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Sample records for 3d x-ray breast

  1. Automatic multimodal 2D/3D image fusion of ultrasound computer tomography and x-ray mammography for breast cancer diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopp, Torsten; Duric, Neb; Ruiter, Nicole V.

    2012-03-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women. The established screening method to detect breast cancer in an early state is X-ray mammography. However, X-ray frequently provides limited contrast of tumors located within glandular tissue. A new imaging approach is Ultrasound Computer Tomography generating threedimensional volumes of the breast. Three different images are available: reflectivity, attenuation and speed of sound. The correlation of USCT volumes with X-ray mammograms is of interest for evaluation of the new imaging modality as well as for a multimodal diagnosis. Yet, both modalities differ in image dimensionality, patient positioning and deformation state of the breast. In earlier work we proposed a methodology based on Finite Element Method to register speed of sound images with the according mammogram. In this work, we enhanced the methodology to register all three image types provided by USCT. Furthermore, the methodology is now completely automated using image similarity measures to estimate rotations in datasets. A fusion methodology is proposed which combines the information of the three USCT image types with the X-ray mammogram via semitransparent overlay images. The evaluation was done using 13 datasets from a clinical study. The registration accuracy was measured by the displacement of the center of a lesion marked in both modalities. Using the automated rotation estimation, a mean displacement of 10.4 mm was achieved. Due to the clinically relevant registration accuracy, the methodology provides a basis for evaluation of the new imaging device USCT as well as for multimodal diagnosis.

  2. 3-D reconstruction and virtual ductoscopy of high-grade ductal carcinoma in situ of the breast with casting type calcifications using refraction-based X-ray CT.

    PubMed

    Ichihara, Shu; Ando, Masami; Maksimenko, Anton; Yuasa, Tetsuya; Sugiyama, Hiroshi; Hashimoto, Eiko; Yamasaki, Katsuhito; Mori, Kensaku; Arai, Yoshinori; Endo, Tokiko

    2008-01-01

    Stereomicroscopic observations of thick sections, or three-dimensional (3-D) reconstructions from serial sections, have provided insights into histopathology. However, they generally require time-consuming and laborious procedures. Recently, we have developed a new algorithm for refraction-based X-ray computed tomography (CT). The aim of this study is to apply this emerging technology to visualize the 3-D structure of a high-grade ductal carcinomas in situ (DCIS) of the breast. The high-resolution two-dimensional images of the refraction-based CT were validated by comparing them with the sequential histological sections. Without adding any contrast medium, the new CT showed strong contrast and was able to depict the non-calcified fine structures such as duct walls and intraductal carcinoma itself, both of which were barely visible in a conventional absorption-based CT. 3-D reconstruction and virtual endoscopy revealed that the high-grade DCIS was located within the dichotomatous branches of the ducts. Multiple calcifications occurred in the necrotic core of the continuous DCIS, resulting in linear and branching (casting type) calcifications, a hallmark of high-grade DCIS on mammograms. In conclusion, refraction-based X-ray CT approaches the low-power light microscopic view of the histological sections. It provides high quality slice data for 3-D reconstruction and virtual ductosocpy.

  3. 3D X-Ray Luggage-Screening System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fernandez, Kenneth

    2006-01-01

    A three-dimensional (3D) x-ray luggage- screening system has been proposed to reduce the fatigue experienced by human inspectors and increase their ability to detect weapons and other contraband. The system and variants thereof could supplant thousands of xray scanners now in use at hundreds of airports in the United States and other countries. The device would be applicable to any security checkpoint application where current two-dimensional scanners are in use. A conventional x-ray luggage scanner generates a single two-dimensional (2D) image that conveys no depth information. Therefore, a human inspector must scrutinize the image in an effort to understand ambiguous-appearing objects as they pass by at high speed on a conveyor belt. Such a high level of concentration can induce fatigue, causing the inspector to reduce concentration and vigilance. In addition, because of the lack of depth information, contraband objects could be made more difficult to detect by positioning them near other objects so as to create x-ray images that confuse inspectors. The proposed system would make it unnecessary for a human inspector to interpret 2D images, which show objects at different depths as superimposed. Instead, the system would take advantage of the natural human ability to infer 3D information from stereographic or stereoscopic images. The inspector would be able to perceive two objects at different depths, in a more nearly natural manner, as distinct 3D objects lying at different depths. Hence, the inspector could recognize objects with greater accuracy and less effort. The major components of the proposed system would be similar to those of x-ray luggage scanners now in use. As in a conventional x-ray scanner, there would be an x-ray source. Unlike in a conventional scanner, there would be two x-ray image sensors, denoted the left and right sensors, located at positions along the conveyor that are upstream and downstream, respectively (see figure). X-ray illumination

  4. X-ray imaging of laser produced plasmas by a compound 3D x-ray lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garanin, R. V.; Pavlov, G. A.; Suslov, N. A.; Treushnikov, V. M.; Treushnikov, V. V.; Zhidkov, N. V.

    2015-04-01

    Pilot scheme for the study of plasma under extreme condition is implemented using a compound 3D X-ray lens. Hard X-ray image of laser plasma produced by irradiating of copper foil by intense laser pulse was recorded using this lens.

  5. 2D and 3D Refraction Based X-ray Imaging Suitable for Clinical and Pathological Diagnosis

    SciTech Connect

    Ando, Masami; Bando, Hiroko; Ueno, Ei

    2007-01-19

    The first observation of micro papillary (MP) breast cancer by x-ray dark-field imaging (XDFI) and the first observation of the 3D x-ray internal structure of another breast cancer, ductal carcinoma in-situ (DCIS), are reported. The specimen size for the sheet-shaped MP was 26 mm x 22 mm x 2.8 mm, and that for the rod-shaped DCIS was 3.6 mm in diameter and 4.7 mm in height. The experiment was performed at the Photon Factory, KEK: High Energy Accelerator Research Organization. We achieved a high-contrast x-ray image by adopting a thickness-controlled transmission-type angular analyzer that allows only refraction components from the object for 2D imaging. This provides a high-contrast image of cancer-cell nests, cancer cells and stroma. For x-ray 3D imaging, a new algorithm due to the refraction for x-ray CT was created. The angular information was acquired by x-ray optics diffraction-enhanced imaging (DEI). The number of data was 900 for each reconstruction. A reconstructed CT image may include ductus lactiferi, micro calcification and the breast gland. This modality has the possibility to open up a new clinical and pathological diagnosis using x-ray, offering more precise inspection and detection of early signs of breast cancer.

  6. New 3D Bolton standards: coregistration of biplane x rays and 3D CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dean, David; Subramanyan, Krishna; Kim, Eun-Kyung

    1997-04-01

    The Bolton Standards 'normative' cohort (16 males, 16 females) have been invited back to the Bolton-Brush Growth Study Center for new biorthogonal plain film head x-rays and 3D (three dimensional) head CT-scans. A set of 29 3D landmarks were identified on both their biplane head film and 3D CT images. The current 3D CT image is then superimposed onto the landmarks collected from the current biplane head films. Three post-doctoral fellows have collected 37 3D landmarks from the Bolton Standards' 40 - 70 year old biplane head films. These films were captured annually during their growing period (ages 3 - 18). Using 29 of these landmarks the current 3D CT image is next warped (via thin plate spline) to landmarks taken from each participant's 18th year biplane head films, a process that is successively reiterated back to age 3. This process is demonstrated here for one of the Bolton Standards. The outer skull surfaces will be extracted from each warped 3D CT image and an average will be generated for each age/sex group. The resulting longitudinal series of average 'normative' boney skull surface images may be useful for craniofacial patient: diagnosis, treatment planning, stereotactic procedures, and outcomes assessment.

  7. 3D Reconstruction from X-ray Fluoroscopy for Clinical Veterinary Medicine using Differential Volume Rendering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khongsomboon, Khamphong; Hamamoto, Kazuhiko; Kondo, Shozo

    3D reconstruction from ordinary X-ray equipment which is not CT or MRI is required in clinical veterinary medicine. Authors have already proposed a 3D reconstruction technique from X-ray photograph to present bone structure. Although the reconstruction is useful for veterinary medicine, the thechnique has two problems. One is about exposure of X-ray and the other is about data acquisition process. An x-ray equipment which is not special one but can solve the problems is X-ray fluoroscopy. Therefore, in this paper, we propose a method for 3D-reconstruction from X-ray fluoroscopy for clinical veterinary medicine. Fluoroscopy is usually used to observe a movement of organ or to identify a position of organ for surgery by weak X-ray intensity. Since fluoroscopy can output a observed result as movie, the previous two problems which are caused by use of X-ray photograph can be solved. However, a new problem arises due to weak X-ray intensity. Although fluoroscopy can present information of not only bone structure but soft tissues, the contrast is very low and it is very difficult to recognize some soft tissues. It is very useful to be able to observe not only bone structure but soft tissues clearly by ordinary X-ray equipment in the field of clinical veterinary medicine. To solve this problem, this paper proposes a new method to determine opacity in volume rendering process. The opacity is determined according to 3D differential coefficient of 3D reconstruction. This differential volume rendering can present a 3D structure image of multiple organs volumetrically and clearly for clinical veterinary medicine. This paper shows results of simulation and experimental investigation of small dog and evaluation by veterinarians.

  8. The X-Ray Transform Projection of 3D Mother Wavelet Function

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xiangyu; Guo, Jiqiang; Lu, Li; Zeng, Li

    2013-01-01

    As we all know, any practical computed tomography (CT) projection data more or less contains noises. Hence, it will be inconvenient for the postprocessing of a reconstructed 3D image even when the noise in the projection data is white. The reason is that the noise in the reconstructed image may be nonwhite. X-ray transform can be applied to the three dimensional (3D) CT, depicting the relationship between material density and ray projection. In this paper, nontensor product relationship between the two dimensional (2D) mother wavelet and 3D mother wavelet is obtained by taking X-ray transform projection of 3D mother wavelet. We proved that the projection of the 3D mother wavelet is a 2D mother wavelet if the 3D mother wavelet satisfies certain conditions. So, the 3D wavelet transform of a 3D image can be implemented by the 2D wavelet transform of its X-ray transform projection and it will contribute to the reduction complexity and computation time during image processing. What is more, it can also avoid noise transfer and amplification during the processing of CT image reconstruction. PMID:24376470

  9. An instrument for 3D x-ray nano-imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Holler, M.; Raabe, J.; Diaz, A.; Guizar-Sicairos, M.; Quitmann, C.; Menzel, A.; Bunk, O.

    2012-07-15

    We present an instrument dedicated to 3D scanning x-ray microscopy, allowing a sample to be precisely scanned through a beam while the angle of x-ray incidence can be changed. The position of the sample is controlled with respect to the beam-defining optics by laser interferometry. The instrument achieves a position stability better than 10 nm standard deviation. The instrument performance is assessed using scanning x-ray diffraction microscopy and we demonstrate a resolution of 18 nm in 2D imaging of a lithographic test pattern while the beam was defined by a pinhole of 3 {mu}m in diameter. In 3D on a test object of copper interconnects of a microprocessor, a resolution of 53 nm is achieved.

  10. Final report: high resolution lensless 3D imaging of nanostructures with coherent x-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobsen, Chris

    2011-04-14

    This project helped pioneer the core capabilities of coherent diffraction imaging (CDI) using X rays at synchrotron light source facilities. We developed an apparatus that was used for CDI at the Advanced Light Source, and applied it to 2D and 3D imaging of nanostructures. We also explored a number of conceptual and computational issues on the reconstruction of CDI data.

  11. 3D ablation catheter localisation using individual C-arm x-ray projections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haase, C.; Schäfer, D.; Dössel, O.; Grass, M.

    2014-11-01

    Cardiac ablation procedures during electrophysiology interventions are performed under x-ray guidance with a C-arm imaging system. Some procedures require catheter navigation in complex anatomies like the left atrium. Navigation aids like 3D road maps and external tracking systems may be used to facilitate catheter navigation. As an alternative to external tracking a fully automatic method is presented here that enables the calculation of the 3D location of the ablation catheter from individual 2D x-ray projections. The method registers a high resolution, deformable 3D attenuation model of the catheter to a 2D x-ray projection. The 3D localization is based on the divergent beam projection of the catheter. On an individual projection, the catheter tip is detected in 2D by image filtering and a template matching method. The deformable 3D catheter model is adapted using the projection geometry provided by the C-arm system and 2D similarity measures for an accurate 2D/3D registration. Prior to the tracking and registration procedure, the deformable 3D attenuation model is automatically extracted from a separate 3D cone beam CT reconstruction of the device. The method can hence be applied to various cardiac ablation catheters. In a simulation study of a virtual ablation procedure with realistic background, noise, scatter and motion blur an average 3D registration accuracy of 3.8 mm is reached for the catheter tip. In this study four different types of ablation catheters were used. Experiments using measured C-arm fluoroscopy projections of a catheter in a RSD phantom deliver an average 3D accuracy of 4.5 mm.

  12. 3D ablation catheter localisation using individual C-arm x-ray projections.

    PubMed

    Haase, C; Schäfer, D; Dössel, O; Grass, M

    2014-11-21

    Cardiac ablation procedures during electrophysiology interventions are performed under x-ray guidance with a C-arm imaging system. Some procedures require catheter navigation in complex anatomies like the left atrium. Navigation aids like 3D road maps and external tracking systems may be used to facilitate catheter navigation. As an alternative to external tracking a fully automatic method is presented here that enables the calculation of the 3D location of the ablation catheter from individual 2D x-ray projections. The method registers a high resolution, deformable 3D attenuation model of the catheter to a 2D x-ray projection. The 3D localization is based on the divergent beam projection of the catheter. On an individual projection, the catheter tip is detected in 2D by image filtering and a template matching method. The deformable 3D catheter model is adapted using the projection geometry provided by the C-arm system and 2D similarity measures for an accurate 2D/3D registration. Prior to the tracking and registration procedure, the deformable 3D attenuation model is automatically extracted from a separate 3D cone beam CT reconstruction of the device. The method can hence be applied to various cardiac ablation catheters. In a simulation study of a virtual ablation procedure with realistic background, noise, scatter and motion blur an average 3D registration accuracy of 3.8 mm is reached for the catheter tip. In this study four different types of ablation catheters were used. Experiments using measured C-arm fluoroscopy projections of a catheter in a RSD phantom deliver an average 3D accuracy of 4.5 mm.

  13. Interpixel crosstalk in a 3D-integrated active pixel sensor for x-ray detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LaMarr, Beverly; Bautz, Mark; Foster, Rick; Kissel, Steve; Prigozhin, Gregory; Suntharalingam, Vyshnavi

    2010-07-01

    MIT Lincoln Laboratories and MIT Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research have developed an active pixel sensor for use as a photon counting device for imaging spectroscopy in the soft X-ray band. A silicon-on-insulator (SOI) readout circuit was integrated with a high-resistivity silicon diode detector array using a per-pixel 3D integration technique developed at Lincoln Laboratory. We have tested these devices at 5.9 keV and 1.5 keV. Here we examine the interpixel cross-talk measured with 5.9 keV X-rays.

  14. 3D elemental sensitive imaging using transmission X-ray microscopy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yijin; Meirer, Florian; Wang, Junyue; Requena, Guillermo; Williams, Phillip; Nelson, Johanna; Mehta, Apurva; Andrews, Joy C; Pianetta, Piero

    2012-09-01

    Determination of the heterogeneous distribution of metals in alloy/battery/catalyst and biological materials is critical to fully characterize and/or evaluate the functionality of the materials. Using synchrotron-based transmission x-ray microscopy (TXM), it is now feasible to perform nanoscale-resolution imaging over a wide X-ray energy range covering the absorption edges of many elements; combining elemental sensitive imaging with determination of sample morphology. We present an efficient and reliable methodology to perform 3D elemental sensitive imaging with excellent sample penetration (tens of microns) using hard X-ray TXM. A sample of an Al-Si piston alloy is used to demonstrate the capability of the proposed method. PMID:22349401

  15. 3D elemental sensitive imaging using transmission X-ray microscopy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yijin; Meirer, Florian; Wang, Junyue; Requena, Guillermo; Williams, Phillip; Nelson, Johanna; Mehta, Apurva; Andrews, Joy C; Pianetta, Piero

    2012-09-01

    Determination of the heterogeneous distribution of metals in alloy/battery/catalyst and biological materials is critical to fully characterize and/or evaluate the functionality of the materials. Using synchrotron-based transmission x-ray microscopy (TXM), it is now feasible to perform nanoscale-resolution imaging over a wide X-ray energy range covering the absorption edges of many elements; combining elemental sensitive imaging with determination of sample morphology. We present an efficient and reliable methodology to perform 3D elemental sensitive imaging with excellent sample penetration (tens of microns) using hard X-ray TXM. A sample of an Al-Si piston alloy is used to demonstrate the capability of the proposed method.

  16. 3D simulation of the image formation in soft x-ray microscopes.

    PubMed

    Selin, Mårten; Fogelqvist, Emelie; Holmberg, Anders; Guttmann, Peter; Vogt, Ulrich; Hertz, Hans M

    2014-12-15

    In water-window soft x-ray microscopy the studied object is typically larger than the depth of focus and the sample illumination is often partially coherent. This blurs out-of-focus features and may introduce considerable fringing. Understanding the influence of these phenomena on the image formation is therefore important when interpreting experimental data. Here we present a wave-propagation model operating in 3D for simulating the image formation of thick objects in partially coherent soft x-ray microscopes. The model is compared with present simulation methods as well as with experiments. The results show that our model predicts the image formation of transmission soft x-ray microscopes more accurately than previous models.

  17. 3D localization of electrophysiology catheters from a single x-ray cone-beam projection

    SciTech Connect

    Robert, Normand Polack, George G.; Sethi, Benu; Rowlands, John A.; Crystal, Eugene

    2015-10-15

    Purpose: X-ray images allow the visualization of percutaneous devices such as catheters in real time but inherently lack depth information. The provision of 3D localization of these devices from cone beam x-ray projections would be advantageous for interventions such as electrophysiology (EP), whereby the operator needs to return a device to the same anatomical locations during the procedure. A method to achieve real-time 3D single view localization (SVL) of an object of known geometry from a single x-ray image is presented. SVL exploits the change in the magnification of an object as its distance from the x-ray source is varied. The x-ray projection of an object of interest is compared to a synthetic x-ray projection of a model of said object as its pose is varied. Methods: SVL was tested with a 3 mm spherical marker and an electrophysiology catheter. The effect of x-ray acquisition parameters on SVL was investigated. An independent reference localization method was developed to compare results when imaging a catheter translated via a computer controlled three-axes stage. SVL was also performed on clinical fluoroscopy image sequences. A commercial navigation system was used in some clinical image sequences for comparison. Results: SVL estimates exhibited little change as x-ray acquisition parameters were varied. The reproducibility of catheter position estimates in phantoms denoted by the standard deviations, (σ{sub x}, σ{sub y}, σ{sub z}) = (0.099 mm,  0.093 mm,  2.2 mm), where x and y are parallel to the detector plane and z is the distance from the x-ray source. Position estimates (x, y, z) exhibited a 4% systematic error (underestimation) when compared to the reference method. The authors demonstrated that EP catheters can be tracked in clinical fluoroscopic images. Conclusions: It has been shown that EP catheters can be localized in real time in phantoms and clinical images at fluoroscopic exposure rates. Further work is required to characterize

  18. 3D global estimation and augmented reality visualization of intra-operative X-ray dose.

    PubMed

    Rodas, Nicolas Loy; Padoy, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    The growing use of image-guided minimally-invasive surgical procedures is confronting clinicians and surgical staff with new radiation exposure risks from X-ray imaging devices. The accurate estimation of intra-operative radiation exposure can increase staff awareness of radiation exposure risks and enable the implementation of well-adapted safety measures. The current surgical practice of wearing a single dosimeter at chest level to measure radiation exposure does not provide a sufficiently accurate estimation of radiation absorption throughout the body. In this paper, we propose an approach that combines data from wireless dosimeters with the simulation of radiation propagation in order to provide a global radiation risk map in the area near the X-ray device. We use a multi-camera RGBD system to obtain a 3D point cloud reconstruction of the room. The positions of the table, C-arm and clinician are then used 1) to simulate the propagation of radiation in a real-world setup and 2) to overlay the resulting 3D risk-map onto the scene in an augmented reality manner. By using real-time wireless dosimeters in our system, we can both calibrate the simulation and validate its accuracy at specific locations in real-time. We demonstrate our system in an operating room equipped with a robotised X-ray imaging device and validate the radiation simulation on several X-ray acquisition setups. PMID:25333145

  19. Non-destructive investigations of a copper and argon doped sputtered beryllium capsule using x-rays in 3d

    SciTech Connect

    Patterson, Brian M; Defriend, Kimberly A; Havrilla, George J; Nikroo, Abbas

    2008-01-01

    The combination of 3D computed micro x-ray tomography (micro CT) and 3D confocal micro x-ray fluorescence (confocal MXRF) are very useful nondestructive metrology techniques for determining the unique compositional and morphological information of fusion targets and target materials.

  20. NDE of spacecraft materials using 3D Compton backscatter x-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke, E. R.; Grubsky, V.; Romanov, V.; Shoemaker, K.

    2016-02-01

    We present the results of testing of the NDE performance of a Compton Imaging Tomography (CIT) system for single-sided, penetrating 3D inspection. The system was recently developed by Physical Optics Corporation (POC) and delivered to NASA for testing and evaluation. The CIT technology is based on 3D structure mapping by collecting the information on density profiles in multiple object cross sections through hard x-ray Compton backscatter imaging. The individual cross sections are processed and fused together in software, generating a 3D map of the density profile of the object which can then be analyzed slice-by-slice in x, y, or z directions. The developed CIT scanner is based on a 200-kV x-ray source, flat-panel x-ray detector (FPD), and apodized x-ray imaging optics. The CIT technology is particularly well suited to the NDE of lightweight aerospace materials, such as the thermal protection system (TPS) ceramic and composite materials, micrometeoroid and orbital debris (MMOD) shielding, spacecraft pressure walls, inflatable habitat structures, composite overwrapped pressure vessels (COPVs), and aluminum honeycomb materials. The current system provides 3D localization of defects and features with field of view 20x12x8 cm3 and spatial resolution ˜2 mm. In this paper, we review several aerospace NDE applications of the CIT technology, with particular emphasis on TPS. Based on the analysis of the testing results, we provide recommendations for continued development on TPS applications that can benefit the most from the unique capabilities of this new NDE technology.

  1. 3D Medipix2 detector characterization with a micro-focused X-ray beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gimenez, E. N.; Maneuski, D.; Mac Raighne, A.; Parkes, C.; Bates, R.; O'Shea, V.; Fleta, C.; Pellegrini, G.; Lozano, M.; Alianelli, L.; Sawhney, K. J. S.; Marchal, J.; Tartoni, N.

    2011-05-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) photodiode detectors offer advantages over standard planar photodiodes in a wide range of applications. The main advantage of these sensors for X-ray imaging is their reduced charge sharing between adjacent pixels, which could improve spatial and spectral resolution. However, a drawback of 3D sensors structures is the loss of detection efficiency due to the presence in the pixel structure of heavily doped electrode columns which are insensitive to X-ray. In this work two types of 3D silicon detectors: n-type wafer with hole collecting readout-columns (N-TYPE) and p-type wafer with electron collecting readout-columns (P-TYPE), bump-bounded to a Medipix2 read-out chip were characterized with a 14.5 keV micro-focused X-ray beam from a synchrotron. Measurements of the detection efficiency and the charge sharing were performed at different bias voltages and Medipix2 energy thresholds and compared with those of a standard planar silicon sensor.

  2. 3D X-ray imaging methods in support catheter ablations of cardiac arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Stárek, Zdeněk; Lehar, František; Jež, Jiří; Wolf, Jiří; Novák, Miroslav

    2014-10-01

    Cardiac arrhythmias are a very frequent illness. Pharmacotherapy is not very effective in persistent arrhythmias and brings along a number of risks. Catheter ablation has became an effective and curative treatment method over the past 20 years. To support complex arrhythmia ablations, the 3D X-ray cardiac cavities imaging is used, most frequently the 3D reconstruction of CT images. The 3D cardiac rotational angiography (3DRA) represents a modern method enabling to create CT like 3D images on a standard X-ray machine equipped with special software. Its advantage lies in the possibility to obtain images during the procedure, decreased radiation dose and reduction of amount of the contrast agent. The left atrium model is the one most frequently used for complex atrial arrhythmia ablations, particularly for atrial fibrillation. CT data allow for creation and segmentation of 3D models of all cardiac cavities. Recently, a research has been made proving the use of 3DRA to create 3D models of other cardiac (right ventricle, left ventricle, aorta) and non-cardiac structures (oesophagus). They can be used during catheter ablation of complex arrhythmias to improve orientation during the construction of 3D electroanatomic maps, directly fused with 3D electroanatomic systems and/or fused with fluoroscopy. An intensive development in the 3D model creation and use has taken place over the past years and they became routinely used during catheter ablations of arrhythmias, mainly atrial fibrillation ablation procedures. Further development may be anticipated in the future in both the creation and use of these models.

  3. X-Ray Laue Microdiffraction Study of 3D Grain Growth in Polycrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budai, J. D.; Yang, W.; Tischler, J. Z.; Larson, B. C.; Liu, W.; Ice, G. E.

    2004-11-01

    We describe a new technique for studying 3D grain growth in polycrystalline materials using white x-ray microdiffraction with micron spatial resolution. This scanning technique uses focussed, polychromatic x-rays at the Advanced Photon Source to measure the local crystal structure and lattice orientation. The capabilities of this method are demonstrated by 3D grain growth studies of aluminium during thermal annealing. 3D grain orientation maps were obtained from hot-rolled (200ºC) polycrystalline aluminum ( 1Fe,Si). The sample was then annealed to induce grain growth, cooled, and re-mapped to measure the thermal migration of all grain boundaries within the same volume region. Initial observations reveal significant grain growth above 360ºC, involving movement of both low- and high-angle boundaries. Systematic measurements obtained after annealing at successively higher temperatures provide a detailed description of the microstructural evolution in a bulk material. These measurements provide the 3D experimental link needed for testing theories and large-scale computer models of 3D grain growth in advanced materials. Support by DOE Division of Materials Sciences under contract with ORNL managed by UT-Battelle, LLC; UNI-CAT is supported by ORNL, UIUC-MRL, NIST, and UOP LLC; APS supported by DOE.

  4. Geometrical Calibration of X-Ray Imaging With RGB Cameras for 3D Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Albiol, Francisco; Corbi, Alberto; Albiol, Alberto

    2016-08-01

    We present a methodology to recover the geometrical calibration of conventional X-ray settings with the help of an ordinary video camera and visible fiducials that are present in the scene. After calibration, equivalent points of interest can be easily identifiable with the help of the epipolar geometry. The same procedure also allows the measurement of real anatomic lengths and angles and obtains accurate 3D locations from image points. Our approach completely eliminates the need for X-ray-opaque reference marks (and necessary supporting frames) which can sometimes be invasive for the patient, occlude the radiographic picture, and end up projected outside the imaging sensor area in oblique protocols. Two possible frameworks are envisioned: a spatially shifting X-ray anode around the patient/object and a moving patient that moves/rotates while the imaging system remains fixed. As a proof of concept, experiences with a device under test (DUT), an anthropomorphic phantom and a real brachytherapy session have been carried out. The results show that it is possible to identify common points with a proper level of accuracy and retrieve three-dimensional locations, lengths and shapes with a millimetric level of precision. The presented approach is simple and compatible with both current and legacy widespread diagnostic X-ray imaging deployments and it can represent a good and inexpensive alternative to other radiological modalities like CT. PMID:26978665

  5. Non-destructive mapping of grain orientations in 3D by laboratory X-ray microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, S. A.; Reischig, P.; Holzner, C.; Lauridsen, E. M.; Withers, P. J.; Merkle, A. P.; Feser, M.

    2015-10-01

    The ability to characterise crystallographic microstructure, non-destructively and in three-dimensions, is a powerful tool for understanding many aspects related to damage and deformation mechanisms in polycrystalline materials. To this end, the technique of X-ray diffraction contrast tomography (DCT) using monochromatic synchrotron and polychromatic laboratory X-ray sources has been shown to be capable of mapping crystal grains and their orientations non-destructively in 3D. Here we describe a novel laboratory-based X-ray DCT modality (LabDCT), enabling the wider accessibility of the DCT technique for routine use and in-depth studies of, for example, temporal changes in crystallographic grain structure non-destructively over time through ‘4D’ in situ time-lapse studies. The capability of the technique is demonstrated by studying a titanium alloy (Ti-β21S) sample. In the current implementation the smallest grains that can be reliably detected are around 40 μm. The individual grain locations and orientations are reconstructed using the LabDCT method and the results are validated against independent measurements from phase contrast tomography and electron backscatter diffraction respectively. Application of the technique promises to provide important insights related to the roles of recrystallization and grain growth on materials properties as well as supporting 3D polycrystalline modelling of materials performance.

  6. Non-destructive mapping of grain orientations in 3D by laboratory X-ray microscopy

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, S. A.; Reischig, P.; Holzner, C.; Lauridsen, E. M.; Withers, P. J.; Merkle, A. P.; Feser, M.

    2015-01-01

    The ability to characterise crystallographic microstructure, non-destructively and in three-dimensions, is a powerful tool for understanding many aspects related to damage and deformation mechanisms in polycrystalline materials. To this end, the technique of X-ray diffraction contrast tomography (DCT) using monochromatic synchrotron and polychromatic laboratory X-ray sources has been shown to be capable of mapping crystal grains and their orientations non-destructively in 3D. Here we describe a novel laboratory-based X-ray DCT modality (LabDCT), enabling the wider accessibility of the DCT technique for routine use and in-depth studies of, for example, temporal changes in crystallographic grain structure non-destructively over time through ‘4D’ in situ time-lapse studies. The capability of the technique is demonstrated by studying a titanium alloy (Ti-β21S) sample. In the current implementation the smallest grains that can be reliably detected are around 40 μm. The individual grain locations and orientations are reconstructed using the LabDCT method and the results are validated against independent measurements from phase contrast tomography and electron backscatter diffraction respectively. Application of the technique promises to provide important insights related to the roles of recrystallization and grain growth on materials properties as well as supporting 3D polycrystalline modelling of materials performance. PMID:26494523

  7. STEMS3D: An X-ray spectral model for magnetar persistent radiations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gogus, Ersin; Weng, Shan-Shan

    2016-07-01

    Anomalous X-ray pulsars and soft gamma-ray repeaters are recognized as the most promising magnetar candidates, as indicated by their energetic bursts and rapid spin-downs. It is expected that the strong magnetic field leaves distinctive imprints on the emergent radiation both by affecting the radiative processes in atmospheres of magnetars and by scattering in the upper magnetospheres. We construct a self-consistent physical model that incorporates emission from the magnetar surface and its reprocessing in the three-dimensional twisted magnetosphere using a Monte Carlo technique. The synthetic spectra are characterized by four parameters: surface temperature kT, surface magnetic field strength B, magnetospheric twist angle Δφ, and the normalized electron velocity β. We also create a tabular model (STEMS3D) and apply it to X-ray spectra of magnetars.

  8. Application of 3D X-ray CT data sets to finite element analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Bossart, P.L.; Martz, H.E.; Brand, H.R.; Hollerbach, K.

    1995-08-31

    Finite Element Modeling (FEM) is becoming more important as industry drives toward concurrent engineering. A fundamental hindrance to fully exploiting the power of FEM is the human effort required to acquire complex part geometry, particularly as-built geometry, as a FEM mesh. Many Quantitative Non Destructive Evaluation (QNDE) techniques that produce three-dimensional (3D) data sets provide a substantial reduction in the effort required to apply FEM to as-built parts. This paper describes progress at LLNL on the application of 3D X-ray computed tomography (CT) data sets to more rapidly produce high-quality FEM meshes of complex, as-built geometries. Issues related to the volume segmentation of the 3D CT data as well as the use of this segmented data to tailor generic hexahedral FEM meshes to part specific geometries are discussed. The application of these techniques to FEM analysis in the medical field is reported here.

  9. X-Ray Phase Nanotomography Resolves the 3D Human Bone Ultrastructure

    PubMed Central

    Suhonen, Heikki; Grimal, Quentin; Cloetens, Peter; Peyrin, Françoise

    2012-01-01

    Bone strength and failure are increasingly thought to be due to ultrastructural properties, such as the morphology of the lacuno-canalicular network, the collagen fiber orientation and the mineralization on the nanoscale. However, these properties have not been studied in 3D so far. Here we report the investigation of the human bone ultrastructure with X-ray phase nanotomography, which now provides the required sensitivity, spatial resolution and field of view. The 3D organization of the lacuno-canalicular network is studied in detail over several cells in osteonal and interstitial tissue. Nanoscale density variations are revealed and show that the cement line separating these tissues is hypermineralized. Finally, we show that the collagen fibers are organized as a twisted plywood structure in 3D. PMID:22952569

  10. Characterization of a prototype tabletop x-ray CT breast imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connor, J. Michael; Glick, Stephen J.; Gong, Xing; Didier, Clay; Mah'd, Mufeed

    2007-03-01

    Planar X-ray mammography is the standard medical imaging modality for the early detection of breast cancer. Based on advancements in digital flat-panel detector technology, dedicated x-ray computed tomography (CT) mammography is a modality under investigation that offers the potential for improved breast tumor imaging. We have implemented a prototype half cone-beam CT breast imaging system that utilizes an indirect flat-panel detector. This prototype can be used to explore and evaluate the effect of varying acquisition and reconstruction parameters on image quality. This report describes our system and characterizes the performance of the system through the analysis of Modulation Transfer Function (MTF) and Noise Power Spectrum (NPS). All CT reconstructions were made using Feldkamp's filtered backprojection algorithm. The 3D MTF was determined by the analysis of the plane spread function (PlSF) derived from the surface spread function (SSF) of reconstructed 6.3mm spheres. 3D NPS characterization was performed through the analysis of a 3D volume extracted from zero-mean CT noise of air reconstructions. The effect of varying locations on MTF and the effect of different Butterworth filter cutoff frequencies on NPS are reported. Finally, we present CT images of mastectomy excised breast tissue. Breast specimen images were acquired on our CTMS using an x-ray technique similar to the one used during performance characterization. Specimen images demonstrate the inherent CT capability to reduce the masking effect of anatomical noise. Both the quantitative system characterization and the breast specimen images continue to reinforce the hope that dedicated flat-panel detector, x-ray cone-beam CT will eventually provide enhanced breast cancer detection capability.

  11. Matching methods evaluation framework for stereoscopic breast x-ray images.

    PubMed

    Rousson, Johanna; Naudin, Mathieu; Marchessoux, Cédric

    2016-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3-D) imaging has been intensively studied in the past few decades. Depth information is an important added value of 3-D systems over two-dimensional systems. Special focuses were devoted to the development of stereo matching methods for the generation of disparity maps (i.e., depth information within a 3-D scene). Dedicated frameworks were designed to evaluate and rank the performance of different stereo matching methods but never considering x-ray medical images. Yet, 3-D x-ray acquisition systems and 3-D medical displays have already been introduced into the diagnostic market. To access the depth information within x-ray stereoscopic images, computing accurate disparity maps is essential. We aimed at developing a framework dedicated to x-ray stereoscopic breast images used to evaluate and rank several stereo matching methods. A multiresolution pyramid optimization approach was integrated to the framework to increase the accuracy and the efficiency of the stereo matching techniques. Finally, a metric was designed to score the results of the stereo matching compared with the ground truth. Eight methods were evaluated and four of them [locally scaled sum of absolute differences (LSAD), zero mean sum of absolute differences, zero mean sum of squared differences, and locally scaled mean sum of squared differences] appeared to perform equally good with an average error score of 0.04 (0 is the perfect matching). LSAD was selected for generating the disparity maps. PMID:26587552

  12. X-ray microscopy for in situ characterization of 3D nanostructural evolution in the laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hornberger, Benjamin; Bale, Hrishikesh; Merkle, Arno; Feser, Michael; Harris, William; Etchin, Sergey; Leibowitz, Marty; Qiu, Wei; Tkachuk, Andrei; Gu, Allen; Bradley, Robert S.; Lu, Xuekun; Withers, Philip J.; Clarke, Amy; Henderson, Kevin; Cordes, Nikolaus; Patterson, Brian M.

    2015-09-01

    X-ray microscopy (XRM) has emerged as a powerful technique that reveals 3D images and quantitative information of interior structures. XRM executed both in the laboratory and at the synchrotron have demonstrated critical analysis and materials characterization on meso-, micro-, and nanoscales, with spatial resolution down to 50 nm in laboratory systems. The non-destructive nature of X-rays has made the technique widely appealing, with potential for "4D" characterization, delivering 3D micro- and nanostructural information on the same sample as a function of sequential processing or experimental conditions. Understanding volumetric and nanostructural changes, such as solid deformation, pore evolution, and crack propagation are fundamental to understanding how materials form, deform, and perform. We will present recent instrumentation developments in laboratory based XRM including a novel in situ nanomechanical testing stage. These developments bridge the gap between existing in situ stages for micro scale XRM, and SEM/TEM techniques that offer nanometer resolution but are limited to analysis of surfaces or extremely thin samples whose behavior is strongly influenced by surface effects. Several applications will be presented including 3D-characterization and in situ mechanical testing of polymers, metal alloys, composites and biomaterials. They span multiple length scales from the micro- to the nanoscale and different mechanical testing modes such as compression, indentation and tension.

  13. Spectroscopic and X-ray Scattering Models in SPECT3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golovkin, Igor; Gregori, Gianluca; Macfarlane, Joseph; Hall, Iain; Woodruff, Pamela; Bailey, James; Harding, Eric; Ao, Tom

    2012-10-01

    Spectrally resolved X-ray scattering has become a very effective method for diagnosing the electron temperatures, densities, and average ionization of warm dense matter. We present a newly implemented capability to compute scattering from realistic experiment configurations, including the influence of plasma non-uniformities and collecting scattered x-rays from a range of angles. The method is based on a formalism developed by G. Gregori [1]. The x-ray scattering modeling has been added to the multi-dimensional collisional-radiative spectral and imaging package SPECT3D [2]. Ability to compute emissivity and attenuation of scattered photons within a multi-dimensional plasma with non-uniform temperature and density distributions adds major new functionality to existing models. We will discuss the implementation details and demonstrate results relevant to ongoing experimental investigations at Sandia National Laboratories.[4pt] [1] G. Gregori, S. H. Glenzer, W. Rozmus, R. W. Lee, and O. L. Landen, Phys. Rev. E 67, 026412 (2003).[0pt] [2] J. J. MacFarlane, I. E. Golovkin, P. Wang, P. R. Woodruff, and N. A. Pereyra, High Energy Density Phys., Vol. 3, p. 181-190 (2007).

  14. 3D printing of preclinical X-ray computed tomographic data sets.

    PubMed

    Doney, Evan; Krumdick, Lauren A; Diener, Justin M; Wathen, Connor A; Chapman, Sarah E; Stamile, Brian; Scott, Jeremiah E; Ravosa, Matthew J; Van Avermaete, Tony; Leevy, W Matthew

    2013-01-01

    Three-dimensional printing allows for the production of highly detailed objects through a process known as additive manufacturing. Traditional, mold-injection methods to create models or parts have several limitations, the most important of which is a difficulty in making highly complex products in a timely, cost-effective manner.(1) However, gradual improvements in three-dimensional printing technology have resulted in both high-end and economy instruments that are now available for the facile production of customized models.(2) These printers have the ability to extrude high-resolution objects with enough detail to accurately represent in vivo images generated from a preclinical X-ray CT scanner. With proper data collection, surface rendering, and stereolithographic editing, it is now possible and inexpensive to rapidly produce detailed skeletal and soft tissue structures from X-ray CT data. Even in the early stages of development, the anatomical models produced by three-dimensional printing appeal to both educators and researchers who can utilize the technology to improve visualization proficiency. (3, 4) The real benefits of this method result from the tangible experience a researcher can have with data that cannot be adequately conveyed through a computer screen. The translation of pre-clinical 3D data to a physical object that is an exact copy of the test subject is a powerful tool for visualization and communication, especially for relating imaging research to students, or those in other fields. Here, we provide a detailed method for printing plastic models of bone and organ structures derived from X-ray CT scans utilizing an Albira X-ray CT system in conjunction with PMOD, ImageJ, Meshlab, Netfabb, and ReplicatorG software packages. PMID:23542702

  15. 3D printing of preclinical X-ray computed tomographic data sets.

    PubMed

    Doney, Evan; Krumdick, Lauren A; Diener, Justin M; Wathen, Connor A; Chapman, Sarah E; Stamile, Brian; Scott, Jeremiah E; Ravosa, Matthew J; Van Avermaete, Tony; Leevy, W Matthew

    2013-03-22

    Three-dimensional printing allows for the production of highly detailed objects through a process known as additive manufacturing. Traditional, mold-injection methods to create models or parts have several limitations, the most important of which is a difficulty in making highly complex products in a timely, cost-effective manner.(1) However, gradual improvements in three-dimensional printing technology have resulted in both high-end and economy instruments that are now available for the facile production of customized models.(2) These printers have the ability to extrude high-resolution objects with enough detail to accurately represent in vivo images generated from a preclinical X-ray CT scanner. With proper data collection, surface rendering, and stereolithographic editing, it is now possible and inexpensive to rapidly produce detailed skeletal and soft tissue structures from X-ray CT data. Even in the early stages of development, the anatomical models produced by three-dimensional printing appeal to both educators and researchers who can utilize the technology to improve visualization proficiency. (3, 4) The real benefits of this method result from the tangible experience a researcher can have with data that cannot be adequately conveyed through a computer screen. The translation of pre-clinical 3D data to a physical object that is an exact copy of the test subject is a powerful tool for visualization and communication, especially for relating imaging research to students, or those in other fields. Here, we provide a detailed method for printing plastic models of bone and organ structures derived from X-ray CT scans utilizing an Albira X-ray CT system in conjunction with PMOD, ImageJ, Meshlab, Netfabb, and ReplicatorG software packages.

  16. 3D X-rays application for precision measurement of the cell structure of extruded polystyrene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, J. Y.; Kim, K. Y.; Shin, H. S.; Yeom, S.; Lee, S. E.

    2015-12-01

    While the thermal performance of existing insulation materials have been determined by blister gases, the thermal performance of future insulation materials will be dependent on the cell size and independent foam content as we use eco-friendly blister gases with a higher thermal conductivity. However, with the current technology we are only able to guess the whole cell size and independent foam content through SEM applied 2D fragmentary scanning but are still far from the level of accurate cell structure data extraction. Under this situation, we utilized X-ray CT scanned 3D images to identify and shape the cell structure and proposed a method of inferring the whole distribution and independent foam content as accurately as possible. According to X-ray CT scanning images and SEM images, the shape was similar but according to tracer applied CT scanning images, the cell size distribution was 380∼400 pm within the range of the general insulation diameter distribution which had the highest reliability. As for extrusion foaming polystyrene, we need additional image processing to identify the independent foam content as its density is too low. So, it is recommended to raise the 3D cell structure completeness of XPS by improving the scanning accuracy.

  17. 3D Imaging of Transition Metals in the Zebrafish Embryo by X-ray Fluorescence Microtomography

    PubMed Central

    Bourassa, Daisy; Gleber, Sophie-Charlotte; Vogt, Stefan; Yi, Hong; Will, Fabian; Richter, Heiko; Shin, Chong Hyun; Fahrni, Christoph J.

    2014-01-01

    Synchrotron X-ray fluorescence (SXRF) microtomography has emerged as a powerful technique for the 3D visualization of the elemental distribution in biological samples. The mechanical stability, both of the instrument and the specimen, is paramount when acquiring tomographic projection series. By combining the progressive lowering of temperature method (PLT) with femtosecond laser sectioning, we were able to embed, excise, and preserve a zebrafish embryo at 24 hours post fertilization in an X-ray compatible, transparent resin for tomographic elemental imaging. Based on a data set comprised of 60 projections, acquired with a step size of 2 μm during 100 hours of beam time, we reconstructed the 3D distribution of zinc, iron, and copper using the iterative maximum likelihood expectation maximization (MLEM) reconstruction algorithm. The volumetric elemental maps, which entail over 124 million individual voxels for each transition metal, revealed distinct elemental distributions that could be correlated with characteristic anatomical features at this stage of embryonic development. PMID:24992831

  18. TU-F-BRF-04: Registration of 3D Transesophageal Echocardiography and X-Ray Fluoroscopy Using An Inverse Geometry X-Ray System

    SciTech Connect

    Speidel, M; Hatt, C; Tomkowiak, M; Raval, A; Funk, T

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a method for the fusion of 3D echocardiography and Scanning-Beam Digital X-ray (SBDX) fluoroscopy to assist with catheter device and soft tissue visualization during interventional procedures. Methods: SBDX is a technology for low-dose inverse geometry x-ray fluoroscopy that performs digital tomosynthesis at multiple planes in real time. In this study, transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) images were fused with SBDX images by estimating the 3D position and orientation (the “pose”) of the TEE probe within the x-ray coordinate system and then spatially transforming the TEE image data to match this pose. An initial pose estimate was obtained through tomosynthesis-based 3D localization of points along the probe perimeter. Position and angle estimates were then iteratively refined by comparing simulated projections of a 3D probe model against SBDX x-ray images. Algorithm performance was quantified by imaging a TEE probe in different known orientations and locations within the x-ray field (0-30 degree tilt angle, up to 50 mm translation). Fused 3D TEE/SBDX imaging was demonstrated by imaging a tissue-mimicking polyvinyl alcohol cylindrical cavity as a catheter was navigated along the cavity axis. Results: Detected changes in probe tilt angle agreed with the known changes to within 1.2 degrees. For a 50 mm translation along the source-detector axis, the detected translation was 50.3 mm. Errors for in-plane translations ranged from 0.1 to 0.9 mm. In a fused 3D TEE/SBDX display, the catheter device was well visualized and coincident with the device shadow in the TEE images. The TEE images portrayed phantom boundaries that were not evident under x-ray. Conclusion: Registration of soft tissue anatomy derived from TEE imaging and device imaging from SBDX x-ray fluoroscopy is feasible. The simultaneous 3D visualization of these two modalities may be useful in interventional procedures involving the navigation of devices to soft tissue anatomy.

  19. Development of a physical 3D anthropomorphic breast phantom

    SciTech Connect

    Carton, Ann-Katherine; Bakic, Predrag; Ullberg, Christer; Derand, Helen; Maidment, Andrew D. A.

    2011-02-15

    Purpose: Develop a technique to fabricate a 3D anthropomorphic breast phantom with known ground truth for image quality assessment of 2D and 3D breast x-ray imaging systems. Methods: The phantom design is based on an existing computer model that can generate breast voxel phantoms of varying composition, size, and shape. The physical phantom is produced in two steps. First, the portion of the voxel phantom consisting of the glandular tissue, skin, and Cooper's ligaments is separated into sections. These sections are then fabricated by high-resolution rapid prototyping using a single material with 50% glandular equivalence. The remaining adipose compartments are then filled using an epoxy-based resin (EBR) with 100% adipose equivalence. The phantom sections are stacked to form the physical anthropomorphic phantom. Results: The authors fabricated a prototype phantom corresponding to a 450 ml breast with 45% dense tissue, deformed to a 5 cm compressed thickness. Both the rapid prototype (RP) and EBR phantom materials are radiographically uniform. The coefficient of variation (CoV) of the relative attenuation between RP and EBR phantom samples was <1% and the CoV of the signal intensity within RP and EBR phantom samples was <1.5% on average. Digital mammography and reconstructed digital breast tomosynthesis images of the authors' phantom were reviewed by two radiologists; they reported that the images are similar in appearance to clinical images, noting there are still artifacts from air bubbles in the EBR. Conclusions: The authors have developed a technique to produce 3D anthropomorphic breast phantoms with known ground truth, yielding highly realistic x-ray images. Such phantoms may serve both qualitative and quantitative performance assessments for 2D and 3D breast x-ray imaging systems.

  20. Phase Tomography Reconstructed by 3D TIE in Hard X-ray Microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Yin, G.-C.; Chen, F.-R.; Pyun, Ahram; Je, Jung Ho; Hwu, Yeukuang; Liang, Keng S.

    2007-01-19

    X-ray phase tomography and phase imaging are promising ways of investigation on low Z material. A polymer blend of PE/PS sample was used to test the 3D phase retrieval method in the parallel beam illuminated microscope. Because the polymer sample is thick, the phase retardation is quite mixed and the image can not be distinguished when the 2D transport intensity equation (TIE) is applied. In this study, we have provided a different approach for solving the phase in three dimensions for thick sample. Our method involves integration of 3D TIE/Fourier slice theorem for solving thick phase sample. In our experiment, eight sets of de-focal series image data sets were recorded covering the angular range of 0 to 180 degree. Only three set of image cubes were used in 3D TIE equation for solving the phase tomography. The phase contrast of the polymer blend in 3D is obviously enhanced, and the two different groups of polymer blend can be distinguished in the phase tomography.

  1. 3D-printing of undisturbed soil imaged by X-ray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacher, Matthias; Koestel, John; Schwen, Andreas

    2014-05-01

    The unique pore structures in Soils are altered easily by water flow. Each sample has a different morphology and the results of repetitions vary as well. Soil macropores in 3D-printed durable material avoid erosion and have a known morphology. Therefore potential and limitations of reproducing an undisturbed soil sample by 3D-printing was evaluated. We scanned an undisturbed soil column of Ultuna clay soil with a diameter of 7 cm by micro X-ray computer tomography at a resolution of 51 micron. A subsample cube of 2.03 cm length with connected macropores was cut out from this 3D-image and printed in five different materials by a 3D-printing service provider. The materials were ABS, Alumide, High Detail Resin, Polyamide and Prime Grey. The five print-outs of the subsample were tested on their hydraulic conductivity by using the falling head method. The hydrophobicity was tested by an adapted sessile drop method. To determine the morphology of the print-outs and compare it to the real soil also the print-outs were scanned by X-ray. The images were analysed with the open source program ImageJ. The five 3D-image print-outs copied from the subsample of the soil column were compared by means of their macropore network connectivity, porosity, surface volume, tortuosity and skeleton. The comparison of pore morphology between the real soil and the print-outs showed that Polyamide reproduced the soil macropore structure best while Alumide print-out was the least detailed. Only the largest macropore was represented in all five print-outs. Printing residual material or printing aid material remained in and clogged the pores of all print-out materials apart from Prime Grey. Therefore infiltration was blocked in these print-outs and the materials are not suitable even though the 3D-printed pore shapes were well reproduced. All of the investigated materials were insoluble. The sessile drop method showed angles between 53 and 85 degrees. Prime Grey had the fastest flow rate; the

  2. Monte Carlo simulation of x-ray scatter based on patient model from digital breast tomosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bob; Wu, Tao; Moore, Richard H.; Kopans, Daniel B.

    2006-03-01

    We are developing a breast specific scatter correction method for digital beast tomosynthesis (DBT). The 3D breast volume was initially reconstructed from 15 projection images acquired from a GE prototype tomosynthesis system without correction of scatter. The voxel values were mapped to the tissue compositions using various segmentation schemes. This voxelized digital breast model was entered into a Monte Carlo package simulating the prototype tomosynthesis system. One billion photons were generated from the x-ray source for each projection in the simulation and images of scattered photons were obtained. A primary only projection image was then produced by subtracting the scatter image from the corresponding original projection image which contains contributions from the both primary photons and scatter photons. The scatter free projection images were then used to reconstruct the 3D breast using the same algorithm. Compared with the uncorrected 3D image, the x-ray attenuation coefficients represented by the scatter-corrected 3D image are closer to those derived from the measurement data.

  3. Accurate 3D kinematic measurement of temporomandibular joint using X-ray fluoroscopic images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazaki, Takaharu; Matsumoto, Akiko; Sugamoto, Kazuomi; Matsumoto, Ken; Kakimoto, Naoya; Yura, Yoshiaki

    2014-04-01

    Accurate measurement and analysis of 3D kinematics of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is very important for assisting clinical diagnosis and treatment of prosthodontics and orthodontics, and oral surgery. This study presents a new 3D kinematic measurement technique of the TMJ using X-ray fluoroscopic images, which can easily obtain the TMJ kinematic data in natural motion. In vivo kinematics of the TMJ (maxilla and mandibular bone) is determined using a feature-based 2D/3D registration, which uses beads silhouette on fluoroscopic images and 3D surface bone models with beads. The 3D surface models of maxilla and mandibular bone with beads were created from CT scans data of the subject using the mouthpiece with the seven strategically placed beads. In order to validate the accuracy of pose estimation for the maxilla and mandibular bone, computer simulation test was performed using five patterns of synthetic tantalum beads silhouette images. In the clinical applications, dynamic movement during jaw opening and closing was conducted, and the relative pose of the mandibular bone with respect to the maxilla bone was determined. The results of computer simulation test showed that the root mean square errors were sufficiently smaller than 1.0 mm and 1.0 degree. In the results of clinical application, during jaw opening from 0.0 to 36.8 degree of rotation, mandibular condyle exhibited 19.8 mm of anterior sliding relative to maxillary articular fossa, and these measurement values were clinically similar to the previous reports. Consequently, present technique was thought to be suitable for the 3D TMJ kinematic analysis.

  4. Registration of 2D x-ray images to 3D MRI by generating pseudo-CT data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Bom, M. J.; Pluim, J. P. W.; Gounis, M. J.; van de Kraats, E. B.; Sprinkhuizen, S. M.; Timmer, J.; Homan, R.; Bartels, L. W.

    2011-02-01

    Spatial and soft tissue information provided by magnetic resonance imaging can be very valuable during image-guided procedures, where usually only real-time two-dimensional (2D) x-ray images are available. Registration of 2D x-ray images to three-dimensional (3D) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data, acquired prior to the procedure, can provide optimal information to guide the procedure. However, registering x-ray images to MRI data is not a trivial task because of their fundamental difference in tissue contrast. This paper presents a technique that generates pseudo-computed tomography (CT) data from multi-spectral MRI acquisitions which is sufficiently similar to real CT data to enable registration of x-ray to MRI with comparable accuracy as registration of x-ray to CT. The method is based on a k-nearest-neighbors (kNN)-regression strategy which labels voxels of MRI data with CT Hounsfield Units. The regression method uses multi-spectral MRI intensities and intensity gradients as features to discriminate between various tissue types. The efficacy of using pseudo-CT data for registration of x-ray to MRI was tested on ex vivo animal data. 2D-3D registration experiments using CT and pseudo-CT data of multiple subjects were performed with a commonly used 2D-3D registration algorithm. On average, the median target registration error for registration of two x-ray images to MRI data was approximately 1 mm larger than for x-ray to CT registration. The authors have shown that pseudo-CT data generated from multi-spectral MRI facilitate registration of MRI to x-ray images. From the experiments it could be concluded that the accuracy achieved was comparable to that of registering x-ray images to CT data.

  5. X-ray imaging and 3D reconstruction of in-flight exploding foil initiator flyers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willey, T. M.; Champley, K.; Hodgin, R.; Lauderbach, L.; Bagge-Hansen, M.; May, C.; Sanchez, N.; Jensen, B. J.; Iverson, A.; van Buuren, T.

    2016-06-01

    Exploding foil initiators (EFIs), also known as slapper initiators or detonators, offer clear safety and timing advantages over other means of initiating detonation in high explosives. This work outlines a new capability for imaging and reconstructing three-dimensional images of operating EFIs. Flyer size and intended velocity were chosen based on parameters of the imaging system. The EFI metal plasma and plastic flyer traveling at 2.5 km/s were imaged with short ˜80 ps pulses spaced 153.4 ns apart. A four-camera system acquired 4 images from successive x-ray pulses from each shot. The first frame was prior to bridge burst, the 2nd images the flyer about 0.16 mm above the surface but edges of the foil and/or flyer are still attached to the substrate. The 3rd frame captures the flyer in flight, while the 4th shows a completely detached flyer in a position that is typically beyond where slappers strike initiating explosives. Multiple acquisitions at different incident angles and advanced computed tomography reconstruction algorithms were used to produce a 3-dimensional image of the flyer at 0.16 and 0.53 mm above the surface. Both the x-ray images and the 3D reconstruction show a strong anisotropy in the shape of the flyer and underlying foil parallel vs. perpendicular to the initiating current and electrical contacts. These results provide detailed flyer morphology during the operation of the EFI.

  6. Multi-contrast 3D X-ray imaging of porous and composite materials

    SciTech Connect

    Sarapata, Adrian; Herzen, Julia; Ruiz-Yaniz, Maite; Zanette, Irene; Rack, Alexander; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2015-04-13

    Grating-based X-ray computed tomography allows for simultaneous and nondestructive determination of the full X-ray complex index of refraction and the scattering coefficient distribution inside an object in three dimensions. Its multi-contrast capabilities combined with a high resolution of a few micrometers make it a suitable tool for assessing multiple phases inside porous and composite materials such as concrete. Here, we present quantitative results of a proof-of-principle experiment performed on a concrete sample. Thanks to the complementarity of the contrast channels, more concrete phases could be distinguished than in conventional attenuation-based imaging. The phase-contrast reconstruction shows high contrast between the hardened cement paste and the aggregates and thus allows easy 3D segmentation. Thanks to the dark-field image, micro-cracks inside the coarse aggregates are visible. We believe that these results are extremely interesting in the field of porous and composite materials studies because of unique information provided by grating interferometry in a non-destructive way.

  7. 3-D X-ray tomography of diamondiferous mantle eclogite xenoliths, Siberia: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howarth, Geoffrey H.; Sobolev, Nikolay V.; Pernet-Fisher, John F.; Ketcham, Richard A.; Maisano, Jessica A.; Pokhilenko, Lyudmila N.; Taylor, Dawn; Taylor, Lawrence A.

    2015-04-01

    -systems'. Diamonds observed completely enclosed in garnets suggest an early diamond-forming event prior to major re-crystallization and eclogite formation during subduction. The occurrence of diamond in association with embayed garnets suggests that diamond grew at the expense of the hosting silicate protolith. In addition, the spatial relationships of diamonds with metasomatic pathways, which are generally interpreted to result from late-stage proto-kimberlitic fluid percolation, indicate a period of diamond growth occurring close to, but prior to, the time of kimberlite emplacement. Furthermore, the paragenesis of sulfides within eclogite xenoliths are described using 3-D models for entire xenoliths volumes, providing important constraints of the timing of sulfide mobilization within the mantle. Three-D animations created using X-ray tomography data for ten of the xenoliths can be viewed at the following link: http://eps.utk.edu/faculty/taylor/tomography.php

  8. X-Ray Nanofocus CT: Visualising Of Internal 3D-Structures With Submicrometer Resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinekoetter, Christian

    2008-09-01

    High-resolution X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) allows the visualization and failure analysis of the internal micro structure of objects—even if they have complicated 3D-structures where 2D X-ray microscopy would give unclear information. During the past several years, computed tomography has progressed to higher resolution and quicker reconstruction of the 3D-volume. Most recently it even allows a three-dimensional look into the inside of materials with submicron resolution. With the use of nanofocus® tube technology, nanoCT®-systems are pushing forward into application fields that were exclusive to high cost and rare available synchrotron techniques. The study was performed with the new nanotom, a very compact laboratory system which allows the analysis of samples up to 120 mm in diameter and weighing up to 1 kg with exceptional voxel-resolution down to <500 nm (<0.5 microns). It is the first 180 kV nanofocus® computed tomography system in the world which is tailored specifically to the highest-resolution applications in the fields of material science, micro electronics, geology and biology. Therefore it is particularly suitable for nanoCT-examinations e.g. of synthetic materials, metals, ceramics, composite materials, mineral and organic samples. There are a few physical effects influencing the CT quality, such as beam-hardening within the sample or ring-artefacts, which can not be completely avoided. To optimize the quality of high resolution 3D volumes, the nanotom® includes a variety of effective software tools to reduce ring-artefacts and correct beam hardenings or drift effects which occurred during data acquisition. The resulting CT volume data set can be displayed in various ways, for example by virtual slicing and sectional views in any direction of the volume. By the fact that this requires only a mouse click, this technique will substitute destructive mechanical slicing and cutting in many applications. The initial CT results obtained with the

  9. Local ISM 3D Distribution and Soft X-ray Background Inferences for Nearby Hot Gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Puspitarini, L.; Lallement, R.; Snowden, Steven L.; Vergely, J.-L.; Snowden, S.

    2014-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) interstellar medium (ISM) maps can be used to locate not only interstellar (IS) clouds, but also IS bubbles between the clouds that are blown by stellar winds and supernovae, and are filled by hot gas. To demonstrate this, and to derive a clearer picture of the local ISM, we compare our recent 3D IS dust distribution maps to the ROSAT diffuse Xray background maps after removal of heliospheric emission. In the Galactic plane, there is a good correspondence between the locations and extents of the mapped nearby cavities and the soft (0.25 keV) background emission distribution, showing that most of these nearby cavities contribute to this soft X-ray emission. Assuming a constant dust to gas ratio and homogeneous 106 K hot gas filling the cavities, we modeled in a simple way the 0.25 keV surface brightness along the Galactic plane as seen from the Sun, taking into account the absorption by the mapped clouds. The data-model comparison favors the existence of hot gas in the solar neighborhood, the so-called Local Bubble (LB). The inferred mean pressure in the local cavities is found to be approx.9,400/cu cm K, in agreement with previous studies, providing a validation test for the method. On the other hand, the model overestimates the emission from the huge cavities located in the third quadrant. Using CaII absorption data, we show that the dust to CaII ratio is very small in those regions, implying the presence of a large quantity of lower temperature (non-X-ray emitting) ionized gas and as a consequence a reduction of the volume filled by hot gas, explaining at least part of the discrepancy. In the meridian plane, the two main brightness enhancements coincide well with the LB's most elongated parts and chimneys connecting the LB to the halo, but no particular nearby cavity is found towards the enhancement in the direction of the bright North Polar Spur (NPS) at high latitude. We searched in the 3D maps for the source regions of the higher energy

  10. Enhanced quantification for 3D SEM-EDS: using the full set of available X-ray lines.

    PubMed

    Burdet, Pierre; Croxall, S A; Midgley, P A

    2015-01-01

    An enhanced method to quantify energy dispersive spectra recorded in 3D with a scanning electron microscope (3D SEM-EDS) has been previously demonstrated. This paper presents an extension of this method using all the available X-ray lines generated by the beam. The extended method benefits from using high energy lines, that are more accurately quantified, and from using soft X-rays that are highly absorbed and thus more surface sensitive. The data used to assess the method are acquired with a dual beam FIB/SEM investigating a multi-element Ni-based superalloy. A high accelerating voltage, needed to excite the highest energy X-ray line, results in two available X-ray lines for several elements. The method shows an improved compositional quantification as well as an improved spatial resolution. PMID:25461593

  11. Enhanced quantification for 3D SEM–EDS: Using the full set of available X-ray lines

    PubMed Central

    Burdet, Pierre; Croxall, S.A.; Midgley, P.A.

    2015-01-01

    An enhanced method to quantify energy dispersive spectra recorded in 3D with a scanning electron microscope (3D SEM–EDS) has been previously demonstrated. This paper presents an extension of this method using all the available X-ray lines generated by the beam. The extended method benefits from using high energy lines, that are more accurately quantified, and from using soft X-rays that are highly absorbed and thus more surface sensitive. The data used to assess the method are acquired with a dual beam FIB/SEM investigating a multi-element Ni-based superalloy. A high accelerating voltage, needed to excite the highest energy X-ray line, results in two available X-ray lines for several elements. The method shows an improved compositional quantification as well as an improved spatial resolution. PMID:25461593

  12. Simulations Of 3D MHD Jets: The Effects Of ICM Weather And AGN History On X-ray Cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendygral, Peter; Jones, T. W.; Dolag, K.

    2011-01-01

    The powerful jets from AGN produce low density bubbles in the ICM of the host galaxy cluster that are observed as X-ray cavities. The morphology of X-ray cavities is influenced by factors such as AGN history and ICM weather. We present 3D magnetohydrodynamical (MHD) simulations of hypersonic AGN jets in realistic cluster environments that explore the relationship between these factors and cavity properties. We will also discuss the consequences on observations of X-ray cavities with synthetic observations of these simulations. This work is supported by the NSF and by the University of Minnesota Supercomputing Institute.

  13. 3D polymer gel dosimetry and Geant4 Monte Carlo characterization of novel needle based X-ray source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.; Sozontov, E.; Safronov, V.; Gutman, G.; Strumban, E.; Jiang, Q.; Li, S.

    2010-11-01

    In the recent years, there have been a few attempts to develop a low energy x-ray radiation sources alternative to conventional radioisotopes used in brachytherapy. So far, all efforts have been centered around the intent to design an interstitial miniaturized x-ray tube. Though direct irradiation of tumors looks very promising, the known insertable miniature x-ray tubes have many limitations: (a) difficulties with focusing and steering the electron beam to the target; (b)necessity to cool the target to increase x-ray production efficiency; (c)impracticability to reduce the diameter of the miniaturized x-ray tube below 4mm (the requirement to decrease the diameter of the x-ray tube and the need to have a cooling system for the target have are mutually exclusive); (c) significant limitations in changing shape and energy of the emitted radiation. The specific aim of this study is to demonstrate the feasibility of a new concept for an insertable low-energy needle x-ray device based on simulation with Geant4 Monte Carlo code and to measure the dose rate distribution for low energy (17.5 keV) x-ray radiation with the 3D polymer gel dosimetry.

  14. Dosimetry in x-ray-based breast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dance, David R.; Sechopoulos, Ioannis

    2016-10-01

    The estimation of the mean glandular dose to the breast (MGD) for x-ray based imaging modalities forms an essential part of quality control and is needed for risk estimation and for system design and optimisation. This review considers the development of methods for estimating the MGD for mammography, digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) and dedicated breast CT (DBCT). Almost all of the methodology used employs Monte Carlo calculated conversion factors to relate the measurable quantity, generally the incident air kerma, to the MGD. After a review of the size and composition of the female breast, the various mathematical models used are discussed, with particular emphasis on models for mammography. These range from simple geometrical shapes, to the more recent complex models based on patient DBCT examinations. The possibility of patient-specific dose estimates is considered as well as special diagnostic views and the effect of breast implants. Calculations using the complex models show that the MGD for mammography is overestimated by about 30% when the simple models are used. The design and uses of breast-simulating test phantoms for measuring incident air kerma are outlined and comparisons made between patient and phantom-based dose estimates. The most widely used national and international dosimetry protocols for mammography are based on different simple geometrical models of the breast, and harmonisation of these protocols using more complex breast models is desirable.

  15. X-ray imaging and 3D reconstruction of in-flight exploding foil initiator flyers

    DOE PAGES

    Willey, T. M.; Champley, K.; Hodgin, R.; Lauderbach, L.; Bagge-Hansen, M.; May, C.; Sanchez, N.; Jensen, B. J.; Iverson, A.; van Buuren, T.

    2016-06-17

    Exploding foil initiators (EFIs), also known as slapper initiators or detonators, offer clear safety and timing advantages over other means of initiating detonation in high explosives. The work described here outlines a new capability for imaging and reconstructing three-dimensional images of operating EFIs. Flyer size and intended velocity were chosen based on parameters of the imaging system. The EFI metal plasma and plastic flyer traveling at 2.5 km/s were imaged with short ~80 ps pulses spaced 153.4 ns apart. A four-camera system acquired 4 images from successive x-ray pulses from each shot. The first frame was prior to bridge burst,more » the 2nd images the flyer about 0.16 mm above the surface but edges of the foil and/or flyer are still attached to the substrate. The 3rd frame captures the flyer in flight, while the 4th shows a completely detached flyer in a position that is typically beyond where slappers strike initiating explosives. Multiple acquisitions at different incident angles and advanced computed tomography reconstruction algorithms were used to produce a 3-dimensional image of the flyer at 0.16 and 0.53 mm above the surface. Both the x-ray images and the 3D reconstruction show a strong anisotropy in the shape of the flyer and underlying foil parallel vs. perpendicular to the initiating current and electrical contacts. These results provide detailed flyer morphology during the operation of the EFI.« less

  16. Moving-Article X-Ray Imaging System and Method for 3-D Image Generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fernandez, Kenneth R. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    An x-ray imaging system and method for a moving article are provided for an article moved along a linear direction of travel while the article is exposed to non-overlapping x-ray beams. A plurality of parallel linear sensor arrays are disposed in the x-ray beams after they pass through the article. More specifically, a first half of the plurality are disposed in a first of the x-ray beams while a second half of the plurality are disposed in a second of the x-ray beams. Each of the parallel linear sensor arrays is oriented perpendicular to the linear direction of travel. Each of the parallel linear sensor arrays in the first half is matched to a corresponding one of the parallel linear sensor arrays in the second half in terms of an angular position in the first of the x-ray beams and the second of the x-ray beams, respectively.

  17. Visualising, segmenting and analysing heterogenous glacigenic sediments using 3D x-ray CT.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, Simon; Diggens, Lucy; Groves, John; O'Sullivan, Catherine; Marsland, Rhona

    2015-04-01

    Whilst there has been significant application of 3D x-ray CT to geological contexts, much of this work has focused on examining properties such as porosity, which are important in reservoir assessment and hydrological evaluations. There has been considerably less attention given to the analysis of the properties of sediments themselves. One particular challenge in CT analysis is to effectively observe and discriminate the relationships between the skeleton and matrix of a sediment. This is particularly challenging in glacial sediments, which comprise an admixture of particles of a wide range of size, morphology and composition within a variably-consolidated sediment body. A key sedimentological component of glacial sediments is their fabric properties. Till fabric data has long been applied to the analysis of the coupling between glaciers and their deformable substrates. This work has typically focused on identifying former ice-flow directions, processes of till deformation and emplacement, and such data is often used to reconcile the sedimentary evidence of former glaciation with the predicted glacier and ice-sheet dynamics derived from numerical models. The collection and interpretation of till fabric data has received significant criticism in recent years, with issues such as low sample populations (typically ~50 grains per sample), small-scale spatial variation in till fabric and operator bias during data collection, all of which compromise the reliability of macro-scale till fabric analysis. Recent studies of micro-scale till fabrics have substantially added to our understanding, and suggest there is systematic variation in particle fabric as a function of particle size. However, these findings are compromised by the 2D nature of the samples (derived from thin sections) capturing only apparent orientations of particles, and are again limited to relatively small datasets. As such, there are fundamental limitations in the quality and application of till fabric

  18. Analytic 3D imaging of mammalian nucleus at nanoscale using coherent x-rays and optical fluorescence microscopy.

    PubMed

    Song, Changyong; Takagi, Masatoshi; Park, Jaehyun; Xu, Rui; Gallagher-Jones, Marcus; Imamoto, Naoko; Ishikawa, Tetsuya

    2014-09-01

    Despite the notable progress that has been made with nano-bio imaging probes, quantitative nanoscale imaging of multistructured specimens such as mammalian cells remains challenging due to their inherent structural complexity. Here, we successfully performed three-dimensional (3D) imaging of mammalian nuclei by combining coherent x-ray diffraction microscopy, explicitly visualizing nuclear substructures at several tens of nanometer resolution, and optical fluorescence microscopy, cross confirming the substructures with immunostaining. This demonstrates the successful application of coherent x-rays to obtain the 3D ultrastructure of mammalian nuclei and establishes a solid route to nanoscale imaging of complex specimens.

  19. Sloped irradiation techniques in deep x-ray lithography for 3D shaping of microstructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feiertag, Gregor; Ehrfeld, Wolfgang; Lehr, Heinz; Schmidt, Martin

    1997-07-01

    Deep x-ray lithography (DXRL) makes use of synchrotron radiation (SR) to transfer an absorber pattern from a mask into a thick resist layer. For most applications the direction of the SR beam is perpendicular to the mask and the resist plane. Subsequent replication techniques, e.g. electroforming, moulding or hot embossing, convert the resist relief obtained after development into micromechanical, microfluidic or micro- optical elements made from metals, polymers or ceramic materials. This process sequence is well known as the LIGA technique. The normal shadow printing process is complemented and enhanced by advanced techniques, e.g. by tilting the mask and the resist with respect to the SR beam or aligned multiple exposures to produce step-like structures. In this paper a technology for the fabrication of multidirectional inclined microstructures applying multiple tilted DXRL will be presented. Instead of one exposure with the mask/substrate assembly perpendicular to the SR beam, irradiation is performed several times applying tilt and rotational angles of the mask/substrate assembly relative to the SR beam. A huge variety of 3-D structures can be obtained using this technique. Some possible applications will be discussed.

  20. X-ray self-emission imaging used to diagnose 3-D nonuniformities in direct-drive ICF implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, A. K.; Michel, D. T.; Craxton, R. S.; Epstein, R.; Hohenberger, M.; Mo, T.; Froula, D. H.

    2016-11-01

    As hydrodynamics codes develop to increase understanding of three-dimensional (3-D) effects in inertial confinement fusion implosions, diagnostics must adapt to evaluate their predictive accuracy. A 3-D radiation postprocessor was developed to investigate the use of soft x-ray self-emission images of an imploding target to measure the size of nonuniformities on the target surface. Synthetic self-emission images calculated from 3-D simulations showed a narrow ring of emission outside the ablation surface of the target. Nonuniformities growing in directions perpendicular to the diagnostic axis were measured through angular variations in the radius of the steepest intensity gradient on the inside of the ring and through changes in the peak x-ray intensity in the ring as a function of angle. The technique was applied to an implosion to measure large 3-D nonuniformities resulting from two dropped laser beam quads at the National Ignition Facility.

  1. Fully 3D-Integrated Pixel Detectors for X-Rays

    SciTech Connect

    Deptuch, Grzegorz W.; Gabriella, Carini; Enquist, Paul; Grybos, Pawel; Holm, Scott; Lipton, Ronald; Maj, Piotr; Patti, Robert; Siddons, David Peter; Szczygiel, Robert; Yarema, Raymond

    2016-01-01

    The vertically integrated photon imaging chip (VIPIC1) pixel detector is a stack consisting of a 500-μm-thick silicon sensor, a two-tier 34-μm-thick integrated circuit, and a host printed circuit board (PCB). The integrated circuit tiers were bonded using the direct bonding technology with copper, and each tier features 1-μm-diameter through-silicon vias that were used for connections to the sensor on one side, and to the host PCB on the other side. The 80-μm-pixel-pitch sensor was the direct bonding technology with nickel bonded to the integrated circuit. The stack was mounted on the board using Sn–Pb balls placed on a 320-μm pitch, yielding an entirely wire-bond-less structure. The analog front-end features a pulse response peaking at below 250 ns, and the power consumption per pixel is 25 μW. We successful completed the 3-D integration and have reported here. Additionally, all pixels in the matrix of 64 × 64 pixels were responding on well-bonded devices. Correct operation of the sparsified readout, allowing a single 153-ns bunch timing resolution, was confirmed in the tests on a synchrotron beam of 10-keV X-rays. An equivalent noise charge of 36.2 e- rms and a conversion gain of 69.5 μV/e- with 2.6 e- rms and 2.7 μV/e- rms pixel-to-pixel variations, respectively, were measured.

  2. 3D Ultrastructural Organization of Whole Chlamydomonas reinhardtii Cells Studied by Nanoscale Soft X-Ray Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Hummel, Eric; Guttmann, Peter; Werner, Stephan; Tarek, Basel; Schneider, Gerd; Kunz, Michael; Frangakis, Achilleas S.; Westermann, Benedikt

    2012-01-01

    The complex architecture of their structural elements and compartments is a hallmark of eukaryotic cells. The creation of high resolution models of whole cells has been limited by the relatively low resolution of conventional light microscopes and the requirement for ultrathin sections in transmission electron microscopy. We used soft x-ray tomography to study the 3D ultrastructural organization of whole cells of the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii at unprecedented spatial resolution. Intact frozen hydrated cells were imaged using the natural x-ray absorption contrast of the sample without any staining. We applied different fiducial-based and fiducial-less alignment procedures for the 3D reconstructions. The reconstructed 3D volumes of the cells show features down to 30 nm in size. The whole cell tomograms reveal ultrastructural details such as nuclear envelope membranes, thylakoids, basal apparatus, and flagellar microtubule doublets. In addition, the x-ray tomograms provide quantitative data from the cell architecture. Therefore, nanoscale soft x-ray tomography is a new valuable tool for numerous qualitative and quantitative applications in plant cell biology. PMID:23300909

  3. Stereotactic breast irradiation with kilovoltage x-ray beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garnica-Garza, H. M.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to determine, using Monte Carlo simulation and a realistic patient model, the characteristics of the resultant absorbed dose distributions when breast tumors are irradiated using small-field stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) with kilovoltage x-ray beams instead of the standard megavoltage energies currently in use. The Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI) female phantom was used to model a pair of small-field SBRT breast treatments: in one treatment the tumor at depth and another one with the tumor located close to the breast surface. Each treatment consisted of 300 circular beams aimed at the tumor from a plurality of positions. The PENELOPE Monte Carlo code was used to determine the absorbed dose distribution for each beam and subsequently an optimization algorithm determined each beam weight according to a set of prescription goals. Both kilo- and megavoltage beam treatments were modeled, the latter to be used as a reference. Cumulative dose-volume histograms for eleven structures were used to compare the kilovoltage and reference treatments. Integral dose values are also reported. Absorbed dose distributions for the target volumes as well as the organs at risk were within the parameters reported in a clinical trial for both treatments. While for the ipsilateral healthy breast tissue the megavoltage treatment does offer an advantage in terms of less volume irradiated to intermediate doses, for the contralateral structures, breast and lung, the low penetration ability of the kilovoltage treatment results in a lower maximum dose. Skin dose is higher for the kilovoltage treatment but still well within the tolerance limits reported in the clinical trial.

  4. A Bayesian approach to real-time 3D tumor localization via monoscopic x-ray imaging during treatment delivery

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Ruijiang; Fahimian, Benjamin P.; Xing, Lei

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: Monoscopic x-ray imaging with on-board kV devices is an attractive approach for real-time image guidance in modern radiation therapy such as VMAT or IMRT, but it falls short in providing reliable information along the direction of imaging x-ray. By effectively taking consideration of projection data at prior times and/or angles through a Bayesian formalism, the authors develop an algorithm for real-time and full 3D tumor localization with a single x-ray imager during treatment delivery. Methods: First, a prior probability density function is constructed using the 2D tumor locations on the projection images acquired during patient setup. Whenever an x-ray image is acquired during the treatment delivery, the corresponding 2D tumor location on the imager is used to update the likelihood function. The unresolved third dimension is obtained by maximizing the posterior probability distribution. The algorithm can also be used in a retrospective fashion when all the projection images during the treatment delivery are used for 3D localization purposes. The algorithm does not involve complex optimization of any model parameter and therefore can be used in a ''plug-and-play'' fashion. The authors validated the algorithm using (1) simulated 3D linear and elliptic motion and (2) 3D tumor motion trajectories of a lung and a pancreas patient reproduced by a physical phantom. Continuous kV images were acquired over a full gantry rotation with the Varian TrueBeam on-board imaging system. Three scenarios were considered: fluoroscopic setup, cone beam CT setup, and retrospective analysis. Results: For the simulation study, the RMS 3D localization error is 1.2 and 2.4 mm for the linear and elliptic motions, respectively. For the phantom experiments, the 3D localization error is < 1 mm on average and < 1.5 mm at 95th percentile in the lung and pancreas cases for all three scenarios. The difference in 3D localization error for different scenarios is small and is not

  5. Twin robotic x-ray system for 2D radiographic and 3D cone-beam CT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fieselmann, Andreas; Steinbrener, Jan; Jerebko, Anna K.; Voigt, Johannes M.; Scholz, Rosemarie; Ritschl, Ludwig; Mertelmeier, Thomas

    2016-03-01

    In this work, we provide an initial characterization of a novel twin robotic X-ray system. This system is equipped with two motor-driven telescopic arms carrying X-ray tube and flat-panel detector, respectively. 2D radiographs and fluoroscopic image sequences can be obtained from different viewing angles. Projection data for 3D cone-beam CT reconstruction can be acquired during simultaneous movement of the arms along dedicated scanning trajectories. We provide an initial evaluation of the 3D image quality based on phantom scans and clinical images. Furthermore, initial evaluation of patient dose is conducted. The results show that the system delivers high image quality for a range of medical applications. In particular, high spatial resolution enables adequate visualization of bone structures. This system allows 3D X-ray scanning of patients in standing and weight-bearing position. It could enable new 2D/3D imaging workflows in musculoskeletal imaging and improve diagnosis of musculoskeletal disorders.

  6. 3D-analysis of plant microstructures: advantages and limitations of synchrotron X-ray microtomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsushima, U.; Graf, W.; Zabler, S.; Manke, I.; Dawson, M.; Choinka, G.; Hilger, A.; Herppich, W. B.

    2013-01-01

    Synchrotron X-ray computer microtomography was used to analyze the microstructure of rose peduncles. Samples from three rose cultivars, differing in anatomy, were scanned to study the relation between tissue structure and peduncles mechanical strength. Additionally, chlorophyll fluorescence imaging and conventional light microscopy was applied to quantify possible irradiation-induced damage to plant physiology and tissue structure. The spatial resolution of synchrotron X-ray computer microtomography was sufficiently high to investigate the complex tissues of intact rose peduncles without the necessity of any preparation. However, synchrotron X-radiation induces two different types of damage on irradiated tissues. First, within a few hours after first X-ray exposure, there is a direct physical destruction of cell walls. In addition, a slow and delayed destruction of chlorophyll and, consequently, of photosynthetic activity occurred within hours/ days after the exposure. The results indicate that synchrotron X-ray computer microtomography is well suited for three-dimensional visualization of the microstructure of rose peduncles. However, in its current technique, synchrotron X-ray computer microtomography is not really non-destructive but induce tissue damage. Hence, this technique needs further optimization before it can be applied for time-series investigations of living plant materials

  7. Energy Dispersive X-ray Tomography for 3D Elemental Mapping of Individual Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Slater, Thomas J. A.; Lewis, Edward A.; Haigh, Sarah J.

    2016-01-01

    Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy within the scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) provides accurate elemental analysis with high spatial resolution, and is even capable of providing atomically resolved elemental maps. In this technique, a highly focused electron beam is incident upon a thin sample and the energy of emitted X-rays is measured in order to determine the atomic species of material within the beam path. This elementally sensitive spectroscopy technique can be extended to three dimensional tomographic imaging by acquiring multiple spectrum images with the sample tilted along an axis perpendicular to the electron beam direction. Elemental distributions within single nanoparticles are often important for determining their optical, catalytic and magnetic properties. Techniques such as X-ray tomography and slice and view energy dispersive X-ray mapping in the scanning electron microscope provide elementally sensitive three dimensional imaging but are typically limited to spatial resolutions of > 20 nm. Atom probe tomography provides near atomic resolution but preparing nanoparticle samples for atom probe analysis is often challenging. Thus, elementally sensitive techniques applied within the scanning transmission electron microscope are uniquely placed to study elemental distributions within nanoparticles of dimensions 10-100 nm. Here, energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy within the STEM is applied to investigate the distribution of elements in single AgAu nanoparticles. The surface segregation of both Ag and Au, at different nanoparticle compositions, has been observed. PMID:27403838

  8. 3D chemical imaging in the laboratory by hyperspectral X-ray computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Egan, C. K.; Jacques, S. D. M.; Wilson, M. D.; Veale, M. C.; Seller, P.; Beale, A. M.; Pattrick, R. A. D.; Withers, P. J.; Cernik, R. J.

    2015-01-01

    We report the development of laboratory based hyperspectral X-ray computed tomography which allows the internal elemental chemistry of an object to be reconstructed and visualised in three dimensions. The method employs a spectroscopic X-ray imaging detector with sufficient energy resolution to distinguish individual elemental absorption edges. Elemental distributions can then be made by K-edge subtraction, or alternatively by voxel-wise spectral fitting to give relative atomic concentrations. We demonstrate its application to two material systems: studying the distribution of catalyst material on porous substrates for industrial scale chemical processing; and mapping of minerals and inclusion phases inside a mineralised ore sample. The method makes use of a standard laboratory X-ray source with measurement times similar to that required for conventional computed tomography. PMID:26514938

  9. 3D chemical imaging in the laboratory by hyperspectral X-ray computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Egan, C K; Jacques, S D M; Wilson, M D; Veale, M C; Seller, P; Beale, A M; Pattrick, R A D; Withers, P J; Cernik, R J

    2015-01-01

    We report the development of laboratory based hyperspectral X-ray computed tomography which allows the internal elemental chemistry of an object to be reconstructed and visualised in three dimensions. The method employs a spectroscopic X-ray imaging detector with sufficient energy resolution to distinguish individual elemental absorption edges. Elemental distributions can then be made by K-edge subtraction, or alternatively by voxel-wise spectral fitting to give relative atomic concentrations. We demonstrate its application to two material systems: studying the distribution of catalyst material on porous substrates for industrial scale chemical processing; and mapping of minerals and inclusion phases inside a mineralised ore sample. The method makes use of a standard laboratory X-ray source with measurement times similar to that required for conventional computed tomography. PMID:26514938

  10. Modeling and Measurement of 3D Deformation of Scoliotic Spine Using 2D X-ray Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hao; Leow, Wee Kheng; Huang, Chao-Hui; Howe, Tet Sen

    Scoliosis causes deformations such as twisting and lateral bending of the spine. To correct scoliotic deformation, the extents of 3D spinal deformation need to be measured. This paper studies the modeling and measurement of scoliotic spine based on 3D curve model. Through modeling the spine as a 3D Cosserat rod, the 3D structure of a scoliotic spine can be recovered by obtaining the minimum potential energy registration of the rod to the scoliotic spine in the x-ray image. Test results show that it is possible to obtain accurate 3D reconstruction using only the landmarks in a single view, provided that appropriate boundary conditions and elastic properties are included as constraints.

  11. STXM goes 3D: digital reconstruction of focal stacks as novel approach towards confocal soft x-ray microscopy.

    PubMed

    Späth, Andreas; Scho Ll, Simon; Riess, Christian; Schmidtel, Daniel; Paradossi, Gaio; Raabe, Jo Rg; Hornegger, Joachim; Fink, Rainer H

    2014-09-01

    Fresnel zone plate based soft x-ray transmission microspectroscopy has developed into a routine technique for high-resolution elemental or chemical 2D imaging of thin film specimens. The availability of high resolution Fresnel lenses with short depth of focus offers the possibility of optical slicing (in the third dimension) by focus series with resolutions in the submicron regime. We introduce a 3D reconstruction algorithm that uses a variance-based metric to assign a focus measure as basis for volume rendering. The algorithm is applied to simulated geometries and opaque soft matter specimens thus enabling 3D visualization. These studies with z-resolution of few 100nm serve as important step towards the vision of a confocal transmission x-ray microscope.

  12. Final report of LDRD project : compact ultrabright multikilovolt x-ray sources for advanced materials studies, 3D nanoimaging, and attosecond x-ray technology.

    SciTech Connect

    Loubriel, Guillermo Manuel; Rhodes, Charles Kirkham; Mar, Alan

    2005-02-01

    Experimental evidence and corresponding theoretical analyses have led to the conclusion that the system composed of Xe hollow atom states, that produce a characteristic Xe(L) spontaneous emission spectrum at 1 {at} 2.9 {angstrom} and arise from the excitation of Xe clusters with an intense pulse of 248 nm radiation propagating in a self-trapped plasma channel, closely represents the ideal situation sought for amplification in the multikilovolt region. The key innovation that is central to all aspects of the proposed work is the controlled compression of power to the level ({approx} 10{sup 20} W/cm{sup 3}) corresponding to the maximum achieved by thermonuclear events. Furthermore, since the x-ray power that is produced appears in a coherent form, an entirely new domain of physical interaction is encountered that involves states of matter that are both highly excited and highly ordered. Moreover, these findings lead to the concept of 'photonstaging', an idea which offers the possibility of advancing the power compression by an additional factor of {approx} 10{sup 9} to {approx} 10{sup 29} W/cm{sup 3}. In this completely unexplored regime, g-ray production ({h_bar}{omega}{sub {gamma}} {approx} 1 MeV) is expected to be a leading process. A new technology for the production of very highly penetrating radiation would then be available. The Xe(L) source at {h_bar}{omega}{sub x} {approx} 4.5 keV can be applied immediately to the experimental study of many aspects of the coupling of intense femtosecond x-ray pulses to materials. In a joint collaboration, the UIC group and Sandia plan to explore the following areas. These are specifically, (1) anomalous electromagnetic coupling to solid state materials, (2) 3D nanoimaging of solid matter and hydrated biological materials (e.g. interchromosomal linkers and actin filaments in muscle), and (3) EMP generation with attosecond x-rays.

  13. Revealing the 3D internal structure of natural polymer microcomposites using X-ray ultra microtomography.

    PubMed

    Pakzad, A; Parikh, N; Heiden, P A; Yassar, R S

    2011-07-01

    Properties of composite materials are directly affected by the spatial arrangement of reinforcement and matrix. In this research, partially hydrolysed cellulose microcrystals were used to fabricate polycaprolactone microcomposites. The spatial distribution of cellulose microcrystals was characterized by a newly developed technique of X-ray ultra microscopy and microtomography. The phase and absorption contrast imaging of X-ray ultra microscopy revealed two-dimensional and three-dimensional information on CMC distribution in polymer matrices. The highest contrast and flux (signal-to-noise ratio) were obtained using vanadium foil targets with the accelerating voltage of 30 keV and beam current of >200 nA. The spatial distribution of cellulose microcrystals was correlated to the mechanical properties of the microcomposites. It was observed that heterogeneous distribution and clustering of cellulose microcrystals resulted in degradation of tensile strength and elastic modulus of composites. The utilization of X-ray ultra microscopy can open up new opportunities for composite researchers to explore the internal structure of microcomposites. X-ray ultra microscopy sample preparation is relatively simple in comparison to transmission electron microscopy and the spatial information is gathered at much larger scale.

  14. 3D nanoscale imaging of biological samples with laboratory-based soft X-ray sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dehlinger, Aurélie; Blechschmidt, Anne; Grötzsch, Daniel; Jung, Robert; Kanngießer, Birgit; Seim, Christian; Stiel, Holger

    2015-09-01

    In microscopy, where the theoretical resolution limit depends on the wavelength of the probing light, radiation in the soft X-ray regime can be used to analyze samples that cannot be resolved with visible light microscopes. In the case of soft X-ray microscopy in the water-window, the energy range of the radiation lies between the absorption edges of carbon (at 284 eV, 4.36 nm) and oxygen (543 eV, 2.34 nm). As a result, carbon-based structures, such as biological samples, posses a strong absorption, whereas e.g. water is more transparent to this radiation. Microscopy in the water-window, therefore, allows the structural investigation of aqueous samples with resolutions of a few tens of nanometers and a penetration depth of up to 10μm. The development of highly brilliant laser-produced plasma-sources has enabled the transfer of Xray microscopy, that was formerly bound to synchrotron sources, to the laboratory, which opens the access of this method to a broader scientific community. The Laboratory Transmission X-ray Microscope at the Berlin Laboratory for innovative X-ray technologies (BLiX) runs with a laser produced nitrogen plasma that emits radiation in the soft X-ray regime. The mentioned high penetration depth can be exploited to analyze biological samples in their natural state and with several projection angles. The obtained tomogram is the key to a more precise and global analysis of samples originating from various fields of life science.

  15. Image fusion of Ultrasound Computer Tomography volumes with X-ray mammograms using a biomechanical model based 2D/3D registration.

    PubMed

    Hopp, T; Duric, N; Ruiter, N V

    2015-03-01

    Ultrasound Computer Tomography (USCT) is a promising breast imaging modality under development. Comparison to a standard method like mammography is essential for further development. Due to significant differences in image dimensionality and compression state of the breast, correlating USCT images and X-ray mammograms is challenging. In this paper we present a 2D/3D registration method to improve the spatial correspondence and allow direct comparison of the images. It is based on biomechanical modeling of the breast and simulation of the mammographic compression. We investigate the effect of including patient-specific material parameters estimated automatically from USCT images. The method was systematically evaluated using numerical phantoms and in-vivo data. The average registration accuracy using the automated registration was 11.9mm. Based on the registered images a method for analysis of the diagnostic value of the USCT images was developed and initially applied to analyze sound speed and attenuation images based on X-ray mammograms as ground truth. Combining sound speed and attenuation allows differentiating lesions from surrounding tissue. Overlaying this information on mammograms, combines quantitative and morphological information for multimodal diagnosis. PMID:25456144

  16. Combined Optical and X-ray Tomosynthesis Breast Imaging1

    PubMed Central

    Selb, Juliette; Carp, Stefan A.; Boverman, Gregory; Miller, Eric L.; Brooks, Dana H.; Moore, Richard H.; Kopans, Daniel B.; Boas, David A.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To explore the optical and physiologic properties of normal and lesion-bearing breasts by using a combined optical and digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) imaging system. Materials and Methods: Institutional review board approval and patient informed consent were obtained for this HIPAA-compliant study. Combined optical and tomosynthesis imaging analysis was performed in 189 breasts from 125 subjects (mean age, 56 years ± 13 [standard deviation]), including 138 breasts with negative findings and 51 breasts with lesions. Three-dimensional (3D) maps of total hemoglobin concentration (HbT), oxygen saturation (So2), and tissue reduced scattering coefficients were interpreted by using the coregistered DBT images. Paired and unpaired t tests were performed between various tissue types to identify significant differences. Results: The estimated average bulk HbT from 138 normal breasts was 19.2 μmol/L. The corresponding mean So2 was 0.73, within the range of values in the literature. A linear correlation (R = 0.57, P < .0001) was found between HbT and the fibroglandular volume fraction derived from the 3D DBT scans. Optical reconstructions of normal breasts revealed structures corresponding to chest-wall muscle, fibroglandular, and adipose tissues in the HbT, So2, and scattering images. In 26 malignant tumors of 0.6–2.5 cm in size, HbT was significantly greater than that in the fibroglandular tissue of the same breast (P = .0062). Solid benign lesions (n = 17) and cysts (n = 8) had significantly lower HbT contrast than did the malignant lesions (P = .025 and P = .0033, respectively). Conclusion: The optical and DBT images were structurally consistent. The malignant tumors and benign lesions demonstrated different HbT and scattering contrasts, which can potentially be exploited to reduce the false-positive rate of conventional mammography and unnecessary biopsies. © RSNA, 2010 Supplemental material: http://radiology.rsna.org/lookup/suppl/doi:10.1148/radiol

  17. A 3D reconstruction method of the body envelope from biplanar X-rays: Evaluation of its accuracy and reliability.

    PubMed

    Nérot, Agathe; Choisne, Julie; Amabile, Célia; Travert, Christophe; Pillet, Hélène; Wang, Xuguang; Skalli, Wafa

    2015-12-16

    The aim of this study was to propose a novel method for reconstructing the external body envelope from the low dose biplanar X-rays of a person. The 3D body envelope was obtained by deforming a template to match the surface profiles in two X-rays images in three successive steps: global morphing to adopt the position of a person and scale the template׳s body segments, followed by a gross deformation and a fine deformation using two sets of pre-defined control points. To evaluate the method, a biplanar X-ray acquisition was obtained from head to foot for 12 volunteers in a standing posture. Up to 172 radio-opaque skin markers were attached to the body surface and used as reference positions. Each envelope was reconstructed three times by three operators. Results showed a bias lower than 7mm and a confidence interval (95%) of reproducibility lower than 6mm for all body parts, comparable to other existing methods matching a template onto stereographic photographs. The proposed method offers the possibility of reconstructing body shape in addition to the skeleton using a low dose biplanar X-rays system. PMID:26592437

  18. A 3D reconstruction method of the body envelope from biplanar X-rays: Evaluation of its accuracy and reliability.

    PubMed

    Nérot, Agathe; Choisne, Julie; Amabile, Célia; Travert, Christophe; Pillet, Hélène; Wang, Xuguang; Skalli, Wafa

    2015-12-16

    The aim of this study was to propose a novel method for reconstructing the external body envelope from the low dose biplanar X-rays of a person. The 3D body envelope was obtained by deforming a template to match the surface profiles in two X-rays images in three successive steps: global morphing to adopt the position of a person and scale the template׳s body segments, followed by a gross deformation and a fine deformation using two sets of pre-defined control points. To evaluate the method, a biplanar X-ray acquisition was obtained from head to foot for 12 volunteers in a standing posture. Up to 172 radio-opaque skin markers were attached to the body surface and used as reference positions. Each envelope was reconstructed three times by three operators. Results showed a bias lower than 7mm and a confidence interval (95%) of reproducibility lower than 6mm for all body parts, comparable to other existing methods matching a template onto stereographic photographs. The proposed method offers the possibility of reconstructing body shape in addition to the skeleton using a low dose biplanar X-rays system.

  19. Analysis of the KROTOS KFC test by coupling X-Ray image analysis and MC3D calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Brayer, C.; Charton, A.; Grishchenko, D.; Fouquart, P.; Bullado, Y.; Compagnon, F.; Correggio, P.; Cassiaut-Louis, N.; Piluso, P.

    2012-07-01

    During a hypothetical severe accident sequence in a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR), the hot molten materials (corium) issuing from the degraded reactor core may generate a steam explosion if they come in contact with water and may damage the structures and threaten the reactor integrity. The SERENA program is an international OECD project that aims at helping the understanding of this phenomenon also called Fuel Coolant Interaction (FCI) by providing data. CEA takes part in this program by performing tests in its KROTOS facility where steam explosions using prototypic corium can be triggered. Data about the different phases in the premixing are extracted from the KROTOS X-Ray radioscopy images by using KIWI software (KROTOS Image analysis of Water-corium Interaction) currently developed by CEA. The MC3D code, developed by IRSN, is a thermal-hydraulic multiphase code mainly dedicated to FCI studies. It is composed of two applications: premixing and explosion. An overall FCI calculation with MC3D requires a premixing calculation followed by an explosion calculation. The present paper proposes an alternative approach in which all the features of the premixing are extracted from the X-Ray pictures using the KIWI software and transferred to an MC3D dataset for a direct simulation of the explosion. The main hypothesis are discussed as well as the first explosion results obtained with MC3D for the KROTOS KFC test. These results are rather encouraging and are analyzed on the basis of comparisons with the experimental data. (authors)

  20. Mineral crystal alignment in mineralized fracture callus determined by 3D small-angle X-ray scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yifei; Manjubala, Inderchand; Roschger, Paul; Schell, Hanna; Duda, Georg N.; Fratzl, Peter

    2010-10-01

    Callus tissue formed during bone fracture healing is a mixture of different tissue types as revealed by histological analysis. But the structural characteristics of mineral crystals within the healing callus are not well known. Since two-dimensional (2D) scanning small-angle X-ray scattering (sSAXS) patterns showed that the size and orientation of callus crystals vary both spatially and temporally [1] and 2D electron microscopic analysis implies an anisotropic property of the callus morphology, the mineral crystals within the callus are also expected to vary in size and orientation in 3D. Three-dimensional small-angle X-ray scattering (3D SAXS), which combines 2D SAXS patterns collected at different angles of sample tilting, has been previously applied to investigate bone minerals in horse radius [2] and oim/oim mouse femur/tibia [3]. We implement a similar 3D SAXS method but with a different way of data analysis to gather information on the mineral alignment in fracture callus. With the proposed accurate yet fast assessment of 3D SAXS information, it was shown that the plate shaped mineral particles in the healing callus were aligned in groups with their predominant orientations occurring as a fiber texture.

  1. Methodology toward 3D micro X-ray fluorescence imaging using an energy dispersive charge-coupled device detector.

    PubMed

    Garrevoet, Jan; Vekemans, Bart; Tack, Pieter; De Samber, Björn; Schmitz, Sylvia; Brenker, Frank E; Falkenberg, Gerald; Vincze, Laszlo

    2014-12-01

    A new three-dimensional (3D) micro X-ray fluorescence (μXRF) methodology based on a novel 2D energy dispersive CCD detector has been developed and evaluated at the P06 beamline of the Petra-III storage ring (DESY) in Hamburg, Germany. This method is based on the illumination of the investigated sample cross-section by a horizontally focused beam (vertical sheet beam) while fluorescent X-rays are detected perpendicularly to the sheet beam by a 2D energy dispersive (ED) CCD detector allowing the collection of 2D cross-sectional elemental images of a certain depth within the sample, limited only by signal self-absorption effects. 3D elemental information is obtained by a linear scan of the sample in the horizontal direction across the vertically oriented sheet beam and combining the detected cross-sectional images into a 3D elemental distribution data set. Results of the 3D μXRF analysis of mineral inclusions in natural deep Earth diamonds are presented to illustrate this new methodology. PMID:25346101

  2. Laser-wakefield accelerators as hard x-ray sources for 3D medical imaging of human bone.

    PubMed

    Cole, J M; Wood, J C; Lopes, N C; Poder, K; Abel, R L; Alatabi, S; Bryant, J S J; Jin, A; Kneip, S; Mecseki, K; Symes, D R; Mangles, S P D; Najmudin, Z

    2015-01-01

    A bright μm-sized source of hard synchrotron x-rays (critical energy Ecrit > 30 keV) based on the betatron oscillations of laser wakefield accelerated electrons has been developed. The potential of this source for medical imaging was demonstrated by performing micro-computed tomography of a human femoral trabecular bone sample, allowing full 3D reconstruction to a resolution below 50 μm. The use of a 1 cm long wakefield accelerator means that the length of the beamline (excluding the laser) is dominated by the x-ray imaging distances rather than the electron acceleration distances. The source possesses high peak brightness, which allows each image to be recorded with a single exposure and reduces the time required for a full tomographic scan. These properties make this an interesting laboratory source for many tomographic imaging applications.

  3. The K x-ray line structures of the 3d-transition metals in warm dense plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szymańska, E.; Syrocki, Ł.; Słabkowska, K.; Polasik, M.; Rzadkiewicz, J.

    2016-09-01

    The shapes and positions of the Kα1 and Kα2 x-ray lines for 3d-transition metals can vary substantially as electrons are stripped from the outer-shells. This paper shows the detailed line shapes for nickel and zinc, obtained by calculations with a multiconfiguration Dirac-Fock method that includes Breit interaction and quantum electrodynamics corrections. The line shapes can be useful in interpreting hot, dense plasmas with energetic electrons for which the K x-ray lines are optically thin, as may be produced by pulsed power machines such as the plasma-filled rod pinch diode or the plasma focus, or in short-pulsed high power laser plasmas.

  4. Laser-wakefield accelerators as hard x-ray sources for 3D medical imaging of human bone.

    PubMed

    Cole, J M; Wood, J C; Lopes, N C; Poder, K; Abel, R L; Alatabi, S; Bryant, J S J; Jin, A; Kneip, S; Mecseki, K; Symes, D R; Mangles, S P D; Najmudin, Z

    2015-01-01

    A bright μm-sized source of hard synchrotron x-rays (critical energy Ecrit > 30 keV) based on the betatron oscillations of laser wakefield accelerated electrons has been developed. The potential of this source for medical imaging was demonstrated by performing micro-computed tomography of a human femoral trabecular bone sample, allowing full 3D reconstruction to a resolution below 50 μm. The use of a 1 cm long wakefield accelerator means that the length of the beamline (excluding the laser) is dominated by the x-ray imaging distances rather than the electron acceleration distances. The source possesses high peak brightness, which allows each image to be recorded with a single exposure and reduces the time required for a full tomographic scan. These properties make this an interesting laboratory source for many tomographic imaging applications. PMID:26283308

  5. Strain in a silicon-on-insulator nanostructure revealed by 3D x-ray Bragg ptychography.

    PubMed

    Chamard, V; Allain, M; Godard, P; Talneau, A; Patriarche, G; Burghammer, M

    2015-01-01

    Progresses in the design of well-defined electronic band structure and dedicated functionalities rely on the high control of complex architectural device nano-scaled structures. This includes the challenging accurate description of strain fields in crystalline structures, which requires non invasive and three-dimensional (3D) imaging methods. Here, we demonstrate in details how x-ray Bragg ptychography can be used to quantify in 3D a displacement field in a lithographically patterned silicon-on-insulator structure. The image of the crystalline properties, which results from the phase retrieval of a coherent intensity data set, is obtained from a well-controlled optimized process, for which all steps are detailed. These results confirm the promising perspectives of 3D Bragg ptychography for the investigation of complex nano-structured crystals in material science.

  6. Precise Animated 3-D Displays Of The Heart Constructed From X-Ray Scatter Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McInerney, J. J.; Herr, M. D.; Copenhaver, G. L.

    1986-01-01

    A technique, based upon the interrogation of x-ray scatter, has been used to construct precise animated displays of the three-dimensional surface of the heart throughout the cardiac cycle. With the selection of motion amplification, viewing orientation, beat rate, and repetitive playbacks of isolated segments of the cardiac cycle, these displays are used to directly visualize epicardial surface velocity and displacement patterns, to construct regional maps of old or new myocardial infarction, and to visualize diastolic stiffening of the ventricle associated with acute ischemia. The procedure is non-invasive. Cut-downs or injections are not required.

  7. Breast density mapping based upon system calibration, x-ray techniques, and FFDM images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Biao; Smith, Andrew P.; Jing, Zhenxue; Wu, Tao

    2007-03-01

    Clinical studies have correlated a high breast density to a women's risk of breast cancer. A breast density measurement that can quantitatively depict the volume distribution and percentage of dense tissues in breasts would be very useful for risk factor assessment of breast cancer, and might be more predictive of risks than the common but subjective and coarse 4-point BIRADS scale. This paper proposes to use a neural-network mapping to compute the breast density information based upon system calibration data, x-ray techniques, and Full Field Digital Mammography (FFDM) images. The mapping consists of four modules, namely, system calibration, generator of beam quality, generator of normalized absorption, and a multi-layer feed-forward neural network. As the core of breast density mapping, the network accepts x-ray target/filter combination, normalized x-ray absorption, pixel-wise breast thickness map, and x-ray beam quality during image acquisition as input elements, and exports a pixel-wise breast density distribution and a single breast density percentage for the imaged breast. Training and testing data sets for the design and verification of the network were formulated from calibrated x-ray beam quality, imaging data with a step wedge phantom under a variety x-ray imaging techniques, and nominal breast densities of tissue equivalent materials. The network was trained using a Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm based back-propagation learning method. Various thickness and glandular density phantom studies were performed with clinical x-ray techniques. Preliminary results showed that the neural network mapping is promising in accurately computing glandular density distribution and breast density percentage.

  8. 3D morphological measurements of dental casts with occlusal relationship using microfocus X-ray CT.

    PubMed

    Kamegawa, Masayuki; Nakamura, Masayuki; Tsutsumi, Sadami

    2008-07-01

    In the diagnosis of dental occlusion, it is necessary to quantitatively measure interocclusal contacts and transfer them to a computer model. In this aspect, three-dimensional computer models of upper and lower dental casts play a significant role. In this study, we proposed a new method to measure occlusal interaction by using a microfocus X-ray CT technique. Measurement accuracy was determined as +/-0.03 mm in comparison with a coordinate measuring machine. A superimposition procedure for two sets of three-dimensional dental cast models was also established. Using the same dental cast, the standard deviation between the two sets of models was +/-0.015 mm - which was defined as measurement precision. Between an optical laser scanner and the microfocus X-ray CT system, the standard deviation measured between the two models was +/-0.05 mm. Data were acquired when upper and lower dental casts mounted on the bite impression were scanned, and then occlusal interaction, contacts, and distance distribution between the casts were visualized by a colored map on the cast models. Within the limitations of the current study, it was successfully demonstrated that microfocus Xray CT was well poised for quantitative measurement of occlusal interaction. PMID:18833768

  9. Understanding Plasticity and Fracture in Aluminum Alloys and their Composites by 3D X-ray Synchrotron Tomography and Microdiffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hruby, Peter

    Aluminum alloys and their composites are attractive materials for applications requiring high strength-to-weight ratios and reasonable cost. Many of these applications, such as those in the aerospace industry, undergo fatigue loading. An understanding of the microstructural damage that occurs in these materials is critical in assessing their fatigue resistance. Two distinct experimental studies were performed to further the understanding of fatigue damage mechanisms in aluminum alloys and their composites, specifically fracture and plasticity. Fatigue resistance of metal matrix composites (MMCs) depends on many aspects of composite microstructure. Fatigue crack growth behavior is particularly dependent on the reinforcement characteristics and matrix microstructure. The goal of this work was to obtain a fundamental understanding of fatigue crack growth behavior in SiC particle-reinforced 2080 Al alloy composites. In situ X-ray synchrotron tomography was performed on two samples at low (R=0.1) and at high (R=0.6) R-ratios. The resulting reconstructed images were used to obtain three-dimensional (3D) rendering of the particles and fatigue crack. Behaviors of the particles and crack, as well as their interaction, were analyzed and quantified. Four-dimensional (4D) visual representations were constructed to aid in the overall understanding of damage evolution. During fatigue crack growth in ductile materials, a plastic zone is created in the region surrounding the crack tip. Knowledge of the plastic zone is important for the understanding of fatigue crack formation as well as subsequent growth behavior. The goal of this work was to quantify the 3D size and shape of the plastic zone in 7075 Al alloys. X-ray synchrotron tomography and Laue microdiffraction were used to non-destructively characterize the volume surrounding a fatigue crack tip. The precise 3D crack profile was segmented from the reconstructed tomography data. Depth-resolved Laue patterns were obtained using

  10. Rapid fusion of 2D X-ray fluoroscopy with 3D multislice CT for image-guided electrophysiology procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zagorchev, Lyubomir; Manzke, Robert; Cury, Ricardo; Reddy, Vivek Y.; Chan, Raymond C.

    2007-03-01

    Interventional cardiac electrophysiology (EP) procedures are typically performed under X-ray fluoroscopy for visualizing catheters and EP devices relative to other highly-attenuating structures such as the thoracic spine and ribs. These projections do not however contain information about soft-tissue anatomy and there is a recognized need for fusion of conventional fluoroscopy with pre-operatively acquired cardiac multislice computed tomography (MSCT) volumes. Rapid 2D-3D integration in this application would allow for real-time visualization of all catheters present within the thorax in relation to the cardiovascular anatomy visible in MSCT. We present a method for rapid fusion of 2D X-ray fluoroscopy with 3DMSCT that can facilitate EP mapping and interventional procedures by reducing the need for intra-operative contrast injections to visualize heart chambers and specialized systems to track catheters within the cardiovascular anatomy. We use hardware-accelerated ray-casting to compute digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs) from the MSCT volume and iteratively optimize the rigid-body pose of the volumetric data to maximize the similarity between the MSCT-derived DRR and the intra-operative X-ray projection data.

  11. 3D X-ray Strain Microscopy in Two-Phase Composites at Submicron Length Scale

    SciTech Connect

    Barabash, Rozaliya; Bei, Hongbin; Ice, Gene E; Gao, Yanfei; Barabash, Oleg M

    2011-01-01

    Author note: Part of this research summary is based on findings first reported in Refs. [3-5, 18]. Renewed interest in composite materials is driven by the fact that their mechanical properties can be superior to those of individual constituent phases. Interfaces between the phases are the key elements responsible for the unique micro-mechanisms of plastic deformation in composites. In this study the depth-dependent residual strain distributed in the two phases and partitioned across the composite interfaces is directly measured at submicron length-scale using X-ray microdiffraction and compared to a detailed simulation within the framework of micromechanical stress analysis. Interface strength is determined from the analysis of the so-called slip zone caused by the near-surface stress relaxation. Two examples are discussed including NiAl/Mo and Ni/Mo composites.

  12. Real-time 3-D X-ray and gamma-ray viewer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yin, L. I. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A multi-pinhole aperture lead screen forms an equal plurality of invisible mini-images having dissimilar perspectives of an X-ray and gamma-ray emitting object (ABC) onto a near-earth phosphor layer. This layer provides visible light mini-images directly into a visible light image intensifier. A viewing screen having an equal number of dissimilar perspective apertures distributed across its face in a geometric pattern identical to the lead screen, provides a viewer with a real, pseudoscopic image (A'B'C') of the object with full horizontal and vertical parallax. Alternatively, a third screen identical to viewing screen and spaced apart from a second visible light image intensifier, may be positioned between the first image intensifier and the viewing screen, thereby providing the viewer with a virtual, orthoscopic image (A"B"C") of the object (ABC) with full horizontal and vertical parallax.

  13. Mapping electronic ordering in chromium in 3D with x-ray microdiffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Ruqing

    2015-03-01

    In the antiferromagnetic state of chromium, electrons form spin-density waves and charge-density waves with wave vector along one of the lattice cubic axes; the spontaneous ordering of the electrons breaks the lattice symmetry and creates domains within a single crystal. We report the first 3-dimentional mapping of charge-density wave domains in bulk polycrystalline chromium samples using differential-aperture x-ray microdiffraction at the Advanced Photon Source. This research used resources of the Advanced Photon Source, a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science User Facility operated for the DOE Office of Science by Argonne National Laboratory under Contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357

  14. Mobile Biplane X-Ray Imaging System for Measuring 3D Dynamic Joint Motion During Overground Gait.

    PubMed

    Guan, Shanyuanye; Gray, Hans A; Keynejad, Farzad; Pandy, Marcus G

    2016-01-01

    Most X-ray fluoroscopy systems are stationary and impose restrictions on the measurement of dynamic joint motion; for example, knee-joint kinematics during gait is usually measured with the subject ambulating on a treadmill. We developed a computer-controlled, mobile, biplane, X-ray fluoroscopy system to track human body movement for high-speed imaging of 3D joint motion during overground gait. A robotic gantry mechanism translates the two X-ray units alongside the subject, tracking and imaging the joint of interest as the subject moves. The main aim of the present study was to determine the accuracy with which the mobile imaging system measures 3D knee-joint kinematics during walking. In vitro experiments were performed to measure the relative positions of the tibia and femur in an intact human cadaver knee and of the tibial and femoral components of a total knee arthroplasty (TKA) implant during simulated overground gait. Accuracy was determined by calculating mean, standard deviation and root-mean-squared errors from differences between kinematic measurements obtained using volumetric models of the bones and TKA components and reference measurements obtained from metal beads embedded in the bones. Measurement accuracy was enhanced by the ability to track and image the joint concurrently. Maximum root-mean-squared errors were 0.33 mm and 0.65° for translations and rotations of the TKA knee and 0.78 mm and 0.77° for translations and rotations of the intact knee, which are comparable to results reported for treadmill walking using stationary biplane systems. System capability for in vivo joint motion measurement was also demonstrated for overground gait.

  15. Regularization Designs for Uniform Spatial Resolution and Noise Properties in Statistical Image Reconstruction for 3D X-ray CT

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Jang Hwan; Fessler, Jeffrey A.

    2014-01-01

    Statistical image reconstruction methods for X-ray computed tomography (CT) provide improved spatial resolution and noise properties over conventional filtered back-projection (FBP) reconstruction, along with other potential advantages such as reduced patient dose and artifacts. Conventional regularized image reconstruction leads to spatially variant spatial resolution and noise characteristics because of interactions between the system models and the regularization. Previous regularization design methods aiming to solve such issues mostly rely on circulant approximations of the Fisher information matrix that are very inaccurate for undersampled geometries like short-scan cone-beam CT. This paper extends the regularization method proposed in [1] to 3D cone-beam CT by introducing a hypothetical scanning geometry that helps address the sampling properties. The proposed regularization designs were compared with the original method in [1] with both phantom simulation and clinical reconstruction in 3D axial X-ray CT. The proposed regularization methods yield improved spatial resolution or noise uniformity in statistical image reconstruction for short-scan axial cone-beam CT. PMID:25361500

  16. Efficient feature-based 2D/3D registration of transesophageal echocardiography to x-ray fluoroscopy for cardiac interventions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatt, Charles R.; Speidel, Michael A.; Raval, Amish N.

    2014-03-01

    We present a novel 2D/ 3D registration algorithm for fusion between transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) and X-ray fluoroscopy (XRF). The TEE probe is modeled as a subset of 3D gradient and intensity point features, which facilitates efficient 3D-to-2D perspective projection. A novel cost-function, based on a combination of intensity and edge features, evaluates the registration cost value without the need for time-consuming generation of digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs). Validation experiments were performed with simulations and phantom data. For simulations, in silica XRF images of a TEE probe were generated in a number of different pose configurations using a previously acquired CT image. Random misregistrations were applied and our method was used to recover the TEE probe pose and compare the result to the ground truth. Phantom experiments were performed by attaching fiducial markers externally to a TEE probe, imaging the probe with an interventional cardiac angiographic x-ray system, and comparing the pose estimated from the external markers to that estimated from the TEE probe using our algorithm. Simulations found a 3D target registration error of 1.08(1.92) mm for biplane (monoplane) geometries, while the phantom experiment found a 2D target registration error of 0.69mm. For phantom experiments, we demonstrated a monoplane tracking frame-rate of 1.38 fps. The proposed feature-based registration method is computationally efficient, resulting in near real-time, accurate image based registration between TEE and XRF.

  17. The 3D-architecture of individual free silver nanoparticles captured by X-ray scattering

    PubMed Central

    Barke, Ingo; Hartmann, Hannes; Rupp, Daniela; Flückiger, Leonie; Sauppe, Mario; Adolph, Marcus; Schorb, Sebastian; Bostedt, Christoph; Treusch, Rolf; Peltz, Christian; Bartling, Stephan; Fennel, Thomas; Meiwes-Broer, Karl-Heinz; Möller, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The diversity of nanoparticle shapes generated by condensation from gaseous matter reflects the fundamental competition between thermodynamic equilibration and the persistence of metastable configurations during growth. In the kinetically limited regime, intermediate geometries that are favoured only in early formation stages can be imprinted in the finally observed ensemble of differently structured specimens. Here we demonstrate that single-shot wide-angle scattering of femtosecond soft X-ray free-electron laser pulses allows three-dimensional characterization of the resulting metastable nanoparticle structures. For individual free silver particles, which can be considered frozen in space for the duration of photon exposure, both shape and orientation are uncovered from measured scattering images. We identify regular shapes, including species with fivefold symmetry and surprisingly large aspect ratio up to particle radii of the order of 100 nm. Our approach includes scattering effects beyond Born’s approximation and is remarkably efficient—opening up new routes in ultrafast nanophysics and free-electron laser science. PMID:25650004

  18. The 3D-architecture of individual free silver nanoparticles captured by X-ray scattering.

    PubMed

    Barke, Ingo; Hartmann, Hannes; Rupp, Daniela; Flückiger, Leonie; Sauppe, Mario; Adolph, Marcus; Schorb, Sebastian; Bostedt, Christoph; Treusch, Rolf; Peltz, Christian; Bartling, Stephan; Fennel, Thomas; Meiwes-Broer, Karl-Heinz; Möller, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The diversity of nanoparticle shapes generated by condensation from gaseous matter reflects the fundamental competition between thermodynamic equilibration and the persistence of metastable configurations during growth. In the kinetically limited regime, intermediate geometries that are favoured only in early formation stages can be imprinted in the finally observed ensemble of differently structured specimens. Here we demonstrate that single-shot wide-angle scattering of femtosecond soft X-ray free-electron laser pulses allows three-dimensional characterization of the resulting metastable nanoparticle structures. For individual free silver particles, which can be considered frozen in space for the duration of photon exposure, both shape and orientation are uncovered from measured scattering images. We identify regular shapes, including species with fivefold symmetry and surprisingly large aspect ratio up to particle radii of the order of 100 nm. Our approach includes scattering effects beyond Born's approximation and is remarkably efficient-opening up new routes in ultrafast nanophysics and free-electron laser science. PMID:25650004

  19. The 3D-architecture of individual free silver nanoparticles captured by X-ray scattering

    DOE PAGES

    Barke, Ingo; Hartmann, Hannes; Rupp, Daniela; Flückiger, Leonie; Sauppe, Mario; Adolph, Marcus; Schorb, Sebastian; Bostedt, Christoph; Treusch, Rolf; Peltz, Christian; et al

    2015-02-04

    The diversity of nanoparticle shapes generated by condensation from gaseous matter reflects the fundamental competition between thermodynamic equilibration and the persistence of metastable configurations during growth. In the kinetically limited regime, intermediate geometries that are favoured only in early formation stages can be imprinted in the finally observed ensemble of differently structured specimens. Here we demonstrate that single-shot wide-angle scattering of femtosecond soft X-ray free-electron laser pulses allows three-dimensional characterization of the resulting metastable nanoparticle structures. For individual free silver particles, which can be considered frozen in space for the duration of photon exposure, both shape and orientation are uncoveredmore » from measured scattering images. We identify regular shapes, including species with fivefold symmetry and surprisingly large aspect ratio up to particle radii of the order of 100 nm. Our approach includes scattering effects beyond Born’s approximation and is remarkably efficient—opening up new routes in ultrafast nanophysics and free-electron laser science« less

  20. The 3D-architecture of individual free silver nanoparticles captured by X-ray scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Barke, Ingo; Hartmann, Hannes; Rupp, Daniela; Flückiger, Leonie; Sauppe, Mario; Adolph, Marcus; Schorb, Sebastian; Bostedt, Christoph; Treusch, Rolf; Peltz, Christian; Bartling, Stephan; Fennel, Thomas; Meiwes-Broer, Karl-Heinz; Möller, Thomas

    2015-02-04

    The diversity of nanoparticle shapes generated by condensation from gaseous matter reflects the fundamental competition between thermodynamic equilibration and the persistence of metastable configurations during growth. In the kinetically limited regime, intermediate geometries that are favoured only in early formation stages can be imprinted in the finally observed ensemble of differently structured specimens. Here we demonstrate that single-shot wide-angle scattering of femtosecond soft X-ray free-electron laser pulses allows three-dimensional characterization of the resulting metastable nanoparticle structures. For individual free silver particles, which can be considered frozen in space for the duration of photon exposure, both shape and orientation are uncovered from measured scattering images. We identify regular shapes, including species with fivefold symmetry and surprisingly large aspect ratio up to particle radii of the order of 100 nm. Our approach includes scattering effects beyond Born’s approximation and is remarkably efficient—opening up new routes in ultrafast nanophysics and free-electron laser science

  1. Quantitative 3D petrography using X-ray tomography 2: Combining information at various resolutions

    SciTech Connect

    Pamukcu, Ayla S.; Gualda, Guilherme A.R.

    2010-12-02

    X-ray tomography is a nondestructive technique that can be used to study rocks and other materials in three dimensions over a wide range of sizes. Samples that range from decimeters to micrometers in size can be analyzed, and micrometer- to centimeter-sized crystals, vesicles, and other particles can be identified and quantified. In many applications, quantification of a large spectrum of sizes is important, but this cannot be easily accomplished using a single tomogram due to a common trade-off between sample size and image resolution. This problem can be circumvented by combining tomograms acquired for a single sample at a variety of resolutions. We have successfully applied this method to obtain crystal size distributions (CSDs) for magnetite, pyroxene + biotite, and quartz + feldspar in Bishop Tuff pumice. Five cylinders of systematically varying size (1-10 mm diameter and height) were analyzed from each of five pumice clasts. Cylinder size is inversely proportional to image resolution, such that resolution ranges from 2.5 to 17 {micro}m/voxel with increasing sample size. This allows quantification of crystals 10-1000 {micro}m in size. We obtained CSDs for each phase in each sample by combining information from all resolutions, each size bin containing data from the resolution that best characterizes crystals of that size. CSDs for magnetite and pyroxene + biotite in late-erupted Bishop pumice obtained using this method are fractal, but do not seem to result from crystal fragmentation. CSDs for quartz + feldspar reveal a population of abundant crystals <35 {micro}m in size, and a population of crystals >50 {micro}m in size, which will be the focus of a separate publication.

  2. Colloid Transport in Unsaturated Porous Media: 3D Visualization Using Synchrotron X-Ray Microtomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brueck, C. L.; Meisenheimer, D.; Wildenschild, D.

    2015-12-01

    Understanding the mechanisms controlling colloid transport and deposition in the vadose zone is an important step in protecting our water resources. Not only may these particles themselves be undesirable contaminants, but they can also aid in the transport of smaller, molecular-scale contaminants by chemical attachment. In this research, we examined the influence that air-water interfaces (AWI) and air-water-solid contact lines (AWS) have on colloid deposition and mobilization in three-dimensional systems. We used x-ray microtomography to visualize the transport of hydrophobic colloids as they move through a partially saturated glass bead pack. Drainage and imbibition experiments were conducted using syringe pumps to control the flow of a colloid suspension through the porous media at 0.6 mL/hr. The high ionic strength fluid was adjusted to a pH of 9.5 and a concentration of 1.0 mol/L KI. During the drainage and imbibition, the flow was periodically halted and allowed to equilibrate before collecting the microtomography scans. Dopants were used to enhance the contrast between the four phases (water, air, beads, and colloids), including potassium iodide dissolved in the fluid, and an outer layer of silver coating the colloids. We hypothesized that AWIs and AWSs will scour and mobilize a significant percentage of colloids, and therefore reduce the concentration of colloids along the vertical profile of the column. The concentration of potassium iodide, and thus the ionic strength, necessary for adequate image segmentation was also explored in separate experiments so that the influence of ionic strength on colloid deposition and mobilization can be studied.

  3. Personalized x-ray reconstruction of the proximal femur via a non-rigid 2D-3D registration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Weimin; Zysset, Philippe; Zheng, Guoyan

    2015-03-01

    In this paper we present a new approach for a personalized X-ray reconstruction of the proximal femur via a non-rigid registration of a 3D volumetric template to 2D calibrated C-arm images. The 2D-3D registration is done with a hierarchical two-stage strategy: the global scaled rigid registration stage followed by a regularized deformable b-spline registration stage. In both stages, a set of control points with uniform spacing are placed over the domain of the 3D volumetric template and the registrations are driven by computing updated positions of these control points, which then allows to accurately register the 3D volumetric template to the reference space of the C-arm images. Comprehensive experiments on simulated images, on images of cadaveric femurs and on clinical datasets are designed and conducted to evaluate the performance of the proposed approach. Quantitative and qualitative evaluation results are given, which demonstrate the efficacy of the present approach.

  4. Data-fusion of high resolution X-ray CT, SEM and EDS for 3D and pseudo-3D chemical and structural characterization of sandstone.

    PubMed

    De Boever, Wesley; Derluyn, Hannelore; Van Loo, Denis; Van Hoorebeke, Luc; Cnudde, Veerle

    2015-07-01

    When dealing with the characterization of the structure and composition of natural stones, problems of representativeness and choice of analysis technique almost always occur. Since feature-sizes are typically spread over the nanometer to centimeter range, there is never one single technique that allows a rapid and complete characterization. Over the last few decades, high resolution X-ray CT (μ-CT) has become an invaluable tool for the 3D characterization of many materials, including natural stones. This technique has many important advantages, but there are also some limitations, including a tradeoff between resolution and sample size and a lack of chemical information. For geologists, this chemical information is of importance for the determination of minerals inside samples. We suggest a workflow for the complete chemical and structural characterization of a representative volume of a heterogeneous geological material. This workflow consists of combining information derived from CT scans at different spatial resolutions with information from scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. PMID:25939085

  5. Data-fusion of high resolution X-ray CT, SEM and EDS for 3D and pseudo-3D chemical and structural characterization of sandstone.

    PubMed

    De Boever, Wesley; Derluyn, Hannelore; Van Loo, Denis; Van Hoorebeke, Luc; Cnudde, Veerle

    2015-07-01

    When dealing with the characterization of the structure and composition of natural stones, problems of representativeness and choice of analysis technique almost always occur. Since feature-sizes are typically spread over the nanometer to centimeter range, there is never one single technique that allows a rapid and complete characterization. Over the last few decades, high resolution X-ray CT (μ-CT) has become an invaluable tool for the 3D characterization of many materials, including natural stones. This technique has many important advantages, but there are also some limitations, including a tradeoff between resolution and sample size and a lack of chemical information. For geologists, this chemical information is of importance for the determination of minerals inside samples. We suggest a workflow for the complete chemical and structural characterization of a representative volume of a heterogeneous geological material. This workflow consists of combining information derived from CT scans at different spatial resolutions with information from scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy.

  6. 3-D reconstruction of an ancient Egyptian mummy using X-ray computer tomography.

    PubMed

    Baldock, C; Hughes, S W; Whittaker, D K; Taylor, J; Davis, R; Spencer, A J; Tonge, K; Sofat, A

    1994-12-01

    Computer tomography has been used to image and reconstruct in 3-D an Egyptian mummy from the collection of the British Museum. This study of Tjentmutengebtiu, a priestess from the 22nd dynasty (945-715 BC) revealed invaluable information of a scientific, Egyptological and palaeopathological nature without mutilation and destruction of the painted cartonnage case or linen wrappings. Precise details on the removal of the brain through the nasal cavity and the viscera from the abdominal cavity were obtained. The nature and composition of the false eyes were investigated. The detailed analysis of the teeth provided a much closer approximation of age at death. The identification of materials used for the various amulets including that of the figures placed in the viscera was graphically demonstrated using this technique.

  7. 3-D reconstruction of an ancient Egyptian mummy using X-ray computer tomography.

    PubMed Central

    Baldock, C; Hughes, S W; Whittaker, D K; Taylor, J; Davis, R; Spencer, A J; Tonge, K; Sofat, A

    1994-01-01

    Computer tomography has been used to image and reconstruct in 3-D an Egyptian mummy from the collection of the British Museum. This study of Tjentmutengebtiu, a priestess from the 22nd dynasty (945-715 BC) revealed invaluable information of a scientific, Egyptological and palaeopathological nature without mutilation and destruction of the painted cartonnage case or linen wrappings. Precise details on the removal of the brain through the nasal cavity and the viscera from the abdominal cavity were obtained. The nature and composition of the false eyes were investigated. The detailed analysis of the teeth provided a much closer approximation of age at death. The identification of materials used for the various amulets including that of the figures placed in the viscera was graphically demonstrated using this technique. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3. Figure 4. Figure 5. PMID:7853321

  8. Reproducing 2D breast mammography images with 3D printed phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Matthew; Ghammraoui, Bahaa; Badal, Andreu

    2016-03-01

    Mammography is currently the standard imaging modality used to screen women for breast abnormalities and, as a result, it is a tool of great importance for the early detection of breast cancer. Physical phantoms are commonly used as surrogates of breast tissue to evaluate some aspects of the performance of mammography systems. However, most phantoms do not reproduce the anatomic heterogeneity of real breasts. New fabrication technologies, such as 3D printing, have created the opportunity to build more complex, anatomically realistic breast phantoms that could potentially assist in the evaluation of mammography systems. The primary objective of this work is to present a simple, easily reproducible methodology to design and print 3D objects that replicate the attenuation profile observed in real 2D mammograms. The secondary objective is to evaluate the capabilities and limitations of the competing 3D printing technologies, and characterize the x-ray properties of the different materials they use. Printable phantoms can be created using the open-source code introduced in this work, which processes a raw mammography image to estimate the amount of x-ray attenuation at each pixel, and outputs a triangle mesh object that encodes the observed attenuation map. The conversion from the observed pixel gray value to a column of printed material with equivalent attenuation requires certain assumptions and knowledge of multiple imaging system parameters, such as x-ray energy spectrum, source-to-object distance, compressed breast thickness, and average breast material attenuation. A detailed description of the new software, a characterization of the printed materials using x-ray spectroscopy, and an evaluation of the realism of the sample printed phantoms are presented.

  9. Stationary digital breast tomosynthesis with distributed field emission x-ray tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sprenger, F.; Calderon, X.; Gidcumb, E.; Lu, J.; Qian, X.; Spronk, D.; Tucker, A.; Yang, G.; Zhou, O.

    2011-03-01

    Tomosynthesis requires projection images from different viewing angles. Using a distributed x-ray source this can be achieved without mechanical motion of the source with the potential for faster image acquisition speed. A distributed xray tube has been designed and manufactured specifically for breast tomosynthesis. The x-ray tube consists of 31 field emission x-ray sources with an angular range of 30°. The total dose is up to 100mAs with an energy range between 27 and 45 kVp. We discuss the source geometry and results from the characterization of the first prototype. The x-ray tube uses field emission cathodes based on carbon nanotubes (CNT) as electron source. Prior to the manufacturing of the sealed x-ray tube extensive testing on the field emission cathodes has been performed to verify the requirements for commercial tomosynthesis systems in terms of emission current, focal spot size and tube lifetime.

  10. High-quality 3-D coronary artery imaging on an interventional C-arm x-ray system

    SciTech Connect

    Hansis, Eberhard; Carroll, John D.; Schaefer, Dirk; Doessel, Olaf; Grass, Michael

    2010-04-15

    Purpose: Three-dimensional (3-D) reconstruction of the coronary arteries during a cardiac catheter-based intervention can be performed from a C-arm based rotational x-ray angiography sequence. It can support the diagnosis of coronary artery disease, treatment planning, and intervention guidance. 3-D reconstruction also enables quantitative vessel analysis, including vessel dynamics from a time-series of reconstructions. Methods: The strong angular undersampling and motion effects present in gated cardiac reconstruction necessitate the development of special reconstruction methods. This contribution presents a fully automatic method for creating high-quality coronary artery reconstructions. It employs a sparseness-prior based iterative reconstruction technique in combination with projection-based motion compensation. Results: The method is tested on a dynamic software phantom, assessing reconstruction accuracy with respect to vessel radii and attenuation coefficients. Reconstructions from clinical cases are presented, displaying high contrast, sharpness, and level of detail. Conclusions: The presented method enables high-quality 3-D coronary artery imaging on an interventional C-arm system.

  11. Classification and quantification of pore shapes in sandstone reservoir rocks with 3-D X-ray micro-computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, Mayka; Halisch, Matthias; Müller, Cornelia; Peres Fernandes, Celso

    2016-02-01

    Recent years have seen a growing interest in the characterization of the pore morphologies of reservoir rocks and how the spatial organization of pore traits affects the macro behavior of rock-fluid systems. With the availability of 3-D high-resolution imaging, such as x-ray micro-computed tomography (µ-CT), the detailed quantification of particle shapes has been facilitated by progress in computer science. Here, we show how the shapes of irregular rock particles (pores) can be classified and quantified based on binary 3-D images. The methodology requires the measurement of basic 3-D particle descriptors (length, width, and thickness) and a shape classification that involves the similarity of artificial objects, which is based on main pore network detachments and 3-D sample sizes. Two main pore components were identified from the analyzed volumes: pore networks and residual pore ganglia. A watershed algorithm was applied to preserve the pore morphology after separating the main pore networks, which is essential for the pore shape characterization. The results were validated for three sandstones (S1, S2, and S3) from distinct reservoirs, and most of the pore shapes were found to be plate- and cube-like, ranging from 39.49 to 50.94 % and from 58.80 to 45.18 % when the Feret caliper descriptor was investigated in a 10003 voxel volume. Furthermore, this study generalizes a practical way to correlate specific particle shapes, such as rods, blades, cuboids, plates, and cubes to characterize asymmetric particles of any material type with 3-D image analysis.

  12. Critical dimension small angle X-ray scattering measurements of FinFET and 3D memory structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Settens, Charles; Bunday, Benjamin; Thiel, Brad; Kline, R. Joseph; Sunday, Daniel; Wang, Chengqing; Wu, Wen-li; Matyi, Richard

    2013-04-01

    We have demonstrated that transmission critical dimension small angle X-ray scattering (CD-SAXS) provides high accuracy and precision CD measurements on advanced 3D microelectronic architectures. The competitive advantage of CD-SAXS over current 3D metrology methods such as optical scatterometry is that CD-SAXS is able to decouple and fit cross-section parameters without any significant parameter cross-correlations. As the industry aggressively scales beyond the 22 nm node, CD-SAXS can be used to quantitatively measure nanoscale deviations in the average crosssections of FinFETs and high-aspect ratio (HAR) memory devices. Fitting the average cross-section of 18:1 isolated HAR contact holes with an effective trapezoid model yielded an average pitch of 796.9 +/- 0.4 nm, top diameter of 70.3 +/- 0.9 nm, height of 1088 +/- 4 nm, and sidewall angle below 0.1°. Simulations of dense 40:1 HAR contact holes and FinFET fin-gate crossbar structures have been analyzed using CD-SAXS to inquire the theoretical precision of the technique to measure important process parameters such as fin CD, height, and sidewall angle; BOX etch recess, thickness of hafnium oxide and titanium nitride layers; gate CD, height, and sidewall angle; and hafnium oxide and titanium nitride etch recess. The simulations of HAR and FinFET structures mimic the characteristics of experimental data collected at a synchrotron x-ray source. Using the CD-SAXS simulator, we estimate the measurement capabilities for smaller similar structures expected at future nodes to predict the applicability of this technique to fulfill important CD metrology needs.

  13. A 3D CZT hard x-ray polarimeter for a balloon-borne payload

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caroli, E.; Alvarez, J. M.; Auricchio, N.; Budtz-Jørgensen, C.; Curado da Silva, R. M.; Del Sordo, S.; Ferrando, P.; Laurent, P.; Limousin, O.; Galvèz, J. L.; Gloster, C. P.; Hernanz, M.; Isern, J.; Kuvvetli, I.; Maia, J. M.; Meuris, A.; Stephen, J. B.; Zappettini, A.

    2012-09-01

    Today it is widely recognised that a measurement of the polarization status of cosmic sources high energy emission is a key observational parameter to understand the active production mechanism and its geometry. Therefore new instrumentation operating in the hard X/soft γ rays energy range should be optimized also for this type of measurement. In this framework, we present the concept of a small high-performance spectrometer designed for polarimetry between 100 and 1000 keV suitable as a stratospheric balloon-borne payload dedicated to perform an accurate and reliable measurement of the polarization status of the Crab pulsar, i.e. the polarization level and direction. The detector with 3D spatial resolution is based on a CZT spectrometer in a highly segmented configuration designed to operate as a high performance scattering polarimeter. We discuss different configurations based on recent development results and possible improvements currently under study. Furthermore we describe a possible baseline design of the payload, which can be also seen as a pathfinder for a high performance focal plane detector in new hard X and soft gamma ray focussing telescopes and/or advanced Compton instruments. Finally we present preliminary data from Montecarlo undergoing studies to determine the best trade-off between polarimetric performance and detector design complexity.

  14. Acute effects of delayed reperfusion following myocardial infarction: a 3D x-ray imaging analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simari, Robert D.; Bell, M. R.; Pao, Y. C.; Gersh, B. J.; Ritman, Erik L.

    1996-04-01

    Clinical and experimental data suggest that delayed reperfusion of the infarct related artery may limit infarct expansion without increasing myocardial salvage. In order to assess the potential mechanisms involved, an acute closed chest canine model of myocardial infarction and delayed reperfusion was studied. Nineteen dogs underwent 3D computed tomography in the Dynamic Spatial Reconstructor (a fast, volume imaging, CT scanner) at baseline and three and four hours later to estimate left ventricular chamber volumes, global distensibility and regional myocardial stiffness. A control group was scanned without intervention. An occlusion group underwent four hours of coronary artery occlusion. A reperfusion group underwent three hours of coronary artery occlusion followed by one hour of reperfusion. Similar infarct sizes were seen in the occlusion and reperfusion groups. Globally reperfusion was associated with increased left ventricular end diastolic pressure and prolongation of global relaxation. Regionally reperfusion was associated with increased myocardial stiffness, intramyocardial blood volume and wall thickness within the infarct zone relative to the not reperfused myocardium.

  15. A preliminary study of breast cancer diagnosis using laboratory based small angle x-ray scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Round, A. R.; Wilkinson, S. J.; Hall, C. J.; Rogers, K. D.; Glatter, O.; Wess, T.; Ellis, I. O.

    2005-09-01

    Breast tissue collected from tumour samples and normal tissue from bi-lateral mastectomy procedures were examined using small angle x-ray scattering. Previous work has indicated that breast tissue disease diagnosis could be performed using small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) from a synchrotron radiation source. The technique would be more useful to health services if it could be made to work using a conventional x-ray source. Consistent and reliable differences in x-ray scatter distributions were observed between samples from normal and tumour tissue samples using the laboratory based 'SAXSess' system. Albeit from a small number of samples, a sensitivity of 100% was obtained. This result encourages us to pursue the implementation of SAXS as a laboratory based diagnosis technique.

  16. Two step formation of metal aggregates by surface X-ray radiolysis under Langmuir monolayers: 2D followed by 3D growth

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Smita; Fauré, Marie-Claude; Goldmann, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Summary In order to form a nanostructured metallic layer below a Langmuir monolayer, radiolysis synthesis was carried out in an adapted geometry that we call surface X-ray radiolysis. In this procedure, an X-ray beam produced by a synchrotron beamline intercepts the surface of an aqueous metal-ion solution covered by a Langmuir monolayer at an angle of incidence below the critical angle for total internal reflection. Underneath the organic layer, the X-ray beam induces the radiolytic synthesis of a nanostructured metal–organic layer whose ultrathin thickness is defined by the vertical X-ray penetration depth. We have shown that increasing the X-ray flux on the surface, which considerably enhances the kinetics of the silver layer formation, results in a second growth regime of silver nanocrystals. Here the formation of the oriented thin layer is followed by the appearance of a 3D powder of silver clusters. PMID:26734531

  17. A software-based x-ray scatter correction method for breast tomosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Jia Feng, Steve Si; Sechopoulos, Ioannis

    2011-12-15

    Purpose: To develop a software-based scatter correction method for digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) imaging and investigate its impact on the image quality of tomosynthesis reconstructions of both phantoms and patients. Methods: A Monte Carlo (MC) simulation of x-ray scatter, with geometry matching that of the cranio-caudal (CC) view of a DBT clinical prototype, was developed using the Geant4 toolkit and used to generate maps of the scatter-to-primary ratio (SPR) of a number of homogeneous standard-shaped breasts of varying sizes. Dimension-matched SPR maps were then deformed and registered to DBT acquisition projections, allowing for the estimation of the primary x-ray signal acquired by the imaging system. Noise filtering of the estimated projections was then performed to reduce the impact of the quantum noise of the x-ray scatter. Three dimensional (3D) reconstruction was then performed using the maximum likelihood-expectation maximization (MLEM) method. This process was tested on acquisitions of a heterogeneous 50/50 adipose/glandular tomosynthesis phantom with embedded masses, fibers, and microcalcifications and on acquisitions of patients. The image quality of the reconstructions of the scatter-corrected and uncorrected projections was analyzed by studying the signal-difference-to-noise ratio (SDNR), the integral of the signal in each mass lesion (integrated mass signal, IMS), and the modulation transfer function (MTF). Results: The reconstructions of the scatter-corrected projections demonstrated superior image quality. The SDNR of masses embedded in a 5 cm thick tomosynthesis phantom improved 60%-66%, while the SDNR of the smallest mass in an 8 cm thick phantom improved by 59% (p < 0.01). The IMS of the masses in the 5 cm thick phantom also improved by 15%-29%, while the IMS of the masses in the 8 cm thick phantom improved by 26%-62% (p < 0.01). Some embedded microcalcifications in the tomosynthesis phantoms were visible only in the scatter

  18. A software-based x-ray scatter correction method for breast tomosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Jia Feng, Steve Si; Sechopoulos, Ioannis

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a software-based scatter correction method for digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) imaging and investigate its impact on the image quality of tomosynthesis reconstructions of both phantoms and patients. Methods: A Monte Carlo (MC) simulation of x-ray scatter, with geometry matching that of the cranio-caudal (CC) view of a DBT clinical prototype, was developed using the Geant4 toolkit and used to generate maps of the scatter-to-primary ratio (SPR) of a number of homogeneous standard-shaped breasts of varying sizes. Dimension-matched SPR maps were then deformed and registered to DBT acquisition projections, allowing for the estimation of the primary x-ray signal acquired by the imaging system. Noise filtering of the estimated projections was then performed to reduce the impact of the quantum noise of the x-ray scatter. Three dimensional (3D) reconstruction was then performed using the maximum likelihood-expectation maximization (MLEM) method. This process was tested on acquisitions of a heterogeneous 50/50 adipose/glandular tomosynthesis phantom with embedded masses, fibers, and microcalcifications and on acquisitions of patients. The image quality of the reconstructions of the scatter-corrected and uncorrected projections was analyzed by studying the signal-difference-to-noise ratio (SDNR), the integral of the signal in each mass lesion (integrated mass signal, IMS), and the modulation transfer function (MTF). Results: The reconstructions of the scatter-corrected projections demonstrated superior image quality. The SDNR of masses embedded in a 5 cm thick tomosynthesis phantom improved 60%–66%, while the SDNR of the smallest mass in an 8 cm thick phantom improved by 59% (p < 0.01). The IMS of the masses in the 5 cm thick phantom also improved by 15%–29%, while the IMS of the masses in the 8 cm thick phantom improved by 26%–62% (p < 0.01). Some embedded microcalcifications in the tomosynthesis phantoms were visible only in the scatter

  19. Design of smart 3D-digital X-ray microtomographic scanners for non-destructive testing of materials and components of electronic devices with a multilayered structure

    SciTech Connect

    Syryamkin, V. I. Klestov, S. A. Echina, E. S.; Suntsov, S. B.

    2015-10-27

    The article studies the operating procedures of an X-ray microtomographic scanner and the module of reconstruction and analysis 3D-image of a test sample in particular. An algorithm for 3D-image reconstruction based on image shadow projections and mathematical methods of the processing are described. Chapter 1 describes the basic principles of X-ray tomography and general procedures of the device developed. Chapters 2 and 3 are devoted to the problem of resources saving by the system during the X-ray tomography procedure, which is achieved by preprocessing of the initial shadow projections. Preprocessing includes background noise removing from the images, which reduces the amount of shadow projections in general and increases the efficiency of the group shadow projections compression. Chapter 4 covers general procedures of defect search, which is based on vector analysis principles. In conclusion, the main applications of X-ray tomography are presented.

  20. Development of a lab-scale, high-resolution, tube-generated X-ray computed-tomography system for three-dimensional (3D) materials characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Mertens, J.C.E. Williams, J.J. Chawla, Nikhilesh

    2014-06-01

    The design and construction of a modular high resolution X-ray computed tomography (XCT) system is highlighted in this paper. The design approach is detailed for meeting a specified set of instrument performance goals tailored towards experimental versatility and high resolution imaging. The XCT tool is unique in the detector and X-ray source design configuration, enabling control in the balance between detection efficiency and spatial resolution. The system package is also unique: The sample manipulation approach implemented enables a wide gamut of in situ experimentation to analyze structure evolution under applied stimulus, by optimizing scan conditions through a high degree of controllability. The component selection and design process is detailed: Incorporated components are specified, custom designs are shared, and the approach for their integration into a fully functional XCT scanner is provided. Custom designs discussed include the dual-target X-ray source cradle which maintains position and trajectory of the beam between the two X-ray target configurations with respect to a scintillator mounting and positioning assembly and the imaging sensor, as well as a novel large-format X-ray detector with enhanced adaptability. The instrument is discussed from an operational point of view, including the details of data acquisition and processing implemented for 3D imaging via micro-CT. The performance of the instrument is demonstrated on a silica-glass particle/hydroxyl-terminated-polybutadiene (HTPB) matrix binder PBX simulant. Post-scan data processing, specifically segmentation of the sample's relevant microstructure from the 3D reconstruction, is provided to demonstrate the utility of the instrument. - Highlights: • Custom built X-ray tomography system for microstructural characterization • Detector design for maximizing polychromatic X-ray detection efficiency • X-ray design offered for maximizing X-ray flux with respect to imaging resolution • Novel lab

  1. Petrophysical analysis of limestone rocks by nuclear logging and 3D high-resolution X-ray computed microtomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, M. F. S.; Lima, I.; Ferrucio, P. L.; Abreu, C. J.; Borghi, L.; Lopes, R. T.

    2011-10-01

    This study presents the pore-space system analysis of the 2-ITAB-1-RJ well cores, which were drilled in the São José do Itaboraí Basin, in the state of Rio de Janeiro, Brasil. The analysis presented herein has been developed based on two techniques: nuclear logging and 3D high-resolution X-ray computed microtomography. Nuclear logging has been proven to be the technique that provides better quality and more quantitative information about the porosity using radioactive sources. The Density Gamma Probe and the Neutron Sonde used in this work provide qualitative information about bulk density variations and compensated porosity of the geological formation. The samples obtained from the well cores were analyzed by microtomography. The use of this technique in sedimentary rocks allows quantitative evaluation of pore system and generates high-resolution 3D images (˜microns order). The images and data obtained by microtomography were integrated with the response obtained by nuclear logging. The results obtained by these two techniques allow the understanding of the pore-size distribution and connectivity, as well as the porosity values. Both techniques are important and they complement each other.

  2. Multivariate analysis of X-ray, ion and electron spectral images: from surface to 3D materials characterization.

    SciTech Connect

    Kotula, Paul Gabriel; Keenan, Michael Robert

    2005-02-01

    Spectral imaging where a complete spectrum is collected from each of a series of spatial locations (1D lines, 2D images or 3D volumes) is now available on a wide range of analytical tools - from electron and x-ray to ion beam instruments. With this capability to collect extremely large spectral images comes the need for automated data analysis tools that can rapidly and without bias reduce a large number of raw spectra to a compact, chemically relevant, and easily interpreted representation. It is clear that manual interrogation of individual spectra is impractical even for very small spectral images (< 5000 spectra). More typical spectral images can contain tens of thousands to millions of spectra, which given the constraint of acquisition time may contain between 5 and 300 counts per 1000-channel spectrum. Conventional manual approaches to spectral image analysis such as summing spectra from regions or constructing x-ray maps are prone to bias and possibly error. One way to comprehensively analyze spectral image data, which has been automated, is to utilize an unsupervised self-modeling multivariate statistical analysis method such as multivariate curve resolution (MCR). This approach has proven capable of solving a wide range of analytical problems based upon the counting of x-rays (SEM/STEM-EDX, XRF, PIXE), electrons (EELS, XPS) and ions (TOF-SIMS). As an example of the MCR approach, a STEM x-ray spectral image from a ZrB2-SiC composite was acquired and analyzed. The data were generated in a FEI Tecnai F30-ST TEM/STEM operated at 300kV, equipped with an EDAX SUTW x-ray detector. The spectral image was acquired with the TIA software on the STEM at 128 by 128 pixels (12nm/pixel) for 100msec dwell per pixel (total acquisition time was 30 minutes) with a probe of approximately the same size as each pixel. Each spectrum in the image had, on average, 500 counts. The calculation took 5 seconds on a PC workstation with dual 2.4GHz PentiumIV Xeon processors and 2Gbytes

  3. Plant tissues in 3D via X-ray tomography: simple contrasting methods allow high resolution imaging.

    PubMed

    Staedler, Yannick M; Masson, David; Schönenberger, Jürg

    2013-01-01

    Computed tomography remains strongly underused in plant sciences despite its high potential in delivering detailed 3D phenotypical information because of the low X-ray absorption of most plant tissues. Existing protocols to study soft tissues display poor performance, especially when compared to those used on animals. More efficient protocols to study plant material are therefore needed. Flowers of Arabidopsis thaliana and Marcgravia caudata were immersed in a selection of contrasting agents used to treat samples for transmission electron microscopy. Grayscale values for floral tissues and background were measured as a function of time. Contrast was quantified via a contrast index. The thick buds of Marcgravia were scanned to determine which contrasting agents best penetrate thick tissues. The highest contrast increase with cytoplasm-rich tissues was obtained with phosphotungstate, whereas osmium tetroxide and bismuth tatrate displayed the highest contrast increase with vacuolated tissues. Phosphotungstate also displayed the best sample penetration. Furthermore, infiltration with phosphotungstate allowed imaging of all plants parts at a high resolution of 3 µm, which approaches the maximum resolution of our equipment: 1.5 µm. The high affinity of phosphotungstate for vasculature, cytoplasm-rich tissue, and pollen causes these tissues to absorb more X-rays than the surrounding tissues, which, in turn, makes these tissues appear brighter on the scan data. Tissues with different brightness can then be virtually dissected from each other by selecting the bracket of grayscale to be visualized. Promising directions for the future include in silico phenotyping and developmental studies of plant inner parts (e.g., ovules, vasculature, pollen, and cell nuclei) via virtual dissection as well as correlations of quantitative phenotypes with omics datasets. Therefore, this work represents a crucial improvement of previous methods, allowing new directions of research to be

  4. Feasibility of CT-based 3D anatomic mapping with a scanning-beam digital x-ray (SBDX) system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slagowski, Jordan M.; Tomkowiak, Michael T.; Dunkerley, David A. P.; Speidel, Michael A.

    2015-03-01

    This study investigates the feasibility of obtaining CT-derived 3D surfaces from data provided by the scanning-beam digital x-ray (SBDX) system. Simulated SBDX short-scan acquisitions of a Shepp-Logan and a thorax phantom containing a high contrast spherical volume were generated. 3D reconstructions were performed using a penalized weighted least squares method with total variation regularization (PWLS-TV), as well as a more efficient variant employing gridding of projection data to parallel rays (gPWLS-TV). Voxel noise, edge blurring, and surface accuracy were compared to gridded filtered back projection (gFBP). PWLS reconstruction of a noise-free reduced-size Shepp-Logan phantom had 1.4% rRMSE. In noisy gPWLS-TV reconstructions of a reduced-size thorax phantom, 99% of points on the segmented sphere perimeter were within 0.33, 0.47, and 0.70 mm of the ground truth, respectively, for fluences comparable to imaging through 18.0, 27.2, and 34.6 cm acrylic. Surface accuracies of gFBP and gPWLS-TV were similar at high fluences, while gPWLS-TV offered improvement at the lowest fluence. The gPWLS-TV voxel noise was reduced by 60% relative to gFBP, on average. High-contrast linespread functions measured 1.25 mm and 0.96 mm (FWHM) for gPWLS-TV and gFBP. In a simulation of gated and truncated projection data from a full-sized thorax, gPWLS-TV reconstruction yielded segmented surface points which were within 1.41 mm of ground truth. Results support the feasibility of 3D surface segmentation with SBDX. Further investigation of artifacts caused by data truncation and patient motion is warranted.

  5. 3-D Structure of Arcade Type Flares Deduced from Soft X-Ray Observations of a Homologous Flare Series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morita, S.; Uchida, Y.; Hirose, S.

    2002-01-01

    In the solar flare problems, no ultimate model that matches observations has been established. One of the reasons for this is due to the restrictions in the observational data lacking information about the third dimension. Thus, many researchers have tried to get information about the three dimensional (3-D) coronal structures by using various techniques or ideas; like movie analysis, calculations using vector or line-of-sight components of photospheric magnetic data, and etc.. In the near future, a mission named STEREO which will obtain information about the 3-D coronal structures from two satellites, is planned. In the present paper, we noted the homology in a homologous flare series of February 1992. We derived a 3-D coronal structures by making use of the images obtained from the three different sight-lines at some common phases in them with Yohkoh SXT. The result of this analysis has made it clear that the so-called ``cusped arcade'' at the maximum phase in the well-known 1992 February 21 flare is, contrary to the general views, an ``elongated arch'' seen with a shallow oblique angle. It is not the ``flare arcade'' seen axis-on as widely conceived. This elongated arch coincides roughly with a diagonal of the main body of the "soft X-ray arcade" that came up later. The magnetic structure causing the flare as a whole turned out in this analysis to be a structure with quadruple magnetic sources. The relative locations of these four characteristic sources stayed almost the same throughout the period of this homologous flare series, determining the fundamental shape of this homologous series. We also examined the corresponding features for other similar events, also using information from other satellites, and will report the results.

  6. Calibration model of a dual gain flat panel detector for 2D and 3D x-ray imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidgunst, C.; Ritter, D.; Lang, E.

    2007-09-15

    The continuing research and further development in flat panel detector technology have led to its integration into more and more medical x-ray systems for two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) imaging, such as fixed or mobile C arms. Besides the obvious advantages of flat panel detectors, like the slim design and the resulting optimum accessibility to the patient, their success is primarily a product of the image quality that can be achieved. The benefits in the physical and performance-related features as opposed to conventional image intensifier systems (e.g., distortion-free reproduction of imaging information or almost linear signal response over a large dynamic range) can be fully exploited, however, only if the raw detector images are correctly calibrated and postprocessed. Previous procedures for processing raw data contain idealizations that, in the real world, lead to artifacts or losses in image quality. Thus, for example, temperature dependencies or changes in beam geometry, as can occur with mobile C arm systems, have not been taken into account up to this time. Additionally, adverse characteristics such as image lag or aging effects have to be compensated to attain the best possible image quality. In this article a procedure is presented that takes into account the important dependencies of the individual pixel sensitivity of flat panel detectors used in 2D or 3D imaging and simultaneously minimizes the work required for an extensive recalibration. It is suitable for conventional detectors with only one gain mode as well as for the detectors specially developed for 3D imaging with dual gain read-out technology.

  7. Multi-scale 3D X-ray Imaging Capabilities at the Advanced Photon Source - Current status and future direction (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeCarlo, F.; Xiao, X.; Khan, F.; Glowacki, A.; Schwarz, N.; Jacobsen, C.

    2013-12-01

    In x-ray computed μ-tomography (μ-XCT), a thin scintillator screen is coupled to a visible light lens and camera system to obtain micrometer-scale transmission imaging of specimens as large as a few millimeters. Recent advances in detector technology allow collecting these images at unprecedented frame rates. For a high x-ray flux density synchrotron facility like the Advanced Photon Source (APS), the detector exposure time ranges from hundreds of milliseconds to hundreds of picoseconds, making possible to acquire a full 3D micrometer-resolution dataset in less than one second. The micron resolution limitation of parallel x-ray beam projection systems can be overcame by Transmission X-ray Microscopes (TXM) where part of the image magnification is done in x-ray regime using x-ray optics like capillary condensers and Fresnel zone plates. These systems, when installed on a synchrotron x-ray source, can generate 2D images with up to 20 nm resolution with second exposure time and collect a full 3D nano-resolution dataset in few minutes. μ-XCT and TXM systems available at the x-ray imaging beamlines of the APS are routinely used in material science and geoscience applications where high-resolution and fast 3D imaging are instrumental in extracting in situ four-dimensional dynamic information. In this presentation we describe the computational challenges associated with μ-XCT and TXM systems and present the framework and infrastructure developed at the APS to allow for routine multi-scale data integration between the two systems.

  8. Multi-scale 3D X-ray Imaging Capabilities at the Advanced Photon Source - Current status and future direction (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeCarlo, F.; Xiao, X.; Khan, F.; Glowacki, A.; Schwarz, N.; Jacobsen, C.

    2011-12-01

    In x-ray computed μ-tomography (μ-XCT), a thin scintillator screen is coupled to a visible light lens and camera system to obtain micrometer-scale transmission imaging of specimens as large as a few millimeters. Recent advances in detector technology allow collecting these images at unprecedented frame rates. For a high x-ray flux density synchrotron facility like the Advanced Photon Source (APS), the detector exposure time ranges from hundreds of milliseconds to hundreds of picoseconds, making possible to acquire a full 3D micrometer-resolution dataset in less than one second. The micron resolution limitation of parallel x-ray beam projection systems can be overcame by Transmission X-ray Microscopes (TXM) where part of the image magnification is done in x-ray regime using x-ray optics like capillary condensers and Fresnel zone plates. These systems, when installed on a synchrotron x-ray source, can generate 2D images with up to 20 nm resolution with second exposure time and collect a full 3D nano-resolution dataset in few minutes. μ-XCT and TXM systems available at the x-ray imaging beamlines of the APS are routinely used in material science and geoscience applications where high-resolution and fast 3D imaging are instrumental in extracting in situ four-dimensional dynamic information. In this presentation we describe the computational challenges associated with μ-XCT and TXM systems and present the framework and infrastructure developed at the APS to allow for routine multi-scale data integration between the two systems.

  9. High resolution cone beam X-ray computed tomography of 3D-microstructures of cast Al-alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Kastner, Johann; Harrer, Bernhard; Degischer, H. Peter

    2011-01-15

    X-ray computed tomography (XCT) has become a very important method for non-destructive 3D-characterisation of materials. XCT systems with cone beam geometry, micro- or nano-focus tubes and matrix detectors are increasingly used in research and non-destructive testing. Spatial resolutions down to 1 {mu}m can be reached with such XCT-systems for heterogeneities in metals with high absorption contrast. High resolution cone beam XCT is applied to five different Al-alloys: AlMg5Si7, AlCu4Mg1, AlZn6Mg2Cu2, AlZn8Mg2Cu2 and AlSi12Ni1. Up to four different types of inhomogeneities are segmented in one alloy using voxel sizes between (0.4 {mu}m){sup 3} and (2.3 {mu}m){sup 3}. Target metallography and elemental analysis by energy dispersive X-ray analysis are used to identify the inhomogeneities. The possibilities and restrictions of XCT applied to Al-alloys are discussed. AlMg5Si7 XCT-data with a voxel size of (0.4 {mu}m){sup 3} show inhomogeneities with brighter grey-values than the Al-matrix identified as elongated Fe-aluminides, and those with lower grey-values identified as pores and Mg{sub 2}Si-particles with a 'Chinese script-like' structure. Higher-absorbing interdendritic Al-Al{sub 2}Cu-eutectic regions appear brighter than the Al-dendrites in the CT-data of AlCu4Mg1 with (1.1 {mu}m){sup 3}/voxel, whereas pores > 4 {mu}m appear darker than the Al-matrix. The size and the 3D-structure of the {alpha}-Al dendrite arms with a diameter of 50-100 {mu}m are determined in samples from chill cast billets of AlCu4Mg1 and AlZn6Mg2Cu2 alloys. The irregular interdendritic regions containing eutectic segregations with Cu- and Zn-rich phases are > 5 {mu}m wide. Equally absorbing primary equi-axed Al{sub 3}(Sc, Zr) particles > 5 {mu}m are distinguished in the centres of the dendrites by the level of sphericity values. The distribution of Ni- and Fe-aluminides in a squeeze cast AlSi12Ni1-alloy is imaged with (0.4 {mu}m){sup 3}/voxel, but the Si-phase cannot be segmented.

  10. On the Correlation Between Fatigue Striation Spacing and Crack Growth Rate: A Three-Dimensional (3-D) X-ray Synchrotron Tomography Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Jason J.; Yazzie, Kyle E.; Connor Phillips, N.; Chawla, Nikhilesh; Xiao, Xinghui; de Carlo, Francesco; Iyyer, Nagaraja; Kittur, Maddan

    2011-12-01

    In situ three-dimensional (3-D) X-ray synchrotron tomography of fatigue crack growth was conducted in a 7075-T6 aluminum alloy. Local measurements of da/ dN were possible with the 3-D data sets obtained from tomography. A comparison with fatigue striation spacings obtained from scanning electron microscopy of the fracture surfaces yielded excellent correlation with da/ dN obtained from tomography. The X-ray tomography technique can be used to obtain a highly accurate and representative measurements of crack growth locally in the microstructure of the material.

  11. Mean glandular dose estimation using MCNPX for a digital breast tomosynthesis system with tungsten/aluminum and tungsten/aluminum+silver x-ray anode-filter combinations

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Andy K. W.; Darambara, Dimitra G.; Stewart, Alexander; Gunn, Spencer; Bullard, Edward

    2008-12-15

    Breast cancer screening with x-ray mammography, using one or two projection images of the breast, is an indispensible tool in the early detection of breast cancer in women. Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) is a 3D imaging technique that promises higher sensitivity and specificity in breast cancer screening at a similar radiation dose to conventional two-view screening mammography. In DBT a 3D volume is reconstructed with anisotropic voxels from a limited number of x-ray projection images acquired over a limited angle. Although the benefit of early cancer detection through screening mammography outweighs the potential risks associated with radiation, the radiation dosage to women in terms of mean glandular dose (MGD) is carefully monitored. This work studies the MGD arising from a prototype DBT system under various parameters. Two anode/filter combinations (W/Al and W/Al+Ag) were investigated; the tube potential ranges from 20 to 50 kVp; and the breast size varied between 4 and 10 cm chest wall-to-nipple distance and between 3 and 7 cm compressed breast thickness. The dosimetric effect of breast positioning with respect to the imaging detector was also reviewed. It was found that the position of the breast can affect the MGD by as much as 5% to 13% depending on the breast size.

  12. Stereotactic mammography imaging combined with 3D US imaging for image guided breast biopsy

    SciTech Connect

    Surry, K. J. M.; Mills, G. R.; Bevan, K.; Downey, D. B.; Fenster, A.

    2007-11-15

    Stereotactic X-ray mammography (SM) and ultrasound (US) guidance are both commonly used for breast biopsy. While SM provides three-dimensional (3D) targeting information and US provides real-time guidance, both have limitations. SM is a long and uncomfortable procedure and the US guided procedure is inherently two dimensional (2D), requiring a skilled physician for both safety and accuracy. The authors developed a 3D US-guided biopsy system to be integrated with, and to supplement SM imaging. Their goal is to be able to biopsy a larger percentage of suspicious masses using US, by clarifying ambiguous structures with SM imaging. Features from SM and US guided biopsy were combined, including breast stabilization, a confined needle trajectory, and dual modality imaging. The 3D US guided biopsy system uses a 7.5 MHz breast probe and is mounted on an upright SM machine for preprocedural imaging. Intraprocedural targeting and guidance was achieved with real-time 2D and near real-time 3D US imaging. Postbiopsy 3D US imaging allowed for confirmation that the needle was penetrating the target. The authors evaluated 3D US-guided biopsy accuracy of their system using test phantoms. To use mammographic imaging information, they registered the SM and 3D US coordinate systems. The 3D positions of targets identified in the SM images were determined with a target localization error (TLE) of 0.49 mm. The z component (x-ray tube to image) of the TLE dominated with a TLE{sub z} of 0.47 mm. The SM system was then registered to 3D US, with a fiducial registration error (FRE) and target registration error (TRE) of 0.82 and 0.92 mm, respectively. Analysis of the FRE and TRE components showed that these errors were dominated by inaccuracies in the z component with a FRE{sub z} of 0.76 mm and a TRE{sub z} of 0.85 mm. A stereotactic mammography and 3D US guided breast biopsy system should include breast compression for stability and safety and dual modality imaging for target localization

  13. 3D Atomic Arrangement at Functional Interfaces Inside Nanoparticles by Resonant High-Energy X-ray Diffraction.

    PubMed

    Petkov, Valeri; Prasai, Binay; Shastri, Sarvjit; Chen, Tsan-Yao

    2015-10-21

    With current science and technology moving rapidly into smaller scales, nanometer-sized materials, often referred to as NPs, are produced in increasing numbers and explored for numerous useful applications. Evidence is mounting, however, that useful properties of NPs can be improved further and even new NP functionality achieved by not only controlling the NP size and shape but also interfacing chemically or structurally distinct entities into single, so-called "composite" NPs. A typical example is core-shell NPs wherein the synergy of distinct atoms at the core\\shell interface endows the NPs with otherwise unachievable functionality. However, though advantageous, the concept of functional interfaces inside NPs is still pursued largely by trial-and-error. That is because it is difficut to assess the interfaces precisely at the atomic level using traditional experimental techniques and, hence, difficult to take control of. Using the core\\shell interface in less than 10 nm in size Ru core-Pt shells NPs as an example, we demonstrate that precise knowledge of the 3D atomic arrangement at functional interfaces inside NPs can be obtained by resonant high-energy X-ray diffraction (XRD) coupled to element-specific atomic pair distribution function (PDF) analysis. On the basis of the unique structure knowledge obtained, we scrutinize the still-debatable influence of core\\shell interface on the catalytic functionality of Ru core-Pt shell NPs, thus evidencing the usefulness of this nontraditional technique for practical applications.

  14. 3D visualization of XFEL beam focusing properties using LiF crystal X-ray detector.

    PubMed

    Pikuz, Tatiana; Faenov, Anatoly; Matsuoka, Takeshi; Matsuyama, Satoshi; Yamauchi, Kazuto; Ozaki, Norimasa; Albertazzi, Bruno; Inubushi, Yuichi; Yabashi, Makina; Tono, Kensuke; Sato, Yuya; Yumoto, Hirokatsu; Ohashi, Haruhiko; Pikuz, Sergei; Grum-Grzhimailo, Alexei N; Nishikino, Masaharu; Kawachi, Tetsuya; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Kodama, Ryosuke

    2015-01-01

    Here, we report, that by means of direct irradiation of lithium fluoride a (LiF) crystal, in situ 3D visualization of the SACLA XFEL focused beam profile along the propagation direction is realized, including propagation inside photoluminescence solid matter. High sensitivity and large dynamic range of the LiF crystal detector allowed measurements of the intensity distribution of the beam at distances far from the best focus as well as near the best focus and evaluation of XFEL source size and beam quality factor M(2). Our measurements also support the theoretical prediction that for X-ray photons with energies ~10 keV the radius of the generated photoelectron cloud within the LiF crystal reaches about 600 nm before thermalization. The proposed method has a spatial resolution ~0.4-2.0 μm for photons with energies 6-14 keV and potentially could be used in a single shot mode for optimization of different focusing systems developed at XFEL and synchrotron facilities. PMID:26634431

  15. Exploring 3D microstructural evolution in Li-Sulfur battery electrodes using in-situ X-ray tomography

    PubMed Central

    Yermukhambetova, Assiya; Tan, Chun; Daemi, Sohrab R.; Bakenov, Zhumabay; Darr, Jawwad A.; Brett, Daniel J. L.; Shearing, Paul R.

    2016-01-01

    Lithium sulfur (Li-S) batteries offer higher theoretical specific capacity, lower cost and enhanced safety compared to current Li-ion battery technology. However, the multiple reactions and phase changes in the sulfur conversion cathode result in highly complex phenomena that significantly impact cycling life. For the first time to the authors’ knowledge, a multi-scale 3D in-situ tomography approach is used to characterize morphological parameters and track microstructural evolution of the sulfur cathode across multiple charge cycles. Here we show the uneven distribution of the sulfur phase fraction within the electrode thickness as a function of charge cycles, suggesting significant mass transport limitations within thick-film sulfur cathodes. Furthermore, we report a shift towards larger particle sizes and a decrease in volume specific surface area with cycling, suggesting sulfur agglomeration. Finally, we demonstrate the nano-scopic length-scale required for the features of the carbon binder domain to become discernible, confirming the need for future work on in-situ nano-tomography. We anticipate that X-ray tomography will be a powerful tool for optimization of electrode structures for Li-S batteries. PMID:27748437

  16. 3D visualization of XFEL beam focusing properties using LiF crystal X-ray detector

    PubMed Central

    Pikuz, Tatiana; Faenov, Anatoly; Matsuoka, Takeshi; Matsuyama, Satoshi; Yamauchi, Kazuto; Ozaki, Norimasa; Albertazzi, Bruno; Inubushi, Yuichi; Yabashi, Makina; Tono, Kensuke; Sato, Yuya; Yumoto, Hirokatsu; Ohashi, Haruhiko; Pikuz, Sergei; Grum-Grzhimailo, Alexei N.; Nishikino, Masaharu; Kawachi, Tetsuya; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Kodama, Ryosuke

    2015-01-01

    Here, we report, that by means of direct irradiation of lithium fluoride a (LiF) crystal, in situ 3D visualization of the SACLA XFEL focused beam profile along the propagation direction is realized, including propagation inside photoluminescence solid matter. High sensitivity and large dynamic range of the LiF crystal detector allowed measurements of the intensity distribution of the beam at distances far from the best focus as well as near the best focus and evaluation of XFEL source size and beam quality factor M2. Our measurements also support the theoretical prediction that for X-ray photons with energies ~10 keV the radius of the generated photoelectron cloud within the LiF crystal reaches about 600 nm before thermalization. The proposed method has a spatial resolution ~ 0.4–2.0 μm for photons with energies 6–14 keV and potentially could be used in a single shot mode for optimization of different focusing systems developed at XFEL and synchrotron facilities. PMID:26634431

  17. A study of internal structure in components made by additive manufacturing process using 3 D X-ray tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Raguvarun, K. Balasubramaniam, Krishnan Rajagopal, Prabhu; Palanisamy, Suresh; Nagarajah, Romesh; Kapoor, Ajay; Hoye, Nicholas; Curiri, Dominic

    2015-03-31

    Additive manufacturing methods are gaining increasing popularity for rapidly and efficiently manufacturing parts and components in the industrial context, as well as for domestic applications. However, except when used for prototyping or rapid visualization of components, industries are concerned with the load carrying capacity and strength achievable by additive manufactured parts. In this paper, the wire-arc additive manufacturing (AM) process based on gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) has been examined for the internal structure and constitution of components generated by the process. High-resolution 3D X-ray tomography is used to gain cut-views through wedge-shaped parts created using this GTAW additive manufacturing process with titanium alloy materials. In this work, two different control conditions for the GTAW process are considered. The studies reveal clusters of porosities, located in periodic spatial intervals along the sample cross-section. Such internal defects can have a detrimental effect on the strength of the resulting AM components, as shown in destructive testing studies. Closer examination of this phenomenon shows that defect clusters are preferentially located at GTAW traversal path intervals. These results highlight the strong need for enhanced control of process parameters in ensuring components with minimal defects and higher strength.

  18. Exploring 3D microstructural evolution in Li-Sulfur battery electrodes using in-situ X-ray tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yermukhambetova, Assiya; Tan, Chun; Daemi, Sohrab R.; Bakenov, Zhumabay; Darr, Jawwad A.; Brett, Daniel J. L.; Shearing, Paul R.

    2016-10-01

    Lithium sulfur (Li-S) batteries offer higher theoretical specific capacity, lower cost and enhanced safety compared to current Li-ion battery technology. However, the multiple reactions and phase changes in the sulfur conversion cathode result in highly complex phenomena that significantly impact cycling life. For the first time to the authors’ knowledge, a multi-scale 3D in-situ tomography approach is used to characterize morphological parameters and track microstructural evolution of the sulfur cathode across multiple charge cycles. Here we show the uneven distribution of the sulfur phase fraction within the electrode thickness as a function of charge cycles, suggesting significant mass transport limitations within thick-film sulfur cathodes. Furthermore, we report a shift towards larger particle sizes and a decrease in volume specific surface area with cycling, suggesting sulfur agglomeration. Finally, we demonstrate the nano-scopic length-scale required for the features of the carbon binder domain to become discernible, confirming the need for future work on in-situ nano-tomography. We anticipate that X-ray tomography will be a powerful tool for optimization of electrode structures for Li-S batteries.

  19. Observations of 3-D transverse dispersion and dilution in natural consolidated rock by X-ray tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boon, Maartje; Bijeljic, Branko; Niu, Ben; Krevor, Sam

    2016-10-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated the importance of transverse dispersion for dilution and mixing of solutes but most observations have remained limited to two-dimensional sand-box models. We present a new core-flood test to characterize solute transport in 3-D natural-rock media. A device consisting of three annular regions was used for fluid injection into a cylindrical rock core. Pure water was injected into the center and outer region and a NaI solution into the middle region. Steady state transverse dispersion of NaI was visualized with an X-ray medical CT-scanner for a range of Peclét numbers. Three methods were used to calculate Dt: (1) fitting an analytical solution, (2) analyzing the second-central moment, and (3) analyzing the dilution index and reactor ratio. Transverse dispersion decreased with distance due to flow focusing. Furthermore, Dt in the power-law regime showed sub-linear behavior. Overall, the reactor ratios were high confirming the homogeneity of Berea sandstone.

  20. High-resolution X-ray CT for 3D petrography of ferruginous sandstone for an investigation of building stone decay.

    PubMed

    Cnudde, Veerle; Dewanckele, Jan; Boone, Matthieu; de Kock, Tim; Boone, Marijn; Brabant, Loes; Dusar, Michiel; de Ceukelaire, Marleen; de Clercq, Hilde; Hayen, Roald; Jacobs, Patric

    2011-11-01

    Diestian ferruginous sandstone has been used as the dominant building stone for monuments in the Hageland, a natural landscape in east-central Belgium. Like all rocks, this stone type is sensitive to weathering. Case hardening was observed in combination with blackening of the exterior parts of the dressed stones. To determine the 3D petrography and to identify the structural differences between the exterior and interior parts, X-ray computed tomography was used in combination with more traditional research techniques like optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The 3D characterization of the ferruginous sandstone was performed with a high-resolution X-ray CT scanner (www.ugct.ugent.be) in combination with the flexible 3D analysis software Morpho+, which provides the necessary petrophysical parameters of the scanned samples in 3D. Besides providing the required 3D parameters like porosity, pore-size distribution, grain size, grain orientation, and surface analysis, the results of the 3D analysis can also be visualized, which enables to understand and interpret the analysis results in a straightforward way. The complementarities between high-quality X-ray CT images and flexible 3D software and its relation with the more traditional microscopical research techniques are opening up new gateways in the study of weathering processes of natural building stones.

  1. Precise 3D dimensional metrology using high-resolution x-ray computed tomography (μCT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunke, Oliver; Santillan, Javier; Suppes, Alexander

    2010-09-01

    Over the past decade computed tomography (CT) with conventional x-ray sources has evolved from an imaging method in medicine to a well established technology for industrial applications in fields such as material science, light metals and plastics processing, microelectronics and geology. By using modern microfocus and nanofocus X-ray tubes, parts can be scanned with sub-micrometer resolutions. Currently, micro-CT is a technology increasingly used for metrology applications in the automotive industry. CT offers big advantages compared with conventional tactile or optical coordinate measuring machines (CMMs). This is of greater importance if complex parts with hidden or difficult accessible surfaces have to be measured. In these cases, CT offers the advantage of a high density of measurement points and a non-destructive and fast capturing of the sample's complete geometry. When using this growing technology the question arises how precise a μCT based CMM can measure as compared to conventional and established methods for coordinate measurements. For characterizing the metrological capabilities of a tactile or optical CMM, internationally standardized parameters like length measurement error and probing error are defined and used. To increase the acceptance of CT as a metrological method, our work seeks to clarify the definition and usage of parameters used in the field of metrology as these apply to CT. In this paper, an overview of the process chain in CT based metrology will be given and metrological characteristics will be described. For the potential user of CT as 3D metrology tool it is important to show the measurement accuracy and repeatability on realistic samples. Following a discussion of CT metrology techniques, two samples are discussed. The first compares a measured CT Data set to CAD data using CMM data as a standard for comparison of results. The second data second realistic data set will compare the results of applying both the CMM method of

  2. Relationship between radiation dose and reduced X-ray sensitivity surrounding breast region using CR stimulable phosphor plate for mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishide, Hiroko; Kodera, Yoshie

    2015-03-01

    Computed radiography (CR) systems use a photostimulable phosphor plate (imaging plate ; IP) as a sensor for digital mammography. In clinical mammography, breast is almost exposed same region of IP, and therefor, direct x-ray regions surrounding suffer from reduced x-ray sensitivity. Consequently, the difference in x-ray sensitivity between the breast regions and the unattenuated x-ray region was obtained. However, radiation dose quantity that reduces x-ray sensitivity is not known. In this study, we imaged a breast phantom under fixed conditions, and subsequently, we investigated the pixel value differences between the breast region and the unattenuated x-ray regions. We measured the entrance air-kerma using 550 sensing elements of glass dosimeter, 22x25 lines, that were placed at the surface of the cassette including the IP. In order to measure the x-ray sensitivity, pre- and post-exposure breast phantom images were acquired after 500, 1,000, 1,350, and 1,500 trials. The pixel values were measured at four points; in the breast region and in the unattenuated x-ray region. The ratio of these pixel values was compared with the cumulative exposure dose. The ratio was nearly constant until 1,000 trials, but a significant reduction was observed after 1,350 trials. Further, in the image obtained after 1,500th trials, the shape of breast phantom could be observed. This image supports the fact that the x-ray sensitivity was lowered in the unattenuated x-ray region. The difference in the pixel value between the breast region and the unattenuated x-ray region was obtained over 1,000 exposures at 100,000 mAs.

  3. Method for dose-reduced 3D catheter tracking on a scanning-beam digital x-ray system using dynamic electronic collimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunkerley, David A. P.; Funk, Tobias; Speidel, Michael A.

    2016-03-01

    Scanning-beam digital x-ray (SBDX) is an inverse geometry x-ray fluoroscopy system capable of tomosynthesis-based 3D catheter tracking. This work proposes a method of dose-reduced 3D tracking using dynamic electronic collimation (DEC) of the SBDX scanning x-ray tube. Positions in the 2D focal spot array are selectively activated to create a regionof- interest (ROI) x-ray field around the tracked catheter. The ROI position is updated for each frame based on a motion vector calculated from the two most recent 3D tracking results. The technique was evaluated with SBDX data acquired as a catheter tip inside a chest phantom was pulled along a 3D trajectory. DEC scans were retrospectively generated from the detector images stored for each focal spot position. DEC imaging of a catheter tip in a volume measuring 11.4 cm across at isocenter required 340 active focal spots per frame, versus 4473 spots in full-FOV mode. The dose-area-product (DAP) and peak skin dose (PSD) for DEC versus full field-of-view (FOV) scanning were calculated using an SBDX Monte Carlo simulation code. DAP was reduced to 7.4% to 8.4% of the full-FOV value, consistent with the relative number of active focal spots (7.6%). For image sequences with a moving catheter, PSD was 33.6% to 34.8% of the full-FOV value. The root-mean-squared-deviation between DEC-based 3D tracking coordinates and full-FOV 3D tracking coordinates was less than 0.1 mm. The 3D distance between the tracked tip and the sheath centerline averaged 0.75 mm. Dynamic electronic collimation can reduce dose with minimal change in tracking performance.

  4. 3D tissue-engineered construct analysis via conventional high-resolution microcomputed tomography without X-ray contrast.

    PubMed

    Voronov, Roman S; VanGordon, Samuel B; Shambaugh, Robert L; Papavassiliou, Dimitrios V; Sikavitsas, Vassilios I

    2013-05-01

    As the field of tissue engineering develops, researchers are faced with a large number of degrees of freedom regarding the choice of material, architecture, seeding, and culturing. To evaluate the effectiveness of a tissue-engineered strategy, histology is typically done by physically slicing and staining a construct (crude, time-consuming, and unreliable). However, due to recent advances in high-resolution biomedical imaging, microcomputed tomography (μCT) has arisen as a quick and effective way to evaluate samples, while preserving their structure in the original state. However, a major barrier for using μCT to do histology has been its inability to differentiate between materials with similar X-ray attenuation. Various contrasting strategies (hardware and chemical staining agents) have been proposed to address this problem, but at a cost of additional complexity and limited access. Instead, here we suggest a strategy for how virtual 3D histology in silico can be conducted using conventional μCT, and we provide an illustrative example from bone tissue engineering. The key to our methodology is an implementation of scaffold surface architecture that is ordered in relation to cells and tissue, in concert with straightforward image-processing techniques, to minimize the reliance on contrasting for material segmentation. In the case study reported, μCT was used to image and segment porous poly(lactic acid) nonwoven fiber mesh scaffolds that were seeded dynamically with mesenchymal stem cells and cultured to produce soft tissue and mineralized tissue in a flow perfusion bioreactor using an osteogenic medium. The methodology presented herein paves a new way for tissue engineers to identify and distinguish components of cell/tissue/scaffold constructs to easily and effectively evaluate the tissue-engineering strategies that generate them.

  5. Bayesian 3D X-ray computed tomography image reconstruction with a scaled Gaussian mixture prior model

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Li; Gac, Nicolas; Mohammad-Djafari, Ali

    2015-01-13

    In order to improve quality of 3D X-ray tomography reconstruction for Non Destructive Testing (NDT), we investigate in this paper hierarchical Bayesian methods. In NDT, useful prior information on the volume like the limited number of materials or the presence of homogeneous area can be included in the iterative reconstruction algorithms. In hierarchical Bayesian methods, not only the volume is estimated thanks to the prior model of the volume but also the hyper parameters of this prior. This additional complexity in the reconstruction methods when applied to large volumes (from 512{sup 3} to 8192{sup 3} voxels) results in an increasing computational cost. To reduce it, the hierarchical Bayesian methods investigated in this paper lead to an algorithm acceleration by Variational Bayesian Approximation (VBA) [1] and hardware acceleration thanks to projection and back-projection operators paralleled on many core processors like GPU [2]. In this paper, we will consider a Student-t prior on the gradient of the image implemented in a hierarchical way [3, 4, 1]. Operators H (forward or projection) and H{sup t} (adjoint or back-projection) implanted in multi-GPU [2] have been used in this study. Different methods will be evalued on synthetic volume 'Shepp and Logan' in terms of quality and time of reconstruction. We used several simple regularizations of order 1 and order 2. Other prior models also exists [5]. Sometimes for a discrete image, we can do the segmentation and reconstruction at the same time, then the reconstruction can be done with less projections.

  6. TU-F-18C-03: X-Ray Scatter Correction in Breast CT: Advances and Patient Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Ramamurthy, S; Sechopoulos, I

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To further develop and perform patient testing of an x-ray scatter correction algorithm for dedicated breast computed tomography (BCT). Methods: A previously proposed algorithm for x-ray scatter signal reduction in BCT imaging was modified and tested with a phantom and on patients. A wireless electronic positioner system was designed and added to the BCT system that positions a tungsten plate in and out of the x-ray beam. The interpolation used by the algorithm was replaced with a radial basis function-based algorithm, with automated exclusion of non-valid sampled points due to patient motion or other factors. A 3D adaptive noise reduction filter was also introduced to reduce the impact of scatter quantum noise post-reconstruction. The impact on image quality of the improved algorithm was evaluated using a breast phantom and seven patient breasts, using quantitative metrics such signal difference (SD) and signal difference-to-noise ratios (SDNR) and qualitatively using image profiles. Results: The improvements in the algorithm resulted in a more robust interpolation step, with no introduction of image artifacts, especially at the imaged object boundaries, which was an issue in the previous implementation. Qualitative evaluation of the reconstructed slices and corresponding profiles show excellent homogeneity of both the background and the higher density features throughout the whole imaged object, as well as increased accuracy in the Hounsfield Units (HU) values of the tissues. Profiles also demonstrate substantial increase in both SD and SDNR between glandular and adipose regions compared to both the uncorrected and system-corrected images. Conclusion: The improved scatter correction algorithm can be reliably used during patient BCT acquisitions with no introduction of artifacts, resulting in substantial improvement in image quality. Its impact on actual clinical performance needs to be evaluated in the future. Research Agreement, Koning Corp., Hologic

  7. Breast tissue segmentation from x-ray radiographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chen; Nielsen, Mads; Karssemeijer, Nico; Brandt, Sami S.

    2014-05-01

    In this paper, we propose a robust and accurate method that segments mammograms to three distinct regions: breast tissue, pectoral muscle and background. Our approach is built around a neural, two-layer committee machine. On the first layer, individual experts, each formed by a feature vector and a classifier, vote the local class label of the mammogram. The votes are given as an input, together with a prior map, to the second layer of the committee machine, which combines the inputs by a gating network. As the first layer features, we use effective, well-known local features based on image intensity, intensity histograms, local binary patterns, and histograms of oriented gradient. As with the first-layer classifiers and the gating network, we use support vector machines. Our experiments on a database of 495 mammograms, divided into independent training, validations and test subsets, show that our method is able to segment the breast tissue without failure, and it challenges the manual expert segmentation in the level of accuracy.

  8. Breast tissue segmentation from x-ray radiographs.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chen; Nielsen, Mads; Karssemeijer, Nico; Brandt, Sami S

    2014-05-21

    In this paper, we propose a robust and accurate method that segments mammograms to three distinct regions: breast tissue, pectoral muscle and background. Our approach is built around a neural, two-layer committee machine. On the first layer, individual experts, each formed by a feature vector and a classifier, vote the local class label of the mammogram. The votes are given as an input, together with a prior map, to the second layer of the committee machine, which combines the inputs by a gating network. As the first layer features, we use effective, well-known local features based on image intensity, intensity histograms, local binary patterns, and histograms of oriented gradient. As with the first-layer classifiers and the gating network, we use support vector machines. Our experiments on a database of 495 mammograms, divided into independent training, validations and test subsets, show that our method is able to segment the breast tissue without failure, and it challenges the manual expert segmentation in the level of accuracy. PMID:24778348

  9. 3D chemical mapping: application of scanning transmission (soft) X-ray microscopy (STXM) in combination with angle-scan tomography in bio-, geo-, and environmental sciences.

    PubMed

    Obst, Martin; Schmid, Gregor

    2014-01-01

    The identification of environmental processes and mechanisms often requires information on the organochemical and inorganic composition of specimens at high spatial resolution. X-ray spectroscopy (XAS) performed in the soft X-ray range (100-2,200 eV) provides chemical speciation information for elements that are of high biogeochemical relevance such as carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen but also includes transition metals such as iron, manganese, or nickel. Synchrotron-based scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) combines XAS with high resolution mapping on the 20-nm scale. This provides two-dimensional (2D) quantitative information about the distribution of chemical species such as organic macromolecules, metals, or mineral phases within environmental samples. Furthermore, the combination of STXM with angle-scan tomography allows for three-dimensional (3D) spectromicroscopic analysis of bio-, geo-, or environmental samples. For the acquisition of STXM tomography data, the sample is rotated around an axis perpendicular to the X-ray beam. Various sample preparation approaches such as stripes cut from TEM grids or the preparation of wet cells allow for preparing environmentally relevant specimens in a dry or in a fully hydrated state for 2D and 3D STXM measurements. In this chapter we give a short overview about the principles of STXM, its application to environmental sciences, different preparation techniques, and the analysis and 3D reconstruction of STXM tomography data.

  10. 3D chemical mapping: application of scanning transmission (soft) X-ray microscopy (STXM) in combination with angle-scan tomography in bio-, geo-, and environmental sciences.

    PubMed

    Obst, Martin; Schmid, Gregor

    2014-01-01

    The identification of environmental processes and mechanisms often requires information on the organochemical and inorganic composition of specimens at high spatial resolution. X-ray spectroscopy (XAS) performed in the soft X-ray range (100-2,200 eV) provides chemical speciation information for elements that are of high biogeochemical relevance such as carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen but also includes transition metals such as iron, manganese, or nickel. Synchrotron-based scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) combines XAS with high resolution mapping on the 20-nm scale. This provides two-dimensional (2D) quantitative information about the distribution of chemical species such as organic macromolecules, metals, or mineral phases within environmental samples. Furthermore, the combination of STXM with angle-scan tomography allows for three-dimensional (3D) spectromicroscopic analysis of bio-, geo-, or environmental samples. For the acquisition of STXM tomography data, the sample is rotated around an axis perpendicular to the X-ray beam. Various sample preparation approaches such as stripes cut from TEM grids or the preparation of wet cells allow for preparing environmentally relevant specimens in a dry or in a fully hydrated state for 2D and 3D STXM measurements. In this chapter we give a short overview about the principles of STXM, its application to environmental sciences, different preparation techniques, and the analysis and 3D reconstruction of STXM tomography data. PMID:24357389

  11. Analysis of Ablative Performance of C/C Composite Throat Containing Defects Based on X-ray 3D Reconstruction in a Solid Rocket Motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hui, Wei-Hua; Bao, Fu-Ting; Wei, Xiang-Geng; Liu, Yang

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, a new measuring method of ablation rate was proposed based on X-ray three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction. The ablation of 4-direction carbon/carbon composite nozzles was investigated in the combustion environment of a solid rocket motor, and the macroscopic ablation and linear recession rate were studied through the X-ray 3D reconstruction method. The results showed that the maximum relative error of the X-ray 3D reconstruction was 0.0576%, which met the minimum accuracy of the ablation analysis; along the nozzle axial direction, from convergence segment, throat to expansion segment, the ablation gradually weakened; in terms of defect ablation, the middle ablation was weak, while the ablation in both sides was more serious. In a word, the proposed reconstruction method based on X-ray about C/C nozzle ablation can construct a clear model of ablative nozzle which characterizes the details about micro-cracks, deposition, pores and surface to analyze ablation, so that this method can create the ablation curve in any surface clearly.

  12. An object-oriented simulator for 3D digital breast tomosynthesis imaging system.

    PubMed

    Seyyedi, Saeed; Cengiz, Kubra; Kamasak, Mustafa; Yildirim, Isa

    2013-01-01

    Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) is an innovative imaging modality that provides 3D reconstructed images of breast to detect the breast cancer. Projections obtained with an X-ray source moving in a limited angle interval are used to reconstruct 3D image of breast. Several reconstruction algorithms are available for DBT imaging. Filtered back projection algorithm has traditionally been used to reconstruct images from projections. Iterative reconstruction algorithms such as algebraic reconstruction technique (ART) were later developed. Recently, compressed sensing based methods have been proposed in tomosynthesis imaging problem. We have developed an object-oriented simulator for 3D digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) imaging system using C++ programming language. The simulator is capable of implementing different iterative and compressed sensing based reconstruction methods on 3D digital tomosynthesis data sets and phantom models. A user friendly graphical user interface (GUI) helps users to select and run the desired methods on the designed phantom models or real data sets. The simulator has been tested on a phantom study that simulates breast tomosynthesis imaging problem. Results obtained with various methods including algebraic reconstruction technique (ART) and total variation regularized reconstruction techniques (ART+TV) are presented. Reconstruction results of the methods are compared both visually and quantitatively by evaluating performances of the methods using mean structural similarity (MSSIM) values. PMID:24371468

  13. 3D structure of liquid sprays: X-ray μ -radiography and tomography by polycapillary based technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchitto, L.; Allocca, L.; Hampai, D.; Alfuso, S.; Dabagov, S. B.; Liedl, A.; Polese, C.

    2015-07-01

    This work reports the results of X-ray μ -tomographic investigation on the inner structure of high pressure fuel sprays. X-ray imaging is widely used in industry where non-destructive and high accuracy measurements of the samples morphology are required. A high flux beam can overcome the problems related to the low absorption of hydrocarbon chains as fossil fuels, therefore synchrotron X-ray sources are generally used for fuel sprays investigation. A desktop facility has successfully been used to characterize high pressure gasoline sprays for automotive applications. A X-ray tube coupled with polycapillary optics has been used providing a high flux beam with low divergence. In this paper the last improvements concerning quantitative measurements carried out on fuel sprays are reported.

  14. Indirect-detection single-photon-counting x-ray detector for breast tomosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Hao; Kaercher, Joerg; Durst, Roger

    2016-03-01

    X-ray mammography is a crucial screening tool for early identification of breast cancer. However, the overlap of anatomical features present in projection images often complicates the task of correctly identifying suspicious masses. As a result, there has been increasing interest in acquisition of volumetric information through digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) which, compared to mammography, offers the advantage of depth information. Since DBT requires acquisition of many projection images, it is desirable that the noise in each projection image be dominated by the statistical noise of the incident x-ray quanta and not by the additive noise of the imaging system (referred to as quantum-limited imaging) and that the cumulative dose be as low as possible (e.g., no more than for a mammogram). Unfortunately, the electronic noise (~2000 electrons) present in current DBT systems based on active matrix, flat-panel imagers (AMFPIs) is still relatively high compared with modest x-ray gain of the a-Se and CsI:Tl x-ray converters often used. To overcome the modest signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) limitations of current DBT systems, we have developed a large-area x-ray imaging detector with the combination of an extremely low noise (~20 electrons) active-pixel CMOS and a specially designed high resolution scintillator. The high sensitivity and low noise of such system provides better SNR by at least an order of magnitude than current state-of-art AMFPI systems and enables x-ray indirect-detection single photon counting (SPC) at mammographic energies with the potential of dose reduction.

  15. 3D multiscale segmentation and morphological analysis of X-ray microtomography from cold-sprayed coatings.

    PubMed

    Gillibert, L; Peyrega, C; Jeulin, D; Guipont, V; Jeandin, M

    2012-11-01

    X-ray microtomography from cold-sprayed coatings brings a new insight on this deposition process. A noise-tolerant segmentation algorithm is introduced, based on the combination of two segmentations: a deterministic multiscale segmentation and a stochastic segmentation. The stochastic approach uses random Poisson lines as markers. Results on a X-ray microtomographic image of aluminium particles are presented and validated. PMID:22946787

  16. 3D printing in X-ray and Gamma-Ray Imaging: A novel method for fabricating high-density imaging apertures.

    PubMed

    Miller, Brian W; Moore, Jared W; Barrett, Harrison H; Fryé, Teresa; Adler, Steven; Sery, Joe; Furenlid, Lars R

    2011-12-10

    Advances in 3D rapid-prototyping printers, 3D modeling software, and casting techniques allow for cost-effective fabrication of custom components in gamma-ray and X-ray imaging systems. Applications extend to new fabrication methods for custom collimators, pinholes, calibration and resolution phantoms, mounting and shielding components, and imaging apertures. Details of the fabrication process for these components, specifically the 3D printing process, cold casting with a tungsten epoxy, and lost-wax casting in platinum are presented.

  17. 3D printing in X-ray and Gamma-Ray Imaging: A novel method for fabricating high-density imaging apertures☆

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Brian W.; Moore, Jared W.; Barrett, Harrison H.; Fryé, Teresa; Adler, Steven; Sery, Joe; Furenlid, Lars R.

    2011-01-01

    Advances in 3D rapid-prototyping printers, 3D modeling software, and casting techniques allow for cost-effective fabrication of custom components in gamma-ray and X-ray imaging systems. Applications extend to new fabrication methods for custom collimators, pinholes, calibration and resolution phantoms, mounting and shielding components, and imaging apertures. Details of the fabrication process for these components, specifically the 3D printing process, cold casting with a tungsten epoxy, and lost-wax casting in platinum are presented. PMID:22199414

  18. Characterizing X-ray detectors for prototype digital breast tomosynthesis systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Y.-s.; Park, H.-s.; Park, S.-J.; Choi, S.; Lee, H.; Lee, D.; Choi, Y.-W.; Kim, H.-J.

    2016-03-01

    The digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) system is a newly developed 3-D imaging technique that overcomes the tissue superposition problems of conventional mammography. Therefore, it produces fewer false positives. In DBT system, several parameters are involved in image acquisition, including geometric components. A series of projections should be acquired at low exposure. This makes the system strongly dependent on the detector's characteristic performance. This study compares two types of x-ray detectors developed by the Korea Electrotechnology Research Institute (KERI). The first prototype DBT system has a CsI (Tl) scintillator/CMOS based flat panel digital detector (2923 MAM, Dexela Ltd.), with a pixel size of 0.0748 mm. The second uses a-Se based direct conversion full field detector (AXS 2430, analogic) with a pixel size of 0.085 mm. The geometry of both systems is same, with a focal spot 665.8 mm from the detector, and a center of rotation 33 mm above the detector surface. The systems were compared with regard to modulation transfer function (MTF), normalized noise power spectrum (NNPS), detective quantum efficiency (DQE) and a new metric, the relative object detectability (ROD). The ROD quantifies the relative performance of each detector at detecting specified objects. The system response function demonstrated excellent linearity (R2>0.99). The CMOS-based detector had a high sensitivity, while the Anrad detector had a large dynamic range. The higher MTF and noise power spectrum (NPS) values were measured using an Anrad detector. The maximum DQE value of the Dexela detector was higher than that of the Anrad detector with a low exposure level, considering one projection exposure for tomosynthesis. Overall, the Dexela detector performed better than did the Anrad detector with regard to the simulated Al wires, spheres, test objects of ROD with low exposure level. In this study, we compared the newly developed prototype DBT system with two different types of x-ray

  19. Estimation of effective x-ray tissue attenuation differences for volumetric breast density measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Biao; Ruth, Chris; Jing, Zhenxue; Ren, Baorui; Smith, Andrew; Kshirsagar, Ashwini

    2014-03-01

    Breast density has been identified to be a risk factor of developing breast cancer and an indicator of lesion diagnostic obstruction due to masking effect. Volumetric density measurement evaluates fibro-glandular volume, breast volume, and breast volume density measures that have potential advantages over area density measurement in risk assessment. One class of volume density computing methods is based on the finding of the relative fibro-glandular tissue attenuation with regards to the reference fat tissue, and the estimation of the effective x-ray tissue attenuation differences between the fibro-glandular and fat tissue is key to volumetric breast density computing. We have modeled the effective attenuation difference as a function of actual x-ray skin entrance spectrum, breast thickness, fibro-glandular tissue thickness distribution, and detector efficiency. Compared to other approaches, our method has threefold advantages: (1) avoids the system calibration-based creation of effective attenuation differences which may introduce tedious calibrations for each imaging system and may not reflect the spectrum change and scatter induced overestimation or underestimation of breast density; (2) obtains the system specific separate and differential attenuation values of fibroglandular and fat for each mammographic image; and (3) further reduces the impact of breast thickness accuracy to volumetric breast density. A quantitative breast volume phantom with a set of equivalent fibro-glandular thicknesses has been used to evaluate the volume breast density measurement with the proposed method. The experimental results have shown that the method has significantly improved the accuracy of estimating breast density.

  20. The diagnostic capability of x-ray scattering parameters for the characterization of breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Elshemey, Wael M.; Desouky, Omar S.; Fekry, Mostafa M.; Talaat, Sahar M.; Elsayed, Anwar A.

    2010-08-15

    Purpose: The evaluation of the diagnostic capability of easy to measure x-ray scattering profile characterization parameters for the detection of breast cancer in excised samples. The selected parameters are the full width at half maximum (FWHM) and area under the x-ray scattering profile of breast tissue in addition to the ratio of scattering intensities (I{sub 2}/I{sub 1}%) at 1.6 nm{sup -1} to that at 1.1 nm{sup -1} (corresponding to scattering from soft and adipose tissues, respectively). Methods: A histopathologist is asked to classify 36 excised breast tissue samples into healthy or malignant. A conventional x-ray diffractometer is used to acquire the scattering profiles of the investigated samples. The values of three profile characterization parameters are calculated and the diagnostic capability of each is evaluated by determining the optimal cutoffs of scatter diagrams, calculating the diagnostic indices, and plotting the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves. Results: At the calculated optimal cutoff for each of the examined parameters, the sensitivity ranged from 78% (for area under curve) up to 94% (for FWHM), the specificity ranged from 94%[for I{sub 2}/I{sub 1}% and area under curve] up to 100% (for FWHM), and the diagnostic accuracy ranged from 86% (for area under curve) up to 97% (for FWHM). The area under the ROC curves is greater than 0.95 for all of the investigated parameters, reflecting a highly accurate diagnostic performance. Conclusions: The discussed tests offered a means to quantitatively evaluate the performance of the suggested breast tissue x-ray scattering characterization parameters. The performance results are promising, indicating that the evaluated parameters would be considered a tool for fast, on spot probing of breast cancer in excised tissue samples.

  1. Carbon nanotube based stationary x-ray tomosynthesis scanner for detection of breast cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Guang

    In this dissertation, my Ph.D. research during the past six years will be presented. My research mainly focused on design, fabrication and characterization of devices based on carbon nanotubes (CNT). Since the discovery of CNT in 1991, the research focus has gradually shifted from material synthesis and characterization to devices and applications. During early stages of my Ph.D. study, I worked on synthesizing CNT using laser ablation method, and fabricating CNT-AFM tips and magnetic wire MFM tips. During the second half of my Ph.D. study, my research focused more on design, fabrication, and testing the x-ray sources and imaging systems based on CNT, including both single-beam system (microCT) and multi-beam system (tomosysthesis). During the last two years, I worked on the project to develop a novel imaging system (Argus) using CNT x-ray source array for breast cancer detection. This is the first stationary digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) imaging system in the world. My research result has shown great clinical potentials of these imaging systems using x-ray source based on CNTs. This dissertation is composed by five chapters. In chapter one, the physics behind x-ray and field emission theory will be reviewed. Chapter two covers discovery, property and synthesis of CNT. Methods to fabricate CNT emitters and their emission property will also be introduced there. Single and multi beam x-ray sources and applications will be discussed in chapter three. The design and characteristic test results are presented. The application includes micro-CT, tomosynthesis and multiplexing. Chapter four is dedicated to the Argus system, the first stationary digital breast tomosynthesis imaging system. At last, conclusion is given in chapter five.

  2. Measurement of breast-tissue x-ray attenuation by spectral mammography: solid lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fredenberg, Erik; Kilburn-Toppin, Fleur; Willsher, Paula; Moa, Elin; Danielsson, Mats; Dance, David R.; Young, Kenneth C.; Wallis, Matthew G.

    2016-04-01

    Knowledge of x-ray attenuation is essential for developing and evaluating x-ray imaging technologies. For instance, techniques to distinguish between cysts and solid tumours at mammography screening would be highly desirable to reduce recalls, but the development requires knowledge of the x-ray attenuation for cysts and tumours. We have previously measured the attenuation of cyst fluid using photon-counting spectral mammography. Data on x-ray attenuation for solid breast lesions are available in the literature, but cover a relatively wide range, likely caused by natural spread between samples, random measurement errors, and different experimental conditions. In this study, we have adapted a previously developed spectral method to measure the linear attenuation of solid breast lesions. A total of 56 malignant and 5 benign lesions were included in the study. The samples were placed in a holder that allowed for thickness measurement. Spectral (energy-resolved) images of the samples were acquired and the image signal was mapped to equivalent thicknesses of two known reference materials, which can be used to derive the x-ray attenuation as a function of energy. The spread in equivalent material thicknesses was relatively large between samples, which is likely to be caused mainly by natural variation and only to a minor extent by random measurement errors and sample inhomogeneity. No significant difference in attenuation was found between benign and malignant solid lesions. The separation between cyst-fluid and tumour attenuation was, however, significant, which suggests it may be possible to distinguish cystic from solid breast lesions, and the results lay the groundwork for a clinical trial. In addition, the study adds a relatively large sample set to the published data and may contribute to a reduction in the overall uncertainty in the literature.

  3. Conceptual detector development and Monte Carlo simulation of a novel 3D breast computed tomography system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziegle, Jens; Müller, Bernhard H.; Neumann, Bernd; Hoeschen, Christoph

    2016-03-01

    A new 3D breast computed tomography (CT) system is under development enabling imaging of microcalcifications in a fully uncompressed breast including posterior chest wall tissue. The system setup uses a steered electron beam impinging on small tungsten targets surrounding the breast to emit X-rays. A realization of the corresponding detector concept is presented in this work and it is modeled through Monte Carlo simulations in order to quantify first characteristics of transmission and secondary photons. The modeled system comprises a vertical alignment of linear detectors hold by a case that also hosts the breast. Detectors are separated by gaps to allow the passage of X-rays towards the breast volume. The detectors located directly on the opposite side of the gaps detect incident X-rays. Mechanically moving parts in an imaging system increase the duration of image acquisition and thus can cause motion artifacts. So, a major advantage of the presented system design is the combination of the fixed detectors and the fast steering electron beam which enable a greatly reduced scan time. Thereby potential motion artifacts are reduced so that the visualization of small structures such as microcalcifications is improved. The result of the simulation of a single projection shows high attenuation by parts of the detector electronics causing low count levels at the opposing detectors which would require a flat field correction, but it also shows a secondary to transmission ratio of all counted X-rays of less than 1 percent. Additionally, a single slice with details of various sizes was reconstructed using filtered backprojection. The smallest detail which was still visible in the reconstructed image has a size of 0.2mm.

  4. Performance of a carbon nanotube field emission X-ray source array for stationary digital breast tomosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gidcumb, Emily Morgan

    This work describes the performance of a stationary digital breast tomosynthesis (s-DBT) X-ray tube based on carbon nanotube (CNT) cathodes, and the imaging system developed around it. The s-DBT system has the potential to improve the detection and diagnosis of breast cancer over commercially available digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) systems. DBT is growing in popularity in the United States, and around the world, as a potential replacement for traditional 2D mammography. The main advantage of DBT over 2D mammography lies in the pseudo-3D nature of the technique allowing the removal of overlapping breast tissue within the image. s-DBT builds on this advantage by removing blur from focal spot motion. Introductions to breast imaging techniques and the DBT modality are given, followed by an introduction to carbon nanotube field emission, the foundation of the s-DBT technology. Details of the s-DBT X-ray tube design and system integration are discussed including specific design parameters, system requirements, and the development process. Also included are summaries of the X-ray tube and system performance over time, and results from characterization measurements. Specific focus is given to the development and completion of a fabrication procedure for tungsten gate mesh, characterization of the CNT cathodes, and improving the system's spatial resolution with use of the focusing electrodes. The tungsten gate mesh is an essential component for extracting electrons from CNTs. A successful deep reactive ion etching fabrication procedure was developed, and the improved gate mesh allowed for higher cathode current and longer pulse widths to be employed in the s-DBT system. Characterization of the CNT cathodes revealed their high-current capacity and the ability to produce relatively long pulse widths, mimicking a 2D imaging modality. This work confirmed that the cathodes are well suited for the task of breast imaging, and explored possible improvements. Lastly, it was

  5. Estimates of Average Glandular Dose with Auto-modes of X-ray Exposures in Digital Breast Tomosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Kamal, Izdihar; Chelliah, Kanaga K.; Mustafa, Nawal

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this research was to examine the average glandular dose (AGD) of radiation among different breast compositions of glandular and adipose tissue with auto-modes of exposure factor selection in digital breast tomosynthesis. Methods: This experimental study was carried out in the National Cancer Society, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, between February 2012 and February 2013 using a tomosynthesis digital mammography X-ray machine. The entrance surface air kerma and the half-value layer were determined using a 100H thermoluminescent dosimeter on 50% glandular and 50% adipose tissue (50/50) and 20% glandular and 80% adipose tissue (20/80) commercially available breast phantoms (Computerized Imaging Reference Systems, Inc., Norfolk, Virginia, USA) with auto-time, auto-filter and auto-kilovolt modes. Results: The lowest AGD for the 20/80 phantom with auto-time was 2.28 milliGray (mGy) for two dimension (2D) and 2.48 mGy for three dimensional (3D) images. The lowest AGD for the 50/50 phantom with auto-time was 0.97 mGy for 2D and 1.0 mGy for 3D. Conclusion: The AGD values for both phantoms were lower against a high kilovolt peak and the use of auto-filter mode was more practical for quick acquisition while limiting the probability of operator error. PMID:26052465

  6. Phase-contrast x-ray imaging of the breast: recent developments towards clinics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coan, P.; Bravin, A.; Tromba, G.

    2013-12-01

    Breast imaging is one of the most demanding and delicate radiological applications. Mammography is the primary diagnosis tool in breast cancer detection and national screening programmes. Recognition of breast cancer depends on the detection of subtle architectural distortion, masses showing near normal breast tissue density, skin thickening and microcalcifications. The small differences in attenuation of x-rays between normal and malignant tissue result in low contrast and make cancer detection difficult in conventional x-ray absorption mammography. Because of these challenging aspects, breast imaging has been the first and most explored diagnostic field in phase-contrast imaging research. This novel imaging method has been extensively used and has demonstrated a unique capability in producing high-contrast and sensitive images at quasi-histological resolution. The most recent and significant technical developments are introduced and results obtained by the application of various phase-contrast imaging techniques for breast imaging are reported. The first phase-contrast mammography clinical trials project is also presented and the short- and long-term future perspectives of the method are discussed.

  7. 3D Imaging of Nickel Oxidation States using Full Field X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure Nanotomography

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, George; Harris, William; Izzo, John; Grew, Kyle N.

    2012-01-20

    Reduction-oxidation (redox) cycling of the nickel electrocatalyst phase in the solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) anode can lead to performance degradation and cell failure. A greater understanding of nickel redox mechanisms at the microstructural level is vital to future SOFC development. Transmission x-ray microscopy (TXM) provides several key techniques for exploring oxidation states within SOFC electrode microstructure. Specifically, x-ray nanotomography and x-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy have been applied to study samples of varying nickel (Ni) and nickel oxide (NiO) compositions. The imaged samples are treated as mock SOFC anodes containing distinct regions of the materials in question. XANES spectra presented for the individual materials provide a basis for the further processing and analysis of mixed samples. Images of composite samples obtained are segmented, and the distinct nickel and nickel oxide phases are uniquely identified using full field XANES spectroscopy. Applications to SOFC analysis are discussed.

  8. 3D reconstruction of a patient-specific surface model of the proximal femur from calibrated x-ray radiographs: A validation study

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng Guoyan; Schumann, Steffen

    2009-04-15

    Twenty-three femurs (one plastic bone and twenty-two cadaver bones) with both nonpathologic and pathologic cases were considered to validate a statistical shape model based technique for three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction of a patient-specific surface model from calibrated x-ray radiographs. The 3D reconstruction technique is based on an iterative nonrigid registration of the features extracted from a statistically instantiated 3D surface model to those interactively identified from the radiographs. The surface models reconstructed from the radiographs were compared to the associated ground truths derived either from a 3D CT-scan reconstruction method or from a 3D laser-scan reconstruction method and an average error distance of 0.95 mm were found. Compared to the existing works, our approach has the advantage of seamlessly handling both nonpathologic and pathologic cases even when the statistical shape model that we used was constructed from surface models of nonpathologic bones.

  9. Characterization of materials for optimal near-infrared and x-ray imaging of the breast.

    PubMed

    Michaelsen, Kelly; Krishnaswamy, Venkataramanan; Pogue, Brian W; Brooks, Ken; Defreitas, Ken; Shaw, Ian; Poplack, Steven P; Paulsen, Keith D

    2012-09-01

    Development of a detector case for complete co-registration of images in a non-fiber-based combined near-infrared spectral tomography and digital breast tomosynthesis, required analysis to find materials that could support a breast under full mammographic compression without affecting the x-ray images or the quality of the near infrared measurements. Several possible solutions were considered, and many types of plastics were tested in the development of the detector case. Light channeling within the detector case changed the data obtained in resin and agarose phantoms, lowering recovered absorption values. Additional developments focusing on blocking stray light were successful and permitted a normal subject imaging exam.

  10. Mechanical, Electromagnetic, and X-ray Shielding Characterization of a 3D Printable Tungsten-Polycarbonate Polymer Matrix Composite for Space-Based Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shemelya, Corey M.; Rivera, Armando; Perez, Angel Torrado; Rocha, Carmen; Liang, Min; Yu, Xiaoju; Kief, Craig; Alexander, David; Stegeman, James; Xin, Hao; Wicker, Ryan B.; MacDonald, Eric; Roberson, David A.

    2015-08-01

    Material-extrusion three-dimensional (3D) printing has recently attracted much interest because of its process flexibility, rapid response to design alterations, and ability to create structures "on-the-go". For this reason, 3D printing has possible applications in rapid creation of space-based devices, for example cube satellites (CubeSat). This work focused on fabrication and characterization of tungsten-doped polycarbonate polymer matrix composites specifically designed for x-ray radiation-shielding applications. The polycarbonate-tungsten polymer composite obtained intentionally utilizes low loading levels to provide x-ray shielding while limiting effects on other properties of the material, for example weight, electromagnetic functionality, and mechanical strength. The fabrication process, from tungsten functionalization to filament extrusion and material characterization, is described, including printability, determination of x-ray attenuation, tensile strength, impact resistance, and gigahertz permittivity, and failure analysis. The proposed materials are uniquely advantageous when implemented in 3D printed structures, because even a small volume fraction of tungsten has been shown to substantially alter the properties of the resulting composite.

  11. High resolution stationary digital breast tomosynthesis using distributed carbon nanotube x-ray source array

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Xin; Tucker, Andrew; Gidcumb, Emily; Shan, Jing; Yang, Guang; Calderon-Colon, Xiomara; Sultana, Shabana; Lu, Jianping; Zhou, Otto; Spronk, Derrek; Sprenger, Frank; Zhang, Yiheng; Kennedy, Don; Farbizio, Tom; Jing, Zhenxue

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to investigate the feasibility of increasing the system spatial resolution and scanning speed of Hologic Selenia Dimensions digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) scanner by replacing the rotating mammography x-ray tube with a specially designed carbon nanotube (CNT) x-ray source array, which generates all the projection images needed for tomosynthesis reconstruction by electronically activating individual x-ray sources without any mechanical motion. The stationary digital breast tomosynthesis (s-DBT) design aims to (i) increase the system spatial resolution by eliminating image blurring due to x-ray tube motion and (ii) reduce the scanning time. Low spatial resolution and long scanning time are the two main technical limitations of current DBT technology. Methods: A CNT x-ray source array was designed and evaluated against a set of targeted system performance parameters. Simulations were performed to determine the maximum anode heat load at the desired focal spot size and to design the electron focusing optics. Field emission current from CNT cathode was measured for an extended period of time to determine the stable life time of CNT cathode for an expected clinical operation scenario. The source array was manufactured, tested, and integrated with a Selenia scanner. An electronic control unit was developed to interface the source array with the detection system and to scan and regulate x-ray beams. The performance of the s-DBT system was evaluated using physical phantoms. Results: The spatially distributed CNT x-ray source array comprised 31 individually addressable x-ray sources covering a 30 angular span with 1 pitch and an isotropic focal spot size of 0.6 mm at full width at half-maximum. Stable operation at 28 kV(peak) anode voltage and 38 mA tube current was demonstrated with extended lifetime and good source-to-source consistency. For the standard imaging protocol of 15 views over 14, 100 mAs dose, and 2 × 2 detector

  12. High resolution stationary digital breast tomosynthesis using distributed carbon nanotube x-ray source array

    SciTech Connect

    Qian Xin; Tucker, Andrew; Gidcumb, Emily; Shan Jing; Yang Guang; Calderon-Colon, Xiomara; Sultana, Shabana; Lu Jianping; Zhou, Otto; Spronk, Derrek; Sprenger, Frank; Zhang Yiheng; Kennedy, Don; Farbizio, Tom; Jing Zhenxue

    2012-04-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to investigate the feasibility of increasing the system spatial resolution and scanning speed of Hologic Selenia Dimensions digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) scanner by replacing the rotating mammography x-ray tube with a specially designed carbon nanotube (CNT) x-ray source array, which generates all the projection images needed for tomosynthesis reconstruction by electronically activating individual x-ray sources without any mechanical motion. The stationary digital breast tomosynthesis (s-DBT) design aims to (i) increase the system spatial resolution by eliminating image blurring due to x-ray tube motion and (ii) reduce the scanning time. Low spatial resolution and long scanning time are the two main technical limitations of current DBT technology. Methods: A CNT x-ray source array was designed and evaluated against a set of targeted system performance parameters. Simulations were performed to determine the maximum anode heat load at the desired focal spot size and to design the electron focusing optics. Field emission current from CNT cathode was measured for an extended period of time to determine the stable life time of CNT cathode for an expected clinical operation scenario. The source array was manufactured, tested, and integrated with a Selenia scanner. An electronic control unit was developed to interface the source array with the detection system and to scan and regulate x-ray beams. The performance of the s-DBT system was evaluated using physical phantoms. Results: The spatially distributed CNT x-ray source array comprised 31 individually addressable x-ray sources covering a 30 angular span with 1 pitch and an isotropic focal spot size of 0.6 mm at full width at half-maximum. Stable operation at 28 kV(peak) anode voltage and 38 mA tube current was demonstrated with extended lifetime and good source-to-source consistency. For the standard imaging protocol of 15 views over 14, 100 mAs dose, and 2 x 2 detector binning

  13. Carbon nanotube electron field emitters for x-ray imaging of human breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Gidcumb, Emily; Gao, Bo; Shan, Jing; Inscoe, Christy; Lu, Jianping; Zhou, Otto

    2014-06-20

    For imaging human breast cancer, digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) has been shown to improve image quality and breast cancer detection in comparison to two-dimensional (2D) mammography. Current DBT systems have limited spatial resolution and lengthy scan times. Stationary DBT (s-DBT), utilizing an array of carbon nanotube (CNT) field emission x-ray sources, provides increased spatial resolution and potentially faster imaging than current DBT systems. This study presents the results of detailed evaluations of CNT cathodes for x-ray breast imaging tasks. The following were investigated: high current, long-term stability of CNT cathodes for DBT; feasibility of using CNT cathodes to perform a 2D radiograph function; and cathode performance through several years of imaging. Results show that a breast tomosynthesis system using CNT cathodes could run far beyond the experimentally tested lifetime of one to two years. CNT cathodes were found capable of producing higher currents than typical DBT would require, indicating that the s-DBT imaging time can be further reduced. The feasibility of using a single cathode of the s-DBT tube to perform 2D mammography in 4 s was demonstrated. Over the lifetime of the prototype s-DBT system, it was found that both cathode performance and transmission rate were stable and consistent.

  14. Carbon nanotube electron field emitters for x-ray imaging of human breast cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gidcumb, Emily; Gao, Bo; Shan, Jing; Inscoe, Christy; Lu, Jianping; Zhou, Otto

    2014-06-01

    For imaging human breast cancer, digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) has been shown to improve image quality and breast cancer detection in comparison to two-dimensional (2D) mammography. Current DBT systems have limited spatial resolution and lengthy scan times. Stationary DBT (s-DBT), utilizing an array of carbon nanotube (CNT) field emission x-ray sources, provides increased spatial resolution and potentially faster imaging than current DBT systems. This study presents the results of detailed evaluations of CNT cathodes for x-ray breast imaging tasks. The following were investigated: high current, long-term stability of CNT cathodes for DBT; feasibility of using CNT cathodes to perform a 2D radiograph function; and cathode performance through several years of imaging. Results show that a breast tomosynthesis system using CNT cathodes could run far beyond the experimentally tested lifetime of one to two years. CNT cathodes were found capable of producing higher currents than typical DBT would require, indicating that the s-DBT imaging time can be further reduced. The feasibility of using a single cathode of the s-DBT tube to perform 2D mammography in 4 s was demonstrated. Over the lifetime of the prototype s-DBT system, it was found that both cathode performance and transmission rate were stable and consistent.

  15. In situ investigation of high humidity stress corrosion cracking of 7075 aluminum alloy by three-dimensional (3D) X-ray synchrotron tomography

    DOE PAGES

    Singh, S. S.; Williams, J. J.; Lin, M. F.; Xiao, X.; De Carlo, F.; Chawla, N.

    2014-05-14

    In situ X-ray synchrotron tomography was used to investigate the stress corrosion cracking behavior of under-aged Al–Zn–Mg–Cu alloy in moisture. The discontinuous surface cracks (crack jumps) mentioned in the literature are actually a single continuous and tortuous crack when observed in three dimension (3D). Contrary to 2D measurements made at the surface which suggest non-uniform crack growth rates, 3D measurements of the crack length led to a much more accurate measurement of crack growth rates.

  16. In situ investigation of high humidity stress corrosion cracking of 7075 aluminum alloy by three-dimensional (3D) X-ray synchrotron tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, S. S.; Williams, J. J.; Lin, M. F.; Xiao, X.; De Carlo, F.; Chawla, N.

    2014-05-14

    In situ X-ray synchrotron tomography was used to investigate the stress corrosion cracking behavior of under-aged Al–Zn–Mg–Cu alloy in moisture. The discontinuous surface cracks (crack jumps) mentioned in the literature are actually a single continuous and tortuous crack when observed in three dimension (3D). Contrary to 2D measurements made at the surface which suggest non-uniform crack growth rates, 3D measurements of the crack length led to a much more accurate measurement of crack growth rates.

  17. X-ray scattering for the characterization of lyophilized breast tissue samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elshemey, Wael M.; Mohamed, Fayrouz S.; Khater, Ibrahim M.

    2013-09-01

    This work investigates the possibility of characterizing breast cancer by measuring the X-ray scattering profiles of lyophilized excised breast tissue samples. Since X-ray scattering from water-rich tissue is dominated by scattering from water, the removal of water by lyophilization would enhance the characterization process. In the present study, X-ray scattering profiles of 22 normal, 22 malignant and 10 benign breast tissue samples are measured. The cut-offs of scatter diagrams, sensitivity, specificity and diagnostic accuracy of three characterization parameters (full width at half maximum (FWHM) for the peak at 1.1 nm-1, area under curve (AUC), and ratio of 1st to 2nd scattering peak intensities (I1/I2%)) are calculated and compared to the data from non-lyophilized samples. Results show increased sensitivity (up to 100%) of the present data on lyophilized breast tissue samples compared to previously reported data for non-lyophilized samples while the specificity (up to 95.4%), diagnostic accuracy (up to 95.4%) and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve values (up to 0.9979) for both sets of data are comparable. The present study shows significant differences between normal samples and each of malignant and benign samples. Only subtle differences exist between malignant and benign lyophilized breast tissue samples where FWHM=0.7±0.1 and 0.8±0.3, AUC=1.3±0.2 and 1.4±0.2 and I1/I2%=44.9±11.0 and 52.4±7.6 for malignant and benign samples respectively.

  18. Dedicated 3D photoacoustic breast imaging

    PubMed Central

    Kruger, Robert A.; Kuzmiak, Cherie M.; Lam, Richard B.; Reinecke, Daniel R.; Del Rio, Stephen P.; Steed, Doreen

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To report the design and imaging methodology of a photoacoustic scanner dedicated to imaging hemoglobin distribution throughout a human breast. Methods: The authors developed a dedicated breast photoacoustic mammography (PAM) system using a spherical detector aperture based on our previous photoacoustic tomography scanner. The system uses 512 detectors with rectilinear scanning. The scan shape is a spiral pattern whose radius varies from 24 to 96 mm, thereby allowing a field of view that accommodates a wide range of breast sizes. The authors measured the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) using a target comprised of 1-mm dots printed on clear plastic. Each dot absorption coefficient was approximately the same as a 1-mm thickness of whole blood at 756 nm, the output wavelength of the Alexandrite laser used by this imaging system. The target was immersed in varying depths of an 8% solution of stock Liposyn II-20%, which mimics the attenuation of breast tissue (1.1 cm−1). The spatial resolution was measured using a 6 μm-diameter carbon fiber embedded in agar. The breasts of four healthy female volunteers, spanning a range of breast size from a brassiere C cup to a DD cup, were imaged using a 96-mm spiral protocol. Results: The CNR target was clearly visualized to a depth of 53 mm. Spatial resolution, which was estimated from the full width at half-maximum of a profile across the PAM image of a carbon fiber, was 0.42 mm. In the four human volunteers, the vasculature was well visualized throughout the breast tissue, including to the chest wall. Conclusions: CNR, lateral field-of-view and penetration depth of our dedicated PAM scanning system is sufficient to image breasts as large as 1335 mL, which should accommodate up to 90% of the women in the United States. PMID:24320471

  19. 3D Non-destructive morphological analysis of a solid oxide fuel cell anode using full-field X-ray nano-tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karen Chen-Wiegart, Yu-chen; Cronin, J. Scott; Yuan, Qingxi; Yakal-Kremski, Kyle J.; Barnett, Scott A.; Wang, Jun

    2012-11-01

    An accurate 3D morphological analysis is critically needed to study the process-structure-property relationship in many application fields such as battery electrodes, fuel cells and porous materials for sensing and actuating. Here we present the application of a newly developed full field X-ray nano-scale transmission microscopy (TXM) imaging for a non-destructive, comprehensive 3D morphology analysis of a porous Ni-YSZ solid oxide fuel cell anode. A unique combination of improved 3D resolution and large analyzed volume (˜3600 μm3) yields structural data with excellent statistical accuracy. 3D morphological parameters quantified include phase volume fractions, surface and interfacial area densities, phase size distribution, directional connectivity, tortuosity, and electrochemically active triple phase boundary density. A prediction of electrochemical anode polarization resistance based on this microstructural data yielded good agreement with a measured anode resistance via electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The Mclachlan model is used to estimate the anode electrical conductivity.

  20. Microdosimetric characteristics of 50 kV X rays at different depths for breast intraoperative radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Wuu, Cheng-Shie; Sheu, Ren-Dih; Chen, Jing

    2015-09-01

    An intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT) device with 50 kV X rays was designed to deliver a single dose to the tumour bed after local excision of breast cancer. The quality of a radiation can be determined by the microscopic distribution of energy transfers along and across the charged particle tracks. The lineal energy, y, serves as an accurate measure of local energy concentration. The dose mean lineal energy, yD, is an indicator of radiation quality. For low linear energy transfer radiation, the ratio of its dose mean lineal energy to that of (60)Co gamma rays can serve as a good indicator of the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) at low doses. In this study, microdosimetric simulations are performed for soft tissue irradiated by 50 kV X rays generated from the IORT device, with a 4-cm breast applicator attached. All energy transfers are recorded with the location coordinates in the tissue. Microdosimetric single events in a sphere of 1 µm in diameter are scored as a function of radial distances from the applicator surface. Single-event spectra are then constructed. From those single-event spectra, dose mean lineal energy is calculated. Compared with dose mean lineal energy of (60)Co gamma rays, the estimated RBEs at low doses are given for the X rays at different depths in the tissue. The RBEs at clinically relevant doses, as a function of depth, are also presented.

  1. DynAMITe: a prototype large area CMOS APS for breast cancer diagnosis using x-ray diffraction measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konstantinidis, A.; Anaxagoras, T.; Esposito, M.; Allinson, N.; Speller, R.

    2012-03-01

    X-ray diffraction studies are used to identify specific materials. Several laboratory-based x-ray diffraction studies were made for breast cancer diagnosis. Ideally a large area, low noise, linear and wide dynamic range digital x-ray detector is required to perform x-ray diffraction measurements. Recently, digital detectors based on Complementary Metal-Oxide- Semiconductor (CMOS) Active Pixel Sensor (APS) technology have been used in x-ray diffraction studies. Two APS detectors, namely Vanilla and Large Area Sensor (LAS), were developed by the Multidimensional Integrated Intelligent Imaging (MI-3) consortium to cover a range of scientific applications including x-ray diffraction. The MI-3 Plus consortium developed a novel large area APS, named as Dynamically Adjustable Medical Imaging Technology (DynAMITe), to combine the key characteristics of Vanilla and LAS with a number of extra features. The active area (12.8 × 13.1 cm2) of DynaMITe offers the ability of angle dispersive x-ray diffraction (ADXRD). The current study demonstrates the feasibility of using DynaMITe for breast cancer diagnosis by identifying six breast-equivalent plastics. Further work will be done to optimize the system in order to perform ADXRD for identification of suspicious areas of breast tissue following a conventional mammogram taken with the same sensor.

  2. Monte Carlo simulation of novel breast imaging modalities based on coherent x-ray scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghammraoui, Bahaa; Badal, Andreu

    2014-07-01

    We present upgraded versions of MC-GPU and penEasy_Imaging, two open-source Monte Carlo codes for the simulation of radiographic projections and CT, that have been extended and validated to account for the effect of molecular interference in the coherent x-ray scatter. The codes were first validation by comparison between simulated and measured energy dispersive x-ray diffraction (EDXRD) spectra. A second validation was by evaluation of the rejection factor of a focused anti-scatter grid. To exemplify the capabilities of the new codes, the modified MC-GPU code was used to examine the possibility of characterizing breast tissue composition and microcalcifications in a volume of interest inside a whole breast phantom using EDXRD and to simulate a coherent scatter computed tomography (CSCT) system based on first generation CT acquisition geometry. It was confirmed that EDXRD and CSCT have the potential to characterize tissue composition inside a whole breast. The GPU-accelerated code was able to simulate, in just a few hours, a complete CSCT acquisition composed of 9758 independent pencil-beam projections. In summary, it has been shown that the presented software can be used for fast and accurate simulation of novel breast imaging modalities relying on scattering measurements and therefore can assist in the characterization and optimization of promising modalities currently under development.

  3. Monte Carlo simulation of novel breast imaging modalities based on coherent x-ray scattering.

    PubMed

    Ghammraoui, Bahaa; Badal, Andreu

    2014-07-01

    We present upgraded versions of MC-GPU and penEasy_Imaging, two open-source Monte Carlo codes for the simulation of radiographic projections and CT, that have been extended and validated to account for the effect of molecular interference in the coherent x-ray scatter. The codes were first validation by comparison between simulated and measured energy dispersive x-ray diffraction (EDXRD) spectra. A second validation was by evaluation of the rejection factor of a focused anti-scatter grid. To exemplify the capabilities of the new codes, the modified MC-GPU code was used to examine the possibility of characterizing breast tissue composition and microcalcifications in a volume of interest inside a whole breast phantom using EDXRD and to simulate a coherent scatter computed tomography (CSCT) system based on first generation CT acquisition geometry. It was confirmed that EDXRD and CSCT have the potential to characterize tissue composition inside a whole breast. The GPU-accelerated code was able to simulate, in just a few hours, a complete CSCT acquisition composed of 9758 independent pencil-beam projections. In summary, it has been shown that the presented software can be used for fast and accurate simulation of novel breast imaging modalities relying on scattering measurements and therefore can assist in the characterization and optimization of promising modalities currently under development. PMID:24898114

  4. Quantitative breast tissue characterization using grating-based x-ray phase-contrast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willner, M.; Herzen, J.; Grandl, S.; Auweter, S.; Mayr, D.; Hipp, A.; Chabior, M.; Sarapata, A.; Achterhold, K.; Zanette, I.; Weitkamp, T.; Sztrókay, A.; Hellerhoff, K.; Reiser, M.; Pfeiffer, F.

    2014-04-01

    X-ray phase-contrast imaging has received growing interest in recent years due to its high capability in visualizing soft tissue. Breast imaging became the focus of particular attention as it is considered the most promising candidate for a first clinical application of this contrast modality. In this study, we investigate quantitative breast tissue characterization using grating-based phase-contrast computed tomography (CT) at conventional polychromatic x-ray sources. Different breast specimens have been scanned at a laboratory phase-contrast imaging setup and were correlated to histopathology. Ascertained tumor types include phylloides tumor, fibroadenoma and infiltrating lobular carcinoma. Identified tissue types comprising adipose, fibroglandular and tumor tissue have been analyzed in terms of phase-contrast Hounsfield units and are compared to high-quality, high-resolution data obtained with monochromatic synchrotron radiation, as well as calculated values based on tabulated tissue properties. The results give a good impression of the method’s prospects and limitations for potential tumor detection and the associated demands on such a phase-contrast breast CT system. Furthermore, the evaluated quantitative tissue values serve as a reference for simulations and the design of dedicated phantoms for phase-contrast mammography.

  5. Assessment of the 3 D Pore Structure and Individual Components of Preshaped Catalyst Bodies by X-Ray Imaging

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Julio C; Mader, Kevin; Holler, Mirko; Haberthür, David; Diaz, Ana; Guizar-Sicairos, Manuel; Cheng, Wu-Cheng; Shu, Yuying; Raabe, Jörg; Menzel, Andreas; van Bokhoven, Jeroen A

    2015-01-01

    Porosity in catalyst particles is essential because it enables reactants to reach the active sites and it enables products to leave the catalyst. The engineering of composite-particle catalysts through the tuning of pore-size distribution and connectivity is hampered by the inability to visualize structure and porosity at critical-length scales. Herein, it is shown that the combination of phase-contrast X-ray microtomography and high-resolution ptychographic X-ray tomography allows the visualization and characterization of the interparticle pores at micro- and nanometer-length scales. Furthermore, individual components in preshaped catalyst bodies used in fluid catalytic cracking, one of the most used catalysts, could be visualized and identified. The distribution of pore sizes, as well as enclosed pores, which cannot be probed by traditional methods, such as nitrogen physisorption and isotherm analysis, were determined. PMID:26191088

  6. Generation of 3D synthetic breast tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elangovan, Premkumar; Dance, David R.; Young, Kenneth C.; Wells, Kevin

    2016-03-01

    Virtual clinical trials are an emergent approach for the rapid evaluation and comparison of various breast imaging technologies and techniques using computer-based modeling tools. A fundamental requirement of this approach for mammography is the use of realistic looking breast anatomy in the studies to produce clinically relevant results. In this work, a biologically inspired approach has been used to simulate realistic synthetic breast phantom blocks for use in virtual clinical trials. A variety of high and low frequency features (including Cooper's ligaments, blood vessels and glandular tissue) have been extracted from clinical digital breast tomosynthesis images and used to simulate synthetic breast blocks. The appearance of the phantom blocks was validated by presenting a selection of simulated 2D and DBT images interleaved with real images to a team of experienced readers for rating using an ROC paradigm. The average areas under the curve for 2D and DBT images were 0.53+/-.04 and 0.55+/-.07 respectively; errors are the standard errors of the mean. The values indicate that the observers had difficulty in differentiating the real images from simulated images. The statistical properties of simulated images of the phantom blocks were evaluated by means of power spectrum analysis. The power spectrum curves for real and simulated images closely match and overlap indicating good agreement.

  7. X-ray scatter correction method for dedicated breast computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Sechopoulos, Ioannis

    2012-05-15

    Purpose: To improve image quality and accuracy in dedicated breast computed tomography (BCT) by removing the x-ray scatter signal included in the BCT projections. Methods: The previously characterized magnitude and distribution of x-ray scatter in BCT results in both cupping artifacts and reduction of contrast and accuracy in the reconstructions. In this study, an image processing method is proposed that estimates and subtracts the low-frequency x-ray scatter signal included in each BCT projection postacquisition and prereconstruction. The estimation of this signal is performed using simple additional hardware, one additional BCT projection acquisition with negligible radiation dose, and simple image processing software algorithms. The high frequency quantum noise due to the scatter signal is reduced using a noise filter postreconstruction. The dosimetric consequences and validity of the assumptions of this algorithm were determined using Monte Carlo simulations. The feasibility of this method was determined by imaging a breast phantom on a BCT clinical prototype and comparing the corrected reconstructions to the unprocessed reconstructions and to reconstructions obtained from fan-beam acquisitions as a reference standard. One-dimensional profiles of the reconstructions and objective image quality metrics were used to determine the impact of the algorithm. Results: The proposed additional acquisition results in negligible additional radiation dose to the imaged breast ({approx}0.4% of the standard BCT acquisition). The processed phantom reconstruction showed substantially reduced cupping artifacts, increased contrast between adipose and glandular tissue equivalents, higher voxel value accuracy, and no discernible blurring of high frequency features. Conclusions: The proposed scatter correction method for dedicated breast CT is feasible and can result in highly improved image quality. Further optimization and testing, especially with patient images, is necessary to

  8. The effect of characteristic x-rays on the spatial and spectral resolution of a CZT-based detector for breast CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glick, Stephen J.; Didier, Clay S.

    2011-03-01

    In an effort to improve the early stage detection and diagnosis of breast cancer, a number of research groups have been investigating the use of x-ray computerized tomography (CT) systems dedicated for use in imaging the breast. Preliminary results suggest that dedicated breast CT systems can provide improved visualization of 3D breast tissue as compared to conventional mammography. However, current breast CT prototypes that are being investigated have limitations resulting in less than desirable spatial resolution, lesion contrast, and signal-to-noise (SNR) ratio. Another option is a CT breast imaging system that uses a cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) based detector operating in a photon counting mode. This paper uses a Monte Carlo simulation to evaluate the effect of characteristic x-rays on spatial and spectral resolution for a CZT detector used for breast CT. It is concluded that using CZT of 500-750 μm would not cause significant differences in spatial or spectral resolution, nor in stopping power as compared to using CZT with thickness 2-3 mm.

  9. X-ray scatter correction method for dedicated breast computed tomography: improvements and initial patient testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramamurthy, Senthil; D'Orsi, Carl J.; Sechopoulos, Ioannis

    2016-02-01

    A previously proposed x-ray scatter correction method for dedicated breast computed tomography was further developed and implemented so as to allow for initial patient testing. The method involves the acquisition of a complete second set of breast CT projections covering 360° with a perforated tungsten plate in the path of the x-ray beam. To make patient testing feasible, a wirelessly controlled electronic positioner for the tungsten plate was designed and added to a breast CT system. Other improvements to the algorithm were implemented, including automated exclusion of non-valid primary estimate points and the use of a different approximation method to estimate the full scatter signal. To evaluate the effectiveness of the algorithm, evaluation of the resulting image quality was performed with a breast phantom and with nine patient images. The improvements in the algorithm resulted in the avoidance of introduction of artifacts, especially at the object borders, which was an issue in the previous implementation in some cases. Both contrast, in terms of signal difference and signal difference-to-noise ratio were improved with the proposed method, as opposed to with the correction algorithm incorporated in the system, which does not recover contrast. Patient image evaluation also showed enhanced contrast, better cupping correction, and more consistent voxel values for the different tissues. The algorithm also reduces artifacts present in reconstructions of non-regularly shaped breasts. With the implemented hardware and software improvements, the proposed method can be reliably used during patient breast CT imaging, resulting in improvement of image quality, no introduction of artifacts, and in some cases reduction of artifacts already present. The impact of the algorithm on actual clinical performance for detection, diagnosis and other clinical tasks in breast imaging remains to be evaluated.

  10. X-ray scatter correction method for dedicated breast computed tomography: improvements and initial patient testing.

    PubMed

    Ramamurthy, Senthil; D'Orsi, Carl J; Sechopoulos, Ioannis

    2016-02-01

    A previously proposed x-ray scatter correction method for dedicated breast computed tomography was further developed and implemented so as to allow for initial patient testing. The method involves the acquisition of a complete second set of breast CT projections covering 360° with a perforated tungsten plate in the path of the x-ray beam. To make patient testing feasible, a wirelessly controlled electronic positioner for the tungsten plate was designed and added to a breast CT system. Other improvements to the algorithm were implemented, including automated exclusion of non-valid primary estimate points and the use of a different approximation method to estimate the full scatter signal. To evaluate the effectiveness of the algorithm, evaluation of the resulting image quality was performed with a breast phantom and with nine patient images. The improvements in the algorithm resulted in the avoidance of introduction of artifacts, especially at the object borders, which was an issue in the previous implementation in some cases. Both contrast, in terms of signal difference and signal difference-to-noise ratio were improved with the proposed method, as opposed to with the correction algorithm incorporated in the system, which does not recover contrast. Patient image evaluation also showed enhanced contrast, better cupping correction, and more consistent voxel values for the different tissues. The algorithm also reduces artifacts present in reconstructions of non-regularly shaped breasts. With the implemented hardware and software improvements, the proposed method can be reliably used during patient breast CT imaging, resulting in improvement of image quality, no introduction of artifacts, and in some cases reduction of artifacts already present. The impact of the algorithm on actual clinical performance for detection, diagnosis and other clinical tasks in breast imaging remains to be evaluated. PMID:26760295

  11. Method for the determination of the modulation transfer function (MTF) in 3D x-ray imaging systems with focus on correction for finite extent of test objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schäfer, Dirk; Wiegert, Jens; Bertram, Matthias

    2007-03-01

    It is well known that rotational C-arm systems are capable of providing 3D tomographic X-ray images with much higher spatial resolution than conventional CT systems. Using flat X-ray detectors, the pixel size of the detector typically is in the range of the size of the test objects. Therefore, the finite extent of the "point" source cannot be neglected for the determination of the MTF. A practical algorithm has been developed that includes bias estimation and subtraction, averaging in the spatial domain, and correction for the frequency content of the imaged bead or wire. Using this algorithm, the wire and the bead method are analyzed for flat detector based 3D X-ray systems with the use of standard CT performance phantoms. Results on both experimental and simulated data are presented. It is found that the approximation of applying the analysis of the wire method to a bead measurement is justified within 3% accuracy up to the first zero of the MTF.

  12. Direct navigation on 3D rotational x-ray data acquired with a mobile propeller C-arm: accuracy and application in functional endoscopic sinus surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van de Kraats, Everine B.; Carelsen, Bart; Fokkens, Wytske J.; Boon, Sjirk N.; Noordhoek, Niels; Niessen, Wiro J.; van Walsum, Theo

    2005-12-01

    Recently, three-dimensional (3D) rotational x-ray imaging has been combined with navigation technology, enabling direct 3D navigation for minimally invasive image guided interventions. In this study, phantom experiments are used to determine the accuracy of such a navigation set-up for a mobile C-arm with propeller motion. After calibration of the C-arm system, the accuracy is evaluated by pinpointing divots on a special-purpose phantom with known geometry. This evaluation is performed both with and without C-arm motion in between calibration and registration for navigation. The variation caused by each of the individual transformations in the calibration and registration process is also studied. The feasibility of direct navigation on 3D rotational x-ray images for functional endoscopic sinus surgery has been evaluated in a cadaver navigation experiment. Navigation accuracy was approximately 1.0 mm, which is sufficient for functional endoscopic sinus surgery. C-arm motion in between calibration and registration slightly degraded the registration accuracy by approximately 0.3 mm. Standard deviations of each of the transformations were in the range 0.15-0.31 mm. In the cadaver experiment, the navigation images were considered in good correspondence with the endoscopic images by an experienced ENT surgeon. Availability of 3D localization information provided by the navigation system was considered valuable by the ENT surgeon.

  13. X-ray scatter correction in breast tomosynthesis with a precomputed scatter map library

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Steve Si Jia; D’Orsi, Carl J.; Newell, Mary S.; Seidel, Rebecca L.; Patel, Bhavika; Sechopoulos, Ioannis

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To develop and evaluate the impact on lesion conspicuity of a software-based x-ray scatter correction algorithm for digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) imaging into which a precomputed library of x-ray scatter maps is incorporated. Methods: A previously developed model of compressed breast shapes undergoing mammography based on principal component analysis (PCA) was used to assemble 540 simulated breast volumes, of different shapes and sizes, undergoing DBT. A Monte Carlo (MC) simulation was used to generate the cranio-caudal (CC) view DBT x-ray scatter maps of these volumes, which were then assembled into a library. This library was incorporated into a previously developed software-based x-ray scatter correction, and the performance of this improved algorithm was evaluated with an observer study of 40 patient cases previously classified as BI-RADS® 4 or 5, evenly divided between mass and microcalcification cases. Observers were presented with both the original images and the scatter corrected (SC) images side by side and asked to indicate their preference, on a scale from −5 to +5, in terms of lesion conspicuity and quality of diagnostic features. Scores were normalized such that a negative score indicates a preference for the original images, and a positive score indicates a preference for the SC images. Results: The scatter map library removes the time-intensive MC simulation from the application of the scatter correction algorithm. While only one in four observers preferred the SC DBT images as a whole (combined mean score = 0.169 ± 0.37, p > 0.39), all observers exhibited a preference for the SC images when the lesion examined was a mass (1.06 ± 0.45, p < 0.0001). When the lesion examined consisted of microcalcification clusters, the observers exhibited a preference for the uncorrected images (−0.725 ± 0.51, p < 0.009). Conclusions: The incorporation of the x-ray scatter map library into the scatter correction algorithm improves the efficiency

  14. Solution structure of the complex between CR2 SCR 1-2 and C3d of human complement: an X-ray scattering and sedimentation modelling study.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Hannah E; Eaton, Julian T; Hannan, Jonathan P; Holers, V Michael; Perkins, Stephen J

    2005-02-25

    Complement receptor type 2 (CR2, CD21) forms a tight complex with C3d, a fragment of C3, the major complement component. Previous crystal structures of the C3d-CR2 SCR 1-2 complex and free CR2 SCR 1-2 showed that the two SCR domains of CR2 form contact with each other in a closed V-shaped structure. SCR 1 and SCR 2 are connected by an unusually long eight-residue linker peptide. Medium-resolution solution structures for CR2 SCR 1-2, C3d, and their complex were determined by X-ray scattering and analytical ultracentrifugation. CR2 SCR 1-2 is monomeric. For CR2 SCR 1-2, its radius of gyration R(G) of 2.12(+/-0.05) nm, its maximum length of 10nm and its sedimentation coefficient s20,w(o) of 1.40(+/-0.03) S do not agree with those calculated from the crystal structures, and instead suggest an open structure. Computer modelling of the CR2 SCR1-2 solution structure was based on the structural randomisation of the eight-residue linker peptide joining SCR 1 and SCR 2 to give 9950 trial models. Comparisons with the X-ray scattering curve indicated that the most favoured arrangements for the two SCR domains corresponded to an open V-shaped structure with no contacts between the SCR domains. For C3d, X-ray scattering and sedimentation velocity experiments showed that it exists as a monomer-dimer equilibrium with a dissociation constant of 40 microM. The X-ray scattering curve for monomeric C3d gave an R(G) value of 1.95 nm, and this together with its s20,w(o) value of 3.17 S gave good agreement with the monomeric C3d crystal structure. Modelling of the C3d dimer gave good agreements with its scattering and ultracentrifugation parameters. For the complex, scattering and ultracentrifugation experiments showed that there was no dimerisation, indicating that the C3d dimerisation site was located close to the CR2 SCR 1-2 binding site. The R(G) value of 2.44(+/-0.1) nm, its length of 9 nm and its s20,w(o) value of 3.45(+/-0.01) S showed that its structure was not much more

  15. Estimation of three-dimensional knee joint movement using bi-plane x-ray fluoroscopy and 3D-CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haneishi, Hideaki; Fujita, Satoshi; Kohno, Takahiro; Suzuki, Masahiko; Miyagi, Jin; Moriya, Hideshige

    2005-04-01

    Acquisition of exact information of three-dimensional knee joint movement is desired in plastic surgery. Conventional X-ray fluoroscopy provides dynamic but just two-dimensional projected image. On the other hand, three-dimensional CT provides three-dimensional but just static image. In this paper, a method for acquiring three-dimensional knee joint movement using both bi-plane, dynamic X-ray fluoroscopy and static three-dimensional CT is proposed. Basic idea is use of 2D/3D registration using digitally reconstructed radiograph (DRR) or virtual projection of CT data. Original ideal is not new but the application of bi-plane fluoroscopy to natural bones of knee is reported for the first time. The technique was applied to two volunteers and successful results were obtained. Accuracy evaluation through computer simulation and phantom experiment with a knee joint of a pig were also conducted.

  16. Automatic 3D lesion segmentation on breast ultrasound images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Hsien-Chi; Giger, Maryellen L.; Reiser, Ingrid; Drukker, Karen; Edwards, Alexandra; Sennett, Charlene A.

    2013-02-01

    Automatically acquired and reconstructed 3D breast ultrasound images allow radiologists to detect and evaluate breast lesions in 3D. However, assessing potential cancers in 3D ultrasound can be difficult and time consuming. In this study, we evaluate a 3D lesion segmentation method, which we had previously developed for breast CT, and investigate its robustness on lesions on 3D breast ultrasound images. Our dataset includes 98 3D breast ultrasound images obtained on an ABUS system from 55 patients containing 64 cancers. Cancers depicted on 54 US images had been clinically interpreted as negative on screening mammography and 44 had been clinically visible on mammography. All were from women with breast density BI-RADS 3 or 4. Tumor centers and margins were indicated and outlined by radiologists. Initial RGI-eroded contours were automatically calculated and served as input to the active contour segmentation algorithm yielding the final lesion contour. Tumor segmentation was evaluated by determining the overlap ratio (OR) between computer-determined and manually-drawn outlines. Resulting average overlap ratios on coronal, transverse, and sagittal views were 0.60 +/- 0.17, 0.57 +/- 0.18, and 0.58 +/- 0.17, respectively. All OR values were significantly higher the 0.4, which is deemed "acceptable". Within the groups of mammogram-negative and mammogram-positive cancers, the overlap ratios were 0.63 +/- 0.17 and 0.56 +/- 0.16, respectively, on the coronal views; with similar results on the other views. The segmentation performance was not found to be correlated to tumor size. Results indicate robustness of the 3D lesion segmentation technique in multi-modality 3D breast imaging.

  17. Bisphosphonate-functionalized gold nanoparticles for contrast-enhanced X-ray detection of breast microcalcifications.

    PubMed

    Cole, Lisa E; Vargo-Gogola, Tracy; Roeder, Ryan K

    2014-02-01

    Microcalcifications are one of the most common abnormalities detected by mammography for the diagnosis of breast cancer. However, the detection of microcalcifications and correct diagnosis of breast cancer are limited by the sensitivity and specificity of mammography. Therefore, the objective of this study was to investigate the potential of bisphosphonate-functionalized gold nanoparticles (BP-Au NPs) for contrast-enhanced radiographic detection of breast microcalcifications using two models of breast microcalcifications, which allowed for precise control over levels of hydroxyapatite (HA) mineral within a low attenuating matrix. First, an in vitro imaging phantom was prepared with varying concentrations of HA uniformly dispersed in an agarose hydrogel. The X-ray attenuation of HA-agarose compositions labeled by BP-Au NPs was increased by up to 26 HU compared to unlabeled compositions for HA concentrations ranging from 1 to 10 mg/mL. Second, an ex vivo tissue model was developed to more closely mimic the heterogeneity of breast tissue by injecting varying concentrations of HA in a Matrigel carrier into murine mammary glands. The X-ray attenuation of HA-Matrigel compositions labeled by BP-Au NPs was increased by up to 289 HU compared to unlabeled compositions for HA concentrations ranging from 0.5 to 25 mg/mL, which included an HA concentration (0.5 mg/mL) that was otherwise undetectable by micro-computed tomography. Cumulatively, both models demonstrated the ability of BP-Au NPs to enhance contrast for radiographic detection of microcalcifications, including at a clinically-relevant imaging resolution. Therefore, BP-Au NPs may have potential to improve clinical detection of breast microcalcifications by mammography. PMID:24360718

  18. Bisphosphonate-Functionalized Gold Nanoparticles for Contrast-Enhanced X-Ray Detection of Breast Microcalcifications

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Lisa E.; Vargo-Gogola, Tracy; Roeder, Ryan K.

    2014-01-01

    Microcalcifications are one of the most common abnormalities detected by mammography for the diagnosis of breast cancer. However, the detection of microcalcifications and correct diagnosis of breast cancer are limited by the sensitivity and specificity of mammography. Therefore, the objective of this study was to investigate the potential of bisphosphonate-functionalized gold nanoparticles (BP-Au NPs) for contrast-enhanced radiographic detection of breast microcalcifications using two models of breast microcalcifications which allowed for precise control over levels of hydroxyapatite (HA) mineral within a low attenuating matrix. First, an in vitro imaging phantom was prepared with varying concentrations of HA uniformly dispersed in an agarose hydrogel. The X-ray attenuation of HA-agarose compositions labeled by BP-Au NPs was increased by up to 26 HU compared to unlabeled compositions for HA concentrations ranging from 1–10 mg/mL. Second, an ex vivo tissue model was developed to more closely mimic the heterogeneity of breast tissue by injecting varying concentrations of HA in a Matrigel carrier into murine mammary glands. The X-ray attenuation of HA-Matrigel compositions labeled by BP-Au NPs was increased by up to 289 HU compared to unlabeled compositions for HA concentrations ranging from 0.5–25 mg/mL, which included an HA concentration (0.5 mg/mL) that was otherwise undetectable by micro-computed tomography. Cumulatively, both models demonstrated the ability of BP-Au NPs to enhance contrast for radiographic detection of microcalcifications, including at a clinically-relevant imaging resolution. Therefore, BP-Au NPs may have potential to improve clinical detection of breast microcalcifications by mammography. PMID:24360718

  19. The Best of Both Worlds: 3D X-ray Microscopy with Ultra-high Resolution and a Large Field of View

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, W.; Gelb, J.; Yang, Y.; Guan, Y.; Wu, W.; Chen, J.; Tian, Y.

    2011-09-01

    3D visualizations of complex structures within various samples have been achieved with high spatial resolution by X-ray computed nanotomography (nano-CT). While high spatial resolution generally comes at the expense of field of view (FOV). Here we proposed an approach that stitched several 3D volumes together into a single large volume to significantly increase the size of the FOV while preserving resolution. Combining this with nano-CT, 18-μm FOV with sub-60-nm resolution has been achieved for non-destructive 3D visualization of clustered yeasts that were too large for a single scan. It shows high promise for imaging other large samples in the future.

  20. Visualization of 3D geometric models of the breast created from contrast-enhanced MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leader, J. Ken, III; Wang, Xiao Hui; Chang, Yuan-Hsiang; Chapman, Brian E.

    2002-05-01

    Contrast enhanced breast MRI is currently used as an adjuvant modality to x-ray mammography because of its ability to resolve ambiguities and determine the extent of malignancy. This study described techniques to create and visualize 3D geometric models of abnormal breast tissue. MRIs were performed on a General Electric 1.5 Tesla scanner using dual phased array breast coils. Image processing tasks included: 1) correction of image inhomogeneity caused by the coils, 2) segmentation of normal and abnormal tissue, and 3) modeling and visualization of the segmented tissue. The models were visualized using object-based surface rendering which revealed characteristics critical to differentiating benign from malignant tissue. Surface rendering illustrated the enhancement distribution and enhancement patterns. The modeling process condensed the multi-slice MRI data information and standardized its interpretation. Visualizing the 3D models should improve the radiologist's and/or surgeon's impression of the 3D shape, extent, and accessibility of the malignancy compared to viewing breast MRI data slice by slice.

  1. Investigating the effect of characteristic x-rays in cadmium zinc telluride detectors under breast computerized tomography operating conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glick, Stephen J.; Didier, Clay

    2013-10-01

    A number of research groups have been investigating the use of dedicated breast computerized tomography (CT). Preliminary results have been encouraging, suggesting an improved visualization of masses on breast CT as compared to conventional mammography. Nonetheless, there are many challenges to overcome before breast CT can become a routine clinical reality. One potential improvement over current breast CT prototypes would be the use of photon counting detectors with cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) (or CdTe) semiconductor material. These detectors can operate at room temperature and provide high detection efficiency and the capability of multi-energy imaging; however, one factor in particular that limits image quality is the emission of characteristic x-rays. In this study, the degradative effects of characteristic x-rays are examined when using a CZT detector under breast CT operating conditions. Monte Carlo simulation software was used to evaluate the effect of characteristic x-rays and the detector element size on spatial and spectral resolution for a CZT detector used under breast CT operating conditions. In particular, lower kVp spectra and thinner CZT thicknesses were studied than that typically used with CZT based conventional CT detectors. In addition, the effect of characteristic x-rays on the accuracy of material decomposition in spectral CT imaging was explored. It was observed that when imaging with 50-60 kVp spectra, the x-ray transmission through CZT was very low for all detector thicknesses studied (0.5-3.0 mm), thus retaining dose efficiency. As expected, characteristic x-ray escape from the detector element of x-ray interaction increased with decreasing detector element size, approaching a 50% escape fraction for a 100 μm size detector element. The detector point spread function was observed to have only minor degradation with detector element size greater than 200 μm and lower kV settings. Characteristic x-rays produced increasing distortion in the

  2. Investigating the effect of characteristic x-rays in cadmium zinc telluride detectors under breast computerized tomography operating conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Glick, Stephen J.; Didier, Clay

    2013-10-14

    A number of research groups have been investigating the use of dedicated breast computerized tomography (CT). Preliminary results have been encouraging, suggesting an improved visualization of masses on breast CT as compared to conventional mammography. Nonetheless, there are many challenges to overcome before breast CT can become a routine clinical reality. One potential improvement over current breast CT prototypes would be the use of photon counting detectors with cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) (or CdTe) semiconductor material. These detectors can operate at room temperature and provide high detection efficiency and the capability of multi-energy imaging; however, one factor in particular that limits image quality is the emission of characteristic x-rays. In this study, the degradative effects of characteristic x-rays are examined when using a CZT detector under breast CT operating conditions. Monte Carlo simulation software was used to evaluate the effect of characteristic x-rays and the detector element size on spatial and spectral resolution for a CZT detector used under breast CT operating conditions. In particular, lower kVp spectra and thinner CZT thicknesses were studied than that typically used with CZT based conventional CT detectors. In addition, the effect of characteristic x-rays on the accuracy of material decomposition in spectral CT imaging was explored. It was observed that when imaging with 50-60 kVp spectra, the x-ray transmission through CZT was very low for all detector thicknesses studied (0.5–3.0 mm), thus retaining dose efficiency. As expected, characteristic x-ray escape from the detector element of x-ray interaction increased with decreasing detector element size, approaching a 50% escape fraction for a 100 μm size detector element. The detector point spread function was observed to have only minor degradation with detector element size greater than 200 μm and lower kV settings. Characteristic x-rays produced increasing distortion in

  3. Accuracy of x-ray image-based 3D localization from two C-arm views: a comparison between an ideal system and a real device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brost, Alexander; Strobel, Norbert; Yatziv, Liron; Gilson, Wesley; Meyer, Bernhard; Hornegger, Joachim; Lewin, Jonathan; Wacker, Frank

    2009-02-01

    arm X-ray imaging devices are commonly used for minimally invasive cardiovascular or other interventional procedures. Calibrated state-of-the-art systems can, however, not only be used for 2D imaging but also for three-dimensional reconstruction either using tomographic techniques or even stereotactic approaches. To evaluate the accuracy of X-ray object localization from two views, a simulation study assuming an ideal imaging geometry was carried out first. This was backed up with a phantom experiment involving a real C-arm angiography system. Both studies were based on a phantom comprising five point objects. These point objects were projected onto a flat-panel detector under different C-arm view positions. The resulting 2D positions were perturbed by adding Gaussian noise to simulate 2D point localization errors. In the next step, 3D point positions were triangulated from two views. A 3D error was computed by taking differences between the reconstructed 3D positions using the perturbed 2D positions and the initial 3D positions of the five points. This experiment was repeated for various C-arm angulations involving angular differences ranging from 15° to 165°. The smallest 3D reconstruction error was achieved, as expected, by views that were 90° degrees apart. In this case, the simulation study yielded a 3D error of 0.82 mm +/- 0.24 mm (mean +/- standard deviation) for 2D noise with a standard deviation of 1.232 mm (4 detector pixels). The experimental result for this view configuration obtained on an AXIOM Artis C-arm (Siemens AG, Healthcare Sector, Forchheim, Germany) system was 0.98 mm +/- 0.29 mm, respectively. These results show that state-of-the-art C-arm systems can localize instruments with millimeter accuracy, and that they can accomplish this almost as well as an idealized theoretical counterpart. High stereotactic localization accuracy, good patient access, and CT-like 3D imaging capabilities render state-of-the-art C-arm systems ideal devices for X-ray

  4. 3D algebraic iterative reconstruction for cone-beam x-ray differential phase-contrast computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Fu, Jian; Hu, Xinhua; Velroyen, Astrid; Bech, Martin; Jiang, Ming; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2015-01-01

    Due to the potential of compact imaging systems with magnified spatial resolution and contrast, cone-beam x-ray differential phase-contrast computed tomography (DPC-CT) has attracted significant interest. The current proposed FDK reconstruction algorithm with the Hilbert imaginary filter will induce severe cone-beam artifacts when the cone-beam angle becomes large. In this paper, we propose an algebraic iterative reconstruction (AIR) method for cone-beam DPC-CT and report its experiment results. This approach considers the reconstruction process as the optimization of a discrete representation of the object function to satisfy a system of equations that describes the cone-beam DPC-CT imaging modality. Unlike the conventional iterative algorithms for absorption-based CT, it involves the derivative operation to the forward projections of the reconstructed intermediate image to take into account the differential nature of the DPC projections. This method is based on the algebraic reconstruction technique, reconstructs the image ray by ray, and is expected to provide better derivative estimates in iterations. This work comprises a numerical study of the algorithm and its experimental verification using a dataset measured with a three-grating interferometer and a mini-focus x-ray tube source. It is shown that the proposed method can reduce the cone-beam artifacts and performs better than FDK under large cone-beam angles. This algorithm is of interest for future cone-beam DPC-CT applications.

  5. Use of 3D X-ray Computed Microtomography to Observe in situ Sediment Structure and Colloidal Zirconia Deposits at the Pore Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, C.; Packman, A. I.; Keane, D. T.; Gaillard, J.

    2006-12-01

    We are using X-ray Micro-Tomography (XMT) to study in situ sediment structure using the facilities of the DuPont-Northwestern-Dow Collaborative Access Team (DND-CAT), Advanced Photon Source (APS), Argonne National Laboratory. Images of a sediment sample are taken at a number of different angles as the incident x- ray beam passes through it, and a three-dimensional view of the interior of the sample is then reconstructed from these maps using Computed Tomography (CT). These 3D images allow us to observe sediment structure with near-micron-scale resolution. We are also using difference tomography to resolve the distribution of zirconium in sediment cores. Column experiments were performed to observe the deposition of colloidal zirconia (Zr) particles in porous media composed of glass beads. Reconstructed 3D maps of Zr deposition demonstrate strong pore-scale heterogeneity. Most zirconia particles accumulated at the upstream sides of collector beads and in narrow pore throats. Statistical analysis of deposition clusters reveals the average, large-scale filtration behavior. Reconstructed 3D pore structure data were used to investigate scale dependency and the effects of local variation within the porous medium. Statistical representative elementary volumes were calculated for quantities such as porosity, specific surface area, and permeability. Finally, preliminary experiments in flume were conducted in order to investigate zirconia deposition in streambeds at the scale of characteristic topographic features (bedforms).

  6. Three-dimensional (3D) microstructural characterization and quantification of reflow porosity in Sn-rich alloy/copper joints by X-ray tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang Ling; Chawla, Nikhilesh; Pacheco, Mario; Noveski, Vladimir

    2011-10-15

    In this paper high resolution X-ray tomography was used to characterize reflow porosity in Sn-3.9Ag-0.7Cu/Cu solder joints. The combination of two segmentation techniques was applied for the three-dimensional (3D) visualization of pores in the joints and the quantification on the characteristics of reflow porosity, including pore size, volume fraction and morphology. The size, morphology and distribution of porosity were visualized in 3D for three different solder joints. Since the results are relatively similar for all three, only the results of one joint are presented. Solder reflow porosity was mostly spherical, segregated along the solder/Cu interface, and had an average pore size of 30 {mu}m in diameter. A few large pores (larger than 100 {mu}m in diameter) were present, some of which had lower sphericity, i.e., they were more irregular. The presence of these large pores may significantly influence the mechanical behavior of solder joints. - Highlights: {yields} Non-destructive 3D characterization and quantification of porosity in Pb-free solders by X-ray tomography {yields} Two new image analysis and reconstruction tools are presented that can be used by the community at large {yields} Pore size, volume fraction, and sphericity, is critical to understanding microstructure and modeling of these systems.

  7. Laser gain on 3p-3d and 3s-3p transitions and X-ray line ratios for the nitrogen isoelectronic sequence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feldman, U.; Seely, J. F.; Bhatia, A. K.

    1989-01-01

    Results are presented on calculations of the 72 levels belonging to the 2s(2)2p(3), 2s2p(4), 2p(5), 2s(2)2p(2)3s, 2s(2)2p(2)3p, and 2s(2)2p(2)3d configurations of the N I isoelectronic sequence for the ions Ar XII, Ti XVI, Fe XX, Zn XXIV, and Kr XXX, for electron densities up to 10 to the 24th/cu cm. It was found that large population inversions and gain occur between levels in the 2s(2)2p(2)3p configuration and levels in the 2s(2)2p(2)3d configuration that cannot decay to the ground configuration by an electric dipole transition. For increasing electron densities, the intensities of the X-ray transitions from the 2s(2)2p(2)3p configuration to the ground configuration decrease relative to the transitions from the 2s(2)2p(2)3s and 2s(2)2p(2)3d configurations to the ground configuration. The density dependence of these X-ray line ratios is presented.

  8. Evaluation of x-ray scatter properties in a dedicated cone-beam breast CT scanner

    SciTech Connect

    Kwan, Alexander L.C.; Boone, John M.; Shah, Nikula

    2005-09-15

    The magnitude of scatter contamination on a first-generation prototype breast computed tomography (CT) scanner was evaluated using the scatter-to-primary ratio (SPR) metric. The SPR was measured and characterized over a wide range of parameters relevant to breast CT imaging, including x-ray beam energy, breast diameter, breast composition, isocenter-to-detector distance, collimated slot thickness, and grid ratio. The results demonstrated that in the absence of scatter reduction techniques, the SPR levels for the average breast (e.g., 14 cm diameter 50/50 composition cylindrical phantom) are quite high ({approx}0.5 at the center of the phantom for 80 kVp in true cone-beam CT geometry), and increases as the diameter of the phantom is increased (to {approx}1.0 at the center of a 18 cm diameter 50/50 phantom). The x-ray beam energy and the phantom compositions had only minimal impact on the measured SPR. When an ideal bowtie filter was used, the SPRs at the central axis of the 14 and 18 cm cylindrical phantoms were reduced while the SPRs at the edge of the phantoms were increased. Lastly, collimation in the vertical direction had a significant impact on the SPRs at the central axis of the phantoms. These high SPR levels might lead to cupping artifacts and increased noise in the reconstructed CT images, and this suggests that efficient scatter rejection and/or correction techniques may be required to improve the quality and accuracy of cone beam CT images.

  9. Investigation of 3D glenohumeral displacements from 3D reconstruction using biplane X-ray images: Accuracy and reproducibility of the technique and preliminary analysis in rotator cuff tear patients.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Cheng; Skalli, Wafa; Lagacé, Pierre-Yves; Billuart, Fabien; Ohl, Xavier; Cresson, Thierry; Bureau, Nathalie J; Rouleau, Dominique M; Roy, André; Tétreault, Patrice; Sauret, Christophe; de Guise, Jacques A; Hagemeister, Nicola

    2016-08-01

    Rotator cuff (RC) tears may be associated with increased glenohumeral instability; however, this instability is difficult to quantify using currently available diagnostic tools. Recently, the three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction and registration method of the scapula and humeral head, based on sequences of low-dose biplane X-ray images, has been proposed for glenohumeral displacement assessment. This research aimed to evaluate the accuracy and reproducibility of this technique and to investigate its potential with a preliminary application comparing RC tear patients and asymptomatic volunteers. Accuracy was assessed using CT scan model registration on biplane X-ray images for five cadaveric shoulder specimens and showed differences ranging from 0.6 to 1.4mm depending on the direction of interest. Intra- and interobserver reproducibility was assessed through two operators who repeated the reconstruction of five subjects three times, allowing defining 95% confidence interval ranging from ±1.8 to ±3.6mm. Intraclass correlation coefficient varied between 0.84 and 0.98. Comparison between RC tear patients and asymptomatic volunteers showed differences of glenohumeral displacements, especially in the superoinferior direction when shoulder was abducted at 20° and 45°. This study thus assessed the accuracy of the low-dose 3D biplane X-ray reconstruction technique for glenohumeral displacement assessment and showed potential in biomechanical and clinical research.

  10. Degradation of Li/S Battery Electrodes On 3D Current Collectors Studied Using X-ray Phase Contrast Tomography.

    PubMed

    Zielke, L; Barchasz, C; Waluś, S; Alloin, F; Leprêtre, J-C; Spettl, A; Schmidt, V; Hilger, A; Manke, I; Banhart, J; Zengerle, R; Thiele, S

    2015-01-01

    Lithium/sulphur batteries are promising candidates for future energy storage systems, mainly due to their high potential capacity. However low sulphur utilization and capacity fading hinder practical realizations. In order to improve understanding of the system, we investigate Li/S electrode morphology changes for different ageing steps, using X-ray phase contrast tomography. Thereby we find a strong decrease of sulphur loading after the first cycle, and a constant loading of about 15% of the initial loading afterwards. While cycling, the mean sulphur particle diameters decrease in a qualitatively similar fashion as the discharge capacity fades. The particles spread, migrate into the current collector and accumulate in the upper part again. Simultaneously sulphur particles lose contact area with the conducting network but regain it after ten cycles because their decreasing size results in higher surface areas. Since the capacity still decreases, this regain could be associated with effects such as surface area passivation and increasing charge transfer resistance. PMID:26043280

  11. Solidification of Al Alloys Under Electromagnetic Pulses and Characterization of the 3D Microstructures Using Synchrotron X-ray Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manuwong, Theerapatt; Zhang, Wei; Kazinczi, Peter Lobo; Bodey, Andrew J.; Rau, Christoph; Mi, Jiawei

    2015-07-01

    A novel programmable electromagnetic pulse device was developed and used to study the solidification of Al-15 pct Cu and Al-35 pct Cu alloys. The pulsed magnetic fluxes and Lorentz forces generated inside the solidifying melts were simulated using finite element methods, and their effects on the solidification microstructures were characterized using electron microscopy and synchrotron X-ray tomography. Using a discharging voltage of 120 V, a pulsed magnetic field with the peak Lorentz force of ~1.6 N was generated inside the solidifying Al-Cu melts which were showed sufficiently enough to disrupt the growth of the primary Al dendrites and the Al2Cu intermetallic phases. The microstructures exhibit a strong correlation to the characteristics of the applied pulse, forming a periodical pattern that resonates the frequency of the applied electromagnetic field.

  12. Degradation of Li/S Battery Electrodes On 3D Current Collectors Studied Using X-ray Phase Contrast Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Zielke, L.; Barchasz, C.; Waluś, S.; Alloin, F.; Leprêtre, J.-C.; Spettl, A.; Schmidt, V.; Hilger, A.; Manke, I.; Banhart, J.; Zengerle, R.; Thiele, S.

    2015-01-01

    Lithium/sulphur batteries are promising candidates for future energy storage systems, mainly due to their high potential capacity. However low sulphur utilization and capacity fading hinder practical realizations. In order to improve understanding of the system, we investigate Li/S electrode morphology changes for different ageing steps, using X-ray phase contrast tomography. Thereby we find a strong decrease of sulphur loading after the first cycle, and a constant loading of about 15% of the initial loading afterwards. While cycling, the mean sulphur particle diameters decrease in a qualitatively similar fashion as the discharge capacity fades. The particles spread, migrate into the current collector and accumulate in the upper part again. Simultaneously sulphur particles lose contact area with the conducting network but regain it after ten cycles because their decreasing size results in higher surface areas. Since the capacity still decreases, this regain could be associated with effects such as surface area passivation and increasing charge transfer resistance. PMID:26043280

  13. 3D Morphochemistry of Basaltic/Rhyolitic Mixed Eruptions revealed via Microanalysis and X-ray microtomography.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgavi, D.; Arzilli, F.; Pritchard, C. J.; Perugini, D.; Mancini, L.; Larson, P. B.; Dingwell, D. B.

    2014-12-01

    Magma Mixing, a widespread petrogenetic process often operates in concert with fractional crystallisation and assimilation, to produce chemical and temperature gradients in magma. The injection of mafic magmas into felsic magma chambers is widely regarded as a key driver in the sudden triggering of what often become highly explosive volcanic eruptions. Understanding the mechanistic chain leading to such hazardous events is the goal of the present study of the morphochemistry of mingled lavas. This study involves the combination of X-ray microtomographic and electron microprobe analyses, to unravel the complex textures and attendant chemical heterogeneities of the mixed basaltic and rhyolitic eruption of Grizzly Lake in the Norris-Mammoth corridor of the Yellowstone Plateau Volcanic Field (YPVF). We observe that both magmatic viscous interfingering and disequilibrium crystallization/dissolution processes provide vital information on the timescale of interaction between the two magmatic components prior to the eruption. Mixed rocks in the YPVF appear to have a complicated history and evolution. Therefore a very considerable amount of chemical analysis was employed here. In addition, X-ray microtomography images show variegated textural features, such as vesicle and crystal distributions, filament morphology, the distribution of enclaves, and further textural features otherwise obscured in a simple 2D analyses. Here most effort was applied to the determination of the characterisation of mixing end members. Nevertheless, analysis of the hybrid portion has led to the unexpected discovery that mixing in the Grizzly Lake system was also characterised by the disintegration/dissolution of mafic crystals into the rhyolitic magma. The results of this study expose the complexity of mixing in natural magmatic systems, identifying several textural reactive factors that must be understood more deeply for our understanding of this potential eruptive trigger to proceed.

  14. Classification and quantification of pore shapes in sandstone reservoir rocks with 3-D X-ray micro-computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, M.; Halisch, M.; Müller, C.; Fernandes, C. P.

    2015-12-01

    Recent years have seen a growing interest in the characterization of the pore morphologies of reservoir rocks and how the spatial organization of pore traits affects the macro behaviour of rock-fluid systems. With the availability of 3-D high-resolution imaging (e.g. μ-CT), the detailed quantification of particle shapes has been facilitated by progress in computer science. Here, we show how the shapes of irregular rock particles (pores) can be classified and quantified based on binary 3-D images. The methodology requires the measurement of basic 3-D particle descriptors and a shape classification that involves the similarity of artificial objects, which is based on main pore network detachments and 3-D sample sizes. The results were validated for three sandstones (S1, S2 and S3) from distinct reservoirs, and most of the pore shapes were found to be plate- and cube-like. Furthermore, this study generalizes a practical way to correlate specific particle shapes, such as rods, blades, cuboids, plates and cubes, to characterize asymmetric particles of any material type with 3-D image analysis.

  15. Mammotome breast cancer biopsy: combined guided with X-ray stereotaxis and imaging probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soluri, A.; Scafè, R.; Falcini, F.; Sala, R.; Burgio, N.; Fiorentini, G.; Giorgetti, G.; Stella, S.; Chiarini, S.; Scopinaro, F.

    2003-01-01

    Since 1999 our group started with practical experience on diagnostic use of small, transportable prototypes of high-resolution gamma cameras (patented) for radioguided surgery: the Imaging Probe (IP). First experiences allowed us to develop dedicated prototypes for specific applications. At the moment the most intriguing field is guiding biopsy. Dedicated detectors, characterized by low cost and weight, allow to transfer imaging where the biopsy has to be done. In this paper, a new combined application for breast cancer detection is described. In present system IP is put inside a Fisher digital stereotactic device prepared for Mammotome biopsy: so biopsy can contemporaneously be driven by X-ray stereotaxis and 99mTc-Sestamibi (MIBI) images from IP. The Field Of View (FOV) is about 2×2 cm 2 and 0.8 kg weight. This novel scintillation camera is based upon the compact Hamamatsu R7600-00-C8 Position Sensitive Photomultiplier Tube (PSPMT), coupled to scintillating arrays. The PSPMT can be arranged as array when larger FOV is needed. Present application was provided with off line software for image fusion running on the IP dedicated PC. It was matched with the Fisher digital stereotactic X-ray device dedicated to address Mammotome (Ethicon Endo-surgery by Johnson and Johnson) towards breast opacities. Spatial resolution of the IP was 2.5 mm Full-Width Half-Maximum (FWHM) at laboratory tests. A preliminary IP-X-ray digital system inter-calibration was performed using a Perspex-lead phantom. 99mTc MIBI was injected at the dose of 740 MBq 1 h before biopsy to three patients with breast opacities of respectively 0.6, 0.8 and 1.5 cm, scheduled for Mammotome biopsy. Sixty-four pixel scintigraphic images were acquired before and after biopsy in each patient. Operator was allowed to slightly correct the direction of the Mammotome needle taking into account stereotactic X-ray, scintigraphic and fused images. Bioptic samples were also counted with IP before sending them to

  16. Microtomographic images of rat's lumbar vertebra microstructure using 30 keV synchrotron X-rays: an analysis in terms of 3D visualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, D. V.; Takeda, T.; Kawakami, T.; Uesugi, K.; Tsuchiya, Y.; Wu, J.; Lwin, T. T.; Itai, Y.; Zeniya, T.; Yuasa, T.; Akatsuka, T.

    2004-05-01

    Microtomographic images of rat's lumbar vertebra of different age groups varying from 8, 56 and 78 weeks were obtained at 30 keV using synchrotron X-rays with a spatial resolution of 12 μm. The images are analyzed in terms of 3D visualization and micro-architecture. Density histogram of rat's lumbar vertebra is compared with test phantoms. Rat's lumbar volume and phantom volume are studied at different concentrations of hydroxyapatite with slice number. With the use of 2D slices, 3D images are reconstructed, in order to know the evolution and a state of decline of bone microstructure with aging. Cross-sectional μ-CT images shows that the bone of young rat has a fine trabecular microstructure while that of the old rat has large meshed structure.

  17. Linking snow microstructure to its macroscopic elastic stiffness tensor: A numerical homogenization method and its application to 3-D images from X-ray tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wautier, A.; Geindreau, C.; Flin, F.

    2015-10-01

    The full 3-D macroscopic mechanical behavior of snow is investigated by solving kinematically uniform boundary condition problems derived from homogenization theories over 3-D images obtained by X-ray tomography. Snow is modeled as a porous cohesive material, and its mechanical stiffness tensor is computed within the framework of the elastic behavior of ice. The size of the optimal representative elementary volume, expressed in terms of correlation lengths, is determined through a convergence analysis of the computed effective properties. A wide range of snow densities is explored, and power laws with high regression coefficients are proposed to link the Young's and shear moduli of snow to its density. The degree of anisotropy of these properties is quantified, and Poisson's ratios are also provided. Finally, the influence of the main types of metamorphism (isothermal, temperature gradient, and wet snow metamorphism) on the elastic properties of snow and on their anisotropy is reported.

  18. Three-Dimensional Mapping of Soil Chemical Characteristics at Micrometric Scale by Combining 2D SEM-EDX Data and 3D X-Ray CT Images

    PubMed Central

    Hapca, Simona; Baveye, Philippe C.; Wilson, Clare; Lark, Richard Murray; Otten, Wilfred

    2015-01-01

    There is currently a significant need to improve our understanding of the factors that control a number of critical soil processes by integrating physical, chemical and biological measurements on soils at microscopic scales to help produce 3D maps of the related properties. Because of technological limitations, most chemical and biological measurements can be carried out only on exposed soil surfaces or 2-dimensional cuts through soil samples. Methods need to be developed to produce 3D maps of soil properties based on spatial sequences of 2D maps. In this general context, the objective of the research described here was to develop a method to generate 3D maps of soil chemical properties at the microscale by combining 2D SEM-EDX data with 3D X-ray computed tomography images. A statistical approach using the regression tree method and ordinary kriging applied to the residuals was developed and applied to predict the 3D spatial distribution of carbon, silicon, iron, and oxygen at the microscale. The spatial correlation between the X-ray grayscale intensities and the chemical maps made it possible to use a regression-tree model as an initial step to predict the 3D chemical composition. For chemical elements, e.g., iron, that are sparsely distributed in a soil sample, the regression-tree model provides a good prediction, explaining as much as 90% of the variability in some of the data. However, for chemical elements that are more homogenously distributed, such as carbon, silicon, or oxygen, the additional kriging of the regression tree residuals improved significantly the prediction with an increase in the R2 value from 0.221 to 0.324 for carbon, 0.312 to 0.423 for silicon, and 0.218 to 0.374 for oxygen, respectively. The present research develops for the first time an integrated experimental and theoretical framework, which combines geostatistical methods with imaging techniques to unveil the 3-D chemical structure of soil at very fine scales. The methodology presented

  19. In situ 3-D mapping of pore structures and hollow grains of interplanetary dust particles with phase contrast X-ray nanotomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Z. W.; Winarski, R. P.

    2016-09-01

    Unlocking the 3-D structure and properties of intact chondritic porous interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) in nanoscale detail is challenging, which is also complicated by atmospheric entry heating, but is important for advancing our understanding of the formation and origins of IDPs and planetary bodies as well as dust and ice agglomeration in the outer protoplanetary disk. Here, we show that indigenous pores, pristine grains, and thermal alteration products throughout intact particles can be noninvasively visualized and distinguished morphologically and microstructurally in 3-D detail down to ~10 nm by exploiting phase contrast X-ray nanotomography. We have uncovered the surprisingly intricate, submicron, and nanoscale pore structures of a ~10-μm-long porous IDP, consisting of two types of voids that are interconnected in 3-D space. One is morphologically primitive and mostly submicron-sized intergranular voids that are ubiquitous; the other is morphologically advanced and well-defined intragranular nanoholes that run through the approximate centers of ~0.3 μm or lower submicron hollow grains. The distinct hollow grains exhibit complex 3-D morphologies but in 2-D projections resemble typical organic hollow globules observed by transmission electron microscopy. The particle, with its outer region characterized by rough vesicular structures due to thermal alteration, has turned out to be an inherently fragile and intricately submicron- and nanoporous aggregate of the sub-μm grains or grain clumps that are delicately bound together frequently with little grain-to-grain contact in 3-D space.

  20. 3D mapping of water in oolithic limestone at atmospheric and vacuum saturation using X-ray micro-CT differential imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Boone, M.A.; De Kock, T.; Bultreys, T.; De Schutter, G.; Vontobel, P.; Van Hoorebeke, L.; Cnudde, V.

    2014-11-15

    Determining the distribution of fluids in porous sedimentary rocks is of great importance in many geological fields. However, this is not straightforward, especially in the case of complex sedimentary rocks like limestone, where a multidisciplinary approach is often needed to capture its broad, multimodal pore size distribution and complex pore geometries. This paper focuses on the porosity and fluid distribution in two varieties of Massangis limestone, a widely used natural building stone from the southeast part of the Paris basin (France). The Massangis limestone shows locally varying post-depositional alterations, resulting in different types of pore networks and very different water distributions within the limestone. Traditional techniques for characterizing the porosity and pore size distribution are compared with state-of-the-art neutron radiography and X-ray computed microtomography to visualize the distribution of water inside the limestone at different imbibition conditions. X-ray computed microtomography images have the great advantage to non-destructively visualize and analyze the pore space inside of a rock, but are often limited to the larger macropores in the rock due to resolution limitations. In this paper, differential imaging is successfully applied to the X-ray computed microtomography images to obtain sub-resolution information about fluid occupancy and to map the fluid distribution in three dimensions inside the scanned limestone samples. The detailed study of the pore space with differential imaging allows understanding the difference in the water uptake behavior of the limestone, a primary factor that affects the weathering of the rock. - Highlights: • The water distribution in a limestone was visualized in 3D with micro-CT. • Differential imaging allowed to map both macro and microporous zones in the rock. • The 3D study of the pore space clarified the difference in water uptake behavior. • Trapped air is visualized in the moldic

  1. Quantitative 3D elemental analysis inside plant roots by means of synchrotron confocal micro X-ray fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terzano, R.; Vekemans, B.; Tomasi, N.; Spagnuolo, M.; Schoonjans, T.; Vincze, L.; Pinton, R.; Cesco, S.; Ruggiero, P.

    2009-04-01

    The knowledge of the distribution and concentration of elements within plants is a fundamental step to better understand how these plants uptake specific elements from the medium of growth and how they manage acquisition and compartmentalisation of nutrients as well as toxic metals. For some elements, either nutrients or toxicants, it can be of relevance to know their concentration level within microscopic volumes in plant organs, where they are stored or accumulated. Usually, this type of microscopic analysis requires complex cutting procedures and extensive sample manipulations. In this research, the technique of synchrotron micro X-ray fluorescence in the confocal mode was applied to image the distribution of elements in selected key-planes of tomato roots without the need of any sample preparation, except washing and freeze-drying. Using this method, a first polycapillary lens focussed the X-ray beam with an energy of 12.4 keV down to a 20 µm beam that is penetrating the sample, and a second polycapillary half-lens, that was positioned at the detection side at 90 degrees to the first polycapillary, could then restrict further the view on this irradiated volume to a defined microscopic volume (typically 20x20x20 µm3) from which the induced fluorescent radiation is finally collected by the energy dispersive detector. In this way, it was possible to investigate the concentration levels of some elements such as K, Ca, Mn, Fe, Cu and Zn within the roots of tomato plants. The quantification was performed by means of a dedicated XRF Fundamental Parameter (FP) method in order to calculate the concentrations of trace elements within the analysed plants. Utilizing fundamental atomic parameters, the applied FP method is taking into account the influence of sample self-absorption and especially the specific detection processes by the polycapillary lens. Quantification was assessed and validated by using different standards: NIST SRM 1573a (trace elements in tomato leaves

  2. Objective breast symmetry evaluation using 3-D surface imaging.

    PubMed

    Eder, Maximilian; Waldenfels, Fee V; Swobodnik, Alexandra; Klöppel, Markus; Pape, Ann-Kathrin; Schuster, Tibor; Raith, Stefan; Kitzler, Elena; Papadopulos, Nikolaos A; Machens, Hans-Günther; Kovacs, Laszlo

    2012-04-01

    This study develops an objective breast symmetry evaluation using 3-D surface imaging (Konica-Minolta V910(®) scanner) by superimposing the mirrored left breast over the right and objectively determining the mean 3-D contour difference between the 2 breast surfaces. 3 observers analyzed the evaluation protocol precision using 2 dummy models (n = 60), 10 test subjects (n = 300), clinically tested it on 30 patients (n = 900) and compared it to established 2-D measurements on 23 breast reconstructive patients using the BCCT.core software (n = 690). Mean 3-D evaluation precision, expressed as the coefficient of variation (VC), was 3.54 ± 0.18 for all human subjects without significant intra- and inter-observer differences (p > 0.05). The 3-D breast symmetry evaluation is observer independent, significantly more precise (p < 0.001) than the BCCT.core software (VC = 6.92 ± 0.88) and may play a part in an objective surgical outcome analysis after incorporation into clinical practice.

  3. A second generation of physical anthropomorphic 3D breast phantoms based on human subject data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nolte, Adam; Kiarashi, Nooshin; Samei, Ehsan; Segars, W. P.; Lo, Joseph Y.

    2014-03-01

    Previous fabrication of anthropomorphic breast phantoms has demonstrated their viability as a model for 2D (mammography) and 3D (tomosynthesis) breast imaging systems. Further development of these models will be essential for the evaluation of breast x-ray systems. There is also the potential to use them as the ground truth in virtual clinical trials. The first generation of phantoms was segmented from human subject dedicated breast computed tomography data and fabricated into physical models using highresolution 3D printing. Two variations were made. The first was a multi-material model (doublet) printed with two photopolymers to represent glandular and adipose tissues with the greatest physical contrast available, mimicking 75% and 35% glandular tissue. The second model was printed with a single 75% glandular equivalent photopolymer (singlet) to represent glandular tissue, which can be filled independently with an adipose-equivalent material such as oil. For this study, we have focused on improving the latter, the singlet phantom. First, the temporary oil filler has been replaced with a permanent adipose-equivalent urethane-based polymer. This offers more realistic contrast as compared to the multi-material approach at the expense of air bubbles and pockets that form during the filling process. Second, microcalcification clusters have been included in the singlet model via crushed eggshells, which have very similar chemical composition to calcifications in vivo. The results from these new prototypes demonstrate significant improvement over the first generation of anthropomorphic physical phantoms.

  4. Feasibility of 3D tracking of surgical tools using 2D single plane x-ray projections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seslija, Petar; Habets, Damiaan F.; Peters, Terry M.; Holdsworth, David W.

    2008-03-01

    Fluoroscopy is widely used for intra-procedure image guidance, however its planar images provide limited information about the location of the surgical tools or targets in three-dimensional space. An iterative method based on the projection-Procrustes technique can determine the three-dimensional positions and orientations of known sparse objects from a single, perspective projection. We assess the feasibility of applying this technique to track surgical tools by measuring its accuracy and precision through in vitro experiments. Two phantoms were fabricated to perform this assessment: a grid plate phantom with numerous point-targets at regular distances from each other; and a sparse object used as a surgical tool phantom. Two-dimensional projections of the phantoms were acquired using an image intensifier-based C-arm x-ray unit. The locations of the markers projected onto the images were identified and measured using an automated algorithm. The three-dimensional location of the phantom tool tip was identified from these images using the projection-Procrustes technique. The accuracy and precision of the tip localization were used to assess our technique. The average three-dimensional root-mean-square target registration error of the phantom tool tip was 1.8 mm. The average three-dimensional root-mean-square precision of localizing the tool tip was 0.5 mm.

  5. Breast tumour visualization using 3D quantitative ultrasound methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gangeh, Mehrdad J.; Raheem, Abdul; Tadayyon, Hadi; Liu, Simon; Hadizad, Farnoosh; Czarnota, Gregory J.

    2016-04-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most common cancer types accounting for 29% of all cancer cases. Early detection and treatment has a crucial impact on improving the survival of affected patients. Ultrasound (US) is non-ionizing, portable, inexpensive, and real-time imaging modality for screening and quantifying breast cancer. Due to these attractive attributes, the last decade has witnessed many studies on using quantitative ultrasound (QUS) methods in tissue characterization. However, these studies have mainly been limited to 2-D QUS methods using hand-held US (HHUS) scanners. With the availability of automated breast ultrasound (ABUS) technology, this study is the first to develop 3-D QUS methods for the ABUS visualization of breast tumours. Using an ABUS system, unlike the manual 2-D HHUS device, the whole patient's breast was scanned in an automated manner. The acquired frames were subsequently examined and a region of interest (ROI) was selected in each frame where tumour was identified. Standard 2-D QUS methods were used to compute spectral and backscatter coefficient (BSC) parametric maps on the selected ROIs. Next, the computed 2-D parameters were mapped to a Cartesian 3-D space, interpolated, and rendered to provide a transparent color-coded visualization of the entire breast tumour. Such 3-D visualization can potentially be used for further analysis of the breast tumours in terms of their size and extension. Moreover, the 3-D volumetric scans can be used for tissue characterization and the categorization of breast tumours as benign or malignant by quantifying the computed parametric maps over the whole tumour volume.

  6. X-ray phase contrast imaging of the breast: Analysis of tissue simulating materials

    SciTech Connect

    Vedantham, Srinivasan; Karellas, Andrew

    2013-04-15

    Purpose: Phase contrast imaging, particularly of the breast, is being actively investigated. The purpose of this work is to investigate the x-ray phase contrast properties of breast tissues and commonly used breast tissue substitutes or phantom materials with an aim of determining the phantom materials best representative of breast tissues. Methods: Elemental compositions of breast tissues including adipose, fibroglandular, and skin were used to determine the refractive index, n= 1 -{delta}+i {beta}. The real part of the refractive index, specifically the refractive index decrement ({delta}), over the energy range of 5-50 keV were determined using XOP software (version 2.3, European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, France). Calcium oxalate and calcium hydroxyapatite were considered to represent the material compositions of microcalcifications in vivo. Nineteen tissue substitutes were considered as possible candidates to represent adipose tissue, fibroglandular tissue and skin, and four phantom materials were considered as possible candidates to represent microcalcifications. For each material, either the molecular formula, if available, or the elemental composition based on weight fraction, was used to determine {delta}. At each x-ray photon energy, the absolute percent difference in {delta} between the breast tissue and the substitute material was determined, from which three candidates were selected. From these candidate tissue substitutes, the material that minimized the absolute percent difference in linear attenuation coefficient {mu}, and hence {beta}, was considered to be best representative of that breast tissue. Results: Over the energy range of 5-50 keV, while the {delta} of CB3 and fibroglandular tissue-equivalent material were within 1% of that of fibroglandular tissue, the {mu} of fibroglandular tissue-equivalent material better approximated the fibroglandular tissue. While the {delta} of BR10 and adipose tissue-equivalent material were within 1% of

  7. New BNL 3D-Trench Electrode Si Detectors for Radiation Hard Detectors for sLHC and for X-ray Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Li Z.

    2011-05-11

    . Since the large electrode spacing (up to 500 {micro}m) can be realized in the 3D-Trench electrode detector due to their advantage of greatly reduced full depletion voltage, detectors with large pixel cells (therefore small dead volume) can be made for applications in photon science (e.g. X-ray).

  8. New BNL 3D-Trench electrode Si detectors for radiation hard detectors for sLHC and for X-ray applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zheng

    2011-12-01

    . Since the large electrode spacing (up to 500 μm) can be realized in the 3D-Trench electrode detector due to their advantage of greatly reduced full depletion voltage, detectors with large pixel cells (therefore small dead volume) can be made for applications in photon science (e.g. X-ray).

  9. Breast tumor segmentation in high resolution x-ray phase contrast analyzer based computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Brun, E.; Grandl, S.; Sztrókay-Gaul, A.; Gasilov, S.; Barbone, G.; Mittone, A.; Coan, P.; Bravin, A.

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: Phase contrast computed tomography has emerged as an imaging method, which is able to outperform present day clinical mammography in breast tumor visualization while maintaining an equivalent average dose. To this day, no segmentation technique takes into account the specificity of the phase contrast signal. In this study, the authors propose a new mathematical framework for human-guided breast tumor segmentation. This method has been applied to high-resolution images of excised human organs, each of several gigabytes. Methods: The authors present a segmentation procedure based on the viscous watershed transform and demonstrate the efficacy of this method on analyzer based phase contrast images. The segmentation of tumors inside two full human breasts is then shown as an example of this procedure’s possible applications. Results: A correct and precise identification of the tumor boundaries was obtained and confirmed by manual contouring performed independently by four experienced radiologists. Conclusions: The authors demonstrate that applying the watershed viscous transform allows them to perform the segmentation of tumors in high-resolution x-ray analyzer based phase contrast breast computed tomography images. Combining the additional information provided by the segmentation procedure with the already high definition of morphological details and tissue boundaries offered by phase contrast imaging techniques, will represent a valuable multistep procedure to be used in future medical diagnostic applications.

  10. Development of a 3D digitizer for breast surgery procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez-Larena, Jorge; Canal Bienzobas, Fernando

    1999-03-01

    The planning of a breast reconstruction surgical operation has to resolve the problem of measuring directly on the patient meaningful anthropometric points from which distances, areas and volumes have to be calculated. In this paper, we propose using a 3D optical digitizer to perform this task.

  11. Chest wall segmentation in automated 3D breast ultrasound scans.

    PubMed

    Tan, Tao; Platel, Bram; Mann, Ritse M; Huisman, Henkjan; Karssemeijer, Nico

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, we present an automatic method to segment the chest wall in automated 3D breast ultrasound images. Determining the location of the chest wall in automated 3D breast ultrasound images is necessary in computer-aided detection systems to remove automatically detected cancer candidates beyond the chest wall and it can be of great help for inter- and intra-modal image registration. We show that the visible part of the chest wall in an automated 3D breast ultrasound image can be accurately modeled by a cylinder. We fit the surface of our cylinder model to a set of automatically detected rib-surface points. The detection of the rib-surface points is done by a classifier using features representing local image intensity patterns and presence of rib shadows. Due to attenuation of the ultrasound signal, a clear shadow is visible behind the ribs. Evaluation of our segmentation method is done by computing the distance of manually annotated rib points to the surface of the automatically detected chest wall. We examined the performance on images obtained with the two most common 3D breast ultrasound devices in the market. In a dataset of 142 images, the average mean distance of the annotated points to the segmented chest wall was 5.59 ± 3.08 mm.

  12. Non-destructive 3D Imaging of Extraterrestrial Materials by Synchrotron X-ray Micro- tomography (XR-CMT) and Laser Confocal Scanning Microscopy (LCSM): Beyond Pretty Pictures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebel, D. S.; Greenberg, M.

    2009-05-01

    We report scientific results made possible only by the use these two non-destructive 3D imaging techniques. XR-CMT provides 3D image reconstructions at spatial resolutions of 1 to 17 micron/voxel edge. We use XR- CMT to locate potential melt-inclusion-bearing phenocrysts in batches of 100-200 micron lunar fire-fountain spherules; to locate and visualize the morphology of 1-2mm size, irregular, unmelted Ca-, Al-rich inclusions (CAIs) and to quantify chondrule/matrix ratios and chondrule size distributions in 6x6x20mm chunks of carbonaceous chondrites; to quantify the modal abundance of opaque phases in similar sized Martian meteorite fragments, and in individual 1-2mm diameter chondrules from chondrites. LCSM provides 3D image stacks at resolutions < 100 nm/pixel. We are the only group creating deconvolved image stacks of 100 to over 1000 micron long comet particle tracks in aerogel keystones from the Stardust mission. We present measurements of track morphology in 3D, and locate high-value particles using complementary synchrotron x- ray fluorescence (XRF) examination. We show that bench-top LCSM extracts maximum information about tracks and particles rapidly and cheaply prior to destructive disassembly. Using XR-CMT we quantify, for the first time, the volumetric abundances of metal grains in 1-2 mm diameter CR chondrite chondrules. Metal abundances vary from 1 to 37 vol.% between 8 chondrules (and more by inspection), in a meteorite with solar (chondritic) Fe/Si ratio, indicating that chondrules formed and accreted locally from bulk solar composition material. They are 'complementary' to each other in Fe/Si ratios. Void spaces in chondritic CAIs and chondrules are shown to be a primary feature, not due to plucking during sectioning. CAI morphology in 3D reveals pre-accretionary impact features, and various types of mineralogical layering, seen in 3D, reveal the formation history of these building blocks of planets and asteroids. We also quantify the x-ray

  13. A digital x-ray tomosynthesis coupled near infrared spectral tomography system for dual-modality breast imaging

    PubMed Central

    Krishnaswamy, Venkataramanan; Michaelsen, Kelly E.; Pogue, Brian W.; Poplack, Steven P.; Shaw, Ian; Defrietas, Ken; Brooks, Ken; Paulsen, Keith D.

    2012-01-01

    A Near Infrared Spectral Tomography (NIRST) system has been developed and integrated into a commercial Digital Breast Tomosynthesis (DBT) scanner to allow structural and functional imaging of breast in vivo. The NIRST instrument uses an 8-wavelength continuous wave (CW) laser-based scanning source assembly and a 75-element silicon photodiode solid-state detector panel to produce dense spectral and spatial projection data from which spectrally constrained 3D tomographic images of tissue chromophores are produced. Integration of the optical imaging system into the DBT scanner allows direct co-registration of the optical and DBT images, while also facilitating the synergistic use of x-ray contrast as anatomical priors in optical image reconstruction. Currently, the total scan time for a combined NIRST-DBT exam is ~50s with data collection from 8 wavelengths in the optical scan requiring ~42s to complete. The system was tested in breast simulating phantoms constructed using intralipid and blood in an agarose matrix with a 3 cm x 2 cm cylindrical inclusion at 1 cm depth from the surface. Diffuse image reconstruction of total hemoglobin (HbT) concentration resulted in accurate recovery of the lateral size and position of the inclusion to within 6% and 8%, respectively. Use of DBT structural priors in the NIRST reconstruction process improved the quantitative accuracy of the HbT recovery, and led to linear changes in imaged versus actual contrast, underscoring the advantages of dual-modality optical imaging approaches. The quantitative accuracy of the system can be further improved with independent measurements of scattering properties through integration of frequency or time domain data. PMID:23038553

  14. A density-based segmentation for 3D images, an application for X-ray micro-tomography.

    PubMed

    Tran, Thanh N; Nguyen, Thanh T; Willemsz, Tofan A; van Kessel, Gijs; Frijlink, Henderik W; van der Voort Maarschalk, Kees

    2012-05-01

    Density-based spatial clustering of applications with noise (DBSCAN) is an unsupervised classification algorithm which has been widely used in many areas with its simplicity and its ability to deal with hidden clusters of different sizes and shapes and with noise. However, the computational issue of the distance table and the non-stability in detecting the boundaries of adjacent clusters limit the application of the original algorithm to large datasets such as images. In this paper, the DBSCAN algorithm was revised and improved for image clustering and segmentation. The proposed clustering algorithm presents two major advantages over the original one. Firstly, the revised DBSCAN algorithm made it applicable for large 3D image dataset (often with millions of pixels) by using the coordinate system of the image data. Secondly, the revised algorithm solved the non-stability issue of boundary detection in the original DBSCAN. For broader applications, the image dataset can be ordinary 3D images or in general, it can also be a classification result of other type of image data e.g. a multivariate image.

  15. Local ISM 3D distribution and soft X-ray background. Inferences on nearby hot gas and the North Polar Spur

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puspitarini, L.; Lallement, R.; Vergely, J.-L.; Snowden, S. L.

    2014-06-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) interstellar medium (ISM) maps can be used to locate not only interstellar (IS) clouds, but also IS bubbles between the clouds that are blown by stellar winds and supernovae, and that are filled by hot gas. To demonstrate this and to derive a clearer picture of the local ISM, we compare our recent 3D maps of the IS dust distribution to the ROSAT diffuse X-ray background maps after removing heliospheric emission. In the Galactic plane, there is a good correspondence between the locations and extents of the mapped nearby cavities and the soft (0.25 keV) background emission distribution, showing that most of these nearby cavities contribute to this soft X-ray emission. Assuming a constant dust-to-gas ratio and homogeneous 106 K hot gas filling the cavities, we modeled the 0.25 keV surface brightness in a simple way along the Galactic plane as seen from the Sun, taking the absorption by the mapped clouds into account. The data-model comparison favors the existence of hot gas in the solar neighborhood, the so-called Local Bubble (LB). The inferred average mean pressure in the local cavities is found to be on the order of 10 000 cm-3 K, in agreement with previous studies, providing a validation test for the method. On the other hand, the model overestimates the emission from the huge cavities located in the third quadrant. Using CaII absorption data, we show that the dust-to-CaII ratio is very low in this region, implying there is a large quantity of lower temperature (non-X-ray emitting) ionized gas and, as a consequence, a reduction in the volume filled by hot gas, explaining at least part of the discrepancy. In the meridian plane, the main two brightness enhancements coincide well with the LB's most elongated parts and chimneys connecting the LB to the halo, but no particular nearby cavity is found towards the enhancement in the direction of the bright North Polar Spur (NPS) at high latitude. We searched in the 3D maps for the source regions of

  16. X-ray scattering for classifying tissue types associated with breast disease

    SciTech Connect

    Sidhu, Sabeena; Siu, Karen K. W.; Falzon, Gregory; Nazaretian, Simon; Hart, Stewart A.; Fox, Jane G.; Susil, Beatrice J.; Lewis, Robert A.

    2008-10-15

    Collagen types I and III can be characterized at the molecular level (at the tens to hundreds of nanometers scale) using small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS). Although collagen fibril structural parameters at this length scale have shown differences between diseased and nondiseased breast tissues, a comprehensive analysis involving a multitude of features with a large (>50) patient cohort has not previously been investigated. Breast tissue samples were excised from 80 patients presenting with either a breast lump or reduction mammoplasty. From these, invasive carcinoma, benign tissue, and normal parenchyma were analyzed. Parameters related to collagen structure, including longitudinal (axial) and lateral (equatorial) features, polar angle features, total scattering intensity, and tissue heterogeneity effects, were extracted from the SAXS patterns and examined. The amplitude of the third-order axial peak and the total scattering intensity (amorphous scatter) showed the most separation between tissue groups and a classification model using these two parameters demonstrated an accuracy of over 95% between invasive carcinoma and mammoplasty patients. Normal tissue taken from disease-free patients (mammoplasty) and normal tissue taken from patients with presence of disease showed significant differences, suggesting that SAXS may provide different diagnostic information from that of conventional histopathology.

  17. MRI-3D ultrasound-X-ray image fusion with electromagnetic tracking for transendocardial therapeutic injections: in-vitro validation and in-vivo feasibility.

    PubMed

    Hatt, Charles R; Jain, Ameet K; Parthasarathy, Vijay; Lang, Andrew; Raval, Amish N

    2013-03-01

    Myocardial infarction (MI) is one of the leading causes of death in the world. Small animal studies have shown that stem-cell therapy offers dramatic functional improvement post-MI. An endomyocardial catheter injection approach to therapeutic agent delivery has been proposed to improve efficacy through increased cell retention. Accurate targeting is critical for reaching areas of greatest therapeutic potential while avoiding a life-threatening myocardial perforation. Multimodal image fusion has been proposed as a way to improve these procedures by augmenting traditional intra-operative imaging modalities with high resolution pre-procedural images. Previous approaches have suffered from a lack of real-time tissue imaging and dependence on X-ray imaging to track devices, leading to increased ionizing radiation dose. In this paper, we present a new image fusion system for catheter-based targeted delivery of therapeutic agents. The system registers real-time 3D echocardiography, magnetic resonance, X-ray, and electromagnetic sensor tracking within a single flexible framework. All system calibrations and registrations were validated and found to have target registration errors less than 5 mm in the worst case. Injection accuracy was validated in a motion enabled cardiac injection phantom, where targeting accuracy ranged from 0.57 to 3.81 mm. Clinical feasibility was demonstrated with in-vivo swine experiments, where injections were successfully made into targeted regions of the heart.

  18. Communication: Systematic shifts of the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital peak in x-ray absorption for a series of 3d metal porphyrins.

    PubMed

    García-Lastra, J M; Cook, P L; Himpsel, F J; Rubio, A

    2010-10-21

    Porphyrins are widely used as dye molecules in solar cells. Knowing the energies of their frontier orbitals is crucial for optimizing the energy level structure of solar cells. We use near edge x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy to obtain the energy of the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) with respect to the N(1s) core level of the molecule. A systematic energy shift of the N(1s) to LUMO transition is found along a series of 3d metal octaethylporphyrins and explained by density functional theory. It is mainly due to a shift of the N(1s) level rather than a shift of the LUMO or a change in the electron-hole interaction of the core exciton.

  19. Optical cone beam tomography of Cherenkov-mediated signals for fast 3D dosimetry of x-ray photon beams in water

    SciTech Connect

    Glaser, Adam K. E-mail: Brian.W.Pogue@dartmouth.edu; Andreozzi, Jacqueline M.; Zhang, Rongxiao; Pogue, Brian W. E-mail: Brian.W.Pogue@dartmouth.edu; Gladstone, David J.

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: To test the use of a three-dimensional (3D) optical cone beam computed tomography reconstruction algorithm, for estimation of the imparted 3D dose distribution from megavoltage photon beams in a water tank for quality assurance, by imaging the induced Cherenkov-excited fluorescence (CEF). Methods: An intensified charge-coupled device coupled to a standard nontelecentric camera lens was used to tomographically acquire two-dimensional (2D) projection images of CEF from a complex multileaf collimator (MLC) shaped 6 MV linear accelerator x-ray photon beam operating at a dose rate of 600 MU/min. The resulting projections were used to reconstruct the 3D CEF light distribution, a potential surrogate of imparted dose, using a Feldkamp–Davis–Kress cone beam back reconstruction algorithm. Finally, the reconstructed light distributions were compared to the expected dose values from one-dimensional diode scans, 2D film measurements, and the 3D distribution generated from the clinical Varian ECLIPSE treatment planning system using a gamma index analysis. A Monte Carlo derived correction was applied to the Cherenkov reconstructions to account for beam hardening artifacts. Results: 3D light volumes were successfully reconstructed over a 400 × 400 × 350 mm{sup 3} volume at a resolution of 1 mm. The Cherenkov reconstructions showed agreement with all comparative methods and were also able to recover both inter- and intra-MLC leaf leakage. Based upon a 3%/3 mm criterion, the experimental Cherenkov light measurements showed an 83%–99% pass fraction depending on the chosen threshold dose. Conclusions: The results from this study demonstrate the use of optical cone beam computed tomography using CEF for the profiling of the imparted dose distribution from large area megavoltage photon beams in water.

  20. Optical cone beam tomography of Cherenkov-mediated signals for fast 3D dosimetry of x-ray photon beams in water

    PubMed Central

    Glaser, Adam K.; Andreozzi, Jacqueline M.; Zhang, Rongxiao; Pogue, Brian W.; Gladstone, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To test the use of a three-dimensional (3D) optical cone beam computed tomography reconstruction algorithm, for estimation of the imparted 3D dose distribution from megavoltage photon beams in a water tank for quality assurance, by imaging the induced Cherenkov-excited fluorescence (CEF). Methods: An intensified charge-coupled device coupled to a standard nontelecentric camera lens was used to tomographically acquire two-dimensional (2D) projection images of CEF from a complex multileaf collimator (MLC) shaped 6 MV linear accelerator x-ray photon beam operating at a dose rate of 600 MU/min. The resulting projections were used to reconstruct the 3D CEF light distribution, a potential surrogate of imparted dose, using a Feldkamp–Davis–Kress cone beam back reconstruction algorithm. Finally, the reconstructed light distributions were compared to the expected dose values from one-dimensional diode scans, 2D film measurements, and the 3D distribution generated from the clinical Varian ECLIPSE treatment planning system using a gamma index analysis. A Monte Carlo derived correction was applied to the Cherenkov reconstructions to account for beam hardening artifacts. Results: 3D light volumes were successfully reconstructed over a 400 × 400 × 350 mm3 volume at a resolution of 1 mm. The Cherenkov reconstructions showed agreement with all comparative methods and were also able to recover both inter- and intra-MLC leaf leakage. Based upon a 3%/3 mm criterion, the experimental Cherenkov light measurements showed an 83%–99% pass fraction depending on the chosen threshold dose. Conclusions: The results from this study demonstrate the use of optical cone beam computed tomography using CEF for the profiling of the imparted dose distribution from large area megavoltage photon beams in water. PMID:26133613

  1. Critical factors affecting the 3D microstructural formation in hybrid conductive adhesive materials studied by X-ray nano-tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen-Wiegart, Yu-Chen Karen; Figueroa-Santos, Miriam Aileen; Petrash, Stanislas; Garcia-Miralles, Jose; Wang, Jun

    2014-12-01

    Conductive adhesives are found favorable in a wide range of applications including a lead-free solder in micro-chips, flexible and printable electronics and enhancing the performance of energy storage devices. Composite materials comprised of metallic fillers and a polymer matrix are of great interest to be implemented as hybrid conductive adhesives. Here we investigated a cost-effective conductive adhesive material consisting of silver-coated copper as micro-fillers using synchrotron-based three-dimensional (3D) X-ray nano-tomography. The key factors affecting the quality and performance of the material were quantitatively studied in 3D on the nanometer scale for the first time. A critical characteristic parameter, defined as a shape-factor, was determined to yield a high-quality silver coating, leading to satisfactory performance. A `stack-and-screen' mechanism was proposed to elaborate such a phenomenon. The findings and the technique developed in this work will facilitate the future advancement of conductive adhesives to have a great impact in micro-electronics and other applications.Conductive adhesives are found favorable in a wide range of applications including a lead-free solder in micro-chips, flexible and printable electronics and enhancing the performance of energy storage devices. Composite materials comprised of metallic fillers and a polymer matrix are of great interest to be implemented as hybrid conductive adhesives. Here we investigated a cost-effective conductive adhesive material consisting of silver-coated copper as micro-fillers using synchrotron-based three-dimensional (3D) X-ray nano-tomography. The key factors affecting the quality and performance of the material were quantitatively studied in 3D on the nanometer scale for the first time. A critical characteristic parameter, defined as a shape-factor, was determined to yield a high-quality silver coating, leading to satisfactory performance. A `stack-and-screen' mechanism was proposed to

  2. Breast tumor angiogenesis analysis using 3D power Doppler ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Ruey-Feng; Huang, Sheng-Fang; Lee, Yu-Hau; Chen, Dar-Ren; Moon, Woo Kyung

    2006-03-01

    Angiogenesis is the process that correlates to tumor growth, invasion, and metastasis. Breast cancer angiogenesis has been the most extensively studied and now serves as a paradigm for understanding the biology of angiogenesis and its effects on tumor outcome and patient prognosis. Most studies on characterization of angiogenesis focus on pixel/voxel counts more than morphological analysis. Nevertheless, in cancer, the blood flow is greatly affected by the morphological changes, such as the number of vessels, branching pattern, length, and diameter. This paper presents a computer-aided diagnostic (CAD) system that can quantify vascular morphology using 3-D power Doppler ultrasound (US) on breast tumors. We propose a scheme to extract the morphological information from angiography and to relate them to tumor diagnosis outcome. At first, a 3-D thinning algorithm helps narrow down the vessels into their skeletons. The measurements of vascular morphology significantly rely on the traversing of the vascular trees produced from skeletons. Our study of 3-D assessment of vascular morphological features regards vessel count, length, bifurcation, and diameter of vessels. Investigations into 221 solid breast tumors including 110 benign and 111 malignant cases, the p values using the Student's t-test for all features are less than 0.05 indicating that the proposed features are deemed statistically significant. Our scheme focuses on the vascular architecture without involving the technique of tumor segmentation. The results show that the proposed method is feasible, and have a good agreement with the diagnosis of the pathologists.

  3. Critical factors affecting the 3D microstructural formation in hybrid conductive adhesive materials studied by X-ray nano-tomography.

    PubMed

    Chen-Wiegart, Yu-chen Karen; Figueroa-Santos, Miriam Aileen; Petrash, Stanislas; Garcia-Miralles, Jose; Wang, Jun

    2015-01-21

    Conductive adhesives are found favorable in a wide range of applications including a lead-free solder in micro-chips, flexible and printable electronics and enhancing the performance of energy storage devices. Composite materials comprised of metallic fillers and a polymer matrix are of great interest to be implemented as hybrid conductive adhesives. Here we investigated a cost-effective conductive adhesive material consisting of silver-coated copper as micro-fillers using synchrotron-based three-dimensional (3D) X-ray nano-tomography. The key factors affecting the quality and performance of the material were quantitatively studied in 3D on the nanometer scale for the first time. A critical characteristic parameter, defined as a shape-factor, was determined to yield a high-quality silver coating, leading to satisfactory performance. A 'stack-and-screen' mechanism was proposed to elaborate such a phenomenon. The findings and the technique developed in this work will facilitate the future advancement of conductive adhesives to have a great impact in micro-electronics and other applications. PMID:25474162

  4. Statistically deformable 2D/3D registration for accurate determination of post-operative cup orientation from single standard X-ray radiograph.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Guoyan

    2009-01-01

    The widely used procedure of evaluation of cup orientation following total hip arthroplasty using single standard anteroposterior (AP) radiograph is known inaccurate, largely due to the wide variability in individual pelvic orientation relative to X-ray plate. 2D/3D rigid image registration methods have been introduced for an accurate determination of the post-operative cup alignment with respect to an anatomical reference extracted from the CT data. Although encouraging results have been reported, their extensive usage in clinical routine is still limited. This may be explained by their requirement of a CAD model of the prosthesis, which is often difficult to be organized from the manufacturer due to the proprietary issue, and by their requirement of a pre-operative CT scan, which is not available for most retrospective studies. To address these issues, we developed and validated a statistically deformable 2D/3D registration approach for accurate determination of post-operative cup orientation. No CAD model and pre-operative CT data is required any more. Quantitative and qualitative results evaluated on cadaveric and clinical datasets are given, which indicate the validity of the approach. PMID:20426064

  5. Comprehensive Non-Destructive Conservation Documentation of Lunar Samples Using High-Resolution Image-Based 3D Reconstructions and X-Ray CT Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blumenfeld, E. H.; Evans, C. A.; Oshel, E. R.; Liddle, D. A.; Beaulieu, K.; Zeigler, R. A.; Hanna, R. D.; Ketcham, R. A.

    2015-01-01

    Established contemporary conservation methods within the fields of Natural and Cultural Heritage encourage an interdisciplinary approach to preservation of heritage material (both tangible and intangible) that holds "Outstanding Universal Value" for our global community. NASA's lunar samples were acquired from the moon for the primary purpose of intensive scientific investigation. These samples, however, also invoke cultural significance, as evidenced by the millions of people per year that visit lunar displays in museums and heritage centers around the world. Being both scientifically and culturally significant, the lunar samples require a unique conservation approach. Government mandate dictates that NASA's Astromaterials Acquisition and Curation Office develop and maintain protocols for "documentation, preservation, preparation and distribution of samples for research, education and public outreach" for both current and future collections of astromaterials. Documentation, considered the first stage within the conservation methodology, has evolved many new techniques since curation protocols for the lunar samples were first implemented, and the development of new documentation strategies for current and future astromaterials is beneficial to keeping curation protocols up to date. We have developed and tested a comprehensive non-destructive documentation technique using high-resolution image-based 3D reconstruction and X-ray CT (XCT) data in order to create interactive 3D models of lunar samples that would ultimately be served to both researchers and the public. These data enhance preliminary scientific investigations including targeted sample requests, and also provide a new visual platform for the public to experience and interact with the lunar samples. We intend to serve these data as they are acquired on NASA's Astromaterials Acquisistion and Curation website at http://curator.jsc.nasa.gov/. Providing 3D interior and exterior documentation of astromaterial

  6. High density resolution synchrotron radiation based x-ray microtomography (SR μCT) for quantitative 3D-morphometrics in zoological sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nickel, Michael; Hammel, Jörg U.; Herzen, Julia; Bullinger, Eric; Beckmann, Felix

    2008-08-01

    Zoological sciences widely rely on morphological data to reconstruct and understand body structures of animals. The best suitable methods like tomography allow for a direct representation of 3D-structures. In recent years, synchrotron radiation based x-ray microtomography (SR μCT) placed high resolutions to the disposal of morphologists. With the development of highly brilliant and collimated third generation synchrotron sources, phase contrast SR μCT became widely available. A number of scientific contributions stressed the superiority of phase contrast over absorption contrast. However, here we demonstrate the power of high density resolution methods based on absorption-contrast SRμCT for quantitative 3D-measurements of tissues and other delicate bio-structures in zoological sciences. We used beamline BW2 at DORIS III (DESY, Hamburg, Germany) to perform microtomography on tissue and mineral skeletons of marine sponges (Porifera) which were shock frozen and/or fixed in a glutamate osmium tetroxide solution, followed by critical point drying. High density resolution tomographic reconstructions allowed running quantitative 3D-image analyses in Matlab and ImageJ. By applying contrast and shape rule based algorithms we semi-automatically extracted and measured sponge body structures like mineral spicules, elements of the canal system or tissue structures. This lead to a better understanding of sponge biology: from skeleton functional morphology and internal water flow regimes to body contractility. Our high density resolution based quantitative approach can be applied to a wide variety of biological structures. However, two prerequisites apply: (1) maximum density resolution is necessary; (2) edge effects as seen for example in phase outline contrast SR μCT must not be present. As a consequence, to allow biological sciences to fully exploit the power of SR μCT further increase of density resolution in absorption contrast methods is desirable.

  7. The Devil is in the Details: Using X-Ray Computed Tomography to Develop Accurate 3D Grain Characteristics and Bed Structure Metrics for Gravel Bed Rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voepel, H.; Hodge, R. A.; Leyland, J.; Sear, D. A.; Ahmed, S. I.

    2014-12-01

    Uncertainty for bedload estimates in gravel bed rivers is largely driven by our inability to characterize the arrangement and orientation of the sediment grains within the bed. The characteristics of the surface structure are produced by the water working of grains, which leads to structural differences in bedforms through differential patterns of grain sorting, packing, imbrication, mortaring and degree of bed armoring. Until recently the technical and logistical difficulties of characterizing the arrangement of sediment in 3D have prohibited a full understanding of how grains interact with stream flow and the feedback mechanisms that exist. Micro-focus X-ray CT has been used for non-destructive 3D imaging of grains within a series of intact sections of river bed taken from key morphological units (see Figure 1). Volume, center of mass, points of contact, protrusion and spatial orientation of individual surface grains are derived from these 3D images, which in turn, facilitates estimates of 3D static force properties at the grain-scale such as pivoting angles, buoyancy and gravity forces, and grain exposure. By aggregating representative samples of grain-scale properties of localized interacting sediment into overall metrics, we can compare and contrast bed stability at a macro-scale with respect to stream bed morphology. Understanding differences in bed stability through representative metrics derived at the grain-scale will ultimately lead to improved bedload estimates with reduced uncertainty and increased understanding of interactions between grain-scale properties on channel morphology. Figure 1. CT-Scans of a water worked gravel-filled pot. a. 3D rendered scan showing the outer mesh, and b. the same pot with the mesh removed. c. vertical change in porosity of the gravels sampled in 5mm volumes. Values are typical of those measured in the field and lab. d. 2-D slices through the gravels at 20% depth from surface (porosity = 0.35), and e. 75% depth from

  8. Assessment of Image Processing and Resolution on Permeability and Drainage Simulations Through 3D Pore-networks Obtained Using X-ray Computed Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, G.; Willson, C. S.; Thompson, K. E.; Rivers, M. L.

    2013-12-01

    Typically, continuum-scale flow parameters are obtained through laboratory experiments. Over the past several years, image-based modeling, which is a direct simulation of flow through the structural arrangements of the voids and solids obtained using X-ray computed tomography (XCT) in a sample porous medium, has become a reliable technique for predicting certain flow parameters. Even though XCT is capable of resolving micron-level details, the voxel resolution of the reconstructed image is still dependent upon a number of factors, including the sample size, X-ray energy and XCT beamline setup. Thus, each imaging experiment requires a tradeoff between the sample size that can be imaged, the voxel resolution, and the length scale of the pore space that can be extracted. In addition, the geometric and topological properties of the void space and 3D pore network structure are dictated by the image processing and the choice of pore network generation method. In this research, image-based pore network models are used to quantitatively assess the impact of image resolution, image processing and the choice of pore network generation methods on simulated parameters. A 5 mm diameter and ~15 mm in length Berea sandstone core was scanned two times. First, a ~12 mm long section of the entire cross-section was scanned at 4.1 micron voxel resolution; next, a ~1.4 mm diameter and ~4.12 mm length section within the 1st domain was scanned at 1 micron voxel resolution. The resulting 3D datasets were filtered and segmented into solid and void space. The low resolution image was filtered and segmented using two different approaches in order to evaluate the potential of each approach in identifying the different solid phases in the original 16 bit dataset. A set of networks were created by varying the pore density on both the high and low resolution datasets in order to assess the impact of these factors on flow simulations. Single-phase permeability and a two-phase drainage pore

  9. Monte Carlo performance on the x-ray converter thickness in digital mammography using software breast models

    SciTech Connect

    Liaparinos, P.; Bliznakova, K.

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: In x-ray mammography, some of the components that play significant role to early diagnosis are the x-ray source, the breast composition as well as the composition of the x-ray converter. Various studies have previously investigated separately the influence of breast characteristics and detector configuration on the optimization of mammographic imaging systems. However, it is important to examine the combined effect of both components in improving the signal transfer properties in mammography systems of the mammograms. In the present study, the authors compared and evaluated x-ray converters using software breast models and realistic mammographic spectra in terms of: (a) zero-frequency detective quantum efficiency (DQE) and (b) sensitivity. The impact of x-ray converter thickness on contrast threshold (C{sub TH}) for observer assessment, based on the Rose model, was demonstrated as well. Methods: Monte Carlo techniques were applied to simulate the x-ray interactions within the software breast phantoms and thereafter within the detective medium. Simulations involved: (a) two mammographic x-ray spectra: 28 kV Mo, 0.030 mm Mo, and 32 kV W, 0.050 mm Rh of different entrance surface air kerma (ESAK: 3-7 mGy), (b) realistic breast models (dense and fatty) and (c) x-ray converter materials most frequently considered in investigations on energy integrating digital mammography detectors: the Gd{sub 2}O{sub 2}S:Tb granular phosphor, the CsI:Tl structured phosphor, and the a-Se photoconductive layer. Detector material thickness was considered to vary in the range from 50 mg/cm{sup 2} up to 150 mg/cm{sup 2}. Results: The Monte Carlo study showed that: (a) the x-ray beam becomes less penetrating after passing through dense breasts leading to higher values of zero-frequency DQE of the x-ray imaging converters and improved C{sub TH} values in all cases considered, (b) W/Rh target/filter combination results in improved C{sub TH} values at higher ESAK values, and (c) a

  10. The use of sequential X-ray, CT and MRI in the preoperative evaluation of breast-conserving surgery

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Huiyu; Tan, Hongna; Gao, Jianbo; Wei, Yan; Yu, Zhan; Zhou, Yan

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the value of sequential application of molybdenum target X-ray, multi-slice spiral computed tomography (MSCT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the preoperative evaluation of breast-conserving surgeries. In total, 76 patients with indications for breast-conserving surgery due to complicated breast cancer participated in the study and were assigned to either control or observation group (n=38 per group). The patients in the control group were evaluated with two sets of random combinations of molybdenum target X-ray, MSCT or MRI with ultrasound inspection, whereas the patients in the observation group were evaluated by sequential inspection methods of molybdenum target X-ray, MSCT and MRI. A comparison of surgery outcomes, incidence of complications, rate of positive surgical margins, and recurrence and survival rates in the groups during a follow-up period of 24 months was made. Comparisons of the preoperative evaluation results for tumor number, average maximum diameter, number of lymphatic metastatic groups and number of metastatic lymph nodes in the observation group showed the numbers to be significantly higher than those in the control group (P<0.05). Conversely, the comparisons of age, tumor distribution and T-staging yielded no significant differences, validating the analysis. The percentage of successful breast-conserving surgeries in the observation group was significantly higher than that in the control group, while the incidence of complications in the observation group was lower (P<0.05). The rate of positive surgical margins and the recurrence rate of cancer in the observation group were lower than those in the control group, and the survival rate in the observation group was higher, with differences having statistical significance (P<0.05). In conclusion, the sequential application of molybdenum target X-ray, MSCT and MRI during the preoperative evaluation for breast-conserving surgery positively affects

  11. The simulation of 3D microcalcification clusters in 2D digital mammography and breast tomosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Shaheen, Eman; Van Ongeval, Chantal; Zanca, Federica; Cockmartin, Lesley; Marshall, Nicholas; Jacobs, Jurgen; Young, Kenneth C.; Dance, David R.; Bosmans, Hilde

    2011-12-15

    Purpose: This work proposes a new method of building 3D models of microcalcification clusters and describes the validation of their realistic appearance when simulated into 2D digital mammograms and into breast tomosynthesis images. Methods: A micro-CT unit was used to scan 23 breast biopsy specimens of microcalcification clusters with malignant and benign characteristics and their 3D reconstructed datasets were segmented to obtain 3D models of microcalcification clusters. These models were then adjusted for the x-ray spectrum used and for the system resolution and simulated into 2D projection images to obtain mammograms after image processing and into tomographic sequences of projection images, which were then reconstructed to form 3D tomosynthesis datasets. Six radiologists were asked to distinguish between 40 real and 40 simulated clusters of microcalcifications in two separate studies on 2D mammography and tomosynthesis datasets. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was used to test the ability of each observer to distinguish between simulated and real microcalcification clusters. The kappa statistic was applied to assess how often the individual simulated and real microcalcification clusters had received similar scores (''agreement'') on their realistic appearance in both modalities. This analysis was performed for all readers and for the real and the simulated group of microcalcification clusters separately. ''Poor'' agreement would reflect radiologists' confusion between simulated and real clusters, i.e., lesions not systematically evaluated in both modalities as either simulated or real, and would therefore be interpreted as a success of the present models. Results: The area under the ROC curve, averaged over the observers, was 0.55 (95% confidence interval [0.44, 0.66]) for the 2D study, and 0.46 (95% confidence interval [0.29, 0.64]) for the tomosynthesis study, indicating no statistically significant difference between real and simulated

  12. Nanomagnetic Levitation 3-D Cultures of Breast and Colorectal Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Bumpers, Harvey L.; Janagama, Dasharatham G.; Manne, Upender; Basson, Marc D.; Katkoori, Venkat

    2014-01-01

    Background Innovative technologies for drug discovery and development, cancer models, stem cell research, tissue engineering, and drug testing in various cell-based platforms require an application similar to the in vivo system. Materials and Methods We developed for the first time nanomagnetically levitated three dimensional (3-D) cultures of breast cancer (BC) and colorectal cancer (CRC) cells using carbon encapsulated cobalt magnetic nanoparticles. BC and CRC xenografts grown in severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice were evaluated for N-cadherin and Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) expressions. These phenotypes were compared with 2-D cultures and 3-D cultures grown in a gel matrix. Results The BC and CRC cells grown by magnetic levitation formed microtissues. The levitated cultures had high viability and were maintained in culture for long periods of time. It has been observed that N-cadherin and EGFR activities were highly expressed in the levitated 3-D tumor spheres and xenografts of CRC and BC cells. Conclusions Nanomagnetically levitated 3-D cultures tend to form stable microtissues of BC and CRC and may be more feasible for a range of applications in drug discovery or regenerative medicine. PMID:25617973

  13. Long-term toxicity of an intraoperative radiotherapy boost using low energy X-rays during breast-conserving surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Kraus-Tiefenbacher, Uta . E-mail: uta.kraus-tiefenbacher@radonk.ma.uni-heidelberg.de; Bauer, Lelia; Scheda, Antonella; Fleckenstein, Katharina; Keller, Anke; Herskind, Carsten; Steil, Volker; Melchert, Frank; Wenz, Frederik

    2006-10-01

    Purpose: Intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) as a boost for breast cancer delivers a high single dose of radiation to a late-reacting tissue; therefore late toxicity is of particular interest, and long-term follow-up is warranted. To date there are only limited data available on breast cancer patients treated with IORT using low energy X-rays. We analyzed toxicity and cosmesis after IORT as a boost with a minimum follow-up of 18 months. Methods and Materials: A total of 73 patients treated with IORT (20 Gy/50 kV X-rays; INTRABEAM [Carl Zeiss Surgical, Oberkochen, Germany]) to the tumor bed during breast-conserving surgery as a boost followed by whole-breast radiotherapy (WBRT, 46 Gy) underwent a prospective, predefined follow-up (median, 25 months; range 18-44 months), including clinical examination and breast ultrasound at 6-months and mammographies at 1-year intervals. Toxicities were documented using the common toxicity criteria (CTC)/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer and the LENT-SOMA score. Cosmesis was evaluated with a score from 1 to 4. Results: The IORT in combination with WBRT was well tolerated, with no Grade 3 or 4 skin toxicities and no telangiectasias. Fibrosis of the entire breast was observed in 5% of the patients. A circumscribed fibrosis around the tumor bed was palpable in up to 27% with a peak around 18 months after therapy and a decline thereafter. The observed toxicitiy rates were not influenced by age, tumor stage, or systemic therapy. The cosmetic outcome was good to excellent in {>=}90% of cases. Conclusions: After IORT of the breast using low-energy X-rays, no unexpected toxicity rates were observed during long-term-follow-up.

  14. Attempt at Two-Dimensional Mapping of X-ray Fluorescence from Breast Cancer Tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ando, Masami; Yamasaki, Katsuhito; Ohbayashi, Chiho; Esumi, Hiroyasu; Hyodo, Kazuyuki; Sugiyama, Hiroshi; Li, Gang; Maksimenko, Anton; Kawai, Toshiaki

    2005-07-01

    A world first two-dimensional mapping of X-ray fluorescence from an invasive papillary carcinoma containing three kinds of metal elements that by white radiation has been obtained. Carcinoma shows intense Ca K X-rays, while normal tissue including stroma, shows no such Ca X-ray signals within experimental precision, but even shows reasonable Fe and Zn K X-ray intensity. This has extremely good correspondence to an X-ray dark-field (X-DF) image taken using a Laue angular analyzer. This fact may suggest an idea that carcinoma may attract Ca atoms better than Fe and Zn atoms, which are involved more in normal tissue.

  15. High-Resolution X-Ray Techniques as New Tool to Investigate the 3D Vascularization of Engineered-Bone Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Bukreeva, Inna; Fratini, Michela; Campi, Gaetano; Pelliccia, Daniele; Spanò, Raffaele; Tromba, Giuliana; Brun, Francesco; Burghammer, Manfred; Grilli, Marco; Cancedda, Ranieri; Cedola, Alessia; Mastrogiacomo, Maddalena

    2015-01-01

    The understanding of structure–function relationships in normal and pathologic mammalian tissues is at the basis of a tissue engineering (TE) approach for the development of biological substitutes to restore or improve tissue function. In this framework, it is interesting to investigate engineered bone tissue, formed when porous ceramic constructs are loaded with bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC) and implanted in vivo. To monitor the relation between bone formation and vascularization, it is important to achieve a detailed imaging and a quantitative description of the complete three-dimensional vascular network in such constructs. Here, we used synchrotron X-ray phase-contrast micro-tomography to visualize and analyze the three-dimensional micro-vascular networks in bone-engineered constructs, in an ectopic bone formation mouse-model. We compared samples seeded and not seeded with BMSC, as well as samples differently stained or unstained. Thanks to the high quality of the images, we investigated the 3D distribution of both vessels and collagen matrix and we obtained quantitative information for all different samples. We propose our approach as a tool for quantitative studies of angiogenesis in TE and for any pre-clinical investigation where a quantitative analysis of the vascular network is required. PMID:26442248

  16. X-ray fluorescence (conventional and 3D) and scanning electron microscopy for the investigation of Portuguese polychrome glazed ceramics: Advances in the knowledge of the manufacturing techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guilherme, A.; Coroado, J.; dos Santos, J. M. F.; Lühl, L.; Wolff, T.; Kanngießer, B.; Carvalho, M. L.

    2011-05-01

    This work shows the first analytical results obtained by X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) (conventional and 3D) and Scanning Electron Microscopy with Energy Dispersive System (SEM-EDS) on original Portuguese ceramic pieces produced between the 16th and 18th centuries in Coimbra and Lisbon. Experts distinguished these productions based only on the color, texture and brightness, which originates mislabeling in some cases. Thanks to lateral and spatial resolution in the micrometer regime, the results obtained with μ-XRF were essential in determining the glaze and pigment thicknesses by monitoring the profile of the most abundant element in each "layer". Furthermore, the dissemination of these elements throughout the glaze is different depending on the glaze composition, firing temperature and on the pigment itself. Hence, the crucial point of this investigation was to analyze and understand the interfaces color/glaze and glaze/ceramic support. Together with the XRF results, images captured by SEM and the corresponding semi-quantitative EDS data revealed different manufacturing processes used by the two production centers. Different capture modes were suitable to distinguish different crystals from the minerals that confer the color of the pigments used and to enhance the fact that some of them are very well spread through the glassy matrix, sustaining the theory of an evolved and careful procedure in the manufacturing process of the glaze.

  17. In situ 3D topographic and shape analysis by synchrotron radiation X-ray microtomography for crystal form identification in polymorphic mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Xian-Zhen; Xiao, Ti-Qiao; Nangia, Ashwini; Yang, Shuo; Lu, Xiao-Long; Li, Hai-Yan; Shao, Qun; He, You; York, Peter; Zhang, Ji-Wen

    2016-04-01

    Polymorphism denotes the existence of more than one crystal structure of a substance, and great practical and theoretical interest for the chemical and pharmaceutical industries. In many cases, it is challenging to produce a pure crystal form and establish a sensitive detection method for the identification of crystal form in a mixture of polymorphs. In this study, an accurate and sensitive method based on synchrotron radiation X-ray computed microtomography (SR-μCT) was devised to identify the polymorphs of clopidogrel bisulphate (CLP). After 3D reconstruction, crystal particles were extracted and dozens of structural parameters were calculated. Whilst, the particle shapes of the two crystal forms were all irregular, the surface of CLP II was found to be rougher than CLP I. In order to classify the crystal form based on the quantitative morphological property of particles, Volume Bias Percentage based on Surface Smoothing (VBP) was defined and a new method based on VBP was successfully developed, with a total matching rate of 99.91% for 4544 particles and a lowest detectable limit of 1%. More important for the mixtures in solid pharmaceutical formulations, the interference of excipients can be avoided, a feature cannot achieved by other available analytical methods.

  18. Synchrotron X-ray 2D and 3D Elemental Imaging of CdSe/ZnS Quantum dot Nanoparticles in Daphnia Magna

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, B.; Pace, H; Lanzirotti, A; Smith, R; Ranville, J

    2009-01-01

    The potential toxicity of nanoparticles to aquatic organisms is of interest given that increased commercialization will inevitably lead to some instances of inadvertent environmental exposures. Cadmium selenide quantum dots (QDs) capped with zinc sulfide are used in the semiconductor industry and in cellular imaging. Their small size (<10 nm) suggests that they may be readily assimilated by exposed organisms. We exposed Daphnia magna to both red and green QDs and used synchrotron X-ray fluorescence to study the distribution of Zn and Se in the organism over a time period of 36 h. The QDs appeared to be confined to the gut, and there was no evidence of further assimilation into the organism. Zinc and Se fluorescence signals were highly correlated, suggesting that the QDs had not dissolved to any extent. There was no apparent difference between red or green QDs, i.e., there was no effect of QD size. 3D tomography confirmed that the QDs were exclusively in the gut area of the organism. It is possible that the QDs aggregated and were therefore too large to cross the gut wall.

  19. In situ 3D topographic and shape analysis by synchrotron radiation X-ray microtomography for crystal form identification in polymorphic mixtures

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Xian-Zhen; Xiao, Ti-Qiao; Nangia, Ashwini; Yang, Shuo; Lu, Xiao-Long; Li, Hai-Yan; Shao, Qun; He, You; York, Peter; Zhang, Ji-Wen

    2016-01-01

    Polymorphism denotes the existence of more than one crystal structure of a substance, and great practical and theoretical interest for the chemical and pharmaceutical industries. In many cases, it is challenging to produce a pure crystal form and establish a sensitive detection method for the identification of crystal form in a mixture of polymorphs. In this study, an accurate and sensitive method based on synchrotron radiation X-ray computed microtomography (SR-μCT) was devised to identify the polymorphs of clopidogrel bisulphate (CLP). After 3D reconstruction, crystal particles were extracted and dozens of structural parameters were calculated. Whilst, the particle shapes of the two crystal forms were all irregular, the surface of CLP II was found to be rougher than CLP I. In order to classify the crystal form based on the quantitative morphological property of particles, Volume Bias Percentage based on Surface Smoothing (VBP) was defined and a new method based on VBP was successfully developed, with a total matching rate of 99.91% for 4544 particles and a lowest detectable limit of 1%. More important for the mixtures in solid pharmaceutical formulations, the interference of excipients can be avoided, a feature cannot achieved by other available analytical methods. PMID:27097672

  20. X-ray attenuation of adipose breast tissue: in-vitro and in-vivo measurements using spectral imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fredenberg, Erik; Erhard, Klaus; Berggren, Karl; Dance, David R.; Young, Kenneth C.; Cederström, Björn; Johansson, Henrik; Lundqvist, Mats; Moa, Elin; Homan, Hanno; Willsher, Paula; Kilburn-Toppin, Fleur; Wallis, Matthew

    2015-03-01

    The development of new x-ray imaging techniques often requires prior knowledge of tissue attenuation, but the sources of such information are sparse. We have measured the attenuation of adipose breast tissue using spectral imaging, in vitro and in vivo. For the in-vitro measurement, fixed samples of adipose breast tissue were imaged on a spectral mammography system, and the energy-dependent x-ray attenuation was measured in terms of equivalent thicknesses of aluminum and poly-methyl methacrylate (PMMA). For the in-vivo measurement, a similar procedure was applied on a number of spectral screening mammograms. The results of the two measurements agreed well and were consistent with published attenuation data and with measurements on tissue-equivalent material.

  1. Dose efficiency consideration for volume-of-interest breast imaging using x-ray differential phase-contrast CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Weixing; Ning, Ruola

    2009-02-01

    The newly developed differential phase-contrast (DPC) imaging technique has attracted increasing interest among researchers. In a DPC system, the self-imaging effect and the phase-stepping method are implemented through three gratings to manifest phase contrast, and differentiated phase images can be obtained. An important advantage of this technique is that hospital-grade x-ray tubes can be used, allowing much higher x-ray output power and faster image processing than with micro-focus in-line phase-contrast imaging. A DPC-CT system can acquire images from different view angles along a circular orbit, and tomographic images can be reconstructed. However, the principle of DPC imaging requires multiple exposures to compute any differentiated phase image at each view angle, which raises concerns about radiation exposure via x-ray dose. Computer simulations are carried out to study the dose efficiency for DPC-CT for volume-of-interest breast imaging. A conceptual CBCT/DPC-CT hybrid imaging system and a numerical breast phantom are designed for this study. A FBP-type reconstruction algorithm is optimized for the VOI reconstruction. Factors including the x-ray flux and detector pixel size are considered and their effects on reconstruction image quality in terms of noise level and contrast-to-noise ratio are investigated. The results indicate that with a pixel size of 20 microns and a dose level of 5.7mGy, which is equivalent to the patient dose of a two-view mammography screening or a dedicated CBCT breast imaging scan, much better tissue contrast and spatial resolution can be achieved using the DPC-CT technique. It is very promising for possible application at pathology-level in vivo study for human breasts.

  2. The possibility of using x-ray diffraction with hair to screen for pathologic conditions such as breast cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, Veronica; Cookson, David

    2000-02-01

    Mammalian hair exhibits a complex structure on length scales ranging from a few to hundreds of Angstroms. High-quality synchrotron x-ray images have yielded new insight about the structure and packing of the intermediate keratinous filaments that represent the bulk of a hair's volume. When comparing human hair diffraction patterns from healthy individuals and breast cancer patients significant differences have been seen, raising the possibility that fiber diffraction may be useful as a screening technique for certain pathologic conditions.

  3. Effect of X-ray treatments on salmonella enterica and spoilage bacteria on skin-on chicken breast fillets and shell eggs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objectives of this study were to determine the efficacy of X-ray irradiation on the inactivation of a 3- strain mixture of Salmonella enterica (S. Enteritidis E190-88, S. Typhimurium ATCC 14028, and S. Montevideo ATCC 8387) using an RS 2400 X-ray system on chicken breast fillets and shell eggs a...

  4. SoilJ - An ImageJ plugin for semi-automatized image-processing of 3-D X-ray images of soil columns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koestel, John

    2016-04-01

    3-D X-ray imaging is a formidable tool for quantifying soil structural properties which are known to be extremely diverse. This diversity necessitates the collection of large sample sizes for adequately representing the spatial variability of soil structure at a specific sampling site. One important bottleneck of using X-ray imaging is however the large amount of time required by a trained specialist to process the image data which makes it difficult to process larger amounts of samples. The software SoilJ aims at removing this bottleneck by automatizing most of the required image processing steps needed to analyze image data of cylindrical soil columns. SoilJ is a plugin of the free Java-based image-processing software ImageJ. The plugin is designed to automatically process all images located with a designated folder. In a first step, SoilJ recognizes the outlines of the soil column upon which the column is rotated to an upright position and placed in the center of the canvas. Excess canvas is removed from the images. Then, SoilJ samples the grey values of the column material as well as the surrounding air in Z-direction. Assuming that the column material (mostly PVC of aluminium) exhibits a spatially constant density, these grey values serve as a proxy for the image illumination at a specific Z-coordinate. Together with the grey values of the air they are used to correct image illumination fluctuations which often occur along the axis of rotation during image acquisition. SoilJ includes also an algorithm for beam-hardening artefact removal and extended image segmentation options. Finally, SoilJ integrates the morphology analyses plugins of BoneJ (Doube et al., 2006, BoneJ Free and extensible bone image analysis in ImageJ. Bone 47: 1076-1079) and provides an ASCII file summarizing these measures for each investigated soil column, respectively. In the future it is planned to integrate SoilJ into FIJI, the maintained and updated edition of ImageJ with selected

  5. An elastically compressible phantom material with mechanical and x-ray attenuation properties equivalent to breast tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, B. D.; Gibson, A. P.; Tan, L. T.; Royle, G. J.

    2010-02-01

    We have developed a novel phantom material: a solution of polyvinyl alcohol (PVAL) in ethanol and water, freeze-thawed to produce a solid yet elastically compressible gel. The x-ray attenuation and mechanical properties of these gels are compared with published measurements of breast tissue. Gels with PVAL concentrations from 5 to 20% w/v were produced. The linear x-ray attenuation coefficients of these gels range from 0.76 to 0.86 cm-1 at 17.5 keV, increasing with PVAL concentration. These values are very similar to the published values of breast tissue at this energy, 0.8-0.9 cm-1. Under compression cancerous breast tissue is approximately ten times stiffer than healthy breast tissue. The Young's moduli of the gels increase with PVAL concentration. Varying the PVAL concentration from 7.5 to 20% w/v produces gels with Young's moduli from 20 to 220 kPa at 15% strain. These values are characteristic of normal and cancerous breast tissue, respectively.

  6. Measurement of breast-tissue x-ray attenuation by spectral mammography: first results on cyst fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fredenberg, Erik; Dance, David R.; Willsher, Paula; Moa, Elin; von Tiedemann, Miriam; Young, Kenneth C.; Wallis, Matthew G.

    2013-12-01

    Knowledge of x-ray attenuation is essential for developing and evaluating x-ray imaging technologies. For instance, techniques to better characterize cysts at mammography screening would be highly desirable to reduce recalls, but the development is hampered by the lack of attenuation data for cysts. We have developed a method to measure x-ray attenuation of tissue samples using a prototype photon-counting spectral mammography unit. The method was applied to measure the attenuation of 50 samples of breast cyst fluid and 50 samples of water. Spectral (energy-resolved) images of the samples were acquired and the image signal was mapped to equivalent thicknesses of two known reference materials, which can be used to derive the x-ray attenuation as a function of energy. The attenuation of cyst fluid was found to be significantly different from water. There was a relatively large natural spread between different samples of cyst fluid, whereas the homogeneity of each individual sample was found to be good; the variation within samples did not reach above the quantum noise floor. The spectral method proved stable between several measurements on the same sample. Further, chemical analysis and elemental attenuation calculation were used to validate the spectral measurement on a subset of the samples. The two methods agreed within the precision of the elemental attenuation calculation over the mammographic energy range.

  7. Maximum-likelihood estimation of scatter components algorithm for x-ray coherent scatter computed tomography of the breast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghammraoui, Bahaa; Badal, Andreu; Popescu, Lucretiu M.

    2016-04-01

    Coherent scatter computed tomography (CSCT) is a reconstructive x-ray imaging technique that yields the spatially resolved coherent-scatter cross section of the investigated object revealing structural information of tissue under investigation. In the original CSCT proposals the reconstruction of images from coherently scattered x-rays is done at each scattering angle separately using analytic reconstruction. In this work we develop a maximum likelihood estimation of scatter components algorithm (ML-ESCA) that iteratively reconstructs images using a few material component basis functions from coherent scatter projection data. The proposed algorithm combines the measured scatter data at different angles into one reconstruction equation with only a few component images. Also, it accounts for data acquisition statistics and physics, modeling effects such as polychromatic energy spectrum and detector response function. We test the algorithm with simulated projection data obtained with a pencil beam setup using a new version of MC-GPU code, a Graphical Processing Unit version of PENELOPE Monte Carlo particle transport simulation code, that incorporates an improved model of x-ray coherent scattering using experimentally measured molecular interference functions. The results obtained for breast imaging phantoms using adipose and glandular tissue cross sections show that the new algorithm can separate imaging data into basic adipose and water components at radiation doses comparable with Breast Computed Tomography. Simulation results also show the potential for imaging microcalcifications. Overall, the component images obtained with ML-ESCA algorithm have a less noisy appearance than the images obtained with the conventional filtered back projection algorithm for each individual scattering angle. An optimization study for x-ray energy range selection for breast CSCT is also presented.

  8. Maximum-likelihood estimation of scatter components algorithm for x-ray coherent scatter computed tomography of the breast.

    PubMed

    Ghammraoui, Bahaa; Badal, Andreu; Popescu, Lucretiu M

    2016-04-21

    Coherent scatter computed tomography (CSCT) is a reconstructive x-ray imaging technique that yields the spatially resolved coherent-scatter cross section of the investigated object revealing structural information of tissue under investigation. In the original CSCT proposals the reconstruction of images from coherently scattered x-rays is done at each scattering angle separately using analytic reconstruction. In this work we develop a maximum likelihood estimation of scatter components algorithm (ML-ESCA) that iteratively reconstructs images using a few material component basis functions from coherent scatter projection data. The proposed algorithm combines the measured scatter data at different angles into one reconstruction equation with only a few component images. Also, it accounts for data acquisition statistics and physics, modeling effects such as polychromatic energy spectrum and detector response function. We test the algorithm with simulated projection data obtained with a pencil beam setup using a new version of MC-GPU code, a Graphical Processing Unit version of PENELOPE Monte Carlo particle transport simulation code, that incorporates an improved model of x-ray coherent scattering using experimentally measured molecular interference functions. The results obtained for breast imaging phantoms using adipose and glandular tissue cross sections show that the new algorithm can separate imaging data into basic adipose and water components at radiation doses comparable with Breast Computed Tomography. Simulation results also show the potential for imaging microcalcifications. Overall, the component images obtained with ML-ESCA algorithm have a less noisy appearance than the images obtained with the conventional filtered back projection algorithm for each individual scattering angle. An optimization study for x-ray energy range selection for breast CSCT is also presented. PMID:27025665

  9. Radiologist Evaluation of an X-ray Tube Based Diffraction Enhanced Imaging Prototype Using Full Thickness Breast Specimens.

    SciTech Connect

    Faulconer, L.; Zhong, Z.; Parham, C.; Connor, D. M.; , Kim, E.; Zeng, D.; Livasy, C.; Cole, E.; Kuzmiak, C.; Koomen, M.; Pavic, D.; Pisano, E.

    2009-05-21

    Conventional mammographic image contrast is derived from x-ray absorption, resulting in breast structure visualization due to density gradients that attenuate radiation without distinction between transmitted, scattered, or refracted x-rays. Diffraction-enhanced imaging (DEI) allows for increased contrast with decreased radiation dose compared to conventional mammographic imaging because of monochromatic x-rays, its unique refraction-based contrast mechanism, and excellent scatter rejection. However, a lingering drawback to the clinical translation of DEI has been the requirement for synchrotron radiation. The authors laboratory developed a DEI prototype (DEI-PR) using a readily available tungsten x-ray tube source and traditional DEI crystal optics, providing soft tissue images at 60 keV. Images of full-thickness human breast tissue specimens were acquired on synchrotron-based DEI (DEI-SR), DEI-PR, and digital mammographic systems. A panel of expert radiologists evaluated lesion feature visibility and correlation with pathology after receiving training on the interpretation of refraction contrast mammographic images. For mammographic features (mass, calcification), no significant differences were detected between the DEI-SR and DEI-PR systems. Benign lesions were perceived as better seen by radiologists using the DEI-SR system than the DEI-PR system at the [111] reflectivity, with generalizations limited by small sample size. No significant differences between DEI-SR and DEI-PR were detected for any other lesion type (atypical, cancer) at either crystal reflectivity. Thus, except for benign lesion characterizations, the DEI-PR system's performance was roughly equivalent to that of the traditional DEI system, demonstrating a significant step toward clinical translation of this modality for breast cancer applications.

  10. Fast 3-D Tomographic Microwave Imaging for Breast Cancer Detection

    PubMed Central

    Meaney, Paul M.; Kaufman, Peter A.; diFlorio-Alexander, Roberta M.; Paulsen, Keith D.

    2013-01-01

    Microwave breast imaging (using electromagnetic waves of frequencies around 1 GHz) has mostly remained at the research level for the past decade, gaining little clinical acceptance. The major hurdles limiting patient use are both at the hardware level (challenges in collecting accurate and noncorrupted data) and software level (often plagued by unrealistic reconstruction times in the tens of hours). In this paper we report improvements that address both issues. First, the hardware is able to measure signals down to levels compatible with sub-centimeter image resolution while keeping an exam time under 2 min. Second, the software overcomes the enormous time burden and produces similarly accurate images in less than 20 min. The combination of the new hardware and software allows us to produce and report here the first clinical 3-D microwave tomographic images of the breast. Two clinical examples are selected out of 400+ exams conducted at the Dartmouth Hitchcock Medical Center (Lebanon, NH). The first example demonstrates the potential usefulness of our system for breast cancer screening while the second example focuses on therapy monitoring. PMID:22562726

  11. 3D Structure of Sulfolobus solfataricus Carboxypeptidase Developed by Molecular Modeling is Confirmed by Site-Directed Mutagenesis and Small Angle X-Ray Scattering

    PubMed Central

    Occhipinti, Emanuela; Martelli, Pier Luigi; Spinozzi, Francesco; Corsi, Federica; Formantici, Cristina; Molteni, Laura; Amenitsch, Heintz; Mariani, Paolo; Tortora, Paolo; Casadio, Rita

    2003-01-01

    Sulfolobus solfataricus carboxypeptidase (CPSso) is a thermostable zinc-metalloenzyme with a Mr of 43,000. Taking into account the experimentally determined zinc content of one ion per subunit, we developed two alternative 3D models, starting from the available structures of Thermoactinomyces vulgaris carboxypeptidase (Model A) and Pseudomonas carboxypeptidase G2 (Model B). The former enzyme is monomeric and has one metal ion in the active site, while the latter is dimeric and has two bound zinc ions. The two models were computed by exploiting the structural alignment of the one zinc- with the two zinc-containing active sites of the two templates, and with a threading procedure. Both computed structures resembled the respective template, with only one bound zinc with tetrahedric coordination in the active site. With these models, two different quaternary structures can be modeled: one using Model A with a hexameric symmetry, the other from Model B with a tetrameric symmetry. Mutagenesis experiments directed toward the residues putatively involved in metal chelation in either of the models disproved Model A and supported Model B, in which the metal-binding site comprises His108, Asp109, and His168. We also identified Glu142 as the acidic residue interacting with the water molecule occupying the fourth chelation site. Furthermore, the overall fold and the oligomeric structure of the molecule was validated by small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS). An ab initio original approach was used to reconstruct the shape of the CPSso in solution from the experimental curves. The results clearly support a tetrameric structure. The Monte Carlo method was then used to compare the crystallographic coordinates of the possible quaternary structures for CPSso with the SAXS profiles. The fitting procedure showed that only the model built using the Pseudomonas carboxypeptidase G2 structure as a template fitted the experimental data. PMID:12885660

  12. Molecular Predictors of 3D Morphogenesis by Breast Cancer Cell Lines in 3D Culture

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Ju; Chang, Hang; Giricz, Orsi; Lee, Genee; Baehner, Frederick; Gray, Joe; Bissell, Mina; Kenny, Paraic; Parvin, Bahram

    2010-02-01

    Correlative analysis of molecular markers with phenotypic signatures is the simplest model for hypothesis generation. In this paper, a panel of 24 breast cell lines was grown in 3D culture, their morphology was imaged through phase contrast microscopy, and computational methods were developed to segment and represent each colony at multiple dimensions. Subsequently, subpopulations from these morphological responses were identified through consensus clustering to reveal three clusters of round, grape-like, and stellate phenotypes. In some cases, cell lines with particular pathobiological phenotypes clustered together (e.g., ERBB2 amplified cell lines sharing the same morphometric properties as the grape-like phenotype). Next, associations with molecular features were realized through (i) differential analysis within each morphological cluster, and (ii) regression analysis across the entire panel of cell lines. In both cases, the dominant genes that are predictive of the morphological signatures were identified. Specifically, PPAR? has been associated with the invasive stellate morphological phenotype, which corresponds to triple-negative pathobiology. PPAR? has been validated through two supporting biological assays.

  13. Correction of absorption-edge artifacts in polychromatic X-ray tomography in a scanning electron microscope for 3D microelectronics

    SciTech Connect

    Laloum, D.; Printemps, T.; Bleuet, P.; Lorut, F.

    2015-01-15

    X-ray tomography is widely used in materials science. However, X-ray scanners are often based on polychromatic radiation that creates artifacts such as dark streaks. We show this artifact is not always due to beam hardening. It may appear when scanning samples with high-Z elements inside a low-Z matrix because of the high-Z element absorption edge: X-rays whose energy is above this edge are strongly absorbed, violating the exponential decay assumption for reconstruction algorithms and generating dark streaks. A method is proposed to limit the absorption edge effect and is applied on a microelectronic case to suppress dark streaks between interconnections.

  14. TU-A-17A-02: In Memoriam of Ben Galkin: Virtual Tools for Validation of X-Ray Breast Imaging Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, K; Bakic, P; Abbey, C; Kupinski, M; Mertelmeier, T

    2014-06-15

    This symposium will explore simulation methods for the preclinical evaluation of novel 3D and 4D x-ray breast imaging systems – the subject of AAPM taskgroup TG234. Given the complex design of modern imaging systems, simulations offer significant advantages over long and costly clinical studies in terms of reproducibility, reduced radiation exposures, a known reference standard, and the capability for studying patient and disease subpopulations through appropriate choice of simulation parameters. Our focus will be on testing the realism of software anthropomorphic phantoms and virtual clinical trials tools developed for the optimization and validation of breast imaging systems. The symposium will review the stateof- the-science, as well as the advantages and limitations of various approaches to testing realism of phantoms and simulated breast images. Approaches based upon the visual assessment of synthetic breast images by expert observers will be contrasted with approaches based upon comparing statistical properties between synthetic and clinical images. The role of observer models in the assessment of realism will be considered. Finally, an industry perspective will be presented, summarizing the role and importance of virtual tools and simulation methods in product development. The challenges and conditions that must be satisfied in order for computational modeling and simulation to play a significantly increased role in the design and evaluation of novel breast imaging systems will be addressed. Learning Objectives: Review the state-of-the science in testing realism of software anthropomorphic phantoms and virtual clinical trials tools; Compare approaches based upon the visual assessment by expert observers vs. the analysis of statistical properties of synthetic images; Discuss the role of observer models in the assessment of realism; Summarize the industry perspective to virtual methods for breast imaging.

  15. MRI-Derived 3-D-Printed Breast Phantom for Microwave Breast Imaging Validation.

    PubMed

    Burfeindt, Matthew J; Colgan, Timothy J; Mays, R Owen; Shea, Jacob D; Behdad, Nader; Van Veen, Barry D; Hagness, Susan C

    2012-01-01

    We propose a 3-D-printed breast phantom for use in preclinical experimental microwave imaging studies. The phantom is derived from an MRI of a human subject; thus, it is anthropomorphic, and its interior is very similar to an actual distribution of fibroglandular tissues. Adipose tissue in the breast is represented by the solid plastic (printed) regions of the phantom, while fibroglandular tissue is represented by liquid-filled voids in the plastic. The liquid is chosen to provide a biologically relevant dielectric contrast with the printed plastic. Such a phantom enables validation of microwave imaging techniques. We describe the procedure for generating the 3-D-printed breast phantom and present the measured dielectric properties of the 3-D-printed plastic over the frequency range 0.5-3.5 GHz. We also provide an example of a suitable liquid for filling the fibroglandular voids in the plastic.

  16. Automatic localization of vertebral levels in x-ray fluoroscopy using 3D-2D registration: a tool to reduce wrong-site surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otake, Y.; Schafer, S.; Stayman, J. W.; Zbijewski, W.; Kleinszig, G.; Graumann, R.; Khanna, A. J.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2012-09-01

    Surgical targeting of the incorrect vertebral level (wrong-level surgery) is among the more common wrong-site surgical errors, attributed primarily to the lack of uniquely identifiable radiographic landmarks in the mid-thoracic spine. The conventional localization method involves manual counting of vertebral bodies under fluoroscopy, is prone to human error and carries additional time and dose. We propose an image registration and visualization system (referred to as LevelCheck), for decision support in spine surgery by automatically labeling vertebral levels in fluoroscopy using a GPU-accelerated, intensity-based 3D-2D (namely CT-to-fluoroscopy) registration. A gradient information (GI) similarity metric and a CMA-ES optimizer were chosen due to their robustness and inherent suitability for parallelization. Simulation studies involved ten patient CT datasets from which 50 000 simulated fluoroscopic images were generated from C-arm poses selected to approximate the C-arm operator and positioning variability. Physical experiments used an anthropomorphic chest phantom imaged under real fluoroscopy. The registration accuracy was evaluated as the mean projection distance (mPD) between the estimated and true center of vertebral levels. Trials were defined as successful if the estimated position was within the projection of the vertebral body (namely mPD <5 mm). Simulation studies showed a success rate of 99.998% (1 failure in 50 000 trials) and computation time of 4.7 s on a midrange GPU. Analysis of failure modes identified cases of false local optima in the search space arising from longitudinal periodicity in vertebral structures. Physical experiments demonstrated the robustness of the algorithm against quantum noise and x-ray scatter. The ability to automatically localize target anatomy in fluoroscopy in near-real-time could be valuable in reducing the occurrence of wrong-site surgery while helping to reduce radiation exposure. The method is applicable beyond

  17. Evaluating the impact of x-ray spectral shape on image quality in flat-panel CT breast imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Glick, Stephen J.; Thacker, Samta; Gong Xing; Liu, Bob

    2007-01-15

    In recent years, there has been an increasing interest in exploring the feasibility of dedicated computed tomography (CT) breast imaging using a flat-panel digital detector in a truncated cone-beam imaging geometry. Preliminary results are promising and it appears as if three-dimensional tomographic imaging of the breast has great potential for reducing the masking effect of superimposed parenchymal structure typically observed with conventional mammography. In this study, a mathematical framework used for determining optimal design and acquisition parameters for such a CT breast imaging system is described. The ideal observer signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is used as a figure of merit, under the assumptions that the imaging system is linear and shift invariant. Computation of the ideal observer SNR used a parallel-cascade model to predict signal and noise propagation through the detector, as well as a realistic model of the lesion detection task in breast imaging. For all evaluations, the total mean glandular dose for a CT breast imaging study was constrained to be approximately equivalent to that of a two-view conventional mammography study. The framework presented was used to explore the effect of x-ray spectral shape across an extensive range of kVp settings, filter material types, and filter thicknesses. The results give an indication of how spectral shape can affect image quality in flat-panel CT breast imaging.

  18. Large area CMOS active pixel sensor x-ray imager for digital breast tomosynthesis: Analysis, modeling, and characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Chumin; Kanicki, Jerzy; Konstantinidis, Anastasios C.; Patel, Tushita

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: Large area x-ray imagers based on complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) active pixel sensor (APS) technology have been proposed for various medical imaging applications including digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT). The low electronic noise (50–300 e{sup −}) of CMOS APS x-ray imagers provides a possible route to shrink the pixel pitch to smaller than 75 μm for microcalcification detection and possible reduction of the DBT mean glandular dose (MGD). Methods: In this study, imaging performance of a large area (29 × 23 cm{sup 2}) CMOS APS x-ray imager [Dexela 2923 MAM (PerkinElmer, London)] with a pixel pitch of 75 μm was characterized and modeled. The authors developed a cascaded system model for CMOS APS x-ray imagers using both a broadband x-ray radiation and monochromatic synchrotron radiation. The experimental data including modulation transfer function, noise power spectrum, and detective quantum efficiency (DQE) were theoretically described using the proposed cascaded system model with satisfactory consistency to experimental results. Both high full well and low full well (LFW) modes of the Dexela 2923 MAM CMOS APS x-ray imager were characterized and modeled. The cascaded system analysis results were further used to extract the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) for microcalcifications with sizes of 165–400 μm at various MGDs. The impact of electronic noise on CNR was also evaluated. Results: The LFW mode shows better DQE at low air kerma (K{sub a} < 10 μGy) and should be used for DBT. At current DBT applications, air kerma (K{sub a} ∼ 10 μGy, broadband radiation of 28 kVp), DQE of more than 0.7 and ∼0.3 was achieved using the LFW mode at spatial frequency of 0.5 line pairs per millimeter (lp/mm) and Nyquist frequency ∼6.7 lp/mm, respectively. It is shown that microcalcifications of 165–400 μm in size can be resolved using a MGD range of 0.3–1 mGy, respectively. In comparison to a General Electric GEN2 prototype DBT system (at

  19. Contrast-enhanced X-ray detection of breast microcalcifications in a murine model using targeted gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Cole, Lisa E; Vargo-Gogola, Tracy; Roeder, Ryan K

    2014-07-22

    Microcalcifications are deposits of hydroxyapatite (HA) mineral within breast tissue and the most common abnormality detected by mammography when screening for breast cancer due to exhibiting greater X-ray attenuation than the surrounding tissue. However, the detection of microcalcifications is limited by the sensitivity and specificity of mammography. Therefore, the objective of this study was to investigate in vivo targeted delivery of bisphosphonate-functionalized gold nanoparticles (BP-Au NPs) for contrast-enhanced detection of microcalcifications using computed tomography (CT). A murine model was developed for precise, a priori control over the level of microcalcification burden by injecting varying concentrations of HA crystals in a Matrigel carrier into mammary glands. The measured X-ray attenuation of microcalcifications containing varying HA concentrations demonstrated that the model was reproducible and able to recapitulate varying levels of microcalcification burden, including levels undetectable by CT in the absence of contrast enhancement. After intramammary delivery, BP-Au NPs provided enhanced contrast for the detection of microcalcifications that were otherwise below the CT detection limit. BP-Au NPs targeted microcalcifications due to specific binding to HA crystal surfaces, resulting in contrast between the HA microcalcification site and surrounding tissue which was visibly apparent (∼30-135 HU) within 2 days after delivery. Therefore, targeted BP-Au NPs enabled improved sensitivity and specificity for the detection of microcalcifications.

  20. Contrast-enhanced X-ray detection of breast microcalcifications in a murine model using targeted gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Cole, Lisa E; Vargo-Gogola, Tracy; Roeder, Ryan K

    2014-07-22

    Microcalcifications are deposits of hydroxyapatite (HA) mineral within breast tissue and the most common abnormality detected by mammography when screening for breast cancer due to exhibiting greater X-ray attenuation than the surrounding tissue. However, the detection of microcalcifications is limited by the sensitivity and specificity of mammography. Therefore, the objective of this study was to investigate in vivo targeted delivery of bisphosphonate-functionalized gold nanoparticles (BP-Au NPs) for contrast-enhanced detection of microcalcifications using computed tomography (CT). A murine model was developed for precise, a priori control over the level of microcalcification burden by injecting varying concentrations of HA crystals in a Matrigel carrier into mammary glands. The measured X-ray attenuation of microcalcifications containing varying HA concentrations demonstrated that the model was reproducible and able to recapitulate varying levels of microcalcification burden, including levels undetectable by CT in the absence of contrast enhancement. After intramammary delivery, BP-Au NPs provided enhanced contrast for the detection of microcalcifications that were otherwise below the CT detection limit. BP-Au NPs targeted microcalcifications due to specific binding to HA crystal surfaces, resulting in contrast between the HA microcalcification site and surrounding tissue which was visibly apparent (∼30-135 HU) within 2 days after delivery. Therefore, targeted BP-Au NPs enabled improved sensitivity and specificity for the detection of microcalcifications. PMID:24992365

  1. Augmented Reality Imaging System: 3D Viewing of a Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Douglas, David B.; Boone, John M.; Petricoin, Emanuel; Liotta, Lance; Wilson, Eugene

    2016-01-01

    Objective To display images of breast cancer from a dedicated breast CT using Depth 3-Dimensional (D3D) augmented reality. Methods A case of breast cancer imaged using contrast-enhanced breast CT (Computed Tomography) was viewed with the augmented reality imaging, which uses a head display unit (HDU) and joystick control interface. Results The augmented reality system demonstrated 3D viewing of the breast mass with head position tracking, stereoscopic depth perception, focal point convergence and the use of a 3D cursor and joy-stick enabled fly through with visualization of the spiculations extending from the breast cancer. Conclusion The augmented reality system provided 3D visualization of the breast cancer with depth perception and visualization of the mass's spiculations. The augmented reality system should be further researched to determine the utility in clinical practice. PMID:27774517

  2. SU-E-I-09: The Impact of X-Ray Scattering On Image Noise for Dedicated Breast CT

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, K; Gazi, P; Boone, J

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To quantify the impact of detected x-ray scatter on image noise in flat panel based dedicated breast CT systems and to determine the optimal scanning geometry given practical trade-offs between radiation dose and scatter reduction. Methods: Four different uniform polyethylene cylinders (104, 131, 156, and 184 mm in diameter) were scanned as the phantoms on a dedicated breast CT scanner developed in our laboratory. Both stationary projection imaging and rotational cone-beam CT imaging was performed. For each acquisition type, three different x-ray beam collimations were used (12, 24, and 109 mm measured at isocenter). The aim was to quantify image noise properties (pixel variance, SNR, and image NPS) under different levels of x-ray scatter, in order to optimize the scanning geometry. For both projection images and reconstructed CT images, individual pixel variance and NPS were determined and compared. Noise measurement from the CT images were also performed with different detector binning modes and reconstruction matrix sizes. Noise propagation was also tracked throughout the intermediate steps of cone-beam CT reconstruction, including the inverse-logarithmic process, Fourier-filtering before backprojection. Results: Image noise was lower in the presence of higher scatter levels. For the 184 mm polyethylene phantom, the image noise (measured in pixel variance) was ∼30% lower with full cone-beam acquisition compared to a narrow (12 mm) fan-beam acquisition. This trend is consistent across all phantom sizes and throughout all steps of CT image reconstruction. Conclusion: From purely a noise perspective, the cone-beam geometry (i.e. the full cone-angle acquisition) produces lower image noise compared to the lower-scatter fan-beam acquisition for breast CT. While these results are relevant in homogeneous phantoms, the full impact of scatter on noise in bCT should involve contrast-to-noise-ratio measurements in heterogeneous phantoms if the goal is to optimize

  3. Visibility of microcalcification in cone beam breast CT: Effects of x-ray tube voltage and radiation dose

    SciTech Connect

    Lai Chaojen; Shaw, Chris C.; Chen, Lingyun; Altunbas, Mustafa C.; Liu Xinming; Han Tao; Wang Tianpeng; Yang, Wei T.; Whitman, Gary J.; Tu Shuju

    2007-07-15

    Mammography is the only technique currently used for detecting microcalcification (MC) clusters, an early indicator of breast cancer. However, mammographic images superimpose a three-dimensional compressed breast image onto two-dimensional projection views, resulting in overlapped anatomical breast structures that may obscure the detection and visualization of MCs. One possible solution to this problem is the use of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) with a flat-panel (FP) digital detector. Although feasibility studies of CBCT techniques for breast imaging have yielded promising results, they have not shown how radiation dose and x-ray tube voltage affect the accuracy with which MCs are detected by CBCT experimentally. We therefore conducted a phantom study using a FP-based CBCT system with various mean glandular doses and kVp values. An experimental CBCT scanner was constructed with a data acquisition rate of 7.5 frames/s. 10.5 and 14.5 cm diameter breast phantoms made of gelatin were used to simulate uncompressed breasts consisting of 100% glandular tissue. Eight different MC sizes of calcium carbonate grains, ranging from 180-200 {mu}m to 355-425 {mu}m, were used to simulate MCs. MCs of the same size were arranged to form a 5x5 MC cluster and embedded in the breast phantoms. These MC clusters were positioned at 2.8 cm away from the center of the breast phantoms. The phantoms were imaged at 60, 80, and 100 kVp. With a single scan (360 deg.), 300 projection images were acquired with 0.5x, 1x, and 2x mean glandular dose limit for 10.5 cm phantom and with 1x, 2x, and 4x for 14.5 cm phantom. A Feldkamp algorithm with a pure ramp filter was used for image reconstruction. The normalized noise level was calculated for each x-ray tube voltage and dose level. The image quality of the CBCT images was evaluated by counting the number of visible MCs for each MC cluster for various conditions. The average percentage of the visible MCs was computed and plotted as a function

  4. Breast mass detection using slice conspicuity in 3D reconstructed digital breast volumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Seong Tae; Kim, Dae Hoe; Ro, Yong Man

    2014-09-01

    In digital breast tomosynthesis, the three dimensional (3D) reconstructed volumes only provide quasi-3D structure information with limited resolution along the depth direction due to insufficient sampling in depth direction and the limited angular range. The limitation could seriously hamper the conventional 3D image analysis techniques for detecting masses because the limited number of projection views causes blurring in the out-of-focus planes. In this paper, we propose a novel mass detection approach using slice conspicuity in the 3D reconstructed digital breast volumes to overcome the above limitation. First, to overcome the limited resolution along the depth direction, we detect regions of interest (ROIs) on each reconstructed slice and separately utilize the depth directional information to combine the ROIs effectively. Furthermore, we measure the blurriness of each slice for resolving the degradation of performance caused by the blur in the out-of-focus plane. Finally, mass features are extracted from the selected in focus slices and analyzed by a support vector machine classifier to reduce the false positives. Comparative experiments have been conducted on a clinical data set. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed approach outperforms the conventional 3D approach by achieving a high sensitivity with a small number of false positives.

  5. 3D quantification of dynamic fluid-fluid interfaces in porous media with fast x-ray microtomography: A comparison with quasi-equilibrium methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meisenheimer, D.; Brueck, C. L.; Wildenschild, D.

    2015-12-01

    X-ray microtomography imaging of fluid-fluid interfaces in three-dimensional porous media allows for the testing of thermodynamically derived predictions that seek a unique relationship between capillary pressure, fluid saturation, and specific interfacial area (Pc-Sw-Anw). Previous experimental studies sought to test this functional dependence under quasi-equilibrium conditions (assumed static on the imaging time-scale); however, applying predictive models developed under static conditions for dynamic scenarios can lead to substantial flaws in predicted outcomes. Theory and models developed using dynamic data can be verified using fast x-ray microtomography which allows for the unprecedented measurement of developing interfacial areas, curvatures, and trapping behaviors of fluid phases in three-dimensional systems. We will present results of drainage and imbibition experiments of air and water within a mixture of glass beads. The experiments were performed under both quasi-equilibrium and dynamic conditions at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory. Fast x-ray microtomography was achieved by utilizing the high brilliance of the x-ray beam at the APS under pink-beam conditions where the white beam is modified with a 4 mm Al absorber and a 0.8 mrad Pt-coated mirror to eliminate low and high-energy photons, respectively. We present a comparison of the results from the quasi-equilibrium and dynamic experiments in an effort to determine if the Pc-Sw-Anw relationship is comparable under either experimental condition and to add to the discussion on whether the Pc-Sw-Anw relationship is unique as hypothesized by existing theory.

  6. Automated 3D whole-breast ultrasound imaging: results of a clinical pilot study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leproux, Anaïs; van Beek, Michiel; de Vries, Ute; Wasser, Martin; Bakker, Leon; Cuisenaire, Olivier; van der Mark, Martin; Entrekin, Rob

    2010-03-01

    We present the first clinical results of a novel fully automated 3D breast ultrasound system. This system was designed to match a Philips diffuse optical mammography system to enable straightforward coregistration of optical and ultrasound images. During a measurement, three 3D transducers scan the breast at 4 different views. The resulting 12 datasets are registered together into a single volume using spatial compounding. In a pilot study, benign and malignant masses could be identified in the 3D images, however lesion visibility is less compared to conventional breast ultrasound. Clear breast shape visualization suggests that ultrasound could support the reconstruction and interpretation of diffuse optical tomography images.

  7. Breast Density Analysis with Automated Whole-Breast Ultrasound: Comparison with 3-D Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jeon-Hor; Lee, Yan-Wei; Chan, Si-Wa; Yeh, Dah-Cherng; Chang, Ruey-Feng

    2016-05-01

    In this study, a semi-automatic breast segmentation method was proposed on the basis of the rib shadow to extract breast regions from 3-D automated whole-breast ultrasound (ABUS) images. The density results were correlated with breast density values acquired with 3-D magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). MRI images of 46 breasts were collected from 23 women without a history of breast disease. Each subject also underwent ABUS. We used Otsu's thresholding method on ABUS images to obtain local rib shadow information, which was combined with the global rib shadow information (extracted from all slice projections) and integrated with the anatomy's breast tissue structure to determine the chest wall line. The fuzzy C-means classifier was used to extract the fibroglandular tissues from the acquired images. Whole-breast volume (WBV) and breast percentage density (BPD) were calculated in both modalities. Linear regression was used to compute the correlation of density results between the two modalities. The consistency of density measurement was also analyzed on the basis of intra- and inter-operator variation. There was a high correlation of density results between MRI and ABUS (R(2) = 0.798 for WBV, R(2) = 0.825 for PBD). The mean WBV from ABUS images was slightly smaller than the mean WBV from MR images (MRI: 342.24 ± 128.08 cm(3), ABUS: 325.47 ± 136.16 cm(3), p < 0.05). In addition, the BPD calculated from MR images was smaller than the BPD from ABUS images (MRI: 24.71 ± 15.16%, ABUS: 28.90 ± 17.73%, p < 0.05). The intra-operator and inter-operator variant analysis results indicated that there was no statistically significant difference in breast density measurement variation between the two modalities. Our results revealed a high correlation in WBV and BPD between MRI and ABUS. Our study suggests that ABUS provides breast density information useful in the assessment of breast health. PMID:26831342

  8. Breast Density Analysis with Automated Whole-Breast Ultrasound: Comparison with 3-D Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jeon-Hor; Lee, Yan-Wei; Chan, Si-Wa; Yeh, Dah-Cherng; Chang, Ruey-Feng

    2016-05-01

    In this study, a semi-automatic breast segmentation method was proposed on the basis of the rib shadow to extract breast regions from 3-D automated whole-breast ultrasound (ABUS) images. The density results were correlated with breast density values acquired with 3-D magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). MRI images of 46 breasts were collected from 23 women without a history of breast disease. Each subject also underwent ABUS. We used Otsu's thresholding method on ABUS images to obtain local rib shadow information, which was combined with the global rib shadow information (extracted from all slice projections) and integrated with the anatomy's breast tissue structure to determine the chest wall line. The fuzzy C-means classifier was used to extract the fibroglandular tissues from the acquired images. Whole-breast volume (WBV) and breast percentage density (BPD) were calculated in both modalities. Linear regression was used to compute the correlation of density results between the two modalities. The consistency of density measurement was also analyzed on the basis of intra- and inter-operator variation. There was a high correlation of density results between MRI and ABUS (R(2) = 0.798 for WBV, R(2) = 0.825 for PBD). The mean WBV from ABUS images was slightly smaller than the mean WBV from MR images (MRI: 342.24 ± 128.08 cm(3), ABUS: 325.47 ± 136.16 cm(3), p < 0.05). In addition, the BPD calculated from MR images was smaller than the BPD from ABUS images (MRI: 24.71 ± 15.16%, ABUS: 28.90 ± 17.73%, p < 0.05). The intra-operator and inter-operator variant analysis results indicated that there was no statistically significant difference in breast density measurement variation between the two modalities. Our results revealed a high correlation in WBV and BPD between MRI and ABUS. Our study suggests that ABUS provides breast density information useful in the assessment of breast health.

  9. Optimization of phosphor-based detector design for oblique x-ray incidence in digital breast tomosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Acciavatti, Raymond J.; Maidment, Andrew D. A.

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: In digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT), a volumetric reconstruction of the breast is generated from a limited range of x-ray projections. One trade-off of DBT is resolution loss in the projections due to non-normal (i.e., oblique) x-ray incidence. Although degradation in image quality due to oblique incidence has been studied using empirical data and Monte Carlo simulations, a theoretical treatment has been lacking. The purpose of this work is to extend Swank's calculations of the transfer functions of turbid granular phosphors to oblique incidence. The model is ultimately used as a tool for optimizing the design of DBT detectors. Methods: A quantum-limited system and 20 keV x-rays are considered. Under these assumptions, the modulation transfer function (MTF) and noise power spectra (NPS) are derived using the diffusion approximation to the Boltzmann equation to model optical scatter within the phosphor. This approach is applicable to a nonstructured scintillator such as gadolinium oxysulfide doped with terbium (Gd{sub 2}O{sub 2}S:Tb), which is commonly used in breast imaging and which can reasonably approximate other detector materials. The detective quantum efficiency (DQE) is then determined from the Nishikawa formulation, where it is written as the product of the x-ray quantum detection efficiency, the Swank factor, and the Lubberts fraction. Transfer functions are calculated for both front- and back-screen configurations, which differ by positioning the photocathode at the exit or entrance point of the x-ray beam, respectively. Results: In the front-screen configuration, MTF and DQE are found to have considerable angular dependence, while NPS is shown to vary minimally with projection angle. As expected, the high frequency MTF and DQE are degraded substantially at large angles. By contrast, all transfer functions for the back-screen configuration have the advantage of significantly less angular dependence. Using these models, we investigated the

  10. Novel single x-ray absorptiometry method to solve for volumetric breast density in mammograms with paddle tilt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malkov, Serghei; Wang, Jeff; Shepherd, John

    2007-03-01

    We report on the design and validation of a breast tissue equivalent phantom for automated measurement of breast composition in film/screen and digital mammography systems. This phantom is a multi-step phantom made of a single material and containing nine lead positioning markers around its periphery. The markers allow for the phantom position to be solved relative to the x-ray gantry. The phantom was adhered to the top of the mammographic compression paddle such that it projected an attenuation image onto the unused corner of the image without overlapping with CC- nor MLO-view breast edges. The markers and their centroids were identified using automatic morphological image processing operations. The phantom, and thus the paddle, orientation is then obtained by minimizing a simple least-square error function of the difference between a pseudo projection image of the phantom markers at known coordinates and the actual marker image. Fibroglandular-equivalent breast attenuation values were found directly from step phantom projections. Fat attenuation values were derived from the attenuation coefficient ratios of fat to fibroglandular tissue. Finally, breast density was calculated by comparing image pixel values to the fat/fibroglandular references at the same thickness. Multiple scans of a test object (a density step phantom with 7 densities) at nine different compression thicknesses and six paddle-tilt angles were acquired. We found the precision for determining the breast thickness to be 0.015 cm (standard deviation) and for determining individual paddle angles to be 0.05 degrees. Multiple clinical studies using the technique on film/screen and digital mammography machines are also currently under way.

  11. Optimization of breast cancer detection in Dual Energy X-ray Mammography using a CMOS imaging detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koukou, V.; Fountos, G.; Martini, N.; Sotiropoulou, P.; Michail, C.; Kalyvas, N.; Valais, I.; Bakas, A.; Kounadi, E.; Kandarakis, I.; Nikiforidis, G.

    2015-01-01

    Dual energy mammography has the ability to improve the detection of microcalcifications leading to early diagnosis of breast cancer. In this simulation study, a prototype dual energy mammography system, using a CMOS based imaging detector with different X-ray spectra, was modeled. The device consists of a 33.91 mg/cm2 Gd2O2S:Tb scintillator screen, placed in direct contact with the sensor, with a pixel size of 22.5 μm. Various filter materials and tube voltages of a Tungsten (W) anode for both the low and high energy were examined. The selection of the filters applied to W spectra was based on their K- edges (K-edge filtering). Hydroxyapatite (HAp) was used to simulate microcalcifications. Calcification signal-to-noise ratio (SNRtc) was calculated for entrance surface dose within the acceptable levels of conventional mammography. Optimization was based on the maximization of SNRtc while minimizing the entrance dose. The best compromise between SNRtc value and dose was provided by a 35kVp X-ray spectrum with added beam filtration of 100μm Pd and a 70kVp Yb filtered spectrum of 800 μm for the low and high energy, respectively. Computer simulation results show that a SNRtc value of 3.6 can be achieved for a calcification size of 200 μm. Compared with previous studies, this method can improve detectability of microcalcifications.

  12. Evaluation of Multiple-Scale 3D Characterization for Coal Physical Structure with DCM Method and Synchrotron X-Ray CT

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yushuang; Yang, Jianli; Nie, Yihang; Jia, Jing; Wang, Yudan

    2015-01-01

    Multiscale nondestructive characterization of coal microscopic physical structure can provide important information for coal conversion and coal-bed methane extraction. In this study, the physical structure of a coal sample was investigated by synchrotron-based multiple-energy X-ray CT at three beam energies and two different spatial resolutions. A data-constrained modeling (DCM) approach was used to quantitatively characterize the multiscale compositional distributions at the two resolutions. The volume fractions of each voxel for four different composition groups were obtained at the two resolutions. Between the two resolutions, the difference for DCM computed volume fractions of coal matrix and pores is less than 0.3%, and the difference for mineral composition groups is less than 0.17%. This demonstrates that the DCM approach can account for compositions beyond the X-ray CT imaging resolution with adequate accuracy. By using DCM, it is possible to characterize a relatively large coal sample at a relatively low spatial resolution with minimal loss of the effect due to subpixel fine length scale structures. PMID:25861674

  13. Evaluation of multiple-scale 3D characterization for coal physical structure with DCM method and synchrotron X-ray CT.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haipeng; Yang, Yushuang; Yang, Jianli; Nie, Yihang; Jia, Jing; Wang, Yudan

    2015-01-01

    Multiscale nondestructive characterization of coal microscopic physical structure can provide important information for coal conversion and coal-bed methane extraction. In this study, the physical structure of a coal sample was investigated by synchrotron-based multiple-energy X-ray CT at three beam energies and two different spatial resolutions. A data-constrained modeling (DCM) approach was used to quantitatively characterize the multiscale compositional distributions at the two resolutions. The volume fractions of each voxel for four different composition groups were obtained at the two resolutions. Between the two resolutions, the difference for DCM computed volume fractions of coal matrix and pores is less than 0.3%, and the difference for mineral composition groups is less than 0.17%. This demonstrates that the DCM approach can account for compositions beyond the X-ray CT imaging resolution with adequate accuracy. By using DCM, it is possible to characterize a relatively large coal sample at a relatively low spatial resolution with minimal loss of the effect due to subpixel fine length scale structures.

  14. Review of three-dimensional (3D) surface imaging for oncoplastic, reconstructive and aesthetic breast surgery.

    PubMed

    O'Connell, Rachel L; Stevens, Roger J G; Harris, Paul A; Rusby, Jennifer E

    2015-08-01

    Three-dimensional surface imaging (3D-SI) is being marketed as a tool in aesthetic breast surgery. It has recently also been studied in the objective evaluation of cosmetic outcome of oncological procedures. The aim of this review is to summarise the use of 3D-SI in oncoplastic, reconstructive and aesthetic breast surgery. An extensive literature review was undertaken to identify published studies. Two reviewers independently screened all abstracts and selected relevant articles using specific inclusion criteria. Seventy two articles relating to 3D-SI for breast surgery were identified. These covered endpoints such as image acquisition, calculations and data obtainable, comparison of 3D and 2D imaging and clinical research applications of 3D-SI. The literature provides a favourable view of 3D-SI. However, evidence of its superiority over current methods of clinical decision making, surgical planning, communication and evaluation of outcome is required before it can be accepted into mainstream practice.

  15. Including the effect of molecular interference in the coherent x-ray scattering modeling in MC-GPU and PENELOPE for the study of novel breast imaging modalities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghammraoui, B.; Peng, R.; Suarez, I.; Bettolo, C.; Badal, A.

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: To present upgraded versions of MC-GPU and PenEASY Imaging, two open-source Monte Carlo codes for the simulation of radiographic projections and CT. The codes have been extended with the aim of studying breast imaging modalities that rely on the accurate modeling of coherent x-ray scatter. Methods: The simulation codes were extended to account for the effect of molecular interference in coherent scattering using experimentally measured molecular interference functions. The validity of the new model was tested experimentally using the Energy Dispersive X-Ray Diffraction (EDXRD) technique with a polychromatic x-ray source and an energy-resolved Germanium detector at a fixed scattering angle. Experiments and simulations of a full field digital mammography system with and without a 1D focused antiscatter grid were conducted for additional validation. The modified MC-GPU code was also used to examine the possibility of characterizing breast cancer within a mathematical breast phantom using the EDXRD technique. Results: The measured EDXRD spectra were correctly reproduced by the simulation with the modified code while the previous code using the Independent Atomic Approximation led to large errors in the predicted diffraction spectra. There was good agreement between the simulated and measured rejection factor for the 1D focused antiscatter grid with both models. The simulation study in a whole breast showed that the x-ray scattering profiles of adipose, fibrosis, cancer and benign tissues are differentiable. Conclusion: MC-GPU and PENELOPE were successfully extended and validated for accurate modeling of coherent x-ray scatter. The EDXRD technique with pencil-cone geometry in a whole breast was investigated by a simulation study and it was concluded that this technique has potential to characterize breast cancer lesions.

  16. Detailed characterization of 2D and 3D scatter-to-primary ratios of various breast geometries using a dedicated CT mammotomography system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, Jainil; Pachon, Jan H.; Madhav, Priti; Tornai, Martin P.

    2011-03-01

    With a dedicated breast CT system using a quasi-monochromatic x-ray source and flat-panel digital detector, the 2D and 3D scatter to primary ratios (SPR) of various geometric phantoms having different densities were characterized in detail. Projections were acquired using geometric and anthropomorphic breast phantoms. Each phantom was filled with 700ml of 5 different water-methanol concentrations to simulate effective boundary densities of breast compositions from 100% glandular (1.0g/cm3) to 100% fat (0.79g/cm3). Projections were acquired with and without a beam stop array. For each projection, 2D scatter was determined by cubic spline interpolating the values behind the shadow of each beam stop through the object. Scatter-corrected projections were obtained by subtracting the scatter, and the 2D SPRs were obtained as a ratio of the scatter to scatter-corrected projections. Additionally the (un)corrected data were individually iteratively reconstructed. The (un)corrected 3D volumes were subsequently subtracted, and the 3D SPRs obtained from the ratio of the scatter volume-to-scatter-corrected (or primary) volume. Results show that the 2D SPR values peak in the center of the volumes, and were overall highest for the simulated 100% glandular composition. Consequently, scatter corrected reconstructions have visibly reduced cupping regardless of the phantom geometry, as well as more accurate linear attenuation coefficients. The corresponding 3D SPRs have increased central density, which reduces radially. Not surprisingly, for both 2D and 3D SPRs there was a dependency on both phantom geometry and object density on the measured SPR values, with geometry dominating for 3D SPRs. Overall, these results indicate the need for scatter correction given different geometries and breast densities that will be encountered with 3D cone beam breast CT.

  17. 3D breast image registration--a review.

    PubMed

    Sivaramakrishna, Radhika

    2005-02-01

    Image registration is an important problem in breast imaging. It is used in a wide variety of applications that include better visualization of lesions on pre- and post-contrast breast MRI images, speckle tracking and image compounding in breast ultrasound images, alignment of positron emission, and standard mammography images on hybrid machines et cetera. It is a prerequisite to align images taken at different times to isolate small interval lesions. Image registration also has useful applications in monitoring cancer therapy. The field of breast image registration has gained considerable interest in recent years. While the primary focus of interest continues to be the registration of pre- and post-contrast breast MRI images, other areas like breast ultrasound registration have gained more attention in recent years. The focus of registration algorithms has also shifted from control point based semi-automated techniques, to more sophisticated voxel based automated techniques that use mutual information as a similarity measure. This paper visits the problem of breast image registration and provides an overview of the current state-of-the-art in this area. PMID:15649086

  18. Pathology of breast cancer in women irradiated for acute postpartum mastitis. [X rays

    SciTech Connect

    Dvoretsky, P.M.; Woodard, E.; Bonfiglio, T.A.; Hempelmann, L.H.; Morse, I.P.

    1980-11-15

    The gross and microscopic pathology of breast cancers in women irradiated for acute postpartum mastitis was compared to the breast cancers found in the sisters of the irradiated women. In considering the lesions in the two populations, the size, location, histologic type, histologic grade, inflammatory response, lymphatic and blood vascular invasion, nipple involvement, axillary lymph node metastases, and menopausal status at the time of diagnosis were statistically indistinguishable. The only parameter that was different in the two populations was the desmoplastic response to the malignant lesion. The control population had more marked fibrosis within the cancers compared with the irradiated women.

  19. X-ray-absorption near-edge structure of 3d transition elements in tetrahedral coordination: The effect of bond-length variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianconi, A.; Fritsch, E.; Calas, G.; Petiau, J.

    1985-09-01

    The x-ray-absorption near-edge structure (XANES) of transition elements in tetrahedral coordination in crystals and glasses has been studied. We have identified the XANES features in the continuum that can be assigned to multiple scattering within the first coordination shell. The energy positions Er of the XANES peaks in the continuum follow the rule (Er-Eb)d2= const, where Eb is the energy of the prepeak, defined as the first core excitation to the bound antibonding state of T2 symmetry, and d is the interatomic distance. This plot allows us to determine the tetrahedral coordination of a vanadium impurity in a SiO2 glass and to get an estimation of the vanadium-oxygen distance (1.77+/-0.05 Å).

  20. In vivo 3D modeling of the femoropopliteal artery in human subjects based on x-ray angiography: Methodology and validation

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, Andrew J.; Casserly, Ivan P.; Messenger, John C.; Carroll, John D.; Chen, S.-Y. James

    2009-02-15

    Endovascular revascularization of the femoropopliteal (FP) artery has been limited by high rates of restenosis and stent fracture. The unique physical forces that are applied to the FP artery during leg movement have been implicated in these phenomena. The foundation for measuring the effects of physical forces on the FP artery in a clinically relevant environment is based on the ability to develop 3D models of this vessel in different leg positions in vivo in patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD). By acquiring paired angiographic images of the FP artery, and using angiography-based 3D modeling algorithms previously validated in the coronary arteries, the authors generated 3D models of ten FP arteries in nine patients with PAD with the lower extremity in straight leg (SL) and crossed leg (CL) positions. Due to the length of the FP artery, overlapping paired angiographic images of the entire FP artery were required to image the entire vessel, which necessitated the development of a novel fusion process in order to generate a 3D model of the entire FP artery. The methodology of angiographic acquisition and 3D model generation of the FP artery is described. In a subset of patients, a third angiographic view (i.e., validation view) was acquired in addition to the standard paired views for the purpose of validating the 3D modeling process. The mean root-mean-square (rms) error of the point-to-point distances between the centerline of the main FP artery from the 2D validation view and the centerline from the 3D model placed in the validation view for the SL and CL positions were 0.93{+-}0.19 mm and 1.12{+-}0.25 mm, respectively. Similarly, the mean rms error of the same comparison for the main FP artery and sidebranches for the SL and CL positions were 1.09{+-}0.38 mm and 1.21{+-}0.25 mm, respectively. A separate validation of the novel fusion process was performed by comparing the 3D model of the FP artery derived from fusion of 3D models of adjacent FP

  1. Exploring silver as a contrast agent for contrast-enhanced dual-energy X-ray breast imaging

    PubMed Central

    Tsourkas, A; Maidment, A D A

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Through prior monoenergetic modelling, we have identified silver as a potential alternative to iodine in dual-energy (DE) X-ray breast imaging. The purpose of this study was to compare the performance of silver and iodine contrast agents in a commercially available DE imaging system through a quantitative analysis of signal difference-to-noise ratio (SDNR). Methods: A polyenergetic simulation algorithm was developed to model the signal intensity and noise. The model identified the influence of various technique parameters on SDNR. The model was also used to identify the optimal imaging techniques for silver and iodine, so that the two contrast materials could be objectively compared. Results: The major influences on the SDNR were the low-energy dose fraction and breast thickness. An increase in the value of either of these parameters resulted in a decrease in SDNR. The SDNR for silver was on average 43% higher than that for iodine when imaged at their respective optimal conditions, and 40% higher when both were imaged at the optimal conditions for iodine. Conclusion: A silver contrast agent should provide benefit over iodine, even when translated to the clinic without modification of imaging system or protocol. If the system were slightly modified to reflect the lower k-edge of silver, the difference in SDNR between the two materials would be increased. Advances in knowledge: These data are the first to demonstrate the suitability of silver as a contrast material in a clinical contrast-enhanced DE image acquisition system. PMID:24998157

  2. Model predictions for the wide-angle x-ray scatter signals of healthy and malignant breast duct biopsies.

    PubMed

    LeClair, Robert J; Ferreira, Andrew; McDonald, Nancy; Laamanen, Curtis; Tang, Robert Y

    2015-10-01

    Wide-angle x-ray scatter (WAXS) could potentially be used to diagnose ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) in breast biopsies. The regions of interest were assumed to consist of fibroglandular tissue and epithelial cells and the model assumed that biopsies with DCIS would have a higher concentration of the latter. The scattered number of photons from a 2-mm diameter column of tissue was simulated using a 110-kV beam and selectively added in terms of momentum transfer. For a 1-min exposure, specificities and sensitivities of unity were obtained for biopsies 2- to 20-mm thick. The impact of sample and tumor cell layer thicknesses was studied. For example, a biopsy erroneously estimated to be 8 mm would be correctly diagnosed if its actual thickness was between 7.3 and 8.7 mm. An 8-mm thick malignant biopsy can be correctly diagnosed provided the malignant cell layer thickness is [Formula: see text]. WAXS methods could become a diagnostic tool for DCIS within breast biopsies. PMID:26835493

  3. Complete blood counts, liver function tests, and chest x-rays as routine screening in early-stage breast cancer: value added or just cost?

    PubMed

    Louie, Raphael J; Tonneson, Jennifer E; Gowarty, Minda; Goodney, Philip P; Barth, Richard J; Rosenkranz, Kari M

    2015-11-01

    Current National Comprehensive Cancer Network guidelines for breast cancer staging include pre-treatment complete blood count (CBC) and liver function tests (LFT) to screen for occult metastatic disease. To date, the relevance of these tests in detecting metastatic disease in asymptomatic women with early-stage breast cancer (Stage I/II) has not been demonstrated. Although chest x-rays are no longer recommended in the NCCN guidelines, many centers continue to include this imaging as part of their screening process. We aim to determine the clinical and financial impact of these labs and x-rays in the evaluation of early-stage breast cancer patients. A single institution IRB-approved retrospective chart review was conducted of patients with biopsy-proven invasive breast cancer treated from January 1, 2005–December 31, 2009. We collected patient demographics, clinical and pathologic staging, chest x-ray, CBC, and LFT results at the time of referral. Patients were stratified according to radiographic stage at the time of diagnosis. We obtained Medicare reimbursement fees for cost analysis. From 2005 to 2009, 1609 patients with biopsy-proven invasive breast cancer were treated at our institution. Of the 1082 patients with radiographic stage I/II disease, 27.3 % of patients had abnormal CBCs. No additional testing was performed to evaluate these abnormalities. In the early-stage population, 24.7 % of patients had elevated LFTs, resulting in 84 additional imaging studies. No metastatic disease was detected. The cost of CBC, LFTs and chest x-rays was $110.20 per patient, totaling $106,410.99. Additional tests prompted by abnormal results cost $58,143.30 over the five-year period. We found that pre-treatment CBCs, LFTs, and chest x-rays did not improve detection of occult metastatic disease but resulted in additional financial costs. Avoiding routine ordering of these tests would save the US healthcare system $25.7 million annually.

  4. The relative biological effectiveness of low-dose mammography quality X rays in the human breast MCF-10A cell line.

    PubMed

    Mills, Caitlin E; Thome, Christopher; Koff, David; Andrews, David W; Boreham, Douglas R

    2015-01-01

    Mammography is used to screen a large fraction of the population for breast cancer, and mammography quality X rays are speculated to be more damaging than the higher energy X rays used for other diagnostic procedures. The radiation dose delivered to breast cells as a result of these screening exposures may be a concern. The purpose of this current study was to determine the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of low-energy mammography X rays for radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks evaluated using a highly sensitive automated 53BP1 assay. Automation of the 53BP1 assay enabled the quantification and analysis of meaningful image-based features, including foci counting, within the cell nuclei. Nontumorigenic, human breast epithelial MCF-10A cells were irradiated in the low-dose range with approximately 3-30 mGy of 29 kVp mammography X rays or (137)Cs (662 keV) gamma rays. The induction and resolution of the 53BP1 foci did not differ significantly between exposures to (137)Cs gamma rays and 29 kVp X rays. The RBE was calculated to be 1.1 with a standard deviation of 0.2 for the initial number of radiation-induced double-strand breaks. The radiation dose from a single mammogram did not yield a significant change in the number of detectable foci. However, analysis of additional features revealed subtle differences in the distribution of 53BP1 throughout the nuclei after exposure to the different radiation qualities. A single mammogram was sufficient to alter the distribution of 53BP1 within the nuclear area, but not into discrete foci, while a dose-matched gamma exposure was not sufficient to alter the distribution of 53BP1. Our results indicate that exposure to clinically relevant doses of low-energy mammography quality X rays does not induce more DNA double-strand breaks than exposure to higher energy photons.

  5. Breast density measurement: 3D cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) images versus 2D digital mammograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Tao; Lai, Chao-Jen; Chen, Lingyun; Liu, Xinming; Shen, Youtao; Zhong, Yuncheng; Ge, Shuaiping; Yi, Ying; Wang, Tianpeng; Yang, Wei T.; Shaw, Chris C.

    2009-02-01

    Breast density has been recognized as one of the major risk factors for breast cancer. However, breast density is currently estimated using mammograms which are intrinsically 2D in nature and cannot accurately represent the real breast anatomy. In this study, a novel technique for measuring breast density based on the segmentation of 3D cone beam CT (CBCT) images was developed and the results were compared to those obtained from 2D digital mammograms. 16 mastectomy breast specimens were imaged with a bench top flat-panel based CBCT system. The reconstructed 3D CT images were corrected for the cupping artifacts and then filtered to reduce the noise level, followed by using threshold-based segmentation to separate the dense tissue from the adipose tissue. For each breast specimen, volumes of the dense tissue structures and the entire breast were computed and used to calculate the volumetric breast density. BI-RADS categories were derived from the measured breast densities and compared with those estimated from conventional digital mammograms. The results show that in 10 of 16 cases the BI-RADS categories derived from the CBCT images were lower than those derived from the mammograms by one category. Thus, breasts considered as dense in mammographic examinations may not be considered as dense with the CBCT images. This result indicates that the relation between breast cancer risk and true (volumetric) breast density needs to be further investigated.

  6. Piecewise-rigid 2D-3D registration for pose estimation of snake-like manipulator using an intraoperative x-ray projection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otake, Y.; Murphy, R. J.; Kutzer, M. D.; Taylor, R. H.; Armand, M.

    2014-03-01

    Background: Snake-like dexterous manipulators may offer significant advantages in minimally-invasive surgery in areas not reachable with conventional tools. Precise control of a wire-driven manipulator is challenging due to factors such as cable deformation, unknown internal (cable friction) and external forces, thus requiring correcting the calibration intraoperatively by determining the actual pose of the manipulator. Method: A method for simultaneously estimating pose and kinematic configuration of a piecewise-rigid object such as a snake-like manipulator from a single x-ray projection is presented. The method parameterizes kinematics using a small number of variables (e.g., 5), and optimizes them simultaneously with the 6 degree-of-freedom pose parameter of the base link using an image similarity between digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs) of the manipulator's attenuation model and the real x-ray projection. Result: Simulation studies assumed various geometric magnifications (1.2-2.6) and out-of-plane angulations (0°-90°) in a scenario of hip osteolysis treatment, which demonstrated the median joint angle error was 0.04° (for 2.0 magnification, +/-10° out-of-plane rotation). Average computation time was 57.6 sec with 82,953 function evaluations on a mid-range GPU. The joint angle error remained lower than 0.07° while out-of-plane rotation was 0°-60°. An experiment using video images of a real manipulator demonstrated a similar trend as the simulation study except for slightly larger error around the tip attributed to accumulation of errors induced by deformation around each joint not modeled with a simple pin joint. Conclusions: The proposed approach enables high precision tracking of a piecewise-rigid object (i.e., a series of connected rigid structures) using a single projection image by incorporating prior knowledge about the shape and kinematic behavior of the object (e.g., each rigid structure connected by a pin joint parameterized by a

  7. HipMatch: an object-oriented cross-platform program for accurate determination of cup orientation using 2D-3D registration of single standard X-ray radiograph and a CT volume.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Guoyan; Zhang, Xuan; Steppacher, Simon D; Murphy, Stephen B; Siebenrock, Klaus A; Tannast, Moritz

    2009-09-01

    The widely used procedure of evaluation of cup orientation following total hip arthroplasty using single standard anteroposterior (AP) radiograph is known inaccurate, largely due to the wide variability in individual pelvic orientation relative to X-ray plate. 2D-3D image registration methods have been introduced for an accurate determination of the post-operative cup alignment with respect to an anatomical reference extracted from the CT data. Although encouraging results have been reported, their extensive usage in clinical routine is still limited. This may be explained by their requirement of a CAD model of the prosthesis, which is often difficult to be organized from the manufacturer due to the proprietary issue, and by their requirement of either multiple radiographs or a radiograph-specific calibration, both of which are not available for most retrospective studies. To address these issues, we developed and validated an object-oriented cross-platform program called "HipMatch" where a hybrid 2D-3D registration scheme combining an iterative landmark-to-ray registration with a 2D-3D intensity-based registration was implemented to estimate a rigid transformation between a pre-operative CT volume and the post-operative X-ray radiograph for a precise estimation of cup alignment. No CAD model of the prosthesis is required. Quantitative and qualitative results evaluated on cadaveric and clinical datasets are given, which indicate the robustness and the accuracy of the program. HipMatch is written in object-oriented programming language C++ using cross-platform software Qt (TrollTech, Oslo, Norway), VTK, and Coin3D and is transportable to any platform. PMID:19328585

  8. Breast Cancer Induced by X-Ray Mammography Screening? A Review Based on Recent Understanding of Low-Dose Radiobiology.

    PubMed

    Pauwels, Ernest K J; Foray, Nicolas; Bourguignon, Michel H

    2016-01-01

    Screening mammography offers the possibility of discovering malignant diseases at an early stage, which is consequently treated early, thereby reducing the mortality rate. However, ionizing radiation as used in low-dose X-ray mammography may be associated with a risk of radiation-induced carcinogenesis. In the context of the harmful effects of ionizing radiation, this article reviewed novel radiobiological data and provided a simulation of the relative incidence of radiation-induced breast cancer due to screening against a background baseline incidence in a population of 100,000 individuals. The use of modern digital mammographic technology was assumed, giving rise to a glandular dose of 2.5 mGy from a 2-view per breast image. Assuming no latency time, this led to a ratio of induced incidence rate over baseline incidence rate of about 1.6‰ for biennial screening in women aged 50-74 years, although it cannot be excluded that the dose and dose rate effectiveness factor values relying on new radiobiological insights may lower this number to about 0.7‰. This carcinogenic risk is considered small in relation to the potential beneficial effects of screening, especially as latency time was not taken into consideration. However, individuals who are known to be carriers of risk-increasing genetic variations and/or have an inherited disposition of breast cancer should avoid ionizing radiation as much as possible and should be referred to ultrasound or magnetic resonance imaging. In addition, a significant, but difficult to quantify, risk of cancer is present for individuals who suffer from hypersusceptibility to ionizing radiation. PMID:26571215

  9. NOTE: On the question of 3D seed reconstruction in prostate brachytherapy: the determination of x-ray source and film locations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Mutian; Zaider, Marco; Worman, Michael; Cohen, Gilad

    2004-10-01

    Inaccuracy in seed placement during permanent prostate implants may lead to significant dosimetric deviations from the intended plan. In two recent publications (Todor et al 2002 Phys. Med. Biol. 47 2031 48, Todor et al 2003 Phys. Med. Biol. 48 1153 71), methodology was described for identifying intraoperatively the positions of seeds already implanted, thus allowing re-optimization of the treatment plan and correcting for such seed misplacement. Seed reconstruction is performed using fluoroscopic images and an important (and non-trivial) component of this approach is the ability to accurately determine the position of the gantry relative to the treatment volume. We describe the methodology for acquiring this information, based on the known geometry of six markers attached to the ultrasound probe. This method does not require the C-arm unit to be isocentric and films can be taken with the gantry set at any arbitrary position. This is significant because the patient positioning on the operating table (in the lithotomy position) restricts the range of angles at which films can be taken to a quite narrow (typically ±10°) interval and, as a general rule, the closer the angles the larger the uncertainty in the seed location reconstruction along the direction from the x-ray source to the film.

  10. Chiral diaminopyrrolic receptors for selective recognition of mannosides, part 2: a 3D view of the recognition modes by X-ray, NMR spectroscopy, and molecular modeling.

    PubMed

    Ardá, Ana; Cañada, F Javier; Nativi, Cristina; Francesconi, Oscar; Gabrielli, Gabriele; Ienco, Andrea; Jiménez-Barbero, Jesús; Roelens, Stefano

    2011-04-18

    The structural features of a representative set of five complexes of octyl α- and β-mannosides with some members of a new generation of chiral tripodal diaminopyrrolic receptors, namely, (R)-5 and (S)- and (R)-7, have been investigated in solution and in the solid state by a combined X-ray, NMR spectroscopy, and molecular modeling approach. In the solid state, the binding arms of the free receptors 7 delimit a cleft in which two solvent molecules are hydrogen bonded to the pyrrolic groups and to the benzenic scaffold. In a polar solvent (CD(3)CN), chemical shift and intermolecular NOE data, assisted by molecular modeling calculations, ascertained the binding modes of the interaction between the receptor and the glycoside for these complexes. Although a single binding mode was found to adequately describe the complex of the acyclic receptor 5 with the α-mannoside, for the complexes of the cyclic receptors 7 two different binding modes were required to simultaneously fit all the experimental data. In all cases, extensive binding through hydrogen bonding and CH-π interactions is responsible for the affinities measured in the same solvent. Furthermore, the binding modes closely account for the recognition preferences observed toward the anomeric glycosides and for the peculiar enantiodiscrimination properties exhibited by the chiral receptors.

  11. Opacity of iron, nickel, and copper plasmas in the x-ray wavelength range: Theoretical interpretation of 2p-3d absorption spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Blenski, T.; Loisel, G.; Poirier, M.; Thais, F.; Arnault, P.; Caillaud, T.; Fariaut, J.; Gilleron, F.; Pain, J.-C.; Porcherot, Q.; Reverdin, C.; Silvert, V.; Villette, B.; Bastiani-Ceccotti, S.; Turck-Chieze, S.; Foelsner, W.; Gaufridy de Dortan, F. de

    2011-09-15

    This paper deals with theoretical studies on the 2p-3d absorption in iron, nickel, and copper plasmas related to LULI2000 (Laboratoire pour l'Utilisation des Lasers Intenses, 2000J facility) measurements in which target temperatures were of the order of 20 eV and plasma densities were in the range 0.004-0.01 g/cm{sup 3}. The radiatively heated targets were close to local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE). The structure of 2p-3d transitions has been studied with the help of the statistical superconfiguration opacity code sco and with the fine-structure atomic physics codes hullac and fac. A new mixed version of the sco code allowing one to treat part of the configurations by detailed calculation based on the Cowan's code rcg has been also used in these comparisons. Special attention was paid to comparisons between theory and experiment concerning the term features which cannot be reproduced by sco. The differences in the spin-orbit splitting and the statistical (thermal) broadening of the 2p-3d transitions have been investigated as a function of the atomic number Z. It appears that at the conditions of the experiment the role of the term and configuration broadening was different in the three analyzed elements, this broadening being sensitive to the atomic number. Some effects of the temperature gradients and possible non-LTE effects have been studied with the help of the radiative-collisional code scric. The sensitivity of the 2p-3d structures with respect to temperature and density in medium-Z plasmas may be helpful for diagnostics of LTE plasmas especially in future experiments on the {Delta}n=0 absorption in medium-Z plasmas for astrophysical applications.

  12. Mean glandular dose coefficients (D(g)N) for x-ray spectra used in contemporary breast imaging systems.

    PubMed

    Nosratieh, Anita; Hernandez, Andrew; Shen, Sam Z; Yaffe, Martin J; Seibert, J Anthony; Boone, John M

    2015-09-21

    To develop tables of normalized glandular dose coefficients D(g)N for a range of anode-filter combinations and tube voltages used in contemporary breast imaging systems. Previously published mono-energetic D(g)N values were used with various spectra to mathematically compute D(g)N coefficients. The tungsten anode spectra from TASMICS were used; molybdenum and rhodium anode-spectra were generated using MCNPX Monte Carlo code. The spectra were filtered with various thicknesses of Al, Rh, Mo or Cu. An initial half value layer (HVL) calculation was made using the anode and filter material. A range of the HVL values was produced with the addition of small thicknesses of polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) as a surrogate for the breast compression paddle, to produce a range of HVL values at each tube voltage. Using a spectral weighting method, D(g)N coefficients for the generated spectra were calculated for breast glandular densities of 0%, 12.5%, 25%, 37.5%, 50% and 100% for a range of compressed breast thicknesses from 3 to 8 cm. Eleven tables of normalized glandular dose (D(g)N) coefficients were produced for the following anode/filter combinations: W + 50 μm Ag, W + 500 μm Al, W + 700 μm Al, W + 200 μm Cu, W + 300 μm Cu, W + 50 μm Rh, Mo + 400 μm Cu, Mo + 30 μm Mo, Mo + 25 μm Rh, Rh + 400 μm Cu and Rh + 25 μm Rh. Where possible, these results were compared to previously published D(g)N values and were found to be on average less than 2% different than previously reported values.Over 200 pages of D(g)N coefficients were computed for modeled x-ray system spectra that are used in a number of new breast imaging applications. The reported values were found to be in excellent agreement when compared to published values. PMID:26348995

  13. X-ray induced photoacoustic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Liangzhong; Han, Bin; Carpenter, Colin; Pratx, Guillem; Kuang, Yu; Xing, Lei

    2013-03-01

    X-ray induced photoacoustic tomography, also called X-ray acoustic computer tomography (XACT) is investigated in this paper. Short pulsed (μs-range) X-ray beams from a medical linear accelerator were used to generate ultrasound. The ultrasound signals were collected with an ultrasound transducer (500 KHz central frequency) positioned around an object. The transducer, driven by a computer-controlled step motor to scan around the object, detected the resulting acoustic signals in the imaging plane at each scanning position. A pulse preamplifier, with a bandwidth of 20 KHz-2 MHz at -3 dB, and switchable gains of 40 and 60 dB, received the signals from the transducer and delivered the amplified signals to a secondary amplifier. The secondary amplifier had bandwidth of 20 KHz-30 MHz at -3 dB, and a gain range of 10-60 dB. Signals were recorded and averaged 128 times by an oscilloscope. A sampling rate of 100 MHz was used to record 2500 data points at each view angle. One set of data incorporated 200 positions as the receiver moved 360°. The x-ray generated acoustic image was then reconstructed with the filtered back projection algorithm. The twodimensional XACT images of the lead rod embedded in chicken breast tissue were found to be in good agreement with the shape of the object. This new modality may be useful for a number of applications, such as providing the location of a fiducial, or monitoring x-ray dose distribution during radiation therapy.

  14. Digital breast tomosynthesis: computerized detection of microcalcifications in reconstructed breast volume using a 3D approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Heang-Ping; Sahiner, Berkman; Wei, Jun; Hadjiiski, Lubomir M.; Zhou, Chuan; Helvie, Mark A.

    2010-03-01

    We are developing a computer-aided detection (CAD) system for clustered microcalcifications in digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT). In this preliminary study, we investigated the approach of detecting microcalcifications in the tomosynthesized volume. The DBT volume is first enhanced by 3D multi-scale filtering and analysis of the eigenvalues of Hessian matrices with a calcification response function and signal-to-noise ratio enhancement filtering. Potential signal sites are identified in the enhanced volume and local analysis is performed to further characterize each object. A 3D dynamic clustering procedure is designed to locate potential clusters using hierarchical criteria. We collected a pilot data set of two-view DBT mammograms of 39 breasts containing microcalcification clusters (17 malignant, 22 benign) with IRB approval. A total of 74 clusters were identified by an experienced radiologist in the 78 DBT views. Our prototype CAD system achieved view-based sensitivity of 90% and 80% at an average FP rate of 7.3 and 2.0 clusters per volume, respectively. At the same levels of case-based sensitivity, the FP rates were 3.6 and 1.3 clusters per volume, respectively. For the subset of malignant clusters, the view-based detection sensitivity was 94% and 82% at an average FP rate of 6.0 and 1.5 FP clusters per volume, respectively. At the same levels of case-based sensitivity, the FP rates were 1.2 and 0.9 clusters per volume, respectively. This study demonstrated that computerized microcalcification detection in 3D is a promising approach to the development of a CAD system for DBT. Study is underway to further improve the computer-vision methods and to optimize the processing parameters using a larger data set.

  15. MiR-34a is up-regulated in response to low dose, low energy X-ray induced DNA damage in breast cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background MicroRNAs are non-coding RNAs involved in the regulation of gene expression including DNA damage responses. Low doses of low energy X-ray radiation, similar to those used in mammographic exams, has been described to be genotoxic. In the present work we investigated the expression of miR-34a; a well described p53-regulated miRNA implicated in cell responses to X-ray irradiation at low doses. Methods Non-cancerous breast cell line MCF-10A and cancerous T-47D and MCF-7 cell lines were submitted to a low-energy X-ray irradiation (ranging from 28–30 Kv) using a dose of 5 Gy. The expression level of miR-34a, let-7a and miR-21 was assessed by qRT-PCR at 4 and 24 hours post-irradiation. DNA damage was then measured by comet assay and micronuclei estimation in MCF-10A and MCF-7 cell lines, where an increase of miR-34a levels could be observed after irradiation. The rate of apoptotic cells was estimated by nuclear staining and fluorescence microscopy. These experiments were also performed at low doses (3; 12 and 48 mGy) in MCF-10A and MCF-7 cell lines. Results We have observed an increase in miR-34a expression 4 hours post-irradiation at 5 Gy in MCF-10A and MCF-7 cell lines while its level did not change in T-47D, a breast cancer cell line bearing non-functional p53. At low doses, miR-34a was up-regulated in non-tumoral MCF-10A to a higher extent as compared to MCF-7. MiR-34a levels decreased 24 hours post-irradiation. We have also observed DNA damage and apoptosis at low-energy X-ray irradiation at low doses and the high dose in MCF-10A and MCF-7 4 and 24 hours post-irradiation relative to the mock control. Conclusion Low energy X-ray is able to promote DNA strand breaks and miR-34a might be involved in cell responses to low energy X-ray DNA damage. MiR-34a expression correlates with X-ray dose, time after irradiation and cell type. The present study reinforces the need of investigating consequences of low dose X-ray irradiation of breast cells. PMID

  16. A precise and non-destructive method to calculate the surface area in living scleractinian corals using X-ray computed tomography and 3D modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laforsch, C.; Christoph, E.; Glaser, C.; Naumann, M.; Wild, C.; Niggl, W.

    2008-12-01

    The surface area of corals represents a major reference parameter for the standardization of flux rates, for coral growth investigations, and for investigations of coral metabolism. The methods currently used to determine the surface area of corals are rather approximate approaches lacking accuracy, or are invasive and often destructive methods that are inapplicable for experiments involving living corals. This study introduces a novel precise and non-destructive technique to quantify surface area in living coral colonies by applying computed tomography (CT) and subsequent 3D reconstruction. Living coral colonies of different taxa were scanned by conventional medical CT either in air or in sea water. Resulting data volumes were processed by 3D modeling software providing realistic 3D coral skeleton surface reconstructions, thus enabling surface area measurements. Comparisons of CT datasets obtained from calibration bodies and coral colonies proved the accuracy of the surface area determination. Surface area quantifications derived from two different surface rendering techniques applied for scanning living coral colonies showed congruent results (mean deviation ranging from 1.32 to 2.03%). The validity of surface area measurement was verified by repeated measurements of the same coral colonies by three test persons. No significant differences between all test persons in all coral genera and in both surface rendering techniques were found (independent sample t-test: all n.s.). Data analysis of a single coral colony required approximately 15 to 30 min for a trained user using the isosurface technique regardless of the complexity and growth form of the latter, rendering the method presented in this study as a time-saving and accurate method to quantify surface areas in both living coral colonies and bare coral skeletons.

  17. High-Resolution Imaged-Based 3D Reconstruction Combined with X-Ray CT Data Enables Comprehensive Non-Destructive Documentation and Targeted Research of Astromaterials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blumenfeld, E. H.; Evans, C. A.; Oshel, E. R.; Liddle, D. A.; Beaulieu, K.; Zeigler, R. A.; Righter, K.; Hanna, R. D.; Ketcham, R. A.

    2014-01-01

    Providing web-based data of complex and sensitive astromaterials (including meteorites and lunar samples) in novel formats enhances existing preliminary examination data on these samples and supports targeted sample requests and analyses. We have developed and tested a rigorous protocol for collecting highly detailed imagery of meteorites and complex lunar samples in non-contaminating environments. These data are reduced to create interactive 3D models of the samples. We intend to provide these data as they are acquired on NASA's Astromaterials Acquisition and Curation website at http://curator.jsc.nasa.gov/.

  18. Systematic review of 3D mammography for breast cancer screening.

    PubMed

    Hodgson, Robert; Heywang-Köbrunner, Sylvia H; Harvey, Susan C; Edwards, Mary; Shaikh, Javed; Arber, Mick; Glanville, Julie

    2016-06-01

    This review investigated the relative performance of digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) (alone or with full field digital mammography (FFDM) or synthetic digital mammography) compared with FFDM alone for detecting breast cancer lesions in asymptomatic women. A systematic review was carried out according to systematic reviewing principles provided in the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Diagnostic Test Accuracy. A protocol was developed a priori. The review was registered with PROSPERO (number CRD42014013949). Searches were undertaken in October 2014. Following selection, five studies were eligible. Higher cancer detection rates were observed when comparing DBT + FFDM with FFDM in two European studies: the summary difference per 1000 screens was 2.43 (95% CI: 1.8 to 3.1). Both European studies found lower false positive rates for individual readers. One found a lower recall rate based on conditional recall. The second study was not designed to compare post-arbitration recall rates between FFDM and DBT + FFDM. One European study presented data on interval cancer rates; sensitivity and specificity for DBT + FFDM were both higher compared to FFDM. One large multicentre US study showed a higher cancer detection rate for DBT + FFDM, while two smaller US studies did not find statistically significant differences. Reductions in recall and false positive rates were observed in the US studies in favour of DBT + FFDM. In comparison to FFDM, DBT, as an adjunct to FFDM, has a higher cancer detection rate, increasing the effectiveness of breast cancer screening. Additional benefits of DBT may also include reduced recalls and, consequently, reduced costs and distress caused to women who would have been recalled. PMID:27212700

  19. Nested Case-control Study of Occupational Radiation Exposure and Breast and Esophagus Cancer Risk among Medical Diagnostic X Ray Workers in Jiangsu of China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fu-Ru; Fang, Qiao-Qiao; Tang, Wei-Ming; Xu, Xiao-San; Mahapatra, Tanmay; Mahapatra, Sanchita; Liu, Yu-Fei; Yu, Ning-Le; Sun, Quan-Fu

    2015-01-01

    Medical diagnostic X-ray workers are one occupational group that expose to the long-term low-dose external radiation over their working lifetime, and they may under risk of different cancers. This study aims to determine the relationship between the occupational X-ray radiation exposure and cancer risk among these workers in Jiangsu, China. We conducted Nested case-control study to investigate the occupational X-ray radiation exposure and cancer risk. Data were collected through self-administered questionnaire, which includes but not limits to demographic data, personal behaviors and family history of cancer. Retrospective dose reconstruction was conducted to estimate the cumulative doses of the x-ray workers. Inferential statistics, t-test and 2 tests were used to compare the differences between each group. We used the logistic regression model to calculate the odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) of cancer by adjusting the age, gender. All 34 breast cancer cases and 45 esophageal cancer cases that detected in a cohort conducted among health workers between 1950~2011 were included in this presented study, and 158 cancer-free controls were selected by frequency-matched (1:2). Our study found that the occupational radiation exposure was associated with a significantly increased cancer risk compared with the control, especially in breast cancer and esophageal cancer (adjusted OR=2.90, 95% CI: 1.19-7.04 for breast cancer; OR=4.19, 95% CI: 1.87-9.38 for esophageal cancer, and OR=3.43, 95% CI: 1.92-6.12 for total cancer, respectively). The occupational X-ray radiation exposure was associated with increasing cancer risk, which indicates that proper intervention and prevention strategies may be needed in order to bring down the occupational cancer risk.

  20. Exploring the relationship between SDNR and detectability in dual-energy breast x-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karunamuni, Roshan; Kanamaluru, Swathiu; Lau, Kristen; Gavenonis, Sara; Bakic, Predrag R.; Maidment, Andrew D. A.

    2013-03-01

    Contrast-enhanced (CE) digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) provides a technique to increase the contrast of radiographic imaging agents by suppressing soft-tissue signal variation. By reducing the effect of the soft-tissue anatomical noise, it is then possible to quantify the signal from an iodinated contrast agent. The combination of dual-energy and tomographic acquisitions allows for both the accurate quantification and localization of an iodinated lesion. Here, we present our findings demonstrating the relationship that exists between the signal difference to noise ratio (SDNR) and reader detectability of iodinated lesions in a physical anthropomorphic phantom. The observer study was conducted using the ViewDEX software platform with a total of nine readers. The readers were asked to score each of the iodinated lesions on a scale from 1 (entire boundary and area are visible) to 5 (not visible). Both SDNR and lesion detectability were found to improve as the concentration of the iodine increases, and the thickness of the phantom decreases. Lesion detectability was better in the tomographic slice that best matches the focal plane of the imaged object. However, SDNR does not significantly change with focal plane. Our results demonstrated that observer lesion detectability correlated well with SDNR. Lesions whose SDNR fell below 1 were difficult to distinguish from the background and were in general not visible. Lesions that were rated entirely visible corresponded to those with SDNR values above 3. Lesions with intermediate SDNR values were visualized but not confidently from the surrounding background. These threshold SDNR values can be used to optimize the imaging parameters in CE-DBT.

  1. A 3D printed nano bone matrix for characterization of breast cancer cell and osteoblast interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Wei; Castro, Nathan J.; Cui, Haitao; Zhou, Xuan; Boualam, Benchaa; McGrane, Robert; Glazer, Robert I.; Zhang, Lijie Grace

    2016-08-01

    Bone metastasis is one of the most prevalent complications of late-stage breast cancer, in which the native bone matrix components, including osteoblasts, are intimately involved in tumor progression. The development of a successful in vitro model would greatly facilitate understanding the underlying mechanism of breast cancer bone invasion as well as provide a tool for effective discovery of novel therapeutic strategies. In the current study, we fabricated a series of in vitro bone matrices composed of a polyethylene glycol hydrogel and nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite of varying concentrations to mimic the native bone microenvironment for the investigation of breast cancer bone metastasis. A stereolithography-based three-dimensional (3D) printer was used to fabricate the bone matrices with precisely controlled architecture. The interaction between breast cancer cells and osteoblasts was investigated in the optimized bone matrix. Using a Transwell® system to separate the two cell lines, breast cancer cells inhibited osteoblast proliferation, while osteoblasts stimulated breast cancer cell growth, whereas, both cell lines increased IL-8 secretion. Breast cancer cells co-cultured with osteoblasts within the 3D bone matrix formed multi-cellular spheroids in comparison to two-dimensional monolayers. These findings validate the use of our 3D printed bone matrices as an in vitro metastasis model, and highlights their potential for investigating breast cancer bone metastasis.

  2. 3D printed nanocomposite matrix for the study of breast cancer bone metastasis.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wei; Holmes, Benjamin; Glazer, Robert I; Zhang, Lijie Grace

    2016-01-01

    Bone is one of the most common metastatic sites of breast cancer, but the underlying mechanisms remain unclear, in part due to an absence of advanced platforms for cancer culture and study that mimic the bone microenvironment. In the present study, we integrated a novel stereolithography-based 3D printer and a unique 3D printed nano-ink consisting of hydroxyapatite nanoparticles suspended in hydrogel to create a biomimetic bone-specific environment for evaluating breast cancer bone invasion. Breast cancer cells cultured in a geometrically optimized matrix exhibited spheroid morphology and migratory characteristics. Co-culture of tumor cells with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells increased the formation of spheroid clusters. The 3D matrix also allowed for higher drug resistance of breast cancer cells than 2D culture. These results validate that our 3D bone matrix can mimic tumor bone microenvironments, suggesting that it can serve as a tool for studying metastasis and assessing drug sensitivity. From the Clinical Editor: Cancer remains a major cause of mortality for patients in the clinical setting. For breast cancer, bone is one of the most common metastatic sites. In this intriguing article, the authors developed a bone-like environment using 3D printing technology to investigate the underlying biology of bone metastasis. Their results would also allow a new model for other researchers who work on cancer to use.

  3. Real-time 3D surface-image-guided beam setup in radiotherapy of breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Djajaputra, David; Li Shidong

    2005-01-01

    We describe an approach for external beam radiotherapy of breast cancer that utilizes the three-dimensional (3D) surface information of the breast. The surface data of the breast are obtained from a 3D optical camera that is rigidly mounted on the ceiling of the treatment vault. This 3D camera utilizes light in the visible range therefore it introduces no ionization radiation to the patient. In addition to the surface topographical information of the treated area, the camera also captures gray-scale information that is overlaid on the 3D surface image. This allows us to visualize the skin markers and automatically determine the isocenter position and the beam angles in the breast tangential fields. The field sizes and shapes of the tangential, supraclavicular, and internal mammary gland fields can all be determined according to the 3D surface image of the target. A least-squares method is first introduced for the tangential-field setup that is useful for compensation of the target shape changes. The entire process of capturing the 3D surface data and subsequent calculation of beam parameters typically requires less than 1 min. Our tests on phantom experiments and patient images have achieved the accuracy of 1 mm in shift and 0.5 deg. in rotation. Importantly, the target shape and position changes in each treatment session can both be corrected through this real-time image-guided system.

  4. Design, synthesis, biological evaluation and X-ray crystal structure of novel classical 6,5,6-tricyclic benzo[4,5]thieno[2,3-d]pyrimidines as dual thymidylate synthase and dihydrofolate reductase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xin; Zhou, Xilin; L.Kisliuk, Roy; Piraino, Jennifer; Cody, Vivian

    2011-01-01

    Classical antifolates (4-7) with a tricyclic benzo[4,5]thieno[2,3-d]pyrimidine scaffold and a flexible and rigid benzoylglutamate were synthesized as dual thymidylate synthase (TS) and dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) inhibitors. Oxidative aromatization of ethyl 2-amino-4-methyl-4,5,6,7-tetrahydro-1-benzothiophene-3-carboxylate (±)-9 to ethyl 2-amino-4-methyl-1-benzothiophene-3-carboxylate 10 with 10% Pd/C was a key synthetic step. Compounds with 2-CH3 substituents inhibited human (h) TS (IC50 = 0.26-0.8 μM), but not hDHFR. Substitution of the 2-CH3 with a 2-NH2 increases hTS inhibition by more than 10-fold and also affords excellent hDHFR inhibition (IC50 = 0.09-0.1 μM). This study shows that the tricyclic benzo[4,5]thieno[2,3-d]pyrimidine scaffold is highly conducive to single hTS or dual hTS-hDHFR inhibition depending on the 2-position substituents. The X-ray crystal structures of 6 and 7 with hDHFR reveal, for the first time, that tricyclics 6 and 7 bind with the benzo[4,5]thieno[2,3-d]pyrimidine ring in the folate binding mode with the thieno S mimicking the 4-amino of methotrexate. PMID:21550809

  5. X-ray microtomographic scanners

    SciTech Connect

    Syryamkin, V. I. Klestov, S. A.

    2015-11-17

    The article studies the operating procedures of an X-ray microtomographic scanner and the module of reconstruction and analysis 3D-image of a test sample in particular. An algorithm for 3D-image reconstruction based on image shadow projections and mathematical methods of the processing are described. Chapter 1 describes the basic principles of X-ray tomography and general procedures of the device developed. Chapters 2 and 3 are devoted to the problem of resources saving by the system during the X-ray tomography procedure, which is achieved by preprocessing of the initial shadow projections. Preprocessing includes background noise removing from the images, which reduces the amount of shadow projections in general and increases the efficiency of the group shadow projections compression. In conclusion, the main applications of X-ray tomography are presented.

  6. Realistic microwave breast models through T1-weighted 3-D MRI data.

    PubMed

    Tunçay, Ahmet Hakan; Akduman, Ibrahim

    2015-02-01

    In this paper we present an effective method for developing realistic numerical three-dimensional (3-D) microwave breast models of different shape, size, and tissue density. These models are especially convenient for microwave breast cancer imaging applications and numerical analysis of human breast-microwave interactions. As in the recent studies on this area, anatomical information of the breast tissue is collected from T1-weighted 3-D MRI data of different patients' in prone position. The method presented in this paper offers significant improvements including efficient noise reduction and tissue segmentation, nonlinear mapping of electromagnetic properties, realistically asymmetric phantom shape, and a realistic classification of breast phantoms. Our method contains a five-step approach where each MRI voxel is classified and mapped to the appropriate dielectric properties. In the first step, the MRI data are denoised by estimating and removing the bias field from each slice, after which the voxels are segmented into two main tissues as fibro-glandular and adipose. Using the distribution of the voxel intensities in MRI histogram, two nonlinear mapping functions are generated for dielectric permittivity and conductivity profiles, which allow each MRI voxel to map to its proper dielectric properties. Obtained dielectric profiles are then converted into 3-D numerical breast phantoms using several image processing techniques, including morphologic operations, filtering. Resultant phantoms are classified according to their adipose content, which is a critical parameter that affects penetration depth during microwave breast imaging.

  7. Automated 3D-2D registration of X-ray microcomputed tomography with histological sections for dental implants in bone using chamfer matching and simulated annealing.

    PubMed

    Becker, Kathrin; Stauber, Martin; Schwarz, Frank; Beißbarth, Tim

    2015-09-01

    We propose a novel 3D-2D registration approach for micro-computed tomography (μCT) and histology (HI), constructed for dental implant biopsies, that finds the position and normal vector of the oblique slice from μCT that corresponds to HI. During image pre-processing, the implants and the bone tissue are segmented using a combination of thresholding, morphological filters and component labeling. After this, chamfer matching is employed to register the implant edges and fine registration of the bone tissues is achieved using simulated annealing. The method was tested on n=10 biopsies, obtained at 20 weeks after non-submerged healing in the canine mandible. The specimens were scanned with μCT 100 and processed for hard tissue sectioning. After registration, we assessed the agreement of bone to implant contact (BIC) using automated and manual measurements. Statistical analysis was conducted to test the agreement of the BIC measurements in the registered samples. Registration was successful for all specimens and agreement of the respective binary images was high (median: 0.90, 1.-3. Qu.: 0.89-0.91). Direct comparison of BIC yielded that automated (median 0.82, 1.-3. Qu.: 0.75-0.85) and manual (median 0.61, 1.-3. Qu.: 0.52-0.67) measures from μCT were significant positively correlated with HI (median 0.65, 1.-3. Qu.: 0.59-0.72) between μCT and HI groups (manual: R(2)=0.87, automated: R(2)=0.75, p<0.001). The results show that this method yields promising results and that μCT may become a valid alternative to assess osseointegration in three dimensions.

  8. 50 μm pixel pitch wafer-scale CMOS active pixel sensor x-ray detector for digital breast tomosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, C.; Konstantinidis, A. C.; Zheng, Y.; Anaxagoras, T.; Speller, R. D.; Kanicki, J.

    2015-12-01

    Wafer-scale CMOS active pixel sensors (APSs) have been developed recently for x-ray imaging applications. The small pixel pitch and low noise are very promising properties for medical imaging applications such as digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT). In this work, we evaluated experimentally and through modeling the imaging properties of a 50 μm pixel pitch CMOS APS x-ray detector named DynAMITe (Dynamic Range Adjustable for Medical Imaging Technology). A modified cascaded system model was developed for CMOS APS x-ray detectors by taking into account the device nonlinear signal and noise properties. The imaging properties such as modulation transfer function (MTF), noise power spectrum (NPS), and detective quantum efficiency (DQE) were extracted from both measurements and the nonlinear cascaded system analysis. The results show that the DynAMITe x-ray detector achieves a high spatial resolution of 10 mm-1 and a DQE of around 0.5 at spatial frequencies  <1 mm-1. In addition, the modeling results were used to calculate the image signal-to-noise ratio (SNRi) of microcalcifications at various mean glandular dose (MGD). For an average breast (5 cm thickness, 50% glandular fraction), 165 μm microcalcifications can be distinguished at a MGD of 27% lower than the clinical value (~1.3 mGy). To detect 100 μm microcalcifications, further optimizations of the CMOS APS x-ray detector, image aquisition geometry and image reconstruction techniques should be considered.

  9. 50 μm pixel pitch wafer-scale CMOS active pixel sensor x-ray detector for digital breast tomosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, C; Konstantinidis, A C; Zheng, Y; Anaxagoras, T; Speller, R D; Kanicki, J

    2015-12-01

    Wafer-scale CMOS active pixel sensors (APSs) have been developed recently for x-ray imaging applications. The small pixel pitch and low noise are very promising properties for medical imaging applications such as digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT). In this work, we evaluated experimentally and through modeling the imaging properties of a 50 μm pixel pitch CMOS APS x-ray detector named DynAMITe (Dynamic Range Adjustable for Medical Imaging Technology). A modified cascaded system model was developed for CMOS APS x-ray detectors by taking into account the device nonlinear signal and noise properties. The imaging properties such as modulation transfer function (MTF), noise power spectrum (NPS), and detective quantum efficiency (DQE) were extracted from both measurements and the nonlinear cascaded system analysis. The results show that the DynAMITe x-ray detector achieves a high spatial resolution of 10 mm(-1) and a DQE of around 0.5 at spatial frequencies  <1 mm(-1). In addition, the modeling results were used to calculate the image signal-to-noise ratio (SNRi) of microcalcifications at various mean glandular dose (MGD). For an average breast (5 cm thickness, 50% glandular fraction), 165 μm microcalcifications can be distinguished at a MGD of 27% lower than the clinical value (~1.3 mGy). To detect 100 μm microcalcifications, further optimizations of the CMOS APS x-ray detector, image aquisition geometry and image reconstruction techniques should be considered. PMID:26540090

  10. Calibration and optimization of 3D digital breast tomosynthesis guided near infrared spectral tomography

    PubMed Central

    Michaelsen, Kelly E.; Krishnaswamy, Venkataramanan; Shi, Linxi; Vedantham, Srinivasan; Poplack, Steven P.; Karellas, Andrew; Pogue, Brian W.; Paulsen, Keith D.

    2015-01-01

    Calibration of a three-dimensional multimodal digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) x-ray and non-fiber based near infrared spectral tomography (NIRST) system is challenging but essential for clinical studies. Phantom imaging results yielded linear contrast recovery of total hemoglobin (HbT) concentration for cylindrical inclusions of 15 mm, 10 mm and 7 mm with a 3.5% decrease in the HbT estimate for each 1 cm increase in inclusion depth. A clinical exam of a patient’s breast containing both benign and malignant lesions was successfully imaged, with greater HbT was found in the malignancy relative to the benign abnormality and fibroglandular regions (11 μM vs. 9.5 μM). Tools developed improved imaging system characterization and optimization of signal quality, which will ultimately improve patient selection and subsequent clinical trial results. PMID:26713210

  11. Characterization of structural-prior guided optical tomography using realistic breast models derived from dual-energy x-ray mammography

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Bin; Brooks, Dana H.; Boas, David A.; Lundqvist, Mats; Fang, Qianqian

    2015-01-01

    Multi-spectral near-infrared diffuse optical tomography (DOT) is capable of providing functional tissue assessment that can complement structural mammographic images for more comprehensive breast cancer diagnosis. To take full advantage of the readily available sub-millimeter resolution structural information in a multi-modal imaging setting, an efficient x-ray/optical joint image reconstruction model has been proposed previously to utilize anatomical information from a mammogram as a structural prior. In this work, we develop a complex digital breast phantom (available at http://openjd.sf.net/digibreast) based on direct measurements of fibroglandular tissue volume fractions using dual-energy mammographic imaging of a human breast. We also extend our prior-guided reconstruction algorithm to facilitate the recovery of breast tumors, and perform a series of simulation-based studies to systematically evaluate the impact of lesion sizes and contrasts, tissue background, mesh resolution, inaccurate priors, and regularization parameters, on the recovery of breast tumors using multi-modal DOT/x-ray measurements. Our studies reveal that the optical property estimation error can be reduced by half by utilizing structural priors; the minimum detectable tumor size can also be reduced by half when prior knowledge regarding the tumor location is provided. Moreover, our algorithm is shown to be robust to false priors on tumor location. PMID:26203367

  12. Characterization of structural-prior guided optical tomography using realistic breast models derived from dual-energy x-ray mammography.

    PubMed

    Deng, Bin; Brooks, Dana H; Boas, David A; Lundqvist, Mats; Fang, Qianqian

    2015-07-01

    Multi-spectral near-infrared diffuse optical tomography (DOT) is capable of providing functional tissue assessment that can complement structural mammographic images for more comprehensive breast cancer diagnosis. To take full advantage of the readily available sub-millimeter resolution structural information in a multi-modal imaging setting, an efficient x-ray/optical joint image reconstruction model has been proposed previously to utilize anatomical information from a mammogram as a structural prior. In this work, we develop a complex digital breast phantom (available at http://openjd.sf.net/digibreast) based on direct measurements of fibroglandular tissue volume fractions using dual-energy mammographic imaging of a human breast. We also extend our prior-guided reconstruction algorithm to facilitate the recovery of breast tumors, and perform a series of simulation-based studies to systematically evaluate the impact of lesion sizes and contrasts, tissue background, mesh resolution, inaccurate priors, and regularization parameters, on the recovery of breast tumors using multi-modal DOT/x-ray measurements. Our studies reveal that the optical property estimation error can be reduced by half by utilizing structural priors; the minimum detectable tumor size can also be reduced by half when prior knowledge regarding the tumor location is provided. Moreover, our algorithm is shown to be robust to false priors on tumor location. PMID:26203367

  13. Modelling the radiobiological effect of intraoperative X-ray brachytherapy for breast cancer using an air-filled spherical applicator

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Simon; Morgan, David

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We present a framework, in which we compare a conventional standard dose of 50 Gy in 25 fractions with accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) using electronic brachytherapy (eBT). We discuss how radiobiological modelling enables us to establish a framework, within which we can compare external beam radiotherapy (EBRT). This leads to a determination of the shell of isoeffect in breast tissue, at which very low kV eBT can be considered to be clinically equivalent to standard EBRT. Material and methods To estimate relative biological effectiveness (RBE) values as a function of dose and irradiation time, we used a modified linear quadratic (LQ) approach, taking into account the ability of this new device, to deliver 20 Gy at the surface of a 40 mm diameter rigid, hollow spherical applicator in less than 2 minutes. In this study, we considered the radiobiological effectiveness of the Papillon +™ X-ray brachytherapy device operating at 30 kV, 0.3 mA producing dose rates in excess of 14 Gy/min. Results Calculated clinical RBEs ranged from 1.154 at the surface of a 40 mm diameter applicator to 1.100 at 35 mm from the applicator surface for the Papillon+ device. The absolute physical dose D (abs) 30 kV ranged from 20.00 Gy at the applicator surface to 1.20 at 35 mm distant. The product of the isoeffective single dose of 60Co reference radiation – (RBE)60Co, and the RBE corrected standard 2 Gy equivalent dose fractions (EQD2) doses, EQD2(30 kV) * (RBE)60Co ranged from 98.62 Gy at the applicator surface to 1.13 at 35 mm. The ‘shell of isoeffect’, the value on the X-axis where the EQD2(30 kV) * (RBE)60Co line crosses the 50 Gy mark on the Y-axis, was found to be approximately 3.5 mm beyond the applicator surface. Conclusions The ‘shell of isoeffect’ can serve as a useful metric with which to compare the radiobiological effectiveness of low kV eBT with various regimes of conventional EBRT. PMID:27648085

  14. Modelling the radiobiological effect of intraoperative X-ray brachytherapy for breast cancer using an air-filled spherical applicator

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Simon; Morgan, David

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We present a framework, in which we compare a conventional standard dose of 50 Gy in 25 fractions with accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) using electronic brachytherapy (eBT). We discuss how radiobiological modelling enables us to establish a framework, within which we can compare external beam radiotherapy (EBRT). This leads to a determination of the shell of isoeffect in breast tissue, at which very low kV eBT can be considered to be clinically equivalent to standard EBRT. Material and methods To estimate relative biological effectiveness (RBE) values as a function of dose and irradiation time, we used a modified linear quadratic (LQ) approach, taking into account the ability of this new device, to deliver 20 Gy at the surface of a 40 mm diameter rigid, hollow spherical applicator in less than 2 minutes. In this study, we considered the radiobiological effectiveness of the Papillon +™ X-ray brachytherapy device operating at 30 kV, 0.3 mA producing dose rates in excess of 14 Gy/min. Results Calculated clinical RBEs ranged from 1.154 at the surface of a 40 mm diameter applicator to 1.100 at 35 mm from the applicator surface for the Papillon+ device. The absolute physical dose D (abs) 30 kV ranged from 20.00 Gy at the applicator surface to 1.20 at 35 mm distant. The product of the isoeffective single dose of 60Co reference radiation – (RBE)60Co, and the RBE corrected standard 2 Gy equivalent dose fractions (EQD2) doses, EQD2(30 kV) * (RBE)60Co ranged from 98.62 Gy at the applicator surface to 1.13 at 35 mm. The ‘shell of isoeffect’, the value on the X-axis where the EQD2(30 kV) * (RBE)60Co line crosses the 50 Gy mark on the Y-axis, was found to be approximately 3.5 mm beyond the applicator surface. Conclusions The ‘shell of isoeffect’ can serve as a useful metric with which to compare the radiobiological effectiveness of low kV eBT with various regimes of conventional EBRT.

  15. A novel MR-guided interventional device for 3D circumferential access to breast tissue

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Matthew; Zhai, Xu; Harter, Ray; Sisney, Gale; Elezaby, Mai; Fain, Sean

    2008-01-01

    MRI is rapidly growing as a tool for image-guided procedures in the breast such as needle localizations, biopsy, and cryotherapy. The ability of MRI to resolve small (<1 cm) lesions allows earlier detection and diagnosis than with ultrasound. Most MR-guidance methods perform a two-dimensional compression of the breast that distorts tissue anatomy and limits medial access. This work presents a system for localizing breast lesions with 360° access to breast tissue. A novel system has been developed to perform breast lesion localization using MR guidance that uses a 3D radial coordinate system with four degrees of freedom. The device is combined with a novel breast RF coil for improved signal to noise and rotates 360° around the breast to allow medial, lateral, superior, and inferior access minimizing insertion depth to the target. Coil performance was evaluated using a human volunteer by comparing signal to noise from both the developed breast RF coil and a commercial seven-channel breast coil. The system was tested with a breast-shaped gel phantom containing randomly distributed MR-visible targets. MR-compatible localization needles were used to demonstrate the accuracy and feasibility of the concept for breast biopsy. Localization results were classified based on the relationship between the final needle tip position and the lesion. A 3D bladder concept was also tested using animal tissue to evaluate the device’s ability to immobilize deformable breast tissue during a needle insertion. The RF breast coil provided signal to noise values comparable to a seven-channel breast coil. The needle tip was in contact with the targeted lesion in 89% (25∕28) of all the trials and 100% (6∕6) of the trials with targeted lesions >6 mm. Target lesions were 3–4 mm in diameter for 47% (13∕28), 5–6 mm in diameter for 32% (9∕28), and over 6 mm in diameter for 21% (6∕28) of the trials, respectively. The 3D bladder concept was shown to immobilize a deformable animal

  16. Animal testing using 3D microwave tomography system for breast cancer detection.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jong Moon; Son, Sung Ho; Kim, Hyuk Je; Kim, Bo Ra; Choi, Heyng Do; Jeon, Soon Ik

    2014-01-01

    The three dimensional microwave tomography (3D MT) system of the Electronics and Telecommunications Research Institute (ETRI) comprises an antenna array, transmitting receiving module, switch matrix module and a signal processing component. This system also includes a patient interface bed as well as a 3D reconstruction algorithm. Here, we perform a comparative analysis of image reconstruction results using the assembled system and MRI results, which is used to image the breasts of dogs. Microwave imaging reconstruction results (at 1,500 MHz) obtained using the ETRI 3D MT system are presented. The system provides computationally reliable diagnosis results from the reconstructed MT Image. PMID:25160233

  17. Combining supine MRI and 3D optical scanning for improved surgical planning of breast conserving surgeries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pallone, Matthew J.; Poplack, Steven P.; Barth, Richard J., Jr.; Paulsen, Keith D.

    2012-02-01

    Image-guided wire localization is the current standard of care for the excision of non-palpable carcinomas during breast conserving surgeries (BCS). The efficacy of this technique depends upon the accuracy of wire placement, maintenance of the fixed wire position (despite patient movement), and the surgeon's understanding of the spatial relationship between the wire and tumor. Notably, breast shape can vary significantly between the imaging and surgical positions. Despite this method of localization, re-excision is needed in approximately 30% of patients due to the proximity of cancer to the specimen margins. These limitations make wire localization an inefficient and imprecise procedure. Alternatively, we investigate a method of image registration and finite element (FE) deformation which correlates preoperative supine MRIs with 3D optical scans of the breast surface. MRI of the breast can accurately define the extents of very small cancers. Furthermore, supine breast MR reduces the amount of tissue deformation between the imaging and surgical positions. At the time of surgery, the surface contour of the breast may be imaged using a handheld 3D laser scanner. With the MR images segmented by tissue type, the two scans are approximately registered using fiducial markers present in both acquisitions. The segmented MRI breast volume is then deformed to match the optical surface using a FE mechanical model of breast tissue. The resulting images provide the surgeon with 3D views and measurements of the tumor shape, volume, and position within the breast as it appears during surgery which may improve surgical guidance and obviate the need for wire localization.

  18. Evaluation of an improved algorithm for producing realistic 3D breast software phantoms: Application for mammography

    SciTech Connect

    Bliznakova, K.; Suryanarayanan, S.; Karellas, A.; Pallikarakis, N.

    2010-11-15

    Purpose: This work presents an improved algorithm for the generation of 3D breast software phantoms and its evaluation for mammography. Methods: The improved methodology has evolved from a previously presented 3D noncompressed breast modeling method used for the creation of breast models of different size, shape, and composition. The breast phantom is composed of breast surface, duct system and terminal ductal lobular units, Cooper's ligaments, lymphatic and blood vessel systems, pectoral muscle, skin, 3D mammographic background texture, and breast abnormalities. The key improvement is the development of a new algorithm for 3D mammographic texture generation. Simulated images of the enhanced 3D breast model without lesions were produced by simulating mammographic image acquisition and were evaluated subjectively and quantitatively. For evaluation purposes, a database with regions of interest taken from simulated and real mammograms was created. Four experienced radiologists participated in a visual subjective evaluation trial, as they judged the quality of the simulated mammograms, using the new algorithm compared to mammograms, obtained with the old modeling approach. In addition, extensive quantitative evaluation included power spectral analysis and calculation of fractal dimension, skewness, and kurtosis of simulated and real mammograms from the database. Results: The results from the subjective evaluation strongly suggest that the new methodology for mammographic breast texture creates improved breast models compared to the old approach. Calculated parameters on simulated images such as {beta} exponent deducted from the power law spectral analysis and fractal dimension are similar to those calculated on real mammograms. The results for the kurtosis and skewness are also in good coincidence with those calculated from clinical images. Comparison with similar calculations published in the literature showed good agreement in the majority of cases. Conclusions: The

  19. Timescales of quartz crystallization estimated from glass inclusion faceting using 3D propagation phase-contrast x-ray tomography: examples from the Bishop (California, USA) and Oruanui (Taupo Volcanic Zone, New Zealand) Tuffs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pamukcu, A.; Gualda, G. A.; Anderson, A. T.

    2012-12-01

    Compositions of glass inclusions have long been studied for the information they provide on the evolution of magma bodies. Textures - sizes, shapes, positions - of glass inclusions have received less attention, but they can also provide important insight into magmatic processes, including the timescales over which magma bodies develop and erupt. At magmatic temperatures, initially round glass inclusions will become faceted (attain a negative crystal shape) through the process of dissolution and re-precipitation, such that the extent to which glass inclusions are faceted can be used to estimate timescales. The size and position of the inclusion within a crystal will influence how much faceting occurs: a larger inclusion will facet more slowly; an inclusion closer to the rim will have less time to facet. As a result, it is critical to properly document the size, shape, and position of glass inclusions to assess faceting timescales. Quartz is an ideal mineral to study glass inclusion faceting, as Si is the only diffusing species of concern, and Si diffusion rates are relatively well-constrained. Faceting time calculations to date (Gualda et al., 2012) relied on optical microscopy to document glass inclusions. Here we use 3D propagation phase-contrast x-ray tomography to image glass inclusions in quartz. This technique enhances inclusion edges such that images can be processed more successfully than with conventional tomography. We have developed a set of image processing tools to isolate inclusions and more accurately obtain information on the size, shape, and position of glass inclusions than with optical microscopy. We are studying glass inclusions from two giant tuffs. The Bishop Tuff is ~1000 km3 of high-silica rhyolite ash fall, ignimbrite, and intracaldera deposits erupted ~760 ka in eastern California (USA). Glass inclusions in early-erupted Bishop Tuff range from non-faceted to faceted, and faceting times determined using both optical microscopy and x-ray

  20. 3-D breast anthropometry of plus-sized women in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Pandarum, Reena; Yu, Winnie; Hunter, Lawrance

    2011-09-01

    Exploratory retail studies in South Africa indicate that plus-sized women experience problems and dissatisfaction with poorly fitting bras. The lack of 3-D anthropometric studies for the plus-size women's bra market initiated this research. 3-D body torso measurements were collected from a convenience sample of 176 plus-sized women in South Africa. 3-D breast measurements extracted from the TC(2) NX12-3-D body scanner 'breast module' software were compared with traditional tape measurements. Regression equations show that the two methods of measurement were highly correlated although, on average, the bra cup size determining factor 'bust minus underbust' obtained from the 3-D method is approximately 11% smaller than that of the manual method. It was concluded that the total bust volume correlated with the quadrant volume (r = 0.81), cup length, bust length and bust prominence, should be selected as the overall measure of bust size and not the traditional bust girth and the underbust measurement. STATEMENT OF RELEVANCE: This study contributes new data and adds to the knowledge base of anthropometry and consumer ergonomics on bra fit and support, published in this, the Ergonomics Journal, by Chen et al. (2010) on bra fit and White et al. (2009) on breast support during overground running.

  1. 3D freehand ultrasound for medical assistance in diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer: preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres, Fabian; Fanti, Zian; Arambula Cosío, F.

    2013-11-01

    Image-guided interventions allow the physician to have a better planning and visualization of a procedure. 3D freehand ultrasound is a non-invasive and low-cost imaging tool that can be used to assist medical procedures. This tool can be used in the diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer. There are common medical practices that involve large needles to obtain an accurate diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer. In this study we propose the use of 3D freehand ultrasound for planning and guiding such procedures as core needle biopsy and radiofrequency ablation. The proposed system will help the physician to identify the lesion area, using image-processing techniques in the 3D freehand ultrasound images, and guide the needle to this area using the information of position and orientation of the surgical tools. We think that this system can upgrade the accuracy and efficiency of these procedures.

  2. Nanometer x-ray lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartley, Frank T.; Khan Malek, Chantal G.

    1999-10-01

    New developments for x-ray nanomachining include pattern transfer onto non-planar surfaces coated with electrodeposited resists using synchrotron radiation x-rays through extremely high-resolution mask made by chemically assisted focused ion beam lithography. Standard UV photolithographic processes cannot maintain sub-micron definitions over large variation in feature topography. The ability of x-ray printing to pattern thin or thick layers of photoresist with high resolution on non-planar surfaces of large and complex topographies with limited diffraction and scattering effects and no substrate reflection is known and can be exploited for patterning microsystems with non-planar 3D geometries as well as multisided and multilayered substrates. Thin conformal coatings of electro-deposited positive and negative tone photoresist have been shown to be x-ray sensitive and accommodate sub-micro pattern transfer over surface of extreme topographical variations. Chemically assisted focused ion beam selective anisotropic erosion was used to fabricate x-ray masks directly. Masks with feature sizes less than 20 nm through 7 microns of gold were made on bulk silicon substrates and x-ray mask membranes. The technique is also applicable to other high density materials. Such masks enable the primary and secondary patterning and/or 3D machining of Nano-Electro-Mechanical Systems over large depths or complex relief and the patterning of large surface areas with sub-optically dimensioned features.

  3. 3D Imaging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hastings, S. K.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses 3 D imaging as it relates to digital representations in virtual library collections. Highlights include X-ray computed tomography (X-ray CT); the National Science Foundation (NSF) Digital Library Initiatives; output peripherals; image retrieval systems, including metadata; and applications of 3 D imaging for libraries and museums. (LRW)

  4. Enhancement of 3D modeling and classification of microcalcifications in breast computed tomography (BCT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alquran, Hiam; Shaheen, Eman; O'Connor, J. Michael; Mahd, Mufeed

    2014-03-01

    Current computer aided diagnosis (CADx) software for digital mammography relies mainly on 2D techniques. With the emergence of three-dimensional (3D) breast imaging modalities such as breast Computed Tomography (BCT), there is an opportunity to analyze 3D features in the classification of calcifications. We previously reported our initial work on automated 3D feature detection and classification based on morphological descriptions for single microcalcifications within clusters [1]. In this work, we propose the expansion of the 3D classification methods to include novel microcalcification morphological feature detection such as including more morphological classes and replacing the 2D Radon transform by a 3D Radon transform. Results show that the classification rate improved compared to the previously reported results from a total of 546 to 559 consistently classified calcifications out of 635 total calcifications. This slight improvement is due to the use of the 3D Radon transform and incorporating methods to detect two classes not previously implemented. Future work will focus on adding feature detection and classification of cluster patterns.

  5. Automatic nipple detection on 3D images of an automated breast ultrasound system (ABUS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Javanshir Moghaddam, Mandana; Tan, Tao; Karssemeijer, Nico; Platel, Bram

    2014-03-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that applying Automated Breast Ultrasound in addition to mammography in women with dense breasts can lead to additional detection of small, early stage breast cancers which are occult in corresponding mammograms. In this paper, we proposed a fully automatic method for detecting the nipple location in 3D ultrasound breast images acquired from Automated Breast Ultrasound Systems. The nipple location is a valuable landmark to report the position of possible abnormalities in a breast or to guide image registration. To detect the nipple location, all images were normalized. Subsequently, features have been extracted in a multi scale approach and classification experiments were performed using a gentle boost classifier to identify the nipple location. The method was applied on a dataset of 100 patients with 294 different 3D ultrasound views from Siemens and U-systems acquisition systems. Our database is a representative sample of cases obtained in clinical practice by four medical centers. The automatic method could accurately locate the nipple in 90% of AP (Anterior-Posterior) views and in 79% of the other views.

  6. Joint x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    X-ray - joint; Arthrography; Arthrogram ... x-ray technologist will help you position the joint to be x-rayed on the table. Once in place, pictures are taken. The joint may be moved into other positions for more ...

  7. Chest X-Ray

    MedlinePlus

    ... by: Image/Video Gallery Your radiologist explains chest x-ray. Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot org! Hello, ... you about chest radiography also known as chest x-rays. Chest x-rays are the most commonly performed ...

  8. Cosmic x ray physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccammon, Dan; Cox, D. P.; Kraushaar, W. L.; Sanders, W. T.

    1991-01-01

    The annual progress report on Cosmic X Ray Physics for the period 1 Jan. to 31 Dec. 1990 is presented. Topics studied include: soft x ray background, new sounding rocket payload: x ray calorimeter, and theoretical studies.

  9. Cosmic x ray physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccammon, Dan; Cox, D. P.; Kraushaar, W. L.; Sanders, W. T.

    1990-01-01

    The annual progress report on Cosmic X Ray Physics is presented. Topics studied include: the soft x ray background, proportional counter and filter calibrations, the new sounding rocket payload: X Ray Calorimeter, and theoretical studies.

  10. X-ray tensor tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malecki, A.; Potdevin, G.; Biernath, T.; Eggl, E.; Willer, K.; Lasser, T.; Maisenbacher, J.; Gibmeier, J.; Wanner, A.; Pfeiffer, F.

    2014-02-01

    Here we introduce a new concept for x-ray computed tomography that yields information about the local micro-morphology and its orientation in each voxel of the reconstructed 3D tomogram. Contrary to conventional x-ray CT, which only reconstructs a single scalar value for each point in the 3D image, our approach provides a full scattering tensor with multiple independent structural parameters in each volume element. In the application example shown in this study, we highlight that our method can visualize sub-pixel fiber orientations in a carbon composite sample, hence demonstrating its value for non-destructive testing applications. Moreover, as the method is based on the use of a conventional x-ray tube, we believe that it will also have a great impact in the wider range of material science investigations and in future medical diagnostics. The authors declare no competing financial interests.

  11. Intraoperative Radiotherapy as a Boost During Breast-Conserving Surgery Using Low-Kilovoltage X-Rays: The First 5 Years of Experience With a Novel Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Wenz, Frederik; Welzel, Grit; Blank, Elena; Hermann, Brigitte; Steil, Volker; Suetterlin, Marc; Kraus-Tiefenbacher, Uta

    2010-08-01

    Purpose: Intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) during breast-conserving surgery (BCS) has been recently introduced using different devices. We report the first 5 years of a single-center experience after introduction of a novel approach to deliver IORT as a tumor bed boost during BCS for breast cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 155 breast cancers in 154 women (median age, 63 years; range, 30-83 years; T1/T2 = 100/55; N0/N+ = 108/47) were treated between February 2002 and December 2007 at the University Medical Center Mannheim, in whom IORT as tumor bed boost was applied using 50-kV X-rays (20 Gy) followed by 46-50 Gy whole-breast external-beam radiotherapy (EBRT). Chemotherapy, if indicated, was given before EBRT. The median interval between BCS plus IORT and EBRT was 40 days. Median follow-up was 34 months (maximum 80 months, 1 patient lost to follow-up). Overall survival and local relapse-free survival were calculated at 5 years using the Kaplan-Meier method. Seventy-nine patients were evaluated at 3-year follow-up for late toxicity according to the Late Effects in Normal Tissues-Subjective, Objective, Management, and Analytic system. Results: Ten patients died, 2 had in-breast relapse, and 8 developed distant metastases (5-year overall survival = 87.0%; 5-year local relapse-free survival = 98.5%). Grade 3 fibroses of the tumor bed were detected in 5% of the patients after 3 years. Skin toxicity was mild (telangiectases and hyperpigmentations in approximately 6% each). Conclusions: Intraoperative radiotherapy as a tumor bed boost during BCS for breast cancer using low-kilovoltage X-rays followed by EBRT yields low recurrence and toxicity rates.

  12. Automated 3D ultrasound image segmentation to aid breast cancer image interpretation.

    PubMed

    Gu, Peng; Lee, Won-Mean; Roubidoux, Marilyn A; Yuan, Jie; Wang, Xueding; Carson, Paul L

    2016-02-01

    Segmentation of an ultrasound image into functional tissues is of great importance to clinical diagnosis of breast cancer. However, many studies are found to segment only the mass of interest and not all major tissues. Differences and inconsistencies in ultrasound interpretation call for an automated segmentation method to make results operator-independent. Furthermore, manual segmentation of entire three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound volumes is time-consuming, resource-intensive, and clinically impractical. Here, we propose an automated algorithm to segment 3D ultrasound volumes into three major tissue types: cyst/mass, fatty tissue, and fibro-glandular tissue. To test its efficacy and consistency, the proposed automated method was employed on a database of 21 cases of whole breast ultrasound. Experimental results show that our proposed method not only distinguishes fat and non-fat tissues correctly, but performs well in classifying cyst/mass. Comparison of density assessment between the automated method and manual segmentation demonstrates good consistency with an accuracy of 85.7%. Quantitative comparison of corresponding tissue volumes, which uses overlap ratio, gives an average similarity of 74.54%, consistent with values seen in MRI brain segmentations. Thus, our proposed method exhibits great potential as an automated approach to segment 3D whole breast ultrasound volumes into functionally distinct tissues that may help to correct ultrasound speed of sound aberrations and assist in density based prognosis of breast cancer.

  13. Automated 3D ultrasound image segmentation for assistant diagnosis of breast cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuxin; Gu, Peng; Lee, Won-Mean; Roubidoux, Marilyn A.; Du, Sidan; Yuan, Jie; Wang, Xueding; Carson, Paul L.

    2016-04-01

    Segmentation of an ultrasound image into functional tissues is of great importance to clinical diagnosis of breast cancer. However, many studies are found to segment only the mass of interest and not all major tissues. Differences and inconsistencies in ultrasound interpretation call for an automated segmentation method to make results operator-independent. Furthermore, manual segmentation of entire three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound volumes is time-consuming, resource-intensive, and clinically impractical. Here, we propose an automated algorithm to segment 3D ultrasound volumes into three major tissue types: cyst/mass, fatty tissue, and fibro-glandular tissue. To test its efficacy and consistency, the proposed automated method was employed on a database of 21 cases of whole breast ultrasound. Experimental results show that our proposed method not only distinguishes fat and non-fat tissues correctly, but performs well in classifying cyst/mass. Comparison of density assessment between the automated method and manual segmentation demonstrates good consistency with an accuracy of 85.7%. Quantitative comparison of corresponding tissue volumes, which uses overlap ratio, gives an average similarity of 74.54%, consistent with values seen in MRI brain segmentations. Thus, our proposed method exhibits great potential as an automated approach to segment 3D whole breast ultrasound volumes into functionally distinct tissues that may help to correct ultrasound speed of sound aberrations and assist in density based prognosis of breast cancer.

  14. High-resolution 3D micro-CT imaging of breast microcalcifications: a preliminary analysis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Detection of microcalcifications on mammograms indicates the presence of breast lesion, and the shapes of the microcalcifications as seen by conventional mammography correlates with the probability of malignancy. This preliminary study evaluated the 3D shape of breast microcalcifications using micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) and compared the findings with those obtained using anatomopathological analysis. Methods The study analyzed breast biopsy samples from 11 women with findings of suspicious microcalcifications on routine mammograms. The samples were imaged using a micro-CT (SkyScan 1076) at a resolution of 35 μm. Images were reconstructed using filtered back-projection and analyzed in 3D using surface rendering. The samples were subsequently analyzed by the pathology service. Reconstructed 3D images were compared with the corresponding histological slices. Results Anatomopathological analysis showed that 5 of 11 patients had ductal breast carcinoma in situ. One patient was diagnosed with invasive ductal carcinoma. Individual object analysis was performed on 597 microcalcifications. Malignant microcalcifications tended to be thinner and to have a smaller volume and surface area, while their surface area-to-volume ratio was greater than that of benign microcalcifications. The structure model index values were the same for malignant and benign microcalcifications. Conclusions This is the first study to use micro-CT for quantitative 3D analysis of microcalcifications. This high-resolution imaging technique will be valuable for gaining a greater understanding of the morphologic characteristics of malignant and benign microcalcifications. The presence of many small microcalcifications can be an indication of malignancy. For the larger microcalcifications, 3D parameters confirmed the more irregular shape of malignant microcalcifications. PMID:24393444

  15. Radiation dose in breast CT imaging with monochromatic x-rays: simulation study of the influence of energy, composition and thickness.

    PubMed

    Mittone, A; Bravin, A; Coan, P

    2014-05-01

    Recent developments have shown that high resolution phase contrast x-ray computed tomography (CT) of the breast can be performed at clinically compatible doses. Results have yet been obtained in vitro on full breasts, and the clinical translation of the technique seems more and more possible. This work presents a method to quickly estimate the average dose in the organ using the software GATE. The influence of different parameters on the dose distribution, like breast composition and thickness, and for preclinical test, the presence of a skin/PMMA external layer, has been investigated. Several correction factors, to be applied to the given dose database, are also introduced to allow the use of these results in geometries different from those studied here. An energy optimization study is presented that considers also the influence on the energy choice of x-ray detector. A simple analytical method to estimate the best energy that minimizes the dose-transmittance ratio in CT imaging is presented and compared with the results of simulations.

  16. Hydrogen in polar intermetallics: Syntheses and structures of the ternary Ca5Bi3D0.93, Yb5Bi3Hx, and Sm5Bi3H~1 by powder neutron or single crystal X-ray diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Leon-Escamilla, E. Alejandro; Dervenagas, Panagiotis; Stasis, Constantine; Corbett, John D.

    2010-01-01

    The syntheses of the title compounds are described in detail. Structural characterizations from refinements of single crystal X-ray diffraction data for Yb{sub 5}Bi{sub 3}H{sub x} and Sm{sub 5}Bi{sub 3}H{sub 1} and of powder neutron diffraction data for Ca{sub 5}Bi{sub 3}D{sub 0.93(3)} are reported. These confirm that all three crystallize with the heavy atom structure type of {beta}-Yb{sub 5}Sb{sub 3}, and the third gives the first proof that the deuterium lies in the center of nominal calcium tetrahedra, isostructural with the Ca{sub 5}Sb{sub 3}F-type structure. These Ca and Yb phases are particularly stable with respect to dissociation to Mn{sub 5}Si{sub 3}-type product plus H{sub 2}. Some contradictions in the literature regarding Yb{sub 5}Sb{sub 3} and Yb{sub 5}Sb{sub 3}H{sub x} phases are considered in terms of adventitious hydrogen impurities that are generated during reactions in fused silica containers at elevated temperatures.

  17. Search for novel contrast materials in dual-energy x-ray breast imaging using theoretical modeling of contrast-to-noise ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karunamuni, R.; Maidment, A. D. A.

    2014-08-01

    Contrast-enhanced (CE) dual-energy (DE) x-ray breast imaging uses a low- and high-energy x-ray spectral pair to eliminate soft-tissue signal variation and thereby increase the detectability of exogenous imaging agents. Currently, CEDE breast imaging is performed with iodinated contrast agents. These compounds are limited by several deficiencies, including rapid clearance and poor tumor targeting ability. The purpose of this work is to identify novel contrast materials whose contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) is comparable or superior to that of iodine in the mammographic energy range. A monoenergetic DE subtraction framework was developed to calculate the DE signal intensity resulting from the logarithmic subtraction of the low- and high-energy signal intensities. A weighting factor is calculated to remove the dependence of the DE signal on the glandularity of the breast tissue. Using the DE signal intensity and weighting factor, the CNR for materials with atomic numbers (Z) ranging from 1 to 79 are computed for energy pairs between 10 and 50 keV. A group of materials with atomic numbers ranging from 42 to 63 were identified to exhibit the highest levels of CNR in the mammographic energy range. Several of these materials have been formulated as nanoparticles for various applications but none, apart from iodine, have been investigated as CEDE breast imaging agents. Within this group of materials, the necessary dose fraction to the LE image decreases as the atomic number increases. By reducing the dose to the LE image, the DE subtraction technique will not provide an anatomical image of sufficient quality to accompany the contrast information. Therefore, materials with Z from 42 to 52 provide nearly optimal values of CNR with energy pairs and dose fractions that provide good anatomical images. This work is intended to inspire further research into new materials for optimized CEDE breast functional imaging.

  18. Search for novel contrast materials in dual-energy x-ray breast imaging using theoretical modeling of contrast-to-noise ratio.

    PubMed

    Karunamuni, R; Maidment, A D A

    2014-08-01

    Contrast-enhanced (CE) dual-energy (DE) x-ray breast imaging uses a low- and high-energy x-ray spectral pair to eliminate soft-tissue signal variation and thereby increase the detectability of exogenous imaging agents. Currently, CEDE breast imaging is performed with iodinated contrast agents. These compounds are limited by several deficiencies, including rapid clearance and poor tumor targeting ability. The purpose of this work is to identify novel contrast materials whose contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) is comparable or superior to that of iodine in the mammographic energy range. A monoenergetic DE subtraction framework was developed to calculate the DE signal intensity resulting from the logarithmic subtraction of the low- and high-energy signal intensities. A weighting factor is calculated to remove the dependence of the DE signal on the glandularity of the breast tissue. Using the DE signal intensity and weighting factor, the CNR for materials with atomic numbers (Z) ranging from 1 to 79 are computed for energy pairs between 10 and 50 keV. A group of materials with atomic numbers ranging from 42 to 63 were identified to exhibit the highest levels of CNR in the mammographic energy range. Several of these materials have been formulated as nanoparticles for various applications but none, apart from iodine, have been investigated as CEDE breast imaging agents. Within this group of materials, the necessary dose fraction to the LE image decreases as the atomic number increases. By reducing the dose to the LE image, the DE subtraction technique will not provide an anatomical image of sufficient quality to accompany the contrast information. Therefore, materials with Z from 42 to 52 provide nearly optimal values of CNR with energy pairs and dose fractions that provide good anatomical images. This work is intended to inspire further research into new materials for optimized CEDE breast functional imaging.

  19. 3D surface imaging for guidance in breast cancer radiotherapy: organs at risk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alderliesten, Tanja; Betgen, Anja; van Vliet-Vroegindeweij, Corine; Remeijer, Peter

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the variability in heart position in deep-inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) radiotherapy for breast cancer when 3D surface imaging would be used for monitoring the depth of the breath hold during treatment. Materials and Methods: Ten patients who received DIBH radiotherapy after breast-conserving surgery (BCS) were included. Retrospectively, heart-based registrations were performed for cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) to planning CT and breast surface registrations were performed for a 3D surface (two different regions of interest [ROIs]), captured concurrently with CBCT, to planning CT. The resulting setup errors were compared with linear regression analysis and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was performed to investigate the prediction quality of 3D surface imaging for 3D heart displacement. Further, the residual setup errors (systematic [Σ] and random [σ]) of the heart were estimated relative to the surface registrations. Results: When surface imaging [ROIleft-side;ROIboth-sides] would be used for monitoring, the residual errors of the heart position are in left-right: Σ=[0.360.12], σ=[0.160.14] cranio-caudal: Σ=[0.540.54], σ=[0.280.31] and in anteriorposterior: Σ=[0.180.14], σ=[0.200.19] cm. Correlations between setup errors were: R2 = [0.23;0.73], [0.67;0.65], [0.65;0.73] in left-right, cranio-caudal, and anterior-posterior direction, respectively. ROC analysis resulted in an area under the ROC curve of [0.82;0.78]. Conclusion: The use of ROIboth-sides provided promising results. However, considerable variability in the heart position, particularly in CC direction, is observed when 3D surface imaging would be used for guidance in DIBH radiotherapy after BCS. Planning organ at risk volume margins should be used to take into account the heart-position variability.

  20. Chest x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    Chest radiography; Serial chest x-ray; X-ray - chest ... You stand in front of the x-ray machine. You will be told to hold your breath when the x-ray is taken. Two images are usually taken. You will ...

  1. Wavelet-based feature extraction applied to small-angle x-ray scattering patterns from breast tissue: a tool for differentiating between tissue types.

    PubMed

    Falzon, G; Pearson, S; Murison, R; Hall, C; Siu, K; Evans, A; Rogers, K; Lewis, R

    2006-05-21

    This paper reports on the application of wavelet decomposition to small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) patterns from human breast tissue produced by a synchrotron source. The pixel intensities of SAXS patterns of normal, benign and malignant tissue types were transformed into wavelet coefficients. Statistical analysis found significant differences between the wavelet coefficients describing the patterns produced by different tissue types. These differences were then correlated with position in the image and have been linked to the supra-molecular structural changes that occur in breast tissue in the presence of disease. Specifically, results indicate that there are significant differences between healthy and diseased tissues in the wavelet coefficients that describe the peaks produced by the axial d-spacing of collagen. These differences suggest that a useful classification tool could be based upon the spectral information within the axial peaks.

  2. [Metastasizing Leiomyoma of the Lung Detected on Chest X-ray after Surgery for Breast Cancer;Report of a Case].

    PubMed

    Kiyokawa, Hiroki; Omiya, Hideyasu; Takami, Koji; Sekimoto, Mitsugu; Mori, Kiyoshi

    2015-12-01

    A 60-year-old postmenopausal woman presented with a lung nodule, which was detected on a chest X-ray 2 years after surgery for breast cancer. Pulmonary metastasis from the breast cancer was suspected and surgical resection was performed. On histopathological examination, the lung nodule showed a smooth muscle cell tumor, and immunohistochemical staining was positive for estrogen and progesterone receptors. As a mass in the uterine was detected by computed tomography images before surgical resection, benign metastasizing leiomyoma of the lung was suspected. Subsequently, the patient underwent hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy. The pathological findings revealed that the mass in the uterine was atypical leiomyoma, which was consistent with the primary lesion of the lung metastasis. Atypical leiomyoma is classified as a benign tumor, but in this case, careful follow-up is required because of its clinical course and histological features. PMID:26759955

  3. X-ray microfluorescence as a tool to analyze elemental changes in femur head induced by chemotherapy drugs for the treatment of breast cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pickler, A.; Mota, C. L.; Mantuano, A.; Salata, C.; Nogueira, L. P.; Almeida, A. P.; Alessio, R.; Sena, G.; Braz, D.; de Almeida, C. E. V.; Barroso, R. C.

    2015-11-01

    Recently some developments in a large number of investigative techniques have been made with the objective to obtain a micrometer spatial resolution imaging of elemental concentrations. The X-ray microfluorescence analysis (μXRF) is one of those techniques which is based on the localized excitation of a small area on the surface of sample, providing information of all elements contained in the material under study. Breast cancer is the most common malignancy in Brazilian women. The main treatment strategies for the breast cancer are surgery and chemotherapy. As bone loss is one of the possible chemotherapy side effects, in this work was used μXRF technique on femoral head samples of female Wistar rats to evaluate Ca, Fe and Zn concentrations in order to investigate possible elemental changes in bone caused by the chemotherapy. Fifteen female rats were divided randomly in groups (five rats each). G1 group received doses of doxorubicin/cyclophosphamide drugs and G2 group was treated with docetaxel/cyclophosphamide drugs. μXRF measurements were carried out at the X-ray XRF beamline in the Brazilian Synchrotron Light Laboratory. The results showed significant decrease especially in Ca concentrations when comparing the treated groups with the control group.

  4. Volumetric x-ray coherent scatter imaging of cancer in resected breast tissue: a Monte Carlo study using virtual anthropomorphic phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakshmanan, Manu N.; Harrawood, Brian P.; Samei, Ehsan; Kapadia, Anuj J.

    2015-08-01

    Breast cancer patients undergoing surgery often choose to have a breast conserving surgery (BCS) instead of mastectomy for removal of only the breast tumor. If post-surgical analysis such as histological assessment of the resected tumor reveals insufficient healthy tissue margins around the cancerous tumor, the patient must undergo another surgery to remove the missed tumor tissue. Such re-excisions are reported to occur in 20%-70% of BCS patients. A real-time surgical margin assessment technique that is fast and consistently accurate could greatly reduce the number of re-excisions performed in BCS. We describe here a tumor margin assessment method based on x-ray coherent scatter computed tomography (CSCT) imaging and demonstrate its utility in surgical margin assessment using Monte Carlo simulations. A CSCT system was simulated in Geant4 and used to simulate two virtual anthropomorphic CSCT scans of phantoms resembling surgically resected tissue. The resulting images were volume-rendered and found to distinguish cancerous tumors embedded in complex distributions of adipose and fibroglandular breast tissue (as is expected in the breast). The images exhibited sufficient spatial and spectral (i.e. momentum transfer) resolution to classify the tissue in any given voxel as healthy or cancerous. ROC analysis of the classification accuracy revealed an area under the curve of up to 0.97. These results indicate that coherent scatter imaging is promising as a possible fast and accurate surgical margin assessment technique.

  5. Volumetric x-ray coherent scatter imaging of cancer in resected breast tissue: a Monte Carlo study using virtual anthropomorphic phantoms.

    PubMed

    Lakshmanan, Manu N; Harrawood, Brian P; Samei, Ehsan; Kapadia, Anuj J

    2015-08-21

    Breast cancer patients undergoing surgery often choose to have a breast conserving surgery (BCS) instead of mastectomy for removal of only the breast tumor. If post-surgical analysis such as histological assessment of the resected tumor reveals insufficient healthy tissue margins around the cancerous tumor, the patient must undergo another surgery to remove the missed tumor tissue. Such re-excisions are reported to occur in 20%-70% of BCS patients. A real-time surgical margin assessment technique that is fast and consistently accurate could greatly reduce the number of re-excisions performed in BCS. We describe here a tumor margin assessment method based on x-ray coherent scatter computed tomography (CSCT) imaging and demonstrate its utility in surgical margin assessment using Monte Carlo simulations. A CSCT system was simulated in GEANT4 and used to simulate two virtual anthropomorphic CSCT scans of phantoms resembling surgically resected tissue. The resulting images were volume-rendered and found to distinguish cancerous tumors embedded in complex distributions of adipose and fibroglandular breast tissue (as is expected in the breast). The images exhibited sufficient spatial and spectral (i.e. momentum transfer) resolution to classify the tissue in any given voxel as healthy or cancerous. ROC analysis of the classification accuracy revealed an area under the curve of up to 0.97. These results indicate that coherent scatter imaging is promising as a possible fast and accurate surgical margin assessment technique. PMID:26237265

  6. Stereotactic vacuum-assisted biopsies on a digital breast 3D-tomosynthesis system.

    PubMed

    Viala, Juliette; Gignier, Pierre; Perret, Baudouin; Hovasse, Claudie; Hovasse, Denis; Chancelier-Galan, Marie-Dominique; Bornet, Gregoire; Hamrouni, Adel; Lasry, Jean-Louis; Convard, Jean-Paul

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe our operating process and to report results of 118 stereotactic vacuum-assisted biopsies performed on a digital breast 3D-tomosynthesis system. From October 2009 to December 2010, 118 stereotactic vacuum assisted biopsies have been performed on a digital breast 3D-tomosynthesis system. Informed consent was obtained for all patients. A total of 106 patients had a lesion, six had two lesions. Sixty-one lesions were clusters of micro-calcifications, 54 were masses and three were architectural distortions. Patients were in lateral decubitus position to allow shortest skin-target approach (or sitting). Specific compression paddle, adapted on the system, performed, and graduated, allowing localization in X-Y. Tomosynthesis views define the depth of lesion. Graduated Coaxial localization kit determines the beginning of the biopsy window. Biopsies were performed with an ATEC-Suros, 9 Gauge handpiece. All biopsies, except one, have reached the lesions. Five hemorrhages were incurred in the process, but no interruption was needed. Eight breast hematomas, were all spontaneously resolved. One was an infection. About 40% of patients had a skin ecchymosis. Processing is fast, easy, and requires lower irradiation dose than with classical stereotactic biopsies. Histology analysis reported 45 benign clusters of micro-calcifications, 16 malignant clusters of micro-calcifications, 24 benign masses, and 33 malignant masses. Of 13 malignant lesions, digital 2D-mammography failed to detect eight lesions and underestimated the classification of five lesions. Digital breast 3D-tomosynthesis depicts malignant lesions not visualized on digital 2D-mammography. Development of tomosynthesis biopsy unit integrated to stereotactic system will permit histology analysis for suspicious lesions.

  7. A comparative analysis of 2D and 3D CAD for calcifications in digital breast tomosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acciavatti, Raymond J.; Ray, Shonket; Keller, Brad M.; Maidment, Andrew D. A.; Conant, Emily F.

    2015-03-01

    Many medical centers offer digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) and 2D digital mammography acquired under the same compression (i.e., "Combo" examination) for screening. This paper compares a conventional 2D CAD algorithm (Hologic® ImageChecker® CAD v9.4) for calcification detection against a prototype 3D algorithm (Hologic® ImageChecker® 3D Calc CAD v1.0). Due to the newness of DBT, the development of this 3D CAD algorithm is ongoing, and it is currently not FDA-approved in the United States. For this study, DBT screening cases with suspicious calcifications were identified retrospectively at the University of Pennsylvania. An expert radiologist (E.F.C.) reviewed images with both 2D and DBT CAD marks, and compared the marks to biopsy results. Control cases with one-year negative follow-up were also studied; these cases either possess clearly benign calcifications or lacked calcifications. To allow the user to alter the sensitivity for cancer detection, an operating point is assigned to each CAD mark. As expected from conventional 2D CAD, increasing the operating point in 3D CAD increases sensitivity and reduces specificity. Additionally, we showed that some cancers are occult to 2D CAD at all operating points. By contrast, 3D CAD allows for detection of some cancers that are missed on 2D CAD. We also demonstrated that some non-cancerous CAD marks in 3D are not present at analogous locations in the 2D image. Hence, there are additional marks when using both 2D and 3D CAD in combination, leading to lower specificity than with conventional 2D CAD alone.

  8. Note: Design and construction of a multi-scale, high-resolution, tube-generated X-Ray computed-tomography system for three-dimensional (3D) imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Mertens, J. C. E.; Williams, J. J.; Chawla, Nikhilesh

    2014-01-15

    The design and construction of a high resolution modular x-ray computed tomography (XCT) system is described. The approach for meeting a specified set of performance goals tailored toward experimental versatility is highlighted. The instrument is unique in its detector and x-ray source configuration, both of which enable elevated optimization of spatial and temporal resolution. The process for component selection is provided. The selected components are specified, the custom component design discussed, and the integration of both into a fully functional XCT instrument is outlined. The novelty of this design is a new lab-scale detector and imaging optimization through x-ray source and detector modularity.

  9. Thoracic spine x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    Vertebral radiography; X-ray - spine; Thoracic x-ray; Spine x-ray; Thoracic spine films; Back films ... care provider's office. You will lie on the x-ray table in different positions. If the x-ray ...

  10. SU-E-T-393: Investigation of Hot Spots in Tomotherapy 3D Conformal Breast Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Q; Siebers, J; Khandelwal, S

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to determine the root-cause of hotspots inherent to Tomotherapy static beam 3D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) for breast treatment. ASTRO (ref here) recommends that IMRT be avoided for breast treatments. Despite Tomotherapy's inherent IMRT-like optimization and delivery, our experience at a Tomotherapy-only site has been that Tomotherapy 3DCRT fail to produce a clinically acceptable plan for 79% of our breast patients. Hot-spots have been one of the major obstacles. Methods: Eight lumpectomy patients were planned according to RTOG-1005 specification. Two or four tangential beams were used for 3DCRT breast planning. To spare the contralateral breast and ipsilateral lung, part of the PTV was not covered by the primary beam, yielding adjacent hot-spots. We hypothesize that the planning system creates hotspots adjacent to the cold spots to yield scatter radiation dose compensation in the blocked region. Various phantom and patient setup were used to test the hypothesis. Results: Hot spots outside of PTV in the range of 135% - 174% were observed for patient plan. It is confirmed that the PTV partial block causes the adjacent hot spot. The root cause is the optimizer quadratic objective function over- weighs improving the cold spot. The IMRT flexibility offered by Tomotherapy is counter-productive in static-beam 3DCRT breast treatment. For phantom case, as the Modulation-Factor increases from 1.1 to 5, the hot spot increases from 110% to 300%. Limiting the 3DCRT intensity modulation is shown to produce clinically acceptable plan. Conclusion: Most of the hot spots in Tomotherapy 3DCRT breast plan originate from the planning-system optimizer attempting to cover PTV cold spots rather than from the beam energy. Altering the objective function could improve clinical acceptability of static beam Tomotherapy 3DCRT.

  11. Design and evaluation of a laboratory prototype system for 3D photoacoustic full breast tomography.

    PubMed

    Xia, Wenfeng; Piras, Daniele; Singh, Mithun K A; van Hespen, Johan C G; van Leeuwen, Ton G; Steenbergen, Wiendelt; Manohar, Srirang

    2013-01-01

    Photoacoustic imaging can visualize vascularization-driven optical absorption contrast with great potential for breast cancer detection and diagnosis. State-of-the-art photoacoustic breast imaging systems are promising but are limited either by only a 2D imaging capability or by an insufficient imaging field-of-view (FOV). We present a laboratory prototype system designed for 3D photoacoustic full breast tomography, and comprehensively characterize it and evaluate its performance in imaging phantoms. The heart of the system is an ultrasound detector array specifically developed for breast imaging and optimized for high sensitivity. Each detector element has an acoustic lens to enlarge the acceptance angle of the large surface area detector elements to ensure a wide system FOV. We characterized the ultrasound detector array performance in terms of frequency response, directional sensitivity, minimum detectable pressure and inter-element electrical and mechanical cross-talk. Further we evaluated the system performance of the laboratory prototype imager using well-defined breast mimicking phantoms. The system possesses a 2 mm XY plane resolution and a 6 mm vertical resolution. A vasculature mimicking object was successfully visualized down to a depth of 40 mm in the breast phantom. Further, tumor mimicking spherical objects with 5 and 10 mm diameter at 20 mm and 40 mm depths are recovered, indicating high system sensitivity. The system has a 170 × 170 × 170 mm(3) FOV, which is well suited for full breast imaging. Various recommendations are provided for performance improvement and to guide this laboratory prototype to a clinical version in future.

  12. Design and evaluation of a laboratory prototype system for 3D photoacoustic full breast tomography

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Wenfeng; Piras, Daniele; Singh, Mithun K. A.; van Hespen, Johan C. G.; van Leeuwen, Ton G.; Steenbergen, Wiendelt; Manohar, Srirang

    2013-01-01

    Photoacoustic imaging can visualize vascularization-driven optical absorption contrast with great potential for breast cancer detection and diagnosis. State-of-the-art photoacoustic breast imaging systems are promising but are limited either by only a 2D imaging capability or by an insufficient imaging field-of-view (FOV). We present a laboratory prototype system designed for 3D photoacoustic full breast tomography, and comprehensively characterize it and evaluate its performance in imaging phantoms. The heart of the system is an ultrasound detector array specifically developed for breast imaging and optimized for high sensitivity. Each detector element has an acoustic lens to enlarge the acceptance angle of the large surface area detector elements to ensure a wide system FOV. We characterized the ultrasound detector array performance in terms of frequency response, directional sensitivity, minimum detectable pressure and inter-element electrical and mechanical cross-talk. Further we evaluated the system performance of the laboratory prototype imager using well-defined breast mimicking phantoms. The system possesses a 2 mm XY plane resolution and a 6 mm vertical resolution. A vasculature mimicking object was successfully visualized down to a depth of 40 mm in the breast phantom. Further, tumor mimicking spherical objects with 5 and 10 mm diameter at 20 mm and 40 mm depths are recovered, indicating high system sensitivity. The system has a 170 × 170 × 170 mm3 FOV, which is well suited for full breast imaging. Various recommendations are provided for performance improvement and to guide this laboratory prototype to a clinical version in future. PMID:24298416

  13. Amorphous In–Ga–Zn–O thin-film transistor active pixel sensor x-ray imager for digital breast tomosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Chumin; Kanicki, Jerzy

    2014-09-15

    Purpose: The breast cancer detection rate for digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) is limited by the x-ray image quality. The limiting Nyquist frequency for current DBT systems is around 5 lp/mm, while the fine image details contained in the high spatial frequency region (>5 lp/mm) are lost. Also today the tomosynthesis patient dose is high (0.67–3.52 mGy). To address current issues, in this paper, for the first time, a high-resolution low-dose organic photodetector/amorphous In–Ga–Zn–O thin-film transistor (a-IGZO TFT) active pixel sensor (APS) x-ray imager is proposed for next generation DBT systems. Methods: The indirect x-ray detector is based on a combination of a novel low-cost organic photodiode (OPD) and a cesium iodide-based (CsI:Tl) scintillator. The proposed APS x-ray imager overcomes the difficulty of weak signal detection, when small pixel size and low exposure conditions are used, by an on-pixel signal amplification with a significant charge gain. The electrical performance of a-IGZO TFT APS pixel circuit is investigated by SPICE simulation using modified Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) TFT model. Finally, the noise, detective quantum efficiency (DQE), and resolvability of the complete system are modeled using the cascaded system formalism. Results: The result demonstrates that a large charge gain of 31–122 is achieved for the proposed high-mobility (5–20 cm{sup 2}/V s) amorphous metal-oxide TFT APS. The charge gain is sufficient to eliminate the TFT thermal noise, flicker noise as well as the external readout circuit noise. Moreover, the low TFT (<10{sup −13} A) and OPD (<10{sup −8} A/cm{sup 2}) leakage currents can further reduce the APS noise. Cascaded system analysis shows that the proposed APS imager with a 75 μm pixel pitch can effectively resolve the Nyquist frequency of 6.67 lp/mm, which can be further improved to ∼10 lp/mm if the pixel pitch is reduced to 50 μm. Moreover, the

  14. Computer-aided detection of clustered microcalcifications in digital breast tomosynthesis: A 3D approach

    PubMed Central

    Sahiner, Berkman; Chan, Heang-Ping; Hadjiiski, Lubomir M.; Helvie, Mark A.; Wei, Jun; Zhou, Chuan; Lu, Yao

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To design a computer-aided detection (CADe) system for clustered microcalcifications in reconstructed digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) volumes and to perform a preliminary evaluation of the CADe system. Methods: IRB approval and informed consent were obtained in this study. A data set of two-view DBT of 72 breasts containing microcalcification clusters was collected from 72 subjects who were scheduled to undergo breast biopsy. Based on tissue sampling results, 17 cases had breast cancer and 55 were benign. A separate data set of two-view DBT of 38 breasts free of clustered microcalcifications from 38 subjects was collected to independently estimate the number of false-positives (FPs) generated by the CADe system. A radiologist experienced in breast imaging marked the biopsied cluster of microcalcifications with a 3D bounding box using all available clinical and imaging information. A CADe system was designed to detect microcalcification clusters in the reconstructed volume. The system consisted of prescreening, clustering, and false-positive reduction stages. In the prescreening stage, the conspicuity of microcalcification-like objects was increased by an enhancement-modulated 3D calcification response function. An iterative thresholding and 3D object growing method was used to detect cluster seed objects, which were used as potential centers of microcalcification clusters. In the cluster detection stage, microcalcification candidates were identified using a second iterative thresholding procedure, which was applied to the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) enhanced image voxels with a positive calcification response. Starting with each cluster seed object as the initial cluster center, a dynamic clustering algorithm formed a cluster candidate by including microcalcification candidates within a 3D neighborhood of the cluster seed object that satisfied the clustering criteria. The number, size, and SNR of the microcalcifications in a cluster candidate and the

  15. Automated 3D ultrasound elastography of the breast: a phantom validation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendriks, Gijs A. G. M.; Holländer, Branislav; Menssen, Jan; Milkowski, Andy; Hansen, Hendrik H. G.; de Korte, Chris L.

    2016-04-01

    In breast cancer screening, the automated breast volume scanner (ABVS) was introduced as an alternative for mammography since the latter technique is less suitable for women with dense breasts. Although clinical studies show promising results, clinicians report two disadvantages: long acquisition times (>90 s) introducing breathing artefacts, and high recall rates due to detection of many small lesions of uncertain malignant potential. Technical improvements for faster image acquisition and better discrimination between benign and malignant lesions are thus required. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate if 3D ultrasound elastography using plane-wave imaging is feasible. Strain images of a breast elastography phantom were acquired by an ABVS-mimicking device that allowed axial and elevational movement of the attached transducer. Pre- and post-deformation volumes were acquired with different constant speeds (between 1.25 and 40.0 mm s-1) and by three protocols: Go-Go (pre- and post-volumes with identical start and end positions), Go-Return (similar to Go-Go with opposite scanning directions) and Control (pre- and post-volumes acquired per position, this protocol can be seen as reference). Afterwards, 2D and 3D cross-correlation and strain algorithms were applied to the acquired volumes and the results were compared. The Go-Go protocol was shown to be superior with better strain image quality (CNRe and SNRe) than Go-Return and to be similar as Control. This can be attributed to applying opposite mechanical forces to the phantom during the Go-Return protocol, leading to out-of-plane motion. This motion was partly compensated by using 3D cross-correlation. However, the quality was still inferior to Go-Go. Since these results were obtained in a phantom study with controlled deformations, the effect of possible uncontrolled in vivo tissue motion artefacts has to be addressed in future studies. In conclusion, it seems feasible to implement 3D ultrasound

  16. Automated 3D ultrasound elastography of the breast: a phantom validation study.

    PubMed

    Hendriks, Gijs A G M; Holländer, Branislav; Menssen, Jan; Milkowski, Andy; Hansen, Hendrik H G; de Korte, Chris L

    2016-04-01

    In breast cancer screening, the automated breast volume scanner (ABVS) was introduced as an alternative for mammography since the latter technique is less suitable for women with dense breasts. Although clinical studies show promising results, clinicians report two disadvantages: long acquisition times (>90 s) introducing breathing artefacts, and high recall rates due to detection of many small lesions of uncertain malignant potential. Technical improvements for faster image acquisition and better discrimination between benign and malignant lesions are thus required. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate if 3D ultrasound elastography using plane-wave imaging is feasible. Strain images of a breast elastography phantom were acquired by an ABVS-mimicking device that allowed axial and elevational movement of the attached transducer. Pre- and post-deformation volumes were acquired with different constant speeds (between 1.25 and 40.0 mm s(-1)) and by three protocols: Go-Go (pre- and post-volumes with identical start and end positions), Go-Return (similar to Go-Go with opposite scanning directions) and Control (pre- and post-volumes acquired per position, this protocol can be seen as reference). Afterwards, 2D and 3D cross-correlation and strain algorithms were applied to the acquired volumes and the results were compared. The Go-Go protocol was shown to be superior with better strain image quality (CNRe and SNRe) than Go-Return and to be similar as Control. This can be attributed to applying opposite mechanical forces to the phantom during the Go-Return protocol, leading to out-of-plane motion. This motion was partly compensated by using 3D cross-correlation. However, the quality was still inferior to Go-Go. Since these results were obtained in a phantom study with controlled deformations, the effect of possible uncontrolled in vivo tissue motion artefacts has to be addressed in future studies. In conclusion, it seems feasible to implement 3D

  17. Dental x-rays

    MedlinePlus

    X-ray - teeth; Radiograph - dental; Bitewings; Periapical film; Panoramic film; Digital image ... dentist's office. There are many types of dental x-rays. Some of them are: Bitewing. Shows the crown ...

  18. X-ray (image)

    MedlinePlus

    X-rays are a form of ionizing radiation that can penetrate the body to form an image on ... will be shades of gray depending on density. X-rays can provide information about obstructions, tumors, and other ...

  19. X-Ray Lasers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapline, George; Wood, Lowell

    1975-01-01

    Outlines the prospects of generating coherent x rays using high-power lasers and indentifies problem areas in their development. Indicates possible applications for coherent x rays in the fields of chemistry, biology, and crystallography. (GS)

  20. X Ray Topography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balchin, A. A.

    1974-01-01

    Discusses some aspects in X-ray topography, including formation of dislocations, characteristics of stacking faults, x-ray contrast in defect inspection, Berg-Barrett technique, and Lang traversing crystal and Borrmann's methods. (CC)

  1. The simulation of 3D mass models in 2D digital mammography and breast tomosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Shaheen, Eman De Keyzer, Frederik; Bosmans, Hilde; Ongeval, Chantal Van; Dance, David R.; Young, Kenneth C.

    2014-08-15

    Purpose: This work proposes a new method of building 3D breast mass models with different morphological shapes and describes the validation of the realism of their appearance after simulation into 2D digital mammograms and breast tomosynthesis images. Methods: Twenty-five contrast enhanced MRI breast lesions were collected and each mass was manually segmented in the three orthogonal views: sagittal, coronal, and transversal. The segmented models were combined, resampled to have isotropic voxel sizes, triangularly meshed, and scaled to different sizes. These masses were referred to as nonspiculated masses and were then used as nuclei onto which spicules were grown with an iterative branching algorithm forming a total of 30 spiculated masses. These 55 mass models were projected into 2D projection images to obtain mammograms after image processing and into tomographic sequences of projection images, which were then reconstructed to form 3D tomosynthesis datasets. The realism of the appearance of these mass models was assessed by five radiologists via receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis when compared to 54 real masses. All lesions were also given a breast imaging reporting and data system (BIRADS) score. The data sets of 2D mammography and tomosynthesis were read separately. The Kendall's coefficient of concordance was used for the interrater observer agreement assessment for the BIRADS scores per modality. Further paired analysis, using the Wilcoxon signed rank test, of the BIRADS assessment between 2D and tomosynthesis was separately performed for the real masses and for the simulated masses. Results: The area under the ROC curves, averaged over all observers, was 0.54 (95% confidence interval [0.50, 0.66]) for the 2D study, and 0.67 (95% confidence interval [0.55, 0.79]) for the tomosynthesis study. According to the BIRADS scores, the nonspiculated and the spiculated masses varied in their degrees of malignancy from normal (BIRADS 1) to highly

  2. X-Ray Imaging

    MedlinePlus

    ... Brain Surgery Imaging Clinical Trials Basics Patient Information X-Ray Imaging Print This Page X-ray imaging is perhaps the most familiar type of imaging. Images produced by X-rays are due to the different absorption rates of ...

  3. X-Rays

    MedlinePlus

    X-rays are a type of radiation called electromagnetic waves. X-ray imaging creates pictures of the inside of your ... different amounts of radiation. Calcium in bones absorbs x-rays the most, so bones look white. Fat and ...

  4. Hand x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    X-ray - hand ... A hand x-ray is taken in a hospital radiology department or your health care provider's office by an ... technician. You will be asked to place your hand on the x-ray table, and keep it ...

  5. Panoramic Dental X-Ray

    MedlinePlus

    ... X-ray? What is Panoramic X-ray? Panoramic radiography , also called panoramic x-ray , is a two- ... Exams Dental Cone Beam CT X-ray, Interventional Radiology and Nuclear Medicine Radiation Safety About this Site ...

  6. The differentiation of malignant and benign human breast tissue at surgical margins and biopsy using x-ray interaction data and Bayesian classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mersov, A.; Mersov, G.; Al-Ebraheem, A.; Cornacchi, S.; Gohla, G.; Lovrics, P.; Farquharson, M. J.

    2014-02-01

    Worldwide, about 1.3 million women are diagnosed with breast cancer annually with an estimated 465,000 deaths. Accordingly, there is a need for high accuracy and speed in diagnosis of lesions suspected of being cancerous. This study assesses the interaction data collected from low energy x-rays within breast tissue samples. Trace element concentrations are assessed using x-ray fluorescence, as well as electron density, and molecular structure which are examined using incoherent and coherent scatter, respectively. Our work to date has shown that such data can provide a quantitative measure of certain tissue characterising parameters and hence, through appropriate modelling, could be used to classify samples for uses such as surgical margin detection and biopsy examination. The parameters used in this study for comparing the normal and tumour tissue sample populations are: levels of elements Ca, Cu, Fe, Br, Zn, Rb, K; the area, FWHM and amplitude from peaks fitted to the coherent scatter profile that are associated with fat, fibre and water content; the ratio of the Compton and coherent scatter peak area, FWHM and amplitude from the incoherent scatter profile. The novelty of the approach to this work lies in the fact that the classification process does not rely on one source of data but combines several measurements, the data from which in this application are modelled using a method based on Bayesian classification. The reliability of the classifications was assessed by its application to diagnostically known data that was not itself included in the thresholds determination. The results of the classification of over 70 breast tissue samples will be presented in this study. Bayesian modelling was carried out using selected significant parameters for classification resulting in 71% of normal tissue samples (n=35) and 66% of tumour tissue samples (n=35) being correctly classified when using all the samples. Bayesian classification using the same variables on all

  7. Detection of Post-Therapeutic Effects in Breast Carcinoma Using Hard X-Ray Index of Refraction Computed Tomography – A Feasibility Study

    PubMed Central

    Mittone, Alberto; Gasilov, Sergey; Brun, Emmanuel; Bravin, Alberto; Mayr, Doris; Auweter, Sigrid D.; Hellerhoff, Karin; Reiser, Maximilian; Coan, Paola

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Neoadjuvant chemotherapy is the state-of-the-art treatment in advanced breast cancer. A correct visualization of the post-therapeutic tumor size is of high prognostic relevance. X-ray phase-contrast computed tomography (PC-CT) has been shown to provide improved soft-tissue contrast at a resolution formerly restricted to histopathology, at low doses. This study aimed at assessing ex-vivo the potential use of PC-CT for visualizing the effects of neoadjuvant chemotherapy on breast carcinoma. Materials and Methods The analysis was performed on two ex-vivo formalin-fixed mastectomy samples containing an invasive carcinoma removed from two patients treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Images were matched with corresponding histological slices. The visibility of typical post-therapeutic tissue changes was assessed and compared to results obtained with conventional clinical imaging modalities. Results PC-CT depicted the different tissue types with an excellent correlation to histopathology. Post-therapeutic tissue changes were correctly visualized and the residual tumor mass could be detected. PC-CT outperformed clinical imaging modalities in the detection of chemotherapy-induced tissue alterations including post-therapeutic tumor size. Conclusions PC-CT might become a unique diagnostic tool in the prediction of tumor response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy. PC-CT might be used to assist during histopathological diagnosis, offering a high-resolution and high-contrast virtual histological tool for the accurate delineation of tumor boundaries. PMID:27362638

  8. Development and Implementation of a Web-Enabled 3D Consultation Tool for Breast Augmentation Surgery Based on 3D-Image Reconstruction of 2D Pictures

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Jaime; Olariu, Radu; Dindoyal, Irving; Le Huu, Serge

    2012-01-01

    Background Producing a rich, personalized Web-based consultation tool for plastic surgeons and patients is challenging. Objective (1) To develop a computer tool that allows individual reconstruction and simulation of 3-dimensional (3D) soft tissue from ordinary digital photos of breasts, (2) to implement a Web-based, worldwide-accessible preoperative surgical planning platform for plastic surgeons, and (3) to validate this tool through a quality control analysis by comparing 3D laser scans of the patients with the 3D reconstructions with this tool from original 2-dimensional (2D) pictures of the same patients. Methods The proposed system uses well-established 2D digital photos for reconstruction into a 3D torso, which is then available to the user for interactive planning. The simulation is performed on dedicated servers, accessible via Internet. It allows the surgeon, together with the patient, to previsualize the impact of the proposed breast augmentation directly during the consultation before a surgery is decided upon. We retrospectively conduced a quality control assessment of available anonymized pre- and postoperative 2D digital photographs of patients undergoing breast augmentation procedures. The method presented above was used to reconstruct 3D pictures from 2D digital pictures. We used a laser scanner capable of generating a highly accurate surface model of the patient’s anatomy to acquire ground truth data. The quality of the computed 3D reconstructions was compared with the ground truth data used to perform both qualitative and quantitative evaluations. Results We evaluated the system on 11 clinical cases for surface reconstructions and 4 clinical cases of postoperative simulations, using laser surface scan technologies showing a mean reconstruction error between 2 and 4 mm and a maximum outlier error of 16 mm. Qualitative and quantitative analyses from plastic surgeons demonstrate the potential of these new emerging technologies. Conclusions We

  9. X-ray binaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Satellite X-ray experiments and ground-based programs aimed at observation of X-ray binaries are discussed. Experiments aboard OAO-3, OSO-8, Ariel 5, Uhuru, and Skylab are included along with rocket and ground-based observations. Major topics covered are: Her X-1, Cyg X-3, Cen X-3, Cyg X-1, the transient source A0620-00, other possible X-ray binaries, and plans and prospects for future observational programs.

  10. Biofield potential simulation as a novel adjunt modality for continuous monitoring of breast lesions: a 3D numerical model.

    PubMed

    Ng, E Y K; Ng, W K; Acharya, U Rajendra

    2008-01-01

    Breast cancer is a disease characterized by the uncontrolled growth of abnormal cells. Early detection of this disease is the most effective way to reduce mortality. Although several new technologies show promise for improved capability of diagnosis, none have yet proved superior to traditional, X-ray film mammography in screening for breast cancer. More evaluation and development of new imaging tools and of promising skin surface electrical potential techniques is required and warranted. In the present study, we propose a theoretical three-dimensional, simplified and realistic model of the female breast to distinguish the surface biopotential in different types of breast abnormalities. We developed an inhomogeneous female breast model, closer to the actual, by considering the breast as a hemisphere with various layers of unequal thickness in supine condition. In order to determine the potential distribution developed, isotropic homogeneous conductivity was assigned to each of these compartments and the volume conductor problem was solved using finite element method. Richardson extrapolation for grid invariance test was used to ensure the results are of reliable accuracy. The simulation results show that the surface potentials are sensitive to the presence of tumour, location and placement of the electrodes.

  11. A study of the effect of formalin preservation on normal and cancerous breast tissues using small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Changizi, V.; Wilkinson, S.; Hall, C. J.; Grossmann, G.

    2006-09-01

    Small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) has the ability to provide information on a molecular and supra-molecular scale from biological tissue specimens. It has been postulated that this information will be useful in providing histopathological diagnoses for certain diseases of the breast. In this category, we include cancer, a major health problem for a number of populations around the world. So far studies in our group have been made using flash-frozen tissue samples. This limits the range and ease of use of the technique. If we were able to obtain the same information from preserved tissues then a more extensive use of SAXS diagnosis would be possible. Here we report on the first investigations into this possibility. In the research reported in this paper, 84 human breast biopsies including cancer and normal tissues were obtained from human patients. Small angle scatter data were collected at station 2.1 of the SRS at the Daresbury Laboratory, UK using a beam size of 0.25 mm 2 at the sample and a wavelength of 1.54 Å. The sample to detector distance was 2000 mm. The results verify that there is a quantifiable difference between the scatter curves from flash-frozen cancer and normal breast tissue in the range of scatter vector Q between 0.4 and 0.7 nm -1. After preserving the tissues in formalin, the difference between the normal and cancerous tissues is less marked. The preservation of the tissue in formalin can essentially mask the effects that disease would have on the tissue supra-molecular structure rendering the preserved specimens of less useful for this histopathology technique.

  12. X-ray source for mammography

    DOEpatents

    Logan, C.M.

    1994-12-20

    An x-ray source is described utilizing anode material which shifts the output spectrum to higher energy and thereby obtains higher penetrating ability for screening mammography application, than the currently utilized anode material. The currently used anode material (molybdenum) produces an energy x-ray spectrum of 17.5/19.6 keV, which using the anode material of this invention (e.g. silver, rhodium, and tungsten) the x-ray spectrum would be in the 20-35 keV region. Thus, the anode material of this invention provides for imaging of breasts with higher than average x-ray opacity without increase of the radiation dose, and thus reduces the risk of induced breast cancer due to the radiation dose administered for mammograms. 6 figures.

  13. X-ray source for mammography

    DOEpatents

    Logan, Clinton M.

    1994-01-01

    An x-ray source utilizing anode material which shifts the output spectrum to higher energy and thereby obtains higher penetrating ability for screening mammography application, than the currently utilized anode material. The currently used anode material (molybdenum) produces an energy x-ray spectrum of 17.5/19.6 keV, which using the anode material of this invention (e.g. silver, rhodium, and tungsten) the x-ray spectrum would be in the 20-35 keV region. Thus, the anode material of this invention provides for imaging of breasts with higher than average x-ray opacity without increase of the radiation dose, and thus reduces the risk of induced breast cancer due to the radiation dose administered for mammograms.

  14. The systematic and random errors determination using realtime 3D surface tracking system in breast cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanphet, J.; Suriyapee, S.; Dumrongkijudom, N.; Sanghangthum, T.; Kumkhwao, J.; Wisetrintong, M.

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this study to determine the patient setup uncertainties in deep inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) radiation therapy for left breast cancer patients using real-time 3D surface tracking system. The six breast cancer patients treated by 6 MV photon beams from TrueBeam linear accelerator were selected. The patient setup errors and motion during treatment were observed and calculated for interfraction and intrafraction motions. The systematic and random errors were calculated in vertical, longitudinal and lateral directions. From 180 images tracking before and during treatment, the maximum systematic error of interfraction and intrafraction motions were 0.56 mm and 0.23 mm, the maximum random error of interfraction and intrafraction motions were 1.18 mm and 0.53 mm, respectively. The interfraction was more pronounce than the intrafraction, while the systematic error was less impact than random error. In conclusion the intrafraction motion error from patient setup uncertainty is about half of interfraction motion error, which is less impact due to the stability in organ movement from DIBH. The systematic reproducibility is also half of random error because of the high efficiency of modern linac machine that can reduce the systematic uncertainty effectively, while the random errors is uncontrollable.

  15. Automated linking of suspicious findings between automated 3D breast ultrasound volumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gubern-Mérida, Albert; Tan, Tao; van Zelst, Jan; Mann, Ritse M.; Karssemeijer, Nico

    2016-03-01

    Automated breast ultrasound (ABUS) is a 3D imaging technique which is rapidly emerging as a safe and relatively inexpensive modality for screening of women with dense breasts. However, reading ABUS examinations is very time consuming task since radiologists need to manually identify suspicious findings in all the different ABUS volumes available for each patient. Image analysis techniques to automatically link findings across volumes are required to speed up clinical workflow and make ABUS screening more efficient. In this study, we propose an automated system to, given the location in the ABUS volume being inspected (source), find the corresponding location in a target volume. The target volume can be a different view of the same study or the same view from a prior examination. The algorithm was evaluated using 118 linkages between suspicious abnormalities annotated in a dataset of ABUS images of 27 patients participating in a high risk screening program. The distance between the predicted location and the center of the annotated lesion in the target volume was computed for evaluation. The mean ± stdev and median distance error achieved by the presented algorithm for linkages between volumes of the same study was 7.75±6.71 mm and 5.16 mm, respectively. The performance was 9.54±7.87 and 8.00 mm (mean ± stdev and median) for linkages between volumes from current and prior examinations. The proposed approach has the potential to minimize user interaction for finding correspondences among ABUS volumes.

  16. Adaptive enhancement and visualization techniques for 3D THz images of breast cancer tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yuhao; Bowman, Tyler; Gauch, John; El-Shenawee, Magda

    2016-03-01

    This paper evaluates image enhancement and visualization techniques for pulsed terahertz (THz) images of tissue samples. Specifically, our research objective is to effectively differentiate between heterogeneous regions of breast tissues that contain tumors diagnosed as triple negative infiltrating ductal carcinoma (IDC). Tissue slices and blocks of varying thicknesses were prepared and scanned using our lab's THz pulsed imaging system. One of the challenges we have encountered in visualizing the obtained images and differentiating between healthy and cancerous regions of the tissues is that most THz images have a low level of details and narrow contrast, making it difficult to accurately identify and visualize the margins around the IDC. To overcome this problem, we have applied and evaluated a number of image processing techniques to the scanned 3D THz images. In particular, we employed various spatial filtering and intensity transformation techniques to emphasize the small details in the images and adjust the image contrast. For each of these methods, we investigated how varying filter sizes and parameters affect the amount of enhancement applied to the images. Our experimentation shows that several image processing techniques are effective in producing THz images of breast tissue samples that contain distinguishable details, making further segmentation of the different image regions promising.

  17. X-ray beamsplitter

    DOEpatents

    Ceglio, N.M.; Stearns, D.G.; Hawryluk, A.M.; Barbee, T.W. Jr.

    1987-08-07

    An x-ray beamsplitter which splits an x-ray beam into two coherent parts by reflecting and transmitting some fraction of an incident beam has applications for x-ray interferometry, x-ray holography, x-ray beam manipulation, and x-ray laser cavity output couplers. The beamsplitter is formed of a wavelength selective multilayer thin film supported by a very thin x-ray transparent membrane. The beamsplitter resonantly transmits and reflects x-rays through thin film interference effects. A thin film is formed of 5--50 pairs of alternate Mo/Si layers with a period of 20--250 A. The support membrane is 10--200 nm of silicon nitride or boron nitride. The multilayer/support membrane structure is formed across a window in a substrate by first forming the structure on a solid substrate and then forming a window in the substrate to leave a free-standing structure over the window. 6 figs.

  18. X-ray beamsplitter

    DOEpatents

    Ceglio, Natale M.; Stearns, Daniel S.; Hawryluk, Andrew M.; Barbee, Jr., Troy W.

    1989-01-01

    An x-ray beamsplitter which splits an x-ray beam into two coherent parts by reflecting and transmitting some fraction of an incident beam has applications for x-ray interferometry, x-ray holography, x-ray beam manipulation, and x-ray laser cavity output couplers. The beamsplitter is formed of a wavelength selective multilayer thin film supported by a very thin x-ray transparent membrane. The beamsplitter resonantly transmits and reflects x-rays through thin film interference effects. A thin film is formed of 5-50 pairs of alternate Mo/Si layers with a period of 20-250 A. The support membrane is 10-200 nm of silicon nitride or boron nitride. The multilayer/support membrane structure is formed across a window in a substrate by first forming the structure on a solid substrate and then forming a window in the substrate to leave a free-standing structure over the window.

  19. X-ray Spectrometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Markowicz, Andrzej A.; Van Grieken, Rene E.

    1984-01-01

    Provided is a selective literature survey of X-ray spectrometry from late 1981 to late 1983. Literature examined focuses on: excitation (photon and electron excitation and particle-induced X-ray emission; detection (wavelength-dispersive and energy-dispersive spectrometry); instrumentation and techniques; and on such quantitative analytical…

  20. X-ray

    MedlinePlus

    ... is very low. Most experts feel that the benefits of appropriate x-ray imaging greatly outweigh any risks. Young children and babies in the womb are more sensitive to the risks of x-rays. Tell your health care provider if you think you might be pregnant.

  1. X-ray generator

    DOEpatents

    Dawson, John M.

    1976-01-01

    Apparatus and method for producing coherent secondary x-rays that are controlled as to direction by illuminating a mixture of high z and low z gases with an intense burst of primary x-rays. The primary x-rays are produced with a laser activated plasma, and these x-rays strip off the electrons of the high z atoms in the lasing medium, while the low z atoms retain their electrons. The neutral atoms transfer electrons to highly excited states of the highly striped high z ions giving an inverted population which produces the desired coherent x-rays. In one embodiment, a laser, light beam provides a laser spark that produces the intense burst of coherent x-rays that illuminates the mixture of high z and low z gases, whereby the high z atoms are stripped while the low z ones are not, giving the desired mixture of highly ionized and neutral atoms. To this end, the laser spark is produced by injecting a laser light beam, or a plurality of beams, into a first gas in a cylindrical container having an adjacent second gas layer co-axial therewith, the laser producing a plasma and the intense primary x-rays in the first gas, and the second gas containing the high and low atomic number elements for receiving the primary x-rays, whereupon the secondary x-rays are produced therein by stripping desired ions in a neutral gas and transfer of electrons to highly excited states of the stripped ions from the unionized atoms. Means for magnetically confining and stabilizing the plasma are disclosed for controlling the direction of the x-rays.

  2. Skin-sparing Helical Tomotherapy vs 3D-conformal Radiotherapy for Adjuvant Breast Radiotherapy: In Vivo Skin Dosimetry Study

    SciTech Connect

    Capelle, Lisa; Warkentin, Heather; MacKenzie, Marc; Joseph, Kurian; Gabos, Zsolt; Pervez, Nadeem; Tankel, Keith; Chafe, Susan; Amanie, John; Ghosh, Sunita; Parliament, Matthew; Abdulkarim, Bassam

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: We investigated whether treatment-planning system (TPS)-calculated dose accurately reflects skin dose received for patients receiving adjuvant breast radiotherapy (RT) with standard three-dimensional conformal RT (3D-CRT) or skin-sparing helical tomotherapy (HT). Methods and Materials: Fifty patients enrolled in a randomized controlled trial investigating acute skin toxicity from adjuvant breast RT with 3D-CRT compared to skin-sparing HT, where a 5-mm strip of ipsilateral breast skin was spared. Thermoluminescent dosimetry or optically stimulated luminescence measurements were made in multiple locations and were compared to TPS-calculated doses. Skin dosimetric parameters and acute skin toxicity were recorded in these patients. Results: With HT there was a significant correlation between calculated and measured dose in the medial and lateral ipsilateral breast (r = 0.67, P<.001; r = 0.44, P=.03, respectively) and the medial and central contralateral breast (r = 0.73, P<.001; r = 0.88, P<.001, respectively). With 3D-CRT there was a significant correlation in the medial and lateral ipsilateral breast (r = 0.45, P=.03; r = 0.68, P<.001, respectively); the medial and central contralateral breast (r = 0.62, P=.001; r = 0.86, P<.001, respectively); and the mid neck (r = 0.42, P=.04, respectively). On average, HT-calculated dose overestimated the measured dose by 14%; 3D-CRT underestimated the dose by 0.4%. There was a borderline association between highest measured skin dose and moist desquamation (P=.05). Skin-sparing HT had greater skin homogeneity (homogeneity index of 1.39 vs 1.65, respectively; P=.005) than 3D-CRT plans. HT plans had a lower skin{sub V50} (1.4% vs 5.9%, respectively; P=.001) but higher skin{sub V40} and skin{sub V30} (71.7% vs 64.0%, P=.02; and 99.0% vs 93.8%, P=.001, respectively) than 3D-CRT plans. Conclusion: The 3D-CRT TPS more accurately reflected skin dose than the HT TPS, which tended to overestimate dose received by 14% in patients

  3. Prognostic breast cancer signature identified from 3D culture model accurately predicts clinical outcome across independent datasets

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Katherine J.; Patrick, Denis R.; Bissell, Mina J.; Fournier, Marcia V.

    2008-10-20

    One of the major tenets in breast cancer research is that early detection is vital for patient survival by increasing treatment options. To that end, we have previously used a novel unsupervised approach to identify a set of genes whose expression predicts prognosis of breast cancer patients. The predictive genes were selected in a well-defined three dimensional (3D) cell culture model of non-malignant human mammary epithelial cell morphogenesis as down-regulated during breast epithelial cell acinar formation and cell cycle arrest. Here we examine the ability of this gene signature (3D-signature) to predict prognosis in three independent breast cancer microarray datasets having 295, 286, and 118 samples, respectively. Our results show that the 3D-signature accurately predicts prognosis in three unrelated patient datasets. At 10 years, the probability of positive outcome was 52, 51, and 47 percent in the group with a poor-prognosis signature and 91, 75, and 71 percent in the group with a good-prognosis signature for the three datasets, respectively (Kaplan-Meier survival analysis, p<0.05). Hazard ratios for poor outcome were 5.5 (95% CI 3.0 to 12.2, p<0.0001), 2.4 (95% CI 1.6 to 3.6, p<0.0001) and 1.9 (95% CI 1.1 to 3.2, p = 0.016) and remained significant for the two larger datasets when corrected for estrogen receptor (ER) status. Hence the 3D-signature accurately predicts breast cancer outcome in both ER-positive and ER-negative tumors, though individual genes differed in their prognostic ability in the two subtypes. Genes that were prognostic in ER+ patients are AURKA, CEP55, RRM2, EPHA2, FGFBP1, and VRK1, while genes prognostic in ER patients include ACTB, FOXM1 and SERPINE2 (Kaplan-Meier p<0.05). Multivariable Cox regression analysis in the largest dataset showed that the 3D-signature was a strong independent factor in predicting breast cancer outcome. The 3D-signature accurately predicts breast cancer outcome across multiple datasets and holds prognostic

  4. Development of model observers applied to 3D breast tomosynthesis microcalcifications and masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz, Ivan; Timberg, Pontus; Zhang, Sheng; Abbey, Craig; Verdun, Francis; Bochud, François O.

    2011-03-01

    The development of model observers for mimicking human detection strategies has followed from symmetric signals in simple noise to increasingly complex backgrounds. In this study we implement different model observers for the complex task of detecting a signal in a 3D image stack. The backgrounds come from real breast tomosynthesis acquisitions and the signals were simulated and reconstructed within the volume. Two different tasks relevant to the early detection of breast cancer were considered: detecting an 8 mm mass and detecting a cluster of microcalcifications. The model observers were calculated using a channelized Hotelling observer (CHO) with dense difference-of-Gaussian channels, and a modified (Partial prewhitening [PPW]) observer which was adapted to realistic signals which are not circularly symmetric. The sustained temporal sensitivity function was used to filter the images before applying the spatial templates. For a frame rate of five frames per second, the only CHO that we calculated performed worse than the humans in a 4-AFC experiment. The other observers were variations of PPW and outperformed human observers in every single case. This initial frame rate was a rather low speed and the temporal filtering did not affect the results compared to a data set with no human temporal effects taken into account. We subsequently investigated two higher speeds at 5, 15 and 30 frames per second. We observed that for large masses, the two types of model observers investigated outperformed the human observers and would be suitable with the appropriate addition of internal noise. However, for microcalcifications both only the PPW observer consistently outperformed the humans. The study demonstrated the possibility of using a model observer which takes into account the temporal effects of scrolling through an image stack while being able to effectively detect a range of mass sizes and distributions.

  5. Proceedings of the workshop on X-ray computed microtomography

    SciTech Connect

    1998-02-01

    This report consists of vugraphs from the nine presentations at the conference. Titles of the presentations are: CMT: Applications and Techniques; Computer Microtomography Using X-rays from Third Generation Synchrotron X-ray; Approaches to Soft-X-ray Nanotomography; Diffraction Enhanced Tomography; X-ray Computed Microtomography Applications at the NSLS; XCMT Applications in Forestry and Forest Products; 3DMA: Investigating Three Dimensional Pore Geometry from High Resolution Images; X-ray Computed Microtomography Studies of Volcanic Rock; and 3-D Visualization of Tomographic Volumes.

  6. X-ray crystallography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    X-rays diffracted from a well-ordered protein crystal create sharp patterns of scattered light on film. A computer can use these patterns to generate a model of a protein molecule. To analyze the selected crystal, an X-ray crystallographer shines X-rays through the crystal. Unlike a single dental X-ray, which produces a shadow image of a tooth, these X-rays have to be taken many times from different angles to produce a pattern from the scattered light, a map of the intensity of the X-rays after they diffract through the crystal. The X-rays bounce off the electron clouds that form the outer structure of each atom. A flawed crystal will yield a blurry pattern; a well-ordered protein crystal yields a series of sharp diffraction patterns. From these patterns, researchers build an electron density map. With powerful computers and a lot of calculations, scientists can use the electron density patterns to determine the structure of the protein and make a computer-generated model of the structure. The models let researchers improve their understanding of how the protein functions. They also allow scientists to look for receptor sites and active areas that control a protein's function and role in the progress of diseases. From there, pharmaceutical researchers can design molecules that fit the active site, much like a key and lock, so that the protein is locked without affecting the rest of the body. This is called structure-based drug design.

  7. X-Ray Crystallography Reagent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Dennis R. (Inventor); Mosier, Benjamin (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    Microcapsules prepared by encapsulating an aqueous solution of a protein, drug or other bioactive substance inside a semi-permeable membrane by are disclosed. The microcapsules are formed by interfacial coacervation under conditions where the shear forces are limited to 0-100 dynes per square centimeter at the interface. By placing the microcapsules in a high osmotic dewatering solution. the protein solution is gradually made saturated and then supersaturated. and the controlled nucleation and crystallization of the protein is achieved. The crystal-filled microcapsules prepared by this method can be conveniently harvested and stored while keeping the encapsulated crystals in essentially pristine condition due to the rugged. protective membrane. Because the membrane components themselves are x-ray transparent, large crystal-containing microcapsules can be individually selected, mounted in x-ray capillary tubes and subjected to high energy x-ray diffraction studies to determine the 3-D smucture of the protein molecules. Certain embodiments of the microcapsules of the invention have composite polymeric outer membranes which are somewhat elastic, water insoluble, permeable only to water, salts, and low molecular weight molecules and are structurally stable in fluid shear forces typically encountered in the human vascular system.

  8. Laboratory x ray lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, D. L.

    1989-08-01

    One of the most innovative spinoffs of ICF technology and physics was the development of the x ray wavelength laser. The first incontrovertible demonstration of this type of laser came from LLNL in 1984 using the Novette laser to pump a selenium foil target. The power and energy of Novette were then needed to produce a column of plasma of sufficient length to achieve a sufficient gainlength product (approximately 5.5, this corresponds to an amplification of approximately 250X) that could unquestionably illustrate the lasing effect. LLNL ICF expertise was also required to develop time-resolved spectrometers used to view the lasing transitions at approximately 20 nm, a region of the XUV spectrum normally dominated by high backgrounds. The design of the x ray laser amplifier, which required maintaining nonequilibrium level populations in a tailored plasma having the proper conditions for gain and x ray laser beam propagation, was accomplished with modified versions of ICF kinetics and hydrodynamics codes. Since the first demonstration, progress in the development of the x ray laser was rapid. New achievements include production of megawatt power levels at 20 nm, amplified spontaneous emission levels approaching saturation intensity GL of approximately 17 at 20 nm, efficiency (x ray laser energy/pump energy) approximately 10(exp 6), the demonstration of double and triple pass amplification (hinting at the possibility of producing x ray wavelength resonators), the focusing of x ray lasers to pump other types of lasers and the first demonstration of an x ray hologram produced by an x ray laser. The generation of amplification at ever shorter wavelength is possible using various types of inversion schemes. We depict below this progress benchmarked against production of gain in the water window (2.2 to 4.4 nm,), where applications to biological imaging may be facilitated.

  9. Lumbosacral spine x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    X-ray - lumbosacral spine; X-ray - lower spine ... The test is done in a hospital x-ray department or your health care provider's office by an x-ray technician. You will be asked to lie on the x-ray table ...

  10. The use of 3D laser imaging and a new breast replica cast as a method to optimize autologous breast reconstruction after mastectomy.

    PubMed

    Ahcan, Uros; Bracun, Drago; Zivec, Katarina; Pavlic, Rok; Butala, Peter

    2012-04-01

    Aesthetically pleasing and symmetrical breasts are the goal of reconstructive breast surgery. Sometimes, however, multiple procedures are needed to improve a reconstructed breast's symmetry and appearance. In order to avoid additional corrective procedures, we have developed a new method that uses a reverse engineering technique to produce what we call a new breast replica cast (NBRC). The NBRC is a mould of the contralateral healthy breast, designed according to preoperative laser 3D images. During surgery, the mould is used to help shape the new breast. With this method, we are able to achieve breast symmetry in terms of volume, projection, contour, and position on the chest wall more accurately, more quickly, and more safely than before.

  11. X-ray laser

    DOEpatents

    Nilsen, Joseph

    1991-01-01

    An X-ray laser (10) that lases between the K edges of carbon and oxygen, i.e. between 44 and 23 Angstroms, is provided. The laser comprises a silicon (12) and dysprosium (14) foil combination (16) that is driven by two beams (18, 20) of intense line focused (22, 24) optical laser radiation. Ground state nickel-like dysprosium ions (34) are resonantly photo-pumped to their upper X-ray laser state by line emission from hydrogen-like silicon ions (32). The novel X-ray laser should prove especially useful for the microscopy of biological specimens.

  12. Chest-wall segmentation in automated 3D breast ultrasound images using thoracic volume classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Tao; van Zelst, Jan; Zhang, Wei; Mann, Ritse M.; Platel, Bram; Karssemeijer, Nico

    2014-03-01

    Computer-aided detection (CAD) systems are expected to improve effectiveness and efficiency of radiologists in reading automated 3D breast ultrasound (ABUS) images. One challenging task on developing CAD is to reduce a large number of false positives. A large amount of false positives originate from acoustic shadowing caused by ribs. Therefore determining the location of the chestwall in ABUS is necessary in CAD systems to remove these false positives. Additionally it can be used as an anatomical landmark for inter- and intra-modal image registration. In this work, we extended our previous developed chestwall segmentation method that fits a cylinder to automated detected rib-surface points and we fit the cylinder model by minimizing a cost function which adopted a term of region cost computed from a thoracic volume classifier to improve segmentation accuracy. We examined the performance on a dataset of 52 images where our previous developed method fails. Using region-based cost, the average mean distance of the annotated points to the segmented chest wall decreased from 7.57±2.76 mm to 6.22±2.86 mm.art.

  13. Hard X-Ray Emission from X-Ray Bursters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halpern, Jules P.; Kaaret, Philip

    1999-01-01

    The scientific goal of this project is to study the hard x-ray emission from x-ray bursters. One target of opportunity observation was made for this investigation during 1997. We obtained 38ks of data on the source 4UI705-44. The project is closely related to "Monitoring x-ray emission from x-ray bursters", and "Long-Term Hard X-Ray Monitoring of X-Ray Bursters."

  14. X-ray (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... a form of electromagnetic radiation, just like visible light. Structures that are dense (such as bone) will block most of the x-ray particles, and will appear white. Metal and contrast media (special dye used to highlight ...

  15. Pelvis x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    X-ray - pelvis ... Tumors Degenerative conditions of bones in the hips, pelvis, and upper legs ... hip joint Tumors of the bones of the pelvis Sacroiliitis (inflammation of the area where the sacrum ...

  16. Medical X-Rays

    MedlinePlus

    ... Diagnostic X-Ray Equipment Compliance Program Guidance Manual CP 7386.003 Field Compliance Testing of Diagnostic (Medical) ... and Exporting Electronic Products Compliance Program Guidance Manual CP 7386.003 Field Compliance Testing of Diagnostic (Medical) ...

  17. X-Ray Diffraction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, D. K.; Smith, K. L.

    1980-01-01

    Reviews applications in research and analytical characterization of compounds and materials in the field of X-ray diffraction, emphasizing new developments in applications and instrumentation in both single crystal and powder diffraction. Cites 414 references. (CS)

  18. X-ray - skeleton

    MedlinePlus

    ... is used to look for: Fractures or broken bone Cancer that has spread to other areas of the ... 2014:chap 8. Read More Bone tumor Broken bone Cancer Metastasis Osteomyelitis X-ray Update Date 5/9/ ...

  19. Cosmic x ray physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccammon, Dan; Cox, D. P.; Kraushaar, W. L.; Sanders, W. T.

    1992-01-01

    This final report covers the period 1 January 1985 - 31 March 1992. It is divided into the following sections: the soft x-ray background; proportional counter and filter calibrations; sounding rocket flight preparations; new sounding rocket payload: x-ray calorimeter; and theoretical studies. Staff, publications, conference proceedings, invited talks, contributed talks, colloquia and seminars, public service lectures, and Ph. D. theses are listed.

  20. Isotropic 3D Nuclear Morphometry of Normal, Fibrocystic and Malignant Breast Epithelial Cells Reveals New Structural Alterations

    PubMed Central

    Nandakumar, Vivek; Kelbauskas, Laimonas; Hernandez, Kathryn F.; Lintecum, Kelly M.; Senechal, Patti; Bussey, Kimberly J.; Davies, Paul C. W.; Johnson, Roger H.; Meldrum, Deirdre R.

    2012-01-01

    Background Grading schemes for breast cancer diagnosis are predominantly based on pathologists' qualitative assessment of altered nuclear structure from 2D brightfield microscopy images. However, cells are three-dimensional (3D) objects with features that are inherently 3D and thus poorly characterized in 2D. Our goal is to quantitatively characterize nuclear structure in 3D, assess its variation with malignancy, and investigate whether such variation correlates with standard nuclear grading criteria. Methodology We applied micro-optical computed tomographic imaging and automated 3D nuclear morphometry to quantify and compare morphological variations between human cell lines derived from normal, benign fibrocystic or malignant breast epithelium. To reproduce the appearance and contrast in clinical cytopathology images, we stained cells with hematoxylin and eosin and obtained 3D images of 150 individual stained cells of each cell type at sub-micron, isotropic resolution. Applying volumetric image analyses, we computed 42 3D morphological and textural descriptors of cellular and nuclear structure. Principal Findings We observed four distinct nuclear shape categories, the predominant being a mushroom cap shape. Cell and nuclear volumes increased from normal to fibrocystic to metastatic type, but there was little difference in the volume ratio of nucleus to cytoplasm (N/C ratio) between the lines. Abnormal cell nuclei had more nucleoli, markedly higher density and clumpier chromatin organization compared to normal. Nuclei of non-tumorigenic, fibrocystic cells exhibited larger textural variations than metastatic cell nuclei. At p<0.0025 by ANOVA and Kruskal-Wallis tests, 90% of our computed descriptors statistically differentiated control from abnormal cell populations, but only 69% of these features statistically differentiated the fibrocystic from the metastatic cell populations. Conclusions Our results provide a new perspective on nuclear structure variations

  1. Quantitative Analysis of Vascular Heterogeneity in Breast Lesions Using Contrast-Enhanced 3-D Harmonic and Subharmonic Ultrasound Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Sridharan, Anush; Eisenbrey, John R.; Machado, Priscilla; Ojeda-Fournier, Haydee; Wilkes, Annina; Sevrukov, Alexander; Mattrey, Robert F.; Wallace, Kirk; Chalek, Carl L.; Thomenius, Kai E.; Forsberg, Flemming

    2015-01-01

    Ability to visualize breast lesion vascularity and quantify the vascular heterogeneity using contrast-enhanced 3-D harmonic (HI) and subharmonic (SHI) ultrasound imaging was investigated in a clinical population. Patients (n = 134) identified with breast lesions on mammography were scanned using power Doppler imaging, contrast-enhanced 3-D HI, and 3-D SHI on a modified Logiq 9 scanner (GE Healthcare). A region of interest corresponding to ultrasound contrast agent flow was identified in 4D View (GE Medical Systems) and mapped to raw slice data to generate a map of time-intensity curves for the lesion volume. Time points corresponding to baseline, peak intensity, and washout of ultrasound contrast agent were identified and used to generate and compare vascular heterogeneity plots for malignant and benign lesions. Vascularity was observed with power Doppler imaging in 84 lesions (63 benign and 21 malignant). The 3-D HI showed flow in 8 lesions (5 benign and 3 malignant), whereas 3-D SHI visualized flow in 68 lesions (49 benign and 19 malignant). Analysis of vascular heterogeneity in the 3-D SHI volumes found benign lesions having a significant difference in vascularity between central and peripheral sections (1.71 ± 0.96 vs. 1.13 ± 0.79 dB, p < 0.001, respectively), whereas malignant lesions showed no difference (1.66 ± 1.39 vs. 1.24 ± 1.14 dB, p = 0.24), indicative of more vascular coverage. These preliminary results suggest quantitative evaluation of vascular heterogeneity in breast lesions using contrast-enhanced 3-D SHI is feasible and able to detect variations in vascularity between central and peripheral sections for benign and malignant lesions. PMID:25935933

  2. TU-A-9A-07: X-Ray Acoustic Computed Tomography (XACT): 100% Sensitivity to X-Ray Absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Xiang, L; Ahmad, M; Nikoozadeh, A; Pratx, G; Khuri-Yakub, B; Xing, L

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To assess whether X-ray acoustic computed tomography (XACT) is more sensitive to X-ray absorption than that of the conventional X-ray imaging. Methods: First, a theoretical model was built to analyze the X-ray absorption sensitivity of XACT imaging and conventional X-ray imaging. Second, an XACT imaging system was developed to evaluate the X-ray induced acoustic signal generation as well as the sensitivity improvement over transmission x-ray imaging. Ultra-short x-ray pulses (60-nanosecond) were generated from an X-ray source operated at the energy of 150 kVp with a 10-Hz repetition rate. The X-ray pulse was synchronized with the acoustic detection via a x-ray scintillation triggering to acquire the X-ray induced acoustic signal. Results: Theoretical analysis shows that X-ray induced acoustic signal is sensitive only to the X-ray absorption, while completely insensitive to out the X-ray scattering and fluorescence. XACT has reduced background and increased contrast-to-noise ratio, and therefore has increased sensitivity compared to transmission x-ray imaging. For a 50-μm size, gadolinium insertion in tissue exposed to 40 keV X-rays; the sensitivity of XACT imaging is about 28.9 times higher than that of conventional X-ray imaging. Conclusion: X-ray acoustic computer tomography (XACT) as a new imaging modality combines X-ray absorption contrast and high ultrasonic resolution in a single modality. It is feasible to improve the imaging sensitivity with XACT imaging compared with conventional X-ray imaging. Taking advantage of the high ultrasonic resolution, it is possible to perform 3-D imaging with a single x-ray pulse with arrays of transducers without any mechanical motion of the imaging system. This single-shot capability offers the potential of reducing radiation dose by a factor of 1000, and imaging 100 times faster when compared to the conventional X-ray CT, and thus revolutionizing x-ray imaging applications in medicine and biology. The authors

  3. An analysis of the mechanical parameters used for finite element compression of a high-resolution 3D breast phantom

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Christina M. L.; Palmeri, Mark L.; Segars, W. Paul; Veress, Alexander I.; Dobbins, James T.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The authors previously introduced a methodology to generate a realistic three-dimensional (3D), high-resolution, computer-simulated breast phantom based on empirical data. One of the key components of such a phantom is that it provides a means to produce a realistic simulation of clinical breast compression. In the current study, they have evaluated a finite element (FE) model of compression and have demonstrated the effect of a variety of mechanical properties on the model using a dense mesh generated from empirical breast data. While several groups have demonstrated an effective compression simulation with lower density finite element meshes, the presented study offers a mesh density that is able to model the morphology of the inner breast structures more realistically than lower density meshes. This approach may prove beneficial for multimodality breast imaging research, since it provides a high level of anatomical detail throughout the simulation study. Methods: In this paper, the authors describe methods to improve the high-resolution performance of a FE compression model. In order to create the compressible breast phantom, dedicated breast CT data was segmented and a mesh was generated with 4-noded tetrahedral elements. Using an explicit FE solver to simulate breast compression, several properties were analyzed to evaluate their effect on the compression model including: mesh density, element type, density, and stiffness of various tissue types, friction between the skin and the compression plates, and breast density. Following compression, a simulated projection was generated to demonstrate the ability of the compressible breast phantom to produce realistic simulated mammographic images. Results: Small alterations in the properties of the breast model can change the final distribution of the tissue under compression by more than 1 cm; which ultimately results in different representations of the breast model in the simulated images. The model

  4. Dosimetric comparison of 3D conformal, IMRT, and V-MAT techniques for accelerated partial-breast irradiation (APBI)

    SciTech Connect

    Qiu, Jian-Jian; Chang, Zheng; Horton, Janet K.; Wu, Qing-Rong Jackie; Yoo, Sua; Yin, Fang-Fang

    2014-07-01

    The purpose is to dosimetrically compare the following 3 delivery techniques: 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT), intensity-modulated arc therapy (IMRT), and volumetric-modulated arc therapy (V-MAT) in the treatment of accelerated partial-breast irradiation (APBI). Overall, 16 patients with T1/2N0 breast cancer were treated with 3D-CRT (multiple, noncoplanar photon fields) on the RTOG 0413 partial-breast trial. These cases were subsequently replanned using static gantry IMRT and V-MAT technology to understand dosimetric differences among these 3 techniques. Several dosimetric parameters were used in plan quality evaluation, including dose conformity index (CI) and dose-volume histogram analysis of normal tissue coverage. Quality assurance studies including gamma analysis were performed to compare the measured and calculated dose distributions. The IMRT and V-MAT plans gave more conformal target dose distributions than the 3D-CRT plans (p < 0.05 in CI). The volume of ipsilateral breast receiving 5 and 10 Gy was significantly less using the V-MAT technique than with either 3D-CRT or IMRT (p < 0.05). The maximum lung dose and the ipsilateral lung volume receiving 10 (V{sub 10}) or 20 Gy (V{sub 20}) were significantly less with both V-MAT and IMRT (p < 0.05). The IMRT technique was superior to 3D-CRT and V-MAT of low dose distributions in ipsilateral lung (p < 0.05 in V{sub 5} and D{sub 5}). The total mean monitor units (MUs) for V-MAT (621.0 ± 111.9) were 12.2% less than those for 3D-CRT (707.3 ± 130.9) and 46.5% less than those for IMRT (1161.4 ± 315.6) (p < 0.05). The average machine delivery time was 1.5 ± 0.2 minutes for the V-MAT plans, 7.0 ± 1.6 minutes for the 3D-CRT plans, and 11.5 ± 1.9 minutes for the IMRT plans, demonstrating much less delivery time for V-MAT. Based on this preliminary study, V-MAT and IMRT techniques offer improved dose conformity as compared with 3D-CRT techniques without increasing dose to the ipsilateral lung. In

  5. 3D parallel-detection microwave tomography for clinical breast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epstein, N. R.; Meaney, P. M.; Paulsen, K. D.

    2014-12-01

    of 3D dielectric property distributions for breast-like phantoms with tumor inclusions utilizing both the in-plane and new cross-plane data.

  6. 3D parallel-detection microwave tomography for clinical breast imaging

    PubMed Central

    Meaney, P. M.; Paulsen, K. D.

    2014-01-01

    recovery of 3D dielectric property distributions for breast-like phantoms with tumor inclusions utilizing both the in-plane and new cross-plane data. PMID:25554311

  7. 3D parallel-detection microwave tomography for clinical breast imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Epstein, N. R.; Meaney, P. M.; Paulsen, K. D.

    2014-12-15

    recovery of 3D dielectric property distributions for breast-like phantoms with tumor inclusions utilizing both the in-plane and new cross-plane data.

  8. X-ray spectral measurements for tungsten-anode from 20 to 49 kVp on a digital breast tomosynthesis system

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Da; Li Xinhua; Liu, Bob

    2012-06-15

    Purpose: This paper presents new spectral measurements of a tungsten-target digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) system, including spectra of 43-49 kVp. Methods: Raw x-ray spectra of 20-49 kVp were directly measured from the tube port of a Selenia Dimensions DBT system using a CdTe based spectrometer. Two configurations of collimation were employed: one with two tungsten pinholes of 25{mu}m and 200{mu}m diameters, and the other with a single pinhole of 25{mu}m diameter, for acquiring spectra from the focal spot and from the focal spot as well as its vicinity. Stripping correction was applied to the measured spectra to compensate distortions due to escape events. The measured spectra were compared with the existing mammographic spectra of the TASMIP model in terms of photon fluence per exposure, spectral components, and half-value layer (HVL). HVLs were calculated from the spectra with a numerical filtration of 0.7 mm aluminum and were compared against actual measurements on the DBT system using W/Al (target-filter) combination, without paddle in the beam. Results: The spectra from the double-pinhole configuration, in which the acceptance aperture pointed right at the focal spot, were harder than the single-pinhole spectra which include both primary and off-focus radiation. HVL calculated from the single-pinhole setup agreed with the measured HVL within 0.04 mm aluminum, while the HVL values from the double-pinhole setup were larger than the single-pinhole HVL by at most 0.1 mm aluminum. The spectra from single-pinhole setup agreed well with the TASMIP mammographic spectra, and are more relevant for clinical purpose. Conclusions: The spectra data would be useful for future research on DBT system with tungsten targets.

  9. A structural basis for Staphylococcal complement subversion: X-ray structure of the complement-binding domain of Staphylococcus aureus protein Sbi in complex with ligand C3d.

    PubMed

    Clark, Elizabeth A; Crennell, Susan; Upadhyay, Abhishek; Zozulya, Alexey V; Mackay, Julia D; Svergun, Dmitri I; Bagby, Stefan; van den Elsen, Jean M H

    2011-01-01

    The structure of the complement-binding domain of Staphylococcus aureus protein Sbi (Sbi-IV) in complex with ligand C3d is presented. The 1.7Å resolution structure reveals the molecular details of the recognition of thioester-containing fragment C3d of the central complement component C3, involving interactions between residues of Sbi-IV helix α2 and the acidic concave surface of C3d. The complex provides a structural basis for the binding preference of Sbi for native C3 over C3b and explains how Sbi-IV inhibits the interaction between C3d and complement receptor 2. A second C3d binding site on Sbi-IV is identified in the crystal structure that is not observed in related S. aureus C3 inhibitors Efb-C and Ehp. This binding mode perhaps hints as to how Sbi-IV, as part of Sbi, forms a C3b-Sbi adduct and causes futile consumption of C3, an extraordinary aspect of Sbi function that is not shared by any other known Staphylococcal complement inhibitor.

  10. Reconstruction of viruses from solution x-ray scattering data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yibin; Doerschuk, Peter C.; Johnson, John E.

    1995-08-01

    A model-based method for reconstructing the 3D structure of icosahedrally-symmetric viruses from solution x-ray scattering is presented. An example of the reconstruction, for data from cowpea mosaic virus, is described. The major opportunity provided by solution x-ray scattering is the ability to study the dynamics of virus particles in solution, information that is not accessible to crystal x-ray diffraction experiments.

  11. 2D and 3D registration methods for dual-energy contrast-enhanced digital breast tomosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, Kristen C.; Roth, Susan; Maidment, Andrew D. A.

    2014-03-01

    Contrast-enhanced digital breast tomosynthesis (CE-DBT) uses an iodinated contrast agent to image the threedimensional breast vasculature. The University of Pennsylvania is conducting a CE-DBT clinical study in patients with known breast cancers. The breast is compressed continuously and imaged at four time points (1 pre-contrast; 3 postcontrast). A hybrid subtraction scheme is proposed. First, dual-energy (DE) images are obtained by a weighted logarithmic subtraction of the high-energy and low-energy image pairs. Then, post-contrast DE images are subtracted from the pre-contrast DE image. This hybrid temporal subtraction of DE images is performed to analyze iodine uptake, but suffers from motion artifacts. Employing image registration further helps to correct for motion, enhancing the evaluation of vascular kinetics. Registration using ANTS (Advanced Normalization Tools) is performed in an iterative manner. Mutual information optimization first corrects large-scale motions. Normalized cross-correlation optimization then iteratively corrects fine-scale misalignment. Two methods have been evaluated: a 2D method using a slice-by-slice approach, and a 3D method using a volumetric approach to account for out-of-plane breast motion. Our results demonstrate that iterative registration qualitatively improves with each iteration (five iterations total). Motion artifacts near the edge of the breast are corrected effectively and structures within the breast (e.g. blood vessels, surgical clip) are better visualized. Statistical and clinical evaluations of registration accuracy in the CE-DBT images are ongoing.

  12. X-ray microtomography of porous media at BNL

    SciTech Connect

    Dowd, B.

    1997-02-01

    This session is comprised of pertinent information about the historical aspects, current status of research, technical achievements, and future plans in X-ray computed microtomography at Brookhaven National Laboratories. An explanation with specifications and diagrams of X-ray instrumentation is provided. Several high resolution 3-D color images of reservoir rock drill cores and other materials are included.

  13. Three-dimensional conformal setup (3D-CSU) of patients using the coordinate system provided by three internal fiducial markers and two orthogonal diagnostic X-ray systems in the treatment room

    SciTech Connect

    Shirato, Hiroki . E-mail: hshirato@radi.med.hokudai.ac.jp; Oita, Masataka; Fujita, Katsuhisa; Shimizu, Shinichi; Onimaru, Rikiya; Uegaki, Shinji; Watanabe, Yoshiharu; Kato, Norio; Miyasaka, Kazuo

    2004-10-01

    Purpose: To test the accuracy of a system for correcting for the rotational error of the clinical target volume (CTV) without having to reposition the patient using three fiducial markers and two orthogonal fluoroscopic images. We call this system 'three-dimensional conformal setup' (3D-CSU). Methods and materials: Three 2.0-mm gold markers are inserted into or adjacent to the CTV. On the treatment couch, the actual positions of the three markers are calculated based on two orthogonal fluoroscopies crossing at the isocenter of the linear accelerator. Discrepancy of the actual coordinates of gravity center of three markers from its planned coordinates is calculated. Translational setup error is corrected by adjustment of the treatment couch. The rotation angles ({alpha}, {beta}, {gamma}) of the coordinates of the actual CTV relative to the planned CTV are calculated around the lateral (x), craniocaudal (y), and anteroposterior (z) axes of the planned CTV. The angles of the gantry head, collimator, and treatment couch of the linear accelerator are adjusted according to the rotation of the actual coordinates of the tumor in relation to the planned coordinates. We have measured the accuracy of 3D-CSU using a static cubic phantom. Results: The gravity center of the phantom was corrected within 0.9 {+-} 0.3 mm (mean {+-} SD), 0.4 {+-} 0.2 mm, and 0.6 {+-} 0.2 mm for the rotation of the phantom from 0-30 degrees around the x, y, and z axes, respectively, every 5 degrees. Dose distribution was shown to be consistent with the planned dose distribution every 10 degrees of the rotation from 0-30 degrees. The mean rotational error after 3D-CSU was -0.4 {+-} 0.4 (mean {+-} SD), -0.2 {+-} 0.4, and 0.0 {+-} 0.5 degrees around the x, y, and z axis, respectively, for the rotation from 0-90 degrees. Conclusions: Phantom studies showed that 3D-CSU is useful for performing rotational correction of the target volume without correcting the position of the patient on the treatment couch

  14. X-ray beam finder

    DOEpatents

    Gilbert, H.W.

    1983-06-16

    An X-ray beam finder for locating a focal spot of an X-ray tube includes a mass of X-ray opaque material having first and second axially-aligned, parallel-opposed faces connected by a plurality of substantially identical parallel holes perpendicular to the faces and a film holder for holding X-ray sensitive film tightly against one face while the other face is placed in contact with the window of an X-ray head.

  15. Three-dimensional x-ray fluorescence mapping of a gold nanoparticle-loaded phantom

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Liqiang; Wu, Di; Li, Yuhua; Liu, Hong; Wang, Ge; Wu, Xizeng

    2014-03-15

    Purpose : X-ray fluorescence (XRF) is a promising technique with sufficient specificity and sensitivity for identifying and quantifying features in small samples containing high atomic number (Z) materials such as iodine, gadolinium, and gold. In this study, the feasibility of applying XRF to early breast cancer diagnosis and treatment is studied using a novel approach for three-dimensional (3D) x-ray fluorescence mapping (XFM) of gold nanoparticle (GNP)-loaded objects in a physical phantom at the technical level. Methods : All the theoretical analysis and experiments are conducted under the condition of using x-ray pencil beam and a compactly integrated x-ray spectrometer. The penetrability of the fluorescence x-rays from GNPs is first investigated by adopting a combination of BR12 with 70 mm/50 mm in thickness on the excitation/emission path to mimic the possible position of tumor goldin vivo. Then, a physical phantom made of BR12 is designed to translate in 3D space with three precise linear stages and subsequently the step by step XFM scanning is performed. The experimental technique named as background subtraction is applied to isolate the gold fluorescence from each spectrum obtained by the spectrometer. Afterwards, the attenuations of both the incident primary x-ray beam with energies beyond the gold K-edge energy (80.725 keV) and the isolated gold K{sub α} fluorescence x-rays (65.99 –69.80 keV) acquired after background subtraction are well calibrated, and finally the unattenuated K{sub α} fluorescence counts are used to realize mapping reconstruction and to describe the linear relationship between gold fluorescence counts and corresponding concentration of gold solutions. Results : The penetration results show that the goldK{sub α} fluorescence x-rays have sufficient penetrability for this phantom study, and the reconstructed mapping results indicate that both the spatial distribution and relative concentration of GNPs within the designed BR12 phantom

  16. Target specific delivery of anticancer drug in silk fibroin based 3D distribution model of bone-breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Subia, Bano; Dey, Tuli; Sharma, Shaily; Kundu, Subhas C

    2015-02-01

    To avoid the indiscriminating action of anticancer drugs, the cancer cell specific targeting of drug molecule becomes a preferred choice for the treatment. The successful screening of the drug molecules in 2D culture system requires further validation. The failure of target specific drug in animal model raises the issue of creating a platform in between the in vitro (2D) and in vivo animal testing. The metastatic breast cancer cells migrate and settle at different sites such as bone tissue. This work evaluates the in vitro 3D model of the breast cancer and bone cells to understand the cellular interactions in the presence of a targeted anticancer drug delivery system. The silk fibroin based cytocompatible 3D scaffold is used as in vitro 3D distribution model. Human breast adenocarcinoma and osteoblast like cells are cocultured to evaluate the efficiency of doxorubicin loaded folic acid conjugated silk fibroin nanoparticle as drug delivery system. Decreasing population of the cancer cells, which lower the levels of vascular endothelial growth factors, glucose consumption, and lactate production are observed in the drug treated coculture constructs. The drug treated constructs do not show any major impact on bone mineralization. The diminished expression of osteogenic markers such as osteocalcein and alkaline phosphatase are recorded. The result indicates that this type of silk based 3D in vitro coculture model may be utilized as a bridge between the traditional 2D and animal model system to evaluate the new drug molecule (s) or to reassay the known drug molecules or to develop target specific drug in cancer research. PMID:25557227

  17. Target specific delivery of anticancer drug in silk fibroin based 3D distribution model of bone-breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Subia, Bano; Dey, Tuli; Sharma, Shaily; Kundu, Subhas C

    2015-02-01

    To avoid the indiscriminating action of anticancer drugs, the cancer cell specific targeting of drug molecule becomes a preferred choice for the treatment. The successful screening of the drug molecules in 2D culture system requires further validation. The failure of target specific drug in animal model raises the issue of creating a platform in between the in vitro (2D) and in vivo animal testing. The metastatic breast cancer cells migrate and settle at different sites such as bone tissue. This work evaluates the in vitro 3D model of the breast cancer and bone cells to understand the cellular interactions in the presence of a targeted anticancer drug delivery system. The silk fibroin based cytocompatible 3D scaffold is used as in vitro 3D distribution model. Human breast adenocarcinoma and osteoblast like cells are cocultured to evaluate the efficiency of doxorubicin loaded folic acid conjugated silk fibroin nanoparticle as drug delivery system. Decreasing population of the cancer cells, which lower the levels of vascular endothelial growth factors, glucose consumption, and lactate production are observed in the drug treated coculture constructs. The drug treated constructs do not show any major impact on bone mineralization. The diminished expression of osteogenic markers such as osteocalcein and alkaline phosphatase are recorded. The result indicates that this type of silk based 3D in vitro coculture model may be utilized as a bridge between the traditional 2D and animal model system to evaluate the new drug molecule (s) or to reassay the known drug molecules or to develop target specific drug in cancer research.

  18. The intrafraction motion induced dosimetric impacts in breast 3D radiation treatment: A 4DCT based study

    SciTech Connect

    Yue, Ning J.; Li Xiang; Beriwal, Sushil; Heron, Dwight E.; Sontag, Marc R.; Huq, M. Saiful

    2007-07-15

    The question remains regarding the dosimetric impact of intrafraction motion in 3D breast treatment. This study was conducted to investigate this issue utilizing the 4DCT scan. The 4D and helical CT scan sets were acquired for 12 breast cancer patients. For each of these patients, based on the helical CT scan, a conventional 3D conformal plan was generated. The breast treatment was then simulated based on the 4DCT scan. In each phase of the 4DCT scan, dose distribution was generated with the same beam parameters as the conventional plan. A software package was developed to compute the cumulative dose distribution from all the phases. Since the intrafraction organ motion is reflected by the 4DCT images, the cumulative dose computed based on the 4DCT images should be closer to what the patient received during treatment. Various dosimetric parameters were obtained from the plan and 4D cumulative dose distribution for the target volume and heart, and were compared to deduce the motion-induced impacts. The studies were performed for both whole breast and partial breast treatment. In the whole breast treatment, the average intrafraction motion induced changes in D{sub 95}, D{sub 90}, V{sub 100}, V{sub 95}, and V{sub 90} of the target volume were -5.4%, -3.1%, -13.4%, -5.1%, and -3.2%, respectively, with the largest values at -26.2%, -14.1%, -91.0%, -15.1%, and -9.0%, respectively. Motion had little impact on the D{sub max} of the target volume, but its impact on the D{sub min} of the target volume was significant. For left breast treatment, the motion-induced D{sub max} change to the heart could be negative or positive, with the largest increase at about 6 Gy. In partial breast treatment, the only non-insignificant impact was in the D{sub min} of the CTV (ranging from -15.2% to 11.7%). The results showed that the intrafraction motion may compromise target dose coverage in breast treatments and the degree of that compromise was correlated with motion magnitude. However

  19. 3-D visualization and non-linear tissue classification of breast tumors using ultrasound elastography in vivo.

    PubMed

    Sayed, Ahmed; Layne, Ginger; Abraham, Jame; Mukdadi, Osama M

    2014-07-01

    The goal of the study described here was to introduce new methods for the classification and visualization of human breast tumors using 3-D ultrasound elastography. A tumor's type, shape and size are key features that can help the physician to decide the sort and extent of necessary treatment. In this work, tumor type, being either benign or malignant, was classified non-invasively for nine volunteer patients. The classification was based on estimating four parameters that reflect the tumor's non-linear biomechanical behavior, under multi-compression levels. Tumor prognosis using non-linear elastography was confirmed with biopsy as a gold standard. Three tissue classification parameters were found to be statistically significant with a p-value < 0.05, whereas the fourth non-linear parameter was highly significant, having a p-value < 0.001. Furthermore, each breast tumor's shape and size were estimated in vivo using 3-D elastography, and were enhanced using interactive segmentation. Segmentation with level sets was used to isolate the stiff tumor from the surrounding soft tissue. Segmentation also provided a reliable means to estimate tumors volumes. Four volumetric strains were investigated: the traditional normal axial strain, the first principal strain, von Mises strain and maximum shear strain. It was noted that these strains can provide varying degrees of boundary enhancement to the stiff tumor in the constructed elastograms. The enhanced boundary improved the performance of the segmentation process. In summary, the proposed methods can be employed as a 3-D non-invasive tool for characterization of breast tumors, and may provide early prognosis with minimal pain, as well as diminish the risk of late-stage breast cancer.

  20. Peptide Hydrogelation and Cell Encapsulation for 3D Culture of MCF-7 Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xiuzhi S.; Nguyen, Thu A.

    2013-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) cell culture plays an invaluable role in tumor biology by providing in vivo like microenviroment and responses to therapeutic agents. Among many established 3D scaffolds, hydrogels demonstrate a distinct property as matrics for 3D cell culture. Most of the existing pre-gel solutions are limited under physiological conditions such as undesirable pH or temperature. Here, we report a peptide hydrogel that shows superior physiological properties as an in vitro matrix for 3D cell culture. The 3D matrix can be accomplished by mixing a self-assembling peptide directly with a cell culture medium without any pH or temperature adjustment. Results of dynamic rheological studies showed that this hydrogel can be delivered multiple times via pipetting without permanently destroying the hydrogel architecture, indicating the deformability and remodeling ability of the hydrogel. Human epithelial cancer cells, MCF-7, are encapsulated homogeneously in the hydrogel matrix during hydrogelation. Compared with two-dimensional (2D) monolayer culture, cells residing in the hydrogel matrix grow as tumor-like clusters in 3D formation. Relevant parameters related to cell morphology, survival, proliferation, and apoptosis were analyzed using MCF-7 cells in 3D hydrogels. Interestingly, treatment of cisplatin, an anti-cancer drug, can cause a significant decrease of cell viability of MCF-7 clusters in hydrogels. The responses to cisplatin were dose- and time-dependent, indicating the potential usage of hydrogels for drug testing. Results of confocal microscopy and Western blotting showed that cells isolated from hydrogels are suitable for downstream proteomic analysis. The results provided evidence that this peptide hydrogel is a promising 3D cell culture material for drug testing. PMID:23527204

  1. Characterization of image quality for 3D scatter-corrected breast CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pachon, Jan H.; Shah, Jainil; Tornai, Martin P.

    2011-03-01

    The goal of this study was to characterize the image quality of our dedicated, quasi-monochromatic spectrum, cone beam breast imaging system under scatter corrected and non-scatter corrected conditions for a variety of breast compositions. CT projections were acquired of a breast phantom containing two concentric sets of acrylic spheres that varied in size (1-8mm) based on their polar position. The breast phantom was filled with 3 different concentrations of methanol and water, simulating a range of breast densities (0.79-1.0g/cc); acrylic yarn was sometimes included to simulate connective tissue of a breast. For each phantom condition, 2D scatter was measured for all projection angles. Scatter-corrected and uncorrected projections were then reconstructed with an iterative ordered subsets convex algorithm. Reconstructed image quality was characterized using SNR and contrast analysis, and followed by a human observer detection task for the spheres in the different concentric rings. Results show that scatter correction effectively reduces the cupping artifact and improves image contrast and SNR. Results from the observer study indicate that there was no statistical difference in the number or sizes of lesions observed in the scatter versus non-scatter corrected images for all densities. Nonetheless, applying scatter correction for differing breast conditions improves overall image quality.

  2. Treatment techniques for 3D conformal radiation to breast and chest wall including the internal mammary chain.

    PubMed

    Sonnik, Deborah; Selvaraj, Raj N; Faul, Clare; Gerszten, Kristina; Heron, Dwight E; King, Gwendolyn C

    2007-01-01

    Breast, chest wall, and regional nodal irradiation have been associated with an improved outcome in high-risk breast cancer patients. Complex treatment planning is often utilized to ensure complete coverage of the target volume while minimizing the dose to surrounding normal tissues. The 2 techniques evaluated in this report are the partially wide tangent fields (PWTFs) and the 4-field photon/electron combination (the modified "Kuske Technique"). These 2 techniques were evaluated in 10 consecutive breast cancer patients. All patients had computerized tomographic (CT) scans for 3D planning supine on a breast board. The breast was defined clinically by the physician and confirmed radiographically with radiopaque bebes. The resulting dose-volume histograms (DVHs) of normal and target tissues were then compared. The deep tangent field with blocks resulted in optimal coverage of the target and the upper internal mammary chain (IMC) while sparing of critical and nontarget tissues. The wide tangent technique required less treatment planning and delivery time. We compared the 2 techniques and their resultant DVHs and feasibility in a busy clinic.

  3. Microenvironment complexity and matrix stiffness regulate breast cancer cell activity in a 3D in vitro model

    PubMed Central

    Cavo, Marta; Fato, Marco; Peñuela, Leonardo; Beltrame, Francesco; Raiteri, Roberto; Scaglione, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) cell cultures represent fundamental tools for the comprehension of cellular phenomena both in normal and in pathological conditions. In particular, mechanical and chemical stimuli play a relevant role on cell fate, cancer onset and malignant evolution. Here, we use mechanically-tuned alginate hydrogels to study the role of substrate elasticity on breast adenocarcinoma cell activity. The hydrogel elastic modulus (E) was measured via atomic force microscopy (AFM) and a remarkable range (150–4000 kPa) was obtained. A breast cancer cell line, MCF-7, was seeded within the 3D gels, on standard Petri and alginate-coated dishes (2D controls). Cells showed dramatic morphological differences when cultured in 3D versus 2D, exhibiting a flat shape in both 2D conditions, while maintaining a circular, spheroid-organized (cluster) conformation within the gels, similar to those in vivo. Moreover, we observed a strict correlation between cell viability and substrate elasticity; in particular, the number of MCF-7 cells decreased constantly with increasing hydrogel elasticity. Remarkably, the highest cellular proliferation rate, associated with the formation of cell clusters, occurred at two weeks only in the softest hydrogels (E = 150–200 kPa), highlighting the need to adopt more realistic and a priori defined models for in vitro cancer studies. PMID:27734939

  4. X-ray lithography masking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Henry I. (Inventor); Lim, Michael (Inventor); Carter, James (Inventor); Schattenburg, Mark (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    X-ray masking apparatus includes a frame having a supporting rim surrounding an x-ray transparent region, a thin membrane of hard inorganic x-ray transparent material attached at its periphery to the supporting rim covering the x-ray transparent region and a layer of x-ray opaque material on the thin membrane inside the x-ray transparent region arranged in a pattern to selectively transmit x-ray energy entering the x-ray transparent region through the membrane to a predetermined image plane separated from the layer by the thin membrane. A method of making the masking apparatus includes depositing back and front layers of hard inorganic x-ray transparent material on front and back surfaces of a substrate, depositing back and front layers of reinforcing material on the back and front layers, respectively, of the hard inorganic x-ray transparent material, removing the material including at least a portion of the substrate and the back layers of an inside region adjacent to the front layer of hard inorganic x-ray transparent material, removing a portion of the front layer of reinforcing material opposite the inside region to expose the surface of the front layer of hard inorganic x-ray transparent material separated from the inside region by the latter front layer, and depositing a layer of x-ray opaque material on the surface of the latter front layer adjacent to the inside region.

  5. X-ray Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porter, F. Scott

    2004-01-01

    The X-ray Spectrometer (XRS) instrument is a revolutionary non-dispersive spectrometer that will form the basis for the Astro-E2 observatory to be launched in 2005. We have recently installed a flight spare X R S microcalorimeter spectrometer at the EBIT-I facility at LLNL replacing the XRS from the earlier Astro-E mission and providing twice the resolution. The X R S microcalorimeter is an x-ray detector that senses the heat deposited by the incident photon. It achieves a high energy resolution by operating at 0.06K and by carefully controlling the heat capacity and thermal conductance. The XRS/EBIT instrument has 32 pixels in a square geometry and achieves an energy resolution of 6 eV at 6 keV, with a bandpass from 0.1 to 12 keV (or more at higher operating temperature). The instrument allows detailed studies of the x-ray line emission of laboratory plasmas. The XRS/EBIT also provides an extensive calibration "library" for the Astro-E2 observatory.

  6. X-Ray Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, S. T.

    2000-01-01

    Dr. S. N. Zhang has lead a seven member group (Dr. Yuxin Feng, Mr. XuejunSun, Mr. Yongzhong Chen, Mr. Jun Lin, Mr. Yangsen Yao, and Ms. Xiaoling Zhang). This group has carried out the following activities: continued data analysis from space astrophysical missions CGRO, RXTE, ASCA and Chandra. Significant scientific results have been produced as results of their work. They discovered the three-layered accretion disk structure around black holes in X-ray binaries; their paper on this discovery is to appear in the prestigious Science magazine. They have also developed a new method for energy spectral analysis of black hole X-ray binaries; four papers on this topics were presented at the most recent Atlanta AAS meeting. They have also carried Monte-Carlo simulations of X-ray detectors, in support to the hardware development efforts at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). These computation-intensive simulations have been carried out entirely on the computers at UAH. They have also carried out extensive simulations for astrophysical applications, taking advantage of the Monte-Carlo simulation codes developed previously at MSFC and further improved at UAH for detector simulations. One refereed paper and one contribution to conference proceedings have been resulted from this effort.

  7. Monitoring X-Ray Emission from X-Ray Bursters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaaret, Philip

    1998-01-01

    The goal of this investigation was to use the All-Sky Monitor on the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) in combination with the Burst and Transient Source Experiment on the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory to simultaneously measure the x-ray (2-12 keV) and hard x-ray (20-100 keV) emission from x-ray bursters. The investigation was successful. We made the first simultaneous measurement of hard and soft x-ray emission and found a strong anticorrelation of hard and soft x-ray emission from the X-Ray Burster 4U 0614+091. The monitoring performed under this investigation was also important in triggering target of opportunity observations of x-ray bursters made under the investigation hard x-ray emission of x-ray bursters approved for RXTE cycles 1 and 2. These observations lead to a number of papers on high-frequency quasi-periodic oscillations and on hard x-ray emission from the x-ray bursters 4U 0614+091 and 4U 1705-44.

  8. Fluctuation X-Ray Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Saldin, PI: D. K.; Co-I's: J. C. H. Spence and P. Fromme

    2013-01-25

    The work supported by the grant was aimed at developing novel methods of finding the structures of biomolecules using x-rays from novel sources such as the x-ray free electron laser and modern synchrotrons

  9. Dual X-ray absorptiometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altman, Albert; Aaron, Ronald

    2012-07-01

    Dual X-ray absorptiometry is widely used in analyzing body composition and imaging. Both the method and its limitations are related to the Compton and photoelectric contributions to the X-ray attenuation coefficients of materials.

  10. A Compressive Sensing Approach for 3D Breast Cancer Microwave Imaging With Magnetic Nanoparticles as Contrast Agent.

    PubMed

    Bevacqua, Martina T; Scapaticci, Rosa

    2016-02-01

    In microwave breast cancer imaging magnetic nanoparticles have been recently proposed as contrast agent. Due to the non-magnetic nature of human tissues, magnetic nanoparticles make possible the overcoming of some limitations of conventional microwave imaging techniques, thus providing reliable and specific diagnosis of breast cancer. In this paper, a Compressive Sensing inspired inversion technique is introduced for the reconstruction of the magnetic contrast induced within the tumor. The applicability of Compressive Sensing theory is guaranteed by the fact that the underlying inverse scattering problem is linear and the searched magnetic perturbation is sparse. From the numerical analysis, performed in realistic conditions in 3D geometry, it has been pointed out that the adoption of this new tool allows improving resolution and accuracy of the reconstructions, as well as reducing the number of required measurements.

  11. Tunable X-ray source

    DOEpatents

    Boyce, James R.

    2011-02-08

    A method for the production of X-ray bunches tunable in both time and energy level by generating multiple photon, X-ray, beams through the use of Thomson scattering. The method of the present invention simultaneously produces two X-ray pulses that are tunable in energy and/or time.

  12. X-ray Crystallography Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Edward Snell, a National Research Council research fellow at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), prepares a protein crystal for analysis by x-ray crystallography as part of NASA's structural biology program. The small, individual crystals are bombarded with x-rays to produce diffraction patterns, a map of the intensity of the x-rays as they reflect through the crystal.

  13. X-ray satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    An overview of the second quarter 1985 development of the X-ray satellite project is presented. It is shown that the project is proceeding according to plan and that the projected launch date of September 9, 1987 is on schedule. An overview of the work completed and underway on the systems, subsystems, payload, assembly, ground equipment and interfaces is presented. Problem areas shown include cost increases in the area of focal instrumentation, the star sensor light scattering requirements, and postponements in the data transmission subsystems.

  14. SMM x ray polychromator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saba, J. L. R.

    1993-01-01

    The objective of the X-ray Polychromator (XRP) experiment was to study the physical properties of solar flare plasma and its relation to the parent active region to understand better the flare mechanism and related solar activity. Observations were made to determine the temperature, density, and dynamic structure of the pre-flare and flare plasma as a function of wavelength, space and time, the extent to which the flare plasma departs from thermal equilibrium, and the variation of this departure with time. The experiment also determines the temperature and density structure of active regions and flare-induced changes in the regions.

  15. Beyond hard x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy: Simultaneous combination with x-ray diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Rubio-Zuazo, Juan; Castro, German R.

    2013-05-15

    Hard x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (HAXPES) is a powerful and novel emerging technique for the nondestructive determination of electronic properties and chemical composition of bulk, buried interfaces and surfaces. It benefits from the exceptionally large escape depth of high kinetic energy photoelectrons, increasing the information depth up to several tens of nanometers. Complementing HAXPES with an atomic structure sensitive technique (such as x-ray diffraction) opens a new research field with major applications for materials science. At SpLine, the Spanish CRG beamline at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, we have developed a novel experimental set-up that combines HAXPES and x-ray diffraction (x-ray reflectivity, surface x-ray diffraction, grazing incidence x-ray diffraction, and reciprocal space maps). Both techniques can be operated simultaneously on the same sample and using the same excitation source. The set-up includes a robust 2S + 3D diffractometer hosting a ultrahigh vacuum chamber equipped with a unique photoelectron spectrometer (few eV < electron kinetic energy < 15 keV), x-ray tube (Mg/Ti), 15 keV electron gun, and auxiliary standard surface facilities (molecular beam epitaxy evaporator, ion gun, low energy electron diffraction, sample heating/cooling system, leak valves, load-lock sample transfer, etc.). This end-station offers the unique possibility of performing simultaneous HAXPES + x-ray diffraction studies. In the present work, we describe the experimental set-up together with two experimental examples that emphasize its outstanding capabilities: (i) nondestructive characterization of the Si/Ge and HfO{sub 2}/SiO{sub 2} interfaces on Ge-based CMOS devices, and (ii) strain study on La{sub 0.7}Ca{sub 0.3}MnO{sub 3} ultrathin films grown on SrTiO{sub 3}(001) substrate.

  16. 3D In Vitro Model for Breast Cancer Research Using Magnetic Levitation and Bioprinting Method.

    PubMed

    Leonard, Fransisca; Godin, Biana

    2016-01-01

    Tumor microenvironment composition and architecture are known as a major factor in orchestrating the tumor growth and its response to various therapies. In this context, in vivo studies are necessary to evaluate the responses. However, while tumor cells can be of human origin, tumor microenvironment in the in vivo models is host-based. On the other hand, in vitro studies in a flat monoculture of tumor cells (the most frequently used in vitro tumor model) are unable to recapitulate the complexity of tumor microenvironment. Three-dimensional (3D) in vitro cell cultures of tumor cells have been proven to be an important experimental tool in understanding mechanisms of tumor growth, response to therapeutics, and transport of nutrients/drugs. We have recently described a novel tool to create 3D co-cultures of tumor cells and cells in the tumor microenvironment. Our method utilizes magnetic manipulation/levitation of the specific ratios of tumor cells and cells in the tumor microenvironment (from human or animal origin) aiding in the formation of tumor spheres with defined cellular composition and density, as quickly as within 24 h. This chapter describes the experimental protocols developed to model the 3D structure of the cancer environment using the above method. PMID:26820961

  17. Soft x-ray lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, D.L.; Rosen, M.D.

    1988-12-01

    One of the elusive dreams of laser physicists has been the development of an x-ray laser. After 25 years of waiting, the x-ray laser has at last entered the scientific scene, although those now in operation are still laboratory prototypes. They produce soft x rays down to about five nanometers. X-ray lasers retain the usual characteristics of their optical counterparts: a very tight beam, spatial and temporal coherence, and extreme brightness. Present x-ray lasers are nearly 100 times brighter that the next most powerful x-ray source in the world: the electron synchrotron. Although Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is widely known for its hard-x-ray laser program which has potential applications in the Strategic Defense Initiative, the soft x-ray lasers have no direct military applications. These lasers, and the scientific tools that result from their development, may one day have a place in the design and diagnosis of both laser fusion and hard x-ray lasers. The soft x-ray lasers now in operation at the LLNL have shown great promise but are still in the primitive state. Once x-ray lasers become reliable, efficient, and economical, they will have several important applications. Chief among them might be the creation of holograms of microscopic biological structures too small to be investigated with visible light. 5 figs.

  18. X-ray lithography source

    DOEpatents

    Piestrup, M.A.; Boyers, D.G.; Pincus, C.

    1991-12-31

    A high-intensity, inexpensive X-ray source for X-ray lithography for the production of integrated circuits is disclosed. Foil stacks are bombarded with a high-energy electron beam of 25 to 250 MeV to produce a flux of soft X-rays of 500 eV to 3 keV. Methods of increasing the total X-ray power and making the cross section of the X-ray beam uniform are described. Methods of obtaining the desired X-ray-beam field size, optimum frequency spectrum and eliminating the neutron flux are all described. A method of obtaining a plurality of station operation is also described which makes the process more efficient and economical. The satisfying of these issues makes transition radiation an excellent moderate-priced X-ray source for lithography. 26 figures.

  19. X-ray lithography source

    DOEpatents

    Piestrup, Melvin A.; Boyers, David G.; Pincus, Cary

    1991-01-01

    A high-intensity, inexpensive X-ray source for X-ray lithography for the production of integrated circuits. Foil stacks are bombarded with a high-energy electron beam of 25 to 250 MeV to produce a flux of soft X-rays of 500 eV to 3 keV. Methods of increasing the total X-ray power and making the cross section of the X-ray beam uniform are described. Methods of obtaining the desired X-ray-beam field size, optimum frequency spectrum and elminating the neutron flux are all described. A method of obtaining a plurality of station operation is also described which makes the process more efficient and economical. The satisfying of these issues makes transition radiation an exellent moderate-priced X-ray source for lithography.

  20. Monitoring X-Ray Emission from X-Ray Bursters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halpern, Jules P.; Kaaret, Philip

    1999-01-01

    The scientific goal of this project was to monitor a selected sample of x-ray bursters using data from the All-Sky Monitor (ASM) on the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer together with data from the Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) on the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory to study the long-term temporal evolution of these sources in the x-ray and hard x-ray bands. The project was closely related to "Long-Term Hard X-Ray Monitoring of X-Ray Bursters", NASA project NAG5-3891, and and "Hard x-ray emission of x-ray bursters", NASA project NAG5-4633, and shares publications in common with both of these. The project involved preparation of software for use in monitoring and then the actual monitoring itself. These efforts have lead to results directly from the ASM data and also from Target of Opportunity Observations (TOO) made with the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer based on detection of transient hard x-ray outbursts with the ASM and BATSE.

  1. Luminescence properties after X-ray irradiation for dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Duk-Geun; Kim, Myung-Jin

    2016-05-01

    To investigate the luminescence characteristics after exposure to X-ray radiation, we developed an independent, small X-ray irradiation system comprising a Varian VF-50J mini X-ray generator, a Pb collimator, a delay shutter, and an Al absorber. With this system, the apparent dose rate increased linearly to 0.8 Gy/s against the emission current for a 50 kV anode potential when the shutter was delayed for an initial 4 s and the Al absorber was 300 µm thick. In addition, an approximately 20 mm diameter sample area was irradiated homogeneously with X rays. Based on three-dimensional (3D) thermoluminescence (TL) spectra, the small X-ray irradiator was considered comparable to the conventional 90Sr/90Y beta source even though the TL intensity from beta irradiation was higher than that from X-ray irradiation. The single aliquot regenerative (SAR) growth curve for the small X-ray irradiator was identical to that for the beta source. Therefore, we concluded that the characteristics of the small X-ray irradiator and the conventional 90Sr/90Y beta source were similar and that X ray irradiation had the potential for being suitable for use in luminescence dosimetry.

  2. Far-infrared and 3D imaging for doneness assessment in chicken breast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Yang; Ibarra, Juan G.

    2001-03-01

    Sensor fusion of infrared imaging and range imaging was proposed to estimate internal temperature on just cooked chicken breasts. An infrared camera operating at 8-12 microns registered surface temperature of cooked meat samples, while a single line structured light system located the thickest region of the meat target. In this region of interest, a combined time series/neural network method is applied to correlate the internal and external temperatures during the cool-down process. Experimental verification in a pilot plant oven is presented. To ensure food safety, a mandatory regulation requires all poultry processors in the U.S.A to verify that all ready-to-eat products reach a minimum endpoint temperature (71¦C for chicken breast), but no current assay can do a non-invasively inspection of all the samples. The proposed system has the potential for on-line inspection of ready-to-eat meat for food quality and safety.

  3. The cytoskeletal organization of breast carcinoma and fibroblast cells inside three dimensional (3-D) isotropic silicon microstructures.

    PubMed

    Nikkhah, Mehdi; Strobl, Jeannine S; De Vita, Raffaella; Agah, Masoud

    2010-06-01

    Studying the cytoskeletal organization as cells interact in their local microenvironment is interest of biological science, tissue engineering and cancer diagnosis applications. Herein, we describe the behavior of cell lines obtained from metastatic breast tumor pleural effusions (MDA-MB-231), normal fibrocystic mammary epithelium (MCF10A), and HS68 normal fibroblasts inside three dimensional (3-D) isotropic silicon microstructures fabricated by a single-mask, single-isotropic-etch process. We report differences in adhesion, mechanism of force balance within the cytoskeleton, and deformability among these cell types inside the 3-D microenvironment. HS68 fibroblasts typically stretched and formed vinculin-rich focal adhesions at anchor sites inside the etched cavities. In contrast, MCF10A and MDA-MB-231 cells adopted the curved surfaces of isotropic microstructures and exhibited more diffuse vinculin cytoplasmic staining in addition to vinculin localized in focal adhesions. The measurement of cells elasticity using atomic force microscopy (AFM) indentation revealed that HS68 cells are signi