Science.gov

Sample records for 3d volumetric approach

  1. Laser Based 3D Volumetric Display System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-03-01

    Literature, Costa Mesa, CA July 1983. 3. "A Real Time Autostereoscopic Multiplanar 3D Display System", Rodney Don Williams, Felix Garcia, Jr., Texas...8217 .- NUMBERS LASER BASED 3D VOLUMETRIC DISPLAY SYSTEM PR: CD13 0. AUTHOR(S) PE: N/AWIU: DN303151 P. Soltan, J. Trias, W. Robinson, W. Dahlke 7...laser generated 3D volumetric images on a rotating double helix, (where the 3D displays are computer controlled for group viewing with the naked eye

  2. Volumetric 3D Display System with Static Screen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geng, Jason

    2011-01-01

    Current display technology has relied on flat, 2D screens that cannot truly convey the third dimension of visual information: depth. In contrast to conventional visualization that is primarily based on 2D flat screens, the volumetric 3D display possesses a true 3D display volume, and places physically each 3D voxel in displayed 3D images at the true 3D (x,y,z) spatial position. Each voxel, analogous to a pixel in a 2D image, emits light from that position to form a real 3D image in the eyes of the viewers. Such true volumetric 3D display technology provides both physiological (accommodation, convergence, binocular disparity, and motion parallax) and psychological (image size, linear perspective, shading, brightness, etc.) depth cues to human visual systems to help in the perception of 3D objects. In a volumetric 3D display, viewers can watch the displayed 3D images from a completely 360 view without using any special eyewear. The volumetric 3D display techniques may lead to a quantum leap in information display technology and can dramatically change the ways humans interact with computers, which can lead to significant improvements in the efficiency of learning and knowledge management processes. Within a block of glass, a large amount of tiny dots of voxels are created by using a recently available machining technique called laser subsurface engraving (LSE). The LSE is able to produce tiny physical crack points (as small as 0.05 mm in diameter) at any (x,y,z) location within the cube of transparent material. The crack dots, when illuminated by a light source, scatter the light around and form visible voxels within the 3D volume. The locations of these tiny voxels are strategically determined such that each can be illuminated by a light ray from a high-resolution digital mirror device (DMD) light engine. The distribution of these voxels occupies the full display volume within the static 3D glass screen. This design eliminates any moving screen seen in previous

  3. 3D volumetric radar using 94-GHz millimeter waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takács, Barnabás

    2006-05-01

    This article describes a novel approach to the real-time visualization of 3D imagery obtained from a 3D millimeter wave scanning radar. The MMW radar system employs a spinning antenna to generate a fan-shaped scanning pattern of the entire scene. The beams formed this way provide all weather 3D distance measurements (range/azimuth display) of objects as they appear on the ground. The beam width of the antenna and its side lobes are optimized to produce the best possible resolution even at distances of up to 15 Kms. To create a full 3D data set the fan-pattern is tilted up and down with the help of a controlled stepper motor. For our experiments we collected data at 0.1 degrees increments while using both bi-static as well as a mono-static antennas in our arrangement. The data collected formed a stack of range-azimuth images in the shape of a cone. This information is displayed using our high-end 3D visualization engine capable of displaying high-resolution volumetric models with 30 frames per second. The resulting 3D scenes can then be viewed from any angle and subsequently processed to integrate, fuse or match them against real-life sensor imagery or 3D model data stored in a synthetic database.

  4. Slow Growing Volumetric Subdivision for 3D Volumetric Data

    SciTech Connect

    Pascucci, V; Kahn, S; Kelley, R; Kilbourne, C; Porter, F; Wargelin, B

    2004-12-16

    In recent years subdivision methods have been successfully applied to the multi-resolution representation and compression of surface meshes. Unfortunately their use in the volumetric case has remained impractical because of the use of tensor-product generalizations that induce an excessive growth of the mesh size before sufficient number is preformed. This technical sketch presents a new subdivision technique that refines volumetric (and higher-dimensional) meshes at the same rate of surface meshes. The scheme builds adaptive refinements of a mesh without using special decompositions of the cells connecting different levels of resolution. Lower dimensional ''sharp'' features are also handled directly in a natural way. The averaging rules allow to reproduce the same smoothness of the two best known previous tensor product refinement methods.

  5. Volumetric visualization of 3D data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, Gregory; Miles, Richard

    1989-01-01

    In recent years, there has been a rapid growth in the ability to obtain detailed data on large complex structures in three dimensions. This development occurred first in the medical field, with CAT (computer aided tomography) scans and now magnetic resonance imaging, and in seismological exploration. With the advances in supercomputing and computational fluid dynamics, and in experimental techniques in fluid dynamics, there is now the ability to produce similar large data fields representing 3D structures and phenomena in these disciplines. These developments have produced a situation in which currently there is access to data which is too complex to be understood using the tools available for data reduction and presentation. Researchers in these areas are becoming limited by their ability to visualize and comprehend the 3D systems they are measuring and simulating.

  6. Volumetric image display for complex 3D data visualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsao, Che-Chih; Chen, Jyh Shing

    2000-05-01

    A volumetric image display is a new display technology capable of displaying computer generated 3D images in a volumetric space. Many viewers can walk around the display and see the image from omni-directions simultaneously without wearing any glasses. The image is real and possesses all major elements in both physiological and psychological depth cues. Due to the volumetric nature of its image, the VID can provide the most natural human-machine interface in operations involving 3D data manipulation and 3D targets monitoring. The technology creates volumetric 3D images by projecting a series of profiling images distributed in the space form a volumetric image because of the after-image effect of human eyes. Exemplary applications in biomedical image visualization were tested on a prototype display, using different methods to display a data set from Ct-scans. The features of this display technology make it most suitable for applications that require quick understanding of the 3D relations, need frequent spatial interactions with the 3D images, or involve time-varying 3D data. It can also be useful for group discussion and decision making.

  7. Volumetric 3D display using a DLP projection engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Jason

    2012-03-01

    In this article, we describe a volumetric 3D display system based on the high speed DLPTM (Digital Light Processing) projection engine. Existing two-dimensional (2D) flat screen displays often lead to ambiguity and confusion in high-dimensional data/graphics presentation due to lack of true depth cues. Even with the help of powerful 3D rendering software, three-dimensional (3D) objects displayed on a 2D flat screen may still fail to provide spatial relationship or depth information correctly and effectively. Essentially, 2D displays have to rely upon capability of human brain to piece together a 3D representation from 2D images. Despite the impressive mental capability of human visual system, its visual perception is not reliable if certain depth cues are missing. In contrast, volumetric 3D display technologies to be discussed in this article are capable of displaying 3D volumetric images in true 3D space. Each "voxel" on a 3D image (analogous to a pixel in 2D image) locates physically at the spatial position where it is supposed to be, and emits light from that position toward omni-directions to form a real 3D image in 3D space. Such a volumetric 3D display provides both physiological depth cues and psychological depth cues to human visual system to truthfully perceive 3D objects. It yields a realistic spatial representation of 3D objects and simplifies our understanding to the complexity of 3D objects and spatial relationship among them.

  8. Semi-quantitative assessment of right ventricular function in comparison to a 3D volumetric approach: a cardiovascular magnetic resonance study.

    PubMed

    Nijveldt, Robin; Germans, Tjeerd; McCann, Gerald P; Beek, Aernout M; van Rossum, Albert C

    2008-11-01

    Right ventricular (RV) volume measurements with cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) is considered the gold standard, but acquisition and analysis remain time-consuming. The aim of our study was therefore to investigate the accuracy and performance of a semi-quantitative assessment of RV function in CMR, compared to the standard quantitative approach. Seventy-five subjects with pulmonary hypertension (15), anterior myocardial infarction (15), inferior myocardial infarction (15), Brugada syndrome (15) and normal subjects (15) underwent cine CMR. RV end-systolic and end-diastolic volumes were determined to calculate RV ejection fraction (EF). Four-chamber cine images were used to measure tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion (TAPSE). RV fractional shortening (RVFS) was calculated by dividing TAPSE by the RV end-diastolic length. RV EF correlated significantly with TAPSE (r = 0.62, p < 0.01) and RVFS (r = 0.67, p < 0.01). Sensitivity to predict RV dysfunction was comparable between TAPSE and RVFS, with higher specificity for RVFS, but comparable areas under the ROC curve. Intra- and inter-observer variability of RV EF was better than TAPSE (3%/4% versus 7%/15%, respectively). For routine screening in clinical practice, TAPSE and RVFS seem reliable and easy methods to identify patients with RV dysfunction. The 3D volumetric approach is preferred to assess RV function for research purposes or to evaluate treatment response.

  9. Massively parallel implementation of 3D-RISM calculation with volumetric 3D-FFT.

    PubMed

    Maruyama, Yutaka; Yoshida, Norio; Tadano, Hiroto; Takahashi, Daisuke; Sato, Mitsuhisa; Hirata, Fumio

    2014-07-05

    A new three-dimensional reference interaction site model (3D-RISM) program for massively parallel machines combined with the volumetric 3D fast Fourier transform (3D-FFT) was developed, and tested on the RIKEN K supercomputer. The ordinary parallel 3D-RISM program has a limitation on the number of parallelizations because of the limitations of the slab-type 3D-FFT. The volumetric 3D-FFT relieves this limitation drastically. We tested the 3D-RISM calculation on the large and fine calculation cell (2048(3) grid points) on 16,384 nodes, each having eight CPU cores. The new 3D-RISM program achieved excellent scalability to the parallelization, running on the RIKEN K supercomputer. As a benchmark application, we employed the program, combined with molecular dynamics simulation, to analyze the oligomerization process of chymotrypsin Inhibitor 2 mutant. The results demonstrate that the massive parallel 3D-RISM program is effective to analyze the hydration properties of the large biomolecular systems.

  10. Multi-sensor 3D volumetric reconstruction using CUDA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aliakbarpour, Hadi; Almeida, Luis; Menezes, Paulo; Dias, Jorge

    2011-12-01

    This paper presents a full-body volumetric reconstruction of a person in a scene using a sensor network, where some of them can be mobile. The sensor network is comprised of couples of camera and inertial sensor (IS). Taking advantage of IS, the 3D reconstruction is performed using no planar ground assumption. Moreover, IS in each couple is used to define a virtual camera whose image plane is horizontal and aligned with the earth cardinal directions. The IS is furthermore used to define a set of inertial planes in the scene. The image plane of each virtual camera is projected onto this set of parallel-horizontal inertial-planes, using some adapted homography functions. A parallel processing architecture is proposed in order to perform human real-time volumetric reconstruction. The real-time characteristic is obtained by implementing the reconstruction algorithm on a graphics processing unit (GPU) using Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA). In order to show the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm, a variety of the gestures of a person acting in the scene is reconstructed and demonstrated. Some analyses have been carried out to measure the performance of the algorithm in terms of processing time. The proposed framework has potential to be used by different applications such as smart-room, human behavior analysis and 3D teleconference. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  11. 3D Volumetric Modeling and Microvascular Reconstruction of Irradiated Lumbosacral Defects after Oncologic Resection.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Tutor, Emilio; Romeo, Marco; Chae, Michael P; Hunter-Smith, David J; Rozen, Warren Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Locoregional flaps are sufficient in most sacral reconstructions. However, large sacral defects due to malignancy necessitate a different reconstructive approach, with local flaps compromised by radiation and regional flaps inadequate for broad surface areas or substantial volume obliteration. In this report, we present our experience using free muscle transfer for volumetric reconstruction, in such cases, and demonstrate three-dimensional (3D) haptic models of the sacral defect to aid preoperative planning. Five consecutive patients with irradiated sacral defects secondary to oncologic resections were included, surface area ranging from 143-600 cm(2). Latissimus dorsi (LD)-based free flap sacral reconstruction was performed in each case, between 2005 and 2011. Where the superior gluteal artery was compromised, the subcostal artery (SA) was used as a recipient vessel. Microvascular technique, complications, and outcomes are reported. The use of volumetric analysis and 3D printing is also demonstrated, with imaging data converted to 3D images suitable for 3D printing with Osirix software (Pixmeo, Geneva, Switzerland). An office-based, desktop 3D printer was used to print 3D models of sacral defects, used to demonstrate surface area and contour and produce a volumetric print of the dead space needed for flap obliteration. The clinical series of LD free flap reconstructions is presented, with successful transfer in all cases, and adequate soft-tissue cover and volume obliteration achieved. The original use of the SA as a recipient vessel was successfully achieved. All wounds healed uneventfully. 3D printing is also demonstrated as a useful tool for 3D evaluation of volume and dead space. Free flaps offer unique benefits in sacral reconstruction where local tissue is compromised by irradiation and tumor recurrence, and dead space requires accurate volumetric reconstruction. We describe for the first time the use of the SA as a recipient in free flap sacral

  12. Combining volumetric edge display and multiview display for expression of natural 3D images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasui, Ryota; Matsuda, Isamu; Kakeya, Hideki

    2006-02-01

    In the present paper the authors present a novel stereoscopic display method combining volumetric edge display technology and multiview display technology to realize presentation of natural 3D images where the viewers do not suffer from contradiction between binocular convergence and focal accommodation of the eyes, which causes eyestrain and sickness. We adopt volumetric display method only for edge drawing, while we adopt stereoscopic approach for flat areas of the image. Since focal accommodation of our eyes is affected only by the edge part of the image, natural focal accommodation can be induced if the edges of the 3D image are drawn on the proper depth. The conventional stereo-matching technique can give us robust depth values of the pixels which constitute noticeable edges. Also occlusion and gloss of the objects can be roughly expressed with the proposed method since we use stereoscopic approach for the flat area. We can attain a system where many users can view natural 3D objects at the consistent position and posture at the same time in this system. A simple optometric experiment using a refractometer suggests that the proposed method can give us 3-D images without contradiction between binocular convergence and focal accommodation.

  13. [Volumetric CT scanning: 2D and 3D reconstruction].

    PubMed

    Ferretti, G-R; Jankowski, A

    2010-12-01

    This review aims to present the 2D and 3D reconstructions derived from high-resolution volume CT acquisitions and to illustrate their thoracic applications, as well as showing the interest and limitations of these techniques. We present new applications for computer-assisted detection (CAD) and tools for quantification of pulmonary lesions. Copyright © 2010 SPLF. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. 3-d volumetric evaluation of human mandibular growth.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Mathew; Reynolds, Michael; Adeeb, Samer; El-Bialy, Tarek

    2011-01-01

    Bone growth is a complex process that is controlled by a multitude of mechanisms that are not fully understood.Most of the current methods employed to measure the growth of bones focus on either studying cadaveric bones from different individuals of different ages, or successive two-dimensional (2D) radiographs. Both techniques have their known limitations. The purpose of this study was to explore a technique for quantifying the three dimensional (3D) growth of an adolescent human mandible over the period of one year utilizing cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans taken for regular orthodontic records. Three -dimensional virtual models were created from the CBCT data using mainstream medical imaging software. A comparison between computer-generated surface meshes of successive 3-D virtual models illustrates the magnitude of relative mandible growth. The results of this work are in agreement with previously reported data from human cadaveric studies and implantable marker studies. The presented method provides a new relatively simple basis (utilizing commercially available software) to visualize and evaluate individualized 3D (mandibular) growth in vivo.

  15. 3-D Volumetric Evaluation of Human Mandibular Growth

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, Mathew; Reynolds, Michael; Adeeb, Samer; El-Bialy, Tarek

    2011-01-01

    Bone growth is a complex process that is controlled by a multitude of mechanisms that are not fully understood.Most of the current methods employed to measure the growth of bones focus on either studying cadaveric bones from different individuals of different ages, or successive two-dimensional (2D) radiographs. Both techniques have their known limitations. The purpose of this study was to explore a technique for quantifying the three dimensional (3D) growth of an adolescent human mandible over the period of one year utilizing cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans taken for regular orthodontic records. Three -dimensional virtual models were created from the CBCT data using mainstream medical imaging software. A comparison between computer-generated surface meshes of successive 3-D virtual models illustrates the magnitude of relative mandible growth. The results of this work are in agreement with previously reported data from human cadaveric studies and implantable marker studies. The presented method provides a new relatively simple basis (utilizing commercially available software) to visualize and evaluate individualized 3D (mandibular) growth in vivo. PMID:22046201

  16. 3D change detection - Approaches and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Rongjun; Tian, Jiaojiao; Reinartz, Peter

    2016-12-01

    Due to the unprecedented technology development of sensors, platforms and algorithms for 3D data acquisition and generation, 3D spaceborne, airborne and close-range data, in the form of image based, Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) based point clouds, Digital Elevation Models (DEM) and 3D city models, become more accessible than ever before. Change detection (CD) or time-series data analysis in 3D has gained great attention due to its capability of providing volumetric dynamics to facilitate more applications and provide more accurate results. The state-of-the-art CD reviews aim to provide a comprehensive synthesis and to simplify the taxonomy of the traditional remote sensing CD techniques, which mainly sit within the boundary of 2D image/spectrum analysis, largely ignoring the particularities of 3D aspects of the data. The inclusion of 3D data for change detection (termed 3D CD), not only provides a source with different modality for analysis, but also transcends the border of traditional top-view 2D pixel/object-based analysis to highly detailed, oblique view or voxel-based geometric analysis. This paper reviews the recent developments and applications of 3D CD using remote sensing and close-range data, in support of both academia and industry researchers who seek for solutions in detecting and analyzing 3D dynamics of various objects of interest. We first describe the general considerations of 3D CD problems in different processing stages and identify CD types based on the information used, being the geometric comparison and geometric-spectral analysis. We then summarize relevant works and practices in urban, environment, ecology and civil applications, etc. Given the broad spectrum of applications and different types of 3D data, we discuss important issues in 3D CD methods. Finally, we present concluding remarks in algorithmic aspects of 3D CD.

  17. 3D texture analysis of solitary pulmonary nodules using co-occurrence matrix from volumetric lung CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhara, Ashis Kumar; Mukhopadhyay, Sudipta; Khandelwal, Niranjan

    2013-02-01

    In this paper we have investigated a new approach for texture features extraction using co-occurrence matrix from volumetric lung CT image. Traditionally texture analysis is performed in 2D and is suitable for images collected from 2D imaging modality. The use of 3D imaging modalities provide the scope of texture analysis from 3D object and 3D texture feature are more realistic to represent 3D object. In this work, Haralick's texture features are extended in 3D and computed from volumetric data considering 26 neighbors. The optimal texture features to characterize the internal structure of Solitary Pulmonary Nodules (SPN) are selected based on area under curve (AUC) values of ROC curve and p values from 2-tailed Student's t-test. The selected texture feature in 3D to represent SPN can be used in efficient Computer Aided Diagnostic (CAD) design plays an important role in fast and accurate lung cancer screening. The reduced number of input features to the CAD system will decrease the computational time and classification errors caused by irrelevant features. In the present work, SPN are classified from Ground Glass Nodule (GGN) using Artificial Neural Network (ANN) classifier considering top five 3D texture features and top five 2D texture features separately. The classification is performed on 92 SPN and 25 GGN from Imaging Database Resources Initiative (IDRI) public database and classification accuracy using 3D texture features and 2D texture features provide 97.17% and 89.1% respectively.

  18. Correlation of 3D volumetric positioning errors and temperature distributions: theory and measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svoboda, O.; Bach, P.; Yang, J.; Wang, C.

    2006-11-01

    In a real machine shop environment and under various spindle loads, the machine thermal expansion may cause large 3D volumetric positioning errors. With an intelligent controller, it is possible to compensate these errors provide that the relations between the 3D volumetric positioning errors and the temperature distribution were measured. A laser vector measurement technique developed by Optodyne was used for a quick measurement of 3D volumetric positioning errors of a CNC machining center under various spindle loads, machine movement and ambient conditions. Correlation calculations were used to determine the key temperatures and the various positioning errors. Preliminary results showed that large machine temperature changes caused somewhat small straightness error changes but large squareness error changes. Using the measured position errors, several error maps could be generated. Compensation tables at an actual thermal state can be interpolated to achieve higher accuracy at various thermal loadings.

  19. Current issues on 3D volumetric positioning accuracy: measurement, compensation, and definition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, C.

    2008-10-01

    Traditionally, manufacturers have ensured part accuracy by linear calibration of each machine tool axis. The conventional definition of the 3-D volumetric positioning error is the root mean square of the three-axis displacement error. 20 years ago, the dominate error is the lead screw pitch error of 3 axes. This definition is adequate. However, now the machine accuracy has been improved with better lead screw, linear encoder and compensation, the dominate errors become the squareness errors and straightness errors. Hence the above definition is inadequate. During the past years, the industry has seen demand emerge for the "volumetric accuracy" specification on machine tools. One hurdle remains: a standard definition so that everyone measures volumetric accuracy with the same yardstick. The issue has been discussed in many Standards Committees, machine tool builders and the metrology community. Reported here are, a new 3D volumetric positioning error measurement and compensation technique, proposed definitions or measures of 3 D volumetric positioning errors of a CNC machine tool, and its verification.

  20. Average Cross-Sectional Area of DebriSat Fragments Using Volumetrically Constructed 3D Representations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scruggs, T.; Moraguez, M.; Patankar, K.; Fitz-Coy, N.; Liou, J.-C.; Sorge, M.; Huynh, T.

    2016-01-01

    Debris fragments from the hypervelocity impact testing of DebriSat are being collected and characterized for use in updating existing satellite breakup models. One of the key parameters utilized in these models is the ballistic coefficient of the fragment which is directly related to its area-to-mass ratio. However, since the attitude of fragments varies during their orbital lifetime, it is customary to use the average cross-sectional area in the calculation of the area-to-mass ratio. The average cross-sectional area is defined as the average of the projected surface areas perpendicular to the direction of motion and has been shown to be equal to one-fourth of the total surface area of a convex object. Unfortunately, numerous fragments obtained from the DebriSat experiment show significant concavity (i.e., shadowing) and thus we have explored alternate methods for computing the average cross-sectional area of the fragments. An imaging system based on the volumetric reconstruction of a 3D object from multiple 2D photographs of the object was developed for use in determining the size characteristic (i.e., characteristics length) of the DebriSat fragments. For each fragment, the imaging system generates N number of images from varied azimuth and elevation angles and processes them using a space-carving algorithm to construct a 3D point cloud of the fragment. This paper describes two approaches for calculating the average cross-sectional area of debris fragments based on the 3D imager. Approach A utilizes the constructed 3D object to generate equally distributed cross-sectional area projections and then averages them to determine the average cross-sectional area. Approach B utilizes a weighted average of the area of the 2D photographs to directly compute the average cross-sectional area. A comparison of the accuracy and computational needs of each approach is described as well as preliminary results of an analysis to determine the "optimal" number of images needed for

  1. Data acquirement and remodeling on volumetric 3D emissive display system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Yi; Liu, Xu; Lin, Yuanfang; Zhang, Huangzhu; Zhang, Xiaojie; Liu, Xiangdong

    2005-01-01

    Since present display technology is projecting 3D to 2D, people's eyes are deceived by the loss of spatial data. So it's a revolution for human vision to develop a real 3D display device. The monitor is based on emissive pad with 64*256 LED array. When rotated at a frequency of 10 Hertz, it shows real 3D images with pixels at their exact positions. The article presents a procedure that the software possesses 3D object and converts to volumetric 3D formatted data for this system. For simulating the phenomenon on PC, it also presents a program remodels the object based on OpenGL. An algorithm for faster processing and optimizing rendering speed is also given. The monitor provides real 3D scenes with free visual angle. It can be expected that the revolution will bring a strike on modern monitors and will lead to a new world for display technology.

  2. Machine tool 3D volumetric positioning error measurement under various thermal conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svoboda, O.; Bach, P.; Liotto, G.; Wang, C.

    2006-11-01

    To manufacture good quality or accurate parts, the measurement and compensation of three dimensional volumetric positioning errors of a machine tool are very important. Using a conventional laser interferometer to measure the straightness and squareness errors is very difficult and time consuming. Recently, Optodyne has developed a laser vector technique for the measurement of 3D volumetric positioning errors, including 3 linear displacement errors, 6 straightness errors and 3 squareness errors in a very short time. Using this laser vector technique combine with the data obtained from a set of thermocouples placed at key locations of the machine tool structure, the relations between the machine temperature distribution and the 3D positioning errors can be measured and modeled. The results can be used to compensate the 3D volumetric positioning errors under various thermal conditions. Reported here are the definition of the 3D volumetric positioning errors; the basic theory and description of the laser vector technique; the temperature sensors and the laser vector technique measurement results obtained on a vertical CNC machining center under different spindle load, machine temperature and environmental temperature.

  3. JP3D compressed-domain watermarking of volumetric medical data sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouled Zaid, Azza; Makhloufi, Achraf; Olivier, Christian

    2010-01-01

    Increasing transmission of medical data across multiple user systems raises concerns for medical image watermarking. Additionaly, the use of volumetric images triggers the need for efficient compression techniques in picture archiving and communication systems (PACS), or telemedicine applications. This paper describes an hybrid data hiding/compression system, adapted to volumetric medical imaging. The central contribution is to integrate blind watermarking, based on turbo trellis-coded quantization (TCQ), to JP3D encoder. Results of our method applied to Magnetic Resonance (MR) and Computed Tomography (CT) medical images have shown that our watermarking scheme is robust to JP3D compression attacks and can provide relative high data embedding rate whereas keep a relative lower distortion.

  4. Improved Second-Generation 3-D Volumetric Display System. Revision 2

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-10-01

    submarines operate in littoral waters, awareness of the ocean bottom has increased. In the case of the Navy’s new 3-D display, sonar data of the ocean...color for group viewing in the Submarine Attack Center to guide the submarine in shallow waters, live and in real time. In the case of the 3-D Volu...considering the following. In the case of volumetric scanning, a typical volume with a resolution of 1000 voxels on each side would contain (1000)3

  5. Morphological and Volumetric Assessment of Cerebral Ventricular System with 3D Slicer Software.

    PubMed

    Gonzalo Domínguez, Miguel; Hernández, Cristina; Ruisoto, Pablo; Juanes, Juan A; Prats, Alberto; Hernández, Tomás

    2016-06-01

    We present a technological process based on the 3D Slicer software for the three-dimensional study of the brain's ventricular system with teaching purposes. It values the morphology of this complex brain structure, as a whole and in any spatial position, being able to compare it with pathological studies, where its anatomy visibly changes. 3D Slicer was also used to obtain volumetric measurements in order to provide a more comprehensive and detail representation of the ventricular system. We assess the potential this software has for processing high resolution images, taken from Magnetic Resonance and generate the three-dimensional reconstruction of ventricular system.

  6. The Space {B^{-1}_{∞, ∞}}, Volumetric Sparseness, and 3D NSE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farhat, Aseel; Grujić, Zoran; Leitmeyer, Keith

    2017-09-01

    In the context of the {L^\\infty}-theory of the 3D NSE, it is shown that smallness of a solution in Besov space {B^{-1}_{\\infty, \\infty}} suffices to prevent a possible blow-up. In particular, it is revealed that the aforementioned condition implies a particular local spatial structure of the regions of high velocity magnitude, namely, the structure of local volumetric sparseness on the scale comparable to the radius of spatial analyticity measured in {L^\\infty}.

  7. An inverse hyper-spherical harmonics-based formulation for reconstructing 3D volumetric lung deformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santhanam, Anand P.; Min, Yugang; Mudur, Sudhir P.; Rastogi, Abhinav; Ruddy, Bari H.; Shah, Amish; Divo, Eduardo; Kassab, Alain; Rolland, Jannick P.; Kupelian, Patrick

    2010-07-01

    A method to estimate the deformation operator for the 3D volumetric lung dynamics of human subjects is described in this paper. For known values of air flow and volumetric displacement, the deformation operator and subsequently the elastic properties of the lung are estimated in terms of a Green's function. A Hyper-Spherical Harmonic (HSH) transformation is employed to compute the deformation operator. The hyper-spherical coordinate transformation method discussed in this paper facilitates accounting for the heterogeneity of the deformation operator using a finite number of frequency coefficients. Spirometry measurements are used to provide values for the airflow inside the lung. Using a 3D optical flow-based method, the 3D volumetric displacement of the left and right lungs, which represents the local anatomy and deformation of a human subject, was estimated from 4D-CT dataset. Results from an implementation of the method show the estimation of the deformation operator for the left and right lungs of a human subject with non-small cell lung cancer. Validation of the proposed method shows that we can estimate the Young's modulus of each voxel within a 2% error level.

  8. The effect of volumetric (3D) tactile symbols within inclusive tactile maps.

    PubMed

    Gual, Jaume; Puyuelo, Marina; Lloveras, Joaquim

    2015-05-01

    Point, linear and areal elements, which are two-dimensional and of a graphic nature, are the morphological elements employed when designing tactile maps and symbols for visually impaired users. However, beyond the two-dimensional domain, there is a fourth group of elements - volumetric elements - which mapmakers do not take sufficiently into account when it comes to designing tactile maps and symbols. This study analyses the effect of including volumetric, or 3D, symbols within a tactile map. In order to do so, the researchers compared two tactile maps. One of them uses only two-dimensional elements and is produced using thermoforming, one of the most popular systems in this field, while the other includes volumetric symbols, thus highlighting the possibilities opened up by 3D printing, a new area of production. The results of the study show that including 3D symbols improves the efficiency and autonomous use of these products. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd and The Ergonomics Society. All rights reserved.

  9. Parallel implementation of 3D FFT with volumetric decomposition schemes for efficient molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Jaewoon; Kobayashi, Chigusa; Imamura, Toshiyuki; Sugita, Yuji

    2016-03-01

    Three-dimensional Fast Fourier Transform (3D FFT) plays an important role in a wide variety of computer simulations and data analyses, including molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. In this study, we develop hybrid (MPI+OpenMP) parallelization schemes of 3D FFT based on two new volumetric decompositions, mainly for the particle mesh Ewald (PME) calculation in MD simulations. In one scheme, (1d_Alltoall), five all-to-all communications in one dimension are carried out, and in the other, (2d_Alltoall), one two-dimensional all-to-all communication is combined with two all-to-all communications in one dimension. 2d_Alltoall is similar to the conventional volumetric decomposition scheme. We performed benchmark tests of 3D FFT for the systems with different grid sizes using a large number of processors on the K computer in RIKEN AICS. The two schemes show comparable performances, and are better than existing 3D FFTs. The performances of 1d_Alltoall and 2d_Alltoall depend on the supercomputer network system and number of processors in each dimension. There is enough leeway for users to optimize performance for their conditions. In the PME method, short-range real-space interactions as well as long-range reciprocal-space interactions are calculated. Our volumetric decomposition schemes are particularly useful when used in conjunction with the recently developed midpoint cell method for short-range interactions, due to the same decompositions of real and reciprocal spaces. The 1d_Alltoall scheme of 3D FFT takes 4.7 ms to simulate one MD cycle for a virus system containing more than 1 million atoms using 32,768 cores on the K computer.

  10. A GPU-Accelerated 3-D Coupled Subsample Estimation Algorithm for Volumetric Breast Strain Elastography.

    PubMed

    Peng, Bo; Wang, Yuqi; Hall, Timothy J; Jiang, Jingfeng

    2017-04-01

    Our primary objective of this paper was to extend a previously published 2-D coupled subsample tracking algorithm for 3-D speckle tracking in the framework of ultrasound breast strain elastography. In order to overcome heavy computational cost, we investigated the use of a graphic processing unit (GPU) to accelerate the 3-D coupled subsample speckle tracking method. The performance of the proposed GPU implementation was tested using a tissue-mimicking phantom and in vivo breast ultrasound data. The performance of this 3-D subsample tracking algorithm was compared with the conventional 3-D quadratic subsample estimation algorithm. On the basis of these evaluations, we concluded that the GPU implementation of this 3-D subsample estimation algorithm can provide high-quality strain data (i.e., high correlation between the predeformation and the motion-compensated postdeformation radio frequency echo data and high contrast-to-noise ratio strain images), as compared with the conventional 3-D quadratic subsample algorithm. Using the GPU implementation of the 3-D speckle tracking algorithm, volumetric strain data can be achieved relatively fast (approximately 20 s per volume [2.5 cm ×2.5 cm ×2.5 cm]).

  11. Application of a 3D volumetric display for radiation therapy treatment planning I: quality assurance procedures.

    PubMed

    Gong, Xing; Kirk, Michael Collins; Napoli, Josh; Stutsman, Sandy; Zusag, Tom; Khelashvili, Gocha; Chu, James

    2009-07-17

    To design and implement a set of quality assurance tests for an innovative 3D volumetric display for radiation treatment planning applications. A genuine 3D display (Perspecta Spatial 3D, Actuality-Systems Inc., Bedford, MA) has been integrated with the Pinnacle TPS (Philips Medical Systems, Madison WI), for treatment planning. The Perspecta 3D display renders a 25 cm diameter volume that is viewable from any side, floating within a translucent dome. In addition to displaying all 3D data exported from Pinnacle, the system provides a 3D mouse to define beam angles and apertures and to measure distance. The focus of this work is the design and implementation of a quality assurance program for 3D displays and specific 3D planning issues as guided by AAPM Task Group Report 53. A series of acceptance and quality assurance tests have been designed to evaluate the accuracy of CT images, contours, beams, and dose distributions as displayed on Perspecta. Three-dimensional matrices, rulers and phantoms with known spatial dimensions were used to check Perspecta's absolute spatial accuracy. In addition, a system of tests was designed to confirm Perspecta's ability to import and display Pinnacle data consistently. CT scans of phantoms were used to confirm beam field size, divergence, and gantry and couch angular accuracy as displayed on Perspecta. Beam angles were verified through Cartesian coordinate system measurements and by CT scans of phantoms rotated at known angles. Beams designed on Perspecta were exported to Pinnacle and checked for accuracy. Dose at sampled points were checked for consistency with Pinnacle and agreed within 1% or 1 mm. All data exported from Pinnacle to Perspecta was displayed consistently. The 3D spatial display of images, contours, and dose distributions were consistent with Pinnacle display. When measured by the 3D ruler, the distances between any two points calculated using Perspecta agreed with Pinnacle within the measurement error.

  12. Volumetric CT-based segmentation of NSCLC using 3D-Slicer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velazquez, Emmanuel Rios; Parmar, Chintan; Jermoumi, Mohammed; Mak, Raymond H.; van Baardwijk, Angela; Fennessy, Fiona M.; Lewis, John H.; de Ruysscher, Dirk; Kikinis, Ron; Lambin, Philippe; Aerts, Hugo J. W. L.

    2013-12-01

    Accurate volumetric assessment in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is critical for adequately informing treatments. In this study we assessed the clinical relevance of a semiautomatic computed tomography (CT)-based segmentation method using the competitive region-growing based algorithm, implemented in the free and public available 3D-Slicer software platform. We compared the 3D-Slicer segmented volumes by three independent observers, who segmented the primary tumour of 20 NSCLC patients twice, to manual slice-by-slice delineations of five physicians. Furthermore, we compared all tumour contours to the macroscopic diameter of the tumour in pathology, considered as the ``gold standard''. The 3D-Slicer segmented volumes demonstrated high agreement (overlap fractions > 0.90), lower volume variability (p = 0.0003) and smaller uncertainty areas (p = 0.0002), compared to manual slice-by-slice delineations. Furthermore, 3D-Slicer segmentations showed a strong correlation to pathology (r = 0.89, 95%CI, 0.81-0.94). Our results show that semiautomatic 3D-Slicer segmentations can be used for accurate contouring and are more stable than manual delineations. Therefore, 3D-Slicer can be employed as a starting point for treatment decisions or for high-throughput data mining research, such as Radiomics, where manual delineating often represent a time-consuming bottleneck.

  13. Volumetric CT-based segmentation of NSCLC using 3D-Slicer

    PubMed Central

    Velazquez, Emmanuel Rios; Parmar, Chintan; Jermoumi, Mohammed; Mak, Raymond H.; van Baardwijk, Angela; Fennessy, Fiona M.; Lewis, John H.; De Ruysscher, Dirk; Kikinis, Ron; Lambin, Philippe; Aerts, Hugo J. W. L.

    2013-01-01

    Accurate volumetric assessment in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is critical for adequately informing treatments. In this study we assessed the clinical relevance of a semiautomatic computed tomography (CT)-based segmentation method using the competitive region-growing based algorithm, implemented in the free and public available 3D-Slicer software platform. We compared the 3D-Slicer segmented volumes by three independent observers, who segmented the primary tumour of 20 NSCLC patients twice, to manual slice-by-slice delineations of five physicians. Furthermore, we compared all tumour contours to the macroscopic diameter of the tumour in pathology, considered as the “gold standard”. The 3D-Slicer segmented volumes demonstrated high agreement (overlap fractions > 0.90), lower volume variability (p = 0.0003) and smaller uncertainty areas (p = 0.0002), compared to manual slice-by-slice delineations. Furthermore, 3D-Slicer segmentations showed a strong correlation to pathology (r = 0.89, 95%CI, 0.81–0.94). Our results show that semiautomatic 3D-Slicer segmentations can be used for accurate contouring and are more stable than manual delineations. Therefore, 3D-Slicer can be employed as a starting point for treatment decisions or for high-throughput data mining research, such as Radiomics, where manual delineating often represent a time-consuming bottleneck. PMID:24346241

  14. 3D Volumetric Strain Modelling of Eruptions at Soufrière Hills Volcano Montserrat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, N. K.; Gottsmann, J.

    2015-12-01

    Volumetric strain data has captured a number of Vulcanian explosions at Soufrière Hills Volcano, Montserrat, which involve the uppermost part of the magmatic system. We previously used volumetric strain data from during one of these explosions to elucidate the geometry of the shallow plumbing system and crustal mechanics at Montserrat for mechanically plausible depressurisation amplitudes. Our results from both forward and inverse 2D models found that it was necessary to incorporate a mechanically weak shallow crust and mechanically compliant halo of material around the highest part of the SHV magmatic system i.e. the conduit, in order to implement geologically realistic conditions of depressurisation and rock strength. However, this model lacks complexity that cannot be implemented in a 2D environment. Here, in the first study of its kind, we use Finite Element Analysis of volumetric strain data in a 3D domain incorporating topography and mechanical complexities as imaged by seismic and gravimetric data. Our model implements topography from a DEM covering the island and surrounding bathymetry and include the mechanically stiff extinct volcanic cores of the Silver Hills and the Centre Hills. Here we present our preliminary findings from the 3D strain modelling and the effect of the extinct volcanic cores on strain partitioning on Montserrat.

  15. Non-invasive volumetric analysis of asymptomatic hands using a 3-D scanner

    PubMed Central

    Shinkai, Hiroki; Yamamoto, Michiro; Tatebe, Masahiro; Iwatsuki, Katsuyuki; Kurimoto, Shigeru; Hirata, Hitoshi

    2017-01-01

    Hand swelling is one of the symptoms often seen in practice, but none of the available morphometric methods can quickly and efficiently quantify hand volume in an objective manner, and the current gold-standard volume measurement requires immersion in water, which can be difficult to use. Therefore, we aimed to analyze the accuracy of using 3-dimensional (3-D) scanning to measure hand volume. First, we compared the hand volume calculated using the 3-D scanner to that calculated from the conventional method among 109 volunteers to determine the reliability of 3-D measurements. We defined the beginning of the hand as the distal wrist crease, and 3-D forms of the hands were captured by the 3-D scanning system. Second, 238 volunteers (87 men, 151 women) with no disease or history of hand surgery underwent 3-D scanning. Data collected included age, height, weight, and shoe size. The wrist circumference (WC) and the distance between distal wrist crease and tip of middle finger (DDT) were measured. Statistical analyses were performed using linear regression to investigate the relationship between the hand volume and these parameters. In the first study, a significantly strong positive correlation was observed [R = 0.98] between the hand volume calculated via 3-D scanning and that calculated via the conventional method. In the second study, no significant differences between the volumes, WC or DDT of right and left hands were found. The correlations of hand volume with weight, WC, and DDT were strong. We created a formula to predict the hand volume using these parameters; these variables explained approximately 80% of the predicted volume. We confirmed that the new 3-D scanning method, which is performed without touching the hand and can record the form of the hand, yields an accurate volumetric analysis of an asymptomatic hand. PMID:28796816

  16. Supervised recursive segmentation of volumetric CT images for 3D reconstruction of lung and vessel tree.

    PubMed

    Li, Xuanping; Wang, Xue; Dai, Yixiang; Zhang, Pengbo

    2015-12-01

    Three dimensional reconstruction of lung and vessel tree has great significance to 3D observation and quantitative analysis for lung diseases. This paper presents non-sheltered 3D models of lung and vessel tree based on a supervised semi-3D lung tissues segmentation method. A recursive strategy based on geometric active contour is proposed instead of the "coarse-to-fine" framework in existing literature to extract lung tissues from the volumetric CT slices. In this model, the segmentation of the current slice is supervised by the result of the previous one slice due to the slight changes between adjacent slice of lung tissues. Through this mechanism, lung tissues in all the slices are segmented fast and accurately. The serious problems of left and right lungs fusion, caused by partial volume effects, and segmentation of pleural nodules can be settled meanwhile during the semi-3D process. The proposed scheme is evaluated by fifteen scans, from eight healthy participants and seven participants suffering from early-stage lung tumors. The results validate the good performance of the proposed method compared with the "coarse-to-fine" framework. The segmented datasets are utilized to reconstruct the non-sheltered 3D models of lung and vessel tree.

  17. Evaluation of feature-based 3-d registration of probabilistic volumetric scenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Restrepo, Maria I.; Ulusoy, Ali O.; Mundy, Joseph L.

    2014-12-01

    Automatic estimation of the world surfaces from aerial images has seen much attention and progress in recent years. Among current modeling technologies, probabilistic volumetric models (PVMs) have evolved as an alternative representation that can learn geometry and appearance in a dense and probabilistic manner. Recent progress, in terms of storage and speed, achieved in the area of volumetric modeling, opens the opportunity to develop new frameworks that make use of the PVM to pursue the ultimate goal of creating an entire map of the earth, where one can reason about the semantics and dynamics of the 3-d world. Aligning 3-d models collected at different time-instances constitutes an important step for successful fusion of large spatio-temporal information. This paper evaluates how effectively probabilistic volumetric models can be aligned using robust feature-matching techniques, while considering different scenarios that reflect the kind of variability observed across aerial video collections from different time instances. More precisely, this work investigates variability in terms of discretization, resolution and sampling density, errors in the camera orientation, and changes in illumination and geographic characteristics. All results are given for large-scale, outdoor sites. In order to facilitate the comparison of the registration performance of PVMs to that of other 3-d reconstruction techniques, the registration pipeline is also carried out using Patch-based Multi-View Stereo (PMVS) algorithm. Registration performance is similar for scenes that have favorable geometry and the appearance characteristics necessary for high quality reconstruction. In scenes containing trees, such as a park, or many buildings, such as a city center, registration performance is significantly more accurate when using the PVM.

  18. Key factors in the design of a LED volumetric 3D display system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yuanfang; Liu, Xu; Yao, Yi; Zhang, Xiaojie; Liu, Xiangdong; Lin, Fengchun

    2005-01-01

    Through careful consideration of key factors that impact upon voxel attributes and image quality, a volumetric three-dimensional (3D) display system employing the rotation of a two-dimensional (2D) thin active panel was developed. It was designed as a lower-cost 3D visualization platform for experimentation and demonstration. Light emitting diodes (LEDs) were arranged into a 256x64 dot matrix on a single surface of the panel, which was positioned symmetrically about the axis of rotation. The motor and necessary supporting structures were located below the panel. LEDs individually of 500 ns response time, 1.6 mm×0.8 mm×0.6 mm external dimensions, 0.38 mm×0.43 mm horizontal and vertical spacing were adopted. The system is functional, providing 512×256×64, i.e. over 8 million addressable voxels within a 292 mm×165 mm cylindrical volume at a refresh frequency in excess of 16 Hz. Due to persistence of vision, momentarily addressed voxels will be perceived and fused into a 3D image. Many static or dynamic 3D scenes were displayed, which can be directly viewed from any position with few occlusion zones and dead zones. Important depth cues like binocular disparity and motion parallax are satisfied naturally.

  19. Feature extraction, analysis, and 3D visualization of local lung regions in volumetric CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delegacz, Andrzej; Lo, Shih-Chung B.; Freedman, Matthew T.; Mun, Seong K.

    2001-05-01

    The purpose of the work was to develop image functions for volumetric segmentation, feature extraction, and enhanced 3D visualization of local regions using CT datasets of human lungs. The system is aimed to assist the radiologist in the analysis of lung nodules. Volumetric datasets consisting of 30-50 thoracic helical low-dose CT slices were used in the study. The 3D topological characteristics of local structures including bronchi, blood vessels, and nodules were computed and evaluated. When a location of a region of interest is identified, the computer would automatically compute size, surface of the area, and normalized shape index of the suspected lesion. The developed system can also allow the user to perform interactive operation for evaluation of lung regions and structures through a user- friendly interface. These functions provide the user with a powerful tool to observe and investigate clinically interesting regions through unconventional radiographic viewings and analyses. The developed functions can also be used to view and analyze patient's lung abnormalities in surgical planning applications. Additionally, we see the possibility of using the system as a teaching tool for correlating anatomy of lungs.

  20. a Geometric Processing Workflow for Transforming Reality-Based 3d Models in Volumetric Meshes Suitable for Fea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonizzi Barsanti, S.; Guidi, G.

    2017-02-01

    Conservation of Cultural Heritage is a key issue and structural changes and damages can influence the mechanical behaviour of artefacts and buildings. The use of Finite Elements Methods (FEM) for mechanical analysis is largely used in modelling stress behaviour. The typical workflow involves the use of CAD 3D models made by Non-Uniform Rational B-splines (NURBS) surfaces, representing the ideal shape of the object to be simulated. Nowadays, 3D documentation of CH has been widely developed through reality-based approaches, but the models are not suitable for a direct use in FEA: the mesh has in fact to be converted to volumetric, and the density has to be reduced since the computational complexity of a FEA grows exponentially with the number of nodes. The focus of this paper is to present a new method aiming at generate the most accurate 3D representation of a real artefact from highly accurate 3D digital models derived from reality-based techniques, maintaining the accuracy of the high-resolution polygonal models in the solid ones. The approach proposed is based on a wise use of retopology procedures and a transformation of this model to a mathematical one made by NURBS surfaces suitable for being processed by volumetric meshers typically embedded in standard FEM packages. The strong simplification with little loss of consistency possible with the retopology step is used for maintaining as much coherence as possible between the original acquired mesh and the simplified model, creating in the meantime a topology that is more favourable for the automatic NURBS conversion.

  1. The Derivation of Fault Volumetric Properties from 3D Trace Maps Using Outcrop Constrained Discrete Fracture Network Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodgetts, David; Seers, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Fault systems are important structural elements within many petroleum reservoirs, acting as potential conduits, baffles or barriers to hydrocarbon migration. Large, seismic-scale faults often serve as reservoir bounding seals, forming structural traps which have proved to be prolific plays in many petroleum provinces. Though inconspicuous within most seismic datasets, smaller subsidiary faults, commonly within the damage zones of parent structures, may also play an important role. These smaller faults typically form narrow, tabular low permeability zones which serve to compartmentalize the reservoir, negatively impacting upon hydrocarbon recovery. Though considerable improvements have been made in the visualization field to reservoir-scale fault systems with the advent of 3D seismic surveys, the occlusion of smaller scale faults in such datasets is a source of significant uncertainty during prospect evaluation. The limited capacity of conventional subsurface datasets to probe the spatial distribution of these smaller scale faults has given rise to a large number of outcrop based studies, allowing their intensity, connectivity and size distributions to be explored in detail. Whilst these studies have yielded an improved theoretical understanding of the style and distribution of sub-seismic scale faults, the ability to transform observations from outcrop to quantities that are relatable to reservoir volumes remains elusive. These issues arise from the fact that outcrops essentially offer a pseudo-3D window into the rock volume, making the extrapolation of surficial fault properties such as areal density (fracture length per unit area: P21), to equivalent volumetric measures (i.e. fracture area per unit volume: P32) applicable to fracture modelling extremely challenging. Here, we demonstrate an approach which harnesses advances in the extraction of 3D trace maps from surface reconstructions using calibrated image sequences, in combination with a novel semi

  2. Inverse modeling of InSAR and ground leveling data for 3D volumetric strain distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallardo, L. A.; Glowacka, E.; Sarychikhina, O.

    2015-12-01

    Wide availability of modern Interferometric Synthetic aperture Radar (InSAR) data have made possible the extensive observation of differential surface displacements and are becoming an efficient tool for the detailed monitoring of terrain subsidence associated to reservoir dynamics, volcanic deformation and active tectonism. Unfortunately, this increasing popularity has not been matched by the availability of automated codes to estimate underground deformation, since many of them still rely on trial-error subsurface model building strategies. We posit that an efficient algorithm for the volumetric modeling of differential surface displacements should match the availability of current leveling and InSAR data and have developed an algorithm for the joint inversion of ground leveling and dInSAR data in 3D. We assume the ground displacements are originated by a stress free-volume strain distribution in a homogeneous elastic media and determined the displacement field associated to an ensemble of rectangular prisms. This formulation is then used to develop a 3D conjugate gradient inversion code that searches for the three-dimensional distribution of the volumetric strains that predict InSAR and leveling surface displacements simultaneously. The algorithm is regularized applying discontinuos first and zero order Thikonov constraints. For efficiency, the resulting computational code takes advantage of the resulting convolution integral associated to the deformation field and some basic tools for multithreading parallelization. We extensively test our algorithm on leveling and InSAR test and field data of the Northwest of Mexico and compare to some feasible geological scenarios of underground deformation.

  3. Constrained reverse diffusion for thick slice interpolation of 3D volumetric MRI images.

    PubMed

    Neubert, Aleš; Salvado, Olivier; Acosta, Oscar; Bourgeat, Pierrick; Fripp, Jurgen

    2012-03-01

    Due to physical limitations inherent in magnetic resonance imaging scanners, three dimensional volumetric scans are often acquired with anisotropic voxel resolution. We investigate several interpolation approaches to reduce the anisotropy and present a novel approach - constrained reverse diffusion for thick slice interpolation. This technique was compared to common methods: linear and cubic B-Spline interpolation and a technique based on non-rigid registration of neighboring slices. The methods were evaluated on artificial MR phantoms and real MR scans of human brain. The constrained reverse diffusion approach delivered promising results and provides an alternative for thick slice interpolation, especially for higher anisotropy factors.

  4. 3-D Technology Approaches for Biological Ecologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Liyu; Austin, Robert; U. S-China Physical-Oncology Sciences Alliance (PS-OA) Team

    Constructing three dimensional (3-D) landscapes is an inevitable issue in deep study of biological ecologies, because in whatever scales in nature, all of the ecosystems are composed by complex 3-D environments and biological behaviors. Just imagine if a 3-D technology could help complex ecosystems be built easily and mimic in vivo microenvironment realistically with flexible environmental controls, it will be a fantastic and powerful thrust to assist researchers for explorations. For years, we have been utilizing and developing different technologies for constructing 3-D micro landscapes for biophysics studies in in vitro. Here, I will review our past efforts, including probing cancer cell invasiveness with 3-D silicon based Tepuis, constructing 3-D microenvironment for cell invasion and metastasis through polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) soft lithography, as well as explorations of optimized stenting positions for coronary bifurcation disease with 3-D wax printing and the latest home designed 3-D bio-printer. Although 3-D technologies is currently considered not mature enough for arbitrary 3-D micro-ecological models with easy design and fabrication, I hope through my talk, the audiences will be able to sense its significance and predictable breakthroughs in the near future. This work was supported by the State Key Development Program for Basic Research of China (Grant No. 2013CB837200), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11474345) and the Beijing Natural Science Foundation (Grant No. 7154221).

  5. Quantitative evaluation of 3D dosimetry for stereotactic volumetric-modulated arc delivery using COMPASS.

    PubMed

    Vikraman, Subramani; Manigandan, Durai; Karrthick, Karukkupalayam Palaniappan; Sambasivaselli, Raju; Senniandavar, Vellaingiri; Ramu, Mahendran; Rajesh, Thiyagarajan; Lutz, Muller; Muthukumaran, Manavalan; Karthikeyan, Nithyanantham; Tejinder, Kataria

    2014-01-07

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate quantitatively the patient-specific 3D dosimetry tool COMPASS with 2D array MatriXX detector for stereotactic volumetric-modulated arc delivery. Twenty-five patients CT images and RT structures from different sites (brain, head & neck, thorax, abdomen, and spine) were taken from CyberKnife Multiplan planning system for this study. All these patients underwent radical stereotactic treatment in CyberKnife. For each patient, linac based volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) stereotactic plans were generated in Monaco TPS v3.1 using Elekta Beam Modulator MLC. Dose prescription was in the range of 5-20 Gy per fraction. Target prescription and critical organ constraints were tried to match the delivered treatment plans. Each plan quality was analyzed using conformity index (CI), conformity number (CN), gradient Index (GI), target coverage (TC), and dose to 95% of volume (D95). Monaco Monte Carlo (MC)-calculated treatment plan delivery accuracy was quantitatively evaluated with COMPASS-calculated (CCA) dose and COMPASS indirectly measured (CME) dose based on dose-volume histogram metrics. In order to ascertain the potential of COMPASS 3D dosimetry for stereotactic plan delivery, 2D fluence verification was performed with MatriXX using MultiCube phantom. Routine quality assurance of absolute point dose verification was performed to check the overall delivery accuracy. Quantitative analyses of dose delivery verification were compared with pass and fail criteria of 3 mm and 3% distance to agreement and dose differences. Gamma passing rate was compared with 2D fluence verification from MatriXX with MultiCube. Comparison of COMPASS reconstructed dose from measured fluence and COMPASS computed dose has shown a very good agreement with TPS calculated dose. Each plan was evaluated based on dose volume parameters for target volumes such as dose at 95% of volume (D95) and average dose. For critical organs dose at 20% of volume (D20

  6. Volumetric 3D display with multi-layered active screens for enhanced the depth perception (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hak-Rin; Park, Min-Kyu; Choi, Jun-Chan; Park, Ji-Sub; Min, Sung-Wook

    2016-09-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) display technology has been studied actively because it can offer more realistic images compared to the conventional 2D display. Various psychological factors such as accommodation, binocular parallax, convergence and motion parallax are used to recognize a 3D image. For glass-type 3D displays, they use only the binocular disparity in 3D depth cues. However, this method cause visual fatigue and headaches due to accommodation conflict and distorted depth perception. Thus, the hologram and volumetric display are expected to be an ideal 3D display. Holographic displays can represent realistic images satisfying the entire factors of depth perception. But, it require tremendous amount of data and fast signal processing. The volumetric 3D displays can represent images using voxel which is a physical volume. However, it is required for large data to represent the depth information on voxel. In order to simply encode 3D information, the compact type of depth fused 3D (DFD) display, which can create polarization distributed depth map (PDDM) image having both 2D color image and depth image is introduced. In this paper, a new volumetric 3D display system is shown by using PDDM image controlled by polarization controller. In order to introduce PDDM image, polarization states of the light through spatial light modulator (SLM) was analyzed by Stokes parameter depending on the gray level. Based on the analysis, polarization controller is properly designed to convert PDDM image into sectioned depth images. After synchronizing PDDM images with active screens, we can realize reconstructed 3D image. Acknowledgment This work was supported by `The Cross-Ministry Giga KOREA Project' grant from the Ministry of Science, ICT and Future Planning, Korea

  7. Volumetric cardiac quantification by using 3D dual-phase whole-heart MR imaging.

    PubMed

    Uribe, Sergio; Tangchaoren, Tarinee; Parish, Victoria; Wolf, Ivo; Razavi, Reza; Greil, Gerald; Schaeffter, Tobias

    2008-08-01

    This study was approved by the local institutional ethics committee, and informed consent was obtained from all volunteers and patients. The purpose of the study was to assess ventricular volumes by using three-dimensional (3D) whole-heart data sets acquired during end-systolic and end-diastolic phases during one free-breathing magnetic resonance imaging examination. In five healthy volunteers and 10 patients, 3D dual cardiac phase data sets, short-axis multisection breath-hold images, and through-plane flow images of the great vessels were acquired. Within these data sets, statistic analyses were performed to compare stroke, end-systolic, and end-diastolic volumes for the left ventricle (LV) and the right ventricle (RV). Results showed that the breath-hold multisection approach, the flow measurement approach, and the new dual-phase 3D approach delivered comparable results for quantification of cardiac volumes and function. High correlation values greater than 0.95 were found when these methods were compared, and no significant differences were recognized for stroke, end-systolic, or end-diastolic volumes in either the LV or the RV.

  8. Left atrial volumetric assessment using a novel automated framework for 3D echocardiography: a multi-centre analysis.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Nuno; Papachristidis, Alexandros; Pearson, Peter; Sarvari, Sebastian Imre; Engvall, Jan; Edvardsen, Thor; Monaghan, Mark; Gérard, Olivier; Samset, Eigil; D'hooge, Jan

    2016-08-22

    This study aims at validating a software tool for automated segmentation and quantification of the left atrium (LA) from 3D echocardiography. The LA segmentation tool uses a dual-chamber model of the left side of the heart to automatically detect and track the atrio-ventricular plane and the LA endocardium in transthoracic 3D echocardiography. The tool was tested in a dataset of 121 ultrasound images from patients with several cardiovascular pathologies (in a multi-centre setting), and the resulting volumes were compared with those assessed manually by experts in a blinded analysis using conventional contouring. Bland-Altman analysis showed good agreement between the automated method and the manual references, with differences (mean ± 1.96 SD) of 0.5 ± 5.7 mL for LA minimum volume and -1.6 ± 9.7 mL for LA maximum volume (comparable to the inter-observer variability of manual tracings). The automated tool required no user interaction in 93% of the recordings, while 4% required a single click and only 2% required contour adjustments, reducing considerably the amount of time and effort required for LA volumetric analysis. The automated tool was validated in a multi-centre setting, providing quantification of the LA volume over the cardiac cycle with minimal user interaction. The results of the automated analysis were in agreement with those estimated manually by experts. This study shows that such approach has clinical utility for the assessment of the LA morphology and function, automating and facilitating the time-consuming task of analysing 3D echocardiographic recordings. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2016. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Handheld real-time volumetric 3-D gamma-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haefner, Andrew; Barnowski, Ross; Luke, Paul; Amman, Mark; Vetter, Kai

    2017-06-01

    This paper presents the concept of real-time fusion of gamma-ray imaging and visual scene data for a hand-held mobile Compton imaging system in 3-D. The ability to obtain and integrate both gamma-ray and scene data from a mobile platform enables improved capabilities in the localization and mapping of radioactive materials. This not only enhances the ability to localize these materials, but it also provides important contextual information of the scene which once acquired can be reviewed and further analyzed subsequently. To demonstrate these concepts, the high-efficiency multimode imager (HEMI) is used in a hand-portable implementation in combination with a Microsoft Kinect sensor. This sensor, in conjunction with open-source software, provides the ability to create a 3-D model of the scene and to track the position and orientation of HEMI in real-time. By combining the gamma-ray data and visual data, accurate 3-D maps of gamma-ray sources are produced in real-time. This approach is extended to map the location of radioactive materials within objects with unknown geometry.

  10. 3D Geo: An Alternative Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgopoulos, A.

    2016-10-01

    The expression GEO is mostly used to denote relation to the earth. However it should not be confined to what is related to the earth's surface, as other objects also need three dimensional representation and documentation, like cultural heritage objects. They include both tangible and intangible ones. In this paper the 3D data acquisition and 3D modelling of cultural heritage assets are briefly described and their significance is also highlighted. Moreover the organization of such information, related to monuments and artefacts, into relational data bases and its use for various purposes, other than just geometric documentation is also described and presented. In order to help the reader understand the above, several characteristic examples are presented and their methodology explained and their results evaluated.

  11. A novel skeleton based quantification and 3-D volumetric visualization of left atrium fibrosis using late gadolinium enhancement magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Ravanelli, Daniele; dal Piaz, Elena Costanza; Centonze, Maurizio; Casagranda, Giulia; Marini, Massimiliano; Del Greco, Maurizio; Karim, Rashed; Rhode, Kawal; Valentini, Aldo

    2014-02-01

    This work presents the results of a new tool for 3-D segmentation, quantification and visualization of cardiac left atrium fibrosis, based on late gadolinium enhancement magnetic resonance imaging (LGE-MRI), for stratifying patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) that are candidates for radio-frequency catheter ablation. In this study 10 consecutive patients suffering AF with different grades of atrial fibrosis were considered. LGE-MRI and magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) images were used to detect and quantify fibrosis of the left atrium using a threshold and 2-D skeleton based approach. Quantification and 3-D volumetric views of atrial fibrosis were compared with quantification and 3-D bipolar voltage maps measured with an electro-anatomical mapping (EAM) system, the clinical reference standard technique for atrial substrate characterization. Segmentation and quantification of fibrosis areas proved to be clinically reliable among all different fibrosis stages. The proposed tool obtains discrepancies in fibrosis quantification less than 4% from EAM results and yields accurate 3-D volumetric views of fibrosis of left atrium. The novel 3-D visualization and quantification tool based on LGE-MRI allows detection of cardiac left atrium fibrosis areas. This noninvasive method provides a clinical alternative to EAM systems for quantification and localization of atrial fibrosis.

  12. Oxygen- and Nitrogen-Enriched 3D Porous Carbon for Supercapacitors of High Volumetric Capacity.

    PubMed

    Li, Jia; Liu, Kang; Gao, Xiang; Yao, Bin; Huo, Kaifu; Cheng, Yongliang; Cheng, Xiaofeng; Chen, Dongchang; Wang, Bo; Sun, Wanmei; Ding, Dong; Liu, Meilin; Huang, Liang

    2015-11-11

    Efficient utilization and broader commercialization of alternative energies (e.g., solar, wind, and geothermal) hinges on the performance and cost of energy storage and conversion systems. For now and in the foreseeable future, the combination of rechargeable batteries and electrochemical capacitors remains the most promising option for many energy storage applications. Porous carbonaceous materials have been widely used as an electrode for batteries and supercapacitors. To date, however, the highest specific capacitance of an electrochemical double layer capacitor is only ∼200 F/g, although a wide variety of synthetic approaches have been explored in creating optimized porous structures. Here, we report our findings in the synthesis of porous carbon through a simple, one-step process: direct carbonization of kelp in an NH3 atmosphere at 700 °C. The resulting oxygen- and nitrogen-enriched carbon has a three-dimensional structure with specific surface area greater than 1000 m(2)/g. When evaluated as an electrode for electrochemical double layer capacitors, the porous carbon structure demonstrated excellent volumetric capacitance (>360 F/cm(3)) with excellent cycling stability. This simple approach to low-cost carbonaceous materials with unique architecture and functionality could be a promising alternative to fabrication of porous carbon structures for many practical applications, including batteries and fuel cells.

  13. Volumetric medical image compression using 3D listless embedded block partitioning.

    PubMed

    Senapati, Ranjan K; Prasad, P M K; Swain, Gandharba; Shankar, T N

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a listless variant of a modified three-dimensional (3D)-block coding algorithm suitable for medical image compression. A higher degree of correlation is achieved by using a 3D hybrid transform. The 3D hybrid transform is performed by a wavelet transform in the spatial dimension and a Karhunen-Loueve transform in the spectral dimension. The 3D transformed coefficients are arranged in a one-dimensional (1D) fashion, as in the hierarchical nature of the wavelet-coefficient distribution strategy. A novel listless block coding algorithm is applied to the mapped 1D coefficients which encode in an ordered-bit-plane fashion. The algorithm originates from the most significant bit plane and terminates at the least significant bit plane to generate an embedded bit stream, as in 3D-SPIHT. The proposed algorithm is called 3D hierarchical listless block (3D-HLCK), which exhibits better compression performance than that exhibited by 3D-SPIHT. Further, it is highly competitive with some of the state-of-the-art 3D wavelet coders for a wide range of bit rates for magnetic resonance, digital imaging and communication in medicine and angiogram images. 3D-HLCK provides rate and resolution scalability similar to those provided by 3D-SPIHT and 3D-SPECK. In addition, a significant memory reduction is achieved owing to the listless nature of 3D-HLCK.

  14. On the Uncertain Future of the Volumetric 3D Display Paradigm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blundell, Barry G.

    2017-06-01

    Volumetric displays permit electronically processed images to be depicted within a transparent physical volume and enable a range of cues to depth to be inherently associated with image content. Further, images can be viewed directly by multiple simultaneous observers who are able to change vantage positions in a natural way. On the basis of research to date, we assume that the technologies needed to implement useful volumetric displays able to support translucent image formation are available. Consequently, in this paper we review aspects of the volumetric paradigm and identify important issues which have, to date, precluded their successful commercialization. Potentially advantageous characteristics are outlined and demonstrate that significant research is still needed in order to overcome barriers which continue to hamper the effective exploitation of this display modality. Given the recent resurgence of interest in developing commercially viable general purpose volumetric systems, this discussion is of particular relevance.

  15. Hybrid 3D printing and electrodeposition approach for controllable 3D alginate hydrogel formation.

    PubMed

    Shang, Wanfeng; Liu, Yanting; Wan, Wenfeng; Hu, Chengzhi; Liu, Zeyang; Wong, Chin To; Fukuda, Toshio; Shen, Yajing

    2017-06-07

    Calcium alginate hydrogels are widely used as biocompatible materials in a substantial number of biomedical applications. This paper reports on a hybrid 3D printing and electrodeposition approach for forming 3D calcium alginate hydrogels in a controllable manner. Firstly, a specific 3D hydrogel printing system is developed by integrating a customized ejection syringe with a conventional 3D printer. Then, a mixed solution of sodium alginate and CaCO3 nanoparticles is filled into the syringe and can be continuously ejected out of the syringe nozzle onto a conductive substrate. When applying a DC voltage (∼5 V) between the substrate (anode) and the nozzle (cathode), the Ca(2+) released from the CaCO3 particles can crosslink the alginate to form calcium alginate hydrogel on the substrate. To elucidate the gel formation mechanism and better control the gel growth, we can further establish and verify a gel growth model by considering several key parameters, i.e., applied voltage and deposition time. The experimental results indicate that the alginate hydrogel of various 3D structures can be formed by controlling the movement of the 3D printer. A cell viability test is conducted and shows that the encapsulated cells in the gel can maintain a high survival rate (∼99% right after gel formation). This research establishes a reliable method for the controllable formation of 3D calcium alginate hydrogel, exhibiting great potential for use in basic biology and applied biomedical engineering.

  16. MAP3D: a media processor approach for high-end 3D graphics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darsa, Lucia; Stadnicki, Steven; Basoglu, Chris

    1999-12-01

    Equator Technologies, Inc. has used a software-first approach to produce several programmable and advanced VLIW processor architectures that have the flexibility to run both traditional systems tasks and an array of media-rich applications. For example, Equator's MAP1000A is the world's fastest single-chip programmable signal and image processor targeted for digital consumer and office automation markets. The Equator MAP3D is a proposal for the architecture of the next generation of the Equator MAP family. The MAP3D is designed to achieve high-end 3D performance and a variety of customizable special effects by combining special graphics features with high performance floating-point and media processor architecture. As a programmable media processor, it offers the advantages of a completely configurable 3D pipeline--allowing developers to experiment with different algorithms and to tailor their pipeline to achieve the highest performance for a particular application. With the support of Equator's advanced C compiler and toolkit, MAP3D programs can be written in a high-level language. This allows the compiler to successfully find and exploit any parallelism in a programmer's code, thus decreasing the time to market of a given applications. The ability to run an operating system makes it possible to run concurrent applications in the MAP3D chip, such as video decoding while executing the 3D pipelines, so that integration of applications is easily achieved--using real-time decoded imagery for texturing 3D objects, for instance. This novel architecture enables an affordable, integrated solution for high performance 3D graphics.

  17. Registering preprocedure volumetric images with intraprocedure 3-D ultrasound using an ultrasound imaging model.

    PubMed

    King, A P; Rhode, K S; Ma, Y; Yao, C; Jansen, C; Razavi, R; Penney, G P

    2010-03-01

    For many image-guided interventions there exists a need to compute the registration between preprocedure image(s) and the physical space of the intervention. Real-time intraprocedure imaging such as ultrasound (US) can be used to image the region of interest directly and provide valuable anatomical information for computing this registration. Unfortunately, real-time US images often have poor signal-to-noise ratio and suffer from imaging artefacts. Therefore, registration using US images can be challenging and significant preprocessing is often required to make the registrations robust. In this paper we present a novel technique for computing the image-to-physical registration for minimally invasive cardiac interventions using 3-D US. Our technique uses knowledge of the physics of the US imaging process to reduce the amount of preprocessing required on the 3-D US images. To account for the fact that clinical US images normally undergo significant image processing before being exported from the US machine our optimization scheme allows the parameters of the US imaging model to vary. We validated our technique by computing rigid registrations for 12 cardiac US/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) datasets acquired from six volunteers and two patients. The technique had mean registration errors of 2.1-4.4 mm, and 75% capture ranges of 5-30 mm. We also demonstrate how the same approach can be used for respiratory motion correction: on 15 datasets acquired from five volunteers the registration errors due to respiratory motion were reduced by 45%-92%.

  18. Intraoperative patient registration using volumetric true 3D ultrasound without fiducials

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Songbai; Roberts, David W.; Hartov, Alex; Paulsen, Keith D.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Accurate patient registration is crucial for effective image-guidance in open cranial surgery. Typically, it is accomplished by matching skin-affixed fiducials manually identified in the operating room (OR) with their counterparts in the preoperative images, which not only consumes OR time and personnel resources but also relies on the presence (and subsequent fixation) of the fiducials during the preoperative scans (until the procedure begins). In this study, the authors present a completely automatic, volumetric image-based patient registration technique that does not rely on fiducials by registering tracked (true) 3D ultrasound (3DUS) directly with preoperative magnetic resonance (MR) images. Methods: Multistart registrations between binary 3DUS and MR volumes were first executed to generate an initial starting point without incorporating prior information on the US transducer contact point location or orientation for subsequent registration between grayscale 3DUS and MR via maximization of either mutual information (MI) or correlation ratio (CR). Patient registration was then computed through concatenation of spatial transformations. Results: In ten (N = 10) patient cases, an average fiducial (marker) distance error (FDE) of 5.0 mm and 4.3 mm was achieved using MI or CR registration (FDE was smaller with CR vs MI in eight of ten cases), which are comparable to values reported for typical fiducial- or surface-based patient registrations. The translational and rotational capture ranges were found to be 24.0 mm and 27.0° for binary registrations (up to 32.8 mm and 36.4°), 12.2 mm and 25.6° for MI registrations (up to 18.3 mm and 34.4°), and 22.6 mm and 40.8° for CR registrations (up to 48.5 mm and 65.6°), respectively. The execution time to complete a patient registration was 12–15 min with parallel processing, which can be significantly reduced by confining the 3DUS transducer location to the center of craniotomy in MR before registration (an

  19. On Alternative Approaches to 3D Image Perception: Monoscopic 3D Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blundell, Barry G.

    2015-06-01

    In the eighteenth century, techniques that enabled a strong sense of 3D perception to be experienced without recourse to binocular disparities (arising from the spatial separation of the eyes) underpinned the first significant commercial sales of 3D viewing devices and associated content. However following the advent of stereoscopic techniques in the nineteenth century, 3D image depiction has become inextricably linked to binocular parallax and outside the vision science and arts communities relatively little attention has been directed towards earlier approaches. Here we introduce relevant concepts and terminology and consider a number of techniques and optical devices that enable 3D perception to be experienced on the basis of planar images rendered from a single vantage point. Subsequently we allude to possible mechanisms for non-binocular parallax based 3D perception. Particular attention is given to reviewing areas likely to be thought-provoking to those involved in 3D display development, spatial visualization, HCI, and other related areas of interdisciplinary research.

  20. An evaluation of cine-mode 3D portal image dosimetry for Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansbacher, W.; Swift, C.-L.; Greer, P. B.

    2010-11-01

    We investigated cine-mode portal imaging on a Varian Trilogy accelerator and found that the linearity and other dosimetric properties are sufficient for 3D dose reconstruction as used in patient-specific quality assurance for VMAT (RapidArc) treatments. We also evaluated the gantry angle label in the portal image file header as a surrogate for the true imaged angle. The precision is only just adequate for the 3D evaluation method chosen, as discrepancies of 2° were observed.

  1. Influence of georeference for saturated excess overland flow modelling using 3D volumetric soft geo-objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izham, Mohamad Yusoff; Muhamad Uznir, Ujang; Alias, Abdul Rahman; Ayob, Katimon; Wan Ruslan, Ismail

    2011-04-01

    Existing 2D data structures are often insufficient for analysing the dynamism of saturation excess overland flow (SEOF) within a basin. Moreover, all stream networks and soil surface structures in GIS must be preserved within appropriate projection plane fitting techniques known as georeferencing. Inclusion of 3D volumetric structure of the current soft geo-objects simulation model would offer a substantial effort towards representing 3D soft geo-objects of SEOF dynamically within a basin by visualising saturated flow and overland flow volume. This research attempts to visualise the influence of a georeference system towards the dynamism of overland flow coverage and total overland flow volume generated from the SEOF process using VSG data structure. The data structure is driven by Green-Ampt methods and the Topographic Wetness Index (TWI). VSGs are analysed by focusing on spatial object preservation techniques of the conformal-based Malaysian Rectified Skew Orthomorphic (MRSO) and the equidistant-based Cassini-Soldner projection plane under the existing geodetic Malaysian Revised Triangulation 1948 (MRT48) and the newly implemented Geocentric Datum for Malaysia (GDM2000) datum. The simulated result visualises deformation of SEOF coverage under different georeference systems via its projection planes, which delineate dissimilar computation of SEOF areas and overland flow volumes. The integration of Georeference, 3D GIS and the saturation excess mechanism provides unifying evidence towards successful landslide and flood disaster management through envisioning the streamflow generating process (mainly SEOF) in a 3D environment.

  2. Compression of medical volumetric datasets: physical and psychovisual performance comparison of the emerging JP3D standard and JPEG2000

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimpe, T.; Bruylants, T.; Sneyders, Y.; Deklerck, R.; Schelkens, P.

    2007-03-01

    The size of medical data has increased significantly over the last few years. This poses severe problems for the rapid transmission of medical data across the hospital network resulting into longer access times of the images. Also longterm storage of data becomes more and more a problem. In an attempt to overcome the increasing data size often lossless or lossy compression algorithms are being used. This paper compares the existing JPEG2000 compression algorithm and the new emerging JP3D standard for compression of volumetric datasets. The main benefit of JP3D is that this algorithm truly is a 3D compression algorithm that exploits correlation not only within but also in between slices of a dataset. We evaluate both lossless and lossy modes of these algorithms. As a first step we perform an objective evaluation. Using RMSE and PSNR metrics we determine which compression algorithm performs best and this for multiple compression ratios and for several clinically relevant medical datasets. It is well known that RMSE and PSNR often do not correlate well with subjectively perceived image quality. Therefore we also perform a psycho visual analysis by means of a numerical observer. With this observer model we analyze how compression artifacts actually are perceived by a human observer. Results show superior performance of the new JP3D algorithm compared to the existing JPEG2000 algorithm.

  3. Robust volumetric change detection using mutual information with 3D fractals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahmes, Mark; Akbari, Morris; Henning, Ronda; Pokorny, John

    2014-06-01

    We discuss a robust method for quantifying change of multi-temporal remote sensing point data in the presence of affine registration errors. Three dimensional image processing algorithms can be used to extract and model an electronic module, consisting of a self-contained assembly of electronic components and circuitry, using an ultrasound scanning sensor. Mutual information (MI) is an effective measure of change. We propose a multi-resolution 3D fractal algorithm which is a novel extension to MI or regional mutual information (RMI). Our method is called fractal mutual information (FMI). This extension efficiently takes neighborhood fractal patterns of corresponding voxels (3D pixels) into account. The goal of this system is to quantify the change in a module due to tampering and provide a method for quantitative and qualitative change detection and analysis.

  4. A 3-D SAR approach to IFSAR processing

    SciTech Connect

    DOERRY,ARMIN W.; BICKEL,DOUGLAS L.

    2000-03-01

    Interferometric SAR (IFSAR) can be shown to be a special case of 3-D SAR image formation. In fact, traditional IFSAR processing results in the equivalent of merely a super-resolved, under-sampled, 3-D SAR image. However, when approached as a 3-D SAR problem, a number of IFSAR properties and anomalies are easily explained. For example, IFSAR decorrelation with height is merely ordinary migration in 3-D SAR. Consequently, treating IFSAR as a 3-D SAR problem allows insight and development of proper motion compensation techniques and image formation operations to facilitate optimal height estimation. Furthermore, multiple antenna phase centers and baselines are easily incorporated into this formulation, providing essentially a sparse array in the elevation dimension. This paper shows the Polar Format image formation algorithm extended to 3 dimensions, and then proceeds to apply it to the IFSAR collection geometry. This suggests a more optimal reordering of the traditional IFSAR processing steps.

  5. a Novel Approach for 3d Neighbourhood Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emamgholian, S.; Taleai, M.; Shojaei, D.

    2017-09-01

    Population growth and lack of land in urban areas have caused massive developments such as high rises and underground infrastructures. Land authorities in the international context recognizes 3D cadastres as a solution to efficiently manage these developments in complex cities. Although a 2D cadastre does not efficiently register these developments, it is currently being used in many jurisdictions for registering land and property information. Limitations in analysis and presentation are considered as examples of such limitations. 3D neighbourhood analysis by automatically finding 3D spaces has become an issue of major interest in recent years. Whereas the neighbourhood analysis has been in the focus of research, the idea of 3D neighbourhood analysis has rarely been addressed in 3 dimensional information systems (3D GIS) analysis. In this paper, a novel approach for 3D neighbourhood analysis has been proposed by recording spatial and descriptive information of the apartment units and easements. This approach uses the coordinates of the subject apartment unit to find the neighbour spaces. By considering a buffer around the edges of the unit, neighbour spaces are accurately detected. This method was implemented in ESRI ArcScene and three case studies were defined to test the efficiency of this approach. The results show that spaces are accurately detected in various complex scenarios. This approach can also be applied for other applications such as property management and disaster management in order to find the affected apartments around a defined space.

  6. Elastic image registration to quantify 3-D regional myocardial deformation from volumetric ultrasound: experimental validation in an animal model.

    PubMed

    Heyde, Brecht; Bouchez, Stefaan; Thieren, Sabine; Vandenheuvel, Michael; Jasaityte, Ruta; Barbosa, Daniel; Claus, Piet; Maes, Frederik; Wouters, Patrick; D'Hooge, Jan

    2013-09-01

    Although real-time 3-D echocardiography has the potential to allow more accurate assessment of global and regional ventricular dynamics compared with more traditional 2-D ultrasound examinations, it still requires rigorous testing and validation should it break through as a standard examination in routine clinical practice. However, only a limited number of studies have validated 3-D strain algorithms in an in vivo experimental setting. The aim of the present study, therefore, was to validate a registration-based strain estimation methodology in an animal model. Volumetric images were acquired in 14 open-chest sheep instrumented with ultrasonic microcrystals. Radial strain (ɛRR), longitudinal strain (ɛLL) and circumferential strain (ɛCC) were estimated during different stages: at rest, during reduced and increased cardiac inotropy induced by esmolol and dobutamine infusion, respectively, and during acute ischemia. Agreement between image-based and microcrystal-based strain estimates was evaluated by their linear correlation, indicating that all strain components could be estimated with acceptable accuracy (r = 0.69 for ɛRR, r = 0.64 for ɛLL and r = 0.62 for ɛCC). These findings are comparable to the performance of the current state-of-the-art commercial 3-D speckle tracking methods. Furthermore, shape of the strain curves, timing of peak values and location of dysfunctional regions were identified well. Whether 3-D elastic registration performs better than 3-D block matching-based methodologies still remains to be proven. Copyright © 2013 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Dosimetric impact of different CT datasets for stereotactic treatment planning using 3D conformal radiotherapy or volumetric modulated arc therapy.

    PubMed

    Oechsner, Markus; Odersky, Leonhard; Berndt, Johannes; Combs, Stephanie Elisabeth; Wilkens, Jan Jakob; Duma, Marciana Nona

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the impact on dose to the planning target volume (PTV) and organs at risk (OAR) by using four differently generated CT datasets for dose calculation in stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) of lung and liver tumors. Additionally, dose differences between 3D conformal radiotherapy and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) plans calculated on these CT datasets were determined. Twenty SBRT patients, ten lung cases and ten liver cases, were retrospectively selected for this study. Treatment plans were optimized on average intensity projection (AIP) CTs using 3D conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). Afterwards, the plans were copied to the planning CTs (PCT), maximum intensity projection (MIP) and mid-ventilation (MidV) CT datasets and dose was recalculated keeping all beam parameters and monitor units unchanged. Ipsilateral lung and liver volumes and dosimetric parameters for PTV (Dmean, D2, D98, D95), ipsilateral lung and liver (Dmean, V30, V20, V10) were determined and statistically analysed using Wilcoxon test. Significant but small mean differences were found for PTV dose between the CTs (lung SBRT: ≤2.5 %; liver SBRT: ≤1.6 %). MIPs achieved the smallest lung and the largest liver volumes. OAR mean doses in MIP plans were distinctly smaller than in the other CT datasets. Furthermore, overlapping of tumors with the diaphragm results in underestimated ipsilateral lung dose in MIP plans. Best agreement was found between AIP and MidV (lung SBRT). Overall, differences in liver SBRT were smaller than in lung SBRT and VMAT plans achieved slightly smaller differences than 3D-CRT plans. Only small differences were found for PTV parameters between the four CT datasets. Larger differences occurred for the doses to organs at risk (ipsilateral lung, liver) especially for MIP plans. No relevant differences were observed between 3D-CRT or VMAT plans. MIP CTs are not appropriate for OAR dose

  8. Sparse representation-based volumetric super-resolution algorithm for 3D CT images of reservoir rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhengji; Teng, Qizhi; He, Xiaohai; Yue, Guihua; Wang, Zhengyong

    2017-09-01

    The parameter evaluation of reservoir rocks can help us to identify components and calculate the permeability and other parameters, and it plays an important role in the petroleum industry. Until now, computed tomography (CT) has remained an irreplaceable way to acquire the microstructure of reservoir rocks. During the evaluation and analysis, large samples and high-resolution images are required in order to obtain accurate results. Owing to the inherent limitations of CT, however, a large field of view results in low-resolution images, and high-resolution images entail a smaller field of view. Our method is a promising solution to these data collection limitations. In this study, a framework for sparse representation-based 3D volumetric super-resolution is proposed to enhance the resolution of 3D voxel images of reservoirs scanned with CT. A single reservoir structure and its downgraded model are divided into a large number of 3D cubes of voxel pairs and these cube pairs are used to calculate two overcomplete dictionaries and the sparse-representation coefficients in order to estimate the high frequency component. Future more, to better result, a new feature extract method with combine BM4D together with Laplacian filter are introduced. In addition, we conducted a visual evaluation of the method, and used the PSNR and FSIM to evaluate it qualitatively.

  9. Initialisation of 3D level set for hippocampus segmentation from volumetric brain MR images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hajiesmaeili, Maryam; Dehmeshki, Jamshid; Bagheri Nakhjavanlo, Bashir; Ellis, Tim

    2014-04-01

    Shrinkage of the hippocampus is a primary biomarker for Alzheimer's disease and can be measured through accurate segmentation of brain MR images. The paper will describe the problem of initialisation of a 3D level set algorithm for hippocampus segmentation that must cope with the some challenging characteristics, such as small size, wide range of intensities, narrow width, and shape variation. In addition, MR images require bias correction, to account for additional inhomogeneity associated with the scanner technology. Due to these inhomogeneities, using a single initialisation seed region inside the hippocampus is prone to failure. Alternative initialisation strategies are explored, such as using multiple initialisations in different sections (such as the head, body and tail) of the hippocampus. The Dice metric is used to validate our segmentation results with respect to ground truth for a dataset of 25 MR images. Experimental results indicate significant improvement in segmentation performance using the multiple initialisations techniques, yielding more accurate segmentation results for the hippocampus.

  10. 3D volumetric modeling of grapevine biomass using Tripod LiDAR

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Keightley, K.E.; Bawden, G.W.

    2010-01-01

    Tripod mounted laser scanning provides the means to generate high-resolution volumetric measures of vegetation structure and perennial woody tissue for the calculation of standing biomass in agronomic and natural ecosystems. Other than costly destructive harvest methods, no technique exists to rapidly and accurately measure above-ground perennial tissue for woody plants such as Vitis vinifera (common grape vine). Data collected from grapevine trunks and cordons were used to study the accuracy of wood volume derived from laser scanning as compared with volume derived from analog measurements. A set of 10 laser scan datasets were collected for each of 36 vines from which volume was calculated using combinations of two, three, four, six and 10 scans. Likewise, analog volume measurements were made by submerging the vine trunks and cordons in water and capturing the displaced water. A regression analysis examined the relationship between digital and non-digital techniques among the 36 vines and found that the standard error drops rapidly as additional scans are added to the volume calculation process and stabilizes at the four-view geometry with an average Pearson's product moment correlation coefficient of 0.93. Estimates of digital volumes are systematically greater than those of analog volumes and can be explained by the manner in which each technique interacts with the vine tissue. This laser scanning technique yields a highly linear relationship between vine volume and tissue mass revealing a new, rapid and non-destructive method to remotely measure standing biomass. This application shows promise for use in other ecosystems such as orchards and forests. ?? 2010 Elsevier B.V.

  11. A 3D Approach to First Year English Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zeegers, Margaret

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore the suggestive possibilities of an approach to undergraduate English teacher education that the author has called the 3D Approach--Develop professional knowledge, Display professional knowledge, Disseminate professional knowledge--in relation to a number of groups of first year pre-service teachers…

  12. Accurate quantification of atherosclerotic plaque volume by 3D vascular ultrasound using the volumetric linear array method.

    PubMed

    López-Melgar, Beatriz; Fernández-Friera, Leticia; Sánchez-González, Javier; Vilchez, Jean Paul; Cecconi, Alberto; Mateo, Jesús; Peñalvo, José L; Oliva, Belén; García-Ruiz, Jose M; Kauffman, Steve; Jiménez-Borreguero, Luis Jesús; Ruiz-Cabello, Jesús; Fernández-Ortiz, Antonio; Ibáñez, Borja; Fuster, Valentín

    2016-05-01

    Direct quantification of atherosclerotic plaque volume by three-dimensional vascular ultrasound (3DVUS) is more reproducible than 2DUS-based three-dimensional (2D/3D) techniques that generate pseudo-3D volumes from summed 2D plaque areas; however, its accuracy has not been reported. We aimed to determine 3DVUS accuracy for plaque volume measurement with special emphasis on small plaques (a hallmark of early atherosclerosis). The in vitro study consisted of nine phantoms of different volumes (small and medium-large) embedded at variable distances from the surface (superficial vs. >5 cm-depth) and comparison of 3DVUS data generated using a novel volumetric-linear array method with the real phantom volumes. The in vivo study was undertaken in a rabbit model of atherosclerosis in which 3DVUS and 2D/3D volume measurements were correlated against gold-standard histological measurements. In the in vitro setting, there was a strong correlation between 3DVUS measures and real phantom volume both for small (3.0-64.5 mm(3) size) and medium-large (91.1-965.5 mm(3) size) phantoms embedded superficially, with intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) of 0.99 and 0.98, respectively; conversely, when phantoms were placed at >5 cm, the correlation was only moderate (ICC = 0.67). In the in vivo setting there was strong correlation between 3DVUS-measured plaque volumes and the histological gold-standard (ICC = 0.99 [4.02-92.5 mm(3) size]). Conversely, the correlation between 2D/3D values and the histological gold standard (sum of plaque areas) was weaker (ICC = 0.87 [49-520 mm(2) size]), with large dispersion of the differences between measurements in Bland-Altman plots (mean error, 79.2 mm(2)). 3DVUS using the volumetric-linear array method accurately measures plaque volumes, including those of small plaques. Measurements are more accurate for superficial arterial territories than for deep territories. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. 3D ultrasound biomicroscopy for assessment of cartilage repair tissue: volumetric characterisation and correlation to established classification systems.

    PubMed

    Schöne, M; Männicke, N; Somerson, J S; Marquaß, B; Henkelmann, R; Mochida, J; Aigner, T; Raum, K; Schulz, R M

    2016-02-08

    Objective and sensitive assessment of cartilage repair outcomes lacks suitable methods. This study investigated the feasibility of 3D ultrasound biomicroscopy (UBM) to quantify cartilage repair outcomes volumetrically and their correlation with established classification systems. 32 sheep underwent bilateral treatment of a focal cartilage defect. One or two years post-operatively the repair outcomes were assessed and scored macroscopically (Outerbridge, ICRS-CRA), by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, MOCART), and histopathology (O'Driscoll, ICRS-I and ICRS-II). The UBM data were acquired after MRI and used to reconstruct the shape of the initial cartilage layer, enabling the estimation of the initial cartilage thickness and defect volume as well as volumetric parameters for defect filling, repair tissue, bone loss and bone overgrowth. The quantification of the repair outcomes revealed high variations in the initial thickness of the cartilage layer, indicating the need for cartilage thickness estimation before creating a defect. Furthermore, highly significant correlations were found for the defect filling estimated from UBM to the established classification systems. 3D visualisation of the repair regions showed highly variable morphology within single samples. This raises the question as to whether macroscopic, MRI and histopathological scoring provide sufficient reliability. The biases of the individual methods will be discussed within this context. UBM was shown to be a feasible tool to evaluate cartilage repair outcomes, whereby the most important objective parameter is the defect filling. Translation of UBM into arthroscopic or transcutaneous ultrasound examinations would allow non-destructive and objective follow-up of individual patients and better comparison between the results of clinical trials.

  14. HPIV based volumetric 3D flow description in the roughness sublayer of a turbulent channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talapatra, Siddharth; Katz, Joseph

    2011-11-01

    Microscopic HPIV is utilized to resolve the 3D flow in the roughness sublayer of a boundary layer over a rough wall at Reτ=3400, consisting of pyramidal elements with height of k=0.45mm and 3.3mm wavelength. Typically, ~7000 particles are tracked in a 3.2 ×2.1 ×1.8mm3 volume, whose wall-normal extent is -0.2 < y / k < 4.67, y=0 being the roughness peak. These measurements are facilitated by matching the refractive index of the fluid with that of the acrylic rough wall. Results show that the sublayer is flooded by complex coherent structures scaled between 1-2 k. They are mostly aligned with roughness grooves, but some wrap around the pyramids, and stretch to a streamwise orientation by a relatively fast channeling flow that develops between the pyramid ridgelines. Occasionally, structures eject away from the roughness sublayer at a steep angle to the mean flow. Using the 300 realizations processed so far, the spatial variations in mean velocity and Reynolds stresses are compared to 2D PIV results, and trends generally (but not always) agree. In particular, there is a rapid increase in all Reynolds stress components close y=0. Conditional sampling is used to extract statistically significant structures. Sponsored by ONR (grant No. 000140-91-10-0-7).

  15. Measurement of spiculation index in 3D for solitary pulmonary nodules in volumetric lung CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhara, Ashis Kumar; Mukhopadhyay, Sudipta; Alam, Naved; Khandelwal, Niranjan

    2013-02-01

    In this paper a differential geometry based method is proposed for calculating surface speculation of solitary pulmonary nodule (SPN) in 3D from lung CT images. Spiculation present in SPN is an important shape feature to assist radiologist for measurement of malignancy. Performance of Computer Aided Diagnostic (CAD) system depends on the accurate estimation of feature like spiculation. In the proposed method, the peak of the spicules is identified using the property of Gaussian and mean curvature calculated at each surface point on segmented SPN. Once the peak point for a particular SPN is identified, the nearest valley points for the corresponding peak point are determined. The area of cross-section of the best fitted plane passing through the valley points is the base of that spicule. The solid angle subtended by the base of spicule at peak point and the distance of peak point from nodule base are taken as the measures of spiculation. The speculation index (SI) for a particular SPN is the weighted combination of all the spicules present in that SPN. The proposed method is validated on 95 SPN from Imaging Database Resources Initiative (IDRI) public database. It has achieved 87.4% accuracy in calculating quantified spiculation index compared to the spiculation index provided by radiologists in IDRI database.

  16. Extraction and classification of 3D objects from volumetric CT data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Samuel M.; Kwon, Junghyun; Ely, Austin; Enyeart, John; Johnson, Chad; Lee, Jongkyu; Kim, Namho; Boyd, Douglas P.

    2016-05-01

    We propose an Automatic Threat Detection (ATD) algorithm for Explosive Detection System (EDS) using our multistage Segmentation Carving (SC) followed by Support Vector Machine (SVM) classifier. The multi-stage Segmentation and Carving (SC) step extracts all suspect 3-D objects. The feature vector is then constructed for all extracted objects and the feature vector is classified by the Support Vector Machine (SVM) previously learned using a set of ground truth threat and benign objects. The learned SVM classifier has shown to be effective in classification of different types of threat materials. The proposed ATD algorithm robustly deals with CT data that are prone to artifacts due to scatter, beam hardening as well as other systematic idiosyncrasies of the CT data. Furthermore, the proposed ATD algorithm is amenable for including newly emerging threat materials as well as for accommodating data from newly developing sensor technologies. Efficacy of the proposed ATD algorithm with the SVM classifier is demonstrated by the Receiver Operating Characteristics (ROC) curve that relates Probability of Detection (PD) as a function of Probability of False Alarm (PFA). The tests performed using CT data of passenger bags shows excellent performance characteristics.

  17. Accuracy of 3D volumetric image registration based on CT, MR and PET/CT phantom experiments.

    PubMed

    Li, Guang; Xie, Huchen; Ning, Holly; Citrin, Deborah; Capala, Jacek; Maass-Moreno, Roberto; Guion, Peter; Arora, Barbara; Coleman, Norman; Camphausen, Kevin; Miller, Robert W

    2008-07-09

    Registration is critical for image-based treatment planning and image-guided treatment delivery. Although automatic registration is available, manual, visual-based image fusion using three orthogonal planar views (3P) is always employed clinically to verify and adjust an automatic registration result. However, the 3P fusion can be time consuming, observer dependent, as well as prone to errors, owing to the incomplete 3-dimensional (3D) volumetric image representations. It is also limited to single-pixel precision (the screen resolution). The 3D volumetric image registration (3DVIR) technique was developed to overcome these shortcomings. This technique introduces a 4th dimension in the registration criteria beyond the image volume, offering both visual and quantitative correlation of corresponding anatomic landmarks within the two registration images, facilitating a volumetric image alignment, and minimizing potential registration errors. The 3DVIR combines image classification in real-time to select and visualize a reliable anatomic landmark, rather than using all voxels for alignment. To determine the detection limit of the visual and quantitative 3DVIR criteria, slightly misaligned images were simulated and presented to eight clinical personnel for interpretation. Both of the criteria produce a detection limit of 0.1 mm and 0.1 degree. To determine the accuracy of the 3DVIR method, three imaging modalities (CT, MR and PET/CT) were used to acquire multiple phantom images with known spatial shifts. Lateral shifts were applied to these phantoms with displacement intervals of 5.0+/-0.1 mm. The accuracy of the 3DVIR technique was determined by comparing the image shifts determined through registration to the physical shifts made experimentally. The registration accuracy, together with precision, was found to be: 0.02+/-0.09 mm for CT/CT images, 0.03+/-0.07 mm for MR/MR images, and 0.03+/-0.35 mm for PET/CT images. This accuracy is consistent with the detection limit

  18. A Straightforward Approach for 3D Bacterial Printing

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Sustainable and personally tailored materials production is an emerging challenge to society. Living organisms can produce and pattern an extraordinarily wide range of different molecules in a sustainable way. These natural systems offer an abundant source of inspiration for the development of new environmentally friendly materials production techniques. In this paper, we describe the first steps toward the 3-dimensional printing of bacterial cultures for materials production and patterning. This methodology combines the capability of bacteria to form new materials with the reproducibility and tailored approach of 3D printing systems. For this purpose, a commercial 3D printer was modified for bacterial systems, and new alginate-based bioink chemistry was developed. Printing temperature, printhead speed, and bioink extrusion rate were all adapted and customized to maximize bacterial health and spatial resolution of printed structures. Our combination of 3D printing technology with biological systems enables a sustainable approach for the production of numerous new materials. PMID:28225616

  19. A Straightforward Approach for 3D Bacterial Printing.

    PubMed

    Lehner, Benjamin A E; Schmieden, Dominik T; Meyer, Anne S

    2017-03-01

    Sustainable and personally tailored materials production is an emerging challenge to society. Living organisms can produce and pattern an extraordinarily wide range of different molecules in a sustainable way. These natural systems offer an abundant source of inspiration for the development of new environmentally friendly materials production techniques. In this paper, we describe the first steps toward the 3-dimensional printing of bacterial cultures for materials production and patterning. This methodology combines the capability of bacteria to form new materials with the reproducibility and tailored approach of 3D printing systems. For this purpose, a commercial 3D printer was modified for bacterial systems, and new alginate-based bioink chemistry was developed. Printing temperature, printhead speed, and bioink extrusion rate were all adapted and customized to maximize bacterial health and spatial resolution of printed structures. Our combination of 3D printing technology with biological systems enables a sustainable approach for the production of numerous new materials.

  20. The New Approach to Sport Medicine: 3-D Reconstruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ince, Alparslan

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to present a new approach to sport medicine. Comparative analysis of the Vertebrae Lumbales was done in sedentary group and Muay Thai athletes. It was done by acquiring three dimensional (3-D) data and models through photogrammetric methods from the Multi-detector Computerized Tomography (MDCT) images of the Vertebrae…

  1. The New Approach to Sport Medicine: 3-D Reconstruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ince, Alparslan

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to present a new approach to sport medicine. Comparative analysis of the Vertebrae Lumbales was done in sedentary group and Muay Thai athletes. It was done by acquiring three dimensional (3-D) data and models through photogrammetric methods from the Multi-detector Computerized Tomography (MDCT) images of the Vertebrae…

  2. Geospatial Modelling Approach for 3d Urban Densification Developments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koziatek, O.; Dragićević, S.; Li, S.

    2016-06-01

    With growing populations, economic pressures, and the need for sustainable practices, many urban regions are rapidly densifying developments in the vertical built dimension with mid- and high-rise buildings. The location of these buildings can be projected based on key factors that are attractive to urban planners, developers, and potential buyers. Current research in this area includes various modelling approaches, such as cellular automata and agent-based modelling, but the results are mostly linked to raster grids as the smallest spatial units that operate in two spatial dimensions. Therefore, the objective of this research is to develop a geospatial model that operates on irregular spatial tessellations to model mid- and high-rise buildings in three spatial dimensions (3D). The proposed model is based on the integration of GIS, fuzzy multi-criteria evaluation (MCE), and 3D GIS-based procedural modelling. Part of the City of Surrey, within the Metro Vancouver Region, Canada, has been used to present the simulations of the generated 3D building objects. The proposed 3D modelling approach was developed using ESRI's CityEngine software and the Computer Generated Architecture (CGA) language.

  3. Volumetric LiDAR scanning of a wind turbine wake and comparison with a 3D analytical wake model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbajo Fuertes, Fernando; Porté-Agel, Fernando

    2016-04-01

    A correct estimation of the future power production is of capital importance whenever the feasibility of a future wind farm is being studied. This power estimation relies mostly on three aspects: (1) a reliable measurement of the wind resource in the area, (2) a well-established power curve of the future wind turbines and, (3) an accurate characterization of the wake effects; the latter being arguably the most challenging one due to the complexity of the phenomenon and the lack of extensive full-scale data sets that could be used to validate analytical or numerical models. The current project addresses the problem of obtaining a volumetric description of a full-scale wake of a 2MW wind turbine in terms of velocity deficit and turbulence intensity using three scanning wind LiDARs and two sonic anemometers. The characterization of the upstream flow conditions is done by one scanning LiDAR and two sonic anemometers, which have been used to calculate incoming vertical profiles of horizontal wind speed, wind direction and an approximation to turbulence intensity, as well as the thermal stability of the atmospheric boundary layer. The characterization of the wake is done by two scanning LiDARs working simultaneously and pointing downstream from the base of the wind turbine. The direct LiDAR measurements in terms of radial wind speed can be corrected using the upstream conditions in order to provide good estimations of the horizontal wind speed at any point downstream of the wind turbine. All this data combined allow for the volumetric reconstruction of the wake in terms of velocity deficit as well as turbulence intensity. Finally, the predictions of a 3D analytical model [1] are compared to the 3D LiDAR measurements of the wind turbine. The model is derived by applying the laws of conservation of mass and momentum and assuming a Gaussian distribution for the velocity deficit in the wake. This model has already been validated using high resolution wind-tunnel measurements

  4. Optical Approach to Resin Formulation for 3D Printed Microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Gong, Hua; Beauchamp, Michael; Perry, Steven; Woolley, Adam T; Nordin, Gregory P

    2015-12-31

    Microfluidics imposes different requirements on 3D printing compared to many applications because the critical features for microfluidics consist of internal microvoids. Resins for general 3D printing applications, however, are not necessarily formulated to meet the requirements of microfluidics and minimize the size of fabricated voids. In this paper we use an optical approach to guide custom formulation of resins to minimize the cross sectional size of fabricated flow channels as exemplars of such voids. We focus on stereolithgraphy (SL) 3D printing with Digital Light Processing (DLP) based on a micromirror array and use a commercially available 3D printer. We develop a mathematical model for the optical dose delivered through the thickness of a 3D printed part, including the effect of voids. We find that there is a fundamental trade-off between the homogeneity of the optical dose within individual layers and how far the critical dose penetrates into a flow channel during fabrication. We also experimentally investigate the practical limits of flow channel miniaturization given the optical properties of a resin and find that the minimum flow channel height is ~3.5-5.5ha where ha is the optical penetration depth of the resin, and that the minimum width is 4 pixels in the build plane. We also show that the ratio of the build layer thickness to ha should be in the range 0.3-1.0 to obtain the minimum flow channel height for a given resin. The minimum flow channel size that we demonstrate for a custom resin is 60 μm × 108 μm for a 10 μm build layer thickness. This work lays the foundation for 3D printing of <100 μm microfluidic features.

  5. Optical Approach to Resin Formulation for 3D Printed Microfluidics†

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Hua; Beauchamp, Michael; Perry, Steven; Woolley, Adam T.

    2015-01-01

    Microfluidics imposes different requirements on 3D printing compared to many applications because the critical features for microfluidics consist of internal microvoids. Resins for general 3D printing applications, however, are not necessarily formulated to meet the requirements of microfluidics and minimize the size of fabricated voids. In this paper we use an optical approach to guide custom formulation of resins to minimize the cross sectional size of fabricated flow channels as exemplars of such voids. We focus on stereolithgraphy (SL) 3D printing with Digital Light Processing (DLP) based on a micromirror array and use a commercially available 3D printer. We develop a mathematical model for the optical dose delivered through the thickness of a 3D printed part, including the effect of voids. We find that there is a fundamental trade-off between the homogeneity of the optical dose within individual layers and how far the critical dose penetrates into a flow channel during fabrication. We also experimentally investigate the practical limits of flow channel miniaturization given the optical properties of a resin and find that the minimum flow channel height is ~3.5–5.5ha where ha is the optical penetration depth of the resin, and that the minimum width is 4 pixels in the build plane. We also show that the ratio of the build layer thickness to ha should be in the range 0.3–1.0 to obtain the minimum flow channel height for a given resin. The minimum flow channel size that we demonstrate for a custom resin is 60 μm × 108 μm for a 10 μm build layer thickness. This work lays the foundation for 3D printing of <100 μm microfluidic features. PMID:26744624

  6. Lattice percolation approach to 3D modeling of tissue aging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorshkov, Vyacheslav; Privman, Vladimir; Libert, Sergiy

    2016-11-01

    We describe a 3D percolation-type approach to modeling of the processes of aging and certain other properties of tissues analyzed as systems consisting of interacting cells. Lattice sites are designated as regular (healthy) cells, senescent cells, or vacancies left by dead (apoptotic) cells. The system is then studied dynamically with the ongoing processes including regular cell dividing to fill vacant sites, healthy cells becoming senescent or dying, and senescent cells dying. Statistical-mechanics description can provide patterns of time dependence and snapshots of morphological system properties. The developed theoretical modeling approach is found not only to corroborate recent experimental findings that inhibition of senescence can lead to extended lifespan, but also to confirm that, unlike 2D, in 3D senescent cells can contribute to tissue's connectivity/mechanical stability. The latter effect occurs by senescent cells forming the second infinite cluster in the regime when the regular (healthy) cell's infinite cluster still exists.

  7. Optimized Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy Versus 3D-CRT for Early Stage Mediastinal Hodgkin Lymphoma Without Axillary Involvement: A Comparison of Second Cancers and Heart Disease Risk

    SciTech Connect

    Filippi, Andrea Riccardo; Ragona, Riccardo; Piva, Cristina; Scafa, Davide; Fiandra, Christian; Fusella, Marco; Giglioli, Francesca Romana; Lohr, Frank; Ricardi, Umberto

    2015-05-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the risks of second cancers and cardiovascular diseases associated with an optimized volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) planning solution in a selected cohort of stage I/II Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) patients treated with either involved-node or involved-site radiation therapy in comparison with 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT). Methods and Materials: Thirty-eight patients (13 males and 25 females) were included. Disease extent was mediastinum alone (n=8, 21.1%); mediastinum plus unilateral neck (n=19, 50%); mediastinum plus bilateral neck (n=11, 29.9%). Prescription dose was 30 Gy in 2-Gy fractions. Only 5 patients had mediastinal bulky disease at diagnosis (13.1%). Anteroposterior 3D-CRT was compared with a multiarc optimized VMAT solution. Lung, breast, and thyroid cancer risks were estimated by calculating a lifetime attributable risk (LAR), with a LAR ratio (LAR{sub VMAT}-to-LAR{sub 3D-CRT}) as a comparative measure. Cardiac toxicity risks were estimated by calculating absolute excess risk (AER). Results: The LAR ratio favored 3D-CRT for lung cancer induction risk in mediastinal alone (P=.004) and mediastinal plus unilateral neck (P=.02) presentations. LAR ratio for breast cancer was lower for VMAT in mediastinal plus bilateral neck presentations (P=.02), without differences for other sites. For thyroid cancer, no significant differences were observed, regardless of anatomical presentation. A significantly lower AER of cardiac (P=.038) and valvular diseases (P<.0001) was observed for VMAT regardless of disease extent. Conclusions: In a cohort of patients with favorable characteristics in terms of disease extent at diagnosis (large prevalence of nonbulky presentations without axillary involvement), optimized VMAT reduced heart disease risk with comparable risks of thyroid and breast cancer, with an increase in lung cancer induction probability. The results are however strongly influenced by

  8. Optimized volumetric modulated arc therapy versus 3D-CRT for early stage mediastinal Hodgkin lymphoma without axillary involvement: a comparison of second cancers and heart disease risk.

    PubMed

    Filippi, Andrea Riccardo; Ragona, Riccardo; Piva, Cristina; Scafa, Davide; Fiandra, Christian; Fusella, Marco; Giglioli, Francesca Romana; Lohr, Frank; Ricardi, Umberto

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the risks of second cancers and cardiovascular diseases associated with an optimized volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) planning solution in a selected cohort of stage I/II Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) patients treated with either involved-node or involved-site radiation therapy in comparison with 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT). Thirty-eight patients (13 males and 25 females) were included. Disease extent was mediastinum alone (n=8, 21.1%); mediastinum plus unilateral neck (n=19, 50%); mediastinum plus bilateral neck (n=11, 29.9%). Prescription dose was 30 Gy in 2-Gy fractions. Only 5 patients had mediastinal bulky disease at diagnosis (13.1%). Anteroposterior 3D-CRT was compared with a multiarc optimized VMAT solution. Lung, breast, and thyroid cancer risks were estimated by calculating a lifetime attributable risk (LAR), with a LAR ratio (LAR(VMAT)-to-LAR(3D-CRT)) as a comparative measure. Cardiac toxicity risks were estimated by calculating absolute excess risk (AER). The LAR ratio favored 3D-CRT for lung cancer induction risk in mediastinal alone (P=.004) and mediastinal plus unilateral neck (P=.02) presentations. LAR ratio for breast cancer was lower for VMAT in mediastinal plus bilateral neck presentations (P=.02), without differences for other sites. For thyroid cancer, no significant differences were observed, regardless of anatomical presentation. A significantly lower AER of cardiac (P=.038) and valvular diseases (P<.0001) was observed for VMAT regardless of disease extent. In a cohort of patients with favorable characteristics in terms of disease extent at diagnosis (large prevalence of nonbulky presentations without axillary involvement), optimized VMAT reduced heart disease risk with comparable risks of thyroid and breast cancer, with an increase in lung cancer induction probability. The results are however strongly influenced by the different anatomical presentations, supporting an

  9. Kallen Lehman approach to 3D Ising model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canfora, F.

    2007-03-01

    A “Kallen-Lehman” approach to Ising model, inspired by quantum field theory à la Regge, is proposed. The analogy with the Kallen-Lehman representation leads to a formula for the free-energy of the 3D model with few free parameters which could be matched with the numerical data. The possible application of this scheme to the spin glass case is shortly discussed.

  10. Volumetric label-free imaging and 3D reconstruction of mammalian cochlea based on two-photon excitation fluorescence microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xianzeng; Geng, Yang; Ye, Qing; Zhan, Zhenlin; Xie, Shusen

    2013-11-01

    The visualization of the delicate structure and spatial relationship of intracochlear sensory cells has relied on the laborious procedures of tissue excision, fixation, sectioning and staining for light and electron microscopy. Confocal microscopy is advantageous for its high resolution and deep penetration depth, yet disadvantageous due to the necessity of exogenous labeling. In this study, we present the volumetric imaging of rat cochlea without exogenous dyes using a near-infrared femtosecond laser as the excitation mechanism and endogenous two-photon excitation fluorescence (TPEF) as the contrast mechanism. We find that TPEF exhibits strong contrast, allowing cellular and even subcellular resolution imaging of the cochlea, differentiating cell types, visualizing delicate structures and the radial nerve fiber. Our results further demonstrate that 3D reconstruction rendered with z-stacks of optical sections enables better revealment of fine structures and spatial relationships, and easily performed morphometric analysis. The TPEF-based optical biopsy technique provides great potential for new and sensitive diagnostic tools for hearing loss or hearing disorders, especially when combined with fiber-based microendoscopy.

  11. Volumetric and surface-based 3D MRI analyses of fetal isolated mild ventriculomegaly: brain morphometry in ventriculomegaly.

    PubMed

    Scott, Julia A; Habas, Piotr A; Rajagopalan, Vidya; Kim, Kio; Barkovich, A James; Glenn, Orit A; Studholme, Colin

    2013-05-01

    Diagnosis of fetal isolated mild ventriculomegaly (IMVM) is the most common brain abnormality on prenatal ultrasound. We have set to identify potential alterations in brain development specific to IMVM in tissue volume and cortical and ventricular local surface curvature derived from in utero magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Multislice 2D T2-weighted MRI were acquired from 32 fetuses (16 IMVM, 16 controls) between 22 and 25.5 gestational weeks. The images were motion-corrected and reconstructed into 3D volumes for volumetric and curvature analyses. The brain images were automatically segmented into cortical plate, cerebral mantle, deep gray nuclei, and ventricles. Volumes were compared between IMVM and control subjects. Surfaces were extracted from the segmentations for local mean surface curvature measurement on the inner cortical plate and the ventricles. Linear models were estimated for age-related and ventricular volume-associated changes in local curvature in both the inner cortical plate and ventricles. While ventricular volume was enlarged in IMVM, all other tissue volumes were not different from the control group. Ventricles increased in curvature with age along the atrium and anterior body. Increasing ventricular volume was associated with reduced curvature over most of the ventricular surface. The cortical plate changed in curvature with age at multiple sites of primary sulcal formation. Reduced cortical folding was detected near the parieto-occipital sulcus in IMVM subjects. While tissue volume appears to be preserved in brains with IMVM, cortical folding may be affected in regions where ventricles are dilated.

  12. Towards a 3d Spatial Urban Energy Modelling Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahu, J.-M.; Koch, A.; Kremers, E.; Murshed, S. M.

    2013-09-01

    Today's needs to reduce the environmental impact of energy use impose dramatic changes for energy infrastructure and existing demand patterns (e.g. buildings) corresponding to their specific context. In addition, future energy systems are expected to integrate a considerable share of fluctuating power sources and equally a high share of distributed generation of electricity. Energy system models capable of describing such future systems and allowing the simulation of the impact of these developments thus require a spatial representation in order to reflect the local context and the boundary conditions. This paper describes two recent research approaches developed at EIFER in the fields of (a) geo-localised simulation of heat energy demand in cities based on 3D morphological data and (b) spatially explicit Agent-Based Models (ABM) for the simulation of smart grids. 3D city models were used to assess solar potential and heat energy demand of residential buildings which enable cities to target the building refurbishment potentials. Distributed energy systems require innovative modelling techniques where individual components are represented and can interact. With this approach, several smart grid demonstrators were simulated, where heterogeneous models are spatially represented. Coupling 3D geodata with energy system ABMs holds different advantages for both approaches. On one hand, energy system models can be enhanced with high resolution data from 3D city models and their semantic relations. Furthermore, they allow for spatial analysis and visualisation of the results, with emphasis on spatially and structurally correlations among the different layers (e.g. infrastructure, buildings, administrative zones) to provide an integrated approach. On the other hand, 3D models can benefit from more detailed system description of energy infrastructure, representing dynamic phenomena and high resolution models for energy use at component level. The proposed modelling strategies

  13. Right approach to 3D modeling using CAD tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baddam, Mounica Reddy

    The thesis provides a step-by-step methodology to enable an instructor dealing with CAD tools to optimally guide his/her students through an understandable 3D modeling approach which will not only enhance their knowledge about the tool's usage but also enable them to achieve their desired result in comparatively lesser time. In the known practical field, there is particularly very little information available to apply CAD skills to formal beginners' training sessions. Additionally, advent of new software in 3D domain cumulates updating into a more difficult task. Keeping up to the industry's advanced requirements emphasizes the importance of more skilled hands in the field of CAD development, rather than just prioritizing manufacturing in terms of complex software features. The thesis analyses different 3D modeling approaches specified to the varieties of CAD tools currently available in the market. Utilizing performance-time databases, learning curves have been generated to measure their performance time, feature count etc. Based on the results, improvement parameters have also been provided for (Asperl, 2005).

  14. Object 3D surface reconstruction approach using portable laser scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Ning; Zhang, Wei; Zhu, Liye; Li, Changqing; Wang, Shifeng

    2017-06-01

    The environment perception plays the key role for a robot system. The 3D surface of the objects can provide essential information for the robot to recognize objects. This paper present an approach to reconstruct objects' 3D surfaces using a portable laser scanner we designed which consists of a single-layer laser scanner, an encoder, a motor, power supply and mechanical components. The captured point cloud data is processed to remove the discrete points, denoise filtering, stitching and registration. Then the triangular mesh generation of point cloud is accomplished by using Gaussian bilateral filtering, ICP real-time registration and greedy triangle projection algorithm. The experiment result shows the feasibility of the device designed and the algorithm proposed.

  15. Ct3d: tracking microglia motility in 3D using a novel cosegmentation approach.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Hang; Li, Ying; Du, Jiulin; Mosig, Axel

    2011-02-15

    Cell tracking is an important method to quantitatively analyze time-lapse microscopy data. While numerous methods and tools exist for tracking cells in 2D time-lapse images, only few and very application-specific tracking tools are available for 3D time-lapse images, which is of high relevance in immunoimaging, in particular for studying the motility of microglia in vivo. We introduce a novel algorithm for tracking cells in 3D time-lapse microscopy data, based on computing cosegmentations between component trees representing individual time frames using the so-called tree-assignments. For the first time, our method allows to track microglia in three dimensional confocal time-lapse microscopy images. We also evaluate our method on synthetically generated data, demonstrating that our algorithm is robust even in the presence of different types of inhomogeneous background noise. Our algorithm is implemented in the ct3d package, which is available under http://www.picb.ac.cn/patterns/Software/ct3d; supplementary videos are available from http://www.picb.ac.cn/patterns/Supplements/ct3d.

  16. Segmentation of complex objects with non-spherical topologies from volumetric medical images using 3D livewire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poon, Kelvin; Hamarneh, Ghassan; Abugharbieh, Rafeef

    2007-03-01

    Segmentation of 3D data is one of the most challenging tasks in medical image analysis. While reliable automatic methods are typically preferred, their success is often hindered by poor image quality and significant variations in anatomy. Recent years have thus seen an increasing interest in the development of semi-automated segmentation methods that combine computational tools with intuitive, minimal user interaction. In an earlier work, we introduced a highly-automated technique for medical image segmentation, where a 3D extension of the traditional 2D Livewire was proposed. In this paper, we present an enhanced and more powerful 3D Livewire-based segmentation approach with new features designed to primarily enable the handling of complex object topologies that are common in biological structures. The point ordering algorithm we proposed earlier, which automatically pairs up seedpoints in 3D, is improved in this work such that multiple sets of points are allowed to simultaneously exist. Point sets can now be automatically merged and split to accommodate for the presence of concavities, protrusions, and non-spherical topologies. The robustness of the method is further improved by extending the 'turtle algorithm', presented earlier, by using a turtle-path pruning step. Tests on both synthetic and real medical images demonstrate the efficiency, reproducibility, accuracy, and robustness of the proposed approach. Among the examples illustrated is the segmentation of the left and right ventricles from a T1-weighted MRI scan, where an average task time reduction of 84.7% was achieved when compared to a user performing 2D Livewire segmentation on every slice.

  17. Silicon-Embedding Approaches to 3-D Toroidal Inductor Fabrication

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, XH; Kim, M; Herrault, F; Ji, CH; Kim, J; Allen, MG

    2013-06-01

    This paper presents complementary-metal-oxide-semiconductor-compatible silicon-embedding techniques for on-chip integration of microelectromechanical-system devices with 3-D complex structures. By taking advantage of the "dead volume" within the bulk of the silicon wafer, functional devices with large profile can be embedded into the substrate without consuming valuable die area on the wafer surface or increasing the packaging complexity. Furthermore, through-wafer interconnects can be implemented to connect the device to the circuitry on the wafer surface. The key challenge of embedding structures within the wafer volume is processing inside deep trenches. To achieve this goal in an area-efficient manner, straight-sidewall trenches are desired, adding additional difficulty to the embedding process. Two approaches to achieve this goal are presented in this paper, i.e., a lithography-based process and a shadow-mask-based process. The lithography-based process utilizes a spray-coating technique and proximity lithography in combination with thick epoxy processing and laminated dry-film lithography. The shadow-mask-based process employs a specially designed 3-D silicon shadow mask to enable simultaneous metal patterning on both the vertical sidewall and the bottom surface of the trench during deposition, eliminating multiple lithography steps and reducing the process time. Both techniques have been demonstrated through the embedding of the topologically complex 3-D toroidal inductors into the silicon substrate for power supply on-chip (PwrSoC) applications. Embedded 3-D inductors that possess 25 turns and a diameter of 6 mm in a silicon trench of 300-mu m depth achieve overall inductances of 45-60 nH, dc resistances of 290-400 m Omega, and quality factors of 16-17.5 at 40-70 MHz.

  18. 3D Volumetric Evaluation of Lipiodol Retention in HCC after Chemoembolization: A Quantitative Comparison between CBCT and MDCT

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhijun; Lin, MingDe; Lesage, David; Chen, Rongxin; Chapiro, Julius; Gu, Tara; Tacher, Vania; Duran, Rafael; Geschwind, Jean-François

    2014-01-01

    Rationale and Objectives To evaluate the capability of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) acquired immediately after transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE) in determining Lipiodol retention quantitatively and volumetrically when compared to 1-day post-procedure unenhanced MDCT. Materials and methods From June to December, 2012, fifteen patients met the inclusion criteria of unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) that was treated with conventional TACE (cTACE), and had intra-procedural CBCT and 1-day post-TACE MDCT. Four patients were excluded because the Lipiodol was diffuse throughout the entire liver or Lipiodol deposition was not clear on both CBCT and MDCT. Eleven patients with a total of 31 target lesions were included in the analysis. A quantitative and 3D software was used to assess complete, localized and diffuse lipiodol deposition. Tumor volume, Lipiodol volume in the tumor, % Lipiodol retention, and Lipiodol enhancement in Hounsfield Unit (HU) were calculated and compared between CBCT and MDCT using two-tailed student’s t-test and Bland-Altman plots. Results The mean value of tumor volume, Lipiodol deposited regions, calculated average % Lipiodol retention, and HU value of CBCT were not significantly different from those of MDCT (tumor volume: 9.37±11.35cm3 vs. 9.34±11.44cm3, P=0.991; Lipiodol volume: 7.84±9.34cm3 vs. 7.84±9.60 cm3, P=0.998; % Lipiodol retention: 89.3%±14.7% vs. 90.2% ± 14.9%, P=0.811; HU value: 307.7±160.1 HU vs. 257.2±120.0 HU, P=0.139). Bland-Altman plots showed only minimal difference and high agreement when comparing CBCT to MDCT. Conclusion CBCT has a similar capability, intraprocedurally, to assess Lipiodol deposition in 3D for patients with HCC treated with cTACE when compared to MDCT. PMID:24507426

  19. Size-based emphysema cluster analysis on low attenuation area in 3D volumetric CT: comparison with pulmonary functional test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Minho; Kim, Namkug; Lee, Sang Min; Seo, Joon Beom; Oh, Sang Young

    2015-03-01

    To quantify low attenuation area (LAA) of emphysematous regions according to cluster size in 3D volumetric CT data of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients and to compare these indices with their pulmonary functional test (PFT). Sixty patients with COPD were scanned by a more than 16-multi detector row CT scanner (Siemens Sensation 16 and 64) within 0.75mm collimation. Based on these LAA masks, a length scale analysis to estimate each emphysema LAA's size was performed as follows. At first, Gaussian low pass filter from 30mm to 1mm kernel size with 1mm interval on the mask was performed from large to small size, iteratively. Centroid voxels resistant to the each filter were selected and dilated by the size of the kernel, which was regarded as the specific size emphysema mask. The slopes of area and number of size based LAA (slope of semi-log plot) were analyzed and compared with PFT. PFT parameters including DLco, FEV1, and FEV1/FVC were significantly (all p-value< 0.002) correlated with the slopes (r-values; -0.73, 0.54, 0.69, respectively) and EI (r-values; -0.84, -0.60, -0.68, respectively). In addition, the D independently contributed regression for FEV1 and FEV1/FVC (adjust R sq. of regression study: EI only, 0.70, 0.45; EI and D, 0.71, 0.51, respectively). By the size based LAA segmentation and analysis, we evaluated the Ds of area, number, and distribution of size based LAA, which would be independent factors for predictor of PFT parameters.

  20. Modeling approaches for ligand-based 3D similarity.

    PubMed

    Tresadern, Gary; Bemporad, Daniele

    2010-10-01

    3D ligand-based similarity approaches are widely used in the early phases of drug discovery for tasks such as hit finding by virtual screening or compound design with quantitative structure-activity relationships. Here in we review widely used software for performing such tasks. Some techniques are based on relatively mature technology, shape-based similarity for instance. Typically, these methods remained in the realm of the expert user, the experienced modeler. However, advances in implementation and speed have improved usability and allow these methods to be applied to databases comprising millions of compounds. There are now many reports of such methods impacting drug-discovery projects. As such, the medicinal chemistry community has become the intended market for some of these new tools, yet they may consider the wide array and choice of approaches somewhat disconcerting. Each method has subtle differences and is better suited to certain tasks than others. In this article we review some of the widely used computational methods via application, provide straightforward background on the underlying theory and provide examples for the interested reader to pursue in more detail. In the new era of preclinical drug discovery there will be ever more pressure to move faster and more efficiently, and computational approaches based on 3D ligand similarity will play an increasing role in in this process.

  1. Novel Approaches in 3D Sensing, Imaging, and Visualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulein, Robert; Daneshpanah, M.; Cho, M.; Javidi, B.

    Three-dimensional (3D) imaging systems are being researched extensively for purposes of sensing and visualization in fields as diverse as defense, medical, art, and entertainment. When compared to traditional 2D imaging techniques, 3D imaging offers advantages in ranging, robustness to scene occlusion, and target recognition performance. Amongst the myriad 3D imaging techniques, 3D multiperspective imaging technologies have received recent attention due to the technologies' relatively low cost, scalability, and passive sensing capabilities. Multiperspective 3D imagers collect 3D scene information by recording 2D intensity information from multiple perspectives, thus retaining both ray intensity and angle information. Three novel developments in 3D sensing, imaging, and visualization systems are presented: 3D imaging with axially distributed sensing, 3D optical profilometry, and occluded 3D object tracking.

  2. Urbanisation and 3d Spatial - a Geometric Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duncan, E. E.; Rahman, A. Abdul

    2013-09-01

    Urbanisation creates immense competition for space, this may be attributed to an increase in population owing to domestic and external tourism. Most cities are constantly exploring all avenues in maximising its limited space. Hence, urban or city authorities need to plan, expand and use such three dimensional (3D) space above, on and below the city space. Thus, difficulties in property ownership and the geometric representation of the 3D city space is a major challenge. This research, investigates the concept of representing a geometric topological 3D spatial model capable of representing 3D volume parcels for man-made constructions above and below the 3D surface volume parcel. A review of spatial data models suggests that the 3D TIN (TEN) model is significant and can be used as a unified model. The concepts, logical and physical models of 3D TIN for 3D volumes using tetrahedrons as the base geometry is presented and implemented to show man-made constructions above and below the surface parcel within a user friendly graphical interface. Concepts for 3D topology and 3D analysis are discussed. Simulations of this model for 3D cadastre are implemented. This model can be adopted by most countries to enhance and streamline geometric 3D property ownership for urban centres. 3D TIN concept for spatial modelling can be adopted for the LA_Spatial part of the Land Administration Domain Model (LADM) (ISO/TC211, 2012), this satisfies the concept of 3D volumes.

  3. Approach to 3d Analysis of Gravity Ptosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guryanov, R. A.; Monkin, S.; Monkin, A.; Petrov, A.

    2017-05-01

    The assessment of ptosis degree for rejuvenation procedures, the choice of following operation technique and evaluation of surgery result are based on subjective visual examination and surgeon's experience. The photogrammetric scans of 25 female patients of age 20 to 55 in vertical and supine (horizontal) position of body with placing the regular marker points on the face were analyzed. For 5 patients, also the CT data was acquired and segmentation of soft tissue was performed. Four of these patients underwent SMAS-lifting, the photogrammetry scanning was repeat 6 months after the operation. Computer vision algorithms was used for markers detection on the 3D model texture, marker were projected from texture to triangular mesh. 3D mesh models were registered with user defined anatomy points and pair selection based on markers location was done. Pairs of points on vertical and horizontal 3D models were analyzed for surface tissue mobility examination. The migration vectors of each side of the face are uniformly directed upwards and laterally. The vectors are projected at the areas of so-called ligaments demonstrate no evidence in deviation from row sequences. The volume migration is strongly correlates with the age of examined patients, on the contrary the point migration moderately correlates with age in patients of 30 to 50 years old. The analysis of migration vectors before and after the SMAS-lifting revealed no significant changes in surface points' migration. The described method allows to assess the mechanical conditions of individual face and evaluate efficacy of surgery. This approach can be used for the classification of face ptosis grade.

  4. 3D imaging of soil pore network: two different approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matrecano, M.; Di Matteo, B.; Mele, G.; Terribile, F.

    2009-04-01

    system but on less noisy images. SSAT system showed more flexibility in terms of sample size although both techniques allowed investigation on REVs (Representative Elementary Volumes) for most of macroscopic properties describing soil processes. Morover, undoubted advantages of not destructivity and ease sample preparation for the Skysan 1172 are balanced by lower overall costs for the SSAT and its potential of producing 3D representation of soil features different from the simple solid/porous phases. Both approaches allow to use exactly the same image analysis procedures on the reconstructed 3D images although require some specific pre-processing treatments.

  5. Object-Oriented Approach for 3d Archaeological Documentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valente, R.; Brumana, R.; Oreni, D.; Banfi, F.; Barazzetti, L.; Previtali, M.

    2017-08-01

    Documentation on archaeological fieldworks needs to be accurate and time-effective. Many features unveiled during excavations can be recorded just once, since the archaeological workflow physically removes most of the stratigraphic elements. Some of them have peculiar characteristics which make them hardly recognizable as objects and prevent a full 3D documentation. The paper presents a suitable feature-based method to carry on archaeological documentation with a three-dimensional approach, tested on the archaeological site of S. Calocero in Albenga (Italy). The method is based on one hand on the use of structure from motion techniques for on-site recording and 3D Modelling to represent the three-dimensional complexity of stratigraphy. The entire documentation workflow is carried out through digital tools, assuring better accuracy and interoperability. Outputs can be used in GIS to perform spatial analysis; moreover, a more effective dissemination of fieldworks results can be assured with the spreading of datasets and other information through web-services.

  6. Registration of 3D spectral OCT volumes combining ICP with a graph-based approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niemeijer, Meindert; Lee, Kyungmoo; Garvin, Mona K.; Abràmoff, Michael D.; Sonka, Milan

    2012-02-01

    The introduction of spectral Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) scanners has enabled acquisition of high resolution, 3D cross-sectional volumetric images of the retina. 3D-OCT is used to detect and manage eye diseases such as glaucoma and age-related macular degeneration. To follow-up patients over time, image registration is a vital tool to enable more precise, quantitative comparison of disease states. In this work we present a 3D registrationmethod based on a two-step approach. In the first step we register both scans in the XY domain using an Iterative Closest Point (ICP) based algorithm. This algorithm is applied to vessel segmentations obtained from the projection image of each scan. The distance minimized in the ICP algorithm includes measurements of the vessel orientation and vessel width to allow for a more robust match. In the second step, a graph-based method is applied to find the optimal translation along the depth axis of the individual A-scans in the volume to match both scans. The cost image used to construct the graph is based on the mean squared error (MSE) between matching A-scans in both images at different translations. We have applied this method to the registration of Optic Nerve Head (ONH) centered 3D-OCT scans of the same patient. First, 10 3D-OCT scans of 5 eyes with glaucoma imaged in vivo were registered for a qualitative evaluation of the algorithm performance. Then, 17 OCT data set pairs of 17 eyes with known deformation were used for quantitative assessment of the method's robustness.

  7. Advantage of 3D volumetric dosemeter in delivery quality assurance of dynamic arc therapy: comparison of pencil beam and Monte Carlo calculations

    PubMed Central

    Shin, H-J; Song, J H; Jung, J-Y; Kwak, Y-K; Kay, C S; Kang, Y-N; Choi, B O; Jang, H S

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the accuracy of pencil beam calculation (PBC) and Monte Carlo calculation (MCC) for dynamic arc therapy (DAT) in a cylindrically shaped homogenous phantom, by comparing the two plans with an ion chamber, a film and a three-dimensional (3D) volumetric dosemeter. Methods: For this study, an in-house phantom was constructed, and the PBC and MCC plans for DAT were performed using iPlan® RT (BrainLAB®, Heimstetten, Germany). The A16 micro ion chamber (Standard Imaging, Middleton, WI), Gafchromic® EBT2 film (International Specialty Products, Wayne, NJ) and ArcCHECK™ (Sun Nuclear, Melbourne, FL) were used for measurements. For comparison with each plan, two-dimensional (2D) and 3D gamma analyses were performed using 3%/3 mm and 2%/2 mm criteria. Results: The difference between the PBC and MCC plans using 2D and 3D gamma analyses was found to be 7.85% and 28.8%, respectively. The ion chamber and 2D dose distribution measurements did not exhibit this difference revealed by the comparison between the PBC and MCC plans. However, the 3D assessment showed a significant difference between the PBC and MCC (62.7% for PBC vs 93.4% for MCC, p = 0.034). Conclusion: Evaluation using a 3D volumetric dosemeter can be clinically useful for delivery quality assurance (QA), and the MCC should be used to achieve the most reliable dose calculation for DAT. Advances in knowledge: (1) The DAT plan calculated using the PBC has a limitation in the calculation methods, and a 3D volumetric dosemeter was found to be an adequate tool for delivery QA of DAT. (2) The MCC was superior to PBC in terms of the accuracy in dose calculation for DAT even in the homogenous condition. PMID:24234583

  8. SU-D-BRC-07: System Design for a 3D Volumetric Scintillation Detector Using SCMOS Cameras

    SciTech Connect

    Darne, C; Robertson, D; Alsanea, F; Beddar, S

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this project is to build a volumetric scintillation detector for quantitative imaging of 3D dose distributions of proton beams accurately in near real-time. Methods: The liquid scintillator (LS) detector consists of a transparent acrylic tank (20×20×20 cm{sup 3}) filled with a liquid scintillator that when irradiated with protons generates scintillation light. To track rapid spatial and dose variations in spot scanning proton beams we used three scientific-complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (sCMOS) imagers (2560×2160 pixels). The cameras collect optical signal from three orthogonal projections. To reduce system footprint two mirrors oriented at 45° to the tank surfaces redirect scintillation light to cameras for capturing top and right views. Selection of fixed focal length objective lenses for these cameras was based on their ability to provide large depth of field (DoF) and required field of view (FoV). Multiple cross-hairs imprinted on the tank surfaces allow for image corrections arising from camera perspective and refraction. Results: We determined that by setting sCMOS to 16-bit dynamic range, truncating its FoV (1100×1100 pixels) to image the entire volume of the LS detector, and using 5.6 msec integration time imaging rate can be ramped up to 88 frames per second (fps). 20 mm focal length lens provides a 20 cm imaging DoF and 0.24 mm/pixel resolution. Master-slave camera configuration enable the slaves to initiate image acquisition instantly (within 2 µsec) after receiving a trigger signal. A computer with 128 GB RAM was used for spooling images from the cameras and can sustain a maximum recording time of 2 min per camera at 75 fps. Conclusion: The three sCMOS cameras are capable of high speed imaging. They can therefore be used for quick, high-resolution, and precise mapping of dose distributions from scanned spot proton beams in three dimensions.

  9. Development of a temporal multiplexed 3D beam-scanning Lissajous trajectory microscope for rapid multimodal volumetric imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, Justin A.; Sullivan, Shane Z.; Dinh, Janny; Sarkar, Sreya; Simpson, Garth J.

    2016-03-01

    A beam-scanning microscope is described based on a temporally multiplexed Lissajous trajectory for achieving 1 kHz frame rate 3D imaging. The microscope utilizes two fast-scan resonant mirrors to direct the optical beam on a circuitous, Lissajous trajectory through the field of view. Acquisition of two simultaneous focal planes is achieved by implementation of an optical delay line, producing a second incident beam at a different focal plane relative to the initial incident beam. High frame rates are achieved by separating the full time-domain data into shorter sub-trajectories resulting in undersampling of the field of view. A model-based image reconstruction (MBIR) 3D in-painting algorithm is utilized for interpolating the missing data to recover full images. The MBIR algorithm uses a maximum a posteriori estimation with a generalized Gaussian Markov random field prior model for image interpolation. Because images are acquired using photomultiplier tubes or photodiodes, parallelization for multi-channel imaging is straightforward. Preliminary results obtained using a Lissajous trajectory beam-scanning approach coupled with temporal multiplexing by the implementation of an optical delay line demonstrate the ability to acquire 2 distinct focal planes simultaneously at frame rates >450 Hz for full 512 × 512 images. The use of multi-channel data acquisition cards allows for simultaneous multimodal image acquisition with perfect image registry between all imaging modalities. Also discussed here is the implementation of Lissajous trajectory beam-scanning on commercially available microscope hardware.

  10. Soft-tissue volumetric changes following monobloc distraction procedure: analysis using digital three-dimensional photogrammetry system (3dMD).

    PubMed

    Chan, Fuan Chiang; Kawamoto, Henry K; Federico, Christina; Bradley, James P

    2013-03-01

    We have previously reported that monobloc advancement by distraction osteogenesis resulted in decreased morbidity and greater advancement with less relapse compared with acute monobloc advancement with bone grafting. In this study, we examine the three-dimensional (3D) volumetric soft-tissue changes in monobloc distraction.Patients with syndromic craniosynostosis who underwent monobloc distraction from 2002 to 2010 at University of California-Los Angeles Craniofacial Center were studied (n = 12). We recorded diagnosis, indications for the surgery, and volumetric changes for skeletal and soft-tissue midface structures (preoperative/postoperative [6 weeks]/follow-up [>1 year]). Computed tomography scans and a digital 3D photogrammetry system were used for image analysis.Patients ranged from 6 to 14 years of age (mean, 10.1 years) at the time of the operation (follow-up 2-11 years); mean distraction advancement was 19.4 mm (range, 14-25 mm). There was a mean increase in the 3D volumetric soft-tissue changes: 99.5 ± 4.0 cm(3) (P < 0.05) at 6 weeks and 94.9 ± 3.6 cm(3) (P < 0.05) at 1-year follow-up. When comparing soft-tissue changes at 6 weeks postoperative to 1-year follow-up, there were minimal relapse changes. The overall mean 3D skeletal change was 108.9 ± 4.2 cm. For every 1 cm of skeletal gain, there was 0.78 cm(3) of soft-tissue gain.Monobloc advancement by distraction osteogenesis using internal devices resulted in increased volumetric soft-tissue changes, which remained stable at 1 year. The positive linear correlation between soft-tissue increments and bony advancement can be incorporated during the planning of osteotomies to achieve optimum surgical outcomes with monobloc distraction.

  11. An approach towards 3D sensitive AFM cantilevers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koops, Richard; Fokkema, Vincent

    2014-04-01

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) tapping mode is a highly sensitive local probing technique that is very useful to study and measure surface properties down to the atomic scale. The tapping mode is mostly implemented using the resonance of the first bending mode of the cantilever and therefore provides sensitivity mainly along the direction of this oscillation. Driven by the semiconductor industry, there is an increasing need for accurate measurements of nanoscale structures for side wall characterization by AFM that requires additional sensitivity in the lateral direction. The conventional tapping mode has been augmented by various authors, for example by tilting the cantilever system (Cho et al 2011 Rev. Sci. Instrum. 82 023707) to access the sidewall or using a torsion mode (Dai et al 2011 Meas. Sci. Technol. 22 094009) of the cantilever to provide additional lateral sensitivity. These approaches however trade lateral sensitivity for vertical sensitivity or still lack sensitivity in the remaining lateral direction. We present an approach towards true 3D sensitivity for AFM cantilevers based on simultaneous excitation and optical detection of multiple cantilever resonance modes along three axes. Tuning the excitation of the cantilever to specific frequencies provides a mechanism to select only those cantilever modes that have the desired characteristics. Additionally, cantilever engineering has been used to design and create a substructure within the cantilever that has been optimized for specific resonance behavior around 4 MHz. In contrast to the conventional approach of using a piezo to actuate the cantilever modulation, we present results on photo-thermal excitation using an intensity modulated low-power laser source. By tightly focusing the excitation spot on the cantilever we were able to attain a deflection efficiency of 0.7 nm µW-1 for the first bending mode. The presented approach results in an efficient all optical excitation and deflection detection

  12. Protocol for volumetric segmentation of medial temporal structures using high-resolution 3-D magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Bonilha, Leonardo; Kobayashi, Eliane; Cendes, Fernando; Min Li, Li

    2004-06-01

    Quantitative analysis of brain structures in normal subjects and in different neurological conditions can be carried out in vivo through magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) volumetric studies. The use of high-resolution MRI combined with image post-processing that allows simultaneous multiplanar view may facilitate volumetric segmentation of temporal lobe structures. We define a protocol for volumetric studies of medial temporal lobe structures using high-resolution MR images and we studied 30 healthy subjects (19 women; mean age, 33 years; age range, 21-55 years). Images underwent field non-homogeneity correction and linear stereotaxic transformation into a standard space. Structures of interest comprised temporopolar, entorhinal, perirhinal, parahippocampal cortices, hippocampus, and the amygdala. Segmentation was carried out with multiplanar assessment. There was no statistically significant left/right-sided asymmetry concerning any structure analyzed. Neither gender nor age influenced the volumes obtained. The coefficient of repeatability showed no significant difference of intra- and interobserver measurements. Imaging post-processing and simultaneous multiplanar view of high-resolution MRI facilitates volumetric assessment of the medial portion of the temporal lobe with strict adherence to anatomic landmarks. This protocol shows no significant inter- and intraobserver variations and thus is reliable for longitudinal studies.

  13. Single-view volumetric PIV via high-resolution scanning, isotropic voxel restructuring and 3D least-squares matching (3D-LSM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brücker, C.; Hess, D.; Kitzhofer, J.

    2013-02-01

    Scanning PIV as introduced by Brücker (1995 Exp. Fluids 19 255-63, 1996a Appl. Sci. Res. 56 157-79) has been successfully applied in the last 20 years to different flow problems where the frame rate was sufficient to ensure a ‘frozen’ field condition. The limited number of parallel planes however leads typically to an under-sampling in the scan direction in depth; therefore, the spatial resolution in depth is typically considerably lower than the spatial resolution in the plane of the laser sheet (depth resolution = scan shift Δz ≫ pixel unit in object space). In addition, a partial volume averaging effect due to the thickness of the light sheet must be taken into account. Herein, the method is further developed using a high-resolution scanning in combination with a Gaussian regression technique to achieve an isotropic representation of the tracer particles in a voxel-based volume reconstruction with cuboidal voxels. This eliminates the partial volume averaging effect due to light sheet thickness and leads to comparable spatial resolution of the particle field reconstructions in x-, y- and z-axes. In addition, advantage of voxel-based processing with estimations of translation, rotation and shear/strain is taken by using a 3D least-squares matching method, well suited for reconstruction of grey-level pattern fields. The method is discussed in this paper and used to investigate the ring vortex instability at Re = 2500 within a measurement volume of roughly 75 × 75 × 50 mm3 with a spatial resolution of 100 µm/voxel (750 × 750 × 500 voxel elements). The volume has been scanned with a number of 100 light sheets and scan rates of 10 kHz. The results show the growth of the Tsai-Widnall azimuthal instabilities accompanied with a precession of the axis of the vortex ring. Prior to breakdown, secondary instabilities evolve along the core with streamwise oriented striations. The front stagnation point's streamwise distance to the core starts to decrease while

  14. An Asymmetric Supercapacitor with Both Ultra-High Gravimetric and Volumetric Energy Density Based on 3D Ni(OH)2/MnO2@Carbon Nanotube and Activated Polyaniline-Derived Carbon.

    PubMed

    Shen, Juanjuan; Li, Xiaocheng; Wan, Liu; Liang, Kun; Tay, Beng Kang; Kong, Lingbin; Yan, Xingbin

    2017-01-11

    Development of a supercapacitor device with both high gravimetric and volumetric energy density is one of the most important requirements for their practical application in energy storage/conversion systems. Currently, improvement of the gravimetric/volumetric energy density of a supercapacitor is restricted by the insufficient utilization of positive materials at high loading density and the inferior capacitive behavior of negative electrodes. To solve these problems, we elaborately designed and prepared a 3D core-shell structured Ni(OH)2/MnO2@carbon nanotube (CNT) composite via a facile solvothermal process by using the thermal chemical vapor deposition grown-CNTs as support. Owing to the superiorities of core-shell architecture in improving the service efficiency of pseudocapacitive materials at high loading density, the prepared Ni(OH)2/MnO2@CNT electrode demonstrated a high capacitance value of 2648 F g(-1) (1 A g(-1)) at a high loading density of 6.52 mg cm(-2). Coupled with high-performance activated polyaniline-derived carbon (APDC, 400 F g(-1) at 1 A g(-1)), the assembled Ni(OH)2/MnO2@CNT//APDC asymmetric device delivered both high gravimetric and volumetric energy density (126.4 Wh kg(-1) and 10.9 mWh cm(-3), respectively), together with superb rate performance and cycling lifetime. Moreover, we demonstrate an effective approach for building a high-performance supercapacitor with high gravimetric/volumetric energy density.

  15. True-Depth: a new type of true 3D volumetric display system suitable for CAD, medical imaging, and air-traffic control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolgoff, Eugene

    1998-04-01

    Floating Images, Inc. is developing a new type of volumetric monitor capable of producing a high-density set of points in 3D space. Since the points of light actually exist in space, the resulting image can be viewed with continuous parallax, both vertically and horizontally, with no headache or eyestrain. These 'real' points in space are always viewed with a perfect match between accommodation and convergence. All scanned points appear to the viewer simultaneously, making this display especially suitable for CAD, medical imaging, air-traffic control, and various military applications. This system has the potential to display imagery so accurately that a ruler could be placed within the aerial image to provide precise measurement in any direction. A special virtual imaging arrangement allows the user to superimpose 3D images on a solid object, making the object look transparent. This is particularly useful for minimally invasive surgery in which the internal structure of a patient is visible to a surgeon in 3D. Surgical procedures can be carried out through the smallest possible hole while the surgeon watches the procedure from outside the body as if the patient were transparent. Unlike other attempts to produce volumetric imaging, this system uses no massive rotating screen or any screen at all, eliminating down time due to breakage and possible danger due to potential mechanical failure. Additionally, it is also capable of displaying very large images.

  16. Adaptive Geometric Tessellation for 3D Reconstruction of Anisotropically Developing Cells in Multilayer Tissues from Sparse Volumetric Microscopy Images

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Anirban; Perales, Mariano M.; Reddy, G. Venugopala; Roy-Chowdhury, Amit K.

    2013-01-01

    The need for quantification of cell growth patterns in a multilayer, multi-cellular tissue necessitates the development of a 3D reconstruction technique that can estimate 3D shapes and sizes of individual cells from Confocal Microscopy (CLSM) image slices. However, the current methods of 3D reconstruction using CLSM imaging require large number of image slices per cell. But, in case of Live Cell Imaging of an actively developing tissue, large depth resolution is not feasible in order to avoid damage to cells from prolonged exposure to laser radiation. In the present work, we have proposed an anisotropic Voronoi tessellation based 3D reconstruction framework for a tightly packed multilayer tissue with extreme z-sparsity (2–4 slices/cell) and wide range of cell shapes and sizes. The proposed method, named as the ‘Adaptive Quadratic Voronoi Tessellation’ (AQVT), is capable of handling both the sparsity problem and the non-uniformity in cell shapes by estimating the tessellation parameters for each cell from the sparse data-points on its boundaries. We have tested the proposed 3D reconstruction method on time-lapse CLSM image stacks of the Arabidopsis Shoot Apical Meristem (SAM) and have shown that the AQVT based reconstruction method can correctly estimate the 3D shapes of a large number of SAM cells. PMID:23940509

  17. A volumetric model-based 2D to 3D registration method for measuring kinematics of natural knees with single-plane fluoroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, Tsung-Yuan; Lu, Tung-Wu; Chen, Chung-Ming; Kuo, Mei-Ying; Hsu, Horng-Chaung

    2010-03-15

    Purpose: Accurate measurement of the three-dimensional (3D) rigid body and surface kinematics of the natural human knee is essential for many clinical applications. Existing techniques are limited either in their accuracy or lack more realistic experimental evaluation of the measurement errors. The purposes of the study were to develop a volumetric model-based 2D to 3D registration method, called the weighted edge-matching score (WEMS) method, for measuring natural knee kinematics with single-plane fluoroscopy to determine experimentally the measurement errors and to compare its performance with that of pattern intensity (PI) and gradient difference (GD) methods. Methods: The WEMS method gives higher priority to matching of longer edges of the digitally reconstructed radiograph and fluoroscopic images. The measurement errors of the methods were evaluated based on a human cadaveric knee at 11 flexion positions. Results: The accuracy of the WEMS method was determined experimentally to be less than 0.77 mm for the in-plane translations, 3.06 mm for out-of-plane translation, and 1.13 deg. for all rotations, which is better than that of the PI and GD methods. Conclusions: A new volumetric model-based 2D to 3D registration method has been developed for measuring 3D in vivo kinematics of natural knee joints with single-plane fluoroscopy. With the equipment used in the current study, the accuracy of the WEMS method is considered acceptable for the measurement of the 3D kinematics of the natural knee in clinical applications.

  18. Influence of multi-leaf collimator leaf width in radiosurgery via volumetric modulated arc therapy and 3D dynamic conformal arc therapy.

    PubMed

    Serna, Alfredo; Puchades, Vicente; Mata, Fernando; Ramos, David; Alcaraz, Miguel

    2015-05-01

    To study the influence of Multileaf Collimator (MLC) leaf width in radiosurgery treatment planning for Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT) and 3D Dynamic Conformal Arc Therapy (3D-DCA). 16 patients with solitary brain metastases treated with radiosurgery via the non-coplanar VMAT were replanned for the 3D-DCA. For each planning technique two MLC leaf width sizes were utilized, i.e. 5 mm and 2.5 mm. These treatment plans were compared using dosimetric indices (conformity, gradient and mean dose for brain tissue) and the normal tissue complication probability (NTCP). An improvement in planning quality for VMAT was observed versus 3D-DCA for any MLC leaf width, mainly with regards to dose conformity and to a lesser extent regards dose gradient. No significant difference was observed for any of both techniques using smaller leaf width. However, dose gradient was improved in favor of the 2.5 mm MLC for either of both techniques (15% VMAT and 10% 3D-DCA); being noticeable for lesions smaller than 10cm(3). Nonetheless, the NTCP index was not significantly affected by variations in the dose gradient index. This, our present study, suggests that the use of an MLC leaf width of 2.5 mm via the noncoplanar VMAT and 3D-DCA techniques provides improvement in terms of dose gradient for small volumes, over those results obtained with an MLC leaf width of 5 mm. The 3D-DCA does also benefit from MLC leaf widths of a smaller size, mainly in terms of conformity. Copyright © 2015 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. An automatic approach for 3D registration of CT scans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yang; Saber, Eli; Dianat, Sohail; Vantaram, Sreenath Rao; Abhyankar, Vishwas

    2012-03-01

    CT (Computed tomography) is a widely employed imaging modality in the medical field. Normally, a volume of CT scans is prescribed by a doctor when a specific region of the body (typically neck to groin) is suspected of being abnormal. The doctors are required to make professional diagnoses based upon the obtained datasets. In this paper, we propose an automatic registration algorithm that helps healthcare personnel to automatically align corresponding scans from 'Study' to 'Atlas'. The proposed algorithm is capable of aligning both 'Atlas' and 'Study' into the same resolution through 3D interpolation. After retrieving the scanned slice volume in the 'Study' and the corresponding volume in the original 'Atlas' dataset, a 3D cross correlation method is used to identify and register various body parts.

  20. Treatment of left sided breast cancer for a patient with funnel chest: volumetric-modulated arc therapy vs. 3D-CRT and intensity-modulated radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Haertl, Petra M; Pohl, Fabian; Weidner, Karin; Groeger, Christian; Koelbl, Oliver; Dobler, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    This case study presents a rare case of left-sided breast cancer in a patient with funnel chest, which is a technical challenge for radiation therapy planning. To identify the best treatment technique for this case, 3 techniques were compared: conventional tangential fields (3D conformal radiotherapy [3D-CRT]), intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), and volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT). The plans were created for a SynergyS® (Elekta, Ltd, Crawley, UK) linear accelerator with a BeamModulator™ head and 6-MV photons. The planning system was Oncentra Masterplan® v3.3 SP1 (Nucletron BV, Veenendal, Netherlands). Calculations were performed with collapsed cone algorithm. Dose prescription was 50.4 Gy to the average of the planning target volume (PTV). PTV coverage and homogeneity was comparable for all techniques. VMAT allowed reducing dose to the ipsilateral organs at risk (OAR) and the contralateral breast compared with IMRT and 3D-CRT: The volume of the left lung receiving 20 Gy was 19.3% for VMAT, 26.1% for IMRT, and 32.4% for 3D-CRT. In the heart, a D(15%) of 9.7 Gy could be achieved with VMAT compared with 14 Gy for IMRT and 46 Gy for 3D-CRT. In the contralateral breast, D(15%) was 6.4 Gy for VMAT, 8.8 Gy for IMRT, and 10.2 Gy for 3D-CRT. In the contralateral lung, however, the lowest dose was achieved with 3D-CRT with D(10%) of 1.7 Gy for 3D-CRT, and 6.7 Gy for both IMRT and VMAT. The lowest number of monitor units (MU) per 1.8-Gy fraction was required by 3D-CRT (192 MU) followed by VMAT (518 MU) and IMRT (727 MU). Treatment time was similar for 3D-CRT (3 min) and VMAT (4 min) but substantially increased for IMRT (13 min). VMAT is considered the best treatment option for the presented case of a patient with funnel chest. It allows reducing dose in most OAR without compromising target coverage, keeping delivery time well below 5 minutes.

  1. Volumetric Medical Image Coding: An Object-based, Lossy-to-lossless and Fully Scalable Approach.

    PubMed

    Danyali, Habibiollah; Mertins, Alfred

    2011-01-01

    In this article, an object-based, highly scalable, lossy-to-lossless 3D wavelet coding approach for volumetric medical image data (e.g., magnetic resonance (MR) and computed tomography (CT)) is proposed. The new method, called 3DOBHS-SPIHT, is based on the well-known set partitioning in the hierarchical trees (SPIHT) algorithm and supports both quality and resolution scalability. The 3D input data is grouped into groups of slices (GOS) and each GOS is encoded and decoded as a separate unit. The symmetric tree definition of the original 3DSPIHT is improved by introducing a new asymmetric tree structure. While preserving the compression efficiency, the new tree structure allows for a small size of each GOS, which not only reduces memory consumption during the encoding and decoding processes, but also facilitates more efficient random access to certain segments of slices. To achieve more compression efficiency, the algorithm only encodes the main object of interest in each 3D data set, which can have any arbitrary shape, and ignores the unnecessary background. The experimental results on some MR data sets show the good performance of the 3DOBHS-SPIHT algorithm for multi-resolution lossy-to-lossless coding. The compression efficiency, full scalability, and object-based features of the proposed approach, beside its lossy-to-lossless coding support, make it a very attractive candidate for volumetric medical image information archiving and transmission applications.

  2. Volumetric Medical Image Coding: An Object-based, Lossy-to-lossless and Fully Scalable Approach

    PubMed Central

    Danyali, Habibiollah; Mertins, Alfred

    2011-01-01

    In this article, an object-based, highly scalable, lossy-to-lossless 3D wavelet coding approach for volumetric medical image data (e.g., magnetic resonance (MR) and computed tomography (CT)) is proposed. The new method, called 3DOBHS-SPIHT, is based on the well-known set partitioning in the hierarchical trees (SPIHT) algorithm and supports both quality and resolution scalability. The 3D input data is grouped into groups of slices (GOS) and each GOS is encoded and decoded as a separate unit. The symmetric tree definition of the original 3DSPIHT is improved by introducing a new asymmetric tree structure. While preserving the compression efficiency, the new tree structure allows for a small size of each GOS, which not only reduces memory consumption during the encoding and decoding processes, but also facilitates more efficient random access to certain segments of slices. To achieve more compression efficiency, the algorithm only encodes the main object of interest in each 3D data set, which can have any arbitrary shape, and ignores the unnecessary background. The experimental results on some MR data sets show the good performance of the 3DOBHS-SPIHT algorithm for multi-resolution lossy-to-lossless coding. The compression efficiency, full scalability, and object-based features of the proposed approach, beside its lossy-to-lossless coding support, make it a very attractive candidate for volumetric medical image information archiving and transmission applications. PMID:22606653

  3. The effect of CT scanner parameters and 3D volume rendering techniques on the accuracy of linear, angular, and volumetric measurements of the mandible

    PubMed Central

    Whyms, B.J.; Vorperian, H.K.; Gentry, L.R.; Schimek, E.M.; Bersu, E.T.; Chung, M.K.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives This study investigates the effect of scanning parameters on the accuracy of measurements from three-dimensional multi-detector computed tomography (3D-CT) mandible renderings. A broader range of acceptable parameters can increase the availability of CT studies for retrospective analysis. Study Design Three human mandibles and a phantom object were scanned using 18 combinations of slice thickness, field of view, and reconstruction algorithm and three different threshold-based segmentations. Measurements of 3D-CT models and specimens were compared. Results Linear and angular measurements were accurate, irrespective of scanner parameters or rendering technique. Volume measurements were accurate with a slice thickness of 1.25 mm, but not 2.5 mm. Surface area measurements were consistently inflated. Conclusions Linear, angular and volumetric measurements of mandible 3D-CT models can be confidently obtained from a range of parameters and rendering techniques. Slice thickness is the primary factor affecting volume measurements. These findings should also apply to 3D rendering using cone-beam-CT. PMID:23601224

  4. High-dose radiotherapy in inoperable nonsmall cell lung cancer: Comparison of volumetric modulated arc therapy, dynamic IMRT and 3D conformal radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Bree, Ingrid de; Hinsberg, Marieelle G.E. van; Veelen, Lieneke R. van

    2012-01-01

    Conformal 3D radiotherapy (3D-CRT) combined with chemotherapy for inoperable non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) to the preferable high dose is often not achievable because of dose-limiting organs. This reduces the probability of regional tumor control. Therefore, the surplus value of using intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) techniques, specifically volumetric modulated arc therapy (RapidArc [RA]) and dynamic IMRT (d-IMRT) has been investigated. RA and d-IMRT plans were compared with 3D-CRT treatment plans for 20 patients eligible for concurrent high-dose chemoradiotherapy, in whom a dose of 60 Gy was not achievable. Comparison of dose delivery in the target volume and organs at risk was carried out by evaluating 3D dose distributions and dose-volume histograms. Quality of the dose distribution was assessed using the inhomogeneity and conformity index. For most patients, a higher dose to the target volume can be delivered using RA or d-IMRT; in 15% of the patients a dose {>=}60 Gy was possible. Both IMRT techniques result in a better conformity of the dose (p < 0.001). There are no significant differences in homogeneity of dose in the target volume. IMRT techniques for NSCLC patients allow higher dose to the target volume, thus improving regional tumor control.

  5. Dynamic 3D measurement of modulated radiotherapy: a scintillator-based approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Archambault, Louis; Rilling, Madison; Roy-Pomerleau, Xavier; Thibault, Simon

    2017-05-01

    With the rise of high-conformity dynamic radiotherapy, such as volumetric modulated arc therapy and robotic radiosurgery, the temporal dimension of dose measurement is becoming increasingly important. It must be possible to tell both ‘where’ and ‘when’ a discrepancy occurs between the plan and its delivery. A 3D scintillation-based dosimetry system could be ideal for such a thorough, end-to-end verification; however, the challenge lies in retrieving the volumetric information of the light-emitting volume. This paper discusses the motivation, from an optics point of view, of using the images acquired with a plenoptic camera, or light field imager, of an irradiated plastic scintillator volume to reconstruct the delivered 3D dose distribution. Current work focuses on the optimization of the optical design as well as the data processing that is involved in the ongoing development of a clinically viable, second generation dosimetry system.

  6. SU-E-T-624: Quantitative Evaluation of 2D Versus 3D Dosimetry for Stereotactic Volumetric Modulated Arc Delivery Using COMPASS

    SciTech Connect

    Vikraman, S; Karrthick, K; Rajesh, T; Sambasivaselli, R; Senniandanvar, V; Kataria, T; Manigandan, D; Karthikeyan, N; Muthukumaran, M

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate quantitatively 2D versus 3D dosimetry for stereotactic volumetric modulated arc delivery using COMPASS with 2D array. Methods: Twenty-five patients CT images and RT structures of different sites like brain, head and neck, thorax, abdomen and spine were taken from Multiplan planning system for this study. All these patients underwent radical stereotactic treatment in Cyberknife. For each patient, linac based VMAT stereotactic plans were generated in Monaco TPS v 3.1 using Elekta Beam Modulator MLC. Dose prescription was in the range of 5-20Gy/fraction.TPS calculated VMAT plan delivery accuracy was quantitatively evaluated with COMPASS measured dose and calculated dose based on DVH metrics. In order to ascertain the potential of COMPASS 3D dosimetry for stereotactic plan delivery, 2D fluence verification was performed with MatriXX using Multicube. Results: For each site, D{sub 9} {sub 5} was achieved with 100% of prescription dose with maximum 0.05SD. Conformity index (CI) was observed closer to 1.15 in all cases. Maximum deviation of 2.62 % was observed for D{sub 9} {sub 5} when compared TPS versus COMPASS measured. Considerable deviations were observed in head and neck cases compare to other sites. The maximum mean and standard deviation for D{sub 9} {sub 5}, average target dose and average gamma were -0.78±1.72, -1.10±1.373 and 0.39±0.086 respectively. Numbers of pixels passing 2D fluence verification were observed as a mean of 99.36% ±0.455 SD with 3% dose difference and 3mm DTA. For critical organs in head and neck cases, significant dose differences were observed in 3D dosimetry while the target doses were matched well within limit in both 2D and 3D dosimetry. Conclusion: The quantitative evaluations of 2D versus 3D dosimetry for stereotactic volumetric modulated plans showed the potential of highlighting the delivery errors. This study reveals that COMPASS 3D dosimetry is an effective tool for patient

  7. MO-DE-210-06: Development of a Supercompounded 3D Volumetric Ultrasound Image Guidance System for Prone Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation (APBI)

    SciTech Connect

    Chiu, T; Hrycushko, B; Zhao, B; Jiang, S; Gu, X

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: For early-stage breast cancer, accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) is a cost-effective breast-conserving treatment. Irradiation in a prone position can mitigate respiratory induced breast movement and achieve maximal sparing of heart and lung tissues. However, accurate dose delivery is challenging due to breast deformation and lumpectomy cavity shrinkage. We propose a 3D volumetric ultrasound (US) image guidance system for accurate prone APBI Methods: The designed system, set beneath the prone breast board, consists of a water container, an US scanner, and a two-layer breast immobilization cup. The outer layer of the breast cup forms the inner wall of water container while the inner layer is attached to patient breast directly to immobilization. The US transducer scans is attached to the outer-layer of breast cup at the dent of water container. Rotational US scans in a transverse plane are achieved by simultaneously rotating water container and transducer, and multiple transverse scanning forms a 3D scan. A supercompounding-technique-based volumetric US reconstruction algorithm is developed for 3D image reconstruction. The performance of the designed system is evaluated with two custom-made gelatin phantoms containing several cylindrical inserts filled in with water (11% reflection coefficient between materials). One phantom is designed for positioning evaluation while the other is for scaling assessment. Results: In the positioning evaluation phantom, the central distances between the inserts are 15, 20, 30 and 40 mm. The distances on reconstructed images differ by −0.19, −0.65, −0.11 and −1.67 mm, respectively. In the scaling evaluation phantom, inserts are 12.7, 19.05, 25.40 and 31.75 mm in diameter. Measured inserts’ sizes on images differed by 0.23, 0.19, −0.1 and 0.22 mm, respectively. Conclusion: The phantom evaluation results show that the developed 3D volumetric US system can accurately localize target position and determine

  8. Volumetric modulated arc planning for lung stereotactic body radiotherapy using conventional and unflattened photon beams: a dosimetric comparison with 3D technique

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Frequently, three-dimensional (3D) conformal beams are used in lung cancer stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Recently, volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) was introduced as a new treatment modality. VMAT techniques shorten delivery time, reducing the possibility of intrafraction target motion. However dose distributions can be quite different from standard 3D therapy. This study quantifies those differences, with focus on VMAT plans using unflattened photon beams. Methods A total of 15 lung cancer patients previously treated with 3D or VMAT SBRT were randomly selected. For each patient, non-coplanar 3D, coplanar and non-coplanar VMAT and flattening filter free VMAT (FFF-VMAT) plans were generated to meet the same objectives with 50 Gy covering 95% of the PTV. Two dynamic arcs were used in each VMAT plan. The couch was set at ± 5° to the 0° straight position for the two non-coplanar arcs. Pinnacle version 9.0 (Philips Radiation Oncology, Fitchburg WI) treatment planning system with VMAT capabilities was used. We analyzed the conformity index (CI), which is the ratio of the total volume receiving at least the prescription dose to the target volume receiving at least the prescription dose; the conformity number (CN) which is the ratio of the target coverage to CI; and the gradient index (GI) which is the ratio of the volume of 50% of the prescription isodose to the volume of the prescription isodose; as well as the V20, V5, and mean lung dose (MLD). Paired non-parametric analysis of variance tests with post-tests were performed to examine the statistical significance of the differences of the dosimetric indices. Results Dosimetric indices CI, CN and MLD all show statistically significant improvement for all studied VMAT techniques compared with 3D plans (p < 0.05). V5 and V20 show statistically significant improvement for the FFF-VMAT plans compared with 3D (p < 0.001). GI is improved for the FFF-VMAT and the non-coplanar VMAT plans (p < 0.01 and p

  9. TOPICAL REVIEW: Computational approaches to 3D modeling of RNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laing, Christian; Schlick, Tamar

    2010-07-01

    Many exciting discoveries have recently revealed the versatility of RNA and its importance in a variety of functions within the cell. Since the structural features of RNA are of major importance to their biological function, there is much interest in predicting RNA structure, either in free form or in interaction with various ligands, including proteins, metabolites and other molecules. In recent years, an increasing number of researchers have developed novel RNA algorithms for predicting RNA secondary and tertiary structures. In this review, we describe current experimental and computational advances and discuss recent ideas that are transforming the traditional view of RNA folding. To evaluate the performance of the most recent RNA 3D folding algorithms, we provide a comparative study in order to test the performance of available 3D structure prediction algorithms for an RNA data set of 43 structures of various lengths and motifs. We find that the algorithms vary widely in terms of prediction quality across different RNA lengths and topologies; most predictions have very large root mean square deviations from the experimental structure. We conclude by outlining some suggestions for future RNA folding research.

  10. Diagonal Slices of 3D Young Diagrams in the Approach of Maya Diagrams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Li-Qiang; Wang, Li-Fang; Wu, Ke; Yang, Jie

    2014-09-01

    According to the correspondence between 2D Young diagrams and Maya diagrams and the relation between 2D and 3D Young diagrams, we construct 3D Young diagrams in the approach of Maya diagrams. Moreover, we formulate the generating function of 3D Young diagrams, which is the MacMahon function in terms of Maya diagrams.

  11. Coronary vessel trees from 3D imagery: A topological approach

    PubMed Central

    Szymczak, Andrzej; Stillman, Arthur; Tannenbaum, Allen; Mischaikow, Konstantin

    2013-01-01

    We propose a simple method for reconstructing vascular trees from 3D images. Our algorithm extracts persistent maxima of the intensity on all axis-aligned 2D slices of the input image. The maxima concentrate along 1D intensity ridges, in particular along blood vessels. We build a forest connecting the persistent maxima with short edges. The forest tends to approximate the blood vessels present in the image, but also contains numerous spurious features and often fails to connect segments belonging to one vessel in low contrast areas. We improve the forest by applying simple geometric filters that trim short branches, fill gaps in blood vessels and remove spurious branches from the vascular tree to be extracted. Experiments show that our technique can be applied to extract coronary trees from heart CT scans. PMID:16798058

  12. Human Skin 3D Bioprinting Using Scaffold-Free Approach.

    PubMed

    Pourchet, Léa J; Thepot, Amélie; Albouy, Marion; Courtial, Edwin J; Boher, Aurélie; Blum, Loïc J; Marquette, Christophe A

    2017-02-01

    Organ in vitro synthesis is one of the last bottlenecks between tissue engineering and transplantation of synthetic organs. Bioprinting has proven its capacity to produce 3D objects composed of living cells but highly organized tissues such as full thickness skin (dermis + epidermis) are rarely attained. The focus of the present study is to demonstrate the capability of a newly developed ink formulation and the use of an open source printer, for the production of a really complete skin model. Proofs are given through immunostaining and electronic microscopy that the bioprinted skin presents all characteristics of human skin, both at the molecular and macromolecular level. Finally, the printability of large skin objects is demonstrated with the printing of an adult-size ear.

  13. Designing a genetic watermarking approach for 3D scenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiao-Wei; Liu, Yang; Kim, Seok-Tae; Wang, Qiong-Hua

    2017-06-01

    A new watermarking algorithm based on genetic algorithm (GA) in the transform domain is proposed. Unlike the existing computer-generated integral imaging based watermarking methods, the proposed method utilizes GA searching to the optimized transform domain to serve as a trade-off for watermark embedding. In this paper, 3D scene to be captured by using a virtual pinhole array and be computationally recorded as an elemental image array (EIA), watermarking with GA optimization and computer-generated holography is implemented. In the proposed GA optimization process, we utilize the fitness function to improve the visual quality of watermarked images and the robustness. Simulation results show that the proposed algorithm yields a holographic watermark that is imperceptibility to human eyes and robust to standard watermarking attacks. A comparison of the proposed watermarking method to the existing similar watermarking methods demonstrated that the proposed method generally outperforms completing methods in terms of imperceptibility and robustness.

  14. 3D Volumetric Analysis of Wind Turbine Wake Properties in the Atmosphere Using High-Resolution Doppler Lidar

    SciTech Connect

    Banta, Robert M.; Pichugina, Yelena L.; Brewer, W. Alan; Lundquist, Julie K.; Kelley, Neil D.; Sandberg, Scott P.; Alvarez II, Raul J.; Hardesty, R. Michael; Weickmann, Ann M.

    2015-05-01

    Wind turbine wakes in the atmosphere are three-dimensional (3D) and time dependent. An important question is how best to measure atmospheric wake properties, both for characterizing these properties observationally and for verification of numerical, conceptual, and physical (e.g., wind tunnel) models of wakes. Here a scanning, pulsed, coherent Doppler lidar is used to sample a turbine wake using 3D volume scan patterns that envelop the wake and simultaneously measure the inflow profile. The volume data are analyzed for quantities of interest, such as peak velocity deficit, downwind variability of the deficit, and downwind extent of the wake, in a manner that preserves the measured data. For the case study presented here, in which the wake was well defined in the lidar data, peak deficits of up to 80% were measured 0.6-2 rotor diameters (D) downwind of the turbine, and the wakes extended more than 11D downwind. Temporal wake variability over periods of minutes and the effects of atmospheric gusts and lulls in the inflow are demonstrated in the analysis. Lidar scanning trade-offs important to ensuring that the wake quantities of interest are adequately sampled by the scan pattern, including scan coverage, number of scans per volume, data resolution, and scan-cycle repeat interval, are discussed.

  15. Evaluation of 3D pre-treatment verification for volumetric modulated arc therapy plan in head region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruangchan, S.; Oonsiri, S.; Suriyapee, S.

    2016-03-01

    The development of pre-treatment QA tools contributes to the three dimension (3D) dose verification using the calculation software with the measured planar dose distribution. This research is aimed to evaluate the Sun Nuclear 3DVH software with Thermo luminescence dosimeter (TLD) measurement. The two VMAT patient plans (2.5 arcs) of 6 MV photons with different PTV locations were transferred to the Rando phantom images. The PTV of the first plan located in homogeneous area and vice versa in the second plan. For treatment planning process, the Rando phantom images were employed in optimization and calculation with the PTV, brain stem, lens and TLD position contouring. The verification plans were created, transferred to the ArcCHECK for measurement and calculated the 3D dose using 3DVH software. The range of the percent dose differences in both PTV and organ at risk (OAR) between TLD and 3DVH software of the first and the second plans were -2.09 to 3.87% and -1.39 to 6.88%, respectively. The mean percent dose differences for the PTV were 1.62% and 3.93% for the first and the second plans, respectively. In conclusion, the 3DVH software results show good agreement with TLD when the tumor located in the homogeneous area.

  16. Retrospective evaluation of dosimetric quality for prostate carcinomas treated with 3D conformal, intensity modulated and volumetric modulated arc radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Crowe, Scott B; Kairn, Tanya; Middlebrook, Nigel; Hill, Brendan; Christie, David R H; Knight, Richard T; Kenny, John; Langton, Christian M; Trapp, Jamie V

    2013-01-01

    Introduction This study examines and compares the dosimetric quality of radiotherapy treatment plans for prostate carcinoma across a cohort of 163 patients treated across five centres: 83 treated with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT), 33 treated with intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and 47 treated with volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). Methods Treatment plan quality was evaluated in terms of target dose homogeneity and organs at risk (OAR), through the use of a set of dose metrics. These included the mean, maximum and minimum doses; the homogeneity and conformity indices for the target volumes; and a selection of dose coverage values that were relevant to each OAR. Statistical significance was evaluated using two-tailed Welch's T-tests. The Monte Carlo DICOM ToolKit software was adapted to permit the evaluation of dose metrics from DICOM data exported from a commercial radiotherapy treatment planning system. Results The 3DCRT treatment plans offered greater planning target volume dose homogeneity than the other two treatment modalities. The IMRT and VMAT plans offered greater dose reduction in the OAR: with increased compliance with recommended OAR dose constraints, compared to conventional 3DCRT treatments. When compared to each other, IMRT and VMAT did not provide significantly different treatment plan quality for like-sized tumour volumes. Conclusions This study indicates that IMRT and VMAT have provided similar dosimetric quality, which is superior to the dosimetric quality achieved with 3DCRT. PMID:26229621

  17. Alpha shape theory for 3D visualization and volumetric measurement of brain tumor progression using magnetic resonance images.

    PubMed

    Hamoud Al-Tamimi, Mohammed Sabbih; Sulong, Ghazali; Shuaib, Ibrahim Lutfi

    2015-07-01

    Resection of brain tumors is a tricky task in surgery due to its direct influence on the patients' survival rate. Determining the tumor resection extent for its complete information via-à-vis volume and dimensions in pre- and post-operative Magnetic Resonance Images (MRI) requires accurate estimation and comparison. The active contour segmentation technique is used to segment brain tumors on pre-operative MR images using self-developed software. Tumor volume is acquired from its contours via alpha shape theory. The graphical user interface is developed for rendering, visualizing and estimating the volume of a brain tumor. Internet Brain Segmentation Repository dataset (IBSR) is employed to analyze and determine the repeatability and reproducibility of tumor volume. Accuracy of the method is validated by comparing the estimated volume using the proposed method with that of gold-standard. Segmentation by active contour technique is found to be capable of detecting the brain tumor boundaries. Furthermore, the volume description and visualization enable an interactive examination of tumor tissue and its surrounding. Admirable features of our results demonstrate that alpha shape theory in comparison to other existing standard methods is superior for precise volumetric measurement of tumor.

  18. Retrospective evaluation of dosimetric quality for prostate carcinomas treated with 3D conformal, intensity modulated and volumetric modulated arc radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Crowe, Scott B; Kairn, Tanya; Middlebrook, Nigel; Hill, Brendan; Christie, David R H; Knight, Richard T; Kenny, John; Langton, Christian M; Trapp, Jamie V

    2013-12-15

    This study examines and compares the dosimetric quality of radiotherapy treatment plans for prostate carcinoma across a cohort of 163 patients treated across five centres: 83 treated with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT), 33 treated with intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and 47 treated with volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). Treatment plan quality was evaluated in terms of target dose homogeneity and organs at risk (OAR), through the use of a set of dose metrics. These included the mean, maximum and minimum doses; the homogeneity and conformity indices for the target volumes; and a selection of dose coverage values that were relevant to each OAR. Statistical significance was evaluated using two-tailed Welch's T-tests. The Monte Carlo DICOM ToolKit software was adapted to permit the evaluation of dose metrics from DICOM data exported from a commercial radiotherapy treatment planning system. The 3DCRT treatment plans offered greater planning target volume dose homogeneity than the other two treatment modalities. The IMRT and VMAT plans offered greater dose reduction in the OAR: with increased compliance with recommended OAR dose constraints, compared to conventional 3DCRT treatments. When compared to each other, IMRT and VMAT did not provide significantly different treatment plan quality for like-sized tumour volumes. This study indicates that IMRT and VMAT have provided similar dosimetric quality, which is superior to the dosimetric quality achieved with 3DCRT.

  19. Correlation between gamma index passing rate and clinical dosimetric difference for pre-treatment 2D and 3D volumetric modulated arc therapy dosimetric verification.

    PubMed

    Jin, X; Yan, H; Han, C; Zhou, Y; Yi, J; Xie, C

    2015-03-01

    To investigate comparatively the percentage gamma passing rate (%GP) of two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) pre-treatment volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) dosimetric verification and their correlation and sensitivity with percentage dosimetric errors (%DE). %GP of 2D and 3D pre-treatment VMAT quality assurance (QA) with different acceptance criteria was obtained by ArcCHECK® (Sun Nuclear Corporation, Melbourne, FL) for 20 patients with nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC) and 20 patients with oesophageal cancer. %DE were calculated from planned dose-volume histogram (DVH) and patients' predicted DVH calculated by 3DVH® software (Sun Nuclear Corporation). Correlation and sensitivity between %GP and %DE were investigated using Pearson's correlation coefficient (r) and receiver operating characteristics (ROCs). Relatively higher %DE on some DVH-based metrics were observed for both patients with NPC and oesophageal cancer. Except for 2%/2 mm criterion, the average %GPs for all patients undergoing VMAT were acceptable with average rates of 97.11% ± 1.54% and 97.39% ± 1.37% for 2D and 3D 3%/3 mm criteria, respectively. The number of correlations for 3D was higher than that for 2D (21 vs 8). However, the general correlation was still poor for all the analysed metrics (9 out of 26 for 3D 3%/3 mm criterion). The average area under the curve (AUC) of ROCs was 0.66 ± 0.12 and 0.71 ± 0.21 for 2D and 3D evaluations, respectively. There is a lack of correlation between %GP and %DE for both 2D and 3D pre-treatment VMAT dosimetric evaluation. DVH-based dose metrics evaluation obtained from 3DVH will provide more useful analysis. Correlation and sensitivity of %GP with %DE for VMAT QA were studied for the first time.

  20. Correlation between gamma index passing rate and clinical dosimetric difference for pre-treatment 2D and 3D volumetric modulated arc therapy dosimetric verification

    PubMed Central

    Jin, X; Yan, H; Han, C; Zhou, Y; Yi, J

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate comparatively the percentage gamma passing rate (%GP) of two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) pre-treatment volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) dosimetric verification and their correlation and sensitivity with percentage dosimetric errors (%DE). Methods: %GP of 2D and 3D pre-treatment VMAT quality assurance (QA) with different acceptance criteria was obtained by ArcCHECK® (Sun Nuclear Corporation, Melbourne, FL) for 20 patients with nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC) and 20 patients with oesophageal cancer. %DE were calculated from planned dose–volume histogram (DVH) and patients' predicted DVH calculated by 3DVH® software (Sun Nuclear Corporation). Correlation and sensitivity between %GP and %DE were investigated using Pearson's correlation coefficient (r) and receiver operating characteristics (ROCs). Results: Relatively higher %DE on some DVH-based metrics were observed for both patients with NPC and oesophageal cancer. Except for 2%/2 mm criterion, the average %GPs for all patients undergoing VMAT were acceptable with average rates of 97.11% ± 1.54% and 97.39% ± 1.37% for 2D and 3D 3%/3 mm criteria, respectively. The number of correlations for 3D was higher than that for 2D (21 vs 8). However, the general correlation was still poor for all the analysed metrics (9 out of 26 for 3D 3%/3 mm criterion). The average area under the curve (AUC) of ROCs was 0.66 ± 0.12 and 0.71 ± 0.21 for 2D and 3D evaluations, respectively. Conclusions: There is a lack of correlation between %GP and %DE for both 2D and 3D pre-treatment VMAT dosimetric evaluation. DVH-based dose metrics evaluation obtained from 3DVH will provide more useful analysis. Advances in knowledge: Correlation and sensitivity of %GP with %DE for VMAT QA were studied for the first time. PMID:25494412

  1. An initial study on the estimation of time-varying volumetric treatment images and 3D tumor localization from single MV cine EPID images

    SciTech Connect

    Mishra, Pankaj Mak, Raymond H.; Rottmann, Joerg; Bryant, Jonathan H.; Williams, Christopher L.; Berbeco, Ross I.; Lewis, John H.; Li, Ruijiang

    2014-08-15

    Purpose: In this work the authors develop and investigate the feasibility of a method to estimate time-varying volumetric images from individual MV cine electronic portal image device (EPID) images. Methods: The authors adopt a two-step approach to time-varying volumetric image estimation from a single cine EPID image. In the first step, a patient-specific motion model is constructed from 4DCT. In the second step, parameters in the motion model are tuned according to the information in the EPID image. The patient-specific motion model is based on a compact representation of lung motion represented in displacement vector fields (DVFs). DVFs are calculated through deformable image registration (DIR) of a reference 4DCT phase image (typically peak-exhale) to a set of 4DCT images corresponding to different phases of a breathing cycle. The salient characteristics in the DVFs are captured in a compact representation through principal component analysis (PCA). PCA decouples the spatial and temporal components of the DVFs. Spatial information is represented in eigenvectors and the temporal information is represented by eigen-coefficients. To generate a new volumetric image, the eigen-coefficients are updated via cost function optimization based on digitally reconstructed radiographs and projection images. The updated eigen-coefficients are then multiplied with the eigenvectors to obtain updated DVFs that, in turn, give the volumetric image corresponding to the cine EPID image. Results: The algorithm was tested on (1) Eight digital eXtended CArdiac-Torso phantom datasets based on different irregular patient breathing patterns and (2) patient cine EPID images acquired during SBRT treatments. The root-mean-squared tumor localization error is (0.73 ± 0.63 mm) for the XCAT data and (0.90 ± 0.65 mm) for the patient data. Conclusions: The authors introduced a novel method of estimating volumetric time-varying images from single cine EPID images and a PCA-based lung motion model

  2. An initial study on the estimation of time-varying volumetric treatment images and 3D tumor localization from single MV cine EPID images.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Pankaj; Li, Ruijiang; Mak, Raymond H; Rottmann, Joerg; Bryant, Jonathan H; Williams, Christopher L; Berbeco, Ross I; Lewis, John H

    2014-08-01

    In this work the authors develop and investigate the feasibility of a method to estimate time-varying volumetric images from individual MV cine electronic portal image device (EPID) images. The authors adopt a two-step approach to time-varying volumetric image estimation from a single cine EPID image. In the first step, a patient-specific motion model is constructed from 4DCT. In the second step, parameters in the motion model are tuned according to the information in the EPID image. The patient-specific motion model is based on a compact representation of lung motion represented in displacement vector fields (DVFs). DVFs are calculated through deformable image registration (DIR) of a reference 4DCT phase image (typically peak-exhale) to a set of 4DCT images corresponding to different phases of a breathing cycle. The salient characteristics in the DVFs are captured in a compact representation through principal component analysis (PCA). PCA decouples the spatial and temporal components of the DVFs. Spatial information is represented in eigenvectors and the temporal information is represented by eigen-coefficients. To generate a new volumetric image, the eigen-coefficients are updated via cost function optimization based on digitally reconstructed radiographs and projection images. The updated eigen-coefficients are then multiplied with the eigenvectors to obtain updated DVFs that, in turn, give the volumetric image corresponding to the cine EPID image. The algorithm was tested on (1) Eight digital eXtended CArdiac-Torso phantom datasets based on different irregular patient breathing patterns and (2) patient cine EPID images acquired during SBRT treatments. The root-mean-squared tumor localization error is (0.73 ± 0.63 mm) for the XCAT data and (0.90 ± 0.65 mm) for the patient data. The authors introduced a novel method of estimating volumetric time-varying images from single cine EPID images and a PCA-based lung motion model. This is the first method to estimate

  3. 3-D volumetric computed tomographic scoring as an objective outcome measure for chronic rhinosinusitis: Clinical correlations and comparison to Lund-Mackay scoring

    PubMed Central

    Pallanch, John; Yu, Lifeng; Delone, David; Robb, Rich; Holmes, David R.; Camp, Jon; Edwards, Phil; McCollough, Cynthia H.; Ponikau, Jens; Dearking, Amy; Lane, John; Primak, Andrew; Shinkle, Aaron; Hagan, John; Frigas, Evangelo; Ocel, Joseph J.; Tombers, Nicole; Siwani, Rizwan; Orme, Nicholas; Reed, Kurtis; Jerath, Nivedita; Dhillon, Robinder; Kita, Hirohito

    2014-01-01

    Background We aimed to test the hypothesis that 3-D volume-based scoring of computed tomographic (CT) images of the paranasal sinuses was superior to Lund-Mackay CT scoring of disease severity in chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS). We determined correlation between changes in CT scores (using each scoring system) with changes in other measures of disease severity (symptoms, endoscopic scoring, and quality of life) in patients with CRS treated with triamcinolone. Methods The study group comprised 48 adult subjects with CRS. Baseline symptoms and quality of life were assessed. Endoscopy and CT scans were performed. Patients received a single systemic dose of intramuscular triamcinolone and were reevaluated 1 month later. Strengths of the correlations between changes in CT scores and changes in CRS signs and symptoms and quality of life were determined. Results We observed some variability in degree of improvement for the different symptom, endoscopic, and quality-of-life parameters after treatment. Improvement of parameters was significantly correlated with improvement in CT disease score using both CT scoring methods. However, volumetric CT scoring had greater correlation with these parameters than Lund-Mackay scoring. Conclusion Volumetric scoring exhibited higher degree of correlation than Lund-Mackay scoring when comparing improvement in CT score with improvement in score for symptoms, endoscopic exam, and quality of life in this group of patients who received beneficial medical treatment for CRS. PMID:24106202

  4. 3D flexible O/N Co-doped graphene foams for supercapacitor electrodes with high volumetric and areal capacitances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Tianfeng; Wan, Zunyuan; Wang, Zilei; Wen, Yuxiang; Liu, Mengting; Peng, Shanglong; He, Deyan; Hou, Juan; Huang, Fei; Cao, Guozhong

    2016-12-01

    3D flexible O/N co-doped graphene foams (GF) have been designed and fabricated successfully via combining the compression/hot curing strategy with chemical reduction and hydrothermal treatment, in which melamine foams were used not only as the source of N/O functional groups for the introduction of pseudocapacitance but also as the sacrificial template to inhibit the agglomeration of graphene. Also, the mechanism for method of the compressing/hot curing has been investigated systematically. And the resultant GF demonstrates excellent mechanical strength and flexibility. When the compacting GF is used as free-standing electrodes for supercapacitor, it exhibits more excellent ability of charge storage than that of pristine graphene foams. And 10 MPa-GF electrodes delivers high areal capacitance of 375 μF cm-2 at a current density of 1 A g-1, excellent rate capabilities and superior cycling stability of above 100%. According to the analysis of capacitance contribution for 10 MPa-GF electrode, the pseudocapacitance originated from N/O functional groups is up to ∼65% of the contribution of total capacitance. Moreover, the symmetric supercapacitor comprised of 10 MPa-GF electrodes presents a maximum energy density of 16 Wh kg-1 (8 Wh L-1) and a maximum power density of 17 kW kg-1 (8.6 kW L-1).

  5. Lightning Modelling: From 3D to Circuit Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moussa, H.; Abdi, M.; Issac, F.; Prost, D.

    2012-05-01

    The topic of this study is electromagnetic environment and electromagnetic interferences (EMI) effects, specifically the modelling of lightning indirect effects [1] on aircraft electrical systems present on deported and highly exposed equipments, such as nose landing gear (NLG) and nacelle, through a circuit approach. The main goal of the presented work, funded by a French national project: PREFACE, is to propose a simple equivalent electrical circuit to represent a geometrical structure, taking into account mutual, self inductances, and resistances, which play a fundamental role in the lightning current distribution. Then this model is intended to be coupled to a functional one, describing a power train chain composed of: a converter, a shielded power harness and a motor or a set of resistors used as a load for the converter. The novelty here, is to provide a pre-sizing qualitative approach allowing playing on integration in pre-design phases. This tool intends to offer a user-friendly way for replying rapidly to calls for tender, taking into account the lightning constraints. Two cases are analysed: first, a NLG that is composed of tubular pieces that can be easily approximated by equivalent cylindrical straight conductors. Therefore, passive R, L, M elements of the structure can be extracted through analytical engineer formulas such as those implemented in the partial element equivalent circuit (PEEC) [2] technique. Second, the same approach is intended to be applied on an electrical de-icing nacelle sub-system.

  6. Intraoperative fiducial-less patient registration using volumetric 3D ultrasound: a prospective series of 32 neurosurgical cases.

    PubMed

    Fan, Xiaoyao; Roberts, David W; Ji, Songbai; Hartov, Alex; Paulsen, Keith D

    2015-09-01

    Fiducial-based registration (FBR) is used widely for patient registration in image-guided neurosurgery. The authors of this study have developed an automatic fiducial-less registration (FLR) technique to find the patient-to-image transformation by directly registering 3D ultrasound (3DUS) with MR images without incorporating prior information. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the performance of the FLR technique when used prospectively in the operating room and to compare it with conventional FBR. In 32 surgical patients who underwent conventional FBR, preoperative T1-weighted MR images (pMR) with attached fiducial markers were acquired prior to surgery. After craniotomy but before dural opening, a set of 3DUS images of the brain volume was acquired. A 2-step registration process was executed immediately after image acquisition: 1) the cortical surfaces from pMR and 3DUS were segmented, and a multistart sum-of-squared-intensity-difference registration was executed to find an initial alignment between down-sampled binary pMR and 3DUS volumes; and 2) the alignment was further refined by a mutual information-based registration between full-resolution grayscale pMR and 3DUS images, and a patient-to-image transformation was subsequently extracted. To assess the accuracy of the FLR technique, the following were quantified: 1) the fiducial distance error (FDE); and 2) the target registration error (TRE) at anterior commissure and posterior commissure locations; these were compared with conventional FBR. The results showed that although the average FDE (6.42 ± 2.05 mm) was higher than the fiducial registration error (FRE) from FBR (3.42 ± 1.37 mm), the overall TRE of FLR (2.51 ± 0.93 mm) was lower than that of FBR (5.48 ± 1.81 mm). The results agreed with the intent of the 2 registration techniques: FBR is designed to minimize the FRE, whereas FLR is designed to optimize feature alignment and hence minimize TRE. The overall computational cost of FLR was

  7. Intraoperative fiducial-less patient registration using volumetric 3D ultrasound: a prospective series of 32 neurosurgical cases

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Xiaoyao; Roberts, David W.; Ji, Songbai; Hartov, Alex; Paulsen, Keith D.

    2016-01-01

    Object Fiducial-based registration (FBR) is used widely for patient registration in image-guided neurosurgery. The authors of this study have developed an automatic fiducial-less registration (FLR) technique to find the patient-to-image transformation by directly registering 3D ultrasound (3DUS) with MR images without incorporating prior information. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the performance of the FLR technique when used prospectively in the operating room and to compare it with conventional FBR. Methods In 32 surgical patients who underwent conventional FBR, preoperative T1-weighted MR images (pMR) with attached fiducial markers were acquired prior to surgery. After craniotomy but before dural opening, a set of 3DUS images of the brain volume was acquired. A 2-step registration process was executed immediately after image acquisition: 1) the cortical surfaces from pMR and 3DUS were segmented, and a multistart sum-of-squared-intensity-difference registration was executed to find an initial alignment between down-sampled binary pMR and 3DUS volumes; and 2) the alignment was further refined by a mutual information-based registration between full-resolution grayscale pMR and 3DUS images, and a patient-to-image transformation was subsequently extracted. Results To assess the accuracy of the FLR technique, the following were quantified: 1) the fiducial distance error (FDE); and 2) the target registration error (TRE) at anterior commissure and posterior commissure locations; these were compared with conventional FBR. The results showed that although the average FDE (6.42 ± 2.05 mm) was higher than the fiducial registration error (FRE) from FBR (3.42 ± 1.37 mm), the overall TRE of FLR (2.51 ± 0.93 mm) was lower than that of FBR (5.48 ± 1.81 mm). The results agreed with the intent of the 2 registration techniques: FBR is designed to minimize the FRE, whereas FLR is designed to optimize feature alignment and hence minimize TRE. The overall computational

  8. Comparison between Thin-Slice 3-D Volumetric Ultrasound and Conventional Ultrasound in the Differentiation of Benign and Malignant Thyroid Lesions.

    PubMed

    Li, Wen-Bo; Zhang, Bo; Zhu, Qing-Li; Jiang, Yu-Xin; Sun, Jian; Yang, Meng; Li, Jian-Chu

    2015-12-01

    We explored the efficacy of thin-slice volumetric 3-D ultrasound (3-DUS) in distinguishing between benign and malignant thyroid nodules. A total of 103 thyroid nodules were evaluated prospectively using 3-D gray-scale ultrasonography. The shape, margin, halo and potential capsular invasion of the nodules were compared with the findings of conventional 2-D ultrasound (2-DUS). Of the 103 thyroid nodules, there were 50 pathologically confirmed benign lesions and 53 malignant lesions (51.5%). Shape irregularity, ill-defined margins and capsular invasion provided sensitivities of 90.0%, 47.2% and 39.6% and specificities of 88.0%, 84.0% and 100%, respectively, for the malignant lesions. The diagnosis of thyroid cancer was improved in 3-DUS compared with 2-DUS, with a sensitivity of 88.7%, specificity of 90.0%, positive predictive value of 90.4%, negative predictive value of 88.2% and accuracy of 89.3%. The sensitivity of detection for lesions with capsular invasion increased to 39.6% with 3-DUS, more than twice that of 2-DUS. Three-dimensional US is highly accurate in diagnosing thyroid nodules, particularly those with capsular invasion.

  9. Feasibility of Using Volumetric Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound with a 3-D Transducer to Evaluate Therapeutic Response after Targeted Therapy in Rabbit Hepatic VX2 Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeehyun; Kim, Jung Hoon; Yoon, Soon Ho; Choi, Won Seok; Kim, Young Jae; Han, Joon Koo; Choi, Byung-Ihn

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility of using dynamic contrast-enhanced ultrasound (DCE-US) with a 3-D transducer to evaluate therapeutic responses to targeted therapy. Rabbits with hepatic VX2 carcinomas, divided into a treatment group (n = 22, 30 mg/kg/d sorafenib) and a control group (n = 13), were evaluated with DCE-US using 2-D and 3-D transducers and computed tomography (CT) perfusion imaging at baseline and 1 d after the first treatment. Perfusion parameters were collected, and correlations between parameters were analyzed. In the treatment group, both volumetric and 2-D DCE-US perfusion parameters, including peak intensity (33.2 ± 19.9 vs. 16.6 ± 10.7, 63.7 ± 20.0 vs. 30.1 ± 19.8), slope (15.3 ± 12.4 vs. 5.7 ± 4.5, 37.3 ± 20.4 vs. 15.7 ± 13.0) and area under the curve (AUC; 1004.1 ± 560.3 vs. 611.4 ± 421.1, 1332.2 ± 708.3 vs. 670.4 ± 388.3), had significantly decreased 1 d after the first treatment (p = 0.00). In the control group, 2-D DCE-US revealed that peak intensity, time to peak and slope had significantly changed (p < 0.05); however, volumetric DCE-US revealed that peak intensity, time-intensity AUC, AUC during wash-in and AUC during wash-out had significantly changed (p = 0.00). CT perfusion imaging parameters, including blood flow, blood volume and permeability of the capillary vessel surface, had significantly decreased in the treatment group (p = 0.00); however, in the control group, peak intensity and blood volume had significantly increased (p = 0.00). It is feasible to use DCE-US with a 3-D transducer to predict early therapeutic response after targeted therapy because perfusion parameters, including peak intensity, slope and AUC, significantly decreased, which is similar to the trend observed for 2-D DCE-US and CT perfusion imaging parameters.

  10. Continuous table acquisition MRI for radiotherapy treatment planning: Distortion assessment with a new extended 3D volumetric phantom

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Amy Metcalfe, Peter; Liney, Gary; Holloway, Lois; Dowling, Jason; Rivest-Henault, David

    2015-04-15

    Purpose: Accurate geometry is required for radiotherapy treatment planning (RTP). When considering the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for RTP, geometric distortions observed in the acquired images should be considered. While scanner technology and vendor supplied correction algorithms provide some correction, large distortions are still present in images, even when considering considerably smaller scan lengths than those typically acquired with CT in conventional RTP. This study investigates MRI acquisition with a moving table compared with static scans for potential geometric benefits for RTP. Methods: A full field of view (FOV) phantom (diameter 500 mm; length 513 mm) was developed for measuring geometric distortions in MR images over volumes pertinent to RTP. The phantom consisted of layers of refined plastic within which vitamin E capsules were inserted. The phantom was scanned on CT to provide the geometric gold standard and on MRI, with differences in capsule location determining the distortion. MRI images were acquired with two techniques. For the first method, standard static table acquisitions were considered. Both 2D and 3D acquisition techniques were investigated. With the second technique, images were acquired with a moving table. The same sequence was acquired with a static table and then with table speeds of 1.1 mm/s and 2 mm/s. All of the MR images acquired were registered to the CT dataset using a deformable B-spline registration with the resulting deformation fields providing the distortion information for each acquisition. Results: MR images acquired with the moving table enabled imaging of the whole phantom length while images acquired with a static table were only able to image 50%–70% of the phantom length of 513 mm. Maximum distortion values were reduced across a larger volume when imaging with a moving table. Increased table speed resulted in a larger contribution of distortion from gradient nonlinearities in the through

  11. Continuous table acquisition MRI for radiotherapy treatment planning: distortion assessment with a new extended 3D volumetric phantom.

    PubMed

    Walker, Amy; Liney, Gary; Holloway, Lois; Dowling, Jason; Rivest-Henault, David; Metcalfe, Peter

    2015-04-01

    Accurate geometry is required for radiotherapy treatment planning (RTP). When considering the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for RTP, geometric distortions observed in the acquired images should be considered. While scanner technology and vendor supplied correction algorithms provide some correction, large distortions are still present in images, even when considering considerably smaller scan lengths than those typically acquired with CT in conventional RTP. This study investigates MRI acquisition with a moving table compared with static scans for potential geometric benefits for RTP. A full field of view (FOV) phantom (diameter 500 mm; length 513 mm) was developed for measuring geometric distortions in MR images over volumes pertinent to RTP. The phantom consisted of layers of refined plastic within which vitamin E capsules were inserted. The phantom was scanned on CT to provide the geometric gold standard and on MRI, with differences in capsule location determining the distortion. MRI images were acquired with two techniques. For the first method, standard static table acquisitions were considered. Both 2D and 3D acquisition techniques were investigated. With the second technique, images were acquired with a moving table. The same sequence was acquired with a static table and then with table speeds of 1.1 mm/s and 2 mm/s. All of the MR images acquired were registered to the CT dataset using a deformable B-spline registration with the resulting deformation fields providing the distortion information for each acquisition. MR images acquired with the moving table enabled imaging of the whole phantom length while images acquired with a static table were only able to image 50%-70% of the phantom length of 513 mm. Maximum distortion values were reduced across a larger volume when imaging with a moving table. Increased table speed resulted in a larger contribution of distortion from gradient nonlinearities in the through-plane direction and an increased

  12. 3D Lorentzian loop quantum gravity and the spinor approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girelli, Florian; Sellaroli, Giuseppe

    2015-12-01

    We consider the generalization of the "spinor approach" to the Lorentzian case, in the context of three-dimensional loop quantum gravity with cosmological constant Λ =0 . The key technical tool that allows this generalization is the recoupling theory between unitary infinite-dimensional representations and nonunitary finite-dimensional ones, obtained in the process of generalizing the Wigner-Eckart theorem to SU(1,1). We use SU(1,1) tensor operators to build observables and a solvable quantum Hamiltonian constraint, analogous to the one introduced by V. Bonzom and his collaborators in the Euclidean case (with both Λ =0 and Λ ≠0 ). We show that the Lorentzian Ponzano-Regge amplitude is the solution of the quantum Hamiltonian constraint by recovering the Biedenharn-Elliott relation [generalized to the case where unitary and nonunitary SU(1,1) representations are coupled to each other]. Our formalism is sufficiently general that both the Lorentzian and the Euclidean case can be recovered (with Λ =0 ).

  13. Light-field camera-based 3D volumetric particle image velocimetry with dense ray tracing reconstruction technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Shengxian; Ding, Junfei; New, T. H.; Soria, Julio

    2017-07-01

    This paper presents a dense ray tracing reconstruction technique for a single light-field camera-based particle image velocimetry. The new approach pre-determines the location of a particle through inverse dense ray tracing and reconstructs the voxel value using multiplicative algebraic reconstruction technique (MART). Simulation studies were undertaken to identify the effects of iteration number, relaxation factor, particle density, voxel-pixel ratio and the effect of the velocity gradient on the performance of the proposed dense ray tracing-based MART method (DRT-MART). The results demonstrate that the DRT-MART method achieves higher reconstruction resolution at significantly better computational efficiency than the MART method (4-50 times faster). Both DRT-MART and MART approaches were applied to measure the velocity field of a low speed jet flow which revealed that for the same computational cost, the DRT-MART method accurately resolves the jet velocity field with improved precision, especially for the velocity component along the depth direction.

  14. Semiautomatic approaches to account for 3-D distortion of the electric field from local, near-surface structures in 3-D resistivity inversions of 3-D regional magnetotelluric data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rodriguez, Brian D.

    2017-03-31

    This report summarizes the results of three-dimensional (3-D) resistivity inversion simulations that were performed to account for local 3-D distortion of the electric field in the presence of 3-D regional structure, without any a priori information on the actual 3-D distribution of the known subsurface geology. The methodology used a 3-D geologic model to create a 3-D resistivity forward (“known”) model that depicted the subsurface resistivity structure expected for the input geologic configuration. The calculated magnetotelluric response of the modeled resistivity structure was assumed to represent observed magnetotelluric data and was subsequently used as input into a 3-D resistivity inverse model that used an iterative 3-D algorithm to estimate 3-D distortions without any a priori geologic information. A publicly available inversion code, WSINV3DMT, was used for all of the simulated inversions, initially using the default parameters, and subsequently using adjusted inversion parameters. A semiautomatic approach of accounting for the static shift using various selections of the highest frequencies and initial models was also tested. The resulting 3-D resistivity inversion simulation was compared to the “known” model and the results evaluated. The inversion approach that produced the lowest misfit to the various local 3-D distortions was an inversion that employed an initial model volume resistivity that was nearest to the maximum resistivities in the near-surface layer.

  15. A Featureless Approach to 3D Polyhedral Building Modeling from Aerial Images

    PubMed Central

    Hammoudi, Karim; Dornaika, Fadi

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a model-based approach for reconstructing 3D polyhedral building models from aerial images. The proposed approach exploits some geometric and photometric properties resulting from the perspective projection of planar structures. Data are provided by calibrated aerial images. The novelty of the approach lies in its featurelessness and in its use of direct optimization based on image rawbrightness. The proposed framework avoids feature extraction and matching. The 3D polyhedral model is directly estimated by optimizing an objective function that combines an image-based dissimilarity measure and a gradient score over several aerial images. The optimization process is carried out by the Differential Evolution algorithm. The proposed approach is intended to provide more accurate 3D reconstruction than feature-based approaches. Fast 3D model rectification and updating can take advantage of the proposed method. Several results and evaluations of performance from real and synthetic images show the feasibility and robustness of the proposed approach. PMID:22346575

  16. A featureless approach to 3D polyhedral building modeling from aerial images.

    PubMed

    Hammoudi, Karim; Dornaika, Fadi

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a model-based approach for reconstructing 3D polyhedral building models from aerial images. The proposed approach exploits some geometric and photometric properties resulting from the perspective projection of planar structures. Data are provided by calibrated aerial images. The novelty of the approach lies in its featurelessness and in its use of direct optimization based on image rawbrightness. The proposed framework avoids feature extraction and matching. The 3D polyhedral model is directly estimated by optimizing an objective function that combines an image-based dissimilarity measure and a gradient score over several aerial images. The optimization process is carried out by the Differential Evolution algorithm. The proposed approach is intended to provide more accurate 3D reconstruction than feature-based approaches. Fast 3D model rectification and updating can take advantage of the proposed method. Several results and evaluations of performance from real and synthetic images show the feasibility and robustness of the proposed approach.

  17. A new approach towards image based virtual 3D city modeling by using close range photogrammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, S. P.; Jain, K.; Mandla, V. R.

    2014-05-01

    3D city model is a digital representation of the Earth's surface and it's related objects such as building, tree, vegetation, and some manmade feature belonging to urban area. The demand of 3D city modeling is increasing day to day for various engineering and non-engineering applications. Generally three main image based approaches are using for virtual 3D city models generation. In first approach, researchers used Sketch based modeling, second method is Procedural grammar based modeling and third approach is Close range photogrammetry based modeling. Literature study shows that till date, there is no complete solution available to create complete 3D city model by using images. These image based methods also have limitations This paper gives a new approach towards image based virtual 3D city modeling by using close range photogrammetry. This approach is divided into three sections. First, data acquisition process, second is 3D data processing, and third is data combination process. In data acquisition process, a multi-camera setup developed and used for video recording of an area. Image frames created from video data. Minimum required and suitable video image frame selected for 3D processing. In second section, based on close range photogrammetric principles and computer vision techniques, 3D model of area created. In third section, this 3D model exported to adding and merging of other pieces of large area. Scaling and alignment of 3D model was done. After applying the texturing and rendering on this model, a final photo-realistic textured 3D model created. This 3D model transferred into walk-through model or in movie form. Most of the processing steps are automatic. So this method is cost effective and less laborious. Accuracy of this model is good. For this research work, study area is the campus of department of civil engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Roorkee. This campus acts as a prototype for city. Aerial photography is restricted in many country

  18. DeepEM3D: approaching human-level performance on 3D anisotropic EM image segmentation.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Tao; Wu, Bian; Ji, Shuiwang

    2017-08-15

    Progress in 3D electron microscopy (EM) imaging has greatly facilitated neuroscience research in high-throughput data acquisition. Correspondingly, high-throughput automated image analysis methods are necessary to work on par with the speed of data being produced. One such example is the need for automated EM image segmentation for neurite reconstruction. However, the efficiency and reliability of current methods are still lagging far behind human performance. Here, we propose DeepEM3D, a deep learning method for segmenting 3D anisotropic brain electron microscopy images. In this method, the deep learning model can efficiently build feature representation and incorporate sufficient multi-scale contextual information. We propose employing a combination of novel boundary map generation methods with optimized model ensembles to address the inherent challenges of segmenting anisotropic images. We evaluated our method by participating in the 3D segmentation of neurites in EM images (SNEMI3D) challenge. Our submission is ranked #1 on the current leaderboard as of Oct 15, 2016. More importantly, our result was very close to human-level performance in terms of the challenge evaluation metric: namely, a Rand error of 0.06015 versus the human value of 0.05998. The code is available at https://github.com/divelab/deepem3d/. sji@eecs.wsu.edu. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  19. New approach on calculating multiview 3D crosstalk for autostereoscopic displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Sung-Min; Lee, Kyeong-Jin; Kang, Ji-Na; Lee, Seung-Chul; Lim, Kyoung-Moon

    2012-03-01

    In this study, we suggest a new concept of 3D crosstalk for auto-stereoscopic displays and obtain 3D crosstalk values of several multi-view systems based on the suggested definition. First, we measure the angular dependencies of the luminance for auto-stereoscopic displays under various test patterns corresponding to each view of a multi-view system and then calculate the 3D crosstalk based on our new definition with respect to the measured luminance profiles. Our new approach gives just a single 3D crosstalk value for single device without any ambiguity and shows similar order of values to the conventional stereoscopic displays. These results are compared with the conventional 3D crosstalk values of selected auto-stereoscopic displays such as 4-view and 9-view systems. From the result, we believe that this new approach is very useful for controlling 3D crosstalk values of the 3D displays manufacturing and benchmarking of the 3D performances among the various auto-stereoscopic displays.

  20. Framework for quantitative evaluation of 3D vessel segmentation approaches using vascular phantoms in conjunction with 3D landmark localization and registration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wörz, Stefan; Hoegen, Philipp; Liao, Wei; Müller-Eschner, Matthias; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich; von Tengg-Kobligk, Hendrik; Rohr, Karl

    2016-03-01

    We introduce a framework for quantitative evaluation of 3D vessel segmentation approaches using vascular phantoms. Phantoms are designed using a CAD system and created with a 3D printer, and comprise realistic shapes including branches and pathologies such as abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA). To transfer ground truth information to the 3D image coordinate system, we use a landmark-based registration scheme utilizing fiducial markers integrated in the phantom design. For accurate 3D localization of the markers we developed a novel 3D parametric intensity model that is directly fitted to the markers in the images. We also performed a quantitative evaluation of different vessel segmentation approaches for a phantom of an AAA.

  1. Optimization approaches to volumetric modulated arc therapy planning.

    PubMed

    Unkelbach, Jan; Bortfeld, Thomas; Craft, David; Alber, Markus; Bangert, Mark; Bokrantz, Rasmus; Chen, Danny; Li, Ruijiang; Xing, Lei; Men, Chunhua; Nill, Simeon; Papp, Dávid; Romeijn, Edwin; Salari, Ehsan

    2015-03-01

    Volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) has found widespread clinical application in recent years. A large number of treatment planning studies have evaluated the potential for VMAT for different disease sites based on the currently available commercial implementations of VMAT planning. In contrast, literature on the underlying mathematical optimization methods used in treatment planning is scarce. VMAT planning represents a challenging large scale optimization problem. In contrast to fluence map optimization in intensity-modulated radiotherapy planning for static beams, VMAT planning represents a nonconvex optimization problem. In this paper, the authors review the state-of-the-art in VMAT planning from an algorithmic perspective. Different approaches to VMAT optimization, including arc sequencing methods, extensions of direct aperture optimization, and direct optimization of leaf trajectories are reviewed. Their advantages and limitations are outlined and recommendations for improvements are discussed.

  2. Optimization approaches to volumetric modulated arc therapy planning

    SciTech Connect

    Unkelbach, Jan Bortfeld, Thomas; Craft, David; Alber, Markus; Bangert, Mark; Bokrantz, Rasmus; Chen, Danny; Li, Ruijiang; Xing, Lei; Men, Chunhua; Nill, Simeon; Papp, Dávid; Romeijn, Edwin; Salari, Ehsan

    2015-03-15

    Volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) has found widespread clinical application in recent years. A large number of treatment planning studies have evaluated the potential for VMAT for different disease sites based on the currently available commercial implementations of VMAT planning. In contrast, literature on the underlying mathematical optimization methods used in treatment planning is scarce. VMAT planning represents a challenging large scale optimization problem. In contrast to fluence map optimization in intensity-modulated radiotherapy planning for static beams, VMAT planning represents a nonconvex optimization problem. In this paper, the authors review the state-of-the-art in VMAT planning from an algorithmic perspective. Different approaches to VMAT optimization, including arc sequencing methods, extensions of direct aperture optimization, and direct optimization of leaf trajectories are reviewed. Their advantages and limitations are outlined and recommendations for improvements are discussed.

  3. An approach for 3D geoscientific data integration in underground planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Zheng; Tor, Yam Khoon; Tan, Guoxian

    2008-12-01

    Due to finite space, there is an increasing need to plan and develop strategic underground facilities and infrastructures for various military and non-military applications in Singapore in recent years. The awareness of the underground option among planners, developers, and financiers should be increased so that subsurface planning issues can be better addressed. The lack of adequate and accurate 3D spatial data often makes the design and construction of such underground works difficult. It is necessary to integrate all of the spatial objects for underground planning. Over the past two decades, a number of commercial software systems have been developed for 3D geographic and geological modeling. For example, VGEGIS software allows users to create 3D surface geological maps. 3D GeoModeller, a 3D geological modeling and geophysical inversion package, allows project geologists to build realistic 3D geology models. This paper presents an approach to integrate the geographic and geological models for underground planning. A prototype of 3D Geographic Information System (3DGIS) called "3DRock" has been developed by authors to implement the data integration with 3D GeoModeler. The results so far showed that 3DRock is able to integrate the above-surface, surface, and subsurface information available from maps, sections, terrain models, topographic data, drillholes, etc. for the Banyan Basin in Jurong Island, Singapore, in a case study.

  4. A new neural net approach to robot 3D perception and visuo-motor coordination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Sukhan

    1992-01-01

    A novel neural network approach to robot hand-eye coordination is presented. The approach provides a true sense of visual error servoing, redundant arm configuration control for collision avoidance, and invariant visuo-motor learning under gazing control. A 3-D perception network is introduced to represent the robot internal 3-D metric space in which visual error servoing and arm configuration control are performed. The arm kinematic network performs the bidirectional association between 3-D space arm configurations and joint angles, and enforces the legitimate arm configurations. The arm kinematic net is structured by a radial-based competitive and cooperative network with hierarchical self-organizing learning. The main goal of the present work is to demonstrate that the neural net representation of the robot 3-D perception net serves as an important intermediate functional block connecting robot eyes and arms.

  5. A new neural net approach to robot 3D perception and visuo-motor coordination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Sukhan

    1992-01-01

    A novel neural network approach to robot hand-eye coordination is presented. The approach provides a true sense of visual error servoing, redundant arm configuration control for collision avoidance, and invariant visuo-motor learning under gazing control. A 3-D perception network is introduced to represent the robot internal 3-D metric space in which visual error servoing and arm configuration control are performed. The arm kinematic network performs the bidirectional association between 3-D space arm configurations and joint angles, and enforces the legitimate arm configurations. The arm kinematic net is structured by a radial-based competitive and cooperative network with hierarchical self-organizing learning. The main goal of the present work is to demonstrate that the neural net representation of the robot 3-D perception net serves as an important intermediate functional block connecting robot eyes and arms.

  6. Silhouette-based approach of 3D image reconstruction for automated image acquisition using robotic arm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azhar, N.; Saad, W. H. M.; Manap, N. A.; Saad, N. M.; Syafeeza, A. R.

    2017-06-01

    This study presents the approach of 3D image reconstruction using an autonomous robotic arm for the image acquisition process. A low cost of the automated imaging platform is created using a pair of G15 servo motor connected in series to an Arduino UNO as a main microcontroller. Two sets of sequential images were obtained using different projection angle of the camera. The silhouette-based approach is used in this study for 3D reconstruction from the sequential images captured from several different angles of the object. Other than that, an analysis based on the effect of different number of sequential images on the accuracy of 3D model reconstruction was also carried out with a fixed projection angle of the camera. The effecting elements in the 3D reconstruction are discussed and the overall result of the analysis is concluded according to the prototype of imaging platform.

  7. Evaluation of the sensitivity of two 3D diode array dosimetry systems to setup error for quality assurance (QA) of volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT).

    PubMed

    Li, Guangjun; Bai, Sen; Chen, Nianyong; Henderson, Lansdale; Wu, Kui; Xiao, Jianghong; Zhang, Yingjie; Jiang, Qingfeng; Jiang, Xiaoqin

    2013-09-06

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the sensitivities of 3D diode arrays to setup error for patient-specific quality assurance (QA) of volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT). Translational setup errors of ± 1, ± 2, and ± 3 mm in the RL, SI, and AP directions and rotational setup errors of ± 1° and ± 2° in the pitch, roll, and yaw directions were set up in two phantom systems, ArcCHECK and Delta4, with VMAT plans for 11 patients. Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) followed by automatic correction using a HexaPOD 6D treatment couch ensured the position accuracy. Dose distributions of the two phantoms were compared in order to evaluate the agreement between calculated and measured values by using γ analysis with 3%/3 mm, 3%/2 mm, and 2%/2 mm criteria. To determine the impact on setup error for VMAT QA, we evaluated the sensitivity of results acquired by both 3D diode array systems to setup errors in translation and rotation. For the VMAT QA of all patients, the pass rate with the 3%/3 mm criteria exceeded 95% using either phantom. For setup errors of 3 mm and 2°, respectively, the pass rates with the 3%/3mm criteria decreased by a maximum of 14.0% and 23.5% using ArcCHECK, and 14.4% and 5.0% using Delta4. Both systems are sensitive to setup error, and do not have mechanisms to account for setup errors in the software. The sensitivity of both VMAT QA systems was strongly dependent on the patient-specific plan. The sensitivity of ArcCHECK to the rotational error was higher than that of Delta4. In order to achieve less than 3% mean pass rate reduction of VMAT plan QA with the 3%/3 mm criteria, a setup accuracy of 2 mm/1° and 2 mm/2° is required for ArcCheck and Delta4 devices, respectively. The cumulative effect of the combined 2 mm translational and 1° rotational errors caused 3.8% and 2.4% mean pass rates reduction with 3%/3 mm criteria, respectively, for ArcCHECK and Delta4 systems. For QA of VMAT plans for nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC) using the Arc

  8. SU-E-T-105: Development of 3D Dose Verification System for Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy Using Improved Polyacrylamide-Based Gel Dosimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Ono, K; Fujimoto, S; Akagi, Y; Hirokawa, Y; Hayashi, S; Miyazawa, M

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The aim of this dosimetric study was to develop 3D dose verification system for volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) using polyacrylamide-based gel (PAGAT) dosimeter improved the sensitivity by magnesium chloride (MgCl{sub 2}). Methods: PAGAT gel containing MgCl{sub 2} as a sensitizer was prepared in this study. Methacrylic-acid-based gel (MAGAT) was also prepared to compare the dosimetric characteristics with PAGAT gel. The cylindrical glass vials (4 cm diameter, 12 cm length) filled with each polymer gel were irradiated with 6 MV photon beam using Novalis Tx linear accelerator (Varian/BrainLAB). The irradiated polymer gel dosimeters were scanned with Signa 1.5 T MRI system (GE), and dose calibration curves were obtained using T{sub 2} relaxation rate (R{sub 2} = 1/T{sub 2}). Dose rate (100-600 MU min{sup −1}) and fractionation (1-8 fractions) were varied. In addition, a cubic acrylic phantom (10 × 10 × 10 cm{sup 3}) filled with improved PAGAT gel inserted into the IMRT phantom (IBA) was irradiated with VMAT (RapidArc). C-shape structure was used for the VMAT planning by the Varian Eclipse treatment planning system (TPS). The dose comparison of TPS and measurements with the polymer gel dosimeter was accomplished by the gamma index analysis, overlaying the dose profiles for a set of data on selected planes using in-house developed software. Results: Dose rate and fractionation dependence of improved PAGAT gel were smaller than MAGAT gel. A high similarity was found by overlaying the dose profiles measured with improved PAGAT gel dosimeter and the TPS dose, and the mean pass rate of the gamma index analysis using 3%/3 mm criteria was achieved 90% on orthogonal planes for VMAT using improved PAGAT gel dosimeter. Conclusion: In-house developed 3D dose verification system using improved polyacrylamide-based gel dosimeter had a potential as an effective tool for VMAT QA.

  9. A hybrid approach for addressing ring flexibility in 3D database searching.

    PubMed

    Sadowski, J

    1997-01-01

    A hybrid approach for flexible 3D database searching is presented that addresses the problem of ring flexibility. It combines the explicit storage of up to 25 multiple conformations of rings, with up to eight atoms, generated by the 3D structure generator CORINA with the power of a torsional fitting technique implemented in the 3D database system UNITY. A comparison with the original UNITY approach, using a database with about 130,000 entries and five different pharmacophore queries, was performed. The hybrid approach scored, on an average, 10-20% more hits than the reference run. Moreover, specific problems with unrealistic hit geometries produced by the original approach can be excluded. In addition, the influence of the maximum number of ring conformations per molecule was investigated. An optimal number of 10 conformations per molecule is recommended.

  10. Hybrid atlas-based and image-based approach for segmenting 3D brain MRIs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bueno, Gloria; Musse, Olivier; Heitz, Fabrice; Armspach, Jean-Paul

    2001-07-01

    This work is a contribution to the problem of localizing key cerebral structures in 3D MRIs and its quantitative evaluation. In pursuing it, the cooperation between an image-based segmentation method and a hierarchical deformable registration approach has been considered. The segmentation relies on two main processes: homotopy modification and contour decision. The first one is achieved by a marker extraction stage where homogeneous 3D regions of an image, I(s), from the data set are identified. These regions, M(I), are obtained combining information from deformable atlas, achieved by the warping of eight previous labeled maps on I(s). Then, the goal of the decision stage is to precisely locate the contours of the 3D regions set by the markers. This contour decision is performed by a 3D extension of the watershed transform. The anatomical structures taken into consideration and embedded into the atlas are brain, ventricles, corpus callosum, cerebellum, right and left hippocampus, medulla and midbrain. The hybrid method operates fully automatically and in 3D, successfully providing segmented brain structures. The quality of the segmentation has been studied in terms of the detected volume ratio by using kappa statistic and ROC analysis. Results of the method are shown and validated on a 3D MRI phantom. This study forms part of an on-going long term research aiming at the creation of a 3D probabilistic multi-purpose anatomical brain atlas.

  11. Metabolic approach for tumor delineation in glioma surgery: 3D MR spectroscopy image-guided resection.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jie; Zhuang, Dong-Xiao; Yao, Cheng-Jun; Lin, Ching-Po; Wang, Tian-Liang; Qin, Zhi-Yong; Wu, Jin-Song

    2016-06-01

    OBJECT The extent of resection is one of the most essential factors that influence the outcomes of glioma resection. However, conventional structural imaging has failed to accurately delineate glioma margins because of tumor cell infiltration. Three-dimensional proton MR spectroscopy ((1)H-MRS) can provide metabolic information and has been used in preoperative tumor differentiation, grading, and radiotherapy planning. Resection based on glioma metabolism information may provide for a more extensive resection and yield better outcomes for glioma patients. In this study, the authors attempt to integrate 3D (1)H-MRS into neuronavigation and assess the feasibility and validity of metabolically based glioma resection. METHODS Choline (Cho)-N-acetylaspartate (NAA) index (CNI) maps were calculated and integrated into neuronavigation. The CNI thresholds were quantitatively analyzed and compared with structural MRI studies. Glioma resections were performed under 3D (1)H-MRS guidance. Volumetric analyses were performed for metabolic and structural images from a low-grade glioma (LGG) group and high-grade glioma (HGG) group. Magnetic resonance imaging and neurological assessments were performed immediately after surgery and 1 year after tumor resection. RESULTS Fifteen eligible patients with primary cerebral gliomas were included in this study. Three-dimensional (1)H-MRS maps were successfully coregistered with structural images and integrated into navigational system. Volumetric analyses showed that the differences between the metabolic volumes with different CNI thresholds were statistically significant (p < 0.05). For the LGG group, the differences between the structural and the metabolic volumes with CNI thresholds of 0.5 and 1.5 were statistically significant (p = 0.0005 and 0.0129, respectively). For the HGG group, the differences between the structural and metabolic volumes with CNI thresholds of 0.5 and 1.0 were statistically significant (p = 0.0027 and 0

  12. Mobile 3D quality of experience evaluation: a hybrid data collection and analysis approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utriainen, Timo; Häyrynen, Jyrki; Jumisko-Pyykkö, Satu; Boev, Atanas; Gotchev, Atanas; Hannuksela, Miska M.

    2011-02-01

    The paper presents a hybrid approach to study the user's experienced quality of 3D visual content on mobile autostereoscopic displays. It combines extensive subjective tests with collection and objective analysis of eye-tracked data. 3D cues which are significant for mobiles are simulated in the generated 3D test content. The methodology for conducting subjective quality evaluation includes hybrid data-collection of quantitative quality preferences, qualitative impressions, and binocular eye-tracking. We present early results of the subjective tests along with eye movement reaction times, areas of interest and heatmaps obtained from raw eye-tracked data after statistical analysis. The study contributes to the question what is important to be visualized on portable auto-stereoscopic displays and how to maintain and visually enhance the quality of 3D content for such displays.

  13. Comparison Between Two Generic 3d Building Reconstruction Approaches - Point Cloud Based VS. Image Processing Based

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahlke, D.; Linkiewicz, M.

    2016-06-01

    This paper compares two generic approaches for the reconstruction of buildings. Synthesized and real oblique and vertical aerial imagery is transformed on the one hand into a dense photogrammetric 3D point cloud and on the other hand into photogrammetric 2.5D surface models depicting a scene from different cardinal directions. One approach evaluates the 3D point cloud statistically in order to extract the hull of structures, while the other approach makes use of salient line segments in 2.5D surface models, so that the hull of 3D structures can be recovered. With orders of magnitudes more analyzed 3D points, the point cloud based approach is an order of magnitude more accurate for the synthetic dataset compared to the lower dimensioned, but therefor orders of magnitude faster, image processing based approach. For real world data the difference in accuracy between both approaches is not significant anymore. In both cases the reconstructed polyhedra supply information about their inherent semantic and can be used for subsequent and more differentiated semantic annotations through exploitation of texture information.

  14. 3-D, bluff body drag estimation using a Green's function/Gram-Charlier series approach.

    SciTech Connect

    Barone, Matthew Franklin; De Chant, Lawrence Justin

    2004-05-01

    In this study, we describe the extension of the 2-d preliminary design bluff body drag estimation tool developed by De Chant to apply for 3-d flows. As with the 2-d method, the 3-d extension uses a combined approximate Green's function/Gram-Charlier series approach to retain the body geometry information. Whereas, the 2-d methodology relied solely upon the use of small disturbance theory for the inviscid flow field associated with the body of interest to estimate the near-field initial conditions, e.g. velocity defect, the 3-d methodology uses both analytical (where available) and numerical inviscid solutions. The defect solution is then used as an initial condition in an approximate 3-d Green's function solution. Finally, the Green's function solution is matched to the 3-d analog of the classical 2-d Gram-Charlier series and then integrated to yield the net form drag on the bluff body. Preliminary results indicate that drag estimates computed are of accuracy equivalent to the 2-d method for flows with large separation, i.e. less than 20% relative error. As was the lower dimensional method, the 3-d concept is intended to be a supplement to turbulent Navier-Stokes and experimental solution for estimating drag coefficients over blunt bodies.

  15. 3-D, bluff body drag estimation using a Green's function/Gram-Charlier series approach.

    SciTech Connect

    Barone, Matthew Franklin; De Chant, Lawrence Justin

    2005-01-01

    In this study, we describe the extension of the 2-d preliminary design bluff body drag estimation tool developed by De Chant1 to apply for 3-d flows. As with the 2-d method, the 3-d extension uses a combined approximate Green's function/Gram-Charlier series approach to retain the body geometry information. Whereas, the 2-d methodology relied solely upon the use of small disturbance theory for the inviscid flow field associated with the body of interest to estimate the near-field initial conditions, e.g. velocity defect, the 3-d methodology uses both analytical (where available) and numerical inviscid solutions. The defect solution is then used as an initial condition in an approximate 3-d Green's function solution. Finally, the Green's function solution is matched to the 3-d analog of the classical 2-d Gram-Charlier series and then integrated to yield the net form drag on the bluff body. Preliminary results indicate that drag estimates computed are of accuracy equivalent to the 2-d method for flows with large separation, i.e. less than 20% relative error. As was the lower dimensional method, the 3-d concept is intended to be a supplement to turbulent Navier-Stokes and experimental solution for estimating drag coefficients over blunt bodies.

  16. Linear programming approach to optimize 3D data obtained from multiple view angiograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noël, Peter B.; Xu, Jinhui; Hoffmann, Kenneth R.; Singh, Vikas; Schafer, Sebastian; Walczak, Alan M.

    2007-03-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) vessel data from CTA or MRA are not always available prior to or during endovascular interventional procedures, whereas multiple 2D projection angiograms often are. Unfortunately, patient movement, table movement, and gantry sag during angiographic procedures can lead to large errors in gantry-based imaging geometries and thereby incorrect 3D. Therefore, we are developing methods for combining vessel data from multiple 2D angiographic views obtained during interventional procedures to provide 3D vessel data during these procedures. Multiple 2D projection views of carotid vessels are obtained, and the vessel centerlines are indicated. For each pair of views, endpoints of the 3D centerlines are reconstructed using triangulation based on the provided gantry geometry. Previous investigations indicated that translation errors were the primary source of error in the reconstructed 3D. Therefore, the errors in the translations relating the imaging systems are corrected by minimizing the L1 distance between the reconstructed endpoints, after which the 3D centerlines are reconstructed using epipolar constraints for every pair of views. Evaluations were performed using simulations, phantom data, and clinical cases. In simulation and phantom studies, the RMS error decreased from 6.0 mm obtained with biplane approaches to 0.5 mm with our technique. Centerlines in clinical cases are smoother and more consistent than those calculated from individual biplane pairs. The 3D centerlines are calculated in about 2 seconds. These results indicate that reliable 3D vessel data can be generated for treatment planning or revision during interventional procedures.

  17. Visualization of boundaries in volumetric data sets through a what material you pick is what boundary you see approach.

    PubMed

    Li, Lu; Peng, Hu; Chen, Xun; Cheng, Juan; Gao, Dayong

    2016-04-01

    Transfer function design is a key issue in direct volume rendering. Many sophisticated transfer functions have been proposed to visualize boundaries in volumetric data sets such as computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. However, it is still conventionally challenging to reliably detect boundaries. Meanwhile, the interactive strategy is complicated for new users or even experts. In this paper, we first propose the human-centric boundary extraction criteria and our boundary model. Based on the model we present a boundary visualization method through a what material you pick is what boundary you see approach. Users can pick out the material of interest to directly convey semantics. In addition, the 3-D canny edge detection is utilized to ensure the good localization of boundaries. Furthermore, we establish a point-to-material distance measure to guarantee the accuracy and integrity of boundaries. The proposed boundary visualization is intuitive and flexible for the exploration of volumetric data.

  18. Design of mulitlevel OLF approach ("V"-shaped decompressive laminoplasty) based on 3D printing technology.

    PubMed

    Ling, Qinjie; He, Erxing; Ouyang, Hanbin; Guo, Jing; Yin, Zhixun; Huang, Wenhua

    2017-07-27

    To introduce a new surgical approach to the multilevel ossification of the ligamentum flavum (OLF) aided by three-dimensional (3D) printing technology. A multilevel OLF patient (male, 66 years) was scanned using computed tomography (CT). His saved DICOM format data were inputted to the Mimics14.0 3D reconstruction software (Materialise, Belgium). The resulting 3D model was used to observe the anatomical features of the multilevel OLF area and to design the surgical approach. At the base of the spinous process, two channels were created using an osteotomy bilaterally to create a "V" shape to remove the bone ligamentous complex (BLC). The decompressive laminoplasty using mini-plate fixation was simulated with the computer. The physical model was manufactured using 3D printing technology. The patient was subsequently treated using the designed surgery. The operation was completed successfully without any complications. The operative time was 90 min, and blood loss was 200 ml. One month after the operation, neurologic function was recovered well, and the JOA score was improved from 6 preoperatively to 10. Postoperative CT scanning showed that the OLF was totally removed, and the replanted BLC had not subsided. 3D printing technology is an effective, reliable, and minimally invasive method to design operations. The technique can be an option for multilevel OLF surgical treatment. This can provide sufficient decompression with minimum damage to the spine and other intact anatomical structures.

  19. Dosimetric validation and clinical implementation of two 3D dose verification systems for quality assurance in volumetric-modulated arc therapy techniques.

    PubMed

    Clemente-Gutiérrez, Francisco; Pérez-Vara, Consuelo

    2015-03-08

    A pretreatment quality assurance program for volumetric techniques should include redundant calculations and measurement-based verifications. The patient-specific quality assurance process must be based in clinically relevant metrics. The aim of this study was to show the commission, clinical implementation, and comparison of two systems that allow performing a 3D redundant dose calculation. In addition, one of them is capable of reconstructing the dose on patient anatomy from measurements taken with a 2D ion chamber array. Both systems were compared in terms of reference calibration data (absolute dose, output factors, percentage depth-dose curves, and profiles). Results were in good agreement for absolute dose values (discrepancies were below 0.5%) and output factors (mean differences were below 1%). Maximum mean discrepancies were located between 10 and 20 cm of depth for PDDs (-2.7%) and in the penumbra region for profiles (mean DTA of 1.5 mm). Validation of the systems was performed by comparing point-dose measurements with values obtained by the two systems for static, dynamic fields from AAPM TG-119 report, and 12 real VMAT plans for different anatomical sites (differences better than 1.2%). Comparisons between measurements taken with a 2D ion chamber array and results obtained by both systems for real VMAT plans were also performed (mean global gamma passing rates better than 87.0% and 97.9% for the 2%/2 mm and 3%/3 mm criteria). Clinical implementation of the systems was evaluated by comparing dose-volume parameters for all TG-119 tests and real VMAT plans with TPS values (mean differences were below 1%). In addition, comparisons between dose distributions calculated by TPS and those extracted by the two systems for real VMAT plans were also performed (mean global gamma passing rates better than 86.0% and 93.0% for the 2%/2 mm and 3%/ 3 mm criteria). The clinical use of both systems was successfully evaluated.

  20. Dosimetric impact of inter-observer variability for 3D conformal radiotherapy and volumetric modulated arc therapy: the rectal tumor target definition case

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background To assess the dosimetric effect induced by inter-observer variability in target definition for 3D-conformal RT (3DCRT) and volumetric modulated arc therapy by RapidArc (RA) techniques for rectal cancer treatment. Methods Ten patients with rectal cancer subjected to neo-adjuvant RT were randomly selected from the internal database. Four radiation oncologists independently contoured the clinical target volume (CTV) in blind mode. Planning target volume (PTV) was defined as CTV + 7 mm in the three directions. Afterwards, shared guidelines between radiation oncologists were introduced to give general criteria for the contouring of rectal target and the four radiation oncologists defined new CTV following the guidelines. For each patient, six intersections (I) and unions (U) volumes were calculated coupling the contours of the various oncologists. This was repeated for the contours drawn after the guidelines. Agreement Index (AI = I/U) was calculated pre and post guidelines. Two RT plans (one with 3DCRT technique using 3–4 fields and one with RA using a single modulated arc) were optimized on each radiation oncologist’s PTV. For each plan the PTV volume receiving at least 95% of the prescribed dose (PTV V95%) was calculated for both target and non-target PTVs. Results The inter-operator AI pre-guidelines was 0.57 and was increased up to 0.69 post-guidelines. The maximum volume difference between the various CTV couples, drawn for each patient, passed from 380 ± 147 cm3 to 137 ± 83 cm3 after the introduction of guidelines. The mean percentage for the non-target PTV V95% was 93.7 ± 9.2% before and 96.6 ± 4.9%after the introduction of guidelines for the 3DCRT, for RA the increase was more relevant, passing from 86.5 ± 13.8% (pre) to 94.5 ± 7.5% (post). The OARs were maximally spared with VMAT technique while the variability between pre and post guidelines was not relevant in both techniques. Conclusions The contouring

  1. Dosimetric impact of inter-observer variability for 3D conformal radiotherapy and volumetric modulated arc therapy: the rectal tumor target definition case.

    PubMed

    Lobefalo, Francesca; Bignardi, Mario; Reggiori, Giacomo; Tozzi, Angelo; Tomatis, Stefano; Alongi, Filippo; Fogliata, Antonella; Gaudino, Anna; Navarria, Piera; Cozzi, Luca; Scorsetti, Marta; Mancosu, Pietro

    2013-07-09

    To assess the dosimetric effect induced by inter-observer variability in target definition for 3D-conformal RT (3DCRT) and volumetric modulated arc therapy by RapidArc (RA) techniques for rectal cancer treatment. Ten patients with rectal cancer subjected to neo-adjuvant RT were randomly selected from the internal database. Four radiation oncologists independently contoured the clinical target volume (CTV) in blind mode. Planning target volume (PTV) was defined as CTV + 7 mm in the three directions. Afterwards, shared guidelines between radiation oncologists were introduced to give general criteria for the contouring of rectal target and the four radiation oncologists defined new CTV following the guidelines. For each patient, six intersections (I) and unions (U) volumes were calculated coupling the contours of the various oncologists. This was repeated for the contours drawn after the guidelines. Agreement Index (AI = I/U) was calculated pre and post guidelines. Two RT plans (one with 3DCRT technique using 3-4 fields and one with RA using a single modulated arc) were optimized on each radiation oncologist's PTV. For each plan the PTV volume receiving at least 95% of the prescribed dose (PTV V95%) was calculated for both target and non-target PTVs. The inter-operator AI pre-guidelines was 0.57 and was increased up to 0.69 post-guidelines. The maximum volume difference between the various CTV couples, drawn for each patient, passed from 380 ± 147 cm³ to 137 ± 83 cm³ after the introduction of guidelines. The mean percentage for the non-target PTV V95% was 93.7 ± 9.2% before and 96.6 ± 4.9%after the introduction of guidelines for the 3DCRT, for RA the increase was more relevant, passing from 86.5 ± 13.8% (pre) to 94.5 ± 7.5% (post). The OARs were maximally spared with VMAT technique while the variability between pre and post guidelines was not relevant in both techniques. The contouring inter-observer variability has dosimetric

  2. Chest wall desmoid tumours treated with definitive radiotherapy: a plan comparison of 3D conformal radiotherapy, intensity-modulated radiotherapy and volumetric-modulated arc radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jia; Ng, Diana; Lee, James; Stalley, Paul; Hong, Angela

    2016-03-02

    Definitive radiotherapy is often used for chest wall desmoid tumours due to size or anatomical location. The delivery of radiotherapy is challenging due to the large size and constraints of normal surrounding structures. We compared the dosimetry of 3D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT), intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and volumetric-modulated arc radiotherapy (VMAT) to evaluate the best treatment option. Ten consecutive patients with inoperable chest wall desmoid tumours (PTV range 416-4549 cm(3)) were selected. For each patient, 3DCRT, IMRT and VMAT plans were generated and the Conformity Index (CI), organ at risk (OAR) doses and monitor unit (MU) were evaluated. The Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used to compare dose delivered to both target and OARs. The mean number of fields for 3DCRT and IMRT were 6.3 ± 2.1, 7.2 ± 1.8. The mean number of arcs for VMAT was 3.7 ± 1.1. The mean conformity index of VMAT (0.98 ± 0.14) was similar to that of IMRT (1.03 ± 0.13), both of which were significantly better than 3DCRT (1.35 ± 0.20; p = 0.005). The mean dose to lung was significantly higher for 3DCRT (11.9Gy ± 7.9) compared to IMRT (9.4Gy ± 5.4, p = 0.014) and VMAT (8.9Gy ± 4.5, p = 0.017). For the 3 females, the low dose regions in the ipsilateral breast for VMAT were generally less with VMAT. IMRT plans required 1427 ± 532 MU per fraction which was almost 4-fold higher than 3DCRT (313 ± 112, P = 0.005). Compared to IMRT, VMAT plans required 60 % less MU (570 ± 285, P = 0.005). For inoperable chest wall desmoid tumours, VMAT delivered equivalent target coverage when compared to IMRT but required 60 % less MU. Both VMAT and IMRT were superior to 3DCRT in terms of better PTV coverage and sparing of lung tissue.

  3. On the Dynamic Programming Approach for the 3D Navier-Stokes Equations

    SciTech Connect

    Manca, Luigi

    2008-06-15

    The dynamic programming approach for the control of a 3D flow governed by the stochastic Navier-Stokes equations for incompressible fluid in a bounded domain is studied. By a compactness argument, existence of solutions for the associated Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman equation is proved. Finally, existence of an optimal control through the feedback formula and of an optimal state is discussed.

  4. Individualized Surgical Approach Planning for Petroclival Tumors Using a 3D Printer.

    PubMed

    Muelleman, Thomas John; Peterson, Jeremy; Chowdhury, Naweed Iffat; Gorup, Jason; Camarata, Paul; Lin, James

    2016-06-01

    Objectives To determine the utility of three-dimensional (3D) printed models in individualized petroclival tumor resection planning by measuring the fidelity of printed anatomical structures and comparing tumor exposure afforded by different approaches. Design Case series and review of the literature. Setting Tertiary care center. Participants Three patients with petroclival lesions. Main Outcome Measures Subjective opinion of access by neuro-otologists and neurosurgeons as well as surface area of tumor exposure. Results Surgeons found the 3D models of each patient's skull and tumor useful for preoperative planning. Limitations of individual surgical approaches not identified through preoperative imaging were apparent after 3D models were evaluated. Significant variability in exposure was noted between models for similar or identical approaches. A notable drawback is that our printing process did not replicate mastoid air cells. Conclusions We found that 3D modeling is useful for individualized preoperative planning for approaching petroclival tumors. Our printing techniques did produce authentic replicas of the tumors in relation to bony structures.

  5. A universal approach for automatic organ segmentations on 3D CT images based on organ localization and 3D GrabCut

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xiangrong; Ito, Takaaki; Zhou, Xinxin; Chen, Huayue; Hara, Takeshi; Yokoyama, Ryujiro; Kanematsu, Masayuki; Hoshi, Hiroaki; Fujita, Hiroshi

    2014-03-01

    This paper describes a universal approach to automatic segmentation of different internal organ and tissue regions in three-dimensional (3D) computerized tomography (CT) scans. The proposed approach combines object localization, a probabilistic atlas, and 3D GrabCut techniques to achieve automatic and quick segmentation. The proposed method first detects a tight 3D bounding box that contains the target organ region in CT images and then estimates the prior of each pixel inside the bounding box belonging to the organ region or background based on a dynamically generated probabilistic atlas. Finally, the target organ region is separated from the background by using an improved 3D GrabCut algorithm. A machine-learning method is used to train a detector to localize the 3D bounding box of the target organ using template matching on a selected feature space. A content-based image retrieval method is used for online generation of a patient-specific probabilistic atlas for the target organ based on a database. A 3D GrabCut algorithm is used for final organ segmentation by iteratively estimating the CT number distributions of the target organ and backgrounds using a graph-cuts algorithm. We applied this approach to localize and segment twelve major organ and tissue regions independently based on a database that includes 1300 torso CT scans. In our experiments, we randomly selected numerous CT scans and manually input nine principal types of inner organ regions for performance evaluation. Preliminary results showed the feasibility and efficiency of the proposed approach for addressing automatic organ segmentation issues on CT images.

  6. Simulation approach of atomic layer deposition in large 3D structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwille, Matthias C.; Barth, Jonas; Schössler, Timo; Schön, Florian; Bartha, Johann W.; Oettel, Martin

    2017-04-01

    We present a new simulation method predicting thicknesses of thin films obtained by atomic layer deposition in high aspect ratio 3D geometries as they appear in MEMS manufacturing. The method features a Monte-Carlo computation of film deposition in free molecular flow, as well as in the Knudsen and diffusive gas regime, applicable for large structures. We compare our approach to analytic and simulation results from the literature. The capability of the method is demonstrated by a comparison to experimental film thicknesses in a large 3D structure. Finally, the feasability to extract process parameters, i.e. sticking coefficients is shown.

  7. New approach for 3D imaging and geometry modeling of the human inner ear.

    PubMed

    Vogel, U

    1999-01-01

    Obtaining high-resolution three-dimensional (3D) geometry data performs a necessary assumption for modeling cochlear mechanics. Preferably this procedure has to be done noninvasively to preserve the original morphology. Depending on the actual application, various levels of spatial resolution and tissue differentiation should be reached. Here a new approach is presented which allows 3D imaging of temporal bone specimens with intact regions of interest and spatial resolution currently in the 10-microm range, but providing capabilities for future enhancements down to the submicron level. The technique is based on microtomography by X-rays or synchrotron radiation respectively. The structural data are reconstructed and converted to geometry data by 3D image processing, and eventually transferred into simulation environments, e.g., Finite Element Analysis, but may also be used for general visualization tasks in research, clinics, and education.

  8. Re-thinking 3D printing: A novel approach to guided facial contouring.

    PubMed

    Darwood, Alastair; Collier, Jonathan; Joshi, Naresh; Grant, William E; Sauret-Jackson, Veronique; Richards, Robin; Dawood, Andrew; Kirkpatrick, Niall

    2015-09-01

    Rapid prototyped or three dimensional printed (3D printed) patient specific guides are of great use in many craniofacial and maxillofacial procedures and are extensively described in the literature. These guides are relatively easy to produce and cost effective. However existing designs are limited in that they are unable to be used in procedures requiring the 3D contouring of patient tissues. This paper presents a novel design and approach for the use of three dimensional printing in the production of a patient specific guide capable of fully guiding intraoperative 3D tissue contouring based on a pre-operative plan. We present a case where the technique was used on a patient suffering from an extensive osseous tumour as a result of fibrous dysplasia with encouraging results.

  9. A 3D contact analysis approach for the visualization of the electrical contact asperities

    PubMed Central

    Swingler, Jonathan

    2017-01-01

    The electrical contact is an important phenomenon that should be given into consideration to achieve better performance and long term reliability for the design of devices. Based upon this importance, the electrical contact interface has been visualized as a ‘‘3D Contact Map’’ and used in order to investigate the contact asperities. The contact asperities describe the structures above and below the contact spots (the contact spots define the 3D contact map) to the two conductors which make the contact system. The contact asperities require the discretization of the 3D microstructures of the contact system into voxels. A contact analysis approach has been developed and introduced in this paper which shows the way to the 3D visualization of the contact asperities of a given contact system. For the discretization of 3D microstructure of contact system into voxels, X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) method is used in order to collect the data of a 250 V, 16 A rated AC single pole rocker switch which is used as a contact system for investigation. PMID:28105383

  10. A Bio-Inspired Approach to Task Assignment of Swarm Robots in 3-D Dynamic Environments.

    PubMed

    Xin Yi; Anmin Zhu; Yang, Simon X; Chaomin Luo

    2017-04-01

    Intending to mimic the operating mechanism of biological neural systems, a self organizing map-based approach to task assignment of a swarm of robots in 3-D dynamic environments is proposed in this paper. This approach integrates the advantages and characteristics of biological neural systems. It is capable of dynamically planning the paths of a swarm of robots in 3-D environments under uncertain situations, such as when some robots are presented in or broken down or when more than one robot is needed for some special task locations. A Bezier path optimizing algorithm and a parameter adjusting algorithm are integrated in this paper. It is capable of reducing the complexity of the robot navigation control and limiting the number of convergence iterations. The simulation results with different environments demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach.

  11. A Bio-Inspired Approach to Task Assignment of Swarm Robots in 3-D Dynamic Environments.

    PubMed

    Yi, Xin; Zhu, Anmin; Yang, Simon X; Luo, Chaomin

    2016-03-15

    Intending to mimic the operating mechanism of biological neural systems, a self organizing map-based approach to task assignment of a swarm of robots in 3-D dynamic environments is proposed in this paper. This approach integrates the advantages and characteristics of biological neural systems. It is capable of dynamically planning the paths of a swarm of robots in 3-D environments under uncertain situations, such as when some robots are presented in or broken down or when more than one robot is needed for some special task locations. A Bezier path optimizing algorithm and a parameter adjusting algorithm are integrated in this paper. It is capable of reducing the complexity of the robot navigation control and limiting the number of convergence iterations. The simulation results with different environments demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach.

  12. Endoscopic expanded endonasal approach: preliminary experience with the new 3D endoscope.

    PubMed

    Felisati, G; Lenzi, R; Pipolo, C; Maccari, A; Messina, F; Revay, M; Lania, A; Cardia, A; Lasio, G

    2013-04-01

    The recent introduction of the 3D endoscope for endonasal surgery has been welcomed because of its promise to overcome the main limitation of endoscopy, namely the lack of stereoscopic vision. This innovation particularly regarded the most complex transnasal surgery of the skull base. We therefore discuss our early experience as ENT surgeons with the use of a purely 3D endoscopic expanded endonasal approach for supradiaphragmatic lesions in 10 consecutive patients. This article will focus on the surgical technique, the complications, the outcome, and more importantly the advantages and limitations of the new device. We believe that the new 3D system shows its main drawback when surgery is conducted in the narrow nasal spaces. Nevertheless, the improved knowledge of the three-dimensional nasal anatomy enabled the ENT surgeon to perform a more selective demolition of the nasal structures even in the anterior part of the nose. The depth perception obtained with the 3D system also permitted a better understanding of the plasticity of the surgical defects, increasing the confidence to perform successful skull base plasties. We believe that, for both the ENT surgeon and the neurosurgeon, the expanded endonasal approach is the main indication for this exciting tool, although larger prospective studies are needed to determine the equality to the 2D HD endoscope in oncological terms.

  13. Extended 3D Approach for Quantification of Abnormal Ascending Aortic Flow

    PubMed Central

    Sigovan, Monica; Dyverfeldt, Petter; Wrenn, Jarrett; Tseng, Elaine E.; Saloner, David; Hope, Michael D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Flow displacement quantifies eccentric flow, a potential risk factor for aneurysms in the ascending aorta, but only at a single anatomic location. The aim of this study is to extend flow displacement analysis to 3D in patients with aortic and aortic valve pathologies. Methods 43 individuals were studied with 4DFlow MRI in 6 groups: healthy, tricuspid aortic valve (TAV) with aortic stenosis (AS) but no dilatation, TAV with dilatation but no AS, and TAV with both AS and dilatation, BAV without AS or dilatation, BAV without AS but with dilation. The protocol was approved by our institutional review board, and informed consent was obtained. Flow displacement was calculated for multiple planes along the ascending aorta, and 2D and 3D analyses were compared. Results Good correlation was found between 2D flow displacement and both maximum and average 3D values (r>0.8). Healthy controls had significantly lower flow displacement values with all approaches (p<0.05). The highest flow displacement was seen with stenotic TAV and aortic dilation (0.24±0.02 with maximum flow displacement). The 2D approach underestimated the maximum flow displacement by more than 20% in 13 out of 36 patients (36%). Conclusions The extended 3D flow displacement analysis offers a more comprehensive quantitative evaluation of abnormal systolic flow in the ascending aorta than 2D analysis. Differences between patient subgroups are better demonstrated, and maximum flow displacement is more reliable assessed. PMID:25721998

  14. A new approach for salt dome detection using a 3D multidirectional edge detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asjad, Amin; Mohamed, Deriche

    2015-09-01

    Accurate salt dome detection from 3D seismic data is crucial to different seismic data analysis applications. We present a new edge based approach for salt dome detection in migrated 3D seismic data. The proposed algorithm overcomes the drawbacks of existing edge-based techniques which only consider edges in the x (crossline) and y (inline) directions in 2D data and the x (crossline), y (inline), and z (time) directions in 3D data. The algorithm works by combining 3D gradient maps computed along diagonal directions and those computed in x, y, and z directions to accurately detect the boundaries of salt regions. The combination of x, y, and z directions and diagonal edges ensures that the proposed algorithm works well even if the dips along the salt boundary are represented only by weak reflectors. Contrary to other edge and texture based salt dome detection techniques, the proposed algorithm is independent of the amplitude variations in seismic data. We tested the proposed algorithm on the publicly available Netherlands offshore F3 block. The results suggest that the proposed algorithm can detect salt bodies with high accuracy than existing gradient based and texture-based techniques when used separately. More importantly, the proposed approach is shown to be computationally efficient allowing for real time implementation and deployment.

  15. An instrumental approach to combining confocal microspectroscopy and 3D scanning probe nanotomography.

    PubMed

    Mochalov, Konstantin E; Chistyakov, Anton A; Solovyeva, Daria O; Mezin, Alexey V; Oleinikov, Vladimir A; Vaskan, Ivan S; Molinari, Michael; Agapov, Igor I; Nabiev, Igor; Efimov, Anton E

    2017-06-21

    In the past decade correlative microscopy, which combines the potentials of different types of high-resolution microscopies with a variety of optical microspectroscopy techniques, has been attracting increasing attention in material science and biological research. One of outstanding solutions in this area is the combination of scanning probe microscopy (SPM), which provides data on not only the topography, but also the spatial distribution of a wide range of physical properties (elasticity, conductivity, etc.), with ultramicrotomy, allowing 3D multiparametric examination of materials. The combination of SPM and ultramicrotomy (scanning probe nanotomography) is very appropriate for characterization of soft multicompound nanostructurized materials, such as polymer matrices and microstructures doped with different types of nanoparticles (magnetic nanoparticles, quantum dots, nanotubes, etc.), and biological materials. A serious problem of this technique is a lack of chemical and optical characterization tools, which may be solved by using optical microspectroscopy. Here, we report the development of an instrumental approach to combining confocal microspectroscopy and 3D scanning probe nanotomography in a single apparatus. This approach retains all the advantages of SPM and upright optical microspectroscopy and allows 3D multiparametric characterization using both techniques. As the first test of the system developed, we have performed correlative characterization of the morphology and the magnetic and fluorescent properties of fluorescent magnetic microspheres doped with a fluorescent dye and magnetic nanoparticles. The results of this study can be used to obtain 3D volume images of a specimen for most high-resolution near-field scanning probe microscopies: SNOM, TERS, AFM-IR, etc. This approach will result in development of unique techniques combining the advantages of SPM (nanoscale morphology and a wide range of physical parameters) and high-resolution optical

  16. Does shape co-variation between the skull and the mandible have functional consequences? A 3D approach for a 3D problem.

    PubMed

    Cornette, Raphaël; Baylac, Michel; Souter, Thibaud; Herrel, Anthony

    2013-10-01

    Morpho-functional patterns are important drivers of phenotypic diversity given their importance in a fitness-related context. Although modularity of the mandible and skull has been studied extensively in mammals, few studies have explored shape co-variation between these two structures. Despite being developmentally independent, the skull and mandible form a functionally integrated unit. In the present paper we use 3D surface geometric morphometric methods allowing us to explore the form of both skull and mandible in its 3D complexity using the greater white-toothed shrew as a model. This approach allows an accurate 3D description of zones devoid of anatomical landmarks that are functionally important. Two-block partial least-squares approaches were used to describe the co-variation of form between skull and mandible. Moreover, a 3D biomechanical model was used to explore the functional consequences of the observed patterns of co-variation. Our results show the efficiency of the method in investigations of complex morpho-functional patterns. Indeed, the description of shape co-variation between the skull and the mandible highlighted the location and the intensity of their functional relationships through the jaw adductor muscles linking these two structures. Our results also demonstrated that shape co-variation in form between the skull and mandible has direct functional consequences on the recruitment of muscles during biting.

  17. Real-time tracking of the left ventricle in 3D echocardiography using a state estimation approach.

    PubMed

    Orderud, Fredrik; Hansgård, Jøger; Rabben, Stein I

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we present a framework for real-time tracking of deformable contours in volumetric datasets. The framework supports composite deformation models, controlled by parameters for contour shape in addition to global pose. Tracking is performed in a sequential state estimation fashion, using an extended Kalman filter, with measurement processing in information space to effectively predict and update contour deformations in real-time. A deformable B-spline surface coupled with a global pose transform is used to model shape changes of the left ventricle of the heart. Successful tracking of global motion and local shape changes without user intervention is demonstrated on a dataset consisting of 21 3D echocardiography recordings. Real-time tracking using the proposed approach requires a modest CPU load of 13% on a modern computer. The segmented volumes compare to a semi-automatic segmentation tool with 95% limits of agreement in the interval 4.1 +/- 24.6 ml (r = 0.92).

  18. 3D deformable image matching: a hierarchical approach over nested subspaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musse, Olivier; Heitz, Fabrice; Armspach, Jean-Paul

    2000-06-01

    This paper presents a fast hierarchical method to perform dense deformable inter-subject matching of 3D MR Images of the brain. To recover the complex morphological variations in neuroanatomy, a hierarchy of 3D deformations fields is estimated, by minimizing a global energy function over a sequence of nested subspaces. The nested subspaces, generated from a single scaling function, consist of deformation fields constrained at different scales. The highly non linear energy function, describing the interactions between the target and the source images, is minimized using a coarse-to-fine continuation strategy over this hierarchy. The resulting deformable matching method shows low sensitivity to local minima and is able to track large non-linear deformations, with moderate computational load. The performances of the approach are assessed both on simulated 3D transformations and on a real data base of 3D brain MR Images from different individuals. The method has shown efficient in putting into correspondence the principle anatomical structures of the brain. An application to atlas-based MRI segmentation, by transporting a labeled segmentation map on patient data, is also presented.

  19. 3D virtual character reconstruction from projections: a NURBS-based approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Triki, Olfa; Zaharia, Titus B.; Preteux, Francoise J.

    2004-05-01

    This work has been carried out within the framework of the industrial project, so-called TOON, supported by the French government. TOON aims at developing tools for automating the traditional 2D cartoon content production. This paper presents preliminary results of the TOON platform. The proposed methodology concerns the issues of 2D/3D reconstruction from a limited number of drawn projections, and 2D/3D manipulation/deformation/refinement of virtual characters. Specifically, we show that the NURBS-based modeling approach developed here offers a well-suited framework for generating deformable 3D virtual characters from incomplete 2D information. Furthermore, crucial functionalities such as animation and non-rigid deformation can be also efficiently handled and solved. Note that user interaction is enabled exclusively in 2D by achieving a multiview constraint specification method. This is fully consistent and compliant with the cartoon creator traditional practice and makes it possible to avoid the use of 3D modeling software packages which are generally complex to manipulate.

  20. A reduced-coordinate approach to modeling RNA 3-D structures

    SciTech Connect

    Tung, Chang-Shung

    1997-09-01

    With the realization of RNA molecules capable of performing very specific functions (e.g., catalytic RNAs and RNAs that bind ligand with affinity and specificity of an anti-body) and contrary to the traditional view that structure of RNA molecules being functionally passive, it has become clear that studying the 3-dimensional (3-D) folding of RNA molecules is a very important task. In the absence of sufficient number of experimentally determined RNA structures available up-to-date, folding of RNA structures computationally provides an alternative approach in studying the 3-D structure of RNA molecules. We have developed a computational approach for folding RNA 3-D structures. The method is conceptually simple and general. It consists of two major components. The first being the arrangement of all helices in space. Once the helices are positioned and oriented in space, structures of the connecting loops are modeled and inserted between the helices. Any number of structural constraints derived either experimentally or theoretically can be used to guide the folding processes. A conformational sampling approach is developed with structural equilibration using the Metropolis Monte Carlo simulation. The lengths of various loop sizes (ranging from 1 base to 7 bases) are calculated based on a set of RNA structures deposited in PDB as well as a set of loop structures constructed using our method. The validity of using the averaged loop lengths of the connecting loops as distance constraints for arranging the helices in space is studied.

  1. 3D Scene Reconstruction Using Omnidirectional Vision and LiDAR: A Hybrid Approach

    PubMed Central

    Vlaminck, Michiel; Luong, Hiep; Goeman, Werner; Philips, Wilfried

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel approach to obtain accurate 3D reconstructions of large-scale environments by means of a mobile acquisition platform. The system incorporates a Velodyne LiDAR scanner, as well as a Point Grey Ladybug panoramic camera system. It was designed with genericity in mind, and hence, it does not make any assumption about the scene or about the sensor set-up. The main novelty of this work is that the proposed LiDAR mapping approach deals explicitly with the inhomogeneous density of point clouds produced by LiDAR scanners. To this end, we keep track of a global 3D map of the environment, which is continuously improved and refined by means of a surface reconstruction technique. Moreover, we perform surface analysis on consecutive generated point clouds in order to assure a perfect alignment with the global 3D map. In order to cope with drift, the system incorporates loop closure by determining the pose error and propagating it back in the pose graph. Our algorithm was exhaustively tested on data captured at a conference building, a university campus and an industrial site of a chemical company. Experiments demonstrate that it is capable of generating highly accurate 3D maps in very challenging environments. We can state that the average distance of corresponding point pairs between the ground truth and estimated point cloud approximates one centimeter for an area covering approximately 4000 m2. To prove the genericity of the system, it was tested on the well-known Kitti vision benchmark. The results show that our approach competes with state of the art methods without making any additional assumptions. PMID:27854315

  2. A validation of a posture matching approach for the determination of 3D cumulative back loads.

    PubMed

    Sutherland, Chad A; Albert, Wayne J; Wrigley, Allan T; Callaghan, Jack P

    2008-03-01

    The purpose of this project was to investigate the amount of error in calculating cumulative lumbar spine kinetics using a posture matching approach (3DMatch) compared to a 3D coordinate electromagnetic tracking approach (FASTRAK). Six subjects were required to perform five repeats each of two symmetrical and two asymmetrical lifts while being simultaneously recorded from 4 camera views at viewing angles of 0 degrees , 45 degrees , 60 degrees and 90 degrees to the sagittal plane while wearing eight FASTRAK sensors to define an 8 segment rigid link model (RLM) of the head, arms, and trunk. Four hundred and eighty lifts (6 subjects x20 lifts x4 camera views) were analyzed using the 3DMatch posture-matching program to calculate the following cumulative loads at the L4/L5 joint: compression, anterior shear, posterior shear, reaction shear and extension moment. The errors in cumulative load calculation were determined as the difference between the values calculated for the same lifts using a 3D RLM that used electromagnetic motion tracking sensors (FASTRAK) positioned at the segment center of masses as model inputs. No significant difference (p<0.05) in the relative error for any of the cumulative loading variables between the four camera views and the 3D RLM approach was found. Furthermore the relative errors for cumulative compression, joint anterior shear, reaction anterior shear and extension moment were all below 12%. These results suggest that posture matching by trained users can provide reasonable 3D data to calculate cumulative low back loads with a biomechanical model.

  3. 3D Scene Reconstruction Using Omnidirectional Vision and LiDAR: A Hybrid Approach.

    PubMed

    Vlaminck, Michiel; Luong, Hiep; Goeman, Werner; Philips, Wilfried

    2016-11-16

    In this paper, we propose a novel approach to obtain accurate 3D reconstructions of large-scale environments by means of a mobile acquisition platform. The system incorporates a Velodyne LiDAR scanner, as well as a Point Grey Ladybug panoramic camera system. It was designed with genericity in mind, and hence, it does not make any assumption about the scene or about the sensor set-up. The main novelty of this work is that the proposed LiDAR mapping approach deals explicitly with the inhomogeneous density of point clouds produced by LiDAR scanners. To this end, we keep track of a global 3D map of the environment, which is continuously improved and refined by means of a surface reconstruction technique. Moreover, we perform surface analysis on consecutive generated point clouds in order to assure a perfect alignment with the global 3D map. In order to cope with drift, the system incorporates loop closure by determining the pose error and propagating it back in the pose graph. Our algorithm was exhaustively tested on data captured at a conference building, a university campus and an industrial site of a chemical company. Experiments demonstrate that it is capable of generating highly accurate 3D maps in very challenging environments. We can state that the average distance of corresponding point pairs between the ground truth and estimated point cloud approximates one centimeter for an area covering approximately 4000 m 2 . To prove the genericity of the system, it was tested on the well-known Kitti vision benchmark. The results show that our approach competes with state of the art methods without making any additional assumptions.

  4. A simple approach for the fabrication of 3D microelectrodes for impedimetric sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahsin Guler, Mustafa; Bilican, Ismail; Agan, Sedat; Elbuken, Caglar

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, we present a very simple method to fabricate three-dimensional (3D) microelectrodes integrated with microfluidic devices. We form the electrodes by etching a microwire placed across a microchannel. For precise control of the electrode spacing, we employ a hydrodynamic focusing microfluidic device and control the width of the etching solution stream. The focused widths of the etchant solution and the etching time determine the gap formed between the electrodes. Using the same microfluidic device, we can fabricate integrated 3D electrodes with different electrode gaps. We have demonstrated the functionality of these electrodes using an impedimetric particle counting setup. Using 3D microelectrodes with a diameter of 25 μm, we have detected 6 μm-diameter polystyrene beads in a buffer solution as well as erythrocytes in a PBS solution. We study the effect of electrode spacing on the signal-to-noise ratio of the impedance signal and we demonstrate that the smaller the electrode spacing the higher the signal obtained from a single microparticle. The sample stream is introduced to the system using the same hydrodynamic focusing device, which ensures the alignment of the sample in between the electrodes. Utilising a 3D hydrodynamic focusing approach, we force all the particles to go through the sensing region of the electrodes. This fabrication scheme not only provides a very low-cost and easy method for rapid prototyping, but which can also be used for applications requiring 3D electric field focused through a narrow section of the microchannel.

  5. 3D cell culture: a review of current approaches and techniques.

    PubMed

    Haycock, John W

    2011-01-01

    Cell culture in two dimensions has been routinely and diligently undertaken in thousands of laboratories worldwide for the past four decades. However, the culture of cells in two dimensions is arguably primitive and does not reproduce the anatomy or physiology of a tissue for informative or useful study. Creating a third dimension for cell culture is clearly more relevant, but requires a multidisciplinary approach and multidisciplinary expertise. When entering the third dimension, investigators need to consider the design of scaffolds for supporting the organisation of cells or the use of bioreactors for controlling nutrient and waste product exchange. As 3D culture systems become more mature and relevant to human and animal physiology, the ability to design and develop co-cultures becomes possible as does the ability to integrate stem cells. The primary objectives for developing 3D cell culture systems vary widely - and range from engineering tissues for clinical delivery through to the development of models for drug screening. The intention of this review is to provide a general overview of the common approaches and techniques for designing 3D culture models.

  6. An approach to detecting deliberately introduced defects and micro-defects in 3D printed objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Straub, Jeremy

    2017-05-01

    In prior work, Zeltmann, et al. demonstrated the negative impact that can be created by defects of various sizes in 3D printed objects. These defects may make the object unsuitable for its application or even present a hazard, if the object is being used for a safety-critical application. With the uses of 3D printing proliferating and consumer access to printers increasing, the desire of a nefarious individual or group to subvert the desired printing quality and safety attributes of a printer or printed object must be considered. Several different approaches to subversion may exist. Attackers may physically impair the functionality of the printer or launch a cyber-attack. Detecting introduced defects, from either attack, is critical to maintaining public trust in 3D printed objects and the technology. This paper presents an alternate approach. It applies a quality assurance technology based on visible light sensing to this challenge and assesses its capability for detecting introduced defects of multiple sizes.

  7. Towards the design of 3D multiscale instructive tissue engineering constructs: Current approaches and trends.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Sara M; Reis, Rui L; Mano, João F

    2015-11-01

    The design of 3D constructs with adequate properties to instruct and guide cells both in vitro and in vivo is one of the major focuses of tissue engineering. Successful tissue regeneration depends on the favorable crosstalk between the supporting structure, the cells and the host tissue so that a balanced matrix production and degradation are achieved. Herein, the major occurring events and players in normal and regenerative tissue are overviewed. These have been inspiring the selection or synthesis of instructive cues to include into the 3D constructs. We further highlight the importance of a multiscale perception of the range of features that can be included on the biomimetic structures. Lastly, we focus on the current and developing tissue-engineering approaches for the preparation of such 3D constructs: top-down, bottom-up and integrative. Bottom-up and integrative approaches present a higher potential for the design of tissue engineering devices with multiscale features and higher biochemical control than top-down strategies, and are the main focus of this review. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. 3D building reconstruction from lidar data based on Delaunay TIN approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Dongdong; Du, Peijun

    2011-10-01

    With a great progress in the research on digital city and related commercial applications, the construction of 3D city models has been matured gradually as a research topic in recent years. When constructing 3D city models on large scale, it is inevitable to have available reconstruction tools that offer a high level of automation and produce valid models reliably within the required accuracy. In this paper, a new method for the automatic generation of 3D building models from directly observed point cloud captured by airborne LiDAR system is presented. At first, Delaunay TIN model is constructed based on the building points. Then an edge length ratio based trace algorithm is used for refining the building's boundary. And the extracted outlines are regularized applying the regression analysis to obtain the better geometric quality. Then the same plane points set are clustered via those points in a triangle facet having the similar normal vector value, which determines the roof structures. Finally, with the regular outlines and roof structures information, the building models are constructed. The data in the study area provided by www.terrasolid.fi are used to test the approach. The experimental results show that this proposed approach is able to construct building models effectively.

  9. A Generalized Approach to the Modeling and Analysis of 3D Surface Morphology in Organisms

    PubMed Central

    Pappas, Janice L.; Miller, Daniel J.

    2013-01-01

    The surface geometry of an organism represents the boundary of its three-dimensional (3D) form and can be used as a proxy for the phenotype. A mathematical approach is presented that describes surface morphology using parametric 3D equations with variables expressed as x, y, z in terms of parameters u, v. Partial differentiation of variables with respect to parameters yields elements of the Jacobian representing tangent lines and planes of every point on the surface. Jacobian elements provide a compact size-free summary of the entire surface, and can be used as variables in principal components analysis to produce a morphospace. Mollusk and echinoid models are generated to demonstrate that whole organisms can be represented in a common morphospace, regardless of differences in size, geometry, and taxonomic affinity. Models can be used to simulate theoretical forms, novel morphologies, and patterns of phenotypic variation, and can also be empirically-based by designing them with reference to actual forms using reverse engineering principles. Although this study uses the Jacobian to summarize models, they can also be analyzed with 3D methods such as eigensurface, spherical harmonics, wavelet analysis, and geometric morphometrics. This general approach should prove useful for exploring broad questions regarding morphological evolution and variation. PMID:24204866

  10. Fourier Domain Iterative Approach to Optical Sectioning of 3d Translucent Objects for Ophthalmology Purposes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razguli, A. V.; Iroshnikov, N. G.; Larichev, A. V.; Romanenko, T. E.; Goncharov, A. S.

    2017-05-01

    In this paper we deal with the problem of optical sectioning. This is a post processing step while investigating of 3D translucent medical objects based on rapid refocusing of the imaging system by the adaptive optics technique. Each image, captured in focal plane, can be represented as the sum of in-focus true section and out-of-focus images of the neighboring sections of the depth that are undesirable in the subsequent reconstruction of 3D object. The problem of optical sectioning under consideration is to elaborate a robust approach capable of obtaining a stack of cross section images purified from such distortions. For a typical sectioning statement arising in ophthalmology we propose a local iterative method in Fourier spectral plane. Compared to the non-local constant parameter selection for the whole spectral domain, the method demonstrates both improved sectioning results and a good level of scalability when implemented on multi-core CPUs.

  11. Sustainable approach toward synthesis of green functional carbonaceous 3-D micro/nanostructures from biomass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavangar, Amirhossein; Tan, Bo; Venkatakrishnan, Krishnan

    2013-08-01

    This study proposes a novel technique to synthesize functional carbonaceous three-dimensional (3-D) micro/nanocompounds from agricultural by-products using femtosecond laser irradiation. Biowastes of rice husk and wheat straw are value-engineered to carbonaceous structures in a single-step process under ambient conditions. Our results demonstrate that by controlling the laser fluence, structures with a variety of different morphologies from nanostructures to microstructures can be achieved. Also, the results indicate that altering the laser processing parameters influences the chemical composition of the synthesized structures. This sustainable approach presents an important step towards synthesizing 3-D micro/nanofibrous compounds from biowaste materials. These structures, as-synthesized or as nanocomposite fillers, can have practical uses in electronic, sensing, biological, and environmental applications.

  12. Efficient non-hydrostatic modelling of 3D wave-induced currents using a subgrid approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rijnsdorp, Dirk P.; Smit, Pieter B.; Zijlema, Marcel; Reniers, Ad J. H. M.

    2017-08-01

    Wave-induced currents are an ubiquitous feature in coastal waters that can spread material over the surf zone and the inner shelf. These currents are typically under resolved in non-hydrostatic wave-flow models due to computational constraints. Specifically, the low vertical resolutions adequate to describe the wave dynamics - and required to feasibly compute at the scales of a field site - are too coarse to account for the relevant details of the three-dimensional (3D) flow field. To describe the relevant dynamics of both wave and currents, while retaining a model framework that can be applied at field scales, we propose a two grid approach to solve the governing equations. With this approach, the vertical accelerations and non-hydrostatic pressures are resolved on a relatively coarse vertical grid (which is sufficient to accurately resolve the wave dynamics), whereas the horizontal velocities and turbulent stresses are resolved on a much finer subgrid (of which the resolution is dictated by the vertical scale of the mean flows). This approach ensures that the discrete pressure Poisson equation - the solution of which dominates the computational effort - is evaluated on the coarse grid scale, thereby greatly improving efficiency, while providing a fine vertical resolution to resolve the vertical variation of the mean flow. This work presents the general methodology, and discusses the numerical implementation in the SWASH wave-flow model. Model predictions are compared with observations of three flume experiments to demonstrate that the subgrid approach captures both the nearshore evolution of the waves, and the wave-induced flows like the undertow profile and longshore current. The accuracy of the subgrid predictions is comparable to fully resolved 3D simulations - but at much reduced computational costs. The findings of this work thereby demonstrate that the subgrid approach has the potential to make 3D non-hydrostatic simulations feasible at the scale of a

  13. Quantification of Left Ventricular Linear, Areal and Volumetric Dimensions: A Phantom and in Vivo Comparison of 2-D and Real-Time 3-D Echocardiography with Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance.

    PubMed

    Polte, Christian L; Lagerstrand, Kerstin M; Gao, Sinsia A; Lamm, Carl R; Bech-Hanssen, Odd

    2015-07-01

    Two-dimensional echocardiography and real-time 3-D echocardiography have been reported to underestimate human left ventricular volumes significantly compared with cardiovascular magnetic resonance. We investigated the ability of 2-D echocardiography, real-time 3-D echocardiography and cardiovascular magnetic resonance to delineate dimensions of increasing complexity (diameter-area-volume) in a multimodality phantom model and in vivo, with the aim of elucidating the main cause of underestimation. All modalities were able to delineate phantom dimensions with high precision. In vivo, 2-D and real-time 3-D echocardiography underestimated short-axis end-diastolic linear and areal and all left ventricular volumetric dimensions significantly compared with cardiovascular magnetic resonance, but not short-axis end-systolic linear and areal dimensions. Underestimation increased successively from linear to volumetric left ventricular dimensions. When analyzed according to the same principles, 2-D and real-time 3-DE echocardiography provided similar left ventricular volumes. In conclusion, echocardiographic underestimation of left ventricular dimensions is due mainly to inherent technical differences in the ability to differentiate trabeculated from compact myocardium. Identical endocardial border definition criteria are needed to minimize differences between the modalities and to ensure better comparability in clinical practice.

  14. Volumetric (3D) bladder dose parameters are more reproducible than point (2D) dose parameters in vaginal vault high-dose-rate brachytherapy

    PubMed Central

    Sapienza, Lucas Gomes; Flosi, Adriana; Aiza, Antonio; de Assis Pellizzon, Antonio Cassio; Chojniak, Rubens; Baiocchi, Glauco

    2016-01-01

    There is no consensus on the use of computed tomography in vaginal cuff brachytherapy (VCB) planning. The purpose of this study was to prospectively determine the reproducibility of point bladder dose parameters (DICRU and maximum dose), compared with volumetric-based parameters. Twenty-two patients who were treated with high-dose-rate (HDR) VCB underwent simulation by computed tomography (CT-scan) with a Foley catheter at standard tension (position A) and extra tension (position B). CT-scan determined the bladder ICRU dose point in both positions and compared the displacement and recorded dose. Volumetric parameters (D0.1cc, D1.0cc, D2.0cc, D4.0cc and D50%) and point dose parameters were compared. The average spatial shift in ICRU dose point in the vertical, longitudinal and lateral directions was 2.91 mm (range: 0.10–9.00), 12.04 mm (range: 4.50–24.50) and 2.65 mm (range: 0.60–8.80), respectively. The DICRU ratio for positions A and B was 1.64 (p < 0.001). Moreover, a decrease in Dmax was observed (p = 0.016). Tension level of the urinary catheter did not affect the volumetric parameters. Our data suggest that point parameters (DICRU and Dmax) are not reproducible and are not the ideal choice for dose reporting. PMID:27296459

  15. A 3D clustering approach for point clouds to detect and quantify changes at a rock glacier front

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Micheletti, Natan; Tonini, Marj; Lane, Stuart N.

    2016-04-01

    points (i) at a maximum distance (ii) around each core-point. Under this condition, seed points are said to be density-reachable by a core point delimiting a cluster around it. A chain of intermediate seed-points can connect contiguous clusters allowing clusters of arbitrary shape to be defined. The novelty of the proposed approach consists in the implementation of the DBSCAN 3D-module, where the xyz-coordinates identify each point and the density of points within a sphere is considered. This allows detecting volumetric features with a higher accuracy, depending only on actual sampling resolution. The approach is truly 3D and exploits all TLS measurements without the need of interpolation or data reduction. Using this method, enhanced geomorphological activity during the summer of 2015 in respect to the previous two years was observed. We attribute this result to the exceptionally high temperatures of that summer, which we deem responsible for accelerating the melting process at the rock glacier front and probably also increasing creep velocities. References: - Tonini, M. and Abellan, A. (2014). Rockfall detection from terrestrial LiDAR point clouds: A clustering approach using R. Journal of Spatial Information Sciences. Number 8, pp95-110 - Hennig, C. Package fpc: Flexible procedures for clustering. https://cran.r-project.org/web/packages/fpc/index.html, 2015. Accessed 2016-01-12.

  16. 3-D printing provides a novel approach for standardization and reproducibility of freezing devices.

    PubMed

    Hu, E; Childress, William; Tiersch, Terrence R

    2017-06-01

    Cryopreservation has become an important and accepted tool for long-term germplasm conservation of animals and plants. To protect genetic resources, repositories have been developed with national and international cooperation. For a repository to be effective, the genetic material submitted must be of good quality and comparable to other submissions. However, due to a variety of reasons, including constraints in knowledge and available resources, cryopreservation methods for aquatic species vary widely across user groups which reduces reproducibility and weakens quality control. Herein we describe a standardizable freezing device produced using 3-dimensional (3-D) printing and introduce the concept of network sharing to achieve aggregate high-throughput cryopreservation for aquatic species. The objectives were to: 1) adapt widely available polystyrene foam products that would be inexpensive, portable, and provide adequate work space; 2) develop a design suitable for 3-D printing that could provide multiple configurations, be inexpensive, and easy to use, and 3) evaluate various configurations to attain freezing rates suitable for various common cryopreservation containers. Through this approach, identical components can be accessed globally, and we demonstrated that 3-D printers can be used to fabricate parts for standardizable freezing devices yielding relevant and reproducible cooling rates across users. With standardized devices for freezing, methods and samples can harmonize into an aggregated high-throughput pathway not currently available for aquatic species repository development. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. 3-D printing provides a novel approach for standardization and reproducibility of freezing devices

    PubMed Central

    Hu, E; Childress, William; Tiersch, Terrence R.

    2017-01-01

    Cryopreservation has become an important and accepted tool for long-term germplasm conservation of animals and plants. To protect genetic resources, repositories have been developed with national and international cooperation. For a repository to be effective, the genetic material submitted must be of good quality and comparable to other submissions. However, due to a variety of reasons, including constraints in knowledge and available resources, cryopreservation methods for aquatic species vary widely across user groups which reduces reproducibility and weakens quality control. Herein we describe a standardizable freezing device produced using 3-dimensional (3-D) printing and introduce the concept of network sharing to achieve aggregate high-throughput cryopreservation for aquatic species. The objectives were to: 1) adapt widely available polystyrene foam products that would be inexpensive, portable, and provide adequate work space; 2) develop a design suitable for 3-D printing that could provide multiple configurations, be inexpensive, and easy to use, and 3) evaluate various configurations to attain freezing rates suitable for various common cryopreservation containers. Through this approach, identical components can be accessed globally, and we demonstrated that 3-D printers can be used to fabricate parts for standardizable freezing devices yielding relevant and reproducible cooling rates across users. With standardized devices for freezing, methods and samples can harmonize into an aggregated high-throughput pathway not currently available for aquatic species repository development. PMID:28465185

  18. Fast Volumetric Spatial-Spectral MR Imaging of Hyperpolarized 13C-Labeled Compounds using Multiple Echo 3D bSSFP

    PubMed Central

    Perman, William H.; Bhattacharya, Pratip; Leupold, Jochen; Lin, Alexander P.; Harris, Kent C.; Norton, Valerie A.; Hovener, Jan B.; Ross, Brian D.

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE The goal of this work was to develop a fast 3D chemical shift imaging technique for the non-invasive measurement of hyperpolarized 13C-labeled substrates and metabolic products at low concentration. MATERIALS AND METHODS Multiple echo 3D balanced steady state MR imaging (ME-3DbSSFP) was performed in vitro on a syringe containing hyperpolarized [1,3,3-2H3; 1-13C]2-hydroxyethylpropionate (HEP) adjacent to a 13C-enriched acetate phantom, and in vivo on a rat before and after IV injection of hyperpolarized HEP at 1.5 T. Chemical shift images of the hyperpolarized HEP were derived from the multiple echo data by Fourier transformation along the echoes on a voxel by voxel basis for each slice of the 3D data set. RESULTS ME-3DbSSFP imaging was able to provide chemical shift images of hyperpolarized HEP in vivo, and in a rat with isotropic 7 mm spatial resolution, 93 Hz spectral resolution and 16 second temporal resolution for a period greater than 45 seconds. CONCLUSION Multiple echo 3D bSSFP imaging can provide chemical shift images of hyperpolarized 13C-labeled compounds in vivo with relatively high spatial resolution and moderate spectral resolution. The increased signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of this 3D technique will enable the detection of hyperpolarized 13C-labeled metabolites at lower concentrations as compared to a 2D technique. PMID:20171034

  19. An approach to 3D model fusion in GIS systems and its application in a future ECDIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Tao; Zhao, Depeng; Pan, Mingyang

    2016-04-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) computer graphics technology is widely used in various areas and causes profound changes. As an information carrier, 3D models are becoming increasingly important. The use of 3D models greatly helps to improve the cartographic expression and design. 3D models are more visually efficient, quicker and easier to understand and they can express more detailed geographical information. However, it is hard to efficiently and precisely fuse 3D models in local systems. The purpose of this study is to propose an automatic and precise approach to fuse 3D models in geographic information systems (GIS). It is the basic premise for subsequent uses of 3D models in local systems, such as attribute searching, spatial analysis, and so on. The basic steps of our research are: (1) pose adjustment by principal component analysis (PCA); (2) silhouette extraction by simple mesh silhouette extraction and silhouette merger; (3) size adjustment; (4) position matching. Finally, we implement the above methods in our system Automotive Intelligent Chart (AIC) 3D Electronic Chart Display and Information Systems (ECDIS). The fusion approach we propose is a common method and each calculation step is carefully designed. This approach solves the problem of cross-platform model fusion. 3D models can be from any source. They may be stored in the local cache or retrieved from Internet, or may be manually created by different tools or automatically generated by different programs. The system can be any kind of 3D GIS system.

  20. Minimal duality breaking in the Kallen Lehman approach to 3D Ising model: A numerical test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astorino, Marco; Canfora, Fabrizio; Martínez, Cristián; Parisi, Luca

    2008-06-01

    A Kallen-Lehman approach to 3D Ising model is analyzed numerically both at low and high temperatures. It is shown that, even assuming a minimal duality breaking, one can fix three parameters of the model to get a very good agreement with the Monte Carlo results at high temperatures. With the same parameters the agreement is satisfactory both at low and near critical temperatures. How to improve the agreement with Monte Carlo results by introducing a more general duality breaking is shortly discussed.

  1. Computing 3-D steady supersonic flow via a new Lagrangian approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loh, C. Y.; Liou, M.-S.

    1993-01-01

    The new Lagrangian method introduced by Loh and Hui (1990) is extended for 3-D steady supersonic flow computation. Details of the conservation form, the implementation of the local Riemann solver, and the Godunov and the high resolution TVD schemes are presented. The new approach is robust yet accurate, capable of handling complicated geometry and reactions between discontinuous waves. It keeps all the advantages claimed in the 2-D method of Loh and Hui, e.g., crisp resolution for a slip surface (contact discontinuity) and automatic grid generation along the stream.

  2. Computing 3-D steady supersonic flow via a new Lagrangian approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loh, C. Y.; Liou, M.-S.

    1993-01-01

    The new Lagrangian method introduced by Loh and Hui (1990) is extended for 3-D steady supersonic flow computation. Details of the conservation form, the implementation of the local Riemann solver, and the Godunov and the high resolution TVD schemes are presented. The new approach is robust yet accurate, capable of handling complicated geometry and reactions between discontinuous waves. It keeps all the advantages claimed in the 2-D method of Loh and Hui, e.g., crisp resolution for a slip surface (contact discontinuity) and automatic grid generation along the stream.

  3. Controlled Positioning of Cells in Biomaterials—Approaches Towards 3D Tissue Printing

    PubMed Central

    Wüst, Silke; Müller, Ralph; Hofmann, Sandra

    2011-01-01

    Current tissue engineering techniques have various drawbacks: they often incorporate uncontrolled and imprecise scaffold geometries, whereas the current conventional cell seeding techniques result mostly in random cell placement rather than uniform cell distribution. For the successful reconstruction of deficient tissue, new material engineering approaches have to be considered to overcome current limitations. An emerging method to produce complex biological products including cells or extracellular matrices in a controlled manner is a process called bioprinting or biofabrication, which effectively uses principles of rapid prototyping combined with cell-loaded biomaterials, typically hydrogels. 3D tissue printing is an approach to manufacture functional tissue layer-by-layer that could be transplanted in vivo after production. This method is especially advantageous for stem cells since a controlled environment can be created to influence cell growth and differentiation. Using printed tissue for biotechnological and pharmacological needs like in vitro drug-testing may lead to a revolution in the pharmaceutical industry since animal models could be partially replaced by biofabricated tissues mimicking human physiology and pathology. This would not only be a major advancement concerning rising ethical issues but would also have a measureable impact on economical aspects in this industry of today, where animal studies are very labor-intensive and therefore costly. In this review, current controlled material and cell positioning techniques are introduced highlighting approaches towards 3D tissue printing. PMID:24956301

  4. Controlled Positioning of Cells in Biomaterials-Approaches Towards 3D Tissue Printing.

    PubMed

    Wüst, Silke; Müller, Ralph; Hofmann, Sandra

    2011-08-04

    Current tissue engineering techniques have various drawbacks: they often incorporate uncontrolled and imprecise scaffold geometries, whereas the current conventional cell seeding techniques result mostly in random cell placement rather than uniform cell distribution. For the successful reconstruction of deficient tissue, new material engineering approaches have to be considered to overcome current limitations. An emerging method to produce complex biological products including cells or extracellular matrices in a controlled manner is a process called bioprinting or biofabrication, which effectively uses principles of rapid prototyping combined with cell-loaded biomaterials, typically hydrogels. 3D tissue printing is an approach to manufacture functional tissue layer-by-layer that could be transplanted in vivo after production. This method is especially advantageous for stem cells since a controlled environment can be created to influence cell growth and differentiation. Using printed tissue for biotechnological and pharmacological needs like in vitro drug-testing may lead to a revolution in the pharmaceutical industry since animal models could be partially replaced by biofabricated tissues mimicking human physiology and pathology. This would not only be a major advancement concerning rising ethical issues but would also have a measureable impact on economical aspects in this industry of today, where animal studies are very labor-intensive and therefore costly. In this review, current controlled material and cell positioning techniques are introduced highlighting approaches towards 3D tissue printing.

  5. Single-arc volumetric-modulated arc therapy (sVMAT) as adjuvant treatment for gastric cancer: Dosimetric comparisons with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT)

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xin; Li, Guangjun; Zhang, Yingjie; Bai, Sen; Xu, Feng; Wei, Yuquan; Gong, Youling

    2013-01-01

    To compare the dosimetric differences between the single-arc volumetric-modulated arc therapy (sVMAT), 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) techniques in treatment planning for gastric cancer as adjuvant radiotherapy. Twelve patients were retrospectively analyzed. In each patient's case, the parameters were compared based on the dose-volume histogram (DVH) of the sVMAT, 3D-CRT, and IMRT plans, respectively. Three techniques showed similar target dose coverage. The maximum and mean doses of the target were significantly higher in the sVMAT plans than that in 3D-CRT plans and in the 3D-CRT/IMRT plans, respectively, but these differences were clinically acceptable. The IMRT and sVMAT plans successfully achieved better target dose conformity, reduced the V{sub 20/30}, and mean dose of the left kidney, as well as the V{sub 20/30} of the liver, compared with the 3D-CRT plans. And the sVMAT technique reduced the V{sub 20} of the liver much significantly. Although the maximum dose of the spinal cord were much higher in the IMRT and sVMAT plans, respectively (mean 36.4 vs 39.5 and 40.6 Gy), these data were still under the constraints. Not much difference was found in the analysis of the parameters of the right kidney, intestine, and heart. The IMRT and sVMAT plans achieved similar dose distribution to the target, but superior to the 3D-CRT plans, in adjuvant radiotherapy for gastric cancer. The sVMAT technique improved the dose sparings of the left kidney and liver, compared with the 3D-CRT technique, but showed few dosimetric advantages over the IMRT technique. Studies are warranted to evaluate the clinical benefits of the VMAT treatment for patients with gastric cancer after surgery in the future.

  6. Assessment of dry-stone terrace wall degradation with a 3D approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djuma, Hakan; Camera, Corrado; Faka, Marina; Bruggeman, Adriana; Hermon, Sorin

    2016-04-01

    displacements between 3 and 8 cm on 1% of the middle terrace wall. High displacement values (> 8-10 cm) were associated with presence or removal of vegetation and/or data gaps. On the second site, the 3D models indicated that the collapsed terrace had lost a volume of 1.9 m3, which was restored during the communal terrace building event. This digital 3D documentation approach is more economical than laser scanning and it is a promising method for assessment of terrace wall displacement and changes after terrace wall restoration.

  7. Digital breast tomosynthesis: computerized detection of microcalcifications in reconstructed breast volume using a 3D approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Heang-Ping; Sahiner, Berkman; Wei, Jun; Hadjiiski, Lubomir M.; Zhou, Chuan; Helvie, Mark A.

    2010-03-01

    We are developing a computer-aided detection (CAD) system for clustered microcalcifications in digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT). In this preliminary study, we investigated the approach of detecting microcalcifications in the tomosynthesized volume. The DBT volume is first enhanced by 3D multi-scale filtering and analysis of the eigenvalues of Hessian matrices with a calcification response function and signal-to-noise ratio enhancement filtering. Potential signal sites are identified in the enhanced volume and local analysis is performed to further characterize each object. A 3D dynamic clustering procedure is designed to locate potential clusters using hierarchical criteria. We collected a pilot data set of two-view DBT mammograms of 39 breasts containing microcalcification clusters (17 malignant, 22 benign) with IRB approval. A total of 74 clusters were identified by an experienced radiologist in the 78 DBT views. Our prototype CAD system achieved view-based sensitivity of 90% and 80% at an average FP rate of 7.3 and 2.0 clusters per volume, respectively. At the same levels of case-based sensitivity, the FP rates were 3.6 and 1.3 clusters per volume, respectively. For the subset of malignant clusters, the view-based detection sensitivity was 94% and 82% at an average FP rate of 6.0 and 1.5 FP clusters per volume, respectively. At the same levels of case-based sensitivity, the FP rates were 1.2 and 0.9 clusters per volume, respectively. This study demonstrated that computerized microcalcification detection in 3D is a promising approach to the development of a CAD system for DBT. Study is underway to further improve the computer-vision methods and to optimize the processing parameters using a larger data set.

  8. Automated volumetric assessment of the Achilles tendon (AVAT) using a 3D T2 weighted SPACE sequence at 3T in healthy and pathologic cases.

    PubMed

    Syha, R; Würslin, C; Ketelsen, D; Martirosian, P; Grosse, U; Schick, F; Claussen, C D; Springer, F

    2012-07-01

    Achilles tendinopathy has been reported to be frequently associated with increasing volume of the tendon. This work aims at reliable and accurate volumetric quantification of the Achilles tendon using a newly developed contour detection algorithm applied on high resolution MRI data sets recorded at 3T. A total of 26 healthy tendons and 4 degenerated tendons were examined for this study. Automated identification (AI) of tendon boundaries was performed in transverse slices with isotropic resolution (0.8mm) gained with a T2-weighted SPACE sequence at 3T. For AI a snake algorithm was applied and compared to manual tracing (MT). AI was feasible in all examined tendons without further correction. AI of both tendons was performed in each participant within 2 min (2 × 37 slices) compared to MT lasting 20 min. MT and AI showed excellent agreement and correlation (R(2) = 0.99, p<0.0001). AI provided a reduction of measurement error (0.4 cm(3) vs. 0.5 cm(3)) and coefficient of variation (1% vs. 2%). Compared to MT the AI allows assessment of tendon volumes in highly resolved MRI data in a more accurate and reliable time-saving way. Therefore automated volume detection is seen as a helpful clinical tool for evaluation of small volumetric changes of the Achilles tendon. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. First clinical results of adaptive radiotherapy based on 3D portal dosimetry for lung cancer patients with atelectasis treated with volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT).

    PubMed

    Persoon, Lucas C G G; Egelmeer, Ada G T M; Ollers, Michel C; Nijsten, Sebastiaan M J J G; Troost, Esther G C; Verhaegen, Frank

    2013-10-01

    Atelectasis in lung cancer patients can change rapidly during a treatment course, which may displace the tumor/healthy tissues, or change tissue densities locally. This may result in differences between the planned and the actually delivered dose. With complex delivery techniques treatment verification is essential and inter-fractional adaptation may be necessary. We present the first clinical results of treatment adaptation based on an in-house developed three-dimensional (3D) portal dose measurement (PDM) system. A method was developed for 3D PDM combined with cone beam computed tomography (kV-CBCT) imaging. Lung cancer patients are monitored routinely with this imaging technique. During treatment, the first three fractions are analyzed with 3D PDM and weekly thereafter. The reconstructed measured dose is compared to the planned dose using dose-volume histograms and a γ evaluation. Patients having |γ|> 1 in more than 5% of the (primary tumor or organ at risk) volume were subjected to further analysis. In this study we show the PDM dose changes for five patients. We detected relevant dose changes induced by changes in atelectasis in the presented cases. Two patients received two treatment adaptations after being detected with PDM confirmed by visual inspection of the kV-CBCTs, and in two other patients the radiation treatment plan was adapted once. In one case no dose delivery change was detected with PDM. The first clinical patients show that 3D PDM combined with kV-CBCT is a valuable quality assurance tool for detecting anatomical alterations and their dosimetric consequences during the course of radiotherapy. In our clinic, 3D PDM is fully automated for ease and speed of the procedure, and for minimization of human error. The technique is able to flag patients with suspected dose discrepancies for potential adaptation of the treatment plan.

  10. A template-based approach for the analysis of lung nodules in a volumetric CT phantom study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavrielides, Marios A.; Zeng, Rongping; Kinnard, Lisa M.; Myers, Kyle J.; Petrick, Nicholas

    2009-02-01

    Volumetric CT has the potential to improve the quantitative analysis of lung nodule size change compared to currently used one-dimensional measurement practices. Towards that goal, we have been conducting studies using an anthropomorphic phantom to quantify sources of volume measurement error. One source of error is the measurement technique or software tool used to estimate lesion volume. In this manuscript, we present a template-based approach which utilizes the properties of the acquisition and reconstruction system to quantify nodule volume. This approach may reduce the error associated with the volume estimation technique, thereby improving our ability to estimate the error directly associated with CT parameters and nodule characteristics. Our estimation approach consists of: (a) the simulation of the object-to-image transformation of a helical CT system, (b) the creation of a bank of simulated 3D nodule templates of varying sizes, and (c) the 3D matching of synthetic nodules - that were attached to lung vasculature and scanned with a 16-slice MDCT system - to the bank of simulated templates to estimate nodule volume. Results based on 10 repeat scans for different protocols and a root mean square error (RMSE) similarity metric showed a relative bias of 88%, 14%, and 4% for the measurement of 5 mm, 8 mm and 10 mm low density nodules (-630 HU) compared to -3%, -6%, and 8% for nodules of +100HU density. However, the relative bias for the small, low density nodules (5 mm, -630 HU), was significantly reduced to 7% when a penalized RMSE metric was used to enforce a symmetry constraint that reduced the impact of attached vessels. The results are promising for the use of this measurement approach as a low-bias estimator of nodule volume which will allow the systematic quantification and ranking of measurement error in volumetric CT analysis of lung nodules.

  11. Characterization of impact craters in 3D meshes using a feature lines approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jorda, L.; Mari, J.; Viseur, S.; Bouley, S.

    2013-12-01

    Impact craters are observed at the surface of most solar system bodies: terrestrial planets, satellites and asteroids.The measurement of their size-frequency distribution (SFD) is the only method available to estimate the age of the observed geological units, assuming a rate and velocity distributions of impactors and a crater scaling law. The age of the geological units is fundamental to establish a chronology of events explaining the global evolution of the surface. In addition, the detailed characterization of the crater properties (depth-to-diameter ratio and radial profile) yields a better understanding of the geological processes which altered the observed surfaces. Crater detection is usually performed manually directly from the acquired images. However, this method can become prohibitive when dealing with small craters extracted from very large data sets. A large number of solar system objects is being mapped at a very high spatial resolution by space probes since a few decades, emphasizing the need for new automatic methods of crater detection. Powerful computers are now available to produce and analyze huge 3D models of the surface in the form of 3D meshes containing tens to hundreds of billions of facets. This motivates the development of a new family of automatic crater detection algorithms (CDAs). The automatic CDAs developed so far were mainly based on morphological analyses and pattern recognition techniques on 2D images. Since a few years, new CDAs based on 3D models are being developed. Our objective is to develop and test against existing methods an automatic CDA using a new approach based on the discrete differential properties of 3D meshes. The method produces the feature lines (the crest and the ravine lines) lying on the surface. It is based on a double step algorithm: first, the regions of interest are flagged according to curvature properties, and then an original skeletonization approach is applied to extract the feature lines. This new

  12. A Novel Multiparametric Approach to 3D Quantitative MRI of the Brain.

    PubMed

    Palma, Giuseppe; Tedeschi, Enrico; Borrelli, Pasquale; Cocozza, Sirio; Russo, Carmela; Liu, Saifeng; Ye, Yongquan; Comerci, Marco; Alfano, Bruno; Salvatore, Marco; Haacke, E Mark; Mancini, Marcello

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance properties of tissues can be quantified in several respects: relaxation processes, density of imaged nuclei, magnetism of environmental molecules, etc. In this paper, we propose a new comprehensive approach to obtain 3D high resolution quantitative maps of arbitrary body districts, mainly focusing on the brain. The theory presented makes it possible to map longitudinal (R1), pure transverse (R2) and free induction decay ([Formula: see text]) rates, along with proton density (PD) and magnetic susceptibility (χ), from a set of fast acquisition sequences in steady-state that are highly insensitive to flow phenomena. A novel denoising scheme is described and applied to the acquired datasets to enhance the signal to noise ratio of the derived maps and an information theory approach compensates for biases from radio frequency (RF) inhomogeneities, if no direct measure of the RF field is available. Finally, the results obtained on sample brain scans of healthy controls and multiple sclerosis patients are presented and discussed.

  13. Accurate assessment of breast volume: a study comparing the volumetric gold standard (direct water displacement measurement of mastectomy specimen) with a 3D laser scanning technique.

    PubMed

    Yip, Jia Miin; Mouratova, Naila; Jeffery, Rebecca M; Veitch, Daisy E; Woodman, Richard J; Dean, Nicola R

    2012-02-01

    Preoperative assessment of breast volume could contribute significantly to the planning of breast-related procedures. The availability of 3D scanning technology provides us with an innovative method for doing this. We performed this study to compare measurements by this technology with breast volume measurement by water displacement. A total of 30 patients undergoing 39 mastectomies were recruited from our center. The volume of each patient's breast(s) was determined with a preoperative 3D laser scan. The volume of the mastectomy specimen was then measured in the operating theater by water displacement. There was a strong linear association between breast volumes measured using the 2 different methods when using a Pearson correlation (r = 0.95, P < 0.001). The mastectomy mean volume was defined by the equation: mastectomy mean volume = (scan mean volume × 1.03) -70.6. This close correlation validates the Cyberware WBX Scanner as a tool for assessment of breast volume.

  14. 3D inversion based on multi-grid approach of magnetotelluric data from Northern Scandinavia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherevatova, M.; Smirnov, M.; Korja, T. J.; Egbert, G. D.

    2012-12-01

    In this work we investigate the geoelectrical structure of the cratonic margin of Fennoscandian Shield by means of magnetotelluric (MT) measurements carried out in Northern Norway and Sweden during summer 2011-2012. The project Magnetotellurics in the Scandes (MaSca) focuses on the investigation of the crust, upper mantle and lithospheric structure in a transition zone from a stable Precambrian cratonic interior to a passive continental margin beneath the Caledonian Orogen and the Scandes Mountains in western Fennoscandia. Recent MT profiles in the central and southern Scandes indicated a large contrast in resistivity between Caledonides and Precambrian basement. The alum shales as a highly conductive layers between the resistive Precambrian basement and the overlying Caledonian nappes are revealed from this profiles. Additional measurements in the Northern Scandes were required. All together data from 60 synchronous long period (LMT) and about 200 broad band (BMT) sites were acquired. The array stretches from Lofoten and Bodo (Norway) in the west to Kiruna and Skeleftea (Sweden) in the east covering an area of 500x500 square kilometers. LMT sites were occupied for about two months, while most of the BMT sites were measured during one day. We have used new multi-grid approach for 3D electromagnetic (EM) inversion and modelling. Our approach is based on the OcTree discretization where the spatial domain is represented by rectangular cells, each of which might be subdivided (recursively) into eight sub-cells. In this simplified implementation the grid is refined only in the horizontal direction, uniformly in each vertical layer. Using multi-grid we manage to have a high grid resolution near the surface (for instance, to tackle with galvanic distortions) and lower resolution at greater depth as the EM fields decay in the Earth according to the diffusion equation. We also have a benefit in computational costs as number of unknowns decrease. The multi-grid forward

  15. Stratification approach for 3-D euclidean reconstruction of nonrigid objects from uncalibrated image sequences.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guanghui; Wu, Q M Jonathan

    2008-02-01

    This paper addresses the problem of 3-D reconstruction of nonrigid objects from uncalibrated image sequences. Under the assumption of affine camera and that the nonrigid object is composed of a rigid part and a deformation part, we propose a stratification approach to recover the structure of nonrigid objects by first reconstructing the structure in affine space and then upgrading it to the Euclidean space. The novelty and main features of the method lies in several aspects. First, we propose a deformation weight constraint to the problem and prove the invariability between the recovered structure and shape bases under this constraint. The constraint was not observed by previous studies. Second, we propose a constrained power factorization algorithm to recover the deformation structure in affine space. The algorithm overcomes some limitations of a previous singular-value-decomposition-based method. It can even work with missing data in the tracking matrix. Third, we propose to separate the rigid features from the deformation ones in 3-D affine space, which makes the detection more accurate and robust. The stratification matrix is estimated from the rigid features, which may relax the influence of large tracking errors in the deformation part. Extensive experiments on synthetic data and real sequences validate the proposed method and show improvements over existing solutions.

  16. Thin-dielectric-layer engineering for 3D nanostructure integration using an innovative planarization approach.

    PubMed

    Guerfi, Y; Doucet, J B; Larrieu, G

    2015-10-23

    Three-dimensional (3D) nanostructures are emerging as promising building blocks for a large spectrum of applications. One critical issue in integration regards mastering the thin, flat, and chemically stable insulating layer that must be implemented on the nanostructure network in order to build striking nano-architectures. In this letter, we report an innovative method for nanoscale planarization on 3D nanostructures by using hydrogen silesquioxane as a spin-on-glass (SOG) dielectric material. To decouple the thickness of the final layer from the height of the nanostructure, we propose to embed the nanowire network in the insulator layer by exploiting the planarizing properties of the SOG approach. To achieve the desired dielectric thickness, the structure is chemically etched back with a highly diluted solution to control the etch rate precisely. The roughness of the top surface was less than 2 nm. There were no surface defects and the planarity was excellent, even in the vicinity of the nanowires. This newly developed process was used to realize a multilevel stack architecture with sub-deca-nanometer-range layer thickness.

  17. 3D Materials image segmentation by 2D propagation: a graph-cut approach considering homomorphism.

    PubMed

    Waggoner, Jarrell; Zhou, Youjie; Simmons, Jeff; De Graef, Marc; Wang, Song

    2013-12-01

    Segmentation propagation, similar to tracking, is the problem of transferring a segmentation of an image to a neighboring image in a sequence. This problem is of particular importance to materials science, where the accurate segmentation of a series of 2D serial-sectioned images of multiple, contiguous 3D structures has important applications. Such structures may have distinct shape, appearance, and topology, which can be considered to improve segmentation accuracy. For example, some materials images may have structures with a specific shape or appearance in each serial section slice, which only changes minimally from slice to slice, and some materials may exhibit specific inter-structure topology that constrains their neighboring relations. Some of these properties have been individually incorporated to segment specific materials images in prior work. In this paper, we develop a propagation framework for materials image segmentation where each propagation is formulated as an optimal labeling problem that can be efficiently solved using the graph-cut algorithm. Our framework makes three key contributions: 1) a homomorphic propagation approach, which considers the consistency of region adjacency in the propagation; 2) incorporation of shape and appearance consistency in the propagation; and 3) a local non-homomorphism strategy to handle newly appearing and disappearing substructures during this propagation. To show the effectiveness of our framework, we conduct experiments on various 3D materials images, and compare the performance against several existing image segmentation methods.

  18. Efficient convex optimization approach to 3D non-rigid MR-TRUS registration.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yue; Yuan, Jing; Rajchl, Martin; Qiu, Wu; Romagnoli, Cesare; Fenster, Aaron

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we propose an efficient non-rigid MR-TRUS deformable registration method to improve the accuracy of targeting suspicious locations during a 3D ultrasound (US) guided prostate biopsy. The proposed deformable registration approach employs the multi-channel modality independent neighbourhood descriptor (MIND) as the local similarity feature across the two modalities of MR and TRUS, and a novel and efficient duality-based convex optimization based algorithmic scheme is introduced to extract the deformations which align the two MIND descriptors. The registration accuracy was evaluated using 10 patient images by measuring the TRE of manually identified corresponding intrinsic fiducials in the whole gland and peripheral zone, and performance metrics (DSC, MAD and MAXD) for the apex, mid-gland and base of the prostate were also calculated by comparing two manually segmented prostate surfaces in the registered 3D MR and TRUS images. Experimental results show that the proposed method yielded an overall mean TRE of 1.74 mm, which is favorably comparable to a clinical requirement for an error of less than 2.5 mm.

  19. High performance computing approaches for 3D reconstruction of complex biological specimens.

    PubMed

    da Silva, M Laura; Roca-Piera, Javier; Fernández, José-Jesús

    2010-01-01

    Knowledge of the structure of specimens is crucial to determine the role that they play in cellular and molecular biology. To yield the three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction by means of tomographic reconstruction algorithms, we need the use of large projection images and high processing time. Therefore, we propose the use of the high performance computing (HPC) to cope with the huge computational demands of this problem. We have implemented a HPC strategy where the distribution of tasks follows the master-slave paradigm. The master processor distributes a slab of slices, a piece of the final 3D structure to reconstruct, among the slave processors and receives reconstructed slices of the volume. We have evaluated the performance of our HPC approach using different sizes of the slab. We have observed that it is possible to find out an optimal size of the slab for the number of processor used that minimize communications time while maintaining a reasonable grain of parallelism to be exploited by the set of processors.

  20. Thin-dielectric-layer engineering for 3D nanostructure integration using an innovative planarization approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerfi, Y.; Doucet, J. B.; Larrieu, G.

    2015-10-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) nanostructures are emerging as promising building blocks for a large spectrum of applications. One critical issue in integration regards mastering the thin, flat, and chemically stable insulating layer that must be implemented on the nanostructure network in order to build striking nano-architectures. In this letter, we report an innovative method for nanoscale planarization on 3D nanostructures by using hydrogen silesquioxane as a spin-on-glass (SOG) dielectric material. To decouple the thickness of the final layer from the height of the nanostructure, we propose to embed the nanowire network in the insulator layer by exploiting the planarizing properties of the SOG approach. To achieve the desired dielectric thickness, the structure is chemically etched back with a highly diluted solution to control the etch rate precisely. The roughness of the top surface was less than 2 nm. There were no surface defects and the planarity was excellent, even in the vicinity of the nanowires. This newly developed process was used to realize a multilevel stack architecture with sub-deca-nanometer-range layer thickness.

  1. A new 3D texture feature based computer-aided diagnosis approach to differentiate pulmonary nodules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Fangfang; Wang, Huafeng; Song, Bowen; Zhang, Guopeng; Lu, Hongbing; Moore, William; Zhao, Hong; Liang, Zhengrong

    2013-02-01

    To distinguish malignant pulmonary nodules from benign ones is of much importance in computer-aided diagnosis of lung diseases. Compared to many previous methods which are based on shape or growth assessing of nodules, this proposed three-dimensional (3D) texture feature based approach extracted fifty kinds of 3D textural features from gray level, gradient and curvature co-occurrence matrix, and more derivatives of the volume data of the nodules. To evaluate the presented approach, the Lung Image Database Consortium public database was downloaded. Each case of the database contains an annotation file, which indicates the diagnosis results from up to four radiologists. In order to relieve partial-volume effect, interpolation process was carried out to those volume data with image slice thickness more than 1mm, and thus we had categorized the downloaded datasets to five groups to validate the proposed approach, one group of thickness less than 1mm, two types of thickness range from 1mm to 1.25mm and greater than 1.25mm (each type contains two groups, one with interpolation and the other without). Since support vector machine is based on statistical learning theory and aims to learn for predicting future data, so it was chosen as the classifier to perform the differentiation task. The measure on the performance was based on the area under the curve (AUC) of Receiver Operating Characteristics. From 284 nodules (122 malignant and 162 benign ones), the validation experiments reported a mean of 0.9051 and standard deviation of 0.0397 for the AUC value on average over 100 randomizations.

  2. Optimising GPR modelling: A practical, multi-threaded approach to 3D FDTD numerical modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millington, T. M.; Cassidy, N. J.

    2010-09-01

    The demand for advanced interpretational tools has lead to the development of highly sophisticated, computationally demanding, 3D GPR processing and modelling techniques. Many of these methods solve very large problems with stepwise methods that utilise numerically similar functions within iterative computational loops. Problems of this nature are readily parallelised by splitting the computational domain into smaller, independent chunks for direct use on cluster-style, multi-processor supercomputers. Unfortunately, the implications of running such facilities, as well as time investment needed to develop the parallel codes, means that for most researchers, the use of these advanced methods is too impractical. In this paper, we propose an alternative method of parallelisation which exploits the capabilities of the modern multi-core processors (upon which today's desktop PCs are built) by multi-threading the calculation of a problem's individual sub-solutions. To illustrate the approach, we have applied it to an advanced, 3D, finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) GPR modelling tool in which the calculation of the individual vector field components is multi-threaded. To be of practical use, the FDTD scheme must be able to deliver accurate results with short execution times and we, therefore, show that the performance benefits of our approach can deliver runtimes less than half those of the more conventional, serial programming techniques. We evaluate implementations of the technique using different programming languages (e.g., Matlab, Java, C++), which will facilitate the construction of a flexible modelling tool for use in future GPR research. The implementations are compared on a variety of typical hardware platforms, having between one and eight processing cores available, and also a modern Graphical Processing Unit (GPU)-based computer. Our results show that a multi-threaded xyz modelling approach is easy to implement and delivers excellent results when implemented

  3. Volumetric Modulation Arc Radiotherapy With Flattening Filter-Free Beams Compared With Static Gantry IMRT and 3D Conformal Radiotherapy for Advanced Esophageal Cancer: A Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect

    Nicolini, Giorgia; Ghosh-Laskar, Sarbani; Shrivastava, Shyam Kishore; Banerjee, Sushovan; Chaudhary, Suresh; Agarwal, Jai Prakash; Munshi, Anusheel; Clivio, Alessandro; Fogliata, Antonella; Mancosu, Pietro; Vanetti, Eugenio; Cozzi, Luca

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: A feasibility study was performed to evaluate RapidArc (RA), and the potential benefit of flattening filter-free beams, on advanced esophageal cancer against intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT). Methods and Materials: The plans for 3D-CRT and IMRT with three to seven and five to seven fixed beams were compared against double-modulated arcs with avoidance sectors to spare the lungs for 10 patients. All plans were optimized for 6-MV photon beams. The RA plans were studied for conventional and flattening filter-free (FFF) beams. The objectives for the planning target volume were the volume receiving {>=}95% or at most 107% of the prescribed dose of <1% with a dose prescription of 59.4 Gy. For the organs at risk, the lung volume (minus the planning target volume) receiving {>=}5 Gy was <60%, that receiving 20 Gy was <20%-30%, and the mean lung dose was <15.0 Gy. The heart volume receiving 45 Gy was <20%, volume receiving 30 Gy was <50%. The spinal dose received by 1% was <45 Gy. The technical delivery parameters for RA were assessed to compare the normal and FFF beam characteristics. Results: RA and IMRT provided equivalent coverage and homogeneity, slightly superior to 3D-CRT. The conformity index was 1.2 {+-} 0.1 for RA and IMRT and 1.5 {+-} 0.2 for 3D-CRT. The mean lung dose was 12.2 {+-} 4.5 for IMRT, 11.3 {+-} 4.6 for RA, and 10.8 {+-} 4.4 for RA with FFF beams, 18.2 {+-} 8.5 for 3D-CRT. The percentage of volume receiving {>=}20 Gy ranged from 23.6% {+-} 9.1% to 21.1% {+-} 9.7% for IMRT and RA (FFF beams) and 39.2% {+-} 17.0% for 3D-CRT. The heart and spine objectives were met by all techniques. The monitor units for IMRT and RA were 457 {+-} 139, 322 {+-} 20, and 387 {+-} 40, respectively. RA with FFF beams showed, compared with RA with normal beams, a {approx}20% increase in monitor units per Gray, a 90% increase in the average dose rate, and 20% reduction in beam on time (owing to different

  4. A multi-stage 3-D stress field modelling approach exemplified in the Bavarian Molasse Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziegler, Moritz O.; Heidbach, Oliver; Reinecker, John; Przybycin, Anna M.; Scheck-Wenderoth, Magdalena

    2016-09-01

    The knowledge of the contemporary in situ stress state is a key issue for safe and sustainable subsurface engineering. However, information on the orientation and magnitudes of the stress state is limited and often not available for the areas of interest. Therefore 3-D geomechanical-numerical modelling is used to estimate the in situ stress state and the distance of faults from failure for application in subsurface engineering. The main challenge in this approach is to bridge the gap in scale between the widely scattered data used for calibration of the model and the high resolution in the target area required for the application. We present a multi-stage 3-D geomechanical-numerical approach which provides a state-of-the-art model of the stress field for a reservoir-scale area from widely scattered data records. Therefore, we first use a large-scale regional model which is calibrated by available stress data and provides the full 3-D stress tensor at discrete points in the entire model volume. The modelled stress state is used subsequently for the calibration of a smaller-scale model located within the large-scale model in an area without any observed stress data records. We exemplify this approach with two-stages for the area around Munich in the German Molasse Basin. As an example of application, we estimate the scalar values for slip tendency and fracture potential from the model results as measures for the criticality of fault reactivation in the reservoir-scale model. The modelling results show that variations due to uncertainties in the input data are mainly introduced by the uncertain material properties and missing SHmax magnitude estimates needed for a more reliable model calibration. This leads to the conclusion that at this stage the model's reliability depends only on the amount and quality of available stress information rather than on the modelling technique itself or on local details of the model geometry. Any improvements in modelling and increases

  5. 3-D threat image projection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yildiz, Yesna O.; Abraham, Douglas Q.; Agaian, Sos; Panetta, Karen

    2008-02-01

    Automated Explosive Detection Systems utilizing Computed Tomography perform a series X-ray scans of passenger bags being checked in at the airport, and produce various 2-D projection images and 3-D volumetric images of the bag. The determination as to whether the passenger bag contains an explosive and needs to be searched manually is performed through trained Transportation Security Administration screeners following an approved protocol. In order to keep the screeners vigilant with regards to screening quality, the Transportation Security Administration has mandated the use of Threat Image Projection on 2-D projection X-ray screening equipment used at all US airports. These algorithms insert visual artificial threats into images of the normal passenger bags in order to test the screeners with regards to their screening efficiency and their screening quality at determining threats. This technology for 2-D X-ray system is proven and is widespread amongst multiple manufacturers of X-ray projection systems. Until now, Threat Image Projection has been unsuccessful at being introduced into 3-D Automated Explosive Detection Systems for numerous reasons. The failure of these prior attempts are mainly due to imaging queues that the screeners pickup on, and therefore make it easy for the screeners to discern the presence of the threat image and thus defeating the intended purpose. This paper presents a novel approach for 3-D Threat Image Projection for 3-D Automated Explosive Detection Systems. The method presented here is a projection based approach where both the threat object and the bag remain in projection sinogram space. Novel approaches have been developed for projection based object segmentation, projection based streak reduction used for threat object isolation along with scan orientation independence and projection based streak generation for an overall realistic 3-D image. The algorithms are prototyped in MatLab and C++ and demonstrate non discernible 3-D threat

  6. Multiple-scattering approach to the x-ray-absorption spectra of 3d transition metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitamura, Michihide; Muramatsu, Shinji; Sugiura, Chikara

    1986-04-01

    The x-ray-absorption near-edge structure (XANES) has been calculated for the 3d transition metals Cr, Fe, Ni, and Cu from a multiple-scattering approach within the muffin-tin-potential approximation, as a first step to studying the XANES for complicated materials. The muffin-tin potential is constructed via the Mattheiss prescription using the atomic data of Herman and Skillman. It is found that the XANES is sensitive to the potential used and that the calculated XANES spectra reproduce the number of peaks and their separations observed experimentally. The final spectra, including the lifetime-broadening effect, show the general features of each material. We emphasize that the multiple-scattering theory which can be applied to the disordered systems as well as the ordered ones may be promising as a tool to analyze the XANES of complicated materials.

  7. An adaptive learning approach for 3-D surface reconstruction from point clouds.

    PubMed

    Junior, Agostinho de Medeiros Brito; Neto, Adrião Duarte Dória; de Melo, Jorge Dantas; Goncalves, Luiz Marcos Garcia

    2008-06-01

    In this paper, we propose a multiresolution approach for surface reconstruction from clouds of unorganized points representing an object surface in 3-D space. The proposed method uses a set of mesh operators and simple rules for selective mesh refinement, with a strategy based on Kohonen's self-organizing map (SOM). Basically, a self-adaptive scheme is used for iteratively moving vertices of an initial simple mesh in the direction of the set of points, ideally the object boundary. Successive refinement and motion of vertices are applied leading to a more detailed surface, in a multiresolution, iterative scheme. Reconstruction was experimented on with several point sets, including different shapes and sizes. Results show generated meshes very close to object final shapes. We include measures of performance and discuss robustness.

  8. Reliability of MR-Based Volumetric 3-D Analysis of Pelvic Muscles among Subjects with Low Back with Leg Pain and Healthy Volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Skorupska, Elżbieta; Keczmer, Przemysław; Łochowski, Rafał M.; Tomal, Paulina; Rychlik, Michał; Samborski, Włodzimierz

    2016-01-01

    Aim Lately, the diagnostic value of magnetic resonance imaging, Lasègue sign and classic neurological signs have been considered not accurate enough to distinguish the radicular from non-radicular low back with leg pain (LBLP) and a calculation of the symptomatic side muscle volume has been indicated as a probable valuable marker. However, only the multifidus muscle volume has been calculated so far. The main objective of the study was to verify whether LBLP subjects presented symptomatic side pelvic muscle atrophy compared to healthy volunteers. The second aim was to assess the inter-rater reliability of 3-D manual method for segmenting and measuring the volume of the gluteus maximus, gluteus medius, gluteus minimus and piriformis muscles in both LBLP patients and healthy subjects. Method Two independent raters analyzed MR images of LBLP and healthy subjects towards muscle volume of four pelvic muscles, i.e. the piriformis, gluteus minimus, gluteus medius and gluteus maximus. For both sides, the MR images of the muscles without adipose tissue infiltration were manually segmented in 3-D medical images. Results Symptomatic muscle atrophy was confirmed in only over 50% of LBLP subjects (gluteus maximus (p<0.001), gluteus minimus (p<0.01) and piriformis (p<0.05)). The ICC values indicated that the inter-rater reproducibility was greater than 0.90 for all measurements (LBLP and healthy subjects), except for the measurement of the right gluteus medius muscle in LBLP patients, which was equal to 0.848. Conclusion More than 50% of LBLP subjects presented symptomatic gluteus maximus, gluteus minimus and piriformis muscle atrophy. 3-D manual segmentation reliably measured muscle volume in all the measured pelvic muscles in both healthy and LBLP subjects. To answer the question of what kind of muscle atrophy is indicative of radicular or non-radicular pain further studies are required. PMID:27459688

  9. 3D mapping of airway wall thickening in asthma with MSCT: a level set approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fetita, Catalin; Brillet, Pierre-Yves; Hartley, Ruth; Grenier, Philippe A.; Brightling, Christopher

    2014-03-01

    Assessing the airway wall thickness in multi slice computed tomography (MSCT) as image marker for airway disease phenotyping such asthma and COPD is a current trend and challenge for the scientific community working in lung imaging. This paper addresses the same problem from a different point of view: considering the expected wall thickness-to-lumen-radius ratio for a normal subject as known and constant throughout the whole airway tree, the aim is to build up a 3D map of airway wall regions of larger thickness and to define an overall score able to highlight a pathological status. In this respect, the local dimension (caliber) of the previously segmented airway lumen is obtained on each point by exploiting the granulometry morphological operator. A level set function is defined based on this caliber information and on the expected wall thickness ratio, which allows obtaining a good estimate of the airway wall throughout all segmented lumen generations. Next, the vascular (or mediastinal dense tissue) contact regions are automatically detected and excluded from analysis. For the remaining airway wall border points, the real wall thickness is estimated based on the tissue density analysis in the airway radial direction; thick wall points are highlighted on a 3D representation of the airways and several quantification scores are defined. The proposed approach is fully automatic and was evaluated (proof of concept) on a patient selection coming from different databases including mild, severe asthmatics and normal cases. This preliminary evaluation confirms the discriminative power of the proposed approach regarding different phenotypes and is currently extending to larger cohorts.

  10. Comparison between 3D volumetric rendering and multiplanar slices on the reliability of linear measurements on CBCT images: an in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    FERNANDES, Thais Maria Freire; ADAMCZYK, Julie; POLETI, Marcelo Lupion; HENRIQUES, José Fernando Castanha; FRIEDLAND, Bernard; GARIB, Daniela Gamba

    2015-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to determine the accuracy and reliability of two methods of measurements of linear distances (multiplanar 2D and tridimensional reconstruction 3D) obtained from cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) with different voxel sizes. Material and Methods Ten dry human mandibles were scanned at voxel sizes of 0.2 and 0.4 mm. Craniometric anatomical landmarks were identified twice by two independent operators on the multiplanar reconstructed and on volume rendering images that were generated by the software Dolphin®. Subsequently, physical measurements were performed using a digital caliper. Analysis of variance (ANOVA), intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) and Bland-Altman were used for evaluating accuracy and reliability (p<0.05). Results Excellent intraobserver reliability and good to high precision interobserver reliability values were found for linear measurements from CBCT 3D and multiplanar images. Measurements performed on multiplanar reconstructed images were more accurate than measurements in volume rendering compared with the gold standard. No statistically significant difference was found between voxel protocols, independently of the measurement method. Conclusions Linear measurements on multiplanar images of 0.2 and 0.4 voxel are reliable and accurate when compared with direct caliper measurements. Caution should be taken in the volume rendering measurements, because the measurements were reliable, but not accurate for all variables. An increased voxel resolution did not result in greater accuracy of mandible measurements and would potentially provide increased patient radiation exposure. PMID:25004053

  11. FRACTURED RESERVOIR E&P IN ROCKY MOUNTAIN BASINS: A 3-D RTM MODELING APPROACH

    SciTech Connect

    P. Ortoleva; J. Comer; A. Park; D. Payne; W. Sibo; K. Tuncay

    2001-11-26

    Key natural gas reserves in Rocky Mountain and other U.S. basins are in reservoirs with economic producibility due to natural fractures. In this project, we evaluate a unique technology for predicting fractured reservoir location and characteristics ahead of drilling based on a 3-D basin/field simulator, Basin RTM. Recommendations are made for making Basin RTM a key element of a practical E&P strategy. A myriad of reaction, transport, and mechanical (RTM) processes underlie the creation, cementation and preservation of fractured reservoirs. These processes are often so strongly coupled that they cannot be understood individually. Furthermore, sedimentary nonuniformity, overall tectonics and basement heat flux histories make a basin a fundamentally 3-D object. Basin RTM is the only 3-D, comprehensive, fully coupled RTM basin simulator available for the exploration of fractured reservoirs. Results of Basin RTM simulations are presented, that demonstrate its capabilities and limitations. Furthermore, it is shown how Basin RTM is a basis for a revolutionary automated methodology for simultaneously using a range of remote and other basin datasets to locate reservoirs and to assess risk. Characteristics predicted by our model include reserves and composition, matrix and fracture permeability, reservoir rock strength, porosity, in situ stress and the statistics of fracture aperture, length and orientation. Our model integrates its input data (overall sedimentation, tectonic and basement heat flux histories) via the laws of physics and chemistry that describe the RTM processes to predict reservoir location and characteristics. Basin RTM uses 3-D, finite element solutions of the equations of rock mechanics, organic and inorganic diagenesis and multi-phase hydrology to make its predictions. As our model predicts reservoir characteristics, it can be used to optimize production approaches (e.g., assess the stability of horizontal wells or vulnerability of fractures to

  12. Assessment of image quality in real time three-dimensional dobutamine stress echocardiography: an integrated 2D/3D approach.

    PubMed

    Johri, Amer M; Chitty, David W; Hua, Lanqi; Marincheva, Gergana; Picard, Michael H

    2015-03-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) stress echocardiography is a relatively new technique offering the potential to acquire images of the entire left ventricle from 1 or 2 transducer positions in a time-efficient manner. Relative to two-dimensional (2D) imaging, the ability to quickly acquire full volume images during peak stress with 3D echocardiography can eliminate left ventricular (LV) foreshortening while reducing inter-operator variability. Our objectives were to (1) determine the practicality of a novel integrated 2D/3D stress protocol in incorporating 3D imaging into a standard 2D stress echocardiogram and (2) to determine whether the quality of imaging using the novel 2D/3D protocol was sufficient for interpretation. Twenty-five patients referred for stress echocardiography underwent an integrated 2D/3D image acquisition protocol. LV segments were scored from 0 (absent or no clear endocardial visualization) to 3 (excellent/full visualization of endocardial border) with each modality. 2D segment quality scoring was compared with 3D. An integrated score was compared with either 2D or 3D imaging alone. Two-dimensional and 3D imaging were optimal for differing segments and the integrated protocol was superior to either modality alone. 3D imaging was superior in visualizing the anterior and anterolateral region of the base segments, compared to 2D imaging. 3D imaging was less useful for the base, the mid-inferior, and the inferoseptal segments, thus emphasizing the need to retain 2D imaging in stress echocardiography at this time. The integrated 2D/3D protocol approach to stress echocardiography is technically feasible and maximizes image quality of dobutamine stress echocardiography, improving patient assessment. © 2014, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Feature-constrained surface reconstruction approach for point cloud data acquired with 3D laser scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yongbo; Sheng, Yehua; Lu, Guonian; Tian, Peng; Zhang, Kai

    2008-04-01

    Surface reconstruction is an important task in the field of 3d-GIS, computer aided design and computer graphics (CAD & CG), virtual simulation and so on. Based on available incremental surface reconstruction methods, a feature-constrained surface reconstruction approach for point cloud is presented. Firstly features are extracted from point cloud under the rules of curvature extremes and minimum spanning tree. By projecting local sample points to the fitted tangent planes and using extracted features to guide and constrain the process of local triangulation and surface propagation, topological relationship among sample points can be achieved. For the constructed models, a process named consistent normal adjustment and regularization is adopted to adjust normal of each face so that the correct surface model is achieved. Experiments show that the presented approach inherits the convenient implementation and high efficiency of traditional incremental surface reconstruction method, meanwhile, it avoids improper propagation of normal across sharp edges, which means the applicability of incremental surface reconstruction is greatly improved. Above all, appropriate k-neighborhood can help to recognize un-sufficient sampled areas and boundary parts, the presented approach can be used to reconstruct both open and close surfaces without additional interference.

  14. Prostate segmentation: an efficient convex optimization approach with axial symmetry using 3-D TRUS and MR images.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Wu; Yuan, Jing; Ukwatta, Eranga; Sun, Yue; Rajchl, Martin; Fenster, Aaron

    2014-04-01

    We propose a novel global optimization-based approach to segmentation of 3-D prostate transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) and T2 weighted magnetic resonance (MR) images, enforcing inherent axial symmetry of prostate shapes to simultaneously adjust a series of 2-D slice-wise segmentations in a "global" 3-D sense. We show that the introduced challenging combinatorial optimization problem can be solved globally and exactly by means of convex relaxation. In this regard, we propose a novel coherent continuous max-flow model (CCMFM), which derives a new and efficient duality-based algorithm, leading to a GPU-based implementation to achieve high computational speeds. Experiments with 25 3-D TRUS images and 30 3-D T2w MR images from our dataset, and 50 3-D T2w MR images from a public dataset, demonstrate that the proposed approach can segment a 3-D prostate TRUS/MR image within 5-6 s including 4-5 s for initialization, yielding a mean Dice similarity coefficient of 93.2%±2.0% for 3-D TRUS images and 88.5%±3.5% for 3-D MR images. The proposed method also yields relatively low intra- and inter-observer variability introduced by user manual initialization, suggesting a high reproducibility, independent of observers.

  15. Revealing the Functions of Tenascin-C in 3-D Breast Cancer Models Using Cell Biological and in Silico Approaches

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-01

    in 3-D Breast Cancer Models Using Cell Biological and In Silico Approaches PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Agne Tarasevicuite...Functions of Tenascin-C in 3-D Breast Cancer 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Models Using Cell Biological and In Silico Approaches 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH... cancer development and progression, yet its role in this disease remains obscure. To investigate the effects of stromal TN-C on normal human mammary

  16. Domain decomposition approach to extract pore-network models from large 3D porous media images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timofey, Sizonenko; Marina, Karsanina; Irina, Bayuk; Kirill, Gerke

    2017-04-01

    Pore-network are very useful and effective method to model porous media structure and properties such as permeability and multi-phase flow. Several methods for pore-network extraction were proposed to date, including median axis, maximal inscribed ball, watershed techniques and their modifications. Input data for pore-network extraction algorithms usually represent 3D binary image. Modern X-ray tomography devices can easily provide scans with dimensions of 4k x 4k x 10k voxels. For such large images extraction algorithms may hit the problem of memory (RAM) consumption or will too time consuming. To overcome such problems or create parallelizable algorithm here we propose to divide the whole volume into sub-volumes with smaller size and extract pore- network sequentially/in parallel manner separately. However, the problem of correct pore-network extraction at the sub-volume connection areas is challenging. In this contribution we address this issue in detail. We propose a method to merge such sub-volumes. Our method explores the slices of porous medium under study at the sub-volumes intersections. Each slice has its own geometric features and associated with a number of pores or throats. Characteristics of pore that associated with slice such as diameter, distance its center to the sub-domain boundary are also taken into account. Based on the pore element properties and also properties of aforementioned slices the algorithm makes decision about how pores from opposite sides of sub-volumes should be connected. There are 3 cases of merging: 1) building a throat between pores, 2) absorption of one pore by the other, 3) breaking connection (no pore or throat are built). We have tested our approach on several different binary 3D images, including soil, sandstones, and carbonates. We also compared this new approach against a conventional one where the extraction is performed using the whole domain without its decomposition into sub-domains. We show that our approach

  17. A tetrahedral mesh generation approach for 3D marine controlled-source electromagnetic modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Um, Evan Schankee; Kim, Seung-Sep; Fu, Haohuan

    2017-03-01

    3D finite-element (FE) mesh generation is a major hurdle for marine controlled-source electromagnetic (CSEM) modeling. In this paper, we present a FE discretization operator (FEDO) that automatically converts a 3D finite-difference (FD) model into reliable and efficient tetrahedral FE meshes for CSEM modeling. FEDO sets up wireframes of a background seabed model that precisely honors the seafloor topography. The wireframes are then partitioned into multiple regions. Outer regions of the wireframes are discretized with coarse tetrahedral elements whose maximum size is as large as a skin depth of the regions. We demonstrate that such coarse meshes can produce accurate FE solutions because numerical dispersion errors of tetrahedral meshes do not accumulate but oscillates. In contrast, central regions of the wireframes are discretized with fine tetrahedral elements to describe complex geology in detail. The conductivity distribution is mapped from FD to FE meshes in a volume-averaged sense. To avoid excessive mesh refinement around receivers, we introduce an effective receiver size. Major advantages of FEDO are summarized as follow. First, FEDO automatically generates reliable and economic tetrahedral FE meshes without adaptive meshing or interactive CAD workflows. Second, FEDO produces FE meshes that precisely honor the boundaries of the seafloor topography. Third, FEDO derives multiple sets of FE meshes from a given FD model. Each FE mesh is optimized for a different set of sources and receivers and is fed to a subgroup of processors on a parallel computer. This divide and conquer approach improves the parallel scalability of the FE solution. Both accuracy and effectiveness of FEDO are demonstrated with various CSEM examples.

  18. A modern approach to storing of 3D geometry of objects in machine engineering industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolova, E. A.; Aslanov, G. A.; Sokolov, A. A.

    2017-02-01

    3D graphics is a kind of computer graphics which has absorbed a lot from the vector and raster computer graphics. It is used in interior design projects, architectural projects, advertising, while creating educational computer programs, movies, visual images of parts and products in engineering, etc. 3D computer graphics allows one to create 3D scenes along with simulation of light conditions and setting up standpoints.

  19. A goal-oriented adaptive finite-element approach for plane wave 3-D electromagnetic modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Zhengyong; Kalscheuer, Thomas; Greenhalgh, Stewart; Maurer, Hansruedi

    2013-08-01

    We have developed a novel goal-oriented adaptive mesh refinement approach for finite-element methods to model plane wave electromagnetic (EM) fields in 3-D earth models based on the electric field differential equation. To handle complicated models of arbitrary conductivity, magnetic permeability and dielectric permittivity involving curved boundaries and surface topography, we employ an unstructured grid approach. The electric field is approximated by linear curl-conforming shape functions which guarantee the divergence-free condition of the electric field within each tetrahedron and continuity of the tangential component of the electric field across the interior boundaries. Based on the non-zero residuals of the approximated electric field and the yet to be satisfied boundary conditions of continuity of both the normal component of the total current density and the tangential component of the magnetic field strength across the interior interfaces, three a-posterior error estimators are proposed as a means to drive the goal-oriented adaptive refinement procedure. The first a-posterior error estimator relies on a combination of the residual of the electric field, the discontinuity of the normal component of the total current density and the discontinuity of the tangential component of the magnetic field strength across the interior faces shared by tetrahedra. The second a-posterior error estimator is expressed in terms of the discontinuity of the normal component of the total current density (conduction plus displacement current). The discontinuity of the tangential component of the magnetic field forms the third a-posterior error estimator. Analytical solutions for magnetotelluric (MT) and radiomagnetotelluric (RMT) fields impinging on a homogeneous half-space model are used to test the performances of the newly developed goal-oriented algorithms using the above three a-posterior error estimators. A trapezoidal topographical model, using normally incident EM waves

  20. Embedding SAS approach into conjugate gradient algorithms for asymmetric 3D elasticity problems

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Hsin-Chu; Warsi, N.A.; Sameh, A.

    1996-12-31

    In this paper, we present two strategies to embed the SAS (symmetric-and-antisymmetric) scheme into conjugate gradient (CG) algorithms to make solving 3D elasticity problems, with or without global reflexive symmetry, more efficient. The SAS approach is physically a domain decomposition scheme that takes advantage of reflexive symmetry of discretized physical problems, and algebraically a matrix transformation method that exploits special reflexivity properties of the matrix resulting from discretization. In addition to offering large-grain parallelism, which is valuable in a multiprocessing environment, the SAS scheme also has the potential for reducing arithmetic operations in the numerical solution of a reasonably wide class of scientific and engineering problems. This approach can be applied directly to problems that have global reflexive symmetry, yielding smaller and independent subproblems to solve, or indirectly to problems with partial symmetry, resulting in loosely coupled subproblems. The decomposition is achieved by separating the reflexive subspace from the antireflexive one, possessed by a special class of matrices A, A {element_of} C{sup n x n} that satisfy the relation A = PAP where P is a reflection matrix (symmetric signed permutation matrix).

  1. An automatic approach and grip method of micro-particle in 3D space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Juan; Wu, Wenrong; Bi, Lie

    2017-03-01

    Micro-particle is hard to be observed as small scale and hard to be gripped as micro-force from substrate, an automatic approach and grip method of micro-particle in the guide of microscopic vision systems is proposed in the paper to grip micro-particle. First, the micro-gripper driven by electrostatic force is introduced and forces in gripping process are analyzed. Second, a micro-assembly robot composed of two microscopic vision systems is established to monitor micro-operation process and to operate micro-particle. Image features of micro-particle and micro-gripper end-effector are extracted by image feature extraction method to calculate relative position of micro-particle and micro-gripper in image space. Last, a movement control strategy in 3D space based on image Jacobian matrix is studied to control micro-gripper approach and align with micro-particle. Experimental results verified the effectiveness of proposed methods.

  2. Validation of a Parametric Approach for 3d Fortification Modelling: Application to Scale Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacquot, K.; Chevrier, C.; Halin, G.

    2013-02-01

    Parametric modelling approach applied to cultural heritage virtual representation is a field of research explored for years since it can address many limitations of digitising tools. For example, essential historical sources for fortification virtual reconstructions like plans-reliefs have several shortcomings when they are scanned. To overcome those problems, knowledge based-modelling can be used: knowledge models based on the analysis of theoretical literature of a specific domain such as bastioned fortification treatises can be the cornerstone of the creation of a parametric library of fortification components. Implemented in Grasshopper, these components are manually adjusted on the data available (i.e. 3D surveys of plans-reliefs or scanned maps). Most of the fortification area is now modelled and the question of accuracy assessment is raised. A specific method is used to evaluate the accuracy of the parametric components. The results of the assessment process will allow us to validate the parametric approach. The automation of the adjustment process can finally be planned. The virtual model of fortification is part of a larger project aimed at valorising and diffusing a very unique cultural heritage item: the collection of plans-reliefs. As such, knowledge models are precious assets when automation and semantic enhancements will be considered.

  3. An efficient approach to 3D single tree-crown delineation in LiDAR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mongus, Domen; Žalik, Borut

    2015-10-01

    This paper proposes a new method for 3D delineation of single tree-crowns in LiDAR data by exploiting the complementaries of treetop and tree trunk detections. A unified mathematical framework is provided based on the graph theory, allowing for all the segmentations to be achieved using marker-controlled watersheds. Treetops are defined by detecting concave neighbourhoods within the canopy height model using locally fitted surfaces. These serve as markers for watershed segmentation of the canopy layer where possible oversegmentation is reduced by merging the regions based on their heights, areas, and shapes. Additional tree crowns are delineated from mid- and under-storey layers based on tree trunk detection. A new approach for estimating the verticalities of the points' distributions is proposed for this purpose. The watershed segmentation is then applied on a density function within the voxel space, while boundaries of delineated trees from the canopy layer are used to prevent the overspreading of regions. The experiments show an approximately 6% increase in the efficiency of the proposed treetop definition based on locally fitted surfaces in comparison with the traditionally used local maxima of the smoothed canopy height model. In addition, 4% increase in the efficiency is achieved by the proposed tree trunk detection. Although the tree trunk detection alone is dependent on the data density, supplementing it with the treetop detection the proposed approach is efficient even when dealing with low density point-clouds.

  4. Personalized Medicine Approaches in Prostate Cancer Employing Patient Derived 3D Organoids and Humanized Mice

    PubMed Central

    Bartucci, Monica; Ferrari, Anna C.; Kim, Isaac Yi; Ploss, Alexander; Yarmush, Martin; Sabaawy, Hatem E.

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is the most common malignancy and the second most common cause of cancer death in Western men. Despite its prevalence, PCa has proven very difficult to propagate in vitro. PCa represents a complex organ-like multicellular structure maintained by the dynamic interaction of tumoral cells with parenchymal stroma, endothelial and immune cells, and components of the extracellular matrix (ECM). The lack of PCa models that recapitulate this intricate system has hampered progress toward understanding disease progression and lackluster therapeutic responses. Tissue slices, monolayer cultures and genetically engineered mouse models (GEMM) fail to mimic the complexities of the PCa microenvironment or reproduce the diverse mechanisms of therapy resistance. Moreover, patient derived xenografts (PDXs) are expensive, time consuming, difficult to establish for prostate cancer, lack immune cell-tumor regulation, and often tumors undergo selective engraftments. Here, we describe an interdisciplinary approach using primary PCa and tumor initiating cells (TICs), three-dimensional (3D) tissue engineering, genetic and morphometric profiling, and humanized mice to generate patient-derived organoids for examining personalized therapeutic responses in vitro and in mice co-engrafted with a human immune system (HIS), employing adaptive T-cell- and chimeric antigen receptor- (CAR) immunotherapy. The development of patient specific therapies targeting the vulnerabilities of cancer, when combined with antiproliferative and immunotherapy approaches could help to achieve the full transformative power of cancer precision medicine. PMID:27446916

  5. Fully kinetic 3D simulations of the Hermean magnetosphere under realistic conditions: a new approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amaya, Jorge; Gonzalez-Herrero, Diego; Lembège, Bertrand; Lapenta, Giovanni

    2017-04-01

    Simulations of the magnetosphere of planets are usually performed using the MHD and the hybrid approaches. However, these two methods still rely on approximations for the computation of the pressure tensor, and require the neutrality of the plasma at every point of the domain by construction. These approximations undermine the role of electrons on the emergence of plasma features in the magnetosphere of planets. The high mobility of electrons, their characteristic time and space scales, and the lack of perfect neutrality, are the source of many observed phenomena in the magnetospheres, including the turbulence energy cascade, the magnetic reconnection, the particle acceleration in the shock front and the formation of current systems around the magnetosphere. Fully kinetic codes are extremely demanding of computing time, and have been unable to perform simulations of the full magnetosphere at the real scales of a planet with realistic plasma conditions. This is caused by two main reasons: 1) explicit codes must resolve the electron scales limiting the time and space discretisation, and 2) current versions of semi-implicit codes are unstable for cell sizes larger than a few Debye lengths. In this work we present new simulations performed with ECsim, an Energy Conserving semi-implicit method [1], that can overcome these two barriers. We compare the solutions obtained with ECsim with the solutions obtained by the classic semi-implicit code iPic3D [2]. The new simulations with ECsim demand a larger computational effort, but the time and space discretisations are larger than those in iPic3D allowing for a faster simulation time of the full planetary environment. The new code, ECsim, can reach a resolution allowing the capture of significant large scale physics without loosing kinetic electron information, such as wave-electron interaction and non-Maxwellian electron velocity distributions [3]. The code is able to better capture the thickness of the different boundary

  6. Evaluation of Jumping and Creeping Regularization Approaches Applied to 3D Seismic Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, M.; Ramachandran, K.

    2011-12-01

    are evaluated on a synthetic 3-D true model obtained from a large scale experiment. The evaluation is performed for jumping and creeping approaches for various levels of smoothing constraints, and initial models. The final models are compared against the true models to compute residual distance between the models. Horizontal and vertical roughness in the final models are computed and compared with the true model roughness. Correlation between the true and final models is computed to evaluate the similarities of spatial patterns in the models. The study is also used to show that average 1-D models derived from the final models are very close, indicating that this will be an optimal approach to construct 1-D starting models.

  7. LayTracks3D: A new approach for meshing general solids using medial axis transform

    SciTech Connect

    Quadros, William Roshan

    2015-08-22

    This study presents an extension of the all-quad meshing algorithm called LayTracks to generate high quality hex-dominant meshes of general solids. LayTracks3D uses the mapping between the Medial Axis (MA) and the boundary of the 3D domain to decompose complex 3D domains into simpler domains called Tracks. Tracks in 3D have no branches and are symmetric, non-intersecting, orthogonal to the boundary, and the shortest path from the MA to the boundary. These properties of tracks result in desired meshes with near cube shape elements at the boundary, structured mesh along the boundary normal with any irregular nodes restricted to the MA, and sharp boundary feature preservation. The algorithm has been tested on a few industrial CAD models and hex-dominant meshes are shown in the Results section. Work is underway to extend LayTracks3D to generate all-hex meshes.

  8. A View to the Future: A Novel Approach for 3D-3D Superimposition and Quantification of Differences for Identification from Next-Generation Video Surveillance Systems.

    PubMed

    Gibelli, Daniele; De Angelis, Danilo; Poppa, Pasquale; Sforza, Chiarella; Cattaneo, Cristina

    2017-03-01

    Techniques of 2D-3D superimposition are widely used in cases of personal identification from video surveillance systems. However, the progressive improvement of 3D image acquisition technology will enable operators to perform also 3D-3D facial superimposition. This study aims at analyzing the possible applications of 3D-3D superimposition to personal identification, although from a theoretical point of view. Twenty subjects underwent a facial 3D scan by stereophotogrammetry twice at different time periods. Scans were superimposed two by two according to nine landmarks, and root-mean-square (RMS) value of point-to-point distances was calculated. When the two superimposed models belonged to the same individual, RMS value was 2.10 mm, while it was 4.47 mm in mismatches with a statistically significant difference (p < 0.0001). This experiment shows the potential of 3D-3D superimposition: Further studies are needed to ascertain technical limits which may occur in practice and to improve methods useful in the forensic practice. © 2016 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  9. The modular approach enables a fully ab initio simulation of the contacts between 3D and 2D materials.

    PubMed

    Fediai, Artem; Ryndyk, Dmitry A; Cuniberti, Gianaurelio

    2016-10-05

    Up to now, the electrical properties of the contacts between 3D metals and 2D materials have never been computed at a fully ab initio level due to the huge number of atomic orbitals involved in a current path from an electrode to a pristine 2D material. As a result, there are still numerous open questions and controversial theories on the electrical properties of systems with 3D/2D interfaces-for example, the current path and the contact length scalability. Our work provides a first-principles solution to this long-standing problem with the use of the modular approach, a method which rigorously combines a Green function formalism with the density functional theory (DFT) for this particular contact type. The modular approach is a general approach valid for any 3D/2D contact. As an example, we apply it to the most investigated among 3D/2D contacts-metal/graphene contacts-and show its abilities and consistency by comparison with existing experimental data. As it is applicable to any 3D/2D interface, the modular approach allows the engineering of 3D/2D contacts with the pre-defined electrical properties.

  10. Quantitative Image Feature Engine (QIFE): an Open-Source, Modular Engine for 3D Quantitative Feature Extraction from Volumetric Medical Images.

    PubMed

    Echegaray, Sebastian; Bakr, Shaimaa; Rubin, Daniel L; Napel, Sandy

    2017-10-06

    The aim of this study was to develop an open-source, modular, locally run or server-based system for 3D radiomics feature computation that can be used on any computer system and included in existing workflows for understanding associations and building predictive models between image features and clinical data, such as survival. The QIFE exploits various levels of parallelization for use on multiprocessor systems. It consists of a managing framework and four stages: input, pre-processing, feature computation, and output. Each stage contains one or more swappable components, allowing run-time customization. We benchmarked the engine using various levels of parallelization on a cohort of CT scans presenting 108 lung tumors. Two versions of the QIFE have been released: (1) the open-source MATLAB code posted to Github, (2) a compiled version loaded in a Docker container, posted to DockerHub, which can be easily deployed on any computer. The QIFE processed 108 objects (tumors) in 2:12 (h/mm) using 1 core, and 1:04 (h/mm) hours using four cores with object-level parallelization. We developed the Quantitative Image Feature Engine (QIFE), an open-source feature-extraction framework that focuses on modularity, standards, parallelism, provenance, and integration. Researchers can easily integrate it with their existing segmentation and imaging workflows by creating input and output components that implement their existing interfaces. Computational efficiency can be improved by parallelizing execution at the cost of memory usage. Different parallelization levels provide different trade-offs, and the optimal setting will depend on the size and composition of the dataset to be processed.

  11. Soft computing approach to 3D lung nodule segmentation in CT.

    PubMed

    Badura, P; Pietka, E

    2014-10-01

    This paper presents a novel, multilevel approach to the segmentation of various types of pulmonary nodules in computed tomography studies. It is based on two branches of computational intelligence: the fuzzy connectedness (FC) and the evolutionary computation. First, the image and auxiliary data are prepared for the 3D FC analysis during the first stage of an algorithm - the masks generation. Its main goal is to process some specific types of nodules connected to the pleura or vessels. It consists of some basic image processing operations as well as dedicated routines for the specific cases of nodules. The evolutionary computation is performed on the image and seed points in order to shorten the FC analysis and improve its accuracy. After the FC application, the remaining vessels are removed during the postprocessing stage. The method has been validated using the first dataset of studies acquired and described by the Lung Image Database Consortium (LIDC) and by its latest release - the LIDC-IDRI (Image Database Resource Initiative) database.

  12. Accelerating screening of 3D protein data with a graph theoretical approach.

    PubMed

    Frömmel, Cornelius; Gille, Christoph; Goede, Andrean; Gröpl, Clemens; Hougardy, Stefan; Nierhoff, Till; Preissner, Robert; Thimm, Martin

    2003-12-12

    The Dictionary of Interfaces in Proteins (DIP) is a database collecting the 3D structure of interacting parts of proteins that are called patches. It serves as a repository, in which patches similar to given query patches can be found. The computation of the similarity of two patches is time consuming and traversing the entire DIP requires some hours. In this work we address the question of how the patches similar to a given query can be identified by scanning only a small part of DIP. The answer to this question requires the investigation of the distribution of the similarity of patches. The score values describing the similarity of two patches can roughly be divided into three ranges that correspond to different levels of spatial similarity. Interestingly, the two iso-score lines separating the three classes can be determined by two different approaches. Applying a concept of the theory of random graphs reveals significant structural properties of the data in DIP. These can be used to accelerate scanning the DIP for patches similar to a given query. Searches for very similar patches could be accelerated by a factor of more than 25. Patches with a medium similarity could be found 10 times faster than by brute-force search.

  13. Monitoring strategies at phreatic wellfields: a 3D travel time approach.

    PubMed

    Broers, Hans Peter; van Geer, Frans C

    2005-01-01

    Ground water quality networks for monitoring phreatic drinking water wellfields are generally established for two main purposes: (1) the short-term safeguarding of public water supply and (2) signaling and predicting future quality changes in the extracted ground water. Six monitoring configurations with different well locations and different screen depths and lengths were evaluated using a numerical model of the 3D ground water flow toward a partially penetrating pumping well in a phreatic aquifer. Travel times and breakthrough curves for observation and pumping wells were used to judge the effectiveness of different design configurations for three monitoring objectives: (1) early warning; (2) prediction of future quality changes; and (3) evaluation of protection measures inside a protection zone. Effectiveness was tested for scenarios with advective transport, first-order degradation, and linear sorption. It is shown that the location and especially the depth of the observation wells should be carefully chosen, taking into account the residence time from the surface to the observation well, the residual transit times to the extraction well, and the transformation and retardation rates. Shallow monitoring was most functional for a variety of objectives and conditions. The larger the degradation rates or retardation, the shallower should the monitoring be for effective early warning and prediction of future ground water quality. The general approach followed in the current study is applicable for many geohydrological situations, tuning specific monitoring objectives with residence times and residual transit times obtained from a site-specific ground water flow model.

  14. Efficient global wave propagation adapted to 3-D structural complexity: a pseudospectral/spectral-element approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leng, Kuangdai; Nissen-Meyer, Tarje; van Driel, Martin

    2016-12-01

    We present a new, computationally efficient numerical method to simulate global seismic wave propagation in realistic 3-D Earth models. We characterize the azimuthal dependence of 3-D wavefields in terms of Fourier series, such that the 3-D equations of motion reduce to an algebraic system of coupled 2-D meridian equations, which is then solved by a 2-D spectral element method (SEM). Computational efficiency of such a hybrid method stems from lateral smoothness of 3-D Earth models and axial singularity of seismic point sources, which jointly confine the Fourier modes of wavefields to a few lower orders. We show novel benchmarks for global wave solutions in 3-D structures between our method and an independent, fully discretized 3-D SEM with remarkable agreement. Performance comparisons are carried out on three state-of-the-art tomography models, with seismic period ranging from 34 s down to 11 s. It turns out that our method has run up to two orders of magnitude faster than the 3-D SEM, featured by a computational advantage expanding with seismic frequency.

  15. 3D resolution tests of two-plane wave approach using synthetic seismograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceylan, S.; Larmat, C. S.; Sandvol, E. A.

    2012-12-01

    Two-plane wave tomography (TPWT) is becoming a standard approach to obtain fundamental mode Rayleigh wave phase velocities for a variety of tectonic settings. A recent study by Ceylan et al. (2012) has applied this method to eastern Tibet, using data from INDEPTH-IV and Namche-Barwa seismic experiments. The TPWT assumes that distortion of wavefronts at each station can be expressed as the sum of two plane waves. However, there is currently no robust or complete resolution test for TPWT, to address its limitations such as wavefront healing. In this study, we test the capabilities of TPWT and resolution of INDEPTH-IV seismic experiment, by performing 3D resolution tests using synthetic seismograms. Utilizing SPECFEM3D software, we compute synthetic data sets resolving periods down to ~30 s. We implement a checkerboard upper mantle (for depths between 50 and 650 km) with variable cell sizes, superimposed to PREM as the background model. We then calculate fundamental mode surface wave phase velocities using TPWT for periods between 33-143 seconds, using synthetic seismograms computed from our three dimensional hypothetical model. Assuming a constant Poisson's ratio, we use partial derivatives from Saito (1988) to invert for shear wave velocities. We show that the combination of TPWT and Saito (1988) methods is capable of retrieving anomalies down to depths of ~200 km for Rayleigh waves. Below these depths, we observe evidence of both lateral and vertical smearing. We also find that the traditional method for estimating the resolution of TPWT consistently overestimates phase velocity resolutions. Love waves exhibit adequate resolution down to depths of ~100 km. At depths greater than 100 km, smearing is more evident in SH wave results than those of SV waves. Increased smearing of SH waves is most probably due to propagation characteristics and shallower sensitivity of Love waves. Our results imply that TPWT can be applied to Love waves, making future investigations of

  16. 3D dentofacial photogrammetry reference values: a novel approach to orthodontic diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Masoud, Mohamed I; Bansal, Neetu; C Castillo, Jose; Manosudprasit, Amornrut; Allareddy, Veerasathpurush; Haghi, Arshan; Hawkins, Hannah C; Otárola-Castillo, Erik

    2017-04-01

    Orthodontic diagnostic standards generally use the cranial base as a reference and rely on samples selected by orthodontists. The purpose of this study was to provide male and female standards for a novel non-radiographic approach for orthodontic diagnosis that utilizes 3D dentofacial photogrammetry using the eyes and natural head orientation as references instead of the cranial base. One hundred and eighty females and 200 males between the ages of 18 and 35 years from 2 modeling agencies were orthodontically screened for near ideal occlusion. Subjects that met the inclusion criteria were rated by a sample of 40 lay people for attractiveness on a visual analogue scale. The final sample that had 3D facial and dental imaging included 49 subjects 25 males and 24 females with near ideal occlusion and considered attractive by the public. Inter and Intra-examiner ICC were greater than 0.8 for both landmarking and indexing. Relative to a coronal plane contacting the pupils (MC), the mean sagittal position of the alar curvature (representing the nasomaxillary complex) was 14.36 ± 3.08 mm in males and 12.4 ± 3.58 mm in females. The sagittal position of soft tissue pogonion relative to the pupils was 14.84 ± 3.63 mm in males and 12.78 ± 5.68 mm in females. The angle between the alar curvature and pogonion relative to the pupils was 9° in males and 10° in females. With the exception of the occlusal plane which was steeper in females, no ratios or angular facial measurements showed a significant gender difference. Relative to MC, males had more proclined upper incisors (20° vs 16°) and more retroclined Lower incisors (27° vs 31°; P > 0.05). A Procrustes ANOVA and permutation test showed that the shapes of males and females are different enough to be considered two distinct populations. 1. When using the proposed method for orthodontic diagnosis, male and female patients should be compared to their respective dentofacial standards. 2. Validation of the proposed method

  17. An economic approach that links volumetric estimates of resources with cost and price information

    SciTech Connect

    Nesbitt, D.M. )

    1993-01-01

    For many years, organizations such as the US Geological Survey have assembled volumetric estimates of gas and oil in place. It is legitimate for people in industry to ask: [open quotes]What do such estimates mean to me What do they mean to my business What do they mean for commodity prices [close quotes] In a world of ideal, efficient markets, such estimates would have little relevance; the best use of one's time would be to merely survey the various markets. In reality, markets are not completely efficient, and methods other than market observations are required. Volumetric estimates can contribute to better decisionmaking if they can be associated with cost and price information and if their implications in the market can thereby be determined. Until the generalized equilibrium approach, volumetric information has never been linked with the market. It has never entered the decision process of private companies the United States, Canada, or the rest of the world. With the approach outlined, the US Geological Survey volumetric estimates can be used to support such decisionmaking and lead to better industry profits, more enlightened regulation and Government administration, and more efficient use of resources. 66 refs., 28 figs.

  18. New Approaches in Renal Microscopy: Volumetric Imaging and Super-resolution Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Alfred H.J.; Suleiman, Hani; Shaw, Andrey S.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review Histologic and electron microscopic analysis of the kidney has provided tremendous insight into structures such as the glomerulus and nephron. Recent advances in imaging, such as deep volumetric approaches and super-resolution microscopy, have the capacity to dramatically enhance our current understanding of the structure and function of the kidney. Volumetric imaging can generate images millimeters below the surface of the intact kidney. Super-resolution microscopy breaks the diffraction barrier inherent in traditional light microscopy, enabling for the visualization of fine structures. Here, we describe new approaches to deep volumetric and super-resolution microscopy of the kidney. Recent findings Rapid advances in lasers, microscopic objectives, and tissue preparation have transformed our ability to deep volumetric image the kidney. Innovations in sample preparation have allowed for super-resolution imaging with electron microscopy correlation, providing unprecedented insight into the structures within the glomerulus. Summary Technological advances in imaging have revolutionized our capacity to image both large volumes of tissue and the finest structural details of a cell. These new advances have the potential to provide additional profound observations into the normal and pathologic functions of the kidney. PMID:27023834

  19. A new bioinformatic approach to detect common 3D sites in protein structures.

    PubMed

    Jambon, Martin; Imberty, Anne; Deléage, Gilbert; Geourjon, Christophe

    2003-08-01

    An innovative bioinformatic method has been designed and implemented to detect similar three-dimensional (3D) sites in proteins. This approach allows the comparison of protein structures or substructures and detects local spatial similarities: this method is completely independent from the amino acid sequence and from the backbone structure. In contrast to already existing tools, the basis for this method is a representation of the protein structure by a set of stereochemical groups that are defined independently from the notion of amino acid. An efficient heuristic for finding similarities that uses graphs of triangles of chemical groups to represent the protein structures has been developed. The implementation of this heuristic constitutes a software named SuMo (Surfing the Molecules), which allows the dynamic definition of chemical groups, the selection of sites in the proteins, and the management and screening of databases. To show the relevance of this approach, we focused on two extreme examples illustrating convergent and divergent evolution. In two unrelated serine proteases, SuMo detects one common site, which corresponds to the catalytic triad. In the legume lectins family composed of >100 structures that share similar sequences and folds but may have lost their ability to bind a carbohydrate molecule, SuMo discriminates between functional and non-functional lectins with a selectivity of 96%. The time needed for searching a given site in a protein structure is typically 0.1 s on a PIII 800MHz/Linux computer; thus, in further studies, SuMo will be used to screen the PDB. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  20. A 2D range Hausdorff approach to 3D facial recognition.

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, Mark William; Russ, Trina Denise; Little, Charles Quentin

    2004-11-01

    This paper presents a 3D facial recognition algorithm based on the Hausdorff distance metric. The standard 3D formulation of the Hausdorff matching algorithm has been modified to operate on a 2D range image, enabling a reduction in computation from O(N2) to O(N) without large storage requirements. The Hausdorff distance is known for its robustness to data outliers and inconsistent data between two data sets, making it a suitable choice for dealing with the inherent problems in many 3D datasets due to sensor noise and object self-occlusion. For optimal performance, the algorithm assumes a good initial alignment between probe and template datasets. However, to minimize the error between two faces, the alignment can be iteratively refined. Results from the algorithm are presented using 3D face images from the Face Recognition Grand Challenge database version 1.0.

  1. A 2D range Hausdorff approach for 3D face recognition.

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, Mark William; Russ, Trina Denise; Little, Charles Quentin

    2005-04-01

    This paper presents a 3D facial recognition algorithm based on the Hausdorff distance metric. The standard 3D formulation of the Hausdorff matching algorithm has been modified to operate on a 2D range image, enabling a reduction in computation from O(N2) to O(N) without large storage requirements. The Hausdorff distance is known for its robustness to data outliers and inconsistent data between two data sets, making it a suitable choice for dealing with the inherent problems in many 3D datasets due to sensor noise and object self-occlusion. For optimal performance, the algorithm assumes a good initial alignment between probe and template datasets. However, to minimize the error between two faces, the alignment can be iteratively refined. Results from the algorithm are presented using 3D face images from the Face Recognition Grand Challenge database version 1.0.

  2. Automatic left-atrial segmentation from cardiac 3D ultrasound: a dual-chamber model-based approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almeida, Nuno; Sarvari, Sebastian I.; Orderud, Fredrik; Gérard, Olivier; D'hooge, Jan; Samset, Eigil

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we present an automatic solution for segmentation and quantification of the left atrium (LA) from 3D cardiac ultrasound. A model-based framework is applied, making use of (deformable) active surfaces to model the endocardial surfaces of cardiac chambers, allowing incorporation of a priori anatomical information in a simple fashion. A dual-chamber model (LA and left ventricle) is used to detect and track the atrio-ventricular (AV) plane, without any user input. Both chambers are represented by parametric surfaces and a Kalman filter is used to fit the model to the position of the endocardial walls detected in the image, providing accurate detection and tracking during the whole cardiac cycle. This framework was tested in 20 transthoracic cardiac ultrasound volumetric recordings of healthy volunteers, and evaluated using manual traces of a clinical expert as a reference. The 3D meshes obtained with the automatic method were close to the reference contours at all cardiac phases (mean distance of 0.03+/-0.6 mm). The AV plane was detected with an accuracy of -0.6+/-1.0 mm. The LA volumes assessed automatically were also in agreement with the reference (mean +/-1.96 SD): 0.4+/-5.3 ml, 2.1+/-12.6 ml, and 1.5+/-7.8 ml at end-diastolic, end-systolic and pre-atrial-contraction frames, respectively. This study shows that the proposed method can be used for automatic volumetric assessment of the LA, considerably reducing the analysis time and effort when compared to manual analysis.

  3. Variational approach to reconstruct surface from sparse and nonparallel contours in freehand 3D ultrasound imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Shuangcheng; Jiang, Lipei; Cao, Yingyu; Zhang, Junwen; Zheng, Haiyang

    2012-01-01

    The 3D reconstruction for freehand 3D ultrasound is a challenging issue because the recorded B-scans are not only sparse, but also non-parallel (actually they may intersect each other). Conventional volume reconstruction methods can't reconstruct sparse data efficiently while not introducing geometrical artifacts, and conventional surface reconstruction methods can't reconstruct surfaces from contours that are arbitrarily oriented in 3D space. We developed a new surface reconstruction method for freehand 3D ultrasound. It is based on variational implicit function which is presented by Greg Turk for shape transformation. In the new method, we first constructed on- & off-surface constraints from the segmented contours of all recorded B-scans, then used a variational interpolation technique to get a single implicit function in 3D. Finally, the implicit function was evaluated to extract the zero-valued surface as reconstruction result. Two experiment was conducted to assess our variational surface reconstruction method, and the experiment results have shown that the new method is capable of reconstructing surface smoothly from sparse contours which can be arbitrarily oriented in 3D space.

  4. A fast 3D region growing approach for CT angiography applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Zhen; Lin, Zhongmin; Lu, Cheng-chang

    2004-05-01

    Region growing is one of the most popular methods for low-level image segmentation. Many researches on region growing have focused on the definition of the homogeneity criterion or growing and merging criterion. However, one disadvantage of conventional region growing is redundancy. It requires a large memory usage, and the computation-efficiency is very low especially for 3D images. To overcome this problem, a non-recursive single-pass 3D region growing algorithm named SymRG is implemented and successfully applied to 3D CT angiography (CTA) applications for vessel segmentation and bone removal. The method consists of three steps: segmenting one-dimensional regions of each row; doing region merging to adjacent rows to obtain the region segmentation of each slice; and doing region merging to adjacent slices to obtain the final region segmentation of 3D images. To improve the segmentation speed for very large volume 3D CTA images, this algorithm is applied repeatedly to newly updated local cubes. The next new cube can be estimated by checking isolated segmented regions on all 6 faces of the current local cube. This local non-recursive 3D region-growing algorithm is memory-efficient and computation-efficient. Clinical testings of this algorithm on Brain CTA show this technique could effectively remove whole skull, most of the bones on the skull base, and reveal the cerebral vascular structures clearly.

  5. Machine learning and synthetic aperture refocusing approach for more accurate masking of fish bodies in 3D PIV data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, Logan; Bajpayee, Abhishek; Techet, Alexandra

    2015-11-01

    3D particle image velocimetry (PIV) is becoming a popular technique to study biological flows. PIV images that contain fish or other animals around which flow is being studied, need to be appropriately masked in order to remove the animal body from the 3D reconstructed volumes prior to calculating particle displacement vectors. Presented here is a machine learning and synthetic aperture (SA) refocusing based approach for more accurate masking of fish from reconstructed intensity fields for 3D PIV purposes. Using prior knowledge about the 3D shape and appearance of the fish along with SA refocused images at arbitrarily oriented focal planes, the location and orientation of a fish in a reconstructed volume can be accurately determined. Once the location and orientation of a fish in a volume is determined, it can be masked out.

  6. A computational approach to modelling magma ocean evolution in 2-D and 3-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tackley, Paul; Lourenco, Diogo; Fomin, Ilya

    2017-04-01

    Models of magma ocean evolution have typically been performed in 1-D (e.g. Abe, PEPI 1997; Solomatov and Stevenson, JGR 1993; Elkins-Tanton EPSL 2008). However, 1-D models may miss important aspects of the process, in particular the possible development of solid-state convection before the magma ocean has completely crystallised, and possible large-scale overturn driven by thermal and/or compositional gradients. On the other hand, fully resolving magma ocean evolution in 2-D or 3-D would be extremely challenging due to the small time-scales and length-scales associated with turbulent convection in the magma and the extreme viscosity contrast between regions of high melt fraction and regions of low melt fraction, which are separated by a rheological threshold associated with the solid forming an interconnected matrix. Here, an intermediate approach to treat these has been implemented within the framework of the mantle convection code StagYY (Tackley, PEPI 2008). The basic approach is to resolve processes that occur in the mostly solid state (i.e. below the rheological threshold) while parameterising processes that occur in the mostly liquid state, based largely on the works of Y. Abe. Thus, turbulent convection in magma-rich regions is treated using an effective thermal conductivity based on mixing-length theory, and segregation of solid and liquid is treated using Darcy's law for low melt fractions or crystal settling (offset by vigorous convection) for high melt fractions. At the outer surface a combined radiative-conductive heat balance is implemented, including the temperature drop over a very thin ( cm) thermal boundary layer and reduction of radiative heat loss by an atmosphere. Key to the whole process is petrology: the coexisting compositions of magma and solid under various conditions including possible fractionation, and for this different approaches have been parameterised ranging from a simple basalt-harzburgite parameterisation to a bi-eutectic lower

  7. Tracking of cracks in bridges using GPR: a 3D approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benedetto, A.

    2012-04-01

    Corrosion associated with reinforcing bars is the most significant contributor to bridge deficiencies. The corrosion is usually caused by moisture and chloride ion exposure. In particular, corrosion products FeO, Fe2O3, Fe3O4 and other oxides along reinforcement bars. The reinforcing bars are attacked by corrosion and yield expansive corrosion products. These oxidation products occupy a larger volume than the original intact steel and internal expansive stresses lead to cracking and debonding. There are some conventional inspection methods for detection of reinforcing bar corrosion but they can be invasive and destructive, often laborious, lane closures is required and it is difficult or unreliable any quantification of corrosion. For these reasons, bridge engineers are always more preferring to use the Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) technique. In this work a novel numerical approach for three dimensional tracking and mapping of cracks in the bridge is proposed. The work starts from some interesting results based on the use of the 3D imaging technique in order to improve the potentiality of GPR to detect voids, cracks or buried object. The numerical approach has been tested on data acquired on some bridges using a pulse GPR system specifically designed for bridge deck and pavement inspection that is called RIS Hi Bright. The equipment integrates two arrays of Ultra Wide Band ground coupled antennas, having a main working frequency of 2 GHz. The two arrays within the RIS Hi Bright are using antennas arranged with different polarization. One array includes sensors with parallel polarization with respect to the scanning direction (VV array), the other has sensors in orthogonal polarization (HH array). Overall the system collects 16 profiles within a single scan (8 HH + 8 VV). The cracks, associated often to moisture increasing and higher values of the dielectric constant, produce a not negligible increasing of the signal amplitude. Following this, the algorithm

  8. TOBAGO — a semi-automated approach for the generation of 3-D building models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruen, Armin

    3-D city models are in increasing demand for a great number of applications. Photogrammetry is a relevant technology that can provide an abundance of geometric, topologic and semantic information concerning these models. The pressure to generate a large amount of data with high degree of accuracy and completeness poses a great challenge to phtogrammetry. The development of automated and semi-automated methods for the generation of those data sets is therefore a key issue in photogrammetric research. We present in this article a strategy and methodology for an efficient generation of even fairly complex building models. Within this concept we request the operator to measure the house roofs from a stereomodel in form of an unstructured point cloud. According to our experience this can be done very quickly. Even a non-experienced operator can measure several hundred roofs or roof units per day. In a second step we fit generic building models fully automatically to these point clouds. The structure information is inherently included in these building models. In such a way geometric, topologic and even semantic data can be handed over to a CAD-system, in our case AutoCad, for further visualization and manipulation. The structuring is achieved in three steps. In a first step a classifier is initiated which recognizes the class of houses a particular roof point cloud belongs to. This recognition step is primarily based on the analysis of the number of ridge points. In the second and third steps the concrete topological relations between roof points are investigated and generic building models are fitted to the point clouds. Based on the technique of constraint-based reasoning two geometrical parsers are solving this problem. We have tested the methodology under a variety of different conditions in several pilot projects. The results will indicate the good performance of our approach. In addition we will demonstrate how the results can be used for visualization (texture

  9. Evolution, Interaction, and Intrinsic Properties of Dislocations in Intermetallics: Anisotropic 3D Dislocation Dynamics Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Qian

    2008-01-01

    The generation, motion, and interaction of dislocations play key roles during the plastic deformation process of crystalline solids. 3D Dislocation Dynamics has been employed as a mesoscale simulation algorithm to investigate the collective and cooperative behavior of dislocations. Most current research on 3D Dislocation Dynamics is based on the solutions available in the framework of classical isotropic elasticity. However, due to some degree of elastic anisotropy in almost all crystalline solids, it is very necessary to extend 3D Dislocation Dynamics into anisotropic elasticity. In this study, first, the details of efficient and accurate incorporation of the fully anisotropic elasticity into 3D discrete Dislocation Dynamics by numerically evaluating the derivatives of Green's functions are described. Then the intrinsic properties of perfect dislocations, including their stability, their core properties and disassociation characteristics, in newly discovered rare earth-based intermetallics and in conventional intermetallics are investigated, within the framework of fully anisotropic elasticity supplemented with the atomistic information obtained from the ab initio calculations. Moreover, the evolution and interaction of dislocations in these intermetallics as well as the role of solute segregation are presented by utilizing fully anisotropic 3D dislocation dynamics. The results from this work clearly indicate the role and the importance of elastic anisotropy on the evolution of dislocation microstructures, the overall ductility and the hardening behavior in these systems.

  10. LayTracks3D: A new approach for meshing general solids using medial axis transform

    DOE PAGES

    Quadros, William Roshan

    2015-08-22

    This study presents an extension of the all-quad meshing algorithm called LayTracks to generate high quality hex-dominant meshes of general solids. LayTracks3D uses the mapping between the Medial Axis (MA) and the boundary of the 3D domain to decompose complex 3D domains into simpler domains called Tracks. Tracks in 3D have no branches and are symmetric, non-intersecting, orthogonal to the boundary, and the shortest path from the MA to the boundary. These properties of tracks result in desired meshes with near cube shape elements at the boundary, structured mesh along the boundary normal with any irregular nodes restricted to themore » MA, and sharp boundary feature preservation. The algorithm has been tested on a few industrial CAD models and hex-dominant meshes are shown in the Results section. Work is underway to extend LayTracks3D to generate all-hex meshes.« less

  11. A 3D contact analysis approach for the visualization of the electrical contact asperities

    DOE PAGES

    Roussos, Constantinos C.; Swingler, Jonathan

    2017-01-11

    The electrical contact is an important phenomenon that should be given into consideration to achieve better performance and long term reliability for the design of devices. Based upon this importance, the electrical contact interface has been visualized as a “3D Contact Map” and used in order to investigate the contact asperities. The contact asperities describe the structures above and below the contact spots (the contact spots define the 3D contact map) to the two conductors which make the contact system. The contact asperities require the discretization of the 3D microstructures of the contact system into voxels. A contact analysis approachmore » has been developed and introduced in this paper which shows the way to the 3D visualization of the contact asperities of a given contact system. For the discretization of 3D microstructure of contact system into voxels, X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) method is used in order to collect the data of a 250 V, 16 A rated AC single pole rocker switch which is used as a contact system for investigation.« less

  12. Optimal Surface Segmentation in Volumetric Images—A Graph-Theoretic Approach

    PubMed Central

    Li, Kang; Wu, Xiaodong; Chen, Danny Z.; Sonka, Milan

    2008-01-01

    Efficient segmentation of globally optimal surfaces representing object boundaries in volumetric data sets is important and challenging in many medical image analysis applications. We have developed an optimal surface detection method capable of simultaneously detecting multiple interacting surfaces, in which the optimality is controlled by the cost functions designed for individual surfaces and by several geometric constraints defining the surface smoothness and interrelations. The method solves the surface segmentation problem by transforming it into computing a minimum s-t cut in a derived arc-weighted directed graph. The proposed algorithm has a low-order polynomial time complexity and is computationally efficient. It has been extensively validated on more than 300 computer-synthetic volumetric images, 72 CT-scanned data sets of different-sized plexiglas tubes, and tens of medical images spanning various imaging modalities. In all cases, the approach yielded highly accurate results. Our approach can be readily extended to higher-dimensional image segmentation. PMID:16402624

  13. ADN-Viewer: a 3D approach for bioinformatic analyses of large DNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Hérisson, Joan; Ferey, Nicolas; Gros, Pierre-Emmanuel; Gherbi, Rachid

    2007-01-20

    Most of biologists work on textual DNA sequences that are limited to the linear representation of DNA. In this paper, we address the potential offered by Virtual Reality for 3D modeling and immersive visualization of large genomic sequences. The representation of the 3D structure of naked DNA allows biologists to observe and analyze genomes in an interactive way at different levels. We developed a powerful software platform that provides a new point of view for sequences analysis: ADNViewer. Nevertheless, a classical eukaryotic chromosome of 40 million base pairs requires about 6 Gbytes of 3D data. In order to manage these huge amounts of data in real-time, we designed various scene management algorithms and immersive human-computer interaction for user-friendly data exploration. In addition, one bioinformatics study scenario is proposed.

  14. Artificial intelligence (AI)-based relational matching and multimodal medical image fusion: generalized 3D approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vajdic, Stevan M.; Katz, Henry E.; Downing, Andrew R.; Brooks, Michael J.

    1994-09-01

    A 3D relational image matching/fusion algorithm is introduced. It is implemented in the domain of medical imaging and is based on Artificial Intelligence paradigms--in particular, knowledge base representation and tree search. The 2D reference and target images are selected from 3D sets and segmented into non-touching and non-overlapping regions, using iterative thresholding and/or knowledge about the anatomical shapes of human organs. Selected image region attributes are calculated. Region matches are obtained using a tree search, and the error is minimized by evaluating a `goodness' of matching function based on similarities of region attributes. Once the matched regions are found and the spline geometric transform is applied to regional centers of gravity, images are ready for fusion and visualization into a single 3D image of higher clarity.

  15. Molecular interaction study of flavonoid derivative 3d with human serum albumin using multispectroscopic and molecular modeling approach.

    PubMed

    Wei, Juntong; Jin, Feng; Wu, Qin; Jiang, Yuyang; Gao, Dan; Liu, Hongxia

    2014-08-01

    Human serum albumin (HSA) has been developed as a model protein to study drug-protein interaction. In the present work, the interaction between our synthesized flavonoid derivative 3d (possessing potent antitumor activity against HepG2 cells) and HSA was investigated using fluorescence spectroscopy, circular dichroism spectroscopy, UV-vis spectroscopy and molecular modeling approach. Fluorescence spectroscopy showed that the fluorescence of HSA can be quenched remarkably by 3d under physiological condition with a slight shift of maximum fluorescence emission bands from 360nm to 363nm. Calculated results from Stern-Volmer equation and modified Stern-Volmer equation indicated that the fluorescence was quenched by static quenching processing with association constant 5.26±0.04×10(4)L mol(-1) at 298K. After comprehensive consideration of the free energy change ΔG, enthalpy change ΔH and entropy change ΔS, electrostatic interactions were confirmed as the main factor that participate in stabilizing the 3d-HSA complex. Both dichroism spectroscopy and UV-vis spectroscopy indicated conformational change of HSA after binding to 3d. Moreover, the structure of HSA was loosened and the percentage of α-helix decreased with increasing concentration of 3d. Molecular modeling results demonstrated that 3d could bind to HSA well into subdomain IIA, which is related to its capability of deposition and delivery. Three cation-π interactions and three hydrogen bonds occurred between 3d and amino acid residuals ARG218, ARG222 and LYS199. In conclusion, flavonoid derivative 3d can bind to HSA with noncovalent bond in a relatively stable way, so it can be delivered by HSA in a circulatory system. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. a Unified Approach for 3d Generalization of Building Models in Citygml

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baig, S. U.; Rahman, A. A.

    2013-05-01

    Task-specific applications demand abstractions (generalized) 3D scenes of 3D models to be used for visualization and analysis purposes. Therefore, lower LoDs (level-of-details) from higher LoDs need to be made available to these applications. A unified generalization framework is proposed to derive multiple LoDs (LoD3-LoD1) taking both semantics and geometric aspects of 3D buildings modelled in CityGML (City Geography Markup Language) into account. For this purpose, interior structures of 3D objects at LoD4 are removed to derive LoD3 and openings (door, windows) are removed from LoD3 to derive LoD2. Remaining parts such as outer installations and walls are projected onto the ground and simplified based on CityGML generalization specifications. Algorithms for simplification with the aim to derive LoD1 from LoD2 are implemented and tested on a number of buildings of Putrajaya city, Malaysia.The experiments shows that elimination of important part (s) or merging could be avoided by applying semantic-based removal of objects at different LoDs.

  17. A 3D learning playground for potential attention training in ADHD: A brain computer interface approach.

    PubMed

    Ali, Abdulla; Puthusserypady, Sadasivan

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a novel brain-computer-interface (BCI) system that could potentially be used for enhancing the attention ability of subjects with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). It employs the steady state visual evoked potential (SSVEP) paradigm. The developed system consists of a 3D classroom environment with active 3D distractions and 2D games executed on the blackboard. The system is concealed as a game (with stages of varying difficulty) with an underlying story to motivate the subjects. It was tested on eleven healthy subjects and the results undeniably establish that by moving to a higher stage in the game where the 2D environment is changed to 3D along with the added 3D distractions, the difficulty level in keeping attention on the main task increases for the subjects. Results also show a mean accuracy of 92.26 ± 7.97% and a mean average selection time of 3.07 ± 1.09 seconds.

  18. A 3-D Puzzle Approach to Building Protein-DNA Structures.

    PubMed

    Hinton, Deborah M

    2017-02-02

    Despite recent advances in structural analysis, it is still challenging to obtain a high resolution structure for a complex of RNA polymerase, transcriptional factors, and DNA. However, using biochemical constraints, 3-D printed models of available structures, and computer modeling, one can build biologically relevant models of such supramolecular complexes.

  19. Receptor Guided 3D-QSAR: A Useful Approach for Designing of IGF-1R Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Muddassar, M.; Pasha, F. A.; Chung, H. W.; Yoo, K. H.; Oh, C. H.; Cho, S. J.

    2008-01-01

    Research by other investigators has established that insulin-like growth factor‐1 receptor (IGF-1R) is a key oncological target, and that derivatives of 1, 3-disubstituted-imidazo[1,5-α] pyrazine are potent IGF-1R inhibitors. In this paper, we report on our three-dimensional quantitative structure activity relationship (3D-QSAR) studies for this series of compounds. We validated the 3D-QSAR models by the comparison of two major alignment schemes, namely, ligand-based (LB) and receptor-guided (RG) alignment schemes. The latter scheme yielded better 3D-QSAR models for both comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA) (q2 = 0.35, r2 = 0.95) and comparative molecular similarity indices analysis (CoMSIA) (q2 = 0.51, r2 = 0.86). We submit that this might arise from the more accurate inhibitor alignment that results from using the structural information of the active site. We conclude that the receptor-guided 3D-QSAR may be helpful to design more potent IGF-1R inhibitors, as well as to understand their binding affinity with the receptor. PMID:18385815

  20. Receptor guided 3D-QSAR: a useful approach for designing of IGF-1R inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Muddassar, M; Pasha, F A; Chung, H W; Yoo, K H; Oh, C H; Cho, S J

    2008-01-01

    Research by other investigators has established that insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF-1R) is a key oncological target, and that derivatives of 1, 3-disubstituted-imidazo[1,5-alpha] pyrazine are potent IGF-1R inhibitors. In this paper, we report on our three-dimensional quantitative structure activity relationship (3D-QSAR) studies for this series of compounds. We validated the 3D-QSAR models by the comparison of two major alignment schemes, namely, ligand-based (LB) and receptor-guided (RG) alignment schemes. The latter scheme yielded better 3D-QSAR models for both comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA) (q(2) = 0.35, r(2) = 0.95) and comparative molecular similarity indices analysis (CoMSIA) (q(2) = 0.51, r(2) = 0.86). We submit that this might arise from the more accurate inhibitor alignment that results from using the structural information of the active site. We conclude that the receptor-guided 3D-QSAR may be helpful to design more potent IGF-1R inhibitors, as well as to understand their binding affinity with the receptor.

  1. An integral equation approach to smooth 3D Navier-Stokes solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costin, O.; Luo, G.; Tanveer, S.

    2008-12-01

    We summarize a recently developed integral equation (IE) approach to tackling the long-time existence problem for smooth solution v(x, t) to the 3D Navier-Stokes (NS) equation in the context of a periodic box problem with smooth time independent forcing and initial condition v0. Using an inverse-Laplace transform of {\\skew5\\hat v} (k, t) - {\\skew5\\hat v}_0 in 1/t, we arrive at an IE for {\\skew5\\hat U} (k, p) , where p is inverse-Laplace dual to 1/t and k is the Fourier variable dual to x. The advantage of this formulation is that the solution {\\skew5\\hat U} to the IE is known to exist a priori for p \\in \\mathbb{R}^+ and the solution is integrable and exponentially bounded at ∞. Global existence of NS solution in this formulation is reduced to an asymptotics question. If \\parallel\\!{\\skew5\\hat U} (\\cdot, p)\\!\\parallel_{{l^{1} (\\mathbb{Z}^3)}} has subexponential bounds as p→∞, then global existence to NS follows. Moreover, if f=0, then the converse is also true in the following sense: if NS has global solution, then there exists n>=1 for which the inverse-Laplace transform of {\\skew5\\hat v} (k, t) - {\\skew5\\hat v}_0 in 1/tn necessarily decays as q→∞, where q is the inverse-Laplace dual to 1/tn. We also present refined estimates of the exponential growth when the solution {\\skew5\\hat U} is known on a finite interval [0, p0]. We also show that for analytic v[0] and f, with finitely many nonzero Fourier-coefficients, the series for {\\skew5\\hat U} (k, p) in powers of p has a radius of convergence independent of initial condition and forcing; indeed the radius gets bigger for smaller viscosity. We also show that the IE can be solved numerically with controlled errors. Preliminary numerical calculations for Kida (1985 J. Phys. Soc. Japan 54 2132) initial conditions, though far from being optimized, and performed on a modest interval in the accelerated variable q show decay in q.

  2. A Bayesian approach for suppression of limited angular sampling artifacts in single particle 3D reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Moriya, Toshio; Acar, Erman; Cheng, R Holland; Ruotsalainen, Ulla

    2015-09-01

    In the single particle reconstruction, the initial 3D structure often suffers from the limited angular sampling artifact. Selecting 2D class averages of particle images generally improves the accuracy and efficiency of the reference-free 3D angle estimation, but causes an insufficient angular sampling to fill the information of the target object in the 3D frequency space. Similarly, the initial 3D structure by the random-conical tilt reconstruction has the well-known "missing cone" artifact. Here, we attempted to solve the limited angular sampling problem by sequentially applying maximum a posteriori estimate with expectation maximization algorithm (sMAP-EM). Using both simulated and experimental cryo-electron microscope images, the sMAP-EM was compared to the direct Fourier method on the basis of reconstruction error and resolution. To establish selection criteria of the final regularization weight for the sMAP-EM, the effects of noise level and sampling sparseness on the reconstructions were examined with evenly distributed sampling simulations. The frequency information filled in the missing cone of the conical tilt sampling simulations was assessed by developing new quantitative measurements. All the results of visual and numerical evaluations showed the sMAP-EM performed better than the direct Fourier method, regardless of the sampling method, noise level, and sampling sparseness. Furthermore, the frequency domain analysis demonstrated that the sMAP-EM can fill the meaningful information in the unmeasured angular space without detailed a priori knowledge of the objects. The current research demonstrated that the sMAP-EM has a high potential to facilitate the determination of 3D protein structures at near atomic-resolution.

  3. A photogrammetric approach for real-time 3D localization and tracking of pedestrians in monocular infrared imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundegorski, Mikolaj E.; Breckon, Toby P.

    2014-10-01

    Target tracking within conventional video imagery poses a significant challenge that is increasingly being addressed via complex algorithmic solutions. The complexity of this problem can be fundamentally attributed to the ambiguity associated with actual 3D scene position of a given tracked object in relation to its observed position in 2D image space. We propose an approach that challenges the current trend in complex tracking solutions by addressing this fundamental ambiguity head-on. In contrast to prior work in the field, we leverage the key advantages of thermal-band infrared (IR) imagery for the pedestrian localization to show that robust localization and foreground target separation, afforded via such imagery, facilities accurate 3D position estimation to within the error bounds of conventional Global Position System (GPS) positioning. This work investigates the accuracy of classical photogrammetry, within the context of current target detection and classification techniques, as a means of recovering the true 3D position of pedestrian targets within the scene. Based on photogrammetric estimation of target position, we then illustrate the efficiency of regular Kalman filter based tracking operating on actual 3D pedestrian scene trajectories. We present both a statistical and experimental analysis of the associated errors of this approach in addition to real-time 3D pedestrian tracking using monocular infrared (IR) imagery from a thermal-band camera.

  4. Economic 3D-printing approach for transplantation of human stem cell-derived β-like cells.

    PubMed

    Song, Jiwon; Millman, Jeffrey R

    2016-12-01

    Transplantation of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSC) differentiated into insulin-producing β cells is a regenerative medicine approach being investigated for diabetes cell replacement therapy. This report presents a multifaceted transplantation strategy that combines differentiation into stem cell-derived β (SC-β) cells with 3D printing. By modulating the parameters of a low-cost 3D printer, we created a macroporous device composed of polylactic acid (PLA) that houses SC-β cell clusters within a degradable fibrin gel. Using finite element modeling of cellular oxygen diffusion-consumption and an in vitro culture system that allows for culture of devices at physiological oxygen levels, we identified cluster sizes that avoid severe hypoxia within 3D-printed devices and developed a microwell-based technique for resizing clusters within this range. Upon transplantation into mice, SC-β cell-embedded 3D-printed devices function for 12 weeks, are retrievable, and maintain structural integrity. Here, we demonstrate a novel 3D-printing approach that advances the use of differentiated hPSC for regenerative medicine applications and serves as a platform for future transplantation strategies.

  5. Estimating 3D gaze in physical environment: a geometric approach on consumer-level remote eye tracker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wibirama, Sunu; Mahesa, Rizki R.; Nugroho, Hanung A.; Hamamoto, Kazuhiko

    2017-02-01

    Remote eye trackers with consumer price have been used for various applications on flat computer screen. On the other hand, 3D gaze tracking in physical environment has been useful for visualizing gaze behavior, robots controller, and assistive technology. Instead of using affordable remote eye trackers, 3D gaze tracking in physical environment has been performed using corporate-level head mounted eye trackers, limiting its practical usage to niche user. In this research, we propose a novel method to estimate 3D gaze using consumer-level remote eye tracker. We implement geometric approach to obtain 3D point of gaze from binocular lines-of-sight. Experimental results show that the proposed method yielded low errors of 3.47+/-3.02 cm, 3.02+/-1.34 cm, and 2.57+/-1.85 cm in X, Y , and Z dimensions, respectively. The proposed approach may be used as a starting point for designing interaction method in 3D physical environment.

  6. Bound state solution of Dirac equation for 3D harmonics oscillator plus trigonometric scarf noncentral potential using SUSY QM approach

    SciTech Connect

    Cari, C. Suparmi, A.

    2014-09-30

    Dirac equation of 3D harmonics oscillator plus trigonometric Scarf non-central potential for spin symmetric case is solved using supersymmetric quantum mechanics approach. The Dirac equation for exact spin symmetry reduces to Schrodinger like equation. The relativistic energy and wave function for spin symmetric case are simply obtained using SUSY quantum mechanics method and idea of shape invariance.

  7. Designing Spatial Visualisation Tasks for Middle School Students with a 3D Modelling Software: An Instrumental Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turgut, Melih; Uygan, Candas

    2015-01-01

    In this work, certain task designs to enhance middle school students' spatial visualisation ability, in the context of an instrumental approach, have been developed. 3D modelling software, SketchUp®, was used. In the design process, software tools were focused on and, thereafter, the aim was to interpret the instrumental genesis and spatial…

  8. Designing Spatial Visualisation Tasks for Middle School Students with a 3D Modelling Software: An Instrumental Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turgut, Melih; Uygan, Candas

    2015-01-01

    In this work, certain task designs to enhance middle school students' spatial visualisation ability, in the context of an instrumental approach, have been developed. 3D modelling software, SketchUp®, was used. In the design process, software tools were focused on and, thereafter, the aim was to interpret the instrumental genesis and spatial…

  9. Fatigue life estimation for different notched specimens based on the volumetric approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zehsaz, M.; Hassanifard, S.; Esmaeili, F.

    2010-06-01

    In this paper, the effects of notch radius for different notched specimens has been studied on the values of stress concentration factor, notch strength reduction factor, and fatigue life duration of the specimens. The material which has been selected for this investigation is Al 2024T3 . Volumetric approach has been applied to obtain the values of notch strength reduction factor and results have been compared with those obtained from the Neuber and Peterson methods. Load controlled fatigue tests of mentioned specimens have been conducted on the 250kN servo-hydraulic Zwick/Amsler fatigue testing machine with the frequency of 10Hz. The fatigue lives of the specimens have also been predicted based on the available smooth S-N curve of Al2024-T3 and also the amounts of notch strength reduction factor which have been obtained from volumetric, Neuber and Peterson methods. The values of stress and strain around the notch roots are required to predict the fatigue life of notched specimens, so Ansys finite element code has been used and non-linear analyses have been performed to obtain the stress and strain distributions around the notches. The plastic deformations of the material have been simulated using multi-linear kinematic hardening and cyclic stress-strain relation. The work here shows that the volumetric approach does a very good job for predicting the fatigue life of the notched specimens.

  10. A Murine Model of Volumetric Muscle Loss and a Regenerative Medicine Approach for Tissue Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Sicari, Brian M.; Agrawal, Vineet; Siu, Bernard F.; Medberry, Christopher J.; Dearth, Christopher L.; Turner, Neill J.

    2012-01-01

    Volumetric muscle loss (VML) resulting from traumatic accidents, tumor ablation, or degenerative disease is associated with limited treatment options and high morbidity. The lack of a reliable and reproducible animal model of VML has hindered the development of effective therapeutic strategies. The present study describes a critical-sized excisional defect within the mouse quadriceps muscle that results in an irrecoverable volumetric defect. This model of VML was used to evaluate the efficacy of a surgically placed inductive biologic scaffold material composed of porcine small intestinal submucosa–extracellular matrix (SIS-ECM). The targeted placement of an SIS-ECM scaffold within the defect was associated with constructive tissue remodeling including the formation of site-appropriate skeletal muscle tissue. The present study provides a reproducible animal model with which to study VML and shows the therapeutic potential of a bioscaffold-based regenerative medicine approach to VML. PMID:22906411

  11. Multiple 3D reference system analyses for Phobos grooves, a novel approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simioni, Emanuele; Pajola, Maurizio; Massironi, Matteo; Cremonese, Gabriele

    2015-04-01

    Grooves analysis has represented in the last decade a robust method for geomorphological study of small bodies, as is the case for asteroids 951 Gaspra (Veverka et al., 1994), 243 Ida (Belton et al., 1994), 433 Eros (Thomas et al., (2002), Buczkowski et al., 2008), 21 Lutetia (Massironi et al., 2011, *Besse et al., 2014*) and 4 Vesta (Buczkowski et al., 2*012). Hence, such source of information can be deeper used for a novel approach presented on Phobos with the aim of providing more hints on its harshly debated origin. Stereo-plots and cyclographs represent two methods, unified under the name of stereographic projections, commonly used to describe the statistic of the orientations (dip-angle and dip-direction) of different planes with respect to cardinal points and a reference horizontal plane (Bucher, 1944; Phillips, 1954; Ragan, 1985). However this reference system is ambiguous for any applications on small irregular bodies such as asteroids or comets since it does not permit to highlight systems of parallel anisotropies and to have an idea of their distribution with respect to a given surface feature (for example an impact crater). In this work we show a novel approach for stereographic projections focusing to a multi-reference system. The multi-reference system can be centered on a specific surface feature such as a crater and can alternatively use an absolute reference plane containing the center of figure of the body (to retrieve systems of parallel anisotropies) or a relative horizontal plane (to understand the distribution of the anisotropies with respect to the central feature). In this way we are able to well define the distribution of the grooves expected to be originated from a impact cratering event in a small body. Following this methodology, we have extracted 352 3D fracture planes from the attitudes of the grooves over the surface topography of Phobos and, for each plane, the local surface versor has been defined. Consequently, stereo-plots on

  12. Airborne, All the Way, 3D From the Sky: Approach for an Air Drop Capable, Medium Tactical Vehicle

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-11-01

    Defense AT&L: November–December 2015 56 Airborne, All The Way, 3D From the Sky Approach for an Air Drop Capable, Medium Tactical Vehicle CPT Peter F...build the 29 tooling stamps required for all the body panels, and produce five prototype cabs. It would take more than 450 days after award to produce...Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was showcasing its 3D printed Shelby Cobra next to Local Motors, and all the minds behind the project were

  13. A new optimization approach for the calibration of an ultrasound probe using a 3D optical localizer.

    PubMed

    Dardenne, G; Cano, J D Gil; Hamitouche, C; Stindel, E; Roux, C

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes a fast procedure for the calibration of an ultrasound (US) probe using a 3D optical localizer. This calibration step allows us to obtain the 3D position of any point located on the 2D ultrasonic (US) image. To carry out correctly this procedure, a phantom of known geometric properties is probed and these geometries are found in the US images. A segmentation step is applied in order to obtain automatically the needed information in the US images and then, an optimization approach is performed to find the optimal calibration parameters. A new optimization method to estimate the calibration parameters for an ultrasound (US) probe is developed.

  14. Mechano-sensing and cell migration: a 3D model approach.

    PubMed

    Borau, C; Kamm, R D; García-Aznar, J M

    2011-12-01

    Cell migration is essential for tissue development in different physiological and pathological conditions. It is a complex process orchestrated by chemistry, biological factors, microstructure and surrounding mechanical properties. Focusing on the mechanical interactions, cells do not only exert forces on the matrix that surrounds them, but they also sense and react to mechanical cues in a process called mechano-sensing. Here, we hypothesize the involvement of mechano-sensing in the regulation of directional cell migration through a three-dimensional (3D) matrix. For this purpose, we develop a 3D numerical model of individual cell migration, which incorporates the mechano-sensing process of the cell as the main mechanism regulating its movement. Consistent with this hypothesis, we found that factors, such as substrate stiffness, boundary conditions and external forces, regulate specific and distinct cell movements.

  15. An approach to quantifying 3D responses of cells to extreme strain

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yuhui; Huang, Guoyou; Li, Moxiao; Wang, Lin; Elson, Elliot L.; Jian Lu, Tian; Genin, Guy M.; Xu, Feng

    2016-01-01

    The tissues of hollow organs can routinely stretch up to 2.5 times their length. Although significant pathology can arise if relatively large stretches are sustained, the responses of cells are not known at these levels of sustained strain. A key challenge is presenting cells with a realistic and well-defined three-dimensional (3D) culture environment that can sustain such strains. Here, we describe an in vitro system called microscale, magnetically-actuated synthetic tissues (micro-MASTs) to quantify these responses for cells within a 3D hydrogel matrix. Cellular strain-threshold and saturation behaviors were observed in hydrogel matrix, including strain-dependent proliferation, spreading, polarization, and differentiation, and matrix adhesion retained at strains sufficient for apoptosis. More broadly, the system shows promise for defining and controlling the effects of mechanical environment upon a broad range of cells. PMID:26887698

  16. 3D Kirchhoff depth migration algorithm: A new scalable approach for parallelization on multicore CPU based cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rastogi, Richa; Londhe, Ashutosh; Srivastava, Abhishek; Sirasala, Kirannmayi M.; Khonde, Kiran

    2017-03-01

    In this article, a new scalable 3D Kirchhoff depth migration algorithm is presented on state of the art multicore CPU based cluster. Parallelization of 3D Kirchhoff depth migration is challenging due to its high demand of compute time, memory, storage and I/O along with the need of their effective management. The most resource intensive modules of the algorithm are traveltime calculations and migration summation which exhibit an inherent trade off between compute time and other resources. The parallelization strategy of the algorithm largely depends on the storage of calculated traveltimes and its feeding mechanism to the migration process. The presented work is an extension of our previous work, wherein a 3D Kirchhoff depth migration application for multicore CPU based parallel system had been developed. Recently, we have worked on improving parallel performance of this application by re-designing the parallelization approach. The new algorithm is capable to efficiently migrate both prestack and poststack 3D data. It exhibits flexibility for migrating large number of traces within the available node memory and with minimal requirement of storage, I/O and inter-node communication. The resultant application is tested using 3D Overthrust data on PARAM Yuva II, which is a Xeon E5-2670 based multicore CPU cluster with 16 cores/node and 64 GB shared memory. Parallel performance of the algorithm is studied using different numerical experiments and the scalability results show striking improvement over its previous version. An impressive 49.05X speedup with 76.64% efficiency is achieved for 3D prestack data and 32.00X speedup with 50.00% efficiency for 3D poststack data, using 64 nodes. The results also demonstrate the effectiveness and robustness of the improved algorithm with high scalability and efficiency on a multicore CPU cluster.

  17. Different Approaches for the Creation and Exploitation of 3D Urban Models

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-09-01

    Digital terrain models (or DTM ) are the foundation of any 3D urban models. Created from various data sources (such as DEM or DTED data form mapping...agencies, contour lines, elevation points), it is important to use the proper datasets to construct the DTM . DTM are generally created by using...triangulation algorithms that generate an irregular surface of the terrain. Two data structures are usually used with DTM : regular grid and triangulated

  18. New approach to navigation: matching sequential images to 3D terrain maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Tianxu; Hu, Bo; Li, Wei

    1998-03-01

    In this paper an efficient image matching algorithm is presented for use in aircraft navigation. A sequence images with each two successive images partially overlapped is sensed by a monocular optical system. 3D undulation features are recovered from the image pairs, and then matched against a reference undulation feature map. Finally, the aircraft position is estimated by minimizing Hausdorff distance measure. The simulation experiment using real terrain data is reported.

  19. Generalization of the tensor renormalization group approach to 3-D or higher dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teng, Peiyuan

    2017-04-01

    In this paper, a way of generalizing the tensor renormalization group (TRG) is proposed. Mathematically, the connection between patterns of tensor renormalization group and the concept of truncation sequence in polytope geometry is discovered. A theoretical contraction framework is therefore proposed. Furthermore, the canonical polyadic decomposition is introduced to tensor network theory. A numerical verification of this method on the 3-D Ising model is carried out.

  20. Statistical shape analysis using 3D Poisson equation--A quantitatively validated approach.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yi; Bouix, Sylvain

    2016-05-01

    Statistical shape analysis has been an important area of research with applications in biology, anatomy, neuroscience, agriculture, paleontology, etc. Unfortunately, the proposed methods are rarely quantitatively evaluated, and as shown in recent studies, when they are evaluated, significant discrepancies exist in their outputs. In this work, we concentrate on the problem of finding the consistent location of deformation between two population of shapes. We propose a new shape analysis algorithm along with a framework to perform a quantitative evaluation of its performance. Specifically, the algorithm constructs a Signed Poisson Map (SPoM) by solving two Poisson equations on the volumetric shapes of arbitrary topology, and statistical analysis is then carried out on the SPoMs. The method is quantitatively evaluated on synthetic shapes and applied on real shape data sets in brain structures.

  1. Approaches to integrating indicators into 3D landscape visualisations and their benefits for participative planning situations.

    PubMed

    Wissen, Ulrike; Schroth, Olaf; Lange, Eckart; Schmid, Willy A

    2008-11-01

    In discussing issues of landscape change, the complex relationships in the landscape have to be assessed. In participative planning processes, 3D visualisations have a high potential as an aid in understanding and communicating characteristics of landscape conditions by integrating visual and non-visual landscape information. Unclear is, which design and how much interactivity is required for an indicator visualisation that would suit stakeholders best in workshop situations. This paper describes the preparation and application of three different types of integrated 3D visualisations in workshops conducted in the Entlebuch UNESCO Biosphere Reserve (CH). The results reveal that simple representations of a complex issue created by draping thematic maps on the 3D model can make problematic developments visible at a glance; that diagrams linked to the spatial context can help draw attention to problematic relationships not considered beforehand; and that the size of species as indicators of conditions of the landscape's production and biotope function seems to provide a common language for stakeholders with different perspectives. Overall, the of the indicators the functions required to assist in information processing. Further research should focus on testing the effectiveness of the integrated visualisation tools in participative processes for the general public.

  2. An approach to architecture 3D scaffold with interconnective microchannel networks inducing angiogenesis for tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jiaoxia; Wang, Yuanliang; Qian, Zhiyong; Hu, Chenbo

    2011-11-01

    The angiogenesis of 3D scaffold is one of the major current limitations in clinical practice tissue engineering. The new strategy of construction 3D scaffold with microchannel circulation network may improve angiogenesis. In this study, 3D poly(D: ,L: -lactic acid) scaffolds with controllable microchannel structures were fabricated using sacrificial sugar structures. Melt drawing sugar-fiber network produced by a modified filament spiral winding method was used to form the microchannel with adjustable diameters and porosity. This fabrication process was rapid, inexpensive, and highly scalable. The porosity, microchannel diameter, interconnectivity and surface topographies of the scaffold were characterized by scanning electron microscopy. Mechanical properties were evaluated by compression tests. The mean porosity values of the scaffolds were in the 65-78% and the scaffold exhibited microchannel structure with diameter in the 100-200 μm range. The results showed that the scaffolds exhibited an adequate porosity, interconnective microchannel network, and mechanical properties. The cell culture studies with endothelial cells (ECs) demonstrated that the scaffold allowed cells to proliferate and penetrate into the volume of the entire scaffold. Overall, these findings suggest that the fabrication process offers significant advantages and flexibility in generating a variety of non-cytotoxic tissue engineering scaffolds with controllable distributions of porosity and physical properties that could provide the necessary physical cues for ECs and further improve angiogenesis for tissue engineering.

  3. 3D Tissue-Like Assemblies: A Novel Approach to Investigate Virus-Cell Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Goodwin, Thomas J.; McCarthy, Maureen; Cohrs, Randall J.; Kaufer, Benedikt B.

    2017-01-01

    Virus-host cell interactions are most commonly analyzed in cells maintained in vitro as two-dimensional tissue cultures. However, these in vitro conditions vary quite drastically from the tissues that are commonly infected in vivo. Over the years, a number of systems have been developed that allow the establishment of three-dimensional (3D) tissue structures that have properties similar to their in vivo 3D counterparts. These 3D systems have numerous applications including drug testing, maintenance of large tissue explants, monitoring migration of human lymphocytes in tissues, analysis of human organ tissue development and investigation of virus-host interactions including viral latency. Here, we describe the establishment of tissue-like assemblies for human lung and neuronal tissue that we infected with a variety of viruses including the respiratory pathogens human parainfluenza virus type 3 (PIV3), respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and SARS corona virus (SARS-CoV) as well as the human neurotropic herpesvirus, varicella-zoster virus (VZV) PMID:25986169

  4. A new approach for semi-automatic rock mass joints recognition from 3D point clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riquelme, Adrián J.; Abellán, A.; Tomás, R.; Jaboyedoff, M.

    2014-07-01

    Rock mass characterization requires a deep geometric understanding of the discontinuity sets affecting rock exposures. Recent advances in Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) instrumentation currently allow quick and accurate 3D data acquisition, yielding on the development of new methodologies for the automatic characterization of rock mass discontinuities. This paper presents a methodology for the identification and analysis of flat surfaces outcropping in a rocky slope using the 3D data obtained with LiDAR. This method identifies and defines the algebraic equations of the different planes of the rock slope surface by applying an analysis based on a neighbouring points coplanarity test, finding principal orientations by Kernel Density Estimation and identifying clusters by the Density-Based Scan Algorithm with Noise. Different sources of information - synthetic and 3D scanned data - were employed, performing a complete sensitivity analysis of the parameters in order to identify the optimal value of the variables of the proposed method. In addition, raw source files and obtained results are freely provided in order to allow to a more straightforward method comparison aiming to a more reproducible research.

  5. A pose prediction approach based on ligand 3D shape similarity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Ashutosh; Zhang, Kam Y. J.

    2016-06-01

    Molecular docking predicts the best pose of a ligand in the target protein binding site by sampling and scoring numerous conformations and orientations of the ligand. Failures in pose prediction are often due to either insufficient sampling or scoring function errors. To improve the accuracy of pose prediction by tackling the sampling problem, we have developed a method of pose prediction using shape similarity. It first places a ligand conformation of the highest 3D shape similarity with known crystal structure ligands into protein binding site and then refines the pose by repacking the side-chains and performing energy minimization with a Monte Carlo algorithm. We have assessed our method utilizing CSARdock 2012 and 2014 benchmark exercise datasets consisting of co-crystal structures from eight proteins. Our results revealed that ligand 3D shape similarity could substitute conformational and orientational sampling if at least one suitable co-crystal structure is available. Our method identified poses within 2 Å RMSD as the top-ranking pose for 85.7 % of the test cases. The median RMSD for our pose prediction method was found to be 0.81 Å and was better than methods performing extensive conformational and orientational sampling within target protein binding sites. Furthermore, our method was better than similar methods utilizing ligand 3D shape similarity for pose prediction.

  6. Terahertz metamaterials and systems based on rolled-up 3D elements: designs, technological approaches, and properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prinz, Victor Ya.; Naumova, Elena V.; Golod, Sergey V.; Seleznev, Vladimir A.; Bocharov, Andrey A.; Kubarev, Vitaliy V.

    2017-03-01

    Electromagnetic metamaterials opened the way to extraordinary manipulation of radiation. Terahertz (THz) and optical metamaterials are usually fabricated by traditional planar-patterning approaches, while the majority of practical applications require metamaterials with 3D resonators. Making arrays of precise 3D micro- and nanoresonators is still a challenging problem. Here we present a versatile set of approaches to fabrication of metamaterials with 3D resonators rolled-up from strained films, demonstrate novel THz metamaterials/systems, and show giant polarization rotation by several chiral metamaterials/systems. The polarization spectra of chiral metamaterials on semiconductor substrates exhibit ultrasharp quasiperiodic peaks. Application of 3D printing allowed assembling more complex systems, including the bianisotropic system with optimal microhelices, which showed an extreme polarization azimuth rotation of 85° with drop by 150° at a frequency shift of 0.4%. We refer the quasiperiodic peaks in the polarization spectra of metamaterial systems to the interplay of different resonances, including peculiar chiral waveguide resonance. Formed metamaterials cannot be made by any other presently available technology. All steps of presented fabrication approaches are parallel, IC-compatible and allow mass fabrication with scaling of rolled-up resonators up to visible frequencies. We anticipate that the rolled-up meta-atoms will be ideal building blocks for future generations of commercial metamaterials, devices and systems on their basis.

  7. Terahertz metamaterials and systems based on rolled-up 3D elements: designs, technological approaches, and properties.

    PubMed

    Prinz, Victor Ya; Naumova, Elena V; Golod, Sergey V; Seleznev, Vladimir A; Bocharov, Andrey A; Kubarev, Vitaliy V

    2017-03-03

    Electromagnetic metamaterials opened the way to extraordinary manipulation of radiation. Terahertz (THz) and optical metamaterials are usually fabricated by traditional planar-patterning approaches, while the majority of practical applications require metamaterials with 3D resonators. Making arrays of precise 3D micro- and nanoresonators is still a challenging problem. Here we present a versatile set of approaches to fabrication of metamaterials with 3D resonators rolled-up from strained films, demonstrate novel THz metamaterials/systems, and show giant polarization rotation by several chiral metamaterials/systems. The polarization spectra of chiral metamaterials on semiconductor substrates exhibit ultrasharp quasiperiodic peaks. Application of 3D printing allowed assembling more complex systems, including the bianisotropic system with optimal microhelices, which showed an extreme polarization azimuth rotation of 85° with drop by 150° at a frequency shift of 0.4%. We refer the quasiperiodic peaks in the polarization spectra of metamaterial systems to the interplay of different resonances, including peculiar chiral waveguide resonance. Formed metamaterials cannot be made by any other presently available technology. All steps of presented fabrication approaches are parallel, IC-compatible and allow mass fabrication with scaling of rolled-up resonators up to visible frequencies. We anticipate that the rolled-up meta-atoms will be ideal building blocks for future generations of commercial metamaterials, devices and systems on their basis.

  8. Terahertz metamaterials and systems based on rolled-up 3D elements: designs, technological approaches, and properties

    PubMed Central

    Prinz, Victor Ya.; Naumova, Elena V.; Golod, Sergey V.; Seleznev, Vladimir A.; Bocharov, Andrey A.; Kubarev, Vitaliy V.

    2017-01-01

    Electromagnetic metamaterials opened the way to extraordinary manipulation of radiation. Terahertz (THz) and optical metamaterials are usually fabricated by traditional planar-patterning approaches, while the majority of practical applications require metamaterials with 3D resonators. Making arrays of precise 3D micro- and nanoresonators is still a challenging problem. Here we present a versatile set of approaches to fabrication of metamaterials with 3D resonators rolled-up from strained films, demonstrate novel THz metamaterials/systems, and show giant polarization rotation by several chiral metamaterials/systems. The polarization spectra of chiral metamaterials on semiconductor substrates exhibit ultrasharp quasiperiodic peaks. Application of 3D printing allowed assembling more complex systems, including the bianisotropic system with optimal microhelices, which showed an extreme polarization azimuth rotation of 85° with drop by 150° at a frequency shift of 0.4%. We refer the quasiperiodic peaks in the polarization spectra of metamaterial systems to the interplay of different resonances, including peculiar chiral waveguide resonance. Formed metamaterials cannot be made by any other presently available technology. All steps of presented fabrication approaches are parallel, IC-compatible and allow mass fabrication with scaling of rolled-up resonators up to visible frequencies. We anticipate that the rolled-up meta-atoms will be ideal building blocks for future generations of commercial metamaterials, devices and systems on their basis. PMID:28256587

  9. Using Pressure and Volumetric Approaches to Estimate CO2 Storage Capacity in Deep Saline Aquifers

    SciTech Connect

    Thibeau, Sylvain; Bachu, Stefan; Birkholzer, Jens; Holloway, Sam; Neele, Filip; Zhou, Quanlin

    2014-12-31

    Various approaches are used to evaluate the capacity of saline aquifers to store CO2, resulting in a wide range of capacity estimates for a given aquifer. The two approaches most used are the volumetric “open aquifer” and “closed aquifer” approaches. We present four full-scale aquifer cases, where CO2 storage capacity is evaluated both volumetrically (with “open” and/or “closed” approaches) and through flow modeling. These examples show that the “open aquifer” CO2 storage capacity estimation can strongly exceed the cumulative CO2 injection from the flow model, whereas the “closed aquifer” estimates are a closer approximation to the flow-model derived capacity. An analogy to oil recovery mechanisms is presented, where the primary oil recovery mechanism is compared to CO2 aquifer storage without producing formation water; and the secondary oil recovery mechanism (water flooding) is compared to CO2 aquifer storage performed simultaneously with extraction of water for pressure maintenance. This analogy supports the finding that the “closed aquifer” approach produces a better estimate of CO2 storage without water extraction, and highlights the need for any CO2 storage estimate to specify whether it is intended to represent CO2 storage capacity with or without water extraction.

  10. Using Pressure and Volumetric Approaches to Estimate CO2 Storage Capacity in Deep Saline Aquifers

    DOE PAGES

    Thibeau, Sylvain; Bachu, Stefan; Birkholzer, Jens; ...

    2014-12-31

    Various approaches are used to evaluate the capacity of saline aquifers to store CO2, resulting in a wide range of capacity estimates for a given aquifer. The two approaches most used are the volumetric “open aquifer” and “closed aquifer” approaches. We present four full-scale aquifer cases, where CO2 storage capacity is evaluated both volumetrically (with “open” and/or “closed” approaches) and through flow modeling. These examples show that the “open aquifer” CO2 storage capacity estimation can strongly exceed the cumulative CO2 injection from the flow model, whereas the “closed aquifer” estimates are a closer approximation to the flow-model derived capacity. Anmore » analogy to oil recovery mechanisms is presented, where the primary oil recovery mechanism is compared to CO2 aquifer storage without producing formation water; and the secondary oil recovery mechanism (water flooding) is compared to CO2 aquifer storage performed simultaneously with extraction of water for pressure maintenance. This analogy supports the finding that the “closed aquifer” approach produces a better estimate of CO2 storage without water extraction, and highlights the need for any CO2 storage estimate to specify whether it is intended to represent CO2 storage capacity with or without water extraction.« less

  11. Robust statistical approaches for local planar surface fitting in 3D laser scanning data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nurunnabi, Abdul; Belton, David; West, Geoff

    2014-10-01

    This paper proposes robust methods for local planar surface fitting in 3D laser scanning data. Searching through the literature revealed that many authors frequently used Least Squares (LS) and Principal Component Analysis (PCA) for point cloud processing without any treatment of outliers. It is known that LS and PCA are sensitive to outliers and can give inconsistent and misleading estimates. RANdom SAmple Consensus (RANSAC) is one of the most well-known robust methods used for model fitting when noise and/or outliers are present. We concentrate on the recently introduced Deterministic Minimum Covariance Determinant estimator and robust PCA, and propose two variants of statistically robust algorithms for fitting planar surfaces to 3D laser scanning point cloud data. The performance of the proposed robust methods is demonstrated by qualitative and quantitative analysis through several synthetic and mobile laser scanning 3D data sets for different applications. Using simulated data, and comparisons with LS, PCA, RANSAC, variants of RANSAC and other robust statistical methods, we demonstrate that the new algorithms are significantly more efficient, faster, and produce more accurate fits and robust local statistics (e.g. surface normals), necessary for many point cloud processing tasks. Consider one example data set used consisting of 100 points with 20% outliers representing a plane. The proposed methods called DetRD-PCA and DetRPCA, produce bias angles (angle between the fitted planes with and without outliers) of 0.20° and 0.24° respectively, whereas LS, PCA and RANSAC produce worse bias angles of 52.49°, 39.55° and 0.79° respectively. In terms of speed, DetRD-PCA takes 0.033 s on average for fitting a plane, which is approximately 6.5, 25.4 and 25.8 times faster than RANSAC, and two other robust statistical methods, respectively. The estimated robust surface normals and curvatures from the new methods have been used for plane fitting, sharp feature

  12. An approach to 3D magnetic field calculation using numerical and differential algebra methods

    SciTech Connect

    Caspi, S.; Helm, M.; Laslett, L.J.; Brady, V.O.

    1992-07-17

    Motivated by the need for new means for specification and determination of 3D fields that are produced by electromagnetic lens elements in the region interior to coil windings and seeking to obtain techniques that will be convenient for accurate conductor placement and dynamical study of particle motion, we have conveniently gene the representation of a 2D magnetic field to 3D. We have shown that the 3 dimensioal magnetic field components of a multipole magnet in the curl-fire divergence-fire region near the axis r=0 can be derived from one dimensional functions A{sub n}(z) and their derivatives (part 1). In the region interior to coil windings of accelerator magnets the three spatial components of magnet fields can be expressed in terms of harmonic components'' proportional to functions sin (n{theta}) or cos (n{theta}) of the azimuthal angle. The r,z dependence of any such component can then be expressed in terms of powers of r times functions A{sub n}(z) and their derivatives. For twodimensional configurations B{sub z} of course is identically zero, the derivatives of A{sub n}(z) vanish, and the harmonic components of the transverse field then acquire a simple proportionality B{sub r,n} {proportional to} r{sup n-1} sin (n{theta}),B{sub {theta},n} {proportional to} r{sup n-1} cos (n{theta}), whereas in a 3-D configuration the more complex nature of the field gives rise to additional so-called psuedomultipole'' components as judged by additional powers of r required in the development of the field. Computation of the 3-D magnetic field arising at a sequence of field points, as a direct result of a specified current configuration or coil geometry, can be calculated explicitly through use of the Biot-Savart law and from such data the coefficients can then be derived for a general development of the type indicated above. We indicate, discuss, and illustrate two means by which this development may be performed.

  13. 3-D Gaussian beam scattering from a gyromagnetic perforated layer: Quasi-static approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yachin, Vladimir V.; Zinenko, Tatiana L.

    2016-12-01

    This paper is devoted to the study of the scattering of a three-dimensional (3-D) Gaussian beam with the circular cross section from a double periodic perforated gyromagnetic layer with polarization independent unit-cell, in the quasi-static approximation. We used the plane-wave spectrum representation for Gaussian beam field representation and reduced it to a single integral representation. The phenomena of the lateral beam shift influenced by Faraday rotation and the nearly total beam transmission when passing through gyromagnetic slab biased with an external static magnetic field in the Faraday configuration were considered.

  14. 3D handheld laser scanner based approach for automatic identification and localization of EEG sensors.

    PubMed

    Koessler, Laurent; Cecchin, Thierry; Ternisien, Eric; Maillard, Louis

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes and assesses for the first time the use of a handheld 3D laser scanner for scalp EEG sensor localization and co-registration with magnetic resonance images. Study on five subjects showed that the scanner had an equivalent accuracy, a better repeatability, and was faster than the reference electromagnetic digitizer. According to electrical source imaging, somatosensory evoked potentials experiments validated its ability to give precise sensor localization. With our automatic labeling method, the data provided by the scanner could be directly introduced in the source localization studies.

  15. Shadowdetection from Vhr Aerial Images in Urban Area by Using 3d City Models and a Decision Fusion Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, K. L.; Gorte, B. G. H.

    2017-09-01

    In VHR(very high resolution) aerial images, shadows indicating height information are valuable for validating or detecting changes on an existing 3D city model. In the paper, we propose a novel and full automatic approach for shadow detection from VHR images. Instead of automatic thresholding, the supervised machine learning approach is expected with better performance on shadow detection, but it requires to obtain training samples manually. The shadow image reconstructed from an existing 3D city model can provide free training samples with large variety. However, as the 3D model is often not accuracy, incomplete and outdated, a small portion of training samples are mislabeled. The erosion morphology is provided to remove boundary pixels which have high mislabeling possibility from the reconstructed image. Moreover, the quadratic discriminant analysis (QDA) which is resistant to the mislabeling is chosen. Further, two feature domains, RGB and ratio of the hue over the intensity, are analyzed to have complementary effects on better detecting different objects. Finally, a decision fusion approach is proposed to combine the results wisely from preliminary classifications from two feature domains. The fuzzy membership is a confidence measurement and determines the way of making decision, in the meanwhile the memberships are weighted by an entropy measurements to indicate their certainties. The experimental results on two cities in the Netherlands demonstrate that the proposed approach outperforms the two separate classifiers and two stacked-vector fusion approaches.

  16. Virtual Boutique: a 3D modeling and content-based management approach to e-commerce

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paquet, Eric; El-Hakim, Sabry F.

    2000-12-01

    The Virtual Boutique is made out of three modules: the decor, the market and the search engine. The decor is the physical space occupied by the Virtual Boutique. It can reproduce any existing boutique. For this purpose, photogrammetry is used. A set of pictures of a real boutique or space is taken and a virtual 3D representation of this space is calculated from them. Calculations are performed with software developed at NRC. This representation consists of meshes and texture maps. The camera used in the acquisition process determines the resolution of the texture maps. Decorative elements are added like painting, computer generated objects and scanned objects. The objects are scanned with laser scanner developed at NRC. This scanner allows simultaneous acquisition of range and color information based on white laser beam triangulation. The second module, the market, is made out of all the merchandises and the manipulators, which are used to manipulate and compare the objects. The third module, the search engine, can search the inventory based on an object shown by the customer in order to retrieve similar objects base don shape and color. The items of interest are displayed in the boutique by reconfiguring the market space, which mean that the boutique can be continuously customized according to the customer's needs. The Virtual Boutique is entirely written in Java 3D and can run in mono and stereo mode and has been optimized in order to allow high quality rendering.

  17. Automated Segmentation of the Right Ventricle in 3D Echocardiography: A Kalman Filter State Estimation Approach.

    PubMed

    Bersvendsen, Jorn; Orderud, Fredrik; Massey, Richard John; Fosså, Kristian; Gerard, Olivier; Urheim, Stig; Samset, Eigil

    2016-01-01

    As the right ventricle's (RV) role in cardiovascular diseases is being more widely recognized, interest in RV imaging, function and quantification is growing. However, there are currently few RV quantification methods for 3D echocardiography presented in the literature or commercially available. In this paper we propose an automated RV segmentation method for 3D echocardiographic images. We represent the RV geometry by a Doo-Sabin subdivision surface with deformation modes derived from a training set of manual segmentations. The segmentation is then represented as a state estimation problem and solved with an extended Kalman filter by combining the RV geometry with a motion model and edge detection. Validation was performed by comparing surface-surface distances, volumes and ejection fractions in 17 patients with aortic insufficiency between the proposed method, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and a manual echocardiographic reference. The algorithm was efficient with a mean computation time of 2.0 s. The mean absolute distances between the proposed and manual segmentations were 3.6 ± 0.7 mm. Good agreements of end diastolic volume, end systolic volume and ejection fraction with respect to MRI ( -26±24 mL , -16±26 mL and 0 ± 10%, respectively) and a manual echocardiographic reference (7 ± 30 mL, 13 ± 17 mL and -5±7% , respectively) were observed.

  18. A 3D modeling approach to complex faults with multi-source data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Qiang; Xu, Hua; Zou, Xukai; Lei, Hongzhuan

    2015-04-01

    Fault modeling is a very important step in making an accurate and reliable 3D geological model. Typical existing methods demand enough fault data to be able to construct complex fault models, however, it is well known that the available fault data are generally sparse and undersampled. In this paper, we propose a workflow of fault modeling, which can integrate multi-source data to construct fault models. For the faults that are not modeled with these data, especially small-scale or approximately parallel with the sections, we propose the fault deduction method to infer the hanging wall and footwall lines after displacement calculation. Moreover, using the fault cutting algorithm can supplement the available fault points on the location where faults cut each other. Increasing fault points in poor sample areas can not only efficiently construct fault models, but also reduce manual intervention. By using a fault-based interpolation and remeshing the horizons, an accurate 3D geological model can be constructed. The method can naturally simulate geological structures no matter whether the available geological data are sufficient or not. A concrete example of using the method in Tangshan, China, shows that the method can be applied to broad and complex geological areas.

  19. Early Earth plume-lid tectonics: A high-resolution 3D numerical modelling approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, R.; Gerya, T.

    2016-10-01

    Geological-geochemical evidence point towards higher mantle potential temperature and a different type of tectonics (global plume-lid tectonics) in the early Earth (>3.2 Ga) compared to the present day (global plate tectonics). In order to investigate tectono-magmatic processes associated with plume-lid tectonics and crustal growth under hotter mantle temperature conditions, we conduct a series of 3D high-resolution magmatic-thermomechanical models with the finite-difference code I3ELVIS. No external plate tectonic forces are applied to isolate 3D effects of various plume-lithosphere and crust-mantle interactions. Results of the numerical experiments show two distinct phases in coupled crust-mantle evolution: (1) a longer (80-100 Myr) and relatively quiet 'growth phase' which is marked by growth of crust and lithosphere, followed by (2) a short (∼20 Myr) and catastrophic 'removal phase', where unstable parts of the crust and mantle lithosphere are removed by eclogitic dripping and later delamination. This modelling suggests that the early Earth plume-lid tectonic regime followed a pattern of episodic growth and removal also called episodic overturn with a periodicity of ∼100 Myr.

  20. 3D finite element model of the diabetic neuropathic foot: a gait analysis driven approach.

    PubMed

    Guiotto, Annamaria; Sawacha, Zimi; Guarneri, Gabriella; Avogaro, Angelo; Cobelli, Claudio

    2014-09-22

    Diabetic foot is an invalidating complication of diabetes that can lead to foot ulcers. Three-dimensional (3D) finite element analysis (FEA) allows characterizing the loads developed in the different anatomical structures of the foot in dynamic conditions. The aim of this study was to develop a subject specific 3D foot FE model (FEM) of a diabetic neuropathic (DNS) and a healthy (HS) subject, whose subject specificity can be found in term of foot geometry and boundary conditions. Kinematics, kinetics and plantar pressure (PP) data were extracted from the gait analysis trials of the two subjects with this purpose. The FEM were developed segmenting bones, cartilage and skin from MRI and drawing a horizontal plate as ground support. Materials properties were adopted from previous literature. FE simulations were run with the kinematics and kinetics data of four different phases of the stance phase of gait (heel strike, loading response, midstance and push off). FEMs were then driven by group gait data of 10 neuropathic and 10 healthy subjects. Model validation focused on agreement between FEM-simulated and experimental PP. The peak values and the total distribution of the pressures were compared for this purpose. Results showed that the models were less robust when driven from group data and underestimated the PP in each foot subarea. In particular in the case of the neuropathic subject's model the mean errors between experimental and simulated data were around the 20% of the peak values. This knowledge is crucial in understanding the aetiology of diabetic foot.

  1. Interactive 3D-PDF Presentations for the Simulation and Quantification of Extended Endoscopic Endonasal Surgical Approaches.

    PubMed

    Mavar-Haramija, Marija; Prats-Galino, Alberto; Méndez, Juan A Juanes; Puigdelívoll-Sánchez, Anna; de Notaris, Matteo

    2015-10-01

    A three-dimensional (3D) model of the skull base was reconstructed from the pre- and post-dissection head CT images and embedded in a Portable Document Format (PDF) file, which can be opened by freely available software and used offline. The CT images were segmented using a specific 3D software platform for biomedical data, and the resulting 3D geometrical models of anatomical structures were used for dual purpose: to simulate the extended endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal approaches and to perform the quantitative analysis of the procedures. The analysis consisted of bone removal quantification and the calculation of quantitative parameters (surgical freedom and exposure area) of each procedure. The results are presented in three PDF documents containing JavaScript-based functions. The 3D-PDF files include reconstructions of the nasal structures (nasal septum, vomer, middle turbinates), the bony structures of the anterior skull base and maxillofacial region and partial reconstructions of the optic nerve, the hypoglossal and vidian canals and the internal carotid arteries. Alongside the anatomical model, axial, sagittal and coronal CT images are shown. Interactive 3D presentations were created to explain the surgery and the associated quantification methods step-by-step. The resulting 3D-PDF files allow the user to interact with the model through easily available software, free of charge and in an intuitive manner. The files are available for offline use on a personal computer and no previous specialized knowledge in informatics is required. The documents can be downloaded at http://hdl.handle.net/2445/55224 .

  2. A Bayesian approach to real-time 3D tumor localization via monoscopic x-ray imaging during treatment delivery

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Ruijiang; Fahimian, Benjamin P.; Xing, Lei

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: Monoscopic x-ray imaging with on-board kV devices is an attractive approach for real-time image guidance in modern radiation therapy such as VMAT or IMRT, but it falls short in providing reliable information along the direction of imaging x-ray. By effectively taking consideration of projection data at prior times and/or angles through a Bayesian formalism, the authors develop an algorithm for real-time and full 3D tumor localization with a single x-ray imager during treatment delivery. Methods: First, a prior probability density function is constructed using the 2D tumor locations on the projection images acquired during patient setup. Whenever an x-ray image is acquired during the treatment delivery, the corresponding 2D tumor location on the imager is used to update the likelihood function. The unresolved third dimension is obtained by maximizing the posterior probability distribution. The algorithm can also be used in a retrospective fashion when all the projection images during the treatment delivery are used for 3D localization purposes. The algorithm does not involve complex optimization of any model parameter and therefore can be used in a ''plug-and-play'' fashion. The authors validated the algorithm using (1) simulated 3D linear and elliptic motion and (2) 3D tumor motion trajectories of a lung and a pancreas patient reproduced by a physical phantom. Continuous kV images were acquired over a full gantry rotation with the Varian TrueBeam on-board imaging system. Three scenarios were considered: fluoroscopic setup, cone beam CT setup, and retrospective analysis. Results: For the simulation study, the RMS 3D localization error is 1.2 and 2.4 mm for the linear and elliptic motions, respectively. For the phantom experiments, the 3D localization error is < 1 mm on average and < 1.5 mm at 95th percentile in the lung and pancreas cases for all three scenarios. The difference in 3D localization error for different scenarios is small and is not

  3. New developments at PTB in 3D-AFM with tapping and torsion AFM mode and vector approach probing strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, G.; Hässler-Grohne, W.; Hüser, D.; Wolff, H.; Fluegge, J.; Bosse, H.

    2011-06-01

    A new 3D-AFM for true 3D measurements of nano structures has been developed at Physikalisch Technische-Bundesanstalt, the national metrology institute of Germany. In its configuration, two piezo actuators are applied to drive the AFM cantilever near its vertical and torsional resonant frequencies. In such a way, the AFM tip can probe the surface with a vertical and/or a lateral oscillation, offering high 3D probing sensitivity. For enhancing measurement flexibility as well as reducing tip wear, a so called "vector approach probing" (VAP) method has been applied. The sample is measured point by point using this method. At each probing point, the tip is approached towards the surface in its normal direction until the desired tip-sample interaction is detected and then immediately withdrawn from the surface. Preliminary experimental results show promising performance of the developed system. The measurement of a line structure of 800 nm height employing a super sharp AFM tip is performed, showing a repeatability of its 3D profiles of better than 1 nm (p-v). A single crystal critical dimension reference material (SCCDRM) having features with almost vertical sidewall is measured using a flared AFM tip. Results show that the feature has averaged left and right sidewall angles of 88.64° and 88.67deg;, respectively. However, the feature width non-uniformity may reach 10 nm within the measurement range of 1 μm. The standard deviation of the averaged middle CD values of 7 repeated measurements reaches 0.35 nm. In addition, an investigation of long term measurement stability is performed on a PTB photomask. The results shows that the 3D-AFM has a drift rate of about 0.00033 nm per line, which confirms the high measurement stability and the very low tip wear.

  4. Microfluidic volumetric flow determination using optical coherence tomography speckle: An autocorrelation approach

    SciTech Connect

    De Pretto, Lucas R. Nogueira, Gesse E. C.; Freitas, Anderson Z.

    2016-04-28

    Functional modalities of Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) based on speckle analysis are emerging in the literature. We propose a simple approach to the autocorrelation of OCT signal to enable volumetric flow rate differentiation, based on decorrelation time. Our results show that this technique could distinguish flows separated by 3 μl/min, limited by the acquisition speed of the system. We further perform a B-scan of gradient flow inside a microchannel, enabling the visualization of the drag effect on the walls.

  5. Engineering approaches to study fibrosis in 3-D in vitro systems.

    PubMed

    Porras, Ana M; Hutson, Heather N; Berger, Anthony J; Masters, Kristyn S

    2016-08-01

    Fibrotic diseases occur in virtually every tissue of the body and are a major cause of mortality, yet they remain largely untreatable and poorly understood on a mechanistic level. The development of anti-fibrotic agents has been hampered, in part, by the insufficient fibrosis biomimicry provided by traditional in vitro platforms. This review focuses on recent advancements toward creating 3-D platforms that mimic key features of fibrosis, as well as the application of novel imaging and sensor techniques to analyze dynamic extracellular matrix remodeling. Several opportunities are highlighted to apply new tools from the fields of biomaterials, imaging, and systems biology to yield pathophysiologically relevant in vitro platforms that improve our understanding of fibrosis and may enable identification of potential treatment targets. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. A parallel 3-D discrete wavelet transform architecture using pipelined lifting scheme approach for video coding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hegde, Ganapathi; Vaya, Pukhraj

    2013-10-01

    This article presents a parallel architecture for 3-D discrete wavelet transform (3-DDWT). The proposed design is based on the 1-D pipelined lifting scheme. The architecture is fully scalable beyond the present coherent Daubechies filter bank (9, 7). This 3-DDWT architecture has advantages such as no group of pictures restriction and reduced memory referencing. It offers low power consumption, low latency and high throughput. The computing technique is based on the concept that lifting scheme minimises the storage requirement. The application specific integrated circuit implementation of the proposed architecture is done by synthesising it using 65 nm Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Company standard cell library. It offers a speed of 486 MHz with a power consumption of 2.56 mW. This architecture is suitable for real-time video compression even with large frame dimensions.

  7. 3D Modeling of Spectra and Light Curves of Hot Jupiters with PHOENIX; a First Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez-Torres, J. J.

    2016-04-01

    A detailed global circulation model was used to feed the PHOENIX code and calculate 3D spectra and light curves of hot Jupiters. Cloud free and dusty radiative fluxes for the planet HD179949b were modeled to show differences between them. The PHOENIX simulations can explain the broad features of the observed 8 μm light curves, including the fact that the planet-star flux ratio peaks before the secondary eclipse. The PHOENIX reflection spectrum matches the Spitzer secondary-eclipse depth at 3.6 μm and underpredicts eclipse depths at 4.5, 5.8 and 8.0 μm. These discrepancies result from the chemical composition and suggest the incorporation of different metallicities in future studies.

  8. Mass Movement Susceptibility in the Western San Juan Mountains, Colorado: A Preliminary 3-D Mapping Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelkar, K. A.; Giardino, J. R.

    2015-12-01

    Mass movement is a major activity that impacts lives of humans and their infrastructure. Human activity in steep, mountainous regions is especially at risk to this potential hazard. Thus, the identification and quantification of risk by mapping and determining mass movement susceptibility are fundamental in protecting lives, resources and ensuring proper land use regulation and planning. Specific mass-movement processes including debris flows, rock falls, snow avalanches and landslides continuously modify the landscape of the San Juan Mountains. Historically, large-magnitude slope failures have repeatedly occurred in the region. Common triggers include intense, long-duration precipitation, freeze-thaw processes, human activity and various volcanic lithologies overlying weaker sedimentary formations. Predicting mass movement is challenging because of its episodic and spatially, discontinuous occurrence. Landslides in mountain terrain are characterized as widespread, highly mobile and have a long duration of activity. We developed a 3-D model for landslide susceptibility using Geographic Information Systems Technology (GIST). The study area encompasses eight USGS quadrangles: Ridgway, Dallas, Mount Sneffels, Ouray, Telluride, Ironton, Ophir and Silverton. Fieldwork consisted of field reconnaissance mapping at 1:5,000 focusing on surficial geomorphology. Field mapping was used to identify potential locations, which then received additional onsite investigation and photographic documentation of features indicative of slope failure. A GIS module was created using seven terrain spatial databases: geology, surficial geomorphology (digitized), slope aspect, slope angle, vegetation, soils and distance to infrastructure to map risk. The GIS database will help determine risk zonation for the study area. Correlations between terrain parameters leading to slope failure were determined through the GIS module. This 3-D model will provide a spatial perspective of the landscape to

  9. 3D topography measurements on correlation cells—a new approach to forensic ballistics identifications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, John; Chu, Wei; Tong, Mingsi; Soons, Johannes

    2014-06-01

    Based on three-dimensional (3D) topography measurements on correlation cells, the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has developed the ‘NIST Ballistics Identification System (NBIS)’ aimed at accurate ballistics identifications and fast ballistics evidence searches. The 3D topographies are divided into arrays of correlation cells to identify ‘valid correlation areas’ and eliminate ‘invalid correlation areas’ from the matching and identification procedure. A ‘congruent matching cells’ (CMC)’ method using three types of identification parameters of the paired correlation cells (cross correlation function maximum CCFmax, spatial registration position in x-y and registration angle θ) is used for high accuracy ballistics identifications. ‘Synchronous processing’ is proposed for correlating multiple cell pairs at the same time to increase the correlation speed. The proposed NBIS can be used for correlations of both geometrical topographies and optical intensity images. All the correlation parameters and algorithms are in the public domain and subject to open tests. An error rate reporting procedure has been developed that can greatly add to the scientific support for the firearm and toolmark identification specialty, and give confidence to the trier of fact in court proceedings. The NBIS is engineered to employ transparent identification parameters and criteria, statistical models and correlation algorithms. In this way, interoperability between different ballistics identification systems can be more easily achieved. This interoperability will make the NBIS suitable for ballistics identifications and evidence searches with large national databases, such as the National Integrated Ballistic Information Network in the United States.

  10. Feeding biomechanics of Late Triassic metoposaurids (Amphibia: Temnospondyli): a 3D finite element analysis approach.

    PubMed

    Fortuny, Josep; Marcé-Nogué, Jordi; Konietzko-Meier, Dorota

    2017-03-29

    The Late Triassic freshwater ecosystems were occupied by different tetrapod groups including large-sized anamniotes, such as metoposaurids. Most members of this group of temnospondyls acquired gigantic sizes (up to 5 m long) with a nearly worldwide distribution. The paleoecology of metoposaurids is controversial; they have been historically considered passive, bottom-dwelling animals, waiting for prey on the bottom of rivers and lakes, or they have been suggested to be active mid-water feeders. The present study aims to expand upon the paleoecological interpretations of these animals using 3D finite element analyses (FEA). Skulls from two taxa, Metoposaurus krasiejowensis, a gigantic taxon from Europe, and Apachesaurus gregorii, a non-gigantic taxon from North America, were analyzed under different biomechanical scenarios. Both 3D models of the skulls were scaled to allow comparisons between them and reveal that the general stress distribution pattern found in both taxa is clearly similar in all scenarios. In light of our results, both previous hypotheses about the paleoecology of these animals can be partly merged: metoposaurids probably were ambush and active predators, but not the top predators of these aquatic environments. The FEA results demonstrate that they were particularly efficient at bilateral biting, and together with their characteristically anteropositioned orbits, optimal for an ambush strategy. Nonetheless, the results also show that these animals were capable of lateral strikes of the head, suggesting active hunting of prey. Regarding the important skull size differences between the taxa analyzed, our results suggest that the size reduction in the North American taxon could be related to drastic environmental changes or the increase of competitors. The size reduction might have helped them expand into new ecological niches, but they likely remained fully aquatic, as are all other metoposaurids.

  11. 3D geometry analysis of the medial meniscus--a statistical shape modeling approach.

    PubMed

    Vrancken, A C T; Crijns, S P M; Ploegmakers, M J M; O'Kane, C; van Tienen, T G; Janssen, D; Buma, P; Verdonschot, N

    2014-10-01

    The geometry-dependent functioning of the meniscus indicates that detailed knowledge on 3D meniscus geometry and its inter-subject variation is essential to design well functioning anatomically shaped meniscus replacements. Therefore, the aim of this study was to quantify 3D meniscus geometry and to determine whether variation in medial meniscus geometry is size- or shape-driven. Also we performed a cluster analysis to identify distinct morphological groups of medial menisci and assessed whether meniscal geometry is gender-dependent. A statistical shape model was created, containing the meniscus geometries of 35 subjects (20 females, 15 males) that were obtained from MR images. A principal component analysis was performed to determine the most important modes of geometry variation and the characteristic changes per principal component were evaluated. Each meniscus from the original dataset was then reconstructed as a linear combination of principal components. This allowed the comparison of male and female menisci, and a cluster analysis to determine distinct morphological meniscus groups. Of the variation in medial meniscus geometry, 53.8% was found to be due to primarily size-related differences and 29.6% due to shape differences. Shape changes were most prominent in the cross-sectional plane, rather than in the transverse plane. Significant differences between male and female menisci were only found for principal component 1, which predominantly reflected size differences. The cluster analysis resulted in four clusters, yet these clusters represented two statistically different meniscal shapes, as differences between cluster 1, 2 and 4 were only present for principal component 1. This study illustrates that differences in meniscal geometry cannot be explained by scaling only, but that different meniscal shapes can be distinguished. Functional analysis, e.g. through finite element modeling, is required to assess whether these distinct shapes actually influence

  12. 3D geometry analysis of the medial meniscus – a statistical shape modeling approach

    PubMed Central

    Vrancken, A C T; Crijns, S P M; Ploegmakers, M J M; O'Kane, C; van Tienen, T G; Janssen, D; Buma, P; Verdonschot, N

    2014-01-01

    The geometry-dependent functioning of the meniscus indicates that detailed knowledge on 3D meniscus geometry and its inter-subject variation is essential to design well functioning anatomically shaped meniscus replacements. Therefore, the aim of this study was to quantify 3D meniscus geometry and to determine whether variation in medial meniscus geometry is size- or shape-driven. Also we performed a cluster analysis to identify distinct morphological groups of medial menisci and assessed whether meniscal geometry is gender-dependent. A statistical shape model was created, containing the meniscus geometries of 35 subjects (20 females, 15 males) that were obtained from MR images. A principal component analysis was performed to determine the most important modes of geometry variation and the characteristic changes per principal component were evaluated. Each meniscus from the original dataset was then reconstructed as a linear combination of principal components. This allowed the comparison of male and female menisci, and a cluster analysis to determine distinct morphological meniscus groups. Of the variation in medial meniscus geometry, 53.8% was found to be due to primarily size-related differences and 29.6% due to shape differences. Shape changes were most prominent in the cross-sectional plane, rather than in the transverse plane. Significant differences between male and female menisci were only found for principal component 1, which predominantly reflected size differences. The cluster analysis resulted in four clusters, yet these clusters represented two statistically different meniscal shapes, as differences between cluster 1, 2 and 4 were only present for principal component 1. This study illustrates that differences in meniscal geometry cannot be explained by scaling only, but that different meniscal shapes can be distinguished. Functional analysis, e.g. through finite element modeling, is required to assess whether these distinct shapes actually influence

  13. Computational chemistry approach to protein kinase recognition using 3D stochastic van der Waals spectral moments.

    PubMed

    González-Díaz, Humberto; Saíz-Urra, Liane; Molina, Reinaldo; González-Díaz, Yenny; Sánchez-González, Angeles

    2007-04-30

    Three-dimensional (3D) protein structures now frequently lack functional annotations because of the increase in the rate at which chemical structures are solved with respect to experimental knowledge of biological activity. As a result, predicting structure-function relationships for proteins is an active research field in computational chemistry and has implications in medicinal chemistry, biochemistry and proteomics. In previous studies stochastic spectral moments were used to predict protein stability or function (González-Díaz, H. et al. Bioorg Med Chem 2005, 13, 323; Biopolymers 2005, 77, 296). Nevertheless, these moments take into consideration only electrostatic interactions and ignore other important factors such as van der Waals interactions. The present study introduces a new class of 3D structure molecular descriptors for folded proteins named the stochastic van der Waals spectral moments ((o)beta(k)). Among many possible applications, recognition of kinases was selected due to the fact that previous computational chemistry studies in this area have not been reported, despite the widespread distribution of kinases. The best linear model found was Kact = -9.44 degrees beta(0)(c) +10.94 degrees beta(5)(c) -2.40 degrees beta(0)(i) + 2.45 degrees beta(5)(m) + 0.73, where core (c), inner (i) and middle (m) refer to specific spatial protein regions. The model with a high Matthew's regression coefficient (0.79) correctly classified 206 out of 230 proteins (89.6%) including both training and predicting series. An area under the ROC curve of 0.94 differentiates our model from a random classifier. A subsequent principal components analysis of 152 heterogeneous proteins demonstrated that beta(k) codifies information different to other descriptors used in protein computational chemistry studies. Finally, the model recognizes 110 out of 125 kinases (88.0%) in a virtual screening experiment and this can be considered as an additional validation study (these proteins

  14. Personalized development of human organs using 3D printing technology.

    PubMed

    Radenkovic, Dina; Solouk, Atefeh; Seifalian, Alexander

    2016-02-01

    3D printing is a technique of fabricating physical models from a 3D volumetric digital image. The image is sliced and printed using a specific material into thin layers, and successive layering of the material produces a 3D model. It has already been used for printing surgical models for preoperative planning and in constructing personalized prostheses for patients. The ultimate goal is to achieve the development of functional human organs and tissues, to overcome limitations of organ transplantation created by the lack of organ donors and life-long immunosuppression. We hypothesized a precision medicine approach to human organ fabrication using 3D printed technology, in which the digital volumetric data would be collected by imaging of a patient, i.e. CT or MRI images followed by mathematical modeling to create a digital 3D image. Then a suitable biocompatible material, with an optimal resolution for cells seeding and maintenance of cell viability during the printing process, would be printed with a compatible printer type and finally implanted into the patient. Life-saving operations with 3D printed implants were already performed in patients. However, several issues need to be addressed before translational application of 3D printing into clinical medicine. These are vascularization, innervation, and financial cost of 3D printing and safety of biomaterials used for the construct. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Sparsity-based fast CGH generation using layer-based approach for 3D point cloud model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hak Gu; Jeong, Hyunwook; Ro, Yong Man

    2017-03-01

    Computer generated hologram (CGH) is becoming increasingly important for a 3-D display in various applications including virtual reality. In the CGH, holographic fringe patterns are generated by numerically calculating them on computer simulation systems. However, a heavy computational cost is required to calculate the complex amplitude on CGH plane for all points of 3D objects. This paper proposes a new fast CGH generation based on the sparsity of CGH for 3D point cloud model. The aim of the proposed method is to significantly reduce computational complexity while maintaining the quality of the holographic fringe patterns. To that end, we present a new layer-based approach for calculating the complex amplitude distribution on the CGH plane by using sparse FFT (sFFT). We observe the CGH of a layer of 3D objects is sparse so that dominant CGH is rapidly generated from a small set of signals by sFFT. Experimental results have shown that the proposed method is one order of magnitude faster than recently reported fast CGH generation.

  16. A visual data-mining approach using 3D thoracic CT images for classification between benign and malignant pulmonary nodules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawata, Yoshiki; Niki, Noboru; Ohamatsu, Hironobu; Kusumoto, Masahiko; Kakinuma, Ryutaro; Mori, Kiyoshi; Yamada, K.; Nishiyama, Hiroyuki; Eguchi, Kenji; Kaneko, Masahiro; Moriyama, Noriyuki

    2003-05-01

    This paper presents a visual data-mining approach to assist physicians for classification between benign and malignant pulmonary nodules. This approach retrieves and displays nodules which exhibit morphological and internal profiles consistent to the nodule in question. It uses a three-dimensional (3-D) CT image database of pulmonary nodules for which diagnosis is known. The central module in this approach makes possible analysis of the query nodule image and extraction of the features of interest: shape, surrounding structure, and internal structure of the nodules. The nodule shape is characterized by principal axes, while the surrounding and internal structure is represented by the distribution pattern of CT density and 3-D curvature indexes. The nodule representation is then applied to a similarity measure such as a correlation coefficient. For each query case, we sort all the nodules of the database from most to less similar ones. By applying the retrieval method to our database, we present its feasibility to search the similar 3-D nodule images.

  17. Novel 3D Approach to Flare Modeling via Interactive IDL Widget Tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nita, G. M.; Fleishman, G. D.; Gary, D. E.; Kuznetsov, A.; Kontar, E. P.

    2011-12-01

    Currently, and soon-to-be, available sophisticated 3D models of particle acceleration and transport in solar flares require a new level of user-friendly visualization and analysis tools allowing quick and easy adjustment of the model parameters and computation of realistic radiation patterns (images, spectra, polarization, etc). We report the current state of the art of these tools in development, already proved to be highly efficient for the direct flare modeling. We present an interactive IDL widget application intended to provide a flexible tool that allows the user to generate spatially resolved radio and X-ray spectra. The object-based architecture of this application provides full interaction with imported 3D magnetic field models (e.g., from an extrapolation) that may be embedded in a global coronal model. Various tools provided allow users to explore the magnetic connectivity of the model by generating magnetic field lines originating in user-specified volume positions. Such lines may serve as reference lines for creating magnetic flux tubes, which are further populated with user-defined analytical thermal/non thermal particle distribution models. By default, the application integrates IDL callable DLL and Shared libraries containing fast GS emission codes developed in FORTRAN and C++ and soft and hard X-ray codes developed in IDL. However, the interactive interface allows interchanging these default libraries with any user-defined IDL or external callable codes designed to solve the radiation transfer equation in the same or other wavelength ranges of interest. To illustrate the tool capacity and generality, we present a step-by-step real-time computation of microwave and X-ray images from realistic magnetic structures obtained from a magnetic field extrapolation preceding a real event, and compare them with the actual imaging data obtained by NORH and RHESSI instruments. We discuss further anticipated developments of the tools needed to accommodate

  18. (*) A 3D Tissue-Printing Approach for Validation of Diffusion Tensor Imaging in Skeletal Muscle.

    PubMed

    Berry, David B; You, Shangting; Warner, John; Frank, Lawrence R; Chen, Shaochen; Ward, Samuel R

    2017-09-01

    The ability to noninvasively assess skeletal muscle microstructure, which predicts function and disease, would be of significant clinical value. One method that holds this promise is diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging (DT-MRI), which is sensitive to the microscopic diffusion of water within tissues and has become ubiquitous in neuroimaging as a way of assessing neuronal structure and damage. However, its application to the assessment of changes in muscle microstructure associated with injury, pathology, or age remains poorly defined, because it is difficult to precisely control muscle microstructural features in vivo. However, recent advances in additive manufacturing technologies allow precision-engineered diffusion phantoms with histology informed skeletal muscle geometry to be manufactured. Therefore, the goal of this study was to develop skeletal muscle phantoms at relevant size scales to relate microstructural features to MRI-based diffusion measurements. A digital light projection based rapid 3D printing method was used to fabricate polyethylene glycol diacrylate based diffusion phantoms with (1) idealized muscle geometry (no geometry; fiber sizes of 30, 50, or 70 μm or fiber size of 50 μm with 40% of walls randomly deleted) or (2) histology-based geometry (normal and after 30-days of denervation) containing 20% or 50% phosphate-buffered saline (PBS). Mean absolute percent error (8%) of the printed phantoms indicated high conformity to templates when "fibers" were >50 μm. A multiple spin-echo echo planar imaging diffusion sequence, capable of acquiring diffusion weighted data at several echo times, was used in an attempt to combine relaxometry and diffusion techniques with the goal of separating intracellular and extracellular diffusion signals. When fiber size increased (30-70 μm) in the 20% PBS phantom, fractional anisotropy (FA) decreased (0.32-0.26) and mean diffusivity (MD) increased (0.44 × 10(-3) mm(2)/s-0.70 × 10(-3) mm

  19. Robust and scalable 3-D geo-electromagnetic modelling approach using the finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grayver, Alexander V.; Bürg, Markus

    2014-07-01

    We present a robust and scalable solver for time-harmonic Maxwell's equations for problems with large conductivity contrasts, wide range of frequencies, stretched grids and locally refined meshes. The solver is part of the fully distributed adaptive 3-D electromagnetic modelling scheme which employs the finite element method and unstructured non-conforming hexahedral meshes for spatial discretization using the open-source software deal.II. We use the complex-valued electric field formulation and split it into two real-valued equations for which we utilize an optimal block-diagonal pre-conditioner. Application of this pre-conditioner requires the solution of two smaller real-valued symmetric problems. We solve them by using either a direct solver or the conjugate gradient method pre-conditioned with the recently introduced auxiliary space technique. The auxiliary space pre-conditioner reformulates the original problem in form of several simpler ones, which are then solved using highly efficient algebraic multigrid methods. In this paper, we consider the magnetotelluric case and verify our numerical scheme by using COMMEMI 3-D models. Afterwards, we run a series of numerical experiments and demonstrate that the solver converges in a small number of iterations for a wide frequency range and variable problem sizes. The number of iterations is independent of the problem size, but exhibits a mild dependency on frequency. To test the stability of the method on locally refined meshes, we have implemented a residual-based a posteriori error estimator and compared it with uniform mesh refinement for problems up to 200 million unknowns. We test the scalability of the most time consuming parts of our code and show that they fulfill the strong scaling assumption as long as each MPI process possesses enough degrees of freedom to alleviate communication overburden. Finally, we refer back to a direct solver-based pre-conditioner and analyse its complexity in time. The results show

  20. 5D Modelling: An Efficient Approach for Creating Spatiotemporal Predictive 3D Maps of Large-Scale Cultural Resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doulamis, A.; Doulamis, N.; Ioannidis, C.; Chrysouli, C.; Grammalidis, N.; Dimitropoulos, K.; Potsiou, C.; Stathopoulou, E.-K.; Ioannides, M.

    2015-08-01

    Outdoor large-scale cultural sites are mostly sensitive to environmental, natural and human made factors, implying an imminent need for a spatio-temporal assessment to identify regions of potential cultural interest (material degradation, structuring, conservation). On the other hand, in Cultural Heritage research quite different actors are involved (archaeologists, curators, conservators, simple users) each of diverse needs. All these statements advocate that a 5D modelling (3D geometry plus time plus levels of details) is ideally required for preservation and assessment of outdoor large scale cultural sites, which is currently implemented as a simple aggregation of 3D digital models at different time and levels of details. The main bottleneck of such an approach is its complexity, making 5D modelling impossible to be validated in real life conditions. In this paper, a cost effective and affordable framework for 5D modelling is proposed based on a spatial-temporal dependent aggregation of 3D digital models, by incorporating a predictive assessment procedure to indicate which regions (surfaces) of an object should be reconstructed at higher levels of details at next time instances and which at lower ones. In this way, dynamic change history maps are created, indicating spatial probabilities of regions needed further 3D modelling at forthcoming instances. Using these maps, predictive assessment can be made, that is, to localize surfaces within the objects where a high accuracy reconstruction process needs to be activated at the forthcoming time instances. The proposed 5D Digital Cultural Heritage Model (5D-DCHM) is implemented using open interoperable standards based on the CityGML framework, which also allows the description of additional semantic metadata information. Visualization aspects are also supported to allow easy manipulation, interaction and representation of the 5D-DCHM geometry and the respective semantic information. The open source 3DCity

  1. A Chemical Approach to 3-D Lithographic Patterning of Si and GeNanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Sharp, I.D.; Xu, Q.; Yi, D.O.; Liao, C.Y.; Ager III, J.W.; Beeman, J.W.; Yu, K.M.; Robinson, J.T.; Dubon, O.D.; Chrzan, D.C.; Haller, E.E.

    2005-12-12

    Ion implantation into silica followed by thermal annealingis an established growth method for Si and Ge nanocrystals. Wedemonstrate that growth of Group IV semiconductor nanocrystals can besuppressed by co-implantation of oxygen prior to annealing. For Sinanocrystals, at low Si/O dose ratios, oxygen co-implantation leads to areduction of the average nanocrystal size and a blue-shift of thephotoluminescence emission energy. For both Si and Ge nanocrystals, atlarger Si/O or Ge/O dose ratios, the implanted specie is oxidized andnanocrystals do not form. This chemical deactivation was utilized toachieve patterned growth of Si and Ge nanocrystals. Si was implanted intoa thin SiO2 film on a Si substrate followed by oxygen implantationthrough an electron beam lithographically defined stencil mask. Thermalannealing of the co-implanted structure yields two-dimensionallypatterned growth of Si nanocrystals under the masked regions. We applieda previously developed process to obtain exposed nanocrystals byselective HF etching of the silica matrix to these patterned structures.Atomic force microscopy (AFM) of etched structures revealed that exposednanocrystals are not laterally displaced from their original positionsduring the etching process. Therefore, this process provides a means ofachieving patterned structures of exposed nanocrystals. The possibilitiesfor scaling this chemical-based lithography process to smaller featuresand for extending it to 3-D patterning is discussed.

  2. 3D template fabrication process for the dual damascene NIL approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butschke, Joerg; Irmscher, Mathias; Resnick, Douglas; Sailer, Holger; Thompson, Ecron

    2007-05-01

    NIL technique enables an easy replication of three dimensional patterns. Combined with a UV printable low-k material the NIL lithography can dramatically simplify the dual damascene process. Goal of this work was to develop a template process scheme which enables the generation of high resolution pillars on top of corresponding lines for direct printing of later vias and metal lines. The process flow is based on conventional 6025 photomask blanks. Exposure was done on a variable shaped e-beam writer Vistec SB350 using a sample of an advanced negative tone CAR and Fujifilm pCAR FEP171 for the first and the second layer, respectively. Chrome and quartz etching was accomplished in an Oerlikon mask etcher Gen III and Gen IV. Assessment of the developed template process was done in terms of overlay accuracy, feature profile and resolution capability depending on aspect ratio and line duty cycle. Finally the printability of 3D templates fabricated according the developed process scheme was proved.

  3. Automated analysis of barley organs using 3D laser scanning: an approach for high throughput phenotyping.

    PubMed

    Paulus, Stefan; Dupuis, Jan; Riedel, Sebastian; Kuhlmann, Heiner

    2014-07-15

    Due to the rise of laser scanning the 3D geometry of plant architecture is easy to acquire. Nevertheless, an automated interpretation and, finally, the segmentation into functional groups are still difficult to achieve. Two barley plants were scanned in a time course, and the organs were separated by applying a histogram-based classification algorithm. The leaf organs were represented by meshing algorithms, while the stem organs were parameterized by a least-squares cylinder approximation. We introduced surface feature histograms with an accuracy of 96% for the separation of the barley organs, leaf and stem. This enables growth monitoring in a time course for barley plants. Its reliability was demonstrated by a comparison with manually fitted parameters with a correlation R(2) = 0:99 for the leaf area and R(2) = 0:98 for the cumulated stem height. A proof of concept has been given for its applicability for the detection of water stress in barley, where the extension growth of an irrigated and a non-irrigated plant has been monitored.

  4. 3D-QSAR study of hallucinogenic phenylalkylamines by using CoMFA approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhuoyong; An, Liying; Hu, Wenxiang; Xiang, Yuhong

    2007-04-01

    The three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship (3D-QSAR) has been studied on 90 hallucinogenic phenylalkylamines by the comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA). Two conformations were compared during the modeling. Conformation I referred to the amino group close to ring position 6 and conformation II related to the amino group trans to the phenyl ring. Satisfactory results were obtained by using both conformations. There were still differences between the two models. The model based on conformation I got better statistical results than the one about conformation II. And this may suggest that conformation I be preponderant when the hallucinogenic phenylalkylamines interact with the receptor. To further confirm the predictive capability of the CoMFA model, 18 compounds with conformation I were randomly selected as a test set and the remaining ones as training set. The best CoMFA model based on the training set had a cross-validation coefficient q 2 of 0.549 at five components and non cross-validation coefficient R 2 of 0.835, the standard error of estimation was 0.219. The model showed good predictive ability in the external test with a coefficient R pre 2 of 0.611. The CoMFA coefficient contour maps suggested that both steric and electrostatic interactions play an important role. The contributions from the steric and electrostatic fields were 0.450 and 0.550, respectively.

  5. Human race as indicator of 3D planning of soft tissue of face and multidisciplinary approach.

    PubMed

    Nadazdyova, A; Samohyl, M; Stefankova, E; Pintesova, S; Stanko, P

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the optimal parameters for 3D soft tissue planning for ortognatic treatment by gender and increases the effectiveness of multidisciplinary cooperation. Craniofacial parameters which were analysed: nose breadth (al-al), bi-entocanthion breadth (en-en), bi-zygomatic breadth (zy-zy), bi-gonial breadth (go-go), total facial height (n-gn), mouth breadth (ch-ch), morphologic face height (sn-gn), upper-lip height (Ls-Stm), lower-lip height (Stm-Li) and pupils - mid-face (right). The statistically significant level was determined at p values < 0.05. We have determined the optimal parameters of chosen proportions for men and women as the common goal for ortodontist and maxilofacial surgeon. The gender and age influenced the variability of following parameters: bi-gonial breadth, total facial height and morphologic face height. The soft tissue values for craniofacial parameters can be used to identify the surgical-orthodontic goal for patient - europoid race. Due to the immigration and the mix of races it is necessary to take this fact into account (Tab. 3, Fig. 1, Ref. 41).

  6. Size-Controlled Fabrication of Polyaniline Microfibers Based on 3D Hydrodynamic Focusing Approach.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Imsung; Song, Simon; Uh, Kyungchan; Lee, Chan Woo; Kim, Jong-Man

    2015-07-01

    Owing to the relatively high conductivity and unique redox behavior, polyaniline (PANI) has been one of the most technologically promising conducting polymers. Although various methodologies have been developed, fabrication of PANI microfibers has been a challenging task owing to the poor solubility in most organic solvents. By taking advantage of a microfluidic technology and organic soluble acid labile t-Boc-protected PANI (t-Boc-PANI) as the conducting polymer precursor, fabrication of PANI microfibers in a size-controlled manner is possible. Introduction of a THF solution containing t-Boc-PANI, and dodecylbenzenesulfonic acid (DBSA) as a core flow, and water as a sheath flow into a microfluidic channel with a 3D hydrodynamic focusing effect results in crystallization of the polymer fiber. By changing the flow rate, linear PANI microfibers that range from 16.2 to 39.4 μm in diameter are readily obtained. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. A computed tomography approach for understanding 3D deformation patterns in complex folds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramón, M.a.José; Pueyo, Emilio L.; Rodríguez-Pintó, Adriana; Ros, Luis H.; Pocoví, Andrés; Briz, José Luis; Ciria, José Carlos

    2013-05-01

    Analog models are an important tool for understanding complexly folded and faulted geological structures. In this paper, we propose the use of X-ray computed tomography to accurately reconstruct the geometry of analog models using an orthogonal reference system and to completely characterize deformation patterns within the modeled structure in 3D. The rheology and radiological contrast of various different materials have been studied showing that EVA sheets are a good choice to model buckling layers. After considering various possibilities to define the reference system, we opted to screen-print two orthogonal sets of parallel lines on the surfaces using minium (lead tetroxide). The model was then built with gOcad using a series of CT slices that can be closely spaced. This kind of model allows us to reconstruct the volume distribution of strain ellipsoids and can be very accurate and useful to ascertain the orientation of folded lineations in complex structures as well as to characterize the expected deformation on the surfaces. We have built a simple analog model inspired in the Balzes Anticline (located in the External Sierras, Southern Pyrenees) to illustrate the potential of the technique and to analyze the deformation patterns of this complex curved fold that has accommodated significant magnitudes of vertical axis rotation during its formation.

  8. Unequal-period combination approach of gray code and phase-shifting for 3-D visual measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Shuang; Zhang, Jing; Yu, Xiaoyang; Sun, Xiaoming; Wu, Haibin

    2016-09-01

    Combination of Gray code and phase-shifting is the most practical and advanced approach for the structured light 3-D measurement so far, which is able to measure objects with complex and discontinuous surface. However, for the traditional combination of the Gray code and phase-shifting, the captured Gray code images are not always sharp cut-off in the black-white conversion boundaries, which may lead to wrong decoding analog code orders. Moreover, during the actual measurement, there also exists local decoding error for the wrapped analog code obtained with the phase-shifting approach. Therefore, for the traditional approach, the wrong analog code orders and the local decoding errors will consequently introduce the errors which are equivalent to a fringe period when the analog code is unwrapped. In order to avoid one-fringe period errors, we propose an approach which combines Gray code with phase-shifting according to unequal period. With theoretical analysis, we build the measurement model of the proposed approach, determine the applicable condition and optimize the Gray code encoding period and phase-shifting fringe period. The experimental results verify that the proposed approach can offer a reliable unwrapped analog code, which can be used in 3-D shape measurement.

  9. Tomographic Aperture-Encoded Particle Tracking Velocimetry: A New Approach to Volumetric PIV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troolin, Dan; Boomsma, Aaron; Lai, Wing; Pothos, Stamatios; Fluid Mechanics Research Instruments Team

    2016-11-01

    Volumetric velocity fields are useful in a wide variety of fluid mechanics applications. Several types of three-dimensional imaging methods have been used in the past to varying degrees of success, for example, 3D PTV (Maas et al., 1993), DDPIV (Peireira et al., 2006), Tomographic PIV (Elsinga, 2006), and V3V (Troolin and Longmire, 2009), among others. Each of these techniques has shown advantages and disadvantages in different areas. With the advent of higher resolution and lower noise cameras with higher stability levels, new techniques are emerging that combine the advantages of the existing techniques. This talk describes a new technique called Tomographic Aperture-Encoded Particle Tracking Velocimetry (TAPTV), in which segmented triangulation and diameter tolerance are used to achieve three-dimensional particle tracking with extremely high particle densities (on the order of ppp = 0.2 or higher) without the drawbacks normally associated with ghost particles (for example in TomoPIV). The results are highly spatially-resolved data with very fast processing times. A detailed explanation of the technique as well as plots, movies, and experimental considerations will be discussed.

  10. Early Earth tectonics: A high-resolution 3D numerical modelling approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, R.; Gerya, T.

    2014-12-01

    Early Earth had a higher amount of remaining radiogenic elements as well as a higher amount of leftover primordial heat. Both contributed to the increased temperature in the Earth's interior and it is mainly this increased mantle potential temperature ΔTp that controls the dynamics of the crust and upper mantle and the style of Early Earth tectonics. For a minor increase in temperature ΔTp < 175 K a subduction-collision style ensues which is largely similar to present day plate tectonics. For a moderate increase in ΔTp = 175-250 K subduction can still occur, however plates are strongly weakened and buckling, delamination and Rayleigh-Taylor style dripping of the plate is observed in addition. For higher temperatures ΔTp > 250 K no subduction can be observed anymore and tectonics is dominated by delamination and Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities. We conduct 3D petrological-thermomechanical numerical modelling experiments of the crust and upper mantle under Early Earth conditions and a plume tectonics model setup. For varying crustal structures and an increased mantle potential temperature ΔTp, a thermal anomaly in the bottom temperature boundary introduces a plume. The model is able to self-sufficiently form depleted mantle lithosphere after repeated melt removal. New crust can be produced in the form of volcanics or plutonics. To simulate differentiation the newly formed crust can have a range in composition from basaltic over dacitic to granitic depending on its source rock. Models show large amounts of subcrustal decompression melting and consequently large amounts of new formed crust which in turn influences the dynamics. Mantle and crust are convecting separately. Dome-shaped plutons of mafic or felsic composition can be observed in the crust. Between these domes elongated belts of upper crust, volcanics and sediments are formed. These structures look similar to, for example, the Kaapvaal craton in South Africa where the elongated shape of the Barberton

  11. An optimal transport approach for seismic tomography: application to 3D full waveform inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Métivier, L.; Brossier, R.; Mérigot, Q.; Oudet, E.; Virieux, J.

    2016-11-01

    the L 2 distance, in 2D and 3D contexts.

  12. Early Earth plume-lid tectonics: A high-resolution 3D numerical modelling approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Ria; Gerya, Taras

    2016-04-01

    Early Earth had a higher amount of radiogenic elements as well as a higher amount of leftover primordial heat. Both contribute to the increased temperature in the Earth's interior and it is mainly this increased mantle potential temperature Tp that controls the dynamics of the crust and upper mantle and the predominant style of tectonics in the Archean Earth. We conduct 3D petrological-magmatic-thermomechanical numerical modelling experiments of the crust and upper mantle under Archean conditions using a plume-lid tectonics model setup. For varying crustal compositions and a mantle potential temperature increase ΔTp = 250K (compared to present day conditions), a hot lower thermal boundary layer introduces spontaneously developing mantle plumes and after repeated melt removal, depleted mantle lithosphere is formed self-consistently. New crust is produced in the form of both volcanic and plutonic magmatism. Models show large amounts of subcrustal decompression melting and production of new crust which in turn influences the dynamics. On short-term (10 - 20Myr) rising diapirs and sinking basaltic crust lead to crustal overturn and to the formation of the typical Archean dome-and-keel pattern. On long-term a long (˜ 80Myr) passive 'growth phase' with strong growth of crust and lithosphere is observed. Both crust and lithosphere thickness are regulated by thermochemical instabilities assisted by lower crustal eclogitisation and a subcrustal small-scale convection area. Delamination of lower crust and lithosphere is initiated by linear or cylindrical eclogite drips and occurs as one 'catastrophic' event within a 20Myr 'removal phase'.

  13. A 3-D skeleton model & SEMG approach for integrated neck and low back pain analysis test batteries.

    PubMed

    D'amico, M; D'amico, G; Frascarello, M; Paniccia, M; Roncoletta, P; Vallasciani, M

    2008-01-01

    Since several years our group is working on a project to merge into a full 3D reliable and detailed human skeleton representation various segmental biomechanical models presented in literature. The obtained 3D skeleton model is fully parametric and can be fitted to each subject anthropometric characteristics. A non-ionising approach based on 3D opto-electronic measurements of body landmarks labelled by passive markers has been chosen to build the 3D parametric biomechanical skeleton model. A special focus has been devoted to identify and model the spine with a correct degree of accuracy and reliability. In spine pain related pathologies is of major importance the evaluation of functional limitations associated. This requires to integrate morphological characteristics with information deriving from other measurements devices as force platform data, surface EMG, foot pressure maps. The aim of this study is to present a multi-factorial approach which integrates rachis morphological characteristics with full skeleton kinematic, dynamic and SEMG measurements to quantify spine function and mobility in particular for neck and low back pain. A set of clinical-biomechanical tests have been implemented. Static posture characteristics are first evaluated. After that, patient is asked to perform specific motion test batteries in order to fully measure the whole ROMs (spine angles ranges and spine shape modifications) for Axial rotations, forward-backward flexion-extension, lateral bendings per each spine functional units (Skull and neck, thoracic and lumbar districts). During forward bending also a digital Schober test is performed. Such data are correlated to simultaneous SEMG muscle activities recording to investigate motor co-ordination/dysfunction as well as the presence absence of flexion-relaxation phenomena associated to pain.

  14. Depth-image-based rendering (DIBR), compression, and transmission for a new approach on 3D-TV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fehn, Christoph

    2004-05-01

    This paper presents details of a system that allows for an evolutionary introduction of depth perception into the existing 2D digital TV framework. The work is part of the European Information Society Technologies (IST) project "Advanced Three-Dimensional Television System Technologies" (ATTEST), an activity, where industries, research centers and universities have joined forces to design a backwards-compatible, flexible and modular broadcast 3D-TV system. At the very heart of the described new concept is the generation and distribution of a novel data representation format, which consists of monoscopic color video and associated per-pixel depth information. From these data, one or more "virtual" views of a real-world scene can be synthesized in real-time at the receiver side (i.e. a 3D-TV set-top box) by means of so-called depth-image-based rendering (DIBR) techniques. This publication will provide: (1) a detailed description of the fundamentals of this new approach on 3D-TV; (2) a comparison with the classical approach of "stereoscopic" video; (3) a short introduction to DIBR techniques in general; (4) the development of a specific DIBR algorithm that can be used for the efficient generation of high-quality "virtual" stereoscopic views; (5) a number of implementation details that are specific to the current state of the development; (6) research on the backwards-compatible compression and transmission of 3D imagery using state-of-the-art MPEG (Moving Pictures Expert Group) tools.

  15. Computerized identification of airway wall in CT examinations using a 3D active surface evolution approach.

    PubMed

    Gu, Suicheng; Fuhrman, Carl; Meng, Xin; Siegfried, Jill M; Gur, David; Leader, Joseph K; Sciurba, Frank C; Pu, Jiantao

    2013-04-01

    Airway diseases (e.g., asthma, emphysema, and chronic bronchitis) are extremely common worldwide. Any morphological variations (abnormalities) of airways may physically change airflow and ultimately affect the ability of the lungs in gas exchange. In this study, we describe a novel algorithm aimed to automatically identify airway walls depicted on CT images. The underlying idea is to place a three-dimensional (3D) surface model within airway regions and thereafter allow this model to evolve (deform) under predefined external and internal forces automatically to the location where these forces reach a state of balance. By taking advantage of the geometric and the density characteristics of airway walls, the evolution procedure is performed in a distance gradient field and ultimately stops at regions with the highest contrast. The performance of this scheme was quantitatively evaluated from several perspectives. First, we assessed the accuracy of the developed scheme using a dedicated lung phantom in airway wall estimation and compared it with the traditional full-width at half maximum (FWHM) method. The phantom study shows that the developed scheme has an error ranging from 0.04 mm to 0.36 mm, which is much smaller than the FWHM method with an error ranging from 0.16 mm to 0.84 mm. Second, we compared the results obtained by the developed scheme with those manually delineated by an experienced (>30 years) radiologist on clinical chest CT examinations, showing a mean difference of 0.084 mm. In particular, the sensitivity of the scheme to different reconstruction kernels was evaluated on real chest CT examinations. For the 'lung', 'bone' and 'standard' kernels, the average airway wall thicknesses computed by the developed scheme were 1.302 mm, 1.333 mm and 1.339 mm, respectively. Our preliminary experiments showed that the scheme had a reasonable accuracy in airway wall estimation. For a clinical chest CT examination, it took around 4 min for this scheme to identify

  16. A Survey on Model Based Approaches for 2D and 3D Visual Human Pose Recovery

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Sala, Xavier; Escalera, Sergio; Angulo, Cecilio; Gonzàlez, Jordi

    2014-01-01

    Human Pose Recovery has been studied in the field of Computer Vision for the last 40 years. Several approaches have been reported, and significant improvements have been obtained in both data representation and model design. However, the problem of Human Pose Recovery in uncontrolled environments is far from being solved. In this paper, we define a general taxonomy to group model based approaches for Human Pose Recovery, which is composed of five main modules: appearance, viewpoint, spatial relations, temporal consistence, and behavior. Subsequently, a methodological comparison is performed following the proposed taxonomy, evaluating current SoA approaches in the aforementioned five group categories. As a result of this comparison, we discuss the main advantages and drawbacks of the reviewed literature. PMID:24594613

  17. A survey on model based approaches for 2D and 3D visual human pose recovery.

    PubMed

    Perez-Sala, Xavier; Escalera, Sergio; Angulo, Cecilio; Gonzàlez, Jordi

    2014-03-03

    Human Pose Recovery has been studied in the field of Computer Vision for the last 40 years. Several approaches have been reported, and significant improvements have been obtained in both data representation and model design. However, the problem of Human Pose Recovery in uncontrolled environments is far from being solved. In this paper, we define a general taxonomy to group model based approaches for Human Pose Recovery, which is composed of five main modules: appearance, viewpoint, spatial relations, temporal consistence, and behavior. Subsequently, a methodological comparison is performed following the proposed taxonomy, evaluating current SoA approaches in the aforementioned five group categories. As a result of this comparison, we discuss the main advantages and drawbacks of the reviewed literature.

  18. A Comprehensive Automated 3D Approach for Building Extraction, Reconstruction, and Regularization from Airborne Laser Scanning Point Clouds.

    PubMed

    Dorninger, Peter; Pfeifer, Norbert

    2008-11-17

    Three dimensional city models are necessary for supporting numerous management applications. For the determination of city models for visualization purposes, several standardized workflows do exist. They are either based on photogrammetry or on LiDAR or on a combination of both data acquisition techniques. However, the automated determination of reliable and highly accurate city models is still a challenging task, requiring a workflow comprising several processing steps. The most relevant are building detection, building outline generation, building modeling, and finally, building quality analysis. Commercial software tools for building modeling require, generally, a high degree of human interaction and most automated approaches described in literature stress the steps of such a workflow individually. In this article, we propose a comprehensive approach for automated determination of 3D city models from airborne acquired point cloud data. It is based on the assumption that individual buildings can be modeled properly by a composition of a set of planar faces. Hence, it is based on a reliable 3D segmentation algorithm, detecting planar faces in a point cloud. This segmentation is of crucial importance for the outline detection and for the modeling approach. We describe the theoretical background, the segmentation algorithm, the outline detection, and the modeling approach, and we present and discuss several actual projects.

  19. A Comprehensive Automated 3D Approach for Building Extraction, Reconstruction, and Regularization from Airborne Laser Scanning Point Clouds

    PubMed Central

    Dorninger, Peter; Pfeifer, Norbert

    2008-01-01

    Three dimensional city models are necessary for supporting numerous management applications. For the determination of city models for visualization purposes, several standardized workflows do exist. They are either based on photogrammetry or on LiDAR or on a combination of both data acquisition techniques. However, the automated determination of reliable and highly accurate city models is still a challenging task, requiring a workflow comprising several processing steps. The most relevant are building detection, building outline generation, building modeling, and finally, building quality analysis. Commercial software tools for building modeling require, generally, a high degree of human interaction and most automated approaches described in literature stress the steps of such a workflow individually. In this article, we propose a comprehensive approach for automated determination of 3D city models from airborne acquired point cloud data. It is based on the assumption that individual buildings can be modeled properly by a composition of a set of planar faces. Hence, it is based on a reliable 3D segmentation algorithm, detecting planar faces in a point cloud. This segmentation is of crucial importance for the outline detection and for the modeling approach. We describe the theoretical background, the segmentation algorithm, the outline detection, and the modeling approach, and we present and discuss several actual projects. PMID:27873931

  20. 3D printed tablets loaded with polymeric nanocapsules: An innovative approach to produce customized drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Beck, R C R; Chaves, P S; Goyanes, A; Vukosavljevic, B; Buanz, A; Windbergs, M; Basit, A W; Gaisford, S

    2017-08-07

    The generation of multi-functional drug delivery systems, namely solid dosage forms loaded with nano-sized carriers, remains little explored and is still a challenge for formulators. For the first time, the coupling of two important technologies, 3D printing and nanotechnology, to produce innovative solid dosage forms containing drug-loaded nanocapsules was evaluated here. Drug delivery devices were prepared by fused deposition modelling (FDM) from poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) and Eudragit(®) RL100 (ERL) filaments with or without a channelling agent (mannitol). They were soaked in deflazacort-loaded nanocapsules (particle size: 138nm) to produce 3D printed tablets (printlets) loaded with them, as observed by SEM. Drug loading was improved by the presence of the channelling agent and a linear correlation was obtained between the soaking time and the drug loading (r(2)=0.9739). Moreover, drug release profiles were dependent on the polymeric material of tablets and the presence of the channelling agent. In particular, tablets prepared with a partially hollow core (50% infill) had a higher drug loading (0.27% w/w) and faster drug release rate. This study represents an original approach to convert nanocapsules suspensions into solid dosage forms as well as an efficient 3D printing method to produce novel drug delivery systems, as personalised nanomedicines. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Investigation of different cross-linking approaches on 3D gelatin scaffolds for tissue engineering application: A comparative analysis.

    PubMed

    Shankar, K Gopal; Gostynska, Natalia; Montesi, Monica; Panseri, Silvia; Sprio, Simone; Kon, Elizaveta; Marcacci, Maurilio; Tampieri, Anna; Sandri, Monica

    2017-02-01

    The present study aims to investigate the physical-chemical and biological features exhibited by porous scaffolds for regeneration of cartilaginous tissues obtained through stabilization of 3D gelatin hydrogels by physical (DHT), chemical (BDDGE) and natural (Genipin) cross-linking approaches. The study aimed at comparatively assessing the porous microstructure and the long-term resistance of the scaffolds upon degradation in wet physiological conditions (37°C, pH=7.4). The degree of cross-linking increases as function of incorporation of cross-linkers which was maximum up to 73% for BDDGE. The infrared spectroscopy and thermal analysis confirmed the gelatin structure was preserved during the cross-linking treatments. Mechanical properties of the scaffolds were analysed by static and dynamic compression test, which showed different viscoelastic behaviour upon various cross-linking strategies. The biological performance of the scaffolds investigated using human chondrocytes showed good cell adhesion, viability and proliferation, as well as extensive 3D scaffold colonization. Besides, the analysis of gene expression related to the formation of new chondral tissue reported increasing ability with time in the formation of new extra-cellular matrix. In conclusion, out of three different cross-linking methods, the gelatin scaffolds subjected to dehydrothermal treatment (DHT) represented to be the most favourable 3D scaffold for cartilage regeneration. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. A novel interpolation approach for the generation of 3D-geometric digital bone models from image stacks

    PubMed Central

    Mittag, U.; Kriechbaumer, A.; Rittweger, J.

    2017-01-01

    The authors propose a new 3D interpolation algorithm for the generation of digital geometric 3D-models of bones from existing image stacks obtained by peripheral Quantitative Computed Tomography (pQCT) or Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). The technique is based on the interpolation of radial gray value profiles of the pQCT cross sections. The method has been validated by using an ex-vivo human tibia and by comparing interpolated pQCT images with images from scans taken at the same position. A diversity index of <0.4 (1 meaning maximal diversity) even for the structurally complex region of the epiphysis, along with the good agreement of mineral-density-weighted cross-sectional moment of inertia (CSMI), demonstrate the high quality of our interpolation approach. Thus the authors demonstrate that this interpolation scheme can substantially improve the generation of 3D models from sparse scan sets, not only with respect to the outer shape but also with respect to the internal gray-value derived material property distribution. PMID:28574415

  3. A probabilistic approach to jointly integrate 3D/4D seismic, production data and geological information for building reservoir models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro, Scarlet A.

    Reservoir modeling aims at understanding static and dynamic components of the reservoir in order to make decisions about future surface operations. The practice of reservoir modeling calls for the integration of expertise from different disciplines, as well as the in tegration of a wide variety of data: geological data, (core data, well-logs, etc.), production data (fluid rates or volumes, pressure data, etc.), and geophysical data (3D seismic data). Although a single 3D seismic survey is the most common geophysical data available for most reservoirs, a suite of several 3D seismic surveys (4D seismic data) acquired for monitoring production can be available for mature reservoirs. The main contribution of this dissertation is to incorporate 4D seismic data within the reservoir modeling workflow while honoring all other available data. This dissertation proposes two general approaches to include 4D seismic data into the reservoir modeling workflow. The Probabilistic Data Integration approach (PDI), which consists of modeling the information content of 4D seismic through a spatial probability of facies occurrence; and the Forward Modeling (FM) approach, which consists of matching 4D seismic along with production data. The FM approach requires forward modeling the 4D seismic response, which requires to downscale the flow simulation response. This dissertation introduces a novel dynamic downscaling method that takes into account both static information (high-resolution per meability field) and dynamic information in the form of coarsened fluxes and saturations (flow simulation on the coarsened grid). The two proposed approaches (PDI and FM approaches) are applied to a prominent field in the North Sea, to model the channel facies of a fluvial reservoir. The PDI approach constrained the reservoir model to the spatial probability of facies occurrence (obtained from a calibration between well-log and 4D seismic data) as well as other static data while satisfactorily history

  4. 3D-SSF: A bio-inspired approach for dynamic multi-subject clustering of white matter tracts.

    PubMed

    Chekir, A; Hassas, S; Descoteaux, M; Côté, M; Garyfallidis, E; Oulebsir-Boumghar, F

    2017-01-27

    There is growing interest in the study of white matter (WM) variation across subjects, and in particular the analysis of specific WM bundles, to better understand brain development and aging, as well as to improve early detection of some diseases. Several WM multi-subject clustering methods have been proposed to study WM bundles. These methods aim to overcome the complexity of the problem, which includes the huge size of the WM tractography datasets generated from multiple subjects, the existence of various streamlines with different positions, lengths and geometric forms, as well as the presence of outliers. However, the current methods are not sufficiently flexible to address all of these constraints. Here we introduce a novel dynamic multi-subject clustering framework based on a distributed multiagent implementation of the Multiple Species Flocking model, that we name 3D-Streamlines Stream Flocking (3D-SSF). Specifically, we consider streamlines from different subjects as data streams, and each streamline is assigned to a mobile agent. Agents work together following flocking rules in order to form a flock. Thanks to a similarity function, the agents that are associated with similar streamlines form a flock, whereas the agents that are associated with dissimilar streamlines are considered outliers. We use various experiments performed on noisy synthetic and real human brain data to validate 3D-SSF and demonstrate that it is more efficient and robust to outliers compared to other classical approaches. 3D-SSF is able to extract WM bundles at a population level, while considering WM variation across subjects and eliminating outlier streamlines.

  5. A surface-based 3-D dendritic spine detection approach from confocal microscopy images.

    PubMed

    Li, Qing; Deng, Zhigang

    2012-03-01

    Determining the relationship between the dendritic spine morphology and its functional properties is a fundamental challenge in neurobiology research. In particular, how to accurately and automatically analyse meaningful structural information from a large microscopy image data set is far away from being resolved. As pointed out in existing literature, one remaining challenge in spine detection and segmentation is how to automatically separate touching spines. In this paper, based on various global and local geometric features of the dendrite structure, we propose a novel approach to detect and segment neuronal spines, in particular, a breaking-down and stitching-up algorithm to accurately separate touching spines. Extensive performance comparisons show that our approach is more accurate and robust than two state-of-the-art spine detection and segmentation algorithms.

  6. Rational drug design of antineoplastic agents using 3D-QSAR, cheminformatic, and virtual screening approaches.

    PubMed

    Vucicevic, Jelica; Nikolic, Katarina; Mitchell, John B O

    2017-07-12

    Computer-Aided Drug Design has strongly accelerated the development of novel antineoplastic agents by helping in the hit identification, optimization, and evaluation. Computational approaches such as cheminformatic search, virtual screening, pharmacophore modeling, molecular docking and dynamics have been developed and applied to explain the activity of bioactive molecules, design novel agents, increase the success rate of drug research, and decrease the total costs of drug discovery. Similarity searches and virtual screening are used to identify molecules with an increased probability to interact with drug targets of interest, while the other computational approaches are applied for the design and evaluation of molecules with enhanced activity and improved safety profile. In this review are described the main in silico techniques used in rational drug design of antineoplastic agents and presented optimal combinations of computational methods for design of more efficient antineoplastic drugs. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  7. a New Approach for Progressive Dense Reconstruction from Consecutive Images Based on Prior Low-Density 3d Point Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lari, Z.; El-Sheimy, N.

    2017-09-01

    In recent years, the increasing incidence of climate-related disasters has tremendously affected our environment. In order to effectively manage and reduce dramatic impacts of such events, the development of timely disaster management plans is essential. Since these disasters are spatial phenomena, timely provision of geospatial information is crucial for effective development of response and management plans. Due to inaccessibility of the affected areas and limited budget of first-responders, timely acquisition of the required geospatial data for these applications is usually possible only using low-cost imaging and georefencing sensors mounted on unmanned platforms. Despite rapid collection of the required data using these systems, available processing techniques are not yet capable of delivering geospatial information to responders and decision makers in a timely manner. To address this issue, this paper introduces a new technique for dense 3D reconstruction of the affected scenes which can deliver and improve the needed geospatial information incrementally. This approach is implemented based on prior 3D knowledge of the scene and employs computationally-efficient 2D triangulation, feature descriptor, feature matching and point verification techniques to optimize and speed up 3D dense scene reconstruction procedure. To verify the feasibility and computational efficiency of the proposed approach, an experiment using a set of consecutive images collected onboard a UAV platform and prior low-density airborne laser scanning over the same area is conducted and step by step results are provided. A comparative analysis of the proposed approach and an available image-based dense reconstruction technique is also conducted to prove the computational efficiency and competency of this technique for delivering geospatial information with pre-specified accuracy.

  8. Single-Pass Composable 3D Lens Rendering and Spatiotemporal 3D Lenses.

    PubMed

    Borst, Christoph W; Tiesel, Jan-Phillip; Habib, Emad; Das, Kaushik

    2011-09-01

    We present a new 3D lens rendering technique and a new spatiotemporal lens. Interactive 3D lenses, often called volumetric lenses, provide users with alternative views of data sets within 3D lens boundaries while maintaining the surrounding overview (context). In contrast to previous multipass rendering work, we discuss the strengths, limitations, and performance costs of a single-pass technique especially suited to fragment-level lens effects, such as color mapping, lighting, and clipping. Some object-level effects, such as a data set selection lens, are also incorporated, with each object's geometry being processed once by the graphics pipeline. For a substantial range of effects, our approach supports several composable lenses at interactive frame rates without performance loss during increasing lens intersections or manipulation by a user. Other cases, for which this performance cannot be achieved, are also discussed. We illustrate possible applications of our lens system, including Time Warp lenses for exploring time-varying data sets.

  9. A Unified Approach to Joint Regional/Teleseismic Calibration and Event Location with a 3D Earth Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-09-01

    raytracing in 3D models, which has been a serious impediment to the pursuit of 3D event location methods. We will investigate whether, for...Ground-Based Nuclear Explosion Monitoring Technologies 488 3D Raytracing A critical choice in both event location and travel-time tomography with 3D

  10. Approach of automatic 3D geological mapping: the case of the Kovdor phoscorite-carbonatite complex, NW Russia.

    PubMed

    Kalashnikov, A O; Ivanyuk, G Yu; Mikhailova, J A; Sokharev, V A

    2017-07-31

    We have developed an approach for automatic 3D geological mapping based on conversion of chemical composition of rocks to mineral composition by logical computation. It allows to calculate mineral composition based on bulk rock chemistry, interpolate the mineral composition in the same way as chemical composition, and, finally, build a 3D geological model. The approach was developed for the Kovdor phoscorite-carbonatite complex containing the Kovdor baddeleyite-apatite-magnetite deposit. We used 4 bulk rock chemistry analyses - Femagn, P2O5, CO2 and SiO2. We used four techniques for prediction of rock types - calculation of normative mineral compositions (norms), multiple regression, artificial neural network and developed by logical evaluation. The two latter became the best. As a result, we distinguished 14 types of phoscorites (forsterite-apatite-magnetite-carbonate rock), carbonatite and host rocks. The results show good convergence with our petrographical studies of the deposit, and recent manually built maps. The proposed approach can be used as a tool of a deposit genesis reconstruction and preliminary geometallurgical modelling.

  11. Magmatic Systems in 3-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kent, G. M.; Harding, A. J.; Babcock, J. M.; Orcutt, J. A.; Bazin, S.; Singh, S.; Detrick, R. S.; Canales, J. P.; Carbotte, S. M.; Diebold, J.

    2002-12-01

    Multichannel seismic (MCS) images of crustal magma chambers are ideal targets for advanced visualization techniques. In the mid-ocean ridge environment, reflections originating at the melt-lens are well separated from other reflection boundaries, such as the seafloor, layer 2A and Moho, which enables the effective use of transparency filters. 3-D visualization of seismic reflectivity falls into two broad categories: volume and surface rendering. Volumetric-based visualization is an extremely powerful approach for the rapid exploration of very dense 3-D datasets. These 3-D datasets are divided into volume elements or voxels, which are individually color coded depending on the assigned datum value; the user can define an opacity filter to reject plotting certain voxels. This transparency allows the user to peer into the data volume, enabling an easy identification of patterns or relationships that might have geologic merit. Multiple image volumes can be co-registered to look at correlations between two different data types (e.g., amplitude variation with offsets studies), in a manner analogous to draping attributes onto a surface. In contrast, surface visualization of seismic reflectivity usually involves producing "fence" diagrams of 2-D seismic profiles that are complemented with seafloor topography, along with point class data, draped lines and vectors (e.g. fault scarps, earthquake locations and plate-motions). The overlying seafloor can be made partially transparent or see-through, enabling 3-D correlations between seafloor structure and seismic reflectivity. Exploration of 3-D datasets requires additional thought when constructing and manipulating these complex objects. As numbers of visual objects grow in a particular scene, there is a tendency to mask overlapping objects; this clutter can be managed through the effective use of total or partial transparency (i.e., alpha-channel). In this way, the co-variation between different datasets can be investigated

  12. A New Approach for 3D Ocean Reconstruction from Limited Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, X.

    2014-12-01

    Satellites can measure ocean surface height and temperature with sufficient spatial and temporal resolution to capture mesoscale features across the globe. Measurements of the ocean's interior, however, remain sparse and irregular, thus the dynamical inference of subsurface flows is necessary to interpret surface measurements. The most common (and accurate) approach is to incorporate surface measurements into a data-assimilating forward ocean model, but this approach is expensive and slow, and thus completely impractical for time-critical needs, such as offering guidance to ship-based observational campaigns. Two recently-developed approaches have made use of the apparent partial consistency of upper ocean dynamics with quasigeostrophic flows that take into account surface buoyancy gradients (i.e. the "surface quasigeostrophic" (SQG) model) to "reconstruct" the interior flow from knowledge of surface height and buoyancy. Here we improve on these methods in three ways: (1) we adopt a modal decomposition that represents the surface and interior dynamics in an efficient way, allowing the separation of surface energy from total energy; (2) we make use of instantaneous vertical profile observations (e.g. from ARGO data) to improve the reconstruction of eddy variables at depth; and (3) we use advanced statistical methods to choose the optimal modes for the reconstruction. The method is tested using a series of high horizontal and vertical resolution quasigeostrophic simulation, with a wide range of surface buoyancy and interior potential vorticity gradient combinations. In addtion, we apply the method to output from a very high resolution primitive equation simulation of a forced and dissipated baroclinic front in a channel. Our new method is systematically compared to the existing methods as well. Its advantages and limitations will be discussed.

  13. A new approach for magnetic curves in 3D Riemannian manifolds

    SciTech Connect

    Bozkurt, Zehra Gök, Ismail Yaylı, Yusuf Ekmekci, F. Nejat

    2014-05-15

    A magnetic field is defined by the property that its divergence is zero in a three-dimensional oriented Riemannian manifold. Each magnetic field generates a magnetic flow whose trajectories are curves called as magnetic curves. In this paper, we give a new variational approach to study the magnetic flow associated with the Killing magnetic field in a three-dimensional oriented Riemann manifold, (M{sup 3}, g). And then, we investigate the trajectories of the magnetic fields called as N-magnetic and B-magnetic curves.

  14. A new approach to calculate Plant Area Density (PAD) using 3D ground-based lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taheriazad, Leila; Moghadas, Hamid; Sanchez-Azofeifa, Arturo

    2016-10-01

    This paper presents a novel algorithm for calculation of plant area density based on surface and volume convex hull which is applied to each horizontal cut of a point cloud data. This method can be used as an alternative to conventional voxelization approaches to improve accuracy and computation efficiency. The terrestrial data was collected from a boreal forest at Peace River, Alberta, Canada during summer and fall in 2014. This technique can be applied to an arbitrary point cloud data to calculate all other metrics of forests including plant area index, leaf area density, and also leaf area index.

  15. Intensity distribution angular shaping - Practical approach for 3D optical beamforming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wojtanowski, Jacek; Traczyk, Maciej; Zygmunt, Marek; Mierczyk, Zygmunt; Knysak, Piotr; Drozd, Tadeusz

    2014-12-01

    We present approach of optical design which enables to obtain aspheric lens shape optimized for providing the specific light power density distribution in space. Proposed method is based on the evaluation of corresponding angular intensity distribution which can be obtained by the decomposition of the desired spatial distribution into virtual light cones set and collapsing it to the equivalent angular fingerprint. Rigorous formulas have been derived to relate refractive aspheric shape and the corresponding intensity distribution which is used for lens optimization. Algorithms of modeling and optimization were implemented in Matlab© and the calculated designs were successfully tested in Zemax environment.

  16. A Mechanism-based 3D-QSAR Approach for Classification ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Organophosphate (OP) and carbamate esters can inhibit acetylcholinesterase (AChE) by binding covalently to a serine residue in the enzyme active site, and their inhibitory potency depends largely on affinity for the enzyme and the reactivity of the ester. Despite this understanding, there has been no mechanism-based in silico approach for classification and prediction of the inhibitory potency of ether OPs or carbamates. This prompted us to develop a three dimensional prediction framework for OPs, carbamates, and their analogs. Inhibitory structures of a compound that can form the covalent bond were identified through analysis of docked conformations of the compound and its metabolites. Inhibitory potencies of the selected structures were then predicted using a previously developed three dimensional quantitative structure-active relationship. This approach was validated with a large number of structurally diverse OP and carbamate compounds encompassing widely used insecticides and structural analogs including OP flame retardants and thio- and dithiocarbamate pesticides. The modeling revealed that: (1) in addition to classical OP metabolic activation, the toxicity of carbamate compounds can be dependent on biotransformation, (2) OP and carbamate analogs such as OP flame retardants and thiocarbamate herbicides can act as AChEI, (3) hydrogen bonds at the oxyanion hole is critical for AChE inhibition through the covalent bond, and (4) π–π interaction with Trp86

  17. Separation efficiency of a hydrodynamic separator using a 3D computational fluid dynamics multiscale approach.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Vivien; Dufresne, Matthieu; Vazquez, Jose; Fischer, Martin; Morin, Antoine

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the use of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to predict the solid separation efficiency of a hydrodynamic separator. The numerical difficulty concerns the discretization of the geometry to simulate both the global behavior and the local phenomena that occur near the screen. In this context, a CFD multiscale approach was used: a global model (at the scale of the device) is used to observe the hydrodynamic behavior within the device; a local model (portion of the screen) is used to determine the local phenomena that occur near the screen. The Eulerian-Lagrangian approach was used to model the particle trajectories in both models. The global model shows the influence of the particles' characteristics on the trapping efficiency. A high density favors the sedimentation. In contrast, particles with small densities (1,040 kg/m(3)) are steered by the hydrodynamic behavior and can potentially be trapped by the separator. The use of the local model allows us to observe the particle trajectories near the screen. A comparison between two types of screens (perforated plate vs expanded metal) highlights the turbulent effects created by the shape of the screen.

  18. RGB color calibration for quantitative image analysis: the "3D thin-plate spline" warping approach.

    PubMed

    Menesatti, Paolo; Angelini, Claudio; Pallottino, Federico; Antonucci, Francesca; Aguzzi, Jacopo; Costa, Corrado

    2012-01-01

    In the last years the need to numerically define color by its coordinates in n-dimensional space has increased strongly. Colorimetric calibration is fundamental in food processing and other biological disciplines to quantitatively compare samples' color during workflow with many devices. Several software programmes are available to perform standardized colorimetric procedures, but they are often too imprecise for scientific purposes. In this study, we applied the Thin-Plate Spline interpolation algorithm to calibrate colours in sRGB space (the corresponding Matlab code is reported in the Appendix). This was compared with other two approaches. The first is based on a commercial calibration system (ProfileMaker) and the second on a Partial Least Square analysis. Moreover, to explore device variability and resolution two different cameras were adopted and for each sensor, three consecutive pictures were acquired under four different light conditions. According to our results, the Thin-Plate Spline approach reported a very high efficiency of calibration allowing the possibility to create a revolution in the in-field applicative context of colour quantification not only in food sciences, but also in other biological disciplines. These results are of great importance for scientific color evaluation when lighting conditions are not controlled. Moreover, it allows the use of low cost instruments while still returning scientifically sound quantitative data.

  19. A Mechanism-based 3D-QSAR Approach for Classification ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Organophosphate (OP) and carbamate esters can inhibit acetylcholinesterase (AChE) by binding covalently to a serine residue in the enzyme active site, and their inhibitory potency depends largely on affinity for the enzyme and the reactivity of the ester. Despite this understanding, there has been no mechanism-based in silico approach for classification and prediction of the inhibitory potency of ether OPs or carbamates. This prompted us to develop a three dimensional prediction framework for OPs, carbamates, and their analogs. Inhibitory structures of a compound that can form the covalent bond were identified through analysis of docked conformations of the compound and its metabolites. Inhibitory potencies of the selected structures were then predicted using a previously developed three dimensional quantitative structure-active relationship. This approach was validated with a large number of structurally diverse OP and carbamate compounds encompassing widely used insecticides and structural analogs including OP flame retardants and thio- and dithiocarbamate pesticides. The modeling revealed that: (1) in addition to classical OP metabolic activation, the toxicity of carbamate compounds can be dependent on biotransformation, (2) OP and carbamate analogs such as OP flame retardants and thiocarbamate herbicides can act as AChEI, (3) hydrogen bonds at the oxyanion hole is critical for AChE inhibition through the covalent bond, and (4) π–π interaction with Trp86

  20. Fully automatic cardiac segmentation from 3D CTA data: a multi-atlas based approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirisli, Hortense A.; Schaap, Michiel; Klein, Stefan; Neefjes, Lisan A.; Weustink, Annick C.; Van Walsum, Theo; Niessen, Wiro J.

    2010-03-01

    Computed tomography angiography (CTA), a non-invasive imaging technique, is becoming increasingly popular for cardiac examination, mainly due to its superior spatial resolution compared to MRI. This imaging modality is currently widely used for the diagnosis of coronary artery disease (CAD) but it is not commonly used for the diagnosis of ventricular and atrial function. In this paper, we present a fully automatic method for segmenting the whole heart (i.e. the outer surface of the myocardium) and cardiac chambers from CTA datasets. Cardiac chamber segmentation is particularly valuable for the extraction of ventricular and atrial functional information, such as stroke volume and ejection fraction. With our approach, we aim to improve the diagnosis of CAD by providing functional information extracted from the same CTA data, thus not requiring additional scanning. In addition, the whole heart segmentation method we propose can be used for visualization of the coronary arteries and for obtaining a region of interest for subsequent segmentation of the coronaries, ventricles and atria. Our approach is based on multi-atlas segmentation, and performed within a non-rigid registration framework. A leave-one-out quantitative validation was carried out on 8 images. The method showed a high accuracy, which is reflected in both a mean segmentation error of 1.05+/-1.30 mm and an average Dice coefficient of 0.93. The robustness of the method is demonstrated by successfully applying the method to 243 additional datasets, without any significant failure.

  1. A Unified Approach to Joint Regional/Teleseismic Calibration and Event Location with a 3D Earth Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    time to forward model a travel-time data set when a fully 3D raytracing methods is used. An efficient alternative to full 3D raytracing is travel...when a fully 3D raytracing methods is used. An efficient alternative to full 3D raytracing is travel-time linearization, which approximates the...numerical methods are available for raytracing and travel-time calculation in 3D Earth models, such as the finite-difference eikonal method (e.g

  2. An Approach to Extract Moving Objects from Mls Data Using a Volumetric Background Representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gehrung, J.; Hebel, M.; Arens, M.; Stilla, U.

    2017-05-01

    Data recorded by mobile LiDAR systems (MLS) can be used for the generation and refinement of city models or for the automatic detection of long-term changes in the public road space. Since for this task only static structures are of interest, all mobile objects need to be removed. This work presents a straightforward but powerful approach to remove the subclass of moving objects. A probabilistic volumetric representation is utilized to separate MLS measurements recorded by a Velodyne HDL-64E into mobile objects and static background. The method was subjected to a quantitative and a qualitative examination using multiple datasets recorded by a mobile mapping platform. The results show that depending on the chosen octree resolution 87-95% of the measurements are labeled correctly.

  3. Ocean Data Assimilation in the Gulf of Mexico Using 3D VAR Approach - Preliminary Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paturi, S.; Garraffo, Z. D.; Cummings, J. A.; Rivin, I.; Mehra, A.; Kim, H. C.

    2016-12-01

    Approaches to ocean data assimilation vary widely, both in terms of the sophistication of the method and the observations assimilated.A three-dimensional variational (3DVAR) data assimilation system, part of the Navy Coupled Ocean Data Assimilation (NCODA) system developed at Navy Research Laboratory (NRL), is used for assimilating Sea Surface Temperature (SST) and Sea Surface Height (SSH) in the Gulf of Mexico (GoM). The NCODA 3DVAR produces simultaneous analyses of temperature, salinity, and vector velocity and uses all possible sources of ocean data observations.The Hybrid Coordinate Ocean Model (HYCOM) is used for the simulations, at 1/25o grid resolution for July 2011 period. After successful implementation of NCODA 3DVAR in the GoM, the system will be extended to the global ocean with the intent of making it operational.

  4. New 3D-Culture Approaches to Study Interactions of Bone Marrow Adipocytes with Metastatic Prostate Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Herroon, Mackenzie Katheryn; Diedrich, Jonathan Driscoll; Podgorski, Izabela

    2016-01-01

    Adipocytes are a major component of the bone marrow that can critically affect metastatic progression in bone. Understanding how the marrow fat cells influence growth, behavior, and survival of tumor cells requires utilization of in vitro cell systems that can closely mimic the physiological microenvironment. Herein, we present two new three-dimensional (3D) culture approaches to study adipocyte-tumor cell interactions in vitro. The first is a transwell-based system composed of the marrow-derived adipocytes in 3D collagen I gels and reconstituted basement membrane-overlayed prostate tumor cell spheroids. Tumor cells cultured under these 3D conditions are continuously exposed to adipocyte-derived factors, and their response can be evaluated by morphological and immunohistochemical analyses. We show via immunofluorescence analysis of metabolism-associated proteins that under 3D conditions tumor cells have significantly different metabolic response to adipocytes than tumor cells grown in 2D culture. We also demonstrate that this model allows for incorporation of other cell types, such as bone marrow macrophages, and utilization of dye-quenched collagen substrates for examination of proteolysis-driven responses to adipocyte- and macrophage-derived factors. Our second 3D culture system is designed to study tumor cell invasion toward the adipocytes and the consequent interaction between the two cell types. In this model, marrow adipocytes are separated from the fluorescently labeled tumor cells by a layer of collagen I. At designated time points, adipocytes are stained with BODIPY and confocal z-stacks are taken through the depth of the entire culture to determine the distance traveled between the two cell types over time. We demonstrate that this system can be utilized to study effects of candidate factors on tumor invasion toward the adipocytes. We also show that immunohistochemical analyses can be performed to evaluate the impact of direct interaction of prostate

  5. New 3D-Culture Approaches to Study Interactions of Bone Marrow Adipocytes with Metastatic Prostate Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Herroon, Mackenzie Katheryn; Diedrich, Jonathan Driscoll; Podgorski, Izabela

    2016-01-01

    Adipocytes are a major component of the bone marrow that can critically affect metastatic progression in bone. Understanding how the marrow fat cells influence growth, behavior, and survival of tumor cells requires utilization of in vitro cell systems that can closely mimic the physiological microenvironment. Herein, we present two new three-dimensional (3D) culture approaches to study adipocyte–tumor cell interactions in vitro. The first is a transwell-based system composed of the marrow-derived adipocytes in 3D collagen I gels and reconstituted basement membrane-overlayed prostate tumor cell spheroids. Tumor cells cultured under these 3D conditions are continuously exposed to adipocyte-derived factors, and their response can be evaluated by morphological and immunohistochemical analyses. We show via immunofluorescence analysis of metabolism-associated proteins that under 3D conditions tumor cells have significantly different metabolic response to adipocytes than tumor cells grown in 2D culture. We also demonstrate that this model allows for incorporation of other cell types, such as bone marrow macrophages, and utilization of dye-quenched collagen substrates for examination of proteolysis-driven responses to adipocyte- and macrophage-derived factors. Our second 3D culture system is designed to study tumor cell invasion toward the adipocytes and the consequent interaction between the two cell types. In this model, marrow adipocytes are separated from the fluorescently labeled tumor cells by a layer of collagen I. At designated time points, adipocytes are stained with BODIPY and confocal z-stacks are taken through the depth of the entire culture to determine the distance traveled between the two cell types over time. We demonstrate that this system can be utilized to study effects of candidate factors on tumor invasion toward the adipocytes. We also show that immunohistochemical analyses can be performed to evaluate the impact of direct interaction of prostate

  6. A maximum likelihood approach to diffeomorphic speckle tracking for 3D strain estimation in echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Curiale, Ariel H; Vegas-Sánchez-Ferrero, Gonzalo; Bosch, Johan G; Aja-Fernández, Santiago

    2015-08-01

    The strain and strain-rate measures are commonly used for the analysis and assessment of regional myocardial function. In echocardiography (EC), the strain analysis became possible using Tissue Doppler Imaging (TDI). Unfortunately, this modality shows an important limitation: the angle between the myocardial movement and the ultrasound beam should be small to provide reliable measures. This constraint makes it difficult to provide strain measures of the entire myocardium. Alternative non-Doppler techniques such as Speckle Tracking (ST) can provide strain measures without angle constraints. However, the spatial resolution and the noisy appearance of speckle still make the strain estimation a challenging task in EC. Several maximum likelihood approaches have been proposed to statistically characterize the behavior of speckle, which results in a better performance of speckle tracking. However, those models do not consider common transformations to achieve the final B-mode image (e.g. interpolation). This paper proposes a new maximum likelihood approach for speckle tracking which effectively characterizes speckle of the final B-mode image. Its formulation provides a diffeomorphic scheme than can be efficiently optimized with a second-order method. The novelty of the method is threefold: First, the statistical characterization of speckle generalizes conventional speckle models (Rayleigh, Nakagami and Gamma) to a more versatile model for real data. Second, the formulation includes local correlation to increase the efficiency of frame-to-frame speckle tracking. Third, a probabilistic myocardial tissue characterization is used to automatically identify more reliable myocardial motions. The accuracy and agreement assessment was evaluated on a set of 16 synthetic image sequences for three different scenarios: normal, acute ischemia and acute dyssynchrony. The proposed method was compared to six speckle tracking methods. Results revealed that the proposed method is the most

  7. A fully 3D approach for metal artifact reduction in computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Kratz, Baerbel; Weyers, Imke; Buzug, Thorsten M.

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: In computed tomography imaging metal objects in the region of interest introduce inconsistencies during data acquisition. Reconstructing these data leads to an image in spatial domain including star-shaped or stripe-like artifacts. In order to enhance the quality of the resulting image the influence of the metal objects can be reduced. Here, a metal artifact reduction (MAR) approach is proposed that is based on a recomputation of the inconsistent projection data using a fully three-dimensional Fourier-based interpolation. The success of the projection space restoration depends sensitively on a sensible continuation of neighboring structures into the recomputed area. Fortunately, structural information of the entire data is inherently included in the Fourier space of the data. This can be used for a reasonable recomputation of the inconsistent projection data. Methods: The key step of the proposed MAR strategy is the recomputation of the inconsistent projection data based on an interpolation using nonequispaced fast Fourier transforms (NFFT). The NFFT interpolation can be applied in arbitrary dimension. The approach overcomes the problem of adequate neighborhood definitions on irregular grids, since this is inherently given through the usage of higher dimensional Fourier transforms. Here, applications up to the third interpolation dimension are presented and validated. Furthermore, prior knowledge may be included by an appropriate damping of the transform during the interpolation step. This MAR method is applicable on each angular view of a detector row, on two-dimensional projection data as well as on three-dimensional projection data, e.g., a set of sequential acquisitions at different spatial positions, projection data of a spiral acquisition, or cone-beam projection data. Results: Results of the novel MAR scheme based on one-, two-, and three-dimensional NFFT interpolations are presented. All results are compared in projection data space and spatial

  8. Quantification of in-channel large wood recruitment through a 3-D probabilistic approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cislaghi, Alessio; Rigon, Emanuel; Aristide Lenzi, Mario; Battista Bischetti, Gian

    2017-04-01

    Large wood (LW) is a relevant factor in physical, chemical, environmental and biological aspects of low order mountain streams system. LW recruitment, in turn, is affected by many physical processes, such as debris flows, shallow landslides, bank erosion, snow- and wind throw, and increases the potential hazard for downstream human population and infrastructures during intense flood events. In spite of that, the LW recruitment quantification and the modelling of related processes are receiving attention only since few years ago, with particular reference to hillslope instabilities which are the dominant source of LW recruitment in mountainous terrains at regional scale. Actually, models based on the infinite slope approach, commonly adopted for slope stability analysis, can be used for estimating probable LW volume and for identifying the most hazardous areas of wood input, transport and deposition. Such models, however, generally request a robust calibration on landslide inventory and tend to overestimate unstable areas and then LW recruitment volumes. On this background, this work proposes a new LW estimation procedure which combines the forest stand characteristics of the entire catchment and a three-dimensional probabilistic slope stability model. The slope stability model overcomes the limits of the infinite slope approach and considers the spatial variability and uncertainty of the model input parameters through a Monte Carlo analysis. The forest stands characteristics allow including the root reinforcement into the stability model as stochastic input parameter, and provide the necessary information to evaluate the forest wood volume prone to be recruited as LW and its position on the hillslopes. The procedure was tested on a small mountainous headwater catchment in the Eastern Italian Alps, covered with pasture and coniferous forest and prone to shallow landslide and debris flow phenomena, especially during the late spring and the early autumn. The results

  9. Urban Energy Simulation Based on 3d City Models: a Service-Oriented Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wate, P.; Rodrigues, P.; Duminil, E.; Coors, V.

    2016-09-01

    Recent advancements in technology has led to the development of sophisticated software tools revitalizing growth in different domains. Taking advantage of this trend, urban energy domain have developed several compute intensive physical and data driven models. These models are used in various distinct simulation softwares to simulate the whole life-cycle of energy flow in cities from supply, distribution, conversion, storage and consumption. Since some simulation software target a specific energy system, it is necessary to integrate them to predict present and future urban energy needs. However, a key drawback is that, these tools are not compatible with each other as they use custom or propriety formats. Furthermore, they are designed as desktop applications and cannot be easily integrated with third-party tools (open source or commercial). Thereby, missing out on potential model functionalities which are required for sustainable urban energy management. In this paper, we propose a solution based on Service Oriented Architecture (SOA). Our approach relies on open interfaces to offer flexible integration of modelling and computational functionality as loosely coupled distributed services.

  10. Applications of a versatile modelling approach to 3D atom probe simulations.

    PubMed

    Oberdorfer, Christian; Eich, Sebastian Manuel; Lütkemeyer, Martin; Schmitz, Guido

    2015-12-01

    The article addresses application examples of a flexible simulation approach, which is based on an irregular mesh of Voronoi cells. The detailed atomic structure of APT field emitters is represented by Wigner-Seitz cells. In this way, arbitrary crystal structures can be modelled. The electric field results from the solution of the Poisson equation. The evaporation sequence of atoms from the emitter surface is enabled by calculation of the field-induced force, which acts on the surface cells. Presented examples show simulated field desorption maps of a cubic fcc <111> structure in comparison to the close-packed hcp <0001> structure. Additionally, the desorption maps of the cubic sc, bcc, and fcc lattices in <011> orientation are presented. The effect of inhomogeneous evaporation conditions on the emitter apex curvature is demonstrated. Reconstructions derived from the simulation of Σ5 GBs differently inclined with respect to the emitter axis are analyzed. Finally, the stress exerted on an embedded nano-particle during the simulated evaporation with inhomogeneous evaporation thresholds is estimated.

  11. Electrical conductivity of nanocomposites based on carbon nanotubes: a 3D multiscale modeling approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grabowski, Krzysztof; Zbyrad, Paulina; Staszewski, Wieslaw J.; Uhl, Tadeusz; Wiatr, Kazimierz; Packo, Pawel

    2016-04-01

    Remarkable electrical properties of carbon nanotubes (CNT) have lead to increased interest in studying CNT- based devices. Many of current researches are devoted to using all kinds of carbon nanomaterials in the con- struction of sensory elements. One of the most common applications is the development of high performance, large scale sensors. Due to the remarkable conductivity of CNT's such devices represent very high sensitivity. However, there are no sufficient tools for studying and designing such sensors. The main objective of this paper is to develop and validate a multiscale numerical model for a carbon nanotubes based sensor. The device utilises the change of electrical conductivity of a nanocomposite material under applied deformation. The nanocomposite consists of a number of CNTs dispersed in polymer matrix. The paper is devoted to the analysis of the impact of spatial distribution of carbon nanotubes in polymer matrix on electrical conductivity of the sensor. One of key elements is also to examine the impact of strain on electric charge ow in such anisotropic composite structures. In the following work a multiscale electro-mechanical model for CNT - based nanocomposites is proposed. The model comprises of two length scales, namely the meso- and the macro-scale for mechanical and electrical domains. The approach allows for evaluation of macro-scale mechanical response of a strain sensor. Electrical properties of polymeric material with certain CNT fractions were derived considering electrical properties of CNTs, their contact and the tunnelling effect.

  12. High-throughput morphometric analysis of pulmonary airways in MSCT via a mixed 3D/2D approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortner, Margarete; Fetita, Catalin; Brillet, Pierre-Yves; Pr"teux, Françoise; Grenier, Philippe

    2011-03-01

    Asthma and COPD are complex airway diseases with an increased incidence estimated for the next decade. Today, the mechanisms and relationships between airway structure/physiology and the clinical phenotype and genotype are not completely understood. We thus lack the tools to predict disease progression or therapeutic responses. One of the main causes is our limited ability to assess the complexity of airway diseases in large populations of patients with appropriate controls. Multi-slice computed tomography (MSCT) imaging opened the way to the non-invasive assessment of airway physiology and structure, but the use of such technology in large cohorts requires a high degree of automation of the measurements. This paper develops an investigation framework and the associated image quantification tools for high-throughput analysis of airways in MSCT. A mixed approach is proposed, combining 3D and cross-section measurements of the airway tree where the user-interaction is limited to the choice of the desired analysis patterns. Such approach relies on the fully-automated segmentation of the 3D airway tree, caliber estimation and visualization based on morphologic granulometry, central axis computation and tree segment selection, cross-section morphometry of airway lumen and wall, and bronchus longitudinal shape analysis for stenosis/bronciectasis detection and measure validation. The developed methodology has been successfully applied to a cohort of 96 patients from a multi-center clinical study of asthma control in moderate and persistent asthma.

  13. A new approach to the learning of dental morphology, function, and esthetics: the "2D-3D-4D" concept.

    PubMed

    Magne, Pascal

    2015-01-01

    A concept is proposed for an approach to the learning of dental morphology and occlusion. Dental morphology, function, and esthetics should reflect a fundamental driving force, that is, the faithful emulation of the natural dentition's structural (functional, mechanical) and esthetic properties. The innovative part of the proposed approach is the emphasis on visual arts and the 2D-3D-4D aspect that starts with drawing (2D/3D) and continues with partial wax-up exercises that are followed by labial waxups and, finally, full wax-ups using innovative technical aids (electric waxers, prefabricated wax patterns, etc). Finally, the concept of layers (4D) and the histoanatomy of enamel/dentin and optical depth are taught through the realization of layering exercises (advanced acrylic mock-ups and composite resin restorations). All these techniques and materials are not only used to teach morphology and occlusion, but also constitute essential tools that will be of significant use for the student dentists and dental technologists in their future daily practice. The clinical significance of the presented methodology should allow not only students but also practicing dentists and dental technologists to help their youngest collaborators to develop a deep sense of morphology, function, and esthetics.

  14. Multiple 3d Approaches for the Architectural Study of the Medieval Abbey of Cormery in the Loire Valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pouyet, T.

    2017-02-01

    This paper will focus on the technical approaches used for a PhD thesis regarding architecture and spatial organization of benedict abbeys in Touraine in the Middle Ages, in particular the abbey of Cormery in the heart of the Loire Valley. Monastic space is approached in a diachronic way, from the early Middle Ages to the modern times using multi-sources data: architectural study, written sources, ancient maps, various iconographic documents… Many scales are used in the analysis, from the establishment of the abbeys in a territory to the scale of a building like the tower-entrance of the church of Cormery. These methodological axes have been developed in the research unit CITERES for many years and the 3D technology is now used to go further along in that field. The recording in 3D of the buildings of the abbey of Cormery allows us to work at the scale of the monastery and to produce useful data such as sections or orthoimages of the ground and the walls faces which are afterwards drawn and analysed. The study of these documents, crossed with the other historical sources, allowed us to emphasize the presence of walls older than what we thought and to discover construction elements that had not been recognized earlier and which enhance the debate about the construction date St Paul tower and associated the monastic church.

  15. A robust and efficient approach to detect 3D rectal tubes from CT colonography

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Xiaoyun; Slabaugh, Greg

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: The rectal tube (RT) is a common source of false positives (FPs) in computer-aided detection (CAD) systems for CT colonography. A robust and efficient detection of RT can improve CAD performance by eliminating such ''obvious'' FPs and increase radiologists' confidence in CAD. Methods: In this paper, we present a novel and robust bottom-up approach to detect the RT. Probabilistic models, trained using kernel density estimation on simple low-level features, are employed to rank and select the most likely RT tube candidate on each axial slice. Then, a shape model, robustly estimated using random sample consensus (RANSAC), infers the global RT path from the selected local detections. Subimages around the RT path are projected into a subspace formed from training subimages of the RT. A quadratic discriminant analysis (QDA) provides a classification of a subimage as RT or non-RT based on the projection. Finally, a bottom-top clustering method is proposed to merge the classification predictions together to locate the tip position of the RT. Results: Our method is validated using a diverse database, including data from five hospitals. On a testing data with 21 patients (42 volumes), 99.5% of annotated RT paths have been successfully detected. Evaluated with CAD, 98.4% of FPs caused by the RT have been detected and removed without any loss of sensitivity. Conclusions: The proposed method demonstrates a high detection rate of the RT path, and when tested in a CAD system, reduces FPs caused by the RT without the loss of sensitivity.

  16. Transferring Multi-Scale Approaches from 3d City Modeling to Ifc-Based Tunnel Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borrmann, A.; Kolbe, T. H.; Donaubauer, A.; Steuer, H.; Jubierre, J. R.

    2013-09-01

    A multi-scale representation of the built environment is required to provide information with the adequate level of detail (LoD) for different use cases and objectives. This applies not only to the visualization of city and building models, but in particular to their use in the context of planning and analysis tasks. While in the field of Geographic Information Systems, the handling of multi-scale representations is well established and understood, no formal approaches for incorporating multi-scale methods exist in the field of Building Information Modeling (BIM) so far. However, these concepts are much needed to better support highly dynamic planning processes that make use of very rough information about the facility under design in the early stages and provide increasingly detailed and fine-grained information in later stages. To meet these demands, this paper presents a comprehensive concept for incorporating multi-scale representations with infrastructural building information models, with a particular focus on the representation of shield tunnels. Based on a detailed analysis of the data modeling methods used in CityGML for capturing multiscale representations and the requirements present in the context of infrastructure planning projects, we discuss potential extensions to the BIM data model Industry Foundation Classes (IFC). Particular emphasis is put on providing means for preserving the consistency of the representation across the different Levels-of-Detail (LoD). To this end we make use of a procedural geometry description which makes it possible to define explicit dependencies between geometric entities on different LoDs. The modification of an object on a coarse level consequently results in an automated update of all dependent objects on the finer levels. Finally we discuss the transformation of the IFC-based multi-scale tunnel model into a CityGML compliant tunnel representation.

  17. Light distribution in plant canopies: A comparison between 1-D multi-layer modeling approach and 3-D ray tracing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasan, V.; Yiwen, X.; Ellis, A.; Christensen, A.; Borkiewic, K.; Cox, D.; Hart, J.; Long, S.; Marshall-Colon, A.

    2016-12-01

    The distribution of absorbed solar radiation in the photosynthetically active region wavelength (PAR) within plant canopies plays a critical role in determining photosynthetic carbon uptake and its associated transpiration. The vertical distribution of leaf area, leaf angles, leaf absorptivity and reflectivity within the canopy, affect the distribution of PAR absorbed throughout the canopy. While the upper canopy sunlit leaves absorb most of the incoming PAR and hence contribute most towards total canopy carbon uptake, the lower canopy shaded leaves which receive mostly lower intensity diffuse PAR make significant contributions towards plant carbon uptake. Most detailed vegetation models use a 1-D vertical multi-layer approach to model the sunlight and shaded canopy leaf fractions, and quantify the direct and diffuse radiation absorbed by the respective leaf fractions. However, this approach is only applicable under canopy closure conditions, and furthermore it fails to accurately capture the effects of diurnally varying leaf angle distributions in some plant canopies. Here, we show by using a 3-D ray tracing model which uses an explicit 3-D canopy structure that enforces no conditions about canopy closure, that the effects of diurnal variation of canopy leaf angle distributions better match with observed data. Our comparative analysis performed on soybean crop canopies between 3-D ray tracing model and the multi-layer model shows that the distribution of absorbed direct PAR is not exponential while, the distribution of absorbed diffuse PAR radiation within plant canopies is exponential. These results show the multi-layer model to significantly over-predict canopy PAR absorbed, and in turn significantly overestimate photosynthetic carbon uptake by up to 13% and canopy transpiration by 7% under mid-day sun conditions as verified through our canopy chamber experiments. Our results indicate that current detailed 1-D multi-layer canopy radiation attenuation models

  18. A Hybrid Geophysical Fluid Dynamics and Fully 3D Fluid Dynamics Approach to Simulate Multiphysics Coastal Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, H.; Qu, K.

    2014-12-01

    A hybrid method that couples a geophysical fluid dynamics model to a fully 3D fluid dynamics model is the most feasible and promising approach to simulate coastal ocean flow phenomena that involve multiple types of physics spanning a vast range of temporal and spatial scales. We propose such a hybrid method that couples the Finite Volume Coastal Ocean Model (FVCOM) with the Solver for Incompressible Flow on Overset Meshes (SIFOM); the former is used to simulate large-scale estuary flows, and the latter is employed to capture small-scale local processes. The coupling involves distinct governing equations, different numerical algorithms, and dissimilar grids, and it is two-way and realized using the Schwartz alternative iteration. In this presentation, the proposed method will be outlined, and a few applications that are newly produced by it but cannot be handled by other conventional approaches will be presented.

  19. Temperature predictions for geothermal exploration - a lithospheric-scale 3D approach applied to the northern Upper Rhine Graben

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freymark, Jessica; Sippel, Judith; Scheck-Wenderoth, Magdalena; Bär, Kristian; Fritsche, Johann-Gerhard; Kracht, Matthias; Stiller, Manfred

    2015-04-01

    The Upper Rhine Graben and its prolongation, the Hessian depression, were formed as part of the European Cenozoic Rift System in a complex extensional to transtensional setting. At present-day, the Upper Rhine Graben is one of the regions in Germany that are well suitable for deep geothermal exploitation. In the framework of the EU-funded project "IMAGE" (Integrated Methods for Advanced Geothermal Exploration) we aim to contribute to the development of an integrated and multidisciplinary approach for the exploration of geothermal reservoirs by understanding the processes and properties controlling the spatial distribution of key parameters such as the underground temperature. Typically, reservoir-scale numerical models are developed for predictions on the subsurface hydrothermal conditions and for reducing the risk of drilling non-productive geothermal wells. One major problem related to such models is setting appropriate boundary conditions that define, for instance, how much heat enters the reservoir from greater depths. To understand the deep thermal field of the northern Upper Rhine Graben in the federal state of Hessen, we first develop a 3D structural model that differentiates the main geological units of the lithosphere including the shallow sedimentary fill. This model allows to solve the steady-state conductive heat equation and understand the first-order controlling factors of the regional thermal field. We present the database (e.g. seismic reflection data) and the methodological workflow (involving, e.g., 3D gravity modelling) that were used to develop the lithospheric-scale 3D structural model. Furthermore, we show how certain features of the structural model such as thickness variations of the radiogenic-heat-producing crystalline crust control the temperature distribution in the subsurface.

  20. The AERO system: a 3D-like approach for recording gene expression patterns in the whole mouse embryo.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Hirohito; Kubo, Atsushi; Uchibe, Kenta; Hashimoto, Megumi; Yokoyama, Shigetoshi; Takada, Shuji; Mitsuoka, Kazuhiko; Asahara, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    We have recently constructed a web-based database of gene expression in the mouse whole embryo, EMBRYS (http://embrys.jp/embrys/html/MainMenu.html). To allow examination of gene expression patterns to the fullest extent possible, this database provides both photo images and annotation data. However, since embryos develop via an intricate process of morphogenesis, it would be of great value to track embryonic gene expression from a three dimensional perspective. In fact, several methods have been developed to achieve this goal, but highly laborious procedures and specific operational skills are generally required. We utilized a novel microscopic technique that enables the easy capture of rotational, 3D-like images of the whole embryo. In this method, a rotary head equipped with two mirrors that are designed to obtain an image tilted at 45 degrees to the microscope stage captures serial images at 2-degree intervals. By a simple operation, 180 images are automatically collected. These 2D images obtained at multiple angles are then used to reconstruct 3D-like images, termed AERO images. By means of this system, over 800 AERO images of 191 gene expression patterns were captured. These images can be easily rotated on the computer screen using the EMBRYS database so that researchers can view an entire embryo by a virtual viewing on a computer screen in an unbiased or non-predetermined manner. The advantages afforded by this approach make it especially useful for generating data viewed in public databases.

  1. 3d-modelling workflows for trans-nationally shared geological models - first approaches from the project GeoMol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rupf, Isabel

    2013-04-01

    To meet the EU's ambitious targets for carbon emission reduction, renewable energy production has to be strongly upgraded and made more efficient for grid energy storage. Alpine Foreland Basins feature a unique geological inventory which can contribute substantially to tackle these challenges. They offer a geothermal potential and storage capacity for compressed air, as well as space for underground storage of CO2. Exploiting these natural subsurface resources will strongly compete with existing oil and gas claims and groundwater issues. The project GeoMol will provide consistent 3-dimensional subsurface information about the Alpine Foreland Basins based on a holistic and transnational approach. Core of the project GeoMol is a geological framework model for the entire Northern Molasse Basin, complemented by five detailed models in pilot areas, also in the Po Basin, which are dedicated to specific questions of subsurface use. The models will consist of up to 13 litho-stratigraphic horizons ranging from the Cenozoic basin fill down to Mesozoic and late Paleozoic sedimentary rocks and the crystalline basement. More than 5000 wells and 28 000 km seismic lines serve as input data sets for the geological subsurface model. The data have multiple sources and various acquisition dates, and their interpretations have gone through several paradigm changes. Therefore, it is necessary to standardize the data with regards to technical parameters and content prior to further analysis (cf. Capar et al. 2013, EGU2013-5349). Each partner will build its own geological subsurface model with different software solutions for seismic interpretation and 3d-modelling. Therefore, 3d-modelling follows different software- and partner-specific workflows. One of the main challenges of the project is to ensure a seamlessly fitting framework model. It is necessary to define several milestones for cross border checks during the whole modelling process. Hence, the main input data set of the

  2. A unified approach to diffusion direction sensitive slice registration and 3-D DTI reconstruction from moving fetal brain anatomy.

    PubMed

    Fogtmann, Mads; Seshamani, Sharmishtaa; Kroenke, Christopher; Xi Cheng; Chapman, Teresa; Wilm, Jakob; Rousseau, Francois; Studholme, Colin

    2014-02-01

    This paper presents an approach to 3-D diffusion tensor image (DTI) reconstruction from multi-slice diffusion weighted (DW) magnetic resonance imaging acquisitions of the moving fetal brain. Motion scatters the slice measurements in the spatial and spherical diffusion domain with respect to the underlying anatomy. Previous image registration techniques have been described to estimate the between slice fetal head motion, allowing the reconstruction of 3D a diffusion estimate on a regular grid using interpolation. We propose Approach to Unified Diffusion Sensitive Slice Alignment and Reconstruction (AUDiSSAR) that explicitly formulates a process for diffusion direction sensitive DW-slice-to-DTI-volume alignment. This also incorporates image resolution modeling to iteratively deconvolve the effects of the imaging point spread function using the multiple views provided by thick slices acquired in different anatomical planes. The algorithm is implemented using a multi-resolution iterative scheme and multiple real and synthetic data are used to evaluate the performance of the technique. An accuracy experiment using synthetically created motion data of an adult head and an experiment using synthetic motion added to sedated fetal monkey dataset show a significant improvement in motion-trajectory estimation compared to current state-of-the-art approaches. The performance of the method is then evaluated on challenging but clinically typical in utero fetal scans of four different human cases, showing improved rendition of cortical anatomy and extraction of white matter tracts. While the experimental work focuses on DTI reconstruction (second-order tensor model), the proposed reconstruction framework can employ any 5-D diffusion volume model that can be represented by the spatial parameterizations of an orientation distribution function.

  3. A Unified Approach to Diffusion Direction Sensitive Slice Registration and 3-D DTI Reconstruction From Moving Fetal Brain Anatomy

    PubMed Central

    Fogtmann, Mads; Seshamani, Sharmishtaa; Kroenke, Christopher; Cheng, Xi; Chapman, Teresa; Wilm, Jakob; Rousseau, François

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents an approach to 3-D diffusion tensor image (DTI) reconstruction from multi-slice diffusion weighted (DW) magnetic resonance imaging acquisitions of the moving fetal brain. Motion scatters the slice measurements in the spatial and spherical diffusion domain with respect to the underlying anatomy. Previous image registration techniques have been described to estimate the between slice fetal head motion, allowing the reconstruction of 3-D a diffusion estimate on a regular grid using interpolation. We propose Approach to Unified Diffusion Sensitive Slice Alignment and Reconstruction (AUDiSSAR) that explicitly formulates a process for diffusion direction sensitive DW-slice-to-DTI-volume alignment. This also incorporates image resolution modeling to iteratively deconvolve the effects of the imaging point spread function using the multiple views provided by thick slices acquired in different anatomical planes. The algorithm is implemented using a multi-resolution iterative scheme and multiple real and synthetic data are used to evaluate the performance of the technique. An accuracy experiment using synthetically created motion data of an adult head and a experiment using synthetic motion added to sedated fetal monkey dataset show a significant improvement in motion-trajectory estimation compared to a state-of-the-art approaches. The performance of the method is then evaluated on challenging but clinically typical in utero fetal scans of four different human cases, showing improved rendition of cortical anatomy and extraction of white matter tracts. While the experimental work focuses on DTI reconstruction (second-order tensor model), the proposed reconstruction framework can employ any 5-D diffusion volume model that can be represented by the spatial parameterizations of an orientation distribution function. PMID:24108711

  4. Genetic approach to reconstruct complex regional geological setting of the Baltic basin in 3D geological model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popovs, K.; Saks, T.; Ukass, J.; Jatnieks, J.

    2012-04-01

    Interpretation of geological structures in 3D geological models is a relatively new research topic that is already standardized in many geological branches. Due to its wide practical application, these models are indispensable and become one of the dominant interpretation methods in reducing geological uncertainties in many geology fields. Traditionally, geological concepts complement quantitative as much as qualitative data to obtain a model deemed acceptable, however, available data very often is insufficient and modeling methods primarily focus on spatial data but geological history usually is mostly neglected for the modeling of large sedimentary basins. A need to better integrate the long and often complex geological history and geological knowledge into modeling procedure is very acute to gain geological insight and improve the quality of geological models. During this research, 3D geological model of the Baltic basin (BB) was created. Because of its complex regional geological setting - wide range of the data sources with multiple scales, resolution and density as well as its various source formats, the study area provides a challenge for the 3D geological modeling. In order to create 3D regional geometrical model for the study area algorithmic genetic approach for model geometry reconstruction was applied. The genetic approach is based on the assumption that post-depositional deformation produce no significant change in sedimentary strata volume, assuming that the strata thickness and its length in a cross sectional plane remains unchanged except as a result of erosion. Assuming that the tectonic deformation occurred in sequential cycles and subsequent tectonic stage strata is separated by regional unconformity as is the case of the BB, there is an opportunity for algorithmic approach in reconstructing these conditions by sequentially reconstructing the layer original thickness. Layer thicknesses were sliced along fault lines, where applicable layer

  5. Fast 3d Hybrid Seismic Modeling: Ray-fd Approach For Elastic Models With Locally Complex Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oprsal, I.; Brokesova, J.; Faeh, D.; Giardini, D.

    Hybrid approaches may find broad applications wherever full source, path,and site effects modeling methods are too expensive. A new efficient hybrid method allowing to compute seismic wavefield in large 3D elastic models containing a complex local structure embedded in a large, but considerably simpler, structure is designed. This hybrid method combines the ray approach in the large simple structure with the finite difference (FD) approach in the local complex structure. The hybrid method is based on two successive steps. In the 1st one, the source and path information is carried by wavefield propagating in the large simple structure. This wavefield, calculated by the ray method, is incident at the points along a two-fold formal boundary (excitation box, EB) surrounding that part of the model which is to be replaced by the complex medium in the 2nd step. 3D rays are necessary due to ar- bitrary source-EB configuration, even in case the 1st step structure is less dimensional (2D, 1D, homogeneous). Along EB, the ray endpoints may be distributed sparsely thanks to relative simplicity of the structure. This reduces computer time requirements and also the size of the excitation file saved on the disk. The ray wavefield along EB provides (after interpolation in space and time) the input for the second step consisting in calculating the complete wavefield by the 3D FD method on irregular grids. The FD computational domain contains the EB and its close vicinity. The 2nd step model differs from the 1st step model only inside the EB where the local complex structure is inserted. To verify the consistency between the 1st and the 2nd step binding, the 2nd step computation can be performed on (unchanged) 1st step model ('replication test'). This should give the same wavefield as the 1st step inside, and zero wavefield outside the EB. The EB remains fully permeable for all waves propagating within the FD domain. Provided the 1st step structure does not contain too many layers

  6. The Development of a 3D LADAR Simulator Based on a Fast Target Impulse Response Generation Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Temeemy, Ali Adnan

    2017-09-01

    A new laser detection and ranging (LADAR) simulator has been developed, using MATLAB and its graphical user interface, to simulate direct detection time of flight LADAR systems, and to produce 3D simulated scanning images under a wide variety of conditions. This simulator models each stage from the laser source to data generation and can be considered as an efficient simulation tool to use when developing LADAR systems and their data processing algorithms. The novel approach proposed for this simulator is to generate the actual target impulse response. This approach is fast and able to deal with high scanning requirements without losing the fidelity that accompanies increments in speed. This leads to a more efficient LADAR simulator and opens up the possibility for simulating LADAR beam propagation more accurately by using a large number of laser footprint samples. The approach is to select only the parts of the target that lie in the laser beam angular field by mathematically deriving the required equations and calculating the target angular ranges. The performance of the new simulator has been evaluated under different scanning conditions, the results showing significant increments in processing speeds in comparison to conventional approaches, which are also used in this study as a point of comparison for the results. The results also show the simulator's ability to simulate phenomena related to the scanning process, for example, type of noise, scanning resolution and laser beam width.

  7. 3D nonlinear complex-diffusion filter on GPU.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Pedro; Serranho, Pedro; Bernardes, Rui

    2012-01-01

    The ramp preserving 2D nonlinear complex-diffusion filter introduced by Gilboa et al. (2004) was extended to 3D (Maduro et al., 2012). We propose a graphical processing unit implementation of the 3D filter for an overall faster processing in order to be used in a clinical setting. We perform a search for the best diffusion parameters (the number of iterations and spread of the diffusivity) for the 2D and 3D filters and compare their results resorting to synthetic spectral-domain optical coherence tomography volumetric data and several quantitative metrics. Execution time improvement of our implementation versus a single-core approach is also presented, showing that it allows for a full 3D volume to be processed under 7.5 seconds.

  8. Real-time rendering method and performance evaluation of composable 3D lenses for interactive VR.

    PubMed

    Borst, Christoph W; Tiesel, Jan-Phillip; Best, Christopher M

    2010-01-01

    We present and evaluate a new approach for real-time rendering of composable 3D lenses for polygonal scenes. Such lenses, usually called "volumetric lenses," are an extension of 2D Magic Lenses to 3D volumes in which effects are applied to scene elements. Although the composition of 2D lenses is well known, 3D composition was long considered infeasible due to both geometric and semantic complexity. Nonetheless, for a scene with multiple interactive 3D lenses, the problem of intersecting lenses must be considered. Intersecting 3D lenses in meaningful ways supports new interfaces such as hierarchical 3D windows, 3D lenses for managing and composing visualization options, or interactive shader development by direct manipulation of lenses providing component effects. Our 3D volumetric lens approach differs from other approaches and is one of the first to address efficient composition of multiple lenses. It is well-suited to head-tracked VR environments because it requires no view-dependent generation of major data structures, allowing caching and reuse of full or partial results. A Composite Shader Factory module composes shader programs for rendering composite visual styles and geometry of intersection regions. Geometry is handled by Boolean combinations of region tests in fragment shaders, which allows both convex and nonconvex CSG volumes for lens shape. Efficiency is further addressed by a Region Analyzer module and by broad-phase culling. Finally, we consider the handling of order effects for composed 3D lenses.

  9. Numerical Simulation of 3D Thermo-Elastic Fatigue Crack Growth Problems Using Coupled FE-EFG Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pathak, Himanshu; Singh, Akhilendra; Singh, Indra Vir

    2017-06-01

    In this work, finite element method (FEM) and element free Galerkin method (EFGM) are coupled for solving 3D crack domains subjected to cyclic thermal load of constant amplitude. Crack growth contours and fatigue life have been obtained for each of the considered numerical examples. Thermo-elastic problems are decoupled into thermal and elastic problems . Firstly, the unknown temperature field is obtained by solving heat conduction equation, then, it is used as the input load in the elastic problem to calculate the displacement and stress fields. The geometrical discontinuity across crack surface is modelled by extrinsically enriched EFGM and the remaining part of the domain is approximated by standard finite element method. At the crack interface, a ramp function based interpolation scheme has been implemented. This coupled approach combines the advantages of both EFGM and FEM. A linear successive crack increment approach is used to model crack growth. The growing crack surface is traced by level set function. Standard Paris law is used for life estimation of the three-dimensional crack models. Different cases of planar and non-planar crack problems have been solved and their results are compared with the results obtained using extended finite element method to check accuracy, efficiency and robustness of the coupled FE-EFG approach implemented in this study.

  10. Progression in the Fountain Pen Approach: From 2D Writing to 3D Free-Form Micro/Nanofabrication.

    PubMed

    Je, Jung Ho; Kim, Jong-Man; Jaworski, Justyn

    2017-01-01

    The fountain pen approach, as a means for transferring materials to substrates, has shown numerous incarnations in recent years for creating 2D micro/nanopatterns and even generating 3D free-form nanostructures using a variety of material "inks". While the idea of filled reservoirs used to deliver material to a substrate via a capillary remains unchanged since antiquity, the advent of precise micromanipulation systems and functional material "inks" allows the extension of this mechanism to more high-tech applications. Herein, the recent growth in meniscus guided fountain pen approaches for benchtop micro/nanofabrication, which has occurred in the last decade, is discussed. Particular attention is given to the theory, equipment, and experimentation encompassing this unique direct writing approach. A detailed exploration of the diverse ink systems and functional device applications borne from this strategy is put forth to reveal its rapid expansion to a broad range of scientific and engineering disciplines. As such, this informative review is provided for researchers considering adoption of this recent advancement of a familiar technology.

  11. Hierarchical Statistical 3D ' Atomistic' Simulation of Decanano MOSFETs: Drift-Diffusion, Hydrodynamic and Quantum Mechanical Approaches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asenov, Asen; Brown, A. R.; Slavcheva, G.; Davies, J. H.

    2000-01-01

    When MOSFETs are scaled to deep submicron dimensions the discreteness and randomness of the dopant charges in the channel region introduces significant fluctuations in the device characteristics. This effect, predicted 20 year ago, has been confirmed experimentally and in simulation studies. The impact of the fluctuations on the functionality, yield, and reliability of the corresponding systems shifts the paradigm of the numerical device simulation. It becomes insufficient to simulate only one device representing one macroscopical design in a continuous charge approximation. An ensemble of macroscopically identical but microscopically different devices has to be characterized by simulation of statistically significant samples. The aims of the numerical simulations shift from predicting the characteristics of a single device with continuous doping towards estimating the mean values and the standard deviations of basic design parameters such as threshold voltage, subthreshold slope, transconductance, drive current, etc. for the whole ensemble of 'atomistically' different devices in the system. It has to be pointed out that even the mean values obtained from 'atomistic' simulations are not identical to the values obtained from continuous doping simulations. In this paper we present a hierarchical approach to the 'atomistic' simulation of aggressively scaled decanano MOSFETs. A full scale 3D drift-diffusion'atomostic' simulation approach is first described and used for verification of the more economical, but also more restricted, options. To reduce the processor time and memory requirements at high drain voltage we have developed a self-consistent option based on a thin slab solution of the current continuity equation only in the channel region. This is coupled to the Poisson's equation solution in the whole simulation domain in the Gummel iteration cycles. The accuracy of this approach is investigated in comparison with the full self-consistent solution. At low drain

  12. Regional rigorous 3-D modelling of ground geoelectric field due to realistic geomagnetic disturbances. An approach and implementation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivannikova, Elena; Kruglyakov, Mikhail; Kuvshinov, Alexey; Rastaetter, Lutz; Pulkkinen, Antti

    2017-04-01

    Strong eruptions at the Sun's surface produce large release of plasma, which with a high speed (solar wind) flows into space. Solar wind interaction with the Earth's magnetosphere and the ionosphere leads to a continuous disturbance of the geomagnetic field. This fluctuating geomagnetic field induces a ground geoelectric field that in turn generates geomagnetically induced currents (GICs) in technological systems, such as power grids and pipelines. It is well known that GICs are one of the most dangerous factors affecting the operation of the above systems. Thus, an accurate modelling of the spatio-temporal evolution of the geoelectric field during abnormal (storm-time) geomagnetic activity is a key consideration in estimating the hazard to technological systems from space weather. We present a numerical tool for regional modelling of the space weather influence on ground geoelectric field. The tool exploits realistic regional and global three-dimensional (3-D) models of Earth's electrical conductivity, and realistic global models of the spatio-temporal evolution of magnetospheric and ionospheric current systems responsible for geomagnetic disturbances. The tool involves four steps. First, we compute the spatio-temporal distribution of external magnetic field on a regular grid at the surface of the Earth using a magnetohydrodynamic model of the magnetosphere coupled to an electrostatic model of the ionosphere. Second, from the external magnetic field we compute the global source in the form of equivalent currents flowing in a thin shell above the Earth. Third, for a given global source and a given global 3-D conductivity model of the Earth we compute ground geoelectric field globally at a coarse grid (using spherical geometry). Finally, for a given source and a given regional 3-D conductivity model(s) of the Earth we compute geoelectric field regionally (using Cartesian geometry) at a dense grid utilizing the results from the global modelling. Both global and

  13. An approach for the calibration of a combined RGB-sensor and 3D-camera device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulze, M.

    2011-07-01

    The elds of application for 3d cameras are very dierent, because high image frequency and determination of 3d data. Often, 3d cameras are used for mobile robotic. They are used for obstacle detection or object recognition. So they also are interesting for applications in agriculture, in combination with mobile robots. Here, in addition to 3d data, there is often a necessity to get color information for each 3d point. Unfortunately, 3d cameras do not capture any color information. Therefore, an additional sensor is necessary, such as RGB plus possibly NIR. To combine data of two dierent sensors a reference to each other, via calibration, is important. This paper presents several calibration methods and discuss their accuracy potential. Based on a spatial resection, the algorithm determines the translation and rotation between the two sensors and the inner orientation of the used sensor.

  14. 3-D QSAR studies on histone deacetylase inhibitors. A GOLPE/GRID approach on different series of compounds.

    PubMed

    Ragno, Rino; Simeoni, Silvia; Valente, Sergio; Massa, Silvio; Mai, Antonello

    2006-01-01

    Docking simulation and three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationships (