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Sample records for 3d wave equation

  1. A 3D staggered-grid finite difference scheme for poroelastic wave equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yijie; Gao, Jinghuai

    2014-10-01

    Three dimensional numerical modeling has been a viable tool for understanding wave propagation in real media. The poroelastic media can better describe the phenomena of hydrocarbon reservoirs than acoustic and elastic media. However, the numerical modeling in 3D poroelastic media demands significantly more computational capacity, including both computational time and memory. In this paper, we present a 3D poroelastic staggered-grid finite difference (SFD) scheme. During the procedure, parallel computing is implemented to reduce the computational time. Parallelization is based on domain decomposition, and communication between processors is performed using message passing interface (MPI). Parallel analysis shows that the parallelized SFD scheme significantly improves the simulation efficiency and 3D decomposition in domain is the most efficient. We also analyze the numerical dispersion and stability condition of the 3D poroelastic SFD method. Numerical results show that the 3D numerical simulation can provide a real description of wave propagation.

  2. An unsplit Convolutional perfectly matched layer technique improved at grazing incidence for the differential anisotropic elastic wave equation: application to 3D heterogeneous near surface slices.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, R.; Komatitsch, D.

    2007-05-01

    In geophysical exploration, high computational cost of full waveform inverse problem can be drastically reduced by implementing efficient boundary conditions. In many regions of interest for the oil industry or geophysical exploration, nearly tabular geological structures can be handled and analyzed by setting receivers in wells or/and at large offset. Then, the numerical modelling of waves travelling in thin slices along wells and near surface structures can provide very fast responses if highly accurate absorbing conditions around the slice are introduced in the wave propagation modelling. Here we propose then a Convolutional version of the well known Perfectly Matched layer technique. This optimized version allows the generation of seismic waves travelling close to the boundary layer at almost grazing incidence, which allows the treatment of thin 3D slices. The Perfectly Matched Layer (PML) technique, introduced in 1994 by Bérenger for Maxwell's equations, has become classical in the context of numerical simulations in electromagnetics, in particular for 3D finite difference in the time domain (FDTD) calculations. One of the most attractive properties of a PML model is that no reflection occurs at the interface between the physical domain and the absorbing layer before truncation to a finite-size layer and discretization by a numerical scheme. Therefore, the absorbing layer does not send spurious energy back into the medium. This property holds for any frequency and angle of incidence. However, the layer must be truncated in order to be able to perform numerical simulations, and such truncation creates a reflected wave whose amplitude is amplified by the discretization process. In 2001, Collino and Tsogka introduced a PML model for the elastodynamics equation written as a first-order system in velocity and stress with split unknowns, and discretized it based on the standard 2D staggered-grid finite-difference scheme of Virieux (1986). Then in 2001 and 2004

  3. Elastic wave modelling in 3D heterogeneous media: 3D grid method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jianfeng, Zhang; Tielin, Liu

    2002-09-01

    We present a new numerical technique for elastic wave modelling in 3D heterogeneous media with surface topography, which is called the 3D grid method in this paper. This work is an extension of the 2D grid method that models P-SV wave propagation in 2D heterogeneous media. Similar to the finite-element method in the discretization of a numerical mesh, the proposed scheme is flexible in incorporating surface topography and curved interfaces; moreover it satisfies the free-surface boundary conditions of 3D topography naturally. The algorithm, developed from a parsimonious staggered-grid scheme, solves the problem using integral equilibrium around each node, instead of satisfying elastodynamic differential equations at each node as in the conventional finite-difference method. The computational cost and memory requirements for the proposed scheme are approximately the same as those used by the same order finite-difference method. In this paper, a mixed tetrahedral and parallelepiped grid method is presented; and the numerical dispersion and stability criteria on the tetrahedral grid method and parallelepiped grid method are discussed in detail. The proposed scheme is successfully tested against an analytical solution for the 3D Lamb problem and a solution of the boundary method for the diffraction of a hemispherical crater. Moreover, examples of surface-wave propagation in an elastic half-space with a semi-cylindrical trench on the surface and 3D plane-layered model are presented.

  4. Frozen Gaussian approximation for 3-D seismic wave propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chai, Lihui; Tong, Ping; Yang, Xu

    2017-01-01

    We present a systematic introduction on applying frozen Gaussian approximation (FGA) to compute synthetic seismograms in 3-D earth models. In this method, seismic wavefield is decomposed into frozen (fixed-width) Gaussian functions, which propagate along ray paths. Rather than the coherent state solution to the wave equation, this method is rigorously derived by asymptotic expansion on phase plane, with analysis of its accuracy determined by the ratio of short wavelength over large domain size. Similar to other ray-based beam methods (e.g. Gaussian beam methods), one can use relatively small number of Gaussians to get accurate approximations of high-frequency wavefield. The algorithm is embarrassingly parallel, which can drastically speed up the computation with a multicore-processor computer station. We illustrate the accuracy and efficiency of the method by comparing it to the spectral element method for a 3-D seismic wave propagation in homogeneous media, where one has the analytical solution as a benchmark. As another proof of methodology, simulations of high-frequency seismic wave propagation in heterogeneous media are performed for 3-D waveguide model and smoothed Marmousi model, respectively. The second contribution of this paper is that, we incorporate the Snell's law into the FGA formulation, and asymptotically derive reflection, transmission and free surface conditions for FGA to compute high-frequency seismic wave propagation in high contrast media. We numerically test these conditions by computing traveltime kernels of different phases in the 3-D crust-over-mantle model.

  5. Generation Of 3d Periodic Internal Wave Beams:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chashechkin, Yuli D.; Vasiliev, Alexey Yu.

    We study generation of 2D and 3D periodic internal wave beams in continuously strat- ified viscous liquid basing on a complete set of governing equations and exact bound- ary conditions that is no-slip for velocity and attenuation of all disturbances at infinite distance from the source. The linearized governing equations are solved by an integral transform method. A total set of dispersion equation roots contains terms correspond- ing to internal waves and additional roots describing two kinds of periodic boundary layers. The first one is a viscous boundary layer and has an analogue that is a periodic or Stokes' layer in a homogeneous fluid. Its thickness is defined by a kinematic viscos- ity coefficient and a buoyancy frequency. The second one, that is an internal boundary layer, is a specific feature of stratified flows. Its thickness besides the Stokes' scale contains additional factor depending on relative wave frequency and geometry of the problem that is on the local slope of emitting surface and a direction of the waves propagation. We have constructed exact solutions of linear problems describing gen- eration of 2D waves by a strip and 3D by a rectangular with an arbitrary ratio of sides moving along or normally to a sloping plane. We also calculated the wave pattern gen- erated by a part of a vertical cylinder surface with different ratios of intrinsic scales that is of cylinder radius, thickness of the boundary layer and internal viscous scale. All solutions are regularly matched between themselves in limiting cases. The spatial decay of the waves depends on dimension and geometry of the problem. Non-linear generation of internal waves by the Stokes' boundary layer on a periodically rotating horizontal disk or by interacting boundary layers on an arbitrary moving strip is in- vestigated. We found conditions of generation of the main frequency and its second harmonic. In experiments periodic waves beams from different sources are visualised by the

  6. Investigation of surface wave amplitudes in 3-D velocity and 3-D Q models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruan, Y.; Zhou, Y.

    2010-12-01

    It has been long recognized that seismic amplitudes depend on both wave speed structures and anelasticity (Q) structures. However, the effects of lateral heterogeneities in wave speed and Q structures on seismic amplitudes has not been well understood. We investigate the effects of 3-D wave speed and 3-D anelasticity (Q) structures on surface-wave amplitudes based upon wave propagation simulations of twelve globally-distributed earthquakes and 801 stations in Earth models with and without lateral heterogeneities in wave speed and anelasticity using a Spectral Element Method (SEM). Our tomographic-like 3-D Q models are converted from a velocity model S20RTS using a set of reasonable mineralogical parameters, assuming lateral perturbations in both velocity and Q are due to temperature perturbations. Surface-wave amplitude variations of SEM seismograms are measured in the period range of 50--200 s using boxcar taper, cosine taper and Slepian multi-tapers. We calculate ray-theoretical predictions of surface-wave amplitude perturbations due to elastic focusing, attenuation, and anelastic focusing which respectively depend upon the second spatial derivative (''roughness'') of perturbations in phase velocity, 1/Q, and the roughness of perturbations in 1/Q. Both numerical experiments and theoretical calculations show that (1) for short-period (~ 50 s) surface waves, the effects of amplitude attenuation due to 3-D Q structures are comparable with elastic focusing effects due to 3-D wave speed structures; and (2) for long-period (> 100 s) surface waves, the effects of attenuation become much weaker than elastic focusing; and (3) elastic focusing effects are correlated with anelastic focusing at all periods due to the correlation between velocity and Q models; and (4) amplitude perturbations are depend on measurement techniques and therefore cannot be directly compared with ray-theoretical predictions because ray theory does not account for the effects of measurement

  7. Simulation of 3D Global Wave Propagation Through Geodynamic Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuberth, B.; Piazzoni, A.; Bunge, H.; Igel, H.; Steinle-Neumann, G.

    2005-12-01

    This project aims at a better understanding of the forward problem of global 3D wave propagation. We use the spectral element program "SPECFEM3D" (Komatitsch and Tromp, 2002a,b) with varying input models of seismic velocities derived from mantle convection simulations (Bunge et al., 2002). The purpose of this approach is to obtain seismic velocity models independently from seismological studies. In this way one can test the effects of varying parameters of the mantle convection models on the seismic wave field. In order to obtain the seismic velocities from the temperature field of the geodynamical simulations we follow a mineral physics approach. Assuming a certain mantle composition (e.g. pyrolite with CMASF composition) we compute the stable phases for each depth (i.e. pressure) and temperature by system Gibbs free energy minimization. Elastic moduli and density are calculated from the equations of state of the stable mineral phases. For this we use a mineral physics database derived from calorimetric experiments (enthalphy and entropy of formation, heat capacity) and EOS parameters.

  8. 3D Ultrasonic Wave Simulations for Structural Health Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Leckey Cara A/; Miler, Corey A.; Hinders, Mark K.

    2011-01-01

    Structural health monitoring (SHM) for the detection of damage in aerospace materials is an important area of research at NASA. Ultrasonic guided Lamb waves are a promising SHM damage detection technique since the waves can propagate long distances. For complicated flaw geometries experimental signals can be difficult to interpret. High performance computing can now handle full 3-dimensional (3D) simulations of elastic wave propagation in materials. We have developed and implemented parallel 3D elastodynamic finite integration technique (3D EFIT) code to investigate ultrasound scattering from flaws in materials. EFIT results have been compared to experimental data and the simulations provide unique insight into details of the wave behavior. This type of insight is useful for developing optimized experimental SHM techniques. 3D EFIT can also be expanded to model wave propagation and scattering in anisotropic composite materials.

  9. A note on singularities of the 3-D Euler equation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanveer, S.

    1994-01-01

    In this paper, we consider analytic initial conditions with finite energy, whose complex spatial continuation is a superposition of a smooth background flow and a singular field. Through explicit calculation in the complex plane, we show that under some assumptions, the solution to the 3-D Euler equation ceases to be analytic in the real domain in finite time.

  10. A parallel algorithm for solving the 3d Schroedinger equation

    SciTech Connect

    Strickland, Michael; Yager-Elorriaga, David

    2010-08-20

    We describe a parallel algorithm for solving the time-independent 3d Schroedinger equation using the finite difference time domain (FDTD) method. We introduce an optimized parallelization scheme that reduces communication overhead between computational nodes. We demonstrate that the compute time, t, scales inversely with the number of computational nodes as t {proportional_to} (N{sub nodes}){sup -0.95} {sup {+-} 0.04}. This makes it possible to solve the 3d Schroedinger equation on extremely large spatial lattices using a small computing cluster. In addition, we present a new method for precisely determining the energy eigenvalues and wavefunctions of quantum states based on a symmetry constraint on the FDTD initial condition. Finally, we discuss the usage of multi-resolution techniques in order to speed up convergence on extremely large lattices.

  11. 3D Guided Wave Motion Analysis on Laminated Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tian, Zhenhua; Leckey, Cara; Yu, Lingyu

    2013-01-01

    Ultrasonic guided waves have proved useful for structural health monitoring (SHM) and nondestructive evaluation (NDE) due to their ability to propagate long distances with less energy loss compared to bulk waves and due to their sensitivity to small defects in the structure. Analysis of actively transmitted ultrasonic signals has long been used to detect and assess damage. However, there remain many challenging tasks for guided wave based SHM due to the complexity involved with propagating guided waves, especially in the case of composite materials. The multimodal nature of the ultrasonic guided waves complicates the related damage analysis. This paper presents results from parallel 3D elastodynamic finite integration technique (EFIT) simulations used to acquire 3D wave motion in the subject laminated carbon fiber reinforced polymer composites. The acquired 3D wave motion is then analyzed by frequency-wavenumber analysis to study the wave propagation and interaction in the composite laminate. The frequency-wavenumber analysis enables the study of individual modes and visualization of mode conversion. Delamination damage has been incorporated into the EFIT model to generate "damaged" data. The potential for damage detection in laminated composites is discussed in the end.

  12. Wave-equation dispersion inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jing; Feng, Zongcai; Schuster, Gerard

    2017-03-01

    We present the theory for wave-equation inversion of dispersion curves, where the misfit function is the sum of the squared differences between the wavenumbers along the predicted and observed dispersion curves. The dispersion curves are obtained from Rayleigh waves recorded by vertical-component geophones. Similar to wave-equation traveltime tomography, the complicated surface wave arrivals in traces are skeletonized as simpler data, namely the picked dispersion curves in the phase-velocity and frequency domains. Solutions to the elastic wave equation and an iterative optimization method are then used to invert these curves for 2-D or 3-D S-wave velocity models. This procedure, denoted as wave-equation dispersion inversion (WD), does not require the assumption of a layered model and is significantly less prone to the cycle-skipping problems of full waveform inversion. The synthetic and field data examples demonstrate that WD can approximately reconstruct the S-wave velocity distributions in laterally heterogeneous media if the dispersion curves can be identified and picked. The WD method is easily extended to anisotropic data and the inversion of dispersion curves associated with Love waves.

  13. Modeling tree crown dynamics with 3D partial differential equations

    PubMed Central

    Beyer, Robert; Letort, Véronique; Cournède, Paul-Henry

    2014-01-01

    We characterize a tree's spatial foliage distribution by the local leaf area density. Considering this spatially continuous variable allows to describe the spatiotemporal evolution of the tree crown by means of 3D partial differential equations. These offer a framework to rigorously take locally and adaptively acting effects into account, notably the growth toward light. Biomass production through photosynthesis and the allocation to foliage and wood are readily included in this model framework. The system of equations stands out due to its inherent dynamic property of self-organization and spontaneous adaptation, generating complex behavior from even only a few parameters. The density-based approach yields spatially structured tree crowns without relying on detailed geometry. We present the methodological fundamentals of such a modeling approach and discuss further prospects and applications. PMID:25101095

  14. 3D volumetric radar using 94-GHz millimeter waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takács, Barnabás

    2006-05-01

    This article describes a novel approach to the real-time visualization of 3D imagery obtained from a 3D millimeter wave scanning radar. The MMW radar system employs a spinning antenna to generate a fan-shaped scanning pattern of the entire scene. The beams formed this way provide all weather 3D distance measurements (range/azimuth display) of objects as they appear on the ground. The beam width of the antenna and its side lobes are optimized to produce the best possible resolution even at distances of up to 15 Kms. To create a full 3D data set the fan-pattern is tilted up and down with the help of a controlled stepper motor. For our experiments we collected data at 0.1 degrees increments while using both bi-static as well as a mono-static antennas in our arrangement. The data collected formed a stack of range-azimuth images in the shape of a cone. This information is displayed using our high-end 3D visualization engine capable of displaying high-resolution volumetric models with 30 frames per second. The resulting 3D scenes can then be viewed from any angle and subsequently processed to integrate, fuse or match them against real-life sensor imagery or 3D model data stored in a synthetic database.

  15. Bound state solution of Dirac equation for 3D harmonics oscillator plus trigonometric scarf noncentral potential using SUSY QM approach

    SciTech Connect

    Cari, C. Suparmi, A.

    2014-09-30

    Dirac equation of 3D harmonics oscillator plus trigonometric Scarf non-central potential for spin symmetric case is solved using supersymmetric quantum mechanics approach. The Dirac equation for exact spin symmetry reduces to Schrodinger like equation. The relativistic energy and wave function for spin symmetric case are simply obtained using SUSY quantum mechanics method and idea of shape invariance.

  16. Equations on knot polynomials and 3d/5d duality

    SciTech Connect

    Mironov, A.; Morozov, A.

    2012-09-24

    We briefly review the current situation with various relations between knot/braid polynomials (Chern-Simons correlation functions), ordinary and extended, considered as functions of the representation and of the knot topology. These include linear skein relations, quadratic Plucker relations, as well as 'differential' and (quantum) A-polynomial structures. We pay a special attention to identity between the A-polynomial equations for knots and Baxter equations for quantum relativistic integrable systems, related through Seiberg-Witten theory to 5d super-Yang-Mills models and through the AGT relation to the q-Virasoro algebra. This identity is an important ingredient of emerging a 3d- 5d generalization of the AGT relation. The shape of the Baxter equation (including the values of coefficients) depend on the choice of the knot/braid. Thus, like the case of KP integrability, where (some, so far torus) knots parameterize particular points of the Universal Grassmannian, in this relation they parameterize particular points in the moduli space of many-body integrable systems of relativistic type.

  17. 3-D FDTD simulation of shear waves for evaluation of complex modulus imaging.

    PubMed

    Orescanin, Marko; Wang, Yue; Insana, Michael

    2011-02-01

    The Navier equation describing shear wave propagation in 3-D viscoelastic media is solved numerically with a finite differences time domain (FDTD) method. Solutions are formed in terms of transverse scatterer velocity waves and then verified via comparison to measured wave fields in heterogeneous hydrogel phantoms. The numerical algorithm is used as a tool to study the effects on complex shear modulus estimation from wave propagation in heterogeneous viscoelastic media. We used an algebraic Helmholtz inversion (AHI) technique to solve for the complex shear modulus from simulated and experimental velocity data acquired in 2-D and 3-D. Although 3-D velocity estimates are required in general, there are object geometries for which 2-D inversions provide accurate estimations of the material properties. Through simulations and experiments, we explored artifacts generated in elastic and dynamic-viscous shear modulus images related to the shear wavelength and average viscosity.

  18. Efficient global wave propagation adapted to 3-D structural complexity: a pseudospectral/spectral-element approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leng, Kuangdai; Nissen-Meyer, Tarje; van Driel, Martin

    2016-12-01

    We present a new, computationally efficient numerical method to simulate global seismic wave propagation in realistic 3-D Earth models. We characterize the azimuthal dependence of 3-D wavefields in terms of Fourier series, such that the 3-D equations of motion reduce to an algebraic system of coupled 2-D meridian equations, which is then solved by a 2-D spectral element method (SEM). Computational efficiency of such a hybrid method stems from lateral smoothness of 3-D Earth models and axial singularity of seismic point sources, which jointly confine the Fourier modes of wavefields to a few lower orders. We show novel benchmarks for global wave solutions in 3-D structures between our method and an independent, fully discretized 3-D SEM with remarkable agreement. Performance comparisons are carried out on three state-of-the-art tomography models, with seismic period ranging from 34 s down to 11 s. It turns out that our method has run up to two orders of magnitude faster than the 3-D SEM, featured by a computational advantage expanding with seismic frequency.

  19. Fast wave current drive antenna performance on D3-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayberry, M. J.; Pinsker, R. I.; Petty, C. C.; Chiu, S. C.; Jackson, G. L.; Lippmann, S. I.; Prater, R.; Porkolab, M.

    1991-10-01

    Fast wave current drive (FWCD) experiments at 60 MHz are being performed on the D3-D tokamak for the first time in high electron temperature, high (beta) target plasmas. A four-element phased-array antenna is used to launch a directional wave spectrum with the peak n(sub parallel) value (approximately = 7) optimized for strong single-pass electron absorption due to electron Landau damping. For this experiment, high power FW injection (2 MW) must be accomplished without voltage breakdown in the transmission lines or antenna, and without significant impurity influx. In addition, there is the technological challenge of impedance matching a four-element antenna while maintaining equal currents and the correct phasing (90 degrees) in each of the straps for a directional spectrum. We describe the performance of the D3-D FWCD antenna during initial FW electron heating and current drive experiments in terms of these requirements.

  20. Instability and Wave Propagation in Structured 3D Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaynia, Narges; Fang, Nicholas X.; Boyce, Mary C.

    2014-03-01

    Many structured composites found in nature possess undulating and wrinkled interfacial layers that regulate mechanical, chemical, acoustic, adhesive, thermal, electrical and optical functions of the material. This research focused on the complex instability and wrinkling pattern arising in 3D structured composites and the effect of the buckling pattern on the overall structural response. The 3D structured composites consisted of stiffer plates supported by soft matrix on both sides. Compression beyond the critical strain led to complex buckling patterns in the initially straight plates. The motivation of our work is to elaborate the formation of a system of prescribed periodic scatterers (metamaterials) due to buckling, and their effect to interfere wave propagation through the metamaterial structures. Such metamaterials made from elastomers enable large reversible deformation and, as a result, significant changes of the wave propagation properties. We developed analytical and finite element models to capture various aspects of the instability mechanism. Mechanical experiments were designed to further explore the modeling results. The ability to actively alter the 3D composite structure can enable on-demand tunability of many different functions, such as active control of wave propagation to create band-gaps and waveguides.

  1. 3D linearized stability analysis of various forms of Burnett equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Wenwen; Chen, Weifang; Liu, Hualin; Agarwal, Ramesh K.

    2014-12-01

    Burnett equations were originally derived in 1935 by Burnett by employing the Chapman-Enskog expansion to Classical Boltzmann equation to second order in Knudsen number Kn. Since then several variants of these equations have been proposed in the literature; these variants have differing physical and numerical properties. In this paper, we consider three such variants which are known in the literature as `the Original Burnett (OB) equations', the Conventional Burnett (CB) equations' and the recently formulated by the authors `the Simplified Conventional (SCB) equations.' One of the most important issues in obtaining numerical solutions of the Burnett equations is their stability under small perturbations. In this paper, we perform the linearized stability (known as the Bobylev Stability) analysis of three-dimensional Burnett equations for all the three variants (OB, CB, and SCB) for the first time in the literature on this subject. By introducing small perturbations in the steady state flow field, the trajectory curve and the variation in attenuation coefficient with wave frequency of the characteristic equation are obtained for all the three variants of Burnett equations to determine their stability. The results show that the Simplified Conventional Burnett (SCB) equations are unconditionally stable under small wavelength perturbations. However, the Original Burnett (OB) and the Conventional Burnett (CB) equations are unstable when the Knudsen number becomes greater than a critical value and the stability condition worsens in 3D when compared to the stability condition for 1-D and 2-D equations. The critical Knudsen number for 3-D OB and CB equations is 0.061 and 0.287 respectively.

  2. A harmonic polynomial cell (HPC) method for 3D Laplace equation with application in marine hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Shao, Yan-Lin Faltinsen, Odd M.

    2014-10-01

    We propose a new efficient and accurate numerical method based on harmonic polynomials to solve boundary value problems governed by 3D Laplace equation. The computational domain is discretized by overlapping cells. Within each cell, the velocity potential is represented by the linear superposition of a complete set of harmonic polynomials, which are the elementary solutions of Laplace equation. By its definition, the method is named as Harmonic Polynomial Cell (HPC) method. The characteristics of the accuracy and efficiency of the HPC method are demonstrated by studying analytical cases. Comparisons will be made with some other existing boundary element based methods, e.g. Quadratic Boundary Element Method (QBEM) and the Fast Multipole Accelerated QBEM (FMA-QBEM) and a fourth order Finite Difference Method (FDM). To demonstrate the applications of the method, it is applied to some studies relevant for marine hydrodynamics. Sloshing in 3D rectangular tanks, a fully-nonlinear numerical wave tank, fully-nonlinear wave focusing on a semi-circular shoal, and the nonlinear wave diffraction of a bottom-mounted cylinder in regular waves are studied. The comparisons with the experimental results and other numerical results are all in satisfactory agreement, indicating that the present HPC method is a promising method in solving potential-flow problems. The underlying procedure of the HPC method could also be useful in other fields than marine hydrodynamics involved with solving Laplace equation.

  3. Spatial equation for water waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyachenko, A. I.; Zakharov, V. E.

    2016-02-01

    A compact spatial Hamiltonian equation for gravity waves on deep water has been derived. The equation is dynamical and can describe extreme waves. The equation for the envelope of a wave train has also been obtained.

  4. Protrusive waves guide 3D cell migration along nanofibers

    PubMed Central

    Guetta-Terrier, Charlotte; Monzo, Pascale; Zhu, Jie; Long, Hongyan; Venkatraman, Lakshmi; Zhou, Yue; Wang, PeiPei; Chew, Sing Yian; Mogilner, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    In vivo, cells migrate on complex three-dimensional (3D) fibrous matrices, which has made investigation of the key molecular and physical mechanisms that drive cell migration difficult. Using reductionist approaches based on 3D electrospun fibers, we report for various cell types that single-cell migration along fibronectin-coated nanofibers is associated with lateral actin-based waves. These cyclical waves have a fin-like shape and propagate up to several hundred micrometers from the cell body, extending the leading edge and promoting highly persistent directional movement. Cells generate these waves through balanced activation of the Rac1/N-WASP/Arp2/3 and Rho/formins pathways. The waves originate from one major adhesion site at leading end of the cell body, which is linked through actomyosin contractility to another site at the back of the cell, allowing force generation, matrix deformation and cell translocation. By combining experimental and modeling data, we demonstrate that cell migration in a fibrous environment requires the formation and propagation of dynamic, actin based fin-like protrusions. PMID:26553933

  5. Protrusive waves guide 3D cell migration along nanofibers.

    PubMed

    Guetta-Terrier, Charlotte; Monzo, Pascale; Zhu, Jie; Long, Hongyan; Venkatraman, Lakshmi; Zhou, Yue; Wang, PeiPei; Chew, Sing Yian; Mogilner, Alexander; Ladoux, Benoit; Gauthier, Nils C

    2015-11-09

    In vivo, cells migrate on complex three-dimensional (3D) fibrous matrices, which has made investigation of the key molecular and physical mechanisms that drive cell migration difficult. Using reductionist approaches based on 3D electrospun fibers, we report for various cell types that single-cell migration along fibronectin-coated nanofibers is associated with lateral actin-based waves. These cyclical waves have a fin-like shape and propagate up to several hundred micrometers from the cell body, extending the leading edge and promoting highly persistent directional movement. Cells generate these waves through balanced activation of the Rac1/N-WASP/Arp2/3 and Rho/formins pathways. The waves originate from one major adhesion site at leading end of the cell body, which is linked through actomyosin contractility to another site at the back of the cell, allowing force generation, matrix deformation and cell translocation. By combining experimental and modeling data, we demonstrate that cell migration in a fibrous environment requires the formation and propagation of dynamic, actin based fin-like protrusions.

  6. 3D Modeling of Ultrasonic Wave Interaction with Disbonds and Weak Bonds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leckey, C.; Hinders, M.

    2011-01-01

    Ultrasonic techniques, such as the use of guided waves, can be ideal for finding damage in the plate and pipe-like structures used in aerospace applications. However, the interaction of waves with real flaw types and geometries can lead to experimental signals that are difficult to interpret. 3-dimensional (3D) elastic wave simulations can be a powerful tool in understanding the complicated wave scattering involved in flaw detection and for optimizing experimental techniques. We have developed and implemented parallel 3D elastodynamic finite integration technique (3D EFIT) code to investigate Lamb wave scattering from realistic flaws. This paper discusses simulation results for an aluminum-aluminum diffusion disbond and an aluminum-epoxy disbond and compares results from the disbond case to the common artificial flaw type of a flat-bottom hole. The paper also discusses the potential for extending the 3D EFIT equations to incorporate physics-based weak bond models for simulating wave scattering from weak adhesive bonds.

  7. Discrete wave equation upscaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fichtner, Andreas; Hanasoge, Shravan M.

    2017-01-01

    We present homogenisation technique for the uniformly discretised wave equation, based on the derivation of an effective equation for the low-wavenumber component of the solution. The method produces a down-sampled, effective medium, thus making the solution of the effective equation less computationally expensive. Advantages of the method include its conceptual simplicity and ease of implementation, the applicability to any uniformly discretised wave equation in one, two or three dimensions, and the absence of any constraints on the medium properties. We illustrate our method with a numerical example of wave propagation through a one-dimensional multiscale medium, and demonstrate the accurate reproduction of the original wavefield for sufficiently low frequencies.

  8. Extensions of 1d Bgk Electron Solitary Wave Solutions To 3d Magnetized and Unmagnetized Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Li-Jen; Parks, George K.

    This paper will compare the key results for BGK electron solitary waves in 3D mag- netized and unmagnetized plasmas. For 3D magnetized plasmas with highly magnetic field-aligned electrons, our results predict that the parallel widths of the solitary waves can be smaller than one Debye length, the solitary waves can be large scale features of the magnetosphere, and the parallel width-amplitude relation has a dependence on the perpendicular size. We can thus obtain an estimate on the typical perpendicular size of the observed solitary waves assuming a series of consecutive solitary waves are in the same flux tude with a particular perpendicular span. In 3D unmagnetized plasma systems such as the neutral sheet and magnetic reconnection sites, our theory indi- cates that although mathematical solutions can be constructed as the time-stationary solutions for the nonlinear Vlasov-Poisson equations, there does not exist a param- eter range for the solutions to be physical. We conclude that single-humped solitary potential pulses cannot be self-consistently supported by charged particles in 3D un- magnetized plasmas.

  9. 3D Full-Wave Simulations of Reflectometry

    SciTech Connect

    Valeo, E. J.; Kramer, G. J.; Nazikian, R.

    2009-11-26

    The characterization of fluctuation amplitudes, spatial correlation lengths, and wave vectors through measurement of the correlation properties of reflected microwave diagnostic signals depends on a quantitative knowledge of propagation in toroidal, magnetized plasma. The disparity between the radiation wavelength (mm) and the plasma size makes full wave computations challenging. We extend a two dimensional model which computes propagation in a poloidal plane to include toroidal variation. The model reduces the computational burden compared to that of solving the full-wave equation everywhere-but retains both diffraction and refraction-by merging a description appropriate to the under dense plasma (paraxial) with the required full-wave description near the reflection layer. Initial results for ITER-like profiles demonstrate the utility of the tool as an aid in specifying antenna positioning and setting sensitivity requirements.

  10. Analytical and numerical aspects in solving the controlled 3D Gross-Pitaevskii equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedele, R.; Jovanović, D.; De Nicola, S.; Eliasson, B.; Shukla, P. K.

    2009-11-01

    The results of recently developed investigations, that have been carried out within the framework of the controlling potential method (CPM), are reviewed. This method allows one to decompose a three dimensional (3D) Gross-Pitaevskii equation (GPE) into the pair of coupled Schrödinger-type equations. Under suitable mathematical conditions, the solutions of the 3D controlled GPE can be constructed from the solutions of a 2D linear Schrödinger equation (the transverse component of the GPE) coupled with a 1D nonlinear Schrödinger equation (the longitudinal component of the GPE). Such decomposition allows one to cast the solutions in the form of the product of the solutions of the transverse and the longitudinal components of the GPE. The coupling between these two equations is the functional of both the transverse and the longitudinal profiles. It is shown that the CPM can be used to obtain a new class of three-dimensional solitary waves solutions of the GPE, which governs the dynamics of Bose-Einstein condensates. By imposing an external controlling potential, the desired time-dependent shape of the localized BECs is obtained. The stability of the exact solutions was checked with direct simulations of the time -dependent, three-dimensional GPE. Our simulations show that the localized condensates are stable with respect to perturbed initial conditions.

  11. Analytical and numerical aspects in solving the controlled 3D Gross-Pitaevskii equation

    SciTech Connect

    Fedele, R.; Jovanovic, D.; De Nicola, S.; Eliasson, B.; Shukla, P. K.

    2009-11-10

    The results of recently developed investigations, that have been carried out within the framework of the controlling potential method (CPM), are reviewed. This method allows one to decompose a three dimensional (3D) Gross-Pitaevskii equation (GPE) into the pair of coupled Schroedinger-type equations. Under suitable mathematical conditions, the solutions of the 3D controlled GPE can be constructed from the solutions of a 2D linear Schroedinger equation (the transverse component of the GPE) coupled with a 1D nonlinear Schroedinger equation (the longitudinal component of the GPE). Such decomposition allows one to cast the solutions in the form of the product of the solutions of the transverse and the longitudinal components of the GPE. The coupling between these two equations is the functional of both the transverse and the longitudinal profiles. It is shown that the CPM can be used to obtain a new class of three-dimensional solitary waves solutions of the GPE, which governs the dynamics of Bose-Einstein condensates. By imposing an external controlling potential, the desired time-dependent shape of the localized BECs is obtained. The stability of the exact solutions was checked with direct simulations of the time -dependent, three-dimensional GPE. Our simulations show that the localized condensates are stable with respect to perturbed initial conditions.

  12. Two reconstruction procedures for a 3D phaseless inverse scattering problem for the generalized Helmholtz equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klibanov, Michael V.; Romanov, Vladimir G.

    2016-01-01

    The 3D inverse scattering problem of the reconstruction of the unknown dielectric permittivity in the generalized Helmholtz equation is considered. Applications are in imaging of nanostructures and biological cells. The main difference with the conventional inverse scattering problems is that only the modulus of the scattering wave field is measured. The phase is not measured. The initializing wave field is the incident plane wave. On the other hand, in the previous recent works of the authors about the ‘phaseless topic’ the case of the point source was considered (Klibanov and Romanov 2015 J. Inverse Ill-Posed Problem 23 415-28 J. Inverse Ill-Posed Problem 23 187-93). Two reconstruction procedures are developed.

  13. Gravitational Wave Signals from 2D and 3D Core Collapse Supernova Explosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakunin, Konstantin; Mezzacappa, Anthony; Marronetti, Pedro; Bruenn, Stephen; Hix, W. Raphael; Lentz, Eric J.; Messer, O. E. Bronson; Harris, J. Austin; Endeve, Eirik; Blondin, John

    2016-03-01

    We study two- and three-dimensional (2D and 3D) core-collapse supernovae (CCSN) using our first-principles CCSN simulations performed with the neutrino hydrodynamics code CHIMERA. The following physics is included: Newtonian hydrodynamics with a nuclear equation of state capable of describing matter in both NSE and non-NSE, MGFLD neutrino transport with realistic neutrino interactions, an effective GR gravitational potential, and a nuclear reaction network. Both our 2D and 3D models achieve explosion, which in turn enables us to determine their complete gravitational wave signals. In this talk, we present them, and we analyze the similarities and differences between the 2D and 3D signals.

  14. ADVANCED WAVE-EQUATION MIGRATION

    SciTech Connect

    L. HUANG; M. C. FEHLER

    2000-12-01

    Wave-equation migration methods can more accurately account for complex wave phenomena than ray-tracing-based Kirchhoff methods that are based on the high-frequency asymptotic approximation of waves. With steadily increasing speed of massively parallel computers, wave-equation migration methods are becoming more and more feasible and attractive for imaging complex 3D structures. We present an overview of several efficient and accurate wave-equation-based migration methods that we have recently developed. The methods are implemented in the frequency-space and frequency-wavenumber domains and hence they are called dual-domain methods. In the methods, we make use of different approximate solutions of the scalar-wave equation in heterogeneous media to recursively downward continue wavefields. The approximations used within each extrapolation interval include the Born, quasi-Born, and Rytov approximations. In one of our dual-domain methods, we use an optimized expansion of the square-root operator in the one-way wave equation to minimize the phase error for a given model. This leads to a globally optimized Fourier finite-difference method that is a hybrid split-step Fourier and finite-difference scheme. Migration examples demonstrate that our dual-domain migration methods provide more accurate images than those obtained using the split-step Fourier scheme. The Born-based, quasi-Born-based, and Rytov-based methods are suitable for imaging complex structures whose lateral variations are moderate, such as the Marmousi model. For this model, the computational cost of the Born-based method is almost the same as the split-step Fourier scheme, while other methods takes approximately 15-50% more computational time. The globally optimized Fourier finite-difference method significantly improves the accuracy of the split-step Fourier method for imaging structures having strong lateral velocity variations, such as the SEG/EAGE salt model, at an approximately 30% greater

  15. Diffuse optical 3D-slice imaging of bounded turbid media using a new integro-differential equation.

    PubMed

    Pattanayak, D; Yodh, A

    1999-04-12

    A new integro-differential equation for diffuse photon density waves (DPDW) is derived within the diffusion approximation. The new equation applies to inhomogeneous bounded turbid media. Interestingly, it does not contain any terms involving gradients of the light diffusion coefficient. The integro-differential equation for diffusive waves is used to develop a 3D-slice imaging algorithm based the on angular spectrum representation in the parallel plate geometry. The algorithm may be useful for near infrared optical imaging of breast tissue, and is applicable to other diagnostics such as ultrasound and microwave imaging.

  16. On the Implementation of 3D Galerkin Boundary Integral Equations

    SciTech Connect

    Nintcheu Fata, Sylvain; Gray, Leonard J

    2010-01-01

    In this article, a reverse contribution technique is proposed to accelerate the construction of the dense influence matrices associated with a Galerkin approximation of singular and hypersingular boundary integral equations of mixed-type in potential theory. In addition, a general-purpose sparse preconditioner for boundary element methods has also been developed to successfully deal with ill-conditioned linear systems arising from the discretization of mixed boundary-value problems on non-smooth surfaces. The proposed preconditioner, which originates from the precorrected-FFT method, is sparse, easy to generate and apply in a Krylov subspace iterative solution of discretized boundary integral equations. Moreover, an approximate inverse of the preconditioner is implicitly built by employing an incomplete LU factorization. Numerical experiments involving mixed boundary-value problems for the Laplace equation are included to illustrate the performance and validity of the proposed techniques.

  17. GPU Accelerated Spectral Element Methods: 3D Euler equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdi, D. S.; Wilcox, L.; Giraldo, F.; Warburton, T.

    2015-12-01

    A GPU accelerated nodal discontinuous Galerkin method for the solution of three dimensional Euler equations is presented. The Euler equations are nonlinear hyperbolic equations that are widely used in Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP). Therefore, acceleration of the method plays an important practical role in not only getting daily forecasts faster but also in obtaining more accurate (high resolution) results. The equation sets used in our atomospheric model NUMA (non-hydrostatic unified model of the atmosphere) take into consideration non-hydrostatic effects that become more important with high resolution. We use algorithms suitable for the single instruction multiple thread (SIMT) architecture of GPUs to accelerate solution by an order of magnitude (20x) relative to CPU implementation. For portability to heterogeneous computing environment, we use a new programming language OCCA, which can be cross-compiled to either OpenCL, CUDA or OpenMP at runtime. Finally, the accuracy and performance of our GPU implementations are veried using several benchmark problems representative of different scales of atmospheric dynamics.

  18. Galerkin Boundary Integral Analysis for the 3D Helmholtz Equation

    SciTech Connect

    Swager, Melissa; Gray, Leonard J; Nintcheu Fata, Sylvain

    2010-01-01

    A linear element Galerkin boundary integral analysis for the three-dimensional Helmholtz equation is presented. The emphasis is on solving acoustic scattering by an open (crack) surface, and to this end both a dual equation formulation and a symmetric hypersingular formulation have been developed. All singular integrals are defined and evaluated via a boundary limit process, facilitating the evaluation of the (finite) hypersingular Galerkin integral. This limit process is also the basis for the algorithm for post-processing of the surface gradient. The analytic integrations required by the limit process are carried out by employing a Taylor series expansion for the exponential factor in the Helmholtz fundamental solutions. For the open surface, the implementations are validated by comparing the numerical results obtained by using the two different methods.

  19. A 3D unstructured non-hydrostatic ocean model for internal waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ai, Congfang; Ding, Weiye

    2016-10-01

    A 3D non-hydrostatic model is developed to compute internal waves. A novel grid arrangement is incorporated in the model. This not only ensures the homogenous Dirichlet boundary condition for the non-hydrostatic pressure can be precisely and easily imposed but also renders the model relatively simple in its discretized form. The Perot scheme is employed to discretize horizontal advection terms in the horizontal momentum equations, which is based on staggered grids and has the conservative property. Based on previous water wave models, the main works of the present paper are to (1) utilize a semi-implicit, fractional step algorithm to solve the Navier-Stokes equations (NSE); (2) develop a second-order flux-limiter method satisfying the max-min property; (3) incorporate a density equation, which is solved by a high-resolution finite volume method ensuring mass conservation and max-min property based on a vertical boundary-fitted coordinate system; and (4) validate the developed model by using four tests including two internal seiche waves, lock-exchange flow, and internal solitary wave breaking. Comparisons of numerical results with analytical solutions or experimental data or other model results show reasonably good agreement, demonstrating the model's capability to resolve internal waves relating to complex non-hydrostatic phenomena.

  20. A global 3-D MHD model of the solar wind with Alfven waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Usmanov, A. V.

    1995-01-01

    A fully three-dimensional solar wind model that incorporates momentum and heat addition from Alfven waves is developed. The proposed model upgrades the previous one by considering self-consistently the total system consisting of Alfven waves propagating outward from the Sun and the mean polytropic solar wind flow. The simulation region extends from the coronal base (1 R(sub s) out to beyond 1 AU. The fully 3-D MHD equations written in spherical coordinates are solved in the frame of reference corotating with the Sun. At the inner boundary, the photospheric magnetic field observations are taken as boundary condition and wave energy influx is prescribed to be proportional to the magnetic field strength. The results of the model application for several time intervals are presented.

  1. 3D frequency-domain finite-difference modeling of acoustic wave propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Operto, S.; Virieux, J.

    2006-12-01

    We present a 3D frequency-domain finite-difference method for acoustic wave propagation modeling. This method is developed as a tool to perform 3D frequency-domain full-waveform inversion of wide-angle seismic data. For wide-angle data, frequency-domain full-waveform inversion can be applied only to few discrete frequencies to develop reliable velocity model. Frequency-domain finite-difference (FD) modeling of wave propagation requires resolution of a huge sparse system of linear equations. If this system can be solved with a direct method, solutions for multiple sources can be computed efficiently once the underlying matrix has been factorized. The drawback of the direct method is the memory requirement resulting from the fill-in of the matrix during factorization. We assess in this study whether representative problems can be addressed in 3D geometry with such approach. We start from the velocity-stress formulation of the 3D acoustic wave equation. The spatial derivatives are discretized with second-order accurate staggered-grid stencil on different coordinate systems such that the axis span over as many directions as possible. Once the discrete equations were developed on each coordinate system, the particle velocity fields are eliminated from the first-order hyperbolic system (following the so-called parsimonious staggered-grid method) leading to second-order elliptic wave equations in pressure. The second-order wave equations discretized on each coordinate system are combined linearly to mitigate the numerical anisotropy. Secondly, grid dispersion is minimized by replacing the mass term at the collocation point by its weighted averaging over all the grid points of the stencil. Use of second-order accurate staggered- grid stencil allows to reduce the bandwidth of the matrix to be factorized. The final stencil incorporates 27 points. Absorbing conditions are PML. The system is solved using the parallel direct solver MUMPS developed for distributed

  2. On the transition towards slow manifold in shallow-water and 3D Euler equations in a rotating frame

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahalov, A.

    1994-01-01

    The long-time, asymptotic state of rotating homogeneous shallow-water equations is investigated. Our analysis is based on long-time averaged rotating shallow-water equations describing interactions of large-scale, horizontal, two-dimensional motions with surface inertial-gravity waves field for a shallow, uniformly rotating fluid layer. These equations are obtained in two steps: first by introducing a Poincare/Kelvin linear propagator directly into classical shallow-water equations, then by averaging. The averaged equations describe interaction of wave fields with large-scale motions on time scales long compared to the time scale 1/f(sub o) introduced by rotation (f(sub o)/2-angular velocity of background rotation). The present analysis is similar to the one presented by Waleffe (1991) for 3D Euler equations in a rotating frame. However, since three-wave interactions in rotating shallow-water equations are forbidden, the final equations describing the asymptotic state are simplified considerably. Special emphasis is given to a new conservation law found in the asymptotic state and decoupling of the dynamics of the divergence free part of the velocity field. The possible rising of a decoupled dynamics in the asymptotic state is also investigated for homogeneous turbulence subjected to a background rotation. In our analysis we use long-time expansion, where the velocity field is decomposed into the 'slow manifold' part (the manifold which is unaffected by the linear 'rapid' effects of rotation or the inertial waves) and a formal 3D disturbance. We derive the physical space version of the long-time averaged equations and consider an invariant, basis-free derivation. This formulation can be used to generalize Waleffe's (1991) helical decomposition to viscous inhomogeneous flows (e.g. problems in cylindrical geometry with no-slip boundary conditions on the cylinder surface and homogeneous in the vertical direction).

  3. Convergence of the point vortex method for the 3-D Euler equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Thomas Y.; Lowengrub, John

    1990-11-01

    Consistency, stability, and convergence of a point vortex approximation to the 3-D incompressible Euler equations with smooth solutions. The 3-D algorithm considered is similar to the corresponding 3-D vortex are proved blob algorithm introduced by Beale and Majda; The discretization error is second-order accurate. Then the method is stable in l sup p norm for the particle trajectories and in w sup -1,p norm for discrete vorticity. Consequently, the method converges up to any time for which the Euler equations have a smooth solution. One immediate application of the convergence result is that the vortex filament method without smoothing also converges.

  4. An exact solution of the 3-D Navier-Stokes equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muriel, A.

    2011-01-01

    We continue our work (A. Muriel and M. Dresden, Physica D 101, 299, 1997) to calculate the time evolution of the one-particle distribution function. An improved operator formalism, heretofore unused, is applied for spatially uniform initial data. We then choose a Gaussian pair potential between particles. With these two conditions, the velocity fields, energy and pressure are calculated exactly. All stipulations of the Clay Mathematics Institute for proposed solutions of the 3-D Navier-Stokes Equation [ http://www.claymath.org/millennium/Navier-Stokes_Equations/navierstokes.pdf] are satisfied by our time evolution equation. We then substitute our results for the velocity fields into the 3-D Navier-Stokes Equation and calculate the pressure. The results from our time evolution equation and the prescribed pressure from the Navier-Stokes Equation constitute an exact solution to the Navier-Stokes Equation. No turbulence is obtained from the solution.

  5. On the Dynamic Programming Approach for the 3D Navier-Stokes Equations

    SciTech Connect

    Manca, Luigi

    2008-06-15

    The dynamic programming approach for the control of a 3D flow governed by the stochastic Navier-Stokes equations for incompressible fluid in a bounded domain is studied. By a compactness argument, existence of solutions for the associated Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman equation is proved. Finally, existence of an optimal control through the feedback formula and of an optimal state is discussed.

  6. Mach-wave coherence in 3D media with random heterogeneities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vyas, Jagdish C.; Mai, P. Martin; Galis, Martin; Dunham, Eric M.; Imperatori, Walter

    2016-04-01

    We investigate Mach-waves coherence for complex super-shear ruptures embedded in 3D random media that lead to seismic scattering. We simulate Mach-wave using kinematic earthquake sources that include fault-regions over which the rupture propagates at super-shear speed. The local slip rate is modeled with the regularized Yoffe function. The medium heterogeneities are characterized by Von Karman correlation function. We consider various realizations of 3D random media from combinations of different values of correlation length (0.5 km, 2 km, 5 km), standard deviation (5%, 10%, 15%) and Hurst exponent (0.2). Simulations in a homogeneous medium serve as a reference case. The ground-motion simulations (maximum resolved frequency of 5 Hz) are conducted by solving the elasto-dynamic equations of motions using a generalized finite-difference method, assuming a vertical strike-slip fault. The seismic wavefield is sampled at numerous locations within the Mach-cone region to study the properties and evolution of the Mach-waves in scattering media. We find that the medium scattering from random heterogeneities significantly diminishes the coherence of Mach-wave in terms of both amplitude and frequencies. We observe that Mach-waves are considerably scattered at distances RJB > 20 km (and beyond) for random media with standard deviation 10%. The scattering efficiency of the medium for small Hurst exponents (H <= 0.2) is mainly controlled by the standard deviation of the velocity heterogeneities, rather than their correlation length, as both theoretical considerations and numerical experiments indicate. Based on our simulations, we propose that local super-shear ruptures may be more common in nature then reported, but are very difficult to detect due to the strong seismic scattering. We suggest that if an earthquake is recorded within 10-15 km fault perpendicular distance and has high PGA, then inversion should be carried out by allowing rupture speed variations from sub

  7. Analysis of wave propagation in periodic 3D waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaal, Christoph; Bischoff, Stefan; Gaul, Lothar

    2013-11-01

    Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) is a growing research field in the realm of civil engineering. SHM concepts are implemented using integrated sensors and actuators to evaluate the state of a structure. Within this work, wave-based techniques are addressed. Dispersion effects for propagating waves in waveguides of different materials are analyzed for various different cross-sections. Since analytical theory is limited, a general approach based on the Waveguide Finite Element Method is applied. Numerical results are verified experimentally.

  8. Effect of background rotation on the evolution of 3D internal gravity wave beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Boyu; Akylas, T. R.

    2016-11-01

    The effect of background rotation on the 3D propagation of internal gravity wave beams (IGWB) is studied, assuming that variations in the along-beam and transverse directions are of long length scale relative to the beam width. The present study generalizes the asymptotic model of KA (Kataoka & Akylas 2015) who considered the analogous problem in the absence of rotation. It is shown that the role of mean vertical vorticity in the earlier analysis is now taken by the flow mean potential vorticity (MPV). Specifically, 3D variations enable resonant transfer of energy to the flow MPV, resulting in strong nonlinear coupling between a 3D IGWB and its induced mean flow. This coupling mechanism is governed by a system of two nonlinear equations of the same form as those derived in KA. Accordingly, the induced mean flow features a purely inviscid modulational component, as well as a viscous one akin to acoustic streaming; the latter grows linearly with time for a quasi-steady IGWB. On the other hand, owing to background rotation, the induced mean flow in the vicinity of the IGWB is no longer purely horizontal and develops an asymmetric behavior. Supported by NSF.

  9. 3D Numerical Simulation on the Sloshing Waves Excited by the Seismic Shacking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lin; Wu, Tso-Ren

    2016-04-01

    In the event of 2015 Nepal earthquake, a video clip broadcasted worldwide showed a violent water spilling in a hotel swimming pool. This sloshing phenomenon indicates a potential water loss in the sensitive facilities, e.g. the spent fuel pools in nuclear power plant, has to be taken into account carefully under the consideration of seismic-induced ground acceleration. In the previous studies, the simulation of sloshing mainly focused on the pressure force on the structure by using a simplified Spring-Mass Method developed in the field of solid mechanics. However, restricted by the assumptions of plane water surface and limited wave height, significant error will be made in evaluating the amount of water loss in the tank. In this paper, the computational fluid dynamical model, Splash3D, was adopted for studying the sloshing problem accurately. Splash3D solved 3D Navier-Stokes Equation directly with Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) turbulent closure. The Volume-of-fluid (VOF) method with piecewise linear interface calculation (PLIC) was used to track the complex breaking water surface. The time series acceleration of a design seismic was loaded to excite the water. With few restrictions from the assumptions, the accuracy of the simulation results were improved dramatically. A series model validations were conducted by compared to a 2D theoretical solution, and a 3D experimental data. Good comparisons can be seen. After the validation, we performed the simulation for considering a sloshing case in a rectangular water tank with a dimension of 12 m long, 8 m wide, 8 m deep, which contained water with 7 m in depth. The seismic movement was imported by considering time-series acceleration in three dimensions, which were about 0.5 g to 1.2 g in the horizontal directions, and 0.3 g to 1 g in the vertical direction. We focused the discussions on the kinematics of the water surface, wave breaking, velocity field, pressure field, water force on the side walls, and, most

  10. Nonlinear dynamics of 3D beams of fast magnetosonic waves propagating in the ionospheric and magnetospheric plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belashov, V. Yu.; Belashova, E. S.

    2016-11-01

    On the basis of the model of the three-dimensional (3D) generalized Kadomtsev-Petviashvili equation for magnetic field h = B / B the formation, stability, and dynamics of 3D soliton-like structures, such as the beams of fast magnetosonic (FMS) waves generated in ionospheric and magnetospheric plasma at a low-frequency branch of oscillations when β = 4 πnT/ B 2 ≪ 1 and β > 1, are studied. The study takes into account the highest dispersion correction determined by values of the plasma parameters and the angle θ = ( B, k), which plays a key role in the FMS beam propagation at those angles to the magnetic field that are close to π/2. The stability of multidimensional solutions is studied by an investigation of the Hamiltonian boundness under its deformations on the basis of solving of the corresponding variational problem. The evolution and dynamics of the 3D FMS wave beam are studied by the numerical integration of equations with the use of specially developed methods. The results can be interpreted in terms of the self-focusing phenomenon, as the formation of a stationary beam and the scattering and self-focusing of the solitary beam of FMS waves. These cases were studied with a detailed investigation of all evolutionary stages of the 3D FMS wave beams in the ionospheric and magnetospheric plasma.

  11. Transverse instability and viscous dissipation of forced 3-D gravity-capillary solitary waves on deep water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Yeunwoo

    2014-11-01

    The shedding phenomena of 3-D viscous gravity-capillary solitary waves generated by a moving air-forcing on the surface of deep water are investigated. Near the resonance where the forcing speed is close to 23 cm/s, two kinds of shedding modes are possible; Anti-symmetric and symmetric modes. A relevant theoretical model equation is numerically solved for the identification of shedding of solitary waves, and is analytically studied in terms of their linear stability to transverse perturbations. Furthermore, by tracing trajectories of shed solitary waves, the decay rate of a 3-D solitary wave due to viscous dissipation is estimated. This research was supported by Basic Science Research Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) funded by the Ministry of Science, ICT & Future Planning (NRF-2014R1A1A1002441).

  12. Nonlinear evolution of 3D-inertial Alfvén wave and turbulent spectra in Auroral region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rinawa, M. L.; Modi, K. V.; Sharma, R. P.

    2014-10-01

    In the present paper, we have investigated nonlinear interaction of three dimensional (3D) inertial Alfvén wave and perpendicularly propagating magnetosonic wave for low β-plasma ( β≪ m e / m i ). We have developed the set of dimensionless equations in the presence of ponderomotive nonlinearity due to 3D-inertial Alfvén wave in the dynamics of perpendicularly propagating magnetosonic wave. Stability analysis and numerical simulation has been carried out to study the effect of nonlinear coupling on the formation of localized structures and turbulent spectra, applicable to auroral region. The results reveal that the localized structures become more and more complex as the nonlinear interaction progresses. Further, we have studied the turbulent spectrum which follows spectral index (˜ k -3.57) at smaller scales. Relevance of the obtained results has been shown with the observations received by various spacecrafts like FAST, Hawkeye and Heos 2.

  13. Optimization of one-way wave equations.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, M.W.; Suh, S.Y.

    1985-01-01

    The theory of wave extrapolation is based on the square-root equation or one-way equation. The full wave equation represents waves which propagate in both directions. On the contrary, the square-root equation represents waves propagating in one direction only. A new optimization method presented here improves the dispersion relation of the one-way wave equation. -from Authors

  14. High Resolution WENO Simulation of 3D Detonation Waves

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-02-27

    pocket behind the detonation front was not observed in their results because the rotating transverse detonation completely consumed the unburned gas. Dou...three-dimensional detonations We add source terms (functions of x, y, z and t) to the PDE system so that the following functions are exact solutions to... detonation rotates counter-clockwise, opposite to that in [48]. It can be seen that, the triple lines and transverse waves collide with the walls, and strong

  15. Poroelastic Wave Propagation With a 3D Velocity-Stress-Pressure Finite-Difference Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aldridge, D. F.; Symons, N. P.; Bartel, L. C.

    2004-12-01

    Seismic wave propagation within a three-dimensional, heterogeneous, isotropic poroelastic medium is numerically simulated with an explicit, time-domain, finite-difference algorithm. A system of thirteen, coupled, first-order, partial differential equations is solved for the particle velocity vector components, the stress tensor components, and the pressure associated with solid and fluid constituents of the two-phase continuum. These thirteen dependent variables are stored on staggered temporal and spatial grids, analogous to the scheme utilized for solution of the conventional velocity-stress system of isotropic elastodynamics. Centered finite-difference operators possess 2nd-order accuracy in time and 4th-order accuracy in space. Seismological utility is enhanced by an optional stress-free boundary condition applied on a horizontal plane representing the earth's surface. Absorbing boundary conditions are imposed on the flanks of the 3D spatial grid via a simple wavefield amplitude taper approach. A massively parallel computational implementation, utilizing the spatial domain decomposition strategy, allows investigation of large-scale earth models and/or broadband wave propagation within reasonable execution times. Initial algorithm testing indicates that a point force density and/or moment density source activated within a poroelastic medium generates diverging fast and slow P waves (and possibly an S-wave)in accord with Biot theory. Solid and fluid particle velocities are in-phase for the fast P-wave, whereas they are out-of-phase for the slow P-wave. Conversions between all wave types occur during reflection and transmission at interfaces. Thus, although the slow P-wave is regarded as difficult to detect experimentally, its presence is strongly manifest within the complex of waves generated at a lithologic or fluid boundary. Very fine spatial and temporal gridding are required for high-fidelity representation of the slow P-wave, without inducing excessive

  16. Validation and Comparison of 2D and 3D Codes for Nearshore Motion of Long Waves Using Benchmark Problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velioǧlu, Deniz; Cevdet Yalçıner, Ahmet; Zaytsev, Andrey

    2016-04-01

    Tsunamis are huge waves with long wave periods and wave lengths that can cause great devastation and loss of life when they strike a coast. The interest in experimental and numerical modeling of tsunami propagation and inundation increased considerably after the 2011 Great East Japan earthquake. In this study, two numerical codes, FLOW 3D and NAMI DANCE, that analyze tsunami propagation and inundation patterns are considered. Flow 3D simulates linear and nonlinear propagating surface waves as well as long waves by solving three-dimensional Navier-Stokes (3D-NS) equations. NAMI DANCE uses finite difference computational method to solve 2D depth-averaged linear and nonlinear forms of shallow water equations (NSWE) in long wave problems, specifically tsunamis. In order to validate these two codes and analyze the differences between 3D-NS and 2D depth-averaged NSWE equations, two benchmark problems are applied. One benchmark problem investigates the runup of long waves over a complex 3D beach. The experimental setup is a 1:400 scale model of Monai Valley located on the west coast of Okushiri Island, Japan. Other benchmark problem is discussed in 2015 National Tsunami Hazard Mitigation Program (NTHMP) Annual meeting in Portland, USA. It is a field dataset, recording the Japan 2011 tsunami in Hilo Harbor, Hawaii. The computed water surface elevation and velocity data are compared with the measured data. The comparisons showed that both codes are in fairly good agreement with each other and benchmark data. The differences between 3D-NS and 2D depth-averaged NSWE equations are highlighted. All results are presented with discussions and comparisons. Acknowledgements: Partial support by Japan-Turkey Joint Research Project by JICA on earthquakes and tsunamis in Marmara Region (JICA SATREPS - MarDiM Project), 603839 ASTARTE Project of EU, UDAP-C-12-14 project of AFAD Turkey, 108Y227, 113M556 and 213M534 projects of TUBITAK Turkey, RAPSODI (CONCERT_Dis-021) of CONCERT

  17. 3D dynamic simulation of crack propagation in extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wijerathne, M. L. L.; Hori, Muneo; Sakaguchi, Hide; Oguni, Kenji

    2010-06-01

    Some experimental observations of Shock Wave Lithotripsy(SWL), which include 3D dynamic crack propagation, are simulated with the aim of reproducing fragmentation of kidney stones with SWL. Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) is the fragmentation of kidney stones by focusing an ultrasonic pressure pulse onto the stones. 3D models with fine discretization are used to accurately capture the high amplitude shear shock waves. For solving the resulting large scale dynamic crack propagation problem, PDS-FEM is used; it provides numerically efficient failure treatments. With a distributed memory parallel code of PDS-FEM, experimentally observed 3D photoelastic images of transient stress waves and crack patterns in cylindrical samples are successfully reproduced. The numerical crack patterns are in good agreement with the experimental ones, quantitatively. The results shows that the high amplitude shear waves induced in solid, by the lithotriptor generated shock wave, play a dominant role in stone fragmentation.

  18. Refined regularity class of suitable weak solutions to the 3D magnetohydrodynamics equations with an application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yanqing; Wu, Gang; Zhou, Daoguo

    2016-12-01

    By means of blow-up method and the special structure of the 3D viscous magnetohydrodynamics equations, we derive some interior regularity criteria in terms of horizontal part of the velocity with sufficiently small local scaled norm and both the vertical part of the velocity and the magnetic field with bounded local scaled norm for the suitable weak solutions to this system. As an application, this allows us to improve the previous limiting case for the regularity criterion about the MHD equations.

  19. Implementation of Advanced Two Equation Turbulence Models in the USM3D Unstructured Flow Solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Qun-Zhen; Massey, Steven J.; Abdol-Hamid, Khaled S.

    2000-01-01

    USM3D is a widely-used unstructured flow solver for simulating inviscid and viscous flows over complex geometries. The current version (version 5.0) of USM3D, however, does not have advanced turbulence models to accurately simulate complicated flow. We have implemented two modified versions of the original Jones and Launder k-epsilon "two-equation" turbulence model and the Girimaji algebraic Reynolds stress model in USM3D. Tests have been conducted for three flat plate boundary layer cases, a RAE2822 airfoil and an ONERA M6 wing. The results are compared with those from direct numerical simulation, empirical formulae, theoretical results, and the existing Spalart-Allmaras one-equation model.

  20. A Parallel Numerical Algorithm To Solve Linear Systems Of Equations Emerging From 3D Radiative Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wichert, Viktoria; Arkenberg, Mario; Hauschildt, Peter H.

    2016-10-01

    Highly resolved state-of-the-art 3D atmosphere simulations will remain computationally extremely expensive for years to come. In addition to the need for more computing power, rethinking coding practices is necessary. We take a dual approach by introducing especially adapted, parallel numerical methods and correspondingly parallelizing critical code passages. In the following, we present our respective work on PHOENIX/3D. With new parallel numerical algorithms, there is a big opportunity for improvement when iteratively solving the system of equations emerging from the operator splitting of the radiative transfer equation J = ΛS. The narrow-banded approximate Λ-operator Λ* , which is used in PHOENIX/3D, occurs in each iteration step. By implementing a numerical algorithm which takes advantage of its characteristic traits, the parallel code's efficiency is further increased and a speed-up in computational time can be achieved.

  1. 3D FEM-BEM-coupling method to solve magnetostatic Maxwell equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruckner, Florian; Vogler, Christoph; Feischl, Michael; Praetorius, Dirk; Bergmair, Bernhard; Huber, Thomas; Fuger, Markus; Suess, Dieter

    2012-05-01

    3D magnetostatic Maxwell equations are solved using the direct Johnson-Nédélec FEM-BEM coupling method and a reduced scalar potential approach. The occurring BEM matrices are calculated analytically and approximated by H-matrices using the ACA+ algorithm. In addition a proper preconditioning method is suggested that allows to solve large-scale problems using iterative solvers.

  2. On the breakdown of axisymmetric smooth solutions for the 3-D Euler equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chae, Dongho; Kim, Namkwon

    1996-05-01

    We refine the Beale-Kato-Majda criterion for the breakdown of smooth solutions of the 3-D incompressible Euler equations in the case of axisymmetry. In this case the angular component of vorticity in the cylindrical coordinates alone controls blow-up of the higher Sobolev norms of the velocity.

  3. Tailored complex 3D vortex lattice structures by perturbed multiples of three-plane waves.

    PubMed

    Xavier, Jolly; Vyas, Sunil; Senthilkumaran, Paramasivam; Joseph, Joby

    2012-04-20

    As three-plane waves are the minimum number required for the formation of vortex-embedded lattice structures by plane wave interference, we present our experimental investigation on the formation of complex 3D photonic vortex lattice structures by a designed superposition of multiples of phase-engineered three-plane waves. The unfolding of the generated complex photonic lattice structures with higher order helical phase is realized by perturbing the superposition of a relatively phase-encoded, axially equidistant multiple of three noncoplanar plane waves. Through a programmable spatial light modulator assisted single step fabrication approach, the unfolded 3D vortex lattice structures are experimentally realized, well matched to our computer simulations. The formation of higher order intertwined helices embedded in these 3D spiraling vortex lattice structures by the superposition of the multiples of phase-engineered three-plane waves interference is also studied.

  4. 3D mapping of elastic modulus using shear wave optical micro-elastography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jiang; Qi, Li; Miao, Yusi; Ma, Teng; Dai, Cuixia; Qu, Yueqiao; He, Youmin; Gao, Yiwei; Zhou, Qifa; Chen, Zhongping

    2016-10-01

    Elastography provides a powerful tool for histopathological identification and clinical diagnosis based on information from tissue stiffness. Benefiting from high resolution, three-dimensional (3D), and noninvasive optical coherence tomography (OCT), optical micro-elastography has the ability to determine elastic properties with a resolution of ~10 μm in a 3D specimen. The shear wave velocity measurement can be used to quantify the elastic modulus. However, in current methods, shear waves are measured near the surface with an interference of surface waves. In this study, we developed acoustic radiation force (ARF) orthogonal excitation optical coherence elastography (ARFOE-OCE) to visualize shear waves in 3D. This method uses acoustic force perpendicular to the OCT beam to excite shear waves in internal specimens and uses Doppler variance method to visualize shear wave propagation in 3D. The measured propagation of shear waves agrees well with the simulation results obtained from finite element analysis (FEA). Orthogonal acoustic excitation allows this method to measure the shear modulus in a deeper specimen which extends the elasticity measurement range beyond the OCT imaging depth. The results show that the ARFOE-OCE system has the ability to noninvasively determine the 3D elastic map.

  5. 3D mapping of elastic modulus using shear wave optical micro-elastography

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jiang; Qi, Li; Miao, Yusi; Ma, Teng; Dai, Cuixia; Qu, Yueqiao; He, Youmin; Gao, Yiwei; Zhou, Qifa; Chen, Zhongping

    2016-01-01

    Elastography provides a powerful tool for histopathological identification and clinical diagnosis based on information from tissue stiffness. Benefiting from high resolution, three-dimensional (3D), and noninvasive optical coherence tomography (OCT), optical micro-elastography has the ability to determine elastic properties with a resolution of ~10 μm in a 3D specimen. The shear wave velocity measurement can be used to quantify the elastic modulus. However, in current methods, shear waves are measured near the surface with an interference of surface waves. In this study, we developed acoustic radiation force (ARF) orthogonal excitation optical coherence elastography (ARFOE-OCE) to visualize shear waves in 3D. This method uses acoustic force perpendicular to the OCT beam to excite shear waves in internal specimens and uses Doppler variance method to visualize shear wave propagation in 3D. The measured propagation of shear waves agrees well with the simulation results obtained from finite element analysis (FEA). Orthogonal acoustic excitation allows this method to measure the shear modulus in a deeper specimen which extends the elasticity measurement range beyond the OCT imaging depth. The results show that the ARFOE-OCE system has the ability to noninvasively determine the 3D elastic map. PMID:27762276

  6. Solving Dirac equations on a 3D lattice with inverse Hamiltonian and spectral methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Z. X.; Zhang, S. Q.; Meng, J.

    2017-02-01

    A new method to solve the Dirac equation on a 3D lattice is proposed, in which the variational collapse problem is avoided by the inverse Hamiltonian method and the fermion doubling problem is avoided by performing spatial derivatives in momentum space with the help of the discrete Fourier transform, i.e., the spectral method. This method is demonstrated in solving the Dirac equation for a given spherical potential in a 3D lattice space. In comparison with the results obtained by the shooting method, the differences in single-particle energy are smaller than 10-4 MeV, and the densities are almost identical, which demonstrates the high accuracy of the present method. The results obtained by applying this method without any modification to solve the Dirac equations for an axial-deformed, nonaxial-deformed, and octupole-deformed potential are provided and discussed.

  7. On a particular solution to the 3D Navier-Stokes equations for liquids with cavitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabinowitch, Alexander S.

    2016-08-01

    The 3D Navier-Stokes equations for incompressible viscous liquids are examined. In the axially symmetric case, they are represented in the form of three nonlinear partial differential equations. These equations are studied and their particular solution is found. In it, the velocity components are sinusoidal in the direction of their axis of symmetry. As to the pressure, it can reach a sufficiently small value at which the phenomenon of cavitation takes place in a liquid. The found solution describes some flows of viscous liquids outside vapor-filled regions in them.

  8. Upper Semicontinuity of Pullback Attractors for the 3D Nonautonomous Benjamin-Bona-Mahony Equations

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xinguang; Wang, Xiaosong; Zhang, Lingrui

    2014-01-01

    We will study the upper semicontinuity of pullback attractors for the 3D nonautonomouss Benjamin-Bona-Mahony equations with external force perturbation terms. Under some regular assumptions, we can prove the pullback attractors 𝒜 ε(t) of equation ut-Δut-νΔu+∇·F→(u)=ɛg(x,t), x ∈ Ω, converge to the global attractor 𝒜 of the above-mentioned equation with ε = 0 for any t ∈ ℝ. PMID:24790585

  9. Equation-of-State Test Suite for the DYNA3D Code

    SciTech Connect

    Benjamin, Russell D.

    2015-11-05

    This document describes the creation and implementation of a test suite for the Equationof- State models in the DYNA3D code. A customized input deck has been created for each model, as well as a script that extracts the relevant data from the high-speed edit file created by DYNA3D. Each equation-of-state model is broken apart and individual elements of the model are tested, as well as testing the entire model. The input deck for each model is described and the results of the tests are discussed. The intent of this work is to add this test suite to the validation suite presently used for DYNA3D.

  10. Global well-posedness for the 3D incompressible inhomogeneous Navier-Stokes equations and MHD equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Xiaoping; Yin, Zhaoyang

    2017-02-01

    The present paper is dedicated to the global well-posedness for the 3D inhomogeneous incompressible Navier-Stokes equations, in critical Besov spaces without smallness assumption on the variation of the density. We aim at extending the work by Abidi, Gui and Zhang (2012) [2], and (2013) [3] to a lower regularity index about the initial velocity. The key to that improvement is a new a priori estimate for an elliptic equation with nonconstant coefficients in Besov spaces which have the same degree as L2 in R3. Finally, we also generalize our well-posedness result to the inhomogeneous incompressible MHD equations.

  11. Three-dimensional two-fluid investigation of 3D-localized magnetic reconnection and its relation to whistler waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Young Dae; Bellan, Paul M.

    2016-10-01

    A full three-dimensional computer code was developed in order to simulate a 3D-localized magnetic reconnection. We assume an incompressible two-fluid regime where the ions are stationary, and electron inertia and Hall effects are present. We solve a single dimensionless differential equation for perturbed magnetic fields with arbitrary background fields. The code has successfully reproduced both experimental and analytic solutions to resonance and Gendrin mode whistler waves in a uniform background field. The code was then modified to model 3D-localized magnetic reconnection as a 3D-localized perturbation on a hyperbolic-tangent background field. Three-dimensional properties that are asymmetric in the out-of-plane direction have been observed. These properties pertained to magnetic field lines, electron currents and their convection. Helicity and energy have also been examined, as well as the addition of a guide field.

  12. Wave propagation analysis of quasi-3D FG nanobeams in thermal environment based on nonlocal strain gradient theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebrahimi, Farzad; Barati, Mohammad Reza

    2016-09-01

    This article examines the application of nonlocal strain gradient elasticity theory to wave dispersion behavior of a size-dependent functionally graded (FG) nanobeam in thermal environment. The theory contains two scale parameters corresponding to both nonlocal and strain gradient effects. A quasi-3D sinusoidal beam theory considering shear and normal deformations is employed to present the formulation. Mori-Tanaka micromechanical model is used to describe functionally graded material properties. Hamilton's principle is employed to obtain the governing equations of nanobeam accounting for thickness stretching effect. These equations are solved analytically to find the wave frequencies and phase velocities of the FG nanobeam. It is indicated that wave dispersion behavior of FG nanobeams is significantly affected by temperature rise, nonlocality, length scale parameter and material composition.

  13. 3-D zebrafish embryo image filtering by nonlinear partial differential equations.

    PubMed

    Rizzi, Barbara; Campana, Matteo; Zanella, Cecilia; Melani, Camilo; Cunderlik, Robert; Krivá, Zuzana; Bourgine, Paul; Mikula, Karol; Peyriéras, Nadine; Sarti, Alessandro

    2007-01-01

    We discuss application of nonlinear PDE based methods to filtering of 3-D confocal images of embryogenesis. We focus on the mean curvature driven and the regularized Perona-Malik equations, where standard as well as newly suggested edge detectors are used. After presenting the related mathematical models, the practical results are given and discussed by visual inspection and quantitatively using the mean Hausdorff distance.

  14. The Beale-Kato-Majda Criterion for the 3D Magneto-Hydrodynamics Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Qionglei; Miao, Changxing; Zhang, Zhifei

    2007-11-01

    We study the blow-up criterion of smooth solutions to the 3D MHD equations. By means of the Littlewood-Paley decomposition, we prove a Beale-Kato-Majda type blow-up criterion of smooth solutions via the vorticity of velocity only, namely sup_{jinmathbb{Z}}int_0^T\\|Δ_j(nabla× u)\\|_infty dt, where Δ j is the frequency localization operator in the Littlewood-Paley decomposition.

  15. NuSol - Numerical solver for the 3D stationary nuclear Schrödinger equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graen, Timo; Grubmüller, Helmut

    2016-01-01

    The classification of short hydrogen bonds depends on several factors including the shape and energy spacing between the nuclear eigenstates of the hydrogen. Here, we describe the NuSol program in which three classes of algorithms were implemented to solve the 1D, 2D and 3D time independent nuclear Schrödinger equation. The Schrödinger equation was solved using the finite differences based Numerov's method which was extended to higher dimensions, the more accurate pseudo-spectral Chebyshev collocation method and the sinc discrete variable representation by Colbert and Miller. NuSol can be applied to solve the Schrödinger equation for arbitrary analytical or numerical potentials with focus on nuclei bound by the potential of their molecular environment. We validated the methods against literature values for the 2D Henon-Heiles potential, the 3D linearly coupled sextic oscillators and applied them to study hydrogen bonding in the malonaldehyde derivate 4-cyano-2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-3,5-heptanedione. With NuSol, the extent of nuclear delocalization in a given molecular potential can directly be calculated without relying on linear reaction coordinates in 3D molecular space.

  16. Seismic waves in 3-D: from mantle asymmetries to reliable seismic hazard assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panza, Giuliano F.; Romanelli, Fabio

    2014-10-01

    A global cross-section of the Earth parallel to the tectonic equator (TE) path, the great circle representing the equator of net lithosphere rotation, shows a difference in shear wave velocities between the western and eastern flanks of the three major oceanic rift basins. The low-velocity layer in the upper asthenosphere, at a depth range of 120 to 200 km, is assumed to represent the decoupling between the lithosphere and the underlying mantle. Along the TE-perturbed (TE-pert) path, a ubiquitous LVZ, about 1,000-km-wide and 100-km-thick, occurs in the asthenosphere. The existence of the TE-pert is a necessary prerequisite for the existence of a continuous global flow within the Earth. Ground-shaking scenarios were constructed using a scenario-based method for seismic hazard analysis (NDSHA), using realistic and duly validated synthetic time series, and generating a data bank of several thousands of seismograms that account for source, propagation, and site effects. Accordingly, with basic self-organized criticality concepts, NDSHA permits the integration of available information provided by the most updated seismological, geological, geophysical, and geotechnical databases for the site of interest, as well as advanced physical modeling techniques, to provide a reliable and robust background for the development of a design basis for cultural heritage and civil infrastructures. Estimates of seismic hazard obtained using the NDSHA and standard probabilistic approaches are compared for the Italian territory, and a case-study is discussed. In order to enable a reliable estimation of the ground motion response to an earthquake, three-dimensional velocity models have to be considered, resulting in a new, very efficient, analytical procedure for computing the broadband seismic wave-field in a 3-D anelastic Earth model.

  17. The regularized 3D Boussinesq equations with fractional Laplacian and no diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bessaih, H.; Ferrario, B.

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, we study the 3D regularized Boussinesq equations. The velocity equation is regularized à la Leray through a smoothing kernel of order α in the nonlinear term and a β-fractional Laplacian; we consider the critical case α + β =5/4 and we assume 1/2 < β <5/4. The temperature equation is a pure transport equation, where the transport velocity is regularized through the same smoothing kernel of order α. We prove global well posedness when the initial velocity is in Hr and the initial temperature is in H r - β for r > max ⁡ (2 β , β + 1). This regularity is enough to prove uniqueness of solutions. We also prove a continuous dependence of solutions on the initial conditions.

  18. A least-squares finite element method for 3D incompressible Navier-Stokes equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jiang, Bo-Nan; Lin, T. L.; Hou, Lin-Jun; Povinelli, Louis A.

    1993-01-01

    The least-squares finite element method (LSFEM) based on the velocity-pressure-vorticity formulation is applied to three-dimensional steady incompressible Navier-Stokes problems. This method can accommodate equal-order interpolations, and results in symmetric, positive definite algebraic system. An additional compatibility equation, i.e., the divergence of vorticity vector should be zero, is included to make the first-order system elliptic. The Newton's method is employed to linearize the partial differential equations, the LSFEM is used to obtain discretized equations, and the system of algebraic equations is solved using the Jacobi preconditioned conjugate gradient method which avoids formation of either element or global matrices (matrix-free) to achieve high efficiency. The flow in a half of 3D cubic cavity is calculated at Re = 100, 400, and 1,000 with 50 x 52 x 25 trilinear elements. The Taylor-Gortler-like vortices are observed at Re = 1,000.

  19. FGG-NUFFT-Based Method for Near-Field 3-D Imaging Using Millimeter Waves

    PubMed Central

    Kan, Yingzhi; Zhu, Yongfeng; Tang, Liang; Fu, Qiang; Pei, Hucheng

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, to deal with the concealed target detection problem, an accurate and efficient algorithm for near-field millimeter wave three-dimensional (3-D) imaging is proposed that uses a two-dimensional (2-D) plane antenna array. First, a two-dimensional fast Fourier transform (FFT) is performed on the scattered data along the antenna array plane. Then, a phase shift is performed to compensate for the spherical wave effect. Finally, fast Gaussian gridding based nonuniform FFT (FGG-NUFFT) combined with 2-D inverse FFT (IFFT) is performed on the nonuniform 3-D spatial spectrum in the frequency wavenumber domain to achieve 3-D imaging. The conventional method for near-field 3-D imaging uses Stolt interpolation to obtain uniform spatial spectrum samples and performs 3-D IFFT to reconstruct a 3-D image. Compared with the conventional method, our FGG-NUFFT based method is comparable in both efficiency and accuracy in the full sampled case and can obtain more accurate images with less clutter and fewer noisy artifacts in the down-sampled case, which are good properties for practical applications. Both simulation and experimental results demonstrate that the FGG-NUFFT-based near-field 3-D imaging algorithm can have better imaging performance than the conventional method for down-sampled measurements. PMID:27657066

  20. FGG-NUFFT-Based Method for Near-Field 3-D Imaging Using Millimeter Waves.

    PubMed

    Kan, Yingzhi; Zhu, Yongfeng; Tang, Liang; Fu, Qiang; Pei, Hucheng

    2016-09-19

    In this paper, to deal with the concealed target detection problem, an accurate and efficient algorithm for near-field millimeter wave three-dimensional (3-D) imaging is proposed that uses a two-dimensional (2-D) plane antenna array. First, a two-dimensional fast Fourier transform (FFT) is performed on the scattered data along the antenna array plane. Then, a phase shift is performed to compensate for the spherical wave effect. Finally, fast Gaussian gridding based nonuniform FFT (FGG-NUFFT) combined with 2-D inverse FFT (IFFT) is performed on the nonuniform 3-D spatial spectrum in the frequency wavenumber domain to achieve 3-D imaging. The conventional method for near-field 3-D imaging uses Stolt interpolation to obtain uniform spatial spectrum samples and performs 3-D IFFT to reconstruct a 3-D image. Compared with the conventional method, our FGG-NUFFT based method is comparable in both efficiency and accuracy in the full sampled case and can obtain more accurate images with less clutter and fewer noisy artifacts in the down-sampled case, which are good properties for practical applications. Both simulation and experimental results demonstrate that the FGG-NUFFT-based near-field 3-D imaging algorithm can have better imaging performance than the conventional method for down-sampled measurements.

  1. Numerical Investigation of 3D multichannel analysis of surface wave method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Limin; Xu, Yixian; Luo, Yinhe

    2015-08-01

    Multichannel analysis of surface wave (MASW) method is an efficient tool to obtain near-surface S-wave velocity, and it has gained popularity in engineering practice. Up to now, most examples of using the MASW technique are focused on 2D models or data from a 1D linear receiver spread. We propose a 3D MASW scheme. A finite-difference (FD) method is used to investigate the method using linear and fan-shaped receiver spreads. Results show that the 3D topography strongly affects propagation of Rayleigh waves. The energy concentration of dispersion image is distorted and bifurcated because of the influence of free-surface topography. These effects are reduced with the 3D MASW method. Lastly we investigate the relation between the array size and the resolution of dispersion measurement.

  2. A novel numerical flux for the 3D Euler equations with general equation of state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toro, Eleuterio F.; Castro, Cristóbal E.; Lee, Bok Jik

    2015-12-01

    Here we extend the flux vector splitting approach recently proposed in E.F. Toro and M.E. Vázquez-Cendón (2012) [42]. The scheme was originally presented for the 1D Euler equations for ideal gases and its extension presented in this paper is threefold: (i) we solve the three-dimensional Euler equations on general meshes; (ii) we use a general equation of state; and (iii) we achieve high order of accuracy in both space and time through application of the semi-discrete ADER methodology on general meshes. The resulting methods are systematically assessed for accuracy, robustness and efficiency on a carefully selected suite of test problems. Formal high accuracy is assessed through convergence rates studies for schemes of up to 4th order of accuracy in both space and time on unstructured meshes.

  3. A fast rebinning algorithm for 3D positron emission tomography using John's equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Defrise, Michel; Liu, Xuan

    1999-08-01

    Volume imaging in positron emission tomography (PET) requires the inversion of the three-dimensional (3D) x-ray transform. The usual solution to this problem is based on 3D filtered-backprojection (FBP), but is slow. Alternative methods have been proposed which factor the 3D data into independent 2D data sets corresponding to the 2D Radon transforms of a stack of parallel slices. Each slice is then reconstructed using 2D FBP. These so-called rebinning methods are numerically efficient but are approximate. In this paper a new exact rebinning method is derived by exploiting the fact that the 3D x-ray transform of a function is the solution to the second-order partial differential equation first studied by John. The method is proposed for two sampling schemes, one corresponding to a pair of infinite plane detectors and another one corresponding to a cylindrical multi-ring PET scanner. The new FORE-J algorithm has been implemented for this latter geometry and was compared with the approximate Fourier rebinning algorithm FORE and with another exact rebinning algorithm, FOREX. Results with simulated data demonstrate a significant improvement in accuracy compared to FORE, while the reconstruction time is doubled. Compared to FOREX, the FORE-J algorithm is slightly less accurate but more than three times faster.

  4. Statistical properties of the 3-D poor man's Navier--Stokes equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonough, J. M.

    2007-11-01

    The poor man's Navier--Stokes (PMNS) equation is an efficiently-evaluated discrete dynamical system (DDS) derived directly from the Navier--Stokes (N.--S.) equations via a Galerkin procedure. The 2-D version of this DDS was introduced by McDonough and Huang, Int. J. Numer. Meth. Fluids (2004), where it was thoroughly analyzed for values of bifurcation parameters that might be associated with isotropic turbulence. Yang et al., AIAA J. (2003), demonstrated that the PMNS equation could be employed to accurately fit experimental data. These results suggest possible use of the PMNS equation as part of a subgrid-scale (SGS) model for LES formulated to capture effects of interactions between turbulence and other physics on unresolved scales. Here, we consider statistical properties of the 3-D PMNS equation to ascertain whether they are sufficiently close to those of physical N.--S. flows to warrant development of such models. In particular, we will present auto and cross correlation of velocity components, probability density functions, flatness and skewness of velocity derivatives, and scaling of longitudinal velocity structure functions of orders two, three, four and six. It will be demonstrated that PMNS equation statistics are generally in accord with those of the full N.--S. equations, and as a consequence this DDS could lead to very efficient LES SGS models able to replicate small-scale turbulence interactions with other physics.

  5. Stability of Blowup for a 1D Model of Axisymmetric 3D Euler Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Do, Tam; Kiselev, Alexander; Xu, Xiaoqian

    2016-10-01

    The question of the global regularity versus finite- time blowup in solutions of the 3D incompressible Euler equation is a major open problem of modern applied analysis. In this paper, we study a class of one-dimensional models of the axisymmetric hyperbolic boundary blow-up scenario for the 3D Euler equation proposed by Hou and Luo (Multiscale Model Simul 12:1722-1776, 2014) based on extensive numerical simulations. These models generalize the 1D Hou-Luo model suggested in Hou and Luo Luo and Hou (2014), for which finite-time blowup has been established in Choi et al. (arXiv preprint. arXiv:1407.4776, 2014). The main new aspects of this work are twofold. First, we establish finite-time blowup for a model that is a closer approximation of the three-dimensional case than the original Hou-Luo model, in the sense that it contains relevant lower-order terms in the Biot-Savart law that have been discarded in Hou and Luo Choi et al. (2014). Secondly, we show that the blow-up mechanism is quite robust, by considering a broader family of models with the same main term as in the Hou-Luo model. Such blow-up stability result may be useful in further work on understanding the 3D hyperbolic blow-up scenario.

  6. 3D numerical simulation of the long range propagation of acoustical shock waves through a heterogeneous and moving medium

    SciTech Connect

    Luquet, David; Marchiano, Régis; Coulouvrat, François

    2015-10-28

    Many situations involve the propagation of acoustical shock waves through flows. Natural sources such as lightning, volcano explosions, or meteoroid atmospheric entries, emit loud, low frequency, and impulsive sound that is influenced by atmospheric wind and turbulence. The sonic boom produced by a supersonic aircraft and explosion noises are examples of intense anthropogenic sources in the atmosphere. The Buzz-Saw-Noise produced by turbo-engine fan blades rotating at supersonic speed also propagates in a fast flow within the engine nacelle. Simulating these situations is challenging, given the 3D nature of the problem, the long range propagation distances relative to the central wavelength, the strongly nonlinear behavior of shocks associated to a wide-band spectrum, and finally the key role of the flow motion. With this in view, the so-called FLHOWARD (acronym for FLow and Heterogeneous One-Way Approximation for Resolution of Diffraction) method is presented with three-dimensional applications. A scalar nonlinear wave equation is established in the framework of atmospheric applications, assuming weak heterogeneities and a slow wind. It takes into account diffraction, absorption and relaxation properties of the atmosphere, quadratic nonlinearities including weak shock waves, heterogeneities of the medium in sound speed and density, and presence of a flow (assuming a mean stratified wind and 3D turbulent ? flow fluctuations of smaller amplitude). This equation is solved in the framework of the one-way method. A split-step technique allows the splitting of the non-linear wave equation into simpler equations, each corresponding to a physical effect. Each sub-equation is solved using an analytical method if possible, and finite-differences otherwise. Nonlinear effects are solved in the time domain, and others in the frequency domain. Homogeneous diffraction is handled by means of the angular spectrum method. Ground is assumed perfectly flat and rigid. Due to the 3D

  7. 3D numerical simulation of the long range propagation of acoustical shock waves through a heterogeneous and moving medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luquet, David; Marchiano, Régis; Coulouvrat, François

    2015-10-01

    Many situations involve the propagation of acoustical shock waves through flows. Natural sources such as lightning, volcano explosions, or meteoroid atmospheric entries, emit loud, low frequency, and impulsive sound that is influenced by atmospheric wind and turbulence. The sonic boom produced by a supersonic aircraft and explosion noises are examples of intense anthropogenic sources in the atmosphere. The Buzz-Saw-Noise produced by turbo-engine fan blades rotating at supersonic speed also propagates in a fast flow within the engine nacelle. Simulating these situations is challenging, given the 3D nature of the problem, the long range propagation distances relative to the central wavelength, the strongly nonlinear behavior of shocks associated to a wide-band spectrum, and finally the key role of the flow motion. With this in view, the so-called FLHOWARD (acronym for FLow and Heterogeneous One-Way Approximation for Resolution of Diffraction) method is presented with three-dimensional applications. A scalar nonlinear wave equation is established in the framework of atmospheric applications, assuming weak heterogeneities and a slow wind. It takes into account diffraction, absorption and relaxation properties of the atmosphere, quadratic nonlinearities including weak shock waves, heterogeneities of the medium in sound speed and density, and presence of a flow (assuming a mean stratified wind and 3D turbulent ? flow fluctuations of smaller amplitude). This equation is solved in the framework of the one-way method. A split-step technique allows the splitting of the non-linear wave equation into simpler equations, each corresponding to a physical effect. Each sub-equation is solved using an analytical method if possible, and finite-differences otherwise. Nonlinear effects are solved in the time domain, and others in the frequency domain. Homogeneous diffraction is handled by means of the angular spectrum method. Ground is assumed perfectly flat and rigid. Due to the 3D

  8. Nonhydrostatic granular flow over 3-D terrain: New Boussinesq-type gravity waves?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro-Orgaz, Oscar; Hutter, Kolumban; Giraldez, Juan V.; Hager, Willi H.

    2015-01-01

    granular mass flow is a basic step in the prediction and control of natural or man-made disasters related to avalanches on the Earth. Savage and Hutter (1989) pioneered the mathematical modeling of these geophysical flows introducing Saint-Venant-type mass and momentum depth-averaged hydrostatic equations using the continuum mechanics approach. However, Denlinger and Iverson (2004) found that vertical accelerations in granular mass flows are of the same order as the gravity acceleration, requiring the consideration of nonhydrostatic modeling of granular mass flows. Although free surface water flow simulations based on nonhydrostatic depth-averaged models are commonly used since the works of Boussinesq (1872, 1877), they have not yet been applied to the modeling of debris flow. Can granular mass flow be described by Boussinesq-type gravity waves? This is a fundamental question to which an answer is required, given the potential to expand the successful Boussinesq-type water theory to granular flow over 3-D terrain. This issue is explored in this work by generalizing the basic Boussinesq-type theory used in civil and coastal engineering for more than a century to an arbitrary granular mass flow using the continuum mechanics approach. Using simple test cases, it is demonstrated that the above question can be answered in the affirmative way, thereby opening a new framework for the physical and mathematical modeling of granular mass flow in geophysics, whereby the effect of vertical motion is mathematically included without the need of ad hoc assumptions.

  9. Relativistic integro-differential form of the Lorentz-Dirac equation in 3D without runaways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibison, Michael; Puthoff, Harold E.

    2001-04-01

    It is well known that the third-order Lorentz-Dirac equation admits runaway solutions wherein the energy of the particle grows without limit, even when there is no external force. These solutions can be denied simply on physical grounds, and on the basis of careful analysis of the correspondence between classical and quantum theory. Nonetheless, one would prefer an equation that did not admit unphysical behavior at the outset. Such an equation - an integro-differential version of the Lorentz-Dirac equation - is currently available either in 1 dimension only, or in 3 dimensions only in the non-relativistic limit. It is shown herein how the Lorentz-Dirac equation may be integrated without approximation, and is thereby converted to a second-order integro-differential equation in 3D satisfying the above requirement. I.E., as a result, no additional constraints on the solutions are required because runaway solutions are intrinsically absent. The derivation is placed within the historical context established by standard works on classical electrodynamics by Rohrlich, and by Jackson.

  10. Wave equations for pulse propagation

    SciTech Connect

    Shore, B.W.

    1987-06-24

    Theoretical discussions of the propagation of pulses of laser radiation through atomic or molecular vapor rely on a number of traditional approximations for idealizing the radiation and the molecules, and for quantifying their mutual interaction by various equations of propagation (for the radiation) and excitation (for the molecules). In treating short-pulse phenomena it is essential to consider coherent excitation phenomena of the sort that is manifest in Rabi oscillations of atomic or molecular populations. Such processes are not adequately treated by rate equations for excitation nor by rate equations for radiation. As part of a more comprehensive treatment of the coupled equations that describe propagation of short pulses, this memo presents background discussion of the equations that describe the field. This memo discusses the origin, in Maxwell's equations, of the wave equation used in the description of pulse propagation. It notes the separation into lamellar and solenoidal (or longitudinal and transverse) and positive and negative frequency parts. It mentions the possibility of separating the polarization field into linear and nonlinear parts, in order to define a susceptibility or index of refraction and, from these, a phase and group velocity. The memo discusses various ways of characterizing the polarization characteristics of plane waves, that is, of parameterizing a transverse unit vector, such as the Jones vector, the Stokes vector, and the Poincare sphere. It discusses the connection between macroscopically defined quantities, such as the intensity or, more generally, the Stokes parameters, and microscopic field amplitudes. The material presented here is a portion of a more extensive treatment of propagation to be presented separately. The equations presented here have been described in various books and articles. They are collected here as a summary and review of theory needed when treating pulse propagation.

  11. A goal-oriented adaptive finite-element approach for plane wave 3-D electromagnetic modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Zhengyong; Kalscheuer, Thomas; Greenhalgh, Stewart; Maurer, Hansruedi

    2013-08-01

    We have developed a novel goal-oriented adaptive mesh refinement approach for finite-element methods to model plane wave electromagnetic (EM) fields in 3-D earth models based on the electric field differential equation. To handle complicated models of arbitrary conductivity, magnetic permeability and dielectric permittivity involving curved boundaries and surface topography, we employ an unstructured grid approach. The electric field is approximated by linear curl-conforming shape functions which guarantee the divergence-free condition of the electric field within each tetrahedron and continuity of the tangential component of the electric field across the interior boundaries. Based on the non-zero residuals of the approximated electric field and the yet to be satisfied boundary conditions of continuity of both the normal component of the total current density and the tangential component of the magnetic field strength across the interior interfaces, three a-posterior error estimators are proposed as a means to drive the goal-oriented adaptive refinement procedure. The first a-posterior error estimator relies on a combination of the residual of the electric field, the discontinuity of the normal component of the total current density and the discontinuity of the tangential component of the magnetic field strength across the interior faces shared by tetrahedra. The second a-posterior error estimator is expressed in terms of the discontinuity of the normal component of the total current density (conduction plus displacement current). The discontinuity of the tangential component of the magnetic field forms the third a-posterior error estimator. Analytical solutions for magnetotelluric (MT) and radiomagnetotelluric (RMT) fields impinging on a homogeneous half-space model are used to test the performances of the newly developed goal-oriented algorithms using the above three a-posterior error estimators. A trapezoidal topographical model, using normally incident EM waves

  12. Numerical simulations of full-wave fields and analysis of channel wave characteristics in 3-D coal mine roadway models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Si-Tong; Wei, Jiu-Chuan; Cheng, Jiu-Long; Shi, Long-Qing; Wen, Zhi-Jie

    2016-12-01

    Currently, numerical simulations of seismic channel waves for the advance detection of geological structures in coal mine roadways focus mainly on modeling twodimensional wave fields and therefore cannot accurately simulate three-dimensional (3-D) full-wave fields or seismic records in a full-space observation system. In this study, we use the first-order velocity-stress staggered-grid finite difference algorithm to simulate 3-D full-wave fields with P-wave sources in front of coal mine roadways. We determine the three components of velocity V x, V y, and V z for the same node in 3-D staggered-grid finite difference models by calculating the average value of V y, and V z of the nodes around the same node. We ascertain the wave patterns and their propagation characteristics in both symmetrical and asymmetric coal mine roadway models. Our simulation results indicate that the Rayleigh channel wave is stronger than the Love channel wave in front of the roadway face. The reflected Rayleigh waves from the roadway face are concentrated in the coal seam, release less energy to the roof and floor, and propagate for a longer distance. There are surface waves and refraction head waves around the roadway. In the seismic records, the Rayleigh wave energy is stronger than that of the Love channel wave along coal walls of the roadway, and the interference of the head waves and surface waves with the Rayleigh channel wave is weaker than with the Love channel wave. It is thus difficult to identify the Love channel wave in the seismic records. Increasing the depth of the receivers in the coal walls can effectively weaken the interference of surface waves with the Rayleigh channel wave, but cannot weaken the interference of surface waves with the Love channel wave. Our research results also suggest that the Love channel wave, which is often used to detect geological structures in coal mine stopes, is not suitable for detecting geological structures in front of coal mine roadways

  13. Efficient methods to model the scattering of ultrasonic guided waves in 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreau, L.; Velichko, A.; Wilcox, P. D.

    2010-03-01

    The propagation of ultrasonic guided waves and their interaction with a defect is of interest to the nondestructive testing community. There is no general solution to the scattering problem and it is still an ongoing research topic. Due to the complexity of guided wave scattering problems, most existing models are related to the 2D case. However, thanks to the increase in computer calculation power, specific 3D problems can also be studied, with the help of numerical or semi-analytical methods. This paper describes two efficient methods aimed at modeling 3D scattering problems. The first method is the use of the Huygens' principle to reduce the size of finite element models. This principle allows the area of interest to be restricted to the very near field of the defect, for both the generation of the incident field and the modal decomposition of the scattered field. The second method consists of separating the 3D problem into two 2D problems for which the solutions are calculated and used to approximate the 3D solution. This can be used at low frequency-thickness products, where Lamb waves have a similar behavior to bulk waves. These two methods are presented briefly and compared on simple scattering cases.

  14. Free boundary value problem to 3D spherically symmetric compressible Navier-Stokes-Poisson equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Huihui; Li, Hai-Liang

    2017-02-01

    In the paper, we consider the free boundary value problem to 3D spherically symmetric compressible isentropic Navier-Stokes-Poisson equations for self-gravitating gaseous stars with γ -law pressure density function for 6/5 <γ ≤ 4/3. For stress-free boundary condition and zero flow density continuously across the free boundary, the global existence of spherically symmetric weak solutions is shown, and the regularity and long time behavior of global solution are investigated for spherically symmetric initial data with the total mass smaller than a critical mass.

  15. Development of Scientific Simulation 3D Full Wave ICRF Code for Stellarators and Heating/CD Scenarios Development

    SciTech Connect

    Vdovin V.L.

    2005-08-15

    In this report we describe theory and 3D full wave code description for the wave excitation, propagation and absorption in 3-dimensional (3D) stellarator equilibrium high beta plasma in ion cyclotron frequency range (ICRF). This theory forms a basis for a 3D code creation, urgently needed for the ICRF heating scenarios development for the operated LHD, constructed W7-X, NCSX and projected CSX3 stellarators, as well for re evaluation of ICRF scenarios in operated tokamaks and in the ITER . The theory solves the 3D Maxwell-Vlasov antenna-plasma-conducting shell boundary value problem in the non-orthogonal flux coordinates ({Psi}, {theta}, {var_phi}), {Psi} being magnetic flux function, {theta} and {var_phi} being the poloidal and toroidal angles, respectively. All basic physics, like wave refraction, reflection and diffraction are self consistently included, along with the fundamental ion and ion minority cyclotron resonances, two ion hybrid resonance, electron Landau and TTMP absorption. Antenna reactive impedance and loading resistance are also calculated and urgently needed for an antenna -generator matching. This is accomplished in a real confining magnetic field being varying in a plasma major radius direction, in toroidal and poloidal directions, through making use of the hot dense plasma wave induced currents with account to the finite Larmor radius effects. We expand the solution in Fourier series over the toroidal ({var_phi}) and poloidal ({theta}) angles and solve resulting ordinary differential equations in a radial like {Psi}-coordinate by finite difference method. The constructed discretization scheme is divergent-free one, thus retaining the basic properties of original equations. The Fourier expansion over the angle coordinates has given to us the possibility to correctly construct the ''parallel'' wave number k{sub //}, and thereby to correctly describe the ICRF waves absorption by a hot plasma. The toroidal harmonics are tightly coupled with each

  16. Importance of a 3D forward modeling tool for surface wave analysis methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pageot, Damien; Le Feuvre, Mathieu; Donatienne, Leparoux; Philippe, Côte; Yann, Capdeville

    2016-04-01

    Since a few years, seismic surface waves analysis methods (SWM) have been widely developed and tested in the context of subsurface characterization and have demonstrated their effectiveness for sounding and monitoring purposes, e.g., high-resolution tomography of the principal geological units of California or real time monitoring of the Piton de la Fournaise volcano. Historically, these methods are mostly developed under the assumption of semi-infinite 1D layered medium without topography. The forward modeling is generally based on Thomson-Haskell matrix based modeling algorithm and the inversion is driven by Monte-Carlo sampling. Given their efficiency, SWM have been transfered to several scale of which civil engineering structures in order to, e.g., determine the so-called V s30 parameter or assess other critical constructional parameters in pavement engineering. However, at this scale, many structures may often exhibit 3D surface variations which drastically limit the efficiency of SWM application. Indeed, even in the case of an homogeneous structure, 3D geometry can bias the dispersion diagram of Rayleigh waves up to obtain discontinuous phase velocity curves which drastically impact the 1D mean velocity model obtained from dispersion inversion. Taking advantages of high-performance computing center accessibility and wave propagation modeling algorithm development, it is now possible to consider the use of a 3D elastic forward modeling algorithm instead of Thomson-Haskell method in the SWM inversion process. We use a parallelized 3D elastic modeling code based on the spectral element method which allows to obtain accurate synthetic data with very low numerical dispersion and a reasonable numerical cost. In this study, we choose dike embankments as an illustrative example. We first show that their longitudinal geometry may have a significant effect on dispersion diagrams of Rayleigh waves. Then, we demonstrate the necessity of 3D elastic modeling as a forward

  17. High speed and flexible PEB 3D diffusion simulation based on Sylvester equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Pei-Chun; Chen, Charlie Chung-Ping

    2013-04-01

    Post exposure bake (PEB) Diffusion effect is one of the most difficult issues in modeling chemically amplified resists. These model equations result in a system of nonlinear partial differential equations describing the time rate of change reaction and diffusion. Verifying such models are difficult, so numerical simulations are needed to solve the model equations. In this paper, we propose a high speed 3D resist image simulation algorithm based on a novel method to solve the PEB Diffusion equation. Our major discovery is that the matrix formulation of the diffusion equation under the Crank- Nicolson scheme can be derived into a special form, AX+XB=C, where the X matrix is a 3D resist image after diffusion effect, A and B matrices contain the diffusion coefficients and the space relationship between directions x, y and z. These matrices are sparse, symmetric and diagonal dominant. The C matrix is the last time-step resist image. The Sylvester equation can be reduced to another form as (I⊗A + BT⊗I) X =C, in which the operator ⊗ is the Kronecker product notation. Compared with a traditional convolution method, our method is more useful in a way that boundary conditions can be more flexible. From our experimental results, we see that the error of the convolution method can be as high as 30% at borders of the design pattern. Furthermore, since the PEB temperature may not be uniform at multi-zone PEB, the convolution method might not be directly applicable in this scenario. Our method is about 20 times faster than the convolution method for a single time step (2 seconds) as illustrated in the attached figure. To simulate 50 seconds of the flexible PEB diffusion process, our method only takes 210 seconds with a convolution set up for a 1240×1240 working area. We use the typical 45nm immersion lithography in our work. The exposure wavelength is set to 193nm; the NA is 1.3775; and the diffusion coefficient is 1.455×10-17m2/s at PEB temperature 150°C along with PEB

  18. 3D analysis of interaction of Lamb waves with defects in loaded steel plates.

    PubMed

    Kazys, R; Mazeika, L; Barauskas, R; Raisutis, R; Cicenas, V; Demcenko, A

    2006-12-22

    The objective of the research presented here is the investigation of the interaction of guided waves with welds, defects and other non-uniformities in steel plates loaded by liquid. The investigation has been performed using numerical simulation for 2D and 3D cases by the finite differences method, finite element method and measurement of 3D distributions of acoustic fields. Propagation of the S(0) mode in a steel plate and its interaction with non-uniformities was investigated. It was shown that using the measured leaky wave signals in the water loading of the steel plate and by application of signal processing, the 3D ultrasonic field structure inside and outside of the plate can be reconstructed. The presence of leaky wave signals over the defect caused by the mode conversion of Lamb waves has been proved using the numerical modelling and experimental investigations. The developed signal and data processing enables to visualise dynamics of ultrasonic fields over the plate, and also to estimate spatial positions of defects inside the steel plates.

  19. Second order Method for Solving 3D Elasticity Equations with Complex Interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bao; Xia, Kelin; Wei, Guo-Wei

    2015-01-01

    Elastic materials are ubiquitous in nature and indispensable components in man-made devices and equipments. When a device or equipment involves composite or multiple elastic materials, elasticity interface problems come into play. The solution of three dimensional (3D) elasticity interface problems is significantly more difficult than that of elliptic counterparts due to the coupled vector components and cross derivatives in the governing elasticity equation. This work introduces the matched interface and boundary (MIB) method for solving 3D elasticity interface problems. The proposed MIB elasticity interface scheme utilizes fictitious values on irregular grid points near the material interface to replace function values in the discretization so that the elasticity equation can be discretized using the standard finite difference schemes as if there were no material interface. The interface jump conditions are rigorously enforced on the intersecting points between the interface and the mesh lines. Such an enforcement determines the fictitious values. A number of new techniques has been developed to construct efficient MIB elasticity interface schemes for dealing with cross derivative in coupled governing equations. The proposed method is extensively validated over both weak and strong discontinuity of the solution, both piecewise constant and position-dependent material parameters, both smooth and nonsmooth interface geometries, and both small and large contrasts in the Poisson’s ratio and shear modulus across the interface. Numerical experiments indicate that the present MIB method is of second order convergence in both L∞ and L2 error norms for handling arbitrarily complex interfaces, including biomolecular surfaces. To our best knowledge, this is the first elasticity interface method that is able to deliver the second convergence for the molecular surfaces of proteins.. PMID:25914422

  20. Wave Propagation from Complex 3D Sources using the Representation Theorem

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-09-30

    wavenumber integration. The equations for the Green’s functions for surface waves are given by Bache et al. (1982). The Green’s functions for the...Green’s functions for body waves are generated by a procedure similar to that described by Bache and Harkrider (1976) using a saddle point...931 951. Bache , T. C. and D. G Harkrider (1976). The Body Waves Due to a General Seismic source in a Layered Earth Model, Bull. Seism. Soc. Am. 66

  1. A time-space domain stereo finite difference method for 3D scalar wave propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yushu; Yang, Guangwen; Ma, Xiao; He, Conghui; Song, Guojie

    2016-11-01

    The time-space domain finite difference methods reduce numerical dispersion effectively by minimizing the error in the joint time-space domain. However, their interpolating coefficients are related with the Courant numbers, leading to significantly extra time costs for loading the coefficients consecutively according to velocity in heterogeneous models. In the present study, we develop a time-space domain stereo finite difference (TSSFD) method for 3D scalar wave equation. The method propagates both the displacements and their gradients simultaneously to keep more information of the wavefields, and minimizes the maximum phase velocity error directly using constant interpolation coefficients for different Courant numbers. We obtain the optimal constant coefficients by combining the truncated Taylor series approximation and the time-space domain optimization, and adjust the coefficients to improve the stability condition. Subsequent investigation shows that the TSSFD can suppress numerical dispersion effectively with high computational efficiency. The maximum phase velocity error of the TSSFD is just 3.09% even with only 2 sampling points per minimum wavelength when the Courant number is 0.4. Numerical experiments show that to generate wavefields with no visible numerical dispersion, the computational efficiency of the TSSFD is 576.9%, 193.5%, 699.0%, and 191.6% of those of the 4th-order and 8th-order Lax-Wendroff correction (LWC) method, the 4th-order staggered grid method (SG), and the 8th-order optimal finite difference method (OFD), respectively. Meanwhile, the TSSFD is compatible to the unsplit convolutional perfectly matched layer (CPML) boundary condition for absorbing artificial boundaries. The efficiency and capability to handle complex velocity models make it an attractive tool in imaging methods such as acoustic reverse time migration (RTM).

  2. 3D dynamic rupture with anelastic wave propagation using an hp-adaptive Discontinuous Galerkin method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tago, J.; Cruz-Atienza, V. M.; Etienne, V.; Virieux, J.; Benjemaa, M.; Sanchez-Sesma, F. J.

    2010-12-01

    Simulating any realistic seismic scenario requires incorporating physical basis into the model. Considering both the dynamics of the rupture process and the anelastic attenuation of seismic waves is essential to this purpose and, therefore, we choose to extend the hp-adaptive Discontinuous Galerkin finite-element method to integrate these physical aspects. The 3D elastodynamic equations in an unstructured tetrahedral mesh are solved with a second-order time marching approach in a high-performance computing environment. The first extension incorporates the viscoelastic rheology so that the intrinsic attenuation of the medium is considered in terms of frequency dependent quality factors (Q). On the other hand, the extension related to dynamic rupture is integrated through explicit boundary conditions over the crack surface. For this visco-elastodynamic formulation, we introduce an original discrete scheme that preserves the optimal code performance of the elastodynamic equations. A set of relaxation mechanisms describes the behavior of a generalized Maxwell body. We approximate almost constant Q in a wide frequency range by selecting both suitable relaxation frequencies and anelastic coefficients characterizing these mechanisms. In order to do so, we solve an optimization problem which is critical to minimize the amount of relaxation mechanisms. Two strategies are explored: 1) a least squares method and 2) a genetic algorithm (GA). We found that the improvement provided by the heuristic GA method is negligible. Both optimization strategies yield Q values within the 5% of the target constant Q mechanism. Anelastic functions (i.e. memory variables) are introduced to efficiently evaluate the time convolution terms involved in the constitutive equations and thus to minimize the computational cost. The incorporation of anelastic functions implies new terms with ordinary differential equations in the mathematical formulation. We solve these equations using the same order

  3. AE3D

    SciTech Connect

    Spong, Donald A

    2016-06-20

    AE3D solves for the shear Alfven eigenmodes and eigenfrequencies in a torodal magnetic fusion confinement device. The configuration can be either 2D (e.g. tokamak, reversed field pinch) or 3D (e.g. stellarator, helical reversed field pinch, tokamak with ripple). The equations solved are based on a reduced MHD model and sound wave coupling effects are not currently included.

  4. The Vajont disaster: a 3D numerical simulation for the slide and the waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubino, Angelo; Androsov, Alexey; Vacondio, Renato; Zanchettin, Davide; Voltzinger, Naum

    2016-04-01

    A very high resolution O(5 m), 3D hydrostatic nonlinear numerical model was used to simulate the dynamics of both the slide and the surface waves produced during the Vajont disaster (north Italy, 1963), one of the major landslide-induced tsunamis ever documented. Different simulated wave phenomena like, e.g., maximum run-up on the opposite shore, maximum height, and water velocity were analyzed and compared with data available in literature, including the results of a fully 3D simulation obtained with a Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamic code. The difference between measured and simulated after-slide bathymetries was calculated and used in an attempt to quantify the relative magnitude and extension of rigid and fluid motion components during the event.

  5. Computational time analysis of the numerical solution of 3D electrostatic Poisson's equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamboh, Shakeel Ahmed; Labadin, Jane; Rigit, Andrew Ragai Henri; Ling, Tech Chaw; Amur, Khuda Bux; Chaudhary, Muhammad Tayyab

    2015-05-01

    3D Poisson's equation is solved numerically to simulate the electric potential in a prototype design of electrohydrodynamic (EHD) ion-drag micropump. Finite difference method (FDM) is employed to discretize the governing equation. The system of linear equations resulting from FDM is solved iteratively by using the sequential Jacobi (SJ) and sequential Gauss-Seidel (SGS) methods, simulation results are also compared to examine the difference between the results. The main objective was to analyze the computational time required by both the methods with respect to different grid sizes and parallelize the Jacobi method to reduce the computational time. In common, the SGS method is faster than the SJ method but the data parallelism of Jacobi method may produce good speedup over SGS method. In this study, the feasibility of using parallel Jacobi (PJ) method is attempted in relation to SGS method. MATLAB Parallel/Distributed computing environment is used and a parallel code for SJ method is implemented. It was found that for small grid size the SGS method remains dominant over SJ method and PJ method while for large grid size both the sequential methods may take nearly too much processing time to converge. Yet, the PJ method reduces computational time to some extent for large grid sizes.

  6. Full-wave Moment Tensor and Tomographic Inversions Based on 3D Strain Green Tensor

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-31

    G. Jahnke, Wave propagation in 3D spherical sections: effects of subduction zones , Phys. Earth Planet. Inter., 132, 219-234, 2002. Komastitsch, D...is at scales smaller than the Fresnel zone . For example, a 1-Hz P/Pn wave recorded by a receiver ~1000 km from the source has a Fresnel zone width...approach, Eos Trans. AGU, 89(53), Fall Meet. Suppl., abstract T11E-06 Invited, 2008b. Sigloch, K., N. McQuarrie, G. Nolet, Two-stage subduction

  7. 3D Modeling of Antenna Driven Slow Waves Excited by Antennas Near the Plasma Edge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smithe, David; Jenkins, Thomas

    2016-10-01

    Prior work with the 3D finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) plasma and sheath model used to model ICRF antennas in fusion plasmas has highlighted the possibility of slow wave excitation at the very low end of the SOL density range, and thus the prudent need for a slow-time evolution model to treat SOL density modifications due to the RF itself. At higher frequency, the DIII-D helicon antenna has much easier access to a parasitic slow wave excitation, and in this case the Faraday screen provides the dominant means of controlling the content of the launched mode, with antenna end-effects remaining a concern. In both cases, the danger is the same, with the slow-wave propagating into a lower-hybrid resonance layer a short distance ( cm) away from the antenna, which would parasitically absorb power, transferring energy to the SOL edge plasma, primarily through electron-neutral collisions. We will present 3D modeling of antennas at both ICRF and helicon frequencies. We've added a slow-time evolution capability for the SOL plasma density to include ponderomotive force driven rarefaction from the strong fields in the vicinity of the antenna, and show initial application to NSTX antenna geometry and plasma configurations. The model is based on a Scalar Ponderomotive Potential method, using self-consistently computed local field amplitudes from the 3D simulation.

  8. Nonlinear dynamics of the 3D FMS and Alfven wave beams propagating in plasma of ionosphere and magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belashov, Vasily

    We study the formation, structure, stability and dynamics of the multidimensional soliton-like beam structures forming on the low-frequency branch of oscillation in the ionospheric and magnetospheric plasma for cases when beta=4pinT/B(2) <<1 and beta>1. In first case with the conditions omegawaves are excited. Their dynamics under conditions {k_{x}}(2) >>{k_{yz}}(2,) v_{x}$<3D Belashov-Karpman (BK) equation [1] for magnetic field h=B_{wave}/B with due account of the high order dispersive correction defined by values of plasma parameters and the angle Theta=(B,k) [2]. In another case the dynamics of the finite-amplitude Alfvén waves propagating in the ionosphere and magnetosphere near-to-parallel to the field B is described by the 3D derivative nonlinear Schrödinger (3-DNLS) equation for the magnetic field of the wave h=(B_{y}+iB_{z})/2B/1-beta/ [3]. To study the stability of multidimensional solitons in both cases we use the method developed in [2] and investigated the Hamiltonian bounding with its deformation conserving momentum by solving the corresponding variation problem. To study evolution of solitons and their collision dynamics the proper equations were being integrated numerically using the codes specially developed and described in detail in [3]. As a result, we have obtained that in both cases for a single solitons on a level with wave spreading and collapse the formation of multidimensional solitons can be observed. These results may be interpreted in terms of self-focusing phenomenon for the FMS and Alfvén waves’ beam as stationary beam formation, scattering and self-focusing of wave beam. The soliton collisions on a level with known elastic interaction can lead to formation of complex structures including the multisoliton bound states. For all cases the problem of multidimensional soliton dynamics in the ionospheric and

  9. Wave equation on spherically symmetric Lorentzian metrics

    SciTech Connect

    Bokhari, Ashfaque H.; Al-Dweik, Ahmad Y.; Zaman, F. D.; Kara, A. H.; Karim, M.

    2011-06-15

    Wave equation on a general spherically symmetric spacetime metric is constructed. Noether symmetries of the equation in terms of explicit functions of {theta} and {phi} are derived subject to certain differential constraints. By restricting the metric to flat Friedman case the Noether symmetries of the wave equation are presented. Invertible transformations are constructed from a specific subalgebra of these Noether symmetries to convert the wave equation with variable coefficients to the one with constant coefficients.

  10. Effects of obliquely opposing and following currents on wave propagation in a new 3D wave-current basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lieske, Mike; Schlurmann, Torsten

    2016-04-01

    INTRODUCTION & MOTIVATION The design of structures in coastal and offshore areas and their maintenance are key components of coastal protection. Usually, assessments of processes and loads on coastal structures are derived from experiments with flow and wave parameters in separate physical models. However, Peregrin (1976) already points out that processes in natural shallow coastal waters flow and sea state processes do not occur separately, but influence each other nonlinearly. Kemp & Simons (1982) perform 2D laboratory tests and study the interactions between a turbulent flow and following waves. They highlight the significance of wave-induced changes in the current properties, especially in the mean flow profiles, and draw attention to turbulent fluctuations and bottom shear stresses. Kemp & Simons (1983) also study these processes and features with opposing waves. Studies on the wave-current interaction in three-dimensional space for a certain wave height, wave period and water depth were conducted by MacIver et al. (2006). The research focus is set on the investigation of long-crested waves on obliquely opposing and following currents in the new 3D wave-current basin. METHODOLOGY In a first step the flow analysis without waves is carried out and includes measurements of flow profiles in the sweet spot of the basin at predefined measurement positions. Five measuring points in the water column have been delineated in different water depths in order to obtain vertical flow profiles. For the characterization of the undisturbed flow properties in the basin, an uniformly distributed flow was generated in the wave basin. In the second step wave analysis without current, the unidirectional wave propagation and wave height were investigated for long-crested waves in intermediate wave conditions. In the sweet spot of the wave basin waves with three different wave directions, three wave periods and uniform wave steepness were examined. For evaluation, we applied a common

  11. Implicit scheme for Maxwell equations solution in case of flat 3D domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boronina, Marina; Vshivkov, Vitaly

    2016-02-01

    We present a new finite-difference scheme for Maxwell's equations solution for three-dimensional domains with different scales in different directions. The stability condition of the standard leap-frog scheme requires decreasing of the time-step with decreasing of the minimal spatial step, which depends on the minimal domain size. We overcome the conditional stability by modifying the standard scheme adding implicitness in the direction of the smallest size. The new scheme satisfies the Gauss law for the electric and magnetic fields in the final- differences. The approximation order, the maintenance of the wave amplitude and propagation speed, the invariance of the wave propagation on angle with the coordinate axes are analyzed.

  12. 3D resolution tests of two-plane wave approach using synthetic seismograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceylan, S.; Larmat, C. S.; Sandvol, E. A.

    2012-12-01

    Two-plane wave tomography (TPWT) is becoming a standard approach to obtain fundamental mode Rayleigh wave phase velocities for a variety of tectonic settings. A recent study by Ceylan et al. (2012) has applied this method to eastern Tibet, using data from INDEPTH-IV and Namche-Barwa seismic experiments. The TPWT assumes that distortion of wavefronts at each station can be expressed as the sum of two plane waves. However, there is currently no robust or complete resolution test for TPWT, to address its limitations such as wavefront healing. In this study, we test the capabilities of TPWT and resolution of INDEPTH-IV seismic experiment, by performing 3D resolution tests using synthetic seismograms. Utilizing SPECFEM3D software, we compute synthetic data sets resolving periods down to ~30 s. We implement a checkerboard upper mantle (for depths between 50 and 650 km) with variable cell sizes, superimposed to PREM as the background model. We then calculate fundamental mode surface wave phase velocities using TPWT for periods between 33-143 seconds, using synthetic seismograms computed from our three dimensional hypothetical model. Assuming a constant Poisson's ratio, we use partial derivatives from Saito (1988) to invert for shear wave velocities. We show that the combination of TPWT and Saito (1988) methods is capable of retrieving anomalies down to depths of ~200 km for Rayleigh waves. Below these depths, we observe evidence of both lateral and vertical smearing. We also find that the traditional method for estimating the resolution of TPWT consistently overestimates phase velocity resolutions. Love waves exhibit adequate resolution down to depths of ~100 km. At depths greater than 100 km, smearing is more evident in SH wave results than those of SV waves. Increased smearing of SH waves is most probably due to propagation characteristics and shallower sensitivity of Love waves. Our results imply that TPWT can be applied to Love waves, making future investigations of

  13. 3D early embryogenesis image filtering by nonlinear partial differential equations.

    PubMed

    Krivá, Z; Mikula, K; Peyriéras, N; Rizzi, B; Sarti, A; Stasová, O

    2010-08-01

    We present nonlinear diffusion equations, numerical schemes to solve them and their application for filtering 3D images obtained from laser scanning microscopy (LSM) of living zebrafish embryos, with a goal to identify the optimal filtering method and its parameters. In the large scale applications dealing with analysis of 3D+time embryogenesis images, an important objective is a correct detection of the number and position of cell nuclei yielding the spatio-temporal cell lineage tree of embryogenesis. The filtering is the first and necessary step of the image analysis chain and must lead to correct results, removing the noise, sharpening the nuclei edges and correcting the acquisition errors related to spuriously connected subregions. In this paper we study such properties for the regularized Perona-Malik model and for the generalized mean curvature flow equations in the level-set formulation. A comparison with other nonlinear diffusion filters, like tensor anisotropic diffusion and Beltrami flow, is also included. All numerical schemes are based on the same discretization principles, i.e. finite volume method in space and semi-implicit scheme in time, for solving nonlinear partial differential equations. These numerical schemes are unconditionally stable, fast and naturally parallelizable. The filtering results are evaluated and compared first using the Mean Hausdorff distance between a gold standard and different isosurfaces of original and filtered data. Then, the number of isosurface connected components in a region of interest (ROI) detected in original and after the filtering is compared with the corresponding correct number of nuclei in the gold standard. Such analysis proves the robustness and reliability of the edge preserving nonlinear diffusion filtering for this type of data and lead to finding the optimal filtering parameters for the studied models and numerical schemes. Further comparisons consist in ability of splitting the very close objects which

  14. On the Finite-Time Splash and Splat Singularities for the 3-D Free-Surface Euler Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coutand, Daniel; Shkoller, Steve

    2014-01-01

    We prove that the 3-D free-surface incompressible Euler equations with regular initial geometries and velocity fields have solutions which can form a finite-time "splash" (or "splat") singularity first introduced in Castro et al. (Splash singularity for water waves, http://arxiv.org/abs/1106.2120v2, 2011), wherein the evolving 2-D hypersurface, the moving boundary of the fluid domain, self-intersects at a point (or on surface). Such singularities can occur when the crest of a breaking wave falls unto its trough, or in the study of drop impact upon liquid surfaces. Our approach is founded upon the Lagrangian description of the free-boundary problem, combined with a novel approximation scheme of a finite collection of local coordinate charts; as such we are able to analyze a rather general set of geometries for the evolving 2-D free-surface of the fluid. We do not assume the fluid is irrotational, and as such, our method can be used for a number of other fluid interface problems, including compressible flows, plasmas, as well as the inclusion of surface tension effects.

  15. Localization of 3D inertial Alfvén wave and generation of turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, R. P.; Sharma, Prachi; Yadav, N.

    2015-06-01

    The present paper deals with the nonlinear interaction of Inertial Alfvén wave (IAW) and fast magnetosonic wave in the low beta plasma, where beta is the ratio of thermal pressure to the background magnetic pressure. In this paper, the localization and turbulent spectra of IAW along with the density dips correlated with the fast magnetosonic wave have been investigated. Variation of parallel electric field along and across the field lines has also been studied. Taking ponderomotive nonlinear effect in the dynamics of fast magnetosonic wave, couple of dimensionless equations has been derived. These coupled equations have been simulated numerically using the pseudo-spectral method. The obtained results reveal that the Kolmogorov scaling is followed by a steeper scaling in magnetic power spectrum, which is consistent with the observations by the FAST and Hawkeye spacecraft in auroral region. The relevance of present investigation has been discussed for auroral plasmas.

  16. Ultra wide band millimeter wave holographic ``3-D`` imaging of concealed targets on mannequins

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, H.D.; Hall, T.E.; Gribble, R.P.

    1994-08-01

    Ultra wide band (chirp frequency) millimeter wave ``3-D`` holography is a unique technique for imaging concealed targets on human subjects with extremely high lateral and depth resolution. Recent ``3-D`` holographic images of full size mannequins with concealed weapons illustrate the efficacy of this technique for airport security. A chirp frequency (24 GHz to 40 GHz) holographic system was used to construct extremely high resolution images (optical quality) using polyrod antenna in a bi-static configuration using an x-y scanner. Millimeter wave chirp frequency holography can be simply described as a multi-frequency detection and imaging technique where the target`s reflected signals are decomposed into discrete frequency holograms and reconstructed into a single composite ``3-D`` image. The implementation of this technology for security at airports, government installations, etc., will require real-time (video rate) data acquisition and computer image reconstruction of large volumetric data sets. This implies rapid scanning techniques or large, complex ``2-D`` arrays and high speed computing for successful commercialization of this technology.

  17. 3D P-Wave Velocity Structure of the Deep Galicia Rifted Margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayrakci, Gaye; Minshull, Timothy; Davy, Richard; Sawyer, Dale; Klaeschen, Dirk; Papenberg, Cord; Reston, Timothy; Shillington, Donna; Ranero, Cesar

    2015-04-01

    The combined wide-angle reflection-refraction and multi-channel seismic (MCS) experiment, Galicia 3D, was carried out in 2013 at the Galicia rifted margin in the northeast Atlantic Ocean, west of Spain. The main geological features within the 64 by 20 km (1280 km²) 3D box investigated by the survey are the peridotite ridge (PR), the fault bounded, rotated basement blocks and the S reflector, which has been interpreted to be a low angle detachment fault. 44 short period four-component ocean bottom seismometers and 28 ocean bottom hydrophones were deployed in the 3D box. 3D MCS profiles sampling the whole box were acquired with two airgun arrays of 3300 cu.in. fired alternately every 37.5 m. We present the results from 3D first-arrival time tomography that constrains the P-wave velocity in the 3D box, for the entire depth sampled by reflection data. Results are validated by synthetic tests and by the comparison with Galicia 3D MCS lines. The main outcomes are as follows: 1- The 3.5 km/s iso-velocity contour mimics the top of the acoustic basement observed on MCS profiles. Block bounding faults are imaged as velocity contrasts and basement blocks exhibit 3D topographic variations. 2- On the southern profiles, the top of the PR rises up to 5.5 km depth whereas, 20 km northward, its basement expression (at 6.5 km depth) nearly disappears. 3- The 6.5 km/s iso-velocity contour matches the topography of the S reflector where the latter is visible on MCS profiles. Within a depth interval of 0.6 km (in average), velocities beneath the S reflector increase from 6.5 km/s to 7 km/s, which would correspond to a decrease in the degree of serpentinization from ~45 % to ~30 % if these velocity variations are caused solely by variations in hydration. At the intersections between the block bounding normal faults and the S reflector, this decrease happens over a larger depth interval (> 1 km), suggesting that faults act as conduit for the water flow in the upper mantle.

  18. 3D P-Wave Velocity Structure of the Deep Galicia Rifted Margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayrakci, G.; Minshull, T. A.; Davy, R. G.; Sawyer, D. S.; Klaeschen, D.; Papenberg, C. A.; Reston, T. J.; Shillington, D. J.; Ranero, C. R.

    2014-12-01

    The combined wide-angle reflection-refraction and multi-channel seismic (MCS) experiment, Galicia 3D, was carried out in 2013 at the Galicia rifted margin in the northeast Atlantic Ocean, west of Spain. The main geological features within the 64 by 20 km (1280 km²) 3D box investigated by the survey are the peridotite ridge (PR), the fault bounded, rotated basement blocks and the S reflector, which has been interpreted to be a low angle detachment fault. 44 short period four-component ocean bottom seismometers and 28 ocean bottom hydrophones were deployed in the 3D box. 3D MCS profiles sampling the whole box were acquired with two airgun arrays of 3300 cu.in. fired alternately every 37.5 m. We present the results from 3D first-arrival time tomography that constrains the P-wave velocity in the 3D box, for the entire depth sampled by reflection data. Results are validated by synthetic tests and by the comparison with Galicia 3D MCS lines. The main outcomes are as follows: 1- The 3.5 km/s iso-velocity contour mimics the top of the acoustic basement observed on MCS profiles. Block bounding faults are imaged as velocity contrasts and basement blocks exhibit 3D topographic variations. 2- On the southern profiles, the top of the PR rises up to 5.5 km depth whereas, 20 km northward, its basement expression (at 6.5 km depth) nearly disappears. 3- The 6.5 km/s iso-velocity contour matches the topography of the S reflector where the latter is visible on MCS profiles. Within a depth interval of 0.6 km (in average), velocities beneath the S reflector increase from 6.5 km/s to 7 km/s, which would correspond to a decrease in the degree of serpentinization from ~45 % to ~30 % if these velocity variations are caused solely by variations in hydration. At the intersections between the block bounding normal faults and the S reflector, this decrease happens over a larger depth interval (> 1 km), suggesting that faults act as conduit for the water flow in the upper mantle.

  19. Charactrisation of particle assemblies by 3D cross correlation light scattering and diffusing wave spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheffold, Frank

    2014-08-01

    To characterize the structural and dynamic properties of soft materials and small particles, information on the relevant mesoscopic length scales is required. Such information is often obtained from traditional static and dynamic light scattering (SLS/DLS) experiments in the single scattering regime. In many dense systems, however, these powerful techniques frequently fail due to strong multiple scattering of light. Here I will discuss some experimental innovations that have emerged over the last decade. New methods such as 3D static and dynamic light scattering (3D LS) as well as diffusing wave spectroscopy (DWS) can cover a much extended range of experimental parameters ranging from dilute polymer solutions, colloidal suspensions to extremely opaque viscoelastic emulsions.

  20. Total-Field Technique for 3-D Modeling of Short Period Teleseismic Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monteiller, V.; Beller, S.; Operto, S.; Nissen-Meyer, T.; Tago Pacheco, J.; Virieux, J.

    2014-12-01

    The massive development of dense seismic arrays and the rapid increase in computing capacity allow today to consider application of full waveform inversion of teleseismic data for high-resolution lithospheric imaging. We present an hybrid numerical method that allows for the modellingof short period teleseismic waves in 3D lithospheric target with both the discontinuous Galerkin finite elements method and finite difference method, opening the possibility to perform waveform inversion of seismograms recorded by dense regional broadband arrays. However, despite the supercomputer ability, the forward-problem remains expensive at global scale for teleseismic configuration especially when 3D numerical methods are considered. In order to perform the forward problem in a reasonable amount of time, we reduce the computational domain in which full waveform modelling is performed. We define a 3D regional domain located below the seismological network that is embedded in a homogeneous background or axisymmetric model, in which the seismic wavefield can be computed efficiently. The background wavefield is used to compute the full wavefield in the 3D regional domain using the so-called total-field/scattered-field technique. This method relies on the decomposition of the wavefield into a background and a scattered wavefields. The computational domain is subdivided into three sub-domains: an outer domain formed by the perfectly-matched absorbing layers, an intermediate domain in which only the outgoing wavefield scattered by the lithospheric heterogeneities is computed, and the inner domain formed by the lithospheric target in which the full wavefield is computed. In this study, we shall present simulations in realistic lithospheric target when the axisymetric background wavefield is computed with the AxiSEM softwave and the 3D simulation in lithospheric target model is performed with the discontinuous Galerkin or finite difference method.

  1. 3D Simulation of an Audible Ultrasonic Electrolarynx Using Difference Waves

    PubMed Central

    Mills, Patrick; Zara, Jason

    2014-01-01

    A total laryngectomy removes the vocal folds which are fundamental in forming voiced sounds that make speech possible. Although implanted prosthetics are commonly used in developed countries, simple handheld vibrating electrolarynxes are still common worldwide. These devices are easy to use but suffer from many drawbacks including dedication of a hand, mechanical sounding voice, and sound leakage. To address some of these drawbacks, we introduce a novel electrolarynx that uses vibro-acoustic interference of dual ultrasonic waves to generate an audible fundamental frequency. A 3D simulation of the principles of the device is presented in this paper. PMID:25401965

  2. Efficient construction of unified continuous and discontinuous Galerkin formulations for the 3D Euler equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdi, Daniel S.; Giraldo, Francis X.

    2016-09-01

    A unified approach for the numerical solution of the 3D hyperbolic Euler equations using high order methods, namely continuous Galerkin (CG) and discontinuous Galerkin (DG) methods, is presented. First, we examine how classical CG that uses a global storage scheme can be constructed within the DG framework using constraint imposition techniques commonly used in the finite element literature. Then, we implement and test a simplified version in the Non-hydrostatic Unified Model of the Atmosphere (NUMA) for the case of explicit time integration and a diagonal mass matrix. Constructing CG within the DG framework allows CG to benefit from the desirable properties of DG such as, easier hp-refinement, better stability etc. Moreover, this representation allows for regional mixing of CG and DG depending on the flow regime in an area. The different flavors of CG and DG in the unified implementation are then tested for accuracy and performance using a suite of benchmark problems representative of cloud-resolving scale, meso-scale and global-scale atmospheric dynamics. The value of our unified approach is that we are able to show how to carry both CG and DG methods within the same code and also offer a simple recipe for modifying an existing CG code to DG and vice versa.

  3. Two-dimensional ultrasound measurement of thyroid gland volume: a new equation with higher correlation with 3-D ultrasound measurement.

    PubMed

    Ying, Michael; Yung, Dennis M C; Ho, Karen K L

    2008-01-01

    This study aimed to develop a new two-dimensional (2-D) ultrasound thyroid volume estimation equation using three-dimensional (3-D) ultrasound as the standard of reference, and to compare the thyroid volume estimation accuracy of the new equation with three previously reported equations. 2-D and 3-D ultrasound examinations of the thyroid gland were performed in 150 subjects with normal serum thyrotropin (TSH, thyroid-stimulating hormone) and free thyroxine (fT4) levels (63 men and 87 women, age range: 17 to 71 y). In each subject, the volume of both thyroid lobes was measured by 3-D ultrasound. On 2-D ultrasound, the craniocaudal (CC), lateromedial (LM) and anteroposterior (AP) dimensions of the thyroid lobes were measured. The equation was derived by correlating the volume of the thyroid lobes measured with 3-D ultrasound and the product of the three dimensions measured with 2-D ultrasound using linear regression analysis, in 75 subjects without thyroid nodule. The accuracy of thyroid volume estimation of the new equation and the three previously reported equations was evaluated and compared in another 75 subjects (without thyroid nodule, n = 30; with thyroid nodule, n = 45). It is suggested that volume of thyroid lobe may be estimated as: volume of thyroid lobe = 0.38.(CC.LM.AP) + 1.76. Result showed that the new equation (16.9% to 36.1%) had a significantly smaller thyroid volume estimation error than the previously reported equations (20.8% to 54.9%) (p < 0.05). There was a significantly larger thyroid volume estimation error when thyroid glands with nodules were examined (p < 0.05). With the use of the appropriate thyroid volume equation, 2-D ultrasound can be a useful alternative in thyroid volume measurement when 3-D ultrasound is not available.

  4. On a particular analytical solution to the 3D Navier-Stokes equations and its peculiarity for high Reynolds numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabinowitch, Alexander S.

    2015-09-01

    A special class of axially symmetric nonstationary flows of incompressible viscous fluids is examined. For it, the 3D Navier-Stokes equations are reduced to a nonlinear partial differential equation of the third order and a linear partial differential equation of the second order. These equations are studied and their particular analytical solutions are found. The obtained particular solution to the Navier-Stokes equations could be used to describe some types of turbulent flows of viscous fluids in the case of high Reynolds numbers.

  5. 3D Euler equations and ideal MHD mapped to regular systems: Probing the finite-time blowup hypothesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bustamante, Miguel D.

    2011-06-01

    We prove by an explicit construction that solutions to incompressible 3D Euler equations defined in the periodic cube Ω=[0 can be mapped bijectively to a new system of equations whose solutions are globally regular. We establish that the usual Beale-Kato-Majda criterion for finite-time singularity (or blowup) of a solution to the 3D Euler system is equivalent to a condition on the corresponding regular solution of the new system. In the hypothetical case of Euler finite-time singularity, we provide an explicit formula for the blowup time in terms of the regular solution of the new system. The new system is amenable to being integrated numerically using similar methods as in Euler equations. We propose a method to simulate numerically the new regular system and describe how to use this to draw robust and reliable conclusions on the finite-time singularity problem of Euler equations, based on the conservation of quantities directly related to energy and circulation. The method of mapping to a regular system can be extended to any fluid equation that admits a Beale-Kato-Majda type of theorem, e.g. 3D Navier-Stokes, 2D and 3D magnetohydrodynamics, and 1D inviscid Burgers. We discuss briefly the case of 2D ideal magnetohydrodynamics. In order to illustrate the usefulness of the mapping, we provide a thorough comparison of the analytical solution versus the numerical solution in the case of 1D inviscid Burgers equation.

  6. Investigation of 3D surface acoustic waves in granular media with 3-color digital holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leclercq, Mathieu; Picart, Pascal; Penelet, Guillaume; Tournat, Vincent

    2017-01-01

    This paper reports the implementation of digital color holography to investigate elastic waves propagating along a layer of a granular medium. The holographic set-up provides simultaneous recording and measurement of the 3D dynamic displacement at the surface. Full-field measurements of the acoustic amplitude and phase at different excitation frequencies are obtained. It is shown that the experimental data can be used to obtain the dispersion curve of the modes propagating in this granular medium layer. The experimental dispersion curve and that obtained from a finite element modeling of the problem are found to be in good agreement. In addition, full-field images of the interaction of an acoustic wave guided in the granular layer with a buried object are also shown.

  7. Wave optics theory and 3-D deconvolution for the light field microscope.

    PubMed

    Broxton, Michael; Grosenick, Logan; Yang, Samuel; Cohen, Noy; Andalman, Aaron; Deisseroth, Karl; Levoy, Marc

    2013-10-21

    Light field microscopy is a new technique for high-speed volumetric imaging of weakly scattering or fluorescent specimens. It employs an array of microlenses to trade off spatial resolution against angular resolution, thereby allowing a 4-D light field to be captured using a single photographic exposure without the need for scanning. The recorded light field can then be used to computationally reconstruct a full volume. In this paper, we present an optical model for light field microscopy based on wave optics, instead of previously reported ray optics models. We also present a 3-D deconvolution method for light field microscopy that is able to reconstruct volumes at higher spatial resolution, and with better optical sectioning, than previously reported. To accomplish this, we take advantage of the dense spatio-angular sampling provided by a microlens array at axial positions away from the native object plane. This dense sampling permits us to decode aliasing present in the light field to reconstruct high-frequency information. We formulate our method as an inverse problem for reconstructing the 3-D volume, which we solve using a GPU-accelerated iterative algorithm. Theoretical limits on the depth-dependent lateral resolution of the reconstructed volumes are derived. We show that these limits are in good agreement with experimental results on a standard USAF 1951 resolution target. Finally, we present 3-D reconstructions of pollen grains that demonstrate the improvements in fidelity made possible by our method.

  8. Wave optics theory and 3-D deconvolution for the light field microscope

    PubMed Central

    Broxton, Michael; Grosenick, Logan; Yang, Samuel; Cohen, Noy; Andalman, Aaron; Deisseroth, Karl; Levoy, Marc

    2013-01-01

    Light field microscopy is a new technique for high-speed volumetric imaging of weakly scattering or fluorescent specimens. It employs an array of microlenses to trade off spatial resolution against angular resolution, thereby allowing a 4-D light field to be captured using a single photographic exposure without the need for scanning. The recorded light field can then be used to computationally reconstruct a full volume. In this paper, we present an optical model for light field microscopy based on wave optics, instead of previously reported ray optics models. We also present a 3-D deconvolution method for light field microscopy that is able to reconstruct volumes at higher spatial resolution, and with better optical sectioning, than previously reported. To accomplish this, we take advantage of the dense spatio-angular sampling provided by a microlens array at axial positions away from the native object plane. This dense sampling permits us to decode aliasing present in the light field to reconstruct high-frequency information. We formulate our method as an inverse problem for reconstructing the 3-D volume, which we solve using a GPU-accelerated iterative algorithm. Theoretical limits on the depth-dependent lateral resolution of the reconstructed volumes are derived. We show that these limits are in good agreement with experimental results on a standard USAF 1951 resolution target. Finally, we present 3-D reconstructions of pollen grains that demonstrate the improvements in fidelity made possible by our method. PMID:24150383

  9. 3D Plenoptic PIV Measurements of a Shock Wave Boundary Layer Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thurow, Brian; Bolton, Johnathan; Arora, Nishul; Alvi, Farrukh

    2016-11-01

    Plenoptic particle image velocimetry (PIV) is a relatively new technique that uses the computational refocusing capability of a single plenoptic camera and volume illumination with a double-pulsed light source to measure the instantaneous 3D/3C velocity field of a flow field seeded with particles. In this work, plenoptic PIV is used to perform volumetric velocity field measurements of a shock-wave turbulent boundary layer interaction (SBLI). Experiments were performed in a Mach 2.0 flow with the SBLI produced by an unswept fin at 15°angle of attack. The measurement volume was 38 x 25 x 32 mm3 and illuminated with a 400 mJ/pulse Nd:YAG laser with 1.7 microsecond inter-pulse time. Conventional planar PIV measurements along two planes within the volume are used for comparison. 3D visualizations of the fin generated shock and subsequent SBLI are presented. The growth of the shock foot and separation region with increasing distance from the fin tip is observed and agrees with observations made using planar PIV. Instantaneous images depict 3D fluctuations in the position of the shock foot from one image to the next. The authors acknowledge the support of the Air Force Office of Scientific Research.

  10. 3D P-wave Velocity Structure Beneath the Eastern Canadian Shield and Northern Appalachian Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villemaire, M.; Darbyshire, F. A.; Bastow, I. D.

    2010-12-01

    Previous seismic studies of the upper mantle of the Canadian Shield have indicated some low-velocity anomalies within the cratonic lithosphere in the Abitibi-Grenville region. The lack of seismograph station coverage to the east and south-east of the studied area prevented definition of the 3D geometry of these anomalies. Adding new stations from the province of Quebec and from the northeastern United States allows us to carry out new studies of the P-wave velocity structure of the upper mantle, in order to better understand the complexity of the region and the interaction of the lithosphere with possible thermal anomalies in the underlying mantle. We analysed teleseismic P wave arrivals from almost 200 earthquakes, recorded at 45 stations deployed across the provinces of Quebec and Ontario and across the northeastern US. The relative arrival times of teleseismic P waves across the array were measured using the cross-correlation method of VanDecar & Crosson (1990). The travel time data were then inverted to estimate the 3D P-wave velocity structure beneath the region, using the least-squares tomographic inversion code of VanDecar (1991). The model shows some interesting features. We see a diffuse low-velocity structure beneath New-England that extends to at least 500 km depth, and that may be related to the Appalachian Mountain belt. There is also a linear low-velocity structure, flanked by higher velocities, perpendicular to the Grenville Front, and along the Ottawa Valley. We interpret this feature as a mantle signature of the Great Meteor Hotspot track. We have looked for systematic differences between the mantle underlying the Archean Superior craton and the Proterozoic Grenville Province but did not find a significant difference in the upper mantle. We investigate the role of thermal and compositional effects to interpret the velocity models and to relate the patterns of the anomalies to past and present tectonic structures.

  11. Does the Wave Equation Really Work?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armstead, Donald C.; Karls, Michael A.

    2006-01-01

    The wave equation is a classic partial differential equation that one encounters in an introductory course on boundary value problems or mathematical physics, which can be used to describe the vertical displacement of a vibrating string. Using a video camera and Wave-in-Motion software to record displacement data from a vibrating string or spring,…

  12. Radially anisotropic 3-D shear wave structure of the Australian lithosphere and asthenosphere from multi-mode surface waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshizawa, K.

    2014-10-01

    A new radially anisotropic shear wave speed model for the Australasian region is constructed from multi-mode phase dispersion of Love and Rayleigh waves. An automated waveform fitting technique based on a global optimization with the Neighbourhood Algorithm allows the exploitation of large numbers of three-component broad-band seismograms to extract path-specific dispersion curves covering the entire continent. A 3-D shear wave model is constructed including radial anisotropy from a set of multi-mode phase speed maps for both Love and Rayleigh waves. These maps are derived from an iterative inversion scheme incorporating the effects of ray-path bending due to lateral heterogeneity, as well as the finite frequency of the surface waves for each mode. The new S wave speed model exhibits major tectonic features of this region that are in good agreement with earlier shear wave models derived primarily from Rayleigh waves. The lateral variations of depth and thickness of the lithosphere-asthenosphere transition (LAT) are estimated from the isotropic (Voigt average) S wave speed model and its vertical gradient, which reveals correlations between the lateral variations of the LAT and radial anisotropy. The thickness of the LAT is very large beneath the Archean cratons in western Australia, whereas that in south Australia is thinner. The radial anisotropy model shows faster SH wave speed than SV beneath eastern Australia and the Coral Sea at the lithospheric depth. The faster SH anomaly in the lithosphere is also seen in the suture zone between the three cratonic blocks of Australia. One of the most conspicuous features of fast SH anisotropy is found in the asthenosphere beneath the central Australia, suggesting anisotropy induced by shear flow in the asthenosphere beneath the fast drifting Australian continent.

  13. 3D reconstruction and particle acceleration properties of Coronal Shock Waves During Powerful Solar Particle Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plotnikov, Illya; Vourlidas, Angelos; Tylka, Allan J.; Pinto, Rui; Rouillard, Alexis; Tirole, Margot

    2016-07-01

    Identifying the physical mechanisms that produce the most energetic particles is a long-standing observational and theoretical challenge in astrophysics. Strong pressure waves have been proposed as efficient accelerators both in the solar and astrophysical contexts via various mechanisms such as diffusive-shock/shock-drift acceleration and betatron effects. In diffusive-shock acceleration, the efficacy of the process relies on shock waves being super-critical or moving several times faster than the characteristic speed of the medium they propagate through (a high Alfven Mach number) and on the orientation of the magnetic field upstream of the shock front. High-cadence, multipoint imaging using the NASA STEREO, SOHO and SDO spacecrafts now permits the 3-D reconstruction of pressure waves formed during the eruption of coronal mass ejections. Using these unprecedented capabilities, some recent studies have provided new insights on the timing and longitudinal extent of solar energetic particles, including the first derivations of the time-dependent 3-dimensional distribution of the expansion speed and Mach numbers of coronal shock waves. We will review these recent developments by focusing on particle events that occurred between 2011 and 2015. These new techniques also provide the opportunity to investigate the enigmatic long-duration gamma ray events.

  14. Analogy between a 10D model for nonlinear wave-wave interaction in a plasma and the 3D Lorenz dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Letellier, C.; Aguirre, L. A.; Maquet, J.; Lefebvre, B.

    2003-05-01

    This paper investigates nonlinear wave-wave interactions in a system that describes a modified decay instability and consists of three Langmuir and one ion-sound waves. As a means to establish that the underlying dynamics exists in a 3D space and that it is of the Lorenz-type, both continuous and discrete-time multivariable global models were obtained from data. These data were obtained from a 10D dynamical system that describes the modified decay instability obtained from Zakharov’s equations which characterise Langmuir turbulence. This 10D model is equivariant under a continuous rotation symmetry and a discrete order-2 rotation symmetry. When the continuous rotation symmetry is modded out, that is, when the dynamics are represented with the continuous rotation symmetry removed under a local diffeomorphism, it is shown that a 3D system may describe the underlying dynamics. For certain parameter values, the models, obtained using global modelling techniques from three time series from the 10D dynamics with the continuous rotation symmetry modded out, generate attractors which are topologically equivalent. These models can be simulated easily and, due to their simplicity, are amenable for analysis of the original dynamics after symmetries have been modded out. Moreover, it is shown that all of these attractors are topologically equivalent to an attractor generated by the well-known Lorenz system.

  15. An integral equation approach to smooth 3D Navier-Stokes solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costin, O.; Luo, G.; Tanveer, S.

    2008-12-01

    We summarize a recently developed integral equation (IE) approach to tackling the long-time existence problem for smooth solution v(x, t) to the 3D Navier-Stokes (NS) equation in the context of a periodic box problem with smooth time independent forcing and initial condition v0. Using an inverse-Laplace transform of {\\skew5\\hat v} (k, t) - {\\skew5\\hat v}_0 in 1/t, we arrive at an IE for {\\skew5\\hat U} (k, p) , where p is inverse-Laplace dual to 1/t and k is the Fourier variable dual to x. The advantage of this formulation is that the solution {\\skew5\\hat U} to the IE is known to exist a priori for p \\in \\mathbb{R}^+ and the solution is integrable and exponentially bounded at ∞. Global existence of NS solution in this formulation is reduced to an asymptotics question. If \\parallel\\!{\\skew5\\hat U} (\\cdot, p)\\!\\parallel_{{l^{1} (\\mathbb{Z}^3)}} has subexponential bounds as p→∞, then global existence to NS follows. Moreover, if f=0, then the converse is also true in the following sense: if NS has global solution, then there exists n>=1 for which the inverse-Laplace transform of {\\skew5\\hat v} (k, t) - {\\skew5\\hat v}_0 in 1/tn necessarily decays as q→∞, where q is the inverse-Laplace dual to 1/tn. We also present refined estimates of the exponential growth when the solution {\\skew5\\hat U} is known on a finite interval [0, p0]. We also show that for analytic v[0] and f, with finitely many nonzero Fourier-coefficients, the series for {\\skew5\\hat U} (k, p) in powers of p has a radius of convergence independent of initial condition and forcing; indeed the radius gets bigger for smaller viscosity. We also show that the IE can be solved numerically with controlled errors. Preliminary numerical calculations for Kida (1985 J. Phys. Soc. Japan 54 2132) initial conditions, though far from being optimized, and performed on a modest interval in the accelerated variable q show decay in q.

  16. Computational modeling of pitching cylinder-type ocean wave energy converters using 3D MPI-parallel simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freniere, Cole; Pathak, Ashish; Raessi, Mehdi

    2016-11-01

    Ocean Wave Energy Converters (WECs) are devices that convert energy from ocean waves into electricity. To aid in the design of WECs, an advanced computational framework has been developed which has advantages over conventional methods. The computational framework simulates the performance of WECs in a virtual wave tank by solving the full Navier-Stokes equations in 3D, capturing the fluid-structure interaction, nonlinear and viscous effects. In this work, we present simulations of the performance of pitching cylinder-type WECs and compare against experimental data. WECs are simulated at both model and full scales. The results are used to determine the role of the Keulegan-Carpenter (KC) number. The KC number is representative of viscous drag behavior on a bluff body in an oscillating flow, and is considered an important indicator of the dynamics of a WEC. Studying the effects of the KC number is important for determining the validity of the Froude scaling and the inviscid potential flow theory, which are heavily relied on in the conventional approaches to modeling WECs. Support from the National Science Foundation is gratefully acknowledged.

  17. A 3D MPI-Parallel GPU-accelerated framework for simulating ocean wave energy converters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pathak, Ashish; Raessi, Mehdi

    2015-11-01

    We present an MPI-parallel GPU-accelerated computational framework for studying the interaction between ocean waves and wave energy converters (WECs). The computational framework captures the viscous effects, nonlinear fluid-structure interaction (FSI), and breaking of waves around the structure, which cannot be captured in many potential flow solvers commonly used for WEC simulations. The full Navier-Stokes equations are solved using the two-step projection method, which is accelerated by porting the pressure Poisson equation to GPUs. The FSI is captured using the numerically stable fictitious domain method. A novel three-phase interface reconstruction algorithm is used to resolve three phases in a VOF-PLIC context. A consistent mass and momentum transport approach enables simulations at high density ratios. The accuracy of the overall framework is demonstrated via an array of test cases. Numerical simulations of the interaction between ocean waves and WECs are presented. Funding from the National Science Foundation CBET-1236462 grant is gratefully acknowledged.

  18. INS3D - NUMERICAL SOLUTION OF THE INCOMPRESSIBLE NAVIER-STOKES EQUATIONS IN THREE-DIMENSIONAL GENERALIZED CURVILINEAR COORDINATES (IBM VERSION)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwak, D.

    1994-01-01

    INS3D computes steady-state solutions to the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. The INS3D approach utilizes pseudo-compressibility combined with an approximate factorization scheme. This computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code has been verified on problems such as flow through a channel, flow over a backwardfacing step and flow over a circular cylinder. Three dimensional cases include flow over an ogive cylinder, flow through a rectangular duct, wind tunnel inlet flow, cylinder-wall juncture flow and flow through multiple posts mounted between two plates. INS3D uses a pseudo-compressibility approach in which a time derivative of pressure is added to the continuity equation, which together with the momentum equations form a set of four equations with pressure and velocity as the dependent variables. The equations' coordinates are transformed for general three dimensional applications. The equations are advanced in time by the implicit, non-iterative, approximately-factored, finite-difference scheme of Beam and Warming. The numerical stability of the scheme depends on the use of higher-order smoothing terms to damp out higher-frequency oscillations caused by second-order central differencing. The artificial compressibility introduces pressure (sound) waves of finite speed (whereas the speed of sound would be infinite in an incompressible fluid). As the solution converges, these pressure waves die out, causing the derivation of pressure with respect to time to approach zero. Thus, continuity is satisfied for the incompressible fluid in the steady state. Computational efficiency is achieved using a diagonal algorithm. A block tri-diagonal option is also available. When a steady-state solution is reached, the modified continuity equation will satisfy the divergence-free velocity field condition. INS3D is capable of handling several different types of boundaries encountered in numerical simulations, including solid-surface, inflow and outflow, and far

  19. INS3D - NUMERICAL SOLUTION OF THE INCOMPRESSIBLE NAVIER-STOKES EQUATIONS IN THREE-DIMENSIONAL GENERALIZED CURVILINEAR COORDINATES (DEC RISC ULTRIX VERSION)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biyabani, S. R.

    1994-01-01

    INS3D computes steady-state solutions to the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. The INS3D approach utilizes pseudo-compressibility combined with an approximate factorization scheme. This computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code has been verified on problems such as flow through a channel, flow over a backwardfacing step and flow over a circular cylinder. Three dimensional cases include flow over an ogive cylinder, flow through a rectangular duct, wind tunnel inlet flow, cylinder-wall juncture flow and flow through multiple posts mounted between two plates. INS3D uses a pseudo-compressibility approach in which a time derivative of pressure is added to the continuity equation, which together with the momentum equations form a set of four equations with pressure and velocity as the dependent variables. The equations' coordinates are transformed for general three dimensional applications. The equations are advanced in time by the implicit, non-iterative, approximately-factored, finite-difference scheme of Beam and Warming. The numerical stability of the scheme depends on the use of higher-order smoothing terms to damp out higher-frequency oscillations caused by second-order central differencing. The artificial compressibility introduces pressure (sound) waves of finite speed (whereas the speed of sound would be infinite in an incompressible fluid). As the solution converges, these pressure waves die out, causing the derivation of pressure with respect to time to approach zero. Thus, continuity is satisfied for the incompressible fluid in the steady state. Computational efficiency is achieved using a diagonal algorithm. A block tri-diagonal option is also available. When a steady-state solution is reached, the modified continuity equation will satisfy the divergence-free velocity field condition. INS3D is capable of handling several different types of boundaries encountered in numerical simulations, including solid-surface, inflow and outflow, and far

  20. A remark on the Beale-Kato-Majda criterion for the 3D MHD equations with zero magnetic diffusivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gala, Sadek; Ragusa, Maria Alessandra

    2016-06-01

    In this work, we show that a smooth solution of the 3D MHD equations with zero magnetic diffusivity in the whole space ℝ3 breaks down if and only if a certain norm of the magnetic field blows up at the same time.

  1. 3D P and S Wave Velocity Structure and Tremor Locations in the Parkfield Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, X.; Thurber, C. H.; Shelly, D. R.; Bennington, N. L.; Cochran, E. S.; Harrington, R. M.

    2014-12-01

    We have assembled a new dataset to refine the 3D seismic velocity model in the Parkfield region. The S arrivals from 184 earthquakes recorded by the Parkfield Experiment to Record MIcroseismicity and Tremor array (PERMIT) during 2010-2011 were picked by a new S wave picker, which is based on machine learning. 74 blasts have been assigned to four quarries, whose locations were identified with Google Earth. About 1000 P and S wave arrivals from these blasts at permanent seismic network were also incorporated. Low frequency earthquakes (LFEs) occurring within non-volcanic tremor (NVT) are valuable for improving the precision of NVT location and the seismic velocity model at greater depths. Based on previous work (Shelley and Hardebeck, 2010), waveforms of hundreds of LFEs in same family were stacked to improve signal qualify. In a previous study (McClement et al., 2013), stacked traces of more than 30 LFE families at the Parkfileld Array Seismic Observatory (PASO) have been picked. We expanded our work to include LFEs recorded by the PERMIT array. The time-frequency Phase Weight Stacking (tf-PWS) method was introduced to improve the stack quality, as direct stacking does not produce clear S-wave arrivals on the PERMIT stations. This technique uses the coherence of the instantaneous phase among the stacked signals to enhance the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the stack. We found that it is extremely effective for picking LFE arrivals (Thurber et al., 2014). More than 500 P and about 1000 S arrivals from 58 LFE families were picked at the PERMIT and PASO arrays. Since the depths of LFEs are much deeper than earthquakes, we are able to extend model resolution to lower crustal depths. Both P and S wave velocity structure have been obtained with the tomoDD method. The result suggests that there is a low velocity zone (LVZ) in the lower crust and the location of the LVZ is consistent with the high conductivity zone beneath the southern segment of the Rinconada fault that

  2. Singularities of 3D laminar boundary layer equations and flow structure in their vicinity on conical bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shalaev, V. I.

    2016-10-01

    Singularities appearing in solutions of 3D laminar boundary layer (BL) equations, when two streamline families are collided, are discussed. For conical bodies, equations are investigated using asymptotic methods. Analytical solutions are obtained for the outer BL region; their singularities in the runoff plane are studied. The asymptotic flow structure near the singularity is constructed on the base of Navier-Stokes equations at large Reynolds numbers. For different flow regions analytical solutions are found and are matched with BL equation solutions. Properties of BL equations for the near-wall region in the runoff plane are investigated and a criterion of the solution disappearing is found. It is shown that this criterion separates two different topological flow structures and corresponds to the singularity appearance in this plane in solutions of full equations. Calculations confirmed obtained results are presented.

  3. Mathematical and physical aspects of controlling the exact solutions of the 3D Gross-Pitaevskii equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedele, Renato; Jovanović, Dušan; De Nicola, Sergio; Eliasson, Bengt; Shukla, Padma K.

    2010-01-01

    The possibility of the decomposition of the three-dimensional (3D) Gross-Pitaevskii equation (GPE) into a pair of coupled Schrödinger-type equations, is investigated. It is shown that, under suitable mathematical conditions, it is possible to construct the exact controlled solutions of the 3D GPE from the solutions of a linear 2D Schrödinger equation coupled with a 1D nonlinear Schrödinger equation (the transverse and longitudinal components of the GPE, respectively). The coupling between these two equations is the functional of the transverse and the longitudinal profiles. The applied method of nonlinear decomposition, called the controlling potential method (CPM), yields the full 3D solution in the form of the product of the solutions of the transverse and longitudinal components of the GPE. It is shown that the CPM constitutes a variational principle and sets up a condition on the controlling potential well. Its physical interpretation is given in terms of the minimization of the (energy) effects introduced by the control. The method is applied to the case of a parabolic external potential to construct analytically an exact BEC state in the form of a bright soliton, for which the quantitative comparison between the external and controlling potentials is presented.

  4. 3D P-wave velocity structure of the deep Galicia rifted margin: A first analysis of the Galicia 3D wide-angle seismic dataset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayrakci, Gaye; Minshull, Timothy A.; Davy, Richard G.; Karplus, Marianne S.; Kaeschen, Dirk; Papenberg, Cord; Krabbenhoeft, Anne; Sawyer, Dale; Reston, Timothy J.; Shillington, Donna J.; Ranero, César R.

    2014-05-01

    Galicia 3D, a reflection-refraction and long offset seismic experiment was carried out from May through September 2013, at the Galicia rifted margin (in the northeast Atlantic Ocean, west of Spain) as a collaboration between US, UK, German and Spanish groups. The 3D multichannel seismic acquisition conducted by R/V Marcus Langseth covered a 64 km by 20 km (1280 km2) zone where the main geological features are the Peridotite Ridge (PR), composed of serpentinized peridotite and thought be upper mantle exhumed to the seafloor during rifting, and the S reflector which has been interpreted to be a low angle detachment fault overlain by fault bounded, rotated, continental crustal blocks. In the 3D box, two airgun arrays of 3300 cu.in. were fired alternately (in flip-flop configuration) every 37.5 m. All shots are recorded by 44 short period four component ocean bottom seismometers (OBS) and 26 ocean bottom hydrophones (OBH) deployed and recovered by R/V Poseidon, as well as four 6 km hydrophone streamers with 12.5 m channel spacing towed by R/V Marcus Langseth. We present the preliminary results of the first arrival time tomography study which is carried out with a subset of the wide-angle dataset, in order to generate a 3D P-wave velocity volume for the entire depth sampled by the reflection data. After the relocation of OBSs and OBHs, an automatic first-arrival time picking approach is applied to a subset of the dataset, which comprises more than 5.5 million source-receiver pairs. Then, the first-arrival times are checked visually, in 3-dimensions. The a priori model used for the first-arrival time tomography is built up using information from previous seismic surveys carried out at the Galicia margin (e.g. ISE, 1997). The FAST algorithm of Zelt and Barton (1998) is used for the first-arrival time inversion. The 3D P-wave velocity volume can be used in interpreting the reflection dataset, as a starting point for migration, to quantify the thinning of the crustal layers

  5. On the Global Regularity of a Helical-Decimated Version of the 3D Navier-Stokes Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biferale, Luca; Titi, Edriss S.

    2013-06-01

    We study the global regularity, for all time and all initial data in H 1/2, of a recently introduced decimated version of the incompressible 3D Navier-Stokes (dNS) equations. The model is based on a projection of the dynamical evolution of Navier-Stokes (NS) equations into the subspace where helicity (the L 2-scalar product of velocity and vorticity) is sign-definite. The presence of a second (beside energy) sign-definite inviscid conserved quadratic quantity, which is equivalent to the H 1/2-Sobolev norm, allows us to demonstrate global existence and uniqueness, of space-periodic solutions, together with continuity with respect to the initial conditions, for this decimated 3D model. This is achieved thanks to the establishment of two new estimates, for this 3D model, which show that the H 1/2 and the time average of the square of the H 3/2 norms of the velocity field remain finite. Such two additional bounds are known, in the spirit of the work of H. Fujita and T. Kato (Arch. Ration. Mech. Anal. 16:269-315, 1964; Rend. Semin. Mat. Univ. Padova 32:243-260, 1962), to be sufficient for showing well-posedness for the 3D NS equations. Furthermore, they are directly linked to the helicity evolution for the dNS model, and therefore with a clear physical meaning and consequences.

  6. Electronic representation of wave equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veigend, Petr; Kunovský, Jiří; Kocina, Filip; Nečasová, Gabriela; Šátek, Václav; Valenta, Václav

    2016-06-01

    The Taylor series method for solving differential equations represents a non-traditional way of a numerical solution. Even though this method is not much preferred in the literature, experimental calculations done at the Department of Intelligent Systems of the Faculty of Information Technology of TU Brno have verified that the accuracy and stability of the Taylor series method exceeds the currently used algorithms for numerically solving differential equations. This paper deals with solution of Telegraph equation using modelling of a series small pieces of the wire. Corresponding differential equations are solved by the Modern Taylor Series Method.

  7. Intersymbol Interference Investigations Using a 3D Time-Dependent Traveling Wave Tube Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kory, Carol L.; Andro, Monty

    2002-01-01

    For the first time, a time-dependent, physics-based computational model has been used to provide a direct description of the effects of the traveling wave tube amplifier (TWTA) on modulated digital signals. The TWT model comprehensively takes into account the effects of frequency dependent AM/AM and AM/PM conversion; gain and phase ripple; drive-induced oscillations; harmonic generation; intermodulation products; and backward waves. Thus, signal integrity can be investigated in the presence of these sources of potential distortion as a function of the physical geometry and operating characteristics of the high power amplifier and the operational digital signal. This method promises superior predictive fidelity compared to methods using TWT models based on swept- amplitude and/or swept-frequency data. First, the TWT model using the three dimensional (3D) electromagnetic code MAFIA is presented. Then, this comprehensive model is used to investigate approximations made in conventional TWT black-box models used in communication system level simulations. To quantitatively demonstrate the effects these approximations have on digital signal performance predictions, including intersymbol interference (ISI), the MAFIA results are compared to the system level analysis tool, Signal Processing Workstation (SPW), using high order modulation schemes including 16 and 64-QAM.

  8. Intersymbol Interference Investigations Using a 3D Time-Dependent Traveling Wave Tube Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kory, Carol L.; Andro, Monty; Downey, Alan (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    For the first time, a physics based computational model has been used to provide a direct description of the effects of the TWT (Traveling Wave Tube) on modulated digital signals. The TWT model comprehensively takes into account the effects of frequency dependent AM/AM and AM/PM conversion; gain and phase ripple; drive-induced oscillations; harmonic generation; intermodulation products; and backward waves. Thus, signal integrity can be investigated in the presence of these sources of potential distortion as a function of the physical geometry of the high power amplifier and the operational digital signal. This method promises superior predictive fidelity compared to methods using TWT models based on swept amplitude and/or swept frequency data. The fully three-dimensional (3D), time-dependent, TWT interaction model using the electromagnetic code MAFIA is presented. This model is used to investigate assumptions made in TWT black box models used in communication system level simulations. In addition, digital signal performance, including intersymbol interference (ISI), is compared using direct data input into the MAFIA model and using the system level analysis tool, SPW (Signal Processing Worksystem).

  9. 3D transient electromagnetic simulation using a modified correspondence principle for wave and diffusion fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Y.; Ji, Y.; Egbert, G. D.

    2015-12-01

    The fictitious time domain method (FTD), based on the correspondence principle for wave and diffusion fields, has been developed and used over the past few years primarily for marine electromagnetic (EM) modeling. Here we present results of our efforts to apply the FTD approach to land and airborne TEM problems which can reduce the computer time several orders of magnitude and preserve high accuracy. In contrast to the marine case, where sources are in the conductive sea water, we must model the EM fields in the air; to allow for topography air layers must be explicitly included in the computational domain. Furthermore, because sources for most TEM applications generally must be modeled as finite loops, it is useful to solve directly for the impulse response appropriate to the problem geometry, instead of the point-source Green functions typically used for marine problems. Our approach can be summarized as follows: (1) The EM diffusion equation is transformed to a fictitious wave equation. (2) The FTD wave equation is solved with an explicit finite difference time-stepping scheme, with CPML (Convolutional PML) boundary conditions for the whole computational domain including the air and earth , with FTD domain source corresponding to the actual transmitter geometry. Resistivity of the air layers is kept as low as possible, to compromise between efficiency (longer fictitious time step) and accuracy. We have generally found a host/air resistivity contrast of 10-3 is sufficient. (3)A "Modified" Fourier Transform (MFT) allow us recover system's impulse response from the fictitious time domain to the diffusion (frequency) domain. (4) The result is multiplied by the Fourier transformation (FT) of the real source current avoiding time consuming convolutions in the time domain. (5) The inverse FT is employed to get the final full waveform and full time response of the system in the time domain. In general, this method can be used to efficiently solve most time-domain EM

  10. 3-D Acoustic Scattering from 2-D Rough Surfaces Using A Parabolic Equation Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-12-01

    acoustic propagation signals, especially at mid- frequencies and higher (e.g., acoustic communications systems). For many years, the effects of rough...of the effect of surface scattering on 3-D propagation , which is critical in evaluating the variability in underwater acoustic propagation . Results...14. SUBJECT TERMS Acoustic Propagation , Acoustic Scattering, Sea Surface Perturbations, Split- Step Fourier Algorithm, Finite Difference Algorithm

  11. Similarity solution to fractional nonlinear space-time diffusion-wave equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, F. Silva; Marão, J. A. P. F.; Soares, J. C. Alves; de Oliveira, E. Capelas

    2015-03-01

    In this article, the so-called fractional nonlinear space-time wave-diffusion equation is presented and discussed. This equation is solved by the similarity method using fractional derivatives in the Caputo, Riesz-Feller, and Riesz senses. Some particular cases are presented and the corresponding solutions are shown by means of 2-D and 3-D plots.

  12. Thermal Investigation of Common 2d FETs and New Generation of 3d FETs Using Boltzmann Transport Equation in Nanoscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samian, R. S.; Abbassi, A.; Ghazanfarian, J.

    2013-09-01

    The thermal performance of two-dimensional (2D) field-effect transistors (FET) is investigated frequently by solving the Fourier heat diffusion law and the Boltzmann transport equation (BTE). With the introduction of the new generation of 3D FETs in which their thickness is less than the phonon mean-free-path it is necessary to carefully simulate the thermal performance of such devices. This paper numerically integrates the BTE in common 2D transistors including planar single layer and Silicon-On-Insulator (SOI) transistor, and the new generation of 3D transistors including FinFET and Tri-Gate devices. In order to decrease the directional dependency of results in 3D simulations; the Legendre equal-weight (PN-EW) quadrature set has been employed. It is found that if similar switching time is assumed for 3D and 2D FETs while the new generation of 3D FETs has less net energy consumption, they have higher hot-spot temperature. The results show continuous heat flux distribution normal to the silicon/oxide interface while the temperature jump is seen at the interface in double layer transistors.

  13. Anomalously low amplitude of S waves produced by the 3D structures in the lower mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    To, Akiko; Capdeville, Yann; Romanowicz, Barbara

    2016-07-01

    Direct S and Sdiff phases with anomalously low amplitudes are recorded for the earthquakes in Papua New Guinea by seismographs in northern America. According to the prediction by a standard 1D model, the amplitudes are the lowest at stations in southern California, at a distance and azimuth of around 95° and 55°, respectively, from the earthquake. The amplitude anomaly is more prominent at frequencies higher than 0.03 Hz. We checked and ruled out the possibility of the anomalies appearing because of the errors in the focal mechanism used in the reference synthetic waveform calculations. The observed anomaly distribution changes drastically with a relatively small shift in the location of the earthquake. The observations indicate that the amplitude reduction is likely due to the 3D shear velocity (Vs) structure, which deflects the wave energy away from the original ray paths. Moreover, some previous studies suggested that some of the S and Sdiff phases in our dataset are followed by a prominent postcursor and show a large travel time delay, which was explained by placing a large ultra-low velocity zone (ULVZ) located on the core-mantle boundary southwest of Hawaii. In this study, we evaluated the extent of amplitude anomalies that can be explained by the lower mantle structures in the existing models, including the previously proposed ULVZ. In addition, we modified and tested some models and searched for the possible causes of low amplitudes. Full 3D synthetic waveforms were calculated and compared with the observations. Our results show that while the existing models explain the trends of the observed amplitude anomalies, the size of such anomalies remain under-predicted especially at large distances. Adding a low velocity zone, which is spatially larger and has less Vs reduction than ULVZ, on the southwest side of ULVZ, contributes to explain the low amplitudes observed at distances larger than 100° from the earthquake. The newly proposed low velocity zone

  14. Technical note: Criterion validity of whole body surface area equations: a comparison using 3D laser scanning.

    PubMed

    Daniell, Nathan; Olds, Timothy; Tomkinson, Grant

    2012-05-01

    Measurements of whole body surface area (WBSA) have important applications in numerous fields including biological anthropology, clinical medicine, biomechanics, and sports science. Currently, WBSA is most often estimated using predictive equations due to the complex and time consuming methods required for direct measurement. The main aim of this study was to identify whether there were significant and meaningful differences between WBSA measurements taken using a whole body three-dimensional (3D) scanner (criterion measure) and the estimates derived from each WBSA equation identified from a systematic review. The study also aimed to determine whether differences varied according to body mass index (BMI), sex, or athletic status. Fifteen WBSA equations were compared with direct measurements taken on 1,714 young adult subjects, aged 18-30 years, using the Vitus Smart 3D whole body scanner, including 1,452 subjects (753 males, 699 females) from the general Australian population and 262 rowers (148 males, 114 females). Mixed-design analysis of variances determined significant differences and accuracy was quantified using Bland-Altman analysis and effect sizes. Thirteen of the 15 equations overestimated WBSA. With a few exceptions, equations were accurate with a low-systematic error (bias ≤2%) and low-random error (standard deviation of the differences 1.5-3.0%). However, BMI did have a substantial impact with the accuracy of some WBSA equations varying between the four BMI categories. The Shuter and Aslani: Eur J Appl Physiol 82 (2000) 250-254 equation was identified as the most accurate equation and should be used for Western populations 18-30 years of age. Care must be taken when deciding which equation to use when estimating WBSA.

  15. Universal Bounds for the Littlewood-Paley First-Order Moments of the 3D Navier-Stokes Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otto, Felix; Ramos, Fabio

    2010-12-01

    We derive upper bounds for the infinite-time and space average of the L 1-norm of the Littlewood-Paley decomposition of weak solutions of the 3 D periodic Navier-Stokes equations. The result suggests that the Kolmogorov characteristic velocity scaling, {mathbf{U}_kappa˜ɛ^{1/3} kappa^{-1/3}} , holds as an upper bound for a region of wavenumbers near the dissipative cutoff.

  16. Well-posedness of linearized motion for 3-D water waves far from equilibrium

    SciTech Connect

    Hou, T.Y.; Zhen-huan Teng; Pingwen Zhang

    1996-12-31

    In this paper, we study the motion of a free surface separating two different layers of fluid in three dimensions. We assume the flow to be inviscid, irrotational, and incompressible. In this case, one can reduce the entire motion by variables on the surface alone. In general, without additional regularizing effects such as surface alone. In general, without additional regularizing effects such as surface tension or viscosity, the flow can be subject to Rayleigh-Taylor or Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities which will lead to unbounded growth in high frequency wave numbers. In this case, the problem is not well-posed in the Hadamard sense. The problem of water wave with no fluid above is a special case. It is well-known that such motion is well-posed when the free surface is sufficiently close to equilibrium. Beale, Hous and Lowengrub derived a general condition which ensures well-posedness of the linearization about a presumed time-dependent motion in two dimensional case. The linearized equations, when formulated in a proper coordinate system are found to have a qualitative structure surprisingly like that for the simple case of linear waves near equilbrium. Such an analysis is essential in analyzing stability of boundary integral methods for computing free interface problems. 19 refs.

  17. Shock wave equation of state of muscovite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sekine, Toshimori; Rubin, Allan M.; Ahrens, Thomas J.

    1991-01-01

    Shock wave data were obtained between 20 and 140 GPa for natural muscovite obtained from Methuen Township (Ontario), in order to provide a shock-wave equation of state for this crustal hydrous mineral. The shock equation of state data could be fit by a linear shock velocity (Us) versus particle velocity (Up) relation Us = 4.62 + 1.27 Up (km/s). Third-order Birch-Murnaghan equation of state parameters were found to be K(OS) = 52 +/-4 GPa and K-prime(OS) = 3.2 +/-0.3 GPa. These parameters are comparable to those of other hydrous minerals such as brucite, serpentine, and tremolite.

  18. New 3D parallel GILD electromagnetic modeling and nonlinear inversion using global magnetic integral and local differential equation

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, G.; Li, J.; Majer, E.; Zuo, D.

    1998-07-01

    This paper describes a new 3D parallel GILD electromagnetic (EM) modeling and nonlinear inversion algorithm. The algorithm consists of: (a) a new magnetic integral equation instead of the electric integral equation to solve the electromagnetic forward modeling and inverse problem; (b) a collocation finite element method for solving the magnetic integral and a Galerkin finite element method for the magnetic differential equations; (c) a nonlinear regularizing optimization method to make the inversion stable and of high resolution; and (d) a new parallel 3D modeling and inversion using a global integral and local differential domain decomposition technique (GILD). The new 3D nonlinear electromagnetic inversion has been tested with synthetic data and field data. The authors obtained very good imaging for the synthetic data and reasonable subsurface EM imaging for the field data. The parallel algorithm has high parallel efficiency over 90% and can be a parallel solver for elliptic, parabolic, and hyperbolic modeling and inversion. The parallel GILD algorithm can be extended to develop a high resolution and large scale seismic and hydrology modeling and inversion in the massively parallel computer.

  19. Localization and visualization of excess chemical potential in statistical mechanical integral equation theory 3D-HNC-RISM.

    PubMed

    Du, Qi-Shi; Liu, Peng-Jun; Huang, Ri-Bo

    2008-02-01

    In this study the excess chemical potential of the integral equation theory, 3D-RISM-HNC [Q. Du, Q. Wei, J. Phys. Chem. B 107 (2003) 13463-13470], is visualized in three-dimensional form and localized at interaction sites of solute molecule. Taking the advantage of reference interaction site model (RISM), the calculation equations of chemical excess potential are reformulized according to the solute interaction sites s in molecular space. Consequently the solvation free energy is localized at every interaction site of solute molecule. For visualization of the 3D-RISM-HNC calculation results, the excess chemical potentials are described using radial and three-dimensional diagrams. It is found that the radial diagrams of the excess chemical potentials are more sensitive to the bridge functions than the radial diagrams of solvent site density distributions. The diagrams of average excess chemical potential provide useful information of solute-solvent electrostatic and van der Waals interactions. The local description of solvation free energy at active sites of solute in 3D-RISM-HNC may broaden the application scope of statistical mechanical integral equation theory in solution chemistry and life science.

  20. 3D Anisotropic structure of the south-central Mongolia from Rayleigh and Love wave tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, D.; Wu, Q.; Montagner, J. P.

    2014-12-01

    A better understanding of the geodynamics of the crust and mantle below Baikal-Mongolia is required to identify the role of mantle processes versus that of far-field tectonic effects from India-Asia collision. Anisotropy tomography can provide new perspective to the continental growth mechanism. In order to study the 3D anisotropic structure of the upper mantle in the south-central Mongolia, we collected the vertical and transverse components of seismograms recorded at 69 broadband seismic stations. We have measured inter-station phase velocities of 7181 Rayleigh waves and 901 Love waves using the frequency-time analysis of wavelet transformation method for the fundamental mode at period range 10~80s. The lateral phase velocity variations are computed by using a regionalization method. These phase velocities have been inverted to obtain the first anisotropic model including Sv velocities, azimuthal and radial anisotropy. The Middle Gobi is associated with low velocity. Based on the distribution of the Cenozoic basalts in the Middle Gobi, it refers that the low velocity anomaly is related to the Cenozoic volcanism. In the northern domain, near to Baikal zone, the azimuthal anisotropy is normal to the Baikal rift and consistent with the fast direction of previous SKS splitting measurements. In the South Gobi, north to Main Mongolian Lineament, the azimuthal anisotropy is NEE-SWW in the crust and NW-SE in the mantle. It indicates that the crust and mantle are decoupled. We propose that the crustal deformation is related to the far-field effects of India-Asia collision and that the mantle flow is correlated with the Baikal rift activity. Further study in process will provide more evidence and insight to better understand the geodynamics in this region.

  1. Threshold response using modulated continuous wave illumination for multilayer 3D optical data storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saini, A.; Christenson, C. W.; Khattab, T. A.; Wang, R.; Twieg, R. J.; Singer, K. D.

    2017-01-01

    In order to achieve a high capacity 3D optical data storage medium, a nonlinear or threshold writing process is necessary to localize data in the axial dimension. To this end, commercial multilayer discs use thermal ablation of metal films or phase change materials to realize such a threshold process. This paper addresses a threshold writing mechanism relevant to recently reported fluorescence-based data storage in dye-doped co-extruded multilayer films. To gain understanding of the essential physics, single layer spun coat films were used so that the data is easily accessible by analytical techniques. Data were written by attenuating the fluorescence using nanosecond-range exposure times from a 488 nm continuous wave laser overlapping with the single photon absorption spectrum. The threshold writing process was studied over a range of exposure times and intensities, and with different fluorescent dyes. It was found that all of the dyes have a common temperature threshold where fluorescence begins to attenuate, and the physical nature of the thermal process was investigated.

  2. Characterization of an SRF gun: a 3D full wave simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, E.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Wang, J.

    2011-03-28

    We characterized a BNL 1.3GHz half-cell SRF gun is tested for GaAs photocathode. The gun already was simulated several years ago via two-dimensional (2D) numerical codes (i.e., Superfish and Parmela) with and without the beam. In this paper, we discuss our investigation of its characteristics using a three dimensional (3D) full-wave code (CST STUDIO SUITE{trademark}).The input/pickup couplers are sited symmetrically on the same side of the gun at an angle of 180{sup o}. In particular, the inner conductor of the pickup coupler is considerably shorter than that of the input coupler. We evaluated the cross-talk between the beam (trajectory) and the signal on the input coupler compared our findings with published results based on analytical models. The CST STUDIO SUITE{trademark} also was used to predict the field within the cavity; particularly, a combination of transient/eigenmode solvers was employed to accurately construct the RF field for the particles, which also includes the effects of the couplers. Finally, we explored the beam's dynamics with a particle in cell (PIC) simulation, validated the results and compare them with 2D code result.

  3. Understanding the core-halo relation of quantum wave dark matter from 3D simulations.

    PubMed

    Schive, Hsi-Yu; Liao, Ming-Hsuan; Woo, Tak-Pong; Wong, Shing-Kwong; Chiueh, Tzihong; Broadhurst, Tom; Hwang, W-Y Pauchy

    2014-12-31

    We examine the nonlinear structure of gravitationally collapsed objects that form in our simulations of wavelike cold dark matter, described by the Schrödinger-Poisson (SP) equation with a particle mass ∼10(-22)  eV. A distinct gravitationally self-bound solitonic core is found at the center of every halo, with a profile quite different from cores modeled in the warm or self-interacting dark matter scenarios. Furthermore, we show that each solitonic core is surrounded by an extended halo composed of large fluctuating dark matter granules which modulate the halo density on a scale comparable to the diameter of the solitonic core. The scaling symmetry of the SP equation and the uncertainty principle tightly relate the core mass to the halo specific energy, which, in the context of cosmological structure formation, leads to a simple scaling between core mass (Mc) and halo mass (Mh), Mc∝a(-1/2)Mh(1/3), where a is the cosmic scale factor. We verify this scaling relation by (i) examining the internal structure of a statistical sample of virialized halos that form in our 3D cosmological simulations and by (ii) merging multiple solitons to create individual virialized objects. Sufficient simulation resolution is achieved by adaptive mesh refinement and graphic processing units acceleration. From this scaling relation, present dwarf satellite galaxies are predicted to have kiloparsec-sized cores and a minimum mass of ∼10(8)M⊙, capable of solving the small-scale controversies in the cold dark matter model. Moreover, galaxies of 2×10(12)M⊙ at z=8 should have massive solitonic cores of ∼2×10(9)M⊙ within ∼60  pc. Such cores can provide a favorable local environment for funneling the gas that leads to the prompt formation of early stellar spheroids and quasars.

  4. Helical localized wave solutions of the scalar wave equation.

    PubMed

    Overfelt, P L

    2001-08-01

    A right-handed helical nonorthogonal coordinate system is used to determine helical localized wave solutions of the homogeneous scalar wave equation. Introducing the characteristic variables in the helical system, i.e., u = zeta - ct and v = zeta + ct, where zeta is the coordinate along the helical axis, we can use the bidirectional traveling plane wave representation and obtain sets of elementary bidirectional helical solutions to the wave equation. Not only are these sets bidirectional, i.e., based on a product of plane waves, but they may also be broken up into right-handed and left-handed solutions. The elementary helical solutions may in turn be used to create general superpositions, both Fourier and bidirectional, from which new solutions to the wave equation may be synthesized. These new solutions, based on the helical bidirectional superposition, are members of the class of localized waves. Examples of these new solutions are a helical fundamental Gaussian focus wave mode, a helical Bessel-Gauss pulse, and a helical acoustic directed energy pulse train. Some of these solutions have the interesting feature that their shape and localization properties depend not only on the wave number governing propagation along the longitudinal axis but also on the normalized helical pitch.

  5. Lamellipodin promotes invasive 3D cancer cell migration via regulated interactions with Ena/VASP and SCAR/WAVE

    PubMed Central

    Carmona, Guillaume; Perera, Upamali; Gillett, Cheryl; Naba, Alexandra; Law, Ah-Lai; Sharma, Ved P.; Wang, Jian; Wyckoff, Jeffrey; Balsamo, Michele; Mosis, Fuad; De Piano, Mario; Monypenny, James; Woodman, Natalie; McConnell, Russell E.; Mouneimne, Ghassan; Van Hemelrijck, Mieke; Cao, Yihai; Condeelis, John; Hynes, Richard O.; Gertler, Frank B.; Krause, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Cancer invasion is a hallmark of metastasis. The mesenchymal mode of cancer cell invasion is mediated by elongated membrane protrusions driven by the assembly of branched F-actin networks. How deregulation of actin regulators promotes cancer cell invasion is still enigmatic. We report that increased expression and membrane localization of the actin regulator Lamellipodin correlates with reduced metastasis-free survival and poor prognosis in breast cancer patients. In agreement we find that Lamellipodin depletion reduced lung metastasis in an orthotopic mouse breast cancer model. Invasive 3D cancer cell migration as well as invadopodia formation, and matrix degradation were impaired upon Lamellipodin depletion. Mechanistically, we show that Lamellipodin promotes invasive 3D cancer cell migration via both actin-elongating Ena/VASP proteins and the Scar/WAVE complex, which stimulates actin branching. In contrast, Lamellipodin interaction with Scar/WAVE but not Ena/VASP is required for random 2D cell migration. We identify a phosphorylation-dependent mechanism that regulates selective recruitment of these effectors to Lamellipodin: Abl-mediated Lamellipodin phosphorylation promotes its association with both Scar/WAVE and Ena/VASP, while Src-dependent phosphorylation enhances binding to Scar/WAVE but not Ena/VASP. Through these selective, regulated interactions Lamellipodin mediates directional sensing of EGF gradients and invasive 3D migration of breast cancer cells. Our findings imply that increased Lamellipodin levels enhance Ena/VASP and Scar/WAVE activities at the plasma membrane to promote 3D invasion and metastasis. PMID:26996666

  6. Cauchy's almost forgotten Lagrangian formulation of the Euler equation for 3D incompressible flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frisch, Uriel; Villone, Barbara

    2014-09-01

    Two prized papers, one by Augustin Cauchy in 1815, presented to the French Academy and the other by Hermann Hankel in 1861, presented to Göttingen University, contain major discoveries on vorticity dynamics whose impact is now quickly increasing. Cauchy found a Lagrangian formulation of 3D ideal incompressible flow in terms of three invariants that generalize to three dimensions the now well-known law of conservation of vorticity along fluid particle trajectories for two-dimensional flow. This has very recently been used to prove analyticity in time of fluid particle trajectories for 3D incompressible Euler flow and can be extended to compressible flow, in particular to cosmological dark matter. Hankel showed that Cauchy's formulation gives a very simple Lagrangian derivation of the Helmholtz vorticity-flux invariants and, in the middle of the proof, derived an intermediate result which is the conservation of the circulation of the velocity around a closed contour moving with the fluid. This circulation theorem was to be rediscovered independently by William Thomson (Kelvin) in 1869. Cauchy's invariants were only occasionally cited in the 19th century - besides Hankel, foremost by George Stokes and Maurice Lévy - and even less so in the 20th until they were rediscovered via Emmy Noether's theorem in the late 1960, but reattributed to Cauchy only at the end of the 20th century by Russian scientists.

  7. A unifying fractional wave equation for compressional and shear waves.

    PubMed

    Holm, Sverre; Sinkus, Ralph

    2010-01-01

    This study has been motivated by the observed difference in the range of the power-law attenuation exponent for compressional and shear waves. Usually compressional attenuation increases with frequency to a power between 1 and 2, while shear wave attenuation often is described with powers less than 1. Another motivation is the apparent lack of partial differential equations with desirable properties such as causality that describe such wave propagation. Starting with a constitutive equation which is a generalized Hooke's law with a loss term containing a fractional derivative, one can derive a causal fractional wave equation previously given by Caputo [Geophys J. R. Astron. Soc. 13, 529-539 (1967)] and Wismer [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 120, 3493-3502 (2006)]. In the low omegatau (low-frequency) case, this equation has an attenuation with a power-law in the range from 1 to 2. This is consistent with, e.g., attenuation in tissue. In the often neglected high omegatau (high-frequency) case, it describes attenuation with a power-law between 0 and 1, consistent with what is observed in, e.g., dynamic elastography. Thus a unifying wave equation derived properly from constitutive equations can describe both cases.

  8. Time-stepping stability of continuous and discontinuous finite-element methods for 3-D wave propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulder, W. A.; Zhebel, E.; Minisini, S.

    2014-02-01

    We analyse the time-stepping stability for the 3-D acoustic wave equation, discretized on tetrahedral meshes. Two types of methods are considered: mass-lumped continuous finite elements and the symmetric interior-penalty discontinuous Galerkin method. Combining the spatial discretization with the leap-frog time-stepping scheme, which is second-order accurate and conditionally stable, leads to a fully explicit scheme. We provide estimates of its stability limit for simple cases, namely, the reference element with Neumann boundary conditions, its distorted version of arbitrary shape, the unit cube that can be partitioned into six tetrahedra with periodic boundary conditions and its distortions. The Courant-Friedrichs-Lewy stability limit contains an element diameter for which we considered different options. The one based on the sum of the eigenvalues of the spatial operator for the first-degree mass-lumped element gives the best results. It resembles the diameter of the inscribed sphere but is slightly easier to compute. The stability estimates show that the mass-lumped continuous and the discontinuous Galerkin finite elements of degree 2 have comparable stability conditions, whereas the mass-lumped elements of degree one and three allow for larger time steps.

  9. A lattice-Boltzmann scheme of the Navier-Stokes equations on a 3D cuboid lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Haoda; Peng, Cheng; Wang, Lian-Ping

    2015-11-01

    The standard lattice-Boltzmann method (LBM) for fluid flow simulation is based on a square (in 2D) or cubic (in 3D) lattice grids. Recently, two new lattice Boltzmann schemes have been developed on a 2D rectangular grid using the MRT (multiple-relaxation-time) collision model, by adding a free parameter in the definition of moments or by extending the equilibrium moments. Here we developed a lattice Boltzmann model on 3D cuboid lattice, namely, a lattice grid with different grid lengths in different spatial directions. We designed our MRT-LBM model by matching the moment equations from the Chapman-Enskog expansion with the Navier-Stokes equations. The model guarantees correct hydrodynamics. A second-order term is added to the equilibrium moments in order to restore the isotropy of viscosity on a cuboid lattice. The form and the coefficients of the extended equilibrium moments are determined through an inverse design process. An additional benefit of the model is that the viscosity can be adjusted independent of the stress-moment relaxation parameter, thus improving the numerical stability of the model. The resulting cuboid MRT-LBM model is then validated through benchmark simulations using laminar channel flow, turbulent channel flow, and the 3D Taylor-Green vortex flow.

  10. Numerical solution of 3D Navier-Stokes equations with upwind implicit schemes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marx, Yves P.

    1990-01-01

    An upwind MUSCL type implicit scheme for the three-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations is presented. Comparison between different approximate Riemann solvers (Roe and Osher) are performed and the influence of the reconstructions schemes on the accuracy of the solution as well as on the convergence of the method is studied. A new limiter is introduced in order to remove the problems usually associated with non-linear upwind schemes. The implementation of a diagonal upwind implicit operator for the three-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations is also discussed. Finally the turbulence modeling is assessed. Good prediction of separated flows are demonstrated if a non-equilibrium turbulence model is used.

  11. Influence of 3D Teleseismic Body Waves in the Finite-Fault Source Inversion of Subduction Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sladen, A.; Monteiller, V.

    2014-12-01

    Most large earthquakes are generated in subduction zones. To study the complexity of these events, teleseismic body waves offer many advantages over other types of data: they allow to study both the temporal and spatial evolution of slip during the rupture, they don't depend on the presence of nearby land and they allow to study earthquakes regardless of their location. Since the development of teleseismic finite-fault inversion in the 1980th, teleseismic body waves have been simulated using 1D velocity models to take into account propagation effects at the source. Yet, subduction zones are known to be highly heterogeneous: they are characterized by curved and dipping structures, strong seismic velocity contrasts, strong variations of topography and height of the water column. The main reason for relying on a 1D approximation is the computational cost of 3D simulations. And while forward simulations of teleseismic waves in a 3D Earth are only starting to be tractable on modern computers at the frequency range of interest (0.1Hz or shorter), finite-fault source studies require a large number of these simulations. In this work, we present a new and efficient approach to compute 3D teleseismic body waves, in which the full 3D propagation is only computed in a regional domain using discontinuous Galerkin finite-element method, while the rest of the seismic wave field is propagated in a background axisymmetric Earth. The regional and global wave fields are matched using the so-called Total-Field/Scattered-Field technique. This new simulation approach allows us to study the waveform complexities resulting from 3D propagation and investigate how they could improve the resolution and reduce the non-uniqueness of finite-fault inversions.

  12. SHEAR WAVE SEISMIC STUDY COMPARING 9C3D SV AND SH IMAGES WITH 3C3D C-WAVE IMAGES

    SciTech Connect

    John Beecherl; Bob A. Hardage

    2004-07-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the relative merits of shear-wave (S-wave) seismic data acquired with nine-component (9-C) technology and with three-component (3-C) technology. The original proposal was written as if the investigation would be restricted to a single 9-C seismic survey in southwest Kansas (the Ashland survey), on the basis of the assumption that both 9-C and 3-C S-wave images could be created from that one data set. The Ashland survey was designed as a 9-C seismic program. We found that although the acquisition geometry was adequate for 9-C data analysis, the source-receiver geometry did not allow 3-C data to be extracted on an equitable and competitive basis with 9-C data. To do a fair assessment of the relative value of 9-C and 3-C seismic S-wave data, we expanded the study beyond the Ashland survey and included multicomponent seismic data from surveys done in a variety of basins. These additional data were made available through the Bureau of Economic Geology, our research subcontractor. Bureau scientists have added theoretical analyses to this report that provide valuable insights into several key distinctions between 9-C and 3-C seismic data. These theoretical considerations about distinctions between 3-C and 9-C S-wave data are presented first, followed by a discussion of differences between processing 9-C common-midpoint data and 3-C common-conversion-point data. Examples of 9-C and 3-C data are illustrated and discussed in the last part of the report. The key findings of this study are that each S-wave mode (SH-SH, SV-SV, or PSV) involves a different subsurface illumination pattern and a different reflectivity behavior and that each mode senses a different Earth fabric along its propagation path because of the unique orientation of its particle-displacement vector. As a result of the distinct orientation of each mode's particle-displacement vector, one mode may react to a critical geologic condition in a more optimal way than do

  13. Flow effects of blood constitutive equations in 3D models of vascular anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neofytou, Panagiotis; Tsangaris, Sokrates

    2006-06-01

    The effects of different blood rheological models are investigated numerically utilizing two three- dimensional (3D) models of vascular anomalies, namely a stenosis and an abdominal aortic aneurysm model. The employed CFD code incorporates the SIMPLE scheme in conjunction with the finite-volume method with collocated arrangement of variables. The approximation of the convection terms is carried out using the QUICK differencing scheme, whereas the code enables also multi-block computations, which are useful in order to cope with the two-block grid structure of the current computational domain. Three non-Newtonian models are employed, namely the Casson, Power-Law and Quemada models, which have been introduced in the past for modelling the rheological behaviour of blood and cover both the viscous as well as the two-phase character of blood. In view of the haemodynamical mechanisms related to abnormalities in the vascular network and the role of the wall shear stress in initiating and further developing of arterial diseases, the present study focuses on the 3D flow field and in particular on the distribution as well as on both low and high values of the wall shear stress in the vicinity of the anomaly. Finally, a comparison is made between the effects of each rheological model on the aforementioned parameters. Results show marked differences between simulating blood as Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluid and furthermore the Power-Law model exhibits different behaviour in all cases compared to the other models whereas Quemada and Casson models exhibit similar behaviour in the case of the stenosis but different behaviour in the case of the aneurysm.

  14. Converted-Wave Processing of a 3D-3C Refection Seismic Survey of Soda Lake Geothermal Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Louie, J. N.; Kent, T.; Echols, J.

    2012-12-01

    This 3D-3C seismic survey greatly improves the structural model of the Soda Lake, Nevada geothermal system. The picked top of a mudstone interval above reservoir levels reveals a detailed fault map. The geothermal reservoir is within a complex of nested grabens. Determining a "geothermal indicator" for the deeper reservoir in the seismic signal, and processing of the 3D converted-wave data, have been unsuccessful to date. Due to a high near-surface Vp/Vs ratio the shear-wave energy is under-sampled with 220 ft receiver spacing and 550 ft (168 m) line spacing. The 2D converted-wave data that we can image shows encouraging similarity to the deep structural features in the P-wave sections, but have little resolution of shallow structures. Higher-density receivers and a better shallow shear-wave model are needed in conjunction with this deep reflection study to effectively image the 3D converted waves.

  15. Gabor Wave Packet Method to Solve Plasma Wave Equations

    SciTech Connect

    A. Pletzer; C.K. Phillips; D.N. Smithe

    2003-06-18

    A numerical method for solving plasma wave equations arising in the context of mode conversion between the fast magnetosonic and the slow (e.g ion Bernstein) wave is presented. The numerical algorithm relies on the expansion of the solution in Gaussian wave packets known as Gabor functions, which have good resolution properties in both real and Fourier space. The wave packets are ideally suited to capture both the large and small wavelength features that characterize mode conversion problems. The accuracy of the scheme is compared with a standard finite element approach.

  16. Geometric constraints on potentially singular solutions for the 3-D Euler equations

    SciTech Connect

    Constantin, P.; Fefferman, C.; Majda, A.J.

    1996-12-31

    We discuss necessary and sufficient conditions for the formation of finite time singularities (blow up) in the incompressible three dimensional Euler equations. The well-known result of Beale, Kato and Majda states that these equations have smooth solutions on the time interval (0,t) if, and only if lim/t{r_arrow}T {integral}{sup t}{sub 0} {parallel}{Omega}({center_dot},s){parallel}{sub L}{sup {infinity}} (dx)dx < {infinity} where {Omega} = {triangledown} X u is the vorticity of the fluid and u is its divergence=free velocity. In this paper we prove criteria in which the direction of vorticity {xi} = {Omega}/{vert_bar}{Omega}{vert_bar} plays an important role.

  17. Frequency Localized Regularity Criteria for the 3D Navier-Stokes Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradshaw, Z.; Grujić, Z.

    2017-04-01

    Two regularity criteria are established to highlight which Littlewood-Paley frequencies play an essential role in possible singularity formation in a Leray-Hopf weak solution to the Navier-Stokes equations in three spatial dimensions. One of these is a frequency localized refinement of known Ladyzhenskaya-Prodi-Serrin-type regularity criteria restricted to a finite window of frequencies, the lower bound of which diverges to {+∞} as t approaches an initial singular time.

  18. Calculations of separated 3-D flows with a pressure-staggered Navier-Stokes equations solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, S.-W.

    1991-01-01

    A Navier-Stokes equations solver based on a pressure correction method with a pressure-staggered mesh and calculations of separated three-dimensional flows are presented. It is shown that the velocity pressure decoupling, which occurs when various pressure correction algorithms are used for pressure-staggered meshes, is caused by the ill-conditioned discrete pressure correction equation. The use of a partial differential equation for the incremental pressure eliminates the velocity pressure decoupling mechanism by itself and yields accurate numerical results. Example flows considered are a three-dimensional lid driven cavity flow and a laminar flow through a 90 degree bend square duct. For the lid driven cavity flow, the present numerical results compare more favorably with the measured data than those obtained using a formally third order accurate quadratic upwind interpolation scheme. For the curved duct flow, the present numerical method yields a grid independent solution with a very small number of grid points. The calculated velocity profiles are in good agreement with the measured data.

  19. Specular reflection treatment for the 3D radiative transfer equation solved with the discrete ordinates method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Hardy, D.; Favennec, Y.; Rousseau, B.; Hecht, F.

    2017-04-01

    The contribution of this paper relies in the development of numerical algorithms for the mathematical treatment of specular reflection on borders when dealing with the numerical solution of radiative transfer problems. The radiative transfer equation being integro-differential, the discrete ordinates method allows to write down a set of semi-discrete equations in which weights are to be calculated. The calculation of these weights is well known to be based on either a quadrature or on angular discretization, making the use of such method straightforward for the state equation. Also, the diffuse contribution of reflection on borders is usually well taken into account. However, the calculation of accurate partition ratio coefficients is much more tricky for the specular condition applied on arbitrary geometrical borders. This paper presents algorithms that calculate analytically partition ratio coefficients needed in numerical treatments. The developed algorithms, combined with a decentered finite element scheme, are validated with the help of comparisons with analytical solutions before being applied on complex geometries.

  20. Global classical solutions to the 3D isentropic compressible Navier-Stokes equations in a bounded domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Haibo; Zhao, Junning

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we study the global existence for classical solutions to the 3D isentropic compressible Navier-Stokes equations in a cuboid domain. Compared to the Cauchy problem studied in Hoff (1995 J. Differ. Equ. 120 215-54), Hoff (2005 J. Math. Fluid Mech. 7 315-38), Huang et al (2012 Commun. Pure Appl. Math. 65 549-85), some new thoughts are applied to obtain upper bounds for density. Precisely, through piecewise estimation and some time-depending a priori estimates, we establish time-uniform upper bounds for density under the assumption that the initial energy is small. The initial vacuum is allowed.

  1. Complex Singular Solutions of the 3-d Navier-Stokes Equations and Related Real Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boldrighini, Carlo; Li, Dong; Sinai, Yakov G.

    2017-02-01

    By applying methods of statistical physics Li and Sinai (J Eur Math Soc 10:267-313, 2008) proved that there are complex solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations in the whole space R3 which blow up at a finite time. We present a review of the results obtained so far, by theoretical work and computer simulations, for the singular complex solutions, and compare with the behavior of related real solutions. We also discuss the possible application of the techniques introduced in (J Eur Math Soc 10:267-313, 2008) to the study of the real ones.

  2. Complex Singular Solutions of the 3-d Navier-Stokes Equations and Related Real Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boldrighini, Carlo; Li, Dong; Sinai, Yakov G.

    2017-04-01

    By applying methods of statistical physics Li and Sinai (J Eur Math Soc 10:267-313, 2008) proved that there are complex solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations in the whole space R3 which blow up at a finite time. We present a review of the results obtained so far, by theoretical work and computer simulations, for the singular complex solutions, and compare with the behavior of related real solutions. We also discuss the possible application of the techniques introduced in (J Eur Math Soc 10:267-313, 2008) to the study of the real ones.

  3. Moored Observations of Internal Waves in Luzon Strait: 3-D Structure, Dissipation, and Evolution

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-30

    variability, it may be due to waves propagating into Luzon strait from remote sources. Lee Waves and Dissipation on Supercritical Slopes A profiling...variability of the internal wave field in the upper 1000 m of the water column. The phase progression of internal waves as they propagate away from their

  4. Relation Between the 3D-Geometry of the Coronal Wave and Associated CME During the 26 April 2008 Event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Temmer, M.; Veronig, A. M.; Gopalswamy, N.; Yashiro, S.

    We study the kinematical characteristics and 3D geometry of a large-scale coronal wave that occurred in association with the 26 April 2008 flare-CME event. The wave was observed with the EUVI instruments aboard both STEREO spacecraft (STEREO-A and STEREO-B) with a mean speed of ˜ 240 km s-1. The wave is more pronounced in the eastern propagation direction, and is thus, better observable in STEREO-B images. From STEREO-B observations we derive two separate initiation centers for the wave, and their locations fit with the coronal dimming regions. Assuming a simple geometry of the wave we reconstruct its 3D nature from combined STEREO-A and STEREO-B observations. We find that the wave structure is asymmetric with an inclination toward East. The associated CME has a deprojected speed of ˜ 750±50 km s-1, and it shows a non-radial outward motion toward the East with respect to the underlying source region location. Applying the forward fitting model developed by Thernisien, Howard, and Vourlidas (Astrophys. J. 652, 763, 2006), we derive the CME flux rope position on the solar surface to be close to the dimming regions. We conclude that the expanding flanks of the CME most likely drive and shape the coronal wave.

  5. Relation Between the 3D-Geometry of the Coronal Wave and Associated CME During the 26 April 2008 Event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Temmer, M.; Veronig, A. M.; Gopalswamy, N.; Yashiro, S.

    2011-11-01

    We study the kinematical characteristics and 3D geometry of a large-scale coronal wave that occurred in association with the 26 April 2008 flare-CME event. The wave was observed with the EUVI instruments aboard both STEREO spacecraft (STEREO-A and STEREO-B) with a mean speed of ˜ 240 km s-1. The wave is more pronounced in the eastern propagation direction, and is thus, better observable in STEREO-B images. From STEREO-B observations we derive two separate initiation centers for the wave, and their locations fit with the coronal dimming regions. Assuming a simple geometry of the wave we reconstruct its 3D nature from combined STEREO-A and STEREO-B observations. We find that the wave structure is asymmetric with an inclination toward East. The associated CME has a deprojected speed of ˜ 750±50 km s-1, and it shows a non-radial outward motion toward the East with respect to the underlying source region location. Applying the forward fitting model developed by Thernisien, Howard, and Vourlidas (Astrophys. J. 652, 763, 2006), we derive the CME flux rope position on the solar surface to be close to the dimming regions. We conclude that the expanding flanks of the CME most likely drive and shape the coronal wave.

  6. Relation Between the 3D-Geometry of the Coronal Wave and Associated CME During the 26 April 2008 Event

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Temmer, M.; Veronig, A. M.; Gopalswamy, N.; Yashiro, S.

    2011-01-01

    We study the kinematical characteristics and 3D geometry of a large-scale coronal wave that occurred in association with the 26 April 2008 flare-CME event. The wave was observed with the EUVI instruments aboard both STEREO spacecraft (STEREO-A and STEREO-B) with a mean speed of approx 240 km/s. The wave is more pronounced in the eastern propagation direction, and is thus, better observable in STEREO-B images. From STEREO-B observations we derive two separate initiation centers for the wave, and their locations fit with the coronal dimming regions. Assuming a simple geometry of the wave we reconstruct its 3D nature from combined STEREO-A and STEREO-B observations. We find that the wave structure is asymmetric with an inclination toward East. The associated CME has a deprojected speed of approx 750 +/- 50 km/s, and it shows a non-radial outward motion toward the East with respect to the underlying source region location. Applying the forward fitting model developed by Thernisien, Howard, and Vourlidas we derive the CME flux rope position on the solar surface to be close to the dimming regions. We conclude that the expanding flanks of the CME most likely drive and shape the coronal wave.

  7. Identification for a Nonlinear Periodic Wave Equation

    SciTech Connect

    Morosanu, C.; Trenchea, C.

    2001-07-01

    This work is concerned with an approximation process for the identification of nonlinearities in the nonlinear periodic wave equation. It is based on the least-squares approach and on a splitting method. A numerical algorithm of gradient type and the numerical implementation are given.

  8. The Stochastic Nonlinear Damped Wave Equation

    SciTech Connect

    Barbu, V. Da Prato, G.

    2002-12-19

    We prove the existence of an invariant measure for the transition semigroup associated with a nonlinear damped stochastic wave equation in R{sup n} of the Klein-Gordon type. The uniqueness of the invariant measure and the structure of the corresponding Kolmogorov operator are also studied.

  9. Controlled-aperture wave-equation migration

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, L.; Fehler, Michael C.; Sun, H.; Li, Z.

    2003-01-01

    We present a controlled-aperture wave-equation migration method that no1 only can reduce migration artiracts due to limited recording aperlurcs and determine image weights to balance the efl'ects of limited-aperture illumination, but also can improve thc migration accuracy by reducing the slowness perturbations within thc controlled migration regions. The method consists of two steps: migration aperture scan and controlled-aperture migration. Migration apertures for a sparse distribution of shots arc determined using wave-equation migration, and those for the other shots are obtained by interpolation. During the final controlled-aperture niigration step, we can select a reference slowness in c;ontrollecl regions of the slowness model to reduce slowncss perturbations, and consequently increase the accuracy of wave-equation migration inel hods that makc use of reference slownesses. In addition, the computation in the space domain during wavefield downward continuation is needed to be conducted only within the controlled apertures and therefore, the computational cost of controlled-aperture migration step (without including migration aperture scan) is less than the corresponding uncontrolled-aperture migration. Finally, we can use the efficient split-step Fourier approach for migration-aperture scan, then use other, more accurate though more expensive, wave-equation migration methods to perform thc final controlled-apertio.ee migration to produce the most accurate image.

  10. Tachyons and Higher Order Wave Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barci, D. G.; Bollini, C. G.; Rocca, M. C.

    We consider a fourth order wave equation having normal as well as tachyonic solutions. The propagators are, respectively, the Feynman causal function and the Wheeler-Green function (half advanced and half retarded). The latter is consistent with the elimination of tachyons from free asymptotic states. We verify the absence of absorptive parts from convolutions involving the tachyon propagator.

  11. Solitary Wave Solutions of KP equation, Cylindrical KP Equation and Spherical KP Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiang-Zheng; Zhang, Jin-Liang; Wang, Ming-Liang

    2017-02-01

    Three (2+1)-dimensional equations–KP equation, cylindrical KP equation and spherical KP equation, have been reduced to the same KdV equation by different transformation of variables respectively. Since the single solitary wave solution and 2-solitary wave solution of the KdV equation have been known already, substituting the solutions of the KdV equation into the corresponding transformation of variables respectively, the single and 2-solitary wave solutions of the three (2+1)-dimensional equations can be obtained successfully. Supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant No. 11301153 and the Doctoral Foundation of Henan University of Science and Technology under Grant No. 09001562, and the Science and Technology Innovation Platform of Henan University of Science and Technology under Grant No. 2015XPT001

  12. 3D Discontinuous Galerkin elastic seismic wave modeling based upon a grid injection method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monteiller, V.

    2015-12-01

    Full waveform inversion (FWI) is a seismic imaging method that estimates thesub-surface physical properties with a spatial resolution of the order of thewavelength. FWI is generally recast as the iterative optimization of anobjective function that measures the distance between modeled and recordeddata. In the framework of local descent methods, FWI requires to perform atleast two seismic modelings per source and per FWI iteration.Due to the resulting computational burden, applications of elastic FWI have been usuallyrestricted to 2D geometries. Despite the continuous growth of high-performancecomputing facilities, application of 3D elastic FWI to real-scale problemsremain computationally too expensive. To perform elastic seismic modeling with a reasonable amount of time, weconsider a reduced computational domain embedded in a larger background modelin which seismic sources are located. Our aim is to compute repeatedly thefull wavefield in the targeted domain after model alteration, once theincident wavefield has been computed once for all in the background model. Toachieve this goal, we use a grid injection method referred to as the Total-Field/Scattered-Field (TF/SF) technique in theelectromagnetic community. We implemented the Total-Field/Scattered-Field approach in theDiscontinuous Galerkin Finite Element method (DG-FEM) that is used to performmodeling in the local domain. We show how to interface the DG-FEM with any modeling engine (analytical solution, finite difference or finite elements methods) that is suitable for the background simulation. One advantage of the Total-Field/Scattered-Field approach is related to thefact that the scattered wavefield instead of the full wavefield enter thePMLs, hence making more efficient the absorption of the outgoing waves at theouter edges of the computational domain. The domain reduction in which theDG-FEM is applied allows us to use modest computational resources opening theway for high-resolution imaging by full

  13. Statistical shape analysis using 3D Poisson equation--A quantitatively validated approach.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yi; Bouix, Sylvain

    2016-05-01

    Statistical shape analysis has been an important area of research with applications in biology, anatomy, neuroscience, agriculture, paleontology, etc. Unfortunately, the proposed methods are rarely quantitatively evaluated, and as shown in recent studies, when they are evaluated, significant discrepancies exist in their outputs. In this work, we concentrate on the problem of finding the consistent location of deformation between two population of shapes. We propose a new shape analysis algorithm along with a framework to perform a quantitative evaluation of its performance. Specifically, the algorithm constructs a Signed Poisson Map (SPoM) by solving two Poisson equations on the volumetric shapes of arbitrary topology, and statistical analysis is then carried out on the SPoMs. The method is quantitatively evaluated on synthetic shapes and applied on real shape data sets in brain structures.

  14. On the Helicity in 3D-Periodic Navier-Stokes Equations II: The Statistical Case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foias, Ciprian; Hoang, Luan; Nicolaenko, Basil

    2009-09-01

    We study the asymptotic behavior of the statistical solutions to the Navier-Stokes equations using the normalization map [9]. It is then applied to the study of mean energy, mean dissipation rate of energy, and mean helicity of the spatial periodic flows driven by potential body forces. The statistical distribution of the asymptotic Beltrami flows are also investigated. We connect our mathematical analysis with the empirical theory of decaying turbulence. With appropriate mathematically defined ensemble averages, the Kolmogorov universal features are shown to be transient in time. We provide an estimate for the time interval in which those features may still be present. Our collaborator and friend Basil Nicolaenko passed away in September of 2007, after this work was completed. Honoring his contribution and friendship, we dedicate this article to him.

  15. Superconvergence of mixed finite element approximations to 3-D Maxwell's equations in metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yunqing; Li, Jichun; Yang, Wei; Sun, Shuyu

    2011-09-01

    Numerical simulation of metamaterials has attracted more and more attention since 2000, after the first metamaterial with negative refraction index was successfully constructed. In this paper we construct a fully-discrete leap-frog type finite element scheme to solve the three-dimensional time-dependent Maxwell's equations when metamaterials are involved. First, we obtain some superclose results between the interpolations of the analytical solutions and finite element solutions obtained using arbitrary orders of Raviart-Thomas-Nédélec mixed spaces on regular cubic meshes. Then we prove the superconvergence result in the discrete l2 norm achieved for the lowest-order Raviart-Thomas-Nédélec space. To our best knowledge, such superconvergence results have never been obtained elsewhere. Finally, we implement the leap-frog scheme and present numerical results justifying our theoretical analysis.

  16. Further Remarks on the Luo-Hou's Ansatz for a Self-similar Solution to the 3D Euler Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sperone, Gianmarco

    2017-01-01

    It is shown that the self-similar ansatz proposed by T. Hou and G. Luo to describe a singular solution of the 3D axisymmetric Euler equations leads, without assuming any asymptotic condition on the self-similar profiles, to an overdetermined system of partial differential equations that produces two families of solutions: a class of trivial solutions in which the vorticity field is identically zero, and a family of solutions that blow-up immediately, where the vorticity field is governed by a stationary regime. In any case, the analytical properties of these solutions are not consistent with the numerical observations reported by T. Hou and G. Luo. Therefore, this result is a refinement of the previous work published by D. Chae and T.-P. Tsai on this matter, where the authors found the trivial class of solutions under a certain decay condition of the blow-up profiles.

  17. Ultra Deep Wave Equation Imaging and Illumination

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander M. Popovici; Sergey Fomel; Paul Sava; Sean Crawley; Yining Li; Cristian Lupascu

    2006-09-30

    In this project we developed and tested a novel technology, designed to enhance seismic resolution and imaging of ultra-deep complex geologic structures by using state-of-the-art wave-equation depth migration and wave-equation velocity model building technology for deeper data penetration and recovery, steeper dip and ultra-deep structure imaging, accurate velocity estimation for imaging and pore pressure prediction and accurate illumination and amplitude processing for extending the AVO prediction window. Ultra-deep wave-equation imaging provides greater resolution and accuracy under complex geologic structures where energy multipathing occurs, than what can be accomplished today with standard imaging technology. The objective of the research effort was to examine the feasibility of imaging ultra-deep structures onshore and offshore, by using (1) wave-equation migration, (2) angle-gathers velocity model building, and (3) wave-equation illumination and amplitude compensation. The effort consisted of answering critical technical questions that determine the feasibility of the proposed methodology, testing the theory on synthetic data, and finally applying the technology for imaging ultra-deep real data. Some of the questions answered by this research addressed: (1) the handling of true amplitudes in the downward continuation and imaging algorithm and the preservation of the amplitude with offset or amplitude with angle information required for AVO studies, (2) the effect of several imaging conditions on amplitudes, (3) non-elastic attenuation and approaches for recovering the amplitude and frequency, (4) the effect of aperture and illumination on imaging steep dips and on discriminating the velocities in the ultra-deep structures. All these effects were incorporated in the final imaging step of a real data set acquired specifically to address ultra-deep imaging issues, with large offsets (12,500 m) and long recording time (20 s).

  18. Influence of viscosity on the reflection and transmission of an acoustic wave by a periodic array of screens. The general 3-D problem

    PubMed Central

    Homentcovschi, Dorel; Miles, Ronald N.

    2008-01-01

    An analysis is presented of the diffraction of a pressure wave by a periodic grating including the influence of the air viscosity. The direction of the incoming pressure wave is arbitrary. As opposed to the classical nonviscous case, the problem cannot be reduced to a plane problem having a definite 3-D character. The system of partial differential equations used for solving the problem consists of the compressible Navier-Stokes equations associated with no-slip boundary conditions on solid surfaces. The problem is reduced to a system of two hypersingular integral equations for determining the velocity components in the slits’ plane and a hypersingular integral equation for the normal component of velocity. These equations are solved by using Galerkin’s method with some special trial functions. The results can be applied in designing protective screens for miniature microphones realized in MEMS technology. In this case, the physical dimensions of the device are on the order of the viscous boundary layer so that the viscosity cannot be neglected. The analysis indicates that the openings in the screen should be on the order of 10 microns in order to avoid excessive attenuation of the signal. This paper also provides the variation of the transmission coefficient with frequency in the acoustical domain. PMID:19122753

  19. Lamellipodin promotes invasive 3D cancer cell migration via regulated interactions with Ena/VASP and SCAR/WAVE.

    PubMed

    Carmona, G; Perera, U; Gillett, C; Naba, A; Law, A-L; Sharma, V P; Wang, J; Wyckoff, J; Balsamo, M; Mosis, F; De Piano, M; Monypenny, J; Woodman, N; McConnell, R E; Mouneimne, G; Van Hemelrijck, M; Cao, Y; Condeelis, J; Hynes, R O; Gertler, F B; Krause, M

    2016-09-29

    Cancer invasion is a hallmark of metastasis. The mesenchymal mode of cancer cell invasion is mediated by elongated membrane protrusions driven by the assembly of branched F-actin networks. How deregulation of actin regulators promotes cancer cell invasion is still enigmatic. We report that increased expression and membrane localization of the actin regulator Lamellipodin correlate with reduced metastasis-free survival and poor prognosis in breast cancer patients. In agreement, we find that Lamellipodin depletion reduced lung metastasis in an orthotopic mouse breast cancer model. Invasive 3D cancer cell migration as well as invadopodia formation and matrix degradation was impaired upon Lamellipodin depletion. Mechanistically, we show that Lamellipodin promotes invasive 3D cancer cell migration via both actin-elongating Ena/VASP proteins and the Scar/WAVE complex, which stimulates actin branching. In contrast, Lamellipodin interaction with Scar/WAVE but not with Ena/VASP is required for random 2D cell migration. We identified a phosphorylation-dependent mechanism that regulates selective recruitment of these effectors to Lamellipodin: Abl-mediated Lamellipodin phosphorylation promotes its association with both Scar/WAVE and Ena/VASP, whereas Src-dependent phosphorylation enhances binding to Scar/WAVE but not to Ena/VASP. Through these selective, regulated interactions Lamellipodin mediates directional sensing of epidermal growth factor (EGF) gradients and invasive 3D migration of breast cancer cells. Our findings imply that increased Lamellipodin levels enhance Ena/VASP and Scar/WAVE activities at the plasma membrane to promote 3D invasion and metastasis.

  20. Preconditioning for modal discontinuous Galerkin methods for unsteady 3D Navier-Stokes equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birken, Philipp; Gassner, Gregor; Haas, Mark; Munz, Claus-Dieter

    2013-05-01

    We compare different block preconditioners in the context of parallel time adaptive higher order implicit time integration using Jacobian-free Newton-Krylov (JFNK) solvers for discontinuous Galerkin (DG) discretizations of the three dimensional time dependent Navier-Stokes equations. A special emphasis of this work is the performance for a relative high number of processors, i.e. with a low number of elements on the processor. For high order DG discretizations, a particular problem that needs to be addressed is the size of the blocks in the Jacobian. Thus, we propose a new class of preconditioners that exploits the hierarchy of modal basis functions and introduces a flexible order of the off-diagonal Jacobian blocks. While the standard preconditioners 'block Jacobi' (no off-blocks) and full symmetric Gauss-Seidel (full off-blocks) are included as special cases, the reduction of the off-block order results in the new scheme ROBO-SGS. This allows us to investigate the impact of the preconditioner's sparsity pattern with respect to the computational performance. Since the number of iterations is not well suited to judge the efficiency of a preconditioner, we additionally consider CPU time for the comparisons. We found that both block Jacobi and ROBO-SGS have good overall performance and good strong parallel scaling behavior.

  1. A 3D High-Order Unstructured Finite-Volume Algorithm for Solving Maxwell's Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Yen; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    A three-dimensional finite-volume algorithm based on arbitrary basis functions for time-dependent problems on general unstructured grids is developed. The method is applied to the time-domain Maxwell equations. Discrete unknowns are volume integrals or cell averages of the electric and magnetic field variables. Spatial terms are converted to surface integrals using the Gauss curl theorem. Polynomial basis functions are introduced in constructing local representations of the fields and evaluating the volume and surface integrals. Electric and magnetic fields are approximated by linear combinations of these basis functions. Unlike other unstructured formulations used in Computational Fluid Dynamics, the new formulation actually does not reconstruct the field variables at each time step. Instead, the spatial terms are calculated in terms of unknowns by precomputing weights at the beginning of the computation as functions of cell geometry and basis functions to retain efficiency. Since no assumption is made for cell geometry, this new formulation is suitable for arbitrarily defined grids, either smooth or unsmooth. However, to facilitate the volume and surface integrations, arbitrary polyhedral cells with polygonal faces are used in constructing grids. Both centered and upwind schemes are formulated. It is shown that conventional schemes (second order in Cartesian grids) are equivalent to the new schemes using first degree polynomials as the basis functions and the midpoint quadrature for the integrations. In the new formulation, higher orders of accuracy are achieved by using higher degree polynomial basis functions. Furthermore, all the surface and volume integrations are carried out exactly. Several model electromagnetic scattering problems are calculated and compared with analytical solutions. Examples are given for cases based on 0th to 3rd degree polynomial basis functions. In all calculations, a centered scheme is applied in the interior, while an upwind

  2. Evolution of basic equations for nearshore wave field

    PubMed Central

    ISOBE, Masahiko

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, a systematic, overall view of theories for periodic waves of permanent form, such as Stokes and cnoidal waves, is described first with their validity ranges. To deal with random waves, a method for estimating directional spectra is given. Then, various wave equations are introduced according to the assumptions included in their derivations. The mild-slope equation is derived for combined refraction and diffraction of linear periodic waves. Various parabolic approximations and time-dependent forms are proposed to include randomness and nonlinearity of waves as well as to simplify numerical calculation. Boussinesq equations are the equations developed for calculating nonlinear wave transformations in shallow water. Nonlinear mild-slope equations are derived as a set of wave equations to predict transformation of nonlinear random waves in the nearshore region. Finally, wave equations are classified systematically for a clear theoretical understanding and appropriate selection for specific applications. PMID:23318680

  3. Application of 3D and 2D quantitative shear wave elastography (SWE) to differentiate between benign and malignant breast masses

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Jie; Liu, Qianqi; Wang, Xi; Xing, Ping; Yang, Zhuowen; Wu, Changjun

    2017-01-01

    As breast cancer tissues are stiffer than normal tissues, shear wave elastography (SWE) can locally quantify tissue stiffness and provide histological information. Moreover, tissue stiffness can be observed on three-dimensional (3D) colour-coded elasticity maps. Our objective was to evaluate the diagnostic performances of quantitative features in differentiating breast masses by two-dimensional (2D) and 3D SWE. Two hundred ten consecutive women with 210 breast masses were examined with B-mode ultrasound (US) and SWE. Quantitative features of 3D and 2D SWE were assessed, including elastic modulus standard deviation (ESDE) measured on SWE mode images and ESDU measured on B-mode images, as well as maximum elasticity (Emax). Adding quantitative features to B-mode US improved the diagnostic performance (p < 0.05) and reduced false-positive biopsies (p < 0.0001). The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) of 3D SWE was similar to that of 2D SWE for ESDE (p = 0.026) and ESDU (p = 0.159) but inferior to that of 2D SWE for Emax (p = 0.002). Compared with ESDU, ESDE showed a higher AUC on 2D (p = 0.0038) and 3D SWE (p = 0.0057). Our study indicates that quantitative features of 3D and 2D SWE can significantly improve the diagnostic performance of B-mode US, especially 3D SWE ESDE, which shows considerable clinical value. PMID:28106134

  4. Lapse-time-dependent coda-wave depth sensitivity to local velocity perturbations in 3-D heterogeneous elastic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obermann, Anne; Planès, Thomas; Hadziioannou, Céline; Campillo, Michel

    2016-10-01

    In the context of seismic monitoring, recent studies made successful use of seismic coda waves to locate medium changes on the horizontal plane. Locating the depth of the changes, however, remains a challenge. In this paper, we use 3-D wavefield simulations to address two problems: first, we evaluate the contribution of surface- and body-wave sensitivity to a change at depth. We introduce a thin layer with a perturbed velocity at different depths and measure the apparent relative velocity changes due to this layer at different times in the coda and for different degrees of heterogeneity of the model. We show that the depth sensitivity can be modelled as a linear combination of body- and surface-wave sensitivity. The lapse-time-dependent sensitivity ratio of body waves and surface waves can be used to build 3-D sensitivity kernels for imaging purposes. Second, we compare the lapse-time behaviour in the presence of a perturbation in horizontal and vertical slabs to address, for instance, the origin of the velocity changes detected after large earthquakes.

  5. Prediction of Tsunami Waves and Runup Generated by 3d Granular Landslides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammed, F.; Fritz, H. M.

    2008-12-01

    Subaerial and submarine landslides can trigger tsunamis with locally high amplitudes and runup, which can cause devastating effects in the near field region. The 50th anniversary of the Lituya Bay 1958 landslide impact generated mega tsunami recalls the largest tsunami runup of 524m in recorded history. In contrast to earthquake generated tsunamis, landslide generated tsunami sources are not confined to active tectonic regions and therefore are of particular importance for the Atlantic Ocean. Landslide generated tsunamis were studied in the three dimensional NEES tsunami wave basin TWB at OSU based on the generalized Froude similarity. A novel pneumatic landslide generator was deployed to control the landslide geometry and kinematics. Granular materials were used to model deformable landslides. Measurement techniques such as particle image velocimetry (PIV), multiple above and underwater video cameras, multiple acoustic transducer arrays (MTA), as well as resistance wave and runup gauges were applied. The wave generation was characterized by an extremely unsteady three phase flow consisting of the slide granulate, water and air entrained into the flow. The underwater cameras and the MTA provide data on the landslide deformation as it impacts the water surface, penetrates the water and finally deposits on the bottom of the basin. The influence of the landslide volume, shape and the impact speed on the generated tsunami wave characteristics were extensively studied. The experimental data provides prediction models for the generated tsunami wave characteristics based on the initial landslide characteristics and the final slide deposits. PIV provided instantaneous surface velocity vector fields, which gave insight into the kinematics of the landslide and wave generation process. At high impact velocities flow separation occurred on the slide shoulder resulting in a hydrodynamic impact crater. The recorded wave profiles yielded information on the wave propagation and

  6. 3-D Inverse Teleseismic Scattered Wave Imaging using the Kirchhoff Approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, K.; Levander, A.

    2012-04-01

    We have developed a 3-D teleseismic imaging technique for scattered elastic wavefields using the Kirchhoff approximation. Kirchhoff migration/inversion have been well developed in exploration seismology within the inverse scattering framework (e.g. Miller et al., 1987; Beylkin and Burridge, 1990) to image subsurface structure that generates secondary wavefields caused by localized heterogeneities. Application of this method in global seismology has been largely limited to 2-D images made with 1-D reference models due to high computational cost and the lack of adequately dense receiver arrays (Bostock, 2002, Poppeliers and Pavlis, 2003; Frederiksen and Revenaugh, 2004; Cao et al., 2010). The deployment of the USArray Transportable and Flexible arrays in the United States and dense array recordings in other countries motivate developing teleseismic scattered wavefield imaging with the Kirchhoff approximation for 3-D velocity models for both scalar and vector wavefields to improve upper mantle imaging. Following Bostock's development of the 2-D problem (2002), we derive the 3-D P-to-S scattering inversion formula by phrasing the inverse problem in terms of the generalized Radon transform (GRT) and singular functions of discontinuity surfaces. In the forward scattering modeling, we extend the method to utilize a 3-D migration velocity model by calculating 3-D finite-difference traveltimes, backprojected from the receivers using an eikonal solver. To demonstrate the relative accuracy of the inversion, we examine several synthetic cases with a variety of discontinuity surfaces (sinuous, dipping, dome- and crater-shaped discontinuity interfaces, point scatterers, etc.). The Kirchhoff GRT imaging can successfully recover the shapes of these structures very well. We compare our Kirchhoff approximation imaging with the Born-approximate results, as well as the common-conversion point (CCP) stacked receiver function imaging for the various synthetic cases, and show a field

  7. 3D finite element modelling of guided wave scattering at delaminations in composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murat, Bibi Intan Suraya; Fromme, Paul

    2016-02-01

    Carbon fiber laminate composites are increasingly used for aerospace structures as they offer a number of advantages including a good strength to weight ratio. However, impact during the operation and servicing of the aircraft can lead to barely visible and difficult to detect damage. Depending on the severity of the impact, delaminations can occur, reducing the load carrying capacity of the structure. Efficient nondestructive testing of composite panels can be achieved using guided ultrasonic waves propagating along the structure. The guided wave (A0 Lamb wave mode) scattering at delaminations was modeled using full three-dimensional Finite Element (FE) simulations. The influence of the delamination size was systematically investigated from a parameter study. A significant influence of the delamination width on the guided wave scattering was found, especially on the angular dependency of the scattered guided wave amplitude. The sensitivity of guided ultrasonic waves for the detection of delamination damage in composite panels is discussed.

  8. A numerical method for solving the 3D unsteady incompressible Navier Stokes equations in curvilinear domains with complex immersed boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Liang; Sotiropoulos, Fotis

    2007-08-01

    A novel numerical method is developed that integrates boundary-conforming grids with a sharp interface, immersed boundary methodology. The method is intended for simulating internal flows containing complex, moving immersed boundaries such as those encountered in several cardiovascular applications. The background domain (e.g. the empty aorta) is discretized efficiently with a curvilinear boundary-fitted mesh while the complex moving immersed boundary (say a prosthetic heart valve) is treated with the sharp-interface, hybrid Cartesian/immersed-boundary approach of Gilmanov and Sotiropoulos [A. Gilmanov, F. Sotiropoulos, A hybrid cartesian/immersed boundary method for simulating flows with 3d, geometrically complex, moving bodies, Journal of Computational Physics 207 (2005) 457-492.]. To facilitate the implementation of this novel modeling paradigm in complex flow simulations, an accurate and efficient numerical method is developed for solving the unsteady, incompressible Navier-Stokes equations in generalized curvilinear coordinates. The method employs a novel, fully-curvilinear staggered grid discretization approach, which does not require either the explicit evaluation of the Christoffel symbols or the discretization of all three momentum equations at cell interfaces as done in previous formulations. The equations are integrated in time using an efficient, second-order accurate fractional step methodology coupled with a Jacobian-free, Newton-Krylov solver for the momentum equations and a GMRES solver enhanced with multigrid as preconditioner for the Poisson equation. Several numerical experiments are carried out on fine computational meshes to demonstrate the accuracy and efficiency of the proposed method for standard benchmark problems as well as for unsteady, pulsatile flow through a curved, pipe bend. To demonstrate the ability of the method to simulate flows with complex, moving immersed boundaries we apply it to calculate pulsatile, physiological flow

  9. On the stability analysis of approximate factorization methods for 3D Euler and Navier-Stokes equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demuren, A. O.; Ibraheem, S. O.

    1993-01-01

    The convergence characteristics of various approximate factorizations for the 3D Euler and Navier-Stokes equations are examined using the von-Neumann stability analysis method. Three upwind-difference based factorizations and several central-difference based factorizations are considered for the Euler equations. In the upwind factorizations both the flux-vector splitting methods of Steger and Warming and van Leer are considered. Analysis of the Navier-Stokes equations is performed only on the Beam and Warming central-difference scheme. The range of CFL numbers over which each factorization is stable is presented for one-, two-, and three-dimensional flow. Also presented for each factorization is the CFL number at which the maximum eigenvalue is minimized, for all Fourier components, as well as for the high frequency range only. The latter is useful for predicting the effectiveness of multigrid procedures with these schemes as smoothers. Further, local mode analysis is performed to test the suitability of using a uniform flow field in the stability analysis. Some inconsistencies in the results from previous analyses are resolved.

  10. 3C3D VSP Imaging of Salt Flanks Using Converted Waves in the Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y.; Doherty, F.; Jackson, J.

    2005-05-01

    Locating salt boundary and imaging updip sediment structures flanking the salt domes are very important tasks for exploration in the Gulf of Mexico since major petroleum reserves are often trapped underneath overhangs of diapiric salt domes. Although the top of salt and less steep structures can be well imaged using current surface seismic methods, the steep sides of a salt dome with irregularly shapes are hard to image with adequate accuracy. Thus, Vertical Seismic Profiling (VSP) surveys with three-component (3C) receivers in wells are usually requested for improving images of subsurface structures. Conventional multi-offset VSP (OVSP) and refraction salt proximity (SP) surveys are widely applied in the Gulf of Mexico to improve images of slat interfaces, sub-salt and salt flank structures using P waves. In this paper, we will focus on using converted waves to image the steep salt-sediment boundary. A VSP dataset, including multi-OVSP and a SP survey, acquired in the Gulf of Mexico was used in this study. We analyzed 3C OVSP data to identify and separate converted waves, such as PS, P-SP, P-SS, generated at a salt boundary. Then both PP wave and converted waves were 3C3D depth migrated to generate images of the steep salt-sediment interface. Both transmitted P-P and P-S converted waves from the SP survey were used to calculate 3D salt exit points which delineate the steep salt face. The VSP results derived from both methods are abundant and a suitable 3D visualization tool is required for visual integration and interpretation. The image volumes and other available geophysical and geological data were integrated using a 3D visualization tool specially designed for VSP solutions. The migrated images using PP and converted waves provides a precise and complete definition of the steep salt face and reservoir sands flanking the salt dome. This study indicates that both reflection and reflection surveys can result in a consistent location of the steep salt flank

  11. Numerical solutions of the compressible 3-D boundary-layer equations for aerospace configurations with emphasis on LFC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, Julius E.; Iyer, Venkit; Radwan, Samir

    1987-01-01

    The application of stability theory in Laminar Flow Control (LFC) research requires that density and velocity profiles be specified throughout the viscous flow field of interest. These profile values must be as numerically accurate as possible and free of any numerically induced oscillations. Guidelines for the present research project are presented: develop an efficient and accurate procedure for solving the 3-D boundary layer equation for aerospace configurations; develop an interface program to couple selected 3-D inviscid programs that span the subsonic to hypersonic Mach number range; and document and release software to the LFC community. The interface program was found to be a dependable approach for developing a user friendly procedure for generating the boundary-layer grid and transforming an inviscid solution from a relatively coarse grid to a sufficiently fine boundary-layer grid. The boundary-layer program was shown to be fourth-order accurate in the direction normal to the wall boundary and second-order accurate in planes parallel to the boundary. The fourth-order accuracy allows accurate calculations with as few as one-fifth the number of grid points required for conventional second-order schemes.

  12. Far field expansion for anisotropic wave equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hariharan, S. I.; Hagstrom, Thomas

    1989-01-01

    A necessary ingredient for the numerical simulation of many time dependent phenomena in acoustics and aerodynamics is the imposition of accurate radiation conditions at artificial boundaries. The asymptotic analysis of propagating waves provides a rational approach to the development of such conditions. A far field asymptotic expansion of solutions of anisotropic wave equations is derived. This generalizes the well known Friedlander expansion for the standard wave operator. The expansion is used to derive a hierarchy of radiation conditions of increasing accuracy. Two numerical experiments are given to illustrate the utility of this approach. The first application is the study of unsteady vortical disturbances impinging on a flat plate; the second is the simulation of inviscid flow past an impulsively started cylinder.

  13. Analysis of non linear partially standing waves from 3D velocity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drevard, D.; Rey, V.; Svendsen, Ib; Fraunie, P.

    2003-04-01

    Surface gravity waves in the ocean exhibit an energy spectrum distributed in both frequency and direction of propagation. Wave data collection is of great importance in coastal zones for engineering and scientific studies. In particular, partially standing waves measurements near coastal structures and steep or barred beaches may be a requirement, for instance for morphodynamic studies. The aim of the present study is the analysis of partially standing surface waves icluding non-linear effects. According to 1st order Stokes theory, synchronous measurements of horizontal and vertical velocity components allow calculation of rate of standing waves (Drevard et al, 2003). In the present study, it is demonstrated that for deep water conditions, partially standing 2nd order Stokes waves induced velocity field is still represented by the 1st order solution for the velocity potential contrary to the surface elevation which exhibits harmonic components. For intermediate water depth, harmonic components appear not only in the surface elevation but also in the velocity fields, but their weight remains much smaller, because of the vertical decreasing wave induced motion. For irregular waves, the influence of the spectrum width on the non-linear effects in the analysis is discussed. Keywords: Wave measurements ; reflection ; non-linear effects Acknowledgements: This work was initiated during the stay of Prof. Ib Svendsen, as invited Professor, at LSEET in autumn 2002. This study is carried out in the framework of the Scientific French National Programmes PNEC ART7 and PATOM. Their financial supports are acknowledged References: Drevard, D., Meuret, A., Rey, V. Piazzola, J. And Dolle, A.. (2002). "Partially reflected waves measurements using Acoustic Doppler Velocimeter (ADV)", Submitted to ISOPE 03, Honolulu, Hawaii, May 2003.

  14. WaveQ3D: Fast and accurate acoustic transmission loss (TL) eigenrays, in littoral environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reilly, Sean M.

    This study defines a new 3D Gaussian ray bundling acoustic transmission loss model in geodetic coordinates: latitude, longitude, and altitude. This approach is designed to lower the computation burden of computing accurate environmental effects in sonar training application by eliminating the need to transform the ocean environment into a collection of Nx2D Cartesian radials. This approach also improves model accuracy by incorporating real world 3D effects, like horizontal refraction, into the model. This study starts with derivations for a 3D variant of Gaussian ray bundles in this coordinate system. To verify the accuracy of this approach, acoustic propagation predictions of transmission loss, time of arrival, and propagation direction are compared to analytic solutions and other models. To validate the model's ability to predict real world phenomena, predictions of transmission loss and propagation direction are compared to at-sea measurements, in an environment where strong horizontal refraction effect have been observed. This model has been integrated into U.S. Navy active sonar training system applications, where testing has demonstrated its ability to improve transmission loss calculation speed without sacrificing accuracy.

  15. 3D Numerical Simulation of the Wave and Current Loads on a Truss Foundation of the Offshore Wind Turbine During the Extreme Typhoon Event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, C. W.; Wu, T. R.; Chuang, M. H.; Tsai, Y. L.

    2015-12-01

    The wind in Taiwan Strait is strong and stable which offers an opportunity to build offshore wind farms. However, frequently visited typhoons and strong ocean current require more attentions on the wave force and local scour around the foundation of the turbine piles. In this paper, we introduce an in-house, multi-phase CFD model, Splash3D, for solving the flow field with breaking wave, strong turbulent, and scour phenomena. Splash3D solves Navier-Stokes Equation with Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) for the fluid domain, and uses volume of fluid (VOF) with piecewise linear interface reconstruction (PLIC) method to describe the break free-surface. The waves were generated inside the computational domain by internal wave maker with a mass-source function. This function is designed to adequately simulate the wave condition under observed extreme events based on JONSWAP spectrum and dispersion relationship. Dirichlet velocity boundary condition is assigned at the upper stream boundary to induce the ocean current. At the downstream face, the sponge-layer method combined with pressure Dirichlet boundary condition is specified for dissipating waves and conducting current out of the domain. Numerical pressure gauges are uniformly set on the structure surface to obtain the force distribution on the structure. As for the local scour around the foundation, we developed Discontinuous Bi-viscous Model (DBM) for the development of the scour hole. Model validations were presented as well. The force distribution under observed irregular wave condition was extracted by the irregular-surface force extraction (ISFE) method, which provides a fast and elegant way to integrate the force acting on the surface of irregular structure. From the Simulation results, we found that the total force is mainly induced by the impinging waves, and the force from the ocean current is about 2 order of magnitude smaller than the wave force. We also found the dynamic pressure, wave height, and the

  16. Numerical simulation of suspended sediment concentration by 3D coupled wave-current model in the Oujiang River Estuary, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Ting; You, Xue-yi

    2017-04-01

    A 3D sediment transport model based on the modified environmental fluid dynamics code (EFDC) and the nearshore waves simulation model (SWAN) is developed to study the change of suspended sediment concentration and bottom shear stress under the actions of pure current and wave-current. After being validated by the field measured data, the proposed sediment transport model is applied in the Oujiang River Estuary, China. The results show that the ratios of both bottom shear stress and suspended sediment concentration of pure current to those of wave-current show a gradually increase from shallow nearshore water to deep open sea. The results also show that the proportion of wave contributions on bottom shear stress and sediment concentration are above 60%, approximately 20-30% and less than 10% for the water depth of less than 5 m, 5-10 m and more than 20 m, respectively. For the waters among islands, the proportion of wave contribution to bottom shear stress and sediment concentration is reduced to 10-20% for -5 m water depth and this is more obvious for the waves of large amplitude. The bottom stress and suspended sediment concentration between islands are mainly controlled by tidal current, and the effect of wave is not significant.

  17. Investigation of Parametric Excitation of Whistler Waves Using 3D Particle-In-Cell Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caplinger, James; Sotnikov, Vladimir; Main, Daniel; Rose, David; Paraschiv, Ioana

    2016-10-01

    Previous theoretical work has shown that a parametric interaction between quasi-electrostatic lower oblique resonance (LOR) and lower frequency (ω < ωLH) ion acoustic or extremely low frequency (ELF) waves can produce electromagnetic whistler waves in a cold magnetized plasma. It was also demonstrated theoretically that this interaction can more efficiently generate electromagnetic whistler waves than by direct excitation by a conventional loop antenna, operating at a single frequency. For the purpose of numerically validating the above result, a series of particle-in-cell simulations were carried out. We first demonstrate the ability to accurately model whistler wave excitation producing the familiar resonant surfaces which comprise the LOR using a modeled loop antenna. Next we demonstrate the ability to generate ion acoustic waves as well as ELF waves, both of which are shown to agree with the expected linear dispersion relations. Finally, we investigate the existence of any nonlinear interaction which indicates the desired parametric excitation and attempt to analyze the efficiency of this method of excitation and radiated power going into the whistler part of the VLF wave spectrum.

  18. 3D crustal structure of the Alpine belt and foreland basins as imaged by ambient-noise surface wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molinari, Irene; Morelli, Andrea; Cardi, Riccardo; Boschi, Lapo; Poli, Piero; Kissling, Edi

    2016-04-01

    We derive a 3-D crustal structure (S wave velocity) underneath northern Italy and the wider Alpine region, from an extensive data set of measurements of Rayleigh-wave phase- and group-velocities from ambient noise correlation among all seismographic stations available to date in the region, via a constrained tomographic inversion made to honor detailed active source reflection/refraction profiles and other geological information. We first derive a regional-scale surface wave tomography from ambient-noise-based phase- and group- surface wave velocity observations (Verbeke et al., 2012). Our regional 3D model (Molinari et al., 2015) shows the low velocity area beneath the Po Plain and the Molasse basin; the contrast between the low-velocity crust of the Adriatic domain and the high-velocity crust of the Tyrrhenian domain is clearly seen, as well as an almost uniform crystalline crust beneath the Alpine belt. However, higher frequency data can be exploited to achieve higher resolution images of the Po Plain and Alpine foreland 3D crustal structure. We collected and analyze one year of noise records (2011) of ~100 North Italy seismic broadband stations, we derive the Green functions between each couple of stations and we measure the phase- and group-Rayleigh wave velocity. We conduct a suite of linear least squares inversion of both phase- and group-velocity data, resulting in 2-D maps of Rayleigh-wave phase and group velocity at periods between 3 and 40s with a resolution of 0.1x0.1 degrees. The maps are then inverted to get the 3D structure with unprecedented details. We present here our results, we compare them with other studies, and we discuss geological/geodynamical implications. We believe that such a model stands for the most up-to-date seismological information on the crustal structure of the Alpine belt and foreland basins, and it can represent a reliable reference for further, more detailed, studies to come, based on the high seismograph station density

  19. Wave Propagation from Complex 3D Sources Using the Representation Theorem

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-09-30

    functions for surface waves are given by Bache et al. (1982). The Green’s functions for the complete seismograms are computed using a ring load source...procedure similar to that described by Bache and Harkrider (1976), using a saddle point approximation to calculate a far-field plane wave for a given takeoff...space, Part II, Bull. Seism. Soc. Am. 73: 931-951. Bache , T. C. and D. G. Harkrider (1976). The body waves due to a general seismic source in a layered

  20. Surface Acoustic Waves (SAW)-Based Biosensing for Quantification of Cell Growth in 2D and 3D Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tao; Green, Ryan; Nair, Rajesh Ramakrishnan; Howell, Mark; Mohapatra, Subhra; Guldiken, Rasim; Mohapatra, Shyam Sundar

    2015-01-01

    Detection and quantification of cell viability and growth in two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) cell cultures commonly involve harvesting of cells and therefore requires a parallel set-up of several replicates for time-lapse or dose–response studies. Thus, developing a non-invasive and touch-free detection of cell growth in longitudinal studies of 3D tumor spheroid cultures or of stem cell regeneration remains a major unmet need. Since surface acoustic waves (SAWs) permit mass loading-based biosensing and have been touted due to their many advantages including low cost, small size and ease of assembly, we examined the potential of SAW-biosensing to detect and quantify cell growth. Herein, we demonstrate that a shear horizontal-surface acoustic waves (SH-SAW) device comprising two pairs of resonators consisting of interdigital transducers and reflecting fingers can be used to quantify mass loading by the cells in suspension as well as within a 3D cell culture platform. A 3D COMSOL model was built to simulate the mass loading response of increasing concentrations of cells in suspension in the polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) well in order to predict the characteristics and optimize the design of the SH-SAW biosensor. The simulated relative frequency shift from the two oscillatory circuit systems (one of which functions as control) were found to be concordant to experimental data generated with RAW264.7 macrophage and A549 cancer cells. In addition, results showed that SAW measurements per se did not affect viability of cells. Further, SH-SAW biosensing was applied to A549 cells cultured on a 3D electrospun nanofiber scaffold that generate tumor spheroids (tumoroids) and the results showed the device's ability to detect changes in tumor spheroid growth over the course of eight days. Taken together, these results demonstrate the use of SH-SAW device for detection and quantification of cell growth changes over time in 2D suspension cultures and in 3D cell

  1. Surface Acoustic Waves (SAW)-Based Biosensing for Quantification of Cell Growth in 2D and 3D Cultures.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tao; Green, Ryan; Nair, Rajesh Ramakrishnan; Howell, Mark; Mohapatra, Subhra; Guldiken, Rasim; Mohapatra, Shyam Sundar

    2015-12-19

    Detection and quantification of cell viability and growth in two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) cell cultures commonly involve harvesting of cells and therefore requires a parallel set-up of several replicates for time-lapse or dose-response studies. Thus, developing a non-invasive and touch-free detection of cell growth in longitudinal studies of 3D tumor spheroid cultures or of stem cell regeneration remains a major unmet need. Since surface acoustic waves (SAWs) permit mass loading-based biosensing and have been touted due to their many advantages including low cost, small size and ease of assembly, we examined the potential of SAW-biosensing to detect and quantify cell growth. Herein, we demonstrate that a shear horizontal-surface acoustic waves (SH-SAW) device comprising two pairs of resonators consisting of interdigital transducers and reflecting fingers can be used to quantify mass loading by the cells in suspension as well as within a 3D cell culture platform. A 3D COMSOL model was built to simulate the mass loading response of increasing concentrations of cells in suspension in the polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) well in order to predict the characteristics and optimize the design of the SH-SAW biosensor. The simulated relative frequency shift from the two oscillatory circuit systems (one of which functions as control) were found to be concordant to experimental data generated with RAW264.7 macrophage and A549 cancer cells. In addition, results showed that SAW measurements per se did not affect viability of cells. Further, SH-SAW biosensing was applied to A549 cells cultured on a 3D electrospun nanofiber scaffold that generate tumor spheroids (tumoroids) and the results showed the device's ability to detect changes in tumor spheroid growth over the course of eight days. Taken together, these results demonstrate the use of SH-SAW device for detection and quantification of cell growth changes over time in 2D suspension cultures and in 3D cell

  2. Evolution of a Directional Wave Spectrum in a 3D Marginal Ice Zone with Random Floe Size Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montiel, F.; Squire, V. A.

    2013-12-01

    A new ocean wave/sea-ice interaction model is proposed that simulates how a directional wave spectrum evolves as it travels through a realistic marginal ice zone (MIZ), where wave/ice dynamics are entirely governed by coherent conservative wave scattering effects. Field experiments conducted by Wadhams et al. (1986) in the Greenland Sea generated important data on wave attenuation in the MIZ and, particularly, on whether the wave spectrum spreads directionally or collimates with distance from the ice edge. The data suggest that angular isotropy, arising from multiple scattering by ice floes, occurs close to the edge and thenceforth dominates wave propagation throughout the MIZ. Although several attempts have been made to replicate this finding theoretically, including by the use of numerical models, none have confronted this problem in a 3D MIZ with fully randomised floe distribution properties. We construct such a model by subdividing the discontinuous ice cover into adjacent infinite slabs of finite width parallel to the ice edge. Each slab contains an arbitrary (but finite) number of circular ice floes with randomly distributed properties. Ice floes are modeled as thin elastic plates with uniform thickness and finite draught. We consider a directional wave spectrum with harmonic time dependence incident on the MIZ from the open ocean, defined as a continuous superposition of plane waves traveling at different angles. The scattering problem within each slab is then solved using Graf's interaction theory for an arbitrary incident directional plane wave spectrum. Using an appropriate integral representation of the Hankel function of the first kind (see Cincotti et al., 1993), we map the outgoing circular wave field from each floe on the slab boundaries into a directional spectrum of plane waves, which characterizes the slab reflected and transmitted fields. Discretizing the angular spectrum, we can obtain a scattering matrix for each slab. Standard recursive

  3. Observation of 3D defect mediated dust acoustic wave turbulence with fluctuating defects and amplitude hole filaments

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Mei-Chu; Tsai, Ya-Yi; I, Lin

    2013-08-15

    We experimentally demonstrate the direct observation of defect mediated wave turbulence with fluctuating defects and low amplitude hole filaments, from a 3D self-excited plane dust acoustic wave in a dusty plasma by reducing dissipation. The waveform undulation is found to be the origin for the amplitude and the phase modulations of the local dust density oscillation, the broadening of the sharp peaks in the frequency spectrum, and the fluctuating defects. The corrugated wave crest surface also causes the observed high and low density patches in the transverse (xy) plane. Low oscillation amplitude spots (holes) share the same positions with the defects. Their trajectories in the xyt space appear in the form of chaotic filaments without long term predictability, through uncertain pair generation, propagation, and pair annihilation.

  4. Moored Observations of Internal Waves in Luzon Strait: 3-D Structure, Dissipation, and Evolution

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-03-01

    advancing the performance of operational and climate models, as well as for understanding local problems such as pollutant dispersal and biological...Y.J. Yang, M.-H. Chang , and Q. Li. 2011. From Luzon Strait to Dongsha Plateau: Stages in the life of an internal wave. Oceanography 24(4):64–77...Knowledge of the general problems of internal waves and ocean mixing are important for advancing the performance of operational and climate models, as well

  5. Propagation of 3D nonlinear waves over complex bathymetry using a High-Order Spectral method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gouin, Maïté; Ducrozet, Guillaume; Ferrant, Pierre

    2016-04-01

    Scattering of regular and irregular surface gravity waves propagating over a region of arbitrary three-dimensional varying bathymetry is considered here. The three-dimensional High-Order Spectral method (HOS) with an extension to account for a variable bathymetry is used. The efficiency of the model has been proved to be conserved even with this extension. The method is first applied to a bathymetry consisting of an elliptical lens, as used in the Vincent and Briggs (1989) experiment. Incident waves passing across the lens are transformed and a strong convergence region is observed after the elliptical mound. The wave amplification depends on the incident wave. Numerical results for regular and irregular waves are analysed and compared with other methods and experimental data demonstrating the efficiency and practical applicability of the present approach. Then the method is used to model waves propagating over a real bathymetry: the canyons of Scripps/La Jolla in California. The implementation of this complex bathymetry in the model is presented, as well as the first results achieved. They will be compared to the ones obtained with another numerical model.

  6. Conducting a 3D Converted Shear Wave Project to Reduce Exploration Risk at Wister, CA

    SciTech Connect

    Matlick, Skip; Walsh, Patrick; Rhodes, Greg; Fercho, Steven

    2015-06-30

    Ormat sited 2 full-size exploration wells based on 3D seismic interpretation of fractures, prior drilling results, and temperature anomaly. The wells indicated commercial temperatures (>300 F), but almost no permeability, despite one of the wells being drilled within 820 ft of an older exploration well with reported indications of permeability. Following completion of the second well in 2012, Ormat undertook a lengthy program to 1) evaluate the lack of observed permeability, 2) estimate the likelihood of finding permeability with additional drilling, and 3) estimate resource size based on an anticipated extent of permeability.

  7. Display depth analyses with the wave aberration for the auto-stereoscopic 3D display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xin; Sang, Xinzhu; Yu, Xunbo; Chen, Duo; Chen, Zhidong; Zhang, Wanlu; Yan, Binbin; Yuan, Jinhui; Wang, Kuiru; Yu, Chongxiu; Dou, Wenhua; Xiao, Liquan

    2016-07-01

    Because the aberration severely affects the display performances of the auto-stereoscopic 3D display, the diffraction theory is used to analyze the diffraction field distribution and the display depth through aberration analysis. Based on the proposed method, the display depth of central and marginal reconstructed images is discussed. The experimental results agree with the theoretical analyses. Increasing the viewing distance or decreasing the lens aperture can improve the display depth. Different viewing distances and the LCD with two lens-arrays are used to verify the conclusion.

  8. A vector wave equation for neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reifler, Frank

    1984-04-01

    The Cartan map gives an isomorphism between spinors and isotropic vectors. Isotropic vectors F=E+iH satisfy the condition F ṡ F=0. We show that via the Cartan map, the particle current for neutrinos is given by j0=||E||, j=E×H/||E||, and the neutrino wave equation becomes D0F=iD×F-(DF) ṡ v, where v=j/j0=E×H/E2=velocity field, D0=i(h/2)(∂/∂t)-V0,D=-i (h/2)∇-V, where h=Planck's constant and V=(V0,V)=external potential. This wave equation preserves the isotropic condition, and like the equivalent Dirac equation, causes j to be the conserved current. We show that the isotropic restriction on the vector field F accounts for the observable properties of a neutrino in an external field, in particular, for the observed spectrum of the energy, momentum, angular momentum, spin, velocity, and position operators.

  9. SAFE-3D analysis of a piezoelectric transducer to excite guided waves in a rail web

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramatlo, Dineo A.; Long, Craig S.; Loveday, Philip W.; Wilke, Daniel N.

    2016-02-01

    Our existing Ultrasonic Broken Rail Detection system detects complete breaks and primarily uses a propagating mode with energy concentrated in the head of the rail. Previous experimental studies have demonstrated that a mode with energy concentrated in the head of the rail, is capable of detecting weld reflections at long distances. Exploiting a mode with energy concentrated in the web of the rail would allow us to effectively detect defects in the web of the rail and could also help to distinguish between reflections from welds and cracks. In this paper, we will demonstrate the analysis of a piezoelectric transducer attached to the rail web. The forced response at different frequencies is computed by the Semi-Analytical Finite Element (SAFE) method and compared to a full three-dimensional finite element method using ABAQUS. The SAFE method only requires the rail track cross-section to be meshed using two-dimensional elements. The ABAQUS model in turn requires a full three-dimensional discretisation of the rail track. The SAFE approach can yield poor predictions at cut-on frequencies associated with other modes in the rail. Problematic frequencies are identified and a suitable frequency range identified for transducer design. The forced response results of the two methods were found to be in good agreement with each other. We then use a previously developed SAFE-3D method to analyse a practical transducer over the selected frequency range. The results obtained from the SAFE-3D method are in good agreement with experimental measurements.

  10. Nonlinear waves described by the generalized Swift-Hohenberg equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryabov, P. N.; Kudryashov, N. A.

    2017-01-01

    We study the wave processes described by the generalized Swift-Hohenberg equation. We show that the traveling wave reduction of this equation does not pass the Kovalevskaya test. Some solitary wave solutions and kink solutions of the generalized Swift-Hohenberg equation are found. We use the pseudo-spectral algorithm to perform the numerical simulation of the wave processes described by the mixed boundary value problem for the generalized Swift-Hohenberg equation. This algorithm was tested on the obtained solutions. Some features of the nonlinear waves evolution described by the generalized Swift-Hohenberg equation are studied.

  11. Verification of Long Period Surface Waves from Ambient Noise and Its Application in Constructing 3D Shear Wave Structure of Lithosphere in United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, J.; Yang, Y.; Ni, S.; Zhao, K.

    2015-12-01

    In the past decade, ambient noise tomography (ANT) has become an estimated method to construct the earth's interior structures thanks to its advantage in extracting surface waves from cross-correlations of ambient noise without using earthquake data. However, most of previous ambient noise tomography studies concentrate on short and intermediate periods (<50sec) due to the dominant energy of the microseism at these periods. Studies of long period surface waves from cross-correlation of ambient noise are limited. In this study, we verify the accuracy of the long period (50-250sec) surface wave (Rayleigh wave) from ambient noise by comparing both dispersion curves and seismic waveforms from ambient noise with those from earthquake records quantitatively. After that, we calculate vertical-vertical cross-correlation functions among more than1800 USArray Transportable Array stations and extract high quality interstation phase velocity dispersion curves from them at 10-200 sec periods. Then, we adopt a finite frequency ambient noise tomography method based on Born approximation to obtain high resolution phase velocity maps using the obtained dispersion measurements at 10-150 sec periods. Afterward, we extract local dispersion curves from these dispersion maps and invert them for 1D shear wave velocity profiles at individual grids using a Bayesian Monte Carlo method. Finally, a 3D shear velocity model is constructed by assembling all the 1D Vs profiles. Our 3D model is overall similar to other models constructed using earthquake surface waves and body waves. In summary, we demonstrate that the long period surface waves can be extracted from ambient noise, and the long period dispersion measurements from ambient noise are as accurate as those from earthquake data and can be used to construct 3D lithospheric structure from surface down to lithosphere/asthenosphere depths.

  12. Real-time 3D millimeter wave imaging based FMCW using GGD focal plane array as detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levanon, Assaf; Rozban, Daniel; Kopeika, Natan S.; Yitzhaky, Yitzhak; Abramovich, Amir

    2014-03-01

    Millimeter wave (MMW) imaging systems are required for applications in medicine, communications, homeland security, and space technology. This is because there is no known ionization hazard for biological tissue, and atmospheric attenuation in this range of the spectrum is relatively low. The lack of inexpensive room temperature imaging systems makes it difficult to give a suitable MMW system for many of the above applications. 3D MMW imaging system based on chirp radar was studied previously using a scanning imaging system of a single detector. The system presented here proposes to employ a chirp radar method with a Glow Discharge Detector (GDD) Focal Plane Array (FPA) of plasma based detectors. Each point on the object corresponds to a point in the image and includes the distance information. This will enable 3D MMW imaging. The radar system requires that the millimeter wave detector (GDD) will be able to operate as a heterodyne detector. Since the source of radiation is a frequency modulated continuous wave (FMCW), the detected signal as a result of heterodyne detection gives the object's depth information according to value of difference frequency, in addition to the reflectance of the image. In this work we experimentally demonstrate the feasibility of implementing an imaging system based on radar principles and FPA of GDD devices. This imaging system is shown to be capable of imaging objects from distances of at least 10 meters.

  13. High-resolution 3-D P wave attenuation structure of the New Madrid Seismic Zone using local earthquake tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisrat, Shishay T.; DeShon, Heather R.; Pesicek, Jeremy; Thurber, Clifford

    2014-01-01

    A three-dimensional (3-D), high-resolution P wave seismic attenuation model for the New Madrid Seismic Zone (NMSZ) is determined using P wave path attenuation (t*) values of small-magnitude earthquakes (MD < 3.9). Events were recorded at 89 broadband and short-period seismometers of the Cooperative New Madrid Seismic Zone Network and 40 short-period seismometers of the Portable Array for Numerical Data Acquisition experiment. The amplitude spectra of all the earthquakes are simultaneously inverted for source, path (t*), and site parameters. The t* values are inverted for QP using local earthquake tomography methods and a known 3-D P wave velocity model for the region. The four major seismicity arms of the NMSZ exhibit reduced QP (higher attenuation) than the surrounding crust. The highest attenuation anomalies coincide with areas of previously reported high swarm activity attributed to fluid-rich fractures along the southeast extension of the Reelfoot fault. The QP results are consistent with previous attenuation studies in the region, which showed that active fault zones and fractured crust in the NMSZ are highly attenuating.

  14. Guided wave-based J-integral estimation for dynamic stress intensity factors using 3D scanning laser Doppler vibrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayers, J.; Owens, C. T.; Liu, K. C.; Swenson, E.; Ghoshal, A.; Weiss, V.

    2013-01-01

    The application of guided waves to interrogate remote areas of structural components has been researched extensively in characterizing damage. However, there exists a sparsity of work in using piezoelectric transducer-generated guided waves as a method of assessing stress intensity factors (SIF). This quantitative information enables accurate estimation of the remaining life of metallic structures exhibiting cracks, such as military and commercial transport vehicles. The proposed full wavefield approach, based on 3D laser vibrometry and piezoelectric transducer-generated guided waves, provides a practical means for estimation of dynamic stress intensity factors (DSIF) through local strain energy mapping via the J-integral. Strain energies and traction vectors can be conveniently estimated from wavefield data recorded using 3D laser vibrometry, through interpolation and subsequent spatial differentiation of the response field. Upon estimation of the Jintegral, it is possible to obtain the corresponding DSIF terms. For this study, the experimental test matrix consists of aluminum plates with manufactured defects representing canonical elliptical crack geometries under uniaxial tension that are excited by surface mounted piezoelectric actuators. The defects' major to minor axes ratios vary from unity to approximately 133. Finite element simulations are compared to experimental results and the relative magnitudes of the J-integrals are examined.

  15. Exact Travelling Wave Solutions of the Nonlinear Evolution Equations by Auxiliary Equation Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaplan, Melike; Akbulut, Arzu; Bekir, Ahmet

    2015-10-01

    The auxiliary equation method presents wide applicability to handling nonlinear wave equations. In this article, we establish new exact travelling wave solutions of the nonlinear Zoomeron equation, coupled Higgs equation, and equal width wave equation. The travelling wave solutions are expressed by the hyperbolic functions, trigonometric functions, and rational functions. It is shown that the proposed method provides a powerful mathematical tool for solving nonlinear wave equations in mathematical physics and engineering. Throughout the article, all calculations are made with the aid of the Maple packet program.

  16. Emergence of wave equations from quantum geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Majid, Shahn

    2012-09-24

    We argue that classical geometry should be viewed as a special limit of noncommutative geometry in which aspects which are inter-constrained decouple and appear arbitrary in the classical limit. In particular, the wave equation is really a partial derivative in a unified extra-dimensional noncommutative geometry and arises out of the greater rigidity of the noncommutative world not visible in the classical limit. We provide an introduction to this 'wave operator' approach to noncommutative geometry as recently used[27] to quantize any static spacetime metric admitting a spatial conformal Killing vector field, and in particular to construct the quantum Schwarzschild black hole. We also give an introduction to our related result that every classical Riemannian manifold is a shadow of a slightly noncommutative one wherein the meaning of the classical Ricci tensor becomes very natural as the square of a generalised braiding.

  17. Solitary waves of the splitted RLW equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaki, S. I.

    2001-07-01

    A combination of the splitting method and the cubic B-spline finite elements is used to solve the non-linear regularized long wave (RLW) equation. This approach involves a Bubnov-Galerkin method with cubic B-spline finite elements so that there is continuity of the dependent variable and its first derivative throughout the solution region. Time integration of the resulting systems is effected using a Crank-Nicholson approximation. In simulations of the migration of a single solitary wave this algorithm is shown to have higher accuracy and better conservation than a recent splitting difference scheme based on cubic spline interpolation functions, for different amplitudes ranging from a very small ( ⩾0.03) to a considerably high amplitudes ( ⩽0.3). The development of an undular bore is modeled.

  18. Nonlinear acoustic wave equations with fractional loss operators.

    PubMed

    Prieur, Fabrice; Holm, Sverre

    2011-09-01

    Fractional derivatives are well suited to describe wave propagation in complex media. When introduced in classical wave equations, they allow a modeling of attenuation and dispersion that better describes sound propagation in biological tissues. Traditional constitutive equations from solid mechanics and heat conduction are modified using fractional derivatives. They are used to derive a nonlinear wave equation which describes attenuation and dispersion laws that match observations. This wave equation is a generalization of the Westervelt equation, and also leads to a fractional version of the Khokhlov-Zabolotskaya-Kuznetsov and Burgers' equations.

  19. 3-D frequency-domain seismic wave modelling in heterogeneous, anisotropic media using a Gaussian Quadrature Grid (GQG) approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenhalgh, Stewart; Zhou, Bing; Maurer, Hansruedi

    2010-05-01

    We have developed a modified version of the spectral element method (SEM), called the Gaussian Quadrature Grid (GQG) approach, for frequency domain 3D seismic modelling in arbitrary heterogeneous, anisotropic media. The model may incorporate an arbitrary free-surface topography and irregular subsurface interfaces. Unlike the SEM ,it does not require a powerful mesh generator such as the Delauney Triangular or TetGen. Rather, the GQG approach replaces the element mesh with Gaussian quadrature abscissae to directly sample the physical properties of the model parameters and compute the weighted residual or variational integral. This renders the model discretisation simple and easily matched to the model topography, as well as direct control of the model paramterisation for subsequent inversion. In addition, it offers high accuracy in numerical modelling provided that an appropriate density of the Gaussian quadrature abscissae is employed. The second innovation of the GQG is the incorporation of a new implementation of perfectly matched layers to suppress artificial reflections from the domain margins. We employ PML model parameters (specified complex valued density and elastic moduli) rather than explicitly solving the governing wave equation with a complex co-ordinate system as in conventional approaches. Such an implementation is simple, general, effective and easily extendable to any class of anisotropy and other numerical modelling methods. The accuracy of the GQG approach is controlled by the number of Gaussian quadrature points per minimum wavelength, the so-called sampling density. The optimal sampling density should be the one which enables high definition of geological characteristics and high precision of the variational integral evaluation and spatial differentiation. Our experiments show that satisfactory results can be obtained using sampling densities of 5 points per minimum wavelength. Efficiency of the GQG approach mainly depends on the linear

  20. A relativistic wave equation for the Skyrmion

    SciTech Connect

    Rajeev, S.G.

    2008-11-15

    We propose a relativistically invariant wave equation for the Skyrme soliton. It is a differential equation on the space R{sup 1,3}xS{sup 3} which is invariant under the Lorentz group and isospin. The internal variable valued in SU(2){identical_to}S{sup 3} describes the orientation of the soliton. The mass of a particle of spin and isospin both equal to j=1/2 ,3/2 ... is predicted to be M=m{radical}((1+K{sub 2}j(j+1))/(1+K{sub 1}j(j+1)) ) which agrees with the known spectrum for low angular momentum. The iso-scalar magnetic moment is predicted to be -(K{sub 1})/(4m) {sigma}, where {sigma} is the spin.

  1. Summary of work on shock wave feature extraction in 3-D datasets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hesselink, Lambertus (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    A method for extracting and visualizing shock waves from three dimensional data-sets is discussed. Issues concerning computation time, robustness to numerical perturbations, and noise introduction are considered and compared with other methods. Finally, results using this method are discussed.

  2. Global 3-D FDTD Maxwell's-Equations Modeling of Ionospheric Disturbances Associated with Earthquakes Using an Optimized Geodesic Grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, J. J.; Taflove, A.

    2005-12-01

    We report a finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) computational solution of Maxwell's equations [1] that models the possibility of detecting and characterizing ionospheric disturbances above seismic regions. Specifically, we study anomalies in Schumann resonance spectra in the extremely low frequency (ELF) range below 30 Hz as observed in Japan caused by a hypothetical cylindrical ionospheric disturbance above Taiwan. We consider excitation of the global Earth-ionosphere waveguide by lightning in three major thunderstorm regions of the world: Southeast Asia, South America (Amazon region), and Africa. Furthermore, we investigate varying geometries and characteristics of the ionospheric disturbance above Taiwan. The FDTD technique used in this study enables a direct, full-vector, three-dimensional (3-D) time-domain Maxwell's equations calculation of round-the-world ELF propagation accounting for arbitrary horizontal as well as vertical geometrical and electrical inhomogeneities and anisotropies of the excitation, ionosphere, lithosphere, and oceans. Our entire-Earth model grids the annular lithosphere-atmosphere volume within 100 km of sea level, and contains over 6,500,000 grid-points (63 km laterally between adjacent grid points, 5 km radial resolution). We use our recently developed spherical geodesic gridding technique having a spatial discretization best described as resembling the surface of a soccer ball [2]. The grid is comprised entirely of hexagonal cells except for a small fixed number of pentagonal cells needed for completion. Grid-cell areas and locations are optimized to yield a smoothly varying area difference between adjacent cells, thereby maximizing numerical convergence. We compare our calculated results with measured data prior to the Chi-Chi earthquake in Taiwan as reported by Hayakawa et. al. [3]. Acknowledgement This work was suggested by Dr. Masashi Hayakawa, University of Electro-Communications, Chofugaoka, Chofu Tokyo. References [1] A

  3. Exploring the resolution capabilities of subduction zone guided waves: 2D visco-elastic and 3D wave simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garth, T.; Rietbrock, A.

    2011-12-01

    Dispersion of body wave arrivals observed in the fore-arc have been attributed to high frequency guided waves being retained and delayed by a low velocity layer (LVL) in the subducted crust. Lower frequency seismic waves travel at higher velocities in the surrounding mantle. These subduction zone guided waves have the potential to offer unique insights into subducting oceanic crust. Two and three dimensional finite difference (FD) wave propagation models are used to investigate the factors controlling guided wave dispersion and to test which features of the subducted crust can be resolved by guided waves. Other factors that may affect the frequency content of arrivals in the fore-arc such as elevated attenuation are also investigated. Modeling results are compared to observed guided wave dispersion in the Japan, Aleutian and Central American subduction zones. Modeling has shown that trade-offs occur between the velocity contrast and the thickness of the waveguide, with both parameters potentially affecting the frequency content that is delayed. We combine amplitude spectra plots with displacement spectrograms so that the relative amplitudes and relative arrival times of different frequencies can be compared. This allows the specific effects of given parameters to be understood. The effect of elevated attenuation on the frequency content of arrivals in the fore-arc is investigated using a visco-elastic FD wave propagation model (Bohlen 2002). The sensitivity of observed dispersion to variations in the Vp/Vs ratio of the waveguide material is also investigated. Understanding the relative dispersion of P and S waves as well as the relative importance of attenuation in the subduction system may allow us to understand more about the hydrous conditions in subduction zones. Systematic variations in the contrast between the LVL and the surrounding material are investigated. Modeling is designed to test if guided wave dispersion can resolve down dip velocity changes in the

  4. Moored Observations of Internal Waves in Luzon Strait: 3-D Structure, Dissipation, and Evolution

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-30

    the performance of operational and climate models, as well as for understanding local problems such as pollutant dispersal and biological productivity...substantially improves both our understanding and predictive ability of linear internal tides and NLIWs in Luzon Strait and the South China Sea...westward into the northeastern South China Sea (SCS). • To better understand generation and propagation of internal waves in a strongly sheared

  5. Full 3D dispersion curve solutions for guided waves in generally anisotropic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernando Quintanilla, F.; Lowe, M. J. S.; Craster, R. V.

    2016-02-01

    Dispersion curves of guided waves provide valuable information about the physical and elastic properties of waves propagating within a given waveguide structure. Algorithms to accurately compute these curves are an essential tool for engineers working in non-destructive evaluation and for scientists studying wave phenomena. Dispersion curves are typically computed for low or zero attenuation and presented in two or three dimensional plots. The former do not always provide a clear and complete picture of the dispersion loci and the latter are very difficult to obtain when high values of attenuation are involved and arbitrary anisotropy is considered in single or multi-layered systems. As a consequence, drawing correct and reliable conclusions is a challenging task in the modern applications that often utilize multi-layered anisotropic viscoelastic materials. These challenges are overcome here by using a spectral collocation method (SCM) to robustly find dispersion curves in the most complicated cases of high attenuation and arbitrary anisotropy. Solutions are then plotted in three-dimensional frequency-complex wavenumber space, thus gaining much deeper insight into the nature of these problems. The cases studied range from classical examples, which validate this approach, to new ones involving materials up to the most general triclinic class for both flat and cylindrical geometry in multi-layered systems. The apparent crossing of modes within the same symmetry family in viscoelastic media is also explained and clarified by the results. Finally, the consequences of the centre of symmetry, present in every crystal class, on the solutions are discussed.

  6. Localization of metal targets by time reversal of electromagnetic waves . 3D-numerical and experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benhamouche, Mehdi; Bernard, Laurent; Serhir, Mohammed; Pichon, Lionel; Lesselier, Dominique

    2013-11-01

    This paper proposes a criterion for locating obstacles by time reversal (TR) of electromagnetic (EM) waves based on the analysis of the density of EM energy map in time domain. Contrarily to a monochromatic study of the TR, the wide-band approach requires to determine the instant of the wave focus. This enables us to locate the focal spots that are indicative of the positions. The criterion proposed is compared to the inverse of the minimum entropy criterion as used in the literature [X. Xu, E.L. Miller, C.M. Rappaport, IEEE Trans. Geosci. Remote Sens. 41, 1804 (2003)]. An application for the localization of 3D metal targets is proposed using finite integration technique (FIT) as computational tool at the modeling stage. An experimental validation is presented for canonical three-dimensional configurations with two kinds of metal objects. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Numelec 2012", Edited by Adel Razek.

  7. 3-D shear wave radially and azimuthally anisotropic velocity model of the North American upper mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Huaiyu; Romanowicz, Barbara; Fischer, Karen M.; Abt, David

    2011-03-01

    Using a combination of long period seismic waveforms and SKS splitting measurements, we have developed a 3-D upper-mantle model (SAWum_NA2) of North America that includes isotropic shear velocity, with a lateral resolution of ˜250 km, as well as radial and azimuthal anisotropy, with a lateral resolution of ˜500 km. Combining these results, we infer several key features of lithosphere and asthenosphere structure. A rapid change from thin (˜70-80 km) lithosphere in the western United States (WUS) to thick lithosphere (˜200 km) in the central, cratonic part of the continent closely follows the Rocky Mountain Front (RMF). Changes with depth of the fast axis direction of azimuthal anisotropy reveal the presence of two layers in the cratonic lithosphere, corresponding to the fast-to-slow discontinuity found in receiver functions. Below the lithosphere, azimuthal anisotropy manifests a maximum, stronger in the WUS than under the craton, and the fast axis of anisotropy aligns with the absolute plate motion, as described in the hotspot reference frame (HS3-NUVEL 1A). In the WUS, this zone is confined between 70 and 150 km, decreasing in strength with depth from the top, from the RMF to the San Andreas Fault system and the Juan de Fuca/Gorda ridges. This result suggests that shear associated with lithosphere-asthenosphere coupling dominates mantle deformation down to this depth in the western part of the continent. The depth extent of the zone of increased azimuthal anisotropy below the cratonic lithosphere is not well resolved in our study, although it is peaked around 270 km, a robust result. Radial anisotropy is such that, predominantly, ξ > 1, where ξ= (Vsh/Vsv)2, under the continent and its borders down to ˜200 km, with stronger ξ in the bordering oceanic regions. Across the continent and below 200 km, alternating zones of weaker and stronger radial anisotropy, with predominantly ξ < 1, correlate with zones of small lateral changes in the fast axis direction of

  8. Validation of the RPLUS3D Code for Supersonic Inlet Applications Involving Three-Dimensional Shock Wave-Boundary Layer Interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kapoor, Kamlesh; Anderson, Bernhard H.; Shaw, Robert J.

    1994-01-01

    A three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics code, RPLUS3D, which was developed for the reactive propulsive flows of ramjets and scramjets, was validated for glancing shock wave-boundary layer interactions. Both laminar and turbulent flows were studied. A supersonic flow over a wedge mounted on a flat plate was numerically simulated. For the laminar case, the static pressure distribution, velocity vectors, and particle traces on the flat plate were obtained. For turbulent flow, both the Baldwin-Lomax and Chien two-equation turbulent models were used. The static pressure distributions, pitot pressure, and yaw angle profiles were computed. In addition, the velocity vectors and particle traces on the flat plate were also obtained from the computed solution. Overall, the computed results for both laminar and turbulent cases compared very well with the experimentally obtained data.

  9. Fast and accurate 3-D ray tracing using bilinear traveltime interpolation and the wave front group marching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jianzhong; Huang, Yueqin; Song, Lin-Ping; Liu, Qing-Huo

    2011-03-01

    We propose a new ray tracing technique in a 3-D heterogeneous isotropic media based on bilinear traveltime interpolation and the wave front group marching. In this technique, the media is discretized into a series of rectangular cells. There are two steps to be carried out: one is a forward step where wave front expansion is evolved from sources to whole computational domain and the subsequent one is a backward step where ray paths are calculated for any source-receiver configuration as desired. In the forward step, we derive a closed-form expression to calculate traveltime at an arbitrary point in a cell using a bilinear interpolation of the known traveltimes on the cell's surface. Then the group marching method (GMM), a fast wave front advancing method, is applied to expand the wave front from the source to all girds. In the backward step, ray paths starting from receivers are traced by finding the intersection points of potential ray propagation vectors with the surfaces of relevant cells. In this step, the same TI scheme is used to compute the candidate intersection points on all surfaces of each relevant cell. In this process, the point with the minimum traveltime is selected as a ray point from which the similar step is continued until sources. A number of numerical experiments demonstrate that our 3-D ray tracing technique is able to achieve very accurate computation of traveltimes and ray paths and meanwhile take much less computer time in comparison with the existing popular ones like the finite-difference-based GMM method, which is combined with the maximum gradient ray tracing, and the shortest path method.

  10. 3-D upper mantle shear wave speed structure beneath the South Pacific Superswell by a BBOBS array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isse, T.; Suetsugu, D.; Shiobara, H.; Sugioka, H.; Yoshizawa, K.; Kanazawa, T.; Fukao, Y.

    2005-12-01

    Previous seismic tomography studies show a broad low velocity anomaly in the lower mantle, so-called superplume, beneath the South Pacific and there are hotspot chains and large scale topographic high at surface of this region. However, the resolution of seismic tomography is poor, especially in the upper mantle, because of limited spatial distribution of seismic stations. To improve the station coverage, we deployed an array of long-term broadband ocean bottom seismometers (BBOBS) in this region. The quality of the vertical component of seismograms recorded by the BBOBS array is comparable with those by island seismic stations. This observation has enabled us to obtain a more precise 3-D shear wave speed structure in the upper mantle of this region by analyzing Rayleigh waves. We employed a two-station method to determine phase velocity of fundamental mode Rayleigh wave recorded by the BBOBS array and island stations in the Pacific Ocean. We obtained 1025 path-average phase velocity dispersion curves including 188 dispersion curves using the BBOBS data in a period range between 40 and 140 seconds. We then inverted them to a 3-D shear wave speed structure down to a depth of 200 km. At shallow depths the eastern part of the French Polynesia region is in general slower than the western part, which indicates an age-dependence of seismic structure of the uppermost mantle. Slow speed anomalies corresponding to the hotspots are apparently superposed on this age-dependence: Slow speed anomalies can be seen from the surface to a depth of 200 km beneath the Society, Pitcairn, and Macdonald hotspots, but they are limited only to the deep part beneath the Samoa hotspot. The slow speed anomalies beneath the Pitcairn and Society hotspots apparently coalesce at a depth of 100 km, where a single anomaly extending upward from below seems to branch into two directions. A resolution analysis indicates that the BBOBS array data has improved the spatial resolution substantially.

  11. High-resolution 3-D S-wave Tomography of upper crust structures in Yilan Plain from Ambient Seismic Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Kai-Xun; Chen, Po-Fei; Liang, Wen-Tzong; Chen, Li-Wei; Gung, YuanCheng

    2015-04-01

    The Yilan Plain (YP) in NE Taiwan locates on the western YP of the Okinawa Trough and displays high geothermal gradients with abundant hot springs, likely resulting from magmatism associated with the back-arc spreading as attested by the offshore volcanic island (Kueishantao). YP features NS distinctive characteristics that the South YP exhibits thin top sedimentary layer, high on-land seismicity and significant SE movements, relative those of the northern counterpart. A dense network (~2.5 km station interval) of 89 Texan instruments was deployed in Aug. 2014, covering most of the YP and its vicinity. The ray path coverage density of each 0.015 degree cells are greater than 150 km that could provide the robustness assessment of tomographic results. We analyze ambient noise signals to invert a high-resolution 3D S-wave model for shallow velocity structures in and around YP. The aim is to investigate the velocity anomalies corresponding to geothermal resources and the NS geological distinctions aforementioned. We apply the Welch's method to generate empirical Rayleigh wave Green's functions between two stations records of continuous vertical components. The group velocities of thus derived functions are then obtained by the multiple-filter analysis technique measured at the frequency range between 0.25 and 1 Hz. Finally, we implement a wavelet-based multi-scale parameterization technique to construct 3D model of S-wave velocity. Our first month results exhibit low velocity in the plain, corresponding existing sediments, those of whole YP show low velocity offshore YP and those of high-resolution south YP reveal stark velocity contrast across the Sanshin fault. Key words: ambient seismic noises, Welch's method, S-wave, Yilan Plain

  12. High-performance parallel solver for 3D time-dependent Schrodinger equation for large-scale nanosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gainullin, I. K.; Sonkin, M. A.

    2015-03-01

    A parallelized three-dimensional (3D) time-dependent Schrodinger equation (TDSE) solver for one-electron systems is presented in this paper. The TDSE Solver is based on the finite-difference method (FDM) in Cartesian coordinates and uses a simple and explicit leap-frog numerical scheme. The simplicity of the numerical method provides very efficient parallelization and high performance of calculations using Graphics Processing Units (GPUs). For example, calculation of 106 time-steps on the 1000ṡ1000ṡ1000 numerical grid (109 points) takes only 16 hours on 16 Tesla M2090 GPUs. The TDSE Solver demonstrates scalability (parallel efficiency) close to 100% with some limitations on the problem size. The TDSE Solver is validated by calculation of energy eigenstates of the hydrogen atom (13.55 eV) and affinity level of H- ion (0.75 eV). The comparison with other TDSE solvers shows that a GPU-based TDSE Solver is 3 times faster for the problems of the same size and with the same cost of computational resources. The usage of a non-regular Cartesian grid or problem-specific non-Cartesian coordinates increases this benefit up to 10 times. The TDSE Solver was applied to the calculation of the resonant charge transfer (RCT) in nanosystems, including several related physical problems, such as electron capture during H+-H0 collision and electron tunneling between H- ion and thin metallic island film.

  13. Imaging of 3D Ocean Turbulence Microstructure Using Low Frequency Acoustic Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minakov, Alexander; Kolyukhin, Dmitriy; Keers, Henk

    2015-04-01

    In the past decade the technique of imaging the ocean structure with low-frequency signal (Hz), produced by air-guns and typically employed during conventional multichannel seismic data acquisition, has emerged. The method is based on extracting and stacking the acoustic energy back-scattered by the ocean temperature and salinity micro- and meso-structure (1 - 100 meters). However, a good understanding of the link between the scattered wavefield utilized by the seismic oceanography and physical processes in the ocean is still lacking. We describe theory and the numerical implementation of a 3D time-dependent stochastic model of ocean turbulence. The velocity and temperature are simulated as homogeneous Gaussian isotropic random fields with the Kolmogorov-Obukhov energy spectrum in the inertial subrange. Numerical modeling technique is employed for sampling of realizations of random fields with a given spatial-temporal spectral tensor. The model used is shown to be representative for a wide range of scales. Using this model, we provide a framework to solve the forward and inverse acoustic scattering problem using marine seismic data. Our full-waveform inversion method is based on the ray-Born approximation which is specifically suitable for the modelling of small velocity perturbations in the ocean. This is illustrated by showing a good match between synthetic seismograms computed using ray-Born and synthetic seismograms produced with a more computationally expensive finite-difference method.

  14. Horizontal structure and propagation characteristics of mesospheric gravity waves observed by Antarctic Gravity Wave Imaging/Instrument Network (ANGWIN), using a 3-D spectral analysis technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuda, Takashi S.; Nakamura, Takuji; Murphy, Damian; Tsutsumi, Masaki; Moffat-Griffin, Tracy; Zhao, Yucheng; Pautet, Pierre-Dominique; Ejiri, Mitsumu K.; Taylor, Michael

    2016-07-01

    ANGWIN (Antarctic Gravity Wave Imaging/Instrument Network) is an international airglow imager/instrument network in the Antarctic, which commenced observations in 2011. It seeks to reveal characteristics of mesospheric gravity waves, and to study sources, propagation, breaking of the gravity waves over the Antarctic and the effects on general circulation and upper atmosphere. In this study, we compared distributions of horizontal phase velocity of the gravity waves at around 90 km altitude observed in the mesospheric airglow imaging over different locations using our new statistical analysis method of 3-D Fourier transform, developed by Matsuda et al. (2014). Results from the airglow imagers at four stations at Syowa (69S, 40E), Halley (76S, 27W), Davis (69S, 78E) and McMurdo (78S, 156E) out of the ANGWIN imagers have been compared, for the observation period between April 6 and May 21 in 2013. In addition to the horizontal distribution of propagation and phase speed, gravity wave energies have been quantitatively compared, indicating a smaller GW activity in higher latitude stations. We further investigated frequency dependence of gravity wave propagation direction, as well as nightly variation of the gravity wave direction and correlation with the background wind variations. We found that variation of propagation direction is partly due to the effect of background wind in the middle atmosphere, but variation of wave sources could play important role as well. Secondary wave generation is also needed to explain the observed results.

  15. Numerical solutions of nonlinear wave equations

    SciTech Connect

    Kouri, D.J.; Zhang, D.S.; Wei, G.W.; Konshak, T.; Hoffman, D.K.

    1999-01-01

    Accurate, stable numerical solutions of the (nonlinear) sine-Gordon equation are obtained with particular consideration of initial conditions that are exponentially close to the phase space homoclinic manifolds. Earlier local, grid-based numerical studies have encountered difficulties, including numerically induced chaos for such initial conditions. The present results are obtained using the recently reported distributed approximating functional method for calculating spatial derivatives to high accuracy and a simple, explicit method for the time evolution. The numerical solutions are chaos-free for the same conditions employed in previous work that encountered chaos. Moreover, stable results that are free of homoclinic-orbit crossing are obtained even when initial conditions are within 10{sup {minus}7} of the phase space separatrix value {pi}. It also is found that the present approach yields extremely accurate solutions for the Korteweg{endash}de Vries and nonlinear Schr{umlt o}dinger equations. Our results support Ablowitz and co-workers{close_quote} conjecture that ensuring high accuracy of spatial derivatives is more important than the use of symplectic time integration schemes for solving solitary wave equations. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}

  16. 3-D Modelling of Stretched Solitary Waves along Magnetic Field Lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muschietti, L.; Roth, I.; Carlson, C. W.; Berthomier, M.

    2001-12-01

    A model is presented for a new type of fast solitary waves which is observed by FAST in downward current regions of the auroral zone. The three-dimensional, coherent structures are electrostatic, have a positive potential, and move along the ambient magnetic field lines with speeds on the order of the electron drift. Their potential profile in the parallel direction, which can be directly measured, is flat-top whereby it cannot fit to the Gaussian shape used in previous work. Their potential profile in the perpendicular direction can only be inferred from a measured unipolar electric signal. We develop an extended BGK model which includes a flattened potential and an assumed cylindrical symmetry around a centric magnetic field line. The model envisions concentric shells of trapped electrons slowly drifting azimuthally while bouncing back and forth in the parallel direction. The electron dynamics is analysed in terms of three basic motions that occur on different time scales. These are defined by the cyclotron frequency Ω e, the bounce frequency ω b, and the azimuthal drift frequency ω γ , for which explicit analytical expressions are obtained. Subject to the ordering ω γ <<ωb<< Ωe, we calculate self-consistent distribution functions in terms of approximate constants of motion. Constraints on the parameters characterizing the amplitude and shape of the stretched solitary wave are discussed.

  17. Wave Phase-Sensitive Transformation of 3d-Straining of Mechanical Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, I. N.; Speranskiy, A. A.

    2015-11-01

    It is the area of research of oscillatory processes in elastic mechanical systems. Technical result of innovation is creation of spectral set of multidimensional images which reflect time-correlated three-dimensional vector parameters of metrological, and\\or estimated, and\\or design parameters of oscillations in mechanical systems. Reconstructed images of different dimensionality integrated in various combinations depending on their objective function can be used as homeostatic profile or cybernetic image of oscillatory processes in mechanical systems for an objective estimation of current operational conditions in real time. The innovation can be widely used to enhance the efficiency of monitoring and research of oscillation processes in mechanical systems (objects) in construction, mechanical engineering, acoustics, etc. Concept method of vector vibrometry based on application of vector 3D phase- sensitive vibro-transducers permits unique evaluation of real stressed-strained states of power aggregates and loaded constructions and opens fundamental innovation opportunities: conduct of continuous (on-line regime) reliable monitoring of turboagregates of electrical machines, compressor installations, bases, supports, pipe-lines and other objects subjected to damaging effect of vibrations; control of operational safety of technical systems at all the stages of life cycle including design, test production, tuning, testing, operational use, repairs and resource enlargement; creation of vibro-diagnostic systems of authentic non-destructive control of anisotropic characteristics of materials resistance of power aggregates and loaded constructions under outer effects and operational flaws. The described technology is revolutionary, universal and common for all branches of engineering industry and construction building objects.

  18. Rogue waves in Lugiato-Lefever equation with variable coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kol, Guy; Kingni, Sifeu; Woafo, Paul

    2014-11-01

    In this paper, we theoretically investigate the generation of optical rogue waves from a Lugiato-Lefever equation with variable coefficients by using the nonlinear Schrödinger equation-based constructive method. Exact explicit rogue-wave solutions of the Lugiato-Lefever equation with constant dispersion, detuning and dissipation are derived and presented. The bright rogue wave, intermediate rogue wave and the dark rogue wave are obtained by changing the value of one parameter in the exact explicit solutions corresponding to the external pump power of a continuous-wave laser.

  19. Wave-equation based traveltime seismic tomography - Part 1: Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, P.; Zhao, D.; Yang, D.; Yang, X.; Chen, J.; Liu, Q.

    2014-08-01

    In this paper, we propose a wave-equation based traveltime seismic tomography method with a detailed description of its step-by-step process. First, a linear relationship between the traveltime residual Δt = Tobs - Tsyn and the relative velocity perturbation δc(x) / c(x) connected by a finite-frequency traveltime sensitivity kernel K(x) is theoretically derived using the adjoint method. To accurately calculate the traveltime residual Δt, two automatic arrival-time picking techniques including the envelop energy ratio method and the combined ray and cross-correlation method are then developed to compute the arrival times Tsyn for synthetic seismograms. The arrival times Tobs of observed seismograms are usually determined by manual hand picking in real applications. Traveltime sensitivity kernel K(x) is constructed by convolving a forward wavefield u(t,x) with an adjoint wavefield q(t,x). The calculations of synthetic seismograms and sensitivity kernels rely on forward modelling. To make it computationally feasible for tomographic problems involving a large number of seismic records, the forward problem is solved in the two-dimensional (2-D) vertical plane passing through the source and the receiver by a high-order central difference method. The final model is parameterized on 3-D regular grid (inversion) nodes with variable spacings, while model values on each 2-D forward modelling node are linearly interpolated by the values at its eight surrounding 3-D inversion grid nodes. Finally, the tomographic inverse problem is formulated as a regularized optimization problem, which can be iteratively solved by either the LSQR solver or a non-linear conjugate-gradient method. To provide some insights into future 3-D tomographic inversions, Fréchet kernels for different seismic phases are also demonstrated in this study.

  20. Skin-Friction Measurements in a 3-D, Supersonic Shock-Wave/Boundary-Layer Interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wideman, J. K.; Brown, J. L.; Miles, J. B.; Ozcan, O.

    1994-01-01

    The experimental documentation of a three-dimensional shock-wave/boundary-layer interaction in a nominal Mach 3 cylinder, aligned with the free-stream flow, and 20 deg. half-angle conical flare offset 1.27 cm from the cylinder centerline. Surface oil flow, laser light sheet illumination, and schlieren were used to document the flow topology. The data includes surface-pressure and skin-friction measurements. A laser interferometric skin friction data. Included in the skin-friction data are measurements within separated regions and three-dimensional measurements in highly-swept regions. The skin-friction data will be particularly valuable in turbulence modeling and computational fluid dynamics validation.

  1. Pseudo 3-D P wave refraction seismic monitoring of permafrost in steep unstable bedrock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krautblatter, Michael; Draebing, Daniel

    2014-02-01

    permafrost in steep rock walls can cause hazardous rock creep and rock slope failure. Spatial and temporal patterns of permafrost degradation that operate at the scale of instability are complex and poorly understood. For the first time, we used P wave seismic refraction tomography (SRT) to monitor the degradation of permafrost in steep rock walls. A 2.5-D survey with five 80 m long parallel transects was installed across an unstable steep NE-SW facing crestline in the Matter Valley, Switzerland. P wave velocity was calibrated in the laboratory for water-saturated low-porosity paragneiss samples between 20°C and -5°C and increases significantly along and perpendicular to the cleavage by 0.55-0.66 km/s (10-13%) and 2.4-2.7 km/s (>100%), respectively, when freezing. Seismic refraction is, thus, technically feasible to detect permafrost in low-porosity rocks that constitute steep rock walls. Ray densities up to 100 and more delimit the boundary between unfrozen and frozen bedrock and facilitate accurate active layer positioning. SRT shows monthly (August and September 2006) and annual active layer dynamics (August 2006 and 2007) and reveals a contiguous permafrost body below the NE face with annual changes of active layer depth from 2 to 10 m. Large ice-filled fractures, lateral onfreezing of glacierets, and a persistent snow cornice cause previously unreported permafrost patterns close to the surface and along the crestline which correspond to active seasonal rock displacements up to several mm/a. SRT provides a geometrically highly resolved subsurface monitoring of active layer dynamics in steep permafrost rocks at the scale of instability.

  2. Dynamics of wave equations with moving boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, To Fu; Marín-Rubio, Pedro; Surco Chuño, Christian Manuel

    2017-03-01

    This paper is concerned with long-time dynamics of weakly damped semilinear wave equations defined on domains with moving boundary. Since the boundary is a function of the time variable the problem is intrinsically non-autonomous. Under the hypothesis that the lateral boundary is time-like, the solution operator of the problem generates an evolution process U (t , τ) :Xτ →Xt, where Xt are time-dependent Sobolev spaces. Then, by assuming the domains are expanding, we establish the existence of minimal pullback attractors with respect to a universe of tempered sets defined by the forcing terms. Our assumptions allow nonlinear perturbations with critical growth and unbounded time-dependent external forces.

  3. Wave equation modelling using Julia programming language

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Ahreum; Ryu, Donghyun; Ha, Wansoo

    2016-04-01

    Julia is a young high-performance dynamic programming language for scientific computations. It provides an extensive mathematical function library, a clean syntax and its own parallel execution model. We developed 2d wave equation modeling programs using Julia and C programming languages and compared their performance. We used the same modeling algorithm for the two modeling programs. We used Julia version 0.3.9 in this comparison. We declared data type of function arguments and used inbounds macro in the Julia program. Numerical results showed that the C programs compiled with Intel and GNU compilers were faster than Julia program, about 18% and 7%, respectively. Taking the simplicity of dynamic programming language into consideration, Julia can be a novel alternative of existing statically typed programming languages.

  4. The Learner Characteristics, Features of Desktop 3D Virtual Reality Environments, and College Chemistry Instruction: A Structural Equation Modeling Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merchant, Zahira; Goetz, Ernest T.; Keeney-Kennicutt, Wendy; Kwok, Oi-man; Cifuentes, Lauren; Davis, Trina J.

    2012-01-01

    We examined a model of the impact of a 3D desktop virtual reality environment on the learner characteristics (i.e. perceptual and psychological variables) that can enhance chemistry-related learning achievements in an introductory college chemistry class. The relationships between the 3D virtual reality features and the chemistry learning test as…

  5. Capturing atmospheric effects on 3D millimeter wave radar propagation patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, Richard D.; Fiorino, Steven T.; Keefer, Kevin J.; Stringer, Jeremy

    2016-05-01

    Traditional radar propagation modeling is done using a path transmittance with little to no input for weather and atmospheric conditions. As radar advances into the millimeter wave (MMW) regime, atmospheric effects such as attenuation and refraction become more pronounced than at traditional radar wavelengths. The DoD High Energy Laser Joint Technology Offices High Energy Laser End-to-End Operational Simulation (HELEEOS) in combination with the Laser Environmental Effects Definition and Reference (LEEDR) code have shown great promise simulating atmospheric effects on laser propagation. Indeed, the LEEDR radiative transfer code has been validated in the UV through RF. Our research attempts to apply these models to characterize the far field radar pattern in three dimensions as a signal propagates from an antenna towards a point in space. Furthermore, we do so using realistic three dimensional atmospheric profiles. The results from these simulations are compared to those from traditional radar propagation software packages. In summary, a fast running method has been investigated which can be incorporated into computational models to enhance understanding and prediction of MMW propagation through various atmospheric and weather conditions.

  6. Intensity images and statistics from numerical simulation of wave propagation in 3-D random media.

    PubMed

    Martin, J M; Flatté, S M

    1988-06-01

    An extended random medium is modeled by a set of 2-D thin Gaussian phase-changing screens with phase power spectral densities appropriate to the natural medium being modeled. Details of the algorithm and limitations on its application to experimental conditions are discussed, concentrating on power-law spectra describing refractive-index fluctuations of the neutral atmosphere. Inner and outer scale effects on intensity scintillation spectra and intensity variance are also included. Images of single realizations of the intensity field at the observing plane are presented, showing that under weak scattering the small-scale Fresnel length structure of the medium dominates the intensity scattering pattern. As the strength of scattering increases, caustics and interference fringes around focal regions begin to form. Finally, in still stronger scatter, the clustering of bright regions begins to reflect the large-scale structure of the medium. For plane waves incident on the medium, physically reasonable inner scales do not produce the large values of intensity variance observed in the focusing region during laser propagation experiments over kilometer paths in the atmosphere. Values as large as experimental observations have been produced in the simulations, but they require inner scales of the order of 10 cm. Inclusion of an outer scale depresses the low-frequency end of the intensity spectrum and reduces the maximum of the intensity variance. Increasing the steepness of the power law also slightly increases the maximum value of intensity variance.

  7. What's its wave? A 3D analysis of flying snake locomotion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeaton, Isaac J.; Baumgardner, Grant A.; Weiss, Talia M.; Nave, Gary; Ross, Shane D.; Socha, John J.

    2015-11-01

    Arboreal snakes of the genus Chrysopelea are the only known snakes to glide. To execute aerial locomotion, a snake jumps from a tree into the air while simultaneously flattening its body into an aerodynamically favorable shape. Snake gliding is distinguished by complex, three-dimensional body undulations resulting in a stable glide. However, these undulations have not been sufficiently characterized for a proper dynamical analysis. Here we ask, what is the body waveform employed during a glide, and how does this waveform enhance rotational stability? We report on recent glide experiments in which we recorded the three-dimensional body position during 8.5 m glides using a multi-camera motion-capture system. We quantify the body posture using complex modal analysis, which then serves as input in a variable-geometry rigid-body simulation of the snake while gliding. By separating the inertial and aerodynamic contributions in the equations of motion, we can now quantify the stability of the snake's `gait'. Supported by NSF 1351322.

  8. On Modifications of the Zakharov Equation for Surface Gravity Waves.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-07-01

    finite water depth (in section 2) and show its relations to the cubic Schr - dinger equation and to Hasselmann’s nonlinear interaction model (in section 3...on a modification of the nonlinear Schr { dinger equation for waves moving over an uneven bottom. Progress Report, Department of Civil Eng. Technion...7th Conf. of Coastal Engineering, Vol. 1, 184-196. Stiassnie, M. 1983 Note on the modified nonlinear Schr ~ dinger equation for deep water waves. Wave

  9. Detection of hidden objects using a real-time 3-D millimeter-wave imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozban, Daniel; Aharon, Avihai; Levanon, Assaf; Abramovich, Amir; Yitzhaky, Yitzhak; Kopeika, N. S.

    2014-10-01

    Millimeter (mm)and sub-mm wavelengths or terahertz (THz) band have several properties that motivate their use in imaging for security applications such as recognition of hidden objects, dangerous materials, aerosols, imaging through walls as in hostage situations, and also in bad weather conditions. There is no known ionization hazard for biological tissue, and atmospheric degradation of THz radiation is relatively low for practical imaging distances. We recently developed a new technology for the detection of THz radiation. This technology is based on very inexpensive plasma neon indicator lamps, also known as Glow Discharge Detector (GDD), that can be used as very sensitive THz radiation detectors. Using them, we designed and constructed a Focal Plane Array (FPA) and obtained recognizable2-dimensional THz images of both dielectric and metallic objects. Using THz wave it is shown here that even concealed weapons made of dielectric material can be detected. An example is an image of a knife concealed inside a leather bag and also under heavy clothing. Three-dimensional imaging using radar methods can enhance those images since it can allow the isolation of the concealed objects from the body and environmental clutter such as nearby furniture or other people. The GDDs enable direct heterodyning between the electric field of the target signal and the reference signal eliminating the requirement for expensive mixers, sources, and Low Noise Amplifiers (LNAs).We expanded the ability of the FPA so that we are able to obtain recognizable 2-dimensional THz images in real time. We show here that the THz detection of objects in three dimensions, using FMCW principles is also applicable in real time. This imaging system is also shown here to be capable of imaging objects from distances allowing standoff detection of suspicious objects and humans from large distances.

  10. Self-consistent Synthetic Mantle Discontinuities From Joint Modeling of Geodynamics and Mineral Physics and Their Effects on the 3D Global Wave Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuberth, B.; Piazzoni, A.; Bunge, H.; Igel, H.; Steinle-Neumann, G.; Moder, C.; Oeser, J.

    2007-12-01

    Our current understanding of mantle structure and dynamics is to a large part based on inversion of seismic data resulting in tomographic images and on direct analysis of a wide range of seismic phases such as Pdiff, PcP, ScS SdS etc. For solving inverse problems, forward modeling is needed to obtain a synthetic dataset for a given set of model parameters. In this respect, great progress has been made over the last years in the developement of sophisticated numerical full waveform modeling tools. However, the main limitation in the application of this new class of techniques for the forward problem of seismology is the lack of accurate predictions of mantle heterogeneity that allow us to test hypotheses about Earth's mantle. Such predictive models should be based on geodynamic and mineralogical considerations and derived independently of seismological observations. Here, we demonstrate the feasibility of joining forward simulations from geodynamics, mineral physics and seismology to obtain earth-like seismograms. 3D global wave propagation is simulated for dynamically consistent thermal structures derived from 3D mantle circulation modeling (e.g. Bunge et al. 2002), for which the temperatures are converted to seismic velocities using a recently published, thermodynamically self-consistent mineral physics approach (Piazzoni et al. 2007). Assuming a certain, fixed mantle composition (e.g. pyrolite) our mineralogic modeling algorithm computes the stable phases at mantle pressures for a wide range of temperatures by system Gibbs free energy minimization. Through the same equations of state that model the Gibbs free energy, we compute elastic moduli and density for each stable phase assemblage at the same P-T conditions. One straightforward application of this approach is the study of the seismic signature of synthetic mantle discontinuities arising in such models, as the temperature dependent phase transformations occuring at around 410 Km and 660 Km depth are

  11. A coupled wave-3-D hydrodynamics model of the Taranto Sea (Italy): a multiple-nesting approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaeta, Maria Gabriella; Samaras, Achilleas G.; Federico, Ivan; Archetti, Renata; Maicu, Francesco; Lorenzetti, Giuliano

    2016-09-01

    The present work describes an operational strategy for the development of a multiscale modeling system, based on a multiple-nesting approach and open-source numerical models. The strategy was applied and validated for the Gulf of Taranto in southern Italy, scaling large-scale oceanographic model results to high-resolution coupled wave-3-D hydrodynamics simulations for the area of Mar Grande in the Taranto Sea. The spatial and temporal high-resolution simulations were performed using the open-source TELEMAC suite, forced by wind data from the COSMO-ME database, boundary wave spectra from the RON buoy at Crotone and results from the Southern Adriatic Northern Ionian coastal Forecasting System (SANIFS) regarding sea levels and current fields. Model validation was carried out using data collected in the Mar Grande basin from a fixed monitoring station and during an oceanographic campaign in October 2014. The overall agreement between measurements and model results in terms of waves, sea levels, surface currents, circulation patterns and vertical velocity profiles is deemed to be satisfactory, and the methodology followed in the process can constitute a useful tool for both research and operational applications in the same field and as support of decisions for management and design of infrastructures.

  12. Modeling and validation of a 3D velocity structure for the Santa Clara Valley, California, for seismic-wave simulations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hartzell, S.; Harmsen, S.; Williams, R.A.; Carver, D.; Frankel, A.; Choy, G.; Liu, P.-C.; Jachens, R.C.; Brocher, T.M.; Wentworth, C.M.

    2006-01-01

    A 3D seismic velocity and attenuation model is developed for Santa Clara Valley, California, and its surrounding uplands to predict ground motions from scenario earthquakes. The model is developed using a variety of geologic and geophysical data. Our starting point is a 3D geologic model developed primarily from geologic mapping and gravity and magnetic surveys. An initial velocity model is constructed by using seismic velocities from boreholes, reflection/refraction lines, and spatial autocorrelation microtremor surveys. This model is further refined and the seismic attenuation is estimated through waveform modeling of weak motions from small local events and strong-ground motion from the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake. Waveforms are calculated to an upper frequency of 1 Hz using a parallelized finite-difference code that utilizes two regions with a factor of 3 difference in grid spacing to reduce memory requirements. Cenozoic basins trap and strongly amplify ground motions. This effect is particularly strong in the Evergreen Basin on the northeastern side of the Santa Clara Valley, where the steeply dipping Silver Creek fault forms the southwestern boundary of the basin. In comparison, the Cupertino Basin on the southwestern side of the valley has a more moderate response, which is attributed to a greater age and velocity of the Cenozoic fill. Surface waves play a major role in the ground motion of sedimentary basins, and they are seen to strongly develop along the western margins of the Santa Clara Valley for our simulation of the Loma Prieta earthquake.

  13. Modeling ionospheric disturbance features in quasi-vertically incident ionograms using 3-D magnetoionic ray tracing and atmospheric gravity waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cervera, M. A.; Harris, T. J.

    2014-01-01

    The Defence Science and Technology Organisation (DSTO) has initiated an experimental program, Spatial Ionospheric Correlation Experiment, utilizing state-of-the-art DSTO-designed high frequency digital receivers. This program seeks to understand ionospheric disturbances at scales < 150 km and temporal resolutions under 1 min through the simultaneous observation and recording of multiple quasi-vertical ionograms (QVI) with closely spaced ionospheric control points. A detailed description of and results from the first campaign conducted in February 2008 were presented by Harris et al. (2012). In this paper we employ a 3-D magnetoionic Hamiltonian ray tracing engine, developed by DSTO, to (1) model the various disturbance features observed on both the O and X polarization modes in our QVI data and (2) understand how they are produced. The ionospheric disturbances which produce the observed features were modeled by perturbing the ionosphere with atmospheric gravity waves.

  14. Dynamic diffraction-limited light-coupling of 3D-maneuvered wave-guided optical waveguides.

    PubMed

    Villangca, Mark; Bañas, Andrew; Palima, Darwin; Glückstad, Jesper

    2014-07-28

    We have previously proposed and demonstrated the targeted-light delivery capability of wave-guided optical waveguides (WOWs). As the WOWs are maneuvered in 3D space, it is important to maintain efficient light coupling through the waveguides within their operating volume. We propose the use of dynamic diffractive techniques to create diffraction-limited spots that will track and couple to the WOWs during operation. This is done by using a spatial light modulator to encode the necessary diffractive phase patterns to generate the multiple and dynamic coupling spots. The method is initially tested for a single WOW and we have experimentally demonstrated dynamic tracking and coupling for both lateral and axial displacements.

  15. Five-wave classical scattering matrix and integrable equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharov, V. E.; Odesskii, A. V.; Cisternino, M.; Onorato, M.

    2014-07-01

    We study the five-wave classical scattering matrix for nonlinear and dispersive Hamiltonian equations with a nonlinearity of the type u∂u/∂x. Our aim is to find the most general nontrivial form of the dispersion relation ω(k) for which the five-wave interaction scattering matrix is identically zero on the resonance manifold. As could be expected, the matrix in one dimension is zero for the Korteweg-de Vries equation, the Benjamin-Ono equation, and the intermediate long-wave equation. In two dimensions, we find a new equation that satisfies our requirement.

  16. Nonlinear Landau damping, and nonlinear envelope equation, for a driven plasma wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benisti, Didier; Morice, Olivier; Gremillet, Laurent; Strozzi, David

    2009-11-01

    A nonlinear envelope equation for a laser-driven electron plasma wave (EPW) is derived in a 3-D geometry, starting from first principles. This equation accounts the nonlinear variations of the EPW Landau damping rate, frequency, and group velocity, as well as for the nonlinear variations of the coupling of the EPW to the electromagnetic waves. All these quantities are moreover shown to be nonlocal because of nonlocal variations of the electron distribution function. Each piece of our model is carefully tested against Vlasov simulations of stimulated Raman scattering (SRS), and very good agreement is found between the numerical and theoretical results. Our envelope equations for both, the electrostatic and electromagnetic waves, are solved numerically, and comparisons with Vlasov simulations regarding the growth of SRS are provided. Finally, from our theory we can straightforwardly deduce a nonlinear gain factor which provides an alternate, simpler and faster method to quantify the SRS reflectivity. First results using this method will be shown.

  17. A multiblock/multizone code (PAB 3D-v2) for the three-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations: Preliminary applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdol-Hamid, Khaled S.

    1990-01-01

    The development and applications of multiblock/multizone and adaptive grid methodologies for solving the three-dimensional simplified Navier-Stokes equations are described. Adaptive grid and multiblock/multizone approaches are introduced and applied to external and internal flow problems. These new implementations increase the capabilities and flexibility of the PAB3D code in solving flow problems associated with complex geometry.

  18. Effective equations for matter-wave gap solitons in higher-order transversal states.

    PubMed

    Mateo, A Muñoz; Delgado, V

    2013-10-01

    We demonstrate that an important class of nonlinear stationary solutions of the three-dimensional (3D) Gross-Pitaevskii equation (GPE) exhibiting nontrivial transversal configurations can be found and characterized in terms of an effective one-dimensional (1D) model. Using a variational approach we derive effective equations of lower dimensionality for BECs in (m,n(r)) transversal states (states featuring a central vortex of charge m as well as n(r) concentric zero-density rings at every z plane) which provides us with a good approximate solution of the original 3D problem. Since the specifics of the transversal dynamics can be absorbed in the renormalization of a couple of parameters, the functional form of the equations obtained is universal. The model proposed finds its principal application in the study of the existence and classification of 3D gap solitons supported by 1D optical lattices, where in addition to providing a good estimate for the 3D wave functions it is able to make very good predictions for the μ(N) curves characterizing the different fundamental families. We have corroborated the validity of our model by comparing its predictions with those from the exact numerical solution of the full 3D GPE.

  19. Effective equations for matter-wave gap solitons in higher-order transversal states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mateo, A. Muñoz; Delgado, V.

    2013-10-01

    We demonstrate that an important class of nonlinear stationary solutions of the three-dimensional (3D) Gross-Pitaevskii equation (GPE) exhibiting nontrivial transversal configurations can be found and characterized in terms of an effective one-dimensional (1D) model. Using a variational approach we derive effective equations of lower dimensionality for BECs in (m,nr) transversal states (states featuring a central vortex of charge m as well as nr concentric zero-density rings at every z plane) which provides us with a good approximate solution of the original 3D problem. Since the specifics of the transversal dynamics can be absorbed in the renormalization of a couple of parameters, the functional form of the equations obtained is universal. The model proposed finds its principal application in the study of the existence and classification of 3D gap solitons supported by 1D optical lattices, where in addition to providing a good estimate for the 3D wave functions it is able to make very good predictions for the μ(N) curves characterizing the different fundamental families. We have corroborated the validity of our model by comparing its predictions with those from the exact numerical solution of the full 3D GPE.

  20. Multi wave method for the generalized form of BBM equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bildik, Necdet; Tandogan, Yusuf Ali

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, we apply the multi-wave method to find new multi wave solutions for an important nonlinear physical model. This model is well known as generalized form of Benjamin Bona Mahony (BBM) equation. Using the mathematics software Mathematica, we compute the traveling wave solutions. Then, the multi wave solutions including periodic wave solutions, bright soliton solutions and rational function solutions are obtained by the multi wave method. It is seen that this method is very useful mathematical approach for generalized form of BBM equation.

  1. Implementation and validation of a 3D wave-induced current model from the surf zone to the inner-shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michaud, H.; Marsaleix, P.; Leredde, Y.; Estournel, C.; Bourrin, F.; Lyard, F.; Mayet, C.; Ardhuin, F.

    2012-04-01

    We implement the new set of equations of Bennis et al. (2011) which use the glm2z-RANS theory (Ardhuin et al., 2008) to take into account the impact of waves into the 3D circulation model SYMPHONIE (Marsaleix et al., 2008, 2009). These adiabatic equations are completed by additional parameterizations of wave breaking, bottom friction and wave-enhanced vertical mixing, making the forcing valid from the surf zone through to the open ocean. The wave forcing is performed by WAVEWATCH III® (Tolman 2008; Ardhuin et al., 2010) for the realistic cases and SWAN (Booij et al., 1999) for the academic cases. Firstly, the model is tested in two academic cases. In the first case, it is compared with other models for a plane beach test case, previously tested by Haas and Warner (2009) and Uchiyama et al. (2010). Then, a comparison is made with the laboratory measurements of Haller et al. (2002) of a barred beach with channels. Results fit with previous simulations performed by other models or with available observational data: the littoral drift and the vertical profiles of current or in the second case, the rip current are well reproduced. Finally, a realistic case of a winter storm over a coast of the Gulf of Lion (NW of the Mediterranean Sea) for which currents are available at different depths as well as an accurate bathymetric database of the 0-10m depth range, is simulated. A grid nesting approach is used to account for the different forcing acting at the different spatial scales. We use at the smaller scale a grid with a variable resolution. The model is successful to reproduce the powerful northward littoral drift in the 0-15m depth zone. More precisely, two distinct cases are identified: when waves have a normal angle of incidence with the coast, they are responsible for complex circulation cells and rip currents in the surf zone, and when they travel obliquely, they generate a northward littoral drift. These features are more complicated than in the test cases, due to

  2. Coupled 3D time-dependent wave-packet approach in hyperspherical coordinates: application to the adiabatic singlet-state(1(1)A') D(+) + H2 reaction.

    PubMed

    Sahoo, Tapas; Ghosh, Sandip; Adhikari, Satrajit; Sharma, Rahul; Varandas, António J C

    2014-07-03

    We explore a coupled three-dimensional (3D) time-dependent wave packet formalism in hyperspherical coordinates for a 4D reactive scattering problem on the lowest adiabatic singlet surface (1(1)A') of the D(+) + H2 reaction. The coupling among the wavepackets arises through quantization of the rotation matrix, which represents the orientation of the three particles in space. The required transformation from Jacobi to hyperspherical coordinates and vice versa during initialization and projection of the wave packet on the asymptotic state(s), and the coupled equations of motion, are briefly discussed. With the long-range potential known to contribute significantly on the D(+) + H2 system, we demonstrate the workability of our approach, where the convergence profiles of the reaction probability for the reactive noncharge transfer (RNCT) process [D(+) + H2(v=0, j=0,1) → HD(v',j') + H(+)] are shown for three different collisional energies (1.7, 2.1, and 2.5 eV) with respect to the helicity (K) and total angular momentum (J) quantum numbers. The calculated reactive cross-section is presented as a function of the collision energy for two different initial states of the diatom (v = 0, j = 0, 1).

  3. A Generalized Mass Lumping Scheme for Maxwell's Wave Equation

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, A; White, D; Rodrigue, G

    2004-01-15

    We are interested in the high order Vector Finite Element Method (VFEM) [1] solution to Maxwell's wave equation on both orthogonal and non-orthogonal meshes. This method discretizes the wave equation in the following manner, where M is the edge mass matrix and K is the edge stiffness matrix created using classical Nedelec edge elements.

  4. Random Rays, Geometric Acoustics, and the Parabolic Wave Equation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-03-01

    5). Of course. Nelson’s theory is a stochastic version of the Schrodinger equation of quantum mechanics, but this equation is formally identical... equation is just the Schrodinger equation of quantum mechanics, and since we expect ray theory to be meaningful when k »1, i.e., when 1/k « 1, where (1/k...Wave Equation 5. TYPE OF REPORT & PERIOD COVERED TECHNICAL 6. PERFORMING 07G. REPORT NUMBER LAP-4 7. AUTHORfj; Thad Dankel, Jr. 8

  5. High-order rogue waves for the Hirota equation

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Linjing; Wu, Zhiwei; Wang, Lihong; He, Jingsong

    2013-07-15

    The Hirota equation is better than the nonlinear Schrödinger equation when approximating deep ocean waves. In this paper, high-order rational solutions for the Hirota equation are constructed based on the parameterized Darboux transformation. Several types of this kind of solutions are classified by their structures. -- Highlights: •The determinant representation of the N-fold Darboux transformation of the Hirota equation. •Properties of the fundamental pattern of the higher order rogue wave. •Ring structure and triangular structure of the higher order rogue waves.

  6. A comparative study of thermal effects of 3 types of laser in eye: 3D simulation with bioheat equation.

    PubMed

    Joukar, Amin; Nammakie, Erfan; Niroomand-Oscuii, Hanieh

    2015-01-01

    The application of laser in ophthalmology and eye surgery is so widespread that hardly can anyone deny its importance. On the other hand, since the human eye is an organ susceptible to external factors such as heat waves, laser radiation rapidly increases the temperature of the eye and therefore the study of temperature distribution inside the eye under laser irradiation is crucial; but the use of experimental and invasive methods for measuring the temperature inside the eye is typically high-risk and hazardous. In this paper, using the three-dimensional finite element method, the distribution of heat transfer inside the eye under transient condition was studied through three different lasers named Nd:Yag, Nd:Yap and ArF. Considering the metabolic heat and blood perfusion rate in various regions of the eye, numerical solution of space-time dependant Pennes bioheat transfer equation has been applied in this study. Lambert-Beer's law has been used to model the absorption of laser energy inside the eye tissues. It should also be mentioned that the effect of the ambient temperature, tear evaporation rate, laser power and the pupil diameter on the temperature distribution have been studied. Also, temperature distribution inside the eye after applying each laser and temperature variations of six optional regions as functions of time have been investigated. The results show that these radiations cause temperature rise in various regions, which will in turn causes serious damages to the eye tissues. Investigating the temperature distribution inside the eye under the laser irradiation can be a useful tool to study and predict the thermal effects of laser radiation on the human eye and evaluate the risk involved in performing laser surgery.

  7. Local energy decay for linear wave equations with variable coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikehata, Ryo

    2005-06-01

    A uniform local energy decay result is derived to the linear wave equation with spatial variable coefficients. We deal with this equation in an exterior domain with a star-shaped complement. Our advantage is that we do not assume any compactness of the support on the initial data, and its proof is quite simple. This generalizes a previous famous result due to Morawetz [The decay of solutions of the exterior initial-boundary value problem for the wave equation, Comm. Pure Appl. Math. 14 (1961) 561-568]. In order to prove local energy decay, we mainly apply two types of ideas due to Ikehata-Matsuyama [L2-behaviour of solutions to the linear heat and wave equations in exterior domains, Sci. Math. Japon. 55 (2002) 33-42] and Todorova-Yordanov [Critical exponent for a nonlinear wave equation with damping, J. Differential Equations 174 (2001) 464-489].

  8. Electromechanical wave imaging (EWI) validation in all four cardiac chambers with 3D electroanatomic mapping in canines in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costet, Alexandre; Wan, Elaine; Bunting, Ethan; Grondin, Julien; Garan, Hasan; Konofagou, Elisa

    2016-11-01

    Characterization and mapping of arrhythmias is currently performed through invasive insertion and manipulation of cardiac catheters. Electromechanical wave imaging (EWI) is a non-invasive ultrasound-based imaging technique, which tracks the electromechanical activation that immediately follows electrical activation. Electrical and electromechanical activations were previously found to be linearly correlated in the left ventricle, but the relationship has not yet been investigated in the three other chambers of the heart. The objective of this study was to investigate the relationship between electrical and electromechanical activations and validate EWI in all four chambers of the heart with conventional 3D electroanatomical mapping. Six (n  =  6) normal adult canines were used in this study. The electrical activation sequence was mapped in all four chambers of the heart, both endocardially and epicardially using the St Jude’s EnSite 3D mapping system (St. Jude Medical, Secaucus, NJ). EWI acquisitions were performed in all four chambers during normal sinus rhythm, and during pacing in the left ventricle. Isochrones of the electromechanical activation were generated from standard echocardiographic imaging views. Electrical and electromechanical activation maps were co-registered and compared, and electrical and electromechanical activation times were plotted against each other and linear regression was performed for each pair of activation maps. Electromechanical and electrical activations were found to be directly correlated with slopes of the correlation ranging from 0.77 to 1.83, electromechanical delays between 9 and 58 ms and R 2 values from 0.71 to 0.92. The linear correlation between electrical and electromechanical activations and the agreement between the activation maps indicate that the electromechanical activation follows the pattern of propagation of the electrical activation. This suggests that EWI may be used as a novel non-invasive method

  9. Self-Propagating Combustion Triggered Synthesis of 3D Lamellar Graphene/BaFe12O19 Composite and Its Electromagnetic Wave Absorption Properties

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Tingkai; Ji, Xianglin; Jin, Wenbo; Yang, Wenbo; Peng, Xiarong; Duan, Shichang; Dang, Alei; Li, Hao; Li, Tiehu

    2017-01-01

    The synthesis of 3D lamellar graphene/BaFe12O19 composites was performed by oxidizing graphite and sequentially self-propagating combustion triggered process. The 3D lamellar graphene structures were formed due to the synergistic effect of the tremendous heat induced gasification as well as huge volume expansion. The 3D lamellar graphene/BaFe12O19 composites bearing 30 wt % graphene present the reflection loss peak at −27.23 dB as well as the frequency bandwidth at 2.28 GHz (< −10 dB). The 3D lamellar graphene structures could consume the incident waves through multiple reflection and scattering within the layered structures, prolonging the propagation path of electromagnetic waves in the absorbers. PMID:28336889

  10. Bifurcations of traveling wave solutions for an integrable equation

    SciTech Connect

    Li Jibin; Qiao Zhijun

    2010-04-15

    This paper deals with the following equation m{sub t}=(1/2)(1/m{sup k}){sub xxx}-(1/2)(1/m{sup k}){sub x}, which is proposed by Z. J. Qiao [J. Math. Phys. 48, 082701 (2007)] and Qiao and Liu [Chaos, Solitons Fractals 41, 587 (2009)]. By adopting the phase analysis method of planar dynamical systems and the theory of the singular traveling wave systems to the traveling wave solutions of the equation, it is shown that for different k, the equation may have infinitely many solitary wave solutions, periodic wave solutions, kink/antikink wave solutions, cusped solitary wave solutions, and breaking loop solutions. We discuss in a detail the cases of k=-2,-(1/2),(1/2),2, and parametric representations of all possible bounded traveling wave solutions are given in the different (c,g)-parameter regions.

  11. 3D Simulation of Elastic Wave Propagation in Heterogeneous Anisotropic Media in Laplace Domain for Electromagnetic-Seismic Inverse Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, P.; Newman, G. A.

    2011-12-01

    Recent developments in high resolution imaging technology of subsurface objects involves a combination of different geophysical measurements (gravity, EM and seismic). A joint image of the subsurface geophysical attributes (velocity, electrical conductivity and density) requires the consistent treatment of the different geophysical data due to their differing physical nature. For example, in conducting media, which is typical of the Earth's interior, EM energy propagation is defined by a diffusive mechanism and may be characterized by two specific length scales: wavelength and skin depth. However, the propagation of seismic signals is a multiwave process and is characterized by a set of wavelengths. Thus, to consistently treat seismic and electromagnetic data an additional length scale is needed for seismic data that does not directly depend on a wavelength and describes a diffusive process, similar to EM wave propagation in the subsurface. Works by Brown et al.(2005), Shin and Cha(2008), and Shin and Ha(2008) suggest that an artificial damping of seismic wave fields via Laplace-Fourier transformation can be an effective approach to obtain a seismic data that have similar spatial resolution to EM data. The key benefit of such transformation is that diffusive wave-field inversion works well for both data sets: seismic (Brown et al.,2005; Shin and Cha,2008) and electromagnetic (Commer and Newman,2008; Newman et al.,2010). With the recent interest in the Laplace-Fourier domain full waveform inversion, 3D fourth and second-order finite-difference schemes for modeling of seismic wave propagation have been developed (Petrov and Newman, 2010). Incorporation of attenuation and anisotropy into a velocity model is a necessary step for a more realistic description of subsurface media. Here we consider the extension of our method which includes attenuation and VTI anisotropy. Our approach is based on the integro-interpolation technique for velocity-stress formulation. Seven

  12. Stability of drift waves with the integral eigenmode equation

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, L.; Ke, F.J.; Xu, M.J.; Tsai, S.T.; Lee, Y.C.; Antonsen, T.M. Jr.

    1981-11-01

    An analytical theory on the stability properties of drift-wave eigenmodes in a slab plasma with finite magnetic shear is presented. The corresponding eigenmode equation is the integral equation first given by Coppi, Rosenbluth, and Sagdeev (1967) and rederived here, in a relatively simpler fashion, via the gyrokinetic equation. It is then proved that the universal drift-wave eigenmodes remain absolutely stable and finite electron temperature gradients do not alter the stability.

  13. Using 3D Simulation of Elastic Wave Propagation in Laplace Domain for Electromagnetic-Seismic Inverse Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, P.; Newman, G. A.

    2010-12-01

    -Fourier domain we had developed 3D code for full-wave field simulation in the elastic media which take into account nonlinearity introduced by free-surface effects. Our approach is based on the velocity-stress formulation. In the contrast to conventional formulation we defined the material properties such as density and Lame constants not at nodal points but within cells. This second order finite differences method formulated in the cell-based grid, generate numerical solutions compatible with analytical ones within the range errors determinate by dispersion analysis. Our simulator will be embedded in an inversion scheme for joint seismic- electromagnetic imaging. It also offers possibilities for preconditioning the seismic wave propagation problems in the frequency domain. References. Shin, C. & Cha, Y. (2009), Waveform inversion in the Laplace-Fourier domain, Geophys. J. Int. 177(3), 1067- 1079. Shin, C. & Cha, Y. H. (2008), Waveform inversion in the Laplace domain, Geophys. J. Int. 173(3), 922-931. Commer, M. & Newman, G. (2008), New advances in three-dimensional controlled-source electromagnetic inversion, Geophys. J. Int. 172(2), 513-535. Newman, G. A., Commer, M. & Carazzone, J. J. (2010), Imaging CSEM data in the presence of electrical anisotropy, Geophysics, in press.

  14. Symmetry-plane models of 3D Euler fluid equations: Analytical solutions and finite-time blowup using infinitesimal Lie-symmetry methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bustamante, Miguel D.

    2014-11-01

    We consider 3D Euler fluids endowed with a discrete symmetry whereby the velocity field is invariant under mirror reflections about a 2D surface known as the ``symmetry plane.'' This type of flow is widely used in numerical simulations of classical/magnetic/quantum turbulence and vortex reconnection. On the 2D symmetry plane, the governing equations are best written in terms of two scalars: vorticity and stretching rate of vorticity. These determine the velocity field on the symmetry plane. However, the governing equations are not closed, because of the contribution of a single pressure term that depends on the full 3D velocity profile. By modelling this pressure term we propose a one-parameter family of sensible models for the flow along the 2D symmetry plane. We apply the method of infinitesimal Lie symmetries and solve the governing equations analytically for the two scalars as functions of time. We show how the value of the model's parameter determines if the analytical solution has a finite-time blowup and obtain explicit formulae for the blowup time. We validate the models by showing that a particular choice of the model's parameter corresponds to a well-known exact solution of 3D Euler equations [Gibbon et al., Physica D 132, 497 (1999)]. We discuss practical applications. Supported by Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) under Grant Number 12/IP/1491.

  15. Preconditioning techniques for constrained vector potential integral equations, with application to 3-D magnetoquasistatic analysis of electronic packages

    SciTech Connect

    Kamon, M.; Phillips, J.R.

    1994-12-31

    In this paper techniques are presented for preconditioning equations generated by discretizing constrained vector integral equations associated with magnetoquasistatic analysis. Standard preconditioning approaches often fail on these problems. The authors present a specialized preconditioning technique and prove convergence bounds independent of the constraint equations and electromagnetic excitation frequency. Computational results from analyzing several electronic packaging examples are given to demonstrate that the new preconditioning approach can sometimes reduce the number of GMRES iterations by more than an order of magnitude.

  16. PLOT3D/AMES, APOLLO UNIX VERSION USING GMR3D (WITHOUT TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P.

    1994-01-01

    PLOT3D is an interactive graphics program designed to help scientists visualize computational fluid dynamics (CFD) grids and solutions. Today, supercomputers and CFD algorithms can provide scientists with simulations of such highly complex phenomena that obtaining an understanding of the simulations has become a major problem. Tools which help the scientist visualize the simulations can be of tremendous aid. PLOT3D/AMES offers more functions and features, and has been adapted for more types of computers than any other CFD graphics program. Version 3.6b+ is supported for five computers and graphic libraries. Using PLOT3D, CFD physicists can view their computational models from any angle, observing the physics of problems and the quality of solutions. As an aid in designing aircraft, for example, PLOT3D's interactive computer graphics can show vortices, temperature, reverse flow, pressure, and dozens of other characteristics of air flow during flight. As critical areas become obvious, they can easily be studied more closely using a finer grid. PLOT3D is part of a computational fluid dynamics software cycle. First, a program such as 3DGRAPE (ARC-12620) helps the scientist generate computational grids to model an object and its surrounding space. Once the grids have been designed and parameters such as the angle of attack, Mach number, and Reynolds number have been specified, a "flow-solver" program such as INS3D (ARC-11794 or COS-10019) solves the system of equations governing fluid flow, usually on a supercomputer. Grids sometimes have as many as two million points, and the "flow-solver" produces a solution file which contains density, x- y- and z-momentum, and stagnation energy for each grid point. With such a solution file and a grid file containing up to 50 grids as input, PLOT3D can calculate and graphically display any one of 74 functions, including shock waves, surface pressure, velocity vectors, and particle traces. PLOT3D's 74 functions are organized into

  17. PLOT3D/AMES, APOLLO UNIX VERSION USING GMR3D (WITH TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P.

    1994-01-01

    PLOT3D is an interactive graphics program designed to help scientists visualize computational fluid dynamics (CFD) grids and solutions. Today, supercomputers and CFD algorithms can provide scientists with simulations of such highly complex phenomena that obtaining an understanding of the simulations has become a major problem. Tools which help the scientist visualize the simulations can be of tremendous aid. PLOT3D/AMES offers more functions and features, and has been adapted for more types of computers than any other CFD graphics program. Version 3.6b+ is supported for five computers and graphic libraries. Using PLOT3D, CFD physicists can view their computational models from any angle, observing the physics of problems and the quality of solutions. As an aid in designing aircraft, for example, PLOT3D's interactive computer graphics can show vortices, temperature, reverse flow, pressure, and dozens of other characteristics of air flow during flight. As critical areas become obvious, they can easily be studied more closely using a finer grid. PLOT3D is part of a computational fluid dynamics software cycle. First, a program such as 3DGRAPE (ARC-12620) helps the scientist generate computational grids to model an object and its surrounding space. Once the grids have been designed and parameters such as the angle of attack, Mach number, and Reynolds number have been specified, a "flow-solver" program such as INS3D (ARC-11794 or COS-10019) solves the system of equations governing fluid flow, usually on a supercomputer. Grids sometimes have as many as two million points, and the "flow-solver" produces a solution file which contains density, x- y- and z-momentum, and stagnation energy for each grid point. With such a solution file and a grid file containing up to 50 grids as input, PLOT3D can calculate and graphically display any one of 74 functions, including shock waves, surface pressure, velocity vectors, and particle traces. PLOT3D's 74 functions are organized into

  18. Stability of traveling wave solutions to the Whitham equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanford, Nathan; Kodama, Keri; Carter, John D.; Kalisch, Henrik

    2014-06-01

    The Whitham equation was proposed as an alternate model equation for the simplified description of unidirectional wave motion at the surface of an inviscid fluid. An advantage of the Whitham equation over the KdV equation is that it provides a more faithful description of short waves of small amplitude. Recently, Ehrnström and Kalisch [19] established that the Whitham equation admits periodic traveling-wave solutions. The focus of this work is the stability of these solutions. The numerical results presented here suggest that all large-amplitude solutions are unstable, while small-amplitude solutions with large enough wavelength L are stable. Additionally, periodic solutions with wavelength smaller than a certain cut-off period always exhibit modulational instability. The cut-off wavelength is characterized by kh0=1.145, where k=2π/L is the wave number and h0 is the mean fluid depth.

  19. Optimal fourth-order staggered-grid finite-difference scheme for 3D frequency-domain viscoelastic wave modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y.; Han, B.; Métivier, L.; Brossier, R.

    2016-09-01

    We investigate an optimal fourth-order staggered-grid finite-difference scheme for 3D frequency-domain viscoelastic wave modeling. An anti-lumped mass strategy is incorporated to minimize the numerical dispersion. The optimal finite-difference coefficients and the mass weighting coefficients are obtained by minimizing the misfit between the normalized phase velocities and the unity. An iterative damped least-squares method, the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm, is utilized for the optimization. Dispersion analysis shows that the optimal fourth-order scheme presents less grid dispersion and anisotropy than the conventional fourth-order scheme with respect to different Poisson's ratios. Moreover, only 3.7 grid-points per minimum shear wavelength are required to keep the error of the group velocities below 1%. The memory cost is then greatly reduced due to a coarser sampling. A parallel iterative method named CARP-CG is used to solve the large ill-conditioned linear system for the frequency-domain modeling. Validations are conducted with respect to both the analytic viscoacoustic and viscoelastic solutions. Compared with the conventional fourth-order scheme, the optimal scheme generates wavefields having smaller error under the same discretization setups. Profiles of the wavefields are presented to confirm better agreement between the optimal results and the analytic solutions.

  20. Triboelectric nanogenerator built on suspended 3D spiral structure as vibration and positioning sensor and wave energy harvester.

    PubMed

    Hu, Youfan; Yang, Jin; Jing, Qingshen; Niu, Simiao; Wu, Wenzhuo; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2013-11-26

    An unstable mechanical structure that can self-balance when perturbed is a superior choice for vibration energy harvesting and vibration detection. In this work, a suspended 3D spiral structure is integrated with a triboelectric nanogenerator (TENG) for energy harvesting and sensor applications. The newly designed vertical contact-separation mode TENG has a wide working bandwidth of 30 Hz in low-frequency range with a maximum output power density of 2.76 W/m(2) on a load of 6 MΩ. The position of an in-plane vibration source was identified by placing TENGs at multiple positions as multichannel, self-powered active sensors, and the location of the vibration source was determined with an error less than 6%. The magnitude of the vibration is also measured by the output voltage and current signal of the TENG. By integrating the TENG inside a buoy ball, wave energy harvesting at water surface has been demonstrated and used for lighting illumination light, which shows great potential applications in marine science and environmental/infrastructure monitoring.

  1. Stability for line solitary waves of Zakharov-Kuznetsov equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazaki, Yohei

    2017-04-01

    In this paper, we consider the stability for line solitary waves of the two dimensional Zakharov-Kuznetsov equation on R ×TL which is one of a high dimensional generalization of Korteweg-de Vries equation, where TL is the torus with the 2 πL period. The orbital and asymptotic stability of the one soliton of Korteweg-de Vries equation on the energy space was proved by Benjamin [2], Pego and Weinstein [41] and Martel and Merle [30]. We regard the one soliton of Korteweg-de Vries equation as a line solitary wave of Zakharov-Kuznetsov equation on R ×TL. We prove the stability and the transverse instability of the line solitary waves of Zakharov-Kuznetsov equation by applying the method of Evans' function and the argument of Rousset and Tzvetkov [44]. Moreover, we prove the asymptotic stability for orbitally stable line solitary waves of Zakharov-Kuznetsov equation by using the argument of Martel and Merle [30-32] and a Liouville type theorem. If L is the critical period with respect to a line solitary wave, the line solitary wave is orbitally stable. However, since this line solitary wave is a bifurcation point of the stationary equation, the linearized operator of the stationary equation is degenerate. Because of the degeneracy of the linearized operator, we can not show the Liouville type theorem for the line solitary wave by using the usual virial type estimate. To show the Liouville type theorem for the line solitary wave, we modify a virial type estimate.

  2. Global existence and asymptotic behavior for the 3D compressible Navier-Stokes equations without heat conductivity in a bounded domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Guochun

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the global existence and uniqueness of strong solutions to the initial boundary value problem for the 3D compressible Navier-Stokes equations without heat conductivity in a bounded domain with slip boundary. The global existence and uniqueness of strong solutions are obtained when the initial data is near its equilibrium in H2 (Ω). Furthermore, the exponential convergence rates of the pressure and velocity are also proved by delicate energy methods.

  3. Airborne & SAR Synergy Reveals the 3D Structure of Air Bubble Entrainment in Internal Waves and Frontal Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Silva, J. C. B.; Magalhaes, J. M.; Batista, M.; Gostiaux, L.; Gerkema, T.; New, A. L.

    2013-03-01

    spectral range 8-12 μm. With a nominal ground resolution of approximately 1.5 meters (at an altitude of 500 meters) it is capable to detect fine structure associated to turbulence. The LiDAR system that has been used is the Leica ALS50-II (1064nm) with a hit rate greater than 1 hit per square meter and a vertical resolution of approximately 15 cm. Both systems were available simultaneously, together with the hyperspectral system and the RCD105 39Mpx digital camera, integrated with the LiDAR navigation system. We analyse the airborne data together with a comprehensive dataset of satellite Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) that includes ENVISAT and TerraSAR-X images. In addition, in situ observations in the near-shore zone were obtained in a previous experiment (Project SPOTIWAVE-II POCI/MAR/57836/2004 funded by the Portuguese FCT) during the summer period in 2006. These included thermistor chain measurements along the water column that captured the vertical structure of shoaling internal (tidal) waves and ISWs close to the breaking point. The SAR and airborne images were obtained in light wind conditions, in the near-shore zone, and in the presence of ISWs. The LiDAR images revealed sub-surface structures (some 1-2 m below the sea surface) that were co-located with surface films. These film slicks were induced by the convergent fields of internal waves and upwelling fronts. Some of the sub-surface features were located over the front slopes of the internal waves, which coincides with the internal wave slick band visible in the aerial photos and hyperspectral systems. Our flight measurements revealed thermal features similar to “boils” of cold water within the wake of (admittedly breaking) internal waves. These features are consistent with the previous in situ measurements of breaking ISWs. In this paper we will show coincident multi-sensor airborne and satellite SAR observations that reveal the 3D structure of air bubble entrainment in the internal wave field and frontal

  4. Kinetic equation for nonlinear resonant wave-particle interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artemyev, A. V.; Neishtadt, A. I.; Vasiliev, A. A.; Mourenas, D.

    2016-09-01

    We investigate the nonlinear resonant wave-particle interactions including the effects of particle (phase) trapping, detrapping, and scattering by high-amplitude coherent waves. After deriving the relationship between probability of trapping and velocity of particle drift induced by nonlinear scattering (phase bunching), we substitute this relation and other characteristic equations of wave-particle interaction into a kinetic equation for the particle distribution function. The final equation has the form of a Fokker-Planck equation with peculiar advection and collision terms. This equation fully describes the evolution of particle momentum distribution due to particle diffusion, nonlinear drift, and fast transport in phase-space via trapping. Solutions of the obtained kinetic equation are compared with results of test particle simulations.

  5. Solitary Waves of the MRLW Equation by Variational Iteration Method

    SciTech Connect

    Hassan, Saleh M.; Alamery, D. G.

    2009-09-09

    In a recent publication, Soliman solved numerically the modified regularized long wave (MRLW) equation by using the variational iteration method (VIM). In this paper, corrected numerical results have been computed, plotted, tabulated, and compared with not only the exact analytical solutions but also the Adomian decomposition method results. Solitary wave solutions of the MRLW equation are exactly obtained as a convergent series with easily computable components. Propagation of single solitary wave, interaction of two and three waves, and also birth of solitons have been discussed. Three invariants of motion have been evaluated to determine the conservation properties of the problem.

  6. Asymptotic Behavior for a Strongly Damped Nonlinear Wave Equation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-06-01

    Equation (1) may also be considered as an ordinary differential equation on a Banach space. This is the setting I prefer, as it usually seems much more... NONLINEAR WAVE EQUATION ~0 by gc~ Paul Massatt Lefschetz Center for Dynamical Systems Division of Applied Mathematics Brown University Providence, Rhode...Interim -) DAMPED NONLINEAR WAVE EQUATION . 6. PERFORMING 0G. RMRT UMBER 7. AUTHOR(a) S. CONTRACT OR GRANT NUMBER(O) PAUL!MASSATT 47 -Xo AFdSR-76-3,992 / 9

  7. Asymptotic analysis of numerical wave propagation in finite difference equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giles, M.; Thompkins, W. T., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    An asymptotic technique is developed for analyzing the propagation and dissipation of wave-like solutions to finite difference equations. It is shown that for each fixed complex frequency there are usually several wave solutions with different wavenumbers and the slowly varying amplitude of each satisfies an asymptotic amplitude equation which includes the effects of smoothly varying coefficients in the finite difference equations. The local group velocity appears in this equation as the velocity of convection of the amplitude. Asymptotic boundary conditions coupling the amplitudes of the different wave solutions are also derived. A wavepacket theory is developed which predicts the motion, and interaction at boundaries, of wavepackets, wave-like disturbances of finite length. Comparison with numerical experiments demonstrates the success and limitations of the theory. Finally an asymptotic global stability analysis is developed.

  8. Macroscopic heat transport equations and heat waves in nonequilibrium states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yangyu; Jou, David; Wang, Moran

    2017-03-01

    Heat transport may behave as wave propagation when the time scale of processes decreases to be comparable to or smaller than the relaxation time of heat carriers. In this work, a generalized heat transport equation including nonlinear, nonlocal and relaxation terms is proposed, which sums up the Cattaneo-Vernotte, dual-phase-lag and phonon hydrodynamic models as special cases. In the frame of this equation, the heat wave propagations are investigated systematically in nonequilibrium steady states, which were usually studied around equilibrium states. The phase (or front) speed of heat waves is obtained through a perturbation solution to the heat differential equation, and found to be intimately related to the nonlinear and nonlocal terms. Thus, potential heat wave experiments in nonequilibrium states are devised to measure the coefficients in the generalized equation, which may throw light on understanding the physical mechanisms and macroscopic modeling of nanoscale heat transport.

  9. Late-time attractor for the cubic nonlinear wave equation

    SciTech Connect

    Szpak, Nikodem

    2010-08-15

    We apply our recently developed scaling technique for obtaining late-time asymptotics to the cubic nonlinear wave equation and explain the appearance and approach to the two-parameter attractor found recently by Bizon and Zenginoglu.

  10. High-resolution 3-D P-wave tomographic imaging of the shallow magmatic system of Erebus volcano, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zandomeneghi, D.; Aster, R. C.; Barclay, A. H.; Chaput, J. A.; Kyle, P. R.

    2011-12-01

    Erebus volcano (Ross Island), the most active volcano in Antarctica, is characterized by a persistent phonolitic lava lake at its summit and a wide range of seismic signals associated with its underlying long-lived magmatic system. The magmatic structure in a 3 by 3 km area around the summit has been imaged using high-quality data from a seismic tomographic experiment carried out during the 2008-2009 austral field season (Zandomeneghi et al., 2010). An array of 78 short period, 14 broadband, and 4 permanent Mount Erebus Volcano Observatory seismic stations and a program of 12 shots were used to model the velocity structure in the uppermost kilometer over the volcano conduit. P-wave travel times were inverted for the 3-D velocity structure using the shortest-time ray tracing (50-m grid spacing) and LSQR inversion (100-m node spacing) of a tomography code (Toomey et al., 1994) that allows for the inclusion of topography. Regularization is controlled by damping and smoothing weights and smoothing lengths, and addresses complications that are inherent in a strongly heterogeneous medium featuring rough topography and a dense parameterization and distribution of receivers/sources. The tomography reveals a composite distribution of very high and low P-wave velocity anomalies (i.e., exceeding 20% in some regions), indicating a complex sub-lava-lake magmatic geometry immediately beneath the summit region and in surrounding areas, as well as the presence of significant high velocity shallow regions. The strongest and broadest low velocity zone is located W-NW of the crater rim, indicating the presence of an off-axis shallow magma body. This feature spatially corresponds to the inferred centroid source of VLP signals associated with Strombolian eruptions and lava lake refill (Aster et al., 2008). Other resolved structures correlate with the Side Crater and with lineaments of ice cave thermal anomalies extending NE and SW of the rim. High velocities in the summit area possibly

  11. Constructing a 3D Crustal Model Across the Entire Contiguous US Using Broadband Rayleigh Wave Phase Velocity and Ellipticity Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, F. C.; Schmandt, B.

    2015-12-01

    Imaging the crust and lithosphere structure beneath North America is one of the primary targets for the NSF-funded EarthScope project. In this study, we apply the recently developed ambient noise and surface wave tomography methods to construct a detailed 3D crustal model across the entire contiguous US using USArray data between January 2007 and May 2015. By using both Rayleigh wave phase velocity and ellipticity measurements between 8 and 100 sec period, the shear velocity structure can be well resolved within the five crustal layers we modeled: three upper crust, one middle crust, and one lower crust. Clear correlations are observed between the resolved velocity anomalies and known geological features at all depths. In the uppermost crust, slow Vs anomalies are observed within major sedimentary environments such as the Williston Basin, Denver Basin, and Mississippi embayment, and fast Vs anomalies are observed in environments with deeply exhumed bedrock outcrops at the surface including the Laurentian Highlands, Ouachita-Ozark Interior Highlands, and Appalachian Highlands. In the deeper upper crust, slow anomalies are observed in deep sedimentary basins such as the Green River Basin, Appalachian Basin, Southern Oklahoma Aulacogen, and areas surrounding the Gulf of Mexico. Fast anomalies, on the other hand, are observed in the Colorado Plateau, within the Great Plains between the Front Ranges and Midcontinental Rift, and east of the Appalachian Mountains. At this depth, the Midcontinental Rift and Grenville Front clearly correlate well with various velocity structure boundaries. In the middle crust, slow anomalies are mostly observed in the tectonically active areas in the western US, but relatively slow anomalies are also observed southeast of the Precambrian Rift Margins. At this depth, fast anomalies are observed beneath various deep sedimentary basins such as the Southern Oklahoma Aulacogen, Appalachian Basin, and Central Valley. In the lower crust, a clear

  12. A wave equation interpolating between classical and quantum mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schleich, W. P.; Greenberger, D. M.; Kobe, D. H.; Scully, M. O.

    2015-10-01

    We derive a ‘master’ wave equation for a family of complex-valued waves {{Φ }}\\equiv R{exp}[{{{i}}S}({cl)}/{{\\hbar }}] whose phase dynamics is dictated by the Hamilton-Jacobi equation for the classical action {S}({cl)}. For a special choice of the dynamics of the amplitude R which eliminates all remnants of classical mechanics associated with {S}({cl)} our wave equation reduces to the Schrödinger equation. In this case the amplitude satisfies a Schrödinger equation analogous to that of a charged particle in an electromagnetic field where the roles of the scalar and the vector potentials are played by the classical energy and the momentum, respectively. In general this amplitude is complex and thereby creates in addition to the classical phase {S}({cl)}/{{\\hbar }} a quantum phase. Classical statistical mechanics, as described by a classical matter wave, follows from our wave equation when we choose the dynamics of the amplitude such that it remains real for all times. Our analysis shows that classical and quantum matter waves are distinguished by two different choices of the dynamics of their amplitudes rather than two values of Planck’s constant. We dedicate this paper to the memory of Richard Lewis Arnowitt—a pioneer of many-body theory, a path finder at the interface of gravity and quantum mechanics, and a true leader in non-relativistic and relativistic quantum field theory.

  13. Efficient Integration of Quantum Mechanical Wave Equations by Unitary Transforms

    SciTech Connect

    Bauke, Heiko; Keitel, Christoph H.

    2009-08-13

    The integration of time dependent quantum mechanical wave equations is a fundamental problem in computational physics and computational chemistry. The energy and momentum spectrum of a wave function imposes fundamental limits on the performance of numerical algorithms for this problem. We demonstrate how unitary transforms can help to surmount these limitations.

  14. Plane wave (curl; Ω) conforming finite elements for Maxwell's equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ledger, P. D.; Morgan, K.; Hassan, O.; Weatherill, N. P.

    This paper proposes a discretisation of Maxwell's equations which combines the popular edge elements of Nédélec with expansions of plane waves. The method is applied to simple two dimensional electromagnetic wave propagation and scattering simulations and issues of accuracy and matrix conditioning are investigated.

  15. Peaked Periodic Wave Solutions to the Broer–Kaup Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Bo; Bi, Qin-Sheng

    2017-01-01

    By qualitative analysis method, a sufficient condition for the existence of peaked periodic wave solutions to the Broer–Kaup equation is given. Some exact explicit expressions of peaked periodic wave solutions are also presented. Supported by National Nature Science Foundation of China under Grant No. 11102076 and Natural Science Fund for Colleges and Universities in Jiangsu Province under Grant No. 15KJB110005

  16. Solution of the scalar wave equation over very long distances using nonlinear solitary waves: Relation to finite difference methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinhoff, John; Chitta, Subhashini

    2012-08-01

    The linear wave equation represents the basis of many linear electromagnetic and acoustic propagation problems. Features that a computational model must have, to capture large scale realistic effects (for over the horizon or "OTH" radar communication, for example), include propagation of short waves with scattering and partial absorption by complex topography. For these reasons, it is not feasible to use Green's Function or any simple integral method, which neglects these intermediate effects and requires a known propagation function between source and observer. In this paper, we describe a new method for propagating such short waves over long distances, including intersecting scattered waves. The new method appears to be much simpler than conventional high frequency schemes: Lagrangian "particle" based approaches, such as "ray tracing" become very complex in 3-D, especially for waves that may be expanding, or even intersecting. The other high frequency scheme in common use, the Eikonal, also has difficulty with intersecting waves. Our approach, based on nonlinear solitary waves concentrated about centroid surfaces of physical wave features, is related to that of Whitham [1], which involves solving wave fronts propagating on characteristics. Then, the evolving electromagnetic (or acoustic) field can be approximated as a collection of propagating co-dimension one surfaces (for example, 2-D surfaces in three dimensions). This approach involves solving propagation equations discretely on an Eulerian grid to approximate the linear wave equation. However, to propagate short waves over long distances, conventional Eulerian numerical methods, which attempt to resolve the structure of each wave, require far too many grid cells and are not feasible on current or foreseeable computers. Instead, we employ an "extended" wave equation that captures the important features of the propagating waves. This method is first formulated at the partial differential equation (PDE) level

  17. Microscopic models of traveling wave equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunet, Eric; Derrida, Bernard

    1999-09-01

    Reaction-diffusion problems are often described at a macroscopic scale by partial derivative equations of the type of the Fisher or Kolmogorov-Petrovsky-Piscounov equation. These equations have a continuous family of front solutions, each of them corresponding to a different velocity of the front. By simulating systems of size up to N=1016 particles at the microscopic scale, where particles react and diffuse according to some stochastic rules, we show that a single velocity is selected for the front. This velocity converges logarithmically to the solution of the F-KPP equation with minimal velocity when the number N of particles increases. A simple calculation of the effect introduced by the cutoff due to the microscopic scale allows one to understand the origin of the logarithmic correction.

  18. Observations of Plasma Waves in the Colliding Jet Region of a 3D Magnetic Flux Rope Flanked by Two Active Reconnection X Lines at the Subsolar Magnetopause

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oieroset, M.; Sundkvist, D. J.; Chaston, C. C.; Phan, T. D.; Mozer, F.; McFadden, J. P.; Angelopoulos, V.; Andersson, L.; Eastwood, J. P.

    2014-12-01

    We have performed a detailed analysis of plasma and wave observations in a 3D magnetic flux rope encountered by the THEMIS spacecraft at the subsolar magnetopause. The extent of the flux rope was ˜270 ion skin depths in the outflow direction, and it was flanked by two active reconnection X lines producing colliding plasma jets in the flux rope core where ion heating and suprathermal electrons were observed. The colliding jet region was highly dynamic and characterized by the presence of high-frequency waves such as ion acoustic-like waves, electron holes, and whistler mode waves near the flux rope center and low-frequency kinetic Alfvén waves over a larger region. We will discuss possible links between these waves and particle heating.

  19. On Bi-Grid Local Mode Analysis of Solution Techniques for 3-D Euler and Navier-Stokes Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ibraheem, S. O.; Demuren, A. O.

    1994-01-01

    A procedure is presented for utilizing a bi-grid stability analysis as a practical tool for predicting multigrid performance in a range of numerical methods for solving Euler and Navier-Stokes equations. Model problems based on the convection, diffusion and Burger's equation are used to illustrate the superiority of the bi-grid analysis as a predictive tool for multigrid performance in comparison to the smoothing factor derived from conventional von Neumann analysis. For the Euler equations, bi-grid analysis is presented for three upwind difference based factorizations, namely Spatial, Eigenvalue and Combination splits, and two central difference based factorizations, namely LU and ADI methods. In the former, both the Steger-Warming and van Leer flux-vector splitting methods are considered. For the Navier-Stokes equations, only the Beam-Warming (ADI) central difference scheme is considered. In each case, estimates of multigrid convergence rates from the bi-grid analysis are compared to smoothing factors obtained from single-grid stability analysis. Effects of grid aspect ratio and flow skewness are examined. Both predictions are compared with practical multigrid convergence rates for 2-D Euler and Navier-Stokes solutions based on the Beam-Warming central scheme.

  20. Exact traveling wave solutions for system of nonlinear evolution equations.

    PubMed

    Khan, Kamruzzaman; Akbar, M Ali; Arnous, Ahmed H

    2016-01-01

    In this work, recently deduced generalized Kudryashov method is applied to the variant Boussinesq equations, and the (2 + 1)-dimensional breaking soliton equations. As a result a range of qualitative explicit exact traveling wave solutions are deduced for these equations, which motivates us to develop, in the near future, a new approach to obtain unsteady solutions of autonomous nonlinear evolution equations those arise in mathematical physics and engineering fields. It is uncomplicated to extend this method to higher-order nonlinear evolution equations in mathematical physics. And it should be possible to apply the same method to nonlinear evolution equations having more general forms of nonlinearities by utilizing the traveling wave hypothesis.

  1. Simple five-dimensional wave equation for a Dirac particle

    SciTech Connect

    Redington, N.; Lodhi, M. A. K.

    2007-02-15

    A first-order relativistic wave equation is constructed in five dimensions. Its solutions are eight-component spinors, interpreted as single-particle fermion wave functions in four-dimensional space-time. Use of a ''cylinder condition'' (the removal of explicit dependence on the fifth coordinate) reduces each eight-component solution to a pair of degenerate four-component spinors. It is shown that, when the cylinder condition is applied, the results obtained from the new equation are the same as those obtained from the Dirac equation. Without the cylinder condition, on the other hand, the equation implies the existence of a scalar potential, and for zero-mass particles it leads to a four-dimensional fermionic equation analogous to Maxwell's equation with sources.

  2. Theoretical and numerical comparison of 3D numerical schemes for their accuracy with respect to P-wave to S-wave speed ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moczo, P.; Kristek, J.; Galis, M.; Chaljub, E.; Chen, X.; Zhang, Z.

    2012-04-01

    Numerical modeling of earthquake ground motion in sedimentary basins and valleys often has to account for the P-wave to S-wave speed ratios (VP/VS) as large as five and even larger, mainly in sediments below groundwater level. The ratio can attain values larger than 10 - the unconsolidated lake sediments in Ciudad de México are a good example. At the same time, accuracy of the numerical schemes with respect to VP/VS has not been sufficiently analyzed. The numerical schemes are often applied without adequate check of the accuracy. We present theoretical analysis and numerical comparison of 18 3D numerical time-domain explicit schemes for modeling seismic motion for their accuracy with the varying VP/VS. The schemes are based on the finite-difference, spectral-element, finite-element and discontinuous-Galerkin methods. All schemes are presented in a unified form. Theoretical analysis compares accuracy of the schemes in terms of local errors in amplitude and vector difference. In addition to the analysis we compare numerically simulated seismograms with exact solutions for canonical configurations. We compare accuracy of the schemes in terms of the local errors, grid dispersion and full wavefield simulations with respect to the structure of the numerical schemes.

  3. Separable wave equation for three Coulomb interacting particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colavecchia, F. D.; Gasaneo, G.; Garibotti, C. R.

    1998-02-01

    We consider a separable approximation to the Schrödinger equation for the three-body Coulomb problem and found its exact solution above the ionization threshold. This wave function accounts for different possible asymptotic behaviors and reduces to the well-known product of three two-body Coulomb waves (C3) for scattering conditions. The momenta and position-dependent modifications recently proposed for the Sommerfeld parameters, as an improvement to the C3 model, are analyzed. We show how these changes can be included in our model as a suitable physically based variations in the separable approximation for the wave equation.

  4. Numerical Solution of 3D Poisson-Nernst-Planck Equations Coupled with Classical Density Functional Theory for Modeling Ion and Electron Transport in a Confined Environment

    SciTech Connect

    Meng, Da; Zheng, Bin; Lin, Guang; Sushko, Maria L.

    2014-08-29

    We have developed efficient numerical algorithms for the solution of 3D steady-state Poisson-Nernst-Planck equations (PNP) with excess chemical potentials described by the classical density functional theory (cDFT). The coupled PNP equations are discretized by finite difference scheme and solved iteratively by Gummel method with relaxation. The Nernst-Planck equations are transformed into Laplace equations through the Slotboom transformation. Algebraic multigrid method is then applied to efficiently solve the Poisson equation and the transformed Nernst-Planck equations. A novel strategy for calculating excess chemical potentials through fast Fourier transforms is proposed which reduces computational complexity from O(N2) to O(NlogN) where N is the number of grid points. Integrals involving Dirac delta function are evaluated directly by coordinate transformation which yields more accurate result compared to applying numerical quadrature to an approximated delta function. Numerical results for ion and electron transport in solid electrolyte for Li ion batteries are shown to be in good agreement with the experimental data and the results from previous studies.

  5. Optimization of High-order Wave Equations for Multicore CPUs

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Samuel

    2011-11-01

    This is a simple benchmark to guage the performance of a high-order isotropic wave equation grid. The code is optimized for both SSE and AVX and is parallelized using OpenMP (see Optimization section). Structurally, the benchmark begins, reads a few command-line parameters, allocates and pads the four arrays (current, last, next wave fields, and the spatially varying but isotropic velocity), initializes these arrays, then runs the benchmark proper. The code then benchmarks the naive, SSE (if supported), and AVX (if supported implementations) by applying the wave equation stencil 100 times and taking the average performance. Boundary conditions are ignored and would noiminally be implemented by the user. THus, the benchmark measures only the performance of the wave equation stencil and not a full simulation. The naive implementation is a quadruply (z,y,x, radius) nested loop that can handle arbitrarily order wave equations. The optimized (SSE/AVX) implentations are somewhat more complex as they operate on slabs and include a case statement to select an optimized inner loop depending on wave equation order.

  6. On the Rigorous Derivation of the 3D Cubic Nonlinear Schrödinger Equation with a Quadratic Trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xuwen

    2013-11-01

    We consider the dynamics of the three-dimensional N-body Schrödinger equation in the presence of a quadratic trap. We assume the pair interaction potential is N 3 β-1 V( N β x). We justify the mean-field approximation and offer a rigorous derivation of the three-dimensional cubic nonlinear Schrödinger equation (NLS) with a quadratic trap. We establish the space-time bound conjectured by Klainerman and Machedon (Commun Math Phys 279:169-185, 2008) for by adapting and simplifying an argument in Chen and Pavlović (Annales Henri Poincaré, 2013) which solves the problem for in the absence of a trap.

  7. The stationary Navier-Stokes equations in 3D exterior domains. An approach in anisotropically weighted L spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razafison, Ulrich

    We consider the three-dimensional exterior problem for stationary Navier-Stokes equations. We prove, under assumptions of smallness of the data, existence and uniqueness of solutions. By setting the problem in weighted spaces where the weights reflect the anisotropic decay properties of the fundamental solution of Oseen, we show the better decay of the solutions outside the wake region. Moreover, the solutions we obtained have a finite Dirichlet integral and under additional assumptions on the weights they are also PR-solutions in the sense of Finn [R. Finn, On the exterior stationary problem for the Navier-Stokes equations, and associated perturbation problems, Arch. Ration. Mech. Anal. 19 (1965) 363-406]. The study relies on an L-theory for 1

  8. Momentum estimates and ergodicity for the 3D stochastic cubic Ginzburg-Landau equation with degenerate noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pu, Xueke; Guo, Boling

    In this paper, we consider the ergodicity of invariant measures for the stochastic Ginzburg-Landau equation with degenerate random forcing. First, we show the existence and pathwise uniqueness of strong solutions with H-initial data, and then the existence of an invariant measure for the Feller semigroup by the Krylov-Bogoliubov method. Then in the case of degenerate additive noise, using the notion of asymptotically strong Feller property, we prove the uniqueness of invariant measures for the transition semigroup.

  9. Rogue waves in the Davey-Stewartson I equation.

    PubMed

    Ohta, Yasuhiro; Yang, Jianke

    2012-09-01

    General rogue waves in the Davey-Stewartson-I equation are derived by the bilinear method. It is shown that the simplest (fundamental) rogue waves are line rogue waves which arise from the constant background with a line profile and then disappear into the constant background again. It is also shown that multirogue waves describe the interaction of several fundamental rogue waves. These multirogue waves also arise from the constant background and then decay back to it, but in the intermediate times, interesting curvy wave patterns appear. However, higher-order rogue waves exhibit different dynamics. Specifically, only part of the wave structure in the higher-order rogue waves rises from the constant background and then retreats back to it, and this transient wave possesses patterns such as parabolas. But the other part of the wave structure comes from the far distance as a localized lump, which decelerates to the near field and interacts with the transient rogue wave, and is then reflected back and accelerates to the large distance again.

  10. Correlation equation for the marine drag coefficient and wave steepness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foreman, Richard J.; Emeis, Stefan

    2012-09-01

    This work questions, starting from dimensional considerations, the generality of the belief that the marine drag coefficient levels off with increasing wind speed. Dimensional analysis shows that the drag coefficient scales with the wave steepness as opposed to a wave-age scaling. A correlation equation is employed here that uses wave steepness scaling at low aspect ratios (inverse wave steepnesses) and a constant drag coefficient at high aspect ratios. Invoked in support of the correlation are measurements sourced from the literature and at the FINO1 platform in the North Sea. The correlation equation is then applied to measurements recorded from buoys during the passage of hurricanes Rita, Katrina (2005) and Ike (2008). Results show that the correlation equation anticipates the expected levelling off in deeper water, but a drag coefficient more consistent with a Charnock type relation is also possible in more shallower water. Some suggestions are made for proceeding with a higher-order analysis than that conducted here.

  11. Simulations and measurements of 3-D ultrasonic fields radiated by phased-array transducers using the westervelt equation.

    PubMed

    Doinikov, Alexander A; Novell, Anthony; Calmon, Pierre; Bouakaz, Ayache

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of this work is to validate, by comparing numerical and experimental results, the ability of the Westervelt equation to predict the behavior of ultrasound beams generated by phased-array transducers. To this end, the full Westervelt equation is solved numerically and the results obtained are compared with experimental measurements. The numerical implementation of the Westervelt equation is performed using the explicit finite-difference time-domain method on a three-dimensional Cartesian grid. The validation of the developed numerical code is first carried out by using experimental data obtained for two different focused circular transducers in the regimes of small-amplitude and finite-amplitude excitations. Then, the comparison of simulated and measured ultrasonic fields is extended to the case of a modified 32-element array transducer. It is shown that the developed code is capable of correctly predicting the behavior of the main lobe and the grating lobes in the cases of zero and nonzero steering angles for both the fundamental and the second-harmonic components.

  12. GENERAL: Periodic folded waves for a (2+1)-dimensional modified dispersive water wave equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Wen-Hua

    2009-08-01

    A general solution, including three arbitrary functions, is obtained for a (2+1)-dimensional modified dispersive water-wave (MDWW) equation by means of the WTC truncation method. Introducing proper multiple valued functions and Jacobi elliptic functions in the seed solution, special types of periodic folded waves are derived. In the long wave limit these periodic folded wave patterns may degenerate into single localized folded solitary wave excitations. The interactions of the periodic folded waves and the degenerated single folded solitary waves are investigated graphically and found to be completely elastic.

  13. Rogue wave spectra of the Kundu-Eckhaus equation.

    PubMed

    Bayındır, Cihan

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we analyze the rogue wave spectra of the Kundu-Eckhaus equation (KEE). We compare our findings with their nonlinear Schrödinger equation (NLSE) analogs and show that the spectra of the individual rogue waves significantly differ from their NLSE analogs. A remarkable difference is the one-sided development of the triangular spectrum before the rogue wave becomes evident in time. Also we show that increasing the skewness of the rogue wave results in increased asymmetry in the triangular Fourier spectra. Additionally, the triangular spectra of the rogue waves of the KEE begin to develop at earlier stages of their development compared to their NLSE analogs, especially for larger skew angles. This feature may be used to enhance the early warning times of the rogue waves. However, we show that in a chaotic wave field with many spectral components the triangular spectra remain as the main attribute as a universal feature of the typical wave fields produced through modulation instability and characteristic features of the KEE's analytical rogue wave spectra may be suppressed in a realistic chaotic wave field.

  14. Rogue wave spectra of the Kundu-Eckhaus equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayındır, Cihan

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we analyze the rogue wave spectra of the Kundu-Eckhaus equation (KEE). We compare our findings with their nonlinear Schrödinger equation (NLSE) analogs and show that the spectra of the individual rogue waves significantly differ from their NLSE analogs. A remarkable difference is the one-sided development of the triangular spectrum before the rogue wave becomes evident in time. Also we show that increasing the skewness of the rogue wave results in increased asymmetry in the triangular Fourier spectra. Additionally, the triangular spectra of the rogue waves of the KEE begin to develop at earlier stages of their development compared to their NLSE analogs, especially for larger skew angles. This feature may be used to enhance the early warning times of the rogue waves. However, we show that in a chaotic wave field with many spectral components the triangular spectra remain as the main attribute as a universal feature of the typical wave fields produced through modulation instability and characteristic features of the KEE's analytical rogue wave spectra may be suppressed in a realistic chaotic wave field.

  15. Noether symmetries of vacuum classes of pp-waves and the wave equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamal, Sameerah; Shabbir, Ghulam

    2016-06-01

    The Noether symmetry algebras admitted by wave equations on plane-fronted gravitational waves with parallel rays are determined. We apply the classification of different metric functions to determine generators for the wave equation, and also adopt Noether's theorem to derive conserved forms. For the possible cases considered, there exist symmetry groups with dimensions two, three, five, six and eight. These symmetry groups contain the homothetic symmetries of the spacetime.

  16. Using a time-domain higher-order boundary element method to simulate wave and current diffraction from a 3-D body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhen; Teng, Bin; Ning, De-Zhi; Sun, Liang

    2010-06-01

    To study wave-current actions on 3-D bodies a time-domain numerical model was established using a higher-order boundary element method (HOBEM). By assuming small flow velocities, the velocity potential could be expressed for linear and higher order components by perturbation expansion. A 4th-order Runge-Kutta method was applied for time marching. An artificial damping layer was adopted at the outer zone of the free surface mesh to dissipate scattering waves. Validation of the numerical method was carried out on run-up, wave exciting forces, and mean drift forces for wave-currents acting on a bottom-mounted vertical cylinder. The results were in close agreement with the results of a frequency-domain method and a published time-domain method. The model was then applied to compute wave-current forces and run-up on a Seastar mini tension-leg platform.

  17. A Two Colorable Fourth Order Compact Difference Scheme and Parallel Iterative Solution of the 3D Convection Diffusion Equation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Jun; Ge, Lixin; Kouatchou, Jules

    2000-01-01

    A new fourth order compact difference scheme for the three dimensional convection diffusion equation with variable coefficients is presented. The novelty of this new difference scheme is that it Only requires 15 grid points and that it can be decoupled with two colors. The entire computational grid can be updated in two parallel subsweeps with the Gauss-Seidel type iterative method. This is compared with the known 19 point fourth order compact differenCe scheme which requires four colors to decouple the computational grid. Numerical results, with multigrid methods implemented on a shared memory parallel computer, are presented to compare the 15 point and the 19 point fourth order compact schemes.

  18. Galerkin method for unsplit 3-D Dirac equation using atomically/kinetically balanced B-spline basis

    SciTech Connect

    Fillion-Gourdeau, F.; Lorin, E.; Bandrauk, A.D.

    2016-02-15

    A Galerkin method is developed to solve the time-dependent Dirac equation in prolate spheroidal coordinates for an electron–molecular two-center system. The initial state is evaluated from a variational principle using a kinetic/atomic balanced basis, which allows for an efficient and accurate determination of the Dirac spectrum and eigenfunctions. B-spline basis functions are used to obtain high accuracy. This numerical method is used to compute the energy spectrum of the two-center problem and then the evolution of eigenstate wavefunctions in an external electromagnetic field.

  19. Suitable weak solutions to the 3D Navier-Stokes equations are constructed with the Voigt approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berselli, Luigi C.; Spirito, Stefano

    2017-03-01

    In this paper we consider the Navier-Stokes equations supplemented with either the Dirichlet or vorticity-based Navier slip boundary conditions. We prove that weak solutions obtained as limits of solutions of the Navier-Stokes-Voigt model satisfy the local energy inequality, and we also prove certain regularity results for the pressure. Moreover, in the periodic setting we prove that if the parameters are chosen in an appropriate way, then we can construct suitable weak solutions through a Fourier-Galerkin finite-dimensional approximation in the space variables.

  20. A Parallel 3D Spectral Difference Method for Solutions of Compressible Navier Stokes Equations on Deforming Grids and Simulations of Vortex Induced Vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeJong, Andrew

    Numerical models of fluid-structure interaction have grown in importance due to increasing interest in environmental energy harvesting, airfoil-gust interactions, and bio-inspired formation flying. Powered by increasingly powerful parallel computers, such models seek to explain the fundamental physics behind the complex, unsteady fluid-structure phenomena. To this end, a high-fidelity computational model based on the high-order spectral difference method on 3D unstructured, dynamic meshes has been developed. The spectral difference method constructs continuous solution fields within each element with a Riemann solver to compute the inviscid fluxes at the element interfaces and an averaging mechanism to compute the viscous fluxes. This method has shown promise in the past as a highly accurate, yet sufficiently fast method for solving unsteady viscous compressible flows. The solver is monolithically coupled to the equations of motion of an elastically mounted 3-degree of freedom rigid bluff body undergoing flow-induced lift, drag, and torque. The mesh is deformed using 4 methods: an analytic function, Laplace equation, biharmonic equation, and a bi-elliptic equation with variable diffusivity. This single system of equations -- fluid and structure -- is advanced through time using a 5-stage, 4th-order Runge-Kutta scheme. Message Passing Interface is used to run the coupled system in parallel on up to 240 processors. The solver is validated against previously published numerical and experimental data for an elastically mounted cylinder. The effect of adding an upstream body and inducing wake galloping is observed.

  1. Directional decomposition of the acoustic wave equation for fluids and metafluids in spherical geometries, with application to transformational acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsson, Peter

    2016-03-01

    A new directional decomposition of the acoustic 3D wave equation is derived for spherically symmetric geometries, where the wave fields do not need to possess such a symmetry. This provides an alternative basis for various applications of techniques like invariant embedding and time domain Green functions in spherically symmetric geometries. Contrary to previous results on spherical wave splittings, the new decomposition is given in a very explicit form. The wave equation considered incorporates effects from radially varying compressibility and density, but also from anisotropic density, a property of certain so called metafluids. By applying the new spherical wave splitting, we show that all spherically symmetric acoustic metafluid cloaks are diffeomorphic images of a homogeneous and isotropic spherical ball of perfect fluid.

  2. 3D geological to geophysical modelling and seismic wave propagation simulation: a case study from the Lalor Lake VMS (Volcanogenic Massive Sulphides) mining camp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miah, Khalid; Bellefleur, Gilles

    2014-05-01

    The global demand for base metals, uranium and precious metals has been pushing mineral explorations at greater depth. Seismic techniques and surveys have become essential in finding and extracting mineral rich ore bodies, especially for deep VMS mining camps. Geophysical parameters collected from borehole logs and laboratory measurements of core samples provide preliminary information about the nature and type of subsurface lithologic units. Alteration halos formed during the hydrothermal alteration process contain ore bodies, which are of primary interests among geologists and mining industries. It is known that the alteration halos are easier to detect than the ore bodies itself. Many 3D geological models are merely projection of 2D surface geology based on outcrop inspections and geochemical analysis of a small number of core samples collected from the area. Since a large scale 3D multicomponent seismic survey can be prohibitively expensive, performance analysis of such geological models can be helpful in reducing exploration costs. In this abstract, we discussed challenges and constraints encountered in geophysical modelling of ore bodies and surrounding geologic structures from the available coarse 3D geological models of the Lalor Lake mining camp, located in northern Manitoba, Canada. Ore bodies in the Lalor lake VMS camp are rich in gold, zinc, lead and copper, and have an approximate weight of 27 Mt. For better understanding of physical parameters of these known ore bodies and potentially unknown ones at greater depth, we constructed a fine resolution 3D seismic model with dimensions: 2000 m (width), 2000 m (height), and 1500 m (vertical depth). Seismic properties (P-wave, S-wave velocities, and density) were assigned based on a previous rock properties study of the same mining camp. 3D finite-difference elastic wave propagation simulation was performed in the model using appropriate parameters. The generated synthetic 3D seismic data was then compared to

  3. Scattering of electromagnetic waves from 3D multilayer random rough surfaces based on the second-order small perturbation method: energy conservation, reflectivity, and emissivity.

    PubMed

    Sanamzadeh, Mohammadreza; Tsang, Leung; Johnson, Joel T; Burkholder, Robert J; Tan, Shurun

    2017-03-01

    A theoretical investigation of energy conservation, reflectivity, and emissivity in the scattering of electromagnetic waves from 3D multilayer media with random rough interfaces using the second-order small perturbation method (SPM2) is presented. The approach is based on the extinction theorem and develops integral equations for surface fields in the spectral domain. Using the SPM2, we calculate the scattered and transmitted coherent fields and incoherent fields. Reflected and transmitted powers are then found in the form of 2D integrations over wavenumber in the spectral domain. In the integrand, there is a summation over the spectral densities of each of the rough interfaces with each weighted by a corresponding kernel function. We show in this paper that there exists a "strong" condition of energy conservation in that the kernel functions multiplying the spectral density of each interface obey energy conservation exactly. This means that energy is conserved independent of the roughness spectral densities of the rough surfaces. Results of this strong condition are illustrated numerically for up to 50 rough interfaces without requiring specification of surface roughness properties. Two examples are illustrated. One is a multilayer configuration having weak contrasts between adjacent layers, random layer thicknesses, and randomly generated permittivity profiles. The second example is a photonic crystal of periodically alternating permittivities of larger dielectric contrast. The methodology is applied to study the effect of roughness on the brightness temperatures of the Antarctic ice sheet, which is characterized by layers of ice with permittivity fluctuations in addition to random rough interfaces. The results show that the influence of roughness can significantly increase horizontally polarized thermal emission while leaving vertically polarized emissions relatively unaffected.

  4. Transition between free-space Helmholtz equation solutions with plane sources and parabolic wave equation solutions.

    PubMed

    Mahillo-Isla, R; Gonźalez-Morales, M J; Dehesa-Martínez, C

    2011-06-01

    The slowly varying envelope approximation is applied to the radiation problems of the Helmholtz equation with a planar single-layer and dipolar sources. The analyses of such problems provide procedures to recover solutions of the Helmholtz equation based on the evaluation of solutions of the parabolic wave equation at a given plane. Furthermore, the conditions that must be fulfilled to apply each procedure are also discussed. The relations to previous work are given as well.

  5. Kirchhoff modeling via wave equation datuming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, M.

    1985-01-01

    The acoustic reflection response of a plane wave on a cylindrical surface is calculated from a specialization of the Kirchhoff integral. Computational advantages are obtained by assuming that structural changes occur only along the direction of data collection. Off-line geologic invariance permits an integral to be replaced by a short convolution operator. The restriction to single interface modeling permits implementation of personal computers. Also, the single layer algorithm provides the framework for a multilayer code. Details on implementation, example executions, and program listings are included.

  6. Rogue waves of a (3 + 1) -dimensional nonlinear evolution equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Yu-bin; Zhang, Yi

    2017-03-01

    General high-order rogue waves of a (3 + 1) -dimensional Nonlinear Evolution Equation ((3+1)-d NEE) are obtained by the Hirota bilinear method, which are given in terms of determinants, whose matrix elements possess plain algebraic expressions. It is shown that the simplest (fundamental) rogue waves are line rogue waves which arise from the constant background with a line profile and then disappear into the constant background again. Two subclass of nonfundamental rogue waves are analyzed in details. By proper means of the regulations of free parameters, the dynamics of multi-rogue waves and high-order rogue waves have been illustrated in (x,t) plane and (y,z) plane by three dimensional figures.

  7. Phase integral theory, coupled wave equations, and mode conversion.

    PubMed

    Littlejohn, Robert G.; Flynn, William G.

    1992-01-01

    Phase integral or WKB theory is applied to multicomponent wave equations, i.e., wave equations in which the wave field is a vector, spinor, or tensor of some kind. Specific examples of physical interest often have special features that simplify their analysis, when compared with the general theory. The case of coupled channel equations in atomic or molecular scattering theory in the Born-Oppenheimer approximation is examined in this context. The problem of mode conversion, also called surface jumping or Landau-Zener-Stuckelberg transitions, is examined in the multidimensional case, and cast into normal form. The group theoretical principles of the normal form transformation are laid out, and shown to involve both the Lorentz group and the symplectic group.

  8. An Object Oriented, Finite Element Framework for Linear Wave Equations

    SciTech Connect

    Koning, Joseph M.

    2004-03-01

    This dissertation documents an object oriented framework which can be used to solve any linear wave equation. The linear wave equations are expressed in the differential forms language. This differential forms expression allows a strict discrete interpretation of the system. The framework is implemented using the Galerkin Finite Element Method to define the discrete differential forms and operators. Finite element basis functions including standard scalar Nodal and vector Nedelec basis functions are used to implement the discrete differential forms resulting in a mixed finite element system. Discretizations of scalar and vector wave equations in the time and frequency domains will be demonstrated in both differential forms and vector calculi. This framework conserves energy, maintains physical continuity, is valid on unstructured grids, conditionally stable and second order accurate. Examples including linear electrodynamics, acoustics, elasticity and magnetohydrodynamics are demonstrated.

  9. Scattering of solitons for coupled wave-particle equations

    PubMed Central

    Imaykin, Valery; Komech, Alexander; Vainberg, Boris

    2012-01-01

    We establish a long time soliton asymptotics for a nonlinear system of wave equation coupled to a charged particle. The coupled system has a six-dimensional manifold of soliton solutions. We show that in the large time approximation, any solution, with an initial state close to the solitary manifold, is a sum of a soliton and a dispersive wave which is a solution to the free wave equation. It is assumed that the charge density satisfies Wiener condition which is a version of Fermi Golden Rule, and that the momenta of the charge distribution vanish up to the fourth order. The proof is based on a development of the general strategy introduced by Buslaev and Perelman: symplectic projection in Hilbert space onto the solitary manifold, modulation equations for the parameters of the projection, and decay of the transversal component. PMID:22605890

  10. Existence of solitary waves and periodic waves for a perturbed generalized BBM equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Aiyong; Guo, Lina; Deng, Xijun

    2016-11-01

    The existence of solitary waves and periodic waves for a perturbed generalized BBM equation is established by using geometric singular perturbation theory. Attention goes to perturbations of the Hamiltonian vector field with an elliptic Hamiltonian of degree four, exhibiting a cuspidal loop. It is proven that the wave speed c0 (h) is decreasing on h ∈ [ 0 , 1 / 12 ] by analyzing the ratio of Abelian integrals. The upper and lower bounds of the limit wave speed are given. Moreover, the relation between the wave speed and the wavelength of traveling waves is obtained.

  11. Vorticity equation for MHD fast waves in geospace environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamauchi, M.; Lundin, R.; Lui, A. T. Y.

    1993-01-01

    The MHD vorticity equation is modified in order to apply it to nonlinear MHD fast waves or shocks when their extent along the magnetic field is limited. Field-aligned current (FAC) generation is also discussed on the basis of this modified vorticity equation. When the wave normal is not aligned to the finite velocity convection and the source region is spatially limited, a longitudinal polarization causes a pair of plus and minus charges inside the compressional plane waves or shocks, generating a pair of FACs. This polarization is not related to the separation between the electrons and ions caused by their difference in mass, a separation which is inherent to compressional waves. The resultant double field-aligned current structure exists both with and without the contributions from curvature drift, which is questionable in terms of its contribution to vorticity change from the viewpoint of single-particle motion.

  12. Investigating Global 3-D Shear-Wave Anisotropy in the Earth's Mantle from Free Oscillations, Body Waves, Surface Waves and Long-period Waveforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moulik, P.; Ekstrom, G.

    2012-12-01

    We have developed a framework that can be used to investigate anisotropic velocity, density and anelastic heterogeneity in the Earth's mantle using a wide spectrum (0.3-50 mHz) of seismological observables. We start with the extensive dataset of surface-wave phase anomalies, long-period waveforms, and body-wave travel times collected by Kustowski et al. (2008) for the development of the global model S362ANI. The additional data included in our analysis are splitting functions of spheroidal and toroidal modes, which are analogous to phase velocity maps at low frequencies. We include in this set of observations a new dataset containing the splitting functions of 56 spheroidal fundamental modes and overtones, measured by Deuss et al. (2011, 2012) using data from large recent earthquakes. Apart from providing unique constraints on the long-wavelength elastic and density structure in the mantle, the overtone splitting data are especially sensitive to the velocity (and anisotropic) structure in the transition zone and in the deeper mantle. The detection of anisotropy, a marker of flow, in the transition zone has implications for our understanding of mantle convection. Our forward modeling of the splitting functions, like the other types of data, includes the effects of radial anisotropy (Mochizuki, 1986). We show that the upper-mantle shear-wave anisotropy of S362ANI generates a clear contribution to the splitting functions of the modes that are sensitive to the upper-mantle structure. We explore the tradeoffs between fitting the mode splitting functions and the travel-times of body waves that turn in the transition zone or in the lower mantle (e.g. SS), while observing that the waveforms and the surface wave phase-anomalies provide complementary information about the mantle. Our experiments suggest that the splitting data are sufficiently sensitive to the anisotropy in the mantle such that their inclusion may provide a better depth resolution of the anisotropic shear

  13. An efficient formulation of the coupled finite element-integral equation technique for solving large 3D scattering problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cwik, T.; Jamnejad, V.; Zuffada, C.

    1993-01-01

    It is often desirable to calculate the electromagnetic fields inside and about a complicated system of scattering bodies, as well as in their far-field region. The finite element method (FE) is well suited to solving the interior problem, but the domain has to be limited to a manageable size. At the truncation of the FE mesh one can either impose approximate (absorbing) boundary conditions or set up an integral equation (IE) for the fields scattered from the bodies. The latter approach is preferable since it results in higher accuracy. Hence, the two techniques can be successfully combined by introducing a surface that encloses the scatterers, applying a FE model to the inner volume and setting up an IE for the tangential fields components on the surface. Here the continuity of the tangential fields is used bo obtain a consistent solution. A few coupled FE-IE methods have recently appeared in the literature. The approach presented here has the advantage of using edge-based finite elements, a type of finite elements with degrees of freedom associated with edges of the mesh. Because of their properties, they are better suited than the conventional node based elements to represent electromagnetic fields, particularly when inhomogeneous regions are modeled, since the node based elements impose an unnatural continuity of all field components across boundaries of mesh elements. Additionally, our approach is well suited to handle large size problems and lends itself to code parallelization. We will discuss the salient features that make our approach very efficient from the standpoint of numerical computation, and the fields and RCS of a few objects are illustrated as examples.

  14. Nonlinear Generalized Hydrodynamic Wave Equations in Strongly Coupled Dusty Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Veeresha, B. M.; Sen, A.; Kaw, P. K.

    2008-09-07

    A set of nonlinear equations for the study of low frequency waves in a strongly coupled dusty plasma medium is derived using the phenomenological generalized hydrodynamic (GH) model and is used to study the modulational stability of dust acoustic waves to parallel perturbations. Dust compressibility contributions arising from strong Coulomb coupling effects are found to introduce significant modifications in the threshold and range of the instability domain.

  15. The pulsating orb: solving the wave equation outside a ball

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Transient acoustic waves are generated by the oscillations of an object or are scattered by the object. This leads to initial-boundary value problems (IBVPs) for the wave equation. Basic properties of this equation are reviewed, with emphasis on characteristics, wavefronts and compatibility conditions. IBVPs are formulated and their properties reviewed, with emphasis on weak solutions and the constraints imposed by the underlying continuum mechanics. The use of the Laplace transform to treat the IBVPs is also reviewed, with emphasis on situations where the solution is discontinuous across wavefronts. All these notions are made explicit by solving simple IBVPs for a sphere in some detail. PMID:27279773

  16. The pulsating orb: solving the wave equation outside a ball.

    PubMed

    Martin, P A

    2016-05-01

    Transient acoustic waves are generated by the oscillations of an object or are scattered by the object. This leads to initial-boundary value problems (IBVPs) for the wave equation. Basic properties of this equation are reviewed, with emphasis on characteristics, wavefronts and compatibility conditions. IBVPs are formulated and their properties reviewed, with emphasis on weak solutions and the constraints imposed by the underlying continuum mechanics. The use of the Laplace transform to treat the IBVPs is also reviewed, with emphasis on situations where the solution is discontinuous across wavefronts. All these notions are made explicit by solving simple IBVPs for a sphere in some detail.

  17. Numerical Solution of Poroelastic Wave Equation Using Nodal Discontinuous Galerkin Finite Element Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, K.; Wang, Y.; Jaiswal, P.

    2014-12-01

    In a porous medium the seismic energy not only propagates through matrix but also through pore-fluids. The differential movement between sediment grains of the matrix and interstitial fluid generates a diffusive wave which is commonly referred to as the slow P-wave. A combined system of equation which includes both elastic and diffusive phases is known as the poroelasticity. Analyzing seismic data through poroelastic modeling results in accurate interpretation of amplitude and separation of wave modes, leading to more accurate estimation of geomehanical properties of rocks. Despite its obvious multi-scale application, from sedimentary reservoir characterization to deep-earth fractured crust, poroelasticity remains under-developed primarily due to the complex nature of its constituent equations. We present a detail formulation of poroleastic wave equations for isotropic media by combining the Biot's and Newtonian mechanics. System of poroelastic wave equation constitutes for eight time dependent hyperbolic PDEs in 2D whereas in case of 3D number goes up to thirteen. Eigen decomposition of Jacobian of these systems confirms the presence of an additional slow-P wave phase with velocity lower than shear wave, posing stability issues on numerical scheme. To circumvent the issue, we derived a numerical scheme using nodal discontinuous Galerkin approach by adopting the triangular meshes in 2D which is extended to tetrahedral for 3D problems. In our nodal DG approach the basis function over a triangular element is interpolated using Legendre-Gauss-Lobatto (LGL) function leading to a more accurate local solutions than in the case of simple DG. We have tested the numerical scheme for poroelastic media in 1D and 2D case, and solution obtained for the systems offers high accuracy in results over other methods such as finite difference , finite volume and pseudo-spectral. The nodal nature of our approach makes it easy to convert the application into a multi-threaded algorithm

  18. Study of nonlinear waves described by the cubic Schroedinger equation

    SciTech Connect

    Walstead, A.E.

    1980-03-12

    The cubic Schroedinger equation (CSE) is ubiquitous as a model equation for the long-time evolution of finite-amplitude near-monochromatic dispersive waves. It incorporates the effects of the radiation field pressure on the constitutive properties of the supporting medium in a self-consistent manner. The properties of the uniformly transiating periodic wave solutions of the one-dimensional CSE are studied here. These (so-called cnoidal) waves are characterized by the values of four parameters. Whitham's averaged variational principle is used to derive a system of quasilinear evolution equations (the modulational equations) for the values of these parameters when they are slowly varying in space and time. Explicit expressions for the characteristic velocities of the modulational equations are obtained for the full set of cnoidal waves. Riemann invariants are obtained for several limits for the stable case, and growth rates are obtained for several limits, including the solitary wave chain, for the unstable case. The results for several nontrivial limiting cases agree with those obtained by independent methods by others. The dynamics of the CSE generalized to two spatial dimensions are studied for the unstable case. A large class of similarity solutions with cylindrical symmetry are obtained systematically using infinitesimal transformation group techniques. The methods are adapted to obtain the symmetries of the action functional of the CSE and to deduce nine integral invariants. A numerical study of the self-similar solutions reveals that they are modulationally unstable and that singularities dominate the dynamics of the CSE in two dimensions. The CSE is derived using perturbation theory for a specific problem in plasma physics: the evolution of the envelope of a near-monochromatic electromagnetic wave in a cold magnetized plasma. 13 figures, 2 tables.

  19. Mariage des maillages: A new 3D general relativistic hydro code for simulation of gravitational waves from core-collapses.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novak, Jerome; Dimmelmeier, Harrald; Font-Roda, Jose A.

    2004-12-01

    We present a new three-dimensional general relativistic hydrodynamics code which can be applied to study stellar core collapses and the resulting gravitational radiation. This code uses two different numerical techniques to solve partial differential equations arising in the model: high-resolution shock capturing (HRSC) schemes for the evolution of hydrodynamic quantities and spectral methods for the solution of Einstein equations. The equations are written and solved using spherical polar coordinates, best suited to stellar topology. Einstein equations are formulated within the 3+1 formalism and conformal flat condition (CFC) for the 3-metric and gravitational radiation is extracted using Newtonian quadrupole formulation.

  20. Surface electromagnetic wave equations in a warm magnetized quantum plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Chunhua; Yang, Weihong; Wu, Zhengwei; Chu, Paul K.

    2014-07-15

    Based on the single-fluid plasma model, a theoretical investigation of surface electromagnetic waves in a warm quantum magnetized inhomogeneous plasma is presented. The surface electromagnetic waves are assumed to propagate on the plane between a vacuum and a warm quantum magnetized plasma. The quantum magnetohydrodynamic model includes quantum diffraction effect (Bohm potential), and quantum statistical pressure is used to derive the new dispersion relation of surface electromagnetic waves. And the general dispersion relation is analyzed in some special cases of interest. It is shown that surface plasma oscillations can be propagated due to quantum effects, and the propagation velocity is enhanced. Furthermore, the external magnetic field has a significant effect on surface wave's dispersion equation. Our work should be of a useful tool for investigating the physical characteristic of surface waves and physical properties of the bounded quantum plasmas.

  1. Regional seismic wavefield computation on a 3-D heterogeneous Earth model by means of coupled traveling wave synthesis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pollitz, F.F.

    2002-01-01

    I present a new algorithm for calculating seismic wave propagation through a three-dimensional heterogeneous medium using the framework of mode coupling theory originally developed to perform very low frequency (f < ???0.01-0.05 Hz) seismic wavefield computation. It is a Greens function approach for multiple scattering within a defined volume and employs a truncated traveling wave basis set using the locked mode approximation. Interactions between incident and scattered wavefields are prescribed by mode coupling theory and account for the coupling among surface waves, body waves, and evanescent waves. The described algorithm is, in principle, applicable to global and regional wave propagation problems, but I focus on higher frequency (typically f ??????0.25 Hz) applications at regional and local distances where the locked mode approximation is best utilized and which involve wavefields strongly shaped by propagation through a highly heterogeneous crust. Synthetic examples are shown for P-SV-wave propagation through a semi-ellipsoidal basin and SH-wave propagation through a fault zone.

  2. Wave equation for dark coherence in three-level media.

    PubMed

    Eberly, J H; Kozlov, V V

    2002-06-17

    We report the derivation of a wave equation for coherence in "dark state" two-photon-resonance spectroscopy. One of its consequences is a dark state area theorem. The dark area theorem is a single ordinary differential equation which is globally equivalent, in a way we describe, to the full set of five coupled nonlinear partial differential equations that govern space-time evolution of two-pulse coherence in a lambda medium. The predictions of the dark area theorem are open to test via laser spectroscopy in dilute vapors and inhomogeneously broadened solids.

  3. Wave breaking and shock waves for a periodic shallow water equation.

    PubMed

    Escher, Joachim

    2007-09-15

    This paper is devoted to the study of a recently derived periodic shallow water equation. We discuss in detail the blow-up scenario of strong solutions and present several conditions on the initial profile, which ensure the occurrence of wave breaking. We also present a family of global weak solutions, which may be viewed as global periodic shock waves to the equation under discussion.

  4. Comparison of fractional wave equations for power law attenuation in ultrasound and elastography.

    PubMed

    Holm, Sverre; Näsholm, Sven Peter

    2014-04-01

    A set of wave equations with fractional loss operators in time and space are analyzed. The fractional Szabo equation, the power law wave equation and the causal fractional Laplacian wave equation are all found to be low-frequency approximations of the fractional Kelvin-Voigt wave equation and the more general fractional Zener wave equation. The latter two equations are based on fractional constitutive equations, whereas the former wave equations have been derived from the desire to model power law attenuation in applications like medical ultrasound. This has consequences for use in modeling and simulation, especially for applications that do not satisfy the low-frequency approximation, such as shear wave elastography. In such applications, the wave equations based on constitutive equations are the viable ones.

  5. Multidimensional linearizable system of n-wave-type equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zenchuk, A. I.

    2017-01-01

    We propose a linearizable version of a multidimensional system of n-wave-type nonlinear partial differential equations ( PDEs). We derive this system using the spectral representation of its solution via a procedure similar to the dressing method for nonlinear PDEs integrable by the inverse scattering transform method. We show that the proposed system is completely integrable and construct a particular solution.

  6. Detailed 3-D S-wave velocity beneath the High Lava Plains, Oregon, from 2-plane-wave Rayleigh wave inversions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, L. S.; Forsyth, D. W.; Fouch, M. J.; James, D. E.

    2009-12-01

    The High Lava Plains (HLP) of eastern Oregon represent an unusual track of bimodal volcanism extending from the southeastern-most corner of the state to its current position beneath the Newberry Volcano on the eastern margin of the Cascades. The silicic volcanism is time progressive along this track, beginning some 15 Ma near the Owyhee plateau and then trending to the north east. The timing and location of the start of the HLP coincides with that of the initial volcanism associated with the Yellowstone/Snake River Plain track (YSRP). While the YSRP has often been interpreted as the classic intra-continental hot spot track, the HLP, which trends almost normal to absolute plate motion, is harder to explain. This study uses the 100+ stations associated with the HLP seismic deployment together with another ~100 Earthscope Transportable Array stations (TA) to perform a high resolution inversion for Rayleigh wave phase velocities using the 2-plane-wave methodology of Forsyth and Li (2004). Because of the comparatively small grid spacing of this study, we are able to discern much finer scale structures than studies looking at the entire western U.S. with only TA stations. Preliminary results indicate very low velocities across the study area, especially at upper mantle depths. Especially low velocities are seen beneath the Owyhee plateau and along both the HLP and YSRP tracks. Final details about the exact geometries of these features will help constrain possible scenarios for the formation of the HLP volcanic sequence.

  7. Rogue waves of the Kundu-Eckhaus equation in a chaotic wave field.

    PubMed

    Bayindir, Cihan

    2016-03-01

    In this paper we study the properties of the chaotic wave fields generated in the frame of the Kundu-Eckhaus equation (KEE). Modulation instability results in a chaotic wave field which exhibits small-scale filaments with a free propagation constant, k. The average velocity of the filaments is approximately given by the average group velocity calculated from the dispersion relation for the plane-wave solution; however, direction of propagation is controlled by the β parameter, the constant in front of the Raman-effect term. We have also calculated the probabilities of the rogue wave occurrence for various values of propagation constant k and showed that the probability of rogue wave occurrence depends on k. Additionally, we have showed that the probability of rogue wave occurrence significantly depends on the quintic and the Raman-effect nonlinear terms of the KEE. Statistical comparisons between the KEE and the cubic nonlinear Schrödinger equation have also been presented.

  8. 3-D or median map? Earthquake scenario ground-motion maps from physics-based models versus maps from ground-motion prediction equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, K.

    2015-12-01

    There are two common ways to create a ground-motion map for a hypothetical earthquake: using ground motion prediction equations (by far the more common of the two) and using 3-D physics-based modeling. The former is very familiar to engineers, the latter much less so, and the difference can present a problem because engineers tend to trust the familiar and distrust novelty. Maps for essentially the same hypothetical earthquake using the two different methods can look very different, while appearing to present the same information. Using one or the other can lead an engineer or disaster planner to very different estimates of damage and risk. The reasons have to do with depiction of variability, spatial correlation of shaking, the skewed distribution of real-world shaking, and the upward-curving relationship between shaking and damage. The scientists who develop the two kinds of map tend to specialize in one or the other and seem to defend their turf, which can aggravate the problem of clearly communicating with engineers.The USGS Science Application for Risk Reduction's (SAFRR) HayWired scenario has addressed the challenge of explaining to engineers the differences between the two maps, and why, in a disaster planning scenario, one might want to use the less-familiar 3-D map.

  9. A 3-D crustal and uppermost mantle model of the western US from receiver functions and surface wave dispersion derived from ambient noise and teleseismic earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, W.; Schulte-Pelkum, V.; Ritzwoller, M. H.

    2011-12-01

    The joint inversion of surface wave dispersion and receiver functions was proven feasible on a station by station basis more than a decade ago. Joint application to a large number of stations across a broad region such as western US is more challenging, however, because of the different resolutions of the two methods. Improvements in resolution in surface wave studies derived from ambient noise and array-based methods applied to earthquake data now allow surface wave dispersion and receiver functions to be inverted simultaneously across much of the Earthscope/USArray Transportable Array (TA), and we have developed a Monte-Carlo procedure for this purpose. As a proof of concept we applied this procedure to a region containing 186 TA stations in the intermountain west, including a variety of tectonic settings such as the Colorado Plateau, the Basin and Range, the Rocky Mountains, and the Great Plains. This work has now been expanded to encompass all TA stations in the western US. Our approach includes three main components. (1) We enlarge the Earthscope Automated Receiver Survey (EARS) receiver function database by adding more events within a quality control procedure. A back-azimuth-independent receiver function and its associated uncertainties are constructed using a harmonic stripping algorithm. (2) Rayleigh wave dispersion curves are generated from the eikonal tomography applied to ambient noise cross-correlation data and Helmoholtz tomography applied to teleseismic surface wave data to yield dispersion maps from 8 sec to 80 sec period. (3) We apply a Metropolis Monte Carlo algorithm to invert for the average velocity structure beneath each station. Simple kriging is applied to interpolate to the discrete results into a continuous 3-D model. This method has now been applied to over 1,000 TA stations in the western US. We show that the receiver functions and surface wave dispersion data can be reconciled beneath more than 80% of the stations using a smooth

  10. A hybridizable discontinuous Galerkin method combined to a Schwarz algorithm for the solution of 3d time-harmonic Maxwell's equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Liang; Lanteri, Stéphane; Perrussel, Ronan

    2014-01-01

    A Schwarz-type domain decomposition method is presented for the solution of the system of 3d time-harmonic Maxwell's equations. We introduce a hybridizable discontinuous Galerkin (HDG) scheme for the discretization of the problem based on a tetrahedrization of the computational domain. The discrete system of the HDG method on each subdomain is solved by an optimized sparse direct (LU factorization) solver. The solution of the interface system in the domain decomposition framework is accelerated by a Krylov subspace method. The formulation and the implementation of the resulting DD-HDG (Domain Decomposed-Hybridizable Discontinuous Galerkin) method are detailed. Numerical results show that the resulting DD-HDG solution strategy has an optimal convergence rate and can save both CPU time and memory cost compared to a classical upwind flux-based DD-DG (Domain Decomposed-Discontinuous Galerkin) approach.

  11. A Unified Approach to Regularity Problems for the 3D Navier-Stokes and Euler Equations: the Use of Kolmogorov's Dissipation Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheskidov, A.; Shvydkoy, R.

    2014-06-01

    Motivated by Kolmogorov's theory of turbulence we present a unified approach to the regularity problems for the 3D Navier-Stokes and Euler equations. We introduce a dissipation wavenumber that separates low modes where the Euler dynamics is predominant from the high modes where the viscous forces take over. Then using an indifferent to the viscosity technique we obtain a new regularity criterion which is weaker than every Ladyzhenskaya-Prodi-Serrin condition in the viscous case, and reduces to the Beale-Kato-Majda criterion in the inviscid case. In the viscous case we prove that Leray-Hopf solutions are regular provided , which improves our previous condition. We also show that for all Leray-Hopf solutions. Finally, we prove that Leray-Hopf solutions are regular when the time-averaged spatial intermittency is small, i.e., close to Kolmogorov's regime.

  12. Modeling of elastic and plastic waves for HCP single crystals in a 3D formulation based on zinc single crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krivosheina, Marina; Kobenko, Sergey; Tuch, Elena; Kozlova, Maria

    2016-11-01

    This paper investigates elastic and plastic waves in HCP single crystals through the numerical simulation of strain processes in anisotropic materials based on a zinc single crystal. Velocity profiles for compression waves in the back surfaces of single-crystal zinc plates with impact loading oriented in 0001 and 10 1 ¯0 are presented in this work as a part of results obtained in numerical simulations. The mathematical model implemented in this study reflects the following characteristics of the mechanical properties inherent in anisotropic (transtropic) materials: varying degree of anisotropy of elastic and plastic properties, which includes reverse anisotropy, dependence of distribution of all types of waves on the velocity orientation, and the anisotropy of compressibility. Another feature of elastic and plastic waves in HCP single crystals is that the shock wave does not split into an elastic precursor and "plastic" compression shock wave, which is inherent in zinc single crystals with loading oriented in 0001. The study compares numerical results obtained in a three-dimensional formulation with the results of velocity profiles from the back surfaces of target plates obtained in real experiments. These results demonstrate that the mathematical model is capable of describing the properties of the above-mentioned anisotropic (transtropic) materials.

  13. Understanding Stokes forces in the wave-averaged equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Nobuhiro; Fox-Kemper, Baylor

    2016-05-01

    The wave-averaged, or Craik-Leibovich, equations describe the dynamics of upper ocean flow interacting with nonbreaking, not steep, surface gravity waves. This paper formulates the wave effects in these equations in terms of three contributions to momentum: Stokes advection, Stokes Coriolis force, and Stokes shear force. Each contribution scales with a distinctive parameter. Moreover, these contributions affect the turbulence energetics differently from each other such that the classification of instabilities is possible accordingly. Stokes advection transfers energy between turbulence and Eulerian mean-flow kinetic energy, and its form also parallels the advection of tracers such as salinity, buoyancy, and potential vorticity. Stokes shear force transfers energy between turbulence and surface waves. The Stokes Coriolis force can also transfer energy between turbulence and waves, but this occurs only if the Stokes drift fluctuates. Furthermore, this formulation elucidates the unique nature of Stokes shear force and also allows direct comparison of Stokes shear force with buoyancy. As a result, the classic Langmuir instabilities of Craik and Leibovich, wave-balanced fronts and filaments, Stokes perturbations of symmetric and geostrophic instabilities, the wavy Ekman layer, and the wavy hydrostatic balance are framed in terms of intuitive physical balances.

  14. Breaking and Non-Breaking Solitary Wave Impact Pressures on a Cylinder Over a 3-D Bathymetry

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-01-01

    the Morison equation applied to case 2 ................................... 78 6.3 Cross approximation for case 1...showing the wedge angle of the incoming bore approaching the wall, Cross (1967...increasing cross -shore distance at pressure sensor 2

  15. Symmetry structure of a wave equation on some classes of Bianchi cosmological models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamal, S.; Kara, A. H.; Narain, R.; Shabbir, G.

    2015-04-01

    Nonlinear wave equations are constructed on certain Bianchi models and a symmetry analysis of these equations are performed to construct some exact solutions. Conservation laws of the respective wave equations are also obtained by the application of Noether's theorem. We show how a knowledge of these contributes to the reduction of the wave equation on this manifold.

  16. Impact of event-specific chorus wave realization for modeling the October 8-9, 2012, event using the LANL DREAM3D diffusion code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunningham, G.; Tu, W.; Chen, Y.; Reeves, G. D.; Henderson, M. G.; Baker, D. N.; Blake, J. B.; Spence, H.

    2013-12-01

    During the interval October 8-9, 2012, the phase-space density (PSD) of high-energy electrons exhibited a dropout preceding an intense enhancement observed by the MagEIS and REPT instruments aboard the Van Allen Probes. The evolution of the PSD suggests heating by chorus waves, which were observed to have high intensities at the time of the enhancement [1]. Although intense chorus waves were also observed during the first Dst dip on October 8, no PSD enhancement was observed at this time. We demonstrate a quantitative reproduction of the entire event that makes use of three recent modifications to the LANL DREAM3D diffusion code: 1) incorporation of a time-dependent, low-energy, boundary condition from the MagEIS instrument, 2) use of a time-dependent estimate of the chorus wave intensity derived from observations of POES low-energy electron precipitation, and 3) use of an estimate of the last closed drift shell, beyond which electrons are assumed to have a lifetime that is proportional to their drift period around earth. The key features of the event are quantitatively reproduced by the simulation, including the dropout on October 8, and a rapid increase in PSD early on October 9, with a peak near L*=4.2. The DREAM3D code predicts the dropout on October 8 because this feature is dominated by magnetospheric compression and outward radial diffusion-the L* of the last closed drift-shell reaches a minimum value of 5.33 at 1026 UT on October 8. We find that a ';statistical' wave model based on historical CRRES measurements binned in AE* does not reproduce the enhancement because the peak wave amplitudes are only a few 10's of pT, whereas an ';event-specific' model reproduces both the magnitude and timing of the enhancement very well, a s shown in the Figure, because the peak wave amplitudes are 10x higher. [1] 'Electron Acceleration in the Heart of the Van Allen Radiation Belts', G. D. Reeves et al., Science 1237743, Published online 25 July 2013 [DOI:10.1126/science

  17. Broadband sub-millimeter wave amplifer module with 38dB gain and 8.3dB noise figure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkozy, S.; Leong, K.; Lai, R.; Leakey, R.; Yoshida, W.; Mei, X.; Lee, J.; Liu, P.-H.; Gorospe, B.; Deal, W. R.

    2011-05-01

    Broadband sub-millimeter wave technology has received significant attention for potential applications in security, medical, and military imaging. Despite theoretical advantages of reduced size, weight, and power compared to current millimeter-wave systems, sub-millimeter-wave systems are hampered by a fundamental lack of amplification with sufficient gain and noise figure properties. We report on the development of a sub-millimeter wave amplifier module as part of a broadband pixel operating from 300-350 GHz, biased off of a single 2V power supply. Over this frequency range, > 38 dB gain and < 8.3 dB noise figure are obtained and represent the current state-of-art performance capabilities. The prototype pixel chain consists of two WR3 waveguide amplifier blocks, and a horn antenna and diode detector. The low noise amplifier Sub-Millimeter-wave Monolithic Integrated Circuit (SMMIC) was originally developed under the DARPA SWIFT and THz Electronics programs and is based on sub 50 nm Indium Arsenide Composite Channel (IACC) transistor technology with a projected maximum oscillation frequency fmax > 1.0 THz. This development and demonstration may bring to life future sub-millimeter-wave and THz applications such as solutions to brown-out problems, ultra-high bandwidth satellite communication cross-links, and future planetary exploration missions.

  18. Electromagnetic wave equations for relativistically degenerate quantum magnetoplasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Masood, Waqas; Eliasson, Bengt; Shukla, Padma K.

    2010-06-15

    A generalized set of nonlinear electromagnetic quantum hydrodynamic (QHD) equations is derived for a magnetized quantum plasma, including collisional, electron spin-(1/2), and relativistically degenerate electron pressure effects that are relevant for dense astrophysical systems, such as white dwarfs. For illustrative purposes, linear dispersion relations are derived for one-dimensional magnetoacoustic waves for a collisionless nonrelativistic degenerate gas in the presence of the electron spin-(1/2) contribution and for magnetoacoustic waves in a plasma containing relativistically degenerate electrons. It is found that both the spin and relativistic degeneracy at high densities tend to slow down the magnetoacoustic wave due to the Pauli paramagnetic effect and relativistic electron mass increase. The present study outlines the theoretical framework for the investigation of linear and nonlinear behaviors of electromagnetic waves in dense astrophysical systems. The results are applied to calculate the magnetoacoustic speeds for both the nonrelativistic and relativistic electron degeneracy cases typical for white dwarf stars.

  19. Electromagnetic wave equations for relativistically degenerate quantum magnetoplasmas.

    PubMed

    Masood, Waqas; Eliasson, Bengt; Shukla, Padma K

    2010-06-01

    A generalized set of nonlinear electromagnetic quantum hydrodynamic (QHD) equations is derived for a magnetized quantum plasma, including collisional, electron spin- 1/2, and relativistically degenerate electron pressure effects that are relevant for dense astrophysical systems, such as white dwarfs. For illustrative purposes, linear dispersion relations are derived for one-dimensional magnetoacoustic waves for a collisionless nonrelativistic degenerate gas in the presence of the electron spin- 1/2 contribution and for magnetoacoustic waves in a plasma containing relativistically degenerate electrons. It is found that both the spin and relativistic degeneracy at high densities tend to slow down the magnetoacoustic wave due to the Pauli paramagnetic effect and relativistic electron mass increase. The present study outlines the theoretical framework for the investigation of linear and nonlinear behaviors of electromagnetic waves in dense astrophysical systems. The results are applied to calculate the magnetoacoustic speeds for both the nonrelativistic and relativistic electron degeneracy cases typical for white dwarf stars.

  20. Global effects of transmitted shock wave propagation through the Earth's inner magnetosphere: First results from 3-D hybrid kinetic modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipatov, A. S.; Sibeck, D. G.

    2016-09-01

    We use a new hybrid kinetic model to simulate the response of ring current, outer radiation belt, and plasmaspheric particle populations to impulsive interplanetary shocks. Since particle distributions attending the interplanetary shock waves and in the ring current and radiation belts are non-Maxwellian, wave-particle interactions play a crucial role in energy transport within the inner magnetosphere. Finite gyroradius effects become important in mass loading the shock waves with the background plasma in the presence of higher energy ring current and radiation belt ions and electrons. Initial results show that shocks cause strong deformations in the global structure of the ring current, radiation belt, and plasmasphere. The ion velocity distribution functions at the shock front, in the ring current, and in the radiation belt help us determine energy transport through the Earth's inner magnetosphere.

  1. Standing-wave-excited multiplanar fluorescence in a laser scanning microscope reveals 3D information on red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Amor, Rumelo; Mahajan, Sumeet; Amos, William Bradshaw; McConnell, Gail

    2014-12-08

    Standing-wave excitation of fluorescence is highly desirable in optical microscopy because it improves the axial resolution. We demonstrate here that multiplanar excitation of fluorescence by a standing wave can be produced in a single-spot laser scanning microscope by placing a plane reflector close to the specimen. We report here a variation in the intensity of fluorescence of successive planes related to the Stokes shift of the dye. We show by the use of dyes specific for the cell membrane how standing-wave excitation can be exploited to generate precise contour maps of the surface membrane of red blood cells, with an axial resolution of ≈90 nm. The method, which requires only the addition of a plane mirror to an existing confocal laser scanning microscope, may well prove useful in studying diseases which involve the red cell membrane, such as malaria.

  2. Standing-wave-excited multiplanar fluorescence in a laser scanning microscope reveals 3D information on red blood cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amor, Rumelo; Mahajan, Sumeet; Amos, William Bradshaw; McConnell, Gail

    2014-12-01

    Standing-wave excitation of fluorescence is highly desirable in optical microscopy because it improves the axial resolution. We demonstrate here that multiplanar excitation of fluorescence by a standing wave can be produced in a single-spot laser scanning microscope by placing a plane reflector close to the specimen. We report here a variation in the intensity of fluorescence of successive planes related to the Stokes shift of the dye. We show by the use of dyes specific for the cell membrane how standing-wave excitation can be exploited to generate precise contour maps of the surface membrane of red blood cells, with an axial resolution of ~90 nm. The method, which requires only the addition of a plane mirror to an existing confocal laser scanning microscope, may well prove useful in studying diseases which involve the red cell membrane, such as malaria.

  3. Data dependence for the amplitude equation of surface waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Secchi, Paolo

    2016-04-01

    We consider the amplitude equation for nonlinear surface wave solutions of hyperbolic conservation laws. This is an asymptotic nonlocal, Hamiltonian evolution equation with quadratic nonlinearity. For example, this equation describes the propagation of nonlinear Rayleigh waves (Hamilton et al. in J Acoust Soc Am 97:891-897, 1995), surface waves on current-vortex sheets in incompressible MHD (Alì and Hunter in Q Appl Math 61(3):451-474, 2003; Alì et al. in Stud Appl Math 108(3):305-321, 2002) and on the incompressible plasma-vacuum interface (Secchi in Q Appl Math 73(4):711-737, 2015). The local-in-time existence of smooth solutions to the Cauchy problem for the amplitude equation in noncanonical variables was shown in Hunter (J Hyperbolic Differ Equ 3(2):247-267, 2006), Secchi (Q Appl Math 73(4):711-737, 2015). In the present paper we prove the continuous dependence in strong norm of solutions on the initial data. This completes the proof of the well-posedness of the problem in the classical sense of Hadamard.

  4. On the wave length of smooth periodic traveling waves of the Camassa-Holm equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geyer, A.; Villadelprat, J.

    2015-09-01

    This paper is concerned with the wave length λ of smooth periodic traveling wave solutions of the Camassa-Holm equation. The set of these solutions can be parametrized using the wave height a (or "peak-to-peak amplitude"). Our main result establishes monotonicity properties of the map a ⟼ λ (a), i.e., the wave length as a function of the wave height. We obtain the explicit bifurcation values, in terms of the parameters associated with the equation, which distinguish between the two possible qualitative behaviors of λ (a), namely monotonicity and unimodality. The key point is to relate λ (a) to the period function of a planar differential system with a quadratic-like first integral, and to apply a criterion which bounds the number of critical periods for this type of systems.

  5. On the wave length of smooth periodic traveling waves of the Camassa-Holm equation.

    PubMed

    Geyer, A; Villadelprat, J

    2015-09-15

    This paper is concerned with the wave length λ of smooth periodic traveling wave solutions of the Camassa-Holm equation. The set of these solutions can be parametrized using the wave height a (or "peak-to-peak amplitude"). Our main result establishes monotonicity properties of the map [Formula: see text], i.e., the wave length as a function of the wave height. We obtain the explicit bifurcation values, in terms of the parameters associated with the equation, which distinguish between the two possible qualitative behaviors of [Formula: see text], namely monotonicity and unimodality. The key point is to relate [Formula: see text] to the period function of a planar differential system with a quadratic-like first integral, and to apply a criterion which bounds the number of critical periods for this type of systems.

  6. New constraints on the 3D shear wave velocity structure of the upper mantle underneath Southern Scandinavia revealed from non-linear tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wawerzinek, B.; Ritter, J. R. R.; Roy, C.

    2013-08-01

    We analyse travel times of shear waves, which were recorded at the MAGNUS network, to determine the 3D shear wave velocity (vS) structure underneath Southern Scandinavia. The travel time residuals are corrected for the known crustal structure of Southern Norway and weighted to account for data quality and pick uncertainties. The resulting residual pattern of subvertically incident waves is very uniform and simple. It shows delayed arrivals underneath Southern Norway compared to fast arrivals underneath the Oslo Graben and the Baltic Shield. The 3D upper mantle vS structure underneath the station network is determined by performing non-linear travel time tomography. As expected from the residual pattern the resulting tomographic model shows a simple and continuous vS perturbation pattern: a negative vS anomaly is visible underneath Southern Norway relative to the Baltic Shield in the east with a contrast of up to 4% vS and a sharp W-E dipping transition zone. Reconstruction tests reveal besides vertical smearing a good lateral reconstruction of the dipping vS transition zone and suggest that a deep-seated anomaly at 330-410 km depth is real and not an inversion artefact. The upper part of the reduced vS anomaly underneath Southern Norway (down to 250 km depth) might be due to an increase in lithospheric thickness from the Caledonian Southern Scandes in the west towards the Proterozoic Baltic Shield in Sweden in the east. The deeper-seated negative vS anomaly (330-410 km depth) could be caused by a temperature anomaly possibly combined with effects due to fluids or hydrous minerals. The determined simple 3D vS structure underneath Southern Scandinavia indicates that mantle processes might influence and contribute to a Neogene uplift of Southern Norway.

  7. Full-Wave Tomographic and Moment Tensor Inversion Based on 3D Multigrid Strain Green’s Tensor Databases

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-04-30

    105. Shen, Y., et al., 2013, Construction of a nested, global empirical Green’s tensor database, Seismological Society of America meeting, Salt...W. Zhang, 2010, Full-wave ambient noise tomography of the northern Cascadia, SSA meeting (abstract), Seismological Research Letters, 81, 300. Shen

  8. Comprehensive 3D Model of Shock Wave-Brain Interactions in Blast-Induced Traumatic Brain Injuries

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-10-01

    waves can cause brain damage by other mechanisms including excess pressure (leading to contusions), excess strain (leading to subdural ... hematomas and/or diffuse axonal injuries), and, in particular, cavitation effects (leading to subcellular damage). This project aims at the development of a

  9. New Analytical Solution for Nonlinear Shallow Water-Wave Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aydin, Baran; Kânoğlu, Utku

    2017-03-01

    We solve the nonlinear shallow water-wave equations over a linearly sloping beach as an initial-boundary value problem under general initial conditions, i.e., an initial wave profile with and without initial velocity. The methodology presented here is extremely simple and allows a solution in terms of eigenfunction expansion, avoiding integral transform techniques, which sometimes result in singular integrals. We estimate parameters, such as the temporal variations of the shoreline position and the depth-averaged velocity, compare with existing solutions, and observe perfect agreement with substantially less computational effort.

  10. On the Amplitude Equations for Weakly Nonlinear Surface Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benzoni-Gavage, Sylvie; Coulombel, Jean-François

    2012-09-01

    Nonlocal generalizations of Burgers' equation were derived in earlier work by Hunter (Contemp Math, vol 100, pp 185-202. AMS, 1989), and more recently by Benzoni-Gavage and Rosini (Comput Math Appl 57(3-4):1463-1484, 2009), as weakly nonlinear amplitude equations for hyperbolic boundary value problems admitting linear surface waves. The local-in-time well-posedness of such equations in Sobolev spaces was proved by Benzoni-Gavage (Differ Integr Equ 22(3-4):303-320, 2009) under an appropriate stability condition originally pointed out by Hunter. The same stability condition has also been shown to be necessary for well-posedness in Sobolev spaces in a previous work of the authors in collaboration with Tzvetkov (Benzoni-Gavage et al. in Adv Math 227(6):2220-2240, 2011). In this article, we show how the verification of Hunter's stability condition follows from natural stability assumptions on the original hyperbolic boundary value problem, thus avoiding lengthy computations in each particular situation. We also show that the resulting amplitude equation has a Hamiltonian structure when the original boundary value problem has a variational origin. Our analysis encompasses previous equations derived for nonlinear Rayleigh waves in elasticity.

  11. Integro-differential equation of non-local wave interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Engibaryan, N B; Khachatryan, Aghavard Kh

    2007-06-30

    The integro-differential equation d{sup 2}f/dx{sup 2} + Af = {integral}{sub 0}{sup {infinity}}K(x-t)f(t)dt + g(x) with kernel K(x)={lambda}{integral}{sub a}{sup {infinity}}e{sup -|x|p}G(p)dp, a{>=}0, is considered, in which A>0, {lambda} element of 9-{infinity},{infinity}), G(p){>=}0, 2{integral}{sub a}{sup {infinity}}1/p g(p)dp=1. These equations arise, in particular, in the theory of non-local wave interaction. A factorization method of their analysis and solution is developed. Bibliography: 9 titles.

  12. Low velocity crustal flow and crust-mantle coupling mechanism in Yunnan, SE Tibet, revealed by 3D S-wave velocity and azimuthal anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Haopeng; Zhu, Liangbao; Su, Youjin

    2016-08-01

    We used teleseismic data recorded by a permanent seismic network in Yunnan, SE Tibet, and measured the interstation Rayleigh wave phase velocity between 10 and 60 s. A two-step inversion scheme was used to invert for the 3D S-wave velocity and azimuthal anisotropy structure of 10-110 km. The results show that there are two low velocity channels between depths of 20-30 km in Yunnan and that the fast axes are sub-parallel to the strikes of the low velocity channels, which supports the crustal flow model. The azimuthal anisotropy pattern is quite complicated and reveals a complex crust-mantle coupling mechanism in Yunnan. The N-S trending Lüzhijiang Fault separates the Dianzhong Block into two parts. In the western Dianzhong Block, the fast axis of the S-wave changes with depth, which indicates that the crust and the lithospheric mantle are decoupled. In the eastern Dianzhong Block and the western Yangtze Craton, the crust and the lithospheric mantle may be decoupled because of crustal flow, despite a coherent S-wave fast axis at depths of 10-110 km. In addition, the difference between the S-wave fast axis in the lithosphere and the SKS splitting measurement suggests that the lithosphere and the upper mantle are decoupled there. In the Baoshan Block, the stratified anisotropic pattern suggests that the crust and the upper mantle are decoupled.

  13. Loop heating by D.C. electric current and electromagnetic wave emissions simulated by 3-D EM particle zone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakai, J. I.; Zhao, J.; Nishikawa, K.-I.

    1994-01-01

    We have shown that a current-carrying plasma loop can be heated by magnetic pinch driven by the pressure imbalance between inside and outside the loop, using a 3-dimensional electromagnetic (EM) particle code. Both electrons and ions in the loop can be heated in the direction perpendicular to the ambient magnetic field, therefore the perpendicular temperature can be increased about 10 times compared with the parallel temperature. This temperature anisotropy produced by the magnetic pinch heating can induce a plasma instability, by which high-frequency electromagnetic waves can be excited. The plasma current which is enhanced by the magnetic pinch can also excite a kinetic kink instability, which can heat ions perpendicular to the magnetic field. The heating mechanism of ions as well as the electromagnetic emission could be important for an understanding of the coronal loop heating and the electromagnetic wave emissions from active coronal regions.

  14. Global Effects of Transmitted Shock Wave Propagation Through the Earth's Inner Magnetosphere: First Results from 3-D Hybrid Kinetic Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lipatov, A. S.; Sibeck, D. G.

    2016-01-01

    We use a new hybrid kinetic model to simulate the response of ring current, outer radiation belt, and plasmaspheric particle populations to impulsive interplanetary shocks. Since particle distributions attending the interplanetary shock waves and in the ring current and radiation belts are non-Maxwellian, waveparticle interactions play a crucial role in energy transport within the inner magnetosphere. Finite gyroradius effects become important in mass loading the shock waves with the background plasma in the presence of higher energy ring current and radiation belt ions and electrons. Initial results show that shocks cause strong deformations in the global structure of the ring current, radiation belt, and plasmasphere. The ion velocity distribution functions at the shock front, in the ring current, and in the radiation belt help us determine energy transport through the Earth's inner magnetosphere.

  15. Electrostatic wave propagation and trapping near the magnetic equator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barbosa, D. D.

    1985-01-01

    Results of a two-dimensional ray tracing computer code, based on Snell's law, for electrostatic wave propagation in a dipole magnetic field are discussed. A survey of possible ray paths varying a wide range of parameters is conducted for low-harmonic Bernstein modes in a high-density plasma. It is shown that the ray paths exhibit similarity with radial distance and that there exists the possibility of two classes of wave statistics of the equator: a broad emission region extending to about + or - 4 deg and a class of events restricted to the smaller region of 1-2 deg about the magnetic equator. The regulating parameter between these two types of events is the transition energy from the isotropic background electrons to the unstable distribution of superthermals. Ray paths for propagation in the magnetic equatorial plane are considered and an explanation is given for ray focusing in the equatorial plane based on electron gyroradius considerations.

  16. Higher order parabolic approximations of the reduced wave equation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcaninch, G. L.

    1986-01-01

    Asymptotic solutions of order k to the nth are developed for the reduced wave equation. Here k is a dimensionless wave number and n is the arbitrary order of the approximation. These approximations are an extension of geometric acoustics theory, and provide corrections to that theory in the form of multiplicative functions which satisfy parabolic partial differential equations. These corrections account for the diffraction effects caused by variation of the field normal to the ray path and the interaction of these transverse variations with the variation of the field along the ray. The theory is applied to the example of radiation from a piston, and it is demonstrated that the higher order approximations are more accurate for decreasing values of k.

  17. Bounded Error Schemes for the Wave Equation on Complex Domains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abarbanel, Saul; Ditkowski, Adi; Yefet, Amir

    1998-01-01

    This paper considers the application of the method of boundary penalty terms ("SAT") to the numerical solution of the wave equation on complex shapes with Dirichlet boundary conditions. A theory is developed, in a semi-discrete setting, that allows the use of a Cartesian grid on complex geometries, yet maintains the order of accuracy with only a linear temporal error-bound. A numerical example, involving the solution of Maxwell's equations inside a 2-D circular wave-guide demonstrates the efficacy of this method in comparison to others (e.g. the staggered Yee scheme) - we achieve a decrease of two orders of magnitude in the level of the L2-error.

  18. The Massive Wave Equation in Asymptotically AdS Spacetimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warnick, C. M.

    2013-07-01

    We consider the massive wave equation on asymptotically AdS spaces. We show that the timelike F behaves like a finite timelike boundary, on which one may impose the equivalent of Dirichlet, Neumann or Robin conditions for a range of (negative) mass parameter which includes the conformally coupled case. We demonstrate well posedness for the associated initial-boundary value problems at the H 1 level of regularity. We also prove that higher regularity may be obtained, together with an asymptotic expansion for the field near F. The proofs rely on energy methods, tailored to the modified energy introduced by Breitenlohner and Freedman. We do not assume the spacetime is stationary, nor that the wave equation separates.

  19. 3D-ambient noise Rayleigh wave tomography of Snæfellsjökull volcano, Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obermann, Anne; Lupi, Matteo; Mordret, Aurélien; Jakobsdóttir, Steinunn S.; Miller, Stephen A.

    2016-05-01

    From May to September 2013, 21 seismic stations were deployed around the Snæfellsjökull volcano, Iceland. We cross-correlate the five months of seismic noise and measure the Rayleigh wave group velocity dispersion curves to gain more information about the geological structure of the Snæfellsjökull volcano. In particular, we investigate the occurrence of seismic wave anomalies in the first 6 km of crust. We regionalize the group velocity dispersion curves into 2-D velocity maps between 0.9 and 4.8 s. With a neighborhood algorithm we then locally invert the velocity maps to obtain accurate shear-velocity models down to 6 km depth. Our study highlights three seismic wave anomalies. The deepest, located between approximately 3.3 and 5.5 km depth, is a high velocity anomaly, possibly representing a solidified magma chamber. The second anomaly is also a high velocity anomaly east of the central volcano that starts at the surface and reaches approximately 2.5 km depth. It may represent a gabbroic intrusion or a dense swarm of inclined magmatic sheets (similar to the dike swarms found in the ophiolites), typical of Icelandic volcanic systems. The third anomaly is a low velocity anomaly extending up to 1.5 km depth. This anomaly, located directly below the volcanic edifice, may be interpreted either as a shallow magmatic reservoir (typical of Icelandic central volcanoes), or alternatively as a shallow hydrothermal system developed above the cooling magmatic reservoir.

  20. Fast neural solution of a nonlinear wave equation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toomarian, Nikzad; Barhen, Jacob

    1992-01-01

    A neural algorithm for rapidly simulating a certain class of nonlinear wave phenomena using analog VLSI neural hardware is presented and applied to the Korteweg-de Vries partial differential equation. The corresponding neural architecture is obtained from a pseudospectral representation of the spatial dependence, along with a leap-frog scheme for the temporal evolution. Numerical simulations demonstrated the robustness of the proposed approach.

  1. Test of high-resolution 3D P-wave velocity model of Poland by back-azimuthal sections of teleseismic receiver function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilde-Piorko, Monika; Polkowski, Marcin; Grad, Marek

    2015-04-01

    Geological and seismic structure under area of Poland is well studied by over one hundred thousand boreholes, over thirty deep seismic refraction and wide angle reflection profiles and by vertical seismic profiling, magnetic, gravity, magnetotelluric and thermal methods. Compilation of these studies allowed to create a high-resolution 3D P-wave velocity model down to 60 km depth in the area of Poland (Polkowski et al. 2014). Model also provides details about the geometry of main layers of sediments (Tertiary and Quaternary, Cretaceous, Jurassic, Triassic, Permian, old Paleozoic), consolidated/crystalline crust (upper, middle and lower) and uppermost mantle. This model gives an unique opportunity for calculation synthetic receiver function and compering it with observed receiver function calculated for permanent and temporary seismic stations. Modified ray-tracing method (Langston, 1977) can be used directly to calculate the response of the structure with dipping interfaces to the incoming plane wave with fixed slowness and back-azimuth. So, 3D P-wave velocity model has been interpolated to 2.5D P-wave velocity model beneath each seismic station and back-azimuthal sections of components of receiver function have been calculated. Vp/Vs ratio is assumed to be 1.8, 1.67, 1.73, 1.77 and 1.8 in the sediments, upper/middle/lower consolidated/crystalline crust and uppermost mantle, respectively. Densities were calculated with combined formulas of Berteussen (1977) and Gardner et al. (1974). Additionally, to test a visibility of the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary phases at receiver function sections models have been extended to 250 km depth based on P4-mantle model (Wilde-Piórko et al., 2010). National Science Centre Poland provided financial support for this work by NCN grant DEC-2011/02/A/ST10/00284 and by NCN grant UMO-2011/01/B/ST10/06653.

  2. A 3D algorithm based on the combined inversion of Rayleigh and Love waves for imaging and monitoring of shallow structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilz, Marco; Parolai, Stefano; Woith, Heiko

    2017-01-01

    SUMMARYIn recent years there has been increasing interest in the study of seismic noise interferometry as it can provide a complementary approach to active source or earthquake based methods for imaging and continuous monitoring the shallow structure of the Earth. This meaningful information is extracted from wavefields propagating between those receiver positions at which seismic noise was recorded. Until recently, noise-based imaging relied mostly on Rayleigh <span class="hlt">waves</span>. However, considering similar wavelengths, a combined use of Rayleigh and Love <span class="hlt">wave</span> tomography can succeed in retrieving velocity heterogeneities at depth due to their different sensitivity kernels. Here we present a novel one-step algorithm for simultaneously inverting Rayleigh and Love <span class="hlt">wave</span> dispersion data aiming at identifying and describing complex <span class="hlt">3</span><span class="hlt">D</span> velocity structures. The algorithm may help to accurately and efficiently map the shear-<span class="hlt">wave</span> velocities and the Poisson ratio of the surficial soil layers. In the high-frequency range, the scattered part of the correlation functions stabilizes sufficiently fast to provide a reliable estimate of the velocity structure not only for imaging purposes but also allows for changes in the medium properties to be monitored. Such monitoring can be achieved with a high spatial resolution in <span class="hlt">3</span><span class="hlt">D</span> and with a time resolution as small as a few hours. In this article, we describe a recent array experiment in a volcanic environment in Solfatara (Italy) and we show that this novel approach has identified strong velocity variations at the interface between liquids and gas-dominated reservoirs, allowing localizing a region which is highly dynamic due to the interaction between the deep convection and its surroundings.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016CompM.tmp..102W','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016CompM.tmp..102W"><span>A unified quadrature-based superconvergent finite element formulation for eigenvalue computation of <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">equations</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Wang, Dongdong; Li, Xiwei; Pan, Feixu</p> <p>2016-11-01</p> <p>A simple and unified finite element formulation is presented for superconvergent eigenvalue computation of <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">equations</span> ranging from 1D to <span class="hlt">3</span><span class="hlt">D</span>. In this framework, a general method based upon the so called α mass matrix formulation is first proposed to effectively construct 1D higher order mass matrices for arbitrary order elements. The finite elements discussed herein refer to the Lagrangian type of Lobatto elements that take the Lobatto points as nodes. Subsequently a set of quadrature rules that exactly integrate the 1D higher order mass matrices are rationally derived, which are termed as the superconvergent quadrature rules. More importantly, in 2D and <span class="hlt">3</span><span class="hlt">D</span> cases, it is found that the employment of these quadrature rules via tensor product simultaneously for the mass and stiffness matrix integrations of Lobatto elements produces a unified superconvergent formulation for the eigenvalue or frequency computation without <span class="hlt">wave</span> propagation direction dependence, which usually is a critical issue for the multidimensional higher order mass matrix formulation. Consequently the proposed approach is capable of computing arbitrary frequencies in a superconvergent fashion. Meanwhile, numerical implementation of the proposed method for multidimensional problems is trivial. The effectiveness of the proposed methodology is systematically demonstrated by a series of numerical examples. Numerical results revealed that a superconvergence with 2(p+1)th order of frequency accuracy is achieved by the present unified formulation for the pth order Lobatto element.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017CompM..59...37W','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017CompM..59...37W"><span>A unified quadrature-based superconvergent finite element formulation for eigenvalue computation of <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">equations</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Wang, Dongdong; Li, Xiwei; Pan, Feixu</p> <p>2017-01-01</p> <p>A simple and unified finite element formulation is presented for superconvergent eigenvalue computation of <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">equations</span> ranging from 1D to <span class="hlt">3</span><span class="hlt">D</span>. In this framework, a general method based upon the so called α mass matrix formulation is first proposed to effectively construct 1D higher order mass matrices for arbitrary order elements. The finite elements discussed herein refer to the Lagrangian type of Lobatto elements that take the Lobatto points as nodes. Subsequently a set of quadrature rules that exactly integrate the 1D higher order mass matrices are rationally derived, which are termed as the superconvergent quadrature rules. More importantly, in 2D and <span class="hlt">3</span><span class="hlt">D</span> cases, it is found that the employment of these quadrature rules via tensor product simultaneously for the mass and stiffness matrix integrations of Lobatto elements produces a unified superconvergent formulation for the eigenvalue or frequency computation without <span class="hlt">wave</span> propagation direction dependence, which usually is a critical issue for the multidimensional higher order mass matrix formulation. Consequently the proposed approach is capable of computing arbitrary frequencies in a superconvergent fashion. Meanwhile, numerical implementation of the proposed method for multidimensional problems is trivial. The effectiveness of the proposed methodology is systematically demonstrated by a series of numerical examples. Numerical results revealed that a superconvergence with 2(p+1)th order of frequency accuracy is achieved by the present unified formulation for the pth order Lobatto element.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016GeoJI.206.1574Z','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016GeoJI.206.1574Z"><span><span class="hlt">3</span>-<span class="hlt">D</span> P- and S-<span class="hlt">wave</span> velocity structure and low-frequency earthquake locations in the Parkfield, California region</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Zeng, Xiangfang; Thurber, Clifford H.; Shelly, David R.; Harrington, Rebecca M.; Cochran, Elizabeth S.; Bennington, Ninfa L.; Peterson, Dana; Guo, Bin; McClement, Kara</p> <p>2016-09-01</p> <p>To refine the <span class="hlt">3</span>-<span class="hlt">D</span> seismic velocity model in the greater Parkfield, California region, a new data set including regular earthquakes, shots, quarry blasts and low-frequency earthquakes (LFEs) was assembled. Hundreds of traces of each LFE family at two temporary arrays were stacked with time-frequency domain phase weighted stacking method to improve signal-to-noise ratio. We extend our model resolution to lower crustal depth with LFE data. Our result images not only previously identified features but also low velocity zones (LVZs) in the area around the LFEs and the lower crust beneath the southern Rinconada Fault. The former LVZ is consistent with high fluid pressure that can account for several aspects of LFE behaviour. The latter LVZ is consistent with a high conductivity zone in magnetotelluric studies. A new Vs model was developed with S picks that were obtained with a new autopicker. At shallow depth, the low Vs areas underlie the strongest shaking areas in the 2004 Parkfield earthquake. We relocate LFE families and analyse the location uncertainties with the NonLinLoc and tomoDD codes. The two methods yield similar results.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70184979','USGSPUBS'); return false;" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70184979"><span><span class="hlt">3</span>-<span class="hlt">D</span> P- and S-<span class="hlt">wave</span> velocity structure and low-frequency earthquake locations in the Parkfield, California region</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Zeng, Xiangfang; Thurber, Clifford H.; Shelly, David R.; Harrington, Rebecca M.; Cochran, Elizabeth S.; Bennington, Ninfa L.; Peterson, Dana; Guo, Bin; McClement, Kara</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>To refine the <span class="hlt">3</span>-<span class="hlt">D</span> seismic velocity model in the greater Parkfield, California region, a new data set including regular earthquakes, shots, quarry blasts and low-frequency earthquakes (LFEs) was assembled. Hundreds of traces of each LFE family at two temporary arrays were stacked with time–frequency domain phase weighted stacking method to improve signal-to-noise ratio. We extend our model resolution to lower crustal depth with LFE data. Our result images not only previously identified features but also low velocity zones (LVZs) in the area around the LFEs and the lower crust beneath the southern Rinconada Fault. The former LVZ is consistent with high fluid pressure that can account for several aspects of LFE behaviour. The latter LVZ is consistent with a high conductivity zone in magnetotelluric studies. A new Vs model was developed with S picks that were obtained with a new autopicker. At shallow depth, the low Vs areas underlie the strongest shaking areas in the 2004 Parkfield earthquake. We relocate LFE families and analyse the location uncertainties with the NonLinLoc and tomoDD codes. The two methods yield similar results.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19760053296&hterms=Equator&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D40%26Ntt%3DEquator','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19760053296&hterms=Equator&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D40%26Ntt%3DEquator"><span>Plasma <span class="hlt">wave</span> interactions with energetic ions near the magnetic <span class="hlt">equator</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Gurnett, D. A.</p> <p>1976-01-01</p> <p>An intense band of electromagnetic noise is frequently observed near the magnetic equatorial plane at radial distance from about 2 to 9 earth radii. Recent wide band <span class="hlt">wave</span> form measurements with the Imp 6 and Hawkeye 1 satellites have shown that the equatorial noise consists of a complex superposition of many harmonically spaced lines. Several distinctly different frequency spacings are often evident in the same spectrum. The frequency spacing typically ranges from a few hertz to a few tens of hertz. The purpose of this paper is to suggest that these <span class="hlt">waves</span> are interacting with energetic protons, alpha particles, and other heavy ions trapped near the magnetic <span class="hlt">equator</span>. The possible role that these <span class="hlt">waves</span> play in controlling the distribution of the energetic ions is considered.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19760013661','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19760013661"><span>Plasma <span class="hlt">wave</span> interactions with energetic ions near the magnetic <span class="hlt">equator</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Gurnett, D. A.</p> <p>1975-01-01</p> <p>An intense band of electromagnetic noise is frequently observed near the magnetic equatorial plane at radial distance from about 2 to 5 Re. Recent wideband <span class="hlt">wave</span>-form measurements with the IMP-6 and Hawkeye-1 satellites have shown that the equatorial noise consists of a complex superposition of many harmonically spaced lines. Several distinctly different frequency spacings are often evident in the same spectrum. The frequency spacing typically ranges from a few Hz to a few tens of Hz. It is suggested that these <span class="hlt">waves</span> are interacting with energetic protons, alpha particles, and other heavy ions trapped near the magnetic <span class="hlt">equator</span>. The possible role these <span class="hlt">waves</span> play in controlling the distribution of the energetic ions is considered.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015APS..MARF30012I','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015APS..MARF30012I"><span><span class="hlt">Wave</span> <span class="hlt">Equation</span> of Three-Dimensional Skyrmion Line</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Iwasaki, Junichi; Schütte, Christoph; Nagaosa, Naoto</p> <p>2015-03-01</p> <p>Magnetic skyrmion is a particle in magnets, which is now regarded as one of the most promising candidate for information career in future memory devices. In the bulk of chiral magnets, skyrmions form lines along the applied magnetic field. Previous studies report that the emergent magnetic monopoles are assocoated with the creation and annihilation of these lines. Here, we raise more fundamental question: how does the <span class="hlt">wave</span> propagates in these one-dimensional ``strings''? Surprisingly, the numerical simulation reveals that the <span class="hlt">waves</span> propagating in positive and negative directions are different. This asymmetric feature is described by magnon contribution, which has, in general, k-linear term in its dispersion relation under the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction. Starting from the action of the spin system in chiral magnets, we derive the <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">equation</span> of the skyrmion line.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26674178','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26674178"><span>A delay differential <span class="hlt">equation</span> model of follicle <span class="hlt">waves</span> in women.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Panza, Nicole M; Wright, Andrew A; Selgrade, James F</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>This article presents a mathematical model for hormonal regulation of the menstrual cycle which predicts the occurrence of follicle <span class="hlt">waves</span> in normally cycling women. Several follicles of ovulatory size that develop sequentially during one menstrual cycle are referred to as follicle <span class="hlt">waves</span>. The model consists of 13 nonlinear, delay differential <span class="hlt">equations</span> with 51 parameters. Model simulations exhibit a unique stable periodic cycle and this menstrual cycle accurately approximates blood levels of ovarian and pituitary hormones found in the biological literature. Numerical experiments illustrate that the number of follicle <span class="hlt">waves</span> corresponds to the number of rises in pituitary follicle stimulating hormone. Modifications of the model <span class="hlt">equations</span> result in simulations which predict the possibility of two ovulations at different times during the same menstrual cycle and, hence, the occurrence of dizygotic twins via a phenomenon referred to as superfecundation. Sensitive parameters are identified and bifurcations in model behaviour with respect to parameter changes are discussed. Studying follicle <span class="hlt">waves</span> may be helpful for improving female fertility and for understanding some aspects of female reproductive ageing.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/96501','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/96501"><span>Vorticity <span class="hlt">equation</span> for MHD fast <span class="hlt">waves</span> in geospace environment</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Yamauchi, M.; Lundin, R.; Lui, A.T.Y.</p> <p>1993-08-01</p> <p>The magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) vorticity <span class="hlt">equation</span> is modified in order to apply it to nonlinear MHD fast <span class="hlt">waves</span> or shocks when their extent along the magnetic field is limited. Field-aligned current (FAC) generation is also discussed on the basis of this modified vorticity <span class="hlt">equation</span>. When the <span class="hlt">wave</span> normal is not aligned to the finite velocity convection and the source region is spatially limited, a longitudinal polarization (u{sub {perpendicular}}{center_dot}J{sub {perpendicular}}) causes a pair of plus and minus charges inside the compressional plane <span class="hlt">waves</span> or shocks, generating a pair of FACs. This polarization is not related to the separation between the electrons and ions caused by their difference in mass (i.e., Langmuir mode), a separation which is inherent to compressional <span class="hlt">waves</span>. The resultant double field-aligned current structure exists both with and without the contributions from curvature drift, which is questionable in terms of its contribution to vorticity change from the viewpoint of single-particle motion. 14 refs., 3 figs.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016PhLA..380.2136H','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016PhLA..380.2136H"><span>Rational solitary <span class="hlt">wave</span> and rogue <span class="hlt">wave</span> solutions in coupled defocusing Hirota <span class="hlt">equation</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Huang, Xin</p> <p>2016-06-01</p> <p>We derive and study a general rational solution of a coupled defocusing Hirota <span class="hlt">equation</span> which can be used to describe evolution of light in a two-mode fiber with defocusing Kerr effect and some certain high-order effects. We find some new excitation patterns in the model, such as M-shaped soliton, W-shaped soliton, anti-eye-shaped rogue <span class="hlt">wave</span> and four-petaled flower rogue <span class="hlt">wave</span>. The results are compared with the solutions obtained in other coupled systems like vector nonlinear Schrödinger <span class="hlt">equation</span>, coupled focusing Hirota and Sasa-Satsuma <span class="hlt">equations</span>. We explain the new characters by modulational instability properties. This further indicates that rational solution does not necessarily correspond to rogue <span class="hlt">wave</span> excitation dynamics and the quantitative relation between nonlinear excitations and modulational instability should exist.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015APS..DPPN12056H','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015APS..DPPN12056H"><span>Time-Dependent Distribution Functions in C-Mod Calculated with the CQL<span class="hlt">3</span><span class="hlt">D</span>-Hybrid-FOW, AORSA Full-<span class="hlt">Wave</span>, and DC Lorentz Codes</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Harvey, R. W. (Bob); Petrov, Yu. V.; Jaeger, E. F.; Berry, L. A.; Bonoli, P. T.; Bader, A.</p> <p>2015-11-01</p> <p>A time-dependent simulation of C-Mod pulsed ICRF power is made calculating minority hydrogen ion distribution functions with the CQL<span class="hlt">3</span><span class="hlt">D</span>-Hybrid-FOW finite-orbit-width Fokker-Planck code. ICRF fields are calculated with the AORSA full <span class="hlt">wave</span> code, and RF diffusion coefficients are obtained from these fields using the DC Lorentz gyro-orbit code. Prior results with a zero-banana-width simulation using the CQL<span class="hlt">3</span><span class="hlt">D</span>/AORSA/DC time-cycles showed a pronounced enhancement of the H distribution in the perpendicular velocity direction compared to results obtained from Stix's quasilinear theory, in general agreement with experiment. The present study compares the new FOW results, including relevant gyro-radius effects, to determine the importance of these effects on the the NPA synthetic diagnostic time-dependence. The new NPA results give increased agreement with experiment, particularly in the ramp-down time after the ICRF pulse. Funded, through subcontract with Massachusetts Institute of Technology, by USDOE sponsored SciDAC Center for Simulation of <span class="hlt">Wave</span>-Plasma Interactions.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016MsT..........1O','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016MsT..........1O"><span>Seismic body-<span class="hlt">wave</span> interferometry using noise autocorrelations for crustal structure and a tutorial on <span class="hlt">3</span><span class="hlt">D</span> seismic processing and imaging using Madagascar</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Olejnik, Peter</p> <p></p> <p>Seismic body-<span class="hlt">wave</span> interferometry is applied to selected seismic stations from the USArray Earthscope Transportable Array (TA) by autocorrelating ambient seismic noise recordings to construct effective zero-offset reflection seismograms. The robustness of the auto-correlations of noise traces is first tested on a TA station in Nevada where body-<span class="hlt">wave</span> reflections similar to those found in an earlier study are identified. This approach is then applied to several TA stations in the central U.S., and the results are compared with synthetic data. Different stacking time periods are then examined to find the shortest time intervals that provide stable correlation stacks. A tutorial on <span class="hlt">3</span><span class="hlt">D</span> seismic processing and imaging using the Madagascar open-source software package is next presented for educational purposes. The <span class="hlt">3</span><span class="hlt">D</span> Teapot Dome seismic data set is examined to illustrate the processing and imaging steps. A number of processing steps are applied to the data set, including amplitude gaining, muting, deconvolution, static corrections, velocity analysis, normal moveout (NMO) correction, and stacking. Post-stack time and depth migrations are then performed on the stacked data along with post-migration f-x deconvolution.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010AIPC.1316..217C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010AIPC.1316..217C"><span>`Number States' and `Pilot <span class="hlt">Waves</span>' Hidden in Maxwell's Classical <span class="hlt">Equations</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Carroll, John E.</p> <p>2010-12-01</p> <p>Schrödingers <span class="hlt">equation</span> with boundary conditions gives quantized energy states for electron <span class="hlt">waves</span>, but Maxwell's <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">equations</span> have quantized states only by analogies with harmonic oscillators. This problem is addressed by a novel theory of <span class="hlt">wave</span>-packets using diffracting Transverse Electric and Transverse Magnetic fields defined by axial H- and E-fields. All transverse fields and gradient operators can together be rotated about the propagation axis at frequencies, independent of the modal frequency. Without altering the axial fields, any helical motion propagates at the group velocity. This is quite different from single frequency helical modes (e.g. Laguerre Gaussian) travelling at the phase velocity. Reversing time and frequency, allows counter rotating helical solutions. These are referred to as adjoint or a fields that may interact and propagate with the classical causal reference or r fields. Overlapping and counter rotating r and a fields with slightly different frequencies interfere, leaving circular polarization states unaltered and creating a nodal structure in the transverse fields distinct from the nodal structure in the axial fields. Number states arise from requiring that transverse and axial nodes co-locate with integral spacings to form a <span class="hlt">wave</span>-packet,. The a fields act as pilot <span class="hlt">waves</span> for future potential positions of a quantized interaction between r and a fields. Uncertainty in the position of the overlap leads to conventional probabilistic quantum interpretations. The a fields are not fully determined until their detection with the r <span class="hlt">wave</span> and this late determination can offer explanations for non-local entanglement.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19720051948&hterms=heat+shock+method&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D50%26Ntt%3Dheat%2Bshock%2Bmethod','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19720051948&hterms=heat+shock+method&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D50%26Ntt%3Dheat%2Bshock%2Bmethod"><span>Shock-<span class="hlt">wave</span> structure using nonlinear model Boltzmann <span class="hlt">equations</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Segal, B. M.; Ferziger, J. H.</p> <p>1972-01-01</p> <p>The structure of strong plane shock <span class="hlt">waves</span> in a perfect monatomic gas was studied using four nonlinear models of the Boltzmann <span class="hlt">equation</span>. The models involved the use of a simplified collision operator with velocity-independent collision frequency, in place of the complicated Boltzmann collision operator. The models employed were the BGK and ellipsoidal models developed by earlier authors, and the polynomial and trimodal gain function models developed during the work. An exact set of moment <span class="hlt">equations</span> was derived for the density, velocity, temperature, viscous stress, and heat flux within the shock. This set was reduced to a pair of coupled nonlinear integral <span class="hlt">equations</span> and solved using specially adapted numerical techniques. A new and simple Gauss-Seidel iteration was developed during the work and found to be as efficient as the best earlier iteration methods.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016JMP....57f2902B','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016JMP....57f2902B"><span>On a class of nonlocal <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">equations</span> from applications</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Beyer, Horst Reinhard; Aksoylu, Burak; Celiker, Fatih</p> <p>2016-06-01</p> <p>We study <span class="hlt">equations</span> from the area of peridynamics, which is a nonlocal extension of elasticity. The governing <span class="hlt">equations</span> form a system of nonlocal <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">equations</span>. We take a novel approach by applying operator theory methods in a systematic way. On the unbounded domain ℝn, we present three main results. As main result 1, we find that the governing operator is a bounded function of the governing operator of classical elasticity. As main result 2, a consequence of main result 1, we prove that the peridynamic solutions strongly converge to the classical solutions by utilizing, for the first time, strong resolvent convergence. In addition, main result 1 allows us to incorporate local boundary conditions, in particular, into peridynamics. This avenue of research is developed in companion papers, providing a remedy for boundary effects. As main result 3, employing spherical Bessel functions, we give a new practical series representation of the solution which allows straightforward numerical treatment with symbolic computation.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017Prama..88...57L','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017Prama..88...57L"><span>Dynamics of rogue <span class="hlt">waves</span> on multisoliton background in the Benjamin Ono <span class="hlt">equation</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>LIU, YUN-KAI; LI, BIAO</p> <p>2017-04-01</p> <p>For the Benjamin Ono <span class="hlt">equation</span>, the Hirota bilinear method and long <span class="hlt">wave</span> limit method are applied to obtain the breathers and the rogue <span class="hlt">wave</span> solutions. Bright and dark rogue <span class="hlt">waves</span> exist in the Benjamin Ono <span class="hlt">equation</span>, and their typical dynamics are analysed and illustrated. The semirational solutions possessing rogue <span class="hlt">waves</span> and solitons are also obtained, and demonstrated by the three-dimensional figures. Furthermore, the hybrid of rogue <span class="hlt">wave</span> and breather solutions are also found in the Benjamin Ono <span class="hlt">equation</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70160859','USGSPUBS'); return false;" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70160859"><span>Seismic site characterization of an urban dedimentary basin, Livermore Valley, California: Site tesponse, basin-edge-induced surface <span class="hlt">waves</span>, and <span class="hlt">3</span><span class="hlt">D</span> simulations</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Hartzell, Stephen; Leeds, Alena L.; Ramirez-Guzman, Leonardo; Allen, James P.; Schmitt, Robert G.</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Thirty‐two accelerometers were deployed in the Livermore Valley, California, for approximately one year to study sedimentary basin effects. Many local and near‐regional earthquakes were recorded, including the 24 August 2014 Mw 6.0 Napa, California, earthquake. The resulting ground‐motion data set is used to quantify the seismic response of the Livermore basin, a major structural depression in the California Coast Range Province bounded by active faults. Site response is calculated by two methods: the reference‐site spectral ratio method and a source‐site spectral inversion method. Longer‐period (≥1  s) amplification factors follow the same general pattern as Bouguer gravity anomaly contours. Site response spectra are inverted for shallow shear‐<span class="hlt">wave</span> velocity profiles, which are consistent with independent information. Frequency–wavenumber analysis is used to analyze plane‐<span class="hlt">wave</span> propagation across the Livermore Valley and to identify basin‐edge‐induced surface <span class="hlt">waves</span> with back azimuths different from the source back azimuth. Finite‐element simulations in a <span class="hlt">3</span><span class="hlt">D</span> velocity model of the region illustrate the generation of basin‐edge‐induced surface <span class="hlt">waves</span> and point out strips of elevated ground velocities along the margins of the basin.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007OptSp.102..603K','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007OptSp.102..603K"><span>Localized light <span class="hlt">waves</span>: Paraxial and exact solutions of the <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">equation</span> (a review)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Kiselev, A. P.</p> <p>2007-04-01</p> <p>Simple explicit localized solutions are systematized over the whole space of a linear <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">equation</span>, which models the propagation of optical radiation in a linear approximation. Much attention has been paid to exact solutions (which date back to the Bateman findings) that describe <span class="hlt">wave</span> beams (including Bessel-Gauss beams) and <span class="hlt">wave</span> packets with a Gaussian localization with respect to the spatial variables and time. Their asymptotics with respect to free parameters and at large distances are presented. A similarity between these exact solutions and harmonic in time fields obtained in the paraxial approximation based on the Leontovich-Fock parabolic <span class="hlt">equation</span> has been studied. Higher-order modes are considered systematically using the separation of variables method. The application of the Bateman solutions of the <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">equation</span> to the construction of solutions to <span class="hlt">equations</span> with dispersion and nonlinearity and their use in wavelet analysis, as well as the summation of Gaussian beams, are discussed. In addition, solutions localized at infinity known as the Moses-Prosser “acoustic bullets”, as well as their harmonic in time counterparts, “ X waves”, <span class="hlt">waves</span> from complex sources, etc., have been considered. Everywhere possible, the most elementary mathematical formalism is used.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li class="active"><span>21</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_21 --> <div id="page_22" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li class="active"><span>22</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="421"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016EPJP..131..166M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016EPJP..131..166M"><span>Soliton solutions to a few fractional nonlinear evolution <span class="hlt">equations</span> in shallow water <span class="hlt">wave</span> dynamics</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Mirzazadeh, Mohammad; Ekici, Mehmet; Sonmezoglu, Abdullah; Ortakaya, Sami; Eslami, Mostafa; Biswas, Anjan</p> <p>2016-05-01</p> <p>This paper studies a few nonlinear evolution <span class="hlt">equations</span> that appear with fractional temporal evolution and fractional spatial derivatives. These are Benjamin-Bona-Mahoney <span class="hlt">equation</span>, dispersive long <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">equation</span> and Nizhnik-Novikov-Veselov <span class="hlt">equation</span>. The extended Jacobi's elliptic function expansion method is implemented to obtain soliton and other periodic singular solutions to these <span class="hlt">equations</span>. In the limiting case, when the modulus of ellipticity approaches zero or unity, these doubly periodic functions approach solitary <span class="hlt">waves</span> or shock <span class="hlt">waves</span> or periodic singular solutions emerge.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22490896','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22490896"><span>Lifetime of inner-shell hole states of Ar (2p) and Kr (<span class="hlt">3</span><span class="hlt">d</span>) using <span class="hlt">equation</span>-of-motion coupled cluster method</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Ghosh, Aryya; Vaval, Nayana; Pal, Sourav</p> <p>2015-07-14</p> <p>Auger decay is an efficient ultrafast relaxation process of core-shell or inner-shell excited atom or molecule. Generally, it occurs in femto-second or even atto-second time domain. Direct measurement of lifetimes of Auger process of single ionized and double ionized inner-shell state of an atom or molecule is an extremely difficult task. In this paper, we have applied the highly correlated complex absorbing potential-<span class="hlt">equation</span>-of-motion coupled cluster (CAP-EOMCC) approach which is a combination of CAP and EOMCC approach to calculate the lifetime of the states arising from 2p inner-shell ionization of an Ar atom and <span class="hlt">3</span><span class="hlt">d</span> inner-shell ionization of Kr atom. We have also calculated the lifetime of Ar{sup 2+}(2p{sup −1}3p{sup −1}) {sup 1}D, Ar{sup 2+}(2p{sup −1}3p{sup −1}) {sup 1}S, and Ar{sup 2+}(2p{sup −1}3s{sup −1}) {sup 1}P double ionized states. The predicted results are compared with the other theoretical results as well as experimental results available in the literature.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014ZaMP...65..905Z','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014ZaMP...65..905Z"><span>Stability analysis of an interactive system of <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">equation</span> and heat <span class="hlt">equation</span> with memory</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Zhang, Qiong</p> <p>2014-10-01</p> <p>This paper is devoted to the stability analysis of an interaction system comprised of a <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">equation</span> and a heat <span class="hlt">equation</span> with memory, where the hereditary heat conduction is due to Gurtin-Pipkin law or Coleman-Gurtin law. First, we show the strong asymptotic stability of solutions to this system. Then, the exponential stability of the interaction system is obtained when the hereditary heat conduction is of Gurtin-Pipkin type. Further, we show the lack of uniform decay of the interaction system when the heat conduction law is of Coleman-Gurtin type.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/ADA487601','DTIC-ST'); return false;" href="http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/ADA487601"><span>A New Regional <span class="hlt">3</span>-<span class="hlt">D</span> Velocity Model for Asia from the Joint Inversion of P-<span class="hlt">Wave</span> Travel Times and Surface-<span class="hlt">Wave</span> Dispersion Data</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://publicaccess.dtic.mil/psm/api/service/search/search">DTIC Science & Technology</a></p> <p></p> <p>2008-09-30</p> <p>global reference model ( Montagner and Kennett, 1996; Kennett et al., 1995). The attenuation profile is held constant everywhere in our model, except over...discrepancy’ between surface <span class="hlt">waves</span> and body <span class="hlt">waves</span> that other researchers have described (Baig and Dahlen, 2004; Montagner 216 2008 Monitoring Research...travel times, Geophys. J. Int’l. 122: 108-124. Montagner , J.-P. and B. L. N. Kennett (1996). How to reconcile body-<span class="hlt">wave</span> and normal-mode reference earth</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016EGUGA..18.4527D','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016EGUGA..18.4527D"><span>Spatial and temporal compact <span class="hlt">equations</span> for water <span class="hlt">waves</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Dyachenko, Alexander; Kachulin, Dmitriy; Zakharov, Vladimir</p> <p>2016-04-01</p> <p>A one-dimensional potential flow of an ideal incompressible fluid with a free surface in a gravity field is the Hamiltonian system with the Hamiltonian: H = 1/2intdxint-∞^η |nablaφ|^2dz + g/2ont η^2dxŗφ(x,z,t) - is the potential of the fluid, g - gravity acceleration, η(x,t) - surface profile Hamiltonian can be expanded as infinite series of steepness: {Ham4} H &=& H2 + H3 + H4 + dotsŗH2 &=& 1/2int (gη2 + ψ hat kψ) dx, ŗH3 &=& -1/2int \\{(hat kψ)2 -(ψ_x)^2}η dx,ŗH4 &=&1/2int {ψxx η2 hat kψ + ψ hat k(η hat k(η hat kψ))} dx. where hat k corresponds to the multiplication by |k| in Fourier space, ψ(x,t)= φ(x,η(x,t),t). This truncated Hamiltonian is enough for gravity <span class="hlt">waves</span> of moderate amplitudes and can not be reduced. We have derived self-consistent compact <span class="hlt">equations</span>, both spatial and temporal, for unidirectional water <span class="hlt">waves</span>. <span class="hlt">Equations</span> are written for normal complex variable c(x,t), not for ψ(x,t) and η(x,t). Hamiltonian for temporal compact <span class="hlt">equation</span> can be written in x-space as following: {SPACE_C} H = intc^*hat V c dx + 1/2int [ i/4(c2 partial/partial x {c^*}2 - {c^*}2 partial/partial x c2)- |c|2 hat K(|c|^2) ]dx Here operator hat V in K-space is so that Vk = ω_k/k. If along with this to introduce Gardner-Zakharov-Faddeev bracket (for the analytic in the upper half-plane function) {GZF} partial^+x Leftrightarrow ikθk Hamiltonian for spatial compact <span class="hlt">equation</span> is the following: {H24} &&H=1/gint1/ω|cω|2 dω +ŗ&+&1/2g^3int|c|^2(ddot c^*c + ddot c c^*)dt + i/g^2int |c|^2hatω(dot c c* - cdot c^*)dt. <span class="hlt">equation</span> of motion is: {t-space} &&partial /partial xc +i/g partial^2/partial t^2c =ŗ&=& 1/2g^3partial^3/partial t3 [ partial^2/partial t^2(|c|^2c) +2 |c|^2ddot c +ddot c^*c2 ]+ŗ&+&i/g3 partial^3/partial t3 [ partial /partial t( chatω |c|^2) + dot c hatω |c|2 + c hatω(dot c c* - cdot c^*) ]. It solves the spatial Cauchy problem for surface gravity <span class="hlt">wave</span> on the deep water. Main features of the <span class="hlt">equations</span> are: <span class="hlt">Equations</span> are written for</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015EGUGA..17.3995Q','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015EGUGA..17.3995Q"><span>A <span class="hlt">wave</span> action <span class="hlt">equation</span> for water <span class="hlt">waves</span> propagating on vertically sheared flows</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Quinn, Brenda; Toledo, Yaron; Shrira, Victor</p> <p>2015-04-01</p> <p>The coexistence of motions of different scales in oceans and other natural water basins presents a challenge for their dynamic modeling. For water <span class="hlt">waves</span> on currents, an asymptotic procedure exploiting the separation of scales allows the modeling of two motions of a qualitatively different nature, the fast shortwaves on the surface and the dynamics of the slow, long currents. Most <span class="hlt">wave</span> forecast models are based on the <span class="hlt">wave</span> action <span class="hlt">equation</span> which is a conservation <span class="hlt">equation</span> which takes into account the propagation of the <span class="hlt">wave</span> energy in geographic space, shoaling, refraction, diffraction and also source terms which account for generation, <span class="hlt">wave-wave</span> interactions and dissipation of the energy. Water <span class="hlt">waves</span> almost always propagate on currents with a vertical structure such as currents directed towards the beach accompanied by an under-current directed back toward the deep sea or wind-induced currents which change magnitude with depth due to viscosity effects. On larger scales they also change their direction due to the Coriolis force as described by the Ekman spiral. This implies that the existing <span class="hlt">wave</span> models, which assume vertically-averaged currents, is an approximation which is far from realistic. In recent years, ocean circulation models have significantly improved with the capability to model vertically-sheared current profiles in contrast with the earlier vertically-averaged current profiles. Further advancements have coupled <span class="hlt">wave</span> action models to circulation models to relate the mutual effects between the two types of motion. Restricting <span class="hlt">wave</span> models to vertically-averaged current profiles is obviously problematic in these cases and the primary goal of this work is to derive and examine a general <span class="hlt">wave</span> action <span class="hlt">equation</span> which accounts for this shortcoming. Combining two previous theoretical approaches [Voronovich, 1976; Skop, 1987], the developed <span class="hlt">wave</span> action formulation greatly improves the representation of linear <span class="hlt">wave</span>-current interaction in the case of tidal inlets</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016APS..DFD.L5007R','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016APS..DFD.L5007R"><span>Regularized Moment <span class="hlt">Equations</span> and Shock <span class="hlt">Waves</span> for Rarefied Granular Gas</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Reddy, Lakshminarayana; Alam, Meheboob</p> <p>2016-11-01</p> <p>It is well-known that the shock structures predicted by extended hydrodynamic models are more accurate than the standard Navier-Stokes model in the rarefied regime, but they fail to predict continuous shock structures when the Mach number exceeds a critical value. Regularization or parabolization is one method to obtain smooth shock profiles at all Mach numbers. Following a Chapman-Enskog-like method, we have derived the "regularized" version 10-moment <span class="hlt">equations</span> ("R10" moment <span class="hlt">equations</span>) for inelastic hard-spheres. In order to show the advantage of R10 moment <span class="hlt">equations</span> over standard 10-moment <span class="hlt">equations</span>, the R10 moment <span class="hlt">equations</span> have been employed to solve the Riemann problem of plane shock <span class="hlt">waves</span> for both molecular and granular gases. The numerical results are compared between the 10-moment and R10-moment models and it is found that the 10-moment model fails to produce continuous shock structures beyond an upstream Mach number of 1 . 34 , while the R10-moment model predicts smooth shock profiles beyond the upstream Mach number of 1 . 34 . The density and granular temperature profiles are found to be asymmetric, with their maxima occurring within the shock-layer.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016SPIE10010E..22V','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016SPIE10010E..22V"><span><span class="hlt">3</span><span class="hlt">D</span> simulation for solitons used in optical fibers</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Vasile, F.; Tebeica, C. M.; Schiopu, P.; Vladescu, M.</p> <p>2016-12-01</p> <p>In this paper is described <span class="hlt">3</span><span class="hlt">D</span> simulation for solitions used in optical fibers. In the scientific works is started from nonlinear propagation <span class="hlt">equation</span> and the solitons represents its solutions. This paper presents the simulation of the fundamental soliton in <span class="hlt">3</span><span class="hlt">D</span> together with simulation of the second order soliton in <span class="hlt">3</span><span class="hlt">D</span>. These simulations help in the study of the optical fibers for long distances and in the interactions between the solitons. This study helps the understanding of the nonlinear propagation <span class="hlt">equation</span> and for nonlinear <span class="hlt">waves</span>. These <span class="hlt">3</span><span class="hlt">D</span> simulations are obtained using MATLAB programming language, and we can observe fundamental difference between the soliton and the second order/higher order soliton and in their evolution.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008spt..conf..239A','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008spt..conf..239A"><span>Quantum <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">equations</span> in curved space-time from <span class="hlt">wave</span> mechanics</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Arminjon, Mayeul</p> <p></p> <p>The usual way to write the <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">equations</span> of relativistic quantum mechanics in a curved spacetime is by covariantization: the searched <span class="hlt">equation</span> in curved spacetime should coincide with the flat-spacetime version in coordinates where the connection cancels at the event X considered. This is connected with the equivalence principle. For the Dirac <span class="hlt">equation</span> with standard (spinor) transformation, this procedure leads to the Dirac-Fock-Weyl (DFW) eqn, which does not obey the equivalence principle. Alternatively, in this work we want to apply directly the classical-quantum correspondence… Note from Publisher: This article contains the abstract only.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/825842','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/825842"><span>COMBINING A NEW <span class="hlt">3</span>-<span class="hlt">D</span> SEISMIC S-<span class="hlt">WAVE</span> PROPAGATION ANALYSIS FOR REMOTE FRACTURE DETECTION WITH A ROBUST SUBSURFACE MICROFRACTURE-BASED VERIFICATION TECHNIQUE</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Bob Hardage; M.M. Backus; M.V. DeAngelo; R.J. Graebner; S.E. Laubach; Paul Murray</p> <p>2004-02-01</p> <p>Fractures within the producing reservoirs at McElroy Field could not be studied with the industry-provided 3C<span class="hlt">3</span><span class="hlt">D</span> seismic data used as a cost-sharing contribution in this study. The signal-to-noise character of the converted-SV data across the targeted reservoirs in these contributed data was not adequate for interpreting azimuth-dependent data effects. After illustrating the low signal quality of the converted-SV data at McElroy Field, the seismic portion of this report abandons the McElroy study site and defers to 3C<span class="hlt">3</span><span class="hlt">D</span> seismic data acquired across a different fractured carbonate reservoir system to illustrate how 3C<span class="hlt">3</span><span class="hlt">D</span> seismic data can provide useful information about fracture systems. Using these latter data, we illustrate how fast-S and slow-S data effects can be analyzed in the prestack domain to recognize fracture azimuth, and then demonstrate how fast-S and slow-S data volumes can be analyzed in the poststack domain to estimate fracture intensity. In the geologic portion of the report, we analyze published regional stress data near McElroy Field and numerous formation multi-imager (FMI) logs acquired across McElroy to develop possible fracture models for the McElroy system. Regional stress data imply a fracture orientation different from the orientations observed in most of the FMI logs. This report culminates Phase 2 of the study, ''Combining a New <span class="hlt">3</span>-<span class="hlt">D</span> Seismic S-<span class="hlt">Wave</span> Propagation Analysis for Remote Fracture Detection with a Robust Subsurface Microfracture-Based Verification Technique''. Phase 3 will not be initiated because wells were to be drilled in Phase 3 of the project to verify the validity of fracture-orientation maps and fracture-intensity maps produced in Phase 2. Such maps cannot be made across McElroy Field because of the limitations of the available 3C<span class="hlt">3</span><span class="hlt">D</span> seismic data at the depth level of the reservoir target.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017ApSS..396.1649G','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017ApSS..396.1649G"><span>Splitting of the Ti-<span class="hlt">3</span><span class="hlt">d</span> bands of TiSe2 in the charge-density <span class="hlt">wave</span> phase</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Ghafari, A.; Petaccia, L.; Janowitz, C.</p> <p>2017-02-01</p> <p>Very high resolution angular resolved photoemission (ARPES) spectra on TiSe2 in two distinct polarization geometries (vertical and horizontal) at temperatures between 300 K and 22 K enabled the observation of details of bands near the Fermi level not reported so far. Calculations of the electronic band structure based on density functional theory (DFT) using B3LYP hybrid functional and MBJ potential (with and without spin-orbit coupling) were performed to obtain the orbital symmetry and dispersion. Two degenerate conduction bands (CB's) were observed at the Γ-point, a weak CB- emission at the A-point, and two non degenerate CB's (i.e. splitting of CB) at the M/L-point of the Brillouin Zone (BZ). The splitting was detected at L for both polarizations, while at M remarkably only for horizontal polarization. These results cannot be fully accounted for by current theories for the charge density <span class="hlt">wave</span> (CDW) and point to a reduced symmetry of the electronic states, possibly due to the chiral CDW.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015APS..MARY35009Y','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015APS..MARY35009Y"><span><span class="hlt">3</span><span class="hlt">D</span> dimeron as a stable topological object</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Yang, Shijie; Liu, Yongkai</p> <p>2015-03-01</p> <p>Searching for novel topological objects is always an intriguing task for scientists in various fields. We study a new three-dimensional (<span class="hlt">3</span><span class="hlt">D</span>) topological structure called <span class="hlt">3</span><span class="hlt">D</span> dimeron in the trapped two-component Bose-Einstein condensates. The <span class="hlt">3</span><span class="hlt">D</span> dimeron differs to the conventional <span class="hlt">3</span><span class="hlt">D</span> skyrmion for the condensates hosting two interlocked vortex-rings. We demonstrate that the vortex-rings are connected by a singular string and the complexity constitutes a vortex-molecule. The stability is investigated through numerically evolving the Gross-Pitaevskii <span class="hlt">equations</span>, giving a coherent Rabi coupling between the two components. Alternatively, we find that the stable <span class="hlt">3</span><span class="hlt">D</span> dimeron can be naturally generated from a vortex-free Gaussian <span class="hlt">wave</span> packet via incorporating a synthetic non-Abelian gauge potential into the condensates. This work is supported by the NSF of China under Grant No. 11374036 and the National 973 program under Grant No. 2012CB821403.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008AGUFMNS53A1210M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008AGUFMNS53A1210M"><span><span class="hlt">3</span><span class="hlt">D</span> Calculation of Seismic <span class="hlt">Wave</span> Interaction with Topography and Near-surface Structures at the LSBB Underground Laboratory, Rustrel, France</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Maufroy, E.; Gaffet, S.; Operto, S.; Cruz-Atienza, V. M.; Senechal, G.; Dietrich, M.; Zeyen, H.; Sardou, O.; Boyer, D.</p> <p>2008-12-01</p> <p>The understanding of seismic <span class="hlt">wave</span> interaction with both topography and geological structures is one of a principal focus of seismic risk characterization. Seasonal or artificial variations of water (or more generally fluid or gas) saturation in the medium revealed by local variations of rheological parameters (VP, VS, QP, QS, and density) may strongly impact the seismic and the hydro-mechanical site response. The problem addressed here is the characterization of these potential site effects, which are of great interest in the context of underground storage and effects of anthropogenic structures. With the foregoing in mind, a seismic experiment was carried out in 2006 at the LSBB Underground Laboratory (http://lsbb.unice.fr), Rustrel, France. A total of 189 seismometers (<span class="hlt">3</span><span class="hlt">D</span> 0.1 Hz Agecodagis) were spread on the surface of the massif with a slope of 30%, 150 vertical geophones (14 Hz) distributed along the roof of the 800 m long tunnel at LSBB. A two-dimensional profile of 100 shots (150 g equiv. TNT) were used for imaging the rheological properties of the subterranean karstic medium. A <span class="hlt">3</span><span class="hlt">D</span> P-velocity model was obtained from the reflection and surface to depth transmission P-<span class="hlt">wave</span> travel times featuring the foregoing 2D tomographic profile. Main faults and P-<span class="hlt">wave</span> velocities correlate well with the two main lithological formations (Barremian and Bedoulian limestones) [S.S.B.S. program, 1965]. As a preliminary step, finite difference modelling [Shake<span class="hlt">3</span><span class="hlt">D</span>, Cruz-Atienza et al., 2007] using fixed VP/VS ratio provided a means for topographic site effect assessment. With these parameters, deduced mean amplification factors reach values from 3 to 6. There are shadow regions with low ground motion. There are also seismic lenses where seismic energy focusing occurs. These depend on the topography shape and relative source location. In a more realistic medium deduced from full waveform inversion [Operto et al., 2004], variations of VP/VS ratio and quality factors QP, QS, are</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016PhRvB..93g5124K','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016PhRvB..93g5124K"><span>Interplay between spin-density <span class="hlt">wave</span> and <span class="hlt">3</span> <span class="hlt">d</span> local moments with random exchange in a molecular conductor</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Kawaguchi, Genta; Maesato, Mitsuhiko; Komatsu, Tokutaro; Imakubo, Tatsuro; Kitagawa, Hiroshi</p> <p>2016-02-01</p> <p>We present the results of high-pressure transport measurements on the anion-mixed molecular conductors (DIETSe)2M Br2Cl2 [DIETSe = diiodo(ethylenedithio)tetraselenafulvalene; M =Fe , Ga]. They undergo a metal-insulator (M-I) transition below 9 K at ambient pressure, which is suppressed by applying pressure, indicating a spin-density-<span class="hlt">wave</span> (SDW) transition caused by a nesting instability of the quasi-one-dimensional (Q1D) Fermi surface, as observed in the parent compounds (DIETSe)2M Cl4 (M =Fe , Ga). In the metallic state, the existence of the Q1D Fermi surface is confirmed by observing the Lebed resonance. The critical pressures of the SDW, Pc, of the M Br2Cl2 (M =Fe , Ga) salts are significantly lower than those of the the M Cl4 (M = Fe, Ga) salts, suggesting chemical pressure effects. Above Pc, field-induced SDW transitions appear, as evidenced by kink structures in the magnetoresistance (MR) in both salts. The FeBr2Cl2 salt also shows antiferromagnetic (AF) ordering of d spins at 4 K, below which significant spin-charge coupling is observed. A large positive MR change up to 150% appears above the spin-flop field at high pressure. At low pressure, in particular below Pc, a dip or kink structure appears in MR at the spin-flop field, which shows unconventionally large hysteresis at low temperature (T <1 K). The hysteresis region clearly decreases with increasing pressure towards Pc, strongly indicating that the coexisting SDW plays an important role in the enhancement of magnetic hysteresis besides the random exchange interaction.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016PhyD..325...98H','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016PhyD..325...98H"><span>Modulational instability in nonlinear nonlocal <span class="hlt">equations</span> of regularized long <span class="hlt">wave</span> type</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Hur, Vera Mikyoung; Pandey, Ashish Kumar</p> <p>2016-06-01</p> <p>We study the stability and instability of periodic traveling <span class="hlt">waves</span> in the vicinity of the origin in the spectral plane, for <span class="hlt">equations</span> of Benjamin-Bona-Mahony (BBM) and regularized Boussinesq types permitting nonlocal dispersion. We extend recent results for <span class="hlt">equations</span> of Korteweg-de Vries type and derive modulational instability indices as functions of the <span class="hlt">wave</span> number of the underlying <span class="hlt">wave</span>. We show that a sufficiently small, periodic traveling <span class="hlt">wave</span> of the BBM <span class="hlt">equation</span> is spectrally unstable to long wavelength perturbations if the <span class="hlt">wave</span> number is greater than a critical value and a sufficiently small, periodic traveling <span class="hlt">wave</span> of the regularized Boussinesq <span class="hlt">equation</span> is stable to square integrable perturbations.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/842574','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/842574"><span>An Acoustic <span class="hlt">Wave</span> <span class="hlt">Equation</span> for Tilted Transversely Isotropic Media</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Zhang, Linbin; Rector III, James W.; Hoversten, G. Michael</p> <p>2005-03-15</p> <p>A finite-difference method for computing the first arrival traveltimes by solving the Eikonal <span class="hlt">equation</span> in the celerity domain has been developed. This algorithm incorporates the head and diffraction <span class="hlt">wave</span>. We also adapt a fast sweeping method, which is extremely simple to implement in any number of dimensions, to obtain accurate first arrival times in complex velocity models. The method, which is stable and computationally efficient, can handle instabilities due to caustics and provide head <span class="hlt">waves</span> traveltimes. Numerical examples demonstrate that the celerity-domain Eikonal solver provides accurate first arrival traveltimes. This new method is three times accurate more than the 2nd-order fast marching method in a linear velocity model with the same spacing.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26723366','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26723366"><span>Unsplit complex frequency shifted perfectly matched layer for second-order <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">equation</span> using auxiliary differential <span class="hlt">equations</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Gao, Yingjie; Zhang, Jinhai; Yao, Zhenxing</p> <p>2015-12-01</p> <p>The complex frequency shifted perfectly matched layer (CFS-PML) can improve the absorbing performance of PML for nearly grazing incident <span class="hlt">waves</span>. However, traditional PML and CFS-PML are based on first-order <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">equations</span>; thus, they are not suitable for second-order <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">equation</span>. In this paper, an implementation of CFS-PML for second-order <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">equation</span> is presented using auxiliary differential <span class="hlt">equations</span>. This method is free of both convolution calculations and third-order temporal derivatives. As an unsplit CFS-PML, it can reduce the nearly grazing incidence. Numerical experiments show that it has better absorption than typical PML implementations based on second-order <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">equation</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017JCoPh.334..442S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017JCoPh.334..442S"><span>Convolution quadrature for the <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">equation</span> with impedance boundary conditions</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Sauter, S. A.; Schanz, M.</p> <p>2017-04-01</p> <p>We consider the numerical solution of the <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">equation</span> with impedance boundary conditions and start from a boundary integral formulation for its discretization. We develop the generalized convolution quadrature (gCQ) to solve the arising acoustic retarded potential integral <span class="hlt">equation</span> for this impedance problem. For the special case of scattering from a spherical object, we derive representations of analytic solutions which allow to investigate the effect of the impedance coefficient on the acoustic pressure analytically. We have performed systematic numerical experiments to study the convergence rates as well as the sensitivity of the acoustic pressure from the impedance coefficients. Finally, we apply this method to simulate the acoustic pressure in a building with a fairly complicated geometry and to study the influence of the impedance coefficient also in this situation.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016JNS....26..365P','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016JNS....26..365P"><span>Transverse Instability of Line Solitary <span class="hlt">Waves</span> in Massive Dirac <span class="hlt">Equations</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Pelinovsky, Dmitry; Shimabukuro, Yusuke</p> <p>2016-04-01</p> <p>Working in the context of localized modes in periodic potentials, we consider two systems of the massive Dirac <span class="hlt">equations</span> in two spatial dimensions. The first system, a generalized massive Thirring model, is derived for the periodic stripe potentials. The second one, a generalized massive Gross-Neveu <span class="hlt">equation</span>, is derived for the hexagonal potentials. In both cases, we prove analytically that the line solitary <span class="hlt">waves</span> are spectrally unstable with respect to periodic transverse perturbations of large periods. The spectral instability is induced by the spatial translation for the generalized massive Thirring model and by the gauge rotation for the generalized massive Gross-Neveu model. We also observe numerically that the spectral instability holds for the transverse perturbations of any period in the generalized massive Thirring model and exhibits a finite threshold on the period of the transverse perturbations in the generalized massive Gross-Neveu model.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/970445','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/970445"><span>Maxwell <span class="hlt">Equation</span> for the Coupled Spin-Charge <span class="hlt">Wave</span> Propagation</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Bernevig, B.Andrei; Yu, Xiaowei; Zhang, Shou-Cheng; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.</p> <p>2010-01-15</p> <p>We show that the dissipationless spin current in the ground state of the Rashba model gives rise to a reactive coupling between the spin and charge propagation, which is formally identical to the coupling between the electric and the magnetic fields in the 2 + 1 dimensional Maxwell <span class="hlt">equation</span>. This analogy leads to a remarkable prediction that a density packet can spontaneously split into two counter propagation packets, each carrying the opposite spins. In a certain parameter regime, the coupled spin and charge <span class="hlt">wave</span> propagates like a transverse 'photon'. We propose both optical and purely electronic experiments to detect this effect.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li class="active"><span>22</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_22 --> <div id="page_23" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li class="active"><span>23</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>25</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="441"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007JMAA..331..585L','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007JMAA..331..585L"><span>Fourth order <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">equations</span> with nonlinear strain and source terms</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Liu, Yacheng; Xu, Runzhang</p> <p>2007-07-01</p> <p>In this paper we study the initial boundary value problem for fourth order <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">equations</span> with nonlinear strain and source terms. First we introduce a family of potential wells and prove the invariance of some sets and vacuum isolating of solutions. Then we obtain a threshold result of global existence and nonexistence. Finally we discuss the global existence of solutions for the problem with critical initial condition I(u0)[greater-or-equal, slanted]0, E(0)=d. So the Esquivel-Avila's results are generalized and improved.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016ApPhL.109y2602A','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016ApPhL.109y2602A"><span>Enhanced zero-bias conductance peak and splitting at mesoscopic interfaces between an s-<span class="hlt">wave</span> superconductor and a <span class="hlt">3</span><span class="hlt">D</span> Dirac semimetal</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Aggarwal, Leena; Gayen, Sirshendu; Das, Shekhar; Thakur, Gohil S.; Ganguli, Ashok K.; Sheet, Goutam</p> <p>2016-12-01</p> <p>Mesoscopic point contacts between elemental metals and the topological <span class="hlt">3</span><span class="hlt">D</span> Dirac semimetal Cd3As2 have been recently shown to be superconducting with unconventional pairing while Cd3As2 itself does not superconduct. Here we show that the same superconducting phase at mesoscopic interfaces on Cd3As2 can be induced with a known conventional superconductor Nb where a pronounced zero-bias conductance peak is observed which undergoes splitting in energy under certain conditions. The observations are consistent with the theory of the emergence of Andreev bound states due to the presence of a pair potential with broken time reversal symmetry. The data also indicate the possibility of Majorana bound states as expected at the interfaces between s-<span class="hlt">wave</span> superconductors and topologically non-trivial materials with a high degree of spin-orbit coupling.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/ADA506308','DTIC-ST'); return false;" href="http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/ADA506308"><span>Nonlinear Localized Dissipative Structures for Long-Time Solution of <span class="hlt">Wave</span> <span class="hlt">Equation</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://publicaccess.dtic.mil/psm/api/service/search/search">DTIC Science & Technology</a></p> <p></p> <p>2009-07-01</p> <p>Fatemi, E., Engquist, B., and Osher, S., " Numerical Solution of the High Frequency Asymptotic Expansion for the Scalar <span class="hlt">Wave</span> <span class="hlt">Equation</span> ", Journal of...FINAL REPORT Grant Title: Nonlinear Localized Dissipative Structures for Long-Time Solution of <span class="hlt">Wave</span> <span class="hlt">Equation</span> By Dr. John Steinhoff Grant number... numerical method, "<span class="hlt">Wave</span> Confinement" (WC), is developed to efficiently solve the linear <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">equation</span> . This is similar to the originally developed</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25314499','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25314499"><span>Rogue <span class="hlt">waves</span> of the Sasa-Satsuma <span class="hlt">equation</span> in a chaotic <span class="hlt">wave</span> field.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Soto-Crespo, J M; Devine, N; Hoffmann, N P; Akhmediev, N</p> <p>2014-09-01</p> <p>We study the properties of the chaotic <span class="hlt">wave</span> fields generated in the frame of the Sasa-Satsuma <span class="hlt">equation</span> (SSE). Modulation instability results in a chaotic pattern of small-scale filaments with a free parameter-the propagation constant k. The average velocity of the filaments is approximately given by the group velocity calculated from the dispersion relation for the plane-<span class="hlt">wave</span> solution. Remarkably, our results reveal the reason for the skewed profile of the exact SSE rogue-<span class="hlt">wave</span> solutions, which was one of their distinctive unexplained features. We have also calculated the probability density functions for various values of the propagation constant k, showing that probability of appearance of rogue <span class="hlt">waves</span> depends on k.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19970019644','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19970019644"><span>Finite Difference Time Marching in the Frequency Domain: A Parabolic Formulation for the Convective <span class="hlt">Wave</span> <span class="hlt">Equation</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Baumeister, K. J.; Kreider, K. L.</p> <p>1996-01-01</p> <p>An explicit finite difference iteration scheme is developed to study harmonic sound propagation in ducts. To reduce storage requirements for large <span class="hlt">3</span><span class="hlt">D</span> problems, the time dependent potential form of the acoustic <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">equation</span> is used. To insure that the finite difference scheme is both explicit and stable, time is introduced into the Fourier transformed (steady-state) acoustic potential field as a parameter. Under a suitable transformation, the time dependent governing <span class="hlt">equation</span> in frequency space is simplified to yield a parabolic partial differential <span class="hlt">equation</span>, which is then marched through time to attain the steady-state solution. The input to the system is the amplitude of an incident harmonic sound source entering a quiescent duct at the input boundary, with standard impedance boundary conditions on the duct walls and duct exit. The introduction of the time parameter eliminates the large matrix storage requirements normally associated with frequency domain solutions, and time marching attains the steady-state quickly enough to make the method favorable when compared to frequency domain methods. For validation, this transient-frequency domain method is applied to sound propagation in a 2D hard wall duct with plug flow.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016PEPI..261...46Z','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016PEPI..261...46Z"><span><span class="hlt">Wave</span> <span class="hlt">equation</span> based microseismic source location and velocity inversion</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Zheng, Yikang; Wang, Yibo; Chang, Xu</p> <p>2016-12-01</p> <p>The microseismic event locations and velocity information can be used to infer the stress field and guide hydraulic fracturing process, as well as to image the subsurface structures. How to get accurate microseismic event locations and velocity model is the principal problem in reservoir monitoring. For most location methods, the velocity model has significant relation with the accuracy of the location results. The velocity obtained from log data is usually too rough to be used for location directly. It is necessary to discuss how to combine the location and velocity inversion. Among the main techniques for locating microseismic events, time reversal imaging (TRI) based on <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">equation</span> avoids traveltime picking and offers high-resolution locations. Frequency dependent <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">equation</span> traveltime inversion (FWT) is an inversion method that can invert velocity model with source uncertainty at certain frequency band. Thus we combine TRI with FWT to produce improved event locations and velocity model. In the proposed approach, the location and model information are interactively used and updated. Through the proposed workflow, the inverted model is better resolved and the event locations are more accurate. We test this method on synthetic borehole data and filed data of a hydraulic fracturing experiment. The results verify the effectiveness of the method and prove it has potential for real-time microseismic monitoring.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017EPJP..132..108Z','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017EPJP..132..108Z"><span>Separation of arbitrary spin <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">equations</span> in a class of ΛLTB cosmologies. <span class="hlt">Wave</span> <span class="hlt">equations</span> in Λ LTB cosmology</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Zecca, Antonio</p> <p>2017-03-01</p> <p>The arbitrary spin field <span class="hlt">equations</span> that are not separable, contrarily to what happens in the Robertson-Walker and Schwarzschild metrics, are studied in a general comoving spherically symmetric metric. They result to be separable by variable separation in a class of metrics governing the Lemâitre Tolman Bondi cosmological models whose physical radius has a special factorized parametric representation. The result is proved by induction by explicitly considering the spin 1, 3/2, 2 case and then the higher spin values. The procedure is based on the Newman-Penrose formalism, which takes into account the strong analogy with the Robertson-Walker metric case. The existence of a nontrivial Weyl spinor requires a symmetrization of one of the spinor <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">equations</span> for spin values greater than 1.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016GeoJI.207..833A','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016GeoJI.207..833A"><span>Fast Domain Partitioning Method for dynamic boundary integral <span class="hlt">equations</span> applicable to non-planar faults dipping in <span class="hlt">3</span>-<span class="hlt">D</span> elastic half-space</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Ando, Ryosuke</p> <p>2016-11-01</p> <p>The elastodynamic boundary integral <span class="hlt">equation</span> method (BIEM) in real space and in the temporal domain is an accurate semi-analytical tool to investigate the earthquake rupture dynamics on non-planar faults. However, its heavy computational demand for a historic integral generally increases with a time complexity of O(MN3)for the number of time steps N and elements M due to volume integration in the causality cone. In this study, we introduce an efficient BIEM, termed the `Fast Domain Partitioning Method' (FDPM), which enables us to reduce the computation time to the order of the surface integral, O(MN2), without degrading the accuracy. The memory requirement is also reduced to O(M2) from O(M2N). FDPM uses the physical nature of Green's function for stress to partition the causality cone into the domains of the P and S <span class="hlt">wave</span> fronts, the domain in-between the P and S <span class="hlt">wave</span> fronts, and the domain of the static equilibrium, where the latter two domains exhibit simpler dependences on time and/or space. The scalability of this method is demonstrated on the large-scale parallel computing environments of distributed memory systems. It is also shown that FDPM enables an efficient use of memory storage, which makes it possible to reduce computation times to a previously unprecedented level. We thus present FDPM as a powerful tool to break through the current fundamental difficulties in running dynamic simulations of coseismic ruptures and earthquake cycles under realistic conditions of fault geometries.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22303613','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22303613"><span>A Schamel <span class="hlt">equation</span> for ion acoustic <span class="hlt">waves</span> in superthermal plasmas</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Williams, G. Kourakis, I.; Verheest, F.; Hellberg, M. A.; Anowar, M. G. M.</p> <p>2014-09-15</p> <p>An investigation of the propagation of ion acoustic <span class="hlt">waves</span> in nonthermal plasmas in the presence of trapped electrons has been undertaken. This has been motivated by space and laboratory plasma observations of plasmas containing energetic particles, resulting in long-tailed distributions, in combination with trapped particles, whereby some of the plasma particles are confined to a finite region of phase space. An unmagnetized collisionless electron-ion plasma is considered, featuring a non-Maxwellian-trapped electron distribution, which is modelled by a kappa distribution function combined with a Schamel distribution. The effect of particle trapping has been considered, resulting in an expression for the electron density. Reductive perturbation theory has been used to construct a KdV-like Schamel <span class="hlt">equation</span>, and examine its behaviour. The relevant configurational parameters in our study include the superthermality index κ and the characteristic trapping parameter β. A pulse-shaped family of solutions is proposed, also depending on the weak soliton speed increment u{sub 0}. The main modification due to an increase in particle trapping is an increase in the amplitude of solitary <span class="hlt">waves</span>, yet leaving their spatial width practically unaffected. With enhanced superthermality, there is a decrease in both amplitude and width of solitary <span class="hlt">waves</span>, for any given values of the trapping parameter and of the incremental soliton speed. Only positive polarity excitations were observed in our parametric investigation.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016SPIE.9750E..1BH','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016SPIE.9750E..1BH"><span>Oblique incidence of semi-guided <span class="hlt">waves</span> on step-like folds in planar dielectric slabs: Lossless vertical interconnects in <span class="hlt">3</span><span class="hlt">D</span> integrated photonic circuits</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Hildebrandt, Andre; Alhaddad, Samer; Hammer, Manfred; Förstner, Jens</p> <p>2016-02-01</p> <p>Semi-guided light propagation across linear folds of slab waveguides is being considered. Radiation losses vanish beyond certain critical angles of incidence, as can be understood by arguments resembling Snell's law. One thus realizes lossless propagation through 90-degree corner configurations, where the remaining guided <span class="hlt">waves</span> are still subject to pronounced reflection and polarization conversion. A step-like system of two of these sharp corners can then be viewed as a system akin to a Fabry-Perot interferometer, with two partial reflectors at a distance given by the vertical separation of the slab cores. The respective resonance effect enables full transmission of semiguided, laterally plane <span class="hlt">waves</span> through the step structures. One obtains a configuration that optically connects guiding layers at different elevation levels in a <span class="hlt">3</span>-<span class="hlt">D</span> integrated optical chip, without radiation losses, over large distances, and reasonably broadband. We show rigorous quasi-analytical results for typical high-contrast Si/SiO2 structures. Although the full-transmission effect requires a symmetric system, here realized by slab waveguides with a silicon core sandwiched between thick silica substrate and cover layers, simulations for configurations with air cover show that a certain asymmetry can well be afforded.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014AGUFM.S13A4426M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014AGUFM.S13A4426M"><span>Application of the H/V and SPAC Method to Estimate a <span class="hlt">3</span><span class="hlt">D</span> Shear <span class="hlt">Wave</span> Velocity Model, in the City of Coatzacoalcos, Veracruz.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Morales, L. E. A. P.; Aguirre, J.; Vazquez Rosas, R.; Suarez, G.; Contreras Ruiz-Esparza, M. G.; Farraz, I.</p> <p>2014-12-01</p> <p>Methods that use seismic noise or microtremors have become very useful tools worldwide due to its low costs, the relative simplicity in collecting data, the fact that these are non-invasive methods hence there is no need to alter or even perforate the study site, and also these methods require a relatively simple analysis procedure. Nevertheless the geological structures estimated by this methods are assumed to be parallel, isotropic and homogeneous layers. Consequently precision of the estimated structure is lower than that from conventional seismic methods. In the light of these facts this study aimed towards searching a new way to interpret the results obtained from seismic noise methods. In this study, seven triangular SPAC (Aki, 1957) arrays were performed in the city of Coatzacoalcos, Veracruz, varying in sizes from 10 to 100 meters. From the autocorrelation between the stations of each array, a Rayleigh <span class="hlt">wave</span> phase velocity dispersion curve was calculated. Such dispersion curve was used to obtain a S <span class="hlt">wave</span> parallel layers velocity (VS) structure for the study site. Subsequently the horizontal to vertical ratio of the spectrum of microtremors H/V (Nogoshi and Igarashi, 1971; Nakamura, 1989, 2000) was calculated for each vertex of the SPAC triangular arrays, and from the H/V spectrum the fundamental frequency was estimated for each vertex. By using the H/V spectral ratio curves interpreted as a proxy to the Rayleigh <span class="hlt">wave</span> ellipticity curve, a series of VS structures were inverted for each vertex of the SPAC array. Lastly each VS structure was employed to calculate a <span class="hlt">3</span><span class="hlt">D</span> velocity model, in which the exploration depth was approximately 100 meters, and had a velocity range in between 206 (m/s) to 920 (m/s). The <span class="hlt">3</span><span class="hlt">D</span> model revealed a thinning of the low velocity layers. This proved to be in good agreement with the variation of the fundamental frequencies observed at each vertex. With the previous kind of analysis a preliminary model can be obtained as a first</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016IJGMM..1350004C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016IJGMM..1350004C"><span>Coherent states, vacuum structure and infinite component relativistic <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">equations</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Cirilo-Lombardo, Diego Julio</p> <p>2016-11-01</p> <p>It is commonly claimed in the recent literature that certain solutions to <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">equations</span> of positive energy of Dirac-type with internal variables are characterized by a non-thermal spectrum. As part of that statement, it was said that the transformations and symmetries involved in <span class="hlt">equations</span> of such type corresponded to a particular representation of the Lorentz group. In this paper, we give the general solution to this problem emphasizing the interplay between the group structure, the corresponding algebra and the physical spectrum. This analysis is completed with a strong discussion and proving that: (i) the physical states are represented by coherent states; (ii) the solutions in [Yu. P. Stepanovsky, Nucl. Phys. B (Proc. Suppl.) 102 (2001) 407-411; 103 (2001) 407-411] are not general, (iii) the symmetries of the considered physical system in [Yu. P. Stepanovsky, Nucl. Phys. B (Proc. Suppl.) 102 (2001) 407-411; 103 (2001) 407-411] (<span class="hlt">equations</span> and geometry) do not correspond to the Lorentz group but to the fourth covering: the Metaplectic group Mp(n).</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21335969','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21335969"><span>Stability of negative solitary <span class="hlt">waves</span> for an integrable modified Camassa-Holm <span class="hlt">equation</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Yin Jiuli; Tian Lixin; Fan Xinghua</p> <p>2010-05-15</p> <p>In this paper, we prove that the modified Camassa-Holm <span class="hlt">equation</span> is Painleve integrable. We also study the orbital stability problem of negative solitary <span class="hlt">waves</span> for this integrable <span class="hlt">equation</span>. It is shown that the negative solitary <span class="hlt">waves</span> are stable for arbitrary <span class="hlt">wave</span> speed of propagation.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014SolE....5.1151T','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014SolE....5.1151T"><span><span class="hlt">Wave-equation</span>-based travel-time seismic tomography - Part 1: Method</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Tong, P.; Zhao, D.; Yang, D.; Yang, X.; Chen, J.; Liu, Q.</p> <p>2014-11-01</p> <p>In this paper, we propose a <span class="hlt">wave-equation</span>-based travel-time seismic tomography method with a detailed description of its step-by-step process. First, a linear relationship between the travel-time residual Δt = Tobs-Tsyn and the relative velocity perturbation δ c(x)/c(x) connected by a finite-frequency travel-time sensitivity kernel K(x) is theoretically derived using the adjoint method. To accurately calculate the travel-time residual Δt, two automatic arrival-time picking techniques including the envelop energy ratio method and the combined ray and cross-correlation method are then developed to compute the arrival times Tsyn for synthetic seismograms. The arrival times Tobs of observed seismograms are usually determined by manual hand picking in real applications. Travel-time sensitivity kernel K(x) is constructed by convolving a~forward wavefield u(t,x) with an adjoint wavefield q(t,x). The calculations of synthetic seismograms and sensitivity kernels rely on forward modeling. To make it computationally feasible for tomographic problems involving a large number of seismic records, the forward problem is solved in the two-dimensional (2-D) vertical plane passing through the source and the receiver by a high-order central difference method. The final model is parameterized on <span class="hlt">3</span>-<span class="hlt">D</span> regular grid (inversion) nodes with variable spacings, while model values on each 2-D forward modeling node are linearly interpolated by the values at its eight surrounding <span class="hlt">3</span>-<span class="hlt">D</span> inversion grid nodes. Finally, the tomographic inverse problem is formulated as a regularized optimization problem, which can be iteratively solved by either the LSQR solver or a~nonlinear conjugate-gradient method. To provide some insights into future <span class="hlt">3</span>-<span class="hlt">D</span> tomographic inversions, Fréchet kernels for different seismic phases are also demonstrated in this study.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21035856','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21035856"><span>New Travelling Solitary <span class="hlt">Wave</span> and Periodic Solutions of the Generalized Kawahara <span class="hlt">Equation</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Chen Huaitang; Yin Huicheng</p> <p>2007-09-06</p> <p>A simple elliptic <span class="hlt">equation</span> method is used for constructing exact trevelling <span class="hlt">wave</span> solutions of nonlinear partial differential <span class="hlt">equations</span>(PDEs) in a unified way. With the aid of Maple, more new travelling solitary <span class="hlt">wave</span> and periodic solutions are obtained for the generalized Kawahara <span class="hlt">equation</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=damping+AND+systems&id=EJ681881','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=damping+AND+systems&id=EJ681881"><span>On an Acoustic <span class="hlt">Wave</span> <span class="hlt">Equation</span> Arising in Non-Equilibrium Gasdynamics. Classroom Notes</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Chandran, Pallath</p> <p>2004-01-01</p> <p>The sixth-order <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">equation</span> governing the propagation of one-dimensional acoustic <span class="hlt">waves</span> in a viscous, heat conducting gaseous medium subject to relaxation effects has been considered. It has been reduced to a system of lower order <span class="hlt">equations</span> corresponding to the finite speeds occurring in the <span class="hlt">equation</span>, following a method due to Whitham. The lower…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015AGUFM.S23C2753W','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015AGUFM.S23C2753W"><span><span class="hlt">Wave-equation</span> migration velocity inversion using passive seismic sources</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Witten, B.; Shragge, J. C.</p> <p>2015-12-01</p> <p>Seismic monitoring at injection sites (e.g., CO2 sequestration, waste water disposal, hydraulic fracturing) has become an increasingly important tool for hazard identification and avoidance. The information obtained from this data is often limited to seismic event properties (e.g., location, approximate time, moment tensor), the accuracy of which greatly depends on the estimated elastic velocity models. However, creating accurate velocity models from passive array data remains a challenging problem. Common techniques rely on picking arrivals or matching waveforms requiring high signal-to-noise data that is often not available for the magnitude earthquakes observed over injection sites. We present a new method for obtaining elastic velocity information from earthquakes though full-wavefield <span class="hlt">wave-equation</span> imaging and adjoint-state tomography. The technique exploits the fact that the P- and S-<span class="hlt">wave</span> arrivals originate at the same time and location in the subsurface. We generate image volumes by back-propagating P- and S-<span class="hlt">wave</span> data through initial Earth models and then applying a correlation-based extended-imaging condition. Energy focusing away from zero lag in the extended image volume is used as a (penalized) residual in an adjoint-state tomography scheme to update the P- and S-<span class="hlt">wave</span> velocity models. We use an acousto-elastic approximation to greatly reduce the computational cost. Because the method requires neither an initial source location or origin time estimate nor picking of arrivals, it is suitable for low signal-to-noise datasets, such as microseismic data. Synthetic results show that with a realistic distribution of microseismic sources, P- and S-velocity perturbations can be recovered. Although demonstrated at an oil and gas reservoir scale, the technique can be applied to problems of all scales from geologic core samples to global seismology.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012AGUFM.S51A2386W','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012AGUFM.S51A2386W"><span>Using Averaging-Based Factorization to Compare Seismic Hazard Models Derived from <span class="hlt">3</span><span class="hlt">D</span> Earthquake Simulations with NGA Ground Motion Prediction <span class="hlt">Equations</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Wang, F.; Jordan, T. H.</p> <p>2012-12-01</p> <p>Seismic hazard models based on empirical ground motion prediction <span class="hlt">equations</span> (GMPEs) employ a model-based factorization to account for source, propagation, and path effects. An alternative is to simulate these effects directly using earthquake source models combined with three-dimensional (<span class="hlt">3</span><span class="hlt">D</span>) models of Earth structure. We have developed an averaging-based factorization (ABF) scheme that facilitates the geographically explicit comparison of these two types of seismic hazard models. For any fault source k with epicentral position x, slip spatial and temporal distribution f, and moment magnitude m, we calculate the excitation functions G(s, k, x, m, f) for sites s in a geographical region R, such as 5% damped spectral acceleration at a particular period. Through a sequence of weighted-averaging and normalization operations following a certain hierarchy over f, m, x, k, and s, we uniquely factorize G(s, k, x, m, f) into six components: A, B(s), C(s, k), D(s, k, x), E(s, k, x, m), and F(s, k, x, m, f). Factors for a target model can be divided by those of a reference model to obtain six corresponding factor ratios, or residual factors: a, b(s), c(s, k), d(s, k, x), e(s, k, x, m), and f(s, k, x, m, f). We show that these residual factors characterize differences in basin effects primarily through b(s), distance scaling primarily through c(s, k), and source directivity primarily through d(s, k, x). We illustrate the ABF scheme by comparing CyberShake Hazard Model (CSHM) for the Los Angeles region (Graves et. al. 2010) with the Next Generation Attenuation (NGA) GMPEs modified according to the directivity relations of Spudich and Chiou (2008). Relative to CSHM, all NGA models underestimate the directivity and basin effects. In particular, the NGA models do not account for the coupling between source directivity and basin excitation that substantially enhance the low-frequency seismic hazards in the sedimentary basins of the Los Angeles region. Assuming Cyber</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21067483','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21067483"><span>Pointwise and Internal Controllability for the <span class="hlt">Wave</span> <span class="hlt">Equation</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Avdonin, S.A. Seidman, T.I.</p> <p>2002-12-19</p> <p>Problems of internal and pointwise observation and control for the one-dimensional <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">equation</span> arise in the simulation of control and identification processes in electrical engineering, flaw detection, and medical tomography. The generally accepted way of modelling sensors and actuators as pointlike objects leads to results which may make no apparent physical sense: they may depend, for instance, on the rationality or irrationality of the location for a point sensor or actuator. We propose a new formulation of sensor (actuator) action, expressed mathematically by using somewhat unconventional spaces for data presentation and processing. For interaction restricted to an interval of length {epsilon} , the limit system of observation (or control) now makes sense when {epsilon} tends to zero without a sensitive dependence on the precise location of the limiting point.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2003EAEJA......669K','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2003EAEJA......669K"><span>Title of abstract - Different approaches to the determining of <span class="hlt">3</span>-<span class="hlt">d</span> P and S <span class="hlt">wave</span> velocity structures of the crust beneath Northern Tien Shan</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Kryukova, O.</p> <p>2003-04-01</p> <p>The seismic images of the crust beneath Northern Tien Shan (NTS) are obtained with using of different sets of data and several algorithms for solution of local earthquake tomography problem. The NTS is a very interesting region from geophysical point if view due to high seismic activity caused by interplate collision: Tien Shan and Kazakh. A rectangular region under investigation is constrained by lines 41.90o N - 43.40o N and 73.50o E- 76.50o E. 14661 P and 14436 S <span class="hlt">wave</span> arrival times recorded 12 seismic stations of the Kyrgyzstan Broadband Network (KNET) from local earthquake in 1991-1999 years are used. In addition, data from 267 local earthquake recorded over a period of about 20 years by a regional arrays of 93 seismographs in NTS are involved in inversions. 1-d optimal velocity models and stations delays are estimated with help of program VELEST (E.Kissling, 1995). Block parameterization of model and ray tracing described by Thurber and Ellsworth (1980) are used for determination of <span class="hlt">3</span>-<span class="hlt">d</span> velocity structure and relocation of events as one of the approaches (programs S.Roecker Sphypit90 and Sphrel<span class="hlt">3</span><span class="hlt">d</span>). Other approach consists in application linear or cubic B spline interpolation of velocity function and ray tracing Um and Thurber (1987) for the solution of forward problem (program C.Thurber et al. Simulps and own program). The data resolution analysis and statistical analysis of models was carried out. Calculated P <span class="hlt">wave</span> tomographic models were compared with tomographic models S.Roecker et al. (1993), S.Ghose et al. (1998) and T.Sabitova (1996). The main result is the confirmation of existence of different seismic velocity structure beneath Kyrgyz Range and Chu Basin. Using various sets of date and methods for reconstruction velocity model is effective in reveal of more reliable velocity heterogeneities in the domain of research. The author is grateful to dr. I. Kitov for help and to dr. I.Sanina for useful discussion.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li class="active"><span>23</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>25</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_23 --> <div id="page_24" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li class="active"><span>24</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>25</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="461"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016EL....11510002W','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016EL....11510002W"><span>Characteristics of the breathers, rogue <span class="hlt">waves</span> and solitary <span class="hlt">waves</span> in a generalized (2+1)-dimensional Boussinesq <span class="hlt">equation</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Wang, Xiu-Bin; Tian, Shou-Fu; Qin, Chun-Yan; Zhang, Tian-Tian</p> <p>2016-07-01</p> <p>Under investigation in this work is a generalized (2+1)-dimensional Boussinesq <span class="hlt">equation</span>, which can be used to describe the propagation of small-amplitude, long <span class="hlt">wave</span> in shallow water. By virtue of Bell's polynomials, an effective way is presented to succinctly construct its bilinear form. Furthermore, based on the bilinear formalism and the extended homoclinic test method, the breather <span class="hlt">wave</span> solution, rogue-<span class="hlt">wave</span> solution and solitary-<span class="hlt">wave</span> solution of the <span class="hlt">equation</span> are well constructed. Our results can be used to enrich the dynamical behavior of the generalized (2+1)-dimensional nonlinear <span class="hlt">wave</span> fields.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/ADA627039','DTIC-ST'); return false;" href="http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/ADA627039"><span>A Parameter-Free Dynamic Alternative to Hyper-Viscosity for Coupled Transport <span class="hlt">Equations</span>: Application to the Simulation of <span class="hlt">3</span><span class="hlt">D</span> Squall Lines Using Spectral Elements</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://publicaccess.dtic.mil/psm/api/service/search/search">DTIC Science & Technology</a></p> <p></p> <p>2015-06-04</p> <p>that involve physics coupling with phase change in the simulation of <span class="hlt">3</span><span class="hlt">D</span> deep convection . We show that the VMS+DC approach is a robust technique that can...of <span class="hlt">3</span><span class="hlt">D</span> deep convection . We show that the VMS+DC approach is a robust technique that can damp the high order modes characterizing the spectral element...of Spectral Elements, Deep Convection , Kessler Microphysics Preprint J. Comput. Phys. 283 (2015) 360-373 June 4, 2015 1. Introduction In the field of</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1993LMaPh..29....1G','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1993LMaPh..29....1G"><span>Explicit solutions to the intrinsic generalization for the <span class="hlt">wave</span> and sine-Gordon <span class="hlt">equations</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Gu, Chaohao; Hu, Hesheng</p> <p>1993-09-01</p> <p>The Darboux matrix method is used to study intrinsic generalized <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">equation</span> and intrinsic generalized sine-Gordon <span class="hlt">equation</span> which have been studied by Beals and Tenenblat. Explicit formulas for exact solutions are obtained.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017Prama..88...17X','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017Prama..88...17X"><span>Dynamical behaviours and exact travelling <span class="hlt">wave</span> solutions of modified generalized Vakhnenko <span class="hlt">equation</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Xiao, Junjun; Feng, Dahe; Meng, Xia; Cheng, Yuanquan</p> <p>2017-01-01</p> <p>By using the bifurcation theory of planar dynamical systems and the qualitative theory of differential <span class="hlt">equations</span>, we studied the dynamical behaviours and exact travelling <span class="hlt">wave</span> solutions of the modified generalized Vakhnenko <span class="hlt">equation</span> (mGVE). As a result, we obtained all possible bifurcation parametric sets and many explicit formulas of smooth and non-smooth travelling <span class="hlt">waves</span> such as cusped solitons, loop solitons, periodic cusp <span class="hlt">waves</span>, pseudopeakon solitons, smooth periodic <span class="hlt">waves</span> and smooth solitons. Moreover, we provided some numerical simulations of these solutions.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016JPhCS.681a2028D','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016JPhCS.681a2028D"><span>New compact <span class="hlt">equation</span> for numerical simulation of freak <span class="hlt">waves</span> on deep water</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Dyachenko, A. I.; Kachulin, D. I.; Zakharov, V. E.</p> <p>2016-02-01</p> <p>Considering surface gravity <span class="hlt">waves</span> which propagate in same direction we applied canonical transformation to a water <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">equation</span> and drastically simplify the Hamiltonian. After this transformation, corresponding <span class="hlt">equation</span> of motion is written in x-space in a compact form. This new <span class="hlt">equation</span> is suitable for analytical studies and numerical simulations. Localized in space breather-type solution was found numerically by using iterative Petviashvili method. Numerical simulation of breathers collision shows the stability of such solutions. We observed the freak <span class="hlt">wave</span> formation in numerical simulations of sea surface <span class="hlt">waving</span> in the framework of new <span class="hlt">equation</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2004APS..APR.C1020C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2004APS..APR.C1020C"><span>Finding the Real <span class="hlt">Wave</span> <span class="hlt">Equation</span> Sought by Schrodinger for a Nonconservative System</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Chen, Robert L. W.</p> <p>2004-05-01</p> <p>Schrodinger believed that a proper quantum mechanical <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">equation</span> should be a real <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">equation</span> rather than a complex one. The use of some modern mathematical works that did not exist in his time- a theorem in Courant & Hilbert Vol. II among others- enable us to (1) show that there is indeed a problem with the complex <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">equation</span> for the case of a nonconservative system, and (2) obtain a satisfactory real <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">equation</span>, applicable to conservative as well as nonconservative systems. The difference in results from the existing theory is significant for particles of very small mass.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19720028244&hterms=formalism&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D60%26Ntt%3Dformalism','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19720028244&hterms=formalism&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D60%26Ntt%3Dformalism"><span>Non-partial <span class="hlt">wave</span> treatment of reactive and non-reactive scattering Coupled integral <span class="hlt">equation</span> formalism.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Hayes, E. F.; Kouri, D. J.</p> <p>1971-01-01</p> <p>Coupled integral <span class="hlt">equations</span> are derived for the full scattering amplitudes for both reactive and nonreactive channels. The <span class="hlt">equations</span> do not involve any partial <span class="hlt">wave</span> expansion and are obtained using channel operators for reactive and nonreactive collisions. These coupled integral <span class="hlt">equations</span> are similar in nature to <span class="hlt">equations</span> derived for purely nonreactive collisions of structureless particles. Using numerical quadrature techniques, these <span class="hlt">equations</span> may be reduced to simultaneous algebraic <span class="hlt">equations</span> which may then be solved.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26436891','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26436891"><span>Coupled <span class="hlt">3</span><span class="hlt">D</span> Time-Dependent <span class="hlt">Wave</span>-Packet Approach in Hyperspherical Coordinates: The D(+)+H2 Reaction on the Triple-Sheeted DMBE Potential Energy Surface.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Ghosh, Sandip; Sahoo, Tapas; Adhikari, Satrajit; Sharma, Rahul; Varandas, António J C</p> <p>2015-12-17</p> <p>We implement a coupled three-dimensional (<span class="hlt">3</span><span class="hlt">D</span>) time-dependent <span class="hlt">wave</span> packet formalism for the 4D reactive scattering problem in hyperspherical coordinates on the accurate double many body expansion (DMBE) potential energy surface (PES) for the ground and first two singlet states (1(1)A', 2(1)A', and 3(1)A') to account for nonadiabatic processes in the D(+) + H2 reaction for both zero and nonzero values of the total angular momentum (J). As the long-range interactions in D(+) + H2 contribute significantly due to nonadiabatic effects, the convergence profiles of reaction probabilities for the reactive noncharge transfer (RNCT), nonreactive charge transfer (NRCT), and reactive charge transfer (RCT) processes are shown for different collisional energies with respect to the helicity (K) and total angular momentum (J) quantum numbers. The total and state-to-state cross sections are presented as a function of the collision energy for the initial rovibrational state v = 0, j = 0 of the diatom, and the calculated cross sections compared with other theoretical and experimental results.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/1338342','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/1338342"><span>SALSA<span class="hlt">3</span><span class="hlt">D</span>: A Tomographic Model of Compressional <span class="hlt">Wave</span> Slowness in the Earth’s Mantle for Improved Travel-Time Prediction and Travel-Time Prediction Uncertainty</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Ballard, Sanford; Hipp, James R.; Begnaud, Michael L.; Young, Christopher J.; Encarnacao, Andre V.; Chael, Eric P.; Phillips, W. Scott</p> <p>2016-10-11</p> <p>The task of monitoring the Earth for nuclear explosions relies heavily on seismic data to detect, locate, and characterize suspected nuclear tests. In this study, motivated by the need to locate suspected explosions as accurately and precisely as possible, we developed a tomographic model of the compressional <span class="hlt">wave</span> slowness in the Earth’s mantle with primary focus on the accuracy and precision of travel-time predictions for P and Pn ray paths through the model. Path-dependent travel-time prediction uncertainties are obtained by computing the full <span class="hlt">3</span><span class="hlt">D</span> model covariance matrix and then integrating slowness variance and covariance along ray paths from source to receiver. Path-dependent travel-time prediction uncertainties reflect the amount of seismic data that was used in tomography with very low values for paths represented by abundant data in the tomographic data set and very high values for paths through portions of the model that were poorly sampled by the tomography data set. The pattern of travel-time prediction uncertainty is a direct result of the off-diagonal terms of the model covariance matrix and underscores the importance of incorporating the full model covariance matrix in the determination of travel-time prediction uncertainty. In addition, the computed pattern of uncertainty differs significantly from that of 1D distance-dependent travel-time uncertainties computed using traditional methods, which are only appropriate for use with travel times computed through 1D velocity models.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/pages/biblio/1338342-salsa3d-tomographic-model-compressional-wave-slowness-earths-mantle-improved-travel-time-prediction-travel-time-prediction-uncertainty','SCIGOV-DOEP'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/pages/biblio/1338342-salsa3d-tomographic-model-compressional-wave-slowness-earths-mantle-improved-travel-time-prediction-travel-time-prediction-uncertainty"><span>SALSA<span class="hlt">3</span><span class="hlt">D</span>: A Tomographic Model of Compressional <span class="hlt">Wave</span> Slowness in the Earth’s Mantle for Improved Travel-Time Prediction and Travel-Time Prediction Uncertainty</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/pages">DOE PAGES</a></p> <p>Ballard, Sanford; Hipp, James R.; Begnaud, Michael L.; ...</p> <p>2016-10-11</p> <p>The task of monitoring the Earth for nuclear explosions relies heavily on seismic data to detect, locate, and characterize suspected nuclear tests. In this study, motivated by the need to locate suspected explosions as accurately and precisely as possible, we developed a tomographic model of the compressional <span class="hlt">wave</span> slowness in the Earth’s mantle with primary focus on the accuracy and precision of travel-time predictions for P and Pn ray paths through the model. Path-dependent travel-time prediction uncertainties are obtained by computing the full <span class="hlt">3</span><span class="hlt">D</span> model covariance matrix and then integrating slowness variance and covariance along ray paths from source tomore » receiver. Path-dependent travel-time prediction uncertainties reflect the amount of seismic data that was used in tomography with very low values for paths represented by abundant data in the tomographic data set and very high values for paths through portions of the model that were poorly sampled by the tomography data set. The pattern of travel-time prediction uncertainty is a direct result of the off-diagonal terms of the model covariance matrix and underscores the importance of incorporating the full model covariance matrix in the determination of travel-time prediction uncertainty. In addition, the computed pattern of uncertainty differs significantly from that of 1D distance-dependent travel-time uncertainties computed using traditional methods, which are only appropriate for use with travel times computed through 1D velocity models.« less</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17500803','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17500803"><span>Modified Kubelka-Munk <span class="hlt">equations</span> for localized <span class="hlt">waves</span> inside a layered medium.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Haney, Matthew M; van Wijk, Kasper</p> <p>2007-03-01</p> <p>We present a pair of coupled partial differential <span class="hlt">equations</span> to describe the evolution of the average total intensity and intensity flux of a <span class="hlt">wave</span> field inside a randomly layered medium. These <span class="hlt">equations</span> represent a modification of the Kubelka-Munk <span class="hlt">equations</span>, or radiative transfer. Our modification accounts for <span class="hlt">wave</span> interference (e.g., localization), which is neglected in radiative transfer. We numerically solve the modified Kubelka-Munk <span class="hlt">equations</span> and compare the results to radiative transfer as well as to simulations of the <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">equation</span> with randomly located thin layers.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015JPSJ...84l4802B','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015JPSJ...84l4802B"><span>Simple Dispersion <span class="hlt">Equation</span> Based on Lamb-<span class="hlt">Wave</span> Model for Propagating Pulsive <span class="hlt">Waves</span> in Human Heart Wall</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Bekki, Naoaki; Shintani, Seine A.</p> <p>2015-12-01</p> <p>We consider the Rayleigh-Lamb-type <span class="hlt">equation</span> for propagating pulsive <span class="hlt">waves</span> excited by aortic-valve closure at end-systole in the human heart wall. We theoretically investigate the transcendental dispersion <span class="hlt">equation</span> of pulsive <span class="hlt">waves</span> for the asymmetrical zero-order mode of the Lamb <span class="hlt">wave</span>. We analytically find a simple dispersion <span class="hlt">equation</span> with a universal constant for a small Lamb wavenumber. We show that the simple dispersion <span class="hlt">equation</span> can qualitatively explain the myocardial noninvasive measurements in vivo of pulsive <span class="hlt">waves</span> in the human heart wall. We can also consistently estimate the viscoelastic constant of the myocardium in the human heart wall using the simple dispersion <span class="hlt">equation</span> for a small Lamb wavenumber instead of using a complex nonlinear optimization.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016CNSNS..34..142Y','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016CNSNS..34..142Y"><span>Nonautonomous rogue <span class="hlt">waves</span> and 'catch' dynamics for the combined Hirota-LPD <span class="hlt">equation</span> with variable coefficients</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Yu, Fajun</p> <p>2016-05-01</p> <p>We study multi-rogue <span class="hlt">wave</span> solutions of a Schro¨dinger <span class="hlt">equation</span> with higher-order terms employing the generalized Darboux transformation. Some properties of the nonautonomous rogue <span class="hlt">waves</span> are investigated analytically for the combined Hirota-Lakshmanan-Porsezian-Daniel (LPD) <span class="hlt">equation</span>. We consider the controllable behaviors of this nonautonomous rogue <span class="hlt">wave</span> solution with the nonlinearity management function and gain/loss coefficient. It is reported that there are possibilities to 'catch' rogue <span class="hlt">waves</span> through manipulating nonlinear function and gain/loss coefficient. Our approach can provide many possibilities to manipulate rogue <span class="hlt">waves</span> and present the potential applications for the rogue <span class="hlt">wave</span> phenomena.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013AGUSMNS24A..04C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013AGUSMNS24A..04C"><span>Tomography <span class="hlt">3</span><span class="hlt">D</span> models of S <span class="hlt">wave</span> from cross-correlation of seismic noise to explore irregularities of subsoil under the artificial lake of Chapultepec Park</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Cárdenas-Soto, M.; Valdes, J. E.; Escobedo-Zenil, D.</p> <p>2013-05-01</p> <p>In June 2006, the base of the artificial lake in Chapultepec Park collapsed. 20 thousand liters of water were filtered to the ground through a crack increasing the dimensions of initial gap. Studies indicated that the collapse was due to saturated material associated with a sudden and massive water filtration process. Geological studies indicates that all the area of this section the subsoil is composed of vulcano-sedimentary materials that were economically exploited in the mid-20th century, leaving a series of underground mines that were rehabilitated for the construction of the Park. Currently, the Lake is rehabilitated and running for recreational activities. In this study we have applied two methods of seismic noise correlation; seismic interferometry (SI) in time domain and the Spatial Power Auto Correlation (SPAC) in frequency domain, in order to explore the <span class="hlt">3</span><span class="hlt">D</span> subsoil velocity structure. The aim is to highlight major variations in velocity that can be associated with irregularities in the subsoil that may pose a risk to the stability of the Lake. For this purpose we use 96 vertical geophones of 4.5 Hz with 5-m spacing that conform a semi-circular array that provide a length of 480 m around the lake zone. For both correlation methods, we extract the phase velocity associated with the dispersion characteristics between each pair of stations in the frequency range from 4 to 12 Hz. In the SPAC method the process was through the dispersion curve, and in SI method we use the time delay of the maximum amplitude in the correlation pulse, which was previously filtered in multiple frequency bands. The results of both processes were captured in <span class="hlt">3</span><span class="hlt">D</span> velocity volumes (in the case SI a process of traveltime tomography was applied). We observed that in the frequency range from 6 to 8 Hz, appear irregular structures, with high velocity contrast in relation with the shear <span class="hlt">wave</span> velocity of surface layer (ten thick m of saturated sediments). One of these anomalies is related</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011AGUFM.T51H2471H','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011AGUFM.T51H2471H"><span>Crustal and upper mantle <span class="hlt">3</span><span class="hlt">D</span> shear <span class="hlt">wave</span> velocity structure of the High Lava Plains, Oregon, determined from ambient noise tomography</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Hanson-Hedgecock, S.; Wagner, L.; Fouch, M. J.; James, D. E.</p> <p>2011-12-01</p> <p>We present the results of inversions for <span class="hlt">3</span><span class="hlt">D</span> shear velocity structure of the crust and uppermost mantle beneath the High Lava Plains, Oregon using data from ~300 broadband stations of the High Lava Plains seismic experiment and the EarthScope/USArray Transportable Array (TA). The High Lava Plains (HLP) is a WNW progressive silicic volcanism, initiated ~14.5 Ma near the Owyhee Plateau and is currently active at the Newberry caldera. The Yellowstone Snake River Plain (YSRP) volcanic track is temporally contemporaneous with the HLP, but trends to the northeast, parallel to North American plate motion. The cause of volcanism along the HLP is debated and has been variously attributed to Basin and Range extension, back-arc extension, rollback of the subducting Juan de Fuca plate, and an intra-continental hotspot/plume source. Additionally the relationship between the HLP, YSRP, and Columbia River Basalts (CRB), the three major post-17Ma intracontinental volcanic provinces of the Pacific Northwest, is not well understood. The <span class="hlt">3</span><span class="hlt">D</span> shear velocity structure of the crust and uppermost mantle to ~65km depth is determined from fundamental mode Rayleigh <span class="hlt">wave</span> ambient noise phase velocity maps at periods up to 40s. The use of ambient noise tomography with the dense station spacing of the combined High Lava Plains seismic experiment and the EarthScope/USArray Transportable Array (TA) datasets allows the shallow structure of the High Lava Plains to be imaged in finer detail than previous ANT studies that focused on the entire western United States. In the crust, low velocities in central Oregon are observed in association with the Brothers Fault Zone, Jordan and Diamond Craters and Steens Mountain regions in addition to the strong low velocity zone associated with the Cascades to the west. To the east of the HLP, low velocities are observed to about 10km depth in the western SRP. In the eastern SRP we observe a shallow veneer of low velocities underlain by a ~10km thick high velocity</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013JTAP....7...64K','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013JTAP....7...64K"><span>Pretend model of traveling <span class="hlt">wave</span> solution of two-dimensional K-dV <span class="hlt">equation</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Karim, Md Rezaul; Alim, Md Abdul; Andallah, Laek Sazzad</p> <p>2013-11-01</p> <p>Traveling <span class="hlt">wave</span> resolution of Korteweg-de Vries (K-dV) solitary and numerical estimation of analytic solutions have been studied in this paper for imaginary concept. Pretend model of traveling <span class="hlt">wave</span> deals with giant <span class="hlt">waves</span> or series of <span class="hlt">waves</span> created by an undersea earthquake, volcanic eruption or landslide. The concept of traveling <span class="hlt">wave</span> is frequently used by mariners and in coastal, ocean and naval engineering. We have found some exact traveling <span class="hlt">wave</span> solutions with relevant physical parameters using new auxiliary <span class="hlt">equation</span> method introduced by Pang et al. (Appl. Math. Mech-Engl. Ed 31(7):929-936, 2010). We have solved the imaginary part of exact traveling <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">equations</span> analytically, and numerical results of time-dependent <span class="hlt">wave</span> solutions have been presented graphically. This procedure has a potential to be used in more complex system for other types of K-dV <span class="hlt">equations</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011ISPAr3816W.483P','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011ISPAr3816W.483P"><span>Europeana and <span class="hlt">3</span><span class="hlt">D</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Pletinckx, D.</p> <p>2011-09-01</p> <p>The current <span class="hlt">3</span><span class="hlt">D</span> hype creates a lot of interest in <span class="hlt">3</span><span class="hlt">D</span>. People go to <span class="hlt">3</span><span class="hlt">D</span> movies, but are we ready to use <span class="hlt">3</span><span class="hlt">D</span> in our homes, in our offices, in our communication? Are we ready to deliver real <span class="hlt">3</span><span class="hlt">D</span> to a general public and use interactive <span class="hlt">3</span><span class="hlt">D</span> in a meaningful way to enjoy, learn, communicate? The CARARE project is realising this for the moment in the domain of monuments and archaeology, so that real <span class="hlt">3</span><span class="hlt">D</span> of archaeological sites and European monuments will be available to the general public by 2012. There are several aspects to this endeavour. First of all is the technical aspect of flawlessly delivering <span class="hlt">3</span><span class="hlt">D</span> content over all platforms and operating systems, without installing software. We have currently a working solution in PDF, but HTML5 will probably be the future. Secondly, there is still little knowledge on how to create <span class="hlt">3</span><span class="hlt">D</span> learning objects, <span class="hlt">3</span><span class="hlt">D</span> tourist information or <span class="hlt">3</span><span class="hlt">D</span> scholarly communication. We are still in a prototype phase when it comes to integrate <span class="hlt">3</span><span class="hlt">D</span> objects in physical or virtual museums. Nevertheless, Europeana has a tremendous potential as a multi-facetted virtual museum. Finally, <span class="hlt">3</span><span class="hlt">D</span> has a large potential to act as a hub of information, linking to related 2D imagery, texts, video, sound. We describe how to create such rich, explorable <span class="hlt">3</span><span class="hlt">D</span> objects that can be used intuitively by the generic Europeana user and what metadata is needed to support the semantic linking.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2002JDE...186..633I','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2002JDE...186..633I"><span>Diffusion phenomenon for linear dissipative <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">equations</span> in an exterior domain</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Ikehata, Ryo</p> <p></p> <p>Under the general condition of the initial data, we will derive the crucial estimates which imply the diffusion phenomenon for the dissipative linear <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">equations</span> in an exterior domain. In order to derive the diffusion phenomenon for dissipative <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">equations</span>, the time integral method which was developed by Ikehata and Matsuyama (Sci. Math. Japon. 55 (2002) 33) plays an effective role.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011IJMPB..25..319B','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011IJMPB..25..319B"><span>New Traveling <span class="hlt">Wave</span> Solutions for a Class of Nonlinear Evolution <span class="hlt">Equations</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Bai, Cheng-Jie; Zhao, Hong; Xu, Heng-Ying; Zhang, Xia</p> <p></p> <p>The deformation mapping method is extended to solve a class of nonlinear evolution <span class="hlt">equations</span> (NLEEs). Many types of explicit and exact traveling <span class="hlt">wave</span> solutions, which contain solitary <span class="hlt">wave</span> solutions, trigonometric function solutions, and Jacobian elliptic function solutions, are obtained by a simple algebraic transformation relation between the solutions of the NLEEs and those of the cubic nonlinear Klein-Gordon (NKG) <span class="hlt">equation</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19860059405&hterms=Gordon&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D20%26Ntt%3DGordon','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19860059405&hterms=Gordon&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D20%26Ntt%3DGordon"><span>On the solution of the generalized <span class="hlt">wave</span> and generalized sine-Gordon <span class="hlt">equations</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Ablowitz, M. J.; Beals, R.; Tenenblat, K.</p> <p>1986-01-01</p> <p>The generalized <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">equation</span> and generalized sine-Gordon <span class="hlt">equations</span> are known to be natural multidimensional differential geometric generalizations of the classical two-dimensional versions. In this paper, a system of linear differential <span class="hlt">equations</span> is associated with these <span class="hlt">equations</span>, and it is shown how the direct and inverse problems can be solved for appropriately decaying data on suitable lines. An initial-boundary value problem is solved for these <span class="hlt">equations</span>.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li class="active"><span>24</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>25</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_24 --> <div id="page_25" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li class="active"><span>25</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="481"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012SCPMA..55.2469L','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012SCPMA..55.2469L"><span>Two kinds of peaked solitary <span class="hlt">waves</span> of the KdV, BBM and Boussinesq <span class="hlt">equations</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Liao, ShiJun</p> <p>2012-12-01</p> <p>It is well-known that the celebrated Camassa-Holm <span class="hlt">equation</span> has the peaked solitary <span class="hlt">waves</span>, which have been not reported for other mainstream models of shallow water <span class="hlt">waves</span>. In this letter, the closed-form solutions of peaked solitary <span class="hlt">waves</span> of the KdV <span class="hlt">equation</span>, the BBM <span class="hlt">equation</span> and the Boussinesq <span class="hlt">equation</span> are given for the first time. All of them have either a peakon or an anti-peakon. Each of them exactly satisfies the corresponding Rankine-Hogoniot jump condition and could be understood as weak solution. Therefore, the peaked solitary <span class="hlt">waves</span> might be common for most of shallow water <span class="hlt">wave</span> models, no matter whether or not they are integrable and/or admit breaking-<span class="hlt">wave</span> solutions.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23944540','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23944540"><span>Super-rogue <span class="hlt">waves</span> in simulations based on weakly nonlinear and fully nonlinear hydrodynamic <span class="hlt">equations</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Slunyaev, A; Pelinovsky, E; Sergeeva, A; Chabchoub, A; Hoffmann, N; Onorato, M; Akhmediev, N</p> <p>2013-07-01</p> <p>The rogue <span class="hlt">wave</span> solutions (rational multibreathers) of the nonlinear Schrödinger <span class="hlt">equation</span> (NLS) are tested in numerical simulations of weakly nonlinear and fully nonlinear hydrodynamic <span class="hlt">equations</span>. Only the lowest order solutions from 1 to 5 are considered. A higher accuracy of <span class="hlt">wave</span> propagation in space is reached using the modified NLS <span class="hlt">equation</span>, also known as the Dysthe <span class="hlt">equation</span>. This numerical modeling allowed us to directly compare simulations with recent results of laboratory measurements in Chabchoub et al. [Phys. Rev. E 86, 056601 (2012)]. In order to achieve even higher physical accuracy, we employed fully nonlinear simulations of potential Euler <span class="hlt">equations</span>. These simulations provided us with basic characteristics of long time evolution of rational solutions of the NLS <span class="hlt">equation</span> in the case of near-breaking conditions. The analytic NLS solutions are found to describe the actual <span class="hlt">wave</span> dynamics of steep <span class="hlt">waves</span> reasonably well.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016PhDT.......137C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016PhDT.......137C"><span>Boundary integral <span class="hlt">equation</span> method for electromagnetic and elastic <span class="hlt">waves</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Chen, Kun</p> <p></p> <p>In this thesis, the boundary integral <span class="hlt">equation</span> method (BIEM) is studied and applied to electromagnetic and elastic <span class="hlt">wave</span> problems. First of all, a spectral domain BIEM called the spectral domain approach is employed for full <span class="hlt">wave</span> analysis of metal strip grating on grounded dielectric slab (MSG-GDS) and microstrips shielded with either perfect electric conductor (PEC) or perfect magnetic conductor (PMC) walls. The modal relations between these structures are revealed by exploring their symmetries. It is derived analytically and validated numerically that all the even and odd modes of the latter two (when they are mirror symmetric) find their correspondence in the modes of metal strip grating on grounded dielectric slab when the phase shift between adjacent two unit cells is 0 or pi. Extension to non-symmetric case is also made. Several factors, including frequency, grating period, slab thickness and strip width, are further investigated for their impacts on the effective permittivity of the dominant mode of PEC/PMC shielded microstrips. It is found that the PMC shielded microstrip generally has a larger <span class="hlt">wave</span> number than the PEC shielded microstrip. Secondly, computational aspects of the layered medim doubly periodic Green's function (LMDPGF) in matrix-friendly formulation (MFF) are investigated. The MFF for doubly periodic structures in layered medium is derived, and the singularity of the periodic Green's function when the transverse <span class="hlt">wave</span> number equals zero in this formulation is analytically extracted. A novel approach is proposed to calculate the LMDPGF, which makes delicate use of several techniques including factorization of the Green's function, generalized pencil of function (GPOF) method and high order Taylor expansion to derive the high order asymptotic expressions, which are then evaluated by newly derived fast convergent series. This approach exhibits robustness, high accuracy and fast and high order convergence; it also allows fast frequency sweep for</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016JPhCS.766a2032I','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016JPhCS.766a2032I"><span>Cubic Trigonometric B-spline Galerkin Methods for the Regularized Long <span class="hlt">Wave</span> <span class="hlt">Equation</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Irk, Dursun; Keskin, Pinar</p> <p>2016-10-01</p> <p>A numerical solution of the Regularized Long <span class="hlt">Wave</span> (RLW) <span class="hlt">equation</span> is obtained using Galerkin finite element method, based on Crank Nicolson method for the time integration and cubic trigonometric B-spline functions for the space integration. After two different linearization techniques are applied, the proposed algorithms are tested on the problems of propagation of a solitary <span class="hlt">wave</span> and interaction of two solitary <span class="hlt">waves</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013JTAM...43b..43V','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013JTAM...43b..43V"><span>Deep-Water <span class="hlt">Waves</span>: on the Nonlinear Schrödinger <span class="hlt">Equation</span> and its Solutions</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Vitanov, Nikolay K.; Chabchoub, Amin; Hoffmann, Norbert</p> <p>2013-06-01</p> <p>We present a brief discussion on the nonlinear Schrödinger <span class="hlt">equation</span> for modelling the propagation of the deep-water wavetrains and a discussion on its doubly-localized breather solutions, that can be connected to the sudden formation of extreme <span class="hlt">waves</span>, also known as rogue <span class="hlt">waves</span> or freak <span class="hlt">waves</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017LMaPh.tmp...12G','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017LMaPh.tmp...12G"><span>Spectral stability of periodic <span class="hlt">waves</span> in the generalized reduced Ostrovsky <span class="hlt">equation</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Geyer, Anna; Pelinovsky, Dmitry E.</p> <p>2017-02-01</p> <p>We consider stability of periodic travelling <span class="hlt">waves</span> in the generalized reduced Ostrovsky <span class="hlt">equation</span> with respect to co-periodic perturbations. Compared to the recent literature, we give a simple argument that proves spectral stability of all smooth periodic travelling <span class="hlt">waves</span> independent of the nonlinearity power. The argument is based on the energy convexity and does not use coordinate transformations of the reduced Ostrovsky <span class="hlt">equations</span> to the semi-linear <span class="hlt">equations</span> of the Klein-Gordon type.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19850065745&hterms=exact+differential&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D20%26Ntt%3Dexact%2Bdifferential','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19850065745&hterms=exact+differential&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D20%26Ntt%3Dexact%2Bdifferential"><span>Exact finite difference schemes for the non-linear unidirectional <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">equation</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Mickens, R. E.</p> <p>1985-01-01</p> <p>Attention is given to the construction of exact finite difference schemes for the nonlinear unidirectional <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">equation</span> that describes the nonlinear propagation of a <span class="hlt">wave</span> motion in the positive x-direction. The schemes constructed for these <span class="hlt">equations</span> are compared with those obtained by using the usual procedures of numerical analysis. It is noted that the order of the exact finite difference models is equal to the order of the differential <span class="hlt">equation</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22463349','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22463349"><span>Nonlinear Schrödinger <span class="hlt">equation</span>: generalized Darboux transformation and rogue <span class="hlt">wave</span> solutions.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Guo, Boling; Ling, Liming; Liu, Q P</p> <p>2012-02-01</p> <p>In this paper, we construct a generalized Darboux transformation for the nonlinear Schrödinger <span class="hlt">equation</span>. The associated N-fold Darboux transformation is given in terms of both a summation formula and determinants. As applications, we obtain compact representations for the Nth-order rogue <span class="hlt">wave</span> solutions of the focusing nonlinear Schrödinger <span class="hlt">equation</span> and Hirota <span class="hlt">equation</span>. In particular, the dynamics of the general third-order rogue <span class="hlt">wave</span> is discussed and shown to exhibit interesting structures.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19940002502&hterms=viewing+characteristics+drivers&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D20%26Ntt%3Dviewing%2Bcharacteristics%2Bdrivers','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19940002502&hterms=viewing+characteristics+drivers&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D20%26Ntt%3Dviewing%2Bcharacteristics%2Bdrivers"><span>PLOT<span class="hlt">3</span><span class="hlt">D</span>/AMES, DEC VAX VMS VERSION USING DISSPLA (WITH TURB<span class="hlt">3</span><span class="hlt">D</span>)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Buning, P.</p> <p>1994-01-01</p> <p>PLOT<span class="hlt">3</span><span class="hlt">D</span> is an interactive graphics program designed to help scientists visualize computational fluid dynamics (CFD) grids and solutions. Today, supercomputers and CFD algorithms can provide scientists with simulations of such highly complex phenomena that obtaining an understanding of the simulations has become a major problem. Tools which help the scientist visualize the simulations can be of tremendous aid. PLOT<span class="hlt">3</span><span class="hlt">D</span>/AMES offers more functions and features, and has been adapted for more types of computers than any other CFD graphics program. Version 3.6b+ is supported for five computers and graphic libraries. Using PLOT<span class="hlt">3</span><span class="hlt">D</span>, CFD physicists can view their computational models from any angle, observing the physics of problems and the quality of solutions. As an aid in designing aircraft, for example, PLOT<span class="hlt">3</span><span class="hlt">D</span>'s interactive computer graphics can show vortices, temperature, reverse flow, pressure, and dozens of other characteristics of air flow during flight. As critical areas become obvious, they can easily be studied more closely using a finer grid. PLOT<span class="hlt">3</span><span class="hlt">D</span> is part of a computational fluid dynamics software cycle. First, a program such as 3DGRAPE (ARC-12620) helps the scientist generate computational grids to model an object and its surrounding space. Once the grids have been designed and parameters such as the angle of attack, Mach number, and Reynolds number have been specified, a "flow-solver" program such as INS<span class="hlt">3</span><span class="hlt">D</span> (ARC-11794 or COS-10019) solves the system of <span class="hlt">equations</span> governing fluid flow, usually on a supercomputer. Grids sometimes have as many as two million points, and the "flow-solver" produces a solution file which contains density, x- y- and z-momentum, and stagnation energy for each grid point. With such a solution file and a grid file containing up to 50 grids as input, PLOT<span class="hlt">3</span><span class="hlt">D</span> can calculate and graphically display any one of 74 functions, including shock <span class="hlt">waves</span>, surface pressure, velocity vectors, and particle traces. PLOT<span class="hlt">3</span><span class="hlt">D</span>'s 74 functions are organized into</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19940002499&hterms=viewing+characteristics+drivers&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D30%26Ntt%3Dviewing%2Bcharacteristics%2Bdrivers','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19940002499&hterms=viewing+characteristics+drivers&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D30%26Ntt%3Dviewing%2Bcharacteristics%2Bdrivers"><span>PLOT<span class="hlt">3</span><span class="hlt">D</span>/AMES, DEC VAX VMS VERSION USING DISSPLA (WITHOUT TURB<span class="hlt">3</span><span class="hlt">D</span>)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Buning, P. G.</p> <p>1994-01-01</p> <p>PLOT<span class="hlt">3</span><span class="hlt">D</span> is an interactive graphics program designed to help scientists visualize computational fluid dynamics (CFD) grids and solutions. Today, supercomputers and CFD algorithms can provide scientists with simulations of such highly complex phenomena that obtaining an understanding of the simulations has become a major problem. Tools which help the scientist visualize the simulations can be of tremendous aid. PLOT<span class="hlt">3</span><span class="hlt">D</span>/AMES offers more functions and features, and has been adapted for more types of computers than any other CFD graphics program. Version 3.6b+ is supported for five computers and graphic libraries. Using PLOT<span class="hlt">3</span><span class="hlt">D</span>, CFD physicists can view their computational models from any angle, observing the physics of problems and the quality of solutions. As an aid in designing aircraft, for example, PLOT<span class="hlt">3</span><span class="hlt">D</span>'s interactive computer graphics can show vortices, temperature, reverse flow, pressure, and dozens of other characteristics of air flow during flight. As critical areas become obvious, they can easily be studied more closely using a finer grid. PLOT<span class="hlt">3</span><span class="hlt">D</span> is part of a computational fluid dynamics software cycle. First, a program such as 3DGRAPE (ARC-12620) helps the scientist generate computational grids to model an object and its surrounding space. Once the grids have been designed and parameters such as the angle of attack, Mach number, and Reynolds number have been specified, a "flow-solver" program such as INS<span class="hlt">3</span><span class="hlt">D</span> (ARC-11794 or COS-10019) solves the system of <span class="hlt">equations</span> governing fluid flow, usually on a supercomputer. Grids sometimes have as many as two million points, and the "flow-solver" produces a solution file which contains density, x- y- and z-momentum, and stagnation energy for each grid point. With such a solution file and a grid file containing up to 50 grids as input, PLOT<span class="hlt">3</span><span class="hlt">D</span> can calculate and graphically display any one of 74 functions, including shock <span class="hlt">waves</span>, surface pressure, velocity vectors, and particle traces. PLOT<span class="hlt">3</span><span class="hlt">D</span>'s 74 functions are organized into</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015SPIE.9371E..1RG','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015SPIE.9371E..1RG"><span>Cylindrical and spherical space equivalents to the plane <span class="hlt">wave</span> expansion technique of Maxwell's <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">equations</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Gauthier, Robert C.; Alzahrani, Mohammed A.; Jafari, Seyed Hamed</p> <p>2015-02-01</p> <p>The plane <span class="hlt">wave</span> expansion (PWM) technique applied to Maxwell's <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">equations</span> provides researchers with a supply of information regarding the optical properties of dielectric structures. The technique is well suited for structures that display a linear periodicity. When the focus is directed towards optical resonators and structures that lack linear periodicity the eigen-process can easily exceed computational resources and time constraints. In the case of dielectric structures which display cylindrical or spherical symmetry, a coordinate system specific set of basis functions have been employed to cast Maxwell's <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">equations</span> into an eigen-matrix formulation from which the resonator states associated with the dielectric profile can be obtained. As for PWM, the inverse of the dielectric and field components are expanded in the basis functions (Fourier-Fourier-Bessel, FFB, in cylindrical and Fourier- Bessel-Legendre, BLF, in spherical) and orthogonality is employed to form the matrix expressions. The theoretical development details will be presented indicating how certain mathematical complications in the process have been overcome and how the eigen-matrix can be tuned to a specific mode type. The similarities and differences in PWM, FFB and BLF are presented. In the case of structures possessing axial cylindrical symmetry, the inclusion of the z axis component of propagation constant makes the technique applicable to photonic crystal fibers and other waveguide structures. Computational results will be presented for a number of different dielectric geometries including Bragg ring resonators, cylindrical space slot channel waveguides and bottle resonators. Steps to further enhance the computation process will be reported.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26425384','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26425384"><span>THE FUNDAMENTAL SOLUTIONS FOR MULTI-TERM MODIFIED POWER LAW <span class="hlt">WAVE</span> <span class="hlt">EQUATIONS</span> IN A FINITE DOMAIN.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Jiang, H; Liu, F; Meerschaert, M M; McGough, R J</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Fractional partial differential <span class="hlt">equations</span> with more than one fractional derivative term in time, such as the Szabo <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">equation</span>, or the power law <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">equation</span>, describe important physical phenomena. However, studies of these multi-term time-space or time fractional <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">equations</span> are still under development. In this paper, multi-term modified power law <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">equations</span> in a finite domain are considered. The multi-term time fractional derivatives are defined in the Caputo sense, whose orders belong to the intervals (1, 2], [2, 3), [2, 4) or (0, n) (n > 2), respectively. Analytical solutions of the multi-term modified power law <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">equations</span> are derived. These new techniques are based on Luchko's Theorem, a spectral representation of the Laplacian operator, a method of separating variables and fractional derivative techniques. Then these general methods are applied to the special cases of the Szabo <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">equation</span> and the power law <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">equation</span>. These methods and techniques can also be extended to other kinds of the multi-term time-space fractional models including fractional Laplacian.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4584260','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4584260"><span>THE FUNDAMENTAL SOLUTIONS FOR MULTI-TERM MODIFIED POWER LAW <span class="hlt">WAVE</span> <span class="hlt">EQUATIONS</span> IN A FINITE DOMAIN</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Jiang, H.; Liu, F.; Meerschaert, M. M.; McGough, R. J.</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Fractional partial differential <span class="hlt">equations</span> with more than one fractional derivative term in time, such as the Szabo <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">equation</span>, or the power law <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">equation</span>, describe important physical phenomena. However, studies of these multi-term time-space or time fractional <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">equations</span> are still under development. In this paper, multi-term modified power law <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">equations</span> in a finite domain are considered. The multi-term time fractional derivatives are defined in the Caputo sense, whose orders belong to the intervals (1, 2], [2, 3), [2, 4) or (0, n) (n > 2), respectively. Analytical solutions of the multi-term modified power law <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">equations</span> are derived. These new techniques are based on Luchko’s Theorem, a spectral representation of the Laplacian operator, a method of separating variables and fractional derivative techniques. Then these general methods are applied to the special cases of the Szabo <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">equation</span> and the power law <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">equation</span>. These methods and techniques can also be extended to other kinds of the multi-term time-space fractional models including fractional Laplacian. PMID:26425384</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28039990','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28039990"><span>Connecting the grain-shearing mechanism of <span class="hlt">wave</span> propagation in marine sediments to fractional order <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">equations</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Pandey, Vikash; Holm, Sverre</p> <p>2016-12-01</p> <p>The characteristic time-dependent viscosity of the intergranular pore-fluid in Buckingham's grain-shearing (GS) model [Buckingham, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 108, 2796-2815 (2000)] is identified as the property of rheopecty. The property corresponds to a rare type of a non-Newtonian fluid in rheology which has largely remained unexplored. The material impulse response function from the GS model is found to be similar to the power-law memory kernel which is inherent in the framework of fractional calculus. The compressional <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">equation</span> and the shear <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">equation</span> derived from the GS model are shown to take the form of the Kelvin-Voigt fractional-derivative <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">equation</span> and the fractional diffusion-<span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">equation</span>, respectively. Therefore, an analogy is drawn between the dispersion relations obtained from the fractional framework and those from the GS model to establish the equivalence of the respective <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">equations</span>. Further, a physical interpretation of the characteristic fractional order present in the <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">equations</span> is inferred from the GS model. The overall goal is to show that fractional calculus is not just a mathematical framework which can be used to curve-fit the complex behavior of materials. Rather, it can also be derived from real physical processes as illustrated in this work by the example of GS.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011GeoJI.187.1645M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011GeoJI.187.1645M"><span><span class="hlt">3</span>-<span class="hlt">D</span> finite-difference, finite-element, discontinuous-Galerkin and spectral-element schemes analysed for their accuracy with respect to P-<span class="hlt">wave</span> to S-<span class="hlt">wave</span> speed ratio</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Moczo, Peter; Kristek, Jozef; Galis, Martin; Chaljub, Emmanuel; Etienne, Vincent</p> <p>2011-12-01</p> <p>We analyse 13 <span class="hlt">3</span>-<span class="hlt">D</span> numerical time-domain explicit schemes for modelling seismic <span class="hlt">wave</span> propagation and earthquake motion for their behaviour with a varying P-<span class="hlt">wave</span> to S-<span class="hlt">wave</span> speed ratio (VP/VS). The second-order schemes include three finite-difference, three finite-element and one discontinuous-Galerkin schemes. The fourth-order schemes include three finite-difference and two spectral-element schemes. All schemes are second-order in time. We assume a uniform cubic grid/mesh and present all schemes in a unified form. We assume plane S-<span class="hlt">wave</span> propagation in an unbounded homogeneous isotropic elastic medium. We define relative local errors of the schemes in amplitude and the vector difference in one time step and normalize them for a unit time. We also define the equivalent spatial sampling ratio as a ratio at which the maximum relative error is equal to the reference maximum error. We present results of the extensive numerical analysis. We theoretically (i) show how a numerical scheme sees the P and S <span class="hlt">waves</span> if the VP/VS ratio increases, (ii) show the structure of the errors in amplitude and the vector difference and (iii) compare the schemes in terms of the truncation errors of the discrete approximations to the second mixed and non-mixed spatial derivatives. We find that four of the tested schemes have errors in amplitude almost independent on the VP/VS ratio. The homogeneity of the approximations to the second mixed and non-mixed spatial derivatives in terms of the coefficients of the leading terms of their truncation errors as well as the absolute values of the coefficients are key factors for the behaviour of the schemes with increasing VP/VS ratio. The dependence of the errors in the vector difference on the VP/VS ratio should be accounted for by a proper (sufficiently dense) spatial sampling.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015PhyD..303...18S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015PhyD..303...18S"><span><span class="hlt">Wave</span> amplification in the framework of forced nonlinear Schrödinger <span class="hlt">equation</span>: The rogue <span class="hlt">wave</span> context</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Slunyaev, Alexey;