Science.gov

Sample records for 3d velocity measurements

  1. Measuring the Stellar Halo Velocity Anisotropy With 3D Kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunningham, Emily C.; Deason, Alis J.; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Rockosi, Constance M.; van der Marel, Roeland P.; Sohn, S. Tony

    2016-08-01

    We present the first measurement of the anisotropy parameter β using 3D kinematic information outside of the solar neighborhood. Our sample consists of 13 Milky Way halo stars with measured proper motions and radial velocities in the line of sight of M31. Proper motions were measured using deep, multi-epoch HST imaging, and radial velocities were measured from Keck II/DEIMOS spectra. We measure β = -0.3-0.9 +0.4, which is consistent with isotropy, and inconsistent with measurements in the solar neighborhood. We suggest that this may be the kinematic signature of a relatively early, massive accretion event, or perhaps several such events.

  2. An industrial light-field camera applied for 3D velocity measurements in a slot jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seredkin, A. V.; Shestakov, M. V.; Tokarev, M. P.

    2016-10-01

    Modern light-field cameras have found their application in different areas like photography, surveillance and quality control in industry. A number of studies have been reported relatively low spatial resolution of 3D profiles of registered objects along the optical axis of the camera. This article describes a method for 3D velocity measurements in fluid flows using an industrial light-field camera and an alternative reconstruction algorithm based on a statistical approach. This method is more accurate than triangulation when applied for tracking small registered objects like tracer particles in images. The technique was used to measure 3D velocity fields in a turbulent slot jet.

  3. 3D velocity measurement by a single camera using Doppler phase-shifting holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ninomiya, Nao; Kubo, Yamato; Barada, Daisuke; Kiire, Tomohiro

    2016-10-01

    In order to understand the details of the flow field in micro- and nano-fluidic devices, it is necessary to measure the 3D velocities under a microscopy. Thus, there is a strong need for the development of a new measuring technique for 3D velocity by a single camera. One solution is the use of holography, but it is well known that the accuracy in the depth direction is very poor for the commonly used in-line holography. At present, the Doppler phase-shifting holography is used for the 3D measurement of an object. This method extracts the signal of a fixed frequency caused by the Doppler beat between the object light and the reference light. It can measure the 3D shape precisely. Here, the frequency of the Doppler beat is determined by the velocity difference between the object light and the reference light. This implies that the velocity of an object can be calculated by the Doppler frequency. In this study, a Japanese 5 yen coin was traversed at a constant speed and its holography has been observed by a high-speed camera. By extracting only the first order diffraction signal at the Doppler frequency, a precise measurement of the shape and the position of a 5 yen coin has been achieved. At the same time, the longitudinal velocity of a 5 yen coin can be measured by the Doppler frequency. Furthermore, the lateral velocities are obtained by particle image velocimetry (PIV) method. A 5 yen coin has been traversed at different angles and its shapes and the 3D velocities have been measured accurately. This method can be applied to the particle flows in the micro- or nano-devices, and the 3D velocities will be measured under microscopes.

  4. Measurements of 3D slip velocities and plasma column lengths of a gliding arc discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Jiajian; Gao, Jinlong; Ehn, Andreas; Aldén, Marcus; Li, Zhongshan E-mail: alpers@ma.tum.de; Moseev, Dmitry; Kusano, Yukihiro; Salewski, Mirko; Alpers, Andreas E-mail: alpers@ma.tum.de; Gritzmann, Peter; Schwenk, Martin

    2015-01-26

    A non-thermal gliding arc discharge was generated at atmospheric pressure in an air flow. The dynamics of the plasma column and tracer particles were recorded using two synchronized high-speed cameras. Whereas the data analysis for such systems has previously been performed in 2D (analyzing the single camera image), we provide here a 3D data analysis that includes 3D reconstructions of the plasma column and 3D particle tracking velocimetry based on discrete tomography methods. The 3D analysis, in particular, the determination of the 3D slip velocity between the plasma column and the gas flow, gives more realistic insight into the convection cooling process. Additionally, with the determination of the 3D slip velocity and the 3D length of the plasma column, we give more accurate estimates for the drag force, the electric field strength, the power per unit length, and the radius of the conducting zone of the plasma column.

  5. Velocity field measurements in sedimentary rock cores by magnetization prepared 3D SPRITE.

    PubMed

    Romanenko, Konstantin; Xiao, Dan; Balcom, Bruce J

    2012-10-01

    A time-efficient MRI method suitable for quantitative mapping of 3-D velocity fields in sedimentary rock cores, and granular samples is discussed. The method combines the 13-interval Alternating-Pulsed-Gradient Stimulated-Echo (APGSTE) scheme and three-dimensional Single Point Ramped Imaging with T(1) Enhancement (SPRITE). Collecting a few samples near the q-space origin and employing restricted k-space sampling dramatically improves the performance of the imaging method. The APGSTE-SPRITE method is illustrated through mapping of 3-D velocity field in a macroscopic bead pack and heterogeneous sandstone and limestone core plugs. The observed flow patterns are consistent with a general trend for permeability to increase with the porosity. Domains of low permeability obstruct the flow within the core volume. Water tends to flow along macroscopic zones of higher porosity and across zones of lower porosity. PMID:22967892

  6. Velocity field measurements in sedimentary rock cores by magnetization prepared 3D SPRITE.

    PubMed

    Romanenko, Konstantin; Xiao, Dan; Balcom, Bruce J

    2012-10-01

    A time-efficient MRI method suitable for quantitative mapping of 3-D velocity fields in sedimentary rock cores, and granular samples is discussed. The method combines the 13-interval Alternating-Pulsed-Gradient Stimulated-Echo (APGSTE) scheme and three-dimensional Single Point Ramped Imaging with T(1) Enhancement (SPRITE). Collecting a few samples near the q-space origin and employing restricted k-space sampling dramatically improves the performance of the imaging method. The APGSTE-SPRITE method is illustrated through mapping of 3-D velocity field in a macroscopic bead pack and heterogeneous sandstone and limestone core plugs. The observed flow patterns are consistent with a general trend for permeability to increase with the porosity. Domains of low permeability obstruct the flow within the core volume. Water tends to flow along macroscopic zones of higher porosity and across zones of lower porosity.

  7. Application of Plenoptic PIV for 3D Velocity Measurements Over Roughness Elements in a Refractive Index Matched Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thurow, Brian; Johnson, Kyle; Kim, Taehoon; Blois, Gianluca; Best, Jim; Christensen, Ken

    2014-11-01

    The application of Plenoptic PIV in a Refractive Index Matched (RIM) facility housed at Illinois is presented. Plenoptic PIV is an emerging 3D diagnostic that exploits the light-field imaging capabilities of a plenoptic camera. Plenoptic cameras utilize a microlens array to measure the position and angle of light rays captured by the camera. 3D/3C velocity fields are determined through application of the MART algorithm for volume reconstruction and a conventional 3D cross-correlation PIV algorithm. The RIM facility is a recirculating tunnel with a 62.5% aqueous solution of sodium iodide used as the working fluid. Its resulting index of 1.49 is equal to that of acrylic. Plenoptic PIV was used to measure the 3D velocity field of a turbulent boundary layer flow over a smooth wall, a single wall-mounted hemisphere and a full array of hemispheres (i.e. a rough wall) with a k/ δ ~ 4.6. Preliminary time averaged and instantaneous 3D velocity fields will be presented. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. 1235726.

  8. Measurement of near-wall 3D flow velocity from wave-guiding micro-pillars.

    PubMed

    Bruecker, Christoph

    2016-09-19

    The measurement of near-wall flow in a plane close to the wall is achieved using the wave-guiding feature of transparent flexible micro-pillars which are attached in a 2D array to a surface and bend with the flow. Optical detection of bending from below the surface and application of auto-correlation methods provide mean and fluctuating part of the components of the wall-parallel velocity components. In addition, the wall-normal fluid motion is determined from spatial gradients in the array. The data provide the three-component velocity vector field in a plane close to the wall as well as their statistics.

  9. Analysis of non linear partially standing waves from 3D velocity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drevard, D.; Rey, V.; Svendsen, Ib; Fraunie, P.

    2003-04-01

    Surface gravity waves in the ocean exhibit an energy spectrum distributed in both frequency and direction of propagation. Wave data collection is of great importance in coastal zones for engineering and scientific studies. In particular, partially standing waves measurements near coastal structures and steep or barred beaches may be a requirement, for instance for morphodynamic studies. The aim of the present study is the analysis of partially standing surface waves icluding non-linear effects. According to 1st order Stokes theory, synchronous measurements of horizontal and vertical velocity components allow calculation of rate of standing waves (Drevard et al, 2003). In the present study, it is demonstrated that for deep water conditions, partially standing 2nd order Stokes waves induced velocity field is still represented by the 1st order solution for the velocity potential contrary to the surface elevation which exhibits harmonic components. For intermediate water depth, harmonic components appear not only in the surface elevation but also in the velocity fields, but their weight remains much smaller, because of the vertical decreasing wave induced motion. For irregular waves, the influence of the spectrum width on the non-linear effects in the analysis is discussed. Keywords: Wave measurements ; reflection ; non-linear effects Acknowledgements: This work was initiated during the stay of Prof. Ib Svendsen, as invited Professor, at LSEET in autumn 2002. This study is carried out in the framework of the Scientific French National Programmes PNEC ART7 and PATOM. Their financial supports are acknowledged References: Drevard, D., Meuret, A., Rey, V. Piazzola, J. And Dolle, A.. (2002). "Partially reflected waves measurements using Acoustic Doppler Velocimeter (ADV)", Submitted to ISOPE 03, Honolulu, Hawaii, May 2003.

  10. Measurement of near-wall 3D flow velocity from wave-guiding micro-pillars.

    PubMed

    Bruecker, Christoph

    2016-09-19

    The measurement of near-wall flow in a plane close to the wall is achieved using the wave-guiding feature of transparent flexible micro-pillars which are attached in a 2D array to a surface and bend with the flow. Optical detection of bending from below the surface and application of auto-correlation methods provide mean and fluctuating part of the components of the wall-parallel velocity components. In addition, the wall-normal fluid motion is determined from spatial gradients in the array. The data provide the three-component velocity vector field in a plane close to the wall as well as their statistics. PMID:27661882

  11. Near-wall 3D velocity measurements above biomimetic shark skin denticles using Digital In-line Holographic Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toloui, Mostafa; Brajkovic, David; Hong, Jiarong

    2014-11-01

    Digital In-line Holography is employed to image 3D flow structures in the vicinity of a transparent rough surface consisting of closely packed biomimetic shark skin denticles as roughness elements. The 3D printed surface replicates the morphological features of real shark skin, and the denticles have a geometrical scale of 2 mm, i.e. 10 times of the real ones. In order to minimize optical aberrations near the fluid-roughness interface and enable flow measurements around denticles, the optical refractive index of the fluid medium is maintained the same as that of the denticle model in an index-matched flow facility using NaI solution as the working fluid. The experiment is conducted in a 1.2 m long test section with 50 mm × 50 mm cross section. The sampling volume is located in the downstream region of a shark skin replica of 12'' stretch where the turbulent flow is fully-developed and the transitional effect from smooth to the rough surface becomes negligible. Several instantaneous realizations of the 3D velocity field are obtained and are used to illustrate turbulent coherent structures induced by shark-skin denticles. This information will provide insights on the hydrodynamic function of shark's unique surface ornamentation.

  12. 3D velocity field of present-day crustal motion of the Tibetan Plateau derived from GPS measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, W.

    2013-12-01

    Using the measurements of 564 GPS stations around the Tibetan plateau for over 10 years, we derived a high-resolution 3D velocity field for the present-day crustal motion of the plateau with improved precision. The horizontal velocity field of the plateau relative to stable Eurasia displays in details the crustal movement and tectonic deformation features of India-Eurasia continental collision zone with thrust compression, lateral extrusion and clockwise rotation. The vertical velocities reveal that the plateau is still rising as a whole relative to its stable north neighbor. However, in some subregions uplift is insignificant or even negative. The main features of the vertical crustal deformation are: a) The Himalayan range is rising at a rate of ~3mm/yr, the most significant in the whole plateau. The uplift rate of the Himalayan range is ~6mm/a relative to its south foot; b) The mid-eastern plateau has an typical uplift rate between 1~2 mm/a, and some high mountain ranges in this area have surprising uplift rates as large as 2~3mm/a; c) In the mid-southern plateau, there is a basin and endorheic subregion with a series of NE striking normal faults, showing obvious sinking with the rates between 0 to -4mm/a; d) The present-day rising and sinking subregions generally correspond well to the Cenozoic orogenic belts and basins, respectively; e) At the southeastern corner of the plateau, although the horizontal velocity field demonstrates an outstanding clockwise rotation and fan-like front of a flow zone, the vertical velocity field does not show a general uplift or incline trend. Horizontal GPS velocities of the Tibetan plateau relative to stable Eurasia Vertical GPS velocities of the Tibetan plateau relative to its stable northern neighbor

  13. A compact single-camera system for high-speed, simultaneous 3-D velocity and temperature measurements.

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Louise; Sick, Volker; Frank, Jonathan H.

    2013-09-01

    The University of Michigan and Sandia National Laboratories collaborated on the initial development of a compact single-camera approach for simultaneously measuring 3-D gasphase velocity and temperature fields at high frame rates. A compact diagnostic tool is desired to enable investigations of flows with limited optical access, such as near-wall flows in an internal combustion engine. These in-cylinder flows play a crucial role in improving engine performance. Thermographic phosphors were proposed as flow and temperature tracers to extend the capabilities of a novel, compact 3D velocimetry diagnostic to include high-speed thermometry. Ratiometric measurements were performed using two spectral bands of laser-induced phosphorescence emission from BaMg2Al10O17:Eu (BAM) phosphors in a heated air flow to determine the optimal optical configuration for accurate temperature measurements. The originally planned multi-year research project ended prematurely after the first year due to the Sandia-sponsored student leaving the research group at the University of Michigan.

  14. Azimuthally Anisotropic 3D Velocity Continuation

    DOE PAGES

    Burnett, William; Fomel, Sergey

    2011-01-01

    We extend time-domain velocity continuation to the zero-offset 3D azimuthally anisotropic case. Velocity continuation describes how a seismic image changes given a change in migration velocity. This description turns out to be of a wave propagation process, in which images change along a velocity axis. In the anisotropic case, the velocity model is multiparameter. Therefore, anisotropic image propagation is multidimensional. We use a three-parameter slowness model, which is related to azimuthal variations in velocity, as well as their principal directions. This information is useful for fracture and reservoir characterization from seismic data. We provide synthetic diffraction imaging examples to illustratemore » the concept and potential applications of azimuthal velocity continuation and to analyze the impulse response of the 3D velocity continuation operator.« less

  15. Constructing a 3D Crustal Model Across the Entire Contiguous US Using Broadband Rayleigh Wave Phase Velocity and Ellipticity Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, F. C.; Schmandt, B.

    2015-12-01

    Imaging the crust and lithosphere structure beneath North America is one of the primary targets for the NSF-funded EarthScope project. In this study, we apply the recently developed ambient noise and surface wave tomography methods to construct a detailed 3D crustal model across the entire contiguous US using USArray data between January 2007 and May 2015. By using both Rayleigh wave phase velocity and ellipticity measurements between 8 and 100 sec period, the shear velocity structure can be well resolved within the five crustal layers we modeled: three upper crust, one middle crust, and one lower crust. Clear correlations are observed between the resolved velocity anomalies and known geological features at all depths. In the uppermost crust, slow Vs anomalies are observed within major sedimentary environments such as the Williston Basin, Denver Basin, and Mississippi embayment, and fast Vs anomalies are observed in environments with deeply exhumed bedrock outcrops at the surface including the Laurentian Highlands, Ouachita-Ozark Interior Highlands, and Appalachian Highlands. In the deeper upper crust, slow anomalies are observed in deep sedimentary basins such as the Green River Basin, Appalachian Basin, Southern Oklahoma Aulacogen, and areas surrounding the Gulf of Mexico. Fast anomalies, on the other hand, are observed in the Colorado Plateau, within the Great Plains between the Front Ranges and Midcontinental Rift, and east of the Appalachian Mountains. At this depth, the Midcontinental Rift and Grenville Front clearly correlate well with various velocity structure boundaries. In the middle crust, slow anomalies are mostly observed in the tectonically active areas in the western US, but relatively slow anomalies are also observed southeast of the Precambrian Rift Margins. At this depth, fast anomalies are observed beneath various deep sedimentary basins such as the Southern Oklahoma Aulacogen, Appalachian Basin, and Central Valley. In the lower crust, a clear

  16. Direct measurement of particle size and 3D velocity of a gas-solid pipe flow with digital holographic particle tracking velocimetry.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yingchun; Wu, Xuecheng; Yao, Longchao; Gréhan, Gérard; Cen, Kefa

    2015-03-20

    The 3D measurement of the particles in a gas-solid pipe flow is of great interest, but remains challenging due to curved pipe walls in various engineering applications. Because of the astigmatism induced by the pipe, concentric ellipse fringes in the hologram of spherical particles are observed in the experiments. With a theoretical analysis of the particle holography by an ABCD matrix, the in-focus particle image can be reconstructed by the modified convolution method and fractional Fourier transform. Thereafter, the particle size, 3D position, and velocity are simultaneously measured by digital holographic particle tracking velocimetry (DHPTV). The successful application of DHPTV to the particle size and 3D velocity measurement in a glass pipe's flow can facilitate its 3D diagnostics.

  17. 3D velocity distribution of P- and S-waves in a biotite gneiss, measured in oil as the pressure medium: Comparison with velocity measurements in a multi-anvil pressure apparatus and with texture-based calculated data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lokajíček, T.; Kern, H.; Svitek, T.; Ivankina, T.

    2014-06-01

    Ultrasonic measurements of the 3D velocity distribution of P- and S-waves were performed on a spherical sample of a biotite gneiss from the Outokumpu scientific drill hole. Measurements were done at room temperature and pressures up to 400 and 70 MPa, respectively, in a pressure vessel with oil as a pressure medium. A modified transducer/sample assembly and the installation of a new mechanical system allowed simultaneous measurements of P- and S-wave velocities in 132 independent directions of the sphere on a net in steps of 15°. Proper signals for P- and S-waves could be recorded by coating the sample surface with a high-viscosity shear wave gel and by temporal point contacting of the transmitter and receiver transducers with the sample surface during the measurements. The 3D seismic measurements revealed a strong foliation-related directional dependence (anisotropy) of P- and S-wave velocities, which is confirmed by measurements in a multi-anvil apparatus on a cube-shaped specimen of the same rock. Both experimental approaches show a marked pressure sensitivity of P- and S-wave velocities and velocity anisotropies. With increasing pressure, P- and S-wave velocities increase non-linearly due to progressive closure of micro-cracks. The reverse is true for velocity anisotropy. 3D velocity calculations based on neutron diffraction measurements of crystallographic preferred orientation (CPO) of major minerals show that the intrinsic bulk anisotropy is basically caused by the CPO of biotite constituting about 23 vol.% of the rock. Including the shape of biotite grains and oriented low-aspect ratio microcracks into the modelling increases bulk anisotropy. An important finding from this study is that the measurements on the sample sphere and on the sample cube displayed distinct differences, particularly in shear wave velocities. It is assumed that the differences are due to the different geometries of the samples and the configuration of the transducer-sample assembly

  18. Visualizing 3D velocity fields near contour surfaces. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Max, N.; Crawfis, R.; Grant, C.

    1994-08-08

    Vector field rendering is difficult in 3D because the vector icons overlap and hide each other. We propose four different techniques for visualizing vector fields only near surfaces. The first uses motion blurred particles in a thickened region around the surface. The second uses a voxel grid to contain integral curves of the vector field. The third uses many antialiased lines through the surface, and the fourth uses hairs sprouting from the surface and then bending in the direction of the vector field. All the methods use the graphics pipeline, allowing real time rotation and interaction, and the first two methods can animate the texture to move in the flow determined by the velocity field.

  19. Visualizing 3D velocity fields near contour surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Max, N.; Crawfis, R.; Grant, C.

    1994-03-01

    Vector field rendering is difficult in 3D because the vector icons overlap and hide each other. We propose four different techniques for visualizing vector fields only near surfaces. The first uses motion blurred particles in a thickened region around the surface. The second uses a voxel grid to contain integral curves of the vector field. The third uses many antialiased lines through the surface, and the fourth uses hairs sprouting from the surface and then bending in the direction of the vector field. All the methods use the graphite pipeline, allowing real time rotation and interaction, and the first two methods can animate the texture to move in the flow determined by the velocity field.

  20. 3D optical measuring technologies and systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chugui, Yuri V.

    2005-02-01

    The results of the R & D activity of TDI SIE SB RAS in the field of the 3D optical measuring technologies and systems for noncontact 3D optical dimensional inspection applied to atomic and railway industry safety problems are presented. This activity includes investigations of diffraction phenomena on some 3D objects, using the original constructive calculation method. The efficient algorithms for precise determining the transverse and longitudinal sizes of 3D objects of constant thickness by diffraction method, peculiarities on formation of the shadow and images of the typical elements of the extended objects were suggested. Ensuring the safety of nuclear reactors and running trains as well as their high exploitation reliability requires a 100% noncontact precise inspection of geometrical parameters of their components. To solve this problem we have developed methods and produced the technical vision measuring systems LMM, CONTROL, PROFIL, and technologies for noncontact 3D dimensional inspection of grid spacers and fuel elements for the nuclear reactor VVER-1000 and VVER-440, as well as automatic laser diagnostic COMPLEX for noncontact inspection of geometric parameters of running freight car wheel pairs. The performances of these systems and the results of industrial testing are presented and discussed. The created devices are in pilot operation at Atomic and Railway Companies.

  1. 3D measurement using circular gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harding, Kevin

    2013-09-01

    3D measurement using methods of structured light are well known in the industry. Most such systems use some variation of straight lines, either as simple lines or with some form of encoding. This geometry assumes the lines will be projected from one side and viewed from another to generate the profile information. But what about applications where a wide triangulation angle may not be practical, particularly at longer standoff distances. This paper explores the use of circular grating patterns projected from a center point to achieve 3D information. Originally suggested by John Caulfield around 1990, the method had some interesting potential, particularly if combined with alternate means of measurement from traditional triangulation including depth from focus methods. The possible advantages of a central reference point in the projected pattern may offer some different capabilities not as easily attained with a linear grating pattern. This paper will explore the pros and cons of the method and present some examples of possible applications.

  2. Uncertainty assessment of 3D instantaneous velocity model from stack velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emanuele Maesano, Francesco; D'Ambrogi, Chiara

    2015-04-01

    3D modelling is a powerful tool that is experiencing increasing applications in data analysis and dissemination. At the same time the need of quantitative uncertainty evaluation is strongly requested in many aspects of the geological sciences and by the stakeholders. In many cases the starting point for 3D model building is the interpretation of seismic profiles that provide indirect information about the geology of the subsurface in the domain of time. The most problematic step in the 3D modelling construction is the conversion of the horizons and faults interpreted in time domain to the depth domain. In this step the dominant variable that could lead to significantly different results is the velocity. The knowledge of the subsurface velocities is related mainly to punctual data (sonic logs) that are often sparsely distributed in the areas covered by the seismic interpretation. The extrapolation of velocity information to wide extended horizons is thus a critical step to obtain a 3D model in depth that can be used for predictive purpose. In the EU-funded GeoMol Project, the availability of a dense network of seismic lines (confidentially provided by ENI S.p.A.) in the Central Po Plain, is paired with the presence of 136 well logs, but few of them have sonic logs and in some portion of the area the wells are very widely spaced. The depth conversion of the 3D model in time domain has been performed testing different strategies for the use and the interpolation of velocity data. The final model has been obtained using a 4 layer cake 3D instantaneous velocity model that considers both the initial velocity (v0) in every reference horizon and the gradient of velocity variation with depth (k). Using this method it is possible to consider the geological constraint given by the geometries of the horizons and the geo-statistical approach to the interpolation of velocities and gradient. Here we present an experiment based on the use of set of pseudo-wells obtained from the

  3. Tool 3D geometry measurement system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Huijie; Ni, Jun; Sun, Yi; Lin, Xuewen

    2001-10-01

    A new non-contact tool 3D geometry measurement system based on machine vision is described. In this system, analytical and optimization methods are used respectively to achieve system calibration, which can determine the rotation center of the drill. The data merging method is fully studied which can translate the scattered different groups of raw data in sensor coordinates into drill coordinates and get 3-D topography of the drill body. Corresponding data processing methods for drill geometry are also studied. Statistical methods are used to remove the outliers. Laplacian of Gaussian operator are used to detect the boundary on drill cross-section and drill tip profile. The arithmetic method for calculating the parameters is introduced. The initial measurement results are presented. The cross-section profile, drill tips geometry are shown. Pictures of drill wear on drill tip are given. Parameters extracted from the cross-section are listed. Compared with the measurement results using CMM, the difference between this drill geometry measurement system and CMM is, Radius of drill: 0.020mm, Helix angle: 1.310, Web thickness: 0.034mm.

  4. The 3D velocity structure beneath Iceland: Identifying melt pathways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, R.

    2003-04-01

    The integration of various seismic datasets, recorded by the broadband HOTSPOT network deployed across Iceland, provides one of the highest resolution studies of the crust and mantle structure associated with a plume-ridge system. The mantle P- and S-velocity models (ICEMAN), derived from teleseismic body-wave and surface wave analysis, show a vertical, cylindrical low velocity anomaly ˜200 km in diameter extending from ˜400 km, the maximum depth of resolution, up to ˜200 km above which low velocity material is present beneath all of Iceland. The maximum P- and S-velocity anomalies of -2% and -4% respectively are found beneath the northwestern edge of Vatnajokull. The crustal S-velocity model (ICECRTb) is constrained by local surface waves, refraction experiments and receiver functions, and shows significant variation in crustal thickness. The thinnest, ˜15 km, crust is found around coastal regions, the thickest crust is beneath northwestern Vatnajokull where it reaches a thickness of 45 km. Within this thick crustal root is a vertical low velocity anomaly connecting the core of the mantle anomaly to horizontal low velocity regions that extend along the western and eastern volcanic zones but not the northern volcanic zone. These crustal low velocity zones are interpreted as regions through which melt is fed from the mantle to shallow magma chambers beneath the rift zones, where crustal formation occurs. The pipework between the core of the mantle anomaly and the southern rift zones is responsible for ˜30 km thick crust. Its absence to the north results in relatively thin, ˜20 km thick, crust.

  5. 3D Droplet velocities and sizes in the Ranque-Hilsch vortex tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liew, R.; Zeegers, J. C. H.; Kuerten, J. G. M.; Michalek, W. R.

    2012-11-01

    The Ranque-Hilsch vortex tube is a known device that is used to generate spot cooling. In this study, we experimentally investigate the behavior of small water droplets in the vortex tube by means of Phase Doppler Particle Analysis. In an experimental vortex tube, droplets were injected together with a carrier gas to form a fast rotating (up to 80.000 rpm) droplet-gas mixture. Droplet sizes, 3D velocity components, and turbulent properties were measured, showing high intensity isotropic turbulence in the core region. To investigate the cause of the high intensity turbulence, a frequency analysis was applied on the measured velocity. The frequency spectrum of the velocity is presented and indicates that wobbling of the vortex axis is the cause of the high turbulence intensity. It was expected that larger droplets have a higher radial velocity because of the larger centrifugal force. Results show, however, that small and lager droplets behave similar. This research is supported by the Dutch Technology Foundation STW, which is the applied science division of NWO, and the Technology Programme of the Ministry of Economic Affairs.

  6. Effects of 3D random correlated velocity perturbations on predicted ground motions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hartzell, S.; Harmsen, S.; Frankel, A.

    2010-01-01

    Three-dimensional, finite-difference simulations of a realistic finite-fault rupture on the southern Hayward fault are used to evaluate the effects of random, correlated velocity perturbations on predicted ground motions. Velocity perturbations are added to a three-dimensional (3D) regional seismic velocity model of the San Francisco Bay Area using a 3D von Karman random medium. Velocity correlation lengths of 5 and 10 km and standard deviations in the velocity of 5% and 10% are considered. The results show that significant deviations in predicted ground velocities are seen in the calculated frequency range (≤1 Hz) for standard deviations in velocity of 5% to 10%. These results have implications for the practical limits on the accuracy of scenario ground-motion calculations and on retrieval of source parameters using higher-frequency, strong-motion data.

  7. 3-D seismic velocity and attenuation structures in the geothermal field

    SciTech Connect

    Nugraha, Andri Dian; Syahputra, Ahmad; Fatkhan,; Sule, Rachmat

    2013-09-09

    We conducted delay time tomography to determine 3-D seismic velocity structures (Vp, Vs, and Vp/Vs ratio) using micro-seismic events in the geothermal field. The P-and S-wave arrival times of these micro-seismic events have been used as input for the tomographic inversion. Our preliminary seismic velocity results show that the subsurface condition of geothermal field can be fairly delineated the characteristic of reservoir. We then extended our understanding of the subsurface physical properties through determining of attenuation structures (Qp, Qs, and Qs/Qp ratio) using micro-seismic waveform. We combined seismic velocities and attenuation structures to get much better interpretation of the reservoir characteristic. Our preliminary attanuation structures results show reservoir characterization can be more clearly by using the 3-D attenuation model of Qp, Qs, and Qs/Qp ratio combined with 3-D seismic velocity model of Vp, Vs, and Vp/Vs ratio.

  8. Development of a 3D-AFM for true 3D measurements of nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Gaoliang; Häßler-Grohne, Wolfgang; Hüser, Dorothee; Wolff, Helmut; Danzebrink, Hans-Ulrich; Koenders, Ludger; Bosse, Harald

    2011-09-01

    The development of advanced lithography requires highly accurate 3D metrology methods for small line structures of both wafers and photomasks. Development of a new 3D atomic force microscopy (3D-AFM) with vertical and torsional oscillation modes is introduced in this paper. In its configuration, the AFM probe is oscillated using two piezo actuators driven at vertical and torsional resonance frequencies of the cantilever. In such a way, the AFM tip can probe the surface with a vertical and a lateral oscillation, offering high 3D probing sensitivity. In addition, a so-called vector approach probing (VAP) method has been applied. The sample is measured point-by-point using this method. At each probing point, the tip is approached towards the surface until the desired tip-sample interaction is detected and then immediately withdrawn from the surface. Compared to conventional AFMs, where the tip is kept continuously in interaction with the surface, the tip-sample interaction time using the VAP method is greatly reduced and consequently the tip wear is reduced. Preliminary experimental results show promising performance of the developed system. A measurement of a line structure of 800 nm height employing a super sharp AFM tip could be performed with a repeatability of its 3D profiles of better than 1 nm (p-v). A line structure of a Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt photomask with a nominal width of 300 nm has been measured using a flared tip AFM probe. The repeatability of the middle CD values reaches 0.28 nm (1σ). A long-term stability investigation shows that the 3D-AFM has a high stability of better than 1 nm within 197 measurements taken over 30 h, which also confirms the very low tip wear.

  9. Standardization of noncontact 3D measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takatsuji, Toshiyuki; Osawa, Sonko; Sato, Osamu

    2008-08-01

    As the global R&D competition is intensified, more speedy measurement instruments are required both in laboratories and production process. In machinery areas, while contact type coordinate measuring machines (CMM) have been widely used, noncontact type CMMs are growing its market share which are capable of measuring enormous number of points at once. Nevertheless, since no industrial standard concerning an accuracy test of noncontact CMMs exists, each manufacturer writes the accuracy of their product according to their own rules, and this situation gives confusion to customers. The working group ISO/TC 213/WG 10 is trying to make a new ISO standard which stipulates an accuracy test of noncontact CMMs. The concept and the situation of discussion of this new standard will be explained. In National Metrology Institute of Japan (NMIJ), we are collecting measurement data which serves as a technical background of the standards together with a consortium formed by users and manufactures. This activity will also be presented.

  10. Optical characterization and measurements of autostereoscopic 3D displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salmimaa, Marja; Järvenpää, Toni

    2008-04-01

    3D or autostereoscopic display technologies offer attractive solutions for enriching the multimedia experience. However, both characterization and comparison of 3D displays have been challenging when the definitions for the consistent measurement methods have been lacking and displays with similar specifications may appear quite different. Earlier we have investigated how the optical properties of autostereoscopic (3D) displays can be objectively measured and what are the main characteristics defining the perceived image quality. In this paper the discussion is extended to cover the viewing freedom (VF) and the definition for the optimum viewing distance (OVD) is elaborated. VF is the volume inside which the eyes have to be to see an acceptable 3D image. Characteristics limiting the VF space are proposed to be 3D crosstalk, luminance difference and color difference. Since the 3D crosstalk can be presumed to be dominating the quality of the end user experience and in our approach is forming the basis for the calculations of the other optical parameters, the reliability of the 3D crosstalk measurements is investigated. Furthermore the effect on the derived VF definition is evaluated. We have performed comparison 3D crosstalk measurements with different measurement device apertures and the effect of different measurement geometry on the results on actual 3D displays is reported.

  11. Waveform Simulations For TAIGER Data Sets From Taiwan 3D Reference Velocity And Moho Boundary Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, M.; Chen, H.; Zhao, L.

    2008-12-01

    Studying seismic waveform variations in space and time is an important issue to investigate structural heterogeneities and ground motion responses for seismic hazard mitigation. The available 3D reference velocity models from transmission tomography studies are mainly limited by depth resolution, refraction arrival picks without explicit considering later phases and the spatial distribution of earthquakes and stations. Seismic data collected from the TAIGER (TAiwan Integrated GEodynamics Research) project can provide a valuable opportunity for studying deep crust structures. Evaluation of 3D reference models and update their shallow velocity structure is presented through travel-time and waveforms studies. Even though a well-defined multi-scaled reference velocity model of Taiwan is being debated, existing models are still important to study the structural heterogeneities and path effects through parallel computation of 4th-order staggered grid FD 3D waveform simulation. Simulation utilizes both far-field point and finite-dimensional moment tensor sources to investigate effects on Moho reflections and lateral velocity variations. Constraints on Moho reference boundary obtained from receiver function studies is discussed and compared with data collected from TAIGER project. For controlled source experiments, synthetic simulations show clear and focused Moho reflections in the 3-C data. Simultaneous 3D simulation of all available seismic records provides unique constraints on reference velocity model known so far. The waveform simulation will provide a fundamental research platform for future full 3D waveform inversion.

  12. 3D-Measuring for Head Shape Covering Hair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Tsukasa; Hattori, Koosuke; Nomura, Takuya; Taguchi, Ryo; Hoguro, Masahiro; Umezaki, Taizo

    3D-Measuring is paid to attention because 3D-Display is making rapid spread. Especially, face and head are required to be measured because of necessary or contents production. However, it is a present problem that it is difficult to measure hair. Then, in this research, it is a purpose to measure face and hair with phase shift method. By using sine images arranged for hair measuring, the problems on hair measuring, dark color and reflection, are settled.

  13. Quasi-3D Waveform Inversion for Velocity Structures and Source Process Analyses Using its Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hikima, K.; Koketsu, K.

    2007-12-01

    In this study, we propose an efficient waveform inversion method for 2-D velocity structures and 3-D velocity structures are constructed by interpolating the results of the 2-D inversions. We apply these methods to a source process study of the 2003 Miyagi-ken Hokubu earthquake. We will first construct a velocity model, then determine the source processes of this earthquake sequence using the Green's function calculated with the resultant 3-D velocity model. We formulate the inversion procedure in a 2-D cross section. In a 2-D problem, an earthquake is forced to be a line source. Therefore, we introduce approximate transformation from a line source to a point source (Vidale and Helmberger, 1987). We use the 2-D velocity-stress staggered-grid finite difference scheme, so that the source representation is somewhat different from the original 'source box method' and we apply additional corrections to calculated waveforms. The boundary shapes of layers are expressed by connected nodes and we invert observed waveforms for layer thicknesses at the nodes. We perform 2-D velocity inversions along cross sections which involve a medium-size earthquake and observation points. We assemble the results for many stations and interpolated them to construct the 3-D velocity model. Finally, we calculate waveforms from the target earthquake by the 3-D finite difference method with this velocity model to confirm the validity of the model. We next perform waveform inversions for source processes of the 2003 Miyagi-ken Hokubu earthquake sequence using the resultant 3-D velocity model. We divide the fault plane into northern and southern subplanes, so that the southern subplane includes the hypocenter of the mainshock and the largest foreshock. The strike directions of the northern and southern subplanes were N-S and NE-SW, respectively. The Green's functions for these source inversions are calculated using the reciprocal theorem. We determine the slip models using the 3- D structure and

  14. Finite-Source Inversion for the 2004 Parkfield Earthquake using 3D Velocity Model Green's Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, A.; Dreger, D.; Larsen, S.

    2008-12-01

    We determine finite fault models of the 2004 Parkfield earthquake using 3D Green's functions. Because of the dense station coverage and detailed 3D velocity structure model in this region, this earthquake provides an excellent opportunity to examine how the 3D velocity structure affects the finite fault inverse solutions. Various studies (e.g. Michaels and Eberhart-Phillips, 1991; Thurber et al., 2006) indicate that there is a pronounced velocity contrast across the San Andreas Fault along the Parkfield segment. Also the fault zone at Parkfield is wide as evidenced by mapped surface faults and where surface slip and creep occurred in the 1966 and the 2004 Parkfield earthquakes. For high resolution images of the rupture process"Ait is necessary to include the accurate 3D velocity structure for the finite source inversion. Liu and Aurchuleta (2004) performed finite fault inversions using both 1D and 3D Green's functions for 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake using the same source paramerization and data but different Green's functions and found that the models were quite different. This indicates that the choice of the velocity model significantly affects the waveform modeling at near-fault stations. In this study, we used the P-wave velocity model developed by Thurber et al (2006) to construct the 3D Green's functions. P-wave speeds are converted to S-wave speeds and density using by the empirical relationships of Brocher (2005). Using a finite difference method, E3D (Larsen and Schultz, 1995), we computed the 3D Green's functions numerically by inserting body forces at each station. Using reciprocity, these Green's functions are recombined to represent the ground motion at each station due to the slip on the fault plane. First we modeled the waveforms of small earthquakes to validate the 3D velocity model and the reciprocity of the Green"fs function. In the numerical tests we found that the 3D velocity model predicted the individual phases well at frequencies lower than 0

  15. Towards 3C-3D digital holographic fluid velocity vector field measurement—tomographic digital holographic PIV (Tomo-HPIV)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soria, J.; Atkinson, C.

    2008-07-01

    Most unsteady and/or turbulent flows of geophysical and engineering interest have a highly three-dimensional (3D) complex topology and their experimental investigation is in pressing need of quantitative velocity measurement methods that are robust and can provide instantaneous 3C-3D velocity field data over a significant volumetric domain of the flow. This paper introduces and demonstrates a new method that uses multiple digital CCD array cameras to record in-line digital holograms of the same volume of seed particles from multiple orientations. This technique uses the same basic equipment as Tomo-PIV minus the camera lenses, it overcomes the depth-of-field problem of digital in-line holography and does not require the complex optical calibration of Tomo-PIV. The digital sensors can be oriented in an optimal manner to overcome the depth-of-field limitation of in-line holograms recorded using digital CCD or CMOS array cameras, resulting in a 3D reconstruction of the seed particles within the volume of interest, which can subsequently be analysed using 3D cross-correlation PIV analysis to yield a 3C-3D velocity field. A demonstration experiment of Tomo-HPIV using uniform translation with nominally 11 µm diameter seed particles shows that the 3D displacement derived from 3D cross-correlation Tomo-HPIV analysis can be measured within 5% of the imposed uniform translation, where the imposed uniform translation has an estimated standard uncertainty of 4.3%. So this paper proposes a multi-camera digital holographic imaging 3C-3D PIV method, which is identified as tomographic digital holographic PIV or Tomo-HPIV.

  16. 3D morphological measurement of whole slide histological vasculature reconstructions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yiwen; Pickering, J. G.; Nong, Zengxuan; Ward, Aaron D.

    2016-03-01

    Properties of the microvasculature that contribute to tissue perfusion can be assessed using immunohistochemistry on 2D histology sections. However, the vasculature is inherently 3D and the ability to measure and visualize the vessel wall components in 3D will aid in detecting focal pathologies. Our objectives were (1) to develop a method for 3D measurement and visualization of microvasculature in 3D, (2) to compare the normal and regenerated post-ischemia mouse hind limb microvasculature, and (3) to compare the 2D and 3D vessel morphology measures. Vessels were stained for smooth muscle using 3,3'-Diaminobenzidine (DAB) immunostain for both normal (n = 6 mice) and regenerated vasculature (n = 5 mice). 2D vessel segmentations were reconstructed into 3D using landmark based registration. No substantial bias was found in the 2D measurements relative to 3D, but larger differences were observed for individual vessels oriented non-orthogonally to the plane of sectioning. A larger value of area, perimeter, and vessel wall thickness was found in the normal vasculature as compared to the regenerated vasculature, for both the 2D and 3D measurements (p < 0.01). Aggregated 2D measurements are sufficient for identifying morphological differences between groups of mice; however, one must interpret individual 2D measurements with caution if the vessel centerline direction is unknown. Visualization of 3D measurements permits the detection of localized vessel morphology aberrations that are not revealed by 2D measurements. With vascular measure visualization methodologies in 3D, we are now capable of locating focal pathologies on a whole slide level.

  17. a Fast Method for Measuring the Similarity Between 3d Model and 3d Point Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zongliang; Li, Jonathan; Li, Xin; Lin, Yangbin; Zhang, Shanxin; Wang, Cheng

    2016-06-01

    This paper proposes a fast method for measuring the partial Similarity between 3D Model and 3D point Cloud (SimMC). It is crucial to measure SimMC for many point cloud-related applications such as 3D object retrieval and inverse procedural modelling. In our proposed method, the surface area of model and the Distance from Model to point Cloud (DistMC) are exploited as measurements to calculate SimMC. Here, DistMC is defined as the weighted distance of the distances between points sampled from model and point cloud. Similarly, Distance from point Cloud to Model (DistCM) is defined as the average distance of the distances between points in point cloud and model. In order to reduce huge computational burdens brought by calculation of DistCM in some traditional methods, we define SimMC as the ratio of weighted surface area of model to DistMC. Compared to those traditional SimMC measuring methods that are only able to measure global similarity, our method is capable of measuring partial similarity by employing distance-weighted strategy. Moreover, our method is able to be faster than other partial similarity assessment methods. We demonstrate the superiority of our method both on synthetic data and laser scanning data.

  18. Assessment of Altered 3D Blood Characteristics in Aortic Disease by Velocity Distribution Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Julio; Barker, Alex J; van Ooij, Pim; Schnell, Susanne; Puthumana, Jyothy; Bonow, Robert O; Collins, Jeremy D; Carr, James C; Markl, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To test the feasibility of velocity distribution analysis for identifying altered 3D flow characteristics in patients with aortic disease based on 4D flow MRI volumetric analysis. Methods Forty patients with aortic (Ao) dilation (mid ascending aortic diameter MAA=40±7 mm, age=56±17 yr, 11 females) underwent cardiovascular MRI. Four groups were retrospectively defined: mild Ao dilation (n=10, MAA<35 mm); moderate Ao dilation (n=10, 3545 mm); Ao dilation+aortic stenosis AS (n=10, MAA>35 mm and peak velocity >2.5m/s). 3D PC-MR angiograms were computed and used to obtain a 3D segmentation of the aorta which was divided into four segments: root, ascending aorta, arch, descending aorta. Radial chart displays were used to visualize multiple parameters representing segmental changes in the 3D velocity distribution associated with aortic disease. Results Changes in the velocity field and geometry between cohorts resulted in distinct hemodynamic patterns for each aortic segment. Disease progression from mild to Ao dilation+AS resulted in significant differences (P<0.05) in flow parameters across cohorts and increased radial chart size for root and ascending aorta segments by 146% and 99%, respectively. Conclusion Volumetric 4D velocity distribution analysis has the potential to identify characteristic changes in regional blood flow patterns in patients with aortic disease. PMID:25252029

  19. 3D P-Wave Velocity Structure of the Deep Galicia Rifted Margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayrakci, G.; Minshull, T. A.; Davy, R. G.; Sawyer, D. S.; Klaeschen, D.; Papenberg, C. A.; Reston, T. J.; Shillington, D. J.; Ranero, C. R.

    2014-12-01

    The combined wide-angle reflection-refraction and multi-channel seismic (MCS) experiment, Galicia 3D, was carried out in 2013 at the Galicia rifted margin in the northeast Atlantic Ocean, west of Spain. The main geological features within the 64 by 20 km (1280 km²) 3D box investigated by the survey are the peridotite ridge (PR), the fault bounded, rotated basement blocks and the S reflector, which has been interpreted to be a low angle detachment fault. 44 short period four-component ocean bottom seismometers and 28 ocean bottom hydrophones were deployed in the 3D box. 3D MCS profiles sampling the whole box were acquired with two airgun arrays of 3300 cu.in. fired alternately every 37.5 m. We present the results from 3D first-arrival time tomography that constrains the P-wave velocity in the 3D box, for the entire depth sampled by reflection data. Results are validated by synthetic tests and by the comparison with Galicia 3D MCS lines. The main outcomes are as follows: 1- The 3.5 km/s iso-velocity contour mimics the top of the acoustic basement observed on MCS profiles. Block bounding faults are imaged as velocity contrasts and basement blocks exhibit 3D topographic variations. 2- On the southern profiles, the top of the PR rises up to 5.5 km depth whereas, 20 km northward, its basement expression (at 6.5 km depth) nearly disappears. 3- The 6.5 km/s iso-velocity contour matches the topography of the S reflector where the latter is visible on MCS profiles. Within a depth interval of 0.6 km (in average), velocities beneath the S reflector increase from 6.5 km/s to 7 km/s, which would correspond to a decrease in the degree of serpentinization from ~45 % to ~30 % if these velocity variations are caused solely by variations in hydration. At the intersections between the block bounding normal faults and the S reflector, this decrease happens over a larger depth interval (> 1 km), suggesting that faults act as conduit for the water flow in the upper mantle.

  20. 3D P-Wave Velocity Structure of the Deep Galicia Rifted Margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayrakci, Gaye; Minshull, Timothy; Davy, Richard; Sawyer, Dale; Klaeschen, Dirk; Papenberg, Cord; Reston, Timothy; Shillington, Donna; Ranero, Cesar

    2015-04-01

    The combined wide-angle reflection-refraction and multi-channel seismic (MCS) experiment, Galicia 3D, was carried out in 2013 at the Galicia rifted margin in the northeast Atlantic Ocean, west of Spain. The main geological features within the 64 by 20 km (1280 km²) 3D box investigated by the survey are the peridotite ridge (PR), the fault bounded, rotated basement blocks and the S reflector, which has been interpreted to be a low angle detachment fault. 44 short period four-component ocean bottom seismometers and 28 ocean bottom hydrophones were deployed in the 3D box. 3D MCS profiles sampling the whole box were acquired with two airgun arrays of 3300 cu.in. fired alternately every 37.5 m. We present the results from 3D first-arrival time tomography that constrains the P-wave velocity in the 3D box, for the entire depth sampled by reflection data. Results are validated by synthetic tests and by the comparison with Galicia 3D MCS lines. The main outcomes are as follows: 1- The 3.5 km/s iso-velocity contour mimics the top of the acoustic basement observed on MCS profiles. Block bounding faults are imaged as velocity contrasts and basement blocks exhibit 3D topographic variations. 2- On the southern profiles, the top of the PR rises up to 5.5 km depth whereas, 20 km northward, its basement expression (at 6.5 km depth) nearly disappears. 3- The 6.5 km/s iso-velocity contour matches the topography of the S reflector where the latter is visible on MCS profiles. Within a depth interval of 0.6 km (in average), velocities beneath the S reflector increase from 6.5 km/s to 7 km/s, which would correspond to a decrease in the degree of serpentinization from ~45 % to ~30 % if these velocity variations are caused solely by variations in hydration. At the intersections between the block bounding normal faults and the S reflector, this decrease happens over a larger depth interval (> 1 km), suggesting that faults act as conduit for the water flow in the upper mantle.

  1. Coronal Outflow Velocities in a 3D Coronal Model Determined from UVCS Doppler Dimming Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strachan, L.; Panasyuk, A. V.; Dobrzycka, D.; Gibson, S.; Biesecker, D. A.; Ko, Y.-K.; Galvin, A. B.; Romoli, M.; Kohn, J. L.

    1998-04-01

    We constrain coronal outflow velocity solutions, resolved along the line-of-sight, by using Doppler dimming models of H I Lyman alpha and O VI 1032/1037 Angstrom emissivities obtained with data from the Ultraviolet Coronagraph Spectrometer (UVCS) on SOHO. The local emissivities, from heliocentric heights of 1.5 to 3.0 radii, were determined from 3-D reconstructions of line-of-sight intensities obtained during the Whole Sun Month Campaign (10 Aug. -- 8 Sep. 1996). The models use electron densities derived from polarized brightness measurements made with the visible light coronagraphs on UVCS and LASCO, supplemented with data from Mark III at NCAR/MLSO. Electron temperature profiles are derived from `freezing-in' temperatures obtained from an analysis of charge state data from SWICS/Ulysses. The work concentrates on O5+ outflow velocities which are determined from an analysis of the the O VI line ratios. This analysis is less sensitive to the uncertainties in the electron density and independent of the ionization balance and elemental abundance than the analyses which use individual spectral lines. This work is supported in part by NASA under grant NAG-3192 to the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, by the Italian Space Agency and by Swiss funding agencies.

  2. Using Adjoint Methods to Improve 3-D Velocity Models of Southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Q.; Tape, C.; Maggi, A.; Tromp, J.

    2006-12-01

    We use adjoint methods popular in climate and ocean dynamics to calculate Fréchet derivatives for tomographic inversions in southern California. The Fréchet derivative of an objective function χ(m), where m denotes the Earth model, may be written in the generic form δχ=int Km(x) δln m(x) d3x, where δln m=δ m/m denotes the relative model perturbation. For illustrative purposes, we construct the 3-D finite-frequency banana-doughnut kernel Km, corresponding to the misfit of a single traveltime measurement, by simultaneously computing the 'adjoint' wave field s† forward in time and reconstructing the regular wave field s backward in time. The adjoint wave field is produced by using the time-reversed velocity at the receiver as a fictitious source, while the regular wave field is reconstructed on the fly by propagating the last frame of the wave field saved by a previous forward simulation backward in time. The approach is based upon the spectral-element method, and only two simulations are needed to produce density, shear-wave, and compressional-wave sensitivity kernels. This method is applied to the SCEC southern California velocity model. Various density, shear-wave, and compressional-wave sensitivity kernels are presented for different phases in the seismograms. We also generate 'event' kernels for Pnl, S and surface waves, which are the Fréchet kernels of misfit functions that measure the P, S or surface wave traveltime residuals at all the receivers simultaneously for one particular event. Effectively, an event kernel is a sum of weighted Fréchet kernels, with weights determined by the associated traveltime anomalies. By the nature of the 3-D simulation, every event kernel is also computed based upon just two simulations, i.e., its construction costs the same amount of computation time as an individual banana-doughnut kernel. One can think of the sum of the event kernels for all available earthquakes, called the 'misfit' kernel, as a graphical

  3. 3D LDV Measurements in Oscillatory Boundary Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mier, J. M.; Garcia, M. H.

    2012-12-01

    The oscillatory boundary layer represents a particular case of unsteady wall-bounded flows in which fluid particles follow a periodic sinusoidal motion. Unlike steady boundary layer flows, the oscillatory flow regime and bed roughness character change in time along the period for every cycle, a characteristic that introduces a high degree of complexity in the analysis of these flows. Governing equations can be derived from the general Navier-Stokes equations for the motion of fluids, from which the exact solution for the laminar oscillatory boundary layer is obtained (also known as the 2nd Stokes problem). No exact solution exists for the turbulent case, thus, understanding of the main flow characteristics comes from experimental work. Several researchers have reported experimental work in oscillatory boundary layers since the 1960's; however, larger scale facilities and the development of newer measurement techniques with improved temporal and spatial resolution in recent years provides a unique opportunity to achieve a better understanding about this type of flows. Several experiments were performed in the Large Oscillatory Water and Sediment Tunnel (LOWST) facility at the Ven Te Chow Hydrosystems Laboratory, for a range of Reynolds wave numbers between 6x10^4 < Rew < 6x10^6 over a flat and smooth bottom. A 3D Laser Doppler Velocimetry (LDV) system was used to measure instantaneous flow velocities with a temporal resolution up to ~ 1,000 Hz. It was mounted on a 3-axis traverse with a spatial resolution of 0.01 mm in all three directions. The closest point to the bottom was measured at z = 0.2 mm (z+ ≈ 4), which allowed to capture boundary layer features with great detail. In order to achieve true 3D measurements, 2 probes were used on a perpendicular configuration, such that u and w components were measured from a probe on the side of the flume and v component was measured from a probe pointing down through and access window on top of the flume. The top probe

  4. Accommodation response measurements for integral 3D image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiura, H.; Mishina, T.; Arai, J.; Iwadate, Y.

    2014-03-01

    We measured accommodation responses under integral photography (IP), binocular stereoscopic, and real object display conditions, and viewing conditions of binocular and monocular viewing conditions. The equipment we used was an optometric device and a 3D display. We developed the 3D display for IP and binocular stereoscopic images that comprises a high-resolution liquid crystal display (LCD) and a high-density lens array. The LCD has a resolution of 468 dpi and a diagonal size of 4.8 inches. The high-density lens array comprises 106 x 69 micro lenses that have a focal length of 3 mm and diameter of 1 mm. The lenses are arranged in a honeycomb pattern. The 3D display was positioned 60 cm from an observer under IP and binocular stereoscopic display conditions. The target was presented at eight depth positions relative to the 3D display: 15, 10, and 5 cm in front of the 3D display, on the 3D display panel, and 5, 10, 15 and 30 cm behind the 3D display under the IP and binocular stereoscopic display conditions. Under the real object display condition, the target was displayed on the 3D display panel, and the 3D display was placed at the eight positions. The results suggest that the IP image induced more natural accommodation responses compared to the binocular stereoscopic image. The accommodation responses of the IP image were weaker than those of a real object; however, they showed a similar tendency with those of the real object under the two viewing conditions. Therefore, IP can induce accommodation to the depth positions of 3D images.

  5. UCVM: Open Source Software for Understanding and Delivering 3D Velocity Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gill, D.; Small, P.; Maechling, P. J.; Jordan, T. H.; Shaw, J. H.; Plesch, A.; Chen, P.; Lee, E. J.; Taborda, R.; Olsen, K. B.; Callaghan, S.

    2014-12-01

    Physics-based ground motion simulations can calculate the propagation of earthquake waves through 3D velocity models of the Earth. The Southern California Earthquake Center (SCEC) has developed the Unified Community Velocity Model (UCVM) framework to help researchers build structured or unstructured velocity meshes from 3D velocity models for use in wave propagation simulations. The UCVM software framework makes it easy to extract P and S wave propagation speeds and other material properties from 3D velocity models by providing a common interface through which researchers can query earth models for a given location and depth. Currently, the platform supports multiple California models, including SCEC CVM-S4 and CVM-H 11.9.1, and has been designed to support models from any region on earth. UCVM is currently being use to generate velocity meshes for many SCEC wave propagation codes, including AWP-ODC-SGT and Hercules. In this presentation, we describe improvements to the UCVM software. The current version, UCVM 14.3.0, released in March of 2014, supports the newest Southern California velocity model, CVM-S4.26, which was derived from 26 full-3D tomographic iterations using CVM-S4 as the starting model (Lee et al., this meeting), and the Broadband 1D velocity model used in the CyberShake 14.2 study. We have ported UCVM to multiple Linux distributions and OS X. Also included in this release is the ability to add small-scale stochastic heterogeneities to extract Cartesian meshes for use in high-frequency ground motion simulations. This tool was built using the C language open-source FFT library, FFTW. The stochastic parameters (Hurst exponent, correlation length, and the horizontal/vertical aspect ratio) can be customized by the user. UCVM v14.3.0 also provides visualization scripts for constructing cross-sections, horizontal slices, basin depths, and Vs30 maps. The interface allows researchers to visually review velocity models . Also, UCVM v14.3.0 can extract

  6. Trapezoidal phase-shifting method for 3D shape measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Peisen S.; Zhang, Song; Chiang, Fu-Pen

    2004-12-01

    We propose a novel structured light method, namely trapezoidal phase-shifting method, for 3-D shape measurement. This method uses three patterns coded with phase-shifted, trapezoidal-shaped gray levels. The 3-D information of the object is extracted by direct calculation of an intensity ratio. Theoretical analysis showed that this new method was significantly less sensitive to the defocusing effect of the captured images when compared to the traditional intensity-ratio based methods. This important advantage makes large-depth 3-D shape measurement possible. If compared to the sinusoidal phase-shifting method, the resolution is similar, but the processing speed is at least 4.5 times faster. The feasibility of this method was demonstrated in a previously developed real-time 3-D shape measurement system. The reconstructed 3-D results showed similar quality as those obtained by the sinusoidal phase-shifting method. However, since the processing speed was much faster, we were able to not only acquire the images in real time, but also reconstruct the 3-D shapes in real time (40 fps at a resolution of 532 x 500 pixels). This real-time capability allows us to measure dynamically changing objects, such as human faces. The potential applications of this new method include industrial inspection, reverse engineering, robotic vision, computer graphics, medical diagnosis, etc.

  7. UCVM: An Open Source Software Package for Querying and Visualizing 3D Velocity Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gill, D.; Small, P.; Maechling, P. J.; Jordan, T. H.; Shaw, J. H.; Plesch, A.; Chen, P.; Lee, E. J.; Taborda, R.; Olsen, K. B.; Callaghan, S.

    2015-12-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) seismic velocity models provide foundational data for ground motion simulations that calculate the propagation of earthquake waves through the Earth. The Southern California Earthquake Center (SCEC) has developed the Unified Community Velocity Model (UCVM) package for both Linux and OS X. This unique framework provides a cohesive way for querying and visualizing 3D models. UCVM v14.3.0, supports many Southern California velocity models including CVM-S4, CVM-H 11.9.1, and CVM-S4.26. The last model was derived from 26 full-3D tomographic iterations on CVM-S4. Recently, UCVM has been used to deliver a prototype of a new 3D model of central California (CCA) also based on full-3D tomographic inversions. UCVM was used to provide initial plots of this model and will be used to deliver CCA to users when the model is publicly released. Visualizing models is also possible with UCVM. Integrated within the platform are plotting utilities that can generate 2D cross-sections, horizontal slices, and basin depth maps. UCVM can also export models in NetCDF format for easy import into IDV and ParaView. UCVM has also been prototyped to export models that are compatible with IRIS' new Earth Model Collaboration (EMC) visualization utility. This capability allows for user-specified horizontal slices and cross-sections to be plotted in the same 3D Earth space. UCVM was designed to help a wide variety of researchers. It is currently being use to generate velocity meshes for many SCEC wave propagation codes, including AWP-ODC-SGT and Hercules. It is also used to provide the initial input to SCEC's CyberShake platform. For those interested in specific data points, the software framework makes it easy to extract P and S wave propagation speeds and other material properties from 3D velocity models by providing a common interface through which researchers can query earth models for a given location and depth. Also included in the last release was the ability to add small

  8. Energy cost and body centre of mass' 3D intracycle velocity variation in swimming.

    PubMed

    Figueiredo, Pedro; Barbosa, Tiago M; Vilas-Boas, João Paulo; Fernandes, Ricardo J

    2012-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between the energy cost (C) and the 3D intracycle velocity variation (IVV; swimming direction--x, vertical--y and lateral--z axes) throughout the 200 m front crawl event. Ten international level swimmers performed a maximal 200 m front crawl swim followed by 50, 100 and 150 m bouts at the same pace as in the 200 m splits. Oxygen consumption was measured during the bouts and blood samples were collected before and after each one. The C was calculated for each 50 m lap as the ratio of the total energy expenditure (three energy pathways) to the distance. A respiratory snorkel and valve system with low hydrodynamic resistance was used to measure pulmonary ventilation and to collect breathing air samples. Two above water and four underwater cameras videotaped the swim bouts and thereafter APAS was used to assess the centre of mass IVV (x, y and z components). The increase in the C was significantly associated with the increase in the IVV in x for the first 50 m lap (R = -0.83, P < 0.01). It is concluded that the IVV relationship with C in a competitive event does not present the direct relationship found in the literature, revealing a great specificity, which suggests that the relation between these two parameters could not be used as a performance predictor in competitive events. PMID:22262010

  9. Energy cost and body centre of mass' 3D intracycle velocity variation in swimming.

    PubMed

    Figueiredo, Pedro; Barbosa, Tiago M; Vilas-Boas, João Paulo; Fernandes, Ricardo J

    2012-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between the energy cost (C) and the 3D intracycle velocity variation (IVV; swimming direction--x, vertical--y and lateral--z axes) throughout the 200 m front crawl event. Ten international level swimmers performed a maximal 200 m front crawl swim followed by 50, 100 and 150 m bouts at the same pace as in the 200 m splits. Oxygen consumption was measured during the bouts and blood samples were collected before and after each one. The C was calculated for each 50 m lap as the ratio of the total energy expenditure (three energy pathways) to the distance. A respiratory snorkel and valve system with low hydrodynamic resistance was used to measure pulmonary ventilation and to collect breathing air samples. Two above water and four underwater cameras videotaped the swim bouts and thereafter APAS was used to assess the centre of mass IVV (x, y and z components). The increase in the C was significantly associated with the increase in the IVV in x for the first 50 m lap (R = -0.83, P < 0.01). It is concluded that the IVV relationship with C in a competitive event does not present the direct relationship found in the literature, revealing a great specificity, which suggests that the relation between these two parameters could not be used as a performance predictor in competitive events.

  10. Holographic particle velocimetry - A 3D measurement technique for vortex interactions, coherent structures and turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Hui; Hussain, Fazle

    1991-10-01

    To understand the topology and dynamics of coherent structures (CS), the interactions of CS with fine-scale turbulence, and the effects of CS on entrainment, mixing and combustion, experimental tools are needed that can measure velocity (preferably vorticity) vector fields in both 3D space and time. While traditional measurement techniques are not able to serve this purpose, holographic particle velocimetry (HPV) appears to be promising. In a demonstration experiment, the instantaneous 3D velocity vector fields in some simple vortical flows have been obtained using the HPV technique. In this preliminary report, the principles of the HPV technique are illustrated and the key issues in its implementation are discussed.

  11. Locating earthquakes in west Texas oil fields using 3-D anisotropic velocity models

    SciTech Connect

    Hua, Fa; Doser, D.; Baker, M. . Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1993-02-01

    Earthquakes within the War-Wink gas field, Ward County, Texas, that have been located with a 1-D velocity model occur near the edges and top of a naturally occurring overpressured zone. Because the War-Wink field is a structurally controlled anticline with significant velocity anisotropy associated with the overpressured zone and finely layered evaporites, the authors have attempted to re-locate earthquakes using a 3-D anisotropic velocity model. Preliminary results with this model give the unsatisfactory result that many earthquakes previously located at the top of the overpressured zone (3-3.5 km) moved into the evaporites (1-1.5 km) above the field. They believe that this result could be caused by: (1) aliasing the velocity model; or (2) problems in determining the correct location minima when several minima exist. They are currently attempting to determine which of these causes is more likely for the unsatisfactory result observed.

  12. UCVM: An Open Source Framework for 3D Velocity Model Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gill, D.; Maechling, P. J.; Jordan, T. H.; Plesch, A.; Taborda, R.; Callaghan, S.; Small, P.

    2013-12-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) seismic velocity models provide fundamental input data to ground motion simulations, in the form of structured or unstructured meshes or grids. Numerous models are available for California, as well as for other parts of the United States and Europe, but models do not share a common interface. Being able to interact with these models in a standardized way is critical in order to configure and run 3D ground motion simulations. The Unified Community Velocity Model (UCVM) software, developed by researchers at the Southern California Earthquake Center (SCEC), is an open source framework designed to provide a cohesive way to interact with seismic velocity models. We describe the several ways in which we have improved the UCVM software over the last year. We have simplified the UCVM installation process by automating the installation of various community codebases, improving the ease of use.. We discuss how UCVM software was used to build velocity meshes for high-frequency (4Hz) deterministic 3D wave propagation simulations, and how the UCVM framework interacts with other open source resources, such as NetCDF file formats for visualization. The UCVM software uses a layered software architecture that transparently converts geographic coordinates to the coordinate systems used by the underlying velocity models and supports inclusion of a configurable near-surface geotechnical layer, while interacting with the velocity model codes through their existing software interfaces. No changes to the velocity model codes are required. Our recent UCVM installation improvements bundle UCVM with a setup script, written in Python, which guides users through the process that installs the UCVM software along with all the user-selectable velocity models. Each velocity model is converted into a standardized (configure, make, make install) format that is easily downloaded and installed via the script. UCVM is often run in specialized high performance computing (HPC

  13. A 3-D measurement system using object-oriented FORTH

    SciTech Connect

    Butterfield, K.B.

    1989-01-01

    Discussed is a system for storing 3-D measurements of points that relates the coordinate system of the measurement device to the global coordinate system. The program described here used object-oriented FORTH to store the measured points as sons of the measuring device location. Conversion of local coordinates to absolute coordinates is performed by passing messages to the point objects. Modifications to the object-oriented FORTH system are also described. 1 ref.

  14. 3-D measuring of engine camshaft based on machine vision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Jianxin; Tan, Liang; Xu, Xiaodong

    2008-12-01

    The non-touch 3D measuring based on machine vision is introduced into camshaft precise measuring. Currently, because CCD 3-dimensional measuring can't meet requirements for camshaft's measuring precision, it's necessary to improve its measuring precision. In this paper, we put forward a method to improve the measuring method. A Multi-Character Match method based on the Polygonal Non-regular model is advanced with the theory of Corner Extraction and Corner Matching .This method has solved the problem of the matching difficulty and a low precision. In the measuring process, the use of the Coded marked Point method and Self-Character Match method can bring on this problem. The 3D measuring experiment on camshaft, which based on the Multi-Character Match method of the Polygonal Non-regular model, proves that the normal average measuring precision is increased to a new level less than 0.04mm in the point-clouds photo merge. This measuring method can effectively increase the 3D measuring precision of the binocular CCD.

  15. Tangential velocity measurement using interferometric MTI radar

    DOEpatents

    Doerry, Armin W.; Mileshosky, Brian P.; Bickel, Douglas L.

    2006-01-03

    Radar systems use time delay measurements between a transmitted signal and its echo to calculate range to a target. Ranges that change with time cause a Doppler offset in phase and frequency of the echo. Consequently, the closing velocity between target and radar can be measured by measuring the Doppler offset of the echo. The closing velocity is also known as radial velocity, or line-of-sight velocity. Doppler frequency is measured in a pulse-Doppler radar as a linear phase shift over a set of radar pulses during some Coherent Processing Interval (CPI). An Interferometric Moving Target Indicator (MTI) radar can be used to measure the tangential velocity component of a moving target. Multiple baselines, along with the conventional radial velocity measurement, allow estimating the true 3-D velocity of a target.

  16. 3D measuring in the field of endoscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schick, Anton; Forster, Frank; Stockmann, Michael

    2011-05-01

    Industrial optical 3D-measurement techniques are well established to achieve quality targets in production and manufacturing. However measurements inside of objects, especially small ones, are still a challenge since there is no easy access for measurement tools. Inspection tools like endoscopes, which provide a 2D-view or a stereoscopic view of inner surfaces, are commercially available and widely used. Nevertheless, there is no technique for precisely measuring the inner surface geometry of a small hollow object. Especially medical applications would greatly benefit from "dimensional" measuring. Thus a novel approach and a corresponding prototype of a miniaturized endoscopic 3D-scanner are presented. To be suited even for very narrow objects, the prototype has a maximum diameter of 3.6 mm, its flexible design allows for access to bent tubes or canals. The 3D scanning approach is based on the principle of active triangulation, which means that a coded light pattern is projected and then viewed under a different angle. It is usually difficult to realize triangulation setups in a small embodiment. Therefore an optical tandem of a miniaturized pattern projector and a small camera with a resolution of 400 x 400 pixel is presented as a practical solution. The projector projects a pattern of 15 rings of distinct colors into a cylindrical measurement space where the color sequence constitutes a code. The camera uses a catadioptric setup with a spherical mirror to enhance its field of view. It detects the projected rings and is then able to unambiguously reconstruct the 3D-shape of a surface using ray-cone intersection. This so called color coding approach provides several advantages. For example, only a static projection pattern is needed, which greatly reduces complexity and size of the projector compared to phase shifting technologies. Experimental 3D-scans of arbitrarily shaped tubes demonstrate good performance and an accuracy of about 0.1mm.

  17. Measurement system for 3-D foot coordinates and parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Guozhong; Li, Yunhui; Wang, Boxiong; Shi, Hui; Luo, Xiuzhi

    2008-12-01

    The 3-D foot-shape measurement system based on laser-line-scanning principle and the model of the measurement system were presented. Errors caused by nonlinearity of CCD cameras and caused by installation can be eliminated by using the global calibration method for CCD cameras, which based on nonlinear coordinate mapping function and the optimized method. A local foot coordinate system is defined with the Pternion and the Acropodion extracted from the boundaries of foot projections. The characteristic points can thus be located and foot parameters be extracted automatically by the local foot coordinate system and the related sections. Foot measurements for about 200 participants were conducted and the measurement results for male and female participants were presented. 3-D foot coordinates and parameters measurement makes it possible to realize custom-made shoe-making and shows great prosperity in shoe design, foot orthopaedic treatment, shoe size standardization, and establishment of a feet database for consumers.

  18. 3D velocity structure of upper crust beneath NW Bohemia/Vogtland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Javad Fallahi, Mohammad; Mousavi, Sima; Korn, Michael; Sens-Schönfelder, Christoph; Bauer, Klaus; Rößler, Dirk

    2013-04-01

    The 3D structure of the upper crust beneath west Bohemia/Vogtland region, analyzed with travel time tomography and ambient noise surface wave tomography using existing data. This region is characterized by a series of phenomena like occurrence of repeated earthquake swarms, surface exhalation, CO2 enriched fluids, mofettes, mineral springs and enhanced heat flow, and has been proposed as an excellent location for an ICDP drilling project targeted to a better understanding of the crust in an active magmatic environment. We performed a 3D tomography using P-and S-wave travel times of local earthquakes and explosions. The data set were taken from permanent and temporary seismic networks in Germany and Czech Republic from 2000 to 2010, as well as active seismic experiments like Celebration 2000 and quarry blasts. After picking P and S wave arrival times, 399 events which were recorded by 9 or more stations and azimuthal gap<160° were selected for inversion. A simultaneous inversion of P and S wave 1D velocity models together with relocations of hypocenters and station corrections was performed. The obtained minimum 1D velocity model was used as starting model for the 3D Vp and Vp/Vs velocity models. P and S wave travel time tomography employs damped least-square method and ray tracing by pseudo-bending algorithm. For model parametrization different cell node spacings have been tested to evaluate the resolution in each node. Synthetic checkerboard tests have been done to check the structural resolution. Then Vp and Vp/Vs in the preferred 3D grid model have been determined. Earthquakes locations in iteration process change till the hypocenter adjustments and travel time residuals become smaller than the defined threshold criteria. Finally the analysis of the resolution depicts the well resolved features for interpretation. We observed lower Vp/Vs ratio in depth of 5-10 km close to the foci of earthquake swarms and higher Vp/Vs ratio is observed in Saxoturingian zone and

  19. Direct ambient noise tomography for 3-D near surface shear velocity structure: methodology and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, H.; Fang, H.; Li, C.; Liu, Y.; Zhang, H.; van der Hilst, R. D.; Huang, Y. C.

    2014-12-01

    Ambient noise tomography has provided essential constraints on crustal and uppermost mantle shear velocity structure in global seismology. Recent studies demonstrate that high frequency (e.g., ~ 1 Hz) surface waves between receivers at short distances can be successfully retrieved from ambient noise cross-correlation and then be used for imaging near surface or shallow crustal shear velocity structures. This approach provides important information for strong ground motion prediction in seismically active area and overburden structure characterization in oil and gas fields. Here we propose a new tomographic method to invert all surface wave dispersion data for 3-D variations of shear wavespeed without the intermediate step of phase or group velocity maps.The method uses frequency-dependent propagation paths and a wavelet-based sparsity-constrained tomographic inversion. A fast marching method is used to compute, at each period, surface wave traveltimes and ray paths between sources and receivers. This avoids the assumption of great-circle propagation that is used in most surface wave tomographic studies, but which is not appropriate in complex media. The wavelet coefficients of the velocity model are estimated with an iteratively reweighted least squares (IRLS) algorithm, and upon iterations the surface wave ray paths and the data sensitivity matrix are updated from the newly obtained velocity model. We apply this new method to determine the 3-D near surface wavespeed variations in the Taipei basin of Taiwan, Hefei urban area and a shale and gas production field in China using the high-frequency interstation Rayleigh wave dispersion data extracted from ambient noisecross-correlation. The results reveal strong effects of off-great-circle propagation of high-frequency surface waves in these regions with above 30% shear wavespeed variations. The proposed approach is more efficient and robust than the traditional two-step surface wave tomography for imaging complex

  20. Comparative velocity structure of active Hawaiian volcanoes from 3-D onshore-offshore seismic tomography

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Park, J.; Morgan, J.K.; Zelt, C.A.; Okubo, P.G.; Peters, L.; Benesh, N.

    2007-01-01

    We present a 3-D P-wave velocity model of the combined subaerial and submarine portions of the southeastern part of the Island of Hawaii, based on first-arrival seismic tomography of marine airgun shots recorded by the onland seismic network. Our model shows that high-velocity materials (6.5-7.0??km/s) lie beneath Kilauea's summit, Koae fault zone, and the upper Southwest Rift Zone (SWRZ) and upper and middle East Rift Zone (ERZ), indicative of magma cumulates within the volcanic edifice. A separate high-velocity body of 6.5-6.9??km/s within Kilauea's lower ERZ and upper Puna Ridge suggests a distinct body of magma cumulates, possibly connected to the summit magma cumulates at depth. The two cumulate bodies within Kilauea's ERZ may have undergone separate ductile flow seaward, influencing the submarine morphology of Kilauea's south flank. Low velocities (5.0-6.3??km/s) seaward of Kilauea's Hilina fault zone, and along Mauna Loa's seaward facing Kao'iki fault zone, are attributed to thick piles of volcaniclastic sediments deposited on the submarine flanks. Loihi seamount shows high-velocity anomalies beneath the summit and along the rift zones, similar to the interpreted magma cumulates below Mauna Loa and Kilauea volcanoes, and a low-velocity anomaly beneath the oceanic crust, probably indicative of melt within the upper mantle. Around Kilauea's submarine flank, a high-velocity anomaly beneath the outer bench suggests the presence of an ancient seamount that may obstruct outward spreading of the flank. Mauna Loa's southeast flank is also marked by a large, anomalously high-velocity feature (7.0-7.4??km/s), interpreted to define an inactive, buried volcanic rift zone, which might provide a new explanation for the westward migration of Mauna Loa's current SWRZ and the growth of Kilauea's SWRZ. ?? 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Measuring visual discomfort associated with 3D displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambooij, M.; Fortuin, M.; Ijsselsteijn, W. A.; Heynderickx, I.

    2009-02-01

    Some people report visual discomfort when watching 3D displays. For both the objective measurement of visual fatigue and the subjective measurement of visual discomfort, we would like to arrive at general indicators that are easy to apply in perception experiments. Previous research yielded contradictory results concerning such indicators. We hypothesize two potential causes for this: 1) not all clinical tests are equally appropriate to evaluate the effect of stereoscopic viewing on visual fatigue, and 2) there is a natural variation in susceptibility to visual fatigue amongst people with normal vision. To verify these hypotheses, we designed an experiment, consisting of two parts. Firstly, an optometric screening was used to differentiate participants in susceptibility to visual fatigue. Secondly, in a 2×2 within-subjects design (2D vs 3D and two-view vs nine-view display), a questionnaire and eight optometric tests (i.e. binocular acuity, fixation disparity with and without fusion lock, heterophoria, convergent and divergent fusion, vergence facility and accommodation response) were administered before and immediately after a reading task. Results revealed that participants found to be more susceptible to visual fatigue during screening showed a clinically meaningful increase in fusion amplitude after having viewed 3D stimuli. Two questionnaire items (i.e., pain and irritation) were significantly affected by the participants' susceptibility, while two other items (i.e., double vision and sharpness) were scored differently between 2D and 3D for all participants. Our results suggest that a combination of fusion range measurements and self-report is appropriate for evaluating visual fatigue related to 3D displays.

  2. 3D robust digital image correlation for vibration measurement.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhong; Zhang, Xianmin; Fatikow, Sergej

    2016-03-01

    Discrepancies of speckle images under dynamic measurement due to the different viewing angles will deteriorate the correspondence in 3D digital image correlation (3D-DIC) for vibration measurement. Facing this kind of bottleneck, this paper presents two types of robust 3D-DIC methods for vibration measurement, SSD-robust and SWD-robust, which use a sum of square difference (SSD) estimator plus a Geman-McClure regulating term and a Welch estimator plus a Geman-McClure regulating term, respectively. Because the regulating term with an adaptive rejecting bound can lessen the influence of the abnormal pixel data in the dynamical measuring process, the robustness of the algorithm is enhanced. The robustness and precision evaluation experiments using a dual-frequency laser interferometer are implemented. The experimental results indicate that the two presented robust estimators can suppress the effects of the abnormality in the speckle images and, meanwhile, keep higher precision in vibration measurement in contrast with the traditional SSD method; thus, the SWD-robust and SSD-robust methods are suitable for weak image noise and strong image noise, respectively. PMID:26974624

  3. Characterizing 3-D flow velocity in evolving pore networks driven by CaCO3 precipitation and dissolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chojnicki, K. N.; Yoon, H.; Martinez, M. J.

    2015-12-01

    Understanding reactive flow in geomaterials is important for optimizing geologic carbon storage practices, such as using pore space efficiently. Flow paths can be complex in large degrees of geologic heterogeneities across scales. In addition, local heterogeneity can evolve as reactive transport processes alter the pore-scale morphology. For example, dissolved carbon dioxide may react with minerals in fractured rocks, confined aquifers, or faults, resulting in heterogeneous cementation (and/or dissolution) and evolving flow conditions. Both path and flow complexities are important and poorly characterized, making it difficult to determine their evolution with traditional 2-D transport models. Here we characterize the development of 3-D pore-scale flow with an evolving pore configuration due to calcium carbonate (CaCO3) precipitation and dissolution. A simple pattern of a microfluidic pore network is used initially and pore structures will become more complex due to precipitation and dissolution processes. At several stages of precipitation and dissolution, we directly visualize 3-D velocity vectors using micro particle image velocimetry and a laser scanning confocal microscope. Measured 3-D velocity vectors are then compared to 3-D simulated flow fields which will be used to simulate reactive transport. Our findings will highlight the importance of the 3-D flow dynamics and its impact on estimating reactive surface area over time. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. This material is based upon work supported as part of the Center for Frontiers of Subsurface Energy Security, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences under Award Number DE-SC0001114.

  4. Pavement cracking measurements using 3D laser-scan images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyang, W.; Xu, B.

    2013-10-01

    Pavement condition surveying is vital for pavement maintenance programs that ensure ride quality and traffic safety. This paper first introduces an automated pavement inspection system which uses a three-dimensional (3D) camera and a structured laser light to acquire dense transverse profiles of a pavement lane surface when it carries a moving vehicle. After the calibration, the 3D system can yield a depth resolution of 0.5 mm and a transverse resolution of 1.56 mm pixel-1 at 1.4 m camera height from the ground. The scanning rate of the camera can be set to its maximum at 5000 lines s-1, allowing the density of scanned profiles to vary with the vehicle's speed. The paper then illustrates the algorithms that utilize 3D information to detect pavement distress, such as transverse, longitudinal and alligator cracking, and presents the field tests on the system's repeatability when scanning a sample pavement in multiple runs at the same vehicle speed, at different vehicle speeds and under different weather conditions. The results show that this dedicated 3D system can capture accurate pavement images that detail surface distress, and obtain consistent crack measurements in repeated tests and under different driving and lighting conditions.

  5. 3D velocity structure of Mt. Fuji and the south Fossa Magna, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamichi, H.

    2005-12-01

    We present models of the velocity structure beneath the south Fossa Magna and Mt. Fuji, Japan, using local earthquake tomography and new data from a dense seismic network. The seismic network includes 28 temporary and 138 permanent 3-component seismic stations. The stations are deployed 2 - 10 km apart with a gradual increase in station spacing away from Mt. Fuji and are also densely distributed in the direction NE-SW across Mt. Fuji. We inverted 63,287 P- and 59,558 S-wave arrival times from 1087 local earthquakes to obtain the 3D P- (Vp) and S-wave velocity (Vs) and their ratio (Vp/Vs) structure. There is a high correlation between the Vp and Vs structures. At 5-15 km depths both velocity structures show low velocity anomalies trending northward in the west along the Fujikawa river, from Suruga Bay to northwest of Mt. Fuji. North of the Izu Peninsula, there is a broad high-velocity zone. These results correlate with Bouguer gravity anomalies previously observed. A shallowing high velocity anomaly is seen above sea level beneath Mt. Fuji. A low-Vp, Vs and Vp/Vs (1.5-1.6) anomaly is seen at depths of 7 - 17 km beneath Mt. Fuji, corresponding to locations of low-frequency (LF) earthquakes. Volatile fluids (CO2-H2O) could be abundant in the low Vp/Vs region and play an important role in generating the LF earthquakes. A low-Vp, Vs and high-Vp/Vs (1.8-1.9) anomaly is seen at depths of 15 - 25 km beneath Mt. Fuji and is interpreted as partial melt (basaltic magma). P-wave velocities of 6.0 - 6.5 km/s in the Izu collision zone beneath the Tanzawa Mountains indicate a plutonic body of tonalite within an accreted crustal slice of the Philippine Sea plate.

  6. Imaging 3D seismic velocity along the seismogenic zone of Algarve region (southern Portugal)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocha, João.; Bezzeghoud, Mourad; Caldeira, Bento; Dias, Nuno; Borges, José; Matias, Luís.; Dorbath, Catherine; Carrilho, Fernando

    2010-05-01

    The present seismic tomographic study is focused around Algarve region, in South of Portugal. To locate the seismic events and find the local velocity structure of epicentral area, the P and S arrival times at 38 stations are used. The data used in this study were obtained during the Algarve campaign which worked from January/2006 to July/2007. The preliminary estimate of origin times and hypocentral coordinates are determined by the Hypoinverse program. Linearized inversion procedure was applied to comprise the following two steps: 1) finding the minimum 1D velocity model using Velest and 2) simultaneous relocation of hypocenters and determination of local velocity structure. The velocity model we have reached is a 10 layer model which gave the lowest RMS, after several runnings of eight different velocity models that we used "a priori". The model parameterization assumes a continuous velocity field between 4.5 km/s and 7.0 km/s until 30 km depth. The earth structure is represented in 3D by velocity at discrete points, and velocity at any intervening point is determined by linear interpolation among the surrounding eight grid points. A preliminary analysis of the resolution capabilities of the dataset, based on the Derivative Weight Sum (DWS) distribution, shows that the velocity structure is better resolved in the West part of the region between the surface to15 km. The resulting tomographic image has a prominent low-velocity anomaly that shows a maximum decrease in P-wave velocity in the first 12 kms in the studied region. We also identified the occurrence of local seismic events of reduced magnitude not catalogued, in the neighbourhood of Almodôvar (low Alentejo). The spatial distribution of epicentres defines a NE-SW direction that coincides with the strike of the mapped geological faults of the region and issued from photo-interpretation. Is still expectable to refine the seismicity of the region of Almodôvar and establish more rigorously its role in the

  7. A 3-D crustal velocity structure across the Variscides of southwest Ireland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landes, M.; Readman, P. W.; O'Reilly, B. M.; Shannon, P. M.

    2003-04-01

    In the VARNET-96 experiment three seismic refraction profiles were acquired to examine the crustal structure in the south-west of Ireland. The shotpoint geometry allowed for both in-line and off-line fan shot recordings on the three profiles. Results of 3-D inversion modelling illustrate that there is pervasive lateral heterogeneity of the sedimentary and crustal velocity structure south of the Shannon Estuary. Palaeozoic strata at the south coast are about 5-6 km thick associated with the sedimentary infill of the Munster and South Munster Basins. To the north, shallow upper crust in the vicinity of the Killarney-Mallow Fault Zone is followed by a 3-4 km thick sedimentary succession in the Dingle-Shannon Basin. A zone of high-velocity upper crust (6.4-6.6 km/s) beneath the South Munster Basin correlates with a gravity high between the Kenmare-Killarney and the Leinster Granite gravity lows. Other high-velocity zones beneath Dingle Bay and the Kenmare River region may be associated with the deep traces of the Killarney-Mallow Fault Zone and the Cork-Kenmare Line. The 3-D velocity model was taken as a basis for the computation of PmP reflected arrivals from the crust-mantle boundary. The Moho depth varies from 28-29 km at the south coast to 32-33 km beneath the Dingle-Shannon Basin. Pervasive Variscan deformation appears to be confined to the sedimentary and upper crustal structure thus supporting a thin-skinned tectonic model for Variscan deformation. Deep-crustal variations only occur where they can be correlated with major tectonic features such as the Caledonian Iapetus Suture near the Shannon Estuary. The shallowing of the Moho towards the coast may result from Mesozoic crustal extension in the adjacent offshore sedimentary basins.

  8. Dust density measurements in 3D dust clouds by tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melzer, Andre

    2014-10-01

    Dusty plasmas usually consist of (micron-sized) dust particles trapped in a gaseous discharge plasma. Volume-filling dust clouds can be generated in the laboratory by thermophoretic levitation of the particles against gravity or under the microgravity conditions of parabolic flights. In these discharges, the dust density is typically so high that together with the high charge on the particles, the dust charge density can compete with the ion and electron (charge) density indicating a regime of charge depletion. Here, we present a technique that allows to measure the spatially resolved 3D dust density in such dusty discharges. For that purpose, the dust cloud is transilluminated by a homogeneous light source and the transilluminated cloud is measured under different angles in a tomographic-like manner. This allows to reconstruct the full 3D dust density within the discharge volume and further to deduce the force balance for the dust component. Supported by DLR 50 WM 1138.

  9. Calibration of optical 3D-measuring instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brand, Uwe

    1998-09-01

    For the inspection and measurement of microstructures small accurate three-dimensional coordinate measuring machines are needed. Typical measurement volumes are 10 mm by 10 mm by 3 mm and the desired 3D-measurement uncertainty is 0.1 micrometer. Up to now only optical coordinate measuring machines (CMM) offer the necessary lateral measurement ranges. But optical CMMs are restricted to two-dimensional measurements and moreover the aimed uncertainty has not been achieved yet. Since a few years new optical techniques are available which are able to measure nearly three-dimensionally (scanning white light, fringe projection, confocal microscopy, photogrammetry). In order to use these instruments and to specify their measurement uncertainty, calibration of these instruments is necessary. The calibration of the three measurement axes is divided into calibration of the lateral axes and calibration of the vertical axis. The contribution focuses on the development of new depth setting standards (1 micrometer - 1 milimeter) and their traceability.

  10. A method of multi-view intraoral 3D measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Huijie; Wang, Zhen; Jiang, Hongzhi; Xu, Yang; Lv, Peijun; Sun, Yunchun

    2015-02-01

    In dental restoration, its important to achieve a high-accuracy digital impression. Most of the existing intraoral measurement systems can only measure the tooth from a single view. Therfore - if we are wilng to acquire the whole data of a tooth, the scans of the tooth from multi-direction ad the data stitching based on the features of the surface are needed, which increases the measurement duration and influence the measurement accuracy. In this paper, we introduce a fringe-projection based on multi-view intraoral measurement system. It can acquire 3D data of the occlusal surface, the buccal surface and the lingual surface of a tooth synchronously, by using a senor with three mirrors, which aim at the three surfaces respectively and thus expand the measuring area. The constant relationship of the three mirrors is calibrated before measurement and can help stitch the data clouds acquired through different mirrors accurately. Therefore the system can obtain the 3D data of a tooth without the need to measure it from different directions for many times. Experiments proved the availability and reliability of this miniaturized measurement system.

  11. Real-time structured light intraoral 3D measurement pipeline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gheorghe, Radu; Tchouprakov, Andrei; Sokolov, Roman

    2013-02-01

    Computer aided design and manufacturing (CAD/CAM) is increasingly becoming a standard feature and service provided to patients in dentist offices and denture manufacturing laboratories. Although the quality of the tools and data has slowly improved in the last years, due to various surface measurement challenges, practical, accurate, invivo, real-time 3D high quality data acquisition and processing still needs improving. Advances in GPU computational power have allowed for achieving near real-time 3D intraoral in-vivo scanning of patient's teeth. We explore in this paper, from a real-time perspective, a hardware-software-GPU solution that addresses all the requirements mentioned before. Moreover we exemplify and quantify the hard and soft deadlines required by such a system and illustrate how they are supported in our implementation.

  12. Imaging of 3-D seismic velocity structure of Southern Sumatra region using double difference tomographic method

    SciTech Connect

    Lestari, Titik; Nugraha, Andri Dian

    2015-04-24

    Southern Sumatra region has a high level of seismicity due to the influence of the subduction system, Sumatra fault, Mentawai fault and stretching zone activities. The seismic activities of Southern Sumatra region are recorded by Meteorological Climatological and Geophysical Agency (MCGA’s) Seismograph network. In this study, we used earthquake data catalog compiled by MCGA for 3013 events from 10 seismic stations around Southern Sumatra region for time periods of April 2009 – April 2014 in order to invert for the 3-D seismic velocities structure (Vp, Vs, and Vp/Vs ratio). We applied double-difference seismic tomography method (tomoDD) to determine Vp, Vs and Vp/Vs ratio with hypocenter adjustment. For the inversion procedure, we started from the initial 1-D seismic velocity model of AK135 and constant Vp/Vs of 1.73. The synthetic travel time from source to receiver was calculated using ray pseudo-bending technique, while the main tomographic inversion was applied using LSQR method. The resolution model was evaluated using checkerboard test and Derivative Weigh Sum (DWS). Our preliminary results show low Vp and Vs anomalies region along Bukit Barisan which is may be associated with weak zone of Sumatran fault and migration of partial melted material. Low velocity anomalies at 30-50 km depth in the fore arc region may indicated the hydrous material circulation because the slab dehydration. We detected low seismic seismicity in the fore arc region that may be indicated as seismic gap. It is coincides contact zone of high and low velocity anomalies. And two large earthquakes (Jambi and Mentawai) also occurred at the contact of contrast velocity.

  13. Lapse-time dependent coda-wave depth sensitivity to local velocity perturbations in 3-D heterogeneous elastic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obermann, Anne; Planès, Thomas; Hadziioannou, Céline; Campillo, Michel

    2016-07-01

    In the context of seismic monitoring, recent studies made successful use of seismic coda waves to locate medium changes on the horizontal plane. Locating the depth of the changes, however, remains a challenge. In this paper, we use 3-D wavefield simulations to address two problems: firstly, we evaluate the contribution of surface and body wave sensitivity to a change at depth. We introduce a thin layer with a perturbed velocity at different depths and measure the apparent relative velocity changes due to this layer at different times in the coda and for different degrees of heterogeneity of the model. We show that the depth sensitivity can be modelled as a linear combination of body- and surface-wave sensitivity. The lapse-time dependent sensitivity ratio of body waves and surface waves can be used to build 3-D sensitivity kernels for imaging purposes. Secondly, we compare the lapse-time behavior in the presence of a perturbation in horizontal and vertical slabs to address, for instance, the origin of the velocity changes detected after large earthquakes.

  14. Lapse-time-dependent coda-wave depth sensitivity to local velocity perturbations in 3-D heterogeneous elastic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obermann, Anne; Planès, Thomas; Hadziioannou, Céline; Campillo, Michel

    2016-10-01

    In the context of seismic monitoring, recent studies made successful use of seismic coda waves to locate medium changes on the horizontal plane. Locating the depth of the changes, however, remains a challenge. In this paper, we use 3-D wavefield simulations to address two problems: first, we evaluate the contribution of surface- and body-wave sensitivity to a change at depth. We introduce a thin layer with a perturbed velocity at different depths and measure the apparent relative velocity changes due to this layer at different times in the coda and for different degrees of heterogeneity of the model. We show that the depth sensitivity can be modelled as a linear combination of body- and surface-wave sensitivity. The lapse-time-dependent sensitivity ratio of body waves and surface waves can be used to build 3-D sensitivity kernels for imaging purposes. Second, we compare the lapse-time behaviour in the presence of a perturbation in horizontal and vertical slabs to address, for instance, the origin of the velocity changes detected after large earthquakes.

  15. Simulation of AIMS measurements using rigorous mask 3D modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, Chih-Shiang; Huang, Hsu-Ting; Chu, Fu-Sheng; Chu, Yuan-Chih; Huang, Wen-Chun; Liu, Ru-Gun; Gau, Tsai-Sheng

    2015-03-01

    Aerial image measurement system (AIMSTM) has been widely used for wafer level inspection of mask defects. Reported inspection flows include die-to-die (D2D) and die-to-database (D2DB) methods. For patterns that do not repeat in another die, only the D2DB approach is applicable. The D2DB method requires accurate simulation of AIMS measurements for a mask pattern. An optical vectorial model is needed to depict the mask diffraction effect in this simulation. To accurately simulate the imaging results, a rigorous electro-magnetic field (EMF) model is essential to correctly take account of the EMF scattering induced by the mask topography, which is usually called the mask 3D effect. In this study, the mask 3D model we use is rigorous coupled-wave analysis (RCWA), which calculates the diffraction fields from a single plane wave incidence. A hybrid Hopkins-Abbe method with RCWA is used to calculate the EMF diffraction at a desired accuracy level while keeping the computation time practical. We will compare the speed of the hybrid Hopkins-Abbe method to the rigorous Abbe method. The matching between simulation and experiment is more challenging for AIMS than CD-SEM because its measurements provide full intensity information. Parameters in the mask 3D model such as film stack thickness or film optical properties, is optimized during the fitting process. We will report the fitting results of AIMS images for twodimensional structures with various pitches. By accurately simulating the AIMS measurements, it provides a necessary tool to perform the mask inspection using the D2DB approach and to accurately predict the mask defects.

  16. The 3D Space and Spin Velocities of a Gamma-ray Pulsar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romani, Roger W.

    2016-04-01

    PSR J2030+4415 is a LAT-discovered 0.5My-old gamma-ray pulsar with an X-ray synchrotron trail and a rare Halpha bowshock. We have obtained GMOS IFU spectroscopic imaging of this shell, and show a sweep through the remarkable Halpha structure, comparing with the high energy emission. These data provide a unique 3D map of the momentum distribution of the relativistic pulsar wind. This shows that the pulsar is moving nearly in the plane of the sky and that the pulsar wind has a polar component misaligned with the space velocity. The spin axis is shown to be inclined some 95degrees to the Earth line of sight, explaining why this is a radio-quiet, gamma-only pulsar. Intriguingly, the shell also shows multiple bubbles that suggest that the pulsar wind power has varied substantially over the past 500 years.

  17. PRESAGE 3D dosimetry accurately measures Gamma Knife output factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klawikowski, Slade J.; Yang, James N.; Adamovics, John; Ibbott, Geoffrey S.

    2014-12-01

    Small-field output factor measurements are traditionally very difficult because of steep dose gradients, loss of lateral electronic equilibrium, and dose volume averaging in finitely sized detectors. Three-dimensional (3D) dosimetry is ideal for measuring small output factors and avoids many of these potential challenges of point and 2D detectors. PRESAGE 3D polymer dosimeters were used to measure the output factors for the 4 mm and 8 mm collimators of the Leksell Perfexion Gamma Knife radiosurgery treatment system. Discrepancies between the planned and measured distance between shot centers were also investigated. A Gamma Knife head frame was mounted onto an anthropomorphic head phantom. Special inserts were machined to hold 60 mm diameter, 70 mm tall cylindrical PRESAGE dosimeters. The phantom was irradiated with one 16 mm shot and either one 4 mm or one 8 mm shot, to a prescribed dose of either 3 Gy or 4 Gy to the 50% isodose line. The two shots were spaced between 30 mm and 60 mm apart and aligned along the central axis of the cylinder. The Presage dosimeters were measured using the DMOS-RPC optical CT scanning system. Five independent 4 mm output factor measurements fell within 2% of the manufacturer’s Monte Carlo simulation-derived nominal value, as did two independent 8 mm output factor measurements. The measured distances between shot centers varied by ±0.8 mm with respect to the planned shot displacements. On the basis of these results, we conclude that PRESAGE dosimetry is excellently suited to quantify the difficult-to-measure Gamma Knife output factors.

  18. Velocity and Density Models Incorporating the Cascadia Subduction Zone for 3D Earthquake Ground Motion Simulations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stephenson, William J.

    2007-01-01

    INTRODUCTION In support of earthquake hazards and ground motion studies in the Pacific Northwest, three-dimensional P- and S-wave velocity (3D Vp and Vs) and density (3D rho) models incorporating the Cascadia subduction zone have been developed for the region encompassed from about 40.2?N to 50?N latitude, and from about -122?W to -129?W longitude. The model volume includes elevations from 0 km to 60 km (elevation is opposite of depth in model coordinates). Stephenson and Frankel (2003) presented preliminary ground motion simulations valid up to 0.1 Hz using an earlier version of these models. The version of the model volume described here includes more structural and geophysical detail, particularly in the Puget Lowland as required for scenario earthquake simulations in the development of the Seattle Urban Hazards Maps (Frankel and others, 2007). Olsen and others (in press) used the model volume discussed here to perform a Cascadia simulation up to 0.5 Hz using a Sumatra-Andaman Islands rupture history. As research from the EarthScope Program (http://www.earthscope.org) is published, a wealth of important detail can be added to these model volumes, particularly to depths of the upper-mantle. However, at the time of development for this model version, no EarthScope-specific results were incorporated. This report is intended to be a reference for colleagues and associates who have used or are planning to use this preliminary model in their research. To this end, it is intended that these models will be considered a beginning template for a community velocity model of the Cascadia region as more data and results become available.

  19. 3D P and S Wave Velocity Structure and Tremor Locations in the Parkfield Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, X.; Thurber, C. H.; Shelly, D. R.; Bennington, N. L.; Cochran, E. S.; Harrington, R. M.

    2014-12-01

    We have assembled a new dataset to refine the 3D seismic velocity model in the Parkfield region. The S arrivals from 184 earthquakes recorded by the Parkfield Experiment to Record MIcroseismicity and Tremor array (PERMIT) during 2010-2011 were picked by a new S wave picker, which is based on machine learning. 74 blasts have been assigned to four quarries, whose locations were identified with Google Earth. About 1000 P and S wave arrivals from these blasts at permanent seismic network were also incorporated. Low frequency earthquakes (LFEs) occurring within non-volcanic tremor (NVT) are valuable for improving the precision of NVT location and the seismic velocity model at greater depths. Based on previous work (Shelley and Hardebeck, 2010), waveforms of hundreds of LFEs in same family were stacked to improve signal qualify. In a previous study (McClement et al., 2013), stacked traces of more than 30 LFE families at the Parkfileld Array Seismic Observatory (PASO) have been picked. We expanded our work to include LFEs recorded by the PERMIT array. The time-frequency Phase Weight Stacking (tf-PWS) method was introduced to improve the stack quality, as direct stacking does not produce clear S-wave arrivals on the PERMIT stations. This technique uses the coherence of the instantaneous phase among the stacked signals to enhance the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the stack. We found that it is extremely effective for picking LFE arrivals (Thurber et al., 2014). More than 500 P and about 1000 S arrivals from 58 LFE families were picked at the PERMIT and PASO arrays. Since the depths of LFEs are much deeper than earthquakes, we are able to extend model resolution to lower crustal depths. Both P and S wave velocity structure have been obtained with the tomoDD method. The result suggests that there is a low velocity zone (LVZ) in the lower crust and the location of the LVZ is consistent with the high conductivity zone beneath the southern segment of the Rinconada fault that

  20. InSAR, GPS, triangulation and EDM combination in a 3D velocity field: Insight from Arenal volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muller, Cyril; del Potro, Rodrigo; Biggs, Juliet; Gottsmann, Joachim; Ebmeier, Susanna; Van der Laat, Rodolfo

    2014-05-01

    Geodetic techniques provide useful information to detect and assess geophysical processes occurring at volcanoes. When the deformation signal is large, standard analyses and modelling can be carried out. However, when surface movements are subtle and several processes occur simultaneously, stochastic and multi-techniques assessment is required. Here we present a methodology that combines GPS, triangulation, trilateration and InSAR in a 3D velocity surface without any prior specific source assumption. The methodology is in 5 steps: design of the geodetic monitoring network, acquisition and post-processing of deformation observations, spatial integration, time series computation and finally spatial and temporal measurement integration. We apply this methodology to Arenal volcano in Costa Rica and provide an unprecedented insight of the volcano's deformation. The most significant improvements of this method are the reduction of campaign logistics, the unambiguous detection of the outliers, an increase in accuracy, a 3D velocity field accounting for all techniques and measurements. Although, the methodology is applied to GPS, triangulation, trilateration and INSAR geodetic networks with a steady motion, it has the potential to be extended to other geodetic techniques and where transient deformations are ongoing. The described methodology can be applied in volcano monitoring worldwide.

  1. Unbiased contaminant removal for 3D galaxy power spectrum measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalus, B.; Percival, W. J.; Bacon, D. J.; Samushia, L.

    2016-11-01

    We assess and develop techniques to remove contaminants when calculating the 3D galaxy power spectrum. We separate the process into three separate stages: (i) removing the contaminant signal, (ii) estimating the uncontaminated cosmological power spectrum and (iii) debiasing the resulting estimates. For (i), we show that removing the best-fitting contaminant (mode subtraction) and setting the contaminated components of the covariance to be infinite (mode deprojection) are mathematically equivalent. For (ii), performing a quadratic maximum likelihood (QML) estimate after mode deprojection gives an optimal unbiased solution, although it requires the manipulation of large N_mode^2 matrices (Nmode being the total number of modes), which is unfeasible for recent 3D galaxy surveys. Measuring a binned average of the modes for (ii) as proposed by Feldman, Kaiser & Peacock (FKP) is faster and simpler, but is sub-optimal and gives rise to a biased solution. We present a method to debias the resulting FKP measurements that does not require any large matrix calculations. We argue that the sub-optimality of the FKP estimator compared with the QML estimator, caused by contaminants, is less severe than that commonly ignored due to the survey window.

  2. Unbiased contaminant removal for 3D galaxy power spectrum measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalus, B.; Percival, W. J.; Bacon, D. J.; Samushia, L.

    2016-08-01

    We assess and develop techniques to remove contaminants when calculating the 3D galaxy power spectrum. We separate the process into three separate stages: (i) removing the contaminant signal, (ii) estimating the uncontaminated cosmological power spectrum, (iii) debiasing the resulting estimates. For (i), we show that removing the best-fit contaminant (mode subtraction), and setting the contaminated components of the covariance to be infinite (mode deprojection) are mathematically equivalent. For (ii), performing a Quadratic Maximum Likelihood (QML) estimate after mode deprojection gives an optimal unbiased solution, although it requires the manipulation of large N_mode^2 matrices (Nmode being the total number of modes), which is unfeasible for recent 3D galaxy surveys. Measuring a binned average of the modes for (ii) as proposed by Feldman, Kaiser & Peacock (1994, FKP) is faster and simpler, but is sub-optimal and gives rise to a biased solution. We present a method to debias the resulting FKP measurements that does not require any large matrix calculations. We argue that the sub-optimality of the FKP estimator compared with the QML estimator, caused by contaminants is less severe than that commonly ignored due to the survey window.

  3. Validating 3D Seismic Velocity Models Using the Spectral Element Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maceira, M.; Rowe, C. A.; Allen, R. M.; Obrebski, M. J.

    2010-12-01

    As seismic instrumentation, data storage and dissemination and computational power improve, seismic velocity models attempt to resolve smaller structures and cover larger areas. However, it is unclear how accurate these velocity models are and, while the best models available are used for event determination, it is difficult to put uncertainties on seismic event parameters. Model validation is typically done using resolution tests that assume the imaging theory used is accurate and thus only considers the impact of the data coverage on resolution. We present the results of a more rigorous approach to model validation via full three-dimensional waveform propagation using Spectral Element Methods (SEM). This approach makes no assumptions about the theory used to generate the models but require substantial computational resources. We first validate 3D tomographic models for the Western USA generated using both ray-theoretical and finite-frequency methods. The Dynamic North America (DNA) Models of P- and S- velocity structure (DNA09-P and DNA09-S) use teleseismic body-wave traveltime residuals recorded at over 800 seismic stations provided by the Earthscope USArray and regional seismic networks. We performed systematic computations of synthetics for the dataset used to generate the DNA models. Direct comparison of these synthetic seismograms to the actual observations allows us to accurately assess and validate the models. Implementation of the method for a densely instrumented region such as that covered by the DNA model provides a useful testbed for the validation methods that we will subsequently apply to other, more challenging study areas.

  4. Optical 3D-coordinate measuring system using structured light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreiber, Wolfgang; Notni, Gunther; Kuehmstedt, Peter; Gerber, Joerg; Kowarschik, Richard M.

    1996-09-01

    The paper is aimed at the description of an optical shape measuring technique based on a consistent principle using fringe projection technique. We demonstrate a real 3D- coordinate measuring system where the sale of coordinates is given only by the illumination-structures. This method has the advantages that the aberration of the observing system and the depth-dependent imaging scale have no influence on the measuring accuracy and, moreover, the measurements are independent of the position of the camera with respect to the object under test. Furthermore, it is shown that the influence of specular effects of the surface on the measuring result can be eliminated. Moreover, we developed a very simple algorithm to calibrate the measuring system. The measuring examples show that a measuring accuracy of 10-4 (i.e. 10 micrometers ) within an object volume of 100 X 100 X 70 mm3 is achievable. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that the set of coordinate values can be processed in CNC- and CAD-systems.

  5. A global 3D P-velocity model of the Earth's crust and mantle for improved event location : SALSA3D.

    SciTech Connect

    Young, Christopher John; Steck, Lee K.; Phillips, William Scott; Ballard, Sanford; Chang, Marcus C.; Rowe, Charlotte A.; Encarnacao, Andre Villanova; Begnaud, Michael A.; Hipp, James Richard

    2010-07-01

    To test the hypothesis that high quality 3D Earth models will produce seismic event locations which are more accurate and more precise, we are developing a global 3D P wave velocity model of the Earth's crust and mantle using seismic tomography. In this paper, we present the most recent version of our model, SALSA3D version 1.5, and demonstrate its ability to reduce mislocations for a large set of realizations derived from a carefully chosen set of globally-distributed ground truth events. Our model is derived from the latest version of the Ground Truth (GT) catalog of P and Pn travel time picks assembled by Los Alamos National Laboratory. To prevent over-weighting due to ray path redundancy and to reduce the computational burden, we cluster rays to produce representative rays. Reduction in the total number of ray paths is {approx}50%. The model is represented using the triangular tessellation system described by Ballard et al. (2009), which incorporates variable resolution in both the geographic and radial dimensions. For our starting model, we use a simplified two layer crustal model derived from the Crust 2.0 model over a uniform AK135 mantle. Sufficient damping is used to reduce velocity adjustments so that ray path changes between iterations are small. We obtain proper model smoothness by using progressive grid refinement, refining the grid only around areas with significant velocity changes from the starting model. At each grid refinement level except the last one we limit the number of iterations to prevent convergence thereby preserving aspects of broad features resolved at coarser resolutions. Our approach produces a smooth, multi-resolution model with node density appropriate to both ray coverage and the velocity gradients required by the data. This scheme is computationally expensive, so we use a distributed computing framework based on the Java Parallel Processing Framework, providing us with {approx}400 processors. Resolution of our model is assessed

  6. SALSA3D : a global 3D p-velocity model of the Earth's crust and mantle for improved event location.

    SciTech Connect

    Encarnacao, Andre Villanova; Begnaud, Michael A.; Rowe, Charlotte A.; Young, Christopher John; Chang, Marcus C.; Ballard, Sally C.; Hipp, James Richard

    2010-06-01

    To test the hypothesis that high quality 3D Earth models will produce seismic event locations which are more accurate and more precise, we are developing a global 3D P wave velocity model of the Earth's crust and mantle using seismic tomography. In this paper, we present the most recent version of our model, SALSA3D version 1.5, and demonstrate its ability to reduce mislocations for a large set of realizations derived from a carefully chosen set of globally-distributed ground truth events. Our model is derived from the latest version of the Ground Truth (GT) catalog of P and Pn travel time picks assembled by Los Alamos National Laboratory. To prevent over-weighting due to ray path redundancy and to reduce the computational burden, we cluster rays to produce representative rays. Reduction in the total number of ray paths is {approx}50%. The model is represented using the triangular tessellation system described by Ballard et al. (2009), which incorporates variable resolution in both the geographic and radial dimensions. For our starting model, we use a simplified two layer crustal model derived from the Crust 2.0 model over a uniform AK135 mantle. Sufficient damping is used to reduce velocity adjustments so that ray path changes between iterations are small. We obtain proper model smoothness by using progressive grid refinement, refining the grid only around areas with significant velocity changes from the starting model. At each grid refinement level except the last one we limit the number of iterations to prevent convergence thereby preserving aspects of broad features resolved at coarser resolutions. Our approach produces a smooth, multi-resolution model with node density appropriate to both ray coverage and the velocity gradients required by the data. This scheme is computationally expensive, so we use a distributed computing framework based on the Java Parallel Processing Framework, providing us with {approx}400 processors. Resolution of our model is assessed

  7. 3D Body Wave Velocity Tomography in Southern Peru: Seismotectonic Implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallego, A.; Perez, J.; David, C.; Comte, D.; Charrier, R.; Dorbath, L.

    2004-12-01

    The studied region corresponds to the southern segment of the 1868 rupture area, that did not break with the last Mw=8.4 Arequipa earthquake in southern Peru. A temporary network of 19 short period, continuous recording seismic stations was deployed (16.5° -18.5° S; 69.5° -72° W) between December 2002-March 2003 in this region. The 1093 select events were used for a joint hypocentral and velocity structure inversion. The first obtained 1D velocity model was used as the initial model for the 3D inversion, consisting in 231 blocks distributed along layers separated by 10 km for depths lower than 80 km, and by 20 km for depths between 80 and 160 km. North of the Arica Bend, between the Coast and Andean Range the high Vp velocity and Vp/Vs ratio observed at depths lower than 10 km could represent the Precambrian basement uplifted by the Incapuquio sinistral fault system, which develops a positive flower structure typical for transpressional zones, that raised the basement. This behavior is in good agreement with the uplift of the Cambrian metamorphic complex, in the Precordillera south of the Arica Bend (northern Chile), by the west-vergent thrust system. Beneath the anomalous high velocities (between 20 and 30 km depth), a low velocity zone (Vp<4.5 km/s, and Vp/Vs<1.5) can be observed; this LVZ can be associated with a zone of continuous metamorphism and/or partial melting that the decouples the upper-crustal imbrication from a thickening lower-crust. The Wadati-Benioff zone exhibits a dip angle of about 20° between 10 to 60 km depth, and about 45° for depths higher than 80 km. The double seismic zone known for northern Chile is not present in southern Peru. Cross sections perpendicular to the trench, define a very active seismic zone which dips about 45° trenchward, and is almost perpendicular to the subducting slab between 0 and 60 km depths, similar to the one existing in northern Chile, but with a lower rate of seismicity; the higher activity of this zone

  8. Rapid prototyping with optical 3D measurement systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaessler, J.; Blount, G. N.; Jones, R. M.

    1994-11-01

    One of the important tools for speeding up the prototyping of an new industrial or consumer product is the rapid generation of CAD data from hand-made styling models and moulds. We present a new optical 3D digitizing system which produces in a fully automatic way non- ambiguous, absolute and complete surface coordinate data of very complex objects in a short time. The system named `OptoShape' is based on a projection of sinusoidal fringes with a true grey-level matrix projector. The system measures both non-ambiguous and absolute XYZ surface data with a pronounced robustness towards optical surface properties. By moving the 3D sensor head around the object to be digitized with a 3/5 axes manipulator, multiple range images are obtained and automatically merged into a unified cloud of point coordinates. This set of surface coordinates are transferred to a software package where interactive manipulation, sectioning and semi-automatic generation of CAD surface descriptions are performed. CNC data can also be directly generated from the point surface coordinate data set.

  9. 3D tomographic reconstruction of the internal velocity field of an immiscible drop in a shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerdraon, Paul; Dalziel, Stuart B.; Goldstein, Raymond E.; Landel, Julien R.; Peaudecerf, Francois J.

    2015-11-01

    We study experimentally the internal flow of a drop attached to a flat substrate and immersed in an immiscible shear flow. Transport inside the drop can play a crucial role in cleaning applications. Internal advection can enhance the mass transfer across the drop surface, thus increasing the cleaning rate. We used microlitre water-glycerol drops on a hydrophobic substrate. The drops were spherical and did not deform significantly under the shear flow. An oil phase of relative viscosity 0.01 to 1 was flowed over the drop. Typical Reynolds numbers inside the drops were of the order of 0.1 to 10. Using confocal microscopy, we performed 3D tomographic reconstruction of the flow field in the drop. The in-plane velocity field was measured using micro-PIV, and the third velocity component was computed from incompressibility. To our knowledge, this study gives the first experimental measurement of the three-dimensional internal velocity field of a drop in a shear flow. Numerical simulations and theoretical models published in the past 30 years predict a toroidal internal recirculation flow, for which the entire surface flows streamwise. However, our measurements reveal a qualitatively different picture with a two-lobed recirculation, featuring two stagnation points at the surface and a reverse surface flow closer to the substrate. This finding appears to be independent of Reynolds number and viscosity ratio in the ranges studied; we conjecture that the observed flow is due to the effect of surfactants at the drop surface.

  10. 3D refractive index measurements of special optical fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Cheng; Huang, Su-Juan; Miao, Zhuang; Chang, Zheng; Zeng, Jun-Zhang; Wang, Ting-Yun

    2016-09-01

    A digital holographic microscopic chromatography-based approach with considerably improved accuracy, simplified configuration and performance stability is proposed to measure three dimensional refractive index of special optical fibers. Based on the approach, a measurement system is established incorporating a modified Mach-Zehnder interferometer and lab-developed supporting software for data processing. In the system, a phase projection distribution of an optical fiber is utilized to obtain an optimal digital hologram recorded by a CCD, and then an angular spectrum theory-based algorithm is adopted to extract the phase distribution information of an object wave. The rotation of the optic fiber enables the experimental measurements of multi-angle phase information. Based on the filtered back projection algorithm, a 3D refraction index of the optical fiber is thus obtained at high accuracy. To evaluate the proposed approach, both PANDA fibers and special elliptical optical fiber are considered in the system. The results measured in PANDA fibers agree well with those measured using S14 Refractive Index Profiler, which is, however, not suitable for measuring the property of a special elliptical fiber.

  11. Low velocity crustal flow and crust-mantle coupling mechanism in Yunnan, SE Tibet, revealed by 3D S-wave velocity and azimuthal anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Haopeng; Zhu, Liangbao; Su, Youjin

    2016-08-01

    We used teleseismic data recorded by a permanent seismic network in Yunnan, SE Tibet, and measured the interstation Rayleigh wave phase velocity between 10 and 60 s. A two-step inversion scheme was used to invert for the 3D S-wave velocity and azimuthal anisotropy structure of 10-110 km. The results show that there are two low velocity channels between depths of 20-30 km in Yunnan and that the fast axes are sub-parallel to the strikes of the low velocity channels, which supports the crustal flow model. The azimuthal anisotropy pattern is quite complicated and reveals a complex crust-mantle coupling mechanism in Yunnan. The N-S trending Lüzhijiang Fault separates the Dianzhong Block into two parts. In the western Dianzhong Block, the fast axis of the S-wave changes with depth, which indicates that the crust and the lithospheric mantle are decoupled. In the eastern Dianzhong Block and the western Yangtze Craton, the crust and the lithospheric mantle may be decoupled because of crustal flow, despite a coherent S-wave fast axis at depths of 10-110 km. In addition, the difference between the S-wave fast axis in the lithosphere and the SKS splitting measurement suggests that the lithosphere and the upper mantle are decoupled there. In the Baoshan Block, the stratified anisotropic pattern suggests that the crust and the upper mantle are decoupled.

  12. 3D Measurement of Forearm and Upper Arm during Throwing Motion using Body Mounted Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koda, Hideharu; Sagawa, Koichi; Kuroshima, Kouta; Tsukamoto, Toshiaki; Urita, Kazutaka; Ishibashi, Yasuyuki

    The aim of this study is to propose the measurement method of three-dimensional (3D) movement of forearm and upper arm during pitching motion of baseball using inertial sensors without serious consideration of sensor installation. Although high accuracy measurement of sports motion is achieved by using optical motion capture system at present, it has some disadvantages such as the calibration of cameras and limitation of measurement place. Whereas the proposed method for 3D measurement of pitching motion using body mounted sensors provides trajectory and orientation of upper arm by the integration of acceleration and angular velocity measured on upper limb. The trajectory of forearm is derived so that the elbow joint axis of forearm corresponds to that of upper arm. Spatial relation between upper limb and sensor system is obtained by performing predetermined movements of upper limb and utilizing angular velocity and gravitational acceleration. The integration error is modified so that the estimated final position, velocity and posture of upper limb agree with the actual ones. The experimental results of the measurement of pitching motion show that trajectories of shoulder, elbow and wrist estimated by the proposed method are highly correlated to those from the motion capture system within the estimation error of about 10 [%].

  13. 3D P-wave velocity structure of the deep Galicia rifted margin: A first analysis of the Galicia 3D wide-angle seismic dataset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayrakci, Gaye; Minshull, Timothy A.; Davy, Richard G.; Karplus, Marianne S.; Kaeschen, Dirk; Papenberg, Cord; Krabbenhoeft, Anne; Sawyer, Dale; Reston, Timothy J.; Shillington, Donna J.; Ranero, César R.

    2014-05-01

    Galicia 3D, a reflection-refraction and long offset seismic experiment was carried out from May through September 2013, at the Galicia rifted margin (in the northeast Atlantic Ocean, west of Spain) as a collaboration between US, UK, German and Spanish groups. The 3D multichannel seismic acquisition conducted by R/V Marcus Langseth covered a 64 km by 20 km (1280 km2) zone where the main geological features are the Peridotite Ridge (PR), composed of serpentinized peridotite and thought be upper mantle exhumed to the seafloor during rifting, and the S reflector which has been interpreted to be a low angle detachment fault overlain by fault bounded, rotated, continental crustal blocks. In the 3D box, two airgun arrays of 3300 cu.in. were fired alternately (in flip-flop configuration) every 37.5 m. All shots are recorded by 44 short period four component ocean bottom seismometers (OBS) and 26 ocean bottom hydrophones (OBH) deployed and recovered by R/V Poseidon, as well as four 6 km hydrophone streamers with 12.5 m channel spacing towed by R/V Marcus Langseth. We present the preliminary results of the first arrival time tomography study which is carried out with a subset of the wide-angle dataset, in order to generate a 3D P-wave velocity volume for the entire depth sampled by the reflection data. After the relocation of OBSs and OBHs, an automatic first-arrival time picking approach is applied to a subset of the dataset, which comprises more than 5.5 million source-receiver pairs. Then, the first-arrival times are checked visually, in 3-dimensions. The a priori model used for the first-arrival time tomography is built up using information from previous seismic surveys carried out at the Galicia margin (e.g. ISE, 1997). The FAST algorithm of Zelt and Barton (1998) is used for the first-arrival time inversion. The 3D P-wave velocity volume can be used in interpreting the reflection dataset, as a starting point for migration, to quantify the thinning of the crustal layers

  14. The 3-D strain patterns in Turkey using geodetic velocity fields from the RTK-CORS (TR) network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutoglu, Hakan Senol; Toker, Mustafa; Mekik, Cetin

    2016-03-01

    This study presents our use of GPS data to obtain and quantify the full continuous strain tensor using a 3-D velocity field in Turkey. In this study, GPS velocities improve the estimation of short-term strain tensor fields for determining the seismic hazard of Turkey. The tensorial analysis presents different aspects of deformation, such as the normal and shear strains, including their directions, the compressional and extensional strains. This analysis is appropriate for the characterizing the state of the current seismic deformation. GPS velocity data from continuous measurements (2009-2012) to estimate deformations were processed using the GAMIT/GLOBK software. Using high-rate GPS data from permanent 146 GNSS stations (RTK-CORS-TR network), the strain distribution was determined and interpolated using a biharmonic spline technique. We show the strain field patterns within axial and plane form at several critical locations, and discuss these results within the context of the seismic and tectonic deformation of Turkey. We conclude that the knowledge of the crustal strain patterns provides important information on the location of the main faults and strain accumulation for the hazard assessment. The results show an agreement between the seismic and tectonic strains confirming that there are active crustal deformations in Turkey.

  15. A 3D measurement of the offset in paleoseismological studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrater, Marta; Echeverria, Anna; Masana, Eulàlia; Martínez-Díaz, José J.; Sharp, Warren D.

    2016-05-01

    The slip rate of a seismogenic fault is a crucial parameter for establishing the contribution of the fault to the seismic hazard. It is calculated from measurements of the offset of linear landforms, such channels, produced by the fault combined with their age. The three-dimensional measurement of offset in buried paleochannels is subject to uncertainties that need to be quantitatively assessed and propagated into the slip rate. Here, we present a set of adapted scripts to calculate the net, lateral and vertical tectonic offset components caused by faults, together with their associated uncertainties. This technique is applied here to a buried channel identified in the stratigraphic record during a paleoseismological study at the El Saltador site (Alhama de Murcia fault, Iberian Peninsula). After defining and measuring the coordinates of the key points of a buried channel in the walls of eight trenches excavated parallel to the fault, we (a) adjusted a 3D straight line to these points and then extrapolated the tendency of this line onto a simplified fault plane; (b) repeated these two steps for the segment of the channel in the other side of the fault; and (c) measured the distance between the two resulting intersection points with the fault plane. In doing so, we avoided the near fault modification of the channel trace and obtained a three-dimensional measurement of offset and its uncertainty. This methodology is a substantial modification of previous procedures that require excavating progressively towards the fault, leading to possible underestimation of offset due to diffuse deformation near the fault. Combining the offset with numerical dating of the buried channel via U-series on soil carbonate, we calculated a maximum estimate of the net slip rate and its vertical and lateral components for the Alhama de Murcia fault.

  16. 3D measurements of ignition processes at 20 kHz in a supersonic combustor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Lin; Lei, Qingchun; Wu, Yue; Ombrello, Timothy M.; Carter, Campbell D.

    2015-05-01

    The ignition dynamics in a Mach 2 combustor were investigated using a three-dimensional (3D) diagnostic with 20 kHz temporal resolution. The diagnostic was based on a combination of tomographic chemiluminescence and fiber-based endoscopes (FBEs). Customized FBEs were employed to capture line-of-sight integrated chemiluminescence images (termed projections) of the combustor from eight different orientations simultaneously at 20 kHz. The measured projections were then used in a tomographic algorithm to obtain 3D reconstruction of the sparks, ignition kernel, and stable flame. Processing the reconstructions frame by frame resulted in 4D measurements. Key properties were then extracted to quantify the ignition processes, including 3D volume, surface area, sphericity, and velocity of the ignition kernel. The data collected in this work revealed detailed spatiotemporal dynamics of the ignition kernel, which are not obtainable with planar diagnostics, such as its growth, movement, and development into "stable" combustion. This work also illustrates the potential for obtaining quantitative 3D measurements using tomographic techniques and the practical utility of FBEs.

  17. Simultaneous 3D Strain and Flow Fields Measurement of a Model Artery under Unsteady Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toloui, Mostafa; Sheng, Jian

    2011-11-01

    Fluid-Structure Interaction imposes challenges in both aero-elasticity and biomedical studies. A simultaneous solid deformation and fluid flow measurement technique based on digital in-line holographic particle tracking velocimetry (PTV) has been developed. It allows us to measure concurrently 3D strain field of a deforming structure and the unsteady flow near it. To facilitate the measurement, both wall and flow are seeded with tracer particles distinguished by size. The motion of these tracers provides the 3D deformation of the wall and the 3D velocity distribution of the flow separately. A fully index matched facility including transparent artery and NaI solution is constructed to enable observations near the wall or through the complex geometry. An arterial model with the inner diameter of 9.5 mm and the thickness of 0.9 mm is manufactured from the cross-linked transparent PDMS at the mixing ratio of 1:10 and doped with mono-dispersed 19 μm polystyrene particles. A cinematic holographic PTV system is used to trace the 3D particle motion in the model and flow simultaneously. Preliminary study is performed within a sample volume of 15 × 15 × 75 mm with the spatial resolution of 7.4 μm in lateral and 10 μm in depth. Uncertainty and accuracy analysis will be reported. NSF Grant No: CBET-0844647.

  18. A hybrid experimental-numerical technique for determining 3D velocity fields from planar 2D PIV data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eden, A.; Sigurdson, M.; Mezić, I.; Meinhart, C. D.

    2016-09-01

    Knowledge of 3D, three component velocity fields is central to the understanding and development of effective microfluidic devices for lab-on-chip mixing applications. In this paper we present a hybrid experimental-numerical method for the generation of 3D flow information from 2D particle image velocimetry (PIV) experimental data and finite element simulations of an alternating current electrothermal (ACET) micromixer. A numerical least-squares optimization algorithm is applied to a theory-based 3D multiphysics simulation in conjunction with 2D PIV data to generate an improved estimation of the steady state velocity field. This 3D velocity field can be used to assess mixing phenomena more accurately than would be possible through simulation alone. Our technique can also be used to estimate uncertain quantities in experimental situations by fitting the gathered field data to a simulated physical model. The optimization algorithm reduced the root-mean-squared difference between the experimental and simulated velocity fields in the target region by more than a factor of 4, resulting in an average error less than 12% of the average velocity magnitude.

  19. Development of 3-D Ice Accretion Measurement Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Sam; Broeren, Andy P.; Addy, Harold E., Jr.; Sills, Robert; Pifer, Ellen M.

    2012-01-01

    A research plan is currently being implemented by NASA to develop and validate the use of a commercial laser scanner to record and archive fully three-dimensional (3-D) ice shapes from an icing wind tunnel. The plan focused specifically upon measuring ice accreted in the NASA Icing Research Tunnel (IRT). The plan was divided into two phases. The first phase was the identification and selection of the laser scanning system and the post-processing software to purchase and develop further. The second phase was the implementation and validation of the selected system through a series of icing and aerodynamic tests. Phase I of the research plan has been completed. It consisted of evaluating several scanning hardware and software systems against an established selection criteria through demonstrations in the IRT. The results of Phase I showed that all of the scanning systems that were evaluated were equally capable of scanning ice shapes. The factors that differentiated the scanners were ease of use and the ability to operate in a wide range of IRT environmental conditions.

  20. SALSA3D - A Global 3D P-Velocity Model of the Earth's Crust and Mantle for Improved Event Location

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballard, S.; Begnaud, M. L.; Young, C. J.; Hipp, J. R.; Chang, M.; Encarnacao, A. V.; Rowe, C. A.; Phillips, W. S.; Steck, L.

    2010-12-01

    To test the hypothesis that high quality 3D Earth models will produce seismic event locations which are more accurate and more precise, we are developing a global 3D P wave velocity model of the Earth’s crust and mantle using seismic tomography. In this paper, we present the most recent version of our model, SALSA3D version 1.5, and demonstrate its ability to reduce mislocations for a large set of realizations derived from a carefully chosen set of globally-distributed ground truth events. Our model is derived from the latest version of the Ground Truth (GT) catalog of P and Pn travel time picks assembled by Los Alamos National Laboratory. To prevent over-weighting due to ray path redundancy and to reduce the computational burden, we cluster rays to produce representative rays. Reduction in the total number of ray paths is ~50%. The model is represented using the triangular tessellation system described by Ballard et al. (2009), which incorporates variable resolution in both the geographic and radial dimensions.. For our starting model, we use a simplified two layer crustal model derived from the Crust 2.0 model over a uniform AK135 mantle. Sufficient damping is used to reduce velocity adjustments so that ray path changes between iterations are small. We obtain proper model smoothness by using progressive grid refinement, refining the grid only around areas with significant velocity changes from the starting model. At each grid refinement level except the last one we limit the number of iterations to prevent convergence thereby preserving aspects of broad features resolved at coarser resolutions. Our approach produces a smooth, multi-resolution model with node density appropriate to both ray coverage and the velocity gradients required by the data. This scheme is computationally expensive, so we use a distributed computing framework based on the Java Parallel Processing Framework, providing us with ~400 processors. Resolution of our model is assessed using a

  1. A 3-D velocity model for earthquake location from combined geological and geophysical data: a case study from the TABOO near fault observatory (Northern Apennines, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latorre, Diana; Lupattelli, Andrea; Mirabella, Francesco; Trippetta, Fabio; Valoroso, Luisa; Lomax, Anthony; Di Stefano, Raffaele; Collettini, Cristiano; Chiaraluce, Lauro

    2014-05-01

    Accurate hypocenter location at the crustal scale strongly depends on our knowledge of the 3D velocity structure. The integration of geological and geophysical data, when available, should contribute to a reliable seismic velocity model in order to guarantee high quality earthquake locations as well as their consistency with the geological structure. Here we present a 3D, P- and S-wave velocity model of the Upper Tiber valley region (Northern Apennines) retrieved by combining an extremely robust dataset of surface and sub-surface geological data (seismic reflection profiles and boreholes), in situ and laboratory velocity measurements, and earthquake data. The study area is a portion of the Apennine belt undergoing active extension where a set of high-angle normal faults is detached on the Altotiberina low-angle normal fault (ATF). From 2010, this area hosts a scientific infrastructure (the Alto Tiberina Near Fault Observatory, TABOO; http://taboo.rm.ingv.it/), consisting of a dense array of multi-sensor stations, devoted to studying the earthquakes preparatory phase and the deformation processes along the ATF fault system. The proposed 3D velocity model is a layered model in which irregular shaped surfaces limit the boundaries between main lithological units. The model has been constructed by interpolating depth converted seismic horizons interpreted along 40 seismic reflection profiles (down to 4s two way travel times) that have been calibrated with 6 deep boreholes (down to 5 km depth) and constrained by detailed geological maps and structural surveys data. The layers of the model are characterized by similar rock types and seismic velocity properties. The P- and S-waves velocities for each layer have been derived from velocity measurements coming from both boreholes (sonic logs) and laboratory, where measurements have been performed on analogue natural samples increasing confining pressure in order to simulate crustal conditions. In order to test the 3D velocity

  2. Multidimensional measurement by using 3-D PMD sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ringbeck, T.; Möller, T.; Hagebeuker, B.

    2007-06-01

    Optical Time-of-Flight measurement gives the possibility to enhance 2-D sensors by adding a third dimension using the PMD principle. Various applications in the automotive (e.g. pedestrian safety), industrial, robotics and multimedia fields require robust three-dimensional data (Schwarte et al., 2000). These applications, however, all have different requirements in terms of resolution, speed, distance and target characteristics. PMDTechnologies has developed 3-D sensors based on standard CMOS processes that can provide an optimized solution for a wide field of applications combined with high integration and cost-effective production. These sensors are realized in various layout formats from single pixel solutions for basic applications to low, middle and high resolution matrices for applications requiring more detailed data. Pixel pitches ranging from 10 micrometer up to a 300 micrometer or larger can be realized and give the opportunity to optimize the sensor chip depending on the application. One aspect of all optical sensors based on a time-of-flight principle is the necessity of handling background illumination. This can be achieved by various techniques, such as optical filters and active circuits on chip. The sensors' usage of the in-pixel so-called SBI-circuitry (suppression of background illumination) makes it even possible to overcome the effects of bright ambient light. This paper focuses on this technical requirement. In Sect. 2 we will roughly describe the basic operation principle of PMD sensors. The technical challenges related to the system characteristics of an active optical ranging technique are described in Sect. 3, technical solutions and measurement results are then presented in Sect. 4. We finish this work with an overview of actual PMD sensors and their key parameters (Sect. 5) and some concluding remarks in Sect. 6.

  3. Camera-based speckle noise reduction for 3-D absolute shape measurements.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hao; Kuschmierz, Robert; Czarske, Jürgen; Fischer, Andreas

    2016-05-30

    Simultaneous position and velocity measurements enable absolute 3-D shape measurements of fast rotating objects for instance for monitoring the cutting process in a lathe. Laser Doppler distance sensors enable simultaneous position and velocity measurements with a single sensor head by evaluating the scattered light signals. The superposition of several speckles with equal Doppler frequency but random phase on the photo detector results in an increased velocity and shape uncertainty, however. In this paper, we present a novel image evaluation method that overcomes the uncertainty limitations due to the speckle effect. For this purpose, the scattered light is detected with a camera instead of single photo detectors. Thus, the Doppler frequency from each speckle can be evaluated separately and the velocity uncertainty decreases with the square root of the number of camera lines. A reduction of the velocity uncertainty by the order of one magnitude is verified by the numerical simulations and experimental results, respectively. As a result, the measurement uncertainty of the absolute shape is not limited by the speckle effect anymore. PMID:27410133

  4. Angle estimation of simultaneous orthogonal rotations from 3D gyroscope measurements.

    PubMed

    Stančin, Sara; Tomažič, Sašo

    2011-01-01

    A 3D gyroscope provides measurements of angular velocities around its three intrinsic orthogonal axes, enabling angular orientation estimation. Because the measured angular velocities represent simultaneous rotations, it is not appropriate to consider them sequentially. Rotations in general are not commutative, and each possible rotation sequence has a different resulting angular orientation. None of these angular orientations is the correct simultaneous rotation result. However, every angular orientation can be represented by a single rotation. This paper presents an analytic derivation of the axis and angle of the single rotation equivalent to three simultaneous rotations around orthogonal axes when the measured angular velocities or their proportions are approximately constant. Based on the resulting expressions, a vector called the simultaneous orthogonal rotations angle (SORA) is defined, with components equal to the angles of three simultaneous rotations around coordinate system axes. The orientation and magnitude of this vector are equal to the equivalent single rotation axis and angle, respectively. As long as the orientation of the actual rotation axis is constant, given the SORA, the angular orientation of a rigid body can be calculated in a single step, thus making it possible to avoid computing the iterative infinitesimal rotation approximation. The performed test measurements confirm the validity of the SORA concept. SORA is simple and well-suited for use in the real-time calculation of angular orientation based on angular velocity measurements derived using a gyroscope. Moreover, because of its demonstrated simplicity, SORA can also be used in general angular orientation notation.

  5. Angle Estimation of Simultaneous Orthogonal Rotations from 3D Gyroscope Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Stančin, Sara; Tomažič, Sašo

    2011-01-01

    A 3D gyroscope provides measurements of angular velocities around its three intrinsic orthogonal axes, enabling angular orientation estimation. Because the measured angular velocities represent simultaneous rotations, it is not appropriate to consider them sequentially. Rotations in general are not commutative, and each possible rotation sequence has a different resulting angular orientation. None of these angular orientations is the correct simultaneous rotation result. However, every angular orientation can be represented by a single rotation. This paper presents an analytic derivation of the axis and angle of the single rotation equivalent to three simultaneous rotations around orthogonal axes when the measured angular velocities or their proportions are approximately constant. Based on the resulting expressions, a vector called the simultaneous orthogonal rotations angle (SORA) is defined, with components equal to the angles of three simultaneous rotations around coordinate system axes. The orientation and magnitude of this vector are equal to the equivalent single rotation axis and angle, respectively. As long as the orientation of the actual rotation axis is constant, given the SORA, the angular orientation of a rigid body can be calculated in a single step, thus making it possible to avoid computing the iterative infinitesimal rotation approximation. The performed test measurements confirm the validity of the SORA concept. SORA is simple and well-suited for use in the real-time calculation of angular orientation based on angular velocity measurements derived using a gyroscope. Moreover, because of its demonstrated simplicity, SORA can also be used in general angular orientation notation. PMID:22164090

  6. 3D magnetic geometric effects during 3D field application and comparison to measurements in DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilcox, R. S.; Unterberg, E. A.; Wingen, A.; Shafer, M. W.; Cianciosa, M. R.; Hillis, D. L.; McKee, G. R.; Bird, T. M.; Evans, T. E.

    2015-11-01

    Density pumpout during the application of 3D fields in tokamaks may be caused by changes to the plasma equilibrium shaping that destabilize microinstabilities, thereby increasing transport. Local geometric quantities of the magnetic field that are relevant for microinstabilities (curvature and local shear) are calculated using VMEC equilibria in typical RMP discharges on DIII-D. Measurements of phase-differenced soft X-ray emission in the pedestal region show a clear helical structure that is compared with a model of localized impurity transport based on the 3D geometry. Broadband density fluctuations measured by beam emission spectroscopy also show changes in magnitude with I-coil phase, in support of the theory that microstability changes with the magnetic geometry. A scan of 3D equilibria over a large range of DIII-D geometric parameter space has been preformed in order to map out the operating space of the microstability mechanism. Supported by US DOE DE-AC05-00OR22725, DE-FG02-89ER53296, DE-FC02-04ER54698.

  7. Microseismic monitoring of soft-rock landslide: contribution of a 3D velocity model for the location of seismic sources.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Floriane, Provost; Jean-Philippe, Malet; Cécile, Doubre; Julien, Gance; Alessia, Maggi; Agnès, Helmstetter

    2015-04-01

    Characterizing the micro-seismic activity of landslides is an important parameter for a better understanding of the physical processes controlling landslide behaviour. However, the location of the seismic sources on landslides is a challenging task mostly because of (a) the recording system geometry, (b) the lack of clear P-wave arrivals and clear wave differentiation, (c) the heterogeneous velocities of the ground. The objective of this work is therefore to test whether the integration of a 3D velocity model in probabilistic seismic source location codes improves the quality of the determination especially in depth. We studied the clay-rich landslide of Super-Sauze (French Alps). Most of the seismic events (rockfalls, slidequakes, tremors...) are generated in the upper part of the landslide near the main scarp. The seismic recording system is composed of two antennas with four vertical seismometers each located on the east and west sides of the seismically active part of the landslide. A refraction seismic campaign was conducted in August 2014 and a 3D P-wave model has been estimated using the Quasi-Newton tomography inversion algorithm. The shots of the seismic campaign are used as calibration shots to test the performance of the different location methods and to further update the 3D velocity model. Natural seismic events are detected with a semi-automatic technique using a frequency threshold. The first arrivals are picked using a kurtosis-based method and compared to the manual picking. Several location methods were finally tested. We compared a non-linear probabilistic method coupled with the 3D P-wave model and a beam-forming method inverted for an apparent velocity. We found that the Quasi-Newton tomography inversion algorithm provides results coherent with the original underlaying topography. The velocity ranges from 500 m.s-1 at the surface to 3000 m.s-1 in the bedrock. For the majority of the calibration shots, the use of a 3D velocity model

  8. A robust method to detect zero velocity for improved 3D personal navigation using inertial sensors.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhengyi; Wei, Jianming; Zhang, Bo; Yang, Weijun

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes a robust zero velocity (ZV) detector algorithm to accurately calculate stationary periods in a gait cycle. The proposed algorithm adopts an effective gait cycle segmentation method and introduces a Bayesian network (BN) model based on the measurements of inertial sensors and kinesiology knowledge to infer the ZV period. During the detected ZV period, an Extended Kalman Filter (EKF) is used to estimate the error states and calibrate the position error. The experiments reveal that the removal rate of ZV false detections by the proposed method increases 80% compared with traditional method at high walking speed. Furthermore, based on the detected ZV, the Personal Inertial Navigation System (PINS) algorithm aided by EKF performs better, especially in the altitude aspect. PMID:25831086

  9. Implementation and Validation of 3-D Ice Accretion Measurement Methodology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Sam; Broeren, Andy P.; Kreeger, Richard E.; Potapczuk, Mark; Utt, Lloyd

    2014-01-01

    A research program has been implemented to develop and validate the use of a commercial 3-D laser scanning system to record ice accretion geometry in the NASA Icing Research Tunnel. A main component of the program was the geometric assessment of the 3- D laser scanning system on a 2-D (straight wing) and a 3-D (swept wing) airfoil geometries. This exercise consisted of comparison of scanned ice accretion to castings of the same ice accretion. The scan data were also used to create rapid prototype artificial ice shapes that were scanned and compared to the original ice accretion. The results from geometric comparisons on the straight wing showed that the ice shape models generated through the scan/rapid prototype process compared reasonably well with the cast shapes. Similar results were obtained with the geometric comparisons on the swept wing. It was difficult to precisely compare the scans of the cast shapes to the original ice accretion scans because the cast shapes appear to have shrunk during the mold/casting process by as much as 0.10-inch. However the comparison of the local ice-shape features were possible and produced better results. The rapid prototype manufacturing process was shown to reproduce the original ice accretion scan normally within 0.01-inch.

  10. Particle Velocity Measuring System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arndt, G. Dickey (Inventor); Carl, James R. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    Method and apparatus are provided for determining the velocity of individual food particles within a liquid/solid food mixture that is cooked by an aseptic cooking method whereby the food mixture is heated as it flows through a flowline. At least one upstream and at least one downstream microwave transducer are provided to determine the minimum possible travel time of the fastest food particle through the flowline. In one embodiment, the upstream detector is not required. In another embodiment, a plurality of small dipole antenna markers are secured to a plurality of food particles to provide a plurality of signals as the markers pass the upstream and downstream transducers. The dipole antenna markers may also include a non-linear element to reradiate a harmonic frequency of a transmitter frequency. Upstream and downstream transducers include dipole antennas that are matched to the impedance of the food slurry and a signal transmission cable by various impedance matching means including unbalanced feed to the antennas.

  11. Large-scale three-dimensional measurement via combining 3D scanner and laser rangefinder.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jinlong; Sun, Zhengxing; Bai, Suqin

    2015-04-01

    This paper presents a three-dimensional (3D) measurement method of large-scale objects by integrating a 3D scanner and a laser rangefinder. The 3D scanner, used to perform partial section measurement, is fixed on a robotic arm which can slide on a guide rail. The laser rangefinder, used to compute poses of the 3D scanner, is rigidly connected to the 3D scanner. During large-scale measurement, after measuring a partial section, the 3D scanner is straightly moved forward along the guide rail to measure another section. Meanwhile, the poses of the 3D scanner are estimated according to its moved distance for different partial section alignments. The performance and effectiveness are evaluated by experiments. PMID:25967194

  12. 3D P-Wave Velocity Structure of the Crust and Relocation of Earthquakes in 21 the Lushan Source Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, X.; Wang, X.; Zhang, W.

    2014-12-01

    The double difference seismic tomography method is applied to the absolute first arrival P wave arrival times and high quality relative P arrival times of the Lushan seismic sequence to determine the detailed crustal 3D P wave velocity structure and the hypocenter parameters in the Lushan seismic area. The results show that the Lushan mainshock locates at 30.28 N, 103.98 E, with the depth of 16.38 km. The leading edge of aftershock in the northeast of mainshock present a spade with a steep dip angle, the aftershocks' extended length is about 12 km. In the southwest of the Lushan mainshock, the leading edge of aftershock in low velocity zone slope gently, the aftershocks' extended length is about 23 km. The P wave velocity structure of the Lushan seismic area shows obviously lateral heterogeneity. The P wave velocity anomalies represent close relationship with topographic relief and geological structure. In Baoxing area the complex rocks correspond obvious high-velocity anomalies extending down to 15 km depth,while the Cenozoic rocks are correlated with low-velocity anomalies. Our high-resolution tomographic model not only displays the general features contained in the previous models, but also reveals some new features. An obvious high-velocity anomaly is visible in Daxing area. The high-velocity anomalies beneath Baoxing and Daxing connect each other in 10 km depth, which makes the contrast between high and low velocity anomalies more sharp. Above 20 km depth the velocity structure in southwest and northeast segment of the mainshock shows a big difference: low-velocity anomalies are dominated the southwest segment, while high-velocity anomalies rule the northeast segment. The Lushan mainshock locates at the leading edge of a low-velocity anomaly surrounded by the Baoxing and Daxing high-velocity anomalies. The Lushan aftershocks in southwest are distributed in low-velocity anomalies or the transition belt: the footwall represents low-velocity anomalies, while

  13. An experimental technique for performing 3-D LDA measurements inside whirling annular seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Gerald L.; Johnson, Mark C.; Deotte, Robert E., Jr.; Thames, H. Davis, III.; Wiedner, Brian G.

    1992-01-01

    During the last several years, the Fluid Mechanics Division of the Turbomachinery Laboratory at Texas A&M University has developed a rather unique facility with the experimental capability for measuring the flow field inside journal bearings, labyrinth seals, and annular seals. The facility consists of a specially designed 3-D LDA system which is capable of measuring the instantaneous velocity vector within 0.2 mm of a wall while the laser beams are aligned almost perpendicular to the wall. This capability was required to measure the flow field inside journal bearings, labyrinth seals, and annular seals. A detailed description of this facility along with some representative results obtained for a whirling annular seal are presented.

  14. A 3-D shear velocity model of the southern North American and Caribbean plates from ambient noise and earthquake tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaite, B.; Villaseñor, A.; Iglesias, A.; Herraiz, M.; Jiménez-Munt, I.

    2015-02-01

    We use group velocities from earthquake tomography together with group and phase velocities from ambient noise tomography (ANT) of Rayleigh waves to invert for the 3-D shear-wave velocity structure (5-70 km) of the Caribbean (CAR) and southern North American (NAM) plates. The lithospheric model proposed offers a complete image of the crust and uppermost-mantle with imprints of the tectonic evolution. One of the most striking features inferred is the main role of the Ouachita-Marathon-Sonora orogeny front on the crustal seismic structure of the NAM plate. A new imaged feature is the low crustal velocities along the USA-Mexico border. The model also shows a break of the east-west mantle velocity dichotomy of the NAM and CAR plates beneath the Isthmus of the Tehuantepec and the Yucatan Block. High upper-mantle velocities along the Mesoamerican Subduction Zone coincide with inactive volcanic areas while the lowest velocities correspond to active volcanic arcs and thin lithospheric mantle regions.

  15. 3-D Crustal Velocity Structure of Central Idaho/ Eastern Oregon from Joint Inversion of Rayleigh Wave Group and Phase Velocities Derived from Ambient Seismic Noise: Newest Results from the IDOR Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bremner, P. M.; Panning, M. P.; Russo, R. M.; Mocanu, V. I.; Stanciu, A. C.; Torpey, M. E.; Hongsresawat, S.; VanDecar, J. C.

    2014-12-01

    We present the latest 3-D isotropic crustal velocity model beneath central Idaho and eastern Oregon. We produced the velocity model from vertical component Rayleigh wave group and phase velocity measurements on data from the IDaho/ORegon (IDOR) Passive seismic network, 86 broadband seismic stations, using ambient noise tomography and the methods of Gallego et. al (2010) and Lin et. al (2008). We calculated inter-station group/phase velocities in narrow frequency bands from travel-time measurements of the stacked cross-correlations (bandpass filtered between 2 and 30 seconds), which we used to invert for velocity structure beneath the network. Goals of our work include refining models of crustal structure in the accreted Blue Mountain terranes in the western study area; determining the depth extent of the Salmon River Suture/West Idaho Shear Zone (WISZ), which crosses north-south through the middle of the network; determining the architecture of the Idaho batholith, an extensive largely crustal-derived pluton; and examining the nature of the autochthonous (?) North American crust and lithosphere beneath and east of the batholith. We derived Rayleigh wave group and phase velocity maps for each frequency band using the damped least-squares inversion method of Tarantola (2005), and then jointly inverted for velocity with depth. Moho depths are prescribed in the joint inversions based on receiver functions, also from the IDOR seismic data, and provides a starting crustal velocity model. 3-D checkerboard resolution tests indicate lateral resolution of better than 40 km. Preliminary results show higher S wave velocities in the western study area, and lower velocities in the lower crust on the east side of the network, consistent with Basin-and-Range style extension there. A tabular velocity anomaly juxtaposing higher above lower seismic velocities dips shallow west in the midcrust on the west side of the network.

  16. Modeling and validation of a 3D velocity structure for the Santa Clara Valley, California, for seismic-wave simulations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hartzell, S.; Harmsen, S.; Williams, R.A.; Carver, D.; Frankel, A.; Choy, G.; Liu, P.-C.; Jachens, R.C.; Brocher, T.M.; Wentworth, C.M.

    2006-01-01

    A 3D seismic velocity and attenuation model is developed for Santa Clara Valley, California, and its surrounding uplands to predict ground motions from scenario earthquakes. The model is developed using a variety of geologic and geophysical data. Our starting point is a 3D geologic model developed primarily from geologic mapping and gravity and magnetic surveys. An initial velocity model is constructed by using seismic velocities from boreholes, reflection/refraction lines, and spatial autocorrelation microtremor surveys. This model is further refined and the seismic attenuation is estimated through waveform modeling of weak motions from small local events and strong-ground motion from the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake. Waveforms are calculated to an upper frequency of 1 Hz using a parallelized finite-difference code that utilizes two regions with a factor of 3 difference in grid spacing to reduce memory requirements. Cenozoic basins trap and strongly amplify ground motions. This effect is particularly strong in the Evergreen Basin on the northeastern side of the Santa Clara Valley, where the steeply dipping Silver Creek fault forms the southwestern boundary of the basin. In comparison, the Cupertino Basin on the southwestern side of the valley has a more moderate response, which is attributed to a greater age and velocity of the Cenozoic fill. Surface waves play a major role in the ground motion of sedimentary basins, and they are seen to strongly develop along the western margins of the Santa Clara Valley for our simulation of the Loma Prieta earthquake.

  17. On the Quality of Velocity Interpolation Schemes for Marker-In-Cell Methods on 3-D Staggered Grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaus, B.; Pusok, A. E.; Popov, A.

    2015-12-01

    The marker-in-cell method is generally considered to be a flexible and robust method to model advection of heterogenous non-diffusive properties (i.e. rock type or composition) in geodynamic problems or incompressible Stokes problems. In this method, Lagrangian points carrying compositional information are advected with the ambient velocity field on an immobile, Eulerian grid. However, velocity interpolation from grid points to marker locations is often performed without preserving the zero divergence of the velocity field at the interpolated locations (i.e. non-conservative). Such interpolation schemes can induce non-physical clustering of markers when strong velocity gradients are present (Jenny et al., 2001) and this may, eventually, result in empty grid cells, a serious numerical violation of the marker-in-cell method. Solutions to this problem include: using larger mesh resolutions and/or marker densities, or repeatedly controlling the marker distribution (i.e. inject/delete), but which does not have an established physical background. To remedy this at low computational costs, Jenny et al. (2001) and Meyer and Jenny (2004) proposed a simple, conservative velocity interpolation (CVI) scheme for 2-D staggered grid, while Wang et al. (2015) extended the formulation to 3-D finite element methods. Here, we follow up with these studies and report on the quality of velocity interpolation methods for 2-D and 3-D staggered grids. We adapt the formulations from both Jenny et al. (2001) and Wang et al. (2015) for use on 3-D staggered grids, where the velocity components have different node locations as compared to finite element, where they share the same node location. We test the different interpolation schemes (CVI and non-CVI) in combination with different advection schemes (Euler, RK2 and RK4) and with/out marker control on Stokes problems with strong velocity gradients, which are discretized using a finite difference method. We show that a conservative formulation

  18. 3D P-wave velocity structure of the crust and relocation of earthquakes in the Lushan, China, source area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Xiangwei; Wang, Xiaona; Zhang, Wenbo

    2016-04-01

    Many researchers have investigated the Lushan source area with geological and geophysical approaches since the 2013 Lushan, China, earthquake happened. Compared with the previous tomographic studies, we have used a much large data set and an updated tomographic method to determine a small scale three-dimensional P wave velocity structure with spatial resolution less than 5km, which plays the important role for understanding the deep structure and the genetic mechanism beneath the Lushan area. The double difference seismic tomography method is applied to 50,711 absolute first arrival P wave arrival times and 7,294,691 high quality relative P arrival times of 5,285 events of Lushan seismic sequence to simultaneously determine the detailed crustal 3D P wave velocity structure and the hypocenter parameters in the Lushan seismic area. This method takes account of the path anomaly biases explicitly by making full use of valuable information of seismic wave propagation jointly with absolute and relative arrival time data. Our results show that the Lushan mainshock locates at 30.28N, 103.98E, with the depth of 16.38km. The front edge of aftershock in the northeast of mainshock present a spade with a steep dip angle, the aftershocks' extended length is about 12km. In the southwest of Lushan mainshock, the front edge of aftershock in low velocity zone slope gently, the aftershocks' extended length is about 23km. Our high-resolution tomographic model not only displays the general features contained in the previous models, but also reveals some new features. The Tianquan, Shuangshi and Daguan line lies in the transition zone between high velocity anomalies to the southeast and low velocity anomalies to the northwest at the ground surface. An obvious high-velocity anomaly is visible in Daxing area. With the depth increasing, Baoxing high velocity anomaly extends to Lingguan, while the southeast of the Tianquan, Shuangshi and Daguan line still shows low velocity. The high-velocity

  19. Development of a State-Wide 3-D Seismic Tomography Velocity Model for California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thurber, C. H.; Lin, G.; Zhang, H.; Hauksson, E.; Shearer, P.; Waldhauser, F.; Hardebeck, J.; Brocher, T.

    2007-12-01

    We report on progress towards the development of a state-wide tomographic model of the P-wave velocity for the crust and uppermost mantle of California. The dataset combines first arrival times from earthquakes and quarry blasts recorded on regional network stations and travel times of first arrivals from explosions and airguns recorded on profile receivers and network stations. The principal active-source datasets are Geysers-San Pablo Bay, Imperial Valley, Livermore, W. Mojave, Gilroy-Coyote Lake, Shasta region, Great Valley, Morro Bay, Mono Craters-Long Valley, PACE, S. Sierras, LARSE 1 and 2, Loma Prieta, BASIX, San Francisco Peninsula and Parkfield. Our beta-version model is coarse (uniform 30 km horizontal and variable vertical gridding) but is able to image the principal features in previous separate regional models for northern and southern California, such as the high-velocity subducting Gorda Plate, upper to middle crustal velocity highs beneath the Sierra Nevada and much of the Coast Ranges, the deep low-velocity basins of the Great Valley, Ventura, and Los Angeles, and a high- velocity body in the lower crust underlying the Great Valley. The new state-wide model has improved areal coverage compared to the previous models, and extends to greater depth due to the data at large epicentral distances. We plan a series of steps to improve the model. We are enlarging and calibrating the active-source dataset as we obtain additional picks from investigators and perform quality control analyses on the existing and new picks. We will also be adding data from more quarry blasts, mainly in northern California, following an identification and calibration procedure similar to Lin et al. (2006). Composite event construction (Lin et al., in press) will be carried out for northern California for use in conventional tomography. A major contribution of the state-wide model is the identification of earthquakes yielding arrival times at both the Northern California Seismic

  20. 3D fiber probe for multi sensor coordinate measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ettemeyer, A.

    2011-12-01

    Increasing manufacturing accuracy requirements enforce the development of innovative and highly sensitive measuring tools. Especially for measurement with sub micrometer accuracy, the sensor principle has to be chosen appropriately for each measurement surface. Modern multi sensor coordinate measurements systems allow automatic selection of different sensor heads to measure different areas or properties of a sample. As example, different types of optical sensors as well as tactile sensors can be used with the same machine. In this paper we describe different principles of optical sensors used in multi sensor coordinate measurement systems as well as a new approach for tactile measurement with sub micrometer accuracy. A special fiber probe has been developed. The tip of the fiber probe is formed as a sphere. The lateral position of this sphere is observed by a microscope optics and can be determined to a fraction of a micrometer. Additionally, a novel optical set-up now even allows the determination of the z-position of the fiber tip with sub micrometer accuracy. For this purpose we use an interferometric set-up. The light of laser is coupled into the optical fiber. The light, exiting the fiber tip is collected by a microscope optics and superposed with a reference wave, generated directly from the laser. The result is an interferometric signal which is recorded by the camera and processed by a computer. With this set-up, the zdisplacement of the fiber sphere can be measured with an accuracy of a fraction of the used laser wavelength.

  1. ALE3D Simulation and Measurement of Violence in a Fast Cookoff Experiment with LX-10

    SciTech Connect

    McClelland, M A; Maienschein, J L; Howard, W M; deHaven, M R

    2006-11-22

    We performed a computational and experimental analysis of fast cookoff of LX-10 (94.7% HMX, 5.3% Viton A) confined in a 2 kbar steel tube with reinforced end caps. A Scaled-Thermal-Explosion-eXperiment (STEX) was completed in which three radiant heaters were used to heat the vessel until ignition, resulting in a moderately violent explosion after 20.4 minutes. Thermocouple measurements showed tube temperatures as high as 340 C at ignition and LX-10 surface temperatures as high as 279 C, which is near the melting point of HMX. Three micro-power radar systems were used to measure mean fragment velocities of 840 m/s. Photonics Doppler Velocimeters (PDVs) showed a rapid acceleration of fragments over 80 {micro}s. A one-dimensional ALE3D cookoff model at the vessel midplane was used to simulate the heating, thermal expansion, LX-10 decomposition composition, and closing of the gap between the HE (High Explosive) and vessel wall. Although the ALE3D simulation terminated before ignition, the model provided a good representation of heat transfer through the case and across the dynamic gap to the explosive.

  2. Accuracy of volume measurement using 3D ultrasound and development of CT-3D US image fusion algorithm for prostate cancer radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Baek, Jihye; Huh, Jangyoung; Hyun An, So; Oh, Yoonjin; Kim, Myungsoo; Kim, DongYoung; Chung, Kwangzoo; Cho, Sungho; Lee, Rena

    2013-02-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the accuracy of measuring volumes using three-dimensional ultrasound (3D US), and to verify the feasibility of the replacement of CT-MR fusion images with CT-3D US in radiotherapy treatment planning. Methods: Phantoms, consisting of water, contrast agent, and agarose, were manufactured. The volume was measured using 3D US, CT, and MR devices. A CT-3D US and MR-3D US image fusion software was developed using the Insight Toolkit library in order to acquire three-dimensional fusion images. The quality of the image fusion was evaluated using metric value and fusion images. Results: Volume measurement, using 3D US, shows a 2.8 {+-} 1.5% error, 4.4 {+-} 3.0% error for CT, and 3.1 {+-} 2.0% error for MR. The results imply that volume measurement using the 3D US devices has a similar accuracy level to that of CT and MR. Three-dimensional image fusion of CT-3D US and MR-3D US was successfully performed using phantom images. Moreover, MR-3D US image fusion was performed using human bladder images. Conclusions: 3D US could be used in the volume measurement of human bladders and prostates. CT-3D US image fusion could be used in monitoring the target position in each fraction of external beam radiation therapy. Moreover, the feasibility of replacing the CT-MR image fusion to the CT-3D US in radiotherapy treatment planning was verified.

  3. Study on 3-D velocity structure of crust and upper mantle in Sichuan-yunnan region, China

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wang, C.; Mooney, W.D.; Wang, X.; Wu, J.; Lou, H.; Wang, F.

    2002-01-01

    Based on the first arrival P and S data of 4 625 regional earthquakes recorded at 174 stations dispersed in the Yunnan and Sichuan Provinces, the 3-D velocity structure of crust and upper mantle in the region is determined, incorporating with previous deep geophysical data. In the upper crust, a positive anomaly velocity zone exists in the Sichuan basin, whereas a negative anomaly velocity zone exists in the western Sichuan plateau. The boundary between the positive and negative anomaly zones is the Longmenshan fault zone. The images of lower crust and upper mantle in the Longmenshan fault, Xianshuihe fault, Honghe fault and others appear the characteristic of tectonic boundary, indicating that the faults litely penetrate the Moho discontinuity. The negative velocity anomalies at the depth of 50 km in the Tengchong volcanic area and the Panxi tectonic zone appear to be associated with the temperature and composition variations in the upper mantle. The overall features of the crustal and the upper mantle structures in the Sichuan-Yunnan region are the lower average velocity in both crust and uppermost mantle, the large crustal thickness variations, and the existence of high conductivity layer in the crust or/and upper mantle, and higher geothermal value. All these features are closely related to the collision between the Indian and the Asian plates. The crustal velocity in the Sichuan-Yunnan rhombic block generally shows normal.value or positive anomaly, while the negative anomaly exists in the area along the large strike-slip faults as the block boundary. It is conducive to the crustal block side-pressing out along the faults. In the major seismic zones, the seismicity is relative to the negative anomaly velocity. Most strong earthquakes occurred in the upper-mid crust with positive anomaly or normal velocity, where the negative anomaly zone generally exists below.

  4. Present-Day 3D Velocity Field of Eastern North America Based on Continuous GPS Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goudarzi, Mohammad Ali; Cocard, Marc; Santerre, Rock

    2016-07-01

    The Saint Lawrence River valley in eastern Canada was studied using observations of continuously operating GPS (CGPS) stations. The area is one of the most seismically active regions in eastern North America characterized by many earthquakes, which is also subject to an ongoing glacial isostatic adjustment. We present the current three-dimensional velocity field of eastern North America obtained from more than 14 years (9 years on average) of data at 112 CGPS stations. Bernese GNSS and GITSA software were used for CGPS data processing and position time series analysis, respectively. The results show the counterclockwise rotation of the North American plate in the No-Net-Rotation model with the average of 16.8 ± 0.7 mm/year constrained to ITRF 2008. We also present an ongoing uplift model for the study region based on the present-day CGPS observations. The model shows uplift all over eastern Canada with the maximum rate of 13.7 ± 1.2 mm/year and subsidence to the south mainly over northern USA with a typical rate of -1 to -2 mm/year and the minimum value of -2.7 ± 1.4 mm/year. We compared our model with the rate of radial displacements from the ICE-5G model. Both models agree within 0.02 mm/year at the best stations; however, our model shows a systematic spatial tilt compared to ICE-5G. The misfits between two models amount to the maximum relative subsidence of -6.1 ± 1.1 mm/year to the east and maximum relative uplift of 5.9 ± 2.7 mm/year to the west. The intraplate horizontal velocities are radially outward from the centers of maximum uplift and are inward to the centers of maximum subsidence with the typical velocity of 1-1.6 ± 0.4 mm/year that is in agreement with the ICE-5G model to the first order.

  5. Measuring heterogenous stress fields in a 3D colloidal glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Neil; Bierbaum, Matthew; Bi, Max; Sethna, James; Cohen, Itai

    Glass in our common experience is hard and fragile. But it still bends, yields, and flows slowly under loads. The yielding of glass, a well documented yet not fully understood flow behavior, is governed by the heterogenous local stresses in the material. While resolving stresses at the atomic scale is not feasible, measurements of stresses at the single particle level in colloidal glasses, a widely used model system for atomic glasses, has recently been made possible using Stress Assessment from Local Structural Anisotropy (SALSA). In this work, we use SALSA to visualize the three dimensional stress network in a hard-sphere glass during start-up shear. By measuring the evolution of this stress network we identify local-yielding. We find that these local-yielding events often require only minimal structural rearrangement and as such have most likely been ignored in previous analyses. We then relate these micro-scale yielding events to the macro-scale flow behavior observed using bulk measurements.

  6. An optical real-time 3D measurement for analysis of facial shape and movement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qican; Su, Xianyu; Chen, Wenjing; Cao, Yiping; Xiang, Liqun

    2003-12-01

    Optical non-contact 3-D shape measurement provides a novel and useful tool for analysis of facial shape and movement in presurgical and postsurgical regular check. In this article we present a system, which allows a precise 3-D visualization of the patient's facial before and after craniofacial surgery. We discussed, in this paper, the real time 3-D image capture, processing and the 3-D phase unwrapping method to recover complex shape deformation when the movement of the mouth. The result of real-time measurement for facial shape and movement will be helpful for the more ideal effect in plastic surgery.

  7. 3-D seismic velocity structure of the crust and the uppermost mantle in the northeastern Japan Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Dapeng; Horiuchi, Shigeki; Hasegawa, Akira

    1990-09-01

    3-D seismic velocity structure of the crust and the uppermost mantle beneath the northeastern Japan Arc is investigated by using arrival time data from local earthquakes. We use a velocity model composed of three layers corresponding to the upper crust, the lower crust and the uppermost mantle, respectively. Taking into account the observed regional variation of P n-velocity, the uppermost mantle is further divided into three parts by two P n-velocity boundaries near the coasts of the Japan Sea and the Pacific Ocean. The velocities within the upper crust, the lower crust and the three parts of the uppermost mantle are assumed to be constant. Locations of two P n-velocity boundaries and depth distributions of the Conrad and the Moho discontinuities are expressed by continuous functions of unknown parameters. Station corrections and hypocenters are also introduced to be unknowns. These unknown parameters are determined by inverting arrival time data of P- and S-wave first arrivals and clear later arrivals of P g- and P ∗-waves. The P n-velocity boundary between the land and the Pacific Ocean is located approximately along the Pacific coastline and that between the land and the Japan Sea is nearly along the Japan Sea coastline. The Conrad and the Moho discontinuities are at depths ranging from 14 to 20 km and from 27 to 36 km, respectively. The Conrad and the Moho depths have similar spatial distributions. They are deep beneath the land and become shallower toward the western and the eastern coastlines. Beneath the land, they are shallow in the central part of the Tohoku District and become deeper toward both the north and the south directions. In the north, they become shallow again.

  8. Ozone Measurements and a 3D Chemical Transport Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stolarski, Richard S.; Douglass, Anne R.; Frith, Stacey; Steenrod, Steven; Polansky, Brian

    2004-01-01

    We have used our three-dimensional chemical transport model (CTM) to calculate the expected reponse of stratospheric composition over the past 30 years to forcing by chlorine and bromine compounds, solar ultraviolet, and volcanic aerosols. The CTM uses off-line winds and temperatures fiom a 50-year run of the finite volume general circulation model (FVGCM). We compare the total column ozone and the ozone profile fiom the CTM output to a variety of data sources. These include a merged total ozone data set from TOMS and SBUV using the new version 8 algorithm. Total ozone fiom the CTM are compared to ground-station measurements of total ozone at specific locations. Ozone profiles are compared to satellite meausrements fiom SBUV, SAGE, and HALOE. Profiles are also compared to ozonesondes over several locations. The results of the comparisons are quantified by using a time-series statistical analysis to determine trends, solar cycle, and volcanic reponse in both the model and in the data. Initial results indicate that the model responds to forcings in a way that is similar to the observed atmospheric response. The model does seem to be more sensitive to the chlorine and bromine perturbation ihan is the data. Further details and comparisons wiii be discussed.

  9. Calibration of 3-D wind measurements on a single-engine research aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallaun, C.; Giez, A.; Baumann, R.

    2015-08-01

    An innovative calibration method for the wind speed measurement using a boom-mounted Rosemount model 858 AJ air velocity probe is introduced. The method is demonstrated for a sensor system installed on a medium-size research aircraft which is used for measurements in the atmospheric boundary layer. The method encounters a series of coordinated flight manoeuvres to directly estimate the aerodynamic influences on the probe and to calculate the measurement uncertainties. The introduction of a differential Global Positioning System (DGPS) combined with a high-accuracy inertial reference system (IRS) has brought major advances to airborne measurement techniques. The exact determination of geometrical height allows the use of the pressure signal as an independent parameter. Furthermore, the exact height information and the stepwise calibration process lead to maximum accuracy. The results show a measurement uncertainty for the aerodynamic influence of the dynamic and static pressures of 0.1 hPa. The applied parametrisation does not require any height dependencies or time shifts. After extensive flight tests a correction for the flow angles (attack and sideslip angles) was found, which is necessary for a successful wind calculation. A new method is demonstrated to correct for the aerodynamic influence on the sideslip angle. For the three-dimensional (3-D) wind vector (with 100 Hz resolution) a novel error propagation scheme is tested, which determines the measurement uncertainties to be 0.3 m s-1 for the horizontal and 0.2 m s-1 for the vertical wind components.

  10. Calibration of 3-D wind measurements on a single engine research aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallaun, C.; Giez, A.; Baumann, R.

    2015-02-01

    An innovative calibration method for the wind speed measurement using a boom mounted Rosemount model 858 AJ air velocity probe is introduced. The method is demonstrated for a sensor system installed on a medium size research aircraft which is used for measurements in the atmospheric boundary layer. The method encounters a series of coordinated flight manoeuvres to directly estimate the aerodynamic influences on the probe and to calculate the measurement uncertainties. The introduction of a differential Global Positioning System (DGPS) combined with a high accuracy Inertial Reference System (IRS) has brought major advances to airborne measurement techniques. The exact determination of geometrical height allows the use of the pressure signal as an independent parameter. Furthermore, the exact height information and the stepwise calibration process lead to maximum accuracy. The results show a measurement uncertainty for the aerodynamic influence of the dynamic and static pressures of 0.1 hPa. The applied parametrisation does not require any height dependencies or time shifts. After extensive flight tests a correction for the flow angles (attack and sideslip angles) was found, which is necessary for a successful wind calculation. A new method is demonstrated to correct for the aerodynamic influence on the sideslip angle. For the 3-D wind vector (with 100 Hz resolution) a novel error propagation scheme is tested, which determines the measurement uncertainties to be 0.3 m s-1 for the horizontal and 0.2 m s-1 for the vertical wind components.

  11. Anisotropic 3-D Crustal Velocity Structure of Idaho/ Oregon from a Joint Inversion of Group and Phase Velocities of Love and Rayleigh Waves from Ambient Seismic Noise: Results from the IDOR Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bremner, P. M.; Panning, M. P.; Russo, R.; Mocanu, V. I.; Stanciu, A. C.; Torpey, M. E.; Hongsresawat, S.; VanDecar, J. C.

    2015-12-01

    We present new 3-D radially anisotropic and isotropic crustal velocity models beneath central Idaho and eastern Oregon. We produced the velocity models from Love and horizontal component Rayleigh wave group and phase velocity measurements on the IDaho/ORegon (IDOR) Passive seismic network, 86 broadband seismic stations, dataset using ambient noise tomography and the methods of Gallego et. al (2010) and Lin et. al (2008). We calculated inter-station group/phase velocities in narrow frequency bands from travel-time measurements of the rotated stacked horizontal component cross-correlations (bandpass filtered between 2 and 30 seconds), which we used to invert for velocity structure beneath the network. We derived group and phase velocity maps for each frequency band using the damped least-squares inversion method of Tarantola (2005), and then jointly inverted for velocity with depth. Moho depths are prescribed in the joint inversions based on receiver functions, also from the IDOR seismic data, and provides a starting crustal velocity model. Goals of our work include refining models of crustal structure in the accreted Blue Mountain terranes in the western study area; determining the depth extent of the Salmon River Suture/West Idaho Shear Zone (WISZ), which crosses north-south through the middle of the network; determining the architecture of the Idaho batholith, an extensive largely crustal-derived pluton; and examining the nature of the autochthonous (?) North American crust and lithosphere beneath and east of the batholith.

  12. Validation of a CFD model by using 3D sonic anemometers to analyse the air velocity generated by an air-assisted sprayer equipped with two axial fans.

    PubMed

    García-Ramos, F Javier; Malón, Hugo; Aguirre, A Javier; Boné, Antonio; Puyuelo, Javier; Vidal, Mariano

    2015-01-22

    A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model of the air flow generated by an air-assisted sprayer equipped with two axial fans was developed and validated by practical experiments in the laboratory. The CFD model was developed by considering the total air flow supplied by the sprayer fan to be the main parameter, rather than the outlet air velocity. The model was developed for three air flows corresponding to three fan blade settings and assuming that the sprayer is stationary. Actual measurements of the air velocity near the sprayer were taken using 3D sonic anemometers. The workspace sprayer was divided into three sections, and the air velocity was measured in each section on both sides of the machine at a horizontal distance of 1.5, 2.5, and 3.5 m from the machine, and at heights of 1, 2, 3, and 4 m above the ground The coefficient of determination (R2) between the simulated and measured values was 0.859, which demonstrates a good correlation between the simulated and measured data. Considering the overall data, the air velocity values produced by the CFD model were not significantly different from the measured values.

  13. Validation of a CFD Model by Using 3D Sonic Anemometers to Analyse the Air Velocity Generated by an Air-Assisted Sprayer Equipped with Two Axial Fans

    PubMed Central

    García-Ramos, F. Javier; Malón, Hugo; Aguirre, A. Javier; Boné, Antonio; Puyuelo, Javier; Vidal, Mariano

    2015-01-01

    A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model of the air flow generated by an air-assisted sprayer equipped with two axial fans was developed and validated by practical experiments in the laboratory. The CFD model was developed by considering the total air flow supplied by the sprayer fan to be the main parameter, rather than the outlet air velocity. The model was developed for three air flows corresponding to three fan blade settings and assuming that the sprayer is stationary. Actual measurements of the air velocity near the sprayer were taken using 3D sonic anemometers. The workspace sprayer was divided into three sections, and the air velocity was measured in each section on both sides of the machine at a horizontal distance of 1.5, 2.5, and 3.5 m from the machine, and at heights of 1, 2, 3, and 4 m above the ground The coefficient of determination (R2) between the simulated and measured values was 0.859, which demonstrates a good correlation between the simulated and measured data. Considering the overall data, the air velocity values produced by the CFD model were not significantly different from the measured values. PMID:25621611

  14. A global 3D P-velocity model of the Earth's crust and mantle for improved event location.

    SciTech Connect

    Ballard, Sanford; Encarnacao, Andre Villanova; Begnaud, Michael A.; Rowe, Charlotte A.; Lewis, Jennifer E.; Young, Christopher John; Chang, Marcus C.; Hipp, James Richard

    2010-04-01

    To test the hypothesis that high quality 3D Earth models will produce seismic event locations which are more accurate and more precise, we are developing a global 3D P wave velocity model of the Earth's crust and mantle using seismic tomography. In this paper, we present the most recent version of our model, SALSA3D (SAndia LoS Alamos) version 1.4, and demonstrate its ability to reduce mislocations for a large set of realizations derived from a carefully chosen set of globally-distributed ground truth events. Our model is derived from the latest version of the Ground Truth (GT) catalog of P and Pn travel time picks assembled by Los Alamos National Laboratory. To prevent over-weighting due to ray path redundancy and to reduce the computational burden, we cluster rays to produce representative rays. Reduction in the total number of ray paths is > 55%. The model is represented using the triangular tessellation system described by Ballard et al. (2009), which incorporates variable resolution in both the geographic and radial dimensions. For our starting model, we use a simplified two layer crustal model derived from the Crust 2.0 model over a uniform AK135 mantle. Sufficient damping is used to reduce velocity adjustments so that ray path changes between iterations are small. We obtain proper model smoothness by using progressive grid refinement, refining the grid only around areas with significant velocity changes from the starting model. At each grid refinement level except the last one we limit the number of iterations to prevent convergence thereby preserving aspects of broad features resolved at coarser resolutions. Our approach produces a smooth, multi-resolution model with node density appropriate to both ray coverage and the velocity gradients required by the data. This scheme is computationally expensive, so we use a distributed computing framework based on the Java Parallel Processing Framework, providing us with {approx}400 processors. Resolution of our model

  15. Measurement of retinal blood velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winchester, Leonard W., Jr.; Chou, Nee-Yin

    2006-02-01

    A fundus camera was modified to illuminate the retina of a rabbit model with low power laser light in order to obtain laser speckle images. A fast-exposure charge-coupled device (CCD) camera was used to capture laser speckle images of the retina. Image acquisition was synchronized with the arterial pulses of the rabbit to ensure that all images are obtained at the same point in the cardiac cycle. The rabbits were sedated and a speculum was inserted to prevent the eyelid from closing. Both albino (New Zealand; pigmented (Dutch belted) rabbits were used in the study. The rabbit retina is almost avascular. The measurements are obtained for choroidal tissue as well as retinal tissue. Because the retina is in a region of high metabolism, blood velocity is strongly affected by blood oxygen saturation. Measurements of blood velocity obtained over a wide range of O II saturations (58%-100%) showed that blood velocity increases with decreasing O II saturation. For most experiments, the left eye of the rabbit was used for laser measurements whereas the right eye served as a control. No observable difference between pre- and post-experimented eye was noted. Histological examinations of retinal tissue subjected to repeated laser measurements showed no indication of tissue damage.

  16. Indirectly online 3D position measurement based on machine vision using auxiliary gauge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Qinghua; He, Tao

    2008-12-01

    Accurate and rapid 3D position measurement is required in many industrial applications. Traditional 3D position measurements is usually applied in laboratories using coordinate measuring machine(CMM). CMM can achieve a high accuracy, but efficiency is low. Machine vision is a new technology in position measuring. Measurement based on machine vision has non-touch, high speed, high accuracy and other prominent advantages. Because depth information is lost during the process of image formation, synthesizing operation become more complicated, direct 3D position measurement based on machine vision has hardly been used in online industry application. In this paper, an indirectly online 3D position measurement system is discussed. This system is consisted with an assistant gauge, one set of machine vision system and a computer. Through the assistant gauge, 3D position measurement is transffered to 2D measurement. Thus, making full use of existing 2D image processing theory and method, accuracy and speed of measurement of 3D position measurement may be promoted effectively.

  17. A 3D Seismic Velocity Model Offshore Southern California from Ambient Noise Tomography of the ALBACORE OBS Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, M. D.; Bowden, D. C.; Tsai, V. C.; Weeraratne, D. S.

    2015-12-01

    The Pacific-North America plate boundary in Southern California extends far west of the coastline, and a 12-month ocean bottom seismometer (OBS) array spanned the western side of the plate boundary to image lithospheric seismic velocities. Velocities are modeled through stacked cross correlations of ambient noise data. Twelve months of continuous data were used from 22 OBS stations and ~30 coastal and island Southern California Seismic Network stations. Particular attention has been paid to improving signal-to-noise ratios in the noise correlations with OBS stations by removing the effects of instrument tilt and infragravity waves. Different applications of preprocessing techniques allow us to distinguish the fundamental and first higher order Rayleigh modes, especially in deep water OBS pairs where the water layer dominates crustal sensitivity of the fundamental mode. Standard time domain and frequency domain methods are used to examine surface wave dispersion curves for group and phase velocities between 5 and 50 second periods, and these are inverted for 3D velocity structure. The results define the transition in three dimensions from continental lithospheric structure in the near-shore region to oceanic structure west of the continental borderland. While the most prominent features of the model relate to thinning of the crust west of the Patton Escarpment, other notable anomalies are present north-to-south throughout the continental borderland and along the coast from the Los Angeles Basin to the Peninsular Ranges. The velocity model will help describe the region's tectonic history, as well as provide new constraints for determination of earthquake relocations and rupture styles.

  18. Measuring mean velocities with Pogo

    SciTech Connect

    Rossby, T.; Fontaine, J.; Hummon, J. )

    1991-10-01

    Pogo is a sample technique for measuring water transport between the surface and some preselected depth. Equipped with a 12-kHz pinger for tracking and range measurements, a xenon flasher for nighttime relocation, and a VHF beacon for daytime recovery, it has been used over 200 times in the Gulf Stream to measure volume transport and to provide a reference velocity (transport) for geostrophic calculations from pairs of hydrographic stations. This note gives a brief technical description of Pogo and how it is used. Loran C was used for navigation in this study, but with the advent of the Global Positioning System (GPS), Pogo can be used worldwide. 6 refs.

  19. Measuring mean velocities with Pogo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossby, T.; Fontaine, J.; Hummon, J.

    1991-10-01

    Pogo is a sample technique for measuring water transport between the surface and some preselected depth. Equipped with a 12-kHz pinger for tracking and range measurements, a xenon flasher for nighttime relocation, and a VHF beacon for daytime recovery, it has been used over 200 times in the Gulf Stream to measure volume transport and to provide a reference velocity (transport) for geostrophic calculations from pairs of hydrographic stations. This note gives a brief technical description of Pogo and how it is used. Loran C was used for navigation in this study, but with the advent of the Global Positioning System (GPS), Pogo can be used worldwide.

  20. Development of a compact 3D shape measurement unit using the light-source-stepping method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujigaki, Motoharu; Sakaguchi, Toshimasa; Murata, Yorinobu

    2016-10-01

    A compact 3D shape measurement unit that uses the light-source-stepping method (LSSM) is developed. The LSSM proposed by the authors is a phase-shifting fringe projection method for shape measurement. The authors also developed a linear LED device for high-speed shape measurement using the LSSM. A compact and high-speed 3D shape measurement unit can be realized using a linear LED device. However, the LSSM is difficult to utilize because the phase-shifting amount is not uniform. The phase-shifting amount depends on the distance from the grating plate. It is therefore necessary to consider carefully the locations of the linear LED device and the grating plate. In this paper, the design method for a 3D shape measurement unit that uses the LSSM is shown, and a prototype of a compact 3D shape measurement unit with a linear LED device is developed.

  1. Dynamics of gecko locomotion: a force-measuring array to measure 3D reaction forces.

    PubMed

    Dai, Zhendong; Wang, Zhouyi; Ji, Aihong

    2011-03-01

    Measuring the interaction between each foot of an animal and the substrate is one of the most effective ways to understand the dynamics of legged locomotion. Here, a new facility - the force-measuring array (FMA) - was developed and applied to measure 3D reaction forces of geckos on different slope surfaces. The FMA consists of 16 3D sensors with resolution to the mN level. At the same time the locomotion behaviour of geckos freely moving on the FMA was recorded by high speed camera. The reaction forces acting on the gecko's individual feet measured by the FMA and correlated with locomotion behaviour provided enough information to reveal the mechanical and dynamic secrets of gecko locomotion. Moreover, dynamic forces were also measured by a force platform and correlated with locomotion behaviour. The difference between the forces measured by the two methods is discussed. From the results we conclude that FMA is the best way to obtain true reaction forces acting on the gecko's individual feet.

  2. Tomographic Particle Localization and Velocity Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirner, S.; Forster, G.; Schein, J.

    2015-01-01

    Wire arc spraying is one of the most common and elementary thermal spray processes. Due to its easy handling, high deposition rate, and relative low process costs, it is a frequently used coating technology for the production of wear and corrosion resistant coatings. In order to produce reliable and reproducible coatings, it is necessary to be able to control the coating process. This can be achieved by analyzing the parameters of the particles deposited. Essential for the coating quality are, for example, the velocity, the size, and the temperature of the particles. In this work, an innovative diagnostic for particle velocity and location determination is presented. By the use of several synchronized CMOS-Cameras positioned around the particle jet, a series of images from different directions is simultaneously taken. The images contain the information that is necessary to calculate the 3D-location-vector of the particles and finally with the help of the exposure time the trajectory can be determined. In this work, the experimental setup of the tomographic diagnostic is presented, the mathematical method of the reconstruction is explained, and first measured velocity distributions are shown.

  3. Measuring large aspherics using a commercially available 3D-coordinate measuring machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otto, Wolfgang; Matthes, Axel; Schiehle, Heinz

    2000-07-01

    A CNC-controlled precision measuring machine is a very powerful tool in the optical shop not only to determine the surface figure, but also to qualify the radius of curvature and conic constant of aspherics. We used a commercially available 3D-coordinate measuring machine (CMM, ZEISS UPMC 850 CARAT S-ACC) to measure the shape of the GEMINI 1-m convex secondary mirrors at different lapping and polishing stages. To determine the measuring accuracy we compared the mechanical measurements with the results achieved by means of an interferometrical test setup. The data obtained in an early stage of polishing were evaluated in Zernike polynomials which show a very good agreement. The deviation concerning long wave rotational symmetrical errors was 20 nm rms, whereas the accuracy measuring of mid spatial frequency deviations was limited to about 100 nm rms.

  4. Fourier-Space Nonlinear Rayleigh-Taylor Growth Measurements of 3D Laser-Imprinted Modulations in Planar Targets

    SciTech Connect

    Smalyuk, V.A.; Sadot, O.; Delettrez, J.A.; Meyerhofer, D.D.; Regan, S.P.; Sangster, T.C.

    2005-12-05

    Nonlinear growth of 3-D broadband nonuniformities was measured near saturation levels using x-ray radiography in planar foils accelerated by laser light. The initial target modulations were seeded by laser nonuniformities and later amplified during acceleration by Rayleigh-Taylor instability. The nonlinear saturation velocities are measured for the first time and are found to be in excellent agreement with Haan predictions. The measured growth of long-wavelength modes is consistent with enhanced, nonlinear, long-wavelength generation in ablatively driven targets.

  5. Measurement of particle trajectories, dynamics, surface adhesion and detachment in near-wall shear flows using 3D velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guasto, Jeffrey; Schmidt, Brian; Lawrence, Michael; Breuer, Kenneth

    2007-11-01

    Three-dimensional total internal reflection velocimetry (3D-TIRV) is used to measure the trajectories of fluorescent tracer particles within 200 nm of a wall. Diffusion and shear-induced motion can result in mean velocity measurement errors, and by taking measurements using different particle sizes and sampling times, we quantify these effects and compare with theory. We also use 3D-TIRV to observe and characterize the adhesion, surface rolling and release dynamics of particles that can adhere to the surface through the action of biological binding proteins. Particles coated with P-Selectin are allowed to adhere to and detach from a PSGL-1-coated microchannel surface, modeling the interaction between leukocytes (white blood cells) and blood vessels, respectively. Binding affinities, bond strengths and hydrodynamic interactions are inferred from the trajectory data.

  6. Seismicity patterns along the Ecuadorian subduction zone: new constraints from earthquake location in a 3-D a priori velocity model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Font, Yvonne; Segovia, Monica; Vaca, Sandro; Theunissen, Thomas

    2013-04-01

    To improve earthquake location, we create a 3-D a priori P-wave velocity model (3-DVM) that approximates the large velocity variations of the Ecuadorian subduction system. The 3-DVM is constructed from the integration of geophysical and geological data that depend on the structural geometry and velocity properties of the crust and the upper mantle. In addition, specific station selection is carried out to compensate for the high station density on the Andean Chain. 3-D synthetic experiments are then designed to evaluate the network capacity to recover the event position using only P arrivals and the MAXI technique. Three synthetic earthquake location experiments are proposed: (1) noise-free and (2) noisy arrivals used in the 3-DVM, and (3) noise-free arrivals used in a 1-DVM. Synthetic results indicate that, under the best conditions (exact arrival data set and 3-DVM), the spatiotemporal configuration of the Ecuadorian network can accurately locate 70 per cent of events in the frontal part of the subduction zone (average azimuthal gap is 289° ± 44°). Noisy P arrivals (up to ± 0.3 s) can accurately located 50 per cent of earthquakes. Processing earthquake location within a 1-DVM almost never allows accurate hypocentre position for offshore earthquakes (15 per cent), which highlights the role of using a 3-DVM in subduction zone. For the application to real data, the seismicity distribution from the 3-D-MAXI catalogue is also compared to the determinations obtained in a 1-D-layered VM. In addition to good-quality location uncertainties, the clustering and the depth distribution confirm the 3-D-MAXI catalogue reliability. The pattern of the seismicity distribution (a 13 yr record during the inter-seismic period of the seismic cycle) is compared to the pattern of rupture zone and asperity of the Mw = 7.9 1942 and the Mw = 7.7 1958 events (the Mw = 8.8 1906 asperity patch is not defined). We observe that the nucleation of 1942, 1958 and 1906 events coincides with

  7. Label-free characterization of white blood cells by measuring 3D refractive index maps

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Jonghee; Kim, Kyoohyun; Park, HyunJoo; Choi, Chulhee; Jang, Seongsoo; Park, YongKeun

    2015-01-01

    The characterization of white blood cells (WBCs) is crucial for blood analyses and disease diagnoses. However, current standard techniques rely on cell labeling, a process which imposes significant limitations. Here we present three-dimensional (3D) optical measurements and the label-free characterization of mouse WBCs using optical diffraction tomography. 3D refractive index (RI) tomograms of individual WBCs are constructed from multiple two-dimensional quantitative phase images of samples illuminated at various angles of incidence. Measurements of the 3D RI tomogram of WBCs enable the separation of heterogeneous populations of WBCs using quantitative morphological and biochemical information. Time-lapse tomographic measurements also provide the 3D trajectory of micrometer-sized beads ingested by WBCs. These results demonstrate that optical diffraction tomography can be a useful and versatile tool for the study of WBCs. PMID:26504637

  8. Introductory review on `Flying Triangulation': a motion-robust optical 3D measurement principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ettl, Svenja

    2015-04-01

    'Flying Triangulation' (FlyTri) is a recently developed principle which allows for a motion-robust optical 3D measurement of rough surfaces. It combines a simple sensor with sophisticated algorithms: a single-shot sensor acquires 2D camera images. From each camera image, a 3D profile is generated. The series of 3D profiles generated are aligned to one another by algorithms, without relying on any external tracking device. It delivers real-time feedback of the measurement process which enables an all-around measurement of objects. The principle has great potential for small-space acquisition environments, such as the measurement of the interior of a car, and motion-sensitive measurement tasks, such as the intraoral measurement of teeth. This article gives an overview of the basic ideas and applications of FlyTri. The main challenges and their solutions are discussed. Measurement examples are also given to demonstrate the potential of the measurement principle.

  9. ALE3D Simulation and Measurement of Violence in a Fast Cookoff Experiment for LX-10

    SciTech Connect

    McClelland, M A; Maienschein, J L; Howard, W M; deHaven, M R

    2006-05-23

    Fast cookoff is of interest in the areas of fire hazard reduction and the development of directed energy systems for defense. During a fast cookoff (thermal explosion), high heat fluxes cause rapid temperature increases and ignition in thin boundary layers. We are developing ALE3D models to describe the thermal, chemical, and mechanical behavior during the heating, ignition, and explosive phases. The candidate models and numerical strategies are being evaluated using benchmark cookoff experiments. Fast cookoff measurements were made in a Scaled-Thermal-Explosion-eXperiment (STEX) for LX-10 (94.7% HMX, 5.3% Viton A) confined in a 4130 steel tube with reinforced end caps. Gaps were present at the side and top of the explosive charge to allow for thermal expansion. The explosive was heated until explosion using radiant heaters. Temperatures were measured using thermocouples positioned on the tube wall and in the explosive. During the explosion, the tube expansion and fragment velocities were measured with strain gauges, Photonic-Doppler-Velocimeters (PDVs), and micropower radar units. A fragment size distribution was constructed from fragments captured in Lexan panels. ALE3D models for chemical, thermal, and mechanical behavior were developed for the heating and explosive processes. A multi-step chemical kinetics model is employed for the HMX while a one-step model is used for the Viton. A pressure-dependent deflagration model is employed during the expansion. A Steinberg-Guinan model represents the mechanical behavior of the solid constituents while polynomial and gamma-law expressions are used for the equation of state of the solid and gas species, respectively. Parameters for the kinetics model were specified using measurements of the One-Dimensional-Time-to-Explosion (ODTX), while measurements for burn rate were employed to determine parameters in the burn front model. The simulations include radiative and conductive transport across the dynamic gaps between the

  10. 3D micro profile measurement with the method of spatial frequency domain analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yongxiang

    2015-10-01

    3D micro profiles are often needed for measurement in many fields, e.g., binary optics, electronic industry, mechanical manufacturing, aeronautic and space industry, etc. In the case where height difference between two neighboring points of a test profile is equal to or greater than λ / 4, microscopic interferometry based on laser source will no longer be applicable because of the uncertainty in phase unwrapping. As white light possesses the characteristic of interference length approximate to zero, applying it for micro profilometry can avoid the trouble and can yield accurate results. Using self-developed Mirau-type scanning interference microscope, a step-like sample was tested twice, with 128 scanning interferograms recorded for each test. To process each set of the interferograms, the method of spatial frequency domain analysis was adopted. That is, for each point, by use of Furrier transform, white-light interference intensities were decomposed in spatial frequency domain, thus obtaining phase values corresponding to different wavenumbers; by using least square fitting on phases and wave numbers, a group-velocity OPD was gained for the very point; and finally in terms of the relation between relative height and the group-velocity OPD, the profile of the test sample was obtained. Two tests yielded same profile result for the sample, and step heights obtained were 50.88 nm and 50.94 nm, respectively. Meantime, the sample was also measured with a Zygo Newview 7200 topography instrument, with same profile result obtained and step height differing by 0.9 nm. In addition, data processing results indicate that chromatic dispersion equal to and higher than 2nd order is negligible when applying spatial frequency domain analysis method.

  11. 3-D P- and S-wave velocity structure and low-frequency earthquake locations in the Parkfield, California region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Xiangfang; Thurber, Clifford H.; Shelly, David R.; Harrington, Rebecca M.; Cochran, Elizabeth S.; Bennington, Ninfa L.; Peterson, Dana; Guo, Bin; McClement, Kara

    2016-09-01

    To refine the 3-D seismic velocity model in the greater Parkfield, California region, a new data set including regular earthquakes, shots, quarry blasts and low-frequency earthquakes (LFEs) was assembled. Hundreds of traces of each LFE family at two temporary arrays were stacked with time-frequency domain phase weighted stacking method to improve signal-to-noise ratio. We extend our model resolution to lower crustal depth with LFE data. Our result images not only previously identified features but also low velocity zones (LVZs) in the area around the LFEs and the lower crust beneath the southern Rinconada Fault. The former LVZ is consistent with high fluid pressure that can account for several aspects of LFE behaviour. The latter LVZ is consistent with a high conductivity zone in magnetotelluric studies. A new Vs model was developed with S picks that were obtained with a new autopicker. At shallow depth, the low Vs areas underlie the strongest shaking areas in the 2004 Parkfield earthquake. We relocate LFE families and analyse the location uncertainties with the NonLinLoc and tomoDD codes. The two methods yield similar results.

  12. Hypocenter relocation using a fast grid search method and a 3-D seismic velocity model for the Sumatra region

    SciTech Connect

    Nugroho, Hendro; Widiyantoro, Sri; Nugraha, Andri Dian

    2013-09-09

    Determination of earthquake hypocenter in Indonesia conducted by the Meteorological, Climatological, and Geophysical Agency (MCGA) has still used a 1-D seismic velocity model. In this research, we have applied a Fast Grid Search (FGM) method and a 3-D velocity model resulting from tomographic imaging to relocate earthquakes in the Sumatran region. The data were taken from the MCGA data catalog from 2009 to 2011 comprising of subduction zone and on land fault earthquakes with magnitude greater than 4 Mw. Our preliminary results show some significant changes in the depths of the relocated earthquakes which are in general deeper than the depths of hypocenters from the MCGA data catalog. The residual times resulting from the relocation process are smaller than those prior to the relocation. Encouraged by these results, we will continue to conduct hypocenter relocation for all events from the MCGA data catalog periodically in order to produce a new data catalog with good quality. We hope that the new data catalog will be useful for further studies.

  13. An improved and extended GPS-derived 3D velocity field of the glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA) in Fennoscandia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lidberg, Martin; Johansson, Jan M.; Scherneck, Hans-Georg; Davis, James L.

    2007-03-01

    We present a new GPS-derived 3D velocity field for the Fennoscandia glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA) area. This new solution is based upon ˜3,000 days of continuous GPS observations obtained from the permanent networks in Fennoscandia. The period encompasses a prolongated phase of stable observation conditions after the northern autumn of 1996. Several significant improvements have led to smaller uncertainties and lower systematic errors in the new solutions compared to our previous results. The GPS satellite elevation cut-off angle was lowered to 10°, we fixed ambiguities to integers where possible, and only a few hardware changes occurred over the entire network. The GAMIT/GLOBK software package was used for the GPS analysis and reference frame realization. Our new results confirmed earlier findings of maximum discrepancies between GIA models and observations in northern Finland. The reason may be related to overestimated ice-sheet thickness and glaciation period in the north. In general, the new solutions are more coherent in the velocity field, as some of the perturbations are now avoided. We compared GPS-derived GIA rates with sea-level rates from tide-gauge observations, repeated precise leveling, and with GIA model computations, which showed consistency.

  14. 3D flame topography obtained by tomographic chemiluminescence with direct comparison to planar Mie scattering measurements.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wenjiang; Wickersham, A J; Wu, Yue; He, Fan; Ma, Lin

    2015-03-20

    This work reports the measurements of 3D flame topography using tomographic chemiluminescence and its validation by direct comparison against planar Mie scattering measurements. Tomographic measurements of the 3D topography of various well-controlled laboratory flames were performed using projections measured by seven cameras, and a simultaneous Mie scattering measurement was performed to measure a 2D cross section of the 3D flame topography. The tomographic measurements were based on chemiluminescence emissions from the flame, and the Mie scattering measurements were based on micrometer-size oil droplets seeded into the flow. The flame topography derived from the 3D tomographic and the Mie scattering measurement was then directly compared. The results show that the flame topography obtained from tomographic chemiluminescence and the Mie measurement agreed qualitatively (i.e., both methods yielded the same profile of the flame fronts), but a quantitative difference on the order of millimeters was observed between these two methods. These results are expected to be useful for understanding the capabilities and limitations of the 3D tomographic and Mie scattering techniques in combustion diagnostics.

  15. The in-situ 3D measurement system combined with CNC machine tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Huijie; Jiang, Hongzhi; Li, Xudong; Sui, Shaochun; Tang, Limin; Liang, Xiaoyue; Diao, Xiaochun; Dai, Jiliang

    2013-06-01

    With the development of manufacturing industry, the in-situ 3D measurement for the machining workpieces in CNC machine tools is regarded as the new trend of efficient measurement. We introduce a 3D measurement system based on the stereovision and phase-shifting method combined with CNC machine tools, which can measure 3D profile of the machining workpieces between the key machining processes. The measurement system utilizes the method of high dynamic range fringe acquisition to solve the problem of saturation induced by specular lights reflected from shiny surfaces such as aluminum alloy workpiece or titanium alloy workpiece. We measured two workpieces of aluminum alloy on the CNC machine tools to demonstrate the effectiveness of the developed measurement system.

  16. An evaluation of 3-D velocity models of the Kanto basin for long-period ground motion simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhakal, Yadab P.; Yamanaka, Hiroaki

    2013-07-01

    We performed three-dimensional (3-D) finite difference simulations of long-period ground motions (2-10 s) in the Kanto basin using the Japan Seismic Hazard Information Station (J-SHIS 2009), Yamada and Yamanaka (Exploration Geophysics 65(3):139-150, 2012) (YY), and Head Quarter for Earthquake Research Promotion (HERP 2012) velocity models for two intermediate depth (68-80 km) moderate earthquakes (Mw 5.8-5.9), which occurred beneath the Kanto basin. The models primarily differ in the basic data set used in the construction of the velocity models. The J-SHIS and HERP models are the results of integration of mainly geological, geophysical, and earthquake data. On the other hand, the YY model is oriented towards the microtremor-array-observation data. We obtained a goodness of fit between the observed and synthetic data based on three parameters, peak ground velocities (PGVs), smoothed Fourier spectra (FFT), and cross-correlations, using an algorithm proposed by Olsen and Mayhew (Seism Res Lett 81:715-723, 2010). We found that the three models reproduced the PGVs and FFT satisfactorily at most sites. However, the models performed poorly in terms of cross-correlations especially at the basin edges. We found that the synthetics using the YY model overestimate the observed waveforms at several sites located in the areas having V s 0.3 km/s in the top layer; on the other hand, the J-SHIS and HERP models explain the waveforms better at the sites and perform similarly at most sites. We also found that the J-SHIS and HERP models consist of thick sediments beneath some sites, where the YY model is preferable. Thus, we have concluded that the models require revisions for the reliable prediction of long-period ground motions from future large earthquakes.

  17. Measuring Femoral Torsion In Vivo Using Freehand 3-D Ultrasound Imaging.

    PubMed

    Passmore, Elyse; Pandy, Marcus G; Graham, H Kerr; Sangeux, Morgan

    2016-02-01

    Despite variation in bone geometry, muscle and joint function is often investigated using generic musculoskeletal models. Patient-specific bone geometry can be obtained from computerised tomography, which involves ionising radiation, or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which is costly and time consuming. Freehand 3-D ultrasound provides an alternative to obtain bony geometry. The purpose of this study was to determine the accuracy and repeatability of 3-D ultrasound in measuring femoral torsion. Measurements of femoral torsion were performed on 10 healthy adults using MRI and 3-D ultrasound. Measurements of femoral torsion from 3-D ultrasound were, on average, smaller than those from MRI (mean difference = 1.8°; 95% confidence interval: -3.9°, 7.5°). MRI and 3-D ultrasound had Bland and Altman repeatability coefficients of 3.1° and 3.7°, respectively. Accurate measurements of femoral torsion were obtained with 3-D ultrasound offering the potential to acquire patient-specific bone geometry for musculoskeletal modelling. Three-dimensional ultrasound is non-invasive and relatively inexpensive and can be integrated into gait analysis.

  18. Hydrokinetic canal measurements: inflow velocity, wake flow velocity, and turbulence

    DOE Data Explorer

    Gunawan, Budi

    2014-06-11

    The dataset consist of acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) velocity measurements in the wake of a 3-meter diameter vertical-axis hydrokinetic turbine deployed in Roza Canal, Yakima, WA, USA. A normalized hub-centerline wake velocity profile and two cross-section velocity contours, 10 meters and 20 meters downstream of the turbine, are presented. Mean velocities and turbulence data, measured using acoustic Doppler velocimeter (ADV) at 50 meters upstream of the turbine, are also presented. Canal dimensions and hydraulic properties, and turbine-related information are also included.

  19. Chirped amplitude modulation ladar for range and Doppler measurements and 3-D imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stann, Barry; Redman, Brian C.; Lawler, William; Giza, Mark; Dammann, John; Krapels, Keith

    2007-04-01

    Shipboard infrared search and track (IRST) systems can detect sea-skimming anti-ship missiles at long ranges, but cannot distinguish missiles from slowly moving false targets and clutter. In a joint Army-Navy program, the Army Research Laboratory (ARL) is developing a ladar to provide unambiguous range and velocity measurements of targets detected by the distributed aperture system (DAS) IRST system being developed by the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) sponsored by the Office of Naval Research (ONR). By using the ladar's range and velocity data, false alarms and clutter objects will be distinguished from incoming missiles. Because the ladar uses an array receiver, it can also provide three-dimensional (3-D) imagery of potential threats at closer ranges in support of the force protection/situational awareness mission. The ladar development is being accomplished in two phases. In Phase I, ARL designed, built, and reported on an initial breadboard ladar for proof-of-principle static platform field tests. In Phase II, ARL was tasked to design, and test an advanced breadboard ladar that corrected various shortcomings in the transmitter optics and receiver electronics and improved the signal processing and display code. The advanced breadboard will include a high power laser source utilizing a long pulse erbium amplifier built under contract. Because award of the contract for the erbium amplifier was delayed, final assembly of the advanced ladar is delayed. In the course of this year's work we built a "research receiver" to facilitate design revisions, and when combined with a low-power laser, enabled us to demonstrate the viability of the components and subsystems comprising the advanced ladar.

  20. Vorticity, turbulence production, and turbulence induced accelerations in a rectangular jet as measured using 3-D LDA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Gerald L.; Swan, David H.

    1990-01-01

    The flow field of a rectangular jet with a 4:1 aspect ratio (50.4 x 12.7 mm) was studied at a Reynolds number of 100,000 (Mach number 0.09) using a 3-D laser Doppler anemometer system. Measurements were performed along the major and minor axis planes and at various downstream cross-sections of the jet. The mean velocity vector and entire Reynolds stress tensor were measured and presented in a previous publication. The present work presents the vorticity vector, turbulence production, and turbulence induced acceleration vector distributions which were calculated from the previously presented data.

  1. A 3D measurement method based on multi-view fringe projection by using a turntable

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Li-mei; Gao, Yan-yan; Zhu, Xin-jun; Guo, Qing-hua; Xi, Jiang-tao

    2016-09-01

    In order to get the entire data in the optical measurement, a multi-view three-dimensional (3D) measurement method based on turntable is proposed. In the method, a turntable is used to rotate the object and obtain multi-view point cloud data, and then multi-view point cloud data are registered and integrated into a 3D model. The measurement results are compared with that of the sticking marked point method. Experimental results show that the measurement process of the proposed method is simpler, and the scanning speed and accuracy are improved.

  2. A novel 3D stitching method for WLI based large range surface topography measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Zili; Liu, Xiaojun; Zhao, Li; Chen, Liangzhou; Li, Qian; Yuan, Tengfei; Lu, Wenlong

    2016-01-01

    3D image stitching is an important technique for large range surface topography measurement in White-Light Interferometry (WLI). However, the stitching accuracy is inevitably influenced by noise. To solve this problem, a novel method for 3D image stitching is proposed in this paper. In this method, based on noise mechanism analysis in WLI measurement, a new definition of noise in 3D image is given by an evaluation model for difference between the practical WLI interference signal and the ideal signal. By this new definition, actual noises in 3D image are identified while those practical singular heights on surface will not be wrongly attributed to noise. With the definition, a binary matrix for noise mark corresponding to 3D image is obtained. Then, the matrix is devoted, as an important component, to establish a series of new algorithms of capability for suppressing the adverse effects of noises in each process of the proposed stitching method. By this method, the influence of the noises on stitching is substantially reduced and the stitching accuracy is improved. Through 3D image stitching experiments with noises in WLI, effectiveness of the proposed method is verified.

  3. Structure light telecentric stereoscopic vision 3D measurement system based on Scheimpflug condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, Qing; Gao, Jian; Lin, Hui; Chen, Yun; Yunbo, He; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Guanjin; Chen, Xin

    2016-11-01

    We designed a new three-dimensional (3D) measurement system for micro components: a structure light telecentric stereoscopic vision 3D measurement system based on the Scheimpflug condition. This system creatively combines the telecentric imaging model and the Scheimpflug condition on the basis of structure light stereoscopic vision, having benefits of a wide measurement range, high accuracy, fast speed, and low price. The system measurement range is 20 mm×13 mm×6 mm, the lateral resolution is 20 μm, and the practical vertical resolution reaches 2.6 μm, which is close to the theoretical value of 2 μm and well satisfies the 3D measurement needs of micro components such as semiconductor devices, photoelectron elements, and micro-electromechanical systems. In this paper, we first introduce the principle and structure of the system and then present the system calibration and 3D reconstruction. We then present an experiment that was performed for the 3D reconstruction of the surface topography of a wafer, followed by a discussion. Finally, the conclusions are presented.

  4. Qualitative and quantitative comparative analyses of 3D lidar landslide displacement field measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haugen, Benjamin D.

    Landslide ground surface displacements vary at all spatial scales and are an essential component of kinematic and hazards analyses. Unfortunately, survey-based displacement measurements require personnel to enter unsafe terrain and have limited spatial resolution. And while recent advancements in LiDAR technology provide the ability remotely measure 3D landslide displacements at high spatial resolution, no single method is widely accepted. A series of qualitative metrics for comparing 3D landslide displacement field measurement methods were developed. The metrics were then applied to nine existing LiDAR techniques, and the top-ranking methods --Iterative Closest Point (ICP) matching and 3D Particle Image Velocimetry (3DPIV) -- were quantitatively compared using synthetic displacement and control survey data from a slow-moving translational landslide in north-central Colorado. 3DPIV was shown to be the most accurate and reliable point cloud-based 3D landslide displacement field measurement method, and the viability of LiDAR-based techniques for measuring 3D motion on landslides was demonstrated.

  5. [A positioning error measurement method in radiotherapy based on 3D visualization].

    PubMed

    An, Ji-Ye; Li, Yue-Xi; Lu, Xu-Dong; Duan, Hui-Long

    2007-09-01

    The positioning error in radiotherapy is one of the most important factors that influence the location precision of the tumor. Based on the CT-on-rails technology, this paper describes the research on measuring the positioning error in radiotherapy by comparing the planning CT images with the treatment CT images using 3-dimension (3D) methods. It can help doctors to measure positioning errors more accurately than 2D methods. It also supports the powerful 3D interaction such as drag-dropping, rotating and picking-up the object, so that doctors can visualize and measure the positioning errors intuitively.

  6. Global well-posedness to the 3-D incompressible inhomogeneous Navier-Stokes equations with a class of large velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Cuili; Zhang, Ting

    2015-09-01

    In this article, we consider the global well-posedness to the 3-D incompressible inhomogeneous Navier-Stokes equations with a class of large velocity. More precisely, assuming a 0 ∈ B˙ q , 1 /3 q ( R 3 ) and u 0 = ( u0 h , u0 3 ) ∈ B˙ p , 1 - 1 + /3 p ( R 3 ) for p, q ∈ (1, 6) with sup ( /1 p , /1 q ) ≤ /1 3 + inf ( /1 p , /1 q ) , we prove that if C a↑0↑ B˙q1/3 q α (↑u0 3↑ B˙ p , 1 - 1 + /3 p/μ + 1 ) ≤ 1 , /C μ (↑u0 h↑ B˙ p , 1 - 1 + /3 p + ↑u03↑ B˙ p , 1 - 1 + /3 p 1 - α ↑u0h↑ B˙ p , 1 - 1 + /3 p α) ≤ 1 , then the system has a unique global solution a ∈ C ˜ ( [ 0 , ∞ ) ; B˙ q , 1 /3 q ( R 3 ) ) , u ∈ C ˜ ( [ 0 , ∞ ) ; B˙ p , 1 - 1 + /3 p ( R 3 ) ) ∩ L 1 ( R + ; B˙ p , 1 1 + /3 p ( R 3 ) ) . It improves the recent result of M. Paicu and P. Zhang [J. Funct. Anal. 262, 3556-3584 (2012)], where the exponent form of the initial smallness condition is replaced by a polynomial form.

  7. A 3D modeling and measurement system for cultural heritage preservation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Guoguang; Zhou, Mingquan; Ren, Pu; Shui, Wuyang; Zhou, Pengbo; Wu, Zhongke

    2015-07-01

    Cultural Heritage reflects the human production, life style and environmental conditions of various historical periods. It exists as one of the major national carriers of national history and culture. In order to do better protection and utilization for these cultural heritages, a system of three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction and statistical measurement is proposed in this paper. The system solves the problems of cultural heritage's data storage, measurement and analysis. Firstly, for the high precision modeling and measurement problems, range data registration and integration algorithm used to achieve high precision 3D reconstruction. Secondly, multi-view stereo reconstruction method is used to solve the problem of rapid reconstruction by procedures such as the original image data pre-processing, camera calibration, point cloud modeling. At last, the artifacts' measure underlying database is established by calculating the measurements of the 3D model's surface. These measurements contain Euclidean distance between the points on the surface, geodesic distance between the points, normal and curvature in each point, superficial area of a region, volume of model's part and some other measurements. These measurements provide a basis for carrying out information mining of cultural heritage. The system has been applied to the applications of 3D modeling, data measurement of the Terracotta Warriors relics, Tibetan architecture and some other relics.

  8. Real-time 3D measurement based on structured light illumination considering camera lens distortion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Shijie; Chen, Qian; Zuo, Chao; Sun, Jiasong; Yu, ShiLing

    2014-12-01

    Optical three-dimensional (3-D) profilometry is gaining increasing attention for its simplicity, flexibility, high accuracy, and non-contact nature. Recent advances in imaging sensors and digital projection technology further its progress in high-speed, real-time applications, enabling 3-D shapes reconstruction of moving objects and dynamic scenes. In traditional 3-D measurement system where the processing time is not a key factor, camera lens distortion correction is performed directly. However, for the time-critical high-speed applications, the time-consuming correction algorithm is inappropriate to be performed directly during the real-time process. To cope with this issue, here we present a novel high-speed real-time 3-D coordinates measuring technique based on fringe projection with the consideration of the camera lens distortion. A pixel mapping relation between a distorted image and a corrected one is pre-determined and stored in computer memory for real-time fringe correction. And a method of lookup table (LUT) is introduced as well for fast data processing. Our experimental results reveal that the measurement error of the in-plane coordinates has been reduced by one order of magnitude and the accuracy of the out-plane coordinate been tripled after the distortions being eliminated. Moreover, owing to the merit of the LUT, the 3-D reconstruction can be achieved at 92.34 frames per second.

  9. Fast 3D shape measurement using Fourier transform profilometry without phase unwrapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Kechen; Hu, Shaopeng; Wen, Xin; Yan, Yunhui

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents a novel, simple, yet fast 3D shape measurement method using Fourier transform profilometry. Different from the conventional Fourier transform profilometry, this proposed method introduces the binocular stereo vision and employs two image pairs (i.e., original image pairs and fringe image pairs) to restructure 3D shape. In this proposed method, instead of phase unwrapping algorithm, a coarse disparity map is adopted as a constraint condition to realize phase matching using wrapped phase. Since the local phase matching and sub-pixel disparity refinement are proposed to obtain high measuring accuracy, high-quality phase is not required. The validity of the proposed method is verified by experiments.

  10. Machining Error Compensation Based on 3D Surface Model Modified by Measured Accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, Go; Aritoshi, Masatoshi; Tomita, Tomoki; Shirase, Keiichi

    Recently, a demand for precision machining of dies and molds with complex shapes has been increasing. Although CNC machine tools are utilized widely for machining, still machining error compensation is required to meet the increasing demand of machining accuracy. However, the machining error compensation is an operation which takes huge amount of skill, time and cost. This paper deals with a new method of the machining error compensation. The 3D surface data of the machined part is modified according to the machining error measured by CMM (Coordinate Measuring Machine). A compensated NC program is generated from the modified 3D surface data for the machining error compensation.

  11. 3D displacement field measurement with correlation based on the micro-geometrical surface texture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bubaker-Isheil, Halima; Serri, Jérôme; Fontaine, Jean-François

    2011-07-01

    Image correlation methods are widely used in experimental mechanics to obtain displacement field measurements. Currently, these methods are applied using digital images of the initial and deformed surfaces sprayed with black or white paint. Speckle patterns are then captured and the correlation is performed with a high degree of accuracy to an order of 0.01 pixels. In 3D, however, stereo-correlation leads to a lower degree of accuracy. Correlation techniques are based on the search for a sub-image (or pattern) displacement field. The work presented in this paper introduces a new correlation-based approach for 3D displacement field measurement that uses an additional 3D laser scanner and a CMM (Coordinate Measurement Machine). Unlike most existing methods that require the presence of markers on the observed object (such as black speckle, grids or random patterns), this approach relies solely on micro-geometrical surface textures such as waviness, roughness and aperiodic random defects. The latter are assumed to remain sufficiently small thus providing an adequate estimate of the particle displacement. The proposed approach can be used in a wide range of applications such as sheet metal forming with large strains. The method proceeds by first obtaining cloud points using the 3D laser scanner mounted on a CMM. These points are used to create 2D maps that are then correlated. In this respect, various criteria have been investigated for creating maps consisting of patterns, which facilitate the correlation procedure. Once the maps are created, the correlation between both configurations (initial and moved) is carried out using traditional methods developed for field measurements. Measurement validation was conducted using experiments in 2D and 3D with good results for rigid displacements in 2D, 3D and 2D rotations.

  12. 3D Optical Measuring Systems and Laser Technologies for Scientific and Industrial Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chugui, Yu.; Verkhoglyad, A.; Poleshchuk, A.; Korolkov, V.; Sysoev, E.; Zavyalov, P.

    2013-12-01

    Modern industry and science require novel 3D optical measuring systems and laser technologies with micro/nanometer resolution for solving actual problems. Such systems, including the 3D dimensional inspection of ceramic parts for electrotechnical industry, laser inspection of wheel pair diagnostic for running trains and 3D superresolution low-coherent micro- /nanoprofilometers are presented. The newest results in the field of laser technologies for high-precision synthesis of microstructures by updated image generator using the semiconductor laser are given. The measuring systems and the laser image generator developed and produced by TDI SIE and IAE SB RAS have been tested by customers and used in different branches of industry and science.

  13. Quantitative wound healing measurement and monitoring system based on an innovative 3D imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Steven; Yang, Arthur; Yin, Gongjie; Wen, James

    2011-03-01

    In this paper, we report a novel three-dimensional (3D) wound imaging system (hardware and software) under development at Technest Inc. System design is aimed to perform accurate 3D measurement and modeling of a wound and track its healing status over time. Accurate measurement and tracking of wound healing enables physicians to assess, document, improve, and individualize the treatment plan given to each wound patient. In current wound care practices, physicians often visually inspect or roughly measure the wound to evaluate the healing status. This is not an optimal practice since human vision lacks precision and consistency. In addition, quantifying slow or subtle changes through perception is very difficult. As a result, an instrument that quantifies both skin color and geometric shape variations would be particularly useful in helping clinicians to assess healing status and judge the effect of hyperemia, hematoma, local inflammation, secondary infection, and tissue necrosis. Once fully developed, our 3D imaging system will have several unique advantages over traditional methods for monitoring wound care: (a) Non-contact measurement; (b) Fast and easy to use; (c) up to 50 micron measurement accuracy; (d) 2D/3D Quantitative measurements;(e) A handheld device; and (f) Reasonable cost (< $1,000).

  14. Mitotic spindle asymmetry in rodents and primates: 2D vs. 3D measurement methodologies

    PubMed Central

    Delaunay, Delphine; Robini, Marc C.; Dehay, Colette

    2015-01-01

    Recent data have uncovered that spindle size asymmetry (SSA) is a key component of asymmetric cell division (ACD) in the mouse cerebral cortex (Delaunay et al., 2014). In the present study we show that SSA is independent of spindle orientation and also occurs during cortical progenitor divisions in the ventricular zone (VZ) of the macaque cerebral cortex, pointing to a conserved mechanism in the mammalian lineage. Because SSA magnitude is smaller in cortical precursors than in invertebrate neuroblasts, the unambiguous demonstration of volume differences between the two half spindles is considered to require 3D reconstruction of the mitotic spindle (Delaunay et al., 2014). Although straightforward, the 3D analysis of SSA is time consuming, which is likely to hinder SSA identification and prevent further explorations of SSA related mechanisms in generating ACD. We therefore set out to develop an alternative method for accurately measuring spindle asymmetry. Based on the mathematically demonstrated linear relationship between 2D and 3D analysis, we show that 2D assessment of spindle size in metaphase cells is as accurate and reliable as 3D reconstruction provided a specific procedure is applied. We have examined the experimental accuracy of the two methods by applying them to different sets of in vivo and in vitro biological data, including mouse and primate cortical precursors. Linear regression analysis demonstrates that the results from 2D and 3D reconstructions are equally powerful. We therefore provide a reliable and efficient technique to measure SSA in mammalian cells. PMID:25709568

  15. Dynamics of pickup ion velocity distribution function in Titan's plasma environment (TA encounter): 3D hybrid kinetic modeling and comparison with CAPS observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, D. G.; Lipatov, A. S.; Sittler, E. C.; Hartle, R. E.; Cooper, J. F.

    2013-12-01

    Wave-particle interactions play a very important role in the plasma dynamics near Titan: mass loading, excitation of the low-frequency waves and the formation of the particle velocity distribution function, e.g. ring/shell-like distributions, etc. The kinetic approach is important for estimation of the collision processes e.g. a charge exchange. The particle velocity distribution function also plays a key role for understanding the observed particle fluxes. In this report we discuss the ion velocity distribution function dynamics from 3D hybrid modeling. The modeling is based on recent analysis of the Cassini Plasma Spectrometer (CAPS) ion measurements during the TA flyby. In our model the background ions, all pickup ions, and ionospheric ions are considered as particles, whereas the electrons are described as a fluid. Inhomogeneous photoionization, electron-impact ionization and charge exchange are included in our model. The temperatures of the background electrons and pickup electrons were also included into the generalized Ohm's law. We also take into account the collisions between the ions and neutrals. We use Chamberlain profiles for the exosphere's components and include a simple ionosphere model with M=28 ions that were generated inside the ionosphere. The moon is considered as a weakly conducting body. Our modeling shows that interaction between background plasma and pickup ions H+, H2+, CH4+ and N2+ has a more complicated structure than was observed in the T9 flyby and modeling due to the large gyroradius of the background O+ ions [1,2,3,4]. Special attention will be paid to comparing the simulated pickup ion velocity distribution with CAPS TA observations. We also compare our kinetic modeling with other hybrid and MHD modeling of Titan's environment. References [1] Sittler, E.C., et al., Energy Deposition Processes in Titan's Upper Atmosphere and Its Induced Magnetosphere. In: Titan from Cassini-Huygens, Brown, R.H., Lebreton J.P., Waite, J.H., Eds

  16. Accurate 3D kinematic measurement of temporomandibular joint using X-ray fluoroscopic images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazaki, Takaharu; Matsumoto, Akiko; Sugamoto, Kazuomi; Matsumoto, Ken; Kakimoto, Naoya; Yura, Yoshiaki

    2014-04-01

    Accurate measurement and analysis of 3D kinematics of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is very important for assisting clinical diagnosis and treatment of prosthodontics and orthodontics, and oral surgery. This study presents a new 3D kinematic measurement technique of the TMJ using X-ray fluoroscopic images, which can easily obtain the TMJ kinematic data in natural motion. In vivo kinematics of the TMJ (maxilla and mandibular bone) is determined using a feature-based 2D/3D registration, which uses beads silhouette on fluoroscopic images and 3D surface bone models with beads. The 3D surface models of maxilla and mandibular bone with beads were created from CT scans data of the subject using the mouthpiece with the seven strategically placed beads. In order to validate the accuracy of pose estimation for the maxilla and mandibular bone, computer simulation test was performed using five patterns of synthetic tantalum beads silhouette images. In the clinical applications, dynamic movement during jaw opening and closing was conducted, and the relative pose of the mandibular bone with respect to the maxilla bone was determined. The results of computer simulation test showed that the root mean square errors were sufficiently smaller than 1.0 mm and 1.0 degree. In the results of clinical application, during jaw opening from 0.0 to 36.8 degree of rotation, mandibular condyle exhibited 19.8 mm of anterior sliding relative to maxillary articular fossa, and these measurement values were clinically similar to the previous reports. Consequently, present technique was thought to be suitable for the 3D TMJ kinematic analysis.

  17. Pipeline inwall 3D measurement system based on the cross structured light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Da; Lin, Zhipeng; Xue, Lei; Zheng, Qiang; Wang, Zichi

    2014-01-01

    In order to accurately realize the defect detection of pipeline inwall, this paper proposes a measurement system made up of cross structured light, single CCD camera and a smart car, etc. Based on structured light measurement technology, this paper mainly introduces the structured light measurement system, the imaging mathematical model, and the parameters and method of camera calibration. Using these measuring principles and methods, the camera in remote control car platform achieves continuous shooting of objects and real-time rebound processing as well as utilizing established model to extract 3D point cloud coordinate to reconstruct pipeline defects, so it is possible to achieve 3D automatic measuring, and verifies the correctness and feasibility of this system. It has been found that this system has great measurement accuracy in practice.

  18. Research of aluminium alloy aerospace structure aperture measurement based on 3D digital speckle correlation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Lu; Wang, Hongbo; Zhou, Jiangfan; Yang, Rong; Zhang, Hui

    2014-11-01

    In this paper, the aperture change of the aluminium alloy aerospace structure under real load is researched. Static experiments are carried on which is simulated the load environment of flight course. Compared with the traditional methods, through experiments results, it's proved that 3D digital speckle correlation method has good adaptability and precision on testing aperture change, and it can satisfy measurement on non-contact,real-time 3D deformation or stress concentration. The test results of new method is compared with the traditional method.

  19. Quick and low cost measurement of soil parameters using a Kinect 3D scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hut, R.; Van De Giesen, N.; Hagenaars, R.

    2013-12-01

    Retrieval of basic soil parameters such as bulk density and soil moisture from soil samples is a costly and time-consuming activity. Although indirect methods (heat or electromagnetic probes, radar backscatter, etc) are abundant, field truth measurement of soil parameters will remain important, if only to calibrate these other methods. We present a quick, field mountable setup to make 3D scans of surfaces up to 30 x 30 cm using a Kinect 3D scanner. By making scans before and after samples are taken, parameters such as bulk density and moisture content can easily be calculated.

  20. 3D OCT imaging in clinical settings: toward quantitative measurements of retinal structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zawadzki, Robert J.; Fuller, Alfred R.; Zhao, Mingtao; Wiley, David F.; Choi, Stacey S.; Bower, Bradley A.; Hamann, Bernd; Izatt, Joseph A.; Werner, John S.

    2006-02-01

    The acquisition speed of current FD-OCT (Fourier Domain - Optical Coherence Tomography) instruments allows rapid screening of three-dimensional (3D) volumes of human retinas in clinical settings. To take advantage of this ability requires software used by physicians to be capable of displaying and accessing volumetric data as well as supporting post processing in order to access important quantitative information such as thickness maps and segmented volumes. We describe our clinical FD-OCT system used to acquire 3D data from the human retina over the macula and optic nerve head. B-scans are registered to remove motion artifacts and post-processed with customized 3D visualization and analysis software. Our analysis software includes standard 3D visualization techniques along with a machine learning support vector machine (SVM) algorithm that allows a user to semi-automatically segment different retinal structures and layers. Our program makes possible measurements of the retinal layer thickness as well as volumes of structures of interest, despite the presence of noise and structural deformations associated with retinal pathology. Our software has been tested successfully in clinical settings for its efficacy in assessing 3D retinal structures in healthy as well as diseased cases. Our tool facilitates diagnosis and treatment monitoring of retinal diseases.

  1. Inexpensive Time-of-Flight Velocity Measurements.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Everett, Glen E.; Wild, R. L.

    1979-01-01

    Describes a circuit designed to measure time-of-flight velocity and shows how to use it to determine bullet velocity in connection with the ballistic pendulum demonstration of momentum conservation. (Author/GA)

  2. 3D nonrigid medical image registration using a new information theoretic measure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bicao; Yang, Guanyu; Coatrieux, Jean Louis; Li, Baosheng; Shu, Huazhong

    2015-11-01

    This work presents a novel method for the nonrigid registration of medical images based on the Arimoto entropy, a generalization of the Shannon entropy. The proposed method employed the Jensen-Arimoto divergence measure as a similarity metric to measure the statistical dependence between medical images. Free-form deformations were adopted as the transformation model and the Parzen window estimation was applied to compute the probability distributions. A penalty term is incorporated into the objective function to smooth the nonrigid transformation. The goal of registration is to optimize an objective function consisting of a dissimilarity term and a penalty term, which would be minimal when two deformed images are perfectly aligned using the limited memory BFGS optimization method, and thus to get the optimal geometric transformation. To validate the performance of the proposed method, experiments on both simulated 3D brain MR images and real 3D thoracic CT data sets were designed and performed on the open source elastix package. For the simulated experiments, the registration errors of 3D brain MR images with various magnitudes of known deformations and different levels of noise were measured. For the real data tests, four data sets of 4D thoracic CT from four patients were selected to assess the registration performance of the method, including ten 3D CT images for each 4D CT data covering an entire respiration cycle. These results were compared with the normalized cross correlation and the mutual information methods and show a slight but true improvement in registration accuracy.

  3. High-speed 3D face measurement based on color speckle projection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Junpeng; Su, Xianyu; Zhang, Qican

    2015-03-01

    Nowadays, 3D face recognition has become a subject of considerable interest in the security field due to its unique advantages in domestic and international. However, acquiring color-textured 3D faces data in a fast and accurate manner is still highly challenging. In this paper, a new approach based on color speckle projection for 3D face data dynamic acquisition is proposed. Firstly, the projector-camera color crosstalk matrix that indicates how much each projector channel influences each camera channel is measured. Secondly, the reference-speckle-sets images are acquired with CCD, and then three gray sets are separated from the color sets using the crosstalk matrix and are saved. Finally, the color speckle image which is modulated by face is captured, and it is split three gray channels. We measure the 3D face using multi-sets of speckle correlation methods with color speckle image in high-speed similar as one-shot, which greatly improves the measurement accuracy and stability. The suggested approach has been implemented and the results are supported by experiments.

  4. Validity Study of Vertebral Rotation Measurement Using 3-D Ultrasound in Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qian; Li, Meng; Lou, Edmond H M; Chu, Winnie C W; Lam, Tsz-Ping; Cheng, Jack C Y; Wong, Man-Sang

    2016-07-01

    This study aimed to assess the validity of 3-D ultrasound measurements on the vertebral rotation of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) under clinical settings. Thirty curves (mean Cobb angle: 21.7° ± 15.9°) from 16 patients with AIS were recruited. 3-D ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging scans were performed at the supine position. Each of the two raters measured the apical vertebral rotation using the center of laminae (COL) method in the 3-D ultrasound images and the Aaro-Dahlborn method in the magnetic resonance images. The intra- and inter-reliability of the COL method was demonstrated by the intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) (both [2, K] >0.9, p < 0.05). The COL method showed no significant difference (p < 0.05) compared with the Aaro-Dahlborn method. Furthermore, the agreement between these two methods was demonstrated by the Bland-Altman method, and high correlation was found (r > 0.9, p < 0.05). These results validated the proposed 3-D ultrasound method in the measurements of vertebral rotation in the patients with AIS. PMID:27083978

  5. 3D nonrigid medical image registration using a new information theoretic measure.

    PubMed

    Li, Bicao; Yang, Guanyu; Coatrieux, Jean Louis; Li, Baosheng; Shu, Huazhong

    2015-11-21

    This work presents a novel method for the nonrigid registration of medical images based on the Arimoto entropy, a generalization of the Shannon entropy. The proposed method employed the Jensen-Arimoto divergence measure as a similarity metric to measure the statistical dependence between medical images. Free-form deformations were adopted as the transformation model and the Parzen window estimation was applied to compute the probability distributions. A penalty term is incorporated into the objective function to smooth the nonrigid transformation. The goal of registration is to optimize an objective function consisting of a dissimilarity term and a penalty term, which would be minimal when two deformed images are perfectly aligned using the limited memory BFGS optimization method, and thus to get the optimal geometric transformation. To validate the performance of the proposed method, experiments on both simulated 3D brain MR images and real 3D thoracic CT data sets were designed and performed on the open source elastix package. For the simulated experiments, the registration errors of 3D brain MR images with various magnitudes of known deformations and different levels of noise were measured. For the real data tests, four data sets of 4D thoracic CT from four patients were selected to assess the registration performance of the method, including ten 3D CT images for each 4D CT data covering an entire respiration cycle. These results were compared with the normalized cross correlation and the mutual information methods and show a slight but true improvement in registration accuracy.

  6. Full-field strain measurements on turbomachinery components using 3D SLDV technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maguire, Martyn; Sever, Ibrahim

    2016-06-01

    This paper focuses on measurements of 3D Operating Deflection Shapes (ODSs), and subsequently, construction of full-field surface strain maps of a number of turbomachinery components. For this purpose a 3D Scanning Laser Doppler Vibrometer (SLDV) is used. The ODS measurements are performed for a large number of modes and results obtained are compared with the 1-D shapes that are most commonly measured. It is demonstrated that the 3D measurements are a significant improvement over the 1-D case in terms of independent amount of extra information they provide. This is confirmed through comparisons with FE results. Special tests are carried out to recover the full-field strain on scanned faces of the components used. Visual comparison of these measurements with FE counterparts reveal that strain maps can be successfully measured, not only for low frequency modes but also for highly complex high frequency ones. These maps are measured with different levels of input force to assess the linearity of strain results to varying response amplitudes. Lessons learnt and observations made are summarised in concluding remarks and the scope of future work to take this study into the production environment is discussed. This study constitutes a unique comprehensive investigation into full-field strain measurements using real application hardware and a large frequency range.

  7. A fast method to measure the 3D surface of the human heart

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Yiping; Su, Xianyu; Xiang, Liqun; Chen, Wenjing; Zhang, Qican

    2003-12-01

    Three-dimensional (3-D) automatic measurement of an object is widely used in many fields. In Biology and Medicine society, it can be applicable for surgery, orthopedics, viscera disease analysis and diagnosis etc. Here a new fast method to measure the 3D surface of human heart is proposed which can provide doctors a lot of information, such as the size of heart profile, the sizes of the left or right heart ventricle, and the curvature center and radius of heart ventricle, to fully analyze and diagnose pathobiology of human heart. The new fast method is optically and noncontacted and based upon the Phase Measurement Profilometry (PMP), which has higher measuring precision. A human heart specimen experiment has verified our method.

  8. Development and application of 3-D foot-shape measurement system under different loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Guozhong; Wang, Boxiong; Shi, Hui; Luo, Xiuzhi

    2008-03-01

    The 3-D foot-shape measurement system under different loads based on laser-line-scanning principle was designed and the model of the measurement system was developed. 3-D foot-shape measurements without blind areas under different loads and the automatic extraction of foot-parameter are achieved with the system. A global calibration method for CCD cameras using a one-axis motion unit in the measurement system and the specialized calibration kits is presented. Errors caused by the nonlinearity of CCD cameras and other devices and caused by the installation of the one axis motion platform, the laser plane and the toughened glass plane can be eliminated by using the nonlinear coordinate mapping function and the Powell optimized method in calibration. Foot measurements under different loads for 170 participants were conducted and the statistic foot parameter measurement results for male and female participants under non-weight condition and changes of foot parameters under half-body-weight condition, full-body-weight condition and over-body-weight condition compared with non-weight condition are presented. 3-D foot-shape measurement under different loads makes it possible to realize custom-made shoe-making and shows great prosperity in shoe design, foot orthopaedic treatment, shoe size standardization, and establishment of a feet database for consumers and athletes.

  9. Fully automated measurement of field-dependent AMS using MFK1-FA Kappabridge equipped with 3D rotator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chadima, Martin; Studynka, Jan

    2013-04-01

    Low-field magnetic susceptibility of paramagnetic and diamagnetic minerals is field-independent by definition being also field-independent in pure magnetite. On the other hand, in pyrrhotite, hematite and high-Ti titanomagnetite it may be clearly field-dependent. Consequently, the field-dependent AMS enables the magnetic fabric of the latter group of minerals to be separated from the whole-rock AMS. The methods for the determination of the field-dependent AMS consist of separate measurements of each specimen in several fields within the Rayleigh Law range and subsequent processing in which the field-independent and field-dependent AMS components are calculated. The disadvantage of this technique is that each specimen must be measured several times, which is relatively laborious and time consuming. Recently, a new 3D rotator was developed for the MFK1-FA Kappabridge, which rotates the specimen simultaneously about two axes with different velocities. The measurement is fully automated in such a way that, once the specimen is inserted into the rotator, it requires no additional manipulation to measure the full AMS tensor. Consequently, the 3D rotator enables to measure the AMS tensors in the pre-set field intensities without any operator interference. Whole procedure is controlled by newly developed Safyr5 software; once the measurements are finished, the acquired data are immediately processed and can be visualized in a standard way.

  10. Constructing a starting 3D shear velocity model with sharp interfaces for SEM-based upper mantle tomography in North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calo, M.; Bodin, T.; Yuan, H.; Romanowicz, B. A.; Larmat, C. S.; Maceira, M.

    2013-12-01

    Seismic tomography is currently evolving towards 3D earth models that satisfy full seismic waveforms at increasingly high frequencies. This evolution is possible thanks to the advent of powerful numerical methods such as the Spectral Element Method (SEM) that allow accurate computation of the seismic wavefield in complex media, and the drastic increase of computational resources. However, the production of such models requires handling complex misfit functions with more than one local minimum. Standard linearized inversion methods (such as gradient methods) have two main drawbacks: 1) they produce solution models highly dependent on the starting model; 2) they do not provide a means of estimating true model uncertainties. However, these issues can be addressed with stochastic methods that can sample the space of possible solutions efficiently. Such methods are prohibitively challenging computationally in 3D, but increasingly accessible in 1D. In previous work (Yuan and Romanowicz, 2010; Yuan et al., 2011) we developed a continental scale anisotropic upper mantle model of north America based on a combination of long period seismic waveforms and SKS splitting measurements, showing the pervasive presence of layering of anisotropy in the cratonic lithosphere with significant variations in depth of the mid-lithospheric boundary. The radial anisotropy part of the model has been recently updated using the spectral element method for forward wavefield computations and waveform data from the latest deployments of USarray (Yuan and Romanowicz, 2013). However, the long period waveforms (periods > 40s) themselves only provide a relatively smooth view of the mantle if the starting model is smooth, and the mantle discontinuities necessary for geodynamical interpretation are not imaged. Increasing the frequency of the computations to constrain smaller scale features is possible, but challenging computationally, and at the risk of falling in local minima of the misfit function. In

  11. High fidelity digital inline holographic method for 3D flow measurements.

    PubMed

    Toloui, Mostafa; Hong, Jiarong

    2015-10-19

    Among all the 3D optical flow diagnostic techniques, digital inline holographic particle tracking velocimetry (DIH-PTV) provides the highest spatial resolution with low cost, simple and compact optical setups. Despite these advantages, DIH-PTV suffers from major limitations including poor longitudinal resolution, human intervention (i.e. requirement for manually determined tuning parameters during tracer field reconstruction and extraction), limited tracer concentration, and expensive computations. These limitations prevent this technique from being widely used for high resolution 3D flow measurements. In this study, we present a novel holographic particle extraction method with the goal of overcoming all the major limitations of DIH-PTV. The proposed method consists of multiple steps involving 3D deconvolution, automatic signal-to-noise ratio enhancement and thresholding, and inverse iterative particle extraction. The entire method is implemented using GPU-based algorithm to increase the computational speed significantly. Validated with synthetic particle holograms, the proposed method can achieve particle extraction rate above 95% with fake particles less than 3% and maximum position error below 1.6 particle diameter for holograms with particle concentration above 3000 particles/mm3. The applicability of the proposed method for DIH-PTV has been further validated using the experiment of laminar flow in a microchannel and the synthetic tracer flow fields generated using a DNS turbulent channel flow database. Such improvements will substantially enhance the implementation of DIH-PTV for 3D flow measurements and enable the potential commercialization of this technique. PMID:26480377

  12. System crosstalk measurement of a time-sequential 3D display using ideal shutter glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Fu-Hao; Huang, Kuo-Chung; Lin, Lang-Chin; Chou, Yi-Heng; Lee, Kuen

    2011-03-01

    The market of stereoscopic 3D TV grows up fast recently; however, for 3D TV really taking off, the interoperability of shutter glasses (SG) to view different TV sets must be solved, so we developed a measurement method with ideal shutter glasses (ISG) to separate time-sequential stereoscopic displays and SG. For measuring the crosstalk from time-sequential stereoscopic 3D displays, the influences from SG must be eliminated. The advantages are that the sources to crosstalk are distinguished, and the interoperability of SG is broadened. Hence, this paper proposed ideal shutter glasses, whose non-ideal properties are eliminated, as a platform to evaluate the crosstalk purely from the display. In the ISG method, the illuminance of the display was measured in time domain to analyze the system crosstalk SCT of the display. In this experiment, the ISG method was used to measure SCT with a high-speed-response illuminance meter. From the time-resolved illuminance signals, the slow time response of liquid crystal leading to SCT is visualized and quantified. Furthermore, an intriguing phenomenon that SCT measured through SG increases with shortening view distance was observed, and it may arise from LC leakage of the display and shutter leakage at large view angle. Thus, we measured how LC and shutter leakage depending on view angle and verified our argument. Besides, we used the ISG method to evaluate two displays.

  13. Analysis of Uncertainty in a Middle-Cost Device for 3D Measurements in BIM Perspective.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Alonso; Naranjo, José-Manuel; Jiménez, Antonio; González, Alfonso

    2016-09-22

    Medium-cost devices equipped with sensors are being developed to get 3D measurements. Some allow for generating geometric models and point clouds. Nevertheless, the accuracy of these measurements should be evaluated, taking into account the requirements of the Building Information Model (BIM). This paper analyzes the uncertainty in outdoor/indoor three-dimensional coordinate measures and point clouds (using Spherical Accuracy Standard (SAS) methods) for Eyes Map, a medium-cost tablet manufactured by e-Capture Research & Development Company, Mérida, Spain. To achieve it, in outdoor tests, by means of this device, the coordinates of targets were measured from 1 to 6 m and cloud points were obtained. Subsequently, these were compared to the coordinates of the same targets measured by a Total Station. The Euclidean average distance error was 0.005-0.027 m for measurements by Photogrammetry and 0.013-0.021 m for the point clouds. All of them satisfy the tolerance for point cloud acquisition (0.051 m) according to the BIM Guide for 3D Imaging (General Services Administration); similar results are obtained in the indoor tests, with values of 0.022 m. In this paper, we establish the optimal distances for the observations in both, Photogrammetry and 3D Photomodeling modes (outdoor) and point out some working conditions to avoid in indoor environments. Finally, the authors discuss some recommendations for improving the performance and working methods of the device.

  14. Analysis of Uncertainty in a Middle-Cost Device for 3D Measurements in BIM Perspective.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Alonso; Naranjo, José-Manuel; Jiménez, Antonio; González, Alfonso

    2016-01-01

    Medium-cost devices equipped with sensors are being developed to get 3D measurements. Some allow for generating geometric models and point clouds. Nevertheless, the accuracy of these measurements should be evaluated, taking into account the requirements of the Building Information Model (BIM). This paper analyzes the uncertainty in outdoor/indoor three-dimensional coordinate measures and point clouds (using Spherical Accuracy Standard (SAS) methods) for Eyes Map, a medium-cost tablet manufactured by e-Capture Research & Development Company, Mérida, Spain. To achieve it, in outdoor tests, by means of this device, the coordinates of targets were measured from 1 to 6 m and cloud points were obtained. Subsequently, these were compared to the coordinates of the same targets measured by a Total Station. The Euclidean average distance error was 0.005-0.027 m for measurements by Photogrammetry and 0.013-0.021 m for the point clouds. All of them satisfy the tolerance for point cloud acquisition (0.051 m) according to the BIM Guide for 3D Imaging (General Services Administration); similar results are obtained in the indoor tests, with values of 0.022 m. In this paper, we establish the optimal distances for the observations in both, Photogrammetry and 3D Photomodeling modes (outdoor) and point out some working conditions to avoid in indoor environments. Finally, the authors discuss some recommendations for improving the performance and working methods of the device. PMID:27669245

  15. Segmentation of Hypocenters and 3-D Velocity Structure around the Kii Peninsula Revealed by Onshore and Offshore Seismic Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akuhara, T.; Mochizuki, K.; Nakahigashi, K.; Yamada, T.; Shinohara, M.; Sakai, S.; Kanazawa, T.; Uehira, K.; Shimizu, H.

    2013-12-01

    The Philippine Sea Plate subducts beneath the Eurasian Plate at a rate of ~4 cm/year along the Nankai Trough, southwest of Japan. Around the Kii Peninsula, the rupture boundary of the historical Tonankai and Nankai large earthquakes is located, and previous researches have revealed along-strike segmentation of hypocenters [Mochizuki et al., 2010], P-wave anisotropy [Ishise et al., 2009], low frequency earthquake (LFE) distribution [e.g., Obara, 2010] and subduction depth of the Philippine Sea (PHS) Plate, or there may exist a split in the PHS Plate [Ide et al., 2010]. To investigate such segmentation, in our previous work we determined 3-D velocity structure and hypocenters using P- and S-wave arrival times of earthquakes recorded by both ocean bottom seismometers (OBSs) that were deployed from 2003 to 2007 and on-land stations [Akuhara et al., 2013]. As a result, it was discovered that Vp/Vs ratio is also segmented within the oceanic crust and at the bottom of the overriding plate, which coincides with the LFE distribution: segment A is located along the Kii Channel, segment B around the western Kii Peninsula, and segment C around the eastern Kii Peninsula. In segment B, Vp/Vs ratio is low within the oceanic crust and LFE cluster characterized by an anomalously small amount of cumulative slip, compared to the other LFE clusters around the Kii Peninsula, is located [Obara, 2010]. The difference of Vp/Vs ratio and LFE activity among segments were interpreted as difference of pore fluid pressure. In fact, similar segmentation can be seen in hypocenters: Segment A with concentrated seismicity in the oceanic mantle, segment B with that in the oceanic crust, and segment C with little seismicity. To derive characteristic patterns of the hypocenters, we conducted a cluster analysis of earthquakes based on waveform similarity represented by cross-correlation coefficients (CCs) [e.g., Cattaneo, 1999], in which we took varying structural site effects among the OBS stations

  16. 3D shape measurement for moving scenes using an interlaced scanning colour camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Senpeng; Cao, Yiping; Lu, Mingteng; Zhang, Qican

    2014-12-01

    A Fourier transform deinterlacing algorithm (FTDA) is proposed to eliminate the blurring and dislocation of the fringe patterns on a moving object captured by an interlaced scanning colour camera in phase measuring profilometry (PMP). Every frame greyscale fringe from three colour channels of every colour fringe is divided into even and odd field fringes respectively, each of which is respectively processed by FTDA. All of the six frames deinterlaced fringes from one colour fringe form two sets of three-step phase-shifted greyscale fringes, with which two 3D shapes corresponding to two different moments are reconstructed by PMP within a frame period. The deinterlaced fringe is identical with the exact frame fringe at the same moment theoretically. The simulation and experiments show its feasibility and validity. The method doubles the time resolution, maintains the precision of the traditional phase measurement profilometry, and has potential applications in the moving and online object’s 3D shape measurements.

  17. The effect of motion on IMRT - looking at interplay with 3D measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, A.; Yan, H.; Oldham, M.; Juang, T.; Adamovics, J.; Yin, F. F.

    2013-06-01

    Clinical recommendations to address tumor motion management have been derived from studies dealing with simulations and 2D measurements. 3D measurements may provide more insight and possibly alter the current motion management guidelines. This study provides an initial look at true 3D measurements involving leaf motion deliveries by use of a motion phantom and the PRESAGE/DLOS dosimetry system. An IMRT and VMAT plan were delivered to the phantom and analyzed by means of DVHs to determine whether the expansion of treatment volumes based on known imaging motion adequately cover the target. DVHs confirmed that for these deliveries the expansion volumes were adequate to treat the intended target although further studies should be conducted to allow for differences in parameters that could alter the results, such as delivery dose and breathe rate.

  18. Measuring a hidden coordinate: Rate-exchange kinetics from 3D correlation functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berg, Mark A.; Darvin, Jason R.

    2016-08-01

    Nonexponential kinetics imply the existence of at least one slow variable other than the observable, that is, the system has a "hidden" coordinate. We develop a simple, but general, model that allows multidimensional correlation functions to be calculated for these systems. Homogeneous and heterogeneous mechanisms are both included, and slow exchange of the rates is allowed. This model shows that 2D and 3D correlation functions of the observable measure the distribution and kinetics of the hidden coordinate controlling the rate exchange. Both the mean exchange time and the shape of the exchange relaxation are measurable. However, complications arise because higher correlation functions are sums of multiple "pathways," each of which measures different dynamics. Only one 3D pathway involves exchange dynamics. Care must be used to extract exchange dynamics without contamination from other processes.

  19. 3D measurement of the position of gold particles via evanescent digital holographic particle tracking velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satake, Shin-ichi; Unno, Noriyuki; Nakata, Shuichiro; Taniguchi, Jun

    2016-08-01

    A new technique based on digital holography and evanescent waves was developed for 3D measurements of the position of gold nanoparticles in water. In this technique, an intensity profile is taken from a holographic image of a gold particle. To detect the position of the gold particle with high accuracy, its holographic image is recorded on a nanosized step made of MEXFLON, which has a refractive index close to that of water, and the position of the particle is reconstructed by means of digital holography. The height of the nanosized step was measured by using a profilometer and the digitally reconstructed height of the glass substrate had good agreement with the measured value. Furthermore, this method can be used to accurately track the 3D position of a gold particle in water.

  20. Methods for Measuring the Orientation and Rotation Rate of 3D-printed Particles in Turbulence.

    PubMed

    Cole, Brendan C; Marcus, Guy G; Parsa, Shima; Kramel, Stefan; Ni, Rui; Voth, Greg A

    2016-01-01

    Experimental methods are presented for measuring the rotational and translational motion of anisotropic particles in turbulent fluid flows. 3D printing technology is used to fabricate particles with slender arms connected at a common center. Shapes explored are crosses (two perpendicular rods), jacks (three perpendicular rods), triads (three rods in triangular planar symmetry), and tetrads (four arms in tetrahedral symmetry). Methods for producing on the order of 10,000 fluorescently dyed particles are described. Time-resolved measurements of their orientation and solid-body rotation rate are obtained from four synchronized videos of their motion in a turbulent flow between oscillating grids with Rλ = 91. In this relatively low-Reynolds number flow, the advected particles are small enough that they approximate ellipsoidal tracer particles. We present results of time-resolved 3D trajectories of position and orientation of the particles as well as measurements of their rotation rates. PMID:27404898

  1. Design of a large area 3D surface structure measurement system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shenghuai; Li, Xin; Chen, Yurong; Xie, Tiebang

    2010-10-01

    Surface texture plays a vital role in modern engineering products. Currently surface metrology discipline is undergoing a paradigm shift from 2D profile to 3D areal and from stochastic to structured surface characterization. Areal surface texture measurements have greater fully functional significance parameters, better repeatability and more effectively visual express than profile measurements. The existing white light microscopy interference measurement can be used for the non-contact measurement of areal surface texture. However, the measurement field and lateral resolution of this method is restricted to the numerical aperture of objective. To address this issue, a type of vertical scanning white light interference stitching measurement system with large area and seamless has been built up in this paper. This system is based on the compound optical microscopy system and 3D precision displacement system with large travel, nanometer level and displacement measurement. The CCD calibration and angles calculation between CCD and level worktables are settled depending on the measurement system itself. A non-orthogonal worktable moving strategy is used for the seamless stitching measurement of this measurement method, which reduces the cost of stitching and enlarges the measurement field. Therefore the problem, which the lateral resolution and the measurement filed are restricted to the numerical aperture of objective, is solved. An automatic search and location method of fringe for white light interference measurement based on the normalized standard deviation of gray value of interference microscopy images is proposed to solve the problem of inefficiency for the search of interference fringe by hand.

  2. The Evaluation of Steam Generator Level Measurement Model for OPR1000 Using RETRAN-3D

    SciTech Connect

    Doo Yong Lee; Soon Joon Hong; Byung Chul Lee; Heok Soon Lim

    2006-07-01

    Steam generator level measurement is important factor for plant transient analyses using best estimate thermal hydraulic computer codes since the value of steam generator level is used for steam generator level control system and plant protection system. Because steam generator is in the saturation condition which includes steam and liquid together and is the place that heat exchange occurs from primary side to secondary side, computer codes are hard to calculate steam generator level realistically without appropriate level measurement model. In this paper, we prepare the steam generator models using RETRAN-3D that include geometry models, full range feedwater control system and five types of steam generator level measurement model. Five types of steam generator level measurement model consist of level measurement model using elevation difference in downcomer, 1D level measurement model using fluid mass, 1D level measurement model using fluid volume, 2D level measurement model using power and fluid mass, and 2D level measurement model using power and fluid volume. And we perform the evaluation of the capability of each steam generator level measurement model by simulating the real plant transient condition, the title is 'Reactor Trip by The Failure of The Deaerator Level Control Card of Ulchin Unit 3'. The comparison results between real plant data and RETRAN-3D analyses for each steam generator level measurement model show that 2D level measurement model using power and fluid mass or fluid volume has more realistic prediction capability compared with other level measurement models. (authors)

  3. Design of 3D measurement system based on multi-sensor data fusion technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Weiguang; Han, Jun; Yu, Xun

    2009-05-01

    With the rapid development of shape measurement technique, multi-sensor approach becomes one of valid way to improve the accuracy, to expend measuring range, to reduce occlusion, to realize multi-resolution measurement, and to increase measuring speed simultaneously. Sensors in multi-sensor system can have different system parameters, and they may have different measuring range and different precision. Light sectioning method is one of useful measurement technique for 3D profile measurement. It is insensitive to the surface optical property of 3D object, has scarcely any demand on surrounding. A multi-sensor system scheme, which uses light sectioning method and multi-sensor data fusion techniques, is presented for blade of aviation engine and spiral bevel gear measurement. The system model is developed to build the relationship between measuring range & precision and system parameters. The system parameters were set according to system error analysis, measuring range and precision. The result shows that the system is more universal than it's ancestor, and that the accuracy of the system is about 0.05mm for the 60× 60mm2 measuring range, and that the system is successful for the aero-dynamical data curve of blade of aviation engine and tooth profile of spiral bevel gear measurement with 3600 multi-resolution measuring character.

  4. Automatic measurement of vertebral body deformations in CT images based on a 3D parametric model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Štern, Darko; Bürmen, Miran; Njagulj, Vesna; Likar, Boštjan; Pernuš, Franjo; Vrtovec, Tomaž

    2012-03-01

    Accurate and objective evaluation of vertebral body deformations represents an important part of the clinical diagnostics and therapy of pathological conditions affecting the spine. Although modern clinical practice is oriented towards threedimensional (3D) imaging techniques, the established methods for the evaluation of vertebral body deformations are based on measurements in two-dimensional (2D) X-ray images. In this paper, we propose a method for automatic measurement of vertebral body deformations in computed tomography (CT) images that is based on efficient modeling of the vertebral body shape with a 3D parametric model. By fitting the 3D model to the vertebral body in the image, quantitative description of normal and pathological vertebral bodies is obtained from the value of 25 parameters of the model. The evaluation of vertebral body deformations is based on the distance of the observed vertebral body from the distribution of the parameter values of normal vertebral bodies in the parametric space. The distribution is obtained from 80 normal vertebral bodies in the training data set and verified with eight normal vertebral bodies in the control data set. The statistically meaningful distance of eight pathological vertebral bodies in the study data set from the distribution of normal vertebral bodies in the parametric space shows that the parameters can be used to successfully model vertebral body deformations in 3D. The proposed method may therefore be used to assess vertebral body deformations in 3D or provide clinically meaningful observations that are not available when using 2D methods that are established in clinical practice.

  5. Influence of 3D anisotropic structures on bipole-quadrupole DC resistivity (BQ-DC) measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loewer, A.; Junge, A.; Guenther, T.; Grinat, M.; Hering, P.

    2015-12-01

    3D modelling of BQ-DC measurements can show a rather strong directional distortion of the electric current density for an inhomogeneous subsurface. Anisotropic structures increase this effect. Depending on the anisotropy direction, current density might vary by 90° between the interior and exterior of an anisotropic body. In combination with 3D effects currents might even flow into the opposite direction compared to those expected for a homogeneous half space. This effect can produce negative potential differences (in combination with positive geometry factors) at the surface which cannot be explained by an isotropic resistivity distribution and thus those data cannot be used by an isotropic inversion. Consequently, anisotropic forward modelling is necessary to explain such observations. In nature anisotropic resistivity can appear in the context of strongly foliated structures. Such structures exist in the Rhenish Massif, Germany, where extensive shallow greywacke shales with different strength of foliation are found. In this area a field campaign was performed in 2014 to provide evidence for the existence of anisotropic resistivity structures. Two perpendicular bipole current injections at 15 locations produced individual potential distributions. The potential differences were recorded for two orthogonal directions each at 30 positions for an array set up within the survey area. We use the apparent resistivity tensor after Bibby 1986 to display the BQ-DC data. It uses the hypothetical current densities of each of the two bipole sources calculated for an equivalent homogenous half space at the location of the quadrupole measurement to derive a resistivity tensor. The spatial behavior of modelled tensors gives evidence of the anisotropic body although the structure is covered by an isotropic layer. The data are explained by a 3D anisotropic resistivity distribution using a 3D isotropic inversion scheme combined with 3D anisotropic forward-modelling.

  6. Longitudinal Measurement of Extracellular Matrix Rigidity in 3D Tumor Models Using Particle-tracking Microrheology

    PubMed Central

    El-Hamidi, Hamid; Celli, Jonathan P.

    2014-01-01

    The mechanical microenvironment has been shown to act as a crucial regulator of tumor growth behavior and signaling, which is itself remodeled and modified as part of a set of complex, two-way mechanosensitive interactions. While the development of biologically-relevant 3D tumor models have facilitated mechanistic studies on the impact of matrix rheology on tumor growth, the inverse problem of mapping changes in the mechanical environment induced by tumors remains challenging. Here, we describe the implementation of particle-tracking microrheology (PTM) in conjunction with 3D models of pancreatic cancer as part of a robust and viable approach for longitudinally monitoring physical changes in the tumor microenvironment, in situ. The methodology described here integrates a system of preparing in vitro 3D models embedded in a model extracellular matrix (ECM) scaffold of Type I collagen with fluorescently labeled probes uniformly distributed for position- and time-dependent microrheology measurements throughout the specimen. In vitro tumors are plated and probed in parallel conditions using multiwell imaging plates. Drawing on established methods, videos of tracer probe movements are transformed via the Generalized Stokes Einstein Relation (GSER) to report the complex frequency-dependent viscoelastic shear modulus, G*(ω). Because this approach is imaging-based, mechanical characterization is also mapped onto large transmitted-light spatial fields to simultaneously report qualitative changes in 3D tumor size and phenotype. Representative results showing contrasting mechanical response in sub-regions associated with localized invasion-induced matrix degradation as well as system calibration, validation data are presented. Undesirable outcomes from common experimental errors and troubleshooting of these issues are also presented. The 96-well 3D culture plating format implemented in this protocol is conducive to correlation of microrheology measurements with therapeutic

  7. A comparison of the 3D kinematic measurements obtained by single-plane 2D-3D image registration and RSA.

    PubMed

    Muhit, Abdullah A; Pickering, Mark R; Ward, Tom; Scarvell, Jennie M; Smith, Paul N

    2010-01-01

    3D computed tomography (CT) to single-plane 2D fluoroscopy registration is an emerging technology for many clinical applications such as kinematic analysis of human joints and image-guided surgery. However, previous registration approaches have suffered from the inaccuracy of determining precise motion parameters for out-of-plane movements. In this paper we compare kinematic measurements obtained by a new 2D-3D registration algorithm with measurements provided by the gold standard Roentgen Stereo Analysis (RSA). In particular, we are interested in the out-of-plane translation and rotations which are difficult to measure precisely using a single plane approach. Our experimental results show that the standard deviation of the error for out-of-plane translation is 0.42 mm which compares favourably to RSA. It is also evident that our approach produces very similar flexion/extension, abduction/adduction and external knee rotation angles when compared to RSA.

  8. Standardization based on human factors for 3D display: performance characteristics and measurement methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uehara, Shin-ichi; Ujike, Hiroyasu; Hamagishi, Goro; Taira, Kazuki; Koike, Takafumi; Kato, Chiaki; Nomura, Toshio; Horikoshi, Tsutomu; Mashitani, Ken; Yuuki, Akimasa; Izumi, Kuniaki; Hisatake, Yuzo; Watanabe, Naoko; Umezu, Naoaki; Nakano, Yoshihiko

    2010-02-01

    We are engaged in international standardization activities for 3D displays. We consider that for a sound development of 3D displays' market, the standards should be based on not only mechanism of 3D displays, but also human factors for stereopsis. However, we think that there is no common understanding on what the 3D display should be and that the situation makes developing the standards difficult. In this paper, to understand the mechanism and human factors, we focus on a double image, which occurs in some conditions on an autostereoscopic display. Although the double image is generally considered as an unwanted effect, we consider that whether the double image is unwanted or not depends on the situation and that there are some allowable double images. We tried to classify the double images into the unwanted and the allowable in terms of the display mechanism and visual ergonomics for stereopsis. The issues associated with the double image are closely related to performance characteristics for the autostereoscopic display. We also propose performance characteristics, measurement and analysis methods to represent interocular crosstalk and motion parallax.

  9. Automated 3D trajectory measuring of large numbers of moving particles.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hai Shan; Zhao, Qi; Zou, Danping; Chen, Yan Qiu

    2011-04-11

    Complex dynamics of natural particle systems, such as insect swarms, bird flocks, fish schools, has attracted great attention of scientists for years. Measuring 3D trajectory of each individual in a group is vital for quantitative study of their dynamic properties, yet such empirical data is rare mainly due to the challenges of maintaining the identities of large numbers of individuals with similar visual features and frequent occlusions. We here present an automatic and efficient algorithm to track 3D motion trajectories of large numbers of moving particles using two video cameras. Our method solves this problem by formulating it as three linear assignment problems (LAP). For each video sequence, the first LAP obtains 2D tracks of moving targets and is able to maintain target identities in the presence of occlusions; the second one matches the visually similar targets across two views via a novel technique named maximum epipolar co-motion length (MECL), which is not only able to effectively reduce matching ambiguity but also further diminish the influence of frequent occlusions; the last one links 3D track segments into complete trajectories via computing a globally optimal assignment based on temporal and kinematic cues. Experiment results on simulated particle swarms with various particle densities validated the accuracy and robustness of the proposed method. As real-world case, our method successfully acquired 3D flight paths of fruit fly (Drosophila melanogaster) group comprising hundreds of freely flying individuals.

  10. Automated 3D trajectory measuring of large numbers of moving particles.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hai Shan; Zhao, Qi; Zou, Danping; Chen, Yan Qiu

    2011-04-11

    Complex dynamics of natural particle systems, such as insect swarms, bird flocks, fish schools, has attracted great attention of scientists for years. Measuring 3D trajectory of each individual in a group is vital for quantitative study of their dynamic properties, yet such empirical data is rare mainly due to the challenges of maintaining the identities of large numbers of individuals with similar visual features and frequent occlusions. We here present an automatic and efficient algorithm to track 3D motion trajectories of large numbers of moving particles using two video cameras. Our method solves this problem by formulating it as three linear assignment problems (LAP). For each video sequence, the first LAP obtains 2D tracks of moving targets and is able to maintain target identities in the presence of occlusions; the second one matches the visually similar targets across two views via a novel technique named maximum epipolar co-motion length (MECL), which is not only able to effectively reduce matching ambiguity but also further diminish the influence of frequent occlusions; the last one links 3D track segments into complete trajectories via computing a globally optimal assignment based on temporal and kinematic cues. Experiment results on simulated particle swarms with various particle densities validated the accuracy and robustness of the proposed method. As real-world case, our method successfully acquired 3D flight paths of fruit fly (Drosophila melanogaster) group comprising hundreds of freely flying individuals. PMID:21503074

  11. The Utility of 3D Left Atrial Volume and Mitral Flow Velocities as Guides for Acute Volume Resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Santosa, Claudia M; Rose, David D; Fleming, Neal W

    2015-01-01

    Left ventricular end-diastolic pressure (LVEDP) is the foundation of cardiac function assessment. Because of difficulties and risks associated with its direct measurement, correlates of LVEDP derived by pulmonary artery (PA) catheterization or transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) are commonly adopted. TEE has the advantage of being less invasive; however TEE-based estimation of LVEDP using correlates such as left ventricular end-diastolic volume (LVEDV) has technical difficulties that limit its clinical usefulness. Using intraoperative acute normovolemic hemodilution (ANH) as a controlled hemorrhagic model, we examined various mitral flow parameters and three-dimensional reconstructions of left atrial volume as surrogates of LVEDP. Our results demonstrate that peak E wave velocity and left atrial end-diastolic volume (LAEDV) correlated with known changes in intravascular volume associated with ANH. Although left atrial volumetric analysis was done offline in our study, recent advances in echocardiographic software may allow for continuous display and real-time calculation of LAEDV. Along with the ease and reproducibility of acquiring Doppler images of flow across the mitral valve, these two correlates of LVEDP may justify a more widespread use of TEE to optimize intraoperative fluid management. The clinical applicability of peak E wave velocity and LAEDV still needs to be validated during uncontrolled resuscitation.

  12. Visualization of anthropometric measures of workers in computer 3D modeling of work place.

    PubMed

    Mijović, B; Ujević, D; Baksa, S

    2001-12-01

    In this work, 3D visualization of a work place by means of a computer-made 3D-machine model and computer animation of a worker have been performed. By visualization of 3D characters in inverse kinematic and dynamic relation with the operating part of a machine, the biomechanic characteristics of worker's body have been determined. The dimensions of a machine have been determined by an inspection of technical documentation as well as by direct measurements and recordings of the machine by camera. On the basis of measured body height of workers all relevant anthropometric measures have been determined by a computer program developed by the authors. By knowing the anthropometric measures, the vision fields and the scope zones while forming work places, exact postures of workers while performing technological procedures were determined. The minimal and maximal rotation angles and the translation of upper and lower arm which are basis for the analysis of worker burdening were analyzed. The dimensions of the seized space of a body are obtained by computer anthropometric analysis of movement, e.g. range of arms, position of legs, head, back. The influence of forming of a work place on correct postures of workers during work has been reconsidered and thus the consumption of energy and fatigue can be reduced to a minimum. PMID:11811295

  13. 3D real-time measurement system of seam with laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Min-shuang; Huang, Jun-fen

    2014-02-01

    3-D Real-time Measurement System of seam outline based on Moiré Projection is proposed and designed. The system is composed of LD, grating, CCD, video A/D, FPGA, DSP and an output interface. The principle and hardware makeup of high-speed and real-time image processing circuit based on a Digital Signal Processor (DSP) and a Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) are introduced. Noise generation mechanism in poor welding field conditions is analyzed when Moiré stripes are projected on a welding workpiece surface. Median filter is adopted to smooth the acquired original laser image of seam, and then measurement results of a 3-D outline image of weld groove are provided.

  14. Measurement error analysis of the 3D four-wheel aligner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Qiancheng; Yang, Tianlong; Huang, Dongzhao; Ding, Xun

    2013-10-01

    Positioning parameters of four-wheel have significant effects on maneuverabilities, securities and energy saving abilities of automobiles. Aiming at this issue, the error factors of 3D four-wheel aligner, which exist in extracting image feature points, calibrating internal and exeternal parameters of cameras, calculating positional parameters and measuring target pose, are analyzed respectively based on the elaborations of structure and measurement principle of 3D four-wheel aligner, as well as toe-in and camber of four-wheel, kingpin inclination and caster, and other major positional parameters. After that, some technical solutions are proposed for reducing the above error factors, and on this basis, a new type of aligner is developed and marketed, it's highly estimated among customers because the technical indicators meet requirements well.

  15. a Multiple Data Set Joint Inversion Global 3d P-Velocity Model of the Earth's Crust and Mantle for Improved Seismic Event Location

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballard, S.; Begnaud, M. L.; Hipp, J. R.; Chael, E. P.; Encarnacao, A.; Maceira, M.; Yang, X.; Young, C. J.; Phillips, W.

    2013-12-01

    SALSA3D is a global 3D P wave velocity model of the Earth's crust and mantle developed specifically to provide seismic event locations that are more accurate and more precise than are locations from 1D and 2.5D models. In this paper, we present the most recent version of our model, for the first time jointly derived from multiple types of data: body wave travel times, surface wave group velocities, and gravity. The latter two are added to provide information in areas with poor body wave coverage, and are down-weighted in areas where body wave coverage is good. To constrain the inversions, we invoked empirical relations among the density, S velocity, and P velocity. We demonstrate the ability of the new SALSA3D model to reduce mislocations and generate statistically robust uncertainty estimates for a large set of realizations derived from a carefully chosen set of globally-distributed ground truth events. We obtain path-dependent travel time prediction uncertainties for our model by computing the full 3D model covariance matrix of our tomographic system and integrating the model slowness variance and covariance along paths of interest. This approach yields very low travel time prediction uncertainties for well-sampled paths through the Earth and higher uncertainties for paths that are poorly represented in the data set used to develop the model. While the calculation of path-dependent prediction uncertainties with this approach is computationally expensive, uncertainties can be pre-computed for a network of stations and stored in 3D lookup tables that can be quickly and efficiently interrogated using GeoTess software.

  16. Current issues on 3D volumetric positioning accuracy: measurement, compensation, and definition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, C.

    2008-10-01

    Traditionally, manufacturers have ensured part accuracy by linear calibration of each machine tool axis. The conventional definition of the 3-D volumetric positioning error is the root mean square of the three-axis displacement error. 20 years ago, the dominate error is the lead screw pitch error of 3 axes. This definition is adequate. However, now the machine accuracy has been improved with better lead screw, linear encoder and compensation, the dominate errors become the squareness errors and straightness errors. Hence the above definition is inadequate. During the past years, the industry has seen demand emerge for the "volumetric accuracy" specification on machine tools. One hurdle remains: a standard definition so that everyone measures volumetric accuracy with the same yardstick. The issue has been discussed in many Standards Committees, machine tool builders and the metrology community. Reported here are, a new 3D volumetric positioning error measurement and compensation technique, proposed definitions or measures of 3 D volumetric positioning errors of a CNC machine tool, and its verification.

  17. Comparison of measuring strategies for the 3-D electrical resistivity imaging of tumuli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsourlos, Panagiotis; Papadopoulos, Nikos; Yi, Myeong-Jong; Kim, Jung-Ho; Tsokas, Gregory

    2014-02-01

    Artificial erected hills like tumuli, mounds, barrows and kurgans comprise monuments of the past human activity and offer opportunities to reconstruct habitation models regarding the life and customs during their building period. These structures also host features of archeological significance like architectural relics, graves or chamber tombs. Tumulus exploration is a challenging geophysical problem due to the complex distribution of the subsurface physical properties, the size and burial depth of potential relics and the uneven topographical terrain. Geoelectrical methods by means of three-dimensional (3-D) inversion are increasingly popular for tumulus investigation. Typically data are obtained by establishing a regular rectangular grid and assembling the data collected by parallel two-dimensional (2-D) tomographies. In this work the application of radial 3-D mode is studied, which is considered as the assembly of data collected by radially positioned Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) lines. The relative advantages and disadvantages of this measuring mode over the regular grid measurements were investigated and optimum ways to perform 3-D ERT surveys for tumuli investigations were proposed. Comparative test was performed by means of synthetic examples as well as by tests with field data. Overall all tested models verified the superiority of the radial mode in delineating bodies positioned at the central part of the tumulus while regular measuring mode proved superior in recovering bodies positioned away from the center of the tumulus. The combined use of radial and regular modes seems to produce superior results in the expense of time required for data acquisition and processing.

  18. Measuring the correlation between cell mechanics and myofibroblastic differentiation during maturation of 3D microtissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Ruogang; Wang, Weigang; Boudou, Thomas; Chen, Christopher; Reich, Daniel

    2013-03-01

    Tissue stiffness and cellular contractility are two of the most important biomechanical factors regulating pathological transitions of encapsulated cells, such as the differentiation of fibroblasts into myofibroblasts - a key event contributing to tissue fibrosis. However, a quantitative correlation between tissue stiffness and cellular contraction and myofibroblast differentiation has not yet been established in 3D environments, mainly due to the lack of suitable 3D tissue culture models that allow both tissue remodeling and simultaneous measurement of the cell/tissue mechanics. To address this, we have developed a magnetic microtissue tester system that allows the remodeling of arrays of cell-laden 3D collagen microtissues and the measurement of cell and tissue mechanics using magnetically actuated elastomeric microcantilevers. By measuring the development of cell/tissue mechanical properties and the expression level of α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA, a marker for myofibroblast differentiation) during a 6 day culture period, we found microtissue stiffness increased by 45% and α-SMA expression increased by 38%, but tissue contraction forces only increased by 10%, indicating that tissue stiffness may be the predominant mechanical factor for regulation of myofibroblast differentiation. This study provides new quantitative insight into the regulatory effect of cell and tissue mechanics on cellular function. Supported in part by NIH grant HL090747

  19. Contribution to the standardization of 3D measurements using a high-resolution PMD camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lietz, Henrik; Eberhardt, Jörg

    2015-09-01

    Three-dimensional image acquisition is still a growing field in optical metrology. Various methods are available to reconstruct an object's three-dimensional surface. The five main types of 3D cameras are stereo cameras, triangulation (pattern or laser scanning), interferometry, light-field cameras and ToF (time-of-flight) cameras. PMD (photonic mixing device) cameras measure the time of light, and thus belong to the field of ToF cameras. Each camera type has fields of application for which it is particularly well suited. Even within PMD cameras, there is a distinction made between applications for indoor and outdoor use. Until today, there is no method to measure and characterize 3D cameras uniformly. Desirable would be a method, which is able to measure all types of cameras equally. With this work, we want to contribute to the standardization of 3D cameras. In this case, we use a PMD camera for outdoor applications with relatively large pixels. It is shown how to determine the spatial resolution of a PMD camera from both, the amplitude and the distance image. Further, a novel method is presented how to determine the resolution enhancement in an image via gradient image evaluation. Finally, a method is proposed which evaluates the quality of resolution enhancement, when no ground truth data is available. Both are particularly interesting for the use of super-resolution (SR) applications.

  20. Examination about Influence for Precision of 3d Image Measurement from the Ground Control Point Measurement and Surface Matching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anai, T.; Kochi, N.; Yamada, M.; Sasaki, T.; Otani, H.; Sasaki, D.; Nishimura, S.; Kimoto, K.; Yasui, N.

    2015-05-01

    As the 3D image measurement software is now widely used with the recent development of computer-vision technology, the 3D measurement from the image is now has acquired the application field from desktop objects as wide as the topography survey in large geographical areas. Especially, the orientation, which used to be a complicated process in the heretofore image measurement, can be now performed automatically by simply taking many pictures around the object. And in the case of fully textured object, the 3D measurement of surface features is now done all automatically from the orientated images, and greatly facilitated the acquisition of the dense 3D point cloud from images with high precision. With all this development in the background, in the case of small and the middle size objects, we are now furnishing the all-around 3D measurement by a single digital camera sold on the market. And we have also developed the technology of the topographical measurement with the air-borne images taken by a small UAV [1~5]. In this present study, in the case of the small size objects, we examine the accuracy of surface measurement (Matching) by the data of the experiments. And as to the topographic measurement, we examine the influence of GCP distribution on the accuracy by the data of the experiments. Besides, we examined the difference of the analytical results in each of the 3D image measurement software. This document reviews the processing flow of orientation and the 3D measurement of each software and explains the feature of the each software. And as to the verification of the precision of stereo-matching, we measured the test plane and the test sphere of the known form and assessed the result. As to the topography measurement, we used the air-borne image data photographed at the test field in Yadorigi of Matsuda City, Kanagawa Prefecture JAPAN. We have constructed Ground Control Point which measured by RTK-GPS and Total Station. And we show the results of analysis made

  1. Precision and accuracy of 3D lower extremity residua measurement systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Commean, Paul K.; Smith, Kirk E.; Vannier, Michael W.; Hildebolt, Charles F.; Pilgram, Thomas K.

    1996-04-01

    Accurate and reproducible geometric measurement of lower extremity residua is required for custom prosthetic socket design. We compared spiral x-ray computed tomography (SXCT) and 3D optical surface scanning (OSS) with caliper measurements and evaluated the precision and accuracy of each system. Spiral volumetric CT scanned surface and subsurface information was used to make external and internal measurements, and finite element models (FEMs). SXCT and OSS were used to measure lower limb residuum geometry of 13 below knee (BK) adult amputees. Six markers were placed on each subject's BK residuum and corresponding plaster casts and distance measurements were taken to determine precision and accuracy for each system. Solid models were created from spiral CT scan data sets with the prosthesis in situ under different loads using p-version finite element analysis (FEA). Tissue properties of the residuum were estimated iteratively and compared with values taken from the biomechanics literature. The OSS and SXCT measurements were precise within 1% in vivo and 0.5% on plaster casts, and accuracy was within 3.5% in vivo and 1% on plaster casts compared with caliper measures. Three-dimensional optical surface and SXCT imaging systems are feasible for capturing the comprehensive 3D surface geometry of BK residua, and provide distance measurements statistically equivalent to calipers. In addition, SXCT can readily distinguish internal soft tissue and bony structure of the residuum. FEM can be applied to determine tissue material properties interactively using inverse methods.

  2. Design and verification of an ultra-precision 3D-coordinate measuring machine with parallel drives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bos, Edwin; Moers, Ton; van Riel, Martijn

    2015-08-01

    An ultra-precision 3D coordinate measuring machine (CMM), the TriNano N100, has been developed. In our design, the workpiece is mounted on a 3D stage, which is driven by three parallel drives that are mutually orthogonal. The linear drives support the 3D stage using vacuum preloaded (VPL) air bearings, whereby each drive determines the position of the 3D stage along one translation direction only. An exactly constrained design results in highly repeatable machine behavior. Furthermore, the machine complies with the Abbé principle over its full measurement range and the application of parallel drives allows for excellent dynamic behavior. The design allows a 3D measurement uncertainty of 100 nanometers in a measurement range of 200 cubic centimeters. Verification measurements using a Gannen XP 3D tactile probing system on a spherical artifact show a standard deviation in single point repeatability of around 2 nm in each direction.

  3. 3D digital holographic interferometry as a tool to measure the tympanic membrane motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    del Socorro Hernández-Montes, M.; Muñoz Solis, S.; Mendoza Santoyo, F.

    2012-10-01

    Most of the current optical non-invasive methodologies used to characterize the tympanic membrane (TM) motion generate data in the z direction only, i.e., employ an out-of-plane sensitive configuration. In this paper, 3-D digital holographic interferometry (3-D DHI), is used to measure micrometer displacements from the TM surface. The proposed optical configuration provides information from three sensitivity vectors that separate the contributions from x, y and z displacement components. In order to achieve high accuracy of the sensitivity vector and to obtain the complete determination of the 3-D TM displacements, its surface contour is obtained by moving only two object illumination sources chosen from any pair within the DHI optical setup. Results are presented from measurements corresponding to individual displacements maps for the three orthogonal displacements components x, y and z combined with the TM shape from an ex-vivo cat. These results will no doubt contribute to enhance the understanding and determinate the mechanical properties of this complex tissue.

  4. Evolution in boron-based GEM detectors for diffraction measurements: from planar to 3D converters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albani, Giorgia; Perelli Cippo, Enrico; Croci, Gabriele; Muraro, Andrea; Schooneveld, Erik; Scherillo, Antonella; Hall-Wilton, Richard; Kanaki, Kalliopi; Höglund, Carina; Hultman, Lars; Birch, Jens; Claps, Gerardo; Murtas, Fabrizio; Rebai, Marica; Tardocchi, Marco; Gorini, Giuseppe

    2016-11-01

    The so-called ‘3He-crisis’ has motivated the neutron detector community to undertake an intense R&D programme in order to develop technologies alternative to standard 3He tubes and suitable for neutron detection systems in future spallation sources such as the European spallation source (ESS). Boron-based GEM (gas electron multiplier) detectors are a promising ‘3He-free’ technology for thermal neutron detection in neutron scattering experiments. In this paper the evolution of boron-based GEM detectors from planar to 3D converters with an application in diffraction measurements is presented. The use of 3D converters coupled with GEMs allows for an optimization of the detector performances. Three different detectors were used for diffraction measurements on the INES instrument at the ISIS spallation source. The performances of the GEM-detectors are compared with those of conventional 3He tubes installed on the INES instrument. The conceptual detector with the 3D converter used in this paper reached a count rate per unit area of about 25% relative to the currently installed 3He tube. Its timing resolution is similar and the signal-to-background ratio (S/B) is 2 times lower.

  5. Accurately measuring volume of soil samples using low cost Kinect 3D scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Sterre, Boy-Santhos; Hut, Rolf; van de Giesen, Nick

    2013-04-01

    The 3D scanner of the Kinect game controller can be used to increase the accuracy and efficiency of determining in situ soil moisture content. Soil moisture is one of the principal hydrological variables in both the water and energy interactions between soil and atmosphere. Current in situ measurements of soil moisture either rely on indirect measurements (of electromagnetic constants or heat capacity) or on physically taking a sample and weighing it in a lab. The bottleneck in accurately retrieving soil moisture using samples is the determining of the volume of the sample. Currently this is mostly done by the very time consuming "sand cone method" in which the volume were the sample used to sit is filled with sand. We show that 3D scanner that is part of the 150 game controller extension "Kinect" can be used to make 3D scans before and after taking the sample. The accuracy of this method is tested by scanning forms of known volume. This method is less time consuming and less error-prone than using a sand cone.

  6. Accurately measuring volume of soil samples using low cost Kinect 3D scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Sterre, B.; Hut, R.; Van De Giesen, N.

    2012-12-01

    The 3D scanner of the Kinect game controller can be used to increase the accuracy and efficiency of determining in situ soil moisture content. Soil moisture is one of the principal hydrological variables in both the water and energy interactions between soil and atmosphere. Current in situ measurements of soil moisture either rely on indirect measurements (of electromagnetic constants or heat capacity) or on physically taking a sample and weighing it in a lab. The bottleneck in accurately retrieving soil moisture using samples is the determining of the volume of the sample. Currently this is mostly done by the very time consuming "sand cone method" in which the volume were the sample used to sit is filled with sand. We show that 3D scanner that is part of the $150 game controller extension "Kinect" can be used to make 3D scans before and after taking the sample. The accuracy of this method is tested by scanning forms of known volume. This method is less time consuming and less error-prone than using a sand cone.

  7. 3D surface roughness measurement for scaliness scoring of psoriasis lesions.

    PubMed

    Ahmad Fadzil, M Hani; Prakasa, Esa; Asirvadam, Vijanth Sagayan; Nugroho, Hermawan; Affandi, Azura Mohd; Hussein, Suraiya Hani

    2013-11-01

    Psoriasis is an incurable skin disorder affecting 2-3% of the world population. The scaliness of psoriasis is a key assessment parameter of the Psoriasis Area and Severity Index (PASI). Dermatologists typically use visual and tactile senses in PASI scaliness assessment. However, the assessment can be subjective resulting in inter- and intra-rater variability in the scores. This paper proposes an assessment method that incorporates 3D surface roughness with standard clustering techniques to objectively determine the PASI scaliness score for psoriasis lesions. A surface roughness algorithm using structured light projection has been applied to 1999 3D psoriasis lesion surfaces. The algorithm has been validated with an accuracy of 94.12%. Clustering algorithms were used to classify the surface roughness measured using the proposed assessment method for PASI scaliness scoring. The reliability of the developed PASI scaliness algorithm was high with kappa coefficients>0.84 (almost perfect agreement).

  8. 3D shape measurements with a single interferometric sensor for in-situ lathe monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuschmierz, R.; Huang, Y.; Czarske, J.; Metschke, S.; Löffler, F.; Fischer, A.

    2015-05-01

    Temperature drifts, tool deterioration, unknown vibrations as well as spindle play are major effects which decrease the achievable precision of computerized numerically controlled (CNC) lathes and lead to shape deviations between the processed work pieces. Since currently no measurement system exist for fast, precise and in-situ 3d shape monitoring with keyhole access, much effort has to be made to simulate and compensate these effects. Therefore we introduce an optical interferometric sensor for absolute 3d shape measurements, which was integrated into a working lathe. According to the spindle rotational speed, a measurement rate of 2,500 Hz was achieved. In-situ absolute shape, surface profile and vibration measurements are presented. While thermal drifts of the sensor led to errors of several mµm for the absolute shape, reference measurements with a coordinate machine show, that the surface profile could be measured with an uncertainty below one micron. Additionally, the spindle play of 0.8 µm was measured with the sensor.

  9. 3D crustal seismic velocity model for the Gulf of Cadiz and adjacent areas (SW Iberia margin) based on seismic reflection and refraction profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lozano, Lucía; Cantavella, Juan Vicente; Barco, Jaime; Carranza, Marta; Burforn, Elisa

    2016-04-01

    The Atlantic margin of the SW Iberian Peninsula and northern Morocco has been subject of study during the last 30 years. Many seismic reflection and refraction profiles have been carried out offshore, providing detailed information about the crustal structure of the main seafloor tectonic domains in the region, from the South Portuguese Zone and the Gulf of Cadiz to the Abyssal Plains and the Josephine Seamount. The interest to obtain a detailed and realistic velocity model for this area, integrating the available data from these studies, is clear, mainly to improve real-time earthquake hypocentral location and for tsunami and earthquake early warning. Since currently real-time seismic location tools allow the implementation of 3D velocity models, we aim to generate a full 3D crustal model. For this purpose we have reviewed more than 50 profiles obtained in different seismic surveys, from 1980 to 2008. Data from the most relevant and reliable 2D seismic velocity published profiles were retrieved. We first generated a Moho depth map of the studied area (latitude 32°N - 41°N and longitude 15°W - 5°W) by extracting Moho depths along each digitized profile with a 10 km spacing, and then interpolating this dataset using ordinary kriging method and generating the contour isodepth map. Then, a 3D crustal velocity model has been obtained. Selected vertical sections at different distances along each profile were considered to retrieve P-wave velocity values at each interface in order to reproduce the geometry and the velocity gradient within each layer. A double linear interpolation, both in distance and depth, with sampling rates of 10 km and 1 km respectively, was carried out to generate a (latitude, longitude, depth, velocity) matrix. This database of all the profiles was interpolated to obtain the P-wave velocity distribution map every kilometer of depth. The new 3D velocity model has been integrated in NonLinLoc location program to relocate several representative

  10. Quantum Nondemolition Measurement of a Quantum Squeezed State Beyond the 3 dB Limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, C. U.; Weinstein, A. J.; Suh, J.; Wollman, E. E.; Kronwald, A.; Marquardt, F.; Clerk, A. A.; Schwab, K. C.

    2016-09-01

    We use a reservoir engineering technique based on two-tone driving to generate and stabilize a quantum squeezed state of a micron-scale mechanical oscillator in a microwave optomechanical system. Using an independent backaction-evading measurement to directly quantify the squeezing, we observe 4.7 ±0.9 dB of squeezing below the zero-point level surpassing the 3 dB limit of standard parametric squeezing techniques. Our measurements also reveal evidence for an additional mechanical parametric effect. The interplay between this effect and the optomechanical interaction enhances the amount of squeezing obtained in the experiment.

  11. 3D Magnetic Measurements of Kink and Locked Modes in DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, J. D.; Strait, E. J.; Hanson, J. M.; Paz-Soldan, C.; Logan, N. C.; Lanctot, M. J.; Shiraki, D.

    2013-10-01

    The DIII-D magnetics diagnostic has been greatly expanded to fully characterize non-axisymmetric ``3D'' fields. Five poloidal locations now recover n <= 3 , while new HFS arrays provide poloidal spectral resolution of 7.4 cm. Initial measurements suggest externally driven kink structures deviate from MARS-F and IPEC models. These variations extend to the ideal regime, where toroidal agreement is observed. The plasma response to an n = 3 RMP increases monotonically as beta increases and q95 decreases, contrary to predictions of a screening to kink valley. Finally, the temporal evolution of the 3D eigenstructure of a slowly rotating (5 Hz) quasi-static, born locked, tearing mode provides the first evidence of an appreciable n = 2 error field, and an estimate of the phase for future correction. This new 3D capability will be used to understand and optimize control of RWMs, NTV torque, ELMs, and error field correction to extend stable tokamak operation. Work supported in part by the US Department of Energy under DE-AC05-00OR22725, DE-FC02-04ER54698, DE-FG02-95ER54309, DE-AC02-09CH11466, DE-FG02-04ER54761 and DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  12. Automatic 3D image registration using voxel similarity measurements based on a genetic algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Wei; Sullivan, John M., Jr.; Kulkarni, Praveen; Murugavel, Murali

    2006-03-01

    An automatic 3D non-rigid body registration system based upon the genetic algorithm (GA) process is presented. The system has been successfully applied to 2D and 3D situations using both rigid-body and affine transformations. Conventional optimization techniques and gradient search strategies generally require a good initial start location. The GA approach avoids the local minima/maxima traps of conventional optimization techniques. Based on the principles of Darwinian natural selection (survival of the fittest), the genetic algorithm has two basic steps: 1. Randomly generate an initial population. 2. Repeated application of the natural selection operation until a termination measure is satisfied. The natural selection process selects individuals based on their fitness to participate in the genetic operations; and it creates new individuals by inheritance from both parents, genetic recombination (crossover) and mutation. Once the termination criteria are satisfied, the optimum is selected from the population. The algorithm was applied on 2D and 3D magnetic resonance images (MRI). It does not require any preprocessing such as threshold, smoothing, segmentation, or definition of base points or edges. To evaluate the performance of the GA registration, the results were compared with results of the Automatic Image Registration technique (AIR) and manual registration which was used as the gold standard. Results showed that our GA implementation was a robust algorithm and gives very close results to the gold standard. A pre-cropping strategy was also discussed as an efficient preprocessing step to enhance the registration accuracy.

  13. 3D Configuration of Anti-parallel and Component Reconnection: Reconstruction of Cluster Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, R.; Pu, Z.; Wang, X.; Xiao, C.; Xie, L.; Fu, S.; Zhong, J.

    2011-12-01

    Magnetic reconnection (MR) has been commonly studied in two dimensional geometry and usually classified into two categories: anti-parallel and component, the terminology widely used in magnetospheric physics. However, MR is three dimensional (3D) in nature. It is thus necessary to reveal the 3D configuration of anti-parallel and component reconnection in reality. In this presentation we study an event in the magnetotail by reconstructing the magnetic field structure in the MR region based on Cluster four spacecraft measurements. The details of the reconstruction approach can be found in He et al. (2008). It is found that in the event both anti-parallel and component reconnection processes can be detected. The reconstruction shows that in both processes two fan surfaces can be identified and intersect to form a separator. The MR process takes place just on the separator line. In the plane locally perpendicular to the separator, the magnetic field lines display the X-type topology. In the component MR process observed, a null-pair appears at the two ends of the separator. The magnetic field magnitude is found significant in the middle of the separator. On the other hand in the anti-parallel MR process observed, the magnetic field magnitude of the separator is however very weak everywhere. In short, this study shows that the 3D separator MR model can be applied for both processes, i.e., both component and anti-parallel MR processes require a null pair. Component and anti-parallel configurations are just the local manifestations of the 3D separator MR process.

  14. Measuring the 3D shape of high temperature objects using blue sinusoidal structured light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xianling; Liu, Jiansheng; Zhang, Huayu; Wu, Yingchun

    2015-12-01

    The visible light radiated by some high temperature objects (less than 1200 °C) almost lies in the red and infrared waves. It will interfere with structured light projected on a forging surface if phase measurement profilometry (PMP) is used to measure the shapes of objects. In order to obtain a clear deformed pattern image, a 3D measurement method based on blue sinusoidal structured light is proposed in this present work. Moreover, a method for filtering deformed pattern images is presented for correction of the unwrapping phase. Blue sinusoidal phase-shifting fringe pattern images are projected on the surface by a digital light processing (DLP) projector, and then the deformed patterns are captured by a 3-CCD camera. The deformed pattern images are separated into R, G and B color components by the software. The B color images filtered by a low-pass filter are used to calculate the fringe order. Consequently, the 3D shape of a high temperature object is obtained by the unwrapping phase and the calibration parameter matrixes of the DLP projector and 3-CCD camera. The experimental results show that the unwrapping phase is completely corrected with the filtering method by removing the high frequency noise from the first harmonic of the B color images. The measurement system can complete the measurement in a few seconds with a relative error of less than 1 : 1000.

  15. Measurement Matrix Optimization and Mismatch Problem Compensation for DLSLA 3-D SAR Cross-Track Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Qian; Jiang, Chenglong; Lin, Yun; Tan, Weixian; Wang, Zhirui; Hong, Wen

    2016-01-01

    With a short linear array configured in the cross-track direction, downward looking sparse linear array three-dimensional synthetic aperture radar (DLSLA 3-D SAR) can obtain the 3-D image of an imaging scene. To improve the cross-track resolution, sparse recovery methods have been investigated in recent years. In the compressive sensing (CS) framework, the reconstruction performance depends on the property of measurement matrix. This paper concerns the technique to optimize the measurement matrix and deal with the mismatch problem of measurement matrix caused by the off-grid scatterers. In the model of cross-track reconstruction, the measurement matrix is mainly affected by the configuration of antenna phase centers (APC), thus, two mutual coherence based criteria are proposed to optimize the configuration of APCs. On the other hand, to compensate the mismatch problem of the measurement matrix, the sparse Bayesian inference based method is introduced into the cross-track reconstruction by jointly estimate the scatterers and the off-grid error. Experiments demonstrate the performance of the proposed APCs’ configuration schemes and the proposed cross-track reconstruction method. PMID:27556471

  16. Measurement Matrix Optimization and Mismatch Problem Compensation for DLSLA 3-D SAR Cross-Track Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Bao, Qian; Jiang, Chenglong; Lin, Yun; Tan, Weixian; Wang, Zhirui; Hong, Wen

    2016-01-01

    With a short linear array configured in the cross-track direction, downward looking sparse linear array three-dimensional synthetic aperture radar (DLSLA 3-D SAR) can obtain the 3-D image of an imaging scene. To improve the cross-track resolution, sparse recovery methods have been investigated in recent years. In the compressive sensing (CS) framework, the reconstruction performance depends on the property of measurement matrix. This paper concerns the technique to optimize the measurement matrix and deal with the mismatch problem of measurement matrix caused by the off-grid scatterers. In the model of cross-track reconstruction, the measurement matrix is mainly affected by the configuration of antenna phase centers (APC), thus, two mutual coherence based criteria are proposed to optimize the configuration of APCs. On the other hand, to compensate the mismatch problem of the measurement matrix, the sparse Bayesian inference based method is introduced into the cross-track reconstruction by jointly estimate the scatterers and the off-grid error. Experiments demonstrate the performance of the proposed APCs' configuration schemes and the proposed cross-track reconstruction method. PMID:27556471

  17. Measurement Matrix Optimization and Mismatch Problem Compensation for DLSLA 3-D SAR Cross-Track Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Bao, Qian; Jiang, Chenglong; Lin, Yun; Tan, Weixian; Wang, Zhirui; Hong, Wen

    2016-08-22

    With a short linear array configured in the cross-track direction, downward looking sparse linear array three-dimensional synthetic aperture radar (DLSLA 3-D SAR) can obtain the 3-D image of an imaging scene. To improve the cross-track resolution, sparse recovery methods have been investigated in recent years. In the compressive sensing (CS) framework, the reconstruction performance depends on the property of measurement matrix. This paper concerns the technique to optimize the measurement matrix and deal with the mismatch problem of measurement matrix caused by the off-grid scatterers. In the model of cross-track reconstruction, the measurement matrix is mainly affected by the configuration of antenna phase centers (APC), thus, two mutual coherence based criteria are proposed to optimize the configuration of APCs. On the other hand, to compensate the mismatch problem of the measurement matrix, the sparse Bayesian inference based method is introduced into the cross-track reconstruction by jointly estimate the scatterers and the off-grid error. Experiments demonstrate the performance of the proposed APCs' configuration schemes and the proposed cross-track reconstruction method.

  18. Research on Joint Parameter Inversion for an Integrated Underground Displacement 3D Measuring Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Shentu, Nanying; Qiu, Guohua; Li, Qing; Tong, Renyuan; Shentu, Nankai; Wang, Yanjie

    2015-01-01

    Underground displacement monitoring is a key means to monitor and evaluate geological disasters and geotechnical projects. There exist few practical instruments able to monitor subsurface horizontal and vertical displacements simultaneously due to monitoring invisibility and complexity. A novel underground displacement 3D measuring sensor had been proposed in our previous studies, and great efforts have been taken in the basic theoretical research of underground displacement sensing and measuring characteristics by virtue of modeling, simulation and experiments. This paper presents an innovative underground displacement joint inversion method by mixing a specific forward modeling approach with an approximate optimization inversion procedure. It can realize a joint inversion of underground horizontal displacement and vertical displacement for the proposed 3D sensor. Comparative studies have been conducted between the measured and inversed parameters of underground horizontal and vertical displacements under a variety of experimental and inverse conditions. The results showed that when experimentally measured horizontal displacements and vertical displacements are both varied within 0 ~ 30 mm, horizontal displacement and vertical displacement inversion discrepancies are generally less than 3 mm and 1 mm, respectively, under three kinds of simulated underground displacement monitoring circumstances. This implies that our proposed underground displacement joint inversion method is robust and efficient to predict the measuring values of underground horizontal and vertical displacements for the proposed sensor. PMID:25871714

  19. Research on joint parameter inversion for an integrated underground displacement 3D measuring sensor.

    PubMed

    Shentu, Nanying; Qiu, Guohua; Li, Qing; Tong, Renyuan; Shentu, Nankai; Wang, Yanjie

    2015-01-01

    Underground displacement monitoring is a key means to monitor and evaluate geological disasters and geotechnical projects. There exist few practical instruments able to monitor subsurface horizontal and vertical displacements simultaneously due to monitoring invisibility and complexity. A novel underground displacement 3D measuring sensor had been proposed in our previous studies, and great efforts have been taken in the basic theoretical research of underground displacement sensing and measuring characteristics by virtue of modeling, simulation and experiments. This paper presents an innovative underground displacement joint inversion method by mixing a specific forward modeling approach with an approximate optimization inversion procedure. It can realize a joint inversion of underground horizontal displacement and vertical displacement for the proposed 3D sensor. Comparative studies have been conducted between the measured and inversed parameters of underground horizontal and vertical displacements under a variety of experimental and inverse conditions. The results showed that when experimentally measured horizontal displacements and vertical displacements are both varied within 0~30 mm, horizontal displacement and vertical displacement inversion discrepancies are generally less than 3 mm and 1 mm, respectively, under three kinds of simulated underground displacement monitoring circumstances. This implies that our proposed underground displacement joint inversion method is robust and efficient to predict the measuring values of underground horizontal and vertical displacements for the proposed sensor. PMID:25871714

  20. Use of 3D photogrammetry for measurement of river bed porosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frings, R. M.; Vollmer, S.

    2012-04-01

    Porosity is one of the key characteristics of the sediments on a river bed. It defines the suitability of a river as spawning place for salmonids, the amount of oil that is contained in geological river deposits and the life-time of hydropower reservoirs. Nevertheless, little is known about natural variations in porosity, partly due to a lack of proper measuring equipment. The recommended technique for porosity measurements in field conditions is the water replacement method, in which a sediment sample is taken and the amount of water needed to fill the pores of the sample is measured. Division of pore volume by total volume of the sample then returns the porosity. The weakness of this technique is the determination of the in-situ sample volume. Normally, this is done by positioning a plastic ring on top of the sediments prior to sampling and placing a plastic liner is into it. After shaping the liner to conform to the irregular soil surface, the ring is filled with water. After removing the water and liner, a sediment sample is taken, and the pit is covered with the liner and filled with water again. The difference in water volume before and after excavation of the pit represents the sample volume. Because it is very difficult to fill the pit two times to exactly the same level with water, the uncertainties in sample volume can be large. Moreover there is a risk of holes in the liner, and the technique becomes very time-consuming if large samples are needed (for instance in case of heterogeneous coarse sediments). The objective of this study was to determine if the accuracy of porosity measurements can be improved by using 3D photogrammetry to determine the in-situ sample volume. We performed two series of each about 50 porosity measurements in the Rhine River: the first series with the traditional method to measure sample volumes and the second series with a structured-light 3D scanner (Z-Snapper, Vialux) to measure sample volumes. The scanner was placed about

  1. Development of an algorithm to measure defect geometry using a 3D laser scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilambi, S.; Tipton, S. M.

    2012-08-01

    Current fatigue life prediction models for coiled tubing (CT) require accurate measurements of the defect geometry. Three-dimensional (3D) laser imaging has shown promise toward becoming a nondestructive, non-contacting method of surface defect characterization. Laser imaging provides a detailed photographic image of a flaw, in addition to a detailed 3D surface map from which its critical dimensions can be measured. This paper describes algorithms to determine defect characteristics, specifically depth, width, length and projected cross-sectional area. Curve-fitting methods were compared and implicit algebraic fits have higher probability of convergence compared to explicit geometric fits. Among the algebraic fits, the Taubin circle fit has the least error. The algorithm was able to extract the dimensions of the flaw geometry from the scanned data of CT to within a tolerance of about 0.127 mm, close to the tolerance specified for the laser scanner itself, compared to measurements made using traveling microscopes. The algorithm computes the projected surface area of the flaw, which could previously only be estimated from the dimension measurements and the assumptions made about cutter shape. Although shadows compromised the accuracy of the shape characterization, especially for deep and narrow flaws, the results indicate that the algorithm with laser scanner can be used for non-destructive evaluation of CT in the oil field industry. Further work is needed to improve accuracy, to eliminate shadow effects and to reduce radial deviation.

  2. Non-destructive 3D shape measurement of transparent and black objects with thermal fringes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brahm, Anika; Rößler, Conrad; Dietrich, Patrick; Heist, Stefan; Kühmstedt, Peter; Notni, Gunther

    2016-05-01

    Fringe projection is a well-established optical method for the non-destructive contactless three-dimensional (3D) measurement of object surfaces. Typically, fringe sequences in the visible wavelength range (VIS) are projected onto the surfaces of objects to be measured and are observed by two cameras in a stereo vision setup. The reconstruction is done by finding corresponding pixels in both cameras followed by triangulation. Problems can occur if the properties of some materials disturb the measurements. If the objects are transparent, translucent, reflective, or strongly absorbing in the VIS range, the projected patterns cannot be recorded properly. To overcome these challenges, we present a new alternative approach in the infrared (IR) region of the electromagnetic spectrum. For this purpose, two long-wavelength infrared (LWIR) cameras (7.5 - 13 μm) are used to detect the emitted heat radiation from surfaces which is induced by a pattern projection unit driven by a CO2 laser (10.6 μm). Thus, materials like glass or black objects, e.g. carbon fiber materials, can be measured non-destructively without the need of any additional paintings. We will demonstrate the basic principles of this heat pattern approach and show two types of 3D systems based on a freeform mirror and a GOBO wheel (GOes Before Optics) projector unit.

  3. Innovative LIDAR 3D Dynamic Measurement System to estimate fruit-tree leaf area.

    PubMed

    Sanz-Cortiella, Ricardo; Llorens-Calveras, Jordi; Escolà, Alexandre; Arnó-Satorra, Jaume; Ribes-Dasi, Manel; Masip-Vilalta, Joan; Camp, Ferran; Gràcia-Aguilá, Felip; Solanelles-Batlle, Francesc; Planas-DeMartí, Santiago; Pallejà-Cabré, Tomàs; Palacin-Roca, Jordi; Gregorio-Lopez, Eduard; Del-Moral-Martínez, Ignacio; Rosell-Polo, Joan R

    2011-01-01

    In this work, a LIDAR-based 3D Dynamic Measurement System is presented and evaluated for the geometric characterization of tree crops. Using this measurement system, trees were scanned from two opposing sides to obtain two three-dimensional point clouds. After registration of the point clouds, a simple and easily obtainable parameter is the number of impacts received by the scanned vegetation. The work in this study is based on the hypothesis of the existence of a linear relationship between the number of impacts of the LIDAR sensor laser beam on the vegetation and the tree leaf area. Tests performed under laboratory conditions using an ornamental tree and, subsequently, in a pear tree orchard demonstrate the correct operation of the measurement system presented in this paper. The results from both the laboratory and field tests confirm the initial hypothesis and the 3D Dynamic Measurement System is validated in field operation. This opens the door to new lines of research centred on the geometric characterization of tree crops in the field of agriculture and, more specifically, in precision fruit growing.

  4. Underwater 3D Surface Measurement Using Fringe Projection Based Scanning Devices

    PubMed Central

    Bräuer-Burchardt, Christian; Heinze, Matthias; Schmidt, Ingo; Kühmstedt, Peter; Notni, Gunther

    2015-01-01

    In this work we show the principle of optical 3D surface measurements based on the fringe projection technique for underwater applications. The challenges of underwater use of this technique are shown and discussed in comparison with the classical application. We describe an extended camera model which takes refraction effects into account as well as a proposal of an effective, low-effort calibration procedure for underwater optical stereo scanners. This calibration technique combines a classical air calibration based on the pinhole model with ray-based modeling and requires only a few underwater recordings of an object of known length and a planar surface. We demonstrate a new underwater 3D scanning device based on the fringe projection technique. It has a weight of about 10 kg and the maximal water depth for application of the scanner is 40 m. It covers an underwater measurement volume of 250 mm × 200 mm × 120 mm. The surface of the measurement objects is captured with a lateral resolution of 150 μm in a third of a second. Calibration evaluation results are presented and examples of first underwater measurements are given. PMID:26703624

  5. Innovative LIDAR 3D Dynamic Measurement System to estimate fruit-tree leaf area.

    PubMed

    Sanz-Cortiella, Ricardo; Llorens-Calveras, Jordi; Escolà, Alexandre; Arnó-Satorra, Jaume; Ribes-Dasi, Manel; Masip-Vilalta, Joan; Camp, Ferran; Gràcia-Aguilá, Felip; Solanelles-Batlle, Francesc; Planas-DeMartí, Santiago; Pallejà-Cabré, Tomàs; Palacin-Roca, Jordi; Gregorio-Lopez, Eduard; Del-Moral-Martínez, Ignacio; Rosell-Polo, Joan R

    2011-01-01

    In this work, a LIDAR-based 3D Dynamic Measurement System is presented and evaluated for the geometric characterization of tree crops. Using this measurement system, trees were scanned from two opposing sides to obtain two three-dimensional point clouds. After registration of the point clouds, a simple and easily obtainable parameter is the number of impacts received by the scanned vegetation. The work in this study is based on the hypothesis of the existence of a linear relationship between the number of impacts of the LIDAR sensor laser beam on the vegetation and the tree leaf area. Tests performed under laboratory conditions using an ornamental tree and, subsequently, in a pear tree orchard demonstrate the correct operation of the measurement system presented in this paper. The results from both the laboratory and field tests confirm the initial hypothesis and the 3D Dynamic Measurement System is validated in field operation. This opens the door to new lines of research centred on the geometric characterization of tree crops in the field of agriculture and, more specifically, in precision fruit growing. PMID:22163926

  6. Underwater 3D Surface Measurement Using Fringe Projection Based Scanning Devices.

    PubMed

    Bräuer-Burchardt, Christian; Heinze, Matthias; Schmidt, Ingo; Kühmstedt, Peter; Notni, Gunther

    2015-12-23

    In this work we show the principle of optical 3D surface measurements based on the fringe projection technique for underwater applications. The challenges of underwater use of this technique are shown and discussed in comparison with the classical application. We describe an extended camera model which takes refraction effects into account as well as a proposal of an effective, low-effort calibration procedure for underwater optical stereo scanners. This calibration technique combines a classical air calibration based on the pinhole model with ray-based modeling and requires only a few underwater recordings of an object of known length and a planar surface. We demonstrate a new underwater 3D scanning device based on the fringe projection technique. It has a weight of about 10 kg and the maximal water depth for application of the scanner is 40 m. It covers an underwater measurement volume of 250 mm × 200 mm × 120 mm. The surface of the measurement objects is captured with a lateral resolution of 150 μm in a third of a second. Calibration evaluation results are presented and examples of first underwater measurements are given.

  7. Digital holographic measurements of shape and 3D sound-induced displacements of Tympanic Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Weina; Dobrev, Ivo; Cheng, Jeffrey Tao; Furlong, Cosme; Rosowski, John J

    2014-01-01

    Acoustically-induced vibrations of the Tympanic Membrane (TM) play a primary role in the hearing process, in that these motions are the initial mechanical response of the ear to airborne sound. Characterization of the shape and 3D displacement patterns of the TM is a crucial step to a better understanding of the complicated mechanics of sound reception by the ear. In this paper, shape and sound-induced 3D displacements of the TM in cadaveric chinchillas are measured by a lensless Dual-Wavelength Digital Holography system (DWDHS). The DWDHS consists of Laser Delivery (LD), Optical Head (OH), and Computing Platform (CP) subsystems. Shape measurements are performed in double-exposure mode and with the use of two wavelengths of a tunable laser while nanometer-scale displacements are measured along a single sensitivity direction and with a constant wavelength. In order to extract the three principal components of displacement in full-field-of-view, and taking into consideration the anatomical dimensions of the TM, we combine principles of thin-shell theory together with both, displacement measurements along the single sensitivity vector and TM surface shape. To computationally test this approach, Finite Element Methods (FEM) are applied to the study of artificial geometries. PMID:24790255

  8. Assessing the Potential of Low-Cost 3D Cameras for the Rapid Measurement of Plant Woody Structure

    PubMed Central

    Nock, Charles A; Taugourdeau, Olivier; Delagrange, Sylvain; Messier, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Detailed 3D plant architectural data have numerous applications in plant science, but many existing approaches for 3D data collection are time-consuming and/or require costly equipment. Recently, there has been rapid growth in the availability of low-cost, 3D cameras and related open source software applications. 3D cameras may provide measurements of key components of plant architecture such as stem diameters and lengths, however, few tests of 3D cameras for the measurement of plant architecture have been conducted. Here, we measured Salix branch segments ranging from 2–13 mm in diameter with an Asus Xtion camera to quantify the limits and accuracy of branch diameter measurement with a 3D camera. By scanning at a variety of distances we also quantified the effect of scanning distance. In addition, we also test the sensitivity of the program KinFu for continuous 3D object scanning and modeling as well as other similar software to accurately record stem diameters and capture plant form (<3 m in height). Given its ability to accurately capture the diameter of branches >6 mm, Asus Xtion may provide a novel method for the collection of 3D data on the branching architecture of woody plants. Improvements in camera measurement accuracy and available software are likely to further improve the utility of 3D cameras for plant sciences in the future. PMID:24287538

  9. Multiplex acquisition approach for high speed 3D measurements with a chromatic confocal microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taphanel, Miro; Zink, Ralf; Längle, Thomas; Beyerer, Jürgen

    2015-05-01

    A technical realization of a multispectral camera is proposed, by multiplexing a light source with six different spectra. A monochrome line scan camera with six pixel rows is used as detector. The special feature of this acquisition approach is its high speed capability. The scan speed is as high as the frame rate of the line scan camera and not affected by the multiplexing. As application a chromatic confocal microscope was build up. From a data acquisition perspective up to 284 million 3D points per second can be measured. A real time signal processing is proposed, too.

  10. Earthquake relocation using a 3D a-priori geological velocity model from the western Alps to Corsica: Implication for seismic hazard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Béthoux, Nicole; Theunissen, Thomas; Beslier, Marie-Odile; Font, Yvonne; Thouvenot, François; Dessa, Jean-Xavier; Simon, Soazig; Courrioux, Gabriel; Guillen, Antonio

    2016-02-01

    The region between the inner zones of the Alps and Corsica juxtaposes an overthickened crust to an oceanic domain, which makes difficult to ascertain the focal depth of seismic events using routine location codes and average 1D velocity models. The aim of this article is to show that, even with a rather lose monitoring network, accurate routine locations can be achieved by using realistic 3D modelling and advanced location techniques. Previous earthquake tomography studies cover the whole region with spatial resolutions of several tens of kilometres on land, but they fail to resolve the marine domain due to the absence of station coverage and sparse seismicity. To overcome these limitations, we first construct a 3D a-priori P and S velocity model integrating known geophysical and geological information. Significant progress has been achieved in the 3D numerical modelling of complex geological structures by the development of dedicated softwares (e.g. 3D GeoModeller), capable at once of elaborating a 3D structural model from geological and geophysical constraints and, possibly, of refining it by inversion processes (Calcagno et al., 2008). Then, we build an arrival-time catalogue of 1500 events recorded from 2000 to 2011. Hypocentres are then located in this model using a numerical code based on the maximum intersection method (Font et al., 2004), updated by Theunissen et al. (2012), as well as another 3D location technique, the NonLinLoc software (Lomax and Curtis, 2001). The reduction of arrival-time residuals and uncertainties (dh, dz) with respect to classical 1D locations demonstrates the improved accuracy allowed by our approach and confirms the coherence of the 3D geological model built and used in this study. Our results are also compared with previous works that benefitted from the installation of dense temporary networks surrounding the studied epicentre area. The resulting 3D location catalogue allows us to improve the regional seismic hazard assessment

  11. Reproducibility of 3D kinematics and surface electromyography measurements of mastication.

    PubMed

    Remijn, Lianne; Groen, Brenda E; Speyer, Renée; van Limbeek, Jacques; Nijhuis-van der Sanden, Maria W G

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the measurement reproducibility for a procedure evaluating the mastication process and to estimate the smallest detectable differences of 3D kinematic and surface electromyography (sEMG) variables. Kinematics of mandible movements and sEMG activity of the masticatory muscles were obtained over two sessions with four conditions: two food textures (biscuit and bread) of two sizes (small and large). Twelve healthy adults (mean age 29.1 years) completed the study. The second to the fifth chewing cycle of 5 bites were used for analyses. The reproducibility per outcome variable was calculated with an intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) and a Bland-Altman analysis was applied to determine the standard error of measurement relative error of measurement and smallest detectable differences of all variables. ICCs ranged from 0.71 to 0.98 for all outcome variables. The outcome variables consisted of four bite and fourteen chewing cycle variables. The relative standard error of measurement of the bite variables was up to 17.3% for 'time-to-swallow', 'time-to-transport' and 'number of chewing cycles', but ranged from 31.5% to 57.0% for 'change of chewing side'. The relative standard error of measurement ranged from 4.1% to 24.7% for chewing cycle variables and was smaller for kinematic variables than sEMG variables. In general, measurements obtained with 3D kinematics and sEMG are reproducible techniques to assess the mastication process. The duration of the chewing cycle and frequency of chewing were the best reproducible measurements. Change of chewing side could not be reproduced. The published measurement error and smallest detectable differences will aid the interpretation of the results of future clinical studies using the same study variables. PMID:26617403

  12. Reproducibility of 3D kinematics and surface electromyography measurements of mastication.

    PubMed

    Remijn, Lianne; Groen, Brenda E; Speyer, Renée; van Limbeek, Jacques; Nijhuis-van der Sanden, Maria W G

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the measurement reproducibility for a procedure evaluating the mastication process and to estimate the smallest detectable differences of 3D kinematic and surface electromyography (sEMG) variables. Kinematics of mandible movements and sEMG activity of the masticatory muscles were obtained over two sessions with four conditions: two food textures (biscuit and bread) of two sizes (small and large). Twelve healthy adults (mean age 29.1 years) completed the study. The second to the fifth chewing cycle of 5 bites were used for analyses. The reproducibility per outcome variable was calculated with an intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) and a Bland-Altman analysis was applied to determine the standard error of measurement relative error of measurement and smallest detectable differences of all variables. ICCs ranged from 0.71 to 0.98 for all outcome variables. The outcome variables consisted of four bite and fourteen chewing cycle variables. The relative standard error of measurement of the bite variables was up to 17.3% for 'time-to-swallow', 'time-to-transport' and 'number of chewing cycles', but ranged from 31.5% to 57.0% for 'change of chewing side'. The relative standard error of measurement ranged from 4.1% to 24.7% for chewing cycle variables and was smaller for kinematic variables than sEMG variables. In general, measurements obtained with 3D kinematics and sEMG are reproducible techniques to assess the mastication process. The duration of the chewing cycle and frequency of chewing were the best reproducible measurements. Change of chewing side could not be reproduced. The published measurement error and smallest detectable differences will aid the interpretation of the results of future clinical studies using the same study variables.

  13. Crustal high-velocity anomaly at the East European Craton margin in SE Poland (TESZ) modelled by 3-D seismic tomography of refracted and reflected arrivals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Środa, Piotr; Dec, Monika

    2016-04-01

    The area of Trans-European Suture Zone in SE Poland represents a contact of major tectonic units of different consolidation age - from the Precambrian East European Craton, through Palaeozoic West European Platform to Cenozoic Carpathian orogen. The region was built by several phases of crustal accretion, which resulted in a complex collage of tectonic blocks. In 2000, this region was studied by several seismic wide-angle profiles of CELEBRATION 2000 experiment, providing a dense coverage of seismic data in SE Poland and allowing for detailed investigations of the crustal structure and properties in this area. Beneath the marginal part of the EEC, the 2-D modelling of in-line data form several CELEBRATION profiles revealed a prominent high P-wave velocity anomaly in the upper crust, with Vp of 6.7-7.1 km/s, starting at 10-16 km depth (e.g., Środa et al., 2006). Anomalously high velocities are observed in the area located approximately beneath Lublin trough, to the NE of Teisseyre-Tornquist Zone. Based on 3-D tomography of first arrivals of in- and off-line CELEBRATION 2000 recordings (Malinowski et al., 2008), elevated velocities are also reported in the same area and seem to continue to the SW, off the craton margin. Gravimetric modelling also revealed anomalously high density in the same region at similar depths. High seismic velocities and densities are interpreted as indicative for a pronounced mafic intrusion, possibly related to extensional processes at the EEC margin. Previous 3-D models of the high-velocity intrusion were based on first arrivals (crustal refractions) only. In this study, also off-line reflections (not modelled up to now) are used, in order to enlarge the data set and to better constrain the geometry and properties of the velocity anomaly. A code for 3-D joint tomographic inversion of refracted and reflected arrivals, with model parametrization allowing for velocity discontinuities was used (Rawlinson, 2007). With this approach, besides the

  14. Angle-independent measure of motion for image-based gating in 3D coronary angiography

    SciTech Connect

    Lehmann, Glen C.; Holdsworth, David W.; Drangova, Maria

    2006-05-15

    The role of three-dimensional (3D) image guidance for interventional procedures and minimally invasive surgeries is increasing for the treatment of vascular disease. Currently, most interventional procedures are guided by two-dimensional x-ray angiography, but computed rotational angiography has the potential to provide 3D geometric information about the coronary arteries. The creation of 3D angiographic images of the coronary arteries requires synchronization of data acquisition with respect to the cardiac cycle, in order to minimize motion artifacts. This can be achieved by inferring the extent of motion from a patient's electrocardiogram (ECG) signal. However, a direct measurement of motion (from the 2D angiograms) has the potential to improve the 3D angiographic images by ensuring that only projections acquired during periods of minimal motion are included in the reconstruction. This paper presents an image-based metric for measuring the extent of motion in 2D x-ray angiographic images. Adaptive histogram equalization was applied to projection images to increase the sharpness of coronary arteries and the superior-inferior component of the weighted centroid (SIC) was measured. The SIC constitutes an image-based metric that can be used to track vessel motion, independent of apparent motion induced by the rotational acquisition. To evaluate the technique, six consecutive patients scheduled for routine coronary angiography procedures were studied. We compared the end of the SIC rest period ({rho}) to R-waves (R) detected in the patient's ECG and found a mean difference of 14{+-}80 ms. Two simultaneous angular positions were acquired and {rho} was detected for each position. There was no statistically significant difference (P=0.79) between {rho} in the two simultaneously acquired angular positions. Thus we have shown the SIC to be independent of view angle, which is critical for rotational angiography. A preliminary image-based gating strategy that employed the SIC

  15. A new method using orthogonal two-frequency grating in online 3D measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Kuang; Cao, Yiping; Wu, Yingchun; Lu, Mingteng

    2016-09-01

    In online 3D measurement, a new method using orthogonal two-frequency grating based on Phase Measuring Profilometry(PMP) is proposed. The modulation of the entire measured object is used to match pixels and this proposed method successfully resolves the contradiction of the demand for different frequency fringes between the extraction of the modulation information and the phase unwrapping. The high-frequency fringe is used to catch the better modulation patterns for pixel matching, and the low-frequency fringe is used to calculate the phase distribution and avoid phase unwrapping error. In addition, to extract the better modulation patterns for pixel matching, the flat filtering window replaces the circular filtering window to avoid the spectrum aliasing phenomenon. The simulations and experiments show its feasibility.

  16. 3D CFD simulations of trailing suction hopper dredger plume mixing: comparison with field measurements.

    PubMed

    de Wit, Lynyrd; Talmon, A M; van Rhee, C

    2014-11-15

    A 3D computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model is used to simulate mixing of an overflow plume within 400 m from a trailing suction hopper dredger (TSHD). The simulations are compared with new field measurements. It is the first time simulations of overflow dredging plumes are compared in such detail to field measurements this close to a TSHD. Seven cases with a large variety in overflow flux and plume characteristics are used. Measured maximum suspended sediment concentrations (SSC) vary between 30 and 500 mg/l and fluxes vary between 0.7% and 20% of the total overflow flux; the CFD model has, subject to the limitations of the field data, been shown to reproduce this in a satisfactory way. The model gives better understanding of important near field processes, which helps to assess the frequency, duration and intensity of stresses like turbidity and sedimentation needed to find the environmental impact of dredging projects.

  17. The light pen of a no guide 3D-coordinate measuring system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaofang; Jiang, Chengzhi; Xue, Tongze; Li, Cuiying; Wang, Biru

    2006-11-01

    With the advantages of simple structure, high speed, and high accuracy, a no guide 3D-coordinate measuring technique that using the photoelectric detectors with intersection converge imaging has the predominance in workshop measurement. Its measuring head is made in a pen shape with several light sources, which is called as the light pen. In this paper, the structure design and self-calibration of light pen system are analyzed, and the identifying way for multi-sources on light pen is present. The Laser-balls are offered to be the light-sources while the principles as well as fabrication are introduced. The light pen can insert and touch the points of inner surface in a deep hole. So the localization of CMM can be avoided by using the light pen with simple and deft structure.

  18. Full optical characterization of autostereoscopic 3D displays using local viewing angle and imaging measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boher, Pierre; Leroux, Thierry; Bignon, Thibault; Collomb-Patton, Véronique

    2012-03-01

    Two commercial auto-stereoscopic 3D displays are characterized a using Fourier optics viewing angle system and an imaging video-luminance-meter. One display has a fixed emissive configuration and the other adapts its emission to the observer position using head tracking. For a fixed emissive condition, three viewing angle measurements are performed at three positions (center, right and left). Qualified monocular and binocular viewing spaces in front of the display are deduced as well as the best working distance. The imaging system is then positioned at this working distance and crosstalk homogeneity on the entire surface of the display is measured. We show that the crosstalk is generally not optimized on all the surface of the display. Display aspect simulation using viewing angle measurements allows understanding better the origin of those crosstalk variations. Local imperfections like scratches and marks generally increase drastically the crosstalk, demonstrating that cleanliness requirements for this type of display are quite critical.

  19. Registration of Feature-Poor 3D Measurements from Fringe Projection

    PubMed Central

    von Enzberg, Sebastian; Al-Hamadi, Ayoub; Ghoneim, Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    We propose a novel method for registration of partly overlapping three-dimensional surface measurements for stereo-based optical sensors using fringe projection. Based on two-dimensional texture matching, it allows global registration of surfaces with poor and ambiguous three-dimensional features, which are common to surface inspection applications. No prior information about relative sensor position is necessary, which makes our approach suitable for semi-automatic and manual measurement. The algorithm is robust and works with challenging measurements, including uneven illumination, surfaces with specular reflection as well as sparsely textured surfaces. We show that precisions of 1 mm and below can be achieved along the surfaces, which is necessary for further local 3D registration. PMID:26927106

  20. A New Approach to Sap Flow Measurement Using 3D Printed Gauges and Open-source Electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ham, J. M.; Miner, G. L.; Kluitenberg, G. J.

    2015-12-01

    A new type of sap flow gauge was developed to measure transpiration from herbaceous plants using a modified heat pulse technique. Gauges were fabricated using 3D-printing technology and low-cost electronics to keep the materials cost under $20 (U.S.) per sensor. Each gauge consisted of small-diameter needle probes fastened to a 3D-printed frame. One needle contained a resistance heater to provide a 6 to 8 second heat pulse while the other probes measured the resultant temperature increase at two distances from the heat source. The data acquisition system for the gauges was built from a low-cost Arduino microcontroller. The system read the gauges every 10 minutes and stored the results on a SD card. Different numerical techniques were evaluated for estimating sap velocity from the heat pulse data - including analytical solutions and parameter estimation approaches . Prototype gauges were tested in the greenhouse on containerized corn and sunflower. Sap velocities measured by the gauges were compared to independent gravimetric measurements of whole plant transpiration. Results showed the system could measure daily transpiration to within 3% of the gravimetric measurements. Excellent agreement was observed when two gauges were attached the same stem. Accuracy was not affected by rapidly changing transpiration rates observed under partly cloudy conditions. The gauge-based estimates of stem thermal properties suggested the system may also detect the onset of water stress. A field study showed the gauges could run for 1 to 2 weeks on a small battery pack. Sap flow measurements on multiple corn stems were scaled up by population to estimate field-scale transpiration. During full canopy cover, excellent agreement was observed between the scaled-up sap flow measurements and reference crop evapotranspiration calculated from weather data. Data also showed promise as a way to estimate real-time canopy resistance required for model verification and development. Given the low

  1. Fabric defects identification based on on-line 3D measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Limei; An, Hongwei; Dong, Xiaoxiao; Zhang, Chunbo

    2011-08-01

    This paper using on-line identification of three dimensions to solve some difficult problems of two dimensional defects identification. Different defects have different 3D structural features, thus to identify and classify defects based on 3D testing data. Compared with fabric defects processed by two-dimensional image, 3D identification can more exclude cloth wrinkles and the flying thick silk floss. So the 3D identification is of high accuracy and reliability to identify fabric defects.

  2. Breast density measurement: 3D cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) images versus 2D digital mammograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Tao; Lai, Chao-Jen; Chen, Lingyun; Liu, Xinming; Shen, Youtao; Zhong, Yuncheng; Ge, Shuaiping; Yi, Ying; Wang, Tianpeng; Yang, Wei T.; Shaw, Chris C.

    2009-02-01

    Breast density has been recognized as one of the major risk factors for breast cancer. However, breast density is currently estimated using mammograms which are intrinsically 2D in nature and cannot accurately represent the real breast anatomy. In this study, a novel technique for measuring breast density based on the segmentation of 3D cone beam CT (CBCT) images was developed and the results were compared to those obtained from 2D digital mammograms. 16 mastectomy breast specimens were imaged with a bench top flat-panel based CBCT system. The reconstructed 3D CT images were corrected for the cupping artifacts and then filtered to reduce the noise level, followed by using threshold-based segmentation to separate the dense tissue from the adipose tissue. For each breast specimen, volumes of the dense tissue structures and the entire breast were computed and used to calculate the volumetric breast density. BI-RADS categories were derived from the measured breast densities and compared with those estimated from conventional digital mammograms. The results show that in 10 of 16 cases the BI-RADS categories derived from the CBCT images were lower than those derived from the mammograms by one category. Thus, breasts considered as dense in mammographic examinations may not be considered as dense with the CBCT images. This result indicates that the relation between breast cancer risk and true (volumetric) breast density needs to be further investigated.

  3. 3D face recognition using simulated annealing and the surface interpenetration measure.

    PubMed

    Queirolo, Chauã C; Silva, Luciano; Bellon, Olga R P; Segundo, Maurício Pamplona

    2010-02-01

    This paper presents a novel automatic framework to perform 3D face recognition. The proposed method uses a Simulated Annealing-based approach (SA) for range image registration with the Surface Interpenetration Measure (SIM), as similarity measure, in order to match two face images. The authentication score is obtained by combining the SIM values corresponding to the matching of four different face regions: circular and elliptical areas around the nose, forehead, and the entire face region. Then, a modified SA approach is proposed taking advantage of invariant face regions to better handle facial expressions. Comprehensive experiments were performed on the FRGC v2 database, the largest available database of 3D face images composed of 4,007 images with different facial expressions. The experiments simulated both verification and identification systems and the results compared to those reported by state-of-the-art works. By using all of the images in the database, a verification rate of 96.5 percent was achieved at a False Acceptance Rate (FAR) of 0.1 percent. In the identification scenario, a rank-one accuracy of 98.4 percent was achieved. To the best of our knowledge, this is the highest rank-one score ever achieved for the FRGC v2 database when compared to results published in the literature. PMID:20075453

  4. Robust automatic measurement of 3D scanned models for the human body fat estimation.

    PubMed

    Giachetti, Andrea; Lovato, Christian; Piscitelli, Francesco; Milanese, Chiara; Zancanaro, Carlo

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, we present an automatic tool for estimating geometrical parameters from 3-D human scans independent on pose and robustly against the topological noise. It is based on an automatic segmentation of body parts exploiting curve skeleton processing and ad hoc heuristics able to remove problems due to different acquisition poses and body types. The software is able to locate body trunk and limbs, detect their directions, and compute parameters like volumes, areas, girths, and lengths. Experimental results demonstrate that measurements provided by our system on 3-D body scans of normal and overweight subjects acquired in different poses are highly correlated with the body fat estimates obtained on the same subjects with dual-energy X-rays absorptiometry (DXA) scanning. In particular, maximal lengths and girths, not requiring precise localization of anatomical landmarks, demonstrate a good correlation (up to 96%) with the body fat and trunk fat. Regression models based on our automatic measurements can be used to predict body fat values reasonably well.

  5. Full-field 3D deformation measurement: comparison between speckle phase and displacement evaluation.

    PubMed

    Khodadad, Davood; Singh, Alok Kumar; Pedrini, Giancarlo; Sjödahl, Mikael

    2016-09-20

    The objective of this paper is to describe a full-field deformation measurement method based on 3D speckle displacements. The deformation is evaluated from the slope of the speckle displacement function that connects the different reconstruction planes. For our experiment, a symmetrical arrangement with four illuminations parallel to the planes (x,z) and (y,z) was used. Four sets of speckle patterns were sequentially recorded by illuminating an object from the four directions, respectively. A single camera is used to record the holograms before and after deformations. Digital speckle photography is then used to calculate relative speckle displacements in each direction between two numerically propagated planes. The 3D speckle displacements vector is calculated as a combination of the speckle displacements from the holograms recorded in each illumination direction. Using the speckle displacements, problems associated with rigid body movements and phase wrapping are avoided. In our experiment, the procedure is shown to give the theoretical accuracy of 0.17 pixels yielding the accuracy of 2×10-3 in the measurement of deformation gradients.

  6. 3D printed miniaturized spectral system for tissue fluorescence lifetime measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Luwei; Mahmoud, Mohamad; Fahs, Mehdi; Liu, Rui; Lo, Joe F.

    2016-04-01

    Various types of collagens, e.g. type I and III, represent the main load-bearing components in biological tissues. Their composition changes during processes like wound healing and fibrosis. Collagens exhibit autofluorescence when excited by ultra-violet light, distinguishable by their unique fluorescent lifetimes across a range of emission wavelengths. Therefore, we designed a miniaturized spectral-lifetime detection system for collagens as a non-invasive probe for monitoring tissue in wound healing and scarring applications. A sine modulated LED illumination was applied to enable frequency domain (FD) fluorescence lifetime measurements under different wavelengths bands, separated via a series of longpass dichroics at 387nm, 409nm and 435nm. To achieve the minute scale of optomechanics, we employed a stereolithography based 3D printer with <50 μm resolution to create a custom designed optical mount in a hand-held form factor. We examined the characteristics of the 3D printed optical system with finite element modeling to simulate the effect of thermal (LED) and mechanical (handling) strain on the optical system. Using this device, the phase shift and demodulation of collagen types were measured, where the separate spectral bands enhanced the differentiation of their lifetimes.

  7. Full-field 3D deformation measurement: comparison between speckle phase and displacement evaluation.

    PubMed

    Khodadad, Davood; Singh, Alok Kumar; Pedrini, Giancarlo; Sjödahl, Mikael

    2016-09-20

    The objective of this paper is to describe a full-field deformation measurement method based on 3D speckle displacements. The deformation is evaluated from the slope of the speckle displacement function that connects the different reconstruction planes. For our experiment, a symmetrical arrangement with four illuminations parallel to the planes (x,z) and (y,z) was used. Four sets of speckle patterns were sequentially recorded by illuminating an object from the four directions, respectively. A single camera is used to record the holograms before and after deformations. Digital speckle photography is then used to calculate relative speckle displacements in each direction between two numerically propagated planes. The 3D speckle displacements vector is calculated as a combination of the speckle displacements from the holograms recorded in each illumination direction. Using the speckle displacements, problems associated with rigid body movements and phase wrapping are avoided. In our experiment, the procedure is shown to give the theoretical accuracy of 0.17 pixels yielding the accuracy of 2×10-3 in the measurement of deformation gradients. PMID:27661605

  8. Characteristics of digital micromirror projection for 3D shape measurement at extreme speed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Höfling, Roland; Aswendt, Petra; Leischnig, Frank; Förster, Matthias

    2015-03-01

    3D shape measurement is one of the growing industrial applications of the Texas Instruments DLP® micro-mirror device. This paper presents investigations on precision and repeatability of that spatial light modulators output when it is driven up to its high-speed limit. The study concerns the basic switching behavior of the individual micro-mirror at different frame rates ranging over three orders of magnitude. The 3D shape measuring methodologies are focused on phase encoded triangulation, i.e. the projection of sinusoidal patterns. The DLP chip is a bi-stable device providing an on/off pattern at each certain moment in time, i.e. it has a native binary output. Sinusoidal patterns are the result of either a temporal integration of multiple on/off patterns or a spatial integration within one on/off pattern. Both approaches are studied experimentally with respect to precision and stability of the pattern output. The STAR-07 industrial projection unit, based upon the 0.7" DLP Discovery™4100 chipset, has been used for this work and the pattern frame rates cover the range from 225 frames per second (fps) to 50,000 fps. The STAR-07 output is detected by a photodiode, amplified, and analyzed in a Yokogawa digital storage oscilloscope. All results prove the very high precision and repeatability of the STAR-07 pattern projection, up to the extreme speed of 50,000 fps.

  9. Measuring the 3-D wind vector with a weight-shift microlight aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metzger, S.; Junkermann, W.; Butterbach-Bahl, K.; Schmid, H. P.; Foken, T.

    2011-02-01

    This study investigates whether the 3-D wind vector can be measured reliably from a highly transportable and low-cost weight-shift microlight aircraft. Therefore we draw up a transferable procedure to accommodate flow distortion originating from the aircraft body and -wing. This procedure consists of the analysis of aircraft dynamics and seven successive calibration steps. For our aircraft the horizontal wind components receive their greatest single amendment (14%, relative to the initial uncertainty) from the correction of flow distortion magnitude in the dynamic pressure computation. Conversely the vertical wind component is most of all improved (31%) by subsequent steps considering the 3-D flow distortion distribution in the flow angle computations. Therein the influences of the aircraft's aeroelastic wing (53%), as well as sudden changes in wing loading (16%) are considered by using the measured lift coefficient as explanatory variable. Three independent lines of analysis are used to evaluate the quality of the wind measurement: (a) A wind tunnel study in combination with the propagation of sensor uncertainties defines the systems input uncertainty to ≈0.6 m s-1 at the extremes of a 95% confidence interval. (b) During severe vertical flight manoeuvres the deviation range of the vertical wind component does not exceed 0.3 m s-1. (c) The comparison with ground based wind measurements yields an overall operational uncertainty (root mean square deviation) of ≈0.4 m s-1 for the horizontal and ≍0.3 m s-1 for the vertical wind components. No conclusive dependence of the uncertainty on the wind magnitude (<8 m s-1) or true airspeed (ranging from 23-30 m s-1) is found. Hence our analysis provides the necessary basis to study the wind measurement precision and spectral quality, which is prerequisite for reliable eddy-covariance flux measurements.

  10. Measuring the 3-D wind vector with a weight-shift microlight aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metzger, S.; Junkermann, W.; Butterbach-Bahl, K.; Schmid, H. P.; Foken, T.

    2011-07-01

    This study investigates whether the 3-D wind vector can be measured reliably from a highly transportable and low-cost weight-shift microlight aircraft. Therefore we draw up a transferable procedure to accommodate flow distortion originating from the aircraft body and -wing. This procedure consists of the analysis of aircraft dynamics and seven successive calibration steps. For our aircraft the horizontal wind components receive their greatest single amendment (14 %, relative to the initial uncertainty) from the correction of flow distortion magnitude in the dynamic pressure computation. Conversely the vertical wind component is most of all improved (31 %) by subsequent steps considering the 3-D flow distortion distribution in the flow angle computations. Therein the influences of the aircraft's trim (53 %), as well as changes in the aircraft lift (16 %) are considered by using the measured lift coefficient as explanatory variable. Three independent lines of analysis are used to evaluate the quality of the wind measurement: (a) A wind tunnel study in combination with the propagation of sensor uncertainties defines the systems input uncertainty to ≈0.6 m s-1 at the extremes of a 95 % confidence interval. (b) During severe vertical flight manoeuvres the deviation range of the vertical wind component does not exceed 0.3 m s-1. (c) The comparison with ground based wind measurements yields an overall operational uncertainty (root mean square error) of ≈0.4 m s-1 for the horizontal and ≈0.3 m s-1 for the vertical wind components. No conclusive dependence of the uncertainty on the wind magnitude (<8 m s-1) or true airspeed (ranging from 23-30 m s-1) is found. Hence our analysis provides the necessary basis to study the wind measurement precision and spectral quality, which is prerequisite for reliable Eddy-Covariance flux measurements.

  11. Crustal and upper mantle 3D shear wave velocity structure of the High Lava Plains, Oregon, determined from ambient noise tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanson-Hedgecock, S.; Wagner, L.; Fouch, M. J.; James, D. E.

    2011-12-01

    We present the results of inversions for 3D shear velocity structure of the crust and uppermost mantle beneath the High Lava Plains, Oregon using data from ~300 broadband stations of the High Lava Plains seismic experiment and the EarthScope/USArray Transportable Array (TA). The High Lava Plains (HLP) is a WNW progressive silicic volcanism, initiated ~14.5 Ma near the Owyhee Plateau and is currently active at the Newberry caldera. The Yellowstone Snake River Plain (YSRP) volcanic track is temporally contemporaneous with the HLP, but trends to the northeast, parallel to North American plate motion. The cause of volcanism along the HLP is debated and has been variously attributed to Basin and Range extension, back-arc extension, rollback of the subducting Juan de Fuca plate, and an intra-continental hotspot/plume source. Additionally the relationship between the HLP, YSRP, and Columbia River Basalts (CRB), the three major post-17Ma intracontinental volcanic provinces of the Pacific Northwest, is not well understood. The 3D shear velocity structure of the crust and uppermost mantle to ~65km depth is determined from fundamental mode Rayleigh wave ambient noise phase velocity maps at periods up to 40s. The use of ambient noise tomography with the dense station spacing of the combined High Lava Plains seismic experiment and the EarthScope/USArray Transportable Array (TA) datasets allows the shallow structure of the High Lava Plains to be imaged in finer detail than previous ANT studies that focused on the entire western United States. In the crust, low velocities in central Oregon are observed in association with the Brothers Fault Zone, Jordan and Diamond Craters and Steens Mountain regions in addition to the strong low velocity zone associated with the Cascades to the west. To the east of the HLP, low velocities are observed to about 10km depth in the western SRP. In the eastern SRP we observe a shallow veneer of low velocities underlain by a ~10km thick high velocity

  12. Velocity measurements in inhomogeneous combustion systems

    SciTech Connect

    Chigier, N. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering)

    1989-10-01

    Measurements of velocity have been made in single-phase and two-phase combustion systems using laser anemometers. Argon ion lasers, Bragg cells for frequency shifting, forward and backscatter collection, signal processing, and computer analysis are used for velocity measurement. The set of vertical and horizontal fringes allows two orthogonal velocity components to be measured simultaneously and instantaneously. Radiation line filters are installed in the photomultiplier detectors to remove influence of flame radiation on velocity measurements. Instantaneous measurements of three orthogonal velocity components ({mu}, {nu}, w) are made over time periods sufficiently long for statistically valid time averaging. Conditional sampling is used on velocity-time traces to separate periodic fluctuations of flow field structure (form intermittency) from microscale fluctuations intrinsic to fluid mechanic turbulence. For two-phase flow systems with liquid fuel injection, the phase Doppler particle analyzer measures the size and velocity of single drops simultaneously. The technique is based upon the measurement of the interference fringe patterns produced by spherical drops passing through the intersection of two laser beams. Three detectors, separated at fixed spacing, are used to receive Doppler signals and to determine the phase shift due to different path lengths of the laser beam. Detailed measurements have been made in burning and nonburning air-assisted atomizer sprays revealing the detailed structural changes in the sprays as a result of drop collision and coalescence, evaporation, dispersion, and acceleration. Comparisons of mean drop sizes, number densities, and velocities under burning and nonburning conditions show the extent that the spray and flow fields are modified by combustion.

  13. Superhilac real-time velocity measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Feinberg, B.; Meaney, D.; Thatcher, R.; Timossi, C.

    1987-03-01

    Phase probes have been placed in several external beam lines at the LBL heavy ion linear accelerator (SuperHILAC) to provide non-destructive velocity measurements independent of the ion being accelerated. The existing system has been improved to provide the following features: a display refresh rate better than twice per second, a sensitive pseudo-correlation technique to pick out the signal from the noise, simultaneous measurements of up to four ion velocities when more than one beam is being accelerated, and a touch-screen operator interface. These improvements allow the system to be used as a routine tuning aid and beam velocity monitor.

  14. Measuring Fracture Properties of Meteorites: 3D Scans and Disruption Experiments.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cotto-Figueroa, Desireé; Asphaug, Erik; Morris, Melissa A.; Garvie, Laurence

    2014-11-01

    The Arizona State University (ASU) Center for Meteorite Studies (CMS) houses over 30,000 specimens that represent almost every known meteorite type. A number of these are available for fragmentation experiments in small samples, but in most cases non-destructive experiments are desired in order to determine the fundamental mechanical properties of meteorites, and by extension, the Near-Earth Asteroids (NEAs) and other planetary bodies they derive from. We present results from an ongoing suite of measurements and experiments, featuring automated 3D topographic scans of a comprehensive suite of meteorites in the CMS collection, basic mechanical studies, and culminating in catastrophic fragmentation of four representative meteorites: Tamdakht (H5), Allende (CV3), Northwest Africa 869 (L3-6) and Chelyabinsk (LL5). Results will include high-resolution 3D color-shape models of meteorites, including specimens such as the 349g oriented and fusion crusted Martian (shergottite) Tissint, and the delicately fusion crusted and oriented 131g Whetstone Mountains (H5) ordinary chondrite. The 3D color-shape models will allow us to obtain basic physical properties (such as volume to derive density) and to derive fractal dimensions of fractured surfaces. Fractal dimension is closely related to the internal structural heterogeneity and fragmentation of the material, to macroscopic optical properties, and to rubble friction and cohesion. Freshly fractured surfaces of fragments that will result from catastrophic hypervelocity impact experiments will be subsequently scanned and analyzed in order to determine whether fractal dimension is preserved or if it changes with surface maturation.

  15. Water Surface and Velocity Measurement-River and Flume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandler, J. H.; Ferreira, E.; Wackrow, R.; Shiono, K.

    2014-06-01

    Understanding the flow of water in natural watercourses has become increasingly important as climate change increases the incidence of extreme rainfall events which cause flooding. Vegetation in rivers and streams reduce water conveyance and natural vegetation plays a critical role in flood events which needs to be understood more fully. A funded project at Loughborough University is therefore examining the influence of vegetation upon water flow, requiring measurement of both the 3-D water surface and flow velocities. Experimental work therefore requires the measurement of water surface morphology and velocity (i.e. speed and direction) in a controlled laboratory environment using a flume but also needs to be adaptable to work in a real river. Measuring the 3D topographic characteristics and velocity field of a flowing water surface is difficult and the purpose of this paper is to describe recent experimental work to achieve this. After reviewing past work in this area, the use of close range digital photogrammetry for capturing both the 3D water surface and surface velocity is described. The selected approach uses either two or three synchronised digital SLR cameras in combination with PhotoModeler for data processing, a commercial close range photogrammetric package. One critical aspect is the selection and distribution of appropriate floating marker points, which are critical if automated and appropriate measurement methods are to be used. Two distinct targeting approaches are available: either large and distinct specific floating markers or some fine material capable of providing appropriate texture. Initial work described in this paper uses specific marker points, which also provide the potential measuring surface velocity. The paper demonstrates that a high degree of measurement and marking automation is possible in a flume environment, where lighting influences can be highly controlled. When applied to a real river it is apparent that only lower degrees of

  16. Developments in digital in-line holography enable validated measurement of 3D particle field dynamics.

    SciTech Connect

    Guildenbecher, Daniel Robert

    2013-12-01

    Digital in-line holography is an optical technique which can be applied to measure the size, three-dimensional position, and three-component velocity of disperse particle fields. This work summarizes recent developments at Sandia National Laboratories focused on improvement in measurement accuracy, experimental validation, and applications to multiphase flows. New routines are presented which reduce the uncertainty in measured position along the optical axis to a fraction of the particle diameter. Furthermore, application to liquid atomization highlights the ability to measure complex, three-dimensional structures. Finally, investigation of particles traveling at near sonic conditions prove accuracy despite significant experimental noise due to shock-waves.

  17. Computerized method for automated measurement of thickness of cerebral cortex for 3-D MR images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arimura, Hidetaka; Yoshiura, Takashi; Kumazawa, Seiji; Koga, Hiroshi; Sakai, Shuji; Mihara, Futoshi; Honda, Hiroshi; Ohki, Masafumi; Toyofuku, Fukai; Higashida, Yoshiharu

    2006-03-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is associated with the degeneration of cerebral cortex, which results in focal volume change or thinning in the cerebral cortex in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Therefore, the measurement of the cortical thickness is important for detection of the atrophy related to AD. Our purpose was to develop a computerized method for automated measurement of the cortical thickness for three-dimensional (3-D) MRI. The cortical thickness was measured with normal vectors from white matter surface to cortical gray matter surface on a voxel-by-voxel basis. First, a head region was segmented by use of an automatic thresholding technique, and then the head region was separated into the cranium region and brain region by means of a multiple gray level thresholding with monitoring the ratio of the first maximum volume to the second one. Next, a fine white matter region was determined based on a level set method as a seed region of the rough white matter region extracted from the brain region. Finally, the cortical thickness was measured by extending normal vectors from the white matter surface to gray matter surface (brain surface) on a voxel-by-voxel basis. We applied the computerized method to high-resolution 3-D T1-weighted images of the whole brains from 7 clinically diagnosed AD patients and 8 healthy subjects. The average cortical thicknesses in the upper slices for AD patients were thinner than those for non-AD subjects, whereas the average cortical thicknesses in the lower slices for most AD patients were slightly thinner. Our preliminary results suggest that the MRI-based computerized measurement of gray matter atrophy is promising for detecting AD.

  18. Separation of Lamb waves modes using polarization filter of 3D laser measured signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambrozinski, Lukasz; Stepinski, Tadeusz; Uhl, Tadeusz

    2015-04-01

    Interpretation of Lamb waves signals can rise serious difficulties due to their multi-modal nature. Different modes propagating with different velocities can be misleading with damage reflected components. As a solution to this problem we propose a technique capable of modes separation based on a polarization filter. Both S0 and A0 Lamb modes exhibit elliptical polarization, however, their polarization parameters, i.e. the ratios of in-plane and out-of-plane displacements and phase-shifts between these components are different. Furthermore, these parameters can be considered constant in a narrow frequency band. Therefore, if the vertical and horizontal components of the wave motion are available, it is possible to apply signal processing technique referred to as oblique polarization filter. This operation is based on phase-shifts and amplifications of the in- and out-of-plane components, which results in orthogonal, linearly polarized A0 and S0 waves signals. In this paper the proposed technique will be illustrated using both numerical simulations and experimental data. The simulations of wave propagation were performed using local interaction simulation approach (LISA) assuming isotropic material. The experiments were performed using 3D laser scanning Doppler vibrometer that allowed to capture the in-plane and out-of-plane wave components.

  19. Numerical and measured data from the 3D salt canopy physical modeling project

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, C.; House, L.; Fehler, M.; Pearson, J.; TenCate, J.; Wiley, R.

    1997-11-01

    The evolution of salt structures in the Gulf of Mexico have been shown to provide a mechanism for the trapping of significant hydrocarbon reserves. Most of these structures have complex geometries relative to the surrounding sedimentary layers. This aspect in addition to high velocities within the salt tend to scatter and defocus seismic energy and make imaging of subsalt lithology extremely difficult. An ongoing program the SEG/EAEG modeling project (Aminzadeh et al. 1994a: Aminzadeh et al. 1994b: Aminzadeh et al. 1995), and a follow-up project funded as part of the Advanced Computational Technology Initiative (ACTI) (House et al. 1996) have sought to investigate problems with imaging beneath complex salt structures using numerical modeling and more recently, construction of a physical model patterned after the numerical subsalt model (Wiley and McKnight. 1996). To date, no direct comparison of the numerical and physical aspects of these models has been attempted. We present the results of forward modeling a numerical realization of the 3D salt canopy physical model with the French Petroleum Institute (IFP) acoustic finite difference algorithm used in the numerical subsalt tests. We compare the results from the physical salt canopy model, the acoustic modeling of the physical/numerical model and the original numerical SEG/EAEG Salt Model. We will be testing the sensitivity of migration to the presence of converted shear waves and acquisition geometry.

  20. Regional 3D Numerical Modeling of the Lithosphere-Mantle System: Implications for Continental Rift-Parallel Surface Velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stamps, S.; Bangerth, W.; Hager, B. H.

    2014-12-01

    The East African Rift System (EARS) is an active divergent plate boundary with slow, approximately E-W extension rates ranging from <1-6 mm/yr. Previous work using thin-sheet modeling indicates lithospheric buoyancy dominates the force balance driving large-scale Nubia-Somalia divergence, however GPS observations within the Western Branch of the EARS show along-rift motions that contradict this simple model. Here, we test the role of mantle flow at the rift-scale using our new, regional 3D numerical model based on the open-source code ASPECT. We define a thermal lithosphere with thicknesses that are systematically changed for generic models or based on geophysical constraints in the Western branch (e.g. melting depths, xenoliths, seismic tomography). Preliminary results suggest existing variations in lithospheric thicknesses along-rift in the Western Branch can drive upper mantle flow that is consistent with geodetic observations.

  1. 3D measurement with active triangulation for spectacle lens optimization and individualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gehrmann, Julia; Tiemann, Markus; Seitz, Peter C.

    2015-05-01

    We present for the first time an active triangulation technique for video centration. This technique requires less manual selection than current methods and thus enables faster measurements while providing the same resolution. The suitability to measure physiological parameters is demonstrated in a measurement series. The active triangulation technique uses a laser line for illumination which is positioned such that it intersects with the pupils of the subject to be measured. For the illumination of human eyes, the wavelength and output power were carefully investigated to ensure photobiological safety at all times and reduce irritation of the subject being measured. A camera with a known orientation to the laser line images the subject. Physiological features on the subject and the frame are then selected in the acquired image yielding directly a 3D position if lying on the illuminated laser line. Distances to points off the laser line can be estimated from a scaling at the same depth. Focus is on two parameters: interpupillary distance (PD) and corneal face form angle (FFA). In our study we examined the repeatability of the measurements. We found an excellent repeatability with small deviations to the reference value. Furthermore a physiological study was carried out with the setup showing the applicability of this method for video centration measurements. A comparison to a reference measurement system shows only small differences.

  2. 3D printing of tissue-simulating phantoms as a traceable standard for biomedical optical measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Erbao; Wang, Minjie; Shen, Shuwei; Han, Yilin; Wu, Qiang; Xu, Ronald

    2016-01-01

    Optical phantoms are commonly used to validate and calibrate biomedical optical devices in order to ensure accurate measurement of optical properties in biological tissue. However, commonly used optical phantoms are based on homogenous materials that reflect neither optical properties nor multi-layer heterogeneities of biological tissue. Using these phantoms for optical calibration may result in significant bias in biological measurement. We propose to characterize and fabricate tissue simulating phantoms that simulate not only the multi-layer heterogeneities but also optical properties of biological tissue. The tissue characterization module detects tissue structural and functional properties in vivo. The phantom printing module generates 3D tissue structures at different scales by layer-by-layer deposition of phantom materials with different optical properties. The ultimate goal is to fabricate multi-layer tissue simulating phantoms as a traceable standard for optimal calibration of biomedical optical spectral devices.

  3. Roughness of stylolites: implications of 3D high resolution topography measurements.

    PubMed

    Schmittbuhl, J; Renard, F; Gratier, J P; Toussaint, R

    2004-12-01

    Stylolites are natural pressure-dissolution surfaces in sedimentary rocks. We present 3D high resolution measurements at laboratory scales of their complex roughness. The topography is shown to be described by a self-affine scaling invariance. At large scales, the Hurst exponent is zeta(1) approximately 0.5 and very different from that at small scales where zeta(2) approximately 1.2. A crossover length scale at around L(c)=1 mm is well characterized. Measurements are consistent with a Langevin equation that describes the growth of a stylolitic interface as a competition between stabilizing long range elastic interactions at large scales or local surface tension effects at small scales and a destabilizing quenched material disorder.

  4. Uncertainty studies of topographical measurements on steel surface corrosion by 3D scanning electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Kang, K W; Pereda, M D; Canafoglia, M E; Bilmes, P; Llorente, C; Bonetto, R

    2012-02-01

    Pitting corrosion is a damage mechanism quite serious and dangerous in both carbon steel boiler tubes for power plants which are vital to most industries and stainless steels for orthopedic human implants whose demand, due to the increase of life expectation and rate of traffic accidents, has sharply increased. Reliable methods to characterize this kind of damage are becoming increasingly necessary, when trying to evaluate the advance of damage and to establish the best procedures for component inspection in order to determine remaining lives and failure mitigation. A study about the uncertainties on the topographies of corrosion pits from 3D SEM images, obtained at low magnifications (where errors are greater) and different stage tilt angles were carried out using an in-house software previously developed. Additionally, measurements of pit depths on biomaterial surfaces, subjected to two different surface treatments on stainless steels, were carried out. The different depth distributions observed were in agreement with electrochemical measurements.

  5. 3D-ANTLERS: Virtual Reconstruction and Three-Dimensional Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barba, S.; Fiorillo, F.; De Feo, E.

    2013-02-01

    The main objective of this paper is to establish a procedural method for measuring and cataloguing antlers through the use of laser scanner and of a 3D reconstruction of complex modeling. The deer's antlers have been used as a test and subjected to capture and measurement. For this purpose multiple data sources techniques have been studied and compared, (also considering low-cost sensors) estimating the accuracy and its errors in order to demonstrate the validity of the process. A further development is the comparison of results with applications of digital photogrammetry, considering also cloud computing software. The study has began with an introduction to sensors, addressing the underlying characteristics of the technology available, the scope and the limits of these applications. We have focused particularly on the "structured light", as the acquisition will be completed through three-dimensional scanners: DAVID and the ARTEC MH. The first is a low-cost sensor, a basic webcam and a linear laser pointer, red coloured, that leads to acquisition of three-dimensional strips. The other one is a hand scanner; even in this case we will explain how to represent a 3D model, with a pipeline that provides data export from the "proprietary" to a "reverse engineering" software. Typically, these are the common steps to the two approaches that have been performed in WRAP format: point sampling, manual and global registration, repair normals, surface editing and texture projection. In fact, after a first and common data processing was done with the use of a software supplied with the equipment, the proto-models thus obtained were treated in Geomagic Studio, which was also chosen to allow the homogenization and standardization of data in order to make a more objective comparison. It is commonplace to observe that the editing of the digital mock-up obtained with the DAVID - which had not yet been upgraded to the 3.5 release at the time of this study - is substantially different

  6. Characterization of emissions from a desktop 3D printer and indoor air measurements in office settings.

    PubMed

    Steinle, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Emissions from a desktop 3D printer based on fused deposition modeling (FDM) technology were measured in a test chamber and indoor air was monitored in office settings. Ultrafine aerosol (UFA) emissions were higher while printing a standard object with polylactic acid (PLA) than with acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) polymer (2.1 × 10(9) vs. 2.4 × 10(8) particles/min). Prolonged use of the printer led to higher emission rates (factor 2 with PLA and 4 with ABS, measured after seven months of occasional use). UFA consisted mainly of volatile droplets, and some small (100-300 nm diameter) iron containing and soot-like particles were found. Emissions of inhalable and respirable dust were below the limit of detection (LOD) when measured gravimetrically, and only slightly higher than background when measured with an aerosol spectrometer. Emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOC) were in the range of 10 µg/min. Styrene accounted for more than 50% of total VOC emitted when printing with ABS; for PLA, methyl methacrylate (MMA, 37% of TVOC) was detected as the predominant compound. Two polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), fluoranthene and pyrene, were observed in very low amounts. All other analyzed PAH, as well as inorganic gases and metal emissions except iron (Fe) and zinc (Zn), were below the LOD or did not differ from background without printing. A single 3D print (165 min) in a large, well-ventilated office did not significantly increase the UFA and VOC concentrations, whereas these were readily detectable in a small, unventilated room, with UFA concentrations increasing by 2,000 particles/cm(3) and MMA reaching a peak of 21 µg/m(3) and still being detectable in the room even 20 hr after printing. PMID:26550911

  7. Characterization of emissions from a desktop 3D printer and indoor air measurements in office settings.

    PubMed

    Steinle, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Emissions from a desktop 3D printer based on fused deposition modeling (FDM) technology were measured in a test chamber and indoor air was monitored in office settings. Ultrafine aerosol (UFA) emissions were higher while printing a standard object with polylactic acid (PLA) than with acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) polymer (2.1 × 10(9) vs. 2.4 × 10(8) particles/min). Prolonged use of the printer led to higher emission rates (factor 2 with PLA and 4 with ABS, measured after seven months of occasional use). UFA consisted mainly of volatile droplets, and some small (100-300 nm diameter) iron containing and soot-like particles were found. Emissions of inhalable and respirable dust were below the limit of detection (LOD) when measured gravimetrically, and only slightly higher than background when measured with an aerosol spectrometer. Emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOC) were in the range of 10 µg/min. Styrene accounted for more than 50% of total VOC emitted when printing with ABS; for PLA, methyl methacrylate (MMA, 37% of TVOC) was detected as the predominant compound. Two polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), fluoranthene and pyrene, were observed in very low amounts. All other analyzed PAH, as well as inorganic gases and metal emissions except iron (Fe) and zinc (Zn), were below the LOD or did not differ from background without printing. A single 3D print (165 min) in a large, well-ventilated office did not significantly increase the UFA and VOC concentrations, whereas these were readily detectable in a small, unventilated room, with UFA concentrations increasing by 2,000 particles/cm(3) and MMA reaching a peak of 21 µg/m(3) and still being detectable in the room even 20 hr after printing.

  8. 3-D ice shape measurements using mid-infrared laser scanning.

    PubMed

    Gong, Xiaoliang; Bansmer, Stephan

    2015-02-23

    A general approach based on mid-infrared (MIR) laser scanning is proposed to measure the 3-D ice shape no matter whether the ice is composed of clear ice, rime ice, mixed ice, or even supercooled water droplets or films. This is possible because MIR radiation penetrates ice and water only within a depth of less than 10 micrometers. First, an MIR laser point scanning technique is implemented and verified on transparent glass and clear ice. Then, to improve efficiency, an MIR laser line scanning method is developed and validated on different models. At last, several sequential MIR laser line scans are applied to trace the 3-D shape evolution of the continuous ice accretion on an airfoil in an icing wind tunnel. The ice growth process can be well observed in the results. The MIR scan shows a good agreement with the traditional visible laser scan on a plastic replication of the final ice shape made by the mold and casting method. PMID:25836526

  9. Measuring fracture properties of meteorites: 3D scans and disruption experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cotto-Figueroa, D.; Asphaug, E.; Morris, M.; Garvier, L.

    2014-07-01

    Many meteorite studies are focused on chemical and isotopic composition, which provide insightful information regarding the age, formation, and evolution of the Solar System. However, their fundamental mechanical properties have received less attention. It is important to determine these properties as they are related to disruption and fragmentation of bolides and asteroids, and activities related to sample return and hazardous asteroid mitigation. Here we present results from an ongoing suite of measurements and experiments focusing on maps of surface texture that connect to the dynamic geological properties of a diverse range of meteorites from the Center for Meteorite Studies (CMS) collection at Arizona State University (ASU). Results will include high-resolution 3D color-shape models and texture maps from which we derive fractal dimensions of fractured surfaces. Fractal dimension is closely related to the internal structural heterogeneity and fragmentation of rock, and to macroscopic optical properties, and to rubble friction and cohesion. Selected meteorites, in particular Tamdakht (H5), Allende (CV3), and Chelyabinsk (LL5), will subsequently be disrupted in catastrophic hypervelocity impact experiments. The fragments obtained from these experiments will be scanned, and the results compared with the fragments obtained in numerical hydrocode simulations, whose initial conditions are set up precisely from 3D scans of the original meteorite. By attaining the best match we will obtain key parameters for models of asteroid and bolide disruption.

  10. Measurements of stress fields near a grain boundary: Exploring blocked arrays of dislocations in 3D

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Y.; Collins, D. M.; Tarleton, E.; Hofmann, F.; Tischler, J.; Liu, W.; Xu, R.; Wilkinson, A. J.; Britton, T. B.

    2015-06-24

    The interaction between dislocation pile-ups and grain boundaries gives rise to heterogeneous stress distributions when a structural metal is subjected to mechanical loading. Such stress heterogeneity leads to preferential sites for damage nucleation and therefore is intrinsically linked to the strength and ductility of polycrystalline metals. To date the majority of conclusions have been drawn from 2D experimental investigations at the sample surface, allowing only incomplete observations. Our purpose here is to significantly advance the understanding of such problems by providing quantitative measurements of the effects of dislocation pile up and grain boundary interactions in 3D. This is accomplished through the application of differential aperture X-ray Laue micro-diffraction (DAXM) and high angular resolution electron backscatter diffraction (HR-EBSD) techniques. Our analysis demonstrates a similar strain characterization capability between DAXM and HR-EBSD and the variation of stress intensity in 3D reveals that different parts of the same grain boundary may have different strengths in resisting slip transfer, likely due to the local grain boundary curvature.

  11. Dual-frequency pattern scheme for high-speed 3-D shape measurement.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kai; Wang, Yongchang; Lau, Daniel L; Hao, Qi; Hassebrook, Laurence G

    2010-03-01

    A novel dual-frequency pattern is developed which combines a high-frequency sinusoid component with a unit-frequency sinusoid component, where the high-frequency component is used to generate robust phase information, and the unit-frequency component is used to reduce phase unwrapping ambiguities. With our proposed pattern scheme, phase unwrapping can overcome the major shortcomings of conventional spatial phase unwrapping: phase jumping and discontinuities. Compared with conventional temporal phase unwrapped approaches, the proposed pattern scheme can achieve higher quality phase data using a less number of patterns. To process data in real time, we also propose and develop look-up table based fast and accurate algorithms for phase generation and 3-D reconstruction. Those fast algorithms can be applied to our pattern scheme as well as traditional phase measuring profilometry. For a 640 x 480 video stream, we can generate phase data at 1063.8 frames per second and full 3-D coordinate point clouds at 8.3 frames per second. These achievements are 25 and 10 times faster than previously reported studies.

  12. Measurements of stress fields near a grain boundary: Exploring blocked arrays of dislocations in 3D

    DOE PAGES

    Guo, Y.; Collins, D. M.; Tarleton, E.; Hofmann, F.; Tischler, J.; Liu, W.; Xu, R.; Wilkinson, A. J.; Britton, T. B.

    2015-06-24

    The interaction between dislocation pile-ups and grain boundaries gives rise to heterogeneous stress distributions when a structural metal is subjected to mechanical loading. Such stress heterogeneity leads to preferential sites for damage nucleation and therefore is intrinsically linked to the strength and ductility of polycrystalline metals. To date the majority of conclusions have been drawn from 2D experimental investigations at the sample surface, allowing only incomplete observations. Our purpose here is to significantly advance the understanding of such problems by providing quantitative measurements of the effects of dislocation pile up and grain boundary interactions in 3D. This is accomplished throughmore » the application of differential aperture X-ray Laue micro-diffraction (DAXM) and high angular resolution electron backscatter diffraction (HR-EBSD) techniques. Our analysis demonstrates a similar strain characterization capability between DAXM and HR-EBSD and the variation of stress intensity in 3D reveals that different parts of the same grain boundary may have different strengths in resisting slip transfer, likely due to the local grain boundary curvature.« less

  13. 3-D ice shape measurements using mid-infrared laser scanning.

    PubMed

    Gong, Xiaoliang; Bansmer, Stephan

    2015-02-23

    A general approach based on mid-infrared (MIR) laser scanning is proposed to measure the 3-D ice shape no matter whether the ice is composed of clear ice, rime ice, mixed ice, or even supercooled water droplets or films. This is possible because MIR radiation penetrates ice and water only within a depth of less than 10 micrometers. First, an MIR laser point scanning technique is implemented and verified on transparent glass and clear ice. Then, to improve efficiency, an MIR laser line scanning method is developed and validated on different models. At last, several sequential MIR laser line scans are applied to trace the 3-D shape evolution of the continuous ice accretion on an airfoil in an icing wind tunnel. The ice growth process can be well observed in the results. The MIR scan shows a good agreement with the traditional visible laser scan on a plastic replication of the final ice shape made by the mold and casting method.

  14. Influence of center of pressure estimation errors on 3D inverse dynamics solutions during gait at different velocities.

    PubMed

    Camargo-Junior, Franklin; Ackermann, Marko; Loss, Jefferson F; Sacco, Isabel C N

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of errors in the location of the center of pressure (5 and 10 mm) on lower limb joint moment uncertainties at different gait velocities (1.0, 1.5, and 2.0 m/s). Our hypotheses were that the absolute joint moment uncertainties would be gradually reduced from distal to proximal joints and from higher to lower velocities. Joint moments of five healthy young adults were calculated by inverse dynamics using the bottom-up approach, depending on which estimate the uncertainty propagated. Results indicated that there is a linear relationship between errors in center of pressure and joint moment uncertainties. The absolute moment peak uncertainties expressed on the anatomic reference frames decreased from distal to proximal joints, confirming our first hypothesis, except for the abduction moments. There was an increase in moment uncertainty (up to 0.04 N m/kg for the 10 mm error in the center of pressure) from the lower to higher gait velocity, confirming our second hypothesis, although, once again, not for hip or knee abduction. Finally, depending on the plane of movement and the joint, relative uncertainties experienced variation (between 5 and 31%), and the knee joint moments were the most affected.

  15. An octahedral shear strain-based measure of SNR for 3D MR elastography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGarry, M. D. J.; Van Houten, E. E. W.; Perriñez, P. R.; Pattison, A. J.; Weaver, J. B.; Paulsen, K. D.

    2011-07-01

    A signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) measure based on the octahedral shear strain (the maximum shear strain in any plane for a 3D state of strain) is presented for magnetic resonance elastography (MRE), where motion-based SNR measures are commonly used. The shear strain, γ, is directly related to the shear modulus, μ, through the definition of shear stress, τ = μγ. Therefore, noise in the strain is the important factor in determining the quality of motion data, rather than the noise in the motion. Motion and strain SNR measures were found to be correlated for MRE of gelatin phantoms and the human breast. Analysis of the stiffness distributions of phantoms reconstructed from the measured motion data revealed a threshold for both strain and motion SNR where MRE stiffness estimates match independent mechanical testing. MRE of the feline brain showed significantly less correlation between the two SNR measures. The strain SNR measure had a threshold above which the reconstructed stiffness values were consistent between cases, whereas the motion SNR measure did not provide a useful threshold, primarily due to rigid body motion effects.

  16. Precision measurement of the 3 d 3/2 2D-state lifetime in a single trapped +40Ca

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, H.; Huang, Y.; Guan, H.; Qian, Y.; Gao, K.

    2016-10-01

    We present a high-precision measurement of the 3 d 3/2 2D-state lifetime in a single trapped +40Ca. The measurement was performed using a high-efficiency quantum-state detection technique to monitor quantum jumps and a high-precision and highly synchronous measurement sequence for laser control. A feature in our measurement is the pumping rate of the 729-nm laser that was corrected in a real-time way. The 3 d 3/2 2D-state lifetime was obtained through the measurement of the spontaneous decay rate after incoherent shelving of the ion to the 3 d 3/2 2D state with a wait time. Systematic errors, such as collisions with background gases, heating effects, impurity components, the shelving and pumping rates, and state detection, were carefully analyzed and estimated. We determined an improved value of the 3 d 3/2 2D-state lifetime to be τ3 /2=1.195 (8 ) s. Furthermore, the 3 d 3/2 2D →4 s 1/2 2S quadrupole transition matrix element was measured to be Sk i=7.936 (26 ) e a02 , and the ratio between the lifetimes of 3 d 2D3 /2 and 3 d 2D5 /2 was determined to be 1.018(11). Our method can be universally applied to lifetime measurements of other single ions and atoms with a similar structure.

  17. Spall velocity measurements from laboratory impact craters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polanskey, Carol A.; Ahrens, Thomas J.

    1986-01-01

    Spall velocities were measured for a series of impacts into San Marcos gabbro. Impact velocities ranged from 1 to 6.5 km/sec. Projectiles varied in material and size with a maximum mass of 4g for a lead bullet to a minimum of 0.04 g for an aluminum sphere. The spall velocities were calculated both from measurements taken from films of the events and from estimates based on range measurements of the spall fragments. The maximum spall velocity observed was 27 m/sec, or 0.5 percent of the impact velocity. The measured spall velocities were within the range predicted by the Melosh (1984) spallation model for the given experimental parameters. The compatability between the Melosh model for large planetary impacts and the results of these small scale experiments is considered in detail. The targets were also bisected to observe the internal fractures. A series of fractures were observed whose location coincided with the boundary of the theoretical near surface zone predicted by Melosh. Above this boundary the target material should receive reduced levels of compressive stress as compared to the more highly shocked region below.

  18. The static accuracy and calibration of inertial measurement units for 3D orientation.

    PubMed

    Brodie, M A; Walmsley, A; Page, W

    2008-12-01

    Inertial measurement units (IMUs) are integrated electronic devices that contain accelerometers, magnetometers and gyroscopes. Wearable motion capture systems based on IMUs have been advertised as alternatives to optical motion capture. In this paper, the accuracy of five different IMUs of the same type in measuring 3D orientation in static situations, as well as the calibration of the accelerometers and magnetometers within the IMUs, has been investigated. The maximum absolute static orientation error was 5.2 degrees , higher than the 1 degrees claimed by the vendor. If the IMUs are re-calibrated at the time of measurement with the re-calibration procedure described in this paper, it is possible to obtain an error of less than 1 degrees , in agreement with the vendor's specifications (XSens Technologies B.V. 2005. Motion tracker technical documentation Mtx-B. Version 1.03. Available from: www.xsens.com). The new calibration appears to be valid for at least 22 days providing the sensor is not exposed to high impacts. However, if several sensors are 'daisy chained' together changes to the magnetometer bias can cause heading errors of up to 15 degrees . The results demonstrate the non-linear relationship between the vendor's orthogonality claim of < 0.1 degrees and the accuracy of 3D orientation obtained from factory calibrated IMUs in static situations. The authors hypothesise that the high magnetic dip (64 degrees ) in our laboratory may have exacerbated the errors reported. For biomechanical research, small relative movements of a body segment from a calibrated position are likely to be more accurate than large scale global motion that may have an error of up to 9.8 degrees . PMID:18688763

  19. Application of optical 3D measurement on thin film buckling to estimate interfacial toughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, H. K.; Wang, S. B.; Li, L. A.; Wang, Z. Y.; Goudeau, P.

    2014-03-01

    The shape-from-focus (SFF) method has been widely studied as a passive depth recovery and 3D reconstruction method for digital images. An important step in SFF is the calculation of the focus level for different points in an image by using a focus measure. In this work, an image entropy-based focus measure is introduced into the SFF method to measure the 3D buckling morphology of an aluminum film on a polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) substrate at a micro scale. Spontaneous film wrinkles and telephone-cord wrinkles are investigated after the deposition of a 300 nm thick aluminum film onto the PMMA substrate. Spontaneous buckling is driven by the highly compressive stress generated in the Al film during the deposition process. The interfacial toughness between metal films and substrates is an important parameter for the reliability of the film/substrate system. The height profiles of different sections across the telephone-cord wrinkle can be considered a straight-sided model with uniform width and height or a pinned circular model that has a delamination region characterized by a sequence of connected sectors. Furthermore, the telephone-cord geometry of the thin film can be used to calculate interfacial toughness. The instability of the finite element model is introduced to fit the buckling morphology obtained by SFF. The interfacial toughness is determined to be 0.203 J/m2 at a 70.4° phase angle from the straight-sided model and 0.105 J/m2 at 76.9° from the pinned circular model.

  20. 3D seismic velocity structure in the rupture area of the 2014 M8.2 Iquique earthquake in Northern Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woollam, Jack; Fuenzallida, Amaya; Garth, Tom; Rietbrock, Andreas; Ruiz, Sergio; Tavera, Hernando

    2016-04-01

    Seismic velocity tomography is one of the key tools in Earth sciences to image the physical properties of the subsurface. In recent years significant advances have been made to image the Chilean subductions zone, especially in the area of the 2010 M8.8 Maule earthquake (e.g. Hicks et al., 2014), providing much needed physical constraints for earthquakes source inversions and rupture models. In 2014 the M8.2 Iquique earthquake struck the northern part of the Chilean subduction zone in close proximity to the Peruvian boarder. The pre- and aftershock sequence of this major earthquake was recorded by a densified seismological network in Northern Chile and Southern Peru, which provides an excellent data set to study in depth the 3D velocity structure along the subduction megathrust. Based on an automatic event catalogue of nearly 10,000 events spanning the time period March to May 2014 we selected approximately 450 events for a staggered 3D inversion approach. Events are selected to guarantee an even ray coverage through the inversion volume. We only select events with a minimum GAP of 200 to improve depth estimates and therefore increase resolution in the marine forearc. Additionally, we investigate secondary arrivals between the P- and S-wave arrival to improve depth location. Up to now we have processed about 450 events, from which about 150 with at least 30 P- and S-wave observations have been selected for the subsequent 3D tomography. Overall the data quality is very high, which allows arrival time estimates better than 0.05s on average. We will show results from the 1D, 2D, and preliminary 3D inversions and discuss the results together with the obtained seismicity distribution.

  1. Internal Detonation Velocity Measurements Inside High Explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Benterou, J; Bennett, C V; Cole, G; Hare, D E; May, C; Udd, E

    2009-01-16

    In order to fully calibrate hydrocodes and dynamic chemistry burn models, initiation models and detonation models of high explosives, the ability to continuously measure the detonation velocity within an explosive is required. Progress on an embedded velocity diagnostic using a 125 micron diameter optical fiber containing a chirped fiber Bragg grating is reported. As the chirped fiber Bragg grating is consumed by the moving detonation wave, the physical length of the unconsumed Bragg grating is monitored with a fast InGaAs photodiode. Experimental details of the associated equipment and data in the form of continuous detonation velocity records within PBX-9502 are presented. This small diameter fiber sensor has the potential to measure internal detonation velocities on the order of 10 mm/{micro}sec along path lengths tens of millimeters long.

  2. Modeling and Measurement of 3D Deformation of Scoliotic Spine Using 2D X-ray Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hao; Leow, Wee Kheng; Huang, Chao-Hui; Howe, Tet Sen

    Scoliosis causes deformations such as twisting and lateral bending of the spine. To correct scoliotic deformation, the extents of 3D spinal deformation need to be measured. This paper studies the modeling and measurement of scoliotic spine based on 3D curve model. Through modeling the spine as a 3D Cosserat rod, the 3D structure of a scoliotic spine can be recovered by obtaining the minimum potential energy registration of the rod to the scoliotic spine in the x-ray image. Test results show that it is possible to obtain accurate 3D reconstruction using only the landmarks in a single view, provided that appropriate boundary conditions and elastic properties are included as constraints.

  3. A high resolution 3D velocity model beneath the Tokyo Metropolitan area by MeSO-net

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakagawa, S.; Sakai, S.; Honda, R.; Kimura, H.; Hirata, N.

    2015-12-01

    Beneath the Tokyo metropolitan area, the Philippine Sea Plate (PSP) subducts and causes devastating mega-thrust earthquakes, such as the 1703 Genroku earthquake (M8.0) and the 1923 Kanto earthquake (M7.9). An M7 or greater (M7+) earthquake in this area at present has high potential to produce devastating serious loss of life and property with even greater global economic repercussions. The Central Disaster Management Council of Japan estimates that an M7+ earthquake will cause 23,000 fatalities and 95 trillion yen (about 1 trillion US$) economic loss. We have launched the Special Project for Reducing Vulnerability for Urban Mega Earthquake Disasters in collaboration with scientists, engineers, and social-scientists in nationwide institutions since 2012. We analyze data from the dense seismic array called Metropolitan Seismic Observation network (MeSO-net), which has 296 seismic stations with spacing of 5 km (Sakai and Hirata, 2009; Kasahara et al., 2009). We applied the double-difference tomography method (Zhang and Thurber, 2003) and estimated the velocity structure and the upper boundary of PSP (Nakagawa et al., 2010). The 2011 Tohoku-oki earthquake (M9.0) has activated seismicity also in Kanto region, providing better coverage of ray paths for tomographic analysis. We obtain much higher resolution velocity models from whole dataset observed by MeSO-net between 2008 and 2015. A detailed image of tomograms shows that PSP contacts Pacific plate at a depth of 50 km beneath northern Tokyo bay. A variation of velocity along the oceanic crust suggests dehydration reaction to produce seismicity in a slab, which may related to the M7+ earthquake. Acknowledgement: This study was supported by the Special Project for Reducing Vulnerability for Urban Mega Earthquake Disasters of MEXT, Japan and the Earthquake Research Institute cooperative research program.

  4. 3D maps of the local ISM from inversion of individual color excess measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lallement, R.; Vergely, J.-L.; Valette, B.; Puspitarini, L.; Eyer, L.; Casagrande, L.

    2014-01-01

    Aims: Three-dimensional (3D) maps of the Galactic interstellar matter (ISM) are a potential tool of wide use, but accurate and detailed maps are still lacking. One of the ways to construct the maps is to invert individual distance-limited ISM measurements, a method we have applied here to measurements of stellar color excess in the optical. Methods: We assembled color excess data together with the associated parallax or photometric distances to constitute a catalog of ≃23 000 sightlines for stars within 2.5 kpc. The photometric data are taken from Strömgren catalogs, the Geneva photometric database, and the Geneva-Copenhagen survey. We also included extinctions derived towards open clusters. We applied an inversion method based on a regularized Bayesian approach to this color excess dataset, a method previously used for mapping at closer distances. Results: We show the dust spatial distribution resulting from the inversion by means of planar cuts through the differential opacity 3D distribution, and by means of 2D maps of the integrated opacity from the Sun up to various distances. The mapping assigns locations to the nearby dense clouds and represents their distribution at the spatial resolution that is allowed by the dataset properties, i.e. ≃10 pc close to the Sun and increasing to ≃100 pc beyond 1 kpc. Biases toward nearby and/or weakly extincted stars make this dataset particularly appropriate to mapping the local and neighboring cavities and to locating faint, extended nearby clouds, which are both goals that are difficult or impossible with other mapping methods. The new maps reveal a ≃1 kpc wide empty region in the third quadrant in the continuation of the so-called CMa tunnel of the Local Cavity, a cavity that we identify as the Superbubble GSH238+00+09 detected in radio emission maps and that is found to be bounded by the Orion and Vela clouds. The maps also show an extended narrower tunnel in the opposite direction (l ≃ 70°) that also extends

  5. Measurements of Shaped Charge Jet Velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Hongfa

    2013-06-01

    Penetration depth is an important requirement in oil/gas well perforating jobs. The depth determines how far the wellbore can directly communicate with reservoir fluids. Deep perforation charges are widely used in oilfield industry and most of those are powder metal liner charge for no carrot-like slug left as solid liner does. Comprehensive measurements for the powder metal liner shaped charge jet characteristics, namely, the jet density and velocity, are needed to predict the shaped charge performance and to plan the perforating job. This paper focuses on an experimental work of jet velocity measurements. A medium size of powder metal liner charges (27 grams HMX) is used in the tests. The powder jet shoots through a stack of limestone blocks with shorting switch set in between. Half inch air-gap between two blocks is design to provide space for jet traveling in air to record free fly velocity, meanwhile the jet penetration velocity in the limestone is measured. Aluminum foil switches are used to record the jet Time of Arrival (TOA). The charged switch shorted by the metal jet when it arrives. The shorting signal is recorded. The two velocities can be used to estimate the jet penetration effectiveness. A series of TOA tests show that jet velocity along its length linearly decreases from jet tip to tail until the stagnation points referring to which jet material moves in opposite direction.

  6. 3D-PTV measurement of the phototactic movement of algae in shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeda, Tatsuyuki; Ishikawa, Takuji; Ueno, Hironori; Numayama-Tsuruta, Keiko; Imai, Yosuke; Yamaguchi, Takami

    2012-11-01

    Recently, swimming motion of algae cells is researched actively, because algae fuel is one of the hottest topic in engineering. It is known that algae swim toward the light for photosynthesis however, the effect of a background flow on the unidirectional swimming is unclear. In this study, we used Volvox as a model alga and placed them in a simple shear flow with or without light stimulus. The shear flow was generated by moving two flat sheets in the opposite direction tangentially. A red LED light (wave length 660 nm) was used as an observation light source, and a white LED light was used to stimulate cells for the phototaxis. The trajectories of individual cells were measured by a 3D-PTV system, consists of a pair of high-speed camera with macro lenses. The results were analyzed to understand the effect of the background shear flow on the phototaxis of cells.

  7. 3D laser measurements of bare and shod feet during walking.

    PubMed

    Novak, Boštjan; Možina, Janez; Jezeršek, Matija

    2014-01-01

    This article presents a new system for 3D foot-shape measurements during walking. It is based on the laser-triangulation, multiple-line-illumination and color-modulation techniques. It consists of a walking stage and four measuring modules that simultaneously acquire the foot shape from the top, bottom and side views. The measuring speed is 30 fps. Custom-developed software makes it possible to analyze the foot's dimensions at an arbitrary cross-section by means of the width, height, girth and section orientation. Six subjects were measured during bare and shod walking, and the bare foot and the outside dimensions of the footwear during the entire stance phase are presented. The relative measurement repeatability of a single subject is 0.5% for bare foot and 1% for shod foot. This means that it is possible to study the differences between various influences on the foot-shape dynamics, such as a bare/shod foot, different loading conditions and the shoe's stiffness condition.

  8. The 3-D wake measurements near a hovering rotor for determining profile and induced drag

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcalister, K. W.; Schuler, C. A.; Branum, L.; Wu, J. C.

    1995-01-01

    Primarily an experimental effort, this study focuses on the velocity and vorticity fields in the near wake of a hovering rotor. Drag terminology is reviewed, and the theory for separately determining the profile-and-induced-drag components from wake quantities is introduced. Instantaneous visualizations of the flow field are used to center the laser velocimeter (LV) measurements on the vortex core and to assess the extent of the positional mandering of the trailing vortex. Velocity profiles obtained at different rotor speeds and distances behind the rotor blade clearly indicate the position, size, and rate of movement of the wake sheet and the core of the trailing vortex. The results also show the distribution of vorticity along the wake sheet and within the trailing vortex.

  9. Combining 3D optical imaging and dual energy absorptiometry to measure three compositional components.

    PubMed

    Malkov, Serghei; Shepherd, John

    2014-02-17

    We report on the design of the technique combining 3D optical imaging and dual-energy absorptiometry body scanning to estimate local body area compositions of three compartments. Dual-energy attenuation and body shape measures are used together to solve for the three compositional tissue thicknesses: water, lipid, and protein. We designed phantoms with tissue-like properties as our reference standards for calibration purposes. The calibration was created by fitting phantom values using non-linear regression of quadratic and truncated polynomials. Dual-energy measurements were performed on tissue-mimicking phantoms using a bone densitometer unit. The phantoms were made of materials shown to have similar x-ray attenuation properties of the biological compositional compartments. The components for the solid phantom were tested and their high energy/low energy attenuation ratios are in good correspondent to water, lipid, and protein for the densitometer x-ray region. The three-dimensional body shape was reconstructed from the depth maps generated by Microsoft Kinect for Windows. We used open-source Point Cloud Library and freeware software to produce dense point clouds. Accuracy and precision of compositional and thickness measures were calculated. The error contributions due to two modalities were estimated. The preliminary phantom composition and shape measurements are found to demonstrate the feasibility of the method proposed.

  10. Combining 3D optical imaging and dual energy absorptiometry to measure three compositional components

    PubMed Central

    Malkov, Serghei; Shepherd, John

    2014-01-01

    We report on the design of the technique combining 3D optical imaging and dual-energy absorptiometry body scanning to estimate local body area compositions of three compartments. Dual-energy attenuation and body shape measures are used together to solve for the three compositional tissue thicknesses: water, lipid, and protein. We designed phantoms with tissue-like properties as our reference standards for calibration purposes. The calibration was created by fitting phantom values using non-linear regression of quadratic and truncated polynomials. Dual-energy measurements were performed on tissue-mimicking phantoms using a bone densitometer unit. The phantoms were made of materials shown to have similar x-ray attenuation properties of the biological compositional compartments. The components for the solid phantom were tested and their high energy/low energy attenuation ratios are in good correspondent to water, lipid, and protein for the densitometer x-ray region. The three-dimensional body shape was reconstructed from the depth maps generated by Microsoft Kinect for Windows. We used open-source Point Cloud Library and freeware software to produce dense point clouds. Accuracy and precision of compositional and thickness measures were calculated. The error contributions due to two modalities were estimated. The preliminary phantom composition and shape measurements are found to demonstrate the feasibility of the method proposed. PMID:25083118

  11. Combining 3D optical imaging and dual energy absorptiometry to measure three compositional components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malkov, Serghei; Shepherd, John

    2014-02-01

    We report on the design of the technique combining 3D optical imaging and dual-energy absorptiometry body scanning to estimate local body area compositions of three compartments. Dual-energy attenuation and body shape measures are used together to solve for the three compositional tissue thicknesses: water, lipid, and protein. We designed phantoms with tissue-like properties as our reference standards for calibration purposes. The calibration was created by fitting phantom values using non-linear regression of quadratic and truncated polynomials. Dual-energy measurements were performed on tissue-mimicking phantoms using a bone densitometer unit. The phantoms were made of materials shown to have similar x-ray attenuation properties of the biological compositional compartments. The components for the solid phantom were tested and their high energy/low energy attenuation ratios are in good correspondent to water, lipid, and protein for the densitometer x-ray region. The three-dimensional body shape was reconstructed from the depth maps generated by Microsoft Kinect for Windows. We used open-source Point Cloud Library and freeware software to produce dense point clouds. Accuracy and precision of compositional and thickness measures were calculated. The error contributions due to two modalities were estimated. The preliminary phantom composition and shape measurements are found to demonstrate the feasibility of the method proposed.

  12. 3D density imaging with muons flux measurements from underground galleries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lesparre, Nolwenn; Cabrera, Justo; Marteau, Jacques

    2016-04-01

    Atmospheric muons flux measurements provide information on sub-surface density distribution, giving insights on the medium structure. We measured the muons flux from the underground galleries of the Tournemire experimental platform to image the medium between the galleries and the surface. The experiment aimed at evaluating the capacity of the method to detect the presence of discontinuities produced either by secondary strike-slip faults that present small vertical displacements or by a karstic network may be present at the level of an upper aquifer. Measurements were performed from three different sites so the trajectories of detected muons paths intersect in the medium. Such a configuration provided complementary information on the density distribution, offering the possibility to seek density variations at different depths. A specific calibration method was applied in order to interpolate the data acquired at different times with the same muons sensor. Muons flux measurements variations were then processed through a non-linear inversion, producing a 3D image of the density together with an evaluation of the different distinguished targets reliability. The density distribution showed the presence of a very low density region at the level of the upper aquifer, suggesting the presence of a karstic network hosting locally cavities. The trace of secondary strike-slip faults did not appear clearly on the image as the density contrast they produce might be too low compared to the signal to noise ratio present in the muons flux data. We propose different strategies to improve the density image accuracy.

  13. 3D force and displacement sensor for SFA and AFM measurements.

    PubMed

    Kristiansen, Kai; McGuiggan, Patricia; Carver, Greg; Meinhart, Carl; Israelachvili, Jacob

    2008-02-19

    A new device has been designed, and a prototype built and tested, that can simultaneously measure the displacements and/or the components of a force in three orthogonal directions. The "3D sensor" consists of four or eight strain gauges attached to the four arms of a single cross-shaped force-measuring cantilever spring. Finite element modeling (FEM) was performed to optimize the design configuration to give desired sensitivity of force, displacement, stiffness, and resonant frequency in each direction (x, y, and z) which were tested on a "mesoscale" device and found to agree with the predicted values to within 4-10%. The device can be fitted into a surface forces apparatus (SFA), and a future smaller "microscale" microfabricated version can be fitted into an atomic force microscope (AFM) for simultaneous measurements of the normal and lateral (friction) forces between a tip (or colloidal bead probe) and a surface, and the topography of the surface. Results of the FEM analysis are presented, and approximate equations derived using linear elasticity theory are given for the sensitivity in each direction. Initial calibrations and measurements of thin film rheology (lubrication forces) using the "mesoscale" prototype show the device to function as expected.

  14. The Quantitative Measurement Of Temperature Distribution In 3-D Thermal Field With High-Speed Real-Time Holographic Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji-zong, Wu; Wei-qiao, Fu; Qin, Wu

    1989-06-01

    The theory of using high-speed real-time holographic interferometry to measure quantitatively 3-D thermal field is discussed in thispaper. An experimental arrangement, and the holographic interference fringes of thermal field formed by the electrAc heating coil wires which were taken by the high-speed camera are given. With CONCEPT 32/2725 computer system and corresponding programms the distribution of 3-D thermal field is calculated and plotted Finally, the problems required to be improved and solved for the method of measuring quantitatively 3-D thermal field are discussed.

  15. 3D topography measurements on correlation cells—a new approach to forensic ballistics identifications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, John; Chu, Wei; Tong, Mingsi; Soons, Johannes

    2014-06-01

    Based on three-dimensional (3D) topography measurements on correlation cells, the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has developed the ‘NIST Ballistics Identification System (NBIS)’ aimed at accurate ballistics identifications and fast ballistics evidence searches. The 3D topographies are divided into arrays of correlation cells to identify ‘valid correlation areas’ and eliminate ‘invalid correlation areas’ from the matching and identification procedure. A ‘congruent matching cells’ (CMC)’ method using three types of identification parameters of the paired correlation cells (cross correlation function maximum CCFmax, spatial registration position in x-y and registration angle θ) is used for high accuracy ballistics identifications. ‘Synchronous processing’ is proposed for correlating multiple cell pairs at the same time to increase the correlation speed. The proposed NBIS can be used for correlations of both geometrical topographies and optical intensity images. All the correlation parameters and algorithms are in the public domain and subject to open tests. An error rate reporting procedure has been developed that can greatly add to the scientific support for the firearm and toolmark identification specialty, and give confidence to the trier of fact in court proceedings. The NBIS is engineered to employ transparent identification parameters and criteria, statistical models and correlation algorithms. In this way, interoperability between different ballistics identification systems can be more easily achieved. This interoperability will make the NBIS suitable for ballistics identifications and evidence searches with large national databases, such as the National Integrated Ballistic Information Network in the United States.

  16. Antarctica: Measuring glacier velocity from satellite images

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lucchitta, B.K.; Ferguson, H.M.

    1986-01-01

    Many Landsat images of Antarctica show distinctive flow and crevasse features in the floating part of ice streams and outlet glaciers immediately below their grounding zones. Some of the features, which move with the glacier or ice stream, remain visible over many years and thus allow time-lapse measurements of ice velocities. Measurements taken from Landsat images of features on Byrd Glacier agree well with detailed ground and aerial observations. The satellite-image technique thus offers a rapid and cost-effective method of obtaining average velocities, to a first order of accuracy, of many ice streams and outlet glaciers near their termini.

  17. Antarctica: measuring glacier velocity from satellite images

    SciTech Connect

    Lucchitta, B.K.; Ferguson, H.M.

    1986-11-28

    Many Landsat images of Antarctica show distinctive flow and crevasse features in the floating part of ice streams and outlet glaciers immediately below their grounding zones. Some of the features, which move with the glacier or ice stream, remain visible over many years and thus allow time-lapse measurements of ice velocities. Measurements taken from Landsat images of features on Byrd Glacier agree well with detailed ground and aerial observations. The satellite-image technique thus offers a rapid and cost-effective method of obtaining average velocities, to a first order of accuracy, of many ice streams and outlet glaciers near their termini.

  18. A Measure of the Effectiveness of Incorporating 3D Human Anatomy into an Online Undergraduate Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hilbelink, Amy J.

    2009-01-01

    Results of a study designed to determine the effectiveness of implementing three-dimensional (3D) stereo images of a human skull in an undergraduate human anatomy online laboratory were gathered and analysed. Mental model theory and its applications to 3D relationships are discussed along with the research results. Quantitative results on 62 pairs…

  19. Three-Axis Distributed Fiber Optic Strain Measurement in 3D Woven Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castellucci, Matt; Klute, Sandra; Lally, Evan M.; Froggatt, Mark E.; Lowry, David

    2013-01-01

    Recent advancements in composite materials technologies have broken further from traditional designs and require advanced instrumentation and analysis capabilities. Success or failure is highly dependent on design analysis and manufacturing processes. By monitoring smart structures throughout manufacturing and service life, residual and operational stresses can be assessed and structural integrity maintained. Composite smart structures can be manufactured by integrating fiber optic sensors into existing composite materials processes such as ply layup, filament winding and three-dimensional weaving. In this work optical fiber was integrated into 3D woven composite parts at a commercial woven products manufacturing facility. The fiber was then used to monitor the structures during a VARTM manufacturing process, and subsequent static and dynamic testing. Low cost telecommunications-grade optical fiber acts as the sensor using a high resolution commercial Optical Frequency Domain Reflectometer (OFDR) system providing distributed strain measurement at spatial resolutions as low as 2mm. Strain measurements using the optical fiber sensors are correlated to resistive strain gage measurements during static structural loading. Keywords: fiber optic, distributed strain sensing, Rayleigh scatter, optical frequency domain reflectometry

  20. A new technique of recognition for coded targets in optical 3D measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Changye; Cheng, Xiaosheng; Cui, Haihua; Dai, Ning; Weng, Jinping

    2014-11-01

    A new technique for coded targets recognition in optical 3D-measurement application is proposed in this paper. Traditionally, point cloud registration is based on homologous features, such as the curvature, which is time-consuming and not reliable. For this, we paste some coded targets onto the surface of the object to be measured to improve the optimum target location and accurate correspondence among multi-source images. Circular coded targets are used, and an algorithm to automatically detecting them is proposed. This algorithm extracts targets with intensive bimodal histogram features from complex background, and filters noise according to their size, shape and intensity. In addition, the coded targets' identification is conducted out by their ring codes. We affine them around the circle inversely, set foreground and background respectively as 1 and 0 to constitute a binary number, and finally shift one bit every time to calculate a decimal one of the binary number to determine a minimum decimal number as its code. In this 3Dmeasurement application, we build a mutual relationship between different viewpoints containing three or more coded targets with different codes. Experiments show that it is of efficiency to obtain global surface data of an object to be measured and is robust to the projection angles and noise.

  1. Three-axis distributed fiber optic strain measurement in 3D woven composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellucci, Matt; Klute, Sandra; Lally, Evan M.; Froggatt, Mark E.; Lowry, David

    2013-03-01

    Recent advancements in composite materials technologies have broken further from traditional designs and require advanced instrumentation and analysis capabilities. Success or failure is highly dependent on design analysis and manufacturing processes. By monitoring smart structures throughout manufacturing and service life, residual and operational stresses can be assessed and structural integrity maintained. Composite smart structures can be manufactured by integrating fiber optic sensors into existing composite materials processes such as ply layup, filament winding and three-dimensional weaving. In this work optical fiber was integrated into 3D woven composite parts at a commercial woven products manufacturing facility. The fiber was then used to monitor the structures during a VARTM manufacturing process, and subsequent static and dynamic testing. Low cost telecommunications-grade optical fiber acts as the sensor using a high resolution commercial Optical Frequency Domain Reflectometer (OFDR) system providing distributed strain measurement at spatial resolutions as low as 2mm. Strain measurements using the optical fiber sensors are correlated to resistive strain gage measurements during static structural loading.

  2. Development of portable 3D optical measuring system using structured light projection method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoki, Hiroshi

    2014-05-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) scanners are becoming increasingly common in many industries. However most of these scanning technologies have drawbacks for practical use due to size, weight, accessibility, and ease-of-use. Depending on the application, speed, flexibility and portability can often be deemed more important than accuracy. We have developed a solution to address this market requirement and overcome the aforementioned limitations. To counteract shortcomings such as heavy weight and large size, an optical sensor is used that consists of a laser projector, a camera system, and a multi-touch screen. Structured laser light is projected onto the measured object with a newly designed laser projector employing a single Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS) mirror. The optical system is optimized for the combination of a Laser Diode (LD), the MEMS mirror and the size of measurement area to secure the ideal contrast of structured light. Also, we developed a new calibration algorithm for this sensor with MEMS laser projector that uses an optical camera model for point cloud calculation. These technical advancements make the sensor compact, save power consumption, and reduce heat generation yet still allows for rapid calculation. Due to the principle of the measurement, structured light triangulation utilizing phase-shifting technology, resolution is improved. To meet requirements for practical applications, the optics, electronics, image processing, display and data management capabilities have been integrated into a single compact unit.

  3. The effect of motion on IMRT – looking at interplay with 3D measurements

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, A; Yan, H; Oldham, M; Juang, T; Adamovics, J; Yin, FF

    2013-01-01

    Six base of skull IMRT treatment plans were delivered to 3D dosimeters within the RPC Head and Neck Phantom for QA verification. Isotropic 2mm 3D data was obtained using the DLOS-PRESAGE system and compared to an Eclipse (Varian) treatment plan. Normalized Dose Distribution pass rates were obtained for a number of criteria. High quality 3D dosimetry data was observed from the DLOS system, illustrated here through colormaps, isodose lines, profiles, and NDD 3D maps. Excellent agreement with the planned dose distributions was also observed with NDD analysis revealing > 90% NDD pass rates [3%, 2mm], noise < 0.5%. This paper focuses on a detailed exploration of the quality and use of 3D dosimetry data obtained with the DLOS-PRESAGE system. PMID:26877756

  4. Preliminary result of teleseismic double-difference relocation of earthquakes in the Molucca collision zone with a 3D velocity model

    SciTech Connect

    Shiddiqi, Hasbi Ash E-mail: h.a.shiddiqi@gmail.com; Widiyantoro, Sri; Nugraha, Andri Dian; Ramdhan, Mohamad; Wandono,; Sutiyono,; Handayani, Titi; Nugroho, Hendro

    2015-04-24

    We have relocated hypocenters of earthquakes occurring in the Molucca collision zone and surrounding region taken from the BMKG catalog using teleseismic double-difference relocation algorithm (teletomoDD). We used P-wave arrival times of local, regional, and teleseismic events recorded at 304 recording stations. Over 7,000 earthquakes were recorded by the BMKG seismographicnetworkin the study region from April, 2009 toJune, 2014. We used a 3D regional-global nested velocity modelresulting fromprevious global tomographystudy. In this study, the3D seismic velocity model was appliedto theIndonesian region, whilethe1D seismicvelocity model (ak135)wasused for regions outside of Indonesia. Our relocation results show a better improvement in travel-time RMS residuals comparedto those of the BMKG catalog.Ourresultsalso show that relocation shifts were dominated intheeast-west direction, whichmaybeinfluenced by theexistingvelocity anomaly related to the reversed V-shaped slabbeneaththestudy region. Our eventrelocation results refine the geometry of slabs beneath the Halmahera and Sangihe arcs.

  5. Documentation and Instructions for Running Two Python Scripts that Aid in Setting up 3D Measurements using the Polytec 3D Scanning Laser Doppler Vibrometer.

    SciTech Connect

    Rohe, Daniel Peter

    2015-08-24

    Sandia National Laboratories has recently purchased a Polytec 3D Scanning Laser Doppler Vibrometer for vibration measurement. This device has proven to be a very nice tool for making vibration measurements, and has a number of advantages over traditional sensors such as accelerometers. The non-contact nature of the laser vibrometer means there is no mass loading due to measuring the response. Additionally, the laser scanning heads can position the laser spot much more quickly and accurately than placing an accelerometer or performing a roving hammer impact. The disadvantage of the system is that a significant amount of time must be invested to align the lasers with each other and the part so that the laser spots can be accurately positioned. The Polytec software includes a number of nice tools to aid in this procedure; however, certain portions are still tedious. Luckily, the Polytec software is readily extensible by programming macros for the system, so tedious portions of the procedure can be made easier by automating the process. The Polytec Software includes a WinWrap (similar to Visual Basic) editor and interface to run macros written in that programming language. The author, however, is much more proficient in Python, and the latter also has a much larger set of libraries that can be used to create very complex macros, while taking advantage of Python’s inherent readability and maintainability.

  6. Modeling, measurement, and 3-D equilibrium reconstruction of the bootstrap current in the Helically Symmetric Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitt, J. C.; Talmadge, J. N.; Anderson, D. T.; Hanson, J. D.

    2014-09-15

    The bootstrap current for three electron cyclotron resonance heated plasma scenarios in a quasihelically symmetric stellarator (the Helically Symmetric Experiment) are analyzed and compared to a neoclassical transport code PENTA. The three conditions correspond to 50 kW input power with a resonance that is off-axis, 50 kW on-axis heating and 100 kW on-axis heating. When the heating location was moved from off-axis to on-axis with 50 kW heating power, the stored energy and the extrapolated steady-state current were both observed to increase. When the on-axis heating power was increased from 50 kW to 100 kW, the stored energy continued to increase while the bootstrap current slightly decreased. This trend is qualitatively in agreement with the calculations which indicate that a large positive electric field for the 100 kW case was driving the current negative in a small region close to the magnetic axis and accounting for the decrease in the total integrated current. This trend in the calculations is only observed to occur when momentum conservation between particle species is included. Without momentum conservation, the calculated bootstrap current increases monotonically. We show that the magnitude of the bootstrap current as calculated by PENTA agrees better with the experiment when momentum conservation between plasma species is included in the calculation. The total current was observed in all cases to flow in a direction to unwind the transform, unlike in a tokamak in which the bootstrap current adds to the transform. The 3-D inductive response of the plasma is simulated to predict the evolution of the current profile during the discharge. The 3-D equilibrium reconstruction code V3FIT is used to reconstruct profiles of the plasma pressure and current constrained by measurements with a set of magnetic diagnostics. The reconstructed profiles are consistent with the measured plasma pressure profile and the simulated current profile when the

  7. Wave Measurements Using GPS Velocity Signals

    PubMed Central

    Doong, Dong-Jiing; Lee, Beng-Chun; Kao, Chia Chuen

    2011-01-01

    This study presents the idea of using GPS-output velocity signals to obtain wave measurement data. The application of the transformation from a velocity spectrum to a displacement spectrum in conjunction with the directional wave spectral theory are the core concepts in this study. Laboratory experiments were conducted to verify the accuracy of the inversed displacement of the surface of the sea. A GPS device was installed on a moored accelerometer buoy to verify the GPS-derived wave parameters. It was determined that loss or drifting of the GPS signal, as well as energy spikes occurring in the low frequency band led to erroneous measurements. Through the application of moving average skill and a process of frequency cut-off to the GPS output velocity, correlations between GPS-derived, and accelerometer buoy-measured significant wave heights and periods were both improved to 0.95. The GPS-derived one-dimensional and directional wave spectra were in agreement with the measurements. Despite the direction verification showing a 10° bias, this exercise still provided useful information with sufficient accuracy for a number of specific purposes. The results presented in this study indicate that using GPS output velocity is a reasonable alternative for the measurement of ocean waves. PMID:22346618

  8. Calculation of three-dimensional (3-D) internal flow by means of the velocity-vorticity formulation on a staggered grid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stremel, Paul M.

    1995-01-01

    A method has been developed to accurately compute the viscous flow in three-dimensional (3-D) enclosures. This method is the 3-D extension of a two-dimensional (2-D) method developed for the calculation of flow over airfoils. The 2-D method has been tested extensively and has been shown to accurately reproduce experimental results. As in the 2-D method, the 3-D method provides for the non-iterative solution of the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations by means of a fully coupled implicit technique. The solution is calculated on a body fitted computational mesh incorporating a staggered grid methodology. In the staggered grid method, the three components of vorticity are defined at the centers of the computational cell sides, while the velocity components are defined as normal vectors at the centers of the computational cell faces. The staggered grid orientation provides for the accurate definition of the vorticity components at the vorticity locations, the divergence of vorticity at the mesh cell nodes and the conservation of mass at the mesh cell centers. The solution is obtained by utilizing a fractional step solution technique in the three coordinate directions. The boundary conditions for the vorticity and velocity are calculated implicitly as part of the solution. The method provides for the non-iterative solution of the flow field and satisfies the conservation of mass and divergence of vorticity to machine zero at each time step. To test the method, the calculation of simple driven cavity flows have been computed. The driven cavity flow is defined as the flow in an enclosure driven by a moving upper plate at the top of the enclosure. To demonstrate the ability of the method to predict the flow in arbitrary cavities, results will he shown for both cubic and curved cavities.

  9. The LLNL-G3D global P-wave velocity model and the significance of the BayesLoc multiple-event location procedure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simmons, N. A.; Myers, S. C.; Johannesson, G.; Matzel, E.

    2011-12-01

    LLNL-G3D is a global-scale model of P-wave velocity designed to accurately predict seismic travel times at regional and teleseismic distances simultaneously. The underlying goal of the model is to provide enhanced seismic event location capabilities. Previous versions of LLNL-G3D (versions 1 and 2) provide substantial improvements in event location accuracy via 3-D ray tracing. The latest models are based on ~2.7 million P and Pn arrivals that are re-processed using our global multi-event locator known as BayesLoc. Bayesloc is a formulation of the joint probability distribution across multiple-event location parameters, including hypocenters, travel time corrections, pick precision, and phase labels. Modeling the whole multiple-event system results in accurate locations and an internally consistent data set that is ideal for tomography. Our recently developed inversion approach (called Progressive Multi-level Tessellation Inversion or PMTI) captures regional trends and fine details where data warrant. Using PMTI, we model multiple heterogeneity scale lengths without defining parameter grids with variable densities based on some ad hoc criteria. LLNL-G3Dv3 (version 3) is produced with data generated with the BayesLoc procedure, recently modified to account for localized travel time trends via a multiple event clustering technique. We demonstrate the significance of BayesLoc processing, the impact on the resulting tomographic images, and the application of LLNL-G3D to seismic event location. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. LLNL-ABS-491805.

  10. The 3-D distribution of random velocity inhomogeneities in southwestern Japan and the western part of the Nankai subduction zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Tsutomu; Obana, Koichiro; Yamamoto, Yojiro; Nakanishi, Ayako; Kodaira, Shuichi; Kaneda, Yoshiyuki

    2013-05-01

    waves at high frequencies (>1 Hz) show collapsed and broadened wave trains caused by multiple scattering in the lithosphere. This study analyzed the envelopes of direct S waves in southwestern Japan and on the western side of the Nankai trough and estimated the spatial distribution of random inhomogeneities by assuming a von Kármán type power spectral density function (PSDF). Strongly inhomogeneous media have been mostly imaged at shallow depth (0-20 km depth) in the onshore area of southwestern Japan, and their PSDF is represented as P(m) ≈ 0.05m-3.7 km3, with m being the spatial wave number, whereas most of the other area shows weak inhomogeneities of which PSDF is P(m) ≈ 0.005m-4.5 km3. At Hyuga-nada in Nankai trough, there is an anomaly of inhomogeneity of which PSDF is estimated as P(m) ≈ 0.01m-4.5 km3. This PSDF has the similar spectral gradient with the weakly inhomogeneous media, but has larger power spectral density than other offshore areas. This anomalous region is broadly located in the subducted Kyushu Palau ridge, which was identified by using velocity structures and bathymetry, and it shows no clear correlation with the fault zones of large earthquakes in past decades. These spatial correlations suggest that possible origins of inhomogeneities at Hyuga-nada are ancient volcanic activity in the oceanic plate or deformed structures due to the subduction of the Kyushu Palau ridge.

  11. Comparison of clinical bracket point registration with 3D laser scanner and coordinate measuring machine

    PubMed Central

    Nouri, Mahtab; Farzan, Arash; Baghban, Ali Reza Akbarzadeh; Massudi, Reza

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of the present study was to assess the diagnostic value of a laser scanner developed to determine the coordinates of clinical bracket points and to compare with the results of a coordinate measuring machine (CMM). METHODS: This diagnostic experimental study was conducted on maxillary and mandibular orthodontic study casts of 18 adults with normal Class I occlusion. First, the coordinates of the bracket points were measured on all casts by a CMM. Then, the three-dimensional coordinates (X, Y, Z) of the bracket points were measured on the same casts by a 3D laser scanner designed at Shahid Beheshti University, Tehran, Iran. The validity and reliability of each system were assessed by means of intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) and Dahlberg's formula. RESULTS: The difference between the mean dimension and the actual value for the CMM was 0.0066 mm. (95% CI: 69.98340, 69.99140). The mean difference for the laser scanner was 0.107 ± 0.133 mm (95% CI: -0.002, 0.24). In each method, differences were not significant. The ICC comparing the two methods was 0.998 for the X coordinate, and 0.996 for the Y coordinate; the mean difference for coordinates recorded in the entire arch and for each tooth was 0.616 mm. CONCLUSION: The accuracy of clinical bracket point coordinates measured by the laser scanner was equal to that of CMM. The mean difference in measurements was within the range of operator errors. PMID:25741826

  12. Countermovement jump performance assessment using a wearable 3D inertial measurement unit.

    PubMed

    Picerno, Pietro; Camomilla, Valentina; Capranica, Laura

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to validate a wearable inertial measurement unit (IMU), containing a 3D accelerometer and gyroscope, for the estimation of countermovement jump height. The absolute vertical acceleration of the IMU positioned on the back of the participant at L5 level, compensated for trunk rotations, was used to obtain jump height by applying the equation of free-fall to the motion of the IMU. The methodology was tested on 28 participants performing five countermovement jumps each. A reference value for this quantity was obtained using stereophotogrammetry (35.4 cm, s = 4.9). Jump height scores obtained using the proposed methodology (35.9 cm, s = 5.5) presented no significant difference with respect to stereophotogrammetry (P = 0.61). A low bias of 0.6 cm confirmed the accuracy of the estimate, which also showed a high (r = 0.87) and significant (P < 0.0001) correlation with reference values. Furthermore, without compensating accelerations for trunk rotation, jump height was largely underestimated (P < 0.0001) (bias: -12.7 cm) and poorly associated (r = 0.31) with stereophotogrammetry. The results of this study show that the estimation of jump height using inertial sensors leads to accurate results when the measured accelerations are corrected for trunk rotations.

  13. Investigation of Three-Dimensional (3-D) Solar Radiative Transfer Effects Using A-Train Satellite Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ham, S.; Kato, S.; Barker, H.; Rose, F. G.

    2012-12-01

    Three-dimensional (3-D) radiative effects are examined for cloudy atmosphere obtained from A-train satellite measurements. Since CloudSat and Cloud Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) only provide two-dimensional (2-D) nadir profiles along the satellite track, Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) spectral radiances are used to extend the 2-D cloud profiles to the cross track direction (Barker et al., 2011). Then one-dimensional (1-D) and 3-D simulations are performed to get (SW) broad band (BB) flux and heating rate profile for constructed 3-D cloud field. In the simulation, correlated k-distribution model is employed to obtain rapid estimation of gaseous optical depths for 70 solar spectral bands. The difference between 1-D and 3-D results are interpreted as 3-D solar effects, and analyzed for different cloud types and solar zenith angle. In addition, modeled top-of-atmosphere (TOA) irradiances by the 1-D and 3-D models are compared to Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES)-derived TOA irradiances. The preliminary results show that 3-D cloud absorption is larger than 1-D calculation, and thus 3-D heating rate is larger than 1-D heating rate for cloud layer. On the other hand, 3-D downward flux at surface is smaller than 1-D flux. Reference Barker, H. W., M. P. Jerg, T. Wehr, S. Kato, D. P. Donovan, and R. J. Hogan, 2011, A 3D cloud-construction algorithm for the EarthCARE mission, Q. J. R. Meteorol. Soc., 137, 1042-1058.

  14. 3-D GPS velocity field and its implications on the present-day post-orogenic deformation of the Western Alps and Pyrenees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ninh Nguyen, Hai; Vernant, Philippe; Mazzotti, Stephane; Khazaradze, Giorgi; Asensio, Eva

    2016-09-01

    We present a new 3-D GPS velocity solution for 182 sites for the region encompassing the Western Alps, Pyrenees, and southern France. The velocity field is based on a Precise Point Positioning (PPP) solution, to which we apply a common-mode filter, defined by the 26 longest time series, in order to correct for network-wide biases (reference frame, unmodeled large-scale processes, etc.). We show that processing parameters, such as troposphere delay modeling, can lead to systematic velocity variations of 0.1-0.5 mm yr-1 affecting both accuracy and precision, especially for short (< 5 years) time series. A velocity convergence analysis shows that minimum time-series lengths of ˜ 3 and ˜ 5.5 years are required to reach a velocity stability of 0.5 mm yr-1 in the horizontal and vertical components, respectively. On average, horizontal residual velocities show a stability of ˜ 0.2 mm yr-1 in the Western Alps, Pyrenees, and southern France. The only significant horizontal strain rate signal is in the western Pyrenees with up to 4 × 10-9 yr-1 NNE-SSW extension, whereas no significant strain rates are detected in the Western Alps (< 1 × 10-9 yr-1). In contrast, we identify significant uplift rates up to 2 mm yr-1 in the Western Alps but not in the Pyrenees (0.1 ± 0.2 mm yr-1). A correlation between site elevations and fast uplift rates in the northern part of the Western Alps, in the region of the Würmian ice cap, suggests that part of this uplift is induced by postglacial rebound. The very slow uplift rates in the southern Western Alps and in the Pyrenees could be accounted for by erosion-induced rebound.

  15. Validation of 3-D Ice Accretion Measurement Methodology for Experimental Aerodynamic Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broeren, Andy P.; Addy, Harold E., Jr.; Lee, Sam; Monastero, Marianne C.

    2015-01-01

    Determining the adverse aerodynamic effects due to ice accretion often relies on dry-air wind-tunnel testing of artificial, or simulated, ice shapes. Recent developments in ice-accretion documentation methods have yielded a laser-scanning capability that can measure highly three-dimensional (3-D) features of ice accreted in icing wind tunnels. The objective of this paper was to evaluate the aerodynamic accuracy of ice-accretion simulations generated from laser-scan data. Ice-accretion tests were conducted in the NASA Icing Research Tunnel using an 18-in. chord, two-dimensional (2-D) straight wing with NACA 23012 airfoil section. For six ice-accretion cases, a 3-D laser scan was performed to document the ice geometry prior to the molding process. Aerodynamic performance testing was conducted at the University of Illinois low-speed wind tunnel at a Reynolds number of 1.8 × 10(exp 6) and a Mach number of 0.18 with an 18-in. chord NACA 23012 airfoil model that was designed to accommodate the artificial ice shapes. The ice-accretion molds were used to fabricate one set of artificial ice shapes from polyurethane castings. The laser-scan data were used to fabricate another set of artificial ice shapes using rapid prototype manufacturing such as stereolithography. The iced-airfoil results with both sets of artificial ice shapes were compared to evaluate the aerodynamic simulation accuracy of the laser-scan data. For five of the six ice-accretion cases, there was excellent agreement in the iced-airfoil aerodynamic performance between the casting and laser-scan based simulations. For example, typical differences in iced-airfoil maximum lift coefficient were less than 3 percent with corresponding differences in stall angle of approximately 1 deg or less. The aerodynamic simulation accuracy reported in this paper has demonstrated the combined accuracy of the laser-scan and rapid-prototype manufacturing approach to simulating ice accretion for a NACA 23012 airfoil. For several

  16. Acoustic Measurement of Potato Cannon Velocity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Courtney, Michael; Courtney, Amy

    2007-01-01

    Potato cannon velocity can be measured with a digitized microphone signal. A microphone is attached to the potato cannon muzzle, and a potato is fired at an aluminum target about 10 m away. Flight time can be determined from the acoustic waveform by subtracting the time in the barrel and time for sound to return from the target. The potato…

  17. Radionuclide Counting Technique Measures Wind Velocity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, J. J.; Khandelwal, G. S.; Mall, G. H.

    1983-01-01

    Proposed technique for measuring wind velocity based on inverse-squarelaw variation of radioactive counting rates. In proposal, radioative source is deposited on bottom of light, hollow sphere and suspended by flexible wire over radiation counter, Anemometer based on this concept is self-contained, portable, yet not too fragile. Used for extended periods of time, even at remote, inhospitable and inaccessible sites.

  18. Fish body surface data measurement based on 3D digital image correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Ming; Qian, Chen; Yang, Wenkai

    2016-01-01

    To film the moving fish in the glass tank, light will be bent at the interface of air and glass, glass and water. Based on binocular stereo vision and refraction principle, we establish a mathematical model of 3D image correlation to reconstruct the 3D coordinates of samples in the water. Marking speckle in fish surface, a series of real-time speckle images of swimming fish will be obtained by two high-speed cameras, and instantaneous 3D shape, strain, displacement etc. of fish will be reconstructed.

  19. Quantifying bone weathering stages using the average roughness parameter Ra measured from 3D data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vietti, Laura A.

    2016-09-01

    Bone surface texture is known to degrade in a predictable fashion due to subaerial exposure, and can thus act as a relative proxy for estimating temporal information from modern and ancient bone assemblages. To date, the majority of bone weathering data is collected on a categorical scale based on descriptive terms. While this qualitative classification of weathering data is well established, textural analyses of bone surfaces may provide means to quantify weathering stages but have yet to be tested. Here, I examined the suitability of textural analyses for bone weathering studies by first establishing bone surface regions most appropriate for weathering analyses. I then measured and compared the roughness texture of weathered bones at different stages. To establish regions of bone most suitable for textural analyses, Ra was measured from 3D scans of dorsal ribs of four adult ungulate taxa. Results indicate that the rib-shafts from unweathered ungulate skeletons were similar and are likely good candidates because differences in surface texture will not be due to differences in initial bone texture. To test if textural measurements could reliably characterize weathering stages, the average roughness values (Ra) were measured from weathered ungulate rib-shafts assigned to four descriptive weathering stages. Results from analyses indicate that the Ra was statistically distinct for each weathering stage and that roughness positively correlates with the degree of weathering. As such, results suggest that textural analyses may provide the means for quantifying bone-weathering stages. Using Ra and other quantifiable texture parameters may enable more reliable and comparative taphonomic analyses by reducing inter-observer variations and by providing numerical data more compatible for multivariate statistics.

  20. SU-F-BRE-04: Construction of 3D Printed Patient Specific Phantoms for Dosimetric Verification Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Ehler, E; Higgins, P; Dusenbery, K

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To validate a method to create per patient phantoms for dosimetric verification measurements. Methods: Using a RANDO phantom as a substitute for an actual patient, a model of the external features of the head and neck region of the phantom was created. A phantom was used instead of a human for two reasons: to allow for dosimetric measurements that would not be possible in-vivo and to avoid patient privacy issues. Using acrylonitrile butadiene styrene thermoplastic as the building material, a hollow replica was created using the 3D printer filled with a custom tissue equivalent mixture of paraffin wax, magnesium oxide, and calcium carbonate. A traditional parallel-opposed head and neck plan was constructed. Measurements were performed with thermoluminescent dosimeters in both the RANDO phantom and in the 3D printed phantom. Calculated and measured dose was compared at 17 points phantoms including regions in high and low dose regions and at the field edges. On-board cone beam CT was used to localize both phantoms within 1mm and 1° prior to radiation. Results: The maximum difference in calculated dose between phantoms was 1.8% of the planned dose (180 cGy). The mean difference between calculated and measured dose in the anthropomorphic phantom and the 3D printed phantom was 1.9% ± 2.8% and −0.1% ± 4.9%, respectively. The difference between measured and calculated dose was determined in the RANDO and 3D printed phantoms. The differences between measured and calculated dose in each respective phantom was within 2% for 12 of 17 points. The overlap of the RANDO and 3D printed phantom was 0.956 (Jaccard Index). Conclusion: A custom phantom was created using a 3D printer. Dosimetric calculations and measurements showed good agreement between the dose in the RANDO phantom (patient substitute) and the 3D printed phantom.

  1. A global 3D P-Velocity model of the Earth%3CU%2B2019%3Es crust and mantle for improved event location.

    SciTech Connect

    Ballard, Sanford; Encarnacao, Andre Villanova; Begnaud, Michael A.; Rowe, Charlotte A.; Lewis, Jennifer E.; Young, Christopher John; Chang, Marcus C.; Hipp, James Richard

    2010-05-01

    To test the hypothesis that high quality 3D Earth models will produce seismic event locations which are more accurate and more precise, we are developing a global 3D P wave velocity model of the Earth's crust and mantle using seismic tomography. In this paper, we present the most recent version of our model, SALSA3D (SAndia LoS Alamos) version 1.4, and demonstrate its ability to reduce mislocations for a large set of realizations derived from a carefully chosen set of globally-distributed ground truth events. Our model is derived from the latest version of the Ground Truth (GT) catalog of P and Pn travel time picks assembled by Los Alamos National Laboratory. To prevent over-weighting due to ray path redundancy and to reduce the computational burden, we cluster rays to produce representative rays. Reduction in the total number of ray paths is > 55%. The model is represented using the triangular tessellation system described by Ballard et al. (2009), which incorporates variable resolution in both the geographic and radial dimensions. For our starting model, we use a simplified two layer crustal model derived from the Crust 2.0 model over a uniform AK135 mantle. Sufficient damping is used to reduce velocity adjustments so that ray path changes between iterations are small. We obtain proper model smoothness by using progressive grid refinement, refining the grid only around areas with significant velocity changes from the starting model. At each grid refinement level except the last one we limit the number of iterations to prevent convergence thereby preserving aspects of broad features resolved at coarser resolutions. Our approach produces a smooth, multi-resolution model with node density appropriate to both ray coverage and the velocity gradients required by the data. This scheme is computationally expensive, so we use a distributed computing framework based on the Java Parallel Processing Framework, providing us with {approx}400 processors. Resolution of our model

  2. 3D Equilibrium Reconstruction with Internal Measurements on Madison Symmetric Torus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koliner, J. J.; Chapman, B. E.; Sarff, J. S.; Anderson, J. K.; Munaretto, S.; Capecchi, W.; Lin, L.; Hanson, J. D.; Cianciosa, M. R.

    2014-10-01

    Plasmas in the MST reversed field pinch (RFP) bifurcate to a helical equilibrium, forming a single helical axis (SHAx) at high plasma current (Ip ~ 500 kA) and low density (ne ~ 0.5 - 1019 m-3) . In order to understand the physics of confinement and self-organization in SHAx, 3D equilibrium reconstruction is needed. The V3FIT equilibrium reconstruction code is applied using measurements from the 11-chord interferometer-polarimeter, 22-point Thomson scattering system, 4-camera soft x-ray probes, and magnetics. Equilibria have been generated using a fixed plasma boundary with no external currents. Model signals fit well to observed signals, χ2 ~ 1, and the zero crossing of line-averaged neBz from Faraday rotation is matched by the model. External magnetics are shown to be an inadequate equilibrium constraint with the VMEC model, due to possible shear in the poloidal phase of the helical structure, as well as strong contribution to the edge magnetic field from currents in the conducting shell. To address this shortcoming, a filament current model has been created to simulate the conducting shell with many external currents for a free plasma boundary. Axisymmetric equilibria have been reconstructed using the filament model and compared to solutions obtained with the MSTFIT axisymmetric equilibrium reconstruction code. The filament model has been extended to allow reconstruction of helical equilibria. Supported by DoE.

  3. Standard deviations of composition measurements in atom probe analyses-Part II: 3D atom probe.

    PubMed

    Danoix, F; Grancher, G; Bostel, A; Blavette, D

    2007-09-01

    In a companion paper [F. Danoix, G. Grancher, A. Bostel, D. Blavette, Surf. Interface Anal. this issue (previous paper).], the derivation of variances of the estimates of measured composition, and the underlying hypotheses, have been revisited in the the case of conventional one dimensional (1D) atom probes. In this second paper, we will concentrate on the analytical derivation of the variance when the estimate of composition is obtained from a 3D atom probe. As will be discussed, when the position information is available, compositions can be derived either from constant number of atoms, or from constant volume, blocks. The analytical treatment in the first case is identical to the one developed for conventional 1D instruments, and will not be discussed further in this paper. Conversely, in the second case, the analytical treatment is different, as well as the formula of the variance. In particular, it will be shown that the detection efficiency plays an important role in the determination of the variance.

  4. Measurement of carbon ion microdosimetric distributions with ultrathin 3D silicon diodes.

    PubMed

    Gómez, F; Fleta, C; Esteban, S; Quirion, D; Pellegrini, G; Lozano, M; Prezado, Y; Dos Santos, M; Guardiola, C; Montarou, G; Prieto-Pena, J; Pardo-Montero, Juan

    2016-06-01

    The commissioning of an ion beam for hadrontherapy requires the evaluation of the biologically weighted effective dose that results from the microdosimetric properties of the therapy beam. The spectra of the energy imparted at cellular and sub-cellular scales are fundamental to the determination of the biological effect of the beam. These magnitudes are related to the microdosimetric distributions of the ion beam at different points along the beam path. This work is dedicated to the measurement of microdosimetric spectra at several depths in the central axis of a (12)C beam with an energy of 94.98 AMeV using a novel 3D ultrathin silicon diode detector. Data is compared with Monte Carlo calculations providing an excellent agreement (deviations are less than 2% for the most probable lineal energy value) up to the Bragg peak. The results show the feasibility to determine with high precision the lineal energy transfer spectrum of a hadrontherapy beam with these silicon devices. PMID:27163881

  5. 3D-Laser-Scanning Technique Applied to Bulk Density Measurements of Apollo Lunar Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macke, R. J.; Kent, J. J.; Kiefer, W. S.; Britt, D. T.

    2015-01-01

    In order to better interpret gravimetric data from orbiters such as GRAIL and LRO to understand the subsurface composition and structure of the lunar crust, it is import to have a reliable database of the density and porosity of lunar materials. To this end, we have been surveying these physical properties in both lunar meteorites and Apollo lunar samples. To measure porosity, both grain density and bulk density are required. For bulk density, our group has historically utilized sub-mm bead immersion techniques extensively, though several factors have made this technique problematic for our work with Apollo samples. Samples allocated for measurement are often smaller than optimal for the technique, leading to large error bars. Also, for some samples we were required to use pure alumina beads instead of our usual glass beads. The alumina beads were subject to undesirable static effects, producing unreliable results. Other investigators have tested the use of 3d laser scanners on meteorites for measuring bulk volumes. Early work, though promising, was plagued with difficulties including poor response on dark or reflective surfaces, difficulty reproducing sharp edges, and large processing time for producing shape models. Due to progress in technology, however, laser scanners have improved considerably in recent years. We tested this technique on 27 lunar samples in the Apollo collection using a scanner at NASA Johnson Space Center. We found it to be reliable and more precise than beads, with the added benefit that it involves no direct contact with the sample, enabling the study of particularly friable samples for which bead immersion is not possible

  6. Velocity Dispersion Measurements in Cracked Quartzite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schijns, H. M.; Schmitt, D. R.; Jackson, I.

    2011-12-01

    Oscillating stress induced by seismic waves is expected to cause reversible fluid flow within low aspect ratio cracks, resulting in strongly frequency dependent seismic wave velocities. Laboratory measurements of seismic velocities typically made at MHz frequencies, well logging undertaken at kHz frequencies and in-situ exploration seismic (10-300 Hz) measurements are unlikely to be directly comparable as a result of this fluid flow effect. Experimental measurements over a broad range of frequencies are necessary to constrain theoretical velocity dispersion models. Here we present a preliminary comparison of ultrasonic (MHz) measurements on two cracked quartzite samples with measurements made in the mHz-Hz frequency band using forced oscillation. Quartzite samples from Cape Sorell, Australia and Alberta, Canada are cracked by thermally heating the samples to 1100 C and quenching them in liquid nitrogen and water, respectively. A relatively isotropic distribution of cracks, with average aperture of 1 μm and aspect ratio of <0.01, is induced in both samples for total porosities of ~2%. Measurements are made on the quartzite samples when they are dry, and after saturating with argon and water. The difference in viscosity between argon (0.025 mPa s at 10 MPa and 20 C) and water (1 mPa s) allow the investigation of different time scales of fluid flow. Further, measurements are made over effective pressures from 10-150 MPa, with progressive crack closure observed between 10-100 MPa. High frequency (0.64 MHz) measurements using piezoelectric transducers are used in conjunction with density measurements to calculate high frequency Young's and shear moduli. Low frequency (mHz-Hz) moduli are measured using a forced oscillation apparatus at Australian National University. The experimental assembly consists of a long cylindrical beam; the top of the beam is held fixed while the bottom is driven using time-varying electromagnetic drivers. The polarization of the applied force

  7. A high-resolution 3D seismic velocity model of the 2010 Mw 8.8 Maule, Chile earthquake rupture zone using land & OBS networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hicks, S. P.; Rietbrock, A.; Ryder, I. M.; Miller, M.; Lee, C.

    2013-12-01

    Knowledge of seismic properties along a subduction megathrust can shed light on the composition and structure of rocks along the fault. By comparing seismic velocity structure with models of interseismic locking, co-seismic slip and afterslip, we can begin to understand how physical properties may affect fault dynamics throughout the subduction seismic cycle. The Maule earthquake, which hit the coast of central Chile in 2010, is the 6th largest earthquake ever recorded, rupturing a 500 x 80 km area of the Chilean megathrust. Published models demonstrate a complex bilateral rupture, with most co-seismic slip occurring to the north of the mainshock epicentre, although significant slip likely stopped short of the trench and the continental Moho. Here, we show a new high-resolution 3D velocity model (vp and vp/vs ratio) of the central Chilean margin Our velocity model is based on manually picked P- and S-wave arrival times from 670 aftershocks recorded by the International Maule Aftershock Deployment (IMAD) network. Seismic properties of the marine forearc are poorly understood in subduction zones, but by incorporating picks from two ocean-bottom seismometer (OBS) networks, we can resolve the velocity structure of the megathrust as far as the trench. In total, the catalogue used for the tomographic inversion yields a total of ~50,000 high quality P- and S-wave picks. We analyse the quality of our model by analysis of the resolution matrix and by testing characteristic models. The 3D velocity model shows the main structures associated within a subduction forearc: the marine forearc basin (vp < 6.0 km/s), continental mantle (vp > 7.5 km/s), and subducting oceanic crust (vp ~ 7.7 km/s). The plate interface is well defined by relocated aftershock seismicity. P-wave velocities along the megathrust range from 6.5 km/s beneath the marine forearc to 7.7 km/s at the intersection of the megathrust with the continental Moho. We infer several high vp anomalies within the South

  8. Application of the H/V and SPAC Method to Estimate a 3D Shear Wave Velocity Model, in the City of Coatzacoalcos, Veracruz.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales, L. E. A. P.; Aguirre, J.; Vazquez Rosas, R.; Suarez, G.; Contreras Ruiz-Esparza, M. G.; Farraz, I.

    2014-12-01

    Methods that use seismic noise or microtremors have become very useful tools worldwide due to its low costs, the relative simplicity in collecting data, the fact that these are non-invasive methods hence there is no need to alter or even perforate the study site, and also these methods require a relatively simple analysis procedure. Nevertheless the geological structures estimated by this methods are assumed to be parallel, isotropic and homogeneous layers. Consequently precision of the estimated structure is lower than that from conventional seismic methods. In the light of these facts this study aimed towards searching a new way to interpret the results obtained from seismic noise methods. In this study, seven triangular SPAC (Aki, 1957) arrays were performed in the city of Coatzacoalcos, Veracruz, varying in sizes from 10 to 100 meters. From the autocorrelation between the stations of each array, a Rayleigh wave phase velocity dispersion curve was calculated. Such dispersion curve was used to obtain a S wave parallel layers velocity (VS) structure for the study site. Subsequently the horizontal to vertical ratio of the spectrum of microtremors H/V (Nogoshi and Igarashi, 1971; Nakamura, 1989, 2000) was calculated for each vertex of the SPAC triangular arrays, and from the H/V spectrum the fundamental frequency was estimated for each vertex. By using the H/V spectral ratio curves interpreted as a proxy to the Rayleigh wave ellipticity curve, a series of VS structures were inverted for each vertex of the SPAC array. Lastly each VS structure was employed to calculate a 3D velocity model, in which the exploration depth was approximately 100 meters, and had a velocity range in between 206 (m/s) to 920 (m/s). The 3D model revealed a thinning of the low velocity layers. This proved to be in good agreement with the variation of the fundamental frequencies observed at each vertex. With the previous kind of analysis a preliminary model can be obtained as a first

  9. Background and Pickup Ion Velocity Distribution Dynamics in Titan's Plasma Environment: 3D Hybrid Simulation and Comparison with CAPS T9 Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lipatov, A. S.; Sittler, E. C., Jr.; Hartle, R. E.; Cooper, J. F.; Simpson, D. G.

    2011-01-01

    In this report we discuss the ion velocity distribution dynamics from the 3D hybrid simulation. In our model the background, pickup, and ionospheric ions are considered as a particles, whereas the electrons are described as a fluid. Inhomogeneous photoionization, electron-impact ionization and charge exchange are included in our model. We also take into account the collisions between the ions and neutrals. The current simulation shows that mass loading by pickup ions H(+); H2(+), CH4(+) and N2(+) is stronger than in the previous simulations when O+ ions are introduced into the background plasma. In our hybrid simulations we use Chamberlain profiles for the atmospheric components. We also include a simple ionosphere model with average mass M = 28 amu ions that were generated inside the ionosphere. The moon is considered as a weakly conducting body. Special attention will be paid to comparing the simulated pickup ion velocity distribution with CAPS T9 observations. Our simulation shows an asymmetry of the ion density distribution and the magnetic field, including the formation of the Alfve n wing-like structures. The simulation also shows that the ring-like velocity distribution for pickup ions relaxes to a Maxwellian core and a shell-like halo.

  10. Analysis and Compensation for Lateral Chromatic Aberration in a Color Coding Structured Light 3D Measurement System

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Junhui; Xue, Qi; Wang, Zhao; Gao, Jianmin

    2016-01-01

    While color-coding methods have improved the measuring efficiency of a structured light three-dimensional (3D) measurement system, they decreased the measuring accuracy significantly due to lateral chromatic aberration (LCA). In this study, the LCA in a structured light measurement system is analyzed, and a method is proposed to compensate the error caused by the LCA. Firstly, based on the projective transformation, a 3D error map of LCA is constructed in the projector images by using a flat board and comparing the image coordinates of red, green and blue circles with the coordinates of white circles at preselected sample points within the measurement volume. The 3D map consists of the errors, which are the equivalent errors caused by LCA of the camera and projector. Then in measurements, error values of LCA are calculated and compensated to correct the projector image coordinates through the 3D error map and a tri-linear interpolation method. Eventually, 3D coordinates with higher accuracy are re-calculated according to the compensated image coordinates. The effectiveness of the proposed method is verified in the following experiments. PMID:27598174

  11. Analysis and Compensation for Lateral Chromatic Aberration in a Color Coding Structured Light 3D Measurement System.

    PubMed

    Huang, Junhui; Xue, Qi; Wang, Zhao; Gao, Jianmin

    2016-01-01

    While color-coding methods have improved the measuring efficiency of a structured light three-dimensional (3D) measurement system, they decreased the measuring accuracy significantly due to lateral chromatic aberration (LCA). In this study, the LCA in a structured light measurement system is analyzed, and a method is proposed to compensate the error caused by the LCA. Firstly, based on the projective transformation, a 3D error map of LCA is constructed in the projector images by using a flat board and comparing the image coordinates of red, green and blue circles with the coordinates of white circles at preselected sample points within the measurement volume. The 3D map consists of the errors, which are the equivalent errors caused by LCA of the camera and projector. Then in measurements, error values of LCA are calculated and compensated to correct the projector image coordinates through the 3D error map and a tri-linear interpolation method. Eventually, 3D coordinates with higher accuracy are re-calculated according to the compensated image coordinates. The effectiveness of the proposed method is verified in the following experiments. PMID:27598174

  12. The ATLAS3D project - XXI. Correlations between gradients of local escape velocity and stellar populations in early-type galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, Nicholas; Cappellari, Michele; Davies, Roger L.; Kleijn, Gijs Verdoes; Bois, Maxime; Alatalo, Katherine; Blitz, Leo; Bournaud, Frédéric; Bureau, Martin; Crocker, Alison; Davis, Timothy A.; de Zeeuw, P. T.; Duc, Pierre-Alain; Emsellem, Eric; Khochfar, Sadegh; Krajnović, Davor; Kuntschner, Harald; McDermid, Richard M.; Morganti, Raffaella; Naab, Thorsten; Oosterloo, Tom; Sarzi, Marc; Serra, Paolo; Weijmans, Anne-Marie; Young, Lisa M.

    2013-07-01

    We explore the connection between the local escape velocity, Vesc, and the stellar population properties in the ATLAS3D survey, a complete, volume-limited sample of nearby early-type galaxies. We make use of ugriz photometry to construct Multi-Gaussian Expansion models of the surface brightnesses of our galaxies. We are able to fit the full range of surface brightness profiles found in our sample, and in addition we reproduce the results of state-of-the-art photometry in the literature with residuals of 0.04 mag. We utilize these photometric models and SAURON integral-field spectroscopy, combined with Jeans dynamical modelling, to determine the local Vesc derived from the surface brightness. We find that the local Vesc is tightly correlated with the Mg b and Fe5015 line strengths and optical colours, and anti-correlated with the Hβ line strength. In the case of the Mg b and colour-Vesc relations we find that the relation within individual galaxies follows the global relation between different galaxies. We intentionally ignored any uncertain contribution due to dark matter since we are seeking an empirical description of stellar population gradients in early-type galaxies that is ideal for quantitative comparison with model predictions. We also make use of single stellar population (SSP) modelling to transform our line strength index measurements into the SSP-equivalent parameters age (t), metallicity ([Z/H]) and α-enhancement [α/Fe]. The residuals from the relation are correlated with age, [α/Fe], molecular gas mass and local environmental density. We identify a population of galaxies that occur only at low Vesc that exhibit negative gradients in the Mg b- and Colour-Vesc relations. These galaxies typically have young central stellar populations and contain significant amounts of molecular gas and dust. Combining these results with N-body simulations of binary mergers we use the Mg b-Vesc relation to constrain the possible number of dry mergers experienced by

  13. Nano-Structural Elucidation in Carbon Black Loaded NR Vulcanizate by 3D-TEM and In Situ WAXD Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Ikeda,Y.; Kato, A.; Shimanuki, J.; Kohjiya, S.; Tosaka, M.; Poompradub, S.; Toki, S.; Hsiao, B.

    2007-01-01

    Three dimensional (3D) visualization of nanometer structure of carbon black dispersion in rubbery matrix has successfully been studied and reported in this paper. Use of 3D-TEM, which is computerized tomography combined with transmission electron microscopy (TEM), enabled us to reconstruct 3D images of carbon black aggregates in natural rubber (NR) matrix. The TEM measurements were conducted by a bright-field method on thin samples without any electron staining. The sample was subject to uni-axial tilting (+65 degree to -65 degree with 2 degree increment) in the sample chamber, and 66 TEM images were taken on each sample. These TEM images were used for computerized tomography to reconstruct the 3D image. This technique is designated as 3D-TEM. The nano-structural features observed by 3D-TEM were in conformity with the electron-conductivity results, and the percolation behavior was recognized. These results were further supplemented by in situ wide-angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD), i.e., simultaneous WAXD and tensile measurements on the sample to observe the strain-induced crystallization in NR vulcanizate. Upon tensile elongation, the crystallization was clearly observed in WAXD in the presence of carbon black, and it contributed to the tensile properties. In order to understand the performances of filled NR vulcanizates, it surely is necessary to know the structural states of the mixed nano-filler and the crystallites produced upon elongation.

  14. Whole field velocity measurements in three-dimensional periodic flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, Urmila Chennuru

    To quantify flows around rotorcraft, rapid measurements of scalar and vector fields are needed over large volumes. The techniques used must be suitable for large test facilities. This thesis studies methods for acquiring and reconstructing four-dimensional, spatio-temporal measurements of flow properties in periodic flows. It involves both the theoretical studies needed for algorithm development and the solution of practical problems required to enable multi-dimensional velocity field measurement in flows typical of full-scale rotorcraft. Resolving the four-dimensional flowfield is viewed as a problem in the tomographic reconstruction of scalar and vector fields. Theoretical formulations reconstructing n-dimensional scalar fields from (n-1)-dimensional projections are studied. This work was a precursor to the extraction of three-component, three-dimensional velocity fields from planar Spatial Cross-Correlation Velocimetry (SCV). SCV measures a planar displacement field by cross-correlating two time-separated images of the flow. A scalable system that uses inexpensive pulsed white light sources and enables large-area imaging has been integrated for use in full-scale test facilities. The flowfield around a V22 half-model was studied using this technique. SCV discovered the existence of a transient upflow above the rotor plane, unique to compressible rotor flows, and verified other flow features. Measurements in a turbofan engine test cell validated system performance in the highly turbulent and vibrating test environment, under time limitations typical of industry testing. Studies of a two-bladed rotor in axial flight revealed basic vortex pairing and merger phenomena. These tests provided the first proof that full-scale rotor wakes at high Reynolds number and Mach number are cleanly periodic when facility interference effects are eliminated. A method was developed to compute the 3D, three-component, periodic velocity field by integrating 2D, phase-resolved, SCV data

  15. Real-time 3-D shape measurement with composite phase-shifting fringes and multi-view system.

    PubMed

    Tao, Tianyang; Chen, Qian; Da, Jian; Feng, Shijie; Hu, Yan; Zuo, Chao

    2016-09-01

    In recent years, fringe projection has become an established and essential method for dynamic three-dimensional (3-D) shape measurement in different fields such as online inspection and real-time quality control. Numerous high-speed 3-D shape measurement methods have been developed by either employing high-speed hardware, minimizing the number of pattern projection, or both. However, dynamic 3-D shape measurement of arbitrarily-shaped objects with full sensor resolution without the necessity of additional pattern projections is still a big challenge. In this work, we introduce a high-speed 3-D shape measurement technique based on composite phase-shifting fringes and a multi-view system. The geometry constraint is adopted to search the corresponding points independently without additional images. Meanwhile, by analysing the 3-D position and the main wrapped phase of the corresponding point, pairs with an incorrect 3-D position or a considerable phase difference are effectively rejected. All of the qualified corresponding points are then corrected, and the unique one as well as the related period order is selected through the embedded triangular wave. Finally, considering that some points can only be captured by one of the cameras due to the occlusions, these points may have different fringe orders in the two views, so a left-right consistency check is employed to eliminate those erroneous period orders in this case. Several experiments on both static and dynamic scenes are performed, verifying that our method can achieve a speed of 120 frames per second (fps) with 25-period fringe patterns for fast, dense, and accurate 3-D measurement.

  16. Real-time 3-D shape measurement with composite phase-shifting fringes and multi-view system.

    PubMed

    Tao, Tianyang; Chen, Qian; Da, Jian; Feng, Shijie; Hu, Yan; Zuo, Chao

    2016-09-01

    In recent years, fringe projection has become an established and essential method for dynamic three-dimensional (3-D) shape measurement in different fields such as online inspection and real-time quality control. Numerous high-speed 3-D shape measurement methods have been developed by either employing high-speed hardware, minimizing the number of pattern projection, or both. However, dynamic 3-D shape measurement of arbitrarily-shaped objects with full sensor resolution without the necessity of additional pattern projections is still a big challenge. In this work, we introduce a high-speed 3-D shape measurement technique based on composite phase-shifting fringes and a multi-view system. The geometry constraint is adopted to search the corresponding points independently without additional images. Meanwhile, by analysing the 3-D position and the main wrapped phase of the corresponding point, pairs with an incorrect 3-D position or a considerable phase difference are effectively rejected. All of the qualified corresponding points are then corrected, and the unique one as well as the related period order is selected through the embedded triangular wave. Finally, considering that some points can only be captured by one of the cameras due to the occlusions, these points may have different fringe orders in the two views, so a left-right consistency check is employed to eliminate those erroneous period orders in this case. Several experiments on both static and dynamic scenes are performed, verifying that our method can achieve a speed of 120 frames per second (fps) with 25-period fringe patterns for fast, dense, and accurate 3-D measurement. PMID:27607632

  17. Development of a stereo vision measurement system for a 3D three-axial pneumatic parallel mechanism robot arm.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Mao-Hsiung; Lin, Hao-Ting; Hou, Chien-Lun

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, a stereo vision 3D position measurement system for a three-axial pneumatic parallel mechanism robot arm is presented. The stereo vision 3D position measurement system aims to measure the 3D trajectories of the end-effector of the robot arm. To track the end-effector of the robot arm, the circle detection algorithm is used to detect the desired target and the SAD algorithm is used to track the moving target and to search the corresponding target location along the conjugate epipolar line in the stereo pair. After camera calibration, both intrinsic and extrinsic parameters of the stereo rig can be obtained, so images can be rectified according to the camera parameters. Thus, through the epipolar rectification, the stereo matching process is reduced to a horizontal search along the conjugate epipolar line. Finally, 3D trajectories of the end-effector are computed by stereo triangulation. The experimental results show that the stereo vision 3D position measurement system proposed in this paper can successfully track and measure the fifth-order polynomial trajectory and sinusoidal trajectory of the end-effector of the three- axial pneumatic parallel mechanism robot arm.

  18. New constraints on the 3D shear wave velocity structure of the upper mantle underneath Southern Scandinavia revealed from non-linear tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wawerzinek, B.; Ritter, J. R. R.; Roy, C.

    2013-08-01

    We analyse travel times of shear waves, which were recorded at the MAGNUS network, to determine the 3D shear wave velocity (vS) structure underneath Southern Scandinavia. The travel time residuals are corrected for the known crustal structure of Southern Norway and weighted to account for data quality and pick uncertainties. The resulting residual pattern of subvertically incident waves is very uniform and simple. It shows delayed arrivals underneath Southern Norway compared to fast arrivals underneath the Oslo Graben and the Baltic Shield. The 3D upper mantle vS structure underneath the station network is determined by performing non-linear travel time tomography. As expected from the residual pattern the resulting tomographic model shows a simple and continuous vS perturbation pattern: a negative vS anomaly is visible underneath Southern Norway relative to the Baltic Shield in the east with a contrast of up to 4% vS and a sharp W-E dipping transition zone. Reconstruction tests reveal besides vertical smearing a good lateral reconstruction of the dipping vS transition zone and suggest that a deep-seated anomaly at 330-410 km depth is real and not an inversion artefact. The upper part of the reduced vS anomaly underneath Southern Norway (down to 250 km depth) might be due to an increase in lithospheric thickness from the Caledonian Southern Scandes in the west towards the Proterozoic Baltic Shield in Sweden in the east. The deeper-seated negative vS anomaly (330-410 km depth) could be caused by a temperature anomaly possibly combined with effects due to fluids or hydrous minerals. The determined simple 3D vS structure underneath Southern Scandinavia indicates that mantle processes might influence and contribute to a Neogene uplift of Southern Norway.

  19. Solar Wind Halo Formation by the Scattering of the Strahl via Direct Cluster/PEACE Observations of the 3D Velocity Distribution Function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Figueroa-Vinas, Adolfo; Gurgiolo, Chris A.; Nieves-Chinchilla, Teresa; Goldstein, Melvyn L.

    2010-01-01

    It has been suggested by a number of authors that the solar wind electron halo can be formed by the scattering of the strahl. On frequent occasions we have observed in electron angular skymaps (Phi/Theta-plots) of the electron 3D velocity distribution functions) a bursty-filament of particles connecting the strahl to the solar wind core-halo. These are seen over a very limited energy range. When the magnetic field is well off the nominal solar wind flow direction such filaments are inconsistent with any local forces and are probably the result of strong scattering. Furthermore, observations indicates that the strahl component is frequently and significantly anisotropic (Tper/Tpal approx.2). This provides a possible free energy source for the excitation of whistler waves as a possible scattering mechanism. The empirical observational evidence between the halo and the strahl suggests that the strahl population may be, at least in part, the source of the halo component.

  20. 3D measurements of live cells via digital holographic microscopy and terahertz spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jun Yong; Oser, Dorian; Iapozzuto, Peter; Norbury, Sean; Mahajan, Supriya; Khmaladze, Alexander; Sharikova, Anna

    2016-03-01

    This is a study of the central nervous system (CNS) cells, including brain micro vascular endothelial cells (BMV) that constitute the blood brain barrier, and C6 glial cells that are the predominant cell in the brain. The cells are exposed to various chemicals by non-invasive, label-free methods. Digital holographic microscopy (DHM) is a technique that records an interference pattern between an object and reference waves, so that the computationally reconstructed holographic image contains both amplitude and phase information, and 3D images are obtained. The measurement of cell cultures by digital holographic microscopy yields information about cell death mechanisms, since these processes are correlated with individual cell volume. Our in-house DHM combines a visible (red) laser source with a conventional microscope base, and LabVIEW-run data processing. Terahertz spectral signatures are associated with structural changes in molecules and provide complementary information about cells. Both CNS cells BMV and C6 cells are treated with the drug "Methamphetamine" (METH), which induces apoptosis in neuronal cells and exhibits decrease in cell volume, a characteristic of cells undergoing apoptosis (induced cell death). METH can cause CNS cell death by cross-talk between mitochondria-, endoplasmic reticulum-, and receptor-mediated apoptotic events, all of which results in drug induced changes in neuroplasticity and significant neuropathology. Doxorubicin (DOX), a popular anticancer drug, is used as a control. We observe that METH treatment resulted in more pronounced cell volume shrinkage in both the BMV and C6 cells, as compared to DOX-induced cell apoptosis.

  1. Multi-frequency, 3D ODS measurement by continuous scan laser Doppler vibrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weekes, Ben; Ewins, David

    2015-06-01

    Continuous scan laser Doppler vibrometry (CSLDV) is a technique which has been described and explored in the literature for over two decades, but remains niche compared to SLDV inspection by a series of discrete-point measurements. This is in part because of the unavoidable phenomenon of laser speckle, which deteriorates signal quality when velocity data is captured from a moving spot measurement. Further, applicability of CSLDV has typically been limited to line scans and rectangular areas by the application of sine, step, or ramp functions to the scanning mirrors which control the location of the measurement laser spot. In this paper it is shown that arbitrary functions to scan any area can easily be derived from a basic calibration routine, equivalent to the calibration performed in conventional discrete-point laser vibrometry. This is extended by performing the same scan path upon a test surface from three independent locations of the laser head, and decomposing the three sets of one-dimensional deflection shapes into a single set of three-dimensional deflection shapes. The test was performed with multi-sine excitation, yielding 34 operating deflection shapes from each scan.

  2. Contribution of a 3D velocity model and of beam forming method for the location of microseismic sources generated in soft rock landslides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Provost, Floriane; Malet, Jean-Philippe; Helmstetter, Agnès; Doubre, Cécile; Gance, Julien

    2016-04-01

    Microseismicity monitoring has proven to be an important tool for a better understanding of the deformation occurring in slow-sliding landslides. However locating the seismic sources generated by a landslide remains a challenging problem due to (1) the small sizes of the landslide, (b) the heterogenous and time-changing petro-physical properties of the landslide material, (c) the complexity of the recorded signals with unclear discriminations of the wave onsets, and (d) the difficulties to install and maintain a dense seismological network on-site close to the seismic sources. We studied the seismic sources generated by the deformation of the clay-rich Super-Sauze landslide (South French Alps). Previous studies show that the most active zone is the uphill part of the landslide within a zone of 300x300m2. Two seismic antennas have been installed on the sides of this zone and a seismic campaign was conducted to build a 3D velocity model of the area. Calibration shots were performed to test the performance of the location method. We show that the use of a 3D velocity model integrated in a beam forming location method slightly improves the accuracy of the shot location epicenter. However, this approach does not help to interpret with confidence the location of the natural events because the horizontal error remains larger than 50m for more than 50% of the shots. Nevertheless, adding station corrections and constraining the grid search area with additional informations based on the signal and the landslide behavior such as SNR, seismic event typology, and surface kinematics of the landslide allow obtaining reliable results. More than 70% of the calibration shots could be located with a horizontal error of less than 40m. The lack of sensor installed in depth as well as the the lack of calibration shots realized at different depths does not permit us to identify the depth of the sources.

  3. 3D Anisotropic Velocity Structure beneath the Kii Peninsula from P-wave Traveltime Tomography: Diagnostics of Seismic Anisotropy in a Subduction Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishise, M.; Koketsu, K.; Miyake, H.

    2008-12-01

    Seismic anisotropy is one of key elements to understand geodynamics such as mantle convection, plate tectonics, and evolutional process of the crust. Thus, it is crucial to investigate seismic anisotropy in the subduction zone where various phenomena are attributed to dynamic processes caused by interaction among adjacent plates. Actually, recent studies of seismic anisotropy show that the determination of a 3D seismic anisotropy structure can be potential diagnostics of a geological lineament structure inside the crust, and probe earthquake rupture areas and rupture nucleation points. In this study, we have evaluated the three-dimensional (3D) P-wave anisotropic velocity structure in the Kii Peninsula, southwest Japan, as well as the isotropic velocity structure by P-wave travel times tomography. The study area lies on the Eurasian (Amulian) plate above the subducting Philippine Sea Plate. This belongs to an accretionary prism, which is being developed at the margin of the Asian Continent, and is characterized by E-W trending metamorphic belts including a segment of the active faults zone called the Median Tectonic Line (MTL). Additionally, the Kii Peninsula region is presumed to be source regions of megathrust earthquakes along the Nankai trough. The resultant images of both the isotropic and anisotropic tomography show that the upper crust is characterized by E-W trending structure similar to that of the geological structure over the peninsula region. Because deformation of the crust such as preferred mineral alignment and recrystallization associated with planar structures produces significant seismic anisotropy, the plausible factor of the crustal feature is interpreted as E-W orientation of the regional metamorphic belt. Furthermore, in the resultant tomographic image, the E-W trending pattern is found within the deeper crust. This fact indicates that the lineament structure is sustained in the deeper crust. Since our tomography has good resolution in the

  4. Note: An improved 3D imaging system for electron-electron coincidence measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Yun Fei; Lee, Suk Kyoung; Adhikari, Pradip; Herath, Thushani; Lingenfelter, Steven; Winney, Alexander H.; Li, Wen

    2015-09-15

    We demonstrate an improved imaging system that can achieve highly efficient 3D detection of two electrons in coincidence. The imaging system is based on a fast frame complementary metal-oxide semiconductor camera and a high-speed waveform digitizer. We have shown previously that this detection system is capable of 3D detection of ions and electrons with good temporal and spatial resolution. Here, we show that with a new timing analysis algorithm, this system can achieve an unprecedented dead-time (<0.7 ns) and dead-space (<1 mm) when detecting two electrons. A true zero dead-time detection is also demonstrated.

  5. Note: An improved 3D imaging system for electron-electron coincidence measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yun Fei; Lee, Suk Kyoung; Adhikari, Pradip; Herath, Thushani; Lingenfelter, Steven; Winney, Alexander H.; Li, Wen

    2015-09-01

    We demonstrate an improved imaging system that can achieve highly efficient 3D detection of two electrons in coincidence. The imaging system is based on a fast frame complementary metal-oxide semiconductor camera and a high-speed waveform digitizer. We have shown previously that this detection system is capable of 3D detection of ions and electrons with good temporal and spatial resolution. Here, we show that with a new timing analysis algorithm, this system can achieve an unprecedented dead-time (<0.7 ns) and dead-space (<1 mm) when detecting two electrons. A true zero dead-time detection is also demonstrated.

  6. Using twelve years of USGS refraction lines to calibrate the Brocher and others (1997) 3D velocity model of the Bay Area

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boatwright, John; Blair, Luke; Catchings, Rufus; Goldman, Mark; Perosi, Fabio; Steedman, Clare

    2004-01-01

    Campbell (1983) demonstrated that site amplification correlates with depths to the 1.0, 1.5, and 2.5 km/s S-wave velocity horizons. To estimate these depths for the Bay Area stations in the PEER/NGA database, we compare the depths to the 3.2 and 4.4 km/s P-wave velocities in the Brocher and others (1997) 3D velocity model with the depths to these horizons determined from 6 refraction lines shot in the Bay Area from 1991 to 2003. These refraction lines range from two recent 20 km lines that extend from Los Gatos to downtown San Jose, and from downtown San Jose into Alum Rock Park, to two older 200 km lines than run axially from Hollister up the San Francisco Peninsula to Inverness and from Hollister up the East Bay across San Pablo Bay to Santa Rosa. Comparison of these cross-sections with the Brocher and others (1997) model indicates that the 1.5 km/s S-wave horizon, which we correlate with the 3.2 km/s P-wave horizon, is the most reliable horizon that can be extracted from the Brocher and others (1997) velocity model. We determine simple adjustments to bring the Brocher and others (1997) 3.2 and 4.4 km/s P-wave horizons into an average agreement with the refraction results. Then we apply these adjustments to estimate depths to the 1.5 and 2.5 km/s S-wave horizons beneath the strong motion stations in the PEER/NGA database.

  7. High-speed real-time 3-D coordinates measurement based on fringe projection profilometry considering camera lens distortion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Shijie; Chen, Qian; Zuo, Chao; Sun, Jiasong; Yu, Shi Ling

    2014-10-01

    Optical three-dimensional (3-D) profilometry is gaining increasing attention for its simplicity, flexibility, high accuracy, and non-contact nature. Recent advances in imaging sensors and digital projection technology further its progress in high-speed, real-time applications, enabling 3-D shapes reconstruction of moving objects and dynamic scenes. However, the camera lens is never perfect and the lens distortion does influence the accuracy of the measurement result, which is often overlooked in the existing real-time 3-D shape measurement systems. To this end, here we present a novel high-speed real-time 3-D coordinates measuring technique based on fringe projection with the consideration of the camera lens distortion. A pixel mapping relation between a distorted image and a corrected one is pre-determined and stored in computer memory for real-time fringe correction. The out-of-plane height is obtained firstly and the acquisition for the two corresponding in-plane coordinates follows on the basis of the solved height. Besides, a method of lookup table (LUT) is introduced as well for fast data processing. Our experimental results reveal that the measurement error of the in-plane coordinates has been reduced by one order of magnitude and the accuracy of the out-plane coordinate been tripled after the distortions being eliminated. Moreover, owing to the generated LUTs, a 3-D reconstruction speed of 92.34 frames per second can be achieved.

  8. Fiber based optical tweezers for simultaneous in situ force exertion and measurements in a 3D polyacrylamide gel compartment.

    PubMed

    Ti, Chaoyang; Thomas, Gawain M; Ren, Yundong; Zhang, Rui; Wen, Qi; Liu, Yuxiang

    2015-07-01

    Optical tweezers play an important role in biological applications. However, it is difficult for traditional optical tweezers based on objective lenses to work in a three-dimensional (3D) solid far away from the substrate. In this work, we develop a fiber based optical trapping system, namely inclined dual fiber optical tweezers, that can simultaneously apply and measure forces both in water and in a 3D polyacrylamide gel matrix. In addition, we demonstrate in situ, non-invasive characterization of local mechanical properties of polyacrylamide gel by measurements on an embedded bead. The fiber optical tweezers measurements agree well with those of atomic force microscopy (AFM). The inclined dual fiber optical tweezers provide a promising and versatile tool for cell mechanics study in 3D environments.

  9. Fiber based optical tweezers for simultaneous in situ force exertion and measurements in a 3D polyacrylamide gel compartment

    PubMed Central

    Ti, Chaoyang; Thomas, Gawain M; Ren, Yundong; Zhang, Rui; Wen, Qi; Liu, Yuxiang

    2015-01-01

    Optical tweezers play an important role in biological applications. However, it is difficult for traditional optical tweezers based on objective lenses to work in a three-dimensional (3D) solid far away from the substrate. In this work, we develop a fiber based optical trapping system, namely inclined dual fiber optical tweezers, that can simultaneously apply and measure forces both in water and in a 3D polyacrylamide gel matrix. In addition, we demonstrate in situ, non-invasive characterization of local mechanical properties of polyacrylamide gel by measurements on an embedded bead. The fiber optical tweezers measurements agree well with those of atomic force microscopy (AFM). The inclined dual fiber optical tweezers provide a promising and versatile tool for cell mechanics study in 3D environments. PMID:26203364

  10. Ultrasound velocities for axial eye length measurement.

    PubMed

    Hoffer, K J

    1994-09-01

    Since 1974, I have used individual sound velocities for each eye condition encountered for axial length measurement. The calculation results in 1,555 M/sec for the average phakic eye. A slower speed of 1,549 M/sec was found for an extremely long (30 mm) eye and a higher speed of 1,561 M/sec was noted for an extremely short (20 mm) eye. This inversely proportional velocity change can best be adjusted for by measuring the phakic eye at 1,532 M/sec and correcting the result by dividing the square of the measured axial length (AL1,532)2 by the difference of the measured axial length (AL1,532) minus 0.35 mm. A velocity of 1,534 M/sec was found for all aphakic eyes regardless of their length, and correction is clinically significant. The velocity of an eye containing a poly(methyl methacrylate) intraocular lens is not different from an average phakic eye but it does magnify the effect of axial length change. I recommend measuring the pseudophakic eye at 1,532 M/sec and adding to the result (AL1,532), + 0.04 + 44% of the IOL thickness. The speed for an eye with a silicone IOL was found to be 1,476 M/sec (or AL1,532 + 0.04 - 56% of IOL thickness) and for glass, 1,549 M/sec (or AL1,532 + 0.04 + 75% of IOL thickness). A speed of 1,139 M/sec was found for a phakic eye with silicone oil filling most of the vitreous cavity and 1,052 M/sec for an aphakic eye filled with oil. For varying volumes of oil, each eye should be calculated individually. The speed was 534 M/sec for phakic eyes filled with gas. Eyes containing a silicone IOL or oil or gas will create clinically significant errors (3 to 10 diopters) if the sound velocity is not corrected. PMID:7996413

  11. Feasibility of RACT for 3D dose measurement and range verification in a water phantom

    SciTech Connect

    Alsanea, Fahed; Moskvin, Vadim; Stantz, Keith M.

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: The objective of this study is to establish the feasibility of using radiation-induced acoustics to measure the range and Bragg peak dose from a pulsed proton beam. Simulation studies implementing a prototype scanner design based on computed tomographic methods were performed to investigate the sensitivity to proton range and integral dose. Methods: Derived from thermodynamic wave equation, the pressure signals generated from the dose deposited from a pulsed proton beam with a 1 cm lateral beam width and a range of 16, 20, and 27 cm in water using Monte Carlo methods were simulated. The resulting dosimetric images were reconstructed implementing a 3D filtered backprojection algorithm and the pressure signals acquired from a 71-transducer array with a cylindrical geometry (30 × 40 cm) rotated over 2π about its central axis. Dependencies on the detector bandwidth and proton beam pulse width were performed, after which, different noise levels were added to the detector signals (using 1 μs pulse width and a 0.5 MHz cutoff frequency/hydrophone) to investigate the statistical and systematic errors in the proton range (at 20 cm) and Bragg peak dose (of 1 cGy). Results: The reconstructed radioacoustic computed tomographic image intensity was shown to be linearly correlated to the dose within the Bragg peak. And, based on noise dependent studies, a detector sensitivity of 38 mPa was necessary to determine the proton range to within 1.0 mm (full-width at half-maximum) (systematic error < 150 μm) for a 1 cGy Bragg peak dose, where the integral dose within the Bragg peak was measured to within 2%. For existing hydrophone detector sensitivities, a Bragg peak dose of 1.6 cGy is possible. Conclusions: This study demonstrates that computed tomographic scanner based on ionizing radiation-induced acoustics can be used to verify dose distribution and proton range with centi-Gray sensitivity. Realizing this technology into the clinic has the potential to significantly

  12. Validation of 3-D Ice Accretion Measurement Methodology for Experimental Aerodynamic Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broeren, Andy P.; Addy, Harold E., Jr.; Lee, Sam; Monastero, Marianne C.

    2014-01-01

    Determining the adverse aerodynamic effects due to ice accretion often relies on dry-air wind-tunnel testing of artificial, or simulated, ice shapes. Recent developments in ice accretion documentation methods have yielded a laser-scanning capability that can measure highly three-dimensional features of ice accreted in icing wind tunnels. The objective of this paper was to evaluate the aerodynamic accuracy of ice-accretion simulations generated from laser-scan data. Ice-accretion tests were conducted in the NASA Icing Research Tunnel using an 18-inch chord, 2-D straight wing with NACA 23012 airfoil section. For six ice accretion cases, a 3-D laser scan was performed to document the ice geometry prior to the molding process. Aerodynamic performance testing was conducted at the University of Illinois low-speed wind tunnel at a Reynolds number of 1.8 x 10(exp 6) and a Mach number of 0.18 with an 18-inch chord NACA 23012 airfoil model that was designed to accommodate the artificial ice shapes. The ice-accretion molds were used to fabricate one set of artificial ice shapes from polyurethane castings. The laser-scan data were used to fabricate another set of artificial ice shapes using rapid prototype manufacturing such as stereolithography. The iced-airfoil results with both sets of artificial ice shapes were compared to evaluate the aerodynamic simulation accuracy of the laser-scan data. For four of the six ice-accretion cases, there was excellent agreement in the iced-airfoil aerodynamic performance between the casting and laser-scan based simulations. For example, typical differences in iced-airfoil maximum lift coefficient were less than 3% with corresponding differences in stall angle of approximately one degree or less. The aerodynamic simulation accuracy reported in this paper has demonstrated the combined accuracy of the laser-scan and rapid-prototype manufacturing approach to simulating ice accretion for a NACA 23012 airfoil. For several of the ice

  13. Obstacle Classification and 3D Measurement in Unstructured Environments Based on ToF Cameras

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hongshan; Zhu, Jiang; Wang, Yaonan; Jia, Wenyan; Sun, Mingui; Tang, Yandong

    2014-01-01

    Inspired by the human 3D visual perception system, we present an obstacle detection and classification method based on the use of Time-of-Flight (ToF) cameras for robotic navigation in unstructured environments. The ToF camera provides 3D sensing by capturing an image along with per-pixel 3D space information. Based on this valuable feature and human knowledge of navigation, the proposed method first removes irrelevant regions which do not affect robot's movement from the scene. In the second step, regions of interest are detected and clustered as possible obstacles using both 3D information and intensity image obtained by the ToF camera. Consequently, a multiple relevance vector machine (RVM) classifier is designed to classify obstacles into four possible classes based on the terrain traversability and geometrical features of the obstacles. Finally, experimental results in various unstructured environments are presented to verify the robustness and performance of the proposed approach. We have found that, compared with the existing obstacle recognition methods, the new approach is more accurate and efficient. PMID:24945679

  14. Obstacle classification and 3D measurement in unstructured environments based on ToF cameras.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hongshan; Zhu, Jiang; Wang, Yaonan; Jia, Wenyan; Sun, Mingui; Tang, Yandong

    2014-01-01

    Inspired by the human 3D visual perception system, we present an obstacle detection and classification method based on the use of Time-of-Flight (ToF) cameras for robotic navigation in unstructured environments. The ToF camera provides 3D sensing by capturing an image along with per-pixel 3D space information. Based on this valuable feature and human knowledge of navigation, the proposed method first removes irrelevant regions which do not affect robot's movement from the scene. In the second step, regions of interest are detected and clustered as possible obstacles using both 3D information and intensity image obtained by the ToF camera. Consequently, a multiple relevance vector machine (RVM) classifier is designed to classify obstacles into four possible classes based on the terrain traversability and geometrical features of the obstacles. Finally, experimental results in various unstructured environments are presented to verify the robustness and performance of the proposed approach. We have found that, compared with the existing obstacle recognition methods, the new approach is more accurate and efficient. PMID:24945679

  15. Obstacle classification and 3D measurement in unstructured environments based on ToF cameras.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hongshan; Zhu, Jiang; Wang, Yaonan; Jia, Wenyan; Sun, Mingui; Tang, Yandong

    2014-06-18

    Inspired by the human 3D visual perception system, we present an obstacle detection and classification method based on the use of Time-of-Flight (ToF) cameras for robotic navigation in unstructured environments. The ToF camera provides 3D sensing by capturing an image along with per-pixel 3D space information. Based on this valuable feature and human knowledge of navigation, the proposed method first removes irrelevant regions which do not affect robot's movement from the scene. In the second step, regions of interest are detected and clustered as possible obstacles using both 3D information and intensity image obtained by the ToF camera. Consequently, a multiple relevance vector machine (RVM) classifier is designed to classify obstacles into four possible classes based on the terrain traversability and geometrical features of the obstacles. Finally, experimental results in various unstructured environments are presented to verify the robustness and performance of the proposed approach. We have found that, compared with the existing obstacle recognition methods, the new approach is more accurate and efficient.

  16. The use of 3D surface scanning for the measurement and assessment of the human foot

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background A number of surface scanning systems with the ability to quickly and easily obtain 3D digital representations of the foot are now commercially available. This review aims to present a summary of the reported use of these technologies in footwear development, the design of customised orthotics, and investigations for other ergonomic purposes related to the foot. Methods The PubMed and ScienceDirect databases were searched. Reference lists and experts in the field were also consulted to identify additional articles. Studies in English which had 3D surface scanning of the foot as an integral element of their protocol were included in the review. Results Thirty-eight articles meeting the search criteria were included. Advantages and disadvantages of using 3D surface scanning systems are highlighted. A meta-analysis of studies using scanners to investigate the changes in foot dimensions during varying levels of weight bearing was carried out. Conclusions Modern 3D surface scanning systems can obtain accurate and repeatable digital representations of the foot shape and have been successfully used in medical, ergonomic and footwear development applications. The increasing affordability of these systems presents opportunities for researchers investigating the foot and for manufacturers of foot related apparel and devices, particularly those interested in producing items that are customised to the individual. Suggestions are made for future areas of research and for the standardization of the protocols used to produce foot scans. PMID:20815914

  17. Capacitance Measurement with a Sigma Delta Converter for 3D Electrical Capacitance Tomography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nurge, Mark

    2005-01-01

    This paper will explore suitability of a newly available capacitance to digital converter for use in a 3D Electrical Capacitance Tomography system. A switch design is presented along with circuitry needed to extend the range of the capacitance to digital converter. Results are then discussed for a 15+ hour drift and noise test.

  18. Measurement of neutrino masses from relative velocities.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hong-Ming; Pen, Ue-Li; Chen, Xuelei; Inman, Derek; Yu, Yu

    2014-09-26

    We present a new technique to measure neutrino masses using their flow field relative to dark matter. Present day streaming motions of neutrinos relative to dark matter and baryons are several hundred km/s, comparable with their thermal velocity dispersion. This results in a unique dipole anisotropic distortion of the matter-neutrino cross power spectrum, which is observable through the dipole distortion in the cross correlation of different galaxy populations. Such a dipole vanishes if not for this relative velocity and so it is a clean signature for neutrino mass. We estimate the size of this effect and find that current and future galaxy surveys may be sensitive to these signature distortions. PMID:25302878

  19. 3D velocity structure of the outer forearc of the Colombia-Ecuador subduction zone; implications for the 1958 megathrust earthquake rupture zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galve, A.; Charvis, P.; Garcia Cano, L.; Marcaillou, B.

    2013-12-01

    In 2005, we conducted an onshore-offshore 3D refraction and wide-angle reflection seismic experiment over the rupture zone of the 1958 subduction earthquake that occurred near the border between Colombia and Ecuador. This earthquake was part of a sequence of 3 large ruptures (1942, Mw=7.8; 1958, Mw=7.7; 1979, Mw=8.2), which successively broke from south to north the segments of the megathrust that had been ruptured in 1906 by a single, very large magnitude (8.8) earthquake. Using first arrival traveltime inversion, we constructed a well-defined Vp velocity model of the plate boundary and of the upper and lower plates, down to 25 km depth. The model reveals a 5-km thick, low velocity zone in the upper plate, located immediately above the interplate contact. Because similar low-velocity zones are commonly observed along margins made of oceanic or island-arc accreted terranes, we suggest that the low-velocity zone might result from the alteration and hydration of mafic and ultramafic rocks in the upper plate basement, rather than from hydrofracturing alone. Sediments underplated beneath the inner wedge might contribute to the low-velocity zone but it is unlikely that they are several kilometers thick. Nevertheless, fluids expelled by the compaction and dehydration of those underplated sediments possibly favor the alteration of the overlying rocks. The low-velocity zone is spatially coincident with the 1958 rupture area. Near the toe of the margin, the model shows a low velocity gradient in the outer wedge that we interpret as a zone of highly faulted and fractured rocks or of poorly consolidated sediments. This low velocity/low gradient region forms the oceanward limit of the rupture zones of both the 1958 and the 1979 earthquakes. We suggest that the two earthquake ruptures were arrested by the low velocity zone because its low rigidity contributed to dissipate most of the seismic energy and of the coseismic strain/stress. This might be the reason why the 1958

  20. 3D growth rates from tomographic images: local measurements for a better understanding of snow metamorphism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flin, F.; Calonne, N.; Denis, R.; Caneill, R.; Bernard, L.; Anne, D.; Philip, A.; Roulle, J.; Rolland du Roscoat, S.; Geindreau, C.

    2015-12-01

    Once deposited on the ground, snow forms a complex porous material whose microstructure constantly transforms over time. These evolutions, which strongly impact the physical and mechanical properties of snow (e.g. Srivastava et al, 2010; Calonne et al, 2014) need to be considered in details for an accurate snowpack modeling. However, some of the physical mechanisms involved in metamorphism are still poorly understood.To address this problem, several investigations combining X-ray tomography and 3D micro-modeling have been carried out (e.g. Flin et al, 2003; Kämpfer and Plapp, 2009; Pinzer et al, 2012) but precise comparisons between experimentation and modeling remain difficult. One of the difficulties comes from the lack of high resolution time-lapse series for experiments occurring with very well-defined boundary conditions, and from which precise measurements of the interfacial growth rates can be done.Thanks to a recently developed cryogenic cell (Calonne et al, 2015), we conducted in situ time-lapse tomographic experiments on several snow and ice samples under various conditions (isothermal metamorphism at -7°C, temperature gradient metamorphism at -2°C under a TG of 18 K/m, air cavity migration in a single crystal at -4°C under a TG of 50 K/m). The non-destructive nature of X-ray microtomography yielded series of 8 micron resolution images that were acquired with a 2 to 12 h time step. An image analysis method was then developed to estimate the normal growth rates on each point of the ice-air interface and applied to the series obtained.The analysis of the results and their comparison to those of existing models (e.g. Flin et al, 2003; Flin and Brzoska, 2008) give interesting outlooks for the understanding of the physical mechanisms involved in snow metamorphism. References:Calonne, N., et al (2015), Geophys. Res. Lett., 42, 3911-3918.Calonne, N., et al (2014), The Cryosphere, 8, 2255-2274.Flin, F. and J.-B. Brzoska (2008), Ann. Glaciol., 49, 17-21.Flin

  1. 3-D flow and scour near a submerged wing dike: ADCP measurements on the Missouri River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jamieson, E.C.; Rennie, C.D.; Jacobson, R.B.; Townsend, R.D.

    2011-01-01

    Detailed mapping of bathymetry and three-dimensional water velocities using a boat-mounted single-beam sonar and acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) was carried out in the vicinity of two submerged wing dikes located in the Lower Missouri River near Columbia, Missouri. During high spring flows the wing dikes become submerged, creating a unique combination of vertical flow separation and overtopping (plunging) flow conditions, causing large-scale three-dimensional turbulent flow structures to form. On three different days and for a range of discharges, sampling transects at 5 and 20 m spacing were completed, covering the area adjacent to and upstream and downstream from two different wing dikes. The objectives of this research are to evaluate whether an ADCP can identify and measure large-scale flow features such as recirculating flow and vortex shedding that develop in the vicinity of a submerged wing dike; and whether or not moving-boat (single-transect) data are sufficient for resolving complex three-dimensional flow fields. Results indicate that spatial averaging from multiple nearby single transects may be more representative of an inherently complex (temporally and spatially variable) three-dimensional flow field than repeated single transects. Results also indicate a correspondence between the location of calculated vortex cores (resolved from the interpolated three-dimensional flow field) and the nearby scour holes, providing new insight into the connections between vertically oriented coherent structures and local scour, with the unique perspective of flow and morphology in a large river.

  2. Remote measurement methods for 3-D modeling purposes using BAE Systems' Software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Stewart; Pietrzak, Arleta

    2015-06-01

    Efficient, accurate data collection from imagery is the key to an economical generation of useful geospatial products. Incremental developments of traditional geospatial data collection and the arrival of new image data sources cause new software packages to be created and existing ones to be adjusted to enable such data to be processed. In the past, BAE Systems' digital photogrammetric workstation, SOCET SET®, met fin de siècle expectations in data processing and feature extraction. Its successor, SOCET GXP®, addresses today's photogrammetric requirements and new data sources. SOCET GXP is an advanced workstation for mapping and photogrammetric tasks, with automated functionality for triangulation, Digital Elevation Model (DEM) extraction, orthorectification and mosaicking, feature extraction and creation of 3-D models with texturing. BAE Systems continues to add sensor models to accommodate new image sources, in response to customer demand. New capabilities added in the latest version of SOCET GXP facilitate modeling, visualization and analysis of 3-D features.

  3. 3D monolithically stacked CMOS Active Pixel Sensors for particle position and direction measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Servoli, L.; Passeri, D.; Morozzi, A.; Magalotti, D.; Piperku, L.

    2015-01-01

    In this work we propose a 3D monolithically stacked, multi-layer detectors based on CMOS Active Pixel Sensors (APS) layers which allows at the same time accurate estimation of the impact point and of the incidence angle an ionizing particle. The whole system features two fully-functional CMOS APS matrix detectors, including both sensing area and control/signal elaboration circuitry, stacked in a monolithic device by means of Through Silicon Via (TSV) connections thanks to the capabilities of the CMOS vertical scale integration (3D-IC) 130 nm Chartered/Tezzaron technology. In order to evaluate the suitability of the two layer monolithic active pixel sensor system to reconstruct particle tracks, tests with proton beams have been carried out at the INFN LABEC laboratories in Florence (Italy) with 3 MeV proton beam.

  4. Damage and deterioration monitoring of artwork by data fusion of 3D surface and hyperspectral measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groves, Roger M.; Caballero, José; Quinzan, Ianisse; Ribes-Gómez, Emilio

    2014-05-01

    This paper describes the processing algorithm methodology and preliminary results from a novel optical-based system for the assessment of chemical and mechanical deterioration of artworks. The FP7 Syddarta Project prototype is composed of two optical channels: 1) a 3D imaging channel which acquires 3D surface data and multiband information in the visible spectral range; 2) an infrared hyperspectral imaging channel in the spectral range 900 to 2500 nm. The processing algorithms developed perform the system calibration, damage detection and chemical deterioration analysis. Both photometric and geometric calibrations have been implemented. The photometric calibration is based on a white reference and intensity map and compensates for variation in light intensities. The geometric calibration is based on planar homographies to determine the interior and exterior orientation of the projector and the two cameras. This is used to map the acquired data of the different sensors into a single reference frame. To acquire 3D data, a set of phase-shifted fringe patterns is projected on the object which are processed by Fourier transform. To identify mechanical deterioration, the acquired 3D cloud of points is meshed and differences in surface normals for a given radius are computed. To analyse the chemical deterioration of the pigments a supervised classification method has been implemented. First of all, spectral data is normalized with the Extended Multiplicative Scatter Correction algorithm. Then, data dimensionality is reduced by applying Principal Component Analysis and classification is done with Support Vector Machine. Results are presented showing the performance of the described algorithms.

  5. Measurements of Coronal Proton Velocity Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohl, J. L.; Panasyuk, A.; Cranmer, S. R.; Gardner, L. D.; Raymond, J. C.

    2007-12-01

    The Ultraviolet Coronagraph Spectrometer (UVCS) on the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory is being used to measure precise coronal H I Ly-alpha spectral line profiles out to several Doppler half widths. Such observations can be used to reveal the proton velocity distribution along the line-of-sight. Departures from a Maxwellian distribution are believed to be needed for the acceleration of solar energetic particles (SEPs) by coronal mass ejection (CME) shocks. Our initial attempt to measure suprathermal proton velocity distributions has been described by Kohl et al. (2006). We have made considerable additional progress on such measurements since then. Improvements include the following: a much more accurate instrument spectral line profile, an increase in the wavelength range used for the observations, an increase in the statistical accuracy of the observations by increasing the observation time, and inclusion of a background measurement as part of every set of observations. We have also investigated the sensitivity to the detector high voltage, investigated the effects of diffraction in the instrument, determined the stray light effects and the Thompson scattering effects, which both turn out to be small except for scattering of Si III 120.6 nm. That scattered light is out of the primary wavelength range of interest. We believe that we have now demonstrated that UVCS has the sensitivity to distinguish between a Gaussian coronal velocity distribution and a kappa = 4 or smaller distribution. It is generally believed that the required seed particle population needed to produce SEPs of interest with a CME shock would have a velocity distribution with 0.001 to 0.01 of the particles with speeds that exceed 1000 km/s. Assuming a kappa distribution that is symmetric in the tangential plane and Maxwellian in the radial direction, this would correspond to a distribution with kappa = 3.5 or smaller. This paper will report the results of examining a fairly large body of new

  6. Radionuclide counting technique for measuring wind velocity

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, J.J.; Khandelwal, G.S.

    1981-12-01

    A technique for measuring wind velocities of meteorological interest is described. It is based on inverse-square-law variation of the counting rates as the radioactive source-to-counter distance is changed by wind drag on the source ball. Results of a feasibility study using a weak bismuth 207 radiation source and three Geiger-Muller radiation counters are reported. The use of the technique is not restricted to Martian or Mars-like environments. A description of the apparatus, typical results, and frequency response characteristics are included. A discussion of a double-pendulum arrangement is presented. Measurements reported herein indicate that the proposed technique may be suitable for measuring wind speeds up to 100 m/sec, which are either steady or whose rates of fluctuation are less than 1 kHz.

  7. A Detailed 3D Seismic Velocity Structure of the Subducting Pacific Slab Beneath Hokkaido, Tohoku and Kanto, Japan, by Double-Difference Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuji, Y.; Nakajima, J.; Kita, S.; Okada, T.; Matsuzawa, T.; Hasegawa, A.

    2007-12-01

    Three-dimensional heterogeneous structure beneath northeastern (NE) Japan has been investigated by previous studies and an inclined seismic low-velocity zone is imaged in the mantle wedge sub-parallel to the down-dip direction of the subducting slab (Zhao et al., 1992, Nakajima et al., 2001). However, the heterogeneous structure within the slab has not been well studied even though it is very important to understand the whole process of water transportation from the slab to the surface. Here we show a detailed 3D seismic velocity structure within the subducted Pacific slab around Japan and propose a water-transportation path from the slab to the mantle wedge. In this study, we estimated 3D velocity structure within the Pacific slab by the double-difference tomography (Zhang and Thurber, 2003). We divided the study area, from Hokkaido to Kanto, into 6 areas due to the limitation of memory and computation time. In each area, arrival-time data of 7,500-17,000 events recorded at 70-170 stations were used in the analysis. The total number of absolute travel-time data was about 140,000-312,000 for P wave and 123,000-268,000 for S wave, and differential data were about 736,000-1,920,000 for P wave and 644,000-1,488,000 for S wave. Horizontal and vertical grid separations are 10-25 km and 6.5 km, respectively. RMS residuals of travel times for P wave decreased from 0.23s to 0.09s and for S wave from 0.35s to 0.13s. The obtained results are as follows: (1) a remarkable low-Vs zone exists in the uppermost part of the subducting slab, (2) it extends down to a depth of about 80 km, (3) the termination of this low-Vs zone almost corresponds to the "seismic belt" recently detected in the upper plane of the double seismic zone (Kita et al.,2006; Hasegawa et al., 2007), (4) at depths deeper than 80 km, a low-Vs and high-Vp/Vs zone is apparently distributed in the mantle wedge, immediately above the slab crust. We consider that these features reflect water-transportation processes

  8. Measurement and ALE3D Simulation of Violence in a Deflagration Experiment With LX-10 and Aermet-100 Alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Knap, J; McClelland, M A; Maienschein, J L; Howard, W M; Nichols, A L; deHaven, M R; Strand, O T

    2006-06-22

    We describe the results of a Scaled-Thermal-Explosion-eXperiment (STEX) for LX-10 (94.7 % HMX, 5.3 % Viton A) confined in an AerMet 100 (iron-cobalt-nickel alloy) tube with reinforced end caps. The experimental measurements are compared with predictions of an Arbitrary-Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE3D) computer model. ALE3D is a three-dimensional multi-physics computer code capable of solving coupled equations describing thermal, mechanical and chemical behavior of materials. In particular, we focus on the processes linked to fracture and fragmentation of the AerMet tube driven by the LX-10 deflagration.

  9. Optical low-cost and portable arrangement for full field 3D displacement measurement using a single camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Alba, E.; Felipe-Sesé, L.; Schmeer, S.; Díaz, F. A.

    2016-11-01

    In the current paper, an optical low-cost system for 3D displacement measurement based on a single camera and 3D digital image correlation is presented. The conventional 3D-DIC set-up based on a two-synchronized-cameras system is compared with a proposed pseudo-stereo portable system that employs a mirror system integrated in a device for a straightforward application achieving a novel handle and flexible device for its use in many scenarios. The proposed optical system splits the image by the camera into two stereo images of the object. In order to validate this new approach and quantify its uncertainty compared to traditional 3D-DIC systems, solid rigid in and out-of-plane displacements experiments have been performed and analyzed. The differences between both systems have been studied employing an image decomposition technique which performs a full image comparison. Therefore, results of all field of view are compared with those using a stereoscopy system and 3D-DIC, discussing the accurate results obtained with the proposed device not having influence any distortion or aberration produced by the mirrors. Finally, the adaptability of the proposed system and its accuracy has been tested performing quasi-static and dynamic experiments using a silicon specimen under high deformation. Results have been compared and validated with those obtained from a conventional stereoscopy system showing an excellent level of agreement.

  10. 3D ELM fluctuation measurements with the new dual array ECE-Imaging diagnostic on ASDEX Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Classen, Ivo; Vanovac, Branka; Domier, Calvin; Luhmann, Neville; Bogomolov, Anton; Suttrop, Wolfgang; Tobias, Benjamin; ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2015-11-01

    In a major upgrade, the (2D) electron cyclotron emission imaging diagnostic (ECE-Imaging) at ASDEX Upgrade (AUG) has been equipped with a second detector array, and has been successfully commissioned. The two detector arrays observe the plasma through the same vacuum window, both under a slight toroidal angle, to enable quasi-3D measurements of the electron temperature. The system measures a total of 288 channels, in two toroidally separated 2D arrays of approximately 50 cm vertically by 10 cm radially. The toroidal separation between the two poloidal observation planes is about 40 cm, such that the majority of the field lines is observed by both arrays simultaneously, thereby enabling a direct measurement of the 3D properties of plasma instabilities like ELM filaments. The toroidal separation of 40 cm is sufficient for the accurate measurement of both phase differences and transit times of (rotating) plasma structures, enabling a distinction between time varying 2D structures and true 3D structures (not possible with 2D diagnostics). The research will mainly focus on the investigation of the 3D structure of the temperature fluctuations related to edge localized modes (ELMs), in particular precursors and filaments. The first results on ELMs will be reported.

  11. A 3D polarized Monte Carlo LIDAR system simulator for studying effects of cirrus inhomogeneities on CALIOP/CALIPSO measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szczap, F.; Cornet, C.; Alqassem, A.; Gour, Y.; C.-Labonnote, L.; Jourdan, O.

    2013-05-01

    To estimate cirrus inhomogeneity effects on the apparent backscatter and on the apparent depolarization ratio measured by CALIOP/CALIPSO, a 3D polarized Monte Carlo LIDAR simulator was developed. Comparisons were done with the fast Hogan's LIDAR simulator. Early results show that clouds inhomogeneous effects seem to be negligible on the apparent backscatter but not on the apparent depolarization ratio.

  12. 3-D flow and scour near a submerged wing dike: ADCP measurements on the Missouri River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jamieson, E.C.; Rennie, C.D.; Jacobson, R.B.; Townsend, R.D.

    2011-01-01

    Detailed mapping of bathymetry and three-dimensional water velocities using a boat-mounted single-beam sonar and acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) was carried out in the vicinity of two submerged wing dikes located in the Lower Missouri River near Columbia, Missouri. During high spring flows the wing dikes become submerged, creating a unique combination of vertical flow separation and overtopping (plunging) flow conditions, causing large-scale three-dimensional turbulent flow structures to form. On three different days and for a range of discharges, sampling transects at 5 and 20 m spacing were completed, covering the area adjacent to and upstream and downstream from two different wing dikes. The objectives of this research are to evaluate whether an ADCP can identify and measure large-scale flow features such as recirculating flow and vortex shedding that develop in the vicinity of a submerged wing dike; and whether or not moving-boat (single-transect) data are sufficient for resolving complex three-dimensional flow fields. Results indicate that spatial averaging from multiple nearby single transects may be more representative of an inherently complex (temporally and spatially variable) three-dimensional flow field than repeated single transects. Results also indicate a correspondence between the location of calculated vortex cores (resolved from the interpolated three-dimensional flow field) and the nearby scour holes, providing new insight into the connections between vertically oriented coherent structures and local scour, with the unique perspective of flow and morphology in a large river. Copyright 2011 by the American Geophysical Union.

  13. Precision and error of three-dimensional phenotypic measures acquired from 3dMD photogrammetric images.

    PubMed

    Aldridge, Kristina; Boyadjiev, Simeon A; Capone, George T; DeLeon, Valerie B; Richtsmeier, Joan T

    2005-10-15

    The genetic basis for complex phenotypes is currently of great interest for both clinical investigators and basic scientists. In order to acquire a thorough understanding of the translation from genotype to phenotype, highly precise measures of phenotypic variation are required. New technologies, such as 3D photogrammetry are being implemented in phenotypic studies due to their ability to collect data rapidly and non-invasively. Before these systems can be broadly implemented, the error associated with data collected from images acquired using these technologies must be assessed. This study investigates the precision, error, and repeatability associated with anthropometric landmark coordinate data collected from 3D digital photogrammetric images acquired with the 3dMDface System. Precision, error due to the imaging system, error due to digitization of the images, and repeatability are assessed in a sample of children and adults (n = 15). Results show that data collected from images with the 3dMDface System are highly repeatable and precise. The average error associated with the placement of landmarks is sub-millimeter; both the error due to digitization and due to the imaging system are very low. The few measures showing a higher degree of error include those crossing the labial fissure, which are influenced by even subtle movement of the mandible. These results suggest that 3D anthropometric data collected using the 3dMDface System are highly reliable and, therefore, useful for evaluation of clinical dysmorphology and surgery, analyses of genotype-phenotype correlations, and inheritance of complex phenotypes. PMID:16158436

  14. Benchmarking of 3D space charge codes using direct phase space measurements from photoemission high voltage dc gun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazarov, Ivan V.; Dunham, Bruce M.; Gulliford, Colwyn; Li, Yulin; Liu, Xianghong; Sinclair, Charles K.; Soong, Ken; Hannon, Fay

    2008-10-01

    We present a comparison between space charge calculations and direct measurements of the transverse phase space of space charge dominated electron bunches from a high voltage dc photoemission gun followed by an emittance compensation solenoid magnet. The measurements were performed using a double-slit emittance measurement system over a range of bunch charge and solenoid current values. The data are compared with detailed simulations using the 3D space charge codes GPT and Parmela3D. The initial particle distributions were generated from measured transverse and temporal laser beam profiles at the photocathode. The beam brightness as a function of beam fraction is calculated for the measured phase space maps and found to approach within a factor of 2 the theoretical maximum set by the thermal energy and the accelerating field at the photocathode.

  15. On-machine measurement of a slow slide servo diamond-machined 3D microstructure with a curved substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Wu-Le; Yang, Shunyao; Ju, Bing-Feng; Jiang, Jiacheng; Sun, Anyu

    2015-07-01

    A scanning tunneling microscope-based multi-axis measuring system is specially developed for the on-machine measurement of three-dimensional (3D) microstructures, to address the quality control difficulty with the traditional off-line measurement process. A typical 3D microstructure of the curved compound eye was diamond-machined by the slow slide servo technique, and then the whole surface was on-machine scanned three-dimensionally based on the tip-tracking strategy by utilizing a spindle, two linear motion stages, and an additional rotary stage. The machined surface profile and its shape deviation were accurately measured on-machine. The distortion of imaged ommatidia on the curved substrate was distinctively evaluated based on the characterized points extracted from the measured surface. Furthermore, the machining errors were investigated in connection with the on-machine measured surface and its characteristic parameters. Through experiments, the proposed measurement system is demonstrated to feature versatile on-machine measurement of 3D microstructures with a curved substrate, which is highly meaningful for quality control in the fabrication field.

  16. Measurements of 3D relative locations of particles by Fourier Interferometry Imaging (FII).

    PubMed

    Briard, Paul; Saengkaew, Sawitree; Wu, Xuecheng; Meunier-Guttin-Cluzel, Siegfried; Chen, Linghong; Cen, Kefa; Grehan, Gérard

    2011-06-20

    In a large number of physical systems formed of discrete particles, a key parameter is the relative distance between the objects, as for example in studies of spray evaporation or droplets micro-explosion. This paper is devoted to the presentation of an approach where the relative 3D location of particles in the control volume is accurately extracted from the interference patterns recorded at two different angles. No reference beam is used and only ten (2 + 8) 2D-FFT have to be computed. PMID:21716513

  17. SU-E-T-472: A Multi-Dimensional Measurements Comparison to Analyze a 3D Patient Specific QA Tool

    SciTech Connect

    Ashmeg, S; Jackson, J; Zhang, Y; Oldham, M; Yin, F; Ren, L

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To quantitatively evaluate a 3D patient specific QA tool using 2D film and 3D Presage dosimetry. Methods: A brain IMRT case was delivered to Delta4, EBT2 film and Presage plastic dosimeter. The film was inserted in the solid water slabs at 7.5cm depth for measurement. The Presage dosimeter was inserted into a head phantom for 3D dose measurement. Delta4's Anatomy software was used to calculate the corresponding dose to the film in solid water slabs and to Presage in the head phantom. The results from Anatomy were compared to both calculated results from Eclipse and measured dose from film and Presage to evaluate its accuracy. Using RIT software, we compared the “Anatomy” dose to the EBT2 film measurement and the film measurement to ECLIPSE calculation. For 3D analysis, DICOM file of “Anatomy” was extracted and imported to CERR software, which was used to compare the Presage dose to both “Anatomy” calculation and ECLIPSE calculation. Gamma criteria of 3% - 3mm and 5% - 5mm was used for comparison. Results: Gamma passing rates of film vs “Anatomy”, “Anatomy” vs ECLIPSE and film vs ECLIPSE were 82.8%, 70.9% and 87.6% respectively when 3% - 3mm criteria is used. When the criteria is changed to 5% - 5mm, the passing rates became 87.8%, 76.3% and 90.8% respectively. For 3D analysis, Anatomy vs ECLIPSE showed gamma passing rate of 86.4% and 93.3% for 3% - 3mm and 5% - 5mm respectively. The rate is 77.0% for Presage vs ECLIPSE analysis. The Anatomy vs ECLIPSE were absolute dose comparison. However, film and Presage analysis were relative comparison Conclusion: The results show higher passing rate in 3D than 2D in “Anatomy” software. This could be due to the higher degrees of freedom in 3D than in 2D for gamma analysis.

  18. A free software for pore-scale modelling: solving Stokes equation for velocity fields and permeability values in 3D pore geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerke, Kirill; Vasilyev, Roman; Khirevich, Siarhei; Karsanina, Marina; Collins, Daniel; Korost, Dmitry; Mallants, Dirk

    2015-04-01

    In this contribution we introduce a novel free software which solves the Stokes equation to obtain velocity fields for low Reynolds-number flows within externally generated 3D pore geometries. Provided with velocity fields, one can calculate permeability for known pressure gradient boundary conditions via Darcy's equation. Finite-difference schemes of 2nd and 4th order of accuracy are used together with an artificial compressibility method to iteratively converge to a steady-state solution of Stokes' equation. This numerical approach is much faster and less computationally demanding than the majority of open-source or commercial softwares employing other algorithms (finite elements/volumes, lattice Boltzmann, etc.) The software consists of two parts: 1) a pre and post-processing graphical interface, and 2) a solver. The latter is efficiently parallelized to use any number of available cores (the speedup on 16 threads was up to 10-12 depending on hardware). Due to parallelization and memory optimization our software can be used to obtain solutions for 300x300x300 voxels geometries on modern desktop PCs. The software was successfully verified by testing it against lattice Boltzmann simulations and analytical solutions. To illustrate the software's applicability for numerous problems in Earth Sciences, a number of case studies have been developed: 1) identifying the representative elementary volume for permeability determination within a sandstone sample, 2) derivation of permeability/hydraulic conductivity values for rock and soil samples and comparing those with experimentally obtained values, 3) revealing the influence of the amount of fine-textured material such as clay on filtration properties of sandy soil. This work was partially supported by RSF grant 14-17-00658 (pore-scale modelling) and RFBR grants 13-04-00409-a and 13-05-01176-a.

  19. Holographic microscopy and microfluidics platform for measuring wall stress and 3D flow over surfaces textured by micro-pillars

    PubMed Central

    Bocanegra Evans, Humberto; Gorumlu, Serdar; Aksak, Burak; Castillo, Luciano; Sheng, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Understanding how fluid flow interacts with micro-textured surfaces is crucial for a broad range of key biological processes and engineering applications including particle dispersion, pathogenic infections, and drag manipulation by surface topology. We use high-speed digital holographic microscopy (DHM) in combination with a correlation based de-noising algorithm to overcome the optical interference generated by surface roughness and to capture a large number of 3D particle trajectories in a microfluidic channel with one surface patterned with micropillars. It allows us to obtain a 3D ensembled velocity field with an uncertainty of 0.06% and 2D wall shear stress distribution at the resolution of ~65 μPa. Contrary to laminar flow in most microfluidics, we find that the flow is three-dimensional and complex for the textured microchannel. While the micropillars affect the velocity flow field locally, their presence is felt globally in terms of wall shear stresses at the channel walls. These findings imply that micro-scale mixing and wall stress sensing/manipulation can be achieved through hydro-dynamically smooth but topologically rough micropillars. PMID:27353632

  20. Holographic microscopy and microfluidics platform for measuring wall stress and 3D flow over surfaces textured by micro-pillars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bocanegra Evans, Humberto; Gorumlu, Serdar; Aksak, Burak; Castillo, Luciano; Sheng, Jian

    2016-06-01

    Understanding how fluid flow interacts with micro-textured surfaces is crucial for a broad range of key biological processes and engineering applications including particle dispersion, pathogenic infections, and drag manipulation by surface topology. We use high-speed digital holographic microscopy (DHM) in combination with a correlation based de-noising algorithm to overcome the optical interference generated by surface roughness and to capture a large number of 3D particle trajectories in a microfluidic channel with one surface patterned with micropillars. It allows us to obtain a 3D ensembled velocity field with an uncertainty of 0.06% and 2D wall shear stress distribution at the resolution of ~65 μPa. Contrary to laminar flow in most microfluidics, we find that the flow is three-dimensional and complex for the textured microchannel. While the micropillars affect the velocity flow field locally, their presence is felt globally in terms of wall shear stresses at the channel walls. These findings imply that micro-scale mixing and wall stress sensing/manipulation can be achieved through hydro-dynamically smooth but topologically rough micropillars.

  1. 3D multifunctional integumentary membranes for spatiotemporal cardiac measurements and stimulation across the entire epicardium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Lizhi; Gutbrod, Sarah R.; Bonifas, Andrew P.; Su, Yewang; Sulkin, Matthew S.; Lu, Nanshu; Chung, Hyun-Joong; Jang, Kyung-In; Liu, Zhuangjian; Ying, Ming; Lu, Chi; Webb, R. Chad; Kim, Jong-Seon; Laughner, Jacob I.; Cheng, Huanyu; Liu, Yuhao; Ameen, Abid; Jeong, Jae-Woong; Kim, Gwang-Tae; Huang, Yonggang; Efimov, Igor R.; Rogers, John A.

    2014-02-01

    Means for high-density multiparametric physiological mapping and stimulation are critically important in both basic and clinical cardiology. Current conformal electronic systems are essentially 2D sheets, which cannot cover the full epicardial surface or maintain reliable contact for chronic use without sutures or adhesives. Here we create 3D elastic membranes shaped precisely to match the epicardium of the heart via the use of 3D printing, as a platform for deformable arrays of multifunctional sensors, electronic and optoelectronic components. Such integumentary devices completely envelop the heart, in a form-fitting manner, and possess inherent elasticity, providing a mechanically stable biotic/abiotic interface during normal cardiac cycles. Component examples range from actuators for electrical, thermal and optical stimulation, to sensors for pH, temperature and mechanical strain. The semiconductor materials include silicon, gallium arsenide and gallium nitride, co-integrated with metals, metal oxides and polymers, to provide these and other operational capabilities. Ex vivo physiological experiments demonstrate various functions and methodological possibilities for cardiac research and therapy.

  2. 3D X-rays application for precision measurement of the cell structure of extruded polystyrene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, J. Y.; Kim, K. Y.; Shin, H. S.; Yeom, S.; Lee, S. E.

    2015-12-01

    While the thermal performance of existing insulation materials have been determined by blister gases, the thermal performance of future insulation materials will be dependent on the cell size and independent foam content as we use eco-friendly blister gases with a higher thermal conductivity. However, with the current technology we are only able to guess the whole cell size and independent foam content through SEM applied 2D fragmentary scanning but are still far from the level of accurate cell structure data extraction. Under this situation, we utilized X-ray CT scanned 3D images to identify and shape the cell structure and proposed a method of inferring the whole distribution and independent foam content as accurately as possible. According to X-ray CT scanning images and SEM images, the shape was similar but according to tracer applied CT scanning images, the cell size distribution was 380∼400 pm within the range of the general insulation diameter distribution which had the highest reliability. As for extrusion foaming polystyrene, we need additional image processing to identify the independent foam content as its density is too low. So, it is recommended to raise the 3D cell structure completeness of XPS by improving the scanning accuracy.

  3. 3D multifunctional integumentary membranes for spatiotemporal cardiac measurements and stimulation across the entire epicardium.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lizhi; Gutbrod, Sarah R; Bonifas, Andrew P; Su, Yewang; Sulkin, Matthew S; Lu, Nanshu; Chung, Hyun-Joong; Jang, Kyung-In; Liu, Zhuangjian; Ying, Ming; Lu, Chi; Webb, R Chad; Kim, Jong-Seon; Laughner, Jacob I; Cheng, Huanyu; Liu, Yuhao; Ameen, Abid; Jeong, Jae-Woong; Kim, Gwang-Tae; Huang, Yonggang; Efimov, Igor R; Rogers, John A

    2014-01-01

    Means for high-density multiparametric physiological mapping and stimulation are critically important in both basic and clinical cardiology. Current conformal electronic systems are essentially 2D sheets, which cannot cover the full epicardial surface or maintain reliable contact for chronic use without sutures or adhesives. Here we create 3D elastic membranes shaped precisely to match the epicardium of the heart via the use of 3D printing, as a platform for deformable arrays of multifunctional sensors, electronic and optoelectronic components. Such integumentary devices completely envelop the heart, in a form-fitting manner, and possess inherent elasticity, providing a mechanically stable biotic/abiotic interface during normal cardiac cycles. Component examples range from actuators for electrical, thermal and optical stimulation, to sensors for pH, temperature and mechanical strain. The semiconductor materials include silicon, gallium arsenide and gallium nitride, co-integrated with metals, metal oxides and polymers, to provide these and other operational capabilities. Ex vivo physiological experiments demonstrate various functions and methodological possibilities for cardiac research and therapy. PMID:24569383

  4. 3D multifunctional integumentary membranes for spatiotemporal cardiac measurements and stimulation across the entire epicardium

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Lizhi; Gutbrod, Sarah R.; Bonifas, Andrew P.; Su, Yewang; Sulkin, Matthew S.; Lu, Nanshu; Chung, Hyun-Joong; Jang, Kyung-In; Liu, Zhuangjian; Ying, Ming; Lu, Chi; Webb, R. Chad; Kim, Jong-Seon; Laughner, Jacob I.; Cheng, Huanyu; Liu, Yuhao; Ameen, Abid; Jeong, Jae-Woong; Kim, Gwang-Tae; Huang, Yonggang; Efimov, Igor R.; Rogers, John A.

    2015-01-01

    Means for high-density multiparametric physiological mapping and stimulation are critically important in both basic and clinical cardiology. Current conformal electronic systems are essentially 2D sheets, which cannot cover the full epicardial surface or maintain reliable contact for chronic use without sutures or adhesives. Here we create 3D elastic membranes shaped precisely to match the epicardium of the heart via the use of 3D printing, as a platform for deformable arrays of multifunctional sensors, electronic and optoelectronic components. Such integumentary devices completely envelop the heart, in a form-fitting manner, and possess inherent elasticity, providing a mechanically stable bioti-/abiotic interface during normal cardiac cycles. Component examples range from actuators for electrical, thermal and optical stimulation, to sensors for pH, temperature and mechanical strain. The semiconductor materials include silicon, gallium arsenide and gallium nitride, co-integrated with metals, metal oxides and polymers, to provide these and other operational capabilities. Ex vivo physiological experiments demonstrate various functions and methodological possibilities for cardiac research and therapy. PMID:24569383

  5. Mutual information as a measure of image quality for 3D dynamic lung imaging with EIT

    PubMed Central

    Crabb, M G; Davidson, J L; Little, R; Wright, P; Morgan, A R; Miller, C A; Naish, J H; Parker, G J M; Kikinis, R; McCann, H; Lionheart, W R B

    2014-01-01

    We report on a pilot study of dynamic lung electrical impedance tomography (EIT) at the University of Manchester. Low-noise EIT data at 100 frames per second (fps) were obtained from healthy male subjects during controlled breathing, followed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) subsequently used for spatial validation of the EIT reconstruction. The torso surface in the MR image and electrode positions obtained using MRI fiducial markers informed the construction of a 3D finite element model extruded along the caudal-distal axis of the subject. Small changes in the boundary that occur during respiration were accounted for by incorporating the sensitivity with respect to boundary shape into a robust temporal difference reconstruction algorithm. EIT and MRI images were co-registered using the open source medical imaging software, 3D Slicer. A quantitative comparison of quality of different EIT reconstructions was achieved through calculation of the mutual information with a lung-segmented MR image. EIT reconstructions using a linear shape correction algorithm reduced boundary image artefacts, yielding better contrast of the lungs, and had 10% greater mutual information compared with a standard linear EIT reconstruction. PMID:24710978

  6. Using LiDAR Data to Measure the 3D Green Biomass of Beijing Urban Forest in China

    PubMed Central

    He, Cheng; Convertino, Matteo; Feng, Zhongke; Zhang, Siyu

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the paper is to find a new approach to measure 3D green biomass of urban forest and to testify its precision. In this study, the 3D green biomass could be acquired on basis of a remote sensing inversion model in which each standing wood was first scanned by Terrestrial Laser Scanner to catch its point cloud data, then the point cloud picture was opened in a digital mapping data acquisition system to get the elevation in an independent coordinate, and at last the individual volume captured was associated with the remote sensing image in SPOT5(System Probatoired'Observation dela Tarre)by means of such tools as SPSS (Statistical Product and Service Solutions), GIS (Geographic Information System), RS (Remote Sensing) and spatial analysis software (FARO SCENE and Geomagic studio11). The results showed that the 3D green biomass of Beijing urban forest was 399.1295 million m3, of which coniferous was 28.7871 million m3 and broad-leaf was 370.3424 million m3. The accuracy of 3D green biomass was over 85%, comparison with the values from 235 field sample data in a typical sampling way. This suggested that the precision done by the 3D forest green biomass based on the image in SPOT5 could meet requirements. This represents an improvement over the conventional method because it not only provides a basis to evalue indices of Beijing urban greenings, but also introduces a new technique to assess 3D green biomass in other cities. PMID:24146792

  7. Using LiDAR data to measure the 3D green biomass of Beijing urban forest in China.

    PubMed

    He, Cheng; Convertino, Matteo; Feng, Zhongke; Zhang, Siyu

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the paper is to find a new approach to measure 3D green biomass of urban forest and to testify its precision. In this study, the 3D green biomass could be acquired on basis of a remote sensing inversion model in which each standing wood was first scanned by Terrestrial Laser Scanner to catch its point cloud data, then the point cloud picture was opened in a digital mapping data acquisition system to get the elevation in an independent coordinate, and at last the individual volume captured was associated with the remote sensing image in SPOT5(System Probatoired'Observation dela Tarre)by means of such tools as SPSS (Statistical Product and Service Solutions), GIS (Geographic Information System), RS (Remote Sensing) and spatial analysis software (FARO SCENE and Geomagic studio11). The results showed that the 3D green biomass of Beijing urban forest was 399.1295 million m(3), of which coniferous was 28.7871 million m(3) and broad-leaf was 370.3424 million m(3). The accuracy of 3D green biomass was over 85%, comparison with the values from 235 field sample data in a typical sampling way. This suggested that the precision done by the 3D forest green biomass based on the image in SPOT5 could meet requirements. This represents an improvement over the conventional method because it not only provides a basis to evalue indices of Beijing urban greenings, but also introduces a new technique to assess 3D green biomass in other cities. PMID:24146792

  8. Model-based measurement of food portion size for image-based dietary assessment using 3D/2D registration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hsin-Chen; Jia, Wenyan; Yue, Yaofeng; Li, Zhaoxin; Sun, Yung-Nien; Fernstrom, John D.; Sun, Mingui

    2013-10-01

    Dietary assessment is important in health maintenance and intervention in many chronic conditions, such as obesity, diabetes and cardiovascular disease. However, there is currently a lack of convenient methods for measuring the volume of food (portion size) in real-life settings. We present a computational method to estimate food volume from a single photographic image of food contained on a typical dining plate. First, we calculate the food location with respect to a 3D camera coordinate system using the plate as a scale reference. Then, the food is segmented automatically from the background in the image. Adaptive thresholding and snake modeling are implemented based on several image features, such as color contrast, regional color homogeneity and curve bending degree. Next, a 3D model representing the general shape of the food (e.g., a cylinder, a sphere, etc) is selected from a pre-constructed shape model library. The position, orientation and scale of the selected shape model are determined by registering the projected 3D model and the food contour in the image, where the properties of the reference are used as constraints. Experimental results using various realistically shaped foods with known volumes demonstrated satisfactory performance of our image-based food volume measurement method even if the 3D geometric surface of the food is not completely represented in the input image.

  9. Solar Wind Halo Formation by the Scattering of the Strahl: Direct Cluster/PEACE Observations of the 3D Velocity Distribution Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinas, A. F.; Gurgiolo, C. A.; Nieves-Chinchilla, T.; Wendel, D. E.; Goldstein, M. L.; Fazakerley, A. N.

    2010-12-01

    The current hypothesis of the formation of the solar wind halo electrons is that they are produced from scattering of the strahl. This hypothesis is strengthened by direct observations of the strahl electrons being scattered into the halo in an isolated event. On frequent occasions we have observed in electron angular skymaps (Phi/Theta-plots) of the electron 3D velocity distribution functions, a bursty-filament of particles connecting the strahl to the solar wind core-halo. These are seen over a limited energy range. The observation implies that the formation of the halo is not a continuous process but occurs in bursts in regions where conditions for wave growth providing the scattering are optimum. Sometimes, observations indicates that the strahl component is anisotropic (Tper/Tpal ~ 2). This provides a possible free energy source for the excitation of whistler waves as a possible scattering mechanism, however this condition is not always observed. The empirical observational evidence between the halo and the strahl suggests that the strahl population may be, at least in part, the source of the halo component.

  10. The lithosphere and asthenosphere system in Italy as inferred from the Vp and Vs 3D velocity model and moho map

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ciaccio, M.; Di Stefano, R.

    2013-12-01

    We present an updated high resolution tomographic P- and S-wave velocity model of the lithosphere and asthenosphere system in Italy, obtained by adding the observations from 7.200 earthquakes to the previously inverted dataset (165,000 P-wave arrivals) and by including S-waves readings from 10 years of seismic data recorded at three components seismic stations. The main strength of this research is the use of a method able to model P- and S- seismic phases refracted at the Moho discontinuity. We use a new and original map of the 3D Moho geometry obtained by integrating selected high quality controlled source seismic and teleseismic receiver function data. Resolution strongly benefits also from the fast increase in number and quality of INGV National Seismic Network since year 2003 and from its integration with several permanent regional seismic networks. This study confirms the main structural features in the best resolved parts of the inverted volume and much better image details in some of the previously less resolved areas, due to both the larger number of inverted phases and the more even distribution of seismic stations. Surface basins and relationships between the Adriatic, Tyrrhenian, and Adria plates are better imaged. The investigation of the physical properties of the lithosphere-asthenosphere system if improved by the use of a large dataset of good quality S-readings.

  11. Quantification of ultrasound correlation-based flow velocity mapping and edge velocity gradient measurement.

    PubMed

    Park, Dae Woo; Kruger, Grant H; Rubin, Jonathan M; Hamilton, James; Gottschalk, Paul; Dodde, Robert E; Shih, Albert J; Weitzel, William F

    2013-10-01

    This study investigated the use of ultrasound speckle decorrelation- and correlation-based lateral speckle-tracking methods for transverse and longitudinal blood velocity profile measurement, respectively. By studying the blood velocity gradient at the vessel wall, vascular wall shear stress, which is important in vascular physiology as well as the pathophysiologic mechanisms of vascular diseases, can be obtained. Decorrelation-based blood velocity profile measurement transverse to the flow direction is a novel approach, which provides advantages for vascular wall shear stress measurement over longitudinal blood velocity measurement methods. Blood flow velocity profiles are obtained from measurements of frame-to-frame decorrelation. In this research, both decorrelation and lateral speckle-tracking flow estimation methods were compared with Poiseuille theory over physiologic flows ranging from 50 to 1000 mm/s. The decorrelation flow velocity measurement method demonstrated more accurate prediction of the flow velocity gradient at the wall edge than the correlation-based lateral speckle-tracking method. The novelty of this study is that speckle decorrelation-based flow velocity measurements determine the blood velocity across a vessel. In addition, speckle decorrelation-based flow velocity measurements have higher axial spatial resolution than Doppler ultrasound measurements to enable more accurate measurement of blood velocity near a vessel wall and determine the physiologically important wall shear.

  12. 3-D High-Lift Flow-Physics Experiment - Transition Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGinley, Catherine B.; Jenkins, Luther N.; Watson, Ralph D.; Bertelrud, Arild

    2005-01-01

    An analysis of the flow state on a trapezoidal wing model from the NASA 3-D High Lift Flow Physics Experiment is presented. The objective of the experiment was to characterize the flow over a non-proprietary semi-span three-element high-lift configuration to aid in assessing the state of the art in the computation of three-dimensional high-lift flows. Surface pressures and hot-film sensors are used to determine the flow conditions on the slat, main, and flap. The locations of the attachments lines and the values of the attachment line Reynolds number are estimated based on the model surface pressures. Data from the hot-films are used to determine if the flow is laminar, transitional, or turbulent by examining the hot-film time histories, statistics, and frequency spectra.

  13. Measuring the orientation and rotation rate of 3D printed particles in turbulent flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voth, Greg; Marcus, Guy G.; Parsa, Shima; Kramel, Stefan; Ni, Rui; Cole, Brendan

    2014-11-01

    The orientation distribution and rotations of anisotropic particles plays a key role in many applications ranging from icy clouds to papermaking and drag reduction in pipe flow. Experimental access to time resolved orientations of anisotropic particles has not been easy to achieve. We have found that 3D printing technology can be used to fabricate a wide range of particle shapes with smallest dimension down to 300 μm. So far we have studied rods, crosses, jacks, tetrads, and helical shapes. We extract the particle orientations from stereoscopic video images using a method of least squares optimization in Euler angle space. We find that in turbulence the orientation and rotation rate of many particles can be understood using a simple picture of alignment of both the vorticity and a long axis of the particle with the Lagrangian stretching direction of the flow. This research is supported by NSF Grant DMR-1208990.

  14. Measuring the orientation and rotation rate of 3D printed particles in turbulent flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voth, Greg; Kramel, Stefan; Cole, Brendan

    2015-03-01

    The orientation distribution and rotations of anisotropic particles plays a key role in many applications ranging from icy clouds to papermaking and drag reduction in pipe flow. Experimental access to time resolved orientations of anisotropic particles has not been easy to achieve. We have found that 3D printing technology can be used to fabricate a wide range of particle shapes with smallest dimension down to 300 ?m. So far we have studied rods, crosses, jacks, tetrads, and helical shapes. We extract the particle orientations from stereoscopic video images using a method of least squares optimization in Euler angle space. We find that in turbulence the orientation and rotation rate of many particles can be understood using a simple picture of alignment of both the vorticity and a long axis of the particle with the Lagrangian stretching direction of the flow.

  15. An Orientation Measurement Method Based on Hall-effect Sensors for Permanent Magnet Spherical Actuators with 3D Magnet Array

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Liang; Zhu, Bo; Jiao, Zongxia; Chen, Chin-Yin; Chen, I-Ming

    2014-01-01

    An orientation measurement method based on Hall-effect sensors is proposed for permanent magnet (PM) spherical actuators with three-dimensional (3D) magnet array. As there is no contact between the measurement system and the rotor, this method could effectively avoid friction torque and additional inertial moment existing in conventional approaches. Curved surface fitting method based on exponential approximation is proposed to formulate the magnetic field distribution in 3D space. The comparison with conventional modeling method shows that it helps to improve the model accuracy. The Hall-effect sensors are distributed around the rotor with PM poles to detect the flux density at different points, and thus the rotor orientation can be computed from the measured results and analytical models. Experiments have been conducted on the developed research prototype of the spherical actuator to validate the accuracy of the analytical equations relating the rotor orientation and the value of magnetic flux density. The experimental results show that the proposed method can measure the rotor orientation precisely, and the measurement accuracy could be improved by the novel 3D magnet array. The study result could be used for real-time motion control of PM spherical actuators. PMID:25342000

  16. An Orientation Measurement Method Based on Hall-effect Sensors for Permanent Magnet Spherical Actuators with 3D Magnet Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Liang; Zhu, Bo; Jiao, Zongxia; Chen, Chin-Yin; Chen, I.-Ming

    2014-10-01

    An orientation measurement method based on Hall-effect sensors is proposed for permanent magnet (PM) spherical actuators with three-dimensional (3D) magnet array. As there is no contact between the measurement system and the rotor, this method could effectively avoid friction torque and additional inertial moment existing in conventional approaches. Curved surface fitting method based on exponential approximation is proposed to formulate the magnetic field distribution in 3D space. The comparison with conventional modeling method shows that it helps to improve the model accuracy. The Hall-effect sensors are distributed around the rotor with PM poles to detect the flux density at different points, and thus the rotor orientation can be computed from the measured results and analytical models. Experiments have been conducted on the developed research prototype of the spherical actuator to validate the accuracy of the analytical equations relating the rotor orientation and the value of magnetic flux density. The experimental results show that the proposed method can measure the rotor orientation precisely, and the measurement accuracy could be improved by the novel 3D magnet array. The study result could be used for real-time motion control of PM spherical actuators.

  17. Comparing 3D Gyrification Index and area-independent curvature-based measures in quantifying neonatal brain folding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez-Carranza, Claudia E.; Mukherjee, P.; Vigneron, Daniel; Barkovich, James; Studholme, Colin

    2007-03-01

    In this work we compare 3D Gyrification Index and our recently proposed area-independent curvature-based surface measures [26] for the in-vivo quantification of brain surface folding in clinically acquired neonatal MR image data. A meaningful comparison of gyrification across brains of different sizes and their subregions will only be possible through the quantification of folding with measures that are independent of the area of the region of analysis. This work uses a 3D implementation of the classical Gyrification Index, a 2D measure that quantifies folding based on the ratio of the inner and outer contours of the brain and which has been used to study gyral patterns in adults with schizophrenia, among other conditions. The new surface curvature-based measures and the 3D Gyrification Index were calculated on twelve premature infants (age 28-37 weeks) from which surfaces of cerebrospinal fluid/gray matter (CSF/GM) interface and gray matter/white matter (GM/WM) interface were extracted. Experimental results show that our measures better quantify folding on the CSF/GM interface than Gyrification Index, and perform similarly on the GM/WM interface.

  18. An orientation measurement method based on Hall-effect sensors for permanent magnet spherical actuators with 3D magnet array.

    PubMed

    Yan, Liang; Zhu, Bo; Jiao, Zongxia; Chen, Chin-Yin; Chen, I-Ming

    2014-10-24

    An orientation measurement method based on Hall-effect sensors is proposed for permanent magnet (PM) spherical actuators with three-dimensional (3D) magnet array. As there is no contact between the measurement system and the rotor, this method could effectively avoid friction torque and additional inertial moment existing in conventional approaches. Curved surface fitting method based on exponential approximation is proposed to formulate the magnetic field distribution in 3D space. The comparison with conventional modeling method shows that it helps to improve the model accuracy. The Hall-effect sensors are distributed around the rotor with PM poles to detect the flux density at different points, and thus the rotor orientation can be computed from the measured results and analytical models. Experiments have been conducted on the developed research prototype of the spherical actuator to validate the accuracy of the analytical equations relating the rotor orientation and the value of magnetic flux density. The experimental results show that the proposed method can measure the rotor orientation precisely, and the measurement accuracy could be improved by the novel 3D magnet array. The study result could be used for real-time motion control of PM spherical actuators.

  19. 3D thoracoscopic ultrasound volume measurement validation in an ex vivo and in vivo porcine model of lung tumours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hornblower, V. D. M.; Yu, E.; Fenster, A.; Battista, J. J.; Malthaner, R. A.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to validate the accuracy and reliability of volume measurements obtained using three-dimensional (3D) thoracoscopic ultrasound (US) imaging. Artificial 'tumours' were created by injecting a liquid agar mixture into spherical moulds of known volume. Once solidified, the 'tumours' were implanted into the lung tissue in both a porcine lung sample ex vivo and a surgical porcine model in vivo. 3D US images were created by mechanically rotating the thoracoscopic ultrasound probe about its long axis while the transducer was maintained in close contact with the tissue. Volume measurements were made by one observer using the ultrasound images and a manual-radial segmentation technique and these were compared with the known volumes of the agar. In vitro measurements had average accuracy and precision of 4.76% and 1.77%, respectively; in vivo measurements had average accuracy and precision of 8.18% and 1.75%, respectively. The 3D thoracoscopic ultrasound can be used to accurately and reproducibly measure 'tumour' volumes both in vivo and ex vivo.

  20. LDA measurement of the passage flow field in a 3-D airfoil cascade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stauter, R. C.; Fleeter, S.

    1986-01-01

    Three-dimensional internal flow computational models are currently being developed to predict the flow through turbomachinery blade rows. For these codes to be of quantitative value, they must be verified with data obtained in experiments which model the fundamental flow phenomena. In this paper, the complete three-dimensional flow field through a subsonic annular cascade of cambered airfoils is experimentally quantified. In particular, detailed three-dimensional data are obtained to quantify the inlet velocity profile, the cascade passage velocity field, and the exit region flow field. The primary instrumentation for acquiring these data is a single-channel Laser Doppler Anemometer operating in the backscatter mode, with chordwise distributions of airfoil surface static pressure taps also utilized. Appropriate data are correlated with predictions from the MERIDL/TSONIC codes.

  1. Sexual dimorphism in human browridge volume measured from 3D models of dry crania: a new digital morphometrics approach.

    PubMed

    Shearer, Brian M; Sholts, Sabrina B; Garvin, Heather M; Wärmländer, Sebastian K T S

    2012-10-10

    Sex estimation from the human skull is often a necessary step when constructing a biological profile from unidentified human remains. Traditional methods for determining the sex of a skull require observers to rank the expression of sexually dimorphic skeletal traits by subjectively assessing their qualitative differences. One of these traits is the prominence of the glabellar region above the browridge. In this paper, the volume of the browridge region was measured from digital 3D models of 128 dry crania (65 female, 63 male). The 3D models were created with a desktop laser scanner, and the browridge region of each 3D model was isolated using geometric planes defined by cranial landmarks. Statistical analysis of browridge-to-cranium volume ratios revealed significant differences between male and female crania. Differences were also observed between geographically distinct populations, and between temporally distinct populations from the same locale. The results suggest that in the future, sex determination of human crania may be assisted by quantitative computer-based volume calculations from 3D models, which can provide increased objectivity and repeatability when compared to traditional forensic techniques. The method presented in this paper can easily be extended to other volumetric regions of the human cranium.

  2. 1-D and 2-D resonances in an Alpine valley identified from ambient noise measurements and 3-D modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Roux, Olivier; Cornou, Cécile; Jongmans, Denis; Schwartz, Stéphane

    2012-09-01

    H/V spectral ratios are regularly used for estimating the bedrock depth in 1-D like basins exhibiting smooth lateral variations. In the case of 2-D or 3-D pronounced geometries, observational and numerical studies have shown that H/V curves exhibit peculiar shapes and that the H/V frequency generally overestimates 1-D theoretical resonance frequency. To investigate the capabilities of the H/V method in complex structures, a detailed comparison between measured and 3-D-simulated ambient vibrations was performed in the small-size lower Romanche valley (French Alps), which shows significant variations in geometry, downstream and upstream the Séchilienne basin. Analysing the H/V curve characteristics, two different wave propagation modes were identified along the valley. Relying on previous geophysical investigation, a power-law relationship was derived between the bedrock depth and the H/V peak frequency, which was used for building a 3-D model of the valley geometry. Simulated and experimental H/V curves were found to exhibit quite similar features in terms of curve shape and peak frequency values, validating the 3-D structure. This good agreement also evidenced two different propagation modes in the valley: 2-D resonance in the Séchilienne basin and 1-D resonance in the external parts. This study underlines the interest of H/V curves for investigating complex basin structures.

  3. Parameters of the human 3D gaze while observing portable autostereoscopic display: a model and measurement results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boev, Atanas; Hanhela, Marianne; Gotchev, Atanas; Utirainen, Timo; Jumisko-Pyykkö, Satu; Hannuksela, Miska

    2012-02-01

    We present an approach to measure and model the parameters of human point-of-gaze (PoG) in 3D space. Our model considers the following three parameters: position of the gaze in 3D space, volume encompassed by the gaze and time for the gaze to arrive on the desired target. Extracting the 3D gaze position from binocular gaze data is hindered by three problems. The first problem is the lack of convergence - due to micro saccadic movements the optical lines of both eyes rarely intersect at a point in space. The second problem is resolution - the combination of short observation distance and limited comfort disparity zone typical for a mobile 3D display does not allow the depth of the gaze position to be reliably extracted. The third problem is measurement noise - due to the limited display size, the noise range is close to the range of properly measured data. We have developed a methodology which allows us to suppress most of the measurement noise. This allows us to estimate the typical time which is needed for the point-of-gaze to travel in x, y or z direction. We identify three temporal properties of the binocular PoG. The first is reaction time, which is the minimum time that the vision reacts to a stimulus position change, and is measured as the time between the event and the time the PoG leaves the proximity of the old stimulus position. The second is the travel time of the PoG between the old and new stimulus position. The third is the time-to-arrive, which is the time combining the reaction time, travel time, and the time required for the PoG to settle in the new position. We present the method for filtering the PoG outliers, for deriving the PoG center from binocular eye-tracking data and for calculating the gaze volume as a function of the distance between PoG and the observer. As an outcome from our experiments we present binocular heat maps aggregated over all observers who participated in a viewing test. We also show the mean values for all temporal

  4. Intrinsic spatial shift of local focus metric curves in digital inline holography for accurate 3D morphology measurement of irregular micro-objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yingchun; Wu, Xuecheng; Lebrun, Denis; Brunel, Marc; Coëtmellec, Sébastien; Lesouhaitier, Olivier; Chen, Jia; Gréhan, Gérard

    2016-09-01

    A theoretical model of digital inline holography system reveals that the local focus metric curves (FMCs) of different parts of an irregular micro-object present spatial shift in the depth direction which is resulted from the depth shift. Thus, the 3D morphology of an irregular micro-object can be accurately measured using the cross correlation of the local FMCs. This method retrieves the 3D depth information directly, avoiding the uncertainty inherited from the depth position determination. Typical 3D morphology measurements, including the 3D boundary lines of tilted carbon fibers and irregular coal particles, and the 3D swimming gesture of a live Caenorhabdities elegans, are presented.

  5. A new 3D shape precision measurement system calibration method based on non-diffraction grating structured light projection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Ya; Zhou, Liping; Li, Wenlong; Gan, Jianghong; Xu, Long

    2016-03-01

    Phase calculation-based fringe projection techniques are widely used in three-dimensional shape measurement fields to obtain the 3D shape data of the object's surface. One important step of the phase calculation is calibration, which determines the relationship between the image phase and depth information. The traditional calibration methods are too complex and require many parameters. In this paper, model of 3D shape precision calibration method based on non-diffraction grating structured light fringes projection is proposed, which is consist of camera model, fringe phase obtaining, height-phase relationship model. This method is simple, convenient and there is no approximation in it, which can satisfy the precision measurement.

  6. 21 CFR 882.1550 - Nerve conduction velocity measurement device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Nerve conduction velocity measurement device. 882.1550 Section 882.1550 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... conduction velocity measurement device. (a) Identification. A nerve conduction velocity measurement device...

  7. 21 CFR 882.1550 - Nerve conduction velocity measurement device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Nerve conduction velocity measurement device. 882.1550 Section 882.1550 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... conduction velocity measurement device. (a) Identification. A nerve conduction velocity measurement device...

  8. 21 CFR 882.1550 - Nerve conduction velocity measurement device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Nerve conduction velocity measurement device. 882.1550 Section 882.1550 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... conduction velocity measurement device. (a) Identification. A nerve conduction velocity measurement device...

  9. 21 CFR 882.1550 - Nerve conduction velocity measurement device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Nerve conduction velocity measurement device. 882.1550 Section 882.1550 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... conduction velocity measurement device. (a) Identification. A nerve conduction velocity measurement device...

  10. 21 CFR 882.1550 - Nerve conduction velocity measurement device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Nerve conduction velocity measurement device. 882.1550 Section 882.1550 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... conduction velocity measurement device. (a) Identification. A nerve conduction velocity measurement device...

  11. Comparison between measured turbine stage performance and the predicted performance using quasi-3D flow and boundary layer analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyle, R. J.; Haas, J. E.; Katsanis, T.

    1984-01-01

    A method for calculating turbine stage performance is described. The usefulness of the method is demonstrated by comparing measured and predicted efficiencies for nine different stages. Comparisons are made over a range of turbine pressure ratios and rotor speeds. A quasi-3D flow analysis is used to account for complex passage geometries. Boundary layer analyses are done to account for losses due to friction. Empirical loss models are used to account for incidence, secondary flow, disc windage, and clearance losses.

  12. Spectrographs for the Measurement of Radial Velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranne, A.

    A radial-velocity measurement derives from a shift in position of spectral features at the focus of a spectrographic instrument. We do not often think about how small these shifts are. It is not generally appreciated that the accuracy to which this shift must be measured is a tiny fraction of a pixel. Or, if we prefer to calculate in microns a surprising minuteness. What precautions should we be taking for the measurement of such small shifts? It is true that, thanks to computers, modern reduction methods allows us to correct for a wide variety of pertubations, provided that these are foreseen and understood; but such reduction procedures will give the best results if such pertubations are kept very small. We must therefore analyse these pertubations and think about how we can control them. The correlation method initiated in its modern form by Roger Griffin, and which we developed further with an optical mask in CORAVEL twenty-five years ago and more recently with a numerical mask in ELODIE, has demonstrated its power. In terms of these methods, the problem of high precision is to improve the correlation peak. Can this be done? Does the correlation method allow us to distinguish the overall radial velocity of the object from possible distortions of the lines? This is certainly a major problem which must be solved. The luminous efficiency of high-precision spectrographs is low. If the use of an optical fibre with scrambling for feeding the spectrograph seems inevitable to us today, it seems to me that the transmission of this system can be considerably improved by a better choice of the F-ratio of the image beam of the telescope which is to be matched with that of the spectrograph. This problem, common to all spectrographs, could be resolved with a specialised focal-plane instrument, giving a much greater than usual F-ratio, resulting in a simplification of the spectrograph optics, and hence an improvement in transmission and a serious decrease in size (which is

  13. Connecting Global Measures of 3D Magnetic Reconnection to Local Kinetic Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Daughton, William Scott

    2015-07-16

    After giving the motivation for the work, slides present the topic under the following headings: Description of LAPD experiment; Actual simulation setup; Simple kinetic theory of ined-tied tearing; Diagnostics to characterizing 3D reconnection; Example #1 - short-tied system; and Example #2 - long line-tied system. Colorful simulations are shown for quasipotential vs field line exponentiation, field line integrated Ohms Law, and correlation with agyrotopy & energy conversion for example #1; and evolution of current density for largest case, field exponentiation vs quasi-potential, and time evolution of magnetic field lines for example #2. To satisfy line-tied boundary conditions, there is need for superposition of oblique modes--the simple two-mode approximation works surprisingly well. For force-free layers with bg >1, the fastest growing periodic modes are oblique with kxλ ~0.5. This implies a minimum length of Ly > 2πλbg. There are strong correlations between σ → Ξ → A0e (observable with spacecraft). Electron pressure tensor is the dominant non-ideal term.

  14. Optical 3D laser measurement system for navigation of autonomous mobile robot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Básaca-Preciado, Luis C.; Sergiyenko, Oleg Yu.; Rodríguez-Quinonez, Julio C.; García, Xochitl; Tyrsa, Vera V.; Rivas-Lopez, Moises; Hernandez-Balbuena, Daniel; Mercorelli, Paolo; Podrygalo, Mikhail; Gurko, Alexander; Tabakova, Irina; Starostenko, Oleg

    2014-03-01

    In our current research, we are developing a practical autonomous mobile robot navigation system which is capable of performing obstacle avoiding task on an unknown environment. Therefore, in this paper, we propose a robot navigation system which works using a high accuracy localization scheme by dynamic triangulation. Our two main ideas are (1) integration of two principal systems, 3D laser scanning technical vision system (TVS) and mobile robot (MR) navigation system. (2) Novel MR navigation scheme, which allows benefiting from all advantages of precise triangulation localization of the obstacles, mostly over known camera oriented vision systems. For practical use, mobile robots are required to continue their tasks with safety and high accuracy on temporary occlusion condition. Presented in this work, prototype II of TVS is significantly improved over prototype I of our previous publications in the aspects of laser rays alignment, parasitic torque decrease and friction reduction of moving parts. The kinematic model of the MR used in this work is designed considering the optimal data acquisition from the TVS with the main goal of obtaining in real time, the necessary values for the kinematic model of the MR immediately during the calculation of obstacles based on the TVS data.

  15. Out-of-plane ultrasonic velocity measurement

    DOEpatents

    Hall, M.S.; Brodeur, P.H.; Jackson, T.G.

    1998-07-14

    A method for improving the accuracy of measuring the velocity and time of flight of ultrasonic signals through moving web-like materials such as paper, paperboard and the like, includes a pair of ultrasonic transducers disposed on opposing sides of a moving web-like material. In order to provide acoustical coupling between the transducers and the web-like material, the transducers are disposed in fluid-filled wheels. Errors due to variances in the wheel thicknesses about their circumference which can affect time of flight measurements and ultimately the mechanical property being tested are compensated by averaging the ultrasonic signals for a predetermined number of revolutions. The invention further includes a method for compensating for errors resulting from the digitization of the ultrasonic signals. More particularly, the invention includes a method for eliminating errors known as trigger jitter inherent with digitizing oscilloscopes used to digitize the signals for manipulation by a digital computer. In particular, rather than cross-correlate ultrasonic signals taken during different sample periods as is known in the art in order to determine the time of flight of the ultrasonic signal through the moving web, a pulse echo box is provided to enable cross-correlation of predetermined transmitted ultrasonic signals with predetermined reflected ultrasonic or echo signals during the sample period. By cross-correlating ultrasonic signals in the same sample period, the error associated with trigger jitter is eliminated. 20 figs.

  16. Out-of-plane ultrasonic velocity measurement

    DOEpatents

    Hall, Maclin S.; Brodeur, Pierre H.; Jackson, Theodore G.

    1998-01-01

    A method for improving the accuracy of measuring the velocity and time of flight of ultrasonic signals through moving web-like materials such as paper, paperboard and the like, includes a pair of ultrasonic transducers disposed on opposing sides of a moving web-like material. In order to provide acoustical coupling between the transducers and the web-like material, the transducers are disposed in fluid-filled wheels. Errors due to variances in the wheel thicknesses about their circumference which can affect time of flight measurements and ultimately the mechanical property being tested are compensated by averaging the ultrasonic signals for a predetermined number of revolutions. The invention further includes a method for compensating for errors resulting from the digitization of the ultrasonic signals. More particularly, the invention includes a method for eliminating errors known as trigger jitter inherent with digitizing oscilloscopes used to digitize the signals for manipulation by a digital computer. In particular, rather than cross-correlate ultrasonic signals taken during different sample periods as is known in the art in order to determine the time of flight of the ultrasonic signal through the moving web, a pulse echo box is provided to enable cross-correlation of predetermined transmitted ultrasonic signals with predetermined reflected ultrasonic or echo signals during the sample period. By cross-correlating ultrasonic signals in the same sample period, the error associated with trigger jitter is eliminated.

  17. Characterizing microscale aluminum composite layer properties on silicon solar cells with hybrid 3D scanning force measurements

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Sung-Kuk; Choi, Beomjoon; Chung, Haseung; Shin, Seungwon; Song, Hee-eun; Seo, Jung Hwan

    2016-01-01

    This article presents a novel technique to estimate the mechanical properties of the aluminum composite layer on silicon solar cells by using a hybrid 3-dimensional laser scanning force measurement (3-D LSFM) system. The 3-D LSFM system measures the material properties of sub-layers constituting a solar cell. This measurement is critical for realizing high-efficient ultra-thin solar cells. The screen-printed aluminum layer, which significantly affects the bowing phenomenon, is separated from the complete solar cell by removing the silicon (Si) layer with deep reactive ion etching. An elastic modulus of ~15.1 GPa and a yield strength of ~35.0 MPa for the aluminum (Al) composite layer were obtained by the 3-D LSFM system. In experiments performed for 6-inch Si solar cells, the bowing distances decreased from 12.02 to 1.18 mm while the Si layer thicknesses increased from 90 to 190 μm. These results are in excellent agreement with the theoretical predictions for ultra-thin Si thickness (90 μm) based on the obtained Al composite layer properties. PMID:26948248

  18. Characterizing microscale aluminum composite layer properties on silicon solar cells with hybrid 3D scanning force measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bae, Sung-Kuk; Choi, Beomjoon; Chung, Haseung; Shin, Seungwon; Song, Hee-Eun; Seo, Jung Hwan

    2016-03-01

    This article presents a novel technique to estimate the mechanical properties of the aluminum composite layer on silicon solar cells by using a hybrid 3-dimensional laser scanning force measurement (3-D LSFM) system. The 3-D LSFM system measures the material properties of sub-layers constituting a solar cell. This measurement is critical for realizing high-efficient ultra-thin solar cells. The screen-printed aluminum layer, which significantly affects the bowing phenomenon, is separated from the complete solar cell by removing the silicon (Si) layer with deep reactive ion etching. An elastic modulus of ~15.1 GPa and a yield strength of ~35.0 MPa for the aluminum (Al) composite layer were obtained by the 3-D LSFM system. In experiments performed for 6-inch Si solar cells, the bowing distances decreased from 12.02 to 1.18 mm while the Si layer thicknesses increased from 90 to 190 μm. These results are in excellent agreement with the theoretical predictions for ultra-thin Si thickness (90 μm) based on the obtained Al composite layer properties.

  19. Characterizing microscale aluminum composite layer properties on silicon solar cells with hybrid 3D scanning force measurements.

    PubMed

    Bae, Sung-Kuk; Choi, Beomjoon; Chung, Haseung; Shin, Seungwon; Song, Hee-eun; Seo, Jung Hwan

    2016-01-01

    This article presents a novel technique to estimate the mechanical properties of the aluminum composite layer on silicon solar cells by using a hybrid 3-dimensional laser scanning force measurement (3-D LSFM) system. The 3-D LSFM system measures the material properties of sub-layers constituting a solar cell. This measurement is critical for realizing high-efficient ultra-thin solar cells. The screen-printed aluminum layer, which significantly affects the bowing phenomenon, is separated from the complete solar cell by removing the silicon (Si) layer with deep reactive ion etching. An elastic modulus of ~15.1 GPa and a yield strength of ~35.0 MPa for the aluminum (Al) composite layer were obtained by the 3-D LSFM system. In experiments performed for 6-inch Si solar cells, the bowing distances decreased from 12.02 to 1.18 mm while the Si layer thicknesses increased from 90 to 190 μm. These results are in excellent agreement with the theoretical predictions for ultra-thin Si thickness (90 μm) based on the obtained Al composite layer properties. PMID:26948248

  20. Characterizing microscale aluminum composite layer properties on silicon solar cells with hybrid 3D scanning force measurements.

    PubMed

    Bae, Sung-Kuk; Choi, Beomjoon; Chung, Haseung; Shin, Seungwon; Song, Hee-eun; Seo, Jung Hwan

    2016-03-07

    This article presents a novel technique to estimate the mechanical properties of the aluminum composite layer on silicon solar cells by using a hybrid 3-dimensional laser scanning force measurement (3-D LSFM) system. The 3-D LSFM system measures the material properties of sub-layers constituting a solar cell. This measurement is critical for realizing high-efficient ultra-thin solar cells. The screen-printed aluminum layer, which significantly affects the bowing phenomenon, is separated from the complete solar cell by removing the silicon (Si) layer with deep reactive ion etching. An elastic modulus of ~15.1 GPa and a yield strength of ~35.0 MPa for the aluminum (Al) composite layer were obtained by the 3-D LSFM system. In experiments performed for 6-inch Si solar cells, the bowing distances decreased from 12.02 to 1.18 mm while the Si layer thicknesses increased from 90 to 190 μm. These results are in excellent agreement with the theoretical predictions for ultra-thin Si thickness (90 μm) based on the obtained Al composite layer properties.

  1. A methodology to accurately quantify patellofemoral cartilage contact kinematics by combining 3D image shape registration and cine-PC MRI velocity data.

    PubMed

    Borotikar, Bhushan S; Sipprell, William H; Wible, Emily E; Sheehan, Frances T

    2012-04-01

    Patellofemoral osteoarthritis and its potential precursor patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS) are common, costly, and debilitating diseases. PFPS has been shown to be associated with altered patellofemoral joint mechanics; however, an actual variation in joint contact stresses has not been established due to challenges in accurately quantifying in vivo contact kinematics (area and location). This study developed and validated a method for tracking dynamic, in vivo cartilage contact kinematics by combining three magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques, cine-phase contrast (CPC), multi-plane cine (MPC), and 3D high-resolution static imaging. CPC and MPC data were acquired from 12 healthy volunteers while they actively extended/flexed their knee within the MRI scanner. Since no gold standard exists for the quantification of in vivo dynamic cartilage contact kinematics, the accuracy of tracking a single point (patellar origin relative to the femur) represented the accuracy of tracking the kinematics of an entire surface. The accuracy was determined by the average absolute error between the PF kinematics derived through registration of MPC images to a static model and those derived through integration of the CPC velocity data. The accuracy ranged from 0.47 mm to 0.77 mm for the patella and femur and from 0.68 mm to 0.86 mm for the patellofemoral joint. For purely quantifying joint kinematics, CPC remains an analytically simpler and more accurate (accuracy <0.33 mm) technique. However, for application requiring the tracking of an entire surface, such as quantifying cartilage contact kinematics, this combined imaging approach produces accurate results with minimal operator intervention.

  2. A methodology to accurately quantify patellofemoral cartilage contact kinematics by combining 3D image shape registration and cine-PC MRI velocity data

    PubMed Central

    Borotikar, Bhushan S.; Sipprell, William H.; Wible, Emily E.; Sheehan, Frances T.

    2012-01-01

    Patellofemoral osteoarthritis and its potential precursor patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS) are common, costly, and debilitating diseases. PFPS has been shown to be associated with altered patellofemoral joint mechanics; however, an actual variation in joint contact stresses has not been established due to challenges in accurately quantifying in vivo contact kinematics (area and location). This study developed and validated a method for tracking dynamic, in vivo cartilage contact kinematics by combining three magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques, cine-phase contrast (CPC), multi-plane cine (MPC), and 3D high-resolution static imaging. CPC and MPC data were acquired from 12 healthy volunteers while they actively extended/flexed their knee within the MRI scanner. Since no gold standard exists for the quantification of in vivo dynamic cartilage contact kinematics, the accuracy of tracking a single point (patellar origin relative to the femur) represented the accuracy of tracking the kinematics of an entire surface. The accuracy was determined by the average absolute error between the PF kinematics derived through registration of MPC images to a static model and those derived through integration of the CPC velocity data. The accuracy ranged from 0.47mm–0.77mm for the patella and femur and 0.68mm–0.86 mm for the patellofemoral joint. For purely quantifying joint kinematics, CPC remains an analytically simpler and more accurate (accuracy < 0.33mm) technique. However, for application requiring the tracking of an entire surface, such as quantifying cartilage contact kinematics, this combined imaging approach produces accurate results with minimal operator intervention. PMID:22284428

  3. Holographic particle velocity measurement in the Fraunhofer plane.

    PubMed

    Ewan, B C

    1979-03-01

    Double exposure holograms of a moving particle field having a 1-D velocity distribution are produced. The Fraunhofer plane is observed on reconstruction, and it is shown that for a Gaussian velocity distribution, the fringes which modulate the diffraction pattern have spacings characteristic of the peak velocity. Known and measured peak velocities are compared, and the effect of the velocity distribution width on the fringe contrast is demonstrated.

  4. MC2-3 / DIF3D Analysis for the ZPPR-15 Doppler and Sodium Void Worth Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Micheal A.; Lell, Richard M.; Lee, Changho

    2015-01-01

    This manuscript covers validation efforts for our deterministic codes at Argonne National Laboratory. The experimental results come from the ZPPR-15 work in 1985-1986 which was focused on the accuracy of physics data for the integral fast reactor concept. Results for six loadings are studied in this document and focus on Doppler sample worths and sodium void worths. The ZPPR-15 loadings are modeled using the MC2-3/DIF3D codes developed and maintained at ANL and the MCNP code from LANL. The deterministic models are generated by processing the as-built geometry information, i.e. MCNP input, and generating MC2-3 cross section generation instructions and a drawer homogenized equivalence problem. The Doppler reactivity worth measurements are small heated samples which insert very small amounts of reactivity into the system (< 2 pcm). The results generated by the MC2-3/DIF3D codes were excellent for ZPPR-15A and ZPPR-15B and good for ZPPR-15D, compared to the MCNP solutions. In all cases, notable improvements were made over the analysis techniques applied to the same problems in 1987. The sodium void worths from MC2-3/DIF3D were quite good at 37.5 pcm while MCNP result was 33 pcm and the measured result was 31.5 pcm. Copyright © (2015) by the American Nuclear Society All rights reserved.

  5. Doppler radar velocity measurements for wound ballistics experiments.

    PubMed

    Knudsen, P J; Svender, J

    1994-01-01

    Bullet velocity is a basic parameter in wound ballistics studies. It is usually measured electronically by means of a variety of solid or photoelectric barriers connected to equipment measuring the time elapsing between impulses, enabling the velocity to be calculated. With the advent of Doppler radar velocity measurement of large calibre artillery shells, the use of this equipment for wound ballistics experiments was investigated. Anaesthetized pigs were shot at a range of 9-10 metres and the velocities measured by Doppler radar and photocells were compared. A very good correspondence between the measured entry and exit velocities in low and medium velocity bullets was found, i.e. an average deviation of less than 1% (range 0-2%) between the two types of equipment. In high velocity bullets measurement of entry velocities was just as good, but in both methods measurement of the exit velocity was complicated by the cluttering of signals by fragments of tissue released from the exit wound and the deflection of the bullet, Doppler radar offers important benefits - simple set up, minimal risk of damage of equipment by stray bullets and very good accuracy - and may replace photocells and similar equipment in studies involving low and medium velocity bullets. Measurement of the exit velocity of high velocity bullets is unsatisfactory in both methods, and it is necessary to improve the Doppler radar method in order to measure that as well.

  6. Effects of horizontal velocity variations on ultrasonic velocity measurements in open channels

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Swain, E.D.

    1992-01-01

    Use of an ultrasonic velocity meter to determine discharge in open channels involves measuring the velocity in a line between transducers in the stream and relating that velocity to the average velocity in the stream. The standard method of calculating average velocity in the channel assumes that the velocity profile in the channel can be represented by the one-dimensional von Karman universal velocity profile. However, the velocity profile can be described by a two-dimensional equation that accounts for the horizontal velocity variations induced by the channel sides. An equation to calculate average velocity accounts for the two-dimensional variations in velocity within a stream. The use of this new equation to calculate average velocity was compared to the standard method in theoretical trapezoidal cross sections and in the L-31N and Snapper Creek Extension Canals near Miami, Florida. These comparisons indicate that the two-dimensional variations have the most significant effect in narrow, deep channels. Also, the two-dimensional effects may be significant in some field situations and need to be considered when determining average velocity and discharge with an ultrasonic velocity meter.

  7. YieldStar based reticle 3D measurements and its application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaenkatesan, Vidya; Schellekens, Twan; Davydova, Natalia; Dillen, Harm; van Dijk, Joep

    2015-09-01

    YieldStar (YS) is an ASML-built scatterometry tool with well-established capability to measure wafer Critical Dimension (CD), Overlay and Focus. In a feasibility study, the application range of YS was extended to measure CD patterns in EUV reticles (absorber CD, height, Side Wall Angle-SWA). The measured data compared well with the available data from CD-SEM and AFM. Further the YS measured data was used to mathematically separate the reticle induced fingerprint from the scanner fingerprint.

  8. System and method for investigating sub-surface features and 3D imaging of non-linear property, compressional velocity VP, shear velocity VS and velocity ratio VP/VS of a rock formation

    DOEpatents

    Vu, Cung Khac; Skelt, Christopher; Nihei, Kurt; Johnson, Paul A.; Guyer, Robert; Ten Cate, James A.; Le Bas, Pierre-Yves; Larmat, Carene S.

    2015-06-02

    A system and a method for generating a three-dimensional image of a rock formation, compressional velocity VP, shear velocity VS and velocity ratio VP/VS of a rock formation are provided. A first acoustic signal includes a first plurality of pulses. A second acoustic signal from a second source includes a second plurality of pulses. A detected signal returning to the borehole includes a signal generated by a non-linear mixing process from the first and second acoustic signals in a non-linear mixing zone within an intersection volume. The received signal is processed to extract the signal over noise and/or signals resulting from linear interaction and the three dimensional image of is generated.

  9. Compressional velocity measurements for a highly fractured lunar anorthosite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sondergeld, C. H.; Granryd, L. A.; Spetzler, H. A.

    1979-01-01

    The compressional wave (V sub p) velocities in three mutually perpendicular directions have been measured in lunar sample 60025,174, lunar anorthosite. V sub p measurements were made at ambient temperature and pressure and a new technique was developed to measure the velocities because of the tremendous acoustic wave attenuation of the lunar sample. The measured velocities were all less than 1 km/sec and displayed up to a 21% departure from the mean value of the three directions. The velocities agree with seismic wave velocities determined for the lunar surface at the collection site.

  10. Automated 3D quantitative assessment and measurement of alpha angles from the femoral head-neck junction using MR imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Ying; Fripp, Jurgen; Chandra, Shekhar S.; Walker, Duncan; Crozier, Stuart; Engstrom, Craig

    2015-10-01

    To develop an automated approach for 3D quantitative assessment and measurement of alpha angles from the femoral head-neck (FHN) junction using bone models derived from magnetic resonance (MR) images of the hip joint. Bilateral MR images of the hip joints were acquired from 30 male volunteers (healthy active individuals and high-performance athletes, aged 18-49 years) using a water-excited 3D dual echo steady state (DESS) sequence. In a subset of these subjects (18 water-polo players), additional True Fast Imaging with Steady-state Precession (TrueFISP) images were acquired from the right hip joint. For both MR image sets, an active shape model based algorithm was used to generate automated 3D bone reconstructions of the proximal femur. Subsequently, a local coordinate system of the femur was constructed to compute a 2D shape map to project femoral head sphericity for calculation of alpha angles around the FHN junction. To evaluate automated alpha angle measures, manual analyses were performed on anterosuperior and anterior radial MR slices from the FHN junction that were automatically reformatted using the constructed coordinate system. High intra- and inter-rater reliability (intra-class correlation coefficients  >  0.95) was found for manual alpha angle measurements from the auto-extracted anterosuperior and anterior radial slices. Strong correlations were observed between manual and automatic measures of alpha angles for anterosuperior (r  =  0.84) and anterior (r  =  0.92) FHN positions. For matched DESS and TrueFISP images, there were no significant differences between automated alpha angle measures obtained from the upper anterior quadrant of the FHN junction (two-way repeated measures ANOVA, F  <  0.01, p  =  0.98). Our automatic 3D method analysed MR images of the hip joints to generate alpha angle measures around the FHN junction circumference with very good reliability and reproducibility. This work has the

  11. Comparison of INSAT-3D AOD over Indian region with satellite- and ground-based measurements: a data assimilation perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sumit; George, John P.; Sreevathsa, M. N. Raghavendra; Indira Rani, S.

    2016-05-01

    This paper aims at comparing the INSAT-3D AOD with other space based observations over the continental regions. INSAT-3D launched in 2013 is an advanced geostationary weather satellite of India at 82° East longitude provides Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) observations at 650 nm over both land and ocean. The level-3 daily AOD measurements from MODIS (both Aqua and Terra) and MISR are used for comparison with that from INSAT-3D. This work is applied during premonsoon season of 2015. Overall statistical scores and systematic errors are compared to characterize various error sources. Our study indicates that significant differences exist between different aerosol observations which may be partly due to retrieval algorithm, sensor configurations and temporal sampling. Comparison of INSAT observed AOD shows less bias towards MISR and MODIS-Terra observed AOD than with MODIS-Aqua. The INSAT observations over oceanic region have better correlation, minimum bias and rmse than land region. Overall, the mean bias of the dataset is ±0.05, with a root mean square error of 0.22, but these errors are also found highly dependent on geographical region. Additionally, we compared INSAT 660 nm AOD with two AERONET ground stations. The comparison of INSAT with different observations shows that the retrieved AOD is closer to the ground-based data than the MISR and MODIS AOD.

  12. 3D morphological measurements of dental casts with occlusal relationship using microfocus X-ray CT.

    PubMed

    Kamegawa, Masayuki; Nakamura, Masayuki; Tsutsumi, Sadami

    2008-07-01

    In the diagnosis of dental occlusion, it is necessary to quantitatively measure interocclusal contacts and transfer them to a computer model. In this aspect, three-dimensional computer models of upper and lower dental casts play a significant role. In this study, we proposed a new method to measure occlusal interaction by using a microfocus X-ray CT technique. Measurement accuracy was determined as +/-0.03 mm in comparison with a coordinate measuring machine. A superimposition procedure for two sets of three-dimensional dental cast models was also established. Using the same dental cast, the standard deviation between the two sets of models was +/-0.015 mm - which was defined as measurement precision. Between an optical laser scanner and the microfocus X-ray CT system, the standard deviation measured between the two models was +/-0.05 mm. Data were acquired when upper and lower dental casts mounted on the bite impression were scanned, and then occlusal interaction, contacts, and distance distribution between the casts were visualized by a colored map on the cast models. Within the limitations of the current study, it was successfully demonstrated that microfocus Xray CT was well poised for quantitative measurement of occlusal interaction. PMID:18833768

  13. 3D MEMS in Standard Processes: Fabrication, Quality Assurance, and Novel Measurement Microstructures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Gisela; Lawton, Russell A.

    2000-01-01

    Three-dimensional MEMS microsystems that are commercially fabricated require minimal post-processing and are easily integrated with CMOS signal processing electronics. Measurements to evaluate the fabrication process (such as cross-sectional imaging and device performance characterization) provide much needed feedback in terms of reliability and quality assurance. MEMS technology is bringing a new class of microscale measurements to fruition. The relatively small size of MEMS microsystems offers the potential for higher fidelit