolution near-IR spectroscopy, (iv) thermoelectric temperature control, (v) retroreflection optics, and (vi) optomechanical alignment system. The rapid prototyping endowed by 3D printing dramatically reduces production time and expenses while allowing reproducibility and integration of “off-the-shelf” components and enables the concept of printing on demand. The utility of this SEOP setup is demonstrated here to obtain near-unity 129Xe polarization values in a 0.5 L optical pumping cell, including ~74 ± 7% at 1000 Torr xenon partial pressure, a record value at such high Xe density. Values for the 129Xe polarization exponential build-up rate [(3.63 ± 0.15) × 10−2 min−1] and in-cell 129Xe spin−lattice relaxation time (T1 = 2.19 ± 0.06 h) for 1000 Torr Xe were in excellent agreement with the ratio of the gas-phase polarizations for 129Xe and Rb (PRb ~ 96%). Hyperpolarization-enhanced 129Xe gas imaging was demonstrated with a spherical phantom following automated gas transfer from the polarizer. Taken together, these results support the development of a wide range of chemical, biochemical, material science, and biomedical applications. PMID:24400919

  3. Simulation of underwater explosion benchmark experiments with ALE3D

    SciTech Connect

    Couch, R.; Faux, D.

    1997-05-19

    Some code improvements have been made during the course of this study. One immediately obvious need was for more flexibility in the constitutive representation for materials in shell elements. To remedy this situation, a model with a tabular representation of stress versus strain and rate dependent effects was implemented. This was required in order to obtain reasonable results in the IED cylinder simulation. Another deficiency was in the ability to extract and plot variables associated with shell elements. The pipe whip analysis required the development of a scheme to tally and plot time dependent shell quantities such as stresses and strains. This capability had previously existed only for solid elements. Work was initiated to provide the same range of plotting capability for structural elements that exist with the DYNA3D/TAURUS tools. One of the characteristics of these problems is the disparity in zoning required in the vicinity of the charge and bubble compared to that needed in the far field. This disparity can cause the equipotential relaxation logic to provide a less than optimal solution. Various approaches were utilized to bias the relaxation to obtain more optimal meshing during relaxation. Extensions of these techniques have been developed to provide more powerful options, but more work still needs to be done. The results presented here are representative of what can be produced with an ALE code structured like ALE3D. They are not necessarily the best results that could have been obtained. More experience in assessing sensitivities to meshing and boundary conditions would be very useful. A number of code deficiencies discovered in the course of this work have been corrected and are available for any future investigations.

  4. 3-D Technology Approaches for Biological Ecologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Liyu; Austin, Robert; U. S-China Physical-Oncology Sciences Alliance (PS-OA) Team

    Constructing three dimensional (3-D) landscapes is an inevitable issue in deep study of biological ecologies, because in whatever scales in nature, all of the ecosystems are composed by complex 3-D environments and biological behaviors. Just imagine if a 3-D technology could help complex ecosystems be built easily and mimic in vivo microenvironment realistically with flexible environmental controls, it will be a fantastic and powerful thrust to assist researchers for explorations. For years, we have been utilizing and developing different technologies for constructing 3-D micro landscapes for biophysics studies in in vitro. Here, I will review our past efforts, including probing cancer cell invasiveness with 3-D silicon based Tepuis, constructing 3-D microenvironment for cell invasion and metastasis through polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) soft lithography, as well as explorations of optimized stenting positions for coronary bifurcation disease with 3-D wax printing and the latest home designed 3-D bio-printer. Although 3-D technologies is currently considered not mature enough for arbitrary 3-D micro-ecological models with easy design and fabrication, I hope through my talk, the audiences will be able to sense its significance and predictable breakthroughs in the near future. This work was supported by the State Key Development Program for Basic Research of China (Grant No. 2013CB837200), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11474345) and the Beijing Natural Science Foundation (Grant No. 7154221).

  5. 3D Printing and Digital Rock Physics for Geomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, M. J.; Yoon, H.; Dewers, T. A.

    2015-12-01

    Imaging techniques for the analysis of porous structures have revolutionized our ability to quantitatively characterize geomaterials. Digital representations of rock from CT images and physics modeling based on these pore structures provide the opportunity to further advance our quantitative understanding of fluid flow, geomechanics, and geochemistry, and the emergence of coupled behaviors. Additive manufacturing, commonly known as 3D printing, has revolutionized production of custom parts with complex internal geometries. For the geosciences, recent advances in 3D printing technology may be co-opted to print reproducible porous structures derived from CT-imaging of actual rocks for experimental testing. The use of 3D printed microstructure allows us to surmount typical problems associated with sample-to-sample heterogeneity that plague rock physics testing and to test material response independent from pore-structure variability. Together, imaging, digital rocks and 3D printing potentially enables a new workflow for understanding coupled geophysical processes in a real, but well-defined setting circumventing typical issues associated with reproducibility, enabling full characterization and thus connection of physical phenomena to structure. In this talk we will discuss the possibilities that these technologies can bring to geosciences and present early experiences with coupled multiscale experimental and numerical analysis using 3D printed fractured rock specimens. In particular, we discuss the processes of selection and printing of transparent fractured specimens based on 3D reconstruction of micro-fractured rock to study fluid flow characterization and manipulation. Micro-particle image velocimetry is used to directly visualize 3D single and multiphase flow velocity in 3D fracture networks. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U

  6. RT3D tutorials for GMS users

    SciTech Connect

    Clement, T.P.; Jones, N.L.

    1998-02-01

    RT3D (Reactive Transport in 3-Dimensions) is a computer code that solves coupled partial differential equations that describe reactive-flow and transport of multiple mobile and/or immobile species in a three dimensional saturated porous media. RT3D was developed from the single-species transport code, MT3D (DoD-1.5, 1997 version). As with MT3D, RT3D also uses the USGS groundwater flow model MODFLOW for computing spatial and temporal variations in groundwater head distribution. This report presents a set of tutorial problems that are designed to illustrate how RT3D simulations can be performed within the Department of Defense Groundwater Modeling System (GMS). GMS serves as a pre- and post-processing interface for RT3D. GMS can be used to define all the input files needed by RT3D code, and later the code can be launched from within GMS and run as a separate application. Once the RT3D simulation is completed, the solution can be imported to GMS for graphical post-processing. RT3D v1.0 supports several reaction packages that can be used for simulating different types of reactive contaminants. Each of the tutorials, described below, provides training on a different RT3D reaction package. Each reaction package has different input requirements, and the tutorials are designed to describe these differences. Furthermore, the tutorials illustrate the various options available in GMS for graphical post-processing of RT3D results. Users are strongly encouraged to complete the tutorials before attempting to use RT3D and GMS on a routine basis.

  7. 3D transrectal ultrasound prostate biopsy using a mechanical imaging and needle-guidance system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bax, Jeffrey; Cool, Derek; Gardi, Lori; Montreuil, Jacques; Gil, Elena; Bluvol, Jeremy; Knight, Kerry; Smith, David; Romagnoli, Cesare; Fenster, Aaron

    2008-03-01

    Prostate biopsy procedures are generally limited to 2D transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) imaging for biopsy needle guidance. This limitation results in needle position ambiguity and an insufficient record of biopsy core locations in cases of prostate re-biopsy. We have developed a multi-jointed mechanical device that supports a commercially available TRUS probe with an integrated needle guide for precision prostate biopsy. The device is fixed at the base, allowing the joints to be manually manipulated while fully supporting its weight throughout its full range of motion. Means are provided to track the needle trajectory and display this trajectory on a corresponding TRUS image. This allows the physician to aim the needle-guide at predefined targets within the prostate, providing true 3D navigation. The tracker has been designed for use with several end-fired transducers that can be rotated about the longitudinal axis of the probe to generate 3D images. The tracker reduces the variability associated with conventional hand-held probes, while preserving user familiarity and procedural workflow. In a prostate phantom, biopsy needles were guided to within 2 mm of their targets, and the 3D location of the biopsy core was accurate to within 3 mm. The 3D navigation system is validated in the presence of prostate motion in a preliminary patient study.

  8. 3D-2D registration for surgical guidance: effect of projection view angles on registration accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uneri, A.; Otake, Y.; Wang, A. S.; Kleinszig, G.; Vogt, S.; Khanna, A. J.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2014-01-01

    An algorithm for intensity-based 3D-2D registration of CT and x-ray projections is evaluated, specifically using single- or dual-projection views to provide 3D localization. The registration framework employs the gradient information similarity metric and covariance matrix adaptation evolution strategy to solve for the patient pose in six degrees of freedom. Registration performance was evaluated in an anthropomorphic phantom and cadaver, using C-arm projection views acquired at angular separation, Δθ, ranging from ˜0°-180° at variable C-arm magnification. Registration accuracy was assessed in terms of 2D projection distance error and 3D target registration error (TRE) and compared to that of an electromagnetic (EM) tracker. The results indicate that angular separation as small as Δθ ˜10°-20° achieved TRE <2 mm with 95% confidence, comparable or superior to that of the EM tracker. The method allows direct registration of preoperative CT and planning data to intraoperative fluoroscopy, providing 3D localization free from conventional limitations associated with external fiducial markers, stereotactic frames, trackers and manual registration.

  9. Familial influences on the full range of variability in attention and activity levels during adolescence: A longitudinal twin study.

    PubMed

    Peng, Chun-Zi; Grant, Julia D; Heath, Andrew C; Reiersen, Angela M; Mulligan, Richard C; Anokhin, Andrey P

    2016-05-01

    To investigate familial influences on the full range of variability in attention and activity across adolescence, we collected maternal ratings of 339 twin pairs at ages 12, 14, and 16, and estimated the transmitted and new familial influences on attention and activity as measured by the Strengths and Weaknesses of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder Symptoms and Normal Behavior Scale. Familial influences were substantial for both traits across adolescence: genetic influences accounted for 54%-73% (attention) and 31%-73% (activity) of the total variance, and shared environmental influences accounted for 0%-22% of the attention variance and 13%-57% of the activity variance. The longitudinal stability of individual differences in attention and activity was largely accounted for by familial influences transmitted from previous ages. Innovations over adolescence were also partially attributable to familial influences. Studying the full range of variability in attention and activity may facilitate our understanding of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder's etiology and intervention. PMID:26612434

  10. High resolution, large spectral range, in variable- included- angle soft X-ray monochromators using a plane VLS grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reininger, Ruben; de Castro, A. R. B.

    2005-02-01

    We give a unified discussion of two different approaches to the design of grazing incidence monochromators with a variable line spacing (VLS) grating for soft X-ray undulator sources. Neither one uses an entrance slit and both work with a fixed position exit slit. In one approach, being constructed at LNLS and designed for the energy range 100variable c-value with a single plane grating and little sacrifice in the maximum resolving power. In this case source size limited resolving power of circa 40 000 is expected at 100 eV. In the second approach, for the storage ring in Wisconsin, two gratings covering the energy range 40

  11. Range and Richness of Vascular Land-Plants: The role of variable light (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eagleson, P. S.

    2009-12-01

    Since the time of Darwin it has been recognized that with increasing latitude, the average continuous range of latitudes occupied by all the plant species found locally increases, while the number of different species found there (i.e. the local richness of species) decreases. General agreement has developed that climate is somehow responsible, but as recently as 1992 E.O. Wilson found the richness gradient still to be "...one of the great theoretical problems of evolutionary biology", and the 2006 Millenium Ecosystem Assessment found that "We lack a robust theoretical basis for linking ecological diversity to ecosystem dynamics...". In a "zeroth-order" approximation of reality, we posit here that incident SW radiation is the principal driver of these phenomena. We show that the species-specific intersection of the asymptotes of the photosynthetic-capacity curves of the C3 plants overwhelmingly predominant in the extra-tropics offer, at these latitudes, a unique state defining the Darwinian-optimum species (horizontal leaf-area index) for each local climate (average incident SW radiation). This provides a basis for a locally-linear transformation of the probability density function of observed local SW flux into the resulting probability density function of stable species and thence into the range of latitudes separating the same species when appearing in the extremes of this distribution. Further assuming the maximum number of stable local species to be the one-for-one result of separate germination-cum-species-supporting SW flux events, we model their local arrival as a stochastic process and count their annual number as an estimate of the local maximum richness. Range and richness are found here to be inversely related theoretically as was noted observationally by Rapoport (1975), and agreement of both theories with observations is found to be excellent at extra-tropical latitudes. [Currently in the publication process, this work will appear shortly as a

  12. 3D Stratigraphic Modeling of Central Aachen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, M.; Neukum, C.; Azzam, R.; Hu, H.

    2010-05-01

    Since 1980s, advanced computer hardware and software technologies, as well as multidisciplinary research have provided possibilities to develop advanced three dimensional (3D) simulation software for geosciences application. Some countries, such as USA1) and Canada2) 3), have built up regional 3D geological models based on archival geological data. Such models have played huge roles in engineering geology2), hydrogeology2) 3), geothermal industry1) and so on. In cooperating with the Municipality of Aachen, the Department of Engineering Geology of RWTH Aachen University have built up a computer-based 3D stratigraphic model of 50 meter' depth for the center of Aachen, which is a 5 km by 7 km geologically complex area. The uncorrelated data from multi-resources, discontinuous nature and unconformable connection of the units are main challenges for geological modeling in this area. The reliability of 3D geological models largely depends on the quality and quantity of data. Existing 1D and 2D geological data were collected, including 1) approximately 6970 borehole data of different depth compiled in Microsoft Access database and MapInfo database; 2) a Digital Elevation Model (DEM); 3) geological cross sections; and 4) stratigraphic maps in 1m, 2m and 5m depth. Since acquired data are of variable origins, they were managed step by step. The main processes are described below: 1) Typing errors of borehole data were identified and the corrected data were exported to Variowin2.2 to distinguish duplicate points; 2) The surface elevation of borehole data was compared to the DEM, and differences larger than 3m were eliminated. Moreover, where elevation data missed, it was read from the DEM; 3) Considerable data were collected from municipal constructions, such as residential buildings, factories, and roads. Therefore, many boreholes are spatially clustered, and only one or two representative points were picked out in such areas; After above procedures, 5839 boreholes with -x

  13. Serum 25-Hydroxyvitamin D Levels: Variability, Knowledge Gaps, and the Concept of a Desirable Range.

    PubMed

    Fuleihan, Ghada El-Hajj; Bouillon, Roger; Clarke, Bart; Chakhtoura, Marlene; Cooper, Cyrus; McClung, Michael; Singh, Ravinder J

    2015-07-01

    Hypovitaminosis D is prevalent worldwide but proportions vary widely between regions, depending on genetic and lifestyle factors, the threshold to define deficiency, and accuracy of 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD) assays used. Latitude, pollution, concealing clothing, sun exposure, gender, dietary habits, and lack of government regulation account for up to 50% in variations in serum 25OHD levels, whereas genetic polymorphisms in the vitamin D pathway account for less than 5%. Organizations/societies have developed guidelines for recommended desirable 25OHD levels and vitamin D doses to reach them, but their applicability across age groups and populations are still debated. This article and the accompanying online Supporting Information highlight sources of variations in circulating 25OHD levels, uncertainties and knowledge gaps, and analytical problems facing 25OHD assays, while keeping efficacy and safety data as the dominant factors when defining a desirable range for 25OHD levels. We propose a desirable range of 20 to 40 ng/mL (50 to 100 nmol/L), provided precise and accurate assays are used. Although slightly lower levels, 15 to 20 ng/mL, may be sufficient for some infants and adults, higher levels, 40 to 60 ng/mL, may still be safe. This desirable range allows physicians to tailor treatment while taking season, lifestyle, vitamin D intake, and other sources of variation into account. We reserve 25OHD measurements for at-risk patients, defined by disease or lifestyle, and the use of 25OHD assays calibrated against the recommended international standards. Most target groups reach desirable target levels by a daily intake of 400 to 600 IU for children and 800 IU for adults. A total daily allowance of vitamin D of up to 1000 IU in the pediatric age groups, and up to 2000 IU in adults, tailored to an individual patient risk profile, is probably safe over long durations. Additional data are needed to validate the proposed range and vitamin D doses

  14. Experimental test of the variability of G using Viking lander ranging data

    SciTech Connect

    Hellings, R.W.; Adams, P.J.; Anderson, J.D.; Keesey, M.S.; Lau, E.L.; Standish, E.M.; Canuto, V.M.; Goldman, I.

    1983-10-31

    Results are presented from the analysis of solar system astrometric data, notably the range data to the Viking landers on Mars. A least-squares fit of the parameters of the solar system model to these data limits a simple time variation in the effective Newtonian gravitational constant to (0.2 +- 0.4) x 10/sup -11/ yr/sup -1/ and a rate of drift of atomic clocks relative to the implicit clock of relativistic dynamics to (0.1 +- 0.8) x 10/sup -11/ yr/sup -1/. The error limits quoted are the result of uncertainties in the masses of the asteroids.

  15. Fiber optic coherent laser radar 3D vision system

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, R.B.; Gallman, P.G.; Slotwinski, A.R.; Wagner, K.; Weaver, S.; Xu, Jieping

    1996-12-31

    This CLVS will provide a substantial advance in high speed computer vision performance to support robotic Environmental Management (EM) operations. This 3D system employs a compact fiber optic based scanner and operator at a 128 x 128 pixel frame at one frame per second with a range resolution of 1 mm over its 1.5 meter working range. Using acousto-optic deflectors, the scanner is completely randomly addressable. This can provide live 3D monitoring for situations where it is necessary to update once per second. This can be used for decontamination and decommissioning operations in which robotic systems are altering the scene such as in waste removal, surface scarafacing, or equipment disassembly and removal. The fiber- optic coherent laser radar based system is immune to variations in lighting, color, or surface shading, which have plagued the reliability of existing 3D vision systems, while providing substantially superior range resolution.

  16. A new generic model potential for mesogenic systems: square well line potential of variable range.

    PubMed

    Varga, Szabolcs; Vesely, Franz J

    2009-11-21

    A single-site pair potential is derived to approximate the linear n-site square well interaction. The resulting square well line (SWL) potential is analytical, fairly smooth, and reproduces the distance and orientation dependence of the multisite pair energy. It contains only three control parameters n, L, and s(2), in addition to the units of length s(1) and energy epsilon. The advantages of the new model over the traditional potentials such as Gay-Berne and Kihara are that n, L, and s(2) are physically meaningful quantities and that no additional adjustable parameters are introduced. With the SWL potential even very long square well chain molecules may be treated in Monte Carlo (MC) simulations; moreover the model is well suited for perturbation theory. Using Onsager-like theories we test the effect of molecular elongation, temperature, and the range of the square well potential on the vapor-liquid and nematic-smectic A (NS) phase transitions. We find that the vapor-liquid binodal of the SWL fluid is in good agreement with MC results for square well dumbbells. For repulsive SWL particles, varying the interaction range s(2) results in a similar effect on the NS transition as the change in the ionic strength in a real suspension of fd viruses. PMID:19929059

  17. A new generic model potential for mesogenic systems: Square well line potential of variable range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varga, Szabolcs; Vesely, Franz J.

    2009-11-01

    A single-site pair potential is derived to approximate the linear n-site square well interaction. The resulting square well line (SWL) potential is analytical, fairly smooth, and reproduces the distance and orientation dependence of the multisite pair energy. It contains only three control parameters n, L, and s2, in addition to the units of length s1 and energy ɛ. The advantages of the new model over the traditional potentials such as Gay-Berne and Kihara are that n, L, and s2 are physically meaningful quantities and that no additional adjustable parameters are introduced. With the SWL potential even very long square well chain molecules may be treated in Monte Carlo (MC) simulations; moreover the model is well suited for perturbation theory. Using Onsager-like theories we test the effect of molecular elongation, temperature, and the range of the square well potential on the vapor-liquid and nematic-smectic A (NS) phase transitions. We find that the vapor-liquid binodal of the SWL fluid is in good agreement with MC results for square well dumbbells. For repulsive SWL particles, varying the interaction range s2 results in a similar effect on the NS transition as the change in the ionic strength in a real suspension of fd viruses.

  18. Seasonality of torpor patterns and physiological variables of a free-ranging subtropical bat.

    PubMed

    Stawski, C; Geiser, F

    2010-02-01

    Seasonal changes in weather and food availability differ vastly between temperate and subtropical climates, yet knowledge on how free-ranging subtropical insectivorous bats cope with such changes is limited. We quantified ambient temperatures, torpor patterns and thermal physiology of subtropical insectivorous northern long-eared bats, Nyctophilus bifax, during summer (n=13) and winter (n=8) by temperature telemetry. As predicted, ambient conditions varied significantly between seasons, with warmer weather during summer. All bats used torpor on 85% of observation days during summer in comparison to 100% during winter. During summer, patterns of torpor varied and the duration of torpor bouts was not significantly affected by ambient temperature, whereas during winter torpor bout duration was negatively correlated with mean ambient temperature. Mean torpor bout duration in summer was 3.2+/-1.3 h and in winter was 26.8+/-11.3 h. Mean arousal time during summer was in the early afternoon and during winter in the late afternoon, and throughout both seasons arousals for possible foraging periods occurred near sunset. Skin temperature was positively correlated with ambient temperatures in both seasons, but the relationship differed between seasons. We show that torpor is used regularly throughout the year in a free-ranging subtropical bat and provide the first evidence demonstrating that torpor patterns and thermal physiology change with season. PMID:20086123

  19. 3D Dynamic Echocardiography with a Digitizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oshiro, Osamu; Matani, Ayumu; Chihara, Kunihiro

    1998-05-01

    In this paper,a three-dimensional (3D) dynamic ultrasound (US) imaging system,where a US brightness-mode (B-mode) imagetriggered with an R-wave of electrocardiogram (ECG)was obtained with an ultrasound diagnostic deviceand the location and orientation of the US probewere simultaneously measured with a 3D digitizer, is described.The obtained B-mode imagewas then projected onto a virtual 3D spacewith the proposed interpolation algorithm using a Gaussian operator.Furthermore, a 3D image was presented on a cathode ray tube (CRT)and stored in virtual reality modeling language (VRML).We performed an experimentto reconstruct a 3D heart image in systole using this system.The experimental results indicatethat the system enables the visualization ofthe 3D and internal structure of a heart viewed from any angleand has potential for use in dynamic imaging,intraoperative ultrasonography and tele-medicine.

  20. Exploratory Long-Range Models to Estimate Summer Climate Variability over Southern Africa.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jury, Mark R.; Mulenga, Henry M.; Mason, Simon J.

    1999-07-01

    Teleconnection predictors are explored using multivariate regression models in an effort to estimate southern African summer rainfall and climate impacts one season in advance. The preliminary statistical formulations include many variables influenced by the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) such as tropical sea surface temperatures (SST) in the Indian and Atlantic Oceans. Atmospheric circulation responses to ENSO include the alternation of tropical zonal winds over Africa and changes in convective activity within oceanic monsoon troughs. Numerous hemispheric-scale datasets are employed to extract predictors and include global indexes (Southern Oscillation index and quasi-biennial oscillation), SST principal component scores for the global oceans, indexes of tropical convection (outgoing longwave radiation), air pressure, and surface and upper winds over the Indian and Atlantic Oceans. Climatic targets include subseasonal, area-averaged rainfall over South Africa and the Zambezi river basin, and South Africa's annual maize yield. Predictors and targets overlap in the years 1971-93, the defined training period. Each target time series is fitted by an optimum group of predictors from the preceding spring, in a linear multivariate formulation. To limit artificial skill, predictors are restricted to three, providing 17 degrees of freedom. Models with colinear predictors are screened out, and persistence of the target time series is considered. The late summer rainfall models achieve a mean r2 fit of 72%, contributed largely through ENSO modulation. Early summer rainfall cross validation correlations are lower (61%). A conceptual understanding of the climate dynamics and ocean-atmosphere coupling processes inherent in the exploratory models is outlined.Seasonal outlooks based on the exploratory models could help mitigate the impacts of southern Africa's fluctuating climate. It is believed that an advance warning of drought risk and seasonal rainfall prospects will

  1. 3D toroidal physics: testing the boundaries of symmetry breaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spong, Don

    2014-10-01

    Toroidal symmetry is an important concept for plasma confinement; it allows the existence of nested flux surface MHD equilibria and conserved invariants for particle motion. However, perfect symmetry is unachievable in realistic toroidal plasma devices. For example, tokamaks have toroidal ripple due to discrete field coils, optimized stellarators do not achieve exact quasi-symmetry, the plasma itself continually seeks lower energy states through helical 3D deformations, and reactors will likely have non-uniform distributions of ferritic steel near the plasma. Also, some level of designed-in 3D magnetic field structure is now anticipated for most concepts in order to lead to a stable, steady-state fusion reactor. Such planned 3D field structures can take many forms, ranging from tokamaks with weak 3D ELM-suppression fields to stellarators with more dominant 3D field structures. There is considerable interest in the development of unified physics models for the full range of 3D effects. Ultimately, the questions of how much symmetry breaking can be tolerated and how to optimize its design must be addressed for all fusion concepts. Fortunately, significant progress is underway in theory, computation and plasma diagnostics on many issues such as magnetic surface quality, plasma screening vs. amplification of 3D perturbations, 3D transport, influence on edge pedestal structures, MHD stability effects, modification of fast ion-driven instabilities, prediction of energetic particle heat loads on plasma-facing materials, effects of 3D fields on turbulence, and magnetic coil design. A closely coupled program of simulation, experimental validation, and design optimization is required to determine what forms and amplitudes of 3D shaping and symmetry breaking will be compatible with future fusion reactors. The development of models to address 3D physics and progress in these areas will be described. This work is supported both by the US Department of Energy under Contract DE

  2. Line formation in accretion disks. 3D comoving frame calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papkalla, R.

    1994-10-01

    The 3D radiative transfer equation is written in O(nu/c) in the comoving frame and solved by a short characteristics method for a two-level atom with complete redistribution. An Approximate-LAMBDA operator and various other acceleration techniques are applied to improve the rate of convergence. Line profiles and source functions are calculated for accretion disk models of cataclysmic variables (CV) and active galactic nuclei (AGN) homogeneous in density and temperature. We find that the velocity gradient in the disks makes it necessary for line transfer problems to use the full 3D radiative transfer equation.

  3. 3D Scientific Visualization with Blender

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kent, Brian R.

    2015-03-01

    This is the first book written on using Blender for scientific visualization. It is a practical and interesting introduction to Blender for understanding key parts of 3D rendering and animation that pertain to the sciences via step-by-step guided tutorials. 3D Scientific Visualization with Blender takes you through an understanding of 3D graphics and modelling for different visualization scenarios in the physical sciences.

  4. Effect of 3D fractal dimension on contact area and asperity interactions in elastoplastic contact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jourani, Abdeljalil

    2016-05-01

    Few models are devoted to investigate the effect of 3D fractal dimension Ds on contact area and asperity interactions. These models used statistical approaches or two-dimensional deterministic simulations without considering the asperity interactions and elastic-plastic transition regime. In this study, a complete 3D deterministic model is adopted to simulate the contact between fractal surfaces which are generated using a modified two-variable Weierstrass-Mandelbrot function. This model incorporates the asperity interactions and considers the different deformation modes of surface asperities which range from entirely elastic through elastic-plastic to entirely plastic contact. The simulations reveal that the elastoplastic model is more appropriate to calculate the contact area ratio and pressure field. It is also shown that the influence of the asperity interactions cannot be neglected, especially at lower fractal dimension Ds and higher load.

  5. Software for 3D radiotherapy dosimetry. Validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozicki, Marek; Maras, Piotr; Karwowski, Andrzej C.

    2014-08-01

    The subject of this work is polyGeVero® software (GeVero Co., Poland), which has been developed to fill the requirements of fast calculations of 3D dosimetry data with the emphasis on polymer gel dosimetry for radiotherapy. This software comprises four workspaces that have been prepared for: (i) calculating calibration curves and calibration equations, (ii) storing the calibration characteristics of the 3D dosimeters, (iii) calculating 3D dose distributions in irradiated 3D dosimeters, and (iv) comparing 3D dose distributions obtained from measurements with the aid of 3D dosimeters and calculated with the aid of treatment planning systems (TPSs). The main features and functions of the software are described in this work. Moreover, the core algorithms were validated and the results are presented. The validation was performed using the data of the new PABIGnx polymer gel dosimeter. The polyGeVero® software simplifies and greatly accelerates the calculations of raw 3D dosimetry data. It is an effective tool for fast verification of TPS-generated plans for tumor irradiation when combined with a 3D dosimeter. Consequently, the software may facilitate calculations by the 3D dosimetry community. In this work, the calibration characteristics of the PABIGnx obtained through four calibration methods: multi vial, cross beam, depth dose, and brachytherapy, are discussed as well.

  6. Dimensional accuracy of 3D printed vertebra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogden, Kent; Ordway, Nathaniel; Diallo, Dalanda; Tillapaugh-Fay, Gwen; Aslan, Can

    2014-03-01

    3D printer applications in the biomedical sciences and medical imaging are expanding and will have an increasing impact on the practice of medicine. Orthopedic and reconstructive surgery has been an obvious area for development of 3D printer applications as the segmentation of bony anatomy to generate printable models is relatively straightforward. There are important issues that should be addressed when using 3D printed models for applications that may affect patient care; in particular the dimensional accuracy of the printed parts needs to be high to avoid poor decisions being made prior to surgery or therapeutic procedures. In this work, the dimensional accuracy of 3D printed vertebral bodies derived from CT data for a cadaver spine is compared with direct measurements on the ex-vivo vertebra and with measurements made on the 3D rendered vertebra using commercial 3D image processing software. The vertebra was printed on a consumer grade 3D printer using an additive print process using PLA (polylactic acid) filament. Measurements were made for 15 different anatomic features of the vertebral body, including vertebral body height, endplate width and depth, pedicle height and width, and spinal canal width and depth, among others. It is shown that for the segmentation and printing process used, the results of measurements made on the 3D printed vertebral body are substantially the same as those produced by direct measurement on the vertebra and measurements made on the 3D rendered vertebra.

  7. Stereo 3-D Vision in Teaching Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zabunov, Svetoslav

    2012-03-01

    Stereo 3-D vision is a technology used to present images on a flat surface (screen, paper, etc.) and at the same time to create the notion of three-dimensional spatial perception of the viewed scene. A great number of physical processes are much better understood when viewed in stereo 3-D vision compared to standard flat 2-D presentation. The current paper describes the modern stereo 3-D technologies that are applicable to various tasks in teaching physics in schools, colleges, and universities. Examples of stereo 3-D simulations developed by the author can be observed on online.

  8. Accuracy in Quantitative 3D Image Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Bassel, George W.

    2015-01-01

    Quantitative 3D imaging is becoming an increasingly popular and powerful approach to investigate plant growth and development. With the increased use of 3D image analysis, standards to ensure the accuracy and reproducibility of these data are required. This commentary highlights how image acquisition and postprocessing can introduce artifacts into 3D image data and proposes steps to increase both the accuracy and reproducibility of these analyses. It is intended to aid researchers entering the field of 3D image processing of plant cells and tissues and to help general readers in understanding and evaluating such data. PMID:25804539

  9. The effect of Cs-137 short-range spatial variability on soil after the Chernobyl disaster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martynenko, Vladimir; Vakulovsky, Sergey; Linnik, Vitaly

    2014-05-01

    After the Chernobyl accident of 1986, large areas of Russia were contaminated by 137Cs. Post-depositional redistribution of 137Cs fallout across the land surface resulting from mechanical, physical, chemical, and biological processes operating in the soil system and the grain size selectivity associated with soil erosion and sediment transport processes. Therefore of uppermost importance are data on evaluating 137Cs variability at short distances, obtained at the early period after the accident. Measurements of 137Cs deposit at the territory of Russia exposed to radioactive contamination were mainly conducted with the help of air-gamma survey, and were verified by soil sampling on test plots with size 10x10 m with control soil sampling using "envelope" method of fivefold soil sampling (1 sampling at the centre and 4 along the edges of the plot under study). Presented here are evaluation data of 137Cs contamination, obtained in the Bryansk, Yaroslav and Rostov regions in 1991. Test plots were selected at the distance of 50-100 m away from a road on matted areas with undisturbed soil structure. Test routes of sampling were made perpendicularly to directions crossing basic traces of radioactive contamination. Sampling measurements were carried out at Canberra and Ortec gamma spectrometers. Each of the 5 samples of the "envelope" was measured separately, soil mixing was not applied. 137Cs value for the Bryansk Region varied from 2,6 kBq/m2 to 2294 kBq/m2, at the territories of the Yaroslav and Rostov regions 137Cs value varied from 0,44 kBq/m2 to 5,1 kBq/m2 and 0,56 kBq/m2 to 22,2 kBq/m2, respectively. Statistical analysis of 137Cs deposit at different plots is a solid argumentation in favour of nonuniform distribution in various landscapes and at a different distance from the Chernobyl NPP. Such nonuniformity of 137Cs soil contamination in the limits of 10 m of the plot is most likely to be related to initial aerosol contamination nonuniformity at the moment of

  10. FastScript3D - A Companion to Java 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koenig, Patti

    2005-01-01

    FastScript3D is a computer program, written in the Java 3D(TM) programming language, that establishes an alternative language that helps users who lack expertise in Java 3D to use Java 3D for constructing three-dimensional (3D)-appearing graphics. The FastScript3D language provides a set of simple, intuitive, one-line text-string commands for creating, controlling, and animating 3D models. The first word in a string is the name of a command; the rest of the string contains the data arguments for the command. The commands can also be used as an aid to learning Java 3D. Developers can extend the language by adding custom text-string commands. The commands can define new 3D objects or load representations of 3D objects from files in formats compatible with such other software systems as X3D. The text strings can be easily integrated into other languages. FastScript3D facilitates communication between scripting languages [which enable programming of hyper-text markup language (HTML) documents to interact with users] and Java 3D. The FastScript3D language can be extended and customized on both the scripting side and the Java 3D side.

  11. 3D PDF - a means of public access to geological 3D - objects, using the example of GTA3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slaby, Mark-Fabian; Reimann, Rüdiger

    2013-04-01

    In geology, 3D modeling has become very important. In the past, two-dimensional data such as isolines, drilling profiles, or cross-sections based on those, were used to illustrate the subsurface geology, whereas now, we can create complex digital 3D models. These models are produced with special software, such as GOCAD ®. The models can be viewed, only through the software used to create them, or through viewers available for free. The platform-independent PDF (Portable Document Format), enforced by Adobe, has found a wide distribution. This format has constantly evolved over time. Meanwhile, it is possible to display CAD data in an Adobe 3D PDF file with the free Adobe Reader (version 7). In a 3D PDF, a 3D model is freely rotatable and can be assembled from a plurality of objects, which can thus be viewed from all directions on their own. In addition, it is possible to create moveable cross-sections (profiles), and to assign transparency to the objects. Based on industry-standard CAD software, 3D PDFs can be generated from a large number of formats, or even be exported directly from this software. In geoinformatics, different approaches to creating 3D PDFs exist. The intent of the Authority for Mining, Energy and Geology to allow free access to the models of the Geotectonic Atlas (GTA3D), could not be realized with standard software solutions. A specially designed code converts the 3D objects to VRML (Virtual Reality Modeling Language). VRML is one of the few formats that allow using image files (maps) as textures, and to represent colors and shapes correctly. The files were merged in Acrobat X Pro, and a 3D PDF was generated subsequently. A topographic map, a display of geographic directions and horizontal and vertical scales help to facilitate the use.

  12. A Primitive-Based 3D Object Recognition System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhawan, Atam P.

    1988-08-01

    A knowledge-based 3D object recognition system has been developed. The system uses the hierarchical structural, geometrical and relational knowledge in matching the 3D object models to the image data through pre-defined primitives. The primitives, we have selected, to begin with, are 3D boxes, cylinders, and spheres. These primitives as viewed from different angles covering complete 3D rotation range are stored in a "Primitive-Viewing Knowledge-Base" in form of hierarchical structural and relational graphs. The knowledge-based system then hypothesizes about the viewing angle and decomposes the segmented image data into valid primitives. A rough 3D structural and relational description is made on the basis of recognized 3D primitives. This description is now used in the detailed high-level frame-based structural and relational matching. The system has several expert and knowledge-based systems working in both stand-alone and cooperative modes to provide multi-level processing. This multi-level processing utilizes both bottom-up (data-driven) and top-down (model-driven) approaches in order to acquire sufficient knowledge to accept or reject any hypothesis for matching or recognizing the objects in the given image.

  13. Automated 3D reconstruction of interiors with multiple scan views

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sequeira, Vitor; Ng, Kia C.; Wolfart, Erik; Goncalves, Joao G. M.; Hogg, David C.

    1998-12-01

    This paper presents two integrated solutions for realistic 3D model acquisition and reconstruction; an early prototype, in the form of a push trolley, and a later prototype in the form of an autonomous robot. The systems encompass all hardware and software required, from laser and video data acquisition, processing and output of texture-mapped 3D models in VRML format, to batteries for power supply and wireless network communications. The autonomous version is also equipped with a mobile platform and other sensors for the purpose of automatic navigation. The applications for such a system range from real estate and tourism (e.g., showing a 3D computer model of a property to a potential buyer or tenant) or as tool for content creation (e.g., creating 3D models of heritage buildings or producing broadcast quality virtual studios). The system can also be used in industrial environments as a reverse engineering tool to update the design of a plant, or as a 3D photo-archive for insurance purposes. The system is Internet compatible: the photo-realistic models can be accessed via the Internet and manipulated interactively in 3D using a common Web browser with a VRML plug-in. Further information and example reconstructed models are available on- line via the RESOLV web-page at http://www.scs.leeds.ac.uk/resolv/.

  14. 3D Modeling from Photos Given Topological Information.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young Min; Cho, Junghyun; Ahn, Sang Chul

    2016-09-01

    Reconstructing 3D models given a single-view 2D information is inherently an ill-posed problem and requires additional information such as shape prior or user input.We introduce a method to generate multiple 3D models of a particular category given corresponding photographs when the topological information is known. While there is a wide range of shapes for an object of a particular category, the basic topology usually remains constant.In consequence, the topological prior needs to be provided only once for each category and can be easily acquired by consulting an existing database of 3D models or by user input. The input of topological description is only connectivity information between parts; this is in contrast to previous approaches that have required users to interactively mark individual parts. Given the silhouette of an object and the topology, our system automatically finds a skeleton and generates a textured 3D model by jointly fitting multiple parts. The proposed method, therefore, opens the possibility of generating a large number of 3D models by consulting a massive number of photographs. We demonstrate examples of the topological prior and reconstructed 3D models using photos. PMID:26661474

  15. Application of 3-D Urbanization Index to Assess Impact of Urbanization on Air Temperature.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chih-Da; Lung, Shih-Chun Candice

    2016-01-01

    The lack of appropriate methodologies and indicators to quantify three-dimensional (3-D) building constructions poses challenges to authorities and urban planners when formulating polices to reduce health risks due to heat stress. This study evaluated the applicability of an innovative three-dimensional Urbanization Index (3DUI), based on remote sensing database, with a 5 m spatial resolution of 3-D man-made constructions to representing intra-urban variability of air temperature by assessing correlation of 3DUI with air temperature from a 3-D perspective. The results showed robust high correlation coefficients, ranging from 0.83 to 0.85, obtained within the 1,000 m circular buffer around weather stations regardless of season, year, or spatial location. Our findings demonstrated not only the strength of 3DUI in representing intra-urban air-temperature variability, but also its great potential for heat stress assessment within cities. In view of the maximum correlation between building volumes within the 1,000 m circular buffer and ambient air temperature, urban planning should consider setting ceilings for man-made construction volume in each 2 × 2 km(2) residential community for thermal environment regulation, especially in Asian metropolis with high population density in city centers. PMID:27079537

  16. Application of 3-D Urbanization Index to Assess Impact of Urbanization on Air Temperature

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chih-Da; Lung, Shih-Chun Candice

    2016-01-01

    The lack of appropriate methodologies and indicators to quantify three-dimensional (3-D) building constructions poses challenges to authorities and urban planners when formulating polices to reduce health risks due to heat stress. This study evaluated the applicability of an innovative three-dimensional Urbanization Index (3DUI), based on remote sensing database, with a 5 m spatial resolution of 3-D man-made constructions to representing intra-urban variability of air temperature by assessing correlation of 3DUI with air temperature from a 3-D perspective. The results showed robust high correlation coefficients, ranging from 0.83 to 0.85, obtained within the 1,000 m circular buffer around weather stations regardless of season, year, or spatial location. Our findings demonstrated not only the strength of 3DUI in representing intra-urban air-temperature variability, but also its great potential for heat stress assessment within cities. In view of the maximum correlation between building volumes within the 1,000 m circular buffer and ambient air temperature, urban planning should consider setting ceilings for man-made construction volume in each 2 × 2 km2 residential community for thermal environment regulation, especially in Asian metropolis with high population density in city centers. PMID:27079537

  17. Application of 3-D Urbanization Index to Assess Impact of Urbanization on Air Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chih-Da; Lung, Shih-Chun Candice

    2016-04-01

    The lack of appropriate methodologies and indicators to quantify three-dimensional (3-D) building constructions poses challenges to authorities and urban planners when formulating polices to reduce health risks due to heat stress. This study evaluated the applicability of an innovative three-dimensional Urbanization Index (3DUI), based on remote sensing database, with a 5 m spatial resolution of 3-D man-made constructions to representing intra-urban variability of air temperature by assessing correlation of 3DUI with air temperature from a 3-D perspective. The results showed robust high correlation coefficients, ranging from 0.83 to 0.85, obtained within the 1,000 m circular buffer around weather stations regardless of season, year, or spatial location. Our findings demonstrated not only the strength of 3DUI in representing intra-urban air-temperature variability, but also its great potential for heat stress assess