Science.gov

Sample records for 3d vectorial time

  1. 3D Vectorial Time Domain Computational Integrated Photonics

    SciTech Connect

    Kallman, J S; Bond, T C; Koning, J M; Stowell, M L

    2007-02-16

    The design of integrated photonic structures poses considerable challenges. 3D-Time-Domain design tools are fundamental in enabling technologies such as all-optical logic, photonic bandgap sensors, THz imaging, and fast radiation diagnostics. Such technologies are essential to LLNL and WFO sponsors for a broad range of applications: encryption for communications and surveillance sensors (NSA, NAI and IDIV/PAT); high density optical interconnects for high-performance computing (ASCI); high-bandwidth instrumentation for NIF diagnostics; micro-sensor development for weapon miniaturization within the Stockpile Stewardship and DNT programs; and applications within HSO for CBNP detection devices. While there exist a number of photonics simulation tools on the market, they primarily model devices of interest to the communications industry. We saw the need to extend our previous software to match the Laboratory's unique emerging needs. These include modeling novel material effects (such as those of radiation induced carrier concentrations on refractive index) and device configurations (RadTracker bulk optics with radiation induced details, Optical Logic edge emitting lasers with lateral optical inputs). In addition we foresaw significant advantages to expanding our own internal simulation codes: parallel supercomputing could be incorporated from the start, and the simulation source code would be accessible for modification and extension. This work addressed Engineering's Simulation Technology Focus Area, specifically photonics. Problems addressed from the Engineering roadmap of the time included modeling the Auston switch (an important THz source/receiver), modeling Vertical Cavity Surface Emitting Lasers (VCSELs, which had been envisioned as part of fast radiation sensors), and multi-scale modeling of optical systems (for a variety of applications). We proposed to develop novel techniques to numerically solve the 3D multi-scale propagation problem for both the microchip

  2. [Real time 3D echocardiography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, F.; Shiota, T.; Thomas, J. D.

    2001-01-01

    Three-dimensional representation of the heart is an old concern. Usually, 3D reconstruction of the cardiac mass is made by successive acquisition of 2D sections, the spatial localisation and orientation of which require complex guiding systems. More recently, the concept of volumetric acquisition has been introduced. A matricial emitter-receiver probe complex with parallel data processing provides instantaneous of a pyramidal 64 degrees x 64 degrees volume. The image is restituted in real time and is composed of 3 planes (planes B and C) which can be displaced in all spatial directions at any time during acquisition. The flexibility of this system of acquisition allows volume and mass measurement with greater accuracy and reproducibility, limiting inter-observer variability. Free navigation of the planes of investigation allows reconstruction for qualitative and quantitative analysis of valvular heart disease and other pathologies. Although real time 3D echocardiography is ready for clinical usage, some improvements are still necessary to improve its conviviality. Then real time 3D echocardiography could be the essential tool for understanding, diagnosis and management of patients.

  3. [Real time 3D echocardiography].

    PubMed

    Bauer, F; Shiota, T; Thomas, J D

    2001-07-01

    Three-dimensional representation of the heart is an old concern. Usually, 3D reconstruction of the cardiac mass is made by successive acquisition of 2D sections, the spatial localisation and orientation of which require complex guiding systems. More recently, the concept of volumetric acquisition has been introduced. A matricial emitter-receiver probe complex with parallel data processing provides instantaneous of a pyramidal 64 degrees x 64 degrees volume. The image is restituted in real time and is composed of 3 planes (planes B and C) which can be displaced in all spatial directions at any time during acquisition. The flexibility of this system of acquisition allows volume and mass measurement with greater accuracy and reproducibility, limiting inter-observer variability. Free navigation of the planes of investigation allows reconstruction for qualitative and quantitative analysis of valvular heart disease and other pathologies. Although real time 3D echocardiography is ready for clinical usage, some improvements are still necessary to improve its conviviality. Then real time 3D echocardiography could be the essential tool for understanding, diagnosis and management of patients. PMID:11494630

  4. Rigorous 3-D vectorial complex ray model applied to light scattering by an arbitrary spheroid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Bingqiang; Kattawar, George W.; Yang, Ping; Ren, Kuan Fang

    2016-08-01

    After a ray bundle passes a curved surface, the equal-phase wavefront associated with the refracted rays will be distorted. Consequently, the cross-section of a ray bundle with a curved wavefront during propagation in a homogeneous medium will vary with the ray-bundle propagation distance. Moreover, the phase of a ray bundle with convergent wavefront will undergo a phase shift of π/2 with each passage of a focal line. The contribution to the scattering amplitude by a ray bundle after passing a scatterer is determined by three elements: the cross-section variation of its wavefront, the total phase, and the refraction coefficients determined by Fresnel equations. In the geometric optics regime, the aforesaid three elements caused by a curved surface can be systematically quantified in terms of the vectorial complex ray-tracing technique. In this study, rigorous vectorial complex ray-tracing calculations are conducted for light scattering by a general spheroid and the results are validated in comparison with the benchmarks provided by the rigorous T-matrix method.

  5. 3D MR imaging in real time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guttman, Michael A.; McVeigh, Elliot R.

    2001-05-01

    A system has been developed to produce live 3D volume renderings from an MR scanner. Whereas real-time 2D MR imaging has been demonstrated by several groups, 3D volumes are currently rendered off-line to gain greater understanding of anatomical structures. For example, surgical planning is sometimes performed by viewing 2D images or 3D renderings from previously acquired image data. A disadvantage of this approach is misregistration which could occur if the anatomy changes due to normal muscle contractions or surgical manipulation. The ability to produce volume renderings in real-time and present them in the magnet room could eliminate this problem, and enable or benefit other types of interventional procedures. The system uses the data stream generated by a fast 2D multi- slice pulse sequence to update a volume rendering immediately after a new slice is available. We demonstrate some basic types of user interaction with the rendering during imaging at a rate of up to 20 frames per second.

  6. Real-Time 3D Visualization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Butler Hine, former director of the Intelligent Mechanism Group (IMG) at Ames Research Center, and five others partnered to start Fourth Planet, Inc., a visualization company that specializes in the intuitive visual representation of dynamic, real-time data over the Internet and Intranet. Over a five-year period, the then NASA researchers performed ten robotic field missions in harsh climes to mimic the end- to-end operations of automated vehicles trekking across another world under control from Earth. The core software technology for these missions was the Virtual Environment Vehicle Interface (VEVI). Fourth Planet has released VEVI4, the fourth generation of the VEVI software, and NetVision. VEVI4 is a cutting-edge computer graphics simulation and remote control applications tool. The NetVision package allows large companies to view and analyze in virtual 3D space such things as the health or performance of their computer network or locate a trouble spot on an electric power grid. Other products are forthcoming. Fourth Planet is currently part of the NASA/Ames Technology Commercialization Center, a business incubator for start-up companies.

  7. Real-time monitoring of 3D cell culture using a 3D capacitance biosensor.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sun-Mi; Han, Nalae; Lee, Rimi; Choi, In-Hong; Park, Yong-Beom; Shin, Jeon-Soo; Yoo, Kyung-Hwa

    2016-03-15

    Three-dimensional (3D) cell cultures have recently received attention because they represent a more physiologically relevant environment compared to conventional two-dimensional (2D) cell cultures. However, 2D-based imaging techniques or cell sensors are insufficient for real-time monitoring of cellular behavior in 3D cell culture. Here, we report investigations conducted with a 3D capacitance cell sensor consisting of vertically aligned pairs of electrodes. When GFP-expressing human breast cancer cells (GFP-MCF-7) encapsulated in alginate hydrogel were cultured in a 3D cell culture system, cellular activities, such as cell proliferation and apoptosis at different heights, could be monitored non-invasively and in real-time by measuring the change in capacitance with the 3D capacitance sensor. Moreover, we were able to monitor cell migration of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) with our 3D capacitance sensor.

  8. Real-time monitoring of 3D cell culture using a 3D capacitance biosensor.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sun-Mi; Han, Nalae; Lee, Rimi; Choi, In-Hong; Park, Yong-Beom; Shin, Jeon-Soo; Yoo, Kyung-Hwa

    2016-03-15

    Three-dimensional (3D) cell cultures have recently received attention because they represent a more physiologically relevant environment compared to conventional two-dimensional (2D) cell cultures. However, 2D-based imaging techniques or cell sensors are insufficient for real-time monitoring of cellular behavior in 3D cell culture. Here, we report investigations conducted with a 3D capacitance cell sensor consisting of vertically aligned pairs of electrodes. When GFP-expressing human breast cancer cells (GFP-MCF-7) encapsulated in alginate hydrogel were cultured in a 3D cell culture system, cellular activities, such as cell proliferation and apoptosis at different heights, could be monitored non-invasively and in real-time by measuring the change in capacitance with the 3D capacitance sensor. Moreover, we were able to monitor cell migration of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) with our 3D capacitance sensor. PMID:26386332

  9. Ames Lab 101: Real-Time 3D Imaging

    ScienceCinema

    Zhang, Song

    2016-07-12

    Ames Laboratory scientist Song Zhang explains his real-time 3-D imaging technology. The technique can be used to create high-resolution, real-time, precise, 3-D images for use in healthcare, security, and entertainment applications.

  10. Ames Lab 101: Real-Time 3D Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Song

    2010-01-01

    Ames Laboratory scientist Song Zhang explains his real-time 3-D imaging technology. The technique can be used to create high-resolution, real-time, precise, 3-D images for use in healthcare, security, and entertainment applications.

  11. Real-time depth map manipulation for 3D visualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ideses, Ianir; Fishbain, Barak; Yaroslavsky, Leonid

    2009-02-01

    One of the key aspects of 3D visualization is computation of depth maps. Depth maps enables synthesis of 3D video from 2D video and use of multi-view displays. Depth maps can be acquired in several ways. One method is to measure the real 3D properties of the scene objects. Other methods rely on using two cameras and computing the correspondence for each pixel. Once a depth map is acquired for every frame, it can be used to construct its artificial stereo pair. There are many known methods for computing the optical flow between adjacent video frames. The drawback of these methods is that they require extensive computation power and are not very well suited to high quality real-time 3D rendering. One efficient method for computing depth maps is extraction of motion vector information from standard video encoders. In this paper we present methods to improve the 3D visualization quality acquired from compression CODECS by spatial/temporal and logical operations and manipulations. We show how an efficient real time implementation of spatial-temporal local order statistics such as median and local adaptive filtering in 3D-DCT domain can substantially improve the quality of depth maps and consequently 3D video while retaining real-time rendering. Real-time performance is achived by utilizing multi-core technology using standard parallelization algorithms and libraries (OpenMP, IPP).

  12. [Real time 3D echocardiography in congenital heart disease].

    PubMed

    Acar, P; Dulac, Y; Taktak, A; Villacèque, M

    2004-05-01

    The introduction of the 3D mode in echocardiography has led to its use in everyday clinical practice. One hundred and fifty real time 3D echocardiographic examinations were performed in 20 foetus, 110 children and 20 adults with various congenital heart lesions (shunts, valvular lesions, aortic diseases). The 4x matricial probe enables the instantaneous acquisition of transthoracic volumes. Four modes of 3D imaging were used: real time, total volume, colour Doppler and biplane. Quantitative measurements were performed at an outlying station. The feasibility of the method in the foetus, the child and the adult was respectively 90%, 99% and 85%. Real time 3D echocardiography did not affect the diagnoses made by standard echocardiography. The 3D imaging gave a more accurate description of atrial septal defects and congenital valvular lesions. Biplane imaging was decisive in the quantitative approach to aortic dilatation of Marfan's syndrome and in segmental analysis of the foetal heart. 3D colour Doppler imaging has been disappointing but the possibilities of volumic quantification of blood flow are very promising. The present limitations of the method are the inadequate resolution in the small child and the absence of quantitative measurement on the echograph. The facility of utilisation of the matricial probe should lead to routine usage of 3D echocardiography as with 2D and the Doppler modes. Its value should be decisive in many congenital cardiac lesions requiring surgery or interventional catheterisation. PMID:15214550

  13. Real time 3D and heterogeneous data fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Little, C.Q.; Small, D.E.

    1998-03-01

    This project visualizes characterization data in a 3D setting, in real time. Real time in this sense means collecting the data and presenting it before it delays the user, and processing faster than the acquisition systems so no bottlenecks occur. The goals have been to build a volumetric viewer to display 3D data, demonstrate projecting other data, such as images, onto the 3D data, and display both the 3D and projected images as fast as the data became available. The authors have examined several ways to display 3D surface data. The most effective was generating polygonal surface meshes. They have created surface maps form a continuous stream of 3D range data, fused image data onto the geometry, and displayed the data with a standard 3D rendering package. In parallel with this, they have developed a method to project real-time images onto the surface created. A key component is mapping the data on the correct surfaces, which requires a-priori positional information along with accurate calibration of the camera and lens system.

  14. VPython: Writing Real-time 3D Physics Programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chabay, Ruth

    2001-06-01

    VPython (http://cil.andrew.cmu.edu/projects/visual) combines the Python programming language with an innovative 3D graphics module called Visual, developed by David Scherer. Designed to make 3D physics simulations accessible to novice programmers, VPython allows the programmer to write a purely computational program without any graphics code, and produces an interactive realtime 3D graphical display. In a program 3D objects are created and their positions modified by computational algorithms. Running in a separate thread, the Visual module monitors the positions of these objects and renders them many times per second. Using the mouse, one can zoom and rotate to navigate through the scene. After one hour of instruction, students in an introductory physics course at Carnegie Mellon University, including those who have never programmed before, write programs in VPython to model the behavior of physical systems and to visualize fields in 3D. The Numeric array processing module allows the construction of more sophisticated simulations and models as well. VPython is free and open source. The Visual module is based on OpenGL, and runs on Windows, Linux, and Macintosh.

  15. Real-time structured light intraoral 3D measurement pipeline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gheorghe, Radu; Tchouprakov, Andrei; Sokolov, Roman

    2013-02-01

    Computer aided design and manufacturing (CAD/CAM) is increasingly becoming a standard feature and service provided to patients in dentist offices and denture manufacturing laboratories. Although the quality of the tools and data has slowly improved in the last years, due to various surface measurement challenges, practical, accurate, invivo, real-time 3D high quality data acquisition and processing still needs improving. Advances in GPU computational power have allowed for achieving near real-time 3D intraoral in-vivo scanning of patient's teeth. We explore in this paper, from a real-time perspective, a hardware-software-GPU solution that addresses all the requirements mentioned before. Moreover we exemplify and quantify the hard and soft deadlines required by such a system and illustrate how they are supported in our implementation.

  16. Extra Dimensions: 3D and Time in PDF Documentation

    SciTech Connect

    Graf, Norman A.; /SLAC

    2011-11-10

    High energy physics is replete with multi-dimensional information which is often poorly represented by the two dimensions of presentation slides and print media. Past efforts to disseminate such information to a wider audience have failed for a number of reasons, including a lack of standards which are easy to implement and have broad support. Adobe's Portable Document Format (PDF) has in recent years become the de facto standard for secure, dependable electronic information exchange. It has done so by creating an open format, providing support for multiple platforms and being reliable and extensible. By providing support for the ECMA standard Universal 3D (U3D) file format in its free Adobe Reader software, Adobe has made it easy to distribute and interact with 3D content. By providing support for scripting and animation, temporal data can also be easily distributed to a wide audience. In this talk, we present examples of HEP applications which take advantage of this functionality. We demonstrate how 3D detector elements can be documented, using either CAD drawings or other sources such as GEANT visualizations as input. Using this technique, higher dimensional data, such as LEGO plots or time-dependent information can be included in PDF files. In principle, a complete event display, with full interactivity, can be incorporated into a PDF file. This would allow the end user not only to customize the view and representation of the data, but to access the underlying data itself.

  17. Optimized 3D Ultrashort Echo Time Pulmonary MRI

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Kevin M.; Fain, Sean B.; Schiebler, Mark L.; Nagle, Scott

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To optimize 3D radial ultrashort echo time MRI for high resolution whole-lung imaging. Methods 3D radial ultrashort echo time was implemented on a 3T scanner to investigate the effects of: (1) limited field-of-view excitation, (2) variable density readouts, and (3) radial oversampling. Improvements in noise performance and spatial resolution were assessed through simulation and phantom studies. Their effects on lung and airway visualization in five healthy male human subjects (mean age 32 years) were compared qualitatively through blinded ordinal scoring by two cardiothoracic radiologists using a nonparametric Friedman test (P < 0.05). Relative signal difference between endobronchial air and adjacent lung tissue, normalized to nearby vessel, was used as a surrogate for lung tissue signal. Quantitative measures were compared using the paired Student's t-test (P < 0.05). Finally, clinical feasibility was investigated in a patient with interstitial fibrosis. Results Simulation and phantom studies showed up to 67% improvement in SNR and reduced blurring for short T2* species using all three optimizations. In vivo images showed decreased artifacts and improved lung tissue and airway visualization both qualitatively and quantitatively. Conclusion The use of limited field-of-view excitation, variable readout gradients, and radial oversampling significantly improve the technical quality of 3D radial ultrashort echo time lung images. PMID:23213020

  18. 3-D tracking in a miniature time projection chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vahsen, S. E.; Hedges, M. T.; Jaegle, I.; Ross, S. J.; Seong, I. S.; Thorpe, T. N.; Yamaoka, J.; Kadyk, J. A.; Garcia-Sciveres, M.

    2015-07-01

    The three-dimensional (3-D) detection of millimeter-scale ionization trails is of interest for detecting nuclear recoils in directional fast neutron detectors and in direction-sensitive searches for weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs), which may constitute the Dark Matter of the universe. We report on performance characterization of a miniature gas target Time Projection Chamber (TPC) where the drift charge is avalanche-multiplied with Gas Electron Multipliers (GEMs) and detected with the ATLAS FE-I3 Pixel Application Specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC). We report on measurements of gain, gain resolution, point resolution, diffusion, angular resolution, and energy resolution with low-energy X-rays, cosmic rays, and alpha particles, using the gases Ar:CO2 (70:30) and He:CO2 (70:30) at atmospheric pressure. We discuss the implications for future, larger directional neutron and Dark Matter detectors. With an eye to designing and selecting components for these, we generalize our results into analytical expressions for detector performance whenever possible. We conclude by demonstrating the 3-D directional detection of a fast neutron source.

  19. Real time 3D scanner: investigations and results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nouri, Taoufik; Pflug, Leopold

    1993-12-01

    This article presents a concept of reconstruction of 3-D objects using non-invasive and touch loss techniques. The principle of this method is to display parallel interference optical fringes on an object and then to record the object under two angles of view. According to an appropriated treatment one reconstructs the 3-D object even when the object has no symmetrical plan. The 3-D surface data is available immediately in digital form for computer- visualization and for analysis software tools. The optical set-up for recording the 3-D object, the 3-D data extraction and treatment, as well as the reconstruction of the 3-D object are reported and commented on. This application is dedicated for reconstructive/cosmetic surgery, CAD, animation and research purposes.

  20. Real-time cylindrical curvilinear 3-D ultrasound imaging.

    PubMed

    Pua, E C; Yen, J T; Smith, S W

    2003-07-01

    In patients who are obese or exhibit signs of pulmonary disease, standard transthoracic scanning may yield poor quality cardiac images. For these conditions, two-dimensional transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) is established as an essential diagnostic tool. Current techniques in transesophageal scanning, though, are limited by incomplete visualization of cardiac structures in close proximity to the transducer. Thus, we propose a 2D curvilinear array for 3D transesophageal echocardiography in order to widen the field of view and increase visualization close to the transducer face. In this project, a 440 channel 5 MHz two-dimensional array with a 12.6 mm aperture diameter on a flexible interconnect circuit has been molded to a 4 mm radius of curvature. A 75% element yield was achieved during fabrication and an average -6dB bandwidth of 30% was observed in pulse-echo tests. Using this transducer in conjunction with modifications to the beam former delay software and scan converter display software of the our 3D scanner, we obtained cylindrical real-time curvilinear volumetric scans of tissue phantoms, including a field of view of greater than 120 degrees in the curved, azimuth direction and 65 degrees phased array sector scans in the elevation direction. These images were achieved using a stepped subaperture across the cylindrical curvilinear direction of the transducer face and phased array sector scanning in the noncurved plane. In addition, real-time volume rendered images of a tissue mimicking phantom with holes ranging from 1 cm to less than 4 mm have been obtained. 3D color flow Doppler results have also been acquired. This configuration can theoretically achieve volumes displaying 180 degrees by 120 degrees. The transducer is also capable of obtaining images through a curvilinear stepped subaperture in azimuth in conjunction with a rectilinear stepped subaperture in elevation, further increasing the field of view close to the transducer face. Future work

  1. Reduced Scan Time 3D FLAIR using Modulated Inversion and Repetition Time

    PubMed Central

    Gai, Neville D.; Butman, John A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To design and evaluate a new reduced scan time 3D FLuid Attenuated Inversion Recovery (FLAIR) sequence. Materials and Methods The 3D FLAIR sequence was modified so that the repetition time was modulated in a predetermined smooth fashion (3D mFLAIR). Inversion times were adjusted accordingly to maintain CSF suppression. Simulations were performed to determine SNR for gray matter (GM), white matter (WM) and CSF. Fourteen volunteers were imaged using the modified and product sequence. SNR measurements were performed in GM, WM and CSF. Mean value and the 95% confidence interval ([CI]) were assessed. Scan time for the 3D FLAIR and 3D mFLAIR sequences was measured. Results There was no statistically significant difference in the SNR measured in GM (P value = 0.5; mean SNR = 42.8 [CI]: 38.2-45.5 vs 42.2 [CI]: 38.3-46.1 for 3D FLAIR and 3D mFLAIR, respectively) and WM (P value = 0.25; mean SNR = 32.1 [CI]: 30.3-33.8 vs 32.9 [CI]: 31.1-34.7). Scan time reduction greater than 30% was achieved for the given parameter set with the 3D mFLAIR sequence. Conclusion Scan time for 3D FLAIR can be effectively reduced by modulating repetition and inversion time in a predetermined fashion while maintaining the SNR and CNR of a constant TR sequence. PMID:24979311

  2. Time domain topology optimization of 3D nanophotonic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elesin, Y.; Lazarov, B. S.; Jensen, J. S.; Sigmund, O.

    2014-02-01

    We present an efficient parallel topology optimization framework for design of large scale 3D nanophotonic devices. The code shows excellent scalability and is demonstrated for optimization of broadband frequency splitter, waveguide intersection, photonic crystal-based waveguide and nanowire-based waveguide. The obtained results are compared to simplified 2D studies and we demonstrate that 3D topology optimization may lead to significant performance improvements.

  3. Real-time 3D video conference on generic hardware

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desurmont, X.; Bruyelle, J. L.; Ruiz, D.; Meessen, J.; Macq, B.

    2007-02-01

    Nowadays, video-conference tends to be more and more advantageous because of the economical and ecological cost of transport. Several platforms exist. The goal of the TIFANIS immersive platform is to let users interact as if they were physically together. Unlike previous teleimmersion systems, TIFANIS uses generic hardware to achieve an economically realistic implementation. The basic functions of the system are to capture the scene, transmit it through digital networks to other partners, and then render it according to each partner's viewing characteristics. The image processing part should run in real-time. We propose to analyze the whole system. it can be split into different services like central processing unit (CPU), graphical rendering, direct memory access (DMA), and communications trough the network. Most of the processing is done by CPU resource. It is composed of the 3D reconstruction and the detection and tracking of faces from the video stream. However, the processing needs to be parallelized in several threads that have as little dependencies as possible. In this paper, we present these issues, and the way we deal with them.

  4. Extra dimensions: 3D and time in PDF documentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graf, N. A.

    2011-01-01

    Experimental science is replete with multi-dimensional information which is often poorly represented by the two dimensions of presentation slides and print media. Past efforts to disseminate such information to a wider audience have failed for a number of reasons, including a lack of standards which are easy to implement and have broad support. Adobe's Portable Document Format (PDF) has in recent years become the de facto standard for secure, dependable electronic information exchange. It has done so by creating an open format, providing support for multiple platforms and being reliable and extensible. By providing support for the ECMA standard Universal 3D (U3D) file format in its free Adobe Reader software, Adobe has made it easy to distribute and interact with 3D content. By providing support for scripting and animation, temporal data can also be easily distributed to a wide, non-technical audience. We discuss how the field of radiation imaging could benefit from incorporating full 3D information about not only the detectors, but also the results of the experimental analyses, in its electronic publications. In this article, we present examples drawn from high-energy physics, mathematics and molecular biology which take advantage of this functionality. We demonstrate how 3D detector elements can be documented, using either CAD drawings or other sources such as GEANT visualizations as input.

  5. Extra Dimensions: 3D and Time in PDF Documentation

    SciTech Connect

    Graf, N.A.; /SLAC

    2012-04-11

    Experimental science is replete with multi-dimensional information which is often poorly represented by the two dimensions of presentation slides and print media. Past efforts to disseminate such information to a wider audience have failed for a number of reasons, including a lack of standards which are easy to implement and have broad support. Adobe's Portable Document Format (PDF) has in recent years become the de facto standard for secure, dependable electronic information exchange. It has done so by creating an open format, providing support for multiple platforms and being reliable and extensible. By providing support for the ECMA standard Universal 3D (U3D) file format in its free Adobe Reader software, Adobe has made it easy to distribute and interact with 3D content. By providing support for scripting and animation, temporal data can also be easily distributed to a wide, non-technical audience. We discuss how the field of radiation imaging could benefit from incorporating full 3D information about not only the detectors, but also the results of the experimental analyses, in its electronic publications. In this article, we present examples drawn from high-energy physics, mathematics and molecular biology which take advantage of this functionality. We demonstrate how 3D detector elements can be documented, using either CAD drawings or other sources such as GEANT visualizations as input.

  6. Real-Time Camera Guidance for 3d Scene Reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schindler, F.; Förstner, W.

    2012-07-01

    We propose a framework for operator guidance during the image acquisition process for reliable multi-view stereo reconstruction. Goal is to achieve full coverage of the object and sufficient overlap. Multi-view stereo is a commonly used method to reconstruct both camera trajectory and 3D object shape. After determining an initial solution, a globally optimal reconstruction is usually obtained by executing a bundle adjustment involving all images. Acquiring suitable images, however, still requires an experienced operator to ensure accuracy and completeness of the final solution. We propose an interactive framework for guiding unexperienced users or possibly an autonomous robot. Using approximate camera orientations and object points we estimate point uncertainties within a sliding bundle adjustment and suggest appropriate camera movements. A visual feedback system communicates the decisions to the user in an intuitive way. We demonstrate the suitability of our system with a virtual image acquisition simulation as well as in real-world scenarios. We show that when following the camera movements suggested by our system, the proposed framework is able to generate good approximate values for the bundle adjustment, leading to accurate results compared to ground truth after few iterations. Possible applications are non-professional 3D acquisition systems on low-cost platforms like mobile phones, autonomously navigating robots as well as online flight planning of unmanned aerial vehicles.

  7. Future enhancements to 3D printing and real time production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landa, Joseph; Jenkins, Jeffery; Wu, Jerry; Szu, Harold

    2014-05-01

    The cost and scope of additive printing machines range from several hundred to hundreds of thousands of dollars. For the extra money, one can get improvements in build size, selection of material properties, resolution, and consistency. However, temperature control during build and fusing predicts outcome and protects the IP by large high cost machines. Support material options determine geometries that can be accomplished which drives cost and complexity of printing heads. Historically, 3D printers have been used for design and prototyping efforts. Recent advances and cost reduction sparked new interest in developing printed products and consumables such as NASA who is printing food, printing consumer parts (e.g. cell phone cases, novelty toys), making tools and fixtures in manufacturing, and recursively print a self-similar printer (c.f. makerbot). There is a near term promise of the capability to print on demand products at the home or office... directly from the printer to use.

  8. Integration of real-time 3D capture, reconstruction, and light-field display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhaoxing; Geng, Zheng; Li, Tuotuo; Pei, Renjing; Liu, Yongchun; Zhang, Xiao

    2015-03-01

    Effective integration of 3D acquisition, reconstruction (modeling) and display technologies into a seamless systems provides augmented experience of visualizing and analyzing real objects and scenes with realistic 3D sensation. Applications can be found in medical imaging, gaming, virtual or augmented reality and hybrid simulations. Although 3D acquisition, reconstruction, and display technologies have gained significant momentum in recent years, there seems a lack of attention on synergistically combining these components into a "end-to-end" 3D visualization system. We designed, built and tested an integrated 3D visualization system that is able to capture in real-time 3D light-field images, perform 3D reconstruction to build 3D model of the objects, and display the 3D model on a large autostereoscopic screen. In this article, we will present our system architecture and component designs, hardware/software implementations, and experimental results. We will elaborate on our recent progress on sparse camera array light-field 3D acquisition, real-time dense 3D reconstruction, and autostereoscopic multi-view 3D display. A prototype is finally presented with test results to illustrate the effectiveness of our proposed integrated 3D visualization system.

  9. Tensor3D: A computer graphics program to simulate 3D real-time deformation and visualization of geometric bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pallozzi Lavorante, Luca; Dirk Ebert, Hans

    2008-07-01

    Tensor3D is a geometric modeling program with the capacity to simulate and visualize in real-time the deformation, specified through a tensor matrix and applied to triangulated models representing geological bodies. 3D visualization allows the study of deformational processes that are traditionally conducted in 2D, such as simple and pure shears. Besides geometric objects that are immediately available in the program window, the program can read other models from disk, thus being able to import objects created with different open-source or proprietary programs. A strain ellipsoid and a bounding box are simultaneously shown and instantly deformed with the main object. The principal axes of strain are visualized as well to provide graphical information about the orientation of the tensor's normal components. The deformed models can also be saved, retrieved later and deformed again, in order to study different steps of progressive strain, or to make this data available to other programs. The shape of stress ellipsoids and the corresponding Mohr circles defined by any stress tensor can also be represented. The application was written using the Visualization ToolKit, a powerful scientific visualization library in the public domain. This development choice, allied to the use of the Tcl/Tk programming language, which is independent on the host computational platform, makes the program a useful tool for the study of geometric deformations directly in three dimensions in teaching as well as research activities.

  10. Multiple-Relaxation-Time Lattice Boltzmann Models in 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    dHumieres, Dominique; Ginzburg, Irina; Krafczyk, Manfred; Lallemand, Pierre; Luo, Li-Shi; Bushnell, Dennis M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This article provides a concise exposition of the multiple-relaxation-time lattice Boltzmann equation, with examples of fifteen-velocity and nineteen-velocity models in three dimensions. Simulation of a diagonally lid-driven cavity flow in three dimensions at Re=500 and 2000 is performed. The results clearly demonstrate the superior numerical stability of the multiple-relaxation-time lattice Boltzmann equation over the popular lattice Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook equation.

  11. 3D-Pathology: a real-time system for quantitative diagnostic pathology and visualisation in 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gottrup, Christian; Beckett, Mark G.; Hager, Henrik; Locht, Peter

    2005-02-01

    This paper presents the results of the 3D-Pathology project conducted under the European EC Framework 5. The aim of the project was, through the application of 3D image reconstruction and visualization techniques, to improve the diagnostic and prognostic capabilities of medical personnel when analyzing pathological specimens using transmitted light microscopy. A fully automated, computer-controlled microscope system has been developed to capture 3D images of specimen content. 3D image reconstruction algorithms have been implemented and applied to the acquired volume data in order to facilitate the subsequent 3D visualization of the specimen. Three potential application fields, immunohistology, cromogenic in situ hybridization (CISH) and cytology, have been tested using the prototype system. For both immunohistology and CISH, use of the system furnished significant additional information to the pathologist.

  12. V3D enables real-time 3D visualization and quantitative analysis of large-scale biological image data sets.

    PubMed

    Peng, Hanchuan; Ruan, Zongcai; Long, Fuhui; Simpson, Julie H; Myers, Eugene W

    2010-04-01

    The V3D system provides three-dimensional (3D) visualization of gigabyte-sized microscopy image stacks in real time on current laptops and desktops. V3D streamlines the online analysis, measurement and proofreading of complicated image patterns by combining ergonomic functions for selecting a location in an image directly in 3D space and for displaying biological measurements, such as from fluorescent probes, using the overlaid surface objects. V3D runs on all major computer platforms and can be enhanced by software plug-ins to address specific biological problems. To demonstrate this extensibility, we built a V3D-based application, V3D-Neuron, to reconstruct complex 3D neuronal structures from high-resolution brain images. V3D-Neuron can precisely digitize the morphology of a single neuron in a fruitfly brain in minutes, with about a 17-fold improvement in reliability and tenfold savings in time compared with other neuron reconstruction tools. Using V3D-Neuron, we demonstrate the feasibility of building a 3D digital atlas of neurite tracts in the fruitfly brain. PMID:20231818

  13. An optical real-time 3D measurement for analysis of facial shape and movement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qican; Su, Xianyu; Chen, Wenjing; Cao, Yiping; Xiang, Liqun

    2003-12-01

    Optical non-contact 3-D shape measurement provides a novel and useful tool for analysis of facial shape and movement in presurgical and postsurgical regular check. In this article we present a system, which allows a precise 3-D visualization of the patient's facial before and after craniofacial surgery. We discussed, in this paper, the real time 3-D image capture, processing and the 3-D phase unwrapping method to recover complex shape deformation when the movement of the mouth. The result of real-time measurement for facial shape and movement will be helpful for the more ideal effect in plastic surgery.

  14. Time within time: 3D printed sculptures within holographic art practice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Yin-Ren; Richardson, Martin

    2015-03-01

    Holography is a time-based medium, which uses its own aesthetics and techniques to interpret colour and light. This exclusive descriptive language does not simply represent a particular scenario in the moment of recording, but also documents the performance light during the shooting process. Nowadays 3D graphic software and Internet offer practitioners greater mobility in both the development and the delivery of their artwork. Furthermore, the diverse web-based social media presents unlimited and various spaces to facilitate artists in the exchange of creative knowledge, it enables them to collaborate on their projects with external connections - audience, specialists, etc. Within the analogue holography art practice, there is a primary lack of interface, or, in other words, it cannot utilise any digital creative tools. 3D printing makes it possible to bridge the gap between cyber space and the holographic world; even more so, as this emerging technique also becomes a platform, which can connect computational data and light information. The application of 3D printing in contemporary art will reshape the process of creation, as well as the form of visual narrative itself. New technologies continually and increasingly involve the projection of another artistic dimension, and the term "visual" embarks on challenging the generally accepted notion of understanding art and interacting with it. As new pathways of practice are established, it will take years to build a complete understanding of this medium in order to be able to take a full advantage of the benefits its use offers. This paper is aimed at looking for the potential new ways of artistic expression, deriving from the interrelation between analogue holography and 3D printing. It will also attempt an articulate assessment of 3D printing within the dynamic holographic aesthetics.

  15. Photopolarization of Fucus zygotes is determined by time sensitive vectorial addition of environmental cues during axis amplification

    PubMed Central

    Bogaert, Kenny A.; Beeckman, Tom; De Clerck, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    Fucoid zygotes have been extensively used to study cell polarization and asymmetrical cell division. Fertilized eggs are responsive to different environmental cues (e.g., light, gravity) for a long period before the polarity is fixed and the cells germinate accordingly. First, it is commonly believed that the direction and sense of the polarization vector are established simultaneously as indicated by the formation of an F-actin patch. Secondly, upon reorientation of the zygote, a new polar gradient is formed and it is assumed that the position of the future rhizoid pole is only influenced by the latter. Here we tested these two hypotheses investigating photopolarization in Fucus zygotes by reorienting zygotes 90° relative to a unilateral light source at different time points during the first cell cycle. We conclude that fixation of direction and sense of the polarization vector is indeed established simultaneously. However, the experiments yielded a distribution of polarization axes that cannot be explained if only the last environmental cue is supposed to determine the polarization axis. We conclude that our observations, together with published findings, can only be explained by assuming imprinting of the different polarization vectors and their integration as a vectorial sum at the moment of axis fixation. This way cells will average different serially perceived cues resulting in a polarization vector representative of the dynamic intertidal environment, instead of betting exclusively on the perceived vector at the moment of axis fixation. PMID:25691888

  16. Photopolarization of Fucus zygotes is determined by time sensitive vectorial addition of environmental cues during axis amplification.

    PubMed

    Bogaert, Kenny A; Beeckman, Tom; De Clerck, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    Fucoid zygotes have been extensively used to study cell polarization and asymmetrical cell division. Fertilized eggs are responsive to different environmental cues (e.g., light, gravity) for a long period before the polarity is fixed and the cells germinate accordingly. First, it is commonly believed that the direction and sense of the polarization vector are established simultaneously as indicated by the formation of an F-actin patch. Secondly, upon reorientation of the zygote, a new polar gradient is formed and it is assumed that the position of the future rhizoid pole is only influenced by the latter. Here we tested these two hypotheses investigating photopolarization in Fucus zygotes by reorienting zygotes 90° relative to a unilateral light source at different time points during the first cell cycle. We conclude that fixation of direction and sense of the polarization vector is indeed established simultaneously. However, the experiments yielded a distribution of polarization axes that cannot be explained if only the last environmental cue is supposed to determine the polarization axis. We conclude that our observations, together with published findings, can only be explained by assuming imprinting of the different polarization vectors and their integration as a vectorial sum at the moment of axis fixation. This way cells will average different serially perceived cues resulting in a polarization vector representative of the dynamic intertidal environment, instead of betting exclusively on the perceived vector at the moment of axis fixation.

  17. Real-time auto-stereoscopic visualization of 3D medical images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portoni, Luisa; Patak, Alexandre; Noirard, Pierre; Grossetie, Jean-Claude; van Berkel, Cees

    2000-04-01

    The work here described regards multi-viewer auto- stereoscopic visualization of 3D models of anatomical structures and organs of the human body. High-quality 3D models of more than 1600 anatomical structures have been reconstructed using the Visualization Toolkit, a freely available C++ class library for 3D graphics and visualization. 2D images used for 3D reconstruction comes from the Visible Human Data Set. Auto-stereoscopic 3D image visualization is obtained using a prototype monitor developed at Philips Research Labs, UK. This special multiview 3D-LCD screen has been connected directly to a SGI workstation, where 3D reconstruction and medical imaging applications are executed. Dedicated software has been developed to implement multiview capability. A number of static or animated contemporary views of the same object can simultaneously be seen on the 3D-LCD screen by several observers, having a real 3D perception of the visualized scene without the use of extra media as dedicated glasses or head-mounted displays. Developed software applications allow real-time interaction with visualized 3D models, didactical animations and movies have been realized as well.

  18. Study on basic problems in real-time 3D holographic display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Jia; Liu, Juan; Wang, Yongtian; Pan, Yijie; Li, Xin

    2013-05-01

    In recent years, real-time three-dimensional (3D) holographic display has attracted more and more attentions. Since a holographic display can entirely reconstruct the wavefront of an actual 3D scene, it can provide all the depth cues for human eye's observation and perception, and it is believed to be the most promising technology for future 3D display. However, there are several unsolved basic problems for realizing large-size real-time 3D holographic display with a wide field of view. For examples, commercial pixelated spatial light modulators (SLM) always lead to zero-order intensity distortion; 3D holographic display needs a huge number of sampling points for the actual objects or scenes, resulting in enormous computational time; The size and the viewing zone of the reconstructed 3D optical image are limited by the space bandwidth product of the SLM; Noise from the coherent light source as well as from the system severely degrades the quality of the 3D image; and so on. Our work is focused on these basic problems, and some initial results are presented, including a technique derived theoretically and verified experimentally to eliminate the zero-order beam caused by a pixelated phase-only SLM; a method to enlarge the reconstructed 3D image and shorten the reconstruction distance using a concave reflecting mirror; and several algorithms to speed up the calculation of computer generated holograms (CGH) for the display.

  19. Real Time 3D Facial Movement Tracking Using a Monocular Camera.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yanchao; Wang, Yanming; Yue, Jiguang; Hu, Zhencheng

    2016-01-01

    The paper proposes a robust framework for 3D facial movement tracking in real time using a monocular camera. It is designed to estimate the 3D face pose and local facial animation such as eyelid movement and mouth movement. The framework firstly utilizes the Discriminative Shape Regression method to locate the facial feature points on the 2D image and fuses the 2D data with a 3D face model using Extended Kalman Filter to yield 3D facial movement information. An alternating optimizing strategy is adopted to fit to different persons automatically. Experiments show that the proposed framework could track the 3D facial movement across various poses and illumination conditions. Given the real face scale the framework could track the eyelid with an error of 1 mm and mouth with an error of 2 mm. The tracking result is reliable for expression analysis or mental state inference. PMID:27463714

  20. LiveView3D: Real Time Data Visualization for the Aerospace Testing Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwartz, Richard J.; Fleming, Gary A.

    2006-01-01

    This paper addresses LiveView3D, a software package and associated data visualization system for use in the aerospace testing environment. The LiveView3D system allows researchers to graphically view data from numerous wind tunnel instruments in real time in an interactive virtual environment. The graphical nature of the LiveView3D display provides researchers with an intuitive view of the measurement data, making it easier to interpret the aerodynamic phenomenon under investigation. LiveView3D has been developed at the NASA Langley Research Center and has been applied in the Langley Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel (UPWT). This paper discusses the capabilities of the LiveView3D system, provides example results from its application in the UPWT, and outlines features planned for future implementation.

  1. Real Time 3D Facial Movement Tracking Using a Monocular Camera.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yanchao; Wang, Yanming; Yue, Jiguang; Hu, Zhencheng

    2016-07-25

    The paper proposes a robust framework for 3D facial movement tracking in real time using a monocular camera. It is designed to estimate the 3D face pose and local facial animation such as eyelid movement and mouth movement. The framework firstly utilizes the Discriminative Shape Regression method to locate the facial feature points on the 2D image and fuses the 2D data with a 3D face model using Extended Kalman Filter to yield 3D facial movement information. An alternating optimizing strategy is adopted to fit to different persons automatically. Experiments show that the proposed framework could track the 3D facial movement across various poses and illumination conditions. Given the real face scale the framework could track the eyelid with an error of 1 mm and mouth with an error of 2 mm. The tracking result is reliable for expression analysis or mental state inference.

  2. Real Time 3D Facial Movement Tracking Using a Monocular Camera

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Yanchao; Wang, Yanming; Yue, Jiguang; Hu, Zhencheng

    2016-01-01

    The paper proposes a robust framework for 3D facial movement tracking in real time using a monocular camera. It is designed to estimate the 3D face pose and local facial animation such as eyelid movement and mouth movement. The framework firstly utilizes the Discriminative Shape Regression method to locate the facial feature points on the 2D image and fuses the 2D data with a 3D face model using Extended Kalman Filter to yield 3D facial movement information. An alternating optimizing strategy is adopted to fit to different persons automatically. Experiments show that the proposed framework could track the 3D facial movement across various poses and illumination conditions. Given the real face scale the framework could track the eyelid with an error of 1 mm and mouth with an error of 2 mm. The tracking result is reliable for expression analysis or mental state inference. PMID:27463714

  3. Time- and Computation-Efficient Calibration of MEMS 3D Accelerometers and Gyroscopes

    PubMed Central

    Stančin, Sara; Tomažič, Sašo

    2014-01-01

    We propose calibration methods for microelectromechanical system (MEMS) 3D accelerometers and gyroscopes that are efficient in terms of time and computational complexity. The calibration process for both sensors is simple, does not require additional expensive equipment, and can be performed in the field before or between motion measurements. The methods rely on a small number of defined calibration measurements that are used to obtain the values of 12 calibration parameters. This process enables the static compensation of sensor inaccuracies. The values detected by the 3D sensor are interpreted using a generalized 3D sensor model. The model assumes that the values detected by the sensor are equal to the projections of the measured value on the sensor sensitivity axes. Although this finding is trivial for 3D accelerometers, its validity for 3D gyroscopes is not immediately apparent; thus, this paper elaborates on this latter topic. For an example sensor device, calibration parameters were established using calibration measurements of approximately 1.5 min in duration for the 3D accelerometer and 2.5 min in duration for the 3D gyroscope. Correction of each detected 3D value using the established calibration parameters in further measurements requires only nine addition and nine multiplication operations. PMID:25123469

  4. Time- and computation-efficient calibration of MEMS 3D accelerometers and gyroscopes.

    PubMed

    Stančin, Sara; Tomažič, Sašo

    2014-01-01

    We propose calibration methods for microelectromechanical system (MEMS) 3D accelerometers and gyroscopes that are efficient in terms of time and computational complexity. The calibration process for both sensors is simple, does not require additional expensive equipment, and can be performed in the field before or between motion measurements. The methods rely on a small number of defined calibration measurements that are used to obtain the values of 12 calibration parameters. This process enables the static compensation of sensor inaccuracies. The values detected by the 3D sensor are interpreted using a generalized 3D sensor model. The model assumes that the values detected by the sensor are equal to the projections of the measured value on the sensor sensitivity axes. Although this finding is trivial for 3D accelerometers, its validity for 3D gyroscopes is not immediately apparent; thus, this paper elaborates on this latter topic. For an example sensor device, calibration parameters were established using calibration measurements of approximately 1.5 min in duration for the 3D accelerometer and 2.5 min in duration for the 3D gyroscope. Correction of each detected 3D value using the established calibration parameters in further measurements requires only nine addition and nine multiplication operations.

  5. Multithreaded real-time 3D image processing software architecture and implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramachandra, Vikas; Atanassov, Kalin; Aleksic, Milivoje; Goma, Sergio R.

    2011-03-01

    Recently, 3D displays and videos have generated a lot of interest in the consumer electronics industry. To make 3D capture and playback popular and practical, a user friendly playback interface is desirable. Towards this end, we built a real time software 3D video player. The 3D video player displays user captured 3D videos, provides for various 3D specific image processing functions and ensures a pleasant viewing experience. Moreover, the player enables user interactivity by providing digital zoom and pan functionalities. This real time 3D player was implemented on the GPU using CUDA and OpenGL. The player provides user interactive 3D video playback. Stereo images are first read by the player from a fast drive and rectified. Further processing of the images determines the optimal convergence point in the 3D scene to reduce eye strain. The rationale for this convergence point selection takes into account scene depth and display geometry. The first step in this processing chain is identifying keypoints by detecting vertical edges within the left image. Regions surrounding reliable keypoints are then located on the right image through the use of block matching. The difference in the positions between the corresponding regions in the left and right images are then used to calculate disparity. The extrema of the disparity histogram gives the scene disparity range. The left and right images are shifted based upon the calculated range, in order to place the desired region of the 3D scene at convergence. All the above computations are performed on one CPU thread which calls CUDA functions. Image upsampling and shifting is performed in response to user zoom and pan. The player also consists of a CPU display thread, which uses OpenGL rendering (quad buffers). This also gathers user input for digital zoom and pan and sends them to the processing thread.

  6. Advanced Visualization of Experimental Data in Real Time Using LiveView3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwartz, Richard J.; Fleming, Gary A.

    2006-01-01

    LiveView3D is a software application that imports and displays a variety of wind tunnel derived data in an interactive virtual environment in real time. LiveView3D combines the use of streaming video fed into a three-dimensional virtual representation of the test configuration with networked communications to the test facility Data Acquisition System (DAS). This unified approach to real time data visualization provides a unique opportunity to comprehend very large sets of diverse forms of data in a real time situation, as well as in post-test analysis. This paper describes how LiveView3D has been implemented to visualize diverse forms of aerodynamic data gathered during wind tunnel experiments, most notably at the NASA Langley Research Center Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel (UPWT). Planned future developments of the LiveView3D system are also addressed.

  7. A real-time noise filtering strategy for photon counting 3D imaging lidar.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zijing; Zhao, Yuan; Zhang, Yong; Wu, Long; Su, Jianzhong

    2013-04-22

    For a direct-detection 3D imaging lidar, the use of Geiger mode avalanche photodiode (Gm-APD) could greatly enhance the detection sensitivity of the lidar system since each range measurement requires a single detected photon. Furthermore, Gm-APD offers significant advantages in reducing the size, mass, power and complexity of the system. However the inevitable noise, including the background noise, the dark count noise and so on, remains a significant challenge to obtain a clear 3D image of the target of interest. This paper presents a smart strategy, which can filter out false alarms in the stage of acquisition of raw time of flight (TOF) data and obtain a clear 3D image in real time. As a result, a clear 3D image is taken from the experimental system despite the background noise of the sunny day.

  8. A real-time noise filtering strategy for photon counting 3D imaging lidar.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zijing; Zhao, Yuan; Zhang, Yong; Wu, Long; Su, Jianzhong

    2013-04-22

    For a direct-detection 3D imaging lidar, the use of Geiger mode avalanche photodiode (Gm-APD) could greatly enhance the detection sensitivity of the lidar system since each range measurement requires a single detected photon. Furthermore, Gm-APD offers significant advantages in reducing the size, mass, power and complexity of the system. However the inevitable noise, including the background noise, the dark count noise and so on, remains a significant challenge to obtain a clear 3D image of the target of interest. This paper presents a smart strategy, which can filter out false alarms in the stage of acquisition of raw time of flight (TOF) data and obtain a clear 3D image in real time. As a result, a clear 3D image is taken from the experimental system despite the background noise of the sunny day. PMID:23609635

  9. Real-time volume rendering of 4D image using 3D texture mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Jinwoo; Kim, June-Sic; Kim, Jae Seok; Kim, In Young; Kim, Sun Il

    2001-05-01

    Four dimensional image is 3D volume data that varies with time. It is used to express deforming or moving object in virtual surgery of 4D ultrasound. It is difficult to render 4D image by conventional ray-casting or shear-warp factorization methods because of their time-consuming rendering time or pre-processing stage whenever the volume data are changed. Even 3D texture mapping is used, repeated volume loading is also time-consuming in 4D image rendering. In this study, we propose a method to reduce data loading time using coherence between currently loaded volume and previously loaded volume in order to achieve real time rendering based on 3D texture mapping. Volume data are divided into small bricks and each brick being loaded is tested for similarity to one which was already loaded in memory. If the brick passed the test, it is defined as 3D texture by OpenGL functions. Later, the texture slices of the brick are mapped into polygons and blended by OpenGL blending functions. All bricks undergo this test. Continuously deforming fifty volumes are rendered in interactive time with SGI ONYX. Real-time volume rendering based on 3D texture mapping is currently available on PC.

  10. Real-time 3D measurement based on structured light illumination considering camera lens distortion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Shijie; Chen, Qian; Zuo, Chao; Sun, Jiasong; Yu, ShiLing

    2014-12-01

    Optical three-dimensional (3-D) profilometry is gaining increasing attention for its simplicity, flexibility, high accuracy, and non-contact nature. Recent advances in imaging sensors and digital projection technology further its progress in high-speed, real-time applications, enabling 3-D shapes reconstruction of moving objects and dynamic scenes. In traditional 3-D measurement system where the processing time is not a key factor, camera lens distortion correction is performed directly. However, for the time-critical high-speed applications, the time-consuming correction algorithm is inappropriate to be performed directly during the real-time process. To cope with this issue, here we present a novel high-speed real-time 3-D coordinates measuring technique based on fringe projection with the consideration of the camera lens distortion. A pixel mapping relation between a distorted image and a corrected one is pre-determined and stored in computer memory for real-time fringe correction. And a method of lookup table (LUT) is introduced as well for fast data processing. Our experimental results reveal that the measurement error of the in-plane coordinates has been reduced by one order of magnitude and the accuracy of the out-plane coordinate been tripled after the distortions being eliminated. Moreover, owing to the merit of the LUT, the 3-D reconstruction can be achieved at 92.34 frames per second.

  11. [3D real time contrast enhanced ultrasonography,a new technique].

    PubMed

    Dietrich, C F

    2002-02-01

    While 3D sonography has become established in gynecology, abdominal applications have been mainly restricted to case reports. However, recent advances in computer technology have supported the development of new systems with motion detection methods and image registration algorithms - making it possible to acquire 3D data without position sensors, before and after administration of contrast enhancing agents. Hepatic (and also splenic) applications involve the topographic localization of masses in relation to the vessels, e.g. hepatic veins and portal vein branches prior to surgical procedures (segment localization). 3D imaging in the characterization of liver tumors after administration of contrast enhancing agents could become of special importance. We report on the first use of 3D imaging of the liver and spleen under real time conditions in 10 patients, using contrast enhanced phase inversion imaging with low mechanical index, which may improve the detection rate and characterization of liver and splenic tumors. PMID:11898076

  12. Real-time visualization of 3-D dynamic microscopic objects using optical diffraction tomography.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyoohyun; Kim, Kyung Sang; Park, Hyunjoo; Ye, Jong Chul; Park, Yongkeun

    2013-12-30

    3-D refractive index (RI) distribution is an intrinsic bio-marker for the chemical and structural information about biological cells. Here we develop an optical diffraction tomography technique for the real-time reconstruction of 3-D RI distribution, employing sparse angle illumination and a graphic processing unit (GPU) implementation. The execution time for the tomographic reconstruction is 0.21 s for 96(3) voxels, which is 17 times faster than that of a conventional approach. We demonstrated the real-time visualization capability with imaging the dynamics of Brownian motion of an anisotropic colloidal dimer and the dynamic shape change in a red blood cell upon shear flow.

  13. Real-time 3D surface-image-guided beam setup in radiotherapy of breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Djajaputra, David; Li Shidong

    2005-01-01

    We describe an approach for external beam radiotherapy of breast cancer that utilizes the three-dimensional (3D) surface information of the breast. The surface data of the breast are obtained from a 3D optical camera that is rigidly mounted on the ceiling of the treatment vault. This 3D camera utilizes light in the visible range therefore it introduces no ionization radiation to the patient. In addition to the surface topographical information of the treated area, the camera also captures gray-scale information that is overlaid on the 3D surface image. This allows us to visualize the skin markers and automatically determine the isocenter position and the beam angles in the breast tangential fields. The field sizes and shapes of the tangential, supraclavicular, and internal mammary gland fields can all be determined according to the 3D surface image of the target. A least-squares method is first introduced for the tangential-field setup that is useful for compensation of the target shape changes. The entire process of capturing the 3D surface data and subsequent calculation of beam parameters typically requires less than 1 min. Our tests on phantom experiments and patient images have achieved the accuracy of 1 mm in shift and 0.5 deg. in rotation. Importantly, the target shape and position changes in each treatment session can both be corrected through this real-time image-guided system.

  14. Prestack reverse time migration for 3D marine reflection seismic data

    SciTech Connect

    Jang, Seonghyung; Kim, Taeyoun

    2015-03-10

    Prestack reverse time migration (RTM) is a method for imaging the subsurface using the inner product of wavefield extrapolation in shot domain and in receiver domain. It is well known that RTM is better for preserving amplitudes and phases than other prestack migrations. Since 3D seismic data is huge data volume and it needs heavy computing works, it requires parallel computing in order to have a meaningful depth image of the 3D subsurface. We implemented a parallelized version of 3D RTM for prestack depth migration. The results of numerical example for 3D SEG/EAGE salt model showed good agreement with the original geological model. We applied RTM to offshore 3D seismic reflection data. The study area is 12 × 25 km with 120 survey lines. Shot and receiver spacing is 25 m and 12.5 m. The line spacing is 100 m. Shot gathers were preprocessed to enhance signal to noise ratio and velocity model was calculated from conventional stack velocity. Both of them were used to obtain 3D image using RTM. The results show reasonable subsurface image.

  15. PRIMAS: a real-time 3D motion-analysis system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabel, Jan C.; van Veenendaal, Hans L. J.; Furnee, E. Hans

    1994-03-01

    The paper describes a CCD TV-camera-based system for real-time multicamera 2D detection of retro-reflective targets and software for accurate and fast 3D reconstruction. Applications of this system can be found in the fields of sports, biomechanics, rehabilitation research, and various other areas of science and industry. The new feature of real-time 3D opens an even broader perspective of application areas; animations in virtual reality are an interesting example. After presenting an overview of the hardware and the camera calibration method, the paper focuses on the real-time algorithms used for matching of the images and subsequent 3D reconstruction of marker positions. When using a calibrated setup of two cameras, it is now possible to track at least ten markers at 100 Hz. Limitations in the performance are determined by the visibility of the markers, which could be improved by adding a third camera.

  16. FPGA-based real-time anisotropic diffusion filtering of 3D ultrasound images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro-Pareja, Carlos R.; Dandekar, Omkar S.; Shekhar, Raj

    2005-02-01

    Three-dimensional ultrasonic imaging, especially the emerging real-time version of it, is particularly valuable in medical applications such as echocardiography, obstetrics and surgical navigation. A known problem with ultrasound images is their high level of speckle noise. Anisotropic diffusion filtering has been shown to be effective in enhancing the visual quality of 3D ultrasound images and as preprocessing prior to advanced image processing. However, due to its arithmetic complexity and the sheer size of 3D ultrasound images, it is not possible to perform online, real-time anisotropic diffusion filtering using standard software implementations. We present an FPGA-based architecture that allows performing anisotropic diffusion filtering of 3D images at acquisition rates, thus enabling the use of this filtering technique in real-time applications, such as visualization, registration and volume rendering.

  17. [A new approach to the tricuspid valve in Ebstein's anomaly by real time 3D echocardiography].

    PubMed

    Taktak, A; Acar, P; Dulac, Y; Abadir, S; Chilon, T; Roux, D; Glock, Y; Fournial, G

    2005-05-01

    Ebstein's anomaly affects the tricuspid valve with a large range of anatomical forms. Successful tricuspid valvuloplasty depends mainly on the ability to mobilise the leaflets. Evaluation of the leaflet surface is difficult with 2D echocardiography whereas 3D echocardiography provides intracardiac views of the valve. The authors used this method in 10 patients with 3 modes of imaging: biplane, real time and total volume. The study population (age: 1 day to 30 years) included: 1 prenatal diagnosis, 1 neonate with refractory cyanosis, 5 patients with mild tricuspid regurgitation, 3 patients with severe tricuspid regurgitation, 2 of whom underwent valvuloplasty. 3D echocardiography was disappointing in the foetus and neonate because of poor spatial resolution. The ventricular view of the tricuspid valve in older children and adults allowed analysis of tricuspid leaflet coaptation and of the mechanism of regurgitation. The commissures and leaflet surfaces were assessed. The results of surgical valvuloplasty could be evaluated by 3D echocardiography. 3D echocardiography is now transthoracic and a real time investigation. Technical advances are required before it comes into routine usage: a more manoeuvrable matricial probe (integrating pulsed and continuous wave Doppler) and larger volume real time 3D imaging with better resolution. Its role in the assessment of Ebstein's anomaly should be evaluated in a larger series of patients. PMID:15966604

  18. Integration of GPR and Laser Position Sensors for Real-Time 3D Data Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grasmueck, M.; Viggiano, D.

    2005-05-01

    Non-invasive 3D imaging visualizes anatomy and contents inside objects. Such tools are a commodity for medical doctors diagnosing a patient's health without scalpel and airport security staff inspecting the contents of baggage without opening. For geologists, hydrologists, archeologists and engineers wanting to see inside the shallow subsurface, such 3D tools are still a rarity. Theory and practice show that full-resolution 3D Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) imaging requires unaliased recording of dipping reflections and diffractions. For a heterogeneous subsurface, minimum grid spacing of GPR measurements should be at least quarter wavelength or less in all directions. Consequently, positioning precision needs to be better than eighth wavelength for correct grid point assignment. Until now 3D GPR imaging has not been practical: data acquisition and processing took weeks to months, data analysis required geophysical training with no versatile 3D systems commercially available. We have integrated novel rotary laser positioning technology with GPR into a highly efficient and simple to use 3D imaging system. The laser positioning enables acquisition of centimeter accurate x, y, and z coordinates from multiple small detectors attached to moving GPR antennae. Positions streaming with 20 updates/second from each detector are fused in real-time with the GPR data. We developed software for automated data acquisition and real-time 3D GPR data quality control on slices at selected depths. Standard formatted (SEGY) data cubes and animations are generated within an hour after the last trace has been acquired. Examples can be seen at www.3dgpr.info. Such instant 3D GPR can be used as an on-site imaging tool supporting field work, hypothesis testing, and optimal sample collection. Rotary laser positioning has the flexibility to be integrated with multiple moving GPR antennae and other geophysical sensors enabling simple and efficient high resolution 3D data acquisition at

  19. Time-lapse 3-D seismic imaging of shallow subsurface contaminant flow.

    PubMed

    McKenna, J; Sherlock, D; Evans, B

    2001-12-01

    This paper presents a physical modelling study outlining a technique whereby buoyant contaminant flow within water-saturated unconsolidated sand was remotely monitored utilizing the time-lapse 3-D (TL3-D) seismic response. The controlled temperature and pressure conditions, along with the high level of acquisition repeatability attainable using sandbox physical models, allow the TL3-D seismic response to pore fluid movement to be distinguished from all other effects. TL3-D seismic techniques are currently being developed to monitor hydrocarbon reserves within producing reservoirs in an endeavour to improve overall recovery. However, in many ways, sandbox models under atmospheric conditions more accurately simulate the shallow subsurface than petroleum reservoirs. For this reason, perhaps the greatest application for analogue sandbox modelling is to improve our understanding of shallow groundwater and environmental flow mechanisms. Two fluid flow simulations were conducted whereby air and kerosene were injected into separate water-saturated unconsolidated sand models. In both experiments, a base 3-D seismic volume was recorded and compared with six later monitor surveys recorded while the injection program was conducted. Normal incidence amplitude and P-wave velocity information were extracted from the TL3-D seismic data to provide visualization of contaminant migration. Reflection amplitudes displayed qualitative areal distribution of fluids when a suitable impedance contrast existed between pore fluids. TL3-D seismic reflection tomography can potentially monitor the change in areal distribution of fluid contaminants over time, indicating flow patterns. However, other research and this current work have not established a quantifiable relationship between either normal reflection amplitudes and attenuation and fluid saturation. Generally, different pore fluids will have unique seismic velocities due to differences in compressibility and density. The predictable

  20. Real-time 3D-surface-guided head refixation useful for fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Li Shidong; Liu Dezhi; Yin Gongjie; Zhuang Ping; Geng, Jason

    2006-02-15

    Accurate and precise head refixation in fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy has been achieved through alignment of real-time 3D-surface images with a reference surface image. The reference surface image is either a 3D optical surface image taken at simulation with the desired treatment position, or a CT/MRI-surface rendering in the treatment plan with corrections for patient motion during CT/MRI scans and partial volume effects. The real-time 3D surface images are rapidly captured by using a 3D video camera mounted on the ceiling of the treatment vault. Any facial expression such as mouth opening that affects surface shape and location can be avoided using a new facial monitoring technique. The image artifacts on the real-time surface can generally be removed by setting a threshold of jumps at the neighboring points while preserving detailed features of the surface of interest. Such a real-time surface image, registered in the treatment machine coordinate system, provides a reliable representation of the patient head position during the treatment. A fast automatic alignment between the real-time surface and the reference surface using a modified iterative-closest-point method leads to an efficient and robust surface-guided target refixation. Experimental and clinical results demonstrate the excellent efficacy of <2 min set-up time, the desired accuracy and precision of <1 mm in isocenter shifts, and <1 deg. in rotation.

  1. Diagnostic value of 3D time-of-flight MRA in trigeminal neuralgia.

    PubMed

    Cai, Jing; Xin, Zhen-Xue; Zhang, Yu-Qiang; Sun, Jie; Lu, Ji-Liang; Xie, Feng

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this meta-analysis was to evaluate the diagnostic value of 3D time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography (3D-TOF-MRA) in trigeminal neuralgia (TN). Relevant studies were identified by computerized database searches supplemented by manual search strategies. The studies were included in accordance with stringent inclusion and exclusion criteria. Following a multistep screening process, high quality studies related to the diagnostic value of 3D-TOF-MRA in TN were selected for meta-analysis. Statistical analyses were conducted using Statistical Analysis Software (version 8.2; SAS Institute, Cary, NC, USA) and Meta Disc (version 1.4; Unit of Clinical Biostatistics, Ramon y Cajal Hospital, Madrid, Spain). For the present meta-analysis, we initially retrieved 95 studies from database searches. A total of 13 studies were eventually enrolled containing a combined total of 1084 TN patients. The meta-analysis results demonstrated that the sensitivity and specificity of the diagnostic value of 3D-TOF-MRA in TN were 95% (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.93-0.96) and 77% (95% CI 0.66-0.86), respectively. The pooled positive likelihood ratio and negative likelihood ratio were 2.72 (95% CI 1.81-4.09) and 0.08 (95% CI 0.06-0.12), respectively. The pooled diagnostic odds ratio of 3D-TOF-MRA in TN was 52.92 (95% CI 26.39-106.11), and the corresponding area under the curve in the summary receiver operating characteristic curve based on the 3D-TOF-MRA diagnostic image of observers was 0.9695 (standard error 0.0165). Our results suggest that 3D-TOF-MRA has excellent sensitivity and specificity as a diagnostic tool for TN, and that it can accurately identify neurovascular compression in TN patients. PMID:26077938

  2. A volumetric sensor for real-time 3D mapping and robot navigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fournier, Jonathan; Ricard, Benoit; Laurendeau, Denis

    2006-05-01

    The use of robots for (semi-) autonomous operations in complex terrains such as urban environments poses difficult mobility, mapping, and perception challenges. To be able to work efficiently, a robot should be provided with sensors and software such that it can perceive and analyze the world in 3D. Real-time 3D sensing and perception in this operational context are paramount. To address these challenges, DRDC Valcartier has developed over the past years a compact sensor that combines a wide baseline stereo camera and a laser scanner with a full 360 degree azimuth and 55 degree elevation field of view allowing the robot to view and manage overhang obstacles as well as obstacles at ground level. Sensing in 3D is common but to efficiently navigate and work in complex terrain, the robot should also perceive, decide and act in three dimensions. Therefore, 3D information should be preserved and exploited in all steps of the process. To achieve this, we use a multiresolution octree to store the acquired data, allowing mapping of large environments while keeping the representation compact and memory efficient. Ray tracing is used to build and update the 3D occupancy model. This model is used, via a temporary 2.5D map, for navigation, obstacle avoidance and efficient frontier-based exploration. This paper describes the volumetric sensor concept, describes its design features and presents an overview of the 3D software framework that allows 3D information persistency through all computation steps. Simulation and real-world experiments are presented at the end of the paper to demonstrate the key elements of our approach.

  3. Real-Time Analysis of Endogenous Wnt Signalling in 3D Mesenchymal Stromal Cells.

    PubMed

    Saleh, Fatima; Carstairs, Alice; Etheridge, S Leah; Genever, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Wnt signalling has been implicated in the regulation of stem cell self-renewal and differentiation; however, the majority of in vitro studies are carried out using monolayer 2D culture techniques. Here, we used mesenchymal stromal cell (MSC) EGFP reporter lines responsive to Wnt pathway activation in a 3D spheroid culture system to mimic better the in vivo environment. Endogenous Wnt signalling was then investigated under basal conditions and when MSCs were induced to undergo osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation. Interestingly, endogenous Wnt signalling was only active during 3D differentiation whereas 2D cultures showed no EGFP expression throughout an extended differentiation time-course. Furthermore, exogenous Wnt signalling in 3D adipogenic conditions inhibited differentiation compared to unstimulated controls. In addition, suppressing Wnt signalling by Dkk-1 restored and facilitated adipogenic differentiation in MSC spheroids. Our findings indicate that endogenous Wnt signalling is active and can be tracked in 3D MSC cultures where it may act as a molecular switch in adipogenesis. The identification of the signalling pathways that regulate MSCs in a 3D in vivo-like environment will advance our understanding of the molecular mechanisms that control MSC fate. PMID:27668000

  4. Real-Time Analysis of Endogenous Wnt Signalling in 3D Mesenchymal Stromal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Saleh, Fatima; Etheridge, S. Leah

    2016-01-01

    Wnt signalling has been implicated in the regulation of stem cell self-renewal and differentiation; however, the majority of in vitro studies are carried out using monolayer 2D culture techniques. Here, we used mesenchymal stromal cell (MSC) EGFP reporter lines responsive to Wnt pathway activation in a 3D spheroid culture system to mimic better the in vivo environment. Endogenous Wnt signalling was then investigated under basal conditions and when MSCs were induced to undergo osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation. Interestingly, endogenous Wnt signalling was only active during 3D differentiation whereas 2D cultures showed no EGFP expression throughout an extended differentiation time-course. Furthermore, exogenous Wnt signalling in 3D adipogenic conditions inhibited differentiation compared to unstimulated controls. In addition, suppressing Wnt signalling by Dkk-1 restored and facilitated adipogenic differentiation in MSC spheroids. Our findings indicate that endogenous Wnt signalling is active and can be tracked in 3D MSC cultures where it may act as a molecular switch in adipogenesis. The identification of the signalling pathways that regulate MSCs in a 3D in vivo-like environment will advance our understanding of the molecular mechanisms that control MSC fate. PMID:27668000

  5. Real-Time Analysis of Endogenous Wnt Signalling in 3D Mesenchymal Stromal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Saleh, Fatima; Etheridge, S. Leah

    2016-01-01

    Wnt signalling has been implicated in the regulation of stem cell self-renewal and differentiation; however, the majority of in vitro studies are carried out using monolayer 2D culture techniques. Here, we used mesenchymal stromal cell (MSC) EGFP reporter lines responsive to Wnt pathway activation in a 3D spheroid culture system to mimic better the in vivo environment. Endogenous Wnt signalling was then investigated under basal conditions and when MSCs were induced to undergo osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation. Interestingly, endogenous Wnt signalling was only active during 3D differentiation whereas 2D cultures showed no EGFP expression throughout an extended differentiation time-course. Furthermore, exogenous Wnt signalling in 3D adipogenic conditions inhibited differentiation compared to unstimulated controls. In addition, suppressing Wnt signalling by Dkk-1 restored and facilitated adipogenic differentiation in MSC spheroids. Our findings indicate that endogenous Wnt signalling is active and can be tracked in 3D MSC cultures where it may act as a molecular switch in adipogenesis. The identification of the signalling pathways that regulate MSCs in a 3D in vivo-like environment will advance our understanding of the molecular mechanisms that control MSC fate.

  6. Feasibility of real-time 3D echocardiography in weightlessness during parabolic flight.

    PubMed

    Caiani, E G; Sugeng, L; Weinert, L; Husson, S; Bailliart, O; Capderou, A; Lang, R M; Vaida, P

    2004-07-01

    Aim of the study was to test the feasibility of transthoracic real-time 3D (Philips) echocardiography (RT3D) during parabolic flight, to allow direct measurement of heart chambers volumes modifications during the parabola. One RT3D dataset corresponding to one cardiac cycle was acquired at each gravity phase (1 Gz, 1.8 Gz, 0 Gz, 1.8 Gz) during breath-hold in 8 unmedicated normal subjects (41 +/- 8 years old) in standing upright position. Preliminary results, obtained by semi-automatically tracing left ventricular (LV) and left atrial (LA) endocardial contours in multiple views (Tomtec), showed a significant (p<0.05) reduction, compared to 1 Gz, of LV and LA volumes with 1.8 Gz, and a significant increase with 0 Gz. Further analysis will focus on the right heart.

  7. IMPROVEMENTS TO THE TIME STEPPING ALGORITHM OF RELAP5-3D

    SciTech Connect

    Cumberland, R.; Mesina, G.

    2009-01-01

    The RELAP5-3D time step method is used to perform thermo-hydraulic and neutronic simulations of nuclear reactors and other devices. It discretizes time and space by numerically solving several differential equations. Previously, time step size was controlled by halving or doubling the size of a previous time step. This process caused the code to run slower than it potentially could. In this research project, the RELAP5-3D time step method was modifi ed to allow a new method of changing time steps to improve execution speed and to control error. The new RELAP5-3D time step method being studied involves making the time step proportional to the material courant limit (MCL), while insuring that the time step does not increase by more than a factor of two between advancements. As before, if a step fails or mass error is excessive, the time step is cut in half. To examine performance of the new method, a measure of run time and a measure of error were plotted against a changing MCL proportionality constant (m) in seven test cases. The removal of the upper time step limit produced a small increase in error, but a large decrease in execution time. The best value of m was found to be 0.9. The new algorithm is capable of producing a signifi cant increase in execution speed, with a relatively small increase in mass error. The improvements made are now under consideration for inclusion as a special option in the RELAP5-3D production code.

  8. 3D Data Mapping and Real-Time Experiment Control and Visualization in Brain Slices.

    PubMed

    Navarro, Marco A; Hibbard, Jaime V K; Miller, Michael E; Nivin, Tyler W; Milescu, Lorin S

    2015-10-20

    Here, we propose two basic concepts that can streamline electrophysiology and imaging experiments in brain slices and enhance data collection and analysis. The first idea is to interface the experiment with a software environment that provides a 3D scene viewer in which the experimental rig, the brain slice, and the recorded data are represented to scale. Within the 3D scene viewer, the user can visualize a live image of the sample and 3D renderings of the recording electrodes with real-time position feedback. Furthermore, the user can control the instruments and visualize their status in real time. The second idea is to integrate multiple types of experimental data into a spatial and temporal map of the brain slice. These data may include low-magnification maps of the entire brain slice, for spatial context, or any other type of high-resolution structural and functional image, together with time-resolved electrical and optical signals. The entire data collection can be visualized within the 3D scene viewer. These concepts can be applied to any other type of experiment in which high-resolution data are recorded within a larger sample at different spatial and temporal coordinates.

  9. Double Ring Array Catheter for In Vivo Real-Time 3D Ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Smith, Stephen W; Gardea, Paul; Patel, Vivek; Douglas, Stephen J; Wolf, Patrick D

    2014-03-12

    We developed new forward-viewing matrix transducers consisting of double ring arrays of 118 total PZT elements integrated into catheters used to deploy medical interventional devices. Our goal is 3D ultrasound guidance of medical device implantation to reduce x-ray fluoroscopy exposure. The double ring arrays were fabricated on inner and outer custom polyimide flexible circuits with inter-element spacing of 0.20 mm and then wrapped around an 11 French (Fr) catheter to produce a 15 Fr catheter (outer diameter [O.D.]). We used a braided cabling technology to connect the elements to the Volumetrics Medical Imaging (VMI) real-time 3D ultrasound scanner. Transducer performance yielded an average -6 dB fractional bandwidth of 49% ± 11% centered at 4.4 MHz for 118 elements. Real-time 3D cardiac scans of the in vivo pig model yielded good image quality including en face views of the tricuspid valve and real-time 3D guidance of an endo-myocardial biopsy catheter introduced into the left ventricle. PMID:24626564

  10. 3D Data Mapping and Real-Time Experiment Control and Visualization in Brain Slices.

    PubMed

    Navarro, Marco A; Hibbard, Jaime V K; Miller, Michael E; Nivin, Tyler W; Milescu, Lorin S

    2015-10-20

    Here, we propose two basic concepts that can streamline electrophysiology and imaging experiments in brain slices and enhance data collection and analysis. The first idea is to interface the experiment with a software environment that provides a 3D scene viewer in which the experimental rig, the brain slice, and the recorded data are represented to scale. Within the 3D scene viewer, the user can visualize a live image of the sample and 3D renderings of the recording electrodes with real-time position feedback. Furthermore, the user can control the instruments and visualize their status in real time. The second idea is to integrate multiple types of experimental data into a spatial and temporal map of the brain slice. These data may include low-magnification maps of the entire brain slice, for spatial context, or any other type of high-resolution structural and functional image, together with time-resolved electrical and optical signals. The entire data collection can be visualized within the 3D scene viewer. These concepts can be applied to any other type of experiment in which high-resolution data are recorded within a larger sample at different spatial and temporal coordinates. PMID:26488641

  11. Note: Time-gated 3D single quantum dot tracking with simultaneous spinning disk imaging

    SciTech Connect

    DeVore, M. S.; Stich, D. G.; Keller, A. M.; Phipps, M. E.; Hollingsworth, J. A.; Goodwin, P. M.; Werner, J. H.; Cleyrat, C.; Lidke, D. S.; Wilson, B. S.

    2015-12-15

    We describe recent upgrades to a 3D tracking microscope to include simultaneous Nipkow spinning disk imaging and time-gated single-particle tracking (SPT). Simultaneous 3D molecular tracking and spinning disk imaging enable the visualization of cellular structures and proteins around a given fluorescently labeled target molecule. The addition of photon time-gating to the SPT hardware improves signal to noise by discriminating against Raman scattering and short-lived fluorescence. In contrast to camera-based SPT, single-photon arrival times are recorded, enabling time-resolved spectroscopy (e.g., measurement of fluorescence lifetimes and photon correlations) to be performed during single molecule/particle tracking experiments.

  12. Note: Time-gated 3D single quantum dot tracking with simultaneous spinning disk imaging.

    PubMed

    DeVore, M S; Stich, D G; Keller, A M; Cleyrat, C; Phipps, M E; Hollingsworth, J A; Lidke, D S; Wilson, B S; Goodwin, P M; Werner, J H

    2015-12-01

    We describe recent upgrades to a 3D tracking microscope to include simultaneous Nipkow spinning disk imaging and time-gated single-particle tracking (SPT). Simultaneous 3D molecular tracking and spinning disk imaging enable the visualization of cellular structures and proteins around a given fluorescently labeled target molecule. The addition of photon time-gating to the SPT hardware improves signal to noise by discriminating against Raman scattering and short-lived fluorescence. In contrast to camera-based SPT, single-photon arrival times are recorded, enabling time-resolved spectroscopy (e.g., measurement of fluorescence lifetimes and photon correlations) to be performed during single molecule/particle tracking experiments.

  13. Ultra-Wideband Time-Difference-of-Arrival High Resolution 3D Proximity Tracking System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ni, Jianjun; Arndt, Dickey; Ngo, Phong; Phan, Chau; Dekome, Kent; Dusl, John

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes a research and development effort for a prototype ultra-wideband (UWB) tracking system that is currently under development at NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC). The system is being studied for use in tracking of lunar./Mars rovers and astronauts during early exploration missions when satellite navigation systems are not available. U IATB impulse radio (UWB-IR) technology is exploited in the design and implementation of the prototype location and tracking system. A three-dimensional (3D) proximity tracking prototype design using commercially available UWB products is proposed to implement the Time-Difference- Of-Arrival (TDOA) tracking methodology in this research effort. The TDOA tracking algorithm is utilized for location estimation in the prototype system, not only to exploit the precise time resolution possible with UWB signals, but also to eliminate the need for synchronization between the transmitter and the receiver. Simulations show that the TDOA algorithm can achieve the fine tracking resolution with low noise TDOA estimates for close-in tracking. Field tests demonstrated that this prototype UWB TDOA High Resolution 3D Proximity Tracking System is feasible for providing positioning-awareness information in a 3D space to a robotic control system. This 3D tracking system is developed for a robotic control system in a facility called "Moonyard" at Honeywell Defense & System in Arizona under a Space Act Agreement.

  14. Display of real-time 3D sensor data in a DVE system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Völschow, Philipp; Münsterer, Thomas; Strobel, Michael; Kuhn, Michael

    2016-05-01

    This paper describes the implementation of displaying real-time processed LiDAR 3D data in a DVE pilot assistance system. The goal is to display to the pilot a comprehensive image of the surrounding world without misleading or cluttering information. 3D data which can be attributed, i.e. classified, to terrain or predefined obstacle classes is depicted differently from data belonging to elevated objects which could not be classified. Display techniques may be different for head-down and head-up displays to avoid cluttering of the outside view in the latter case. While terrain is shown as shaded surfaces with grid structures or as grid structures alone, respectively, classified obstacles are typically displayed with obstacle symbols only. Data from objects elevated above ground are displayed as shaded 3D points in space. In addition the displayed 3D points are accumulated over a certain time frame allowing on the one hand side a cohesive structure being displayed and on the other hand displaying moving objects correctly. In addition color coding or texturing can be applied based on known terrain features like land use.

  15. Real-Time 3d Reconstruction from Images Taken from AN Uav

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zingoni, A.; Diani, M.; Corsini, G.; Masini, A.

    2015-08-01

    We designed a method for creating 3D models of objects and areas from two aerial images acquired from an UAV. The models are generated automatically and in real-time, and consist in dense and true-colour reconstructions of the considered areas, which give the impression to the operator to be physically present within the scene. The proposed method only needs a cheap compact camera, mounted on a small UAV. No additional instrumentation is necessary, so that the costs are very limited. The method consists of two main parts: the design of the acquisition system and the 3D reconstruction algorithm. In the first part, the choices for the acquisition geometry and for the camera parameters are optimized, in order to yield the best performance. In the second part, a reconstruction algorithm extracts the 3D model from the two acquired images, maximizing the accuracy under the real-time constraint. A test was performed in monitoring a construction yard, obtaining very promising results. Highly realistic and easy-to-interpret 3D models of objects and areas of interest were produced in less than one second, with an accuracy of about 0.5m. For its characteristics, the designed method is suitable for video-surveillance, remote sensing and monitoring, especially in those applications that require intuitive and reliable information quickly, as disasters monitoring, search and rescue and area surveillance.

  16. Real-time 3D human pose recognition from reconstructed volume via voxel classifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, ByungIn; Choi, Changkyu; Han, Jae-Joon; Lee, Changkyo; Kim, Wonjun; Suh, Sungjoo; Park, Dusik; Kim, Junmo

    2014-03-01

    This paper presents a human pose recognition method which simultaneously reconstructs a human volume based on ensemble of voxel classifiers from a single depth image in real-time. The human pose recognition is a difficult task since a single depth camera can capture only visible surfaces of a human body. In order to recognize invisible (self-occluded) surfaces of a human body, the proposed algorithm employs voxel classifiers trained with multi-layered synthetic voxels. Specifically, ray-casting onto a volumetric human model generates a synthetic voxel, where voxel consists of a 3D position and ID corresponding to the body part. The synthesized volumetric data which contain both visible and invisible body voxels are utilized to train the voxel classifiers. As a result, the voxel classifiers not only identify the visible voxels but also reconstruct the 3D positions and the IDs of the invisible voxels. The experimental results show improved performance on estimating the human poses due to the capability of inferring the invisible human body voxels. It is expected that the proposed algorithm can be applied to many fields such as telepresence, gaming, virtual fitting, wellness business, and real 3D contents control on real 3D displays.

  17. System crosstalk measurement of a time-sequential 3D display using ideal shutter glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Fu-Hao; Huang, Kuo-Chung; Lin, Lang-Chin; Chou, Yi-Heng; Lee, Kuen

    2011-03-01

    The market of stereoscopic 3D TV grows up fast recently; however, for 3D TV really taking off, the interoperability of shutter glasses (SG) to view different TV sets must be solved, so we developed a measurement method with ideal shutter glasses (ISG) to separate time-sequential stereoscopic displays and SG. For measuring the crosstalk from time-sequential stereoscopic 3D displays, the influences from SG must be eliminated. The advantages are that the sources to crosstalk are distinguished, and the interoperability of SG is broadened. Hence, this paper proposed ideal shutter glasses, whose non-ideal properties are eliminated, as a platform to evaluate the crosstalk purely from the display. In the ISG method, the illuminance of the display was measured in time domain to analyze the system crosstalk SCT of the display. In this experiment, the ISG method was used to measure SCT with a high-speed-response illuminance meter. From the time-resolved illuminance signals, the slow time response of liquid crystal leading to SCT is visualized and quantified. Furthermore, an intriguing phenomenon that SCT measured through SG increases with shortening view distance was observed, and it may arise from LC leakage of the display and shutter leakage at large view angle. Thus, we measured how LC and shutter leakage depending on view angle and verified our argument. Besides, we used the ISG method to evaluate two displays.

  18. Audiovisual biofeedback improves image quality and reduces scan time for respiratory-gated 3D MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, D.; Greer, P. B.; Arm, J.; Keall, P.; Kim, T.

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that audiovisual (AV) biofeedback can improve image quality and reduce scan time for respiratory-gated 3D thoracic MRI. For five healthy human subjects respiratory motion guidance in MR scans was provided using an AV biofeedback system, utilizing real-time respiratory motion signals. To investigate the improvement of respiratory-gated 3D MR images between free breathing (FB) and AV biofeedback (AV), each subject underwent two imaging sessions. Respiratory-related motion artifacts and imaging time were qualitatively evaluated in addition to the reproducibility of external (abdominal) motion. In the results, 3D MR images in AV biofeedback showed more anatomic information such as a clear distinction of diaphragm, lung lobes and sharper organ boundaries. The scan time was reduced from 401±215 s in FB to 334±94 s in AV (p-value 0.36). The root mean square variation of the displacement and period of the abdominal motion was reduced from 0.4±0.22 cm and 2.8±2.5 s in FB to 0.1±0.15 cm and 0.9±1.3 s in AV (p-value of displacement <0.01 and p-value of period 0.12). This study demonstrated that audiovisual biofeedback improves image quality and reduces scan time for respiratory-gated 3D MRI. These results suggest that AV biofeedback has the potential to be a useful motion management tool in medical imaging and radiation therapy procedures.

  19. Advanced in Visualization of 3D Time-Dependent CFD Solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lane, David A.; Lasinski, T. A. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Numerical simulations of complex 3D time-dependent (unsteady) flows are becoming increasingly feasible because of the progress in computing systems. Unfortunately, many existing flow visualization systems were developed for time-independent (steady) solutions and do not adequately depict solutions from unsteady flow simulations. Furthermore, most systems only handle one time step of the solutions individually and do not consider the time-dependent nature of the solutions. For example, instantaneous streamlines are computed by tracking the particles using one time step of the solution. However, for streaklines and timelines, particles need to be tracked through all time steps. Streaklines can reveal quite different information about the flow than those revealed by instantaneous streamlines. Comparisons of instantaneous streamlines with dynamic streaklines are shown. For a complex 3D flow simulation, it is common to generate a grid system with several millions of grid points and to have tens of thousands of time steps. The disk requirement for storing the flow data can easily be tens of gigabytes. Visualizing solutions of this magnitude is a challenging problem with today's computer hardware technology. Even interactive visualization of one time step of the flow data can be a problem for some existing flow visualization systems because of the size of the grid. Current approaches for visualizing complex 3D time-dependent CFD solutions are described. The flow visualization system developed at NASA Ames Research Center to compute time-dependent particle traces from unsteady CFD solutions is described. The system computes particle traces (streaklines) by integrating through the time steps. This system has been used by several NASA scientists to visualize their CFD time-dependent solutions. The flow visualization capabilities of this system are described, and visualization results are shown.

  20. Global 3-d weather models for the atmospheric correction of gravity time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klügel, Thomas; Wziontek, Hartmut

    2016-04-01

    The use of 3-dimensional weather models allows for an effective reduction of atmospheric effects in gravity time series. In the past the BKG service Atmacs (Atmospheric Attraction Computation Service) provided 3-d atmospheric correction time series only for European stations of the International Geodynamics and Earth Tide Service (IGETS, formerly Global Geodynamics Project, GGP), which are based on the high resolution regional model COSMO-EU of the German Weather Service (DWD). The provision of 3-d density data from the global weather models GME (20 km resolution) and most recently ICON (13 km resolution) by the DWD now allows the computation of 3-d atmospheric correction time series for all IGETS stations worldwide. Due to the triangular grid structure, a different procedure for mass elements close to the computation point is necessary. By increasing the spatial resolution towards the computation point by linear interpolation of the grid values, the use of a point mass approach became possible with an approximation error below 0.3 nm/s2. This approach also allows to consider horizontal density gradients and a tilted model surface of the innermost cells. By means of a variance reduction at different frequency bands a significant improvement of the atmospheric correction can be demonstrated at many IGETS stations. The limited temporal resolution of recently 3 hours can be improved by the user by including local air pressure records using a remove-restore technique. Atmospheric correction time series are online available at http://atmacs.bkg.bund.de.

  1. Autonomous Real-Time Interventional Scan Plane Control With a 3-D Shape-Sensing Needle

    PubMed Central

    Plata, Juan Camilo; Holbrook, Andrew B.; Park, Yong-Lae; Pauly, Kim Butts; Daniel, Bruce L.; Cutkosky, Mark R.

    2016-01-01

    This study demonstrates real-time scan plane control dependent on three-dimensional needle bending, as measured from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-compatible optical strain sensors. A biopsy needle with embedded fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors to measure surface strains is used to estimate its full 3-D shape and control the imaging plane of an MR scanner in real-time, based on the needle’s estimated profile. The needle and scanner coordinate frames are registered to each other via miniature radio-frequency (RF) tracking coils, and the scan planes autonomously track the needle as it is deflected, keeping its tip in view. A 3-D needle annotation is superimposed over MR-images presented in a 3-D environment with the scanner’s frame of reference. Scan planes calculated based on the FBG sensors successfully follow the tip of the needle. Experiments using the FBG sensors and RF coils to track the needle shape and location in real-time had an average root mean square error of 4.2 mm when comparing the estimated shape to the needle profile as seen in high resolution MR images. This positional variance is less than the image artifact caused by the needle in high resolution SPGR (spoiled gradient recalled) images. Optical fiber strain sensors can estimate a needle’s profile in real-time and be used for MRI scan plane control to potentially enable faster and more accurate physician response. PMID:24968093

  2. 3D real-time measurement system of seam with laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Min-shuang; Huang, Jun-fen

    2014-02-01

    3-D Real-time Measurement System of seam outline based on Moiré Projection is proposed and designed. The system is composed of LD, grating, CCD, video A/D, FPGA, DSP and an output interface. The principle and hardware makeup of high-speed and real-time image processing circuit based on a Digital Signal Processor (DSP) and a Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) are introduced. Noise generation mechanism in poor welding field conditions is analyzed when Moiré stripes are projected on a welding workpiece surface. Median filter is adopted to smooth the acquired original laser image of seam, and then measurement results of a 3-D outline image of weld groove are provided.

  3. 3-D electromagnetic modeling for very early time sounding of shallow targets using integral equations

    SciTech Connect

    Xiong, Z.; Tripp, A.C.

    1994-12-31

    This paper presents an integral equation algorithm for 3D EM modeling at high frequencies for applications in engineering an environmental studies. The integral equation method remains the same for low and high frequencies, but the dominant roles of the displacements currents complicate both numerical treatments and interpretations. With singularity extraction technique they successively extended the application of the Hankel filtering technique to the computation of Hankel integrals occurring in high frequency EM modeling. Time domain results are calculated from frequency domain results via Fourier transforms. While frequency domain data are not obvious for interpretations, time domain data show wave-like pictures that resemble seismograms. Both 1D and 3D numerical results show clearly the layer interfaces.

  4. Gust Acoustics Computation with a Space-Time CE/SE Parallel 3D Solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, X. Y.; Himansu, A.; Chang, S. C.; Jorgenson, P. C. E.; Reddy, D. R. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The benchmark Problem 2 in Category 3 of the Third Computational Aero-Acoustics (CAA) Workshop is solved using the space-time conservation element and solution element (CE/SE) method. This problem concerns the unsteady response of an isolated finite-span swept flat-plate airfoil bounded by two parallel walls to an incident gust. The acoustic field generated by the interaction of the gust with the flat-plate airfoil is computed by solving the 3D (three-dimensional) Euler equations in the time domain using a parallel version of a 3D CE/SE solver. The effect of the gust orientation on the far-field directivity is studied. Numerical solutions are presented and compared with analytical solutions, showing a reasonable agreement.

  5. Real-time 3D radiation risk assessment supporting simulation of work in nuclear environments.

    PubMed

    Szőke, I; Louka, M N; Bryntesen, T R; Bratteli, J; Edvardsen, S T; RøEitrheim, K K; Bodor, K

    2014-06-01

    This paper describes the latest developments at the Institute for Energy Technology (IFE) in Norway, in the field of real-time 3D (three-dimensional) radiation risk assessment for the support of work simulation in nuclear environments. 3D computer simulation can greatly facilitate efficient work planning, briefing, and training of workers. It can also support communication within and between work teams, and with advisors, regulators, the media and public, at all the stages of a nuclear installation's lifecycle. Furthermore, it is also a beneficial tool for reviewing current work practices in order to identify possible gaps in procedures, as well as to support the updating of international recommendations, dissemination of experience, and education of the current and future generation of workers.IFE has been involved in research and development into the application of 3D computer simulation and virtual reality (VR) technology to support work in radiological environments in the nuclear sector since the mid 1990s. During this process, two significant software tools have been developed, the VRdose system and the Halden Planner, and a number of publications have been produced to contribute to improving the safety culture in the nuclear industry.This paper describes the radiation risk assessment techniques applied in earlier versions of the VRdose system and the Halden Planner, for visualising radiation fields and calculating dose, and presents new developments towards implementing a flexible and up-to-date dosimetric package in these 3D software tools, based on new developments in the field of radiation protection. The latest versions of these 3D tools are capable of more accurate risk estimation, permit more flexibility via a range of user choices, and are applicable to a wider range of irradiation situations than their predecessors. PMID:24727389

  6. Real-Time Modeling and 3D Visualization of Source Dynamics and Connectivity Using Wearable EEG

    PubMed Central

    Mullen, Tim; Kothe, Christian; Chi, Yu Mike; Ojeda, Alejandro; Kerth, Trevor; Makeig, Scott; Cauwenberghs, Gert; Jung, Tzyy-Ping

    2014-01-01

    This report summarizes our recent efforts to deliver real-time data extraction, preprocessing, artifact rejection, source reconstruction, multivariate dynamical system analysis (including spectral Granger causality) and 3D visualization as well as classification within the open-source SIFT and BCILAB toolboxes. We report the application of such a pipeline to simulated data and real EEG data obtained from a novel wearable high-density (64-channel) dry EEG system. PMID:24110155

  7. Demonstration of digital hologram recording and 3D-scenes reconstruction in real-time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheremkhin, Pavel A.; Evtikhiev, Nikolay N.; Krasnov, Vitaly V.; Kulakov, Mikhail N.; Kurbatova, Ekaterina A.; Molodtsov, Dmitriy Y.; Rodin, Vladislav G.

    2016-04-01

    Digital holography is technique that allows to reconstruct information about 2D-objects and 3D-scenes. This is achieved by registration of interference pattern formed by two beams: object and reference ones. Pattern registered by the digital camera is processed. This allows to obtain amplitude and phase of the object beam. Reconstruction of shape of the 2D objects and 3D-scenes can be obtained numerically (using computer) and optically (using spatial light modulators - SLMs). In this work camera Megaplus II ES11000 was used for digital holograms recording. The camera has 4008 × 2672 pixels with sizes of 9 μm × 9 μm. For hologram recording, 50 mW frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser with wavelength 532 nm was used. Liquid crystal on silicon SLM HoloEye PLUTO VIS was used for optical reconstruction of digital holograms. SLM has 1920 × 1080 pixels with sizes of 8 μm × 8 μm. At objects reconstruction 10 mW He-Ne laser with wavelength 632.8 nm was used. Setups for digital holograms recording and their optical reconstruction with the SLM were combined as follows. MegaPlus Central Control Software allows to display registered frames by the camera with a little delay on the computer monitor. The SLM can work as additional monitor. In result displayed frames can be shown on the SLM display in near real-time. Thus recording and reconstruction of the 3D-scenes was obtained in real-time. Preliminary, resolution of displayed frames was chosen equaled to the SLM one. Quantity of the pixels was limited by the SLM resolution. Frame rate was limited by the camera one. This holographic video setup was applied without additional program implementations that would increase time delays between hologram recording and object reconstruction. The setup was demonstrated for reconstruction of 3D-scenes.

  8. 2D array transducers for real-time 3D ultrasound guidance of interventional devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Light, Edward D.; Smith, Stephen W.

    2009-02-01

    We describe catheter ring arrays for real-time 3D ultrasound guidance of devices such as vascular grafts, heart valves and vena cava filters. We have constructed several prototypes operating at 5 MHz and consisting of 54 elements using the W.L. Gore & Associates, Inc. micro-miniature ribbon cables. We have recently constructed a new transducer using a braided wiring technology from Precision Interconnect. This transducer consists of 54 elements at 4.8 MHz with pitch of 0.20 mm and typical -6 dB bandwidth of 22%. In all cases, the transducer and wiring assembly were integrated with an 11 French catheter of a Cook Medical deployment device for vena cava filters. Preliminary in vivo and in vitro testing is ongoing including simultaneous 3D ultrasound and x-ray fluoroscopy.

  9. A real-time misalignment correction algorithm for stereoscopic 3D cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pekkucuksen, Ibrahim E.; Batur, Aziz Umit; Zhang, Buyue

    2012-03-01

    Camera calibration is an important problem for stereo 3-D cameras since the misalignment between the two views can lead to vertical disparities that significantly degrade 3-D viewing quality. Offline calibration during manufacturing is not always an option especially for mass produced cameras due to cost. In addition, even if one-time calibration is performed during manufacturing, its accuracy cannot be maintained indefinitely because environmental factors can lead to changes in camera hardware. In this paper, we propose a real-time stereo calibration solution that runs inside a consumer camera and continuously estimates and corrects for the misalignment between the stereo cameras. Our algorithm works by processing images of natural scenes and does not require the use of special calibration charts. The algorithm first estimates the disparity in horizontal and vertical directions between the corresponding blocks from stereo images. Then, this initial estimate is refined with two dimensional search using smaller sub-blocks. The displacement data and block coordinates are fed to a modified affine transformation model and outliers are discarded to keep the modeling error low. Finally, the estimated affine parameters are split by half and misalignment correction is applied to each view accordingly. The proposed algorithm significantly reduces the misalignment between stereo frames and enables a more comfortable 3-D viewing experience.

  10. Web GIS in practice V: 3-D interactive and real-time mapping in Second Life

    PubMed Central

    Boulos, Maged N Kamel; Burden, David

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes technologies from Daden Limited for geographically mapping and accessing live news stories/feeds, as well as other real-time, real-world data feeds (e.g., Google Earth KML feeds and GeoRSS feeds) in the 3-D virtual world of Second Life, by plotting and updating the corresponding Earth location points on a globe or some other suitable form (in-world), and further linking those points to relevant information and resources. This approach enables users to visualise, interact with, and even walk or fly through, the plotted data in 3-D. Users can also do the reverse: put pins on a map in the virtual world, and then view the data points on the Web in Google Maps or Google Earth. The technologies presented thus serve as a bridge between mirror worlds like Google Earth and virtual worlds like Second Life. We explore the geo-data display potential of virtual worlds and their likely convergence with mirror worlds in the context of the future 3-D Internet or Metaverse, and reflect on the potential of such technologies and their future possibilities, e.g. their use to develop emergency/public health virtual situation rooms to effectively manage emergencies and disasters in real time. The paper also covers some of the issues associated with these technologies, namely user interface accessibility and individual privacy. PMID:18042275

  11. Web GIS in practice V: 3-D interactive and real-time mapping in Second Life.

    PubMed

    Boulos, Maged N Kamel; Burden, David

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes technologies from Daden Limited for geographically mapping and accessing live news stories/feeds, as well as other real-time, real-world data feeds (e.g., Google Earth KML feeds and GeoRSS feeds) in the 3-D virtual world of Second Life, by plotting and updating the corresponding Earth location points on a globe or some other suitable form (in-world), and further linking those points to relevant information and resources. This approach enables users to visualise, interact with, and even walk or fly through, the plotted data in 3-D. Users can also do the reverse: put pins on a map in the virtual world, and then view the data points on the Web in Google Maps or Google Earth. The technologies presented thus serve as a bridge between mirror worlds like Google Earth and virtual worlds like Second Life. We explore the geo-data display potential of virtual worlds and their likely convergence with mirror worlds in the context of the future 3-D Internet or Metaverse, and reflect on the potential of such technologies and their future possibilities, e.g. their use to develop emergency/public health virtual situation rooms to effectively manage emergencies and disasters in real time. The paper also covers some of the issues associated with these technologies, namely user interface accessibility and individual privacy. PMID:18042275

  12. Time-lapse 3D ground-penetrating radar during plot-scale infiltration experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allroggen, Niklas; Jackisch, Conrad; Tronicke, Jens

    2016-04-01

    In electrical resistive soils, surface-based ground-penetrating radar (GPR) is known as the geophysical tool providing the highest spatial resolution. Thus, 2D and 3D GPR surveys are commonly used for imaging subsurface structures or estimating soil moisture content. Due to its sensitivity to soil moisture and its non-invasive character, GPR provides a large potential to monitor soil moisture variation at high temporal and spatial resolution. As shown in previous experiments, the acquisition of time-lapse GPR data under field conditions requires a high data quality in terms of repeatability as well as spatial and temporal resolution. We present hydrogeophysical field experiments at the plot scale (1m x 1m), during which we record time-lapse 3D GPR. For GPR data acquisition, we use a pulseEKKO PRO GPR system equipped with a pair of 500 MHz antennas in combination with a specially designed metal-free measuring platform. Additionally, we collect tracer and soil moisture data, which are used to improve the interpretation of the GPR data with special focus on preferential flow paths and their structured advective flow field. After an accurate time-lapse GPR data processing, we compare 3D reflection events before and after infiltration and quantitatively interpret their relative time-shift in terms of soil moisture variations. Thereby, we are able to account for basically all of the infiltrated water. The first experiments demonstrate the general applicability of our experimental approach but are limited by the number of acquired time steps and measurement during the sprinkling period (the time of the highest temporal dynamics) are not possible at all. Based on this experience we redesign our experimental setup to continuously collect GPR data during irrigation and infiltration. Thereby, we strongly increase the temporal resolution of our measurements, improve the interpretability of the GPR data, and monitor the temporal and spatial dynamics of shallow subsurface

  13. V-Man Generation for 3-D Real Time Animation. Chapter 5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nebel, Jean-Christophe; Sibiryakov, Alexander; Ju, Xiangyang

    2007-01-01

    The V-Man project has developed an intuitive authoring and intelligent system to create, animate, control and interact in real-time with a new generation of 3D virtual characters: The V-Men. It combines several innovative algorithms coming from Virtual Reality, Physical Simulation, Computer Vision, Robotics and Artificial Intelligence. Given a high-level task like "walk to that spot" or "get that object", a V-Man generates the complete animation required to accomplish the task. V-Men synthesise motion at runtime according to their environment, their task and their physical parameters, drawing upon its unique set of skills manufactured during the character creation. The key to the system is the automated creation of realistic V-Men, not requiring the expertise of an animator. It is based on real human data captured by 3D static and dynamic body scanners, which is then processed to generate firstly animatable body meshes, secondly 3D garments and finally skinned body meshes.

  14. Real-Time 3D Tracking and Reconstruction on Mobile Phones.

    PubMed

    Prisacariu, Victor Adrian; Kähler, Olaf; Murray, David W; Reid, Ian D

    2015-05-01

    We present a novel framework for jointly tracking a camera in 3D and reconstructing the 3D model of an observed object. Due to the region based approach, our formulation can handle untextured objects, partial occlusions, motion blur, dynamic backgrounds and imperfect lighting. Our formulation also allows for a very efficient implementation which achieves real-time performance on a mobile phone, by running the pose estimation and the shape optimisation in parallel. We use a level set based pose estimation but completely avoid the, typically required, explicit computation of a global distance. This leads to tracking rates of more than 100 Hz on a desktop PC and 30 Hz on a mobile phone. Further, we incorporate additional orientation information from the phone's inertial sensor which helps us resolve the tracking ambiguities inherent to region based formulations. The reconstruction step first probabilistically integrates 2D image statistics from selected keyframes into a 3D volume, and then imposes coherency and compactness using a total variational regularisation term. The global optimum of the overall energy function is found using a continuous max-flow algorithm and we show that, similar to tracking, the integration of per voxel posteriors instead of likelihoods improves the precision and accuracy of the reconstruction.

  15. 3D-guided CT reconstruction using time-of-flight camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismail, Mahmoud; Taguchi, Katsuyuki; Xu, Jingyan; Tsui, Benjamin M. W.; Boctor, Emad M.

    2011-03-01

    We propose the use of a time-of-flight (TOF) camera to obtain the patient's body contour in 3D guided imaging reconstruction scheme in CT and C-arm imaging systems with truncated projection. In addition to pixel intensity, a TOF camera provides the 3D coordinates of each point in the captured scene with respect to the camera coordinates. Information from the TOF camera was used to obtain a digitized surface of the patient's body. The digitization points are transformed to X-Ray detector coordinates by registering the two coordinate systems. A set of points corresponding to the slice of interest are segmented to form a 2D contour of the body surface. Radon transform is applied to the contour to generate the 'trust region' for the projection data. The generated 'trust region' is integrated as an input to augment the projection data. It is used to estimate the truncated, unmeasured projections using linear interpolation. Finally the image is reconstructed using the combination of the estimated and the measured projection data. The proposed method is evaluated using a physical phantom. Projection data for the phantom were obtained using a C-arm system. Significant improvement in the reconstructed image quality near the truncation edges was observed using the proposed method as compared to that without truncation correction. This work shows that the proposed 3D guided CT image reconstruction using a TOF camera represents a feasible solution to the projection data truncation problem.

  16. A scalable beamforming architecture for real-time 3D ultrasonic imaging using nonuniform sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dandekar, Omkar; Castro-Pareja, Carlos R.; Shekhar, Raj

    2006-03-01

    Real-time acquisition of 3D volumes is an emerging trend in medical imaging. True real-time 3D ultrasonic imaging is particularly valuable for echocardiography and trauma imaging as well as an intraoperative imaging technique for surgical navigation. Since the frame rate of ultrasonic imaging is fundamentally limited by the speed of sound, many schemes of forming multiple receive beams with a single transmit event have been proposed. With the advent of parallel receive beamforming, several architectures to form multiple (4-8) scan lines at a time have been suggested. Most of these architectures employ uniform sampling and input memory banks to store the samples acquired from all the channels. Some recent developments like crossed electrode array, coded excitation, and synthetic aperture imaging facilitate forming an entire 2D plane with a single transmit event. These techniques are speeding up frame rate to eventually accomplish true real-time 3D ultrasonic imaging. We present an FPGA-based scalable architecture capable of forming a complete scan plane in the time it usually takes to form a single scan line. Our current implementation supports 32 input channels per FPGA and up to 128 dynamically focused beam outputs. The desired focusing delay resolution is achieved using a hybrid scheme, with a combination of nonuniform sampling of the analog channels and linear interpolation for nonsparse delays within a user-specified minimum sampling interval. Overall, our pipelined architecture is capable of processing the input RF data in an online fashion, thereby reducing the input storage requirements and potentially providing better image quality.

  17. A novel time dependent gamma evaluation function for dynamic 2D and 3D dose distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podesta, Mark; CGG Persoon, Lucas; Verhaegen, Frank

    2014-10-01

    Modern external beam radiotherapy requires detailed verification and quality assurance so that confidence can be placed on both the delivery of a single treatment fraction and on the consistency of delivery throughout the treatment course. To verify dose distributions, a comparison between prediction and measurement must be made. Comparisons between two dose distributions are commonly performed using a Gamma evaluation which is a calculation of two quantities on a pixel by pixel basis; the dose difference, and the distance to agreement. By providing acceptance criteria (e.g. 3%, 3 mm), the function will find the most appropriate match within its two degrees of freedom. For complex dynamic treatments such as IMRT or VMAT it is important to verify the dose delivery in a time dependent manner and so a gamma evaluation that includes a degree of freedom in the time domain via a third parameter, time to agreement, is presented here. A C++ (mex) based gamma function was created that could be run on either CPU and GPU computing platforms that would allow a degree of freedom in the time domain. Simple test cases were created in both 2D and 3D comprising of simple geometrical shapes with well-defined boundaries varying over time. Changes of varying magnitude in either space or time were introduced and repeated gamma analyses were performed varying the criteria. A clinical VMAT case was also included, artificial air bubbles of varying size were introduced to a patient geometry, along with shifts of varying magnitude in treatment time. For all test cases where errors in distance, dose or time were introduced, the time dependent gamma evaluation could accurately highlight the errors. The time dependent gamma function presented here allows time to be included as a degree of freedom in gamma evaluations. The function allows for 2D and 3D data sets which are varying over time to be compared using appropriate criteria without penalising minor offsets of subsequent radiation

  18. A novel time dependent gamma evaluation function for dynamic 2D and 3D dose distributions.

    PubMed

    Podesta, Mark; Persoon, Lucas C G G; Verhaegen, Frank

    2014-10-21

    Modern external beam radiotherapy requires detailed verification and quality assurance so that confidence can be placed on both the delivery of a single treatment fraction and on the consistency of delivery throughout the treatment course. To verify dose distributions, a comparison between prediction and measurement must be made. Comparisons between two dose distributions are commonly performed using a Gamma evaluation which is a calculation of two quantities on a pixel by pixel basis; the dose difference, and the distance to agreement. By providing acceptance criteria (e.g. 3%, 3 mm), the function will find the most appropriate match within its two degrees of freedom. For complex dynamic treatments such as IMRT or VMAT it is important to verify the dose delivery in a time dependent manner and so a gamma evaluation that includes a degree of freedom in the time domain via a third parameter, time to agreement, is presented here. A C++ (mex) based gamma function was created that could be run on either CPU and GPU computing platforms that would allow a degree of freedom in the time domain. Simple test cases were created in both 2D and 3D comprising of simple geometrical shapes with well-defined boundaries varying over time. Changes of varying magnitude in either space or time were introduced and repeated gamma analyses were performed varying the criteria. A clinical VMAT case was also included, artificial air bubbles of varying size were introduced to a patient geometry, along with shifts of varying magnitude in treatment time. For all test cases where errors in distance, dose or time were introduced, the time dependent gamma evaluation could accurately highlight the errors.The time dependent gamma function presented here allows time to be included as a degree of freedom in gamma evaluations. The function allows for 2D and 3D data sets which are varying over time to be compared using appropriate criteria without penalising minor offsets of subsequent radiation fields

  19. 3D time-domain airborne EM modeling for an arbitrarily anisotropic earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Changchun; Qi, Yanfu; Liu, Yunhe

    2016-08-01

    Time-domain airborne EM data is currently interpreted based on an isotropic model. Sometimes, it can be problematic when working in the region with distinct dipping stratifications. In this paper, we simulate the 3D time-domain airborne EM responses over an arbitrarily anisotropic earth with topography by edge-based finite-element method. Tetrahedral meshes are used to describe the abnormal bodies with complicated shapes. We further adopt the Backward Euler scheme to discretize the time-domain diffusion equation for electric field, obtaining an unconditionally stable linear equations system. We verify the accuracy of our 3D algorithm by comparing with 1D solutions for an anisotropic half-space. Then, we switch attentions to effects of anisotropic media on the strengths and the diffusion patterns of time-domain airborne EM responses. For numerical experiments, we adopt three typical anisotropic models: 1) an anisotropic anomalous body embedded in an isotropic half-space; 2) an isotropic anomalous body embedded in an anisotropic half-space; 3) an anisotropic half-space with topography. The modeling results show that the electric anisotropy of the subsurface media has big effects on both the strengths and the distribution patterns of time-domain airborne EM responses; this effect needs to be taken into account when interpreting ATEM data in areas with distinct anisotropy.

  20. Probabilistic 3-D time-lapse inversion of magnetotelluric data: application to an enhanced geothermal system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosas-Carbajal, M.; Linde, N.; Peacock, J.; Zyserman, F. I.; Kalscheuer, T.; Thiel, S.

    2015-12-01

    Surface-based monitoring of mass transfer caused by injections and extractions in deep boreholes is crucial to maximize oil, gas and geothermal production. Inductive electromagnetic methods, such as magnetotellurics, are appealing for these applications due to their large penetration depths and sensitivity to changes in fluid conductivity and fracture connectivity. In this work, we propose a 3-D Markov chain Monte Carlo inversion of time-lapse magnetotelluric data to image mass transfer following a saline fluid injection. The inversion estimates the posterior probability density function of the resulting plume, and thereby quantifies model uncertainty. To decrease computation times, we base the parametrization on a reduced Legendre moment decomposition of the plume. A synthetic test shows that our methodology is effective when the electrical resistivity structure prior to the injection is well known. The centre of mass and spread of the plume are well retrieved. We then apply our inversion strategy to an injection experiment in an enhanced geothermal system at Paralana, South Australia, and compare it to a 3-D deterministic time-lapse inversion. The latter retrieves resistivity changes that are more shallow than the actual injection interval, whereas the probabilistic inversion retrieves plumes that are located at the correct depths and oriented in a preferential north-south direction. To explain the time-lapse data, the inversion requires unrealistically large resistivity changes with respect to the base model. We suggest that this is partly explained by unaccounted subsurface heterogeneities in the base model from which time-lapse changes are inferred.

  1. Development of a Wireless and Near Real-Time 3D Ultrasound Strain Imaging System.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhaohong; Chen, Yongdong; Huang, Qinghua

    2016-04-01

    Ultrasound elastography is an important medical imaging tool for characterization of lesions. In this paper, we present a wireless and near real-time 3D ultrasound strain imaging system. It uses a 3D translating device to control a commercial linear ultrasound transducer to collect pre-compression and post-compression radio-frequency (RF) echo signal frames. The RF frames are wirelessly transferred to a high-performance server via a local area network (LAN). A dynamic programming strain estimation algorithm is implemented with the compute unified device architecture (CUDA) on the graphic processing unit (GPU) in the server to calculate the strain image after receiving a pre-compression RF frame and a post-compression RF frame at the same position. Each strain image is inserted into a strain volume which can be rendered in near real-time. We take full advantage of the translating device to precisely control the probe movement and compression. The GPU-based parallel computing techniques are designed to reduce the computation time. Phantom and in vivo experimental results demonstrate that our system can generate strain volumes with good quality and display an incrementally reconstructed volume image in near real-time. PMID:26954841

  2. Indirect time-of-flight 3D ranging based on SPADs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellisai, S.; Villa, F.; Tisa, S.; Bronzi, D.; Zappa, F.

    2012-01-01

    Systems for 3D image acquisition are the enabling technology for a number of applications such as architectural studies, safety and security, automotive. Single-sensor active-illumination cameras are the most promising system, ensuring a good depth measurement accuracy combined with a simple structure (no double sensor required), simplest measurement algorithm and night and daytime operation. These systems are based on the measurement of the time delay between the emission of light signal and the detection of the back-reflected signal (Time of Flight - TOF). The direct measurement of the time delay between two adjacent pulses is called direct TOF (dTOF), while if the time delay is obtained starting from the phase delay of a periodic waveform we speak of indirect TOF (iTOF). We present two different 0.35μm CMOS Silicon mini-arrays for iTOF 3D ranging based on square and sinusoidal waveforms, in which the sensitive element is a Single-Photon Avalanche Diode (SPAD).

  3. Real-time 3D vision solution for on-orbit autonomous rendezvous and docking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruel, S.; English, C.; Anctil, M.; Daly, J.; Smith, C.; Zhu, S.

    2006-05-01

    Neptec has developed a vision system for the capture of non-cooperative objects on orbit. This system uses an active TriDAR sensor and a model based tracking algorithm to provide 6 degree of freedom pose information in real-time from mid range to docking. This system was selected for the Hubble Robotic Vehicle De-orbit Module (HRVDM) mission and for a Detailed Test Objective (DTO) mission to fly on the Space Shuttle. TriDAR (triangulation + LIDAR) technology makes use of a novel approach to 3D sensing by combining triangulation and Time-of-Flight (ToF) active ranging techniques in the same optical path. This approach exploits the complementary nature of these sensing technologies. Real-time tracking of target objects is accomplished using 3D model based tracking algorithms developed at Neptec in partnership with the Canadian Space Agency (CSA). The system provides 6 degrees of freedom pose estimation and incorporates search capabilities to initiate and recover tracking. Pose estimation is performed using an innovative approach that is faster than traditional techniques. This performance allows the algorithms to operate in real-time on the TriDAR's flight certified embedded processor. This paper presents results from simulation and lab testing demonstrating that the system's performance meets the requirements of a complete tracking system for on-orbit autonomous rendezvous and docking.

  4. 3D time-domain airborne EM forward modeling with topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Changchun; Qi, Yanfu; Liu, Yunhe; Cai, Jing

    2016-11-01

    The time-domain finite-difference method has been widely used in simulation of the electromagnetic field diffusion. However, this method is severely restricted by the mesh size and time step. To overcome the defect, we adopted edge finite-element method for unstructured grid with Backward Euler method to conduct 3D airborne electromagnetic forward modeling directly in time-domain. The tetrahedral meshes provide the flexibility required for representing the rugged topography and complex-shape anomalous bodies. We simulated the practical shape, size and attitude of transmitting source by directly setting the loop into the well-generated grids. The characteristic properties of vector basic functions guarantee automatic satisfaction of divergence-free property of electric fields. The Galerkin's method is used to discretize the governing equations and a direct solver is adopted to solve the large sparse linear system. We adopted an algorithm with constant step in each time segment to speed up the forward modeling. Further we introduced the local mesh strategy to reduce the calculations, in which an optimized grid is designed for each sounding station. We check the accuracy of our 3D modeling results against the solution for a homogenous half-space and those for a buried vertical plate model using integral equation. The numerical experiments for a hill, a valley or undulating topography model with buried anomalous bodies were further studied that show that the topography has a serious effect on airborne EM data.

  5. Time-lapse 3D electrical resistivity tomography to monitor soil-plant interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boaga, Jacopo; Rossi, Matteo; Cassiani, Giorgio; Putti, Mario

    2013-04-01

    In this work we present the application of time-lapse non-invasive 3D micro- electrical tomography (ERT) to monitor soil-plant interactions in the root zone in the framework of the FP7 Project CLIMB (Climate Induced Changes on the Hydrology of Mediterranean Basins). The goal of the study is to gain a better understanding of the soil-vegetation interactions by the use of non-invasive techniques. We designed, built and installed a 3D electrical tomography apparatus for the monitoring of the root zone of a single apple tree in an orchard located in the Trentino region, Northern Italy. The micro-ERT apparatus consists of 48 buried electrodes on 4 instrumented micro boreholes plus 24 mini-electrodes on the surface spaced 0.1 m on a square grid. We collected repeated ERT and TDR soil moisture measurements for one year and performed two different controlled irrigation tests: one during a very dry Summer and one during a very wet and highly dynamic plant growing Spring period. We also ran laboratory analyses on soil specimens, in order to evaluate the electrical response at different saturation steps. The results demonstrate that 3D micro-ERT is capable of characterizing subsoil conditions and monitoring root zone activities, especially in terms of root zone suction regions. In particular, we note that in very dry conditions, 3D micro ERT can image water plumes in the shallow subsoil produced by a drip irrigation system. In the very dynamic growing season, under abundant irrigation, micro 3D ERT can detect the main suction zones caused by the tree root activity. Even though the quantitative use of this technique for moisture content balance suffers from well-known inversion difficulties, even the pure imaging of the active root zone is a valuable contribution. However the integration of the measurements in a fully coupled hydrogeophysical inversion is the way forward for a better understanding of subsoil interactions between biomass, hydrosphere and atmosphere.

  6. Arena3D: visualizing time-driven phenotypic differences in biological systems

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Elucidating the genotype-phenotype connection is one of the big challenges of modern molecular biology. To fully understand this connection, it is necessary to consider the underlying networks and the time factor. In this context of data deluge and heterogeneous information, visualization plays an essential role in interpreting complex and dynamic topologies. Thus, software that is able to bring the network, phenotypic and temporal information together is needed. Arena3D has been previously introduced as a tool that facilitates link discovery between processes. It uses a layered display to separate different levels of information while emphasizing the connections between them. We present novel developments of the tool for the visualization and analysis of dynamic genotype-phenotype landscapes. Results Version 2.0 introduces novel features that allow handling time course data in a phenotypic context. Gene expression levels or other measures can be loaded and visualized at different time points and phenotypic comparison is facilitated through clustering and correlation display or highlighting of impacting changes through time. Similarity scoring allows the identification of global patterns in dynamic heterogeneous data. In this paper we demonstrate the utility of the tool on two distinct biological problems of different scales. First, we analyze a medium scale dataset that looks at perturbation effects of the pluripotency regulator Nanog in murine embryonic stem cells. Dynamic cluster analysis suggests alternative indirect links between Nanog and other proteins in the core stem cell network. Moreover, recurrent correlations from the epigenetic to the translational level are identified. Second, we investigate a large scale dataset consisting of genome-wide knockdown screens for human genes essential in the mitotic process. Here, a potential new role for the gene lsm14a in cytokinesis is suggested. We also show how phenotypic patterning allows for extensive

  7. Precise time-of-flight calculation for 3-D synthetic aperture focusing.

    PubMed

    Andresen, Henrik; Nikolov, Svetoslav Ivanov; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2009-09-01

    Conventional linear arrays can be used for 3-D ultrasound imaging by moving the array in the elevation direction and stacking the planes in a volume. The point-spread function is larger in the elevation plane, because the aperture is smaller and has a fixed elevation focus. Resolution improvements in elevation can be achieved by applying synthetic aperture focusing to the beamformed-in-plane RF data. The proposed method uses a virtual source placed at the elevation focus for postbeamforming. This has previously been done in 2 steps, in-plane focusing followed by synthetic aperture postfocusing in elevation, due to lack of a simple expression for the exact time of flight. This paper presents a new single step method for calculating the time of flight for a 3-D case using a linear array. The new method is more flexible and is able to beamform a fewer number of points much more efficiently. The method is evaluated using both simulated data and phantom measurements using the RASMUS experimental scanner. Computational cost of the method is higher than the 2-step method for a full volume beamforming, but it allows for a reduction of an order-of-magnitude if 3 planes are used for real-time visualization. In addition, the need for a temporary storage of beamformed data is removed.

  8. MOEMS-based time-of-flight camera for 3D video capturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Jang-Woo; Park, Yong-Hwa; Cho, Yong-Chul; Park, Chang-Young; Yoon, Heesun; Lee, Sang-Hun; Lee, Seung-Wan

    2013-03-01

    We suggest a Time-of-Flight (TOF) video camera capturing real-time depth images (a.k.a depth map), which are generated from the fast-modulated IR images utilizing a novel MOEMS modulator having switching speed of 20 MHz. In general, 3 or 4 independent IR (e.g. 850nm) images are required to generate a single frame of depth image. Captured video image of a moving object frequently shows motion drag between sequentially captured IR images, which results in so called `motion blur' problem even when the frame rate of depth image is fast (e.g. 30 to 60 Hz). We propose a novel `single shot' TOF 3D camera architecture generating a single depth image out of synchronized captured IR images. The imaging system constitutes of 2x2 imaging lens array, MOEMS optical shutters (modulator) placed on each lens aperture and a standard CMOS image sensor. The IR light reflected from object is modulated by optical shutters on the apertures of 2x2 lens array and then transmitted images are captured on the image sensor resulting in 2x2 sub-IR images. As a result, the depth image is generated with those simultaneously captured 4 independent sub-IR images, hence the motion blur problem is canceled. The resulting performance is very useful in the applications of 3D camera to a human-machine interaction device such as user interface of TV, monitor, or hand held devices and motion capturing of human body. In addition, we show that the presented 3D camera can be modified to capture color together with depth image simultaneously on `single shot' frame rate.

  9. Design and Performance Evaluation on Ultra-Wideband Time-Of-Arrival 3D Tracking System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ni, Jianjun; Arndt, Dickey; Ngo, Phong; Dusl, John

    2012-01-01

    A three-dimensional (3D) Ultra-Wideband (UWB) Time--of-Arrival (TOA) tracking system has been studied at NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) to provide the tracking capability inside the International Space Station (ISS) modules for various applications. One of applications is to locate and report the location where crew experienced possible high level of carbon-dioxide and felt upset. In order to accurately locate those places in a multipath intensive environment like ISS modules, it requires a robust real-time location system (RTLS) which can provide the required accuracy and update rate. A 3D UWB TOA tracking system with two-way ranging has been proposed and studied. The designed system will be tested in the Wireless Habitat Testbed which simulates the ISS module environment. In this presentation, we discuss the 3D TOA tracking algorithm and the performance evaluation based on different tracking baseline configurations. The simulation results show that two configurations of the tracking baseline are feasible. With 100 picoseconds standard deviation (STD) of TOA estimates, the average tracking error 0.2392 feet (about 7 centimeters) can be achieved for configuration Twisted Rectangle while the average tracking error 0.9183 feet (about 28 centimeters) can be achieved for configuration Slightly-Twisted Top Rectangle . The tracking accuracy can be further improved with the improvement of the STD of TOA estimates. With 10 picoseconds STD of TOA estimates, the average tracking error 0.0239 feet (less than 1 centimeter) can be achieved for configuration "Twisted Rectangle".

  10. Real time 3D visualization of ultrasonic data using a standard PC.

    PubMed

    Nikolov, Svetoslav Ivanov; Pablo Gómez Gonzaléz, Juan; Arendt Jensen, Jørgen

    2003-08-01

    This paper describes a flexible, software-based scan converter capable of rendering 3D volumetric data in real time on a standard PC. The display system is used in the remotely accessible and software-configurable multichannel ultrasound sampling system (RASMUS system) developed at the Center for Fast Ultrasound Imaging. The display system is split into two modules: data transfer and display. These two modules are independent and communicate using shared memory and a predefined set of functions. It is, thus, possible to use the display program with a different data-transfer module which is tailored to another source of data (scanner, database, etc.). The data-transfer module of the RASMUS system is based on a digital signal processor from Analog Devices--ADSP 21060. The beamformer is connected to a PC via the link channels of the ADSP. A direct memory access channel transfers the data from the ADSP to a memory buffer. The display module, which is based on OpenGL, uses this memory buffer as a texture map that is passed to the graphics board. The scan conversion, image interpolation, and logarithmic compression are performed by the graphics board, thus reducing the load on the main processor to a minimum. The scan conversion is done by mapping the ultrasonic data to polygons. The format of the image is determined only by the coordinates of the polygons allowing for any kind of geometry to be displayed on the screen. Data from color flow mapping is added by alpha-blending. The 3D data are displayed either as cross-sectional planes, or as a fully rendered 3D volume displayed as a pyramid. All sides of the pyramid can be changed to reveal B-mode or C-mode scans, and the pyramid can be rotated in all directions in real time.

  11. Real-time computer-generated integral imaging and 3D image calibration for augmented reality surgical navigation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Junchen; Suenaga, Hideyuki; Liao, Hongen; Hoshi, Kazuto; Yang, Liangjing; Kobayashi, Etsuko; Sakuma, Ichiro

    2015-03-01

    Autostereoscopic 3D image overlay for augmented reality (AR) based surgical navigation has been studied and reported many times. For the purpose of surgical overlay, the 3D image is expected to have the same geometric shape as the original organ, and can be transformed to a specified location for image overlay. However, how to generate a 3D image with high geometric fidelity and quantitative evaluation of 3D image's geometric accuracy have not been addressed. This paper proposes a graphics processing unit (GPU) based computer-generated integral imaging pipeline for real-time autostereoscopic 3D display, and an automatic closed-loop 3D image calibration paradigm for displaying undistorted 3D images. Based on the proposed methods, a novel AR device for 3D image surgical overlay is presented, which mainly consists of a 3D display, an AR window, a stereo camera for 3D measurement, and a workstation for information processing. The evaluation on the 3D image rendering performance with 2560×1600 elemental image resolution shows the rendering speeds of 50-60 frames per second (fps) for surface models, and 5-8 fps for large medical volumes. The evaluation of the undistorted 3D image after the calibration yields sub-millimeter geometric accuracy. A phantom experiment simulating oral and maxillofacial surgery was also performed to evaluate the proposed AR overlay device in terms of the image registration accuracy, 3D image overlay accuracy, and the visual effects of the overlay. The experimental results show satisfactory image registration and image overlay accuracy, and confirm the system usability.

  12. Single DMD time-multiplexed 64-views autostereoscopic 3D display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loreti, Luigi

    2013-03-01

    Based on previous prototype of the Real time 3D holographic display developed last year, we developed a new concept of auto-stereoscopic multiview display (64 views), wide angle (90°) 3D full color display. The display is based on a RGB laser light source illuminating a DMD (Discovery 4100 0,7") at 24.000 fps, an image deflection system made with an AOD (Acoustic Optic Deflector) driven by a piezo-electric transducer generating a variable standing acoustic wave on the crystal that acts as a phase grating. The DMD projects in fast sequence 64 point of view of the image on the crystal cube. Depending on the frequency of the standing wave, the input picture sent by the DMD is deflected in different angle of view. An holographic screen at a proper distance diffuse the rays in vertical direction (60°) and horizontally select (1°) only the rays directed to the observer. A telescope optical system will enlarge the image to the right dimension. A VHDL firmware to render in real-time (16 ms) 64 views (16 bit 4:2:2) of a CAD model (obj, dxf or 3Ds) and depth-map encoded video images was developed into the resident Virtex5 FPGA of the Discovery 4100 SDK, thus eliminating the needs of image transfer and high speed links

  13. Multifocal multiphoton excitation and time correlated single photon counting detection for 3-D fluorescence lifetime imaging.

    PubMed

    Kumar, S; Dunsby, C; De Beule, P A A; Owen, D M; Anand, U; Lanigan, P M P; Benninger, R K P; Davis, D M; Neil, M A A; Anand, P; Benham, C; Naylor, A; French, P M W

    2007-10-01

    We report a multifocal multiphoton time-correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) microscope system that uses a 16 channel multi-anode PMT detector. Multiphoton excitation minimizes out-of-focus photobleaching, multifocal excitation reduces non-linear in-plane photobleaching effects and TCSPC electronics provide photon-efficient detection of the fluorescence decay profile. TCSPC detection is less prone to bleaching- and movement-induced artefacts compared to wide-field time-gated or frequency-domain FLIM. This microscope is therefore capable of acquiring 3-D FLIM images at significantly increased speeds compared to single beam multiphoton microscopy and we demonstrate this with live cells expressing a GFP tagged protein. We also apply this system to time-lapse FLIM of NAD(P)H autofluorescence in single live cells and report measurements on the change in the fluorescence decay profile following the application of a known metabolic inhibitor. PMID:19550524

  14. Testing & Validating: 3D Seismic Travel Time Tomography (Detailed Shallow Subsurface Imaging)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marti, David; Marzan, Ignacio; Alvarez-Marron, Joaquina; Carbonell, Ramon

    2016-04-01

    A detailed full 3 dimensional P wave seismic velocity model was constrained by a high-resolution seismic tomography experiment. A regular and dense grid of shots and receivers was use to image a 500x500x200 m volume of the shallow subsurface. 10 GEODE's resulting in a 240 channels recording system and a 250 kg weight drop were used for the acquisition. The recording geometry consisted in 10x20m geophone grid spacing, and a 20x20 m stagered source spacing. A total of 1200 receivers and 676 source points. The study area is located within the Iberian Meseta, in Villar de Cañas (Cuenca, Spain). The lithological/geological target consisted in a Neogen sedimentary sequence formed from bottom to top by a transition from gyspum to silstones. The main objectives consisted in resolving the underground structure: contacts/discontinuities; constrain the 3D geometry of the lithology (possible cavities, faults/fractures). These targets were achieved by mapping the 3D distribution of the physical properties (P-wave velocity). The regularly space dense acquisition grid forced to acquire the survey in different stages and with a variety of weather conditions. Therefore, a careful quality control was required. More than a half million first arrivals were inverted to provide a 3D Vp velocity model that reached depths of 120 m in the areas with the highest ray coverage. An extended borehole campaign, that included borehole geophysical measurements in some wells provided unique tight constraints on the lithology an a validation scheme for the tomographic results. The final image reveals a laterally variable structure consisting of four different lithological units. In this methodological validation test travel-time tomography features a high capacity of imaging in detail the lithological contrasts for complex structures located at very shallow depths.

  15. Analysis of the repeatability of time-lapse 3d vsp multicomponent surveys, delhi field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvalho, Mariana Fernandes de

    Delhi Field is a producing oil field located in northeastern Louisiana. In order to monitor the CO2 sweep efficiency, time-lapse 3D seismic data have been acquired in this area. Time-lapse studies are increasingly used to evaluate changes in the seismic response induced by the production of hydrocarbons or the injection of water, CO2 or steam into a reservoir. A 4D seismic signal is generated by a combination of production and injection effects within the reservoir as well as non-repeatability effects. In order to get reliable results from time-lapse seismic methods, it is important to distinguish the production and injection effects from the non-repeatability effects in the 4D seismic signal. Repeatability of 4D land seismic data is affected by several factors. The most significant of them are: source and receiver geometry inaccuracies, differences in seismic sources signatures, variations in the immediate near surface and ambient non-repeatable noise. In this project, two 3D multicomponent VSP surveys acquired in Delhi Field were used to quantify the relative contribution of each factor that can affect the repeatability in land seismic data. The factors analyzed in this study were: source and receiver geometry inaccura- cies, variations in the immediate near surface and ambient non-repeatable noise. This study showed that all these factors had a significant impact on the repeatability of the successive multicomponent VSP surveys in Delhi Field. This project also shows the advantages and disadvantages in the use of different repeata- bility metrics, normalized-root-mean-square (NRMS) difference and signal-to-distortion ratio (SDR) attribute, to evaluate the level of seismic repeatability between successive time-lapse seismic surveys. It is observed that NRMS difference is greatly influenced by time-shifts and that SDR attribute combined with the time-shift may give more distinct and representative repeatability information than the NRMS difference.

  16. 3D time dependent thermo-fluid dynamic model of ground deformation at Campi Flegrei caldera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castaldo, R.; Tizzani, P.; Manconi, A.; Manzo, M.; Pepe, S.; Pepe, A.; Lanari, R.

    2012-04-01

    In active volcanic areas deformation signals are generally characterized by non-linear spatial and temporal variations [Tizzani P. et al., 2007]. This behaviour has been revealed in the last two decades by the so-called advanced DInSAR processing algorithms, developed to analyze surface deformation phenomena [Berardino P. et al., 2002; Ferretti C. et al., 2001]. Notwithstanding, most of the inverse modelling attempts to characterize the evolution of the volcanic sources are based on the assumption that the Earth's crust behaves as a homogeneous linear elastic material. However, the behaviour of the upper lithosphere in thermally anomalous regions (as active volcanoes are) might be well described as a non-Newtonian fluid, where some of the material proprieties of the rocks (i.e., apparent viscosities) can change over time [Pinkerton H. et al., 1995]. In this context, we considered the thermal proprieties and mechanical heterogeneities of the upper crust in order to develop a new 3D time dependent thermo-fluid dynamic model of Campi Flegrei (CF) caldera, Southern Italy. More specifically, according to Tizzani P. et al. (2010), we integrated in a FEM environment geophysical information (gravimetric, seismic, and borehole data) available for the considered area and performed two FEM optimization procedures to constrain the 3D distribution of unknown physical parameters (temperature and viscosity distributions) that might help explaining the data observed at surface (geothermal wells and DInSAR measurements). First, we searched for the heat production, the volume source distribution and surface emissivity parameters providing the best-fit of the geothermal profiles data measured at six boreholes [Agip ESGE, 1986], by solving the Fourier heat equation over time (about 40 kys). The 3D thermal field resulting from this optimization was used to calculate the 3D brittle-ductile transition. This analysis revealed the presence of a ductile region, located beneath the centre of

  17. Vectorial point spread function and optical transfer function in oblique plane imaging.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeongmin; Li, Tongcang; Wang, Yuan; Zhang, Xiang

    2014-05-01

    Oblique plane imaging, using remote focusing with a tilted mirror, enables direct two-dimensional (2D) imaging of any inclined plane of interest in three-dimensional (3D) specimens. It can image real-time dynamics of a living sample that changes rapidly or evolves its structure along arbitrary orientations. It also allows direct observations of any tilted target plane in an object of which orientational information is inaccessible during sample preparation. In this work, we study the optical resolution of this innovative wide-field imaging method. Using the vectorial diffraction theory, we formulate the vectorial point spread function (PSF) of direct oblique plane imaging. The anisotropic lateral resolving power caused by light clipping from the tilted mirror is theoretically analyzed for all oblique angles. We show that the 2D PSF in oblique plane imaging is conceptually different from the inclined 2D slice of the 3D PSF in conventional lateral imaging. Vectorial optical transfer function (OTF) of oblique plane imaging is also calculated by the fast Fourier transform (FFT) method to study effects of oblique angles on frequency responses.

  18. Probabilistic 3-D time-lapse inversion of magnetotelluric data: Application to an enhanced geothermal system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rosas-Carbajal, Marina; Linde, Nicolas; Peacock, Jared R.; Zyserman, F. I.; Kalscheuer, Thomas; Thiel, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    Surface-based monitoring of mass transfer caused by injections and extractions in deep boreholes is crucial to maximize oil, gas and geothermal production. Inductive electromagnetic methods, such as magnetotellurics, are appealing for these applications due to their large penetration depths and sensitivity to changes in fluid conductivity and fracture connectivity. In this work, we propose a 3-D Markov chain Monte Carlo inversion of time-lapse magnetotelluric data to image mass transfer following a saline fluid injection. The inversion estimates the posterior probability density function of the resulting plume, and thereby quantifies model uncertainty. To decrease computation times, we base the parametrization on a reduced Legendre moment decomposition of the plume. A synthetic test shows that our methodology is effective when the electrical resistivity structure prior to the injection is well known. The centre of mass and spread of the plume are well retrieved.We then apply our inversion strategy to an injection experiment in an enhanced geothermal system at Paralana, South Australia, and compare it to a 3-D deterministic time-lapse inversion. The latter retrieves resistivity changes that are more shallow than the actual injection interval, whereas the probabilistic inversion retrieves plumes that are located at the correct depths and oriented in a preferential north-south direction. To explain the time-lapse data, the inversion requires unrealistically large resistivity changes with respect to the base model. We suggest that this is partly explained by unaccounted subsurface heterogeneities in the base model from which time-lapse changes are inferred.

  19. Improved time-space method for 3-D heat transfer problems including global warming

    SciTech Connect

    Saitoh, T.S.; Wakashima, Shinichiro

    1999-07-01

    In this paper, the Time-Space Method (TSM) which has been proposed for solving general heat transfer and fluid flow problems was improved in order to cover global and urban warming. The TSM is effective in almost all-transient heat transfer and fluid flow problems, and has been already applied to the 2-D melting problems (or moving boundary problems). The computer running time will be reduced to only 1/100th--1/1000th of the existing schemes for 2-D and 3-D problems. However, in order to apply to much larger-scale problems, for example, global warming, urban warming and general ocean circulation, the SOR method (or other iterative methods) in four dimensions is somewhat tedious and provokingly slow. Motivated by the above situation, the authors improved the speed of iteration of the previous TSM by introducing the following ideas: (1) Timewise chopping: Time domain is chopped into small peaches to save memory requirement; (2) Adaptive iteration: Converged region is eliminated for further iteration; (3) Internal selective iteration: Equation with slow iteration speed in iterative procedure is selectively iterated to accelerate entire convergence; and (4) False transient integration: False transient term is added to the Poisson-type equation and the relevant solution is regarded as a parabolic equation. By adopting the above improvements, the higher-order finite different schemes and the hybrid mesh, the computer running time for the TSM is reduced to some 1/4600th of the conventional explicit method for a typical 3-D natural convection problem in a closed cavity. The proposed TSM will be more efficacious for large-scale environmental problems, such as global warming, urban warming and general ocean circulation, in which a tremendous computing time would be required.

  20. Real-Time Interactive Facilities Associated With A 3-D Medical Workstation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldwasser, S. M.; Reynolds, R. A.; Talton, D.; Walsh, E.

    1986-06-01

    Biomedical workstations of the future will incorporate three-dimensional interactive capabilities which provide real-time response to most common operator requests. Such systems will find application in many areas of medicine including clinical diagnosis, surgical and radiation therapy planning, biomedical research based on functional imaging, and medical education. This paper considers the requirements of these future systems in terms of image quality, performance, and the interactive environment, and examines the relationship of workstation capabilities to specific medical applications. We describe a prototype physician's workstation that we have designed and built to meet many of these requirements (using conventional graphics technology in conjunction with a custom real-time 3-D processor), and give an account of the remaining issues and challenges that future designers of such systems will have to address.

  1. Time-dependent mechanical properties of 3-D braided graphite/PEEK composites

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, J.N.; Ko, F.K. ); Song, J.W. )

    1992-07-01

    Poly(ether-ether-ketone) or PEEK, was developed as a high performance engineering material. In this study, 3-D braided AS4 graphite /PEEK (graphite/PEEK) composites were preformed and processed to investigate the combined performance of this new system. These manufactured composites were then characterized, using matrix digestion and wide angle x-ray diffraction, to determine their fiber volume fractions and degrees of crystallinity. After physical characterization, the mechanical response of these composites were evaluated at various temperatures. Experimental results from tensile measurements are compared to a fabric geometry model (FGM). This model predicts tensile strength based upon fiber and matrix properties, fiber volume fraction, and braiding angle. The model and experimental results are given here, and are in good agreement with each other. In order to study the time-dependent mechanical properties of these 3-D braided graphite/PEEK composites, their stress relaxation and dynamic mechanical properties were evaluated. The dynamic mechanical properties of PEEK composites are compared to short fiber and continuous fiber reinforced PEEK composites to determine the effects of fiber geometry.

  2. SU-E-J-237: Real-Time 3D Anatomy Estimation From Undersampled MR Acquisitions

    SciTech Connect

    Glitzner, M; Lagendijk, J; Raaymakers, B; Crijns, S; Senneville, B Denis de

    2015-06-15

    Recent developments made MRI guided radiotherapy feasible. Performing simultaneous imaging during fractions can provide information about changing anatomy by means of deformable image registration for either immediate plan adaptations or accurate dose accumulation on the changing anatomy. In 3D MRI, however, acquisition time is considerable and scales with resolution. Furthermore, intra-scan motion degrades image quality.In this work, we investigate the sensitivity of registration quality on imageresolution: potentially, by employing spatial undersampling, the acquisition timeof MR images for the purpose of deformable image registration can be reducedsignificantly.On a volunteer, 3D-MR imaging data was sampled in a navigator-gated manner, acquiring one axial volume (360×260×100mm{sup 3}) per 3s during exhale phase. A T1-weighted FFE sequence was used with an acquired voxel size of (2.5mm{sup 3}) for a duration of 17min. Deformation vector fields were evaluated for 100 imaging cycles with respect to the initial anatomy using deformable image registration based on optical flow. Subsequently, the imaging data was downsampled by a factor of 2, simulating a fourfold acquisition speed. Displacements of the downsampled volumes were then calculated by the same process.In kidneyliver boundaries and the region around stomach/duodenum, prominent organ drifts could be observed in both the original and the downsampled imaging data. An increasing displacement of approximately 2mm was observed for the kidney, while an area around the stomach showed sudden displacements of 4mm. Comparison of the motile points over time showed high reproducibility between the displacements of high-resolution and downsampled volumes: over a 17min acquisition, the componentwise RMS error was not more than 0.38mm.Based on the synthetic experiments, 3D nonrigid image registration shows little sensitivity to image resolution and the displacement information is preserved even when halving the

  3. Miniature stereoscopic video system provides real-time 3D registration and image fusion for minimally invasive surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaron, Avi; Bar-Zohar, Meir; Horesh, Nadav

    2007-02-01

    Sophisticated surgeries require the integration of several medical imaging modalities, like MRI and CT, which are three-dimensional. Many efforts are invested in providing the surgeon with this information in an intuitive & easy to use manner. A notable development, made by Visionsense, enables the surgeon to visualize the scene in 3D using a miniature stereoscopic camera. It also provides real-time 3D measurements that allow registration of navigation systems as well as 3D imaging modalities, overlaying these images on the stereoscopic video image in real-time. The real-time MIS 'see through tissue' fusion solutions enable the development of new MIS procedures in various surgical segments, such as spine, abdomen, cardio-thoracic and brain. This paper describes 3D surface reconstruction and registration methods using Visionsense camera, as a step toward fully automated multi-modality 3D registration.

  4. Parareal in time 3D numerical solver for the LWR Benchmark neutron diffusion transient model

    SciTech Connect

    Baudron, Anne-Marie; Riahi, Mohamed Kamel; Salomon, Julien

    2014-12-15

    In this paper we present a time-parallel algorithm for the 3D neutrons calculation of a transient model in a nuclear reactor core. The neutrons calculation consists in numerically solving the time dependent diffusion approximation equation, which is a simplified transport equation. The numerical resolution is done with finite elements method based on a tetrahedral meshing of the computational domain, representing the reactor core, and time discretization is achieved using a θ-scheme. The transient model presents moving control rods during the time of the reaction. Therefore, cross-sections (piecewise constants) are taken into account by interpolations with respect to the velocity of the control rods. The parallelism across the time is achieved by an adequate use of the parareal in time algorithm to the handled problem. This parallel method is a predictor corrector scheme that iteratively combines the use of two kinds of numerical propagators, one coarse and one fine. Our method is made efficient by means of a coarse solver defined with large time step and fixed position control rods model, while the fine propagator is assumed to be a high order numerical approximation of the full model. The parallel implementation of our method provides a good scalability of the algorithm. Numerical results show the efficiency of the parareal method on large light water reactor transient model corresponding to the Langenbuch–Maurer–Werner benchmark.

  5. Real-time 3D medical structure segmentation using fast evolving active contours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaotao; Wang, Qiang; Hao, Zhihui; Xu, Kuanhong; Guo, Ping; Ren, Haibing; Jang, Wooyoung; Kim, Jung-bae

    2014-03-01

    Segmentation of 3D medical structures in real-time is an important as well as intractable problem for clinical applications due to the high computation and memory cost. We propose a novel fast evolving active contour model in this paper to reduce the requirements of computation and memory. The basic idea is to evolve the brief represented dynamic contour interface as far as possible per iteration. Our method encodes zero level set via a single unordered list, and evolves the list recursively by adding activated adjacent neighbors to its end, resulting in active parts of the zero level set moves far enough per iteration along with list scanning. To guarantee the robustness of this process, a new approximation of curvature for integer valued level set is proposed as the internal force to penalize the list smoothness and restrain the list continual growth. Besides, list scanning times are also used as an upper hard constraint to control the list growing. Together with the internal force, efficient regional and constrained external forces, whose computations are only performed along the unordered list, are also provided to attract the list toward object boundaries. Specially, our model calculates regional force only in a narrowband outside the zero level set and can efficiently segment multiple regions simultaneously as well as handle the background with multiple components. Compared with state-of-the-art algorithms, our algorithm is one-order of magnitude faster with similar segmentation accuracy and can achieve real-time performance for the segmentation of 3D medical structures on a standard PC.

  6. Time And Temperature Dependent Micromechanical Properties Of Solder Joints For 3D-Package Integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roellig, Mike; Meier, Karsten; Metasch, Rene

    2010-11-01

    The recent development of 3D-integrated electronic packages is characterized by the need to increase the diversity of functions and to miniaturize. Currently many 3D-integration concepts are being developed and all of them demand new materials, new designs and new processing technologies. The combination of simulation and experimental investigation becomes increasingly accepted since simulations help to shorten the R&D cycle time and reduce costs. Numerical calculations like the Finite-Element-Method are strong tools to calculate stress conditions in electronic packages resulting from thermal strains due to the manufacturing process and environmental loads. It is essential for the application of numerical calculations that the material data is accurate and describes sufficiently the physical behaviour. The developed machine allows the measurement of time and temperature dependent micromechanical properties of solder joints. Solder joints, which are used to mechanically and electrically connect different packages, are physically measured as they leave the process. This allows accounting for process influences, which may change material properties. Additionally, joint sizes and metallurgical interactions between solder and under bump metallization can be respected by this particular measurement. The measurement allows the determination of material properties within a temperature range of 20° C-200° C. Further, the time dependent creep deformation can be measured within a strain-rate range of 10-31/s-10-81/s. Solder alloys based on Sn-Ag/Sn-Ag-Cu with additionally impurities and joint sizes down to O/ 200 μm were investigated. To finish the material characterization process the material model coefficient were extracted by FEM-Simulation to increase the accuracy of data.

  7. tomo3d: a new 3-D joint refraction and reflection travel-time tomography code for active-source seismic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meléndez, A.; Korenaga, J.; Sallares, V.; Ranero, C. R.

    2012-12-01

    We present the development state of tomo3d, a code for three-dimensional refraction and reflection travel-time tomography of wide-angle seismic data based on the previous two-dimensional version of the code, tomo2d. The core of both forward and inverse problems is inherited from the 2-D version. The ray tracing is performed by a hybrid method combining the graph and bending methods. The graph method finds an ordered array of discrete model nodes, which satisfies Fermat's principle, that is, whose corresponding travel time is a global minimum within the space of discrete nodal connections. The bending method is then applied to produce a more accurate ray path by using the nodes as support points for an interpolation with beta-splines. Travel time tomography is formulated as an iterative linearized inversion, and each step is solved using an LSQR algorithm. In order to avoid the singularity of the sensitivity kernel and to reduce the instability of inversion, regularization parameters are introduced in the inversion in the form of smoothing and damping constraints. Velocity models are built as 3-D meshes, and velocity values at intermediate locations are obtained by trilinear interpolation within the corresponding pseudo-cubic cell. Meshes are sheared to account for topographic relief. A floating reflector is represented by a 2-D grid, and depths at intermediate locations are calculated by bilinear interpolation within the corresponding square cell. The trade-off between the resolution of the final model and the associated computational cost is controlled by the relation between the selected forward star for the graph method (i.e. the number of nodes that each node considers as its neighbors) and the refinement of the velocity mesh. Including reflected phases is advantageous because it provides a better coverage and allows us to define the geometry of those geological interfaces with velocity contrasts sharp enough to be observed on record sections. The code also

  8. A Real-time, 3D Musculoskeletal Model for Dynamic Simulation of Arm Movements

    PubMed Central

    Chadwick, Edward K.; Blana, Dimitra; van den Bogert, Antonie J.; Kirsch, Robert F.

    2010-01-01

    Neuroprostheses can be used to restore movement of the upper limb in individuals with high-level spinal cord injury. Development and evaluation of command and control schemes for such devices typically requires real-time, “patient-in-the-loop” experimentation. A real-time, three-dimensional, musculoskeletal model of the upper limb has been developed for use in a simulation environment to allow such testing to be carried out non-invasively. The model provides real-time feedback of human arm dynamics that can be displayed to the user in a virtual reality environment. The model has a three degree-of-freedom gleno-humeral joint as well as elbow flexion/extension and pronation/supination, and contains 22 muscles of the shoulder and elbow divided into multiple elements. The model is able to run in real time on modest desktop hardware and demonstrates that a large-scale, 3D model can be made to run in real time. This is a prerequisite for a real-time, whole arm model that will form part of a dynamic arm simulator for use in the development, testing and user training of neural prosthesis systems. PMID:19272926

  9. 3D Finite Time Lyapunov Exponents in a left ventricle laboratory model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grazia Badas, Maria; Espa, Stefania; Fortini, Stefania; Querzoli, Giorgio

    2015-05-01

    Finite Time Lyapunov Exponents (FTLEs) are a powerful means to infer characteristic features of the flow that cannot be revealed by other Eulerian criteria. Recently FTLEs are becoming popular also in the medical context, for instance in the analysis of vascular flow measured by means of Magnetic Resonance Imaging. However, many of the FTLE experimental works are based only on two-dimensional velocity fields, moreover those computed on in-vivo data cannot be obtained under controlled and repeatable conditions. Here we present the 3D FTLE evolution inside a Left Ventricle (LV) laboratory model mimicking physiological human conditions. The investigation of FTLE fields highlights distinctive features of the cardiac flow and gives an insight on the physiological development of the Lagrangian Coherent Structures (LCS) that optimize the LV refill.

  10. Real-time 3D vectorcardiography: an application for didactic use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniel, G.; Lissa, G.; Medina Redondo, D.; Vásquez, L.; Zapata, D.

    2007-11-01

    The traditional approach to teach the physiological basis of electrocardiography, based only on textbooks, turns out to be insufficient or confusing for students of biomedical sciences. The addition of laboratory practice to the curriculum enables students to approach theoretical aspects from a hands-on experience, resulting in a more efficient and deeper knowledge of the phenomena of interest. Here, we present the development of a PC-based application meant to facilitate the understanding of cardiac bioelectrical phenomena by visualizing in real time the instantaneous 3D cardiac vector. The system uses 8 standard leads from a 12-channel electrocardiograph. The application interface has pedagogic objectives, and facilitates the observation of cardiac depolarization and repolarization and its temporal relationship with the ECG, making it simpler to interpret.

  11. GATOR: A 3-D time-dependent simulation code for helix TWTs

    SciTech Connect

    Zaidman, E.G.; Freund, H.P.

    1996-12-31

    A 3D nonlinear analysis of helix TWTs is presented. The analysis and simulation code is based upon a spectral decomposition using the vacuum sheath helix modes. The field equations are integrated on a grid and advanced in time using a MacCormack predictor-corrector scheme, and the electron orbit equations are integrated using a fourth order Runge-Kutta algorithm. Charge is accumulated on the grid and the field is interpolated to the particle location by a linear map. The effect of dielectric liners on the vacuum sheath helix dispersion is included in the analysis. Several numerical cases are considered. Simulation of the injection of a DC beam and a signal at a single frequency is compared with a linear field theory of the helix TWT interaction, and good agreement is found.

  12. Myocardial viability: breath-hold 3D MR imaging of delayed hyperenhancement with variable sampling in time.

    PubMed

    Foo, Thomas K F; Stanley, David W; Castillo, Ernesto; Rochitte, Carlos E; Wang, Yi; Lima, João A C; Bluemke, David A; Wu, Katherine C

    2004-03-01

    A method for visualizing myocardial infarction with a three-dimensional (3D) breath-hold gated acquisition was examined. By using variable sampling in time, whole heart coverage with a single volume acquisition was achieved in 24 heart beats. In a study of 35 patients, in whom 3D volume acquisition was compared with a two-dimensional (2D) acquisition, all regions of myocardial infarction were correctly identified at 3D examination. The mean imaging time for 12 section locations was 8.0 minutes +/- 3.0 with a 2D approach compared with 22 seconds +/- 4 with a 3D approach (P <.001). Advantages were also noted for infarct contrast-to-noise ratio: 60 +/- 37 for 3D versus 33 +/- 20 for 2D imaging (P <.001). No significant differences (P >.05) were noted at qualitative assessment of myocardial suppression, endocardial border visualization, respiratory and cardiac motion artifacts, or confidence of transmurality of the infarct.

  13. Observing molecular dynamics with time-resolved 3D momentum imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sturm, F. P.; Wright, T.; Bocharova, I.; Ray, D.; Shivaram, N.; Cryan, J.; Belkacem, A.; Weber, T.; Dörner, R.

    2014-05-01

    Photo-excitation and ionization trigger rich dynamics in molecular systems which play a key role in many important processes in nature such as vision, photosynthesis or photoprotection. Observing those reactions in real-time without significantly disturbing the molecules by a strong electric field has been a great challenge. Recent experiments using Time-of-Flight and Velocity Map Imaging techniques have revealed important information on the dynamics of small molecular systems upon photo-excitation. We have developed an apparatus for time-resolved momentum imaging of electrons and ions in all three spatial dimensions that employs two-color femtosecond laser pulses in the vacuum and extreme ultraviolet (VUV, XUV) for probing molecular dynamics. Our COLTRIMS style reaction microscope can measure electrons and ions in coincidence and reconstruct the momenta of the reaction fragments in 3D. We use a high power 800 nm laser in a loose focusing geometry gas cell to efficinetly drive High Harmonic Generation. The resulting photon flux is sufficient to perform 2-photon pump-probe experiments using VUV and XUV pulses for both pump and probe. With this setup we investigate non-Born-Oppenheimer dynamics in small molecules such as C2H4 and CO2 on a femtosecond time scale. Supported by Chemical Sciences, Geosciences and Biosciences division of BES/DOE.

  14. Computational time analysis of the numerical solution of 3D electrostatic Poisson's equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamboh, Shakeel Ahmed; Labadin, Jane; Rigit, Andrew Ragai Henri; Ling, Tech Chaw; Amur, Khuda Bux; Chaudhary, Muhammad Tayyab

    2015-05-01

    3D Poisson's equation is solved numerically to simulate the electric potential in a prototype design of electrohydrodynamic (EHD) ion-drag micropump. Finite difference method (FDM) is employed to discretize the governing equation. The system of linear equations resulting from FDM is solved iteratively by using the sequential Jacobi (SJ) and sequential Gauss-Seidel (SGS) methods, simulation results are also compared to examine the difference between the results. The main objective was to analyze the computational time required by both the methods with respect to different grid sizes and parallelize the Jacobi method to reduce the computational time. In common, the SGS method is faster than the SJ method but the data parallelism of Jacobi method may produce good speedup over SGS method. In this study, the feasibility of using parallel Jacobi (PJ) method is attempted in relation to SGS method. MATLAB Parallel/Distributed computing environment is used and a parallel code for SJ method is implemented. It was found that for small grid size the SGS method remains dominant over SJ method and PJ method while for large grid size both the sequential methods may take nearly too much processing time to converge. Yet, the PJ method reduces computational time to some extent for large grid sizes.

  15. Real-time 3D Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography guided microvascular anastomosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yong; Ibrahim, Zuhaib; Lee, W. P. A.; Brandacher, Gerald; Kang, Jin U.

    2013-03-01

    Vascular and microvascular anastomosis is considered to be the foundation of plastic and reconstructive surgery, hand surgery, transplant surgery, vascular surgery and cardiac surgery. In the last two decades innovative techniques, such as vascular coupling devices, thermo-reversible poloxamers and suture-less cuff have been introduced. Intra-operative surgical guidance using a surgical imaging modality that provides in-depth view and 3D imaging can improve outcome following both conventional and innovative anastomosis techniques. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a noninvasive high-resolution (micron level), high-speed, 3D imaging modality that has been adopted widely in biomedical and clinical applications. In this work we performed a proof-of-concept evaluation study of OCT as an assisted intraoperative and post-operative imaging modality for microvascular anastomosis of rodent femoral vessels. The OCT imaging modality provided lateral resolution of 12 μm and 3.0 μm axial resolution in air and 0.27 volume/s imaging speed, which could provide the surgeon with clearly visualized vessel lumen wall and suture needle position relative to the vessel during intraoperative imaging. Graphics processing unit (GPU) accelerated phase-resolved Doppler OCT (PRDOCT) imaging of the surgical site was performed as a post-operative evaluation of the anastomosed vessels and to visualize the blood flow and thrombus formation. This information could help surgeons improve surgical precision in this highly challenging anastomosis of rodent vessels with diameter less than 0.5 mm. Our imaging modality could not only detect accidental suture through the back wall of lumen but also promptly diagnose and predict thrombosis immediately after reperfusion. Hence, real-time OCT can assist in decision-making process intra-operatively and avoid post-operative complications.

  16. Automatic 2D to 3D conversion implemented for real-time applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponomaryov, Volodymyr; Ramos-Diaz, Eduardo; Gonzalez Huitron, Victor

    2014-05-01

    Different hardware implementations of designed automatic 2D to 3D video color conversion employing 2D video sequence are presented. The analyzed framework includes together processing of neighboring frames using the following blocks: CIELa*b* color space conversion, wavelet transform, edge detection using HF wavelet sub-bands (HF, LH and HH), color segmentation via k-means on a*b* color plane, up-sampling, disparity map (DM) estimation, adaptive postfiltering, and finally, the anaglyph 3D scene generation. During edge detection, the Donoho threshold is computed, then each sub-band is binarized according to a threshold chosen and finally the thresholding image is formed. DM estimation is performed in the following matter: in left stereo image (or frame), a window with varying sizes is used according to the information obtained from binarized sub-band image, distinguishing different texture areas into LL sub-band image. The stereo matching is performed between two (left and right) LL sub-band images using processing with different window sizes. Upsampling procedure is employed in order to obtain the enhanced DM. Adaptive post-processing procedure is based on median filter and k-means segmentation in a*b* color plane. The SSIM and QBP criteria are applied in order to compare the performance of the proposed framework against other disparity map computation techniques. The designed technique has been implemented on DSP TMS320DM648, Matlab's Simulink module over a PC with Windows 7 and using graphic card (NVIDIA Quadro K2000) demonstrating that the proposed approach can be applied in real-time processing mode.

  17. In situ visualization of magma deformation at high temperature using time-lapse 3D tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godinho, jose; Lee, Peter; Lavallee, Yan; Kendrick, Jackie; Von-Aulock, Felix

    2016-04-01

    We use synchrotron based x-ray computed micro-tomography (sCT) to visualize, in situ, the microstructural evolution of magma samples 3 mm diameter with a resolution of 3 μm during heating and uniaxial compression at temperatures up to 1040 °C. The interaction between crystals, melt and gas bubbles is analysed in 4D (3D + time) during sample deformation. The ability to observe the changes of the microstructure as a function of time allow us to: a) study the effect of temperature in the ability of magma to fracture or deform; b) quantify bubble nucleation and growth rates during heating; c) study the relation between crystal displacement and volatile exsolution. We will show unique beautiful videos of how bubbles grow and coalescence, how samples and crystals within the sample fracture, heal and deform. Our study establishes in situ sCT as a powerful tool to quantify and visualize with micro-scale resolution fast processes taking place in magma that are essential to understand ascent in a volcanic conduit and validate existing models for determining the explosivity of volcanic eruptions. Tracking simultaneously the time and spatial changes of magma microstructures is shown to be primordial to study disequilibrium processes between crystals, melt and gas phases.

  18. GPU based, real-time tracking of perturbed, 3D plasma equilibria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rath, N.; Bialek, J.; Byrne, P. J.; Debono, B.; Levesque, J. P.; Li, B.; Mauel, M. E.; Maurer, D. A.; Navratil, G. A.; Shiraki, D.

    2011-10-01

    The new high-resolution magnetic diagnostics and actuators of the HBT-EP tokamak are used to evaluate a novel approach to long-wavelength MHD mode control: instead of controlling the amplitude of specific preselected perturbations from axisymmetry, the control system will attempt to control the 3D shape of the plasma. This approach frees the experimenter from having to know the approximate shape of the expected instabilities ahead of time, and lifts the restriction of the control reference having to be the perfectly axisymmetric state. Instead, the plasma can be maintained in an arbitrary perturbed equilibrium, which may be selected for beneficial plasma properties. The increased computational demands on the control system are handled by a graphical computing unit (GPU) with 448 computing cores that interfaces directly to digitizers and analog output boards. The control system is designed to handle 96 inputs and 64 outputs with cycle times below 5 and I/O latencies below 10 microseconds. We report on the technical and theoretical design of the control system and give experimental results from testing the system's observer module which tracks the perturbed plasma equilibrium in real-time. This work was supported by US-DOE grant DE-FG02-86ER53222.

  19. A time-space domain stereo finite difference method for 3D scalar wave propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yushu; Yang, Guangwen; Ma, Xiao; He, Conghui; Song, Guojie

    2016-11-01

    The time-space domain finite difference methods reduce numerical dispersion effectively by minimizing the error in the joint time-space domain. However, their interpolating coefficients are related with the Courant numbers, leading to significantly extra time costs for loading the coefficients consecutively according to velocity in heterogeneous models. In the present study, we develop a time-space domain stereo finite difference (TSSFD) method for 3D scalar wave equation. The method propagates both the displacements and their gradients simultaneously to keep more information of the wavefields, and minimizes the maximum phase velocity error directly using constant interpolation coefficients for different Courant numbers. We obtain the optimal constant coefficients by combining the truncated Taylor series approximation and the time-space domain optimization, and adjust the coefficients to improve the stability condition. Subsequent investigation shows that the TSSFD can suppress numerical dispersion effectively with high computational efficiency. The maximum phase velocity error of the TSSFD is just 3.09% even with only 2 sampling points per minimum wavelength when the Courant number is 0.4. Numerical experiments show that to generate wavefields with no visible numerical dispersion, the computational efficiency of the TSSFD is 576.9%, 193.5%, 699.0%, and 191.6% of those of the 4th-order and 8th-order Lax-Wendroff correction (LWC) method, the 4th-order staggered grid method (SG), and the 8th-order optimal finite difference method (OFD), respectively. Meanwhile, the TSSFD is compatible to the unsplit convolutional perfectly matched layer (CPML) boundary condition for absorbing artificial boundaries. The efficiency and capability to handle complex velocity models make it an attractive tool in imaging methods such as acoustic reverse time migration (RTM).

  20. Portable high-intensity focused ultrasound system with 3D electronic steering, real-time cavitation monitoring, and 3D image reconstruction algorithms: a preclinical study in pigs

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the safety and accuracy of a new portable ultrasonography-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (USg-HIFU) system with a 3-dimensional (3D) electronic steering transducer, a simultaneous ablation and imaging module, real-time cavitation monitoring, and 3D image reconstruction algorithms. Methods: To address the accuracy of the transducer, hydrophones in a water chamber were used to assess the generation of sonic fields. An animal study was also performed in five pigs by ablating in vivo thighs by single-point sonication (n=10) or volume sonication (n=10) and ex vivo kidneys by single-point sonication (n=10). Histological and statistical analyses were performed. Results: In the hydrophone study, peak voltages were detected within 1.0 mm from the targets on the y- and z-axes and within 2.0-mm intervals along the x-axis (z-axis, direction of ultrasound propagation; y- and x-axes, perpendicular to the direction of ultrasound propagation). Twenty-nine of 30 HIFU sessions successfully created ablations at the target. The in vivo porcine thigh study showed only a small discrepancy (width, 0.5-1.1 mm; length, 3.0 mm) between the planning ultrasonograms and the pathological specimens. Inordinate thermal damage was not observed in the adjacent tissues or sonic pathways in the in vivo thigh and ex vivo kidney studies. Conclusion: Our study suggests that this new USg-HIFU system may be a safe and accurate technique for ablating soft tissues and encapsulated organs. PMID:25038809

  1. Intersymbol Interference Investigations Using a 3D Time-Dependent Traveling Wave Tube Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kory, Carol L.; Andro, Monty; Downey, Alan (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    For the first time, a physics based computational model has been used to provide a direct description of the effects of the TWT (Traveling Wave Tube) on modulated digital signals. The TWT model comprehensively takes into account the effects of frequency dependent AM/AM and AM/PM conversion; gain and phase ripple; drive-induced oscillations; harmonic generation; intermodulation products; and backward waves. Thus, signal integrity can be investigated in the presence of these sources of potential distortion as a function of the physical geometry of the high power amplifier and the operational digital signal. This method promises superior predictive fidelity compared to methods using TWT models based on swept amplitude and/or swept frequency data. The fully three-dimensional (3D), time-dependent, TWT interaction model using the electromagnetic code MAFIA is presented. This model is used to investigate assumptions made in TWT black box models used in communication system level simulations. In addition, digital signal performance, including intersymbol interference (ISI), is compared using direct data input into the MAFIA model and using the system level analysis tool, SPW (Signal Processing Worksystem).

  2. Intersymbol Interference Investigations Using a 3D Time-Dependent Traveling Wave Tube Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kory, Carol L.; Andro, Monty

    2002-01-01

    For the first time, a time-dependent, physics-based computational model has been used to provide a direct description of the effects of the traveling wave tube amplifier (TWTA) on modulated digital signals. The TWT model comprehensively takes into account the effects of frequency dependent AM/AM and AM/PM conversion; gain and phase ripple; drive-induced oscillations; harmonic generation; intermodulation products; and backward waves. Thus, signal integrity can be investigated in the presence of these sources of potential distortion as a function of the physical geometry and operating characteristics of the high power amplifier and the operational digital signal. This method promises superior predictive fidelity compared to methods using TWT models based on swept- amplitude and/or swept-frequency data. First, the TWT model using the three dimensional (3D) electromagnetic code MAFIA is presented. Then, this comprehensive model is used to investigate approximations made in conventional TWT black-box models used in communication system level simulations. To quantitatively demonstrate the effects these approximations have on digital signal performance predictions, including intersymbol interference (ISI), the MAFIA results are compared to the system level analysis tool, Signal Processing Workstation (SPW), using high order modulation schemes including 16 and 64-QAM.

  3. Automatic alignment of standard views in 3D echocardiograms using real-time tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orderud, Fredrik; Torp, Hans; Rabben, Stein Inge

    2009-02-01

    In this paper, we present an automatic approach for alignment of standard apical and short-axis slices, and correcting them for out-of-plane motion in 3D echocardiography. This is enabled by using real-time Kalman tracking to perform automatic left ventricle segmentation using a coupled deformable model, consisting of a left ventricle model, as well as structures for the right ventricle and left ventricle outflow tract. Landmark points from the segmented model are then used to generate standard apical and short-axis slices. The slices are automatically updated after tracking in each frame to correct for out-of-plane motion caused by longitudinal shortening of the left ventricle. Results from a dataset of 35 recordings demonstrate the potential for automating apical slice initialization and dynamic short-axis slices. Apical 4-chamber, 2-chamber and long-axis slices are generated based on an assumption of fixed angle between the slices, and short-axis slices are generated so that they follow the same myocardial tissue over the entire cardiac cycle. The error compared to manual annotation was 8.4 +/- 3.5 mm for apex, 3.6 +/- 1.8 mm for mitral valve and 8.4 +/- 7.4 for apical 4-chamber view. The high computational efficiency and automatic behavior of the method enables it to operate in real-time, potentially during image acquisition.

  4. 3D Simulations of the ``Keyhole'' Hohlraum for Shock Timing on NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robey, H. F.; Marinak, M. M.; Munro, D. H.; Jones, O. S.

    2007-11-01

    Ignition implosions planned for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) require a pulse shape with a carefully designed series of steps, which launch a series of shocks through the ablator and DT fuel. The relative timing of these shocks must be tuned to better than +/- 100ps to maintain the DT fuel on a sufficiently low adiabat. To meet these requirements, pre-ignition tuning experiments using a modified hohlraum geometry are being planned. This modified geometry, known as the ``keyhole'' hohlraum, adds a re-entrant gold cone, which passes through the hohlraum and capsule walls, to provide an optical line-of-sight to directly measure the shocks as they break out of the ablator. In order to assess the surrogacy of this modified geometry, 3D simulations using HYDRA [1] have been performed. The drive conditions and the resulting effect on shock timing in the keyhole hohlraum will be compared with the corresponding results for the standard ignition hohlraum. [1] M.M. Marinak, et al., Phys. Plasmas 8, 2275 (2001).

  5. Real-time 3D visualization of volumetric video motion sensor data

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, J.; Stansfield, S.; Shawver, D.; Flachs, G.M.; Jordan, J.B.; Bao, Z.

    1996-11-01

    This paper addresses the problem of improving detection, assessment, and response capabilities of security systems. Our approach combines two state-of-the-art technologies: volumetric video motion detection (VVMD) and virtual reality (VR). This work capitalizes on the ability of VVMD technology to provide three-dimensional (3D) information about the position, shape, and size of intruders within a protected volume. The 3D information is obtained by fusing motion detection data from multiple video sensors. The second component involves the application of VR technology to display information relating to the sensors and the sensor environment. VR technology enables an operator, or security guard, to be immersed in a 3D graphical representation of the remote site. VVMD data is transmitted from the remote site via ordinary telephone lines. There are several benefits to displaying VVMD information in this way. Because the VVMD system provides 3D information and because the sensor environment is a physical 3D space, it seems natural to display this information in 3D. Also, the 3D graphical representation depicts essential details within and around the protected volume in a natural way for human perception. Sensor information can also be more easily interpreted when the operator can `move` through the virtual environment and explore the relationships between the sensor data, objects and other visual cues present in the virtual environment. By exploiting the powerful ability of humans to understand and interpret 3D information, we expect to improve the means for visualizing and interpreting sensor information, allow a human operator to assess a potential threat more quickly and accurately, and enable a more effective response. This paper will detail both the VVMD and VR technologies and will discuss a prototype system based upon their integration.

  6. The Quantitative Measurement Of Temperature Distribution In 3-D Thermal Field With High-Speed Real-Time Holographic Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji-zong, Wu; Wei-qiao, Fu; Qin, Wu

    1989-06-01

    The theory of using high-speed real-time holographic interferometry to measure quantitatively 3-D thermal field is discussed in thispaper. An experimental arrangement, and the holographic interference fringes of thermal field formed by the electrAc heating coil wires which were taken by the high-speed camera are given. With CONCEPT 32/2725 computer system and corresponding programms the distribution of 3-D thermal field is calculated and plotted Finally, the problems required to be improved and solved for the method of measuring quantitatively 3-D thermal field are discussed.

  7. tomo3d: a new 3-D joint refraction and reflection travel-time tomography code for active-source seismic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meléndez, A.; Korenaga, J.; Sallarès, V.; Ranero, C. R.

    2012-04-01

    We present the development state of tomo3d, a code for three-dimensional refraction and reflection travel-time tomography of wide-angle seismic data based on the previous two-dimensional version of the code, tomo2d. The core of both forward and inverse problems is inherited from the 2-D version. The ray tracing is performed by a hybrid method combining the graph and bending methods. The graph method finds an ordered array of discrete model nodes, which satisfies Fermat's principle, that is, whose corresponding travel time is a global minimum within the space of discrete nodal connections. The bending method is then applied to produce a more accurate ray path by using the nodes as support points for an interpolation with beta-splines. Travel time tomography is formulated as an iterative linearized inversion, and each step is solved using an LSQR algorithm. In order to avoid the singularity of the sensitivity kernel and to reduce the instability of inversion, regularization parameters are introduced in the inversion in the form of smoothing and damping constraints. Velocity models are built as 3-D meshes, and velocity values at intermediate locations are obtained by trilinear interpolation within the corresponding pseudo-cubic cell. Meshes are sheared to account for topographic relief. A floating reflector is represented by a 2-D grid, and depths at intermediate locations are calculated by bilinear interpolation within the corresponding square cell. The trade-off between the resolution of the final model and the associated computational cost is controlled by the relation between the selected forward star for the graph method (i.e. the number of nodes that each node considers as its neighbors) and the refinement of the velocity mesh. Including reflected phases is advantageous because it provides a better coverage and allows us to define the geometry of those geological interfaces with velocity contrasts sharp enough to be observed on record sections. The code also

  8. Fast segmentation of stained nuclei in terabyte-scale, time resolved 3D microscopy image stacks.

    PubMed

    Stegmaier, Johannes; Otte, Jens C; Kobitski, Andrei; Bartschat, Andreas; Garcia, Ariel; Nienhaus, G Ulrich; Strähle, Uwe; Mikut, Ralf

    2014-01-01

    Automated analysis of multi-dimensional microscopy images has become an integral part of modern research in life science. Most available algorithms that provide sufficient segmentation quality, however, are infeasible for a large amount of data due to their high complexity. In this contribution we present a fast parallelized segmentation method that is especially suited for the extraction of stained nuclei from microscopy images, e.g., of developing zebrafish embryos. The idea is to transform the input image based on gradient and normal directions in the proximity of detected seed points such that it can be handled by straightforward global thresholding like Otsu's method. We evaluate the quality of the obtained segmentation results on a set of real and simulated benchmark images in 2D and 3D and show the algorithm's superior performance compared to other state-of-the-art algorithms. We achieve an up to ten-fold decrease in processing times, allowing us to process large data sets while still providing reasonable segmentation results.

  9. Registration of Real-Time 3-D Ultrasound to Tomographic Images of the Abdominal Aorta.

    PubMed

    Brekken, Reidar; Iversen, Daniel Høyer; Tangen, Geir Arne; Dahl, Torbjørn

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop an image-based method for registration of real-time 3-D ultrasound to computed tomography (CT) of the abdominal aorta, targeting future use in ultrasound-guided endovascular intervention. We proposed a method in which a surface model of the aortic wall was segmented from CT, and the approximate initial location of this model relative to the ultrasound volume was manually indicated. The model was iteratively transformed to automatically optimize correspondence to the ultrasound data. Feasibility was studied using data from a silicon phantom and in vivo data from a volunteer with previously acquired CT. Through visual evaluation, the ultrasound and CT data were seen to correspond well after registration. Both aortic lumen and branching arteries were well aligned. The processing was done offline, and the registration took approximately 0.2 s per ultrasound volume. The results encourage further patient studies to investigate accuracy, robustness and clinical value of the approach. PMID:27156015

  10. The time course of configural change detection for novel 3-D objects.

    PubMed

    Favelle, Simone; Palmisano, Stephen

    2010-05-01

    The present study investigated the time course of visual information processing that is responsible for successful object change detection involving the configuration and shape of 3-D novel object parts. Using a one-shot change detection task, we manipulated stimulus and interstimulus mask durations (40-500 msec). Experiments 1A and 1B showed no change detection advantage for configuration at very short (40-msec) stimulus durations, but the configural advantage did emerge with durations between 80 and 160 msec. In Experiment 2, we showed that, at shorter stimulus durations, the number of parts changing was the best predictor of change detection performance. Finally, in Experiment 3, with a stimulus duration of 160 msec, configuration change detection was found to be highly accurate for each of the mask durations tested, suggesting a fast processing speed for this kind of change information. However, switch and shape change detection reached peak levels of accuracy only when mask durations were increased to 160 and 320 msec, respectively. We conclude that, with very short stimulus exposures, successful object change detection depends primarily on quantitative measures of change. However, with longer stimulus exposures, the qualitative nature of the change becomes progressively more important, resulting in the well-known configural advantage for change detection.

  11. Real-time 3D visualization of cellular rearrangements during cardiac valve formation.

    PubMed

    Pestel, Jenny; Ramadass, Radhan; Gauvrit, Sebastien; Helker, Christian; Herzog, Wiebke; Stainier, Didier Y R

    2016-06-15

    During cardiac valve development, the single-layered endocardial sheet at the atrioventricular canal (AVC) is remodeled into multilayered immature valve leaflets. Most of our knowledge about this process comes from examining fixed samples that do not allow a real-time appreciation of the intricacies of valve formation. Here, we exploit non-invasive in vivo imaging techniques to identify the dynamic cell behaviors that lead to the formation of the immature valve leaflets. We find that in zebrafish, the valve leaflets consist of two sets of endocardial cells at the luminal and abluminal side, which we refer to as luminal cells (LCs) and abluminal cells (ALCs), respectively. By analyzing cellular rearrangements during valve formation, we observed that the LCs and ALCs originate from the atrium and ventricle, respectively. Furthermore, we utilized Wnt/β-catenin and Notch signaling reporter lines to distinguish between the LCs and ALCs, and also found that cardiac contractility and/or blood flow is necessary for the endocardial expression of these signaling reporters. Thus, our 3D analyses of cardiac valve formation in zebrafish provide fundamental insights into the cellular rearrangements underlying this process.

  12. Real-time 3D computed tomographic reconstruction using commodity graphics hardware

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Fang; Mueller, Klaus

    2007-07-01

    The recent emergence of various types of flat-panel x-ray detectors and C-arm gantries now enables the construction of novel imaging platforms for a wide variety of clinical applications. Many of these applications require interactive 3D image generation, which cannot be satisfied with inexpensive PC-based solutions using the CPU. We present a solution based on commodity graphics hardware (GPUs) to provide these capabilities. While GPUs have been employed for CT reconstruction before, our approach provides significant speedups by exploiting the various built-in hardwired graphics pipeline components for the most expensive CT reconstruction task, backprojection. We show that the timings so achieved are superior to those obtained when using the GPU merely as a multi-processor, without a drop in reconstruction quality. In addition, we also show how the data flow across the graphics pipeline can be optimized, by balancing the load among the pipeline components. The result is a novel streaming CT framework that conceptualizes the reconstruction process as a steady flow of data across a computing pipeline, updating the reconstruction result immediately after the projections have been acquired. Using a single PC equipped with a single high-end commodity graphics board (the Nvidia 8800 GTX), our system is able to process clinically-sized projection data at speeds meeting and exceeding the typical flat-panel detector data production rates, enabling throughput rates of 40-50 projections s-1 for the reconstruction of 5123 volumes.

  13. 3D Markov Process for Traffic Flow Prediction in Real-Time

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Eunjeong; Ahn, Jinyoung; Kim, Eun Yi

    2016-01-01

    Recently, the correct estimation of traffic flow has begun to be considered an essential component in intelligent transportation systems. In this paper, a new statistical method to predict traffic flows using time series analyses and geometric correlations is proposed. The novelty of the proposed method is two-fold: (1) a 3D heat map is designed to describe the traffic conditions between roads, which can effectively represent the correlations between spatially- and temporally-adjacent traffic states; and (2) the relationship between the adjacent roads on the spatiotemporal domain is represented by cliques in MRF and the clique parameters are obtained by example-based learning. In order to assess the validity of the proposed method, it is tested using data from expressway traffic that are provided by the Korean Expressway Corporation, and the performance of the proposed method is compared with existing approaches. The results demonstrate that the proposed method can predict traffic conditions with an accuracy of 85%, and this accuracy can be improved further. PMID:26821025

  14. A real-time emergency response workstation using a 3-D numerical model initialized with sodar

    SciTech Connect

    Lawver, B.S.; Sullivan, T.J.; Baskett, R.L.

    1993-01-28

    Many emergency response dispersion modeling systems provide simple Gaussian models driven by single meteorological tower inputs to estimate the downwind consequences from accidental spills or stack releases. Complex meteorological or terrain settings demand more sophisticated resolution of the three-dimensional structure of the atmosphere to reliably calculate plume dispersion. Mountain valleys and sea breeze flows are two common examples of such settings. To address these complexities, the authors have implemented the three-dimensional diagnostic MATHEW mass-adjusted wind field and ADPIC particle-in-cell dispersion models on a workstation for use in real-time emergency response modeling. MATHEW/ADPIC have shown their utility in a variety of complex settings over the last 15 years within the Department of Energy`s Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) project. The models are initialized using an array of surface wind measurements from meteorological towers coupled with vertical profiles from an acoustic sounder (sodar). The workstation automatically acquires the meteorological data every 15 minutes. A source term is generated using either defaults or a real-time stack monitor. Model outputs include contoured isopleths displayed on site geography or plume densities shown over 3-D color shaded terrain. The models are automatically updated every 15 minutes to provide the emergency response manager with a continuous display of potentially hazardous ground-level conditions if an actual release were to occur. Model run time is typically less than 2 minutes on 6 megaflop ({approximately}30 MIPS) workstations. Data acquisition, limited by dial-up modem communications, requires 3 to 5 minutes.

  15. 3D Printing in the Laboratory: Maximize Time and Funds with Customized and Open-Source Labware.

    PubMed

    Coakley, Meghan; Hurt, Darrell E

    2016-08-01

    3D printing, also known as additive manufacturing, is the computer-guided process of fabricating physical objects by depositing successive layers of material. It has transformed manufacturing across virtually every industry, bringing about incredible advances in research and medicine. The rapidly growing consumer market now includes convenient and affordable "desktop" 3D printers. These are being used in the laboratory to create custom 3D-printed equipment, and a growing community of designers are contributing open-source, cost-effective innovations that can be used by both professionals and enthusiasts. User stories from investigators at the National Institutes of Health and the biomedical research community demonstrate the power of 3D printing to save valuable time and funding. While adoption of 3D printing has been slow in the biosciences to date, the potential is vast. The market predicts that within several years, 3D printers could be commonplace within the home; with so many practical uses for 3D printing, we anticipate that the technology will also play an increasingly important role in the laboratory.

  16. 3D Printing in the Laboratory: Maximize Time and Funds with Customized and Open-Source Labware.

    PubMed

    Coakley, Meghan; Hurt, Darrell E

    2016-08-01

    3D printing, also known as additive manufacturing, is the computer-guided process of fabricating physical objects by depositing successive layers of material. It has transformed manufacturing across virtually every industry, bringing about incredible advances in research and medicine. The rapidly growing consumer market now includes convenient and affordable "desktop" 3D printers. These are being used in the laboratory to create custom 3D-printed equipment, and a growing community of designers are contributing open-source, cost-effective innovations that can be used by both professionals and enthusiasts. User stories from investigators at the National Institutes of Health and the biomedical research community demonstrate the power of 3D printing to save valuable time and funding. While adoption of 3D printing has been slow in the biosciences to date, the potential is vast. The market predicts that within several years, 3D printers could be commonplace within the home; with so many practical uses for 3D printing, we anticipate that the technology will also play an increasingly important role in the laboratory. PMID:27197798

  17. Efficient near-real-time monitoring of 3D surface displacements in complex landslide scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allasia, Paolo; Manconi, Andrea; Giordan, Daniele; Baldo, Marco; Lollino, Giorgio

    2013-04-01

    Ground deformation measurements play a key role in monitoring activities of landslides. A wide spectrum of instruments and methods is nowadays available, going from in-situ to remote sensing approaches. In emergency scenarios, monitoring is often based on automated instruments capable to achieve accurate measurements, possibly with a very high temporal resolution, in order to achieve the best information about the evolution of the landslide in near-real-time, aiming at early warning purposes. However, the available tools for a rapid and efficient exploitation, understanding and interpretation of the retrieved measurements is still a challenge. This issue is particularly relevant in contexts where monitoring is fundamental to support early warning systems aimed at ensuring safety to people and/or infrastructures. Furthermore, in many cases the results obtained might be of difficult reading and divulgation, especially when people of different backgrounds are involved (e.g. scientists, authorities, civil protection operators, decision makers, etc.). In this work, we extend the concept of automatic and near real time from the acquisition of measurements to the data processing and divulgation, in order to achieve an efficient monitoring of surface displacements in landslide scenarios. We developed an algorithm that allows to go automatically and in near-real-time from the acquisition of 3D displacements on a landslide area to the efficient divulgation of the monitoring results via WEB. This set of straightforward procedures is called ADVICE (ADVanced dIsplaCement monitoring system for Early warning), and has been already successfully applied in several emergency scenarios. The algorithm includes: (i) data acquisition and transfer protocols; (ii) data collection, filtering, and validation; (iii) data analysis and restitution through a set of dedicated software, such as ©3DA [1]; (iv) recognition of displacement/velocity threshold and early warning (v) short term

  18. Real-Time Climate Simulations in the Interactive 3D Game Universe Sandbox ²

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldenson, N. L.

    2014-12-01

    Exploration in an open-ended computer game is an engaging way to explore climate and climate change. Everyone can explore physical models with real-time visualization in the educational simulator Universe Sandbox ² (universesandbox.com/2), which includes basic climate simulations on planets. I have implemented a time-dependent, one-dimensional meridional heat transport energy balance model to run and be adjustable in real time in the midst of a larger simulated system. Universe Sandbox ² is based on the original game - at its core a gravity simulator - with other new physically-based content for stellar evolution, and handling collisions between bodies. Existing users are mostly science enthusiasts in informal settings. We believe that this is the first climate simulation to be implemented in a professionally developed computer game with modern 3D graphical output in real time. The type of simple climate model we've adopted helps us depict the seasonal cycle and the more drastic changes that come from changing the orbit or other external forcings. Users can alter the climate as the simulation is running by altering the star(s) in the simulation, dragging to change orbits and obliquity, adjusting the climate simulation parameters directly or changing other properties like CO2 concentration that affect the model parameters in representative ways. Ongoing visuals of the expansion and contraction of sea ice and snow-cover respond to the temperature calculations, and make it accessible to explore a variety of scenarios and intuitive to understand the output. Variables like temperature can also be graphed in real time. We balance computational constraints with the ability to capture the physical phenomena we wish to visualize, giving everyone access to a simple open-ended meridional energy balance climate simulation to explore and experiment with. The software lends itself to labs at a variety of levels about climate concepts including seasons, the Greenhouse effect

  19. Real-time 3D adaptive filtering for portable imaging systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bockenbach, Olivier; Ali, Murtaza; Wainwright, Ian; Nadeski, Mark

    2015-03-01

    Portable imaging devices have proven valuable for emergency medical services both in the field and hospital environments and are becoming more prevalent in clinical settings where the use of larger imaging machines is impractical. 3D adaptive filtering is one of the most advanced techniques aimed at noise reduction and feature enhancement, but is computationally very demanding and hence often not able to run with sufficient performance on a portable platform. In recent years, advanced multicore DSPs have been introduced that attain high processing performance while maintaining low levels of power dissipation. These processors enable the implementation of complex algorithms like 3D adaptive filtering, improving the image quality of portable medical imaging devices. In this study, the performance of a 3D adaptive filtering algorithm on a digital signal processor (DSP) is investigated. The performance is assessed by filtering a volume of size 512x256x128 voxels sampled at a pace of 10 MVoxels/sec.

  20. 3-D Time-lapse Electrical Resistivity Monitoring of Injected CO2 in a Shallow Aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doetsch, J.; Vest Christiansen, A.; Auken, E.; Fiandaca, G.; Graham Cahill, A.

    2013-12-01

    Contamination of potable groundwater by leaking CO2 is a potential risk of carbon sequestration. With the help of a field experiment, we investigate if surface electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) can detect dissolved CO2 in a shallow aquifer. For this purpose, we injected CO2 at a depth of 5 and 10 m and monitored its migration using 320 electrodes on a 126 m × 20 m surface grid. A fully automated acquisition system continuously collected data and uploaded it into an online database. The large amount of data allows for time-series analysis using geostatistical techniques for noise estimation and data interpolation to compensate for intermittent instrument failure. We estimate a time-dependent noise level for each ERT configuration, taking data variation and measurement frequency into account. A baseline inversion reveals the geology at the site consisting of aeolian sands near the surface and glacial sands below 5 m depth. Directly following the injection, we image the CO2 gas phase in the aquifer as an increase in resistivity and the higher water saturation in the unsaturated zone as a decrease in resistivity. At later times, the 2-D and 3-D time-lapse inversions clearly image the dissolved CO2 plume with decreased electrical resistivity values. We can image the geochemical changes induced by the dissolved CO2 until the end of the acquisition, 120 days after the injection start. During these 120 days, the CO2 migrates about 40 m in the expected groundwater flow direction (towards south-west). Water electrical conductivity (EC) sampling using 68 sensors in 31 wells allows for very good verification of the ERT results. Water EC and ERT results generally agree very well, with the water sampling showing some fine scale variations that cannot be resolved by the ERT. The ERT images have their strength in outlining the plume's shape in three dimensions and in being able to image the plume outside the well field. These results highlight the potential for imaging

  1. New fabrication techniques for ring-array transducers for real-time 3D intravascular ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Light, Edward D; Lieu, Victor; Smith, Stephen W

    2009-10-01

    We have previously described miniature 2D array transducers integrated into a Cook Medical, Inc. vena cava filter deployment device. While functional, the fabrication technique was very labor intensive and did not lend itself well to efficient fabrication of large numbers of devices. We developed two new fabrication methods that we believe can be used to efficiently manufacture these types of devices in greater than prototype numbers. One transducer consisted of 55 elements operating near 5 MHz. The interelement spacing is 0.20 mm. It was constructed on a flat piece of copper-clad polyimide and then wrapped around an 11 French catheter of a Cook Medical, Inc. inferior vena cava (IVC) filter deployment device. We used a braided wiring technology from Tyco Electronics Corp. to connect the elements to our real-time 3D ultrasound scanner. Typical measured transducer element bandwidth was 20% centered at 4.7 MHz and the 50 Omega round trip insertion loss was --82 dB. The mean of the nearest neighbor cross talk was -37.0 dB. The second method consisted of a 46-cm long single layer flex circuit from MicroConnex that terminates in an interconnect that plugs directly into our system cable. This transducer had 70 elements at 0.157 mm interelement spacing operating at 4.8 MHz. Typical measured transducer element bandwidth was 29% and the 50 Omega round trip insertion loss was -83 dB. The mean of the nearest neighbor cross talk was -33.0 dB. PMID:20458877

  2. Real Time 3D Echocardiographic Evaluation of Iatrogenic Atrial Septal Defects After Percutaneous Transvenous Mitral Commissurotomy

    PubMed Central

    Devarakonda, Sarath Babu; Mannuva, Boochi Babu; Durgaprasad, Rajasekhar; Velam, Vanajakshamma; Akula, Vidya Sagar; Kasala, Latheef

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Percutaneous transvenous mitral commissurotomy (PTMC) is a safe and effective procedure for relief of severe mitral stenosis. PTMC is being done widely and many transseptal procedures requiring large diameter catheters, sheaths are becoming popular. The knowledge of iatrogenic atrial septal defect (iASD) is vital. This study assessed the use of real-time 3D echocardiography (RT3DE) and incidence of iASD in a cohort of patients undergoing transseptal catheterization during PTMC. Methods: One hundred ten patients underwent PTMC. The reliability and accuracy of RT3DE for iASD detection was determined, RT3DE was compared with 2D echocardiography (2DE) for iASD occurrence, influencing variables analyzed and followed up for 1 year. Results: RT3DE is more reliable and accurate for the study of iASD than 2DE. Color RT3DE detected iASD in 94 (85.5%), with 2DE iASD was detected in 74 (67.3%) (P < .0001).On follow up 85% had iASD post procedure, 56% at 6 months, 19% at 1 year follow up. The mean iASD diameter was 5.41 ± 3.12 mm and area 6.57 ± 3.81 mm2. iASD correlated with patient height, Wilkins score, pre-PTMC LA ‘v’, and post-PTMC LVEDP. Conclusion: RT3DE imaging is superior in accuracy to traditional 2DE techniques. All the modes of RT3DE are useful in the assessment of iASD. iASD measured by RT3DE correlates with several patient, procedural and echocardiographic variables. PMID:26430495

  3. Simultaneous elastic parameter inversion in 2-D/3-D TTI medium combined later arrival times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Chao-ying; Wang, Tao; Yang, Shang-bei; Li, Xing-wang; Huang, Guo-jiao

    2016-04-01

    Traditional traveltime inversion for anisotropic medium is, in general, based on a "weak" assumption in the anisotropic property, which simplifies both the forward part (ray tracing is performed once only) and the inversion part (a linear inversion solver is possible). But for some real applications, a general (both "weak" and "strong") anisotropic medium should be considered. In such cases, one has to develop a ray tracing algorithm to handle with the general (including "strong") anisotropic medium and also to design a non-linear inversion solver for later tomography. Meanwhile, it is constructive to investigate how much the tomographic resolution can be improved by introducing the later arrivals. For this motivation, we incorporated our newly developed ray tracing algorithm (multistage irregular shortest-path method) for general anisotropic media with a non-linear inversion solver (a damped minimum norm, constrained least squares problem with a conjugate gradient approach) to formulate a non-linear inversion solver for anisotropic medium. This anisotropic traveltime inversion procedure is able to combine the later (reflected) arrival times. Both 2-D/3-D synthetic inversion experiments and comparison tests show that (1) the proposed anisotropic traveltime inversion scheme is able to recover the high contrast anomalies and (2) it is possible to improve the tomographic resolution by introducing the later (reflected) arrivals, but not as expected in the isotropic medium, because the different velocity (qP, qSV and qSH) sensitivities (or derivatives) respective to the different elastic parameters are not the same but are also dependent on the inclination angle.

  4. With the advent of domestic 3-dimensional (3D) printers and their associated reduced cost, is it now time for every medical school to have their own 3D printer?

    PubMed

    Balestrini, Christopher; Campo-Celaya, Tatiana

    2016-01-01

    Anatomy is the backbone of medical education and new techniques to improve learning are frequently explored. With the introduction of 3D printers specifically for the home market, the price of this technology has reached affordable levels. Using patient scan data, accurate 3D models can be printed that represent real human variation in anatomy to provide an innovative, inexpensive and valuable adjunct to anatomical teaching. Is it now time for every medical school to have their own 3D printer?

  5. Touring Mars Online, Real-time, in 3D for Math and Science Educators and Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Greg; Kalinowski, Kevin

    2007-01-01

    This article discusses a project that placed over 97% of Mars' topography made available from NASA into an interactive 3D multi-user online learning environment beginning in 2003. In 2005 curriculum materials that were created to support middle school math and science education were developed. Research conducted at the University of North Texas…

  6. Real-Time Large Scale 3d Reconstruction by Fusing Kinect and Imu Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huai, J.; Zhang, Y.; Yilmaz, A.

    2015-08-01

    Kinect-style RGB-D cameras have been used to build large scale dense 3D maps for indoor environments. These maps can serve many purposes such as robot navigation, and augmented reality. However, to generate dense 3D maps of large scale environments is still very challenging. In this paper, we present a mapping system for 3D reconstruction that fuses measurements from a Kinect and an inertial measurement unit (IMU) to estimate motion. Our major achievements include: (i) Large scale consistent 3D reconstruction is realized by volume shifting and loop closure; (ii) The coarse-to-fine iterative closest point (ICP) algorithm, the SIFT odometry, and IMU odometry are combined to robustly and precisely estimate pose. In particular, ICP runs routinely to track the Kinect motion. If ICP fails in planar areas, the SIFT odometry provides incremental motion estimate. If both ICP and the SIFT odometry fail, e.g., upon abrupt motion or inadequate features, the incremental motion is estimated by the IMU. Additionally, the IMU also observes the roll and pitch angles which can reduce long-term drift of the sensor assembly. In experiments on a consumer laptop, our system estimates motion at 8Hz on average while integrating color images to the local map and saving volumes of meshes concurrently. Moreover, it is immune to tracking failures, and has smaller drift than the state-of-the-art systems in large scale reconstruction.

  7. Time-resolved fuel injector flow characterisation based on 3D laser Doppler vibrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crua, Cyril; Heikal, Morgan R.

    2014-12-01

    Hydrodynamic turbulence and cavitation are known to play a significant role in high-pressure atomizers, but the small geometries and extreme operating conditions hinder the understanding of the flow’s characteristics. Diesel internal flow experiments are generally conducted using x-ray techniques or on transparent, and often enlarged, nozzles with different orifice geometries and surface roughness to those found in production injectors. In order to enable investigations of the fuel flow inside unmodified injectors, we have developed a new experimental approach to measure time-resolved vibration spectra of diesel nozzles using a 3D laser vibrometer. The technique we propose is based on the triangulation of the vibrometer and fuel pressure transducer signals, and enables the quantitative characterisation of quasi-cyclic internal flows without requiring modifications to the injector, the working fluid, or limiting the fuel injection pressure. The vibrometer, which uses the Doppler effect to measure the velocity of a vibrating object, was used to scan injector nozzle tips during the injection event. The data were processed using a discrete Fourier transform to provide time-resolved spectra for valve-closed-orifice, minisac and microsac nozzle geometries, and injection pressures ranging from 60 to 160 MPa, hence offering unprecedented insight into cyclic cavitation and internal mechanical dynamic processes. A peak was consistently found in the spectrograms between 6 and 7.5 kHz for all nozzles and injection pressures. Further evidence of a similar spectral peak was obtained from the fuel pressure transducer and a needle lift sensor mounted into the injector body. Evidence of propagation of the nozzle oscillations to the liquid sprays was obtained by recording high-speed videos of the near-nozzle diesel jet, and computing the fast Fourier transform for a number of pixel locations at the interface of the jets. This 6-7.5 kHz frequency peak is proposed to be the

  8. High-speed real-time 3-D coordinates measurement based on fringe projection profilometry considering camera lens distortion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Shijie; Chen, Qian; Zuo, Chao; Sun, Jiasong; Yu, Shi Ling

    2014-10-01

    Optical three-dimensional (3-D) profilometry is gaining increasing attention for its simplicity, flexibility, high accuracy, and non-contact nature. Recent advances in imaging sensors and digital projection technology further its progress in high-speed, real-time applications, enabling 3-D shapes reconstruction of moving objects and dynamic scenes. However, the camera lens is never perfect and the lens distortion does influence the accuracy of the measurement result, which is often overlooked in the existing real-time 3-D shape measurement systems. To this end, here we present a novel high-speed real-time 3-D coordinates measuring technique based on fringe projection with the consideration of the camera lens distortion. A pixel mapping relation between a distorted image and a corrected one is pre-determined and stored in computer memory for real-time fringe correction. The out-of-plane height is obtained firstly and the acquisition for the two corresponding in-plane coordinates follows on the basis of the solved height. Besides, a method of lookup table (LUT) is introduced as well for fast data processing. Our experimental results reveal that the measurement error of the in-plane coordinates has been reduced by one order of magnitude and the accuracy of the out-plane coordinate been tripled after the distortions being eliminated. Moreover, owing to the generated LUTs, a 3-D reconstruction speed of 92.34 frames per second can be achieved.

  9. TIPS Placement in Swine, Guided by Electromagnetic Real-Time Needle Tip Localization Displayed on Previously Acquired 3-D CT

    SciTech Connect

    Solomon, Stephen B.; Magee, Carolyn; Acker, David E.; Venbrux, Anthony C.

    1999-09-15

    Purpose: To determine the feasibility of guiding a transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) procedure with an electromagnetic real-time needle tip position sensor coupled to previously acquired 3-dimensional (3-D) computed tomography (CT) images. Methods: An electromagnetic position sensor was placed at the tip of a Colapinto needle. The real-time position and orientation of the needle tip was then displayed on previously acquired 3-D CT images which were registered with the five swine. Portal vein puncture was then attempted in all animals. Results: The computer calculated accuracy of the position sensor was on average 3 mm. Four of five portal vein punctures were successful. In the successes, only one or two attempts were necessary and success was achieved in minutes. Conclusion: A real-time position sensor attached to the tip of a Colapinto needle and coupled to previously acquired 3-D CT images may potentially aid in entering the portal vein during the TIPS procedure.

  10. Coupled Neutron-Photon, 3-D, Combinatorial Geometry, Time Dependent, Monte Carlo Transport Code System.

    2013-06-24

    Version 07 TART2012 is a coupled neutron-photon Monte Carlo transport code designed to use three-dimensional (3-D) combinatorial geometry. Neutron and/or photon sources as well as neutron induced photon production can be tracked. It is a complete system to assist you with input preparation, running Monte Carlo calculations, and analysis of output results. TART2012 is also incredibly FAST; if you have used similar codes, you will be amazed at how fast this code is compared tomore » other similar codes. Use of the entire system can save you a great deal of time and energy. TART2012 extends the general utility of the code to even more areas of application than available in previous releases by concentrating on improving the physics, particularly with regard to improved treatment of neutron fission, resonance self-shielding, molecular binding, and extending input options used by the code. Several utilities are included for creating input files and displaying TART results and data. TART2012 uses the latest ENDF/B-VI, Release 8, data. New for TART2012 is the use of continuous energy neutron cross sections, in addition to its traditional multigroup cross sections. For neutron interaction, the data are derived using ENDF-ENDL2005 and include both continuous energy cross sections and 700 group neutron data derived using a combination of ENDF/B-VI, Release 8, and ENDL data. The 700 group structure extends from 10-5 eV up to 1 GeV. Presently nuclear data are only available up to 20 MeV, so that only 616 of the groups are currently used. For photon interaction, 701 point photon data were derived using the Livermore EPDL97 file. The new 701 point structure extends from 100 eV up to 1 GeV, and is currently used over this entire energy range. TART2012 completely supersedes all older versions of TART, and it is strongly recommended that one use only the most recent version of TART2012 and its data files. Check author’s homepage for related information: http

  11. 3D time-lapse analysis of Rab11/FIP5 complex: spatiotemporal dynamics during apical lumen formation.

    PubMed

    Mangan, Anthony; Prekeris, Rytis

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescent imaging of fixed cells grown in two-dimensional (2D) cultures is one of the most widely used techniques for observing protein localization and distribution within cells. Although this technique can also be applied to polarized epithelial cells that form three-dimensional (3D) cysts when grown in a Matrigel matrix suspension, there are still significant limitations in imaging cells fixed at a particular point in time. Here, we describe the use of 3D time-lapse imaging of live cells to observe the dynamics of apical membrane initiation site (AMIS) formation and lumen expansion in polarized epithelial cells. PMID:25800842

  12. Argonaute 3D: a real-time cooperative medical planning software on DSL network.

    PubMed

    Le Mer, Pascal; Soler, Luc; Pavy, Dominique; Bernard, Alain; Moreau, Johan; Mutter, Didier; Marescaux, Jacques

    2004-01-01

    Today, diagnosis of cancer and also therapeutic choice imply many specialized practitioners. They are generally located at different places and have to take the best decision as promptly as possible with the difficulty of CT-scan or MRI interpretation. Argonaute 3D is a tool that easily overcomes these issues, thanks to a cooperative solution based on virtual reality. An experimentation, where four practitioners met virtually throughout France, allowed to assess the interest of this solution.

  13. Sky3D: Time-dependent Hartree-Fock equation solver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maruhn, J. A.; Reinhard, P.-G.; Stevenson, P. D.; Umar, A. S.

    2016-09-01

    Written in Fortran 90, Sky3D solves the static or dynamic equations on a three-dimensional Cartesian mesh with isolated or periodic boundary conditions and no further symmetry assumptions. Pairing can be included in the BCS approximation for the static case. The code can be easily modified to include additional physics or special analysis of the results and requires LAPACK and FFTW3.

  14. Needle Trajectory and Tip Localization in Real-Time 3-D Ultrasound Using a Moving Stylus.

    PubMed

    Beigi, Parmida; Rohling, Robert; Salcudean, Tim; Lessoway, Victoria A; Ng, Gary C

    2015-07-01

    Described here is a novel approach to needle localization in 3-D ultrasound based on automatic detection of small changes in appearance on movement of the needle stylus. By stylus oscillation, including its full insertion into the cannula to the tip, the image processing techniques can localize the needle trajectory and the tip in the 3-D ultrasound volume. The 3-D needle localization task is reduced to two 2-D localizations using orthogonal projections. To evaluate our method, we tested it on three different ex vivo tissue types, and the preliminary results indicated that the method accuracy lies within clinical acceptance, with average error ranges of 0.9°-1.4° in needle trajectory and 0.8-1.1 mm in needle tip. Results also indicate that method performance is independent of the echogenicity of the tissue. This technique is a safe way of producing ultrasonic intensity changes and appears to introduce negligible risk to the patient, as the outer cannula remains fixed.

  15. Extended field-of-view and increased-signal 3D holographic illumination with time-division multiplexing.

    PubMed

    Yang, Samuel J; Allen, William E; Kauvar, Isaac; Andalman, Aaron S; Young, Noah P; Kim, Christina K; Marshel, James H; Wetzstein, Gordon; Deisseroth, Karl

    2015-12-14

    Phase spatial light modulators (SLMs) are widely used for generating multifocal three-dimensional (3D) illumination patterns, but these are limited to a field of view constrained by the pixel count or size of the SLM. Further, with two-photon SLM-based excitation, increasing the number of focal spots penalizes the total signal linearly--requiring more laser power than is available or can be tolerated by the sample. Here we analyze and demonstrate a method of using galvanometer mirrors to time-sequentially reposition multiple 3D holograms, both extending the field of view and increasing the total time-averaged two-photon signal. We apply our approach to 3D two-photon in vivo neuronal calcium imaging.

  16. Extended field-of-view and increased-signal 3D holographic illumination with time-division multiplexing.

    PubMed

    Yang, Samuel J; Allen, William E; Kauvar, Isaac; Andalman, Aaron S; Young, Noah P; Kim, Christina K; Marshel, James H; Wetzstein, Gordon; Deisseroth, Karl

    2015-12-14

    Phase spatial light modulators (SLMs) are widely used for generating multifocal three-dimensional (3D) illumination patterns, but these are limited to a field of view constrained by the pixel count or size of the SLM. Further, with two-photon SLM-based excitation, increasing the number of focal spots penalizes the total signal linearly--requiring more laser power than is available or can be tolerated by the sample. Here we analyze and demonstrate a method of using galvanometer mirrors to time-sequentially reposition multiple 3D holograms, both extending the field of view and increasing the total time-averaged two-photon signal. We apply our approach to 3D two-photon in vivo neuronal calcium imaging. PMID:26699047

  17. Extended field-of-view and increased-signal 3D holographic illumination with time-division multiplexing

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Samuel J.; Allen, William E.; Kauvar, Isaac; Andalman, Aaron S.; Young, Noah P.; Kim, Christina K.; Marshel, James H.; Wetzstein, Gordon; Deisseroth, Karl

    2016-01-01

    Phase spatial light modulators (SLMs) are widely used for generating multifocal three-dimensional (3D) illumination patterns, but these are limited to a field of view constrained by the pixel count or size of the SLM. Further, with two-photon SLM-based excitation, increasing the number of focal spots penalizes the total signal linearly—requiring more laser power than is available or can be tolerated by the sample. Here we analyze and demonstrate a method of using galvanometer mirrors to time-sequentially reposition multiple 3D holograms, both extending the field of view and increasing the total time-averaged two-photon signal. We apply our approach to 3D two-photon in vivo neuronal calcium imaging. PMID:26699047

  18. Learning Dictionaries of Sparse Codes of 3D Movements of Body Joints for Real-Time Human Activity Understanding

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Jin; Yang, Zhiyong

    2014-01-01

    Real-time human activity recognition is essential for human-robot interactions for assisted healthy independent living. Most previous work in this area is performed on traditional two-dimensional (2D) videos and both global and local methods have been used. Since 2D videos are sensitive to changes of lighting condition, view angle, and scale, researchers begun to explore applications of 3D information in human activity understanding in recently years. Unfortunately, features that work well on 2D videos usually don't perform well on 3D videos and there is no consensus on what 3D features should be used. Here we propose a model of human activity recognition based on 3D movements of body joints. Our method has three steps, learning dictionaries of sparse codes of 3D movements of joints, sparse coding, and classification. In the first step, space-time volumes of 3D movements of body joints are obtained via dense sampling and independent component analysis is then performed to construct a dictionary of sparse codes for each activity. In the second step, the space-time volumes are projected to the dictionaries and a set of sparse histograms of the projection coefficients are constructed as feature representations of the activities. Finally, the sparse histograms are used as inputs to a support vector machine to recognize human activities. We tested this model on three databases of human activities and found that it outperforms the state-of-the-art algorithms. Thus, this model can be used for real-time human activity recognition in many applications. PMID:25473850

  19. Exact vectorial law for axisymmetric MHD turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galtier, S.

    2009-12-01

    3D incompressible MHD turbulence is investigated under the assumptions of homogeneity and axisymmetry. We demonstrate that previous works of Chandrasekhar (1950) may be improved significantly by using a different formalism for the representation of two-point correlation tensors. From this axisymmetric kinematics, the equations a la von Karman-Howarth are derived from which an exact relation is found in terms of measurable correlations. The relation is then analyzed in the particular case of a medium permeated by an imposed magnetic field. We make the ansatz that the development of anisotropy implies an algebraic relation between the axial and the radial components of the separation vector and we derive an exact vectorial law which is parametrized by the intensity of anisotropy. The critical balance proposed by Goldreich & Sridhar (1995) is used to fix this parameter and to obtain a unique exact expression; the particular limits of correlations transverse and parallel to the mean field are given for which simple expressions are found. Predictions for the energy spectra are also proposed by a straightforward dimensional analysis of the exact law; it gives a stronger theoretical background to the heuristic spectra previously proposed in the context of the critical balance. We also discuss the wave turbulence limit of an asymptotically large external magnetic field which appears as a natural limit of the vectorial relation. A new interpretation of the anisotropic solar wind observations is eventually discussed.

  20. Real-time 3-D shape measurement with composite phase-shifting fringes and multi-view system.

    PubMed

    Tao, Tianyang; Chen, Qian; Da, Jian; Feng, Shijie; Hu, Yan; Zuo, Chao

    2016-09-01

    In recent years, fringe projection has become an established and essential method for dynamic three-dimensional (3-D) shape measurement in different fields such as online inspection and real-time quality control. Numerous high-speed 3-D shape measurement methods have been developed by either employing high-speed hardware, minimizing the number of pattern projection, or both. However, dynamic 3-D shape measurement of arbitrarily-shaped objects with full sensor resolution without the necessity of additional pattern projections is still a big challenge. In this work, we introduce a high-speed 3-D shape measurement technique based on composite phase-shifting fringes and a multi-view system. The geometry constraint is adopted to search the corresponding points independently without additional images. Meanwhile, by analysing the 3-D position and the main wrapped phase of the corresponding point, pairs with an incorrect 3-D position or a considerable phase difference are effectively rejected. All of the qualified corresponding points are then corrected, and the unique one as well as the related period order is selected through the embedded triangular wave. Finally, considering that some points can only be captured by one of the cameras due to the occlusions, these points may have different fringe orders in the two views, so a left-right consistency check is employed to eliminate those erroneous period orders in this case. Several experiments on both static and dynamic scenes are performed, verifying that our method can achieve a speed of 120 frames per second (fps) with 25-period fringe patterns for fast, dense, and accurate 3-D measurement.

  1. Real-time 3-D shape measurement with composite phase-shifting fringes and multi-view system.

    PubMed

    Tao, Tianyang; Chen, Qian; Da, Jian; Feng, Shijie; Hu, Yan; Zuo, Chao

    2016-09-01

    In recent years, fringe projection has become an established and essential method for dynamic three-dimensional (3-D) shape measurement in different fields such as online inspection and real-time quality control. Numerous high-speed 3-D shape measurement methods have been developed by either employing high-speed hardware, minimizing the number of pattern projection, or both. However, dynamic 3-D shape measurement of arbitrarily-shaped objects with full sensor resolution without the necessity of additional pattern projections is still a big challenge. In this work, we introduce a high-speed 3-D shape measurement technique based on composite phase-shifting fringes and a multi-view system. The geometry constraint is adopted to search the corresponding points independently without additional images. Meanwhile, by analysing the 3-D position and the main wrapped phase of the corresponding point, pairs with an incorrect 3-D position or a considerable phase difference are effectively rejected. All of the qualified corresponding points are then corrected, and the unique one as well as the related period order is selected through the embedded triangular wave. Finally, considering that some points can only be captured by one of the cameras due to the occlusions, these points may have different fringe orders in the two views, so a left-right consistency check is employed to eliminate those erroneous period orders in this case. Several experiments on both static and dynamic scenes are performed, verifying that our method can achieve a speed of 120 frames per second (fps) with 25-period fringe patterns for fast, dense, and accurate 3-D measurement. PMID:27607632

  2. Application of 3D WebGIS and real-time technique in earthquake information publishing and visualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Boren; Wu, Jianping; Pan, Mao; Huang, Jing

    2015-06-01

    In hazard management, earthquake researchers have utilized GIS to ease the process of managing disasters. Researchers use WebGIS to assess hazards and seismic risk. Although they can provide a visual analysis platform based on GIS technology, they lack a general description in the extensibility of WebGIS for processing dynamic data, especially real-time data. In this paper, we propose a novel approach for real-time 3D visual earthquake information publishing model based on WebGIS and digital globe to improve the ability of processing real-time data in systems based on WebGIS. On the basis of the model, we implement a real-time 3D earthquake information publishing system—EqMap3D. The system can not only publish real-time earthquake information but also display these data and their background geoscience information in a 3D scene. It provides a powerful tool for display, analysis, and decision-making for researchers and administrators. It also facilitates better communication between researchers engaged in geosciences and the interested public.

  3. A Bayesian approach to real-time 3D tumor localization via monoscopic x-ray imaging during treatment delivery

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Ruijiang; Fahimian, Benjamin P.; Xing, Lei

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: Monoscopic x-ray imaging with on-board kV devices is an attractive approach for real-time image guidance in modern radiation therapy such as VMAT or IMRT, but it falls short in providing reliable information along the direction of imaging x-ray. By effectively taking consideration of projection data at prior times and/or angles through a Bayesian formalism, the authors develop an algorithm for real-time and full 3D tumor localization with a single x-ray imager during treatment delivery. Methods: First, a prior probability density function is constructed using the 2D tumor locations on the projection images acquired during patient setup. Whenever an x-ray image is acquired during the treatment delivery, the corresponding 2D tumor location on the imager is used to update the likelihood function. The unresolved third dimension is obtained by maximizing the posterior probability distribution. The algorithm can also be used in a retrospective fashion when all the projection images during the treatment delivery are used for 3D localization purposes. The algorithm does not involve complex optimization of any model parameter and therefore can be used in a ''plug-and-play'' fashion. The authors validated the algorithm using (1) simulated 3D linear and elliptic motion and (2) 3D tumor motion trajectories of a lung and a pancreas patient reproduced by a physical phantom. Continuous kV images were acquired over a full gantry rotation with the Varian TrueBeam on-board imaging system. Three scenarios were considered: fluoroscopic setup, cone beam CT setup, and retrospective analysis. Results: For the simulation study, the RMS 3D localization error is 1.2 and 2.4 mm for the linear and elliptic motions, respectively. For the phantom experiments, the 3D localization error is < 1 mm on average and < 1.5 mm at 95th percentile in the lung and pancreas cases for all three scenarios. The difference in 3D localization error for different scenarios is small and is not

  4. 3D real-time visualization of blood flow in cerebral aneurysms by light field particle image velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlsohn, Matthias F.; Kemmling, André; Petersen, Arne; Wietzke, Lennart

    2016-04-01

    Cerebral aneurysms require endovascular treatment to eliminate potentially lethal hemorrhagic rupture by hemostasis of blood flow within the aneurysm. Devices (e.g. coils and flow diverters) promote homeostasis, however, measurement of blood flow within an aneurysm or cerebral vessel before and after device placement on a microscopic level has not been possible so far. This would allow better individualized treatment planning and improve manufacture design of devices. For experimental analysis, direct measurement of real-time microscopic cerebrovascular flow in micro-structures may be an alternative to computed flow simulations. An application of microscopic aneurysm flow measurement on a regular basis to empirically assess a high number of different anatomic shapes and the corresponding effect of different devices would require a fast and reliable method at low cost with high throughout assessment. Transparent three dimensional 3D models of brain vessels and aneurysms may be used for microscopic flow measurements by particle image velocimetry (PIV), however, up to now the size of structures has set the limits for conventional 3D-imaging camera set-ups. On line flow assessment requires additional computational power to cope with the processing large amounts of data generated by sequences of multi-view stereo images, e.g. generated by a light field camera capturing the 3D information by plenoptic imaging of complex flow processes. Recently, a fast and low cost workflow for producing patient specific three dimensional models of cerebral arteries has been established by stereo-lithographic (SLA) 3D printing. These 3D arterial models are transparent an exhibit a replication precision within a submillimeter range required for accurate flow measurements under physiological conditions. We therefore test the feasibility of microscopic flow measurements by PIV analysis using a plenoptic camera system capturing light field image sequences. Averaging across a sequence of

  5. Real-time 3D imaging of microstructure growth in battery cells using indirect MRI.

    PubMed

    Ilott, Andrew J; Mohammadi, Mohaddese; Chang, Hee Jung; Grey, Clare P; Jerschow, Alexej

    2016-09-27

    Lithium metal is a promising anode material for Li-ion batteries due to its high theoretical specific capacity and low potential. The growth of dendrites is a major barrier to the development of high capacity, rechargeable Li batteries with lithium metal anodes, and hence, significant efforts have been undertaken to develop new electrolytes and separator materials that can prevent this process or promote smooth deposits at the anode. Central to these goals, and to the task of understanding the conditions that initiate and propagate dendrite growth, is the development of analytical and nondestructive techniques that can be applied in situ to functioning batteries. MRI has recently been demonstrated to provide noninvasive imaging methodology that can detect and localize microstructure buildup. However, until now, monitoring dendrite growth by MRI has been limited to observing the relatively insensitive metal nucleus directly, thus restricting the temporal and spatial resolution and requiring special hardware and acquisition modes. Here, we present an alternative approach to detect a broad class of metallic dendrite growth via the dendrites' indirect effects on the surrounding electrolyte, allowing for the application of fast 3D (1)H MRI experiments with high resolution. We use these experiments to reconstruct 3D images of growing Li dendrites from MRI, revealing details about the growth rate and fractal behavior. Radiofrequency and static magnetic field calculations are used alongside the images to quantify the amount of the growing structures.

  6. Programmable real-time applications with the 3D-Flow for input data rate systems of hundreds of MHz

    SciTech Connect

    Crosetto, D.

    1996-02-01

    The applicability of the 3D-Flow system to different experimental setups for real-time applications in the range of hundreds of nanoseconds is described. The results of the simulation of several real-time applications using the 3D-Flow demonstrate the advantages of a simple architecture that carries out operations in a balanced manner using regular connections and exceptionally few replicated components compared to conventional microprocessors. Diverse applications can be found that will benefit from this approach: High Energy Physics (HEP), which typically requires discerning patterns from thousands of accelerator particle collision signals up to 40 Mhz input data rate; Medical Imaging, that requires interactive tools for studying fast occurring biological processes; processing output from high-rate CCD cameras in commercial applications, such as quality control in manufacturing; data compression; speech and character recognition; automatic automobile guidance, and other applications. The 3D-Flow system was conceived for experiments at the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC). It was adopted by the Gamma Electron and Muon (GEM) experiment that was to be used for particle identification. The target of the 3D-Flow system was real-time pattern recognition at 100 million frames/sec.

  7. Toward real-time endoscopically-guided robotic navigation based on a 3D virtual surgical field model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Yuanzheng; Hu, Danying; Hannaford, Blake; Seibel, Eric J.

    2015-03-01

    The challenge is to accurately guide the surgical tool within the three-dimensional (3D) surgical field for roboticallyassisted operations such as tumor margin removal from a debulked brain tumor cavity. The proposed technique is 3D image-guided surgical navigation based on matching intraoperative video frames to a 3D virtual model of the surgical field. A small laser-scanning endoscopic camera was attached to a mock minimally-invasive surgical tool that was manipulated toward a region of interest (residual tumor) within a phantom of a debulked brain tumor. Video frames from the endoscope provided features that were matched to the 3D virtual model, which were reconstructed earlier by raster scanning over the surgical field. Camera pose (position and orientation) is recovered by implementing a constrained bundle adjustment algorithm. Navigational error during the approach to fluorescence target (residual tumor) is determined by comparing the calculated camera pose to the measured camera pose using a micro-positioning stage. From these preliminary results, computation efficiency of the algorithm in MATLAB code is near real-time (2.5 sec for each estimation of pose), which can be improved by implementation in C++. Error analysis produced 3-mm distance error and 2.5 degree of orientation error on average. The sources of these errors come from 1) inaccuracy of the 3D virtual model, generated on a calibrated RAVEN robotic platform with stereo tracking; 2) inaccuracy of endoscope intrinsic parameters, such as focal length; and 3) any endoscopic image distortion from scanning irregularities. This work demonstrates feasibility of micro-camera 3D guidance of a robotic surgical tool.

  8. In Vivo 3D Meibography of the Human Eyelid Using Real Time Imaging Fourier-Domain OCT

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Ho Sik; Shin, Jun Geun; Lee, Byeong Ha; Eom, Tae Joong; Joo, Choun-Ki

    2013-01-01

    Recently, we reported obtaining tomograms of meibomian glands from healthy volunteers using commercial anterior segment optical coherence tomography (AS-OCT), which is widely employed in clinics for examination of the anterior segment. However, we could not create 3D images of the meibomian glands, because the commercial OCT does not have a 3D reconstruction function. In this study we report the creation of 3D images of the meibomian glands by reconstructing the tomograms of these glands using high speed Fourier-Domain OCT (FD-OCT) developed in our laboratory. This research was jointly undertaken at the Department of Ophthalmology, Seoul St. Mary's Hospital (Seoul, Korea) and the Advanced Photonics Research Institute of Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology (Gwangju, Korea) with two healthy volunteers and seven patients with meibomian gland dysfunction. A real time imaging FD-OCT system based on a high-speed wavelength swept laser was developed that had a spectral bandwidth of 100 nm at the 1310 nm center wavelength. The axial resolution was 5 µm and the lateral resolution was 13 µm in air. Using this device, the meibomian glands of nine subjects were examined. A series of tomograms from the upper eyelid measuring 5 mm (from left to right, B-scan) × 2 mm (from upper part to lower part, C-scan) were collected. Three-D images of the meibomian glands were then reconstructed using 3D “data visualization, analysis, and modeling software”. Established infrared meibography was also performed for comparison. The 3D images of healthy subjects clearly showed the meibomian glands, which looked similar to bunches of grapes. These results were consistent with previous infrared meibography results. The meibomian glands were parallel to each other, and the saccular acini were clearly visible. Here we report the successful production of 3D images of human meibomian glands by reconstructing tomograms of these glands with high speed FD-OCT. PMID:23805297

  9. In Vivo 3D Meibography of the Human Eyelid Using Real Time Imaging Fourier-Domain OCT.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Ho Sik; Shin, Jun Geun; Lee, Byeong Ha; Eom, Tae Joong; Joo, Choun-Ki

    2013-01-01

    Recently, we reported obtaining tomograms of meibomian glands from healthy volunteers using commercial anterior segment optical coherence tomography (AS-OCT), which is widely employed in clinics for examination of the anterior segment. However, we could not create 3D images of the meibomian glands, because the commercial OCT does not have a 3D reconstruction function. In this study we report the creation of 3D images of the meibomian glands by reconstructing the tomograms of these glands using high speed Fourier-Domain OCT (FD-OCT) developed in our laboratory. This research was jointly undertaken at the Department of Ophthalmology, Seoul St. Mary's Hospital (Seoul, Korea) and the Advanced Photonics Research Institute of Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology (Gwangju, Korea) with two healthy volunteers and seven patients with meibomian gland dysfunction. A real time imaging FD-OCT system based on a high-speed wavelength swept laser was developed that had a spectral bandwidth of 100 nm at the 1310 nm center wavelength. The axial resolution was 5 µm and the lateral resolution was 13 µm in air. Using this device, the meibomian glands of nine subjects were examined. A series of tomograms from the upper eyelid measuring 5 mm (from left to right, B-scan) × 2 mm (from upper part to lower part, C-scan) were collected. Three-D images of the meibomian glands were then reconstructed using 3D "data visualization, analysis, and modeling software". Established infrared meibography was also performed for comparison. The 3D images of healthy subjects clearly showed the meibomian glands, which looked similar to bunches of grapes. These results were consistent with previous infrared meibography results. The meibomian glands were parallel to each other, and the saccular acini were clearly visible. Here we report the successful production of 3D images of human meibomian glands by reconstructing tomograms of these glands with high speed FD-OCT.

  10. Modeling of 3d Space-time Surface of Potential Fields and Hydrogeologic Modeling of Nuclear Waste Disposal Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shestopalov, V.; Bondarenko, Y.; Zayonts, I.; Rudenko, Y.

    Introduction After the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant (CNPP) disaster (04.26.1986) a huge amount (over 2000 sq. km) of nuclear wastes appeared within so-called "Cher- nobyl Exclusion Zone" (CEZ). At present there are not enough storage facilities in the Ukraine for safe disposal of nuclear wastes and hazardous chemical wastes. The urgent problem now is safe isolation of these dangerous wastes. According to the developed state program of radioactive waste management, the construction of a na- tional storage facility of nuclear wastes is planned. It is also possible to create regional storage facilities for hazardous chemical wastes. The region of our exploration cov- ers the eastern part of the Korosten Plutone and its slope, reaching the CNPP. 3D Space-Time Surface Imaging of Geophysical Fields. There are only three direct meth- ods of stress field reconstruction in present practice, namely the field investigations based on the large-scale fracturing tests, petrotectonic and optical polarization meth- ods. Unfortunately, all these methods are extremely laborious and need the regular field tests, which is difficult to conduct in the areas of anisotropic rock outcrops. A compilation of magnetic and gravity data covering the CNPP area was carried out as a prelude to an interpretation study. More than thirty map products were generated from magnetic, gravity and geodesy data to prepare the 3D Space-Time Surface Images (3D STSI). Multi-layer topography and geophysic surfaces included: total magnetic intensity, isostatically-corrected Bouguer gravity, aspect and slope, first and second derivatives, vertical and horizontal curvature, histogram characteristics and space cor- relation coefficients between the gradient fields. Many maps shows the first and sec- ond derivatives of the potential fields, with the results of lineament (edge) structure detection superimposed. The lineament or edges of the potential fields are located from maximal gradient in many directions

  11. Passive Markers for Tracking Surgical Instruments in Real-Time 3-D Ultrasound Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Stoll, Jeffrey; Ren, Hongliang; Dupont, Pierre E.

    2013-01-01

    A family of passive echogenic markers is presented by which the position and orientation of a surgical instrument can be determined in a 3-D ultrasound volume, using simple image processing. Markers are attached near the distal end of the instrument so that they appear in the ultrasound volume along with the instrument tip. They are detected and measured within the ultrasound image, thus requiring no external tracking device. This approach facilitates imaging instruments and tissue simultaneously in ultrasound-guided interventions. Marker-based estimates of instrument pose can be used in augmented reality displays or for image-based servoing. Design principles for marker shapes are presented that ensure imaging system and measurement uniqueness constraints are met. An error analysis is included that can be used to guide marker design and which also establishes a lower bound on measurement uncertainty. Finally, examples of marker measurement and tracking algorithms are presented along with experimental validation of the concepts. PMID:22042148

  12. Space-time evolution of a growth fold (Betic Cordillera, Spain). Evidences from 3D geometrical modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin-Rojas, Ivan; Alfaro, Pedro; Estévez, Antonio

    2014-05-01

    We present a study that encompasses several software tools (iGIS©, ArcGIS©, Autocad©, etc.) and data (geological mapping, high resolution digital topographic data, high resolution aerial photographs, etc.) to create a detailed 3D geometric model of an active fault propagation growth fold. This 3D model clearly shows structural features of the analysed fold, as well as growth relationships and sedimentary patterns. The results obtained permit us to discuss the kinematics and structural evolution of the fold and the fault in time and space. The study fault propagation fold is the Crevillente syncline. This fold represents the northern limit of the Bajo Segura Basin, an intermontane basin in the Eastern Betic Cordillera (SE Spain) developed from upper Miocene on. 3D features of the Crevillente syncline, including growth pattern, indicate that limb rotation and, consequently, fault activity was higher during Messinian than during Tortonian; consequently, fault activity was also higher. From Pliocene on our data point that limb rotation and fault activity steadies or probably decreases. This in time evolution of the Crevillente syncline is not the same all along the structure; actually the 3D geometric model indicates that observed lateral heterogeneity is related to along strike variation of fault displacement.

  13. Time-Dependent Effects of Pre-Aging 3D Polymer Scaffolds in Cell Culture Medium on Cell Proliferation.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Kaushik; Hung, Stevephen; Kumar, Girish; Simon, Carl G

    2012-01-01

    Protein adsorption is known to direct biological response to biomaterials and is important in determining cellular response in tissue scaffolds. In this study we investigated the effect of the duration of protein adsorption to 3D polymer scaffolds on cell attachment and proliferation. 3D macro-porous polymer scaffolds were pre-aged in serum-containing culture medium for 5 min, 1 d or 7 d prior to seeding osteoblasts. The total amount of protein adsorbed was found to increase with pre-ageing time. Cell attachment and proliferation were measured 1 d and 14 d, respectively, after cell seeding. Osteoblast proliferation, but not attachment, increased with scaffold pre-ageing time and amount of adsorbed serum protein. These results demonstrate that the amount of time that scaffolds are exposed to serum-containing medium can affect cell proliferation and suggest that these effects are mediated by differences in the amount of protein adsorption.

  14. A spheroid toxicity assay using magnetic 3D bioprinting and real-time mobile device-based imaging.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Hubert; Gage, Jacob A; Shen, Tsaiwei; Haisler, William L; Neeley, Shane K; Shiao, Sue; Chen, Jianbo; Desai, Pujan K; Liao, Angela; Hebel, Chris; Raphael, Robert M; Becker, Jeanne L; Souza, Glauco R

    2015-01-01

    An ongoing challenge in biomedical research is the search for simple, yet robust assays using 3D cell cultures for toxicity screening. This study addresses that challenge with a novel spheroid assay, wherein spheroids, formed by magnetic 3D bioprinting, contract immediately as cells rearrange and compact the spheroid in relation to viability and cytoskeletal organization. Thus, spheroid size can be used as a simple metric for toxicity. The goal of this study was to validate spheroid contraction as a cytotoxic endpoint using 3T3 fibroblasts in response to 5 toxic compounds (all-trans retinoic acid, dexamethasone, doxorubicin, 5'-fluorouracil, forskolin), sodium dodecyl sulfate (+control), and penicillin-G (-control). Real-time imaging was performed with a mobile device to increase throughput and efficiency. All compounds but penicillin-G significantly slowed contraction in a dose-dependent manner (Z' = 0.88). Cells in 3D were more resistant to toxicity than cells in 2D, whose toxicity was measured by the MTT assay. Fluorescent staining and gene expression profiling of spheroids confirmed these findings. The results of this study validate spheroid contraction within this assay as an easy, biologically relevant endpoint for high-throughput compound screening in representative 3D environments. PMID:26365200

  15. A spheroid toxicity assay using magnetic 3D bioprinting and real-time mobile device-based imaging

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, Hubert; Gage, Jacob A.; Shen, Tsaiwei; Haisler, William L.; Neeley, Shane K.; Shiao, Sue; Chen, Jianbo; Desai, Pujan K.; Liao, Angela; Hebel, Chris; Raphael, Robert M.; Becker, Jeanne L.; Souza, Glauco R.

    2015-01-01

    An ongoing challenge in biomedical research is the search for simple, yet robust assays using 3D cell cultures for toxicity screening. This study addresses that challenge with a novel spheroid assay, wherein spheroids, formed by magnetic 3D bioprinting, contract immediately as cells rearrange and compact the spheroid in relation to viability and cytoskeletal organization. Thus, spheroid size can be used as a simple metric for toxicity. The goal of this study was to validate spheroid contraction as a cytotoxic endpoint using 3T3 fibroblasts in response to 5 toxic compounds (all-trans retinoic acid, dexamethasone, doxorubicin, 5′-fluorouracil, forskolin), sodium dodecyl sulfate (+control), and penicillin-G (−control). Real-time imaging was performed with a mobile device to increase throughput and efficiency. All compounds but penicillin-G significantly slowed contraction in a dose-dependent manner (Z’ = 0.88). Cells in 3D were more resistant to toxicity than cells in 2D, whose toxicity was measured by the MTT assay. Fluorescent staining and gene expression profiling of spheroids confirmed these findings. The results of this study validate spheroid contraction within this assay as an easy, biologically relevant endpoint for high-throughput compound screening in representative 3D environments. PMID:26365200

  16. Low-cost real-time 3D PC distributed-interactive-simulation (DIS) application for C4I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonthier, David L.; Veron, Harry

    1998-04-01

    A 3D Distributed Interactive Simulation (DIS) application was developed and demonstrated in a PC environment. The application is capable of running in the stealth mode or as a player which includes battlefield simulations, such as ModSAF. PCs can be clustered together, but not necessarily collocated, to run a simulation or training exercise on their own. A 3D perspective view of the battlefield is displayed that includes terrain, trees, buildings and other objects supported by the DIS application. Screen update rates of 15 to 20 frames per second have been achieved with fully lit and textured scenes thus providing high quality and fast graphics. A complete PC system can be configured for under $2,500. The software runs under Windows95 and WindowsNT. It is written in C++ and uses a commercial API called RenderWare for 3D rendering. The software uses Microsoft Foundation classes and Microsoft DirectPlay for joystick input. The RenderWare libraries enhance the performance through optimization for MMX and the Pentium Pro processor. The RenderWare and the Righteous 3D graphics board from Orchid Technologies with an advertised rendering rate of up to 2 million texture mapped triangles per second. A low-cost PC DIS simulator that can partake in a real-time collaborative simulation with other platforms is thus achieved.

  17. Real-time visual sensing system achieving high-speed 3D particle tracking with nanometer resolution.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Peng; Jhiang, Sissy M; Menq, Chia-Hsiang

    2013-11-01

    This paper presents a real-time visual sensing system, which is created to achieve high-speed three-dimensional (3D) motion tracking of microscopic spherical particles in aqueous solutions with nanometer resolution. The system comprises a complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) camera, a field programmable gate array (FPGA), and real-time image processing programs. The CMOS camera has high photosensitivity and superior SNR. It acquires images of 128×120 pixels at a frame rate of up to 10,000 frames per second (fps) under the white light illumination from a standard 100 W halogen lamp. The real-time image stream is downloaded from the camera directly to the FPGA, wherein a 3D particle-tracking algorithm is implemented to calculate the 3D positions of the target particle in real time. Two important objectives, i.e., real-time estimation of the 3D position matches the maximum frame rate of the camera and the timing of the output data stream of the system is precisely controlled, are achieved. Two sets of experiments were conducted to demonstrate the performance of the system. First, the visual sensing system was used to track the motion of a 2 μm polystyrene bead, whose motion was controlled by a three-axis piezo motion stage. The ability to track long-range motion with nanometer resolution in all three axes is demonstrated. Second, it was used to measure the Brownian motion of the 2 μm polystyrene bead, which was stabilized in aqueous solution by a laser trapping system. PMID:24216655

  18. Real Time Gabor-Domain Optical Coherence Microscopy for 3D Imaging.

    PubMed

    Rolland, Jannick P; Canavesi, Cristina; Tankam, Patrice; Cogliati, Andrea; Lanis, Mara; Santhanam, Anand P

    2016-01-01

    Fast, robust, nondestructive 3D imaging is needed for the characterization of microscopic tissue structures across various clinical applications. A custom microelectromechanical system (MEMS)-based 2D scanner was developed to achieve, together with a multi-level GPU architecture, 55 kHz fast-axis A-scan acquisition in a Gabor-domain optical coherence microscopy (GD-OCM) custom instrument. GD-OCM yields high-definition micrometer-class volumetric images. A dynamic depth of focusing capability through a bio-inspired liquid lens-based microscope design, as in whales' eyes, was developed to enable the high definition instrument throughout a large field of view of 1 mm3 volume of imaging. Developing this technology is prime to enable integration within the workflow of clinical environments. Imaging at an invariant resolution of 2 μm has been achieved throughout a volume of 1 × 1 × 0.6 mm3, acquired in less than 2 minutes. Volumetric scans of human skin in vivo and an excised human cornea are presented. PMID:27046601

  19. Development of 3D touch trigger probe with real-time observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Chih-Liang; Wu, Cheng-Yu

    2010-08-01

    This study aims at inventing a low-price but high-precision 3D touch trigger probe (or a CMM probe). The tip ball of the stylus, with a diameter smaller than 100 μm, is made by a micro electro discharge machine and wire electro discharge grinding. The stylus is mounted at the centre of a stiff cross-form frame, which in turn is suspended on four micro beams. As proven by several experiments, this structure restricts the degrees of freedom on three directions. The displacement sensor and 2D angle sensor is performed using modified commercial DVD pickup heads to measure the three degrees of motional freedom on the suspension structure. As for application, since the tip ball is difficult to identify by naked eye, we use modified commercial webcam and microscope to create a micro imaging system. This imaging system has been tested to have 2.8mmx2.1mm field of view, and 1.5mm depth of field.

  20. Photogrammetric Techniques for 3 - D Underwater Record of the Antique Time Ship from Phanagoria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhukovsky, M. O.; Kuznetsov, V. D.; Olkhovsky, S. V.

    2013-07-01

    Phanagoria - the largest known ancient Greek settlement on the territory of Russia is situated on the Taman peninsula on the southern side of the Taman bay. The unique feature of the site is that about 1/3 of the settlement of Phanagoria is currently flooded by waters of the Taman bay due to the transgression of the Black sea level since antiquity. In 2012 in the course of underwater prospection of the Taman bay a wooden ship buried under the 1.5 m thick bottom sediments was discovered in situ. The unique feature of the ship is excellent preservation of its wooden parts, which makes it one of the few finds of this kind ever made on the territory of Russia. This paper presents a case-study of application of photogrammetry technique for archaeological field documentation record in course of underwater excavations of the Phanagorian shipwreck. The advantages and possible underwaterspecific constraints of automated point cloud extraction algorithm which was used in the research are discussed. The paper gives an overview of the practical aspects of the workflow of photgrammetry technique application at the excavation ground: photo capture procedure and measurement of control points. Finally a resulting 3-D model of the shipwreck is presented and high potential of automated point cloud extraction algorithms for archaeological documentation record is concluded.

  1. Cardiac C-arm computed tomography using a 3D + time ROI reconstruction method with spatial and temporal regularization

    SciTech Connect

    Mory, Cyril; Auvray, Vincent; Zhang, Bo; Grass, Michael; Schäfer, Dirk; Chen, S. James; Carroll, John D.; Rit, Simon; Peyrin, Françoise; Douek, Philippe; Boussel, Loïc

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: Reconstruction of the beating heart in 3D + time in the catheter laboratory using only the available C-arm system would improve diagnosis, guidance, device sizing, and outcome control for intracardiac interventions, e.g., electrophysiology, valvular disease treatment, structural or congenital heart disease. To obtain such a reconstruction, the patient's electrocardiogram (ECG) must be recorded during the acquisition and used in the reconstruction. In this paper, the authors present a 4D reconstruction method aiming to reconstruct the heart from a single sweep 10 s acquisition. Methods: The authors introduce the 4D RecOnstructiOn using Spatial and TEmporal Regularization (short 4D ROOSTER) method, which reconstructs all cardiac phases at once, as a 3D + time volume. The algorithm alternates between a reconstruction step based on conjugate gradient and four regularization steps: enforcing positivity, averaging along time outside a motion mask that contains the heart and vessels, 3D spatial total variation minimization, and 1D temporal total variation minimization. Results: 4D ROOSTER recovers the different temporal representations of a moving Shepp and Logan phantom, and outperforms both ECG-gated simultaneous algebraic reconstruction technique and prior image constrained compressed sensing on a clinical case. It generates 3D + time reconstructions with sharp edges which can be used, for example, to estimate the patient's left ventricular ejection fraction. Conclusions: 4D ROOSTER can be applied for human cardiac C-arm CT, and potentially in other dynamic tomography areas. It can easily be adapted to other problems as regularization is decoupled from projection and back projection.

  2. A general approach for time-supersampling of 3D-PIV data by the vortex-in-cell method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scarano, Fulvio; Schneiders, Jan; Dwight, Richard; Aerospace Engineering/Aerodynamics Team

    2013-11-01

    Advancements of tomographic PIV [1] have led into 3D time-resolved experiments to study the dynamical evolution of 3D turbulent flows [2]. The known bottleneck of Tomo-PIV is the high laser power required to illuminate large volumes in airflows, which becomes critical beyond 10 kHz. Time-super-sampling is an approach to reduce the sampling rate, proven for frozen turbulence where the advection model yields a significant increase of temporal resolution [3]. Instead, in separated flows, the advection principle yields unacceptable distortions. The use of Navier-Stokes numerical calculations with the vortex-in-cell (VIC) method is proposed herein. The assumption is made of inviscid incompressible flow [4]. The spatial-resolution of the data is exploited to increase the temporal resolution. The dynamical evolution of the vorticity and velocity field between subsequent snapshots in the 3D domain is numerically evaluated. The verification with fully time resolved data of a circular jet indicates a substantial increase of temporal resolution. Interestingly, data sampled below the Nyquist limit could be reconstructed faithfully, indicating the potential of VIC in alleviating requirements on PIV measurement rate. Work supported by the European Research Council grant 202887.

  3. Time Efficient 3D Radial UTE Sampling with Fully Automatic Delay Compensation on a Clinical 3T MR Scanner

    PubMed Central

    Reichenbach, Jürgen R.

    2016-01-01

    This work’s aim was to minimize the acquisition time of a radial 3D ultra-short echo-time (UTE) sequence and to provide fully automated, gradient delay compensated, and therefore artifact free, reconstruction. The radial 3D UTE sequence (echo time 60 μs) was implemented as single echo acquisition with center-out readouts and improved time efficient spoiling on a clinical 3T scanner without hardware modifications. To assess the sequence parameter dependent gradient delays each acquisition contained a quick calibration scan and utilized the phase of the readouts to detect the actual k-space center. This calibration scan does not require any user interaction. To evaluate the robustness of this automatic delay estimation phantom experiments were performed and 19 in vivo imaging data of the head, tibial cortical bone, feet and lung were acquired from 6 volunteers. As clinical application of this fast 3D UTE acquisition single breath-hold lung imaging is demonstrated. The proposed sequence allowed very short repetition times (TR~1ms), thus reducing total acquisition time. The proposed, fully automated k-phase based gradient delay calibration resulted in accurate delay estimations (difference to manually determined optimal delay −0.13 ± 0.45 μs) and allowed unsupervised reconstruction of high quality images for both phantom and in vivo data. The employed fast spoiling scheme efficiently suppressed artifacts caused by incorrectly refocused echoes. The sequence proved to be quite insensitive to motion, flow and susceptibility artifacts and provides oversampling protection against aliasing foldovers in all directions. Due to the short TR, acquisition times are attractive for a wide range of clinical applications. For short T2* mapping this sequence provides free choice of the second TE, usually within less scan time as a comparable dual echo UTE sequence. PMID:26975051

  4. 3D and Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meulien Ohlmann, Odile

    2013-02-01

    Today the industry offers a chain of 3D products. Learning to "read" and to "create in 3D" becomes an issue of education of primary importance. 25 years professional experience in France, the United States and Germany, Odile Meulien set up a personal method of initiation to 3D creation that entails the spatial/temporal experience of the holographic visual. She will present some different tools and techniques used for this learning, their advantages and disadvantages, programs and issues of educational policies, constraints and expectations related to the development of new techniques for 3D imaging. Although the creation of display holograms is very much reduced compared to the creation of the 90ies, the holographic concept is spreading in all scientific, social, and artistic activities of our present time. She will also raise many questions: What means 3D? Is it communication? Is it perception? How the seeing and none seeing is interferes? What else has to be taken in consideration to communicate in 3D? How to handle the non visible relations of moving objects with subjects? Does this transform our model of exchange with others? What kind of interaction this has with our everyday life? Then come more practical questions: How to learn creating 3D visualization, to learn 3D grammar, 3D language, 3D thinking? What for? At what level? In which matter? for whom?

  5. CO2 mass estimation visible in time-lapse 3D seismic data from a saline aquifer and uncertainties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanova, A.; Lueth, S.; Bergmann, P.; Ivandic, M.

    2014-12-01

    At Ketzin (Germany) the first European onshore pilot scale project for geological storage of CO2 was initiated in 2004. This project is multidisciplinary and includes 3D time-lapse seismic monitoring. A 3D pre-injection seismic survey was acquired in 2005. Then CO2 injection into a sandstone saline aquifer started at a depth of 650 m in 2008. A 1st 3D seismic repeat survey was acquired in 2009 after 22 kilotons had been injected. The imaged CO2 signature was concentrated around the injection well (200-300 m). A 2nd 3D seismic repeat survey was acquired in 2012 after 61 kilotons had been injected. The imaged CO2 signature further extended (100-200 m). The injection was terminated in 2013. Totally 67 kilotons of CO2 were injected. Time-lapse seismic processing, petrophysical data and geophysical logging on CO2 saturation have allowed for an estimate of the amount of CO2 visible in the seismic data. This estimate is dependent upon a choice of a number of parameters and contains a number of uncertainties. The main uncertainties are following. The constant reservoir porosity and CO2 density used for the estimation are probably an over-simplification since the reservoir is quite heterogeneous. May be velocity dispersion is present in the Ketzin reservoir rocks, but we do not consider it to be large enough that it could affect the mass of CO2 in our estimation. There are only a small number of direct petrophysical observations, providing a weak statistical basis for the determination of seismic velocities based on CO2 saturation and we have assumed that the petrophysical experiments were carried out on samples that are representative for the average properties of the whole reservoir. Finally, the most of the time delay values in the both 3D seismic repeat surveys within the amplitude anomaly are near the noise level of 1-2 ms, however a change of 1 ms in the time delay affects significantly the mass estimate, thus the choice of the time-delay cutoff is crucial. In spite

  6. Multi-pulse time delay integration method for flexible 3D super-resolution range-gated imaging.

    PubMed

    Xinwei, Wang; Youfu, Li; Yan, Zhou

    2015-03-23

    Constructing flexible regular-shaped range-intensity profiles by the convolution of illuminator laser pulse and sensor gate pulse is crucial for 3D super-resolution range-gated imaging. However, ns-scale rectangular-shaped laser pulse with tunable pulse width is difficult to be obtained, especially for pulsed solid-stated lasers. In this paper we propose a multi-pulse time delay integration (MPTDI) method to reshape range-intensity profiles (RIP) free from the above limitation of pulsed lasers. An equivalent laser pulse temporal shaping model is established to evaluate and optimize the MPTDI method. By using MPTDI, the RIP shape and depth of viewing can both be flexibly changed as desired. Here typical triangular and trapezoidal RIPs are established for 3D imaging under triangular and trapezoidal range-intensity correlation algorithms. In addition, a prototype experiment is demonstrated to prove the feasibility of MPTDI.

  7. Development of real-time motion capture system for 3D on-line games linked with virtual character

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jong Hyeong; Ryu, Young Kee; Cho, Hyung Suck

    2004-10-01

    Motion tracking method is being issued as essential part of the entertainment, medical, sports, education and industry with the development of 3-D virtual reality. Virtual human character in the digital animation and game application has been controlled by interfacing devices; mouse, joysticks, midi-slider, and so on. Those devices could not enable virtual human character to move smoothly and naturally. Furthermore, high-end human motion capture systems in commercial market are expensive and complicated. In this paper, we proposed a practical and fast motion capturing system consisting of optic sensors, and linked the data with 3-D game character with real time. The prototype experiment setup is successfully applied to a boxing game which requires very fast movement of human character.

  8. 3D-SURFER 2.0: web platform for real-time search and characterization of protein surfaces.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Yi; Esquivel-Rodriguez, Juan; Sael, Lee; Kihara, Daisuke

    2014-01-01

    The increasing number of uncharacterized protein structures necessitates the development of computational approaches for function annotation using the protein tertiary structures. Protein structure database search is the basis of any structure-based functional elucidation of proteins. 3D-SURFER is a web platform for real-time protein surface comparison of a given protein structure against the entire PDB using 3D Zernike descriptors. It can smoothly navigate the protein structure space in real-time from one query structure to another. A major new feature of Release 2.0 is the ability to compare the protein surface of a single chain, a single domain, or a single complex against databases of protein chains, domains, complexes, or a combination of all three in the latest PDB. Additionally, two types of protein structures can now be compared: all-atom-surface and backbone-atom-surface. The server can also accept a batch job for a large number of database searches. Pockets in protein surfaces can be identified by VisGrid and LIGSITE (csc) . The server is available at http://kiharalab.org/3d-surfer/. PMID:24573477

  9. 3D-SURFER 2.0: web platform for real-time search and characterization of protein surfaces.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Yi; Esquivel-Rodriguez, Juan; Sael, Lee; Kihara, Daisuke

    2014-01-01

    The increasing number of uncharacterized protein structures necessitates the development of computational approaches for function annotation using the protein tertiary structures. Protein structure database search is the basis of any structure-based functional elucidation of proteins. 3D-SURFER is a web platform for real-time protein surface comparison of a given protein structure against the entire PDB using 3D Zernike descriptors. It can smoothly navigate the protein structure space in real-time from one query structure to another. A major new feature of Release 2.0 is the ability to compare the protein surface of a single chain, a single domain, or a single complex against databases of protein chains, domains, complexes, or a combination of all three in the latest PDB. Additionally, two types of protein structures can now be compared: all-atom-surface and backbone-atom-surface. The server can also accept a batch job for a large number of database searches. Pockets in protein surfaces can be identified by VisGrid and LIGSITE (csc) . The server is available at http://kiharalab.org/3d-surfer/.

  10. Reconstruction for time-domain in vivo EPR 3D multigradient oximetric imaging--a parallel processing perspective.

    PubMed

    Dharmaraj, Christopher D; Thadikonda, Kishan; Fletcher, Anthony R; Doan, Phuc N; Devasahayam, Nallathamby; Matsumoto, Shingo; Johnson, Calvin A; Cook, John A; Mitchell, James B; Subramanian, Sankaran; Krishna, Murali C

    2009-01-01

    Three-dimensional Oximetric Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Imaging using the Single Point Imaging modality generates unpaired spin density and oxygen images that can readily distinguish between normal and tumor tissues in small animals. It is also possible with fast imaging to track the changes in tissue oxygenation in response to the oxygen content in the breathing air. However, this involves dealing with gigabytes of data for each 3D oximetric imaging experiment involving digital band pass filtering and background noise subtraction, followed by 3D Fourier reconstruction. This process is rather slow in a conventional uniprocessor system. This paper presents a parallelization framework using OpenMP runtime support and parallel MATLAB to execute such computationally intensive programs. The Intel compiler is used to develop a parallel C++ code based on OpenMP. The code is executed on four Dual-Core AMD Opteron shared memory processors, to reduce the computational burden of the filtration task significantly. The results show that the parallel code for filtration has achieved a speed up factor of 46.66 as against the equivalent serial MATLAB code. In addition, a parallel MATLAB code has been developed to perform 3D Fourier reconstruction. Speedup factors of 4.57 and 4.25 have been achieved during the reconstruction process and oximetry computation, for a data set with 23 x 23 x 23 gradient steps. The execution time has been computed for both the serial and parallel implementations using different dimensions of the data and presented for comparison. The reported system has been designed to be easily accessible even from low-cost personal computers through local internet (NIHnet). The experimental results demonstrate that the parallel computing provides a source of high computational power to obtain biophysical parameters from 3D EPR oximetric imaging, almost in real-time.

  11. 3D Real-Time Echocardiography Combined with Mini Pressure Wire Generate Reliable Pressure-Volume Loops in Small Hearts

    PubMed Central

    Linden, Katharina; Dewald, Oliver; Gatzweiler, Eva; Seehase, Matthias; Duerr, Georg Daniel; Dörner, Jonas; Kleppe, Stephanie

    2016-01-01

    Background Pressure-volume loops (PVL) provide vital information regarding ventricular performance and pathophysiology in cardiac disease. Unfortunately, acquisition of PVL by conductance technology is not feasible in neonates and small children due to the available human catheter size and resulting invasiveness. The aim of the study was to validate the accuracy of PVL in small hearts using volume data obtained by real-time three-dimensional echocardiography (3DE) and simultaneously acquired pressure data. Methods In 17 piglets (weight range: 3.6–8.0 kg) left ventricular PVL were generated by 3DE and simultaneous recordings of ventricular pressure using a mini pressure wire (PVL3D). PVL3D were compared to conductance catheter measurements (PVLCond) under various hemodynamic conditions (baseline, alpha-adrenergic stimulation with phenylephrine, beta-adrenoreceptor-blockage using esmolol). In order to validate the accuracy of 3D volumetric data, cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) was performed in another 8 piglets. Results Correlation between CMR- and 3DE-derived volumes was good (enddiastolic volume: mean bias -0.03ml ±1.34ml). Computation of PVL3D in small hearts was feasible and comparable to results obtained by conductance technology. Bland-Altman analysis showed a low bias between PVL3D and PVLCond. Systolic and diastolic parameters were closely associated (Intraclass-Correlation Coefficient for: systolic myocardial elastance 0.95, arterial elastance 0.93, diastolic relaxation constant tau 0.90, indexed end-diastolic volume 0.98). Hemodynamic changes under different conditions were well detected by both methods (ICC 0.82 to 0.98). Inter- and intra-observer coefficients of variation were below 5% for all parameters. Conclusions PVL3D generated from 3DE combined with mini pressure wire represent a novel, feasible and reliable method to assess different hemodynamic conditions of cardiac function in hearts comparable to neonate and infant size. This

  12. Lanthanum halide scintillators for time-of-flight 3-D pet

    DOEpatents

    Karp, Joel S.; Surti, Suleman

    2008-06-03

    A Lanthanum Halide scintillator (for example LaCl.sub.3 and LaBr.sub.3) with fast decay time and good timing resolution, as well as high light output and good energy resolution, is used in the design of a PET scanner. The PET scanner includes a cavity for accepting a patient and a plurality of PET detector modules arranged in an approximately cylindrical configuration about the cavity. Each PET detector includes a Lanthanum Halide scintillator having a plurality of Lanthanum Halide crystals, a light guide, and a plurality of photomultiplier tubes arranged respectively peripherally around the cavity. The good timing resolution enables a time-of-flight (TOF) PET scanner to be developed that exhibits a reduction in noise propagation during image reconstruction and a gain in the signal-to-noise ratio. Such a PET scanner includes a time stamp circuit that records the time of receipt of gamma rays by respective PET detectors and provides timing data outputs that are provided to a processor that, in turn, calculates time-of-flight (TOF) of gamma rays through a patient in the cavity and uses the TOF of gamma rays in the reconstruction of images of the patient.

  13. Texture-based visualization of unsteady 3D flow by real-time advection and volumetric illumination.

    PubMed

    Weiskopf, Daniel; Schafhitzel, Tobias; Ertl, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents an interactive technique for the dense texture-based visualization of unsteady 3D flow, taking into account issues of computational efficiency and visual perception. High efficiency is achieved by a 3D graphics processing unit (GPU)-based texture advection mechanism that implements logical 3D grid structures by physical memory in the form of 2D textures. This approach results in fast read and write access to physical memory, independent of GPU architecture. Slice-based direct volume rendering is used for the final display. We investigate two alternative methods for the volumetric illumination of the result of texture advection: First, gradient-based illumination that employs a real-time computation of gradients, and, second, line-based lighting based on illumination in codimension 2. In addition to the Phong model, perception-guided rendering methods are considered, such as cool/warm shading, halo rendering, or color-based depth cueing. The problems of clutter and occlusion are addressed by supporting a volumetric importance function that enhances features of the flow and reduces visual complexity in less interesting regions. GPU implementation aspects, performance measurements, and a discussion of results are included to demonstrate our visualization approach.

  14. Attosecond time delay in the photoionization of Mn in the region of the 3 p →3 d giant resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolmatov, V. K.; Kheifets, A. S.; Deshmukh, P. C.; Manson, S. T.

    2015-05-01

    Initial insight into time delay in Mn photoionization in the region of the 3 p →,3 d giant autoionization resonance is gained in the framework of the "spin-polarized" random-phase approximation with exchange. The dramatic effect of the giant autoionization resonance on the time delay of photoemission from the 3 d and 4 s valence subshells of the Mn atom is unraveled. Strong sensitivity of the time delay of the 4 s photoemission to the final-state term of the ion remainder [Mn+(4 s1,5S ) vs Mn+(4 s1,7S ) ] is discovered. It is shown that photoionization time delay in the autoionizing resonance region is explicitly associated with the resonance lifetime, which can thus be directly measured in attosecond time-delay experiments. Similar features are expected to emerge in photoionization time delays of other transition-metal and rare-earth atoms with half-filled subshells that possess giant autoionization resonances as well.

  15. Lift force time delays on 2D and 3D wings in unsteady flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, David; Colling, Jesse; Quach, Vien; Colonius, Tim; Tadmor, Gilead

    2008-11-01

    Active flow control (AFC) used for enhancing the maneuverability of wings is usually applied during conditions of steady external flow. However, when the external flow is unsteady or the wing is maneuvering, then at least two time delays become important; namely, the time delay of the lift to changes in external flow, τf, and the time delay to changes in AFC actuation, τa. These time delays were measured in wind tunnel experiments using two- and three-dimensional wings in an oscillating freestream and with variable duty cycle actuation. Dimensionless freestream oscillation frequencies from k = 0.01 to k = 0.2 with amplitudes of 5 percent of the mean speed were used to characterize the system. As a demonstration of the important role of the two time constants, AFC is used to damp lift force oscillations occurring in an unsteady freestream using a feed forward control system. The instantaneous velocity provides input to a control algorithm which adjusts the duty cycle of the AFC actuator to suppress lift fluctuations.

  16. Radiation and Polarization Signatures of the 3D Multizone Time-dependent Hadronic Blazar Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Haocheng; Diltz, Chris; Böttcher, Markus

    2016-10-01

    We present a newly developed time-dependent three-dimensional multizone hadronic blazar emission model. By coupling a Fokker-Planck-based lepto-hadronic particle evolution code, 3DHad, with a polarization-dependent radiation transfer code, 3DPol, we are able to study the time-dependent radiation and polarization signatures of a hadronic blazar model for the first time. Our current code is limited to parameter regimes in which the hadronic γ-ray output is dominated by proton synchrotron emission, neglecting pion production. Our results demonstrate that the time-dependent flux and polarization signatures are generally dominated by the relation between the synchrotron cooling and the light-crossing timescale, which is largely independent of the exact model parameters. We find that unlike the low-energy polarization signatures, which can vary rapidly in time, the high-energy polarization signatures appear stable. As a result, future high-energy polarimeters may be able to distinguish such signatures from the lower and more rapidly variable polarization signatures expected in leptonic models.

  17. Real-time geometric scene estimation for RGBD images using a 3D box shape grammar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willis, Andrew R.; Brink, Kevin M.

    2016-06-01

    This article describes a novel real-time algorithm for the purpose of extracting box-like structures from RGBD image data. In contrast to conventional approaches, the proposed algorithm includes two novel attributes: (1) it divides the geometric estimation procedure into subroutines having atomic incremental computational costs, and (2) it uses a generative "Block World" perceptual model that infers both concave and convex box elements from detection of primitive box substructures. The end result is an efficient geometry processing engine suitable for use in real-time embedded systems such as those on an UAVs where it is intended to be an integral component for robotic navigation and mapping applications.

  18. Enhancing Time-Connectives with 3D Immersive Virtual Reality (IVR)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Passig, David; Eden, Sigal

    2010-01-01

    This study sought to test the most efficient representation mode with which children with hearing impairment could express a story while producing connectives indicating relations of time and of cause and effect. Using Bruner's (1973, 1986, 1990) representation stages, we tested the comparative effectiveness of Virtual Reality (VR) as a mode of…

  19. Time-resolved diffusion tomographic 2D and 3D imaging in highly scattering turbid media

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alfano, Robert R. (Inventor); Cai, Wei (Inventor); Liu, Feng (Inventor); Lax, Melvin (Inventor); Das, Bidyut B. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A method for imaging objects in highly scattering turbid media. According to one embodiment of the invention, the method involves using a plurality of intersecting source/detectors sets and time-resolving equipment to generate a plurality of time-resolved intensity curves for the diffusive component of light emergent from the medium. For each of the curves, the intensities at a plurality of times are then inputted into the following inverse reconstruction algorithm to form an image of the medium: ##EQU1## wherein W is a matrix relating output at source and detector positions r.sub.s and r.sub.d, at time t, to position r, .LAMBDA. is a regularization matrix, chosen for convenience to be diagonal, but selected in a way related to the ratio of the noise, to fluctuations in the absorption (or diffusion) X.sub.j that we are trying to determine: .LAMBDA..sub.ij =.lambda..sub.j .delta..sub.ij with .lambda..sub.j =/<.DELTA.Xj.DELTA.Xj> Y is the data collected at the detectors, and X.sup.k is the kth iterate toward the desired absoption information. An algorithm, which combines a two dimensional (2D) matrix inversion with a one-dimensional (1D) Fourier transform inversion is used to obtain images of three dimensional hidden objects in turbid scattering media.

  20. Time-resolved diffusion tomographic 2D and 3D imaging in highly scattering turbid media

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alfano, Robert R. (Inventor); Cai, Wei (Inventor); Gayen, Swapan K. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A method for imaging objects in highly scattering turbid media. According to one embodiment of the invention, the method involves using a plurality of intersecting source/detectors sets and time-resolving equipment to generate a plurality of time-resolved intensity curves for the diffusive component of light emergent from the medium. For each of the curves, the intensities at a plurality of times are then inputted into the following inverse reconstruction algorithm to form an image of the medium: wherein W is a matrix relating output at source and detector positions r.sub.s and r.sub.d, at time t, to position r, .LAMBDA. is a regularization matrix, chosen for convenience to be diagonal, but selected in a way related to the ratio of the noise, to fluctuations in the absorption (or diffusion) X.sub.j that we are trying to determine: .LAMBDA..sub.ij =.lambda..sub.j .delta..sub.ij with .lambda..sub.j =/<.DELTA.Xj.DELTA.Xj> Y is the data collected at the detectors, and X.sup.k is the kth iterate toward the desired absorption information. An algorithm, which combines a two dimensional (2D) matrix inversion with a one-dimensional (1D) Fourier transform inversion is used to obtain images of three dimensional hidden objects in turbid scattering media.

  1. Real-time 3D imaging of Haines jumps in porous media flow

    PubMed Central

    Berg, Steffen; Ott, Holger; Klapp, Stephan A.; Schwing, Alex; Neiteler, Rob; Brussee, Niels; Makurat, Axel; Leu, Leon; Enzmann, Frieder; Schwarz, Jens-Oliver; Kersten, Michael; Irvine, Sarah; Stampanoni, Marco

    2013-01-01

    Newly developed high-speed, synchrotron-based X-ray computed microtomography enabled us to directly image pore-scale displacement events in porous rock in real time. Common approaches to modeling macroscopic fluid behavior are phenomenological, have many shortcomings, and lack consistent links to elementary pore-scale displacement processes, such as Haines jumps and snap-off. Unlike the common singular pore jump paradigm based on observations of restricted artificial capillaries, we found that Haines jumps typically cascade through 10–20 geometrically defined pores per event, accounting for 64% of the energy dissipation. Real-time imaging provided a more detailed fundamental understanding of the elementary processes in porous media, such as hysteresis, snap-off, and nonwetting phase entrapment, and it opens the way for a rigorous process for upscaling based on thermodynamic models. PMID:23431151

  2. An eliminating method of motion-induced vertical parallax for time-division 3D display technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Liyuan; Hou, Chunping

    2015-10-01

    A time difference between the left image and right image of the time-division 3D display makes a person perceive alternating vertical parallax when an object is moving vertically on a fixed depth plane, which causes the left image and right image perceived do not match and makes people more prone to visual fatigue. This mismatch cannot eliminate simply rely on the precise synchronous control of the left image and right image. Based on the principle of time-division 3D display technology and human visual system characteristics, this paper establishes a model of the true vertical motion velocity in reality and vertical motion velocity on the screen, and calculates the amount of the vertical parallax caused by vertical motion, and then puts forward a motion compensation method to eliminate the vertical parallax. Finally, subjective experiments are carried out to analyze how the time difference affects the stereo visual comfort by comparing the comfort values of the stereo image sequences before and after compensating using the eliminating method. The theoretical analysis and experimental results show that the proposed method is reasonable and efficient.

  3. Real-time 3-D SAFT-UT system evaluation and validation

    SciTech Connect

    Doctor, S.R.; Schuster, G.J.; Reid, L.D.; Hall, T.E.

    1996-09-01

    SAFT-UT technology is shown to provide significant enhancements to the inspection of materials used in US nuclear power plants. This report provides guidelines for the implementation of SAFT-UT technology and shows the results from its application. An overview of the development of SAFT-UT is provided so that the reader may become familiar with the technology. Then the basic fundamentals are presented with an extensive list of references. A comprehensive operating procedure, which is used in conjunction with the SAFT-UT field system developed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), provides the recipe for both SAFT data acquisition and analysis. The specification for the hardware implementation is provided for the SAFT-UT system along with a description of the subsequent developments and improvements. One development of technical interest is the SAFT real time processor. Performance of the real-time processor is impressive and comparison is made of this dedicated parallel processor to a conventional computer and to the newer high-speed computer architectures designed for image processing. Descriptions of other improvements, including a robotic scanner, are provided. Laboratory parametric and application studies, performed by PNL and not previously reported, are discussed followed by a section on field application work in which SAFT was used during inservice inspections of operating reactors.

  4. Real-Time Estimation of 3-D Needle Shape and Deflection for MRI-Guided Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Park, Yong-Lae; Elayaperumal, Santhi; Daniel, Bruce; Ryu, Seok Chang; Shin, Mihye; Savall, Joan; Black, Richard J.; Moslehi, Behzad; Cutkosky, Mark R.

    2015-01-01

    We describe a MRI-compatible biopsy needle instrumented with optical fiber Bragg gratings for measuring bending deflections of the needle as it is inserted into tissues. During procedures, such as diagnostic biopsies and localized treatments, it is useful to track any tool deviation from the planned trajectory to minimize positioning errors and procedural complications. The goal is to display tool deflections in real time, with greater bandwidth and accuracy than when viewing the tool in MR images. A standard 18 ga × 15 cm inner needle is prepared using a fixture, and 350-μm-deep grooves are created along its length. Optical fibers are embedded in the grooves. Two sets of sensors, located at different points along the needle, provide an estimate of the bent profile, as well as temperature compensation. Tests of the needle in a water bath showed that it produced no adverse imaging artifacts when used with the MR scanner. PMID:26405428

  5. Regional Gastrointestinal Transit Times in Patients With Carcinoid Diarrhea: Assessment With the Novel 3D-Transit System

    PubMed Central

    Gregersen, Tine; Haase, Anne-Mette; Schlageter, Vincent; Gronbaek, Henning; Krogh, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims The paucity of knowledge regarding gastrointestinal motility in patients with neuroendocrine tumors and carcinoid diarrhea restricts targeted treatment. 3D-Transit is a novel, minimally invasive, ambulatory method for description of gastrointestinal motility. The system has not yet been evaluated in any group of patients. We aimed to test the performance of 3D-Transit in patients with carcinoid diarrhea and to compare the patients’ regional gastrointestinal transit times (GITT) and colonic motility patterns with those of healthy subjects. Methods Fifteen healthy volunteers and seven patients with neuroendocrine tumor and at least 3 bowel movements per day were investigated with 3D-Transit and standard radiopaque markers. Results Total GITT assessed with 3D-Transit and radiopaque markers were well correlated (Spearman’s rho = 0.64, P = 0.002). Median total GITT was 12.5 (range: 8.5–47.2) hours in patients versus 25.1 (range: 13.1–142.3) hours in healthy (P = 0.007). There was no difference in gastric emptying (P = 0.778). Median small intestinal transit time was 3.8 (range: 1.4–5.5) hours in patients versus 4.4 (range: 1.8–7.2) hours in healthy subjects (P = 0.044). Median colorectal transit time was 5.2 (range: 2.9–40.1) hours in patients versus 18.1 (range: 5.0–134.0) hours in healthy subjects (P = 0.012). Median frequency of pansegmental colonic movements was 0.45 (range: 0.03–1.02) per hour in patients and 0.07 (range: 0–0.61) per hour in healthy subjects (P = 0.045). Conclusions Three-dimensional Transit allows assessment of regional GITT in patients with diarrhea. Patients with carcinoid diarrhea have faster than normal gastrointestinal transit due to faster small intestinal and colorectal transit times. The latter is caused by an increased frequency of pansegmental colonic movements. PMID:26130638

  6. Detection of hidden objects using a real-time 3-D millimeter-wave imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozban, Daniel; Aharon, Avihai; Levanon, Assaf; Abramovich, Amir; Yitzhaky, Yitzhak; Kopeika, N. S.

    2014-10-01

    Millimeter (mm)and sub-mm wavelengths or terahertz (THz) band have several properties that motivate their use in imaging for security applications such as recognition of hidden objects, dangerous materials, aerosols, imaging through walls as in hostage situations, and also in bad weather conditions. There is no known ionization hazard for biological tissue, and atmospheric degradation of THz radiation is relatively low for practical imaging distances. We recently developed a new technology for the detection of THz radiation. This technology is based on very inexpensive plasma neon indicator lamps, also known as Glow Discharge Detector (GDD), that can be used as very sensitive THz radiation detectors. Using them, we designed and constructed a Focal Plane Array (FPA) and obtained recognizable2-dimensional THz images of both dielectric and metallic objects. Using THz wave it is shown here that even concealed weapons made of dielectric material can be detected. An example is an image of a knife concealed inside a leather bag and also under heavy clothing. Three-dimensional imaging using radar methods can enhance those images since it can allow the isolation of the concealed objects from the body and environmental clutter such as nearby furniture or other people. The GDDs enable direct heterodyning between the electric field of the target signal and the reference signal eliminating the requirement for expensive mixers, sources, and Low Noise Amplifiers (LNAs).We expanded the ability of the FPA so that we are able to obtain recognizable 2-dimensional THz images in real time. We show here that the THz detection of objects in three dimensions, using FMCW principles is also applicable in real time. This imaging system is also shown here to be capable of imaging objects from distances allowing standoff detection of suspicious objects and humans from large distances.

  7. Time lapse investigation of antibiotic susceptibility using a microfluidic linear gradient 3D culture device.

    PubMed

    Hou, Zining; An, Yu; Hjort, Karin; Hjort, Klas; Sandegren, Linus; Wu, Zhigang

    2014-09-01

    This study reports a novel approach to quantitatively investigate the antibacterial effect of antibiotics on bacteria using a three-dimensional microfluidic culture device. In particular, our approach is suitable for studying the pharmacodynamics effects of antibiotics on bacterial cells temporally and with a continuous range of concentrations in a single experiment. The responses of bacterial cells to a linear concentration gradient of antibiotics were observed using time-lapse photography, by encapsulating bacterial cells in an agarose-based gel located in a commercially available microfluidics chamber. This approach generates dynamic information with high resolution, in a single operation, e.g., growth curves and antibiotic pharmacodynamics, in a well-controlled environment. No pre-labelling of the cells is needed and therefore any bacterial sample can be tested in this setup. It also provides static information comparable to that of standard techniques for measuring minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC). Five antibiotics with different mechanisms were analysed against wild-type Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus and Salmonella Typhimurium. The entire process, including data analysis, took 2.5-4 h and from the same analysis, high-resolution growth curves were obtained. As a proof of principle, a pharmacodynamic model of streptomycin against Salmonella Typhimurium was built based on the maximal effect model, which agreed well with the experimental results. Our approach has the potential to be a simple and flexible solution to study responding behaviours of microbial cells under different selection pressures both temporally and in a range of concentrations.

  8. Left ventricular endocardial surface detection based on real-time 3D echocardiographic data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corsi, C.; Borsari, M.; Consegnati, F.; Sarti, A.; Lamberti, C.; Travaglini, A.; Shiota, T.; Thomas, J. D.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: A new computerized semi-automatic method for left ventricular (LV) chamber segmentation is presented. METHODS: The LV is imaged by real-time three-dimensional echocardiography (RT3DE). The surface detection model, based on level set techniques, is applied to RT3DE data for image analysis. The modified level set partial differential equation we use is solved by applying numerical methods for conservation laws. The initial conditions are manually established on some slices of the entire volume. The solution obtained for each slice is a contour line corresponding with the boundary between LV cavity and LV endocardium. RESULTS: The mathematical model has been applied to sequences of frames of human hearts (volume range: 34-109 ml) imaged by 2D and reconstructed off-line and RT3DE data. Volume estimation obtained by this new semi-automatic method shows an excellent correlation with those obtained by manual tracing (r = 0.992). Dynamic change of LV volume during the cardiac cycle is also obtained. CONCLUSION: The volume estimation method is accurate; edge based segmentation, image completion and volume reconstruction can be accomplished. The visualization technique also allows to navigate into the reconstructed volume and to display any section of the volume.

  9. Lapse-time dependent coda-wave depth sensitivity to local velocity perturbations in 3-D heterogeneous elastic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obermann, Anne; Planès, Thomas; Hadziioannou, Céline; Campillo, Michel

    2016-07-01

    In the context of seismic monitoring, recent studies made successful use of seismic coda waves to locate medium changes on the horizontal plane. Locating the depth of the changes, however, remains a challenge. In this paper, we use 3-D wavefield simulations to address two problems: firstly, we evaluate the contribution of surface and body wave sensitivity to a change at depth. We introduce a thin layer with a perturbed velocity at different depths and measure the apparent relative velocity changes due to this layer at different times in the coda and for different degrees of heterogeneity of the model. We show that the depth sensitivity can be modelled as a linear combination of body- and surface-wave sensitivity. The lapse-time dependent sensitivity ratio of body waves and surface waves can be used to build 3-D sensitivity kernels for imaging purposes. Secondly, we compare the lapse-time behavior in the presence of a perturbation in horizontal and vertical slabs to address, for instance, the origin of the velocity changes detected after large earthquakes.

  10. Lapse-time-dependent coda-wave depth sensitivity to local velocity perturbations in 3-D heterogeneous elastic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obermann, Anne; Planès, Thomas; Hadziioannou, Céline; Campillo, Michel

    2016-10-01

    In the context of seismic monitoring, recent studies made successful use of seismic coda waves to locate medium changes on the horizontal plane. Locating the depth of the changes, however, remains a challenge. In this paper, we use 3-D wavefield simulations to address two problems: first, we evaluate the contribution of surface- and body-wave sensitivity to a change at depth. We introduce a thin layer with a perturbed velocity at different depths and measure the apparent relative velocity changes due to this layer at different times in the coda and for different degrees of heterogeneity of the model. We show that the depth sensitivity can be modelled as a linear combination of body- and surface-wave sensitivity. The lapse-time-dependent sensitivity ratio of body waves and surface waves can be used to build 3-D sensitivity kernels for imaging purposes. Second, we compare the lapse-time behaviour in the presence of a perturbation in horizontal and vertical slabs to address, for instance, the origin of the velocity changes detected after large earthquakes.

  11. Real-time 3D visualization of the thoraco-abdominal surface during breathing with body movement and deformation extraction.

    PubMed

    Povšič, K; Jezeršek, M; Možina, J

    2015-07-01

    Real-time 3D visualization of the breathing displacements can be a useful diagnostic tool in order to immediately observe the most active regions on the thoraco-abdominal surface. The developed method is capable of separating non-relevant torso movement and deformations from the deformations that are solely related to breathing. This makes it possible to visualize only the breathing displacements. The system is based on the structured laser triangulation principle, with simultaneous spatial and color data acquisition of the thoraco-abdominal region. Based on the tracking of the attached passive markers, the torso movement and deformation is compensated using rigid and non-rigid transformation models on the three-dimensional (3D) data. The total time of 3D data processing together with visualization equals 20 ms per cycle.In vitro verification of the rigid movement extraction was performed using the iterative closest point algorithm as a reference. Furthermore, a volumetric evaluation on a live subject was performed to establish the accuracy of the rigid and non-rigid model. The root mean square deviation between the measured and the reference volumes shows an error of  ±0.08 dm(3) for rigid movement extraction. Similarly, the error was calculated to be  ±0.02 dm(3) for torsional deformation extraction and  ±0.11 dm(3) for lateral bending deformation extraction. The results confirm that during the torso movement and deformation, the proposed method is sufficiently accurate to visualize only the displacements related to breathing. The method can be used, for example, during the breathing exercise on an indoor bicycle or a treadmill.

  12. 1D-3D hybrid modeling-from multi-compartment models to full resolution models in space and time.

    PubMed

    Grein, Stephan; Stepniewski, Martin; Reiter, Sebastian; Knodel, Markus M; Queisser, Gillian

    2014-01-01

    Investigation of cellular and network dynamics in the brain by means of modeling and simulation has evolved into a highly interdisciplinary field, that uses sophisticated modeling and simulation approaches to understand distinct areas of brain function. Depending on the underlying complexity, these models vary in their level of detail, in order to cope with the attached computational cost. Hence for large network simulations, single neurons are typically reduced to time-dependent signal processors, dismissing the spatial aspect of each cell. For single cell or networks with relatively small numbers of neurons, general purpose simulators allow for space and time-dependent simulations of electrical signal processing, based on the cable equation theory. An emerging field in Computational Neuroscience encompasses a new level of detail by incorporating the full three-dimensional morphology of cells and organelles into three-dimensional, space and time-dependent, simulations. While every approach has its advantages and limitations, such as computational cost, integrated and methods-spanning simulation approaches, depending on the network size could establish new ways to investigate the brain. In this paper we present a hybrid simulation approach, that makes use of reduced 1D-models using e.g., the NEURON simulator-which couples to fully resolved models for simulating cellular and sub-cellular dynamics, including the detailed three-dimensional morphology of neurons and organelles. In order to couple 1D- and 3D-simulations, we present a geometry-, membrane potential- and intracellular concentration mapping framework, with which graph- based morphologies, e.g., in the swc- or hoc-format, are mapped to full surface and volume representations of the neuron and computational data from 1D-simulations can be used as boundary conditions for full 3D simulations and vice versa. Thus, established models and data, based on general purpose 1D-simulators, can be directly coupled to the

  13. 1D-3D hybrid modeling—from multi-compartment models to full resolution models in space and time

    PubMed Central

    Grein, Stephan; Stepniewski, Martin; Reiter, Sebastian; Knodel, Markus M.; Queisser, Gillian

    2014-01-01

    Investigation of cellular and network dynamics in the brain by means of modeling and simulation has evolved into a highly interdisciplinary field, that uses sophisticated modeling and simulation approaches to understand distinct areas of brain function. Depending on the underlying complexity, these models vary in their level of detail, in order to cope with the attached computational cost. Hence for large network simulations, single neurons are typically reduced to time-dependent signal processors, dismissing the spatial aspect of each cell. For single cell or networks with relatively small numbers of neurons, general purpose simulators allow for space and time-dependent simulations of electrical signal processing, based on the cable equation theory. An emerging field in Computational Neuroscience encompasses a new level of detail by incorporating the full three-dimensional morphology of cells and organelles into three-dimensional, space and time-dependent, simulations. While every approach has its advantages and limitations, such as computational cost, integrated and methods-spanning simulation approaches, depending on the network size could establish new ways to investigate the brain. In this paper we present a hybrid simulation approach, that makes use of reduced 1D-models using e.g., the NEURON simulator—which couples to fully resolved models for simulating cellular and sub-cellular dynamics, including the detailed three-dimensional morphology of neurons and organelles. In order to couple 1D- and 3D-simulations, we present a geometry-, membrane potential- and intracellular concentration mapping framework, with which graph- based morphologies, e.g., in the swc- or hoc-format, are mapped to full surface and volume representations of the neuron and computational data from 1D-simulations can be used as boundary conditions for full 3D simulations and vice versa. Thus, established models and data, based on general purpose 1D-simulators, can be directly coupled to

  14. A 3D Tomographic Model of Asia Based on Pn and P Travel Times from GT Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, C. J.; Begnaud, M. L.; Ballard, S.; Phillips, W. S.; Hipp, J. R.; Steck, L. K.; Rowe, C. A.; Chang, M. C.

    2008-12-01

    Increasingly, nuclear explosion monitoring is focusing on detection, location, and identification of small events recorded at regional distances. Because Earth structure is highly variable on regional scales, locating events accurately at these distances requires the use of region-specific models to provide accurate travel times. Improved results have been achieved with composites of 1D models and with approximate 3D models with simplified upper mantle structures, but both approaches introduce non-physical boundaries that are problematic for operational monitoring use. Ultimately, what is needed is a true, seamless 3D model of the Earth. Towards that goal, we have developed a 3D tomographic model of the P velocity of the crust and mantle for the Asian continent. Our model is derived by an iterative least squares travel time inversion of more than one million Pn and teleseismic P picks from some 35,000 events recorded at 4,000+ stations. We invert for P velocities from the top of the crust to the core mantle boundary, along with source and receiver static time terms to account for the effects of event mislocation and unaccounted for fine-scale structure near the receiver. Because large portions of the model are under-constrained, we apply spatially varying damping, which constrains the inversion to update the starting model only where good data coverage is available. Our starting crustal model is taken from the a priori crust and upper mantle model of Asia developed through National Nuclear Security Administration laboratory collaboration, which is based on various global and regional studies, and we substantially increase the damping in the crust to discourage changes from this model. Our starting mantle model is AK135. To simplify the inversion, we fix the depths of the major mantle discontinuities (Moho, 410 km, 660 km). 3D rays are calculated using an implementation of the Um and Thurber ray pseudo-bending approach, with full enforcement of Snell's Law in 3D at

  15. Development of CT and 3D-CT Using Flat Panel Detector Based Real-Time Digital Radiography System

    SciTech Connect

    Ravindran, V. R.; Sreelakshmi, C.; Vibin

    2008-09-26

    The application of Digital Radiography in the Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE) of space vehicle components is a recent development in India. A Real-time DR system based on amorphous silicon Flat Panel Detector has been developed for the NDE of solid rocket motors at Rocket Propellant Plant of VSSC in a few years back. The technique has been successfully established for the nondestructive evaluation of solid rocket motors. The DR images recorded for a few solid rocket specimens are presented in the paper. The Real-time DR system is capable of generating sufficient digital X-ray image data with object rotation for the CT image reconstruction. In this paper the indigenous development of CT imaging based on the Realtime DR system for solid rocket motor is presented. Studies are also carried out to generate 3D-CT image from a set of adjacent CT images of the rocket motor. The capability of revealing the spatial location and characterisation of defect is demonstrated by the CT and 3D-CT images generated.

  16. Sensors for 3D Imaging: Metric Evaluation and Calibration of a CCD/CMOS Time-of-Flight Camera.

    PubMed

    Chiabrando, Filiberto; Chiabrando, Roberto; Piatti, Dario; Rinaudo, Fulvio

    2009-01-01

    3D imaging with Time-of-Flight (ToF) cameras is a promising recent technique which allows 3D point clouds to be acquired at video frame rates. However, the distance measurements of these devices are often affected by some systematic errors which decrease the quality of the acquired data. In order to evaluate these errors, some experimental tests on a CCD/CMOS ToF camera sensor, the SwissRanger (SR)-4000 camera, were performed and reported in this paper. In particular, two main aspects are treated: the calibration of the distance measurements of the SR-4000 camera, which deals with evaluation of the camera warm up time period, the distance measurement error evaluation and a study of the influence on distance measurements of the camera orientation with respect to the observed object; the second aspect concerns the photogrammetric calibration of the amplitude images delivered by the camera using a purpose-built multi-resolution field made of high contrast targets.

  17. Simultaneous real-time 3D photoacoustic tomography and EEG for neurovascular coupling study in an animal model of epilepsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bo; Xiao, Jiaying; Jiang, Huabei

    2014-08-01

    Objective. Neurovascular coupling in epilepsy is poorly understood; its study requires simultaneous monitoring of hemodynamic changes and neural activity in the brain. Approach. Here for the first time we present a combined real-time 3D photoacoustic tomography (PAT) and electrophysiology/electroencephalography (EEG) system for the study of neurovascular coupling in epilepsy, whose ability was demonstrated with a pentylenetetrazol (PTZ) induced generalized seizure model in rats. Two groups of experiments were carried out with different wavelengths to detect the changes of oxy-hemoglobin (HbO2) and deoxy-hemoglobin (HbR) signals in the rat brain. We extracted the average PAT signals of the superior sagittal sinus (SSS), and compared them with the EEG signal. Main results. Results showed that the seizure process can be divided into three stages. A ‘dip’ lasting for 1-2 min in the first stage and the following hyperfusion in the second stage were observed. The HbO2 signal and the HbR signal were generally negatively correlated. The change of blood flow was also estimated. All the acquired results here were in accordance with other published results. Significance. Compared to other existing functional neuroimaging tools, the method proposed here enables reliable tracking of hemodynamic signal with both high spatial and high temporal resolution in 3D, so it is more suitable for neurovascular coupling study of epilepsy.

  18. A GRASS GIS based Spatio-Temporal Algebra for Raster-, 3D Raster- and Vector Time Series Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leppelt, Thomas; Gebbert, Sören

    2015-04-01

    Enhancing the well known and widely used map algebra proposed by Dr. Charles Dana Tomlin [1] with the time dimension is an ongoing research topic. The efficient processing of large time series of raster, 3D raster and vector datasets, e. g. raster datasets for temperature or precipitations on continental scale, requires a sophisticated spatio-temporal algebra that is capable of handling datasets with different temporal granularities and spatio-temporal extents. With the temporal enabled GRASS GIS [2] and the GRASS GIS Temporal Framework new spatio-temporal data types are available in GRASS GIS 7, called space time datasets. These space time datasets represent time series of raster, 3D raster and vector map layers. Furthermore the temporal framework provides a wide range of functionalities to support the implementation of a temporal algebra. While spatial capabilities of GRASS GIS are used to perform the spatial processing of the time stamped map layers that are registered in a space time dataset, the temporal processing is provided by the GRASS GIS temporal framework that supports time intervals and time instances. Mixing time instance and time intervals as well as gaps, overlapping or inclusion of intervals and instances is possible. Hence this framework allows an arbitrary layout of the time dimension. We implemented two ways to process space time datasets with arbitrary temporal layout, the temporal topology and the granularity based spatio-temporal algebra. The algebra provides the functionality to define complex spatio-temporal topological operators that process time and space in a single expression. The algebra includes methods to select map layers from space time datasets based on their temporal relations, to temporally shift time stamped map layers, to create temporal buffer and to snap time instances of time stamped map layers to create a valid temporal topology. In addition spatio-temporal operations can be evaluated within conditional statements. These

  19. Real-time cardiac synchronization with fixed volume frame rate for reducing physiological instabilities in 3D FMRI.

    PubMed

    Tijssen, Rob H N; Okell, Thomas W; Miller, Karla L

    2011-08-15

    Although 2D echo-planar imaging (EPI) remains the dominant method for functional MRI (FMRI), 3D readouts are receiving more interest as these sequences have favorable signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and enable imaging at a high isotropic resolution. Spoiled gradient-echo (SPGR) and balanced steady-state free-precession (bSSFP) are rapid sequences that are typically acquired with highly segmented 3D readouts, and thus less sensitive to image distortion and signal dropout. They therefore provide a powerful alternative for FMRI in areas with strong susceptibility offsets, such as deep gray matter structures and the brainstem. Unfortunately, the multi-shot nature of the readout makes these sequences highly sensitive to physiological fluctuations, and large signal instabilities are observed in the inferior regions of the brain. In this work a characterization of the source of these instabilities is given and a new method is presented to reduce the instabilities observed in 3D SPGR and bSSFP. Rapidly acquired single-slice data, which critically sampled the respiratory and cardiac waveforms, showed that cardiac pulsation is the dominant source of the instabilities. Simulations further showed that synchronizing the readout to the cardiac cycle minimizes the instabilities considerably. A real-time synchronization method was therefore developed, which utilizes parallel-imaging techniques to allow cardiac synchronization without alteration of the volume acquisition rate. The implemented method significantly improves the temporal stability in areas that are affected by cardiac-related signal fluctuations. In bSSFP data the tSNR in the brainstem increased by 45%, at the cost of a small reduction in tSNR in the cortical areas. In SPGR the temporal stability is improved by approximately 20% in the subcortical structures and as well as cortical gray matter when synchronization was performed.

  20. [Measurement of left atrial and ventricular volumes in real-time 3D echocardiography. Validation by nuclear magnetic resonance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, F.; Shiota, T.; Qin, J. X.; White, R. D.; Thomas, J. D.

    2001-01-01

    The measurement of the left ventricular ejection fraction is important for the evaluation of cardiomyopathy and depends on the measurement of left ventricular volumes. There are no existing conventional echocardiographic means of measuring the true left atrial and ventricular volumes without mathematical approximations. The aim of this study was to test anew real time 3-dimensional echocardiographic system of calculating left atrial and ventricular volumes in 40 patients after in vitro validation. The volumes of the left atrium and ventricle acquired from real time 3-D echocardiography in the apical view, were calculated in 7 sections parallel to the surface of the probe and compared with atrial (10 patients) and ventricular (30 patients) volumes calculated by nuclear magnetic resonance with the simpson method and with volumes of water in balloons placed in a cistern. Linear regression analysis showed an excellent correlation between the real volume of water in the balloons and volumes given in real time 3-dimensional echocardiography (y = 0.94x + 5.5, r = 0.99, p < 0.001, D = -10 +/- 4.5 ml). A good correlation was observed between real time 3-dimensional echocardiography and nuclear magnetic resonance for the measurement of left atrial and ventricular volumes (y = 0.95x - 10, r = 0.91, p < 0.001, D = -14.8 +/- 19.5 ml and y = 0.87x + 10, r = 0.98, P < 0.001, D = -8.3 +/- 18.7 ml, respectively. The authors conclude that real time three-dimensional echocardiography allows accurate measurement of left heart volumes underlying the clinical potential of this new 3-D method.

  1. Towards real-time 3D US to CT bone image registration using phase and curvature feature based GMM matching.

    PubMed

    Brounstein, Anna; Hacihaliloglu, Ilker; Guy, Pierre; Hodgson, Antony; Abugharbieh, Rafeef

    2011-01-01

    In order to use pre-operatively acquired computed tomography (CT) scans to guide surgical tool movements in orthopaedic surgery, the CT scan must first be registered to the patient's anatomy. Three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound (US) could potentially be used for this purpose if the registration process could be made sufficiently automatic, fast and accurate, but existing methods have difficulties meeting one or more of these criteria. We propose a near-real-time US-to-CT registration method that matches point clouds extracted from local phase images with points selected in part on the basis of local curvature. The point clouds are represented as Gaussian Mixture Models (GMM) and registration is achieved by minimizing the statistical dissimilarity between the GMMs using an L2 distance metric. We present quantitative and qualitative results on both phantom and clinical pelvis data and show a mean registration time of 2.11 s with a mean accuracy of 0.49 mm.

  2. Simultaneous bilateral real-time 3-d transcranial ultrasound imaging at 1 MHz through poor acoustic windows.

    PubMed

    Lindsey, Brooks D; Nicoletto, Heather A; Bennett, Ellen R; Laskowitz, Daniel T; Smith, Stephen W

    2013-04-01

    Ultrasound imaging has been proposed as a rapid, portable alternative imaging modality to examine stroke patients in pre-hospital or emergency room settings. However, in performing transcranial ultrasound examinations, 8%-29% of patients in a general population may present with window failure, in which case it is not possible to acquire clinically useful sonographic information through the temporal bone acoustic window. In this work, we describe the technical considerations, design and fabrication of low-frequency (1.2 MHz), large aperture (25.3 mm) sparse matrix array transducers for 3-D imaging in the event of window failure. These transducers are integrated into a system for real-time 3-D bilateral transcranial imaging-the ultrasound brain helmet-and color flow imaging capabilities at 1.2 MHz are directly compared with arrays operating at 1.8 MHz in a flow phantom with attenuation comparable to the in vivo case. Contrast-enhanced imaging allowed visualization of arteries of the Circle of Willis in 5 of 5 subjects and 8 of 10 sides of the head despite probe placement outside of the acoustic window. Results suggest that this type of transducer may allow acquisition of useful images either in individuals with poor windows or outside of the temporal acoustic window in the field.

  3. Travel time calculation in regular 3D grid in local and regional scale using fast marching method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polkowski, M.

    2015-12-01

    Local and regional 3D seismic velocity models of crust and sediments are very important for numerous technics like mantle and core tomography, localization of local and regional events and others. Most of those techniques require calculation of wave travel time through the 3D model. This can be achieved using multiple approaches from simple ray tracing to advanced full waveform calculation. In this study simple and efficient implementation of fast marching method is presented. This method provides more information than ray tracing and is much less complicated than methods like full waveform being the perfect compromise. Presented code is written in C++, well commented and is easy to modify for different types of studies. Additionally performance is widely discussed including possibilities of multithreading and massive parallelism like GPU. Source code will be published in 2016 as it is part of the PhD thesis. National Science Centre Poland provided financial support for this work via NCN grant DEC-2011/02/A/ST10/00284.

  4. Real-time processor for 3-D information extraction from image sequences by a moving area sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hattori, Tetsuo; Nakada, Makoto; Kubo, Katsumi

    1990-11-01

    This paper presents a real time image processor for obtaining threedimensional( 3-D) distance information from image sequence caused by a moving area sensor. The processor has been developed for an automated visual inspection robot system (pilot system) with an autonomous vehicle which moves around avoiding obstacles in a power plant and checks whether there are defects or abnormal phenomena such as steam leakage from valves. The processor detects the distance between objects in the input image and the area sensor deciding corresponding points(pixels) between the first input image and the last one by tracing the loci of edges through the sequence of sixteen images. The hardware which plays an important role is two kinds of boards: mapping boards which can transform X-coordinate (horizontal direction) and Y-coordinate (vertical direction) for each horizontal row of images and a regional labelling board which extracts the connected loci of edges through image sequence. This paper also shows the whole processing flow of the distance detection algorithm. Since the processor can continuously process images ( 512x512x8 [pixels*bits per frame] ) at the NTSC video rate it takes about O. 7[sec] to measure the 3D distance by sixteen input images. The error rate of the measurement is maximum 10 percent when the area sensor laterally moves the range of 20 [centimeters] and when the measured scene including complicated background is at a distance of 4 [meters] from

  5. Quantum 3D spin-glass system on the scales of space-time periods of external electromagnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Gevorkyan, A. S.

    2012-10-15

    A dielectric medium consisting of rigidly polarized molecules has been treated as a quantum 3D disordered spin system. It is shown that using Birkhoff's ergodic hypothesis the initial 3D disordered spin problem on scales of space-time periods of external field is reduced to two conditionally separable 1D problems. The first problem describes a 1D disordered N-particle quantum system with relaxation in random environment while the second one describes statistical properties of ensemble of disordered 1D steric spin chains of certain length. Basing on constructions which are developed in both problems, the coefficient of polarizability related to collective orientational effects under the influence of external field was calculated. On the basis of these investigations the equation of Clausius-Mossotti (CM) has been generalized as well as the equation for permittivity. It is shown that under the influence of weak standing electromagnetic fields in the equation of CM arising of catastrophe is possible, that can substantially change behavior of permittivity in the X-ray region on the macroscopic scale of space.

  6. Non-invasive 3D time-of-flight imaging technique for tumour volume assessment in subcutaneous models.

    PubMed

    Delgado San Martin, J A; Worthington, P; Yates, J W T

    2015-04-01

    Subcutaneous tumour xenograft volumes are generally measured using callipers. This method is susceptible to inter- and intra-observer variability and systematic inaccuracies. Non-invasive 3D measurement using ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have been considered, but require immobilization of the animal. An infrared-based 3D time-of-flight (3DToF) camera was used to acquire a depth map of tumour-bearing mice. A semi-automatic algorithm based on parametric surfaces was applied to estimate tumour volume. Four clay mouse models and 18 tumour-bearing mice were assessed using callipers (applying both prolate spheroid and ellipsoid models) and 3DToF methods, and validated using tumour weight. Inter-experimentalist variability could be up to 25% in the calliper method. Experimental results demonstrated good consistency and relatively low error rates for the 3DToF method, in contrast to biased overestimation using callipers. Accuracy is currently limited by camera performance; however, we anticipate the next generation 3DToF cameras will be able to support the development of a practical system. Here, we describe an initial proof of concept for a non-invasive, non-immobilized, morphology-independent, economical and potentially more precise tumour volume assessment technique. This affordable technique should maximize the datapoints per animal, by reducing the numbers required in experiments and reduce their distress.

  7. C-ME: A 3D Community-Based, Real-Time Collaboration Tool for Scientific Research and Training

    PubMed Central

    Kolatkar, Anand; Kennedy, Kevin; Halabuk, Dan; Kunken, Josh; Marrinucci, Dena; Bethel, Kelly; Guzman, Rodney; Huckaby, Tim; Kuhn, Peter

    2008-01-01

    The need for effective collaboration tools is growing as multidisciplinary proteome-wide projects and distributed research teams become more common. The resulting data is often quite disparate, stored in separate locations, and not contextually related. Collaborative Molecular Modeling Environment (C-ME) is an interactive community-based collaboration system that allows researchers to organize information, visualize data on a two-dimensional (2-D) or three-dimensional (3-D) basis, and share and manage that information with collaborators in real time. C-ME stores the information in industry-standard databases that are immediately accessible by appropriate permission within the computer network directory service or anonymously across the internet through the C-ME application or through a web browser. The system addresses two important aspects of collaboration: context and information management. C-ME allows a researcher to use a 3-D atomic structure model or a 2-D image as a contextual basis on which to attach and share annotations to specific atoms or molecules or to specific regions of a 2-D image. These annotations provide additional information about the atomic structure or image data that can then be evaluated, amended or added to by other project members. PMID:18286178

  8. 3D Visualization of near real-time remote-sensing observation for hurricanes field campaign using Google Earth API

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, P.; Turk, J.; Vu, Q.; Knosp, B.; Hristova-Veleva, S. M.; Lambrigtsen, B.; Poulsen, W. L.; Licata, S.

    2009-12-01

    NASA is planning a new field experiment, the Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes (GRIP), in the summer of 2010 to better understand how tropical storms form and develop into major hurricanes. The DC-8 aircraft and the Global Hawk Unmanned Airborne System (UAS) will be deployed loaded with instruments for measurements including lightning, temperature, 3D wind, precipitation, liquid and ice water contents, aerosol and cloud profiles. During the field campaign, both the spaceborne and the airborne observations will be collected in real-time and integrated with the hurricane forecast models. This observation-model integration will help the campaign achieve its science goals by allowing team members to effectively plan the mission with current forecasts. To support the GRIP experiment, JPL developed a website for interactive visualization of all related remote-sensing observations in the GRIP’s geographical domain using the new Google Earth API. All the observations are collected in near real-time (NRT) with 2 to 5 hour latency. The observations include a 1KM blended Sea Surface Temperature (SST) map from GHRSST L2P products; 6-hour composite images of GOES IR; stability indices, temperature and vapor profiles from AIRS and AMSU-B; microwave brightness temperature and rain index maps from AMSR-E, SSMI and TRMM-TMI; ocean surface wind vectors, vorticity and divergence of the wind from QuikSCAT; the 3D precipitation structure from TRMM-PR and vertical profiles of cloud and precipitation from CloudSAT. All the NRT observations are collected from the data centers and science facilities at NASA and NOAA, subsetted, re-projected, and composited into hourly or daily data products depending on the frequency of the observation. The data products are then displayed on the 3D Google Earth plug-in at the JPL Tropical Cyclone Information System (TCIS) website. The data products offered by the TCIS in the Google Earth display include image overlays, wind vectors, clickable

  9. Design and application of real-time visual attention model for the exploration of 3D virtual environments.

    PubMed

    Hillaire, Sébastien; Lécuyer, Anatole; Regia-Corte, Tony; Cozot, Rémi; Royan, Jérôme; Breton, Gaspard

    2012-03-01

    This paper studies the design and application of a novel visual attention model designed to compute user's gaze position automatically, i.e., without using a gaze-tracking system. The model we propose is specifically designed for real-time first-person exploration of 3D virtual environments. It is the first model adapted to this context which can compute in real time a continuous gaze point position instead of a set of 3D objects potentially observed by the user. To do so, contrary to previous models which use a mesh-based representation of visual objects, we introduce a representation based on surface-elements. Our model also simulates visual reflexes and the cognitive processes which take place in the brain such as the gaze behavior associated to first-person navigation in the virtual environment. Our visual attention model combines both bottom-up and top-down components to compute a continuous gaze point position on screen that hopefully matches the user's one. We conducted an experiment to study and compare the performance of our method with a state-of-the-art approach. Our results are found significantly better with sometimes more than 100 percent of accuracy gained. This suggests that computing a gaze point in a 3D virtual environment in real time is possible and is a valid approach, compared to object-based approaches. Finally, we expose different applications of our model when exploring virtual environments. We present different algorithms which can improve or adapt the visual feedback of virtual environments based on gaze information. We first propose a level-of-detail approach that heavily relies on multiple-texture sampling. We show that it is possible to use the gaze information of our visual attention model to increase visual quality where the user is looking, while maintaining a high-refresh rate. Second, we introduce the use of the visual attention model in three visual effects inspired by the human visual system namely: depth-of-field blur, camera

  10. Design and application of real-time visual attention model for the exploration of 3D virtual environments.

    PubMed

    Hillaire, Sébastien; Lécuyer, Anatole; Regia-Corte, Tony; Cozot, Rémi; Royan, Jérôme; Breton, Gaspard

    2012-03-01

    This paper studies the design and application of a novel visual attention model designed to compute user's gaze position automatically, i.e., without using a gaze-tracking system. The model we propose is specifically designed for real-time first-person exploration of 3D virtual environments. It is the first model adapted to this context which can compute in real time a continuous gaze point position instead of a set of 3D objects potentially observed by the user. To do so, contrary to previous models which use a mesh-based representation of visual objects, we introduce a representation based on surface-elements. Our model also simulates visual reflexes and the cognitive processes which take place in the brain such as the gaze behavior associated to first-person navigation in the virtual environment. Our visual attention model combines both bottom-up and top-down components to compute a continuous gaze point position on screen that hopefully matches the user's one. We conducted an experiment to study and compare the performance of our method with a state-of-the-art approach. Our results are found significantly better with sometimes more than 100 percent of accuracy gained. This suggests that computing a gaze point in a 3D virtual environment in real time is possible and is a valid approach, compared to object-based approaches. Finally, we expose different applications of our model when exploring virtual environments. We present different algorithms which can improve or adapt the visual feedback of virtual environments based on gaze information. We first propose a level-of-detail approach that heavily relies on multiple-texture sampling. We show that it is possible to use the gaze information of our visual attention model to increase visual quality where the user is looking, while maintaining a high-refresh rate. Second, we introduce the use of the visual attention model in three visual effects inspired by the human visual system namely: depth-of-field blur, camera

  11. Automated real-time search and analysis algorithms for a non-contact 3D profiling system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haynes, Mark; Wu, Chih-Hang John; Beck, B. Terry; Peterman, Robert J.

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of this research is to develop a new means of identifying and extracting geometrical feature statistics from a non-contact precision-measurement 3D profilometer. Autonomous algorithms have been developed to search through large-scale Cartesian point clouds to identify and extract geometrical features. These algorithms are developed with the intent of providing real-time production quality control of cold-rolled steel wires. The steel wires in question are prestressing steel reinforcement wires for concrete members. The geometry of the wire is critical in the performance of the overall concrete structure. For this research a custom 3D non-contact profilometry system has been developed that utilizes laser displacement sensors for submicron resolution surface profiling. Optimizations in the control and sensory system allow for data points to be collected at up to an approximate 400,000 points per second. In order to achieve geometrical feature extraction and tolerancing with this large volume of data, the algorithms employed are optimized for parsing large data quantities. The methods used provide a unique means of maintaining high resolution data of the surface profiles while keeping algorithm running times within practical bounds for industrial application. By a combination of regional sampling, iterative search, spatial filtering, frequency filtering, spatial clustering, and template matching a robust feature identification method has been developed. These algorithms provide an autonomous means of verifying tolerances in geometrical features. The key method of identifying the features is through a combination of downhill simplex and geometrical feature templates. By performing downhill simplex through several procedural programming layers of different search and filtering techniques, very specific geometrical features can be identified within the point cloud and analyzed for proper tolerancing. Being able to perform this quality control in real time

  12. 3-D imaging of large scale buried structure by 1-D inversion of very early time electromagnetic (VETEM) data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Aydmer, A.A.; Chew, W.C.; Cui, T.J.; Wright, D.L.; Smith, D.V.; Abraham, J.D.

    2001-01-01

    A simple and efficient method for large scale three-dimensional (3-D) subsurface imaging of inhomogeneous background is presented. One-dimensional (1-D) multifrequency distorted Born iterative method (DBIM) is employed in the inversion. Simulation results utilizing synthetic scattering data are given. Calibration of the very early time electromagnetic (VETEM) experimental waveforms is detailed along with major problems encountered in practice and their solutions. This discussion is followed by the results of a large scale application of the method to the experimental data provided by the VETEM system of the U.S. Geological Survey. The method is shown to have a computational complexity that is promising for on-site inversion.

  13. Incorporation of 3-D Scanning Lidar Data into Google Earth for Real-time Air Pollution Observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiang, C.; Nee, J.; Das, S.; Sun, S.; Hsu, Y.; Chiang, H.; Chen, S.; Lin, P.; Chu, J.; Su, C.; Lee, W.; Su, L.; Chen, C.

    2011-12-01

    3-D Differential Absorption Scanning Lidar (DIASL) system has been designed with small size, light weight, and suitable for installation in various vehicles and places for monitoring of air pollutants and displays a detailed real-time temporal and spatial variability of trace gases via the Google Earth. The fast scanning techniques and visual information can rapidly identify the locations and sources of the polluted gases and assess the most affected areas. It is helpful for Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to protect the people's health and abate the air pollution as quickly as possible. The distributions of the atmospheric pollutants and their relationship with local metrological parameters measured with ground based instruments will also be discussed. Details will be presented in the upcoming symposium.

  14. Re-analysis data base from a 3D data assimilation tool covering the RBSP-time period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourdarie, Sebastien; Lazaro, Didier; RBSP ECT Team

    2016-04-01

    An Ensemble Kalman filter combined with the Salammbô 3D tool has been used to produce a re-analysis data base of the electron radiation belt from September 2012 to end of 2015. RBSP-A&B/MagEis data, GOES-13/MagEd and GOES-13/SEM data were ingested by the system. So far only omni-directional fluxes have been considered in this study. The time resolution of the re-analysis data base is 10 minutes and covers electron energies above 300 keV. The results obtained are compared/validated against INTEGRAL/SREM data. Performance of the data assimilation tool will be discussed as well as ways of improvement for the future.

  15. Coherence and visibility for vectorial light.

    PubMed

    Luis, Alfredo

    2010-08-01

    Two-path interference of transversal vectorial waves is embedded within a larger scheme: this is four-path interference between four scalar waves. This comprises previous approaches to coherence between vectorial waves and restores the equivalence between correlation-based coherence and visibility. PMID:20686580

  16. Helicopter Flight Test of a Compact, Real-Time 3-D Flash Lidar for Imaging Hazardous Terrain During Planetary Landing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roback, VIncent E.; Amzajerdian, Farzin; Brewster, Paul F.; Barnes, Bruce W.; Kempton, Kevin S.; Reisse, Robert A.; Bulyshev, Alexander E.

    2013-01-01

    A second generation, compact, real-time, air-cooled 3-D imaging Flash Lidar sensor system, developed from a number of cutting-edge components from industry and NASA, is lab characterized and helicopter flight tested under the Autonomous Precision Landing and Hazard Detection and Avoidance Technology (ALHAT) project. The ALHAT project is seeking to develop a guidance, navigation, and control (GN&C) and sensing system based on lidar technology capable of enabling safe, precise crewed or robotic landings in challenging terrain on planetary bodies under any ambient lighting conditions. The Flash Lidar incorporates a 3-D imaging video camera based on Indium-Gallium-Arsenide Avalanche Photo Diode and novel micro-electronic technology for a 128 x 128 pixel array operating at a video rate of 20 Hz, a high pulse-energy 1.06 µm Neodymium-doped: Yttrium Aluminum Garnet (Nd:YAG) laser, a remote laser safety termination system, high performance transmitter and receiver optics with one and five degrees field-of-view (FOV), enhanced onboard thermal control, as well as a compact and self-contained suite of support electronics housed in a single box and built around a PC-104 architecture to enable autonomous operations. The Flash Lidar was developed and then characterized at two NASA-Langley Research Center (LaRC) outdoor laser test range facilities both statically and dynamically, integrated with other ALHAT GN&C subsystems from partner organizations, and installed onto a Bell UH-1H Iroquois "Huey" helicopter at LaRC. The integrated system was flight tested at the NASA-Kennedy Space Center (KSC) on simulated lunar approach to a custom hazard field consisting of rocks, craters, hazardous slopes, and safe-sites near the Shuttle Landing Facility runway starting at slant ranges of 750 m. In order to evaluate different methods of achieving hazard detection, the lidar, in conjunction with the ALHAT hazard detection and GN&C system, operates in both a narrow 1deg FOV raster

  17. Intracellular nanomanipulation by a photonic-force microscope with real-time acquisition of a 3D stiffness matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertseva, E.; Singh, A. S. G.; Lekki, J.; Thévenaz, P.; Lekka, M.; Jeney, S.; Gremaud, G.; Puttini, S.; Nowak, W.; Dietler, G.; Forró, L.; Unser, M.; Kulik, A. J.

    2009-07-01

    A traditional photonic-force microscope (PFM) results in huge sets of data, which requires tedious numerical analysis. In this paper, we propose instead an analog signal processor to attain real-time capabilities while retaining the richness of the traditional PFM data. Our system is devoted to intracellular measurements and is fully interactive through the use of a haptic joystick. Using our specialized analog hardware along with a dedicated algorithm, we can extract the full 3D stiffness matrix of the optical trap in real time, including the off-diagonal cross-terms. Our system is also capable of simultaneously recording data for subsequent offline analysis. This allows us to check that a good correlation exists between the classical analysis of stiffness and our real-time measurements. We monitor the PFM beads using an optical microscope. The force-feedback mechanism of the haptic joystick helps us in interactively guiding the bead inside living cells and collecting information from its (possibly anisotropic) environment. The instantaneous stiffness measurements are also displayed in real time on a graphical user interface. The whole system has been built and is operational; here we present early results that confirm the consistency of the real-time measurements with offline computations.

  18. Analysis of time-structure of BSRs using 3D seismic data in the Eastern Nankai Trough, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagakubo, S.; Inamori, T.; Kobayashi, T.; Fujii, T.

    2005-12-01

    According to the result of METI Exploratory Wells "Tokai-Oki to Kumano-nada" conducted in FY2003 in Japan, it is suggested that methane hydrate bearing layers in the Eastern Nanakai Trough distribute heterogeneously above BSRs (Bottom Simulating Reflectors). To understand the heterogeneity of distribution of methane hydrate bearing layers and explore concentrated hydrate bearing layers, we conducted a detailed analysis of time-structure map of BSR using 3D seismic survey data acquired in the Eastern Nankai Trough. Since P-wave velocity of hydrate bearing layers are high, it was expected that two-way-time from sea bottom to BSR is short above concentrated hydrate bearing layers compared to hydrate bearing zones. Although significant anomalies are recognized on time-structure map, it seems that anomalies are corresponding to heterogeneous thermal-structure in preference to distribution of hydrate bearing layers around surveyed area. It should be considered that these thermal anomalies are depending on fluid migration with hydrocarbons through faults, unconformities and permeable sand layers from deeper formations. Since occurrences of methane hydrates are strongly restricted by temperature and pressure, analysis of time-structure of BSR acquired by seismic data could be helpful to understand the accumulation mechanism of methane hydrates in sediments.

  19. High-performance parallel solver for 3D time-dependent Schrodinger equation for large-scale nanosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gainullin, I. K.; Sonkin, M. A.

    2015-03-01

    A parallelized three-dimensional (3D) time-dependent Schrodinger equation (TDSE) solver for one-electron systems is presented in this paper. The TDSE Solver is based on the finite-difference method (FDM) in Cartesian coordinates and uses a simple and explicit leap-frog numerical scheme. The simplicity of the numerical method provides very efficient parallelization and high performance of calculations using Graphics Processing Units (GPUs). For example, calculation of 106 time-steps on the 1000ṡ1000ṡ1000 numerical grid (109 points) takes only 16 hours on 16 Tesla M2090 GPUs. The TDSE Solver demonstrates scalability (parallel efficiency) close to 100% with some limitations on the problem size. The TDSE Solver is validated by calculation of energy eigenstates of the hydrogen atom (13.55 eV) and affinity level of H- ion (0.75 eV). The comparison with other TDSE solvers shows that a GPU-based TDSE Solver is 3 times faster for the problems of the same size and with the same cost of computational resources. The usage of a non-regular Cartesian grid or problem-specific non-Cartesian coordinates increases this benefit up to 10 times. The TDSE Solver was applied to the calculation of the resonant charge transfer (RCT) in nanosystems, including several related physical problems, such as electron capture during H+-H0 collision and electron tunneling between H- ion and thin metallic island film.

  20. An assessment of the 3D geometric surrogacy of shock timing diagnostic techniques for tuning experiments on the NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robey, H. F.; Munro, D. H.; Spears, B. K.; Marinak, M. M.; Jones, O. S.; Patel, M. V.; Haan, S. W.; Salmonson, J. D.; Landen, O. L.; Boehly, T. R.; Nikroo, A.

    2008-05-01

    Ignition capsule implosions planned for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) require a pulse shape with a carefully designed series of four steps, which launch a corresponding series of shocks through the ablator and DT ice shell. The relative timing of these shocks is critical for maintaining the DT fuel on a low adiabat. The current NIF specification requires that the timing of all four shocks be tuned to an accuracy of <= +/- 100ps. To meet these stringent requirements, dedicated tuning experiments are being planned to measure and adjust the shock timing on NIF. These tuning experiments will be performed in a modified hohlraum geometry, where a re-entrant Au cone is added to the standard NIF hohlraum to provide optical diagnostic (VISAR and SOP) access to the shocks as they break out of the ablator. This modified geometry is referred to as the 'keyhole' hohlraum and introduces a geometric difference between these tuning-experiments and the full ignition geometry. In order to assess the surrogacy of this modified geometry, 3D simulations using HYDRA [1] have been performed. The results from simulations of a quarter of the target geometry are presented. Comparisons of the hohlraum drive conditions and the resulting effect on the shock timing in the keyhole hohlraum are compared with the corresponding results for the standard ignition hohlraum.

  1. Medical applications of fast 3D cameras in real-time image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) of cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shidong; Li, Tuotuo; Geng, Jason

    2013-03-01

    Dynamic volumetric medical imaging (4DMI) has reduced motion artifacts, increased early diagnosis of small mobile tumors, and improved target definition for treatment planning. High speed cameras for video, X-ray, or other forms of sequential imaging allow a live tracking of external or internal movement useful for real-time image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT). However, none of 4DMI can track real-time organ motion and no camera has correlated with 4DMI to show volumetric changes. With a brief review of various IGRT techniques, we propose a fast 3D camera for live-video stereovision, an automatic surface-motion identifier to classify body or respiratory motion, a mechanical model for synchronizing the external surface movement with the internal target displacement by combination use of the real-time stereovision and pre-treatment 4DMI, and dynamic multi-leaf collimation for adaptive aiming the moving target. Our preliminary results demonstrate that the technique is feasible and efficient in IGRT of mobile targets. A clinical trial has been initiated for validation of its spatial and temporal accuracies and dosimetric impact for intensity-modulated RT (IMRT), volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT), and stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) of any mobile tumors. The technique can be extended for surface-guided stereotactic needle insertion in biopsy of small lung nodules.

  2. Real-time microstructure imaging by Laue microdiffraction: A sample application in laser 3D printed Ni-based superalloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Guangni; Zhu, Wenxin; Shen, Hao; Li, Yao; Zhang, Anfeng; Tamura, Nobumichi; Chen, Kai

    2016-06-01

    Synchrotron-based Laue microdiffraction has been widely applied to characterize the local crystal structure, orientation, and defects of inhomogeneous polycrystalline solids by raster scanning them under a micro/nano focused polychromatic X-ray probe. In a typical experiment, a large number of Laue diffraction patterns are collected, requiring novel data reduction and analysis approaches, especially for researchers who do not have access to fast parallel computing capabilities. In this article, a novel approach is developed by plotting the distributions of the average recorded intensity and the average filtered intensity of the Laue patterns. Visualization of the characteristic microstructural features is realized in real time during data collection. As an example, this method is applied to image key features such as microcracks, carbides, heat affected zone, and dendrites in a laser assisted 3D printed Ni-based superalloy, at a speed much faster than data collection. Such analytical approach remains valid for a wide range of crystalline solids, and therefore extends the application range of the Laue microdiffraction technique to problems where real-time decision-making during experiment is crucial (for instance time-resolved non-reversible experiments).

  3. Time-stepping stability of continuous and discontinuous finite-element methods for 3-D wave propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulder, W. A.; Zhebel, E.; Minisini, S.

    2014-02-01

    We analyse the time-stepping stability for the 3-D acoustic wave equation, discretized on tetrahedral meshes. Two types of methods are considered: mass-lumped continuous finite elements and the symmetric interior-penalty discontinuous Galerkin method. Combining the spatial discretization with the leap-frog time-stepping scheme, which is second-order accurate and conditionally stable, leads to a fully explicit scheme. We provide estimates of its stability limit for simple cases, namely, the reference element with Neumann boundary conditions, its distorted version of arbitrary shape, the unit cube that can be partitioned into six tetrahedra with periodic boundary conditions and its distortions. The Courant-Friedrichs-Lewy stability limit contains an element diameter for which we considered different options. The one based on the sum of the eigenvalues of the spatial operator for the first-degree mass-lumped element gives the best results. It resembles the diameter of the inscribed sphere but is slightly easier to compute. The stability estimates show that the mass-lumped continuous and the discontinuous Galerkin finite elements of degree 2 have comparable stability conditions, whereas the mass-lumped elements of degree one and three allow for larger time steps.

  4. Real-time microstructure imaging by Laue microdiffraction: A sample application in laser 3D printed Ni-based superalloys.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Guangni; Zhu, Wenxin; Shen, Hao; Li, Yao; Zhang, Anfeng; Tamura, Nobumichi; Chen, Kai

    2016-01-01

    Synchrotron-based Laue microdiffraction has been widely applied to characterize the local crystal structure, orientation, and defects of inhomogeneous polycrystalline solids by raster scanning them under a micro/nano focused polychromatic X-ray probe. In a typical experiment, a large number of Laue diffraction patterns are collected, requiring novel data reduction and analysis approaches, especially for researchers who do not have access to fast parallel computing capabilities. In this article, a novel approach is developed by plotting the distributions of the average recorded intensity and the average filtered intensity of the Laue patterns. Visualization of the characteristic microstructural features is realized in real time during data collection. As an example, this method is applied to image key features such as microcracks, carbides, heat affected zone, and dendrites in a laser assisted 3D printed Ni-based superalloy, at a speed much faster than data collection. Such analytical approach remains valid for a wide range of crystalline solids, and therefore extends the application range of the Laue microdiffraction technique to problems where real-time decision-making during experiment is crucial (for instance time-resolved non-reversible experiments). PMID:27302087

  5. Real-time microstructure imaging by Laue microdiffraction: A sample application in laser 3D printed Ni-based superalloys

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Guangni; Zhu, Wenxin; Shen, Hao; Li, Yao; Zhang, Anfeng; Tamura, Nobumichi; Chen, Kai

    2016-01-01

    Synchrotron-based Laue microdiffraction has been widely applied to characterize the local crystal structure, orientation, and defects of inhomogeneous polycrystalline solids by raster scanning them under a micro/nano focused polychromatic X-ray probe. In a typical experiment, a large number of Laue diffraction patterns are collected, requiring novel data reduction and analysis approaches, especially for researchers who do not have access to fast parallel computing capabilities. In this article, a novel approach is developed by plotting the distributions of the average recorded intensity and the average filtered intensity of the Laue patterns. Visualization of the characteristic microstructural features is realized in real time during data collection. As an example, this method is applied to image key features such as microcracks, carbides, heat affected zone, and dendrites in a laser assisted 3D printed Ni-based superalloy, at a speed much faster than data collection. Such analytical approach remains valid for a wide range of crystalline solids, and therefore extends the application range of the Laue microdiffraction technique to problems where real-time decision-making during experiment is crucial (for instance time-resolved non-reversible experiments). PMID:27302087

  6. A Comprehensive Software System for Interactive, Real-time, Visual 3D Deterministic and Stochastic Groundwater Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, S.

    2002-05-01

    Taking advantage of the recent developments in groundwater modeling research and computer, image and graphics processing, and objected oriented programming technologies, Dr. Li and his research group have recently developed a comprehensive software system for unified deterministic and stochastic groundwater modeling. Characterized by a new real-time modeling paradigm and improved computational algorithms, the software simulates 3D unsteady flow and reactive transport in general groundwater formations subject to both systematic and "randomly" varying stresses and geological and chemical heterogeneity. The software system has following distinct features and capabilities: Interactive simulation and real time visualization and animation of flow in response to deterministic as well as stochastic stresses. Interactive, visual, and real time particle tracking, random walk, and reactive plume modeling in both systematically and randomly fluctuating flow. Interactive statistical inference, scattered data interpolation, regression, and ordinary and universal Kriging, conditional and unconditional simulation. Real-time, visual and parallel conditional flow and transport simulations. Interactive water and contaminant mass balance analysis and visual and real-time flux update. Interactive, visual, and real time monitoring of head and flux hydrographs and concentration breakthroughs. Real-time modeling and visualization of aquifer transition from confined to unconfined to partially de-saturated or completely dry and rewetting Simultaneous and embedded subscale models, automatic and real-time regional to local data extraction; Multiple subscale flow and transport models Real-time modeling of steady and transient vertical flow patterns on multiple arbitrarily-shaped cross-sections and simultaneous visualization of aquifer stratigraphy, properties, hydrological features (rivers, lakes, wetlands, wells, drains, surface seeps), and dynamically adjusted surface flooding area

  7. Towards real-time 3D US to CT bone image registration using phase and curvature feature based GMM matching.

    PubMed

    Brounstein, Anna; Hacihaliloglu, Ilker; Guy, Pierre; Hodgson, Antony; Abugharbieh, Rafeef

    2011-01-01

    In order to use pre-operatively acquired computed tomography (CT) scans to guide surgical tool movements in orthopaedic surgery, the CT scan must first be registered to the patient's anatomy. Three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound (US) could potentially be used for this purpose if the registration process could be made sufficiently automatic, fast and accurate, but existing methods have difficulties meeting one or more of these criteria. We propose a near-real-time US-to-CT registration method that matches point clouds extracted from local phase images with points selected in part on the basis of local curvature. The point clouds are represented as Gaussian Mixture Models (GMM) and registration is achieved by minimizing the statistical dissimilarity between the GMMs using an L2 distance metric. We present quantitative and qualitative results on both phantom and clinical pelvis data and show a mean registration time of 2.11 s with a mean accuracy of 0.49 mm. PMID:22003622

  8. Three-dimensional time-of-flight MR angiography for evaluation of intracranial aneurysms after endosaccular packing with Guglielmi detachable coils: comparison with 3D digital subtraction angiography.

    PubMed

    Okahara, Mika; Kiyosue, Hiro; Hori, Yuzo; Yamashita, Masanori; Nagatomi, Hirofumi; Mori, Hiromu

    2004-07-01

    The sensitivities and specificities of three-dimensional time-of-flight MR angiography (3D-TOF MRA) and 3D digital subtraction angiography (3D-DSA) were compared for evaluation of cerebral aneurysms after endosaccular packing with Guglielmi detachable coils (GDCs). Thirty-three patients with 33 aneurysms were included in this prospective study. 3D-TOF MRA and 3D-DSA were performed in the same week on all patients. Maximal intensity projection (MIP) and 3D reconstructed MRA images were compared with 3D-DSA images. The diameters of residual/recurrent aneurysms detected on 3D-DSA were calculated on a workstation. In 3 (9%) of 33 aneurysms, 3D-TOF MRA did not provide reliable information due to significant susceptibility artifacts on MRA. The sensitivity and specificity rates of MRA were 72.7 and 90.9%, respectively, for the diagnosis of residual/recurrent aneurysm. The diameters of residual/recurrent aneurysms that could not be detected by MRA were significantly smaller than those of detected aneurysms (mean 1.1 vs mean 2.3 mm). In one aneurysm of the anterior communicating artery (ACoA), the relationship between the residual aneurysm and the ACoA was more evident on MRA than DSA images. MRA can detect the recurrent/residual lumen of aneurysms treated with GDCs of up to at least 1.8 mm in diameter. 3D-TOF MRA is useful for follow-up of intracranial aneurysms treated with GDCs, and could partly replace DSA.

  9. Architecture of web services in the enhancement of real-time 3D video virtualization in cloud environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bada, Adedayo; Wang, Qi; Alcaraz-Calero, Jose M.; Grecos, Christos

    2016-04-01

    This paper proposes a new approach to improving the application of 3D video rendering and streaming by jointly exploring and optimizing both cloud-based virtualization and web-based delivery. The proposed web service architecture firstly establishes a software virtualization layer based on QEMU (Quick Emulator), an open-source virtualization software that has been able to virtualize system components except for 3D rendering, which is still in its infancy. The architecture then explores the cloud environment to boost the speed of the rendering at the QEMU software virtualization layer. The capabilities and inherent limitations of Virgil 3D, which is one of the most advanced 3D virtual Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) available, are analyzed through benchmarking experiments and integrated into the architecture to further speed up the rendering. Experimental results are reported and analyzed to demonstrate the benefits of the proposed approach.

  10. 3D imaging of cone photoreceptors over extended time periods using optical coherence tomography with adaptive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocaoglu, Omer P.; Lee, Sangyeol; Jonnal, Ravi S.; Wang, Qiang; Herde, Ashley E.; Besecker, Jason; Gao, Weihua; Miller, Donald T.

    2011-03-01

    Optical coherence tomography with adaptive optics (AO-OCT) is a highly sensitive, noninvasive method for 3D imaging of the microscopic retina. The purpose of this study is to advance AO-OCT technology by enabling repeated imaging of cone photoreceptors over extended periods of time (days). This sort of longitudinal imaging permits monitoring of 3D cone dynamics in both normal and diseased eyes, in particular the physiological processes of disc renewal and phagocytosis, which are disrupted by retinal diseases such as age related macular degeneration and retinitis pigmentosa. For this study, the existing AO-OCT system at Indiana underwent several major hardware and software improvements to optimize system performance for 4D cone imaging. First, ultrahigh speed imaging was realized using a Basler Sprint camera. Second, a light source with adjustable spectrum was realized by integration of an Integral laser (Femto Lasers, λc=800nm, ▵λ=160nm) and spectral filters in the source arm. For cone imaging, we used a bandpass filter with λc=809nm and ▵λ=81nm (2.6 μm nominal axial resolution in tissue, and 167 KHz A-line rate using 1,408 px), which reduced the impact of eye motion compared to previous AO-OCT implementations. Third, eye motion artifacts were further reduced by custom ImageJ plugins that registered (axially and laterally) the volume videos. In two subjects, cone photoreceptors were imaged and tracked over a ten day period and their reflectance and outer segment (OS) lengths measured. High-speed imaging and image registration/dewarping were found to reduce eye motion to a fraction of a cone width (1 μm root mean square). The pattern of reflections in the cones was found to change dramatically and occurred on a spatial scale well below the resolution of clinical instruments. Normalized reflectance of connecting cilia (CC) and OS posterior tip (PT) of an exemplary cone was 54+/-4, 47+/-4, 48+/-6, 50+/-5, 56+/-1% and 46+/-4, 53+/-4, 52+/-6, 50+/-5, 44

  11. Short and long time effects of low temperature Plasma Activated Media on 3D multicellular tumor spheroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Judée, Florian; Fongia, Céline; Ducommun, Bernard; Yousfi, Mohammed; Lobjois, Valérie; Merbahi, Nofel

    2016-02-01

    This work investigates the regionalized antiproliferative effects of plasma-activated medium (PAM) on colon adenocarcinoma multicellular tumor spheroid (MCTS), a model that mimics 3D organization and regionalization of a microtumor region. PAM was generated by dielectric barrier plasma jet setup crossed by helium carrier gas. MCTS were transferred in PAM at various times after plasma exposure up to 48 hours and effect on MCTS growth and DNA damage were evaluated. We report the impact of plasma exposure duration and delay before transfer on MCTS growth and DNA damage. Local accumulation of DNA damage revealed by histone H2AX phosphorylation is observed on outermost layers and is dependent on plasma exposure. DNA damage is completely reverted by catalase addition indicating that H2O2 plays major role in observed genotoxic effect while growth inhibitory effect is maintained suggesting that it is due to others reactive species. SOD and D-mannitol scavengers also reduced DNA damage by 30% indicating that and OH* are involved in H2O2 formation. Finally, PAM is able to retain its cytotoxic and genotoxic activity upon storage at +4 °C or ‑80 °C. These results suggest that plasma activated media may be a promising new antitumor strategy for colorectal cancer tumors.

  12. A Real-Time Magnetoencephalography Brain-Computer Interface Using Interactive 3D Visualization and the Hadoop Ecosystem.

    PubMed

    McClay, Wilbert A; Yadav, Nancy; Ozbek, Yusuf; Haas, Andy; Attias, Hagaii T; Nagarajan, Srikantan S

    2015-09-30

    Ecumenically, the fastest growing segment of Big Data is human biology-related data and the annual data creation is on the order of zetabytes. The implications are global across industries, of which the treatment of brain related illnesses and trauma could see the most significant and immediate effects. The next generation of health care IT and sensory devices are acquiring and storing massive amounts of patient related data. An innovative Brain-Computer Interface (BCI) for interactive 3D visualization is presented utilizing the Hadoop Ecosystem for data analysis and storage. The BCI is an implementation of Bayesian factor analysis algorithms that can distinguish distinct thought actions using magneto encephalographic (MEG) brain signals. We have collected data on five subjects yielding 90% positive performance in MEG mid- and post-movement activity. We describe a driver that substitutes the actions of the BCI as mouse button presses for real-time use in visual simulations. This process has been added into a flight visualization demonstration. By thinking left or right, the user experiences the aircraft turning in the chosen direction. The driver components of the BCI can be compiled into any software and substitute a user's intent for specific keyboard strikes or mouse button presses. The BCI's data analytics OPEN ACCESS Brain. Sci. 2015, 5 420 of a subject's MEG brainwaves and flight visualization performance are stored and analyzed using the Hadoop Ecosystem as a quick retrieval data warehouse.

  13. VR-Planets : a 3D immersive application for real-time flythrough images of planetary surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Civet, François; Le Mouélic, Stéphane

    2015-04-01

    During the last two decades, a fleet of planetary probes has acquired several hundred gigabytes of images of planetary surfaces. Mars has been particularly well covered thanks to the Mars Global Surveyor, Mars Express and Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter spacecrafts. HRSC, CTX, HiRISE instruments allowed the computation of Digital Elevation Models with a resolution from hundreds of meters up to 1 meter per pixel, and corresponding orthoimages with a resolution from few hundred of meters up to 25 centimeters per pixel. The integration of such huge data sets into a system allowing user-friendly manipulation either for scientific investigation or for public outreach can represent a real challenge. We are investigating how innovative tools can be used to freely fly over reconstructed landscapes in real time, using technologies derived from the game industry and virtual reality. We have developed an application based on a game engine, using planetary data, to immerse users in real martian landscapes. The user can freely navigate in each scene at full spatial resolution using a game controller. The actual rendering is compatible with several visualization devices such as 3D active screen, virtual reality headsets (Oculus Rift), and android devices.

  14. Single Molecule 3D Orientation in Time and Space: A 6D Dynamic Study on Fluorescently Labeled Lipid Membranes.

    PubMed

    Börner, Richard; Ehrlich, Nicky; Hohlbein, Johannes; Hübner, Christian G

    2016-05-01

    Interactions between single molecules profoundly depend on their mutual three-dimensional orientation. Recently, we demonstrated a technique that allows for orientation determination of single dipole emitters using a polarization-resolved distribution of fluorescence into several detection channels. As the method is based on the detection of single photons, it additionally allows for performing fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) as well as dynamical anisotropy measurements thereby providing access to fast orientational dynamics down to the nanosecond time scale. The 3D orientation is particularly interesting in non-isotropic environments such as lipid membranes, which are of great importance in biology. We used giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) labeled with fluorescent dyes down to a single molecule concentration as a model system for both, assessing the robustness of the orientation determination at different timescales and quantifying the associated errors. The vesicles provide a well-defined spherical surface, such that the use of fluorescent lipid dyes (DiO) allows to establish a a wide range of dipole orientations experimentally. To complement our experimental data, we performed Monte Carlo simulations of the rotational dynamics of dipoles incorporated into lipid membranes. Our study offers a comprehensive view on the dye orientation behavior in a lipid membrane with high spatiotemporal resolution representing a six-dimensional fluorescence detection approach. PMID:26972111

  15. Short and long time effects of low temperature Plasma Activated Media on 3D multicellular tumor spheroids

    PubMed Central

    Judée, Florian; Fongia, Céline; Ducommun, Bernard; Yousfi, Mohammed; Lobjois, Valérie; Merbahi, Nofel

    2016-01-01

    This work investigates the regionalized antiproliferative effects of plasma-activated medium (PAM) on colon adenocarcinoma multicellular tumor spheroid (MCTS), a model that mimics 3D organization and regionalization of a microtumor region. PAM was generated by dielectric barrier plasma jet setup crossed by helium carrier gas. MCTS were transferred in PAM at various times after plasma exposure up to 48 hours and effect on MCTS growth and DNA damage were evaluated. We report the impact of plasma exposure duration and delay before transfer on MCTS growth and DNA damage. Local accumulation of DNA damage revealed by histone H2AX phosphorylation is observed on outermost layers and is dependent on plasma exposure. DNA damage is completely reverted by catalase addition indicating that H2O2 plays major role in observed genotoxic effect while growth inhibitory effect is maintained suggesting that it is due to others reactive species. SOD and D-mannitol scavengers also reduced DNA damage by 30% indicating that and OH* are involved in H2O2 formation. Finally, PAM is able to retain its cytotoxic and genotoxic activity upon storage at +4 °C or −80 °C. These results suggest that plasma activated media may be a promising new antitumor strategy for colorectal cancer tumors. PMID:26898904

  16. A workflow to process 3D+time microscopy images of developing organisms and reconstruct their cell lineage.

    PubMed

    Faure, Emmanuel; Savy, Thierry; Rizzi, Barbara; Melani, Camilo; Stašová, Olga; Fabrèges, Dimitri; Špir, Róbert; Hammons, Mark; Čúnderlík, Róbert; Recher, Gaëlle; Lombardot, Benoît; Duloquin, Louise; Colin, Ingrid; Kollár, Jozef; Desnoulez, Sophie; Affaticati, Pierre; Maury, Benoît; Boyreau, Adeline; Nief, Jean-Yves; Calvat, Pascal; Vernier, Philippe; Frain, Monique; Lutfalla, Georges; Kergosien, Yannick; Suret, Pierre; Remešíková, Mariana; Doursat, René; Sarti, Alessandro; Mikula, Karol; Peyriéras, Nadine; Bourgine, Paul

    2016-01-01

    The quantitative and systematic analysis of embryonic cell dynamics from in vivo 3D+time image data sets is a major challenge at the forefront of developmental biology. Despite recent breakthroughs in the microscopy imaging of living systems, producing an accurate cell lineage tree for any developing organism remains a difficult task. We present here the BioEmergences workflow integrating all reconstruction steps from image acquisition and processing to the interactive visualization of reconstructed data. Original mathematical methods and algorithms underlie image filtering, nucleus centre detection, nucleus and membrane segmentation, and cell tracking. They are demonstrated on zebrafish, ascidian and sea urchin embryos with stained nuclei and membranes. Subsequent validation and annotations are carried out using Mov-IT, a custom-made graphical interface. Compared with eight other software tools, our workflow achieved the best lineage score. Delivered in standalone or web service mode, BioEmergences and Mov-IT offer a unique set of tools for in silico experimental embryology. PMID:26912388

  17. A Real-Time Magnetoencephalography Brain-Computer Interface Using Interactive 3D Visualization and the Hadoop Ecosystem.

    PubMed

    McClay, Wilbert A; Yadav, Nancy; Ozbek, Yusuf; Haas, Andy; Attias, Hagaii T; Nagarajan, Srikantan S

    2015-01-01

    Ecumenically, the fastest growing segment of Big Data is human biology-related data and the annual data creation is on the order of zetabytes. The implications are global across industries, of which the treatment of brain related illnesses and trauma could see the most significant and immediate effects. The next generation of health care IT and sensory devices are acquiring and storing massive amounts of patient related data. An innovative Brain-Computer Interface (BCI) for interactive 3D visualization is presented utilizing the Hadoop Ecosystem for data analysis and storage. The BCI is an implementation of Bayesian factor analysis algorithms that can distinguish distinct thought actions using magneto encephalographic (MEG) brain signals. We have collected data on five subjects yielding 90% positive performance in MEG mid- and post-movement activity. We describe a driver that substitutes the actions of the BCI as mouse button presses for real-time use in visual simulations. This process has been added into a flight visualization demonstration. By thinking left or right, the user experiences the aircraft turning in the chosen direction. The driver components of the BCI can be compiled into any software and substitute a user's intent for specific keyboard strikes or mouse button presses. The BCI's data analytics OPEN ACCESS Brain. Sci. 2015, 5 420 of a subject's MEG brainwaves and flight visualization performance are stored and analyzed using the Hadoop Ecosystem as a quick retrieval data warehouse. PMID:26437432

  18. Accuracy of a Mitral Valve Segmentation Method Using J-Splines for Real-Time 3D Echocardiography Data

    PubMed Central

    Siefert, Andrew W.; Icenogle, David A.; Rabbah, Jean-Pierre; Saikrishnan, Neelakantan; Rossignac, Jarek; Lerakis, Stamatios; Yoganathan, Ajit P.

    2013-01-01

    Patient-specific models of the heart’s mitral valve (MV) exhibit potential for surgical planning. While advances in 3D echocardiography (3DE) have provided adequate resolution to extract MV leaflet geometry, no study has quantitatively assessed the accuracy of their modeled leaflets versus a ground-truth standard for temporal frames beyond systolic closure or for differing valvular dysfunctions. The accuracy of a 3DE-based segmentation methodology based on J-splines was assessed for porcine MVs with known 4D leaflet coordinates within a pulsatile simulator during closure, peak closure, and opening for a control, prolapsed, and billowing MV model. For all time points, the mean distance error between the segmented models and ground-truth data were 0.40±0.32 mm, 0.52±0.51 mm, and 0.74±0.69 mm for the control, flail, and billowing models. For all models and temporal frames, 95% of the distance errors were below 1.64 mm. When applied to a patient data set, segmentation was able to confirm a regurgitant orifice and post-operative improvements in coaptation. This study provides an experimental platform for assessing the accuracy of an MV segmentation methodology at phases beyond systolic closure and for differing MV dysfunctions. Results demonstrate the accuracy of a MV segmentation methodology for the development of future surgical planning tools. PMID:23460042

  19. Computational hologram synthesis and representation on spatial light modulators for real-time 3D holographic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichelt, Stephan; Leister, Norbert

    2013-02-01

    In dynamic computer-generated holography that utilizes spatial light modulators, both hologram synthesis and hologram representation are essential in terms of fast computation and high reconstruction quality. For hologram synthesis, i.e. the computation step, Fresnel transform based or point-source based raytracing methods can be applied. In the encoding step, the complex wave-field has to be optimally represented by the SLM with its given modulation capability. For proper hologram reconstruction that implies a simultaneous and independent amplitude and phase modulation of the input wave-field by the SLM. In this paper, we discuss full complex hologram representation methods on SLMs by considering inherent SLM parameter such as modulation type and bit depth on their reconstruction performance such as diffraction efficiency and SNR. We review the three implementation schemes of Burckhardt amplitude-only representation, phase-only macro-pixel representation, and two-phase interference representation. Besides the optical performance we address their hardware complexity and required computational load. Finally, we experimentally demonstrate holographic reconstructions of different representation schemes as obtained by functional prototypes utilizing SeeReal's viewing-window holographic display technology. The proposed hardware implementations enable a fast encoding of complex-valued hologram data and thus will pave the way for commercial real-time holographic 3D imaging in the near future.

  20. A workflow to process 3D+time microscopy images of developing organisms and reconstruct their cell lineage

    PubMed Central

    Faure, Emmanuel; Savy, Thierry; Rizzi, Barbara; Melani, Camilo; Stašová, Olga; Fabrèges, Dimitri; Špir, Róbert; Hammons, Mark; Čúnderlík, Róbert; Recher, Gaëlle; Lombardot, Benoît; Duloquin, Louise; Colin, Ingrid; Kollár, Jozef; Desnoulez, Sophie; Affaticati, Pierre; Maury, Benoît; Boyreau, Adeline; Nief, Jean-Yves; Calvat, Pascal; Vernier, Philippe; Frain, Monique; Lutfalla, Georges; Kergosien, Yannick; Suret, Pierre; Remešíková, Mariana; Doursat, René; Sarti, Alessandro; Mikula, Karol; Peyriéras, Nadine; Bourgine, Paul

    2016-01-01

    The quantitative and systematic analysis of embryonic cell dynamics from in vivo 3D+time image data sets is a major challenge at the forefront of developmental biology. Despite recent breakthroughs in the microscopy imaging of living systems, producing an accurate cell lineage tree for any developing organism remains a difficult task. We present here the BioEmergences workflow integrating all reconstruction steps from image acquisition and processing to the interactive visualization of reconstructed data. Original mathematical methods and algorithms underlie image filtering, nucleus centre detection, nucleus and membrane segmentation, and cell tracking. They are demonstrated on zebrafish, ascidian and sea urchin embryos with stained nuclei and membranes. Subsequent validation and annotations are carried out using Mov-IT, a custom-made graphical interface. Compared with eight other software tools, our workflow achieved the best lineage score. Delivered in standalone or web service mode, BioEmergences and Mov-IT offer a unique set of tools for in silico experimental embryology. PMID:26912388

  1. On the Finite-Time Splash and Splat Singularities for the 3-D Free-Surface Euler Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coutand, Daniel; Shkoller, Steve

    2014-01-01

    We prove that the 3-D free-surface incompressible Euler equations with regular initial geometries and velocity fields have solutions which can form a finite-time "splash" (or "splat") singularity first introduced in Castro et al. (Splash singularity for water waves, http://arxiv.org/abs/1106.2120v2, 2011), wherein the evolving 2-D hypersurface, the moving boundary of the fluid domain, self-intersects at a point (or on surface). Such singularities can occur when the crest of a breaking wave falls unto its trough, or in the study of drop impact upon liquid surfaces. Our approach is founded upon the Lagrangian description of the free-boundary problem, combined with a novel approximation scheme of a finite collection of local coordinate charts; as such we are able to analyze a rather general set of geometries for the evolving 2-D free-surface of the fluid. We do not assume the fluid is irrotational, and as such, our method can be used for a number of other fluid interface problems, including compressible flows, plasmas, as well as the inclusion of surface tension effects.

  2. Short and long time effects of low temperature Plasma Activated Media on 3D multicellular tumor spheroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Judée, Florian; Fongia, Céline; Ducommun, Bernard; Yousfi, Mohammed; Lobjois, Valérie; Merbahi, Nofel

    2016-02-01

    This work investigates the regionalized antiproliferative effects of plasma-activated medium (PAM) on colon adenocarcinoma multicellular tumor spheroid (MCTS), a model that mimics 3D organization and regionalization of a microtumor region. PAM was generated by dielectric barrier plasma jet setup crossed by helium carrier gas. MCTS were transferred in PAM at various times after plasma exposure up to 48 hours and effect on MCTS growth and DNA damage were evaluated. We report the impact of plasma exposure duration and delay before transfer on MCTS growth and DNA damage. Local accumulation of DNA damage revealed by histone H2AX phosphorylation is observed on outermost layers and is dependent on plasma exposure. DNA damage is completely reverted by catalase addition indicating that H2O2 plays major role in observed genotoxic effect while growth inhibitory effect is maintained suggesting that it is due to others reactive species. SOD and D-mannitol scavengers also reduced DNA damage by 30% indicating that and OH* are involved in H2O2 formation. Finally, PAM is able to retain its cytotoxic and genotoxic activity upon storage at +4 °C or -80 °C. These results suggest that plasma activated media may be a promising new antitumor strategy for colorectal cancer tumors.

  3. Short and long time effects of low temperature Plasma Activated Media on 3D multicellular tumor spheroids.

    PubMed

    Judée, Florian; Fongia, Céline; Ducommun, Bernard; Yousfi, Mohammed; Lobjois, Valérie; Merbahi, Nofel

    2016-01-01

    This work investigates the regionalized antiproliferative effects of plasma-activated medium (PAM) on colon adenocarcinoma multicellular tumor spheroid (MCTS), a model that mimics 3D organization and regionalization of a microtumor region. PAM was generated by dielectric barrier plasma jet setup crossed by helium carrier gas. MCTS were transferred in PAM at various times after plasma exposure up to 48 hours and effect on MCTS growth and DNA damage were evaluated. We report the impact of plasma exposure duration and delay before transfer on MCTS growth and DNA damage. Local accumulation of DNA damage revealed by histone H2AX phosphorylation is observed on outermost layers and is dependent on plasma exposure. DNA damage is completely reverted by catalase addition indicating that H2O2 plays major role in observed genotoxic effect while growth inhibitory effect is maintained suggesting that it is due to others reactive species. SOD and D-mannitol scavengers also reduced DNA damage by 30% indicating that O(2)(-)* and OH* are involved in H2O2 formation. Finally, PAM is able to retain its cytotoxic and genotoxic activity upon storage at +4 °C or -80 °C. These results suggest that plasma activated media may be a promising new antitumor strategy for colorectal cancer tumors. PMID:26898904

  4. A Real-Time Magnetoencephalography Brain-Computer Interface Using Interactive 3D Visualization and the Hadoop Ecosystem

    PubMed Central

    McClay, Wilbert A.; Yadav, Nancy; Ozbek, Yusuf; Haas, Andy; Attias, Hagaii T.; Nagarajan, Srikantan S.

    2015-01-01

    Ecumenically, the fastest growing segment of Big Data is human biology-related data and the annual data creation is on the order of zetabytes. The implications are global across industries, of which the treatment of brain related illnesses and trauma could see the most significant and immediate effects. The next generation of health care IT and sensory devices are acquiring and storing massive amounts of patient related data. An innovative Brain-Computer Interface (BCI) for interactive 3D visualization is presented utilizing the Hadoop Ecosystem for data analysis and storage. The BCI is an implementation of Bayesian factor analysis algorithms that can distinguish distinct thought actions using magneto encephalographic (MEG) brain signals. We have collected data on five subjects yielding 90% positive performance in MEG mid- and post-movement activity. We describe a driver that substitutes the actions of the BCI as mouse button presses for real-time use in visual simulations. This process has been added into a flight visualization demonstration. By thinking left or right, the user experiences the aircraft turning in the chosen direction. The driver components of the BCI can be compiled into any software and substitute a user’s intent for specific keyboard strikes or mouse button presses. The BCI’s data analytics of a subject’s MEG brainwaves and flight visualization performance are stored and analyzed using the Hadoop Ecosystem as a quick retrieval data warehouse. PMID:26437432

  5. Fusion of current technologies with real-time 3D MEMS ladar for novel security and defense applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siepmann, James P.

    2006-05-01

    Through the utilization of scanning MEMS mirrors in ladar devices, a whole new range of potential military, Homeland Security, law enforcement, and civilian applications is now possible. Currently, ladar devices are typically large (>15,000 cc), heavy (>15 kg), and expensive (>$100,000) while current MEMS ladar designs are more than a magnitude less, opening up a myriad of potential new applications. One such application with current technology is a GPS integrated MEMS ladar unit, which could be used for real-time border monitoring or the creation of virtual 3D battlefields after being dropped or propelled into hostile territory. Another current technology that can be integrated into a MEMS ladar unit is digital video that can give high resolution and true color to a picture that is then enhanced with range information in a real-time display format that is easier for the user to understand and assimilate than typical gray-scale or false color images. The problem with using 2-axis MEMS mirrors in ladar devices is that in order to have a resonance frequency capable of practical real-time scanning, they must either be quite small and/or have a low maximum tilt angle. Typically, this value has been less than (< or = to 10 mg-mm2-kHz2)-degrees. We have been able to solve this problem by using angle amplification techniques that utilize a series of MEMS mirrors and/or a specialized set of optics to achieve a broad field of view. These techniques and some of their novel applications mentioned will be explained and discussed herein.

  6. 3-D ion distribution and evolution in storm-time RC Retrieved from TWINS ENA by differential voxel CT technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, S.; Yan, W.; Xu, L.

    2013-12-01

    The quantitative retrieval of the 3-D spatial distribution of the parent energetic ions of ENA from a 2-D ENA image is a quite challenge task. The Two Wide-angle Imaging Neutral-atom Spectrometers (TWINS) mission of NASA is the first constellation to perform stereoscopic magnetospheric imaging of energetic neutral atoms (ENA) from a pair of spacecraft flying on two widely-separated Molniya orbits. TWINS provides a unique opportunity to retrieve the 3-D distribution of ions in the ring current (RC) by using a volumetric pixel (voxel) CT inversion method. In this study the voxel CT method is implemented for a series of differential ENA fluxes averaged over about 6 to 7 sweeps (corresponding to a time period of about 9 min.) at different energy levels ranging from 5 to 100 keV, obtained simultaneously by the two satellites during the main phase of a great magnetic storm with minimum Sym-H of -156 nT on 24-25 October 2011. The data were selected to span a period about 50 minutes during which a large substorm was undergoing its expansion phase first and then recovery. The ENA species of O and H are distinguished for some time-segments by analyzing the signals of pulse heights of second electrons emitted from the carbon foil and impacted on the MCP detector in the TWINS sensors. In order to eliminate the possible influence on retrieval induced by instrument bias error, a differential voxel CT technique is applied. The flux intensity of the ENAs' parent ions in the RC has been obtained as a function of energy, L value, MLT sector and latitude, along with their time evolution during the storm-time substorm expansion phase. Forward calculations proved the reliability of the retrieved results. It shows that the RC is highly asymmetric, with a major concentration in the midnight to dawn sector for equatorial latitudes. Halfway through the substorm expansion there occurred a large enhancement of equatorial ion flux at lower energy (5 keV) in the dusk sector, with narrow extent

  7. Quantification of Shunt Volume Through Ventricular Septal Defect by Real-Time 3-D Color Doppler Echocardiography: An in Vitro Study.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Meihua; Ashraf, Muhammad; Tam, Lydia; Streiff, Cole; Kimura, Sumito; Shimada, Eriko; Sahn, David J

    2016-05-01

    Quantification of shunt volume is important for ventricular septal defects (VSDs). The aim of the in vitro study described here was to test the feasibility of using real-time 3-D color Doppler echocardiography (RT3-D-CDE) to quantify shunt volume through a modeled VSD. Eight porcine heart phantoms with VSDs ranging in diameter from 3 to 25 mm were studied. Each phantom was passively driven at five different stroke volumes from 30 to 70 mL and two stroke rates, 60 and 120 strokes/min. RT3-D-CDE full volumes were obtained at color Doppler volume rates of 15, 20 and 27 volumes/s. Shunt flow derived from RT3-D-CDE was linearly correlated with pump-driven stroke volume (R = 0.982). RT3-D-CDE-derived shunt volumes from three color Doppler flow rate settings and two stroke rate acquisitions did not differ (p > 0.05). The use of RT3-D-CDE to determine shunt volume though VSDs is feasible. Different color volume rates/heart rates under clinically/physiologically relevant range have no effect on VSD 3-D shunt volume determination.

  8. Influence of cratonic lithosphere on slab geometry and mantle flow: insights from 3D time-dependent modelling.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taramón, Jorge M.; Rodríguez-González, Juan; Negredo, Ana M.

    2014-05-01

    Recent studies show a clear correlation between the occurrence of flat subduction and the proximity of areas of high elastic/thermal thickness in the overriding plate. A plausible explanation is that cold overriding plates lead to colder mantle wedge, increasing the hydrodynamic suction and decreasing the slab dip. In particular, recent numerical modeling has shown that the presence of cratonic lithosphere in the overriding plate has a significant effect on subducting slabs. In this study we quantify the influence of cratonic areas in the overriding plate on subduction dynamics. We present 3D thermo-mechanical and time-dependent numerical models of buoyancy-driven subduction processes. A non-Newtonian pseudo-plastic rheology is assumed. Different simulations have been performed to quantify the effect of different factors, such as the craton width, thermal thickness and distante to the trench. Modelling results indicate that presence of cratonic lithosphere in the overriding plate produces strong along-trench variations of the slab geometry. These variations are maintained and propagated at great depths as the slab sinks deeper into the mantle. Significant trench-parallel flow in the mantle wedge is generated by time-dependent changes in slab dip. For cases of reduced slab pull, the slab and the base of the craton become coupled, which causes a dramatic reduction of subduction velocity and the formation of a slab gap. The presence of cratons may have an important role on subduction episodicity and provide a new mechanism to explain slab gaps in areas where cratons have been located close to trenches, as is the case of South America and the Cenozoic subduction of North America. We further emphasize that the lithospheric structure of the overriding plate should be taken into account in analysis and modelling studies of subduction zones.

  9. 3-D Seismic Interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Gregory F.

    2009-05-01

    This volume is a brief introduction aimed at those who wish to gain a basic and relatively quick understanding of the interpretation of three-dimensional (3-D) seismic reflection data. The book is well written, clearly illustrated, and easy to follow. Enough elementary mathematics are presented for a basic understanding of seismic methods, but more complex mathematical derivations are avoided. References are listed for readers interested in more advanced explanations. After a brief introduction, the book logically begins with a succinct chapter on modern 3-D seismic data acquisition and processing. Standard 3-D acquisition methods are presented, and an appendix expands on more recent acquisition techniques, such as multiple-azimuth and wide-azimuth acquisition. Although this chapter covers the basics of standard time processing quite well, there is only a single sentence about prestack depth imaging, and anisotropic processing is not mentioned at all, even though both techniques are now becoming standard.

  10. Numerical dispersion, stability, and phase-speed for 3D time-domain finite-difference seismic wave propagation algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haney, M. M.; Aldridge, D. F.; Symons, N. P.

    2005-12-01

    Numerical solution of partial differential equations by explicit, time-domain, finite-difference (FD) methods entails approximating temporal and spatial derivatives by discrete function differences. Thus, the solution of the difference equation will not be identical to the solution of the underlying differential equation. Solution accuracy degrades if temporal and spatial gridding intervals are too large. Overly coarse spatial gridding leads to spurious artifacts in the calculated results referred to as numerical dispersion, whereas coarse temporal sampling may produce numerical instability (manifest as unbounded growth in the calculations as FD timestepping proceeds). Quantitative conditions for minimizing dispersion and avoiding instability are developed by deriving the dispersion relation appropriate for the discrete difference equation (or coupled system of difference equations) under examination. A dispersion relation appropriate for FD solution of the 3D velocity-stress system of isotropic elastodynamics, on staggered temporal and spatial grids, is developed. The relation applies to either compressional or shear wave propagation, and reduces to the proper form for acoustic propagation in the limit of vanishing shear modulus. A stability condition and a plane-wave phase-speed formula follow as consequences of the dispersion relation. The mathematical procedure utilized for the derivation is a modern variant of classical von Neumann analysis, and involves a 4D discrete space/time Fourier transform of the nine, coupled, FD updating formulae for particle velocity vector and stress tensor components. The method is generalized to seismic wave propagation within anelastic and poroelastic media, as well as sound wave propagation within a uniformly-moving atmosphere. A significant extension of the approach yields a stability condition for wave propagation across an interface between dissimilar media with strong material contrast (e.g., the earth's surface, the seabed

  11. Vectorial atomic magnetometer using electronic and nuclear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Binquan; Chen, Linlin; Lei, Guanqun; Meng, Xiaofeng; Fang, Jiancheng

    2015-05-01

    We present an experimental study of a vectorial atomic magnetometer, which can measure three-dimensional magnetic field simultaneously. The experimental setup for magnetometer has been described in the literature. Where an external magnetic field is added parallel to the pumping light, that the goal is to switch the nuclear spin state form an undesired state to the desired state creating a gas whose atoms are completely aligned. A probe light is added perpendicular to the pumping light. When there is transverse alternating magnetic field, the probe light will be modulated by the spin procession. We obtain the two transverse magnetic fields signal through the in-phase and out-of-phase of a lock-in amplifier, At the same time, the external magnetic field held constant relative to the external frequency reference, two nuclear signals can be used to measure z vertical magnetic field by comparing the measured two nuclear signal to a second stable reference signal generated by the same external frequency. Once the output signal is feedbacked to the coil, the external three-dimensional magnetic field is measured in real-time. The dynamic range can be adjusted through the external magnetic field,so this method can be used both in the magnetic surveys and in the prospecting field range. This work was supported in part by the NSF of China (61227902,61374210,61121003).

  12. Real-time 3D image reconstruction of a 24×24 row-column addressing array: from raw data to image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chunyu; Yang, Jiali; Li, Xu; Zhong, Xiaoli; Song, Junjie; Ding, Mingyue; Yuchi, Ming

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents a work of real-time 3-D image reconstruction for a 7.5-MHz, 24×24 row-column addressing array transducer. The transducer works with a predesigned transmit/receive module. After the raw data are captured by the NI PXIe data acquisition (DAQ) module, the following processing procedures are performed: delay and sum (DAS), base-line calibration, envelope detection, logarithm compression, down-sampling, gray scale mapping and 3-D display. These procedures are optimized for obtaining real-time 3-D images. Fixed-point focusing scheme is applied in delay and sum (DAS) to obtain line data from channel data. Zero-phase high-pass filter is used to calibrate the base-line shift of echo. The classical Hilbert transformation is adopted to detect the envelopes of echo. Logarithm compression is implemented to enlarge the weak signals and narrow the gap from the strong ones. Down-sampling reduces the amount of data to improve the processing speed. Linear gray scale mapping is introduced that the weakest signal is mapped to 0 and the strongest signal 255. The real-time 3-D images are displayed with multi-planar mode, which shows three orthogonal sections (vertical section, coronal section, transverse section). A trigger signal is sent from the transmit/receive module to the DAQ module at the start of each volume data generation to ensure synchronization between these two modules. All procedures, include data acquisition (DAQ), signal processing and image display, are programmed on the platform of LabVIEW. 675MB raw echo data are acquired in one minute to generate 24×24×48, 27fps 3-D images. The experiment on the strong reflection object (aluminum slice) shows the feasibility of the whole process from raw data to real-time 3-D images.

  13. Vectorial algorithm for the computation of light propagation equation based on Huygens' principle using the scalar theory of diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morucci, Stephane; Noirard, Pierre; Grossetie, Jean-Claude

    1996-03-01

    In digital holography, computation of holograms is often reduced to calculations of fast Fourier transforms if the distance between the object plane and the hologram plane is large enough. Two classical approximations for solving this problem include a binomial series expansion of the distance and an elimination of the so-called inclination factor. We present here a vectorial algorithm which computes the discrete form of the light propagation equation obtained by the Huygens' principle for a bidimensional object. None of the approximations mentioned above have been used. This enables the computation of a diffraction pattern at any distance compatible with the scalar theory of diffraction. This vectorial algorithm has been implemented on workstations, on a Convex C-220 and on a Cray YMP computer. We focus our attention on the computing granularity of the problem and we present processing times and the associated performances for bidimensional images. Various holograms are computed and compared with those obtained by two traditional methods, namely, Fresnel transforms and the resolution of the rigorous scalar diffraction equation using discrete convolutions. We then consider the 3D case and modifications are proposed in order to parallelize this algorithm.

  14. An efficient method of 3-D elastic full waveform inversion using a finite-difference injection method for time-lapse imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisov, Dmitry; Singh, Satish C.; Fuji, Nobuaki

    2015-09-01

    Seismic full waveform inversion is an objective method to estimate elastic properties of the subsurface and is an important area of research, particularly in seismic exploration community. It is a data-fitting approach, where the difference between observed and synthetic data is minimized iteratively. Due to a very high computational cost, the practical implementation of waveform inversion has so far been restricted to a 2-D geometry with different levels of physics incorporated in it (e.g. elasticity/viscoelasticity) or to a 3-D geometry but using an acoustic approximation. However, the earth is three-dimensional, elastic and heterogeneous and therefore a full 3-D elastic inversion is required in order to obtain more accurate and valuable models of the subsurface. Despite the recent increase in computing power, the application of 3-D elastic full waveform inversion to real-scale problems remains quite challenging on the current computer architecture. Here, we present an efficient method to perform 3-D elastic full waveform inversion for time-lapse seismic data using a finite-difference injection method. In this method, the wavefield is computed in the whole model and is stored on a surface above a finite volume where the model is perturbed and localized inversion is performed. Comparison of the final results using the 3-D finite-difference injection method and conventional 3-D inversion performed within the whole volume shows that our new method provides significant reductions in computational time and memory requirements without any notable loss in accuracy. Our approach shows a big potential for efficient reservoir monitoring in real time-lapse experiments.

  15. 3D rapid mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isaksson, Folke; Borg, Johan; Haglund, Leif

    2008-04-01

    In this paper the performance of passive range measurement imaging using stereo technique in real time applications is described. Stereo vision uses multiple images to get depth resolution in a similar way as Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) uses multiple measurements to obtain better spatial resolution. This technique has been used in photogrammetry for a long time but it will be shown that it is now possible to do the calculations, with carefully designed image processing algorithms, in e.g. a PC in real time. In order to get high resolution and quantitative data in the stereo estimation a mathematical camera model is used. The parameters to the camera model are settled in a calibration rig or in the case of a moving camera the scene itself can be used for calibration of most of the parameters. After calibration an ordinary TV camera has an angular resolution like a theodolite, but to a much lower price. The paper will present results from high resolution 3D imagery from air to ground. The 3D-results from stereo calculation of image pairs are stitched together into a large database to form a 3D-model of the area covered.

  16. Improving Three-Dimensional (3D) Range Gated Reconstruction Through Time-of-Flight (TOF) Imaging Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chua, S. Y.; Wang, X.; Guo, N.; Tan, C. S.; Chai, T. Y.; Seet, G. L.

    2016-04-01

    This paper performs an experimental investigation on the TOF imaging profile which strongly influences the quality of reconstruction to accomplish accurate range sensing. From our analysis, the reflected intensity profile recorded appears to deviate from Gaussian model which is commonly assumed and can be perceived as a mixture of noises and actual reflected signal. Noise-weighted Average range calculation is therefore proposed to alleviate noise influence based on the signal detection threshold and system noises. From our experimental result, this alternative range solution demonstrates better accuracy as compared to the conventional weighted average method and proven as a para-axial correction to improve range reconstruction in 3D gated imaging system.

  17. 3D Elevation Program—Virtual USA in 3D

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lukas, Vicki; Stoker, J.M.

    2016-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) 3D Elevation Program (3DEP) uses a laser system called ‘lidar’ (light detection and ranging) to create a virtual reality map of the Nation that is very accurate. 3D maps have many uses with new uses being discovered all the time.  

  18. 3D Elevation Program—Virtual USA in 3D

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lukas, Vicki; Stoker, J.M.

    2016-04-14

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) 3D Elevation Program (3DEP) uses a laser system called ‘lidar’ (light detection and ranging) to create a virtual reality map of the Nation that is very accurate. 3D maps have many uses with new uses being discovered all the time.  

  19. Real-time 3D millimeter wave imaging based FMCW using GGD focal plane array as detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levanon, Assaf; Rozban, Daniel; Kopeika, Natan S.; Yitzhaky, Yitzhak; Abramovich, Amir

    2014-03-01

    Millimeter wave (MMW) imaging systems are required for applications in medicine, communications, homeland security, and space technology. This is because there is no known ionization hazard for biological tissue, and atmospheric attenuation in this range of the spectrum is relatively low. The lack of inexpensive room temperature imaging systems makes it difficult to give a suitable MMW system for many of the above applications. 3D MMW imaging system based on chirp radar was studied previously using a scanning imaging system of a single detector. The system presented here proposes to employ a chirp radar method with a Glow Discharge Detector (GDD) Focal Plane Array (FPA) of plasma based detectors. Each point on the object corresponds to a point in the image and includes the distance information. This will enable 3D MMW imaging. The radar system requires that the millimeter wave detector (GDD) will be able to operate as a heterodyne detector. Since the source of radiation is a frequency modulated continuous wave (FMCW), the detected signal as a result of heterodyne detection gives the object's depth information according to value of difference frequency, in addition to the reflectance of the image. In this work we experimentally demonstrate the feasibility of implementing an imaging system based on radar principles and FPA of GDD devices. This imaging system is shown to be capable of imaging objects from distances of at least 10 meters.

  20. Vectorial rotating vortex Hankel laser beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotlyar, Victor V.; Kovalev, Alexey A.; Soifer, Victor A.

    2016-09-01

    We propose a generalization of spherical waves in the form of linearly polarized beams with embedded optical vortices. The source of these beams is an infinitely narrow light ring with an infinitely small radius. These vectorial beams are obtained based on scalar Hankel beams discovered by the authors recently. We have derived explicit relations for complex amplitudes of all six components of vectorial vortex Hankel beams. A closed analytical expression for the axial projection of the orbital angular momentum density in far field has been obtained. We also showed that the intensity distribution of the electric vector rotates by 90 degrees upon the beam propagation in near field.

  1. Real-Time 3D Fluoroscopy-Guided Large Core Needle Biopsy of Renal Masses: A Critical Early Evaluation According to the IDEAL Recommendations

    SciTech Connect

    Kroeze, Stephanie G. C.; Huisman, Merel; Verkooijen, Helena M.; Diest, Paul J. van; Ruud Bosch, J. L. H.; Bosch, Maurice A. A. J. van den

    2012-06-15

    Introduction: Three-dimensional (3D) real-time fluoroscopy cone beam CT is a promising new technique for image-guided biopsy of solid tumors. We evaluated the technical feasibility, diagnostic accuracy, and complications of this technique for guidance of large-core needle biopsy in patients with suspicious renal masses. Methods: Thirteen patients with 13 suspicious renal masses underwent large-core needle biopsy under 3D real-time fluoroscopy cone beam CT guidance. Imaging acquisition and subsequent 3D reconstruction was done by a mobile flat-panel detector (FD) C-arm system to plan the needle path. Large-core needle biopsies were taken by the interventional radiologist. Technical success, accuracy, and safety were evaluated according to the Innovation, Development, Exploration, Assessment, Long-term study (IDEAL) recommendations. Results: Median tumor size was 2.6 (range, 1.0-14.0) cm. In ten (77%) patients, the histological diagnosis corresponded to the imaging findings: five were malignancies, five benign lesions. Technical feasibility was 77% (10/13); in three patients biopsy results were inconclusive. The lesion size of these three patients was <2.5 cm. One patient developed a minor complication. Median follow-up was 16.0 (range, 6.4-19.8) months. Conclusions: 3D real-time fluoroscopy cone beam CT-guided biopsy of renal masses is feasible and safe. However, these first results suggest that diagnostic accuracy may be limited in patients with renal masses <2.5 cm.

  2. Integrated monolithic 3D MEMS scanner for switchable real time vertical/horizontal cross-sectional imaging.

    PubMed

    Li, Haijun; Duan, Xiyu; Qiu, Zhen; Zhou, Quan; Kurabayashi, Katsuo; Oldham, Kenn R; Wang, Thomas D

    2016-02-01

    We present an integrated monolithic, electrostatic 3D MEMS scanner with a compact chip size of 3.2 × 2.9 mm(2). Use of parametric excitation near resonance frequencies produced large optical deflection angles up to ± 27° and ± 28.5° in the X- and Y-axes and displacements up to 510 μm in the Z-axis with low drive voltages at atmospheric pressure. When packaged in a dual axes confocal endomicroscope, horizontal and vertical cross-sectional images can be collected seamlessly in tissue with a large field-of-view of >1 × 1 mm(2) and 1 × 0.41 mm(2), respectively, at 5 frames/sec.

  3. LLNL-Earth3D

    SciTech Connect

    2013-10-01

    Earth3D is a computer code designed to allow fast calculation of seismic rays and travel times through a 3D model of the Earth. LLNL is using this for earthquake location and global tomography efforts and such codes are of great interest to the Earth Science community.

  4. Bedside assistance in freehand ultrasonic diagnosis by real-time visual feedback of 3D scatter diagram of pulsatile tissue-motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuzawa, M.; Kawata, K.; Nakamori, N.; Kitsunezuka, Y.

    2011-03-01

    By real-time visual feedback of 3D scatter diagram of pulsatile tissue-motion, freehand ultrasonic diagnosis of neonatal ischemic diseases has been assisted at the bedside. The 2D ultrasonic movie was taken with a conventional ultrasonic apparatus (ATL HDI5000) and ultrasonic probes of 5-7 MHz with the compact tilt-sensor to measure the probe orientation. The real-time 3D visualization was realized by developing an extended version of the PC-based visualization system. The software was originally developed on the DirectX platform and optimized with the streaming SIMD extensions. The 3D scatter diagram of the latest pulsatile tissues has been continuously generated and visualized as projection image with the ultrasonic movie in the current section more than 15 fps. It revealed the 3D structure of pulsatile tissues such as middle and posterior cerebral arteries, Willis ring and cerebellar arteries, in which pediatricians have great interests in the blood flow because asphyxiated and/or low-birth-weight neonates have a high risk of ischemic diseases such as hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy and periventricular leukomalacia. Since the pulsatile tissue-motion is due to local blood flow, it can be concluded that the system developed in this work is very useful to assist freehand ultrasonic diagnosis of ischemic diseases in the neonatal cranium.

  5. Europeana and 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pletinckx, D.

    2011-09-01

    The current 3D hype creates a lot of interest in 3D. People go to 3D movies, but are we ready to use 3D in our homes, in our offices, in our communication? Are we ready to deliver real 3D to a general public and use interactive 3D in a meaningful way to enjoy, learn, communicate? The CARARE project is realising this for the moment in the domain of monuments and archaeology, so that real 3D of archaeological sites and European monuments will be available to the general public by 2012. There are several aspects to this endeavour. First of all is the technical aspect of flawlessly delivering 3D content over all platforms and operating systems, without installing software. We have currently a working solution in PDF, but HTML5 will probably be the future. Secondly, there is still little knowledge on how to create 3D learning objects, 3D tourist information or 3D scholarly communication. We are still in a prototype phase when it comes to integrate 3D objects in physical or virtual museums. Nevertheless, Europeana has a tremendous potential as a multi-facetted virtual museum. Finally, 3D has a large potential to act as a hub of information, linking to related 2D imagery, texts, video, sound. We describe how to create such rich, explorable 3D objects that can be used intuitively by the generic Europeana user and what metadata is needed to support the semantic linking.

  6. Automated simulation and evaluation of autostereoscopic multiview 3D display designs by time-sequential and wavelength-selective filter barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhlmey, Mathias; Jurk, Silvio; Duckstein, Bernd; de la Barré, René

    2015-09-01

    A novel simulation tool has been developed for spatial multiplexed 3D displays. Main purpose of our software is the 3D display design with optical image splitter in particular lenticular grids or wavelength-selective barriers. As a result of interaction of image splitter with ray emitting displays a spatial light-modulator generating the autostereoscopic image representation was modeled. Based on the simulation model the interaction of optoelectronic devices with the defined spatial planes is described. Time-sequential multiplexing enables increasing the resolution of such 3D displays. On that reason the program was extended with an intermediate data cumulating component. The simulation program represents a stepwise quasi-static functionality and control of the arrangement. It calculates and renders the whole display ray emission and luminance distribution on viewing distance. The degree of result complexity will increase by using wavelength-selective barriers. Visible images at the viewer's eye positon were determined by simulation after every switching operation of optical image splitter. The summation and evaluation of the resulting data is processed in correspondence to the equivalent time sequence. Hereby the simulation was expanded by a complex algorithm for automated search and validation of possible solutions in the multi-dimensional parameter space. For the multiview 3D display design a combination of ray-tracing and 3D rendering was used. Therefore the emitted light intensity distribution of each subpixel will be evaluated by researching in terms of color, luminance and visible area by using different content distribution on subpixel plane. The analysis of the accumulated data will deliver different solutions distinguished by standards of evaluation.

  7. Monitoring a CO2 plume using time-lapse 3D magnetotellurics, DC resistivity, and induced polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowles-martinez, E.; Schultz, A.; Vincent, P.

    2014-12-01

    When CO2 is injected into a deep saline aquifer, the combination of fluid displacement and chemical interaction with groundwater and minerals results in changes to the electrical properties of the storage formation. Geophysical methods that are sensitive to the electrical resistivity and chargeability of the rocks and fluids are used to monitor a modeled CO2 plume. The arrival of supercritical CO2 appears as a resistive pulse as the CO2 displaces water while rising buoyantly. Groundwater becomes carbonated and undergoes a rapid drop in pH. Formation conductivity increases as acidic fluid mobilizes ions in the surrounding rock. A surge of increased conductivity is seen at the plume front as easily-mobilized ions enter the fluid. As the injection proceeds and groundwater flows, this high-conductivity plume front migrates, leaving behind an aquifer largely depleted of highly-mobile ions, with only slightly elevated conductivity. Meanwhile, the dissolution of minerals reduces surface area along the fluid-mineral interface. This causes pore throat widening and reduction of sites where electric charge can build up, thereby reducing the polarizability in the parts of the formation that have encountered the plume. This study looks at monitoring methods that are sensitive to all of these changes in electrical properties at various depths within the earth. These methods include magnetotellurics (MT) and combined DC resistivity and induced polarization (IP). MT is useful for showing large-scale structure using an array that is moveable to cover an arbitrarily large area as the plume expands far beyond initial monitoring locations. MT also allows for phase tensor analysis to clearly show deep resistivity gradients and changes in dimensionality. The active-source nature of DC and IP makes them effective at clearly showing the plume's extent in the region within a few km of the injection well. All methods are modeled in 3D using the planned Kevin Dome carbon storage site in

  8. 3D morphometry of valley networks on Mars from HRSC/MEX DEMs: Implications for climatic evolution through time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansan, V.; Mangold, N.

    2013-09-01

    valley networks have been identified mainly in the Noachian heavily cratered uplands. Eight dense branching valley networks were studied in Noachian terrains of Huygens, Newcomb and Kepler craters, south Tyrrhena Terra, and Thaumasia, in Hesperian terrains of Echus Plateau and west Eberswalde craters, and in Amazonian terrains of Alba Patera, using images and digital elevation models from the Mars Express High Resolution Stereo Camera to determine 2D and 3D morphometric parameters. Extracted geomorphic parameters show similar geometry to terrestrial valleys: drainage densities, organization from bifurcation ratios and lengths ratios, Hack exponent consistent with terrestrial values of ~0.6, and progressive deepening of valleys with increasing Strahler order. In addition, statistics on valley depths indicate a deeper incision of Noachian valleys compared to younger post-Noachian valleys (<25 m for Amazonian ones compared to >100 m for Noachian ones), showing a strong difference in fluvial erosion. These characteristics show that dense Martian valley networks formed by overland flows in relation to a global atmospheric water cycle in Noachian epoch and confirm that the later stages of activity may be related to shorter duration of activity, distinct climatic conditions, and/or regional processes, or conditions.

  9. 3D Audio System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Ames Research Center research into virtual reality led to the development of the Convolvotron, a high speed digital audio processing system that delivers three-dimensional sound over headphones. It consists of a two-card set designed for use with a personal computer. The Convolvotron's primary application is presentation of 3D audio signals over headphones. Four independent sound sources are filtered with large time-varying filters that compensate for motion. The perceived location of the sound remains constant. Possible applications are in air traffic control towers or airplane cockpits, hearing and perception research and virtual reality development.

  10. Position tracking of moving liver lesion based on real-time registration between 2D ultrasound and 3D preoperative images

    SciTech Connect

    Weon, Chijun; Hyun Nam, Woo; Lee, Duhgoon; Ra, Jong Beom; Lee, Jae Young

    2015-01-15

    Purpose: Registration between 2D ultrasound (US) and 3D preoperative magnetic resonance (MR) (or computed tomography, CT) images has been studied recently for US-guided intervention. However, the existing techniques have some limits, either in the registration speed or the performance. The purpose of this work is to develop a real-time and fully automatic registration system between two intermodal images of the liver, and subsequently an indirect lesion positioning/tracking algorithm based on the registration result, for image-guided interventions. Methods: The proposed position tracking system consists of three stages. In the preoperative stage, the authors acquire several 3D preoperative MR (or CT) images at different respiratory phases. Based on the transformations obtained from nonrigid registration of the acquired 3D images, they then generate a 4D preoperative image along the respiratory phase. In the intraoperative preparatory stage, they properly attach a 3D US transducer to the patient’s body and fix its pose using a holding mechanism. They then acquire a couple of respiratory-controlled 3D US images. Via the rigid registration of these US images to the 3D preoperative images in the 4D image, the pose information of the fixed-pose 3D US transducer is determined with respect to the preoperative image coordinates. As feature(s) to use for the rigid registration, they may choose either internal liver vessels or the inferior vena cava. Since the latter is especially useful in patients with a diffuse liver disease, the authors newly propose using it. In the intraoperative real-time stage, they acquire 2D US images in real-time from the fixed-pose transducer. For each US image, they select candidates for its corresponding 2D preoperative slice from the 4D preoperative MR (or CT) image, based on the predetermined pose information of the transducer. The correct corresponding image is then found among those candidates via real-time 2D registration based on a

  11. Validity of computational hemodynamics in human arteries based on 3D time-of-flight MR angiography and 2D electrocardiogram gated phase contrast images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Huidan (Whitney); Chen, Xi; Chen, Rou; Wang, Zhiqiang; Lin, Chen; Kralik, Stephen; Zhao, Ye

    2015-11-01

    In this work, we demonstrate the validity of 4-D patient-specific computational hemodynamics (PSCH) based on 3-D time-of-flight (TOF) MR angiography (MRA) and 2-D electrocardiogram (ECG) gated phase contrast (PC) images. The mesoscale lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) is employed to segment morphological arterial geometry from TOF MRA, to extract velocity profiles from ECG PC images, and to simulate fluid dynamics on a unified GPU accelerated computational platform. Two healthy volunteers are recruited to participate in the study. For each volunteer, a 3-D high resolution TOF MRA image and 10 2-D ECG gated PC images are acquired to provide the morphological geometry and the time-varying flow velocity profiles for necessary inputs of the PSCH. Validation results will be presented through comparisons of LBM vs. 4D Flow Software for flow rates and LBM simulation vs. MRA measurement for blood flow velocity maps. Indiana University Health (IUH) Values Fund.

  12. Symmetry-plane models of 3D Euler fluid equations: Analytical solutions and finite-time blowup using infinitesimal Lie-symmetry methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bustamante, Miguel D.

    2014-11-01

    We consider 3D Euler fluids endowed with a discrete symmetry whereby the velocity field is invariant under mirror reflections about a 2D surface known as the ``symmetry plane.'' This type of flow is widely used in numerical simulations of classical/magnetic/quantum turbulence and vortex reconnection. On the 2D symmetry plane, the governing equations are best written in terms of two scalars: vorticity and stretching rate of vorticity. These determine the velocity field on the symmetry plane. However, the governing equations are not closed, because of the contribution of a single pressure term that depends on the full 3D velocity profile. By modelling this pressure term we propose a one-parameter family of sensible models for the flow along the 2D symmetry plane. We apply the method of infinitesimal Lie symmetries and solve the governing equations analytically for the two scalars as functions of time. We show how the value of the model's parameter determines if the analytical solution has a finite-time blowup and obtain explicit formulae for the blowup time. We validate the models by showing that a particular choice of the model's parameter corresponds to a well-known exact solution of 3D Euler equations [Gibbon et al., Physica D 132, 497 (1999)]. We discuss practical applications. Supported by Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) under Grant Number 12/IP/1491.

  13. [3-D ultrasound in gastroenterology].

    PubMed

    Zoller, W G; Liess, H

    1994-06-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) sonography represents a development of noninvasive diagnostic imaging by real-time two-dimensional (2D) sonography. The use of transparent rotating scans, comparable to a block of glass, generates a 3D effect. The objective of the present study was to optimate 3D presentation of abdominal findings. Additional investigations were made with a new volumetric program to determine the volume of selected findings of the liver. The results were compared with the estimated volumes of 2D sonography and 2D computer tomography (CT). For the processing of 3D images, typical parameter constellations were found for the different findings, which facilitated processing of 3D images. In more than 75% of the cases examined we found an optimal 3D presentation of sonographic findings with respect to the evaluation criteria developed by us for the 3D imaging of processed data. Great differences were found for the estimated volumes of the findings of the liver concerning the three different techniques applied. 3D ultrasound represents a valuable method to judge morphological appearance in abdominal findings. The possibility of volumetric measurements enlarges its potential diagnostic significance. Further clinical investigations are necessary to find out if definite differentiation between benign and malign findings is possible.

  14. RAPID COMMUNICATION: A novel time frequency-based 3D Lissajous figure method and its application to the determination of oxygen saturation from the photoplethysmogram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Addison, Paul S.; Watson, James N.

    2004-11-01

    We present a novel time-frequency method for the measurement of oxygen saturation using the photoplethysmogram (PPG) signals from a standard pulse oximeter machine. The method utilizes the time-frequency transformation of the red and infrared PPGs to derive a 3D Lissajous figure. By selecting the optimal Lissajous, the method provides an inherently robust basis for the determination of oxygen saturation as regions of the time-frequency plane where high- and low-frequency signal artefacts are to be found are automatically avoided.

  15. 3d-3d correspondence revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Hee-Joong; Dimofte, Tudor; Gukov, Sergei; Sułkowski, Piotr

    2016-04-01

    In fivebrane compactifications on 3-manifolds, we point out the importance of all flat connections in the proper definition of the effective 3d {N}=2 theory. The Lagrangians of some theories with the desired properties can be constructed with the help of homological knot invariants that categorify colored Jones polynomials. Higgsing the full 3d theories constructed this way recovers theories found previously by Dimofte-Gaiotto-Gukov. We also consider the cutting and gluing of 3-manifolds along smooth boundaries and the role played by all flat connections in this operation.

  16. 3d-3d correspondence revisited

    DOE PAGES

    Chung, Hee -Joong; Dimofte, Tudor; Gukov, Sergei; Sułkowski, Piotr

    2016-04-21

    In fivebrane compactifications on 3-manifolds, we point out the importance of all flat connections in the proper definition of the effective 3d N = 2 theory. The Lagrangians of some theories with the desired properties can be constructed with the help of homological knot invariants that categorify colored Jones polynomials. Higgsing the full 3d theories constructed this way recovers theories found previously by Dimofte-Gaiotto-Gukov. As a result, we also consider the cutting and gluing of 3-manifolds along smooth boundaries and the role played by all flat connections in this operation.

  17. A Closed Form Vectorial Solution to the Relative Orbital Motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Condurache, C.; Martinuşi, V.

    2007-05-01

    Time-explicit solutions for relative Keplerian dynamics are presented for the general case in which the reference trajectory is elliptic, parabolic or hyperbolic. The non-linear differential equation modeling the motion is solved by means of tensorial and vectorial regularization methods. This regularizing procedure extends the approaches of Levi-Civita and Kustaanheimo-Stiefel in the case of Kepler problem in rotating reference frames. The solution generalizes the approximate results obtained from Hill-Clohessy-Wiltshire, Lawden and Tschauner-Hempel equations. The approximate solutions derived from the liniarized models are in fact the first linear approximation of the exact solution the authors have found.

  18. Simulation of AIMS measurements using rigorous mask 3D modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, Chih-Shiang; Huang, Hsu-Ting; Chu, Fu-Sheng; Chu, Yuan-Chih; Huang, Wen-Chun; Liu, Ru-Gun; Gau, Tsai-Sheng

    2015-03-01

    Aerial image measurement system (AIMSTM) has been widely used for wafer level inspection of mask defects. Reported inspection flows include die-to-die (D2D) and die-to-database (D2DB) methods. For patterns that do not repeat in another die, only the D2DB approach is applicable. The D2DB method requires accurate simulation of AIMS measurements for a mask pattern. An optical vectorial model is needed to depict the mask diffraction effect in this simulation. To accurately simulate the imaging results, a rigorous electro-magnetic field (EMF) model is essential to correctly take account of the EMF scattering induced by the mask topography, which is usually called the mask 3D effect. In this study, the mask 3D model we use is rigorous coupled-wave analysis (RCWA), which calculates the diffraction fields from a single plane wave incidence. A hybrid Hopkins-Abbe method with RCWA is used to calculate the EMF diffraction at a desired accuracy level while keeping the computation time practical. We will compare the speed of the hybrid Hopkins-Abbe method to the rigorous Abbe method. The matching between simulation and experiment is more challenging for AIMS than CD-SEM because its measurements provide full intensity information. Parameters in the mask 3D model such as film stack thickness or film optical properties, is optimized during the fitting process. We will report the fitting results of AIMS images for twodimensional structures with various pitches. By accurately simulating the AIMS measurements, it provides a necessary tool to perform the mask inspection using the D2DB approach and to accurately predict the mask defects.

  19. Comparison of the LLNL ALE3D and AKTS Thermal Safety Computer Codes for Calculating Times to Explosion in ODTX and STEX Thermal Cookoff Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Wemhoff, A P; Burnham, A K

    2006-04-05

    Cross-comparison of the results of two computer codes for the same problem provides a mutual validation of their computational methods. This cross-validation exercise was performed for LLNL's ALE3D code and AKTS's Thermal Safety code, using the thermal ignition of HMX in two standard LLNL cookoff experiments: the One-Dimensional Time to Explosion (ODTX) test and the Scaled Thermal Explosion (STEX) test. The chemical kinetics model used in both codes was the extended Prout-Tompkins model, a relatively new addition to ALE3D. This model was applied using ALE3D's new pseudospecies feature. In addition, an advanced isoconversional kinetic approach was used in the AKTS code. The mathematical constants in the Prout-Tompkins code were calibrated using DSC data from hermetically sealed vessels and the LLNL optimization code Kinetics05. The isoconversional kinetic parameters were optimized using the AKTS Thermokinetics code. We found that the Prout-Tompkins model calculations agree fairly well between the two codes, and the isoconversional kinetic model gives very similar results as the Prout-Tompkins model. We also found that an autocatalytic approach in the beta-delta phase transition model does affect the times to explosion for some conditions, especially STEX-like simulations at ramp rates above 100 C/hr, and further exploration of that effect is warranted.

  20. pySeismicFMM: Python based travel time calculation in regular 2D and 3D grids in Cartesian and geographic coordinates using Fast Marching Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polkowski, Marcin

    2016-04-01

    Seismic wave travel time calculation is the most common numerical operation in seismology. The most efficient is travel time calculation in 1D velocity model - for given source, receiver depths and angular distance time is calculated within fraction of a second. Unfortunately, in most cases 1D is not enough to encounter differentiating local and regional structures. Whenever possible travel time through 3D velocity model has to be calculated. It can be achieved using ray calculation or time propagation in space. While single ray path calculation is quick it is complicated to find the ray path that connects source with the receiver. Time propagation in space using Fast Marching Method seems more efficient in most cases, especially when there are multiple receivers. In this presentation a Python module pySeismicFMM is presented - simple and very efficient tool for calculating travel time from sources to receivers. Calculation requires regular 2D or 3D velocity grid either in Cartesian or geographic coordinates. On desktop class computer calculation speed is 200k grid cells per second. Calculation has to be performed once for every source location and provides travel time to all receivers. pySeismicFMM is free and open source. Development of this tool is a part of authors PhD thesis. National Science Centre Poland provided financial support for this work via NCN grant DEC-2011/02/A/ST10/00284.

  1. Improving the Sequential Time Perception of Teenagers with Mild to Moderate Mental Retardation with 3D Immersive Virtual Reality (IVR)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Passig, David

    2009-01-01

    Children with mental retardation have pronounced difficulties in using cognitive strategies and comprehending abstract concepts--among them, the concept of sequential time (Van-Handel, Swaab, De-Vries, & Jongmans, 2007). The perception of sequential time is generally tested by using scenarios presenting a continuum of actions. The goal of this…

  2. PLOT3D/AMES, APOLLO UNIX VERSION USING GMR3D (WITHOUT TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P.

    1994-01-01

    Apollo's 3-dimensional graphics hardware, but does not take advantage of the shading and hidden line/surface removal capabilities of the Apollo DN10000. Although this implementation does not offer a capability for putting text on plots, it does support the use of a mouse to translate, rotate, or zoom in on views. The version 3.6b+ Apollo implementations of PLOT3D (ARC-12789) and PLOT3D/TURB3D (ARC-12785) were developed for use on Apollo computers running UNIX System V with BSD 4.3 extensions and the graphics library GMR3D Version 2.0. The standard distribution media for each of these programs is a 9-track, 6250 bpi magnetic tape in TAR format. Customers purchasing one implementation version of PLOT3D or PLOT3D/TURB3D will be given a $200 discount on each additional implementation version ordered at the same time. Version 3.6b+ of PLOT3D and PLOT3D/TURB3D are also supported for the following computers and graphics libraries: 1) generic UNIX Supercomputer and IRIS, suitable for CRAY 2/UNICOS, CONVEX, and Alliant with remote IRIS 2xxx/3xxx or IRIS 4D (ARC-12779, ARC-12784); 2) VAX computers running VMS Version 5.0 and DISSPLA Version 11.0 (ARC-12777, ARC-12781); 3) generic UNIX and DISSPLA Version 11.0 (ARC-12788, ARC-12778); and (4) Silicon Graphics IRIS 2xxx/3xxx or IRIS 4D workstations (ARC-12783, ARC-12782). Silicon Graphics Iris, IRIS 4D, and IRIS 2xxx/3xxx are trademarks of Silicon Graphics Incorporated. VAX and VMS are trademarks of Digital Electronics Corporation. DISSPLA is a trademark of Computer Associates. CRAY 2 and UNICOS are trademarks of CRAY Research, Incorporated. CONVEX is a trademark of Convex Computer Corporation. Alliant is a trademark of Alliant. Apollo and GMR3D are trademarks of Hewlett-Packard, Incorporated. UNIX is a registered trademark of AT&T.

  3. PLOT3D/AMES, APOLLO UNIX VERSION USING GMR3D (WITH TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P.

    1994-01-01

    Apollo's 3-dimensional graphics hardware, but does not take advantage of the shading and hidden line/surface removal capabilities of the Apollo DN10000. Although this implementation does not offer a capability for putting text on plots, it does support the use of a mouse to translate, rotate, or zoom in on views. The version 3.6b+ Apollo implementations of PLOT3D (ARC-12789) and PLOT3D/TURB3D (ARC-12785) were developed for use on Apollo computers running UNIX System V with BSD 4.3 extensions and the graphics library GMR3D Version 2.0. The standard distribution media for each of these programs is a 9-track, 6250 bpi magnetic tape in TAR format. Customers purchasing one implementation version of PLOT3D or PLOT3D/TURB3D will be given a $200 discount on each additional implementation version ordered at the same time. Version 3.6b+ of PLOT3D and PLOT3D/TURB3D are also supported for the following computers and graphics libraries: 1) generic UNIX Supercomputer and IRIS, suitable for CRAY 2/UNICOS, CONVEX, and Alliant with remote IRIS 2xxx/3xxx or IRIS 4D (ARC-12779, ARC-12784); 2) VAX computers running VMS Version 5.0 and DISSPLA Version 11.0 (ARC-12777, ARC-12781); 3) generic UNIX and DISSPLA Version 11.0 (ARC-12788, ARC-12778); and (4) Silicon Graphics IRIS 2xxx/3xxx or IRIS 4D workstations (ARC-12783, ARC-12782). Silicon Graphics Iris, IRIS 4D, and IRIS 2xxx/3xxx are trademarks of Silicon Graphics Incorporated. VAX and VMS are trademarks of Digital Electronics Corporation. DISSPLA is a trademark of Computer Associates. CRAY 2 and UNICOS are trademarks of CRAY Research, Incorporated. CONVEX is a trademark of Convex Computer Corporation. Alliant is a trademark of Alliant. Apollo and GMR3D are trademarks of Hewlett-Packard, Incorporated. UNIX is a registered trademark of AT&T.

  4. Rapid and retrievable recording of big data of time-lapse 3D shadow images of microbial colonies.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Hiroyuki; Nasu, Senshi; Takeshige, Motomu; Saito, Mikako; Matsuoka, Hideaki

    2015-01-01

    We formerly developed an automatic colony count system based on the time-lapse shadow image analysis (TSIA). Here this system has been upgraded and applied to practical rapid decision. A microbial sample was spread on/in an agar plate with 90 mm in diameter as homogeneously as possible. We could obtain the results with several strains that most of colonies appeared within a limited time span. Consequently the number of colonies reached a steady level (Nstdy) and then unchanged until the end of long culture time to give the confirmed value (Nconf). The equivalence of Nstdy and Nconf as well as the difference of times for Nstdy and Nconf determinations were statistically significant at p < 0.001. Nstdy meets the requirement of practical routines treating a large number of plates. The difference of Nstdy and Nconf, if any, may be elucidated by means of retrievable big data. Therefore Nconf is valid for official documentation. PMID:25975590

  5. Rapid and retrievable recording of big data of time-lapse 3D shadow images of microbial colonies.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Hiroyuki; Nasu, Senshi; Takeshige, Motomu; Saito, Mikako; Matsuoka, Hideaki

    2015-05-15

    We formerly developed an automatic colony count system based on the time-lapse shadow image analysis (TSIA). Here this system has been upgraded and applied to practical rapid decision. A microbial sample was spread on/in an agar plate with 90 mm in diameter as homogeneously as possible. We could obtain the results with several strains that most of colonies appeared within a limited time span. Consequently the number of colonies reached a steady level (Nstdy) and then unchanged until the end of long culture time to give the confirmed value (Nconf). The equivalence of Nstdy and Nconf as well as the difference of times for Nstdy and Nconf determinations were statistically significant at p < 0.001. Nstdy meets the requirement of practical routines treating a large number of plates. The difference of Nstdy and Nconf, if any, may be elucidated by means of retrievable big data. Therefore Nconf is valid for official documentation.

  6. A full-field and real-time 3D surface imaging augmented DOT system for in-vivo small animal studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Steven X.; Yang, Bingcheng; Yin, Gongjie

    2010-02-01

    A crucial parameter in Diffuse Optical Tomography (DOT) is the construction of an accurate forward model, which greatly depends on tissue boundary. Since photon propagation is a three-dimensional volumetric problem, extraction and subsequent modeling of three-dimensional boundaries is essential. Original experimental demonstration of the feasibility of DOT to reconstruct absorbers, scatterers and fluorochromes used phantoms or tissues confined appropriately to conform to easily modeled geometries such as a slab or a cylinder. In later years several methods have been developed to model photon propagation through diffuse media with complex boundaries using numerical solutions of the diffusion or transport equation (finite elements or differences) or more recently analytical methods based on the tangent-plane method . While optical examinations performed simultaneously with anatomical imaging modalities such as MRI provide well-defined boundaries, very limited progress has been done so far in extracting full-field (360 degree) boundaries for in-vivo three-dimensional DOT stand-alone imaging. In this paper, we present a desktop multi-spectrum in-vivo 3D DOT system for small animal imaging. This system is augmented with Technest's full-field 3D cameras. The built system has the capability of acquiring 3D object surface profiles in real time and registering 3D boundary with diffuse tomography. Extensive experiments are performed on phantoms and small animals by our collaborators at the Center for Molecular Imaging Research (CMIR) at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) and Harvard Medical School. Data has shown successful reconstructed DOT data with improved accuracy.

  7. Oblique incidence of semi-guided waves on rectangular slab waveguide discontinuities: A vectorial QUEP solver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammer, Manfred

    2015-03-01

    The incidence of thin-film-guided, in-plane unguided waves at oblique angles on straight discontinuities of dielectric slab waveguides, an early problem of integrated optics, is being re-considered. The 3-D frequency domain Maxwell equations reduce to a parametrized inhomogeneous vectorial problem on a 2-D computational domain, with transparent-influx boundary conditions. We propose a rigorous vectorial solver based on simultaneous expansions into polarized local slab eigenmodes along the two orthogonal cross section coordinates (quadridirectional eigenmode propagation QUEP). The quasi-analytical scheme is applicable to configurations with - in principle - arbitrary cross section geometries. Examples for a high-contrast facet of an asymmetric slab waveguide, for the lateral excitation of a channel waveguide, and for a step discontinuity between slab waveguides of different thicknesses are discussed.

  8. Foundations of vectorial metabolism and osmochemistry.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Peter D

    2004-01-01

    Chemical transformations, like osmotic translocations, are transport processes when looked at in detail. In chemiosmotic systems, the pathways of specific ligand conduction are spatially orientated through osmoenzymes and porters in which the actions of chemical group, electron and solute transfer occur as vectorial (or higher tensorial order) diffusion processes down gradients of total potential energy that represent real spatially directed fields of force. Thus, it has been possible to describe classical bag-of-enzymes biochemistry as well as membrane biochemistry in terms of transport. But it would not have been possible to explain biological transport in terms of classical transformational biochemistry or chemistry. The recognition of this conceptual asymmetry in favour of transport has seemed to be upsetting to some biochemists and chemists; and they have resisted the shift towards thinking primarily in terms of the vectorial forces and co-linear displacements of ligands in place of their much less informative scalar products that correspond to the conventional scalar energies. Nevertheless, considerable progress has been made in establishing vectorial metabolism and osmochemistry as acceptable biochemical disciplines embracing transport and metabolism, and bioenergetics has been fundamentally transformed as a result.

  9. Joint 3D seismic travel time and full channel electrical resistivity inversion with cross gradient structure constraint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, J.; Zhang, H.

    2015-12-01

    Near surface geophysical exploration for the purpose of engineering design or construction For this reason, geophysical imaging demands a higher resolution and a better quantitative interpretation. Seismic travel time tomography and direct current resistivity tomography are two main methods for the near surface survey. Because of the limited coverage of observation system and the complex physical relationship between physical parameters and observations, individual geophysical method suffers issues of non-uniqueness and resolution limitation to some degree. We have developed a joint inversion method to combine seismic travel time tomography and full channel resistivity tomography. For the full channel resistivity survey, it uses two electrodes for power supply and all the other electrodes for recording. Compared with the traditional resistivity method, it collects more data and has a better model converge. Our joint inversion strategy relies on the structure constraint enforced through minimizing cross gradients between seismic velocity and resistivity models (Gallardo, 2003). For resistivity tomography, sensitivity kernels are obtained through the adjoint method by solving the electrostatic field equation with the finite-difference method. For seismic travel time tomography, ray paths and travel times are calculated using the fast marching method. We have tested our joint inversion method for a 2D cross-hole problem where two small zones with high and low velocity/resistivity anomalies. Seismic/electrical sources/receivers are installed in two boreholes. For separate seismic inversion, the smearing effect is evident and two anomaly zones are distorted and misplaced. For separate electric resistivity inversion, although two anomaly zones are positioned correctly their values are not accurate. By joint inversion, two velocity anomaly zones are clearly imaged and the smearing effect is greatly reduced. In comparison, for the resistivity model, the two anomaly zones

  10. Registration of fast cine cardiac MR slices to 3D preprocedural images: toward real-time registration for MRI-guided procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smolikova, Renata; Wachowiak, Mark P.; Drangova, Maria

    2004-05-01

    Interventional cardiac magnetic resonance (MR) procedures are the subject of an increasing number of research studies. Typically, during the procedure only two-dimensional images of oblique slices can be presented to the interventionalist in real time. There is a clear benefit to being able to register the real-time 2D slices to a previously acquired 3D computed tomography (CT) or MR image of the heart. Results from a study of the accuracy of registration of 2D cardiac images of an anesthetized pig to a 3D volume obtained in diastole are presented. Fast cine MR images representing twenty phases of the cardiac cycle were obtained of a 2D slice in a known oblique orientation. The 2D images were initially mis-oriented at distances ranging from 2 to 20 mm, and rotations of +/-10 degrees about all three axes. Images from all 20 cardiac phases were registered to examine the effect of timing between the 2D image and the 3D pre-procedural image. Linear registration using mutual information computed with 64 histogram bins yielded the highest accuracy. For the diastolic phases, mean translation and rotation errors ranged between 0.91 and 1.32 mm and between 1.73 and 2.10 degrees. Scans acquired at other phases also had high accuracy. These results are promising for the use of real time MR in image-guided cardiac interventions, and demonstrate the feasibility of registering 2D oblique MR slices to previously acquired single-phase volumes without preprocessing.

  11. Development of a 3D circular microfluidic centrifuge for the separation of mixed particles by using their different centrifuge times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, H. J.; Kim, D. I.; Kim, M. J.; Nguyen, X. D.; Park, D. H.; Go, J. S.

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents a circular microfluidic centrifuge with two inlets and two outlets to separate mixed microparticles with a specially designed sample injection hole. To separate the mixed particles, it uses a rotational flow, generated in a chamber by counter primary flows in the microchannels. The shape and sizes of the circular microfluidic centrifuge have been designed through numerical evaluation to have a large relative centrifugal force. The difference of centrifuge times of the mixed particles of 1 μm and 6 μm was determined to be 8.2 s at an inlet Reynolds number of 500 and a sample Reynolds number of 20. In the experiment, this was measured to be about 10 s. From the separation of the two polymer particles analogous to the representative sizes of platelets and red blood cells, the circular microfluidic centrifuge shows a potential to separate human blood cells size-selectively by using the difference of centrifuge times.

  12. A Sparsity-Based Approach to 3D Binaural Sound Synthesis Using Time-Frequency Array Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cobos, Maximo; Lopez, JoseJ; Spors, Sascha

    2010-12-01

    Localization of sounds in physical space plays a very important role in multiple audio-related disciplines, such as music, telecommunications, and audiovisual productions. Binaural recording is the most commonly used method to provide an immersive sound experience by means of headphone reproduction. However, it requires a very specific recording setup using high-fidelity microphones mounted in a dummy head. In this paper, we present a novel processing framework for binaural sound recording and reproduction that avoids the use of dummy heads, which is specially suitable for immersive teleconferencing applications. The method is based on a time-frequency analysis of the spatial properties of the sound picked up by a simple tetrahedral microphone array, assuming source sparseness. The experiments carried out using simulations and a real-time prototype confirm the validity of the proposed approach.

  13. Imaging subsurface migration of dissolved CO2 in a shallow aquifer using 3-D time-lapse electrical resistivity tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auken, Esben; Doetsch, Joseph; Fiandaca, Gianluca; Christiansen, Anders Vest; Gazoty, Aurélie; Cahill, Aaron Graham; Jakobsen, Rasmus

    2014-02-01

    Contamination of groundwater by leaking CO2 is a potential risk of carbon sequestration. With the help of a field experiment in western Denmark, we investigate to what extent surface electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) can detect and image dissolved CO2 in a shallow aquifer. For this purpose, we injected CO2 at a depth of 5 and 10 m and monitored its migration using 320 electrodes on a 126 m × 25 m surface grid. A fully automated acquisition system continuously collected data and uploaded it into an online database. The large amount of data allows for time-series analysis using geostatistical techniques for noise estimation and data interpolation to compensate for intermittent instrument failure. We estimate a time-dependent noise level for each ERT configuration, taking data variation and measurement frequency into account.

  14. Unstructured grids in 3D and 4D for a time-dependent interface in front tracking with improved accuracy

    SciTech Connect

    Glimm, J.; Grove, J. W.; Li, X. L.; Li, Y.; Xu, Z.

    2002-01-01

    Front tracking traces the dynamic evolution of an interface separating differnt materials or fluid components. In this paper, they describe three types of the grid generation methods used in the front tracking method. One is the unstructured surface grid. The second is a structured grid-based reconstruction method. The third is a time-space grid, also grid based, for a conservative tracking algorithm with improved accuracy.

  15. Progress in the Simulation of Steady and Time-Dependent Flows with 3D Parallel Unstructured Cartesian Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aftosmis, M. J.; Berger, M. J.; Murman, S. M.; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The proposed paper will present recent extensions in the development of an efficient Euler solver for adaptively-refined Cartesian meshes with embedded boundaries. The paper will focus on extensions of the basic method to include solution adaptation, time-dependent flow simulation, and arbitrary rigid domain motion. The parallel multilevel method makes use of on-the-fly parallel domain decomposition to achieve extremely good scalability on large numbers of processors, and is coupled with an automatic coarse mesh generation algorithm for efficient processing by a multigrid smoother. Numerical results are presented demonstrating parallel speed-ups of up to 435 on 512 processors. Solution-based adaptation may be keyed off truncation error estimates using tau-extrapolation or a variety of feature detection based refinement parameters. The multigrid method is extended to for time-dependent flows through the use of a dual-time approach. The extension to rigid domain motion uses an Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerlarian (ALE) formulation, and results will be presented for a variety of two- and three-dimensional example problems with both simple and complex geometry.

  16. Stereoscopic helmet mounted system for real time 3D environment reconstruction and indoor ego-motion estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donato, Giuseppe; Sequeira, Vitor M.; Sadka, Abdul

    2008-04-01

    A novel type of stereoscopic Helmet Mounted System for simultaneous user localization and mapping applications is described. This paper presents precise real time volume data reconstruction. The system is designed for users that need to explore and navigate in unprepared indoor environments without any support of GPS signal or environment preparation through preinstalled markers. Augmented Reality features in support of self-navigation can be interactively added by placing virtual markers in the desired positions in the world coordinate system. They can then be retrieved when the marker is back in the user field of view being used as visual alerts or for back path finding.

  17. Time-Dependent Distribution Functions in C-Mod Calculated with the CQL3D-Hybrid-FOW, AORSA Full-Wave, and DC Lorentz Codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, R. W. (Bob); Petrov, Yu. V.; Jaeger, E. F.; Berry, L. A.; Bonoli, P. T.; Bader, A.

    2015-11-01

    A time-dependent simulation of C-Mod pulsed ICRF power is made calculating minority hydrogen ion distribution functions with the CQL3D-Hybrid-FOW finite-orbit-width Fokker-Planck code. ICRF fields are calculated with the AORSA full wave code, and RF diffusion coefficients are obtained from these fields using the DC Lorentz gyro-orbit code. Prior results with a zero-banana-width simulation using the CQL3D/AORSA/DC time-cycles showed a pronounced enhancement of the H distribution in the perpendicular velocity direction compared to results obtained from Stix's quasilinear theory, in general agreement with experiment. The present study compares the new FOW results, including relevant gyro-radius effects, to determine the importance of these effects on the the NPA synthetic diagnostic time-dependence. The new NPA results give increased agreement with experiment, particularly in the ramp-down time after the ICRF pulse. Funded, through subcontract with Massachusetts Institute of Technology, by USDOE sponsored SciDAC Center for Simulation of Wave-Plasma Interactions.

  18. Comparison of hydrologic response between a conceptual and a travel time distribution model for a snow-covered alpine catchment using Alpine3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comola, Francesco; Lehning, Michael; Bavay, Mathias; Mutzner, Raphaël; Schaefli, Bettina; Rinaldo, Andrea; Parlange, Marc

    2013-04-01

    Fully distributed models of alpine catchment surface processes typically use the geomorphological information provided by digital maps for describing the dynamics of rain, snow, soil and vegetation with much detail. Physically based hydrological models would also require a detailed description of the sub-surface characteristics, which is hardly available. With the increased use of detailed and highly distributed models of surface transport the lack of adequate treatment of sub-surface processes becomes the serious bottle neck. In the past, conceptual hydrological models have been widely applied also for mountain catchments. Their parameters, however, require careful calibration since they do not generally have any direct physical meaning. This motivates the testing of a spatially-explicit hydrologic response model based on geomorphologic travel time distributions, in connection with the detailed description of alpine surface processes as provided by Alpine3D. Moreover, mountain basins are generally characterized by shallow soil layers and the runoff response is highly influenced by the significant topographical gradients, which may favour travel time distribution approaches based on geomorphological information. In this contribution we present the comparison between the conceptual snowmelt/rainfall-runoff model currently implemented in Alpine3D and the spatially-explicit hydrological response model. In particular we characterize the response during snowmelt, considering patchy snow covers in the Dischma and Val Ferret catchments (Grisons and Valais, Switzerland). We show that the spatially-explicit hydrological response model, which explicitly accounts for geomorphologic travel time distributions reacts adequately to spatially varying water input from melting snow. We conclude that a spatially-explicit hydrological model presents an interesting new avenue for the simulation of the hydrologic response of mountain catchments with Alpine3D.

  19. Improved image guidance technique for minimally invasive mitral valve repair using real-time tracked 3D ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rankin, Adam; Moore, John; Bainbridge, Daniel; Peters, Terry

    2016-03-01

    In the past ten years, numerous new surgical and interventional techniques have been developed for treating heart valve disease without the need for cardiopulmonary bypass. Heart valve repair is now being performed in a blood-filled environment, reinforcing the need for accurate and intuitive imaging techniques. Previous work has demonstrated how augmenting ultrasound with virtual representations of specific anatomical landmarks can greatly simplify interventional navigation challenges and increase patient safety. These techniques often complicate interventions by requiring additional steps taken to manually define and initialize virtual models. Furthermore, overlaying virtual elements into real-time image data can also obstruct the view of salient image information. To address these limitations, a system was developed that uses real-time volumetric ultrasound alongside magnetically tracked tools presented in an augmented virtuality environment to provide a streamlined navigation guidance platform. In phantom studies simulating a beating-heart navigation task, procedure duration and tool path metrics have achieved comparable performance to previous work in augmented virtuality techniques, and considerable improvement over standard of care ultrasound guidance.

  20. Terrestrial laser scanning point clouds time series for the monitoring of slope movements: displacement measurement using image correlation and 3D feature tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bornemann, Pierrick; Jean-Philippe, Malet; André, Stumpf; Anne, Puissant; Julien, Travelletti

    2016-04-01

    Dense multi-temporal point clouds acquired with terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) have proved useful for the study of structure and kinematics of slope movements. Most of the existing deformation analysis methods rely on the use of interpolated data. Approaches that use multiscale image correlation provide a precise and robust estimation of the observed movements; however, for non-rigid motion patterns, these methods tend to underestimate all the components of the movement. Further, for rugged surface topography, interpolated data introduce a bias and a loss of information in some local places where the point cloud information is not sufficiently dense. Those limits can be overcome by using deformation analysis exploiting directly the original 3D point clouds assuming some hypotheses on the deformation (e.g. the classic ICP algorithm requires an initial guess by the user of the expected displacement patterns). The objective of this work is therefore to propose a deformation analysis method applied to a series of 20 3D point clouds covering the period October 2007 - October 2015 at the Super-Sauze landslide (South East French Alps). The dense point clouds have been acquired with a terrestrial long-range Optech ILRIS-3D laser scanning device from the same base station. The time series are analyzed using two approaches: 1) a method of correlation of gradient images, and 2) a method of feature tracking in the raw 3D point clouds. The estimated surface displacements are then compared with GNSS surveys on reference targets. Preliminary results tend to show that the image correlation method provides a good estimation of the displacement fields at first order, but shows limitations such as the inability to track some deformation patterns, and the use of a perspective projection that does not maintain original angles and distances in the correlated images. Results obtained with 3D point clouds comparison algorithms (C2C, ICP, M3C2) bring additional information on the

  1. A heterogeneous sensor network simulation system with integrated terrain data for real-time target detection in 3D space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Hong; Tanner, Steve; Rushing, John; Graves, Sara; Criswell, Evans

    2008-03-01

    Large scale sensor networks composed of many low-cost small sensors networked together with a small number of high fidelity position sensors can provide a robust, fast and accurate air defense and warning system. The team has been developing simulations of such large networks, and is now adding terrain data in an effort to provide more realistic analysis of the approach. This work, a heterogeneous sensor network simulation system with integrated terrain data for real-time target detection in a three-dimensional environment is presented. The sensor network can be composed of large numbers of low fidelity binary and bearing-only sensors, and small numbers of high fidelity position sensors, such as radars. The binary and bearing-only sensors are randomly distributed over a large geographic region; while the position sensors are distributed evenly. The elevations of the sensors are determined through the use of DTED Level 0 dataset. The targets are located through fusing measurement information from all types of sensors modeled by the simulation. The network simulation utilizes the same search-based optimization algorithm as in our previous two-dimensional sensor network simulation with some significant modifications. The fusion algorithm is parallelized using spatial decomposition approach: the entire surveillance area is divided into small regions and each region is assigned to one compute node. Each node processes sensor measurements and terrain data only for the assigned sub region. A master process combines the information from all the compute nodes to get the overall network state. The simulation results have indicated that the distributed fusion algorithm is efficient enough so that an optimal solution can be reached before the arrival of the next sensor data with a reasonable time interval, and real-time target detection can be achieved. The simulation was performed on a Linux cluster with communication between nodes facilitated by the Message Passing Interface

  2. A real-time monitoring/emergency response workstation using a 3-D numerical model initialized with SODAR

    SciTech Connect

    Lawver, B.S.; Sullivan, T.J.; Baskett, R.L.

    1993-05-10

    Many workstation based emergency response dispersion modeling systems provide simple Gaussian models driven by single meteorological tower inputs to estimate the downwind consequences from accidental spills or stack releases. Complex meteorological or terrain settings demand more sophisticated resolution of the three-dimensional structure of the atmosphere to reliably calculate plume dispersion. Mountain valleys and sea breeze flows are two common examples of such settings. To address these complexities, we have implemented the three-dimensional-diagnostic MATHEW mass-adjusted wind field and ADPIC particle-in-cell dispersion models on a workstation for use in real-time emergency response modeling. Both MATHEW and ADPIC have shown their utility in a variety of complex settings over the last 15 years within the Department of Energy`s Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability project.

  3. Performance and suitability assessment of a real-time 3D electromagnetic needle tracking system for interstitial brachytherapy

    PubMed Central

    Boutaleb, Samir; Fillion, Olivier; Bonillas, Antonio; Hautvast, Gilion; Binnekamp, Dirk; Beaulieu, Luc

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Accurate insertion and overall needle positioning are key requirements for effective brachytherapy treatments. This work aims at demonstrating the accuracy performance and the suitability of the Aurora® V1 Planar Field Generator (PFG) electromagnetic tracking system (EMTS) for real-time treatment assistance in interstitial brachytherapy procedures. Material and methods The system's performance was characterized in two distinct studies. First, in an environment free of EM disturbance, the boundaries of the detection volume of the EMTS were characterized and a tracking error analysis was performed. Secondly, a distortion analysis was conducted as a means of assessing the tracking accuracy performance of the system in the presence of potential EM disturbance generated by the proximity of standard brachytherapy components. Results The tracking accuracy experiments showed that positional errors were typically 2 ± 1 mm in a zone restricted to the first 30 cm of the detection volume. However, at the edges of the detection volume, sensor position errors of up to 16 mm were recorded. On the other hand, orientation errors remained low at ± 2° for most of the measurements. The EM distortion analysis showed that the presence of typical brachytherapy components in vicinity of the EMTS had little influence on tracking accuracy. Position errors of less than 1 mm were recorded with all components except with a metallic arm support, which induced a mean absolute error of approximately 1.4 mm when located 10 cm away from the needle sensor. Conclusions The Aurora® V1 PFG EMTS possesses a great potential for real-time treatment assistance in general interstitial brachytherapy. In view of our experimental results, we however recommend that the needle axis remains as parallel as possible to the generator surface during treatment and that the tracking zone be restricted to the first 30 cm from the generator surface. PMID:26622231

  4. 3D Lithospheric Imaging by Time-Domain Full-Waveform Inversion of Teleseismic Body-Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beller, S.; Monteiller, V.; Operto, S.; Nolet, G.; Combe, L.; Metivier, L.; Virieux, J.; Nissen-Meyer, T.; Paul, A.

    2014-12-01

    With the deployment of dense seismic arrays and the continuous growth of computing facilities, full-waveform inversion (FWI) of teleseismic data has become a method of choice for high-resolution lithospheric imaging. FWI can be recast as a local optimization problem that seeks to estimate Earth's elastic properties by iteratively minimizing the misfit function between observed and modeled seismograms.In passive teleseismic configurations, the seismic source no longer corresponds to a point source embedded in the targeted medium but rather corresponds to a wavefront incoming from the outside of the model. We develop a 3-dimensional time-domain full-waveform inversion program that is more designed for this configuration. The gradient of the misfit function is efficiently computed with the adjoint-state method. A velocity-stress finite-difference time-domain modeling engine, which is interfaced with the so-called total-field/scattered-field method, is used to propagate in the targeted medium the incident wavefield inferred from a global Earth simulation (AxiSEM). Such interfacing is required to account for the multiple arrivals in the incoming wavefield and the sphericity of the Earth. Despite the limited number of nearly plane-wave sources, the interaction of the incident wavefield with the topography (P-Sv conversions and P-P reflections acting as secondary sources) provides a suitable framework to record both transmitted wavefields and reflected wavefields from lithospheric reflectors. These recordings of both transmitted and reflected waves makes FWI amenable to a broadband-wavenumber (i.e., high resolution) reconstruction of the lithosphere.Feasibility of the method is assessed with a realistic synthetic model representative of the Western Alps. One key issue is the estimation of the temporal source excitation, as there might be some trade-off between the source estimation and the subsurface update. To avoid being trapped in a local minimum, we follow a

  5. Time Resolved 3-D Mapping of Atmospheric Aerosols and Clouds During the Recent ARM Water Vapor IOP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwemmer, Geary; Miller, David; Wilkerson, Thomas; Andrus, Ionio; Starr, David OC. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The HARLIE lidar was deployed at the ARM SGP site in north central Oklahoma and recorded over 100 hours of data on 16 days between 17 September and 6 October 2000 during the recent Water Vapor Intensive Operating Period (IOP). Placed in a ground-based trailer for upward looking scanning measurements of clouds and aerosols, HARLIE provided a unique record of time-resolved atmospheric backscatter at 1 micron wavelength. The conical scanning lidar images atmospheric backscatter along the surface of an inverted 90 degree (full angle) cone up to an altitude of 20 km. 360 degree scans having spatial resolutions of 20 meters in the vertical and 1 degree in azimuth were obtained every 36 seconds. Various boundary layer and cloud parameters are derived from the lidar data, as well as atmospheric wind vectors where there is Sufficiently resolved structure that can be traced moving through the surface described by the scanning laser beam. Comparison of HARLIE measured winds with radiosonde measured winds validates the accuracy of this new technique for remotely measuring atmospheric winds without Doppler information.

  6. Real-time 3D reconstruction of road curvature in far look-ahead distance from analysis of image sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behringer, Reinhold

    1995-12-01

    A system for visual road recognition in far look-ahead distance, implemented in the autonomous road vehicle VaMP (a passenger car), is described. Visual cues of a road in a video image are the bright lane markings and the edges formed at the road borders. In a distance of more than 100 m, the most relevant road cue is the homogeneous road area, limited by the two border edges. These cues can be detected by the image processing module KRONOS applying edge detection techniques and areal 2D segmentation based on resolution triangles (analogous to a resolution pyramid). An estimation process performs an update of a state vector, which describes spatial road shape and vehicle orientation relative to the road. This state vector is estimated every 40 ms by exploiting knowledge about the vehicle movement (spatio-temporal model of vehicle dynamics) and the road design rules (clothoidal segments). Kalman filter techniques are applied to obtain an optimal estimate of the state vector by evaluating the measurements of the road border positions in the image sequence taken by a set of CCD cameras. The road consists of segments with piecewise constant curvature parameters. The borders between these segments can be detected by applying methods which have been developed for detection of discontinuities during time-discrete measurements. The road recognition system has been tested in autonomous rides with VaMP on public Autobahnen in real traffic at speeds up to 130 km/h.

  7. New opportunities for quantitative and time efficient 3D MRI of liquid and solid electrochemical cell components: Sectoral Fast Spin Echo and SPRITE.

    PubMed

    Romanenko, Konstantin; Forsyth, Maria; O'Dell, Luke A

    2014-11-01

    The ability to image electrochemical processes in situ using nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) offers exciting possibilities for understanding and optimizing materials in batteries, fuel cells and supercapacitors. In these applications, however, the quality of the MRI measurement is inherently limited by the presence of conductive elements in the cell or device. To overcome related difficulties, optimal methodologies have to be employed. We show that time-efficient three dimensional (3D) imaging of liquid and solid lithium battery components can be performed by Sectoral Fast Spin Echo and Single Point Imaging with T1 Enhancement (SPRITE), respectively. The former method is based on the generalized phase encoding concept employed in clinical MRI, which we have adapted and optimized for materials science and electrochemistry applications. Hard radio frequency pulses, short echo spacing and centrically ordered sectoral phase encoding ensure accurate and time-efficient full volume imaging. Mapping of density, diffusivity and relaxation time constants in metal-containing liquid electrolytes is demonstrated. 1, 2 and 3D SPRITE approaches show strong potential for rapid high resolution (7)Li MRI of lithium electrode components.

  8. New opportunities for quantitative and time efficient 3D MRI of liquid and solid electrochemical cell components: Sectoral Fast Spin Echo and SPRITE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanenko, Konstantin; Forsyth, Maria; O'Dell, Luke A.

    2014-11-01

    The ability to image electrochemical processes in situ using nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) offers exciting possibilities for understanding and optimizing materials in batteries, fuel cells and supercapacitors. In these applications, however, the quality of the MRI measurement is inherently limited by the presence of conductive elements in the cell or device. To overcome related difficulties, optimal methodologies have to be employed. We show that time-efficient three dimensional (3D) imaging of liquid and solid lithium battery components can be performed by Sectoral Fast Spin Echo and Single Point Imaging with T1 Enhancement (SPRITE), respectively. The former method is based on the generalized phase encoding concept employed in clinical MRI, which we have adapted and optimized for materials science and electrochemistry applications. Hard radio frequency pulses, short echo spacing and centrically ordered sectoral phase encoding ensure accurate and time-efficient full volume imaging. Mapping of density, diffusivity and relaxation time constants in metal-containing liquid electrolytes is demonstrated. 1, 2 and 3D SPRITE approaches show strong potential for rapid high resolution 7Li MRI of lithium electrode components.

  9. New opportunities for quantitative and time efficient 3D MRI of liquid and solid electrochemical cell components: Sectoral Fast Spin Echo and SPRITE.

    PubMed

    Romanenko, Konstantin; Forsyth, Maria; O'Dell, Luke A

    2014-11-01

    The ability to image electrochemical processes in situ using nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) offers exciting possibilities for understanding and optimizing materials in batteries, fuel cells and supercapacitors. In these applications, however, the quality of the MRI measurement is inherently limited by the presence of conductive elements in the cell or device. To overcome related difficulties, optimal methodologies have to be employed. We show that time-efficient three dimensional (3D) imaging of liquid and solid lithium battery components can be performed by Sectoral Fast Spin Echo and Single Point Imaging with T1 Enhancement (SPRITE), respectively. The former method is based on the generalized phase encoding concept employed in clinical MRI, which we have adapted and optimized for materials science and electrochemistry applications. Hard radio frequency pulses, short echo spacing and centrically ordered sectoral phase encoding ensure accurate and time-efficient full volume imaging. Mapping of density, diffusivity and relaxation time constants in metal-containing liquid electrolytes is demonstrated. 1, 2 and 3D SPRITE approaches show strong potential for rapid high resolution (7)Li MRI of lithium electrode components. PMID:25442778

  10. A GPU-based framework for modeling real-time 3D lung tumor conformal dosimetry with subject-specific lung tumor motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Yugang; Santhanam, Anand; Neelakkantan, Harini; Ruddy, Bari H.; Meeks, Sanford L.; Kupelian, Patrick A.

    2010-09-01

    In this paper, we present a graphics processing unit (GPU)-based simulation framework to calculate the delivered dose to a 3D moving lung tumor and its surrounding normal tissues, which are undergoing subject-specific lung deformations. The GPU-based simulation framework models the motion of the 3D volumetric lung tumor and its surrounding tissues, simulates the dose delivery using the dose extracted from a treatment plan using Pinnacle Treatment Planning System, Phillips, for one of the 3DCTs of the 4DCT and predicts the amount and location of radiation doses deposited inside the lung. The 4DCT lung datasets were registered with each other using a modified optical flow algorithm. The motion of the tumor and the motion of the surrounding tissues were simulated by measuring the changes in lung volume during the radiotherapy treatment using spirometry. The real-time dose delivered to the tumor for each beam is generated by summing the dose delivered to the target volume at each increase in lung volume during the beam delivery time period. The simulation results showed the real-time capability of the framework at 20 discrete tumor motion steps per breath, which is higher than the number of 4DCT steps (approximately 12) reconstructed during multiple breathing cycles.

  11. Nuclear accessibility of β-actin mRNA is measured by 3D single-molecule real-time tracking.

    PubMed

    Smith, Carlas S; Preibisch, Stephan; Joseph, Aviva; Abrahamsson, Sara; Rieger, Bernd; Myers, Eugene; Singer, Robert H; Grunwald, David

    2015-05-25

    Imaging single proteins or RNAs allows direct visualization of the inner workings of the cell. Typically, three-dimensional (3D) images are acquired by sequentially capturing a series of 2D sections. The time required to step through the sample often impedes imaging of large numbers of rapidly moving molecules. Here we applied multifocus microscopy (MFM) to instantaneously capture 3D single-molecule real-time images in live cells, visualizing cell nuclei at 10 volumes per second. We developed image analysis techniques to analyze messenger RNA (mRNA) diffusion in the entire volume of the nucleus. Combining MFM with precise registration between fluorescently labeled mRNA, nuclear pore complexes, and chromatin, we obtained globally optimal image alignment within 80-nm precision using transformation models. We show that β-actin mRNAs freely access the entire nucleus and fewer than 60% of mRNAs are more than 0.5 µm away from a nuclear pore, and we do so for the first time accounting for spatial inhomogeneity of nuclear organization. PMID:26008747

  12. Deriving Macropore and Preferential Flow Parameters from Tracer and Time-lapse 3D GPR Experiments at the Plot-Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackisch, Conrad; Allroggen, Niklas; Tronicke, Jens; Zehe, Erwin

    2014-05-01

    "Hydrology - a science in which all processes are preferential" (Uhlenbrook, 2006) - as such preferential flow is known and discussed in hydrology since almost three decades. At the same time, preferential flow remains problematic as explicit descriptions are hard to define and upscale and implicit descriptions remain rather case sensitive. Moreover, our techniques to monitor preferential flow and especially flow structures are very limited. We conducted three multi-tracer plot-scale (1m x 1m) sprinkler experiments at a forested hillslope in the Attert Basin in Luxembourg with prevailing geogenic and biogenic preferential flow structures. It was accompanied by a 3D time-lapse GPR (Ground Penetrating Radar) survey covering an area of 3m x 3m. We present the results with special emphasis on the derivation of macropore parameters for further modelling. To do so, we developed an automated analysis of images from excavated Brilliant Blue stained profiles. Additionally, we analyse our time-lapse GPR data with respect to temporal changes and derive 3D strutural information of the preferential flow patterns. Superior to tracers, this high resolution subsurface imaging technique is non-invasive, repeatable and therefore helps to disentangle the dye stained patterns towards process observation. The results of the image analyses and the GPR surveys are compared and referenced to soil moisture monitoring, sampled Bromide profiles and stable isotope signatures. We further discuss implications for joint development of model concepts and observation methods.

  13. Nuclear accessibility of β-actin mRNA is measured by 3D single-molecule real-time tracking

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Carlas S.; Preibisch, Stephan; Joseph, Aviva; Abrahamsson, Sara; Rieger, Bernd; Myers, Eugene; Singer, Robert H.

    2015-01-01

    Imaging single proteins or RNAs allows direct visualization of the inner workings of the cell. Typically, three-dimensional (3D) images are acquired by sequentially capturing a series of 2D sections. The time required to step through the sample often impedes imaging of large numbers of rapidly moving molecules. Here we applied multifocus microscopy (MFM) to instantaneously capture 3D single-molecule real-time images in live cells, visualizing cell nuclei at 10 volumes per second. We developed image analysis techniques to analyze messenger RNA (mRNA) diffusion in the entire volume of the nucleus. Combining MFM with precise registration between fluorescently labeled mRNA, nuclear pore complexes, and chromatin, we obtained globally optimal image alignment within 80-nm precision using transformation models. We show that β-actin mRNAs freely access the entire nucleus and fewer than 60% of mRNAs are more than 0.5 µm away from a nuclear pore, and we do so for the first time accounting for spatial inhomogeneity of nuclear organization. PMID:26008747

  14. The next chapter in experimental petrology: Metamorphic dehydration of polycrystalline gypsum captured in 3D microtomographic time series datasets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bedford, John; Fusseis, Florian; Leclere, Henry; Wheeler, John; Faulkner, Dan

    2016-04-01

    Nucleation and growth of new minerals in response to disequilibrium is the most fundamental metamorphic process. However, our current kinetic models of metamorphic reactions are largely based on inference from fossil mineral assemblages, rather than from direct observation. The experimental investigation of metamorphism has also been limited, typically to concealed vessels that restrict the possibility of direct microstructural monitoring. Here we present one of the first time series datasets that captures a metamorphic reaction, dehydration of polycrystalline gypsum to form hemihydrate, in a series of three dimensional x-ray microtomographic datasets. We achieved this by installing an x-ray transparent hydrothermal cell (Fusseis et al., 2014, J. Synchrotron Rad. 21, 251-253) in the microtomography beamline 2BM at the Advanced Photon Source (USA). In the cell, we heated a millimetre-sized sample of Volterra Alabaster to 388 K while applying an effective pressure of 5 MPa. Using hard x-rays that penetrate the pressure vessel, we imaged the specimen 40 times while it reacted for approximately 10 hours. Each microtomographic dataset was acquired in 300 seconds without interrupting the reaction. Our absorption microtomographic data have a voxel size of 1.3 μm, which suffices to analyse the reaction progress in 4D. Gypsum can clearly be distinguished from hemihydrate and pores, which form due to the large negative solid volume change. On the resolved scale, the first hemihydrate needles appear after about 2 hours. Our data allow tracking of individual needles throughout the entire experiment. We quantified their growth rates by measuring their circumference. While individual grains grow at different rates, they all start slowly during the initial nucleation stage, then accelerate and grow steadily between about 200 and 400 minutes before reaction rate decelerates again. Hemihydrate needles are surrounded by porous haloes, which grow with the needles, link up and

  15. Use of MV and kV imager correlation for maintaining continuous real-time 3D internal marker tracking during beam interruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiersma, R. D.; Riaz, N.; Dieterich, Sonja; Suh, Yelin; Xing, L.

    2009-01-01

    The integration of onboard kV imaging together with a MV electronic portal imaging device (EPID) on linear accelerators (LINAC) can provide an easy to implement real-time 3D organ position monitoring solution for treatment delivery. Currently, real-time MV-kV tracking has only been demonstrated by simultaneous imagining by both MV and kV imaging devices. However, modalities such as step-and-shoot IMRT (SS-IMRT), which inherently contain MV beam interruptions, can lead to loss of target information necessary for 3D localization. Additionally, continuous kV imaging throughout the treatment delivery can lead to high levels of imaging dose to the patient. This work demonstrates for the first time how full 3D target tracking can be maintained even in the presence of such beam interruption, or MV/kV beam interleave, by use of a relatively simple correlation model together with MV-kV tracking. A moving correlation model was constructed using both present and prior positions of the marker in the available MV or kV image to compute the position of the marker on the interrupted imager. A commercially available radiotherapy system, equipped with both MV and kV imaging devices, was used to deliver typical SS-IMRT lung treatment plans to a 4D phantom containing internally embedded metallic markers. To simulate actual lung tumor motion, previous recorded 4D lung patient motion data were used. Lung tumor motion data of five separate patients were inputted into the 4D phantom, and typical SS-IMRT lung plans were delivered to simulate actual clinical deliveries. Application of the correlation model to SS-IMRT lung treatment deliveries was found to be an effective solution for maintaining continuous 3D tracking during 'step' beam interruptions. For deliveries involving five or more gantry angles with 50 or more fields per plan, the positional errors were found to have <=1 mm root mean squared error (RMSE) in all three spatial directions. In addition to increasing the robustness of

  16. Use of MV and kV imager correlation for maintaining continuous real-time 3D internal marker tracking during beam interruptions.

    PubMed

    Wiersma, R D; Riaz, N; Dieterich, Sonja; Suh, Yelin; Xing, L

    2009-01-01

    The integration of onboard kV imaging together with a MV electronic portal imaging device (EPID) on linear accelerators (LINAC) can provide an easy to implement real-time 3D organ position monitoring solution for treatment delivery. Currently, real-time MV-kV tracking has only been demonstrated by simultaneous imagining by both MV and kV imaging devices. However, modalities such as step-and-shoot IMRT (SS-IMRT), which inherently contain MV beam interruptions, can lead to loss of target information necessary for 3D localization. Additionally, continuous kV imaging throughout the treatment delivery can lead to high levels of imaging dose to the patient. This work demonstrates for the first time how full 3D target tracking can be maintained even in the presence of such beam interruption, or MV/kV beam interleave, by use of a relatively simple correlation model together with MV-kV tracking. A moving correlation model was constructed using both present and prior positions of the marker in the available MV or kV image to compute the position of the marker on the interrupted imager. A commercially available radiotherapy system, equipped with both MV and kV imaging devices, was used to deliver typical SS-IMRT lung treatment plans to a 4D phantom containing internally embedded metallic markers. To simulate actual lung tumor motion, previous recorded 4D lung patient motion data were used. Lung tumor motion data of five separate patients were inputted into the 4D phantom, and typical SS-IMRT lung plans were delivered to simulate actual clinical deliveries. Application of the correlation model to SS-IMRT lung treatment deliveries was found to be an effective solution for maintaining continuous 3D tracking during 'step' beam interruptions. For deliveries involving five or more gantry angles with 50 or more fields per plan, the positional errors were found to have < or =1 mm root mean squared error (RMSE) in all three spatial directions. In addition to increasing the robustness

  17. 3D Imaging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hastings, S. K.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses 3 D imaging as it relates to digital representations in virtual library collections. Highlights include X-ray computed tomography (X-ray CT); the National Science Foundation (NSF) Digital Library Initiatives; output peripherals; image retrieval systems, including metadata; and applications of 3 D imaging for libraries and museums. (LRW)

  18. Hybrid tenso-vectorial compressive sensing for hyperspectral imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qun; Bernal, Edgar A.

    2016-05-01

    Hyperspectral imaging has a wide range of applications relying on remote material identification, including astronomy, mineralogy, and agriculture; however, due to the large volume of data involved, the complexity and cost of hyperspectral imagers can be prohibitive. The exploitation of redundancies along the spatial and spectral dimensions of a hyperspectral image of a scene has created new paradigms that overcome the limitations of traditional imaging systems. While compressive sensing (CS) approaches have been proposed and simulated with success on already acquired hyperspectral imagery, most of the existing work relies on the capability to simultaneously measure the spatial and spectral dimensions of the hyperspectral cube. Most real-life devices, however, are limited to sampling one or two dimensions at a time, which renders a significant portion of the existing work unfeasible. We propose a new variant of the recently proposed serial hybrid vectorial and tensorial compressive sensing (HCS-S) algorithm that, like its predecessor, is compatible with real-life devices both in terms of the acquisition and reconstruction requirements. The newly introduced approach is parallelizable, and we abbreviate it as HCS-P. Together, HCS-S and HCS-P comprise a generalized framework for hybrid tenso-vectorial compressive sensing, or HCS for short. We perform a detailed analysis that demonstrates the uniqueness of the signal reconstructed by both the original HCS-S and the proposed HCS-P algorithms. Last, we analyze the behavior of the HCS reconstruction algorithms in the presence of measurement noise, both theoretically and experimentally.

  19. NASA's "Eyes On The Solar System:" A Real-time, 3D-Interactive Tool to Teach the Wonder of Planetary Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussey, K.

    2014-12-01

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory is using video game technology to immerse students, the general public and mission personnel in our solar system and beyond. "Eyes on the Solar System," a cross-platform, real-time, 3D-interactive application that can run on-line or as a stand-alone "video game," is of particular interest to educators looking for inviting tools to capture students interest in a format they like and understand. (eyes.nasa.gov). It gives users an extraordinary view of our solar system by virtually transporting them across space and time to make first-person observations of spacecraft, planetary bodies and NASA/ESA missions in action. Key scientific results illustrated with video presentations, supporting imagery and web links are imbedded contextually into the solar system. Educators who want an interactive, game-based approach to engage students in learning Planetary Science will see how "Eyes" can be effectively used to teach its principles to grades 3 through 14.The presentation will include a detailed demonstration of the software along with a description/demonstration of how this technology is being adapted for education. There will also be a preview of coming attractions. This work is being conducted by the Visualization Technology Applications and Development Group at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, the same team responsible for "Eyes on the Earth 3D," and "Eyes on Exoplanets," which can be viewed at eyes.nasa.gov/earth and eyes.nasa.gov/exoplanets.

  20. Towards real-time 3D US-CT registration on the beating heart for guidance of minimally invasive cardiac interventions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Feng; Lang, Pencilla; Rajchl, Martin; Chen, Elvis C. S.; Guiraudon, Gerard; Peters, Terry M.

    2012-02-01

    Compared to conventional open-heart surgeries, minimally invasive cardiac interventions cause less trauma and sideeffects to patients. However, the direct view of surgical targets and tools is usually not available in minimally invasive procedures, which makes image-guided navigation systems essential. The choice of imaging modalities used in the navigation systems must consider the capability of imaging soft tissues, spatial and temporal resolution, compatibility and flexibility in the OR, and financial cost. In this paper, we propose a new means of guidance for minimally invasive cardiac interventions using 3D real-time ultrasound images to show the intra-operative heart motion together with preoperative CT image(s) employed to demonstrate high-quality 3D anatomical context. We also develop a method to register intra-operative ultrasound and pre-operative CT images in close to real-time. The registration method has two stages. In the first, anatomical features are segmented from the first frame of ultrasound images and the CT image(s). A feature based registration is used to align those features. The result of this is used as an initialization in the second stage, in which a mutual information based registration is used to register every ultrasound frame to the CT image(s). A GPU based implementation is used to accelerate the registration.

  1. A radial sampling strategy for uniform k-space coverage with retrospective respiratory gating in 3D ultrashort-echo-time lung imaging.

    PubMed

    Park, Jinil; Shin, Taehoon; Yoon, Soon Ho; Goo, Jin Mo; Park, Jang-Yeon

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this work was to develop a 3D radial-sampling strategy which maintains uniform k-space sample density after retrospective respiratory gating, and demonstrate its feasibility in free-breathing ultrashort-echo-time lung MRI. A multi-shot, interleaved 3D radial sampling function was designed by segmenting a single-shot trajectory of projection views such that each interleaf samples k-space in an incoherent fashion. An optimal segmentation factor for the interleaved acquisition was derived based on an approximate model of respiratory patterns such that radial interleaves are evenly accepted during the retrospective gating. The optimality of the proposed sampling scheme was tested by numerical simulations and phantom experiments using human respiratory waveforms. Retrospectively, respiratory-gated, free-breathing lung MRI with the proposed sampling strategy was performed in healthy subjects. The simulation yielded the most uniform k-space sample density with the optimal segmentation factor, as evidenced by the smallest standard deviation of the number of neighboring samples as well as minimal side-lobe energy in the point spread function. The optimality of the proposed scheme was also confirmed by minimal image artifacts in phantom images. Human lung images showed that the proposed sampling scheme significantly reduced streak and ring artifacts compared with the conventional retrospective respiratory gating while suppressing motion-related blurring compared with full sampling without respiratory gating. In conclusion, the proposed 3D radial-sampling scheme can effectively suppress the image artifacts due to non-uniform k-space sample density in retrospectively respiratory-gated lung MRI by uniformly distributing gated radial views across the k-space.

  2. Constant-time 2D and 3D through-bond correlation NMR spectroscopy of solids under 60 kHz MAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Rongchun; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2016-01-01

    Establishing connectivity and proximity of nuclei is an important step in elucidating the structure and dynamics of molecules in solids using magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectroscopy. Although recent studies have successfully demonstrated the feasibility of proton-detected multidimensional solid-state NMR experiments under ultrafast-MAS frequencies and obtaining high-resolution spectral lines of protons, assignment of proton resonances is a major challenge. In this study, we first re-visit and demonstrate the feasibility of 2D constant-time uniform-sign cross-peak correlation (CTUC-COSY) NMR experiment on rigid solids under ultrafast-MAS conditions, where the sensitivity of the experiment is enhanced by the reduced spin-spin relaxation rate and the use of low radio-frequency power for heteronuclear decoupling during the evolution intervals of the pulse sequence. In addition, we experimentally demonstrate the performance of a proton-detected pulse sequence to obtain a 3D 1H/13C/1H chemical shift correlation spectrum by incorporating an additional cross-polarization period in the CTUC-COSY pulse sequence to enable proton chemical shift evolution and proton detection in the incrementable t1 and t3 periods, respectively. In addition to through-space and through-bond 13C/1H and 13C/13C chemical shift correlations, the 3D 1H/13C/1H experiment also provides a COSY-type 1H/1H chemical shift correlation spectrum, where only the chemical shifts of those protons, which are bonded to two neighboring carbons, are correlated. By extracting 2D F1/F3 slices (1H/1H chemical shift correlation spectrum) at different 13C chemical shift frequencies from the 3D 1H/13C/1H spectrum, resonances of proton atoms located close to a specific carbon atom can be identified. Overall, the through-bond and through-space homonuclear/heteronuclear proximities determined from the 3D 1H/13C/1H experiment would be useful to study the structure and dynamics of a variety of chemical and biological

  3. Constant-time 2D and 3D through-bond correlation NMR spectroscopy of solids under 60 kHz MAS.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rongchun; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2016-01-21

    Establishing connectivity and proximity of nuclei is an important step in elucidating the structure and dynamics of molecules in solids using magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectroscopy. Although recent studies have successfully demonstrated the feasibility of proton-detected multidimensional solid-state NMR experiments under ultrafast-MAS frequencies and obtaining high-resolution spectral lines of protons, assignment of proton resonances is a major challenge. In this study, we first re-visit and demonstrate the feasibility of 2D constant-time uniform-sign cross-peak correlation (CTUC-COSY) NMR experiment on rigid solids under ultrafast-MAS conditions, where the sensitivity of the experiment is enhanced by the reduced spin-spin relaxation rate and the use of low radio-frequency power for heteronuclear decoupling during the evolution intervals of the pulse sequence. In addition, we experimentally demonstrate the performance of a proton-detected pulse sequence to obtain a 3D (1)H/(13)C/(1)H chemical shift correlation spectrum by incorporating an additional cross-polarization period in the CTUC-COSY pulse sequence to enable proton chemical shift evolution and proton detection in the incrementable t1 and t3 periods, respectively. In addition to through-space and through-bond (13)C/(1)H and (13)C/(13)C chemical shift correlations, the 3D (1)H/(13)C/(1)H experiment also provides a COSY-type (1)H/(1)H chemical shift correlation spectrum, where only the chemical shifts of those protons, which are bonded to two neighboring carbons, are correlated. By extracting 2D F1/F3 slices ((1)H/(1)H chemical shift correlation spectrum) at different (13)C chemical shift frequencies from the 3D (1)H/(13)C/(1)H spectrum, resonances of proton atoms located close to a specific carbon atom can be identified. Overall, the through-bond and through-space homonuclear/heteronuclear proximities determined from the 3D (1)H/(13)C/(1)H experiment would be useful to study the structure and dynamics of

  4. Study of the 3D Coronal Magnetic Field of Active Region 11117 Around the Time of a Confined Flare Using a Data-Driven CESE-MHD Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, C.; Feng, X.; Wu, S.; Hu, Q.

    2012-12-01

    Non-potentiality of the solar coronal magnetic field accounts for the solar explosion like flares and CMEs. We apply a data-driven CESE-MHD model to investigate the three-dimensional (3D) coronal magnetic field of NOAA active region (AR) 11117 around the time of a C-class confined flare occurred on 2010 October 25. The CESE-MHD model, based on the spacetime conservation-element and solution-element scheme, is designed to focus on the magnetic-field evolution and to consider a simplified solar atomsphere with finite plasma β. Magnetic vector-field data derived from the observations at the photoshpere is inputted directly to constrain the model. Assuming that the dynamic evolution of the coronal magnetic field can be approximated by successive equilibria, we solve a time sequence of MHD equilibria basing on a set of vector magnetograms for AR 11117 taken by the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) on board the Solar Dynamic Observatory (SDO) around the time of flare. The model qualitatively reproduces the basic structures of the 3D magnetic field, as supported by the visual similarity between the field lines and the coronal loops observed by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA), which shows that the coronal field can indeed be well characterized by the MHD equilibrium in most time. The magnetic configuration changes very limited during the studied time interval of two hours. A topological analysis reveals that the small flare is correlated with a bald patch (BP, where the magnetic field is tangent to the photoshpere), suggesting that the energy release of the flare can be understood by magnetic reconnection associated with the BP separatrices. The total magnetic flux and energy keep increasing slightly in spite of the flare, while the magnetic free energy drops during the flare with an amount of 1.7 × 1030 erg, which can be interpreted as the energy budget released by the minor C-class flare.

  5. Generation of perfect vectorial vortex beams.

    PubMed

    Li, Peng; Zhang, Yi; Liu, Sheng; Ma, Chaojie; Han, Lei; Cheng, Huachao; Zhao, Jianlin

    2016-05-15

    We propose the concept of perfect vectorial vortex beams (VVBs), which not merely have intensity profile independent of the polarization order and the topological charge of spiral phase, but also have stable intensity profile and state of polarization (SoP) upon propagation. Utilizing a Sagnac interferometer, we approximately generate perfect VVBs with locally linear and elliptical polarizations, and demonstrate that such beams can keep their intensity profile and SoP at a certain propagation distance. These proposed VVBs can be expanded to encode information and quantum cryptography, as well as to enrich the conversion of spin and orbital angular momenta. PMID:27176963

  6. Left-ventricle segmentation in real-time 3D echocardiography using a hybrid active shape model and optimal graph search approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Honghai; Abiose, Ademola K.; Campbell, Dwayne N.; Sonka, Milan; Martins, James B.; Wahle, Andreas

    2010-03-01

    Quantitative analysis of the left ventricular shape and motion patterns associated with left ventricular mechanical dyssynchrony (LVMD) is essential for diagnosis and treatment planning in congestive heart failure. Real-time 3D echocardiography (RT3DE) used for LVMD analysis is frequently limited by heavy speckle noise or partially incomplete data, thus a segmentation method utilizing learned global shape knowledge is beneficial. In this study, the endocardial surface of the left ventricle (LV) is segmented using a hybrid approach combining active shape model (ASM) with optimal graph search. The latter is used to achieve landmark refinement in the ASM framework. Optimal graph search translates the 3D segmentation into the detection of a minimum-cost closed set in a graph and can produce a globally optimal result. Various information-gradient, intensity distributions, and regional-property terms-are used to define the costs for the graph search. The developed method was tested on 44 RT3DE datasets acquired from 26 LVMD patients. The segmentation accuracy was assessed by surface positioning error and volume overlap measured for the whole LV as well as 16 standard LV regions. The segmentation produced very good results that were not achievable using ASM or graph search alone.

  7. YouDash3D: exploring stereoscopic 3D gaming for 3D movie theaters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schild, Jonas; Seele, Sven; Masuch, Maic

    2012-03-01

    Along with the success of the digitally revived stereoscopic cinema, events beyond 3D movies become attractive for movie theater operators, i.e. interactive 3D games. In this paper, we present a case that explores possible challenges and solutions for interactive 3D games to be played by a movie theater audience. We analyze the setting and showcase current issues related to lighting and interaction. Our second focus is to provide gameplay mechanics that make special use of stereoscopy, especially depth-based game design. Based on these results, we present YouDash3D, a game prototype that explores public stereoscopic gameplay in a reduced kiosk setup. It features live 3D HD video stream of a professional stereo camera rig rendered in a real-time game scene. We use the effect to place the stereoscopic effigies of players into the digital game. The game showcases how stereoscopic vision can provide for a novel depth-based game mechanic. Projected trigger zones and distributed clusters of the audience video allow for easy adaptation to larger audiences and 3D movie theater gaming.

  8. Use of a graphics processing unit (GPU) to facilitate real-time 3D graphic presentation of the patient skin-dose distribution during fluoroscopic interventional procedures.

    PubMed

    Rana, Vijay; Rudin, Stephen; Bednarek, Daniel R

    2012-02-23

    We have developed a dose-tracking system (DTS) that calculates the radiation dose to the patient's skin in real-time by acquiring exposure parameters and imaging-system-geometry from the digital bus on a Toshiba Infinix C-arm unit. The cumulative dose values are then displayed as a color map on an OpenGL-based 3D graphic of the patient for immediate feedback to the interventionalist. Determination of those elements on the surface of the patient 3D-graphic that intersect the beam and calculation of the dose for these elements in real time demands fast computation. Reducing the size of the elements results in more computation load on the computer processor and therefore a tradeoff occurs between the resolution of the patient graphic and the real-time performance of the DTS. The speed of the DTS for calculating dose to the skin is limited by the central processing unit (CPU) and can be improved by using the parallel processing power of a graphics processing unit (GPU). Here, we compare the performance speed of GPU-based DTS software to that of the current CPU-based software as a function of the resolution of the patient graphics. Results show a tremendous improvement in speed using the GPU. While an increase in the spatial resolution of the patient graphics resulted in slowing down the computational speed of the DTS on the CPU, the speed of the GPU-based DTS was hardly affected. This GPU-based DTS can be a powerful tool for providing accurate, real-time feedback about patient skin-dose to physicians while performing interventional procedures.

  9. 'Diamond' in 3-D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This 3-D, microscopic imager mosaic of a target area on a rock called 'Diamond Jenness' was taken after NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity ground into the surface with its rock abrasion tool for a second time.

    Opportunity has bored nearly a dozen holes into the inner walls of 'Endurance Crater.' On sols 177 and 178 (July 23 and July 24, 2004), the rover worked double-duty on Diamond Jenness. Surface debris and the bumpy shape of the rock resulted in a shallow and irregular hole, only about 2 millimeters (0.08 inch) deep. The final depth was not enough to remove all the bumps and leave a neat hole with a smooth floor. This extremely shallow depression was then examined by the rover's alpha particle X-ray spectrometer.

    On Sol 178, Opportunity's 'robotic rodent' dined on Diamond Jenness once again, grinding almost an additional 5 millimeters (about 0.2 inch). The rover then applied its Moessbauer spectrometer to the deepened hole. This double dose of Diamond Jenness enabled the science team to examine the rock at varying layers. Results from those grindings are currently being analyzed.

    The image mosaic is about 6 centimeters (2.4 inches) across.

  10. Clinical performance of a free-breathing spatiotemporally accelerated 3-D time-resolved contrast-enhanced pediatric abdominal MR angiography

    PubMed Central

    Yousaf, Ufra; Hsiao, Albert; Cheng, Joseph Y.; Alley, Marcus T.; Lustig, Michael; Pauly, John M.; Vasanawala, Shreyas S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Pediatric contrast-enhanced MR angiography is often limited by respiration, other patient motion and compromised spatiotemporal resolution. Objective To determine the reliability of a free-breathing spatiotemporally accelerated 3-D time-resolved contrast enhanced MR angiography method for depicting abdominal arterial anatomy in young children. Materials and methods With IRB approval and informed consent, we retrospectively identified 27 consecutive children (16 males and 11 females; mean age: 3.8 years, range: 14 days to 8.4 years) referred for contrast enhanced MR angiography at our institution, who had undergone free-breathing spatiotemporally accelerated time-resolved contrast enhanced MR angiography studies. An radio-frequency-spoiled gradient echo sequence with Cartesian variable density k-space sampling and radial view ordering, intrinsic motion navigation and intermittent fat suppression was developed. Images were reconstructed with soft-gated parallel imaging locally low-rank method to achieve both motion correction and high spatiotemporal resolution. Quality of delineation of 13 abdominal arteries in the reconstructed images was assessed independently by two radiologists on a five-point scale. Ninety-five percent confidence intervals of the proportion of diagnostically adequate cases were calculated. Interobserver agreements were also analyzed. Results Eleven out of 13 arteries achieved acceptable image quality (mean score range: 3.9–5.0) for both readers. Fair to substantial interobserver agreement was reached on nine arteries. Conclusion Free-breathing spatiotemporally accelerated 3-D time-resolved contrast enhanced MR angiography frequently yields diagnostic image quality for most abdominal arteries for pediatric contrast enhanced MR angiography. PMID:26040509

  11. Use of a graphics processing unit (GPU) to facilitate real-time 3D graphic presentation of the patient skin-dose distribution during fluoroscopic interventional procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rana, Vijay; Rudin, Stephen; Bednarek, Daniel R.

    2012-03-01

    We have developed a dose-tracking system (DTS) that calculates the radiation dose to the patient's skin in realtime by acquiring exposure parameters and imaging-system-geometry from the digital bus on a Toshiba Infinix C-arm unit. The cumulative dose values are then displayed as a color map on an OpenGL-based 3D graphic of the patient for immediate feedback to the interventionalist. Determination of those elements on the surface of the patient 3D-graphic that intersect the beam and calculation of the dose for these elements in real time demands fast computation. Reducing the size of the elements results in more computation load on the computer processor and therefore a tradeoff occurs between the resolution of the patient graphic and the real-time performance of the DTS. The speed of the DTS for calculating dose to the skin is limited by the central processing unit (CPU) and can be improved by using the parallel processing power of a graphics processing unit (GPU). Here, we compare the performance speed of GPU-based DTS software to that of the current CPU-based software as a function of the resolution of the patient graphics. Results show a tremendous improvement in speed using the GPU. While an increase in the spatial resolution of the patient graphics resulted in slowing down the computational speed of the DTS on the CPU, the speed of the GPU-based DTS was hardly affected. This GPU-based DTS can be a powerful tool for providing accurate, real-time feedback about patient skin-dose to physicians while performing interventional procedures.

  12. Nanoelectronic three-dimensional (3D) nanotip sensing array for real-time, sensitive, label-free sequence specific detection of nucleic acids

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Lu; koochak, Zahra; Harris, James S.; Davis, Ronald W.

    2016-01-01

    The improvements in our ability to sequence and genotype DNA have opened up numerous avenues in the understanding of human biology and medicine with various applications, especially in medical diagnostics. But the realization of a label free, real time, high-throughput and low cost biosensing platforms to detect molecular interactions with a high level of sensitivity has been yet stunted due to two factors: one, slow binding kinetics caused by the lack of probe molecules on the sensors and two, limited mass transport due to the planar structure (two-dimensional) of the current biosensors. Here we present a novel three-dimensional (3D), highly sensitive, real-time, inexpensive and label-free nanotip array as a rapid and direct platform to sequence-specific DNA screening. Our nanotip sensors are designed to have a nano sized thin film as their sensing area (~ 20 nm), sandwiched between two sensing electrodes. The tip is then conjugated to a DNA oligonucleotide complementary to the sequence of interest, which is electrochemically detected in real-time via impedance changes upon the formation of a double-stranded helix at the sensor interface. This 3D configuration is specifically designed to improve the biomolecular hit rate and the detection speed. We demonstrate that our nanotip array effectively detects oligonucleotides in a sequence-specific and highly sensitive manner, yielding concentration-dependent impedance change measurements with a target concentration as low as 10 pM and discrimination against even a single mismatch. Notably, our nanotip sensors achieve this accurate, sensitive detection without relying on signal indicators or enhancing molecules like fluorophores. It can also easily be scaled for highly multiplxed detection with up to 5000 sensors/square centimeter, and integrated into microfluidic devices. The versatile, rapid, and sensitive performance of the nanotip array makes it an excellent candidate for point-of-care diagnostics, and high

  13. High-resolution fully vectorial scanning Kerr magnetometer.

    PubMed

    Flajšman, Lukáš; Urbánek, Michal; Křižáková, Viola; Vaňatka, Marek; Turčan, Igor; Šikola, Tomáš

    2016-05-01

    We report on the development of a high-resolution scanning magnetometer, which fully exploits the vectorial nature of the magneto-optical Kerr effect. The three-dimensional nature of magnetization is at the basis of many micromagnetic phenomena and from these data, we can fully characterize magnetization processes of nanostructures in static and dynamic regimes. Our scanning Kerr magnetometer uses a high numerical aperture microscope objective where the incident light beam can be deterministically deviated from the objective symmetry axis, therefore, both in-plane (via the longitudinal Kerr effect) and out-of-plane (via the polar Kerr effect) components of the magnetization vector may be detected. These components are then separated by exploiting the symmetries of the polar and longitudinal Kerr effects. From four consecutive measurements, we are able to directly obtain the three orthogonal components of the magnetization vector with a resolution of 600 nm. Performance of the apparatus is demonstrated by a measurement of 3D magnetization vector maps showing out-of-plane domains and in-plane domain walls in an yttrium-iron-garnet film and on a study of magnetization reversal in a 4-μm-wide magnetic disk. PMID:27250432

  14. High-resolution fully vectorial scanning Kerr magnetometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flajšman, Lukáš; Urbánek, Michal; Křižáková, Viola; VaÅatka, Marek; Turčan, Igor; Šikola, Tomáš

    2016-05-01

    We report on the development of a high-resolution scanning magnetometer, which fully exploits the vectorial nature of the magneto-optical Kerr effect. The three-dimensional nature of magnetization is at the basis of many micromagnetic phenomena and from these data, we can fully characterize magnetization processes of nanostructures in static and dynamic regimes. Our scanning Kerr magnetometer uses a high numerical aperture microscope objective where the incident light beam can be deterministically deviated from the objective symmetry axis, therefore, both in-plane (via the longitudinal Kerr effect) and out-of-plane (via the polar Kerr effect) components of the magnetization vector may be detected. These components are then separated by exploiting the symmetries of the polar and longitudinal Kerr effects. From four consecutive measurements, we are able to directly obtain the three orthogonal components of the magnetization vector with a resolution of 600 nm. Performance of the apparatus is demonstrated by a measurement of 3D magnetization vector maps showing out-of-plane domains and in-plane domain walls in an yttrium-iron-garnet film and on a study of magnetization reversal in a 4-μm-wide magnetic disk.

  15. High-resolution fully vectorial scanning Kerr magnetometer.

    PubMed

    Flajšman, Lukáš; Urbánek, Michal; Křižáková, Viola; Vaňatka, Marek; Turčan, Igor; Šikola, Tomáš

    2016-05-01

    We report on the development of a high-resolution scanning magnetometer, which fully exploits the vectorial nature of the magneto-optical Kerr effect. The three-dimensional nature of magnetization is at the basis of many micromagnetic phenomena and from these data, we can fully characterize magnetization processes of nanostructures in static and dynamic regimes. Our scanning Kerr magnetometer uses a high numerical aperture microscope objective where the incident light beam can be deterministically deviated from the objective symmetry axis, therefore, both in-plane (via the longitudinal Kerr effect) and out-of-plane (via the polar Kerr effect) components of the magnetization vector may be detected. These components are then separated by exploiting the symmetries of the polar and longitudinal Kerr effects. From four consecutive measurements, we are able to directly obtain the three orthogonal components of the magnetization vector with a resolution of 600 nm. Performance of the apparatus is demonstrated by a measurement of 3D magnetization vector maps showing out-of-plane domains and in-plane domain walls in an yttrium-iron-garnet film and on a study of magnetization reversal in a 4-μm-wide magnetic disk.

  16. EXACT VECTORIAL LAW FOR AXISYMMETRIC MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMICS TURBULENCE

    SciTech Connect

    Galtier, S.

    2009-10-20

    Three-dimensional incompressible magnetohydrodynamics turbulence is investigated under the assumptions of homogeneity and axisymmetry. We demonstrate that previous works of Chandrasekhar may be improved significantly by using a different formalism for the representation of two-point correlation tensors. From this axisymmetric kinematics, the equations a la von Karman-Howarth are derived from which an exact relation is found in terms of measurable correlations. The relation is then analyzed in the particular case of a medium permeated by an imposed magnetic field B{sub 0} . We make the ansatz that the development of anisotropy implies an algebraic relation between the axial and the radial components of the separation vector r and we derive an exact vectorial law which is parameterized by the intensity of anisotropy. The critical balance proposed by Goldreich and Sridhar is used to fix this parameter and to obtain a unique exact expression; the particular limits of correlations transverse and parallel to B{sub 0} are given for which simple expressions are found. Predictions for the energy spectra are also proposed by a straightforward dimensional analysis of the exact law; it gives a stronger theoretical background to the heuristic spectra previously proposed in the context of the critical balance. We also discuss the wave turbulence limit of an asymptotically large external magnetic field which appears as a natural limit of the vectorial relation. A new interpretation of the anisotropic solar wind observations is eventually discussed.

  17. Exact Vectorial Law for Axisymmetric Magnetohydrodynamics Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galtier, S.

    2009-10-01

    Three-dimensional incompressible magnetohydrodynamics turbulence is investigated under the assumptions of homogeneity and axisymmetry. We demonstrate that previous works of Chandrasekhar may be improved significantly by using a different formalism for the representation of two-point correlation tensors. From this axisymmetric kinematics, the equations à la von Kármán-Howarth are derived from which an exact relation is found in terms of measurable correlations. The relation is then analyzed in the particular case of a medium permeated by an imposed magnetic field B0 . We make the ansatz that the development of anisotropy implies an algebraic relation between the axial and the radial components of the separation vector r and we derive an exact vectorial law which is parameterized by the intensity of anisotropy. The critical balance proposed by Goldreich & Sridhar is used to fix this parameter and to obtain a unique exact expression; the particular limits of correlations transverse and parallel to B0 are given for which simple expressions are found. Predictions for the energy spectra are also proposed by a straightforward dimensional analysis of the exact law; it gives a stronger theoretical background to the heuristic spectra previously proposed in the context of the critical balance. We also discuss the wave turbulence limit of an asymptotically large external magnetic field which appears as a natural limit of the vectorial relation. A new interpretation of the anisotropic solar wind observations is eventually discussed.

  18. A time series generalized functional model based method for vibration-based damage precise localization in structures consisting of 1D, 2D, and 3D elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakaris, C. S.; Sakellariou, J. S.; Fassois, S. D.

    2016-06-01

    This study focuses on the problem of vibration-based damage precise localization via data-based, time series type, methods for structures consisting of 1D, 2D, or 3D elements. A Generalized Functional Model Based method is postulated based on an expanded Vector-dependent Functionally Pooled ARX (VFP-ARX) model form, capable of accounting for an arbitrary structural topology. The FP model's operating parameter vector elements are properly constrained to reflect any given topology. Damage localization is based on operating parameter vector estimation within the specified topology, so that the location estimate and its uncertainty bounds are statistically optimal. The method's effectiveness is experimentally demonstrated through damage precise localization on a laboratory spatial truss structure using various damage scenarios and a single pair of random excitation - vibration response signals in a low and limited frequency bandwidth.

  19. Realtime infiltration process monitoring in macroporous soil - a plot-scale experiment accompanied by high-resolution time-lapse 3D GPR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackisch, Conrad; Allroggen, Niklas

    2016-04-01

    Infiltration and quick vertical redistribution of event water through rapid subsurface flow in soil structures is one of the key issues in hydrology. Although the importance of preferential flow is broadly recognised, our theories, observation techniques and modelling approaches lose grounds when the assumption of well-mixed states in REVs collapses. To characterise the combination of advective and diffusive flow is especially challenging. We have shown in earlier studies that a combination of TDR monitoring, dye- and salt-tracer recovery and time-lapse 3D GPR in irrigation experiments provides means to characterise infiltration dynamics at the plot- and hillslope-scale also in highly structured soils. We pinpointed that the spatial and temporal resolution requires special attention and improvement - particularly owing to the facts of high velocity (10‑3 ms‑1) of advective flow and small scale (10‑2 m) of the respective flow structures. We present insights from a novel technique of continuous high-resolution time-lapse 3D GPR measurements during and after a plot-scale (1 m x 1 m) irrigation experiment. Continuous TDR soil moisture measurements, dye tracer excavation and salt-tracer samples are used as qualitative and quantitative references. While classical infiltration experiments either look at spatial patterns or temporal dynamics at singular gauges, we highlight the advantage of combining both to achieve a more complete image of the infiltration process. Although operating at the limits of the techniques this setup enables non-invasive observation of preferential flow processes in the field and allows to explore and characterise macropore matrix exchange.

  20. A new back-and-forth iterative method for time-reversed convection modeling: Implications for the Cenozoic evolution of 3-D structure and dynamics of the mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glišović, Petar; Forte, Alessandro M.

    2016-06-01

    The 3-D distribution of buoyancy in the convecting mantle drives a suite of convection-related manifestations. Although seismic tomography is providing increasingly resolved images of the present-day mantle heterogeneity, the distribution of mantle density variations in the geological past is unknown, and, by implication, this is true for the convection-related observables. The one major exception is tectonic plate motions, since geologic data are available to estimate their history and they currently provide the only available constraints on the evolution of 3-D mantle buoyancy in the past. We developed a new back-and-forth iterative method for time-reversed convection modeling with a procedure for matching plate velocity data at different instants in the past. The crucial aspect of this reconstruction methodology is to ensure that at all times plates are driven by buoyancy forces in the mantle and not vice versa. Employing tomography-based retrodictions over the Cenozoic, we estimate the global amplitude of the following observables: dynamic surface topography, the core-mantle boundary ellipticity, the free-air gravity anomalies, and the global divergence rates of tectonic plates. One of the major benefits of the new data assimilation method is the stable recovery of much shorter wavelength changes in heterogeneity than was possible in our previous work. We now resolve what appears to be two-stage subduction of the Farallon plate under the western U.S. and a deeply rooted East African Plume that is active under the Ethiopian volcanic fields during the Early Eocene.

  1. Optical coherence tomography for ultrahigh-resolution 3D imaging of cell development and real-time guiding for photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tianshi; Zhen, Jinggao; Wang, Bo; Xue, Ping

    2009-11-01

    Optical coherence tomography is a new emerging technique for cross-sectional imaging with high spatial resolution of micrometer scale. It enables in vivo and non-invasive imaging with no need to contact the sample and is widely used in biological and clinic application. In this paper optical coherence tomography is demonstrated for both biological and clinic applications. For biological application, a white-light interference microscope is developed for ultrahigh-resolution full-field optical coherence tomography (full-field OCT) to implement 3D imaging of biological tissue. Spatial resolution of 0.9μm×1.1μm (transverse×axial) is achieved A system sensitivity of 85 dB is obtained at an acquisition time of 5s per image. The development of a mouse embryo is studied layer by layer with our ultrahigh-resolution full-filed OCT. For clinic application, a handheld optical coherence tomography system is designed for real-time and in situ imaging of the port wine stains (PWS) patient and supplying surgery guidance for photodynamic therapy (PDT) treatment. The light source with center wavelength of 1310nm, -3 dB wavelength range of 90 nm and optical power of 9mw is utilized. Lateral resolution of 8 μm and axial resolution of 7μm at a rate of 2 frames per second and with 102dB sensitivity are achieved in biological tissue. It is shown that OCT images distinguish very well the normal and PWS tissues in clinic and are good to serve as a valuable diagnosis tool for PDT treatment.

  2. Study of a temperature gradient metamorphism of snow from 3-D images: time evolution of microstructures, physical properties and their associated anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calonne, N.; Flin, F.; Geindreau, C.; Lesaffre, B.; Rolland du Roscoat, S.

    2014-02-01

    We carried out a study to monitor the time evolution of microstructural and physical properties of snow during a temperature gradient metamorphism: a snow slab was subjected to a constant temperature gradient along the vertical during three weeks in a cold-room, and regularly sampled in order to obtain a set of 3-D images using X-ray microtomography. A large panel of properties was then computed from this series of 3-D images: density, specific surface area, correlation length, mean and Gaussian curvature distributions, air and ice tortuosities, effective thermal conductivity, and intrinsic permeability. Whenever possible, a specific attention was paid to assess these properties along the vertical and horizontal directions, and an anisotropy coefficient defined as the ratio of the vertical over the horizontal values was deduced. The time evolution of these properties, as well as their anisotropy coefficients, was investigated, showing the development of a strong anisotropic behavior during the experiment. Most of the computed physical properties of snow were then compared with two analytical models (Self consistent estimates and Dilutes bed of spheroids) based on the snow density, and the size and anisotropy of the grains through the correlation lengths. These models, which require only basic microstructural information, offer rather good estimates of the properties and anisotropy coefficients for our experiment without any fitting parameters. Our results highlight the interplay between the microstructure and physical properties, showing that the physical properties of snow subjected to a temperature gradient cannot be described accurately using only isotropic parameters such as the density and require more refined information. Furthermore, this study constitutes a detailed database on the evolution of snow properties under a temperature gradient, which can be used as a guideline and a validation tool for snow metamorphism models at the micro or macro scale.

  3. Study of a temperature gradient metamorphism of snow from 3-D images: time evolution of microstructures, physical properties and their associated anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calonne, N.; Flin, F.; Geindreau, C.; Lesaffre, B.; Rolland du Roscoat, S.

    2014-12-01

    We carried out a study to monitor the time evolution of microstructural and physical properties of snow during temperature gradient metamorphism: a snow slab was subjected to a constant temperature gradient in the vertical direction for 3 weeks in a cold room, and regularly sampled in order to obtain a series of three-dimensional (3-D) images using X-ray microtomography. A large set of properties was then computed from this series of 3-D images: density, specific surface area, correlation lengths, mean and Gaussian curvature distributions, air and ice tortuosities, effective thermal conductivity, and intrinsic permeability. Whenever possible, specific attention was paid to assess these properties along the vertical and horizontal directions, and an anisotropy coefficient defined as the ratio of the vertical over the horizontal values was deduced. The time evolution of these properties, as well as their anisotropy coefficients, was investigated, showing the development of a strong anisotropic behavior during the experiment. Most of the computed physical properties of snow were then compared with two analytical estimates (self-consistent estimates and dilute beds of spheroids) based on the snow density, and the size and anisotropy of the microstructure through the correlation lengths. These models, which require only basic microstructural information, offer rather good estimates of the properties and anisotropy coefficients for our experiment without any fitting parameters. Our results highlight the interplay between the microstructure and physical properties, showing that the physical properties of snow subjected to a temperature gradient cannot be described accurately using only isotropic parameters such as the density and require more refined information. Furthermore, this study constitutes a detailed database on the evolution of snow properties under a temperature gradient, which can be used as a guideline and a validation tool for snow metamorphism models at the

  4. Speaking Volumes About 3-D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    In 1999, Genex submitted a proposal to Stennis Space Center for a volumetric 3-D display technique that would provide multiple users with a 360-degree perspective to simultaneously view and analyze 3-D data. The futuristic capabilities of the VolumeViewer(R) have offered tremendous benefits to commercial users in the fields of medicine and surgery, air traffic control, pilot training and education, computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing, and military/battlefield management. The technology has also helped NASA to better analyze and assess the various data collected by its satellite and spacecraft sensors. Genex capitalized on its success with Stennis by introducing two separate products to the commercial market that incorporate key elements of the 3-D display technology designed under an SBIR contract. The company Rainbow 3D(R) imaging camera is a novel, three-dimensional surface profile measurement system that can obtain a full-frame 3-D image in less than 1 second. The third product is the 360-degree OmniEye(R) video system. Ideal for intrusion detection, surveillance, and situation management, this unique camera system offers a continuous, panoramic view of a scene in real time.

  5. Innovative radar products for the 3D, high-resolution and real-time monitoring of the convective activity in the airspace around airports

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabary, P.; Bousquet, O.; Sénési, S.; Josse, P.

    2009-09-01

    Airports are recognized to become critical areas in the future given the expected doubling in air traffic by 2020. The increased density of aircrafts in the airport airspaces calls for improved systems and products to monitor in real-time potential hazards and thus meet the airport objectives in terms of safety and throughput. Among all meteorological hazards, convection is certainly the most impacting one. We describe here some innovative radar products that have recently been developed and tested at Météo France around the Paris airports. Those products rely on the French Doppler radar network consisting today of 24 elements with some of them being polarimetric. Reflectivity and Doppler volumetric data are concentrated from all 24 radar sites in real-time at the central level (Toulouse) where 3D Cartesian mosaics covering the entire French territory (i.e. a typical 1,000 by 1,000 km² area) are elaborated. The innovation with respect to what has been done previously is that the three components of the wind are retrieved by operational combination of the radial velocities. The final product, available in real-time every 15 minutes with a spatial resolution of 2.5 km horizontally and 500 m vertically, is a 3D grid giving the interpolated reflectivity and wind field (u, v and w) values. The 2.5 km resolution, arising from the fact that the retrieval is carried out every 15 minutes from radars typically spaced apart by 150 km, is not sufficient for airport airspace monitoring but is valuable for en-route monitoring. Its extension to the entire European space is foreseen. To address the specific needs in the airport areas, a downscaling technique has been proposed to merge the above-mentioned low-resolution 3D wind and reflectivity fields with the high resolution (5 minutes and 1 km²) 2D imagery of the Trappes radar that is the one that covers the Paris airports. The merging approach is based on the assumption that the Vertical Profile of Reflectivity (i.e. the

  6. Three-Dimensional Rotation, Twist and Torsion Analyses Using Real-Time 3D Speckle Tracking Imaging: Feasibility, Reproducibility, and Normal Ranges in Pediatric Population

    PubMed Central

    Han, Wei; Gao, Jun; He, Lin; Yang, Yali; Yin, Ping; Xie, Mingxing; Ge, Shuping

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objective The specific aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility, reproducibility and maturational changes of LV rotation, twist and torsion variables by real-time 3D speckle-tracking echocardiography (RT3DSTE) in children. Methods A prospective study was conducted in 347 consecutive healthy subjects (181 males/156 females, mean age 7.12 ± 5.3 years, and range from birth to 18-years) using RT 3D echocardiography (3DE). The LV rotation, twist and torsion measurements were made off-line using TomTec software. Manual landmark selection and endocardial border editing were performed in 3 planes (apical “2”-, “4”-, and “3”- chamber views) and semi-automated tracking yielded LV rotation, twist and torsion measurements. LV rotation, twist and torsion analysis by RT 3DSTE were feasible in 307 out of 347 subjects (88.5%). Results There was no correlation between rotation or twist and age, height, weight, BSA or heart rate, respectively. However, there was statistically significant, but very modest correlation between LV torsion and age (R2 = 0.036, P< 0.001). The normal ranges were defined for rotation and twist in this cohort, and for torsion for each age group. The intra-observer and inter-observer variabilities for apical and basal rotation, twist and torsion ranged from 7.3% ± 3.8% to 12.3% ± 8.8% and from 8.8% ± 4.6% to 15.7% ± 10.1%, respectively. Conclusions We conclude that analysis of LV rotation, twist and torsion by this new RT3D STE is feasible and reproducible in pediatric population. There is no maturational change in rotation and twist, but torsion decreases with age in this cohort. Further refinement is warranted to validate the utility of this new methodology in more sensitive and quantitative evaluation of congenital and acquired heart diseases in children. PMID:27427968

  7. CROSS DRIVE: A New Interactive and Immersive Approach for Exploring 3D Time-Dependent Mars Atmospheric Data in Distributed Teams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerndt, Andreas M.; Engelke, Wito; Giuranna, Marco; Vandaele, Ann C.; Neary, Lori; Aoki, Shohei; Kasaba, Yasumasa; Garcia, Arturo; Fernando, Terrence; Roberts, David; CROSS DRIVE Team

    2016-10-01

    Atmospheric phenomena of Mars can be highly dynamic and have daily and seasonal variations. Planetary-scale wavelike disturbances, for example, are frequently observed in Mars' polar winter atmosphere. Possible sources of the wave activity were suggested to be dynamical instabilities and quasi-stationary planetary waves, i.e. waves that arise predominantly via zonally asymmetric surface properties. For a comprehensive understanding of these phenomena, single layers of altitude have to be analyzed carefully and relations between different atmospheric quantities and interaction with the surface of Mars have to be considered. The CROSS DRIVE project tries to address the presentation of those data with a global view by means of virtual reality techniques. Complex orbiter data from spectrometer and observation data from Earth are combined with global circulation models and high-resolution terrain data and images available from Mars Express or MRO instruments. Scientists can interactively extract features from those dataset and can change visualization parameters in real-time in order to emphasize findings. Stereoscopic views allow for perception of the actual 3D behavior of Mars's atmosphere. A very important feature of the visualization system is the possibility to connect distributed workspaces together. This enables discussions between distributed working groups. The workspace can scale from virtual reality systems to expert desktop applications to web-based project portals. If multiple virtual environments are connected, the 3D position of each individual user is captured and used to depict the scientist as an avatar in the virtual world. The appearance of the avatar can also scale from simple annotations to complex avatars using tele-presence technology to reconstruct the users in 3D. Any change of the feature set (annotations, cutplanes, volume rendering, etc.) within the VR is immediately exchanged between all connected users. This allows that everybody is always

  8. Radiochromic 3D Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oldham, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Radiochromic materials exhibit a colour change when exposed to ionising radiation. Radiochromic film has been used for clinical dosimetry for many years and increasingly so recently, as films of higher sensitivities have become available. The two principle advantages of radiochromic dosimetry include greater tissue equivalence (radiologically) and the lack of requirement for development of the colour change. In a radiochromic material, the colour change arises direct from ionising interactions affecting dye molecules, without requiring any latent chemical, optical or thermal development, with important implications for increased accuracy and convenience. It is only relatively recently however, that 3D radiochromic dosimetry has become possible. In this article we review recent developments and the current state-of-the-art of 3D radiochromic dosimetry, and the potential for a more comprehensive solution for the verification of complex radiation therapy treatments, and 3D dose measurement in general.

  9. An automated system for collection of time-lapse 3D radar data to investigate vadose zone flow and transport processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mangel, A. R.; Moysey, S. M.

    2013-12-01

    Capturing three-dimensional ground-penetrating radar (GPR) images can significantly enhance our understanding of subsurface variability during vadose zone flow and transport processes. The high spatial sampling (i.e., small step sizes between profiles) required to collect full resolution 3D data can be a major challenge - particularly for high frequency imaging of detailed structures such as those related to preferential flow patterns in soils. We have developed an automated system for collecting GPR data to address these challenges. The system is based on the Sensors and Software SPIDAR (OEM NIC) platform running a 1000MHz source and receiver antenna that can be independently positioned using a 2-axis motion control system, with both the radar and positioning components integrated through LabView. The antennas can be positioned independently along a rail parallel with the x-axis, which can itself be moved along a second set of rails along the y-axis. The positioning accuracy along each axis has been estimated to be 3um and 0.2mm along each direction, respectively, thus indicating that high resolution positioning for accurate 3D imaging is readily attained. The integrated radar and positioning system is currently capable of collecting up to 100 traces per second over a 25ns time window with 4 stacks, or an equivalent lateral velocity of approximately 50cm/s with traces collected every 0.5cm along the profile. This high speed data collection means that a full 3D section of data (>75,000 traces) over a 0.75m x 1.5m area can be collected in under 20 minutes at sub-centimeter resolution, implying that near real-time imaging of infiltration over reasonably large areas can be achieved. In our case, the radar system has been implemented for a lab environment where it is able to perform imaging experiments over a 4m x 4m x 2m (LxWxH) sand-filled tank. In this presentation we will provide examples of three dimensional data collected over the tank. Experiments imaging rocks

  10. Analysis of ancient-river systems by 3D seismic time-slice technique: A case study in northeast Malay Basin, offshore Terengganu, Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sulaiman, Noorzamzarina; Hamzah, Umar; Samsudin, Abdul Rahim

    2014-09-01

    Fluvial sandstones constitute one of the major clastic petroleum reservoir types in many sedimentary basins around the world. This study is based on the analysis of high-resolution, shallow (seabed to 500 m depth) 3D seismic data which generated three-dimensional (3D) time slices that provide exceptional imaging of the geometry, dimension and temporal and spatial distribution of fluvial channels. The study area is in the northeast of Malay Basin about 280 km to the east of Terengganu offshore. The Malay Basin comprises a thick (> 8 km), rift to post-rift Oligo-Miocene to Pliocene basin-fill. The youngest (Miocene to Pliocene), post-rift succession is dominated by a thick (1-5 km), cyclic succession of coastal plain and coastal deposits, which accumulated in a humid-tropical climatic setting. This study focuses on the Pleistocene to Recent (500 m thick) succession, which comprises a range of seismic facies analysis of the two-dimensional (2D) seismic sections, mainly reflecting changes in fluvial channel style and river architecture. The succession has been divided into four seismic units (Unit S1-S4), bounded by basin-wide strata surfaces. Two types of boundaries have been identified: 1) a boundary that is defined by a regionally-extensive erosion surface at the base of a prominent incised valley (S3 and S4); 2) a sequence boundary that is defined by more weakly-incised, straight and low-sinuosity channels which is interpreted as low-stand alluvial bypass channel systems (S1 and S2). Each unit displays a predictable vertical change of the channel pattern and scale, with wide low-sinuosity channels at the base passing gradationally upwards into narrow high-sinuosity channels at the top. The wide variation in channel style and size is interpreted to be controlled mainly by the sea-level fluctuations on the widely flat Sunda land Platform.

  11. Analysis of ancient-river systems by 3D seismic time-slice technique: A case study in northeast Malay Basin, offshore Terengganu, Malaysia

    SciTech Connect

    Sulaiman, Noorzamzarina; Hamzah, Umar; Samsudin, Abdul Rahim

    2014-09-03

    Fluvial sandstones constitute one of the major clastic petroleum reservoir types in many sedimentary basins around the world. This study is based on the analysis of high-resolution, shallow (seabed to 500 m depth) 3D seismic data which generated three-dimensional (3D) time slices that provide exceptional imaging of the geometry, dimension and temporal and spatial distribution of fluvial channels. The study area is in the northeast of Malay Basin about 280 km to the east of Terengganu offshore. The Malay Basin comprises a thick (> 8 km), rift to post-rift Oligo-Miocene to Pliocene basin-fill. The youngest (Miocene to Pliocene), post-rift succession is dominated by a thick (1–5 km), cyclic succession of coastal plain and coastal deposits, which accumulated in a humid-tropical climatic setting. This study focuses on the Pleistocene to Recent (500 m thick) succession, which comprises a range of seismic facies analysis of the two-dimensional (2D) seismic sections, mainly reflecting changes in fluvial channel style and river architecture. The succession has been divided into four seismic units (Unit S1-S4), bounded by basin-wide strata surfaces. Two types of boundaries have been identified: 1) a boundary that is defined by a regionally-extensive erosion surface at the base of a prominent incised valley (S3 and S4); 2) a sequence boundary that is defined by more weakly-incised, straight and low-sinuosity channels which is interpreted as low-stand alluvial bypass channel systems (S1 and S2). Each unit displays a predictable vertical change of the channel pattern and scale, with wide low-sinuosity channels at the base passing gradationally upwards into narrow high-sinuosity channels at the top. The wide variation in channel style and size is interpreted to be controlled mainly by the sea-level fluctuations on the widely flat Sunda land Platform.

  12. From 3D view to 3D print

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dima, M.; Farisato, G.; Bergomi, M.; Viotto, V.; Magrin, D.; Greggio, D.; Farinato, J.; Marafatto, L.; Ragazzoni, R.; Piazza, D.

    2014-08-01

    thickness, in the Z direction, and in drop-per-inch, in X and Y directions. 3D printing is also an easy and quick production technique, which can become useful in the ad-hoc realization of mechanical components for optical setups to be used in a laboratory for new concept studies and validation, reducing the manufacturing time. With this technique, indeed, it is possible to realize in few hours custom-made mechanical parts, without any specific knowledge and expertise in tool machinery, as long as the resolution and size are compliant with the requirements.

  13. Bootstrapping 3D fermions

    DOE PAGES

    Iliesiu, Luca; Kos, Filip; Poland, David; Pufu, Silviu S.; Simmons-Duffin, David; Yacoby, Ran

    2016-03-17

    We study the conformal bootstrap for a 4-point function of fermions <ψψψψ> in 3D. We first introduce an embedding formalism for 3D spinors and compute the conformal blocks appearing in fermion 4-point functions. Using these results, we find general bounds on the dimensions of operators appearing in the ψ × ψ OPE, and also on the central charge CT. We observe features in our bounds that coincide with scaling dimensions in the GrossNeveu models at large N. Finally, we also speculate that other features could coincide with a fermionic CFT containing no relevant scalar operators.

  14. Demosaicking for multispectral images based on vectorial total variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinoda, Kazuma; Hamasaki, Taisuke; Kawase, Maru; Hasegawa, Madoka; Kato, Shigeo

    2016-08-01

    Multispectral images (MSIs), which consist of more color components than RGB images, can be used in the field of vegetation analysis and medical imaging. A capturing system with multispectral filter array (MSFA) technology has been researched to shorten the capturing time and reduce the cost. In this system, the mosaicked image captured by the MSFA is demosaicked to reconstruct the MSI. We propose a demosaicking method using vectorial total variation (VTV) regularization for an MSI. This process is regarded as inverse problem of the image observation model. The reconstructed image is estimated by minimizing the VTV as a regularization term under the constraint condition. In the experimental results, the reconstructed image quality obtained using the proposed method is better than that of the conventional approaches in terms of both peak signal-to-noise ratio and structural similarity.

  15. A 3D Time-Shared NOESY Experiment Designed to Provide Optimal Resolution for Accurate Assignment of NMR Distance Restraints in Large Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Subrata H; Harden, Bradley J

    2014-01-01

    Structure determination of proteins by solution NMR has become an established method, but challenges increase steeply with the size of proteins. Notably spectral crowding and signal overlap impair the analysis of cross-peaks in NOESY spectra that provide distance restraints for structural models. An optimal spectral resolution can alleviate overlap but requires prohibitively long experimental time with existing methods. Here we present a time-shared 3D experiment optimized for large proteins that provides 15N and 13C dispersed NOESY spectra in a single measurement. NOESY correlations appear in the detected dimension and hence benefit from the highest resolution achievable of all dimensions without increase in experimental time. By design, this experiment is inherently optimal for non-uniform sampling acquisition when compared to current alternatives. Thus, 15N and 13C dispersed NOESY spectra with ultra-high resolution in all dimensions were acquired in parallel within about 4 days instead of 80 days for a 52 kDa monomeric protein at a concentration of 350 μM. PMID:25381567

  16. Computationally efficient solution to the Cahn-Hilliard equation: Adaptive implicit time schemes, mesh sensitivity analysis and the 3D isoperimetric problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wodo, Olga; Ganapathysubramanian, Baskar

    2011-07-01

    We present an efficient numerical framework for analyzing spinodal decomposition described by the Cahn-Hilliard equation. We focus on the analysis of various implicit time schemes for two and three dimensional problems. We demonstrate that significant computational gains can be obtained by applying embedded, higher order Runge-Kutta methods in a time adaptive setting. This allows accessing time-scales that vary by five orders of magnitude. In addition, we also formulate a set of test problems that isolate each of the sub-processes involved in spinodal decomposition: interface creation and bulky phase coarsening. We analyze the error fluctuations using these test problems on the split form of the Cahn-Hilliard equation solved using the finite element method with basis functions of different orders. Any scheme that ensures at least four elements per interface satisfactorily captures both sub-processes. Our findings show that linear basis functions have superior error-to-cost properties. This strategy - coupled with a domain decomposition based parallel implementation - let us notably augment the efficiency of a numerical Cahn-Hillard solver, and open new venues for its practical applications, especially when three dimensional problems are considered. We use this framework to address the isoperimetric problem of identifying local solutions in the periodic cube in three dimensions. The framework is able to generate all five hypothesized candidates for the local solution of periodic isoperimetric problem in 3D - sphere, cylinder, lamella, doubly periodic surface with genus two (Lawson surface) and triply periodic minimal surface (P Schwarz surface).

  17. An embedded real-time red peach detection system based on an OV7670 camera, ARM cortex-M4 processor and 3D look-up tables.

    PubMed

    Teixidó, Mercè; Font, Davinia; Pallejà, Tomàs; Tresanchez, Marcel; Nogués, Miquel; Palacín, Jordi

    2012-10-22

    This work proposes the development of an embedded real-time fruit detection system for future automatic fruit harvesting. The proposed embedded system is based on an ARM Cortex-M4 (STM32F407VGT6) processor and an Omnivision OV7670 color camera. The future goal of this embedded vision system will be to control a robotized arm to automatically select and pick some fruit directly from the tree. The complete embedded system has been designed to be placed directly in the gripper tool of the future robotized harvesting arm. The embedded system will be able to perform real-time fruit detection and tracking by using a three-dimensional look-up-table (LUT) defined in the RGB color space and optimized for fruit picking. Additionally, two different methodologies for creating optimized 3D LUTs based on existing linear color models and fruit histograms were implemented in this work and compared for the case of red peaches. The resulting system is able to acquire general and zoomed orchard images and to update the relative tracking information of a red peach in the tree ten times per second.

  18. An Embedded Real-Time Red Peach Detection System Based on an OV7670 Camera, ARM Cortex-M4 Processor and 3D Look-Up Tables

    PubMed Central

    Teixidó, Mercè; Font, Davinia; Pallejà, Tomàs; Tresanchez, Marcel; Nogués, Miquel; Palacín, Jordi

    2012-01-01

    This work proposes the development of an embedded real-time fruit detection system for future automatic fruit harvesting. The proposed embedded system is based on an ARM Cortex-M4 (STM32F407VGT6) processor and an Omnivision OV7670 color camera. The future goal of this embedded vision system will be to control a robotized arm to automatically select and pick some fruit directly from the tree. The complete embedded system has been designed to be placed directly in the gripper tool of the future robotized harvesting arm. The embedded system will be able to perform real-time fruit detection and tracking by using a three-dimensional look-up-table (LUT) defined in the RGB color space and optimized for fruit picking. Additionally, two different methodologies for creating optimized 3D LUTs based on existing linear color models and fruit histograms were implemented in this work and compared for the case of red peaches. The resulting system is able to acquire general and zoomed orchard images and to update the relative tracking information of a red peach in the tree ten times per second. PMID:23202040

  19. Venus in 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plaut, J. J.

    1993-08-01

    Stereographic images of the surface of Venus which enable geologists to reconstruct the details of the planet's evolution are discussed. The 120-meter resolution of these 3D images make it possible to construct digital topographic maps from which precise measurements can be made of the heights, depths, slopes, and volumes of geologic structures.

  20. 3D reservoir visualization

    SciTech Connect

    Van, B.T.; Pajon, J.L.; Joseph, P. )

    1991-11-01

    This paper shows how some simple 3D computer graphics tools can be combined to provide efficient software for visualizing and analyzing data obtained from reservoir simulators and geological simulations. The animation and interactive capabilities of the software quickly provide a deep understanding of the fluid-flow behavior and an accurate idea of the internal architecture of a reservoir.

  1. Exact vectorial law for homogeneous rotating turbulence.

    PubMed

    Galtier, Sébastien

    2009-10-01

    Three-dimensional hydrodynamic turbulence is investigated under the assumptions of homogeneity and weak axisymmetry. Following the kinematics developed by E. Lindborg [J. Fluid Mech. 302, 179 (1995)] we rewrite the von Kármán-Howarth equation in terms of measurable correlations and derive the exact relation associated with the flux conservation. This relation is then analyzed in the particular case of turbulence subject to solid-body rotation. We make the ansatz that the development of anisotropy implies an algebraic relation between the axial and the radial components of the separation vector r and we derive an exact vectorial law which is parametrized by the intensity of anisotropy. A simple dimensional analysis allows us to fix this parameter and find a unique expression.

  2. Evidence of vectorial photoelectric effect on copper

    SciTech Connect

    Pedersoli, E.; Banfi, F.; Ressel, B.; Pagliara, S.; Giannetti,C.; Galimberti, G.; Lidia, S.; Corlett, J.; Ferrini, G.; Parmigiani, F.

    2005-05-27

    Quantum Efficiency (QE) measurements of single photon photoemission from a Cu(111) single crystal and a Cu polycrystal photocathodes, irradiated by 150 fs-6.28 eV laser pulses, are reported over a broad range of incidence angle, both in s and p polarizations. The maximum QE (approx. = 4x10-4) for polycrystalline Cu is obtained in p polarization at an angle of incidence theta = 65 deg. We observe a QE enhancement in p polarization which can not be explained in terms of optical absorption, a phenomenon known as vectorial photoelectric effect. Issues concerning surface roughness and symmetry considerations are addressed. An explanation in terms of non local conductivity tensor is proposed.

  3. TACO3D. 3-D Finite Element Heat Transfer Code

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, W.E.

    1992-03-04

    TACO3D is a three-dimensional, finite-element program for heat transfer analysis. An extension of the two-dimensional TACO program, it can perform linear and nonlinear analyses and can be used to solve either transient or steady-state problems. The program accepts time-dependent or temperature-dependent material properties, and materials may be isotropic or orthotropic. A variety of time-dependent and temperature-dependent boundary conditions and loadings are available including temperature, flux, convection, and radiation boundary conditions and internal heat generation. Additional specialized features treat enclosure radiation, bulk nodes, and master/slave internal surface conditions (e.g., contact resistance). Data input via a free-field format is provided. A user subprogram feature allows for any type of functional representation of any independent variable. A profile (bandwidth) minimization option is available. The code is limited to implicit time integration for transient solutions. TACO3D has no general mesh generation capability. Rows of evenly-spaced nodes and rows of sequential elements may be generated, but the program relies on separate mesh generators for complex zoning. TACO3D does not have the ability to calculate view factors internally. Graphical representation of data in the form of time history and spatial plots is provided through links to the POSTACO and GRAPE postprocessor codes.

  4. Novel System for Real-Time Integration of 3-D Echocardiography and Fluoroscopy for Image-Guided Cardiac Interventions: Preclinical Validation and Clinical Feasibility Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Housden, R. James; Ma, Yingliang; Rajani, Ronak; Gao, Gang; Nijhof, Niels; Cathier, Pascal; Bullens, Roland; Gijsbers, Geert; Parish, Victoria; Kapetanakis, Stamatis; Hancock, Jane; Rinaldi, C. Aldo; Cooklin, Michael; Gill, Jaswinder; Thomas, Martyn; O'neill, Mark D.; Razavi, Reza; Rhode, Kawal S.

    2014-01-01

    Real-time imaging is required to guide minimally invasive catheter-based cardiac interventions. While transesophageal echocardiography allows for high-quality visualization of cardiac anatomy, X-ray fluoroscopy provides excellent visualization of devices. We have developed a novel image fusion system that allows real-time integration of 3-D echocardiography and the X-ray fluoroscopy. The system was validated in the following two stages: 1) preclinical to determine function and validate accuracy; and 2) in the clinical setting to assess clinical workflow feasibility and determine overall system accuracy. In the preclinical phase, the system was assessed using both phantom and porcine experimental studies. Median 2-D projection errors of 4.5 and 3.3 mm were found for the phantom and porcine studies, respectively. The clinical phase focused on extending the use of the system to interventions in patients undergoing either atrial fibrillation catheter ablation (CA) or transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). Eleven patients were studied with nine in the CA group and two in the TAVI group. Successful real-time view synchronization was achieved in all cases with a calculated median distance error of 2.2 mm in the CA group and 3.4 mm in the TAVI group. A standard clinical workflow was established using the image fusion system. These pilot data confirm the technical feasibility of accurate real-time echo-fluoroscopic image overlay in clinical practice, which may be a useful adjunct for real-time guidance during interventional cardiac procedures. PMID:27170872

  5. Effects of in-pulse transverse relaxation in 3D ultrashort echo time sequences: Analytical derivation, comparison to numerical simulation and experimental application at 3 T

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Springer, Fabian; Steidle, Günter; Martirosian, Petros; Claussen, Claus D.; Schick, Fritz

    2010-09-01

    The introduction of ultrashort-echo-time-(UTE)-sequences to clinical whole-body MR scanners has opened up the field of MR characterization of materials or tissues with extremely fast signal decay. If the transverse relaxation time is in the range of the RF-pulse duration, approximation of the RF-pulse by an instantaneous rotation applied at the middle of the RF-pulse and immediately followed by free relaxation will lead to a distinctly underestimated echo signal. Thus, the regular Ernst equation is not adequate to correctly describe steady state signal under those conditions. The paper presents an analytically derived modified Ernst equation, which correctly describes in-pulse relaxation of transverse magnetization under typical conditions: The equation is valid for rectangular excitation pulses, usually applied in 3D UTE sequences. Longitudinal relaxation time of the specimen must be clearly longer than RF-pulse duration, which is fulfilled for tendons and bony structures as well as many solid materials. Under these conditions, the proposed modified Ernst equation enables adequate and relatively simple calculation of the magnetization of materials or tissues. Analytically derived data are compared to numerical results obtained by using an established Runge-Kutta-algorithm based on the Bloch equations. Validity of the new approach was also tested by systematical measurements of a solid polymeric material on a 3 T whole-body MR scanner. Thus, the presented modified Ernst equation provides a suitable basis for T1 measurements, even in tissues with T2 values as short as the RF-pulse duration: independent of RF-pulse duration, the 'variable flip angle method' led to consistent results of longitudinal relaxation time T1, if the T2 relaxation time of the material of interest is known as well.

  6. Presentation of a High Resolution Time Lapse 3D Groundwater Model of Metsähovi for Calculating the Gravity Effect of Groundwater in Local Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hokkanen, T. M.; Hartikainen, A.; Raja-Halli, A.; Virtanen, H.; Makinen, J.

    2015-12-01

    INTRODUCTION The aim of this study is to construct a fine resolution time lapse groundwater (GW) model of Metsähovi (MH). GW, geological, and soil moisture (SM) data were collected for several years to achieve the goal. The knowledge of the behavior of the GW at local scale is essential for superconductive gravimeter (SG) investigations performing in MH. DESCRIPTION OF THE DATA Almost 50 sensors have been recorded SM data some 6 years with 1 to 5 minutes sampling frequency. The GW table has been monitored, both in bedrock and in soil, in many stages with all together 15 piezometers. Two geological sampling campaigns were conducted to get the knowledge of hydrological properties of soil in the study area of 200×200 m2 around SG station in MH. PRINCIPLE OF TIME LAPSE 3D HYDROGEOLOGICAL MODEL The model of study site consists of the surfaces of ground and bedrock gridded with 2×2 m2 resolution. The height of GW table was interpolated to 2×2×0.1 m3 grid between GW and SM monitoring points. Close to the outline of the study site and areas lacking of sensors GW table was defined by extrapolation and considering the geological information of the area. The bedrock porosity is 2% and soil porosity determined by geological information and SM recordings is from 5 to 35%. Only fully saturated media is considered in the time lapse model excluding unsaturated one. BENEFICIERS With a new model the fluctuation of GW table can be followed with ranging time lapses from 1 minute to 1 month. The gravity effect caused by the variation of GW table can be calculated more accurate than before in MH. Moreover, the new model can be validated and refined by measured gravity, i.e. hydrological model can be improved by SG recordings (Figure 1).

  7. Effect of Larval Competition on Extrinsic Incubation Period and Vectorial Capacity of Aedes albopictus for Dengue Virus.

    PubMed

    Bara, Jeffrey; Rapti, Zoi; Cáceres, Carla E; Muturi, Ephantus J

    2015-01-01

    Despite the growing awareness that larval competition can influence adult mosquito life history traits including susceptibility to pathogens, the net effect of larval competition on human risk of exposure to mosquito-borne pathogens remains poorly understood. We examined how intraspecific larval competition affects dengue-2 virus (DENV-2) extrinsic incubation period and vectorial capacity of its natural vector Aedes albopictus. Adult Ae. albopictus from low and high-larval density conditions were orally challenged with DENV-2 and then assayed for virus infection and dissemination rates following a 6, 9, or 12-day incubation period using real-time quantitative reverse transcription PCR. We then modeled the effect of larval competition on vectorial capacity using parameter estimates obtained from peer-reviewed field and laboratory studies. Larval competition resulted in significantly longer development times, lower emergence rates, and smaller adults, but did not significantly affect the extrinsic incubation period of DENV-2 in Ae. albopictus. Our vectorial capacity models suggest that the effect of larval competition on adult mosquito longevity likely has a greater influence on vectorial capacity relative to any competition-induced changes in vector competence. Furthermore, we found that large increases in the viral dissemination rate may be necessary to compensate for small competition-induced reductions in daily survivorship. Our results indicate that mosquito populations that experience stress from larval competition are likely to have a reduced vectorial capacity, even when susceptibility to pathogens is enhanced.

  8. Real-time prediction and gating of respiratory motion in 3D space using extended Kalman filters and Gaussian process regression network.

    PubMed

    Bukhari, W; Hong, S-M

    2016-03-01

    The prediction as well as the gating of respiratory motion have received much attention over the last two decades for reducing the targeting error of the radiation treatment beam due to respiratory motion. In this article, we present a real-time algorithm for predicting respiratory motion in 3D space and realizing a gating function without pre-specifying a particular phase of the patient's breathing cycle. The algorithm, named EKF-GPRN(+) , first employs an extended Kalman filter (EKF) independently along each coordinate to predict the respiratory motion and then uses a Gaussian process regression network (GPRN) to correct the prediction error of the EKF in 3D space. The GPRN is a nonparametric Bayesian algorithm for modeling input-dependent correlations between the output variables in multi-output regression. Inference in GPRN is intractable and we employ variational inference with mean field approximation to compute an approximate predictive mean and predictive covariance matrix. The approximate predictive mean is used to correct the prediction error of the EKF. The trace of the approximate predictive covariance matrix is utilized to capture the uncertainty in EKF-GPRN(+) prediction error and systematically identify breathing points with a higher probability of large prediction error in advance. This identification enables us to pause the treatment beam over such instances. EKF-GPRN(+) implements a gating function by using simple calculations based on the trace of the predictive covariance matrix. Extensive numerical experiments are performed based on a large database of 304 respiratory motion traces to evaluate EKF-GPRN(+) . The experimental results show that the EKF-GPRN(+) algorithm reduces the patient-wise prediction error to 38%, 40% and 40% in root-mean-square, compared to no prediction, at lookahead lengths of 192 ms, 384 ms and 576 ms, respectively. The EKF-GPRN(+) algorithm can further reduce the prediction error by employing the gating

  9. Case study: Beauty and the Beast 3D: benefits of 3D viewing for 2D to 3D conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Handy Turner, Tara

    2010-02-01

    From the earliest stages of the Beauty and the Beast 3D conversion project, the advantages of accurate desk-side 3D viewing was evident. While designing and testing the 2D to 3D conversion process, the engineering team at Walt Disney Animation Studios proposed a 3D viewing configuration that not only allowed artists to "compose" stereoscopic 3D but also improved efficiency by allowing artists to instantly detect which image features were essential to the stereoscopic appeal of a shot and which features had minimal or even negative impact. At a time when few commercial 3D monitors were available and few software packages provided 3D desk-side output, the team designed their own prototype devices and collaborated with vendors to create a "3D composing" workstation. This paper outlines the display technologies explored, final choices made for Beauty and the Beast 3D, wish-lists for future development and a few rules of thumb for composing compelling 2D to 3D conversions.

  10. Real-time analysis of integrin-mediated chemotactic migration of T lymphocytes within 3-D extracellular matrix-like gels.

    PubMed

    Franitza, S; Alon, R; Lider, O

    1999-05-27

    We have developed a novel 3-D gel reconstituted with major extracellular matrix (ECM) glycoproteins to follow the dynamics of migration of human T cells locomoting, in real-time, on gradients formed by representative chemoattractants: the C-C chemokine RANTES, and the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-2. In the absence of chemoattractants, none of the T cells migrated directionally and the levels of random migration or cell polarization were low. However, major fractions of T cells placed in IL-2 and RANTES gradients in the gels polarized immediately after exposure to the chemoattractants. Shortly after polarization, 25% of the T cells migrated, in either a random or directional fashion, towards the sources of the chemoattractants; additional 5-10% of the cells remained polarized but stationary. The number of T cells migrating directionally towards RANTES or IL-2 peaked along with the formation of the chemotactic gradients. The directional migration of T cells was increased by a short pre-exposure to low doses of IL-2, which did not alter the level of expression of the beta1 integrins. The directional migration of T cells towards IL-2 and RANTES was mediated by IL-2R and pertussis toxin-sensitive receptors, respectively, and the directional, and to a lesser degree, the random locomotion of T cells induced by both chemoattractants required intact tyrosine kinase signaling and activities of the alpha4, alpha5, and, to a lesser degree, the alpha2 and alpha6 members the beta1 integrins. Our system enables the real-time tracking of individual locomoting lymphocytes and the analysis of their dynamic interactions with ECM components and cytokines. PMID:10365778

  11. A unified optical theorem for scalar and vectorial wave fields.

    PubMed

    Wapenaar, Kees; Douma, Huub

    2012-05-01

    The generalized optical theorem is an integral relation for the angle-dependent scattering amplitude of an inhomogeneous scattering object embedded in a homogeneous background. It has been derived separately for several scalar and vectorial wave phenomena. Here a unified optical theorem is derived that encompasses the separate versions for scalar and vectorial waves. Moreover, this unified theorem also holds for scattering by anisotropic elastic and piezoelectric scatterers as well as bianisotropic (non-reciprocal) EM scatterers. PMID:22559339

  12. A unified optical theorem for scalar and vectorial wave fields.

    PubMed

    Wapenaar, Kees; Douma, Huub

    2012-05-01

    The generalized optical theorem is an integral relation for the angle-dependent scattering amplitude of an inhomogeneous scattering object embedded in a homogeneous background. It has been derived separately for several scalar and vectorial wave phenomena. Here a unified optical theorem is derived that encompasses the separate versions for scalar and vectorial waves. Moreover, this unified theorem also holds for scattering by anisotropic elastic and piezoelectric scatterers as well as bianisotropic (non-reciprocal) EM scatterers.

  13. Taming supersymmetric defects in 3d-3d correspondence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gang, Dongmin; Kim, Nakwoo; Romo, Mauricio; Yamazaki, Masahito

    2016-07-01

    We study knots in 3d Chern-Simons theory with complex gauge group {SL}(N,{{C}}), in the context of its relation with 3d { N }=2 theory (the so-called 3d-3d correspondence). The defect has either co-dimension 2 or co-dimension 4 inside the 6d (2,0) theory, which is compactified on a 3-manifold \\hat{M}. We identify such defects in various corners of the 3d-3d correspondence, namely in 3d {SL}(N,{{C}}) CS theory, in 3d { N }=2 theory, in 5d { N }=2 super Yang-Mills theory, and in the M-theory holographic dual. We can make quantitative checks of the 3d-3d correspondence by computing partition functions at each of these theories. This Letter is a companion to a longer paper [1], which contains more details and more results.

  14. Automatic 3D video format detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Tao; Wang, Zhe; Zhai, Jiefu; Doyen, Didier

    2011-03-01

    Many 3D formats exist and will probably co-exist for a long time even if 3D standards are today under definition. The support for multiple 3D formats will be important for bringing 3D into home. In this paper, we propose a novel and effective method to detect whether a video is a 3D video or not, and to further identify the exact 3D format. First, we present how to detect those 3D formats that encode a pair of stereo images into a single image. The proposed method detects features and establishes correspondences between features in the left and right view images, and applies the statistics from the distribution of the positional differences between corresponding features to detect the existence of a 3D format and to identify the format. Second, we present how to detect the frame sequential 3D format. In the frame sequential 3D format, the feature points are oscillating from frame to frame. Similarly, the proposed method tracks feature points over consecutive frames, computes the positional differences between features, and makes a detection decision based on whether the features are oscillating. Experiments show the effectiveness of our method.

  15. Real-time 3D internal marker tracking during arc radiotherapy by the use of combined MV kV imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, W.; Wiersma, R. D.; Mao, W.; Luxton, G.; Xing, L.

    2008-12-01

    To minimize the adverse dosimetric effect caused by tumor motion, it is desirable to have real-time knowledge of the tumor position throughout the beam delivery process. A promising technique to realize the real-time image guided scheme in external beam radiation therapy is through the combined use of MV and onboard kV beam imaging. The success of this MV-kV triangulation approach for fixed-gantry radiation therapy has been demonstrated. With the increasing acceptance of modern arc radiotherapy in the clinics, a timely and clinically important question is whether the image guidance strategy can be extended to arc therapy to provide the urgently needed real-time tumor motion information. While conceptually feasible, there are a number of theoretical and practical issues specific to the arc delivery that need to be resolved before clinical implementation. The purpose of this work is to establish a robust procedure of system calibration for combined MV and kV imaging for internal marker tracking during arc delivery and to demonstrate the feasibility and accuracy of the technique. A commercially available LINAC equipped with an onboard kV imager and electronic portal imaging device (EPID) was used for the study. A custom built phantom with multiple ball bearings was used to calibrate the stereoscopic MV-kV imaging system to provide the transformation parameters from imaging pixels to 3D world coordinates. The accuracy of the fiducial tracking system was examined using a 4D motion phantom capable of moving in accordance with a pre-programmed trajectory. Overall, spatial accuracy of MV-kV fiducial tracking during the arc delivery process for normal adult breathing amplitude and period was found to be better than 1 mm. For fast motion, the results depended on the imaging frame rates. The RMS error ranged from ~0.5 mm for the normal adult breathing pattern to ~1.5 mm for more extreme cases with a low imaging frame rate of 3.4 Hz. In general, highly accurate real-time

  16. Real-time 3D internal marker tracking during arc radiotherapy by the use of combined MV-kV imaging.

    PubMed

    Liu, W; Wiersma, R D; Mao, W; Luxton, G; Xing, L

    2008-12-21

    To minimize the adverse dosimetric effect caused by tumor motion, it is desirable to have real-time knowledge of the tumor position throughout the beam delivery process. A promising technique to realize the real-time image guided scheme in external beam radiation therapy is through the combined use of MV and onboard kV beam imaging. The success of this MV-kV triangulation approach for fixed-gantry radiation therapy has been demonstrated. With the increasing acceptance of modern arc radiotherapy in the clinics, a timely and clinically important question is whether the image guidance strategy can be extended to arc therapy to provide the urgently needed real-time tumor motion information. While conceptually feasible, there are a number of theoretical and practical issues specific to the arc delivery that need to be resolved before clinical implementation. The purpose of this work is to establish a robust procedure of system calibration for combined MV and kV imaging for internal marker tracking during arc delivery and to demonstrate the feasibility and accuracy of the technique. A commercially available LINAC equipped with an onboard kV imager and electronic portal imaging device (EPID) was used for the study. A custom built phantom with multiple ball bearings was used to calibrate the stereoscopic MV-kV imaging system to provide the transformation parameters from imaging pixels to 3D world coordinates. The accuracy of the fiducial tracking system was examined using a 4D motion phantom capable of moving in accordance with a pre-programmed trajectory. Overall, spatial accuracy of MV-kV fiducial tracking during the arc delivery process for normal adult breathing amplitude and period was found to be better than 1 mm. For fast motion, the results depended on the imaging frame rates. The RMS error ranged from approximately 0.5 mm for the normal adult breathing pattern to approximately 1.5 mm for more extreme cases with a low imaging frame rate of 3.4 Hz. In general

  17. 3D Printable Graphene Composite.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xiaojun; Li, Dong; Jiang, Wei; Gu, Zheming; Wang, Xiaojuan; Zhang, Zengxing; Sun, Zhengzong

    2015-07-08

    In human being's history, both the Iron Age and Silicon Age thrived after a matured massive processing technology was developed. Graphene is the most recent superior material which could potentially initialize another new material Age. However, while being exploited to its full extent, conventional processing methods fail to provide a link to today's personalization tide. New technology should be ushered in. Three-dimensional (3D) printing fills the missing linkage between graphene materials and the digital mainstream. Their alliance could generate additional stream to push the graphene revolution into a new phase. Here we demonstrate for the first time, a graphene composite, with a graphene loading up to 5.6 wt%, can be 3D printable into computer-designed models. The composite's linear thermal coefficient is below 75 ppm·°C(-1) from room temperature to its glass transition temperature (Tg), which is crucial to build minute thermal stress during the printing process.

  18. 2D mapping of the MV photon fluence and 3D dose reconstruction in real time for quality assurance during radiotherapy treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alrowaili, Z. A.; Lerch, M. L. F.; Carolan, M.; Fuduli, I.; Porumb, C.; Petasecca, M.; Metcalfe, P.; Rosenfeld, A. B.

    2015-09-01

    Summary: the photon irradiation response of a 2D solid state transmission detector array mounted in a linac block tray is used to reconstruct the projected 2D dose map in a homogenous phantom along rays that diverge from the X-ray source and pass through each of the 121 detector elements. A unique diode response-to-dose scaling factor, applied to all detectors, is utilised in the reconstruction to demonstrate that real time QA during radiotherapy treatment is feasible. Purpose: to quantitatively demonstrate reconstruction of the real time radiation dose from the irradiation response of the 11×11 silicon Magic Plate (MP) detector array operated in Transmission Mode (MPTM). Methods and Materials: in transmission mode the MP is positioned in the block tray of a linac so that the central detector of the array lies on the central axis of the radiation beam. This central detector is used to determine the conversion factor from measured irradiation response to reconstructed dose at any point on the central axis within a homogenous solid water phantom. The same unique conversion factor is used for all MP detector elements lying within the irradiation field. Using the two sets of data, the 2D or 3D dose map is able to be reconstructed in the homogenous phantom. The technique we have developed is illustrated here for different depths and irradiation field sizes, (5 × 5 cm2 to 40 × 40 cm2) as well as a highly non uniform irradiation field. Results: we find that the MPTM response is proportional to the projected 2D dose map measured at a specific phantom depth, the "sweet depth". A single factor, for several irradiation field sizes and depths, is derived to reconstruct the dose in the phantom along rays projected from the photon source through each MPTM detector element. We demonstrate that for all field sizes using the above method, the 2D reconstructed and measured doses agree to within ± 2.48% (2 standard deviation) for all in-field MP detector elements. Conclusions: a

  19. FIRE: an open-software suite for real-time 2D/3D image registration for image guided radiotherapy research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furtado, H.; Gendrin, C.; Spoerk, J.; Steiner, E.; Underwood, T.; Kuenzler, T.; Georg, D.; Birkfellner, W.

    2016-03-01

    Radiotherapy treatments have changed at a tremendously rapid pace. Dose delivered to the tumor has escalated while organs at risk (OARs) are better spared. The impact of moving tumors during dose delivery has become higher due to very steep dose gradients. Intra-fractional tumor motion has to be managed adequately to reduce errors in dose delivery. For tumors with large motion such as tumors in the lung, tracking is an approach that can reduce position uncertainty. Tumor tracking approaches range from purely image intensity based techniques to motion estimation based on surrogate tracking. Research efforts are often based on custom designed software platforms which take too much time and effort to develop. To address this challenge we have developed an open software platform especially focusing on tumor motion management. FLIRT is a freely available open-source software platform. The core method for tumor tracking is purely intensity based 2D/3D registration. The platform is written in C++ using the Qt framework for the user interface. The performance critical methods are implemented on the graphics processor using the CUDA extension. One registration can be as fast as 90ms (11Hz). This is suitable to track tumors moving due to respiration (~0.3Hz) or heartbeat (~1Hz). Apart from focusing on high performance, the platform is designed to be flexible and easy to use. Current use cases range from tracking feasibility studies, patient positioning and method validation. Such a framework has the potential of enabling the research community to rapidly perform patient studies or try new methods.

  20. A Vectorial Semantics Approach to Personality Assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neuman, Yair; Cohen, Yochai

    2014-04-01

    Personality assessment and, specifically, the assessment of personality disorders have traditionally been indifferent to computational models. Computational personality is a new field that involves the automatic classification of individuals' personality traits that can be compared against gold-standard labels. In this context, we introduce a new vectorial semantics approach to personality assessment, which involves the construction of vectors representing personality dimensions and disorders, and the automatic measurements of the similarity between these vectors and texts written by human subjects. We evaluated our approach by using a corpus of 2468 essays written by students who were also assessed through the five-factor personality model. To validate our approach, we measured the similarity between the essays and the personality vectors to produce personality disorder scores. These scores and their correspondence with the subjects' classification of the five personality factors reproduce patterns well-documented in the psychological literature. In addition, we show that, based on the personality vectors, we can predict each of the five personality factors with high accuracy.

  1. A vectorial semantics approach to personality assessment.

    PubMed

    Neuman, Yair; Cohen, Yochai

    2014-04-23

    Personality assessment and, specifically, the assessment of personality disorders have traditionally been indifferent to computational models. Computational personality is a new field that involves the automatic classification of individuals' personality traits that can be compared against gold-standard labels. In this context, we introduce a new vectorial semantics approach to personality assessment, which involves the construction of vectors representing personality dimensions and disorders, and the automatic measurements of the similarity between these vectors and texts written by human subjects. We evaluated our approach by using a corpus of 2468 essays written by students who were also assessed through the five-factor personality model. To validate our approach, we measured the similarity between the essays and the personality vectors to produce personality disorder scores. These scores and their correspondence with the subjects' classification of the five personality factors reproduce patterns well-documented in the psychological literature. In addition, we show that, based on the personality vectors, we can predict each of the five personality factors with high accuracy.

  2. Vectorial photocurrents and photoconductivity in metalized chloroplasts

    SciTech Connect

    Greenbaum, E. )

    1990-08-09

    A novel photobiophysical phenomenon was observed in isolated spinach chloroplasts that were metalized by precipitating colloidal platinum onto the surface of the thylakoid membranes. A two-point irradiation and detection system was constructed in which a continuous-beam helium-neon laser ({lambda} = 632.8 nm) was used to irradiate the platinized chloroplasts at varying perpendicular distances (Figure 1) from a single linear platinum electrode in pressure contact with the platinized chloroplasts. No external voltage bias was applied to the system. The key objective of the experiments reported in this report was to measure the relative photoconductivity of the chloroplast-metal composite matrix. Unlike conventional photosynthetic electrochemical cells, in which irradiated chloroplasts are in close proximity to an electrode or linked to the electrode by an electrode-active mediator, the flow of photocurrent was through the biocomposite material. A sustained steady-state vectorial flow of current in the plane of the entrapped composite from the point of laser irradiation to the wire electrode was measured.

  3. A new method for real-time co-registration of 3D coronary angiography and intravascular ultrasound or optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Carlier, Stéphane; Didday, Rich; Slots, Tristan; Kayaert, Peter; Sonck, Jeroen; El-Mourad, Mike; Preumont, Nicolas; Schoors, Dany; Van Camp, Guy

    2014-06-01

    We present a new clinically practical method for online co-registration of 3D quantitative coronary angiography (QCA) and intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) or optical coherence tomography (OCT). The workflow is based on two modified commercially available software packages. Reconstruction steps are explained and compared to previously available methods. The feasibility for different clinical scenarios is illustrated. The co-registration appears accurate, robust and induced a minimal delay on the normal cath lab activities. This new method is based on the 3D angiographic reconstruction of the catheter path and does not require operator's identification of landmarks to establish the image synchronization.

  4. Stereo 3-D Vision in Teaching Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zabunov, Svetoslav

    2012-03-01

    Stereo 3-D vision is a technology used to present images on a flat surface (screen, paper, etc.) and at the same time to create the notion of three-dimensional spatial perception of the viewed scene. A great number of physical processes are much better understood when viewed in stereo 3-D vision compared to standard flat 2-D presentation. The current paper describes the modern stereo 3-D technologies that are applicable to various tasks in teaching physics in schools, colleges, and universities. Examples of stereo 3-D simulations developed by the author can be observed on online.

  5. Insights and questions raised from a multi-tracer plot-scale sprinkler experiment with time-lapse 3D GPR in a structured forested soil.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackisch, Conrad; Sprenger, Matthias; Allroggen, Niklas; van Schaik, Loes; Weiler, Markus; Zehe, Erwin

    2014-05-01

    Stable isotopes appear as ideal tracer commonly applied in preferential flow analyses. At the same time, central assumptions about signature mixing and propagation are founded on effective parameters merging advective and diffusive flow domains. However, in structured soils conditions are often far from well-mixed and some established assumptions may need to be reconsidered. We conducted a multi-tracer sprinkler experiment at a forested hillslope in the Attert Basin in Luxembourg with prevailing geogenic and biogenic preferential flow structures. At plot scale of 1x1 m2 we sprinkled two plots with 50 mm and one plot with 30 mm Brilliant Blue and Bromide enriched water for 1 hour. The experiments were accompanied by a high resolution 3D time-lapse GPR (Ground-Penetrating Radar) survey scanning 3x3 m2 before, directly after sprinkling and before excavation one day after sprinkling. Soil moisture was monitored with a TDR tube probe. Soil profiles were excavated and recorded for dye flow paths and for one medium resolution Bromide profile. In addition one core for pore water stable isotope analysis was taken before the sprinkling as reference and at each plot after sprinkling. We present the results with focus on the found evidence of preferential flow and the signals of the different tracers - especially the stable isotopes. While all other methods clearly show that only minor proportions of the soil took part in the infiltration process and that the sprinkler water has largely advectively propagated to the saprolite layer at about 80-100 cm depth, the stable isotopes signals from the cores indicate more intense interaction between the soil matrix and macropores, especially in the top 50 cm. This leads to the question of how the isotope signal could mix well, when most of the pore-water did not directly interact with the infiltration-water. Further questions arise to the use of tracers in general, due to the known limitations of excavation itself and rather coarse

  6. Stereo 3-D Vision in Teaching Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zabunov, Svetoslav

    2012-01-01

    Stereo 3-D vision is a technology used to present images on a flat surface (screen, paper, etc.) and at the same time to create the notion of three-dimensional spatial perception of the viewed scene. A great number of physical processes are much better understood when viewed in stereo 3-D vision compared to standard flat 2-D presentation. The…

  7. JAR3D Webserver: Scoring and aligning RNA loop sequences to known 3D motifs

    PubMed Central

    Roll, James; Zirbel, Craig L.; Sweeney, Blake; Petrov, Anton I.; Leontis, Neocles

    2016-01-01

    Many non-coding RNAs have been identified and may function by forming 2D and 3D structures. RNA hairpin and internal loops are often represented as unstructured on secondary structure diagrams, but RNA 3D structures show that most such loops are structured by non-Watson–Crick basepairs and base stacking. Moreover, different RNA sequences can form the same RNA 3D motif. JAR3D finds possible 3D geometries for hairpin and internal loops by matching loop sequences to motif groups from the RNA 3D Motif Atlas, by exact sequence match when possible, and by probabilistic scoring and edit distance for novel sequences. The scoring gauges the ability of the sequences to form the same pattern of interactions observed in 3D structures of the motif. The JAR3D webserver at http://rna.bgsu.edu/jar3d/ takes one or many sequences of a single loop as input, or else one or many sequences of longer RNAs with multiple loops. Each sequence is scored against all current motif groups. The output shows the ten best-matching motif groups. Users can align input sequences to each of the motif groups found by JAR3D. JAR3D will be updated with every release of the RNA 3D Motif Atlas, and so its performance is expected to improve over time. PMID:27235417

  8. Impact of time-of-flight on indirect 3D and direct 4D parametric image reconstruction in the presence of inconsistent dynamic PET data.

    PubMed

    Kotasidis, F A; Mehranian, A; Zaidi, H

    2016-05-01

    reconstruction can substantially prevent kinetic parameter error propagation either from erroneous kinetic modelling, inter-frame motion or emission/transmission mismatch. Furthermore, we demonstrate the benefits of TOF in parameter estimation when conventional post-reconstruction (3D) methods are used and compare the potential improvements to direct 4D methods. Further improvements could possibly be achieved in the future by combining TOF direct 4D image reconstruction with adaptive kinetic models and inter-frame motion correction schemes.

  9. Impact of time-of-flight on indirect 3D and direct 4D parametric image reconstruction in the presence of inconsistent dynamic PET data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotasidis, F. A.; Mehranian, A.; Zaidi, H.

    2016-05-01

    reconstruction can substantially prevent kinetic parameter error propagation either from erroneous kinetic modelling, inter-frame motion or emission/transmission mismatch. Furthermore, we demonstrate the benefits of TOF in parameter estimation when conventional post-reconstruction (3D) methods are used and compare the potential improvements to direct 4D methods. Further improvements could possibly be achieved in the future by combining TOF direct 4D image reconstruction with adaptive kinetic models and inter-frame motion correction schemes.

  10. 3D Ultrafast Ultrasound Imaging In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Provost, Jean; Papadacci, Clement; Arango, Juan Esteban; Imbault, Marion; Gennisson, Jean-Luc; Tanter, Mickael; Pernot, Mathieu

    2014-01-01

    Very high frame rate ultrasound imaging has recently allowed for the extension of the applications of echography to new fields of study such as the functional imaging of the brain, cardiac electrophysiology, and the quantitative real-time imaging of the intrinsic mechanical properties of tumors, to name a few, non-invasively and in real time. In this study, we present the first implementation of Ultrafast Ultrasound Imaging in three dimensions based on the use of either diverging or plane waves emanating from a sparse virtual array located behind the probe. It achieves high contrast and resolution while maintaining imaging rates of thousands of volumes per second. A customized portable ultrasound system was developed to sample 1024 independent channels and to drive a 32×32 matrix-array probe. Its capability to track in 3D transient phenomena occurring in the millisecond range within a single ultrafast acquisition was demonstrated for 3-D Shear-Wave Imaging, 3-D Ultrafast Doppler Imaging and finally 3D Ultrafast combined Tissue and Flow Doppler. The propagation of shear waves was tracked in a phantom and used to characterize its stiffness. 3-D Ultrafast Doppler was used to obtain 3-D maps of Pulsed Doppler, Color Doppler, and Power Doppler quantities in a single acquisition and revealed, for the first time, the complex 3-D flow patterns occurring in the ventricles of the human heart during an entire cardiac cycle, and the 3-D in vivo interaction of blood flow and wall motion during the pulse wave in the carotid at the bifurcation. This study demonstrates the potential of 3-D Ultrafast Ultrasound Imaging for the 3-D real-time mapping of stiffness, tissue motion, and flow in humans in vivo and promises new clinical applications of ultrasound with reduced intra- and inter-observer variability. PMID:25207828

  11. 3D Printed Shelby Cobra

    SciTech Connect

    Love, Lonnie

    2015-01-09

    ORNL's newly printed 3D Shelby Cobra was showcased at the 2015 NAIAS in Detroit. This "laboratory on wheels" uses the Shelby Cobra design, celebrating the 50th anniversary of this model and honoring the first vehicle to be voted a national monument. The Shelby was printed at the Department of Energy’s Manufacturing Demonstration Facility at ORNL using the BAAM (Big Area Additive Manufacturing) machine and is intended as a “plug-n-play” laboratory on wheels. The Shelby will allow research and development of integrated components to be tested and enhanced in real time, improving the use of sustainable, digital manufacturing solutions in the automotive industry.

  12. Prominent rocks - 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Many prominent rocks near the Sagan Memorial Station are featured in this image, taken in stereo by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) on Sol 3. 3D glasses are necessary to identify surface detail. Wedge is at lower left; Shark, Half-Dome, and Pumpkin are at center. Flat Top, about four inches high, is at lower right. The horizon in the distance is one to two kilometers away.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

    Click below to see the left and right views individually. [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Left [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Right

  13. Martian terrain - 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This area of terrain near the Sagan Memorial Station was taken on Sol 3 by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP). 3D glasses are necessary to identify surface detail.

    The IMP is a stereo imaging system with color capability provided by 24 selectable filters -- twelve filters per 'eye.' It stands 1.8 meters above the Martian surface, and has a resolution of two millimeters at a range of two meters.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

    Click below to see the left and right views individually. [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Left [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Right

  14. Gravitation in 3D Spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laubenstein, John; Cockream, Kandi

    2009-05-01

    3D spacetime was developed by the IWPD Scale Metrics (SM) team using a coordinate system that translates n dimensions to n-1. 4-vectors are expressed in 3D along with a scaling factor representing time. Time is not orthogonal to the three spatial dimensions, but rather in alignment with an object's axis-of-motion. We have defined this effect as the object's ``orientation'' (X). The SM orientation (X) is equivalent to the orientation of the 4-velocity vector positioned tangent to its worldline, where X-1=θ+1 and θ is the angle of the 4-vector relative to the axis-of -motion. Both 4-vectors and SM appear to represent valid conceptualizations of the relationship between space and time. Why entertain SM? Scale Metrics gravity is quantized and may suggest a path for the full unification of gravitation with quantum theory. SM has been tested against current observation and is in agreement with the age of the universe, suggests a physical relationship between dark energy and dark matter, is in agreement with the accelerating expansion rate of the universe, contributes to the understanding of the fine-structure constant and provides a physical explanation of relativistic effects.

  15. 3D ultrafast ultrasound imaging in vivo.

    PubMed

    Provost, Jean; Papadacci, Clement; Arango, Juan Esteban; Imbault, Marion; Fink, Mathias; Gennisson, Jean-Luc; Tanter, Mickael; Pernot, Mathieu

    2014-10-01

    Very high frame rate ultrasound imaging has recently allowed for the extension of the applications of echography to new fields of study such as the functional imaging of the brain, cardiac electrophysiology, and the quantitative imaging of the intrinsic mechanical properties of tumors, to name a few, non-invasively and in real time. In this study, we present the first implementation of Ultrafast Ultrasound Imaging in 3D based on the use of either diverging or plane waves emanating from a sparse virtual array located behind the probe. It achieves high contrast and resolution while maintaining imaging rates of thousands of volumes per second. A customized portable ultrasound system was developed to sample 1024 independent channels and to drive a 32  ×  32 matrix-array probe. Its ability to track in 3D transient phenomena occurring in the millisecond range within a single ultrafast acquisition was demonstrated for 3D Shear-Wave Imaging, 3D Ultrafast Doppler Imaging, and, finally, 3D Ultrafast combined Tissue and Flow Doppler Imaging. The propagation of shear waves was tracked in a phantom and used to characterize its stiffness. 3D Ultrafast Doppler was used to obtain 3D maps of Pulsed Doppler, Color Doppler, and Power Doppler quantities in a single acquisition and revealed, at thousands of volumes per second, the complex 3D flow patterns occurring in the ventricles of the human heart during an entire cardiac cycle, as well as the 3D in vivo interaction of blood flow and wall motion during the pulse wave in the carotid at the bifurcation. This study demonstrates the potential of 3D Ultrafast Ultrasound Imaging for the 3D mapping of stiffness, tissue motion, and flow in humans in vivo and promises new clinical applications of ultrasound with reduced intra--and inter-observer variability.

  16. 3D ultrafast ultrasound imaging in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Provost, Jean; Papadacci, Clement; Esteban Arango, Juan; Imbault, Marion; Fink, Mathias; Gennisson, Jean-Luc; Tanter, Mickael; Pernot, Mathieu

    2014-10-01

    Very high frame rate ultrasound imaging has recently allowed for the extension of the applications of echography to new fields of study such as the functional imaging of the brain, cardiac electrophysiology, and the quantitative imaging of the intrinsic mechanical properties of tumors, to name a few, non-invasively and in real time. In this study, we present the first implementation of Ultrafast Ultrasound Imaging in 3D based on the use of either diverging or plane waves emanating from a sparse virtual array located behind the probe. It achieves high contrast and resolution while maintaining imaging rates of thousands of volumes per second. A customized portable ultrasound system was developed to sample 1024 independent channels and to drive a 32  ×  32 matrix-array probe. Its ability to track in 3D transient phenomena occurring in the millisecond range within a single ultrafast acquisition was demonstrated for 3D Shear-Wave Imaging, 3D Ultrafast Doppler Imaging, and, finally, 3D Ultrafast combined Tissue and Flow Doppler Imaging. The propagation of shear waves was tracked in a phantom and used to characterize its stiffness. 3D Ultrafast Doppler was used to obtain 3D maps of Pulsed Doppler, Color Doppler, and Power Doppler quantities in a single acquisition and revealed, at thousands of volumes per second, the complex 3D flow patterns occurring in the ventricles of the human heart during an entire cardiac cycle, as well as the 3D in vivo interaction of blood flow and wall motion during the pulse wave in the carotid at the bifurcation. This study demonstrates the potential of 3D Ultrafast Ultrasound Imaging for the 3D mapping of stiffness, tissue motion, and flow in humans in vivo and promises new clinical applications of ultrasound with reduced intra—and inter-observer variability.

  17. 3D ultrafast ultrasound imaging in vivo.

    PubMed

    Provost, Jean; Papadacci, Clement; Arango, Juan Esteban; Imbault, Marion; Fink, Mathias; Gennisson, Jean-Luc; Tanter, Mickael; Pernot, Mathieu

    2014-10-01

    Very high frame rate ultrasound imaging has recently allowed for the extension of the applications of echography to new fields of study such as the functional imaging of the brain, cardiac electrophysiology, and the quantitative imaging of the intrinsic mechanical properties of tumors, to name a few, non-invasively and in real time. In this study, we present the first implementation of Ultrafast Ultrasound Imaging in 3D based on the use of either diverging or plane waves emanating from a sparse virtual array located behind the probe. It achieves high contrast and resolution while maintaining imaging rates of thousands of volumes per second. A customized portable ultrasound system was developed to sample 1024 independent channels and to drive a 32  ×  32 matrix-array probe. Its ability to track in 3D transient phenomena occurring in the millisecond range within a single ultrafast acquisition was demonstrated for 3D Shear-Wave Imaging, 3D Ultrafast Doppler Imaging, and, finally, 3D Ultrafast combined Tissue and Flow Doppler Imaging. The propagation of shear waves was tracked in a phantom and used to characterize its stiffness. 3D Ultrafast Doppler was used to obtain 3D maps of Pulsed Doppler, Color Doppler, and Power Doppler quantities in a single acquisition and revealed, at thousands of volumes per second, the complex 3D flow patterns occurring in the ventricles of the human heart during an entire cardiac cycle, as well as the 3D in vivo interaction of blood flow and wall motion during the pulse wave in the carotid at the bifurcation. This study demonstrates the potential of 3D Ultrafast Ultrasound Imaging for the 3D mapping of stiffness, tissue motion, and flow in humans in vivo and promises new clinical applications of ultrasound with reduced intra--and inter-observer variability. PMID:25207828

  18. Fabrication of 3D Silicon Sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Kok, A.; Hansen, T.E.; Hansen, T.A.; Lietaer, N.; Summanwar, A.; Kenney, C.; Hasi, J.; Da Via, C.; Parker, S.I.; /Hawaii U.

    2012-06-06

    Silicon sensors with a three-dimensional (3-D) architecture, in which the n and p electrodes penetrate through the entire substrate, have many advantages over planar silicon sensors including radiation hardness, fast time response, active edge and dual readout capabilities. The fabrication of 3D sensors is however rather complex. In recent years, there have been worldwide activities on 3D fabrication. SINTEF in collaboration with Stanford Nanofabrication Facility have successfully fabricated the original (single sided double column type) 3D detectors in two prototype runs and the third run is now on-going. This paper reports the status of this fabrication work and the resulted yield. The work of other groups such as the development of double sided 3D detectors is also briefly reported.

  19. 3D PDF - a means of public access to geological 3D - objects, using the example of GTA3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slaby, Mark-Fabian; Reimann, Rüdiger

    2013-04-01

    In geology, 3D modeling has become very important. In the past, two-dimensional data such as isolines, drilling profiles, or cross-sections based on those, were used to illustrate the subsurface geology, whereas now, we can create complex digital 3D models. These models are produced with special software, such as GOCAD ®. The models can be viewed, only through the software used to create them, or through viewers available for free. The platform-independent PDF (Portable Document Format), enforced by Adobe, has found a wide distribution. This format has constantly evolved over time. Meanwhile, it is possible to display CAD data in an Adobe 3D PDF file with the free Adobe Reader (version 7). In a 3D PDF, a 3D model is freely rotatable and can be assembled from a plurality of objects, which can thus be viewed from all directions on their own. In addition, it is possible to create moveable cross-sections (profiles), and to assign transparency to the objects. Based on industry-standard CAD software, 3D PDFs can be generated from a large number of formats, or even be exported directly from this software. In geoinformatics, different approaches to creating 3D PDFs exist. The intent of the Authority for Mining, Energy and Geology to allow free access to the models of the Geotectonic Atlas (GTA3D), could not be realized with standard software solutions. A specially designed code converts the 3D objects to VRML (Virtual Reality Modeling Language). VRML is one of the few formats that allow using image files (maps) as textures, and to represent colors and shapes correctly. The files were merged in Acrobat X Pro, and a 3D PDF was generated subsequently. A topographic map, a display of geographic directions and horizontal and vertical scales help to facilitate the use.

  20. Positional Awareness Map 3D (PAM3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, Monica; Allen, Earl L.; Yount, John W.; Norcross, April Louise

    2012-01-01

    The Western Aeronautical Test Range of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration s Dryden Flight Research Center needed to address the aging software and hardware of its current situational awareness display application, the Global Real-Time Interactive Map (GRIM). GRIM was initially developed in the late 1980s and executes on older PC architectures using a Linux operating system that is no longer supported. Additionally, the software is difficult to maintain due to its complexity and loss of developer knowledge. It was decided that a replacement application must be developed or acquired in the near future. The replacement must provide the functionality of the original system, the ability to monitor test flight vehicles in real-time, and add improvements such as high resolution imagery and true 3-dimensional capability. This paper will discuss the process of determining the best approach to replace GRIM, and the functionality and capabilities of the first release of the Positional Awareness Map 3D.

  1. Vectorial strain gauge method using single flexible orthogonal polydimethylsiloxane gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Hao; Tang, Jun; Qian, Kun; Tsoukalas, Dimitris; Zhao, Miaomiao; Yang, Jiangtao; Zhang, Binzhen; Chou, Xiujian; Liu, Jun; Xue, Chenyang; Zhang, Wendong

    2016-03-01

    A vectorial strain gauge method using a single sensing element is reported based on the double-sided polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) Fraunhofer diffraction gratings structures. Using O2 plasma treatment steps, orthogonal wrinkled gratings were fabricated on both sides of a pre-strained PDMS film. Diffracted laser spots from this structure have been used to experimentally demonstrate, that any applied strain can be quantitatively characterized in both the x and y directions with an error of less than 0.6% and with a gauge factor of approximately 10. This simple and low cost technology which is completely different from the traditional vectorial strain gauge method, can be applied to surface vectorial strain measurement and multi-axis integrated mechanical sensors.

  2. Vectorial strain gauge method using single flexible orthogonal polydimethylsiloxane gratings.

    PubMed

    Guo, Hao; Tang, Jun; Qian, Kun; Tsoukalas, Dimitris; Zhao, Miaomiao; Yang, Jiangtao; Zhang, Binzhen; Chou, Xiujian; Liu, Jun; Xue, Chenyang; Zhang, Wendong

    2016-01-01

    A vectorial strain gauge method using a single sensing element is reported based on the double-sided polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) Fraunhofer diffraction gratings structures. Using O2 plasma treatment steps, orthogonal wrinkled gratings were fabricated on both sides of a pre-strained PDMS film. Diffracted laser spots from this structure have been used to experimentally demonstrate, that any applied strain can be quantitatively characterized in both the x and y directions with an error of less than 0.6% and with a gauge factor of approximately 10. This simple and low cost technology which is completely different from the traditional vectorial strain gauge method, can be applied to surface vectorial strain measurement and multi-axis integrated mechanical sensors.

  3. Vectorial strain gauge method using single flexible orthogonal polydimethylsiloxane gratings

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Hao; Tang, Jun; Qian, Kun; Tsoukalas, Dimitris; Zhao, Miaomiao; Yang, Jiangtao; Zhang, Binzhen; Chou, Xiujian; Liu, Jun; Xue, Chenyang; Zhang, Wendong

    2016-01-01

    A vectorial strain gauge method using a single sensing element is reported based on the double-sided polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) Fraunhofer diffraction gratings structures. Using O2 plasma treatment steps, orthogonal wrinkled gratings were fabricated on both sides of a pre-strained PDMS film. Diffracted laser spots from this structure have been used to experimentally demonstrate, that any applied strain can be quantitatively characterized in both the x and y directions with an error of less than 0.6% and with a gauge factor of approximately 10. This simple and low cost technology which is completely different from the traditional vectorial strain gauge method, can be applied to surface vectorial strain measurement and multi-axis integrated mechanical sensors. PMID:27005493

  4. [3D interactive clipping technology in medical image processing].

    PubMed

    Sun, Shaoping; Yang, Kaitai; Li, Bin; Li, Yuanjun; Liang, Jing

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this paper is to study the methods of 3D visualization and the 3D interactive clipping of CT/MRI image sequence in arbitrary orientation based on the Visualization Toolkit (VTK). A new method for 3D CT/MRI reconstructed image clipping is presented, which can clip 3D object and 3D space of medical image sequence to observe the inner structure using 3D widget for manipulating an infinite plane. Experiment results show that the proposed method can implement 3D interactive clipping of medical image effectively and get satisfied results with good quality in short time.

  5. Vectorial approach of determining the wave propagation at metasurfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Daniel; Campbell, Michael; Bergmann, Andreas

    2015-10-15

    Vector approach often benefits optical engineers and physicists, and a vector formulation of the laws of reflection and refraction has been studied (Tkaczyk, 2012). However, the conventional reflection and refraction laws may be violated in the presence of a metasurface, and reflection and refraction at the metasurface obey generalized laws of reflection and refraction (Yu et al., 2011). In this letter, the vectorial laws of reflection and refraction at the metasurface were derived, and the matrix formulation of these vectorial laws are also obtained. These results enable highly efficient and unambiguous computations in ray-tracing problems that involve a metasurface.

  6. Modeling Cellular Processes in 3-D

    PubMed Central

    Mogilner, Alex; Odde, David

    2011-01-01

    Summary Recent advances in photonic imaging and fluorescent protein technology offer unprecedented views of molecular space-time dynamics in living cells. At the same time, advances in computing hardware and software enable modeling of ever more complex systems, from global climate to cell division. As modeling and experiment become more closely integrated, we must address the issue of modeling cellular processes in 3-D. Here, we highlight recent advances related to 3-D modeling in cell biology. While some processes require full 3-D analysis, we suggest that others are more naturally described in 2-D or 1-D. Keeping the dimensionality as low as possible reduces computational time and makes models more intuitively comprehensible; however, the ability to test full 3-D models will build greater confidence in models generally and remains an important emerging area of cell biological modeling. PMID:22036197

  7. Low-cost 3D rangefinder system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Bor-Tow; Lou, Wen-Shiou; Chen, Chia-Chen; Lin, Hsien-Chang

    1998-06-01

    Nowadays, 3D data are popularly performed in computer, and 3D browsers manipulate 3D model in the virtual world. Yet, till now, 3D digitizer is still a high-cost product and not a familiar equipment. In order to meet the requirement of 3D fancy world, in this paper, the concept of a low-cost 3D digitizer system is proposed to catch 3D range data from objects. The specified optical design of the 3D extraction is effective to depress the size, and the processing software of the system is compatible with PC to promote its portable capability. Both features contribute a low-cost system in PC environment in contrast to a large system bundled in an expensive workstation platform. In the structure of 3D extraction, laser beam and CCD camera are adopted to construct a 3D sensor. Instead of 2 CCD cameras for capturing laser lines twice before, a 2-in-1 system is proposed to merge 2 images in one CCD which still retains the information of two fields of views to inhibit occlusion problems. Besides, optical paths of two camera views are reflected by mirror in order that the volume of the system can be minified with one rotary axis only. It makes a portable system be more possible to work. Combined with the processing software executable in PC windows system, the proposed system not only saves hardware cost but also processing time of software. The system performance achieves 0.05 mm accuracy. It shows that a low- cost system is more possible to be high-performance.

  8. LOTT RANCH 3D PROJECT

    SciTech Connect

    Larry Lawrence; Bruce Miller

    2004-09-01

    The Lott Ranch 3D seismic prospect located in Garza County, Texas is a project initiated in September of 1991 by the J.M. Huber Corp., a petroleum exploration and production company. By today's standards the 126 square mile project does not seem monumental, however at the time it was conceived it was the most intensive land 3D project ever attempted. Acquisition began in September of 1991 utilizing GEO-SEISMIC, INC., a seismic data contractor. The field parameters were selected by J.M. Huber, and were of a radical design. The recording instruments used were GeoCor IV amplifiers designed by Geosystems Inc., which record the data in signed bit format. It would not have been practical, if not impossible, to have processed the entire raw volume with the tools available at that time. The end result was a dataset that was thought to have little utility due to difficulties in processing the field data. In 1997, Yates Energy Corp. located in Roswell, New Mexico, formed a partnership to further develop the project. Through discussions and meetings with Pinnacle Seismic, it was determined that the original Lott Ranch 3D volume could be vastly improved upon reprocessing. Pinnacle Seismic had shown the viability of improving field-summed signed bit data on smaller 2D and 3D projects. Yates contracted Pinnacle Seismic Ltd. to perform the reprocessing. This project was initiated with high resolution being a priority. Much of the potential resolution was lost through the initial summing of the field data. Modern computers that are now being utilized have tremendous speed and storage capacities that were cost prohibitive when this data was initially processed. Software updates and capabilities offer a variety of quality control and statics resolution, which are pertinent to the Lott Ranch project. The reprocessing effort was very successful. The resulting processed data-set was then interpreted using modern PC-based interpretation and mapping software. Production data, log data

  9. 3D medical thermography device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moghadam, Peyman

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, a novel handheld 3D medical thermography system is introduced. The proposed system consists of a thermal-infrared camera, a color camera and a depth camera rigidly attached in close proximity and mounted on an ergonomic handle. As a practitioner holding the device smoothly moves it around the human body parts, the proposed system generates and builds up a precise 3D thermogram model by incorporating information from each new measurement in real-time. The data is acquired in motion, thus it provides multiple points of view. When processed, these multiple points of view are adaptively combined by taking into account the reliability of each individual measurement which can vary due to a variety of factors such as angle of incidence, distance between the device and the subject and environmental sensor data or other factors influencing a confidence of the thermal-infrared data when captured. Finally, several case studies are presented to support the usability and performance of the proposed system.

  10. 3D Printable Graphene Composite

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Xiaojun; Li, Dong; Jiang, Wei; Gu, Zheming; Wang, Xiaojuan; Zhang, Zengxing; Sun, Zhengzong

    2015-01-01

    In human being’s history, both the Iron Age and Silicon Age thrived after a matured massive processing technology was developed. Graphene is the most recent superior material which could potentially initialize another new material Age. However, while being exploited to its full extent, conventional processing methods fail to provide a link to today’s personalization tide. New technology should be ushered in. Three-dimensional (3D) printing fills the missing linkage between graphene materials and the digital mainstream. Their alliance could generate additional stream to push the graphene revolution into a new phase. Here we demonstrate for the first time, a graphene composite, with a graphene loading up to 5.6 wt%, can be 3D printable into computer-designed models. The composite’s linear thermal coefficient is below 75 ppm·°C−1 from room temperature to its glass transition temperature (Tg), which is crucial to build minute thermal stress during the printing process. PMID:26153673

  11. 3D Printable Graphene Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Xiaojun; Li, Dong; Jiang, Wei; Gu, Zheming; Wang, Xiaojuan; Zhang, Zengxing; Sun, Zhengzong

    2015-07-01

    In human being’s history, both the Iron Age and Silicon Age thrived after a matured massive processing technology was developed. Graphene is the most recent superior material which could potentially initialize another new material Age. However, while being exploited to its full extent, conventional processing methods fail to provide a link to today’s personalization tide. New technology should be ushered in. Three-dimensional (3D) printing fills the missing linkage between graphene materials and the digital mainstream. Their alliance could generate additional stream to push the graphene revolution into a new phase. Here we demonstrate for the first time, a graphene composite, with a graphene loading up to 5.6 wt%, can be 3D printable into computer-designed models. The composite’s linear thermal coefficient is below 75 ppm·°C-1 from room temperature to its glass transition temperature (Tg), which is crucial to build minute thermal stress during the printing process.

  12. RAG-3D: A search tool for RNA 3D substructures

    DOE PAGES

    Zahran, Mai; Sevim Bayrak, Cigdem; Elmetwaly, Shereef; Schlick, Tamar

    2015-08-24

    In this study, to address many challenges in RNA structure/function prediction, the characterization of RNA's modular architectural units is required. Using the RNA-As-Graphs (RAG) database, we have previously explored the existence of secondary structure (2D) submotifs within larger RNA structures. Here we present RAG-3D—a dataset of RNA tertiary (3D) structures and substructures plus a web-based search tool—designed to exploit graph representations of RNAs for the goal of searching for similar 3D structural fragments. The objects in RAG-3D consist of 3D structures translated into 3D graphs, cataloged based on the connectivity between their secondary structure elements. Each graph is additionally describedmore » in terms of its subgraph building blocks. The RAG-3D search tool then compares a query RNA 3D structure to those in the database to obtain structurally similar structures and substructures. This comparison reveals conserved 3D RNA features and thus may suggest functional connections. Though RNA search programs based on similarity in sequence, 2D, and/or 3D structural elements are available, our graph-based search tool may be advantageous for illuminating similarities that are not obvious; using motifs rather than sequence space also reduces search times considerably. Ultimately, such substructuring could be useful for RNA 3D structure prediction, structure/function inference and inverse folding.« less

  13. RAG-3D: A search tool for RNA 3D substructures

    SciTech Connect

    Zahran, Mai; Sevim Bayrak, Cigdem; Elmetwaly, Shereef; Schlick, Tamar

    2015-08-24

    In this study, to address many challenges in RNA structure/function prediction, the characterization of RNA's modular architectural units is required. Using the RNA-As-Graphs (RAG) database, we have previously explored the existence of secondary structure (2D) submotifs within larger RNA structures. Here we present RAG-3D—a dataset of RNA tertiary (3D) structures and substructures plus a web-based search tool—designed to exploit graph representations of RNAs for the goal of searching for similar 3D structural fragments. The objects in RAG-3D consist of 3D structures translated into 3D graphs, cataloged based on the connectivity between their secondary structure elements. Each graph is additionally described in terms of its subgraph building blocks. The RAG-3D search tool then compares a query RNA 3D structure to those in the database to obtain structurally similar structures and substructures. This comparison reveals conserved 3D RNA features and thus may suggest functional connections. Though RNA search programs based on similarity in sequence, 2D, and/or 3D structural elements are available, our graph-based search tool may be advantageous for illuminating similarities that are not obvious; using motifs rather than sequence space also reduces search times considerably. Ultimately, such substructuring could be useful for RNA 3D structure prediction, structure/function inference and inverse folding.

  14. RAG-3D: a search tool for RNA 3D substructures

    PubMed Central

    Zahran, Mai; Sevim Bayrak, Cigdem; Elmetwaly, Shereef; Schlick, Tamar

    2015-01-01

    To address many challenges in RNA structure/function prediction, the characterization of RNA's modular architectural units is required. Using the RNA-As-Graphs (RAG) database, we have previously explored the existence of secondary structure (2D) submotifs within larger RNA structures. Here we present RAG-3D—a dataset of RNA tertiary (3D) structures and substructures plus a web-based search tool—designed to exploit graph representations of RNAs for the goal of searching for similar 3D structural fragments. The objects in RAG-3D consist of 3D structures translated into 3D graphs, cataloged based on the connectivity between their secondary structure elements. Each graph is additionally described in terms of its subgraph building blocks. The RAG-3D search tool then compares a query RNA 3D structure to those in the database to obtain structurally similar structures and substructures. This comparison reveals conserved 3D RNA features and thus may suggest functional connections. Though RNA search programs based on similarity in sequence, 2D, and/or 3D structural elements are available, our graph-based search tool may be advantageous for illuminating similarities that are not obvious; using motifs rather than sequence space also reduces search times considerably. Ultimately, such substructuring could be useful for RNA 3D structure prediction, structure/function inference and inverse folding. PMID:26304547

  15. 3D Elastic Wavefield Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guasch, L.; Warner, M.; Stekl, I.; Umpleby, A.; Shah, N.

    2010-12-01

    Wavefield tomography, or waveform inversion, aims to extract the maximum information from seismic data by matching trace by trace the response of the solid earth to seismic waves using numerical modelling tools. Its first formulation dates from the early 80's, when Albert Tarantola developed a solid theoretical basis that is still used today with little change. Due to computational limitations, the application of the method to 3D problems has been unaffordable until a few years ago, and then only under the acoustic approximation. Although acoustic wavefield tomography is widely used, a complete solution of the seismic inversion problem requires that we account properly for the physics of wave propagation, and so must include elastic effects. We have developed a 3D tomographic wavefield inversion code that incorporates the full elastic wave equation. The bottle neck of the different implementations is the forward modelling algorithm that generates the synthetic data to be compared with the field seismograms as well as the backpropagation of the residuals needed to form the direction update of the model parameters. Furthermore, one or two extra modelling runs are needed in order to calculate the step-length. Our approach uses a FD scheme explicit time-stepping by finite differences that are 4th order in space and 2nd order in time, which is a 3D version of the one developed by Jean Virieux in 1986. We chose the time domain because an explicit time scheme is much less demanding in terms of memory than its frequency domain analogue, although the discussion of wich domain is more efficient still remains open. We calculate the parameter gradients for Vp and Vs by correlating the normal and shear stress wavefields respectively. A straightforward application would lead to the storage of the wavefield at all grid points at each time-step. We tackled this problem using two different approaches. The first one makes better use of resources for small models of dimension equal

  16. In situ and real time characterization of interface microstructure in 3D alloy solidification: benchmark microgravity experiments in the DECLIC-Directional Solidification Insert on ISS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramirez, A.; Chen, L.; Bergeon, N.; Billia, B.; Gu, Jiho; Trivedi, R.

    2012-01-01

    Dynamical microstructure formation and selection during solidification processing, which has a major influence on the properties in the use of elaborated materials, occur during the growth process. In situ observation of the solid-liquid interface morphology evolution is thus necessary. On earth, convection effects dominate in bulk samples and may strongly interact with microstructure dynamics and alter pattern characterization. Series of solidification experiments with 3D cylindrical sample geometry were conducted in succinonitrile (SCN) -0.24 wt%camphor (model transparent system), in microgravity environment in the Directional Solidification Insert of the DECLIC facility of CNES (French space agency) on the International Space Station (ISS). Microgravity enabled homogeneous values of control parameters over the whole interface allowing the obtaining of homogeneous patterns suitable to get quantitative benchmark data. First analyses of the characteristics of the pattern (spacing, order, etc.) and of its dynamics in microgravity will be presented.

  17. In-vivo Optical Tomography of Small Scattering Specimens: time-lapse 3D imaging of the head eversion process in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Arranz, Alicia; Dong, Di; Zhu, Shouping; Savakis, Charalambos; Tian, Jie; Ripoll, Jorge

    2014-01-01

    Even though in vivo imaging approaches have witnessed several new and important developments, specimens that exhibit high light scattering properties such as Drosophila melanogaster pupae are still not easily accessible with current optical imaging techniques, obtaining images only from subsurface features. This means that in order to obtain 3D volumetric information these specimens need to be studied either after fixation and a chemical clearing process, through an imaging window - thus perturbing physiological development -, or during early stages of development when the scattering contribution is negligible. In this paper we showcase how Optical Projection Tomography may be used to obtain volumetric images of the head eversion process in vivo in Drosophila melanogaster pupae, both in control and headless mutant specimens. Additionally, we demonstrate the use of Helical Optical Projection Tomography (hOPT) as a tool for high throughput 4D-imaging of several specimens simultaneously. PMID:25471694

  18. In-vivo optical tomography of small scattering specimens: time-lapse 3D imaging of the head eversion process in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Arranz, Alicia; Dong, Di; Zhu, Shouping; Savakis, Charalambos; Tian, Jie; Ripoll, Jorge

    2014-01-01

    Even though in vivo imaging approaches have witnessed several new and important developments, specimens that exhibit high light scattering properties such as Drosophila melanogaster pupae are still not easily accessible with current optical imaging techniques, obtaining images only from subsurface features. This means that in order to obtain 3D volumetric information these specimens need to be studied either after fixation and a chemical clearing process, through an imaging window--thus perturbing physiological development -, or during early stages of development when the scattering contribution is negligible. In this paper we showcase how Optical Projection Tomography may be used to obtain volumetric images of the head eversion process in vivo in Drosophila melanogaster pupae, both in control and headless mutant specimens. Additionally, we demonstrate the use of Helical Optical Projection Tomography (hOPT) as a tool for high throughput 4D-imaging of several specimens simultaneously. PMID:25471694

  19. Eyes on the Earth 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kulikov, anton I.; Doronila, Paul R.; Nguyen, Viet T.; Jackson, Randal K.; Greene, William M.; Hussey, Kevin J.; Garcia, Christopher M.; Lopez, Christian A.

    2013-01-01

    Eyes on the Earth 3D software gives scientists, and the general public, a realtime, 3D interactive means of accurately viewing the real-time locations, speed, and values of recently collected data from several of NASA's Earth Observing Satellites using a standard Web browser (climate.nasa.gov/eyes). Anyone with Web access can use this software to see where the NASA fleet of these satellites is now, or where they will be up to a year in the future. The software also displays several Earth Science Data sets that have been collected on a daily basis. This application uses a third-party, 3D, realtime, interactive game engine called Unity 3D to visualize the satellites and is accessible from a Web browser.

  20. Nonlaser-based 3D surface imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Shin-yee; Johnson, R.K.; Sherwood, R.J.

    1994-11-15

    3D surface imaging refers to methods that generate a 3D surface representation of objects of a scene under viewing. Laser-based 3D surface imaging systems are commonly used in manufacturing, robotics and biomedical research. Although laser-based systems provide satisfactory solutions for most applications, there are situations where non laser-based approaches are preferred. The issues that make alternative methods sometimes more attractive are: (1) real-time data capturing, (2) eye-safety, (3) portability, and (4) work distance. The focus of this presentation is on generating a 3D surface from multiple 2D projected images using CCD cameras, without a laser light source. Two methods are presented: stereo vision and depth-from-focus. Their applications are described.

  1. Market study: 3-D eyetracker

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    A market study of a proposed version of a 3-D eyetracker for initial use at NASA's Ames Research Center was made. The commercialization potential of a simplified, less expensive 3-D eyetracker was ascertained. Primary focus on present and potential users of eyetrackers, as well as present and potential manufacturers has provided an effective means of analyzing the prospects for commercialization.

  2. 3D World Building System

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    This video provides an overview of the Sandia National Laboratories developed 3-D World Model Building capability that provides users with an immersive, texture rich 3-D model of their environment in minutes using a laptop and color and depth camera.

  3. 3D World Building System

    SciTech Connect

    2013-10-30

    This video provides an overview of the Sandia National Laboratories developed 3-D World Model Building capability that provides users with an immersive, texture rich 3-D model of their environment in minutes using a laptop and color and depth camera.

  4. Euro3D Science Conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, J. R.

    2004-02-01

    The Euro3D RTN is an EU funded Research Training Network to foster the exploitation of 3D spectroscopy in Europe. 3D spectroscopy is a general term for spectroscopy of an area of the sky and derives its name from its two spatial + one spectral dimensions. There are an increasing number of instruments which use integral field devices to achieve spectroscopy of an area of the sky, either using lens arrays, optical fibres or image slicers, to pack spectra of multiple pixels on the sky (``spaxels'') onto a 2D detector. On account of the large volume of data and the special methods required to reduce and analyse 3D data, there are only a few centres of expertise and these are mostly involved with instrument developments. There is a perceived lack of expertise in 3D spectroscopy spread though the astronomical community and its use in the armoury of the observational astronomer is viewed as being highly specialised. For precisely this reason the Euro3D RTN was proposed to train young researchers in this area and develop user tools to widen the experience with this particular type of data in Europe. The Euro3D RTN is coordinated by Martin M. Roth (Astrophysikalisches Institut Potsdam) and has been running since July 2002. The first Euro3D science conference was held in Cambridge, UK from 22 to 23 May 2003. The main emphasis of the conference was, in keeping with the RTN, to expose the work of the young post-docs who are funded by the RTN. In addition the team members from the eleven European institutes involved in Euro3D also presented instrumental and observational developments. The conference was organized by Andy Bunker and held at the Institute of Astronomy. There were over thirty participants and 26 talks covered the whole range of application of